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Sample records for single neutral alumina

  1. The possibility of a fully automated procedure for radiosynthesis of fluorine-18-labeled fluoromisonidazole using a simplified single, neutral alumina column purification procedure.

    PubMed

    Nandy, Saikat; Rajan, M G R; Korde, A; Krishnamurthy, N V

    2010-10-01

    A novel fully automated radiosynthesis procedure for [(18)F]Fluoromisonidazole using a simple alumina cartridge-column for purification instead of conventionally used semi-preparative HPLC was developed. [(18)F]FMISO was prepared via a one-pot, two-step synthesis procedure using a modified nuclear interface synthesis module. Nucleophilic fluorination of the precursor molecule 1-(2'-nitro-1'-imidazolyl)-2-O-tetrahydropyranyl-3-O-toluenesulphonylpropanediol (NITTP) with no-carrier added [(18)F]fluoride followed by hydrolysis of the protecting group with 1M HCl. Purification was carried out using a single neutral alumina cartridge-column instead of semi-preparative HPLC. The maximum overall radiochemical yield obtained was 37.49+/-1.68% with 10mg NITTP (n=3, without any decay correction) and the total synthesis time was 40+/-1 min. The radiochemical purity was greater than 95% and the product was devoid of other chemical impurities including residual aluminum and acetonitrile. The biodistribution study in fibrosarcoma tumor model showed maximum uptake in tumor, 2h post injection. Finally, PET/CT imaging studies in normal healthy rabbit, showed clear uptake in the organs involved in the metabolic process of MISO. No bone uptake was observed excluding the presence of free [(18)F]fluoride. The reported method can be easily adapted in any commercial FDG synthesis module. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Conduction mechanism of single-crystal alumina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Will, Fritz G.; Delorenzi, Horst G.; Janora, Kevin H.

    1992-01-01

    The fully guarded three-terminal technique was used to perform conductivity measurements on single-crystal alumina at temperatures of 400-1300 C. The conductivity was also determined as a function of time at various temperatures and applied fields. Further, the fractions of the current carried by Al and O ions (ionic transference numbers) were determined from long-term transference experiments in the temperature range 1100-1300 C. A mathematical model of the conduction mechanism is proposed, and model predictions are compared with experimental results.

  3. Self-diffusion of oxygen in single crystal alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oishi, Y.; Ando, Ken; Kubota, Y.

    1980-08-01

    The self-diffusion coefficient of oxygen in (polished slices of a Verneuil) single-crystal alumina was determined in the temperature range 1500-1770 °C by means of the gas-solid isotope exchange technique. The results were represented by D=1.12×103 exp (-155×103/RT) cm2/s. The activation energy was interpreted to be for intrinsic diffusion. By comparison of the results with the oxygen self-diffusion coefficients previously reported for crushed particles of a Verneuil alumina and a vapor-grown alumina, the extrinsic diffusion exhibited by the crushed particles was confirmed to be due to a dislocation enhancement process.

  4. Current Noise in Sodium Beta Alumina Ceramics and Single Crystals.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-08-01

    AD-Ai7O 412 CURRENT NOISE IN SODIUM BETA ALUMINA CERAMICS AIND t/l SINGLE CRYSTALS(U) UTAH UNIV SALT LAKE CITY DEPT OF PHYSICS J J BROPHY’ 81 AUG 86...ZIP C-0- UNIVERSITY OF UTAH UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 84112 Bandelier Hall West Albuquerque, NM 87131 go NAME OF FUNDING...bloeS nIumbe Conductivity fluctuations and contact noise observed in ceramic and single crystal silver 811 alumina are very pilar to those in sodium 8

  5. Treatment of alumina refinery waste (red mud) through neutralization techniques: A review.

    PubMed

    Rai, Suchita; Wasewar, K L; Agnihotri, A

    2017-06-01

    In the Bayer process of extraction of alumina from bauxite, the insoluble product generated after bauxite digestion with sodium hydroxide at elevated temperature and pressure is known as 'red mud' or 'bauxite residue'. This alumina refinery waste is highly alkaline in nature with a pH of 10.5-12.5 and is conventionally disposed of in mostly clay-lined land-based impoundments. The alkaline constituents in the red mud impose severe and alarming environmental problems, such as soil and air pollution. Keeping in view sustainable re-vegetation and residue management, neutralization/treatment of red mud using different techniques is the only alternative to make the bauxite residue environmentally benign. Hence, neutralization techniques, such as using mineral acids, acidic waste (pickling liquor waste), coal dust, superphosphate and gypsum as amenders, CO2, sintering with silicate material and seawater for treatment of red mud have been studied in detail. This paper is based upon and emphasizes the experimental work carried out for all the neutralization techniques along with a comprehensive review of each of the processes. The scope, applicability, limitations and feasibility of these processes have been compared exhaustively. Merits and demerits have been discussed using flow diagrams. All the techniques described are technically feasible, wherein findings obtained with seawater neutralization can be set as a benchmark for future work. Further studies should be focused on exploring the economical viability of these processes for better waste management and disposal of red mud.

  6. Single Crystal Structure Determination of Alumina to 1 Mbar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, H.; Zhang, L.; Prakapenka, V.; Mao, H.

    2014-12-01

    Aluminum oxide (Al2O3) is an important ceramic material and a major oxide in the earth. Additionally, alumina is a widely used pressure standard in static high-pressure experiments (Cr3+-bearing corundum, ruby). The changes of its crystal structure with pressure (P) and temperature (T) are important for its applications and understanding its physical properties in the deep Earth. There have been numerous reports on the high P-T polymorphs of alumina. Previous theoretical calculations and experiments suggest that the crystal structure of Al2O3 evolves greatly at high P-T. In this study, we used the newly developed multigrain crystallography method combined with single-crystal x-ray diffraction analysis technique for the structure determination of alumina at high P-T to provide single-crystal structure refinement for high-pressure phases of Al2O3. Alumina powder was mixed with ~10% Pt and Ne was used as both pressure transmitting media and thermal insulating layers during laser-heating. Coarse-grained aggregates of Al2O3 were synthesized in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell. The structure change of Al2O3 was monitored by in situ x-ray diffraction at ~1 Mbar and 2700 K. The results allow us to distinguish the structural differences between the Rh2O3 (II) structure (space group Pbcn) and perovskite structure (space group Pbnm) for the first high-pressure phase of Al2O3. More detailed results will be discussed in the later work.

  7. Method for thermal processing alumina-enriched spinel single crystals

    DOEpatents

    Jantzen, Carol M.

    1995-01-01

    A process for age-hardening alumina-rich magnesium aluminum spinel to obtain the desired combination of characteristics of hardness, clarity, flexural strength and toughness comprises selection of the time-temperature pair for isothermal heating followed by quenching. The time-temperature pair is selected from the region wherein the precipitate groups have the characteristics sought. The single crystal spinel is isothermally heated and will, if heated long enough pass from its single phase through two pre-precipitates and two metastable precipitates to a stable secondary phase precipitate within the spinel matrix. Quenching is done slowly at first to avoid thermal shock, then rapidly.

  8. Method for thermal processing alumina-enriched spinel single crystals

    DOEpatents

    Jantzen, C.M.

    1995-05-09

    A process for age-hardening alumina-rich magnesium aluminum spinel to obtain the desired combination of characteristics of hardness, clarity, flexural strength and toughness comprises selection of the time-temperature pair for isothermal heating followed by quenching. The time-temperature pair is selected from the region wherein the precipitate groups have the characteristics sought. The single crystal spinel is isothermally heated and will, if heated long enough pass from its single phase through two pre-precipitates and two metastable precipitates to a stable secondary phase precipitate within the spinel matrix. Quenching is done slowly at first to avoid thermal shock, then rapidly. 12 figs.

  9. Cellular porous anodic alumina grown in neutral organic electrolyte. 1. Structure, composition, and properties of the films

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Alwitt, R.S.; Shimizu, K.

    2000-04-01

    Anodic alumina films with cellular porous structure grow in neutral organic electrolytes with low water content and containing ethylene glycol and a large dicarboxylic acid. An Al carboxylate precipitates in the pore and is extruded from the coating. The porous structure develops even though the current efficiency for film formation is near 95%. The coating matrix contains substantial organic material, 15 wt % by thermal analysis. It is an oxide/organic composite with higher field strength and lower dielectric constant than pure anodic alumina.

  10. Conductivity of boules of single crystal sodium beta-alumina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fielder, W. L.; Kautz, H. E.; Fordyce, J. S.; Singer, J.

    1974-01-01

    The ionic and electrochemical polarization characteristics of two boules of single crystal sodium beta-alumina (Na2O.8Al2O3), 2 cm in diameter, were investigated over the range of 25 to 300 C using 2- and 4-probe ac and dc techniques with reversible and ion-blocking electrodes. Textural (or internal) polarization at 27 C was present only in boule 1 which cleaved easily. Interfacial polarization, using solid sodium electrodes, was present at 27 C in the 2-probe conductivities for both boules. Cleaning with liquid sodium at 300 C reduced its magnitude, but some interfacial polarization was still present in the 2-probe conductivities for boule 2 below about 140 C. Above 140 C, with liquid sodium electrodes, the 2-probe conductivities, essentially polarization-free, were given by KT = 3300 exp(-3650/RT). The conductivity of boule 2 at 180 C remained essentially constant with increasing current density up to about 140 milliamps per square centimeter.

  11. Fabrication and Characterization of Single Phase α-Alumina Membranes with Tunable Pore Diameters

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Tatsuya; Asoh, Hidetaka; Haraguchi, Satoshi; Ono, Sachiko

    2015-01-01

    Nanoporous and single phase α-alumina membranes with pore diameters tunable over a wide range of approximately 60–350 nm were successfully fabricated by optimizing the conditions for anodizing, subsequent detachment, and heat treatment. The pore diameter increased and the cell diameter shrunk upon crystallization to α-alumina by approximately 20% and 3%, respectively, in accordance with the 23% volume shrinkage resulting from the change in density associated with the transformation from the amorphous state to α-alumina. Nevertheless, flat α-alumina membranes, each with a diameter of 25 mm and a thickness of 50 μm, were obtained without thermal deformation. The α-alumina membranes exhibited high chemical resistance in various concentrated acidic and alkaline solutions as well as when exposed to high temperature steam under pressure. The Young’s modulus and hardness of the single phase α-alumina membranes formed by heat treatment at 1250 °C were notably decreased compared to the corresponding amorphous membranes, presumably because of the nodular crystallite structure of the cell walls and the substantial increase in porosity. Furthermore, when used for filtration, the α-alumina membrane exhibited a level of flux higher than that of the commercial ceramic membrane. PMID:28788005

  12. Toughening and reinforcing alumina matrix composite with single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jin-Peng; Zhuang, Da-Ming; Zhao, Da-Qing; Zhang, Gong; Wu, Min-Sheng; Wei, Fei; Fan, Zhuang-Jun

    2006-09-01

    The authors report an efficient way of incorporating single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) into alumina matrix with strong interfaces by heterocoagulation. The fracture toughness of SWNTs/Al2O3 composite reaches 6.40±0.3MPam1/2, which is twice as high as that of unreinforced alumina. The flexure strength of the composite also increases by 20%. The main toughening mechanism is crack bridging of SWNTs, and SWNT pullout takes effect also.

  13. Self-adjusting unique nanoscale contact resistance of a single alumina grain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Manjima; Dey, Arjun; Mukhopadhyay, Anoop Kumar

    2016-04-01

    This work evaluates the nanohardness of a single alumina grain for a coarse grain alumina ceramic of ∼10 μm grain size. The results reveal that the nanoscale contact deformation resistance of the single grain has a unique self-adjusting characteristic. It increases in response to enhancement in the externally applied load. The nanoscale contact deformation resistance of a single alumina grain is determined by controlled nano-indentation experiments. The corresponding load versus depth plots are carefully analysed to identify the critical load at which the very first burst of incipient nanoscale plasticity is initiated. To avoid any spurious effect from neighbouring grain boundaries the nano-indentations experiments are deliberately carried out with only single grains. A range of ultra low loads that span from 1000 to 12 000 μN is used for this purpose. Both partial unload and load controlled nano-indentation experiments are performed with a Berkovich indenter on single alumina grains. The indenter has a tip radius of 150 nm. The results show for the very first time that a mild indentation size effect exists even in single grain hardness at nanoscale. In addition the intrinsic nanoscale contact deformation resistance increases as the externally applied load is enhanced. The way it increases follows an empirical power law. These results are analysed in terms of the dislocation loop radius, critical resolved shear stress and the maximum shear stress that is generated just underneath the indenter.

  14. Nearly equidistant single swift heavy ion impact sites through nanoporous alumina masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauchy, Xavier; Roorda, Sjoerd

    2013-04-01

    A semi-ordered pattern of 70 MeV Ag single ion impact sites on a fused silica sample was achieved by irradiation through a free-standing 10 μm through-pore ordered nanoporous alumina membrane. The membranes were fabricated by constant voltage anodization in oxalic acid with a two-step replication process. An apparatus and a method were developed to realize the alignment of the pores parallel to the ion beam. Measurements of the surface, by atomic force microscopy, confirm the presence of a semi-ordered pattern of single ion impact sites.

  15. Nearly equidistant single swift heavy ion impact sites through nanoporous alumina masks

    SciTech Connect

    Cauchy, Xavier; Roorda, Sjoerd

    2013-04-19

    A semi-ordered pattern of 70 MeV Ag single ion impact sites on a fused silica sample was achieved by irradiation through a free-standing 10 {mu}m through-pore ordered nanoporous alumina membrane. The membranes were fabricated by constant voltage anodization in oxalic acid with a two-step replication process. An apparatus and a method were developed to realize the alignment of the pores parallel to the ion beam. Measurements of the surface, by atomic force microscopy, confirm the presence of a semi-ordered pattern of single ion impact sites.

  16. Single neutral pion production by charged-current $$\\bar{\

    DOE PAGES

    Le, T.; Paomino, J. L.; Aliaga, L.; ...

    2015-07-21

    We studied single neutral pion production via muon antineutrino charged-current interactions in plastic scintillator (CH) using the MINERvA detector exposed to the NuMI low-energy, wideband antineutrino beam at Fermilab. Measurement of this process constrains models of neutral pion production in nuclei, which is important because the neutral-current analog is a background for appearance oscillation experiments. Furthermore, the differential cross sections for π0 momentum and production angle, for events with a single observed π0 and no charged pions, are presented and compared to model predictions. These results comprise the first measurement of the π0 kinematics for this process.

  17. Ultra-High Density Single Nanometer-Scale Anodic Alumina Nanofibers Fabricated by Pyrophosphoric Acid Anodizing

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Nishinaga, Osamu; Nakajima, Daiki; Kawashima, Jun; Natsui, Shungo; Sakaguchi, Norihito; Suzuki, Ryosuke O.

    2014-01-01

    Anodic oxide fabricated by anodizing has been widely used for nanostructural engineering, but the nanomorphology is limited to only two oxides: anodic barrier and porous oxides. Therefore, the discovery of an additional anodic oxide with a unique nanofeature would expand the applicability of anodizing. Here we demonstrate the fabrication of a third-generation anodic oxide, specifically, anodic alumina nanofibers, by anodizing in a new electrolyte, pyrophosphoric acid. Ultra-high density single nanometer-scale anodic alumina nanofibers (1010 nanofibers/cm2) consisting of an amorphous, pure aluminum oxide were successfully fabricated via pyrophosphoric acid anodizing. The nanomorphologies of the anodic nanofibers can be controlled by the electrochemical conditions. Anodic tungsten oxide nanofibers can also be fabricated by pyrophosphoric acid anodizing. The aluminum surface covered by the anodic alumina nanofibers exhibited ultra-fast superhydrophilic behavior, with a contact angle of less than 1°, within 1 second. Such ultra-narrow nanofibers can be used for various nanoapplications including catalysts, wettability control, and electronic devices. PMID:25491282

  18. Quantum delayed-choice experiment with a single neutral atom.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Zhang, Pengfei; Zhang, Tiancai

    2017-10-01

    We present a proposal to implement a quantum delayed-choice (QDC) experiment with a single neutral atom, such as a rubidium or cesium atom. In our proposal, a Ramsey interferometer is adopted to observe the wave-like or particle-like behaviors of a single atom depending on the existence or absence of the second π/2-rotation. A quantum-controlled π/2-rotation on target atom is realized through a Rydberg-Rydberg interaction by another ancilla atom. It shows that a heavy neutral atom can also have a morphing behavior between the particle and the wave. The realization of the QDC experiment with such heavy neutral atoms not only is significant to understand the Bohr's complementarity principle in matter-wave and matter-particle domains but also has great potential on the quantum information process with neutral atoms.

  19. Investigations on the Q and CT Bands of Cytochrome c Submonolayer Adsorbed on an Alumina Surface Using Broadband Spectroscopy with Single-Mode Integrated Optical Waveguides.

    PubMed

    Wiederkehr, Rodrigo S; Hoops, Geoffrey C; Aslan, Mustafa M; Byard, Courtney L; Mendes, Sergio B

    2009-05-14

    In this work, we report experimental results on the molar absorptivity of cytochrome c adsorbed at different submonolayer levels onto an aluminum oxide waveguide surface; our data show a clear dependence of the protein optical properties on its surface density. The measurements were performed using the broadband, single-mode, integrated optical waveguide spectroscopic technique, which is an extremely sensitive tool able to reach submonolayer levels of detection required for this type of studies. This investigation focuses on the molar absorptivity at the Q-band (centered at 525 nm) and, for the first time to our knowledge, the weak charge transfer (CT) band (centered at 695 nm) of surface-adsorbed cyt c. Polarized light in the spectral region from 450 to 775 nm was all-coupled into an alumina thin film, which functioned as a single-mode planar optical waveguide. The alumina thin-film waveguide used for this work had a thickness of 180 nm and was deposited on a glass substrate by the atomic layer deposition process. The protein submonolayer was formed on the alumina waveguide surface through electrostatic adsorption from an aqueous buffer solution at neutral pH. The optical properties of the surface-adsorbed cyt c were investigated for bulk protein concentrations ranging from 5 nM to 8200 nM in the aqueous buffer solution. For a protein surface density of 2.3 pmol/cm(2), the molar absorptivity measured at the charge transfer band was 335 M(-1) cm(-1), and for a surface density of 15 pmol/cm(2) was 720 M(-1) cm(-1), which is much closer to the value of cyt c dissolved in an aqueous neutral buffer (830 M(-1) cm(-1)). The modification of the protein molar absorptivity and its dependence on the surface density can most likely be attributed to conformational changes of the surface-adsorbed species.

  20. Pesticide residue analysis of a dietary ingredient by gas chromatography/selected-ion monitoring mass spectrometry using neutral alumina solid-phase extraction cleanup.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Mijeong Lee; Zahn, Michael; Trinh, Thao; Brooke, Fay A; Ma, Wenwen

    2008-01-01

    A sample cleanup procedure has been developed to remove coextractives that interfere with pesticide residue analysis of a dietary ingredient (Product B), an extract consisting of Scutellaria baicalensis and Acacia catechu. Samples were extracted using 1% acetic acid in acetonitrile, followed by solid-phase extraction and analysis by capillary gas chromatography with mass spectrometry in the selective-ion monitoring mode. Neutral alumina (alumina N) was found to be the most effective sorbent to remove coextractives from Product B; other materials that were tested but failed to remove interference were graphitized carbon black/primary-secondary amine (PSA), octadecylsilane (C18), Florisil, Oasis MCX, and strong anion exchange-PSA. The method was specifically developed for Product B, which was spiked with 41 organochlorine and organophosphorus pesticides, and resulted in the recovery of 80 to 120% at U.S. Pharmacopeia limits (0.06 to 4 microg/g) for the majority of the pesticides.

  1. Effect of crystal orientation on conductivity and electron mobility in single-crystal alumina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Will, Fritz G.; Delorenzi, Horst G.; Janora, Kevin H.

    1992-01-01

    The electrical conductivity of high-purity, single-crystal alumina is determined parallel to and perpendicular to the c-axis. The mean conductivity of four samples of each orientation is a factor 3.3 higher parallel to the c-axis than perpendicular to it. The conductivity as a function of temperature is attributed to extrinsic electron conduction at temperatures from 400 to 900 C, and intrinsic semiconduction at temperatures from 900 to 1300 C. In the high-temperature regime, the slope on all eight specimens is 4.7 +/- 0.1 eV. Hence, the thermal bandgap at O K is 9.4 +/- 0.2 eV.

  2. An atomic model for neutral and singly ionized uranium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maceda, E. L.; Miley, G. H.

    1979-01-01

    A model for the atomic levels above ground state in neutral, U(0), and singly ionized, U(+), uranium is described based on identified atomic transitions. Some 168 states in U(0) and 95 in U(+) are found. A total of 1581 atomic transitions are used to complete this process. Also discussed are the atomic inverse lifetimes and line widths for the radiative transitions as well as the electron collisional cross sections.

  3. An atomic model for neutral and singly ionized uranium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maceda, E. L.; Miley, G. H.

    1979-01-01

    A model for the atomic levels above ground state in neutral, U(0), and singly ionized, U(+), uranium is described based on identified atomic transitions. Some 168 states in U(0) and 95 in U(+) are found. A total of 1581 atomic transitions are used to complete this process. Also discussed are the atomic inverse lifetimes and line widths for the radiative transitions as well as the electron collisional cross sections.

  4. Submicrometer position control of single trapped neutral atoms.

    PubMed

    Dotsenko, I; Alt, W; Khudaverdyan, M; Kuhr, S; Meschede, D; Miroshnychenko, Y; Schrader, D; Rauschenbeutel, A

    2005-07-15

    We optically detect the positions of single neutral cesium atoms stored in a standing wave dipole trap with a subwavelength resolution of 143 nm rms. The distance between two simultaneously trapped atoms is measured with an even higher precision of 36 nm rms. We resolve the discreteness of the interatomic distances due to the 532 nm spatial period of the standing wave potential and infer the exact number of trapping potential wells separating the atoms. Finally, combining an initial position detection with a controlled transport, we place single atoms at a predetermined position along the trap axis to within 300 nm rms.

  5. Lithium ion diffusion in Li β-alumina single crystals measured by pulsed field gradient NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, Mohammed Tareque Takekawa, Reiji; Iwai, Yoshiki; Kuwata, Naoaki; Kawamura, Junichi

    2014-03-28

    The lithium ion diffusion coefficient of a 93% Li β-alumina single crystal was measured for the first time using pulsed field gradient (PFG) NMR spectroscopy with two different crystal orientations. The diffusion coefficient was found to be 1.2 × 10{sup −11} m{sup 2}/s in the direction perpendicular to the c axis at room temperature. The Li ion diffusion coefficient along the c axis direction was found to be very small (6.4 × 10{sup −13} m{sup 2}/s at 333 K), which suggests that the macroscopic diffusion of the Li ion in the β-alumina crystal is mainly two-dimensional. The diffusion coefficient for the same sample was also estimated using NMR line narrowing data and impedance measurements. The impedance data show reasonable agreement with PFG-NMR data, while the line narrowing measurements provided a lower value for the diffusion coefficient. Line narrowing measurements also provided a relatively low value for the activation energy and pre-exponential factor. The temperature dependent diffusion coefficient was obtained in the temperature range 297–333 K by PFG-NMR, from which the activation energy for diffusion of the Li ion was estimated. The activation energy obtained by PFG-NMR was smaller than that obtained by impedance measurements, which suggests that thermally activated defect formation energy exists for 93% Li β-alumina single crystals. The diffusion time dependence of the diffusion coefficient was observed for the Li ion in the 93% Li β-alumina single crystal by means of PFG-NMR experiments. Motion of Li ion in fractal dimension might be a possible explanation for the observed diffusion time dependence of the diffusion coefficient in the 93% Li β–alumina system.

  6. Lithium ion diffusion in Li β-alumina single crystals measured by pulsed field gradient NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Mohammed Tareque; Takekawa, Reiji; Iwai, Yoshiki; Kuwata, Naoaki; Kawamura, Junichi

    2014-03-28

    The lithium ion diffusion coefficient of a 93% Li β-alumina single crystal was measured for the first time using pulsed field gradient (PFG) NMR spectroscopy with two different crystal orientations. The diffusion coefficient was found to be 1.2 × 10(-11) m(2)/s in the direction perpendicular to the c axis at room temperature. The Li ion diffusion coefficient along the c axis direction was found to be very small (6.4 × 10(-13) m(2)/s at 333 K), which suggests that the macroscopic diffusion of the Li ion in the β-alumina crystal is mainly two-dimensional. The diffusion coefficient for the same sample was also estimated using NMR line narrowing data and impedance measurements. The impedance data show reasonable agreement with PFG-NMR data, while the line narrowing measurements provided a lower value for the diffusion coefficient. Line narrowing measurements also provided a relatively low value for the activation energy and pre-exponential factor. The temperature dependent diffusion coefficient was obtained in the temperature range 297-333 K by PFG-NMR, from which the activation energy for diffusion of the Li ion was estimated. The activation energy obtained by PFG-NMR was smaller than that obtained by impedance measurements, which suggests that thermally activated defect formation energy exists for 93% Li β-alumina single crystals. The diffusion time dependence of the diffusion coefficient was observed for the Li ion in the 93% Li β-alumina single crystal by means of PFG-NMR experiments. Motion of Li ion in fractal dimension might be a possible explanation for the observed diffusion time dependence of the diffusion coefficient in the 93% Li β-alumina system.

  7. Depolarizing collisions with hydrogen: Neutral and singly ionized alkaline earths

    SciTech Connect

    Manso Sainz, Rafael; Ramos, Andrés Asensio; Bueno, Javier Trujillo; Aguado, Alfredo

    2014-06-20

    Depolarizing collisions are elastic or quasielastic collisions that equalize the populations and destroy the coherence between the magnetic sublevels of atomic levels. In astrophysical plasmas, the main depolarizing collider is neutral hydrogen. We consider depolarizing rates on the lowest levels of neutral and singly ionized alkali earths Mg I, Sr I, Ba I, Mg II, Ca II, and Ba II, due to collisions with H°. We compute ab initio potential curves of the atom-H° system and solve the quantum mechanical dynamics. From the scattering amplitudes, we calculate the depolarizing rates for Maxwellian distributions of colliders at temperatures T ≤ 10,000 K. A comparative analysis of our results and previous calculations in the literature is completed. We discuss the effect of these rates on the formation of scattering polarization patterns of resonant lines of alkali earths in the solar atmosphere, and their effect on Hanle effect diagnostics of solar magnetic fields.

  8. A Forest of Sub-1.5-nm-wide Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes over an Engineered Alumina Support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ning; Li, Meng; Patscheider, Jörg; Youn, Seul Ki; Park, Hyung Gyu

    2017-04-01

    A precise control of the dimension of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in their vertical array could enable many promising applications in various fields. Here, we demonstrate the growth of vertically aligned, single-walled CNTs (VA-SWCNTs) with diameters in the sub-1.5-nm range (0.98 ± 0.24 nm), by engineering a catalyst support layer of alumina via thermal annealing followed by ion beam treatment. We find out that the ion beam bombardment on the alumina allows the growth of ultra-narrow nanotubes, whereas the thermal annealing promotes the vertical alignment at the expense of enlarged diameters; in an optimal combination, these two effects can cooperate to produce the ultra-narrow VA-SWCNTs. According to micro- and spectroscopic characterizations, ion beam bombardment amorphizes the alumina surface to increase the porosity, defects, and oxygen-laden functional groups on it to inhibit Ostwald ripening of catalytic Fe nanoparticles effectively, while thermal annealing can densify bulk alumina to prevent subsurface diffusion of the catalyst particles. Our findings contribute to the current efforts of precise diameter control of VA-SWCNTs, essential for applications such as membranes and energy storage devices.

  9. Grain boundary sliding measurements during tensile creep of a single-phase alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, C.R.; Lin, H.T.; Becher, P.F.

    1998-06-01

    The grain boundary sliding (GBS) behavior of a single-phase (relatively coarse-grained) alumina material was studied after tensile creep experiments were performed at 1,500 C at stress levels of 20 and 35 MPa. Specimens tested at 35 MPa exhibited a number of modes of GBS, including Mode II (shear) displacements, Mode I (opening) displacements, out-of-plane sliding displacements, and in-plane grain rotation. Strains in the grain boundaries due to Mode II GBS displacements ranged from 940% to 4,400%. Average Mode II GBS displacements ranged from 0.08 to 0.28 {micro}m in samples tested for 120 and 480 min, respectively, at 35 MPa. The GBS displacements were shown to fit a Weibull distribution. Tensile creep under a 35 MPa stress yielded a GBS rate of 9.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} {micro}m/s, while the 20 MPa stress resulted in a GBS rate of 2.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} {micro}m/s. The average Mode II GBS displacements increased linearly with specimen strain, suggesting that GBS may play an important role in creep cavitation during tensile creep. The data also revealed that compatibility and constraint rules appear to govern GBS behavior during tensile creep. GBS behavior during compressive creep will be compared to the tensile creep GBS measurements presented.

  10. EPR and photoluminescence study of irradiated anion-defective alumina single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kortov, V. S.; Ananchenko, D. V.; Konev, S. F.; Pustovarov, V. A.

    2017-09-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and photoluminescence (PL) spectra of anion-defective alumina single crystals were measured. Exposure to a dose 10 Gy-1 kGy causes isotropic EPR signal of a complex form, this signal contains narrow and broad components. At the same time, in the PL spectrum alongside with a band of F+-centers (3.8 eV) an additional emission band with the maximum of 2.25 eV is registered. This band corresponds to aggregate F22+-centers which were create under irradiation. By comparing measurements in EPR and PL spectra with further stepped annealing in the temperature range of 773-1473 K of the samples exposed to the same doses, we were able to conclude that a narrow component of isotropic EPR signal is associated with the formation of paramagnetic F22+-centers under irradiation. A wide component can be caused by deep hole traps which are created by a complex defect (VAl2- - F+) with a localized hole.

  11. Outer-sphere Pb(II) adsorbed at specific surface sites on single crystal α-alumina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bargar, John R.; Towle, Steven N.; Brown, Gordon E.; Parks, George A.

    1996-01-01

    Solvated Pb(II) ions were found to adsorb as structurally well-defined outer-sphere complexes at specific sites on the α-Al2O3 (0001) single crystal surface, as determined by grazing-incidence X-ray absorption fine structure (GI-XAFS) measurements. The XAFS results suggest that the distance between Pb(II) adions and the alumina surface is approximately 4.2 Å. In contrast, Pb(II) adsorbs as more strongly bound inner-sphere complexes on α-Al2O3 (102). The difference in reactivities of the two alumina surfaces has implications for modeling surface complexation reactions of contaminants in natural environments, catalysis, and compositional sector zoning of oxide crystals.

  12. Experimental test of Bohr's complementarity principle with single neutral atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhihui; Tian, Yali; Yang, Chen; Zhang, Pengfei; Li, Gang; Zhang, Tiancai

    2016-12-01

    An experimental test of the quantum complementarity principle based on single neutral atoms trapped in a blue detuned bottle trap was here performed. A Ramsey interferometer was used to assess the wavelike behavior or particlelike behavior with second π /2 rotation on or off. The wavelike behavior or particlelike behavior is characterized by the visibility V of the interference or the predictability P of which-path information, respectively. The measured results fulfill the complementarity relation P2+V2≤1 . Imbalance losses were deliberately introduced to the system and we find the complementarity relation is then formally "violated." All the experimental results can be completely explained theoretically by quantum mechanics without considering the interference between wave and particle behaviors. This observation complements existing information concerning Bohr's complementarity principle based on wave-particle duality of a massive quantum system.

  13. Vertical devices from single-walled carbon nanotubes templated in porous anodic alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklin, Aaron D.

    Over the past decade, tremendous progress has been realized in the fabrication and characterization of single-walled carbon nanotube (CNT) electronic devices. For example, with advantages such as ballistic transport and the absence of surface states, CNTs have been proposed as an ideal 1D channel material for next generation field-effect transistors (FETs). However, the literature is replete with reports of individual high-performance devices that lack the demonstration or feasibility of being fabricated at a large scale. One of the primary obstacles to fabricating highly integrated CNT devices is the placement of the nanotubes at a defined spacing and in precise locations. Nearly all CNT devices to date have been configured in a planar geometry (with the CNT supported horizontally on a substrate) and have primarily relied on random processes for dispersing/growing and contacting the CNTs. Ideally, a high-performance CNTFET would consist of multiple, densely packed CNTs that are aligned, having surround gates, low-barrier contacts, and a sub-100 nm channel length. Such multi-nanotube CNTFETs should further be fabricated in a manner that can be scaled for high-level integration and that is compatible with modern CMOS processing. This dissertation describes the development of a platform based on vertically aligned CNTs templated in porous anodic alumina (PAA) for the scalable fabrication of multi-nanotube CNTFETs with surround gates as well as several other nanoelectronic devices. PAA is a template consisting of hexagonally ordered pores that result from the anodization of an Al film. By embedding a catalyst layer within PAA, single-walled CNTs are synthesized from the nanoscale vertical pores (pore diameter ≈20 nm, spacing ≈100 nm) at a yield of no more than one nanotube per pore. After synthesis, the CNTs are contacted within the pores by electrodepositing Pd, a known low-barrier contact metal for CNTs, to form nanowires that electrically address the CNTs near

  14. New precursors for direct synthesis of single phase Na- and K-{beta}{double_prime}-aluminas for use in AMTEC systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, R.L.; MacQueen, D.B.; Bader, K.E.; Barron, A.R.

    1997-12-31

    Alkali Metal Thermoelectric Converters (AMTEC) are efficient direct energy conversion devices that depend on the use of highly conductive beta-alumina membranes for their operation. The key component of the AMTEC system is a highly conductive Na-{beta}{double_prime}-alumina solid electrolyte which conducts sodium ions from the high to low temperature zone, thereby generating electricity. AMTEC cells convert thermal to electrical energy by using heat to produce and maintain an alkali metal concentration gradient across the ion transporting BASE membrane. They have developed a method for producing pure phase Na-{beta}{double_prime}-alumina and K-{beta}{double_prime}-alumina powders from single phase nano-sized carboxylato-alumoxanes precursors. Sodium or potassium ions (the mobile ions) and either Mg{sup 2+} or Li{sup +} ions (which stabilize the {beta}{double_prime}-alumina structure) can be atomically dispersed into the carboxylato-alumoxane lattice at low (< 100 C) temperature. Calculation of the carboxylato-alumoxane precursors at 1,200--1,500 C produces pure phase {beta}{double_prime}-alumina powders.

  15. Crystal structures of ricin toxin's enzymatic subunit (RTA) in complex with neutralizing and non-neutralizing single-chain antibodies.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Michael J; Vance, David J; Cheung, Jonah; Franklin, Matthew C; Burshteyn, Fiana; Cassidy, Michael S; Gary, Ebony N; Herrera, Cristina; Shoemaker, Charles B; Mantis, Nicholas J

    2014-08-26

    Ricin is a select agent toxin and a member of the RNA N-glycosidase family of medically important plant and bacterial ribosome-inactivating proteins. In this study, we determined X-ray crystal structures of the enzymatic subunit of ricin (RTA) in complex with the antigen binding domains (VHH) of five unique single-chain monoclonal antibodies that differ in their respective toxin-neutralizing activities. None of the VHHs made direct contact with residues involved in RTA's RNA N-glycosidase activity or induced notable allosteric changes in the toxin's subunit. Rather, the five VHHs had overlapping structural epitopes on the surface of the toxin and differed in the degree to which they made contact with prominent structural elements in two folding domains of the RTA. In general, RTA interactions were influenced most by the VHH CDR3 (CDR, complementarity-determining region) elements, with the most potent neutralizing antibody having the shortest and most conformationally constrained CDR3. These structures provide unique insights into the mechanisms underlying toxin neutralization and provide critically important information required for the rational design of ricin toxin subunit vaccines.

  16. Soft-Switched Neutral-Point-Clamped Single-Phase Boost Rectifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Ryozo; Ishizaka, Kouichi

    A soft-switched neutral-point-clamped single-phase boost rectifier capable of compensating the imbalance load voltage is studied. This is based on a single-phase rectifier, in which an inductor is placed in series with the AC supply to resonate with a capacitor connected across the DC output of a full-bridge rectifier and the switching transition is mainly governed by a series resonance. The experimental prototype using insulated-gate bipolar transistors is implemented to investigate the operation under the charge control. The experimental results confirm that the rectifier has a neutral-point-clamp feature providing a good quality AC current.

  17. Direct electrical transport measurement on a single thermoelectric nanowire embedded in an alumina template.

    PubMed

    Ben Khedim, Meriam; Cagnon, Laurent; Garagnon, Christophe; Serradeil, Valerie; Bourgault, Daniel

    2016-04-28

    Electrical conductivity is a key parameter to increase the performance of thermoelectric materials. However, the measurement of such performance remains complex for 1D structures, involving tedious processing. In this study, we present a non-destructive, rapid and easy approach for the characterization of electrical conductivity of Bi2Te3 based single nanowires. By controlling the nanowire overgrowth, each nanowire emerges in the form of a micrometric hemisphere constituting a unique contact zone for direct nanoprobing. As nanowires need no preliminary preparation and remain in their template during measurement, we avoid oxidation effects and time-consuming processing. Electrical transport results show a low nanowire resistivity for compact nanowires obtained at low overpotential. Such values are comparable to bulk materials and thin films. This method not only confirmed its reliability, but it could also be adopted for other semiconducting or metallic electrodeposited nanowires.

  18. Effects of Impurities on Alumina-Niobium InterfacialMicrostructures

    SciTech Connect

    McKeown, Joseph T.; Sugar, Joshua D.; Gronsky, Ronald; Glaeser,Andreas M.

    2005-06-20

    Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy were employed to examine the interfacial microstructural effects of impurities in alumina substrates used to fabricate alumina-niobium interfaces via liquid-film-assisted joining. Three types of alumina were used: undoped high-purity single-crystal sapphire; a high-purity, high-strength polycrystalline alumina; and a lower-purity, lower-strength polycrystalline alumina. Interfaces formed between niobium and both the sapphire and high-purity polycrystalline alumina were free of detectable levels of impurities. In the lower-purity alumina, niobium silicides were observed at the alumina-niobium interface and on alumina grain boundaries near the interface. These silicides formed in small-grained regions of the alumina and were found to grow from the interface into the alumina along grain boundaries. Smaller silicide precipitates found on grain boundaries are believed to form upon cooling from the bonding temperature.

  19. Single amino acid mutations in the capsid switch the neutralization phenotype of porcine circovirus 2.

    PubMed

    Saha, Dipongkor; Lefebvre, David J; Ooms, Karen; Huang, Liping; Delputte, Peter L; Van Doorsselaere, Jan; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2012-07-01

    Porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2) is the causative agent of porcine circovirus-associated diseases in pigs. Previously, it was demonstrated that mAbs 16G12, 38C1, 63H3 and 94H8 directed against the PCV2 capsid protein recognize PCV2 strains Stoon-1010 (PCV2a), 48285 (PCV2b), 1121 (PCV2a), 1147 (PCV2b) and II9F (PCV2b), but only neutralize Stoon-1010 and 48285. This points to the existence of two distinct PCV2 neutralization phenotypes: phenotype α (mAb recognition with neutralization; Stoon-1010 and 48285) and phenotype β (mAb recognition without neutralization; 1121, 1147 and II9F). In the present study, amino acids that are important in determining the neutralization phenotype were identified in the capsid. Mutation of T at position 190 to A in strain 48285 (phenotype α) resulted in a capsid resembling that of strain 1147 (phenotype β) and caused a loss of neutralization (switch from α to β). Mutations of P at position 151 to T and A at position 190 to T in strain II9F (phenotype β) resulted in a capsid resembling that of strain 48285 (phenotype α) and gave a gain of neutralization (switch from β to α). Mutations of T at position 131 to P and of E at position 191 to R in Stoon-1010 (phenotype α) changed the capsid into that of 1121 (phenotype β) and reduced neutralization (switch from α to β). This study demonstrated that single amino acid changes in the capsid result in a phenotypic switch from α to β or β to α.

  20. MCP performance improvement using alumina thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuzhen; Yan, Baojun; Liu, Shulin; Zhao, Tianchi; Yu, Yang; Wen, Kaile; Li, Yumei; Qi, Ming

    2017-10-01

    The performance improvement using alumina thin film on a dual microchannel plate (MCP) detector for single electron counting was investigated. The alumina thin film was coated on all surfaces of the MCPs by atomic layer deposition method. It was found that the gain, the single electron resolution and the peak-to-valley ratio of the dual MCP detector were significantly enhanced by coating the alumina thin film. The optimum operating conditions of the new dual MCP detector have been studied.

  1. Single session of Nd:YAG laser intracanal irradiation neutralizes endotoxin in dental root dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archilla, José R. F.; Moreira, Maria S. N. A.; Miyagi, Sueli P. H.; Bombana, Antônio C.; Gutknecht, Norbert; Marques, Márcia M.

    2012-11-01

    Endotoxins released in the dental root by Gram-negative microorganisms can be neutralized by calcium hydroxide, when this medication is applied inside the root canal for at least seven days. However, several clinical situations demand faster root canal decontamination. Thus, for faster endotoxin neutralization, endodontists are seeking additional treatments. The in vitro study tested whether or not intracanal Nd:YAG laser irradiation would be able to neutralize endotoxin within the human dental root canal in a single session. Twenty-four human teeth with one root were mounted between two chambers. After conventional endodontic treatment, root canals were contaminated with Escherichia coli endotoxin. Then they were irradiated or not (controls) in contact mode with an Nd:YAG laser (1.5 W, 15 Hz, 100 mJ and pulse fluency of 124 J/cm2). The endotoxin activity was measured using the limulus lysate technique and data were statistically compared (p≤0.05). The concentration of active endotoxin measured in the negative control group was significantly lower than that of the positive control group (p=0.04). The concentrations of endotoxin in both irradiated groups were significantly lower than that of the positive control group (p=0.027) and similar to that of negative control group (p=0.20). A single session of intracanal Nd:YAG laser irradiation is able to neutralize endotoxin in the dental root tissues.

  2. Single session of Nd:YAG laser intracanal irradiation neutralizes endotoxin in dental root dentin.

    PubMed

    Archilla, José R F; Moreira, Maria S N A; Miyagi, Sueli P H; Bombana, Antônio C; Gutknecht, Norbert; Marques, Márcia M

    2012-11-01

    Endotoxins released in the dental root by Gram-negative microorganisms can be neutralized by calcium hydroxide, when this medication is applied inside the root canal for at least seven days. However, several clinical situations demand faster root canal decontamination. Thus, for faster endotoxin neutralization, endodontists are seeking additional treatments. The in vitro study tested whether or not intracanal Nd:YAG laser irradiation would be able to neutralize endotoxin within the human dental root canal in a single session. Twenty-four human teeth with one root were mounted between two chambers. After conventional endodontic treatment, root canals were contaminated with Escherichia coli endotoxin. Then they were irradiated or not (controls) in contact mode with an Nd:YAG laser (1.5 W, 15 Hz, 100 mJ and pulse fluency of 124  J/cm2). The endotoxin activity was measured using the limulus lysate technique and data were statistically compared (p≤0.05). The concentration of active endotoxin measured in the negative control group was significantly lower than that of the positive control group (p=0.04). The concentrations of endotoxin in both irradiated groups were significantly lower than that of the positive control group (p=0.027) and similar to that of negative control group (p=0.20). A single session of intracanal Nd:YAG laser irradiation is able to neutralize endotoxin in the dental root tissues.

  3. Hyperfine structure and isotope shifts of transitions in neutral and singly ionized ytterbium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berends, R. W.; Maleki, L.

    1992-01-01

    The present experimental investigation of the hyperfine structure and isotopic shifts of transitions in neutral and singly-ionized Yb, which constitute a system of some interest to microwave-frequency standards, used counterpropagating pump and probe laser beams directed through a hollow-cathode discharge lamp. The results obtained are in agreement with previous measurements except in the case of the Yb-173(+) 6 2P0 sub 3/2 state, which is more accurately determined.

  4. Optimized alumina coagulants for water treatment

    DOEpatents

    Nyman, May D [Albuquerque, NM; Stewart, Thomas A [Albuquerque, NM

    2012-02-21

    Substitution of a single Ga-atom or single Ge-atom (GaAl.sub.12 and GeAl.sub.12 respectively) into the center of an aluminum Keggin polycation (Al.sub.13) produces an optimal water-treatment product for neutralization and coagulation of anionic contaminants in water. GaAl.sub.12 consistently shows .about.1 order of magnitude increase in pathogen reduction, compared to Al.sub.13. At a concentration of 2 ppm, GaAl.sub.12 performs equivalently to 40 ppm alum, removing .about.90% of the dissolved organic material. The substituted GaAl.sub.12 product also offers extended shelf-life and consistent performance. We also synthesized a related polyaluminum chloride compound made of pre-hydrolyzed dissolved alumina clusters of [GaO.sub.4Al.sub.12(OH).sub.24(H.sub.2O).sub.12].sup.7+.

  5. Zinc ion and neutral emission from single crystal zinc oxide during 193-nm excimer laser exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, E. H.; Langford, S. C.; Boatner, Lynn A; Dickinson, J. T.

    2011-01-01

    Mass resolved time-of-flight measurements on neutral zinc atoms and zinc ions show energetic ions and neutrals during 193-nm irradiation of single crystals of semiconducting zinc oxide. Typical Zn+ kinetic energies are 3-5 eV. At fluences (energy per unit area per pulse) below 200 mJ/cm2, the ion intensities (per laser pulse) decrease monotonically to low values with laser pulse number. The depletion kinetics change from exponential to second order near 50 mJ/cm2. We attribute this change to the annihilation of defects yielding Zn+ emission when Zn+ or other surface defects become mobile. At fluences between 200 and 300 mJ/cm2, Zn+ emission becomes more sustained due to defects created by the laser. In this same fluence range, we observe the onset of detectable neutral atomic zinc emission. These neutral atoms display Maxwell-Boltzmann kinetic energy distributions w th effective surface temperatures that approach 5000 K as the fluence is raised to 350 mJ/cm2. These high surface temperatures are remarkable given the low etch rates observed at these fluences, suggesting that heated layer is extremely thin. We propose emission mechanisms and experiments to resolve outstanding questions.

  6. Evaluation of three different formats of a neutralizing single chain human antibody against toxin Cn2: neutralization capacity versus thermodynamic stability.

    PubMed

    Quintero-Hernández, Veronica; Del Pozo-Yauner, Luis; Pedraza-Escalona, Martha; Juárez-González, Victor R; Alcántara-Recillas, Israel; Possani, Lourival D; Becerril, Baltazar

    2012-04-30

    The single-chain antibody fragment (scFv) 6009F, obtained by directed evolution, neutralizes the effects of the Cn2 toxin, which is the major toxic component of Centruroides noxius scorpion venom. In this work we compared the neutralization capacity and the thermodynamic stability of scFv 6009F with those of two other derived formats: Fab 6009F and diabody 6009F. Additionally, the affinity constants to Cn2 toxin of the three recombinant antibody fragments were determined by means of BIAcore. We found a correlation between the thermodynamic stability of these antibody fragments with their neutralization capacity. The order of thermodynamic stability determined was Fab≫scFv>diabody. The Fab and scFv were capable of neutralizing the toxic effects of Cn2 and whole venom but the diabody was unable to fully neutralize intoxication. In silico analysis of the diabody format indicates that the reduction of stability and neutralization capacity could be explained by a less cooperative interface between the heavy and the light variable domains.

  7. An efficient method for the synthesis of phenacyl ester-protected dipeptides using neutral alumina-supported sodium carbonate 'Na2 CO3 /n-Al2 O3 '.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Chikao; Sugimoto, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Youhei; Kodomari, Mitsuo

    2013-10-01

    In the synthesis of dipeptides (Boc-AA(1)-AA(2)-OPac: AA(1) and AA(2) represent amino acids) protected by phenacyl (Pac) ester, amines and solid bases as the base for the conversion of the trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) salt of the amino component (TFA·H-AA(2)-OPac) into the corresponding free amino component (H-AA(2)-OPac) were examined. The synthesis of a dipeptide (Boc-Ala-Gly-OPac) using amines for the conversion afforded an unsatisfactory yield with by-products. On the other hand, the use of neutral alumina-supported Na(2) CO(3) (Na(2)CO(3) /n-Al(2)O(3)) as a solid base for the conversion provided the dipeptide in a quantitative yield without by-products. The application of Na(2)CO(3) /n-Al2 O3 to the synthesis of some dipeptides protected by Pac ester gave the desired peptides in excellent yields. Copyright © 2013 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Characterization of Poliovirus Neutralization Escape Mutants of Single-Domain Antibody Fragments (VHHs)

    PubMed Central

    Schotte, Lise; Thys, Bert; Strauss, Mike; Filman, David J.; Rombaut, Bart

    2015-01-01

    To complete the eradication of poliovirus and to protect unvaccinated people subsequently, the development of one or more antiviral drugs will be necessary. A set of five single-domain antibody fragments (variable parts of the heavy chain of a heavy-chain antibody [VHHs]) with an in vitro neutralizing activity against poliovirus type 1 was developed previously (B. Thys, L. Schotte, S. Muyldermans, U. Wernery, G. Hassanzadeh-Ghassabeh, and B. Rombaut, Antiviral Res 87:257–264, 2010, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.antiviral.2010.05.012), and their mechanisms of action have been studied (L. Schotte, M. Strauss, B. Thys, H. Halewyck, D. J. Filman, M. Bostina, J. M. Hogle, and B. Rombaut, J Virol 88:4403–4413, 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.03402-13). In this study, neutralization escape mutants were selected for each VHH. Sequencing of the P1 region of the genome showed that amino acid substitutions are found in the four viral proteins of the capsid and that they are located both in proximity to the binding sites of the VHHs and in regions further away from the canyon and hidden beneath the surface. Characterization of the mutants demonstrated that they have single-cycle replication kinetics that are similar to those of their parental strain and that they are all drug (VHH) independent. Their resistant phenotypes are stable, as they do not regain full susceptibility to the VHH after passage over HeLa cells in the absence of VHH. They are all at least as stable as the parental strain against heat inactivation at 44°C, and three of them are even significantly (P < 0.05) more resistant to heat inactivation. The resistant variants all still can be neutralized by at least two other VHHs and retain full susceptibility to pirodavir and 35-1F4. PMID:26014941

  9. A Single Step Lapping and Polishing Process for Achieving Surfaces of Compound Semiconductors with Atomic Flatness using a Sub-micron Agglomerate-free Alumina Slurry

    SciTech Connect

    P.S. Dutta; G. Rajagopalan; J.J. Gutmann; D. Keller; L. Sweet

    2002-08-29

    A novel approach for a single step lapping and final polishing of III-V and II-VI compounds using agglomerate-free alumina slurries has been developed. The agglomerate-free nature of the sub-micron slurry leads to removal rates comparable to conventional slurries (with larger particles of tens of microns) used for semiconductor lapping. Surfaces with minimal surface damage and extremely low surface roughness have been obtained using the sub-micron slurries and a soft pad. Strategies for post polishing surface cleaning have been discussed. The new methodology has been experimented on GaSb, InAs, GaAs, InP, InSb, CdTe, GaInSb, GaInAs, AlGaAsSb, GaInAsSb and HgCdTe. Selected results of surface analyses of GaSb and GaInSb using atomic force microscopy will be presented.

  10. Photon initiated single top quark production via flavor-changing neutral currents at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldouzian, Reza; Clerbaux, Barbara

    2017-03-01

    Single top quark production is a powerful process to search for new physics signs. In this work we propose and investigate a search for top quark flavor-changing neutral currents (FCNCs) via a photon using direct single top quark production events in proton-proton collisions at the LHC at CERN. We show that the direct single top quark final state can provide constraints on the strengths of top-quark-γ and top-quark-gluon FCNC couplings simultaneously. Results of a search for direct single top quark production at the LHC at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV performed by the ATLAS Collaboration are used to set first experimental limits on the anomalous FCNC top decay branching fractions B (t →u γ )<0.05 % and B (t →c γ )<0.14 % via direct single top quark production. Finally, the sensitivity of the proposed channel for probing the top-quark-γ couplings at 13 TeV is presented.

  11. Exploiting cross-reactivity to neutralize two different scorpion venoms with one single chain antibody fragment.

    PubMed

    Riaño-Umbarila, Lidia; Contreras-Ferrat, Gabriel; Olamendi-Portugal, Timoteo; Morelos-Juárez, Citlalli; Corzo, Gerardo; Possani, Lourival D; Becerril, Baltazar

    2011-02-25

    We report the optimization of a family of human single chain antibody fragments (scFv) for neutralizing two scorpion venoms. The parental scFv 3F recognizes the main toxins of Centruroides noxius Hoffmann (Cn2) and Centruroides suffusus suffusus (Css2), albeit with low affinity. This scFv was subjected to independent processes of directed evolution to improve its recognition toward Cn2 (Riaño-Umbarila, L., Juárez-González, V. R., Olamendi-Portugal, T., Ortíz-León, M., Possani, L. D., and Becerril, B. (2005) FEBS J. 272, 2591-2601) and Css2 (this work). Each evolved variant showed strong cross-reactivity against several toxins, and was capable of neutralizing Cn2 and Css2. Furthermore, each variant neutralized the whole venoms of the above species. As far as we know, this is the first report of antibodies with such characteristics. Maturation processes revealed key residue changes to attain expression, stability, and affinity improvements as compared with the parental scFv. Combination of these changes resulted in the scFv LR, which is capable of rescuing mice from severe envenomation by 3 LD(50) of freshly prepared whole venom of C. noxius (7.5 μg/20 g of mouse) and C. suffusus (26.25 μg/20 g of mouse), with surviving rates between 90 and 100%. Our research is leading to the formulation of an antivenom consisting of a discrete number of human scFvs endowed with strong cross-reactivity and low immunogenicity.

  12. Exploiting Cross-reactivity to Neutralize Two Different Scorpion Venoms with One Single Chain Antibody Fragment*

    PubMed Central

    Riaño-Umbarila, Lidia; Contreras-Ferrat, Gabriel; Olamendi-Portugal, Timoteo; Morelos-Juárez, Citlalli; Corzo, Gerardo; Possani, Lourival D.; Becerril, Baltazar

    2011-01-01

    We report the optimization of a family of human single chain antibody fragments (scFv) for neutralizing two scorpion venoms. The parental scFv 3F recognizes the main toxins of Centruroides noxius Hoffmann (Cn2) and Centruroides suffusus suffusus (Css2), albeit with low affinity. This scFv was subjected to independent processes of directed evolution to improve its recognition toward Cn2 (Riaño-Umbarila, L., Juárez-González, V. R., Olamendi-Portugal, T., Ortíz-León, M., Possani, L. D., and Becerril, B. (2005) FEBS J. 272, 2591–2601) and Css2 (this work). Each evolved variant showed strong cross-reactivity against several toxins, and was capable of neutralizing Cn2 and Css2. Furthermore, each variant neutralized the whole venoms of the above species. As far as we know, this is the first report of antibodies with such characteristics. Maturation processes revealed key residue changes to attain expression, stability, and affinity improvements as compared with the parental scFv. Combination of these changes resulted in the scFv LR, which is capable of rescuing mice from severe envenomation by 3 LD50 of freshly prepared whole venom of C. noxius (7.5 μg/20 g of mouse) and C. suffusus (26.25 μg/20 g of mouse), with surviving rates between 90 and 100%. Our research is leading to the formulation of an antivenom consisting of a discrete number of human scFvs endowed with strong cross-reactivity and low immunogenicity. PMID:21156801

  13. CO Oxidation on supported single Pt atoms - Experimental and Ab Initio density functional studies of CO interaction with Pt atom on theta-alumina(010) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Narula, Chaitanya Kumar; Debusk, Melanie Moses; Yoon, Mina; Allard Jr, Lawrence Frederick; Mullins, David R; Wu, Zili; Yang, Xiaofan; Veith, Gabriel M; Stocks, George Malcolm

    2013-01-01

    Although there are only a few known examples of supported single atoms, they are unique because they bridge the gap between homogenous and heterogeneous catalysis. The metal center is single supported atoms can be isoelectronic with their homogenous catalyst counterpart and may allow mechanistic pathways normally seen in homogenous catalysts. Here, we report CO oxidation activity of mono-disperse single Pt atoms supported on an inert substrate, -alumina (Al2O3), in the presence of stoichiometric oxygen. Since CO oxidation on single Pt atoms cannot occur via a conventional Langmuir-Hinshelwood scheme (L-H scheme) which requires at least one Pt-Pt bond, we have carried out a first principles density functional theoretical study of a proposed pathway which is a variation on the conventional L-H scheme and is inspired by organometallic chemistry of platinum. We find that a single supported Pt atom prefers to bond to O2 over CO. The CO then bonds with the oxygenated Pt atom and forms a carbonate which dissociates to liberate CO2, leaving an oxygen atom on Pt. A subsequent reaction with another CO molecule regenerates the single atom catalyst. An in-situ diffuse reflectance infrared study of CO adsorption on the catalyst s supported single atoms has been carried out to infer information on CO absorption modes and compare the observed spectra with calculated ones for intermediates in the proposed CO oxidation pathway. Our results clearly show that supported Pt single atoms are catalytically active and that this catalytic activity can occur without involving the substrate. Characterization by electron microscopy and X-ray absorption studies of the mono-disperse Pt/ -Al2O3, synthesized by solution methods, are also presented.

  14. Single discharge of the matrix source of negative hydrogen ions: Influence of the neutral particle dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Paunska, Ts.; Todorov, D. Shivarova, A.; Tarnev, Kh.

    2015-04-08

    The study presents two-dimensional (2D) fluid-plasma-model description of a planar-coil inductively-driven discharge, considered as a single element of a matrix source of volume-produced negative hydrogen ions. Whereas the models developed up to now have been directed towards description of the charged particle behavior in the discharge, including that of the negative ions, this model stresses on the role of the neutral particle dynamics and of the surface processes in the formation of the discharge structure. The latter is discussed based on comparison of results obtained for discharges in a flowing gas and at a constant gas pressure as well as for different values of the coefficient of atom recombination on the walls. The conclusions are that the main plasma parameters – electron density and temperature and plasma potential – determining the gas discharge regime stay stable, regardless of changes in the redistribution of the densities of the neutral particles and of the positive ions. With regards to the volume production of the ions, which requires high density of (vibrationally excited) molecules, the impact on the degree of dissociation of the coefficient of atom recombination on the wall is discussed.

  15. Development of a new single-bottle multi-purpose primer for bonding to dental porcelain, alumina, zirconia, and dental gold alloy.

    PubMed

    Ikemura, Kunio; Tanaka, Hisaki; Fujii, Toshihide; Deguchi, Mikito; Endo, Takeshi; Kadoma, Yoshinori

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the bonding efficacy of a combined primer application which comprised a silane coupling agent, an acidic adhesive monomer, and a dithiooctanoate monomer, as well as the influence of shelf life on bonding. Five experimental primers (coded as Si-P-SS-1 to Si-P-SS-4, and Si-SS as the control) were prepared using 20.0-40.0 wt% 3-methacryloyloxypropyltriethoxysilane (3-MPTES), 0-7.44 wt% 6-methacryloyloxyhexyl phosphonoacetate (6-MHPA), and 0.50 wt% 10-methacryloyloxydecyl 6,8-dithiooctanoate (10-MDDT). After 24-hour storage at 23°C (Initial) and 2-month storage at 50°C (Aged), tensile bond strengths (TBSs) of a resin cement (ResiCem, Shofu Inc., Kyoto, Japan) to primer-treated porcelain, alumina, zirconia, and Au alloy were measured. With the Initial and Aged primers of Si-P-SS-1 to Si-P-SS-3, there were no statistically significant differences in the mean TBSs (MPa) [porcelain: 21.7-29.2; alumina: 21.4-25.3; zirconia: 20.3-24.5; and Au alloy: 23.4-27.6] among these three primers (p>0.05), but they were significantly higher than that of the control primer (p<0.05). The experimental primers Si-P-SS-1 to Si-P-SS-3 demonstrated good potential as multi-purpose primers: they had good shelf lives as single-bottle primer systems and were thus able to exhibit good bond strength to all the adherends tested after 2-month storage under accelerated aging conditions.

  16. Single-component organic conductors based on neutral radicals containing the pyrazino-TCNQ skeleton

    SciTech Connect

    Tsubata, Yoshiaki; Susuki, Takanori; Miyashi, Tsutomu ); Yoshiro Yamashita )

    1992-12-04

    Pyrazino-TCNQ (1a) prepared from 5, 8-diiodoquinoxaline (4a) is, like TCNQ itself, a strong electron acceptor and gives a stable anion radical salt as well as highly conductive charge-transfer crystals with donors. Substituted derivatives 1b-i were similarly prepared from 3,6-diiodo- 1,2-phenylenediamine (5) as a common intermediate, and bulky substituents such as the phenyl or pyridyl groups have very little effect on either the redox properties or planar geometry of 1a. Neutral radicals 3d-g derived from pyridyl-substituted derivatives 1d-g, respectively, are open-shell donor-[pi]-acceptor systems with high electrical amphotericity designed as a new motif for single-component organic conductors. The powder conductivity of 3f was as high as 3.2 [times] 10[sup [minus]5] S cm[sup [minus]1]. 29 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Tailored-waveguide based photonic chip for manipulating an array of single neutral atoms.

    PubMed

    Ke, Min; Zhou, Feng; Li, Xiao; Wang, Jin; Zhan, Mingsheng

    2016-05-02

    We propose a tailored-waveguide based photonic chip with the functions of trapping, coherently manipulating, detecting and individually addressing an array of single neutral atoms. Such photonic chip consists of an array of independent functional units spaced by a few micrometers, each of which is comprised of one silica-on-silicon optical waveguide and one phase Fresnel microlens etched in the middle of the output interface of the optical waveguide. We fabricated a number of photonic chips with 7 functional units and measured optical characteristics of these chips. We further propose feasible schemes to realize the functions of such photonic chip. The photonic chip is stable, scalable and can be combined with other integrated devices, such as atom chips, and can be used in the future hybrid quantum system and photonic quantum devices.

  18. Structural properties of reciprocal form factor in neutral atoms and singly charged ions.

    PubMed

    Romera, E; Angulo, J C

    2004-04-22

    Structural characteristics of the spherically averaged internally folded density or reciprocal form factor Br are studied within the Hartree-Fock framework for 103 neutral atoms, 54 singly charged cations, and 43 anions in their ground state. The function Br is classified throughout the Periodic Table into three types: (i) monotonic decrease from the origin, (ii) maximum at r=0 and a negative minimum at r>0, and (iii) a local maximum at r=0 and a pair maximum-minimum out of the origin. A detailed study of the corresponding properties for individual subshells as well as their relative weight for the total Br is also carried out. For completeness, the analytical Br for hydrogenlike atoms in both ground and excited states is also analyzed.

  19. Energy levels of neutral and singly ionized berkelium, /sup 249/Bk I and II

    SciTech Connect

    Worden, E.F.; Conway, J.G.; Blaise, J.

    1987-09-01

    Energy-level analyses of the observed emission spectrum of berkelium have yielded 179 odd and 186 even levels of neutral berkelium Bk I, and 42 odd and 117 even levels of singly ionized berkelium Bk II. The levels are tabulated with the J value, the g value, the configuration and hyperfine constants A and B, and the width given for many of the levels. The ground states of Bk I and Bk II are (Rn)5f/sup 9/7s/sup 2/ /sup 6/H/sup 0//sub 15/2/ and (Rn)5f/sup 9/7s /sup 7/H/sup 0//sub 8/, respectively. A table lists the lowest level of each identified electronic configuration of Bk I and Bk II.

  20. Precursor decay in several aluminas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, N. H.; Bourne, N. K.; Rosenberg, Z.

