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Sample records for single rat sympathetic

  1. On the secretory activity of single varicosities in the sympathetic nerves innervating the rat tail artery.

    PubMed

    Astrand, P; Stjärne, L

    1989-02-01

    1. Nerve terminal impulses (NTIs) and spontaneous or stimulus-evoked excitatory junction currents (SEJCs or EJCs), reflecting secretion of transmitter quanta from release sites in the sympathetic nerves of rat tail artery, were recorded by extracellular electrodes. 2. The release of transmitter quanta from single varicosities was analysed on a pulse-by-pulse basis. 3. Since the SEJCs were tetrodotoxin-resistant, and hence probably caused by single quanta, they were employed to analyse the quantal content of EJCs. 4. In the majority of recordings, EJCs were large compared to SEJCs from the same attachment, and preceded by prominent NTIs. This type of activity appeared to reflect simultaneous activation of several nerve fibres and numerous varicosities. 5. By focal stimulation, it was usually possible to improve the resolution by examining spots in which a large proportion of the suprathreshold stimuli failed to cause EJCs. Here, averaged NTIs preceding large EJCs were indistinguishable from averaged NTIs not followed by EJCs. Thus, failure of invasion by the nerve impulse was not a cause of the frequent secretory failure. 6. In these attachments the amplitude distribution of nerve stimulus-evoked EJCs was similar to that of the SEJCs and many individual EJCs could be matched in amplitude and time course by SEJCs. Thus, transmitter secretion from these sympathetic nerve varicosities seems to be basically monoquantal. 7. Under conditions when all EJCs were smaller than or equal to the largest SEJCs some characteristic EJC profiles appeared only a few times in response to several hundred suprathreshold stimuli at low frequency (0.5-1 Hz). Using tentatively these EJCs as 'fingerprints' of single quanta from particular release sites, the probability for activation of individual release sites ranges from 0.002 to 0.02.

  2. Enhanced sympathetic activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex in rats with heart failure induced by adriamycin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shujuan; Zhang, Feng; Sun, Haijian; Zhou, Yebo; Han, Ying

    2012-11-01

    Our previous studies have shown that the cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex is enhanced in rats with chronic heart failure (CHF) induced by coronary artery ligation and contributes to the over-excitation of sympathetic activity. We sought to determine whether sympathetic activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex were enhanced in adriamycin-induced CHF and whether angiotensin II (Ang II) in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) was involved in enhancing sympathetic activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex. Heart failure was induced by intraperitoneal injection of adriamycin for six times during 2 weeks (15 mg/kg). Six weeks after the first injection, the rats underwent anesthesia with urethane and α-chloralose. After vagotomy and baroreceptor denervation, cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex was evaluated by renal sympathetic nerve activity and mean arterial pressure (MAP) response to epicardial application of capsaicin (1.0 nmol). The response of MAP to ganglionic blockade with hexamethonium in conscious rats was performed to evaluate sympathetic activity. The renal sympathetic nerve activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex were enhanced in adriamycin rats and the maximum depressor response of MAP induced by hexamethonium was significantly greater in adriamycin rats than that in control rats. Bilateral PVN microinjection of angiotensin II (Ang II) caused larger responses of the cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex, baseline renal sympathetic nerve activity and MAP in adriamycin rats than control rats. These results indicated that both sympathetic activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex were enhanced and Ang II in the PVN was involved in the enhanced sympathetic activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex in rats with adriamycin-induced heart failure. PMID:23554781

  3. Longitudinal Evaluation of Sympathetic Nervous System and Perfusion in Normal and Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat Hearts with Dynamic Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Zan, Yunlong; Boutchko, Rostyslav; Huang, Qiu; Li, Biao; Chen, Kewei; Gullberg, Grant T

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the sympathetic nervous system and structure remodeling during the progression of heart failure in a rodent model using dynamic cardiac single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) model was used to study changes in the nervous system innervation and perfusion in the left ventricular (LV) myocardium with the progression of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) to heart failure. Longitudinal dynamic SPECT studies were performed with seven SHR and seven Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats over 1.5 years using a dual-head SPECT scanner with pinhole collimators. Time-activity curves (TACs) of the 123I-MIBG and 201Tl distribution in the LV blood pool and myocardium were extracted from dynamic SPECT data and fitted to compartment models to determine the influx rate, washout rate, and distribution volume (DV) of 123I-MIBG and 201Tl in the LV myocardium. The standardized uptake values (SUVs) of 123I-MIBG and 201Tl in the LV myocardium were also calculated from the static reconstructed images. The influx and washout rates of 123I-MIBG did not show a significant difference between SHRs and WKY rats. The DVs of 123I-MIBG were greater in the SHRs than in the WKY rats (p = .0028). Specifically, the DV of 123I-MIBG became greater in the SHRs by 6 months of age (p = .0017) and was still significant at the age of 22 months. The SUV of 123I-MIBG in SHRs exhibited abnormal values compared to WKY rats from the age of 18 months. There was no difference in the influx rate and the washout rate of 201Tl between the SHRs and WKY rats. The SHRs exhibited greater DV of 201Tl than WKY rats after the age of 18 months (p = .034). The SUV of 201Tl in SHRs did not show any significant difference from WKY at all ages. The higher DV of 123I-MIBG in the LV myocardium reveals abnormal nervous system activity of the SHRs at an age of 6 months, whereas a greater DV of 201Tl in the LV myocardium can only be detected at an age

  4. Centrally administered glucagon stimulates sympathetic nerve activity in rat.

    PubMed

    Krzeski, R; Czyzyk-Krzeska, M F; Trzebski, A; Millhorn, D E

    1989-12-18

    The effect of pancreatic glucagon given intravenously, intracerebroventricularly and microinjected into the nucleus of the solitary tract on sympathetic activity in the cervical trunk and adrenal nerve was examined in rat. In each case glucagon caused a relatively long-lasting substantial increase in discharge of both nerves. This finding shows that glucagon can act centrally to stimulate sympathetic activity. The most probable site for the sympathoexcitatory effect of glucagon is the nucleus of the solitary tract. PMID:2598031

  5. Dynamic resistance training decreases sympathetic tone in hypertensive ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Shimojo, G L; Palma, R K; Brito, J O; Sanches, I C; Irigoyen, M C; De Angelis, K

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of resistance exercise training on hemodynamics and cardiac autonomic control in ovariectomized spontaneously hypertensive rats. Female rats were divided into 4 groups: sedentary control (SC), sedentary hypertensive (SH), sedentary hypertensive ovariectomized (SHO), and resistance-trained hypertensive ovariectomized (RTHO). Resistance exercise training was performed on a vertical ladder (5 days/week, 8 weeks) at 40-60% maximal load. Direct arterial pressure was recorded. Vagal and sympathetic tones were measured by heart rate (HR) responses to methylatropine (3 mg/kg, iv) and propranolol (4 mg/kg, iv). Ovariectomy resulted in additional increases in blood pressure in hypertensive rats and was associated with decreased vagal tone. Resistance exercise trained rats had lower mean arterial pressure than untrained rats (RTHO: 159±2.2 vs SHO: 177±3.4 mmHg), as well as resting bradycardia (RTHO: 332±9.0 vs SHO: 356±5 bpm). Sympathetic tone was also lower in the trained group. Moreover, sympathetic tone was positively correlated with resting HR (r=0.7, P<0.05). The additional arterial pressure increase in hypertensive rats caused by ovarian hormone deprivation was attenuated by moderate-intensity dynamic resistance training. This benefit may be associated with resting bradycardia and reduced cardiac sympathetic tone after training, which suggests potential benefits of resistance exercise for the management of hypertension after ovarian hormone deprivation.

  6. The articulo-cardiac sympathetic reflex in spinalized, anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Tomohiro; Suzuki, Atsuko; Ito, Ryuzo

    2006-04-01

    Somatic afferent regulation of heart rate by noxious knee joint stimulation has been proven in anesthetized cats to be a reflex response whose reflex center is in the brain and whose efferent arc is a cardiac sympathetic nerve. In the present study we examined whether articular stimulation could influence heart rate by this efferent sympathetic pathway in spinalized rats. In central nervous system (CNS)-intact rats, noxious articular movement of either the knee or elbow joint resulted in an increase in cardiac sympathetic nerve activity and heart rate. However, although in acutely spinalized rats a noxious movement of the elbow joint resulted in a significant increase in cardiac sympathetic nerve activity and heart rate, a noxious movement of the knee joint had no such effect and resulted in only a marginal increase in heart rate. Because this marginal increase was abolished by adrenalectomy suggests that it was due to the release of adrenal catecholamines. In conclusion, the spinal cord appears to be capable of mediating, by way of cardiac sympathetic nerves, the propriospinally induced reflex increase in heart rate that follows noxious stimulation of the elbow joint, but not the knee joint.

  7. Remodelling sympathetic innervation in rat pancreatic islets ontogeny

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera-Vásquez, Siraam; Navarro-Tableros, Víctor; Sánchez-Soto, Carmen; Gutiérrez-Ospina, Gabriel; Hiriart, Marcia

    2009-01-01

    Background Pancreatic islets are not fully developed at birth and it is not clear how they are vascularised and innervated. Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) is required to guide sympathetic neurons that innervate peripheral organs and also in cardiovascular system and ovary angiogenesis. Pancreatic beta cells of a transgenic mouse that over-expressed NGF in attracts sympathetic hyper-innervation towards them. Moreover, we have previously demonstrated that adult beta cells synthesize and secrete NGF; however, we do not know how is NGF secreted during development, nor if it might be trophic for sympathetic innervation and survival in the pancreas. We analyzed sympathetic innervation and vasculature development in rat pancreatic islets at different developmental stages; foetal (F19), early postnatal (P1), weaning period (P20) and adults. We temporarily correlated these events to NGF secretion by islet cells. Results Sympathetic fibres reached pancreatic islets in the early postnatal period, apparently following blood vessels. The maximal number of sympathetic fibres (TH immunopositive) in the periphery of the islets was observed at P20, and then fibres entered the islets and reached the core where beta cells are mainly located. The number of fibres decreased from that stage to adulthood. At all stages studied, islet cells secreted NGF and also expressed the high affinity receptor TrkA. Foetal and neonatal isolated islet cells secreted more NGF than adults. TrkA receptors were expressed at all stages in pancreatic sympathetic fibres and blood vessels. These last structures were NGF–immunoreactive only at early stages (foetal and P0). Conclusion The results suggest that NGF signalling play an important role in the guidance of blood vessels and sympathetic fibres toward the islets during foetal and neonatal stages and could also preserve innervation at later stages of life. PMID:19534767

  8. Differential Sympathetic Vasomotor Activation Induced by Liver Cirrhosis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bergamaschi, Cássia T.; Campos, Ruy R.

    2016-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that there is a topographical sympathetic activation in rats submitted to experimental cirrhosis. Baseline renal (rSNA) and splanchnic (sSNA) sympathetic nerve activities were evaluated in anesthetized rats. In addition, we evaluated main arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and baroreceptor reflex sensitivity (BRS). Cirrhotic Wistar rats were obtained by bile duct ligation (BDL). MAP and HR were measured in conscious rats, and cardiac BRS was assessed by changes in blood pressure induced by increasing doses of phenylephrine or sodium nitroprusside. The BRS and baseline for the control of sSNA and rSNA were also evaluated in urethane-anesthetized rats. Cirrhotic rats had increased baseline sSNA (BDL, 102 vs control, 58 spikes/s; p<0.05), but no baseline changes in the rSNA compared to controls. These data were accompanied by increased splanchnic BRS (p<0.05) and decreased cardiac (p<0.05) and renal BRS (p<0.05). Furthermore, BDL rats had reduced basal MAP (BDL, 93 vs control, 101 mmHg; p<0.05) accompanied by increased HR (BDL, 378 vs control, 356; p<0.05). Our data have shown topographical sympathetic activation in rats submitted to experimental cirrhosis. The BDL group had increased baseline sSNA, independent of dysfunction in the BRS and no changes in baseline rSNA. However, an impairment of rSNA and HR control by arterial baroreceptor was noted. We suggest that arterial baroreceptor impairment of rSNA and HR is an early marker of cardiovascular dysfunction related to liver cirrhosis and probably a major mechanism leading to sympathoexcitation in decompensated phase. PMID:27055088

  9. Characteristics of Sympathetic Ophthalmia in a Single International Center

    PubMed Central

    Guzman-Salas, Pablo Jose; Serna-Ojeda, Juan Carlos; Guinto-Arcos, Ethel Beatriz; Pedroza-Seres, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To report the main features of sympathetic ophthalmia in a referral ophthalmology center. Methods: Retrospective clinical study. We reviewed clinical records of patients with diagnosis of sympathetic ophthalmia attending the Uveitis Department from 2007 to 2013. Patients were selected by clinical criteria. Descriptive statistics were used to assess variables. Results: Twenty patients were included for analysis, 13 males and 7 females. Mean follow up was 1 year. The median age of presentation was 50 years. Fifty percent had history of ocular trauma and 50% had history of intraocular surgery, of which 40% underwent phacoemulsification. The time between injury and onset of symptoms ranged from 1 to 456 months. Most common ocular manifestations were mutton fat keratic precipitates and anterior chamber inflammation. All patients received oral prednisone as single or combined therapy. Sixty percent of the sympathizing eyes improved two or more lines of vision and 20% lost two or more lines of vision. Conclusion: This report from a single center adds to the body of literature of sympathetic ophthalmia occurring in a specific population. Our data found a high proportion of patients with sympathetic ophthalmia after phacoemulsification.

  10. Characteristics of Sympathetic Ophthalmia in a Single International Center

    PubMed Central

    Guzman-Salas, Pablo Jose; Serna-Ojeda, Juan Carlos; Guinto-Arcos, Ethel Beatriz; Pedroza-Seres, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To report the main features of sympathetic ophthalmia in a referral ophthalmology center. Methods: Retrospective clinical study. We reviewed clinical records of patients with diagnosis of sympathetic ophthalmia attending the Uveitis Department from 2007 to 2013. Patients were selected by clinical criteria. Descriptive statistics were used to assess variables. Results: Twenty patients were included for analysis, 13 males and 7 females. Mean follow up was 1 year. The median age of presentation was 50 years. Fifty percent had history of ocular trauma and 50% had history of intraocular surgery, of which 40% underwent phacoemulsification. The time between injury and onset of symptoms ranged from 1 to 456 months. Most common ocular manifestations were mutton fat keratic precipitates and anterior chamber inflammation. All patients received oral prednisone as single or combined therapy. Sixty percent of the sympathizing eyes improved two or more lines of vision and 20% lost two or more lines of vision. Conclusion: This report from a single center adds to the body of literature of sympathetic ophthalmia occurring in a specific population. Our data found a high proportion of patients with sympathetic ophthalmia after phacoemulsification. PMID:27651849

  11. CYTOPLASMIC INCLUSIONS RESEMBLING NUCLEOLI IN SYMPATHETIC NEURONS OF ADULT RATS

    PubMed Central

    Grillo, Mary A.

    1970-01-01

    A distinctive cytoplasmic inclusion consisting of a convoluted network of electron-opaque strands embedded in a less dense matrix was identified in the neurons, but not in the supporting cells, of rat sympathetic ganglia. This ball-like structure, designated "nematosome," measures ∼ 0.9 µ and lacks a limiting membrane. Its strands (diameter = 400–600 A) appear to be made of an entanglement of tightly packed filaments and particles ∼ 25–50 A thick. Cytochemical studies carried out with the light microscope suggest the presence of nonhistone proteins and some RNA. Usually only one such structure is present in a cell, and it appears to occur in most ganglion cells. Although they can be seen anywhere in the cell body, nematosomes are typically located in the perinuclear cytoplasm, where they are often associated with smooth-surfaced and coated vesicles. In fine structure and stainability, they bear a resemblance to the fibrous component of the nucleolus. Subsynaptic formations, which are a special feature of some of the synapses in sympathetic ganglia, appear similar to the threadlike elements in the nematosomes. The possibility that these three structures—nucleolus, nematosome, and subsynaptic formation—may be interrelated in origin and function is discussed. PMID:5458990

  12. Effect of weightlessness on sympathetic-adrenomedullary activity of rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvetňanský, R.; Torda, T.; Macho, L.; Tigranian, R. A.; Serova, L.; Genin, A. M.

    Three cosmic experiments were performed in which rats spent 18-20 days in space on board the biosatellites "COSMOS 782", "COSMOS 936" and "COSMOS 1129". The following indicators of the sympathetic-adrenomedullary system (SAS) activity were measured: tissue and plasma catecholamines (CA), CA-synthesizing enzymes—tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine-β-hydroxylase (DBH), phenylethanolamine-N-methyltransferase (PNMT)—as well as CA-degrading enzymes—monoamine oxidase (MAO) and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT). Adrenal epinephrine (EPI) and norepinephrine (NE) as well as CA-synthesizing and degrading enzymes were not significantly changed in the animals after flight on COSMOS 782. On the other hand, a significant increase was found in heart CA, the indicator which is usually decreased after stress. 26 days after landing all values were at control levels. The results obtained, compared to our previous stress experiments on Earth, suggest that prolonged weightlessness does not appear to be a pronounced stressful stimulus for the SAS. Heart and plasma CA, mainly NE, were increased both in the group living in the state of weightlessness and the group living in a centrifuge and exposed to artificial gravitation 1 g (COSMOS 936), suggesting again that prolonged weightlessness is not an intensive stressful stimulus for the SAS. The animals exposed after space flight on COSMOS 1129 to repeated immobilization stress on Earth showed a significant decrease of adrenal EPI and an expressive increase of adrenal TH activity compared to stressed animals which were not in space. Thus, the results corroborate that prolonged state of weightlessness during space flight though not representing by itself an intensive stressful stimulus for the sympathetic-adrenomedullary system, was found to potentiate the response of "cosmic rats" to stress exposure after return to Earth.

  13. Respiratory-related discharge pattern of sympathetic nerve activity in the spontaneously hypertensive rat.

    PubMed Central

    Czyzyk-Krzeska, M F; Trzebski, A

    1990-01-01

    1. Synchronization of spontaneous sympathetic discharge during the respiratory cycle was studied in the cervical and renal nerves of vagotomized, normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKYs) and age-matched spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Phrenic nerve discharge was used as an index of central inspiratory activity. 2. In normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats depression of sympathetic activity appeared at the onset of inspiration reaching a minimum at mid-inspiration. Peak maximal sympathetic discharge corresponded to postinspiratory phase; a second increase sometimes appeared in late expiration. Variations of respiratory frequency over wide range of experimental conditions by hypoxia, hyperoxia, hyper- or hypocapnia and transection of carotid sinus nerves did not affect this pattern. 3. In SHRs the respiratory-phase-related timing of sympathetic discharge was variable. In normoxia, the maximal sympathetic activity occurred in late inspiration, preceded by short depression at early inspiration and followed by postinspiratory depression. A second increase in sympathetic activity was observed in mid-expiration. 4. The pattern of respiratory phase modulated sympathetic activity in SHRs was altered by hypoxic stimulation of the peripheral chemoreceptors. The early inspiratory depression of sympathetic activity was substantially prolonged and the maximal sympathetic discharge was shifted from inspiration to early expiration. This effect was abolished after carotid sinus nerves had been cut. 5. Hypercapnic stimulation of central chemoreceptors in SHRs with carotid sinus nerves cut did not influence the timing of the sympathetic activity in relation to the respiratory phase, though the magnitude of rhythmical sympathetic discharges was increased. 6. We discuss the possibility that altered synchronization between central respiratory drive and sympathetic neuronal system may contribute to the neurogenic mechanisms of arterial hypertension in SHRs. PMID:2231403

  14. Angiotensin-(1-7) enhances the effects of angiotensin II on the cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex and sympathetic activity in rostral ventrolateral medulla in renovascular hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Zhang, Feng; Sun, Hai-Jian; Zhang, Feng; Han, Ying

    2015-11-01

    Excessive sympathetic activity propels the pathogenesis and progression of organ damage in hypertension. Enhanced cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex (CSAR) is involved in sympathetic activation in hypertension. Given the important role of the renin-angiotensin (Ang) system in regulating sympathetic outflow and cardiovascular activity, the present study aimed to investigate the roles of Ang-(1-7) in Ang II-induced CSAR and the sympathetic activation responses in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) of hypertensive rats. The two-kidney one-clip (2K1C) method was used to induce renovascular hypertension. Responses of renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) to epicardial application of capsaicin were used to evaluate the CSAR in sinoaortic-denervated and cervical-vagotomized rats with anesthesia. Both Ang II and Ang-(1-7) in the RVLM caused greater increases in RSNA and MAP in 2K1C rats than in sham-operated (sham) rats and enhanced CSAR independently. RVLM pretreatment with Ang-(1-7) dose dependently augmented the effects of Ang II on RSNA, MAP, and CSAR in 2K1C rats. Mas receptor antagonist A-779 in the RVLM exhibited more powerful inhibitory effects on RSNA, MAP, and CSAR than the Ang II type 1 (AT1) receptor antagonist losartan. The expression of both the AT1 receptor and Mas receptor proteins in the RVLM increased, but neither the Ang II nor Ang-(1-7) levels in the RVLM changed significantly in the 2K1C rats compared with the sham rats. These results indicate that Ang-(1-7) in the RVLM enhances the CSAR and sympathetic output not only by itself but also through enhancing the effects of Ang II in renovascular hypertensive rats. Both endogenous Ang-(1-7) and Ang II in the RVLM contribute to the enhanced CSAR and sympathetic activation in renovascular hypertension.

  15. Protocol for Culturing Sympathetic Neurons from Rat Superior Cervical Ganglia (SCG)

    PubMed Central

    Zareen, Neela; Greene, Lloyd A.

    2009-01-01

    The superior cervical ganglia (SCG) in rats are small, glossy, almond-shaped structures that contain sympathetic neurons. These neurons provide sympathetic innervations for the head and neck regions and they constitute a well-characterized and relatively homogeneous population (4). Sympathetic neurons are dependent on nerve growth factor (NGF) for survival, differentiation and axonal growth and the wide-spread availability of NGF facilitates their culture and experimental manipulation (2, 3, 6). For these reasons, cultured sympathetic neurons have been used in a wide variety of studies including neuronal development and differentiation, mechanisms of programmed and pathological cell death, and signal transduction (1, 2, 5, and 6). Dissecting out the SCG from newborn rats and culturing sympathetic neurons is not very complicated and can be mastered fairly quickly. In this article, we will describe in detail how to dissect out the SCG from newborn rat pups and to use them to establish cultures of sympathetic neurons. The article will also describe the preparatory steps and the various reagents and equipment that are needed to achieve this. PMID:19229183

  16. GABA and enkephalin tonically alter sympathetic outflows in the rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Belinda R; Goodchild, Ann K

    2015-12-01

    GABA and enkephalin provide significant innervation of sympathetic preganglionic neurons. Despite some investigation as to the identity of premotor sources of these innervations no comprehensive analyses have been conducted. Similarly, although data describing the cardiovascular effects of blockade of GABAA receptors in the spinal cord is available, the effects at other sympathetic outflows are unknown. In contrast the sympathetic effects of opioid blockade in the spinal cord are unclear. The aims of this study were to identify potential sympathetic premotor sources of GABAergic and enkephalinergic input to the spinal cord and to describe the sympathetic and cardiovascular effects of spinal GABAA receptor and delta/mu opioid receptor blockade in urethane anaesthetised rats. Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD67) and preproenkephalin (PPE) mRNA were found in all regions containing sympathetic premotor neurons, with the medullary raphe and RVMM providing the major GABAergic projections, while the PVN, RVMM and medullary raphe provided the major enkephalinergic projections. Intrathecal injection of bicuculline, a GABAA antagonist, elicited large and prolonged increases in all outflows measured, confirming previous work describing a tonic GABAergic influence on vasomotor tone, and revealing a tonic GABAergic inhibition of interscapular brown adipose tissue temperature. Intrathecal naloxone elicited transient small inhibitory effects only on MAP and HR. Thus GABA acting in the spinal cord plays an important role in the tonic suppression of sympathetic outflows while enkephalin appears to play only a minor role.

  17. Decreased receptivity of pathway connective tissue to sympathetic nerve ingrowth in the developing rat.

    PubMed

    Hiebert, J M; Fan, Q; Smith, P G

    1997-05-20

    Sympathetic axons can form atypical pathways to denervated orbital targets in neonatal rats but not in rats aged 30 or more days. The objective of this study was to determine if connective tissue pathways that carry sympathetic nerves lose their ability to sustain axonal sprouting during the early postnatal period. Regions of periorbital sheath known to contain large numbers of sympathetic axons that travel to distal orbital targets were excised from rats (sympathectomized 3 days previously) on postnatal days 6-7, 14-15, 30-31, and 48-49 and placed in anterior chambers of adult host rats. Tissues were removed 3, 6, or 10 days post-transplant and sympathetic ingrowth was analyzed by catecholamine histofluorescence in whole-mount or cryosectioned specimens. Connective tissue transplants from 6-15-day-old donors showed significant fiber ingrowth by 3 days in oculo, and innervation was maximal by 6 days. In contrast, sprouting into 30-49-day-old tissue was significantly slower, with most transplants lacking fibers at 3 days, and with small numbers of short fibers present at 6 days. We conclude that maturational changes occur in periorbital connective tissue pathways in the early postnatal period which make them less receptive to ingrowth by sympathetic nerves. The findings that connective tissue pathways are better substrates for sympathetic sprouting in the neonatal rat supports the view that developmental changes in these tissues are likely to contribute to the impaired reinnervation of orbital targets by contralateral neurons in juvenile and adult rats. PMID:9174244

  18. Effects of Anesthetics on the Renal Sympathetic Response to Anaphylactic Hypotension in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mofei; Kuda, Yuhichi; Kurata, Yasutaka; Shibamoto, Toshishige

    2014-01-01

    The autonomic nervous system plays an important role in rat anaphylactic hypotension. It is well known that sympathetic nerve activity and cardiovascular function are affected by anesthetics. However, the effects of different types of anesthesia on the efferent renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) during anaphylactic hypotension remain unknown. Therefore, we determined the renal sympathetic responses to anaphylactic hypotension in anesthetized and conscious rats and the roles of baroreceptors in these responses. Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly allocated to anesthetic groups that were given pentobarbital, urethane, or ketamine-xylazine and to a conscious group. The rats were sensitized using subcutaneously injected ovalbumin. The systemic arterial pressure (SAP), RSNA and heart rate (HR) were measured. The effects of sinoaortic baroreceptor denervation on RSNA during anaphylaxis were determined in pentobarbital-anesthetized and conscious rats. In all of the sensitized rats, the RSNA increased and SAP decreased after antigen injection. At the early phase within 35 min of the antigen injection, the antigen-induced sympathoexcitation in the conscious rats was significantly greater than that in the anesthetized rats. Anaphylactic hypotension was attenuated in the conscious rats compared to the anesthetized rats. The anesthetic-induced suppression of SAP and RSNA was greater in the order ketamine-xylazine >urethane = pentobarbital. Indeed, in the rats treated with ketamine-xylazine, RSNA did not increase until 40 min, and SAP remained at low levels after the antigen injection. The baroreceptor reflex, as evaluated by increases in RSNA and HR in response to the decrease in SAP induced by sodium nitroprusside (SNP), was suppressed in the anesthetized rats compared with the conscious rats. Consistent with this finding, baroreceptor denervation attenuated the excitatory responses of RSNA to anaphylaxis in the conscious rats but not in the pentobarbital

  19. TRPA1 and Sympathetic Activation Contribute to Increased Risk of Triggered Cardiac Arrhythmias in Hypertensive Rats Exposed to Diesel Exhaust

    PubMed Central

    Haykal-Coates, Najwa; Winsett, Darrell W.; Krantz, Q. Todd; King, Charly; Costa, Daniel L.; Farraj, Aimen K.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Diesel exhaust (DE), which is emitted from on- and off-road sources, is a complex mixture of toxic gaseous and particulate components that leads to triggered adverse cardiovascular effects such as arrhythmias. Objective: We hypothesized that increased risk of triggered arrhythmias 1 day after DE exposure is mediated by airway sensory nerves bearing transient receptor potential (TRP) channels [e.g., transient receptor potential cation channel, member A1 (TRPA1)] that, when activated by noxious chemicals, can cause a centrally mediated autonomic imbalance and heightened risk of arrhythmia. Methods: Spontaneously hypertensive rats implanted with radiotelemeters were whole-body exposed to either 500 μg/m3 (high) or 150 μg/m3 (low) whole DE (wDE) or filtered DE (fDE), or to filtered air (controls), for 4 hr. Arrhythmogenesis was assessed 24 hr later by continuous intravenous infusion of aconitine, an arrhythmogenic drug, while heart rate (HR) and electrocardiogram (ECG) were monitored. Results: Rats exposed to wDE or fDE had slightly higher HRs and increased low-frequency:high-frequency ratios (sympathetic modulation) than did controls; ECG showed prolonged ventricular depolarization and shortened repolarization periods. Rats exposed to wDE developed arrhythmia at lower doses of aconitine than did controls; the dose was even lower in rats exposed to fDE. Pretreatment of low wDE–exposed rats with a TRPA1 antagonist or sympathetic blockade prevented the heightened sensitivity to arrhythmia. Conclusions: These findings suggest that a single exposure to DE increases the sensitivity of the heart to triggered arrhythmias. The gaseous components appear to play an important role in the proarrhythmic response, which may be mediated by activation of TRPA1, and subsequent sympathetic modulation. As such, toxic inhalants may partly exhibit their toxicity by lowering the threshold for secondary triggers, complicating assessment of their risk. PMID:21377951

  20. Inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3β prevents sympathetic hyperinnervation in infarcted rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tsung-Ming; Lin, Shinn-Zong

    2015-01-01

    We have demonstrated that nerve growth factor (NGF) expression in the myocardium is selectively increased during chronic stage of myocardial infarction, resulting in sympathetic hyperinnervation. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) signal has been shown to play key roles in the regulation of cytoskeletal assembly during axon regeneration. We assessed whether lithium, a GSK-3 inhibitor, attenuates cardiac sympathetic reinnervation after myocardial infarction through attenuated NGF expression and Tau expression. Twenty-four hours after ligation of the anterior descending artery, male Wistar rats were randomized to either LiCl or SB216763, chemically unrelated inhibitors of GSK-3β, a combination of LiCl and SB216763, or vehicle for four weeks. Myocardial norepinephrine levels revealed a significant elevation in vehicle-treated rats compared with sham-operated rats, consistent with excessive sympathetic reinnervation after infarction. Immunohistochemical analysis for sympathetic nerve also confirmed the change of myocardial norepinephrine. This was paralleled by a significant upregulation of NGF protein and mRNA in the vehicle-treated rats, which was reduced after administering either LiCl, SB216763, or combination. Arrhythmic scores during programmed stimulation in the vehicle-treated rats were significantly higher than those treated with GSK-3 inhibitors. Addition of SB216763 did not have additional beneficial effects compared with those seen in rats treated with LiCl alone. Furthermore, lithium treatment increased Tau1 and decreased AT8 and AT180 levels. Chronic use of lithium after infarction, resulting in attenuated sympathetic reinnervation by GSK-3 inhibition, may modify the arrhythmogenic response to programmed electrical stimulation. PMID:25576342

  1. Neurophysiological assessment of sympathetic cardiovascular activity after loss of postganglionic neurons in the anesthetized rat.

    PubMed

    Zahner, Matthew R; Liu, Chang-Ning; Okerberg, Carlin V; Opsahl, Alan C; Bobrowski, Walter F; Somps, Chris J

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the degree of sympathetic postganglionic neuronal loss required to impair cardiovascular-related sympathetic activity. To produce neuronal loss separate groups of rats were treated daily with guanethidine for either 5days or 11days, followed by a recovery period. Sympathetic activity was measured by renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). Stereology of thoracic (T13) ganglia was performed to determine neuronal loss. Despite loss of more than two thirds of neurons in T13 ganglia in both treated groups no effect on resting blood pressure (BP) or heart rate (HR) was detected. Basal RSNA in rats treated for 5days (0.61±0.10μV∗s) and 11days (0.37±0.08μV∗s) was significantly less than vehicle-treated rats (0.99±0.13μV∗s, p<0.05). Increases in RSNA by baroreceptor unloading were significantly lower in 5-day (1.09±0.19μV∗s) and 11-day treated rats (0.59±0.11μV∗s) compared with vehicle-treated rats (1.82±0.19μV∗s, p<0.05). Increases in RSNA to chemoreceptor stimulation were significantly lower in 5-day treated rats (1.54±0.25μV∗s) compared with vehicle-treated rats (2.69±0.23μV∗s, p<0.05). Increases in RSNA in 11-day treated rats were significantly lower (0.75±0.15μV∗s, p<0.05) compared with both vehicle-treated and 5-day treated rats. A positive correlation of neurons to sympathetic responsiveness but not basal activity was detected. These data suggest that diminished capacity for reflex sympathetic responsiveness rather than basal activity alone must be assessed for complete detection of neurophysiological cardiovascular impairment. PMID:27085835

  2. Attenuated baroreflex control of sympathetic nerve activity after cardiovascular deconditioning in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moffitt, J. A.; Foley, C. M.; Schadt, J. C.; Laughlin, M. H.; Hasser, E. M.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of cardiovascular deconditioning on baroreflex control of the sympathetic nervous system was evaluated after 14 days of hindlimb unloading (HU) or the control condition. Rats were chronically instrumented with catheters and sympathetic nerve recording electrodes for measurement of mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) and recording of lumbar (LSNA) or renal (RSNA) sympathetic nerve activity. Experiments were conducted 24 h after surgery, with the animals in a normal posture. Baroreflex function was assessed using a logistic function that related HR and LSNA or RSNA to MAP during infusion of phenylephrine and nitroprusside. Baroreflex influence on HR was not affected by HU. Maximum baroreflex-elicited LSNA was significantly reduced in HU rats (204 +/- 11.9 vs. 342 +/- 30.6% baseline LSNA), as was maximum reflex gain (-4.0 +/- 0.6 vs. -7.8 +/- 1.3 %LSNA/mmHg). Maximum baroreflex-elicited RSNA (259 +/- 10.8 vs. 453 +/- 28.0% baseline RSNA), minimum baroreflex-elicited RSNA (-2 +/- 2.8 vs. 13 +/- 4.5% baseline RSNA), and maximum gain (-5.8 +/- 0.5 vs. -13.6 +/- 3.1 %RSNA/mmHg) were significantly decreased in HU rats. Results demonstrate that baroreflex modulation of sympathetic nervous system activity is attenuated after cardiovascular deconditioning in rodents. Data suggest that alterations in the arterial baroreflex may contribute to orthostatic intolerance after a period of bedrest or spaceflight in humans.

  3. Brain renin-angiotensin system and sympathetic hyperactivity in rats after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W; Huang, B S; Leenen, F H

    1999-05-01

    Blockade of brain "ouabain" prevents the sympathetic hyperactivity and impairment of baroreflex function in rats with congestive heart failure (CHF). Because brain "ouabain" may act by activating the brain renin-angiotensin system (RAS), the aim of the present study was to assess whether chronic treatment with the AT1-receptor blocker losartan given centrally normalizes the sympathetic hyperactivity and impairment of baroreflex function in Wistar rats with CHF postmyocardial infarction (MI). After left coronary artery ligation (2 or 6 wk), rats received either intracerebroventricular losartan (1 mg. kg-1. day-1, CHF-Los) or vehicle (CHF-Veh) by osmotic minipumps. To assess possible peripheral effects of intracerebroventricular losartan, one set of CHF rats received the same rate of losartan subcutaneously. Sham-operated rats served as control. After 2 wk of treatment, mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) at rest and in response to air-jet stress and intracerebroventricular injection of the alpha2-adrenoceptor-agonist guanabenz were measured in conscious animals. Arterial baroreflex function was evaluated by ramp changes in MAP. Compared with sham groups, CHF-Veh groups showed impaired arterial baroreflex control of HR and RSNA, increased sympathoexcitatory and pressor responses to air-jet stress, and increased sympathoinhibitory and hypotensive responses to guanabenz. The latter is consistent with decreased activity in sympathoinhibitory pathways. Chronic intracerebroventricular infusion of losartan largely normalized these abnormalities. In CHF rats, the same rate of infusion of losartan subcutaneously was ineffective. In sham-operated rats, losartan intracerebroventricularly or subcutaneously did not affect sympathetic activity. We conclude that the chronic increase in sympathoexcitation, decrease in sympathoinhibition, and desensitized baroreflex function in CHF all appear to depend on the brain RAS, since

  4. Sympathetic neural control of indoleamine metabolism in the rat pineal gland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, H. J.; Hsuan, M.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for the acceleration in rat pineal biosynthetic activity in response to prolonged exposure to darkness or to immobilization were investigated in animals whose pineals were surgically denervated. Some animals were adrenalectomized to remove one potential source of circulating catecholamines, and some were subjected to a partial chemical sympathectomy accomplished by a series of intravenous injections of 6-hydroxydopamine. Results suggest that N-acetyltransferase (NAT) activity can be enhanced either by release of norepinephrine from sympathetic terminals within the pineal or from sympathetic nerve terminals elsewhere. The stress of immobilization stimulates the pineal by increasing circulating catecholamines. Photic control of pineal function requires intact pineal sympathetic innervation, since the onset of darkness apparently does not cause a sufficient rise in circulating catecholamines to stimulate the pineal. The present studies suggest that nonspecific stress triggers increased biosynthesis and secretion of melatonin; it is possible that this hormone may participate in mechanisms of adaptation.

  5. Sympathetic axonopathies and hyperinnervation in the small intestine smooth muscle of aged Fischer 344 rats

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Robert J.; Hudson, Cherie N.; Powley, Terry L.

    2013-01-01

    It is well documented that the intrinsic enteric nervous system of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract sustains neuronal losses and reorganizes as it ages. In contrast, age-related remodeling of the extrinsic sympathetic projections to the wall of the gut is poorly characterized. The present experiment, therefore, surveyed the sympathetic projections to the aged small intestine for axonopathies. Furthermore, the experiment evaluated the specific prediction that catecholaminergic inputs undergo hyperplastic changes. Jejunal tissue was collected from 3-, 8-, 16-, and 24-month-old male Fischer 344 rats, prepared as whole mounts consisting of the muscularis, and processed immunohistochemically for tyrosine hydroxylase, the enzymatic marker for norepinephrine, and either the protein CD163 or the protein MHCII, both phenotypical markers for macrophages. Four distinctive sympathetic axonopathy profiles occurred in the small intestine of the aged rat: (1) swollen and dystrophic terminals, (2) tangled axons, (3) discrete hyperinnervated loci in the smooth muscle wall, including at the bases of Peyer's patches, and (4) ectopic hyperplastic or hyperinnervating axons in the serosa/subserosal layers. In many cases, the axonopathies occurred at localized and limited foci, involving only a few axon terminals, in a pattern consistent with incidences of focal ischemic, vascular, or traumatic insult. The present observations underscore the complexity of the processes of aging on the neural circuitry of the gut, with age-related GI functional impairments likely reflecting a constellation of adjustments that range from selective neuronal losses, through accumulation of cellular debris, to hyperplasias and hyperinnervation of sympathetic inputs. PMID:24104187

  6. Immunohistochemical localization of GAP-43 in rat and human sympathetic nervous system--effects of aging and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, R E; Spencer, S A; Coleman, B D; Roth, K A

    1991-06-28

    The neuronal 43 kDa growth associated peptide (GAP-43) is expressed in conditions of embryonic growth, axonal regeneration, and, to a limited degree, within the central nervous system as an indicator of synaptic plasticity. Although much is known about the expression of GAP-43 in cultured sympathetic neurons, information concerning the existence, immunolocalization and response of GAP-43 to experimental injury is not available for intact sympathetic ganglia in vivo. In this study we have characterized the in situ distribution and identity of GAP-43 in adult rat and human prevertebral and paravertebral sympathetic ganglia using immunohistochemical and biochemical methods. Antisera to GAP-43 intensely labeled intraganglionic presynaptic axons and synapses terminating on neurons of normal adult rat and human sympathetic ganglia in situ. There was minimal GAP-43 immunoreactivity of principal sympathetic neuron perikarya, proximal dendrites and initial axonal segments. The immunohistologic appearance of GAP-43 was unchanged in the ganglia of aged and diabetic rats and elderly humans, conditions in which presynaptic terminal axons and synapses show evidence of chronic degeneration, regeneration and neuroaxonal dystrophy, an unusual ultrastructural alteration which may represent disordered synaptic plasticity. Radioimmunoassay of ganglionic GAP-43 is comparable in young adult, aged and diabetic rat prevertebral or paravertebral sympathetic ganglia. Double immunolocalization of NPY (which labeled markedly swollen dystrophic axons) and GAP-43 in human sympathetic ganglia using a sequential immunogold-silver/fluorescence technique demonstrated that typical dystrophic axons contain little GAP-43.

  7. Long-term facilitation of expiratory and sympathetic activities following acute intermittent hypoxia in rats

    PubMed Central

    Lemes, Eduardo V.; Aiko, Simone; Orbem, Caroline B.; Formentin, Cleiton; Bassi, Mirian; Colombari, Eduardo; Zoccal, Daniel B.

    2015-01-01

    Aim Acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH) promotes persistent increases in ventilation and sympathetic activity, referred as long-term facilitation (LTF). Augmented inspiratory activity is suggested as a major component of respiratory LTF. In the present study, we hypothesized that AIH also elicits a sustained increase in expiratory motor activity. We also investigated whether the expiratory LTF contributes to the development of sympathetic LTF after AIH. Methods Rats were exposed to AIH (10 × 6–7 % O2 for 45 s, every 5 min) and the cardiorespiratory parameters were evaluated during 60 min using in vivo and in situ approaches. Results In unanesthetized conditions (n=9), AIH elicited a modest but sustained increase in baseline mean arterial pressure (MAP, 104±2 vs 111±3 mmHg, P<0.05) associated with enhanced sympathetic and respiratory-related variabilities. In the in situ preparations (n=9), AIH evoked LTF in phrenic (33±12%), thoracic sympathetic (75±25%) and abdominal nerve activities (69±14%). The sympathetic overactivity after AIH was phase-locked with the emergence of bursts in abdominal activity during the late-expiratory phase. In anesthetized vagus-intact animals, AIH increased baseline MAP (113±3 vs 122±2 mmHg, P<0.05) and abdominal muscle activity (535±94%), which were eliminated after pharmacological inhibition of the retrotrapezoid nucleus/parafacial respiratory group (RTN/pFRG). Conclusion These findings indicate that increased expiratory activity is also an important component of AIH-elicited respiratory LTF. Moreover, the development of sympathetic LTF after AIH is linked to the emergence of active expiratory pattern and depends on the integrity of the neurones of the RTN/pFRG. PMID:26910756

  8. Leptin differentially increases sympathetic nerve activity and its baroreflex regulation in female rats: role of oestrogen.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhigang; Brooks, Virginia L

    2015-04-01

    Obesity and hypertension are commonly associated, and activation of the sympathetic nervous system is considered to be a major contributor, at least in part due to the central actions of leptin. However, while leptin increases sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in males, whether leptin is equally effective in females is unknown. Here, we show that intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) leptin increases lumbar (LSNA) and renal (RSNA) SNA and baroreflex control of LSNA and RSNA in α-chloralose anaesthetized female rats, but only during pro-oestrus. In contrast, i.c.v. leptin increased basal and baroreflex control of splanchnic SNA (SSNA) and heart rate (HR) in rats in both the pro-oestrus and dioestrus states. The effects of leptin on basal LSNA, RSNA, SSNA and HR were similar in males and pro-oestrus females; however, i.c.v. leptin increased mean arterial pressure (MAP) only in males. Leptin did not alter LSNA or HR in ovariectomized rats, but its effects were normalized with 4 days of oestrogen treatment. Bilateral nanoinjection of SHU9119 into the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), to block α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) type 3 and 4 receptors, decreased LSNA in leptin-treated pro-oestrus but not dioestrus rats. Unlike leptin, i.c.v. insulin infusion increased basal and baroreflex control of LSNA and HR similarly in pro-oestrus and dioestrus rats; these responses did not differ from those in male rats. We conclude that, in female rats, leptin's stimulatory effects on SNA are differentially enhanced by oestrogen, at least in part via an increase in α-MSH activity in the PVN. These data further suggest that the actions of leptin and insulin to increase the activity of various sympathetic nerves occur via different neuronal pathways or cellular mechanisms. These results may explain the poor correlation in females of SNA with adiposity, or of MAP with leptin. PMID:25398524

  9. Upregulation of orexin receptor in paraventricular nucleus promotes sympathetic outflow in obese Zucker rats.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jing-Jing; Yuan, Fang; Zhang, Yi; Li, De-Pei

    2015-12-01

    Sympathetic vasomotor tone is elevated in obesity-related hypertension. Orexin importantly regulates energy metabolism and autonomic function. We hypothesized that alteration of orexin receptor in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus leads to elevated sympathetic vasomotor tone in obesity. We used in vivo measurement of sympathetic vasomotor tone and microinjection into brain nucleus, whole-cell patch clamp recording in brain slices, and immunocytochemical staining in obese Zucker rats (OZRs) and lean Zucker rats (LZRs). Microinjection of orexin 1 receptor (OX1R) antagonist SB334867 into the PVN reduced basal arterial blood pressure (ABP) and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) in anesthetized OZRs but not in LZRs. Microinjection of orexin A into the PVN produced greater increases in ABP and RSNA in OZRs than in LZRs. Western blot analysis revealed that OX1R expression levels in the PVN were significantly increased in OZRs compared with LZRs. OX1R immunoreactivity was positive in retrogradely labeled PVN-spinal neurons. The basal firing rate of labeled PVN-spinal neurons was higher in OZRs than in LZRs. SB334867 decreased the basal firing activity of PVN-spinal neurons in OZRs but had no effect in LZRs. Orexin A induced a greater increase in the firing rate of PVN-spinal neurons in OZRs than in LZRs. In addition, orexin A induced larger currents in PVN-spinal neurons in OZRs than in LZRs. These data suggest that upregulation of OX1R in the PVN promotes hyperactivity of PVN presympathetic neurons and elevated sympathetic outflow in obesity.

  10. Excitatory sympathetic reflex in NaCl-sensitive spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Y; Calhoun, D A; Chen, Y F; Wyss, J M; Oparil, S

    1993-09-01

    We have previously demonstrated blunted reflex responses of lumbar sympathetic nerve activity during volume expansion in NaCl-sensitive spontaneously hypertensive rats maintained on basal (1% NaCl) diets compared with NaCl-resistant spontaneously hypertensive rats, Wistar-Kyoto rats, and Sprague-Dawley rats. The current study tested the hypothesis that chronic ingestion of a high (8%) NaCl diet further blunts cardiopulmonary reflex function in the NaCl-sensitive spontaneously hypertensive rat. After 3 weeks of a 1% or 8% NaCl diet, male rats of all four strains were instrumented with femoral arterial and venous cannulas and lumbar nerve recording electrodes at 10 weeks of age. Two days later, conscious rats were infused with whole blood to expand blood volume. NaCl-sensitive spontaneously hypertensive rats maintained on a 1% NaCl diet had blunted responses of nerve activity to acute volume expansion compared with control strains. NaCl-sensitive spontaneously hypertensive rats maintained on an 8% NaCl diet had increases in nerve activity responses to volume expansion. In a second experiment, the volume expansion protocol was repeated in anesthetized NaCl-sensitive spontaneously hypertensive rats that had been subjected to sinoaortic denervation after 3 weeks of a 1% or 8% NaCl diet. After sinoaortic denervation, an increase in nerve activity was again observed during volume expansion in animals fed the 8% NaCl diet. In animals fed the 1% NaCl diet, changes in nerve activity were variable. The excitatory response was significantly reduced after bilateral vagotomy. These studies suggest that blood pressure regulation in NaCl-sensitive spontaneously hypertensive rats is a complex interaction of excitatory and inhibitory sympathetic reflex systems that is altered by high dietary NaCl exposure.

  11. Continuous thoracic epidural anesthesia induces segmental sympathetic block in the awake rat.

    PubMed

    Freise, Hendrik; Anthonsen, Sören; Fischer, Lars G; Van Aken, Hugo K; Sielenkämper, Andreas W

    2005-01-01

    Thoracic epidural anesthesia (TEA) is used increasingly in critical care, especially for cardiac and intestinal sympathetic block. In this study we evaluated cardiorespiratory function and sympathetic activity in a new model of continuous TEA in awake rats. Thirteen rats received epidural saline control (CON) or bupivacaine 0.5% epidural infusion (EPI) at 15 microl/h for 2 h on day 1 and day 3. Mean arterial blood pressure, heart rate, respiration rate, arterial PCO2, and motor score were recorded at baseline and after 30, 60, 90, and 120 min. Skin temperature was measured at front paws, high-thoracic, mid-thoracic, and low-thoracic, hind paws, and the proximal and distal tail. Changes in sympathetic activity were assessed by skin temperature changes from baseline (DeltaT). In the EPI group, hemodynamics and respiration remained unchanged and only mild motor deficits occurred. DeltaT in thoracic segments was higher in the EPI than in the CON group (P <0.001 at all times at high-thoracic, mid-thoracic, and low-thoracic segments). Skin temperature decreased in the distal tail in the EPI group, e.g., after 90 min DeltaT=-0.86 +/- 0.25 degrees C (EPI) versus 0.4 +/- 0.12 degrees C (CON) (P <0.05 at 60, 90, and 120 min). DeltaT on day 3 was comparable to day 1. TEA induced stable segmental sympathetic block without cardiorespiratory and motor side effects in awake rats. This new technique may be applied in prolonged models of critical illness. PMID:15616087

  12. Cardiac Sympathetic Afferent Denervation Attenuates Cardiac Remodeling and Improves Cardiovascular Dysfunction in Rats with Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Han-Jun; Wang, Wei; Cornish, Kurtis G.; Rozanski, George J.; Zucker, Irving H.

    2014-01-01

    The enhanced cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex (CSAR) contributes to the exaggerated sympatho-excitation in chronic heart failure (CHF). Increased sympatho-excitation is positively related to mortality in CHF patients. However, the potential beneficial effects of chronic CSAR deletion on cardiac and autonomic function in CHF have not been previously explored. Here we determined the effects of chronic CSAR deletion on cardiac remodeling and autonomic dysfunction in CHF. In order to selectively delete the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 receptor (TRPV1) -expressing CSAR afferents, epicardial application of resiniferatoxin (RTX, 50 μg/ml), an ultrapotent analogue of capsaicin, was performed during myocardium infarction (MI) surgery in rats. This procedure largely abolished the enhanced CSAR, prevented the exaggerated renal and cardiac sympathetic nerve activity and improved baroreflex sensitivity in CHF rats. Most importantly, we found that epicardial application of RTX largely prevented the elevated LVEDP, lung edema and cardiac hypertrophy, partially reduced left ventricular dimensions in the failing heart and increased cardiac contractile reserve in response to β-adrenergic receptor stimulation with isoproterenol in CHF rats. Molecular evidence showed that RTX attenuated cardiac fibrosis and apoptosis and reduced expression of fibrotic markers and TGF β-receptor I in CHF rats. Pressure - volume loop analysis showed that RTX reduced the end diastolic pressure volume relations in CHF rats indicating improved cardiac compliance. In summary, cardiac sympathetic afferent deletion exhibits protective effects against deleterious cardiac remodeling and autonomic dysfunction in CHF. These data suggest a potential new paradigm and therapeutic potential in the management of CHF. PMID:24980663

  13. Modification of sympathetic neuronal function in the rat tail artery by dietary lipid treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Panek, R.L.; Dixon, W.R.; Rutledge, C.O.

    1985-06-01

    The effect of dietary lipid treatment on sympathetic neuronal function was examined in isolated perfused tail arteries of adult rats. The hypothesis that dietary manipulations alter the lipid environment of receptor proteins which may result in the perturbation of specific membrane-associated processes that regulate peripheral adrenergic neurotransmission in the vasculature was the basis for this investigation. In the present study, rats were fed semisynthetic diets enriched in either 16% coconut oil (saturated fat) or 16% sunflower oil (unsaturated fat). The field stimulation-evoked release of endogenous norepinephrine and total /sup 3/H was decreased significantly in rats receiving the coconut oil diet when compared to either sunflower oil- or standard lab chow-fed rats. Norepinephrine content in artery segments from coconut oil-treated rats was significantly higher compared to either sunflower oil- or standard lab chow-fed rats. Tail arteries from rats receiving the coconut oil diet displayed significantly lower perfusion pressure responses to nerve stimulation at all frequencies tested when compared to the sunflower oil- or standard lab chow-fed rats. Vasoconstrictor responses of perfused tail arteries exposed to exogenous norepinephrine resulted in an EC50 for norepinephrine that was not changed by the dietary treatment, but adult rats receiving the sunflower oil diet displayed a significantly greater maximum response to exogenous norepinephrine (10(-5) M) compared to arteries from either coconut oil- or standard lab chow-fed rats.

  14. Reactive oxygen species are involved in BMP-induced dendritic growth in cultured rat sympathetic neurons.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Vidya; Lea, Charlotte; Sosa, Jose Carlo; Higgins, Dennis; Lein, Pamela J

    2015-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) promote dendritic growth in sympathetic neurons; however, the downstream signaling molecules that mediate the dendrite promoting activity of BMPs are not well characterized. Here we test the hypothesis that reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated signaling links BMP receptor activation to dendritic growth. In cultured rat sympathetic neurons, exposure to any of the three mechanistically distinct antioxidants, diphenylene iodinium (DPI), nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NGA) or desferroxamine (DFO), blocked de novo BMP-induced dendritic growth. Addition of DPI to cultures previously induced with BMP to extend dendrites caused dendritic retraction while DFO and NGA prevented further growth of dendrites. The inhibition of the dendrite promoting activity of BMPs by antioxidants was concentration-dependent and occurred without altering axonal growth or neuronal cell survival. Antioxidant treatment did not block BMP activation of SMAD 1,5 as determined by nuclear localization of these SMADs. While BMP treatment did not cause a detectable increase in intracellular ROS in cultured sympathetic neurons as assessed using fluorescent indicator dyes, BMP treatment increased the oxygen consumption rate in cultured sympathetic neurons as determined using the Seahorse XF24 Analyzer, suggesting increased mitochondrial activity. In addition, BMPs upregulated expression of NADPH oxidase 2 (NOX2) and either pharmacological inhibition or siRNA knockdown of NOX2 significantly decreased BMP-7 induced dendritic growth. Collectively, these data support the hypothesis that ROS are involved in the downstream signaling events that mediate BMP7-induced dendritic growth in sympathetic neurons, and suggest that ROS-mediated signaling positively modulates dendritic complexity in peripheral neurons.

  15. Reactive Oxygen Species are involved in BMP-Induced Dendritic Growth in Cultured Rat Sympathetic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekaran, Vidya; Lea, Charlotte; Sosa, Jose Carlo; Higgins, Dennis; Lein, Pamela J.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) promote dendritic growth in sympathetic neurons; however, the downstream signaling molecules that mediate the dendrite promoting activity of BMPs are not well characterized. Here we test the hypothesis that reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated signaling links BMP receptor activation to dendritic growth. In cultured rat sympathetic neurons, exposure to any of three mechanistically distinct antioxidants, diphenylene iodinium (DPI), nordihydroguiaretic acid (NGA) or desferroxamine (DFO), blocked de novo BMP-induced dendritic growth. Addition of DPI to cultures previously induced with BMP to extend dendrites caused dendritic retraction while DFO and NGA prevented further growth of dendrites. The inhibition of the dendrite promoting activity of BMPs by antioxidants was concentration-dependent and occurred without altering axonal growth or neuronal cell survival. Antioxidant treatment did not block BMP activation of SMAD 1,5 as determined by nuclear localization of these SMADs. While BMP treatment did not cause a detectable increase in intracellular ROS in cultured sympathetic neurons as assessed using fluorescent indicator dyes, BMP treatment increased the oxygen consumption rate in cultured sympathetic neurons as determined using the Seahorse XF24 Analyzer, suggesting increased mitochondrial activity. In addition, BMPs upregulated expression of NADPH oxidase 2 (NOX2) and either pharmacological inhibition or siRNA knockdown of NOX2 significantly decreased BMP-7 induced dendritic growth. Collectively, these data support the hypothesis that ROS are involved in the downstream signaling events that mediate BMP7-induced dendritic growth in sympathetic neurons, and suggest that ROS-mediated signaling positively modulates dendritic complexity in peripheral neurons. PMID:26079955

  16. Histamine excites neonatal rat sympathetic preganglionic neurons in vitro via activation of H1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Whyment, Andrew D; Blanks, Andrew M; Lee, Kevin; Renaud, Leo P; Spanswick, David

    2006-04-01

    The role of histamine in regulating excitability of sympathetic preganglionic neurons (SPNs) and the expression of histamine receptor mRNA in SPNs was investigated using whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiological recording techniques combined with single-cell reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in transverse neonatal rat spinal cord slices. Bath application of histamine (100 microM) or the H1 receptor agonist histamine trifluoromethyl toluidide dimaleate (HTMT; 10 microM) induced membrane depolarization associated with a decrease in membrane conductance in the majority (70%) of SPNs tested, via activation of postsynaptic H1 receptors negatively coupled to one or more unidentified K+ conductances. Histamine and HTMT application also induced or increased the amplitude and/or frequency of membrane potential oscillations in electrotonically coupled SPNs. The H2 receptor agonist dimaprit (10 microM) or the H3 receptor agonist imetit (100 nM) were without significant effect on the membrane properties of SPNs. Histamine responses were sensitive to the H1 receptor antagonist triprolidine (10 microM) and the nonselective potassium channel blocker barium (1 mM) but were unaffected by the H2 receptor antagonist tiotidine (10 microM) and the H3 receptor antagonist, clobenpropit (5 microM). Single cell RT-PCR revealed mRNA expression for H1 receptors in 75% of SPNs tested, with no expression of mRNA for H2, H3, or H4 receptors. These data represent the first demonstration of H1 receptor expression in SPNs and suggest that histamine acts to regulate excitability of these neurons via a direct postsynaptic effect on H1 receptors.

  17. Effect of global and regional sympathetic blockade on arterial pressure during water deprivation in conscious rats

    PubMed Central

    Veitenheimer, Britta J.; Engeland, William C.; Guzman, Pilar A.; Fink, Gregory D.

    2012-01-01

    Forty-eight hours of water deprivation (WD) in conscious rats results in a paradoxical increase in mean arterial pressure (MAP). Previous studies suggest this may be due to increased sympathetic nerve activity (SNA). However, this remains to be investigated in conscious, freely behaving animals. The purpose of this study was to determine, in conscious rats, the role of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) in mediating WD-induced increases in MAP and to identify which vascular beds are targeted by increased SNA. Each rat was chronically instrumented with a radiotelemetry transmitter to measure MAP and heart rate (HR) and an indwelling venous catheter for plasma sampling and/or drug delivery. MAP and HR were continuously measured during a 2-day baseline period followed by 48 h of WD and then a recovery period. By the end of the WD period, MAP increased by ∼15 mmHg in control groups, whereas HR did not change significantly. Chronic blockade of α1/β1-adrenergic receptors significantly attenuated the WD-induced increase in MAP, suggesting a role for global activation of the SNS. However, the MAP response to WD was unaffected by selective denervations of the hindlimb, renal, or splanchnic vascular beds, or by adrenal demedullation. In contrast, complete adrenalectomy (with corticosterone and aldosterone replaced) significantly attenuated the MAP response to WD in the same time frame as α1/β1-adrenergic receptor blockade. These results suggest that, in conscious water-deprived rats, the SNS contributes to the MAP response and may be linked to release of adrenocortical hormones. Finally, this sympathetically mediated response is not dependent on increased SNA to one specific vascular bed. PMID:22904160

  18. Locus coeruleus lesions and PCOS: role of the central and peripheral sympathetic nervous system in the ovarian function of rat

    PubMed Central

    Zafari Zangeneh, Farideh; Abdollahi, Alireza; Aminee, Fatemeh; Naghizadeh, Mohammad Mahdi

    2012-01-01

    Background: “Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a complex endocrine and metabolic disorder associated with ovulatory dysfunction”. “Autonomic and central nervous systems play important roles in the regulation of ovarian physiology”. The noradrenergic nucleus locus coeruleus (LC) plays a central role in the regulation of the sympathetic nervous system and synaptically connected to the preganglionic cell bodies of the ovarian sympathetic pathway and its activation is essential to trigger spontaneous or induced LH surges. This study evaluates sympathetic outflow in central and peripheral pathways in PCO rats. Objective: Our objectives in this study were (1) to estimate LC activity in rats with estradiol valerate (EV)-induced PCO; (2) to antagonized alpha2a adrenoceptor in systemic conditions with yohimbine. Materials and Methods: Forty two rats were divided into two groups: 1) LC and yohimbine and 2) control. Every group subdivided in two groups: eighteen rats were treated with estradiol valerate for induction of follicular cysts and the remainders were sesame oil groups. Results: Estradiol concentration was significantly augmented by the LC lesion in PCO rats (p<0.001), while LC lesion could not alter serum concentrations of LH and FSH, like yohimbine. The morphological observations of ovaries of LC lesion rats showed follicles with hyperthecosis, but yohimbine reduced the number of cysts, increased corpus lutea and developed follicles. Conclusion: Rats with EV-induced PCO increased sympathetic activity. LC lesion and yohimbine decreased the number of cysts and yohimbine increased corpus lutea and developed follicles in PCO rats. PMID:25242983

  19. 5-HT1A receptors of the nucleus tractus solitarii facilitate sympathetic recovery following hypotensive hemorrhage in rats

    PubMed Central

    Vantrease, Jaime E.; Dudek, Nichole; DonCarlos, Lydia L.

    2015-01-01

    The role of serotonin in the hemodynamic response to blood loss remains controversial. Caudal raphe serotonin neurons are activated during hypotensive hemorrhage, and their destruction attenuates sympathetic increases following blood loss in unanesthetized rats. Caudal raphe neurons provide serotonin-positive projections to the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS), and disruption of serotonin-positive nerve terminals in the NTS attenuates sympathetic recovery following hemorrhage. Administration of 5-HT1A-receptor agonists following hemorrhage augments sympathetic-mediated increases in venous tone and tissue hypoxia. These findings led us to hypothesize that severe blood loss promotes activation of 5-HT1A receptors in the NTS, which facilitates sympathetic recovery and peripheral tissue perfusion. Here, we developed an adeno-associated viral vector encoding an efficacious small hairpin RNA sequence targeting the rat 5-HT1A receptor. Unanesthetized rats subjected to NTS injection of the anti-rat 5-HT1A small hairpin RNA-encoding vector 4 wk prior showed normal blood pressure recovery, but an attenuated recovery of renal sympathetic nerve activity (−6.4 ± 12.9 vs. 42.6 ± 15.6% baseline, P < 0.05) 50 min after 21% estimated blood volume withdrawal. The same rats developed increased tissue hypoxia after hemorrhage, as indicated by prolonged elevations in lactate (2.77 ± 0.5 vs. 1.34 ± 0.2 mmol/l, 60 min after start of hemorrhage, P < 0.05). 5-HT1A mRNA levels in the commissural NTS were directly correlated with renal sympathetic nerve activity (P < 0.01) and inversely correlated with lactate (P < 0.05) 60 min after start of hemorrhage. The data suggest that 5-HT1A receptors in the commissural NTS facilitate tissue perfusion after blood loss likely by increasing sympathetic-mediated venous return. PMID:25980022

  20. Leptin differentially increases sympathetic nerve activity and its baroreflex regulation in female rats: role of oestrogen

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Zhigang; Brooks, Virginia L

    2015-01-01

    Key points Leptin increases sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in males, which contributes to obesity-induced hypertension; however, whether leptin is equally effective in females is unknown. We report that leptin does increase SNA and heart rate in female rats; however, for lumbar and renal SNA, this action is only evident in pro-oestrus and in oestrogen-treated ovariectomized rats, but not in ovariectomized or dioestrus rats. Leptin increases SNA and heart rate similarly in male and pro-oestrus female rats; however, leptin increases arterial pressure only in males. Blockade of MC3/4 receptors in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) with SHU9119 decreases SNA in leptin-treated pro-oestrus rats, suggesting that leptin increases SNA in part by increasing α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone drive of PVN presympathetic neurons. Our data establish sex differences in leptin's effects to increase SNA and arterial pressure, which emphasizes the need for enhanced recognition and investigation of sex differences in obesity-induced sympathoexcitation and hypertension. Abstract Obesity and hypertension are commonly associated, and activation of the sympathetic nervous system is considered to be a major contributor, at least in part due to the central actions of leptin. However, while leptin increases sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in males, whether leptin is equally effective in females is unknown. Here, we show that intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) leptin increases lumbar (LSNA) and renal (RSNA) SNA and baroreflex control of LSNA and RSNA in α-chloralose anaesthetized female rats, but only during pro-oestrus. In contrast, i.c.v. leptin increased basal and baroreflex control of splanchnic SNA (SSNA) and heart rate (HR) in rats in both the pro-oestrus and dioestrus states. The effects of leptin on basal LSNA, RSNA, SSNA and HR were similar in males and pro-oestrus females; however, i.c.v. leptin increased mean arterial pressure (MAP) only in males. Leptin did not alter LSNA or HR

  1. Direct conscious telemetry recordings demonstrate increased renal sympathetic nerve activity in rats with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Salman, Ibrahim M.; Sarma Kandukuri, Divya; Harrison, Joanne L.; Hildreth, Cara M.; Phillips, Jacqueline K.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with sympathetic hyperactivity and impaired blood pressure control reflex responses, yet direct evidence demonstrating these features of autonomic dysfunction in conscious animals is still lacking. Here we measured renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) using telemetry-based recordings in a rat model of CKD, the Lewis Polycystic Kidney (LPK) rat, and assessed responses to chemoreflex activation and acute stress. Male LPK and Lewis control animals (total n = 16) were instrumented for telemetric recording of RSNA and MAP. At 12–13 weeks-of-age, resting RSNA and MAP, sympathetic and haemodynamic responses to both peripheral (hypoxia: 10% O2) and central chemoreflex (hypercapnia: 7% CO2) activation and acute stress (open-field exposure), were measured. As indicators of renal function, urinary protein (UPro) and creatinine (UCr) levels were assessed. LPK rats had higher resting RSNA (1.2 ± 0.1 vs. 0.6 ± 0.1 μV, p < 0.05) and MAP (151 ± 8 vs. 97 ± 2 mmHg, p < 0.05) compared to Lewis. MAP was negatively correlated with UCr (r = −0.80, p = 0.002) and positively correlated with RSNA (r = 0.66, p = 0.014), with multiple linear regression modeling indicating the strongest correlation was with Ucr. RSNA and MAP responses to activation of the central chemoreflex and open-field stress were reduced in the LPK relative to the Lewis (all p < 0.05). This is the first description of dual conscious telemetry recording of RSNA and MAP in a genetic rodent model of CKD. Elevated RSNA is likely a key contributor to the marked hypertension in this model, while attenuated RSNA and MAP responses to central chemoreflex activation and acute stress in the LPK indicate possible deficits in the neural processing of autonomic outflows evoked by these sympathoexcitatory pathways. PMID:26300784

  2. Histamine H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of sympathetically evoked mydriasis in rats.

    PubMed

    Yu, Y; Kawarai, M; Koss, M C

    2001-05-01

    This study was designed to determine if the histamine H3 receptor agonist R-alpha-methylhistamine would play a role in modulation of sympathetically evoked mydriasis in anesthetized rats, and if so, to ascertain the specific receptor subtype(s) involved. Reproducible frequency-response curves of pupillary dilation were generated by stimulation of the cervical preganglionic sympathetic nerve (1-32 Hz). Systemic administration of R-alpha-methylhistamine (0.3-3.0 mg kg(-1)) produced a dose-related inhibition of the evoked mydriasis. The greatest inhibition was seen at lower frequency levels, with about 43% depression observed at 2 Hz. The specific histamine H3 receptor antagonist, clobenpropit (3.0 mg kg(-1), i.v.), blocked the inhibitory effect of R-alpha-methylhistamine, whereas neither the histamine H2 receptor antagonist, cimetidine (5.0 mg kg(-1), i.v.), nor the histamine H1 receptor antagonist, chlorpheniramine (0.5 mg kg(-1), i.v.), was effective. The histamine H2 receptor agonist, dimaprit (10 mg kg(-1), i.v.), was also without effect on the evoked mydriasis. R-alpha-methylhistamine (3.0 mg kg(-1)) did not inhibit phenylephrine-induced mydriasis. These results support the conclusion that R-alpha-methylhistamine produces inhibition of sympathetically evoked mydriasis via histamine H3 receptor stimulation, presumably by an action on presynaptic histamine H3 receptors.

  3. Respiratory and sympathetic chemoreflex regulation by Kölliker-Fuse neurons in rats.

    PubMed

    Damasceno, Rosélia S; Takakura, Ana C; Moreira, Thiago S

    2015-02-01

    Chemoreceptor activation increases phrenic nerve activity (PNA) and sympathetic nerve activity (SNA). The dorsolateral pontine neurons, including the parabrachial nucleus and the Kölliker-Fuse (KF) region project to several brainstem areas involved in autonomic and respiratory regulation. Here the objective was to further test the hypothesis that the KF region could contribute to central and peripheral sympathetic chemoreflex activation. In urethane-anesthetized sino-aortic denervated or intact and vagotomized male Wistar rats (N = 7-8/group), hypercapnia (end-expiratory CO2 from 5 to 10 %) or KCN increased mean arterial pressure (MAP), splanchnic SNA, and PNA frequency and amplitude. Bilateral injection of muscimol (GABA-A agonist; 2 mM-50 nl) into the KF region increased resting PNA amplitude and reduced resting PNA frequency, without significant changes in resting MAP and SNA. Bilateral blockade of the KF region reduced the rise in MAP, sSNA, and PNA frequency and amplitude produced by hypercapnia or hypoxia. Our data suggest that the KF neurons could integrate and modulate breathing and sympathetic outflow during chemoreceptor activation.

  4. Alterations in Perivascular Sympathetic and Nitrergic Innervation Function Induced by Late Pregnancy in Rat Mesenteric Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Caracuel, Laura; Callejo, María; Balfagón, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose We investigated whether pregnancy was associated with changed function in components of perivascular mesenteric innervation and the mechanism/s involved. Experimental Approach We used superior mesenteric arteries from female Sprague-Dawley rats divided into two groups: control rats (in oestrous phase) and pregnant rats (20 days of pregnancy). Modifications in the vasoconstrictor response to electrical field stimulation (EFS) were analysed in the presence/absence of phentolamine (alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist) or L-NAME (nitric oxide synthase-NOS- non-specific inhibitor). Vasomotor responses to noradrenaline (NA), and to NO donor DEA-NO were studied, NA and NO release measured and neuronal NOS (nNOS) expression/activation analysed. Key Results EFS induced a lower frequency-dependent contraction in pregnant than in control rats. Phentolamine decreased EFS-induced vasoconstriction in segments from both experimental groups, but to a greater extent in control rats. EFS-induced vasoconstriction was increased by L-NAME in arteries from both experimental groups. This increase was greater in segments from pregnant rats. Pregnancy decreased NA release while increasing NO release. nNOS expression was not modified but nNOS activation was increased by pregnancy. Pregnancy decreased NA-induced vasoconstriction response and did not modify DEA-NO-induced vasodilation response. Conclusions and Implications Neural control of mesenteric vasomotor tone was altered by pregnancy. Diminished sympathetic and enhanced nitrergic components both contributed to the decreased vasoconstriction response to EFS during pregnancy. All these changes indicate the selective participation of sympathetic and nitrergic innervations in vascular adaptations produced during pregnancy. PMID:25951331

  5. Exaggerated sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to stimulation of the mesencephalic locomotor region in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Liang, Nan; Mitchell, Jere H; Smith, Scott A; Mizuno, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    The sympathetic and pressor responses to exercise are exaggerated in hypertension. However, the underlying mechanisms causing this abnormality remain to be fully elucidated. Central command, a neural drive originating in higher brain centers, is known to activate cardiovascular and locomotor control circuits concomitantly. As such, it is a viable candidate for the generation of the augmented vascular response to exercise in this disease. We hypothesized that augmentations in central command function contribute to the heightened cardiovascular response to exercise in hypertension. To test this hypothesis, changes in renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) in response to electrical stimulation of mesencephalic locomotor region (MLR; 20-50 μA in 10-μA steps evoking fictive locomotion), a putative component of the central command pathway, were examined in decerebrate, paralyzed normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Tibial nerve discharge during MLR stimulation significantly increased in an intensity-dependent manner in both WKY and SHR but was not different between groups. Stimulation of the MLR evoked significantly larger increases in RSNA and MAP with increasing stimulation intensity in both groups. Importantly, the increases in sympathetic and pressor responses to this fictive locomotion were significantly greater in SHR compared with WKY across all stimulation intensities (e.g., at 50 μA, ΔRSNA: WKY 153 ± 31%, SHR 287 ± 42%; ΔMAP: WKY 87 ± 9 mmHg, SHR 139 ± 7 mmHg). These findings provide the first evidence that central command may be a critical contributor to the exaggerated rise in sympathetic activity and blood pressure during exercise in hypertension. PMID:26545711

  6. Characteristics of sympathetic nerve activity in the rat sciatic nerve in response to microstimulation in a sympathetic fascicle in the contralateral side.

    PubMed

    Sato, Daisuke; Shiwaku, Yutaka; Nakamura, Ryoichi; Koizumi, Shuntaro; Feng, Zhonggang; Kusunoki, Masataka; Nakamura, Takao

    2013-01-01

    Microneurography is used for the monitor of various peripheral nerve activities. We recently reported that the electrical stimulation of peripheral sympathetic nerve fascicle via the microelectrode, i.e., microstimulation, temporarily reduced the blood glucose level in rats in case that the stimulation intensity was set high enough to induce small muscle contraction. However, the nature of microstimulation has little been clarified yet. Therefore, in the present study, we first detected sympathetic nerve signal microneurographically in the bilateral sciatic nerves of rats, and one of the microelectrodes was used for the microstimulation (0.25 ms-width pulse train at a rate of 1 Hz) while sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) was recorded in the contralateral side as a parameter of systemic sympathetic effects. The SNA, expressed as action potential rate, was transiently increased 150 ms after each stimulation pulse in case that the stimulation intensity was set not less than -0.1 V from the contraction threshold (around 0.32 V). To confirm that the increase was not caused by the activation of low threshold, thick fibers such as motor nerves in the vicinity of the microelectrode tip, next, a bipolar hook electrode, instead of the microelectrode, was then used in the stimulation side. As a result, the above-mentioned, transient increase in SNA was not observed any more in the contralateral side. These results suggest that systemic SNA could be enhanced with lower stimulation intensity than that inducing muscle contraction, and that thicker fibers may little affect the increase in the contralateral SNA. PMID:24111188

  7. The interactions between potassium and sodium currents in generating action potentials in the rat sympathetic neurone.

    PubMed Central

    Belluzzi, O; Sacchi, O

    1988-01-01

    1. Membrane conductance parameters for the rat sympathetic neurone in vitro at 37 degrees C have been determined by two-electrode voltage-clamp analysis. The activation kinetics of two ionic currents, IA and IK(V), has been considered. Data for both currents are expressed in terms of Hodgkin-Huxley equations. 2. The isolated IA developed following third-order kinetics. The activation time constant, tau a, was estimated from the current time-to-peak and, for V less than or equal to -40 mV, from the IA tail current analysis upon membrane repolarization to various potentials. The maximum tau a occurred at -55 mV and varied from 0.26 to 0.82 ms in the range of potentials between -100 and +10 mV. The steady-state value of the variable a, corrected for inactivation, was evaluated in the voltage range from -60 to 0 mV; 14.4 mV are required to change a infinity e-fold. Steady-state gA was voltage dependent, increasing with depolarization to a maximum of 1.40 microS at +10 mV. 3. IK(V) was similarly analysed in isolation. The current proved to develop as a first-order process. tau n was determined by fitting a single exponential to the IK(V) rising phase and to the tail currents at the end of short depolarizing pulses. The bell-shaped voltage dependence of tau n exhibited a maximum (25.5 ms) at -30 mV, becoming minimal (1.8 ms) at -80 and +20 mV. The n infinity curve was obtained (n infinity = 0.5 at -6.54 mV; k = 8.91 mV). The mean maximum conductance, gK(V), was 0.33 microS per neurone at +10 mV. 4. Single spikes have been elicited by brief current pulses at membrane potentials from -40 to -100 mV under two-electrode current-clamp conditions in normal saline and in the presence of blockers of the ICa-IK(Ca) (Cd2+) and/or IK(V) (TEA, tetraethylammonium) systems. Spike repolarization was affected by the suppression of either current in the depolarized neurone, but was insensitive to both treatments when the spike arose from holding levels negative to -75 to -80 m

  8. CO2 asphyxia increases plasma norepinephrine in rats via sympathetic nerves.

    PubMed

    Borovsky, V; Herman, M; Dunphy, G; Caplea, A; Ely, D

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether the plasma norepinephrine (NE) increase in rats exposed to CO2 asphyxia was due to adrenal gland release or sympathetic nerve ending (SNS) release. Plasma NE was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography in hypertensive and normotensive rats using the following protocol: control session, CO2 exposure, N2 exposure, reserpine + CO2, and adrenalectomy + CO2. Four strains of male and female rats were used: spontaneously hypertensive rats, Wistar-Kyoto rats, and two congenic strains with different Y chromosomes. The same rats were used throughout the experiment (n = 80). Blood pressure measured by aortic telemetry increased approximately 50-60 mmHg in response to CO2 in all strains. CO2 increased NE 6-10x in all strains and both genders. N2 produced a significant increase in NE (73% of CO2 response). Reserpine significantly decreased (67%) plasma NE after CO2. Adrenalectomy did not significantly reduce the NE response to CO2. In conclusion, the increase in plasma NE after CO2 was associated with SNS release and not adrenal medullary release, was mainly due to hypoxia, and was not a specific response to CO2.

  9. Blockade of brain mineralocorticoid receptors or Na+ channels prevents sympathetic hyperactivity and improves cardiac function in rats post-MI.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bing S; Leenen, Frans H H

    2005-05-01

    In rats post-myocardial infarction (MI), sympathetic hyperactivity can be prevented by blockade of brain mineralocorticoid receptors (MR). Stimulatory responses to central infusion of aldosterone can be blocked by benzamil and therefore appear to be mediated via Na+ channels, presumably epithelial Na+ channels (ENaC), in the brain. To evaluate this concept of endogenous mineralocorticoids in Wistar rats post-MI, we examined effects of blockade of MR and Na+ channels in the brain. At 3 days after coronary artery ligation, intracerebroventricular infusions were started with spironolactone (400 ng.kg(-1).h(-1)) or its vehicle, or with benzamil (4 microg.kg(-1).h(-1)) or its vehicle, using osmotic minipumps. Rats with sham ligation served as control. After 4 wk, in conscious rats, mean arterial pressure, heart rate, and renal sympathetic nerve activity were recorded at rest and in response to air-jet stress, intracerebroventricular injection of the alpha2-adrenoceptor agonist guanabenz, and intravenous infusion of phenylephrine and nitroprusside for baroreflex function. MI size was similar among the four groups of rats (approximately 31%). In rats treated post-MI with vehicles, cardiac function was decreased, sympathetic reactivity was enhanced, and baroreflex function was impaired. Blockade of brain Na+ channels or brain MR similarly prevented sympathetic hyperactivity and impairment of baroreflex function and improved cardiac function. These findings suggest that in rats post-MI, increased binding of endogenous agonists to MR increases ENaC activity in the brain and thereby leads to sympathetic hyperactivity and progressive left ventricular dysfunction.

  10. Partial sympathetic denervation of the rat epididymis permits fertilization but inhibits embryo development.

    PubMed

    Ricker, D D; Crone, J K; Chamness, S L; Klinefelter, G R; Chang, T S

    1997-01-01

    The rat cauda epididymidis receives sympathetic innervation from the inferior mesenteric ganglion (IMG). We have previously demonstrated that surgical removal of the IMG and proximal hypogastric nerves (IMG denervation) results in significant and cauda-specific changes in epididymal sperm transport, sperm motility, luminal fluid protein composition, and tissue histology. In the present study we used natural mating trials and intrauterine insemination (IUI) techniques to determine whether or not IMG denervation affects male fertility and reproductive capacity. For the initial studies, adult male Sprague Dawley rats were mated with estrous females 1 and 4 weeks following IMG denervation. Nine days after mating, uterine implantation sites and corpora lutea (CL) were counted. In females mated with sham-operated control males, 85.8% of ovulated oocytes were fertilized and subsequently implanted. In contrast, females mated with IMG-denervated males 1 or 4 weeks following surgery had 0% and 3.5%, respectively, of ovulated oocytes fertilized and implanted. For rats maintained 21 days after mating, an average of 13 +/- 1 pups were delivered by each of nine females mated with sham-operated control male rats; whereas, only seven morphologically normal pups were delivered by one of 14 females mated with IMG-denervated male rats. Additional experiments demonstrated that the decrement in offspring was, in part, due to a significant decrease in the number of spermatozoa in the female uterus following mating with IMG-denervated males. To determine whether IMG denervation exerted an additional effect directly on the fertilizing ability of spermatozoa, IUI experiments were performed. Six million cauda epididymal spermatozoa from 1- or 4-week IMG-denervated males were inseminated into the uterine horns of luteinzing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH)-synchronized females and 9 days later implantation sites and CL were counted. Implantations were observed for 78%, 28%, and 25% of

  11. Nociception attenuates parasympathetic but not sympathetic baroreflex via NK1 receptors in the rat nucleus tractus solitarii.