    1996-05-01

    Plate impact experiments were performed on three ceramics with alumina content varying from 88 to 99.9% using a 50 mm single stage gas gun. Tiles of ceramic with thicknesses varying from 2 to 12 mm were impacted above their Hugoniot Elastic Limits (HELs) and the rate dependent strength was investigated by monitoring the variation in amplitude of the elastic precursor with propagation distance. Stress levels in the target were recorded using manganin stress transducers and a 1 GS s-1 storage oscilloscope. All grades of alumina were found to exhibit some elastic precursor decay indicating strain rate sensitivity.

  1. Investigation of grain boundary sliding and cavitation during creep of single-phase alumina. Ph.D. Thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, C.R.

    1994-01-01

    Using a high-purity alumina with no glassy phase as a model material, both the creep cavitation and grain boundary sliding (GBS) phenomena were studied and their kinetics quantified. The GBS measurements were performed on both tensile and compressive creep specimens with an automated machine-vision-based stereoimaging technique called DISMAP. SEM observations revealed that compressive creep at 70 and 140 MPa resulted in the nucleation of multiple creep cavities primarily on two-grain facets, secondarily at three- and four-grain junctions, and occasionally at triple points. These cavities were generally observed to be of similar size, shape, and spacing on a given grain boundary and their subsequent growth and coalescence led to the formation of facet-sized cavities leading to failure. Cavities were observed to exhibit a variety of irregular, angular shapes, suggesting that their morphologies may be governed by the crystallographic orientation of the grain facet and the corresponding surface energies. Fracture surfaces of tensile specimens tested at 35 MPa revealed creep cavities located primarily at three- and four-grain junctions and triple points, and only occasionally at two-grain facets. Finally, in the 20 MPa tensile specimen, creep cavities were located almost exclusively at grain boundary triple points. GBS measurements showed that during compressive and tensile creep, grain boundaries exhibit mode II GBS, in-plane grain rotation, in-grain shear deformation, mode I grain boundary opening, and out-of-plane GBS. No dependence of grain boundary orientation to the compressive load axis was observed on the magnitude of mode II GBS displacement. During steady-state tensile creep, the cumulative mode II GBS displacements increased linearly with creep strain and showed an increasing trend with creep time. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) quantification of creep cavitation revealed that the number of cavities per unit volume increases linearly with creep time.

  2. Coherence Preservation of a Single Neutral Atom Qubit Transferred between Magic-Intensity Optical Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jiaheng; He, Xiaodong; Guo, Ruijun; Xu, Peng; Wang, Kunpeng; Sheng, Cheng; Liu, Min; Wang, Jin; Derevianko, Andrei; Zhan, Mingsheng

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate that the coherence of a single mobile atomic qubit can be well preserved during a transfer process among different optical dipole traps (ODTs). This is a prerequisite step in realizing a large-scale neutral atom quantum information processing platform. A qubit encoded in the hyperfine manifold of an 87Rb atom is dynamically extracted from the static quantum register by an auxiliary moving ODT and reinserted into the static ODT. Previous experiments were limited by decoherences induced by the differential light shifts of qubit states. Here, we apply a magic-intensity trapping technique which mitigates the detrimental effects of light shifts and substantially enhances the coherence time to 225 ±21 ms . The experimentally demonstrated magic trapping technique relies on the previously neglected hyperpolarizability contribution to the light shifts, which makes the light shift dependence on the trapping laser intensity parabolic. Because of the parabolic dependence, at a certain "magic" intensity, the first order sensitivity to trapping light-intensity variations over ODT volume is eliminated. We experimentally demonstrate the utility of this approach and measure hyperpolarizability for the first time. Our results pave the way for constructing scalable quantum-computing architectures with single atoms trapped in an array of magic ODTs.

  3. Coherence Preservation of a Single Neutral Atom Qubit Transferred between Magic-Intensity Optical Traps.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiaheng; He, Xiaodong; Guo, Ruijun; Xu, Peng; Wang, Kunpeng; Sheng, Cheng; Liu, Min; Wang, Jin; Derevianko, Andrei; Zhan, Mingsheng

    2016-09-16

    We demonstrate that the coherence of a single mobile atomic qubit can be well preserved during a transfer process among different optical dipole traps (ODTs). This is a prerequisite step in realizing a large-scale neutral atom quantum information processing platform. A qubit encoded in the hyperfine manifold of an ^{87}Rb atom is dynamically extracted from the static quantum register by an auxiliary moving ODT and reinserted into the static ODT. Previous experiments were limited by decoherences induced by the differential light shifts of qubit states. Here, we apply a magic-intensity trapping technique which mitigates the detrimental effects of light shifts and substantially enhances the coherence time to 225±21  ms. The experimentally demonstrated magic trapping technique relies on the previously neglected hyperpolarizability contribution to the light shifts, which makes the light shift dependence on the trapping laser intensity parabolic. Because of the parabolic dependence, at a certain "magic" intensity, the first order sensitivity to trapping light-intensity variations over ODT volume is eliminated. We experimentally demonstrate the utility of this approach and measure hyperpolarizability for the first time. Our results pave the way for constructing scalable quantum-computing architectures with single atoms trapped in an array of magic ODTs.

  4. Measuring the Sensitivity of Single-locus “Neutrality Tests” Using a Direct Perturbation Approach

    PubMed Central

    Garrigan, Daniel; Lewontin, Richard; Wakeley, John

    2010-01-01

    A large number of statistical tests have been proposed to detect natural selection based on a sample of variation at a single genetic locus. These tests measure the deviation of the allelic frequency distribution observed within populations from the distribution expected under a set of assumptions that includes both neutral evolution and equilibrium population demography. The present study considers a new way to assess the statistical properties of these tests of selection, by their behavior in response to direct perturbations of the steady-state allelic frequency distribution, unconstrained by any particular nonequilibrium demographic scenario. Results from Monte Carlo computer simulations indicate that most tests of selection are more sensitive to perturbations of the allele frequency distribution that increase the variance in allele frequencies than to perturbations that decrease the variance. Simulations also demonstrate that it requires, on average, 4N generations (N is the diploid effective population size) for tests of selection to relax to their theoretical, steady-state distributions following different perturbations of the allele frequency distribution to its extremes. This relatively long relaxation time highlights the fact that these tests are not robust to violations of the other assumptions of the null model besides neutrality. Lastly, genetic variation arising under an example of a regularly cycling demographic scenario is simulated. Tests of selection performed on this last set of simulated data confirm the confounding nature of these tests for the inference of natural selection, under a demographic scenario that likely holds for many species. The utility of using empirical, genomic distributions of test statistics, instead of the theoretical steady-state distribution, is discussed as an alternative for improving the statistical inference of natural selection. PMID:19744997

  5. Crystal Structures of Ricin Toxin’s Enzymatic Subunit (RTA) in Complex with Neutralizing and Non-neutralizing Single Chain Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Rudolph, Michael J.; Vance, David J.; Cheung, Jonah; Franklin, Matthew C.; Burshteyn, Fiana; Cassidy, Michael S.; Gary, Ebony N.; Herrera, Cristina; Shoemaker, Charles B.; Mantis, Nicholas J.

    2014-01-01

    Ricin is a Select Agent Toxin and a member of the RNA N-glycosidase family of medically important plant and bacterial ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs). In this study, we determined x-ray crystal structures of the enzymatic subunit of ricin (RTA) in complex with the antigen binding domains (VHH) of five unique single-chain monoclonal antibodies that differ in their respective toxin-neutralizing activities. None of the VHHs made direct contact with residues involved in RTA’s RNA N-glycosidase activity or induced notable allosteric changes in the toxin’s subunit. Rather, the five VHHs had overlapping structural epitopes on the surface of the toxin and differed in the degree to which they made contact with prominent structural elements in two folding domains of the RTA. In general, RTA interactions were influenced most by the VHH CDR3 elements, with the most potent neutralizing antibody having the shortest and most conformationally constrained CDR3. These structures provide unique insights into the mechanisms underlying toxin neutralization and provide critically important information required for the rational design of ricin toxin subunit vaccines. PMID:24907552

  6. Adsorption of neutral red and malachite green onto grapefruit peel in single and binary systems.

    PubMed

    Zou, Weihua; Gao, Shuaipeng; Zou, Xiuli; Bai, Hongjuan

    2013-05-01

    This study characterized the properties of NaOH-modified grapefruit peel (MGP) and investigated its adsorption properties, specifically the adsorption of the synthetic dyes neutral red (NR) and malachite green (MG) onto MGP, in single and binary systems by means of batch techniques. The adsorption equilibrium data of NR onto MGP fit well with both the Langmuir and Koble-Corrigan models, while the Koble-Corrigan and Dubinin-Radushkevich models seemed to agree better with MG adsorption. The maximum equilibrium quantities of NR and MG from the Langmuir model were 640.3 and 314.9 mg/g at 298 K, respectively. The Elovich model was a better fit with the kinetic process, which suggested that ion exchange was one of the main mechanisms at work. The thermodynamic parameters of adsorption systems indicated spontaneous and endothermic processes. In the binary system experiments, NR and MG exhibited competitive adsorption. The quantity of MG adsorbed was more strongly influenced by NR, due to the higher affinity of MGP for the latter.

  7. Noise in Sodium Beta Alumina Crystals.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    Washington, D.C. 20375 .I- 7. 7- NOISE INI SODIUM r ALUMINA SINGLE CRYSTALS James J. Brophy and Steven W. Smith University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah 84112...RD-Ai56 025 NOISE IN SODiUN BETA ALUMINA CRYSTALS(U) UTAH UNIV SALT II LAKE CITY DEPT OF PHYSICS J J BROPHY ET AL. SEP 85 TR-7 N88814-82-K-e603...h.0- "bf’ ; -28242 ’ITLE (andSubsist&) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED L Noise in Sodium B" Alumina Crystals Technical Report #7 CJ S. PERFORMING

  8. Serrumab: a novel human single chain-fragment antibody with multiple scorpion toxin-neutralizing capacities.

    PubMed

    Pucca, Manuela Berto; Cerni, Felipe Augusto; Peigneur, Steve; Arantes, Eliane Candiani; Tytgat, Jan; Barbosa, José Elpidio

    2014-01-01

    In Brazil, scorpion envenomation is an important public health problem. The yellow scorpion, Tityus serrulatus (Ts), is considered the most dangerous species in the country, being responsible for the most severe clinical cases of envenomation. Currently, the administration of serum produced in horses is recognized and used as a treatment for accidents with scorpions. However, horse herds' maintenance is costly and the antibodies are heterologous, which can cause anaphylaxis and Serum Sickness. In the present work, a human monoclonal fragment antibody, Serrumab, has been analysed. Toxin neutralizing effects of Serrumab were evaluated using a two-electrode voltage-clamp technique. The results show that Serrumab presented a high neutralizing effect against Ts β-toxins (Ts1, 43.2% and Ts2, 68.8%) and none or low neutralizing effect against α-toxins (Ts3, 0% and Ts5, 10%). Additional experiments demonstrated that Serrumab was also able to neutralize the action of toxins from other scorpion genus (Css II, 45.96% and Lqh III, 100%/β- and α-toxins, respectively). This work indicated that Serrumab is able to neutralize many toxins in Ts venom, and could being considered as a neutralizing antibody for formulating a human anti-scorpion serum in Brazil. Additionally, this work demonstrated that Serrumab could neutralize different toxins from distinct scorpion genus. All these results reinforce the idea that Serrumab is a scFv antibody with multiple neutralizing capacities and a promising candidate for inclusion in scorpion anti-venoms against different genera.

  9. Adsorptive removal of Cu(II) and Ni(II) from single-metal, binary-metal, and industrial wastewater systems by surfactant-modified alumina.

    PubMed

    Khobragade, Moni U; Pal, Anjali

    2015-01-01

    Batch adsorption was carried out to investigate the possibility of utilizing surfactant-modified alumina (SMA) as an adsorbent for the removal of Cu(II) and Ni(II) from single-metal and binary-metal solutions. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) images of SMA before and after metal removal from single-metal matrix, showed no significant changes, whereas energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) studies confirmed the incorporation of Cu(II) (∼ 0.74 atomic%) and Ni(II) (∼ 0.64 atomic%) on the adsorbent surface. The removal of Cu(II) and Ni(II), using SMA depends on contact time, adsorbent dose and medium pH. The sorption kinetics followed pseudo-second-order model for Cu(II). However, for Ni(II), either pseudo-first-order or pseudo-second-order model is applicable. The batch experimental data were fitted to Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm, and based on the correlation coefficient value (R(2)), the adsorption could be described more precisely by the Freundlich isotherm. The maximum adsorption capacity from Langmuir isotherm of Cu(II) was 9.34 mg g(-1) and for Ni(II) 6.87 mg g(-1). In a synthetic binary mixture of Cu(II) and Ni(II), having a concentration of 10 mg L(-1) each, removal of Cu(II) was better. The treatment method was further applied to real wastewater from an electroplating industry. The batch experiment results showed that SMA was effective in the simultaneous removal of Cu(II) and Ni(II) to a significant extent, with additional improvement of water quality of the industrial effluent considered.

  10. A Neutrality Test for Detecting Selection on DNA Methylation Using Single Methylation Polymorphism Frequency Spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Fan, Chuanzhu

    2015-01-01

    Inheritable epigenetic mutations (epimutations) can contribute to transmittable phenotypic variation. Thus, epimutations can be subject to natural selection and impact the fitness and evolution of organisms. Based on the framework of the modified Tajima’s D test for DNA mutations, we developed a neutrality test with the statistic “Dm” to detect selection forces on DNA methylation mutations using single methylation polymorphisms. With computer simulation and empirical data analysis, we compared the Dm test with the original and modified Tajima’s D tests and demonstrated that the Dm test is suitable for detecting selection on epimutations and outperforms original/modified Tajima’s D tests. Due to the higher resetting rate of epimutations, the interpretation of Dm on epimutations and Tajima’s D test on DNA mutations could be different in inferring natural selection. Analyses using simulated and empirical genome-wide polymorphism data suggested that genes under genetic and epigenetic selections behaved differently. We applied the Dm test to recently originated Arabidopsis and human genes, and showed that newly evolved genes contain higher level of rare epialleles, suggesting that epimutation may play a role in origination and evolution of genes and genomes. Overall, we demonstrate the utility of the Dm test to detect whether the loci are under selection regarding DNA methylation. Our analytical metrics and methodology could contribute to our understanding of evolutionary processes of genes and genomes in the field of epigenetics. The Perl script for the “Dm” test is available at http://fanlab.wayne.edu/ (last accessed December 18, 2014). PMID:25539727

  11. Measurement of muon neutrino and antineutrino induced single neutral pion production cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Colin E.

    2011-05-01

    Elucidating the nature of neutrino oscillation continues to be a goal in the vanguard of the efforts of physics experiment. As neutrino oscillation searches seek an increasingly elusive signal, a thorough understanding of the possible backgrounds becomes ever more important. Measurements of neutrino-nucleus interaction cross sections are key to this understanding. Searches for νμ → νe oscillation - a channel that may yield insight into the vanishingly small mixing parameter θ13, CP violation, and the neutrino mass hierarchy - are particularly susceptible to contamination from neutral current single π0 (NC 1π0) production. Unfortunately, the available data concerning NC 1π0 production are limited in scope and statistics. Without satisfactory constraints, theoretical models of NC 1π0 production yield substantially differing predictions in the critical Eν ~ 1 GeV regime. Additional investigation of this interaction can ameliorate the current deficiencies. The Mini Booster Neutrino Experiment (MiniBooNE) is a short-baseline neutrino oscillation search operating at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). While the oscillation search is the principal charge of the MiniBooNE collaboration, the extensive data (~ 106 neutrino events) offer a rich resource with which to conduct neutrino cross section measurements. This work concerns the measurement of both neutrino and antineutrino NC 1π0 production cross sections at MiniBooNE. The size of the event samples used in the analysis exceeds that of all other similar experiments combined by an order of magnitude. We present the first measurements of the absolute NC 1π0 cross section as well as the first differential cross sections in both neutrino and antineutrino mode. Specifically, we measure single differential cross sections with respect to pion momentum and pion angle. We find the

  12. Fabrication of single phase p-CuInSe{sub 2} nanowire arrays by electrodeposited into anodic alumina templates

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Yu-Song; Lang, Hao-Jan; Houng, Mau-Phon

    2015-10-19

    Single-phase CuInSe{sub 2} nanowire (NW) arrays were prepared at various pH values in a heated electrolyte by using pulse electrodeposition techniques and an anodized aluminum oxide template. X-ray diffraction showed that the CuInSe{sub 2} NW nucleation mechanism received H{sup +} constraints when the NWs were deposited at pH 1.7 with a (112) orientation and annealed at 550 °C. The CuInSe{sub 2} NW band gap was determined to be approximately 1 eV through optical measurements. Transmission electron microscopy showed that at the pH value of 1.7, small particles of the single-phase CuInSe{sub 2} NWs aligned along the crystallographic direction are nucleated to form large particles. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the NW diameter and the length were 80 nm and 2.3 μm, respectively. From Mott–Schottky and Ohmic contact plots, the CuInSe{sub 2} NWs were found to be p-type semiconductors, and their work function was estimated to be approximately 4.69 eV.

  13. Fabrication of single phase p-CuInSe2 nanowire arrays by electrodeposited into anodic alumina templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yu-Song; Lang, Hao-Jan; Houng, Mau-Phon

    2015-10-01

    Single-phase CuInSe2 nanowire (NW) arrays were prepared at various pH values in a heated electrolyte by using pulse electrodeposition techniques and an anodized aluminum oxide template. X-ray diffraction showed that the CuInSe2 NW nucleation mechanism received H+ constraints when the NWs were deposited at pH 1.7 with a (112) orientation and annealed at 550 °C. The CuInSe2 NW band gap was determined to be approximately 1 eV through optical measurements. Transmission electron microscopy showed that at the pH value of 1.7, small particles of the single-phase CuInSe2 NWs aligned along the crystallographic direction are nucleated to form large particles. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the NW diameter and the length were 80 nm and 2.3 μm, respectively. From Mott-Schottky and Ohmic contact plots, the CuInSe2 NWs were found to be p-type semiconductors, and their work function was estimated to be approximately 4.69 eV.

  14. Bauxite and alumina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bray, E.L.

    2009-01-01

    The article provides information on bauxite and alumina mining. U.S. states like Alabama, Arkansas and Georgia produced small amounts of bauxite and bauxitic clays for nonmetallurgical uses. Total metallurgical-grade bauxite imports in 2008 is cited. The leading suppliers of bauxite to the U.S. are Jamaica, Guinea and Brazil. The estimated domestic production of alumina in 2008 is mentioned. It also discusses consumption and prices of both bauxite and alumina.

  15. Single photon emission at 1.55 μm from charged and neutral exciton confined in a single quantum dash

    SciTech Connect

    Dusanowski, Ł. Syperek, M.; Mrowiński, P.; Rudno-Rudziński, W.; Misiewicz, J.; Sęk, G.; Somers, A.; Kamp, M.; Höfling, S.; Reithmaier, J. P.

    2014-07-14

    We investigate charged and neutral exciton complexes confined in a single self-assembled InAs/InGaAlAs/InP quantum dash emitting at 1.55 μm. The emission characteristics have been probed by measuring high-spatial-resolution polarization-resolved photoluminescence and cross-correlations of photon emission statistics at T = 5 K. The photon auto-correlation histogram of the emission from both the neutral and charged exciton indicates a clear antibunching dip with as-measured g{sup (2)}(0) values of 0.18 and 0.31, respectively. It proves that these exciton complexes confined in single quantum dashes of InP-based material system can act as true single photon emitters being compatible with standard long-distance fiber communication technology.

  16. Generation of recombinant single-chain antibodies neutralizing the cytolytic activity of vaginolysin, the main virulence factor of Gardnerella vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Pleckaityte, Milda; Mistiniene, Edita; Lasickiene, Rita; Zvirblis, Gintautas; Zvirbliene, Aurelija

    2011-11-03

    Gardnerella vaginalis is identified as the predominant colonist of the vaginal tract in women with bacterial vaginosis. Vaginolysin (VLY) is a protein toxin released by G. vaginalis. VLY possesses cytolytic activity and is considered as a main virulence factor of G. vaginalis. Inhibition of VLY-mediated cell lysis by antibodies may have important physiological relevance. Single-chain variable fragments of immunoglobulins (scFvs) were cloned from two hybridoma cell lines producing neutralizing antibodies against VLY and expressed as active proteins in E. coli. For each hybridoma, two variants of anti-VLY scFv consisting of either VL-VH or VH-VL linked with a 20 aa-long linker sequence (G₄S)₄ were constructed. Recovery of scFvs from inclusion bodies with subsequent purification by metal-chelate chromatography resulted in VLY-binding proteins that were predominantly monomeric. The antigen-binding activity of purified scFvs was verified by an indirect ELISA. The neutralizing activity was investigated by in vitro hemolytic assay and cytolytic assay using HeLa cell line. Calculated apparent Kd values and neutralizing potency of scFvs were in agreement with those of parental full-length antibodies. VH-VL and VL-VH variants of scFvs showed similar affinity and neutralizing potency. The anti-VLY scFvs derived from hybridoma clone 9B4 exhibited high VLY-neutralizing activity both on human erythrocytes and cervical epithelial HeLa cells. Hybridoma-derived scFvs with VLY-binding activity were expressed in E. coli. Recombinant anti-VLY scFvs inhibited VLY-mediated cell lysis. The monovalent scFvs showed reduced affinity and neutralizing potency as compared to the respective full-length antibodies. The loss of avidity could be restored by generating scFv constructs with multivalent binding properties. Generated scFvs is the first example of recombinant single-chain antibodies with VLY-neutralizing activity produced in prokaryote expression system. G. vaginalis caused

  17. New laboratory atomic data for neutral, singly and doubly ionised iron group elements for astrophysics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickering, Juliet C.; Nave, Gillian; Liggins, Florence; Clear, Christian; Ruffoni, Matthew; Sansonetti, Craig

    2015-08-01

    We present new laboratory spectroscopic measurements to produce atomic data for astrophysically important species: neutral, singly and doubly ionised iron group elements.We use high resolution Fourier Transform Spectrometry (FTS) (resolving power up to 2x106 at 200nm) to measure atomic spectra, giving accurate line wavelengths (to a few parts in 108), atomic energy levels, hyperfine structure splitting and log gfs (accurate to a few %) (Ruffoni et al this meeting). These data are vital for astrophysical spectral analyses for: line identification, spectrum synthesis, elemental abundance determinations [eg 1], and disentangling of blends etc. It is not possible to theoretically calculate these atomic data to the accuracy needed for modern astrophysics applications.At Imperial College we have a unique visible-VUV FT spectrometer with short wavelength cut-off of 135nm. We supplement FTS data at shorter wavelengths with spectra recorded on the NIST 10.7m grating spectrograph (with phosphor image or photographic plates) and at longer wavelengths in the IR we use the NIST IR FT spectrometer.An elemental spectrum may contain thousands of spectral lines from the IR to VUV. We use these wavelengths to correct known atomic energy levels, and search for new atomic levels. The result is a classified linelist and accurate atomic energy levels.We present progress on iron group element atomic energy levels and wavelengths for V I and V II [2,3], Co III [4], Cr I, Mn I and Mn II, and Ni II.This work is supported by STFC(UK), The Leverhulme Trust, The Royal Society and NASA.References[1] Bergemann M, Pickering JC & Gehren T,“NLTE analysis of Co I/Co II lines in spectra of cool stars with new laboratory hyperfine splitting constants",MNRAS 401(2) 1334 (2010)[2] Thorne AP, Pickering JC & Semeniuk J,“The spectrum and term analysis of V II”, ApJS 207,13 (2013)[3] Thorne AP, Pickering JC & Semeniuk J,“The spectrum and term analysis of V I",ApJS 192,11 (2011)[4] Smillie DG

  18. Measurement of differential cross sections for single neutral pion produced by charged-current interactions in MINERvA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Trung; Minerva Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    MINERvA is a neutrino scattering experiment which uses the intense neutrino beam from the NuMI beam line at FNAL. The detector employs high spatial resolution, is fully active, and designed to study interactions of neutrinos using different nuclei. We present the differential cross sections for single neutral pion produced by charged-current interactions of anti-neutrinos in plastic scintillator. We also compare the differential cross sections to predictions by the GENIE event generator.

  19. Single-size thermometric measurements on a size distribution of neutral fullerenes.

    PubMed

    Cauchy, C; Bakker, J M; Huismans, Y; Rouzée, A; Redlich, B; van der Meer, A F G; Bordas, C; Vrakking, M J J; Lépine, F

    2013-05-10

    We present measurements of the velocity distribution of electrons emitted from mass-selected neutral fullerenes, performed at the intracavity free electron laser FELICE. We make use of mass-specific vibrational resonances in the infrared domain to selectively heat up one out of a distribution of several fullerene species. Efficient energy redistribution leads to decay via thermionic emission. Time-resolved electron kinetic energy distributions measured give information on the decay rate of the selected fullerene. This method is generally applicable to all neutral species that exhibit thermionic emission and provides a unique tool to study the stability of mass-selected neutral clusters and molecules that are only available as part of a size distribution.

  20. Experimental transition probabilities and Stark-broadening parameters of neutral and single ionized tin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, M. H.; Roig, R. A.; Bengtson, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    Strengths and Stark-effect widths of the Sn I and Sn II lines prominent between 3200 and 7900 A are measured with a spectroscopic shock tube. Absolute strengths of 17 ionic lines are obtained with estimated (22-50)% accuracy and conform to appropriate quantum-mechanical sum rules. Relative transition probabilities for nine prominent neutral tin lines, normalized to radiative-lifetime data, are compared with other experiments and theoretical predictions. Parameters for Stark-effect broadening are measured over a range of plasma electron densities. Broadening data (with accuracies of 15-35%) for one neutral and ten ionic lines of tin are compared to theoretical predictions.

  1. Microporous alumina ceramic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Marc A.; Sheng, Guangyao

    1993-01-01

    Several methods are disclosed for the preparation microporous alumina ceramic membranes. For the first time, porous alumina membranes are made which have mean pore sizes less than 100 Angstroms and substantially no pores larger than that size. The methods are based on improved sol-gel techniques.

  2. Microporous alumina ceramic membranes

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, M.A.; Guangyao Sheng.

    1993-05-04

    Several methods are disclosed for the preparation microporous alumina ceramic membranes. For the first time, porous alumina membranes are made which have mean pore sizes less than 100 Angstroms and substantially no pores larger than that size. The methods are based on improved sol-gel techniques.

  3. Neutralization of Clostridium difficile Toxin A with Single-domain Antibodies Targeting the Cell Receptor Binding Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Hussack, Greg; Arbabi-Ghahroudi, Mehdi; van Faassen, Henk; Songer, J. Glenn; Ng, Kenneth K.-S.; MacKenzie, Roger; Tanha, Jamshid

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a leading cause of nosocomial infection in North America and a considerable challenge to healthcare professionals in hospitals and nursing homes. The Gram-positive bacterium produces two high molecular weight exotoxins, toxin A (TcdA) and toxin B (TcdB), which are the major virulence factors responsible for C. difficile-associated disease and are targets for C. difficile-associated disease therapy. Here, recombinant single-domain antibody fragments (VHHs), which specifically target the cell receptor binding domains of TcdA or TcdB, were isolated from an immune llama phage display library and characterized. Four VHHs (A4.2, A5.1, A20.1, and A26.8), all shown to recognize conformational epitopes, were potent neutralizers of the cytopathic effects of toxin A on fibroblast cells in an in vitro assay. The neutralizing potency was further enhanced when VHHs were administered in paired or triplet combinations at the same overall VHH concentration, suggesting recognition of nonoverlapping TcdA epitopes. Biacore epitope mapping experiments revealed that some synergistic combinations consisted of VHHs recognizing overlapping epitopes, an indication that factors other than mere epitope blocking are responsible for the increased neutralization. Further binding assays revealed TcdA-specific VHHs neutralized toxin A by binding to sites other than the carbohydrate binding pocket of the toxin. With favorable characteristics such as high production yield, potent toxin neutralization, and intrinsic stability, these VHHs are attractive systemic therapeutics but are more so as oral therapeutics in the destabilizing environment of the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:21216961

  4. Neutralization of Clostridium difficile Toxin B Mediated by Engineered Lactobacilli That Produce Single-Domain Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Kasper Krogh; Strokappe, Nika M.; Hultberg, Anna; Truusalu, Kai; Smidt, Imbi; Mikelsaar, Raik-Hiio; Mikelsaar, Marika; Verrips, Theo; Hammarström, Lennart

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the primary cause of nosocomial antibiotic-associated diarrhea in the Western world. The major virulence factors of C. difficile are two exotoxins, toxin A (TcdA) and toxin B (TcdB), which cause extensive colonic inflammation and epithelial damage manifested by episodes of diarrhea. In this study, we explored the basis for an oral antitoxin strategy based on engineered Lactobacillus strains expressing TcdB-neutralizing antibody fragments in the gastrointestinal tract. Variable domain of heavy chain-only (VHH) antibodies were raised in llamas by immunization with the complete TcdB toxin. Four unique VHH fragments neutralizing TcdB in vitro were isolated. When these VHH fragments were expressed in either secreted or cell wall-anchored form in Lactobacillus paracasei BL23, they were able to neutralize the cytotoxic effect of the toxin in an in vitro cell-based assay. Prophylactic treatment with a combination of two strains of engineered L. paracasei BL23 expressing two neutralizing anti-TcdB VHH fragments (VHH-B2 and VHH-G3) delayed killing in a hamster protection model where the animals were challenged with spores of a TcdA− TcdB+ strain of C. difficile (P < 0.05). Half of the hamsters in the treated group survived until the termination of the experiment at day 5 and showed either no damage or limited inflammation of the colonic mucosa despite having been colonized with C. difficile for up to 4 days. The protective effect in the hamster model suggests that the strategy could be explored as a supplement to existing therapies for patients. PMID:26573738

  5. Hypervelocity impact damage in alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cheng

    2007-12-01

    Ceramics are important engineering materials for their outstanding hardness. One of the most widely used ceramics is alumina, a candidate for armor in defense and aerospace industry. Deformation and fracture mechanisms in alpha-alumina under hypervelocity impact up to 18km/s are investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations containing 540-million atoms. Impacting projectile causes melting and local amorphization of the substrate in a spherical surrounding region. Away from the impact face, a wide range of deformations emerge and disappear under the influence of local stress fields, e.g., basal and pyramidal slips, basal and rhombohedral twins, which show good agreement with the experimental and theoretical results. Furthermore, new deformation modes such as twin along {01¯11} are observed, and the relation between deformation patterns and local stress levels are probed. During unloading, micro-cracks nucleate extensively at the intersections of previous deformations. These micro-cracks grow and coalesce to form fractures under tensile stresses by the unloading wave. The substrate eventually fails along the surface of an hourglass-shaped region, when spallation ejects clusters of substrate material into the vacuum. We also carried out planar shock simulations of alpha-alumina single crystal and nanophase systems. The results show correlations between the atomistic deformation mechanisms and the elastic-plastic response of ceramic material observed in shock loading experiments.

  6. Reuse of activated alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Hobensack, J.E.

    1991-12-31

    Activated alumina is used as a trapping media to remove trace quantities of UF{sub 6} from process vent streams. The current uranium recovery method employs concentrated nitric acid which destroys the alumina pellets and forms a sludge which is a storage and disposal problem. A recently developed technique using a distilled water rinse followed by three dilute acid rinses removes on average 97% of the uranium, and leaves the pellets intact with crush strength and surface area values comparable with new material. Trapping tests confirm the effectiveness of the recycled alumina as UF{sub 6} trapping media.

  7. Neutralization of influenza A viruses by insertion of a single antibody loop into the receptor binding site

    PubMed Central

    Ekiert, Damian C.; Kashyap, Arun K.; Steel, John; Rubrum, Adam; Bhabha, Gira; Khayat, Reza; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Dillon, Michael A.; O’Neil, Ryann E.; Faynboym, Aleksandr M.; Horowitz, Michael; Horowitz, Lawrence; Ward, Andrew B.; Palese, Peter; Webby, Richard; Lerner, Richard A.; Bhatt, Ramesh R.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Immune recognition of protein antigens relies upon the combined interaction of multiple antibody loops, which provides a fairly large footprint and constrains the size and shape of protein surfaces that can be targeted. Single protein loops can mediate extremely high affinity binding, but it is unclear whether such a mechanism is available to antibodies. Here we report the isolation and characterization of antibody C05 that neutralizes strains from multiple subtypes of influenza A viruses, including H1, H2, and H3. Crystal and EM structures show that C5 recognizes conserved elements of the receptor binding site on the hemagglutinin (HA) surface glycoprotein. Recognition of the HA receptor binding site is dominated by a single HCDR3 loop, with minor contacts from HCDR1, and is sufficient to achieve nanomolar binding with a minimal footprint. Thus, binding predominantly with a single loop can allow antibodies to target small, conserved, functional sites on otherwise hypervariable antigens. PMID:22982990

  8. Measurement of single π0 production by coherent neutral-current ν Fe interactions in the MINOS Near Detector

    DOE PAGES

    Adamson, P.; Anghel, I.; Aurisano, A.; ...

    2016-10-26

    Forward single π0 production by coherent neutral-current interactions, νA→νAπ0, is investigated using a 2.8×1020 protons-on-target exposure of the MINOS Near Detector. For single-shower topologies, the event distribution in production angle exhibits a clear excess above the estimated background at very forward angles for visible energy in the range 1–8 GeV. Cross sections are obtained for the detector medium comprised of 80% iron and 20% carbon nuclei withmore » $$\\langle$$A$$\\rangle$$=48, the highest-$$\\langle$$A$$\\rangle$$ target used to date in the study of this coherent reaction. In conclusion, the total cross section for coherent neutral-current single π0 production initiated by the νμ flux of the NuMI low-energy beam with mean (mode) Eν of 4.9 GeV (3.0 GeV), is 77.6±5.0(stat)$$+15.0\\atop{-16.8}$$(syst)×10-40 cm2 pernucleus. Finally, the results are in good agreement with predictions of the Berger-Sehgal model.« less

  9. Measurement of single π0 production by coherent neutral-current ν Fe interactions in the MINOS Near Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamson, P.; Anghel, I.; Aurisano, A.; Barr, G.; Bishai, M.; Blake, A.; Bock, G. J.; Bogert, D.; Cao, S. V.; Carroll, T. J.; Castromonte, C. M.; Chen, R.; Cherdack, D.; Childress, S.; Coelho, J. A. B.; Corwin, L.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; de Jong, J. K.; de Rijck, S.; Devan, A. V.; Devenish, N. E.; Diwan, M. V.; Escobar, C. O.; Evans, J. J.; Falk, E.; Feldman, G. J.; Flanagan, W.; Frohne, M. V.; Gabrielyan, M.; Gallagher, H. R.; Germani, S.; Gomes, R. A.; Goodman, M. C.; Gouffon, P.; Graf, N.; Gran, R.; Grzelak, K.; Habig, A.; Hahn, S. R.; Hartnell, J.; Hatcher, R.; Holin, A.; Huang, J.; Hylen, J.; Irwin, G. M.; Isvan, Z.; James, C.; Jensen, D.; Kafka, T.; Kasahara, S. M. S.; Koizumi, G.; Kordosky, M.; Kreymer, A.; Lang, K.; Ling, J.; Litchfield, P. J.; Lucas, P.; Mann, W. A.; Marshak, M. L.; Mayer, N.; McGivern, C.; Medeiros, M. M.; Mehdiyev, R.; Meier, J. R.; Messier, M. D.; Miller, W. H.; Mishra, S. R.; Moed Sher, S.; Moore, C. D.; Mualem, L.; Musser, J.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Newman, H. B.; Nichol, R. J.; Nowak, J. A.; O'Connor, J.; Oliver, W. P.; Orchanian, M.; Pahlka, R. B.; Paley, J.; Patterson, R. B.; Pawloski, G.; Perch, A.; Pfützner, M. M.; Phan, D. D.; Phan-Budd, S.; Plunkett, R. K.; Poonthottathil, N.; Qiu, X.; Radovic, A.; Rebel, B.; Rosenfeld, C.; Rubin, H. A.; Sail, P.; Sanchez, M. C.; Schneps, J.; Schreckenberger, A.; Schreiner, P.; Sharma, R.; Sousa, A.; Tagg, N.; Talaga, R. L.; Thomas, J.; Thomson, M. A.; Tian, X.; Timmons, A.; Todd, J.; Tognini, S. C.; Toner, R.; Torretta, D.; Tzanakos, G.; Urheim, J.; Vahle, P.; Viren, B.; Weber, A.; Webb, R. C.; White, C.; Whitehead, L.; Whitehead, L. H.; Wojcicki, S. G.; Zwaska, R.; Minos Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    Forward single π0 production by coherent neutral-current interactions, ν A →ν A π0, is investigated using a 2.8 ×1 020 protons-on-target exposure of the MINOS Near Detector. For single-shower topologies, the event distribution in production angle exhibits a clear excess above the estimated background at very forward angles for visible energy in the range 1-8 GeV. Cross sections are obtained for the detector medium comprised of 80% iron and 20% carbon nuclei with ⟨A ⟩=48 , the highest-⟨A ⟩ target used to date in the study of this coherent reaction. The total cross section for coherent neutral-current single π0 production initiated by the νμ flux of the NuMI low-energy beam with mean (mode) Eν of 4.9 GeV (3.0 GeV), is 77.6 ±5.0 (stat )-16.8+15.0(syst )×10-40 cm2 per nucleus . The results are in good agreement with predictions of the Berger-Sehgal model.

  10. Measurement of single π0 production by coherent neutral-current ν Fe interactions in the MINOS Near Detector

    DOE PAGES

    Adamson, P.; Anghel, I.; Aurisano, A.; ...

    2016-10-26

    Forward single π0 production by coherent neutral-current interactions, νA→νAπ0, is investigated using a 2.8×1020 protons-on-target exposure of the MINOS Near Detector. For single-shower topologies, the event distribution in production angle exhibits a clear excess above the estimated background at very forward angles for visible energy in the range 1–8 GeV. Cross sections are obtained for the detector medium comprised of 80% iron and 20% carbon nuclei withmore » $$\\langle$$A$$\\rangle$$=48, the highest-$$\\langle$$A$$\\rangle$$ target used to date in the study of this coherent reaction. In conclusion, the total cross section for coherent neutral-current single π0 production initiated by the νμ flux of the NuMI low-energy beam with mean (mode) Eν of 4.9 GeV (3.0 GeV), is 77.6±5.0(stat)$$+15.0\\atop{-16.8}$$(syst)×10-40 cm2 pernucleus. The results are in good agreement with predictions of the Berger-Sehgal model.« less

  11. Transition probabilities and Stark-broadening parameters of neutral and singly ionized lead

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, M. H.; Bengston, R. D.; Lindsay, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    Strengths and Stark widths of the prominent visible PbI and PbII lines are measured in emission by means of a gas-driven shock tube. Absolute ionic line strengths for 7s-7p and 7p-7d arrays conform well to quantum-mechanical sum rules and agree with theoretical predictions, but 6d-5f results differ markedly from central-field approximations. Neutral-line strengths agree satisfactorily with available comparison data. Semiempirical theory predicts the widths of PbII lines with characteristic reliability of better than 25%.

  12. Neutral, single-component nickel (II) polyolefin catalysts that tolerate heteroatoms

    PubMed

    Younkin; Connor; Henderson; Friedrich; Grubbs; Bansleben

    2000-01-21

    More than half of the 170 million metric tons of polymers produced each year are polyolefins. Current technology uses highly active cationic catalysts, which suffer from an inability to tolerate heteroatoms such as oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur. These systems require scrupulously clean starting materials and activating cocatalysts. A family of catalysts has been developed whose members are tolerant of both heteroatoms and less pure starting materials. These heteroatom-tolerant neutral late transition metal complexes are in fact highly active systems that produce high-molecular-weight polyethylene, polymerize functionalized olefins, and require no cocatalyst.

  13. The interaction of 193-nm excimer laser irradiation with single-crystal zinc oxide: Neutral atomic zinc and oxygen emission

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, E. H.; Langford, S. C.; Dickinson, J. T.; Boatner, Lynn A

    2013-01-01

    We report mass-resolved time-of-flight measurements of neutral particles from the surface of single-crystal ZnO during pulsed 193-nm irradiation at laser fluences below the threshold for avalanche breakdown. The major species emitted are atomic Zn and O. We examine the emissions of atomic Zn as a function of laser fluence and laser exposure. Defects at the ZnO surface appear necessary for the detection of these emissions. Our results suggest that the production of defects is necessary to explain intense sustained emissions at higher fluence. Rapid, clean surface etching and high atomic zinc kinetic energies seen at higher laser fluences are also discussed.

  14. Expression of an anti-botulinum toxin A neutralizing single-chain Fv recombinant antibody in transgenic tobacco.

    PubMed

    Almquist, Kurt C; McLean, Michael D; Niu, Yongqing; Byrne, Greg; Olea-Popelka, Fernando C; Murrant, Coral; Barclay, Jack; Hall, J Christopher

    2006-03-15

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most poisonous substances known and are thus classified as high-risk threats for use as bioterror agents. To examine the potential of transgenic plants as bioreactors for the production of BoNT antidotes, we transformed tobacco with an optimized, synthetic gene encoding a botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) neutralizing single-chain Fv (scFv) recombinant antibody fragment. In vitro mouse muscle twitch assays demonstrated the functional utility of this scFv extracted from tobacco for neutralizing the paralytic effects of BoNT/A at neuromuscular junctions. Based on the efficiency of the scFv capture process and the dose required to antidote a human being, 1-2 ha of this tobacco could yield up to 4 kg of scFv, which would be enough to contribute to the manufacture of 1,000,000 therapeutic doses of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) cocktail capable of neutralizing the effects of BoNT poisoning. Transgenic plants could provide an inexpensive production platform for expression of multiple mAbs toward the creation of polyclonal therapies (i.e. pooled mAbs) as the next improvement in recombinant antibody therapy.

  15. Bauxite and alumina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bray, E.L.

    2011-01-01

    The article discusses the latest developments in the bauxite and alumina industry, particularly in the U.S., as of June 2011. It claims that the U.S. mainly relies on imports for its bauxite consumption. Several states, including Alabama, Arkansas and Georgia, however, produce small amounts of bauxite and bauxitic clays for nonmetallurgical purposes. The major exporters of alumina to the U.S. include Australia, Brazil and Jamaica.

  16. Alumina fiber strength improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, R. T.; Nelson, D. C.

    1982-01-01

    The effective fiber strength of alumina fibers in an aluminum composite was increased to 173,000 psi. A high temperature heat treatment, combined with a glassy carbon surface coating, was used to prevent degradation and improve fiber tensile strength. Attempts to achieve chemical strengthening of the alumina fiber by chromium oxide and boron oxide coatings proved unsuccessful. A major problem encountered on the program was the low and inconsistent strength of the Dupont Fiber FP used for the investigation.

  17. Single neutral pion production by charged-current νbarμ interactions on hydrocarbon at = 3.6 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, T.; Palomino, J. L.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; Bercellie, A.; Bodek, A.; Bravar, A.; Brooks, W. K.; Butkevich, A.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; Carneiro, M. F.; Christy, M. E.; Chvojka, J.; da Motta, H.; Devan, J.; Dytman, S. A.; Díaz, G. A.; Eberly, B.; Felix, J.; Fields, L.; Fine, R.; Gago, A. M.; Gallagher, H.; Gran, R.; Harris, D. A.; Higuera, A.; Hurtado, K.; Kordosky, M.; Maher, E.; Manly, S.; Mann, W. A.; Marshall, C. M.; McFarland, K. S.; McGivern, C. L.; McGowan, A. M.; Miller, J.; Morfín, J. G.; Mousseau, J.; Nelson, J. K.; Norrick, A.; Osta, J.; Paolone, V.; Park, J.; Patrick, C. E.; Perdue, G. N.; Rakotondravohitra, L.; Ransome, R. D.; Ray, H.; Ren, L.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Ruterbories, D.; Schellman, H.; Schmitz, D. W.; Sobczyk, J. T.; Solano Salinas, C. J.; Tagg, N.; Tice, B. G.; Valencia, E.; Walton, T.; Wolcott, J.; Yepes-Ramirez, H.; Zavala, G.; Zhang, D.; Ziemer, B. P.

    2015-10-01

    Single neutral pion production via muon antineutrino charged-current interactions in plastic scintillator (CH) is studied using the MINERvA detector exposed to the NuMI low-energy, wideband antineutrino beam at Fermilab. Measurement of this process constrains models of neutral pion production in nuclei, which is important because the neutral-current analog is a background for νbare appearance oscillation experiments. The differential cross sections for π0 momentum and production angle, for events with a single observed π0 and no charged pions, are presented and compared to model predictions. These results comprise the first measurement of the π0 kinematics for this process.

  18. Single photon production induced by (anti)neutrino neutral current scattering on nucleons and nuclear targets

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez-Ruso, L.; Nieves, J.; Wang, E.

    2015-10-15

    We review our theoretical approach to neutral current photon emission on nucleons and nuclei in the few-GeV energy region, relevant for neutrino oscillation experiments. These reactions are dominated by the weak excitation of the Δ(1232) resonance but there are also important non-resonant contributions. We have also included terms mediated by nucleon excitations from the second resonance region. On nuclei, Pauli blocking, Fermi motion and the in-medium Δ resonance broadening have been taken into account for both incoherent and coherent reaction channels. With this model, the number and distributions of photon events at the MiniBooNE and T2K experiments have been obtained. We have also compared to the NOMAD upper limit at higher energies. The implications of our findings and future perspectives are discussed.

  19. A new approach to the linear theory of single-species tearing in two-dimensional quasi-neutral sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brittnacher, M.; Quest, K. B.; Karimabadi, H.

    1995-01-01

    We have developed the linear theory of collisionless ion tearing in a two-dimensional magnetotail equilibrium for a single resonant species. We have solved the normal mode problem for tearing instability by an algorithm that employs particle-in-cell simulation to calculate the orbit integrals in the Maxwell-Vlasov eigenmode equation. The results of our single-species tearing analysis can be applied to ion tearing where electron effects are not included. We have calculated the tearing growth rate as a function of the magnetic field component B(sub n) normal to the current sheet for thick and thin current sheets, and we show that marginal stability occurs when the normal gyrofrequency Omega(sub n) is comparable to the Harris neutral sheet growth rate. A cross-tail B(sub y) component has little effect on the growth rate for B(sub y) approximately = B(sub n). Even in the limit B(sub y) much greater than B(sub n), the mode is strongly stabilized by B(sub n). We report than random pitch angle scattering can overcome the stabilizing effect of B(sub n) and drive the growth rate up toward the Harris neutral sheet (B(sub n) = 0) value when the pitch angle diffusion rate is comparable to Omega(sub n).

  20. A new approach to the linear theory of single-species tearing in two-dimensional quasi-neutral sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brittnacher, M.; Quest, K. B.; Karimabadi, H.

    1995-01-01

    We have developed the linear theory of collisionless ion tearing in a two-dimensional magnetotail equilibrium for a single resonant species. We have solved the normal mode problem for tearing instability by an algorithm that employs particle-in-cell simulation to calculate the orbit integrals in the Maxwell-Vlasov eigenmode equation. The results of our single-species tearing analysis can be applied to ion tearing where electron effects are not included. We have calculated the tearing growth rate as a function of the magnetic field component B(sub n) normal to the current sheet for thick and thin current sheets, and we show that marginal stability occurs when the normal gyrofrequency Omega(sub n) is comparable to the Harris neutral sheet growth rate. A cross-tail B(sub y) component has little effect on the growth rate for B(sub y) approximately = B(sub n). Even in the limit B(sub y) much greater than B(sub n), the mode is strongly stabilized by B(sub n). We report than random pitch angle scattering can overcome the stabilizing effect of B(sub n) and drive the growth rate up toward the Harris neutral sheet (B(sub n) = 0) value when the pitch angle diffusion rate is comparable to Omega(sub n).

  1. Genotypic Differences in Dengue Virus Neutralization Are Explained by a Single Amino Acid Mutation That Modulates Virus Breathing.

    PubMed

    Dowd, Kimberly A; DeMaso, Christina R; Pierson, Theodore C

    2015-11-03

    Flaviviruses sample an ensemble of virion conformations resulting from the conformational flexibility of their structural proteins. To investigate how sequence variation among strains impacts virus breathing, we performed studies with the monoclonal antibody (MAb) E111, which binds an inaccessible domain III envelope (E) protein epitope of dengue virus serotype 1 (DENV1). Prior studies indicated that an observed ~200-fold difference in neutralization between the DENV1 strains Western Pacific-74 (West Pac-74) and 16007 could not be explained by differences in the affinity of MAb E111 for each strain. Through neutralization studies with wild-type and variant viruses carrying genes encoding reciprocal mutations at all 13 amino acid differences between the E proteins of West Pac-74 and 16007, we found that E111 neutralization susceptibility mapped solely to the presence of a lysine or arginine at E domain II residue 204, located distally from the E111 epitope. This same residue correlated with neutralization differences observed for MAbs specific for epitopes distinct from E111, suggesting that this amino acid dictates changes in the conformational ensembles sampled by the virus. Furthermore, an observed twofold difference in the stability of infectious West Pac-74 versus 16007 in solution also mapped to E residue 204. Our results demonstrate that neutralization susceptibility can be altered in an epitope-independent manner by natural strain variation that influences the structures sampled by DENV. That different conformational ensembles of flaviviruses may affect the landscape available for antibody binding, as well as virus stability, has important implications for functional studies of antibody potency, a critical aspect of vaccine development. The global burden of dengue virus (DENV) is growing, with recent estimates of ~390 million human infections each year. Antibodies play a crucial role in protection from DENV infection, and vaccines that elicit a robust

  2. Efficient loading of a single neutral atom into an optical microscopic tweezer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jun; Liu, Bei; Diao, Wen-Ting; Wang, Jie-Ying; Jin, Gang; Wang, Jun-Min

    2015-04-01

    A single atom in a magneto-optical trap (MOT) with trap size (hundreds of micrometers) can be transferred into an optical microscopic tweezer with a probability of ~ 100%. The ability to transfer a single atom into two traps back and forth allows us to study the loading process. The loading probability is found to be insensitive to the geometric overlap of the MOT and the tweezer. It is therefore possible to perform simultaneously loading of a single atom into all sites of the tweezer array for many qubits. In particular, we present a simulation of the one-dimensional and two-dimensional arrays of an optical microscopic tweezer. We find the same qualitative behavior for all of the trap parameters. Project supported by the National Major Scientific Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB921601) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61205215, 11274213, and 61475091).

  3. Kondo effect in a neutral and stable all organic radical single molecule break junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burzuri, Enrique; Gaudenzi, Rocco; Frisenda, Riccardo; Franco, Carlos; Mas-Torrent, Marta; Rovira, Concepcio; Veciana, Jaume; Alcon, Isaac; Bromley, Stefan T.; van der Zant, Herre S. J.

    Organic radicals are neutral, purely organic molecules exhibiting an intrinsic magnetic moment due to the presence of an unpaired electron in the molecule in its ground state. This property, added to the low spin-orbit coupling makes organic radicals good candidates for molecular spintronics insofar as the radical character is stable in solid state electronic devices. We show that the paramagnetism of the PTM radical molecule, in the shape of a Kondo anomaly is preserved in two- and three-terminal solid-state devices, regardless of mechanical and electrostatic changes. Indeed, our results demonstrate that the Kondo anomaly is robust under electrodes displacement and changes of the electrostatic environment, pointing to a localized orbital in the radical as the source of magnetism. Strong support to this picture is provided by density functional calculations and measurements of the corresponding nonradical specie. We further study polyradical systems, where several unpaired spins interact in the same molecule. This work was supported by the EU FP7 program through project 618082 ACMOL and ERC grant advanced Mols@Mols. It was also supported by the Dutch funding organization NWO (VENI).

  4. Combining red and blue-detuned optical potentials to form a Lamb-Dicke trap for a single neutral atom.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaodong; Yu, Shi; Xu, Peng; Wang, Jin; Zhan, Mingsheng

    2012-02-13

    We propose and demonstrate a scheme for strong radial confinement of a single 87 Rb atom by a bichromatic far-off resonance optical dipole trap (BFORT). The BFORT is composed of a blue-detuned Laguerre-Gaussian LG01 beam and a red-detuned Gaussian beam. The atomic oscillation frequency measurement shows that the effective trapping dimension is much sharper than that from a diffraction-limited microscopic objective. Theory shows that the added scattering rate due to imposing blue-detuned light is negligible when the temperature of the single atoms is close to ground state temperature. By carrying out sub-Doppler cooling, the mean energy of single atoms trapped in the BFORT is reduced to 15 ± 1 μK. The corresponding mean quantum number of radial vibration n is about 1.65, which satisfies the Lamb-Dicke regime. We conclude that the BFORT is a suitable Lamb-Dicke trap for further cooling a single neutral atom down to the ground state and for further application in quantum information processing.

  5. Alumina-on-alumina total hip arthroplasty. A five-year minimum follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jeong Joon; Kim, Young-Min; Yoon, Kang Sup; Koo, Kyung-Hoi; Song, Won Seok; Kim, Hee Joong

    2005-03-01

    Ceramic-on-ceramic couplings are attractive alternative bearing surfaces that have been reported to eliminate or reduce problems related to polyethylene wear debris. Disappointing experiences with alumina ceramic bearings in the past have led to many improvements in the manufacture and design of ceramic implants. The purpose of the present study was to report the results of contemporary alumina-on-alumina total hip arthroplasties with regard to wear, osteolysis, and fracture of the ceramic after a minimum duration of follow-up of five years. We evaluated the results of a consecutive series of 100 primary alumina-on-alumina total hip arthroplasties that had been performed with use of a metal-backed socket and a cementless stem in eighty-four patients. All of the patients were sixty-five years of age or younger (mean age, forty-one years), and a single surgeon performed all of the procedures. After a minimum duration of follow-up of sixty months, one patient (one hip) had died and four patients (six hips) had been lost to follow-up, leaving a total of seventy-nine patients (ninety-three hips) available for study. All of these patients were evaluated clinically and radiographically with special attention to wear, periprosthetic osteolysis, and ceramic failure. The mean Harris hip score was 97 points at the time of the latest follow-up evaluation. All prostheses demonstrated radiographic evidence of bone ingrowth. No implant was loose radiographically, and no implant was revised. Ceramic wear was not detectable in the thirty-seven hips in which the femoral head could be differentiated from the cup on radiographs. Periprosthetic osteolysis was not observed in any hip. A fracture of the alumina femoral head and a peripheral chip fracture of the alumina insert occurred in one hip following a motor-vehicle accident. The results of contemporary alumina-on-alumina total hip arthroplasty with a metal-backed socket and a cementless stem were encouraging after a minimum

  6. Neutralization Analysis of a Chicken Single-Chain Variable Fragment Derived from an Immune Antibody Library Against Infectious Bronchitis Virus.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuan; Li, Benqiang; Ye, Jiaxin; Wang, Man; Wang, Jianhua; Zhang, Ying; Zhu, Jianguo

    2015-09-01

    Avian infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), which is prevalent in many countries causing severe economic loss to the poultry industry, causes infectious bronchitis (IB) in birds. Recombinant single-chain variable fragments (scFvs) have been proven to effectively inhibit many viruses, both in vitro and in vivo, and they could be a potential diagnostic and therapeutic reagent to control IB. In this study, six anti-IBV chicken scFvs, ZL.10, ZL.64, ZL.78, ZL.80, ZL.138, and ZL.256, were obtained by screening random clones from an immune antibody library. An analysis of nucleotide sequences revealed that they represented distinctive genetic sequences and greatly varied in complementarity-determining region three of the heavy chain. Neutralization tests showed that ZL.10, which bound the S1 protein in western blots, inhibited the formation of syncytia in Vero cells 48 h post IBV infection and decreased the transcriptional level of nucleoprotein mRNA to 17.2%, while the other five scFvs, including ZL.78 and ZL.256, that bound the N protein did not. In conclusion, the results suggested that specific and neutralizing chicken scFvs against IBV, which can be safe and economical antibody reagents, can be produced in vitro through prokaryotic expression.

  7. Search for production of single top quarks via tcg and tug flavor-changing-neutral-current couplings.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Assis Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barnes, C; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Binder, M; Biscarat, C; Blackler, I; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Busato, E; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Claes, D; Clément, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Cox, B; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, B; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, P; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doidge, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Hansson, P; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jenkins, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J M; Kalk, J R; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kasper, P; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Koubarovsky, A; Kozelov, A V; Krop, D; Kryemadhi, A; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lesne, V; Leveque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lynker, M; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Michaut, M; Miettinen, H; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Monk, J; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Noeding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Oguri, V; Oliveira, N; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero Y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Perea, P M; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Pompos, A; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rangel, M S; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schmitt, C; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Sengupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Siccardi, V; Sidwell, R A; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Smith, R P; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Trefzger, T; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; van Eijk, B; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vlimant, J-R; Von Toerne, E; Voutilainen, M; Vreeswijk, M; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Weerts, H; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, C; Yu, J; Yurkewicz, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2007-11-09

    We search for the production of single top quarks via flavor-changing-neutral-current couplings of a gluon to the top quark and a charm (c) or up (u) quark. We analyze 230 pb{-1} of lepton+jets data from pp[over] collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We observe no significant deviation from standard model predictions, and hence set upper limits on the anomalous coupling parameters kappa{g}{c}/Lambda and kappa{g}{u}/Lambda, where kappa{g} define the strength of tcg and tug couplings, and Lambda defines the scale of new physics. The limits at 95% C.L. are kappa{g}{c}/Lambda<0.15 TeV-1 and kappa{g}{u}/Lambda<0.037 TeV-1.

  8. Role of metal oxides in chemical evolution: interaction of ribose nucleotides with alumina.

    PubMed

    Arora, Avnish Kumar; Kamaluddin

    2009-03-01

    Interaction of ribonucleotides--namely, 5'-AMP, 5'-GMP, 5'-CMP, and 5'-UMP--with acidic, neutral, and basic alumina has been studied. Purine nucleotides showed higher adsorption on alumina in comparison with pyrimidine nucleotides under acidic conditions. Adsorption data obtained followed Langmuir adsorption isotherm, and X(m) and K(L) values were calculated. On the basis of infrared spectral studies of ribonucleotides, alumina, and ribonucleotide-alumina adducts, we propose that the nitrogen base and phosphate moiety of the ribonucleotides interact with the positive charge surface of alumina. Results of the present study may indicate the importance of alumina in concentrating organic molecules from dilute aqueous solutions in primeval seas in the course of chemical evolution on Earth.

  9. Preparation of Alumina Nanorods from Chromium-Containing Alumina Sludge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuan; Deng, Bin; Sun, Tong; Li, Wei; Duan, Chang-ping

    2017-06-01

    Alumina nanorods were prepared from chromium-containing alumina sludge, and the effects of doping elements, such as Cr, Fe, and Mg, were researched. The results show that the crystal transformation of alumina is restricted by the doped Cr and facilitated by the doped Fe and Mg, which is transformed from θ-Al2O3 to α-Al2O3 in the calcination process. Meanwhile, the crystal transformation of alumina is strongly restrained by co-doped elements from the chromium-containing alumina sludge. The doped elements change the course of phase structure transformation and slightly transform the chemical bond of the alumina nanorods. The impure elements are doped in the alumina crystal and restrain the crystalline growth of alumina nanorods according to the rules. In the sample prepared from chromium-containing alumina sludge, more Cr and Mg but fewer Fe are doped, and most Cr are existed as Cr(III). It is possible that the Fe-doping is confined by the competition of Cr and Mg. Moreover, the lattice imperfection of alumina is caused by doped ions, such as Cr, Fe, and Mg, and the chemical state of O and Al are affected. The findings by these experiments provide essential information for eliminating pollution and promoting comprehensive utilization of the chromium-containing alumina sludge.

  10. Bauxite and alumina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bray, E.L.

    2010-01-01

    The article reports on the global market performance of bauxite and alumina in 2009 and presents an outlook for their 2010 performance. There were only several U.S. states that could produce bauxite and bauxitic clays including Georgia, Arkansas, and Alabama. The prices for imported refractory-grade calcined bauxite ranged between 426 U.S. dollars and 554 dollars per ton.

  11. Alumina Technology Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2002-02-01

    The Alumina Technology Roadmap outlines a comprehensive long-term research and development plan that defines the industry's collective future and establishes a clear pathway forward. It emphasizes twelve high-priority R&D areas deemed most significant in addressing the strategic goals.

  12. Prediction of alumina penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, D A

    1993-02-01

    The MESA hydrocode was used to predict two-dimensional tests of L/D 10 and L/D 15 tungsten rods impacting AD 90 alumina with a steel backing. The residual penetration into the steel is the measured quantity in these experiments conducted at the Southwest Research Institute (SWR). The interface velocity as a function of time between an alumina target and a lithium fluoride window, impacted by an alumina disk at velocities between 544 m/s and 2329 m/s, was also predicted. These one-dimensional flyer plate experiments were conducted at Sandia National Laboratories using Coors AD 995 alumina. The material strength and fracture models are important in the prediction of ceramic experiments. The models used in these predictions are discussed. The penetrations in the two-dimensional tests were predicted to 11.4 percent or better. In five of the six experiments, the predicted penetration depth was deeper than the measured value. This trend is expected since the calculation is based on ideal conditions. The results show that good agreement between the 1-D flyer plate data and the MESA predictions exists at the lower impact velocities, but the maximum velocity is overpredicted as the flyer plate velocity increases. At a flyer plate velocity of 2329 m/s the code overpredicted the data by 12.3 percent.

  13. Solid Lubricant For Alumina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher; Pepper, Stephen V.; Honecy, Frank S.

    1993-01-01

    Outer layer of silver lubricates, while intermediate layer of titanium ensures adhesion. Lubricating outer films of silver deposited on thin intermediate films of titanium on alumina substrates found to reduce sliding friction and wear. Films provide effective lubrication for ceramic seals, bearings, and other hot sliding components in advanced high-temperature engines.

  14. Cross-Neutralization Activity of Single-Chain Variable Fragment (scFv) Derived from Anti-V3 Monoclonal Antibodies Mediated by Post-Attachment Binding.

    PubMed

    Maruta, Yasuhiro; Kuwata, Takeo; Tanaka, Kazuki; Alam, Muntasir; Valdez, Kristel Paola Ramirez; Egami, Yoshika; Suwa, Yoshiaki; Morioka, Hiroshi; Matsushita, Shuzo

    2016-09-21

    The V3 loop in the envelope (Env) of HIV-1 is one of the major targets of neutralizing antibodies. However, this antigen is hidden inside the Env trimer in most isolates and is fully exposed only during CD4-gp120 interaction. Thus, primary HIV-1 isolates are relatively resistant to anti-V3 antibodies because IgG is too large to access the V3 loop. To overcome this obstacle, we constructed single-chain variable fragments (scFvs) from anti-V3 monoclonal antibodies 0.5γ, 5G2, and 16G6. Enhanced neutralization by 0.5γ and 5G2 scFvs was observed in strains resistant to their IgG counterparts. Neutralization coverage by 0.5γ scFv reached up to 90% of the tested viruses (tier 2 and 3 classes). The temperature-regulated neutralization assay revealed that extensive cross-neutralization of 0.5γ scFv can be explained by post-attachment neutralization. Neutralization assay involving viruses carrying an inter-subunit disulfide bond (SOS virus) showed that the neutralization-susceptible timeframe after attachment was 60 to 120 min. These results indicate that the scFvs efficiently access the V3 loop and subsequently neutralize HIV-1, even after virus attachment to the target cells. Based on its broad and potent neutralizing activity, further development of anti-V3 scFv for therapeutic and preventive strategies is warranted.

  15. Yield stress of alumina-zirconia suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Ramakrishnan, V.; Pradip; Malghan, S.G.