    PubMed

    Pickering, Anthony E; Boscan, Pedro; Paton, Julian F R

    2003-09-01

    Somatic noxious stimulation can evoke profound cardiovascular responses by altering activity in the autonomic nervous system. This noxious stimulation attenuates the cardiac vagal baroreflex, a key cardiovascular homeostatic reflex. This attenuation is mediated via NK1 receptors expressed on GABAergic interneurones within the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS). We have investigated the effect of noxious stimulation and exogenous substance P (SP) on the sympathetic component of the baroreflex. We recorded from the sympathetic chain in a decerebrate, artificially perfused rat preparation. Noxious hindlimb pinch was without effect on the sympathetic baroreflex although the cardiac vagal baroreflex gain was decreased (56 %, P < 0.01). Bilateral NTS microinjection of SP (500 fmol) produced a similar selective attenuation of the cardiac vagal baroreflex gain (62 %, P < 0.005) without effect on the sympathetic baroreflex. Recordings from the cardiac sympathetic and vagal nerves confirmed the selectivity of the SP inhibition. Control experiments using a GABAA receptor agonist, isoguvacine, indicated that both components of the baroreflex (parasympathetic and sympathetic) could be blocked from the NTS injection site. The NTS microinjection of a NK1 antagonist (CP-99,994) in vivo attenuated the tachycardic response to hindlimb pinch. Our data suggest that noxious pinch releases SP within the NTS to selectively attenuate the cardiac vagal, but not the sympathetic, component of the baroreflex. This selective withdrawal of the cardiac vagal baroreflex seems to underlie the pinch-evoked tachycardia seen in vivo. Further, these findings confirm that baroreflex sympathetic and parasympathetic pathways diverge, and can be independently controlled, within the NTS.

  12. Nociception attenuates parasympathetic but not sympathetic baroreflex via NK1 receptors in the rat nucleus tractus solitarii

    PubMed Central

    Pickering, Anthony E; Boscan, Pedro; Paton, Julian F R

    2003-01-01

    Somatic noxious stimulation can evoke profound cardiovascular responses by altering activity in the autonomic nervous system. This noxious stimulation attenuates the cardiac vagal baroreflex, a key cardiovascular homeostatic reflex. This attenuation is mediated via NK1 receptors expressed on GABAergic interneurones within the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS). We have investigated the effect of noxious stimulation and exogenous substance P (SP) on the sympathetic component of the baroreflex. We recorded from the sympathetic chain in a decerebrate, artificially perfused rat preparation. Noxious hindlimb pinch was without effect on the sympathetic baroreflex although the cardiac vagal baroreflex gain was decreased (56%, P < 0.01). Bilateral NTS microinjection of SP (500 fmol) produced a similar selective attenuation of the cardiac vagal baroreflex gain (62%, P < 0.005) without effect on the sympathetic baroreflex. Recordings from the cardiac sympathetic and vagal nerves confirmed the selectivity of the SP inhibition. Control experiments using a GABAA receptor agonist, isoguvacine, indicated that both components of the baroreflex (parasympathetic and sympathetic) could be blocked from the NTS injection site. The NTS microinjection of a NK1 antagonist (CP-99,994) in vivo attenuated the tachycardic response to hindlimb pinch. Our data suggest that noxious pinch releases SP within the NTS to selectively attenuate the cardiac vagal, but not the sympathetic, component of the baroreflex. This selective withdrawal of the cardiac vagal baroreflex seems to underlie the pinch-evoked tachycardia seen in vivo. Further, these findings confirm that baroreflex sympathetic and parasympathetic pathways diverge, and can be independently controlled, within the NTS. PMID:12813142

  13. Nociception attenuates parasympathetic but not sympathetic baroreflex via NK1 receptors in the rat nucleus tractus solitarii.

    PubMed

    Pickering, Anthony E; Boscan, Pedro; Paton, Julian F R

    2003-09-01

    Somatic noxious stimulation can evoke profound cardiovascular responses by altering activity in the autonomic nervous system. This noxious stimulation attenuates the cardiac vagal baroreflex, a key cardiovascular homeostatic reflex. This attenuation is mediated via NK1 receptors expressed on GABAergic interneurones within the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS). We have investigated the effect of noxious stimulation and exogenous substance P (SP) on the sympathetic component of the baroreflex. We recorded from the sympathetic chain in a decerebrate, artificially perfused rat preparation. Noxious hindlimb pinch was without effect on the sympathetic baroreflex although the cardiac vagal baroreflex gain was decreased (56 %, P < 0.01). Bilateral NTS microinjection of SP (500 fmol) produced a similar selective attenuation of the cardiac vagal baroreflex gain (62 %, P < 0.005) without effect on the sympathetic baroreflex. Recordings from the cardiac sympathetic and vagal nerves confirmed the selectivity of the SP inhibition. Control experiments using a GABAA receptor agonist, isoguvacine, indicated that both components of the baroreflex (parasympathetic and sympathetic) could be blocked from the NTS injection site. The NTS microinjection of a NK1 antagonist (CP-99,994) in vivo attenuated the tachycardic response to hindlimb pinch. Our data suggest that noxious pinch releases SP within the NTS to selectively attenuate the cardiac vagal, but not the sympathetic, component of the baroreflex. This selective withdrawal of the cardiac vagal baroreflex seems to underlie the pinch-evoked tachycardia seen in vivo. Further, these findings confirm that baroreflex sympathetic and parasympathetic pathways diverge, and can be independently controlled, within the NTS. PMID:12813142

  14. Effects of axotomy or target atrophy on membrane properties of rat sympathetic ganglion cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Vives, M V; Gallego, R

    1993-01-01

    1. The electrical properties of rat superior cervical ganglion cells were examined in vitro with intracellular microelectrodes after axotomy or atrophy of the submandibular salivary gland. 2. Membrane time constant, input resistance and excitatory synaptic potentials (EPSPs) were decreased to about 50% of their control values 7-10 days after axotomy. 3. Axotomized ganglion cells also showed reduced action potentials and after-hyperpolarizations (AHPs). The AHP duration was reduced to 40% of the control value. 4. In 25% of the axotomized cells, the action potential was followed by an after-depolarization (ADP) instead of the AHP that was always present in control cells. In eleven out of seventeen axotomized cells with ADP, preganglionic stimulation failed to evoke an EPSP, whereas the failure of the synaptic response was never observed in control cells and occurred only in two of fifty-three axotomized cells with AHP. 5. In some axotomized cells with AHP, a depolarizing potential developed after a train of action potentials. This was never observed in control cells. 6. Sympathetic neurones innervating the submandibular gland in control animals had membrane properties similar to those observed in other ganglion cells. 7. The properties of neurones innervating the submandibular gland remained unaltered after the experimentally induced atrophy of the gland. 8. It is concluded that the marked effects of short-term axotomy on membrane properties of sympathetic ganglion cells are not reproduced by long-term atrophy of the target tissue. PMID:8120834

  15. [Effects of doxazosin and hydralazine on insulin sensitivity and sympathetic function in spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR)].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, A; Kushiro, T; Kanmatsuse, K

    1998-05-01

    Since insulin resistance and/or hyperinsulinemia may contribute to structural changes of the vascular wall, the influence of antihypertensive agents on insulin sensitivity could interfere with the long term outcome of blood pressure reduction. Although it is postulated that increased peripheral circulation due to vasodilating agents improves insulin sensitivity, reflex sympathetic activation elicited by blood pressure reduction may influence insulin sensitivity. Thus we investigated the different effects of an alpha blocker (doxazosin) as well as a direct vasodilation (hydralazine) on insulin sensitivity and on sympathetic function in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Doxazosin and hydralazine decreased mean arterial pressure to a similar extent. Doxazosin, but not hydralazine decreased steady state blood glucose. Plasma norepinephrine increased in doxazosin and hydralazine treated groups as compared to the control group. Thus, despite their similar effects on blood pressure and plasma norepinephrine, alpha-1 blocker improved insulin sensitivity while the direct vasodilator failed to do so, and this difference is probably related to blockade of the alpha-1 receptor rather than to peripheral vasodilation.

  16. The release of sympathetic neurotransmitters is impaired in aged rats after an inflammatory stimulus. A possible link between cytokine production and sympathetic transmission

    PubMed Central

    Donoso, Verónica; Gomez, Christian R.; Orriantia, Miguel Ángel; Pérez, Viviana; Torres, Claudio; Coddou, Claudio; Nelson, Pablo; Maisey, Kevin; Morales, Bernardo; Fernandez, Ricardo; Imarai, Mónica; Huidobro-Toro, Juan Pablo; Sierra, Felipe; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio

    2009-01-01

    Aging results in a general decline in the response to external insults, including acute inflammatory challenges. In young animals, the inflammatory response requires activation of the sympathetic system, including neurotransmitters such as ATP, and catecholamines (epinephrine and norepinephrine). To test whether aging affects activation of this axis, and whether this in turn might affect cytokine release, we administered lipopolysaccharide (LPS) i.p. to adult, middle-aged and aged Fisher 344 rats (6, 15 and 23-month old, respectively) and evaluated the early (0–12 hours) serum levels of Neuropeptide-Y (NP-Y), ATP and vanillyl mandelic acid (VMA, as an indirect measurement of catecholamine levels). In addition, we evaluated the association between these factors and serum levels of the cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα)3 and interleukin-10 (IL-10). Induction of both ATP and NP-Y was markedly reduced in the serum of aged animals, when compared to their younger counterparts, while induction of VMA was not affected by age. In spite of these changes, serum levels of TNFα and IL-10 were strongly hyper induced and delayed in aged rats. The results suggest that during aging there is a dysregulation in sympathetic neurotransmitter regulatory mechanisms, and this might play a role in the impairment of the inflammatory response. PMID:18973771

  17. Origin of sympathetic and sensory innervation of the temporo-mandibular joint. A retrograde axonal tracing study in the rat.

    PubMed

    Widenfalk, B; Wiberg, M

    1990-02-01

    The cells of origin of sensory and sympathetic innervation of the temporo-mandibular joint were studied by the intraaxonal transport method. Horseradish peroxidase or lectin-conjugated horseradish peroxidase was injected into the temporo-mandibular joint unilaterally in adult rats. Labelled cells were observed ipsilaterally in the superior cervical and stellate sympathetic ganglia, in the sensory trigeminal ganglion and in the second to fifth dorsal root ganglia; none were found contralaterally. The results are discussed in relation to the hypothesis that a nervous mechanism might be involved in the pathogenesis of joint inflammation.

  18. Auditory stimulation affects renal sympathetic nerve activity and blood pressure in rats.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takuo; Tanida, Mamoru; Niijima, Akira; Hibino, Hiroshi; Shen, Jiao; Nagai, Katsuya

    2007-04-12

    Here, we examined the effects of auditory stimulation at 50 dB with white noise (WN) or music (Traeumerei [TM] by Schumann or Etude by Chopin) on renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) and BP in urethane-anesthetized rats. Auditory stimulation with TM, but not with WN or the Etude, significantly decreased RSNA and BP. Complete bilateral destruction of the cochleae and bilateral lesions of the auditory cortex (AuC) eliminated the effects of TM stimulation on RSNA and BP, but bilateral lesions of primary somatosensory cortex (S1C) had no effect. Bilateral lesions of the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) or intracerebral administration of thioperamide, a histaminergic H3 receptor antagonist, also abolished TM-induced decreases in RSNA and BP. These findings suggest that exposure to music can decrease RSNA and BP through the auditory pathway, histaminergic neurons, and the SCN.

  19. Effects of renal sympathetic denervation on cardiac systolic function after myocardial infarction in rats

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jiqun; Zhou, Zhongxia; Li, Zhenzhen; Liu, Qian; Zhu, Guoqing; Shan, Qijun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study investigated the therapeutic effects of renal denervation on cardiac systolic function after myocardial infarction (MI) in rats and the mechanism involved. Fifty male SD rats were randomly assigned to the sham group (n = 15), the MI group (n = 20), and the MI plus renal denervation group (n = 15). MI was established through thoracotomic ligation of the anterior descending artery. Renal denervation was achieved by laparotomic stripping of the renal arterial adventitial sympathetic nerve, approximately 3 mm from the abdominal aorta. Left ventricular function and hemodynamics were measured several weeks following MI. The left ventricular systolic function of the MI group was significantly reduced and the systolic blood pressure (SBP) remarkably declined. In rats with MI treated with renal denervation, the left ventricular ejection fraction (EF), fractional shortening (FS) and SBP markedly improved compared with the MI group. However, heart rate and fibrosis decreased significantly. These findings suggest that renal denervation has therapeutic effects on post-MI cardiac dysfunction. These effects are associated with increased left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and SBP, as well as reduced heart rate and fibrosis. This may represent a new approach to the treatment of post-MI remodeling and subsequent heart failure.

  20. L-Ornithine intake affects sympathetic nerve outflows and reduces body weight and food intake in rats.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Yuuki; Koosaka, Yasutaka; Maruyama, Ryuutaro; Imanishi, Kazuki; Kasahara, Kazuaki; Matsuda, Ai; Akiduki, Saori; Hishida, Yukihiro; Kurata, Yasutaka; Shibamoto, Toshishige; Satomi, Jun; Tanida, Mamoru

    2015-02-01

    Ingesting the amino acid l-ornithine effectively improves lipid metabolism in humans, although it is unknown whether it affects the activities of autonomic nerves that supply the peripheral organs related to lipid metabolism, such as adipose tissues. Thus, we investigated the effects of l-ornithine ingestion on autonomic nerves that innervate adipose tissues and the feeding behaviors of rats. Intragastric injection of l-ornithine (2.5%) in urethane-anesthetized rats activated sympathetic nerve activity to white adipose tissue (WAT-SNA), and stimulated sympathetic nerve activity to brown adipose tissue (BAT-SNA). In addition, WAT-SNA responses to l-ornithine were abolished in rats with ablated abdominal vagal nerves. l-ornithine ingestion for 9 weeks also significantly reduced rats' body weight, food intake, and abdominal fat weight. Proopiomelanocortin (POMC) levels in the hypothalamus and uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) levels in brown adipose tissue were significantly increased in rats that ingested 2.5% l-ornithine for 9 weeks. These results suggested that ingested l-ornithine was taken up in the gastrointestinal organs and stimulated afferent vagal nerves and activated the central nervous system. Subsequently, increased hypothalamic POMC activated sympathetic neurotransmission to adipose tissues and accelerated energy expenditure. PMID:25526897

  1. Perfusion of isolated carotid sinus with hydrogen sulfide attenuated the renal sympathetic nerve activity in anesthetized male rats.

    PubMed

    Guo, Q; Wu, Y; Xue, H; Xiao, L; Jin, S; Wang, R

    2016-07-18

    The purpose of the present study was to define the indirect central effect of hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) on baroreflex control of sympathetic outflow. Perfusing the isolated carotid sinus with sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), a H(2)S donor, the effect of H(2)S was measured by recording changes of renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) in anesthetized male rats. Perfusion of isolated carotid sinus with NaHS (25, 50, 100 micromol/l) dose and time-dependently inhibited sympathetic outflow. Preconditioning of glibenclamide (20 micromol/l), a ATP-sensitive K(+) channels (K(ATP)) blocker, the above effect of NaHS was removed. With 1, 4-dihydro-2, 6-dimethyl-5-nitro-4-(2-[trifluoromethyl] phenyl) pyridine-3-carboxylic acid methyl ester (Bay K8644, 500 nmol/l) pretreatment, which is an agonist of L-calcium channels, the effect of NaHS was eliminated. Perfusion of cystathionine gamma-lyase (CSE) inhibitor, DL-propargylglycine (PPG, 200 micromol/l), increased sympathetic outflow. The results show that exogenous H(2)S in the carotid sinus inhibits sympathetic outflow. The effect of H(2)S is attributed to opening K(ATP) channels and closing the L-calcium channels.

  2. Region-specific changes in sympathetic nerve activity in angiotensin II-salt hypertension in the rat.

    PubMed

    Osborn, John W; Fink, Gregory D

    2010-01-01

    It is now well accepted that many forms of experimental hypertension and human essential hypertension are caused by increased activity of the sympathetic nervous system. However, the role of region-specific changes in sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in the pathogenesis of hypertension has been difficult to determine because methods for chronic measurement of SNA in conscious animals have not been available. We have recently combined indirect, and continuous and chronic direct, assessment of region-specific SNA to characterize hypertension produced by administration of angiotensin II (Ang II) to rats consuming a high-salt diet (Ang II-salt hypertension). Angiotensin II increases whole-body noradrenaline (NA) spillover and depressor responses to ganglionic blockade in rats consuming a high-salt diet, but not in rats on a normal-salt diet. Despite this evidence for increased 'whole-body SNA' in Ang II-salt hypertensive rats, renal SNA is decreased in this model and renal denervation does not attenuate the steady-state level of arterial pressure. In addition, neither lumbar SNA, which largely targets skeletal muscle, nor hindlimb NA spillover is changed from control levels in Ang II-salt hypertensive rats. However, surgical denervation of the splanchnic vascular bed attenuates/abolishes the increase in arterial pressure and total peripheral resistance, as well as the decrease in vascular capacitance, observed in Ang II-salt hypertensive rats. We hypothesize that the 'sympathetic signature' of Ang II-salt hypertension is characterized by increased splanchnic SNA, no change in skeletal muscle SNA and decreased renal SNA, and this sympathetic signature creates unique haemodynamic changes capable of producing sustained hypertension. PMID:19717492

  3. The Role of Lumbar Sympathetic Nerves in Regulation of Blood Flow to Skeletal Muscle during Anaphylactic Hypotension in Anesthetized Rats.

    PubMed

    Song, Jie; Tanida, Mamoru; Shibamoto, Toshishige; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Mofei; Kuda, Yuhichi; Kurata, Yasutaka

    2016-01-01

    During hypovolemic shock, skeletal muscle blood flow could be redistributed to vital organs via vasoconstriction in part evoked by activation of the innervating sympathetic nerve activity. However, it is not well known whether this mechanism operates during anaphylactic shock. We determined the femoral artery blood flow (FBF) and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity (LSNA) mainly regulating the hindquater muscle blood flow during anaphylactic hypotension in anesthetized rats. Anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly allocated to the following groups (n = 7/group): (1) non-sensitized, (2) anaphylaxis, (3) anaphylaxis-lumbar sympathectomy (LS) and (4) anaphylaxis-sinoaortic denervation (SAD) groups. Anaphylaxis was induced by an intravenous injection of the ovalbumin antigen to the sensitized rats. The systemic arterial pressure (SAP), heart rate (HR), central venous pressure (CVP), FBF and LSNA were continuously measured. In the anaphylaxis group, LSNA and HR increased, while SAP and FBF decreased after antigen injection. In the anaphylaxis-SAD group, LSNA did not significantly change during the early phase, but the responses of SAP and FBF were similar to those in the anaphylaxis group. In the anaphylaxis-LS group, both FBF and SAP decreased similarly to the anaphylaxis group during anaphylactic hypotension. These results indicated that LSNA increased via baroreceptor reflex, but this sympathoexcitation or LS did not affect antigen-induced decreases in FBF or SAP. Lumbar sympathetic nerves are not involved in regulation of the blood flow to the hindlimb or systemic blood pressure during anaphylactic hypotension in anesthetized rats. PMID:26998924

  4. Role of Renal Prostaglandins in Sympathetically Mediated Renin Release in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, William B.; Graham, Robert M.; Jackson, Edwin K.

    1979-01-01

    Renal prostaglandins (PG) appear to mediate renin release due to stimulation of the intrarenal baroreceptor, but not that due to activation of the macula densa. However, as the role of PG in sympathetically mediated renin release remains unclear, a possible interrelationship between these factors was examined in conscious rats. Hydralazine increased the serum renin levels from 3.1±0.8 to 16.7±3.0 ng/ml per h at a dose of 1 mg/kg. Indomethacin (5 mg/kg) suppressed urinary PGE2 and PGF2α excretion by 89 and 74%, respectively, arachidonate hypotension by 82%, and inhibited the elevated renin levels from hydralazine by 100% without altering the hypotensive effect of the drug. Another PG synthetase inhibitor, meclofenamate, was also effective in attenuating hydralazine-induced renin release, urinary PGE2 and PGF2α excretion, and arachidonate hypotension. Isoproterenol, a nonselective beta-adrenergic agonist, increased heart rate, lowered blood pressure, and also stimulated the release of renin when administered intraperitoneally. However, intrarenal infusion of the drug only resulted in increased renin release. Indomethacin inhibited isoproterenol-induced renin release by 66 and 67%, respectively, without altering the hemodynamic effects associated with the intraperitoneal administration of the drug. The selective beta1 agonist, H133/22, increased the release of renin and heart rate in a dose-related manner without altering blood pressure. H133/22-induced renin release was inhibited by 80% by indomethacin pretreatment. Finally, intrarenal infusions of dibutyryl cyclic AMP (3 mg/kg per min) increased the serum activity from 4.1±0.2 to 20.4±3.9 ng/ml per h without altering mean arterial pressure. Indomethacin inhibited this renin response to dibutyryl cyclic AMP by 96%. Thus, renal PG appear to be important mediators of sympathetically stimulated renin release acting as a site distal to the beta-adrenergic receptor. PMID:37256

  5. Hypothalamic Paraventricular and Arcuate Nuclei Contribute to Elevated Sympathetic Nerve Activity in Pregnant Rats: Roles of Neuropeptide Y and α-Melanocyte-Stimulating Hormone.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhigang; Cassaglia, Priscila A; Gotthardt, Laura C; Brooks, Virginia L

    2015-12-01

    Pregnancy increases sympathetic nerve activity (SNA), but the mechanisms are unknown. Here, we investigated the contributions of the hypothalamic paraventricular and arcuate nuclei in α-chloralose-anesthetized pregnant and nonpregnant rats. Baseline arterial pressure (AP) was lower, and heart rate (HR), lumbar sympathetic activity, and splanchnic SNA were higher in pregnant rats compared with nonpregnant rats. Inhibition of the paraventricular nucleus via bilateral muscimol nanoinjections decreased AP and HR more in pregnant rats than in nonpregnant rats and decreased lumbar SNA only in pregnant rats. Similarly, after arcuate muscimol nanoninjections, the decreases in AP, HR, and lumbar, renal, and splanchnic sympathetic nerve activities were greater in pregnant rats than in nonpregnant rats. Major arcuate neuronal groups that project to the paraventricular nucleus express inhibitory neuropeptide Y (NPY) and excitatory α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone. Inhibition of paraventricular melanocortin 3/4 receptors with SHU9119 also decreased AP, HR, and lumbar SNA in pregnant rats but not in nonpregnant rats. Conversely, paraventricular nucleus NPY expression was reduced in pregnant animals, and although blockade of paraventricular NPY Y1 receptors increased AP, HR, and lumbar sympathetic activity in nonpregnant rats, it had no effects in pregnant rats. Yet, the sympathoinhibitory, depressor, and bradycardic effects of paraventricular NPY nanoinjections were similar between groups. In conclusion, the paraventricular and arcuate nuclei contribute to increased basal SNA during pregnancy, likely due in part to decreased tonic NPY inhibition and increased tonic α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone excitation of presympathetic neurons in the paraventricular nucleus.

  6. Hypothalamic Paraventricular and Arcuate Nuclei Contribute to Elevated Sympathetic Nerve Activity in Pregnant Rats: Roles of Neuropeptide Y and α-Melanocyte-Stimulating Hormone.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhigang; Cassaglia, Priscila A; Gotthardt, Laura C; Brooks, Virginia L

    2015-12-01

    Pregnancy increases sympathetic nerve activity (SNA), but the mechanisms are unknown. Here, we investigated the contributions of the hypothalamic paraventricular and arcuate nuclei in α-chloralose-anesthetized pregnant and nonpregnant rats. Baseline arterial pressure (AP) was lower, and heart rate (HR), lumbar sympathetic activity, and splanchnic SNA were higher in pregnant rats compared with nonpregnant rats. Inhibition of the paraventricular nucleus via bilateral muscimol nanoinjections decreased AP and HR more in pregnant rats than in nonpregnant rats and decreased lumbar SNA only in pregnant rats. Similarly, after arcuate muscimol nanoninjections, the decreases in AP, HR, and lumbar, renal, and splanchnic sympathetic nerve activities were greater in pregnant rats than in nonpregnant rats. Major arcuate neuronal groups that project to the paraventricular nucleus express inhibitory neuropeptide Y (NPY) and excitatory α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone. Inhibition of paraventricular melanocortin 3/4 receptors with SHU9119 also decreased AP, HR, and lumbar SNA in pregnant rats but not in nonpregnant rats. Conversely, paraventricular nucleus NPY expression was reduced in pregnant animals, and although blockade of paraventricular NPY Y1 receptors increased AP, HR, and lumbar sympathetic activity in nonpregnant rats, it had no effects in pregnant rats. Yet, the sympathoinhibitory, depressor, and bradycardic effects of paraventricular NPY nanoinjections were similar between groups. In conclusion, the paraventricular and arcuate nuclei contribute to increased basal SNA during pregnancy, likely due in part to decreased tonic NPY inhibition and increased tonic α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone excitation of presympathetic neurons in the paraventricular nucleus. PMID:26483343

  7. Increased intrinsic excitability of muscle vasoconstrictor preganglionic neurons may contribute to the elevated sympathetic activity in hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Briant, Linford J. B.; Stalbovskiy, Alexey O.; Nolan, Matthew F.; Champneys, Alan R.

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension is associated with pathologically increased sympathetic drive to the vasculature. This has been attributed to increased excitatory drive to sympathetic preganglionic neurons (SPN) from brainstem cardiovascular control centers. However, there is also evidence supporting increased intrinsic excitability of SPN. To test this hypothesis, we made whole cell recordings of muscle vasoconstrictor-like (MVClike) SPN in the working-heart brainstem preparation of spontaneously hypertensive (SH) and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. The MVClike SPN have a higher spontaneous firing frequency in the SH rat (3.85 ± 0.4 vs. 2.44 ± 0.4 Hz in WKY; P = 0.011) with greater respiratory modulation of their activity. The action potentials of SH SPN had smaller, shorter afterhyperpolarizations (AHPs) and showed diminished transient rectification indicating suppression of an A-type potassium conductance (IA). We developed mathematical models of the SPN to establish if changes in their intrinsic properties in SH rats could account for their altered firing. Reduction of the maximal conductance density of IA by 15–30% changed the excitability and output of the model from the WKY to a SH profile, with increased firing frequency, amplified respiratory modulation, and smaller AHPs. This change in output is predominantly a consequence of altered synaptic integration. Consistent with these in silico predictions, we found that intrathecal 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) increased sympathetic nerve activity, elevated perfusion pressure, and augmented Traube-Hering waves. Our findings indicate that IA acts as a powerful filter on incoming synaptic drive to SPN and that its diminution in the SH rat is potentially sufficient to account for the increased sympathetic output underlying hypertension. PMID:25122704

  8. Sympathetic nerve fibers sprout into rat odontoblast layer, but not into dentinal tubules, in response to cavity preparation.

    PubMed

    Shimeno, Yoichi; Sugawara, Yumiko; Iikubo, Masahiro; Shoji, Noriaki; Sasano, Takashi

    2008-04-11

    This study was designed to determine if sympathetic nerve fibers exist in dentinal tubules in rat normal dental pulp, and if they sprout into the dentinal tubules in response to artificial cavity preparation in dentin. Sympathetic nerve fibers in rat molar dental pulp were labeled using an anterograde axonal transport technique involving injection of wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) into the superior cervical ganglion (SCG). They were then observed using light and electron microscopes. In normal dental pulp (control), scattered WGA-HRP reaction products were observed in unmyelinated nerve endings in the odontoblast layer and subodontoblastic region. In injured pulp 3 weeks after cavity preparation, reaction products were about 1.8-times more plentiful in the above areas (versus control pulp). However, no labeled nerve fibers were observed in the dentinal tubules in either control or injured dental pulp. These results indicate that although sympathetic nerve fibers do indeed sprout in rat dental pulp in response to cavity preparation, they do not penetrate into the dentinal tubules in which postganglionic nerve endings derived from the SCG were not originally present.

  9. TRPA1 mediates amplified sympathetic responsiveness to activation of metabolically sensitive muscle afferents in rats with femoral artery occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Jihong; Lu, Jian; Li, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Autonomic responses to activation of mechanically and metabolically sensitive muscle afferent nerves during static contraction are augmented in rats with femoral artery occlusion. Moreover, metabolically sensitive transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily A, member 1 (TRPA1) has been reported to contribute to sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) and arterial blood pressure (BP) responses evoked by static muscle contraction. Thus, in the present study, we examined the mechanisms by which afferent nerves' TRPA1 plays a role in regulating amplified sympathetic responsiveness due to a restriction of blood flow directed to the hindlimb muscles. Our data show that 24–72 h of femoral artery occlusion (1) upregulates the protein levels of TRPA1 in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) tissues; (2) selectively increases expression of TRPA1 in DRG neurons supplying metabolically sensitive afferent nerves of C-fiber (group IV); and (3) enhances renal SNA and BP responses to AITC (a TRPA1 agonist) injected into the hindlimb muscles. In addition, our data demonstrate that blocking TRPA1 attenuates SNA and BP responses during muscle contraction to a greater degree in ligated rats than those responses in control rats. In contrast, blocking TRPA1 fails to attenuate SNA and BP responses during passive tendon stretch in both groups. Overall, results of this study indicate that alternations in muscle afferent nerves' TRPA1 likely contribute to enhanced sympathetically mediated autonomic responses via the metabolic component of the muscle reflex under circumstances of chronic muscle ischemia. PMID:26441669

  10. Single-Unit Muscle Sympathetic Nerve Activity Reflects Sleep Apnea Severity, Especially in Severe Obstructive Sleep Apnea Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hamaoka, Takuto; Murai, Hisayoshi; Kaneko, Shuichi; Usui, Soichiro; Okabe, Yoshitaka; Tokuhisa, Hideki; Kato, Takeshi; Furusho, Hiroshi; Sugiyama, Yu; Nakatsumi, Yasuto; Takata, Shigeo; Takamura, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is associated with augmented sympathetic nerve activity, as assessed by multi-unit muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA). However, it is still unclear whether single-unit MSNA is a better reflection of sleep apnea severity according to the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI). One hundred and two OSAS patients underwent full polysomnography and single- and multi-unit MSNA measurements. Univariate and multivariate regression analysis were performed to determine which parameters correlated with OSAS severity, which was defined by the AHI. Single- and multi-unit MSNA were significantly and positively correlated with AHI severity. The AHI was also significantly correlated with multi-unit MSNA burst frequency (r = 0.437, p < 0.0001) and single-unit MSNA spike frequency (r = 0.632, p < 0.0001). Multivariable analysis revealed that SF was correlated most significantly with AHI (T = 7.27, p < 0.0001). The distributions of multiple single-unit spikes per one cardiac interval did not differ between patients with an AHI of <30 and those with and AHI of 30–55 events/h; however, the pattern of each multiple spike firing were significantly higher in patients with an AHI of >55. These results suggest that sympathetic nerve activity is associated with sleep apnea severity. In addition, single-unit MSNA is a more accurate reflection of sleep apnea severity with alternation of the firing pattern, especially in patients with very severe OSAS. PMID:26973534

  11. Single-Unit Muscle Sympathetic Nerve Activity Reflects Sleep Apnea Severity, Especially in Severe Obstructive Sleep Apnea Patients.

    PubMed

    Hamaoka, Takuto; Murai, Hisayoshi; Kaneko, Shuichi; Usui, Soichiro; Okabe, Yoshitaka; Tokuhisa, Hideki; Kato, Takeshi; Furusho, Hiroshi; Sugiyama, Yu; Nakatsumi, Yasuto; Takata, Shigeo; Takamura, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is associated with augmented sympathetic nerve activity, as assessed by multi-unit muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA). However, it is still unclear whether single-unit MSNA is a better reflection of sleep apnea severity according to the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI). One hundred and two OSAS patients underwent full polysomnography and single- and multi-unit MSNA measurements. Univariate and multivariate regression analysis were performed to determine which parameters correlated with OSAS severity, which was defined by the AHI. Single- and multi-unit MSNA were significantly and positively correlated with AHI severity. The AHI was also significantly correlated with multi-unit MSNA burst frequency (r = 0.437, p < 0.0001) and single-unit MSNA spike frequency (r = 0.632, p < 0.0001). Multivariable analysis revealed that SF was correlated most significantly with AHI (T = 7.27, p < 0.0001). The distributions of multiple single-unit spikes per one cardiac interval did not differ between patients with an AHI of <30 and those with and AHI of 30-55 events/h; however, the pattern of each multiple spike firing were significantly higher in patients with an AHI of >55. These results suggest that sympathetic nerve activity is associated with sleep apnea severity. In addition, single-unit MSNA is a more accurate reflection of sleep apnea severity with alternation of the firing pattern, especially in patients with very severe OSAS. PMID:26973534

  12. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) enhances sympathetic neurite growth in rat hearts at early developmental stages.

    PubMed

    Miwa, Keiko; Lee, Jong-Kook; Takagishi, Yoshiko; Opthof, Tobias; Fu, Xianming; Kodama, Itsuo

    2010-12-01

    Molecular signaling of sympathetic innervation of myocardium is an unresolved issue. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of neurotrophic factors on sympathetic neurite growth towards cardiomyocytes. Cardiomyocytes (CMs) and sympathetic neurons (SNs) were isolated from neonatal rat hearts and superior cervical ganglia, and were co-cultured, either in a random or localized way. Neurite growth from SNs toward CMs was assessed by immunohistochemistry for neurofilament M and α-actinin in response to neurotrophic factors-nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and a chemical repellent, semaphorin 3A. As a result, GDNF as well as NGF and BDNF stimulated neurite growth. GDNF enhanced neurite outgrowth even under the NGF-depleted culture condition, excluding an indirect effect of GDNF via NGF. Quantification of mRNA and protein by real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry at different developmental stages revealed that GDNF is abundantly expressed in the hearts of embryos and neonates, but not in adult hearts. GDNF plays an important role in inducing cardiac sympathetic innervation at the early developmental stages. A possible role in (re)innervation of injured or transplanted or cultured and transplanted myocardium may deserve investigation.

  13. Intermittent hypoxia-induced sensitization of central chemoreceptors contributes to sympathetic nerve activity during late expiration in rats.

    PubMed

    Molkov, Yaroslav I; Zoccal, Daniel B; Moraes, Davi J A; Paton, Julian F R; Machado, Benedito H; Rybak, Ilya A

    2011-06-01

    Hypertension elicited by chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) is associated with elevated activity of the thoracic sympathetic nerve (tSN) that exhibits an enhanced respiratory modulation reflecting a strengthened interaction between respiratory and sympathetic networks within the brain stem. Expiration is a passive process except for special metabolic conditions such as hypercapnia, when it becomes active through phasic excitation of abdominal motor nerves (AbN) in late expiration. An increase in CO(2) evokes late-expiratory (late-E) discharges phase-locked to phrenic bursts with the frequency increasing quantally as hypercapnia increases. In rats exposed to CIH, the late-E discharges synchronized in AbN and tSN emerge in normocapnia. To elucidate the possible neural mechanisms underlying these phenomena, we extended our computational model of the brain stem respiratory network by incorporating a population of presympathetic neurons in the rostral ventrolateral medulla that received inputs from the pons, medullary respiratory compartments, and retrotrapezoid nucleus/parafacial respiratory group (RTN/pFRG). Our simulations proposed that CIH conditioning increases the CO(2) sensitivity of RTN/pFRG neurons, causing a reduction in both the CO(2) threshold for emerging the late-E activity in AbN and tSN and the hypocapnic threshold for apnea. Using the in situ rat preparation, we have confirmed that CIH-conditioned rats under normal conditions exhibit synchronized late-E discharges in AbN and tSN similar to those observed in control rats during hypercapnia. Moreover, the hypocapnic threshold for apnea was significantly lowered in CIH-conditioned rats relative to that in control rats. We conclude that CIH may sensitize central chemoreception and that this significantly contributes to the neural impetus for generation of sympathetic activity and hypertension.

  14. Changes in muscle sympathetic nerve activity and vascular responses evoked in the spinotrapezius muscle of the rat by systemic hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Steven; Johnson, Christopher D; Marshall, Janice M

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Responses evoked in muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) by systemic hypoxia have received relatively little attention. Moreover, MSNA is generally identified from firing characteristics in fibres supplying whole limbs: their actual destination is not determined. We aimed to address these limitations by using a novel preparation of spinotrapezius muscle in anaesthetised rats. By using focal recording electrodes, multi-unit and discriminated single unit activity were recorded from the surface of arterial vessels. This had cardiac- and respiratory-related activities expected of MSNA, and was increased by baroreceptor unloading, decreased by baroreceptor stimulation and abolished by autonomic ganglion blockade. Progressive, graded hypoxia (breathing sequentially 12, 10, 8% O2 for 2 min each) evoked graded increases in MSNA. In single units, mean firing frequency increased from 0.2 ± 0.04 in 21% O2 to 0.62 ± 0.14 Hz in 8% O2, while instantaneous frequencies ranged from 0.04–6 Hz in 21% O2 to 0.09–20 Hz in 8% O2. Concomitantly, arterial pressure (ABP), fell and heart rate (HR) and respiratory frequency (RF) increased progressively, while spinotrapezius vascular resistance (SVR) decreased (Spinotrapezius blood flow/ABP), indicating muscle vasodilatation. During 8% O2 for 10 min, the falls in ABP and SVR were maintained, but RF, HR and MSNA waned towards baselines from the second to the tenth minute. Thus, we directly show that MSNA increases during systemic hypoxia to an extent that is mainly determined by the increases in peripheral chemoreceptor stimulation and respiratory drive, but its vasoconstrictor effects on muscle vasculature are largely blunted by local dilator influences, despite high instantaneous frequencies in single fibres. PMID:21486771

  15. Diabetes-induced changes in the 5-hydroxytryptamine inhibitory receptors involved in the pressor effect elicited by sympathetic stimulation in the pithed rat.

    PubMed

    García, Mónica; Morán, Asunción; Calama, Elena; Martín, Maria Luisa; Barthelmebs, Mariette; Román, Luis San

    2005-07-01

    1. We investigated the effect of alloxan-induced diabetes on the inhibitory mechanisms of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in the pressor responses induced by stimulation of sympathetic vasopressor outflow in pithed rats, and analysed the type and/or subtype of 5-HT receptors involved. 2. Diabetes was induced in male Wistar rats by a single s.c. injection of alloxan, then 4 weeks later, they were anaesthetized, pretreated with atropine and pithed. Electrical stimulation of the sympathetic outflow from the spinal cord (0.1, 0.5, 1 and 5 Hz) resulted in frequency-dependent increases in blood pressure. 3. Intravenous infusions of 5-HT (1-80 microg kg(-1) min(-1)) reduced the pressor effects obtained by electrical stimulation. The 5-HT(1) receptor agonist 5-carboxamidotryptamine, 5-CT (5 microg kg(-1) min(-1)), caused an inhibition of the pressor response, whereas the selective 5-HT(2) receptor agonist, alpha-methyl-5-HT (5 microg kg(-1) min(-1)) and the selective 5-HT(3) receptor agonist, 1-phenylbiguanide (40 microg kg(-1) min(-1)), did not modify the sympathetic pressor responses. 5-HT had no effect on exogenous noradrenaline (NA)-induced pressor responses. 4. The inhibition of electrically induced pressor responses by 5-HT (10 microg kg(-1) min(-1)) was unable to be elicited after i.v. treatment with methiothepin (100 microg kg(-1)) because of the marked inhibition produced by methiothepin alone. The 5-HT-induced inhibition was blocked after i.v. administration of WAY-100,635 (100 microg kg(-1)) and not affected by ritanserin (1 mg kg(-1)), MDL 72222 (2 mg kg(-1)). 5. The selective 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist, 8-hydroxydipropylaminotretalin hydrobromide (8-OH-DPAT) (5-20 microg kg(-1) min(-1)) but neither the rodent 5-HT(1B) receptor agonist, CGS-12066B (5 microg kg(-1) min(-1)), nor the selective nonrodent 5-HT(1B) and 5-HT(1D) receptor agonist, L-694,247 (5 and 40 microg kg(-1) min(-1)), inhibited the electrically induced pressor response. The selective 5-HT(1A) receptor

  16. Fate of tritiated 6-fluorodopamine in rats: A false neurotransmitter for positron emission tomographic imaging of sympathetic innervation and function

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, P.C.; Szemeredi, K.; Grossman, E.; Kopin, I.J.; Goldstein, D.S. )

    1990-11-01

    In evaluating positron-emitting analogs of dopamine (DA) as imaging agents for visualizing tissue sympathetic innervation and function, we assessed the metabolic fate of systemically injected ({sup 3}H)-6-fluorodopamine (({sup 3}H)-6F-DA) in plasma, in sympathetically innervated tissues (left ventricle, spleen and salivary glands) and in excretory organs (liver and kidney) of rats. By 5 min after intravenous bolus injection of a physiologically inactive amount (450 ng, 10 microCi) of ({sup 3}H)-6F-DA, {sup 3}H was concentrated in all the organs compared with that in blood or plasma. In the sympathetically innervated organs, most of the radioactivity was in ({sup 3}H)-6F-DA and ({sup 3}H)-6-fluoronorepinephrine (( {sup 3}H)-6F-NE), whereas in the blood, plasma and excretory organs most of the radioactivity was in noncatechol compounds such as O-methylated and conjugated metabolites. In sympathetically innervated organs, tissue/blood ratios exceeded 1.0 at all time points between 5 and 120 min after injection of ({sup 3}H)-6F-DA and increased progressively (from 8 to 60 in myocardium), whereas the tissue/blood ratios in the kidney and liver increased by less than 2-fold during this interval. In all the studied tissues, the proportion of total tissue {sup 3}H that was due to ({sup 3}H)F-NE increased progressively while that due to ({sup 3}H)F-DA declined, consistent with conversion of ({sup 3}H)F-DA to ({sup 3}H)F-NE in vesicles in sympathetic nerve endings.

  17. Acute inhibition of glial cells in the NTS does not affect respiratory and sympathetic activities in rats exposed to chronic intermittent hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Costa, Kauê M; Moraes, Davi J A; Machado, Benedito H

    2013-02-16

    Recent studies suggest that neuron-glia interactions are involved in multiple aspects of neuronal activity regulation. In the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) neuron-glia interactions are thought to participate in the integration of autonomic responses to physiological challenges. However, it remains to be shown whether NTS glial cells might influence breathing and cardiovascular control, and also if they could be integral to the autonomic and respiratory responses to hypoxic challenges. Here, we investigated whether NTS glia play a tonic role in the modulation of central respiratory and sympathetic activities as well as in the changes in respiratory-sympathetic coupling induced by exposure to chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), a model of central autonomic and respiratory plasticity. We show that bilateral microinjections of fluorocitrate (FCt), a glial cell inhibitor, into the caudal and intermediate subnuclei of the NTS did not alter baseline respiratory and sympathetic parameters in in situ preparations of juvenile rats. Similar results were observed in rats previously exposed to CIH. Likewise, CIH-induced changes in respiratory-sympathetic coupling were unaffected by FCt-mediated inhibition. However, microinjection of FCt into the ventral medulla produced changes in respiratory frequency. Our results show that acute glial inhibition in the NTS does not affect baseline respiratory and sympathetic control. Additionally, we conclude that NTS glial cells may not be necessary for the continuous manifestation of sympathetic and respiratory adaptations to CIH. Our work provides evidence that neuron-glia interactions in the NTS do not participate in baseline respiratory and sympathetic control.

  18. Carbachol and bradykinin elevate cyclic AMP and rapidly deplete ATP in cultured rat sympathetic neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Suidan, H S; Murrell, R D; Tolkovsky, A M

    1991-01-01

    The agonists carbachol (CCh) and bradykinin (BK) and 54 mM KCl (high K+) were among the most potent stimulants of cyclic AMP (cAMP) production in cultured rat sympathetic neurons, measured with the use of a high-fidelity assay developed for small samples. The rise in cAMP evoked by CCh (through muscarinic receptors), BK, and high K+ was inhibited in Ca2(+)-depleted medium (1.3 mM Ca2+ and 2 mM BAPTA or EGTA), which also prevented the sustained rise in [Ca2+]i evoked by each of these stimuli, showing that elevation of cAMP requires extracellular Ca2+ and, possibly, Ca2+ influx. Preliminary results obtained with the novel calmodulin inhibitor CGS 9343B, which blocked the elevation of cAMP, and with the cyclogenase inhibitor indomethacin, which partially blocked the actions of the agonists but not those of high K+, suggest that calmodulin and arachidonate metabolites may be two components of the signaling pathway. In addition to their effects on cAMP metabolism, CCh, muscarine, and BK, but not nicotine, caused a 30-40% decrease in ATP levels. This effect was much greater than that evoked by high K+ and was largely inhibited by CGS 9343B but slightly enhanced in the Ca(+)-depleted medium, showing that agonists are still active in the absence of [Ca2+]o. Thus, agonists that activate phosphoinositide metabolism can also increase cAMP production and substantially deplete cells of ATP. These novel actions may have to be taken into account when the mechanisms by which such agonists regulate cell function are being considered. PMID:1848792

  19. Macrophage depletion lowers blood pressure and restores sympathetic nerve α2-adrenergic receptor function in mesenteric arteries of DOCA-salt hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Thang, Loc V; Demel, Stacie L; Crawford, Robert; Kaminski, Norbert E; Swain, Greg M; Van Rooijen, Nico; Galligan, James J

    2015-10-01

    We tested the hypothesis that vascular macrophage infiltration and O2 (-) release impairs sympathetic nerve α2-adrenergic autoreceptor (α2AR) function in mesenteric arteries (MAs) of DOCA-salt hypertensive rats. Male rats were uninephrectomized or sham operated (sham). DOCA pellets were implanted subcutaneously in uninephrectomized rats who were provided high-salt drinking water or high-salt water with apocynin. Sham rats received tap water. Blood pressure was measured using radiotelemetry. Treatment of sham and DOCA-salt rats with liposome-encapsulated clodronate was used to deplete macrophages. After 3-5, 10-13, and 18-21 days of DOCA-salt treatment, MAs and peritoneal fluid were harvested from euthanized rats. Norepinephrine (NE) release from periarterial sympathetic nerves was measured in vitro using amperometry with microelectrodes. Macrophage infiltration into MAs as well as TNF-α and p22(phox) were measured using immunohistochemistry. Peritoneal macrophage activation was measured by flow cytometry. O2 (-) was measured using dihydroethidium staining. Hypertension developed over 28 days, and apocynin reduced blood pressure on days 18-21. O2 (-) and macrophage infiltration were greater in DOCA-salt MAs compared with sham MAs after day 10. Peritoneal macrophage activation occurred after day 10 in DOCA-salt rats. Macrophages expressing TNF-α and p22(phox) were localized near sympathetic nerves. Impaired α2AR function and increased NE release from sympathetic nerves occurred in MAs from DOCA-salt rats after day 18. Macrophage depletion reduced blood pressure and vascular O2 (-) while restoring α2AR function in DOCA-salt rats. Macrophage infiltration into the vascular adventitia contributes to increased blood pressure in DOCA-salt rats by releasing O2 (-), which disrupts α2AR function, causing enhanced NE release from sympathetic nerves.

  20. Enhanced sympathetic nerve activity induced by neonatal colon inflammation induces gastric hypersensitivity and anxiety-like behavior in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Winston, John H; Sarna, Sushil K

    2016-07-01

    Gastric hypersensitivity (GHS) and anxiety are prevalent in functional dyspepsia patients; their underlying mechanisms remain unknown largely because of lack of availability of live visceral tissues from human subjects. Recently, we demonstrated in a preclinical model that rats subjected to neonatal colon inflammation show increased basal plasma norepinephrine (NE), which contributes to GHS through the upregulation of nerve growth factor (NGF) expression in the gastric fundus. We tested the hypothesis that neonatal colon inflammation increases anxiety-like behavior and sympathetic nervous system activity, which upregulates the expression of NGF to induce GHS in adult life. Chemical sympathectomy, but not adrenalectomy, suppressed the elevated NGF expression in the fundus muscularis externa and GHS. The measurement of heart rate variability showed a significant increase in the low frequency-to-high frequency ratio in GHS vs. the control rats. Stimulus-evoked release of NE from the fundus muscularis externa strips was significantly greater in GHS than in the control rats. Tyrosine hydroxylase expression was increased in the celiac ganglia of the GHS vs. the control rats. We found an increase in trait but not stress-induced anxiety-like behavior in GHS rats in an elevated plus maze. We concluded that neonatal programming triggered by colon inflammation upregulates tyrosine hydroxylase in the celiac ganglia, which upregulates the release of NE in the gastric fundus muscularis externa. The increase of NE release from the sympathetic nerve terminals concentration dependently upregulates NGF, which proportionately increases the visceromotor response to gastric distention. Neonatal programming concurrently increases anxiety-like behavior in GHS rats. PMID:27151940

  1. Transplanted sympathetic neurons from old rats survive in the anterior eye chamber: a histochemical and electron microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Suhonen, J; Hervonen, A

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the viability and ultrastructural characteristics of intraocular superior cervical ganglion (SCG) grafts from young (3 months), aged (24 months) and very old (36 months) rats after short-term (1 month) grafting. The formaldehyde-induced fluorescence (FIF) technique for histochemical demonstration of catecholamines was used to indicate the functionality of transplanted neurons. Ultrastructural changes in grafts were demonstrated by electron microscopy. Four weeks after transplantation, catecholamine histofluorescence in young transplants was almost as strong as in the intact ganglia, while aged and very old grafts showed decreased fluorescence and contained a marked accumulation of autofluorescent lipopigment bodies. Catecholamine histofluorescence showed a decrease in neuronal density of 47%, 59% and 68% in young, aged and very old grafted ganglia, respectively. The shape of most of the transplanted neurons did not differ from that in the intact ganglia, but the average diameter of neurons was decreased after grafting. In electron microscopy, both neurons with normal in vivo fine structure and neurons showing some abnormal cytological alterations were seen in each age group of the transplants. The most prominent feature after grafting was the accumulation of different types of lipopigment bodies in the perikarya of neurons. the organization of the rough endoplasmic reticulum was more irregular in transplanted neurons than in intact neurons. In addition, the amount of neurofilament aggregates increased and some mitochondria were swollen in neurons after transplantation. These results suggest that young sympathetic ganglion tissue survives rather well after transplantation into the anterior eye chamber, while in the aged sympathetic ganglion implants the survival rate is poorer. However, aged and very old SCG grafts were shown to contain and continue to produce noradrenaline, indicating that sympathetic neurons maintain

  2. Ghrelin Supresses Sympathetic Hyperexcitation in Acute Heart Failure in Male Rats: Assessing Centrally and Peripherally Mediated Pathways.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Mikiyasu; Joe, Natalie; Tsuchimochi, Hirotsugu; Sonobe, Takashi; Schwenke, Daryl O

    2015-09-01

    The hormone ghrelin prevents a dangerous increase in cardiac sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) after acute myocardial infarction (MI), although the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. This study aimed to determine whether ghrelin's sympathoinhibitory properties stem either from directly within the central nervous system, or via modulation of specific cardiac vagal inhibitory afferents. Cardiac SNA was recorded in urethane-anesthetized rats for 3 hours after the ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery (ie, MI). Rats received ghrelin either sc (150 μg/kg) or intracerebroventricularly (5 μg/kg) immediately after the MI. In another two groups, the cervical vagi were denervated prior to the MI, followed by sc injection of either ghrelin or placebo. Acute MI induced a 188% increase in cardiac SNA, which was significantly attenuated in ghrelin-treated rats for both sc or intracerebroventricularly administration (36% and 76% increase, respectively). Consequently, mortality (47%) and the incidence of arrhythmic episodes (12 per 2 h) were improved with both routes of ghrelin administration (<13% and less than five per 2 h, respectively). Bilateral vagotomy significantly attenuated the cardiac SNA response to acute MI (99% increase). Ghrelin further attenuated the sympathetic response to MI in vagotomized rats so that the SNA response was comparable between vagotomized and vagal-intact MI rats treated with ghrelin. These results suggest that ghrelin may act primarily via a central pathway within the brain to suppress SNA after MI, although peripheral vagal afferent pathways may also contribute in part. The exact region(s) within the central nervous system whereby ghrelin inhibits SNA remains to be fully elucidated.

  3. Bilaterally evoked monosynaptic EPSPs, NMDA receptors and potentiation in rat sympathetic preganglionic neurones in vitro.

    PubMed

    Spanswick, D; Renaud, L P; Logan, S D

    1998-05-15

    1. Whole-cell patch clamp and intracellular recordings were obtained from 190 sympathetic preganglionic neurones (SPNs) in spinal cord slices of neonatal rats. Fifty-two of these SPNs were identified histologically as innervating the superior cervical ganglion (SCG) by the presence of Lucifer Yellow introduced from the patch pipette and the appearance of retrograde labelling following the injection of rhodamine-dextran-lysine into the SCG. 2. Electrical stimulation of the ipsilateral (n = 71) or contralateral (n = 32) lateral funiculi (iLF and cLF, respectively), contralateral intermediolateral nucleus (cIML, n = 41) or ipsilateral dorsal horn (DH, n = 34) evoked EPSPs or EPSCs that showed a constant latency and rise time, graded response to increased stimulus intensity, and no failures, suggesting a monosynaptic origin. 3. In all neurones tested (n = 60), fast rising and decaying components of EPSPs or EPSCs evoked from the iLF, cLF, cIML and DH in response to low-frequency stimulation (0.03-0.1 Hz) were sensitive to non-NMDA receptor antagonists. 4. In approximately 50 % of neurones tested (n = 29 of 60), EPSPs and EPSCs evoked from the iLF, cLF, cIML and DH during low-frequency stimulation were reduced by NMDA receptor antagonists. In the remaining neurones, an NMDA receptor antagonist-sensitive EPSP or EPSC was revealed only in magnesium-free bathing medium, or following high-frequency stimulation. 5. EPSPs evoked by stimulation of the iLF exhibited a sustained potentiation of the peak amplitude (25.3 +/- 11.4 %) in six of fourteen SPNs tested following a brief high-frequency stimulus (10-20 Hz, 0.1-2 s). 6. These results indicate that SPNs, including SPNs innervating the SCG, receive monosynaptic connections from both sides of the spinal cord. The neurotransmitter mediating transmission in some of the pathways activated by stimulation of iLF, cLF, cIML and DH is glutamate acting via both NMDA and non-NMDA receptors. Synaptic plasticity is a feature of

  4. Intragastric injection of Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota suppressed spleen sympathetic activation by central corticotrophin-releasing factor or peripheral 2-deoxy-d-glucose in anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Tanida, Mamoru; Takada, Mai; Kato-Kataoka, Akito; Kawai, Mitsuhisa; Miyazaki, Kouji; Shibamoto, Toshishige

    2016-04-21

    Intragastric (IG) administration of probiotic strain Lactobacillus casei Shirota (LcS) decreases the sympathetic nerve outflow of anesthetized rats in a tissue-specific manner. In the present study, we examined the effects of IG administration of LcS on sympathetic activation induced by an intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) and an intravenous (IV) injection of 2-deoxy-d-glucose (2DG) or interleukin (IL)-1β in urethane-anesthetized rats. The IG administration of LcS differently affected the stimulatory responses of sympathetic nerve outflow to CRF. LcS suppressed the increase in splenic sympathetic nerve activity (Spleen-SNA), induced by central CRF, in a dose-dependent manner; however, it did not alter adrenal sympathetic nervous activity (ASNA). In contrast, LcS did not affect spleen-SNA and ASNA following an IV injection of IL-1β. On the other hand, IG administration of LcS suppressed the activation of ASNA following an IV injection of 2DG. These findings suggest that the suppression of central CRF-induced sympathetic activation by LcS is tissue-specific. Moreover, it can suppress the 2DG-induced sympathetic activation. Furthermore, we found that stomach-specific vagotomy attenuates the suppressive effect of LcS on CRF-mediated spleen-SNA activation. Thus, the present study suggests that LcS administered to the stomach may act on the afferent vagal nerve and send afferent signals to the brain to regulate efferent SNA induced by sympathetic stimulators. PMID:26971699

  5. Role of the renal sympathetic nerves in renal sodium/potassium handling and renal damage in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianling; He, Qiaoling; Wu, Weifeng; Li, Qingjie; Huang, Rongjie; Pan, Xiaofeng; Lai, Wenying

    2016-01-01

    Renal sympathetic nerve activity has an important role in renal disease-associated hypertension and in the modulation of fluid homeostasis. In the present study, changes in renal function and renal sodium/potassium handling were investigated in groups of 12-week-old male, spontaneously hypertensive rats with renal denervation (RDNX group) or sham denervation (sham group). The RDNX group excreted significantly more sodium than the sham group during the 2-week observation period (P<0.05). Following bilateral renal denervation, the fractional lithium excretion was elevated in the RDNX group compared with the sham group, but no significant effect was observed of renal denervation on the fractional distal reabsorption rate of sodium or the fractional excretion of potassium. Furthermore, the glomerular injury score and the wall-to-lumen ratio of the interlobular artery were significantly lower in the RDNX group than in the sham group (P<0.05). In conclusion, the present study indicates an involvement of the renal sympathetic nerves in the regulation of renal tubular sodium reabsorption in spontaneously hypertensive rats and in the renal damage associated with hypertension. PMID:27698757

  6. Role of the renal sympathetic nerves in renal sodium/potassium handling and renal damage in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianling; He, Qiaoling; Wu, Weifeng; Li, Qingjie; Huang, Rongjie; Pan, Xiaofeng; Lai, Wenying

    2016-01-01

    Renal sympathetic nerve activity has an important role in renal disease-associated hypertension and in the modulation of fluid homeostasis. In the present study, changes in renal function and renal sodium/potassium handling were investigated in groups of 12-week-old male, spontaneously hypertensive rats with renal denervation (RDNX group) or sham denervation (sham group). The RDNX group excreted significantly more sodium than the sham group during the 2-week observation period (P<0.05). Following bilateral renal denervation, the fractional lithium excretion was elevated in the RDNX group compared with the sham group, but no significant effect was observed of renal denervation on the fractional distal reabsorption rate of sodium or the fractional excretion of potassium. Furthermore, the glomerular injury score and the wall-to-lumen ratio of the interlobular artery were significantly lower in the RDNX group than in the sham group (P<0.05). In conclusion, the present study indicates an involvement of the renal sympathetic nerves in the regulation of renal tubular sodium reabsorption in spontaneously hypertensive rats and in the renal damage associated with hypertension.

  7. Deleterious effect of salusin-β in paraventricular nucleus on sympathetic activity and blood pressure via NF-κB signaling in a rat model of obesity hypertension.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaodong; Wang, Yanchun; Ren, Kuang

    2015-08-01

    The paraventricular nucleus (PVN) has been shown to play a critical role in regulating blood pressure and sympathetic activity in obesity hypertension (OH). Salusin-β is a bioactive peptide with potential roles in mediating cardiovascular activity. The study was designed to test the hypothesis that salusin-β in the PVN can modulate sympathetic activity and blood pressure in OH. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were used to induce OH by a 12-week feeding of a high-fat diet (42% kcal as fat). Microinjection of salusin-β into the PVN increased the renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) in a dose-dependent manner, whereas salusin-β antibody elicited significant decreases in RSNA, MAP and HR, and abolished the effects of salusin-β only in the OH rats. As expected, the OH rats had a higher norepinephrine level, which was further increased by salusin-β. Furthermore, salusin-β in the PVN accelerated the nuclear translocation of the p65 subunit of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-KB) and the degradation of IKB-α (an endogenous inhibitor of NF-KB). Pretreatment with pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (an exogenous inhibitor of NF-KB) decreased RSNA, MAP and HR, and abolished the effects of salusin-β in the PVN in the OH rats. We concluded that salusin-β in the PVN markedly increased sympathetic outflow and blood pressure in diet-induced OH rats via NF-κB signaling.

  8. Selective response of rat peripheral sympathetic nervous system to various stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Ulus, I. H.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    1. We utilized the induction of tyrosine hydroxylase, a catecholamine-synthesizing enzyme, in sympathetic ganglia and adrenal medullae to explore the central and peripheral mechanisms through which choline, various environmental stresses, and drugs that alter blood pressure or central neurotransmission affect various portions of the sympathetic nervous system. Animals received each treatment chronically, and enzyme activity was measured in the superior cervical, stellate, and coeliac ganglia and in the adrenal medullae. 2. Choline administration increased tyrosine hydroxylase activity in all four tissues, probably by increasing the release of acetylcholine from preganglionic sympathetic neurones that synapse on catecholamine-producing ganglion and chromaffin cells; carbachol and nicotine had similar effects. 3. Insulin enhanced tyrosine hydroxylase activity primarily in the coeliac ganglion and the adrenal medullae, but not in the superior cervical ganglia. 4. Reserpine and phenoxybenzamine increased the activity of the enzyme in all four tissues. 5. Prolonged exposure to a cold environment increased enzyme activity in all four tissues, but especially in the stellate and coeliac ganglia; forced swimming affected tyrosine hydroxylase only in these two ganglia. 6. Several drugs known to modify central neurotransmission were found to increase tyrosine hydroxylase activity in some portions of the sympathetic nervous system but not in others. 5,7-Dihydroxytryptamine, which destroys terminals of serotoninergic neurones, enhanced enzyme activity in all four tissues, but primarily in the coeliac ganglion and adrenal medullae. ET-495 (a dopaminergic agonist), D-amphetamine, and morphine induced tyrosine hydroxylase activity in the adrenal medullae and the coeliac ganglion, but not in the superior cervical ganglia. Oxotremorine, a centrally acting muscarinic agonist, increased tyrosine hydroxylase activity only in the adrenal medullae; its effect was not blocked by

  9. Mechanical hypersensitivity, sympathetic sprouting and glial activation are attenuated by local injection of corticosteroid near the lumbar ganglion in a rat model of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing-Yi; Xie, Wenrui; Strong, Judith A.; Guo, Qu-Lian; Zhang, Jun-Ming

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES Inflammatory responses in the lumbar dorsal root ganglion (DRG) play a key role in pathologic pain states. Systemic administration of a common anti-inflammatory corticosteroid, triamcinolone acetonide (TA), reduces sympathetic sprouting, mechanical pain behavior, spontaneous bursting activity, cytokine and nerve growth factor production in the DRG. We hypothesized that systemic TA effects are primarily due to local effects on the DRG METHODS Male Sprague–Dawley rats were divided into four groups: SNL (tight ligation and transection of spinal nerves) or normal, with and without a single dose of TA injectable suspension slowly injected onto the surface of DRG and surrounding region at the time of SNL or sham surgery. Mechanical threshold was tested on postoperative days 1, 3, 5, and 7. Immunohistochemical staining examined tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in DRG, and CD11B antibody (OX-42) in spinal cord. RESULTS Local TA treatment attenuated mechanical sensitivity, reduced sympathetic sprouting in the DRG, and decreased satellite glia activation in the DRG and microglia activation in the spinal cord after SNL. CONCLUSION A single injection of corticosteroid in the vicinity of the axotomized DRG can mimic many effects of systemic TA, mitigating behavioral and cellular abnormalities induced by spinal nerve ligation. This provides a further rational for the clinical use of localized steroid injections clinically, and provides further support for the idea that localized inflammation at the level of the DRG is an important component of the spinal nerve ligation model, commonly classified as neuropathic pain model. PMID:21455091

  10. Virtual leak channels modulate firing dynamics and synaptic integration in rat sympathetic neurons: implications for ganglionic transmission in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Springer, Mitchell G; Kullmann, Paul H M; Horn, John P

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The excitability of rat sympathetic neurons and integration of nicotinic EPSPs were compared in primary cell culture and in the acutely isolated intact superior cervical ganglion using whole cell patch electrode recordings. When repetitive firing was classified by Hodgkin's criteria in cultured cells, 18% displayed tonic class 1 excitability, 36% displayed adapting class 2 excitability and 46% displayed phasic class 3 excitability. In the intact ganglion, 71% of cells were class 1 and 29% were class 2. This diverges from microelectrode reports that nearly 100% of superior cervical ganglion neurons show phasic class 3 firing. The hypothesis that the disparity between patch and microelectrode data arises from a shunt conductance was tested using the dynamic clamp in cell culture. Non-depolarizing shunts of 3–10 nS converted cells from classes 1 and 2 to class 3 dynamics with current–voltage relations that replicated microelectrode data. Primary and secondary EPSPs recorded from the intact superior cervical ganglion were modelled as virtual synapses in cell culture using the dynamic clamp. Stimulating sympathetic neurons with virtual synaptic activity, designed to replicate in vivo recordings of EPSPs in muscle vasoconstrictor neurons, produced a 2.4-fold amplification of presynaptic activity. This gain in postsynaptic output did not differ between neurons displaying the three classes of excitability. Mimicry of microelectrode damage by virtual leak channels reduced and eventually obliterated synaptic gain by inhibiting summation of subthreshold EPSPs. These results provide a framework for interpreting sympathetic activity recorded from intact animals and support the hypothesis that paravertebral ganglia function as activity-dependent amplifiers of spinal output from preganglionic circuitry. PMID:25398531

  11. Moderate caloric restriction during gestation in rats alters adipose tissue sympathetic innervation and later adiposity in offspring.

    PubMed

    García, Ana Paula; Palou, Mariona; Sánchez, Juana; Priego, Teresa; Palou, Andreu; Picó, Catalina

    2011-01-01

    Maternal prenatal undernutrition predisposes offspring to higher adiposity in adulthood. Mechanisms involved in these programming effects, apart from those described in central nervous system development, have not been established. Here we aimed to evaluate whether moderate caloric restriction during early pregnancy in rats affects white adipose tissue (WAT) sympathetic innervation in the offspring, and its relationship with adiposity development. For this purpose, inguinal and retroperitoneal WAT (iWAT and rpWAT, respectively) were analyzed in male and female offspring of control and 20% caloric-restricted (from 1-12 d of pregnancy) (CR) dams. Body weight (BW), the weight, DNA-content, morphological features and the immunoreactive tyrosine hydroxylase and Neuropeptide Y area (TH+ and NPY+ respectively, performed by immunohistochemistry) of both fat depots, were studied at 25 d and 6 m of age, the latter after 2 m exposure to high fat diet. At 6 m of life, CR males but not females, exhibited greater BW, and greater weight and total DNA-content in iWAT, without changes in adipocytes size, suggesting the development of hyperplasia in this depot. However, in rpWAT, CR males but not females, showed larger adipocyte diameter, with no changes in DNA-content, suggesting the development of hypertrophy. These parameters were not different between control and CR animals at the age of 25 d. In iWAT, both at 25 d and 6 m, CR males but not females, showed lower TH(+) and NPY(+), suggesting lower sympathetic innervation in CR males compared to control males. In rpWAT, at 6 m but not at 25 d, CR males but not females, showed lower TH(+) and NPY(+). Thus, the effects of caloric restriction during gestation on later adiposity and on the differences in the adult phenotype between internal and subcutaneous fat depots in the male offspring may be associated in part with specific alterations in sympathetic innervation, which may impact on WAT architecture.

  12. Increased excitability and spontaneous activity of rat sensory neurons following in vitro stimulation of sympathetic fiber sprouts in the isolated dorsal root ganglion

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wenrui; Strong, Judith A.; Zhang, Jun-Ming

    2010-01-01

    Many chronic pain conditions including complex regional pain syndrome are exacerbated by sympathetic activity. In animal models, sympathetic fibers sprout into the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) after peripheral nerve injury, forming abnormal connections with sensory neurons. However, functional studies of sympathetic-sensory connections have been limited largely to in vivo studies. This study describes a new method for studying sympathetic-sensory connections in an isolated whole DRG preparation in the rat spinal nerve ligation (SNL) model. Three days after ligation of the ventral ramus of the spinal nerve (SNL), sympathetic fibers sprouting into the DRG were observed to originate largely in the intact dorsal ramus of the spinal nerve, which at the lumbar level is a small branch of the spinal nerve separating from the ventral ramus near the intervertebral foramen. In whole DRG isolated 3 days after SNL, microelectrode recordings of sensory neurons showed that repeated stimulation of the dorsal ramus enhanced spontaneous activity in large and medium diameter neurons, and reduced rheobase in large neurons. These effects, which were slow and long-lasting, were attributed to stimulation of the sympathetic sprouts because: stimulation had no effect in uninjured DRG; and effects could be reduced or eliminated by a “cocktail” of antagonists of norepinephrine and ATP receptors, by pretreatment with the sympathetic release blocker bretylium, or by pre-cutting the grey ramus through which sympathetic fibers coursed to the ligated DRG. The latter treatment, a relatively minimal form of sympathectomy, was also highly effective in reducing mechanical pain ipsilateral to the SNL. PMID:20800969

  13. Interactions between angiotensin peptides and the sympathetic nervous system mediating intestinal sodium and water absorption in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Levens, N R; Peach, M J; Carey, R M

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the locus of interaction of angiotensin peptides with the sympathetic nervous system leading to alterations in jejunal sodium and water transport. At low physiological doses, angiotensin II (AII) stimulates jejunal sodium and water absorption, while at high doses peptide inhibits absorption and/or stimulates secretion. Both the stimulation of jejunal transport and the inhibition of absorption were expressed in adrenalectomized rats. However, the stimulation of jejunal water absorption was abolished and a potentiated inhibition of transport was expressed in peripherally sympathectomized rats (intact adrenal medulla) and in normal rats after administration of guanethadine, phentolamine, and prazosin. The angiotensin analog (Sar1 Leu8)-AII has low efficacy and is a potent competitive antagonist of the parent peptide in pressor and myotropic systems, but is a full agonist with even greater potency than AII in stimulating jejunal transport. The increased water transport in response to (Sar1 Leu8)-AII is not secondary to enhanced renal renin release, as the analog also stimulated jejunal transport in the presence of captopril and after bilateral nephrectomy. The stimulation of absorption in response to (Sar1 Leu8)-AII alone or together with AII was abolished by phentolamine. These data demonstrate that AII-increased intestinal absorption is secondary to the release of norepinephrine from nerve endings in the jejunum and that AII inhibition of absorption is not mediated by the sympathetic nervous system. The analog (Sar1 Leu8)-AII is a full agonist in the stimulation of jejunal transport (increased norepinephrine release), but antagonizes the inhibitory response to high doses of AII. Angiotensin peptides are potent modulators of intestinal sodium and water absorption. PMID:7204574

  14. Activation and integration of bilateral GABA-mediated synaptic inputs in neonatal rat sympathetic preganglionic neurones in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Whyment, Andrew D; Wilson, Jennifer M M; Renaud, Leo P; Spanswick, David

    2004-01-01

    The role of GABA receptors in synaptic transmission to neonatal rat sympathetic preganglionic neurones (SPNs) was investigated utilizing whole-cell patch clamp recording techniques in longitudinal and transverse spinal cord slice preparations. In the presence of glutamate receptor antagonists (NBQX, 5 μm and D-APV, 10 μm), electrical stimulation of the ipsilateral or contralateral lateral funiculi (iLF and cLF, respectively) revealed monosynaptic inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs) in 75% and 65% of SPNs, respectively. IPSPs were sensitive to bicuculline (10 μm) in all neurones tested and reversed polarity around −55 mV, the latter indicating mediation via chloride conductances. In three neurones IPSPs evoked by stimulation of the iLF (n = 1) or cLF (n = 2) were partly sensitive to strychnine (2 μm). The expression of postsynaptic GABAA and GABAB receptors were confirmed by the sensitivity of SPNs to agonists, GABA (2 mm), muscimol (10–100 μm) or baclofen (10–100 μm), in the presence of TTX, each of which produced membrane hyperpolarization in all SPNs tested. Muscimol-induced responses were sensitive to bicuculline (1–10 μm) and SR95531 (10 μm) and baclofen-induced responses were sensitive to 2-hydroxy-saclofen (100–200 μm) and CGP55845 (200 nm). The GABAC receptor agonist CACA (200 μm) was without significant effect on SPNs. These results suggest that SPNs possess postsynaptic GABAA and GABAB receptors and that subsets of SPNs receive bilateral GABAergic inputs which activate GABAA receptors, coupled to a chloride conductance. At resting or holding potentials close to threshold either single or bursts (10–100 Hz) of IPSPs gave rise to a rebound excitation and action potential firing at the termination of the burst. This effect was mimicked by injection of small (10–20 pA) rectangular-wave current pulses, which revealed a time-dependent, Cs+-sensitive inward rectification and rebound excitation at the termination of the response to

  15. Differential action for ethanol on baroreceptor reflex control of heart rate and sympathetic efferent discharge in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Xin, Z.; Abdel-Rahman, A.R.A.; Wooles, W.R.

    1988-01-01

    The acute effects of ethanol (0.33, 0.66, or 1 g/kg) on baroreflex control of heart rate (HR) and sympathetic efferent discharge (SED) were investigated in rats. The two higher doses of ethanol caused a progressive and significant increase in baseline SED and a slight increase in HR. The findings suggest that the sensitivity of the reflex control of SED was preserved whereas that of HR was impaired after acute ethanol administration. Since these findings were obtained in the same animals, the data suggest that acute ethanol has a differential action on reflex control of SED and HR. Further, the significant increase in SED after moderate and high doses of ethanol suggests an increased central sympathetic tone as recordings were made from preganglionic nerve fibers (splanchnic nerve). The absence of an increase in baseline MAP, in spite of a significant increase in baseline SED following acute ethanol injection, could be explained, at least in part, by an ethanol-evoked reduction in pressor responsiveness to phenylephrine, an ..cap alpha..-adrenergic agonist.

  16. Inhibitory H3 receptors on sympathetic nerves of the pithed rat: activation by endogenous histamine and operation in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Godlewski, G; Malinowska, B; Buczko, W; Schlicker, E

    1997-02-01

    Our previous results demonstrate the occurrence of presynaptic inhibitory histamine H3 receptors on sympathetic neurons innervating resistance vessels of the pithed rat. The present study, in which new H3 receptor ligands with increased potency and selectivity (imetit, clobenpropit) were used, was designed to further explore the role of H3 receptors in the regulation of the rat cardiovascular system. In particular we were interested whether these receptors may be activated by endogenous histamine and whether they are detectable in an experimental model of hypertension. All experiments were performed on pithed and vagotomized rats treated with rauwolscine 1 mumol/kg. In normotensive Wistar rats the electrical (1 Hz, 1 ms, 50 V for 20 s) stimulation of the preganglionic sympathetic nerve fibres increased diastolic blood pressure by about 35 mmHg. Two H3 receptor agonists, R-(-)-alpha-methylhistamine and imetit, inhibited the electrically induced increase in diastolic blood pressure in a dose-dependent manner. The maximal effect (about 25%) was obtained for R-(-)-alpha-methylhistamine at about 10 mumol/kg and for imetit at about 1 mumol/kg. Two H3 receptor antagonists, thioperamide 1 mumol/kg and clobenpropit 0.1 mumol/kg, attenuated the inhibitory effect of imetit. The neurogenic vasopressor response was increased by about 15% by thioperamide 1 mumol/kg and clobenpropit 0.1 mumol/kg and decreased by 25% by the histamine methyltransferase inhibitor metoprine 37 mumol/kg. R-(-)-alpha-Methylhistamine, imetit, thioperamide, clobenpropit and metoprine did not affect the vasopressor response to exogenously added noradrenaline 0.01 mumol/kg (which increased diastolic blood pressure by about 40 mmHg). Metoprine had only a very low affinity for H3 binding sites (labelled by 3H-N alpha-methylhistamine; pKi 4.46). In pithed Wistar Kyoto (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) rats, electrical (1 Hz, 1 ms, 50 V for 10 s) stimulation increased diastolic blood pressure by 28

  17. Diabetes-induced changes in the 5-hydroxytryptamine inhibitory receptors involved in the pressor effect elicited by sympathetic stimulation in the pithed rat

    PubMed Central

    García, Mónica; Morán, Asunción; Calama, Elena; Martín, Maria Luisa; Barthelmebs, Mariette; Román, Luis San

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the effect of alloxan-induced diabetes on the inhibitory mechanisms of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in the pressor responses induced by stimulation of sympathetic vasopressor outflow in pithed rats, and analysed the type and/or subtype of 5-HT receptors involved. Diabetes was induced in male Wistar rats by a single s.c. injection of alloxan, then 4 weeks later, they were anaesthetized, pretreated with atropine and pithed. Electrical stimulation of the sympathetic outflow from the spinal cord (0.1, 0.5, 1 and 5 Hz) resulted in frequency-dependent increases in blood pressure. Intravenous infusions of 5-HT (1–80 μg kg−1 min−1) reduced the pressor effects obtained by electrical stimulation. The 5-HT1 receptor agonist 5-carboxamidotryptamine, 5-CT (5 μg kg−1 min−1), caused an inhibition of the pressor response, whereas the selective 5-HT2 receptor agonist, α-methyl-5-HT (5 μg kg−1 min−1) and the selective 5-HT3 receptor agonist, 1-phenylbiguanide (40 μg kg−1 min−1), did not modify the sympathetic pressor responses. 5-HT had no effect on exogenous noradrenaline (NA)-induced pressor responses. The inhibition of electrically induced pressor responses by 5-HT (10 μg kg−1 min−1) was unable to be elicited after i.v. treatment with methiothepin (100 μg kg−1) because of the marked inhibition produced by methiothepin alone. The 5-HT-induced inhibition was blocked after i.v. administration of WAY-100,635 (100 μg kg−1) and not affected by ritanserin (1 mg kg−1), MDL 72222 (2 mg kg−1). The selective 5-HT1A receptor agonist, 8-hydroxydipropylaminotretalin hydrobromide (8-OH-DPAT) (5–20 μg kg−1 min−1) but neither the rodent 5-HT1B receptor agonist, CGS-12066B (5 μg kg−1 min−1), nor the selective nonrodent 5-HT1B and 5-HT1D receptor agonist, L-694,247 (5 and 40 μg kg−1 min−1), inhibited the electrically induced pressor response. The selective 5-HT1A

  18. Roles for the sympathetic nervous system, renal nerves, and CNS melanocortin-4 receptor in the elevated blood pressure in hyperandrogenemic female rats

    PubMed Central

    Maranon, Rodrigo; Lima, Roberta; Spradley, Frank T.; do Carmo, Jussara M.; Zhang, Howei; Smith, Andrew D.; Bui, Elizabeth; Thomas, R. Lucas; Moulana, Mohadetheh; Hall, John E.; Granger, Joey P.

    2015-01-01

    Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) have hyperandrogenemia and increased prevalence of risk factors for cardiovascular disease, including elevated blood pressure. We recently characterized a hyperandrogenemic female rat (HAF) model of PCOS [chronic dihydrotestosterone (DHT) beginning at 4 wk of age] that exhibits similar characteristics as women with PCOS. In the present studies we tested the hypotheses that the elevated blood pressure in HAF rats is mediated in part by sympathetic activation, renal nerves, and melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) activation. Adrenergic blockade with terazosin and propranolol or renal denervation reduced mean arterial pressure (MAP by telemetry) in HAF rats but not controls. Hypothalamic MC4R expression was higher in HAF rats than controls, and central nervous system MC4R antagonism with SHU-9119 (1 nmol/h icv) reduced MAP in HAF rats. Taking a genetic approach, MC4R null and wild-type (WT) female rats were treated with DHT or placebo from 5 to 16 wk of age. MC4R null rats were obese and had higher MAP than WT control rats, and while DHT increased MAP in WT controls, DHT failed to further increase MAP in MC4R null rats. These data suggest that increases in MAP with chronic hyperandrogenemia in female rats are due, in part, to activation of the sympathetic nervous system, renal nerves, and MC4R and may provide novel insights into the mechanisms responsible for hypertension in women with hyperandrogenemia such as PCOS. PMID:25695289

  19. The role of sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve systems on the smooth muscle of rat seminal vesicles - experimental results and speculation for physiological implication on ejaculation.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, J-T; Kuo, Y-C; Chang, H-C; Liu, S-P; Chen, J-H; Tsai, V F S

    2014-01-01

    Ejaculation is a process involving sympathetic and parasympathetic effects during different stages - emission and ejection. Some conditions of ejaculation dysfunction are associated with autonomic nerves. However, the exact effects of autonomic nerves on ejaculation are not well defined. Autonomic agonists induce different recorded trace patterns of seminal vesicular contraction. The different traces contain different components of phasic and tonic contraction, which may have physiological implications. In this study, we examined isolated rat seminal vesicle (SV) contraction by phenylephrine (PE), acetylcholine, and their respective antagonists and then speculated upon physiological roles of sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves on SV during ejaculation. We found that PE and Ach both achieved good contraction of rat SV. Compared to α1b for sympathetic and M1, M2 for parasympathetic receptors, α1a and M3 are the relatively dominant subtypes on rat SV. Adrenergic and cholinergic agonists cause different trace patterns of SV contraction. We speculated that the sympathetic effect is dominant during emission to squeeze seminal fluid out and that the parasympathetic effect is dominant during ejection to provide an anti-reflux effect on the ejaculatory duct.

  20. Renal ischemic injury affects renal hemodynamics and excretory functions in Sprague Dawley rats: involvement of renal sympathetic tone.

    PubMed

    Salman, Ibrahim M; Sattar, Munavvar A; Abdullah, Nor A; Ameer, Omar Z; Yam, Mun F; Kaur, Gurjeet; Hye Khan, Md Abdul; Johns, Edward J

    2010-01-01

    The role of renal sympathetic nerves in the pathogenesis of ischemic acute renal failure (ARF) and the immediate changes in the renal excretory functions following renal ischemia were investigated. Two groups of male Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were anesthetized (pentobarbitone sodium, 60 mg kg(-1) i.p.) and subjected to unilateral renal ischemia by clamping the left renal artery for 30 min followed by reperfusion. In group 1, the renal nerves were electrically stimulated and the responses in the renal blood flow (RBF) and renal vascular resistance (RVR) were recorded, while group 2 was used to study the early changes in the renal functions following renal ischemia. In post-ischemic animals, basal RBF and the renal vasoconstrictor reperfusion to renal nerve stimulation (RNS) were significantly lower (all p < 0.05 vs. control). Mean arterial pressure (MAP), basal RVR, urine flow rate (UFR), absolute and fractional excretions of sodium (U(Na)V and FE(Na)), and potassium (U(K)V and FE(K)) were higher in ARF rats (all p < 0.05 vs. control). Post-ischemic animals showed markedly lower glomerular filtration rate (GFR) (p < 0.05 vs. control). No appreciable differences were observed in urinary sodium to potassium ratio (U(Na)/U(K)) during the early reperfusion phase of renal ischemia (p > 0.05 vs. control). The data suggest an immediate involvement of renal sympathetic nerve action in the pathogenesis of ischemic ARF primarily through altered renal hemodynamics. Diuresis, natriuresis, and kaliuresis due to impaired renal tubular functions are typical responses to renal ischemia and of comparable magnitudes.

  1. Characteristics of renal sympathetic nerve single units in rabbits with angiotensin-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Burke, Sandra L; Lukoshkova, Elena V; Head, Geoffrey A

    2016-01-01

    We examined the effect of chronic angiotensin (Ang II)-induced hypertension on activity of postganglionic renal sympathetic units to determine whether altered whole renal nerve activity is due to recruitment or changes in firing frequency. Rabbits were treated with a low (20 ng kg(-1) min(-1), 8 weeks) or high dose (50 ng kg(-1) min(-1), 4 weeks) of Ang II before the experiment under chloralose-urethane anaesthesia. Spontaneously active units were detected from multiunit recordings using an algorithm that separated units by action potential shape using templates that matched spikes within a prescribed standard deviation. Multiunit sympathetic nerve activity was 40% higher in rabbits treated with low-dose Ang II than in sham (P = 0.012) but not different in high-dose Ang II. Resting firing frequency was similar in sham rabbits (1.00 ± 0.09 spikes s(-1), n = 144) and in those treated with high-dose Ang II (1.10 ± 0.08 spikes s(-1), n = 112) but was lower with low-dose Ang II (0.65 ± 0.08 spikes s(-1), n = 149, P < 0.05). Unit firing rhythmicity was linked to the cardiac cycle and was similar in sham and low-dose Ang II groups but 29-32% lower in rabbits treated with high-dose Ang II (P < 0.001). Cardiac linkage followed a similar pattern during hypoxia. All units showed baroreceptor dependency. Baroreflex gain and range were reduced and curves shifted to the right in Ang II groups. Firing frequency during hypoxia increased by +39% in low-dose Ang II and +82% in shams, but the greatest increase was in the high-dose Ang II group (+103%, P(dose) = 0.001). Responses to hypercapnia were similar in all groups. Increases in sympathetic outflow in hypertension caused by low-dose chronic Ang II administration are due to recruitment of neurons, but high-dose Ang II increases firing frequency in response to chemoreceptor stimuli independently of the arterial baroreceptors. PMID:26467849

  2. Effects of inhaled citronella oil and related compounds on rat body weight and brown adipose tissue sympathetic nerve.

    PubMed

    Batubara, Irmanida; Suparto, Irma H; Sa'diah, Siti; Matsuoka, Ryunosuke; Mitsunaga, Tohru

    2015-03-01

    Citronella oil is one of the most famous Indonesian essential oils, having a distinctive aroma. As with other essential oils, it is crucial to explore the effects of inhalation of this oil. Therefore, the aim of this research was to elucidate the effects of inhalation of citronella oil and its components isolated from Cymbopogon nardus L. (Poaceae), Indonesian local name: "Sereh Wangi" on the body weight, blood lipid profile, and liver function of rats, as well as on the sympathetic nerve activity and temperature of brown adipose tissue. Sprague-Dawley male adult rats fed with high fat diet (HFD) were made to inhale citronella oil, R-(+)-citronellal, and β-citronellol for five weeks, and the observations were compared to those of HFD rats that were not subjected to inhalation treatment. The results showed that inhalation of β-citronellol decreased feed consumption. As a consequence, the percentage of weight gain decreased compared with that in control group and the blood cholesterol level in the β-citronellol group was significantly lowered. Concentration of liver function enzymes were not significantly different among the groups. In conclusion, inhalation of citronella oil, specifically β-citronellol, decreased body weight by decreasing appetite, without any marked changes in liver enzyme concentrations. PMID:25774603

  3. Effects of Inhaled Citronella Oil and Related Compounds on Rat Body Weight and Brown Adipose Tissue Sympathetic Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Batubara, Irmanida; Suparto, Irma H.; Sa’diah, Siti; Matsuoka, Ryunosuke; Mitsunaga, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    Citronella oil is one of the most famous Indonesian essential oils, having a distinctive aroma. As with other essential oils, it is crucial to explore the effects of inhalation of this oil. Therefore, the aim of this research was to elucidate the effects of inhalation of citronella oil and its components isolated from Cymbopogon nardus L. (Poaceae), Indonesian local name: “Sereh Wangi” on the body weight, blood lipid profile, and liver function of rats, as well as on the sympathetic nerve activity and temperature of brown adipose tissue. Sprague-Dawley male adult rats fed with high fat diet (HFD) were made to inhale citronella oil, R-(+)-citronellal, and β-citronellol for five weeks, and the observations were compared to those of HFD rats that were not subjected to inhalation treatment. The results showed that inhalation of β-citronellol decreased feed consumption. As a consequence, the percentage of weight gain decreased compared with that in control group and the blood cholesterol level in the β-citronellol group was significantly lowered. Concentration of liver function enzymes were not significantly different among the groups. In conclusion, inhalation of citronella oil, specifically β-citronellol, decreased body weight by decreasing appetite, without any marked changes in liver enzyme concentrations. PMID:25774603

  4. Effects of inhaled citronella oil and related compounds on rat body weight and brown adipose tissue sympathetic nerve.

    PubMed

    Batubara, Irmanida; Suparto, Irma H; Sa'diah, Siti; Matsuoka, Ryunosuke; Mitsunaga, Tohru

    2015-03-12

    Citronella oil is one of the most famous Indonesian essential oils, having a distinctive aroma. As with other essential oils, it is crucial to explore the effects of inhalation of this oil. Therefore, the aim of this research was to elucidate the effects of inhalation of citronella oil and its components isolated from Cymbopogon nardus L. (Poaceae), Indonesian local name: "Sereh Wangi" on the body weight, blood lipid profile, and liver function of rats, as well as on the sympathetic nerve activity and temperature of brown adipose tissue. Sprague-Dawley male adult rats fed with high fat diet (HFD) were made to inhale citronella oil, R-(+)-citronellal, and β-citronellol for five weeks, and the observations were compared to those of HFD rats that were not subjected to inhalation treatment. The results showed that inhalation of β-citronellol decreased feed consumption. As a consequence, the percentage of weight gain decreased compared with that in control group and the blood cholesterol level in the β-citronellol group was significantly lowered. Concentration of liver function enzymes were not significantly different among the groups. In conclusion, inhalation of citronella oil, specifically β-citronellol, decreased body weight by decreasing appetite, without any marked changes in liver enzyme concentrations.

  5. Gene transfer of cystathionine β-synthase into RVLM increases hydrogen sulfide-mediated suppression of sympathetic outflow via KATP channel in normotensive rats.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xiao-cui; Guo, Rong; Liu, Shang-yu; Xiao, Lin; Xue, Hong-mei; Guo, Qi; Jin, Sheng; Wu, Yu-ming

    2015-03-15

    Hydrogen sulfide has been shown to have a sympathoinhibitory effect in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM). The present study examined the function of cystathionine β-synthase (CBS)/hydrogen sulfide system in the RVLM, which plays a crucial role in the control of blood pressure and sympathetic nerve activity. Adenovirus vectors encoding CBS (AdCBS) or enhanced green fluorescent protein (AdEGFP) were transfected into the RVLM in normotensive rats. Identical microinjection of AdCBS into the RVLM had no effect on systolic blood pressure and heart rate (HR) in conscious rats. Acute experiments were performed at day 7 after gene transfer in anesthetized rats. Microinjection of the CBS inhibitors hydroxylamine (HA) or amino-oxyacetate into the RVLM produced an increase in the renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and HR. There was a potentiation of the increases in RSNA, MAP, and HR because of the CBS inhibitors in AdCBS-injected rats compared with AdEGFP-injected rats. Pretreatment with pinacidil, a ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channel activator, abolished the effects of HA in two groups. Microinjection of glibenclamide, a KATP channel blocker, produced increases in RSNA, MAP, and HR in AdCBS-injected rats. No changes in behavior were observed in AdEGFP-injected rats. Furthermore, Western blot analysis indicated an increase in the expression of sulfonylurea receptor 2 and inward rectifier K(+) 6.1 in AdCBS-injected rats. These results suggest that the increase in KATP channels in the RVLM may be responsible for the greater sympathetic outflow and pressor effect of HA in AdCBS-injected rats compared with AdEGFP-injected rats.

  6. Endogenous nitric oxide derived from NOS I or II in thoracic spinal cord exerts opposing tonic modulation on sympathetic vasomotor tone via disparate mechanisms in anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Poon, Yan-Yuen; Tsai, Ching-Yi; Cheng, Chung-Dar; Chang, Alice Y W; Chan, Samuel H H

    2016-09-01

    The sympathetic preganglionic neurons (SPN) in the thoracic spinal cord regulate vasomotor tone via norepinephrine released from sympathetic terminals and adrenal medulla. We assessed the hypothesis that nitric oxide synthase I (NOS I)- and NOS II-derived nitric oxide (NO) in the thoracic spinal cord differentially modulate sympathetic outflow and that the adrenal medulla may be involved in those modulatory actions. In Sprague-Dawley rats, NOS I immunoreactivity was distributed primarily in the perikaryon, proximal dendrites, or axons of SPN, and small clusters of NOS II immunoreactivity impinged mainly on the circumference of SPN. Intrathecal administration of 7-nitroindazole (7-NI), a specific NOS I antagonist, into the thoracic spinal cord significantly reduced arterial pressure, heart rate, and basal or baroreflex-mediated sympathetic vasomotor tone. On the other hand, intrathecal application of S-methylisothiourea (SMT), a specific NOS II antagonist, elevated arterial pressure with a transient reduction of heart rate, induced a surge of plasma norepinephrine, and reduced baroreflex-mediated but not basal sympathetic vasomotor tone. Bilateral adrenalectomy significantly exacerbated the cardiovascular responses to 7-NI but antagonized those to SMT. We conclude that both NOS I and NOS II are present in the thoracic spinal cord and are tonically active under physiological conditions. Furthermore, the endogenous NO generated by NOS I-containing SPN exerts a tonic excitatory action on vasomotor tone mediated by norepinephrine released from the adrenal medulla and sympathetic nerve terminals. On the other hand, NO derived from NOS II exerts a tonic inhibitory action on sympathetic outflow from the SPN that targets primarily the blood vessels. PMID:27371683

  7. Renal Sympathetic Denervation in Rats Ameliorates Cardiac Dysfunction and Fibrosis Post-Myocardial Infarction Involving MicroRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiaoxin; Li, Xiaoyan; Lyu, Yongnan; He, Yiyu; Wan, Weiguo; Jiang, Xuejun

    2016-01-01

    Background The role of renal sympathetic denervation (RSD) in ameliorating post-myocardial infarction (MI) left ventricular (LV) fibrosis via microRNA-dependent regulation of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) remains unknown. Material/Methods MI and RSD were induced in Sprague–Dawley rats by ligating the left coronary artery and denervating the bilateral renal nerves, respectively. Norepinephrine, renin, angiotensin II and aldosterone in plasma, collagen, microRNA21, microRNA 101a, microRNA 133a and CTGF in heart tissue, as well as cardiac function were evaluated six weeks post-MI. Results In the RSD group, parameters of cardiac function were significantly improved as evidenced by increased LV ejection fraction (p<0.01), LV end-systolic diameter (p<0.01), end-diastolic diameter (p<0.05), LV systolic pressure (p<0.05), maximal rate of pressure rise and decline (dP/dtmax and dP/dtmin, p<0.05), and decreased LV end-diastolic pressure (p<0.05) when compared with MI rats. Further, reduced collagen deposition in peri-infarct myocardium was observed in RSD-treated rats along with higher microRNA101a and microRNA133a (p<0.05) and lower microRNA21 expression (p<0.01) than in MI rats. CTGF mRNA and protein levels were decreased in LV following RSD (p<0.01), accompanied by decreased expression of norepinephrine, renin, angiotensin II and aldosterone in plasma (p<0.05) compared with untreated MI rats. Conclusions The potential therapeutic effects of RSD on post-MI LV fibrosis may be partly mediated by inhibition of CTGF expression via upregulation of microRNA 101a and microRNA 133a and downregulation of microRNA21. PMID:27490896

  8. SGLT1 protein expression in plasma membrane of acinar cells correlates with the sympathetic outflow to salivary glands in diabetic and hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Sabino-Silva, Robinson; Alves-Wagner, Ana B T; Burgi, Katia; Okamoto, Maristela M; Alves, Adilson S; Lima, Guilherme A; Freitas, Helayne S; Antunes, Vagner R; Machado, Ubiratan F

    2010-12-01

    Salivary gland dysfunction is a feature in diabetes and hypertension. We hypothesized that sodium-glucose cotransporter 1 (SGLT1) participates in salivary dysfunctions through a sympathetic- and protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated pathway. In Wistar-Kyoto (WKY), diabetic WKY (WKY-D), spontaneously hypertensive (SHR), and diabetic SHR (SHR-D) rats, PKA/SGLT1 proteins were analyzed in parotid and submandibular glands, and the sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) to the glands was monitored. Basal SNA was threefold higher in SHR (P < 0.001 vs. WKY), and diabetes decreased this activity (∼50%, P < 0.05) in both WKY and SHR. The catalytic subunit of PKA and the plasma membrane SGLT1 content in acinar cells were regulated in parallel to the SNA. Electrical stimulation of the sympathetic branch to salivary glands increased (∼30%, P < 0.05) PKA and SGLT1 expression. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed the observed regulations of SGLT1, revealing its location in basolateral membrane of acinar cells. Taken together, our results show highly coordinated regulation of sympathetic activity upon PKA activity and plasma membrane SGLT1 content in salivary glands. Furthermore, the present findings show that diabetic- and/or hypertensive-induced changes in the sympathetic activity correlate with changes in SGLT1 expression in basolateral membrane of acinar cells, which can participate in the salivary glands dysfunctions reported by patients with these pathologies.

  9. Insulin growth factors regulate the mitotic cycle in cultured rat sympathetic neuroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    DiCicco-Bloom, E.; Black, I.B. )

    1988-06-01

    While neuronal mitosis is uniquely restricted to early development, the underlying regulation remains to be defined. The authors have now developed a dissociated, embryonic sympathetic neuron culture system that uses fully defined medium in which cells enter the mitotic cycle. The cultured cells expressed two neuronal traits, tyrosine hydroxylase and the neuron-specific 160-kDa neurofilament subunit protein, but were devoid of glial fibrillary acidic protein, a marker for non-myelin-forming Schwann cells in ganglia. Approximately one-third of the tyrosine hydroxylase-positive cells synthesized DNA in culture, specifically incorporating ({sup 3}H)thymidine into their nuclei. They used this system to define factors regulating the mitotic cycle in sympathetic neuroblasts. Members of the insulin family of growth factors, including insulin and insulin-like growth factors I and II, regulated DNA synthesis in the presumptive neuroblasts. Insulin more than doubled the proportion of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive cells entering the mitotic cycle, as indicated by autoradiography of ({sup 3}H)thymidine incorporation into nuclei. Scintillation spectrometry was an even more sensitive index of DNA synthesis. In contrast, the trophic protein nerve growth factor exhibited no mitogenic effect, suggesting that the mitogenic action of insulin growth factors is highly specific. The observations are discussed in the context of the detection of insulin growth factors and receptors in the developing brain.

  10. Sympathetic and sensory innervation of small intensely fluorescent (SIF) cells in rat superior cervical ganglion.

    PubMed

    Takaki, Fumiya; Nakamuta, Nobuaki; Kusakabe, Tatsumi; Yamamoto, Yoshio

    2015-02-01

    The sympathetic ganglion contains small intensely fluorescent (SIF) cells derived from the neural crest. We morphologically characterize SIF cells and focus on their relationship with ganglionic cells, preganglionic nerve fibers and sensory nerve endings. SIF cells stained intensely for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), with a few cells also being immunoreactive for dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH). Vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT)-immunoreactive puncta were distributed around some clusters of SIF cells, whereas some SIF cells closely abutted DBH-immunoreactive ganglionic cells. SIF cells contained bassoon-immunoreactive products beneath the cell membrane at the attachments and on opposite sites to the ganglionic cells. Ganglion neurons and SIF cells were immunoreactive to dopamine D2 receptors. Immunohistochemistry for P2X3 revealed ramified nerve endings with P2X3 immunoreactivity around SIF cells. Triple-labeling for P2X3, TH and VAChT allowed the classification of SIF cells into three types based on their innervation: (1) with only VAChT-immunoreactive puncta, (2) with only P2X3-immunoreactive nerve endings, (3) with both P2X3-immunoreactive nerve endings and VAChT-immunoreactive puncta. The results of retrograde tracing with fast blue dye indicated that most of these nerve endings originated from the petrosal ganglion. Thus, SIF cells in the superior cervical ganglion are innervated by preganglionic fibers and glossopharyngeal sensory nerve endings and can be classified into three types. SIF cells might modulate sympathetic activity in the superior cervical ganglion. PMID:25416508

  11. Binding, internalization, and retrograde transport of /sup 125/I-nerve growth factor in cultured rat sympathetic neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Claude, P.; Hawrot, E.; Dunis, D.A.; Campenot, R.B.

    1982-01-01

    Sympathetic neurons internalize nerve growth factor (NGF) and transport it retrogradely to their cell bodies where it appears to serve a trophic function in maintaining neuronal survival. We have characterized the binding, internalization, and retrograde transport of /sup 125/I-NGF by cultured rat sympathetic neurons. After 3 to 4 weeks in culture, sympathetic neurons possessed approximately 2 X 10(7) specific, cell surface NGF binding sites per neuron with an apparent affinity constant of 2 to 5 X 10(9) M. The density of binding sites on the plasma membrane of the neurites approximately twice that on the plasma membrane of the cell bodies. Because of the extensive network of neuronal processes, the neurites probably account for more than 99.5% of the total binding in mature cultures. Using electron microscope autoradiography, we localized the distribution of /sup 125/I-NGF in the cell body following a 1-hr exposure to /sup 125/I-NGF. The majority of silver grains were associated with lysosomal organelles, including secondary lysosomes, residual bodies, and multivesicular bodies (MVB). The MVB were the most heavily labeled, with a labeling density (L.D.) of 21, while the lysosomes had a L.D. of 3.1. To study the retrograde transport of /sup 125/I-NGF, neurons were grown in compartmentalized culture dishes and their distal processes were exposed to /sup 125/I-NGF. Radioactive material was transported to the cell bodies at the rate of approximately 3 mm/hr. The transport mechanism was sensitive to colchicine and was saturable with respect to NGF. After 8 hr of transport, when the radioactivity in the cell bodies had reached a steady state, the label again was localized primarily to the MVB (L.D. . 16.8) and the lysosomes (L.D. . 3.8). The nuclei were not labeled significantly and had an overall L.D. of 0.47. We saw no evidence for the accumulation of NGF by the nuclear membrane, the nucleolus, or chromatin.

  12. Endothelial and Neuronal Nitric Oxide Activate Distinct Pathways on Sympathetic Neurotransmission in Rat Tail and Mesenteric Arteries.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Joana Beatriz; Vieira-Rocha, Maria Sofia; Arribas, Silvia M; González, Maria Carmen; Fresco, Paula; Diniz, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) seems to contribute to vascular homeostasis regulating neurotransmission. This work aimed at assessing the influence of NO from different sources and respective intracellular pathways on sympathetic neurotransmission, in two vascular beds. Electrically-evoked [3H]-noradrenaline release was assessed in rat mesenteric and tail arteries in the presence of NO donors or endothelial/neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors. The influence of NO on adenosine-mediated effects was also studied using selective antagonists for adenosine receptors subtypes. Location of neuronal NOS (nNOS) was investigated by immunohistochemistry (with specific antibodies for nNOS and for Schwann cells) and Confocal Microscopy. Results indicated that: 1) in mesenteric arteries, noradrenaline release was reduced by NO donors and it was increased by nNOS inhibitors; the effect of NO donors was only abolished by the adenosine A1 receptors antagonist; 2) in tail arteries, noradrenaline release was increased by NO donors and it was reduced by eNOS inhibitors; adenosine receptors antagonists were devoid of effect; 3) confocal microscopy showed nNOS staining in adventitial cells, some co-localized with Schwann cells. nNOS staining and its co-localization with Schwann cells were significantly lower in tail compared to mesenteric arteries. In conclusion, in mesenteric arteries, nNOS, mainly located in Schwann cells, seems to be the main source of NO influencing perivascular sympathetic neurotransmission with an inhibitory effect, mediated by adenosine A1 receptors activation. Instead, in tail arteries endothelial NO seems to play a more relevant role and has a facilitatory effect, independent of adenosine receptors activation.

  13. Endothelial and Neuronal Nitric Oxide Activate Distinct Pathways on Sympathetic Neurotransmission in Rat Tail and Mesenteric Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Joana Beatriz; Vieira-Rocha, Maria Sofia; Arribas, Silvia M.; González, Maria Carmen; Fresco, Paula; Diniz, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) seems to contribute to vascular homeostasis regulating neurotransmission. This work aimed at assessing the influence of NO from different sources and respective intracellular pathways on sympathetic neurotransmission, in two vascular beds. Electrically-evoked [3H]-noradrenaline release was assessed in rat mesenteric and tail arteries in the presence of NO donors or endothelial/neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors. The influence of NO on adenosine-mediated effects was also studied using selective antagonists for adenosine receptors subtypes. Location of neuronal NOS (nNOS) was investigated by immunohistochemistry (with specific antibodies for nNOS and for Schwann cells) and Confocal Microscopy. Results indicated that: 1) in mesenteric arteries, noradrenaline release was reduced by NO donors and it was increased by nNOS inhibitors; the effect of NO donors was only abolished by the adenosine A1 receptors antagonist; 2) in tail arteries, noradrenaline release was increased by NO donors and it was reduced by eNOS inhibitors; adenosine receptors antagonists were devoid of effect; 3) confocal microscopy showed nNOS staining in adventitial cells, some co-localized with Schwann cells. nNOS staining and its co-localization with Schwann cells were significantly lower in tail compared to mesenteric arteries. In conclusion, in mesenteric arteries, nNOS, mainly located in Schwann cells, seems to be the main source of NO influencing perivascular sympathetic neurotransmission with an inhibitory effect, mediated by adenosine A1 receptors activation. Instead, in tail arteries endothelial NO seems to play a more relevant role and has a facilitatory effect, independent of adenosine receptors activation. PMID:26075386

  14. Endothelial and Neuronal Nitric Oxide Activate Distinct Pathways on Sympathetic Neurotransmission in Rat Tail and Mesenteric Arteries.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Joana Beatriz; Vieira-Rocha, Maria Sofia; Arribas, Silvia M; González, Maria Carmen; Fresco, Paula; Diniz, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) seems to contribute to vascular homeostasis regulating neurotransmission. This work aimed at assessing the influence of NO from different sources and respective intracellular pathways on sympathetic neurotransmission, in two vascular beds. Electrically-evoked [3H]-noradrenaline release was assessed in rat mesenteric and tail arteries in the presence of NO donors or endothelial/neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors. The influence of NO on adenosine-mediated effects was also studied using selective antagonists for adenosine receptors subtypes. Location of neuronal NOS (nNOS) was investigated by immunohistochemistry (with specific antibodies for nNOS and for Schwann cells) and Confocal Microscopy. Results indicated that: 1) in mesenteric arteries, noradrenaline release was reduced by NO donors and it was increased by nNOS inhibitors; the effect of NO donors was only abolished by the adenosine A1 receptors antagonist; 2) in tail arteries, noradrenaline release was increased by NO donors and it was reduced by eNOS inhibitors; adenosine receptors antagonists were devoid of effect; 3) confocal microscopy showed nNOS staining in adventitial cells, some co-localized with Schwann cells. nNOS staining and its co-localization with Schwann cells were significantly lower in tail compared to mesenteric arteries. In conclusion, in mesenteric arteries, nNOS, mainly located in Schwann cells, seems to be the main source of NO influencing perivascular sympathetic neurotransmission with an inhibitory effect, mediated by adenosine A1 receptors activation. Instead, in tail arteries endothelial NO seems to play a more relevant role and has a facilitatory effect, independent of adenosine receptors activation. PMID:26075386

  15. Stimulation of sympathetic innervation in the upper gastrointestinal tract as a treatment for obesity

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jolene; DiLorenzo, Daniel J.; McLaughlin, Leslie; Roberts, Andrew T.; Greenway, Frank L.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Sympathetic activity and obesity have a reciprocal relationship. Firstly, hypothalamic obesity is associated with decreased sympathetic activity. Caffeine and ephedrine increase sympathetic activity and induce weight loss, of which 25% is due to increased metabolic rate and 75% is due to a reciprocally decreased food intake. Secondly, hormones and drugs that affect body weight have an inverse relationship between food intake and metabolic rate. Neuropeptide Y decreases sympathetic activity and increases food intake and body weight. Thirdly, a gastric pacemaker Transcend® and vagotomy increase the ratio of sympathetic to parasympathetic activation, decrease food intake, and block gut satiety hormones. Weight loss with the pacemaker or vagotomy is variable. Significant weight reduction is seen only in a small group of those treated. This suggests that activation of the sympathetic arm of the autonomic nervous system may be most important for weight loss. Systemic sympathetic activation causes weight loss in obese patients, but side effects limited its use. We hypothesize that selective local electrical sympathetic stimulation of the upper gastrointestinal tract may induce weight loss and offer a safer, yet effective, obesity treatment. Celiac ganglia delivers sympathetic innervation to the upper gastrointestinal tract. Voltage regulated electrical simulation of the rat celiac ganglia increased metabolic rate in a dose-dependent manner. Stimulation of 6, 3, or 1.5 V increased metabolic rate 15.6%, 6.2%, and 5%, respectively in a single rat. These responses support our hypothesis that selective sympathetic stimulation of the upper GI tract may treat obesity while avoiding side effects of systemic sympathetic activation. PMID:19246162

  16. Alpha-drenergic inhibition of calcium-dependent potentials in rat sympathetic neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Horn, J P; McAfee, D A

    1980-01-01

    1. Post-ganglionic neurones of the rat superior cervical ganglion were studied in vitro (21-26 degrees C) using single intracellular micro-electrode methods. 2. Three Ca2+-dependent potentials were studied: the shoulder on the normal action potential, the hyperpolarizing afterpotential (h.a.p.), and th Ca2+ spike. 3. Bath-applied noradrenaline reversibly inhibited these Ca2+-dependent potentials. The EC50 for inhibition of peak h.a.p. amplitude was about 1 microM. The order of catetholamine potency was: L-adrenaline > L-noradrenaline > D-noradrenaline congruent to dopamine > DL-isoprenaline. Phentolamine (10 microM), an alpha-blocker, but not MJ-1999 (10 microM), a beta-blocker, antagonized the action of noradrenaline. 4. Noradrenaline (10 microM) hyperpolarized most neurones (1-6 mV) studied, with no detectable change in resting membrane conductance. 5. Superfusion with low external Ca2+ and high Mg2+ mimicked the effect of noradrenaline. Either procedure alone antagonized the h.a.p. conductance increase but did not alter the h.a.p. reversal potential. However, in the presence of low Ca2+, high Mg2+, the remaining action potential and h.a.p. were not further reduced by noradrenaline. 6. The Ca2+-dependent shoulder of the action potential did not appear dependent upon GK. Noradrenaline and low Ca2+ antagonized the shoulder when enhanced by TEA+ or Ba2+. 7. Both the rate of rise and amplitude of the Ca2+ spike were antagonized by noradrenaline. 8. We propose that activation of an alpha-adrenoceptor inhibits a voltage-sensitive Ca2+ conductance (GCa(V)), thereby reducing the inward Ca2+ current which may generate the noraml action potential shoulder and the rising phase of the Ca2+ spike. Reduction of Ca2+ current would also reduce the Ca2+-dependent portion of outward K+ current underlying the h.a.p. PMID:6251200

  17. Role of brainstem thyrotropin-releasing hormone-triggered sympathetic overactivation in cardiovascular mortality in type 2 diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hong; Nyby, Michael D; Ao, Yan; Chen, Ai; Adelson, David W; Smutko, Victoria; Wijesuriya, Janake; Go, Vay Liang W; Tuck, Michael L

    2012-02-01

    Sympathetic hyperactivity has an important role in cardiovascular mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH)-containing fibers innervate autonomic motor and premotor nuclei of the brainstem and spinal cord that regulate cardiovascular functions. We compared cardiovascular responses to application of TRH-analog in the brainstem of Wistar and T2D Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats. GK rats exhibited basal systolic hypertension (152±2 mm Hg) and had a significantly potentiated, dose-related hypertensive response to intracisternal (i.c.) injection of the TRH-analog RX77368 (10-60 ng). In GK rats only, i.c. RX77368 (30-60 ng) markedly increased heart rate (HR; +88 b.p.m.) and induced acute cardiac mortality (100%), concurrent with extreme hyperglycemia (>26 mmol l(-1)), increased plasma H(2)O(2) and 8-isoprostane, and enhanced heart expression of NADPH oxidase 4 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 mRNAs. GK rats also had elevated basal plasma epinephrine, higher adrenal gene expression of tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine β-hydroxylase (DβH), and greater plasma catecholamine and adrenal DβH responses to i.c. TRH-analog, compared with Wistar rats. In GK rats, hexamethonium blocked i.c. RX77368-induced hypertensive and tachycardic responses, and reduced mortality by 86%, whereas phentolamine abolished the hypertensive response but enhanced tachycardia (+160 b.p.m.), and reduced mortality by 50%. The angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonist irbesartan prevented i.c. RX77368-induced increases in blood pressure, HR and mortality. In conclusion, sympathetic overactivation triggered by brainstem TRH contributes to the mechanism of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in T2D, which involves heightened cardiac inflammation and peripheral oxidative stress responses to sympathetic drive, and a mediating role of the renin-angiotensin system. PMID:21900943

  18. Use-dependent loss of active sympathetic neurogenic vasodilation after nitric oxide synthase inhibition in conscious rats. Evidence for the presence of preformed stores of nitric oxide-containing factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davisson, R. L.; Shaffer, R. A.; Johnson, A. K.; Lewis, S. J.

    1996-01-01

    In this study, we examined whether air-jet stress-induced active sympathetic hindlimb vasodilation in conscious rats involves the release of preformed stores of nitric oxide-containing factors. We determined the effects of repeated episodes of air-jet stress (six episodes given 5 minutes apart) on mean arterial pressure and vascular resistances in the mesenteric bed and intact and sympathetically denervated hindlimb beds of conscious rats treated with saline or the nitric oxide synthesis inhibitor N omega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 25 mumol/kg IV). In saline-treated rats, air-jet stress produced alerting behavior, minor changes in blood pressure, pronounced mesenteric vaso-constriction, and immediate and marked vasodilation in the sympathetically intact hindlimb but a minor vasodilation in the sympathetically denervated hindlimb. Each air-jet stress produced virtually identical responses. In L-NAME-treated rats, the first air-jet stress produced vasodilator responses in the sympathetically intact and sympathetically denervated hindlimbs that were similar to those in the saline-treated rats. However, each subsequent air-jet stress produced progressively smaller vasodilator responses in the sympathetically intact but not the sympathetically denervated hindlimb. There was no loss of air-jet stress-induced alerting behavior or mesenteric vasoconstriction, suggesting that L-NAME did not interfere with the central processing of the air-jet or the resultant changes in autonomic nerve activity. The progressive diminution of air-jet stress-induced vasodilation in the intact hindlimb of L-NAME-treated rats may be due to the use-dependent depletion of preformed stores of nitric oxide-containing factors that cannot be replenished in the absence of nitric oxide synthesis.

  19. Inhibition of Notch signaling pathway attenuates sympathetic hyperinnervation together with the augmentation of M2 macrophages in rats post-myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jie; Hu, Hesheng; Li, Xiaolu; Xue, Mei; Cheng, Wenjuan; Wang, Ye; Xuan, Yongli; Li, Xinran; Yang, Na; Shi, Yugen; Yan, Suhua

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation-dominated sympathetic sprouting adjacent to the necrotic region following myocardial infarction (MI) has been implicated in the etiology of arrhythmias resulting in sudden cardiac death; however, the mechanisms responsible remain to be elucidated. Although being a key immune mediator, the role of Notch has yet to be explored. We investigated whether Notch regulates macrophage responses to inflammation and affects cardiac sympathetic reinnervation in rats undergoing MI. MI was induced by coronary artery ligation. A high level of Notch intracellular domain was observed in the macrophages that infiltrated the infarct area at 3 days post-MI. The administration of the Notch inhibitor N-N-(3,5-difluorophenacetyl-L-alanyl)-S-phenylglycine-t-butyl ester (DAPT) (intravenously 30 min before MI and then daily until death) decreased the number of macrophages and significantly increased the M2 macrophage activation profile in the early stages and attenuated the expression of nerve growth factor (NGF). Eventually, NGF-induced sympathetic hyperinnervation was blunted, as assessed by the immunofluorescence of tyrosine hydroxylase. At 7 days post-MI, the arrhythmia score of programmed electric stimulation in the vehicle-treated infarcted rats was higher than that in rats treated with DAPT. Further deterioration in cardiac function and decreases in the plasma levels of TNF-α and IL-1β were also detected. In vitro studies revealed that LPS/IFN-γ upregulated the surface expression of NGF in M1 macrophages in a Notch-dependent manner. We concluded that Notch inhibition during the acute inflammatory response phase is associated with the downregulation of NGF, probably through a macrophage-dependent pathway, thus preventing the process of sympathetic hyperinnervation.

  20. The importance of the selection of appropriate reference genes for gene expression profiling in adrenal medulla or sympathetic ganglia of spontaneously hypertensive rat.

    PubMed

    Vavřínová, A; Behuliak, M; Zicha, J

    2016-07-18

    Catecholaminergic system plays an important role in hypertension development. The available results on mRNA expression of catecholaminergic system genes in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) are often contradictory. One of the possible causes might be the use of various reference genes as internal controls. In the present study, we searched for suitable reference genes in adrenal medulla or sympathetic ganglia of SHR and Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats, which would enable reliable comparison of mRNA expression between these two strains. The mRNA expression was measured by quantitative real-time PCR in adrenal medulla and superior cervical ganglia of 4-week-old or 24-week-old SHR and WKY rats. We evaluated 12 reference genes by three software tools (Normfinder, BestKeeper, geNorm) and compared them for the standardization of mRNA expression. Combination of reference genes Hprt1 and Ywhaz in adrenal medulla and Gapdh and 18S in sympathetic ganglia were chosen as the best ones. 18S was found as applicable reference gene in both tissues. We found many alterations in expression of catecholaminergic system genes in adrenal medulla and sympathetic ganglia of SHR. The usage of the most or the least stable reference gene as internal control changed results moderately in sympathetic ganglia but seriously in adrenal medulla. For example, tyrosine hydroxylase (Th) gene was underexpressed in adrenal medulla of adult SHR using the appropriate reference gene but unchanged after the standardization to the least stable reference gene. Our results indicate the importance of appropriate internal control. The suitability of reference genes should be checked again in the case of change in experimental conditions.

  1. Inhibition of Notch signaling pathway attenuates sympathetic hyperinnervation together with the augmentation of M2 macrophages in rats post-myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jie; Hu, Hesheng; Li, Xiaolu; Xue, Mei; Cheng, Wenjuan; Wang, Ye; Xuan, Yongli; Li, Xinran; Yang, Na; Shi, Yugen; Yan, Suhua

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation-dominated sympathetic sprouting adjacent to the necrotic region following myocardial infarction (MI) has been implicated in the etiology of arrhythmias resulting in sudden cardiac death; however, the mechanisms responsible remain to be elucidated. Although being a key immune mediator, the role of Notch has yet to be explored. We investigated whether Notch regulates macrophage responses to inflammation and affects cardiac sympathetic reinnervation in rats undergoing MI. MI was induced by coronary artery ligation. A high level of Notch intracellular domain was observed in the macrophages that infiltrated the infarct area at 3 days post-MI. The administration of the Notch inhibitor N-N-(3,5-difluorophenacetyl-L-alanyl)-S-phenylglycine-t-butyl ester (DAPT) (intravenously 30 min before MI and then daily until death) decreased the number of macrophages and significantly increased the M2 macrophage activation profile in the early stages and attenuated the expression of nerve growth factor (NGF). Eventually, NGF-induced sympathetic hyperinnervation was blunted, as assessed by the immunofluorescence of tyrosine hydroxylase. At 7 days post-MI, the arrhythmia score of programmed electric stimulation in the vehicle-treated infarcted rats was higher than that in rats treated with DAPT. Further deterioration in cardiac function and decreases in the plasma levels of TNF-α and IL-1β were also detected. In vitro studies revealed that LPS/IFN-γ upregulated the surface expression of NGF in M1 macrophages in a Notch-dependent manner. We concluded that Notch inhibition during the acute inflammatory response phase is associated with the downregulation of NGF, probably through a macrophage-dependent pathway, thus preventing the process of sympathetic hyperinnervation. PMID:26491050

  2. Persistence of an amine uptake system in cultured rat sympathetic neurons which use acetylcholine as their transmitter

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    Cultures of dissociated rat superior cervical ganglion neurons (SCGN) were treated with the sympatholytic agent, guanethidine. When treated within the first couple of weeks in vitro, the neurons were rapidly destroyed. The cells grew less susceptible to the toxic effects of guanethidine with age in vitro. Moreover, the apparent affinity, Km, of the transport molecule for norepinephrine (NE) and guanethidine remained essentially unchanged between 2 and 7 wk in culture, as did the maximum velocity of transport (Vmax). This is at a time when previous studies have shown these neurons to be using acetylcholine (ACh) as their neurotransmitter. Cultures which were grown without supporting cells and from which cholinergic synaptic interactions were recorded physiologically were processed for autoradiography after incubation with [3H]NE. All cell bodies and processes seen had silver grains accumulated over them. These experiments show that sympathetic neurons in vitro maintain their amine uptake system relatively unchanged, even though they use ACh as their transmitter. The implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:701368

  3. Decompensated liver cirrhosis and neural regulation of mesenteric vascular tone in rats: role of sympathetic, nitrergic and sensory innervations

    PubMed Central

    Sastre, Esther; Caracuel, Laura; Prieto, Isabel; Llévenes, Pablo; Aller, M. Ángeles; Arias, Jaime; Balfagón, Gloria; Blanco-Rivero, Javier

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the possible alterations produced by liver cholestasis (LC), a model of decompensated liver cirrhosis in sympathetic, sensory and nitrergic nerve function in rat superior mesenteric arteries (SMA). The vasoconstrictor response to electrical field stimulation (EFS) was greater in LC animals. Alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist phentolamine and P2 purinoceptor antagonist suramin decreased this response in LC animals more than in control animals. Both non-specific nitric oxide synthase (NOS) L-NAME and calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) (8-37) increased the vasoconstrictor response to EFS more strongly in LC than in control segments. Vasomotor responses to noradrenaline (NA) or CGRP were greater in LC segments, while NO analogue DEA-NO induced a similar vasodilation in both experimental groups. The release of NA was not modified, while those of ATP, nitrite and CGRP were increased in segments from LC. Alpha 1 adrenoceptor, Rho kinase (ROCK) 1 and 2 and total myosin phosphatase (MYPT) expressions were not modified, while alpha 2B adrenoceptor, nNOS expression and nNOS and MYPT phosphorylation were increased by LC. Together, these alterations might counteract the increased splanchnic vasodilation observed in the last phases of decompensated liver cirrhosis. PMID:27484028

  4. Potent block of potassium currents in rat isolated sympathetic neurones by the uncharged form of amitriptyline and related tricyclic compounds.

    PubMed Central

    Wooltorton, J. R.; Mathie, A.

    1995-01-01

    1. The block of K+ currents by amitriptyline and the related tricyclic compounds cyproheptadine and dizocilpine was studied in dissociated rat sympathetic neurones by whole-cell voltage-clamp recording. 2. Cyproheptadine (30 microM) inhibited the delayed-rectifier current (Kv) by 92% and the transient current (KA) by 43%. For inhibition of Kv, cyproheptaidine had a KD of 2.2 microM. Dizocilpine (30 microM) inhibited Kv by 26% and KA by 22%. The stereoisomers of dizocilpine were equally potent at blocking Kv and KA. 3. Amitriptyline, a weak base, was significantly more effective in blocking Kv at pH 9.4 (KD = 0.46 microM) where the ratio of charged to uncharged drug was 50:50 compared with pH 7.4 (KD = 11.9 microM) where the ratio was 99:1. 4. N-methylamitriptyline (10 microM), the permanently charged analogue of amitriptyline, inhibited Kv by only 2% whereas in the same cells amitriptyline (10 microM) inhibited Kv by 36%. 5. Neither amitriptyline nor N-methylamitriptyline had a detectable effect on Kv when added to the intracellular solution. 6. It is concluded that the uncharged form of amitriptyline is approximately one hundred times more potent in blocking Kv than the charged form. However, this does not seem to be due to uncharged amitriptyline having better access to an intracellular binding site. PMID:8564248

  5. The effects of various carbohydrates on sympathetic activity in heart and interscapular brown adipose tissue of the rat.

    PubMed

    Walgren, M C; Young, J B; Kaufman, L N; Landsberg, L

    1987-06-01

    The present studies were undertaken to determine the effect of various carbohydrates on sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity. Tritiated-norepinephrine (3H-NE) turnover was measured in heart and interscapular brown adipose tissue (IBAT) of rats fed either chow or chow plus 50% caloric supplements of fructose, sucrose, dextrose, or corn starch. Additional studies were performed to examine whether absorption of carbohydrate plays a role in the SNS response, and to determine whether sweet taste in the form of artificial sweeteners may influence SNS activity. After five to ten days on the respective diets, 3H-NE turnover was increased to a similar extent by all carbohydrates tested (from 38% to 160% greater than controls in different studies). Addition of acarbose (which impairs sucrose absorption) to a sucrose-supplemented diet abolished the SNS stimulatory response, whereas cholestyramine (a drug that blocks fat absorption) had no effect. Finally, the addition of saccharin or aspartame to a chow diet failed to alter SNS activity. Thus, caloric supplementation with several carbohydrates, in addition to sucrose, stimulates both cardiac and IBAT SNS activity, absorption of carbohydrate is required for this effect, and noncaloric sugar substitutes do not alter SNS function.

  6. Glutamatergic inputs to the CVLM independent of the NTS promote tonic inhibition of sympathetic vasomotor tone in rats.

    PubMed

    Mandel, Daniel A; Schreihofer, Ann M

    2008-10-01

    GABAergic neurons in the caudal ventrolateral medulla (CVLM) are driven by baroreceptor inputs relayed via the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), and they inhibit neurons in rostral ventrolateral medulla to reduce sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) and arterial pressure (AP). After arterial baroreceptor denervation or lesions of the NTS, inhibition of the CVLM continues to increase AP, suggesting additional inputs also tonically activate the CVLM. This study examined whether the NTS contributes to baroreceptor-independent drive to the CVLM and whether glutamate promotes baroreceptor- and NTS-independent activation of the CVLM to tonically reduce SNA. In addition, we evaluated whether altering central respiratory drive, a baroreceptor-independent regulator of CVLM neurons, influences glutamatergic inputs to the CVLM. Splanchnic SNA and AP were measured in chloralose-anesthetized, ventilated, paralyzed rats. The infusion of nitroprusside decreased AP below threshold for baroreceptor afferent firing (<50 mmHg) and increased SNA to 209+/-22% (P<0.05), but the subsequent inhibition of the NTS by microinjection of the GABA(A) agonist muscimol did not further increase SNA. In contrast, after inhibition of the NTS, blockade of glutamatergic inputs to CVLM by microinjection of kynurenate increased SNA (274+/-54%; P<0.05; n=7). In vagotomized rats with baroreceptors unloaded, inhibition of glutamatergic inputs to CVLM evoked a larger rise in SNA when central respiratory drive was increased (219+/-16% vs. 271+/-17%; n=5; P<0.05). These data suggest that baroreceptor inputs provide the major drive for the NTS-mediated excitation of the CVLM. Furthermore, glutamate tonically activates the CVLM to reduce SNA independent of the NTS, and this excitatory input appears to be affected by the strength of central respiratory drive.

  7. Local knockdown of the NaV1.6 sodium channel reduces pain behaviors, sensory neuron excitability, and sympathetic sprouting in rat models of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wenrui; Strong, Judith A.; Zhang, Jun-Ming

    2015-01-01

    In the spinal nerve ligation model of neuropathic pain, as in other pain models, abnormal spontaneous activity of myelinated sensory neurons occurs early and is essential for establishing pain behaviors and other pathologies. Sympathetic sprouting into the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) is observed after spinal nerve ligation, and sympathectomy reduces pain behavior. Sprouting and spontaneous activity may be mutually reinforcing: blocking neuronal activity reduces sympathetic sprouting, and sympathetic spouts functionally increase spontaneous activity in vitro. However, most studies in this field have used nonspecific methods to block spontaneous activity, methods that also block evoked and normal activity. In this study, we injected small inhibitory RNA directed against the NaV1.6 sodium channel isoform into the DRG before spinal nerve ligation. This isoform can mediate high frequency repetitive firing, like that seen in spontaneously active neurons. Local knockdown of NaV1.6 markedly reduced mechanical pain behaviors induced by spinal nerve ligation, reduced sympathetic sprouting into the ligated sensory ganglion, and blocked abnormal spontaneous activity and other measures of hyperexcitability in myelinated neurons in the ligated sensory ganglion. Immunohistochemical experiments showed that sympathetic sprouting preferentially targeted NaV1.6-positive neurons. Under these experimental conditions, NaV1.6 knockdown did not prevent or strongly alter single evoked action potentials, unlike previous less specific methods used to block spontaneous activity. NaV1.6 knockdown also reduced pain behaviors in another pain model, chronic constriction of the sciatic nerve, provided the model was modified so that the lesion site was relatively close to the siRNA-injected lumbar DRGs. The results highlight the relative importance of abnormal spontaneous activity in establishing both pain behaviors and sympathetic sprouting, and suggest that the NaV1.6 isoform may have value as a

  8. Double-pulse calcium channel current facilitation in adult rat sympathetic neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, S R

    1991-01-01

    1. Double-pulse facilitation of Ca2+ channel currents in enzymatically dispersed adult rat superior cervical ganglion neurones was investigated using the whole-cell variant of the patch-clamp technique. Voltage-clamp recordings were performed at room temperature (21-24 degrees C) in solutions designed to isolate Ca2+ channel currents. 2. Ba2+ currents, elicited by a 0 mV test pulse, were increased in amplitude when preceded by a 40 ms pulse to voltages greater than 0 mV. The magnitude of facilitation was dependent on pre-pulse voltage and reached a maximum of 50% (i.e. 1.5 x the current amplitude elicited without a pre-pulse) at a pre-pulse voltage of +80 mV. Half-maximal facilitation occurred at about +25 mV. A small decrease (-6%) in test pulse amplitude was present at pre-pulse voltages between -40 and 0 mV. The magnitude of facilitation was also dependent on test pulse voltage. Facilitation was greatest between test pulse voltages of -10 and 0 mV. 3. Facilitation slowly decreased during prolonged (1 h) dialysis of the neurone even though the Ba2+ current amplitude was well maintained. 4. Increasing the pre-pulse duration over the range 0-120 ms produced an exponential increase in facilitation with a time constant of 17.3 ms. Conversely, lengthening the interpulse duration over the range 5-915 ms, while maintaining a constant pre-pulse amplitude and duration, resulted in an exponential decrease in facilitation with a time constant of 197 ms. 5. At a test potential of 0 mV, the decay of the facilitated Ba2+ current component was fitted to a double exponential function with time constants of about 25 and 150 ms. The time constants had little pre-pulse voltage dependence between +30 to +80 mV. 6. The initial rising phase of both the control and facilitated Ba2+ current were reasonably well described by a single exponential (tau rise) after a delay of 300 microseconds. The tau rise versus test pulse potential relationship was 'bell shaped' over the test pulse

  9. Sympathetic orchidopathia.

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, R. C.; Thomas, W. E.

    1984-01-01

    Subfertility has recently been shown to follow unilateral torsion of the spermatic cord in more than half the patients studied. Since the anatomical anomaly that predisposes to torsion (a high investment of the tunica vaginalis) is commonly bilateral, there could be an associated congenital defect in spermatogenesis on each side. Alternatively, autoantigens escaping from the ischaemic or 'exciting' testis could trigger an immunological response which damages the contralateral or 'sympathising' testis. Demonstration of an autoallergic (sympathetic) orchidopathia, analogous to sympathetic ophthalmia, would fundamentally alter the management of testicular torsion. PMID:6742739

  10. Contribution of the retrotrapezoid nucleus/parafacial respiratory region to the expiratory-sympathetic coupling in response to peripheral chemoreflex in rats.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Davi J A; Dias, Mirela B; Cavalcanti-Kwiatkoski, Roberta; Machado, Benedito H; Zoccal, Daniel B

    2012-08-01

    Central mechanisms of coupling between respiratory and sympathetic systems are essential for the entrainment between the enhanced respiratory drive and sympathoexcitation in response to hypoxia. However, the brainstem nuclei and neuronal network involved in these respiratory-sympathetic interactions remain unclear. Here, we evaluated whether the increase in expiratory activity and expiratory-modulated sympathoexcitation produced by the peripheral chemoreflex activation involves the retrotrapezoid nucleus/parafacial respiratory region (RTN/pFRG). Using decerebrated arterially perfused in situ rat preparations (60-80 g), we recorded the activities of thoracic sympathetic (tSN), phrenic (PN), and abdominal nerves (AbN) as well as the extracellular activity of RTN/pFRG expiratory neurons, and reflex responses to chemoreflex activation were evaluated before and after inactivation of the RTN/pFRG region with muscimol (1 mM). In the RTN/pFRG, we identified late-expiratory (late-E) neurons (n = 5) that were silent at resting but fired coincidently with the emergence of late-E bursts in AbN after peripheral chemoreceptor activation. Bilateral muscimol microinjections into the RTN/pFRG region (n = 6) significantly reduced basal PN frequency, mean AbN activity, and the amplitude of respiratory modulation of tSN (P < 0.05). With respect to peripheral chemoreflex responses, muscimol microinjections in the RTN/pFRG enhanced the PN inspiratory response, abolished the evoked late-E activity of AbN, but did not alter either the magnitude or pattern of the tSN reflex response. These findings indicate that the RTN/pFRG region is critically involved in the processing of the active expiratory response but not of the expiratory-modulated sympathetic response to peripheral chemoreflex activation of rat in situ preparations.

  11. Mechanisms responsible for postmenopausal hypertension in a rat model: Roles of the renal sympathetic nervous system and the renin-angiotensin system.

    PubMed

    Maranon, Rodrigo O; Reckelhoff, Jane F

    2016-02-01

    Hypertension in postmenopausal women is less well controlled than in age-matched men. The aging female SHR is a model of postmenopausal hypertension that is mediated in part by activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and by the renal sympathetic nervous system. In this study, the hypothesis was tested that renal denervation would lower the blood pressure in old female SHR and would attenuate the antihypertensive effects of AT1 receptor antagonism. Retired breeder female SHR were subjected to right uninephrectomy (UNX) and left renal denervation (RD) or UNX and sham, and 2 weeks later, baseline mean arterial pressure (MAP; radiotelemetry) was measured for 4 days, and then rats were treated with angiotensin (AT1) receptor antagonist, losartan (40 mg/kg/day po) for 6 days. Renal denervation reduced MAP in old females compared to sham (172 ± 6 vs. 193 ± 6 mm Hg; P < 0.05). Losartan reduced MAP in both sham and RD rats similarly (numerically and by percentage) (142 ± 10 vs. 161 ± 6 mm Hg; P < 0.05 vs. RD, P < 0.05 vs. baseline). However, female SHR rats remained significantly hypertensive despite both pharmacological intervention and RD. The data suggest that both the renal sympathetic nervous system and the RAS have independent effects to control the blood pressure in old female SHR. Since the denervated rats treated with losartan remained hypertensive, the data also suggest that other mechanisms than the RAS and renal sympathetic nervous system contribute to the hypertension in old female SHR. The data also suggest that multiple mechanisms may mediate the elevated blood pressure in postmenopausal women.

  12. Renal function in single-kidney rats.

    PubMed

    Provoost, A P; De Keijzer, M H; Wessel, J N; Molenaar, J C

    1989-01-01

    Can a single kidney survive for a normal life span? This is the type of question frequently asked by patients and especially by parents of children who lose one kidney in early childhood. Based on our wide experience with single-kidney rats, we will try to give an answer to this question. After the removal of its counterpart, the single remaining kidney will rapidly adapt to the new situation by a compensatory increase in the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and renal mass. This is true not only for intact kidneys but also for damaged ones. The GFR level obtained by damaged kidneys will be less than that of intact single kidneys, however, depending on the degree of initial damage. The GFR is stable for a certain period of time, which is longer for intact single kidneys than for damaged kidneys and also depends on the daily protein intake; after that renal function will deteriorate. This decline in GFR is preceded by a marked increase in urinary protein excretion. Although the follow-up period is not completed yet, the survival time of single intact kidneys in rats on a normal diet is expected to be 15%-20% less than the normal rat life span. In rats on a lifelong high protein intake the kidney survival time drops to 40% below the normal rat life span. In rats on a moderately reduced protein intake, however, single intact kidneys may survive for a normal life span. The situation is worse for single damaged kidneys. Depending on the severity of the initial damage, kidney survival time will be much less than a normal life span. We studied rats with an initial recovery to 75% of renal function. Despite this initial recovery, the animals died of renal failure within 50% of the expected life span. A low-protein diet prolonged the renal survival by about 12%, a high-protein diet shortened it by the same percentage.

  13. Intra-axonal synthesis of eukaryotic translation initiation factors regulates local protein synthesis and axon growth in rat sympathetic neurons.

    PubMed

    Kar, Amar N; MacGibeny, Margaret A; Gervasi, Noreen M; Gioio, Anthony E; Kaplan, Barry B

    2013-04-24

    Axonal protein synthesis is a complex process involving selective mRNA localization and translational regulation. In this study, using in situ hybridization and metabolic labeling, we show that the mRNAs encoding eukaryotic translation initiation factors eIF2B2 and eIF4G2 are present in the axons of rat sympathetic neurons and are locally translated. We also report that a noncoding microRNA, miR16, modulates the axonal expression of eIF2B2 and eIF4G2. Transfection of axons with precursor miR16 and anti-miR16 showed that local miR16 levels modulated axonal eIF2B2 and eIF4G2 mRNA and protein levels, as well as axon outgrowth. siRNA-mediated knock-down of axonal eIF2B2 and eIF4G2 mRNA also resulted in a significant decrease in axonal eIF2B2 and eIF4G2 protein. Moreover, results of metabolic labeling studies showed that downregulation of axonal eIF2B2 and eIF4G2 expression also inhibited local protein synthesis and axon growth. Together, these data provide evidence that miR16 mediates axonal growth, at least in part, by regulating the local protein synthesis of eukaryotic translation initiation factors eIF2B2 and eIF4G2 in the axon.

  14. Arterial baroreceptor reflex control of renal sympathetic nerve activity following chronic myocardial infarction in male, female, and ovariectomized female rats.

    PubMed

    Pinkham, Maximilian I; Whalley, Gillian A; Guild, Sarah-Jane; Malpas, Simon C; Barrett, Carolyn J

    2015-07-15

    There is controversy regarding whether the arterial baroreflex control of renal sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in heart failure is altered. We investigated the impact of sex and ovarian hormones on changes in the arterial baroreflex control of renal SNA following a chronic myocardial infarction (MI). Renal SNA and arterial pressure were recorded in chloralose-urethane anesthetized male, female, and ovariectomized female (OVX) Wistar rats 6-7 wk postsham or MI surgery. Animals were grouped according to MI size (sham, small and large MI). Ovary-intact females had a lower mortality rate post-MI (24%) compared with both males (38%) and OVX (50%) (P < 0.05). Males and OVX with large MI, but not small MI, displayed an impaired ability of the arterial baroreflex to inhibit renal SNA. As a result, the male large MI group (49 ± 6 vs. 84 ± 5% in male sham group) and OVX large MI group (37 ± 3 vs. 75 ± 5% in OVX sham group) displayed significantly reduced arterial baroreflex range of control of normalized renal SNA (P < 0.05). In ovary-intact females, arterial baroreflex control of normalized renal SNA was unchanged regardless of MI size. In males and OVX there was a significant, positive correlation between left ventricle (LV) ejection fraction and arterial baroreflex range of control of normalized renal SNA, but not absolute renal SNA, that was not evident in ovary-intact females. The current findings demonstrate that the arterial baroreflex control of renal SNA post-MI is preserved in ovary-intact females, and the state of left ventricular dysfunction significantly impacts on the changes in the arterial baroreflex post-MI. PMID:25994953

  15. Arterial baroreceptor reflex control of renal sympathetic nerve activity following chronic myocardial infarction in male, female, and ovariectomized female rats.

    PubMed

    Pinkham, Maximilian I; Whalley, Gillian A; Guild, Sarah-Jane; Malpas, Simon C; Barrett, Carolyn J

    2015-07-15

    There is controversy regarding whether the arterial baroreflex control of renal sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in heart failure is altered. We investigated the impact of sex and ovarian hormones on changes in the arterial baroreflex control of renal SNA following a chronic myocardial infarction (MI). Renal SNA and arterial pressure were recorded in chloralose-urethane anesthetized male, female, and ovariectomized female (OVX) Wistar rats 6-7 wk postsham or MI surgery. Animals were grouped according to MI size (sham, small and large MI). Ovary-intact females had a lower mortality rate post-MI (24%) compared with both males (38%) and OVX (50%) (P < 0.05). Males and OVX with large MI, but not small MI, displayed an impaired ability of the arterial baroreflex to inhibit renal SNA. As a result, the male large MI group (49 ± 6 vs. 84 ± 5% in male sham group) and OVX large MI group (37 ± 3 vs. 75 ± 5% in OVX sham group) displayed significantly reduced arterial baroreflex range of control of normalized renal SNA (P < 0.05). In ovary-intact females, arterial baroreflex control of normalized renal SNA was unchanged regardless of MI size. In males and OVX there was a significant, positive correlation between left ventricle (LV) ejection fraction and arterial baroreflex range of control of normalized renal SNA, but not absolute renal SNA, that was not evident in ovary-intact females. The current findings demonstrate that the arterial baroreflex control of renal SNA post-MI is preserved in ovary-intact females, and the state of left ventricular dysfunction significantly impacts on the changes in the arterial baroreflex post-MI.

  16. Mineralocorticoid and AT1 receptors in the paraventricular nucleus contribute to sympathetic hyperactivity and cardiac dysfunction in rats post myocardial infarct.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bing S; Chen, Aidong; Ahmad, Monir; Wang, Hong-Wei; Leenen, Frans H H

    2014-08-01

    Intracerebroventricular infusion of a mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) or angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) blocker in rats attenuates sympathetic hyperactivity and progressive left ventricular (LV) dysfunction post myocardial infarction (MI). The present study examined whether knockdown of MRs or AT1Rs specifically in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) contributes to these effects, and compared cardiac effects with those of systemic treatment with the β1-adrenergic receptor blocker metoprolol. The PVN of rats was infused with adeno-associated virus carrying small interfering RNA against either MR (AAV-MR-siRNA) or AT1R (AAV-AT1R-siRNA), or as control scrambled siRNA. At 4 weeks post MI, AT1R but not MR expression was increased in the PVN, excitatory renal sympathetic nerve activity and pressor responses to air stress were enhanced, and arterial baroreflex function was impaired; LV end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP) was increased and LV peak systolic pressure (LVPSP), ejection fraction (EF) and dP/dtmax decreased. AAV-MR-siRNA and AAV-AT1R-siRNA both normalized AT1R expression in the PVN, similarly ameliorated sympathetic and pressor responses to air stress, largely prevented baroreflex desensitization, and improved LVEDP, EF and dP/dtmax as well as cardiac interstitial (but not perivascular) fibrosis. In a second set of rats, metoprolol at 70 or 250 mg kg(-1) day(-1) in the drinking water for 4 weeks post MI did not improve LV function except for a decrease in LVEDP at the lower dose. These results suggest that in rats MR-dependent upregulation of AT1Rs in the PVN contributes to sympathetic hyperactivity, and LV dysfunction and remodelling post MI. In rats, normalizing MR-AT1R signalling in the PVN is a more effective strategy to improve LV dysfunction post MI than systemic β1 blockade.

  17. Characterization of the hyperpolarization-activated chloride current in dissociated rat sympathetic neurons.

    PubMed

    Clark, S; Jordt, S E; Jentsch, T J; Mathie, A

    1998-02-01

    1. Dissociated rat superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons have been shown to possess a hyperpolarization-activated inwardly rectifying chloride current. The current was not altered by changes in external potassium concentration, replacing external cations with NMDG (N-methyl-D-glucamine) or by addition of 10 mM caesium or barium ions. 2. The reversal potential of the current was altered by changing external anions. The anion selectivity of the current was Cl- > Br- > I- > cyclamate. All substituted permeant anions also blocked the current. 3. The current was blocked by DIDS (4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid), 9AC (anthracene-9-carboxylic acid) and NPPB (5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)benzoic acid) but was unaffected by SITS (4-acetamido-4'-isothiocyanatostilbene- 2,2'-disulphonic acid) and niflumic acid. The effective blockers were voltage dependent; DIDS and NPPB were more effective at depolarized potentials while 9AC was more effective at hyperpolarized potentials. 4. The current was enhanced by extracellular acidification and reduced by extracellular alkalinization. Reducing external osmolarity was without effect in conventional whole-cell recording but enhanced current amplitude in those perforated-patch recordings where little current was evident in control external solution. 5. The current in SCG neurons was blocked by external cadmium and zinc. ClC-2 chloride currents expressed in Xenopus oocytes were also sensitive to block by these divalent ions and by DIDS but the sensitivity of ClC-2 to block by cadmium ions was lower than that of the current in SCG neurons. 6. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) experiments showed the presence of mRNA for ClC-2 in SCG neurons but not in rat cerebellar granule cells which do not possess a hyperpolarization-activated Cl- current. 7. The data suggest that ClC-2 may be functionally expressed in rat SCG neurons. This current may play a role in regulating the internal chloride

  18. Activity of the sympathetic-adrenomedullary system in rats after space flight on the Cosmos biosatellites.

    PubMed

    Kvetnansky, R; Vigas, M; Tigranyan, R A; Nemeth, S; Macho, L

    1981-01-01

    The indicators of adrenomedullary activity (catecholamine content (CA) and the activity of the catecholamine-synthesizing enzymes tyrosine hydrozylase (TH) and dopamine-beta-hydrozylase (DBH) were measured in the adrenal glands of rats living in a state of weightlessness for 18.5-19.5 days on board the biosatellites COSMOS 936 and COSMOS 1129. None of these indicators was significantly changed by space flight, neither in the group living in a state of weightlessness nor in the group living in a centrifuge on board the spacecraft and exposed to artificial gravity of 1 g (COSMOS 936). Animals exposed after space flight to repeated immobilization stress on Earth showed a significant decrease of adrenal adrenaline and an appreciable increase in adrenal TH activity compared to stressed animals which were not in space. These results suggest that a prolonged state of weightlessness during space flight does not by itself represent an intensive stressful stimulus for the adrenomedullary system but potentiates the response of cosmonauts to stress after return to Earth.

  19. Activity of the sympathetic-adrenomedullary system in rats after space flight on the COSMOS biosatellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvetňanský, R.; Vigaš, M.; Németh, Š.; Macho, L.; Tigranyan, R. A.

    The indicators of adrenomedullary activity (catecholamine content (CA) and the activity of the catecholamine-synthesizing enzymes tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine-β-hydroxylase (DBH)) were measured in the adrenal glands of rats living in a state of weightlessness for 18.5-19.5 days on board the biosatellites COSMOS 936 and COSMOS 1129. None of these indicators was significantly changed by space flight, neither in the group living in a state of weightlessness nor in the group living in a centrifuge on board the spacecraft and exposed to artificial gravity of 1 g (COSMOS 936). Animals exposed after space flight to repeated immobilization stress on Earth showed a significant decrease of adrenal adrenaline and an appreciable increase in adrenal TH activity compared to stressed animals which were not in space. These results suggest that a prolonged state of weightlessness during space flight does not by itself represent an intensive stressful stimulus for the adrenomedullary system but potentiates the response of cosmonauts to stress after return to Earth.

  20. The role of dopamine D2, but not D3 or D4, receptor subtypes, in quinpirole-induced inhibition of the cardioaccelerator sympathetic outflow in pithed rats

    PubMed Central

    Altamirano-Espinoza, A H; González-Hernández, A; Manrique-Maldonado, G; Marichal-Cancino, B A; Ruiz-Salinas, I; Villalón, C M

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Quinpirole (a dopamine D2-like receptor agonist) inhibits the cardioaccelerator sympathetic outflow in pithed rats by sympathoinhibitory D2-like receptors. The present study was designed to identify pharmacologically the specific D2-like receptor subtypes (i.e. D2, D3 and D4) involved in this sympathoinhibition by quinpirole. Experimental Approach One hundred fourteen male Wistar rats were pithed, artificially ventilated with room air and prepared for either preganglionic spinal (C7-T1) stimulation of the cardioaccelerator sympathetic outflow (n = 102) or i.v. bolus injections of exogenous noradrenaline (n = 12). This approach resulted in frequency-dependent and dose-dependent tachycardic responses, respectively, as previously reported by our group. Key Results I.v. continuous infusions of quinpirole (0.1–10 μg kg−1 min−1), but not of saline (0.02 mL min−1), dose-dependently inhibited the sympathetically induced tachycardic responses. Moreover, the cardiac sympathoinhibition induced by 3 μg kg−1 min−1 quinpirole (which failed to affect the tachycardic responses to i.v. noradrenaline) was: (i) unchanged after i.v. injections of the antagonists SB-277011-A (D3; 100–300 μg kg−1) or L-745,870 (D4; 30–100 μg kg−1); and (ii) markedly blocked and abolished by, respectively, 100 and 300 μg kg−1 of the D2 preferring receptor subtype antagonist L-741,626. These doses of antagonists, which did not affect per se the sympathetically induced tachycardic responses, were high enough to completely block their respective receptors. Conclusions and Implications The cardiac sympathoinhibition induced by 3 μg kg−1 min−1 quinpirole involves the dopamine D2 receptor subtype, with no evidence for the involvement of the D3 or D4 subtypes. This provides new evidence for understanding the modulation of the cardioaccelerator sympathetic outflow. PMID:24032529

  1. Blockade of Rostral Ventrolateral Medulla (RVLM) Bombesin Receptor Type 1 Decreases Blood Pressure and Sympathetic Activity in Anesthetized Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Izabella S.; Mourão, Aline A.; da Silva, Elaine F.; Camargo, Amanda S.; Marques, Stefanne M.; Gomes, Karina P.; Fajemiroye, James O.; da Silva Reis, Angela A.; Rebelo, Ana C. S.; Ferreira-Neto, Marcos L.; Rosa, Daniel A.; Freiria-Oliveira, André H.; Castro, Carlos H.; Colombari, Eduardo; Colugnati, Diego B.; Pedrino, Gustavo R.

    2016-01-01

    Intrathecal injection of bombesin (BBS) promoted hypertensive and sympathoexcitatory effects in normotensive (NT) rats. However, the involvement of rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) in these responses is still unclear. In the present study, we investigated: (1) the effects of BBS injected bilaterally into RVLM on cardiorespiratory and sympathetic activity in NT and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR); (2) the contribution of RVLM BBS type 1 receptors (BB1) to the maintenance of hypertension in SHR. Urethane-anesthetized rats (1.2 g · kg−1, i.v.) were instrumented to record mean arterial pressure (MAP), diaphragm (DIA) motor, and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). In NT rats and SHR, BBS (0.3 mM) nanoinjected into RVLM increased MAP (33.9 ± 6.6 and 37.1 ± 4.5 mmHg, respectively; p < 0.05) and RSNA (97.8 ± 12.9 and 84.5 ± 18.1%, respectively; p < 0.05). In SHR, BBS also increased DIA burst amplitude (115.3 ± 22.7%; p < 0.05). BB1 receptors antagonist (BIM-23127; 3 mM) reduced MAP (–19.9 ± 4.4 mmHg; p < 0.05) and RSNA (−17.7 ± 3.8%; p < 0.05) in SHR, but not in NT rats (−2.5 ± 2.8 mmHg; −2.7 ± 5.6%, respectively). These results show that BBS can evoke sympathoexcitatory and pressor responses by activating RVLM BB1 receptors. This pathway might be involved in the maintenance of high levels of arterial blood pressure in SHR. PMID:27313544

  2. Blockade of Rostral Ventrolateral Medulla (RVLM) Bombesin Receptor Type 1 Decreases Blood Pressure and Sympathetic Activity in Anesthetized Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Izabella S; Mourão, Aline A; da Silva, Elaine F; Camargo, Amanda S; Marques, Stefanne M; Gomes, Karina P; Fajemiroye, James O; da Silva Reis, Angela A; Rebelo, Ana C S; Ferreira-Neto, Marcos L; Rosa, Daniel A; Freiria-Oliveira, André H; Castro, Carlos H; Colombari, Eduardo; Colugnati, Diego B; Pedrino, Gustavo R

    2016-01-01

    Intrathecal injection of bombesin (BBS) promoted hypertensive and sympathoexcitatory effects in normotensive (NT) rats. However, the involvement of rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) in these responses is still unclear. In the present study, we investigated: (1) the effects of BBS injected bilaterally into RVLM on cardiorespiratory and sympathetic activity in NT and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR); (2) the contribution of RVLM BBS type 1 receptors (BB1) to the maintenance of hypertension in SHR. Urethane-anesthetized rats (1.2 g · kg(-1), i.v.) were instrumented to record mean arterial pressure (MAP), diaphragm (DIA) motor, and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). In NT rats and SHR, BBS (0.3 mM) nanoinjected into RVLM increased MAP (33.9 ± 6.6 and 37.1 ± 4.5 mmHg, respectively; p < 0.05) and RSNA (97.8 ± 12.9 and 84.5 ± 18.1%, respectively; p < 0.05). In SHR, BBS also increased DIA burst amplitude (115.3 ± 22.7%; p < 0.05). BB1 receptors antagonist (BIM-23127; 3 mM) reduced MAP (-19.9 ± 4.4 mmHg; p < 0.05) and RSNA (-17.7 ± 3.8%; p < 0.05) in SHR, but not in NT rats (-2.5 ± 2.8 mmHg; -2.7 ± 5.6%, respectively). These results show that BBS can evoke sympathoexcitatory and pressor responses by activating RVLM BB1 receptors. This pathway might be involved in the maintenance of high levels of arterial blood pressure in SHR. PMID:27313544

  3. Activation of a muscarinic receptor selectively inhibits a rapidly inactivated Ca2+ current in rat sympathetic neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Wanke, E; Ferroni, A; Malgaroli, A; Ambrosini, A; Pozzan, T; Meldolesi, J

    1987-01-01

    Sympathetic neurons dissociated from the superior cervical ganglion of 2-day-old rats were studied by whole-cell patch clamp and by fura-2 measurements of the cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration, [Ca2+]i. Step depolarizations in the presence of tetrodotoxin and hexamethonium triggered two Ca2+ currents that differed in the voltage dependence of activation and kinetics of inactivation. These currents resemble the L and N currents previously described in chicken sensory neurons [Nowycky, M. C., Fox, A. P. & Tsien, R. W. (1985) Nature (London) 316, 440-442]. Treatment with acetylcholine resulted in the rapid (within seconds), selective, and reversible inhibition of the rapidly inactivated, N-type current, whereas the long-lasting L-type current remained unaffected. The high sensitivity to blocker drugs (atropine, pirenzepine) indicated that this effect of acetylcholine was due to a muscarinic M1 receptor. Intracellular perfusion with nonhydrolyzable guanine nucleotide analogs or pretreatment of the neurons with pertussis toxin had profound effects on the Ca2+ current modulation. Guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate caused the disappearance of the N-type current (an effect akin to that of acetylcholine, but irreversible), whereas guanosine 5'-[beta-thio]diphosphate and pertussis toxin pretreatment prevented the acetylcholine-induced inhibition. In contrast, cAMP, applied intracellularly together with 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, as well as activators and inhibitors of protein kinase C, were without effect. Acetylcholine caused shortening of action potentials in neurons treated with tetraethylammonium to partially block K+ channels. Moreover, when applied to neurons loaded with the fluorescent indicator fura-2, acetylcholine failed to appreciably modify [Ca2+]i at rest but caused a partial blunting of the initial [Ca2+]i peak induced by depolarization with high K+. This effect was blocked by muscarinic antagonists and pertussis toxin and was unaffected by protein kinase

  4. Plasticity in rat uterine sympathetic nerves: the role of TrkA and p75 nerve growth factor receptors

    PubMed Central

    Richeri, Analía; Bianchimano, Paola; Mármol, Nelson M; Viettro, Lorena; Cowen, Timothy; Brauer, M Mónica

    2005-01-01

    Uterine sympathetic innervation undergoes profound remodelling in response to physiological and experimental changes in the circulating levels of sex hormones. It is not known, however, whether this plasticity results from changes in the innervating neurons, the neuritogenic properties of the target tissue or both. Using densitometric immunohistochemistry, we analysed the effects of prepubertal chronic oestrogen treatment (three subcutaneous injections of 20 µg of β-oestradiol 17-cypionate on days 25, 27 and 29 after birth), natural peripubertal transition and late pregnancy (19–20 days post coitum) on the levels of TrkA and p75 nerve growth factor receptors in uterine-projecting sympathetic neurons of the thoraco-lumbar paravertebral sympathetic chain (T7–L2) identified using the retrograde tracer Fluorogold. For comparative purposes, levels of TrkA and p75 were assessed in the superior cervical ganglion (SCG) following prepubertal chronic oestrogen treatment. These studies showed that the vast majority of uterine-projecting neurons expressed both TrkA and p75. Both prepubertal chronic oestrogen treatment and the peripubertal transition increased the ratio p75 to TrkA in uterine-projecting neurons, whereas pregnancy elicited the opposite effect. Prepubertal chronic oestrogen treatment had no effects on levels of TrkA or p75 in sympathetic neurons of the SCG. Taken together, our data suggest that neurotrophin receptor-mediated events may contribute to regulate sex hormone-induced plasticity in uterine sympathetic nerves, and are in line with the idea that, in vivo, plasticity in uterine nerves involves changes in both the target and the innervating neurons. PMID:16050899

  5. Nerve Growth Factor is Required for Induction of c-Fos Immunoreactivity by Serum, Depolarization, Cyclic AMP or Trauma in Cultured Rat Sympathetic Neurons.

    PubMed

    Buckmaster, A; Nobes, C D; Edwards, S N; Tolkovsky, A M

    1991-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) induces transient Fos-immunoreactivity (Fos-IR) independently of any other factor, both in newly isolated rat sympathetic neurons and in established cultures after NGF deprivation. The same proportion of neurons that express Fos-IR in response to NGF also survive. In addition to direct stimulation of Fos-IR expression, the presence or recent exposure to NGF is required to obtain Fos-IR expression by other stimuli. In newly isolated neurons no Fos-IR is detected in response to stimulation by serum alone and a response to depolarization or cyclic AMP is obtained only if neurons are stimulated within a short period after ganglion excision. In established cultures none of these stimuli, nor the trauma of cutting neurites or spiking cell bodies with a microinjection needle induce Fos-IR unless NGF is present or had been removed for <8 - 16 h. The lack of response is not due to a general decrease in the rate of protein or RNA synthesis. These findings show that in regenerating sympathetic neurons NGF induces c-Fos and suggest that NGF may activate a master trigger that is required for c-Fos expression to be induced by other stimuli.

  6. Vasopressin and sympathetic system mediate the cardiovascular effects of the angiotensin II in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis in rat.

    PubMed

    Nasimi, Ali; Kafami, Marzieh

    2016-07-01

    The bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BST) is involved in cardiovascular regulation. The angiotensin II (Ang II) receptor (AT1), and angiotensinogen were found in the BST. In our previous study we found that microinjection of Ang II into the BST produced a pressor response. This study was performed to find the mechanisms mediating this response in anesthetized rats. Ang II was microinjected into the BST and the cardiovascular responses were re-tested after systemic injection of a blocker of autonomic or vasopressin V1 receptor. The ganglionic nicotinic receptor blocker, hexamethonium dichloride, attenuated the pressor response to Ang II, indicating that the cardiovascular sympathetic system is involved in the pressor effect of Ang II. A selective vasopressin V1 receptor antagonist greatly attenuated the pressor effect of Ang II, indicating that the Ang II increases the arterial pressure via stimulation of vasopressin release as well. In conclusion, in the BST, Ang II as a neurotransmitter increases blood pressure by exciting cardiovascular sympathetic system and directly or indirectly causing vasopressin to release into bloodstream by VPN. This is an interesting new finding that not only circulating Ang II but also brain Ang II makes vasopressin release.

  7. The sympathetic nervous system promotes carbon tetrachloride-induced liver cirrhosis in rats by suppressing apoptosis and enhancing the growth kinetics of regenerating hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Hamasaki, K; Nakashima, M; Naito, S; Akiyama, Y; Ohtsuru, A; Hamanaka, Y; Hsu, C T; Ito, M; Sekine, I

    2001-02-01

    Norepinephrine is considered to possess potent anti-apoptotic action in regenerating hepatocytes. To clarify the role of the sympathetic nervous system in apoptosis that occurs in chronic liver damage and following the promotion of liver cirrhosis, we studied a carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced liver injury model, using spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY), and chemically sympathectomized WKY. At 24 h after CCl4 administration. acute damage, characterized by vacuolated hepatocytes in the centrilobular zone, was greater in SHR than in WKY. This vacuolated change in WKY hepatocytes was significantly reduced by chemical sympathectomy with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). After 48 h, the acute damage was dramatically improved in each animal, without significant differences between the three groups. In chronic damage after weekly repetition of CCl4 treatment for 4 weeks, fibrosis was evident in SHR, while in the other groups there was only scant fibrosis in the centrilobular zone. After 8 weeks' repetition of CCl4, liver cirrhosis was seen only in SHR. The incidence of apoptotic cells in areas of both acute and chronic damage in WKY, detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-dUTP nick end labeling, was significantly increased in comparison with that in SHR, and was further increased by 6-OHDA pretreatment. In contrast, there was significantly greater enhancement of the growth of hepatocytes in SHR than in WKY in both acute and chronic damage. Moreover. hepatocyte growth kinetics in WKY was significantly inhibited after sympathectomy in acute injury, as evidenced by immunohistochemistry for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). In vitro, the amount of hepatocellular apoptosis induced by transforming growth factor-beta1 was significantly decreased by incubation with norepinephrine. These findings suggest that the anti-apoptotic effect of the sympathetic nervous system increases cell growth kinetics and promotes liver cirrhosis in this

  8. Angiotensin II in the paraventricular nucleus stimulates sympathetic outflow to the cardiovascular system and make vasopressin release in rat.

    PubMed

    Khanmoradi, Mehrangiz; Nasimi, Ali

    2016-10-01

    The hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) plays essential roles in neuroendocrine and autonomic functions, including cardiovascular regulation. It was shown that microinjection of angiotensin II (AngII) into the PVN produced a pressor response. In this study, we explored the probable mechanisms of this pressor response. AngII was microinjected into the PVN and cardiovascular responses were recorded. Then, the responses were re-tested after systemic injection of a ganglionic blocker, Hexamethonium, or a vasopressin V1 receptor blocker. Hexamethonium pretreatment (i.v.) greatly and significantly attenuated the pressor response to AngII, with no significant effect on heart rate, indicating that the sympathetic system is involved in the cardiovascular effect of AngII in the PVN. Systemic pretreatment (i.v.) with V1 antagonist greatly and significantly attenuated the pressor response to AngII, with no significant effect on heart rate, indicating that vasopressin release is involved in the cardiovascular effect of AngII in the PVN. Overall, we found that AngII microinjected into the PVN produced a pressor response mediated by the sympathetic system and vasopressin release, indicating that other than circulating AngII, endogenous AngII of the PVN increases the vasopressin release from the PVN. PMID:27565052

  9. Changes in the daily rhythm of serum testosterone levels following superior cervical sympathetic ganglionectomy in the cold-exposed rat: the role of the pineal.