    1996-10-01

    The yield stress of concentrated suspensions of alumina, zirconia, and mixed alumina-zirconia powders was measured by the vane technique as a function of solids loading, relative amounts of alumina and zirconia, and pH. At the isoelectric point (IEP), the yield stress varied as the fourth power of the solids loading. The relative ratio of alumina and zirconia particles was important in determining the yield stress of the suspension at the IEP. The yield stress of single and mixed suspensions showed a marked variation with pH. The maximum value occurred at or near the IEP of the suspension. The effect of electrical double-layer forces on the yield stress can be described on the basis of the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. A normalized yield stress--that is, the ratio of the yield stress at a given pH to the yield stress at the IEP predicted by this model--showed good correlation with experimental data.

  16. Alumina forming iron base superalloy

    DOEpatents

    Yamamoto, Yukinori; Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Brady, Michael P.

    2014-08-26

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy, consists essentially of, in weight percent 2.5 to 4 Al; 25 to 35 Ni; 12 to 19 Cr; at least 1, up to 4 total of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Nb and Ta; 0.5 to 3 Ti; less than 0.5 V; 0.1 to 1 of at least on element selected from the group consisting of Zr and Hf; 0.03 to 0.2 C; 0.005 to 0.1 B; and base Fe. The weight percent Fe is greater than the weight percent Ni. The alloy forms an external continuous scale including alumina, and contains coherent precipitates of .gamma.'-Ni.sub.3Al, and a stable essentially single phase FCC austenitic matrix microstructure. The austenitic matrix is essentially delta-ferrite-free and essentially BCC-phase-free.

  17. The effect of rhenium, sulfur and alumina on the conversion of hydrocarbons over platinum single crystals: Surface science and catalytic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, C.

    1992-04-01

    Conversion reactions of hydrocarbons over Pt-Re model catalyst surfaces modified by sulfur and alumina have been studied. A plasma deposition source has been developed to deposit Pt, Re, and Al on metal substrates variable coverage in ultrahigh vacuum without excessive heating. Conversion of n-hexane was performed over the Re-covered Pt and Pt-covered Re surfaces. The presence of the second metal increased hydrogenolysis activity of both Pt-Re surfaces. Addition of sulfur on the model Catalyst surfaces suppressed hydrogenolysis activity and increased the cyclization rate of n-hexane to methylcyclopentane over Pt-Re surfaces. Sulfiding also increased the dehydrogenation rate of cyclohexane to benzene Over Pt-Re surfaces. It has been proposed that the PtRe bimetallic catalysts show unique properties when combined with sulfur, and electronic interactions exist between platinum, rhenium and sulfur. Decomposition of hydrocarbons on the sulfur-covered Pt-Re surfaces supported that argument. For the conversion of 1-butene over the planar Pt/AlO[sub x], the addition of Pt increased the selectivity of hydrogenation over isomerization.

  18. The effect of rhenium, sulfur and alumina on the conversion of hydrocarbons over platinum single crystals: Surface science and catalytic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Changmin

    1992-04-01

    Conversion reactions of hydrocarbons over Pt-Re model catalyst surfaces modified by sulfur and alumina have been studied. A plasma deposition source has been developed to deposit Pt, Re, and Al on metal substrates variable coverage in ultrahigh vacuum without excessive heating. Conversion of n-hexane was performed over the Re-covered Pt and Pt-covered Re surfaces. The presence of the second metal increased hydrogenolysis activity of both Pt-Re surfaces. Addition of sulfur on the model Catalyst surfaces suppressed hydrogenolysis activity and increased the cyclization rate of n-hexane to methylcyclopentane over Pt-Re surfaces. Sulfiding also increased the dehydrogenation rate of cyclohexane to benzene Over Pt-Re surfaces. It has been proposed that the PtRe bimetallic catalysts show unique properties when combined with sulfur, and electronic interactions exist between platinum, rhenium and sulfur. Decomposition of hydrocarbons on the sulfur-covered Pt-Re surfaces supported that argument. For the conversion of 1-butene over the planar Pt/AlOx, the addition of Pt increased the selectivity of hydrogenation over isomerization.

  19. Edge-defined film-fed growth of beta-alumina and Mg-substituted beta-alumina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, A. D.; Stormont, R. W.; Cocks, F. H.

    1975-01-01

    High Na vapor pressure, peritectic decomposition, and high reactivity of the melt complicate the growth of beta-alumina crystals. These difficulties were overcome by using a high-pressure (300 psig) growth chamber, Na2O-rich melts, and Ir for all surfaces in contact with the melt. These procedures were combined with the edge-defined film-fed growth technique to produce single-crystal beta-alumina tubes and ribbons.

  20. Precise measurements of the dipole moment and polarizability of the neutral exciton and positive trion in a single quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mar, J. D.; Baumberg, J. J.; Xu, X. L.; Irvine, A. C.; Williams, D. A.

    2017-05-01

    We perform precise measurements of the permanent dipole moment and polarizability of both the neutral exciton (X0) and positive trion (X+) in a single InAs/GaAs self-assembled quantum dot (QD). This is achieved through one- and two-color high-resolution photocurrent (PC) spectroscopy of X0 and X+, respectively, using ultra-narrow-bandwidth continuous-wave lasers. This technique allows for sub-μeV resolution, which is limited only by the spectral linewidth of the lasers and is more than four orders of magnitude higher than that of previous techniques. We are therefore permitted to obtain precise values for the permanent dipole moment and polarizability of both X0 and X+, by fitting an appropriate theoretical model to the measured transition energies as a function of electric field. As a sequence of protocols for the optical initialization, manipulation, and readout of a QD hole spin qubit embedded in a photodiode device relies on the coherent control of both X0 and X+ as intermediary states, such precise measurements of their dipole moment and polarizability using high-resolution PC spectroscopy are crucial for implementing these quantum computing protocols with high fidelity.

  1. Single- and multiple-electron loss cross-sections for fast heavy ions colliding with neutrals: Semi-classical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, M.-Y.; Litsarev, M. S.; Shevelko, V. P.; Tawara, H.; Yoon, J.-S.

    2009-07-01

    Extensive calculations of single, multiple and total electron-loss cross-sections of fast heavy ions in collisions with neutral atoms are performed in the semi-classical approximation using the DEPOSIT code based on the energy deposition model and statistical distributions for ionization probabilities. The results are presented for Ar 1+, Ar 2+, Kr 7+, Xe 3+, Xe 18+, Pb 25+ and U q+ ( q = 10, 28, 39, 62) ions colliding with H, N, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe and U atoms at energies E > 1 MeV/u and compared with available experimental data and the n-particle classical-trajectory Monte Carlo ( nCTMC) calculations. The results show that the present semi-classical model can be applied for estimation of multiple and total electron-loss cross-sections within accuracies of a factor of 2. From calculated data for the total electron-loss cross-sections σ tot, their dependencies on relative velocity v, the first ionization potential I1 of the projectile and the target atomic number Z A are found and a semi-empirical formula for σ tot is suggested. The velocity range, where the semi-classical approximation can be used, is discussed.

  2. Straightforward selection of broadly neutralizing single-domain antibodies targeting the conserved CD4 and coreceptor binding sites of HIV-1 gp120.

    PubMed

    Matz, Julie; Kessler, Pascal; Bouchet, Jérôme; Combes, Olivier; Ramos, Oscar Henrique Pereira; Barin, Francis; Baty, Daniel; Martin, Loïc; Benichou, Serge; Chames, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Few broadly neutralizing antibodies targeting determinants of the HIV-1 surface envelope glycoprotein (gp120) involved in sequential binding to host CD4 and chemokine receptors have been characterized. While these epitopes show low diversity among various isolates, HIV-1 employs many strategies to evade humoral immune response toward these sensitive sites, including a carbohydrate shield, low accessibility to these buried cavities, and conformational masking. Using trimeric gp140, free or bound to a CD4 mimic, as immunogens in llamas, we selected a panel of broadly neutralizing single-domain antibodies (sdAbs) that bind to either the CD4 or the coreceptor binding site (CD4BS and CoRBS, respectively). When analyzed as monomers or as homo- or heteromultimers, the best sdAb candidates could not only neutralize viruses carrying subtype B envelopes, corresponding to the Env molecule used for immunization and selection, but were also efficient in neutralizing a broad panel of envelopes from subtypes A, C, G, CRF01_AE, and CRF02_AG, including tier 3 viruses. Interestingly, sdAb multimers exhibited a broader neutralizing activity spectrum than the parental sdAb monomers. The extreme stability and high recombinant production yield combined with their broad neutralization capacity make these sdAbs new potential microbicide candidates for HIV-1 transmission prevention.

  3. [Influence of intraoperative cervical posture in single segmental cervical disc replacement on restoration of cervical curve in neutral position].

    PubMed

    Hong, Ying; Deng, Yuxiao; Liu, Hao; Gong, Renrong; An, Lingjing; Gong, Quan; Li, Tao; Song, Yueming

    2013-01-01

    To study the correlation between the cervical posture in the cervical disc replacement (CDR). Between January 2008 and August 2010, 51 and the cervical curve restoration in neutral position after surgery. patients underwent single segmental PRESTIGE LP replacement, and the clinical data were retrospectively analyzed. During the surgery, the patient was supinely placed and the lordosis of the cervical spine was mantained with a pillow placed beneath the neck. Of them, 28 were male and 23 were female, aged 30-64 years (mean, 45 years); 32 were diagnosed as having cervical spondylotic myelopathy, 7 having radiculopathy, and 12 having myelopathy and radiculopathy. The disease duration was 3-48 months (mean, 15 months). CDR was performed at C(4, 5) in 5 cases, at C(5, 6) in 42 cases, and at C(6, 7) in 4 cases. The Cobb angles of the cervical alignment, targeted functional spinal unit (FSU), and targeted disc were measured by sagittal X-ray film of the cervical spine in neutral position before and after surgery, as well as the intraoperative C-arm fluroscopy of the cervical spine. Linear correlation and regression were performed to analyze the relation between cervical Cobb angle difference at intraoperation and improvement of the Cobb angles at 3 months after operation. The cervical Cobb angles at intraoperation and 3 months after operation were larger than those at preoperation (P < 0.05). The difference of the Cobb angle between intra- and pre-operation was (6.72 +/- 9.13) degrees on cervical alignment, (2.10 +/- 5.12) degrees on targeted FSU, and (3.33 +/- 3.75) degrees on targeted disc. At 3 months after operation, the Cobb angle improvement of the cervical alignment, targeted FSU, and targeted disc was (6.30 +/- 7.28), (3.99 +/- 5.37), and (4.29 +/- 5.36) degrees, respectively. There was no significant difference in the Cobb angle improvement between the targeted FSU and the targeted disc (t = -4.391, P = 0.698), and between the targeted disc and the cervical

  4. High Temperature Stability of Potassium Beta Alumina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Kisor, A.; Ryan, M. A.

    1996-01-01

    None. From Objectives section: Evaluate the stability of potassium beta alumina under potassium AMTEC operating conditions. Evaluate the stability regime in which potassium beta alumina can be fabricated.

  5. Increasing the potency of neutralizing single-domain antibodies by functionalization with a CD11b/CD18 binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Rossotti, Martin A; González-Techera, Andrés; Guarnaschelli, Julio; Yim, Lucia; Camacho, Ximena; Fernández, Marcelo; Cabral, Pablo; Leizagoyen, Carmen; Chabalgoity, José A; González-Sapienza, Gualberto

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant single domain antibodies (nanobodies) constitute an attractive alternative for the production of neutralizing therapeutic agents. Their small size warrants rapid bioavailability and fast penetration to sites of toxin uptake, but also rapid renal clearance, which negatively affects their performance. In this work, we present a new strategy to drastically improve the neutralizing potency of single domain antibodies based on their fusion to a second nanobody specific for the complement receptor CD11b/CD18 (Mac-1). These bispecific antibodies retain a small size (˜30 kDa), but acquire effector functions that promote the elimination of the toxin-immunocomplexes. The principle was demonstrated in a mouse model of lethal toxicity with tetanus toxin. Three anti-tetanus toxin nanobodies were selected and characterized in terms of overlapping epitopes and inhibition of toxin binding to neuron gangliosides. Bispecific constructs of the most promising monodomain antibodies were built using anti Mac-1, CD45 and MHC II nanobodies. When co-administered with the toxin, all bispecific antibodies showed higher toxin-neutralizing capacity than the monomeric ones, but only their fusion to the anti-endocytic receptor Mac-1 nanobody allowed the mice to survive a 10-fold lethal dose. In a model of delayed neutralization of the toxin, the anti- Mac-1 bispecific antibodies outperformed a sheep anti-toxin polyclonal IgG that had shown similar neutralization potency in the co-administration experiments. This strategy should have widespread application in the development of nanobody-based neutralizing therapeutics, which can be produced economically and more safely than conventional antisera. PMID:26192995

  6. A method for the detection of virus infectivity in single cells and real time: Towards an automated fluorescence neutralization test.

    PubMed

    Maistriau, Marylene; Carletti, Tea; Zakaria, Mohammad Khalid; Braga, Luca; Faoro, Valentina; Vasileiadis, Vasileios; Marcello, Alessandro

    2017-06-02

    Virus neutralizing antibodies are critical correlates of protection in vaccine development and are discriminatory in the plaque reduction neutralization test when used for the diagnosis of viral infections. However, neutralization assays are time consuming, labor intensive and highly variable, thus limiting their use. Advances in automated live imaging of cells opened new possibilities for standard virus diagnostic techniques such as neutralization assays. To this end, a reporter cell line based on the translocation of the transcription factor IRF3 in response to infection is proposed. Image acquisition of signal in a microplate format allowed the setup of a rapid, semi-automated and high-throughput fluorescent neutralization test. The study is extended to the live imaging of IRF3 translocations that could potentially cut the time of analysis to few hours. The fluorescent neutralization test is suitable for high-throughput assays and expandable to other viruses of global importance such as Zika virus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Bauxite Mining and Alumina Refining

    PubMed Central

    Frisch, Neale; Olney, David

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To describe bauxite mining and alumina refining processes and to outline the relevant physical, chemical, biological, ergonomic, and psychosocial health risks. Methods: Review article. Results: The most important risks relate to noise, ergonomics, trauma, and caustic soda splashes of the skin/eyes. Other risks of note relate to fatigue, heat, and solar ultraviolet and for some operations tropical diseases, venomous/dangerous animals, and remote locations. Exposures to bauxite dust, alumina dust, and caustic mist in contemporary best-practice bauxite mining and alumina refining operations have not been demonstrated to be associated with clinically significant decrements in lung function. Exposures to bauxite dust and alumina dust at such operations are also not associated with the incidence of cancer. Conclusions: A range of occupational health risks in bauxite mining and alumina refining require the maintenance of effective control measures. PMID:24806720

  8. Effect of surface acidity and basicity of aluminas on asphaltene adsorption and oxidation.

    PubMed

    Nassar, Nashaat N; Hassan, Azfar; Pereira-Almao, Pedro

    2011-08-01

    This study investigates the effect of surface acidity and basicity of aluminas on asphaltene adsorption followed by air oxidation. Equilibrium batch adsorption experiments were conducted at 25°C with solutions of asphaltenes in toluene at concentrations ranging from 100 to 3000 g/L using three conventional alumina adsorbents with different surface acidity. Data were found to better fit to the Freundlich isotherm model showing a multilayer adsorption. Results showed that asphaltene adsorption is strongly affected by the surface acidity, and the adsorption capacities of asphaltenes onto the three aluminas followed the order acidic>basic and neutral. Asphaltenes adsorbed over aluminas were subjected to oxidation in air up to 600°C in a thermogravimetric analyzer to study the catalytic effect of aluminas with different surface acidity. A correlation was found between Freundlich affinity constant (1/n) and the catalytic activity. Basic alumina that has the lowest 1/n value, depicting strongest interactions, has the highest catalytic activity, followed by neutral and acidic aluminas, respectively.

  9. Branchy alumina nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Jianping; Pu, Lin; Bao, Ximao; Feng, Duan

    2002-02-01

    Branchy alumina nanotubes (bANTs) have been shown to exist in aluminum oxide. Electron-beam evaporated 400 nm Al film on Si substrate is stepwise anodized in dilute sulfuric acid under the constant dc voltage 40 V at 10.0 °C. This electrochemical-anodizing route resulted in the formation of individual bANTs. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the length of the bANTs was around 450 nm, and the inner diameter was around 10-20 nm. We deduced that the bANTs, the completely detached multibranchy cells of anodic porous alumina (APA) film, should be evolved from the stagnant cells of the APA mother film. The bANTs may be used as templates in fabrication of individual branchy nanoscale cables, jacks, and heterojunctions. The proposed formation mechanisms of the bANTs and the stagnant cells should give some insights into the long-standing problem of APA film, i.e., the self-ordering mechanism of the cells arrangement in porous anodization of aluminum.

  10. Wetting and strength issues at Al/alpha-alumina interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.; Suganuma, Katsuaki

    2003-04-15

    The wetting behavior and strength at aluminum/alumina interfaces has been an active subject of research. Al/alumina applications include ceramic-metal composites and several applications for electronic industries. In this paper the interface strength and microstructure of Al/alpha-alumina was investigated. We discovered that in a solid-state joining, the strength of the joint increases with increasing joining temperature. In a liquid-state joining, the strength of the joint gradually decreases due to the formation of unbonded areas. The strength, sigma sub b, is expressed by the following equation as a function of unbonded area, A: sigma sub b = 2.22 A + 143 (70 percent {le} A {le} 100 percent). The highest strength reached 400 MPa when the interface was formed at around the melting temperature of aluminum. An aluminum layer close to the interface became a single crystal when it was bonded to a sapphire. The following crystallographic orientation relationship is established: (1{bar 1}1){sub Al}//(001){sub {alpha}}-Al{sub 2} O{sub 3}, (110){sub Al}//<100>{sub {alpha}}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Amorphous alumina islands were formed at the interface. In the amorphous alumina, gamma-alumina nanocrystals grew from the sapphire, with the same orientation relationship to sapphire as above.

  11. Adsorptive desulfurization by activated alumina.

    PubMed

    Srivastav, Ankur; Srivastava, Vimal Chandra

    2009-10-30

    This study reports usage of commercial grade activated alumina (aluminum oxide) as adsorbent for the removal of sulfur from model oil (dibenthiophene (DBT) dissolved in n-hexane). Bulk density of alumina was found to be 1177.77 kg/m(3). The BET surface area of alumina was found to decrease from 143.6 to 66.4 m(2)/g after the loading of DBT at optimum conditions. The carbon-oxygen functional groups present on the surface of alumina were found to be effective in the adsorption of DBT onto alumina. Optimum adsorbent dose was found to be 20 g/l. The adsorption of DBT on alumina was found to be gradual process, and quasi-equilibrium reached in 24 h. Langmuir isotherm best represented the equilibrium adsorption data. The heat of adsorption and change in entropy for DBT adsorption onto alumina was found to be 19.5 kJ/mol and 139.2 kJ/mol K, respectively.

  12. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Neutralization Measured by Flow Cytometric Quantitation of Single-Round Infection of Primary Human T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mascola, John R.; Louder, Mark K.; Winter, Christine; Prabhakara, Ranjani; De Rosa, Stephen C.; Douek, Daniel C.; Hill, Brenna J.; Gabuzda, Dana; Roederer, Mario

    2002-01-01

    There is currently intensive research on the design of novel human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vaccine immunogens that can elicit potent neutralizing antibodies. A prerequisite for comparing and optimizing these strategies is the ability to precisely measure neutralizing antibody responses. To this end, we sought to develop an assay that directly quantifies single-round HIV-1 infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Initial experiments demonstrated that essentially all productively infected PBMC could be identified by flow cytometric detection of intracellular p24 antigen (p24-Ag). After infection of PBMC with HIV-1, p24+ lymphocytes could be distinguished beginning 1 day postinfection, and the majority of CD8− T cells were p24-Ag positive by 3 to 4 days postinfection. To directly quantify first-round infection, we included a protease inhibitor in PBMC cultures. The resulting 2-day assay was highly sensitive and specific for the detection of HIV-1-infected PBMC. Serial dilutions of virus stocks demonstrated that the number of target cells infected was directly related to the amount of infectious virus input into the assay. In neutralization assays, the flow cytometric enumeration of first-round infection of PBMC provided quantitative data on the number of target cells infected and on the inactivation of infectious virus due to reaction with antibody. We also used this single-round assay to compare the percentage of cells expressing p24-Ag to the number of copies of HIV-1 gag per 100 PBMC. The precision and reproducibility of this assay will facilitate the measurement of HIV-1 neutralization, particularly incrementally improved neutralizing antibody responses generated by new candidate vaccines. PMID:11967298

  13. Transformation of γ-alumina to θ-alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Shuhui; Sohlberg, Karl; Rashkeev, Sergey; Pantelides, Sokrates T.

    2002-03-01

    γ- and θ-alumina are two metastable phases of aluminum oxide observed along the dehydration sequence of boehmite upon thermal treatment before conversion to the final product α-alumina. The transformation from the γ to the θ phase can best be studied by using Al_16O_24 cells. Motion of eight Al atoms from their γ-alumina positions to new positions and no O motions result in an approximate structure that, upon relaxation by first-principles calculations, becomes the known θ-alumina structure. Total-energy calculations along the paths of atomic motions have been used to map out possible synergistic transformation pathways. This work was supported in part by the USDoE and a NSF GOALI Grant with Alcoa, Inc.

  14. Alumina clay compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Holmgren, J.S.; Gembicki, S.A.; Schoonover, M.W.; Kocal, J.A.

    1992-05-19

    This patent describes a composition consisting essentially of a layered clay homogeneously dispersed in an inorganic oxide matrix, such that the clay layers are completely surrounded by the inorganic oxide matrix, the inorganic oxide selected from the group consisting of alumina, titania, silica, zirconia, P{sub 2}O{sub 5} and mixtures thereof. This patent also describes a process of preparing a composition consisting essentially of a layered clay homogeneously dispersed in an inorganic oxide matrix, the process comprising mixing a clay with a hydrosol of a precursor of the inorganic oxide, forming spherical particles from the clay containing hydrosol and calcining the particles to form a composition comprising a clay homogeneously dispersed in an inorganic oxide matrix, such that the clay layers are completely surrounded by the inorganic oxide matrix.

  15. Gelcasting Polycrystalline Alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Janney, M.A.; Zuk, K.J.; Wei, G.C.

    2000-01-01

    OSRAM SYLVANIA INC. is a major U.S. manufacturer of high-intensity lighting. Among its products is the Lumalux TM line of high-pressure sodium vapor arc lamps, which are used for industrial, highway, and street lighting. The key to the performance of these lamps is the polycrystalline alumina (PCA) tube that is used to contain the plasma that is formed in the electric arc. That plasma consists of ionized sodium, mercury, and xenon vapors. The key attributes of the PCA tubes are their transparency ({approximately}97% total transmittance in the visible), their refractoriness (inner wall temperature can reach l2OOC), and their chemical resistance (sodium and mercury vapor are extremely corrosive). The current efficiency of the lamps is very high, up to 100 initial lumens per watt. (Compare incandescent lamps 10-20 lumens per watt, fluorescent lamps 25-90 lumens per watt.)

  16. A Single Residue within the V5 Region of HIV-1 Envelope Facilitates Viral Escape from the Broadly Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibody VRC01*

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Dongxing; Shi, Xuanling; Arledge, Kelly C.; Song, Dingka; Jiang, Liwei; Fu, Lili; Gong, Xinqi; Zhang, Senyan; Wang, Xinquan; Zhang, Linqi

    2012-01-01

    VRC01, a broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibody, is capable of neutralizing a diverse array of HIV-1 isolates by mimicking CD4 binding with the envelope glycoprotein gp120. Nonetheless, resistant strains have been identified. Here, we examined two genetically related and two unrelated envelope clones, derived from CRF08_BC-infected patients, with distinct VRC01 neutralization profiles. A total of 22 chimeric envelope clones was generated by interchanging the loop D and/or V5 regions between the original envelopes or by single alanine substitutions within each region. Analysis of pseudoviruses built from these mutant envelopes showed that interchanging the V5 region between the genetically related or unrelated clones completely swapped their VRC01 sensitivity profiles. Mutagenesis analysis revealed that the asparagine residue at position 460 (Asn-460), a potential N-linked glycosylation site in the V5 region, is a key factor for observed resistance in these strains, which is further supported by our structural modeling. Moreover, changes in resistance were found to positively correlate with deviations in VRC01 binding affinity. Overall, our study indicates that Asn-460 in the V5 region is a critical determinant of sensitivity to VRC01 specifically in these viral strains. The long side chain of Asn-460, and potential glycosylation, may create steric hindrance that lowers binding affinity, thereby increasing resistance to VRC01 neutralization. PMID:23100255

  17. A single residue within the V5 region of HIV-1 envelope facilitates viral escape from the broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibody VRC01.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dongxing; Shi, Xuanling; Arledge, Kelly C; Song, Dingka; Jiang, Liwei; Fu, Lili; Gong, Xinqi; Zhang, Senyan; Wang, Xinquan; Zhang, Linqi

    2012-12-14

    VRC01, a broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibody, is capable of neutralizing a diverse array of HIV-1 isolates by mimicking CD4 binding with the envelope glycoprotein gp120. Nonetheless, resistant strains have been identified. Here, we examined two genetically related and two unrelated envelope clones, derived from CRF08_BC-infected patients, with distinct VRC01 neutralization profiles. A total of 22 chimeric envelope clones was generated by interchanging the loop D and/or V5 regions between the original envelopes or by single alanine substitutions within each region. Analysis of pseudoviruses built from these mutant envelopes showed that interchanging the V5 region between the genetically related or unrelated clones completely swapped their VRC01 sensitivity profiles. Mutagenesis analysis revealed that the asparagine residue at position 460 (Asn-460), a potential N-linked glycosylation site in the V5 region, is a key factor for observed resistance in these strains, which is further supported by our structural modeling. Moreover, changes in resistance were found to positively correlate with deviations in VRC01 binding affinity. Overall, our study indicates that Asn-460 in the V5 region is a critical determinant of sensitivity to VRC01 specifically in these viral strains. The long side chain of Asn-460, and potential glycosylation, may create steric hindrance that lowers binding affinity, thereby increasing resistance to VRC01 neutralization.

  18. Llama-Derived Single-Chain Antibody Fragments Directed to Rotavirus VP6 Protein Possess Broad Neutralizing Activity In Vitro and Confer Protection against Diarrhea in Mice▿

    PubMed Central

    Garaicoechea, Lorena; Olichon, Aurelien; Marcoppido, Gisela; Wigdorovitz, Andrés; Mozgovoj, Marina; Saif, Linda; Surrey, Thomas; Parreño, Viviana

    2008-01-01

    Group A rotavirus is one of the most common causes of severe diarrhea in human infants and newborn animals. Rotavirus virions are triple-layered particles. The outer capsid proteins VP4 and VP7 are highly variable and represent the major neutralizing antigens. The inner capsid protein VP6 is conserved among group A rotaviruses, is highly immunogenic, and is the target antigen of most immunodiagnosis tests. Llama-derived single-chain antibody fragments (VHH) are the smallest molecules with antigen-binding capacity and can therefore be expected to have properties different from conventional antibodies. In this study a library containing the VHH genes of a llama immunized with recombinant inner capsid protein VP6 was generated. Binders directed to VP6, in its native conformation within the viral particle, were selected and characterized. Four selected VHH directed to conformational epitopes of VP6 recognized all human and animal rotavirus strains tested and could be engineered for their use in immunodiagnostic tests for group A rotavirus detection. Three of the four VHH neutralized rotavirus in vivo independently of the strain serotype. Furthermore, this result was confirmed by in vivo partial protection against rotavirus challenge in a neonatal mouse model. The present study demonstrates for the first time a broad neutralization activity of VP6 specific VHH in vitro and in vivo. Neutralizing VHH directed to VP6 promise to become an essential tool for the prevention and treatment of rotavirus diarrhea. PMID:18632867

  19. Neutralizing antibodies against West Nile virus identified directly from human B cells by single-cell analysis and next generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Tsioris, Konstantinos; Gupta, Namita T.; Ogunniyi, Adebola O.; Zimnisky, Ross M.; Qian, Feng; Yao, Yi; Wang, Xiaomei; Stern, Joel N. H.; Chari, Raj; Briggs, Adrian W.; Clouser, Christopher R.; Vigneault, Francois; Church, George M.; Garcia, Melissa N.; Murray, Kristy O.; Montgomery, Ruth R.; Kleinstein, Steven H.; Love, J. Christopher

    2015-01-01

    West Nile virus infection (WNV) is an emerging mosquito-borne disease that can lead to severe neurological illness and currently has no available treatment or vaccine. Using microengraving, an integrated single-cell analysis method, we analyzed a cohort of subjects infected with WNV - recently infected and post-convalescent subjects - and efficiently identified four novel WNV neutralizing antibodies. We also assessed the humoral response to WNV on a single-cell and repertoire level by integrating next generation sequencing (NGS) into our analysis. The results from single-cell analysis indicate persistence of WNV-specific memory B cells and antibody-secreting cells in post-convalescent subjects. These cells exhibited class-switched antibody isotypes. Furthermore, the results suggest that the antibody response itself does not predict the clinical severity of the disease (asymptomatic or symptomatic). Using the nucleotide coding sequences for WNV-specific antibodies derived from single cells, we revealed the ontogeny of expanded WNV-specific clones in the repertoires of recently infected subjects through NGS and bioinformatic analysis. This analysis also indicated that the humoral response to WNV did not depend on an anamnestic response, due to an unlikely previous exposure to the virus. The innovative and integrative approach presented here to analyze the evolution of neutralizing antibodies from natural infection on a single-cell and repertoire level can also be applied to vaccine studies, and could potentially aid the development of therapeutic antibodies and our basic understanding of other infectious diseases. PMID:26481611

  20. Genotypic Differences in Dengue Virus Neutralization Are Explained by a Single Amino Acid Mutation That Modulates Virus Breathing

    PubMed Central

    Dowd, Kimberly A.; DeMaso, Christina R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Flaviviruses sample an ensemble of virion conformations resulting from the conformational flexibility of their structural proteins. To investigate how sequence variation among strains impacts virus breathing, we performed studies with the monoclonal antibody (MAb) E111, which binds an inaccessible domain III envelope (E) protein epitope of dengue virus serotype 1 (DENV1). Prior studies indicated that an observed ~200-fold difference in neutralization between the DENV1 strains Western Pacific-74 (West Pac-74) and 16007 could not be explained by differences in the affinity of MAb E111 for each strain. Through neutralization studies with wild-type and variant viruses carrying genes encoding reciprocal mutations at all 13 amino acid differences between the E proteins of West Pac-74 and 16007, we found that E111 neutralization susceptibility mapped solely to the presence of a lysine or arginine at E domain II residue 204, located distally from the E111 epitope. This same residue correlated with neutralization differences observed for MAbs specific for epitopes distinct from E111, suggesting that this amino acid dictates changes in the conformational ensembles sampled by the virus. Furthermore, an observed twofold difference in the stability of infectious West Pac-74 versus 16007 in solution also mapped to E residue 204. Our results demonstrate that neutralization susceptibility can be altered in an epitope-independent manner by natural strain variation that influences the structures sampled by DENV. That different conformational ensembles of flaviviruses may affect the landscape available for antibody binding, as well as virus stability, has important implications for functional studies of antibody potency, a critical aspect of vaccine development. PMID:26530385

  1. Alumina-Reinforced Zirconia Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Bansal, Narottam P.

    2003-01-01

    Alumina-reinforced zirconia composites, used as electrolyte materials for solid oxide fuel cells, were fabricated by hot pressing 10 mol percent yttria-stabilized zirconia (10-YSZ) reinforced with two different forms of alumina particulates and platelets each containing 0 to 30 mol percent alumina. Major mechanical and physical properties of both particulate and platelet composites including flexure strength, fracture toughness, slow crack growth, elastic modulus, density, Vickers microhardness, thermal conductivity, and microstructures were determined as a function of alumina content either at 25 C or at both 25 and 1000 C. Flexure strength and fracture toughness at 1000 C were maximized with 30 particulate and 30 mol percent platelet composites, respectively, while resistance to slow crack growth at 1000 C in air was greater for 30 mol percent platelet composite than for 30 mol percent particulate composites.

  2. Gelcast zirconia-alumina composites

    SciTech Connect

    Omatete, O.O.; Bleier, A.; Westmoreland, C.G.; Young, A.C.

    1991-01-01

    Near net-shaped parts of zirconia-alumina composites have been successfully formed by gelcasting, a technique which utilizes in situ polymerization of acrylamide monomers. The high solids loading required for gelcasting ({approximately}50 vol %) was obtained by controlling the pH-dependent stability of the aqueous zirconia-alumina suspensions. A strong correspondence was found among the surface charges on the particles, colloidal stability, and the maximum solids loading. 14 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Electroplating and magnetostructural characterization of multisegmented Co54Ni46/Co85Ni15 nanowires from single electrochemical bath in anodic alumina templates

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Highly hexagonally ordered hard anodic aluminum oxide membranes, which have been modified by a thin cover layer of SiO2 deposited by atomic layer deposition method, were used as templates for the synthesis of electrodeposited magnetic Co-Ni nanowire arrays having diameters of around 180 to 200 nm and made of tens of segments with alternating compositions of Co54Ni46 and Co85Ni15. Each Co-Ni single segment has a mean length of around 290 nm for the Co54Ni46 alloy, whereas the length of the Co85Ni15 segments was around 430 nm. The composition and crystalline structure of each Co-Ni nanowire segment were determined by transmission electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction techniques. The employed single-bath electrochemical nanowire growth method allows for tuning both the composition and crystalline structure of each individual Co-Ni segment. The room temperature magnetic behavior of the multisegmented Co-Ni nanowire arrays is also studied and correlated with their structural and morphological properties. PMID:23735184

  4. Processing, characterization and mechanical properties of alumina-based nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, Katherine E.

    2007-12-01

    The present study focuses on improving the fracture toughness of nanocrystalline alumina by incorporating second phases---specifically niobium and carbon nanotubes. Ceramics have many properties that lend themselves well to load bearing and armor applications. Chemical inertness, high hardness and strength, low wear rates and low densities are examples of these properties that warrant potential substitution of metals and their alloys. In this study, nanocrystalline alumina was investigated based on its impressive elevated temperature properties and high hardness. Despite these promising structural properties, pure nanocrystalline alumina has low fracture toughness (˜2.5 MPa*m1/2) and is thus limited to non-structural applications. Alumina-based nanocomposites reinforced with niobium and/or carbon nanotubes (CNT) were fabricated by advanced powder processing techniques and consolidated by spark plasma sintering (˜1200°C, 4 min). Raman spectroscopy revealed that single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) begin to break down at sintering temperatures above 1150°C. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) showed that, although thermodynamically unlikely, no Al4C3 was formed in the CNT-alumina nanocomposites. Thus, the nanocomposite is purely a physical mixture and no chemical bond was formed between the nanotubes and matrix. In addition, in-situ 3-pt and standard 4-pt bend tests were conducted on niobium and/or carbon nanotube-reinforced alumina nanocomposites in order to assess their toughness. Although stable crack growth was not achieved in the 3-pt bend testing, average fracture toughness vales of 6.1 and 3.3 MPa·m 1/2 were measured for 10 vol%Nb and 10 vol%Nb-5 vol%SWCNT-alumina, respectively. The 4-pt bend testing measured average intrinsic fracture toughness of 2.95, 2.76, 3.33 and 3.95 MPa·m1/2 for alumina nanocomposites containing 5 vol%SWCNT, 10 vol%SWCNT, 5 vol%DWCNT and 10 vol% Nb, respectively. Although nanocrystalline alumina will never be able to compete with

  5. Next-to-leading order QCD corrections to the single top quark production via model-independent tqg flavor-changing neutral-current couplings at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Jun; Li Chongsheng; Zhang Jiajun; Zhu Huaxing

    2009-12-01

    We present the calculations of the complete next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD effects on the single top productions induced by model-independent tqg flavor-changing neutral-current couplings at hadron colliders. Our results show that, for the tcg coupling, the NLO QCD corrections can enhance the total cross sections by about 60% and 30%, and for the tug coupling by about 50% and 20% at the Tevatron and LHC, respectively, which means that the NLO corrections can increase the experimental sensitivity to the flavor-changing neutral-current couplings by about 10%-30%. Moreover, the NLO corrections reduce the dependence of the total cross sections on the renormalization or factorization scale significantly, which lead to increased confidence on the theoretical predictions. Besides, we also evaluate the NLO corrections to several important kinematic distributions, and find that for most of them the NLO corrections are almost the same and do not change the shape of the distributions.

  6. Intercalation of water into lithium. beta. -alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Dudney, N J; Bates, J B; Wang, J C; Brown, G M; Larson, B C; Engstrom, H

    1981-01-01

    Infrared absorption, neutron diffraction and weight loss techniques have been used to investigate the hydration of single crystals of Li ..beta..-alumina. The hydration is a reversible intercalation reaction. Up to approximately two water molecules per formula unit can penetrate the conduction plane. Other protonated species are formed from the dissociation of the molecular water. The rate of hydration is controlled by the diffusion of water in the conduction plane. A likely diffusion mechanism requires dissociation of the water and an interstitialcy motion of the oxygen.

  7. Laser Surface Treatment of Sintered Alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagemann, R.; Noelke, C.; Kaierle, S.; Wesling, V.

    Sintered alumina ceramics are used as refractory materials for industrial aluminum furnaces. In this environment the ceramic surface is in permanent contact with molten aluminum resulting in deposition of oxidic material on its surface. Consequently, a lower volume capacity as well as thermal efficiency of the furnaces follows. To reduce oxidic adherence of the ceramic material, two laser-based surface treatment processes were investigated: a powder- based single-step laser cladding and a laser surface remelting. Main objective is to achieve an improved surface quality of the ceramic material considering the industrial requirements as a high process speed.

  8. Differential neutralizing activities of a single domain camelid antibody (VHH) specific for ricin toxin's binding subunit (RTB).

    PubMed

    Herrera, Cristina; Vance, David J; Eisele, Leslie E; Shoemaker, Charles B; Mantis, Nicholas J

    2014-01-01

    Ricin, a member of the A-B family of ribosome-inactivating proteins, is classified as a Select Toxin by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention because of its potential use as a biothreat agent. In an effort to engineer therapeutics for ricin, we recently produced a collection of alpaca-derived, heavy-chain only antibody VH domains (VHH or "nanobody") specific for ricin's enzymatic (RTA) and binding (RTB) subunits. We reported that one particular RTB-specific VHH, RTB-B7, when covalently linked via a peptide spacer to different RTA-specific VHHs, resulted in heterodimers like VHH D10/B7 that were capable of passively protecting mice against a lethal dose challenge with ricin. However, RTB-B7 itself, when mixed with ricin at a 1 ∶ 10 toxin:antibody ratio did not afford any protection in vivo, even though it had demonstrable toxin-neutralizing activity in vitro. To better define the specific attributes of antibodies associated with ricin neutralization in vitro and in vivo, we undertook a more thorough characterization of RTB-B7. We report that RTB-B7, even at 100-fold molar excess (toxin:antibody) was unable to alter the toxicity of ricin in a mouse model. On the other hand, in two well-established cytotoxicity assays, RTB-B7 neutralized ricin with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) that was equivalent to that of 24B11, a well-characterized and potent RTB-specific murine monoclonal antibody. In fact, RTB-B7 and 24B11 were virtually identical when compared across a series of in vitro assays, including adherence to and neutralization of ricin after the toxin was pre-bound to cell surface receptors. RTB-B7 differed from both 24B11 and VHH D10/B7 in that it was relatively less effective at blocking ricin attachment to receptors on host cells and was not able to form high molecular weight toxin:antibody complexes in solution. Whether either of these activities is important in ricin toxin neutralizing activity in vivo remains to be determined.

  9. Synthesis and textural evolution of alumina particles with mesoporous structures

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Xun; Peng Tianyou; Yao Jinchun; Lv Hongjin; Huang Cheng

    2010-06-15

    Alumina particles with mesostructures were synthesized through a chemical precipitation method by using different inorganic aluminum salts followed by a heterogeneous azeotropic distillation and calcination process. The obtained mesoporous {gamma}-alumina particles were systematically characterized by the X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and nitrogen adsorption-desorption measurement. Effects of the aluminum salt counter anion, pH value and the azeotropic distillation process on the structural or textural evolution of alumina particles were investigated. It is found that Cl{sup -} in the reaction solution can restrain the textural evolution of the resultant precipitates into two-dimensional crystallized pseudoboehmite lamellae during the heterogeneous azeotropic distillation, and then transformed into {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles with mesostructures after further calcination at 1173 K, whereas coexisting SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} can promote above morphology evolution and then transformed into {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanofibers after calcination at 1173 K. Moreover nearly all materials retain relatively high specific surface areas larger than 100 m{sup 2} g{sup -1} even after calcinations at 1173 K. - Graphical abstract: Co-existing Cl{sup -} is beneficial for the formation of {gamma}-alumina nanoparticles with mesostructures during the precipitation process. Interparticle and intraparticle mesopores can be derived from acidic solution and near neutral solution, respectively.

  10. Search for single top-quark production via flavour-changing neutral currents at 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. 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L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. 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D.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, G.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocio, A.; Cirotto, F.; Citron, Z. H.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Cleland, W.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Colasurdo, L.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D’Auria, S.; D’Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Benedetti, A.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell’Acqua, A.; Dell’Asta, L.; Dell’Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Drechsler, E.; Dris, M.; Dubreuil, E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dyndal, M.; Eckardt, C.; Ecker, K. M.; Edgar, R. C.; Edson, W.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Feremenga, L.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, C.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. C.; Fitzgerald, E. A.; Flaschel, N.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, G.; Fletcher, R. R. M.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Francis, D.; Franconi, L.; Franklin, M.; Frate, M.; Fraternali, M.; Freeborn, D.; French, S. T.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fulsom, B. G.; Fusayasu, T.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gach, G. P.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, J.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Y. S.; Garay Walls, F. M.; Garberson, F.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gatti, C.; Gaudiello, A.; Gaudio, G.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gauzzi, P.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Ge, P.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Geisler, M. P.; Gemme, C.; Genest, M. H.; Gentile, S.; George, M.; George, S.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gershon, A.; Ghasemi, S.; Ghazlane, H.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giangiobbe, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, S. M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gillam, T. P. S.; Gillberg, D.; Gilles, G.; Gingrich, D. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giraud, P. F.; Giromini, P.; Giugni, D.; Giuliani, C.; Giulini, M.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gkaitatzis, S.; Gkialas, I.; Gkougkousis, E. L.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glaysher, P. C. F.; Glazov, A.; Goblirsch-Kolb, M.; Goddard, J. R.; Godlewski, J.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Golubkov, D.; Gomes, A.; Gonçalo, R.; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, J.; Gonella, L.; González de la Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Parra, G.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gössling, C.; Gostkin, M. I.; Goujdami, D.; Goussiou, A. G.; Govender, N.; Gozani, E.; Grabas, H. M. X.; Graber, L.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Gradin, P. O. J.; Grafström, P.; Grahn, K-J.; Gramling, J.; Gramstad, E.; Grancagnolo, S.; Gratchev, V.; Gray, H. M.; Graziani, E.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Grefe, C.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Griffiths, J.; Grillo, A. A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohs, J. P.; Grohsjean, A.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Grossi, G. C.; Grout, Z. J.; Guan, L.; Guenther, J.; Guescini, F.; Guest, D.; Gueta, O.; Guido, E.; Guillemin, T.; Guindon, S.; Gul, U.; Gumpert, C.; Guo, J.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gustavino, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutierrez Ortiz, N. G.; Gutschow, C.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Haddad, N.; Haefner, P.; Hageböck, S.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Haleem, M.; Haley, J.; Hall, D.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G. D.; Hamacher, K.; Hamal, P.; Hamano, K.; Hamilton, A.; Hamity, G. N.; Hamnett, P. G.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hanawa, K.; Hance, M.; Hanke, P.; Hanna, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, M. C.; Hansen, P. H.; Hara, K.; Hard, A. S.; Harenberg, T.; Hariri, F.; Harkusha, S.; Harrington, R. D.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartjes, F.; Hasegawa, M.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hasib, A.; Hassani, S.; Haug, S.; Hauser, R.; Hauswald, L.; Havranek, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R. J.; Hawkins, A. D.; Hayashi, T.; Hayden, D.; Hays, C. P.; Hays, J. M.; Hayward, H. S.; Haywood, S. J.; Head, S. J.; Heck, T.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; Heim, S.; Heim, T.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, L.; Hejbal, J.; Helary, L.; Hellman, S.; Hellmich, D.; Helsens, C.; Henderson, J.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Heng, Y.; Hengler, C.; Henkelmann, S.; Henrichs, A.; Henriques Correia, A. M.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Herbert, G. H.; Hernández Jiménez, Y.; Herrberg-Schubert, R.; Herten, G.; Hertenberger, R.; Hervas, L.; Hesketh, G. G.; Hessey, N. P.; Hetherly, J. W.; Hickling, R.; Higón-Rodriguez, E.; Hill, E.; Hill, J. C.; Hiller, K. H.; Hillier, S. J.; Hinchliffe, I.; Hines, E.; Hinman, R. R.; Hirose, M.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hobbs, J.; Hod, N.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Hodgson, P.; Hoecker, A.; Hoeferkamp, M. R.; Hoenig, F.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hohn, D.; Holmes, T. R.; Homann, M.; Hong, T. M.; Hooft van Huysduynen, L.; Hopkins, W. H.; Horii, Y.; Horton, A. J.; Hostachy, J-Y.; Hou, S.; Hoummada, A.; Howard, J.; Howarth, J.; Hrabovsky, M.; Hristova, I.; Hrivnac, J.; Hryn’ova, T.; Hrynevich, A.; Hsu, C.; Hsu, P. 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S.; Rühr, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Ruschke, A.; Russell, H. L.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruthmann, N.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryder, N. C.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sabato, G.; Sacerdoti, S.; Saddique, A.; Sadrozinski, H. F-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Sahinsoy, M.; Saimpert, M.; Saito, T.; Sakamoto, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Salazar Loyola, J. E.; Saleem, M.; Salek, D.; Sales De Bruin, P. H.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sammel, D.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sanchez, A.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sandaker, H.; Sandbach, R. L.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sannino, M.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Sato, K.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Savage, G.; Savard, P.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Scarfone, V.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, R.; Schaeffer, J.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Schiavi, C.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schopf, E.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schroeder, C.; Schuh, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H. -C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schweiger, H.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Sciacca, F. G.; Scifo, E.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekhon, K.; Sekula, S. J.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Shushkevich, S.; Sicho, P.; Sidebo, P. E.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sioli, M.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Sokhrannyi, G.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Song, H. Y.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sosebee, M.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spangenberg, M.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Sperlich, D.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Denis, R. D. St.; Stabile, A.; Staerz, S.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yao, W-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2016-01-29

    A search for single top-quark production via flavour-changing neutral current processes from gluon plus up- or charm-quark initial states in proton–proton collisions at the LHC is presented. Data collected with the ATLAS detector in 2012 at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb–1 are used. Furthermore, candidate events for a top quark decaying into a lepton, a neutrino and a jet are selected and classified into signal- and background-like candidates using a neural network.

  11. Single-molecule magnetic behavior in a neutral terbium(III) complex of a picolinate-based nitronyl nitroxide free radical.

    PubMed

    Coronado, Eugenio; Giménez-Saiz, Carlos; Recuenco, Alejandro; Tarazón, Ana; Romero, Francisco M; Camón, Agustín; Luis, Fernando

    2011-08-15

    The terdentate anionic picolinate-based nitronyl nitroxide (picNN) free radical forms neutral and robust homoleptic complexes with rare earth-metal ions. The nonacoordinated Tb(3+) complex Tb(picNN)(3)·6H(2)O is a single-molecule magnet with an activation energy barrier Δ = 22.8 ± 0.5 K and preexponential factor τ(0) = (5.5 ± 1.1) × 10(-9) s. It shows magnetic hysteresis below 1 K. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  12. Search for single top-quark production via flavour-changing neutral currents at 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; ...

    2016-01-29

    A search for single top-quark production via flavour-changing neutral current processes from gluon plus up- or charm-quark initial states in proton–proton collisions at the LHC is presented. Data collected with the ATLAS detector in 2012 at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb–1 are used. Furthermore, candidate events for a top quark decaying into a lepton, a neutrino and a jet are selected and classified into signal- and background-like candidates using a neural network.

  13. Structural Basis of Neutralization of the Major Toxic Component from the Scorpion Centruroides noxius Hoffmann by a Human-derived Single-chain Antibody Fragment

    SciTech Connect

    Canul-Tec, Juan Carlos; Riaño-Umbarila, Lidia; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique; Becerril, Baltazar; Possani, Lourival D.; Torres-Larios, Alfredo

    2011-08-09

    It has previously been reported that several single-chain antibody fragments of human origin (scFv) neutralize the effects of two different scorpion venoms through interactions with the primary toxins of Centruroides noxius Hoffmann (Cn2) and Centruroides suffusus suffusus (Css2). Here we present the crystal structure of the complex formed between one scFv (9004G) and the Cn2 toxin, determined in two crystal forms at 2.5 and 1.9 {angstrom} resolution. A 15-residue span of the toxin is recognized by the antibody through a cleft formed by residues from five of the complementarity-determining regions of the scFv. Analysis of the interface of the complex reveals three features. First, the epitope of toxin Cn2 overlaps with essential residues for the binding of {beta}-toxins to its Na+ channel receptor site. Second, the putative recognition of Css2 involves mainly residues that are present in both Cn2 and Css2 toxins. Finally, the effect on the increase of affinity of previously reported key residues during the maturation process of different scFvs can be inferred from the structure. Taken together, these results provide the structural basis that explain the mechanism of the 9004G neutralizing activity and give insight into the process of directed evolution that gave rise to this family of neutralizing scFvs.

  14. Structural basis of neutralization of the major toxic component from the scorpion Centruroides noxius Hoffmann by a human-derived single-chain antibody fragment.

    PubMed

    Canul-Tec, Juan Carlos; Riaño-Umbarila, Lidia; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique; Becerril, Baltazar; Possani, Lourival D; Torres-Larios, Alfredo

    2011-06-10

    It has previously been reported that several single-chain antibody fragments of human origin (scFv) neutralize the effects of two different scorpion venoms through interactions with the primary toxins of Centruroides noxius Hoffmann (Cn2) and Centruroides suffusus suffusus (Css2). Here we present the crystal structure of the complex formed between one scFv (9004G) and the Cn2 toxin, determined in two crystal forms at 2.5 and 1.9 Å resolution. A 15-residue span of the toxin is recognized by the antibody through a cleft formed by residues from five of the complementarity-determining regions of the scFv. Analysis of the interface of the complex reveals three features. First, the epitope of toxin Cn2 overlaps with essential residues for the binding of β-toxins to its Na(+) channel receptor site. Second, the putative recognition of Css2 involves mainly residues that are present in both Cn2 and Css2 toxins. Finally, the effect on the increase of affinity of previously reported key residues during the maturation process of different scFvs can be inferred from the structure. Taken together, these results provide the structural basis that explain the mechanism of the 9004G neutralizing activity and give insight into the process of directed evolution that gave rise to this family of neutralizing scFvs.

  15. Structural Basis of Neutralization of the Major Toxic Component from the Scorpion Centruroides noxius Hoffmann by a Human-derived Single-chain Antibody Fragment*

    PubMed Central

    Canul-Tec, Juan Carlos; Riaño-Umbarila, Lidia; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique; Becerril, Baltazar; Possani, Lourival D.; Torres-Larios, Alfredo

    2011-01-01

    It has previously been reported that several single-chain antibody fragments of human origin (scFv) neutralize the effects of two different scorpion venoms through interactions with the primary toxins of Centruroides noxius Hoffmann (Cn2) and Centruroides suffusus suffusus (Css2). Here we present the crystal structure of the complex formed between one scFv (9004G) and the Cn2 toxin, determined in two crystal forms at 2.5 and 1.9 Å resolution. A 15-residue span of the toxin is recognized by the antibody through a cleft formed by residues from five of the complementarity-determining regions of the scFv. Analysis of the interface of the complex reveals three features. First, the epitope of toxin Cn2 overlaps with essential residues for the binding of β-toxins to its Na+ channel receptor site. Second, the putative recognition of Css2 involves mainly residues that are present in both Cn2 and Css2 toxins. Finally, the effect on the increase of affinity of previously reported key residues during the maturation process of different scFvs can be inferred from the structure. Taken together, these results provide the structural basis that explain the mechanism of the 9004G neutralizing activity and give insight into the process of directed evolution that gave rise to this family of neutralizing scFvs. PMID:21489992

  16. Formation and distribution of neutral vanadium, niobium, and tantalum oxide clusters: single photon ionization at 26.5 eV.

    PubMed

    Dong, F; Heinbuch, S; He, S G; Xie, Y; Rocca, J J; Bernstein, E R

    2006-10-28

    Neutral vanadium, niobium, and tantalum oxide clusters are studied by single photon ionization employing a 26.5 eV/photon soft x-ray laser. During the ionization process the metal oxide clusters are almost free of fragmentation. The most stable neutral clusters of vanadium, niobium, and tantalum oxides are of the general form (MO2)0,1(M2O5)y. M2O5 is identified as a basic building unit for these three neutral metal oxide species. Each cluster family (Mm, m=1,...,9) displays at least one oxygen deficient and/or oxygen rich cluster stoichiometry in addition to the above most stable species. For tantalum and niobium families with even m, oxygen deficient clusters have the general formula (MO2)2(M2O5)y. For vanadium oxide clusters, oxygen deficient clusters are detected for all cluster families Vm (m=1,[ellipsis (horizontal)],9), with stable structures (VO2)x(V2O5)y. Oxygen rich metal oxide clusters with high ionization energies (IE>10.5 eV, 118 nm photon) are detected with general formulas expressed as (MO2)2 (M2O5)y O1,2,3. Oxygen rich clusters, in general, have up to three attached hydrogen atoms, such as VO3H1,2, V2O5H1,2, Nb2O5H1,2, etc.

  17. Utility of Japanese encephalitis virus subgenomic replicon-based single-round infectious particles as antigens in neutralization tests for Zika virus and three other flaviviruses.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Atsushi; Moi, Meng Ling; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Kurane, Ichiro; Matsuda, Mami; Suzuki, Ryosuke; Konishi, Eiji

    2017-05-01

    The introduction of a foreign virus into an area may cause an outbreak, as with the Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreak in the Americas. Preparedness for handling a viral outbreak involves the development of tests for the serodiagnosis of foreign virus infections. We previously established a gene-based technology to generate some flaviviral antigens useful for functional antibody assays. The technology utilizes a Japanese encephalitis virus subgenomic replicon to generate single-round infectious particles (SRIPs) that possess designed surface antigens. In the present study, we successfully expanded the capacity of SRIPs to four human-pathogenic mosquito-borne flaviviruses that could potentially be introduced from endemic to non-endemic countries: ZIKV, Sepik virus, Wesselsbron virus, and Usutu virus. Flavivirus-crossreactive monoclonal antibodies dose-dependently neutralized these SRIPs. ZIKV-SRIPs also produced antibody-dose-dependent neutralization curves equivalent to those shown by authentic ZIKV particles using sera from a Zika fever patient. The faithful expression of designed surface antigens on SRIPs will allow their use in neutralization tests to diagnose foreign flaviviral infections.

  18. A VL-linker-VH Orientation Dependent Single Chain Variable Antibody Fragment Against Rabies Virus G Protein with Enhanced Neutralizing Potency in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yue; Li, Zhuang; Xi, Hualong; Gu, Tiejun; Yuan, Ruosen; Chen, Xiaoxu; Jiang, Chunlai; Kong, Wei; Wu, Yongge

    2016-01-01

    Lethal rabies can be prevented effectively by post-exposure prophylactic (PEP) with rabies immunoglobulin (RIG). Single-chain variable fragment (scFv), which is composed of a variable heavy chain (VH) and variable light chain (VL) connected by a peptide linker, may be developed as alternative to RIG for neutralizing rabies virus (RV). However, our previously constructed scFv (FV57S) with the (NH2) VH-linker-VL (COOH) orientation showed a lower neutralizing potency than its parent RIG. This orientation may inhibit FV57S from refolding into an intact and correct conformation. Therefore, the RFV57S protein with a VL-linker-VH orientation was constructed based on FV57S. A HIS tag was incorporated to aid in purification and detection of RFV57S and FV57S. However, abilities of RFV57S and FV57S to bind with the anti-HIS tag mAb were different. Therefore, a novel direct ELISA was established by utilizing a biotin-labeled truncated glycoprotein of RV. Although with similar stability and in vitro neutralizing potency as FV57S, RFV57S showed enhanced binding ability, affinity and in vivo protective efficacy against lethal dose of RV. Our studies support the feasibility of developing a scFv with reversed orientation and provide a novel method for evaluating the binding ability, stability and affinity of engineered antibodies recognizing linear epitope.

  19. The surface reaction kinetics of salicylate on alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z.; Ainsworth, C.C.; Friedrich, D.M.; Joly, A.G.; Gassman, P.L.

    1997-12-31

    The kinetics of reaction of salicylate with colloidal alumina in aqueous suspension and with Al(III) in homogeneous aqueous solution were studied by stopped-flow laser fluorescence spectroscopy. The emission spectra confirmed the formation of both monodentate complexes and more stable bidentate chelates. Temporal evolution of the spectra indicated that the reaction was fast (within first few minutes) for both the homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions but slowed down afterwards for the latter. Reactions completed within 10 minutes in homogeneous phase at pH 3.3 but took more than 12 hours in alumina suspension. Analysis of the fluorescence intensity within first four minutes showed that in homogeneous phase the reaction followed a single pseudo-first-order kinetics. In alumina suspension log plots were nonlinear and characteristic of multiple heterogeneous reaction paths. The kinetics are interpreted in terms of the simultaneous formation of multiple species as well as subsequent conversion between species.

  20. A neutralizing recombinant single chain antibody, scFv, against BaP1, A P-I hemorrhagic metalloproteinase from Bothrops asper snake venom.

    PubMed

    Castro, J M A; Oliveira, T S; Silveira, C R F; Caporrino, M C; Rodriguez, D; Moura-da-Silva, A M; Ramos, O H P; Rucavado, A; Gutiérrez, J M; Magalhães, G S; Faquim-Mauro, E L; Fernandes, I

    2014-09-01

    BaP1 is a P-I class snake venom metalloproteinase (SVMP) relevant in the local tissue damage associated with envenomings by Bothrops asper, a medically important snake species in Central America and parts of South and North America. The main treatment for these accidents is the passive immunotherapy using antibodies raised in horses. In order to obtain more specific and batch-to-batch consistent antivenons, recombinant antibodies are considered a good option compared to animal immunization. We constructed a recombinant single chain variable fragment (scFv) from a monoclonal antibody against BaP1 (MABaP1) formerly secreted by a hybridoma clone. This recombinant antibody was cloned into pMST3 vector in fusion with SUMO protein and contains VH and VL domains linked by a flexible (G4S)3 polypeptide (scFvBaP1). The aim of this work was to produce scFvBaP1 and to evaluate its potential concerning the neutralization of biologically important activities of BaP1. The cytoplasmic expression of this construct was successfully achieved in C43 (DE3) bacteria. Our results showed that scFvBaP1-SUMO fusion protein presented an electrophoretic band of around 43 kDa from which SUMO alone corresponded to 13.6 kDa, and only the scFv was able to recognize BaP1 as well as the whole venom by ELISA. In contrast, neither an irrelevant scFv anti-LDL nor its MoAb partner recognized it. BaP1-induced fibrinolysis was significantly neutralized by scFvBaP1, but not by SUMO, in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, scFvBaP1, as well as MaBaP1, completely neutralized in vivo hemorrhage, muscle necrosis, and inflammation induced by the toxin. Docking analyses revealed possible modes of interaction of the recombinant antibody with BaP1. Our data showed that scFv recognized BaP1 and whole B. asper venom, and neutralized biological effects of this SVMP. This scFv antibody can be used for understanding the molecular mechanisms of neutralization of SVMPs, and for exploring the potential of

  1. Single Cell Synchrotron FT-IR Microspectroscopy Reveals a Link between Neutral Lipid and Storage Carbohydrate Fluxes in S. cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Jamme, Frédéric; Vindigni, Jean-David; Méchin, Valérie; Cherifi, Tamazight; Chardot, Thierry; Froissard, Marine

    2013-01-01

    In most organisms, storage lipids are packaged into specialized structures called lipid droplets. These contain a core of neutral lipids surrounded by a monolayer of phospholipids, and various proteins which vary depending on the species. Hydrophobic structural proteins stabilize the interface between the lipid core and aqueous cellular environment (perilipin family of proteins, apolipoproteins, oleosins). We developed a genetic approach using heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae of the Arabidopsis thaliana lipid droplet oleosin and caleosin proteins AtOle1 and AtClo1. These transformed yeasts overaccumulate lipid droplets, leading to a specific increase in storage lipids. The phenotype of these cells was explored using synchrotron FT-IR microspectroscopy to investigate the dynamics of lipid storage and cellular carbon fluxes reflected as changes in spectral fingerprints. Multivariate statistical analysis of the data showed a clear effect on storage carbohydrates and more specifically, a decrease in glycogen in our modified strains. These observations were confirmed by biochemical quantification of the storage carbohydrates glycogen and trehalose. Our results demonstrate that neutral lipid and storage carbohydrate fluxes are tightly connected and co-regulated. PMID:24040242

  2. Gelcasting polycrystalline alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Janney, M.A.

    1997-04-01

    This work is being done as part of a CRADA with Osram-Sylvania, Inc. (OSI) OSI is a major U.S. manufacturer of high-intensity lighting. Among its products is the Lumalux{reg_sign} line of high-pressure sodium vapor arc lamps, which are used for industrial, highway, and street lighting. The key to the performance of these lamps is the polycrystalline alumina (PCA) tube that is used to contain the plasma that is formed in the electric arc. That plasma consists of ionized sodium, mercury, and xenon vapors. The key attributes of the PCA tubes are their transparency (95% total transmittance in the visible region), their refractoriness (inner wall temperature can reach 1400{degrees}C), and their chemical resistance (sodium and mercury vapor are extremely corrosive). The current efficiency of the lamps is very high, on the order of several hundred lumens / watt. (Compare - incandescent lamps -13 lumens/watt fluorescent lamps -30 lumens/watt.) Osram-Sylvania would like to explore using gelcasting to form PCA tubes for Lumalux{reg_sign} lamps, and eventually for metal halide lamps (known as quartz-halogen lamps). Osram-Sylvania, Inc. currently manufactures PCA tubes by isostatic pressing. This process works well for the shapes that they presently use. However, there are several types of tubes that are either difficult or impossible to make by isostatic pressing. It is the desire to make these new shapes and sizes of tubes that has prompted Osram-Sylvania`s interest in gelcasting. The purpose of the CRADA is to determine the feasibility of making PCA items having sufficient optical quality that they are useful in lighting applications using gelcasting.

  3. Interactions of neutral and singly charged keV atomic particles with gas-phase adenine molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarado, Fresia; Bari, Sadia; Hoekstra, Ronnie; Schlathölter, Thomas

    2007-07-01

    KeV atomic particles traversing biological matter are subject to charge exchange and screening effects which dynamically change this particle's effective charge. The understanding of the collision cascade along the track thus requires a detailed knowledge of the interaction dynamics of radiobiologically relevant molecules, such as DNA building blocks or water, not only with ionic but also with neutral species. We have studied collisions of keV H+, He+, and C+ ions and H0, He0, and C0 atoms with the DNA base adenine by means of high resolution time-of-flight spectrometry. For H0 and H+ we find qualitatively very similar fragmentation patterns, while for carbon, strong differences are observed when comparing C0 and C+ impact. For collisions with He0 and He+ projectiles, a pronounced delayed fragmentation channel is observed, which has not been reported before.

  4. Search for flavor changing neutral currents in single top quark production using 2.3 fb$^-1$ of $p\\bar{p}$ collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Abolins, Maris A.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Nijmegen U.

    2010-06-01

    We present a search for flavor changing neutral currents via quark-gluon couplings in a sample of single top quark final states corresponding to 2.3 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We select events containing a single top quark candidates with an additional jet, and obtain separation between signal and background using Bayesian neural networks. We find consistency between background expectation and observed data, and set limits on avor changing neutral current gluon couplings of the top quark to up quarks (tgu) and charm quarks (tgc). The cross section limits at the 95% C.L. are {sigma}{sub tgu} < 0.20 pb and {sigma}{sub tgc} < 0.27 pb. These correspond to limits on the top quark decay branching fractions of B(t {yields} gu) < 2.0 x 10{sup -4} and B(t {yields} gc) < 3.9 x 10{sup -3}.

  5. Attrition resistant gamma-alumina catalyst support

    DOEpatents

    Singleton, Alan H.; Oukaci, Rachid; Goodwin, James G.

    2006-03-14

    A .gamma.-alumina catalyst support having improved attrition resistance produced by a method comprising the steps of treating a particulate .gamma.-alumina material with an acidic aqueous solution comprising water and nitric acid and then, prior to adding any catalytic material thereto, calcining the treated .gamma.-alumina.

  6. Transport properties of alumina nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kau-Fui Vincent; Kurma, Tarun

    2008-08-27

    Recent studies have showed that nanofluids have significantly greater thermal conductivity compared to their base fluids. Large surface area to volume ratio and certain effects of Brownian motion of nanoparticles are believed to be the main factors for the significant increase in the thermal conductivity of nanofluids. In this paper all three transport properties, namely thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity and viscosity, were studied for alumina nanofluid (aluminum oxide nanoparticles in water). Experiments were performed both as a function of volumetric concentration (3-8%) and temperature (2-50 °C). Alumina nanoparticles with a mean diameter of 36 nm were dispersed in water. The effect of particle size was not studied. The transient hot wire method as described by Nagaska and Nagashima for electrically conducting fluids was used to test the thermal conductivity. In this work, an insulated platinum wire of 0.003 inch diameter was used. Initial calibration was performed using de-ionized water and the resulting data was within 2.5% of standard thermal conductivity values for water. The thermal conductivity of alumina nanofluid increased with both increase in temperature and concentration. A maximum thermal conductivity of 0.7351 W m(-1) K(-1) was recorded for an 8.47% volume concentration of alumina nanoparticles at 46.6 °C. The effective thermal conductivity at this concentration and temperature was observed to be 1.1501, which translates to an increase in thermal conductivity by 22% when compared to water at room temperature. Alumina being a good conductor of electricity, alumina nanofluid displays an increasing trend in electrical conductivity as volumetric concentration increases. A microprocessor-based conductivity/TDS meter was used to perform the electrical conductivity experiments. After carefully calibrating the conductivity meter's glass probe with platinum tip, using a standard potassium chloride solution, readings were taken at

  7. Gas chromatographic separation of hydrogen isotopes on columns packed with alumina, modified alumina and sol-gel alumina.

    PubMed

    Naik, Y P; Gupta, N K; Pillai, K T; Rao, G A Rama; Venugopal, V

    2012-01-06

    The stationary phase of alumina adsorbents, prepared by different chemical processes, was used to study the separation behaviour of hydrogen isotopes. Three types of alumina, obtained by conventional hydroxide route alumina coated with silicon oxide and alumina prepared by internal gelation process (IGP), were used as packing material to study the separation of HT and T(2) in a mixture at various temperatures. The conventional alumina and silicon oxide coated alumina resolved HT and T(2) at 77K temperature with different retention times. The retention times on SiO(2) coated columns were found to be higher than those of other adsorbents. However, the column filled with IGP alumina was found to be ideal for the separation of HT and T(2) at 240 K. The peaks were well resolved in less than 5 min on this column.

  8. Factors contributing to the breakdown of sodium beta-alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Buechele, A.C.

    1982-05-01

    Clarification of the breakdown process occurring during charge transfer in sodium beta alumina solid electrolytes was derived from: (1) studying the effects of molten sodium contact at 350/sup 0/C on single crystal sodium beta alumina and polycrystalline sodium beta alumina; (2) determination of critical current density by monitoring acoustic emissions accompanying crack growth in sodium/sodium beta alumina/sodium cells subjected to linear current ramping at 1 mA cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/; (3) failure analysis conducted on cycled electrolytes, some from commercial sodium/sulfur cells, which had been subjected to up to 703 Ahr cm/sup -2/ of charge transfer. Gray coloration developing in beta aluminas in contact with molten sodium was found to be a consequence of formation, through reduction by sodium, of oxygen vacancies charge compensated by electrons. Electronic conductivity of the electrolyte increases as a result. No second phase formation was detected. Colored electrolytes from sodium/sulfur cells show evidence of a newly recognized degradation mechanism in which fracture occurs when sodium is reduced and deposited internally under pressure as metal in regions where an electronic conductivity gradient exists. Heating colored beta aluminas in air produces reoxidation and bleaching. Kinetics and other properties of the coloration and bleaching processes were determined. Critical current density was found to bear an inverse relation to average electrolyte grain size. Evidence was found in the cycled electrolytes for a slow crack growth mechanism and a progressive mode of degradation advancing from the sulfur electrode interface. Implications of the findings for the construction and operation of sodium/sulfur battery systems are discussed.

  9. Interactions of neutral and singly charged keV atomic particles with gas-phase adenine molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarado, Fresia; Bari, Sadia; Hoekstra, Ronnie; Schlathoelter, Thomas

    2007-07-21

    KeV atomic particles traversing biological matter are subject to charge exchange and screening effects which dynamically change this particle's effective charge. The understanding of the collision cascade along the track thus requires a detailed knowledge of the interaction dynamics of radiobiologically relevant molecules, such as DNA building blocks or water, not only with ionic but also with neutral species. We have studied collisions of keV H{sup +}, He{sup +}, and C{sup +} ions and H{sup 0}, He{sup 0}, and C{sup 0} atoms with the DNA base adenine by means of high resolution time-of-flight spectrometry. For H{sup 0} and H{sup +} we find qualitatively very similar fragmentation patterns, while for carbon, strong differences are observed when comparing C{sup 0} and C{sup +} impact. For collisions with He{sup 0} and He{sup +} projectiles, a pronounced delayed fragmentation channel is observed, which has not been reported before.

  10. Alumina-Enhanced Thermal Barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Marnell; Leiser, Dan; Goldstein, Howard

    1989-01-01

    Rigid, fibrous ceramic tile material called "alumina-enhanced thermal barrier" (AETB) extends temperature capability of insulating materials. Material has obvious potential for terrestrial use in kilns, furnaces, heat engines, and other applications in which light weight and high operating temperature are specified. Three kinds of ceramic fibers are blended, molded, and sintered to make refractory tiles.

  11. Construction of single-chain Fv with two possible CDR3H conformations but similar inter-molecular forces that neutralize bovine herpesvirus 1.

    PubMed

    Koti, Madhuri; Farrugia, William; Nagy, Eva; Ramsland, Paul A; Kaushik, Azad K

    2010-02-01

    Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1) causes respiratory and genital diseases in cattle for which available vaccines do not confer adequate protection. Since passive immunization with antibodies permits disease prevention, single-chain fragment variable (scFv), originating from a monoclonal bovine IgG1 antibody against BoHV-1, were constructed and expressed in Pichia pastoris in V(lambda)-V(H) orientation via a flexible seven-amino acid linker. Similar to the intact IgG, the purified recombinant scFv neutralized BoHV-1 in vitro and recognized viral antigens in BoHV-1 infected MDBK cells by immunofluorescence. Homology modeling of the Fv predicts two distinct conformations for CDR3H. Firstly, a long protruding CDR3H conformation where no disulfide linkage occurred between two "non-canonical" Cys residues resulted in a large binding cavity between V(lambda) and V(H). Secondly, a smaller potential antigen-binding cavity is predicted with a disulfide linkage between the two Cys residues of CDR3H creating a six-membered loop in the ascending polypeptide, which fitted into the space between V(lambda) and V(H). Despite such potential configurational diversity of the antigen-binding site, the electrostatic surface potentials that would interact with the BoHV-1 epitope are largely similar for both the topographies where salt-bridge type electrostatic interactions likely occur at the edges of the binding site. Given that IgG1 antibody against BoHV-1 is clonally selected, it is likely that disulfide-stabilized broader and flatter surface topography is specifically generated to accommodate the predicted carbohydrate neutralizing B-epitope on BoHV-1. The specificity and neutralizing capacity for BoHV-1 of the scFv should make this bovine antibody fragment a useful diagnostic and potential therapeutic candidate for an important viral pathogen in cattle.

  12. Engineering of a recombinant trivalent single-chain variable fragment antibody directed against rabies virus glycoprotein G with improved neutralizing potency.

    PubMed

    Turki, Imène; Hammami, Akil; Kharmachi, Habib; Mousli, Mohamed

    2014-02-01

    Human and equine rabies immunoglobulins are currently available for passive immunization against rabies. However, these are hampered by the limited supply and some drawbacks. Advances in antibody engineering have led to overcome issues of clinical applications and to improve the protective efficacy. In the present study, we report the generation of a trivalent single-chain Fv (scFv50AD1-Fd), that recognizes the rabies virus glycoprotein, genetically fused to the trimerization domain of the bacteriophage T4 fibritin, termed 'foldon' (Fd). scFv50AD1-Fd was expressed as soluble recombinant protein in bacterial periplasmic space and purified through affinity chromatography. The molecular integrity and stability were analyzed by polyacrylamide gradient-gel electrophoresis, size-exclusion chromatography and incubation in human sera. The antigen-binding properties of the trimeric scFv were analyzed by direct and competitive-ELISA. Its apparent affinity constant was estimated at 1.4 ± 0.25 × 10(9)M(-1) and was 75-fold higher than its monovalent scFv (1.9 ± 0.68 × 10(7)M(-1)). The scFv50AD1-Fd neutralized rabies virus in a standard in vitro and in vivo neutralization assay. We showed a high neutralization activity up to 75-fold compared with monovalent format and the WHO standard serum. The gain in avidity resulting from multivalency along with an improved biological activity makes the trivalent scFv50AD1-Fd construct an important reagent for rabies protection. The antibody engineering approach presented here may serve as a strategy for designing a new generation of anti-rabies for passive immunotherapy.

  13. A novel variable antibody fragment dimerized by leucine zippers with enhanced neutralizing potency against rabies virus G protein compared to its corresponding single-chain variable antibody fragment.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhuang; Cheng, Yue; Xi, Hualong; Gu, Tiejun; Yuan, Ruosen; Chen, Xiaoxu; Jiang, Chunlai; Kong, Wei; Wu, Yongge

    2015-12-01

    Fatal rabies can be prevented effectively by post-exposure prophylactic (PEP) with rabies immunoglobulin (RIG). Single-chain variable fragments (scFv), which are composed of a variable heavy chain (VH) and a variable light chain (VL) connected by a peptide linker, can potentially be used to replace RIG. However, in our previous study, a scFv (scFV57S) specific for the rabies virus (RV) G protein showed a lower neutralizing potency than that of its parent IgG due to lower stability and altered peptide assembly pattern. In monoclonal antibodies, the VH and VL interact non-covalently, while in scFvs the VH is connected covalently with the VL by the artificial linker. In this study, we constructed and expressed two peptides 57VL-JUN-HIS and 57VH-FOS-HA in Escherichia coli. The well-known Fos and Jun leucine zippers were utilized to dimerize VH and VL similarly to the IgG counterpart. The two peptides assembled to form zipFv57S in vitro. Due to the greater similarity in structure with IgG, the zipFv57S protein showed a higher binding ability and affinity resulting in notable improvement of in vitro neutralizing activity over its corresponding scFv. The zipFv57S protein was also found to be more stable and showed similar protective rate as RIG in mice challenged with a lethal dose of RV. Our results not only indicated zipFv57S as an ideal alternative for RIG in PEP but also offered a novel and efficient hetero-dimerization pattern of VH and VL leading to enhanced neutralizing potency. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Search for single top-quark production via flavour-changing neutral currents at 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, G.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocio, A.; Cirotto, F.; Citron, Z. 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C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. 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G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2016-02-01

    A search for single top-quark production via flavour-changing neutral current processes from gluon plus up- or charm-quark initial states in proton-proton collisions at the LHC is presented. Data collected with the ATLAS detector in 2012 at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb^{-1} are used. Candidate events for a top quark decaying into a lepton, a neutrino and a jet are selected and classified into signal- and background-like candidates using a neural network. No signal is observed and an upper limit on the production cross-section multiplied by the t → Wb branching fraction is set. The observed 95 % CL limit is σ _{qg → t} { × } {B}(t → Wb)< {3.4} pb and the expected 95 % CL limit is σ _{qg → t} × {B}(t → Wb)< {2.9} pb. The observed limit can be interpreted as upper limits on the coupling constants of the flavour-changing neutral current interactions divided by the scale of new physics κ_{ugt}/Λ < 5.8 × 10^{-3} TeV^{-1} and κ_{cgt}/Λ < 13 × 10^{-3} TeV and on the branching fractions {B}(t → ug) < {4.0 × 10^{-5}} and {B}(t → cg) < {20 × 10^{-5}}.

  15. Evaluation of DNA Single and Double Strand Breaks in Women with Cervical Neoplasia Based on Alkaline and Neutral Comet Assay Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Cortés-Gutiérrez, Elva I.; Hernández-Garza, Fernando; García-Pérez, Jorge O.; Dávila-Rodríguez, Martha I.; Aguado-Barrera, Miguel E.; Cerda-Flores, Ricardo M.

    2012-01-01

    A hospital-based unmatched case-control study was performed in order to determine the relation of DNA single (ssb) and double (dsb) strand breaks in women with and without cervical neoplasia. Cervical epithelial cells of 30 women: 10 with low grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LG-SIL), 10 with high-grade SIL (HG-SIL), and 10 without cervical lesions were evaluated using alkaline and neutral comet assays. A significant increase in global DNA damage (ssb + dsb) and dsb was observed in patients with HG-SIL (48.90 ± 12.87 and 23.50 ± 13.91), patients with LG-SIL (33.60 ± 14.96 and 11.20 ± 5.71), and controls (21.70 ± 11.87 and 5.30 ± 5.38; resp.). Pearson correlation coefficient reveled a strong relation between the levels ssb and dsb (r2 = 0.99, P = 0.03, and r2 = 0.94, P = 0.16, resp.) and progression of neoplasia. The increase of dsb damage in patients with HG-SIL was confirmed by DNA breakage detection-FISH (DBD-FISH) on neutral comets. Our results argue in favor of a real genomic instability in women with cervical neoplasia, which was strengthened by our finding of a higher proportion of DNA dsb. PMID:23093842

  16. Search for single top-quark production via flavour-changing neutral currents at 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector.

    PubMed

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Schioppa, M; Schlenker, S; Schmieden, K; Schmitt, C; Schmitt, S; Schmitt, S; Schneider, B; Schnellbach, Y J; Schnoor, U; Schoeffel, L; Schoening, A; Schoenrock, B D; Schopf, E; Schorlemmer, A L S; Schott, M; Schouten, D; Schovancova, J; Schramm, S; Schreyer, M; Schroeder, C; Schuh, N; Schultens, M J; Schultz-Coulon, H-C; Schulz, H; Schumacher, M; Schumm, B A; Schune, Ph; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwarz, T A; Schwegler, Ph; Schweiger, H; Schwemling, Ph; Schwienhorst, R; Schwindling, J; Schwindt, T; Sciacca, F G; Scifo, E; Sciolla, G; Scuri, F; Scutti, F; Searcy, J; Sedov, G; Sedykh, E; Seema, P; Seidel, S C; Seiden, A; Seifert, F; Seixas, J M; Sekhniaidze, G; Sekhon, K; Sekula, S J; Seliverstov, D M; Semprini-Cesari, N; Serfon, C; Serin, L; Serkin, L; Serre, T; Sessa, M; Seuster, R; Severini, H; Sfiligoj, T; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shan, L Y; Shang, R; Shank, J T; Shapiro, M; Shatalov, P B; Shaw, K; Shaw, S M; Shcherbakova, A; Shehu, C Y; Sherwood, P; Shi, L; Shimizu, S; Shimmin, C O; Shimojima, M; Shiyakova, M; Shmeleva, A; Shoaleh Saadi, D; Shochet, M J; Shojaii, S; Shrestha, S; Shulga, E; Shupe, M A; Shushkevich, S; Sicho, P; Sidebo, P E; Sidiropoulou, O; Sidorov, D; Sidoti, A; Siegert, F; Sijacki, Dj; Silva, J; Silver, Y; Silverstein, S B; Simak, V; Simard, O; Simic, Lj; Simion, S; Simioni, E; Simmons, B; Simon, D; Sinervo, P; Sinev, N B; Sioli, M; Siragusa, G; Sisakyan, A N; Sivoklokov, S Yu; Sjölin, J; Sjursen, T B; Skinner, M B; Skottowe, H P; Skubic, P; Slater, M; Slavicek, T; Slawinska, M; Sliwa, K; Smakhtin, V; Smart, B H; Smestad, L; Smirnov, S Yu; Smirnov, Y; Smirnova, L N; Smirnova, O; Smith, M N K; Smith, R W; Smizanska, M; Smolek, K; Snesarev, A A; Snidero, G; Snyder, S; Sobie, R; Socher, F; Soffer, A; Soh, D A; Sokhrannyi, G; Solans, C A; Solar, M; Solc, J; Soldatov, E Yu; Soldevila, U; Solodkov, A A; Soloshenko, A; Solovyanov, O V; Solovyev, V; Sommer, P; Song, H Y; Soni, N; Sood, A; Sopczak, A; Sopko, B; Sopko, V; Sorin, V; Sosa, D; Sosebee, M; Sotiropoulou, C L; Soualah, R; Soukharev, A M; South, D; Sowden, B C; Spagnolo, S; Spalla, M; Spangenberg, M; Spanò, F; Spearman, W R; Sperlich, D; Spettel, F; Spighi, R; Spigo, G; Spiller, L A; Spousta, M; Spreitzer, T; Denis, R D St; Stabile, A; Staerz, S; Stahlman, J; Stamen, R; Stamm, S; Stanecka, E; Stanescu, C; Stanescu-Bellu, M; Stanitzki, M M; Stapnes, S; Starchenko, E A; Stark, J; Staroba, P; Starovoitov, P; Staszewski, R; Steinberg, P; Stelzer, B; Stelzer, H J; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stenzel, H; Stewart, G A; Stillings, J A; Stockton, M C; Stoebe, M; Stoicea, G; Stolte, P; Stonjek, S; Stradling, A R; Straessner, A; Stramaglia, M E; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strandlie, A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Strizenec, P; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D M; Stroynowski, R; Strubig, A; Stucci, S A; Stugu, B; Styles, N A; Su, D; Su, J; Subramaniam, R; Succurro, A; Sugaya, Y; Suk, M; Sulin, V V; Sultansoy, S; Sumida, T; Sun, S; Sun, X; Sundermann, J E; Suruliz, K; Susinno, G; Sutton, M R; Suzuki, S; Svatos, M; Swiatlowski, M; Sykora, I; Sykora, T; Ta, D; Taccini, C; Tackmann, K; Taenzer, J; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Taiblum, N; Takai, H; Takashima, R; Takeda, H; Takeshita, T; Takubo, Y; Talby, M; Talyshev, A A; Tam, J Y C; Tan, K G; Tanaka, J; Tanaka, R; Tanaka, S; Tannenwald, B B; Tannoury, N; Tapprogge, S; Tarem, S; Tarrade, F; Tartarelli, G F; Tas, P; Tasevsky, M; Tashiro, T; Tassi, E; Tavares Delgado, A; Tayalati, Y; Taylor, F E; Taylor, G N; Taylor, W; Teischinger, F A; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M; Teixeira-Dias, P; Temming, K K; Temple, D; Ten Kate, H; Teng, P K; Teoh, J J; Tepel, F; Terada, S; Terashi, K; Terron, J; Terzo, S; Testa, M; Teuscher, R J; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T; Thomas, J P; Thomas-Wilsker, J; Thompson, E N; Thompson, P D; Thompson, R J; Thompson, A S; Thomsen, L A; Thomson, E; Thomson, M; Thun, R P; Tibbetts, M J; Ticse Torres, R E; Tikhomirov, V O; Tikhonov, Yu A; Timoshenko, S; Tiouchichine, E; Tipton, P; Tisserant, S; Todome, K; Todorov, T; Todorova-Nova, S; Tojo, J; Tokár, S; Tokushuku, K; Tollefson, K; Tolley, E; Tomlinson, L; Tomoto, M; Tompkins, L; Toms, K; Torrence, E; Torres, H; Torró Pastor, E; Toth, J; Touchard, F; Tovey, D R; Trefzger, T; Tremblet, L; Tricoli, A; Trigger, I M; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tripiana, M F; Trischuk, W; Trocmé, B; Troncon, C; Trottier-McDonald, M; Trovatelli, M; True, P; Truong, L; Trzebinski, M; Trzupek, A; Tsarouchas, C; Tseng, J C-L; Tsiareshka, P V; Tsionou, D; Tsipolitis, G; Tsirintanis, N; Tsiskaridze, S; Tsiskaridze, V; Tskhadadze, E G; Tsukerman, I I; Tsulaia, V; Tsuno, S; Tsybychev, D; Tudorache, A; Tudorache, V; Tuna, A N; Tupputi, S A; Turchikhin, S; Turecek, D; Turra, R; Turvey, A J; Tuts, P M; Tykhonov, A; Tylmad, M; Tyndel, M; Ueda, I; Ueno, R; Ughetto, M; Ugland, M; Ukegawa, F; Unal, G; Undrus, A; Unel, G; Ungaro, F C; Unno, Y; Unverdorben, C; Urban, J; Urquijo, P; Urrejola, P; Usai, G; Usanova, A; Vacavant, L; Vacek, V; Vachon, B; Valderanis, C; Valencic, N; Valentinetti, S; Valero, A; Valery, L; Valkar, S; Valladolid Gallego, E; Vallecorsa, S; Valls Ferrer, J A; Van Den Wollenberg, W; Van Der Deijl, P C; van der Geer, R; van der Graaf, H; van Eldik, N; van Gemmeren, P; Van Nieuwkoop, J; van Vulpen, I; van Woerden, M C; Vanadia, M; Vandelli, W; Vanguri, R; Vaniachine, A; Vannucci, F; Vardanyan, G; Vari, R; Varnes, E W; Varol, T; Varouchas, D; Vartapetian, A; Varvell, K E; Vazeille, F; Vazquez Schroeder, T; Veatch, J; Veloce, L M; Veloso, F; Velz, T; Veneziano, S; Ventura, A; Ventura, D; Venturi, M; Venturi, N; Venturini, A; Vercesi, V; Verducci, M; Verkerke, W; Vermeulen, J C; Vest, A; Vetterli, M C; Viazlo, O; Vichou, I; Vickey, T; Vickey Boeriu, O E; Viehhauser, G H A; Viel, S; Vigne, R; Villa, M; Villaplana Perez, M; Vilucchi, E; Vincter, M G; Vinogradov, V B; Vivarelli, I; Vives Vaque, F; Vlachos, S; Vladoiu, D; Vlasak, M; Vogel, M; Vokac, P; Volpi, G; Volpi, M; von der Schmitt, H; von Radziewski, H; von Toerne, E; Vorobel, V; Vorobev, K; Vos, M; Voss, R; Vossebeld, J H; Vranjes, N; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M; Vrba, V; Vreeswijk, M; Vuillermet, R; Vukotic, I; Vykydal, Z; Wagner, P; Wagner, W; Wahlberg, H; Wahrmund, S; Wakabayashi, J; Walder, J; Walker, R; Walkowiak, W; Wang, C; Wang, F; Wang, H; Wang, H; Wang, J; Wang, J; Wang, K; Wang, R; Wang, S M; Wang, T; Wang, T; Wang, X; Wanotayaroj, C; Warburton, A; Ward, C P; Wardrope, D R; Washbrook, A; Wasicki, C; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, I J; Watson, M F; Watts, G; Watts, S; Waugh, B M; Webb, S; Weber, M S; Weber, S W; Webster, J S; Weidberg, A R; Weinert, B; Weingarten, J; Weiser, C; Weits, H; Wells, P S; Wenaus, T; Wengler, T; Wenig, S; Wermes, N; Werner, M; Werner, P; Wessels, M; Wetter, J; Whalen, K; Wharton, A M; White, A; White, M J; White, R; White, S; Whiteson, D; Wickens, F J; Wiedenmann, W; Wielers, M; Wienemann, P; Wiglesworth, C; Wiik-Fuchs, L A M; Wildauer, A; Wilkens, H G; Williams, H H; Williams, S; Willis, C; Willocq, S; Wilson, A; Wilson, J A; Wingerter-Seez, I; Winklmeier, F; Winter, B T; Wittgen, M; Wittkowski, J; Wollstadt, S J; Wolter, M W; Wolters, H; Wosiek, B K; Wotschack, J; Woudstra, M J; Wozniak, K W; Wu, M; Wu, M; Wu, S L; Wu, X; Wu, Y; Wyatt, T R; Wynne, B M; Xella, S; Xu, D; Xu, L; Yabsley, B; Yacoob, S; Yakabe, R; Yamada, M; Yamaguchi, D; Yamaguchi, Y; Yamamoto, A; Yamamoto, S; Yamanaka, T; Yamauchi, K; Yamazaki, Y; Yan, Z; Yang, H; Yang, H; Yang, Y; Yao, W-M; Yasu, Y; Yatsenko, E; Yau Wong, K H; Ye, J; Ye, S; Yeletskikh, I; Yen, A L; Yildirim, E; Yorita, K; Yoshida, R; Yoshihara, K; Young, C; Young, C J S; Youssef, S; Yu, D R; Yu, J; Yu, J M; Yu, J; Yuan, L; Yuen, S P Y; Yurkewicz, A; Yusuff, I; Zabinski, B; Zaidan, R; Zaitsev, A M; Zalieckas, J; Zaman, A; Zambito, S; Zanello, L; Zanzi, D; Zeitnitz, C; Zeman, M; Zemla, A; Zeng, Q; Zengel, K; Zenin, O; Ženiš, T; Zerwas, D; Zhang, D; Zhang, F; Zhang, H; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhang, R; Zhang, X; Zhang, Z; Zhao, X; Zhao, Y; Zhao, Z; Zhemchugov, A; Zhong, J; Zhou, B; Zhou, C; Zhou, L; Zhou, L; Zhou, M; Zhou, N; Zhu, C G; Zhu, H; Zhu, J; Zhu, Y; Zhuang, X; Zhukov, K; Zibell, A; Zieminska, D; Zimine, N I; Zimmermann, C; Zimmermann, S; Zinonos, Z; Zinser, M; Ziolkowski, M; Živković, L; Zobernig, G; Zoccoli, A; Zur Nedden, M; Zurzolo, G; Zwalinski, L

    A search for single top-quark production via flavour-changing neutral current processes from gluon plus up- or charm-quark initial states in proton-proton collisions at the LHC is presented. Data collected with the ATLAS detector in 2012 at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb[Formula: see text] are used. Candidate events for a top quark decaying into a lepton, a neutrino and a jet are selected and classified into signal- and background-like candidates using a neural network. No signal is observed and an upper limit on the production cross-section multiplied by the [Formula: see text] branching fraction is set. The observed 95 % CL limit is [Formula: see text] and the expected 95 % CL limit is [Formula: see text]. The observed limit can be interpreted as upper limits on the coupling constants of the flavour-changing neutral current interactions divided by the scale of new physics [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] and on the branching fractions [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text].

  17. Magnetic field control of the neutral and charged exciton fine structure in single quantum dashes emitting at 1.55 μm

    SciTech Connect

    Mrowiński, P.; Musiał, A.; Maryński, A.; Syperek, M.; Misiewicz, J.; Sęk, G.; Somers, A.; Reithmaier, J. P.; Höfling, S.

    2015-02-02

    We investigated the neutral and charged exciton fine structure in single InAs/InGaAlAs/InP quantum dashes emitting at 1.55 μm using polarization-resolved microphotoluminescence in a magnetic field. Inverted spin configuration of horizontally [1–10] and vertically [110] polarized transitions has been observed. An in-plane magnetic field of up to 5 Tesla has been applied to tailor the fine structure, and eventually to reduce the splitting of the bright exciton states down to zero. This inverted structure has been observed for all the investigated excitons, making it a characteristic feature for this class of nanostructures with the largest splitting reduction of 170 μeV.

  18. Interaction of Zn(2+) ions with single-stranded polyU and polyC in neutral solutions.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, V A; Usenko, E L; Valeev, V A; Berezniak, Ekaterina G; Andrushchenko, V V

    2015-03-26

    Effect of Zn(2+) ions on the conformation of single-stranded polynucleotides polyU and polyC in a wide temperature range at pH 7 was studied by differential UV spectroscopy and by thermal denaturation. The atoms coordinating Zn(2+) ions were determined (O4 and N3 in polyU and N3 in polyC). A three-dimensional phase diagram and its two-dimensional components were constructed for a polyC-Zn(2+) system. The phase diagram revealed a region in which ordered single-stranded structures, stabilized by Zn(2+)-mediated cross-links involving N3 atom of cytosine, are formed. The phase diagram also demonstrated that the behavior of the polyC-Zn(2+) system is similar to the effect of retrograde condensation observed in some binary solutions of simple liquids. A dependence of Zn(2+)-polyC binding constant on the metal ion concentration was obtained. The reason why zinc-induced transition of the sequences with adenine-uracil (AU) base pairs from A-form geometry to a metallized m-form requires higher pH compared to the sequences comprised of guanine-cytosine (GC) base pairs is explained. This information can be useful for the development of possible technological applications based on m-DNA.

  19. Forward Neutral Pion Transverse Single Spin Asymmetries in p+p Collisions at sqrt s = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    STAR Coll

    2008-11-26

    We report precision measurements of the Feynman-x (x{sub F}) dependence, and first measurements of the transverse momentum (p{sub T}) dependence, of transverse single spin asymmetries for the production of {pi}{sup 0} mesons from polarized proton collisions at {radical}s = 200 GeV. The x{sub F} dependence of the results are in fair agreement with perturbative QCD (pQCD) model calculations that identify orbital motion of quarks and gluons within the proton as the origin of the spin effects. Results for the p{sub T} dependence at fixed x{sub F} are not consistent with these same pQCD-based calculations.

  20. Anomalous single production of fourth family up-type quark associated with neutral gauge bosons at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çakır, O.; Çakır, I. T.; Senol, A.; Tasci, A. T.

    2012-05-01

    The fourth family quarks are expected to have mass larger than the top quark considering the results from recent studies on the allowed parameter space. They could also have different dynamics than the quarks of three families of the standard model. The single production of the fourth family up-type quark t‧ is studied via the anomalous production process pp → t‧VX (where V = g, Z, γ) at the LHC with the center of mass energy of 7 and 14 TeV. The signatures of such process are discussed within both the SM and the anomalous decay modes of t‧ quarks. The sensitivity to anomalous coupling κ/Λ = 0.004 TeV-1 can be reached at \\sqrt{s}=14 TeV and Lint = 100 pb-1.

  1. The role of alumina nanoparticles in epoxy adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorigato, Andrea; Pegoretti, Alessandro

    2011-06-01

    Both untreated and calcined fumed alumina nanoparticles were dispersed into an epoxy-based adhesive at various percentages. The glass transition temperature of the nanofilled adhesives increased up to an optimal filler loading and then decreased, probably due to concurrent and contrasting effects of chain blocking and reduction of the crosslinking degree. Tensile modulus, stress at break, and fracture toughness of bulk adhesive were positively affected by the presence of untreated alumina nanoparticles at an optimal filler content. Mechanical tests on single-lap aluminum bonded joints indicated that untreated alumina nanoparticles markedly improved both the shear strength and fatigue life of the bonded joints. In particular, the shear strength increased by about 60% for an optimal filler content of 1 vol.%, and an adhesive failure mechanism was evidenced for all the tested specimens. Concurrently, a relevant decrease of the equilibrium contact angle with water was observed for nanofilled bulk adhesives. In summary, alumina nanoparticles can effectively improve the mechanical performances of epoxy structural adhesives, both by increasing their mechanical properties and by enhancing the interfacial wettability with an aluminum substrate.

  2. Experiments on individual alumina-supported adatoms and clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilius, N.; Cörper, A.; Bozdech, G.; Ernst, N.; Freund, H.-J.

    2001-08-01

    To contribute to an understanding of growth conditions and electronic properties of metal clusters on technologically relevant oxides we have examined the mobility of individual, alumina-supported Pt-adatoms and the optical properties of single supported Ag-clusters. Using field-ion microscopy (FIM) we have prepared and imaged an individual Pt-adatom at approximately 40 K, both on the apex plane of a [1 1 0]-oriented NiAl tip and on a thin alumina film, grown on the same NiAl specimen by oxidation. On the alumina film, the onset temperature for Pt surface diffusion approaches 100 K being distinctively lower than the value 165 K measured on NiAl(1 1 0). Employing the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) as a local electron source, photon emission from individual, alumina-supported Ag-clusters was spectroscopically analyzed. The occurrence of a distinct emission line is explained by the decay of a collective electron oscillation (Mie-plasmon resonance). For decreasing Ag-cluster diameter, the emission lines (i) shift to higher energies and (ii) their widths increase. To explain these observations, we discuss (i) the reduced screening of the plasmon oscillation due to the Ag 4d electrons and (ii) an enhanced electron surface scattering rate in small clusters.

  3. A single amino acid deletion in the matrix protein of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus confers resistance to a polyclonal swine antibody with broadly neutralizing activity.

    PubMed

    Trible, Benjamin R; Popescu, Luca N; Monday, Nicholas; Calvert, Jay G; Rowland, Raymond R R

    2015-06-01

    Assessment of virus neutralization (VN) activity in 176 pigs infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) identified one pig with broadly neutralizing activity. A Tyr-10 deletion in the matrix protein provided escape from broad neutralization without affecting homologous neutralizing activity. The role of the Tyr-10 deletion was confirmed through an infectious clone with a Tyr-10 deletion. The results demonstrate differences in the properties and specificities of VN responses elicited during PRRSV infection.

  4. Processing and mechanical characterization of alumina laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, John K.

    2002-08-01

    Single-phase ceramics that combine property gradients or steps in monolithic bodies are sought as alternatives to ceramic composites made of dissimilar materials. This work describes novel processing methods to produce stepped-density (or laminated) alumina single-phase bodies that maintain their mechanical integrity. One arrangement consists of a stiff, dense bulk material with a thin, flaw tolerant, porous exterior layer. Another configuration consists of a lightweight, low-density bulk material with a thin, hard, wear resistant exterior layer. Alumina laminates with strong interfaces have been successfully produced in this work using two different direct-casting processes. Gelcasting is a useful near-net shape processing technique that has been combined with several techniques, such as reaction bonding of aluminum oxide and the use of starch as a fugative filler, to successfully produced stepped-density alumina laminates. The other direct casting process that has been developed in this work is thermoreversible gelcasting (TRG). This is a reversible gelation process that has been used to produce near-net shape dense ceramic bodies. Also, individual layers can be stacked together and heated to produce laminates. Bilayer laminate samples were produced with varied thickness of porous and dense layers. It was shown that due to the difference in modulus and hardness, transverse cracking is found upon Hertzian contact when the dense layer is on the exterior. In the opposite arrangement, compacted damage zones formed in the porous material and no damage occurred in the underlying dense layer. Flaw tolerant behavior of the porous exterior/dense underlayer was examined by measuring biaxial strength as a function of Vickers indentation load. It was found that the thinnest layer of porous material results in the greatest flaw tolerance. Also, higher strength was exhibited at large indentation loads when compared to dense monoliths. The calculated stresses on the surfaces

  5. Crystallography of Alumina-YAG-Eutectic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, Serene C.; Sayir, Ali; Dickerson, Robert M.; Matson, Lawrence E.

    2000-01-01

    Multiple descriptions of the alumina-YAG eutectic crystallography appear in the ceramic literature. The orientation between two phases in a eutectic system has direct impact on residual stress, morphology, microstructural stability, and high temperature mechanical properties. A study to demonstrate that the different crystallographic relationships can be correlated with different growth constraints was undertaken. Fibers produced by Laser-Heated Float Zone (LHFZ) and Edge-defined Film-fed Growth (EFG) were examined. A map of the orientation relationship between Al2O3 and Y3Al5O12 and their relationship to the fiber growth axis as a function of pull rate are presented. Regions in which a single orientation predominates are identified.

  6. Preparation ways and photoluminescence of mesoporous alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, P.; Liu, J.; Zhao, X.; Wu, G.

    2010-12-01

    High specific surface area (SSA) mesoporous alumina (MA) is synthesized by a sol-gel method using pelagic clay as the raw material. The MA synthesized with a (1-hexadecyl) trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB): utea mixed template shows a SSA of 385.56 m2/g and a mean pore size of 3.6 nm. And the SSA of the MA synthesized with the mixed template is increased compared with the MA synthesized with a CTAB single template. Simultaneously, the MA exhibits a blue photoluminescence which come from the defect F+ and F centers, and the higher PL emission of the MA synthesized with a CTAB: utea mixed template is attributed to the high defect center density in the MA.

  7. Wettability of Aluminum on Alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Sarina; Tang, Kai; Kvithyld, Anne; Tangstad, Merete; Engh, Thorvald Abel

    2011-12-01

    The wettability of molten aluminum on solid alumina substrate has been investigated by the sessile drop technique in a 10-8 bar vacuum or under argon atmosphere in the temperature range from 1273 K to 1673 K (1000 °C to 1400 °C). It is shown that the reduction of oxide skin on molten aluminum is slow under normal pressures even with ultralow oxygen potential, but it is enhanced in high vacuum. To describe the wetting behavior of the Al-Al2O3 system at lower temperatures, a semiempirical calculation was employed. The calculated contact angle at 973 K (700 °C) is approximately 97 deg, which indicates that aluminum does not wet alumina at aluminum casting temperatures. Thus, a priming height is required for aluminum to infiltrate a filter. Wetting in the Al-Al2O3 system increases with temperature.

  8. Neutralization of a single arginine residue gates open a two-pore domain, alkali-activated K+ channel

    PubMed Central

    Niemeyer, María Isabel; González-Nilo, Fernando D.; Zúñiga, Leandro; González, Wendy; Cid, L. Pablo; Sepúlveda, Francisco V.

    2007-01-01

    Potassium channels share a common selectivity filter that determines the conduction characteristics of the pore. Diversity in K+ channels is given by how they are gated open. TASK-2, TALK-1, and TALK-2 are two-pore region (2P) KCNK K+ channels gated open by extracellular alkalinization. We have explored the mechanism for this alkalinization-dependent gating using molecular simulation and site-directed mutagenesis followed by functional assay. We show that the side chain of a single arginine residue (R224) near the pore senses pH in TASK-2 with an unusual pKa of 8.0, a shift likely due to its hydrophobic environment. R224 would block the channel through an electrostatic effect on the pore, a situation relieved by its deprotonation by alkalinization. A lysine residue in TALK-2 fulfills the same role but with a largely unchanged pKa, which correlates with an environment that stabilizes its positive charge. In addition to suggesting unified alkaline pH-gating mechanisms within the TALK subfamily of channels, our results illustrate in a physiological context the principle that hydrophobic environment can drastically modulate the pKa of charged amino acids within a protein. PMID:17197424

  9. Neutralization of a single arginine residue gates open a two-pore domain, alkali-activated K+ channel.

    PubMed

    Niemeyer, María Isabel; González-Nilo, Fernando D; Zúñiga, Leandro; González, Wendy; Cid, L Pablo; Sepúlveda, Francisco V

    2007-01-09

    Potassium channels share a common selectivity filter that determines the conduction characteristics of the pore. Diversity in K+ channels is given by how they are gated open. TASK-2, TALK-1, and TALK-2 are two-pore region (2P) KCNK K+ channels gated open by extracellular alkalinization. We have explored the mechanism for this alkalinization-dependent gating using molecular simulation and site-directed mutagenesis followed by functional assay. We show that the side chain of a single arginine residue (R224) near the pore senses pH in TASK-2 with an unusual pKa of 8.0, a shift likely due to its hydrophobic environment. R224 would block the channel through an electrostatic effect on the pore, a situation relieved by its deprotonation by alkalinization. A lysine residue in TALK-2 fulfills the same role but with a largely unchanged pKa, which correlates with an environment that stabilizes its positive charge. In addition to suggesting unified alkaline pH-gating mechanisms within the TALK subfamily of channels, our results illustrate in a physiological context the principle that hydrophobic environment can drastically modulate the pKa of charged amino acids within a protein.

  10. Alumina as a Thermoluminescent Material

    SciTech Connect

    Uzun, Erdem; Yarar, Yasemin

    2007-04-23

    Thermoluminescence dosimeters are extensively used for quantitative dose measurements in various irradiation fields. They are also important for environmental monitoring after nuclear accident and weapon tests. In this work, the principles of TLD dosimeter and characteristics of several TLD materials are presented. Besides, taken into account the importance as a raw material, the utilization of domestic alumina (Al2O3) in TLDs as a thermoluminescent material is discussed.

  11. Packed Alumina Absorbs Hypergolic Vapors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J. J.; Mauro, D. M.

    1984-01-01

    Beds of activated alumina effective as filters to remove hypergolic vapors from gas streams. Beds absorb such substances as nitrogen oxides and hydrazines and may also absorb acetylene, ethylene, hydrogen sulfide, benzene, butadiene, butene, styrene, toluene, and xoylene. Bed has no moving parts such as pumps, blowers and mixers. Reliable and energy-conservative. Bed readily adapted to any size from small portable units for use where little vapor release is expected to large stationary units for extensive transfer operations.

  12. Method for preparing Pb-. beta. ''-alumina ceramic

    DOEpatents

    Hellstrom, E.E.

    1984-08-30

    A process is disclosed for preparing impermeable, polycrystalline samples of Pb-..beta..''-alumina ceramic from Na-..beta..''-alumina ceramic by ion exchange. The process comprises two steps. The first step is a high-temperature vapor phase exchange of Na by K, followed by substitution of Pb for K by immersing the sample in a molten Pb salt bath. The result is a polycrystalline Pb-..beta..''-alumina ceramic that is substantially crack-free.

  13. Advanced morphological analysis of patterns of thin anodic porous alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Toccafondi, C.; Stępniowski, W.J.; Leoncini, M.; Salerno, M.

    2014-08-15

    Different conditions of fabrication of thin anodic porous alumina on glass substrates have been explored, obtaining two sets of samples with varying pore density and porosity, respectively. The patterns of pores have been imaged by high resolution scanning electron microscopy and analyzed by innovative methods. The regularity ratio has been extracted from radial profiles of the fast Fourier transforms of the images. Additionally, the Minkowski measures have been calculated. It was first observed that the regularity ratio averaged across all directions is properly corrected by the coefficient previously determined in the literature. Furthermore, the angularly averaged regularity ratio for the thin porous alumina made during short single-step anodizations is lower than that of hexagonal patterns of pores as for thick porous alumina from aluminum electropolishing and two-step anodization. Therefore, the regularity ratio represents a reliable measure of pattern order. At the same time, the lower angular spread of the regularity ratio shows that disordered porous alumina is more isotropic. Within each set, when changing either pore density or porosity, both regularity and isotropy remain rather constant, showing consistent fabrication quality of the experimental patterns. Minor deviations are tentatively discussed with the aid of the Minkowski measures, and the slight decrease in both regularity and isotropy for the final data-points of the porosity set is ascribed to excess pore opening and consequent pore merging. - Highlights: • Thin porous alumina is partly self-ordered and pattern analysis is required. • Regularity ratio is often misused: we fix the averaging and consider its spread. • We also apply the mathematical tool of Minkowski measures, new in this field. • Regularity ratio shows pattern isotropy and Minkowski helps in assessment. • General agreement with perfect artificial patterns confirms the good manufacturing.

  14. Binding of HIV-1 gp41-directed neutralizing and non-neutralizing fragment antibody binding domain (Fab) and single chain variable fragment (ScFv) antibodies to the ectodomain of gp41 in the pre-hairpin and six-helix bundle conformations.

    PubMed

    Louis, John M; Aniana, Annie; Lohith, Katheryn; Sayer, Jane M; Roche, Julien; Bewley, Carole A; Clore, G Marius

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported a series of antibodies, in fragment antigen binding domain (Fab) formats, selected from a human non-immune phage library, directed against the internal trimeric coiled-coil of the N-heptad repeat (N-HR) of HIV-1 gp41. Broadly neutralizing antibodies from that series bind to both the fully exposed N-HR trimer, representing the pre-hairpin intermediate state of gp41, and to partially-exposed N-HR helices within the context of the gp41 six-helix bundle. While the affinities of the Fabs for pre-hairpin intermediate mimetics vary by only 2 to 20-fold between neutralizing and non-neutralizing antibodies, differences in inhibition of viral entry exceed three orders of magnitude. Here we compare the binding of neutralizing (8066) and non-neutralizing (8062) antibodies, differing in only four positions within the CDR-H2 binding loop, in Fab and single chain variable fragment (ScFv) formats, to several pre-hairpin intermediate and six-helix bundle constructs of gp41. Residues 56 and 58 of the mini-antibodies are shown to be crucial for neutralization activity. There is a large differential (≥ 150-fold) in binding affinity between neutralizing and non-neutralizing antibodies to the six-helix bundle of gp41 and binding to the six-helix bundle does not involve displacement of the outer C-terminal helices of the bundle. The binding stoichiometry is one six-helix bundle to one Fab or three ScFvs. We postulate that neutralization by the 8066 antibody is achieved by binding to a continuum of states along the fusion pathway from the pre-hairpin intermediate all the way to the formation of the six-helix bundle, but prior to irreversible fusion between viral and cellular membranes.

  15. Synthesis of high porosity, monolithic alumina aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Poco, J F; Satcher, J H; Hrubesh, L W

    2000-09-20

    Many non-silica aerogels are notably weak and fragile in monolithic form. Particularly, few monolithic aerogels with densities less than 50kg/m3 have any significant strength. It is especially difficult to prepare uncracked monoliths of pure alumina aerogels that are robust and moisture stable. In this paper, we discuss the synthesis of strong, stable, monolithic, high porosity (>98% porous) alumina aerogels, using a two-step sol-gel process. The alumina aerogels have a polycrystalline morphology that results in enhanced physical properties. Most of the measured physical properties of the alumina aerogels are superior to those for silica aerogels for equivalent densities.

  16. Structural Effects of Lanthanide Dopants on Alumina

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ketan; Blair, Victoria; Douglas, Justin; Dai, Qilin; Liu, Yaohua; Ren, Shenqiang; Brennan, Raymond

    2017-01-01

    Lanthanide (Ln3+) doping in alumina has shown great promise for stabilizing and promoting desirable phase formation to achieve optimized physical and chemical properties. However, doping alumina with Ln elements is generally accompanied by formation of new phases (i.e. LnAlO3, Ln2O3), and therefore inclusion of Ln-doping mechanisms for phase stabilization of the alumina lattice is indispensable. In this study, Ln-doping (400 ppm) of the alumina lattice crucially delays the onset of phase transformation and enables phase population control, which is achieved without the formation of new phases. The delay in phase transition (θ → α), and alteration of powder morphology, particle dimensions, and composition ratios between α- and θ-alumina phases are studied using a combination of solid state nuclear magnetic resonance, electron microscopy, digital scanning calorimetry, and high resolution X-ray diffraction with refinement fitting. Loading alumina with a sparse concentration of Ln-dopants suggests that the dopants reside in the vacant octahedral locations within the alumina lattice, where complete conversion into the thermodynamically stable α-domain is shown in dysprosium (Dy)- and lutetium (Lu)-doped alumina. This study opens up the potential to control the structure and phase composition of Ln-doped alumina for emerging applications. PMID:28059121

  17. Physical chemistry of carbothermic reduction of alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, Robert A.

    1985-09-01

    Production of aluminium, by means of carbothermic reduction of alumina, is discussed. By employing a solvent metal bath to absorb the alumina metal, carbothermic reduction of alumina was accomplished at temperatures 300/degree/C lower than the temperatures reported in the literature. Reduction occurred without the formation of intermediate compounds and without the high volatilization of aluminum bearing species. Reduction of alumina immersed in a solvent bath appeared to be rate limited by chemical reaction control. The rates seemed to be a function of the activity of aluminum in the solvent metal bath. Reduction of alumina particles, above the surface of the bath, seemed to occur via vapor transport with carbon in the particles or in the crucible walls. Mass transport in the gas phase appeared to be rate limiting. The rates seemed to be a function of the distance separating the alumina and carbon sources. With both submerged alumina and alumina particles, increasing the surface area of the alumina increased the rate of reduction. 58 refs., 65 figs., 9 tabs.

  18. Structural Effects of Lanthanide Dopants on Alumina

    DOE PAGES

    Patel, Ketan; Blair, Victoria; Douglas, Justin; ...

    2017-01-06

    Lanthanide (Ln3+) doping in alumina has shown great promise for stabilizing and promoting desirable phase formation to achieve optimized physical and chemical properties. However, doping alumina with Ln elements is generally accompanied by formation of new phases (i.e. LnAlO3, Ln2O3), and therefore inclusion of Ln-doping mechanisms for phase stabilization of the alumina lattice is indispensable. In this study, Ln-doping (400 ppm) of the alumina lattice crucially delays the onset of phase transformation and enables phase population control, which is achieved without the formation of new phases. In addition, the delay in phase transition (θ → α), and alteration of powdermore » morphology, particle dimensions, and composition ratios between α- and θ-alumina phases are studied using a combination of solid state nuclear magnetic resonance, electron microscopy, digital scanning calorimetry, and high resolution X-ray diffraction with refinement fitting. Loading alumina with a sparse concentration of Ln-dopants suggests that the dopants reside in the vacant octahedral locations within the alumina lattice, where complete conversion into the thermodynamically stable α-domain is shown in dysprosium (Dy)- and lutetium (Lu)-doped alumina. Lastly, this study opens up the potential to control the structure and phase composition of Ln-doped alumina for emerging applications.« less

  19. Structural Effects of Lanthanide Dopants on Alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Ketan; Blair, Victoria; Douglas, Justin; Dai, Qilin; Liu, Yaohua; Ren, Shenqiang; Brennan, Raymond

    2017-01-01

    Lanthanide (Ln3+) doping in alumina has shown great promise for stabilizing and promoting desirable phase formation to achieve optimized physical and chemical properties. However, doping alumina with Ln elements is generally accompanied by formation of new phases (i.e. LnAlO3, Ln2O3), and therefore inclusion of Ln-doping mechanisms for phase stabilization of the alumina lattice is indispensable. In this study, Ln-doping (400 ppm) of the alumina lattice crucially delays the onset of phase transformation and enables phase population control, which is achieved without the formation of new phases. The delay in phase transition (θ → α), and alteration of powder morphology, particle dimensions, and composition ratios between α- and θ-alumina phases are studied using a combination of solid state nuclear magnetic resonance, electron microscopy, digital scanning calorimetry, and high resolution X-ray diffraction with refinement fitting. Loading alumina with a sparse concentration of Ln-dopants suggests that the dopants reside in the vacant octahedral locations within the alumina lattice, where complete conversion into the thermodynamically stable α-domain is shown in dysprosium (Dy)- and lutetium (Lu)-doped alumina. This study opens up the potential to control the structure and phase composition of Ln-doped alumina for emerging applications.

  20. DNA single-strand breaks, double-strand breaks, and crosslinks in rat testicular germ cells: Measurements of their formation and repair by alkaline and neutral filter elution

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, M.O.; Dysart, G. )

    1985-06-01

    This work describes a neutral and alkaline elution method for measuring DNA single-strand breaks (SSBs), DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), and DNA-DNA crosslinks in rat testicular germ cells after treatments in vivo or in vitro with both chemical mutagens and gamma-irradiation. The methods depend upon the isolation of testicular germ cells by collagenase and trypsin digestion, followed by filtration and centrifugation. {sup 137}Cs irradiation induced both DNA SSBs and DSBs in germ cells held on ice in vitro. Irradiation of the whole animal indicated that both types of DNA breaks are induced in vivo and can be repaired. A number of germ cell mutagens induced either DNA SSBs, DSBs, or cross-links after in vivo and in vitro dosing. These chemicals included methyl methanesulfonate, ethyl methanesulfonate, ethyl nitrosourea, dibromochlorpropane, ethylene dibromide, triethylene melamine, and mitomycin C. These results suggest that the blood-testes barrier is relatively ineffective for these mutagens, which may explain in part their in vivo mutagenic potency. This assay should be a useful screen for detecting chemical attack upon male germ-cell DNA and thus, it should help in the assessment of the mutagenic risk of chemicals. In addition, this approach can be used to study the processes of SSB, DSB, and crosslink repair in DNA of male germ cells, either from all stages or specific stages of development.

  1. Rapid isolation of dengue-neutralizing antibodies from single cell-sorted human antigen-specific memory B-cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Cox, Kara S; Tang, Aimin; Chen, Zhifeng; Horton, Melanie S; Yan, Hao; Wang, Xin-Min; Dubey, Sheri A; DiStefano, Daniel J; Ettenger, Andrew; Fong, Rachel H; Doranz, Benjamin J; Casimiro, Danilo R; Vora, Kalpit A

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring antigen-specific memory B cells and the antibodies they encode is important for understanding the specificity, breadth and duration of immune response to an infection or vaccination. The antibodies isolated could further help design vaccine antigens for raising relevant protective immune responses. However, developing assays to measure and isolate antigen-specific memory B cells is technically challenging due to the low frequencies of these cells that exist in the circulating blood. Here, we describe a flow cytometry method to identify and isolate dengue envelope-specific memory B cells using a labeled dengue envelope protein. We enumerated dengue-envelope specific memory B cells from a cohort of dengue seropositive donors using this direct flow cytometry assay. A more established and conventional assay, the cultured B ELISPOT, was used as a benchmark comparator. Furthermore, we were able to confirm the single-sorted memory B-cell specificity by culturing B cells and differentiating them into plasma cells using cell lines expressing CD40L. The culture supernatants were assayed for antigen binding and the ability of the antibodies to neutralize the cognate dengue virus. Moreover, we successfully isolated the heavy and light Ig sequences and expressed them as full-length recombinant antibodies to reproduce the activity seen in culture supernatants. Mapping of these antibodies revealed a novel epitope for dengue 2 virus serotype. In conclusion, we established a reproducible methodology to enumerate antigen-specific memory B cells and assay their encoded antibodies for functional characterization.

  2. Rapid isolation of dengue-neutralizing antibodies from single cell-sorted human antigen-specific memory B-cell cultures

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Kara S.; Tang, Aimin; Chen, Zhifeng; Horton, Melanie S.; Yan, Hao; Wang, Xin-Min; Dubey, Sheri A.; DiStefano, Daniel J.; Ettenger, Andrew; Fong, Rachel H.; Doranz, Benjamin J.; Casimiro, Danilo R.; Vora, Kalpit A.

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring antigen-specific memory B cells and the antibodies they encode is important for understanding the specificity, breadth and duration of immune response to an infection or vaccination. The antibodies isolated could further help design vaccine antigens for raising relevant protective immune responses. However, developing assays to measure and isolate antigen-specific memory B cells is technically challenging due to the low frequencies of these cells that exist in the circulating blood. Here, we describe a flow cytometry method to identify and isolate dengue envelope-specific memory B cells using a labeled dengue envelope protein. We enumerated dengue-envelope specific memory B cells from a cohort of dengue seropositive donors using this direct flow cytometry assay. A more established and conventional assay, the cultured B ELISPOT, was used as a benchmark comparator. Furthermore, we were able to confirm the single-sorted memory B-cell specificity by culturing B cells and differentiating them into plasma cells using cell lines expressing CD40L. The culture supernatants were assayed for antigen binding and the ability of the antibodies to neutralize the cognate dengue virus. Moreover, we successfully isolated the heavy and light Ig sequences and expressed them as full-length recombinant antibodies to reproduce the activity seen in culture supernatants. Mapping of these antibodies revealed a novel epitope for dengue 2 virus serotype. In conclusion, we established a reproducible methodology to enumerate antigen-specific memory B cells and assay their encoded antibodies for functional characterization. PMID:26491897

  3. Perfluoropolyalkylether decomposition on catalytic aluminas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morales, Wilfredo

    1994-01-01

    The decomposition of Fomblin Z25, a commercial perfluoropolyalkylether liquid lubricant, was studied using the Penn State Micro-oxidation Test, and a thermal gravimetric/differential scanning calorimetry unit. The micro-oxidation test was conducted using 440C stainless steel and pure iron metal catalyst specimens, whereas the thermal gravimetric/differential scanning calorimetry tests were conducted using catalytic alumina pellets. Analysis of the thermal data, high pressure liquid chromatography data, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data support evidence that there are two different decomposition mechanisms for Fomblin Z25, and that reductive sites on the catalytic surfaces are responsible for the decomposition of Fomblin Z25.

  4. Formation of alumina-nickel-molybdenum catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Erofeev, V.I.; Basov, V.G.; Vagin, A.I.; Kalechits, I.V.

    1982-06-01

    On the basis of the results obtained in physical and chemical studies of alumina-nickel-molybdenum oxide catalysts as well as binary system and the individual oxides, the conclusions show that the commercial catalyst consists mainly of nickel and aluminium molybdates, aluminium molybdates, molybdenum oxide, and the alumina support. 4 figures.

  5. Hydrogen and the structure of transition aluminas

    SciTech Connect

    Sohlberg, K.; Pennycook, S.J.; Pantelides, S.T.

    1999-08-25

    {alpha}-Alumina results from the complete dehydration of several minerals of the form Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center{underscore}dot}nH{sub 2}O. The ``transition'' aluminas, {gamma}-alumina, {eta}-alumina, and {delta}-alumina are known to have a spinel structure but the possibility that they contain hydrogen (H) has been the subject of debate. The authors present a series of density-functional theory calculations which, together with available experimental data, show that the spinel aluminas exist over a range of hydrogen content captured by the empirical formula H{sub 3m}Al{sub 2{minus}m}O{sub 3}, with a different greek-letter phases corresponding to different distributions of the Aluminum (Al) ions on the two cation sublattices. Calculations of densities and vibrational frequencies of bulk OH bonds are in excellent agreement with available data. The theory reconciles seemingly inconsistent data and reveals a remarkable property of the spinel aluminas: They are ``reactive sponges'' in that they can store and release water in a reactive way. This chemical activity offers a basis for understanding long-standing puzzles in the behavior of aluminas in catalytic systems.

  6. Influence of precursor chemistry on phase evolution and stability range in the potassium-beta alumina system

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, G.W.; Kroon, A.P. de; Aldinger, F.

    1995-12-31

    The beta alumina structures are known for their high ionic mobility within the lattice. This lead to the development of the Na-{beta}-alumina polycrystal as solid electrolyte in Na/S and Na/NiCl{sub 2} batteries. The K-{beta}{double_prime}-alumina compound is a suitable precursor material to establish proton conducting materials by ion exchange.Tests with single crystal and polycrystalline samples showed the possible application in fuel cells operating between 150--250 C. One of the main problems to be solved is correlation between composition and phase evolution of either {beta}- and {beta}{double_prime}-phase, another problem occurring during sintering is the high vapor pressure of the alkaline oxide. This leads to the decomposition of the highly conductive {beta}{double_prime}-alumina phase into {beta}-alumina or corundum phases and lowers significantly the ionic conductivity. The authors investigated the beta alumina phase evolution using alumina raw materials with different crystallographic structure and grain size. The influence of initial alkaline content and dopant concentration on phase formation and phase stability under sintering conditions has been investigated. A refined phase diagram for Na- and K-beta aluminas will be presented.

  7. Photolytic effects in alumina chlorination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soleiman, M. K.; Rao, Y. K.

    1987-06-01

    The temperature dependence of the rate of chlorination of α-alumina with CO/Cl2 gas mixtures exhibits an anomaly, a departure from the normal Arrhenius behavior, in the range 650 to 850°C; it is manifested as a local maximum in the Arrhenius plot at 670°C followed by a local minimum in the range 770 to 850°C. By carefully studying the effect of irradiation of the CO/Cl2 gas mixtures on the rate of chlorination of α-alumina, it is shown that such an anomaly, which has been observed in the chlorination of various metallic oxides, is most likely due to the photochemical formation of phosgene (COCl2) by ambient light incident on the reactant gas mixture during its transport to the main reactor. Phosgene is a better chlorinating agent than a CO/Cl2 mixture. The mechanism of chlorination of α-Al2O3 by CO/Cl2 mixtures subjected to the light emitted by a high-pressure Hg-vapor lamp is elucidated.

  8. Development of single crystal membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stormont, R. W.; Cocks, F. H.

    1972-01-01

    The design and construction of a high pressure crystal growth chamber was accomplished which would allow the growth of crystals under inert gas pressures of 2 MN/sq m (300 psi). A novel crystal growth technique called EFG was used to grow tubes and rods of the hollandite compounds, BaMgTi7O16, K2MgTi7O16, and tubes of sodium beta-alumina, sodium magnesium-alumina, and potassium beta-alumina. Rods and tubes grown are characterized using metallographic and X-ray diffraction techniques. The hollandite compounds are found to be two or three-phase, composed of coarse grained orientated crystallites. Single crystal c-axis tubes of sodium beta-alumina were grown from melts containing excess sodium oxide. Additional experiments demonstrated that crystals of magnesia doped beta-alumina and potassium beta-alumina also can be achieved by this EFG technique.

  9. The Effect of Fuel Types on Porous Alumina Produced via Soft Combustion Reaction for Implant Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamil, Radin Shafinaz; Abdul Razak, Khairunisak; Ahmad, Nurfateen Fakhariah; Mohamad, Hasmaliza

    2012-03-01

    This article describes the effects of fuel types on the porous structure of alumina produced using a soft combustion reaction. There are several combustion parameters that could affect the porous structure of the alumina produced such as fuel-to-oxidizer ratios, ignition temperature, and type of fuels. In this study, the effect of fuel types on alumina properties was studied. Citric acid, glycine, and urea were used as fuels along with aluminum nitrate as an oxidizer. The properties of porous alumina produced using three different fuels were compared to determine the optimum fuel that could produce the best properties for implant applications. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that single-phase alumina powder was obtained in all samples. Morphology observation using scanning electron microscope (SEM) on sintered bodies showed open pores which had potential to be used in implant applications. Porous alumina produced using glycine as fuel (AG) showed the best properties; high surface area of 8.7 m2/g, porosity of 70% and sintered density 1.37 g/cm3.

  10. Processing and properties of an alumina composite fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantonwine, Paul Everett, II

    1999-11-01

    High temperature metal matrix composites have superior properties to many of the metal alloys currently used in high temperature aerospace structures. However, because of the high cost of their fiber reinforcements, these high temperature composites have not been widely used to date. Here a composite fiber processing approach has been developed to create a low cost oxide reinforcement for high temperature composites. The composite fiber developed consisted of a high strength NextelTM 610 alumina fiber tow and a highly porous alumina matrix. A slurry casting process was used to incorporate the matrix into the fiber tow. Composite fiber processing consisted of four stages; slurry infiltration, fiber shaping, solvent evaporation and sintering. Using an alumina slurries with carefully tailored viscosities and particle volume fractions (d = 0.5 mum), two methods for infiltration were successfully developed. During the evaporation of the slurry solvent, shrinkage pores were identified as a significant problem and resulted in large voids within the porous alumina matrix. A systematic process development effort resulted in methods for avoiding these voids, but at the expense of a reduced filament packing density (34%). During this sintering stage, filament grain growth, filament-to-filament, particle-to-filament and particle-to-particle contact growth all occurred. The role of grain growth and each bond-mechanism upon the stress/strain response and ultimate strength of the alumina composite fiber was investigated. It was found that grain growth and filament-to-filament sintering caused a decrease in the single filament and bundle strength. Filament-to-filament sintering had an especially strong effect on the bundle strength because bonded filament clusters failed when the weakest filament within the cluster failed and because shear stresses were induced at the filament-to-filament bond-line. Finite element modeling was used to confirm the presence of these shear stresses

  11. Low-temperature carbon monoxide oxidation catalysed by regenerable atomically dispersed palladium on alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Eric J.; DelaRiva, Andrew T.; Lin, Sen; Johnson, Ryan S.; Guo, Hua; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Kwak, Ja Hun; Peden, Charles H.F.; Kiefer, Boris; Allard, Lawrence F.; Ribeiro, Fabio H.; Datye, Abhaya K.