    PubMed

    Peschke, E; Peschke, D; Peil, J; Rúzsás, C; Mess, B

    1988-01-01

    The effect superior cervical sympathetic ganglionectomy (Gx) exerted on the daily rhythm of serum testosterone levels was investigated in cold-exposed rats. Rhythmic changes in pineal and pituitary weights were also measured. 1. Exposure to cold (10 degrees C for 72 h) resulted in a significant decrease of serum testosterone level and in an increase of the pineal weight. 2. In neutral ambient temperature (24 degrees C) Gx, 30 d after operation, led to a moderate, statistically insignificant increase of serum testosterone levels and to decreased pineal weights (statistically significant). 3. The reactions provoked by cold exposure were counteracted by Gx. Testosterone levels, as well as the pineal weight, showed no remarkable change in the Gx, cold-exposed animals. 4. These results confirm our assumption that experimental manipulations of the pineal gland can provoke significant changes in the neuroendocrine system only under special loading circumstances, e.g., cold exposure. Sympathetic denervation of the pineal gland counteracts the cold-induced decrease of testosterone levels by counteracting the pineal antigonadotropic activity. 5. The empirical regression curves of the investigated parameters indicate that Gx or cold exposure provide a shift in the upper and lower limits of the daily rhythm. Partly inverted rhythms were also observed. 6. The presented results are discussed in relation to the parallel changes previously described in serum thyroxin, cholesterol, thyrotropin (TSH), and pituitary TSH levels. Thyroidal-gonadal interactions, as well as cold exposure as a stress-generating factor, have been considered in the possible explanation of the data herein reported. PMID:3367268

  10. Allosteric interaction of the anticholinergic drug [N-(4-phenyl)-phenacyl-l-hyoscyamine] (Phenthonium) with nicotinic receptors of post-ganglionic sympathetic neurons of the rat vas deferens.

    PubMed

    Munhoz, Egberto; De Lima, Thereza C M; Souccar, Caden; Lapa, Antonio J; Lima-Landman, Maria Teresa R

    2009-08-15

    Phenthonium (Phen), a quaternary analog of hyoscyamine, is a blocker of muscarinic activity and an allosteric blocker of alpha(1)2betagammaepsilon nicotinic receptors. Specifically, Phenthonium increases the spontaneous release of acetylcholine at the motor endplate without depolarizing the muscle or inhibiting cholinesterase activity. This paper compares Phenthonium's effects on sympathetic transmission and on ganglionic nicotinic receptor activation. Neurotransmitter release and twitch of the rat vas deferens were induced either by electrical stimulation or by 1,1-dimethyl-4-phenylpiperazine (DMPP) activation of nicotinic receptors. Contractions independent of transmitter release were induced by noradrenaline and adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP). Phenthonium inhibited transmitter release and depressed twitch without changing the responsiveness to noradrenaline or ATP. Twitch depression did not occur after K(+)-channel blockade with 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) or charybdotoxin. DMPP had a similar effect, but high concentrations induced contraction of non-stimulated organs. Incubation of Phenthonium inhibited further DMPP twitch depression and non-competitively depressed the contractile responses elicited by DMPP. Furthermore, mecamylamine, but neither methyllycaconitine nor atropine, blocked the contraction elicited by DMPP. Phenthonium and DMPP are K(+)-channel openers that primarily inhibit sympathetic transmission. Contraction induced by DMPP was probably mediated by neuronal nicotinic receptor other than the alpha7 subtype. The blockade of DMPP contractile response was unrelated to Phenthonium's antimuscarinic or K(+)-channel opening activities. Since Phenthonium's quaternary chemical structure limits its membrane diffusion, the non-competitive inhibition of DMPP excitatory responses should be linked to allosteric interaction with neuronal nicotinic receptors that putatively qualify Phenthonium as a novel modulator of cholinergic synapses.

  11. Subclassification of muscarinic receptors in the heart, urinary bladder and sympathetic ganglia in the pithed rat. Selectivity of some classical agonists.

    PubMed

    van Charldorp, K J; de Jonge, A; Thoolen, M J; van Zwieten, P A

    1985-12-01

    In pithed normotensive rats muscarinic receptors were characterized in heart, urinary bladder and sympathetic ganglia; the selectivity of some classical muscarinic agents for these subtypes was investigated. The potencies in decreasing heart rate, increasing bladder pressure and increasing diastolic blood pressure were measured for the following, intraarterially administered cholinergic agonists: McN-A-343 ([4-m-chlorophenylcarbamoyloxy]-2-butynyltrimethylammonium), pilocarpine, carbachol, oxotremorine, arecoline, acetyl-beta-methylcholine and acetylcholine. The selective M1-antagonist pirenzepine, the mixed M1/M2-antagonist dexetimide and the cardioselective M2-antagonist gallamine were used as tools for identification of the receptors. All data were obtained after intravenous pretreatment with a high dose of atenolol to eliminate tachycardia induced by stimulating sympathetic ganglionic muscarinic receptors. Dexetimide strongly antagonized the bradycardia as well as the increase in bladder pressure induced by pilocarpine, carbachol, oxotremorine, arecoline, acetyl-beta-methylcholine and acetylcholine, whereas pirenzepine was much less effective. Gallamine antagonized the bradycardia, whereas no influence was found on the bladder contraction. Pilocarpine acted as a partial agonist in reducing heart rate as well as in increasing bladder pressure, whereas McN-A-343 was almost ineffective in doses up to 1 mg/kg. The hypertensive response to pilocarpine and carbachol was less pronounced than that produced by McN-A-343. Pirenzepine and dexetimide significantly antagonized the hypertensive response to McN-A-343 and pilocarpine, whereas gallamine was much less effective. The hypertensive response induced by carbachol was totally blocked by hexamethonium. The other agonists used in this study did not produce a significant increase in diastolic blood pressure in doses that produced a maximal effect on heart rate and urinary bladder pressure.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS

  12. Systemic Anti-inflammatory Corticosteroid Reduces Mechanical Pain Behavior, Sympathetic Sprouting, and Elevation of Pro-inflammatory Cytokines in a Rat Model of Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huiqing; Xie, Wenrui; Strong, Judith A.; Zhang, Jun-Ming

    2007-01-01

    Background: Chronic pain models are commonly defined as either nerve-injury or inflammation models, but recent work suggests inflammatory processes are important in nerve injury-induced pain. Methods: In the rat spinal nerve ligation model, the authors examined effects of systemic corticosteroid triamcinolone acetonide (TA) on the cytokine protein profile and sympathetic sprouting in the axotomized sensory ganglia, excitability of sensory neurons, and mechanical sensitivity. Results: By postoperative day 3, marked increases (5- to 16-fold) in monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, growth-related oncogene (GRO/KC or CXCL1), and interleukin (IL)-6 were observed, whereas IL-4 and IL-2 levels fell more than 4-fold. The increased cytokines and number of sympathetic basket formations in the sensory ganglia were reduced toward normal values by TA given starting at the time of injury. IL-4 and IL-2 levels were not restored by TA. Systemic TA also reduced the firing rate and incidence of bursting activity, but not the overall incidence of spontaneous activity, in large- and medium-sized neurons. Mechanical hypersensitivity on postoperative day 3 was reduced by TA, and some effect could still be observed 4 days after cessation of TA. However, starting TA at day 7 was ineffective. Conclusions: Several components of the spinal nerve injury model are responsive to corticosteroid, suggesting inflammatory processes are important in the development of neuropathic pain. The observation that TA was effective when given starting at the time of injury suggests that steroid treatment might alter the development of chronic pain after surgical procedures that involve nerve injury, such as amputation or hernia repair. PMID:17721250

  13. Blocking Sympathetic Nervous System Reverses Partially Stroke-Induced Immunosuppression but does not Aggravate Functional Outcome After Experimental Stroke in Rats.

    PubMed

    Deng, Qi-Wen; Yang, Heng; Yan, Fu-Ling; Wang, Huan; Xing, Fang-Lan; Zuo, Lei; Zhang, Han-Qing

    2016-08-01

    Stoke results in activation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS), inducing systemic immunosuppression. However, the potential mechanisms underlying stroke-induced immunosuppression remain unclear. Here, we determined the SNS effects on functional outcome and explored the interactions among SNS, β-arrestin2 and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) after experimental stroke in rats. In the current study, stroke was induced by a transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in rats, and SNS activity was inhibited by intraperitoneal injection of 6-hydroxydopamine HBr (6-OHDA). 7.0 T Micro-MRI and Longa score were employed to assess the functional outcome after stroke. Flow cytometry and ELISA assay were used to measure the expression of MHC class II, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ). Western blot was conducted to analyze β-arrestin2 and NF-κB protein expression levels after experimental stroke. We found significantly increased infarct volumes and functional impairment after MCAO at different post-surgery time points, which were not aggravated by 6-OHDA treatment. SNS blockade partially reversed the expression of MHC class II after stroke over time, as well as TNF-α and IFN-γ levels in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages in vitro. Treatment of MCAO rats with SNS-inhibitor significantly diminished NF-κB activation and enhanced β-arrestin2 expression after stroke. This study suggests that pharmacological SNS inhibition dose not aggravate functional outcome after stroke. Stroke-induced immunosuppression may be involved in the SNS-β-arrestin2-NF-κB pathway. PMID:27059792

  14. Gβ₂ mimics activation kinetic slowing of CaV2.2 channels by noradrenaline in rat sympathetic neurons.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Castellanos, Juan M; Vivas, Oscar; Garduño, Julieta; De la Cruz, Lizbeth; Arenas, Isabel; Elías-Viñas, David; Mackie, Ken; García, David E

    2014-02-28

    Several neurotransmitters and hormones acting through G protein-coupled receptors elicit a voltage-dependent regulation of CaV2.2 channels, having profound effects on cell function and the organism. It has been hypothesized that protein-protein interactions define specificity in signal transduction. Yet it is unknown how the molecular interactions in an intracellular signaling cascade determine the specificity of the voltage-dependent regulation induced by a specific neurotransmitter. It has been suspected that specific effector regions on the Gβ subunits of the G proteins are responsible for voltage-dependent regulation. The present study examines whether a neurotransmitter's specificity can be revealed by simple ion-current kinetic analysis likely resulting from interactions between Gβ subunits and the channel-molecule. Noradrenaline is a neurotransmitter that induces voltage-dependent regulation. By using biochemical and patch-clamp methods in rat sympathetic neurons we examined calcium current modulation induced by each of the five Gβ subunits and found that Gβ2 mimics activation kinetic slowing of CaV2.2 channels by noradrenaline. Furthermore, overexpression of the Gβ2 isoform reproduces the effect of noradrenaline in the willing-reluctant model. These results advance our understanding on the mechanisms by which signals conveying from a variety of membrane receptors are able to display precise homeostatic responses. PMID:24513289

  15. Insulin increases sympathetic nerve activity in part by suppression of tonic inhibitory neuropeptide Y inputs into the paraventricular nucleus in female rats.

    PubMed

    Cassaglia, Priscila A; Shi, Zhigang; Brooks, Virginia L

    2016-07-01

    Following binding to receptors in the arcuate nucleus (ArcN), insulin increases sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) and baroreflex control of SNA via a pathway that includes the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN). Previous studies in males indicate that the sympathoexcitatory response is mediated by α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH), which binds to PVN melanocortin type 3/4 receptors (MC3/4R). The present study was conducted in α-chloralose-anesthetized female rats to test the hypothesis that suppression of inhibitory neuropeptide Y (NPY) inputs to the PVN is also involved. In support of this, blockade of PVN NPY Y1 receptors with BIBO 3304 (NPY1x), ArcN insulin nanoinjections, and PVN NPY1x followed by ArcN insulin each increased lumbar SNA (LSNA) and its baroreflex regulation similarly. Moreover, prior PVN injections of NPY blocked the sympathoexcitatory effects of ArcN insulin. Finally, PVN nanoinjections of the MC3/4R inhibitor SHU9119 prevented both the acute (15 min) and longer, more slowly developing (60 min), increases in LSNA in response to ArcN insulin. In conclusion, in females, ArcN insulin increases LSNA, in part, by suppressing tonic PVN NPY inhibition, which unmasks excitatory α-MSH drive of LSNA. Moreover, the steadily increasing rise in LSNA induced by ArcN insulin is also dependent on PVN MC3/4R. PMID:27122366

  16. Diesel Exhaust-Induced Cardiac Dysfunction Is Mediated by Sympathetic Dominance in Heart Failure-Prone Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Short-term exposure to vehicular emissions is associated with adverse cardiac events. Diesel exhaust (DE) may provoke cardiac events through defective co-ordination of the two main autonomic nervous system (ANS) branches. We exposed heart failure-prone rats once to DE (500 g/m3 ...

  17. Sympathetic denervation does not alter the density or properties of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors in rat vas deferens

    SciTech Connect

    Abel, P.W.; Johnson, R.D.; Martin, T.J.; Minneman, K.P.

    1985-06-01

    Alpha-1 adrenergic receptors in surgically denervated rat vas deferens were studied using radioligand binding assays of (/sup 125/I) BE 2254 ((/sup 125/I)BE) and contraction measurements. Scatchard analysis of saturation isotherms of specific (/sup 125/I)BE binding showed no change in the affinity or density of binding sites 4, 7 or 14 days after denervation of rat vas deferens. The potency of norepinephrine in inhibiting specific (/sup 125/I)BE binding was also unchanged 7 days after denervation of vas deferens. The potency of phenylephrine in causing contractions in vitro did not change 4, 7 or 14 days after denervation of vas deferens; however, there was a significant increase in the maximum contractile response to phenylephrine at all time points. After partial inactivation of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors in vitro with phenoxybenzamine, there was an equivalent reduction in the number of (/sup 125/I)BE binding sites in the control and 14-day denervated vas deferens. The equilibrium dissociation constants calculated from contractile measurements for norepinephrine were the same in the control and denervated tissues. However, there was a 2.2-fold increase in contractile sensitivity to norepinephrine 14 days after denervation and a 3.6-fold increase in contractile sensitivity to methacholine 7 days after denervation.

  18. Fluorophore-assisted light inactivation produces both targeted and collateral effects on N-type calcium channel modulation in rat sympathetic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Juan; Chen, Huanmian; Puhl, Henry L; Ikeda*, Stephen R

    2006-01-01

    Fluorophore-assisted light inactivation (FALI) is a method to inactivate specific proteins on a time scale of seconds to minutes using either diffuse or coherent light. Here we examine a novel FALI modality that utilizes a fluorescein-conjugated polypeptide, α-bungarotoxin (BTX) and a 13 amino acid BTX-binding site engineered into the N-terminus of metabotropic glutamate receptor 8a (mGluR8a), a class C G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). The tagged mGluR8a was expressed in rat sympathetic neurons and labelled with fluorescein-conjugated BTX (FL-BTX). The efficacy of FALI was evaluated by monitoring mGluR8a-mediated inhibition of calcium currents (ICa) using whole-cell voltage-clamp techniques. Following either wide-field or laser illumination of FL-BTX-labelled neurons, mGluR8a-mediated ICa inhibition was greatly attenuated whereas holding current and basal ICa, measures of non-specific effects, were minimally affected. Sodium azide, a collision quencher of singlet oxygen, reduced the magnitude of FALI-mediated effects supporting a role for reactive oxygen species in the process. Although these results were consistent with an acute inactivation of mGluR8a, the intended target, two findings confounded this interpretation. First, effects on a natively expressed signalling pathway, α2-adrenergic receptor-mediated ICa modulation, were observed following illumination of neurons expressing FL-BTX-labelled sodium channel β2 subunits or ionotropic 5-HT3 receptors, proteins with no overt relationship to GPCR signalling pathways. Second, GPCR-independent ICa modulation induced with intracellular guanylyl imidophosphate was also attenuated by FALI. These data challenge the assumption that the fluorophore-tagged protein is the sole target of FALI and provide evidence that collateral damage to proximal proteins occurs following fluorophore illumination. PMID:16873413

  19. Mechanisms of insulin action on sympathetic nerve activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muntzel, Martin S.; Anderson, Erling A.; Johnson, Alan Kim; Mark, Allyn L.

    1996-01-01

    Insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia may contribute to the development of arterial hypertension. Although insulin may elevate arterial pressure, in part, through activation of the sympathetic nervous system, the sites and mechanisms of insulin-induced sympathetic excitation remain uncertain. While sympathoexcitation during insulin may be mediated by the baroreflex, or by modulation of norepinephrine release from sympathetic nerve endings, it has been shown repeatedly that insulin increases sympathetic outflow by actions on the central nervous system. Previous studies employing norepinephrine turnover have suggested that insulin causes sympathoexcitation by acting in the hypothalamus. Recent experiments from our laboratory involving direct measurements of regional sympathetic nerve activity have provided further evidence that insulin acts in the central nervous system. For example, administration of insulin into the third cerebralventricle increased lumbar but not renal or adrenal sympathetic nerve activity in normotensive rats. Interestingly, this pattern of regional sympathetic nerve responses to central neural administration of insulin is similar to that seen with systemic administration of insulin. Further, lesions of the anteroventral third ventricle hypothalamic (AV3V) region abolished increases in sympathetic activity to systemic administration of insulin with euglycemic clamp, suggesting that AV3V-related structures are critical for insulin-induced elevations in sympathetic outflow.

  20. Prognostic Significance of Imaging Myocardial Sympathetic Innervation.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Saurabh; Fernandez, Stanley F; Fallavollita, James A; Canty, John M

    2015-08-01

    There has been a longstanding interest in understanding whether the presence of inhomogeneity in myocardial sympathetic innervation can predict patients at risk of sudden cardiac arrest from lethal ventricular arrhythmias. The advent of radiolabeled norepinephrine analogs has allowed this to be imaged in patients with ischemic and non-ischemic cardiomyopathy using single, photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET). Several observational studies have demonstrated that globally elevated myocardial sympathetic tone (as reflected by reduced myocardial norepinephrine analog uptake) can predict composite cardiac end-points including total cardiovascular mortality. More recent studies have indicated that quantifying the extent of regional denervation can predict the risk of lethal ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. This review will summarize our current understanding of the prognostic significance of altered myocardial sympathetic innervation. PMID:26087899

  1. Do changes in the coupling between respiratory and sympathetic activities contribute to neurogenic hypertension?

    PubMed

    Zoccal, Daniel B; Paton, Julian F R; Machado, Benedito H

    2009-12-01

    1. It is well known that respiration markedly modulates the sympathetic nervous system. Interactions between pontine and medullary neurons involved in the control of sympathetic and respiratory functions are the main mechanism underlying the respiratory related oscillations in sympathetic nerve activity. 2. Recently, in rats treated with chronic intermittent hypoxia, we demonstrated that alterations in respiratory pattern may drive increased sympathetic outflow and hence the development of systemic hypertension. These experiments, performed in the in situ working heart-brain stem preparation, raise the possibility that enhanced central coupling between respiratory and sympathetic activities could be a potential mechanism underpinning the development and/or the maintenance of neurogenic hypertension. 3. In the present review, we discuss the neural basis of the enhanced entrainment between respiratory and sympathetic neurons in the brain stem that can be induced by chronic intermittent hypoxia and the possible implications of these mechanisms in the genesis of sympathetic overactivity and, consequently, hypertension. PMID:19413588

  2. Sympathetic Fiber Sprouting in Chronically Compressed Dorsal Root Ganglia Without Peripheral Axotomy

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Shelby Q.; Li, Chunling; Li, Huiqing; Xie, Wenrui; Pablo, Carmelita S.; Zhang, Jun-Ming

    2006-01-01

    Sympathetic axonal sprouting in axotomized dorsal root ganglia (DRG) has been shown to be a major phenomenon implicated in neuropathic pain. However, it is not known whether sympathetic sprouting can occur in pathologic ganglia without peripheral axotomy. We thus examined presence and density of sympathetic axonal sprouting within DRG of rats subjected to a persistent compressive injury by inserting a stainless steel metal rod into L4 and L5 lumbar intervertebral foramen. Sympathetic axons were identified by immunohistochemical staining with anti-tyrosine hydroxylase antibodies. Results indicate that progressive increase in sympathetic axonal sprouting occurred in the bilateral DRGs between postoperative days 2 and 28. The sympathetic fiber density was greater on the lesion side than the contralateral side. In conclusion, chronic compressive injury of the DRG results in sympathetic sprouting in the non-axotomized ganglion and may partially contribute to the development and maintenance of certain pathological pain states. PMID:17387381

  3. Clinical Benefits of Systemic Chemotherapy for Patients with Metastatic Pheochromocytomas or Sympathetic Extra-Adrenal Paragangliomas: Insights from the Largest Single Institutional Experience

    PubMed Central

    Ayala-Ramirez, Montserrat; Feng, Lei; Habra, Mouhammed A.; Rich, Thereasa; Dickson, Paxton V.; Perrier, Nancy; Phan, Alexandria; Waguespack, Steven; Patel, Shreyaskumar; Jimenez, Camilo

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical benefits of systemic chemotherapy for patients with metastatic pheochromocytomas or sympathetic paragangliomas by assessing reduction in tumor size, blood pressure, and improvement in overall survival. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients with metastatic pheochromocytomas-sympathetic paragangliomas who had received chemotherapy at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center Results Clinical benefit and overall survival (OS) were assessed. Of fifty-four patients treated with chemotherapy, fifty-two were evaluable for response. Seventeen (33%) experienced a response, defined as decreased or normalized blood pressure/decreased number and dosage of antihypertensive medications and/or reduced tumor size after the first chemotherapy regimen. The median OS time was 6.4 years (95 confidence interval (CI): 5.2–16.4) for responders and 3.7 (95% CI: 3.0–7.5) years for non-responders. Of patients who had synchronous metastatic disease, a positive response at 1 year after the start of chemotherapy was associated with a trend toward a longer overall survival (log-rank test, P-value =0.095). In a multivariate Cox proportional hazards model, the effect of response to chemotherapy on overall survival was significant (hazard ratio=0.22, 95% confidence interval: 0.05–1.0; P-value = 0.05). All responders had been treated with dacarbazine and cyclophosphamide. Vincristine was included for 14 responders and doxorubicin was included for 12 responders. We could not identify clinical factors that predicted response to chemotherapy. Conclusion Chemotherapy may decrease tumor size and facilitate blood pressure control in about 33% of patients with metastatic pheochromocytoma-sympathetic paraganglioma. These patients exhibit a longer survival. PMID:22006217

  4. [Rat uterus anastomoses in a single and a double layer].

    PubMed

    Gianaroli, L; Bufferli, M; Livani, M F

    1980-11-15

    The Authors display their results on microsurgical operations in rat's uteri. After having described the instruments and methods used, the surgical techniques and the differences between a single and a double layer suture are discussed. However the formation of intraoperative adherences, which can damage the functional results of the intervention, is studied. And what's more the mean number of live born foetuses is seen as an attainable parameter for future validations. PMID:7011341

  5. Sympathetic nervous system and spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, William H.; Convertino, Victor A.

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: Orthostatic stability on Earth is maintained through sympathetic nerve activation sufficient to increase peripheral vascular resistance and defend against reductions of blood pressure. Orthostatic instability in astronauts upon return from space missions has been linked to blunted vascular resistance responses to standing, introducing the possibility that spaceflight alters normal function between sympathetic efferent traffic and vascular reactivity. Methods: We evaluated published results of spaceflight and relevant ground-based microgravity simulations in an effort to determine responses of the sympathetic nervous system and consequences for orthostatic stability. Results: Direct microneurographic recordings from humans in space revealed that sympathetic nerve activity is increased and preserved in the upright posture after return to Earth (STS-90). However, none of the astronauts studied during STS-90 presented with presyncope postflight, leaving unanswered the question of whether postflight orthostatic intolerance is associated with blunted sympathetic nerve responses or inadequate translation into vascular resistance. Conclusions: There is little evidence to support the concept that spaceflight induces fundamental sympathetic neuroplasticity. The available data seem to support the hypothesis that regardless of whether or not sympathetic traffic is altered during flight, astronauts return with reduced blood volumes and consequent heightened baseline sympathetic activity. Because of this, the ability to withstand an orthostatic challenge postflight is directly proportional to an astronaut's maximal sympathetic activation capacity and remaining sympathetic reserve.

  6. Nicotine and sympathetic neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Haass, M; Kübler, W

    1997-01-01

    Nicotine increases heart rate, myocardial contractility, and blood pressure. These nicotine-induced cardiovascular effects are mainly due to stimulation of sympathetic neurotransmission, as nicotine stimulates catecholamine release by an activation of nicotine acetylcholine receptors localized on peripheral postganglionic sympathetic nerve endings and the adrenal medulla. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor is a ligand-gated cation channel with a pentameric structure and a central pore with a cation gate, which is essential for ion selectivity and permeability. Binding of nicotine to its extracellular binding site leads to a conformational change of the central pore, which results in the influx of sodium and calcium ions. The resulting depolarization of the sympathetic nerve ending stimulates calcium influx through voltage-dependent N-type calcium channels, which triggers the nicotine-evoked exocytotic catecholamine release. In the isolated perfused guinea-pig heart, cardiac energy depletion sensitizes cardiac sympathetic nerves to the norepinephrine-releasing effect of nicotine, as indicated by a leftward shift of the concentration-response curve, a potentiation of maximum transmitter release, and a delay of the tachyphylaxis of nicotine-evoked catecholamine release. This sensitization was also shown to occur in the human heart under in vitro conditions. Through the intracardiac release of norepinephrine, nicotine induces a beta-adrenoceptor-mediated increase in heart rate and contractility, and an alpha-adrenoceptor-mediated increase in coronary vasomotor tone. The resulting simultaneous increase in oxygen demand and coronary resistance has a detrimental effect on the oxygen balance of the heart, especially in patients with coronary artery disease. Sensitization of the ischemic heart to the norepinephrine-releasing effect of nicotine may be a trigger for acute cardiovascular events in humans, such as acute myocardial infarction and/or life

  7. Involvement of the orexin system in sympathetic nerve regulation.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Manabu; Ohba, Takayoshi; Kushikata, Testuya; Niwa, Hidetoshi; Kurose, Akira; Imaizumi, Tadaatsu; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Yanagisawa, Teruyuki; Nakaji, Shigeyuki; Ono, Kyoichi; Hirota, Kazuyoshi

    2015-05-15

    Orexin, also known as hypocretin, is a secreted neuropeptide implicated in the regulation of sleep and food intake. In the present study, we examined the importance of orexin in regulation of the sympathetic nervous system using an orexin/ataxin-3 transgenic (OXTg) rat, which has a minimal number of orexin neurons. RT-PCR analysis identified expression of prepro-orexin and orexin receptor-1 (OX1R) in the superior cervical ganglion (SCG), and expression of another receptor (OX2R) was marginal in the wild-type rat. The orexin/ataxin-3 transgenic rat showed increased expression of OX1R and OX2R, whereas expression of prepro-orexin was undetectable, suggesting a compensatory increase in both receptors. In the ECG recording (R-R interval), orexin/ataxin-3 transgenic rats showed decreased responsiveness to the β-adrenergic blocker propranolol. Furthermore, OXTg rats had deteriorated R-R interval regulation, indicating involvement of the orexin system in sympathetic nerve regulation. This was accompanied by decreased baroreflex and responsiveness to β-adrenergic blocker in blood pressure recording, also suggesting involvement of the orexin system in sympathetic nerve regulation. Histological examination revealed hypotrophic changes in the transgenic heart, suggesting involvement of the orexin system in cardiac development. Taken together, our present results indicate involvement of the orexin system in sympathetic nerve control.

  8. Continuous Thoracic Sympathetic Ganglion Block in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Patients with Spinal Cord Stimulation Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, EungDon; Roh, MiSun; Kim, SooHyang; Jo, DaeHyun

    2016-01-01

    The sympathetic block is widely used for treating neuropathic pain such as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). However, single sympathetic block often provides only short-term effect. Moreover, frequent procedures for sympathetic block may increase the risk of complications. The use of epidural route may be limited by concern of infection in case of previous implantation of the spinal cord stimulation (SCS). In contrast, a continuous sympathetic block can be administered without such concerns. The continuous thoracic sympathetic block (TSGB) has been used to treat the ischemic disease and other neuropathic conditions such as postherpetic neuralgia. We administered continuous thoracic sympathetic block using catheter in CRPS patients who underwent SCS implantations and achieved desirable outcomes. We believe a continuous sympathetic block is a considerable option before performing neurolysis or radiofrequency rhizotomy and even after SCS implantation. PMID:27445617

  9. Single Glucose Biofuel Cells Implanted in Rats Power Electronic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Zebda, A.; Cosnier, S.; Alcaraz, J.-P.; Holzinger, M.; Le Goff, A.; Gondran, C.; Boucher, F.; Giroud, F.; Gorgy, K.; Lamraoui, H.; Cinquin, P.

    2013-01-01

    We describe the first implanted glucose biofuel cell (GBFC) that is capable of generating sufficient power from a mammal's body fluids to act as the sole power source for electronic devices. This GBFC is based on carbon nanotube/enzyme electrodes, which utilize glucose oxidase for glucose oxidation and laccase for dioxygen reduction. The GBFC, implanted in the abdominal cavity of a rat, produces an average open-circuit voltage of 0.57 V. This implanted GBFC delivered a power output of 38.7 μW, which corresponded to a power density of 193.5 μW cm−2 and a volumetric power of 161 μW mL−1. We demonstrate that one single implanted enzymatic GBFC can power a light-emitting diode (LED), or a digital thermometer. In addition, no signs of rejection or inflammation were observed after 110 days implantation in the rat. PMID:23519113

  10. Effects of Renal Sympathetic Denervation on Arterial Stiffness and Blood Pressure Control in Resistant Hypertensive Patients: A Single Centre Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Baroni, Matteo; Nava, Stefano; Giupponi, Luca; Meani, Paolo; Panzeri, Francesco; Varrenti, Marisa; Maloberti, Alessandro; Soriano, Francesco; Agrati, Antonio Maria; Ferraro, Giovanni; Colombo, Fabrizio; Rampoldi, Antonio; Mancia, Giuseppe; Colombo, Paola; Klugmann, Silvio; Giannattasio, Cristina

    2015-12-01

    Renal denervation (RD) is an intriguing treatment strategy for resistant hypertension. However, limited data are available about its long time efficacy as well as its effects on intermediate phenotypes like arterial stiffness and carotid IMT. 12 patients (9 males, mean 69 years) with resistant hypertension underwent bilateral RDN (Medtronic System) since April 2012 in Niguarda Ca' Granda Hospital (Milan). Patients were studied before intervention, and at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after RD. Carotid intima media thickness (Esaote Mylab) and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (Complior, Alam medical) were assessed at each step. Compared to baseline, patients showed a marked reduction of office systolic blood pressure at each follow-up step (p < 0.05 versus baseline for all steps) as well as pulse wave velocity (p < 0.01 at 1 year versus baseline). Moreover, reduction in pulse wave velocity was higher than the expected value obtained only considering blood pressure drop. Conversely, no significant effect was observed on diastolic blood pressure as well as carotid intima-media thickness. In our study, renal denervation was a safe and effective procedure. The BP lowering effect was maintained during follow-up and a beneficial effect on arterial stiffness was observed, which implies that this effect can't passively originate from the BP fall but rather from an improvement of arterial mechanical properties, possibly related to a reduced sympathetic arterial drive.

  11. Intraglomerular microcirculation: measurements of single glomerular loop flow in rats.

    PubMed

    Steinhausen, M; Zimmerhackl, B; Thederan, H; Dussel, R; Parekh, N; Esslinger, H U; von Hagens, G; Komitowski, D; Dallenbach, F D

    1981-08-01

    With the use of a new fluorescent microscopic technique, we were able to measure the mean intracapillary velocities and pressures of single capillary loops of renal glomeruli of living rats. The technique involved photographing and recording the flow of fluorescent latex particles through the glomerular loops with a television monitor. In 25 rats the single glomerular loop flow velocity was 781 +/- (SD) 271 micrometers . sec-1. The mean diameter of the capillary loops measured 8.4 +/- 1.4 micrometers; their lengths were 72.3 +/- 37.5 micrometers. From the decrease in velocity of flow along the capillary loop, we were able to evaluate the filtration equivalent for the capillary surface. It was possible to measure intracapillary pressures of single glomerular loops continuously under microscopic control. High intracapillary pressures correlated with high intracapillary velocities. From the data we obtained, we were unable to calculate a filtration equilibrium at the ends of the observed capillary loops. For further correlations, we injected the glomeruli we had studied in the living state and examined them with the scanning electron microscope.

  12. Interaction of Xylamine with peripheral sympathetic neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Ransom, R.W.; Waggaman, L.A.; Cho, A.K.

    1985-09-30

    Xylamine (XYL) administered to intact rats caused a 70-80% reduction in norepinephrine (NE) uptake by the vas deferens but had little or no effect on NE content in that tissue. The vas deferens accumulates /sup 3/H-XYL in vitro by a desmethylimipramine (DMI)-sensitive mechanism. Vasa deferentia from 6-hydroxydopamine (60HDA) pretreated animals exhibited a 80% reduction in both NE content and XYL uptake activity. These results indicate that XYL is taken up by sympathetic nerve terminals and can reduce NE uptake activity without depleting terminals of neurotransmitter. 9 references, 4 tables.

  13. Single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with rat expressed sequences.

    PubMed

    Guryev, Victor; Berezikov, Eugene; Malik, Rainer; Plasterk, Ronald H A; Cuppen, Edwin

    2004-07-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are the most common source of genetic variation in populations and are thus most likely to account for the majority of phenotypic and behavioral differences between individuals or strains. Although the rat is extensively studied for the latter, data on naturally occurring polymorphisms are mostly lacking. We have used publicly available sequences consisting of whole-genome shotgun (WGS), expressed sequence tag (EST), and mRNA data as a source for the in silico identification of SNPs in gene-coding regions and have identified a large collection of 33,305 high-quality candidate SNPs. Experimental verification of 471 candidate SNPs using a limited set of rat isolates revealed a confirmation rate of approximately 50%. Although the majority of SNPs were identified between Sprague-Dawley (EST data) and Brown Norway (WGS data) strains, we found that 66% of the verified variations are common among different rat strains. All SNPs were extensively annotated, including chromosomal and genetic map information, and nonsynonymous SNPs were analyzed by SIFT and PolyPhen prediction programs for their potential deleterious effect on protein function. Interestingly, we retrieved three SNPs from the database that result in the introduction of a premature stop codon and that could be confirmed experimentally. Two of these "in silico-identified knockouts" reside in interesting QTL regions. Data are publicly available via a Web interface (http://cascad.niob.knaw.nl), allowing simple and advanced search queries.

  14. Modulation of silent and constitutively active nociceptin/orphanin FQ receptors by potent receptor antagonists and Na+ ions in rat sympathetic neurons.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Saifeldin; Margas, Wojciech; Trapella, Claudio; Caló, Girolamo; Ruiz-Velasco, Victor

    2010-05-01

    The pharmacology of G protein-coupled receptors can be influenced by factors such as constitutive receptor activation and Na(+) ions. In this study, we examined the coupling of natively and heterologously expressed nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) peptide (NOP) receptors with voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels after exposure to four high-affinity NOP receptor blockers [[Nphe(1)Arg(14)Lys(15)]N/OFQ-NH(2) (UFP-101), 1-[1-(cyclooctylmethyl)-1,2,3,6-tetrahydro-5-(hydroxymethyl)-4-pyridinyl]-3-ethyl-1,3-dihydro-2H-benzimidazol-2-one (Trap-101), 1-benzyl-N-{3-[spiroisobenzofuran-1(3H),4'-piperidin-1-yl]propyl}pyrrolidine-2-carboxamide (compound 24), and N-(4-amino-2-methylquinolin-6-yl)-2-(4-ethylphenoxymethyl)benzamide hydrochloride (JTC-801)] in sympathetic neurons. The enhanced tonic inhibition of Ca(2+) currents in the absence of agonists, indicative of constitutively active NOP receptors in transfected neurons, was abolished after pretreatment with pertussis toxin. In control neurons, the four antagonists did not exert any effects when applied alone but significantly blocked the N/OFQ-mediated Ca(2+) current inhibition. Exposure of transfected neurons to UFP-101 resulted in partial agonist effects. In contrast, Trap-101, compound 24, and JTC-801 exerted inverse agonism, as measured by the loss of tonic Ca(2+) current inhibition. In experiments designed to measure the N/OFQ concentration-response relationship under varying Na(+) concentrations, a leftward shift of IC(50) values was observed after Na(+) exposure. Although similar N/OFQ efficacies were measured with all solutions, a significant decrease of Hill coefficient values was obtained with increasing Na(+) concentrations. Examination of the allosteric effects of Na(+) on heterologously overexpressed NOP receptors showed that the tonic Ca(2+) current inhibition was abolished in the presence of the monovalent cation. These results demonstrate that constitutively active NOP receptors exhibit differential blocker

  15. Influence of simulated microgravity on the sympathetic response to exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodman, C. R.; Kregel, K. C.; Tipton, C. M.

    1997-01-01

    Rats exposed to simulated conditions of microgravity exhibit reductions in aerobic exercise capacity that may be due to an impaired ability of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) to mediate an increase in cardiac output and to redistribute blood flow. The purpose of this study was to quantify the sympathetic response to exercise in rats after exposure to 14 days of simulated microgravity or control conditions. To achieve this aim, rats were exposed to 14 days of head-down suspension (HDS) or cage control (CC) conditions. On day 14, norepinephrine (NE) synthesis was blocked with alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine, and the rate of NE depletion after synthesis blockade was used to estimate SNS activity in the left ventricle, spleen, and soleus muscle during treadmill exercise at 75% of maximal oxygen uptake. When compared with CC rats, the sympathetic response to exercise in HDS rats was characterized by a lower rate of NE depletion in the left ventricle (-82%) and spleen (-42%). The rate of NE depletion in the soleus muscle was 47% higher. These differences could contribute to the decrement in aerobic capacity of HDS rats by impairing their ability to augment cardiac output and to redirect blood flow to actively contracting skeletal muscle during exercise.

  16. Single and Double Alternation Learning in Rats: The Role of Set Size and Correction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kundey, Shannon M. A.; Rowan, James D.

    2009-01-01

    In many experiments, rats have evidenced extreme difficulty mastering alternation patterns. In three experiments, we explored rats' ability to learn double alternation patterns and possible reasons behind their past difficulties with such patterns. In Experiment 1, rats learned single and double alternation patterns. In the second and third…

  17. Sympathetic regulation of estradiol secretion from the ovary.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Sae

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that hormone secretion from endocrine glands is regulated by hierarchical feedback mechanisms. However, although Cannon revealed in the 1920s that sympathoadrenal medullary function increased during emergency situations, no studies on the autonomic nervous regulation of hormone secretion have been undertaken for many years. In the past 40 years, the autonomic nervous regulation of insulin secretion from the pancreas, gastrin secretion from the stomach, glucocorticoid secretion from the adrenal cortex, etc., has been demonstrated. Estradiol secretion from the ovary is strongly controlled by the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis, and its possible regulation by autonomic nerves has been largely unnoticed. Some histological studies have revealed rich adrenergic sympathetic innervation in the ovary. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the activation of the sympathetic nerves to the ovary directly reduces estradiol secretion from the ovary. This article reviews physiological and morphological studies, primarily in rats, on the sympathetic regulation of estradiol secretion from the ovary.

  18. SYMPATHETIC FILAMENT ERUPTIONS CONNECTED BY CORONAL DIMMINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Yunchun; Yang Jiayan; Hong Junchao; Bi Yi; Zheng Ruisheng

    2011-09-10

    We present for the first time detailed observations of three successive, interdependent filament eruptions that occurred one by one within 5 hr from different locations beyond the range of a single active region. The first eruption was observed from an active region and was associated with a coronal mass ejection (CME), during which diffuse and complex coronal dimmings formed, largely extending to the two other filaments located in quiet-Sun regions. Then, both quiescent filaments consecutively underwent the second and third eruptions, while the nearby dimmings were persistent. Comparing the result of a derived coronal magnetic configuration, the magnetic connectivity between the dimmings suggested that they were caused by the joint effect of simple expansion of overlying loop systems forced by the first eruption, as well as by its erupting field interacting or reconnecting with the surrounding magnetic structures. Note that the dimming process in the first eruption indicated a weakening and partial removal of an overlying magnetic field constraint on the two other filaments, and thus one can physically connect these eruptions as sympathetic. It appears that the peculiar magnetic field configuration in our event was largely favorable to the occurrence of sympathetic filament eruptions. Because coronal dimmings are frequent and common phenomena in solar eruptions, especially in CME events, it is very likely that they represent a universal agent that can link consecutive eruptions nearby with sympathetic eruptions.

  19. Sympathetic Solar Filament Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rui; Liu, Ying D.; Zimovets, Ivan; Hu, Huidong; Dai, Xinghua; Yang, Zhongwei

    2016-08-01

    The 2015 March 15 coronal mass ejection as one of the two that together drove the largest geomagnetic storm of solar cycle 24 so far was associated with sympathetic filament eruptions. We investigate the relations between the different filaments involved in the eruption. A surge-like small-scale filament motion is confirmed as the trigger that initiated the erupting filament with multi-wavelength observations and using a forced magnetic field extrapolation method. When the erupting filament moved to an open magnetic field region, it experienced an obvious acceleration process and was accompanied by a C-class flare and the rise of another larger filament that eventually failed to erupt. We measure the decay index of the background magnetic field, which presents a critical height of 118 Mm. Combining with a potential field source surface extrapolation method, we analyze the distributions of the large-scale magnetic field, which indicates that the open magnetic field region may provide a favorable condition for F2 rapid acceleration and have some relation with the largest solar storm. The comparison between the successful and failed filament eruptions suggests that the confining magnetic field plays an important role in the preconditions for an eruption.

  20. Ghrelin inhibits sympathetic nervous activity in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Rongqian; Zhou, Mian; Das, Padmalaya; Dong, Weifeng; Ji, Youxin; Yang, Derek; Miksa, Michael; Zhang, Fangming; Ravikumar, Thanjavur S; Wang, Ping

    2007-12-01

    Our previous studies have shown that norepinephrine (NE) upregulates proinflammatory cytokines by activating alpha(2)-adrenoceptor. Therefore, modulation of the sympathetic nervous system represents a novel treatment for sepsis. We have also shown that a novel stomach-derived peptide, ghrelin, is downregulated in sepsis and that its intravenous administration decreases proinflammatory cytokines and mitigates organ injury. However, it remains unknown whether ghrelin inhibits sympathetic activity through central ghrelin receptors [i.e., growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a (GHSR-la)] in sepsis. To study this, sepsis was induced in male rats by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Ghrelin was administered through intravenous or intracerebroventricular injection 30 min before CLP. Our results showed that intravenous administration of ghrelin significantly reduced the elevated NE and TNF-alpha levels at 2 h after CLP. NE administration partially blocked the inhibitory effect of ghrelin on TNF-alpha in sepsis. GHSR-la inhibition by the administration of a GHSR-la antagonist, [d-Arg(1),d-Phe(5), d-Trp(7,9),Leu(11)]substance P, significantly increased both NE and TNF-alpha levels even in normal animals. Markedly elevated circulating levels of NE 2 h after CLP were also significantly decreased by intracerebroventricular administration of ghrelin. Ghrelin's inhibitory effect on NE release was completely blocked by intracerebroventricular injection of the GHSR-1a antagonist or a neuropeptide Y (NPY)/Y(1) receptor antagonist. However, ghrelin's downregulatory effect on TNF-alpha release was only partially diminished by these agents. Thus ghrelin has sympathoinhibitory properties that are mediated by central ghrelin receptors involving a NPY/Y1 receptor-dependent pathway. Ghrelin's inhibitory effect on TNF-alpha production in sepsis is partially because of its modulation of the overstimulated sympathetic nerve activation.

  1. The sympathetic nervous system through the ages: from Thomas Willis to resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Esler, Murray

    2011-07-01

    The 17th century London neuroanatomical school headed by Thomas Willis provided us with the first identifiable images of the sympathetic nervous system. Nineteenth century giants of European physiology (Bernard, Waller and Brown-Sequard) identified these as the 'pressor nerves'. Von Euler's demonstration that the sympathetic transmitter was noradrenaline brought the field into the modern era. The development of ganglion-blocking drugs by Paton, whose name this review commemorates, allowed comprehensive pharmacological antagonism of this system in patients. With the development of contemporary techniques for recording from human sympathetic nerves and quantifying rates of noradrenaline release, the sympathetic nervous system became accessible to clinical scientists investigating possible contributions to cardiovascular and other diseases. Sympathetic nervous system responses typically are regionally differentiated, with activation in one outflow sometimes accompanying no change or sympathetic inhibition in another. Regional sympathetic activity is best studied in humans by recording from postganglionic sympathetic efferents (multi-unit or single-fibre recording) and by isotope dilution-derived measurement of organ-specific noradrenaline release to plasma from sympathetic nerves (regional 'noradrenaline spillover'). With the application of these techniques, evidence has been assembled in the past three decades which indicates that sympathetic nervous system activation is crucial in the development of cardiovascular disorders, most notably heart failure and essential hypertension. An important goal for clinical scientists is translation of knowledge of pathophysiology, such as this, into better treatment for patients. The achievement of this 'mechanisms to management' transition is mature in cardiac failure, with knowledge of cardiac neural pathophysiology having led to introduction of β-adrenergic blockers, an effective therapy. Perhaps we are now on the cusp of

  2. Regulation of sympathetic nervous system function after cardiovascular deconditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasser, E. M.; Moffitt, J. A.

    2001-01-01

    Humans subjected to prolonged periods of bed rest or microgravity undergo deconditioning of the cardiovascular system, characterized by resting tachycardia, reduced exercise capability, and a predisposition for orthostatic intolerance. These changes in cardiovascular function are likely due to a combination of factors, including changes in control of body fluid balance or cardiac alterations resulting in inadequate maintenance of stroke volume, altered arterial or venous vascular function, reduced activation of cardiovascular hormones, and diminished autonomic reflex function. There is evidence indicating a role for each of these mechanisms. Diminished reflex activation of the sympathetic nervous system and subsequent vasoconstriction appear to play an important role. Studies utilizing the hindlimb-unloaded (HU) rat, an animal model of deconditioning, evaluated the potential role of altered arterial baroreflex control of the sympathetic nervous system. These studies indicate that HU results in blunted baroreflex-mediated activation of both renal and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity in response to a hypotensive stimulus. HU rats are less able to maintain arterial pressure during hemorrhage, suggesting that diminished ability to increase sympathetic activity has functional consequences for the animal. Reflex control of vasopressin secretion appears to be enhanced following HU. Blunted baroreflex-mediated sympathoexcitation appears to involve altered central nervous system function. Baroreceptor afferent activity in response to changes in arterial pressure is unaltered in HU rats. However, increases in efferent sympathetic nerve activity for a given decrease in afferent input are blunted after HU. This altered central nervous system processing of baroreceptor inputs appears to involve an effect at the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM). Specifically, it appears that tonic GABAA-mediated inhibition of the RVLM is enhanced after HU. Augmented inhibition apparently

  3. Enhanced adipose afferent reflex contributes to sympathetic activation in diet-induced obesity hypertension.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xiao-Qing; Chen, Wei-Wei; Han, Ying; Zhou, Ye-Bo; Zhang, Feng; Gao, Xing-Ya; Zhu, Guo-Qing

    2012-11-01

    We recently found that adipose afferent reflex (AAR) induced by chemical stimulation of white adipose tissue (WAT) increased sympathetic outflow and blood pressure in normal rats. The study was designed to test the hypothesis that AAR contributes to sympathetic activation in obesity hypertension. Male rats were fed with a control diet (12% kcal as fat) or high-fat diet (42% kcal as fat) for 12 weeks to induce obesity hypertension. Stimulation of WAT with capsaicin increased renal sympathetic nerve activity and mean arterial pressure. Both AAR and WAT afferent activity were enhanced in obesity hypertension (OH) compared with obesity nonhypertension (ON) and in ON compared with obesity-resistant or control diet rats. WAT sensory denervation induced by resiniferatoxin caused greater decreases in renal sympathetic nerve activity and mean arterial pressure in OH than ON and in ON than obesity-resistant or control. The depressor effect of resiniferatoxin lasted ≥ 3 weeks in OH. Leptin antagonist in WAT reduced renal sympathetic nerve activity and mean arterial pressure in OH. WAT injection of capsaicin increased plasma renin, angiotensin II, and norepinephrine levels in OH and caused more c-fos expression in paraventricular nucleus in OH than ON and in ON than obesity-resistant or control rats. Inhibiting paraventricular nucleus neurons with lidocaine attenuated renal sympathetic nerve activity in OH and ON, decreased mean arterial pressure in OH, and abolished the capsaicin-induced AAR in all groups. The results indicate that enhanced AAR contributes to sympathetic activation in OH, and paraventricular nucleus plays an important role in the enhanced AAR and sympathetic activation in OH.

  4. Sympathetic reaction tests and analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricardson, D. E.; Bowman, A. L.

    1980-01-01

    The critical separation distances for explosive reactions of a solid rocket propellant were measured. Explosive reactions included low order explosion, low order detonation, and high order detonation. The effects of sample size, shape, damage and temperature on sympathetic reaction were determined experimentally. The sympathetic detonation of small cubes of solid rocket propellant was modelled numerically, using the Eulerian reactive hydrodynamic code 2DE with Forest Fire burn rates. The model was applied to cubes of 2.54 - 7.62 cm (1 - 3 in.), with agreement between calculated and experimental results.

  5. Central chemoreceptors and sympathetic vasomotor outflow

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Thiago S; Takakura, Ana C; Colombari, Eduardo; Guyenet, Patrice G

    2006-01-01

    The present study explores how elevations in brain PCO2 increase the sympathetic nerve discharge (SND). SND, phrenic nerve discharge (PND) and putative sympathoexcitatory vasomotor neurons of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) were recorded in anaesthetized sino-aortic denervated and vagotomized rats. Hypercapnia (end-expiratory CO2 from 5% to 10%) increased SND (97 ± 6%) and the activity of RVLM neurons (67 ± 4%). Injection of kynurenic acid (Kyn, ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonist) into RVLM or the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) eliminated or reduced PND, respectively, but did not change the effect of CO2 on SND. Bilateral injection of Kyn or muscimol into the rostral ventral respiratory group (rVRG-pre-Bötzinger region, also called CVLM) eliminated PND while increasing the stimulatory effect of CO2 on SND. Muscimol injection into commissural part of the solitary tract nucleus (commNTS) had no effect on PND or SND activation by CO2. As expected, injection of Kyn into RVLM or muscimol into commNTS virtually blocked the effect of carotid body stimulation on SND in rats with intact carotid sinus nerves. In conclusion, CO2 increases SND by activating RVLM sympathoexcitatory neurons. The relevant central chemoreceptors are probably located within or close to RVLM and not in the NTS or in the rVRG-pre-Bötzinger/CVLM region. RVLM sympathoexcitatory neurons may be intrinsically pH-sensitive and/or receive excitatory synaptic inputs from RTN chemoreceptors. Activation of the central respiratory network reduces the overall sympathetic response to CO2, presumably by activating barosensitive CVLM neurons and inhibiting RTN chemoreceptors. PMID:16901945

  6. Properties of wild-type and fluorescent protein-tagged mouse tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium channel (Na V 1.8) heterologously expressed in rat sympathetic neurons.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Geoffrey G; Puhl, Henry L; Ikeda, Stephen R

    2008-04-01

    The tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistant Na(+) current arising from Na(V)1.8-containing channels participates in nociceptive pathways but is difficult to functionally express in traditional heterologous systems. Here, we show that injection of cDNA encoding mouse Na(V)1.8 into the nuclei of rat superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons results in TTX-resistant Na(+) currents with amplitudes equal to or exceeding the currents arising from natively expressing channels of mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. The activation and inactivation properties of the heterologously expressed Na(V)1.8 Na(+) channels were similar but not identical to native TTX-resistant channels. Most notably, the half-activation potential of the heterologously expressed Na(V)1.8 channels was shifted about 10 mV toward more depolarized potentials. Fusion of fluorescent proteins to the N- or C-termini of Na(V)1.8 did not substantially affect functional expression in SCG neurons. Unexpectedly, fluorescence was not concentrated at the plasma membrane but found throughout the interior of the neuron in a granular pattern. A similar expression pattern was observed in nodose ganglion neurons expressing the tagged channels. In contrast, expression of tagged Na(V)1.8 in HeLa cells revealed a fluorescence pattern consistent with sequestration in the endoplasmic reticulum, thus providing a basis for poor functional expression in clonal cell lines. Our results establish SCG neurons as a favorable surrogate for the expression and study of molecularly defined Na(V)1.8-containing channels. The data also indicate that unidentified factors may be required for the efficient functional expression of Na(V)1.8 with a biophysical phenotype identical to that found in sensory neurons. PMID:18272876

  7. Innervating sympathetic neurons regulate heart size and the timing of cardiomyocyte cell cycle withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Kreipke, R E; Birren, S J

    2015-12-01

    Sympathetic drive to the heart is a key modulator of cardiac function and interactions between heart tissue and innervating sympathetic fibres are established early in development. Significant innervation takes place during postnatal heart development, a period when cardiomyocytes undergo a rapid transition from proliferative to hypertrophic growth. The question of whether these innervating sympathetic fibres play a role in regulating the modes of cardiomyocyte growth was investigated using 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) to abolish early sympathetic innervation of the heart. Postnatal chemical sympathectomy resulted in rats with smaller hearts, indicating that heart growth is regulated by innervating sympathetic fibres during the postnatal period. In vitro experiments showed that sympathetic interactions resulted in delays in markers of cardiomyocyte maturation, suggesting that changes in the timing of the transition from hyperplastic to hypertrophic growth of cardiomyocytes could underlie changes in heart size in the sympathectomized animals. There was also an increase in the expression of Meis1, which has been linked to cardiomyocyte cell cycle withdrawal, suggesting that sympathetic signalling suppresses cell cycle withdrawal. This signalling involves β-adrenergic activation, which was necessary for sympathetic regulation of cardiomyocyte proliferation and hypertrophy. The effect of β-adrenergic signalling on cardiomyocyte hypertrophy underwent a developmental transition. While young postnatal cardiomyocytes responded to isoproterenol (isoprenaline) with a decrease in cell size, mature cardiomyocytes showed an increase in cell size in response to the drug. Together, these results suggest that early sympathetic effects on proliferation modulate a key transition between proliferative and hypertrophic growth of the heart and contribute to the sympathetic regulation of adult heart size.

  8. Higher sympathetic nerve activity during ventricular (VVI) than during dual-chamber (DDD) pacing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, J. A.; Morillo, C. A.; Eckberg, D. L.; Ellenbogen, K. A.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We determined the short-term effects of single-chamber ventricular pacing and dual-chamber atrioventricular (AV) pacing on directly measured sympathetic nerve activity. BACKGROUND: Dual-chamber AV cardiac pacing results in greater cardiac output and lower systemic vascular resistance than does single-chamber ventricular pacing. However, it is unclear whether these hemodynamic advantages result in less sympathetic nervous system outflow. METHODS: In 13 patients with a dual-chamber pacemaker, we recorded the electrocardiogram, noninvasive arterial pressure (Finapres), respiration and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (microneurography) during 3 min of underlying basal heart rate and 3 min of ventricular and AV pacing at rates of 60 and 100 beats/min. RESULTS: Arterial pressure was lowest and muscle sympathetic nerve activity was highest at the underlying basal heart rate. Arterial pressure increased with cardiac pacing and was greater with AV than with ventricular pacing (change in mean blood pressure +/- SE: 10 +/- 3 vs. 2 +/- 2 mm Hg at 60 beats/min; 21 +/- 5 vs. 14 +/- 2 mm Hg at 100 beats/min; p < 0.05). Sympathetic nerve activity decreased with cardiac pacing and the decline was greater with AV than with ventricular pacing (60 beats/min -40 +/- 11% vs. -17 +/- 7%; 100 beats/min -60 +/- 9% vs. -48 +/- 10%; p < 0.05). Although most patients showed a strong inverse relation between arterial pressure and muscle sympathetic nerve activity, three patients with severe left ventricular dysfunction (ejection fraction < or = 30%) showed no relation between arterial pressure and sympathetic activity. CONCLUSIONS: Short-term AV pacing results in lower sympathetic nerve activity and higher arterial pressure than does ventricular pacing, indicating that cardiac pacing mode may influence sympathetic outflow simply through arterial baroreflex mechanisms. We speculate that the greater incidence of adverse outcomes in patients treated with single-chamber ventricular

  9. Cardiorespiratory Coupling: Common Rhythms in Cardiac, Sympathetic, and Respiratory Activities

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Thomas E.; Hsieh, Yee-Hsee; Dhingra, Rishi R.; Baekey, David M.; Galán, Roberto F.; Wehrwein, Erica; Morris, Kendall F.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiorespiratory coupling is an encompassing term describing more than the well-recognized influences of respiration on heart rate and blood pressure. Our data indicate that cardiorespiratory coupling reflects a reciprocal interaction between autonomic and respiratory control systems, and the cardiovascular system modulates the ventilatory pattern as well. For example, cardioventilatory coupling refers to the influence of heart beats and arterial pulse pressure on respiration and is the tendency for the next inspiration to start at a preferred latency after the last heart beat in expiration. Multiple complementary, well-described mechanisms mediate respiration’s influence on cardiovascular function, whereas mechanisms mediating the cardiovascular system’s influence on respiration may only be through the baroreceptors but are just being identified. Our review will describe a differential effect of conditioning rats with either chronic intermittent or sustained hypoxia on sympathetic nerve activity but also on ventilatory pattern variability. Both intermittent and sustained hypoxia increase sympathetic nerve activity after 2 weeks but affect sympatho-respiratory coupling differentially. Intermittent hypoxia enhances sympatho-respiratory coupling, which is associated with low variability in the ventilatory pattern. In contrast, after constant hypobaric hypoxia, 1-to-1 coupling between bursts of sympathetic and phrenic nerve activity is replaced by 2-to-3 coupling. This change in coupling pattern is associated with increased variability of the ventilatory pattern. After baro-denervating hypobaric hypoxic-conditioned rats, splanchnic sympathetic nerve activity becomes tonic (distinct bursts are absent) with decreases during phrenic nerve bursts and ventilatory pattern becomes regular. Thus, conditioning rats to either intermittent or sustained hypoxia accentuates the reciprocal nature of cardiorespiratory coupling. Finally, identifying a compelling physiologic

  10. Norepinephrine-induced nerve growth factor depletion causes cardiac sympathetic denervation in severe heart failure.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Kensuke; Kanazawa, Hideaki; Ieda, Masaki; Kawaguchi-Manabe, Haruko; Miyake, Yoshiko; Yagi, Takashi; Arai, Takahide; Sano, Motoaki; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2010-08-25

    In severe congestive heart failure (CHF), sympathetic overactivity correlates with the exacerbation of cardiac performance. To test the hypothesis that the cardiac sympathetic nerve density dramatically changes with the acceleration of circulating norepinephrine (NE) concentration, we investigated the temporal association of nerve growth factor (NGF) expression in the heart and cardiac sympathetic nerve density during the development of CHF in the continuous NE-infused rats. The animals were analyzed at 0-, 1-, 3-, 7-, 14-, and 28-day after implantation of osmotic pump at a rate of 0.05 mg/kg/hr. The cardiac performance was temporally facilitated in NE-exposed rats at 3-day in accordance with the sympathetic hyper-innervation induced by the augmentation of NGF mRNA expression in the heart. In NE-treated rats, left ventricular end-diastolic pressure was significantly increased after 7-day and marked left ventricular hypertrophy and systemic fluid retention were observed at 28-day. CHF-induced sympathetic overactivity further increased plasma NE concentration in NE-treated rats and finally reached to 16.1+/-5.6 ng/ml at 28-day (control level was 0.39+/-0.1 ng/ml, p<0.01). In the decompensated CHF rats at 28-day, the NGF mRNA expression was conspicuously reduced concomitant with the obvious nerve fiber loss confirmed by the immunostaining of nerve axonal marker, PGP9.5 and sympathetic neuron marker, tyrosine hydroxylase. This resulted in the attenuated tissue NE contents and the exacerbating cardiac performance. The cardiac sympathetic fiber loss was also confirmed in NE-exposed DBH (dopamine beta-hydroxylase)-Cre/Floxed-EGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein) mice with severe CHF, in which sympathetic nerve could be traced by EGFP. Our results suggest that the cardiac sympathetic nerve density is strictly regulated by the NGF expression in the heart and long-exposure of high plasma NE concentration caused myocardial NGF reduction, following sympathetic fiber loss

  11. Effects of a single intraperitoneal administration of cadmium on femoral bone structure in male rats

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Exposure to cadmium (Cd) is considered a risk factor for various bone diseases in humans and experimental animals. This study investigated the acute effects of Cd on femoral bone structure of adult male rats after a single intraperitoneal administration. Methods Ten 4-month-old male Wistar rats were injected intraperitoneally with a single dose of 2 mg CdCl2/kg body weight and killed 36 h after the Cd had been injected. Ten 4-month-old males served as a control group. Differences in body weight, femoral weight, femoral length and histological structure of the femur were evaluated between the two groups of rats. The unpaired Student's t-test was used for establishment of statistical significance. Results A single intraperitoneal administration of Cd had no significant effect on the body weight, femoral weight or femoral length. On the other hand, histological changes were significant. Rats exposed to Cd had significantly higher values of area, perimeter, maximum and minimum diameters of the primary osteons' vascular canals and Haversian canals. In contrast, a significant decrease in all variables of the secondary osteons was observed in these rats. Conclusions The results indicate that, as expected, a single intraperitoneal administration of 2 mg CdCl2/kg body weight had no impact on macroscopic structure of rat's femora; however, it affected the size of vascular canals of primary osteons, Haversian canals, and secondary osteons. PMID:21884588

  12. Effects of muscarine on single rat adrenal chromaffin cells.

    PubMed Central

    Neely, A; Lingle, C J

    1992-01-01

    1. The action of muscarine on membrane currents and cytosolic calcium (Ca2+) of dissociated rat adrenal chromaffin cells was investigated using standard whole-cell voltage-clamp techniques and microfluorimetry of unclamped single cells. 2. In cells held at a constant holding potential negative to -40 mV, brief (5-10 s) applications of muscarine produced a transient activation of outward current. The activation of this current by muscarine also occurs in the presence of 5 mM-Co2+. 3. The outward current activated by muscarine at holding potentials negative to about -40 mV is blocked over 90% by either 200 microM-curare or 200 nM-apamin. One millimolar TEA produces variable blocking effects at such potentials. 4. The outward current activated by muscarine is transient even in the continuing presence of muscarine. Complete recovery between pairs of muscarine applications occurs over a 1-2 min period. If sufficient time was allowed for recovery between muscarine applications, the muscarine-activated outward current could be reliably elicited in dialysed cells for periods of 20-30 min. 5. Voltage ramps were used to examine effects of muscarine on currents over a range of membrane potentials. Over all potentials, muscarine activates a relatively voltage-independent component which is blocked almost completely by 200 nM-apamin and by 200 microM-curare. At potentials negative to about -40 mV, the apamin- and curare-sensitive current accounts for virtually all muscarine-activated current. This current appears to correspond to a Ca(2+)-activated, voltage-independent current found in these cells. Effects of muscarine on currents activated at potentials positive to 0 mV are complex. At potentials above 0 mV, muscarine can produce either an activation or an inhibition of outward current. The outward current activated at positive potentials was primarily voltage dependent and blocked by 1 mM-TEA. However, in some cells activation of voltage-dependent current was not observed and

  13. Single-dose Intravenous Toxicology Testing of Daebohwalryeok Pharmcopuncture in Sprague-Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Seung-Ho; Park, Sunju; Jeong, Jong-Jin; Lee, Kwang-Ho; Yu, Jun-Sang; Seo, Hyung-Sik; Kwon, Ki-Rok

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aims of the study were to test the single-dose intravenous toxicity of Daebohwalryeok pharmacopuncture (DHRP) in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats and to estimate the crude lethal dose. Methods: The experiments were conducted at Biotoxtech Co., a Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) laboratory, according to the GLP regulation and were approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee of Biotoxtech Co. (Approval no: 110156). The rats were divided into three groups: DHRP was injected into the rats in the two test groups at doses of 10 mL/kg and 20 mL/kg, respectively, and normal saline solution was injected into the rats in the control group. Single doses of DHRP were injected intravenously into 6 week old SD rats (5 male and 5 female rats per group). General symptoms were observed and weights were measured during the 14 day observation period after the injection. After the observation period, necropsies were done. Then, histopathological tests were performed. Weight data were analyzed with a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) by using statistical analysis system (SAS, version 9.2). Results: No deaths and no statistical significant weight changes were observed for either male or female SD rats in either the control or the test groups during the observation period. In addition, no treatment related general symptoms or necropsy abnormalities were observed. Histopathological results showed no DHRP related effects in the 20 mL/kg DHRP group for either male or female rats. Conclusion: Under the conditions of this study, the results from single-dose intravenous injections of DHRP showed that estimated lethal doses for both male and female rats were above 20 mL/kg. PMID:26120487

  14. Hindlimb unweighting does not alter vasoconstrictor responsiveness and nitric oxide-mediated inhibition of sympathetic vasoconstriction

    PubMed Central

    Just, Timothy P; Jendzjowsky, Nicholas G; DeLorey, Darren S

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We tested the hypothesis that physical inactivity would increase sympathetic vasoconstrictor responsiveness and diminish NO-mediated inhibition of sympathetic vasoconstriction in resting and contracting skeletal muscle. Sprague–Dawley rats (n = 33) were randomly assigned to sedentary time control (S) or hindlimb unweighted (HU) groups for 21 days. Following the intervention, rats were anaesthetized and instrumented for measurement of arterial blood pressure and femoral artery blood flow and stimulation of the lumbar sympathetic chain. The percentage change of femoral vascular conductance (%FVC) in response to sympathetic chain stimulation delivered at 2 and 5 Hz was determined at rest and during triceps surae muscle contraction before (control) and after NO synthase blockade with l-NAME (5 mg kg i.v.). Sympathetic vasoconstrictor responsiveness was not different (P > 0.05) in S and HU rats at rest (S, 2 Hz, −26 ± 8% and 5 Hz, −46 ± 12%; and HU, 2 Hz, −29 ± 9% and 5 Hz, −51 ± 10%) and during contraction (S, 2 Hz, −10 ± 7% and 5 Hz, −23 ± 11%; and HU, 2 Hz, −9 ± 5% and 5 Hz, −22 ± 7%). Nitric oxide synthase blockade caused a similar increase (P > 0.05) in sympathetic vasoconstrictor responsiveness in HU and S rats at rest (S, 2 Hz, −41 ± 7% and 5 Hz, −58 ± 8%; and HU, 2 Hz, −43 ± 6% and 5 Hz, −63 ± 8%) and during muscle contraction (S, 2 Hz, −15 ± 6% and 5 Hz, −31 ± 11%; and HU, 2 Hz, −12 ± 5% and 5 Hz, −29 ± 8%). Skeletal muscle NO synthase expression and ACh-mediated vasodilatation were also not different between HU and S rats. These data suggest that HU does not alter sympathetic vasoconstrictor responsiveness and NO-mediated inhibition of sympathetic vasoconstriction in resting and contracting skeletal muscle. Key points Physical inactivity increases the risk of cardiovascular disease and may alter sympathetic nervous system control of vascular

  15. Sympathetic cardiac hyperinnervation and atrial autonomic imbalance in diet-induced obesity promote cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    McCully, Belinda H; Hasan, Wohaib; Streiff, Cole T; Houle, Jennifer C; Woodward, William R; Giraud, George D; Brooks, Virginia L; Habecker, Beth A

    2013-11-15

    Obesity increases the risk of arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death, but the mechanisms are unknown. This study tested the hypothesis that obesity-induced cardiac sympathetic outgrowth and hyperinnervation promotes the development of arrhythmic events. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (250-275 g), fed a high-fat diet (33% kcal/fat), diverged into obesity-resistant (OR) and obesity-prone (OP) groups and were compared with rats fed normal chow (13% kcal/fat; CON). In vitro experiments showed that both OR and OP rats exhibited hyperinnervation of the heart and high sympathetic outgrowth compared with CON rats, even though OR rats are not obese. Despite the hyperinnervation and outgrowth, we showed that, in vivo, OR rats were less susceptible to arrhythmic events after an intravenous epinephrine challenge compared with OP rats. On examining total and stimulus-evoked neurotransmitter levels in an ex vivo system, we demonstrate that atrial acetylcholine content and release were attenuated in OP compared with OR and CON groups. OP rats also expressed elevated atrial norepinephrine content, while norepinephrine release was suppressed. These findings suggest that the consumption of a high-fat diet, even in the absence of overt obesity, stimulates sympathetic outgrowth and hyperinnervation of the heart. However, normalized cardiac parasympathetic nervous system control may protect the heart from arrhythmic events.

  16. Toxicity of zinc oxide nanoparticles in rats treated by two different routes: single intravenous injection and single oral administration.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jonghye; Kim, Heyjin; Kim, Pilje; Jo, Eunhye; Kim, Hyun-Mi; Lee, Moo-Yeol; Jin, Seon Mi; Park, Kwangsik

    2015-01-01

    Toxicokinetics of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnONP) was studied in rats via a single intravenous (iv) injection and a single oral administration (3 mg/kg or 30 mg/kg), respectively. Blood concentrations of zinc (Zn) were monitored for 7 d and tissue distribution were determined in liver, kidneys, lung, spleen, thymus, brain, and testes. To ascertain the excretion of ZnONP, Zn levels in urine and feces were measured for 7 d. ZnONP were not readily absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) after oral administration and were excreted mostly in feces. When the nanoparticles were injected iv to rats at a dose of 30 mg/kg, peak concentration appeared at 5 min but returned to normal range by d 2 (48 h after injection). ZnONP were distributed mainly to liver, kidneys, lung, and spleen, but not to thymus, brain, and testes. The distribution level was significantly decreased to normal by d 7. Feces excretion levels after iv injection supported biliary excretion of ZnONP. In rats injected iv with 30 mg/kg, mitotic figures in hepatocytes were significantly increased and multifocal acute injuries with dark brown pigment were noted in lungs, while no significant damage was observed in rats treated orally with the same dosage.

  17. High precision micro-impulse measurements for micro-thrusters based on torsional pendulum and sympathetic resonance techniques.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Daixian; Wu, Jianjun; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Hua; He, Zhen

    2013-12-01

    A sympathetic resonance theory is analyzed and applied in a newly developed torsional pendulum to measure the micro-impulse produced by a μN s-class ablative pulsed plasma thruster. According to theoretical analysis on the dynamical behaviors of a torsional pendulum, the resonance amplification effect of micro-signals is presented. In addition, a new micro-impulse measurement method based on sympathetic resonance theory is proposed as an improvement of the original single pulse measurement method. In contrast with the single pulse measurement method, the advantages of sympathetic resonance method are significant. First, because of the magnification of vibration signals due to resonance processes, measurement precision for the sympathetic resonance method becomes higher especially in reducing reading error. With an increase in peak number, the relative errors induced by readout of voltage signals decrease to approximately ±1.9% for the sympathetic resonance mode, whereas the relative error in single pulse mode is estimated as ±13.4%. Besides, by using the resonance amplification effect the sympathetic resonance method makes it possible to measure an extremely low-impulse beyond the resolution of a thrust stand without redesigning or purchasing a new one. Moreover, because of the simple operational principle and structure the sympathetic resonance method is much more convenient and inexpensive to be implemented than other high-precision methods. Finally, the sympathetic resonance measurement method can also be applied in other thrust stands to improve further the ability to measure the low-impulse bits.

  18. High precision micro-impulse measurements for micro-thrusters based on torsional pendulum and sympathetic resonance techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Daixian; Wu, Jianjun; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Hua; He, Zhen

    2013-12-01

    A sympathetic resonance theory is analyzed and applied in a newly developed torsional pendulum to measure the micro-impulse produced by a μN s-class ablative pulsed plasma thruster. According to theoretical analysis on the dynamical behaviors of a torsional pendulum, the resonance amplification effect of micro-signals is presented. In addition, a new micro-impulse measurement method based on sympathetic resonance theory is proposed as an improvement of the original single pulse measurement method. In contrast with the single pulse measurement method, the advantages of sympathetic resonance method are significant. First, because of the magnification of vibration signals due to resonance processes, measurement precision for the sympathetic resonance method becomes higher especially in reducing reading error. With an increase in peak number, the relative errors induced by readout of voltage signals decrease to approximately ±1.9% for the sympathetic resonance mode, whereas the relative error in single pulse mode is estimated as ±13.4%. Besides, by using the resonance amplification effect the sympathetic resonance method makes it possible to measure an extremely low-impulse beyond the resolution of a thrust stand without redesigning or purchasing a new one. Moreover, because of the simple operational principle and structure the sympathetic resonance method is much more convenient and inexpensive to be implemented than other high-precision methods. Finally, the sympathetic resonance measurement method can also be applied in other thrust stands to improve further the ability to measure the low-impulse bits.

  19. Single-dose Intramuscular Injection Toxicology of Danggui Pharmacopuncture (DGP) in Sprague-Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sun, SeungHo; Jeong, JongJin; Park, Sunju; Lee, KwangHo; Yu, JunSang; Seo, Hyung-Sik; Kwon, KiRok

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of the study is to assess both the approximate lethal dose and the single dose intramuscular injection toxicity of Danggui (Angelica gigantis radix) pharmacopuncture (DGP) in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Methods: The experiments were conducted at the good laboratory practice (GLP) laboratory, Biotoxtech Co., which is a laboratory approved by the ministry of food and drug safety (MFDS). The study was performed according to the GLP regulation and the toxicity test guidelines of the MFDS (2009) after approval of the institutional animal care and use committee of Biotoxtech. Single doses of DGP were injected intramuscularly into the rats in three test groups of 6 week old SD rats (5 male and 5 female rats per groups) in the amounts of 0.1, 0.5, and 1.0 mL/animal for groups 2, 3, and 4, respectively, and normal saline solution in the amount of 1.0 mL/animal was injected intramuscularly into the rats (5 male and 5 female rats) in the control group. Observations of the general symptoms and weight measurements were performed during the 14 day observation period after the injection. Hematologic and serum biochemical examination, necropsy, and a local tolerance test at the injection site were done after the observation period. Results: No death was observed in three test groups (0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 mL/animal group). In addition, the injection of DGP had no effect on general symptoms, weights, hematologic and serum biochemical examination, and necropsy. The results from the local tolerance tests at injection site showed no treatment related effects in the SD rats. Conclusion: The results of single dose intramuscular injection of DGP suggest that the approximate lethal dose is above 1.0 mL/animal for both male and female SD rats and that intramuscular injection of DGP may be safe. PMID:25830059

  20. Modelling the vascular response to sympathetic postganglionic nerve activity

    PubMed Central

    Briant, Linford J.B.; Paton, Julian F.R.; Pickering, Anthony E.; Champneys, Alan R.

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the influence of burst properties of the sympathetic nervous system on arterial contractility. Specifically, a mathematical model is constructed of the pathway from action potential generation in a sympathetic postganglionic neurone to contraction of an arterial smooth muscle cell. The differential equation model is a synthesis of models of the individual physiological processes, and is shown to be consistent with physiological data. The model is found to be unresponsive to tonic (regular) stimulation at typical frequencies recorded in sympathetic efferents. However, when stimulated at the same average frequency, but with repetitive respiratory-modulated burst patterns, it produces marked contractions. Moreover, the contractile force produced is found to be highly dependent on the number of spikes in each burst. In particular, when the model is driven by preganglionic spike trains recorded from wild-type and spontaneously hypertensive rats (which have increased spiking during each burst) the contractile force was found to be 10-fold greater in the hypertensive case. An explanation is provided in terms of the summative increased release of noradrenaline. Furthermore, the results suggest the marked effect that hypertensive spike trains had on smooth muscle cell tone can provide a significant contribution to the pathology of hypertension. PMID:25698230

  1. Heart failure causes cholinergic transdifferentiation of cardiac sympathetic nerves via gp130-signaling cytokines in rodents.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Hideaki; Ieda, Masaki; Kimura, Kensuke; Arai, Takahide; Kawaguchi-Manabe, Haruko; Matsuhashi, Tomohiro; Endo, Jin; Sano, Motoaki; Kawakami, Takashi; Kimura, Tokuhiro; Monkawa, Toshiaki; Hayashi, Matsuhiko; Iwanami, Akio; Okano, Hideyuki; Okada, Yasunori; Ishibashi-Ueda, Hatsue; Ogawa, Satoshi; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2010-02-01

    Although several cytokines and neurotrophic factors induce sympathetic neurons to transdifferentiate into cholinergic neurons in vitro, the physiological and pathophysiological roles of this remain unknown. During congestive heart failure (CHF), sympathetic neural tone is upregulated, but there is a paradoxical reduction in norepinephrine synthesis and reuptake in the cardiac sympathetic nervous system (SNS). Here we examined whether cholinergic transdifferentiation can occur in the cardiac SNS in rodent models of CHF and investigated the underlying molecular mechanism(s) using genetically modified mice. We used Dahl salt-sensitive rats to model CHF and found that, upon CHF induction, the cardiac SNS clearly acquired cholinergic characteristics. Of the various cholinergic differentiation factors, leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and cardiotrophin-1 were strongly upregulated in the ventricles of rats with CHF. Further, LIF and cardiotrophin-1 secreted from cultured failing rat cardiomyocytes induced cholinergic transdifferentiation in cultured sympathetic neurons, and this process was reversed by siRNAs targeting Lif and cardiotrophin-1. Consistent with the data in rats, heart-specific overexpression of LIF in mice caused cholinergic transdifferentiation in the cardiac SNS. Further, SNS-specific targeting of the gene encoding the gp130 subunit of the receptor for LIF and cardiotrophin-1 in mice prevented CHF-induced cholinergic transdifferentiation. Cholinergic transdifferentiation was also observed in the cardiac SNS of autopsied patients with CHF. Thus, CHF causes target-dependent cholinergic transdifferentiation of the cardiac SNS via gp130-signaling cytokines secreted from the failing myocardium.

  2. Dynamics of Phosphoinositide-Dependent Signaling in Sympathetic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kruse, Martin; Vivas, Oscar; Traynor-Kaplan, Alexis

    2016-01-01

    In neurons, loss of plasma membrane phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] leads to a decrease in exocytosis and changes in electrical excitability. Restoration of PI(4,5)P2 levels after phospholipase C activation is therefore essential for a return to basal neuronal activity. However, the dynamics of phosphoinositide metabolism have not been analyzed in neurons. We measured dynamic changes of PI(4,5)P2, phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate, diacylglycerol, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate, and Ca2+ upon muscarinic stimulation in sympathetic neurons from adult male Sprague-Dawley rats with electrophysiological and optical approaches. We used this kinetic information to develop a quantitative description of neuronal phosphoinositide metabolism. The measurements and analysis show and explain faster synthesis of PI(4,5)P2 in sympathetic neurons than in electrically nonexcitable tsA201 cells. They can be used to understand dynamic effects of receptor-mediated phospholipase C activation on excitability and other PI(4,5)P2-dependent processes in neurons. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] is a minor phospholipid in the cytoplasmic leaflet of the plasma membrane. Depletion of PI(4,5)P2 via phospholipase C-mediated hydrolysis leads to a decrease in exocytosis and alters electrical excitability in neurons. Restoration of PI(4,5)P2 is essential for a return to basal neuronal activity. However, the dynamics of phosphoinositide metabolism have not been analyzed in neurons. We studied the dynamics of phosphoinositide metabolism in sympathetic neurons upon muscarinic stimulation and used the kinetic information to develop a quantitative description of neuronal phosphoinositide metabolism. The measurements and analysis show a several-fold faster synthesis of PI(4,5)P2 in sympathetic neurons than in an electrically nonexcitable cell line, and provide a framework for future studies of PI(4,5)P2-dependent processes in neurons. PMID:26818524

  3. Chemoreflexes, Sleep Apnea, and Sympathetic Dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Mansukhani, Meghna P.; Kara, Tomas; Caples, Sean; Somers, Virend K.

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and hypertension are closely linked conditions. Disordered breathing events in OSA are characterized by increasing efforts against an occluded airway whilst asleep, resulting in a marked sympathetic response. This is predominantly due to hypoxemia activating the chemoreflexes, resulting in reflex increases in sympathetic neural outflow. In addition, apnea, and the consequent lack of inhibition of the sympathetic system that occurs with lung inflation during normal breathing, potentiates central sympathetic outflow. Sympathetic activation persists into the daytime, and is thought to contribute to hypertension and other adverse cardiovascular outcomes. This review discusses chemoreflex physiology and sympathetic modulation during normal sleep, as well as the sympathetic dysregulation seen in OSA, its extension into wakefulness, and changes after treatment. Evidence supporting the role of the peripheral chemoreflex in the sympathetic dysregulation seen in OSA, including in the context of co-morbid obesity, metabolic syndrome and systemic hypertension is reviewed. Finally, alterations in cardiovascular variability and other potential mechanisms that might play a role in the autonomic imbalance seen in OSA are also discussed. PMID:25097113

  4. Sympathetic innervation of human muscle spindles

    PubMed Central

    Radovanovic, Dina; Peikert, Kevin; Lindström, Mona; Domellöf, Fatima Pedrosa

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the presence of sympathetic innervation in human muscle spindles, using antibodies against neuropeptide Y (NPY), NPY receptors and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). A total of 232 muscle spindles were immunohistochemically examined. NPY and NPY receptors were found on the intrafusal fibers, on the blood vessels supplying muscle spindles and on free nerve endings in the periaxial space. TH-immunoreactivity was present mainly in the spindle nerve and vessel. This is, to our knowledge, the first morphological study concerning the sympathetic innervation of the human muscle spindles. The results provide anatomical evidence for direct sympathetic innervation of the intrafusal fibers and show that sympathetic innervation is not restricted to the blood vessels supplying spindles. Knowledge about direct sympathetic innervation of the muscle spindle might expand our understanding of motor and proprioceptive dysfunction under stress conditions, for example, chronic muscle pain syndromes. PMID:25994126

  5. Netrin-1 controls sympathetic arterial innervation

    PubMed Central

    Brunet, Isabelle; Gordon, Emma; Han, Jinah; Cristofaro, Brunella; Broqueres-You, Dong; Liu, Chun; Bouvrée, Karine; Zhang, Jiasheng; del Toro, Raquel; Mathivet, Thomas; Larrivée, Bruno; Jagu, Julia; Pibouin-Fragner, Laurence; Pardanaud, Luc; Machado, Maria J.C.; Kennedy, Timothy E.; Zhuang, Zhen; Simons, Michael; Levy, Bernard I.; Tessier-Lavigne, Marc; Grenz, Almut; Eltzschig, Holger; Eichmann, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Autonomic sympathetic nerves innervate peripheral resistance arteries, thereby regulating vascular tone and controlling blood supply to organs. Despite the fundamental importance of blood flow control, how sympathetic arterial innervation develops remains largely unknown. Here, we identified the axon guidance cue netrin-1 as an essential factor required for development of arterial innervation in mice. Netrin-1 was produced by arterial smooth muscle cells (SMCs) at the onset of innervation, and arterial innervation required the interaction of netrin-1 with its receptor, deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC), on sympathetic growth cones. Function-blocking approaches, including cell type–specific deletion of the genes encoding Ntn1 in SMCs and Dcc in sympathetic neurons, led to severe and selective reduction of sympathetic innervation and to defective vasoconstriction in resistance arteries. These findings indicate that netrin-1 and DCC are critical for the control of arterial innervation and blood flow regulation in peripheral organs. PMID:24937433

  6. Single Landmark Learning in Rats: Sex Differences in a Navigation Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forcano, L.; Santamaria, J.; Mackintosh, N. J.; Chamizo, V. D.

    2009-01-01

    In Experiments 1 and 2, rats were trained in a Morris pool to find a hidden platform located some distance away from a single landmark. Males learned to swim to the platform faster than females, but on test trials without the platform, males, unlike females, spent less time in the platform quadrant of the pool in the second half of each test trial…

  7. Single Prolonged Stress Disrupts Retention of Extinguished Fear in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knox, Dayan; George, Sophie A.; Fitzpatrick, Christopher J.; Rabinak, Christine A.; Maren, Stephen; Liberzon, Israel

    2012-01-01

    Clinical research has linked post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) with deficits in fear extinction. However, it is not clear whether these deficits result from stress-related changes in the acquisition or retention of extinction or in the regulation of extinction memories by context, for example. In this study, we used the single prolonged stress…

  8. Sympathetic ophthalmia complicating helium ion irradiation of a choroidal melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Fries, P.D.; Char, D.H.; Crawford, J.B.; Waterhouse, W.

    1987-11-01

    Sympathetic ophthalmia was diagnosed 49 months after helium ion irradiation of a left choroidal melanoma. The patient maintained good vision until 18 months after therapy, when she developed neovascular glaucoma. This complication required multiple therapeutic procedures, including topical anti-inflammatory and antiglaucomatous drops, 360 degrees peripheral panretinal cryoblation, and a single 180 degrees application of inferior cyclocryotherapy over a 2 1/2-year period. Four weeks after the cyclocryotherapy, inflammation was noted in both eyes, and, one month later, enucleation of the left sympathogenic eye was performed. Serial histopathologic sections showed a full-thickness, fibrovascular, scleral scar and tantalum marker ring suture without uveal incarceration. Penetrating surgical trauma, a uveal melanoma, and multiple nonpenetrating treatments resulted in the development of sympathetic ophthalmia.

  9. Effect of single-dose amoxicillin on rat incisor odontogenesis: a morphological study.

    PubMed

    Kumazawa, Kaido; Sawada, Takashi; Yanagisawa, Takaaki; Shintani, Seikou

    2012-06-01

    The effect of exposure to amoxicillin on tooth development remains to be elucidated. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of amoxicillin on rat incisor odontogenesis. Male Wistar rats weighing approximately 100 g were given a single intraperitoneal injection of 3.0 g/kg body weight amoxicillin. One week after injection, the rats were fixed, and the lower incisors were demineralized and prepared into paraffin sections for light microscopy (LM) and immunohistochemistry. Undemineralized samples were embedded in resin and ground for processing for contact microradiography (CMR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Serum calcium, phosphate, and magnesium concentrations were measured. At 1 week after amoxicillin administration, LM, CMR, and SEM revealed a clear increase in the area of interglobular dentin, representing disruption of mineralization by odontoblasts. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated moderate levels of the small integrin-binding ligand N-linked glycoprotein family dentin matrix protein 1 in large areas of interglobular dentin. On the other hand, no morphological alteration or hypomineralization was observed in the enamel. Serum calcium values showed no significant differences between the control and experimental rats during the experimental period although both serum phosphate and magnesium levels increased at day 1 after amoxicillin injection. The results suggest that a single dose of amoxicillin specifically affects normal tooth dentin mineralization, but not enamel mineralization in rat incisor odontogenesis. The present results further our understanding of the clinical association between dentin abnormality and amoxicillin exposure during tooth development.

  10. Simple method for the preparation of single cell suspensions from normal and tumorous rat colonic mucosa.

    PubMed Central

    Perret, V; Lev, R; Pigman, W

    1977-01-01

    Viable single cell suspensions from rat colonic epithelium were obtained by using phosphate buffered saline containing 0-2 M mannitol. The method, which requires no prior enzyme treatment, provides undamaged cells in high yield within one hour. The procedure was also applied to neoplastic rat colonic tissue, which was induced by repeated intrarectal infusion of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea. Comparison between normal and neoplastic cells has shown that the latter have a higher nucleus: cytoplasm ratio and a higher metabolic activity. Images Figure PMID:873323

  11. Matured Hop Bittering Components Induce Thermogenesis in Brown Adipose Tissue via Sympathetic Nerve Activity.

    PubMed

    Morimoto-Kobayashi, Yumie; Ohara, Kazuaki; Takahashi, Chika; Kitao, Sayoko; Wang, Guanying; Taniguchi, Yoshimasa; Katayama, Mikio; Nagai, Katsuya

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is the principal symptom of metabolic syndrome, which refers to a group of risk factors that increase the likelihood of atherosclerosis. In recent decades there has been a sharp rise in the incidence of obesity throughout the developed world. Iso-α-acids, the bitter compounds derived from hops in beer, have been shown to prevent diet-induced obesity by increasing lipid oxidation in the liver and inhibition of lipid absorption from the intestine. Whereas the sharp bitterness induced by effective dose of iso-α-acids precludes their acceptance as a nutrient, matured hop bittering components (MHB) appear to be more agreeable. Therefore, we tested MHB for an effect on ameliorating diet-induced body fat accumulation in rodents. MHB ingestion had a beneficial effect but, compared to iso-α-acids and despite containing structurally similar compounds, acted via different mechanisms to reduce body fat accumulation. MHB supplementation significantly reduced body weight gain, epididymal white adipose tissue weight, and plasma non-esterified free fatty acid levels in diet-induced obese mice. We also found that uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) expression in brown adipose tissue (BAT) was significantly increased in MHB-fed mice at both the mRNA and protein levels. In addition, MHB administration in rats induced the β-adrenergic signaling cascade, which is related to cAMP accumulation in BAT, suggesting that MHB could modulate sympathetic nerve activity innervating BAT (BAT-SNA). Indeed, single oral administration of MHB elevated BAT-SNA in rats, and this elevation was dissipated by subdiaphragmatic vagotomy. Single oral administration of MHB maintained BAT temperature at a significantly higher level than in control rats. Taken together, these findings indicate that MHB ameliorates diet-induced body fat accumulation, at least partly, by enhancing thermogenesis in BAT via BAT-SNA activation. Our data suggests that MHB is a useful tool for developing functional foods or

  12. Matured Hop Bittering Components Induce Thermogenesis in Brown Adipose Tissue via Sympathetic Nerve Activity

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto-Kobayashi, Yumie; Ohara, Kazuaki; Takahashi, Chika; Kitao, Sayoko; Wang, Guanying; Taniguchi, Yoshimasa; Katayama, Mikio; Nagai, Katsuya

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is the principal symptom of metabolic syndrome, which refers to a group of risk factors that increase the likelihood of atherosclerosis. In recent decades there has been a sharp rise in the incidence of obesity throughout the developed world. Iso-α-acids, the bitter compounds derived from hops in beer, have been shown to prevent diet-induced obesity by increasing lipid oxidation in the liver and inhibition of lipid absorption from the intestine. Whereas the sharp bitterness induced by effective dose of iso-α-acids precludes their acceptance as a nutrient, matured hop bittering components (MHB) appear to be more agreeable. Therefore, we tested MHB for an effect on ameliorating diet-induced body fat accumulation in rodents. MHB ingestion had a beneficial effect but, compared to iso-α-acids and despite containing structurally similar compounds, acted via different mechanisms to reduce body fat accumulation. MHB supplementation significantly reduced body weight gain, epididymal white adipose tissue weight, and plasma non-esterified free fatty acid levels in diet-induced obese mice. We also found that uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) expression in brown adipose tissue (BAT) was significantly increased in MHB-fed mice at both the mRNA and protein levels. In addition, MHB administration in rats induced the β-adrenergic signaling cascade, which is related to cAMP accumulation in BAT, suggesting that MHB could modulate sympathetic nerve activity innervating BAT (BAT-SNA). Indeed, single oral administration of MHB elevated BAT-SNA in rats, and this elevation was dissipated by subdiaphragmatic vagotomy. Single oral administration of MHB maintained BAT temperature at a significantly higher level than in control rats. Taken together, these findings indicate that MHB ameliorates diet-induced body fat accumulation, at least partly, by enhancing thermogenesis in BAT via BAT-SNA activation. Our data suggests that MHB is a useful tool for developing functional foods or

  13. Subfornical organ mediates sympathetic and hemodynamic responses to blood-borne proinflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shun-Guang; Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Beltz, Terry G; Yu, Yang; Johnson, Alan Kim; Felder, Robert B

    2013-07-01

    Proinflammatory cytokines play an important role in regulating autonomic and cardiovascular function in hypertension and heart failure. Peripherally administered proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β), act on the brain to increase blood pressure, heart rate, and sympathetic nerve activity. These molecules are too large to penetrate the blood-brain barrier, and so the mechanisms by which they elicit these responses remain unknown. We tested the hypothesis that the subfornical organ (SFO), a forebrain circumventricular organ that lacks a blood-brain barrier, plays a major role in mediating the sympathetic and hemodynamic responses to circulating proinflammatory cytokines. Intracarotid artery injection of TNF-α (200 ng) or IL-1β (200 ng) dramatically increased mean blood pressure, heart rate, and renal sympathetic nerve activity in rats with sham lesions of the SFO (SFO-s). These excitatory responses to intracarotid artery TNF-α and IL-1β were significantly attenuated in SFO-lesioned (SFO-x) rats. Similarly, the increases in mean blood pressure, heart rate, and renal sympathetic nerve activity in response to intravenous injections of TNF-α (500 ng) or IL-1β (500 ng) in SFO-s rats were significantly reduced in the SFO-x rats. Immunofluorescent staining revealed a dense distribution of the p55 TNF-α receptor and the IL-1 receptor accessory protein, a subunit of the IL-1 receptor, in the SFO. These data suggest that SFO is a predominant site in the brain at which circulating proinflammatory cytokines act to elicit cardiovascular and sympathetic responses.

  14. Social isolation after a single defeat reduces striatal dopamine transporter binding in rats.

    PubMed

    Isovich, E; Engelmann, M; Landgraf, R; Fuchs, E

    2001-03-01

    A single social defeat in male rats has long lasting physiological and behavioural consequences, which are similar to those seen in depressive patients. In addition, the housing conditions after social defeat appear to be crucial for the development of depression-like symptoms. Because the dopaminergic system is thought to be altered in depressive illness, we investigated the impact of individual and group housing on the temporal development of changes of dopamine transporter (DAT) binding in male rats after a single social defeat. The number of striatal DAT binding sites was reduced in animals that remained isolated after being defeated. The isolation length after social defeat amplified this effect, indicating a temporal development of the changes on the striatal DAT. In animals which returned to the familiar group after social defeat the density of striatal DAT binding sites was not affected. We conclude that social isolation after a single defeat reduces the number of DAT binding sites. In contrast, a familiar environment after a single social defeat appears to prevent the stress-induced alterations on the dopaminergic system. This finding suggests that housing conditions are critical when investigating the central nervous effects of social defeat in male rats.

  15. A MODEL FOR MAGNETICALLY COUPLED SYMPATHETIC ERUPTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Toeroek, T.; Titov, V. S.; Mikic, Z.; Linker, J. A.; Panasenco, O.; Reeves, K. K.; Velli, M.; De Toma, G.

    2011-10-01

    Sympathetic eruptions on the Sun have been observed for several decades, but the mechanisms by which one eruption can trigger another remain poorly understood. We present a three-dimensional MHD simulation that suggests two possible magnetic trigger mechanisms for sympathetic eruptions. We consider a configuration that contains two coronal flux ropes located within a pseudo-streamer and one rope located next to it. A sequence of eruptions is initiated by triggering the eruption of the flux rope next to the streamer. The expansion of the rope leads to two consecutive reconnection events, each of which triggers the eruption of a flux rope by removing a sufficient amount of overlying flux. The simulation qualitatively reproduces important aspects of the global sympathetic event on 2010 August 1 and provides a scenario for the so-called twin filament eruptions. The suggested mechanisms are also applicable for sympathetic eruptions occurring in other magnetic configurations.

  16. A Model for Magnetically Coupled Sympathetic Eruptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torok, T.; Panasenco, O.; Titrov, V. S.; Mikic, Z.; Reeves, K. K.; Velli, M.; Linker, J. A.; DeToma, G.

    2011-01-01

    Sympathetic eruptions on the Sun have been observed for several decades, but the mechanisms by which one eruption can trigger another remain poorly understood. We present a three-dimenSional MHD simulation that suggests two possible magnetic trigger mechanisms for sympathetic eruptions. We consider a configuration that contains two coronal flux ropes located within a pseudo-streamer and one rope located next to it. A sequence of eruptions is initiated by triggering the eruption of the flux rope next to the streamer. The expansion of the rope leads to two consecutive reconnection events, each of which triggers the eruption of a flux rope by removing a sufficient amount of overlying flux. The simulation qualitatively reproduces important aspects of the global sympathetic event on 2010 August 1 and provides a scenario for the so-called twin filament eruptions. The suggested mechanisms are also applicable for sympathetic eruptions occurring in other magnetic configurations.

  17. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy following traumatic myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Wainapel, S F

    1984-04-01

    Two cases of reflex sympathetic dystrophy in the upper extremity of patients with traumatic cervical spinal cord injuries are reported. Both patients had very incomplete lesions with early neurological recovery, suggesting an underlying central cord syndrome. Although reflex sympathetic dystrophy is often seen following stroke, it has only rarely been documented in traumatic myelopathy, and it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of unexplained pain syndromes in the extremities of paraplegic or quadriplegic patients. PMID:6728500

  18. Single Intramuscular-dose Toxicity of Anti-inflammatory Pharmacopuncture in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Da-jung; Kim, Sung-chul; Lee, Hyung-geol; Choi, Yoo-min; Sin, Min-seop; Choi, Seok-woo; Hong, Seung-won; Song, Beom-yong; Kim, Jong-uk; Yook, Tae-han

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This study was performed to analyze the toxicity of the test substance, anti-inflammatory pharmacopuncture (AIP), when used as a single intramuscular-dose in 6-week-old, male and female Sprague-Dawley rats and to find the lethal dose. Methods: The experiment was conducted at Biotoxtech according to Good Laboratory Practices. Twenty (20) female and 20 male Spague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups of five 5 female and 5 male animals per group. The rats in the three experimental groups received single intramuscular injections with 0.1-㎖, 0.5-㎖ and 1.0-㎖/animal doses of AIP, Groups 2, 3, and 4, respectively, and the control group, Group 1, received a single intramuscular injection with a 1.0-㎖ dose of normal saline. Clinical signs were observed and body weight measurements were carried out for 14 days following the injections. At the end of the observation period, hematology, clinical chemistry, histopathological tests and necropsy were performed on the injected parts. Results: No deaths occurred in any of the groups. Also, histopathological tests showed that AIP had no effect on the injected parts in terms of clinical signs, body weight, hematology, clinical chemistry, and necropsy. Conclusions: As a result of single intramuscular-dose tests of the test substance AIP in 4 groups of rats, the lethal dose for both males and females exceeded 1.0㎖/animal. Therefore, AIP is a relatively safe pharmacopuncture that can be used for treatment, but further studies should be performed. PMID:25780679

  19. Reproductive toxicity of a single dose of 1,3-dinitrobenzene in two ages of young adult male rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    These studies evaluated the reproductive response and the possible influence of testicular maturation on the reproductive parameters, in male rats treated with 1,3-dinitrobenzene (m-DNB). Young adult male rats (75 or 105 days of age) were given a single oral dose of 0, 8, 16, 24,...

  20. Metabolic and morphologic properties of single muscle fibers in the rat after spaceflight, Cosmos 1887

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miu, B.; Martin, T. P.; Roy, R. R.; Oganov, V.; Ilyina-Kakueva, E.; Marini, J. F.; Leger, J. J.; Bodine-Fowler, S. C.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1990-01-01

    The adaptation of a slow (soleus, Sol) and a fast (medial gastrocnemius, MG) skeletal muscle to spaceflight was studied in five young male rats. The flight period was 12.5 days and the rats were killed approximately 48 h after returning to 1 g. Five other rats that were housed in cages similar to those used by the flight rats were maintained at 1 g for the same period of time to serve as ground-based controls. Fibers were classified as dark or light staining for myosin adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase). On the average, the fibers in the Sol of the flight rats atrophied twice as much as those in the MG. Further, the fibers located in the deep (close to the bone and having the highest percentage of light ATPase and high oxidative fibers in the muscle cross section) region of the MG atrophied more than the fibers located in the superficial (away from the bone and having the lowest percentage of light ATPase and high oxidative fibers in the muscle cross-section) region of the muscle. Based on quantitative histochemical assays of single muscle fibers, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity per unit volume was unchanged in fibers of the Sol and MG. However, in the Sol, but not the MG, the total amount of SDH activity in a 10-microns-thick section of a fiber decreased significantly in response to spaceflight. Based on population distributions, it appears that the alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase (GPD) activities were elevated in the dark ATPase fibers in the Sol, whereas the light fibers in the Sol and both fiber types in the MG did not appear to change. The ratio of GPD to SDH activities increased in the dark (but not light) fibers of the Sol and was unaffected in the MG. Immunohistochemical analyses indicate that approximately 40% of the fibers in the Sol of flight rats expressed a fast myosin heavy chain compared with 22% in control rats. Further, 31% of the fibers in the Sol of flight rats expressed both fast and slow myosin heavy chains compared with 8% in

  1. Salt appetite is reduced by a single experience of drinking hypertonic saline in the adult rat.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Michael P; Greenwood, Mingkwan; Paton, Julian F R; Murphy, David

    2014-01-01

    Salt appetite, the primordial instinct to favorably ingest salty substances, represents a vital evolutionary important drive to successfully maintain body fluid and electrolyte homeostasis. This innate instinct was shown here in Sprague-Dawley rats by increased ingestion of isotonic saline (IS) over water in fluid intake tests. However, this appetitive stimulus was fundamentally transformed into a powerfully aversive one by increasing the salt content of drinking fluid from IS to hypertonic saline (2% w/v NaCl, HS) in intake tests. Rats ingested HS similar to IS when given no choice in one-bottle tests and previous studies have indicated that this may modify salt appetite. We thus investigated if a single 24 h experience of ingesting IS or HS, dehydration (DH) or 4% high salt food (HSD) altered salt preference. Here we show that 24 h of ingesting IS and HS solutions, but not DH or HSD, robustly transformed salt appetite in rats when tested 7 days and 35 days later. Using two-bottle tests rats previously exposed to IS preferred neither IS or water, whereas rats exposed to HS showed aversion to IS. Responses to sweet solutions (1% sucrose) were not different in two-bottle tests with water, suggesting that salt was the primary aversive taste pathway recruited in this model. Inducing thirst by subcutaneous administration of angiotensin II did not overcome this salt aversion. We hypothesised that this behavior results from altered gene expression in brain structures important in thirst and salt appetite. Thus we also report here lasting changes in mRNAs for markers of neuronal activity, peptide hormones and neuronal plasticity in supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus following rehydration after both DH and HS. These results indicate that a single experience of drinking HS is a memorable one, with long-term changes in gene expression accompanying this aversion to salty solutions. PMID:25111786

  2. Increased Efferent Cardiac Sympathetic Nerve Activity and Defective Intrinsic Heart Rate Regulation in Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Thaung, H P Aye; Baldi, J Chris; Wang, Heng-Yu; Hughes, Gillian; Cook, Rosalind F; Bussey, Carol T; Sheard, Phil W; Bahn, Andrew; Jones, Peter P; Schwenke, Daryl O; Lamberts, Regis R

    2015-08-01

    Elevated sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) coupled with dysregulated β-adrenoceptor (β-AR) signaling is postulated as a major driving force for cardiac dysfunction in patients with type 2 diabetes; however, cardiac SNA has never been assessed directly in diabetes. Our aim was to measure the sympathetic input to and the β-AR responsiveness of the heart in the type 2 diabetic heart. In vivo recording of SNA of the left efferent cardiac sympathetic branch of the stellate ganglion in Zucker diabetic fatty rats revealed an elevated resting cardiac SNA and doubled firing rate compared with nondiabetic rats. Ex vivo, in isolated denervated hearts, the intrinsic heart rate was markedly reduced. Contractile and relaxation responses to β-AR stimulation with dobutamine were compromised in externally paced diabetic hearts, but not in diabetic hearts allowed to regulate their own heart rate. Protein levels of left ventricular β1-AR and Gs (guanine nucleotide binding protein stimulatory) were reduced, whereas left ventricular and right atrial β2-AR and Gi (guanine nucleotide binding protein inhibitory regulatory) levels were increased. The elevated resting cardiac SNA in type 2 diabetes, combined with the reduced cardiac β-AR responsiveness, suggests that the maintenance of normal cardiovascular function requires elevated cardiac sympathetic input to compensate for changes in the intrinsic properties of the diabetic heart.

  3. Sympathetic baroreflex gain in normotensive pregnant women

    PubMed Central

    Usselman, Charlotte W.; Skow, Rachel J.; Matenchuk, Brittany A.; Chari, Radha S.; Julian, Colleen G.; Stickland, Michael K.; Davenport, Margie H.

    2015-01-01

    Muscle sympathetic nerve activity is increased during normotensive pregnancy while mean arterial pressure is maintained or reduced, suggesting baroreflex resetting. We hypothesized spontaneous sympathetic baroreflex gain would be reduced in normotensive pregnant women relative to nonpregnant matched controls. Integrated muscle sympathetic burst incidence and total sympathetic activity (microneurography), blood pressure (Finometer), and R-R interval (ECG) were assessed at rest in 11 pregnant women (33 ± 1 wk gestation, 31 ± 1 yr, prepregnancy BMI: 23.5 ± 0.9 kg/m2) and 11 nonpregnant controls (29 ± 1 yr; BMI: 25.2 ± 1.7 kg/m2). Pregnant women had elevated baseline sympathetic burst incidence (43 ± 2 vs. 33 ± 2 bursts/100 heart beats, P = 0.01) and total sympathetic activity (1,811 ± 148 vs. 1,140 ± 55 au, P < 0.01) relative to controls. Both mean (88 ± 3 vs. 91 ± 2 mmHg, P = 0.4) and diastolic (DBP) (72 ± 3 vs. 73 ± 2 mmHg, P = 0.7) pressures were similar between pregnant and nonpregnant women, respectively, indicating an upward resetting of the baroreflex set point with pregnancy. Baroreflex gain, calculated as the linear relationship between sympathetic burst incidence and DBP, was reduced in pregnant women relative to controls (−3.7 ± 0.5 vs. −5.4 ± 0.5 bursts·100 heart beats−1·mmHg−1, P = 0.03), as was baroreflex gain calculated with total sympathetic activity (−294 ± 24 vs. −210 ± 24 au·100 heart beats−1·mmHg−1; P = 0.03). Cardiovagal baroreflex gain (sequence method) was not different between nonpregnant controls and pregnant women (49 ± 8 vs. 36 ± 8 ms/mmHg; P = 0.2). However, sympathetic (burst incidence) and cardiovagal gains were negatively correlated in pregnant women (R = −0.7; P = 0.02). Together, these data indicate that the influence of the sympathetic nervous system over arterial blood pressure is reduced in normotensive pregnancy, in terms of both long-term and beat-to-beat regulation of arterial pressure

  4. Orexins (hypocretins) contribute to fear and avoidance in rats exposed to a single episode of footshocks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoyu; Wang, Huiying; Lin, Zhang; Li, Sa; Li, Yonghui; Bergen, Hugo T; Vrontakis, Maria E; Kirouac, Gilbert J

    2014-11-01

    Orexins (hypocretins) are peptides that have been shown to regulate behavioral arousal and wakefulness. Recent evidence indicates that orexin neurons are activated by stress and that orexins play a role in anxiety. The present paper describes a series of experiments that examined whether orexins are involved in the anxiety that resulted from exposing rats to an acute episode of footshocks (5 × 2 s of 1.5 mA shocks). We found that prepro-orexin (ppOX) mRNA was elevated in rats at 6 and 14 days after exposure to footshock and that ppOX mRNA levels were correlated with fear at 14 days post-shock. Systemic injections of the non-selective dual orexin receptor antagonist TCS-1102 (10 and 20 mg/kg, i.p.) were found to decrease fear and anxiety in rats 14 days after exposure to footshock. We also found that rats that exhibited a high level of immobility to a novel tone the day after the footshock episode (high responders, HR) showed significantly elevated levels of ppOX mRNA at 14 days post-shock compared to control rats. Furthermore, TCS-1102 (10 mg/kg, i.p.) was found to have anxiolytic effects that were specific for HR when tested in the elevated T-maze. This study provides evidence linking the orexin system to the anxiety produced by exposure of rats to a single episode of footshocks. It also provides preclinical evidence in support of the use of orexin antagonists for the treatment of anxiety in response to an acute episode of stress.

  5. Single-nephron filtration rate and proximal reabsorption in aging rats.

    PubMed

    Corman, B; Roinel, N

    1991-01-01

    Age-related changes in the function of individual nephrons were investigated by micropuncture experiments measuring single-nephron filtration rates (SNGFR) and proximal reabsorptions in 10-, 20-, and 30-mo-old rats. The animals were female WAG/Rij rats with low incidence of chronic progressive nephropathy, no loss of nephrons, and renal hypertrophy of both kidneys in the oldest animals. Mean SNGFR values per gram kidney weight were 41.4 +/- 1.1, 37.1 +/- 1.5, and 32.2 +/- 1.1 nl.min-1.g kidney wt-1 (n = 41) in the 10-, 20-, and 30-mo-old animals, respectively. This age-related decrease in filtration was no longer apparent when SNGFR values were expressed per nephron (means 24.3 +/- 0.7, 23.7 +/- 0.9, and 24.4 +/- 0.9 nl/min. Individual filtered loads of sodium, potassium, calcium, and magnesium and their absolute reabsorption by the proximal tubule were not different in the three age groups; however, absolute and fractional reabsorptions of phosphate decreased significantly in the 30-mo-old rats. These results indicate that, with the exception of phosphate, individual filtrations and proximal reabsorptions are well maintained in aging rats free of disease. This may be related to the observed renal hypertrophy. PMID:1992782

  6. Quantitative determination of dopamine in single rat pheochromocytoma cells by microchip electrophoresis with only one high-voltage power supply.

    PubMed

    Sha, Cuicui; Fan, Yuejuan; Cheng, Jieke; Cheng, Han

    2015-07-01

    We developed a method for the direct identification of dopamine in single cultured rat pheochromocytoma cells by capillary electrophoresis using an end-channel carbon fiber nanoelectrode amperometric detector. The operation mode was designed to achieve single-cell injection and lysis in microfluidic chip electrophoresis with only one high-voltage power supply. The separation and detection conditions were optimized. Four catecholamines were baseline-separated and determined with this system, and the cell density and liquid height of the reservoirs were accommodated for single cell loading, docking and analysis. The microchip capillary electrophoresis system was successfully applied to determine dopamine in single cultured rat pheochromocytoma cells. PMID:25893961

  7. Ovarian development in Wistar rat treated prenatally with single dose diisobutyl phthalate.

    PubMed

    Ray, B; D'Souza, A S; Kumar, V; Pugazhandhi, B; D'Souza, M R; Nayak, D; Sushma, R K; Shetty, P; Singh, H; Krishna, L; Bhat, K M; Rao, A C; Chakraborti, S; Kumar, N; Saxena, A

    2012-01-01

    Phthalates are a class of industrial compounds with an array of toxicological properties used in day to day life. Diisobutyl phthalate on (DIBP) is used as an additive to keep the plastics soft or flexible (plasticizer) in nitrocellulose plastic, nail polish, explosives, lacquer manufacturing etc. Although DIBP exposure in humans is generally low, people in adhesive industries and pharmaceutical industries are exposed to higher levels. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of single dose of DIBP on developing ovary of Wistar rat. One hundred and eight adult pregnant Wistar rats were divided into control and experimental groups. Rats in experimental group were given DIBP on day 10, 12 and 14 of gestation at 0.375, 0.75 and 1.25 ml/kg body weight dose intraperitoneally in a single dose. Sections of ovaries collected on day 21 of gestation were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and examined and Masson's trichrome histologically. Sections belonging to the control group showed the presence of oocytes in clusters separated by thin fibrous septa. Degeneration oocytes, empty follicles surrounded by follicular cells without gonocytes in the center were observed in ovarian stroma. Blood vessels in the ovarian stroma were prominent and congested. Around a bunch of follicles total architectural disarray was observed although on special staining fibrosis was not evident. As pregnant women are constantly exposed, effect of DIBP on ovary of a developing fetus would denote the long term consequence in future generations (Fig. 5, Ref. 39). PMID:23094893

  8. Reflex control of inflammation by sympathetic nerves, not the vagus.

    PubMed

    Martelli, D; Yao, S T; McKinley, M J; McAllen, R M

    2014-04-01

    We investigated a neural reflex that controls the strength of inflammatory responses to immune challenge - the inflammatory reflex. In anaesthetized rats challenged with intravenous lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 60 μg kg(-1)), we found strong increases in plasma levels of the key inflammatory mediator tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα) 90 min later. Those levels were unaffected by previous bilateral cervical vagotomy, but were enhanced approximately 5-fold if the greater splanchnic sympathetic nerves had been cut. Sham surgery had no effect, and plasma corticosterone levels were unaffected by nerve sections, so could not explain this result. Electrophysiological recordings demonstrated that efferent neural activity in the splanchnic nerve and its splenic branch was strongly increased by LPS treatment. Splenic nerve activity was dependent on inputs from the splanchnic nerves: vagotomy had no effect on the activity in either nerve. Together, these data demonstrate that immune challenge with this dose of LPS activates a neural reflex that is powerful enough to cause an 80% suppression of the acute systemic inflammatory response. The efferent arm of this reflex is in the splanchnic sympathetic nerves, not the vagi as previously proposed. As with other physiological responses to immune challenge, the afferent pathway is presumptively humoral: the present data show that vagal afferents play no measurable part. Because inflammation sits at the gateway to immune responses, this reflex could play an important role in immune function as well as inflammatory diseases.

  9. Reflex control of inflammation by sympathetic nerves, not the vagus

    PubMed Central

    Martelli, D; Yao, S T; McKinley, M J; McAllen, R M

    2014-01-01

    We investigated a neural reflex that controls the strength of inflammatory responses to immune challenge – the inflammatory reflex. In anaesthetized rats challenged with intravenous lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 60 μg kg−1), we found strong increases in plasma levels of the key inflammatory mediator tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα) 90 min later. Those levels were unaffected by previous bilateral cervical vagotomy, but were enhanced approximately 5-fold if the greater splanchnic sympathetic nerves had been cut. Sham surgery had no effect, and plasma corticosterone levels were unaffected by nerve sections, so could not explain this result. Electrophysiological recordings demonstrated that efferent neural activity in the splanchnic nerve and its splenic branch was strongly increased by LPS treatment. Splenic nerve activity was dependent on inputs from the splanchnic nerves: vagotomy had no effect on the activity in either nerve. Together, these data demonstrate that immune challenge with this dose of LPS activates a neural reflex that is powerful enough to cause an 80% suppression of the acute systemic inflammatory response. The efferent arm of this reflex is in the splanchnic sympathetic nerves, not the vagi as previously proposed. As with other physiological responses to immune challenge, the afferent pathway is presumptively humoral: the present data show that vagal afferents play no measurable part. Because inflammation sits at the gateway to immune responses, this reflex could play an important role in immune function as well as inflammatory diseases. PMID:24421357

  10. Identification of motoneurons supplying multiply- or singly-innervated extraocular muscle fibers in the rat.

    PubMed

    Eberhorn, A C; Büttner-Ennever, J A; Horn, A K E

    2006-02-01

    In mammals, the extraocular muscle fibers can be categorized in singly-innervated and multiply-innervated muscle fibers. In the monkey oculomotor, trochlear and abducens nucleus the motoneurons of multiply-innervated muscle fibers lie separated from those innervating singly-innervated muscle fibers and show different histochemical properties. In order to discover, if this organization is a general feature of the oculomotor system, we investigated the location of singly-innervated muscle fiber and multiply-innervated muscle fiber motoneurons in the rat using combined tract-tracing and immunohistochemical techniques. The singly-innervated muscle fiber and multiply-innervated muscle fiber motoneurons of the medial and lateral rectus muscle were identified by retrograde tracer injections into the muscle belly or the distal myotendinous junction. The belly injections labeled the medial rectus muscle subgroup of the oculomotor nucleus or the greatest part of abducens nucleus, including some cells outside the medial border of abducens nucleus. In contrast, the distal injections labeled only a subset of the medial rectus muscle motoneurons and exclusively cells outside the medial border of abducens nucleus. The tracer detection was combined with immunolabeling using antibodies for perineuronal nets (chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan) and non-phosphorylated neurofilaments. In monkeys both antibodies permit a distinction between singly-innervated muscle fiber and multiply-innervated muscle fiber motoneurons. The experiments revealed that neurons labeled from a distal injection lack both markers and are assumed to represent multiply-innervated muscle fiber motoneurons, whereas those labeled from a belly injection are chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan- and non-phosphorylated neurofilament-immunopositive and assumed to represent singly-innervated muscle fiber motoneurons. The overall identification of multiply-innervated muscle fiber and singly-innervated muscle fiber motoneurons

  11. Prenatal development of the fetal thoracic sympathetic trunk in sheep (Ovis aries).

    PubMed

    Nourinezhad, Jamal; Gilanpour, Hassan; Radmehr, Bijan

    2013-10-01

    This study aims at clarifying the detailed morphological and topographical changes of the thoracic part of the sympathetic trunk of sheep during fetal development. Bilateral micro-dissection of the thoracic sympathetic trunk was performed on 40 sheep fetuses aged 6-20 weeks (18 males and 22 females) under a stereomicroscope. The cervicothoracic ganglion (CTG) was observed on 75/80 sides (93.7%) and was composed of the caudal cervical and the first thoracic ganglia on 45/80 sides (56.2%), and of the caudal cervical and the first two thoracic ganglia on 30/80 sides (37.5%). The presence of the two last (12th-13th) thoracic ganglia was not constant. The influence of the sex, the side of the body, and the ages of the fetus on the morphology and topography of the thoracic sympathetic trunk in sheep were identified. In spite of the differences in the morphology and topography of the thoracic sympathetic trunk between early and late fetal developments, the morphology and topography of the older fetal thoracic sympathetic trunk tended to be similar to that of the adult sheep. To comprehend the comparative morphology of the fetal thoracic sympathetic trunk more completely, our results were compared with previous studies. Consequently, differences and similarities in the composition and position of the CTG, presence of single caudal cervical ganglion without fusion to the thoracic ganglia, and absence of the thoracic ganglia, and presence of splitting of the interganglionic branch were found among sheep, pig, and human fetuses. Therefore, sheep might be the appropriate animal model to be applied in human sympathetic nervous system. PMID:23639816

  12. Nucleus tractus solitarii A(2a) adenosine receptors inhibit cardiopulmonary chemoreflex control of sympathetic outputs.

    PubMed

    Minic, Zeljka; O'Leary, Donal S; Scislo, Tadeusz J

    2014-02-01

    Previously we have shown that stimulation of inhibitory A1 adenosine receptors located in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) attenuates cardiopulmonary chemoreflex (CCR) evoked inhibition of renal, adrenal and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity and reflex decreases in arterial pressure and heart rate. Activation of facilitatory A2a adenosine receptors, which dominate over A1 receptors in the NTS, contrastingly alters baseline activity of regional sympathetic outputs: it decreases renal, increases adrenal and does not change lumbar nerve activity. Considering that NTS A2a receptors may facilitate release of inhibitory transmitters we hypothesized that A2a receptors will act in concert with A1 receptors differentially inhibiting regional sympathetic CCR responses (adrenal>lumbar>renal). In urethane/chloralose anesthetized rats (n=38) we compared regional sympathetic responses evoked by stimulation of the CCR with right atrial injections of serotonin 5HT3 receptor agonist, phenylbiguanide, (1-8μg/kg) before and after selective stimulation, blockade or combined blockade and stimulation of NTS A2a adenosine receptors (microinjections into the NTS of CGS-21680 0.2-20pmol/50nl, ZM-241385 40pmol/100nl or ZM-241385+CGS-21680, respectively). We found that stimulation of A2a adenosine receptors uniformly inhibited the regional sympathetic and hemodynamic reflex responses and this effect was abolished by the selective blockade of NTS A2a receptors. This indicates that A2a receptor triggered inhibition of CCR responses and the contrasting shifts in baseline sympathetic activity are mediated via different mechanisms. These data implicate that stimulation of NTS A2a receptors triggers unknown inhibitory mechanism(s) which in turn inhibit transmission in the CCR pathway when adenosine is released into the NTS during severe hypotension. PMID:24216055

  13. Essential role of sympathetic endothelin A receptors for adverse cardiac remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Lorenz H.; Rostosky, Julia S.; Buss, Sebastian J.; Kreusser, Michael M.; Krebs, Jutta; Mier, Walter; Enseleit, Frank; Spiger, Katharina; Hardt, Stefan E.; Wieland, Thomas; Haass, Markus; Lüscher, Thomas F.; Schneider, Michael D.; Parlato, Rosanna; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Haberkorn, Uwe; Yanagisawa, Masashi; Katus, Hugo A.; Backs, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    In preclinical studies, endothelin receptor A (ETA) antagonists (ETAi) attenuated the progression of heart failure (HF). However, clinical HF trials failed to demonstrate beneficial effects of ETAi. These conflicting data may be explained by the possibility that established HF drugs such as adrenergic receptor blockers interfered with the mechanism of ETAi action in clinical trials. Here we report that mice lacking ETA only in sympathetic neurons (SN-KO) showed less adverse structural remodeling and cardiac dysfunction in response to pathological pressure overload induced by transverse aortic constriction (TAC). In contrast, mice lacking ETA only in cardiomyocytes (CM-KO) were not protected. TAC led to a disturbed sympathetic nerve function as measured by cardiac norepinephrine (NE) tissue levels and [124I]-metaiodobenzylguanidine-PET, which was prevented in SN-KO. In a rat model of HF, ETAi improved cardiac and sympathetic nerve function. In cocultures of cardiomyocytes (CMs) and sympathetic neurons (SNs), endothelin-1 (ET1) led to a massive NE release and exaggerated CM hypertrophy compared with CM monocultures. ETA-deficient CMs gained a hypertrophic response through wild-type SNs, but ETA-deficient SNs failed to mediate exaggerated CM hypertrophy. Furthermore, ET1 mediated its effects indirectly via NE in CM-SN cocultures through adrenergic receptors and histone deacetylases, resulting in activation of the prohypertrophic transcription factor myocyte enhancer factor 2. In conclusion, sympathetic ETA amplifies ET1 effects on CMs through adrenergic signaling pathways. Thus, antiadrenergic therapies may blunt potentially beneficial effects of ETAi. Taken together, this may indicate that patients with β blocker intolerance or disturbed sympathetic nerve function could be evaluated for a potential benefit from ETAi. PMID:25197047

  14. Interaction between cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex and chemoreflex is mediated by the NTS AT1 receptors in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Zhong; Gao, Lie; Wang, Han-Jun; Zucker, Irving H; Wang, Wei

    2008-09-01

    Several sympathoexcitatory reflexes, such as the cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex (CSAR) and arterial chemoreflex, are significantly augmented and contribute to elevated sympathetic outflow in chronic heart failure (CHF). This study was undertaken to investigate the interaction between the CSAR and the chemoreflex in CHF and to further identify the involvement of angiotensin II type 1 receptors (AT1Rs) in the nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS) in this interaction. CHF was induced in rats by coronary ligation. Acute experiments were performed in anesthetized rats. The chemoreflex-induced increase in cardiovascular responses was significantly greater in CHF than in sham-operated rats after either chemical or electrical activation of the CSAR. The inhibition of the CSAR by epicardial lidocaine reduced the chemoreflex-induced effects in CHF rats but not in sham-operated rats. Bilateral NTS injection of the AT1R antagonist losartan (10 and 100 pmol) dose-dependently decreased basal sympathetic nerve activity in CHF but not in sham-operated rats. This procedure also abolished the CSAR-induced enhancement of the chemoreflex. The discharge and chemosensitivity of NTS chemosensitive neurons were significantly increased following the stimulation of the CSAR in sham-operated and CHF rats, whereas CSAR inhibition by epicardial lidocaine significantly attenuated chemosensitivity of NTS neurons in CHF but not in sham-operated rats. Finally, the protein expression of AT1R in the NTS was significantly higher in CHF than in sham-operated rats. These results demonstrate that the enhanced cardiac sympathetic afferent input contributes to an excitatory effect of chemoreflex function in CHF, which is mediated by an NTS-AT1R-dependent mechanism.

  15. The effects of Sympathetic Outflow on Upregulation of Vanilloid Receptors TRPV1 in Primary Afferent Neurons Evoked by Intradermal Capsaicin

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xijin; Wang, Peng; Zou, Xiaoju; Li, Dingge; Fang, Li; Gong, Kerui; Lin, Qing

    2010-01-01

    The vanilloid receptor TRPV1 is a key nociceptive molecule located in primary afferent nociceptive neurons in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) for initiating neurogenic inflammation and pain. Our recent study demonstrates that up-regulation of TRPV1 receptors by intradermal injection of capsaicin is modulated by activation of the protein kinase C (PKC) cascade. Neurogenic inflammation and pain resulting from capsaicin injection are sympathetically dependent, responding to norepinephrine, adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) and/or neuropeptide Y released from sympathetic efferents. In a rat model of acute neurogenic inflammatory pain produced by capsaicin injection, we used immunofluorescence and Western blots combined with pharmacology and surgical sympathectomies to analyze whether the capsaicin-evoked up-regulation of TRPV1 in DRG neurons is affected by sympathetic outflow by way of activating the PKC cascade. Sympathetic denervation reduced significantly the capsaicin-evoked expressions of TRPV1, calcitonin gene-related peptide and/or phosphorylated PKC and their co-expression. These reductions could be restored by exogenous pretreatment with an analog of ATP, α,β-methylene ATP. Inhibition of PKC with chelerythrine chloride prevented the ATP effect. Consistent results were obtained from experiments in which capsaicin-evoked changes in cutaneous inflammation (vasodilation and edema) were examined after sympathetic denervation, and the effects of the above pharmacological manipulations were evaluated. Our findings suggest that the capsaicin-evoked up-regulation of TRPV1 receptors in DRG neurons is modulated sympathetically by the action of ATP released from sympathetic efferents to activate the PKC cascade. Thus, this study proposes a potential new mechanism of sympathetic modulation of neurogenic inflammation. PMID:20036240

  16. Important GABAergic mechanism within the NTS and the control of sympathetic baroreflex in SHR.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Thiago S; Takakura, Ana C; Colombari, Eduardo

    2011-01-20

    Inhibitory neurotransmission has an important role in the processing of sensory afferent signals in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), particularly in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) mediated neurotransmission within the NTS produces an inhibition of the baroreflex response of splanchnic sympathetic nerve discharge (sSND). In urethane-anesthetized, artificially ventilated and vagotomized male SHR and Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats we compared baroreflex-response curves evoked after bilateral injections into the NTS of the GABA-A antagonist bicuculline (25pmol/50nl) or the GABA-B antagonist CGP 35348 (5nmol/50nl). Baseline MAP in SHR was higher than the WKY rats (SHR: 153±5, vs. WKY: 112±6mm Hg, p<0.05). Bilateral injection of bicuculline or CGP 35348 into the NTS induced a transient (5min) reduction in MAP (∆=-26±4 and -41±6mm Hg, respectively vs. saline ∆=+4±3mmHg, p<0.05) and sSND (∆=-21±13 and -78±7%, respectively vs. saline: ∆=+6±4% p<0.05). Analysis of the baroreceptor curve revealed a decrease in the lower plateau (43±11 and 15±5%, respectively vs. saline: 78±6%, p<0.05) and an increase in the sympathetic gain of baroreflex (6.3±0.3, 7.2±0.8% respectively vs. saline: 4.2±0.4%, p<0.05). Bicuculline or CGP35348 into the NTS in WKY rats did not change MAP, sSND and sympathetic baroreflex gain. These data indicate that GABAergic mechanisms within the NTS act tonically reducing sympathetic baroreflex gain in SHR.

  17. Echinococcus multilocularis: Single hepatic lesion experimentally established without metastasis in rats.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Masamichi; Imagawa, Tomohiro; Nakaya, Kazuhiro; Sako, Yasuhito; Okamoto, Yoshiharu; Tsuka, Takeshi; Osaki, Tomohiro; Okamoto, Munehiro; Ito, Akira

    2013-10-01

    We herein describe the establishment of single hepatic lesions of Echinococcus multilocularis in rats. A 3mm incision was made on the liver with a surgical knife, and one small round vesicle of E. multilocularis (between 1 × 1 mm and <2 × 2 mm in diameter) was transplanted into the incision and covered with absorbable hemostat gauze. The presence and growth of the transplanted vesicle was monitored for 12 weeks using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Hepatic lesions, the metacestode of this parasite were confirmed in 12 of 17 infected rats (70.6%) by MRI and macroscopic examinations. The average size of the metacestodes with brood capsules at 12 weeks after the experimental transplantation of a single vesicle was 6.1 ± 2.5 mm × 4.4 ± 1.5mm. The smallest size of the metacestodes detected by MRI was approximately 3 × 3 mm. This new approach of establishing single hepatic metacestodes of E. multilocularis in experimental animals is expected to be useful for analyzing the immune-pathological mechanisms of hepatic AE. PMID:23916766

  18. [Effectiveness of sympathetic block using various technics].

    PubMed

    Weissenberg, W

    1987-07-01

    Blocking of sympathetic conduction aims at permanent or temporary elimination of those pain pathways conducted by the sympathetic nervous system. In order to provide an objective evaluation of sufficient blocking effect, earlier inquiries referred to parameters such as: (1) observation of clinical signs such as Horner's syndrome, Guttman's sign, anhidrosis, extended venous filling; (2) difference in skin temperature of at least 1.5 degrees C between blocked and unblocked side; (3) increase in amplitude of the pulse wave; and (4) depression of the psychogalvanic reflex (PGR) on the blocked side (Fig. 1). In clinical practice, these control parameters are effective because they are time-saving, technically simple, and highly evidential. Further parameters for evaluating sympathetic blockade are examination of hydrosis by means of color indicators such as bromocresol and ninhydrin, oscillometry, and plethysmography. The effectiveness of sympathetic blockade after stellate ganglion and sympathetic trunk blocks has been verified by various authors. In a clinical study, 16 patients were divided into four groups in order to test the effectiveness of sympathetic blockade after spinal anesthesia with 3 ml 0.75% bupivacaine (group I) and 4 ml 0.75% bupivacaine (group II) and after peridural anesthesia with 15 ml 0.75% bupivacaine (group III) and 20 ml 0.75% bupivacaine (group IV) by means of temperature difference, response of pulse wave amplitude and PGR between blocked lower and unblocked upper extremity, and sensory levels of block. The patients were classified as ASA I and II; their ages varied from 20 to 63 years.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. A single resistance exercise session improves myocardial contractility in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, A.A.; Faria, T. de O.; Ribeiro, R.F.; Costa, G.P.; Marchezini, B.; Silveira, E.A.; Angeli, J.K.; Stefanon, I.; Vassallo, D.V.; Lizardo, J.H.

    2015-01-01

    Resistance training evokes myocardial adaptation; however, the effects of a single resistance exercise session on cardiac performance are poorly understood or investigated. This study aimed to investigate the effects of a single resistance exercise session on the myocardial contractility of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Male 3-month-old SHRs were divided into two groups: control (Ct) and exercise (Ex). Control animals were submitted to sham exercise. Blood pressure was measured in conscious rats before the exercise session to confirm the presence of arterial hypertension. Ten minutes after the exercise session, the animals were anesthetized and killed, and the hearts were removed. Cardiac contractility was evaluated in the whole heart by the Langendorff technique and by isometric contractions of isolated left ventricular papillary muscles. SERCA2a, phospholamban (PLB), and phosphorylated PLB expression were investigated by Western blot. Exercise increased force development of isolated papillary muscles (Ex=1.0±0.1 g/mg vs Ct=0.63±0.2 g/mg, P<0.05). Post-rest contraction was greater in the exercised animals (Ex=4.1±0.4% vs Ct=1.7±0.2%, P<0.05). Papillary muscles of exercised animals developed greater force under increasing isoproterenol concentrations (P<0.05). In the isolated heart, exercise increased left ventricular isovolumetric systolic pressure (LVISP; Δ +39 mmHg; P<0.05) from baseline conditions. Hearts from the exercised rats presented a greater response to increasing diastolic pressure. Positive inotropic intervention to calcium and isoproterenol resulted in greater LVISP in exercised animals (P<0.05). The results demonstrated that a single resistance exercise session improved myocardial contractility in SHRs. PMID:26176315

  20. Surgery of the sympathetic nervous system.

    PubMed

    Lee, B Y; Da Silva, M C; Aquino-Chu, G; Herz, B L

    1996-01-01

    This article reviews the innervation of the arterial system of the lower extremity, lumbar sympathectomy in vascular surgery, lumbar sympathectomy for digital gangrene and in the prevention of major amputation of the lower extremity and substance P's role in neurogenic inflammatory modulation. Long-term results of lumbar sympathectomy and direct arterial bypass surgery have also been reviewed. In addition to the pilomotor, sudomotor and vasomotor actions of the sympathetic nervous system via its neurotransmitters, the molecular basis of the chronic neurogenic inflammatory reaction have been addressed with special attention to the discovery of substance P in the lumbar sympathetic chain and ganglia of human beings.

  1. The sympathetic nervous system and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, David Y; Anderson, Allen S

    2014-02-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a syndrome characterized by upregulation of the sympathetic nervous system and abnormal responsiveness of the parasympathetic nervous system. Studies in the 1980s and 1990s demonstrated that inhibition of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors improved symptoms and mortality in HF resulting from systolic dysfunction, thus providing a framework to consider the use of β-blockers for HF therapy, contrary to the prevailing wisdom of the time. Against this backdrop, this article reviews the contemporary understanding of the sympathetic nervous system and the failing heart.

  2. Female circulating sex hormones and hippocampal sympathetic ingrowth.

    PubMed

    Harrell, L E; Peagler, A; Parsons, D S; Litersky, J; Barlow, T S

    1993-05-31

    Following cholinergic denervation of the hippocampal formation, via medial septal (MS) lesions, sympathetic fibers, originating from the superior cervical ganglia, growth into the hippocampus. Previous studies have demonstrated a sexually dimorphic effect of this neuronal rearrangement on recovery of a spatial-learning task, with this rearrangement being detrimental in male but protective in female rats. Circulating male sex hormones were found to interact with this effect in male animals. In this study we assessed the role of circulating female sex hormones on the behavioral and biochemical effects of hippocampal sympathetic ingrowth (HSI). For the behavioral studies female rats underwent either sham ovariectomy (sham OVARX) or OVARX and were taught a standard radial-8-arm maze task. Following attainment of criterion, animals underwent one of three surgical procedures: sham surgery; MS lesions+sham ganglionectomy (MS); HSI group; MS lesions+ganglionectomy (MSGx). As in our previous study, animals with HSI (i.e. MS group) were found to recover learning faster (in fact, these animals did not differ from controls) than animals with MS lesions without HSI. Gonadal status did not affect this behavioral recovery. For the biochemical studies hippocampal norepinephrine (NE) and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) were measured in animals sham OVARX and OVARX, 8-12 weeks after the neurosurgical procedure. MS lesions (i.e. MSGx; MS) were found to reduce ChAT activity, regardless of circulating sex hormones. In controls NE levels were similar between OVARX and sham OVARX. NE levels were markedly elevated in the OVARX MS group compared to all other groups including sham OVARX. In the MSGx groups, NE levels were reduced compared to controls, while comparisons between these groups revealed a significant reduction in NE levels in the OVARX MSGx group compared to sham OVARX MSGx group. These studies suggest that female circulating sex hormones interact with brain injury in a very

  3. Altered Differential Control of Sympathetic Outflow Following Sedentary Conditions: Role of Subregional Neuroplasticity in the RVLM

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Madhan; Mueller, Patrick J.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the classically held belief of an “all-or-none” activation of the sympathetic nervous system, differential responses in sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) can occur acutely at varying magnitudes and in opposing directions. Sympathetic nerves also appear to contribute differentially to various disease states including hypertension and heart failure. Previously we have reported that sedentary conditions enhanced responses of splanchnic SNA (SSNA) but not lumbar SNA (LSNA) to activation of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) in rats. Bulbospinal RVLM neurons from sedentary rats also exhibit increased dendritic branching in rostral regions of the RVLM. We hypothesized that regionally specific structural neuroplasticity would manifest as enhanced SSNA but not LSNA following activation of the rostral RVLM. To test this hypothesis, groups of physically active (10–12 weeks on running wheels) or sedentary, male Sprague-Dawley rats were instrumented to record mean arterial pressure, LSNA and SSNA under Inactin anesthesia and during microinjections of glutamate (30 nl, 10 mM) into multiple sites within the RVLM. Sedentary conditions enhanced SSNA but not LSNA responses and SSNA responses were enhanced at more central and rostral sites. Results suggest that enhanced SSNA responses in rostral RVLM coincide with enhanced dendritic branching in rostral RVLM observed previously. Identifying structural and functional neuroplasticity in specific populations of RVLM neurons may help identify new treatments for cardiovascular diseases, known to be more prevalent in sedentary individuals. PMID:27486405

  4. Sequential bilateral striatal lesions have additive effects on single skilled limb use in rats.

    PubMed

    Faraji, Jamshid; Metz, Gerlinde A

    2007-02-27

    Unilateral dopamine depletion in rats induced by injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) into the nigrostriatal system causes permanent impairments in limb use. The disturbances in limb use, including impairments in skilled reaching, are most severe on the side contralateral to the lesion. A number of studies, however, have also described ipsilateral deficits in skilled reaching. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of sequential bilateral striatal 6-OHDA lesions on skilled reaching movements in rats to compare the contribution of contra- versus ipsilateral motor control. Rats were trained in a reaching task to grasp food pellets with their preferred paw prior to receiving an intrastriatal 6-OHDA injection on the side contralateral to the preferred paw. The lesion significantly reduced reaching success along with qualitative impairments in limb use. In addition, animals displayed asymmetry in limb use and contraversive rotation bias after an apomorphine challenge. Three weeks later, animals received a second lesion induced by intrastriatal 6-OHDA injection into the hemisphere ipsilateral to the preferred paw. This lesion exaggerated the previous impairments in limb use and further reduced reaching success of the preferred paw. In the ladder rung walking task, additional impairments were found only in the forelimb ipsilateral to the first lesion. The findings of additive effects of sequential bilateral lesions suggest that both the contra- and ipsilateral striatum control single limb use. This supports the notion of bilateral control of skilled forelimb use by the mesostriatal dopaminergic system. PMID:17182115

  5. Single pellet grasping following cervical spinal cord injury in adult rat using an automated full-time training robot.

    PubMed

    Fenrich, Keith K; May, Zacincte; Torres-Espín, Abel; Forero, Juan; Bennett, David J; Fouad, Karim

    2016-02-15

    Task specific motor training is a common form of rehabilitation therapy in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). The single pellet grasping (SPG) task is a skilled forelimb motor task used to evaluate recovery of forelimb function in rodent models of SCI. The task requires animals to obtain food pellets located on a shelf beyond a slit at the front of an enclosure. Manually training and testing rats in the SPG task requires extensive time and often yields results with high outcome variability and small therapeutic windows (i.e., the difference between pre- and post-SCI success rates). Recent advances in automated SPG training using automated pellet presentation (APP) systems allow rats to train ad libitum 24h a day, 7 days a week. APP trained rats have improved success rates, require less researcher time, and have lower outcome variability compared to manually trained rats. However, it is unclear whether APP trained rats can perform the SPG task using the APP system after SCI. Here we show that rats with cervical SCI can successfully perform the SPG task using the APP system. We found that SCI rats with APP training performed significantly more attempts, had slightly lower and less variable final score success rates, and larger therapeutic windows than SCI rats with manual training. These results demonstrate that APP training has clear advantages over manual training for evaluating reaching performance of SCI rats and represents a new tool for investigating rehabilitative motor training following CNS injury.

  6. Single pellet grasping following cervical spinal cord injury in adult rat using an automated full-time training robot.

    PubMed

    Fenrich, Keith K; May, Zacincte; Torres-Espín, Abel; Forero, Juan; Bennett, David J; Fouad, Karim

    2016-02-15

    Task specific motor training is a common form of rehabilitation therapy in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). The single pellet grasping (SPG) task is a skilled forelimb motor task used to evaluate recovery of forelimb function in rodent models of SCI. The task requires animals to obtain food pellets located on a shelf beyond a slit at the front of an enclosure. Manually training and testing rats in the SPG task requires extensive time and often yields results with high outcome variability and small therapeutic windows (i.e., the difference between pre- and post-SCI success rates). Recent advances in automated SPG training using automated pellet presentation (APP) systems allow rats to train ad libitum 24h a day, 7 days a week. APP trained rats have improved success rates, require less researcher time, and have lower outcome variability compared to manually trained rats. However, it is unclear whether APP trained rats can perform the SPG task using the APP system after SCI. Here we show that rats with cervical SCI can successfully perform the SPG task using the APP system. We found that SCI rats with APP training performed significantly more attempts, had slightly lower and less variable final score success rates, and larger therapeutic windows than SCI rats with manual training. These results demonstrate that APP training has clear advantages over manual training for evaluating reaching performance of SCI rats and represents a new tool for investigating rehabilitative motor training following CNS injury. PMID:26611563

  7. Human sympathetic nerve biology: parallel influences of stress and epigenetics in essential hypertension and panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Esler, Murray; Eikelis, Nina; Schlaich, Markus; Lambert, Gavin; Alvarenga, Marlies; Kaye, David; El-Osta, Assam; Guo, Ling; Barton, David; Pier, Ciaran; Brenchley, Celia; Dawood, Tye; Jennings, Garry; Lambert, Elisabeth

    2008-12-01

    Patients with panic disorder provide a clinical model of stress. On a "good day," free from a panic attack, they show persistent stress-related changes in sympathetic nerve biology, including abnormal sympathetic nerve single-fiber firing ("salvos" of multiple firing within a cardiac cycle) and release of epinephrine as a cotransmitter. The coreleased epinephrine perhaps originates from in situ synthesis by phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT). In searching for biological evidence that essential hypertension is caused by mental stress--a disputed proposition--we note parallels with panic disorder, which provides an explicit clinical model of stress: (1) There is clinical comorbidity; panic disorder prevalence is increased threefold in essential hypertension. (2) For both, epinephrine cotransmission is present in sympathetic nerves. (3) In panic disorder and essential hypertension, but not in health, single-fiber sympathetic nerve firing salvos occur. (4) Tissue nerve growth factor is increased in both conditions (nerve growth factor is a stress reactant). (5) There is induction of PNMT in sympathetic nerves. Essential hypertension exhibits a further manifestation of mental stress: there is activation of noradrenergic brain stem neurons projecting to the hypothalamus and amygdala. These pathophysiological findings strongly support the view that chronic mental stress is important in the pathogenesis of essential hypertension. A hypothesis now under test is whether in both disorders, under prevailing conditions of ongoing stress, PNMT induced in sympathetic nerves acts as a DNA methylase, causing the norepinephrine transporter (NET) gene silencing that is present in both conditions. PNMT can have an intranuclear distribution, binding to DNA. We have demonstrated that the reduced neuronal noradrenaline reuptake present in both disorders does have an epigenetic mechanism, with demonstrable reduction in the abundance of the transporter protein, the NET gene

  8. Firing Properties of Rat Lateral Mammillary Single Units: Head Direction, Head Pitch, and Angular Head Velocity

    PubMed Central

    Stackman, Robert W.; Taube, Jeffrey S.

    2006-01-01

    Many neurons in the rat anterodorsal thalamus (ADN) and postsubiculum (PoS) fire selectively when the rat points its head in a specific direction in the horizontal plane, independent of the animal’s location and ongoing behavior. The lateral mammillary nuclei (LMN) are interconnected with both the ADN and PoS and, therefore, are in a pivotal position to influence ADN/PoS neurophysiology. To further understand how the head direction (HD) cell signal is generated, we recorded single neurons from the LMN of freely moving rats. The majority of cells discharged as a function of one of three types of spatial correlates: (1) directional heading, (2) head pitch, or (3) angular head velocity (AHV). LMN HD cells exhibited higher peak firing rates and greater range of directional firing than that of ADN and PoS HD cells. LMN HD cells were modulated by angular head velocity, turning direction, and anticipated the rat’s future HD by a greater amount of time (~95 msec) than that previously reported for ADN HD cells (~25 msec). Most head pitch cells discharged when the rostrocaudal axis of the rat’s head was orthogonal to the horizontal plane. Head pitch cell firing was independent of the rat’s location, directional heading, and its body orientation (i.e., the cell discharged whenever the rat pointed its head up, whether standing on all four limbs or rearing). AHV cells were categorized as fast or slow AHV cells depending on whether their firing rate increased or decreased in proportion to angular head velocity. These data demonstrate that LMN neurons code direction and angular motion of the head in both horizontal and vertical planes and support the hypothesis that the LMN play an important role in processing both egocentric and allocentric spatial information. PMID:9787007

  9. Sympathetic modulation of sensory nerve activity with age: human and rodent skin models.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Z; LeVasseur, S; Merhi, M; Helme, R D

    1997-11-01

    1. Sensory nerves serve an afferent role and mediate neurogenic components of inflammation and tissue repair via an axon reflex release of sensory peptides at sites of injury. Dysfunction of these nerves with age could contribute to delayed tissue healing. 2. Complementary animal and human skin models were used in the present studies to investigate changes in the modulation of sensory nerve function by sympathetic efferents during ageing. Laser Doppler flowmetry was used to monitor neurogenic skin vascular responses. 3. The animal model used skin of the hind footpad of anaesthetized rats combined with electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve, while the human model comprised capsaicin electrophoresis to the volar surface of the forearm. Sympathetic modulation was effected by systemic phentolamine pretreatment in animals and local application in the human model. 4. The results obtained from the human model confirmed the reported decline in sensory nerve function and showed no change in sympathetic modulation with age. The results from the animal model confirm and expand results obtained from the human model. 5. The use of low (5 Hz) and high (15 Hz) frequency electrical stimulation (20 V, 2 ms for 1 min) revealed a preferential response of aged sensory nerves to low-frequency electrical stimulation parameters with differential sympathetic modulation that is dependent on the frequency of stimulation.

  10. Amine-modified single-walled carbon nanotubes protect neurons from injury in a rat stroke model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyun Jung; Park, Jiae; Yoon, Ok Ja; Kim, Hyun Woo; Lee, Do Yeon; Kim, Do Hee; Lee, Won Bok; Lee, Nae-Eung; Bonventre, Joseph V.; Kim, Sung Su

    2011-02-01

    Stroke results in the disruption of tissue architecture and is the third leading cause of death in the United States. Transplanting scaffolds containing stem cells into the injured areas of the brain has been proposed as a treatment strategy, and carbon nanotubes show promise in this regard, with positive outcomes when used as scaffolds in neural cells and brain tissues. Here, we show that pretreating rats with amine-modified single-walled carbon nanotubes can protect neurons and enhance the recovery of behavioural functions in rats with induced stroke. Treated rats showed less tissue damage than controls and took longer to fall from a rotating rod, suggesting better motor functions after injury. Low levels of apoptotic, angiogenic and inflammation markers indicated that amine-modified single-walled carbon nanotubes protected the brains of treated rats from ischaemic injury.

  11. Characterization of the heterogeneity of R3327 rat prostatic tumors derived from single-cell clones.

    PubMed

    Thompson, S A; Johnson, M P; Heidger, P M; Lubaroff, D M

    1985-01-01

    Prostatic adenocarcinoma is characterized by cellular diversity, which is well demonstrated in the Dunning R3327 rat prostatic adenocarcinoma. This heterogeneity may arise from epigenetic influences, ie, cellular adaptation or selection, and/or from genetic changes. To investigate the question of genetic instability, four tissue culture cell lines were derived from single cells isolated from the uncloned late (UCL) passage of the Dunning R3327H prostate cell culture. Each of these clonally derived tissue cultures was injected into castrated and intact young adult male rats for tumor production. Uncloned early (UCE) and UCL passage tissue cultures were also propagated as solid tumors. Tumors and the cultures from which they were derived were examined for evidence of phenotypic and genetic changes using morphological and cytometric methods. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy revealed only slight differences among the cell cultures. A single population of diploid cells was demonstrated in each of the cell cultures by propidium iodide staining and subsequent flow cytometric measurement of DNA content/nucleus. Tumors of unicellular as well as multicellular origin exhibited extreme heterogeneity of histological features, both among animals as well as within a single tumor. Tumors were surveyed and tissue types were characterized and cataloged. Clone 3 was generally better differentiated than the others; tumors from castrated animals were better differentiated than those from intact animals. Flow cytometry revealed multiple hyperdiploid cell populations that were variable from one sample to another. We concluded that changes in genotype as well as phenotype occurred in the tumors derived from single cells. Some of these changes may have occurred in the cells while still in culture. PMID:4088951

  12. Changes in contractile properties of skinned single rat soleus and diaphragm fibres after chronic hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Degens, Hans; Bosutti, Alessandra; Gilliver, Sally F; Slevin, Mark; van Heijst, Arno; Wüst, Rob C I

    2010-10-01

    Hypoxia may be one of the factors underlying muscle dysfunction during ageing and chronic lung and heart failure. Here we tested the hypothesis that chronic hypoxia per se affects contractile properties of single fibres of the soleus and diaphragm muscle. To do this, the force-velocity relationship, rate of force redevelopment and calcium sensitivity of single skinned fibres from normoxic rats and rats exposed to 4 weeks of hypobaric hypoxia (410 mmHg) were investigated. The reduction in maximal force (P(0)) after hypoxia (p=0.031) was more pronounced in type IIa than type I fibres and was mainly attributable to a reduction in fibre cross-sectional area (p=0.044). In type IIa fibres this was aggravated by a reduction in specific tension (p=0.001). The maximal velocity of shortening (V (max)) and shape of the force velocity relation (a/P(0)), however, did not differ between normoxic and hypoxic muscle fibres and the reduction in maximal power of hypoxic fibres (p=0.012) was mainly due to a reduction in P(0). In conclusion, chronic hypoxia causes muscle fibre dysfunction which is not only due to a loss of muscle mass, but also to a diminished force generating capacity of the remaining contractile material. These effects are similar in the soleus and diaphragm muscle, but more pronounced in type IIa than I fibres. PMID:20697736

  13. Glia, sympathetic activity and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Teschemacher, Anja G.; Kasparov, Sergey; Gourine, Alexander V.

    2016-01-01

    New Findings What is the topic of this review? In this review, we discuss recent findings that provide a novel insight into the mechanisms that link glial cell function with the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease, including systemic arterial hypertension and chronic heart failure. What advances does it highlight? We discuss how glial cells may influence central presympathetic circuits, leading to maladaptive and detrimental increases in sympathetic activity and contributing to the development and progression of cardiovascular disease. Increased activity of the sympathetic nervous system is associated with the development of cardiovascular disease and may contribute to its progression. Vasomotor and cardiac sympathetic activities are generated by the neuronal circuits located in the hypothalamus and the brainstem. These neuronal networks receive multiple inputs from the periphery and other parts of the CNS and, at a local level, may be influenced by their non‐neuronal neighbours, in particular glial cells. In this review, we discuss recent experimental evidence suggesting that astrocytes and microglial cells are able to modulate the activity of sympathoexcitatory neural networks in disparate physiological and pathophysiological conditions. We focus on the chemosensory properties of astrocytes residing in the rostral ventrolateral medulla oblongata and discuss signalling mechanisms leading to glial activation during brain hypoxia and inflammation. Alterations in these mechanisms may lead to heightened activity of sympathoexcitatory CNS circuits and contribute to maladaptive and detrimental increases in sympathetic tone associated with systemic arterial hypertension and chronic heart failure. PMID:26988631

  14. A Salicylate Sympathetic Ink from Consumer Chemicals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    A new sympathetic ink that produces a violet color upon development was developed to develop chemical demonstrations using consumer chemicals. The demonstration was to have a simple, relatively safe reagent system that could be used to make a brightly colored, highly visible "magic sign" for use in science outreach programs.

  15. Renal Sympathetic Denervation: Hibernation or Resurrection?

    PubMed

    Papademetriou, Vasilios; Doumas, Michael; Tsioufis, Costas

    2016-01-01

    The most current versions of renal sympathetic denervation have been invented as minimally invasive approaches for the management of drug-resistant hypertension. The anatomy, physiology and pathophysiology of renal sympathetic innervation provide a strong background supporting an important role of the renal nerves in the regulation of blood pressure (BP) and volume. In addition, historical data with surgical sympathectomy and experimental data with surgical renal denervation indicate a beneficial effect on BP levels. Early clinical studies with transcatheter radiofrequency ablation demonstrated impressive BP reduction, accompanied by beneficial effects in target organ damage and other disease conditions characterized by sympathetic overactivity. However, the failure of the SYMPLICITY 3 trial to meet its primary efficacy end point raised a lot of concerns and put the field of renal denervation into hibernation. This review aims to translate basic research into clinical practice by presenting the anatomical and physiological basis for renal sympathetic denervation, critically discussing the past and present knowledge in this field, where we stand now, and also speculating about the future of the intervention and potential directions for research. PMID:27287994

  16. Sympathetic solar eruptions in quadrupolar magnetic configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torok, T.; Titov, V. S.; Panasenco, O.

    2014-12-01

    Observations by SDO/AIA have renewed the interest in sympathetic solareruptions, i.e., of eruptions that occur simultaneously (or in shortsuccession) at different source regions in the corona. Recently, Toroket al. (2011) developed an idealized numerical model for the triggermechanisms of sympathetic eruptions in so-called pseudo-streamers, whichconsist of a tri-polar magnetic configuration with a parasitic polarityin their center. Here we extend the work by Torok et al. by investigating sympathetic eruptions in (the topologically somewhat more complex) quadrupolar configurations, using MHD simulations. We consider both symmetric and asymmetric initial configurations that contain two or three flux ropes within the quadrupole. We find, differentto Torok et al. (2011), that magnetic reconnection induced by a firsteruption cannot just trigger, but also prevent subsequent eruptions. In addition, a (relatively modest) asymmetry of the configuration may fully suppress the occurrence of successive full eruptions, i.e., of coronal mass ejections. We discuss the implications of these results for our understanding of sympathetic eruptions.

  17. Chronic carcinogenic and toxic effects of a single subcutaneous dose of cadmium in the male Fischer rat

    SciTech Connect

    Waalkes, M.P.; Rehm, S.; Sass, B.; Konishi, N.; Ward, J.M. )

    1991-06-01

    This study determined tumor incidence in various tissues of male Fischer F344 rats after a single dose of cadmium. Cadmium (as CdCl{sub 2}) was given sc in the dorsal thoracic midline at 30 {mu}mole/kg to 70 8-week old male F344 rats while controls received saline. Rats were observed during the next 90 weeks. Early deaths ({much lt} 32 weeks), due mostly to acute cadmium-induced hepatotoxicity, accounted for 37 of the cadmium-treated rats while no control rats died in the same period. A high incidence of injection site sarcomas (ISS) occurred in the cadmium-treated group while only 1/50 occurred in controls (2%). In fact, ISS were the major cause of morbidity after 35 weeks in cadmium-treated rats. These tumors were mostly fibrosarcomas, although histiocytic and osteogenic sarcomas also occurred. Testicular interstitial cell tumors, which show a very high spontaneous incidence in this strain, were not markedly affected by cadmium. This is in sharp contrast to other strains, such as the Wistar, in which cadmium treatment is reported to cause as much as an eightfold increase in interstitial cell (Leydig cell) tumor incidence. The incidence of large granular lymphocyte (LGL) leukemia, which also occurred frequently in control F344 rats was markedly decreased by cadmium in lymphoid tissues of rats, and this may be related to the suppression of the leukemia.

  18. Toxicokinetics of acrylamide in rats and humans following single oral administration of low doses

    SciTech Connect

    Kopp, Eva Katharina; Dekant, Wolfgang

    2009-03-01

    The rodent carcinogen acrylamide (AA) is formed during preparation of starch-containing foods. AA is partly metabolized to the genotoxic epoxide glycidamide (GA). After metabolic processing, the mercapturic acids N-acetyl-S-(2-carbamoylethyl)-L-cysteine (AAMA), rac-N-acetyl-S-(2-carbamoyl-2-hydroxyethyl)-L-cysteine (GAMA) and rac-N-acetyl-S-(1-carbamoyl-moyl-2-hydroxyethyl)-L-cysteine (iso-GAMA) are excreted with urine. In humans, AAMA can be sulfoxidized to AAMA-sulfoxide. The aim of this study was to assess potential species-differences in AA-toxicokinetics in rats and humans after single oral administration of doses similar to the daily human dietary exposure. Male Fischer 344 rats (n = 5/dose group) were administered 20 and 100 {mu}g/kg b.w. {sup 13}C{sub 3}-AA in deionized water via oral gavage. Human subjects (n = 3/gender) were orally administered 0.5 and 20 {mu}g/kg b.w. {sup 13}C{sub 3}-AA with drinking water. Urine samples were collected in intervals for 96 and 94 h, respectively. Urinary concentrations of {sup 13}C{sub 3}-AAMA, {sup 13}C{sub 3}-GAMA and {sup 13}C{sub 3}-AAMA-sulfoxide were monitored by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The recovered urinary metabolites accounted for 66.3% and 70.5% of the 20 and 100 {mu}g/kg b.w. doses in rats and for 71.3% and 70.0% of the 0.5 and 20 {mu}g/kg b.w. doses in humans. In rats, {sup 13}C{sub 3}-AAMA accounted for 33.6% and 38.8% of dose and 32.7% and 31.7% of dose was recovered as {sup 13}C{sub 3}-GAMA; {sup 13}C{sub 3}-AAMA-sulfoxide was not detected in rat urine. In humans, {sup 13}C{sub 3}-AAMA, {sup 13}C{sub 3}-GAMA and {sup 13}C{sub 3}-AAMA-sulfoxide accounted for 51.7% and 49.2%, 6.3% and 6.4% and 13.2% and 14.5% of the applied dose, respectively. The obtained results suggest that the extent of AA bioactivation to GA in humans is lower than in rodents.

  19. Biotransformation of ethanol to ethyl glucuronide in a rat model after a single high oral dosage.

    PubMed

    Wright, Trista H; Ferslew, Kenneth E

    2012-03-01

    Ethyl glucuronide (EtG) is a minor ethanol metabolite that confirms the absorption and metabolism of ethanol after oral or dermal exposure. Human data suggest that maximum blood EtG (BEtG) concentrations are reached between 3.5 and 5.5h after ethanol administration. This study was undertaken to determine if the Sprague-Dawley (SD) rat biotransforms ethanol to EtG after a single high oral dose of ethanol. SD rats (male, n=6) were gavaged with a single ethanol dose (4 g/kg), and urine was collected for 3 h in metabolic cages, followed by euthanization and collection of heart blood. Blood and urine were analyzed for ethanol and EtG by gas chromatography and enzyme immunoassay. Blood and urine ethanol concentrations were 195±23 and 218±19 mg/dL, whereas BEtG and urine EtG (UEtG) concentrations were 1,363±98 ng equivalents/mL and 210±0.29 mg equivalents/dL (X ± standard error of the mean [S.E.M.]). Sixty-six male SD rats were gavaged ethanol (4 g/kg) and placed in metabolic cages to determine the extent and duration of ethanol to EtG biotransformation and urinary excretion. Blood and urine were collected up to 24 h after administration for ethanol and EtG analysis. Maximum blood ethanol, urine ethanol, and UEtG were reached within 4 h, whereas maximum BEtG was reached 6 h after administration. Maximum concentrations were blood ethanol, 213±20 mg/dL; urine ethanol, 308±34 mg/dL; BEtG, 2,683±145 ng equivalents/mL; UEtG, 1.2±0.06 mg equivalents/mL (X±S.E.M.). Areas under the concentration-time curve were blood ethanol, 1,578 h*mg/dL; urine ethanol, 3,096 h*mg/dL; BEtG, 18,284 h*ng equivalents/mL; and UEtG, 850 h*mg equivalents/dL. Blood ethanol and BEtG levels were reduced to below limits of detection (LODs) within 12 and 18 h after ethanol administration. Urine ethanols were below LOD at 18 h, but UEtG was still detectable at 24h after administration. Our data prove that the SD rat biotransforms ethanol to EtG and excretes both in the urine and suggest that it

  20. Biotransformation of ethanol to ethyl glucuronide in a rat model after a single high oral dosage.

    PubMed

    Wright, Trista H; Ferslew, Kenneth E

    2012-03-01

    Ethyl glucuronide (EtG) is a minor ethanol metabolite that confirms the absorption and metabolism of ethanol after oral or dermal exposure. Human data suggest that maximum blood EtG (BEtG) concentrations are reached between 3.5 and 5.5h after ethanol administration. This study was undertaken to determine if the Sprague-Dawley (SD) rat biotransforms ethanol to EtG after a single high oral dose of ethanol. SD rats (male, n=6) were gavaged with a single ethanol dose (4 g/kg), and urine was collected for 3 h in metabolic cages, followed by euthanization and collection of heart blood. Blood and urine were analyzed for ethanol and EtG by gas chromatography and enzyme immunoassay. Blood and urine ethanol concentrations were 195±23 and 218±19 mg/dL, whereas BEtG and urine EtG (UEtG) concentrations were 1,363±98 ng equivalents/mL and 210±0.29 mg equivalents/dL (X ± standard error of the mean [S.E.M.]). Sixty-six male SD rats were gavaged ethanol (4 g/kg) and placed in metabolic cages to determine the extent and duration of ethanol to EtG biotransformation and urinary excretion. Blood and urine were collected up to 24 h after administration for ethanol and EtG analysis. Maximum blood ethanol, urine ethanol, and UEtG were reached within 4 h, whereas maximum BEtG was reached 6 h after administration. Maximum concentrations were blood ethanol, 213±20 mg/dL; urine ethanol, 308±34 mg/dL; BEtG, 2,683±145 ng equivalents/mL; UEtG, 1.2±0.06 mg equivalents/mL (X±S.E.M.). Areas under the concentration-time curve were blood ethanol, 1,578 h*mg/dL; urine ethanol, 3,096 h*mg/dL; BEtG, 18,284 h*ng equivalents/mL; and UEtG, 850 h*mg equivalents/dL. Blood ethanol and BEtG levels were reduced to below limits of detection (LODs) within 12 and 18 h after ethanol administration. Urine ethanols were below LOD at 18 h, but UEtG was still detectable at 24h after administration. Our data prove that the SD rat biotransforms ethanol to EtG and excretes both in the urine and suggest that it

  1. Action of cocaine and chronic sympathetic denervation on vagal escape

    PubMed Central

    Campos, H. A.; Urquilla, P. R.