    2014-09-15

    Catalysis by single isolated atoms of precious metals has attracted much recent interest since it promises the ultimate economy in atom efficiency. Previous reports have been confined to reducible oxide supports such as FeOx, TiO₂ or CeO₂. Here we show that isolated Pd atoms can be stabilized on industrially relevant gamma-alumina supports. At low Pd loadings (≤0.5 wt%) these catalysts contain exclusively atomically dispersed Pd species. The addition of lanthanum-oxide to the alumina, long known for its ability to improve alumina stability, is found to also help in the stabilization of isolated Pd atoms. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (AC-STEM) confirms the presence of intermingled Pd and La on the gamma-alumina surface. Operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy, performed on Pd/La-alumina and Pd/gamma-alumina (0.5 wt% Pd) demonstrates the presence of catalytically active atomically dispersed ionic Pd in the Pd/La-doped gamma-alumina system. CO oxidation reactivity measurements show onset of catalytic activity at 40 °C, indicating that the ionic Pd species are not poisoned by CO. The reaction order in CO and O₂ is positive, suggesting a reaction mechanism that is different from that on metallic Pd. The catalyst activity is lost if the Pd species are reduced to their metallic form, but the activity can be regenerated by oxidation at 700 °C in air. The high-temperature stability of these ionic Pd species on commercial alumina supports makes this catalyst system of potential interest for low-temperature exhaust treatment catalysts.

  12. Characterization and application of electrospun alumina nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Alumina nanofibers were prepared by a technique that combined the sol–gel and electrospinning methods. The solution to be electrospun was prepared by mixing aluminum isopropoxide (AIP) in ethanol, which was then refluxed in the presence of an acid catalyst and polyvinylpyrolidone (PVP) in ethanol. The characterization results showed that alumina nanofibers with diameters in the range of 102 to 378 nm were successfully prepared. On the basis of the results of the XRD and FT-IR, the alumina nanofibers calcined at 1,100°C were identified as comprising the α-alumina phase, and a series of phase transitions such as boehmite → γ-alumina → α-alumina were observed from 500°C to 1,200°C. The pore size of the obtained γ-alumina nanofibers is approximately 8 nm, and it means that they are mesoporous materials. The kinetic study demonstrated that MO adsorption on alumina nanofibers can be seen that the pseudo-second-order kinetic model fits better than the pseudo-first-order kinetic model. PMID:24467944

  13. EFFECT OF GRAIN SIZE ON DYNAMIC SCRATCH RESPONSE IN ALUMINA

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hong; Wereszczak, Andrew A; Lance, Michael J

    2006-01-01

    The machining and wear of ceramics and ceramic components are obviously influenced by abrasive damage. One parameter that can affect the abrasion process is the grain size of the ceramic material. To investigate this, single-grit pendulum scratch testing was used to investigate the dynamic scratch response in three 99.9% aluminas that each had a tight size distribution about mean grain sizes of 2, 15, or 25 m, respectively. The scratch speeds generated had an order of magnitude of ~ 1 m/s and the maximum scratch depths were several tens of micrometers. Tangential and normal scratch forces were monitored during each test and interpreted in conjunction with postmortem SEM and profilometry results. It was observed that both plastic deformation and brittle fracture participated in the scratching process and the relative activity of each was dependent on depth of penetration. At a specific depth of penetration, the material removal of alumina prevailingly relies on the generation and interaction of oblique radial and lateral cracks. Chip formation is greatly enhanced when the created cracks interact and that interaction itself depends on grain size. Larger grain size gives rise to larger lateral cracks, more severe fracture at the groove's bottom, and larger amplitude of scratch force oscillation. Lastly, the cutting pressure and the scratch hardness of alumina exhibit sensitivity to both grain size and the groove depth.

  14. Refractive index of infrared-transparent polycrystalline alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Daniel C.; Johnson, Linda F.; Cambrea, Lee R.; Baldwin, Lawrence; Baronowski, Meghan; Zelmon, David E.; Poston, William B.; Kunkel, John D.; Parish, Mark; Pascucci, Marina R.; Gannon, John J.; Wen, Tzu-Chien

    2017-05-01

    The refractive index of polycrystalline α-alumina prisms with an average grain size of 0.6 μm is reported for the wavelength range 0.9 to 5.0 and the temperature range 293 to 498K. Results agree within 0.0002 with the refractive index predicted for randomly oriented grains of single-crystal aluminum oxide. This paper provides tutorial background on the behavior of birefringent materials and explains how the refractive index of polycrystalline alumina can be predicted from the ordinary and extraordinary refractive indices of sapphire. The refractive index of polycrystalline alumina is described by 𝑛𝑛2 - 1 = (A+B [𝑇𝑇2-𝑇𝑇20]) +Dλ2 /λ2-(λ1+C [𝑇𝑇2-𝑇𝑇20])2 + λ2-λ22 where wavelength λ is expressed in μm, To = 295.15 K, A = 2.07156, B = 6.273× 10-8, λ1 = 0.091293, C = -1.9516 × 10-8, D = 5.62675, and λ2 = 18.5533. The slope dn/dT varies with λ and T, but has the approximate value 1.4 × 10-5 K-1 in the range 296-498 K.

  15. First-principles study of hydrogen diffusion in α-Al2O3 and liquid alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belonoshko, A. B.; Rosengren, A.; Dong, Q.; Hultquist, G.; Leygraf, C.

    2004-01-01

    We have studied the energetics and mobility of neutral hydrogen in alumina Al2O3 using ab initio density-functional calculations. The mobility of hydrogen was studied in corundum (α-Al2O3) as well as in liquid alumina. Using both static as well as molecular-dynamics calculations, and applying classical transition state theory, we derive the temperature-dependent diffusivity of hydrogen in α-Al2O3 as D(T)=(21.7×10-8 m2/s)exp(-1.24 eV/kT). The corresponding diffusivity of hydrogen in liquid/amorphous alumina, derived directly from ab initio molecular dynamics calculations, is D(T)=(8.71×10-7 m2/s)exp(-0.91 eV/kT). The computed diffusivity compares very well to experimental data. We conclude that diffusion of neutral hydrogen through the bulk of alumina is a good approximation of the mechanism for hydrogen mobility in corrosion scales. The representation of grain-boundary structures by amorphous alumina is, probably, realistic at higher temperatures.

  16. Fabrication of thin layer beta alumina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tennenhouse, G. J.

    1977-01-01

    Beta alumina tubes having walls 700 microns, 300 microns, and 140 microns were processed by extrusion and sintering utilizing Ford proprietary binder and fabrication systems. Tubes prepared by this method have properties similar to tubes prepared by isostatic pressing and sintering, i.e. density greater than 98% of theoretical and a helium leak rate less than 3 x 10 to the -9th power cc/sq cm/sec. Ford ultrasonic bonding techniques were used for bonding beta alumina end caps to open ended beta -alumina tubes prior to sintering. After sintering, the bond was hermetic, and the integrity of the bonded area was comparable to the body of the tube.

  17. Alumina Concentration Gradients in Aluminium Reduction Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavoie, Pascal; Taylor, Mark P.

    The length of aluminium electrolysis cells have constantly increased over the last decades. The drive to increase productivity resulted in the need to feed and dissolve more alumina in less electrolyte. There is mounting evidence that these two trends are pushing the electrolysis cells above their capability to maintain alumina concentration, through time and space, at levels preventing both conventional and non-propagating anode effects. Alumina concentration gradient measurements were performed within large industrial cells and showed that large gradients occurred between locations in cells.

  18. Dissolution Kinetics of Alumina Calcine

    SciTech Connect

    Batcheller, Thomas Aquinas

    2001-09-01

    Dissolution kinetics of alumina type non-radioactive calcine was investigated as part of ongoing research that addresses permanent disposal of Idaho High Level Waste (HLW). Calcine waste was produced from the processing of nuclear fuel at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC). Acidic radioactive raffinates were solidified at ~500°C in a fluidized bed reactor to form the dry granular calcine material. Several Waste Management alternatives for the calcine are presented in the Idaho High Level Waste Draft EIS. The Separations Alternative addresses the processing of the calcine so that the HLW is ready for removal to a national geological repository by the year 2035. Calcine dissolution is the key front-end unit operation for the separations alternative.

  19. Interaction of Wide-Band-Gap Single Crystals With 248-nm Excimer Laser Radiation: XI. The Effect of Water Vapor and Temperature on Laser Desorption of Neutral Atoms From Sodium Chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Nwe, K H.; Langford, Stephen C.; Dickinson, J T.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2005-01-20

    We investigate the effect of water vapor and temperature on the desorption of neutral Na and Cl from cleaved, single crystal NaCl during pulsed laser irradiation at 248-nm (KrF excimer). Neutral emissions in the presence of {approx}10-5 Pa of water vapor are much more intense than in ultra high vacuum (total pressure <10-7 Pa). Emission intensities are also increased by raising the substrate temperature or the laser fluence. The neutral time-of-flight signals are well described by Maxwell Boltzmann velocity distributions for effusing particles, which we use to estimate the peak surface temperatures during the laser pulse. The neutral emission intensities display Arrhenius behavior when plotted against both the background substrate temperature and the peak surface temperature. The resulting activation energies correspond to different, rate limiting processes, one of which is enhanced in the presence of water vapor. We propose a mechanism for the effect of water on these neutral emissions and discuss the implications.

  20. Crack healing in alumina bioceramics.

    PubMed

    Fischer, H; Weiss, R; Telle, R

    2008-03-01

    Microscopic cracks can occur at the surface of oxide ceramic restorations as a result of the manufacturing process and mainly due to the final mechanical preparation in the dental laboratory. A method is presented to heal up such microscopic cracks by a glass infiltration process. Bar specimens made of high purity bio-alumina were manufactured. On two batches of specimens microscopic cracks were induced using the Vickers indentation technique. The small microscopic cracks at the tip of the resulting half-penny-shape cracks were extended by the bridge loading method. The indentation pattern of the specimens of one batch was subsequently glass-infiltrated. The surface layers of the specimens with the Vickers indentation were removed by grinding as far as only the extended microscopic cracks (with and without glass) remained at the surface. The strengths of untreated, micro-damaged, and micro-damaged and glass-infiltrated specimens were determined. The microstructure of the fracture surfaces was analyzed using SEM. The characteristic strength of the specimens decreased from sigma(0)=378 to 196 MPa and the Weibull modulus from m=13.7 to 2.3 due to the micro-damaging. The strength and the scatter-in-strength were significantly improved by the glass infiltration process. The strength of the "healed" specimens (sigma(0)=434 MPa, m=17.3) was even better than that of the untreated samples. Microscopic cracks that can occur at the surface of dental restorations made of alumina like abutments or cores of crowns and bridges during the manufacturing and preparation process could reliably be healed by a glass infiltration process.

  1. Dynamic Modulus and Damping of Boron, Silicon Carbide, and Alumina Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, J. A.; Williams, W.

    1980-01-01

    The dynamic modulus and damping capacity for boron, silicon carbide, and silicon carbide coated boron fibers were measured from-190 to 800 C. The single fiber vibration test also allowed measurement of transverse thermal conductivity for the silicon carbide fibers. Temperature dependent damping capacity data for alumina fibers were calculated from axial damping results for alumina-aluminum composites. The dynamics fiber data indicate essentially elastic behavior for both the silicon carbide and alumina fibers. In contrast, the boron based fibers are strongly anelastic, displaying frequency dependent moduli and very high microstructural damping. Ths single fiber damping results were compared with composite damping data in order to investigate the practical and basic effects of employing the four fiber types as reinforcement for aluminum and titanium matrices.

  2. Loss tangent measurements on unirradiated alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; Goulding, R.H.

    1996-04-01

    Unirradiated room temperature loss tangent for sapphire and several commercial grades of polycrystalline alumina are complied for frequencies between 10{sup 5} and 4x10{sup 11} Hz. Sapphire exhibits significantly lower values for the loss tangent at frequencies up to 10{sup 11} Hz. The loss tangents of 3 different grades of Wesgo alumina (AL300, AL995, AL998) and 2 different grades of Coors alumina (AD94, AD995) have typical values near {approx}10{sup -4} at a frequency of 10{sup 8} Hz. On the other hand, the loss tangent of Vitox alumina exhibits a large loss peak tan d{approx} 5x10{sup -3} at this frequency.

  3. Joining of alumina ceramics and nickel alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Ariga, Tadashi; Nitta, Yuji; Miyazawa, Yasuyuki

    1994-12-31

    Joining of alumina ceramics to nickel alloy was made using the various types of Ag-Cu-Ti brazing filler metal. Ti-containing brazing filler metal was produced by physical vapor deposition (PVD) method on the joining area of the alumina ceramics. The joinability of the brazing filler metal was estimated by its mechanical properties. And the composition and structure of the ceramic-metal bond zone in the alumina ceramics-nickel alloy joints were analyzed by SEM, EPMA and X-ray diffraction examinations. Some of brazing filler metal achieved the highest shear strength 100 MPa at room temperature. The elemental distributions of the interface between alumina ceramics and Ag-Cu-Ti brazing filler metal was shown to form the reaction layer consisting titanium oxide.

  4. TENORM: Bauxite and Alumina Production Wastes

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Bauxite is used to produce alumina, which is then used to produce aluminum. Naturally-occurring radioactivity in bauxite ores is concentrated during the refining process, creating TENORM in bauxite refining residuals.

  5. Alcoa Pressure Calcination Process for Alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sucech, S. W.; Misra, C.

    A new alumina calcination process developed at Alcoa Laboratories is described. Alumina is calcined in two stages. In the first stage, alumina hydrate is heated indirectly to 500°C in a decomposer vessel. Released water is recovered as process steam at 110 psig pressure. Partial transformation of gibbsite to boehmite occurs under hydrothermal conditions of the decomposer. The product from the decomposer containing about 5% LOI is then calcined by direct heating to 850°C to obtain smelting grade alumina. The final product is highly attrition resistant, has a surface area of 50-80 m2/g and a LOI of less than 1%. Accounting for the recovered steam, the effective fuel consumption for the new calcination process is only 1.6 GJ/t A12O3.

  6. Electrical Properties of Thin Films of Alumina.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The report consists of a literature survey on the electrical properties of alumina and aluminum oxide thin films . A bibliographic listing of reports is included along with abstracts from most of them.

  7. Processing of Alumina-Toughened Zirconia Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Choi, Sung R.

    2003-01-01

    Dense and crack-free 10-mol%-yttria-stabilized zirconia (10YSZ)-alumina composites, containing 0 to 30 mol% of alumina, have been fabricated by hot pressing. Release of pressure before onset of cooling was crucial in obtaining crack-free material. Hot pressing at 1600 C resulted in the formation of ZrC by reaction of zirconia with grafoil. However, no such reaction was observed at 1500 C. Cubic zirconia and -alumina were the only phases detected from x-ray diffraction indicating no chemical reaction between the composite constituents during hot pressing. Microstructure of the composites was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Density and elastic modulus of the composites followed the rule-of-mixtures. Addition of alumina to 10YSZ resulted in lighter, stronger, and stiffer composites by decreasing density and increasing strength and elastic modulus.

  8. Sorption of metal ions on alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgarten, E.; Kirchhausen-Duesing, U.

    1997-10-01

    The adsorption of metal ions on aluminas is of great interest in different fields such as geochemistry, oceanography, limnology, and pollution control. Precipitation and adsorption of metal ions (Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), and Cr(III)) on {gamma}-alumina were investigated experimentally. A surface chemical reaction model to calculate concentrations of aluminum ions, metal ions, and pH as variables depending on amount of alumina, volume of liquid and gas phase, initial metal concentration, and amount of acid or base added is presented. In the case of Co(II) the pH dependence of rest concentrations with and without alumina is equal; adsorption may be disregarded. For the other ions adsorption is important. Considering the charge of the surface does not improve the fit. In the pH region, where adsorption leads to lower rest concentrations than precipitation, adsorption may be described by a Henry isotherm.

  9. Cast alumina forming austenitic stainless steels

    DOEpatents

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Brady, Michael P

    2013-04-30

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy consisting essentially of, in terms of weight percent ranges 0.15-0.5C; 8-37Ni; 10-25Cr; 2.5-5Al; greater than 0.6, up to 2.5 total of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Nb and Ta; up to 3Mo; up to 3Co; up to 1W; up to 3Cu; up to 15Mn; up to 2Si; up to 0.15B; up to 0.05P; up to 1 total of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Y, La, Ce, Hf, and Zr; <0.3Ti+V; <0.03N; and, balance Fe, where the weight percent Fe is greater than the weight percent Ni, and wherein the alloy forms an external continuous scale comprising alumina, and a stable essentially single phase FCC austenitic matrix microstructure, the austenitic matrix being essentially delta-ferrite free and essentially BCC-phase-free. A method of making austenitic stainless steel alloys is also disclosed.

  10. Preparation and Characterization of Electrospun Alumina Nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinti, Marie J.; Tacastacas, Stephen N.; Stojilovic, Nenad; O'Brien, John P.; Pischera, Anna; Espe, Matthew P.

    2008-10-01

    Alumina nanofibers are promising materials for use in high- temperature applications since they are chemically inert up to very high temperatures. Applications include use as catalyst support in high-temperature chemical reactions, fire protection materials, and as a high-temperature insulator. Electrospinning is a relatively simple and inexpensive method for obtaining nanometer-size fibers and has become a popular technique for producing metal-oxide nanofibers in recent years. The electrospinning mixture for the production of alumina nanofibers typically contains aluminum acetate stabilized with boric acid as the alumina precursor; but the observed presence of boron and sodium on the surface of these nanofibers may affect their use as catalytic supports. We have produced alumina nanofibers from an aluminum reagent devoid of the boric acid stabilizer and calcined the fibers at different temperatures to produce nanofibers with different phases of alumina. Characterization of the fibers by TGA, FE-SEM equipped with the XEDS, powder XRD, DRIFTS, and SSNMR methods to determine the fate of the precursors, fiber morphology and the composition and structure of the calcined alumina nanofibers.

  11. An all-electron density functional theory study of the structure and properties of the neutral and singly charged M12 and M13 clusters: M = Sc-Zn.

    PubMed

    Gutsev, G L; Weatherford, C W; Belay, K G; Ramachandran, B R; Jena, P

    2013-04-28

    The electronic and geometrical structures of the M12 and M13 clusters where M = Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn along with their singly negatively and positively charged ions are studied using all-electron density functional theory within the generalized gradient approximation. The geometries corresponding to the lowest total energy states of singly and negatively charged ions of V13, Mn12, Co12, Ni13, Cu13, Zn12, and Zn13 are found to be different from the geometries of the corresponding neutral parents. The computed ionization energies of the neutrals, vertical electron detachment energies from the anions, and energies required to remove a single atom from the M13 and M13(+) clusters are in good agreement with experiment. The change in a total spin magnetic moment of the cation or anion with respect to a total spin magnetic moment of the corresponding neutral is consistent with the one-electron model in most cases, i.e., they differ by ±1.0 μ(B). Exceptions are found only for Sc12(-), Ti12(+), Mn12(-), Mn12(+), Fe12(-), Fe13(+), and Co12(+).

  12. Alumina surfaces and interfaces under non-ultrahigh vacuum conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelber, Jeffry A.

    2007-07-01

    This paper is a review of studies of the structures and reactivities of ordered alumina surfaces under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV; < 10 -8 Torr), ambient (>1 Torr), and intermediate (10 -7-10 -1 Torr) pressure conditions. Most ordered alumina films—including α- Al 2O 3(0001) and transitional phase thin films grown on single-crystal substrates, are Al-terminated, but do not dissociate H 2O or many other small molecules (e.g., CH 3OH, NH 3) at room temperature under UHV conditions. Under ambient conditions, the α- Al 2O 3(0001) surface becomes OH-terminated, with an overlayer of physisorbed molecular H 2O stabilized by hydrogen bonding interactions with the OH substrate layer. The reactivity under ambient conditions is consistent with theoretical predictions of cooperative dissociation pathways for H 2O on this surface with low activation barriers, and is also consistent with desorption studies indicating that high fractional surface coverages of H 2O ( θO˜1) should only be observed at pressures of ˜1 Torr or higher. Surprisingly, cooperative H 2O interactions have also been observed at the surfaces of ordered films grown on Ni 3Al(111) and (110), and on NiAl(100) substrates at intermediate pressures orders of magnitude below ambient; PH 2O >10 -7 Torr, 300 K. Under these conditions, a cooperative reaction is apparently initiated at defect sites, resulting in strong surface rearrangement. NO appears to exhibit analogous behavior to H 2O, albeit at UHV pressures and at 100 K, where NO dimers form at surface defect sites. These data indicate that cooperative surface reactions occur at transitional phase alumina surfaces at pressures that are orders of magnitude below what one would expect based on straightforward thermodynamics and kinetics calculations, and point to the importance of surface defect sites for initiating reactions that eventually affect the entire surface. There is suggestive evidence that H 2O exposure also leads to the incorporation of interstitial

  13. Synthesis of mono- and bi-layer MFI zeolite films on macroporous alumina tubular supports: Application to nanofiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Said, Ali; Limousy, Lionel; Nouali, Habiba; Michelin, Laure; Halawani, Jalal; Toufaily, Joumana; Hamieh, Tayssir; Dutournié, Patrick; Daou, T. Jean

    2015-10-01

    This work is dedicated to the development of MFI-type structure zeolite films (single-layer or bilayer) on the internal layer of a specific macroporous alumina tubular support for nanofiltration applications. The bottom MFI layer was obtained by direct hydrothermal synthesis while a secondary growth method was used for the top MFI layer. A complete characterization of the obtained MFI membranes (single-layer or bilayer) is proposed using various techniques, such as X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, mercury porosimetry and nitrogen sorption measurements. Dense and highly crystallized films of MFI-type structure zeolite were obtained for both single-layer and bilayer MFI films. The total film thickness were around 7.1±0.5 μm and 14.5±1 μm for single-layer and bilayer MFI films respectively. The Si/Al molar ratio of the MFI films varied between 185 and 305 for single-layer and bilayer MFI films respectively. The hydraulic permeability of the tubular MFI membrane was achieved by the filtration of pure water. The hydraulic permeability of the single-layer and bilayer MFI membranes decreased rapidly at the beginning of the conditioning process, and stabilized at 1.08×10-14 m3 m-2 and 1.02×10-15 m3 m-2 after 15 h and the rejection rates of neutral solute (Vb 12) are 10% and 50% for the single-layer and bilayer MFI films respectively.

  14. Effect of co-existing ions during the preparation of alumina by electrolysis with aluminum soluble electrodes: structure and defluoridation activity of electro-synthesized adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Tchomgui-Kamga, Eric; Audebrand, Nathalie; Darchen, André

    2013-06-15

    The electrochemical dissolution of aluminum was carried out to prepare hydrated aluminas which were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), chemical titrations and defluoridation activities. Aluminas were obtained at controlled pH depending upon the counter cations of the electrolyte. A boehmite AlOOH phase was isolated mainly in ammonium solution, while aluminas synthesized in the other media contained a mixture of phases, usually both boehmite and bayerite γ-Al(OH)₃. All the boehmite phases contained nano-crystallites of less than 3 nm. Batch defluoridation experiments revealed a second influence of the original electrolyte. Aluminas were very effective in defluoridation with abatement rates of 99.5%, 98.5% and 97.3% from neutral fluoride solution at 10 mgL(-1) when they were prepared in solution of (NH₄)₂SO₄, (NH₄)HCO₂ and NH₄Cl, respectively. The maximum fluoride capacities were 46.94; 10.25 and 12.18 mg g(-1) for aluminas prepared in solution of (NH₄)₂SO₄; (NH₄)HCO₂ and NH₄Cl, respectively. The amount of dissolved Al was found to be less than 0.19 mgL(-1) at neutral pH. These results show that a defluoridation with electro-synthesized aluminas would be more efficient and safe than a direct electrocoagulation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Thirty years of experience with alumina-on-alumina bearings in total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Zaoui, Amine; Zadegan, Frédéric; Sedel, Laurent; Nizard, Rémy

    2010-01-01

    Alumina-on-alumina bearings in total hip arthroplasty have been developed in an attempt to minimise debris and the occurrence of osteolytic lesions. The outstanding tribological properties of this bearing system are explained by low surface roughness, high hardness for major scratch resistance, and high wettability. Since the 1970s, technological improvements in the manufacturing process of alumina components together with a better understanding of Morse taper technology have provided a surgical grade material with high density, high purity and small grains. Published studies on the outcome of total hip arthroplasty performed with this new generation of implants showed high survivorship especially in young and active patients, with survival rates free of revision of 90.8% to 97.4% at ten years. However, concern remains over ceramic liner fracture and squeaking, which has been noted recently with increasing prevalence. This review will discuss the current knowledge on the use of alumina-on-alumina bearings. PMID:21191579

  16. High-pressure acid dissolution of refractory alumina for trace element determination

    SciTech Connect

    Foner, H.A.

    1984-04-01

    A new high-pressure vessel (bomb) is described which uses nitrogen gas as the pressurizing medium and has the capability of measuring both the compensating pressure and the bomb temperature during heating. It is possible to dissolve quite large pieces (0.5 g) of unground (i.e., uncontaminated) single-crystal ..cap alpha..-alumina. The physical, electrical, and manufacturing properties of aluminas are all much affected by the levels of impurities present, and hence the determination of trace elements in these materials is of great practical importance.

  17. Fracture Strength of Zirconia and Alumina Ceramic Crowns Supported by Implants.

    PubMed

    Traini, Tonino; Sorrentino, Roberto; Gherlone, Enrico; Perfetti, Federico; Bollero, Patrizio; Zarone, Ferdinando

    2015-07-01

    Due to the brittleness and limited tensile strength of the veneering glass-ceramic materials, the methods that combine strong core material (as zirconia or alumina) are still under debate. The present study aims to evaluate the fracture strength and the mechanism of failure through fractographic analysis of single all-ceramic crowns supported by implants. Forty premolar cores were fabricated with CAD/CAM technology using alumina (n = 20) and zirconia (n = 20). The specimens were veneered with glass-ceramic, cemented on titanium abutments, and subjected to loading test until fracture. SEM fractographic analysis was also performed. The fracture load was 1165 (±509) N for alumina and 1638 (±662) N for zirconia with a statistically significant difference between the two groups (P = 0.026). Fractographic analysis of alumina-glass-ceramic crowns, showed the presence of catastrophic cracks through the entire thickness of the alumina core; for the zirconia-glass-ceramic crowns, the cracks involved mainly the thickness of the ceramic veneering layer. The sandblast procedure of the zirconia core influenced crack path deflection. Few samples (n = 3) showed limited microcracks of the zirconia core. Zirconia showed a significantly higher fracture strength value in implant-supported restorations, indicating the role played by the high resistant cores for premolar crowns.

  18. Synthesis of high thermally-stable mesoporous alumina particles.

    PubMed

    Song, Lee-Hwa; Park, Seung Bin

    2010-01-01

    The mesoporous undoped and Si-doped alumina were prepared with an ultrasonic spray process, and found to have well-developed mesopore structures and large surface areas. The mesoporous Si-doped alumina has a high thermal stability up to 1473 K. Its surface area and pore volume were found to slowly decrease with increasing temperature. Mesoporous undoped alumina is transformed to gamma-alumina at 1073 K, whereas the amorphous nature of the pore walls of the Si-doped alumina is maintained up to 1073 K. When heat treatment was carried out at 1473 K for 2 h, the mesopore-networks of the undoped alumina collapsed, and then all the pore walls were converted into the alpha-alumina phase. In contrast, the mesoporosity of the Si-doped alumina persisted during heat treatment, and its pore walls were transformed to gamma-alumina. The decreases in the pore volume of the undoped alumina at 1073 K and 1473 K were found to be 36% and 99% respectively, but for the Si-doped alumina were only 24% and 36% respectively. The surface area of the undoped alumina at 1473 K was found to be 11 m2/g but that of the Si-doped samples at the same temperature is higher than 100 m2/g. Thus this mesoporous Si-doped alumina can be used as a catalytic support in reactions at high temperatures.

  19. Characterization of Alumina Interfaces in TBC Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pint, Bruce A; More, Karren Leslie

    2009-01-01

    Interfacial segregants in thermally grown {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scales formed during high temperature exposure of thermal barrier coating systems reflect the oxygen-active dopants present in the bond coating and substrate, such as Y and Hf. These dopants diffuse outward and segregate to the substrate-alumina interface and the alumina grain boundaries. Related studies suggest that these segregants affect the growth and mechanical properties of the alumina-scale; however, the characterization of segregation in alumina formed on coated superalloy systems has been limited. Segregation examples evaluated using analytical transmission electron microscopy are given from traditional Pt-modified aluminide coatings and newer Pt diffusion coatings. Model systems are used to illustrate that grain boundary segregants on the columnar alumina boundaries are not because of the reverse diffusion of cations from the Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-stabilized ZrO{sub 2} top coating, and that interstitial elements in the substrate likely affect the outward flux of cation dopants. The dynamic nature of this segregation and oxygen-potential gradient-driven diffusion is discussed in light of observations of substrate dopant and interstitial contents affecting coating performance.

  20. Cross-neutralizing anti-HIV-1 human single chain variable fragments(scFvs) against CD4 binding site and N332 glycan identified from a recombinant phage library

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Lubina; Kumar, Rajesh; Thiruvengadam, Ramachandran; Parray, Hilal Ahmad; Makhdoomi, Muzamil Ashraf; Kumar, Sanjeev; Aggarwal, Heena; Mohata, Madhav; Hussain, Abdul Wahid; Das, Raksha; Varadarajan, Raghavan; Bhattacharya, Jayanta; Vajpayee, Madhu; Murugavel, K. G.; Solomon, Suniti; Sinha, Subrata; Luthra, Kalpana

    2017-01-01

    More than 50% of HIV-1 infection globally is caused by subtype_C viruses. Majority of the broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) targeting HIV-1 have been isolated from non-subtype_C infected donors. Mapping the epitope specificities of bnAbs provides useful information for vaccine design. Recombinant antibody technology enables generation of a large repertoire of monoclonals with diverse specificities. We constructed a phage recombinant single chain variable fragment (scFv) library with a diversity of 7.8 × 108 clones, using a novel strategy of pooling peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of six select HIV-1 chronically infected Indian donors whose plasma antibodies exhibited potent cross neutralization efficiency. The library was panned and screened by phage ELISA using trimeric recombinant proteins to identify viral envelope specific clones. Three scFv monoclonals D11, C11 and 1F6 selected from the library cross neutralized subtypes A, B and C viruses at concentrations ranging from 0.09 μg/mL to 100 μg/mL. The D11 and 1F6 scFvs competed with mAbs b12 and VRC01 demonstrating CD4bs specificity, while C11 demonstrated N332 specificity. This is the first study to identify cross neutralizing scFv monoclonals with CD4bs and N332 glycan specificities from India. Cross neutralizing anti-HIV-1 human scFv monoclonals can be potential candidates for passive immunotherapy and for guiding immunogen design. PMID:28332627

  1. DNA prime and virus-like particle boost from a single H5N1 strain elicits broadly neutralizing antibody responses against head region of H5 hemagglutinin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guiqin; Zhou, Fan; Buchy, Philippe; Zuo, Teng; Hu, Hongxing; Liu, Jingjing; Song, Yufeng; Ding, Heng; Tsai, Cheguo; Chen, Ze; Zhang, Linqi; Deubel, Vincent; Zhou, Paul

    2014-03-01

    Since 1996, highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus has presented a persistent threat to public health. Its high degree of genetic diversity also poses enormous challenges in developing effective vaccines. To search for vaccine regimens that could elicit broadly neutralizing antibody responses against diverse HPAI H5N1 strains, in the present study we tested H5 hemagglutinin (HA) from an A/Thailand/1(KAN)-1/2004 strain in a heterologous prime-boost vaccination. We demonstrated that priming mice with DNA and boosting with virus-like particle induced antibody responses that cross-neutralize all reported clades and subclades of HPAI H5N1 viruses and protect mice from high lethal dose HPAI H5N1 challenge in both active and passive immunizations. Unexpectedly, cross-divergent H5 neutralizing antibodies are directed to the HA head and block both attachment and postattachment of virus entry. Thus, we conclude that as a promising pan-H5 vaccine candidate this prime-boost regimen could be further developed in ferrets and in humans.

  2. Dielectric Performance of a High Purity HTCC Alumina at High Temperatures - a Comparison Study with Other Polycrystalline Alumina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Liangyu

    2014-01-01

    A very high purity (99.99+%) high temperature co-fired ceramic (HTCC) alumina has recently become commercially available. The raw material of this HTCC alumina is very different from conventional HTCC alumina, and more importantly there is no glass additive in this alumina material for co-firing processing. Previously, selected HTCC and LTCC (low temperature co-fired ceramic) alumina materials were evaluated at high temperatures as dielectric and compared to a regularly sintered 96% polycrystalline alumina (96% Al2O3), where 96% alumina was used as the benchmark. A prototype packaging system based on regular 96% alumina with Au thickfilm metallization successfully facilitated long term testing of high temperature silicon carbide (SiC) electronic devices for over 10,000 hours at 500 C. In order to evaluate this new high purity HTCC alumina for possible high temperature packaging applications, the dielectric properties of this HTCC alumina substrate were measured and compared with those of 96% alumina and a previously tested LTCC alumina from room temperature to 550 C at frequencies of 120 Hz, 1 KHz, 10 KHz, 100 KHz, and 1 MHz. A parallel-plate capacitive device with dielectric of the HTCC alumina and precious metal electrodes were used for measurements of the dielectric constant and dielectric loss of the co-fired alumina material in the temperature and frequency ranges. The capacitance and AC parallel conductance of the capacitive device were directly measured by an AC impedance meter, and the dielectric constant and parallel AC conductivity of the dielectric were calculated from the capacitance and conductance measurement results. The temperature and frequency dependent dielectric constant, AC conductivity, and dissipation factor of the HTCC alumina substrate are presented and compared to those of 96% alumina and a selected LTCC alumina. Other technical advantages of this new co-fired material for possible high packaging applications are also discussed.

  3. Sorption of acetaminophen, 17alpha-ethynyl estradiol, nalidixic acid, and norfloxacin to silica, alumina. and a hydrophobic medium.

    PubMed

    Lorphensri, Oranuj; Intravijit, Jittipong; Sabatini, David A; Kibbey, Tohren C G; Osathaphan, Khemarath; Saiwan, Chintana

    2006-04-01

    Two pure minerals and a hydrophobic medium were selected to study sorption of pharmaceuticals. The sorption of four pharmaceuticals, acetaminophen (analgesic), 17alpha-ethynyl estradiol (synthetic hormone), nalidixic acid (antibiotic), and norfloxacin (antibiotic), was evaluated with silica, alumina, and Porapak P (a hydrophobic medium). Alumina and silica were selected to represent positively charged and negatively charged aquifer mineral surfaces at neutral pH, respectively, while Porapak P was selected to represent the hydrophobic organic content of an aquifer medium. At neutral pH, acetaminophen, the least hydrophobic pharmaceutical, showed no significant sorption to any of the media, while 17alpha-ethynyl estradiol, the most hydrophobic pharmaceutical, showed significant sorption to Porapak P. Nalidixic acid, which has a carboxyl functional group that is anionic at neutral pH, showed significant adsorption to the positively charged alumina. Norfloxacin, with both a carboxyl (anionic) and a piperazynyl (cationic) group, can exist in four forms (neutral, cationic, anionic, and zwitterionic) depending on the aqueous pH. Norfloxacin also showed significant adsorption than nalidixic acid. Both nalidixic acid and norfloxacin adsorbed to silica and Porapak P to a much lower extent. The pH dependence of nalidixic acid and norfloxacin adsorption to silica and alumina was also studied by varying the pH between 4 and 11. The maximum adsorption of nalidixic acid to alumina occurred near its pKa (pH approximately 6), where the combination of cationic alumina and anionic nalidixic produced maximum adsorption. The maximum adsorption of norfloxacin to alumina was observed at pH approximately 7, which was the region where the zwitterionic form dominated. This research demonstrates that the adsorption of ionizable pharmaceuticals is strongly dependent on the system pH, the pharmaceutical properties (pKa and hydrophobicity), and the nature of the surface charge (point of zero

  4. Iron films deposited on porous alumina substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Yasuhiro; Tanabe, Kenichi; Nishida, Naoki; Kobayashi, Yoshio

    2016-12-01

    Iron films were deposited on porous alumina substrates using an arc plasma gun. The pore sizes (120 - 250 nm) of the substrates were controlled by changing the temperature during the anodic oxidation of aluminum plates. Iron atoms penetrated into pores with diameters of less than 160 nm, and were stabilized by forming γ-Fe, whereas α-Fe was produced as a flat plane covering the pores. For porous alumina substrates with pore sizes larger than 200 nm, the deposited iron films contained many defects and the resulting α-Fe had smaller hyperfine magnetic fields. In addition, only a very small amount of γ-Fe was obtained. It was demonstrated that the composition and structure of an iron film can be affected by the surface morphology of the porous alumina substrate on which the film is grown.

  5. Bioactivation of inert alumina ceramics by hydroxylation.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Horst; Niedhart, Christopher; Kaltenborn, Nadine; Prange, Andreas; Marx, Rudolf; Niethard, Fritz Uwe; Telle, Rainer

    2005-11-01

    Alumina ceramics (Al(2)O(3)) are frequently used for medical implants and prostheses because of the excellent biocompatibility, and the high mechanical reliability of the material. Inauspiciously alumina is not suitable for implant components with bone contact, because the material is bioinert and thereby no bony ongrowth, and subsequently loosening of the implant occurs. Here, we present a new method to bioactivate the surface of the material. Specimens made of high purity alumina were treated in sodium hydroxide. Cell culture tests with osteoblast-like cells as well as spectroscopical and mechanical tests were performed. Aluminium hydroxide groups were detected on the surface of the treated specimens. Enhanced cell adhesion, proliferation and secretion of osteocalcin were determined after hydroxylation. The bioactivating treatment had no deteriorating effect on the short- and long-term strength behaviour. Our results indicate that the described surface technique could be used to develop a new class of osseointegrative high-strength ceramic implants.

  6. Ceramic failure after total hip arthroplasty with an alumina-on-alumina bearing.

    PubMed

    Park, Youn-Soo; Hwang, Sung-Kwan; Choy, Won-Sik; Kim, Yong-Sik; Moon, Young-Wan; Lim, Seung-Jae

    2006-04-01

    The mechanical properties of alumina ceramic, now in its third generation, have been markedly improved through the evolution of design features and manufacturing processes and the introduction of proof-testing. Nonetheless, because of the lack of ductility of alumina ceramic, there is concern regarding the risk of fracture during insertion or in vivo use. The purpose of the present study was to present a multicenter review of primary total hip arthroplasties performed with use of a polyethylene-ceramic composite liner combined with a ceramic femoral head, with particular attention to failure of the ceramic bearing. We evaluated 357 primary total hip arthroplasties that had been performed in 319 patients with use of a contemporary alumina-on-alumina bearing design incorporating a polyethylene-ceramic composite liner within a titanium-alloy shell coupled with a 28-mm-diameter ceramic femoral head. The procedures were performed at four participating centers from 1998 to 2001. Ceramic failure without trauma occurred in six hips (1.7%). All of these hips were revised, and the retrieved alumina implants were examined by means of visual inspection and scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometry. Two femoral heads fractured during the first postoperative year, and four alumina liners fractured after an average of 36.8 months in vivo. All four of the explanted alumina liners revealed evidence of rim contact with the metal neck of the femoral component. Composition analysis confirmed that surface-stain materials were titanium particles transferred from the femoral component. Despite the theoretical improvement in the fracture toughness of a polyethylene-alumina composite liner, a relatively high rate of catastrophic ceramic bearing surface failure was still observed at the time of short-term follow-up. This finding prompted us to discontinue the use of this type of alumina bearing design.

  7. Characterization of ultrafast microstructuring of alumina (Al2O3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrie, Walter; Rushton, Anne; Gill, Matthew; Fox, Peter; O'Neill, William

    2005-03-01

    Alumina ceramic, Al2O3, presents a challenge to laser micro-structuring due to its neglible linear absorption coefficient in the optical region coupled with its physical properties such as extremely high melting point and high thermal conductivity. In this work, we demonstrate clean micro-structuring of alumina using NIR (λ=775 nm) ultrafast optical pulses with 180 fs duration at 1kHz repetition rate. Sub-picosecond pulses can minimise thermal effects along with collateral damage when processing conditions are optimised, consequently, observed edge quality is excellent in this regime. We present results of changing micro-structure and morphology during ultrafast processing along with measured ablation rates and characteristics of developing surface relief. Initial crystalline phase (alpha Al2O3) is unaltered by femtosecond processing. Multi-pulse ablation threshold fluence Fth ~ 1.1 Jcm-2 and at low fluence ~ 3 Jcm-2, independent of machined depth, there appears to remain a ~ 2μm thick rapidly re-melted layer. On the other hand, micro-structuring at high fluence F ~ 21 Jcm-2 shows no evidence of melting and the machined surface is covered with a fine layer of debris, loosely attached. The nature of debris produced by femtosecond ablation has been investigated and consists mainly of alumina nanoparticles with diameters from 20 nm to 1 micron with average diameter ~ 300 nm. Electron diffraction shows these particles to be essentially single crystal in nature. By developing a holographic technique, we have demonstrated periodic micrometer level structuring on polished samples of this extremely hard material.

  8. REMOVING RADIUM FROM WATER BY PLAIN AND TREATED ACTIVATED ALUMINA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The research determined the feasibility of using BaSO4-impregnated activated alumina and plain activated alumina for radium removal from groundwater by fixed-bed adsorption. The major factors influencing radium adsorption onto the two types of alumina were identified. The radium ...

  9. 21 CFR 73.1010 - Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide). 73.1010... GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1010 Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide). (a) Identity. (1) The color additive alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide) is a white, odorless...

  10. 21 CFR 73.1010 - Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide). 73.1010... GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1010 Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide). (a) Identity. (1) The color additive alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide) is a white, odorless...

  11. 21 CFR 73.1010 - Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide). 73.1010... GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1010 Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide). (a) Identity. (1) The color additive alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide) is a white, odorless...

  12. 21 CFR 73.1010 - Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide). 73.1010... GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1010 Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide). (a) Identity. (1) The color additive alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide) is a white, odorless...

  13. 21 CFR 73.1010 - Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide). 73.1010... GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1010 Alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide). (a) Identity. (1) The color additive alumina (dried aluminum hydroxide) is a white, odorless...

  14. REMOVING RADIUM FROM WATER BY PLAIN AND TREATED ACTIVATED ALUMINA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The research determined the feasibility of using BaSO4-impregnated activated alumina and plain activated alumina for radium removal from groundwater by fixed-bed adsorption. The major factors influencing radium adsorption onto the two types of alumina were identified. The radium ...

  15. Thermal radiation shielding by nanoporous membranes based on anodic alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muratova, E. N.; Matyushkin, L. B.; Moshnikov, V. A.; Chernyakova, K. V.; Vrublevsky, I. A.

    2017-07-01

    The paper is devoted to infrared thermography studies of nanoporous alumina membranes with various geometric parameters of the porous layer: its thickness and average pore diameter. Thermal radiation shielding by anodic alumina membranes is presented. The result obtained showed that nanoporous alumina membranes can be used as heat shields to smooth contrast of thermal radiation of the object and the surrounding background.

  16. Scanning Electron Microscope Studies on Aggregation Characteristics of Alumina Nanofluids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    UNCLASSIFIED SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPE STUDIES ON AGGREGATION CHARACTERISTICS OF ALUMINA NANOFLUIDS INTERIM REPORT TFLRF No. 443...UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPE STUDIES ON AGGREGATION CHARACTERISTICS OF ALUMINA NANOFLUIDS INTERIM REPORT TFLRF...Aggregation Characteristics of Alumina Nanofluids 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W56HZV-09-C-0100 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S

  17. Delayed Failure in a Shock Loaded Alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, G. A.; Millett, J. C. F.; Bourne, N. K.; Dandekar, D. P.

    2006-07-28

    Manganin stress gauges have been used to measure the lateral stress in a shock-loaded alumina. In combination with known longitudinal stresses, these have been used to determine the shear strength of this material, behind the shock front. The two-step nature of the lateral stress traces shows a slow moving front behind the main shock, behind which shear strength undergoes a significant decrease. Results also show that this front decreases markedly in velocity as the HEL is crossed, suggesting that limited plasticity occurs during inelastic deformation. Finally, comparison of measured shear strengths with other aluminas shows a high degree of agreement.

  18. Chlorination of alumina in kaolinitic clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grob, B.; Richarz, W.

    1984-09-01

    The chlorination of alumina in kaolinitic clay with Cl2 and CO gas mixtures was studied gravimetrically. The effects of the calcination method and of NaCl addition on the reactivity of the clay were examined. Fast reaction rates were achieved only with samples previously exposed to a sulfating treatment. Optimum conditions, with maximum yield and selectivity to A1C13 and minimum SiO2 conversion, were found between 770 and 970 K. At higher temperatures the SiCl4 formed poisons the reactive alumina surface by selective chemisorption with a marked decrease of the reaction rate.

  19. Interface Engineering in Alumina/Glass Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-29

    BN coating applied to the fibers disappeared during the fabrication process. Coating thicknesses as much as 0.3 jim was found to be assimilated during...E-200 Alumina Fiber Tin Dioxide ’ -300 - PD - 166 coating,30 -1(0.8 un) -400 00, -600 " 9.4 9.6 9.S 10.0 10.2 r ( jim ) Fig. 2. Fracture surface of...of the specimens Chemical composition’(wt.%) were polished, with 0.5 jim alumina powder, to mini- .i. 71 mize surface flaw effects. Strengih

  20. Contact Noise in Sodium Beta Alumina.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-01

    AD-Al~i 128 CONTACT NOISE IN SODIUM BETA ALUMINA(U) UTANHUNIV SALT i/i LAKE CITY DEPT OF PHYSICS C K KUD ET AL MAY 87 UN SLR55IF IED FG 1,b2 NL UN...by Chu Kun Kuo* and James J. Brophy Physics Department University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 ABSTRACT/ Contact noise in sodium 0alumina cells...ZIPCo*I) UNIVERSITY OF UTAH UNIVERISTY OF NEW MEXICO SALT LAKE CITY UT 84112 Bandelier Hall West Alhkq..u u. m (1 71-11 so NAME of FUNDING /SPONSORING Sb

  1. Current Noise in Sodium Beta Alumina Ceramic.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-11-01

    7 ’FD-i49 549 CURRENT NOISE IN SODIUM BET ALUMINA CERAIC(U) UTAH i/iUNIV SALT LAKE CITY DEPT OF PHYSICS J J BROPHY ET AL.NOV 83 TR-5 N08814-82-K...REPORT NO. 5 CURRENT NOISE IN SODIUM 0" ALUMINA CERAMIC ID by James J. Brophy and Steven W. Smith * Prepared for Publication in the Journal of Applied...Physics D T IC ELECTE JAIN 1 Department of Physics $ ) University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 November 1983 Reproduction in whole or in part is

  2. Environmental neutralization of polonium-218

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, S.D.; Hopke, P.K.

    1985-01-01

    Previous work has indicated that two mechanisms of neutralization of the singly charged polonium ion exist. Charged Polonium-218 can be neutralized by reacting with oxygen to form a polonium oxide ion with a higher ionization potential than that of the polonium metal and then accepting an electron transferred from a lower ionization potential gas. In this present work, this mechanism has been verified by determining that the polonium oxide has an ionization potential in the range 10.35-10.53 eV. It was also previously reported that /sup 218/Po can be neutralized, in the absence of oxygen, by the scavenging of electrons by a trace gas such as water or nitrogen dioxide and their diffusion to the polonium ion. To verify this second neutralization mechanism, concentrations of nitrogen dioxide in nitrogen in the range of 50 ppb-1 ppm were examined for their ability to neutralize the polonium ion. Complete neutralization of /sup 218/Po was observed at nitrogen dioxide concentrations greater than 700 ppb. For concentrations below 700 ppb, the degree of neutralization was found to increase smoothly with the nitrogen dioxide concentration.

  3. Measurement of single π0 production by coherent neutral-current ν Fe interactions in the MINOS Near Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, P.; Anghel, I.; Aurisano, A.; Barr, G.; Bishai, M.; Blake, A.; Bock, G. J.; Bogert, D.; Cao, S. V.; Carroll, T. J.; Castromonte, C. M.; Chen, R.; Cherdack, D.; Childress, S.; Coelho, J. A. B.; Corwin, L.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; de Jong, J. K.; De Rijck, S.; Devan, A. V.; Devenish, N. E.; Diwan, M. V.; Escobar, C. O.; Evans, J. J.; Falk, E.; Feldman, G. J.; Flanagan, W.; Frohne, M. V.; Gabrielyan, M.; Gallagher, H. R.; Germani, S.; Gomes, R. A.; Goodman, M. C.; Gouffon, P.; Graf, N.; Gran, R.; Grzelak, K.; Habig, A.; Hahn, S. R.; Hartnell, J.; Hatcher, R.; Holin, A.; Huang, J.; Hylen, J.; Irwin, G. M.; Isvan, Z.; James, C.; Jensen, D.; Kafka, T.; Kasahara, S. M. S.; Koizumi, G.; Kordosky, M.; Kreymer, A.; Lang, K.; Ling, J.; Litchfield, P. J.; Lucas, P.; Mann, W. A.; Marshak, M. L.; Mayer, N.; McGivern, C.; Medeiros, M. M.; Mehdiyev, R.; Meier, J. R.; Messier, M. D.; Miller, W. H.; Mishra, S. R.; Moed Sher, S.; Moore, C. D.; Mualem, L.; Musser, J.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Newman, H. B.; Nichol, R. J.; Nowak, J. A.; O’Connor, J.; Oliver, W. P.; Orchanian, M.; Pahlka, R. B.; Paley, J.; Patterson, R. B.; Pawloski, G.; Perch, A.; Pfützner, M. M.; Phan, D. D.; Phan-Budd, S.; Plunkett, R. K.; Poonthottathil, N.; Qiu, X.; Radovic, A.; Rebel, B.; Rosenfeld, C.; Rubin, H. A.; Sail, P.; Sanchez, M. C.; Schneps, J.; Schreckenberger, A.; Schreiner, P.; Sharma, R.; Sousa, A.; Tagg, N.; Talaga, R. L.; Thomas, J.; Thomson, M. A.; Tian, X.; Timmons, A.; Todd, J.; Tognini, S. C.; Toner, R.; Torretta, D.; Tzanakos, G.; Urheim, J.; Vahle, P.; Viren, B.; Weber, A.; Webb, R. C.; White, C.; Whitehead, L.; Whitehead, L. H.; Wojcicki, S. G.; Zwaska, R.

    2016-10-26

    Forward single π0 production by coherent neutral-current interactions, νA→νAπ0, is investigated using a 2.8×1020 protons-on-target exposure of the MINOS Near Detector. For single-shower topologies, the event distribution in production angle exhibits a clear excess above the estimated background at very forward angles for visible energy in the range 1–8 GeV. Cross sections are obtained for the detector medium comprised of 80% iron and 20% carbon nuclei with $\\langle$A$\\rangle$=48, the highest-$\\langle$A$\\rangle$ target used to date in the study of this coherent reaction. In conclusion, the total cross section for coherent neutral-current single π0 production initiated by the νμ flux of the NuMI low-energy beam with mean (mode) Eν of 4.9 GeV (3.0 GeV), is 77.6±5.0(stat)$+15.0\\atop{-16.8}$(syst)×10-40 cm2 pernucleus. The results are in good agreement with predictions of the Berger-Sehgal model.

  4. Measurement of single π0 production by coherent neutral-current ν Fe interactions in the MINOS Near Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, P.; Anghel, I.; Aurisano, A.; Barr, G.; Bishai, M.; Blake, A.; Bock, G. J.; Bogert, D.; Cao, S. V.; Carroll, T. J.; Castromonte, C. M.; Chen, R.; Cherdack, D.; Childress, S.; Coelho, J. A. B.; Corwin, L.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; de Jong, J. K.; De Rijck, S.; Devan, A. V.; Devenish, N. E.; Diwan, M. V.; Escobar, C. O.; Evans, J. J.; Falk, E.; Feldman, G. J.; Flanagan, W.; Frohne, M. V.; Gabrielyan, M.; Gallagher, H. R.; Germani, S.; Gomes, R. A.; Goodman, M. C.; Gouffon, P.; Graf, N.; Gran, R.; Grzelak, K.; Habig, A.; Hahn, S. R.; Hartnell, J.; Hatcher, R.; Holin, A.; Huang, J.; Hylen, J.; Irwin, G. M.; Isvan, Z.; James, C.; Jensen, D.; Kafka, T.; Kasahara, S. M. S.; Koizumi, G.; Kordosky, M.; Kreymer, A.; Lang, K.; Ling, J.; Litchfield, P. J.; Lucas, P.; Mann, W. A.; Marshak, M. L.; Mayer, N.; McGivern, C.; Medeiros, M. M.; Mehdiyev, R.; Meier, J. R.; Messier, M. D.; Miller, W. H.; Mishra, S. R.; Moed Sher, S.; Moore, C. D.; Mualem, L.; Musser, J.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Newman, H. B.; Nichol, R. J.; Nowak, J. A.; O’Connor, J.; Oliver, W. P.; Orchanian, M.; Pahlka, R. B.; Paley, J.; Patterson, R. B.; Pawloski, G.; Perch, A.; Pfützner, M. M.; Phan, D. D.; Phan-Budd, S.; Plunkett, R. K.; Poonthottathil, N.; Qiu, X.; Radovic, A.; Rebel, B.; Rosenfeld, C.; Rubin, H. A.; Sail, P.; Sanchez, M. C.; Schneps, J.; Schreckenberger, A.; Schreiner, P.; Sharma, R.; Sousa, A.; Tagg, N.; Talaga, R. L.; Thomas, J.; Thomson, M. A.; Tian, X.; Timmons, A.; Todd, J.; Tognini, S. C.; Toner, R.; Torretta, D.; Tzanakos, G.; Urheim, J.; Vahle, P.; Viren, B.; Weber, A.; Webb, R. C.; White, C.; Whitehead, L.; Whitehead, L. H.; Wojcicki, S. G.; Zwaska, R.

    2016-10-26

    Forward single π0 production by coherent neutral-current interactions, νA→νAπ0, is investigated using a 2.8×1020 protons-on-target exposure of the MINOS Near Detector. For single-shower topologies, the event distribution in production angle exhibits a clear excess above the estimated background at very forward angles for visible energy in the range 1–8 GeV. Cross sections are obtained for the detector medium comprised of 80% iron and 20% carbon nuclei with $\\langle$A$\\rangle$=48, the highest-$\\langle$A$\\rangle$ target used to date in the study of this coherent reaction. In conclusion, the total cross section for coherent neutral-current single π0 production initiated by the νμ flux of the NuMI low-energy beam with mean (mode) Eν of 4.9 GeV (3.0 GeV), is 77.6±5.0(stat)$+15.0\\atop{-16.8}$(syst)×10-40 cm2 pernucleus. Finally, the results are in good agreement with predictions of the Berger-Sehgal model.

  5. Measurement of nu(mu) and anti-nu(mu) induced neutral current single pi0 production cross sections on mineral oil at E(nu) ~ O(1- GeV)

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Arevalo, Alexis A.; et al.

    2010-01-26

    MiniBooNE reports the first absolute cross sections for neutral current single $\\pi^0$ production on $CH_2$ induced by neutrino and antineutrino interactions measured from the largest sets of NC $\\pi^0$ events collected to date. The principal result consists of differential cross sections measured as functions of $\\pi^04$ momentum and $\\pi^0$ angle averaged over the neutrino flux at MiniBooNE. We find total cross sections of (4.76+/-0.05_{stat}+/-0.40_{sys})*$10^{-40} cm^2$/nucleon at a mean energy of <$E_\

  6. Incidence of Modern Alumina Ceramic and Alumina Matrix Composite Femoral Head Failures in Nearly 6 Million Hip Implants.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gwo-Chin; Kim, Raymond H

    2017-02-01

    Because of improvements in ceramic materials and manufacturing, the incidence of ceramic failures has decreased over time. Recent concerns with corrosion have contributed to an increase in ceramic ball head utilization. The purpose of this study is to report the incidence of modern alumina bearing failures from a single major ceramic manufacturer in nearly 6 million hip implants and to identify trends in the modes of failure of these implants. Beginning in the year 2000, CeramTec AG (Plochingen, Germany) began a comprehensive program for reporting and gathering failure data on its products. From January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2013, over 3.2 million pure alumina (PA) and 2.78 million alumina matrix composite (AMC) ceramic ball heads were implanted worldwide. During this period, there were 672 PA and 28 AMC femoral head fractures. The fractures were analyzed with respect to time to failure, head size, and implant factors. The incidence of clinical fractures of modern PA femoral heads and AMC femoral heads was 1 in 5000 (0.0201%) and 1 in 100,000 (0.0010%), respectively (P < .0001). The majority of implant failures (80%) occurred within 48 months following surgery (P < .01). Fractures were usually associated with specific events such as trauma, mismatched components, and dislocations. Large-diameter PA heads were associated with a lower rate of fracture compared to smaller-diameter femoral heads (0.0316% for 28-mm heads vs 0.0080% for heads 32 mm or greater [P < .01]). Similar trends were observed with AMC heads. The neck lengths of the femoral ball heads were also a factor: a short-taper 28-mm ball head was more likely to fracture compared to other neck lengths (P < .01). Modern PA ceramic heads are reliable with extremely low risk of fracture. The reliability is even better with AMC heads. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Thermal Conductivity of Alumina-Toughened Zirconia Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Zhu, Dong-Ming

    2003-01-01

    10-mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia (10YSZ)-alumina composites containing 0 to 30 mol% alumina were fabricated by hot pressing at 1500 C in vacuum. Thermal conductivity of the composites, determined at various temperatures using a steady-state laser heat flux technique, increased with increase in alumina content. Composites containing 0, 5, and 10-mol% alumina did not show any change in thermal conductivity with temperature. However, those containing 20 and 30-mol% alumina showed a decrease in thermal conductivity with increase in temperature. The measured values of thermal conductivity were in good agreement with those calculated from simple rule of mixtures.

  8. Method of making nanocrystalline alpha alumina

    DOEpatents

    Siegel, Richard W.; Hahn, Horst; Eastman, Jeffrey A.

    1992-01-01

    Method of making selected phases of nanocrystalline ceramic materials. Various methods of controlling the production of nanocrystalline alpha alumina and titanium oxygen phases are described. Control of the gas atmosphere and use of particular oxidation treatments give rise to the ability to control the particular phases provided in the aluminum/oxygen and titanium/oxygen system.

  9. Development of Alumina-Forming Austenitic Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Yukinori; Brady, Michael P; Santella, Michael L; Bei, Hongbin; Maziasz, Philip J; Pint, Bruce A

    2008-01-01

    Work in fiscal year 2008 focused on the development of creep-resistant, alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steel alloys, which exhibit a unique combination of an excellent oxidation resistance via protective alumina (Al2O3) scale formation and high-temperature creep strength through the formation of stable nano-scale MC carbides [1-8]. High levels of Nb additions (> 1 wt.% Nb) and/or Ni additions (25-30 wt.%), at Al levels of 2.5-4 wt.%, were found to correlate with increased upper-temperature limit for Al2O3 scale formation in air ( 900 aC) and air with 10% water vapor ( 800 aC). Creep resistance also showed a strong dependence on the level of Nb additions, and was correlated with volume fraction of MC-type carbides using thermodynamic computational tools. A trial heat of a 50 lb AFA alloy ingot was made using conventional single-melt vacuum techniques, and the alloy was successfully hot-rolled without any cracking [2]. This heat showed good weldability, using filler material of the same alloy.

  10. Dielectric Performance of High Purity HTCC Alumina at High Temperatures - A Comparison Study with Other Polycrystalline Alumina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Liang-Yu

    2012-01-01

    A very high purity (99.99+) high temperature co-fired ceramic (HTCC) alumina has recently become commercially available. The raw material of this HTCC alumina is very different from conventional HTCC alumina, and more importantly there is no glass additive in this co-fired material. Previously, selected HTCC and LTCC (low temperature co-fired ceramic) alumina materials were evaluated at high temperatures as dielectric and compared to a regularly sintered 96 polycrystalline alumina (96 Al2O3), where 96 alumina was used as the benchmark. A prototype packaging system based on regular 96 alumina with Au thick-film metallization successfully facilitated long term testing of high temperature silicon carbide (SiC) electronic devices for over 10,000 hours at 500C. In order to evaluate this new HTCC alumina for possible high temperature packaging applications, the dielectric properties of this HTCC alumina substrate were measured and compared with those of 96 alumina and a LTCC alumina from room temperature to 550C at frequencies of 120 Hz, 1 KHz, 10 KHz, 100 KHz, and 1 MHz. A parallel-plate capacitive device with dielectric of the HTCC alumina and precious metal electrodes were used for measurements of the dielectric constant and dielectric loss of the co-fired alumina material in the temperature and frequency ranges. The capacitance and AC parallel conductance of the capacitive device were directly measured by an AC impedance meter, and the dielectric constant and parallel AC conductivity of the dielectric were calculated from the capacitance and conductance measurement results. The temperature and frequency dependent dielectric constant, AC conductivity, and dissipation factor of the HTCC alumina substrate are presented and compared to those of 96 alumina. Other technical advantages of this new co-fired material for possible high packaging applications are also discussed.

  11. Noise in Lead Beta Alumina.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-01

    single crystal and ceramic samples. The temperature dependance for diffusion noise (I>O,1OHz) is greater than can be accounted for by Equation (1). This...3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 3.7 1000/T IN 1/9 Figure 2. Temperature Dependance of Nyqutst Noise (5kHz) and Diffusion Noise (lOHz) of Single Crystal and

  12. Peripherally hydrogenated neutral polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as carriers of the 3 micron interstellar infrared emission complex: results from single-photon infrared emission spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, D. R.; Kim, H. S.; Saykally, R. J.

    2000-01-01

    Infrared emission spectra of five gas-phase UV laser-excited polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) containing aliphatic hydrogens are compared with the main 3.3 microns and associated interstellar unidentified infrared emission bands (UIRs). We show that neutral PAHs can account for the majority of the 3 microns emission complex while making little contribution to the other UIR bands; peripherally hydrogenated PAHs produce a better match to astrophysical data than do those containing methyl side groups; 3.4 microns plateau emission is shown to be a general spectral feature of vibrationally excited PAHs containing aliphatic hydrogens, especially those containing methyl groups; and finally, hot-band and overtone emissions arising from aromatic C-H vibrations are not observed in laboratory emission spectra, and therefore, in contrast to current assignments, are not expected to be observed in the UIRs.

  13. Peripherally hydrogenated neutral polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as carriers of the 3 micron interstellar infrared emission complex: results from single-photon infrared emission spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, D. R.; Kim, H. S.; Saykally, R. J.