    1969-01-01

    1. The effect of cocaine has been studied on vagal escape and on the tachycardia due to vagal stimulation in the atropinized dog. All the dogs were submitted to acute cervical section of the spinal cord and acute or chronic sympathetic denervation. 2. Cocaine, 5 mg/kg or 40 μg/kg/min, I.V., induces a significant enhancement of the ventricular escape. The effects of a continuous infusion of cocaine are more reproducible than those of a single injection of the drug. 3. Cocaine, 40 μg/kg/min, I.V., potentiates the tachycardia due to vagal stimulation in the atropinized dog. 4. Chronic thoracic sympathectomy markedly retards the recovery of the ventricular rate from the inhibitory action of the vagus. Under this condition, the infusion of cocaine does not significantly enhance the ventricular escape. 5. These findings suggest that an adrenergic mechanism located at the sympathetic nerves supplying the heart is substantially involved in the phenomenon of vagal escape. PMID:5249864

  2. Fibromyalgia: When Distress Becomes (Un)sympathetic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Lavin, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a painful stress-related disorder. A key issue in fibromyalgia research is to investigate how distress could be converted into pain. The sympathetic nervous system is the main element of the stress response system. In animal models, physical trauma, infection, or distressing noise can induce abnormal connections between the sympathetic nervous system and the nociceptive system. Dorsal root ganglia sodium channels facilitate this type of sympathetic pain. Similar mechanisms may operate in fibromyalgia. Signs of sympathetic hyperactivity have been described in this condition. Genetic factors and/or distressful lifestyle may lead to this state of sympathetic hyperactivity. Trauma and infection are recognized fibromyalgia triggers. Women who suffer from fibromyalgia have catecholamine-evoked pain. Sympathetic dysfunction may also explain nonpain-related fibromyalgia symptoms. In conclusion, in fibromyalgia, distress could be converted into pain through forced hyperactivity of the sympathetic component of the stress response system. PMID:22110948

  3. From one generation to the next: a comprehensive account of sympathetic receptor control in branching arteriolar trees

    PubMed Central

    Al-Khazraji, Baraa K; Saleem, Amani; Goldman, Daniel; Jackson, Dwayne N

    2015-01-01

    The effect of the sympathetic nervous system on blood flow distribution within skeletal muscle microvasculature is conditional upon regional activation of receptors for sympathetic neurotransmitters. Previous studies have shown that proximal arterioles are largely governed by adrenergic activation, whereas it is speculated that distal branches are controlled by peptidergic and purinergic activation. However, no study has systematically evaluated the activation of adrenergic, peptidergic and purinergic receptors in continuously branching arteriolar trees of an individual skeletal muscle model. Therefore, in the present study, sympathetic agonists were used to evaluate the constriction responses along first to fifth order arterioles in continuously branching arteriolar trees of a in vivo rat gluteus maximus muscle preparation with respect to specific activation of receptors for sympathetic neurotransmitters (α1R, α2R, NPY1R and P2X1R). Constriction responses were incorporated into a mathematical blood flow model to estimate the total flow, resistance and red blood cell flow heterogeneity within a computationally reconstructed gluteus maximus arteriolar network. For the first time, the effects of activating receptors for sympathetic neurotransmitters on vasoconstrictor responses and the ensuing haemodynamics in continuously branching arteriolar trees of skeletal muscle were characterized, where proximal arterioles responded most to α1R and α2R adrenergic activation, whereas distal arterioles responded most to Y1R and P2X1R activation. Total flow and resistance changed with activation of all receptors, whereas red blood cell flow heterogeneity was largely affected by peptidergic and purinergic activation in distal arterioles. The reported data highlight the functional consequences of topologically-dependent sympathetic control and may serve as novel input parameters in computational modelling of network flow. Key points The sympathetic nervous system increases

  4. Axon guidance of sympathetic neurons to cardiomyocytes by glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF).

    PubMed

    Miwa, Keiko; Lee, Jong-Kook; Takagishi, Yoshiko; Opthof, Tobias; Fu, Xianming; Hirabayashi, Masumi; Watabe, Kazuhiko; Jimbo, Yasuhiko; Kodama, Itsuo; Komuro, Issei

    2013-01-01

    Molecular signaling of cardiac autonomic innervation is an unresolved issue. Here, we show that glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) promotes cardiac sympathetic innervation in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, ventricular myocytes (VMs) and sympathetic neurons (SNs) isolated from neonatal rat ventricles and superior cervical ganglia were cultured at a close distance. Then, morphological and functional coupling between SNs and VMs was assessed in response to GDNF (10 ng/ml) or nerve growth factor (50 ng/ml). As a result, fractions of neurofilament-M-positive axons and synapsin-I-positive area over the surface of VMs were markedly increased with GDNF by 9-fold and 25-fold, respectively, compared to control without neurotrophic factors. Pre- and post-synaptic stimulation of β1-adrenergic receptors (BAR) with nicotine and noradrenaline, respectively, resulted in an increase of the spontaneous beating rate of VMs co-cultured with SNs in the presence of GDNF. GDNF overexpressing VMs by adenovirus vector (AdGDNF-VMs) attracted more axons from SNs compared with mock-transfected VMs. In vivo, axon outgrowth toward the denervated myocardium in adult rat hearts after cryoinjury was also enhanced significantly by adenovirus-mediated GDNF overexpression. GDNF acts as a potent chemoattractant for sympathetic innervation of ventricular myocytes, and is a promising molecular target for regulation of cardiac function in diseased hearts.

  5. The effects of enriching laboratory cages using various physical structures on multiple measures of welfare in singly-housed rats.

    PubMed

    Abou-Ismail, Usama A; Mahboub, Hamada D

    2011-07-01

    The single housing of laboratory rats may be recommended in some situations such as hypothesis-driven or test-specific studies, during electroencephalogram recording of phases of sleep and after surgical procedures. However, as single housing of laboratory rats has been shown to be stressful, modification of the housing environment is needed to improve the welfare of these animals. This experiment was carried out to investigate the long-term effects of environmental enrichment on some behavioural, physiological, pathological and psychological measures of welfare. With two batches of animals, 24 rats were housed singly in either enriched cages (EC) (n = 12 cages) or unenriched cages (UC) (n = 12 cages). Behaviour was sampled every week and so was body weight and weight gain over a six-week observation period. Behaviours of the rats in the elevated plus-maze were recorded on the seventh week, whereas organ weights were recorded postmortem. The results revealed that long-term single housing of rats in super-enriched cages increased levels of indicators of good welfare including sleep, exploration, movement and feeding behaviour, body weights, weight gains and the relative weights of the thymus gland and spleen, and decreased levels of indicators of poor welfare such as stationary behaviour and the relative weight of adrenal glands. Thus, enrichment of conventional cages of newly weaned singly-housed laboratory rats with multiple physical structures appeared to improve their ability to control the environment and to promote their species-specific behaviour; changes that can ultimately result in good welfare.

  6. Effects of single-dose and fractionated cranial irradiation on rat brain accumulation of methotrexate

    SciTech Connect

    Kamen, B.A.; Moulder, J.E.; Kun, L.E.; Ring, B.J.; Adams, S.M.; Fish, B.L.; Holcenberg, J.S.

    1984-11-01

    The effects of single-dose and fractionated whole-brain irradiation on brain methotrexate (MTX) has been studied in a rat model. The amount of MTX present in the brain 24 hr after a single i.p. dose (100 mg/kg) was the same whether animals were sham irradiated or given a single dose of 2000 rads 6 or 48 hr prior to the drug (6.9, 8.3, and 6.8 pmol MTX/g, wet weight, respectively). Animals sham irradiated or given 2000 rads in 10 fractions over 11 days and treated with an average dose of 1.2 mg MTX/kg i.p. twice a week for 24 weeks did not differ significantly in their brain MTX concentration (7.9 and 8.3 pmol MTX/g, wet weight, respectively). Chronically MTX-treated animals became folate deficient whether they were irradiated or not (450 and 670 pmol folate/g, wet weight, brain in MTX-treated and control animals). Thus, MTX accumulates in the brain with acute or chronic administration, and this accumulation is not altered by this amount of brain irradiation.

  7. Pharmacokinetics of Memantine after a Single and Multiple Dose of Oral and Patch Administration in Rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo-Han; Kim, Seung-Hyun; Noh, Yook-Hwan; Choi, Byung-Moon; Noh, Gyu-Jeong; Park, Woo-Dae; Kim, Eun-Jung; Cho, Ik-Hyun; Bae, Chun-Sik

    2016-02-01

    Memantine is a non-competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist used to treat Alzheimer's disease. We investigated memantine pharmacokinetics after oral, IV and patch administration in rats, and compared memantine pharmacokinetics after multiple- or single-dose oral and transdermal administration. Venous blood was collected at preset intervals in single- and multiple-dose studies. Non-compartmental pharmacokinetics was analysed for all formulations. The oral, IV and patch memantine doses were 10 mg/kg, 2 mg/kg and 8.21 ± 0.89 mg/kg, respectively. The maximum plasma concentration was lower and the half-life longer after patch administration than oral and IV administration. Memantine bioavailability was 41 and 63% for oral and patch administration, respectively. Steady state was achieved around 24 hr for oral and patch administration. The mean AUC increased after oral or patch administration from single to multiple dose. The memantine patch formulation displayed a longer duration of action and lower peak plasma concentration. However, drug exposure was similar to the oral formulation at each dose. Additionally, the memantine patch formulation displayed a smaller interindividual variability and lower accumulation than the oral formulation.

  8. Single Intramuscular-dose Toxicity of Samgihwalryeok-Pharmacopuncture in Sprague-Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Chul; Ahn, Seong-Hun

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study was performed to examine the single-dose toxicity of Samgihwalryeok pharmacopuncture. Methods: Forty six-week-old Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were divided into four groups of 10 rats each; each group was then sub-divided into two smaller groups, one of five males and the other of five females. Group 1 (G1, control) received 1.0 mL of normal saline solution, while group 2 (G2, low-dose group), group 3 (G3, mid-does group, and group 4 (G4, high-dose group) received 0.1, 0.5, and 1.0 mL of Samgihwalryeok pharmacopuncture, respectively. Results: No mortalities or clinical signs were observed in the four groups. Also, no significant changes in body weights were observed among the group, and no significant differences in hematology/biochemistry, necropsy, or histopathology results were noted. Conclusion: The above findings suggest that treatment with Samgihwalryeok pharmacopuncture is relatively safe. Further studies on this subject are needed. PMID:25780699

  9. Adult rat vigilance states discrimination by artificial neural networks using a single EEG channel.

    PubMed

    Robert, C; Karasinski, P; Natowicz, R; Limoge, A

    1996-06-01

    Two multilayer neural networks were designed to discriminate vigilance states (waking, paradoxical sleep, and non-REM sleep) in the rat using a single parieto-occipital EEG derivation. After filtering (bandwidth 3.18-25 Hz) and digitization at 512 HZ, the EEG signal was segmented into eight second epochs. Five variables (three statistical, two temporal) were extracted from each epoch. The first network computed an epoch by epoch classification, while the second network also utilized contextual information from contiguous epochs. A specific postprocessing procedure was developed to enhance the vigilance state discrimination of the neural networks designed and especially paradoxical sleep state estimation. The classifications made by the networks (with or without the postprocessing procedure) for six rats were compared to these made by two human experts using EMG and EEG informations on 63,000 epochs. High rates of agreement (> 90%) between humans and neural networks classifications were obtained. In view of its development possibilities and its applicability to other signals, this method could prove of value in biomedical research. PMID:8737892

  10. Comparing single and repeated dosimetry data for perfluorooctane sulfonate in rats.

    PubMed

    Harris, Leona A; Barton, Hugh A

    2008-10-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is a member of a class of perfluorinated chemicals used in a variety of consumer and industrial applications because of their oleophobic and hydrophobic properties. It has been shown to cause toxicity in adult and developing laboratory animals. Because PFOS has also been shown to be widely distributed throughout the environment, there have been concerns about its potential health risk to humans. Limited pharmacokinetic data for PFOS are available in rodents and humans, while epidemiological studies of workers and extensive toxicity studies in rodents have been performed. The existing pharmacokinetic and toxicity database in rodents can be useful in the cross-species extrapolations needed to evaluate and interpret internal dosimetry in humans. A mathematical model that describes the disposition of PFOS in adult rats following intravenous, oral, and chronic dietary exposures was developed to gain a better understanding of the pharmacokinetics of PFOS and to determine whether single-dose kinetics are predictive of repeated-dose kinetics. In order to characterize existing time-course data, time-dependent and concentration-dependent changes in the pharmacokinetic parameters for urinary and biliary clearance and liver distribution were needed. Whether these time-dependent changes represent inconsistencies across experiments, effects of aging in the rats, or chemically induced changes in pharmacokinetics remains to be determined. PMID:18706985

  11. Sex differences in steroidogenesis in skeletal muscle following a single bout of exercise in rats.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Katsuji; Iemitsu, Motoyuki; Otsuki, Takeshi; Maeda, Seiji; Miyauchi, Takashi; Mesaki, Noboru

    2008-01-01

    Sex steroid hormones, such as testosterone and estradiol, play important roles in developing both strength and mass of skeletal muscle. Recently, we demonstrated that skeletal muscle can synthesize sex steroid hormones. Whether there are sex differences in basal steroidogenesis or acute exercise-induced alterations of steroidogenesis in the skeletal muscle is unknown. We examined sex differences in the levels of testosterone, estradiol, and steroidogenesis-related enzymes, such as 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD), 3beta-HSD, and aromatase cytochrome P-450 (P450arom), in the skeletal muscle at rest and after exercise. We studied the gastrocnemius muscles of resting rats (10 wk old) and exercised rats (10 wk old, treadmill running, 30 m/min, 30 min). Basal muscular testosterone levels were higher in males than females, whereas estradiol did not differ between sexes. Additionally, 17beta-HSD, 3beta-HSD, and P450arom transcript and protein expression were greater in females. After acute exercise, testosterone levels and 17beta-HSD expression increased in muscle in both sexes. By comparison, muscular estradiol levels increased in males following exercise but were unchanged in females. Expression of P450arom, which regulates estrogen synthesis, increased after acute exercise in males but decreased after exercise in females. Thus a single bout of exercise can influence the steroidogenic system in skeletal muscle, and these alterations differ between sexes. The acute exercise-induced alteration of steroidogenic enzymes may enhance the local steroidogenesis in the skeletal muscle in both sexes.

  12. Quantifying single microvessel permeability in isolated blood-perfused rat lung preparation.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Kathirvel; Parthasarathi, Kaushik

    2014-01-01

    The isolated blood-perfused lung preparation is widely used to visualize and define signaling in single microvessels. By coupling this preparation with real time imaging, it becomes feasible to determine permeability changes in individual pulmonary microvessels. Herein we describe steps to isolate rat lungs and perfuse them with autologous blood. Then, we outline steps to infuse fluorophores or agents via a microcatheter into a small lung region. Using these procedures described, we determined permeability increases in rat lung microvessels in response to infusions of bacterial lipopolysaccharide. The data revealed that lipopolysaccharide increased fluid leak across both venular and capillary microvessel segments. Thus, this method makes it possible to compare permeability responses among vascular segments and thus, define any heterogeneity in the response. While commonly used methods to define lung permeability require postprocessing of lung tissue samples, the use of real time imaging obviates this requirement as evident from the present method. Thus, the isolated lung preparation combined with real time imaging offers several advantages over traditional methods to determine lung microvascular permeability, yet is a straightforward method to develop and implement.

  13. Comparing single and repeated dosimetry data for perfluorooctane sulfonate in rats.

    PubMed

    Harris, Leona A; Barton, Hugh A

    2008-10-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is a member of a class of perfluorinated chemicals used in a variety of consumer and industrial applications because of their oleophobic and hydrophobic properties. It has been shown to cause toxicity in adult and developing laboratory animals. Because PFOS has also been shown to be widely distributed throughout the environment, there have been concerns about its potential health risk to humans. Limited pharmacokinetic data for PFOS are available in rodents and humans, while epidemiological studies of workers and extensive toxicity studies in rodents have been performed. The existing pharmacokinetic and toxicity database in rodents can be useful in the cross-species extrapolations needed to evaluate and interpret internal dosimetry in humans. A mathematical model that describes the disposition of PFOS in adult rats following intravenous, oral, and chronic dietary exposures was developed to gain a better understanding of the pharmacokinetics of PFOS and to determine whether single-dose kinetics are predictive of repeated-dose kinetics. In order to characterize existing time-course data, time-dependent and concentration-dependent changes in the pharmacokinetic parameters for urinary and biliary clearance and liver distribution were needed. Whether these time-dependent changes represent inconsistencies across experiments, effects of aging in the rats, or chemically induced changes in pharmacokinetics remains to be determined.

  14. Glutamate and GABA in Vestibulo-Sympathetic Pathway Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Holstein, Gay R.; Friedrich, Victor L. Jr.; Martinelli, Giorgio P.

    2016-01-01

    The vestibulo-sympathetic reflex (VSR) actively modulates blood pressure during changes in posture. This reflex allows humans to stand up and quadrupeds to rear or climb without a precipitous decline in cerebral perfusion. The VSR pathway conveys signals from the vestibular end organs to the caudal vestibular nuclei. These cells, in turn, project to pre-sympathetic neurons in the rostral and caudal ventrolateral medulla (RVLM and CVLM, respectively). The present study assessed glutamate- and GABA-related immunofluorescence associated with central vestibular neurons of the VSR pathway in rats. Retrograde FluoroGold tract tracing was used to label vestibular neurons with projections to RVLM or CVLM, and sinusoidal galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) was employed to activate these pathways. Central vestibular neurons of the VSR were identified by co-localization of FluoroGold and cFos protein, which accumulates in some vestibular neurons following galvanic stimulation. Triple-label immunofluorescence was used to co-localize glutamate- or GABA- labeling in the identified VSR pathway neurons. Most activated projection neurons displayed intense glutamate immunofluorescence, suggestive of glutamatergic neurotransmission. To support this, anterograde tracer was injected into the caudal vestibular nuclei. Vestibular axons and terminals in RVLM and CVLM co-localized the anterograde tracer and vesicular glutamate transporter-2 signals. Other retrogradely-labeled cFos-positive neurons displayed intense GABA immunofluorescence. VSR pathway neurons of both phenotypes were present in the caudal medial and spinal vestibular nuclei, and projected to both RVLM and CVLM. As a group, however, triple-labeled vestibular cells with intense glutamate immunofluorescence were located more rostrally in the vestibular nuclei than the GABAergic neurons. Only the GABAergic VSR pathway neurons showed a target preference, projecting predominantly to CVLM. These data provide the first

  15. Glutamate and GABA in Vestibulo-Sympathetic Pathway Neurons.

    PubMed

    Holstein, Gay R; Friedrich, Victor L; Martinelli, Giorgio P

    2016-01-01

    The vestibulo-sympathetic reflex (VSR) actively modulates blood pressure during changes in posture. This reflex allows humans to stand up and quadrupeds to rear or climb without a precipitous decline in cerebral perfusion. The VSR pathway conveys signals from the vestibular end organs to the caudal vestibular nuclei. These cells, in turn, project to pre-sympathetic neurons in the rostral and caudal ventrolateral medulla (RVLM and CVLM, respectively). The present study assessed glutamate- and GABA-related immunofluorescence associated with central vestibular neurons of the VSR pathway in rats. Retrograde FluoroGold tract tracing was used to label vestibular neurons with projections to RVLM or CVLM, and sinusoidal galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) was employed to activate these pathways. Central vestibular neurons of the VSR were identified by co-localization of FluoroGold and cFos protein, which accumulates in some vestibular neurons following galvanic stimulation. Triple-label immunofluorescence was used to co-localize glutamate- or GABA- labeling in the identified VSR pathway neurons. Most activated projection neurons displayed intense glutamate immunofluorescence, suggestive of glutamatergic neurotransmission. To support this, anterograde tracer was injected into the caudal vestibular nuclei. Vestibular axons and terminals in RVLM and CVLM co-localized the anterograde tracer and vesicular glutamate transporter-2 signals. Other retrogradely-labeled cFos-positive neurons displayed intense GABA immunofluorescence. VSR pathway neurons of both phenotypes were present in the caudal medial and spinal vestibular nuclei, and projected to both RVLM and CVLM. As a group, however, triple-labeled vestibular cells with intense glutamate immunofluorescence were located more rostrally in the vestibular nuclei than the GABAergic neurons. Only the GABAergic VSR pathway neurons showed a target preference, projecting predominantly to CVLM. These data provide the first

  16. Hepatic and renal metallothionein induction following single oral administration of gallium arsenide in rats.

    PubMed

    Flora, S J; Tripathi, N

    1998-09-01

    Metallothionein genes (MT) are inducible by a variety of agents, including heavy metals. We report the induction of MT expression by gallium arsenide (GaAs), a superior intermetallic semiconductor material at two time intervals following single oral exposure in rats. The data is also supplemented with two additional groups exposed to gallium (III) as gallium oxide and arsenic (III) as sodium arsenite to determine which of the two moieties in GaAs is responsible for any such possible effects. The results indicate that GaAs administration does significantly induces MT in hepatic tissues accompanied by an increase in cytosolic glutathione, arsenic, zinc and copper concentration. It thus proves that arsenic moiety is chiefly responsible for such an effect.

  17. Phorbol-ester-induced alterations of free calcium ion transients in single rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Woods, N M; Cuthbertson, K S; Cobbold, P H

    1987-01-01

    The effect of the phorbol esters phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (TPA) and phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDB) on changes in free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in single rat hepatocytes, microinjected with the photoprotein aequorin, were investigated. [Arg8]vasopressin and phenylephrine induced a series of repetitive [Ca2+]i transients. Phorbol esters inhibited the alpha 1-adrenoceptor-induced response; sub-nanomolar concentrations decreased the transient frequency, and higher concentrations abolished the transients. The inhibitory effect of PDB was readily reversible. Phorbol esters were less effective in decreasing the frequency of [Arg8]-vasopressin-induced transients, and the inhibition could be overcome by high [Arg8]vasopressin concentrations. PMID:3479980

  18. Juxtacellular recording and morphological identification of single neurons in freely moving rats.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qiusong; Brecht, Michael; Burgalossi, Andrea

    2014-10-01

    It is well established that neural circuits consist of a great diversity of cell types, but very little is known about how neuronal diversity contributes to cognition and behavior. One approach to addressing this problem is to directly link cellular diversity to neuronal activity recorded in vivo in behaving animals. Here we describe the technical procedures for obtaining juxtacellular recordings from single neurons in trained rats engaged in exploratory behavior. The recorded neurons can be labeled to allow subsequent anatomical identification. In its current format, the protocol can be used for resolving the cellular identity of spatially modulated neurons (i.e., head-direction cells and grid cells), which form the basis of the animal's internal representation of space, but this approach can easily be extended to other unrestrained behaviors. The procedures described here, from the beginning of animal training to the histological processing of brain sections, can be completed in ≈ 3-4 weeks.

  19. Arteether toxicokinetics and pharmacokinetics in rats after 25 mg/kg/day single and multiple doses.

    PubMed

    Li, Q G; Brueckner, R P; Peggins, J O; Trotman, K M; Brewer, T G

    1999-01-01

    Multiple doses of arteether (ARTE) at 25 mg/kg cause CNS and anorectic toxicities in rats. The same dose of ARTE was used to study the toxicokinetics (TK) after multiple injections and the pharmacokinetics (PK) following single administration. Animals were administered ARTE in sesame oil for 7 days, blood samples were collected using destructive sampling for up to 192 h after dosing and assayed by HPLC-ECD. Two other groups of rats were administered either a single 25 mg/kg i.v. or i.m. dose. In addition, the drug remaining in the i.m. injection site was measured. During the 7 day treatments, anorectic toxicity of ARTE was observed, and that caused significant reductions in food consumption and body weight after day 2. TK data on days 2-7 revealed marked changes compared to the PK parameters estimated on day 1. AUC (4367 ng x h/ml) on day 7 was 5-fold higher than AUC (905 ng x h/ml) on day 1. The volume of distribution at steady state (V(SS)) on day 7 (41.8 l) was 40% of the day 1 value of the V(SS) (104.3 l). Clearance (CL) was increased by 89% of the day 1 value, from 0.98 l/h to 1.85 l/h on day 7. The elimination t(1/2) of ARTE was also prolonged from 13.7 h (day 1) to 31.2 h (day 7). These data suggest that ARTE may have altered its distribution and elimination in rats as a result of the systemic toxicity. Analysis of the injection sites showed that 38% and 91% of the total amount of ARTE single dose remained in the muscles at 24 h (after first injection) and 168 h (at 24 h after 7 daily multiple doses), respectively. Fast and slow absorption phases from muscle were seen with t(1/2) of 0.97 h and 26.3 h, respectively. The apparent elimination t(1/2) of ARTE after i.m. injection (13.7 h) was much longer than that after i.v. dosing (0.67 h) due to the prolonged muscle absorption phase. Acute toxicity data of artemisinin drugs demonstrated that animals receiving a high single ARTE dose in sesame oil died between days 5-11, similar to artemether. When animals

  20. Functional observational battery and motor activity in rats after single administration of two NHE 1 inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Huebler, Nicole; Gottschling, Barbara . E-mail: barbara.gottschling@merck.de; Jacobs, Maren; Landenberg, Friedrich von; Hewicker-Trautwein, Marion

    2005-11-01

    Two tests, a functional observational battery (FOB) and measurement of motor activity, have been used to screen the two NHE inhibitors EMD 96785 and EMD 125021 for neurobehavioral effects. These two NHE inhibitors, which exhibit a marked selectivity for the NHE 1 isoform, are under development in the research laboratories of Merck KGaA. NHE inhibitors are developed for the treatment of acute myocardial infarction and chronic heart failure. In prior studies with EMD 96785 and EMD 125021, clinical symptoms, such as uncoordinated movements and weakness of the hindlimbs, were detected in rats. The aim of this study was the evaluation of clinical findings in more detail using a FOB and measurement of motor activity in 96 female rats. The time course and reversibility of the adverse effects were investigated. The animals were treated with EMD 96785 or EMD 125021 by intravenous injection at a single dose of 100 mg/kg and four different time points (2 h, 1 day, 7 days and 21 days after treatment) were chosen for the clinical examination. This neurobehavioral test battery clearly detected neurological activity and defined time-course characteristics after treatment with EMD 96785 or EMD 125021. The various clinical parameters were grouped into functional-related domains and most alterations were seen in the domains of central nervous system and neuromuscular system. The most prominent clinical findings were seen with the pharmacologically more potent NHE inhibitor EMD 125021 when compared to EMD 96785. The clinical symptoms were proven to be reversible by 7 days after the single treatment for both compounds.

  1. Sympathetic activation triggers endogenous opioid release and analgesia within peripheral inflamed tissue.

    PubMed

    Binder, Waltraud; Mousa, Shaaban A; Sitte, Nicolle; Kaiser, Myriam; Stein, Christoph; Schäfer, Michael

    2004-07-01

    Stress induces analgesia by mechanisms within and outside the brain. Here we show that the sympathetic nervous system is an essential trigger of intrinsic opioid analgesia within peripheral injured tissue. Noradrenaline, injected directly into inflamed hind paws of male Wistar rats, produced dose-dependent antinociception, reversible by alpha(1)-, alpha(2)- and beta(2)-antagonists. alpha(1)-, alpha(2)- and beta(2)-adrenergic receptors were demonstrated on beta-endorphin-containing immune cells and noradrenaline induced adrenergic receptor-specific release of beta-endorphin from immune cell suspensions. This antinociceptive effect of noradrenaline was reversed by micro - and delta-opioid antagonists as well as by anti-beta-endorphin. Stress-induced peripheral analgesia was abolished by chemical sympathectomy and by adrenergic antagonists. These findings indicate that sympathetic neuron-derived noradrenaline stimulates adrenergic receptors on inflammatory cells to release beta-endorphin, which induces analgesia via activation of peripheral opioid receptors. PMID:15245482

  2. Hypothalamic orexin stimulates feeding-associated glucose utilization in skeletal muscle via sympathetic nervous system.

    PubMed

    Shiuchi, Tetsuya; Haque, Mohammad Shahidul; Okamoto, Shiki; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Kageyama, Haruaki; Lee, Suni; Toda, Chitoku; Suzuki, Atsushi; Bachman, Eric S; Kim, Young-Bum; Sakurai, Takashi; Yanagisawa, Masashi; Shioda, Seiji; Imoto, Keiji; Minokoshi, Yasuhiko

    2009-12-01

    Hypothalamic neurons containing orexin (hypocretin) are activated during motivated behaviors and active waking. We show that injection of orexin-A into the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) of mice or rats increased glucose uptake and promoted insulin-induced glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis in skeletal muscle, but not in white adipose tissue, by activating the sympathetic nervous system. These effects of orexin were blunted in mice lacking beta-adrenergic receptors but were restored by forced expression of the beta(2)-adrenergic receptor in both myocytes and nonmyocyte cells of skeletal muscle. Orexin neurons are activated by conditioned sweet tasting and directly excite VMH neurons, thereby increasing muscle glucose metabolism and its insulin sensitivity. Orexin and its receptor in VMH thus play a key role in the regulation of muscle glucose metabolism associated with highly motivated behavior by activating muscle sympathetic nerves and beta(2)-adrenergic signaling.

  3. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy associated with antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Falasca, G F; Toly, T M; Reginato, A J; Schraeder, P L; O'Connor, C R

    1994-01-01

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome (RSDS) complicating antiepileptic drug (AED) therapy is not well acknowledged in the neurologic literature. We report 4 patients with reflex sympathetic dystrophy that occurred while they were receiving AEDs. All patients had shoulder and hand involvement, which in 2 was bilateral, and 1 had ipsilateral foot involvement. Two patients did not respond to a change in AEDs, but all improved with a course of prednisone. One patient with phenobarbital (PB)-associated RSDS relapsed on inadvertent rechallenge with secobarbital. A review of the literature showed that several other fibrosing disorders are associated with AED administration, including Dupuytren's contractures, frozen shoulder, plantar and hand nodules, and Peyronie's disease. RSD associated with AEDs is important to recognize because it may result in permanent disability if treatment is delayed.

  4. Vestibular activation of sympathetic nerve activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, C. A.; Carter, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    AIM: The vestibulosympathetic reflex refers to sympathetic nerve activation by the vestibular system. Animal studies indicate that the vestibular system assists in blood pressure regulation during orthostasis. Although human studies clearly demonstrate activation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) during engagement of the otolith organs, the role of the vestibulosympathetic reflex in maintaining blood pressure during orthostasis is not well-established. Examination of the vestibulosympathetic reflex with other cardiovascular reflexes indicates that it is a powerful and independent reflex. Ageing, which is associated with an increased risk for orthostatic hypotension, attenuates the vestibulosympathetic reflex. The attenuated reflex is associated with a reduction in arterial pressure. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that the vestibulosympathetic reflex assists in blood pressure regulation in humans, but future studies examining this reflex in other orthostatically intolerant populations are necessary to address this hypothesis.

  5. The sympathetic nervous system in hypertension: back to the future?

    PubMed

    Esler, Murray

    2015-02-01

    The seventeenth century London neuroanatomical school headed by Thomas Willis published the first images of the sympathetic nervous system. Nineteenth century European physiologists characterised these as the "pressor nerves". Von Euler's demonstration that the sympathetic transmitter was norepinephrine brought the field into the modern era. Sympathetic nervous system responses are regionally differentiated; human regional sympathetic activity is best studied by recording from postganglionic sympathetic efferents directed to the skeletal muscle vasculature (clinical microneurography) and by measurement of organ-specific norepinephrine release to plasma from sympathetic nerves (regional "norepinephrine spillover"). With these techniques, the sympathetic nervous system became accessible to clinical scientists, allowing the demonstration that sympathetic nervous system activation is crucial in the development and outcomes of cardiovascular disorders, most notably heart failure and essential hypertension. Activation of the renal sympathetic outflow is pivotal in the pathogenesis of essential hypertension. An important goal for clinical scientists is translation of knowledge of pathophysiology, such as this, into better treatment for patients. Although disputed, the case is strong that in hypertension, we are now on the cusp of effective "mechanisms to management" transition, with the use of catheter-based renal sympathetic nerve ablation for treating drug-resistant hypertension.

  6. Cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex and its implications for sympathetic activation in chronic heart failure and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Chen, W-W; Xiong, X-Q; Chen, Q; Li, Y-H; Kang, Y-M; Zhu, G-Q

    2015-04-01

    Persistent excessive sympathetic activation greatly contributes to the pathogenesis of chronic heart failure (CHF) and hypertension. Cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex (CSAR) is a sympathoexcitatory reflex with positive feedback characteristics. Humoral factors such as bradykinin, adenosine and reactive oxygen species produced in myocardium due to myocardial ischaemia stimulate cardiac sympathetic afferents and thereby reflexly increase sympathetic activity and blood pressure. The CSAR is enhanced in myocardial ischaemia, CHF and hypertension. The enhanced CSAR at least partially contributes to the sympathetic activation and pathogenesis of these diseases. Nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and rostral ventrolateral medulla are the most important central sites involved in the modulation and integration of the CSAR. Angiotensin II, AT1 receptors and NAD(P)H oxidase-derived superoxide anions pathway in the PVN are mainly responsible for the enhanced CSAR in CHF and hypertension. Central angiotensin-(1-7), nitric oxide, endothelin, intermedin, hydrogen peroxide and several other signal molecules are involved in regulating CSAR. Blockade of the CSAR shows beneficial effects in CHF and hypertension. This review focuses on the anatomical and physiological basis of the CSAR, the interaction of CSAR with baroreflex and chemoreflex, and the role of enhanced CSAR in the pathogenesis of CHF and hypertension.

  7. Seasonal variation in muscle sympathetic nerve activity.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jian; Muller, Matthew D; Blaha, Cheryl; Kunselman, Allen R; Sinoway, Lawrence I

    2015-08-01

    Epidemiologic data suggest there are seasonal variations in the incidence of severe cardiac events with peak levels being evident in the winter. Whether autonomic indices including muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) vary with season remains unclear. In this report, we tested the hypothesis that resting MSNA varies with the seasons of the year with peak levels evident in the winter. We analyzed the supine resting MSNA in 60 healthy subjects. Each subject was studied during two, three, or four seasons (total 237 visits). MSNA burst rate in the winter (21.0 ± 6.8 burst/min, mean ± SD) was significantly greater than in the summer (13.5 ± 5.8 burst/min, P < 0.001), the spring (17.1 ± 9.0 burst/min, P = 0.03), and the fall (17.9 ± 7.7 burst/min, P = 0.002). There was no significant difference in MSNA for other seasonal comparisons. The results suggest that resting sympathetic nerve activity varies along the seasons, with peak levels evident in the winter. We speculate that the seasonal changes in sympathetic activity may be a contribution to the previously observed seasonal variations in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:26265752

  8. Seasonal variation in muscle sympathetic nerve activity

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jian; Muller, Matthew D; Blaha, Cheryl; Kunselman, Allen R; Sinoway, Lawrence I

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiologic data suggest there are seasonal variations in the incidence of severe cardiac events with peak levels being evident in the winter. Whether autonomic indices including muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) vary with season remains unclear. In this report, we tested the hypothesis that resting MSNA varies with the seasons of the year with peak levels evident in the winter. We analyzed the supine resting MSNA in 60 healthy subjects. Each subject was studied during two, three, or four seasons (total 237 visits). MSNA burst rate in the winter (21.0 ± 6.8 burst/min, mean ± SD) was significantly greater than in the summer (13.5 ± 5.8 burst/min, P < 0.001), the spring (17.1 ± 9.0 burst/min, P = 0.03), and the fall (17.9 ± 7.7 burst/min, P = 0.002). There was no significant difference in MSNA for other seasonal comparisons. The results suggest that resting sympathetic nerve activity varies along the seasons, with peak levels evident in the winter. We speculate that the seasonal changes in sympathetic activity may be a contribution to the previously observed seasonal variations in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:26265752

  9. The 2009 Carl Ludwig Lecture: Pathophysiology of the human sympathetic nervous system in cardiovascular diseases: the transition from mechanisms to medical management.

    PubMed

    Esler, Murray

    2010-02-01

    Sympathetic nervous system responses typically are regionally differentiated, with activation in one outflow sometimes accompanying no change or sympathetic inhibition in another. Regional sympathetic activity is best studied in humans by recording from postganglionic sympathetic efferents (multiunit or single fiber recording) and by isotope dilution-derived measurement of organ-specific norepinephrine release to plasma (regional "norepinephrine spillover"). Evidence assembled in this review indicates that sympathetic nervous system abnormalities are crucial in the development of cardiovascular disorders, notably heart failure, essential hypertension, disorders of postural circulatory control causing syncope, and "psychogenic heart disease," heart disease attributable to mental stress and psychiatric illness. These abnormalities involve persistent, adverse activation of sympathetic outflows to the heart and kidneys in heart failure and hypertension, episodic or ongoing cardiac sympathetic activation in psychogenic heart disease, and defective sympathetic circulatory reflexes in disorders of postural circulatory control. An important goal for clinical scientists is translation of knowledge of pathophysiology, such as this, into better treatment for patients. The achievement of this "mechanisms-to-management" transition is at differing stages of development with the different conditions. Clinical translation is mature in cardiac failure, knowledge of cardiac neural pathophysiology having led to introduction of beta-adrenergic blockers, an effective therapy. With essential hypertension, perhaps we are on the cusp of effective translation, with recent successful testing of selective catheter-based renal sympathetic nerve ablation in patients with resistant hypertension, an intervention firmly based on demonstration of activation of the renal sympathetic outflow. With psychogenic heart disease and postural syncope syndromes, knowledge of the neural pathophysiology is

  10. Chronic intermittent hypoxia increases sympathetic control of blood pressure: role of neuronal activity in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Amanda L; Calderon, Alfredo S; Andrade, Mary Ann; Cunningham, J Thomas; Mifflin, Steven W; Toney, Glenn M

    2013-12-01

    Like humans with sleep apnea, rats exposed to chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) experience arterial hypoxemias and develop hypertension characterized by exaggerated sympathetic nerve activity (SNA). To gain insights into the poorly understood mechanisms that initiate sleep apnea/CIH-associated hypertension, experiments were performed in rats exposed to CIH for only 7 days. Compared with sham-treated normoxic control rats, CIH-exposed rats (n = 8 rats/group) had significantly increased hematocrit (P < 0.001) and mean arterial pressure (MAP; P < 0.05). Blockade of ganglionic transmission caused a significantly (P < 0.05) greater reduction of MAP in rats exposed to CIH than control rats (n = 8 rats/group), indicating a greater contribution of SNA in the support of MAP even at this early stage of CIH hypertension. Chemical inhibition of neuronal discharge in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) (100 pmol muscimol) had no effect on renal SNA but reduced lumbar SNA (P < 0.005) and MAP (P < 0.05) more in CIH-exposed rats (n = 8) than control rats (n = 7), indicating that CIH increased the contribution of PVN neuronal activity in the support of lumbar SNA and MAP. Because CIH activates brain regions controlling body fluid homeostasis, the effects of internal carotid artery injection of hypertonic saline were tested and determined to increase lumbar SNA more (P < 0.05) in CIH-exposed rats than in control rats (n = 9 rats/group). We conclude that neurogenic mechanisms are activated early in the development of CIH hypertension such that elevated MAP relies on increased sympathetic tonus and ongoing PVN neuronal activity. The increased sensitivity of Na(+)/osmosensitive circuitry in CIH-exposed rats suggests that early neuroadaptive responses among body fluid regulatory neurons could contribute to the initiation of CIH hypertension. PMID:24097432

  11. Electroacupuncture at ST25 inhibits jejunal motility: Role of sympathetic pathways and TRPV1

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhi; Zhang, Na; Lu, Chun-Xia; Pang, Ting-Ting; Wang, Kai-Yue; Jiang, Jing-Feng; Zhu, Bing; Xu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether electroacupuncture (EA) at ST25 affects jejunal motility in vivo and if so, whether a sympathetic pathway is involved. METHODS: Jejunal motility was assessed using a manometric balloon placed in the jejunum approximately about 3-5 cm away from the suspensory ligament of the duodenum in anesthetized animals. The effects of EA at ST25 were measured in male Sprague-Dawley rats, some of which were treated with propranolol or clenbuterol (EA intensities: 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9 mA), and in male transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) (capsaicin receptor) knockout mice (EA intensities: 1, 2, and 4 mA). RESULTS: Anesthetized rats exhibited three types of fasting jejunal motor patterns (types A, B, and C), and only type C rats responded to EA stimulation. In type C rats, EA at ST25 significantly suppressed the motor activity of the jejunum in an intensity-dependent manner. The inhibitory effect of EA was weakened by propranolol (β adrenoceptor antagonist) and disappeared with clenbuterol (β adrenoceptor agonist) induced inhibition of motility, suggesting that the effect of EA on motility is mediated via a sympathetic pathway. Compared with wild-type mice, EA at ST25 was less effective in TRPV1 knockout mice, suggesting that this multi-modal sensor channel participates in the mechanism. CONCLUSION: EA at ST25 was found to inhibit jejunal motility in an intensity-dependent manner, via a mechanism in which sympathetic nerves and TRPV1 receptors play an important role. PMID:26855542

  12. Heat transfer through dipolar coupling: Sympathetic cooling without contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renklioglu, B.; Tanatar, B.; Oktel, M. Ã.-.

    2016-02-01

    We consider two parallel layers of dipolar ultracold Fermi gases at different temperatures and calculate the heat transfer between them. The effective interactions describing screening and correlation effects between the dipoles in a single layer are modeled within the Euler-Lagrange Fermi-hypernetted-chain approximation. The random-phase approximation is used for the interactions across the layers. We investigate the amount of transferred power between the layers as a function of the temperature difference. Energy transfer arises due to the long-range dipole-dipole interactions. A simple thermal model is established to investigate the feasibility of using the contactless sympathetic cooling of the ultracold polar atoms and molecules. Our calculations indicate that dipolar heat transfer is effective for typical polar molecule experiments and may be utilized as a cooling process.

  13. Radionuclide imaging of cardiac sympathetic innervation in heart failure: unlocking untapped potential.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shuchita; Amanullah, Aman

    2015-03-01

    Heart failure (HF) is associated with sympathetic overactivity, which contributes to disease progression and arrhythmia development. Cardiac sympathetic innervation imaging can be performed using radiotracers that are taken up in the presynaptic nerve terminal of sympathetic nerves. The commonly used radiotracers are (123)I-metaiodobenzylguanidine ((123)I-mIBG) for planar and single-photon emission computed tomography imaging, and (11)C-hydroxyephedrine for positron emission tomography imaging. Sympathetic innervation imaging has been used in assessing prognosis, response to treatment, risk of ventricular arrhythmias and sudden death and prediction of response to cardiac resynchronization therapy in patients with HF. Other potential applications of these techniques are in patients with chemotherapy-induced cardiomyopathy, predicting myocardial recovery in patients with left ventricular assist devices, and assessing reinnervation following cardiac transplantation. There is a lack of standardization with respect to technique of (123)I-mIBG imaging that needs to be overcome for the imaging modality to gain popularity in clinical practice.

  14. Informational basis of sensory adaptation: entropy and single-spike efficiency in rat barrel cortex.

    PubMed

    Adibi, Mehdi; Clifford, Colin W G; Arabzadeh, Ehsan

    2013-09-11

    We showed recently that exposure to whisker vibrations enhances coding efficiency in rat barrel cortex despite increasing correlations in variability (Adibi et al., 2013). Here, to understand how adaptation achieves this improvement in sensory representation, we decomposed the stimulus information carried in neuronal population activity into its fundamental components in the framework of information theory. In the context of sensory coding, these components are the entropy of the responses across the entire stimulus set (response entropy) and the entropy of the responses conditional on the stimulus (conditional response entropy). We found that adaptation decreased response entropy and conditional response entropy at both the level of single neurons and the pooled activity of neuronal populations. However, the net effect of adaptation was to increase the mutual information because the drop in the conditional entropy outweighed the drop in the response entropy. The information transmitted by a single spike also increased under adaptation. As population size increased, the information content of individual spikes declined but the relative improvement attributable to adaptation was maintained.

  15. Single dose toxicity study of IRDye 800CW in Sprague-Dawley rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Milton V.; Draney, Daniel; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.; Olive, D. Michael

    2010-02-01

    Fluorophore-labeled contrast imaging agents are moving toward clinical use as aids in nodal staging and intraoperative resection of tumors. Near-infrared fluorophores with defined toxicity properties will be needed before these agents can be translated to the clinic. The near-infrared dye IRDye 800CW is frequently used in its N-hydroxysuccinamide (NHS) ester form for labeling these agents. Following conjugation or breakdown of a labeled ligand, excess NHS ester is converted to the carboxylate form. We report here the results of a preliminary toxicity study on IRDye 800CW carboxylate in preparation for its use as a labeling moiety for targeted contrast agents. Male and female Sprague Dawley rats were given a single intravenous or intradermal administration of IRDye 800CW carboxylate; indocyanine green was used as a comparative control. Following administration of varying doses of either the dyes or saline, animals were observed for up to fourteen days during which time, hematological, clinical chemistry, enzymological, and histological testing was performed on animal subgroups. Under the conditions tested, a single administration of IRDye 800CW carboxylate intravenously at dose levels of 1, 5 and 20 mg/kg or 20 mg/kg intradermally produced no pathological evidence of toxicity. A dose of 20 mg/kg was identified as the NOAEL (no observed adverse effect level) following IV or ID routes of administration of IRDye 800CW.

  16. The sympathetic nervous system alterations in human hypertension.

    PubMed

    Grassi, Guido; Mark, Allyn; Esler, Murray

    2015-03-13

    Several articles have dealt with the importance and mechanisms of the sympathetic nervous system alterations in experimental animal models of hypertension. This review addresses the role of the sympathetic nervous system in the pathophysiology and therapy of human hypertension. We first discuss the strengths and limitations of various techniques for assessing the sympathetic nervous system in humans, with a focus on heart rate, plasma norepinephrine, microneurographic recording of sympathetic nerve traffic, and measurements of radiolabeled norepinephrine spillover. We then examine the evidence supporting the importance of neuroadrenergic factors as promoters and amplifiers of human hypertension. We expand on the role of the sympathetic nervous system in 2 increasingly common forms of secondary hypertension, namely hypertension associated with obesity and with renal disease. With this background, we examine interventions of sympathetic deactivation as a mode of antihypertensive treatment. Particular emphasis is given to the background and results of recent therapeutic approaches based on carotid baroreceptor stimulation and radiofrequency ablation of the renal nerves.

  17. Determination of Site of Absorption of Propranolol in Rat Gut Using In Situ Single-Pass Intestinal Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Nagare, N.; Damre, Anagha; Singh, K. S.; Mallurwar, S. R.; Iyer, Seethalakshmi; Naik, A.; Chintamaneni, Meena

    2010-01-01

    Previously, permeability and site of intestinal absorption of propranolol have been reported using the Ussing chamber. In the present study, the utility of Single-Pass Intestinal Perfusion to study permeability and site of intestinal absorption of propranolol was evaluated in rats. Drug permeability in different regions of rat intestine viz. duodenum, jejunum, ileum and colon was measured. Propranolol (30 μg/ml) solution was perfused in situ in each intestinal segment of rats. Effective permeability (Peff) of propranolol in each segment was calculated and site of absorption was determined. The Peff of propranolol in rat duodenum, jejunum, ileum and colon was calculated to be 0.3316×10-4 cm/s, 0.4035×10-4cm/s, 0.5092×10-4 cm/s and 0.7167×10-4 cm/s, respectively. The above results suggest that permeability of propranolol was highest through colon compared to other intestinal sites, which is in close agreement to that reported previously. In conclusion, in situ single pass intestinal perfusion can be used effectively to study intestinal permeability as well as site of intestinal absorption of compounds in rats. PMID:21694996

  18. Determination of site of absorption of propranolol in rat gut using in situ single-pass intestinal perfusion.

    PubMed

    Nagare, N; Damre, Anagha; Singh, K S; Mallurwar, S R; Iyer, Seethalakshmi; Naik, A; Chintamaneni, Meena

    2010-09-01

    Previously, permeability and site of intestinal absorption of propranolol have been reported using the Ussing chamber. In the present study, the utility of Single-Pass Intestinal Perfusion to study permeability and site of intestinal absorption of propranolol was evaluated in rats. Drug permeability in different regions of rat intestine viz. duodenum, jejunum, ileum and colon was measured. Propranolol (30 μg/ml) solution was perfused in situ in each intestinal segment of rats. Effective permeability (Peff) of propranolol in each segment was calculated and site of absorption was determined. The Peff of propranolol in rat duodenum, jejunum, ileum and colon was calculated to be 0.3316×10(-4) cm/s, 0.4035×10(-4)cm/s, 0.5092×10(-4) cm/s and 0.7167×10(-4) cm/s, respectively. The above results suggest that permeability of propranolol was highest through colon compared to other intestinal sites, which is in close agreement to that reported previously. In conclusion, in situ single pass intestinal perfusion can be used effectively to study intestinal permeability as well as site of intestinal absorption of compounds in rats.

  19. Reflex sympathetic dystrophies and algodystrophies: historical and pathogenic considerations.

    PubMed

    Procacci, P; Maresca, M

    1987-11-01

    This paper reviews the historical development of the concepts of 'sympathy' of organs and of the sympathetic nervous system. In particular, the afferent function of the sympathetic system is discussed. The attention is focussed on sympathetic reflex dystrophies, known in some European schools as 'algodystrophies'. The pathogenic mechanisms of these affections, especially of causalgia, are discussed, considering the importance of peripheral damage to nerves, lateralisation of pain, 'mirror phenomena', and the relationship between peripheral and central mechanisms of pain.

  20. Blockade by local anaesthetics of the single Ca(2+)-activated K+ channel in rat hippocampal neurones.

    PubMed

    Oda, M; Yoshida, A; Ikemoto, Y

    1992-01-01

    1. Effects of local anaesthetics on single Ca(2+)-activated K+ channels were investigated using the inside-out configuration of the patch-clamp technique in single pyramidal neurones, which were freshly dissociated from rat hippocampus by use of proteolytic enzymes. 2. No significant effect was observed when 2 mM benzocaine was applied on either side of the membrane patch, or when 2 mM lignocaine or QX-314 was applied to the external surface of the membrane. 3. Lignocaine 1 mM, applied to the internal surface, slightly reduced the amplitude of the single K+ channel current. When applied to the internal surface QX-314 reduced the amplitude of the K+ channel current, accompanied by an increase in noise in the open channel current, suggesting a fast flickering block. The blocking effect of QX-314 on the outward current increased with depolarization, suggesting a binding site for the drug at an electrical distance of about 0.5 across the membrane field. 4. The open time histogram showed one exponential component and the closed time histogram showed at least two components. The mean open time of the outward current was increased when the amplitude was reduced by the drugs. 5. The ionized form of the local anaesthetics had a similar action on the Ca(2+)-activated K+ channels to that on Na+ channels, that is, they enter into the channel from the cytoplasmic side to induce open channel block. The blocking kinetics, however, might be so fast that they were beyond the frequency response of our recording apparatus, thus the recorded current amplitude was decreased. In contrast the K+ channel was not accessible via hydrophobic pathways for the neutral form, which is also known to block the sodium channel.

  1. Sequential morphologic analysis of the nephrotoxicity produced in rats by single doses of chlorozotocin.

    PubMed

    Dees, J H; Kramer, R A

    1986-01-01

    Chlorozotocin is a chloroethylnitrosourea antitumor agent that is in clinical trial for a variety of human tumors. Renal failure has been a reported side effect of treatment with several of the chloroethylnitrosoureas, including chlorozotocin. To better understand the pathogenesis of this target organ toxicity, we have studied the nephrotoxicity of a single high, intermediate, or low dose of chlorozotocin in male F344 rats. We report here the sequence of histopathologic changes seen over a 1-10-day (high dose) or 1-28-day (intermediate or low dose) period. The single high dose (40 mg/kg, s.c.) produced an acute cortical necrosis involving the proximal tubules, followed by later necrotic changes in the collecting ducts in the inner medulla. Karyomegaly was noted at 10 days in occasional cells of the papillary collecting ducts and urinary epithelium lining the papilla. A single intermediate dose (25 mg/kg, s.c.) caused a similar but less severe injury of later onset. Proximal tubule injury was less severe and more limited. Necrosis of papillary collecting ducts was not seen; however, karyomegaly was pronounced in cells of the collecting ducts in the inner stripe of the outer medulla and inner medulla, and in the urinary epithelium covering the papilla. No discernible histopathology was present following the low dose (12.5 mg/kg, s.c.) of chlorozotocin. The histopathology was correlated with biochemical parameters. Our findings have possible implications for monitoring the severity of nephrotoxic side effects in patients, as well as provide preliminary evidence that this antineoplastic agent may itself cause preneoplastic changes, a finding with important long term implications.

  2. Dynamic trajectory of multiple single-unit activity during working memory task in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaofan; Yi, Hu; Bai, Wenwen; Tian, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Working memory plays an important role in complex cognitive tasks. A popular theoretical view is that transient properties of neuronal dynamics underlie cognitive processing. The question raised here as to how the transient dynamics evolve in working memory. To address this issue, we investigated the multiple single-unit activity dynamics in rat medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) during a Y-maze working memory task. The approach worked by reconstructing state space from delays of the original single-unit firing rate variables, which were further analyzed using kernel principal component analysis (KPCA). Then the neural trajectories were obtained to visualize the multiple single-unit activity. Furthermore, the maximal Lyapunov exponent (MLE) was calculated to quantitatively evaluate the neural trajectories during the working memory task. The results showed that the neuronal activity produced stable and reproducible neural trajectories in the correct trials while showed irregular trajectories in the incorrect trials, which may establish a link between the neurocognitive process and behavioral performance in working memory. The MLEs significantly increased during working memory in the correctly performed trials, indicating an increased divergence of the neural trajectories. In the incorrect trials, the MLEs were nearly zero and remained unchanged during the task. Taken together, the trial-specific neural trajectory provides an effective way to track the instantaneous state of the neuronal population during the working memory task and offers valuable insights into working memory function. The MLE describes the changes of neural dynamics in working memory and may reflect different neuronal population states in working memory. PMID:26441626

  3. Single rapamycin administration induces prolonged downward shift in defended body weight in rats.

    PubMed

    Hebert, Mark; Licursi, Maria; Jensen, Brittany; Baker, Ashley; Milway, Steve; Malsbury, Charles; Grant, Virginia L; Adamec, Robert; Hirasawa, Michiru; Blundell, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    Manipulation of body weight set point may be an effective weight loss and maintenance strategy as the homeostatic mechanism governing energy balance remains intact even in obese conditions and counters the effort to lose weight. However, how the set point is determined is not well understood. We show that a single injection of rapamycin (RAP), an mTOR inhibitor, is sufficient to shift the set point in rats. Intraperitoneal RAP decreased food intake and daily weight gain for several days, but surprisingly, there was also a long-term reduction in body weight which lasted at least 10 weeks without additional RAP injection. These effects were not due to malaise or glucose intolerance. Two RAP administrations with a two-week interval had additive effects on body weight without desensitization and significantly reduced the white adipose tissue weight. When challenged with food deprivation, vehicle and RAP-treated rats responded with rebound hyperphagia, suggesting that RAP was not inhibiting compensatory responses to weight loss. Instead, RAP animals defended a lower body weight achieved after RAP treatment. Decreased food intake and body weight were also seen with intracerebroventricular injection of RAP, indicating that the RAP effect is at least partially mediated by the brain. In summary, we found a novel effect of RAP that maintains lower body weight by shifting the set point long-term. Thus, RAP and related compounds may be unique tools to investigate the mechanisms by which the defended level of body weight is determined; such compounds may also be used to complement weight loss strategy.

  4. Valsalva maneuver: Insights into baroreflex modulation of human sympathetic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael L.; Eckberg, Dwain L.; Fritsch, Janice M.; Beightol, Larry A.; Ellenbogen, Kenneth A.

    1991-01-01

    Valsalva's maneuver, voluntary forced expiration against a closed glottis, is a well-characterized research tool, used to assess the integrity of human autonomic cardiovascular control. Valsalva straining provokes a stereotyped succession of alternating positive and negative arterial pressure and heart rate changes mediated in part by arterial baroreceptors. Arterial pressure changes result primarily from fluctuating levels of venous return to the heart and changes of sympathetic nerve activity. Muscle sympathetic activity was measured directly in nine volunteers to explore quantitatively the relation between arterial pressure and human sympathetic outflow during pressure transients provoked by controlled graded Valsalva maneuvers. Our results underscore several properties of sympathetic regulation during Valsalva straining. First, muscle sympathetic nerve activity changes as a mirror image of changes in arterial pressure. Second, the magnitude of sympathetic augmentation during Valsalva straining predicts phase 4 arterial pressure elevations. Third, post-Valsalva sympathetic inhibition persists beyond the return of arterial and right atrial pressures to baseline levels which reflects an alteration of the normal relation between arterial pressure and muscle sympathetic activity. Therefore, Valsalva straining may have some utility for investigating changes of reflex control of sympathetic activity after space flight; however, measurement of beat-to-beat arterial pressure is essential for this use. The utility of this technique in microgravity can not be determined from these data. Further investigations are necessary to determine whether these relations are affected by the expansion of intrathoracic blood volume associated with microgravity.

  5. Single whole-body exposure to sarin vapor in rats: Long-term neuronal and behavioral deficits

    SciTech Connect

    Grauer, Ettie Chapman, Shira; Rabinovitz, Ishai; Raveh, Lily; Weissman, Ben-Avi; Kadar, Tamar; Allon, Nahum

    2008-03-01

    Freely moving rats were exposed to sarin vapor (34.2 {+-} 0.8 {mu}g/l) for 10 min. Mortality at 24 h was 35% and toxic sings in the surviving rats ranged from sever (prolonged convulsions) through moderate to almost no overt signs. Some of the surviving rats developed delayed, intermittent convulsions. All rats were evaluated for long-term functional deficits in comparison to air-exposed control rats. Histological analysis revealed typical cell loss at 1 week post inhalation exposure. Neuronal inflammation was demonstrated by a 20-fold increase in prostaglandin (PGE{sub 2}) levels 24 h following exposure that markedly decreased 6 days later. An additional, delayed increase in PGE{sub 2} was detected at 1 month and continued to increase for up to 6 months post exposure. Glial activation following neural damage was demonstrated by an elevated level of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (PBR) seen in the brain 4 and 6 months after exposure. At the same time muscarinic receptors were unaffected. Six weeks, four and six months post exposure behavioral evaluations were performed. In the open field, sarin-exposed rats showed a significant increase in overall activity with no habituation over days. In a working memory paradigm in the water maze, these same rats showed impaired working and reference memory processes with no recovery. Our data suggest long lasting impairment of brain functions in surviving rats following a single sarin exposure. Animals that seem to fully recover from the exposure, and even animals that initially show no toxicity signs, developed some adverse neural changes with time.

  6. Structural and functional studies of the rat mitochondrial single strand DNA binding protein P16.

    PubMed

    Hoke, G D; Pavco, P A; Ledwith, B J; Van Tuyle, G C

    1990-10-01

    The rat mitochondrial single strand DNA binding protein (SSB) P16 was purified to apparent homogeneity by elution from single strand DNA agarose with ethidium bromide. Each monomer of P16 contains two tryptophan residues, and the intrinsic fluorescence from these residues is quenched upon binding to single strand polynucleotides. From fluorescence quench titrations of ligand to fixed amounts of DNA lattice, a binding site size of 8 or 9 nucleotides per P16 monomer was found. Measurement of the affinity of P16 for isolated sites by titration with either oligo(dT)8 or 5'-dephosphorylated oligo(dT)8 indicated values on the order of 10(7) M-1. P16 exhibited a binding preference for single strand DNA, poly(dT), and poly(dC) in comparison to double strand DNA, poly(U), or poly[d(A-T)]. Although it was not possible to show that P16 destabilizes double helical DNA or even poly[d(A-T)], binding of P16 does inhibit the process of renaturation as shown by inhibition of duplex formation between poly(dA) and poly(dT). The binding of saturating amounts of P16 to single strand poly(dT).oligo(dA)50 template-primers enhanced approximately 10-fold the activity of both the homologous mitochondrial DNA polymerase and the Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I Klenow fragment. However, the mitochondrial DNA primase was nearly completely inhibited by the saturation of the poly(dT) template with P16. Amino-terminal sequence analysis of P16 and a protease-insensitive, DNA binding domain (Mr approximately 6000) revealed that the DNA binding domain residues, at least in part, in the amino-terminal third of the P16 molecule. Furthermore, the amino-terminal sequence was found to be strikingly similar to that of the Xenopus laevis mtSSB-1 and to a lesser extent similar to E. coli SSB and E. coli F sex factor SSB.

  7. Sympathetic activity–associated periodic repolarization dynamics predict mortality following myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Rizas, Konstantinos D.; Nieminen, Tuomo; Barthel, Petra; Zürn, Christine S.; Kähönen, Mika; Viik, Jari; Lehtimäki, Terho; Nikus, Kjell; Eick, Christian; Greiner, Tim O.; Wendel, Hans P.; Seizer, Peter; Schreieck, Jürgen; Gawaz, Meinrad; Schmidt, Georg; Bauer, Axel

    2014-01-01

    Background. Enhanced sympathetic activity at the ventricular myocardium can destabilize repolarization, increasing the risk of death. Sympathetic activity is known to cluster in low-frequency bursts; therefore, we hypothesized that sympathetic activity induces periodic low-frequency changes of repolarization. We developed a technique to assess the sympathetic effect on repolarization and identified periodic components in the low-frequency spectral range (≤0.1 Hz), which we termed periodic repolarization dynamics (PRD). Methods. We investigated the physiological properties of PRD in multiple experimental studies, including a swine model of steady-state ventilation (n = 7) and human studies involving fixed atrial pacing (n = 10), passive head-up tilt testing (n = 11), low-intensity exercise testing (n = 11), and beta blockade (n = 10). We tested the prognostic power of PRD in 908 survivors of acute myocardial infarction (MI). Finally, we tested the predictive values of PRD and T-wave alternans (TWA) in 2,965 patients undergoing clinically indicated exercise testing. Results. PRD was not related to underlying respiratory activity (P < 0.001) or heart-rate variability (P = 0.002). Furthermore, PRD was enhanced by activation of the sympathetic nervous system, and pharmacological blockade of sympathetic nervous system activity suppressed PRD (P ≤ 0.005 for both). Increased PRD was the strongest single risk predictor of 5-year total mortality (hazard ratio 4.75, 95% CI 2.94–7.66; P < 0.001) after acute MI. In patients undergoing exercise testing, the predictive value of PRD was strong and complementary to that of TWA. Conclusion. We have described and identified low-frequency rhythmic modulations of repolarization that are associated with sympathetic activity. Increased PRD can be used as a predictor of mortality in survivors of acute MI and patients undergoing exercise testing. Trial registration. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00196274. Funding. This study was funded by

  8. From one generation to the next: a comprehensive account of sympathetic receptor control in branching arteriolar trees.

    PubMed

    Al-Khazraji, Baraa K; Saleem, Amani; Goldman, Daniel; Jackson, Dwayne N

    2015-07-15

    The effect of the sympathetic nervous system on blood flow distribution within skeletal muscle microvasculature is conditional upon regional activation of receptors for sympathetic neurotransmitters. Previous studies have shown that proximal arterioles are largely governed by adrenergic activation, whereas it is speculated that distal branches are controlled by peptidergic and purinergic activation. However, no study has systematically evaluated the activation of adrenergic, peptidergic and purinergic receptors in continuously branching arteriolar trees of an individual skeletal muscle model. Therefore, in the present study, sympathetic agonists were used to evaluate the constriction responses along first to fifth order arterioles in continuously branching arteriolar trees of a in vivo rat gluteus maximus muscle preparation with respect to specific activation of receptors for sympathetic neurotransmitters (α1R, α2R, NPY1R and P2X1R). Constriction responses were incorporated into a mathematical blood flow model to estimate the total flow, resistance and red blood cell flow heterogeneity within a computationally reconstructed gluteus maximus arteriolar network. For the first time, the effects of activating receptors for sympathetic neurotransmitters on vasoconstrictor responses and the ensuing haemodynamics in continuously branching arteriolar trees of skeletal muscle were characterized, where proximal arterioles responded most to α1R and α2R adrenergic activation, whereas distal arterioles responded most to Y1R and P2X1R activation. Total flow and resistance changed with activation of all receptors, whereas red blood cell flow heterogeneity was largely affected by peptidergic and purinergic activation in distal arterioles. The reported data highlight the functional consequences of topologically-dependent sympathetic control and may serve as novel input parameters in computational modelling of network flow. PMID:25952132

  9. Atrophy and neuron loss: effects of a protein-deficient diet on sympathetic neurons.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Silvio Pires; Nyengaard, Jens Randel; Misawa, Rúbia; Girotti, Priscila Azevedo; Castelucci, Patrìcia; Blazquez, Francisco Hernandez Javier; de Melo, Mariana Pereira; Ribeiro, Antonio Augusto Coppi

    2009-12-01

    Protein deficiency is one of the biggest public health problems in the world, accounting for about 30-40% of hospital admissions in developing countries. Nutritional deficiencies lead to alterations in the peripheral nervous system and in the digestive system. Most studies have focused on the effects of protein-deficient diets on the enteric neurons, but not on sympathetic ganglia, which supply extrinsic sympathetic input to the digestive system. Hence, in this study, we investigated whether a protein-restricted diet would affect the quantitative structure of rat coeliac ganglion neurons. Five male Wistar rats (undernourished group) were given a pre- and postnatal hypoproteinic diet receiving 5% casein, whereas the nourished group (n = 5) was fed with 20% casein (normoproteinic diet). Blood tests were carried out on the animals, e.g., glucose, leptin, and triglyceride plasma concentrations. The main structural findings in this study were that a protein-deficient diet (5% casein) caused coeliac ganglion (78%) and coeliac ganglion neurons (24%) to atrophy and led to neuron loss (63%). Therefore, the fall in the total number of coeliac ganglion neurons in protein-restricted rats contrasts strongly with no neuron losses previously described for the enteric neurons of animals subjected to similar protein-restriction diets. Discrepancies between our figures and the data for enteric neurons (using very similar protein-restriction protocols) may be attributable to the counting method used. In light of this, further systematic investigations comparing 2-D and 3-D quantitative methods are warranted to provide even more advanced data on the effects that a protein-deficient diet may exert on sympathetic neurons. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Hibernating myocardium results in partial sympathetic denervation and nerve sprouting.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Stanley F; Ovchinnikov, Vladislav; Canty, John M; Fallavollita, James A

    2013-01-15

    Hibernating myocardium due to chronic repetitive ischemia is associated with regional sympathetic nerve dysfunction and spontaneous arrhythmic death in the absence of infarction. Although inhomogeneity in regional sympathetic innervation is an acknowledged substrate for sudden death, the mechanism(s) responsible for these abnormalities in viable, dysfunctional myocardium (i.e., neural stunning vs. sympathetic denervation) and their association with nerve sprouting are unknown. Accordingly, markers of sympathetic nerve function and nerve sprouting were assessed in subendocardial tissue collected from chronically instrumented pigs with hibernating myocardium (n = 18) as well as sham-instrumented controls (n = 7). Hibernating myocardium exhibited evidence of partial sympathetic denervation compared with the normally perfused region and sham controls, with corresponding regional reductions in tyrosine hydroxylase protein (-32%, P < 0.001), norepinephrine uptake transport protein (-25%, P = 0.01), and tissue norepinephrine content (-45%, P < 0.001). Partial denervation induced nerve sprouting with regional increases in nerve growth factor precursor protein (31%, P = 0.01) and growth associated protein-43 (38%, P < 0.05). All of the changes in sympathetic nerve markers were similar in animals that developed sudden death (n = 9) compared with electively terminated pigs with hibernating myocardium (n = 9). In conclusion, sympathetic nerve dysfunction in hibernating myocardium is most consistent with partial sympathetic denervation and is associated with regional nerve sprouting. The extent of sympathetic remodeling is similar in animals that develop sudden death compared with survivors; this suggests that sympathetic remodeling in hibernating myocardium is not an independent trigger for sudden death. Nevertheless, sympathetic remodeling likely contributes to electrical instability in combination with other factors.

  11. The Human Sympathetic Nervous System Response to Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ertl, Andrew C.; Diedrich, Andre; Paranjape, Sachin Y.; Biaggioni, Italo; Robertson, Rose Marie; Lane, Lynda D.; Shiavi, Richard; Robertson, David

    2003-01-01

    The sympathetic nervous system is an important part of the autonomic (or automatic) nervous system. When an individual stands up, the sympathetic nervous system speeds the heart and constricts blood vessels to prevent a drop in blood pressure. A significant number of astronauts experience a drop in blood pressure when standing for prolonged periods after they return from spaceflight. Difficulty maintaining blood pressure with standing is also a daily problem for many patients. Indirect evidence available before the Neurolab mission suggested the problem in astronauts while in space might be due partially to reduced sympathetic nervous system activity. The purpose of this experiment was to identify whether sympathetic activity was reduced during spaceflight. Sympathetic nervous system activity can be determined in part by measuring heart rate, nerve activity going to blood vessels, and the release of the hormone norepinephrine into the blood. Norepinephrine is a neurotransmitter discharged from active sympathetic nerve terminals, so its rate of release can serve as a marker of sympathetic nervous system action. In addition to standard cardiovascular measurements (heart rate, blood pressure), we determined sympathetic nerve activity as well as norepinephrine release and clearance on four crewmembers on the Neurolab mission. Contrary to our expectation, the results demonstrated that the astronauts had mildly elevated resting sympathetic nervous system activity in space. Sympathetic nervous system responses to stresses that simulated the cardiovascular effects of standing (lower body negative pressure) were brisk both during and after spaceflight. We concluded that, in the astronauts tested, the activity and response of the sympathetic nervous system to cardiovascular stresses appeared intact and mildly elevated both during and after spaceflight. These changes returned to normal within a few days.

  12. Dysregulation of Neuronal Ca2+ Channel Linked to Heightened Sympathetic Phenotype in Prohypertensive States

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Hege E.; Bardsley, Emma N.; Lefkimmiatis, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is associated with impaired nitric oxide (NO)–cyclic nucleotide (CN)-coupled intracellular calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis that enhances cardiac sympathetic neurotransmission. Because neuronal membrane Ca2+ currents are reduced by NO-activated S-nitrosylation, we tested whether CNs affect membrane channel conductance directly in neurons isolated from the stellate ganglia of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) and their normotensive controls. Using voltage-clamp and cAMP–protein kinase A (PKA) FRET sensors, we hypothesized that impaired CN regulation provides a direct link to abnormal signaling of neuronal calcium channels in the SHR and that targeting cGMP can restore the channel phenotype. We found significantly larger whole-cell Ca2+ currents from diseased neurons that were largely mediated by the N-type Ca2+ channel (Cav2.2). Elevating cGMP restored the SHR Ca2+ current to levels seen in normal neurons that were not affected by cGMP. cGMP also decreased cAMP levels and PKA activity in diseased neurons. In contrast, cAMP–PKA activity was increased in normal neurons, suggesting differential switching in phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity. PDE2A inhibition enhanced the Ca2+ current in normal neurons to a conductance similar to that seen in SHR neurons, whereas the inhibitor slightly decreased the current in diseased neurons. Pharmacological evidence supported a switching from cGMP acting via PDE3 in control neurons to PDE2A in SHR neurons in the modulation of the Ca2+ current. Our data suggest that a disturbance in the regulation of PDE-coupled CNs linked to N-type Ca2+ channels is an early hallmark of the prohypertensive phenotype associated with intracellular Ca2+ impairment underpinning sympathetic dysautonomia. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Here, we identify dysregulation of cyclic-nucleotide (CN)-linked neuronal Ca2+ channel activity that could provide the trigger for the enhanced sympathetic neurotransmission observed in the prohypertensive state

  13. Single-channel currents from diethylpyrocarbonate-modified NMDA receptors in cultured rat brain cortical neurons

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The role of histidine residues in the function of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-activated channels was tested with the histidine-modifying reagent diethylpyrocarbonate (DEP) applied to cells and membrane patches from rat brain cortical neurons in culture. Channels in excised outside-out patches that were treated with 3 mM DEP for 15-30 s (pH 6.5) showed an average 3.4-fold potentiation in steady state open probability when exposed to NMDA and glycine. Analysis of the underlying alterations in channel gating revealed no changes in the numbers of kinetic states: distributions of open intervals were fitted with three exponential components, and four components described the shut intervals, in both control and DEP-modified channels. However, the distribution of shut intervals was obviously different after DEP treatment, consistent with the single-channel current record. After modification, the proportion of long shut states was decreased while the time constants were largely unaffected. Burst kinetics reflected these effects with an increase in the average number of openings/burst from 1.5 (control) to 2.2 (DEP), and a decrease in the average interburst interval from 54.1 to 38.2 ms. These effects were most likely due to histidine modification because other reagents (n- acetylimidazole and 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene 1-sulfonic acid) that are specific for residues other than histidine failed to reproduce the effects of DEP, whereas hydroxylamine could restore channel open probability to control levels. In contrast to these effects on channel gating, DEP had no effect on average single-channel conductance or reversal potential under bi-ionic (Na+:Cs+) conditions. Inhibition by zinc was also unaffected by DEP. We propose a channel gating model in which transitions between single- and multi-opening burst modes give rise to the channel activity observed under steady state conditions. When adjusted to account for the effects of DEP, this model suggests that one or more

  14. Blood glucose level and lipid profile of alloxan-induced hyperglycemic rats treated with single and combinatorial herbal formulations

    PubMed Central

    Ojiako, Okey A.; Chikezie, Paul C.; Ogbuji, Agomuo C.

    2015-01-01

    The current study sought to investigate the capacities of single and combinatorial herbal formulations of leaf extracts of Acanthus montanus, Asystasia gangetica, Emilia coccinea, and Hibiscus rosasinensis to reverse hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia in alloxan-induced diabetic male rats. Phytochemical composition of the herbal extracts, fasting plasma glucose concentration (FPGC), and serum lipid profile (SLP) of the rats were measured by standard methods. The relative abundance of phytochemicals in the four experimental leaf extracts was in the following order: flavonoids > alkaloids > saponins > tannins. Hyperglycemic rats (HyGR) treated with single and combinatorial herbal formulations showed evidence of reduced FPGC compared with the untreated HyGR and were normoglycemic (FPGC < 110.0 mg/dL). Similarly, HyGR treated with single and combinatorial herbal formulations showed evidence of readjustments in their SLPs. Generally, HyGR treated with triple herbal formulations (THfs) exhibited the highest atherogenic index compared with HyGR treated with single herbal formulations (SHfs), double herbal formulations (DHfs), and quadruple herbal formulation (QHf). The display of synergy or antagonism by the composite herbal extracts in ameliorating hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia depended on the type and number of individual herbal extract used in constituting the experimental herbal formulations. Furthermore, the capacities of the herbal formulations (SHfs, DHfs, THfs, and QHf) to exert glycemic control and reverse dyslipidemia did not follow predictable patterns in the animal models. PMID:27114943

  15. Blood glucose level and lipid profile of alloxan-induced hyperglycemic rats treated with single and combinatorial herbal formulations.

    PubMed

    Ojiako, Okey A; Chikezie, Paul C; Ogbuji, Agomuo C

    2016-04-01

    The current study sought to investigate the capacities of single and combinatorial herbal formulations of leaf extracts of Acanthus montanus, Asystasia gangetica, Emilia coccinea, and Hibiscus rosasinensis to reverse hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia in alloxan-induced diabetic male rats. Phytochemical composition of the herbal extracts, fasting plasma glucose concentration (FPGC), and serum lipid profile (SLP) of the rats were measured by standard methods. The relative abundance of phytochemicals in the four experimental leaf extracts was in the following order: flavonoids > alkaloids > saponins > tannins. Hyperglycemic rats (HyGR) treated with single and combinatorial herbal formulations showed evidence of reduced FPGC compared with the untreated HyGR and were normoglycemic (FPGC < 110.0 mg/dL). Similarly, HyGR treated with single and combinatorial herbal formulations showed evidence of readjustments in their SLPs. Generally, HyGR treated with triple herbal formulations (THfs) exhibited the highest atherogenic index compared with HyGR treated with single herbal formulations (SHfs), double herbal formulations (DHfs), and quadruple herbal formulation (QHf). The display of synergy or antagonism by the composite herbal extracts in ameliorating hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia depended on the type and number of individual herbal extract used in constituting the experimental herbal formulations. Furthermore, the capacities of the herbal formulations (SHfs, DHfs, THfs, and QHf) to exert glycemic control and reverse dyslipidemia did not follow predictable patterns in the animal models. PMID:27114943

  16. In vivo genotoxicity study of single-wall carbon nanotubes using comet assay following intratracheal instillation in rats.

    PubMed

    Naya, Masato; Kobayashi, Norihiro; Endoh, Shigehisa; Maru, Junko; Honda, Kazumasa; Ema, Makoto; Tanaka, Jin; Fukumuro, Masahito; Hasegawa, Kazushige; Nakajima, Madoka; Hayashi, Makoto; Nakanishi, Junko

    2012-10-01

    The genotoxicity of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) was evaluated in vivo using the comet assay after intratracheal instillation in rats. The SWCNTs were instilled at a dosage of 0.2 or 1.0mg/kg body weight (single instillation group) and 0.04 or 0.2mg/kg body weight once a week for 5weeks (repeated instillation group). As a negative control, 1% Tween 80 was instilled in a similar manner. As a positive control, ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) at 500mg/kg was administered once orally 3h prior to dissection. Histopathologically, inflammation in the lung was observed for all the SWCNTs in both single and repeated groups. In the comet assay, there was no increase in% tail DNA in any of the SWCNT-treated groups. In the EMS-treated groups, there was a significant increase in% tail DNA compared with the negative control group. The present study indicated that a single intratracheal instillation of SWCNTs (1.0mg/kg) or repeated intratracheal instillation (0.2mg/kg) once a week for five weeks induced a clear inflammatory response (hemorrhage in the alveolus, infiltration of alveolar macrophages and neutrophiles), but no DNA damage, in the lungs in rats. Under the conditions of the test, SWCNTs were not genotoxic in the comet assay following intratracheal instillation in rats. PMID:22735368

  17. Effect of multilevel laboratory rat caging system on the well-being of the singly-housed Sprague Dawley rat.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, R R; Swan, M P; Hickman, D L

    2015-01-01

    Current regulations emphasize that good husbandry practices allow animals to engage in species appropriate postural adjustments without touching the enclosure walls. This study evaluated the well-being of rats housed in a commercially available multilevel rat caging system, with or without access to the upper level of the caging. The evaluation methodologies included assessment of behavioral observations in the home cage, physiological assessment of metabolism and immune function, and determination of the affective state using a spatial cognitive bias assay. The study determined that rats that were provided access to the full multilevel cage during testing after initial restriction to the lower level of the cage demonstrated behavioral changes consistent with a positive affective state, while those with no changes to their housing situation had no significant differences in their affective states. Rats that were consistently housed with access restricted to the lower level of the cage exhibited a tendency to increased neutrophil:lymphocyte ratios as compared with those provided with access to all levels of the multilevel cage. There were no differences in body weight demonstrated between the experimental groups. Overall use of the cage space, as documented through analysis of behavioral observations in the home cage, demonstrated no significant differences in preferred location in the cage during the light or dark cycles, though rats with access to both levels of the cage were significantly more active during the light cycle. The results of this study suggest that the use of a multilevel caging system may improve the well-being of rats used in research.

  18. A single exposure to acrolein desensitizes baroreflex responsiveness and increases cardiac arrhythmias in normotensive and hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Hazari, Mehdi S; Griggs, Jennifer; Winsett, Darrell W; Haykal-Coates, Najwa; Ledbetter, Allen; Costa, Daniel L; Farraj, Aimen K

    2014-03-01

    Short-term exposure to air pollutants has been linked to acute cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Even in the absence of overt signs or symptoms, pollutants can cause subtle disruptions to internal compensatory mechanisms, which maintain homeostatic balance in response to various environmental and physiological stressors. We hypothesized that a single exposure to acrolein, a ubiquitous gaseous air pollutant, would decrease the sensitivity of baroreflex (BRS), which maintains blood pressure by altering heart rate (HR), modify cardiac electrophysiological properties and increase arrhythmia in rats. Wistar-Kyoto normotensive (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive (SH) rats implanted with radiotelemeters and a chronic jugular vein catheter were tested for BRS using phenylephrine and sodium nitroprusside 2 days before and 1 h after whole-body exposure to 3 ppm acrolein (3 h). HR and electrocardiogram (ECG) were continuously monitored for the detection of arrhythmia in the pre-exposure, exposure and post-exposure periods. Whole-body plethysmography was used to continuously monitor ventilation in conscious animals. SH rats had higher blood pressure, lower BRS and increased frequency of AV block as evidence by non-conducted p-waves when compared with WKY rats. A single exposure to acrolein caused a decrease in BRS and increased incidence of arrhythmia in both WKY and SH rats. There were minimal ECG differences between the strains, whereas only SH rats experienced irregular breathing during acrolein. These results demonstrate that acrolein causes immediate cardiovascular reflexive dysfunction and persistent arrhythmia in both normal and hypertensive animals. As such, homeostatic imbalance may be one mechanism by which air pollution increases risk 24 h after exposure, particularly in people with underlying cardiovascular disease.

  19. Single-channel properties of a rat brain endoplasmic reticulum anion channel.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, A G; Murray, D; Ashley, R H

    1997-01-01

    Many intracellular membranes contain ion channels, although their physiological roles are often poorly understood. In this study we incorporated single anion channels colocalized with rat brain endoplasmic reticulum (ER) ryanodine-sensitive Ca(2+)-release channels into planar lipid bilayers. The channels opened in bursts, with more activity at negative (cytoplasm-ER lumen) membrane potentials, and they occupied four open conductance levels with frequencies well described by the binomial equation. The probability of a protomer being open decreased from approximately 0.7 at -40 mV to approximately 0.2 at +40 mV, and the channels selected between different anions in the order PSCN > PNO3 > PBr > PCl > PF. They were also permeant to cations, including the large cation Tris+ (PTris/PCl = 0.16). Their conductance saturated at 170 pS in choline Cl. The channels were inactivated by 15 microM 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS) and blocked with low affinity (KD of 1-100 microM) by anthracene-9-carboxylic acid, ethacrynic acid, frusemide (furosemide), HEPES, the indanyloxyacetic acid derivative IAA-94, 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoate (NPPB), and Zn2+. Unlike protein translocation pores, the channels were unaffected by high salt concentrations or puromycin. They may regulate ER Ca2+ release, or be channel components en route to their final cellular destinations. Alternatively, they may contribute to the fusion machinery involved in intracellular membrane trafficking. PMID:9199781

  20. Single prolonged stress impairs social and object novelty recognition in rats

    PubMed Central

    Eagle, Andrew L.; Fitzpatrick, Chris J.; Perrine, Shane A.