    2000-01-01

    Infrared emission spectra of five gas-phase UV laser-excited polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) containing aliphatic hydrogens are compared with the main 3.3 microns and associated interstellar unidentified infrared emission bands (UIRs). We show that neutral PAHs can account for the majority of the 3 microns emission complex while making little contribution to the other UIR bands; peripherally hydrogenated PAHs produce a better match to astrophysical data than do those containing methyl side groups; 3.4 microns plateau emission is shown to be a general spectral feature of vibrationally excited PAHs containing aliphatic hydrogens, especially those containing methyl groups; and finally, hot-band and overtone emissions arising from aromatic C-H vibrations are not observed in laboratory emission spectra, and therefore, in contrast to current assignments, are not expected to be observed in the UIRs.

  14. Peripherally hydrogenated neutral polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as carriers of the 3 micron interstellar infrared emission complex: results from single-photon infrared emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wagner, D R; Kim, H S; Saykally, R J

    2000-12-20

    Infrared emission spectra of five gas-phase UV laser-excited polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) containing aliphatic hydrogens are compared with the main 3.3 microns and associated interstellar unidentified infrared emission bands (UIRs). We show that neutral PAHs can account for the majority of the 3 microns emission complex while making little contribution to the other UIR bands; peripherally hydrogenated PAHs produce a better match to astrophysical data than do those containing methyl side groups; 3.4 microns plateau emission is shown to be a general spectral feature of vibrationally excited PAHs containing aliphatic hydrogens, especially those containing methyl groups; and finally, hot-band and overtone emissions arising from aromatic C-H vibrations are not observed in laboratory emission spectra, and therefore, in contrast to current assignments, are not expected to be observed in the UIRs.

  15. In Vivo Neutralization of α-Cobratoxin with High-Affinity Llama Single-Domain Antibodies (VHHs) and a VHH-Fc Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Gabrielle; Meyers, Ashley J.; McLean, Michael D.; Arbabi-Ghahroudi, Mehdi; MacKenzie, Roger; Hall, J. Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Small recombinant antibody fragments (e.g. scFvs and VHHs), which are highly tissue permeable, are being investigated for antivenom production as conventional antivenoms consisting of IgG or F(ab’)2 antibody fragments do not effectively neutralize venom toxins located in deep tissues. However, antivenoms composed entirely of small antibody fragments may have poor therapeutic efficacy due to their short serum half-lives. To increase serum persistence and maintain tissue penetration, we prepared low and high molecular mass antivenom antibodies. Four llama VHHs were isolated from an immune VHH-displayed phage library and were shown to have high affinity, in the low nM range, for α-cobratoxin (α–Cbtx), the most lethal component of Naja kaouthia venom. Subsequently, our highest affinity VHH (C2) was fused to a human Fc fragment to create a VHH2-Fc antibody that would offer prolonged serum persistence. After in planta (Nicotiana benthamiana) expression and purification, we show that our VHH2-Fc antibody retained high affinity binding to α–Cbtx. Mouse α–Cbtx challenge studies showed that our highest affinity VHHs (C2 and C20) and the VHH2-Fc antibody effectively neutralized lethality induced by α–Cbtx at an antibody:toxin molar ratio as low as ca. 0.75×:1. Further research towards the development of an antivenom therapeutic involving these anti-α-Cbtx VHHs and VHH2-Fc antibody molecules should involve testing them as a combination, to determine whether they maintain tissue penetration capability and low immunogenicity, and whether they exhibit improved serum persistence and therapeutic efficacy. PMID:23894495

  16. Characterization of human single-chain antibodies against highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 viruses: mimotope and neutralizing activity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiupian; Yoshida, Reiko; Kariya, Yuki; Zhang, Xu; Hashiguchi, Shuhei; Nakashima, Toshihiro; Suda, Yasuo; Takada, Ayato; Ito, Yuji; Sugimura, Kazuhisa

    2010-10-01

    The development of new therapeutic targets and strategies to control highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus infection in humans is urgently needed. Neutralizing recombinant human antibodies would provide important agents for immunotherapy on human H5N1 virus infection and definition of the critical mimotope for vaccine development. In this study, we have characterized an anti-H5-specific scFv clone, 3D1 from the human-scFv-displaying phage library. 3D1 blocked the binding of H5-Fc to MDCK cells in flow cytometry and neutralized H5N1 subtype influenza A viruses in a microneutralization assay. Employing a peptide-displaying phage library, Ph.D-12, the mimotope was determined to be at #128-131 and #204-211 of H5, which are silic acid-binding regions. In consistency with this result, 3D1 binds the recombinant sugar-binding domain (#50G-#272E) produced by a baculovirus vector. The 3D1 antibody employs the germline gene VH1-23. As this antibody is the first human anti-H5 scFv clearly defined on the sugar-binding epitope, it allows us to investigate the influence of amino acid substitutions in this region on the determination of the binding specificity to either sialic acid α2,6-galactose (SA α2,6Gal) or sialic acid α2,3-galactose (SA α2,3Gal) providing new insight for the development of effective H5N1 pandemic vaccines.

  17. A strategy for the generation of specific human antibodies by directed evolution and phage display. An example of a single-chain antibody fragment that neutralizes a major component of scorpion venom.

    PubMed

    Riaño-Umbarila, Lidia; Juárez-González, Victor Rivelino; Olamendi-Portugal, Timoteo; Ortíz-León, Mauricio; Possani, Lourival Domingos; Becerril, Baltazar

    2005-05-01

    This study describes the construction of a library of single-chain antibody fragments (scFvs) from a single human donor by individual amplification of all heavy and light variable domains (1.1 x 10(8) recombinants). The library was panned using the phage display technique, which allowed selection of specific scFvs (3F and C1) capable of recognizing Cn2, the major toxic component of Centruroides noxius scorpion venom. The scFv 3F was matured in vitro by three cycles of directed evolution. The use of stringent conditions in the third cycle allowed the selection of several improved clones. The best scFv obtained (6009F) was improved in terms of its affinity by 446-fold, from 183 nm (3F) to 410 pm. This scFv 6009F was able to neutralize 2 LD(50) of Cn2 toxin when a 1 : 10 molar ratio of toxin-to-antibody fragment was used. It was also able to neutralize 2 LD(50) of the whole venom. These results pave the way for the future generation of recombinant human antivenoms.

  18. Laser trapping of neutral particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Steven

    1992-02-01

    The use of lasers for trapping and manipulating electrically neutral particles is reviewed. The underlying physical phenomena are examined, and some applications in physics, chemistry, and biology are discussed. In particular, attention is given to laser cooling of vapors to nearly absolute zero, development of an improved atomic clock, atom interferometry, and optical tweezers capable of manipulating a single DNA molecule.

  19. Rheological Properties of Aqueous Nanometric Alumina Suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Chuanping

    2004-01-01

    Colloidal processing is an effective and reliable approach in the fabrication of the advanced ceramic products. Successful colloidal processing of fine ceramic powders requires accurate control of the rheological properties. The accurate control relies on the understanding the influences of various colloidal parameters on the rheological properties. Almost all research done on the rheology paid less attention to the interactions of particle and solvent. However, the interactions of the particles are usually built up through the media in which the particles are suspended. Therefore, interactions of the particle with the media, the adsorbed layers on the particle surface, and chemical and physical properties of media themselves must influence the rheology of the suspension, especially for the dense suspensions containing nanosized particles. Relatively little research work has been reported in this area. This thesis addresses the rheological properties of nanometric alumina aqueous suspensions, and paying more attention to the interactions between particle and solvent, which in turn influence the particle-particle interactions. Dense nanometric alumina aqueous suspensions with low viscosity were achieved by environmentally-benign fructose additives. The rheology of nanometric alumina aqueous suspensions and its variation with the particle volume fraction and concentration of fructose were explored by rheometry. The adsorptions of solute (fructose) and solvent (water) on the nanometric alumina particle surfaces were measured and analyzed by TG/DSC, TOC, and NMR techniques. The mobility of water molecules in the suspensions and its variation with particle volume fractions and fructose additive were determined by the 17O NMR relaxation method. The interactions between the nanometric alumina particles in water and fructose solutions were investigated by AFM. The results indicated that a large number of water layers were physically bound on the particles

  20. Fabrication of Nonsintered Alumina-Resin Hybrid Films by Inkjet-Printing Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hun Woo Jang,; Jihoon Kim,; Hyo-tae Kim,; Youngjoon Yoon,; Sung-nam Lee,; Haejin Hwang,; Jonghee Kim,

    2010-07-01

    We used the inkjet printing to fabricate alumina-resin hybrid films without a high temperature sintering process. Single- and co-solvent ink systems showing different evaporation behaviors were formulated in order to understand their impacts on the inkjet-printing of the alumina dots, lines, and films. The packing densities of the inkjet-printed alumina films from both ink systems were around 60% which is higher than the value obtained by other conventional methods. Since the high temperature sintering process was avoided, the polymer-resin was infiltrated through the inkjet-printed alumina films by the same inkjet printing as a binder. The microstructures of these hybrid films were investigated in order to confirm if the microvoids in the films were filled with the resin. The dielectric properties of these hybrid films such as relative permittivity and Q-value were measured in order to assess if these hybrid materials is applicable to three-dimensional (3D) system integration as ceramic package substrates.

  1. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the drilling of alumina ceramic using Nd:YAG pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanon, M. M.; Akman, E.; Genc Oztoprak, B.; Gunes, M.; Taha, Z. A.; Hajim, K. I.; Kacar, E.; Gundogdu, O.; Demir, A.

    2012-06-01

    Alumina ceramics have found wide range of applications from semiconductors, communication technologies, medical devices, automotive to aerospace industries. Processing of alumina ceramics is rather difficult due to its high degree of brittleness, hardness, low thermal diffusivity and conductivity. Rapid improvements in laser technologies in recent years make the laser among the most convenient processing tools for difficult-to-machine materials such as hardened metals, ceramics and composites. This is particularly evident as lasers have become an inexpensive and controllable alternative to conventional hole drilling methods. This paper reports theoretical and experimental results of drilling the alumina ceramic with thicknesses of 5 mm and 10.5 mm using milisecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser. Effects of the laser peak power, pulse duration, repetition rate and focal plane position have been determined using optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) images taken from cross-sections of the drilled alumina ceramic samples. In addition to dimensional analysis of the samples, microstructural investigations have also been examined. It has been observed that, the depth of the crater can be controlled as a function of the peak power and the pulse duration for a single laser pulse application without any defect. Crater depth can be increased by increasing the number of laser pulses with some defects. In addition to experimental work, conditions have been simulated using ANYS FLUENT package providing results, which are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  2. Alkalinity conversion of bauxite refinery residues by neutralization.

    PubMed

    Johnston, M; Clark, M W; McMahon, P; Ward, N

    2010-10-15

    Red mud remains the largest environmental issue for the alumina industry due to its high pH (>13), fine-grained nature (>90% is <10 microm), elevated sodium concentration (>50 g/kg), and soluble alkalinity (approximately 30 g/kg as equivalent CaCO(3)), which reduce the transport and reuse options of red mud. The neutralization of red mud provides potential reuse options because neutralization lowers pH, increases grain-size (e.g., coagulation), and precipitates or converts alkalinity. This paper investigates the geochemistry of 3 treatments of a red mud to affect neutralization and potentially convert materials from a waste material to a resource. This study investigates two commonly used neutralization techniques, a CO(2)-neutralized red mud (CNRM), a Basecon-neutralized red mud (Basecon), and a more novel approach of a CO(2)-neutralization followed by a Basecon-neutralization (Hybrid) to understand the effects that these treatments have on neutralization process. Data indicate that the neutralization techniques form two distinct geochemical groups when discriminated on total alkalinity alone, that is treatments with, and treatments without alkalinity precipitation. However, each treatment has distinct alkalinity speciation (hydroxide-dominant or carbonate/bicarbonate dominant) and residual Ca, Mg and Al in the treatment solution. Similarly, solids produced differ in their reaction pH and ANC, and contrary pH and ANC, a contrary to other studies, Dawsonite was not seen to precipitate during any neutralization. However, despite this approximately 17 g/kg CO(2) was sequestered during CNRM and hybrid neutralizations and all treatments increased either the transport or reuse options of red mud in some way. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Global Mechanical Response and its Relation to Deformation and Failure Modes at Various Length Scales under Shock Impact in Alumina AD995 Armor Ceramic

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    event. Polycrystalline aluminum oxide (Al2O3 - alumina), known as sapphire in single crystal form, has been used for many years in both personnel...transgranular fracture. Typical cleavage features including river patterns and cleavage steps along specific crystal directions, can be identified...in perfect alumina crystals can be roughly estimated according a simple equation (Hirth and Lothe, 1982). to Pb c γ τ = (3) whe s the

  4. Microstructural design in alumina-alumina/zirconia layered composites

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Herencia, A.J.; Moya, J.S.; Tomsia, A.P.

    1997-12-18

    Very recently several authors have pointed out the extremely important role of microstructural design in developing structural ceramic materials for long term high temperature applications. In this sense Raj has identified several boundary conditions: (1) Resistance to oxidation, (ii) Resistance to grain boundary sliding and cavitation, (iii) Good strength and toughness at room temperature. The aspiration is to eliminate grain boundaries which can act as cavitation sites, without using single crystals which typically exhibit low toughness. In this regard ceramics with single crystal-like morphologies, e.g., large elongated grains, with good fracture toughness and high bending strength have been proposed. One route to find these apparently contradictory characteristic is by building up layered microarchitectures where layers with high toughness and high bending strength coexist with layers with high creep resistance. These conditions can be met in the case of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2} laminates. The present work was directed to the study of the microstructural features and properties of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} + unstabilized ZrO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} + t-ZrO{sub 2} (3 mol% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) layered composites.

  5. Mesoscale Modelling of the Response of Aluminas

    SciTech Connect

    Bourne, N. K.

    2006-07-28

    The response of polycrystalline alumina to shock is not well addressed. There are several operating mechanisms that only hypothesized which results in models which are empirical. A similar state of affairs in reactive flow modelling led to the development of mesoscale representations of the flow to illuminate operating mechanisms. In this spirit, a similar effort is undergone for a polycrystalline alumina. Simulations are conducted to observe operating mechanisms at the micron scale. A method is then developed to extend the simulations to meet response at the continuum level where measurements are made. The approach is validated by comparison with continuum experiments. The method and results are presented, and some of the operating mechanisms are illuminated by the observed response.

  6. Activation of consolidation processes of alumina ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matrenin, S. V.; Zenin, B. S.; Tayukin, R. V.

    2016-02-01

    The methods for activating sintering ceramics based on Al2O3 by mechanical activation in the planetary mill, by adding in the mixture of nanopowders (NP) Al, Al2O3, and submicron powder TiO2, and by applying the technology of spark plasma sintering (SPS) are developed. It has been shown that adding the nanopowder up to 20 wt. % Al2O3 in a coarse powder α-Al2O3 activates the sintering process resulting in increased density and hardness of the sintered alumina ceramics. Substantial effect of increasing density of alumina ceramics due to adding the submicron powder TiO2 in the compound of initial powder mixtures has been established.

  7. Li + ion diffusion in nanoscale alumina coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johannes, Michelle; Bernstein, Noam

    Nanoscale coatings of alumina are used to stabilize surfaces for a variety of technologies. Diffusion of ions through these coatings is of primary importance: in some cases, diffusion is unwanted (e.g. corrosion) and in others (e.g. electrode materials), it is necessary. In this work DFT and AIMD calculations are used to investigate Li+ ion diffusion through a nano-layer of alumina, examining the phase (alpha, gamma, and amorphous), ion concentration, and electron count dependence. We look at the role of the surface itself in promoting diffusion. One of our main findings is that as the number of ions or charge increases, the diffusivity rises. We show how our data can explain electrochemical data from coated LiCoO2 cathodes and may point toward better and more efficient coatings for stabilizing electrodes.

  8. Health Risk Assessments for Alumina Refineries

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, Patrick S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To describe contemporary air dispersion modeling and health risk assessment methodologies applied to alumina refineries and to summarize recent results. Methods: Air dispersion models using emission source and meteorological data have been used to assess ground-level concentrations (GLCs) of refinery emissions. Short-term (1-hour and 24-hour average) GLCs and annual average GLCs have been used to assess acute health, chronic health, and incremental carcinogenic risks. Results: The acute hazard index can exceed 1 close to refineries, but it is typically less than 1 at neighboring residential locations. The chronic hazard index is typically substantially less than 1. The incremental carcinogenic risk is typically less than 10−6. Conclusions: The risks of acute health effects are adequately controlled, and the risks of chronic health effects and incremental carcinogenic risks are negligible around referenced alumina refineries. PMID:24806721

  9. Nanoparticles in alumina: Microscopy and Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idrobo, Juan C.; Halabica, Andrej; Rashkeev, Sergey; Glazoff, Michael V.; Boatner, Lynn A.; Haglund, Richard F.; Pennycook, Stephen. J.; Pantelides, Sokrates T.

    2007-03-01

    Transition-metal nanoparticles formed by ion implantation in alumina can be used to modify the optical properties of naturally oxidized and anodized aluminum. Here, we report atomic-resolution Z-contrast images using a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) of CoFe and other metal nanoparticles in alumina. We also report electron energy loss spectra (EELS) and relate them to visual appearance and optical properties. Finally, we report first-principles density- functional calculations of nucleation mechanisms for these nanoparticles. This research was sponsored by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering, U.S. Department of Energy, under contract DE-AC05- 00OR22725 with Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed and operated by UT-Battelle, by NSF grant No. DMR-0513048, and by Alcoa Inc.

  10. Health risk assessments for alumina refineries.

    PubMed

    Donoghue, A Michael; Coffey, Patrick S

    2014-05-01

    To describe contemporary air dispersion modeling and health risk assessment methodologies applied to alumina refineries and to summarize recent results. Air dispersion models using emission source and meteorological data have been used to assess ground-level concentrations (GLCs) of refinery emissions. Short-term (1-hour and 24-hour average) GLCs and annual average GLCs have been used to assess acute health, chronic health, and incremental carcinogenic risks. The acute hazard index can exceed 1 close to refineries, but it is typically less than 1 at neighboring residential locations. The chronic hazard index is typically substantially less than 1. The incremental carcinogenic risk is typically less than 10(-6). The risks of acute health effects are adequately controlled, and the risks of chronic health effects and incremental carcinogenic risks are negligible around referenced alumina refineries.

  11. Microwave joining of high-purity alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Cozzi, A.D.; Clark, D.E.; Ferber, M.K.

    1996-12-31

    Microwave hybrid heating (MHH) was used to join 99.5% pure alumina pieces 25 mm diameter and 25 mm long using 94% pure alumina as the interlayer material. The interlayer material was cut from a rod into discs approximately 2 mm thick. Joining was performed in a home model microwave oven. Temperatures for joining ranged from 1450{degrees}C to 1550{degrees}C and pressures from 1-3 MPa. For comparison, similar joints were made in a conventional furnace. Joined specimens were tested using four-point bend at room temperature. Statistical analysis was utilized to determine the relative effect of the different processing parameters on the strength of the joint.

  12. Silica containing highly porous alumina ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svinka, R.; Svinka, V.; Zake, I.

    2011-04-01

    Porous alumina ceramic were produced by slip casting of aqueous alumina slurry with added small amount of metallic aluminium powder. Pores form in result of chemical reaction of aluminum with water by hydrogen gas evolution reaction and solidification of suspension. Porosity of such materials sintered at a temperature of 1600 - 1750°C varies from 60 to 90%. Pore size distribution and mechanical strength of these materials depend largely on the grain size of used raw materials. The major part of pores in the materials produced without additive of silica are larger than 10 ±m, but with 5 - 10 wt.% additive of silica in the raw mix pore size decreases considerably. The sintering shrinkage decreases to 2.5%. Coefficient of thermal expansion equally decreases from 8.9-10-6 K-1 to 7.1 10-6 K-1 and classification temperature increases to 1600°C, while deformation at high temperature decreases considerably.

  13. Improvement in nanoscale contact resistance of alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Manjima; Chakraborty, Riya; Dey, Arjun; Mandal, Ashok Kumar; Mukhopadhyay, Anoop Kumar

    2012-06-01

    In all contact-related applications such as the wear-resistant inserts, biomedical implants, high strain rate impact-resistant plates, etc., nanohardness, i.e. the intrinsic contact resistance at the nano scale, plays a major role. In spite of the wealth of literature, the studies on nanohardness of dense, coarse-grain alumina ceramics which represent many commercial varieties; have reasonably good hardness at the macro scale and characteristically exhibit R-curve behaviour, are far from significant. Here, to the best of our knowledge, we report for the first time the experimental observations of the increase in intrinsic contact resistance at the nano scale with the loading rate applied to a high-density (˜95 % of theoretical) coarse-grain (˜20 µm) alumina ceramics. These observations were explained in terms of the initiation of nanoscale plasticity and maximum shear stress generated just underneath the nanoindenter.

  14. Single Crystal Membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stormont, R. W.; Morrison, A.

    1974-01-01

    Single crystal a- and c-axis tubes and ribbons of sodium beta-alumina and sodium magnesium beta-alumina were grown from sodium oxide rich melts. Additional experiments grew ribbon crystals containing sodium magnesium beta, beta double prime, beta triple prime, and beta quadruple prime. A high pressure crystal growth chamber, sodium oxide rich melts, and iridium for all surfaces in contact with the melt were combined with the edge-defined, film-fed growth technique to grow the single crystal beta-alumina tubes and ribbons. The crystals were characterized using metallographic and X-ray diffraction techniques, and wet chemical analysis was used to determine the sodium, magnesium, and aluminum content of the grown crystals.

  15. Carbohydrate/protein selection in a single meal correlated with plasma tryptophan and tyrosine ratios to neutral amino acids in fasting individuals.

    PubMed

    Møller, S E

    1986-01-01

    Plasma ratios of tryptophan (Trp) and tyrosine (Tyr) to their respective competing large neutral amino acids (LNAA) for brain uptake, serum insulin and plasma glucose concentrations were determined in 31 fasting healthy female subjects, and in two smaller groups of smokers and oral contraceptive users, who were subsequently allowed to compose individual breakfast meals from a selection of 25 dietary products. Additional blood samples were collected at 2 hr after the meal. Smokers consumed less carbohydrate (-22%) and total calories (-23%) and showed decreased basal serum insulin level, when compared to controls on the same age. Females on oral contraceptives consumed significantly more carbohydrate (+54%) and total calories (+32%) than comparable controls. In the 31 females there was no significant correlation between any of the biological variables and the intake of fat or total calories. The ratio of carbohydrate/protein eaten was significantly and directly correlated with age and with the sum of plasma ratios Trp/LNAA and Tyr/LNAA, and these independent variables associated with 37% of the variance in the ratio carbohydrate/protein consumed, as evaluated by multiple regression analysis. After the meal, the plasma ratio Tyr/LNAA was increased, whereas the ratio Trp/LNAA was decreased in subjects whose ratio carbohydrate/protein consumed was below the mean of the full sample, whereas subjects who consumed meals with a high ratio carbohydrate/protein showed an increase in plasma ratio Trp/LNAA. It is concluded that biological variables in man are significantly associated with the choice between nutrients with different carbohydrate and protein contents for breakfast. The changes in the plasma ratios Trp/LNAA and Tyr/LNAA after consumption were generally moderate.

  16. Luminescence of Cu+ Beta’ Alumina.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-07-01

    the ion exchange procedure using melts of pure cuprous salts often resulted in crystals which were discolored and which lumi- nesced only weakly...importance is the stabil- ity of the cuprous ions in the fil-alumina host. We have begun to explore some of these questions. Very high intensity UV radia...SCHEDULE dis tribut ion is unlimited 4. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER(S) S. MONITORING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER(S) Technical Report No. 12 Ga

  17. Decay of elastic waves in alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marom, H.; Sherman, D.; Rosenberg, Z.

    2000-11-01

    The dynamic response of alumina under shock compression was studied using planar impact experiments with different tile thicknesses. Stress-time measurements were made with manganin gauges backed by different backing materials in order to optimize gauge response. The results show an apparent decay in the Hugoniot elastic limit with propagation distance. However, further analysis reveals that this phenomenon is probably a measurement artifact, resulting from the relatively slow response times of manganin gauges.

  18. Tribology of alumina-graphite composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Chih-Yuan

    Alumina-graphite composites, which combine high wear resistance and self-lubricity, are a potential and promising candidate for advanced tribological applications. The processing, mechanical properties and tribology of alumina-graphite composites are discussed. Full density is difficult to achieve by a pressureless sintering route. Porosity of the composites increases with graphite content which causes the strength, modulus of elasticity, and hardness of the composites to decrease. The increased porosity does cause the fracture toughness to slightly increases. Tribology of alumina-graphite composites was studied with a pin-on-disk tribometer with emphasis on the following aspects: the graphite content in both pin and disk, the graphite flake size and the orientation of the graphite flakes. Scan electronic microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction are utilized to examine and characterize the wear debris and the worn surface. Results confirmed that it is necessary to optimize the structure and the supply of lubricant to improve the tribological behavior and that the arrangements of sliding couples also affect the tribology of self-lubricated ceramic composites. Continuous measurements of the friction coefficients were collected at high frequency in an attempt to correlate the tribology of alumina-graphite composites to vibrations introduced by friction. While these measurements indicate that the time frequency behavior of tribology is an important area of study, conclusions regarding the frequency response of different sliding couples could not be definitively stated. Finally, a new concept connecting instantaneous wear coefficient and instantaneous contact stress is proposed for prediction of wear behavior of brittle materials.

  19. Growth of γ-alumina thin films by pulsed laser deposition and plasma diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahiaoui, K.; Abdelli-Messaci, S.; Messaoud Aberkane, S.; Siad, M.; Kellou, A.

    2017-07-01

    The present work discusses about the synthesis of alumina thin films, which have applications in current and next-generation solid-state electronic devices due to their attractive properties. Alumina thin films were synthesized by pulsed laser deposition at different oxygen pressures and substrate temperatures. The dependence of substrate temperature, oxygen pressure, and the deposition time on the properties of the films has been observed by growing three series of alumina thin films on Si (100). The first films are synthesized using substrate temperatures ranging from room temperature to 780 °C at 0.01 mbar of O2. The second series was realized at a fixed substrate temperature of 760 °C and varied oxygen pressure (from 0.005 to 0.05 mbar). The third set of series was elaborated at different deposition times (from 15 to 60 min) while the oxygen pressure and the substrate temperature were fixed at 0.01 mbar and 760 °C, respectively. The films were characterized using X-ray diffractometer (XRD) for structural analysis, a scanning electron microscope for morphological analysis, a nano-indenter for mechanical analysis (hardness and Young's modulus), and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy for thickness and stoichiometry measurements. Using optical emission spectroscopy, plasma diagnostic was carried out both in the vacuum and in the presence of oxygen with a pressure ranging from 0.01 to 0.05 mbar. Several neutral, ionic, and molecular species were identified such as Al, Al+, and Al++ in vacuum and in oxygen ambiance, O and AlO molecular bands in oxygen-ambient atmosphere. The spatiotemporal evolution of the most relevant species was achieved and their velocities were estimated. The highest amount of crystallized alumina in γ-phase was found in the films elaborated under 0.01 mbar of O2, at a substrate temperature of 780 °C, and a deposition time of 60 min.

  20. High contrast laser marking of alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penide, J.; Quintero, F.; Riveiro, A.; Fernández, A.; del Val, J.; Comesaña, R.; Lusquiños, F.; Pou, J.

    2015-05-01

    Alumina serves as raw material for a broad range of advanced ceramic products. These elements should usually be identified by some characters or symbols printed directly on them. In this sense, laser marking is an efficient, reliable and widely implemented process in industry. However, laser marking of alumina still leads to poor results since the process is not able to produce a dark mark, yielding bad contrast. In this paper, we present an experimental study on the process of marking alumina by three different lasers working in two wavelengths: 1064 nm (Near-infrared) and 532 nm (visible, green radiation). A colorimetric analysis has been carried out in order to compare the resulting marks and its contrast. The most suitable laser operating conditions were also defined and are reported here. Moreover, the physical process of marking by NIR lasers is discussed in detail. Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy, High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy were also employed to analyze the results. Finally, we propose an explanation for the differences of the coloration induced under different atmospheres and laser parameters. We concluded that the atmosphere is the key parameter, being the inert one the best choice to produce the darkest marks.

  1. Compression Testing of Alumina Fiber Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, Wallace L.

    2006-01-01

    A series of tests were conducted to measure the response of alumina fiber insulation to compression loading. The alumina fiber insulation is a candidate gasket material for the Space Shuttle Government Furnished Equipment (GFE) Tile Overlay Repair. Tests were conducted at room temperature and 2300 F. The alumina fiber insulation is a fibrous insulation blanket which was supplied to Langley in two forms, a nominal 3 lb/ft3 version and a nominal 9 lb/ft3 version. The 3 lb/ft3 material was tested as sheets 0.15 and 0.25 inches thick and the 9 lb/ft3 material in sheets 1 inch thick. The material showed very non-linear compression behavior with the compressive resistance of the material increasing as the material was compressed. The 3 lb/ft3 0.15-inch thick material required 4.1 psi to reach the nominal installation thickness of 0.045 inches and retain a load of 2.1 lbs during unloading. Testing at 2300 F resulted in a stiffer more board-like material. The 3 lb/ft3 0.15-inch thick material retained 1 psi of compressive resistance after a 10 minute hold at 2300 F and 0.045 inches thickness.

  2. Exponential-type basis functions: Single- and double-zeta B function basis sets for the ground states of neutral atoms from Z = 2 to Z = 36

    SciTech Connect

    Ema, I.; Vega, J.M.G. de la; Miguel, B.; Dotterweich, J.; Meissner, H.; Steinborn, E.O.

    1999-05-01

    Roothaan-Hartree-Fock (RHF) calculations have been carried out for the ground states of the atoms from helium to krypton using certain exponential-type functions, the B functions. The authors report a compilation of single- and double-zeta (SZ and DZ) wave functions. A comparison with the conventional SZ and DZ RHF wave functions is also presented. For each atom, the total energy, kinetic energy, potential energy, virial ratio, orbital energies, and orbital expansion coefficients and exponents are tabulated.

  3. Role of alumina phase and size in tungsten CMP

    SciTech Connect

    STEIN,DAVID J.; HER,ROBERT Y.-S.

    2000-02-01

    The role of the alumina particle phase and size on polish rate and process temperature was studied to elucidate removal mechanisms involved in tungsten CMP using potassium iodate-based slurries. Additional work including polishing of blanket PETEOS and titanium films, and polishing of M1 to V1 to M2 electrical test structures was performed to determine the performance of the various aluminas in production CMP. The polish rate of tungsten was highest with alpha alumina. Delta/theta and gamma alumina showed lower polish rates. Tungsten and PETEOS polish rates increased with particle size. Only alpha alumina was able to clear the titanium barrier stack. The size of the alpha alumina did not effect the electrical characteristics of short loop electrical test structures.

  4. [Pathological observation on five autopsies of the alumina pneumoconiosis].

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Wang, Hongyuan

    2002-04-01

    To study the pathological characteristics and the morphological changes of alumina pneumoconiosis. The pathological observation and analysis were performed in lungs of five autopsies with alumina pneumoconiosis. The early common pathological change of alumina pneumoconiosis was the dust spots. The dust fibrosis had two forms, one was the non-focal fibrous proliferation of interstitial space, the other was the proliferation of inner-dust-spot fibrosis that finally developed into non-typical pneumoconiosis nodules. The pathological characteristics of the alumina pneumoconiosis may not be all the same to those of aluminium and aluminium oxide pneumoconiosis. Alumina pneumoconiosis is a complex pneumoconiosis. The typical pathological changes are the dust-spot emphysema and dust fibrosis of interstitial tissue. Infection in lung and complication of lung tumor, especially pneumo-tubercolosis would promote dust fibrosis. The pleural thickening, the relationship between lung cancer and alumina dust should be taken seriously.

  5. Divalent beta aluminas: High conductivity solid electrolytes for divalent cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrington, G. C.; Dunn, B.

    1982-10-01

    The Na(+) content of beta alumina can be replaced by a variety of divalent cations in simple ion exchange reactions. The resulting divalent beta' aluminas are the first family of high conductivity solid electrolytes for divalent cations. Divalent beta' aluminas which have been prepared so far include conductors of Ca(2+), Sr(2+), Ba(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+), Pb(2+), Hg(2+), and Mn(2+). Most have conductivities of about 0.1/(ohm-cm) at 300-400 C. However, the conductivity of Pb(++) beta alumina is 0.0046/(ohm-cm) at 40 C, nearly equal to that of Na(+) beta alumina. Preliminary structure studies indicate that order-disorder reactions among the divalent cations and vacancies in the conduction region of beta alumina critically influence conductivity in the structure.

  6. A simple procedure to prepare spherical {alpha}-alumina powders

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Hongyu; Ning Guiling Gan Zhihong; Lin Yuan

    2009-04-02

    Spherical {alpha}-alumina powders were prepared by the controlled hydrolysis of aluminum isopropoxide in a hydrolysis system consisting of octanol and acetonitrile. Diverse solvents to dissolve reactant formed diverse hydrolysis systems and affected particle shape of {alpha}-alumina powders. The precursors crystallized to {gamma}-alumina at 1000 deg. C and converted to {alpha}-alumina at 1150 deg. C without intermediate phases. The particle morphology of precursor was retained after it crystallized to {alpha}-alumina. The heating rate influenced the particle shape and the state of agglomeration during calcination process. The thermal properties of the precursors were characterized by thermal gravimetric and differential thermal analysis. X-ray diffraction technique was used to confirm the conversion of crystalline phase of alumina powders from amorphous to {alpha}-phase. Transmission electron microscopy was used to investigate the morphologies and size of the precursors and products.

  7. Measurement of transverse single-spin asymmetries for midrapidity production of neutral pions and charged hadrons in polarized p + p collisions at square root(s) = 200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adler, S S; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Amirikas, R; Aphecetche, L; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, R; Babintsev, V; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bauer, F; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Berdnikov, Y; Bhagavatula, S; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Borenstein, S; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Camard, X; Chai, J-S; Chand, P; Chang, W C; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J; Choudhury, R K; Chujo, T; Cianciolo, V; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Constantin, P; d'Enterria, D; David, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Devismes, A; Dietzsch, O; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; du Rietz, R; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Efremenko, Y V; El Chenawi, K; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Ewell, L; Fields, D E; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fox, B D; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fung, S-Y; Garpman, S; Ghosh, T K; Glenn, A; Gogiberidze, G; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, H-A; Hachiya, T; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hartouni, E P; Harvey, M; Hayano, R; Hayashi, N; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hibino, M; Hill, J C; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Ichihara, T; Ikonnikov, V V; Imai, K; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jeong, Y; Jia, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kang, J H; Kapoor, S S; Katou, K; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, D W; Kim, E; Kim, G-B; Kim, H J; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Kiyoyama, K; Klein-Boesing, C; Kobayashi, H; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Koehler, D; Kohama, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kuberg, C H; Kurita, K; Kuroki, Y; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Ladygin, V; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, S; Leitch, M J; Li, X H; Lim, H; Litvinenko, A; Liu, M X; Liu, Y; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Martinez, G; Marx, M D; Masui, H; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E; Messer, F; Miake, Y; Milan, J; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Mühlbacher, F; Mukhopadhyay, D; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Nakamura, T; Nandi, B K; Nara, M; Newby, J; Nilsson, P; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, K; Ono, M; Onuchin, V; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Ozawa, K; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Parmar, A; Pate, S F; Peitzmann, T; Peng, J-C; Peresedov, V; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Plasil, F; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosnet, P; Ryu, S S; Sadler, M E; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, M; Sakai, S; Samsonov, V; Sanfratello, L; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shaw, M R; Shea, T K; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarján, P; Tepe, J D; Thomas, T L; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuruoka, H; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Veszprémi, V; Villatte, L; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yang, Y; Yanovich, A; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zhou, S J; Zolin, L

    2005-11-11

    Transverse single-spin asymmetries to probe the transverse-spin structure of the proton have been measured for neutral pions and nonidentified charged hadrons from polarized proton-proton collisions at midrapidity and square root(s) = 200 GeV. The data cover a transverse momentum (pT) range 1.0-5.0 GeV/c for neutral pions and 0.5-5.0 GeV/c for charged hadrons, at a Feynman-x value of approximately zero. The asymmetries seen in this previously unexplored kinematic region are consistent with zero within errors of a few percent. In addition, the inclusive charged hadron cross section at midrapidity from 0.5 < pT < 7.0 GeV/c is presented and compared to next-to-leading order perturbative QCD (pQCD) calculations. Successful description of the unpolarized cross section above approximately 2 GeV/c suggests that pQCD is applicable in the interpretation of the asymmetry results in the relevant kinematic range.

  8. Free-standing alumina nanobottles and nanotubes pre-integrated into nanoporous alumina membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Jinghua; Levchenko, Igor; (Ken Ostrikov, Kostya

    2014-08-01

    A novel interfacial structure consisting of long (up to 5 μm), thin (about 300 nm), highly-ordered, free-standing, highly-reproducible aluminum oxide nanobottles and long tubular nanocapsules attached to a rigid, thin (less than 1 μm) nanoporous anodic alumina membrane is fabricated by simple, fast, catalyst-free, environmentally friendly voltage-pulse anodization. A growth mechanism is proposed based on the formation of straight channels in alumina membrane by anodization, followed by neck formation due to a sophisticated voltage control during the process. This process can be used for the fabrication of alumina nanocontainers with highly controllable geometrical size and volume, vitally important for various applications such as material and energy storage, targeted drug and diagnostic agent delivery, controlled drug and active agent release, gene and biomolecule reservoirs, micro-biologically protected platforms, nano-bioreactors, tissue engineering and hydrogen storage.

  9. Method for preparing Pb-.beta."-alumina ceramic

    DOEpatents

    Hellstrom, Eric E.

    1986-01-01

    A process is disclosed for preparing impermeable, polycrystalline samples of Pb-.beta."-alumina ceramic from Na-.beta."-alumina ceramic by ion exchange. The process comprises two steps. The first step is a high-temperature vapor phase exchange of Na by K, followed by substitution of Pb for K by immersing the sample in a molten Pb salt bath. The result is a polycrystalline Pb-.beta."-alumina ceramic that is substantially crack-free.

  10. a Novel Method to Synthesize N-DOPED CNTs Arrays via Chemical Modifying Porous Alumina Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chengyong; He, Lei

    2014-01-01

    N-doped carbon nanotubes (CNTs) arrays were fabricated via simply chemical modifying porous alumina membrane (PAM) with dopamine. The diameter of N-doped CNTs is about 60-70 nm. The N/C atomic ratio is calculated to be 0.05 and the main functionality is pyridone/pyrrole N. This chemical modifying method can be used to fabricate mass of N-doped CNTs arrays in one step with single raw material.

  11. Plasma sintering of beta″-alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henrichsen, Matthew

    Sintering and phase conversion of beta″-alumina were investigated with static and ultra-rapid passthrough plasma firing. Ultra-rapid passthrough induction firing was used to differentiate the effects of rapid heating rates from plasma effects. Static plasma sintering at low pressures resulted in excessive sodium loss which prohibited the use of dilatometry. Sintering was characterized using the diameter profiles of partially fired tubes. Phase conversion was examined with x-ray diffraction of powdered sections of partially fired tubes. Ultra-rapid passthrough firing speeds ranged from 8 to ˜240 mm/min. Instantaneous shrinkage rates as large as 8%/sec were measured. Phase conversion and sintering were both rapid, and were complete in seconds. Tubes with densities above 97%, beta″-phase content above 98%, and ionic resistivity as low as 13.8 Ocm were produced. Two modes of cracking were identified for tubes in ultra-rapid firing. Both were related to the thickness of the tube wall and sinterability of the powder being fired. A finite element model of sintering and heat transfer was developed to aid in determining the causes of cracking. Cracks formed because of mechanical stress rather than thermal shock. Low levels of cobalt in the precursor materials greatly reduced specimen heating in the plasma. The surface of beta″-alumina, like that of alpha-alumina, is catalytic for recombination of ions and radical components from the plasma. Induction furnace firing produced heating rates lower than those in plasma heating. Fired tubes were oversintered and had duplex microstructures. Some specimens fired in the induction furnace were contaminated by carbon from the graphite susceptor. Two peaks were observed in shrinkage rate profiles of some tubes. A model of dimensional change from simultaneous sintering and phase conversion was constructed. The model produced shrinkage rate profiles similar to those observed in both plasma and induction firing. The multiple peaks

  12. Vacuum brazing of alumina ceramic to titanium for biomedical implants using pure gold as the filler metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, Mohammad S.

    One of the many promising applications of metal/ceramic joining is in biomedical implantable devices. This work is focused on vacuum brazing of C.P titanium to 96% alumina ceramic using pure gold as the filler metal. A novel method of brazing is developed where resistance heating of C.P titanium is done inside a thermal evaporator using a Ta heating electrode. The design of electrode is optimized using Ansys resistive heating simulations. The materials chosen in this study are biocompatible and have prior history in implantable devices approved by FDA. This research is part of Boston Retinal implant project to make a biocompatible implantable device (www.bostonretina.org). Pure gold braze has been used in the construction of single terminal feedthrough in low density hermetic packages utilizing a single platinum pin brazed to an alumina or sapphire ceramic donut (brazed to a titanium case or ferrule for many years in implantable pacemakers. Pure gold (99.99%) brazing of 96% alumina ceramic with CP titanium has been performed and evaluated in this dissertation. Brazing has been done by using electrical resistance heating. The 96% alumina ceramic disk was manufactured by high temperature cofired ceramic (HTCC) processing while the Ti ferrule and gold performs were purchased from outside. Hermetic joints having leak rate of the order of 1.6 x 10-8 atm-cc/ sec on a helium leak detector were measured. Alumina ceramics made by HTCC processing were centreless grounded utilizing 800 grit diamond wheel to provide a smooth surface for sputtering of a thin film of Nb. Since pure alumina demonstrates no adhesion or wetting to gold, an adhesion layer must be used on the alumina surface. Niobium (Nb), Tantalum (Ta) and Tungsten (W) were chosen for evaluation since all are refractory (less dissolution into molten gold), all form stable oxides (necessary for adhesion to alumina) and all are readily thin film deposited as metals. Wetting studies are also performed to determine the

  13. Reduced neutral XLPE cable design

    SciTech Connect

    Valli, G.F.; Zawadzki, J.A.; Orton, H.E. )

    1990-04-01

    This paper describes the theoretical, laboratory and economic analyses undertaken to determine the optimum metallic concentric neutral design for its single conductor 750 and 500 kcmil aluminum XLPE 15 kV insulated concentric-neutral type feeder cables. The results suggest that reducing the cross-sectional area of this concentric neutral from the currently-recognized industry standard of 20 percent of the central conductor to 7% results in overall present-worth system cost saving of approximately $3 per conductor meter or approximately 22% of the cable first cost. The neutral configuration ultimately chosen to replace the previous standard 37 - number 14 AWG wires was 2 - 1 inch {times} 5 mil tinned copper tapes overlapped by 25%. Line voltage fault test were run in the high-power laboratory on samples with various neutral configurations to confirm they would successfully pass our worst-case fault duty of 10 kA for 20 cycles (i.e., .33 sec) with no reclosing.

  14. Forward neutral-pion transverse single-spin asymmetries in p + p collisions at sqrt[s] = 200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Abelev, B I; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Anderson, B D; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Bai, Y; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Baumgart, S; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Benedosso, F; Betts, R R; Bhardwaj, S; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Blyth, S-L; Bombara, M; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Bouchet, J; Braidot, E; Brandin, A V; Bueltmann, S; Burton, T P; Bystersky, M; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Callner, J; Catu, O; Cebra, D; Cervantes, M C; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, J Y; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, K E; Christie, W; Chung, S U; Clarke, R F; Codrington, M J M; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cosentino, M R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Dash, S; Daugherity, M; de Moura, M M; Dedovich, T G; DePhillips, M; Derevschikov, A A; Derradi de Souza, R; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Djawotho, P; Dogra, S M; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Mazumdar, M R; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Elhalhuli, E; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Eun, L; Fachini, P; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Feng, A; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Y; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gaillard, L; Ganti, M S; Garcia-Solis, E; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gorbunov, Y N; Gordon, A; Gos, H; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D; Grube, B; Guertin, S M; Guimaraes, K S F F; Gupta, A; Gupta, N; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Harris, J W; He, W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffman, A M; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Hollis, R S; Horner, M J; Huang, H Z; Hughes, E W; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Iordanova, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jakl, P; Jin, F; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kajimoto, K; Kang, K; Kapitan, J; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kettler, D; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klein, S R; Knospe, A G; Kocoloski, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kouchpil, V; Kowalik, K L; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kumar, A; Kurnadi, P; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Langdon, J; Lange, S; LaPointe, S; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, C-H; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Li, Y; Lin, G; Lin, X; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, J; Liu, L; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Longacre, R S; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, G L; Ma, J G; Ma, Y G; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meschanin, A; Millane, J; Miller, C; Miller, M L; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, A; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nattrass, C; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nepali, C; Netrakanti, P K; Ng, M J; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okada, H; Okorokov, V; Olson, D; Pachr, M; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Phatak, S C; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Porile, N; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Pruthi, N K; Putschke, J; Qattan, I A; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Relyea, D; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L; Russcher, M J; Rykov, V; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Sakuma, T; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarsour, M; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Selyuzhenkov, I; Seyboth, P; Shabetai, A; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shi, X-H; Sichtermann, E P; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Speltz, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stadnik, A; Stanislaus, T D S; Staszak, D; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Suarez, M C; Subba, N L; Sumbera, M; Sun, X M; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Tatarowicz, J; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Tian, J; Timmins, A R; Timoshenko, S; Tokarev, M; Trainor, T A; Tram, V N; Trattner, A L; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O D; Ulery, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van der Kolk, N; van Leeuwen, M; Vander Molen, A M; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vernet, R; Videbaek, F; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Wada, M; Waggoner, W T; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, J S; Wang, Q; Wang, X; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, J; Wu, Y; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Z; Yepes, P; Yoo, I-K; Yue, Q; Zachariou, N; Zawisza, M; Zhan, W; Zhang, H; Zhang, S; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, Y; Zhong, C; Zhou, J; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zuo, J X

    2008-11-28

    We report precision measurements of the Feynman x (xF) dependence, and first measurements of the transverse momentum (pT) dependence, of transverse single-spin asymmetries for the production of pi0 mesons from polarized proton collisions at sqrt[s] = 200 GeV. The xF dependence of the results is in fair agreement with perturbative QCD model calculations that identify orbital motion of quarks and gluons within the proton as the origin of the spin effects. Results for the pT dependence at fixed xF are not consistent with these same perturbative QCD-based calculations.

  15. Forward neutral-pion transverse single-spin asymmetries in p+p collisions at {radical}{ovr s}=200 GeV.

    SciTech Connect

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Krueger, K.; Spinka, H. M.; Underwood, D. G.; STAR Collaboration; High Energy Physics; Univ. of Illinois; Panjab Univ.; Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre; Kent State Univ.; Particle Physic Lab.

    2008-01-01

    We report precision measurements of the Feynman x (x{sub F}) dependence, and first measurements of the transverse momentum (p{sub T}) dependence, of transverse single-spin asymmetries for the production of {pi}{sup 0} mesons from polarized proton collisions at {radical}s = 200 GeV. The x{sub F} dependence of the results is in fair agreement with perturbative QCD model calculations that identify orbital motion of quarks and gluons within the proton as the origin of the spin effects. Results for the p{sub T} dependence at fixed x{sub F} are not consistent with these same perturbative QCD-based calculations.

  16. β-alumina-14H and β-alumina-21R: Two chromic Na2-δ(Al,Mg,Cr)17O25 polysomes observed in slags from the production of low-carbon ferrochromium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejny, Clivia; Kahlenberg, Volker; Schmidmair, Daniela; Tribus, Martina; deVilliers, Johan

    2016-09-01

    The crystal structures of unknown phases found in slags from the production of low-carbon ferrochromium were studied by powder and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Two phases of Na2-δ(Al, Mg, Cr)17O25 composition were found to be composed of an alternating stacking of a spinel-type and a Na-hosting block. Similar structures are known for β-alumina and β"-alumina, NaAl11O17. However, the spinel-type block in Na2-δ(Al, Mg, Cr)17O25 is composed of five cation layers in contrast to three cation layers in the β-alumina spinel-block. The two new phases, β-alumina-14H, P63/mmc, a=5.6467(2), c=31.9111(12) Å, and β-alumina-21R, R 3 ̅m, a=5.6515(3), c=48.068(3) Å have a 14-layer and 21-layer stacking with a 2 × (cccccch) and a 3 × (ccccccc) repeat sequence of oxygen layers in cubic and hexagonal close packing, respectively.

  17. Sintering of beta-type alumina bodies using alpha-alumina encapsulation

    DOEpatents

    McEntire, Bryan J.; Virkar, Anil V.

    1981-01-01

    A method of sintering a shaped green, beta-type alumina body comprising: (A) inserting said body into an open chamber prepared by exposing the interior surface of a container consisting essentially of at least about 50 weight percent of alpha-alumina and a remainder of other refractory material to a sodium oxide or sodium oxide producing environment; (B) sealing the chamber; and heating the chamber with the shaped body encapsulated therein to a temperature and for a time necessary to sinter said body to the desired density. The encapsulation chamber prepared as described above is also claimed.

  18. Samarium and europium beta”-alumina derivatives characterized by XPS

    DOE PAGES

    Myhre, Kristian; Meyer, Harry; Du, Miting

    2017-01-04

    Characterization of sodium, samarium and europium beta -alumina derivatives has been carried out using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Beta -alumina has been widely studied as a material capable of incorporating many different cations into its lattice structure, such as sodium and many of the lanthanide elements. The X-ray photoelectron spectra of samarium and europium in the beta -alumina structure are reported here. Additionally, the spectra of the precursor sodium beta -alumina as well as the europium and samarium trichloride starting materials are presented.

  19. Laser Welding of Alumina Ceramic Substrates with Two Fixed Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedore, Blake William Clark

    Laser welding was investigated as a potential joining technology for alumina ceramic substrates. The objective of this study was to develop a method to preheat the ceramic using a single defocused laser beam prior to welding. Engineering ceramics are employed in a variety of systems and environments due to their unique properties. Joining technologies must be developed to facilitate the manufacture of complex or large ceramic components. Laser welding is advantageous as it forms joints rapidly, and does not introduce intermediate materials to form the bond, which can have deleterious effects. The Laser Machining System (LMS) at Queen's University was adapted for this study. A defocused far-infrared (FIR) laser beam was positioned to overlay a focused near-infrared (NIR) laser beam; the defocused FIR beam preheated the ceramic substrate and the focused NIR beam formed the weld. A finite element model was developed in COMSOL MultiPhysics to simulate the preheating processes and to develop a preheating protocol. The protocol was implemented using the FIR beam and adjusted to achieve preheating temperatures of 1450, 1525, and 1600°C. Welds were performed on 1 mm thick alumina plates using the preheating protocols and NIR beam powers of 25, 50, and 75 W. Weld speed was held constant throughout the study at 0.5 mm/s. The preheating protocols were successful at achieving near-constant preheating temperatures, with standard deviations below 32 degrees. Partially penetrating welds were formed with the NIR beam at 25 W, and fully penetrating welds at 50 and 75 W. Large pores were present in the 25 W and 50 W welds. Minimal porosity was observed in the welds formed at 75 W. All of the welded plates experienced a transverse fracture that extended perpendicular to weld, and a longitudinal fracture extending parallel to the weld. This study shows that a fixed defocused laser beam can successfully preheat alumina substrates to the high temperatures required for welding; however

  20. Contact fatigue response of porcelain-veneered alumina model systems.

    PubMed

    Stappert, Christian F J; Baldassarri, Marta; Zhang, Yu; Stappert, Dina; Thompson, Van P

    2012-02-01

    Fatigue damage modes and reliability of hand-veneered (HV) and over-pressed (OP) aluminum-oxide layer structures were compared. Influence of luting cement thickness on mechanical performance was investigated. Sixty-four aluminum-oxide plates (10 × 10 × 0.5 mm) were veneered with hand built-up or pressed porcelain (0.7 mm) and adhesively luted (50- or 150-μm cement thickness) to water-aged composite resin blocks (12 × 12 × 4 mm). Single-load-to-failure and fatigue tests were performed with a spherical tungsten carbide indenter (d = 6.25 mm) applied in the center of the veneer layer. Specimens were inspected with polarized-reflected-light and scanning electron microscopy. Use-level probability Weibull curves were plotted with two-sided 90% confidence bounds, and reliability at 75,000 cycles and 250 N load was calculated. For all specimens but two OP with 50-μm cement thickness, failure was characterized by flexural radial cracks initiating at the bottom surface of the alumina core and propagating into the veneering porcelain before cone cracks could extend to the porcelain/alumina interface. HV specimens showed higher reliability compared to OP. Those with 50-μm cement thickness were more reliable relative to their 150-μm counterparts (HV_50 μm: 95% (0.99/0.67); HV_150 μm: 55% (0.92/0.01); OP_50 μm: 69% (0.84/0.48); OP_150 μm: 15% (0.53/0.004)). Similar failure modes were observed in HV and OP specimens. Radial cracks developing in the core and spreading into the veneer are suggested to cause bulk fracture, which is the characteristic failure mode for alumina core crowns. However, the highest resistance to fatigue loading was found for the HV specimens with thin cement thickness, while the lowest occurred for the OP with thick cement layer.

  1. A preservation study of carbon nanotubes in alumina-based nanocomposites via Raman spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, K. E.; Jiang, Dongtao; Ritchie, R. O.; Mukherjee, A. K.

    2007-11-01

    Raman spectroscopy was used to study the preservation of the carbon nanotube structure in nanotube-reinforced alumina nanocomposites consolidated via spark plasma sintering (SPS). A series of Raman spectroscopy experiments was used to identify the thermal breakdown temperature of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) embedded in nanocrystalline alumina. It was found that the carbon nanotube structure remains intact after sintering at 1150 °C, but almost completely breaks down by 1350 °C after only 5 min. Also, 27Al nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was used to study the chemical and structural effects of high-energy ball milling (HEBM) and SPS consolidation on pure alumina and SWCNT-alumina nanocomposites. HEBM does not change the mixed coordination number of the as-received alumina, but slight peak shifts indicate residual stresses. No Al4C3 was detected in any of the consolidated samples - even up to 1550 °C for 10 min. Thus, it is concluded that consolidation of carbon nanotube-reinforced composites should be completed at temperatures below ˜1250 °C in order to preserve the carbon nanotube structure.

  2. The effect of different powder particle size on mechanical properties of sintered alumina, resin- and glass-infused alumina.

    PubMed

    Chaiyabutr, Yada; Giordano, Russell; Pober, Richard

    2009-02-01

    In this study, the compaction and sintering behavior of fine alumina powders of different particle sizes and the effect of matrix particle size on biaxial strength and fracture toughness of infused matrices were investigated. Three different alumina powders, In-Ceram alumina, A16SG, and RC172 were selected, representing a range of particle size and shape. RC172 and A16SG were dry-pressed. In-Ceram alumina was slip-cast following manufacturer's recommendations. Dry-pressed ceramic blocks were sectioned into disks with a thickness of 1.5-mm. Uninfused disks were sintered at four temperatures between 1250 degrees C and 1400 degrees C. For glass or resin infused specimens, alumina disks were sintered at 1250 degrees C for 2 h and separated into two groups for glass infusion and resin (UDMA/TEGDMA) infusion. Disks were tested for biaxial flexural strength with a universal testing machine (Instron) at 0.5-mm/min crosshead speeds. One-way ANOVA and Duncan's multiple range tests revealed that alumina disks with different smaller particle sizes have significantly higher biaxial strength (p < 0.05). The strength of the alumina matrix was greatly increased by glass and resin infusion. The biaxial strength of resin-infused alumina increased as particle size decreased, whereas strength of glass-infused alumina was constant.

  3. Static fracture behavior of multilayered alumina-zirconia composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Robert John

    The techniques for evaluating the static fracture behavior of monolithic materials are well established. Applying these same techniques to evaluate the fracture behavior of multilayered and/or gradient composites requires consideration of the changing microstructural influence on fracture. In the current study, single-edge-V-notched-beam (SEVNB) testing was used to evaluate the R-curve behavior of multilayered gradient alumina-zirconia composites. Crack initiation and extension from the V-notch tip were observed via in situ optical microscopy. The V-notch tip was positioned near specific microstructural features within the composite and during loading short cracks (5 to 75 mum) were initiated from the V-notch tip and extended stably in ˜10 mum increments. The influence of gradient microstructures, layer-layer interfaces, platelike alumina additions, residual stresses, and the direction of crack propagation on the resulting R-curves were investigated. The fracture mechanics weight function was used to estimate the fracture behavior based on the stress distribution (applied bending stress and residual stresses). The results were compared to the measured R-curves and the weight function analysis was observed to underestimate the measured KR. These differences were likely due to bridging stresses within the samples that were not accounted for in the weight function analysis. Initial attempts to account for bridging stress within the weight function analysis were in good agreement with the measured R-curves for the monolithic sample and for the samples having a step-wise change in residual stress. However, the same bridging function was not applicable for the samples having a composition gradient within each layer.

  4. Damping Behavior of Alumina Epoxy Nano-Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katiyar, Priyanka; Kumar, Anand

    2016-10-01

    Polymer nano composites, consisting of a polymer matrix with nanoparticle filler, have been predicted to be one of the most beneficial applications of nanotechnology. Addition of nano particulates to a polymer matrix enhances its performance by capitalizing on the nature and properties of the nano-scale fillers. The damping behavior of composites with nano structured phases is significantly different from that of micro structured materials. Viscoelastic homopolymer exhibit a high material damping response over a relatively narrow range of temperature and frequencies. In many practical situations, a polymeric structure is required to possess better strength and stiffness properties together with a reasonable damping behavior. Viscoelastic polymers show higher loss factor beyond the glassy region which comes with a significant drop in the specific modulus. Addition of nano alumina particles to epoxy leads to improved strength and stiffness properties with an increase in glass transition temperature while retaining its damping capability. Experimental investigations are carried out on composite beam specimen fabricated with different compositions of alumina nano particles in epoxy to evaluate loss factor, tan δ. Impact damping method is used for time response analysis. A single point Laser is used to record the transverse displacement of a point on the composite beam specimen. The experimental results are compared with theoretical estimation of loss factor using Voigt estimation. The effect of inter phase is included in theoretical estimation of loss factor. The result reveals that the study of interface properties is very important in deriving the overall loss factor of the composite since interface occupies a significant volume fraction in the composite.

  5. Structure-Guided, Single-Point Modifications in the Phosphinic Dipeptide Structure Yield Highly Potent and Selective Inhibitors of Neutral Aminopeptidases

    SciTech Connect

    Vassiliou, Stamatia; Węglarz-Tomczak, Ewelina; Berlicki, Łukasz; Pawełczak, Małgorzata; Nocek, Bogusław; Mulligan, Rory; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Mucha, Artur

    2014-10-09

    Seven crystal structures of alanyl aminopeptidase from Neisseria meningitides (the etiological agent of meningitis, NmAPN) complexed with organophosphorus compounds were resolved to determine the optimal inhibitor-enzyme interactions. The enantiomeric phosphonic acid analogs of Leu and hPhe, which correspond to the P1 amino acid residues of well-processed substrates, were used to assess the impact of the absolute configuration and the stereospecific hydrogen bond network formed between the aminophosphonate polar head and the active site residues on the binding affinity. For the hPhe analog, an imperfect stereochemical complementarity could be overcome by incorporating an appropriate P1 side chain. The constitution of P1'-extended structures was rationally designed and the lead, phosphinic dipeptide hPhePψ[CH2]Phe, was modified in a single position. Introducing a heteroatom/heteroatom-based fragment to either the P1 or P1' residue required new synthetic pathways. The compounds in the refined structure were low nanomolar and subnanomolar inhibitors of N. meningitides, porcine and human APNs, and the reference leucine aminopeptidase (LAP). The unnatural phosphinic dipeptide analogs exhibited a high affinity for monozinc APNs associated with a reasonable selectivity versus dizinc LAP. Another set of crystal structures containing the NmAPN dipeptide ligand were used to verify and to confirm the predicted binding modes; furthermore, novel contacts, which were promising for inhibitor development, were identified, including a π-π stacking interaction between a pyridine ring and Tyr372.

  6. Structure-Guided, Single-Point Modifications in the Phosphinic Dipeptide Structure Yield Highly Potent and Selective Inhibitors of Neutral Aminopeptidases

    SciTech Connect

    Vassiliou, Stamatia; Węglarz-Tomczak, Ewelina; Berlicki, Łukasz; Pawełczak, Małgorzata; Nocek, Bogusław; Mulligan, Rory; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Mucha, Artur

    2014-10-09

    Seven crystal structures of alanyl aminopeptidase from Neisseria meningitides (the etiological agent of meningitis, NmAPN) complexed with organophosphorus compounds were resolved to determine the optimal inhibitor–enzyme interactions. The enantiomeric phosphonic acid analogs of Leu and hPhe, which correspond to the P1 amino acid residues of well-processed substrates, were used to assess the impact of the absolute configuration and the stereospecific hydrogen bond network formed between the aminophosphonate polar head and the active site residues on the binding affinity. For the hPhe analog, an imperfect stereochemical complementarity could be overcome by incorporating an appropriate P1 side chain. The constitution of P1'-extended structures was rationally designed and the lead, phosphinic dipeptide hPhePψ[CH2]Phe, was modified in a single position. Introducing a heteroatom/heteroatom-based fragment to either the P1 or P1' residue required new synthetic pathways. The compounds in the refined structure were low nanomolar and subnanomolar inhibitors of N. meningitides, porcine and human APNs, and the reference leucine aminopeptidase (LAP). The unnatural phosphinic dipeptide analogs exhibited a high affinity for monozinc APNs associated with a reasonable selectivity versus dizinc LAP. In conclusion, another set of crystal structures containing the NmAPN dipeptide ligand were used to verify and to confirm the predicted binding modes; furthermore, novel contacts, which were promising for inhibitor development, were identified, including a π–π stacking interaction between a pyridine ring and Tyr372.

  7. Structure-guided, single-point modifications in the phosphinic dipeptide structure yield highly potent and selective inhibitors of neutral aminopeptidases.

    PubMed

    Vassiliou, Stamatia; Węglarz-Tomczak, Ewelina; Berlicki, Łukasz; Pawełczak, Małgorzata; Nocek, Bogusław; Mulligan, Rory; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Mucha, Artur

    2014-10-09

    Seven crystal structures of alanyl aminopeptidase from Neisseria meningitides (the etiological agent of meningitis, NmAPN) complexed with organophosphorus compounds were resolved to determine the optimal inhibitor-enzyme interactions. The enantiomeric phosphonic acid analogs of Leu and hPhe, which correspond to the P1 amino acid residues of well-processed substrates, were used to assess the impact of the absolute configuration and the stereospecific hydrogen bond network formed between the aminophosphonate polar head and the active site residues on the binding affinity. For the hPhe analog, an imperfect stereochemical complementarity could be overcome by incorporating an appropriate P1 side chain. The constitution of P1'-extended structures was rationally designed and the lead, phosphinic dipeptide hPhePψ[CH2]Phe, was modified in a single position. Introducing a heteroatom/heteroatom-based fragment to either the P1 or P1' residue required new synthetic pathways. The compounds in the refined structure were low nanomolar and subnanomolar inhibitors of N. meningitides, porcine and human APNs, and the reference leucine aminopeptidase (LAP). The unnatural phosphinic dipeptide analogs exhibited a high affinity for monozinc APNs associated with a reasonable selectivity versus dizinc LAP. Another set of crystal structures containing the NmAPN dipeptide ligand were used to verify and to confirm the predicted binding modes; furthermore, novel contacts, which were promising for inhibitor development, were identified, including a π-π stacking interaction between a pyridine ring and Tyr372.