    2013-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) results from exposure to a traumatic event and manifests as re-experiencing, arousal, avoidance, and negative cognition/mood symptoms. Avoidant symptoms, as well as the newly defined negative cognitions/mood, are a serious complication leading to diminished interest in once important or positive activities, such as social interaction; however, the basis of these symptoms remains poorly understood. PTSD patients also exhibit impaired object and social recognition, which may underlie the avoidance and symptoms of negative cognition, such as social estrangement or diminished interest in activities. Previous studies have demonstrated that single prolonged stress (SPS), models PTSD phenotypes, including impairments in learning and memory. Therefore, it was hypothesized that SPS would impair social and object recognition memory. Male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to SPS then tested in the social choice test (SCT) or novel object recognition test (NOR). These tests measure recognition of novelty over familiarity, a natural preference of rodents. Results show that SPS impaired preference for both social and object novelty. In addition, SPS impairment in social recognition may be caused by impaired behavioral flexibility, or an inability to shift behavior during the SCT. These results demonstrate that traumatic stress can impair social and object recognition memory, which may underlie certain avoidant symptoms or negative cognition in PTSD and be related to impaired behavioral flexibility. PMID:24036168

  1. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) induce vasodilation in isolated rat aortic rings.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Hernández, J M; Ramirez-Lee, M A; Rosas-Hernandez, H; Salazar-García, S; Maldonado-Ortega, D A; González, F J; Gonzalez, C

    2015-06-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are used in biological systems with impact in biomedicine in order to improve diagnostics and treatment of diseases. However, their effects upon the vascular system, are not fully understood. Endothelium and smooth muscle cells (SMC) communicate through release of vasoactive factors as nitric oxide (NO) to maintain vascular tone. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of SWCNTs on vascular tone using isolated rat aortic rings, which were exposed to SWCNTs (0.1, 1 and 10 μg/mL) in presence and absence of endothelium. SWCNTs induced vasodilation in both conditions, indicating that this effect was independent on endothelium; moreover that vasodilation was NO-independent, since its blockage with L-NAME did not modify the observed effect. Together, these results indicate that SWCNTs induce vasodilation in the macrovasculature, may be through a direct interaction with SMC rather than endothelium independent of NO production. Further investigation is required to fully understand the mechanisms of action and mediators involved in the signaling pathway induced by SWCNTs on the vascular system.

  2. Single-dose Intramuscular Toxicity of Neutral Natured Blood Stasis Pharmacopuncture in Sprague-Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, In Ho; Lee, Eun Yong

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study was performed to analyze the single-dose toxicity of neutral natured blood stasis pharmacopuncture extracts. Methods: All experiments were conducted at Biotoxtech, an institution authorized to perform non-clinical studies, under the regulations of Good Laboratory Practice (GLP). Sprague-Dawley rats were chosen for the pilot study. Doses of neutral natured blood stasis pharmacopuncture extracts, 0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 mL, were administered to the experimental group, and the same doses of normal saline solution were administered to the control group. This study was conducted under the approval of the Institutional Animal Ethics Committee. Results: In all 4 groups, no deaths occurred, and the neutral natured blood stasis pharmacopuncture extracts administered by intramuscular (IM) injection was over 1.0 mL/animal. No significant changes in the body weights between the control group and the experimental group were observed. To check for abnormalities in organs and tissues, we used microscopy to examine representative histological sections of each specified organ; the results showed no significant differences in any organs or tissues. Conclusion: The above findings suggest that treatment with neutral natured blood stasis pharmacopuncture extracts is relatively safe. Further studies on this subject should be conducted to yield more concrete evidence. PMID:25780698

  3. Pharmacokinetics of A40926 in rats after single intravenous and subcutaneous doses.

    PubMed Central

    Bernareggi, A; Danese, A; Cavenaghi, L

    1988-01-01

    A40926 is a new glycopeptide antibiotic with unique activity against Neisseria gonorrhoeae and high and prolonged levels in mouse blood (B. P. Goldstein, E. Selva, L. Gastaldo, M. Berti, R. Pallanza, F. Ripamonti, P. Ferrari, M. Denaro, V. Arioli, and G. Cassani, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother., 31:1961-1966, 1987). We studied the pharmacokinetics of A40926 in rats after single intravenous and subcutaneous 10-mg/kg (body weight) doses. Concentrations in plasma and urine were determined by microbiological assay. After intravenous administration, high concentrations of A40926, ranging from 132 mg/liter at 3 min to 0.7 mg/liter at 96 h, were found in plasma. Concentrations declined with a three-exponential decay correlated with a prolonged, biphasic distribution and a slow elimination (terminal half-life, 61.22 h). After completion of the distribution, the compound was widely distributed to the extravascular space. The rate-limiting step in the elimination of A40926 from the body appears to be the slow return from the deep compartment into the central one. A40926 was rapidly absorbed from the injection site after subcutaneous administration, and its availability was close to 90%. The percentage of the dose excreted in urine in 120 h was 35.9%. PMID:3364946

  4. Thyroid hormone modulates glucose production via a sympathetic pathway from the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus to the liver.

    PubMed

    Klieverik, Lars P; Janssen, Sarah F; van Riel, Annelieke; Foppen, Ewout; Bisschop, Peter H; Serlie, Mireille J; Boelen, Anita; Ackermans, Mariëtte T; Sauerwein, Hans P; Fliers, Eric; Kalsbeek, Andries

    2009-04-01

    Thyrotoxicosis increases endogenous glucose production (EGP) and induces hepatic insulin resistance. We have recently shown that these alterations can be modulated by selective hepatic sympathetic and parasympathetic denervation, pointing to neurally mediated effects of thyroid hormone on glucose metabolism. Here, we investigated the effects of central triiodothyronine (T(3)) administration on EGP. We used stable isotope dilution to measure EGP before and after i.c.v. bolus infusion of T(3) or vehicle in euthyroid rats. To study the role of hypothalamic preautonomic neurons, bilateral T(3) microdialysis in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) was performed for 2 h. Finally, we combined T(3) microdialysis in the PVN with selective hepatic sympathetic denervation to delineate the involvement of the sympathetic nervous system in the observed metabolic alterations. T(3) microdialysis in the PVN increased EGP by 11 +/- 4% (P = 0.020), while EGP decreased by 5 +/- 8% (ns) in vehicle-treated rats (T(3) vs. Veh, P = 0.030). Plasma glucose increased by 29 +/- 5% (P = 0.0001) after T(3) microdialysis versus 8 +/- 3% in vehicle-treated rats (T(3) vs. Veh, P = 0.003). Similar effects were observed after i.c.v. T(3) administration. Effects of PVN T(3) microdialysis were independent of plasma T(3), insulin, glucagon, and corticosterone. However, selective hepatic sympathectomy completely prevented the effect of T(3) microdialysis on EGP. We conclude that stimulation of T(3)-sensitive neurons in the PVN of euthyroid rats increases EGP via sympathetic projections to the liver, independently of circulating glucoregulatory hormones. This represents a unique central pathway for modulation of hepatic glucose metabolism by thyroid hormone. PMID:19321430

  5. Single housing during early adolescence causes time-, area- and peptide-specific alterations in endogenous opioids of rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Granholm, L; Roman, E; Nylander, I

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE A number of experimental procedures require single housing to assess individual behaviour and physiological responses to pharmacological treatments. The endogenous opioids are closely linked to social interaction, especially early in life, and disturbance in the social environment may affect opioid peptides and thereby confound experimental outcome. The aim of the present study was to examine time-dependent effects of single housing on opioid peptides in rats. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Early adolescent Sprague Dawley rats (post-natal day 22) were subjected to either prolonged (7 days) or short (30 min) single housing. Several brain regions were dissected and immunoreactive levels of Met-enkephalin-Arg6Phe7 (MEAP), dynorphin B and nociception/orphanin FQ, as well as serum corticosterone were measured using RIA. KEY RESULTS Prolonged single housing reduced immunoreactive MEAP in hypothalamus, cortical regions, amygdala, substantia nigra and periaqueductal grey. Short single housing resulted in an acute stress response as indicated by high levels of corticosterone, accompanied by elevated immunoreactive nociceptin/orphanin FQ in medial prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens and amygdala. Neither short nor prolonged single housing affected dynorphin B. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Disruption in social environmental conditions of rats, through single housing during early adolescence, resulted in time-, area- and peptide-specific alterations in endogenous opioids in the brain. These results provide further evidence for an association between early life social environment and opioids. Furthermore, the results have implications for experimental design; in any pharmacological study involving opioid peptides, it is important to distinguish between effects induced by housing and treatment. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http

  6. Alterations in perivascular innervation function in mesenteric arteries from offspring of diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    de Queiroz, D B; Sastre, E; Caracuel, L; Callejo, M; Xavier, F E; Blanco-Rivero, J; Balfagón, G

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose We have reported that exposure to a diabetic intrauterine environment during pregnancy increases blood pressure in adult offspring, but the mechanisms involved are not completely understood. This study was designed to analyse a possible role of perivascular sympathetic and nitrergic innervation in the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) in this effect. Experimental Approach Diabetes was induced in pregnant Wistar rats by a single injection of streptozotocin. Endothelium-denuded vascular rings from the offspring of control (O-CR) and diabetic rats (O-DR) were used. Vasomotor responses to electrical field stimulation (EFS), NA and the NO donor DEA-NO were studied. The expressions of neuronal NOS (nNOS) and phospho-nNOS (P-nNOS) and release of NA, ATP and NO were determined. Sympathetic and nitrergic nerve densities were analysed by immunofluorescence. Key Results Blood pressure was higher in O-DR animals. EFS-induced vasoconstriction was greater in O-DR animals. This response was decreased by phentolamine more in O-DR animals than their controls. L-NAME increased EFS-induced vasoconstriction more strongly in O-DR than in O-CR segments. Vasomotor responses to NA or DEA-NO were not modified. NA, ATP and NO release was increased in segments from O-DR. nNOS expression was not modified, whereas P-nNOS expression was increased in O-DR. Sympathetic and nitrergic nerve densities were similar in both experimental groups. Conclusions and Implications The activity of sympathetic and nitrergic innervation is increased in SMA from O-DR animals. The net effect is an increase in EFS-induced contractions in these animals. These effects may contribute to the increased blood pressure observed in the offspring of diabetic rats. PMID:26177571

  7. Severe hemorrhage attenuates cardiopulmonary chemoreflex control of regional sympathetic outputs via NTS adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Minic, Zeljka; Li, Cailian; O'Leary, Donal S; Scislo, Tadeusz J

    2014-09-15

    Selective stimulation of inhibitory A1 and facilitatory A2a adenosine receptor subtypes located in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) powerfully inhibits cardiopulmonary chemoreflex (CCR) control of regional sympathetic outputs via different mechanisms: direct inhibition of glutamate release and facilitation of an inhibitory neurotransmitter release, respectively. However, it remains unknown whether adenosine naturally released into the NTS has similar inhibitory effects on the CCR as the exogenous agonists do. Our previous study showed that adenosine is released into the NTS during severe hemorrhage and contributes to reciprocal changes of renal (decreases) and adrenal (increases) sympathetic nerve activity observed in this setting. Both A1 and A2a adenosine receptors are involved. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that, during severe hemorrhage, CCR control of the two sympathetic outputs is attenuated by adenosine naturally released into the NTS. We compared renal and adrenal sympathoinhibitory responses evoked by right atrial injections of 5HT3 receptor agonist phenylbiguanide (2-8 μg/kg) under control conditions, during hemorrhage, and during hemorrhage preceded by blockade of NTS adenosine receptors with bilateral microinjections of 8-(p-sulfophenyl) theophylline (1 nmol/100 nl) in urethane/chloralose anesthetized rats. CCR-mediated inhibition of renal and adrenal sympathetic activity was significantly attenuated during severe hemorrhage despite reciprocal changes in the baseline activity levels, and this attenuation was removed by bilateral blockade of adenosine receptors in the caudal NTS. This confirmed that adenosine endogenously released into the NTS has a similar modulatory effect on integration of cardiovascular reflexes as stimulation of NTS adenosine receptors with exogenous agonists.

  8. Severe hemorrhage attenuates cardiopulmonary chemoreflex control of regional sympathetic outputs via NTS adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Minic, Zeljka; Li, Cailian; O'Leary, Donal S; Scislo, Tadeusz J

    2014-09-15

    Selective stimulation of inhibitory A1 and facilitatory A2a adenosine receptor subtypes located in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) powerfully inhibits cardiopulmonary chemoreflex (CCR) control of regional sympathetic outputs via different mechanisms: direct inhibition of glutamate release and facilitation of an inhibitory neurotransmitter release, respectively. However, it remains unknown whether adenosine naturally released into the NTS has similar inhibitory effects on the CCR as the exogenous agonists do. Our previous study showed that adenosine is released into the NTS during severe hemorrhage and contributes to reciprocal changes of renal (decreases) and adrenal (increases) sympathetic nerve activity observed in this setting. Both A1 and A2a adenosine receptors are involved. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that, during severe hemorrhage, CCR control of the two sympathetic outputs is attenuated by adenosine naturally released into the NTS. We compared renal and adrenal sympathoinhibitory responses evoked by right atrial injections of 5HT3 receptor agonist phenylbiguanide (2-8 μg/kg) under control conditions, during hemorrhage, and during hemorrhage preceded by blockade of NTS adenosine receptors with bilateral microinjections of 8-(p-sulfophenyl) theophylline (1 nmol/100 nl) in urethane/chloralose anesthetized rats. CCR-mediated inhibition of renal and adrenal sympathetic activity was significantly attenuated during severe hemorrhage despite reciprocal changes in the baseline activity levels, and this attenuation was removed by bilateral blockade of adenosine receptors in the caudal NTS. This confirmed that adenosine endogenously released into the NTS has a similar modulatory effect on integration of cardiovascular reflexes as stimulation of NTS adenosine receptors with exogenous agonists. PMID:25063794

  9. [A case of prolonged paroxysmal sympathetic hyperactivity].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Akiko; Ide, Shuhei; Iwasaki, Yuji; Kaga, Makiko; Arima, Masataka

    2016-03-01

    We report the case of a 4-year-old girl who presented with paroxysmal sympathetic hyperactivity (PSH), after developing severe hypoxic-ischemic-encephalopathy because of cardiopulmonary arrest. She showed dramatic paroxysmal sympathetic activity with dystonia. She was treated with wide variety of medications against PSH, which were found to be effective in previous studies. Among them, morphine, bromocriptine, propranolol, and clonidine were effective in reducing the frequency of her attacks while gabapentin, baclofen, dantrolene, and benzodiazepine were ineffective. Though the paroxysms decreased markedly after the treatment, they could not be completely controlled beyond 500 days. Following the treatment, levels of plasma catecholamines and their urinary metabolites decreased to normal during inter- paroxysms. However, once a paroxysm had recurred, these levels were again very high. This case study is considered significant for two rea- sons. One is that PSH among children have been rarely reported, and the other is that this case of prolonged PSH delineated the transition of plasma catecholamines during the treatment. The excitatory: inhibitory ratio (EIR) model proposed by Baguley was considered while dis- cussing drug sensitivity in this case. Accumulation of similar case studies will help establish more effective treatment strategies and elucidate the pathophysiology of PSH. PMID:27149743

  10. Intestinal permeability of metformin using single-pass intestinal perfusion in rats

    PubMed Central

    Song, Nai-Ning; Li, Quan-Sheng; Liu, Chang-Xiao

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To characterize the intestinal transport and mechanism of metformin in rats and to investigate whether or not metformin is a substrate for P-glycoprotein (P-gp). METHODS: The effective intestinal permeability of metformin was investigated using single-pass intestinal perfusion (SPIP) technique in male Waster rats. SPIP was performed in three isolated intestinal segments (duodenum, jejunum and ileum) at the same concentration of metformin (50 μg/mL) to test if the intestinal transport of metformin exhibited site-dependent changes, and in a same isolated intestinal segment (duodenal segment) at three different concentrations of metformin (10, 50, 200 μg/mL) to test if the intestinal transport of metformin exhibited concentration-dependent changes. Besides, P-gp inhibitor verapamil (400 μg/mL) was co-perfused with metformin (50 μg/mL) in the duodenum segment to find out if the intestinal absorption of metformin was affected by P-gp exiting along the gastrointestinal track. Stability studies were conducted to ensure that the loss of metformin could be attributed to intestinal absorption. RESULTS: The effective permeability values (Peff) of metformin in the jejunum and ileum at 50 μg/mL were significantly lower than those in the duodenum at the same concentration. Besides, Peff values in the duodenum at high concentration (200 μg/mL) were found to be significantly lower than those at low and medium concentrations (10 and 50 μg/mL). Moreover the co-perfusion with verapamil did not increase the Peff value of metformin at 50 μg/mL in the duodenum. CONCLUSION: Metformin could be absorbed from the whole intestine, with the main absorption site at duodenum. This concentration-dependent permeability behavior in the duodenum indicates that metformin is transported by both passive and active carrier-mediated saturable mechanism. The Peff value can not be increased by co-perfusion with verapamil, indicating that absorption of metformin is not efficiently transported

  11. Mediators of sympathetic activation in metabolic syndrome obesity.

    PubMed

    Straznicky, Nora E; Eikelis, Nina; Lambert, Elisabeth A; Esler, Murray D

    2008-12-01

    The metabolic syndrome represents a major public health burden because of its high prevalence in the general population and its association with cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Accumulated evidence based on biochemical, neurophysiologic, and indirect measurements of autonomic activity indicate that visceral obesity and the metabolic syndrome are associated with enhanced sympathetic neural drive and vagal impairment. The mechanisms linking metabolic syndrome with sympathetic activation are complex and not completely understood, and cause-effect relationships need further clarification from prospective trials. Components of the metabolic syndrome that may directly or indirectly enhance sympathetic drive include hyperinsulinemia, leptin, nonesterified fatty acids, proinflammatory cytokines, angiotensinogen, baroreflex impairment, and obstructive sleep apnea. beta-Adrenoceptor polymorphisms have also been associated with adrenoceptor desensitization, increased adiposity, insulin resistance, and enhanced sympathetic activity. Because chronic sympathetic activation contributes to hypertension and its target-organ damage, sympathoinhibition remains an important goal in the therapeutic management of the metabolic syndrome.

  12. Management of hypertension by reduction in sympathetic activity.

    PubMed

    Mathias, C J

    1991-04-01

    The sympathetic nervous system may initiate or maintain hypertension, and a range of approaches that reduce sympathetic activity is often of value in management. These may include nonpharmacological methods, such as the various forms of behavioral therapy (e.g., meditation, relaxation, and biofeedback techniques); weight reduction and avoidance of particular foods and agents that stimulate sympathetic activity (including caffeine and alcohol), and regular physical exercise. Pharmacological therapy includes centrally acting drugs such as alpha-methyldopa, clonidine, and reserpine; ganglionic blockers such as hexamethonium; agents acting on sympathetic nerve terminals such as guanethidine and debrisoquine; and drugs that may act at multiple sites, such as the beta-adrenergic blockers. The role of reducing sympathetic activity in the current management of hypertension and its complications is considered in this overview.

  13. Effects of Pretreatment With Single-Dose or Intermittent Oxygen on Cisplatin-Induced Nephrotoxicity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Rasoulian, Bahram; Kaeidi, Ayat; Pourkhodadad, Soheila; Dezfoulian, Omid; Rezaei, Maryam; Wahhabaghai, Hannaneh; Alirezaei, Masoud

    2014-01-01

    Background: Renal injury is the main side effect of cisplatin (CP), an anticancer drug. It has been shown that pretreatment with single-dose oxygen (0.5 to six hours) could reduce CP-induced renal toxicity in rats. Objectives: The present study aimed to compare the effects of pretreatment with single-dose and intermittent O2 on CP-induced nephrotoxicity. Materials and Methods: Adult male rats were allocated to seven groups (eight rats in each group). The rats were kept in normal air or hyperoxic environment (O2, 80%) for either a single six-hour period or intermittent six hours per day for seven days and then were subjected to intraperitoneal injection of saline or CP (5 mg/kg) at 48 hours, 72 hours, or seven days after exposure to O2. Three days after CP (or Saline) injection, renal function tests, renal tissue injury scores, and cleaved Caspase-3 and Bax/Bcl-2 genes expression (as markers of renal cell apoptosis) were assessed. Results: Treatment with the 6-hour single-dose O2 reduced renal injury significantly when CP was administrated 48 hours after O2 pretreatment. Pretreatment with intermittent seven days of six hours per day had no protective effects and even relatively worsened renal injury when CP was injected 48 hours or 72 hours after the last session of O2 pretreatment. The beneficial effects of pretreatment with O2 on renal structure and function were seen if CP was administrates seven days after pretreatment with intermittent O2. Conclusions: The pattern of pretreatment with O2 could change this potential and highly protective strategy against CP-induced nephropathy to an ineffective or even mildly deteriorating one. Therefore, O2 administration before CP injection to patients with cancer, for therapeutic purposes or as a preconditioning approach, should be performed and investigated with caution until exact effects of different protocols has been determined in human. PMID:25695032

  14. Effects of intranasal cocaine on sympathetic nerve discharge in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, T N; Grayburn, P A; Snyder, R W; Hansen, J; Chavoshan, B; Landau, C; Lange, R A; Hillis, L D; Victor, R G

    1997-01-01

    Cocaine-induced cardiovascular emergencies are mediated by excessive adrenergic stimulation. Animal studies suggest that cocaine not only blocks norepinephrine reuptake peripherally but also inhibits the baroreceptors, thereby reflexively increasing sympathetic nerve discharge. However, the effect of cocaine on sympathetic nerve discharge in humans is unknown. In 12 healthy volunteers, we recorded blood pressure and sympathetic nerve discharge to the skeletal muscle vasculature using intraneural microelectrodes (peroneal nerve) during intranasal cocaine (2 mg/kg, n = 8) or lidocaine (2%, n = 4), an internal local anesthetic control, or intravenous phenylephrine (0.5-2.0 microg/kg, n = 4), an internal sympathomimetic control. Experiments were repeated while minimizing the cocaine-induced rise in blood pressure with intravenous nitroprusside to negate sinoaortic baroreceptor stimulation. After lidocaine, blood pressure and sympathetic nerve discharge were unchanged. After cocaine, blood pressure increased abruptly and remained elevated for 60 min while sympathetic nerve discharge initially was unchanged and then decreased progressively over 60 min to a nadir that was only 2+/-1% of baseline (P < 0.05); however, plasma venous norepinephrine concentrations (n = 5) were unchanged up to 60 min after cocaine. Sympathetic nerve discharge fell more rapidly but to the same nadir when blood pressure was increased similarly with phenylephrine. When the cocaine-induced increase in blood pressure was minimized (nitroprusside), sympathetic nerve discharge did not decrease but rather increased by 2.9 times over baseline (P < 0.05). Baroreflex gain was comparable before and after cocaine. We conclude that in conscious humans the primary effect of intranasal cocaine is to increase sympathetic nerve discharge to the skeletal muscle bed. Furthermore, sinoaortic baroreflexes play a pivotal role in modulating the cocaine-induced sympathetic excitation. The interplay between these

  15. Impaired sympathetic vascular regulation in humans after acute dynamic exercise.

    PubMed Central

    Halliwill, J R; Taylor, J A; Eckberg, D L

    1996-01-01

    1. The reduction in vascular resistance which accompanies acute dynamic exercise does not subside immediately during recovery, resulting in a post-exercise hypotension. This sustained vasodilatation suggests that sympathetic vascular regulation is altered after exercise. 2. Therefore, we assessed the baroreflex control of sympathetic outflow in response to arterial pressure changes, and transduction of sympathetic activity into vascular resistance during a sympatho-excitatory stimulus (isometric handgrip exercise) after either exercise (60 min cycling at 60% peak aerobic power (VO2,peak)) or sham treatment (60 min seated rest) in nine healthy subjects. 3. Both muscle sympathetic nerve activity and calf vascular resistance were reduced after exercise (-29.7 +/- 8.8 and -25.3 +/- 9.1%, both P < 0.05). The baroreflex relation between diastolic pressure and sympathetic outflow was shifted downward after exercise (post-exercise intercept, 218 +/- 38 total integrated activity (heartbeat)-1; post-sham intercept, 318 +/- 51 total integrated activity (heartbeat)-1, P < 0.05), indicating less sympathetic outflow across all diastolic pressures. Further, the relation between sympathetic activity and vascular resistance was attenuated after exercise (post-exercise slope, 0.0031 +/- 0.0007 units (total integrated activity)-1 min; post-sham slope, 0.0100 +/- 0.0033 units (total integrated activity)-1 min, P < 0.05), indicating less vasoconstriction with any increase in sympathetic activity. 4. Thus, both baroreflex control of sympathetic outflow and the transduction of sympathetic activity into vascular resistance are altered after dynamic exercise. We conclude that the vasodilation which underlies post-exercise hypotension results from both neural and vascular phenomena. Images Figure 7 PMID:8866370

  16. Sympathetic neural influence on bone metabolism in microgravity (Review).

    PubMed

    Mano, Tadaaki; Nishimura, N; Iwase, S

    2010-12-01

    Bone loss is one of the most important complications for astronauts who are exposed to long-term microgravity in space and also for bedridden elderly people. Recent studies have indicated that the sympathetic nervous system plays a role in bone metabolism. This paper reviews findings concerning with sympathetic influences on bone metabolism to hypothesize the mechanism how sympathetic neural functions are related to bone loss in microgravity. Animal studies have suggested that leptin stimulates hypothalamus increasing sympathetic outflow to bone and enhances bone resorption through noradrenaline and β-adrenoreceptors in bone. In humans, even though there have been some controversial findings, use of β-adrenoblockers has been reported to be beneficial for prevention of osteoporosis and bone fracture. On the other hand, microneurographically-recorded sympathetic nerve activity was enhanced by exposure to microgravity in space as well as dry immersion or long-term bed rest to simulate microgravity. The same sympathetic activity became higher in elderly people whose bone mass becomes generally reduced. Our recent findings indicated a significant correlation between muscle sympathetic nerve activity and urinary deoxypyridinoline as a specific marker measuring bone resorption. Based on these findings we would like to propose a following hypothesis concerning the sympathetic involvement in the mechanism of bone loss in microgravity: An exposure to prolonged microgravity may enhance sympathetic neural traffic not only to muscle but also to bone. This sympathetic enhancement increases plasma noradrenaline level and inhibits osteogenesis and facilitates bone resorption through β-adrenoreceptors in bone to facilitate bone resorption to reduce bone mass. The use of β-adrenoblockers to prevent bone loss in microgravity may be reasonable.

  17. Impaired sympathetic vascular regulation in humans after acute dynamic exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halliwill, J. R.; Taylor, J. A.; Eckberg, D. L.

    1996-01-01

    1. The reduction in vascular resistance which accompanies acute dynamic exercise does not subside immediately during recovery, resulting in a post-exercise hypotension. This sustained vasodilatation suggests that sympathetic vascular regulation is altered after exercise. 2. Therefore, we assessed the baroreflex control of sympathetic outflow in response to arterial pressure changes, and transduction of sympathetic activity into vascular resistance during a sympatho-excitatory stimulus (isometric handgrip exercise) after either exercise (60 min cycling at 60% peak aerobic power (VO2,peak)) or sham treatment (60 min seated rest) in nine healthy subjects. 3. Both muscle sympathetic nerve activity and calf vascular resistance were reduced after exercise (-29.7 +/- 8.8 and -25.3 +/- 9.1%, both P < 0.05). The baroreflex relation between diastolic pressure and sympathetic outflow was shifted downward after exercise (post-exercise intercept, 218 +/- 38 total integrated activity (heartbeat)-1; post-sham intercept, 318 +/- 51 total integrated activity (heartbeat)-1, P < 0.05), indicating less sympathetic outflow across all diastolic pressures. Further, the relation between sympathetic activity and vascular resistance was attenuated after exercise (post-exercise slope, 0.0031 +/- 0.0007 units (total integrated activity)-1 min; post-sham slope, 0.0100 +/- 0.0033 units (total integrated activity)-1 min, P < 0.05), indicating less vasoconstriction with any increase in sympathetic activity. 4. Thus, both baroreflex control of sympathetic outflow and the transduction of sympathetic activity into vascular resistance are altered after dynamic exercise. We conclude that the vasodilation which underlies post-exercise hypotension results from both neural and vascular phenomena.

  18. Effect of single-dose radiation on cell survival and growth hormone secretion by rat anterior pituitary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hochberg, Z.; Kuten, A.; Hertz, P.; Tatcher, M.; Kedar, A.; Benderly, A.

    1983-06-01

    Cranial irradiation has been shown to impair growth hormone secretion in children. In this study a cell culture of dispersed rat anterior pituitary cells was exposed to single doses of radiation in the range of 100 to 1500 rad. Survival curves were obtained for the different anterior pituitary cell lines, and growth hormone secretion was measured in the tissue culture medium. Both survival and growth hormone secretion curves showed an initial shoulder in the range of 0 to 300 rad, followed by a decline between 300 to 750 rad. It is concluded that growth hormone secreting acidophilic pituicytes are sensitive to radiation at single doses greater than 300 rad.

  19. LONG TERM RESPONSE OF RATS TO SINGLE INTRATRACHEAL EXPOSURE OF LIBBY AMPHIBOLE (LA) OR AMOSITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    In former mine workers of Libby, Montana, exposure to amphibole-contaminated vermiculite has been associated with increased incidences of asbestosis and mesothelioma. In this study, we investigated long term effects of Libby amphibole (LA) exposure in a rat model. Rat respirable ...

  20. NTS adenosine A2a receptors inhibit the cardiopulmonary chemoreflex control of regional sympathetic outputs via a GABAergic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Minic, Zeljka; O'Leary, Donal S; Scislo, Tadeusz J

    2015-07-01

    Adenosine is a powerful central neuromodulator acting via opposing A1 (inhibitor) and A2a (activator) receptors. However, in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), both adenosine receptor subtypes attenuate cardiopulmonary chemoreflex (CCR) sympathoinhibition of renal, adrenal, and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity and attenuate reflex decreases in arterial pressure and heart rate. Adenosine A1 receptors inhibit glutamatergic transmission in the CCR pathway, whereas adenosine A2a receptors most likely facilitate release of an unknown inhibitory neurotransmitter, which, in turn, inhibits the CCR. We hypothesized that adenosine A2a receptors inhibit the CCR via facilitation of GABA release in the NTS. In urethane-chloralose-anesthetized rats (n = 51), we compared regional sympathetic responses evoked by stimulation of the CCR with right atrial injections of the 5-HT3 receptor agonist phenylbiguanide (1-8 μg/kg) before and after selective stimulation of NTS adenosine A2a receptors [microinjections into the NTS of CGS-21680 (20 pmol/50 nl)] preceded by blockade of GABAA or GABAB receptors in the NTS [bicuculline (10 pmol/100 nl) or SCH-50911 (1 nmol/100 nl)]. Blockade of GABAA receptors virtually abolished adenosine A2a receptor-mediated inhibition of the CCR. GABAB receptors had much weaker but significant effects. These effects were similar for the different sympathetic outputs. We conclude that stimulation of NTS adenosine A2a receptors inhibits CCR-evoked hemodynamic and regional sympathetic reflex responses via a GABA-ergic mechanism.

  1. NTS adenosine A2a receptors inhibit the cardiopulmonary chemoreflex control of regional sympathetic outputs via a GABAergic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Minic, Zeljka; O'Leary, Donal S; Scislo, Tadeusz J

    2015-07-01

    Adenosine is a powerful central neuromodulator acting via opposing A1 (inhibitor) and A2a (activator) receptors. However, in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), both adenosine receptor subtypes attenuate cardiopulmonary chemoreflex (CCR) sympathoinhibition of renal, adrenal, and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity and attenuate reflex decreases in arterial pressure and heart rate. Adenosine A1 receptors inhibit glutamatergic transmission in the CCR pathway, whereas adenosine A2a receptors most likely facilitate release of an unknown inhibitory neurotransmitter, which, in turn, inhibits the CCR. We hypothesized that adenosine A2a receptors inhibit the CCR via facilitation of GABA release in the NTS. In urethane-chloralose-anesthetized rats (n = 51), we compared regional sympathetic responses evoked by stimulation of the CCR with right atrial injections of the 5-HT3 receptor agonist phenylbiguanide (1-8 μg/kg) before and after selective stimulation of NTS adenosine A2a receptors [microinjections into the NTS of CGS-21680 (20 pmol/50 nl)] preceded by blockade of GABAA or GABAB receptors in the NTS [bicuculline (10 pmol/100 nl) or SCH-50911 (1 nmol/100 nl)]. Blockade of GABAA receptors virtually abolished adenosine A2a receptor-mediated inhibition of the CCR. GABAB receptors had much weaker but significant effects. These effects were similar for the different sympathetic outputs. We conclude that stimulation of NTS adenosine A2a receptors inhibits CCR-evoked hemodynamic and regional sympathetic reflex responses via a GABA-ergic mechanism. PMID:25910812

  2. Resonant oscillation modes of sympathetically cooled ions in a radio-frequency trap

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Taro; Shimizu, Tadao

    2002-12-01

    Sympathetic cooling of Ca{sup +}, Zn{sup +}, Sr{sup +}, Ba{sup +}, and Yb{sup +} as guest ions with laser-cooled {sup 24}Mg{sup +} as host ions in a rf ion trap is carried out, and resonant frequencies of their motion in the trap potential are measured. Various oscillation modes of the sympathetically cooled ions are observed. The resonant frequency of the oscillation mode is different from the frequency of either the collective oscillation frequency of the trapped ions or the oscillation frequency of each ion without host ions. This difference is well explained by a theoretical model in which coupled equations of motion of the host ion cloud with a single guest ion are considered.

  3. pH buffering of single rat skeletal muscle fibers in the in vivo environment.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yoshinori; Inagaki, Tadakatsu; Poole, David C; Kano, Yutaka

    2016-05-15

    Homeostasis of intracellular pH (pHi) has a crucial role for the maintenance of cellular function. Several membrane transporters such as lactate/H(+) cotransporter (MCT), Na(+)/H(+) exchange transporter (NHE), and Na(+)/HCO3 (-) cotransporter (NBC) are thought to contribute to pHi regulation. However, the relative importance of each of these membrane transporters to the in vivo recovery from the low pHi condition is unknown. Using an in vivo bioimaging model, we pharmacologically inhibited each transporter separately and all transporters together and then evaluated the pHi recovery profiles following imposition of a discrete H(+) challenge loaded into single muscle fibers by microinjection. The intact spinotrapezius muscle of adult male Wistar rats (n = 72) was exteriorized and loaded with the fluorescent probe 2',7'-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein-acetoxymethyl ester (10 μM). A single muscle fiber was then loaded with low-pH solution [piperazine-N,N'-bis(2-ethanesulfonic acid) buffer, pH 6.5, ∼2.33 × 10(-3) μl] by microinjection over 3 s. The rats were divided into groups for the following treatments: 1) no inhibitor (CONT), 2) MCT inhibition (by α-Cyano-4-hydroxyciannamic acid; 4 mM), 3) NHE inhibition (by ethylisopropyl amiloride; 0.5 mM), 4) NBC inhibition (by DIDS; 1 mM), and 5) MCT, NHE, and NBC inhibition (All blockade). The fluorescence ratio (F500 nm/F445 nm) was determined from images captured during 1 min (60 images/min) and at 5, 10, 15, and 20 min after injection. The pHi at 1-2 s after injection significantly decreased from resting pHi (ΔpHi = -0.73 ± 0.03) in CONT. The recovery response profile was biphasic, with an initial rapid and close-to-exponential pHi increase (time constant, τ: 60.0 ± 7.9 s). This initial rapid profile was not affected by any pharmacological blockade but was significantly delayed by carbonic anhydrase inhibition. In contrast, the secondary, more gradual, return toward baseline that restored CONT pHi to

  4. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Induces Oxidative Stress in Rat Lung Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Chidananda S.; Sarkar, Shubhashish; Periyakaruppan, Adaikkappan; Barr, Johnny; Wise, Kimberly; Thomas, Renard; Wilson, Bobby L.

    2009-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) show unique properties find applications in micro devices; electronics to biological systems specially drug delivery and gene therapy. However the manufacture and extensive use of nanotubes raises concern about its safe use and human health. Very few studies have been carried out on toxicity of carbon nanotubes in experimental animals and humans, thus resulted in limiting their use. The extensive toxicological studies using in vitro and in vivo models are necessary and are required to establish safe manufacturing guidelines and also the use of SWCNT. These studies also help the chemists to prepare derivative of SWCNT with less or no toxicity. The present study was undertaken to determine the toxicity exhibited by SWCNT in rat lung epithelial cells as a model system. Lung epithelial cells (LE cells) were cultured with or without SWCNT and reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced were measured by change in fluorescence using dichloro fluorescein (DCF). The results show increased ROS on exposure to SWCNT in a dose and time dependent manner. The decrease in glutathione content suggested the depletion and loss of protective mechanism against ROS in SWCNT treated cells. Use of rotenone, the inhibitor of mitochondrial function have no effect on ROS levels suggested that mitochondria is not involved in SWCNT induced ROS production. Studies carried out on the effect of SWCNT on superoxide dismutase (SOD-1 and SOD-2) levels in LE cells, indicates that these enzyme levels decreased by 24 hours. The increased ROS induced by SWCNT on LE cells decreased by treating the cells with 1 mM of glutathione, N-Acetyl Cysteine, and Vitamin C. These results further prove that SWCNT induces oxidative stress in LE cells and shows loss of antioxidants. PMID:17663266

  5. Spontaneous Changes in Taste Sensitivity of Single Units Recorded over Consecutive Days in the Brainstem of the Awake Rat

    PubMed Central

    Sammons, Joshua D.; Weiss, Michael S.; Escanilla, Olga D.; Fooden, Andrew F.; Victor, Jonathan D.

    2016-01-01

    A neuron’s sensitivity profile is fundamental to functional classification of cell types, and underlies theories of sensory coding. Here we show that gustatory neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and parabrachial nucleus of the pons (PbN) of awake rats spontaneously change their tuning properties across days. Rats were surgically implanted with a chronic microwire assembly into the NTS or PbN. Following recovery, water-deprived rats had free access to a lick spout that delivered taste stimuli while cellular activity was recorded. In 12 rats for the NTS and 8 rats for the PbN, single units could be isolated at the same electrode on consecutive days (NTS, 14 units for 2–5 consecutive days, median = 2 days; PbN, 23 units for 2–7 days, median = 2.5 days). Waveforms were highly similar (waveform template correlation > 0.99) across days in 13 units in NTS and 13 units in PbN. This degree of similarity was rare (0.3% of pairs in NTS, 1.5% of pairs in PbN) when the waveforms were from presumed-different neurons (units recorded on nonconsecutive days with at least one intervening day in which there were no spikes, or from different wires or rats). Analyses of multi-day recordings that met this criterion for “same unit” showed that responses to taste stimuli appeared, disappeared, or shifted in magnitude across days, resulting in changes in tuning. These data imply, generally, that frameworks for cell classification and, specifically, that theories of taste coding, need to consider plasticity of response profiles. PMID:27479490

  6. Spontaneous Changes in Taste Sensitivity of Single Units Recorded over Consecutive Days in the Brainstem of the Awake Rat.

    PubMed

    Sammons, Joshua D; Weiss, Michael S; Escanilla, Olga D; Fooden, Andrew F; Victor, Jonathan D; Di Lorenzo, Patricia M

    2016-01-01

    A neuron's sensitivity profile is fundamental to functional classification of cell types, and underlies theories of sensory coding. Here we show that gustatory neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and parabrachial nucleus of the pons (PbN) of awake rats spontaneously change their tuning properties across days. Rats were surgically implanted with a chronic microwire assembly into the NTS or PbN. Following recovery, water-deprived rats had free access to a lick spout that delivered taste stimuli while cellular activity was recorded. In 12 rats for the NTS and 8 rats for the PbN, single units could be isolated at the same electrode on consecutive days (NTS, 14 units for 2-5 consecutive days, median = 2 days; PbN, 23 units for 2-7 days, median = 2.5 days). Waveforms were highly similar (waveform template correlation > 0.99) across days in 13 units in NTS and 13 units in PbN. This degree of similarity was rare (0.3% of pairs in NTS, 1.5% of pairs in PbN) when the waveforms were from presumed-different neurons (units recorded on nonconsecutive days with at least one intervening day in which there were no spikes, or from different wires or rats). Analyses of multi-day recordings that met this criterion for "same unit" showed that responses to taste stimuli appeared, disappeared, or shifted in magnitude across days, resulting in changes in tuning. These data imply, generally, that frameworks for cell classification and, specifically, that theories of taste coding, need to consider plasticity of response profiles. PMID:27479490

  7. Structure and expression of rat osteosarcoma (ROS 17/2.8) alkaline phosphatase: product of a single copy gene.

    PubMed Central

    Thiede, M A; Yoon, K; Golub, E E; Noda, M; Rodan, G A

    1988-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatase [ALP; orthophosphoric-monoester phosphohydrolase (alkaline optimum), EC 3.1.3.1] is a ubiquitous enzyme of unknown function expressed at high levels in cells of mineralizing tissues. To study the structure, function, and expression of ALP, a full-length cDNA of rat ALP (2415 bases) was isolated from a ROS 17/2.8 osteosarcoma cell lambda gt10 cDNA library. The predicted amino acid sequence spans 524 residues and includes an N-terminal signal peptide of 17 amino acids, the phosphohydrolase active site, a rather hydrophilic backbone with five potential N-glycosylation sites, and a short hydrophobic C-terminal sequence. ALP negative CHO cells transfected with an expression vector containing the ALP coding sequences express ALP. The rat bone, liver, and kidney ALP shows remarkable 90% homology with the corresponding human enzyme, the most divergent region being the C-terminal hydrophobic domain through which the enzyme may be anchored to the plasma membrane. The rat ALP also shows 50% homology with the human placental and intestinal ALP and 25% homology with the Escherichia coli ALP. The amino acids involved in catalysis show nearly complete homology among all known ALP sequences, suggesting that these enzymes evolved from a common ancestral gene. The rat ALP cDNA pRAP 54, used as a hybridization probe in RNA blot analysis of several tissues that express ALP, revealed the presence of an ALP mRNA of approximately equal to 2500 bases. Furthermore, hybridization patterns derived from Southern blot analysis of rat chromosomal DNA offered molecular evidence that the ALP expressed in ROS 17/2.8 osteosarcoma and various rat tissues, excluding the intestine, is the product of the same single copy gene. Images PMID:3422431

  8. Properties of transient K+ currents and underlying single K+ channels in rat olfactory receptor neurons

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    The transient potassium current, IK(t), of enzymatically dissociated rat olfactory receptor neurons was studied using patch-clamp techniques. Upon depolarization from negative holding potentials, IK(t) activated rapidly and then inactivated with a time course described by the sum of two exponential components with time constants of 22.4 and 143 ms. Single-channel analysis revealed a further small component with a time constant of several seconds. Steady-state inactivation was complete at -20 mV and completely removed at -80 mV (midpoint -45 mV). Activation was significant at -40 mV and appeared to reach a maximum conductance at +40 mV (midpoint -13 mV). Deactivation was described by the sum of two voltage-dependent exponential components. Recovery from inactivation was extraordinarily slow (50 s at -100 mV) and the underlying processes appeared complex. IK(t) was reduced by 4- aminopyridine and tetraethylammonium applied externally. Increasing the external K+ concentration ([K+]o) from 5 to 25 mM partially removed IK(t) inactivation, usually without affecting activation kinetics. The elevated [K+]o also hyperpolarized the steady-state inactivation curve by 9 mV and significantly depolarized the voltage dependence of activation. Single transient K+ channels, with conductances of 17 and 26 pS, were observed in excised patches and often appeared to be localized into large clusters. These channels were similar to IK(t) in their kinetic, pharmacological, and voltage-dependent properties and their inactivation was also subject to modulation by [K+]o. The properties of IK(t) imply a role in action potential repolarization and suggest it may also be important in modulating spike parameters during neuronal burst firing. A simple method is also presented to correct for errors in the measurement of whole-cell resistance (Ro) that can result when patch-clamping very small cells. The analysis revealed a mean corrected Ro of 26 G omega for these cells. PMID:1865174

  9. Hyperhidrosis and sympathetic skin response in chronic alcoholic patients.

    PubMed

    Tugnoli, V; Eleopra, R; De Grandis, D

    1999-02-01

    Palmoplantar hyperhidrosis is frequently observed in patients with a clinical history of chronic abnormal alcoholic intake. It can be related to peripheral or central mechanisms such as abnormal spontaneous activity in peripheral damaged fibres; receptor hypersensitivity; compensatory incremented activity in segmentary anhidrosis; or impairment of central sweat control. With the aim of quantifying this phenomenon and of identifying its possible origin, sympathetic skin response (SSR) analysis was performed in 20 chronic alcoholic patients with clinical diffuse acral hyperhidrosis, compared with 30 normal subjects and 2 patients affected by primary palmoplantar hyperhidrosis (PPH). SSRs were recorded by disc electrodes place on the hands and feet, simultaneously. At the hand level two recording sites were selected: palm-dorsum proximally and ventral-dorsal tip of the third finger distally. Attention was paid to the number of SSR after a single endogenous or exogenous stimulus. The alcoholic patients were divided into two groups, with and without mild polyneuropathy. Both patient groups showed synchronous SSR at recording sites, with the same pattern and the normal delay between upper and lower arms. In the control group one response was generally related to a single stimulus; if more responses were elicited an evident adaptation was shown; in the two groups of patients an increase of the waves was observed in all the recording sites without any adaptation. The SSR profile described in alcoholic patients was observed also in PPH. The pattern of SSR waves in alcoholic patients seems to suggest a possible central origin of this type of hyperhidrosis. PMID:10212744

  10. Properties of single potassium channels modulated by glucose in rat pancreatic beta-cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ashcroft, F M; Ashcroft, S J; Harrison, D E

    1988-01-01

    1. The patch clamp method has been used to examine the effect of glucose on single K+ channel currents recorded from cell-attached patches on dissociated rat pancreatic beta-cells. Patch pipettes contained a 140 mM-K+ solution. 2. In glucose-free solution three types of K+ channels were observed. Two of these, having conductances of around 50 pS (G-channel) and 20 pS when the external K+ concentration, [K+]0, was 140 mM, were active at the resting potential of the cell. The G-channel was observed in more patches and showed higher activity; it therefore appears to contribute the major fraction of the resting K+ permeability of the beta-cell. At membrane potentials positive to about +20 mV a third type of K+ channel, having a mean conductance of 120 pS, was activated. The open probability of this channel was strongly voltage dependent and increased with depolarization. 3. The reversal potential of the G-channel current was shifted 59 mV by a 10-fold change in external K+ (Na+ substitution) indicating the channel is highly K+ selective. The single-channel conductance varied with [K+]o as predicted from the Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz equation; at physiological [K+]o (5 mM-K+) an inward conductance of around 10 pS is predicted. The amplitude of the single-channel current showed a tendency to saturate with increasing [K+]o. 4. Single G-channel currents show burst kinetics indicating at least two closed states. The open and closed (gap) times within the bursts were distributed exponentially with time constants of 2.5 ms (tau o) and 0.5 ms (tau c1) respectively at the resting potential of the cell. There was little change in tau c1 over the voltage range -40 to 60 mV (pipette potential) but tau o increased slightly with membrane depolarization. 5. The addition of glucose to the bath solution produced a reversible, dose-dependent decrease in G-channel activity. This decrease results principally from a reduction in the frequency and duration of the bursts of openings with

  11. Sympathetic input modulates, but does not determine, phase of peripheral circadian oscillators.

    PubMed

    Vujovic, Nina; Davidson, Alec J; Menaker, Michael

    2008-07-01

    The circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) maintains phase synchrony among circadian oscillators throughout the organism. Environmental light signals entrain the SCN, but timed, limited meal access acts as an overriding time cue for several peripheral tissues. We present data from a peripheral oscillator, the submaxillary salivary gland, in which temporal restriction of meals fails to entrain gene expression. In day-fed rats, submaxillary gland rhythms in expression of the clock gene Period1 (Per1) stay entrained to the light cycle (peaking at night) or become arrhythmic. This result suggests that feeding cues compete weakly with light cycle cues to set the phase of clock genes in this tissue. Since the submaxillary glands receive sympathetic innervation originating in the SCN, which relays light cycle cues to other oscillators, we attempted to assess the role of this neural input in phase control of submaxillary Per1 expression. We sympathetically denervated the submaxillary glands before subjecting rats to daytime-restricted feeding. After denervation, Per1 rhythms in all submaxillary glands shifted phase 180 degrees and entrained to daytime feeding. These results support the hypothesis that peripheral oscillators may receive multiple signals contributing to their phase of entrainment. Sympathetic efferents from the SCN can relay light cycle information, while other external cues may reach tissues through other efferents or nonneural pathways. In an abnormal, disruptive regimen such as daytime-restricted feeding, these different signals compete. Arrhythmicity may result if one signal is not clearly dominant. Elimination of the dominant signal (e.g., surgical sympathectomy) may allow a secondary signal to control phase.

  12. Effects of chronic oestrogen treatment are not selective for uterine noradrenaline-containing sympathetic nerves: a transplantation study

    PubMed Central

    BRAUER, M. MONICA; CHAVEZ-GENARO, REBECA; LLODRA, JAIME; RICHERI, ANALIA; SCORZA, M. CECILIA

    2000-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that chronic administration of oestrogen during postnatal rat development dramatically reduces the total content of noradrenaline in the uterine horn, abolishes myometrial noradrenergic innervation and reduces noradrenaline-fluorescence intensity of intrauterine perivascular nerve fibres. In the present study we analysed if this response is due to a direct and selective effect of oestrogen on the uterine noradrenaline-containing sympathetic nerves, using the in oculo transplantation method. Small pieces of myometrium from prepubertal rats were transplanted into the anterior eye chamber of adult ovariectomised host rats. The effect of systemic chronic oestrogen treatment on the reinnervation of the transplants by noradrenaline-containing sympathetic fibres from the superior cervical ganglion was analysed on cryostat tissue sections processed by the glyoxylic acid technique. In addition, the innervation of the host iris was assessed histochemically and biochemically. The histology of the transplants and irises was examined in toluidine blue-stained semithin sections. These studies showed that after 5 wk in oculo, the overall size of the oestrogen-treated transplants was substantially larger than controls, and histology showed that this change was related to an increase in the size and number of smooth muscle cells within the transplant. Chronic oestrogen treatment did not provoke trophic changes in the irideal muscle. Histochemistry showed that control transplants had a rich noradrenergic innervation, associated with both myometrium and blood vessels. Conversely, in oestrogen-treated transplants only occasional fibres were recognised, showing a reduced NA fluorescence intensity. No changes in the pattern and density of innervation or in the total content of noradrenaline of the host irises were detected after chronic exposure to oestrogen. We interpreted these results to indicate that the effects of oestrogen on uterine noradrenaline

  13. Sympathetic cooling of nanospheres with cold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoya, Cris; Witherspoon, Apryl; Ranjit, Gambhir; Casey, Kirsten; Kitching, John; Geraci, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    Ground state cooling of mesoscopic mechanical structures could enable new hybrid quantum systems where mechanical oscillators act as transducers. Such systems could provide coupling between photons, spins and charges via phonons. It has recently been shown theoretically that optically trapped dielectric nanospheres could reach the ground state via sympathetic cooling with trapped cold atoms. This technique can be beneficial in cases where cryogenic operation of the oscillator is not practical. We describe experimental advances towards coupling an optically levitated dielectric nanosphere to a gas of cold Rubidium atoms. The sphere and the cold atoms are in separate vacuum chambers and are coupled using a one-dimensional optical lattice. This work is partially supported by NSF, Grant Nos. PHY-1205994,PHY-1506431.

  14. Sympathetically mediated hypertension in autonomic failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, J. R.; Jordan, J.; Diedrich, A.; Pohar, B.; Black, B. K.; Robertson, D.; Biaggioni, I.; Roberton, D. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Approximately 50% of patients with primary autonomic failure have supine hypertension. We investigated whether this supine hypertension could be driven by residual sympathetic activity. METHODS AND RESULTS: In patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA) or pure autonomic failure (PAF), we studied the effect of oral yohimbine on seated systolic blood pressure (SBP), the effect of ganglionic blockade (with trimethaphan) on supine SBP and plasma catecholamine levels, and the effect of alpha(1)-adrenoreceptor blockade (phentolamine) on supine SBP. The SBP response to yohimbine was greater in patients with MSA than in those with PAF (area under the curve, 2248+/-543 versus 467+/-209 mm Hg. min; P=0.022). MSA patients with a higher supine SBP had a greater response than those with a lower supine SBP (3874+/-809 versus 785+/-189 mm Hg. min; P=0. 0017); this relationship was not seen in PAF patients. MSA patients had a marked depressor response to low infusion rates of trimethaphan; the response in PAF patients was more variable. Plasma norepinephrine decreased in both groups, but heart rate did not change in either group. At 1 mg/min, trimethaphan decreased supine SBP by 67+/-8 and 12+/-6 mm Hg in MSA and PAF patients, respectively (P<0.0001). Cardiac index and total peripheral resistance decreased in MSA patients by 33.4+/-5.8% and 40.7+/-9.5%, respectively (P=0. 0015). Patients having a depressor response to trimethaphan also had a depressor response to phentolamine. In MSA patients, the pressor response to yohimbine and the decrease in SBP with 1 mg/min trimethaphan were correlated (r=0.98; P=0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Residual sympathetic activity drives supine hypertension in MSA. It contributes to, but does not completely explain, supine hypertension in PAF.

  15. Sympathetic adaptations to one-legged training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, C. A.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of leg exercise training on sympathetic nerve responses at rest and during dynamic exercise. Six men were trained by using high-intensity interval and prolonged continuous one-legged cycling 4 day/wk, 40 min/day, for 6 wk. Heart rate, mean arterial pressure (MAP), and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA; peroneal nerve) were measured during 3 min of upright dynamic one-legged knee extensions at 40 W before and after training. After training, peak oxygen uptake in the trained leg increased 19 +/- 2% (P < 0.01). At rest, heart rate decreased from 77 +/- 3 to 71 +/- 6 beats/min (P < 0.01) with no significant changes in MAP (91 +/- 7 to 91 +/- 11 mmHg) and MSNA (29 +/- 3 to 28 +/- 1 bursts/min). During exercise, both heart rate and MAP were lower after training (108 +/- 5 to 96 +/- 5 beats/min and 132 +/- 8 to 119 +/- 4 mmHg, respectively, during the third minute of exercise; P < 0.01). MSNA decreased similarly from rest during the first 2 min of exercise both before and after training. However, MSNA was significantly less during the third minute of exercise after training (32 +/- 2 to 22 +/- 3 bursts/min; P < 0.01). This training effect on MSNA remained when MSNA was expressed as bursts per 100 heartbeats. Responses to exercise in five untrained control subjects were not different at 0 and 6 wk. These results demonstrate that exercise training prolongs the decrease in MSNA during upright leg exercise and indicates that attenuation of MSNA to exercise reported with forearm training also occurs with leg training.

  16. Cortical control of thermoregulatory sympathetic activation.

    PubMed

    Fechir, M; Klega, A; Buchholz, H G; Pfeifer, N; Balon, S; Schlereth, T; Geber, C; Breimhorst, M; Maihöfner, C; Birklein, F; Schreckenberger, M

    2010-06-01

    Thermoregulation enables adaptation to different ambient temperatures. A complex network of central autonomic centres may be involved. In contrast to the brainstem, the role of the cortex has not been clearly evaluated. This study was therefore designed to address cerebral function during a whole thermoregulatory cycle (cold, neutral and warm stimulation) using 18-fluordeoxyglucose-PET (FDG-PET). Sympathetic activation parameters were co-registered. Ten healthy male volunteers were examined three times on three different days in a water-perfused whole-body suit. After a baseline period (32 degrees C), temperature was either decreased to 7 degrees C (cold), increased to 50 degrees C (warm) or kept constant (32 degrees C, neutral), thereafter the PET examination was performed. Cerebral glucose metabolism was increased in infrapontine brainstem and cerebellar hemispheres during cooling and warming, each compared with neutral temperature. Simultaneously, FDG uptake decreased in the bilateral anterior/mid-cingulate cortex during warming, and in the right insula during cooling and warming. Conjunction analyses revealed that right insular deactivation and brainstem activation appeared both during cold and warm stimulation. Metabolic connectivity analyses revealed positive correlations between the cortical activations, and negative correlations between these cortical areas and brainstem/cerebellar regions. Heart rate changes negatively correlated with glucose metabolism in the anterior cingulate cortex and in the middle frontal gyrus/dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and changes of sweating with glucose metabolism in the posterior cingulate cortex. In summary, these results suggest that the cerebral cortex exerts an inhibitory control on autonomic centres located in the brainstem or cerebellum. These findings may represent reasonable explanations for sympathetic hyperactivity, which occurs, for example, after hemispheric stroke.

  17. Sympathetic adaptations to one-legged training.

    PubMed

    Ray, C A

    1999-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of leg exercise training on sympathetic nerve responses at rest and during dynamic exercise. Six men were trained by using high-intensity interval and prolonged continuous one-legged cycling 4 day/wk, 40 min/day, for 6 wk. Heart rate, mean arterial pressure (MAP), and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA; peroneal nerve) were measured during 3 min of upright dynamic one-legged knee extensions at 40 W before and after training. After training, peak oxygen uptake in the trained leg increased 19 +/- 2% (P < 0.01). At rest, heart rate decreased from 77 +/- 3 to 71 +/- 6 beats/min (P < 0.01) with no significant changes in MAP (91 +/- 7 to 91 +/- 11 mmHg) and MSNA (29 +/- 3 to 28 +/- 1 bursts/min). During exercise, both heart rate and MAP were lower after training (108 +/- 5 to 96 +/- 5 beats/min and 132 +/- 8 to 119 +/- 4 mmHg, respectively, during the third minute of exercise; P < 0.01). MSNA decreased similarly from rest during the first 2 min of exercise both before and after training. However, MSNA was significantly less during the third minute of exercise after training (32 +/- 2 to 22 +/- 3 bursts/min; P < 0.01). This training effect on MSNA remained when MSNA was expressed as bursts per 100 heartbeats. Responses to exercise in five untrained control subjects were not different at 0 and 6 wk. These results demonstrate that exercise training prolongs the decrease in MSNA during upright leg exercise and indicates that attenuation of MSNA to exercise reported with forearm training also occurs with leg training. PMID:10233121

  18. [Clinical application of skin sympathetic nerve activity].

    PubMed

    Iwase, Satoshi

    2009-03-01

    Skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA) is microneurographically recorded from the skin nerve fascicle in the peripheral nerves. It is characterized by the following features: 1) irregular, pulse asynchronous, burst activity with respiratory variation, 2) burst activity followed by vasoconstriction and/or sweating, 3) elicited by mental stress and arousal stimuli, e.g., sound, pain, electric stimulation, 4) burst with longer duration as compared with sympathetic outflow to muscles, and 5) burst activity following sudden inspiratory action. It comprises vasoconstrictor (VC) and sudomotor(SM) activity, as well as vasodilator (VD) activity. VC and SM discharge independently, whereas VD is the same activity with different neurotransmission. The VC and SM are differentiated by effector response, e.g., laser Doppler flowmetry and skin potential changes. SSNA function in thermoregulation in the human body; however it is also elicited by mental stress. SSNA is the lowest at thermoneutral ambient temperature (approximately 27 degrees C), and is enhanced in the pressence of ambient warm and cool air. The burst amplitude is well-correlated to both skin blood flow reduction rate or sweat rate change. The clinical application of SSNA comprises the following: 1) clarification of sweating phenomenon, 2) clarification and diagnosis of anhidrosis, 3) clarification and diagnosis of hyperhidrosis, 4) clarification of thermoregulatory function and diagnosis of thermoregulatory disorder, 5) clarification of pathophysiology and diagnosis of vascular diseases, e.g., Raynaud and Buerger diseases. 6) clarification of the relation between cognitive function and SSNA and 7) determination of pharmacological effect attributable to change in neuroeffector responses. PMID:19301594

  19. Role of sympathetic nerve activity in the process of fainting

    PubMed Central

    Iwase, Satoshi; Nishimura, Naoki; Mano, Tadaaki

    2014-01-01

    Syncope is defined as a transient loss of consciousness and postural tone, characterized by rapid onset, short duration, and spontaneous recovery, and the process of syncope progression is here described with two types of sympathetic change. Simultaneous recordings of microneurographically-recorded muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and continuous and noninvasive blood pressure measurement has disclosed what is going on during the course of syncope progression. For vasovagal or neurally mediated syncope, three stages are identified in the course of syncope onset, oscillation, imbalance, and catastrophe phases. Vasovagal syncope is characterized by sympathoexcitation, followed by vagal overcoming via the Bezold-Jarisch reflex. Orthostatic syncope is caused by response failure or a lack of sympathetic nerve activity to the orthostatic challenge, followed by fluid shift and subsequent low cerebral perfusion. Four causes are considered for the compensatory failure that triggers orthostatic syncope: hypovolemia, increased pooling in the lower body, failure to activate sympathetic activity, and failure of vasoconstriction against sympathetic vasoconstrictive stimulation. Many pathophysiological conditions have been described from the perspectives of (1) exaggerated sympathoexcitation and (2) failure to activate the sympathetic nerve. We conclude that the sympathetic nervous system can control cardiovascular function, and its failure results in syncope; however, responses of the system obtained by microneurographically-recorded MSNA would determine the pathophysiology of the onset and progression of syncope, explaining the treatment effect that could be achieved by the analysis of this mechanism. PMID:25309444

  20. Sympathetic nervous system and inflammation: a conceptual view.

    PubMed

    Jänig, Wilfrid

    2014-05-01

    The peripheral sympathetic nervous system is organized into function-specific pathways that transmit the activity from the central nervous system to its target tissues. The transmission of the impulse activity in the sympathetic ganglia and to the effector tissues is target cell specific and guarantees that the centrally generated command is faithfully transmitted. This is the neurobiological basis of autonomic regulations in which the sympathetic nervous system is involved. Each sympathetic pathway is connected to distinct central circuits in the spinal cord, lower and upper brain stem and hypothalamus. In addition to its conventional functions, the sympathetic nervous system is involved in protection of body tissues against challenges arising from the environment as well as from within the body. This function includes the modulation of inflammation, nociceptors and above all the immune system. Primary and secondary lymphoid organs are innervated by sympathetic postganglionic neurons and processes in the immune tissue are modulated by activity in these sympathetic neurons via adrenoceptors in the membranes of the immune cells (see Bellinger and Lorton, 2014). Are the primary and secondary lymphoid organs innervated by a functionally specific sympathetic pathway that is responsible for the modulation of the functioning of the immune tissue by the brain? Or is this modulation of immune functions a general function of the sympathetic nervous system independent of its specific functions? Which central circuits are involved in the neural regulation of the immune system in the context of neural regulation of body protection? What is the function of the sympatho-adrenal system, involving epinephrine, in the modulation of immune functions? PMID:24525016

  1. A single-fibre study of the relationship between MHC and TnC isoform composition in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Brett; Nguyen, Long T; Stephenson, Gabriela M M

    2004-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the possibility that MHC (myosin heavy chain) and TnC (troponin C) isoforms exist in specific combinations in rat-skeletal-muscle fibres. Single fibres (numbering 245) from soleus (predominantly slow-twitch) and sternomastoid (predominantly fast-twitch) muscles of adult rats were analysed for MHC and TnC isoform composition, using alanine-SDS/PAGE for separating MHC isoforms, and a novel method (based on the previously reported influence of Ca2+ on the mobility of Ca2+-binding proteins in SDS gels) for unequivocal identification of TnC isoforms in single-fibre segments. In this study, all fibres that contained only one MHC isoform (slow or fast) contained only the matching TnC isoform and all fibres that contained multiple fast MHC isoforms contained only the fast TnC isoform. Fibres expressing both slow and fast MHC isoforms displayed either both TnC isoforms or only one TnC isoform of a type depending on the relative proportion of fast/slow MHC present. Our results suggest a close relationship between MHC and TnC isoform composition in non-transforming skeletal muscles of adult rat. PMID:14572306

  2. Compositional analysis of growing axons from rat sympathetic neurons

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    We describe culture systems for neurons of an adrenergic autonomic ganglion which: (a) permit cultivation of neurons without supporting cells, (b) permit separate harvest of somal and axonal material, and (c) permit direct access to the neuronal surface. The antimetabolites used to suppress supporting cell growth did not have demonstrable effects on neuronal polypeptide synthesis. Rapid neurite outgrowth, which characterized these cultures, was prevented by colchicine or cycloheximide and resumed promptly after their withdrawal. Axons separated from cell bodies showed no incorporation of label from leucine or fucose, but did exhibit incorporation of glucosamine. The major polypeptides present in this neuron, as demonstrated by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis, are described. No major differences in polypeptide content were observed when soma and axons were compared. Likewise, there were no differences detected in polypeptides synthesized by neurons in suspension or neurons actively extending processes. Analysis of the polypeptides within the neurites after labeling with amino acids indicated transport at a number of different rates; certain of these polypeptides corresponded in size and transport characteristics to polypeptides observed in the rabbit optic nerve after labeling of retinal ganglion cells. Tubulin and actin have been definitively identified in this cell type (18); we found proteins similar in size and proportionate amounts to be among the rapidly transported soluble polypeptides. The prominent polypeptides observed after several methods of surface labeling are described. PMID:151689

  3. Secondary sympathetic chain reconstruction after endoscopic thoracic sympathicotomy.

    PubMed

    Telaranta, T

    1998-01-01

    Thoracoscopic sympathicotomy by electrocautery is an irreversible procedure. Thus the indications must be meticulously considered before the final decision to operate is taken by both the surgeon and the patient. All possible side effects should be dealt with and written informed consent required. A case of an open nerve reconstruction of the divided sympathetic chains is presented. One year after the reconstruction the patient reported subjective relief of the compensatory oversweating and restoration of sweating in the face and the armpit. Reversible methods like clipping the sympathetic chain should be considered whenever feasible instead of the irreversible electrocoagulation of the sympathetic chain. PMID:9641379

  4. Cardiac sympathetic neuroimaging: summary of the First International Symposium

    PubMed Central

    Orimo, Satoshi

    2010-01-01

    The First International Symposium on Cardiac Sympathetic Neuroimaging brought together for the first time clinical and preclinical researchers evaluating autonomic and neurocardiologic disorders by this modality. The invited lectures and posters presented some uses of cardiac sympathetic neuroimaging for diagnosis, prognosis, and monitoring treatments. The Symposium also included a discussion about whether and how to expand the availability of cardiac sympathetic neuroimaging at medical centers in the United States. Here, we review the background for the Symposium, provide an annotated summary of the lectures and posters, discuss some of the take-home points from the roundtable discussion, and propose a plan of action for the future. PMID:19266158

  5. Mitochondrial membrane potential in single living adult rat cardiac myocytes exposed to anoxia or metabolic inhibition.

    PubMed Central

    Di Lisa, F; Blank, P S; Colonna, R; Gambassi, G; Silverman, H S; Stern, M D; Hansford, R G

    1995-01-01

    1. The relation between mitochondrial membrane potential (delta psi m) and cell function was investigated in single adult rat cardiac myocytes during anoxia and reoxygenation. delta psi m was studied by loading myocytes with JC-1 (5,5',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'- tetra-ethylbenzimidazolylcarbocyanine iodide), a fluorescent probe characterized by two emission peaks (539 and 597 nm with excitation at 490 nm) corresponding to monomer and aggregate forms of the dye. 2. De-energizing conditions applied to mitochondria, cell suspensions or single cells decreased the aggregate emission and increased the monomer emission. This latter result cannot be explained by changes of JC-1 concentration in the aqueous mitochondrial matrix phase indicating that hydrophobic interaction of the probe with membranes has to be taken into account to explain JC-1 fluorescence properties in isolated mitochondria or intact cells. 3. A different sensitivity of the two JC-1 forms to delta psi m changes was shown in isolated mitochondria by the effects of ADP and FCCP and the calibration with K+ diffusion potentials. The monomer emission was responsive to values of delta psi m below 140 mV, which hardly modified the aggregate emission. Thus JC-1 represents a unique double sensor which can provide semi-quantitative information in both low and high potential ranges. 4. At the onset of glucose-free anoxia the epifluorescence of individual myocytes studied in the single excitation (490 nm)-double emission (530 and 590 nm) mode showed a gradual decline of the aggregate emission, which reached a plateau while electrically stimulated (0.2 Hz) contraction was still retained. The subsequent failure of contraction was followed by the rise of the emission at 530 nm, corresponding to the monomer form of the dye, concomitantly with the development of rigor contracture. 5. The onset of the rigor was preceded by the increase in intracellular Mg2+ concentration ([Mg2+]i) monitored by mag-indo-1 epifluorescence

  6. A-Single Spermatogonia Heterogeneity and Cell Cycles Synchronize with Rat Seminiferous Epithelium Stages VIII–IX1

    PubMed Central

    Abid, Shadaan N.; Richardson, Timothy E.; Powell, Heather M.; Jaichander, Priscilla; Chaudhary, Jaideep; Chapman, Karen M.; Hamra, F. Kent

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT In mammalian testes, “A-single” spermatogonia function as stem cells that sustain sperm production for fertilizing eggs. Yet, it is not understood how cellular niches regulate the developmental fate of A-single spermatogonia. Here, immunolabeling studies in rat testes define a novel population of ERBB3+ germ cells as approximately 5% of total SNAP91+ A-single spermatogonia along a spermatogenic wave. As a function of time, ERBB3+ A-single spermatogonia are detected during a 1- to 2-day period each 12.9-day sperm cycle, representing 35%–40% of SNAP91+ A-single spermatogonia in stages VIII–IX of the seminiferous epithelium. Local concentrations of ERBB3+ A-single spermatogonia are maintained under the mean density measured for neighboring SNAP91+ A-single spermatogonia, potentially indicative of niche saturation. ERBB3+ spermatogonia also synchronize their cell cycles with epithelium stages VIII–IX, where they form physical associations with preleptotene spermatocytes transiting the blood-testis barrier and Sertoli cells undergoing sperm release. Thus, A-single spermatogonia heterogeneity within this short-lived and reoccurring microenvironment invokes novel theories on how cellular niches integrate with testicular physiology to orchestrate sperm development in mammals. PMID:24389876

  7. Switch to GluR2-Lacking AMPA Receptors Increases Neuronal Excitability in Hypothalamus and Sympathetic Drive in Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Li, De-Pei; Byan, Hee Sun; Pan, Hui-Lin

    2012-01-01

    Glutamatergic synaptic input in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) plays a critical role in regulating sympathetic outflow in hypertension. GluR2-lacking AMPA receptors (AMPARs) are permeable to Ca2+ and their currents show unique inward rectification. However, little is known about changes in the AMPAR composition and its functional significance in hypertension. In this study, we found that AMPAR-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents (AMPAR-EPSCs) of retrogradely labeled spinally projecting PVN neurons exhibited a linear current-voltage relationship in Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. However, AMPAR-EPSCs of labeled PVN neurons in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) displayed inward rectification at positive holding potentials, which were not altered by lowering blood pressure with celiac ganglionectomy. Blocking GluR2-lacking AMPARs with 1-naphthyl acetyl spermine (NAS) caused a greater reduction in the AMPAR-EPSC amplitude and firing activity of PVN neurons in SHR than in WKY rats. Furthermore, blocking NMDA receptors and inhibition of calpain or calcineurin abolished inward rectification of AMPAR-EPSCs of PVN neurons in SHR. The GluR2 protein level was significantly less in the plasma membrane but greater in the cytosolic vesicle fraction in SHR than in WKY rats. In addition, microinjection of NAS into the PVN decreased blood pressure and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity in SHR but not in WKY rats. Our study reveals that increased GluR2-lacking AMPAR activity of PVN neurons results from GluR2 internalization through NMDA receptor–calpain–calcineurin signaling in hypertension. This phenotype switch in synaptic AMPARs contributes to increased excitability of PVN presympathetic neurons and sympathetic vasomotor tone in hypertension. PMID:22219297

  8. In vivo assessment of diet-induced rat hepatic steatosis development by percutaneous single-fiber spectroscopy detects scattering spectral changes due to fatty infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piao, Daqing; Sultana, Nigar; Holyoak, G. Reed; Ritchey, Jerry W.; Wall, Corey R.; Murray, Jill K.; Bartels, Kenneth E.

    2015-11-01

    This study explores percutaneous single-fiber spectroscopy (SfS) of rat livers undergoing fatty infiltration. Eight test rats were fed a methionine-choline-deficient (MCD) diet, and four control rats were fed a normal diet. Two test rats and one control rat were euthanized on days 12, 28, 49, and 77 following initiation of the diet, after percutaneous SfS of the liver under transabdominal ultrasound guidance. Histology of each set of the two euthanized test rats showed mild and mild hepatic lipid accumulations on day 12, moderate and severe on day 28, severe and mild on day 49, and moderate and mild on day 77. Livers with moderate or higher lipid accumulation generally presented higher spectral reflectance intensity when compared to lean livers. Livers of the eight test rats on day 12, two of which had mild lipid accumulation, revealed an average scattering power of 0.37±0.14 in comparison to 0.07±0.14 for the four control rats (p<0.01). When livers of the test rats with various levels of fatty infiltration were combined, the average scattering power was 0.36±0.15 in comparison to 0.14±0.24 of the control rats (0.05

  9. Single-prolonged stress induces apoptosis in dorsal raphe nucleus in the rat model of posttraumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder that develops after exposure to a life-threatening traumatic experience. Meta-analyses of the brainstem showed that midsagittal area of the pons was significantly reduced in patients with PTSD, suggesting a potential apoptosis in dorsal raphe nucleus after single-prolonged stress (SPS). The aim of this study is to investigate whether SPS induces apoptosis in dorsal raphe nucleus in PTSD rats, which may be a possible mechanism of reduced volume of pons and density of gray matter. Methods In this study, rats were randomly divided into 1d, 7d and 14d groups after SPS along with the control group. The apoptosis rate was determined using annexin V-FITC/PI double-labeled flow cytometry (FCM). Levels of Cytochrome c (Cyt-C) was examined by Western blotting. Expression of Cyt-C on mitochondria in the dorsal raphe nucleus neuron was determined by enzymohistochemistry under transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The change of thiamine monophosphatase (TMP) levels was assessed by enzymohistochemistry under light microscope and TEM. Morphological changes of the ultrastructure of the dorsal raphe nucleus neuron were determined by TEM. Results Apoptotic morphological alterations were observed in dorsal raphe nucleus neuron for all SPS-stimulate groups of rats. The apoptosis rates were significantly increased in dorsal raphe nucleus neuron of SPS rats, along with increased release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria into the cytoplasm, increased expression of Cyt-C and TMP levels in the cytoplasm, which reached to the peak of increase 7 days of SPS. Conclusions The results indicate that SPS induced Cyt-C released from mitochondria into cytosol and apoptosis in dorsal raphe nucleus neuron of rats. Increased TMP in cytoplasm facilitated the clearance of apoptotic cells. We propose that this presents one of the mechanisms that lead to reduced volume of pons and gray matter associated with PTSD. PMID

  10. Sympathetic denervation-induced MSC mobilization in distraction osteogenesis associates with inhibition of MSC migration and osteogenesis by norepinephrine/adrb3.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhaojie; Wang, Lei; Zhao, Yinghua; Cao, Jian; Wang, Tao; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Yabo; Yang, Xinjie; Cheng, Xiaobing; Liu, Baolin; Lei, Delin

    2014-01-01

    The sympathetic nervous system regulates bone formation and resorption under physiological conditions. However, it is still unclear how the sympathetic nerves affect stem cell migration and differentiation in bone regeneration. Distraction osteogenesis is an ideal model of bone regeneration due to its special nature as a self-engineering tissue. In this study, a rat model of mandibular distraction osteogenesis with transection of cervical sympathetic trunk was used to demonstrate that sympathetic denervation can deplete norepinephrine (NE) in distraction-induced bone callus, down-regulate β3-adrenergic receptor (adrb3) in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and promote MSC migration from perivascular regions to bone-forming units. An in vitro Transwell assay was here used to demonstrate that NE can inhibit stroma-derived factor-1 (SDF-1)-induced MSC migration and expression of the migration-related gene matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and downregulate that of the anti-migration gene tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-3 (TIMP-3). Knockdown of adrb3 using siRNA abolishes inhibition of MSC migration. An in vitro osteogenic assay was used to show that NE can inhibit the formation of MSC bone nodules and expression of the osteogenic marker genes alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteocalcin (OCN), and runt-related transcription factor-2 (RUNX2), but knockdown of adrb3 by siRNA can abolish such inhibition of the osteogenic differentiation of MSCs. It is here concluded that sympathetic denervation-induced MSC mobilization in rat mandibular distraction osteogenesis is associated with inhibition of MSC migration and osteogenic differentiation by NE/adrb3 in vitro. These findings may facilitate understanding of the relationship of MSC mobilization and sympathetic nervous system across a wide spectrum of tissue regeneration processes.

  11. A comparative validation of sympathetic reactivity in children and adults.

    PubMed

    Quigley, Karen S; Stifter, Cynthia A

    2006-07-01

    This study provides comparative data on cardiac reactivity to common laboratory tasks in preschool children (ages 4.5-5.5 years) and young adults. We used a series of tasks (an emotionally evocative video, interview, reaction time task, and cold forehead pressor) to examine whether pre-ejection period, a common estimate of sympathetic cardiac activity in adults, provides a comparable measure of sympathetic reactivity to these tasks in preschool children. Our results demonstrate that the cardiac reactivity (pre-ejection period, respiratory sinus arrhythmia, and heart period) to such tasks in children and young adults is similar, but with smaller sympathetic reactivity in children. The consistency of the reactivity across tasks within individuals and consistency of reactivity across children and young adults suggests that pre-ejection period is a reasonable estimate of sympathetic activity in children.

  12. Localized sympathetic overactivity: an uncommon complication of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Walsh, J C; Low, P A; Allsop, J L

    1976-01-01

    Direct nerve infiltration by tumour tissue usually produces pain, and loss of motor, sensory, and autonomic function. Two patients are reported in whom a major symptom of nerve infiltration was sympathetic overactivity manifested by excessive spontaneous sweating. PMID:1255218

  13. Adipose afferent reflex: sympathetic activation and obesity hypertension.

    PubMed

    Xiong, X-Q; Chen, W-W; Zhu, G-Q

    2014-03-01

    Excessive sympathetic activity contributes to the pathogenesis of hypertension and the progression of the related organ damage. Adipose afferent reflex (AAR) is a sympatho-excitatory reflex that the afferent activity from white adipose tissue (WAT) increases sympathetic outflow and blood pressure. Hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN or PVH) is one of the central sites in the control of the AAR, and ionotropic glutamate receptors in the nucleus mediate the AAR. The AAR is enhanced in obesity and obesity hypertension. Enhanced WAT afferent activity and AAR contribute to the excessive sympathetic activation and hypertension in obesity. Blockage of the AAR attenuates the excessive sympathetic activity and hypertension. Leptin may be one of sensors in the WAT for the AAR, and is involved in the enhanced AAR in obesity and hypertension. This review focuses on the neuroanatomical basis and physiological functions of the AAR, and the important role of the enhanced AAR in the pathogenesis of obesity hypertension.

  14. Schwanomma From Cervical Sympathetic Chain Ganglion - A Rare Presentation.

    PubMed

    Asma, A Affee; Kannah, E

    2015-10-01

    Schwanommas arising from cervical sympathetic chain are tumours that are rare in occurrence. These lesions are usually difficult to differentiate from a vagal schwanomma and a carotid body tumour during the initial workup. In this report, a rarely seen huge cervical sympathetic chain schwanomma case with partial Horner's syndrome is being presented in detail, which to our known knowledge, is one of the few cases reported in literature. PMID:26557566

  15. Schwanomma From Cervical Sympathetic Chain Ganglion - A Rare Presentation.

    PubMed

    Asma, A Affee; Kannah, E

    2015-10-01

    Schwanommas arising from cervical sympathetic chain are tumours that are rare in occurrence. These lesions are usually difficult to differentiate from a vagal schwanomma and a carotid body tumour during the initial workup. In this report, a rarely seen huge cervical sympathetic chain schwanomma case with partial Horner's syndrome is being presented in detail, which to our known knowledge, is one of the few cases reported in literature.

  16. Vagal and sympathetic mechanisms in patients with orthostatic vasovagal syncope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morillo, C. A.; Eckberg, D. L.; Ellenbogen, K. A.; Beightol, L. A.; Hoag, J. B.; Tahvanainen, K. U.; Kuusela, T. A.; Diedrich, A. M.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Autonomic and particularly sympathetic mechanisms play a central role in the pathophysiology of vasovagal syncope. We report direct measurements of muscle sympathetic nerve activity in patients with orthostatic vasovagal syncope. METHODS AND RESULTS: We studied 53 otherwise healthy patients with orthostatic syncope. We measured RR intervals and finger arterial pressures and in 15 patients, peroneal nerve muscle sympathetic activity before and during passive 60 degree head-up tilt, with low-dose intravenous isoproterenol if presyncope did not develop by 15 minutes. We measured baroreflex gain before tilt with regression of RR intervals or sympathetic bursts on systolic or diastolic pressures after sequential injections of nitroprusside and phenylephrine. Orthostatic vasovagal reactions occurred in 21 patients, including 7 microneurography patients. Presyncopal and nonsyncopal patients had similar baseline RR intervals, arterial pressure, and muscle sympathetic nerve activity. Vagal baroreflex responses were significantly impaired at arterial pressures below (but not above) baseline levels in presyncopal patients. Initial responses to tilt were comparable; however, during the final 200 seconds of tilt, presyncopal patients had lower RR intervals and diastolic pressures than nonsyncopal patients and gradual reduction of arterial pressure and sympathetic activity. Frank presyncope began abruptly with precipitous reduction of arterial pressure, disappearance of muscle sympathetic nerve activity, and RR interval lengthening. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with orthostatic vasovagal reactions have impaired vagal baroreflex responses to arterial pressure changes below resting levels but normal initial responses to upright tilt. Subtle vasovagal physiology begins before overt presyncope. The final trigger of human orthostatic vasovagal reactions appears to be the abrupt disappearance of muscle sympathetic nerve activity.

  17. Factors governing single-trial contextual fear conditioning in the weanling rat.

    PubMed

    Burman, M A; Murawski, N J; Schiffino, F L; Rosen, J B; Stanton, M E

    2009-10-01

    Although contextual fear conditioning emerges later in development than explicit-cue fear conditioning, little is known about the stimulus parameters and biological substrates required at early ages. The authors adapted methods for investigating hippocampus function in adult rodents to identify determinants of contextual fear conditioning in developing rats. Experiment 1 examined the duration of exposure required by weanling rats at postnatal day (PND) 23 to demonstrate contextual fear conditioning. This experiment demonstrated that 30 s of context exposure is sufficient to support conditioning. Furthermore, preexposure enhanced conditioning to an immediate footshock, the context preexposure facilitation effect (CPFE), but had no effect on contextual conditioning to a delayed shock. Experiment 2 demonstrated that N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor inactivation during preexposure impairs contextual learning at PND 23. Thus, the conjuctive representations underlying the CPFE are NMDA-dependent as early as PND23 in the rat. PMID:19824781

  18. Serum methanol concentrations in rats and in men after a single dose of aspartame.

    PubMed

    Davoli, E; Cappellini, L; Airoldi, L; Fanelli, R

    1986-03-01

    Serum methanol concentrations were measured in rats and in humans given oral aspartame. The dose given to rats was the FDA's projected 99th percentile daily intake for humans, assuming aspartame were to replace all sucrose sweeteners in the diet (34 mg/kg). Four male adult volunteers each received 500 mg, equivalent to 6-8.7 mg/kg, which is approximately the FDA's estimate of mean daily human consumption. Both treatments caused a rise in serum methanol. In rats the mean peak value was 3.1 mg/litre 1 hr after administration; serum methanol returned to endogenous values 4 hr after treatment. In the men, the mean rise over endogenous values was 1.06 mg/litre after 45 min. Two hours after treatment, serum methanol had returned to basal levels. The temporary serum methanol increase showed peak values within the range of individual basal levels.

  19. THE SYMPATHETIC NERVOUS SYSTEM ALTERATIONS IN HUMAN HYPERTENSION

    PubMed Central

    Grassi, Guido; Mark, Allyn; Esler, Murray

    2015-01-01

    A number of articles have dealt with the importance and mechanisms of the sympathetic nervous system alterations in experimental animal models of hypertension. This review addresses the role of the sympathetic nervous system in the pathophysiology and therapy of human hypertension. We first discuss the strengths and limitations of various techniques for assessing the sympathetic nervous system in humans, with a focus on heart rate, plasma norepinephrine, microneurographic recording of sympathetic nerve traffic, and measurements of radiolabeled norepinephrine spillover. We then examine the evidence supporting the importance of neuroadrenergic factors as “promoters” and “amplifiers” of human hypertension. We expand on the role of the sympathetic nervous system in two increasingly common forms of secondary hypertension, namely hypertension associated with obesity and with renal disease. With this background, we examine interventions of sympathetic deactivation as a mode of antihypertensive treatment. Particular emphasis is given to the background and results of recent therapeutic approaches based on carotid baroreceptor stimulation and radiofrequency ablation of the renal nerves. PMID:25767284

  20. Influence of gravitational sympathetic stimulation on the Surgical Plethysmographic Index.

    PubMed

    Colombo, R; Marchi, A; Borghi, B; Fossali, T; Tobaldini, E; Guzzetti, S; Raimondi, F

    2015-01-01

    Surgical Plethysmographic Index (SPI), calculated from pulse photo-plethysmographic amplitude oscillations, has been proposed as a tool to measure nociception anti-nociception balance during general anesthesia, but it is affected by several confounding factor that alter the autonomic nervous system (ANS) modulation. We hypothesized that SPI may be mainly affected by sympathetic stimulation independently from nociception. We studied the effects of two sympathetic stimuli on SPI, delivered through passive head-up tilt at 45 and 90 degrees angles, in nine awake healthy adults. The sympathetic modulation was assessed by means of heart rate variability (HRV) analysis. Mean (SD) SPI significantly increased from baseline to 45 degrees [from 38.6 (13.7) to 60.8 (7.6), p<0.001)] and to 90 degrees angle tilt [82.3 (5.4), p<0.001]. The electrocardiographic mean R-to-R interval significantly shortened during both passive tilts, whereas systolic arterial pressure did not change during the study protocol. HRV changed significantly during the study protocol towards a predominance of sympathetic modulation during passive tilt. Gravitational sympathetic stimulation at two increasing angles, in absence of any painful stimuli, affects SPI in awake healthy volunteers. SPI seems to reflect the sympathetic outflow directed to peripheral vessels.

  1. Vestibular control of sympathetic activity. An otolith-sympathetic reflex in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufmann, H.; Biaggioni, I.; Voustianiouk, A.; Diedrich, A.; Costa, F.; Clarke, R.; Gizzi, M.; Raphan, T.; Cohen, B.

    2002-01-01

    It has been proposed that a vestibular reflex originating in the otolith organs and other body graviceptors modulates sympathetic activity during changes in posture with regard to gravity. To test this hypothesis, we selectively stimulated otolith and body graviceptors sinusoidally along different head axes in the coronal plane with off-vertical axis rotation (OVAR) and recorded sympathetic efferent activity in the peroneal nerve (muscle sympathetic nerve activity, MSNA), blood pressure, heart rate, and respiratory rate. All parameters were entrained during OVAR at the frequency of rotation, with MSNA increasing in nose-up positions during forward linear acceleration and decreasing when nose-down. MSNA was correlated closely with blood pressure when subjects were within +/-90 degrees of nose-down positions with a delay of 1.4 s, the normal latency of baroreflex-driven changes in MSNA. Thus, in the nose-down position, MSNA was probably driven by baroreflex afferents. In contrast, when subjects were within +/-45 degrees of the nose-up position, i.e., when positive linear acceleration was maximal along the naso-ocipital axis, MSNA was closely related to gravitational acceleration at a latency of 0.4 s. This delay is too short for MSNA changes to be mediated by the baroreflex, but it is compatible with the delay of a response originating in the vestibular system. We postulate that a vestibulosympathetic reflex, probably originating mainly in the otolith organs, contributes to blood pressure maintenance during forward linear acceleration. Because of its short latency, this reflex may be one of the earliest mechanisms to sustain blood pressure upon standing.

  2. Cellular Inflammatory Infiltrate in Pneumonitis Induced by a Single Moderate Dose of Thoracic X Radiation in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Szabo, Sara; Ghosh, Swarajit N.; Fish, Brian L.; Bodiga, Sreedhar; Tomic, Rade; Kumar, Gagan; Morrow, Natalya V.; Moulder, John E.; Jacobs, Elizabeth R.; Medhora, Meetha

    2010-01-01

    The goal of these studies was to characterize the infiltrating inflammatory cells during pneumonitis caused by moderate doses of radiation. Two groups of male rats (WAG/RijCmcr, 8 weeks old) were treated with single 10- or 15-Gy doses of thoracic X radiation; a third group of age-matched animals served as controls. Only 25% rats survived the 15-Gy dose. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and whole lung mounts were subjected to cytological and histological evaluation after 8 weeks for distribution of resident macrophages, neutrophils, lymphocytes and mast cells. There was a modest increase in airway and airspace-associated neutrophils in lungs from rats receiving 15 Gy. Mast cells (detected by immunohistochemistry for tryptase) increased over 70% with 10 Gy and over 13-fold after 15 Gy, with considerable leakage of tryptase into blood vessels and airways. Circulating levels of eight inflammatory cytokines were not altered after 10 Gy but appeared to decrease after 15 Gy. In summary, there were only modest increases in cellular inflammatory infiltrate during pneumonitis after a non-lethal dose of 10 Gy, but there was a dramatic rise in mast cell infiltration after 15 Gy, suggesting that circulating levels of mast cell products may be useful markers of severe pneumonitis. PMID:20334527

  3. Comparisons of the clinical outcomes of thoracoscopic sympathetic surgery for palmar hyperhidrosis: R4 sympathicotomy versus R4 sympathetic clipping versus R3 sympathetic clipping

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Seok; Haam, Seokjin; Lee, Sungsoo

    2016-01-01

    Background Thoracoscopic sympathetic surgery is regarded as a definitive treatment for palmar hyperhidrosis. However, the optimal surgical strategy remains unclear. The aim of this study was to compare outcomes based on the level and type of sympathetic disconnection in patients with palmar hyperhidrosis. Methods From January 2009 to December 2014, 101 patients with palmar hyperhidrosis underwent thoracoscopic sympathetic surgery at Gangnam Severance Hospital. Complete follow-up information was obtained from 59 patients. We retrospectively analyzed the results of operation, degree of palmar sweating (%), grade of compensatory sweating (none, mild, moderate, severe, very severe), grade of satisfaction (very satisfied, satisfied, moderate, dissatisfied, very dissatisfied), and recurrence/failure. Results R4 sympathicotomy, R4 sympathetic clipping, and R3 sympathetic clipping were performed in 16, 20, and 23 patients, respectively. The mean degree of palmar sweating after sympathetic surgery was not significantly different between these three groups (17.50% vs. 27.00% vs. 29.78%; P=0.38). The rate of life-bothering compensatory sweating was lower in the R4 sympathicotomy group compared with those of other two groups (0% vs. 25%, 47.8%; P=0.09). The rate of very satisfied to moderate grades of satisfaction were lower in the R3 sympathetic clipping group compared with those of other two groups (93.8%, 100% vs. 73.9%; P=0.07). The rate of recurrence/failure rates were lower in the R4 sympathicotomy group compared with those of other two groups (12.50% vs. 35.00%, 34.8%; P=0.25). Sympathetic surgery at the R3 level was the only significant risk factor for patient dissatisfaction (odd ratio =12.353, 95% confidence interval =1.376–110.914; P=0.025). Conclusions Our data support that R4 sympathicotomy had lower grades of compensatory sweating, higher grades of satisfaction, and lower rates of recurrence/failure. We therefore consider R4 sympathicotomy as an optimal

  4. Muscle glucose uptake in the rat after suspension with single hindlimb weight bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stump, Craig S.; Woodman, Christopher R.; Fregosi, Ralph F.; Tipton, Charles M.

    1993-01-01

    An examination is conducted of the effect of nonweight-bearing conditions, and the systemic influences of simulated microgravity on rat hindlimb muscles. The results obtained suggest that the increases in hindlimb muscle glucose uptake and extracellular space associated with simulated microgravity persist with hindlimb weightbearing, despite the prevention of muscle atrophy. The mechanism (or mechanisms) responsible for these effects are currently unknown.

  5. Developmental protein malnutrition in the rat: effects on single-unit activity in the frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Stern, W C; Pugh, W W; Resnick, O; Morgane, P J

    1984-07-23

    This study evaluated the effects of developmental protein malnutrition on the spontaneous electrical activity of frontal cortex neurons in the anesthetized rat. Rats were raised prenatally and postnatally on either an 8% or 6% casein diet until adulthood. Compared to the 25% casein controls, both malnourished groups showed a 30-36% decrease in mean discharge rates and a 100-200% increase in the percentage of cells with very slow (less than 1/s) discharge rates. Most of the diet-related changes were confined to a zone 600-1200 micron below the brain surface, approximately cortical layers III, IV and V. A second set of studies in which diet reversals were introduced at birth or in adulthood found that: (a) restoration of a normal 25% casein diet at birth did not appreciably attenuate the effect of prenatal administration of an 8% casein diet; (b) introduction in adulthood of the 8% casein diet to a normally fed rat had no effect; (c) introduction of the 8% diet at birth, however, produced effects in adulthood comparable to those seen when the protein malnutrition was introduced in the prenatal period. Thus, the rat brain is sensitive to both prenatal and postnatal protein malnutrition (starting at birth). Most importantly, the effects of prenatal protein malnutrition on the activity of frontal cortex neurons do not appear to be reversible by restoration of a normal diet in adulthood or at birth.

  6. Comparative metabolism studies of hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) diastereomers in male rats following a single oral dose

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Male Sprague-Dawley rats were dosed orally with 3 mg/kg of one of three hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) diastereomers. Each diastereomer was well absorbed (73-83%), and distributed preferentially to lipophilic tissues. Feces were the major route of excretion; cumulatively 42% of dose for alpha-HBCD,...

  7. Respiratory Network Enhances the Sympathoinhibitory Component of Baroreflex of Rats Submitted to Chronic Intermittent Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Davi J A; Bonagamba, Leni G H; da Silva, Melina P; Mecawi, André S; Antunes-Rodrigues, José; Machado, Benedito H

    2016-10-01

    Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) produces respiratory-related sympathetic overactivity and hypertension in rats. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the enhanced central respiratory modulation of sympathetic activity after CIH also decreases the sympathoinhibitory component of baroreflex of rats, which may contribute to the development of hypertension. Wistar rats were exposed to CIH or normoxia (control group) for 10 days. Phrenic nerve, thoracic sympathetic nerve, and neurons in the rostral ventrolateral medulla and caudal ventrolateral medulla were recorded in in situ preparations of rats. Baroreflex regulation of thoracic sympathetic nerve, rostral ventrolateral medulla, and caudal ventrolateral medulla neurons activities were evaluated in different phases of respiration in response to either aortic depressor nerve stimulation or pressure stimuli. CIH rats presented higher respiratory-related thoracic sympathetic nerve and rostral ventrolateral medulla presympathetic neurons activities at the end of expiration in relation to control rats, which are indexes of respiratory-related sympathetic overactivity. Baroreflex-evoked thoracic sympathetic nerve inhibition during expiration, but not during inspiration, was enhanced in CIH when compared with control rats. In addition, CIH selectively enhanced the expiratory-related baroreceptor inputs, probably through caudal ventrolateral medulla neurons, to the respiratory-modulated bulbospinal rostral ventrolateral medulla presympathetic neurons. These findings support the concept that the onset of hypertension, mediated by sympathetic overactivity, after 10 days of CIH is not secondary to a reduction in sympathoinhibitory component of baroreflex. Instead, it was observed an increase in the gain of sympathoinhibitory component in in situ preparations of rats, suggesting that changes in the respiratory-related sympathetic network after CIH also play a key role in preventing greater increase in arterial pressure

  8. An in vitro method for recording single unit afferent activity from mesenteric nerves innervating isolated segments of rat ileum.

    PubMed

    Sharkey, K A; Cervero, F

    1986-04-01

    A technique has been developed for recording single unit afferent activity from mesenteric nerves in isolated segments of rat distal ileum in vitro. The preparation consists of a 3-cm segment of ileum, containing a single neurovascular bundle, held horizontally in an organ bath. One end of the segment is attached to a tension transducer to record changes in longitudinal tension of the gut muscle and the other is connected to a pressure transducer to record changes in intra-luminal pressure. Electromyographic activity of the smooth muscle is recorded using glass-insulated tungsten microelectrodes inserted in the wall of the gut. Afferent nerve activity is recorded with a monopolar platinum wire electrode from filaments of the mesenteric nerves that run between the artery and vein supplying the segment. This preparation permits the detailed analysis of the electrical activity of intestinal afferent nerve fibres correlated with mechanical and chemical events occurring naturally in the gut or imposed experimentally on it.

  9. Evaluation of Sphingolipids in Wistar Rats Treated to Prolonged and Single Oral Doses of Fumonisin B1

    PubMed Central

    Direito, Glória M.; Almeida, Adriana P.; Aquino, Simone; dos Reis, Tatiana Alves; Pozzi, Claudia Rodrigues; Corrêa, Benedito

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate sphingolipid levels (sphingosine-So and sphinganine-Sa) and to compare the Sa/So ratio in liver, serum and urine of Wistar rats after prolonged administration (21 days) of fumonisin B1 (FB1). In parallel, the kinetics of sphingolipid elimination in urine was studied in animals receiving a single dose of FB1. Prolonged exposure to FB1 caused an increase in Sa levels in urine, serum and liver. The most marked effect on sphingolipid biosynthesis was observed in animals treated with the highest dose of FB1. Animals receiving a single dose of FB1 presented variations in Sa and So levels and in the Sa/So ratio. PMID:19333435

  10. Study of Intravenous Single-Dose Toxicity Test of Bufonis venonum Pharmacopuncture in Sprague-Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Ki-Rok; Yu, Jun-Sang; Sun, Seung-Ho; Lee, Kwang-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Bufonis venonum (BV) is toad venom and is the dried, white secretions of the auricular and the skin glands of toads. This study was performed to evaluate the toxicity of intravenous injection of Bufonis venonum pharmacopuncture (BVP) through a single- dose test with sprague-dawley (SD) rats. Methods: Twenty male and 20 female 6-week-old SD rats were injected intravenously in the caudal vein with BVP or normal saline. The animals were divided into four groups with five female and five male rats per group: the control group injected with normal saline, the low-dosage group injected with 0.1 mL/animal of BVP, the medium-dosage group injected with 0.5 mL/ animal of BVP and the high-dosage group injected with 1.0 mL/animal of BVP. We performed clinical observations every day and body weight measurements on days 3, 7 and 14 after the injection. We also conducted hematology, serum biochemistry, and histological observations immediately after the observation period. Results: No mortalities were observed in any experimental group. Paleness occurred in the medium- and the high-dosage groups, and congestion on tails was observed in females in the medium- and the high-dosage groups. No significant changes in weight, hematology, serum biochemistry, and histological observations that could be attributed to the intravenous injection of BVP were observed in any experimental group. Conclusion: The lethal dose of intravenously-administered BVP in SD rats is over 1.0 mL/animal. PMID:27386149

  11. Sympathetic nervous system contributes to enhanced corticosterone levels following chronic stress.

    PubMed

    Lowrance, Steven A; Ionadi, Amy; McKay, Erin; Douglas, Xavier; Johnson, John D

    2016-06-01

    Exposure to chronic stress often elevates basal circulating glucocorticoids during the circadian nadir and leads to exaggerated glucocorticoid production following exposure to subsequent stressors. While glucocorticoid production is primarily mediated by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, there is evidence that the sympathetic nervous system can affect diurnal glucocorticoid production by direct actions at the adrenal gland. Experiments here were designed to examine the role of the HPA and sympathetic nervous system in enhancing corticosterone production following chronic stress. Rats were exposed to a four-day stress paradigm or control conditions then exposed to acute restraint stress on the fifth day to examine corticosterone and ACTH responses. Repeated stressor exposure resulted in a small increase in corticosterone, but not ACTH, during the circadian nadir, and also resulted in exaggerated corticosterone production 5, 10, and 20min following restraint stress. While circulating ACTH levels increased after 5min of restraint, levels were not greater in chronic stress animals compared to controls until following 20min. Administration of astressin (a CRH antagonist) prior to restraint stress significantly reduced ACTH responses but did not prevent the sensitized corticosterone response in chronic stress animals. In contrast, administration of chlorisondamine (a ganglionic blocker) returned basal corticosterone levels in chronic stress animals to normal levels and reduced early corticosterone production following restraint (up to 10min) but did not block the exaggerated corticosterone response in chronic stress animals at 20min. These data indicate that increased sympathetic nervous system tone contributes to elevated basal and rapid glucocorticoid production following chronic stress, but HPA responses likely mediate peak corticosterone responses to stressors of longer duration. PMID:26974501

  12. Fiber type effects on contraction-stimulated glucose uptake and GLUT4 abundance in single fibers from rat skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Castorena, Carlos M.; Arias, Edward B.; Sharma, Naveen; Bogan, Jonathan S.

    2014-01-01

    To fully understand skeletal muscle at the cellular level, it is essential to evaluate single muscle fibers. Accordingly, the major goals of this study were to determine if there are fiber type-related differences in single fibers from rat skeletal muscle for: 1) contraction-stimulated glucose uptake and/or 2) the abundance of GLUT4 and other metabolically relevant proteins. Paired epitrochlearis muscles isolated from Wistar rats were either electrically stimulated to contract (E-Stim) or remained resting (No E-Stim). Single fibers isolated from muscles incubated with 2-deoxy-d-[3H]glucose (2-DG) were used to determine fiber type [myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform protein expression], 2-DG uptake, and abundance of metabolically relevant proteins, including the GLUT4 glucose transporter. E-Stim, relative to No E-Stim, fibers had greater (P < 0.05) 2-DG uptake for each of the isolated fiber types (MHC-IIa, MHC-IIax, MHC-IIx, MHC-IIxb, and MHC-IIb). However, 2-DG uptake for E-Stim fibers was not significantly different among these five fiber types. GLUT4, tethering protein containing a UBX domain for GLUT4 (TUG), cytochrome c oxidase IV (COX IV), and filamin C protein levels were significantly greater (P < 0.05) in MHC-IIa vs. MHC-IIx, MHC-IIxb, or MHC-IIb fibers. TUG and COX IV in either MHC-IIax or MHC-IIx fibers exceeded values for MHC-IIxb or MHC-IIb fibers. GLUT4 levels for MHC-IIax fibers exceeded MHC-IIxb fibers. GLUT4, COX IV, filamin C, and TUG abundance in single fibers was significantly (P < 0.05) correlated with each other. Differences in GLUT4 abundance among the fiber types were not accompanied by significant differences in contraction-stimulated glucose uptake. PMID:25491725

  13. Coping with dehydration: sympathetic activation and regulation of glutamatergic transmission in the hypothalamic PVN.

    PubMed

    Bardgett, Megan E; Chen, Qing-Hui; Guo, Qing; Calderon, Alfredo S; Andrade, Mary Ann; Toney, Glenn M

    2014-06-01

    Autonomic and endocrine profiles of chronic hypertension and heart failure resemble those of acute dehydration. Importantly, all of these conditions are associated with exaggerated sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) driven by glutamatergic activation of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). Here, studies sought to gain insight into mechanisms of disease by determining the role of PVN ionotropic glutamate receptors in supporting SNA and mean arterial pressure (MAP) during dehydration and by elucidating mechanisms regulating receptor activity. Blockade of PVN N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors reduced (P < 0.01) renal SNA and MAP in urethane-chloralose-anesthetized dehydrated (DH) (48 h water deprivation) rats, but had no effect in euhydrated (EH) controls. Blockade of PVN α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors had no effect in either group. NMDA in PVN caused dose-dependent increases of renal SNA and MAP in both groups, but the maximum agonist evoked response (Emax) of the renal SNA response was greater (P < 0.05) in DH rats. The latter was not explained by increased PVN expression of NMDA receptor NR1 subunit protein, increased PVN neuronal excitability, or decreased brain water content. Interestingly, PVN injection of the pan-specific excitatory amino acid transporter (EAAT) inhibitor DL-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartic acid produced smaller sympathoexcitatory and pressor responses in DH rats, which was associated with reduced glial expression of EAAT2 in PVN. Like chronic hypertension and heart failure, dehydration increases excitatory NMDA receptor tone in PVN. Reduced glial-mediated glutamate uptake was identified as a key contributing factor. Defective glutamate uptake in PVN could therefore be an important, but as yet unexplored, mechanism driving sympathetic hyperactivity in chronic cardiovascular diseases. PMID:24671240

  14. Coulomb crystallization of sympathetically cooled highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo López-Urrutia, José R.

    2015-05-01

    Wave functions of inner-shell electrons significantly overlap with the nucleus, whereby enormously magnified relativistic, quantum electrodynamic (QED) and nuclear size effects emerge. In highly charged ions (HCI), the relative reduction of electronic correlations contributions improves the visibility of these effects. This well known facts have driven research efforts with HCI, yet the typically high temperatures at which these can be prepared in the laboratory constitutes a serious hindrance for application of laser spectroscopic methods. The solution for this, cooling HCI down to crystallization has remained an elusive target for more than two decades. By applying laser cooling to an ensemble of Be+ ions, we build Coulomb crystals that we use for stopping the motion of HCI and for cooling them. HCI, in this case Ar13+ ions are extracted from an electron beam ion trap with an energy spread of a few 100's of eV, due to the ion temperature within the trap. Carefully timed electric pulses in a potential-gradient decelerate and bunch the HCI. We achieve Coulomb crystallization of these HCI by re-trapping them in a cryogenic linear radiofrequency trap where they are sympathetically cooled through Coulomb interaction with the directly laser-cooled ensemble. Furthermore, we also demonstrate cooling of a single Ar13+ ion by a single Be+ ion, prerequisite for quantum logic spectroscopy with potentially 10-19 relative accuracy. The strongly suppressed thermal motion of the embedded HCI offers novel possibilities for investigation of questions related to the time variation of fundamental constants, parity non-conservation effects, Lorentz invariance and quantum electrodynamics. Achieving a seven orders-of-magnitude decrease in HCI temperature, from the starting point at MK values in the ion source down to the mK range within the Coulomb crystal eliminates the major obstacle for HCI investigation with high precision laser spectroscopy and quantum computation schemes.

  15. Behavioral and physiological effects of a single injection of rat interferon-alpha on male Sprague-Dawley rats: a long-term evaluation.

    PubMed

    Kentner, A C; Miguelez, M; James, J S; Bielajew, C

    2006-06-20

    Interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) is a cytokine used as a first line of defense against diseases such as cancer and hepatitis C. However, reports indicate that its effectiveness as a treatment is countered by central nervous system (CNS) disruptions in patients. Our work explored the possibility that it may also cause long-term behavioral disruptions by chronicling the behavioral and physiological disturbances associated with a single injection of vehicle, 10, 100, or 1,000 units of IFN-alpha in male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 5/dose). Following 1 day of locomotor baseline collection, we monitored sickness behaviors (ptosis, piloerection, lethargy, and sleep), food and water intake, body weight, temperature, and motor activity. Observations were recorded 4 days prior to and 4 days following the IFN-alpha injection. Temperature and sickness behaviors were recorded three times daily at 9:00, 15:00, and 21:00 h, and all other indices, once daily. On the injection day, temperature values were highest in the animals receiving the 10-unit IFN-alpha dose 15 min and 13 h post-injection. In the case of sickness behaviors, a significant increase was observed in piloerection in all IFN-alpha groups at each time point measured, while the scores of the rats in the vehicle condition remained unchanged between pre- and post-injection days. Analyses of overall sickness behaviors during morning and night observation periods indicated increased scores in all IFN-alpha groups following injection. Cumulatively, these data suggest that a single IFN-alpha exposure may elicit long-term behavioral disruptions and that its consequences should be thoroughly investigated for its use in clinical populations.

  16. [Diagnostic and treatment measures in patients with sympathetically maintained pain].

    PubMed

    Maier, C; Gleim, M

    1998-08-27

    The term "sympathetically maintained pain" (SMP) describes a symptom that might accompany a variety of diseases (CRPS, (post-) herpetic and post-injury neuralgia), which might transform into sympathetically independent pain (SIP) after some time. Patients with SMP present a bunch of disorders of the autonomic and sensory system, but the only reliable way to diagnose a pain as SMP is a positive response to an intervention at the sympathetic nervous system. Three ways of influencing the sympathetic system are commonly used: (a) local anesthetic sympathetic blockade (SB), (b) intravenous regional sympathectomy (IVRS) and (c) ganglionic local opioid application (GLOA). A review of current literature shows that SB has certain advantages in diagnostic sensitivity, whereas GLOA might be slightly superior in therapy of some diseases with longstanding pain history. Obviously, the therapeutic benefit of all interventions is complete independent of the accompanying autonomic disorder and of a blockade of efferent fibers. A new heuristic model of the SMP mechanism is presented, including both experimental and clinical data. For reducing the risks of false positive or negative diagnosis of SMP and SIP, a diagnostic algorithm is proposed. This includes optimizing the technique, changes of interventional measures, and adequate monitoring both of analgesia and as well of the extend of efferent sympathetic blockade (e.g. measurement of sympathetic reflexes). The treatment recommendations in patients with SMP vary in dependence of the kind of disease. In SMP, invasive measures play an important, but only limited role within the comprehensive treatment concept. As an example a three-stage, symptom-adapted treatment algorithm is demonstrated for CRPS, including also drug therapy, psychologic and physiotherapeutic approaches.

  17. Sudomotor function in sympathetic reflex dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Birklein, F; Sittl, R; Spitzer, A; Claus, D; Neundörfer, B; Handwerker, H O

    1997-01-01

    Sudomotor functions were studied in 27 patients suffering from reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) according to the criteria established by Bonica (18 women, 9 men; mean age 50 +/- 12.3 years; median duration of disease 8 weeks, range 2-468 weeks). To measure local sweating rates, two small chambers (5 cm2) were affixed to corresponding areas of hairy skin on the affected and unaffected limbs. Dry nitrogen gas was passed through the chambers (270 ml/min) and evaporation was recorded at both devices with hygrometers. Thermoregulatory sweating (TST) was induced by raising body temperature (intake of 0.5 1 hot tea and infra-red irradiation). Local sweating was also induced through an axon reflex (QSART) by transcutaneous iontophoretic application of carbachol (5 min, 1 mA). In addition, skin temperature was measured on the affected and unaffected side by infra-red thermography. Mean skin temperature was significantly higher on the affected side (P < 0.003). In spite of the temperature differences, there was no difference in basal sweating on the affected and unaffected side. However, both methods of sudomotor stimulation lead to significantly greater sweating responses on the affected compared to the unaffected side (TST: P < 0.05, QSART: P < 0.004). Latency to onset of sweating was significantly shorter on the affected side under both test conditions (P < 0.04 and P < 0.003, respectively). Sweat responses were not correlated to absolute skin temperature but were probably related to the increased blood flow on the affected side. Our findings imply a differential disturbance of vasomotor and sudomotor mechanisms in affected skin. Whereas vasoconstrictor activity is apparently lowered, sudomotor output is either unaltered or may even be enhanced.

  18. Sudomotor function in sympathetic reflex dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Birklein, F; Sittl, R; Spitzer, A; Claus, D; Neundörfer, B; Handwerker, H O

    1997-01-01

    Sudomotor functions were studied in 27 patients suffering from reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) according to the criteria established by Bonica (18 women, 9 men; mean age 50 +/- 12.3 years; median duration of disease 8 weeks, range 2-468 weeks). To measure local sweating rates, two small chambers (5 cm2) were affixed to corresponding areas of hairy skin on the affected and unaffected limbs. Dry nitrogen gas was passed through the chambers (270 ml/min) and evaporation was recorded at both devices with hygrometers. Thermoregulatory sweating (TST) was induced by raising body temperature (intake of 0.5 1 hot tea and infra-red irradiation). Local sweating was also induced through an axon reflex (QSART) by transcutaneous iontophoretic application of carbachol (5 min, 1 mA). In addition, skin temperature was measured on the affected and unaffected side by infra-red thermography. Mean skin temperature was significantly higher on the affected side (P < 0.003). In spite of the temperature differences, there was no difference in basal sweating on the affected and unaffected side. However, both methods of sudomotor stimulation lead to significantly greater sweating responses on the affected compared to the unaffected side (TST: P < 0.05, QSART: P < 0.004). Latency to onset of sweating was significantly shorter on the affected side under both test conditions (P < 0.04 and P < 0.003, respectively). Sweat responses were not correlated to absolute skin temperature but were probably related to the increased blood flow on the affected side. Our findings imply a differential disturbance of vasomotor and sudomotor mechanisms in affected skin. Whereas vasoconstrictor activity is apparently lowered, sudomotor output is either unaltered or may even be enhanced. PMID:9060012

  19. Single and 14-day repeated dose inhalation toxicity studies of hexabromocyclododecane in rats.

    PubMed

    Song, Naining; Li, Lei; Li, Haishan; Ai, Wenchao; Xie, Wenping; Yu, Wenlian; Liu, Wei; Wang, Cheng; Shen, Guolin; Zhou, Lili; Wei, Changlei; Li, Dong; Chen, Huiming

    2016-05-01

    Limited toxicological information is available for hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD),a widely used additive brominated flame retardant. Inhalation is a major route of human exposure to HBCD. The aim of this study was to determine the acute inhalation toxicity and potential subchronic inhalation toxicity of HBCD in Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to HBCD only through inhalation. The acute inhalation toxicity of HBCD was determined using the limit test method on five male and five female Sprague-Dawley rats at a HBCD concentration of 5000 mg/m(3). Repeated-dose toxicity tests were also performed, with 20 males and 20 females randomly assigned to four experimental groups (five rats of each sex in each group). There were three treatment groups (exposed to HBCD concentrations of 125,500, and 2000 mg/m(3)) and a blank control group (exposed to fresh air). In the acute inhalation toxicity study, no significant clinical signs were observed either immediately after exposure or during the recovery period. Gross pathology examination revealed no evidence of organ-specific toxicity in any rat. The inhalation LC50(4 h) for HBCD was higher than 5312 ± 278 mg/m3 for both males and females. In the repeated dose inhalation study, daily head/nose-only exposure to HBCD at 132 ± 8.8, 545.8 ± 35.3, and 2166.0 ± 235.9 mg/m(3) for 14 days caused no adverse effects. No treatment-related clinical signs were observed at any of the test doses. The NOAEL for 14-day repeated dose inhalation toxicity study of HBCD is 2000 mg/m(3). PMID:26929994

  20. Effect of crocin on oxidative stress in recovery from single bout of swimming exercise in rats.

    PubMed

    Altinoz, Eyup; Ozmen, Tarık; Oner, Zulal; Elbe, Hulya; Erdemli, Mehmet E; Bag, Harika G

    2016-01-01

    Physical exercise could cause muscle and tissue damage due to increase in the formation of free oxygen radicals during exercise. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of crocin on parameters associated with oxidative stress in recovery from acute swimming exercise in rats. Rats were divided into eight groups; Normal Control (NC: untreated and did not swim), Crocin Control (CC: received crocin and did not swim), Exercise-1 (Exe-1: untreated and swam), Exercise-24 (Exe-24: untreated and swam), Exercise-48 (Exe-48: untreated and swam), Exercise+Crocin-1 (Exe-Cro-1: received crocin and swam), Exercise+Crocin-24 (Exe-Cro-24: received crocin and swam), Exercise+Crocin-48 (Exe-Cro-48: received crocin and swam). AST, ALP, LDH, CK, XO enzymes levels increased after swimming in untreated and crocin-treated groups, but there was a less increase in crocin-treated groups. The highest MDA levels in serum were determined in Exe-1 compared with all other groups. There was significant difference between control and exercise groups in MDA level (p = 0.033). In contrast, there was significant difference between control and exercise groups in GSH level (p < 0.001). In addition, crocin given to swimming rats significantly increased GSH levels (p < 0.05) and decreased MDA levels when compared with untreated exercise groups. In conclusion, crocin is able to protect liver and skeletal muscle tissue against exercise-induced oxidative damage by preventing reactive oxygen species (ROS) production.

  1. Toxicity of Raw and Purified Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Rat's Lung Epithelial and Cervical Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Goornavar, Virupaxi; Biradar, Santoshkumar; Ezeagwu, Christian; Ezeagwu, Dexter; Hall, Joseph C; Ramesh, Govindarajan T

    2015-03-01

    The increased applications of carbon nanotubes in the field of drug delivery, bioimaging and biosensors demand nanotubes to be of highest purity, free from metallic impurities and amorphous carbon. All of these sectors require a profound investigation about the toxic effects on human and the environment. Many attempts have been made to purify and surface modify the carbon nanotubes, however a detailed study on the raw and purified material has yet to be conducted. Here we present the toxicity studies of raw and the purified single-walled carbon nanotubes in rat's lung epithelial cell and cervical cancer cells (HeLa). These cells were treated with increasing concentration of 0.5 µg/mL to 50 µg/mL and the various biocompatibility assays were performed. The results showed an increased cell death with purified single-walled carbon nanotubes followed by the depletion of antioxidant levels and activation of the caspase cascade at a rapid rate compared to raw single-walled carbon nanotubes. This suggests that purified single walled carbon nanotubes are more toxic to the cells and exhibit ultra-fine particulate matter like toxicity.

  2. Baroreflex Function in Rats after Simulated Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasser, Eileen M.

    1997-01-01

    Prolonged exposure of humans to decreased gravitational forces during spaceflight results in a number of adverse cardiovascular consequences, often referred to as cardiovascular deconditioning. Prominent among these negative cardiovascular effects are orthostatic intolerance and decreased exercise capacity. Rat hindlimb unweighting is an animal model which simulates weightlessness, and results in similar cardiovascular consequences. Cardiovascular reflexes, including arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreflexes, are required for normal adjustment to both orthostatic challenges and exercise. Therefore, the orthostatic intolerance and decreased exercise capacity associated with exposure to microgravity may be due to cardiovascular reflex dysfunction. The proposed studies will test the general hypothesis that hindlimb unweighting in rats results in impaired autonomic reflex control of the sympathetic nervous system. Specifically, we hypothesize that the ability to reflexly increase sympathetic nerve activity in response to decreases in arterial pressure or blood volume will be blunted due to hindlimb unweighting. There are 3 specific aims: (1) To evaluate arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of renal and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity in conscious rats subjected to 14 days of hindlimb unweighting; (2) To examine the interaction between arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of sympathetic nerve activity in conscious hindlimb unweighted rats; (3) to evaluate changes in afferent and/or central nervous system mechanisms in baroreflex regulation of the sympathetic nervous system. These experiments will provide information related to potential mechanisms for orthostatic and exercise intolerance due to microgravity.

  3. Macrophage activity and histopathology of the lymphohematopoietic organs in male Wistar rats orally exposed to single or mixed pesticides.

    PubMed

    De Camargo, Marcela Rodrigues; Barbisan, Luís Fernando; Martinez, Meire França; Da Silva Franchi, Carla Adriene; De Camargo, João Lauro Viana; Spinardi-Barbisan, Ana Lúcia Tozzi

    2013-01-01

    The noxious effects of low or effective dose exposure to single or mixed pesticides on macrophage activity and the lymphohematopoietic organs were investigated. Male Wistar rats were orally exposed to dichlorvos, dicofol, endosulfan, dieldrin and permethrin, either as single or combined mixtures during a 28-day study containing eight groups: one group received a semipurified diet (non-treated); two groups received a semipurified diet containing low dose mixture (dieldrin 0.025 mg/kg, endosulfan, 0.6 mg/kg, dicofol 0.22 mg/kg, dichlorvos 0.23 mg/kg, permethrin 5 mg/kg) or an effective dose mixture (dichlorvos 2.3 mg/kg, dicofol 2.5 mg/kg, endosulfan 2.9 mg/kg, dieldrin 0.05 mg/kg and permethrin 25.0 mg/kg), respectively; the other five groups received a semipurified diet containing each single pesticide in effective doses. At sacrifice, the thymus, spleen, mesenteric lymph nodes, Payer's patches and bone marrow were removed for histological analysis. Peritoneal macrophages were obtained to determine the phagocytosis and spreading indexes and tumoral necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), nitric oxide (NO) and H₂O₂ production. Exposure to pesticide mixtures did not alter the percentage of macrophage phagocytosis and spreading, TNF-α production or the NO and H₂O₂ release when compared to the non-treated group. Neither was there any apparent evidence that a pesticide mixture at low or effective doses altered the histological structure of the lymphohematopoietic organs. The findings indicate that short-term treatment with pesticide mixtures did not induce an apparent immunotoxic effect in male Wistar rats.

  4. Single-Dose Local Simvastatin Injection Improves Implant Fixation via Increased Angiogenesis and Bone Formation in an Ovariectomized Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Jie; Yang, Ning; Fu, Xin; Cui, Yueyi; Guo, Qi; Ma, Teng; Yin, Xiaoxue; Leng, Huijie; Song, Chunli

    2015-01-01

    Background Statins have been reported to promote bone formation. However, taken orally, their bioavailability is low to the bones. Implant therapies require a local repair response, topical application of osteoinductive agents, or biomaterials that promote implant fixation. Material/Methods The present study evaluated the effect of a single local injection of simvastatin on screw fixation in an ovariectomized rat model of osteoporosis. Results Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, micro-computed tomography, histology, and biomechanical tests revealed that 5 and 10 mg simvastatin significantly improved bone mineral density by 18.2% and 22.4%, respectively (P<0.05); increased bone volume fraction by 51.0% and 57.9%, trabecular thickness by 16.4% and 18.9%, trabeculae number by 112.0% and 107.1%, and percentage of osseointegration by 115.7% and 126.3%; and decreased trabeculae separation by 34.1% and 36.6%, respectively (all P<0.01). Bone mineral apposition rate was significantly increased (P<0.01). Furthermore, implant fixation was significantly increased (P<0.05), and bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) expression was markedly increased. Local injection of a single dose of simvastatin also promoted angiogenesis. Vessel number, volume, thickness, surface area, and vascular volume per tissue volume were significantly increased (all P<0.01). Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), VEGF receptor-2, von Willebrand factor, and platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 expression were enhanced. Conclusions A single local injection of simvastatin significantly increased bone formation, promoted osseointegration, and enhanced implant fixation in ovariectomized rats. The underlying mechanism appears to involve enhanced BMP2 expression and angiogenesis in the target bone. PMID:25982481

  5. Inhibition of propofol on single neuron and neuronal ensemble activity in prefrontal cortex of rats during working memory task.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xinyu; Tian, Yu; Wang, Guolin; Tian, Xin

    2014-08-15

    Working memory (WM) refers to the temporary storage and manipulation of information necessary for performance of complex cognitive tasks. There is a growing interest in whether and how propofol anesthesia inhibits WM function. The aim of this study is to investigate the possible inhibition mechanism of propofol anesthesia from the view of single neuron and neuronal ensemble activities. Adult SD rats were randomly divided into two groups: propofol group (0.9 mg kg(-1)min(-1), 2h via a tail vein catheter) and control group. All the rats were tested for working memory performances in a Y-maze-rewarded alternation task (a task of delayed non-matched-to-sample) at 24, 48, 72 h after propofol anesthesia, and the behavior results of WM tasks were recorded at the same time. Spatio-temporal trains of action potentials were obtained from the original signals. Single neuron activity was characterized by peri-event time histograms analysis and neuron ensemble activities were characterized by Granger causality to describe the interactions within the neuron ensemble. The results show that: comparing with the control group, the percentage of neurons excited and related to WM was significantly decreased (p<0.01 in 24h, p<0.05 in 48 h); the interactions within neuron ensemble were significantly weakened (p<0.01 in 24h, p<0.05 in 48 h), whereas no significant difference in 72 h (p>0.05), which were consistent with the behavior results. These findings could lead to improved understanding of the mechanism of anesthesia inhibition on WM functions from the view of single neuron activity and neuron ensemble interactions.

  6. TrkB/BDNF signalling patterns the sympathetic nervous system.

    PubMed

    Kasemeier-Kulesa, Jennifer C; Morrison, Jason A; Lefcort, Frances; Kulesa, Paul M

    2015-01-01

    The sympathetic nervous system is essential for maintaining mammalian homeostasis. How this intricately connected network, composed of preganglionic neurons that reside in the spinal cord and post-ganglionic neurons that comprise a chain of vertebral sympathetic ganglia, arises developmentally is incompletely understood. This problem is especially complex given the vertebral chain of sympathetic ganglia derive secondarily from the dorsal migration of 'primary' sympathetic ganglia that are initially located several hundred microns ventrally from their future pre-synaptic partners. Here we report that the dorsal migration of discrete ganglia is not a simple migration of individual cells but a much more carefully choreographed process that is mediated by extensive interactions of pre-and post-ganglionic neurons. Dorsal migration does not occur in the absence of contact with preganglionic axons, and this is mediated by BDNF/TrkB signalling. Thus BDNF released by preganglionic axons acts chemotactically on TrkB-positive sympathetic neurons, to pattern the developing peripheral nervous system. PMID:26404565

  7. Segregation of Acetylcholine and GABA in the Rat Superior Cervical Ganglia: Functional Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Elinos, Diana; Rodríguez, Raúl; Martínez, Luis Andres; Zetina, María Elena; Cifuentes, Fredy; Morales, Miguel Angel

    2016-01-01

    Sympathetic neurons have the capability to segregate their neurotransmitters (NTs) and co-transmitters to separate varicosities of single axons; furthermore, in culture, these neurons can even segregate classical transmitters. In vivo sympathetic neurons employ acetylcholine (ACh) and other classical NTs such as gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA). Herein, we explore whether these neurons in vivo segregate these classical NTs in the superior cervical ganglia of the rat. We determined the topographical distribution of GABAergic varicosities, somatic GABAA receptor, as well as the regional distribution of the segregation of ACh and GABA. We evaluated possible regional differences in efficacy of ganglionic synaptic transmission, in the sensitivity of GABAA receptor to GABA and to the competitive antagonist picrotoxin (PTX). We found that sympathetic preganglionic neurons in vivo do segregate ACh and GABA. GABAergic varicosities and GABAA receptor expression showed a rostro-caudal gradient along ganglia; in contrast, segregation exhibited a caudo-rostral gradient. These uneven regional distributions in expression of GABA, GABAA receptors, and level of segregation correlate with stronger synaptic transmission found in the caudal region. Accordingly, GABAA receptors of rostral region showed larger sensitivity to GABA and PTX. These results suggest the presence of different types of GABAA receptors in each region that result in a different regional levels of endogenous GABA inhibition. Finally, we discuss a possible correlation of these different levels of GABA modulation and the function of the target organs innervated by rostral and caudal ganglionic neurons. PMID:27092054

  8. [Toxicokinetics of bakuchiol, hepatic and renal toxicity in rats after single oral administration of Psoraleae Fructus and combination with Glycyrrhizae Radix et Rhizoma].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zi-jing; Gong, Zheng; Shi, Shao-ze; Yang, Jin-lan; Ma, Na-na; Wang, Qi

    2015-06-01

    To study the toxicokinetics of bakuchiol, hepatic and renal toxicity in rats after single oral administration of Psoraleae Fructus and combined with Glycyrrhizae Radix et Rhizoma, in order to provide scientific evidences for clinical safe medication use. A total of 35 SD rats were randomly divided into seven groups: vehicle (distilled water) control group, Glycyrrhizae Radix et Rhizoma group, positive control (aristolochic acid A) group, Psoraleae Fructus (40 g x kg(-1)) group( both male and female rats), Psoraleae Fructus and Glycyrrhizae Radix et Rhizoma (40 +20) g x kg(-1) group (both male and female rats). HPLC-UV method was used to determine the concentration of bakuchiol in rat plasma at different time points after single oral administration. Plasma alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), plasma creatinine (Cr), N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) and kidney injury molecule 1 (Kim-1) were measured after administration for 24 h. The main toxicokinetics parameters of bakuchiol in rats exert significantly gender difference. When Psoraleae Fructus combination with Glycyrrhizae Radix et Rhizoma, the total area under the plasma concentration-time curve( AUC), C(max), and plasma clearance (CL) of bakuchiol were increased, respectively; CL, half-life (t½) were decreased, and T(max) were prolonged. The biochemical indicators (including ALT, AST, BUN, Cr and KIM-1 level) in different dose of Psoraleae Fructus groups, were found no statistically significant difference when compared with vehicle control group. The level of NAG in both Psoraleae Fructus and compatibility with Glycyrrhizae Radix et Rhizoma groups were significant increased (P < 0.05). There are obvious effects on toxicokinetics of bakuchiol in rats when Psoraleae Fructus combined with Glycyrrhizae Radix et Rhizoma. Renal toxicity induced by Psoraleae Fructus at high dose was observed after single oral administration and no liver damage in rats was found.

  9. Sympathetic nerve-derived ATP regulates renal medullary vasa recta diameter via pericyte cells: a role for regulating medullary blood flow?

    PubMed

    Crawford, C; Wildman, S S P; Kelly, M C; Kennedy-Lydon, T M; Peppiatt-Wildman, C M

    2013-01-01

    Pericyte cells are now known to be a novel locus of blood flow control, being able to regulate capillary diameter via their unique morphology and expression of contractile proteins. We have previously shown that exogenous ATP causes constriction of vasa recta via renal pericytes, acting at a variety of membrane bound P2 receptors on descending vasa recta (DVR), and therefore may be able to regulate medullary blood flow (MBF). Regulation of MBF is essential for appropriate urine concentration and providing essential oxygen and nutrients to this region of high, and variable, metabolic demand. Various sources of endogenous ATP have been proposed, including from epithelial, endothelial, and red blood cells in response to stimuli such as mechanical stimulation, local acidosis, hypoxia, and exposure to various hormones. Extensive sympathetic innervation of the nephron has previously been shown, however the innervation reported has focused around the proximal and distal tubules, and ascending loop of Henle. We hypothesize that sympathetic nerves are an additional source of ATP acting at renal pericytes and therefore regulate MBF. Using a rat live kidney slice model in combination with video imaging and confocal microscopy techniques we firstly show sympathetic nerves in close proximity to vasa recta pericytes in both the outer and inner medulla. Secondly, we demonstrate pharmacological stimulation of sympathetic nerves in situ (by tyramine) evokes pericyte-mediated vasoconstriction of vasa recta capillaries; inhibited by the application of the P2 receptor antagonist suramin. Lastly, tyramine-evoked vasoconstriction of vasa recta by pericytes is significantly less than ATP-evoked vasoconstriction. Sympathetic innervation may provide an additional level of functional regulation in the renal medulla that is highly localized. It now needs to be determined under which physiological/pathophysiological circumstances that sympathetic innervation of renal pericytes is important

  10. NKCC1 upregulation disrupts chloride homeostasis in the hypothalamus and increases neuronal activity–sympathetic drive in hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Zeng-You; Li, De-Pei; Byun, Hee Sun; Li, Li; Pan, Hui-Lin

    2012-01-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for coronary artery disease, stroke, and kidney failure. However, the etiology of hypertension in most patients is poorly understood. Increased sympathetic drive emanating from the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) plays a major role in the development of hypertension. Na+-K+-2Cl− cotransporter-1 (NKCC1) in the brain is critically involved in maintaining chloride homeostasis and in neuronal responses mediated by GABAA receptors. Here we present novel evidence that the GABA reversal potential (EGABA) of PVN presympathetic neurons undergoes a depolarizing shift that diminishes GABA inhibition in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Inhibition of NKCC1, but not KCC2, normalizes EGABA and restores GABA inhibition of PVN neurons in SHRs. The mRNA and protein levels of NKCC1, but not KCC2, in the PVN are significantly increased in SHRs, and the NKCC1 proteins on the plasma membrane are highly glycosylated. Inhibiting NKCC1 N-glycosylation restores EGABA and GABAergic inhibition of PVN presympathetic neurons in SHRs. Furthermore, NKCC1 inhibition significantly reduces the sympathetic vasomotor tone and augments the sympathoinhibitory responses to GABAA receptor activation in the PVN in SHRs. These findings suggest that increased NKCC1 activity and glycosylation disrupts chloride homeostasis and impairs synaptic inhibition in the PVN to augment the sympathetic drive in hypertension. This information greatly improves our understanding of the pathogenesis of hypertension and helps to design better treatment strategies for neurogenic hypertension. PMID:22723696

  11. Differential role of nitric oxide in regional sympathetic responses to stimulation of NTS A2a adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Scislo, Tadeusz J; Tan, Nobusuke; O'Leary, Donal S

    2005-02-01

    Our previous studies showed that preganglionic adrenal (pre-ASNA), renal (RSNA), lumbar, and postganglionic adrenal sympathetic nerve activities (post-ASNA) are inhibited after stimulation of arterial baroreceptors, nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), and glutamatergic and P2x receptors and are activated after stimulation of adenosine A1 receptors. However, stimulation of adenosine A2a receptors inhibited RSNA and post-ASNA, whereas it activated pre-ASNA. Because the effects evoked by NTS A2a receptors may be mediated via activation of nitric oxide (NO) mechanisms in NTS neurons, we tested the hypothesis that NO synthase (NOS) inhibitors would attenuate regional sympathetic responses to NTS A2a receptor stimulation, whereas NO donors would evoke contrasting responses from pre-ASNA versus RSNA and post-ASNA. Therefore, in chloralose/urethane-anesthetized rats, we compared hemodynamic and regional sympathetic responses to microinjections of selective A2a receptor agonist (CGS-21680, 20 pmol/50 nl) after pretreatment with NOS inhibitors Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (10 nmol/100 nl) and 1-[2-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]imidazole (100 pmol/100 nl) versus pretreatment with vehicle (100 nl). In addition, responses to microinjections into the NTS of different NO donors [40 and 400 pmol/50 nl sodium nitroprusside (SNP); 0.5 and 5 nmol/50 nl 3,3-bis(aminoethyl)-1-hydroxy-2-oxo-1-triazene (DETA NONOate, also known as NOC-18), and 2 nmol/50 nl 3-(2-hydroxy-2-nitroso-1-propylhydrazino)-1-propanamine (PAPA NONOate, also known as NOC-15)], the NO precursor L-arginine (10-50 nmol/50 nl), and sodium glutamate (500 pmol/50 nl) were evaluated. SNP, DETA NONOate, and PAPA NONOate activated pre-ASNA and inhibited RSNA and post-ASNA, whereas l-arginine and glutamate microinjected into the same site of the NTS inhibited all these sympathetic outputs. Decreases in heart rate and depressor or biphasic responses accompanied the neural responses. Pretreatment with NOS inhibitors

  12. Sustained effects of a single injection of ethanol on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in the male rat.

    PubMed

    Steiner, J C; Holloran, M M; Jabamoni, K; Emanuele, N V; Emanuele, M A

    1996-11-01

    The hormones responsible for regulating the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis are essential for proper reproductive function. Ethanol (EtOH) has been shown to exert its effect at all three levels of this axis. The present study defines striking differences in the time course of recovery of luteinizing hormone (LH) in gonadally intact, compared with, castrated male rats after acute EtOH administration. Serum levels of LH and testosterone were measured at various time points up to 2 weeks (1.5, 3, 24, 48, 72, 96, 168, and 336 hr) after a single intraperitoneal injection of either saline or 3 g/kg of EtOH in intact adult male rats. One EtOH injection significantly suppressed testosterone levels as low as 20% (p < 0.01) of saline-injected intact rats. This occurred as early as 1.5 hr after EtOH administration (the first measured time point), and statistically significant suppression was sustained for 96 hr. Similarly, LH levels showed a significant decrease. However, this significant fall in LH did not begin until 3 hr (p < 0.05) and continued up to 96 hr (p < 0.01), with a gradual return to control levels at 168 and 336 hr after treatment. Despite the significant and prolonged fall in testosterone levels in the EtOH-treated intact rats, beta-LH mRNA levels were inappropriately not elevated, as would be expected in the context of low circulating testosterone. However, at 168 and 336 hr, steady-state levels of beta-LH mRNA were significantly higher than seen in saline-injected controls (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively), temporally correlating with the return of serum LH to control. LH levels in the castrated animals were significantly suppressed at 1.5 hr (p < 0.05) and 3 hr (p < 0.01) after EtOH treatment, compared with controls, yet they returned much more quickly by 24 hr after treatment. beta-LH mRNA levels of castrated animals also showed a significant depression at 1.5 and 3 hr, and returned to control levels by 24 hr. In these rats, the hypothalamic LH

  13. Behavioral and neurochemical profile of m-CPP following exposure to single restraint stress in rat.

    PubMed

    Samad, Noreen; Haleem, Darakhshan J

    2009-03-01

    The present study was designed to monitor the responsiveness of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; serotonin)-2C receptors following the exposure to restraint stress in rats. Rats were restrained for 2 hours. 24-h after the termination of the restraint period, 1-(m-Chlorophenyl)piperazine (m-CPP; a 5-HT-2C agonist) at the doses of 1.5 mg/kg or 3.0 mg/kg and saline (1 ml/kg), was injected to unrestrained and restrained animals. Hypolocomotive effects (home cage activity, open field activity and motor coordination) and anxiogenic-like effects (light-dark activity and plus maze activity) were successively monitored in each animal after the drug or saline administration. Rats were decapitated 1-h post-injection to collect brain samples for neurochemical estimation by HPLC-EC. Our results show that differences in the hypolocomotive and anxiogenic-like effects of m-CPP between restrained and unrestrained animals could not be demonstrated in the present experimental paradigm. This was due to the fact that the behavioral effects were already marked after restraint leaving little room for an additional m-CPP effect. The effects of m-CPP on increasing 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid (5-HIAA) and decreasing dihydroxy phenyl acetic acid (DOPAC) levels were more pronounced (p < 0.01) in restrained than unrestrained animals. The results suggest that behavioral responses to m-CPP and stress are similar The attenuation of m-CPP changes in 5-HIAA and DOPAC levels may be due to a decreased responsiveness of 5-HT-2C receptors in restrained animals. PMID:19402569

  14. Lifelong elimination of hyperbilirubinemia in the Gunn rat with a single injection of helper-dependent adenoviral vector

    PubMed Central

    Toietta, Gabriele; Mane, Viraj P.; Norona, Wilma S.; Finegold, Milton J.; Ng, Philip; McDonagh, Antony F.; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Lee, Brendan

    2005-01-01

    Crigler–Najjar syndrome is a recessively inherited disorder characterized by severe unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia caused by a deficiency of uridine diphospho-glucuronosyl transferase 1A1. Current therapy relies on phototherapy to prevent kernicterus, but liver transplantation presently is the only permanent cure. Gene therapy is a potential alternative, and recent work has shown that helper-dependent adenoviral (HD-Ad) vectors, devoid of all viral coding sequences, induce prolonged transgene expression and exhibit significantly less chronic toxicity than early-generation Ad vectors. We used a HD-Ad vector to achieve liver-restricted expression of human uridine diphospho-glucuronosyl transferase 1A1 in the Gunn rat, a model of the human disorder. Total plasma bilirubin levels were reduced from >5.0 mg/dl to «1.4 mg/dl for >2 yr after a single i.v. administration of vector expressing the therapeutic transgene at a dose of 3 × 1012 viral particles per kg. HPLC analysis of bile from treated rats showed the presence of bilirubin glucuronides at normal WT levels >2 yr after one injection of vector, and i.v. injection of bilirubins IIIα and XIIIα in the same animals revealed excess bilirubin-conjugating capacity. There was no significant elevation of liver enzymes (alanine aminotransferase) and only transient, moderate thrombocytopenia after injection of the vector. A clinically significant reduction in serum bilirubin was observed with a dose as low as 6 × 1011 viral particles per kg. We conclude that complete, long-term correction of hyperbilirubinemia in the Gunn rat model of Crigler–Najjar syndrome can be achieved with one injection of HD-Ad vector and negligible chronic toxicity. PMID:15753292

  15. Lifelong elimination of hyperbilirubinemia in the Gunn rat with a single injection of helper-dependent adenoviral vector.

    PubMed

    Toietta, Gabriele; Mane, Viraj P; Norona, Wilma S; Finegold, Milton J; Ng, Philip; McDonagh, Antony F; Beaudet, Arthur L; Lee, Brendan

    2005-03-15

    Crigler-Najjar syndrome is a recessively inherited disorder characterized by severe unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia caused by a deficiency of uridine diphospho-glucuronosyl transferase 1A1. Current therapy relies on phototherapy to prevent kernicterus, but liver transplantation presently is the only permanent cure. Gene therapy is a potential alternative, and recent work has shown that helper-dependent adenoviral (HD-Ad) vectors, devoid of all viral coding sequences, induce prolonged transgene expression and exhibit significantly less chronic toxicity than early-generation Ad vectors. We used a HD-Ad vector to achieve liver-restricted expression of human uridine diphospho-glucuronosyl transferase 1A1 in the Gunn rat, a model of the human disorder. Total plasma bilirubin levels were reduced from >5.0 mg/dl to <1.4 mg/dl for >2 yr after a single i.v. administration of vector expressing the therapeutic transgene at a dose of 3 x 10(12) viral particles per kg. HPLC analysis of bile from treated rats showed the presence of bilirubin glucuronides at normal WT levels >2 yr after one injection of vector, and i.v. injection of bilirubins IIIalpha and XIIIalpha in the same animals revealed excess bilirubin-conjugating capacity. There was no significant elevation of liver enzymes (alanine aminotransferase) and only transient, moderate thrombocytopenia after injection of the vector. A clinically significant reduction in serum bilirubin was observed with a dose as low as 6 x 10(11) viral particles per kg. We conclude that complete, long-term correction of hyperbilirubinemia in the Gunn rat model of Crigler-Najjar syndrome can be achieved with one injection of HD-Ad vector and negligible chronic toxicity. PMID:15753292

  16. Vascular Mural Cells Promote Noradrenergic Differentiation of Embryonic Sympathetic Neurons.

    PubMed

    Fortuna, Vitor; Pardanaud, Luc; Brunet, Isabelle; Ola, Roxana; Ristori, Emma; Santoro, Massimo M; Nicoli, Stefania; Eichmann, Anne

    2015-06-23

    The sympathetic nervous system controls smooth muscle tone and heart rate in the cardiovascular system. Postganglionic sympathetic neurons (SNs) develop in close proximity to the dorsal aorta (DA) and innervate visceral smooth muscle targets. Here, we use the zebrafish embryo to ask whether the DA is required for SN development. We show that noradrenergic (NA) differentiation of SN precursors temporally coincides with vascular mural cell (VMC) recruitment to the DA and vascular maturation. Blocking vascular maturation inhibits VMC recruitment and blocks NA differentiation of SN precursors. Inhibition of platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) signaling prevents VMC differentiation and also blocks NA differentiation of SN precursors. NA differentiation is normal in cloche mutants that are devoid of endothelial cells but have VMCs. Thus, PDGFR-mediated mural cell recruitment mediates neurovascular interactions between the aorta and sympathetic precursors and promotes their noradrenergic differentiation.

  17. Nanoparticle inhalation alters systemic arteriolar vasoreactivity through sympathetic and cyclooxygenase-mediated pathways

    PubMed Central

    Knuckles, Travis L.; Yi, Jinghai; Frazer, David G.; Leonard, Howard D.; Chen, Bean T.; Castranova, Vince; Nurkiewicz, Timothy R.

    2016-01-01

    The widespread increase in the production and use of nanomaterials has increased the potential for nanoparticle exposure; however, the biological effects of nanoparticle inhalation are poorly understood. Rats were exposed to nanosized titanium dioxide aerosols (10 µg lung burden); at 24 h post-exposure, the spinotrapezius muscle was prepared for intravital microscopy. Nanoparticle exposure did not alter perivascular nerve stimulation (PVNS)-induced arteriolar constriction under normal conditions; however, adrenergic receptor inhibition revealed a more robust effect. Nanoparticle inhalation reduced arteriolar dilation in response to active hyperaemia (AH). In both PVNS and AH experiments, nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition affected only controls. Whereas cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition only attenuated AH-induced arteriolar dilation in nanoparticle-exposed animals. This group displayed an enhanced U46619 constriction and attenuated iloprost-induced dilation. Collectively, these studies indicate that nanoparticle exposure reduces microvascular NO bioavailability and alters COX-mediated vasoreactivity. Furthermore, the enhanced adrenergic receptor sensitivity suggests an augmented sympathetic responsiveness. PMID:21830860

  18. A single intravenous administration of zoledronic acid prevents the bone loss and mechanical compromise induced by aromatase inhibition in rats.

    PubMed

    Gasser, Jürg A; Green, Jonathan R; Shen, Victor; Ingold, Peter; Rebmann, Andrea; Bhatnagar, Ajay S; Evans, Dean B

    2006-10-01

    Recent evidence has demonstrated that long-term estrogen deprivation using aromatase inhibitor therapy in postmenopausal women with breast cancer results in bone loss and increased fracture risk. Bisphosphonates are potent inhibitors of bone resorption and have demonstrated efficacy in preventing bone loss in postmenopausal women with low bone mineral density (BMD) and in patients with breast cancer receiving estrogen deprivation therapy. Therefore, this study investigated the effects of the bisphosphonate zoledronic acid on BMD and bone strength in rats treated with the aromatase inhibitor, letrozole. Peripheral quantitative computed tomography demonstrated that treatment of rats with daily oral letrozole (1 mg/kg) induced significant bone loss and cortical thinning compared with control animals (P < 0.01). A single prior intravenous dose of zoledronic acid dose dependently protected against letrozole-induced bone loss and cortical thinning, with the highest evaluated dose (20 microg/kg) resulting in BMD values that were not significantly different from controls over the 24 weeks of letrozole treatment. Furthermore, biomechanical testing of the distal femoral metaphysis demonstrated that zoledronic acid (20 microg/kg) significantly prevented the decrease in stiffness and elastic modulus induced by letrozole treatment. Taken together, these data support the use of zoledronic acid for the prevention of bone loss in women with breast cancer receiving aromatase inhibitor therapy.

  19. In vivo estimation of optical properties of rat liver using single-reflectance fiber probe during ischemia and reperfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akter, Sharmin; Tanabe, Tomoki; Maejima, Satoshi; Kawauchi, Satoko; Sato, Shunichi; Hinoki, Akinari; Aosasa, Suefumi; Yamamoto, Junji; Nishidate, Izumi

    2016-04-01

    To quantify the changes in optical properties of in vivo rat liver tissue, we applied diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) system using single-reflectance fiber probe during ischemia and reperfusion evoked by hepatic portal occlusion (hepatic artery, portal vein and bile duct). Changes in the reduced scattering coefficient μ s', the absorption coefficient μ a, the tissue oxygen saturation StO2, and the oxidation of heme aa3 in cytochrome c oxidase (C cO) OHaa3 of in vivo rat liver (n = 6) were evaluated. Heme aa3 in C cO were significantly reduced (P < 0.05) during ischemia, which indicates a sign of mitochondrial energy failure induced by oxygen insufficiency of liver tissue. We found that OHaa3 obtained from the proposed method was unchanged immediately after the onset of ischemia and started gradually decreasing at 2 min after the onset of ischemia. Difference in the time course between OHaa3 and the conventional ratio metric analysis with μ a(605)/ μ a(620) reported in literature demonstrates that the proposed method is effective in reduction of optical cross talk between hemoglobin and heme aa3. Our results suggest that DRS technique is applicable and useful for assessing in vivo tissue viability and hemodynamics in liver intraoperatively.

  20. Sympathetic overactivity in active ulcerative colitis: effects of clonidine.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Raffaello; Ardizzone, Sandro; Palazzolo, Laura; Rimoldi, Alexandra; Perego, Francesca; Barbic, Franca; Bevilacqua, Maurizio; Vago, Luca; Bianchi Porro, Gabriele; Malliani, Alberto

    2006-01-01

    Previous reports suggest that inflammatory bowel diseases may be accompanied by abnormalities in the neural autonomic profile. We tested the hypotheses that 1) an exaggerated sympathetic activity characterizes active ulcerative colitis (UC) and 2) a reduction of sympathetic activity by clonidine would be associated with clinical changes of UC. In 23 patients with UC and 20 controls, muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), ECG, blood pressure, and respiration were continuously recorded, and plasma catecholamine was evaluated both at rest and during a 75 degrees head-up tilt. Autonomic profile was assessed by MSNA, norepinephrine, epinephrine, spectral markers of low-frequency (LF) cardiac sympathetic (LF(RR); normalized units) and high-frequency (HF) parasympathetic (HF(RR); normalized units) modulation and sympathetic vasomotor control (LF systolic arterial pressure; LF(SAP)), obtained by spectrum analysis of the R-R interval and systolic pressure variability. Among UC patients, 16 agreed to be randomly assigned to 8-wk transdermal clonidine (15 mg/wk, 9 subjects), or placebo (7 patients). An autonomic profile, Disease Activity Index (DAI), and endoscopic pattern were compared before and after clonidine/placebo. At rest, MSNA, heart rate (HR), LF(RR), LF/HF, and LF(SAP) were higher and HF(RR) was lower in patients than in controls. Tilt decreased HF(RR) and increased MSNA and LF(RR) less in patients than in controls. Clonidine decreased HR, MSNA, epinephrine, LF(RR), and increased HF(RR), whereas placebo had no effects. Changes of the autonomic profile after clonidine were associated with reduction of DAI score. An overall increase of sympathetic activity characterized active UC. Normalization of the autonomic profile by clonidine was accompanied by an improvement of the disease.

  1. Sympathetic innervation of the ileocecal junction in horses.

    PubMed

    Russo, D; Bombardi, C; Grandis, A; Furness, J B; Spadari, A; Bernardini, C; Chiocchetti, R

    2010-10-01

    The distribution and chemical phenotypes of sympathetic and dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons innervating the equine ileocecal junction (ICJ) were studied by combining retrograde tracing and immunohistochemistry. Immunoreactivity (IR) for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH), neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), substance P (SP), and neuropeptide Y (NPY) was investigated. Sympathetic neurons projecting to the ICJ were distributed within the celiac (CG), cranial mesenteric (CranMG), and caudal mesenteric (CaudMG) ganglia, as well as in the last ganglia of the thoracic sympathetic chain and in the splanchnic ganglia. In the CG and CranMG 91 +/- 8% and 93 +/- 12% of the neurons innervating the ICJ expressed TH- and DBH-IR, respectively. In the CaudMG 90 +/- 15% and 94 +/- 5% of ICJ innervating neurons were TH- and DBH-IR, respectively. Sympathetic (TH-IR) fibers innervated the myenteric and submucosal ganglia, ileal blood vessels, and the muscle layers. They were more concentrated at the ICJ level and were also seen encircling myenteric plexus (MP) and submucosal plexus (SMP) descending neurons that were retrogradely labeled from the ICJ. Among the few retrogradely labeled DRG neurons, nNOS-, CGRP-, and SP-IR nerve cells were observed. Dense networks of CGRP-, nNOS-, and SP-IR varicosities were seen around retrogradely labeled prevertebral ganglia neurons. The CGRP-IR fibers are probably the endings of neurons projecting from the intestine to the prevertebral ganglia. These findings indicate that this crucial region of the intestinal tract is strongly influenced by the sympathetic system and that sensory information of visceral origin influences the sympathetic control of the ICJ.

  2. Bursting into space: alterations of sympathetic control by space travel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckberg, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    AIM: Astronauts return to Earth with reduced red cell masses and hypovolaemia. Not surprisingly, when they stand, their heart rates may speed inordinately, their blood pressures may fall, and some may experience frank syncope. We studied autonomic function in six male astronauts (average +/- SEM age: 40 +/- 2 years) before, during, and after the 16-day Neurolab space shuttle mission. METHOD: We recorded electrocardiograms, finger photoplethysmographic arterial pressures, respiration, peroneal nerve muscle sympathetic activity, plasma noradrenaline and noradrenaline kinetics, and cardiac output, and we calculated stroke volume and total peripheral resistance. We perturbed autonomic function before and during spaceflight with graded Valsalva manoeuvres and lower body suction, and before and after the mission with passive upright tilt. RESULTS: In-flight baseline sympathetic nerve activity was increased above pre-flight levels (by 10-33%) in three subjects, in whom noradrenaline spillover and clearance also were increased. Valsalva straining provoked greater reductions of arterial pressure, and proportionally greater sympathetic responses in space than on Earth. Lower body suction elicited greater increases of sympathetic nerve activity, plasma noradrenaline, and noradrenaline spillover in space than on Earth. After the Neurolab mission, left ventricular stroke volume was lower and heart rate was higher during tilt, than before spaceflight. No astronaut experienced orthostatic hypotension or pre-syncope during 10 min of post-flight tilting. CONCLUSION: We conclude that baseline sympathetic outflow, however measured, is higher in space than on earth, and that augmented sympathetic nerve responses to Valsalva straining, lower body suction, and post-flight upright tilt represent normal adjustments to greater haemodynamic stresses associated with hypovolaemia.

  3. Comparative Metabolism Studies of Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) Diastereomers in Male Rats Following a Single Oral Dose.

    PubMed

    Hakk, Heldur

    2016-01-01

    Male Sprague-Dawley rats were dosed orally with 3 mg/kg of one of three hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) diastereomers. Each diastereomer was well absorbed (73-83%), and distributed preferentially to lipophilic tissues. Feces were the major route of excretion; cumulatively accounting for 42% of dose for α-HBCD, 59% for ß-HBCD, and 53% for γ-HBCD. Urine was also an important route of HBCD excretion, accounting for 13% of dose for α-HBCD, 30% for ß-HBCD, and 21% for γ-HBCD. Total metabolism of HBCD diastereomers followed the rank order ß > γ > α, and was >65% of that administered. The metabolites formed were distinct in male rats: α-HBCD did not debrominate or stereoisomerize, but formed two hydroxylated metabolites; ß- and γ-HBCD were both extensively metabolized via pathways of stereoisomerization, oxidation, dehydrogenation, reductive debromination, and ring opening. ß-HBCD was biotransformed to two mercapturic acid pathway metabolites. The metabolites of ß- and γ-HBCD were largely distinct, and could possibly be used as markers of exposure. These isomer-specific data suggest that α-HBCD would be the most dominant HBCD diastereomer in biological tissues because it was metabolized to the lowest degree and also accumulated from the stereoisomerization of the β- and γ- diastereomers. PMID:26629593

  4. Activation of NTS A2a adenosine receptors differentially resets baroreflex control of renal vs. adrenal sympathetic nerve activity.

    PubMed

    Ichinose, Tomoko K; O'Leary, Donal S; Scislo, Tadeusz J

    2009-04-01

    The role of nucleus of solitary tract (NTS) A(2a) adenosine receptors in baroreflex mechanisms is controversial. Stimulation of these receptors releases glutamate within the NTS and elicits baroreflex-like decreases in mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), whereas inhibition of these receptors attenuates HR baroreflex responses. In contrast, stimulation of NTS A(2a) adenosine receptors increases preganglionic adrenal sympathetic nerve activity (pre-ASNA), and the depressor and sympathoinhibitory responses are not markedly affected by sinoaortic denervation and blockade of NTS glutamatergic transmission. To elucidate the role of NTS A(2a) adenosine receptors in baroreflex function, we compared full baroreflex stimulus-response curves for HR, RSNA, and pre-ASNA (intravenous nitroprusside/phenylephrine) before and after bilateral NTS microinjections of selective adenosine A(2a) receptor agonist (CGS-21680; 2.0, 20 pmol/50 nl), selective A(2a) receptor antagonist (ZM-241385; 40 pmol/100 nl), and nonselective A(1) + A(2a) receptor antagonist (8-SPT; 1 nmol/100 nl) in urethane/alpha-chloralose anesthetized rats. Activation of A(2a) receptors decreased the range, upper plateau, and gain of baroreflex-response curves for RSNA, whereas these parameters all increased for pre-ASNA, consistent with direct effects of the agonist on regional sympathetic activity. However, no resetting of baroreflex-response curves along the MAP axis occurred despite the marked decreases in baseline MAP. The antagonists had no marked effects on baseline variables or baroreflex-response functions. We conclude that the activation of NTS A(2a) adenosine receptors differentially alters baroreflex control of HR, RSNA, and pre-ASNA mostly via non-baroreflex mechanism(s), and these receptors have virtually no tonic action on baroreflex control of these sympathetic outputs.

  5. Sympathetic nervous system regulation of the tumour microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Steven W.; Nagaraja, Archana S.; Lutgendorf, Susan K.; Green, Paige A.; Sood, Anil K.

    2016-01-01

    The peripheral autonomic nervous system (ANS) is known to regulate gene expression in primary tumours and their surrounding microenvironment. Activation of the sympathetic division of the ANS in particular modulates gene expression programs that promote metastasis of solid tumours by stimulating macrophage infiltration, inflammation, angiogenesis, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and tumour invasion, and by inhibiting cellular immune responses and programmed cell death. Haematological cancers are modulated by sympathetic nervous system (SNS) regulation of stem cell biology and hematopoietic differentiation programs. In addition to identifying a molecular basis for physiologic stress effects on cancer, these findings have also identified new pharmacologic strategies to inhibit cancer progression in vivo. PMID:26299593

  6. Optimized sympathetic cooling of atomic mixtures via fast adiabatic strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Stephen; Sundaram, Bala; Onofrio, Roberto

    2011-11-15

    We discuss fast frictionless cooling techniques in the framework of sympathetic cooling of cold atomic mixtures. It is argued that optimal cooling of an atomic species--in which the deepest quantum degeneracy regime is achieved--may be obtained by means of sympathetic cooling with another species whose trapping frequency is dynamically changed to maintain constancy of the Lewis-Riesenfeld adiabatic invariant. Advantages and limitations of this cooling strategy are discussed, with particular regard to the possibility of cooling Fermi gases to a deeper degenerate regime.

  7. Sympathetic storming in a patient with intracranial basal ganglia hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Siu, Gilbert; Marino, Michael; Desai, Anjuli; Nissley, Frederick

    2011-03-01

    Neurologic deficits and medical complications are common sequelae after intracranial hemorrhage. Among the medical complications, sympathetic storming is relatively rare. We describe a case of a patient with an acute right basal ganglia hemorrhage. During the patient's hospital course, he developed tachypnea, diaphoresis, hypertension, hyperthermia, and tachycardia for three consecutive days. A complete laboratory work-up and imaging studies were unremarkable for infectious etiology, new intracranial hemorrhage, and deep vein thrombosis. The patient was diagnosed with sympathetic storming, a relatively uncommon cause of these symptoms. The storming was secondary to a kinked Foley catheter, and subsequent placement of a new catheter resulted in the resolution of his symptoms. PMID:21297401

  8. The Sympathetic Nervous System in the Pathogenesis of Takotsubo Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wittstein, Ilan S

    2016-10-01

    Takotsubo syndrome is a unique clinical condition of acute heart failure and reversible left ventricular dysfunction frequently precipitated by sudden emotional or physical stress. There is growing evidence that exaggerated sympathetic stimulation is central to the pathogenesis of this syndrome. Precisely how catecholamines mediate myocardial stunning in takotsubo syndrome remains incompletely understood; but possible mechanisms include epicardial spasm, microvascular dysfunction, direct adrenergic-receptor-mediated myocyte injury, and systemic vascular effects that alter ventricular-arterial coupling. Risk factors that increase sympathetic tone and/or catecholamine sensitivity may render individuals particularly susceptible to takotsubo syndrome during episodes of acute stress. PMID:27638019

  9. Sympathetic skin response: basic mechanisms and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Vetrugno, Robert; Liguori, Rocco; Cortelli, Pietro; Montagna, Pasquale

    2003-08-01

    Sympathetic skin response (SSR), defined as the momentary change of the electrical potential of the skin, may be spontaneous or reflexively evoked by a variety of internal or by externally applied arousal stimuli. Although the suprasegmental structures influencing the SSR in humans are not well known, SSR has been proposed as a non-invasive approach to investigate the function of the sympathetic system. SSR is easy to apply but current procedures are not sufficiently reliable for diagnostic purposes, and show imperfect correlations both with clinical features and other measurements of autonomic, in particular, sudomotor dysfunction. PMID:12955550

  10. Age-Dependent Differences in the Strength and Persistence of Psychostimulant-Induced Conditioned Activity in Rats: Effects of a Single Environment-Cocaine Pairing

    PubMed Central

    McDougall, Sanders A.; Pipkin, Joseph A.; Der-Ghazarian, Taleen; Cortez, Anthony M.; Gutierrez, Arnold; Lee, Ryan J.; Carbajal, Sandra; Mohd-Yusof, Alena

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the strength and persistence of cocaine-induced conditioned activity in young and adult rats. A one-trial protocol has proven useful for studying the ontogeny of psychostimulant-induced behavioral sensitization; therefore, a similar procedure was used to examine conditioned activity. On postnatal day (PD) 19 or PD 80, rats were injected with saline or cocaine in either a novel test chamber or the home cage. After various drug abstinence intervals (1–21 days), rats were injected with saline and returned to the test chamber, where conditioned activity was assessed. In a separate experiment, we examined whether cocaine-induced conditioned activity was a consequence of Pavlovian conditioning or a failure to habituate to the test environment. The results showed that adult rats exhibited strong one-trial conditioned activity that persisted for at least 21 days, whereas young rats did not show a conditioned locomotor response. The conditioned activity exhibited by adult rats did not result from a failure to habituate to the cocaine-paired environment. These results indicate that cocaine-paired contextual stimuli differentially affect behavior depending on age of the animal. The data provided by adult rats have potential translational relevance for humans because a single environment-drug pairing caused long-term alterations in behavior. PMID:25171082

  11. Effects of acute administration of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors on sympathetic nerve activity.

    PubMed

    Tiradentes, R V; Pires, J G P; Silva, N F; Ramage, A G; Santuzzi, C H; Futuro Neto, H A

    2014-07-01

    Serotonergic mechanisms have an important function in the central control of circulation. Here, the acute effects of three selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) on autonomic and cardiorespiratory variables were measured in rats. Although SSRIs require 2-3 weeks to achieve their full antidepressant effects, it has been shown that they cause an immediate inhibition of 5-HT reuptake. Seventy male Wistar rats were anesthetized with urethane and instrumented to record blood pressure, heart rate, renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), and respiratory frequency. At lower doses, the acute cardiovascular effects of fluoxetine, paroxetine and sertraline administered intravenously were insignificant and variable. At middle and higher doses, a general pattern was observed, with significant reductions in sympathetic nerve activity. At 10 min, fluoxetine (3 and 10 mg/kg) reduced RSNA by -33 ± 4.7 and -31 ± 5.4%, respectively, without changes in blood pressure; 3 and 10 mg/kg paroxetine reduced RSNA by -35 ± 5.4 and -31 ± 5.5%, respectively, with an increase in blood pressure +26.3 ± 2.5; 3 mg/kg sertraline reduced RSNA by -59.4 ± 8.6%, without changes in blood pressure. Sympathoinhibition began 5 min after injection and lasted approximately 30 min. For fluoxetine and sertraline, but not paroxetine, there was a reduction in heart rate that was nearly parallel to the sympathoinhibition. The effect of these drugs on the other variables was insignificant. In conclusion, acute peripheral administration of SSRIs caused early autonomic cardiovascular effects, particularly sympathoinhibition, as measured by RSNA. Although a peripheral action cannot be ruled out, such effects are presumably mostly central. PMID:25003632

  12. Acute single dose of ketamine relieves mechanical allodynia and consequent depression-like behaviors in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guang-Fen; Wang, Jing; Han, Jin-