  8. Structure-Guided, Single-Point Modifications in the Phosphinic Dipeptide Structure Yield Highly Potent and Selective Inhibitors of Neutral Aminopeptidases

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Seven crystal structures of alanyl aminopeptidase from Neisseria meningitides (the etiological agent of meningitis, NmAPN) complexed with organophosphorus compounds were resolved to determine the optimal inhibitor–enzyme interactions. The enantiomeric phosphonic acid analogs of Leu and hPhe, which correspond to the P1 amino acid residues of well-processed substrates, were used to assess the impact of the absolute configuration and the stereospecific hydrogen bond network formed between the aminophosphonate polar head and the active site residues on the binding affinity. For the hPhe analog, an imperfect stereochemical complementarity could be overcome by incorporating an appropriate P1 side chain. The constitution of P1′-extended structures was rationally designed and the lead, phosphinic dipeptide hPhePψ[CH2]Phe, was modified in a single position. Introducing a heteroatom/heteroatom-based fragment to either the P1 or P1′ residue required new synthetic pathways. The compounds in the refined structure were low nanomolar and subnanomolar inhibitors of N. meningitides, porcine and human APNs, and the reference leucine aminopeptidase (LAP). The unnatural phosphinic dipeptide analogs exhibited a high affinity for monozinc APNs associated with a reasonable selectivity versus dizinc LAP. Another set of crystal structures containing the NmAPN dipeptide ligand were used to verify and to confirm the predicted binding modes; furthermore, novel contacts, which were promising for inhibitor development, were identified, including a π–π stacking interaction between a pyridine ring and Tyr372. PMID:25192493

  9. Solar Carboreduction of Alumina Under Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnevetsky, Irina; Ben-Zvi, Rami; Epstein, Michael; Barak, Shmuel; Rubin, Rachamim

    2013-12-01

    A preliminary study on carboreduction of alumina under vacuum, which was necessary before the solar reactor design, has been performed using an induction heater equipped with a graphite susceptor as the sample holder surrounded by a ceramic tube serving as the metal vapor deposit site. The primary objective was to study the forward and backward reactions as a function of temperature and CO partial pressure. It was concluded that at reaction temperatures above 1600°C and at an average CO partial pressure below 0.2 mbar, the amount of residual by-products in the graphite crucible was negligible, whereas tests with an average CO partial pressure of 2.6 mbar required temperatures above 1800°C to convert the stoichiometric reactants pellets fully. It was concluded that pure aluminum can be found only at deposit sites with temperatures below 600-700°C in tests with temperature and pressure suitable to prevent the volatile suboxide formation in the forward reaction. Based on these results, the solar reactor was designed with a sharp temperature drop from the hot to the cold area. The results of solar tests with different levels of CO partial pressure and temperature conditions reveal that the alumina to aluminum conversion is about 90% for reaction temperatures above the minimum temperature required for full conversion as predicted by the thermodynamic calculations at the appropriate pressure. However, at lower temperatures, a significant amount of solid Al4C3, Al4CO4, and volatile Al2O can be formed in the forward reaction, leading to an increase of the residual by-product in the reactant holder as well as lower purity of the aluminum product and an increase of the alumina content in the deposits at the cold reactor's zone. The observed nanocrystalline and amorphous morphology of the deposits caused by fast cooling in the cold zone will also be discussed.

  10. Structure-Guided, Single-Point Modifications in the Phosphinic Dipeptide Structure Yield Highly Potent and Selective Inhibitors of Neutral Aminopeptidases

    DOE PAGES

    Vassiliou, Stamatia; Węglarz-Tomczak, Ewelina; Berlicki, Łukasz; ...

    2014-10-09

    Seven crystal structures of alanyl aminopeptidase from Neisseria meningitides (the etiological agent of meningitis, NmAPN) complexed with organophosphorus compounds were resolved to determine the optimal inhibitor–enzyme interactions. The enantiomeric phosphonic acid analogs of Leu and hPhe, which correspond to the P1 amino acid residues of well-processed substrates, were used to assess the impact of the absolute configuration and the stereospecific hydrogen bond network formed between the aminophosphonate polar head and the active site residues on the binding affinity. For the hPhe analog, an imperfect stereochemical complementarity could be overcome by incorporating an appropriate P1 side chain. The constitution of P1'-extendedmore » structures was rationally designed and the lead, phosphinic dipeptide hPhePψ[CH2]Phe, was modified in a single position. Introducing a heteroatom/heteroatom-based fragment to either the P1 or P1' residue required new synthetic pathways. The compounds in the refined structure were low nanomolar and subnanomolar inhibitors of N. meningitides, porcine and human APNs, and the reference leucine aminopeptidase (LAP). The unnatural phosphinic dipeptide analogs exhibited a high affinity for monozinc APNs associated with a reasonable selectivity versus dizinc LAP. In conclusion, another set of crystal structures containing the NmAPN dipeptide ligand were used to verify and to confirm the predicted binding modes; furthermore, novel contacts, which were promising for inhibitor development, were identified, including a π–π stacking interaction between a pyridine ring and Tyr372.« less

  11. Improved Synthesis Of Potassium Beta' '-Alumina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Roger M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara; Ryan, Margaret A.; O'Connor, Dennis E.; Kisor, Adam; Underwood, Mark

    1996-01-01

    Improved formulations of precursor materials synthesize nearly-phase-pure potassium beta' '-alumina solid electrolyte (K-BASE) powder. Materials are microhomogeneous powders (or, alternatively, gels) containing K(+,) Mg(2+), and Al(3+). K-BASE powder produced used in potassium-working-fluid alkali-metal thermal-to-electric conversion (K-AMTEC), in which heat-input and heat-rejection temperatures lower than sodium-working-fluid AMTEC (Na-AMTEC). Additional potential use lies in purification of pottassium by removal of sodium and calcium.

  12. Quantum dots confined in nanoporous alumina membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jun; Xia, Jianfeng; Wang, Jun; Shinar, Joseph; Lin, Zhiqun

    2006-09-01

    CdSe /ZnS core/shell quantum dots (QDs) were filled into porous alumina membranes (PAMs) by dip coating. The deposition of QDs induced changes in the refractive index of the PAMs. The amount of absorbed QDs was quantified by fitting the reflection and transmission spectra observed experimentally with one side open and freestanding (i.e., with two sides open) PAMs employed, respectively. The fluorescence of the QDs was found to be retained within the cylindrical nanopores of the PAMs.

  13. On the inelastic shock profile in alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marom, H.; Sherman, D.; Rosenberg, Z.; Murray, N.

    2002-11-01

    The dynamic response of alumina specimens, above their elastic limits, was studied using planar impact experiments with different tile thickness. Stress-time measurements with manganin gauges show a steady spreading of the inelastic portion of the shock profile with increasing tile thickness. Such behavior is typical of elastic waves moving at a constant speed that depends on their amplitude. This finding supports recent interpretations of the failure ramp, by which the elastic response of these materials should be extended to higher stresses than the initial jump. However, further analysis of these profiles raises some questions regarding the exact determination of the Hugoniot elastic limit.

  14. Current distribution modeling for novel alumina electrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, D.P. . Alcoa Labs.)

    1991-01-01

    One-, two- and three-dimensional secondary current distributions are calculated for anode designs and electrolysis being investigated for a novel alumina electrolysis process using a three dimensional or extended area anode design. Agreement with measured polarization is good. The results indicate that for a particular configuration and electrolyte, the maximum local current density will be 28% of the superficial current density. An alternative design giving a maximum of 15% of the superficial current density was also investigated with the models. Evaluation of some other electrolyte systems indicates that they will not be suitable for use in the high surface area configuration. 18 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Anisotropic shrinkage characteristics of tape cast alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patwardhan, Jaideep Suresh

    Dimensional control during sintering is a major issue in ceramics processing to avoid high post-sintering costs associated with machining of the fired ceramic part to desired tolerances and dimensions. Ceramic forming processes such as tape casting, injection molding, and extrusion involve shear of anisotropic particles resulting in preferential alignment of the particles in the green body. This preferential alignment causes directionality in mechanical, electrical, optical, and magnetic properties and most importantly warpage or distortion during sintering. A large effort has been devoted to synthesizing ceramic green bodies with minimal density gradients and uniform packing and modeling the sintering behavior evolution but little effort has been devoted to characterizing orientation of particles and the effect of preferential alignment on sintering shrinkage anisotropy. A systematic study was initiated to study the effect of processing variables such as shear rate, solids loading, temperature, and binder content on aqueous tape cast alumina. Three different alumina systems: A16-SG, Baikowski RC-UFX DBM and RC-LS DBM were investigated. Aqueous tapes of high solids loading alumina (56 vol. %) were tape cast at various speeds and thicknesses and assuming plane Couette flow a shear rate regime of 21--270 s-1 was investigated. Higher shear rates and high solids loading resulted in higher in-plane anisotropy whereas the anisotropy in the thickness direction was higher for low solids loading systems. The anisotropy was found to be fairly constant above a certain critical shear rate (˜100 s-1) irrespective of the temperature and the solids loading and this correlated with the viscosity-shear rate relationship of the cast slips. The higher shrinkage anisotropy in the thickness direction for the low solids loading systems (35 and 45 vol. %) was attributed to the higher amount of organics in the slip required to sustain the suitable viscosity for tape casting and

  16. Trivalent Ion Exchange in Beta’ Alumina.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-06

    halide salt. required higher aticmp I We hew fotat t bet ain synthesis tempratures then wm usned for the are apale f mqporingtrivlen caion divalent...s a dni Table I . Trivalent, Zen Exchngeondiion ion Halt Coqoition ToW (OC) time(h) lexcdwmge Gd3 Gda1 615 5 100 Nd3+ dr 2 . 95 i1d3 45 MM /AS umcl...properties The fluorescence spectra of kUd’* exchanged Ita mtdctivity for Gd3 + beta" aluina Wben" alumina are ganerally similar to that of was masurd

  17. Momentum Flux Measuring Instrument for Neutral and Charged Particle Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chavers, Greg; Chang-Diaz, Franklin; Schafer, Charles F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An instrument to measure the momentum flux (total pressure) of plasma and neutral particle jets onto a surface has been developed. While this instrument was developed for magnetized plasmas, the concept works for non-magnetized plasmas as well. We have measured forces as small as 10(exp -4) Newtons on a surface immersed in the plasma where small forces are due to ionic and neutral particles with kinetic energies on the order of a few eV impacting the surface. This instrument, a force sensor, uses a target plate (surface) that is immersed in the plasma and connected to one end of an alumina rod while the opposite end of the alumina rod is mechanically connected to a titanium beam on which four strain gauges are mounted. The force on the target generates torque causing strain in the beam. The resulting strain measurements can be correlated to a force on the target plate. The alumina rod electrically and thermally isolates the target plate from the strain gauge beam and allows the strain gauges to be located out of the plasma flow while also serving as a moment arm of several inches to increase the strain in the beam at the strain gauge location. These force measurements correspond directly to momentum flux and may be used with known plasma conditions to place boundaries on the kinetic energies of the plasma and neutral particles. The force measurements may also be used to infer thrust produced by a plasma propulsive device. Stainless steel, titanium, molybdenum, and aluminum flat target plates have been used. Momentum flux measurements of H2, D2, He, and Ar plasmas produced in a magnetized plasma device have been performed.

  18. Process for the recovery of alumina from fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Murtha, M.J.

    1983-08-09

    An improvement in the lime-sinter process for recovering alumina from pulverized coal fly ash is disclosed. The addition of from 2 to 10 weight percent carbon and sulfur to the fly ash-calcium carbonate mixture increase alumina recovery at lower sintering temperatures.

  19. 40 CFR 721.10120 - Siloxane modified alumina nanoparticles (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... nanoparticles (generic). 721.10120 Section 721.10120 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10120 Siloxane modified alumina nanoparticles (generic). (a) Chemical... as siloxane modified alumina nanoparticles (PMN P-05-687) is subject to reporting under this...

  20. Dynamic compressive and tensile strengths of spark plasma sintered alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Girlitsky, I.; Zaretsky, E.; Kalabukhov, S.; Dariel, M. P.; Frage, N.

    2014-06-28

    Fully dense submicron grain size alumina samples were manufactured from alumina nano-powder using Spark Plasma Sintering and tested in two kinds of VISAR-instrumented planar impact tests. In the first kind, samples were loaded by 1-mm tungsten impactors, accelerated to a velocity of about 1 km/s. These tests were aimed at studying the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL) of Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS)-processed alumina and the decay, with propagation distance, of the elastic precursor wave. In the tests of the second kind, alumina samples of 3-mm thickness were loaded by 1-mm copper impactors accelerated to 100–1000 m/s. These tests were aimed at studying the dynamic tensile (spall) strength of the alumina specimens. The tensile fracture of the un-alloyed alumina shows a monotonic decline of the spall strength with the amplitude of the loading stress pulse. Analysis of the decay of the elastic precursor wave allowed determining the rate of the irreversible (inelastic) strains in the SPS-processed alumina at the initial stages of the shock-induced inelastic deformation and to clarify the mechanisms responsible for the deformation. The 1-% addition of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} decreases the HEL of the SPS-processed alumina by 5-% and its spall strength by 50% but barely affects its static properties.

  1. Treatment of chrome plating wastewater (Cr+6) using activated alumina.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sudipta; Gupta, Anirban

    2003-01-01

    Suitability of activated alumina for removal of hexavalent chromium from electroplating wastewater has been investigated. Activated alumina exhibited good sorption capacity for hexavalent chromium and pH has no pronounced effect on the sorption capacity. Both batch and column adsorption studies have been carried out and an adsorption column design indicated reasonable depth of column for practical application.

  2. Microstructural and Mechanical Characterization of Actively Brazed Alumina Specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Hosking, F.M.; Cadden, C.H.; Stephens, J.J.; Glass, S.J.; Yang, N.Y.C.; Vianco, P.V.; Walker, C.A.

    1999-08-26

    Alumina (94 and 99.8% grade compositions) was brazed directly to itself with gold-based active brazing alloys (ABA's) containing vanadium additions of 1,2 and 3 weight percent. The effects of brazing conditions on the joint properties were investigated. Wetting behavior, interfacial reactions, microstructure, hermeticity and tensile strength were determined. Wetting was fair to good for the ABA and base material combinations. Microanalysis identified a discontinuous Al-V-O spinel reaction product at the alumina-braze interface. Tensile strength results for 94% alumina were uniformly good and generally not sensitive to the vanadium concentration, with tensile values of 85-105 MPa. There was more variability in the 99.8% alumina strength results, with values ranging from 25-95 MPa. The highest vanadium concentration (3 wt. %) yielded the highest joint strength for the brazed 99.8% alumina. Failures in the 99.8% alumina samples occurred at the braze-alumina interface, while the 94% alumina specimens exhibited fracture of the ceramic substrate.

  3. Dynamic compressive and tensile strengths of spark plasma sintered alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girlitsky, I.; Zaretsky, E.; Kalabukhov, S.; Dariel, M. P.; Frage, N.

    2014-06-01

    Fully dense submicron grain size alumina samples were manufactured from alumina nano-powder using Spark Plasma Sintering and tested in two kinds of VISAR-instrumented planar impact tests. In the first kind, samples were loaded by 1-mm tungsten impactors, accelerated to a velocity of about 1 km/s. These tests were aimed at studying the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL) of Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS)-processed alumina and the decay, with propagation distance, of the elastic precursor wave. In the tests of the second kind, alumina samples of 3-mm thickness were loaded by 1-mm copper impactors accelerated to 100-1000 m/s. These tests were aimed at studying the dynamic tensile (spall) strength of the alumina specimens. The tensile fracture of the un-alloyed alumina shows a monotonic decline of the spall strength with the amplitude of the loading stress pulse. Analysis of the decay of the elastic precursor wave allowed determining the rate of the irreversible (inelastic) strains in the SPS-processed alumina at the initial stages of the shock-induced inelastic deformation and to clarify the mechanisms responsible for the deformation. The 1-% addition of Cr2O3 decreases the HEL of the SPS-processed alumina by 5-% and its spall strength by 50% but barely affects its static properties.

  4. Conversion of Conventional Rotary Kiln Into Effective Sandy Alumina Calciner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, M.; Hirano, T.; Yajima, H.

    Using conventional rotary kiln for calcining sandy alumina in potlines, remakable heat-saving and capacity-improving can be achieved. 83 liters of oil per tonne of alumina (3200MJ/tonne) were required for calcining 800 m.t.p.d. of sandy alumina in the rotary kiln at Shimizu Works. The kiln is installed with two stages of flash dryers and planetary coolers, and was originally designed for calcining floury alumina at 550 m.t.p.d. This improvement in capacity and unit oil consumption was achieved mainly through shortening the flame by using a special burner and effective heat recovery. The quality of sandy alumina calcined by the kiln is good enough for potlines.

  5. Experimental study of 248nm excimer laser etching of alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hongtao; Shao, Jingzhen; Wang, Xi; Fang, Xiaodong

    2016-10-01

    The 248 nm excimer laser etching characteristic of alumina ceramic and sapphire had been studied using different laser fluence and different number of pulses. And the interaction mechanism of 248 nm excimer laser with alumina ceramic and sapphire had been analyzed. The results showed that when the laser fluence was less than 8 J/cm2, the etching depth of alumina ceramic and sapphire were increased with the increase of laser fluence and number of pulses. At the high number pulses and high-energy, the surface of the sapphire had no obvious melting phenomenon, and the alumina ceramic appeared obvious melting phenomenon. The interaction mechanism of excimer laser with alumina ceramics and sapphire was mainly two-photon absorption. But because of the existence of impurities and defects, the coupling between the laser radiation and ceramic and sapphire was strong, and the thermal evaporation mechanism was also obvious.

  6. Removal of impurities from dry scrubbed fluoride enriched alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Schuh, L.; Wedde, G.

    1996-10-01

    The pot-gas from an aluminum electrolytic cell is cleaned by a dry scrubbing process using fresh alumina as a scrubbing agent. This alumina is enriched with fluorides and trace impurities in a closed loop system with the pots. The only significant removal of the impurities is due to metal tapping. An improved technique has been developed that is more effective than earlier stripper systems. The impurity-rich fine fraction (< 10 {micro}m) of the enriched alumina is partly attached to the coarser alumina. That attachment has to be broken. Selective impact milling under special moderate conditions and air classifying have shown to be a cost effective process for the removal of impurities. For iron (Fe) and phosphorus (P) about 30--70% can be removed by the separation of 0.5--1% of the alumina. Full scale tests have successfully confirmed these results.

  7. Thermal Conductivity of Alumina-reinforced Zirconia Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.

    2005-01-01

    10-mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia (10SZ) - alumina composites containing 0-30 mol% alumina were fabricated by hot pressing at 1500 C in vacuum. Thermal conductivity was determined at various temperatures using a steady-state laser heat flux technique. Thermal conductivity of the composites increased with increase in alumina content. Composites containing 0, 5, and 10-mol% alumina did not show any change in thermal conductivity with temperature. However, those containing 20 and 30-mol% alumina showed a decrease in thermal conductivity with increase in temperature. The measured values of thermal conductivity were in good agreement with those calculated from the Maxwell-Eucken model where one phase is uniformly dispersed within a second major continuous phase.

  8. Ten-year results after cementless THA with a sandwich-type alumina ceramic bearing.

    PubMed

    Park, Youn-Soo; Park, Se-Jun; Lim, Seung-Jae

    2010-11-02

    We analyzed the long-term results of a single-surgeon series of 102 cementless total hip arthroplasties (THAs) performed using a sandwich-type alumina ceramic bearing. The prostheses involved a porous-coated acetabular socket, a polyethylene-alumina composite liner, a 28-mm alumina head, and a grit-blasted titanium-alloy stem. Mean patient age at the time of THA was 39 years (range, 18-66 years), and 76% of the patients were younger than 50 years. All procedures were performed with use of the same surgical technique and the same implant at a single center. Mean follow-up was 115 months (range, 84-133 months). When failure was defined as revision of either the acetabular or the femoral component for any reason, Kaplan-Meier survival probability at 10 years was 95.3% (95% confidence interval, 89.5%-100%). Mean Harris Hip Score improved from 47 points (range, 16-70 points) preoperatively to 95 points (range, 85-100 points) at final follow-up. No radiographically detectable osteolysis around the acetabular or femoral component was observed in any hip. No patient reported squeaking in the operated hip. During the follow-up period, 3 hips (3%) required revision surgery; 2 underwent acetabular revision because of a ceramic liner fracture and 1 underwent revision for early loosening of the acetabular cup. Ten-year results of cementless THA with a sandwich-type alumina ceramic bearing were encouraging, and no great increase in ceramic failure rate was observed, which contrasts with the findings of previously reported short-term follow-up studies. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Adsorption of carboxymethyl cellulose on alumina particles.

    PubMed

    Zhivkov, Alexandar M; Hristov, Rosen P

    2015-06-01

    The polyelectrolyte adsorption on colloid particles is often used for stabilization or flocculation of water suspensions. The aim of this work is to study the adsorption of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) on alumina (γ-Al2O3) colloid particles. The particles and polymer are chosen because of the capability of the metal-oxide ampholyte surface and the weak polyelectrolytes to alter their charge by pH. The measurements are done at pH 6.0 where the CMC carboxylic gropes are almost fully dissociated and the alumina surface is positively charged. The high linear charge density of the polyelectrolyte chain provides Na(+) counterions condensation on the COO(-) groups. The main employed method is the electric light scattering based on particle orientation in sinusoidal electric field. The electric polarizability and the relaxation time after field switching off (both depending on the particle charge and size) are used as criteria for polymer adsorption and particle aggregation. Micro-electrophoresis is applied as additional techniques indicating the sign and density of the surface charge. The results obtained give the conditions (time dependence, particle and polymer concentrations) where the CMC adsorption is complete and the suspension is stable.

  10. Lightweight alumina refractory aggregate. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Swansiger, T.G.; Pearson, A.

    1996-07-16

    Objective was to develop a lightweight, high alumina refractory aggregate for use in various high performance insulating (low thermal conductivity) refractory applications (e.g., in the aluminium, glass, cement, and iron and steel industries). A new aggregate process was developed through bench and pilot-scale experiments involving extrusion of a blend of calcined and activated alumina powders and organic extrusion aids and binders. The aggregate, with a bulk density approaching 2.5 g/cc, exhibited reduced thermal conductivity and adequate fired strength compared to dense tabular aggregate. Refractory manufacturers were moderately enthusiastic over the results. Alcoa prepared an economic analysis for producing lightweight aggregate, based on a retrofit of this process into existing Alcoa production facilities. However, a new, competing lightweight aggregate material was developed by another company; this material (Plasmal{trademark})had a significantly more favorable cost base than the Alcoa/DOE material, due to cheap raw materials and fewer processing steps. In late 1995, Alcoa became a distributor of Plasmal. Alcoa estimated that {ge}75% of the market originally envisioned for the Alcoa/DOE aggregate would be taken by Plasmal. Hence, it was decided to terminate the contract without the full- scale demonstration.

  11. Combination for electrolytic reduction of alumina

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Craig W.; Brooks, Richard J.; Frizzle, Patrick B.; Juric, Drago D.

    2002-04-30

    An electrolytic bath for use during the electrolytic reduction of alumina to aluminum. The bath comprises molten electrolyte having the following ingredients: AlF.sub.3 and at least one salt selected from the group consisting of NaF, KF, and LiF; and about 0.004 wt. % to about 0.2 wt. %, based on total weight of the molten electrolyte, of at least one transition metal or at least one compound of the metal or both. The compound is, a fluoride; oxide, or carbonate. The metal is nickel, iron, copper, cobalt, or molybdenum. The bath is employed in a combination including a vessel for containing the bath and at least one non-consumable anode and at least one dimensionally stable cathode in the bath. Employing the instant bath during electrolytic reduction of alumina to aluminum improves the wetting of aluminum on a cathode by reducing or eliminating the formation of non-metallic deposits on the cathode.

  12. Properties of Transition Metal Doped Alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nykwest, Erik; Limmer, Krista; Brennan, Ray; Blair, Victoria; Ramprasad, Rampi

    Crystallographic texture can have profound effects on the properties of a material. One method of texturing is through the application of an external magnetic field during processing. While this method works with highly magnetic systems, doping is required to couple non-magnetic systems with the external field. Experiments have shown that low concentrations of rare earth (RE) dopants in alumina powders have enabled this kind of texturing. The magnetic properties of RE elements are directly related to their f orbital, which can have as many as 7 unpaired electrons. Since d-block elements can have as many as 5 unpaired electrons the effects of substitutional doping of 3d transition metals (TM) for Al in alpha (stable) and theta (metastable) alumina on the local structure and magnetic properties, in addition to the energetic cost, have been calculated by performing first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. This study has led to the development of general guidelines for the magnetic moment distribution at and around the dopant atom, and the dependence of this distribution on the dopant atom type and its coordination environment. It is anticipated that these findings can aid in the selection of suitable dopants help to guide parallel experimental efforts. This project was supported in part by an internship at the Army Research Laboratory, administered by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, along with a grant of computer time from the DoD High Performance Computing Modernization Program.

  13. Ion-Ion Neutralization.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-31

    Accession No. 3. Recipient’s Catalog Number FGL -TR-82 -0202 b- /- 4. Title (and Subtitle) 5. Type of Report & Period Covered ION-ION NEUTRALIZATION Final...few years under the terms of the grant has been the detailed study of binary ion-ion neutralization reactions involving ions of atmospheric...2TT, England. 1. INTRODUCTION Binary positive-ion negative-ion mutual neutralization viz: A+ + B->C + D (1) can be an important loss process for

  14. Parsing abnormal grain growth in specialty aluminas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, Abigail Kremer

    Grain growth in alumina is strongly affected by the impurities present in the material. Certain impurity elements are known to have characteristic effects on abnormal grain growth in alumina. Specialty alumina powders contain multiple impurity species including MgO, CaO, SiO2, and Na 2O. In this work, sintered samples made from alumina powders containing various amounts of the impurities in question were characterized by their grain size and aspect ratio distributions. Multiple quantitative methods were used to characterize and classify samples with varying microstructures. The grain size distributions were used to partition the grain size population into subpopulations depending on the observed deviation from normal behavior. Using both grain size and aspect ratio a new visual representation for a microstructure was introduced called a morphology frequency map that gives a fingerprint for the material. The number of subpopulations within a sample and the shape of the distribution on the morphology map provided the basis for a classification scheme for different types of microstructures. Also using the two parameters a series of five metrics were calculated that describe the character of the abnormal grains in the sample, these were called abnormal character values. The abnormal character values describe the fraction of grains that are considered abnormal, the average magnitude of abnormality (including both grain size and aspect ratio), the average size, and variance in size. The final metric is the correlation between grain size and aspect ratio for the entire population of grains. The abnormal character values give a sense of how different from "normal" the sample is, given the assumption that a normal sample has a lognormal distribution of grain size and a Gaussian distribution of aspect ratios. In the second part of the work the quantified measures of abnormality were correlated with processing parameters such as composition and heat treatment conditions. A

  15. ALEX neutral beam probe

    SciTech Connect

    Pourrezaei, K.

    1982-01-01

    A neutral beam probe capable of measuring plasma space potential in a fully 3-dimensional magnetic field geometry has been developed. This neutral beam was successfully used to measure an arc target plasma contained within the ALEX baseball magnetic coil. A computer simulation of the experiment was performed to refine the experimental design and to develop a numerical model for scaling the ALEX neutral beam probe to other cases of fully 3-dimensional magnetic field. Based on this scaling a 30 to 50 keV neutral cesium beam probe capable of measuring space potential in the thermal barrier region of TMX Upgrade was designed.

  16. Noise in β''-alumina solid electrolytes: Theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Vliet, Carolyne M.; Brophy, James J.

    1993-05-01

    Measurements of noise in β'' aluminas (Na, Pb, Ag, and Ca) showing diffusion noise spectra, with high-frequency asymptote ω-3/2, have been reported by Brophy and co-workers since 1985, both for ceramics and single crystals. Comparison with the standard formulas by Burgess, Lax and Mengert, and Van Vliet and Fassett, showed that the observed noise was 9 to 12 orders of magnitude too high. In the present paper this discrepancy is addressed and removed. A detailed analysis is presented based on the two-dimensional planar diffusive motion of ions and defects in the Beevers-Ross (BR) and anti-Beevers-Ross sites of the conduction plane. Coulomb interaction in the plane is shown to have little effect due to screening; however, the antiferroelectric coupling, which gives rise to superlattice ordering as observed by Collin et al., causes correlated jumps within a coherence area, involving ambipolar motion of vacancy anti-BR sites, cation BR sites, and cation anti-BR sites. In addition, electrostatic induction via the spinel blocks couples the fluctuations in adjacent conduction planes. For Na-β'' and Pb-β'' single crystals quantitative agreement is obtained and the essential features of x-ray- and neutron-scattering data are confirmed.

  17. On the neutral points in Rayleigh transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viik, T.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper we consider the dependence of the existence and position of the neutral points on the albedo of single scattering and the optical thickness in a Rayleigh scattering plane-parallel homogeneous atmospheres. We use the Chandrasekhar method of discrete ordinates and the method of approximating the Sobolev resolvent function to solve the vector equation of transfer in l- and r-representation. On the basis of many different models of Rayleigh atmospheres we show the behaviour of the neutral points while the parallel incident flux can be both unpolarized or polarized. Our calculations show with high probability that the maximum number of neutral points in a Rayleigh atmosphere is four.

  18. Efficient laser production of energetic neutral beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollica, F.; Antonelli, L.; Flacco, A.; Braenzel, J.; Vauzour, B.; Folpini, G.; Birindelli, G.; Schnuerer, M.; Batani, D.; Malka, V.

    2016-03-01

    Laser-driven ion acceleration by intense, ultra-short, laser pulse has received increasing attention in recent years, and the availability of much compact and versatile ions sources motivates the study of laser-driven sources of energetic neutral atoms. We demonstrate the production of a neutral and directional beam of hydrogen and carbon atoms up to 200 keV per nucleon, with a peak flow of 2.7× {{10}13} atom s-1. Laser accelerated ions are neutralized in a pulsed, supersonic argon jet with tunable density between 1.5× {{10}17} cm-3and 6× {{10}18} cm-3. The neutralization efficiency has been measured by a time-of-flight detector for different argon densities. An optimum is found, for which complete neutralization occurs. The neutralization rate can be explained only at high areal densities (>1× {{10}17} cm-2) by single electron charge transfer processes. These results suggest a new perspective for the study of neutral production by laser and open discussion of neutralization at a lower density.

  19. Terbium luminescence in alumina xerogel fabricated in porous anodic alumina matrix under various excitation conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Gaponenko, N. V.; Kortov, V. S.; Orekhovskaya, T. I.; Nikolaenko, I. A.; Pustovarov, V. A.; Zvonarev, S. V.; Slesarev, A. I.; Prislopski, S. Ya.

    2011-07-15

    Terbium-doped alumina xerogel layers are synthesized by the sol-gel method in pores of a porous anodic alumina film 1 {mu}m thick with a pore diameter of 150-180 nm; the film is grown on a silicon substrate. The fabricated structures exhibit terbium photoluminescence with bands typical of trivalent terbium terms. Terbium X-ray luminescence with the most intense band at 542 nm is observed for the first time for such a structure. Morphological analysis of the structure by scanning electron microscopy shows the presence of xerogel clusters in pore channels, while the main pore volume remains unfilled and pore mouths remain open. The data obtained confirm the promising applications of fabricated structures for developing matrix converters of X-rays and other ionizing radiations into visible light. The possibilities of increasing luminescence intensity in the matrix converter are discussed.

  20. Fabrication of Alumina Nanowires from Porous Alumina Membranes by Etching in Phosphoric Acid Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuehua; Li, Chengyong; Ma, Lianjiao; Cao, Hong; Zhang, Baohua

    Alumina nanowires (ANWs) with high aspect ratios were synthesized by the chemical etching of porous alumina membranes (PAMs) in phosphoric acid solution. The morphology and structure of ANWs were analyzed by SEM and XRD, respectively. The results showed that the typical features of ANWs are around 35 nm in diameter and around 20 μm in length, the crystalline structure of the ANWs was amorphous, which was in accordance with that of the PAMs. Furthermore, the morphology of the PAMs was characterized by AFM and SEM in detail. On the basis of AFM and SEM observations, a possible formation mechanism of ANWs was discussed, and the inhomogeneous of the dissolution between the triple points and the side walls was considered to be the essential factor deciding the formation of ANWs.

  1. Deformation Behaviour of Coarse Grain Alumina under Shock Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Satish

    2013-06-01

    To develop better understanding of the shock wave induced deformation behavior of coarse grain alumina ceramics, and for measurement of its Hugoniot Elastic Limit (HEL), in-situ and recovery gas gun experiments have been carried out on coarse grain alumina (grain size ~ 10 μm), prepared in the form of discs (>99.9% TMD) by pressure-less sintering of alpha alumina powder at 1583 K. The HEL value of 1.9 GPa has been determined from the kink in the pressure history recorded using piezoresistance gauge and also from the free surface velocity history of the sample shocked to 9 GPa. The nano-indentation measurements on the alumina samples shocked to 6.5 GPa showed hardness value 15% lower than 21.3 GPa for unshocked alumina, and strong Indentation Size Effect (ISE); the hardness value was still lower and the ISE was stronger for the sample shocked to 12 GPa. The XRD measurements showed reduced particle size and increased microstrains in the shocked alumina fragments. SEM, FESEM and TEM measurements on shock treated samples showed presence of grain localized micro- and nano-scale deformations, micro-cleavages, grain-boundary microcracks, extensive shear induced deformations, and localized micro-fractures, etc. These observations led to the development of a qualitative model for the damage initiation and its subsequent growth mechanisms in shocked alumina. The work performed in collaboration with K.D. Joshi of BARC and A.K. Mukhopadhyay of CGCRI.

  2. Fracture of the alumina-bearing couple delta ceramic liner.

    PubMed

    Taheriazam, Afshin; Mohajer, Mohammad Azizbaig; Aboulghasemian, Mansoour; Hajipour, Babak

    2012-01-16

    The fracture rate of third-generation ceramic liners is greatly reduced compared with first- and second-generation liners because of improvements in the design and manufacturing process. Fractures of the alumina-bearing couple are rare for the same reason.This article describes a case of a fracture of an alumina-bearing couple delta ceramic liner without trauma history that was treated with ceramic-on-polyethylene revision total hip arthroplasty. A 57-year-old man was admitted to the hip ward because of an alumina-bearing couple delta ceramic liner fracture. He underwent hip replacement by anterior approach 18 months previously in the same center because of left hip primary osteoarthritis. He received a 54×36-mm modular press-fit cup ceramic alumina-bearing couple delta insert. Probable causes of such fractures are manufacture production failure and edge loading based on cup inclination, but in our patient, inacceptable range of motion, failure of the locking mechanism during implantation insertion, or cracking were possible causes of fracture.Although the fracture rate of third-generation alumina-bearing couples is low, we believe that it may not be possible to eliminate the actual risk of alumina head fracture. Patients should be informed about the potential for this complication before receiving an alumina-bearing couple. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. Reactions of benzene and alkylbenzenes with deuterium over molybdena-alumina and alumina catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Redey, A.; Hall, W.K.

    1987-11-01

    The reactions of D/sub 2/ with aromatic systems were studied. Benzene did not hydrogenate at atmospheric pressure. On the other hand, exchange between benzene-d/sub 0/ and D/sub 2/ was facile at 70/sup 0/C and 1 atm over reduced (eMo approx. = 1.7) and at 200/sup 0/C over sulfided (eMo approx. = 3.0) catalysts. The exchange reaction also occurred over the alumina support at an intermediate rate. Over alumina the exchange at 70/sup 0/C was stepwise (M = k/sub theta/k/sub 0/ approx. = 1.0), but as the temperature and hence k/sub 0/ increased, multiple exchange (M greater than or equal to 2.0) set in. The usual tests showed that this was not a result of a pore diffusion limitation. The rate of exchange of C/sub 6/D/sub 6/ with the alumina hydroxyl groups increased sharply as the temperature was increased to near 200/sup 0/C in a way which mimicked the increase in M. Thus, the increase in multiplicity may be ascribed to the opening of new pathways for exchange. The much faster rates and higher values of M obtained over the reduced catalysts than over the sulfided ones, coupled with the results of poisoning experiments using NO and CO/sub 2/ (both of which drastically reduced the rates and returned the exchange process to M approx. = 1.0), demonstrated that with the reduced catalyst both portions of the surface act synergistically. The results may be rationalized by the supposition that exchange occurs on the alumina support and that hydrogen may spill-over on reduced catalysts, but not on sulfided ones. In the exchange reactions, alkylaromatics were found to have higher rates for ring than for side chain hydrogens

  4. Search for anomalous Wtb couplings and flavour-changing neutral currents in t-channel single top quark production in pp collisions at √{s}=7 and 8 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

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M.; Gunnellini, P.; Harb, A.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Karacheban, O.; Kasemann, M.; Keaveney, J.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Lange, W.; Lelek, A.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Mankel, R.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Ntomari, E.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Roland, B.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Saxena, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Stefaniuk, N.; Trippkewitz, K. D.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Dreyer, T.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Gonzalez, D.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Junkes, A.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Kovalchuk, N.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Marconi, D.; Meyer, M.; Niedziela, M.; Nowatschin, D.; Ott, J.; Pantaleo, F.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Poehlsen, J.; Sander, C.; Scharf, C.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schumann, S.; Schwandt, J.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Stober, F. M.; Stöver, M.; Tholen, H.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Vormwald, B.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; Colombo, F.; De Boer, W.; Dierlamm, A.; Fink, S.; Friese, R.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Haitz, D.; Hartmann, F.; Heindl, S. M.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Maier, B.; Mildner, H.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, T.; Müller, Th.; Plagge, M.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Röcker, S.; Roscher, F.; Schröder, M.; Sieber, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T.; Williamson, S.; Wöhrmann, C.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. 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    2017-02-01

    Single top quark events produced in the t channel are used to set limits on anomalous Wtb couplings and to search for top quark flavour-changing neutral current (FCNC) interactions. The data taken with the CMS detector at the LHC in proton-proton collisions at √{s}=7 and 8 TeV correspond to integrated luminosities of 5.0 and 19.7 fb-1, respectively. The analysis is performed using events with one muon and two or three jets. A Bayesian neural network technique is used to discriminate between the signal and backgrounds, which are observed to be consistent with the standard model prediction. The 95% confidence level (CL) exclusion limits on anomalous right-handed vector, and left- and right-handed tensor Wtb couplings are measured to be | f V R | < 0.16, | f T L | < 0.057, and - 0.049 < f T R < 0.048, respectively. For the FCNC couplings κ tug and κ tcg, the 95% CL upper limits on coupling strengths are | κ tug|/ Λ < 4.1 × 10- 3 TeV-1 and | κ tcg|/ Λ < 1.8 × 10- 2 TeV-1, where Λ is the scale for new physics, and correspond to upper limits on the branching fractions of 2 .0 × 10-5 and 4 .1 × 10-4 for the decays t → ug and t → cg, respectively.

  5. Interaction of wide-band-gap single crystals with 248-nm excimer laser radiation. XI. The effect of water vapor and temperature on laser desorption of neutral atoms from sodium chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Nwe, K.H.; Langford, S.C.; Dickinson, J.T.; Hess, W.P.

    2005-02-15

    We show that low partial pressures of water vapor (10{sup -5} Pa) dramatically increase the intensity of neutral Na and Cl emissions from cleaved, single-crystal NaCl during pulsed laser irradiation at 248 nm (KrF excimer). The time-of-flight distributions of these emissions are consistent with thermal desorption from laser-heated surfaces. Significantly, introducing water vapor lowers the particle velocities and thus the effective surface temperature during emission. Transmission measurements confirm that laser absorption is reduced in the presence of water vapor. The Arrhenius analysis of the emission intensities and effective temperatures show reduced activation energies in the presence of water vapor, which more than compensate for the vapor-induced reduction in laser absorption and surface temperature. Atomic force and scanning electron microscopy of the irradiated surfaces show evidence for accelerated monolayer-scale erosion in the presence of water vapor. A mechanism for the effect of water on these emission and erosion processes is proposed and discussed.

  6. The examination of calcium ion implanted alumina with energy filtered transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, E.M.; Hampikian, J.M.; Evans, N.D.

    1997-04-01

    Ion implantation can be used to alter in the optical response of insulators through the formation of embedded nano-sized particles. Single crystal alumina has been implanted at ambient temperature with 50 keV Ca{sup +} to a fluence of 5 {times} 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}. Ion channeling, Knoop microhardness measurements, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) indicate that the alumina surface layer was amorphized by the implant. TEM also revealed nano-sized crystals {approx}7--8 nm in diameter. These nanocrystals are randomly oriented, and exhibit a face-centered cubic structure (FCC) with a lattice parameter of 0.409 nm {+-} 0.002 nm. The similarity between this crystallography and that of pure aluminum suggests that they are metallic aluminum nanocrystals with a slightly dilated lattice parameter, possibly due to the incorporation of a small amount of calcium. Energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) provides an avenue by which to confirm the metallic nature of the aluminum involved in the nanocrystals. EFTEM has confirmed that the aluminum present in the particles is metallic in nature, that the particles are oxygen deficient in comparison with the matrix material and that the particles are deficient in calcium, and therefore not likely to be calcia. The particles thus appear to be FCC Al (possibly alloyed with a few percent Ca) with a lattice parameter of 0.409nm. A similar result was obtained for yttrium ion implantation into alumina.

  7. Resolving stress tensor components in space from polarized Raman spectra: polycrystalline alumina.

    PubMed

    Pezzotti, Giuseppe; Zhu, Wenliang

    2015-01-28

    A method of Raman spectroscopic analysis has been proposed for evaluating tensorial stress fields stored in alumina polycrystals with a corundum structure (α-Al2O3). Raman selection rules for all the vibrational modes of the structure were expanded into explicit functions of both 3 Euler angles in space and 4 Raman tensor elements (RTE) of corundum. A theoretical treatment was then worked out according to the phonon deformation potential (PDP) formalism, which explicitly expressed the changes in force constants under stress in matricial form. Close-form solutions could be obtained for the matrix eigenvalues as a function of 9 unknown variables, namely 6 independent stress tensor components and 3 Euler angles in space, the latter parameters being representatives of local crystal orientation. Successively, two separate sets of Raman calibration experiments were performed for the determination of both RTE and PDP constants of the corundum structure of alumina. Calibration experiments provided a quantitative frame to the newly developed Raman formalism. Polarized Raman spectra were systematically recorded in both single-crystalline and polycrystalline samples, with both A1g and Eg vibrational bands being characterized. Regarding polycrystalline samples, a validation of the proposed Raman method could be done through a comparison between Raman and fluorescence data collected at the same locations across an alumina/metal interface embedded in a steeply graded residual stress field.

  8. Is wear debris responsible for failure in alumina-on-alumina implants?

    PubMed

    Savarino, Lucia; Baldini, Nicola; Ciapetti, Gabriela; Pellacani, Andrea; Giunti, Armando

    2009-04-01

    Ceramic-on-ceramic articulation is an attractive alternative to metal-on-polyethylene (PE) bearings, but little is known about the in vivo effects induced by dissemination of alumina wear debris in the periprosthetic tissues. We hypothesized that wear debris is not the main factor responsible for loosening and failure of the implant but that mechanical problems caused by incorrect surgical technique, prosthetic design, or trauma, may cause instability of the implants and result in production of wear debris. Clinical, radiographic, laboratory, and microbiological data from 30 consecutive patients with failed alumina-on-alumina arthroplasties, 19 with screwed socket and 11 with press-fit socket, were systematically collected and evaluated. Retrieved peri-implant tissues and prosthesis wear were also analyzed. Loosening was due to malpositioning, primary mechanical instability, trauma, or infection. Bone stock was generally preserved, even if screwed implants showed higher levels of osteolysis. Variable implant wear and tissue macrophage reaction were present but activation of giant cells/osteoclasts was not induced, and no correlation between histocytic reaction and the level of osteolysis was found. These findings indicate that, in contrast to the situation with metal-on-PE bearings, wear debris and occasional osteolysis were the effect rather than the cause of failure of ceramic-on-ceramic implants, and that press-fit socket fixation was the socket fixation design of preference.

  9. Fabrication of alumina films with laminated structures by ac anodization.

    PubMed

    Segawa, Hiroyo; Okano, Hironaga; Wada, Kenji; Inoue, Satoru

    2014-02-01

    Anodization techniques by alternating current (ac) are introduced in this review. By using ac anodization, laminated alumina films are fabricated. Different types of alumina films consisting of 50-200 nm layers were obtained by varying both the ac power supply and the electrolyte. The total film thickness increased with an increase in the total charge transferred. The thickness of the individual layers increased with the ac voltage; however, the anodization time had little effect on the film thickness. The laminated alumina films resembled the nacre structure of shells, and the different morphologies exhibited by bivalves and spiral shells could be replicated by controlling the rate of increase of the applied potentials.

  10. Alumina Paste Sublimation Suppression Barrier for Thermoelectric Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paik, Jong-Ah (Inventor); Caillat, Thierry (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Alumina as a sublimation suppression barrier for a Zintl thermoelectric material in a thermoelectric power generation device operating at high temperature, e.g. at or above 1000K, is disclosed. The Zintl thermoelectric material may comprise Yb.sub.14MnSb.sub.11. The alumina may be applied as an adhesive paste dried and cured on a substantially oxide free surface of the Zintl thermoelectric material and polished to a final thickness. The sublimation suppression barrier may be finalized by baking out the alumina layer on the Zintl thermoelectric material until it becomes substantially clogged with ytterbia.

  11. Processing of silicon nitride and alumina nanosize powders

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, E.J.; Piermarini, G.; Hockey, B.; Malghan, S.G.

    1995-08-01

    The effects of pressure on the compaction and subsequent processing of nanosize {gamma} alumina powders were studied. A 3 mm diameter piston/cylinder die was used to compact the nanosize powders to pressures of 1 and 2.5 GPa. The green bodies were sintered at temperatures up to 1600{degrees}C. Results show that green body density can be increased by higher compaction pressures. It appears that as a result of the {gamma}-to-{alpha} transformation in alumina, higher green density does not necessarily produce a higher density sintered alumina body. The microstructures of the sintered bodies are described in terms of porosity and phase content.

  12. Porous alumina based ordered nanocomposite coating for wear resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Arti; Muthukumar, M.; Bobji, M. S.

    2016-08-01

    Uniformly dispersed nanocomposite coating of aligned metallic nanowires in a matrix of amorphous alumina is fabricated by pulsed electrodeposition of copper into the pores of porous anodic alumina. Uniform deposition is obtained by controlling the geometry of the dendritic structure at the bottom of pores through stepwise voltage reduction followed by mild etching. The tribological behaviour of this nanocomposite coating is evaluated using a ball on flat reciprocating tribometer under the dry contact conditions. The nanocomposite coating has higher wear resistance compared to corresponding porous alumina coating. Wear resistant nanocomposite coating has wide applications especially in protecting the internal surfaces of aluminium internal combustion engines.

  13. Effects of long term inhalation of alumina fibres in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Pigott, G. H.; Gaskell, B. A.; Ishmael, J.

    1981-01-01

    Groups of rats were exposed by inhalation to atmospheres containing a refractory alumina fibre (Saffil Fibres, I.C.I.) either as manufactured or in a thermally aged form. Similar groups were exposed to UICC chrysotile A asbestos or clean air to serve as positive and negative controls respectively. Exposures continued for 86 weeks after which the animals were maintained to 85% mortality. Pulmonary reaction to both forms of alumina fibre was minimal; chrysotile asbestos provoked the expected progressive fibrosis. Pulmonary tumours (both benign and malignant) were confined to rats dosed with asbestos. The results support the predicted inert nature of these alumina fibres. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7248173

  14. Boria modified alumina probed by methanol dehydration and IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Farias, Andréa M. Duarte; Esteves, Angela M. Lavogade; Ziarelli, Fabio; Caldarelli, Stefano; Fraga, Marco A.; Appel, Lucia G.

    2004-04-01

    Al 2O 3·B 2O 3 catalysts were synthesized by co-precipitation and impregnation methods applying two calcination temperatures and boria loadings. Catalysts were analyzed by IR spectroscopy of pyridine and CO 2 adsorption and were evaluated in methanol dehydration. Results showed that boron addition to alumina causes a decrease of the number of basic and Lewis acid sites on alumina surface. It could also be observed an enhancement in acid strength of Lewis sites for impregnated samples. The results of methanol dehydration show that strong Brönsted sites are not formed on borate alumina.

  15. Fabrication of alumina films with laminated structures by ac anodization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segawa, Hiroyo; Okano, Hironaga; Wada, Kenji; Inoue, Satoru

    2014-02-01

    Anodization techniques by alternating current (ac) are introduced in this review. By using ac anodization, laminated alumina films are fabricated. Different types of alumina films consisting of 50-200 nm layers were obtained by varying both the ac power supply and the electrolyte. The total film thickness increased with an increase in the total charge transferred. The thickness of the individual layers increased with the ac voltage; however, the anodization time had little effect on the film thickness. The laminated alumina films resembled the nacre structure of shells, and the different morphologies exhibited by bivalves and spiral shells could be replicated by controlling the rate of increase of the applied potentials.

  16. Alumina coating on dense tungsten powder by fluidized bed metal organic chemical vapour deposition.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Philippe; Caussat, Brigitte; Ablitzer, Carine; Iltis, Xavière; Brothier, Meryl

    2011-09-01

    In order to study the feasibility of coating very dense powders by alumina using Fluidized Bed Metal Organic Chemical Vapour Deposition (FB-MOCVD), experiments were performed on a commercial tungsten powder, 75 microm in median volume diameter and 19,300 kg/m3 in grain density. The first part of the work was dedicated to the experimental study of the tungsten powder fluidization using argon as carrier gas at room temperature and at 400 degrees C. Due to the very high density of the tungsten powder, leading to low initial fixed bed heights and low bed expansions, different weights of powder were tested in order to reach satisfactory temperature profiles along the fluidized bed. Then, using argon as a fluidized bed former and aluminium acetylacetonate Al(C5O2H7)3 as a single source precursor, alumina thin films were deposited on tungsten particles at a low temperature range (e.g., 370-420 degrees C) by FB-MOCVD. The influence of the weight of powder, bed temperature and run duration was studied. Characterizations of the obtained samples were performed by various techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) analyses, Field Emission Gun SEM (FEG-SEM) and Fourier Transform InfraRed (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The different analyses indicated that tungsten particles were uniformly coated by a continuous alumina thin film. The thickness of the film ranged between 25 and 80 nm, depending on the coating conditions. The alumina thin films were amorphous and contained carbon contamination. This latter may correspond to the adsorption of species resulting from incomplete decomposition of the precursor at so low deposition temperature.

  17. Quantum Dots Confined in Nanoporous Alumina Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jun; Xia, Jianfeng; Wang, Jun; Shinar, Joseph; Lin, Zhiqun

    2007-03-01

    Precise control over the dispersion and lateral distribution of quantum dots (QDs) within nanoscopic porous media provides a unique route to manipulate the optical and/or electronic properties of QDs in a very simple and controllable manner for applications related to light emitting, optoelectronic, and sensor devices. Here we filled nanoporous alumina membranes (PAMs) with CdSe/ZnS core/shell QDs by dip coating. The deposition of QDs induced changes in the refractive index of PAMs. The amount of absorbed QDs was quantified by fitting the reflection and transmission spectra observed experimentally with one side open and freestanding (i.e., with two sides open) PAMs employed, respectively. The fluorescence of the QDs was found to be retained within the cylindrical nanopores of PAMs.

  18. Microstructure and creep properties of alumina.

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, J. M. C.; Lopez, A. R.; Rodriguez, A. D.; Routbort, J. L.; Materials Science Division; Univ. of Seville

    1995-01-01

    High temperature creep of two zirconia toughened alumina ceramics, fabricated by powder processing and sol-gel precursors processing, has been studied in order to determine plastic deformation mechanisms. Compressive creep tests were carried out between 1300 and 1450 C, under stresses from 10 to 150 MPa. For the sample fabricated from powders, a stress exponent of 1.4 and an activation energy of 580 kJ/mol were found below a critical stress of 40 MPa. For larger stresses, accelerated creep rates developed. In the specimens processed from precursors, values of 1.8 for the stress exponent and 540 kJ/mol for the activation energy, over the entire range of stresses have been determined. Creep parameters and microstructural evolution of the samples during the experiments have been correlated with models to establish the dominant creep mechanism.

  19. Tensile creep behavior of polycrystalline alumina fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, H. M.; Goldsby, J. C.

    1993-01-01

    Tensile creep studies were conducted on polycrystalline Nextel 610 and Fiber FP alumina fibers with grain sizes of 100 and 300 nm, respectively. Test conditions were temperatures from 800 to 1050 C and stresses from 60 to 1000 MPa. For both fibers, only a small primary creep portion occurred followed by steady-state creep. The stress exponents for steady-state creep of Nextel 610 and Fiber FP were found to be about 3 and 1, respectively. At lower temperatures, below 1000 C, the finer grained Nextel 610 had a much higher 0.2 percent creep strength for 100 hr than the Fiber FP; while at higher temperatures, Nextel 610 had a comparable creep strength to the Fiber FP. The stress and grain size dependencies suggest Nextel 610 and Fiber FP creep rates are due to grain boundary sliding controlled by interface reaction and Nabarro-Herring mechanisms, respectively.

  20. Compositional characterization of atomic layer deposited alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Philip, Anu; Thomas, Subin; Kumar, K. Rajeev

    2014-01-28

    As the microelectronic industry demands feature size in the order of few and sub nanometer regime, the film composition and other film properties become critical issues and ALD has emerged as the choice of industry. Aluminum oxide is a material with wide applications in electronic and optoelectronic devices and protective and ion barrier layers. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is an excellent dielectric because of its large band gap (8.7eV), large band offsets with silicon. We have deposited thin layers of alumina on silicon wafer (p-type) for gate dielectric applications by ALD technique and compositional characterizations of the deposited thin films were done using EDS, XPS and FTIR spectra.

  1. Electrostatic-based model for alumina surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streitz, F. H.; Mintmire, J. W.

    1994-12-01

    As most technologically important metals will form oxides readily, any complete study of adhesion at real metal surfaces must include the metal-oxide interface. The role of this ubiquitous oxide layer cannot be overlooked, as the adhesive properties of the oxide or oxide-metal system can be expected to differ profoundly from the adhesive properties of a bare metal surface. We report on the development of a novel computational method for molecular dynamics simulations which explicitly includes variable charge transfer between anions and cations. This method is found to be capable of describing the elastic properties, surface energies, and surface relaxation of crystalline metal-oxides accurately. We discuss in detail results using this method of alpha-alumina and several of its low index faces.

  2. Alumina strength degradation in the elastic regime

    SciTech Connect

    Furnish, M.D.; Chhabildas, L.C.

    1997-08-01

    Measurements of Kanel et. al. [1991] have suggested that deviatoric stresses in glasses shocked to nearly the Hugoniot Elastic limit (HEL) relax over a time span of microseconds after initial loading. Failure (damage) waves have been inferred on the basis of these measurements using time-resolved manganin normal and transverse stress gauges. Additional experiments on glass by other researchers, using time-resolved gauges, high-speed photography and spall strength determinations have also lead to the same conclusions. In the present study the authors have conducted transmitted-wave experiments on high-quality Coors AD995 alumina shocked to roughly 5 and 7 GPa (just below or at the HEL). The material is subsequently reshocked to just above its elastic limit. Results of these experiments do show some evidence of strength degradation in the elastic regime.

  3. Alumina strength degradation in the elastic regime

    SciTech Connect

    Furnish, Michael D.; Chhabildas, Lalit C.

    1998-07-10

    Measurements of Kanel et al. [1991] have suggested that deviatoric stresses in glasses shocked to nearly the Hugoniot Elastic Limit (HEL) relax over a time span of microseconds after initial loading. 'Failure' (damage) waves have been inferred on the basis of these measurements using time-resolved manganin normal and transverse stress gauges. Additional experiments on glass by other researchers, using time-resolved gauges, high-speed photography and spall strength determinations have also lead to the same conclusions. In the present study we have conducted transmitted-wave experiments on high-quality Coors AD995 alumina shocked to roughly 5 and 7 GPa (just below or at the HEL). The material is subsequently reshocked to just above its elastic limit. Results of these experiments do show some evidence of strength degradation in the elastic regime.

  4. Alumina strength degradation in the elastic regime

    SciTech Connect

    Furnish, M.D.; Chhabildas, L.C.

    1998-07-01

    Measurements of Kanel {ital et al.} [1991] have suggested that deviatoric stresses in glasses shocked to nearly the Hugoniot Elastic Limit (HEL) relax over a time span of microseconds after initial loading. {open_quotes}Failure{close_quotes} (damage) waves have been inferred on the basis of these measurements using time-resolved manganin normal and transverse stress gauges. Additional experiments on glass by other researchers, using time-resolved gauges, high-speed photography and spall strength determinations have also lead to the same conclusions. In the present study we have conducted transmitted-wave experiments on high-quality Coors AD995 alumina shocked to roughly 5 and 7 GPa (just below or at the HEL). The material is subsequently reshocked to just above its elastic limit. Results of these experiments do show some evidence of strength degradation in the elastic regime. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Nanoporous alumina as templates for multifunctional applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, C. T.; Leitao, D. C.; Proenca, M. P.; Ventura, J.; Pereira, A. M.; Araujo, J. P.

    2014-09-01

    Due to its manufacturing and size tailoring ease, porous anodic alumina (PAA) templates are an elegant physical-chemical nanopatterning approach and an emergent alternative to more sophisticated and expensive methods currently used in nanofabrication. In this review, we will describe the ground work on the fabrication methods of PAA membranes and PAA-based nanostructures. We will present the specificities of the electrochemical growth processes of multifunctional nanomaterials with diversified shapes (e.g., nanowires and nanotubes), and the fabrication techniques used to grow ordered nanohole arrays. We will then focus on the fabrication, properties and applications of magnetic nanostructures grown on PAA and illustrate their dependence on internal (diameter, interpore distance, length, composition) and external (temperature and applied magnetic field intensity and direction) parameters. Finally, the most outstanding experimental findings on PAA-grown nanostructures and their trends for technological applications (sensors, energy harvesting, metamaterials, and biotechnology) will be addressed.

  6. The Effect of Fine Alumina Type on Composition of in Situ Spinel Formation in Alumina-Magnesia Castables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paghandeh, M.; Monshi, A.; Emadi, R.

    Three types of low cement castables (LCC) were prepared from 5% reactive alumina (R5), 5% calcined alumina (A5) and equal proportions of 2.5% (AR). The nest of the composition was fine bauxite (0-1 mm, 57%), coarse bauxite (1-3 mm, 20%), calcined magnesia (5%), secar 71 refractory cemet (7%) and microsilica (1%). By the addition of 5% water, castables were moulded, aged, dried and fired to 1400°C for 2 h. XRD studies showed higher amount of in situ spinel formation in A5. The lattice constants of spinels in A5, AR and R5 were, respectively, 8.0348, 8.0688 and 8.0847 Å. This accounted for respectively alumina rich, stochiometry and magnesia rich spinels. Since calcined alumina is cheaper, produce higher amounts of spinel with the aid of alumina from the aggregate of bauxite and the binder of cement, and alumina rich spinel has better corrosion resistance properties, use of calcined alumina is recommended in LCC.

  7. Aluminum-Alloy-Matrix/Alumina-Reinforcement Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashalikar, Uday; Rozenoyer, Boris

    2004-01-01

    Isotropic composites of aluminum-alloy matrices reinforced with particulate alumina have been developed as lightweight, high-specific-strength, less-expensive alternatives to nickel-base and ferrous superalloys. These composites feature a specific gravity of about 3.45 grams per cubic centimeter and specific strengths of about 200 MPa/(grams per cubic centimeter). The room-temperature tensile strength is 100 ksi (689 MPa) and stiffness is 30 Msi (206 GPa). At 500 F (260 C), these composites have shown 80 percent retention in strength and 95 percent retention in stiffness. These materials also have excellent fatigue tolerance and tribological properties. They can be fabricated in net (or nearly net) sizes and shapes to make housings, pistons, valves, and ducts in turbomachinery, and to make structural components of such diverse systems as diesel engines, automotive brake systems, and power-generation, mining, and oil-drilling equipment. Separately, incorporation of these metal matrix composites within aluminum gravity castings for localized reinforcement has been demonstrated. A composite part of this type can be fabricated in a pressure infiltration casting process. The process begins with the placement of a mold with alumina particulate preform of net or nearly net size and shape in a crucible in a vacuum furnace. A charge of the alloy is placed in the crucible with the preform. The interior of the furnace is evacuated, then the furnace heaters are turned on to heat the alloy above its liquidus temperature. Next, the interior of the furnace is filled with argon gas at a pressure about 900 psi (approximately equal to 6.2 MPa) to force the molten alloy to infiltrate the preform. Once infiltrated, the entire contents of the crucible can be allowed to cool in place, and the composite part recovered from the mold.

  8. Effects of ball milling and sintering on alumina and alumina-boron compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Thomas

    Alumina has a wide variety of applications, but the processing of alumina based materials can be costly. Mechanically milling alumina has been shown to enhance the sintering properties while decreasing the sintering temperature. Additions of boron have also proven to increase sintering properties of alumina. These two processes, mechanical milling and boron additions, will be combined to test the sintering properties and determine if they are improved upon even further compared to the individual processes. Multiple samples of pure alumina, 0.2 weight percent boron, and 1.0 weight percent boron are batched and processed in a ball mill for different time intervals. These samples are then characterized to observe the structure and properties of the samples after milling but before sintering. Pellets are dry pressed from the milled powders, sintered at 1200°C for one to 10 hours, and characterized to determine the impact of processing. X-ray diffractometry (XRD) was used on each sample to determine crystallite size and lattice parameters at different stages throughout the experiment. XRD was also used to identify any samples with an aluminum borate phase. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe the powder and pellet morphology and to measure bulk chemical composition. Samples were sputter coated with an Au-Pd coating observed in the SEM to characterize the topography as a function of variables such as milling time, boron composition, and sintering time. Additionally, porosity and change in diameter were measured to track the sintering process. Milling sample for longer periods of time would be unnecessary due to the crystallite size leveling off between 10 and 12 hours of milling time. Samples of alumina with 0.2 weight percent boron prove to have very little effect on the sintering properties. At 1.0 weight percent boron, there are changes in diffraction patterns and topography after being sintered for one hour. The porosities of all of the sintered

  9. Alumina Inlay Failure in Cemented Polyethylene-backed Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Iwaki, Hiroyoshi; Minoda, Yukihide; Ohashi, Hirotsugu; Takaoka, Kunio

    2008-01-01

    Alumina-on-alumina bearings for THA have markedly improved in mechanical properties through advances in technology; however, alumina fracture is still a concern. We retrospectively reviewed 77 patients (82 hips) with cemented alumina-on-alumina THAs to identify factors relating to alumina failure. The mean age of the patients at surgery was 63 years. The prostheses had a cemented polyethylene-backed acetabular component with an alumina inlay and a 28-mm alumina head. Revision surgery was performed because of alumina inlay failure in four hips (three fractures and one dissociation; 5.6%), deep infection in two, and recurrent dislocation in one. The 8-year survival rate was 90.7% with revision for any reason and 94.4% with revision for alumina failure as the end point. There were no differences in age, body mass index, gender, mobility, function, abduction angle, or size of component among the four hips with alumina failure and the remaining 68 hips without it; however, radiolucent lines in the sockets were more apparent in four cases with alumina inlay failure. This alumina-on-alumina THA thus yielded unsatisfactory medium-term results because we observed a high rate of catastrophic alumina inlay failure. Level of Evidence: Level IV, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18288546

  10. When neutral turns significant: brain dynamics of rapidly formed associations between neutral stimuli and emotional contexts.

    PubMed

    Ventura-Bort, Carlos; Löw, Andreas; Wendt, Julia; Dolcos, Florin; Hamm, Alfons O; Weymar, Mathias

    2016-09-01

    The ability to associate neutral stimuli with motivationally relevant outcomes is an important survival strategy. In this study, we used event-related potentials (ERPs) to investigate brain dynamics of associative emotional learning when participants were confronted with multiple heterogeneous information. Participants viewed 144 different objects in the context of 144 different emotional and neutral background scenes. During each trial, neutral objects were shown in isolation and then paired with the background scene. All pairings were presented twice to compare ERPs in response to neutral objects before and after single association. After single pairing, neutral objects previously encoded in the context of emotional scenes evoked a larger P100 over occipital electrodes compared to objects that were previously paired with neutral scenes. Likewise, larger late positive potentials (LPPs) were observed over parieto-occipital electrodes (450-750 ms) for objects previously associated with emotional relative to neutral contexts. The LPP - but not P100 - enhancement was also related to subjective object/context binding. Taken together, our ERP data provide evidence for fast emotional associative learning, as reflected by heightened perceptual and sustained elaborative processing for neutral information previously encountered in emotional contexts. These findings could assist in understanding binding mechanisms in stress and anxiety, as well as in addiction and eating-related disorders. © 2016 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Equivalent Neutral Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. Timothy; Tang, Wenqing

    1996-01-01

    The definition of equivalent neutral wind and the rationale for using it as the geophysical product of a spaceborne scatterometer are reviewed. The differences between equivalent neutral wind and actual wind, which are caused by atmospheric density stratification, are demonstrated with measurements at selected locations. A method of computing this parameter from ship and buoy measurements is described and some common fallacies in accounting for the effects of atmospheric stratification on wind shear are discussed. The computer code for the model to derive equivalent neutral wind is provided.

  12. Removal of oil from oil-in-saltwater emulsions by adsorption onto nano-alumina functionalized with petroleum vacuum residue.

    PubMed

    Franco, Camilo A; Nassar, Nashaat N; Cortés, Farid B

    2014-11-01

    Formation water from oilfields is one of the major environmental issues related to the oil industry. This research investigated oil adsorption onto nanoparticles of hydrophobic alumina and alumina nanoparticles functionalized with a petroleum vacuum residue (VR) at 2 and 4wt% to reduce the amount of oil in oil-saltwater emulsions at different pH values (5, 7 and 9). The initial concentration of crude oil in water ranged from 100 to 500mg/L. The change in oil concentration after adsorption was determined using a UV-vis spectrophotometer. The results indicated that all of the systems performed more effectively at a pH of 7 and using Al/4VR material. The oil adsorption was higher for neutral and acid systems compared with basic ones, and it was improved by increasing the amount of VR on the surface of the alumina. Additionally, the amount of NaCl adsorbed onto nanoparticles was estimated for different mixtures. The adsorption equilibrium and kinetics were evaluated using the Dubinin-Astakhov model, the Brunauer-Emmet-Teller model, and pseudo-first- and pseudo-second-order models, with a better fitting to the Brunauer-Emmet-Teller model and pseudo-second-order model. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Potassium Beta-Alumina/Molybdenum/Potassium Electrochemical Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R.; Kisor, A.; Ryan, M.; Nakamura, B.; Kikert, S.; O'Connor, D.

    1994-01-01

    potassium alkali metal thermal-to-electric converter (K-AMTEC) cells utilizing potassium beta alumina solid electrolyte (K-BASE) are predicted to have improved properties for thermal to electric conversion at somewhat lower temperatures than sodium AMTEC's.

  14. Removing Fluoride Ions with Continously Fed Activated Alumina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Yeun C.; Itemaking, Isara Cholapranee

    1979-01-01

    Discussed is the mathematical basis for determining fluoride removal during water treatment with activated alumina. The study indicates that decreasing particle size decreases the pore diffusion effect and increases fluoride removal. (AS)

  15. Fabrication method produces high-grade alumina crucibles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmour, H.

    1965-01-01

    Alumina-binder mixture, which has been dry pressed in a die using a mating punch, forms crucibles of various configurations and after firing results in a ceramic structure for use in diffusion experiments.

  16. Removing Fluoride Ions with Continously Fed Activated Alumina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Yeun C.; Itemaking, Isara Cholapranee

    1979-01-01

    Discussed is the mathematical basis for determining fluoride removal during water treatment with activated alumina. The study indicates that decreasing particle size decreases the pore diffusion effect and increases fluoride removal. (AS)

  17. Method for producing graphite and alumina thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhanov, K. M.; Ermaganbetov, K. T.; Chirkova, L. V.; Maukebaeva, M. A.

    2017-07-01

    A simple comprehensible method for producing graphite and alumina films has been suggested. The optical properties of a graphite suspension in toluene and a suspension of natural clay with a high content of alumina particles in water have been studied. It has been found that the optical density of the suspensions varies from layer to layer, and the lowest optical density has been observed in upper layers. Graphite and aluminum films have been prepared by taking samples from different depths. The microstructure of the films has been examined. It has turned out that alumina particles coalesce into regularly shaped objects in the form of snowflakes. In addition, alumina films obtained from samples taken from different depths of the suspension have different thicknesses. In thin and thick films, the particle size is 0.29 and 2.81 μm or more, respectively.

  18. Development of new alumina precipitation routes for catalysis applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafficher, Robin; Digne, Mathieu; Salvatori, Fabien; Boualleg, Malika; Colson, Didier; Puel, François

    2017-06-01

    γ-Alumina is a widely used porous material for catalytic application. Possible routes for alumina improvement can be the use of alternative precursors as well as innovative precipitation technologies. In this study, we compare the influence of both precursor chemistry and mixing efficiency on γ-alumina properties. The conventionally used boehmite and the NH4-dawsonite precursors were precipitated using three mixing technologies: a conventional stirred-tank reactor, a rotor-stator mixer and a sliding surface mixing device. It was observed that, in the study conditions, γ-alumina mean pore diameter and porous volume were particularly sensitive to both precursor and mixing technology, while specific surface area was rather precursor dependent. A wide porosity range can thus be covered at isospecific surface area, using several precursor/mixing technology systems.

  19. Growth of Zircone on Nanoporous Alumina Using Molecular Layer Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Robert A.; George, Steven M.; Kim, Yeongae; Hwang, Woonbong; Samberg, Meghan E.; Monteiro-Riviere, Nancy A.; Narayan, Roger J.

    2014-04-01

    Molecular layer deposition (MLD) is a sequential and self-limiting process that may be used to create hybrid organic/inorganic thin films from organometallic precursors and organic alcohol precursors. In this study, films of a zirconium-containing hybrid organic/inorganic polymer known as zircone were grown on nanoporous alumina using MLD. Scanning electron microscopy data showed obliteration of the pores in zircone-coated nanoporous alumina. An in vitro cell viability study indicated that the growth of human epidermal keratinocytes was the greatest on zircone-coated nanoporous alumina than on uncoated nanoporous alumina. Our results suggest that MLD may be used to create biocompatible coatings for use in many types of medical devices.

  20. Molecular gated nanoporous anodic alumina for the detection of cocaine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribes, Àngela; Xifré-Pérez, Elisabet; Aznar, Elena; Sancenón, Félix; Pardo, Teresa; Marsal, Lluís F.; Martínez-Máñez, Ramόn

    2016-12-01

    We present herein the use of nanoporous anodic alumina (NAA) as a suitable support to implement “molecular gates” for sensing applications. In our design, a NAA support is loaded with a fluorescent reporter (rhodamine B) and functionalized with a short single-stranded DNA. Then pores are blocked by the subsequent hybridisation of a specific cocaine aptamer. The response of the gated material was studied in aqueous solution. In a typical experiment, the support was immersed in hybridisation buffer solution in the absence or presence of cocaine. At certain times, the release of rhodamine B from pore voids was measured by fluorescence spectroscopy. The capped NAA support showed poor cargo delivery, but presence of cocaine in the solution selectively induced rhodamine B release. By this simple procedure a limit of detection as low as 5 × 10-7 M was calculated for cocaine. The gated NAA was successfully applied to detect cocaine in saliva samples and the possible re-use of the nanostructures was assessed. Based on these results, we believe that NAA could be a suitable support to prepare optical gated probes with a synergic combination of the favourable features of selected gated sensing systems and NAA.

  1. Sulfur Impurities and the Microstructure of Alumina Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    1997-01-01

    The relationship between the microstructure of alumina scales, adhesion, and sulfur content was examined through a series of nickel alloys oxidized in 1100 to 1200 deg. C cyclic or isothermal exposures in air. In cyclic tests of undoped NiCrAl, adhesion was produced when the sulfur content was reduced, without any change in scale microstructure. Although interfacial voids were not observed in cyclic tests of NiCrAl, they were promoted by long-term isothermal exposures, by sulfur doping, and in most exposures of NiAl. Two single crystal superalloys, PWA 1480 and Rene' N5, were also tested, either in the as-received condition or after the sulfur content had been reduced to less than 1 ppmw by hydrogen annealing. The unannealed alloys always exhibited spalling to bare metal, but interfacial voids were not observed consistently. Desulfurized PWA 1480 and Rene' N5 exhibited remarkable adhesion and no voidage for either isothermal or cyclic exposures. The most consistent microstructural feature was that, for the cases where voids did form, the scale undersides exhibited corresponding areas with ridged oxide grain boundaries. Voids were not required for spallation nor were other microstructural features essential for adhesion. These observations are consistent with the model whereby scale spallation is controlled primarily by interfacial sulfur segregation and the consequent degradation of oxide-metal bonding.

  2. Sintering of alumina in microwave-induced oxygen plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Su, H.; Johnson, D.L.

    1996-12-01

    Small cylindrical tubes were sintered in a microwave-induced oxygen plasma, initiated and sustained inside a tunable, single-mode cavity. Temperature and shrinkage measurements of the specimens were achieved using an optical-fiber thermometer black-body sensor and a dilatometer, respectively. Sintering experiments at constant heating rate were accomplished to obtain the activation energy for sintering of alumina in the plasma and in a conventional rapid-heating furnace. Diffusion of aluminum interstitials along grain boundaries was believed to be the dominant sintering mechanism, with an estimated activation energy of 488 {+-} 20 kJ/mol for conventional sintering and an average activation energy of 468 {+-} 20 kJ/mol for plasma sintering. A comparison of specimens sintered in the plasma to those sintered in a conventional furnace under the same temperature-time excursions and oxygen pressures showed an athermal effect due to the plasma. To further explore this athermal effect, sintering experiments in plasmas of different oxygen pressure were conducted. The athermal effect was ascribed to an increase of aluminum interstitial concentration during plasma sintering. Sintering data were interpreted using the combined-stage sintering model.

  3. Molecular gated nanoporous anodic alumina for the detection of cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Ribes, Àngela; Xifré -Pérez, Elisabet; Aznar, Elena; Sancenón, Félix; Pardo, Teresa; Marsal, Lluís F.; Martínez-Máñez, Ramόn

    2016-01-01

    We present herein the use of nanoporous anodic alumina (NAA) as a suitable support to implement “molecular gates” for sensing applications. In our design, a NAA support is loaded with a fluorescent reporter (rhodamine B) and functionalized with a short single-stranded DNA. Then pores are blocked by the subsequent hybridisation of a specific cocaine aptamer. The response of the gated material was studied in aqueous solution. In a typical experiment, the support was immersed in hybridisation buffer solution in the absence or presence of cocaine. At certain times, the release of rhodamine B from pore voids was measured by fluorescence spectroscopy. The capped NAA support showed poor cargo delivery, but presence of cocaine in the solution selectively induced rhodamine B release. By this simple procedure a limit of detection as low as 5 × 10−7 M was calculated for cocaine. The gated NAA was successfully applied to detect cocaine in saliva samples and the possible re-use of the nanostructures was assessed. Based on these results, we believe that NAA could be a suitable support to prepare optical gated probes with a synergic combination of the favourable features of selected gated sensing systems and NAA. PMID:27924950

  4. Molecular gated nanoporous anodic alumina for the detection of cocaine.

    PubMed

    Ribes, Àngela; Xifré-Pérez, Elisabet; Aznar, Elena; Sancenón, Félix; Pardo, Teresa; Marsal, Lluís F; Martínez-Máñez, Ramόn

    2016-12-07

    We present herein the use of nanoporous anodic alumina (NAA) as a suitable support to implement "molecular gates" for sensing applications. In our design, a NAA support is loaded with a fluorescent reporter (rhodamine B) and functionalized with a short single-stranded DNA. Then pores are blocked by the subsequent hybridisation of a specific cocaine aptamer. The response of the gated material was studied in aqueous solution. In a typical experiment, the support was immersed in hybridisation buffer solution in the absence or presence of cocaine. At certain times, the release of rhodamine B from pore voids was measured by fluorescence spectroscopy. The capped NAA support showed poor cargo delivery, but presence of cocaine in the solution selectively induced rhodamine B release. By this simple procedure a limit of detection as low as 5 × 10(-7) M was calculated for cocaine. The gated NAA was successfully applied to detect cocaine in saliva samples and the possible re-use of the nanostructures was assessed. Based on these results, we believe that NAA could be a suitable support to prepare optical gated probes with a synergic combination of the favourable features of selected gated sensing systems and NAA.

  5. Antibacterial Activity of Zinc Oxide-Coated Nanoporous Alumina

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-17

    Enterococcus faecalis, and Candida albicans. These results suggest that zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes have activity against some Gram...Enterococcus faecalis, and Candida albicans. These results suggest that zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes have activity...evaluated using several microorganisms found on the surface of the skin, including B. subtilis [26] (a Gram-positive bacterium), Candida albi- cans [27] (a

  6. Voltage Fluctuations at Sodium Beta Alumina/Mercury Electrodes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    008 VOLTAGE FLUCTUATIONS AT SODIUM 0" ALUMINA/MERCURY ELECTRODES by Chu Kun Kuo* and James J. Brophy Physics Department University of Utah Salt Lake...ADDRESS (Cty. State, and ZIP Code) 7b. ADDRESS (City. State, and ZIP Code) UNIVERSITY OF UTAH UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 84112...Include Security Classification) VOLTAGE FLUCTUATIONS AT SODIUM BETA" ALUMINA/MERCURY ELECTRODES -, J l.. 0 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Chu Kun Kuo and James

  7. New Phenomena Observed in Plate Impacts onto Alumina Bars

    SciTech Connect

    Beno, T.; Bless, S.; Nichols, S.

    2006-07-28

    Steel flyer plates were used to impact alumina bars at 275 m/s, nominally. Manganin gauges were used to monitor stress waves in the bars. Geometry of the impact was varied in an attempt to extend gauge records. Gauge life was best improved by careful alignment. The longest gauge records indicated that alumina retains a strength level of about 2 GPa after initial failure. Stress levels of over 5 GPa were obtained with impact-zone confinement.

  8. Electronic and Chemical State of Aluminum from the Single- (K) and Double-Electron Excitation (KLII&III, KLI) X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Spectra of α-Alumina, Sodium Aluminate, Aqueous Al(3+)·(H2O)6, and Aqueous Al(OH)4(-).

    PubMed

    Fulton, John L; Govind, Niranjan; Huthwelker, Thomas; Bylaska, Eric J; Vjunov, Aleksei; Pin, Sonia; Smurthwaite, Tricia D

    2015-07-02

    We probe, at high energy resolution, the double electron excitation (KLII&II) X-ray absorption region that lies approximately 115 eV above the main Al K-edge (1566 eV) of α-alumina and sodium aluminate. The two solid standards, α-alumina (octahedral) and sodium aluminate (tetrahedral), are compared to aqueous species that have the same Al coordination symmetries, Al(3+)·6H2O (octahedral) and Al(OH)4(-) (tetrahedral). For the octahedral species, the edge height of the KLII&III-edge is approximately 10% of the main K-edge; however, the edge height is much weaker (3% of K-edge height) for Al species with tetrahedral symmetry. For the α-alumina and aqueous Al(3+)·6H2O the KLII&III spectra contain white line features and extended absorption fine structure (EXAFS) that mimics the K-edge spectra. The KLII&III-edge feature interferes with an important region in the EXAFS spectra of the crystalline and aqueous standards. The K-edge spectra and K-edge energy positions are predicted using time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). The TDDFT calculations for the K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge spectra (XANES) reproduce the observed transitions in the experimental spectra of the four Al species. The KLII&II and KLI onsets and their corresponding chemical shifts for the four standards are estimated using the delta self-consistent field (ΔSCF) method.

  9. Effects of CMP slurry additives on the agglomeration of alumina nanoparticles 1: general aggregation rate behavior.

    PubMed

    Brahma, Neil; Talbot, Jan B

    2014-04-01

    The aggregation behavior for 150 nm alumina particles suspended in 1 mM KNO3 solutions with various additives used in chemical mechanical planarization of copper was investigated. Three behaviors were observed: no aggregation, reversible aggregation where large agglomerates formed almost instantaneously, and steady aggregation where particle sizes grew over the duration of the measurement. In general steady aggregation occurred at high pH for all suspensions, while no aggregation occurred at acidic pH, except with suspensions with sodium dodecyl sulfate, where reversible aggregation was observed. No aggregation was observed at near neutral pH for all suspensions. Zeta potential and isoelectric points for each suspension were also measured. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The Conversion and Sustainable Use of Alumina Refinery Residues: Global Solution Examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fergusson, Lee

    This paper introduces current industry best practice for the conversion of alumina refinery residues (or "red mud") from hazardous waste to benign, inert material. The paper will examine four neutralization methods and Basecon Technology, a sustainable conversion process. The paper will consider ways through which this converted material can be combined and processed for sustainable applications in the treatment of hazardous waste streams (such as industrial wastewater and sludges, biosolids, and CCA wastes), contaminated brownfield sites, and mine site wastes. Recent discoveries and applications, such as the successful treatment of high levels of radium in drinking water in the USA, will also be discussed. Examples of global solutions and their technical merits will be assessed.

  11. Neutralization Assay for Chikungunya Virus Infection: Plaque Reduction Neutralization Test.

    PubMed

    Azami, Nor Azila Muhammad; Moi, Meng Ling; Takasaki, Tomohiko

    2016-01-01

    Neutralization assay is a technique that detects and quantifies neutralizing antibody in serum samples by calculating the percentage of reduction of virus activity, as the concentration of virus used is usually constant. Neutralizing antibody titer is conventionally determined by calculating the percentage reduction in total virus infectivity by counting and comparing number of plaques (localized area of infection due to cytopathic effect) with a standard amount of virus. Conventional neutralizing test uses plaque-reduction neutralization test (PRNT) to determine neutralizing antibody titers against Chikungunya virus (CHIKV). Here we describe the plaque reduction neutralization assay (PRNT) using Vero cell lines to obtain neutralizing antibody titers.

  12. Solar Neutral Particles

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This animation shows a neutral solar particle's path leaving the sun, following the magnetic field lines out to the heliosheath. The solar particle hits a hydrogen atom, stealing its electron, and ...

  13. Ions and neutralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poncet, A.

    After a short presentation of intensity limitations examples due to trapped ions, the processes of ionization and neutralization build up in particle accelerators and storage rings are briefly reviewed. The tolerable limits in neutralization are then assessed at the light of current theories of incoherent and coherent effects driven by ions. Finally the usual antidotes such as clearing electrodes, missing bunch schemes and beam shaking are presented.

  14. The microstructure and mechanical reliability of alumina scales and coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, K.B.; Pruessner, K.; Tortorelli, P.F.

    1997-09-01

    Alumina scales on iron-aluminides (Fe{sub 3}Al-based) and NiCrAl- based alloys were characterized in order to develop the knowledge to control the oxidation performance of alloys by controlling the microstructure and microchemistry of their scales. Plasma-deposited amorphous alumina coatings on iron-aluminides were used to study phase transformations, transport processes in the scales, and S segregation to the scale/metal interface. It was found that during heat treatment in absence of oxidation, amorphous coatings first transform to {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and eventually {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nucleates at the scale/metal interface. Sulfur from the Zr- free alloy segregates to the scale/metal interface during heat treatment. Thermally grown scales on Zr-doped iron-aluminides were compared to those formed after oxidation of a specimen with an alumina coating. Microstructural and gravimetric results showed that the primarily amorphous alumina coating promoted the nucleation and growth of metastable alumina phases, which resulted in more rapid oxidation. The thermally grown oxide was found on top of the coating. The NiCrAl-based alloys formed columnar alumina scales underneath a layer of mixed oxides. Segregation of alloying elements like Y, Hf, and At was found at both oxide grain boundaries and scale/metal interfaces.

  15. Carbon dioxide pressure swing adsorption process using modified alumina adsorbents

    DOEpatents

    Gaffney, T.R.; Golden, T.C.; Mayorga, S.G.; Brzozowski, J.R.; Taylor, F.W.

    1999-06-29

    A pressure swing adsorption process for absorbing CO[sub 2] from a gaseous mixture containing CO[sub 2] comprises introducing the gaseous mixture at a first pressure into a reactor containing a modified alumina adsorbent maintained at a temperature ranging from 100 C and 500 C to adsorb CO[sub 2] to provide a CO[sub 2] laden alumina adsorbent and a CO[sub 2] depleted gaseous mixture and contacting the CO[sub 2] laden adsorbent with a weakly adsorbing purge fluid at a second pressure which is lower than the first pressure to desorb CO[sub 2] from the CO[sub 2] laden alumina adsorbent. The modified alumina adsorbent which is formed by depositing a solution having a pH of 3.0 or more onto alumina and heating the alumina to a temperature ranging from 100 C and 600 C, is not degraded by high concentrations of water under process operating conditions. 1 fig.

  16. Carbon dioxide pressure swing adsorption process using modified alumina adsorbents

    DOEpatents

    Gaffney, Thomas Richard; Golden, Timothy Christopher; Mayorga, Steven Gerard; Brzozowski, Jeffrey Richard; Taylor, Fred William

    1999-01-01

    A pressure swing adsorption process for absorbing CO.sub.2 from a gaseous mixture containing CO.sub.2 comprising introducing the gaseous mixture at a first pressure into a reactor containing a modified alumina adsorbent maintained at a temperature ranging from 100.degree. C. and 500.degree. C. to adsorb CO.sub.2 to provide a CO.sub.2 laden alumina adsorbent and a CO.sub.2 depleted gaseous mixture and contacting the CO.sub.2 laden adsorbent with a weakly adsorbing purge fluid at a second pressure which is lower than the first pressure to desorb CO.sub.2 from the CO.sub.2 laden alumina adsorbent. The modified alumina adsorbent which is formed by depositing a solution having a pH of 3.0 or more onto alumina and heating the alumina to a temperature ranging from 100.degree. C. and 600.degree. C., is not degraded by high concentrations of water under process operating conditions.

  17. Porous alumina and zirconia ceramics with tailored thermal conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregorová, E.; Pabst, W.; Sofer, Z.; Jankovský, O.; Matějíček, J.

    2012-11-01

    The thermal conductivity of porous ceramics can be tailored by slip casting and uniaxial dry pressing, using either fugitive pore formers (saccharides) or partial sintering. Porous alumina and zirconia ceramics have been prepared using appropriate powder types (ungranulated for casting, granulated for pressing) and identical firing regimes (but different maximum temperatures in the case of partial sintering). Thermal diffusivities have been measured by the laser- and xenon-flash method and transformed into relative thermal conductivities, which enable a temperature-independent comparison between different materials. While the porosity can be controlled in a similar way for both materials when using pore formers, partial sintering exhibits characteristic differences between alumina and zirconia (for alumina porosities below 45 %, full density above 1600 °C, for zirconia porosities below 60 %, full density above 1300 °C). The different compaction behavior of alumina and zirconia (porosity after pressing 0.465 and 0.597, respectively) is reflected in the fact that for alumina the relative conductivity data of partially sintered materials are below the exponential prediction, while for zirconia they coincide with the latter. Notwithstanding these characteristic differences, for both alumina and zirconia it is possible to tailor the thermal conductivity from 100 % down to approx. 15 % of the solid phase value.

  18. Production and characterization of alumina-titania biocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cetiner, B. N.; Erkmen, Z. E.

    2015-03-01

    Alumina is a biomaterial of choice for more than 20 years due to its high hardness accompanied by low friction, wear and inertness to in vivo environment. It has been reported that titanium oxidized to the rutile phase is bioactive. This is a property discovered for certain ceramics such as Bioglass and sintered hydroxylapatite (HA). But the combination of alumina and titania forming tialite (Aluminium titanate-50 mol % Al2O3 and 50 mol % TiO2) is a new challenge. In this work we made firstly the beneficiation of the Seydişehir alumina by leaching it in the acidic solution "the Aqua Regia" followed by preparation of batches containing 2,5 wt %, 3,5 wt % and 4,5 wt % of MgO as the sintering aid, 1 wt % of SiO2 and the balance; the alumina and titania powder mixture (1:1 mole). After sintering these batches at 1600°C for about 12 h, their mechanical properties (the compression and hardness testings) and phase ratios (the XRD analysis) were analyzed and compared with the control group containing the laboratory scale alumina instead of the Seydişehir alumina. Following the characterization (the SEM and the EDS analysis) of the substrate material, the comparison of two different materials was carried out.

  19. Alumina Concentration Detection Based on the Kernel Extreme Learning Machine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sen; Zhang, Tao; Yin, Yixin; Xiao, Wendong

    2017-09-01

    The concentration of alumina in the electrolyte is of great significance during the production of aluminum. The amount of the alumina concentration may lead to unbalanced material distribution and low production efficiency and affect the stability of the aluminum reduction cell and current efficiency. The existing methods cannot meet the needs for online measurement because industrial aluminum electrolysis has the characteristics of high temperature, strong magnetic field, coupled parameters, and high nonlinearity. Currently, there are no sensors or equipment that can detect the alumina concentration on line. Most companies acquire the alumina concentration from the electrolyte samples which are analyzed through an X-ray fluorescence spectrometer. To solve the problem, the paper proposes a soft sensing model based on a kernel extreme learning machine algorithm that takes the kernel function into the extreme learning machine. K-fold cross validation is used to estimate the generalization error. The proposed soft sensing algorithm can detect alumina concentration by the electrical signals such as voltages and currents of the anode rods. The predicted results show that the proposed approach can give more accurate estimations of alumina concentration with faster learning speed compared with the other methods such as the basic ELM, BP, and SVM.

  20. Characteristics of Cement Concrete with Nano Alumina Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaishankar, P.; Karthikeyan, C.

    2017-07-01

    Concrete can be nano-engineered by incorporating nano sized building blocks or objects (e.g., nano particles and nano tubes) to control material behaviour and add novel properties. In this work an attempt has been made to study the effect of nano alumina on the properties of concrete composite. In order to investigate the effect of nano-alumina on the mechanical strength of cement composite, the specimens with different volume percentages (0%, 0.5%, 0.75% and 1%) nano-alumina, in each proportion three sample were cast totally making 58 specimens and after 28 days of curing they were tested. Based on experiment, the compressive strength of concrete cubes was all increased by incorporating nano alumina into matrix, when the fraction of nano alumina was 1% of the cement by weight the compressive strength of composites increased by 33.14% at 28 days. The test results showed that addition of nano alumina enhanced the compressive strength and reduced the initial setting time of concrete composite. Micro analysis was carried out by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS).The studies indicated that nano particle was uniformly distributed by improving the microstructure of concrete.

  1. Superhydrophobic surfaces fabricated by surface modification of alumina particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, Edna; Aruna, S. T.; Basu, Bharathibai J.

    2012-10-01

    The fabrication of superhydrophobic surfaces has attracted intense interest because of their widespread potential applications in various industrial fields. Recently, some attempts have been carried out to prepare superhydrophobic surfaces using metal oxide nanoparticles. In the present work, superhydrophobic surfaces were fabricated with low surface energy material on alumina particles with different sizes. It was found that particle size of alumina is an important factor in achieving stable superhydrophobic surface. It was possible to obtain alumina surface with water contact angle (WCA) of 156° and a sliding angle of <2°. Superhydrophobicity of the modified alumina is attributed to the combined effect of the micro-nanostructure and low surface energy of fatty acid on the surface. The surface morphology of the alumina powder and coatings was determined by FESEM. The stability of the coatings was assessed by conducting water immersion test. Effect of heat treatment on WCA of the coating was also studied. The transition of alumina from hydrophilic to superhydrophobic state was explained using Wenzel and Cassie models. The method is shown to have potential application for creating superhydrophobic surface on cotton fabrics.

  2. Alumina Concentration Detection Based on the Kernel Extreme Learning Machine

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tao; Yin, Yixin; Xiao, Wendong

    2017-01-01

    The concentration of alumina in the electrolyte is of great significance during the production of aluminum. The amount of the alumina concentration may lead to unbalanced material distribution and low production efficiency and affect the stability of the aluminum reduction cell and current efficiency. The existing methods cannot meet the needs for online measurement because industrial aluminum electrolysis has the characteristics of high temperature, strong magnetic field, coupled parameters, and high nonlinearity. Currently, there are no sensors or equipment that can detect the alumina concentration on line. Most companies acquire the alumina concentration from the electrolyte samples which are analyzed through an X-ray fluorescence spectrometer. To solve the problem, the paper proposes a soft sensing model based on a kernel extreme learning machine algorithm that takes the kernel function into the extreme learning machine. K-fold cross validation is used to estimate the generalization error. The proposed soft sensing algorithm can detect alumina concentration by the electrical signals such as voltages and currents of the anode rods. The predicted results show that the proposed approach can give more accurate estimations of alumina concentration with faster learning speed compared with the other methods such as the basic ELM, BP, and SVM. PMID:28862685

  3. Dynamic yield and tensile strengths of spark plasma sintered alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girlitsky, I.; Zaretsky, E.; Kalabukhov, S.; Dariel, M.; Frage, N.

    2014-05-01

    Fully dense alumina samples with 0.6 μm grain size were produced from alumina powder using Spark Plasma Sintering and tested in two types of VISAR-instrumented planar impact tests. In the tests of the first type the samples of 0.28 to 6-mm thickness were loaded by 1-mm tungsten impactors accelerated up to a velocity of about 1 km/s. These tests were aimed to study the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL) of the SPS-processed alumina and the decay of the elastic precursor wave with propagation distance. In the second type of test the samples of ~3-mm thickness were loaded by 1-mm copper impactors accelerated up to velocities 100-1000 m/s. These tests were aimed to study the dynamic tensile (spall) strength of the alumina. The data on tensile fracture of the alumina demonstrate a monotonic decline of the spall strength with the amplitude of the loading stress pulse. The data on the decay of the elastic precursor wave allows for determining the rates of the irreversible (inelastic) strains in the SPS-processed alumina at the initial stages of shock-induced inelastic deformation and, thus, to derive some conclusions concerning the mechanisms responsible of the deformation.

  4. Dynamic yield and tensile strengths of spark plasma sintered alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girlitsky, Inna; Zaretsky, E.; Kalabukhov, S.; Dariel, M.; Frage, N.

    2013-06-01

    Fully dense alumina samples with 0.6- μ grain size were produced from alumina powder using Spark Plasma Sintering and tested in two types of VISAR-instrumented planar impact tests.. In the tests of the first type the samples of 0.28 to 6-mm thickness were loaded by 1-mm tungsten impactors accelerated up to velocity of about 1 km/s. These tests were aimed to study of the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL) of the SPS-processed alumina and the decay of the elastic precursor wave with the propagation distance. In the second type of the tests the samples of ~ 3-mm thickness were loaded by 1-mm copper impactors accelerated up to velocities 100-1000 m/s was. These tests were aimed to the study of the dynamic tensile (spall) strength of the alumina. The data on the decay of the elastic precursor wave allow determining the rates of the irreversible (inelastic) strains in the SPS-processed alumina at the initial stages of the shock-induced plastic deformation and, thus, to derive some conclusions concerning the mechanisms responsible of the deformation. The data on the tensile fracture of the alumina demonstrate a monotonous decline of the spall strength with the amplitude of the loading stress pulse.

  5. Optimization of Neutral Atom Imagers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shappirio, M.; Coplan, M.; Balsamo, E.; Chornay, D.; Collier, M.; Hughes, P.; Keller, J.; Ogilvie, K.; Williams, E.

    2008-01-01

    The interactions between plasma structures and neutral atom populations in interplanetary space can be effectively studied with energetic neutral atom imagers. For neutral atoms with energies less than 1 keV, the most efficient detection method that preserves direction and energy information is conversion to negative ions on surfaces. We have examined a variety of surface materials and conversion geometries in order to identify the factors that determine conversion efficiency. For chemically and physically stable surfaces smoothness is of primary importance while properties such as work function have no obvious correlation to conversion efficiency. For the noble metals, tungsten, silicon, and graphite with comparable smoothness, conversion efficiency varies by a factor of two to three. We have also examined the way in which surface conversion efficiency varies with the angle of incidence of the neutral atom and have found that the highest efficiencies are obtained at angles of incidence greater then 80deg. The conversion efficiency of silicon, tungsten and graphite were examined most closely and the energy dependent variation of conversion efficiency measured over a range of incident angles. We have also developed methods for micromachining silicon in order to reduce the volume to surface area over that of a single flat surface and have been able to reduce volume to surface area ratios by up to a factor of 60. With smooth micro-machined surfaces of the optimum geometry, conversion efficiencies can be increased by an order of magnitude over instruments like LENA on the IMAGE spacecraft without increase the instruments mass or volume.

  6. Optimization of Neutral Atom Imagers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shappirio, M.; Coplan, M.; Balsamo, E.; Chornay, D.; Collier, M.; Hughes, P.; Keller, J.; Ogilvie, K.; Williams, E.

    2008-01-01

    The interactions between plasma structures and neutral atom populations in interplanetary space can be effectively studied with energetic neutral atom imagers. For neutral atoms with energies less than 1 keV, the most efficient detection method that preserves direction and energy information is conversion to negative ions on surfaces. We have examined a variety of surface materials and conversion geometries in order to identify the factors that determine conversion efficiency. For chemically and physically stable surfaces smoothness is of primary importance while properties such as work function have no obvious correlation to conversion efficiency. For the noble metals, tungsten, silicon, and graphite with comparable smoothness, conversion efficiency varies by a factor of two to three. We have also examined the way in which surface conversion efficiency varies with the angle of incidence of the neutral atom and have found that the highest efficiencies are obtained at angles of incidence greater then 80deg. The conversion efficiency of silicon, tungsten and graphite were examined most closely and the energy dependent variation of conversion efficiency measured over a range of incident angles. We have also developed methods for micromachining silicon in order to reduce the volume to surface area over that of a single flat surface and have been able to reduce volume to surface area ratios by up to a factor of 60. With smooth micro-machined surfaces of the optimum geometry, conversion efficiencies can be increased by an order of magnitude over instruments like LENA on the IMAGE spacecraft without increase the instruments mass or volume.

  7. Effects of Etching Time and NaOH Concentration on the Production of Alumina Nanowires Using Porous Anodic Alumina Template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghpour-Motlagh, M.; Mokhtari-Zonouzi, K.; Aghajani, H.; Kakroudi, M. Ghassemi

    2014-06-01

    In this work, two-step anodizing of commercial aluminum foil in acid oxalic solution was applied for producing alumina film. Then the anodic alumina film was etched in sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution resulting dense and aligned alumina nanowires. This procedure leads to splitting of alumina nanotubes. Subsequently nanowires are produced. The effects of NaOH solution concentration (0.2-1 mol/L) and etching time (60-300 s) at constant temperature on characteristic of nanotubes and produced nanowires were investigated using scanning electron microscopy. The results show that an increase in NaOH solution concentration increases the rate of nanowires production and in turn the manipulation process will be more specific.

  8. Search for anomalous Wtb couplings and flavour-changing neutral currents in t-channel single top quark production in pp collisions at $$ \\sqrt{s}=7 $$ and 8 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; ...

    2017-02-07

    Single top quark events produced in the t channel are used to set limits on anomalous Wtb couplings and to search for top quark flavour-changing neutral current (FCNC) interactions. The data taken with the CMS detector at the LHC in proton-proton collisions atmore » $$ \\sqrt{s}=7 $$ and 8 TeV correspond to integrated luminosities of 5.0 and 19.7 fb$$^{-1}$$, respectively. We performed an analysis using events with one muon and two or three jets. A Bayesian neural network technique is used to discriminate between the signal and backgrounds, which are observed to be consistent with the standard model prediction. The 95% confidence level (CL) exclusion limits on anomalous right-handed vector, and left- and right-handed tensor Wtb couplings are measured to be |f$$_{V}^{R}$$ |<0.16, |f$$_{T}^{L}$$ |<0.057, and -0.049 < f$$_{T}^{R}$$<0.048, respectively. Furthermore, for the FCNC couplings κ$$_{tug}$$ and κ$$_{tcg}$$, the 95% CL upper limits on coupling strengths are |κ$$_{tug}$$|/Λ<4.1×10$$^{-3}$$ TeV$$^{-1}$$ and |κ$$_{tcg}$$|/Λ<1.8×10$$^{-2}$$ TeV$$^{-1}$$, where Λ is the scale for new physics, and correspond to upper limits on the branching fractions of 2.0 × 10$$^{-5}$$ and 4.1 × 10$$^{-4}$$ for the decays t → ug and t → cg, respectively.« less

  9. Improving Neutralization Potency and Breadth by Combining Broadly Reactive HIV-1 Antibodies Targeting Major Neutralization Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Rui; Louder, Mark K.; Wagh, Kshitij; Bailer, Robert T.; deCamp, Allan; Greene, Kelli; Gao, Hongmei; Taft, Justin D.; Gazumyan, Anna; Liu, Cassie; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Korber, Bette

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The isolation of broadly neutralizing HIV-1 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to distinct epitopes on the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env) provides the potential to use combinations of MAbs for prevention and treatment of HIV-1 infection. Since many of these MAbs have been isolated in the last few years, the potency and breadth of MAb combinations have not been well characterized. In two parallel experiments, we examined the in vitro neutralizing activities of double-, triple-, and quadruple-MAb combinations targeting four distinct epitopes, including the CD4-binding site, the V1V2-glycan region, the V3-glycan supersite, and the gp41 membrane-proximal external region (MPER), using a panel of 125 Env-pseudotyped viruses. All MAb combinations showed substantially improved neutralization breadth compared to the corresponding single MAbs, while the neutralization potency of individual MAbs was maintained. At a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) cutoff of 1 μg/ml per antibody, double-MAb combinations neutralized 89 to 98% of viruses, and triple combinations neutralized 98 to 100%. Overall, the improvement of neutralization breadth was closely predicted by an additive-effect model and explained by complementary neutralization profiles of antibodies recognizing distinct epitopes. Subtle but consistent favorable interactions were observed in some MAb combinations, whereas less favorable interactions were observed on a small subset of viruses that are highly sensitive to V3-glycan MAbs. These data demonstrate favorable in vitro combinations of broadly neutralizing HIV-1 MAbs and suggest that such combinations could have utility for HIV-1 prevention and treatment. IMPORTANCE Over the last 5 years, numerous broadly reactive HIV-1-neutralizing MAbs have been isolated from B cells of HIV-1-infected donors. Each of these MAbs binds to one of the major vulnerable sites (epitopes) on the surface of the viral envelope glycoprotein. Since antibodies to distinct viral epitopes

  10. Improving neutralization potency and breadth by combining broadly reactive HIV-1 antibodies targeting major neutralization epitopes.

    PubMed

    Kong, Rui; Louder, Mark K; Wagh, Kshitij; Bailer, Robert T; deCamp, Allan; Greene, Kelli; Gao, Hongmei; Taft, Justin D; Gazumyan, Anna; Liu, Cassie; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Korber, Bette; Montefiori, David C; Mascola, John R

    2015-03-01

    The isolation of broadly neutralizing HIV-1 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to distinct epitopes on the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env) provides the potential to use combinations of MAbs for prevention and treatment of HIV-1 infection. Since many of these MAbs have been isolated in the last few years, the potency and breadth of MAb combinations have not been well characterized. In two parallel experiments, we examined the in vitro neutralizing activities of double-, triple-, and quadruple-MAb combinations targeting four distinct epitopes, including the CD4-binding site, the V1V2-glycan region, the V3-glycan supersite, and the gp41 membrane-proximal external region (MPER), using a panel of 125 Env-pseudotyped viruses. All MAb combinations showed substantially improved neutralization breadth compared to the corresponding single MAbs, while the neutralization potency of individual MAbs was maintained. At a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) cutoff of 1 μg/ml per antibody, double-MAb combinations neutralized 89 to 98% of viruses, and triple combinations neutralized 98 to 100%. Overall, the improvement of neutralization breadth was closely predicted by an additive-effect model and explained by complementary neutralization profiles of antibodies recognizing distinct epitopes. Subtle but consistent favorable interactions were observed in some MAb combinations, whereas less favorable interactions were observed on a small subset of viruses that are highly sensitive to V3-glycan MAbs. These data demonstrate favorable in vitro combinations of broadly neutralizing HIV-1 MAbs and suggest that such combinations could have utility for HIV-1 prevention and treatment. Over the last 5 years, numerous broadly reactive HIV-1-neutralizing MAbs have been isolated from B cells of HIV-1-infected donors. Each of these MAbs binds to one of the major vulnerable sites (epitopes) on the surface of the viral envelope glycoprotein. Since antibodies to distinct viral epitopes could theoretically

  11. 3rd generation alumina-on-alumina in modular hip prosthesis: 13 to 18 years follow-up results.

    PubMed

    Toni, Aldo; Giardina, Federico; Guerra, Giovanni; Sudanese, Alessandra; Montalti, Maurizio; Stea, Susanna; Bordini, Barbara

    2017-02-21

    Ceramic-on-ceramic (CoC) couplings are alternative bearings surfaces that have been reported to reduce osteolysis, wear debris and aseptic loosening compared to the use of polyethylene. Early experiences with ceramics had poor results, but they have led to many improvements in the manufacture and design of subsequent implants. We analysed medical files of 300 CoC total hip arthroplasty (THA) with a modular neck performed during period 1995-2000 by a single surgeon for a minimum follow-up of 13 years, evaluating clinical and radiological outcome. The mean clinical Merle d'Aubigne and Postel hip score at the final follow-up is 17.4, against a preoperative value of 11.4. Overall survivorship with an endpoint of revision is 93.2% (95% CI, 89.0%-97.3%) at 15 years, while considering only prosthesis failures related to aseptic loosening and ceramic breakage, survival rate at 15 years is 97.2% (95% CI, 94.8%-100%). We observed complications that led to revision surgery in 11 patients (4%) (periprosthetic fractures, liner ruptures, septic loosening of the implant, aseptic loosening of the cup, aseptic loosening of the stem). The occurrence of squeaking is low (1.6%, 4 cases) and we analysed the characteristics of these patients. Our study shows an excellent long term survivorship of third generation alumina CoC THA. We reiterate the importance to have a stable implant to maximise the advantage of ceramic and to avoid complications.

  12. Novel applications of ceramic precursors -- TiN coating on alumina and functionally gradient materials

    SciTech Connect

    Seyferth, D.; Narula, C.K.; Czubarow, P.

    1996-12-31

    There are very few demonstrated applications of ceramic precursor technology. Here, the authors describe two new applications of known ceramic precursors, thin film deposition and the fabrication of functionally gradient materials (FGM). To demonstrate the thin film deposition, the authors prepared titanium nitride film on an alumina substrate using (CH{sub 3}){sub 3}SiNHTiCl{sub 3} precursor by a single dipcoat-fire cycle. The fabrication of copper and aluminum based FGMs was demonstrated using Nicalon{reg_sign} fiber polycarbosilane and poly(methylsilane) precursors as binders and in situ sources of ceramics.

  13. Effect of alumina composition and surface integrity in alumina/epoxy composites on the ultrasonic attenuation properties.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eikhyun; Park, Gwanwoo; Lee, Jae-Wan; Cho, Sung-Min; Kim, Taekyung; Kim, Joongeok; Choi, Wonjoon; Ohm, Won-Suk; Kang, Shinill

    2016-03-01

    We report a method of fabricating backing blocks for ultrasonic imaging transducers, using alumina/epoxy composites. Backing blocks contain scatterers such as alumina particles interspersed in the epoxy matrix for the effective scattering and attenuation of ultrasound. Here, the surface integrity can be an issue, where the composite material may be damaged during machining because of differences in strength, hardness and brittleness of the hard alumina particles and the soft epoxy matrix. Poor surface integrity results in the formation of air cavities between the backing block and the piezoelectric element upon assembly, hence the increased reflection off the backing block and the eventual degradation in image quality. Furthermore, with an issue of poor surface integrity due to machining, it is difficult to increase alumina as scatterers more than a specific mass fraction ratio. In this study, we increased the portion of alumina within epoxy matrix by obtaining an enhanced surface integrity using a net shape fabrication method, and verified that this method could allow us to achieve higher ultrasonic attenuation. Backing blocks were net-shaped with various mass fractions of alumina to characterize the formability and the mechanical properties, including hardness, surface roughness and the internal micro-structure, which were compared with those of machined backing blocks. The ultrasonic attenuation property of the backing blocks was also measured.

  14. Microstructure evolution and densification of alumina in liquid phase sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Weimin

    The microstructure evolution and densification of alumina during liquid phase sintering were quantified. Quantification included the evolution of pore-size distribution, the redistribution of liquid phase, the densification kinetics, and the fraction of closed and open pores. The results revealed that the small and large pores were filled simultaneously. This is inconsistent with Shaw's model in which liquid fills preferentially the smaller low-coordination-number pores in order to reach a low-energy configuration. The results also recommended that the pressure build-up of the trapped gases in pores due to the closure of open pores might have a significantly negative contribution to the driving force, and consequently cause the termination of the densification of alumina. To demonstrate whether the trapped gases played an important role in the microstructure evolution and the densification of alumina during liquid phase sintering, the following two experiments have been conducted. First, alumina preforms containing artificial pores were penetrated by glass. The results indicated that the trapped gases in pores had a considerable influence on the pore filling process, and ultimately caused the termination of the densification of the alumina preforms. Second, alumina compacts containing different amount of glass were sintered in vacuum. The alumina compact containing 20 vol. % reached full density during vacuum sintering, indicating that the pressure build-up of the trapped gases in pores was the main factor causing the termination of the densification of alumina in the final stage of liquid phase sintering. The limiting relative densities of compacts were calculated theoretically on the basis of a comprehensive analysis of the variation of the capillary pressure and gas pressure in pores with pore size and pore number. The capillary pressure and gas pressure in alumina compact during liquid phase sintering were analyzed on the basis of the above theoretical models

  15. Specific influence of univalent cations on the ionization of alumina-coated TiO2 particles and on the adsorption of poly(acrylic)acid.

    PubMed

    Malgat, Alexandre; Boisvert, Jean-Philippe; Daneault, Claude

    2004-01-15

    A surface counterion titration method was used to monitor the interaction of monovalents cations (Li(+), Na(+), TMA(+)) with the surface of alumina-coated TiO(2) particles in concentrated media at different pH and electrolyte concentrations. This method allows measuring separately the negative and positive contribution to the surface charge. It showed that Cl(-) and TMA(+) are indifferent ions, but Li(+) and Na(+) specifically adsorb on the non-ionized alumina surface sites. The binding sequence of cations is Li(+)>Na(+)>TMA(+) at all ionic strengths investigated and is consistent with the structure-making and structure-breaking model developed a few decades ago. Polyacrylic acid (PAA) previously neutralized with the corresponding hydroxide (LiOH, NaOH, TMAOH) has been adsorbed on the alumina surface at different pH. The polymer counterion has a significant influence on the polymer adsorption. The sequence of the surface coverage as a function of the polymer counterion follows the order Li-PAA > Na-PAA > TMA-PAA. The much higher surface coverage with Li-PAA and Na-PAA compared to TMA-PAA is explained by the specific adsorption of Li-PAA and Na-PAA on the nonionized alumina surface sites, the same way LiCl and NaCl do.

  16. Removal and preconcentration of lead (II), copper (II), chromium (III) and iron (III) from wastewaters by surface developed alumina adsorbents with immobilized 1-nitroso-2-naphthol.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Mohamed E; Osman, Maher M; Hafez, Osama F; Elmelegy, Essam

    2010-01-15

    The potential removal and preconcentration of lead (II), copper (II), chromium (III) and iron (III) from wastewaters were investigated and explored. Three new alumina adsorbents of acidic, neutral and basic nature (I-III) were synthesized via physical adsorption and surface loading of 1-nitroso-2-naphthol as a possible chelating ion-exchanger. The modified alumina adsorbents are characterized by strong thermal stability as well as resistance to acidic medium leaching processes. High metal up-take was found providing this order: Cu(II)>Cr(III)>Pb(II) owing to the strong contribution of surface loaded 1-nitroso-2-naphthol. The outlined results from the distribution coefficient and separation factor evaluations (low metal ion concentration levels) were found to denote to a different selectivity order: Pb(II)>Cu(II)>Cr(III)) due to the strong contribution of alumina matrix in the metal binding processes. The potential applications of alumina adsorbents for removal and preconcentration of Pb(II), Cu(II), Cr(III) from wastewaters as well as drinking tap water samples were successfully accomplished giving recovery values of (89-100+/-1-3%) and (93-99+/-3-4%), respectively without any noticeable interference of the wastewater or drinking tap water matrices.

  17. Filter-pressing of alumina dispersions

    SciTech Connect

    Fries, R.; Rand, B.

    1996-06-01

    The filter-pressing characteristics of aqueous alumina dispersions containing either submicron or nano-sized particles have been compared with respect to ionic strength. The highest green densities for both systems were achieved at electrolyte concentrations < 0.01 mol dm{sup -3} where long-range repulsive interparticle forces stabilize the slips. A slight increase in density with ionic strength in this range was attributed to an increase in the ratio of particle radius-to-double layer thickness, Ka. At higher electrolyte concentrations, above the critical coagulation concentration, the green densities dropped to significantly lower values due to the onset of flocculation and the formation of open particle networks characterized by strong attraction which resisted rearrangement into a dense green microstructure. The green densities of the compacts consolidated from the submicron dispersions at ionic strength > 1 mol dm{sup -3} were significantly higher than those prepared close to the critical coagulation concentration although the slips exhibited properties typical for a flocculated structure. The results may indicate the presence of short-range repulsive forces at high salt concentration for the submicron slips not accounted for by the classical DLVO-theory. In order to characterize the early stages of filter-cake consolidation the initial cake permeability was determined from the compaction curves.

  18. Thermal Conductivity of Alumina and Silica Nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanos, Julian G. Bernal

    This thesis studies the effects of the base fluid, particle type/size, and volumetric concentration on the thermal conductivity of Alumina and Silica nanofluids. The effects of base fluid were observed by preparing samples using ethylene glycol (EG), water, and mixtures of EG/water as the base fluid and Al2O3 (10 nm) nanoparticles. The particles type/size and volumetric concentration effects were tested by preparing samples of nanofluids using Al2O3 (10nm), Al2O3 (150nm), SiO2 (15 nm), and SiO2 (80 nm) nanoparticles and ionized water as base fluid at different volumetric concentrations. All samples were mixed using a sonicator for 30 minutes and a water circulator to maintain the sample at room temperature. The thermal conductivity was measured using a Thermtest Transient Plane Source TPS 500S. The effects of gravity, Brownian motion and thermophoresis were also studied. EG produced the highest thermal conductivity enhancement out of all base fluids tested. Smaller particle size produced a higher enhancement of thermal conductivity, while the volumetric concentration did not have a significant effect in the thermal conductivity enhancement. Finally, gravity, Brownian diffusion and thermophoresis effects played a role in the total enhancement of the thermal conductivity. The nanoparticles were observed to settle rapidly after sonication suggesting gravity effects may play a significant role.

  19. Mechanical properties of alumina porcelain during heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šín, Peter; Podoba, Rudolf; ŠtubÅa, Igor; Trník, Anton

    2014-11-01

    The mechanical strength and Young's modulus of green alumina porcelain (50 wt. % of kaolin, 25 wt. % of Al2O3, and 25 wt. % of feldspar) were measured during heating up to 900 °C and 1100 °C, respectively. To this end, we used the three point-bending method and modulated force thermomechanical analysis (mf-TMA). The loss liberation - of the physically bound water (20 - 250 °C) strengthens the sample and Young's modulus increases its values significantly. The dehydroxylation that takes place in the range of 400 - 650 °C causes a slight decrease in Young's modulus. On the other hand, the mechanical strength slightly increases in this temperature range, although it has a sudden drop at 420 °C. Beyond the dehydroxylation range, above 650 °C, both Young's modulus and mechanical strength increase. Above 950 °C, a sharp increase of Young's modulus is caused by the solid-state sintering and the new structure created by the high-temperature reactions in metakaolinite.

  20. Joining of alumina by vacuum brazing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heikinheimo, Liisa; Siren, Mika; Kauppinen, Pentti

    1993-08-01

    The active brazing method for diffusion bonding of ceramics to metals is addressed. This method is very flexible compared to the traditional Mo-manganese coating with subsequent brazing that includes four process steps: in active brazing the process is done in one step. The joint properties are favorable, the residual stress build up is limited if the braze is correctly selected and the thermal cycle is controlled, and the resulting strength and leak tightness are good. In experimental work the joinability of alumina to titanium and Ni superalloys was studied by wetting experiments, nondestructive test and shear strength measurements. The spreading of the braze is affected not only by the surface conditions of mating materials but also by the type of the brazing alloy. The Ag-Cu base alloys give better wetting, strength and leak tightness properties than the Ag base alloys. A shear test method was developed for the mechanical testing of metal-ceramic joints. However, the sample geometry affects the measured values, namely a smaller specimen size provides better results. The correlation between the C-SAM results, which describe the ratio between the true bonded area and unbonded area, and measured shear strength values is presented. The dependence between the measured strength and the area of the joint defects becomes obvious and should be studied in more detail.

  1. Annealing Would Improve beta" - Alumina Solid Electrolyte

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Roger; Homer, Margie; Ryan, Margaret; Cortez, Roger; Shields, Virgil; Kisor, Adam

    2003-01-01

    A pre-operational annealing process is under investigation as a potential means of preventing a sudden reduction of ionic conductivity in a Beta"-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE) during use. On the basis of tests, the sudden reduction of ionic conductivity, followed by a slow recovery, has been found to occur during testing of the solid electrolyte and electrode components of an alkali metal thermal-to-electric converter (AMTEC) cell. At this time, high-temperature tests of limited duration have indicated the superiority of the treated BASE, but reproducible tests over thousands of hours are necessary to confirm that microcracking has been eliminated. The ionic conductivity of the treated BASE is also measured to be higher than untreated BASE at 1,073 K in low-pressure sodium vapor. Microcracking resulting in loss of conductivity was not observed with treated BASE in one high-temperature experiment, but this result must be duplicated over very long testing times to be sure of the effect. Shorter annealing times (10 to 20 hours) were found to result in significantly less loss of mass; it may be necessary for the packed powder mixture to evolve some Na2O before the Na2O can leave the ceramic.

  2. Neutral Beam Injection in the Electric Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourdain, P.-A.; Carter, T. A.; Gauvreau, J.-L.; Grossman, A.; Lafonteese, D. J.; Pace, D. C.; Schmitz, L. W.; Taylor, R. J.; White, A. E.; Yates, T. F.

    2004-11-01

    The Electric Tokamak (ET) at UCLA (Bt=0.25T, R=5m, a=1m, Te(0)=300eV, tau(0)=1s) is now running long shots (5s). A new development program was started last year to include a neutral beam in the daily operations of the machine. As a result, a 10kV neutral beam injector was built to deal with plasma and measurement issues. The design and parameters of the beam are discussed. The source is based on an RF generated plasma, with a single extraction grid providing an accel-decel configuration. Plasma neutralization efficiency is also presented. Co- or counter injection is now possible using a single beam. The construction of a second beam is planned for simultaneous co- and counter injections for toroidal momentum input control. Plasma toroidal and poloidal rotation, particle diffusion and current drive effects will be presented.

  3. Neutralization escape mutants define a dominant immunogenic neutralization site on hepatitis A virus

    SciTech Connect

    Stapleton, J.T.; Lemon, S.M.

    1987-02-01

    Hepatitis A virus is an hepatotrophic human picornavirus which demonstrates little antigenic variability. To topologically map immunogenic sites on hepatitis A virus which elicit neutralizing antibodies, eight neutralizing monoclonal antibodies were evaluated in competition immunoassays employing radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies and HM-175 virus. Whereas two antibodies (K3-4C8 and K3-2F2) bound to intimately overlapping epitopes, the epitope bound by a third antibody (B5-B3) was distinctly different as evidenced by a lack of competition between antibodies for binding to the virus. The other five antibodies variably blocked the binding of both K3-4C8-K3-2F2 and B5-B3, suggesting that these epitopes are closely spaced and perhaps part of a single neutralization immunogenic site. Several combinations of monoclonal antibodies blocked the binding of polyclonal human convalescent antibody by greater than 96%, indicating that the neutralization epitopes bound by these antibodies are immunodominant in humans. Spontaneously arising HM-175 mutants were selected for resistance to monoclonal antibody-mediated neutralization. Neutralization resistance was associated with reduced antibody binding. These results suggest that hepatitis A virus may differ from poliovirus in possessing a single, dominant neutralization immunogenic site and therefore may be a better candidate for synthetic peptide or antiidiotype vaccine development.

  4. Ion polarization behavior in alumina under pulsed gate bias stress

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yu; Diallo, Abdou Karim; Katz, Howard E.

    2015-03-16

    Alkali metal ion incorporation in alumina significantly increases alumina capacitance by ion polarization. With high capacitance, ion-incorporated aluminas become promising high dielectric constant (high-k) gate dielectric materials in field-effect transistors (FETs) to enable reduced operating voltage, using oxide or organic semiconductors. Alumina capacitance can be manipulated by incorporation of alkali metal ions, including potassium (K{sup +}), sodium (Na{sup +}), and lithium (Li{sup +}), having different bond strengths with oxygen. To investigate the electrical stability of zinc tin oxide-based transistors using ion incorporated alumina as gate dielectrics, pulsed biases at different duty cycles (20%, 10%, and 2% representing 5 ms, 10 ms, and 50 ms periods, respectively) were applied to the gate electrode, sweeping the gate voltage over series of these cycles. We observed a particular bias stress-induced decrease of saturation field-effect mobility accompanied by threshold voltage shifts (ΔV{sub th}) in potassium and sodium-incorporated alumina (abbreviated as PA and SA)-based FETs at high duty cycle that persisted over multiple gate voltage sweeps, suggesting a possible creation of new defects in the semiconductor. This conclusion is also supported by the greater change in the mobility-capacitance (μC) product than in capacitance itself. Moreover, a more pronounced ΔV{sub th} over shorter times was observed in lithium-incorporated alumina (abbreviated as LA)-based transistors, suggesting trapping of electrons in existing interfacial states. ΔV{sub th} from multiple gate voltage sweeps over time were fit to stretched exponential forms. All three dielectrics show good stability using 50-ms intervals (20-Hz frequencies), corresponding to 2% duty cycles.

  5. Ion polarization behavior in alumina under pulsed gate bias stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu; Diallo, Abdou Karim; Katz, Howard E.

    2015-03-01

    Alkali metal ion incorporation in alumina significantly increases alumina capacitance by ion polarization. With high capacitance, ion-incorporated aluminas become promising high dielectric constant (high-k) gate dielectric materials in field-effect transistors (FETs) to enable reduced operating voltage, using oxide or organic semiconductors. Alumina capacitance can be manipulated by incorporation of alkali metal ions, including potassium (K+), sodium (Na+), and lithium (Li+), having different bond strengths with oxygen. To investigate the electrical stability of zinc tin oxide-based transistors using ion incorporated alumina as gate dielectrics, pulsed biases at different duty cycles (20%, 10%, and 2% representing 5 ms, 10 ms, and 50 ms periods, respectively) were applied to the gate electrode, sweeping the gate voltage over series of these cycles. We observed a particular bias stress-induced decrease of saturation field-effect mobility accompanied by threshold voltage shifts (ΔVth) in potassium and sodium-incorporated alumina (abbreviated as PA and SA)-based FETs at high duty cycle that persisted over multiple gate voltage sweeps, suggesting a possible creation of new defects in the semiconductor. This conclusion is also supported by the greater change in the mobility-capacitance (μC) product than in capacitance itself. Moreover, a more pronounced ΔVth over shorter times was observed in lithium-incorporated alumina (abbreviated as LA)-based transistors, suggesting trapping of electrons in existing interfacial states. ΔVth from multiple gate voltage sweeps over time were fit to stretched exponential forms. All three dielectrics show good stability using 50-ms intervals (20-Hz frequencies), corresponding to 2% duty cycles.

  6. Neutral particle lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craver, Barry Paul

    Neutral particle lithography (NPL) is a high resolution, proximity exposure technique where a broad beam of energetic neutral particles floods a stencil mask and transmitted beamlets transfer the mask pattern to resist on a substrate, such that each feature is printed in parallel, rather than in the serial manner of electron beam lithography. It preserves the advantages of ion beam lithography (IBL), including extremely large depth-of-field, sub-5 nm resist scattering, and the near absence of diffraction, yet is intrinsically immune to charge-related artifacts including line-edge roughness and pattern placement errors due to charge accumulation on the mask and substrate. In our experiments, a neutral particle beam is formed by passing an ion beam (e.g., 30 keV He+) through a high pressure helium gas cell (e.g., 100 mTorr) to convert the ions to energetic neutrals through charge transfer scattering. The resolution of NPL is generally superior to that of IBL for applications involving insulating substrates, large proximity gaps, and ultra-small features. High accuracy stepped exposures with energetic neutral particles, where magnetic or electrostatic deflection is impossible, have been obtained by clamping the mask to the wafer, setting the proximity gap with a suitable spacer, and mechanically inclining the mask/wafer stack relative to the beam. This approach is remarkably insensitive to vibration and thermal drift; nanometer scale image offsets have been obtained with +/-2 nm placement accuracy for experiments lasting over one hour. Using this nanostepping technique, linewidth versus dose curves were obtained, from which the NPL lithographic blur was determined as 4.4+/-1.4 nm (1sigma), which is 2-3 times smaller than the blur of electron beam lithography. Neutral particle lithography has the potential to form high density, periodic patterns with sub-10 nm resolution.

  7. Tautomerism in neutral histidine.

    PubMed

    Bermúdez, Celina; Mata, Santiago; Cabezas, Carlos; Alonso, José L

    2014-10-06

    Histidine is an important natural amino acid, involved in many relevant biological processes, which, because of its physical properties, proved difficult to characterize experimentally in its neutral form. In this work, neutral histidine has been generated in the gas phase by laser ablation of solid samples and its N(ε)H tautomeric form unraveled through its rotational spectrum. The quadrupole hyperfine structure, arising from the existing three (14)N nuclei, constituted a site-specifically probe for revealing the tautomeric form as well as the side chain configuration of this proteogenic amino acid.

  8. Electronic and chemical state of aluminum from the single- (K) and double-electron excitation (KLII&III, KLI) x-ray absorption near-edge spectra of α-alumina, sodium aluminate, aqueous Al³⁺•(H₂O)₆, and aqueous Al(OH)₄⁻

    SciTech Connect

    Fulton, John L.; Govind, Niranjan; Huthwelker, Thomas; Bylaska, Eric J.; Vjunov, Aleksei; Pin, Sonia; Smurthwaite, Tricia D.

    2015-07-02

    We probe, at high energy resolution, the double electron excitation (KLII&II) x-ray absorption region that lies approximately 115 eV above the main Al K-edge (1566 eV) of α-alumina and sodium aluminate. The two solid standards, α-alumina (octahedral) and sodium aluminate (tetrahedral) are compared to aqueous species that have the same Al coordination symmetries, Al³⁺•6H₂O (octahedral) and Al(OH)₄⁻ (tetrahedral). For the octahedral species, the edge height of the KLII&III-edge is approximately 10% of the main K-edge however the edge height is much weaker (3% of K-edge height) for Al species with tetrahedral symmetry. For the α-alumina and aqueous Al³⁺•6H₂O the KLII&III spectra contain white line features and extended absorption fine structure (EXAFS) that mimics the K-edge spectra. The KLII&III-edge feature interferes with an important region of the extended-XAFS region of the spectra for the K-edge of the crystalline and aqueous standards. The K-edge spectra and K-edge positions are predicted using time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT