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Sample records for single tooth implant

  1. Single tooth replacement by Morse taper connection implants: a retrospective study of 80 implants.

    PubMed

    Mangano, C; Bartolucci, E G

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this study was to provide data relative to the use of a new implant system (Mac System, Cabon, Milan, Italy) with a Morse taper implant-abutment connection for single implant restorations. The implant system is composed of an endosseous screw made of commercially pure titanium grade 2, while the abutment is titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V). A total of 80 single implants were placed in 69 patients (36 women and 33 men, mean age 42 years, range 16 to 61). All patients gave their informed consent and received a thorough clinical and radiographic examination. Smokers and diabetics were excluded from the study. Three implants were placed in areas of previous tooth impaction, 5 were placed in posttraumatic edentulous areas, 2 were used in situations involving tooth agenesis, and 60 replaced teeth lost because of caries or periodontal disease. All patients were edentulous for at least 1 year prior to treatment. The implants received a definitive prosthesis and had been in function for a mean period of 3.5 years. At second-stage surgery, 2 implants were removed because of lack of osseointegration. After 2 years of loading, 1 implant showed evidence of peri-implantitis and was removed. In addition, 2 fractured abutments and 1 loosened abutment were observed. Few mechanical or infectious complications were seen, and this may have been the result of high stability of the conical connection.

  2. The Single-tooth Implant Treatment of Congenitally Missing Maxillary Lateral Incisors Using Angled Abutments: A Clinical Report

    PubMed Central

    Tuna, Suleyman Hakan; Keyf, Filiz; Pekkan, Gurel

    2009-01-01

    The maxillary lateral incisor is the second most common congenitally absent tooth. There are several treatment options for replacing the missing maxillary lateral incisor, including canine substitution, tooth-supported restoration, or single-tooth implant. Dental implants are an appropriate treatment option for replacing missing maxillary lateral incisor teeth in adolescents when their dental and skeletal development is complete. This case report presents the treatment of a patient with congenitally missing maxillary lateral incisors using dental implants with angled abutments. PMID:21528038

  3. Predictability of soft tissue form around single-tooth implant restorations.

    PubMed

    Priest, George

    2003-02-01

    The objective of this study was to answer important questions about gingival responses to single-tooth implants: (1) Are papilla regeneration and sulcular recession expected results? (2) Do soft tissue profiles retain their sulcular form over an extended period? and (3) Do single-implant replacements require special restorative handling to achieve predictable soft tissue form? A retrospective, photographic examination was used to follow 55 single-implant restorations in 51 patients for a period from 1 to 9 years (mean 3.5 years). Papillae regenerated in 83.9% of implants for a mean growth of 0.65 mm mesially and 0.62 mm distally. The sulcular apex receded in 59% of patients for a mean of 0.06 mm. Complete papilla fill was noted in 75% of patients examined. Short- to long-term measurements revealed that papilla regrowth continued slightly and that sulcular recession abated. Papilla regeneration around single implants was a predictable outcome in this population; sulcular recession was not a predictable finding. Papilla levels demonstrated a tendency toward increasing height, and sulcular levels remained fairly constant over the long term. Predictable soft tissue profiles were achieved with a simplified implant prosthetic protocol, progressing directly from healing abutments to definitive crowns in most cases.

  4. Long-term cumulative survival and mechanical complications of single-tooth Ankylos Implants: focus on the abutment neck fractures

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the cumulative survival rate (CSR) and mechanical complications of single-tooth Ankylos® implants. MATERIALS AND METHODS This was a retrospective clinical study that analyzed 450 single Ankylos® implants installed in 275 patients between December 2005 and December 2012. The main outcomes were survival results CSR and implant failure) and mechanical complications (screw loosening, fracture, and cumulative fracture rate [CFR]). The main outcomes were analyzed according to age, sex, implant length or diameter, bone graft, arch, and position. RESULTS The 8-year CSR was 96.9%. Thirteen (2.9%) implants failed because of early osseointegration failure in 3, marginal bone loss in 6, and abutment fracture in 4. Screw loosening occurred in 10 implants (2.2%), and 10 abutment fractures occurred. All abutment fractures were located in the neck, and concurrent screw fractures were observed. The CSR and rate of screw loosening did not differ significantly according to factors. The CFR was higher in middle-aged patients (5.3% vs 0.0% in younger and older patients); for teeth in a molar position (5.8% vs 0.0% for premolar or 1.1% for anterior position); and for larger-diameter implants (4.5% for 4.5 mm and 6.7% for 5.5 mm diameter vs 0.5% for 3.5 mm diameter) (all P<.05). CONCLUSION The Ankylos® implant is suitable for single-tooth restoration in Koreans. However, relatively frequent abutment fractures (2.2%) were observed and some fractures resulted in implant failures. Middle-aged patients, the molar position, and a large implant diameter were associated with a high incidence of abutment fracture. PMID:26813443

  5. Esthetic evaluation of single-tooth Morse taper connection implants placed in fresh extraction sockets or healed sites.

    PubMed

    Mangano, Francesco G; Mangano, Carlo; Ricci, Massimiliano; Sammons, Rachel L; Shibli, Jamil A; Piattelli, Adriano

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the esthetic outcome of single implants placed in fresh extraction sockets with those placed in fully healed sites of the anterior maxilla. This retrospective study was based on data from patients treated with single-tooth Morse taper connection implants placed in fresh extraction sockets and in fully healed sites of the anterior maxilla. Only single implant treatments were considered with both neighboring teeth present. Additional prerequisites for immediate implant treatment were intact socket walls and a thick gingival biotype. The esthetic outcome was objectively rated using the pink esthetic/white esthetic score (PES/WES). The Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare the PES and the WES between the 2 groups. Twenty-two patients received an immediate implant, and 18 patients had conventional implant surgery. The mean follow-up was 31.09 months (SD 5.57; range 24-46) and 34.44 months (SD 7.10; range 24-48) for immediately and conventionally inserted implants, respectively. No implants were lost. All implants fulfilled the success criteria. The mean PES/WES was 14.50 (SD 2.52; range 9-19) and 15.61 (SD 3.20; range 8-20) for immediately and conventionally placed implants, respectively. Immediate implants had a mean PES of 7.45 (SD 1.62; range 4-10) and a mean WES of 7.04 (SD 1.29; range 5-10). Conventional implants had a mean PES of 7.83 (SD 1.58; range 4-10) and a mean WES of 7.77 (SD 1.66; range 4-10). The difference between the 2 groups was not significant. Immediate and conventional single implant treatment yielded comparable esthetic outcomes.

  6. Clinical evaluation of a single crystal sapphire tooth implant in human beings.

    PubMed

    Sclaroff, A; el-Mofty, S; Guyer, S E

    1990-08-01

    Single crystal sapphire implants are commercially prepared ceramics of aluminum oxide. These endosseous implants have been placed in patients at Washington University since 1978. The course of patients has been followed closely with periodic clinical and radiographic evaluations. Sapphire is well tolerated by hard and soft tissue and provides excellent abutments for fixed partial dentures.

  7. [Dental implants in tooth grinders].

    PubMed

    Lobbezoo, F; Brouwers, J E; Cune, M S; Naeije, M

    2004-03-01

    Bruxism (tooth grinding and clenching) is generally considered a contraindication for dental implants, although the evidence is usually based on clinical experience only. So far, studies to the possible cause-and-effect relationship between bruxism and implant failure do not yield consistent and specific outcomes. This is partly due to the large variation in the technical and the biological aspects of the investigations. Although there is still no proof that bruxism causes overload of dental implants and their suprastructures, a careful approach is recommended. Practical advices as to minimize the chance of implant failure are given. Besides the recommendation to reduce or eliminate bruxism itself, these advices concern the number and dimensions of the implants, the design of the occlusion and articulation patterns, and the use of a hard nightguard. PMID:15058243

  8. Single-tooth morse taper connection implant placed in grafted site of the anterior maxilla: clinical and radiographic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Mangano, Francesco Guido; Zecca, Piero; Luongo, Fabrizia; Iezzi, Giovanna; Mangano, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to achieve aesthetically pleasing soft tissue contours in a severely compromised tooth in the anterior region of the maxilla. For a right-maxillary central incisor with localized advanced chronic periodontitis a tooth extraction followed by reconstructive procedures and delayed implant placement was proposed and accepted by the patient. Guided bone regeneration (GBR) technique was employed, with a biphasic calcium-phosphate (BCP) block graft placed in the extraction socket in conjunction with granules of the same material and a resorbable barrier membrane. After 6 months of healing, an implant was installed. The acrylic provisional restoration remained in situ for 3 months and then was substituted with the definitive crown. This ridge reconstruction technique enabled preserving both hard and soft tissues and counteracting vertical and horizontal bone resorption after tooth extraction and allowed for an ideal three-dimensional implant placement. Localized severe alveolar bone resorption of the anterior maxilla associated with chronic periodontal disease can be successfully treated by means of ridge reconstruction with GBR and delayed implant insertion; the placement of an early-loaded, Morse taper connection implant in the grafted site was effective to create an excellent clinical aesthetic result and to maintain it along time.

  9. Single-Tooth Morse Taper Connection Implant Placed in Grafted Site of the Anterior Maxilla: Clinical and Radiographic Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Mangano, Francesco Guido; Zecca, Piero; Luongo, Fabrizia; Iezzi, Giovanna; Mangano, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to achieve aesthetically pleasing soft tissue contours in a severely compromised tooth in the anterior region of the maxilla. For a right-maxillary central incisor with localized advanced chronic periodontitis a tooth extraction followed by reconstructive procedures and delayed implant placement was proposed and accepted by the patient. Guided bone regeneration (GBR) technique was employed, with a biphasic calcium-phosphate (BCP) block graft placed in the extraction socket in conjunction with granules of the same material and a resorbable barrier membrane. After 6 months of healing, an implant was installed. The acrylic provisional restoration remained in situ for 3 months and then was substituted with the definitive crown. This ridge reconstruction technique enabled preserving both hard and soft tissues and counteracting vertical and horizontal bone resorption after tooth extraction and allowed for an ideal three-dimensional implant placement. Localized severe alveolar bone resorption of the anterior maxilla associated with chronic periodontal disease can be successfully treated by means of ridge reconstruction with GBR and delayed implant insertion; the placement of an early-loaded, Morse taper connection implant in the grafted site was effective to create an excellent clinical aesthetic result and to maintain it along time. PMID:25431687

  10. Evaluation of peri-implant soft tissue and bone levels around early loaded implant in restoring single missing tooth: A clinico-radiographic study

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Isha; Bhushan, Anoop; Baiju, Chandrababu Sudha; Bali, Shweta; Joshi, Vaibhav

    2016-01-01

    Background: One-stage nonsubmerged protocol which can achieve success rates comparable to implants placed in a two-staged submerged procedure also the preconditions for periimplant bone regeneration has lead to more refined concepts of implant loading. Materials and Methods: Twenty sites with single missing tooth were included in this study. Clinical parameters included sulcus bleeding index (sBI), probing pocket depth (PD), and papilla index (PI) and radiographic parameters included crestal bone level were assessed for a period of 9 months. Results: The crestal bone loss showed mean value ranging from baseline 0.25 ± 0.11 to 0.31 ± 0.08 at 3 weeks, to 0.67 ± 0.13 at 3 months, to 0.85 ± 0.09 at 6 months, and to 0.88 ± 0.12 at 9 months. Probing PD, the mean value for probing PD at 3 weeks 1.20 ± 0.83, 3 months 1.60 ± 1.1, at 6 months 1.40 ± 1.14, and at 9 months 1.20 ± 1.0. sBI, mean value for sBI at 3 weeks 0.00 ± 0.00, 3 months 0.3 ± 0.11, at 6 months 0.09 ± 0.25, and at 9 months 0.08 ± 0.24. PI, showed a significant difference among at different points of time with P = 0.000. Conclusion: The dental implants showed <1 mm of crestal bone loss at 9 months follow-up, clinically significant marginal bone loss occurred between the time of implant placement and 3 months. Subsequent to that, bone loss observed around the implant up to 9 months was minimal. The periimplant soft tissue maturity was maintained throughout the study. PMID:27041836

  11. A custom titanium implant-retained single-tooth restoration: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, S M; Chance, D A

    1996-01-01

    Titanium is an inexpensive metal that can be used to create custom cast restorations. Although special investment and casting equipment is needed to make titanium castings, the potential benefit of inexpensive, biocompatible, and custom restorations is significant. Porcelain can easily be applied to titanium with excellent bond strength and esthetics. Problems associated with casting roughness and fit can be corrected using electrical discharge machining. A method of diagnosis and treatment planning that evaluates the restorative space prior to implant placement and eliminates the use of machined components is presented. PMID:8990641

  12. Esthetic Outcomes of Single-Tooth Implant-Supported Restorations Using Metal-Ceramic Restorations with Zirconia or Titanium Abutments: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Study.

    PubMed

    Baldini, Nicola; D'Elia, Chiara; Clementini, Marco; Carrillo de Albornoz, Ana; Sanz, Mariano; De Sanctis, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test whether zirconia abutments exhibit the same clinical and esthetic outcomes as titanium abutments in single-tooth implant restorations in the esthetic area. The 24 treated patients were randomly assigned to a test (zirconia abutment) or control (titanium abutment) group. Objective evaluations were carried out using the Implant Crown Aesthetic Index (ICAI) and the Papilla Index (PI) at the 1-month and 12-month follow-up examinations after crown cementation. No significant differences, either in ICAI or in other periodontal or radiographic measurements, were observed. At 1 year, zirconia and titanium abutments exhibited the same esthetic outcomes. PMID:27333019

  13. Immediate, Non Submerged Root Analog Zirconia Implant in Single Rooted Tooth Replacement: Case Report with 2 years Follow Up.

    PubMed

    Patankar, Amod; Kshirsagar, Rajesh; Patankar, Swapna; Pawar, Sudhir

    2016-07-01

    This report demonstrates the clinical use of a modified, truly anatomic, root analogue zirconia implant for immediate replacement of a right mandibular first premolar. A 22-year-old female patient with chronic apical periodontitis of the right mandibular first premolar was referred and the tooth was carefully extracted. A truly anatomical, root identical, roughened zirconia implant modified by macro-retentions was manufactured and placed into the extraction socket by tapping 3 days later. After 4 months a composite crown was cemented in place. No complications occurred during the healing period. A good functional and aesthetic result was achieved with minimal bone resorption and soft tissue recession at 18 months follow-up. This report describes the successful clinical use of an immediate, single stage, truly anatomical root-analogue zirconia implant for replacement of a single rooted tooth. Significant modifications such as macro-retentions yielded primary stability and excellent osseointegration. This novel approach is minimally invasive, respects the underlying anatomy and aids socket prevention. In addition the procedure saves time and cost, has good patient acceptance as there is no need for osteotomy, sinus lift or bone augmentation. PMID:27408451

  14. FEM evaluation of cemented-retained versus screw-retained dental implant single-tooth crown prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Cicciu, Marco; Bramanti, Ennio; Matacena, Giada; Guglielmino, Eugenio; Risitano, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    Prosthetic rehabilitation of partial or total edentulous patients is today a challenge for clinicians and dental practitioners. The application of dental implants in order to recover areas of missing teeth is going to be a predictable technique, however some important points about the implant angulation, the stress distribution over the bone tissue and prosthetic components should be well investigated for having final long term clinical results. Two different system of the prosthesis fixation are commonly used. The screw retained crown and the cemented retained one. All of the two restoration techniques give to the clinicians several advantages and some disadvantages. Aim of this work is to evaluate all the mechanical features of each system, through engineering systems of investigations like FEM and Von Mises analyses. The FEM is today a useful tool for the prediction of stress effect upon material and biomaterial under load or strengths. Specifically three different area has been evaluated through this study: the dental crown with the bone interface; the passant screw connection area; the occlusal surface of the two different type of crown. The elastic features of the materials used in the study have been taken from recent literature data. Results revealed an adequate response for both type of prostheses, although cemented retained one showed better results over the occlusal area. PMID:24955150

  15. FEM evaluation of cemented-retained versus screw-retained dental implant single-tooth crown prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Cicciu, Marco; Bramanti, Ennio; Matacena, Giada; Guglielmino, Eugenio; Risitano, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    Prosthetic rehabilitation of partial or total edentulous patients is today a challenge for clinicians and dental practitioners. The application of dental implants in order to recover areas of missing teeth is going to be a predictable technique, however some important points about the implant angulation, the stress distribution over the bone tissue and prosthetic components should be well investigated for having final long term clinical results. Two different system of the prosthesis fixation are commonly used. The screw retained crown and the cemented retained one. All of the two restoration techniques give to the clinicians several advantages and some disadvantages. Aim of this work is to evaluate all the mechanical features of each system, through engineering systems of investigations like FEM and Von Mises analyses. The FEM is today a useful tool for the prediction of stress effect upon material and biomaterial under load or strengths. Specifically three different area has been evaluated through this study: the dental crown with the bone interface; the passant screw connection area; the occlusal surface of the two different type of crown. The elastic features of the materials used in the study have been taken from recent literature data. Results revealed an adequate response for both type of prostheses, although cemented retained one showed better results over the occlusal area. PMID:24955150

  16. When should we extract deciduous teeth and place implants in young individuals with tooth agenesis?

    PubMed

    Bergendal, B

    2008-01-01

    The aim was to systematically review and find evidence to determine when to extract deciduous teeth and place implants in young individuals with tooth agenesis. A search was made in MEDLINE on combinations of the terms 'tooth agenesis', 'deciduous teeth' and 'dental implants'. Publications with an abstract and written in the English language only were included. To give a background to the clinical management of young individuals with agenesis of teeth, publications on epidemiology of tooth agenesis, persistence of deciduous teeth, treatment outcomes after multi-disciplinary treatment planning and experiences of treatment with dental implants in young individuals were also reviewed. A search on the terms 'tooth agenesis', 'deciduous teeth' and 'dental implants' resulted in nine references and a search on 'dental implants' and 'tooth agenesis' gave 132 references; 46 met the inclusion criteria. Only two were prospective studies on treatment with implants in young individuals. A vast majority of publications on the clinical management of young individuals with tooth agenesis are reflections of clinical experiences and single case reports. Deciduous teeth are extracted for different reasons and at different ages in an optimal plan for a good treatment result from aesthetic and functional point of view. For ethical reasons, randomized clinical trials on when to extract deciduous teeth and place implants cannot be made in young individuals. There was only limited, low level evidence on when to extract deciduous teeth and place implants. Recommendations on treatment are based mainly on clinical experience.

  17. Prognosis and evaluation of tooth damage caused by implant fixtures.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Wook-Jae; Kim, Su-Gwan; Jeong, Mi-Ae; Oh, Ji-Su; You, Jae-Seek

    2013-06-01

    Damage to adjacent teeth is one of the various complications that may occur during implant placement and is often the result of improper direction during fixture placement or excessive depth of placement. In general, if detrimental symptoms, such as reaction to percussion in damaged teeth, mobility, and pulp necrosis, are not present, osseointegration should be observed at follow-up. In three cases, the possibility of root damage due to an implant fixture placed too close to each adjacent tooth was perceived on radiographs. However, in all of these cases, there were no clinical symptoms or radiographic changes present in the tooth, and the implants did not exhibit decreased stability or peri-implantitis. Therefore, we can carefully predict that the implant fixture close to the adjacent tooth did not invade the cementum of the root, and therefore did not produce the suspected pulpal damage or periradicular symptoms. In this study, we considered both the implant status as well as the adjacent tooth.

  18. Single tooth bite forces in healthy young adults.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, V F; Sforza, C; Serrao, G; Dellavia, C; Tartaglia, G M

    2004-01-01

    The assessment of bite forces on healthy single tooth appears essential for a correct quantification of the actual impact of single implant oral rehabilitations. In the present study, a new single tooth strain-gauge bite transducer was used in 52 healthy young adults (36 men, 16 women) with a complete permanent dentition. The influences of tooth position along the dental arch, of side, and of sex, on maximum bite force were assessed by an ANOVA. No significant left-right differences were found. On average, in both sexes the lowest bite force was recorded on the incisors (40-48% of maximum single tooth bite force), the largest force was recorded on the first molar. Bite forces were larger in men than in women (P < 0.002), and increased monotonically along the arch until the first or second permanent molar (P < 0.0001). The present data can be used as reference values for the comparison of dental forces in patients.

  19. Immediate Placement and Occlusal Loading of Single-Tooth Restorations on Partially Threaded, Titanium-Tantalum Combined Dental Implants: 1-Year Results.

    PubMed

    Peron, Cristian; Romanos, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Single nonrestorable teeth were atraumatically extracted and hybrid titanium implants with tantalum-based midsections (TM) were placed in fresh extraction sockets. Provisional acrylic crowns were delivered (in occlusion) immediately after surgery. Occlusal contacts were present in the maximal intercuspation but not in the lateral movements of the mandible. Two weeks after placement, the implants were finally restored with screw-retained or cemented lithium disilicate crowns. A total of 25 patients were treated (26 implants). Most implants were placed in maxillary premolar locations and in lower-density bone. Mean crestal bone loss was 0.58 ± 0.34 mm. Implant survival and success rates were 100%, respectively (follow-up: 14.1 ± 1.5 months). Within the limitations of this study, immediate placement and loading of TM implants resulted in predictable clinical, functional, and esthetic outcomes.

  20. Immediate Placement and Occlusal Loading of Single-Tooth Restorations on Partially Threaded, Titanium-Tantalum Combined Dental Implants: 1-Year Results.

    PubMed

    Peron, Cristian; Romanos, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Single nonrestorable teeth were atraumatically extracted and hybrid titanium implants with tantalum-based midsections (TM) were placed in fresh extraction sockets. Provisional acrylic crowns were delivered (in occlusion) immediately after surgery. Occlusal contacts were present in the maximal intercuspation but not in the lateral movements of the mandible. Two weeks after placement, the implants were finally restored with screw-retained or cemented lithium disilicate crowns. A total of 25 patients were treated (26 implants). Most implants were placed in maxillary premolar locations and in lower-density bone. Mean crestal bone loss was 0.58 ± 0.34 mm. Implant survival and success rates were 100%, respectively (follow-up: 14.1 ± 1.5 months). Within the limitations of this study, immediate placement and loading of TM implants resulted in predictable clinical, functional, and esthetic outcomes. PMID:27100809

  1. [A tooth or an implant--literature based decision making].

    PubMed

    Bar On, H; Sharon, E; Lipovezky-Adler, M; Haramaty, O; Smidt, A

    2014-07-01

    The common use of dental implants in the daily practice led to a profound change in the available treatment strategies. The option of replacing a diagnosed doubtful tooth with an implant has become widely accepted and often used. The prognosis systems in use today are based on the three major disciplines: endodontics, periodontics and prosthodontics. Combining these three may impair and bias the decision making process and increase the tendency to base it on subjective clinical experience and personal preference. Reading and reviewing the relevant literature gives no clear tool for use. Root canal treatment is considered a highly predictable treatment procedure and a treated tooth is affected mainly by the quality and type of the fabricated restoration and the risk of caries. Periodontal treatment followed by a suitable maintenance regimen will likely allow long term tooth survival. When comparing the success rates of natural teeth rehabilitation versus implant supported restorations, it appears that with implants an additional treatment is demanded along the years. This coincides with the fact that to date there is no consensus regarding the extent of perimplantitis and perimucositis that is to be expected around a restored implant. In addition, a peri implant tissue problem or a failure of a dental implant may prove to be more challenging than a failure of a tooth. It is important to remember that a dental implant is made to substitute a missing tooth and it is a treatment modality with known and clear indications for rehabilitation of an edentulous space. The aim of this paper is to review and discuss the various aspects of whether to maintain a compromised or a doubtful tooth or to prefer a treatment modality using dental implants. In conclusion it is advised here, to incorporate the discussed issues in the decision making process towards the most suitable treatment plan. PMID:25219096

  2. Clinical success of implant-supported and tooth-implant-supported double crown-retained dentures.

    PubMed

    Bernhart, Gunda; Koob, Andreas; Schmitter, Marc; Gabbert, Olaf; Stober, Thomas; Rammelsberg, Peter

    2012-08-01

    The objective of this retrospective study was to compare biological and technical complications of implant-supported and tooth-implant-supported double crown-retained dentures (DCRDs) with those of tooth-supported DCRDs. Sixty-three DCRDs were monitored. One study group included 16 prostheses with a combination of implants and natural teeth as double crowns (ti group), whereas in the second study group, 19 dentures were retained exclusively on implants (ii group); a third study group with 28 exclusively tooth-supported dentures served as controls (tt group). Tooth loss, implant failure, and technical complications (loss of retention of primary crown, abutment screw loosening, loss of facing, fracture of resin denture teeth and fracture of saddle resin) were analysed. During the observation period of 24 months, no implants or teeth were lost in the ti group and three technical complications were recorded. In the ii group, two implants were lost, two cases of peri-implantitis occurred and four technical complications were observed. In the tt group, two cases of tooth loss and seven technical complications were observed. At the time of the last examination, all prostheses of the ti group and the ii group were functional. Patients of these two study groups reported high satisfaction with both function and aesthetics with no significant difference between the two groups. Treatment with DCRDs showed comparable results in the three study groups. The 2-year results indicate that double crowns can be recommended for implant and combined tooth-implant-retained dentures.

  3. Prognosis and evaluation of tooth damage caused by implant fixtures

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Wook-Jae; Jeong, Mi-Ae; Oh, Ji-Su; You, Jae-Seek

    2013-01-01

    Damage to adjacent teeth is one of the various complications that may occur during implant placement and is often the result of improper direction during fixture placement or excessive depth of placement. In general, if detrimental symptoms, such as reaction to percussion in damaged teeth, mobility, and pulp necrosis, are not present, osseointegration should be observed at follow-up. In three cases, the possibility of root damage due to an implant fixture placed too close to each adjacent tooth was perceived on radiographs. However, in all of these cases, there were no clinical symptoms or radiographic changes present in the tooth, and the implants did not exhibit decreased stability or peri-implantitis. Therefore, we can carefully predict that the implant fixture close to the adjacent tooth did not invade the cementum of the root, and therefore did not produce the suspected pulpal damage or periradicular symptoms. In this study, we considered both the implant status as well as the adjacent tooth. PMID:24471033

  4. Biomechanical considerations on tooth-implant supported fixed partial dentures

    PubMed Central

    Calvani, Pasquale; Hirayama, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses the connection of teeth to implants, in order to restore partial edentulism. The main problem arising from this connection is tooth intrusion, which can occur in up to 7.3% of the cases. The justification of this complication is being attempted through the perspective of biomechanics of the involved anatomical structures, that is, the periodontal ligament and the bone, as well as that of the teeth- and implant-supported fixed partial dentures. PMID:23255882

  5. [Treatment of a single-tooth space in the occlusal system].

    PubMed

    Meijer, H J A; Cune, M S

    2012-12-01

    The space created by the absence of 1 not-free-ending tooth in an occlusal system can be indicated as a single-tooth space. For treating a single-tooth space, several options are available to restore the functions of the occlusal system. Feasible options are a resin-bonded fixed prosthesis, a conventional fixed prosthesis, and an implant-supported restoration. Implant-supported restorations have a good prognosis, high patient satisfaction, and the advantage that adjacent teeth are not involved in the treatment. Anxiety about surgical treatment, the width of the single-tooth space, and financial aspects may be reasons not to consider an implant-supported restoration as first-choice treatment.

  6. Cemented and screw-retained implant-supported single-tooth restorations in the molar mandibular region: A retrospective comparison study after an observation period of 1 to 4 years

    PubMed Central

    Peñarrocha-Diago, Miguel; Pradíes, Guillermo; Sola-Ruiz, María-Fernanda; Agustín-Panadero, Rubén

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the survival and compare the appearance of different mechanical and biological complications, in screw-retained and cemented-retained single-tooth implant-supported restorations localized in the molar mandibular region, over a period of 1 to 4 years. Material and Methods: A retrospective study was carried out with a total of eighty implant-supported restorations, which were placed in eighty patients for prosthetic rehabilitation of a mandibular molar. Forty patients were rehabilitated with a cemented-retained restoration and the other forty with a screw-retained restoration. The presence of the following complications was recorded for both types of prostheses: Fractures of the ceramic veneering, loosening screws, mucositis and peri-implantitis. Debonding of the restoration was analyzed in the cemented-retained restoration group. The clinical survival of crowns was analyzed with a Kaplan-Meier test and the clinical complications were compared, using a Student t test and Log-rank test. Results: 27 patients registered some complication. The average rate of complications was 37,5% for cemented-retained restorations and 30% for screw-retained restorations. The complications more common in the cemented-retained restoration were the presence of mucositis (14,87%), while in the screw-retained restorations was the loosening screw (20%). Student t test and Log-Rank test found significant differences (p=0,001) between the screw loosening and presence of mucositis. Conclusions: The cemented-retained restorations seem to prevent screw loosening, but the presence of cement seem to increase the complications around the soft tissues, however in the screw-retained restorations the presence of mucositis and peri-implantitis are lower than cemented-retained restorations. The incidence of fracture of ceramic veneering was similar in both groups. Key words:Screw-retained restorations, cemented-retained restorations, screw loosening

  7. [Application of isolated canine teeth and single implant supported telescopic overdenture in a case with defective dentition of maxillary].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Haihong; Wang, Peng; Zhou, Jun; Yang, Yingshuang

    2012-12-01

    A patient with defective dentition in the upper jaw was placed with implant in left upper jaw. Telescopic overdenture was fabricated and supported by the implant and canine tooth in right upper jaw. The patient felt very comfortable, and this type of restoration could provide sufficient stability and maintain tooth and peri-implant tissues healthy. The preliminary clincal results of this restoration show that isolated canine tooth and single implant supported telescopic overdenture are feasible.

  8. Immediate implants following tooth extraction. A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Pascual, Tania; Mareque-Bueno, Santiago; Hernández-Alfaro, Federico; Ferrés-Padró, Eduard

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this article is to review the current state of immediate implants, with their pros and contras, and the clinical indications and contraindications. Material and Methods: An exhaustive literature search has been carried out in the COCHRANE library and MEDLINE electronic databases from 2004 to November 2009. Randomized clinical trials and clinical trials focused on single implants placed in fresh extraction sockets were included and compared. A meta-analysis could not be performed due to heterogeneity of the data. Results: Twenty studies out of 135 articles from the initial search were finally included, which summed up a total of 1139 immediate implants with at least a 12-month follow-up. Our results have been compared with other current available papers in the literature reviewed that obtained similar outcomes. Discussion: Immediate implants have predictable results with several advantages over delayed implant placement. However, technical complications have been described regarding this technique. Also, biomaterials may be needed when the jumping distance is greater than 1mm or any bone defect is present. Conclusions: Few studies report on success rates rather than survival rates in the literature reviewed. Short-term clinical results were described and results were comparable to those obtained with delayed implant placement. Further long-term, randomized clinical trials are needed to give scientific evidence on the benefits of immediate implants over delayed implant placement. Key words:Immediate implants, fresh socket, dental implants, gap, jumping distance, implant stability. PMID:22143704

  9. Exploring Effectiveness of Computer-Aided Planning in Implant Positioning for a Single Immediate Implant Placement.

    PubMed

    Edelmann, Alexander R; Hosseini, Bashir; Byrd, Warren C; Preisser, John S; Tyndall, Donald A; Nguyen, Tung; Bencharit, Sompop

    2016-06-01

    The value of computer-aided implant planning using cone-beam computerized tomography (CBCT) for single immediate implants was explored. Eighteen patients requiring extraction of a tooth followed by a single immediate implant were enrolled. Small volume preoperative CBCT scans were used to plan the position of the implant. A taper screwed-type implant was immediately placed into a fresh socket using only the final 1 or 2 drills for osteotomy. Postoperative CBCTs were used for the analysis of actual implant placement positioning. Measurements of the planned and the actual implant position were made with respect to their position relative to the adjacent teeth. Mesio-distal displacements and the facial-lingual deviation of the implant from the planned position were determined. Changes in the angulation of the planned and actual implant position in relation to the clinical crown were also measured. To statistically summarize the results, box plots and 95% CIs for means of paired differences were used. The analysis showed no statistical difference between the planned position and final implant placement position in any measurement. The CBCT scans coupled with the computer-aided implant planning program along with a final 1-to-2 drill protocol may improve the accuracy of single immediate implant placement for taper screwed-type implants. PMID:26652644

  10. Exploring Effectiveness of Computer-Aided Planning in Implant Positioning for a Single Immediate Implant Placement.

    PubMed

    Edelmann, Alexander R; Hosseini, Bashir; Byrd, Warren C; Preisser, John S; Tyndall, Donald A; Nguyen, Tung; Bencharit, Sompop

    2016-06-01

    The value of computer-aided implant planning using cone-beam computerized tomography (CBCT) for single immediate implants was explored. Eighteen patients requiring extraction of a tooth followed by a single immediate implant were enrolled. Small volume preoperative CBCT scans were used to plan the position of the implant. A taper screwed-type implant was immediately placed into a fresh socket using only the final 1 or 2 drills for osteotomy. Postoperative CBCTs were used for the analysis of actual implant placement positioning. Measurements of the planned and the actual implant position were made with respect to their position relative to the adjacent teeth. Mesio-distal displacements and the facial-lingual deviation of the implant from the planned position were determined. Changes in the angulation of the planned and actual implant position in relation to the clinical crown were also measured. To statistically summarize the results, box plots and 95% CIs for means of paired differences were used. The analysis showed no statistical difference between the planned position and final implant placement position in any measurement. The CBCT scans coupled with the computer-aided implant planning program along with a final 1-to-2 drill protocol may improve the accuracy of single immediate implant placement for taper screwed-type implants.

  11. Nanofibers implant functionalized by neural growth factor as a strategy to innervate a bioengineered tooth.

    PubMed

    Eap, Sandy; Bécavin, Thibault; Keller, Laetitia; Kökten, Tunay; Fioretti, Florence; Weickert, Jean-Luc; Deveaux, Etienne; Benkirane-Jessel, Nadia; Kuchler-Bopp, Sabine

    2014-03-01

    Current strategies for jaw reconstruction require multiple procedures, to repair the bone defect, to offer sufficient support, and to place the tooth implant. The entire procedure can be painful and time-consuming, and the desired functional repair can be achieved only when both steps are successful. The ability to engineer combined tooth and bone constructs, which would grow in a coordinated fashion with the surrounding tissues, could potentially improve the clinical outcomes and also reduce patient suffering. A unique nanofibrous and active implant for bone-tooth unit regeneration and also the innervation of this bioengineered tooth are demonstrated. A nanofibrous polycaprolactone membrane is functionalized with neural growth factor, along with dental germ, and tooth innervation follows. Such innervation allows complete functionality and tissue homeostasis of the tooth, such as dentinal sensitivity, odontoblast function, masticatory forces, and blood flow. PMID:24124118

  12. [Preserving the natural tooth versus extraction and implant placement: making a rational clinical decision].

    PubMed

    Tsesis, I; Nemkowsky, C E; Tamse, E; Rosen, E

    2010-01-01

    Modern dental practice offers a wide variety of treatment alternatives and modalities. With the wider scale of treatment options, new dilemmas emerged. A common dilemma is the decision whether to preserve the natural tooth by endodontic treatment, or to extract the tooth and replace it with a single dental implant. The clinician needs to remember that the basic goal of dental implants is to replace missing teeth, and not present teeth. Prosthodontic, periodontal, and esthetic considerations should be integrated in the treatment planning process. Long-term prognosis, the capabilities offered by the modern endodontic treatment, the alternatives in case of treatment failure, post treatment quality of life and patient's preferences should all be recognized and incorporated in the dentist decision making. An important factor is the communication between the prosthodontist and the endodontist before and during the treatment in order to avoid possible risks or treatment failure. The integration of these factors would assist the clinician to achieve a rational treatment plan for the benefit of the patient.

  13. Varanoid Tooth Eruption and Implantation Modes in a Late Cretaceous Mosasaur.

    PubMed

    Liu, Min; Reed, David A; Cecchini, Giancarlo M; Lu, Xuanyu; Ganjawalla, Karan; Gonzales, Carol S; Monahan, Richard; Luan, Xianghong; Diekwisch, Thomas G H

    2016-01-01

    Erupting teeth are some of the oldest witnesses of developmental processes in the vertebrate fossil record and provide an important resource for vertebrate cladistics. Here, we have examined a mosasaur jaw fragment from central Texas using ultrathin ground section histology and 3D tomographic imaging to assess features critical for the cladistic placement of mosasaurs among varanoids vs. snakes: (i) the orientation of replacement teeth compared to the major tooth axis, (ii) the occurrence of resorption pits, and (iii) the mode of tooth implantation/attachment to the tooth bearing element (TBE). The replacement tooth studied here developed in an inclined position slightly distal of the deciduous parent tooth, similar to another varanoid squamate, the Gila monster Heloderma suspectum. Ground sections and tomographs also demonstrated that the replacement tooth attachment apparatus was entirely intact and that there was no evidence of mechanical deformation. Sections and tomographs further illustrated that the replacement tooth was located within a bony crypt and the inclination of the crypt matched the inclination of the replacement tooth. These preparations also revealed the presence of a resorption pit within the boundaries of the deciduous tooth that surrounded the developing replacement tooth. This finding suggests that developing mosasaur teeth developed within the walls of resorption pits similar to varanoid tooth germs and unlike developing snake teeth which are surrounded by fibrous connective tissue integuments. Finally, mosasaurs featured pseudo-thecodont tooth implantation with teeth anchored within a socket of mineralized tissue by means of a mineralized periodontal ligament. Together, these data indicate that the moderate inclination of the erupting mosasaur tooth studied here is neither a result of postmortem displacement nor a character representative of snakes, but rather a shared character between Mosasaurs and other varanoids such as Heloderma. In

  14. Varanoid Tooth Eruption and Implantation Modes in a Late Cretaceous Mosasaur

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Min; Reed, David A.; Cecchini, Giancarlo M.; Lu, Xuanyu; Ganjawalla, Karan; Gonzales, Carol S.; Monahan, Richard; Luan, Xianghong

    2016-01-01

    Erupting teeth are some of the oldest witnesses of developmental processes in the vertebrate fossil record and provide an important resource for vertebrate cladistics. Here, we have examined a mosasaur jaw fragment from central Texas using ultrathin ground section histology and 3D tomographic imaging to assess features critical for the cladistic placement of mosasaurs among varanoids vs. snakes: (i) the orientation of replacement teeth compared to the major tooth axis, (ii) the occurrence of resorption pits, and (iii) the mode of tooth implantation/attachment to the tooth bearing element (TBE). The replacement tooth studied here developed in an inclined position slightly distal of the deciduous parent tooth, similar to another varanoid squamate, the Gila monster Heloderma suspectum. Ground sections and tomographs also demonstrated that the replacement tooth attachment apparatus was entirely intact and that there was no evidence of mechanical deformation. Sections and tomographs further illustrated that the replacement tooth was located within a bony crypt and the inclination of the crypt matched the inclination of the replacement tooth. These preparations also revealed the presence of a resorption pit within the boundaries of the deciduous tooth that surrounded the developing replacement tooth. This finding suggests that developing mosasaur teeth developed within the walls of resorption pits similar to varanoid tooth germs and unlike developing snake teeth which are surrounded by fibrous connective tissue integuments. Finally, mosasaurs featured pseudo-thecodont tooth implantation with teeth anchored within a socket of mineralized tissue by means of a mineralized periodontal ligament. Together, these data indicate that the moderate inclination of the erupting mosasaur tooth studied here is neither a result of postmortem displacement nor a character representative of snakes, but rather a shared character between Mosasaurs and other varanoids such as Heloderma. In

  15. Bio-Root and Implant-Based Restoration as a Tooth Replacement Alternative.

    PubMed

    Gao, Z H; Hu, L; Liu, G L; Wei, F L; Liu, Y; Liu, Z H; Fan, Z P; Zhang, C M; Wang, J S; Wang, S L

    2016-06-01

    We previously reported that dental stem cell-mediated bioengineered tooth root (bio-root) regeneration could restore tooth loss in a miniature pig model. As a potential new method for tooth restoration, it is essential to compare this method with the widely used commercial dental implant-based method of tooth restoration. Tooth loss models were created by extracting mandibular incisors from miniature pigs. Allogeneic periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) and dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) were isolated and cultured. A PDLSC sheet was prepared by adding 20.0 µg/mL vitamin C to the culture medium; in addition, a hydroxyapatite tricalcium phosphate (HA/TCP)/DPSC graft was fabricated and cultured in a 3-dimensional culture system. A total of 46 bio-root implantations and 9 dental implants were inserted, and crown restorations were performed 6 mo after implantation. Histological, radiological, biomechanical, and elemental analyses were used to evaluate and compare tissue-engineered bio-roots and dental implants to the natural tooth roots. After 6 mo, both computed tomography scans and histological examinations showed that root-like structures and dentin-like tissues had formed. Three months after crown restoration, clinical assessments revealed that tooth function was equivalent in the regenerated bio-root and the dental implant. Biomechanical testing showed that the bio-roots were similar to natural tooth roots in compressive strength, modulus of elasticity, and torsional force; however, these properties were significantly higher in the dental implants. Elemental analysis revealed a higher similarity in elemental composition between bio-roots and natural tooth roots than between bio-roots and dental implants. However, the dental implant success rate was 100% (9 of 9) and the bio-root success rate was only 22% (10 of 46). Taken together, we showed that an allogeneic HA/TCP/DPSC/PDLSC sheet could successfully build a bio-root with structure and function similar to

  16. Bio-Root and Implant-Based Restoration as a Tooth Replacement Alternative.

    PubMed

    Gao, Z H; Hu, L; Liu, G L; Wei, F L; Liu, Y; Liu, Z H; Fan, Z P; Zhang, C M; Wang, J S; Wang, S L

    2016-06-01

    We previously reported that dental stem cell-mediated bioengineered tooth root (bio-root) regeneration could restore tooth loss in a miniature pig model. As a potential new method for tooth restoration, it is essential to compare this method with the widely used commercial dental implant-based method of tooth restoration. Tooth loss models were created by extracting mandibular incisors from miniature pigs. Allogeneic periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) and dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) were isolated and cultured. A PDLSC sheet was prepared by adding 20.0 µg/mL vitamin C to the culture medium; in addition, a hydroxyapatite tricalcium phosphate (HA/TCP)/DPSC graft was fabricated and cultured in a 3-dimensional culture system. A total of 46 bio-root implantations and 9 dental implants were inserted, and crown restorations were performed 6 mo after implantation. Histological, radiological, biomechanical, and elemental analyses were used to evaluate and compare tissue-engineered bio-roots and dental implants to the natural tooth roots. After 6 mo, both computed tomography scans and histological examinations showed that root-like structures and dentin-like tissues had formed. Three months after crown restoration, clinical assessments revealed that tooth function was equivalent in the regenerated bio-root and the dental implant. Biomechanical testing showed that the bio-roots were similar to natural tooth roots in compressive strength, modulus of elasticity, and torsional force; however, these properties were significantly higher in the dental implants. Elemental analysis revealed a higher similarity in elemental composition between bio-roots and natural tooth roots than between bio-roots and dental implants. However, the dental implant success rate was 100% (9 of 9) and the bio-root success rate was only 22% (10 of 46). Taken together, we showed that an allogeneic HA/TCP/DPSC/PDLSC sheet could successfully build a bio-root with structure and function similar to

  17. Implant-connected versus tooth-connected implant-supported partial dentures: 2-year clinical and radiographic comparative evaluation.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, Tamer Mohamed; El-Sheikh, Mohamed M; Abd El-Fattah, Fadel

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clinically and radiographically compare implant-connected and tooth-connected implant-supported fixed-detachable mandibular partial dentures. Twenty partially edentulous patients (age range: 25 to 50 years) with mandibular Kennedy Class II configurations were equally divided into two groups receiving a three-unit, fixed-detachable, screw-retained partial denture. Group 1 comprised patients with unilateral missing mandibular molars and premolars. Two implants were placed at the mandibular first premolar and first molar areas. Group 2 comprised patients with missing mandibular molars and second premolars. An implant was placed at the mandibular first molar area, the first premolar was prepared, and a coping was cemented to the tooth with permanent cement. Each case was evaluated clinically and radiographically at baseline (partial denture insertion) and after 6, 12, and 24 months. Data were collected and statistically analyzed using repeated-measures one-way and two-way analysis of variance tests. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups (P > .05). The implant-tooth-supported prosthesis provided an equally predictable treatment option compared to the totally implant-supported prosthesis in terms of implant survival and loss of marginal bone. PMID:25909533

  18. Relationship of tooth mortality and implant treatment in Type 2 diabetes mellitus patients in Korean adults

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hyun-Yub; Kim, Yong-Gun; Jin, Myoung-Uk

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to to analyze the effect of Type 2 diabetes on tooth mortality, implant treatment and prosthetic status. MATERIALS AND METHODS 275 Type 2 diabetics and 300 non-diabetics, aged 40-80 years were selected for analysis. The assessment of number of teeth, missing teeth, fixed prostheses (bridge pontics), implants using panoramic radiographs and dental records were carried out. RESULTS Diabetes mellitus (DM) patients had a higher number of missing teeth (P<.05) and placed implants (P=.074), age (P<.05), male gender percentage (P=.042), smoker percentage (P<.05) than non-DM patients. In univariate analysis, the patients in older group showed significantly higher number of tooth loss rate at the first dental examination than the patients in younger group. Tooth loss rate of smokers did not show higher value than that of non-smokers. When multiple variables including DM, age, smoking, gender were considered together, diabetics and older group patients showed significantly higher tooth loss rate at the first dental examination than non-diabetics and younger group patients, respectively. Smokers and male group did not show a significant difference than non-smokers and female group, respectively. CONCLUSION Tooth mortality and implant treatment rate were significantly higher in the DM group as indicated by univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis. Old age groups showed significantly higher odds ratios and tooth loss rate. As diabetics showed the higher tooth loss rate than non-diabetics, diabetics also had more implant restorations than non-diabetics. PMID:23508020

  19. Dynamic UCLA for single tilted implant in an aesthetic region

    PubMed Central

    Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Sônego, Mariana Vilela; da Silva, Emily Vivianne Freitas; de Carvalho Dekon, Stefan Fiuza; de Medeiros, Rodrigo Antonio; Carvalho, Karina Helga Turcio de; dos Santos, Daniela Micheline

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this paper was to present a rehabilitation of a patient with a dynamic universal castable long abutment (UCLA) for a single tilted implant in the anterior maxillary area. Presentation of case A 57-year-old male patient attended the dentistry college clinic complaining of a vertical fracture of a residual root of the dental element 22. The tooth extraction was indicated for the implant installation. Due to the socket buccal wall thickness, the implant was installed with an inclination to the palate. It was done in a two-stage surgical protocol, and an external hexagon implant (3.75 × 11.5 mm) was placed. After a six-month healing period to correct the implant position, a dynamic UCLA was set in place, rectifying the implant emergence profile at 20°. The ceramic structure fitting was performed and, after the patient’s consent, the prosthesis was finalized and installed. Discussion After a follow-up period of twenty months, no complications were observed. Conclusion The installation of tilted implants with a dynamic UCLA may be a viable option, faster and less invasive than bone grafts. PMID:25618842

  20. Implant- and Tooth-Supported Fixed Prostheses Using a High-Performance Polymer (Pekkton) Framework.

    PubMed

    Han, Kyeong-Hwan; Lee, Jeong-Yol; Shin, Sang Wan

    2016-01-01

    The type of prosthetic restoration used in implant rehabilitation greatly contributes to the recovery of masticatory function as well as quality of life in patients. Frameworks for implant-supported prostheses are typically made by casting metal or milling either titanium or zirconia. Recently, nonmetal, polymer-type materials were suggested as framework materials. Polyetherketoneketone (PEKK), a high-performance polymer, was recently introduced in the dental field with potentially wide-ranging applications. This case history report describes implant- and tooth-supported fixed prostheses created using a new high performance polymer (Pekkton, Cendres+Metaux) framework for a fully edentulous maxilla and partially edentulous mandible. PMID:27611747

  1. Early Loaded Single Implant Reinforced Mandibular Overdenture

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhary, R.

    2016-01-01

    Rehabilitating atrophied mandible with two-implant supported denture is a common treatment modality for implant retained removable overdenture in mandible. This paper aims to design a treatment modality where single implant reinforced overdenture is fabricated for a severely atrophied mandibular ridge with early loading protocol. Results of studies have shown that a single implant mandibular overdenture significantly increases the satisfaction and quality of life of patients with edentulism. Midline fracture of the prosthesis is the most common complication related to single implant and two-implant retained mandibular overdentures. To manage such complication, a thin metal mesh is used to reinforce the overdenture and also to make the prostheses lighter and cost effective as compared to conventional cast metal framework. PMID:27403350

  2. Clinical safety and efficacy of implantation of octacalcium phosphate collagen composites in tooth extraction sockets and cyst holes

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Tadashi; Tanuma, Yuji; Matsui, Keiko; Suzuki, Osamu; Takahashi, Tetsu; Kamakura, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    It was demonstrated that octacalcium phosphate collagen composite achieved notable bone regeneration in bone defects in preclinical studies. On the basis of the research results, an investigator-initiated exploratory clinical trial was conducted after approval from a local Institutional Review Board. This clinical study was performed as a single-arm non-randomized intervention study. Octacalcium phosphate collagen composite was implanted into a total of 10 cases of alveolar bone defects after tooth extractions and cystectomy. Safety assessment was performed in terms of the clinical course and several consecutive laboratory examinations, and sequential radiographs were used for efficacy assessment. All participants uneventfully completed the clinical trial without major problems in their general condition. Postoperative wound swelling was observed, as also commonly seen in tooth extraction or cystectomy. Although no serious liver dysfunction, renal dysfunction, electrolyte imbalance, or abnormal urinalysis results were recognized, the number of white blood cells and C-reactive protein level temporarily increased after the operation. An increase in radiopacity in the octacalcium phosphate collagen composite–implanted site was observed in all cases. Finally, the border between the original bone and the octacalcium phosphate collagen composite–implanted site became indistinguishable. These results suggest that octacalcium phosphate collagen composite could be utilized safely in clinical situations in the future. PMID:27757220

  3. Single-crystal sapphire endosseous dental implant loaded with functional stress--clinical and histological evaluation of peri-implant tissues.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, M; Akagawa, Y; Nikai, H; Tsuru, H

    1988-01-01

    Peri-implant tissues of the single-crystal sapphire implant connected with neighbouring teeth by a metal bridge-work were examined clinically, radiographically, and histologically in ten monkeys. Professional tooth cleaning was performed during the study. At 3-12 months after insertion, most of the implants were firmly connected to the surrounding tissues and peri-implant gingiva was regarded as healthy, based on various periodontal parameter scores. Destructive changes of the peri-implant bone were not found radiographically. Histologically, peri-implant gingiva was revealed to show similar structure to that of the gingiva around natural teeth. Direct bone-implant interface was observed at 3 months after insertion, while a thin loose fibrous connective tissue layer was present between bone and implant at 6 and 12 months. Such different interrelationship between bone and implant might be attributable to the difference in distribution of functional stress.

  4. Crestal bone changes on platform-switched implants and adjacent teeth when the tooth-implant distance is less than 1.5 mm.

    PubMed

    Vela, Xavier; Méndez, Víctor; Rodríguez, Xavier; Segalá, Maribel; Tarnow, Dennis P

    2012-04-01

    Because of the peri-implant bone resorption that occurs when a non-platform switched implant is exposed to the oral environment, it has been recommended to maintain 1.5 mm between the tooth and implant to preserve the bone adjacent to the teeth. Several studies have documented that platform-switched implants have less peri-implant bone resorption than matched implants. This retrospective radiographic analysis studied 70 platform-switched implants placed less than 1.5 mm from an adjacent tooth and with prostheses loaded for a minimum of 6 months. The mean distance between the implant and tooth was 0.99 mm (range, 0.20 to 1.49 mm); the mean horizontal and vertical bone resorption was 0.36 and 0.43 mm, respectively. The mean bone peak reduction was 0.37 mm. The results confirm that the use of platform-switched implants reduces bone resorption after two-piece implants have been uncovered and that it is possible to place this type of implant 1 mm from teeth while maintaining the bone level adjacent to them (the bone peak).

  5. [Biomechanics of single dental implants].

    PubMed

    Zagorskiĭ, V A; Zagorskiĭ, V V

    2013-01-01

    Bone tissues of human skull, jawbones and hard dental tissues were formed formed by the influence of chewing loads which are functional irritants used for maintaining their physical qualities. Knowledge of tensions and deformations in bony structures allows to increase their joint work with dental implants installed.

  6. The clinical success of tooth- and implant-supported zirconia-based fixed dental prostheses. A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Le, M; Papia, E; Larsson, C

    2015-06-01

    The aim was to make an inventory of the current literature on the clinical performance of tooth- or implant-supported zirconia-based FDPs and analyse and discuss any complications. Electronic databases, PubMed.gov, Cochrane Library and Science Direct, were searched for original studies reporting on the clinical performance of tooth- or implant-supported zirconia-based FDPs. The electronic search was complemented by manual searches of the bibliographies of all retrieved full-text articles and reviews, as well as a hand search of the following journals: International Journal of Prosthodontics, Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, International Journal of Oral & Maxillofacial Implants and Clinical Oral Implants Research. The search yielded 4253 titles. Sixty-eight potentially relevant full-text articles were retrieved. After applying pre-established criteria, 27 studies were included. Twenty-three studies reported on tooth-supported and 4 on implant-supported FDPs. Five of the studies were randomised, comparing Y-TZP-based restorations with metal-ceramic or other all-ceramic restorations. Most tooth-supported FDPs were FDPs of 3-5 units, whereas most implant-supported FDPs were full arch. The majority of the studies reported on 3- to 5-year follow-up. Life table analysis revealed cumulative 5-year survival rates of 93.5% for tooth-supported and 100% for implant-supported FDPs. For tooth-supported FDPs, the most common reasons for failure were veneering material fractures, framework fractures and caries. Cumulative 5-year complication rates were 27.6% and 30.5% for tooth- and implant-supported FDPs, respectively. The most common complications were veneering material fractures for tooth- as well as implant-supported FDPs. Loss of retention occurred more frequently in FDPs luted with zinc phosphate or glass-ionomer cement compared to those luted with resin cements. The results suggest that the 5-year survival rate is excellent for implant-supported zirconia-based FDPs

  7. Aesthetic perception of single implants placed in the anterior zone. A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Burgueño-Barris, Genís; Cortés-Acha, Berta; Valmaseda-Castellón, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    Background Several aesthetic indexes have been described to assess implant aesthetics. The aim of this study was to compare the aesthetic assessment made by dental professionals and students of single-tooth implants placed in the upper incisors. Material and Methods A cross-sectional survey study using a subjective questionnaire to assess the aesthetics in 3 implant supported single-tooth cases in the anterior maxilla was performed. The interviewed subjects were divided into 4 groups: dentists with experience in implant treatment, dentists without experience in implants and 3rd and 5th year dental students. The questionnaire consisted of 2 visual analogue scales (VAS) to evaluate aesthetics, the pink esthetic score (PES), the white esthetic score (WES) and the simplified papilla index (PI). Results One-hundred dentists and one-hundred dental students filled the aesthetic assessment questionnaire. The results showed that the subjects were more critical than reference values, specially concerning prosthetic issues. The differences between groups were more obvious in the case with the best result. On the other hand, few differences were detected in the remaining cases. Regarding soft tissue and crown features, experienced dentists in implant dentistry were the most demanding. Cronbach’s Alpha showed values ≥ 0,8 in the questionnaire in every case, which indicates an adequate reliability. Conclusions Dentists and dental students have different opinions when assessing aesthetics of single tooth implant supported cases. Experience and area of expertise seem to influence the evaluation of aesthetics in the anterior region. Key words:Dental implant, anterior area, aesthetics. PMID:27031072

  8. Single Ion Implantation and Deterministic Doping

    SciTech Connect

    Schenkel, Thomas

    2010-06-11

    The presence of single atoms, e.g. dopant atoms, in sub-100 nm scale electronic devices can affect the device characteristics, such as the threshold voltage of transistors, or the sub-threshold currents. Fluctuations of the number of dopant atoms thus poses a complication for transistor scaling. In a complementary view, new opportunities emerge when novel functionality can be implemented in devices deterministically doped with single atoms. The grand price of the latter might be a large scale quantum computer, where quantum bits (qubits) are encoded e.g. in the spin states of electrons and nuclei of single dopant atoms in silicon, or in color centers in diamond. Both the possible detrimental effects of dopant fluctuations and single atom device ideas motivate the development of reliable single atom doping techniques which are the subject of this chapter. Single atom doping can be approached with top down and bottom up techniques. Top down refers to the placement of dopant atoms into a more or less structured matrix environment, like a transistor in silicon. Bottom up refers to approaches to introduce single dopant atoms during the growth of the host matrix e.g. by directed self-assembly and scanning probe assisted lithography. Bottom up approaches are discussed in Chapter XYZ. Since the late 1960's, ion implantation has been a widely used technique to introduce dopant atoms into silicon and other materials in order to modify their electronic properties. It works particularly well in silicon since the damage to the crystal lattice that is induced by ion implantation can be repaired by thermal annealing. In addition, the introduced dopant atoms can be incorporated with high efficiency into lattice position in the silicon host crystal which makes them electrically active. This is not the case for e.g. diamond, which makes ion implantation doping to engineer the electrical properties of diamond, especially for n-type doping much harder then for silicon. Ion

  9. Clinical practice guidelines for recall and maintenance of patients with tooth-borne and implant-borne dental restorations.

    PubMed

    Bidra, Avinash S; Daubert, Diane M; Garcia, Lily T; Kosinski, Timothy F; Nenn, Conrad A; Olsen, John A; Platt, Jeffrey A; Wingrove, Susan S; Chandler, Nancy Deal; Curtis, Donald A

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide guidelines for patient recall regimen, professional maintenance regimen, and at-home maintenance regimen for patients with tooth-borne and implant-borne removable and fixed restorations. The American College of Prosthodontists (ACP) convened a scientific panel of experts appointed by the ACP, American Dental Association, Academy of General Dentistry, and American Dental Hygienists Association, who critically evaluated and debated recently published findings from 2 systematic reviews on this topic. The major outcomes and consequences considered during formulation of the clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) were risk for failure of tooth- and implant-borne restorations. The panel conducted a roundtable discussion of the proposed guidelines, which were debated in detail. Feedback was used to supplement and refine the proposed guidelines, and consensus was attained. A set of CPGs was developed for tooth-borne restorations and implant-borne restorations. Each CPG comprised (1) patient recall, (2) professional maintenance, and (3) at-home maintenance. For tooth-borne restorations, the professional maintenance and at-home maintenance CPGs were subdivided for removable and fixed restorations. For implant-borne restorations, the professional maintenance CPGs were subdivided for removable and fixed restorations and further divided into biological maintenance and mechanical maintenance for each type of restoration. The at-home maintenance CPGs were subdivided for removable and fixed restorations. The clinical practice guidelines presented in this document were initially developed using the 2 systematic reviews. Additional guidelines were developed using expert opinion and consensus, which included discussion of the best clinical practices, clinical feasibility, and risk-benefit ratio to the patient. To the authors' knowledge, these are the first CPGs addressing patient recall regimen, professional maintenance regimen, and at

  10. Functional tooth restoration by next-generation bio-hybrid implant as a bio-hybrid artificial organ replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Masamitsu; Inoue, Kaoru; Nakajima, Kei; Tachikawa, Tetsuhiko; Yamazaki, Hiromichi; Isobe, Tomohide; Sugawara, Ayaka; Ogawa, Miho; Tanaka, Chie; Saito, Masahiro; Kasugai, Shohei; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko; Inoue, Takashi; Tezuka, Katsunari; Kuboki, Takuo; Yamaguchi, Akira; Tsuji, Takashi

    2014-08-13

    Bio-hybrid artificial organs are an attractive concept to restore organ function through precise biological cooperation with surrounding tissues in vivo. However, in bio-hybrid artificial organs, an artificial organ with fibrous connective tissues, including muscles, tendons and ligaments, has not been developed. Here, we have enveloped with embryonic dental follicle tissue around a HA-coated dental implant, and transplanted into the lower first molar region of a murine tooth-loss model. We successfully developed a novel fibrous connected tooth implant using a HA-coated dental implant and dental follicle stem cells as a bio-hybrid organ. This bio-hybrid implant restored physiological functions, including bone remodelling, regeneration of severe bone-defect and responsiveness to noxious stimuli, through regeneration with periodontal tissues, such as periodontal ligament and cementum. Thus, this study represents the potential for a next-generation bio-hybrid implant for tooth loss as a future bio-hybrid artificial organ replacement therapy.

  11. 3D finite element analysis of immediate loading of single wide versus double implants for replacing mandibular molar

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Shrikar R.; Karthikeyan, I.; Gaddale, Reetika

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this finite element study was to compare the stresses, strains, and displacements of double versus single implant in immediate loading for replacing mandibular molar. Materials and Methods: Two 3D FEM (finite element method) models were made to simulate implant designs. The first model used 5-mm-wide diameter implant to support a single molar crown. The second model used 3.75-3.75 double implant design. Anisotropic properties were assigned to bone model. Each model was analyzed with single force magnitude (100 N) in vertical axis. Results: This FEM study suggested that micromotion can be controlled better for double implants compared to single wide-diameter implants. The Von Mises stress for double implant showed 74.44% stress reduction compared to that of 5-mm implant. The Von Mises elastic strain was reduced by 61% for double implant compared to 5-mm implant. Conclusion: Within the limitations of the study, when the mesiodistal space for artificial tooth is more than 12.5 mm, under immediate loading, the double implant support should be considered. PMID:24554890

  12. Histology of tissues surrounding single crystal sapphire endosseous dental implants: an experimental study in the beagle dog.

    PubMed

    Fartash, B; Arvidson, K; Ericsson, I

    1990-12-01

    9 single crystal sapphire dental implants were installed bilaterally into pre-extracted areas in the lower jaw of two beagle dogs and histologically analysed after 180 days in situ. 8 implants were stable and radiographs disclosed complete bone healing. Light-, scanning- and transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that the stable implants were surrounded by a mineralizing bone boundary and a mucosa nearly free from inflammatory cell infiltrations. The 9th implant was mobile and surrounded by a non-mineralized connective tissue capsule containing bundles of collagen. The ultrastructure of the mucosa surrounding the implants closely resembled the mucosa surrounding the tooth. Histometric analysis of the alveolar bone surrounding the stable implants revealed that the value of the bone contact surface ranged from 37.1% to 86.9% (mean value 61.8%) at the light microscopic level.

  13. Anterior tooth rehabilitation with frozen homogenous bone graft and immediately loaded titanium implant using computer-guided surgery.

    PubMed

    Margonar, Rogério; Queiroz, Thallita Pereira; Luvizuto, Eloá Rodrigues; Santos, Pamela L; Wady, Amanda Fucci; Paleari, André Gustavo

    2012-09-01

    Computed tomographic scanning is a precise, noinvasive surveying technique that enables the professionals to improve the precision of implant placement by building a prototype that allows the confection of surgical guides. The authors present a clinical case of anterior tooth rehabilitation with frozen homogenous bone graft and immediately loaded titanium implant using computer-guided surgery. A multislice computed tomography was realized, and a prototype was built. All the procedures were previously realized in the prototype before started in the patient. This technique allows a better surgical planning, makes the procedures more accurate, and reduces surgery time.

  14. Clinical evaluation of implant survival based on size and site of placement: A retrospective study of immediate implants at single rooted teeth sites

    PubMed Central

    Ramalingam, Sundar; Al-Hindi, Maryam; Al-Eid, Raniah Abdullah; Nooh, Nasser

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This retrospective clinical study sought to evaluate the survival of immediate implants placed at maxillary and mandibular single-rooted tooth extraction sites and to determine the relationship among implant size, placement site, and implant survival. Methods Between January 2010 and June 2011, 85 patients (33 males, 52 females; mean age: 45 years) underwent immediate implant placement after extraction of single-rooted teeth. All implants were restored between 12 and 14 weeks after implant placement. The implant survival and its relationship with implant size and implantation site were evaluated by odds ratios (ORs). Results Implants were placed at the following sites: upper central incisor (UCI, n = 35), upper lateral incisor (ULI, n = 27), upper second premolar (U2ndP, n = 36), lower incisor (LI, n = 53), and lower premolar (LP, n = 22). Implants of the following sizes were used: 5 × 10 mm (n = 24), 5 × 8 mm (n = 21), 4.3 × 10 mm (n = 77), 4.3 × 8 mm (n = 36), 3.5 × 10 mm (n = 12), and 3.5 × 8 mm (n = 3). After a mean follow-up time of 47 months, the overall implant survival rate was 96%. Survival rate was highest at the LI site (98.1%) and lowest at the ULI site (92.6%). All of the 5-mm implants survived (100%), as did most of the 4.3 × 10 mm implants (96.1%). Implants of 4.3 × 8 mm and 3.5 × 10 mm were the least successful (91.7%). Mandibular implants had a better survival rate (97.3%) than maxillary implants (94.9%). There was no significant OR of increased survival for any particular implant size or site. Conclusions Immediate implant placement in fresh extraction sockets can give predictable clinical outcomes, regardless of the implant size and site of placement. PMID:26082578

  15. Long-term evaluation of single crystal sapphire implants as abutments in fixed prosthodontics.

    PubMed

    Fartash, B; Arvidson, K

    1997-02-01

    49 patients participated in a prospective study of treatment of total or partial edentulism with fixed prosthodontics supported by Bioceram sapphire implants. 15 patients were treated for maxillary or mandibular edentulism, and 7 for a missing maxillary anterior tooth. The remaining 27 patients, with Applegate-Kennedy Class I-IV residual dentitions, were treated with fixed bridges supported by free-standing implants, or bridges supported by teeth and implants. Implant success, prosthesis stability, radiographic marginal bone level as well as parameters for peri-implant health were evaluated. The study began in 1982, and clinical treatment of the last patients was completed in 1988, i.e., a follow-up period ranging from 7 to 13 years. Of the patients treated for total mandibular edentulism, one implant fractured after 6 years in situ. The bone implant score (BIS) values for those implants were at the time for the bridge cementation 63.5 +/- 1.4 and at 1, 2, 3 and 5 year follow-ups 62.1 +/- 1.4, 61.9 +/- 1.5, 61.5 +/- 1.6, and 60.95 +/- 1.3, respectively. The success rate was 100%, 100% and 97.7% for the mandible at 3, 5 and 10 years, respectively. Of the 7 edentulous patients treated with maxillary fixed bridges, 6 implants in 1 patient had to be removed after 1 year in service. Another 2 patients lost all their implants, 6 each, after 36 months. 6 implants in the 4th patient did not fulfil the criteria for success and were rated as failures at the four year follow-up. The success rate was thus 58.1%, 44.2% and 44.2% for the maxilla at 3, 5 and 10 year follow-ups, respectively. Of the 7 patients in whom single missing teeth were replaced, 1 implant in the premolar region was lost during the 1st year post-operatively, but no other complications or changes in BIS were observed. Of the 27 patients treated for partial edentulism (56 implants total) 1 implant, of a 4-unit free standing maxillary bridge fractured after 6 years and was later replaced. There were no

  16. Congenitally Missing Maxillary Lateral Incisors: Functional and Periodontal Aspects in Patients Treated with Implants or Space Closure and Tooth Re-Contouring

    PubMed Central

    Marchi, Luciana Manzotti De; Pini, Núbia Inocencya Pavesi; Hayacibara, Roberto Massayuki; Silva, Rafael Santos; Pascotto, Renata Corrêa

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate functional and periodontal aspects in patients with unilateral or bilateral congenitally missing maxillary lateral incisors, treated with either implants or space closure and tooth re-contouring. The sample consisted of 68 volunteers, divided into 3 groups: SCR - space closure and tooth re-contouring with composite resin (n = 26); SOI – implants placed in the area of agenesis (n = 20); and CG - control group (n = 22). A modified Helkimo questionnaire and the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders were used by a single, previously calibrated evaluator to assess signs and symptoms of temporomandibular joint disorder. The periodontal assessment involved the following aspects: plaque index, bleeding upon probing, pocket depth greater than 3 mm, gingival recession, abfraction, periodontal biotype and papilla index. The data were analyzed using Fisher's exact test and the nonparametric Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests (α=.05). No differences in periodontal status were found between treatments. None of the groups were associated with signs and symptoms of temporomandibular joint disorder. Both treatment alternatives for patients with congenitally missing maxillary lateral incisors were satisfactory and achieved functional and periodontal results similar to those of the control group. PMID:23346262

  17. Analysis of the effects of different materials in a tooth implant-supported fixed prosthesis using finite element method.

    PubMed

    Dargahi, Javad; Najarian, Siamak; Talebi, Mehdi

    2005-01-01

    In this study, design optimization of a tooth implant-supported fixed prosthesis was investigated theoretically. A three-dimensional finite element analysis was utilized to simulate the stress distribution and deformation, with an emphasis on the material selection for various parts of the prosthesis. This mandibular prosthesis was supported by six implants. The properties of 3 different materials for implants and 4 different materials for framework were incorporated into 12 different models. For the loading conditions used, it was found that the largest displacements occurred at the far ends of the framework and that the resulting deflection was highly dependent on the material properties of the framework. The simulations showed that the stress in the framework was mainly concentrated near the holes in the lower surface and that the highest values of von Mises stresses occurred in the lingual part of the prosthesis. Furthermore, the modeling results revealed that more rigid frameworks led to a corresponding decreased stress in the retaining screws and that high-stress concentration areas moved from the neck of the implant towards the base of it, as the value of Young's modulus increased. It was concluded that the first best model was the Cr-Co alloy for the framework and the Ti alloy for the implant and the second best choice was the Cr-Co alloy for both the framework and the implant. PMID:16010040

  18. Single-tooth replacement with a chairside prefabricated fiber-reinforced resin composite bridge: a case study.

    PubMed

    Arteaga, Sarita; Meiers, Jonathan C

    2004-01-01

    There are many fixed options for replacing a single anterior tooth, including implants; conventional full coverage; porcelain-fused-to-metal, all-ceramic, and fiber-reinforced composite designs; and minimal preparation designs that utilize lingual wing frameworks made from metal, ceramic, or fiber-reinforced composite. All of these approaches require at least two visits; however, it is possible to replace a missing anterior tooth in a single visit by using adhesive techniques with resin composite and fiber-reinforced resin composite materials. This approach has been developed and refined with a bridge created at chairside, using a prefabricated fiber-reinforced composite framework. This framework consists of a pontic substructure that is shaped to support a resin composite pontic, with one or two wings used to attach the pontic substructure to either the lingual or facial surfaces of the abutment teeth. This article describes a chairside technique for replacing a maxillary central incisor by using a prefabricated fiber-reinforced framework. PMID:15636277

  19. Comparison of immediate complete denture, tooth and implant-supported overdenture on vertical dimension and muscle activity

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Farhan Khalid; Gebreel, Ashraf; Elshokouki, Ali hamed; Habib, Ahmed Ali

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE To compare the changes in the occlusal vertical dimension, activity of masseter muscles and biting force after insertion of immediate denture constructed with conventional, tooth-supported and Implant-supported immediate mandibular complete denture. MATERIALS AND METHODS Patients were selected and treatment was carried out with all the three different concepts i.e, immediate denture constructed with conventional (Group A), tooth-supported (Group B) and Implant-supported (Group C) immediate mandibular complete dentures. Parameters of evaluation and comparison were occlusal vertical dimension measured by radiograph (at three different time intervals), Masseter muscle electromyographic (EMG) measurement by EMG analysis (at three different positions of jaws) and bite force measured by force transducer (at two different time intervals). The obtained data were statistically analyzed by using ANOVA-F test at 5% level of significance. If the F test was significant, Least Significant Difference test was performed to test further significant differences between variables. RESULTS Comparison between mean differences in occlusal vertical dimension for tested groups showed that it was only statistically significant at 1 year after immediate dentures insertion. Comparison between mean differences in wavelet packet coefficients of the electromyographic signals of masseter muscles for tested groups was not significant at rest position, but significant at initial contact position and maximum voluntary clench position. Comparison between mean differences in maximum biting force for tested groups was not statistically significant at 5% level of significance. CONCLUSION Immediate complete overdentures whether tooth or implant supported prosthesis is recommended than totally mucosal supported prosthesis. PMID:22737309

  20. Single-tooth dento-osseous osteotomy with a computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing surgical guide

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This clinical note introduces a method to assist surgeons in performing single-tooth dento-osseous osteotomy. For use in this method, a surgical guide was manufactured using computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing technology and was based on preoperative surgical simulation data. This method was highly conducive to successful single-tooth dento-osseous segmental osteotomy. PMID:27162756

  1. Single-Stage Ear Reconstruction and Hearing Restoration Using Polyethylene Implant and Implantable Hearing Devices.

    PubMed

    Hempel, John Martin

    2015-12-01

    The use of porous polyethylene in reconstructive surgery of the auricle is becoming increasingly accepted. This is a single-stage procedure providing pleasing cosmetic rehabilitation. Further advantages are the possibility of early implantation and the lack of complications caused by harvesting costal cartilage. Additional hearing restoration using middle ear implants allows functional rehabilitation at an early stage. PMID:26667635

  2. 3D Printing/Additive Manufacturing Single Titanium Dental Implants: A Prospective Multicenter Study with 3 Years of Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Tunchel, Samy; Blay, Alberto; Kolerman, Roni; Mijiritsky, Eitan; Shibli, Jamil Awad

    2016-01-01

    This prospective 3-year follow-up clinical study evaluated the survival and success rates of 3DP/AM titanium dental implants to support single implant-supported restorations. After 3 years of loading, clinical, radiographic, and prosthetic parameters were assessed; the implant survival and the implant-crown success were evaluated. Eighty-two patients (44 males, 38 females; age range 26-67 years) were enrolled in the present study. A total of 110 3DP/AM titanium dental implants (65 maxilla, 45 mandible) were installed: 75 in healed alveolar ridges and 35 in postextraction sockets. The prosthetic restorations included 110 single crowns (SCs). After 3 years of loading, six implants failed, for an overall implant survival rate of 94.5%; among the 104 surviving implant-supported restorations, 6 showed complications and were therefore considered unsuccessful, for an implant-crown success of 94.3%. The mean distance between the implant shoulder and the first visible bone-implant contact was 0.75 mm (±0.32) and 0.89 (±0.45) after 1 and 3 years of loading, respectively. 3DP/AM titanium dental implants seem to represent a successful clinical option for the rehabilitation of single-tooth gaps in both jaws, at least until 3-year period. Further, long-term clinical studies are needed to confirm the present results.

  3. 3D Printing/Additive Manufacturing Single Titanium Dental Implants: A Prospective Multicenter Study with 3 Years of Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This prospective 3-year follow-up clinical study evaluated the survival and success rates of 3DP/AM titanium dental implants to support single implant-supported restorations. After 3 years of loading, clinical, radiographic, and prosthetic parameters were assessed; the implant survival and the implant-crown success were evaluated. Eighty-two patients (44 males, 38 females; age range 26–67 years) were enrolled in the present study. A total of 110 3DP/AM titanium dental implants (65 maxilla, 45 mandible) were installed: 75 in healed alveolar ridges and 35 in postextraction sockets. The prosthetic restorations included 110 single crowns (SCs). After 3 years of loading, six implants failed, for an overall implant survival rate of 94.5%; among the 104 surviving implant-supported restorations, 6 showed complications and were therefore considered unsuccessful, for an implant-crown success of 94.3%. The mean distance between the implant shoulder and the first visible bone-implant contact was 0.75 mm (±0.32) and 0.89 (±0.45) after 1 and 3 years of loading, respectively. 3DP/AM titanium dental implants seem to represent a successful clinical option for the rehabilitation of single-tooth gaps in both jaws, at least until 3-year period. Further, long-term clinical studies are needed to confirm the present results. PMID:27313616

  4. 3D Printing/Additive Manufacturing Single Titanium Dental Implants: A Prospective Multicenter Study with 3 Years of Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Tunchel, Samy; Blay, Alberto; Kolerman, Roni; Mijiritsky, Eitan; Shibli, Jamil Awad

    2016-01-01

    This prospective 3-year follow-up clinical study evaluated the survival and success rates of 3DP/AM titanium dental implants to support single implant-supported restorations. After 3 years of loading, clinical, radiographic, and prosthetic parameters were assessed; the implant survival and the implant-crown success were evaluated. Eighty-two patients (44 males, 38 females; age range 26-67 years) were enrolled in the present study. A total of 110 3DP/AM titanium dental implants (65 maxilla, 45 mandible) were installed: 75 in healed alveolar ridges and 35 in postextraction sockets. The prosthetic restorations included 110 single crowns (SCs). After 3 years of loading, six implants failed, for an overall implant survival rate of 94.5%; among the 104 surviving implant-supported restorations, 6 showed complications and were therefore considered unsuccessful, for an implant-crown success of 94.3%. The mean distance between the implant shoulder and the first visible bone-implant contact was 0.75 mm (±0.32) and 0.89 (±0.45) after 1 and 3 years of loading, respectively. 3DP/AM titanium dental implants seem to represent a successful clinical option for the rehabilitation of single-tooth gaps in both jaws, at least until 3-year period. Further, long-term clinical studies are needed to confirm the present results. PMID:27313616

  5. Initial bone-implant interfaces of submergible and supramergible endosseous single-crystal sapphire implants.

    PubMed

    Akagawa, Y; Hashimoto, M; Kondo, N; Satomi, K; Takata, T; Tsuru, H

    1986-01-01

    Three types of bone-single-crystal sapphire implant interfaces were histologically determined in submergible and supramergible implant: direct bone apposition (type I), thin connective tissue with poor collagen fibers (type II), and dense fibrous connective tissue (type III). Type I interface was predominant and type III interface was sparsely seen in submergible implants. In contrast to these findings, type III interfaces frequently appeared in supramergible implants, primarily at the apical region. These differences were considered to occur by the biomechanical variable of postoperative healing.

  6. Dental Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Procedures Dental Implants Dentures Direct Bonding Implants versus Bridges Orthodontics and Aligners Periodontal Plastic Surgery Porcelain Crowns Porcelain Fixed Bridges Porcelain Veneers Repairing Chipped Teeth Teeth Whitening Tooth- ...

  7. In situ tooth replica custom implant: a 3-dimensional finite element stress and strain analysis.

    PubMed

    Ghuneim, Wael Aly

    2013-10-01

    This study is a phase of a biomechanical study, a part of a research program concerned with the new concept of in situ tooth replication. The purpose of the study was to evaluate tooth replica under each of two possible circumstances: (1) attachment via periodontal ligament and (2) osseointegration. Replicas were made of Cortoss, a bioactive glass, bone substitute. Three-dimensional finite element analysis was used to assess the stresses and strains resulting from each of 2 types of loads: off-vertical pressure and vertical point force acting on natural mandibular second premolar and corresponding replicas. Natural tooth tolerated 19 MPa pressure or 85 N vertical force, periodontally attached replica tolerated 15 MPa pressure or 80 N force, and osseointegrated replica tolerated 23 MPa pressure or 217 N force.

  8. Zirconia Crown as Single Unit Tooth Restoration: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Alfawaz, Yasser

    2016-01-01

    Ceramics has become increasingly popular as a dental restorative material because of its superior esthetics, as well as its inertness and biocompatibility. Among dental ceramics, zirconia is used as a dental biomaterial and it is the material of choice in contemporary restorative dentistry. Zirconia ceramics has both clinical popularity and success due to its outstanding mechanical properties and ease of machining in the green stage via computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing technology. Zirconia is one of the most promising restorative biomaterial because it has favorable mechanical and chemical properties suitable for medical application. Zirconia ceramics is becoming a prevalent biomaterial in dentistry. Clinical evaluations also indicate a good success rate for zirconia with minimal complications. This article reviews the current literature on dental zirconia with respect to basic properties, biocompatibility, and clinical applications in aesthetic dentistry as single unit crown. PMID:27443370

  9. Single Glucose Biofuel Cells Implanted in Rats Power Electronic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Zebda, A.; Cosnier, S.; Alcaraz, J.-P.; Holzinger, M.; Le Goff, A.; Gondran, C.; Boucher, F.; Giroud, F.; Gorgy, K.; Lamraoui, H.; Cinquin, P.

    2013-01-01

    We describe the first implanted glucose biofuel cell (GBFC) that is capable of generating sufficient power from a mammal's body fluids to act as the sole power source for electronic devices. This GBFC is based on carbon nanotube/enzyme electrodes, which utilize glucose oxidase for glucose oxidation and laccase for dioxygen reduction. The GBFC, implanted in the abdominal cavity of a rat, produces an average open-circuit voltage of 0.57 V. This implanted GBFC delivered a power output of 38.7 μW, which corresponded to a power density of 193.5 μW cm−2 and a volumetric power of 161 μW mL−1. We demonstrate that one single implanted enzymatic GBFC can power a light-emitting diode (LED), or a digital thermometer. In addition, no signs of rejection or inflammation were observed after 110 days implantation in the rat. PMID:23519113

  10. Hinged Single Piece Putty Index for Preclinical Demonstration of Tooth Preparation for Fixed Partial Dentures and Crowns

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Shallabh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Different types of indices are being used for assessment of tooth preparation. All these indices are used to visualize tooth preparations in a particular plane. A single versatile index which could help to visualize tooth preparations in different planes is non-existent. The need for fabrication of such an index and its reliability is of utmost important to provide quality tooth preparations. Purpose: The purpose of the study is to fabricate a hinged single piece sectioned index which could be used to visualize tooth preparation in different planes and check its reliability in-vitro on phantom models. Materials and Methods: Ten preclinical students were selected in random for preparing three teeth each. The three teeth preparations are classified as Group A, Group B and Group C based on the non-usage of index, usage of sectioned index and hinged single piece sectioned index respectively. Students were made to do provisional restorations after the tooth preparations. Then a questionnaire was given to students to score the duration/accuracy/comfort during tooth preparation and duration/accuracy of provisional restorations for each of the Groups A,B and C. Results: In Group C, 90% of students found the final preparation to be very accurate. The time taken for fabrication of provisional restoration using sectioned hinged index by 60% of Group C students was 20 to 30 min. Conclusion: This hinged index is a viable option when accuracy of tooth preparation and speedy fabrication of provisional restoration is required. PMID:26023634

  11. Relationship between indication for tooth extraction and outcome of immediate implants: A retrospective study with 5 years of follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Tarazona-Álvarez, Pablo; Peñarrocha-Oltra, David; Peñarrocha-Diago, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aims of this retrospective study were to evaluate the survival rate of a series of immediate implants after 3 years of follow-up and to study the relationship between survival and indication for tooth extraction. Study Design: A retrospective study of patients treated with immediate implants between January 2003 and December 2008 was carried out. All patients receiving at least one post-extraction implant and a minimum follow-up of 5 years were included. Results: After 60 months, 30 immediate implants had been lost in 17 patients, yielding a total implant success rate of 93.8%. None of the implants placed failed after the extraction of included canines (100% success rate). In 20 failed implants the reason for extraction had been severe periodontal disease (91.8% SR), in 4 endodontic failure (88.6%SR), in 3 unrestorable caries (95.9% SR), in 1 untreatable fracture (95.2% SR) and in 2 improvement of prosthetic design (98.1% SR). No statistically significant influence was found between immediate implant failure and the reason for tooth extraction (p=0.11). Conclusions: The use of immediate implants is a successful alternative to replace missing teeth for severe periodontal disease, periapical pathology or by decay or untreatable fractures. Some reasons, such as periodontal disease itself is associated with a success rate significantly below the overall average. Similarly, the prosthetic design is associated with a better prognosis than all other reasons. Key words:Tooth extraction, immediate implants, success rate. PMID:25593661

  12. Single implant in the mandibular molar region of edentulous patient.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Jun-Jiang; Wen, Cai; Teng, Ming-Hua; Liang, Xing

    2013-09-01

    Implant-retained overdentures are a valid treatment option for edentulous patients, especially for patients with severe alveolar ridge atrophy. A central single implant is considered adequate to retain an overdenture in the edentulous mandible. However, for some patients, there is no sufficient bone height, or width in the interforaminal region of the mandible for insertion of the implant. This case report illustrates that the insertion of a single implant in the mandibular molar region might stabilize the prosthesis, and might improve the oral health-related quality of life and chewing function. A Locator attachment was used in this case to retain the overdenture. The one-year clinical results are promising. However, long-term clinical results and randomized clinical trials are needed before this method can be widely used in clinical application.

  13. Single ion implantation for solid state quantum computer development

    SciTech Connect

    Schenkel, Thomas; Meijers, Jan; Persaud, Arun; McDonald, Joseph W.; Holder, Joseph P.; Schneider, Dieter H.

    2001-12-18

    Several solid state quantum computer schemes are based on the manipulation of electron and nuclear spins of single donor atoms in a solid matrix. The fabrication of qubit arrays requires the placement of individual atoms with nanometer precision and high efficiency. In this article we describe first results from low dose, low energy implantations and our development of a low energy (<10 keV), single ion implantation scheme for {sup 31}P{sup q+} ions. When {sup 31}P{sup q+} ions impinge on a wafer surface, their potential energy (9.3 keV for P{sup 15+}) is released, and about 20 secondary electrons are emitted. The emission of multiple secondary electrons allows detection of each ion impact with 100% efficiency. The beam spot on target is controlled by beam focusing and collimation. Exactly one ion is implanted into a selected area avoiding a Poissonian distribution of implanted ions.

  14. Engineering single photon emitters by ion implantation in diamond

    PubMed Central

    Naydenov, B.; Kolesov, R.; Batalov, A.; Meijer, J.; Pezzagna, S.; Rogalla, D.; Jelezko, F.; Wrachtrup, J.

    2009-01-01

    Diamond provides unique technological platform for quantum technologies including quantum computing and communication. Controlled fabrication of optically active defects is a key element for such quantum toolkit. Here we report the production of single color centers emitting in the blue spectral region by high energy implantation of carbon ions. We demonstrate that single implanted defects show sub-poissonian statistics of the emitted photons and can be explored as single photon source in quantum cryptography. Strong zero phonon line at 470.5 nm allows unambiguous identification of this defect as interstitial-related TR12 color center. PMID:19956415

  15. Engineering single photon emitters by ion implantation in diamond.

    PubMed

    Naydenov, B; Kolesov, R; Batalov, A; Meijer, J; Pezzagna, S; Rogalla, D; Jelezko, F; Wrachtrup, J

    2009-11-01

    Diamond provides unique technological platform for quantum technologies including quantum computing and communication. Controlled fabrication of optically active defects is a key element for such quantum toolkit. Here we report the production of single color centers emitting in the blue spectral region by high energy implantation of carbon ions. We demonstrate that single implanted defects show sub-poissonian statistics of the emitted photons and can be explored as single photon source in quantum cryptography. Strong zero phonon line at 470.5 nm allows unambiguous identification of this defect as interstitial-related TR12 color center. PMID:19956415

  16. Engineering single photon emitters by ion implantation in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naydenov, B.; Kolesov, R.; Batalov, A.; Meijer, J.; Pezzagna, S.; Rogalla, D.; Jelezko, F.; Wrachtrup, J.

    2009-11-01

    Diamond provides unique technological platform for quantum technologies including quantum computing and communication. Controlled fabrication of optically active defects is a key element for such quantum toolkit. Here we report the production of single color centers emitting in the blue spectral region by high energy implantation of carbon ions. We demonstrate that single implanted defects show sub-poissonian statistics of the emitted photons and can be explored as single photon source in quantum cryptography. Strong zero phonon line at 470.5 nm allows unambiguous identification of this defect as interstitial-related TR12 color center.

  17. Engineering single photon emitters by ion implantation in diamond.

    PubMed

    Naydenov, B; Kolesov, R; Batalov, A; Meijer, J; Pezzagna, S; Rogalla, D; Jelezko, F; Wrachtrup, J

    2009-11-01

    Diamond provides unique technological platform for quantum technologies including quantum computing and communication. Controlled fabrication of optically active defects is a key element for such quantum toolkit. Here we report the production of single color centers emitting in the blue spectral region by high energy implantation of carbon ions. We demonstrate that single implanted defects show sub-poissonian statistics of the emitted photons and can be explored as single photon source in quantum cryptography. Strong zero phonon line at 470.5 nm allows unambiguous identification of this defect as interstitial-related TR12 color center.

  18. Physics of Heavily Implanted Single Crystal Complex Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofan, Avishai

    Ion implantation is known to result in a significant amount of damage in solid single crystals. In this work a battery of material probes is used to study the effect of a very high-dose He implantation in ferroelectric lithium niobate (LiNbO3) and the implantation-induced formation of defects. In addition, the evolution of these defects with post-implantation annealing is examined. After irradiation, a high concentration of defects is found to collect and create a network of thick prismatic planar defects having typical dimensions of ˜1.5 microm and 200 nm parallel and perpendicular to the Z axis, respectively. Optical microscopy shows that there is strong temperature dependence for forming the network; the density of these defects reaches a maximum value for an annealing temperature of 250 °C. However, annealing to temperatures above 380 °C fully eliminates the defects. High-resolution TEM studies indicate that the defects are likely localized twinning and dislocation pileups due to plastic deformation of the lattice to relieve He-implantation-induced stress. During this deformation He accumulates at the twin boundaries. A second type of implantation induced defects is studied using room temperature, high- resolution electron microscopy; this study shows that implanted He in LiNbO3 nucleates and accumulates as bubbles. These He inclusions are at ˜20 GPa pressure and most probably in the solid phase. In addition, the energetically favored shape of the inclusions in their as-implanted form is spherical and not oblate; this spherical shape is due to the fact their diameter is below a critical radius for balancing the surface and elastics energies as predicted by elastic theory. When annealed, the characteristic length scale of the He inclusions increases, forming faceted bubbles. Annealing also causes the He inclusions to migrate and accumulate into strings due to the preferred {1014}-pyramidal-twinning planes. The ion implantation-induced defects are found to be

  19. Single and Multiple Microphone Noise Reduction Strategies in Cochlear Implants

    PubMed Central

    Azimi, Behnam; Hu, Yi; Friedland, David R.

    2012-01-01

    To restore hearing sensation, cochlear implants deliver electrical pulses to the auditory nerve by relying on sophisticated signal processing algorithms that convert acoustic inputs to electrical stimuli. Although individuals fitted with cochlear implants perform well in quiet, in the presence of background noise, the speech intelligibility of cochlear implant listeners is more susceptible to background noise than that of normal hearing listeners. Traditionally, to increase performance in noise, single-microphone noise reduction strategies have been used. More recently, a number of approaches have suggested that speech intelligibility in noise can be improved further by making use of two or more microphones, instead. Processing strategies based on multiple microphones can better exploit the spatial diversity of speech and noise because such strategies rely mostly on spatial information about the relative position of competing sound sources. In this article, we identify and elucidate the most significant theoretical aspects that underpin single- and multi-microphone noise reduction strategies for cochlear implants. More analytically, we focus on strategies of both types that have been shown to be promising for use in current-generation implant devices. We present data from past and more recent studies, and furthermore we outline the direction that future research in the area of noise reduction for cochlear implants could follow. PMID:22923425

  20. Single and multiple microphone noise reduction strategies in cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Kokkinakis, Kostas; Azimi, Behnam; Hu, Yi; Friedland, David R

    2012-06-01

    To restore hearing sensation, cochlear implants deliver electrical pulses to the auditory nerve by relying on sophisticated signal processing algorithms that convert acoustic inputs to electrical stimuli. Although individuals fitted with cochlear implants perform well in quiet, in the presence of background noise, the speech intelligibility of cochlear implant listeners is more susceptible to background noise than that of normal hearing listeners. Traditionally, to increase performance in noise, single-microphone noise reduction strategies have been used. More recently, a number of approaches have suggested that speech intelligibility in noise can be improved further by making use of two or more microphones, instead. Processing strategies based on multiple microphones can better exploit the spatial diversity of speech and noise because such strategies rely mostly on spatial information about the relative position of competing sound sources. In this article, we identify and elucidate the most significant theoretical aspects that underpin single- and multi-microphone noise reduction strategies for cochlear implants. More analytically, we focus on strategies of both types that have been shown to be promising for use in current-generation implant devices. We present data from past and more recent studies, and furthermore we outline the direction that future research in the area of noise reduction for cochlear implants could follow.

  1. An in vitro investigation into retention strength and fatigue resistance of various designs of tooth/implant supported overdentures.

    PubMed

    Fatalla, Abdalbseet A; Song, Ke; Du, Tianfeng; Cao, Yingguang

    2012-02-01

    Previously, the choice of prosthetic implant-retained overdentures has depended on data from previous studies about the retention-fatigue strength of the attachment system selected. Little or no data have been available on the correlation between the attachment system selected and the overdenture support configuration. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the retention force and fatigue resistance of three attachment systems and four support designs of overdenture prosthesis. Four lower edentulous acrylic models were prepared and eight combinations of attachments groups were investigated in the study. These included: O-Rings with mini-dental implants (MDIs), Dalbo elliptic with Dalbo Rotex and fabricated flexible acrylic attachments with both MDI and Dalbo Rotex. The study was divided into four test groups: groups A and B, controls, and groups C and D, experimental groups. Control group A contained three overdenture supports: two free standing MDIs in the canine region and at the midline, and one simulated tooth root with Dalbo Rotex screwed in. Control group B contained four overdenture support foundations: two free standing MDIs in the right canine region and the first premolar region, and two simulated tooth roots with Dalbo Rotex screwed in at the same MDI position, but on the left side of the model. Experimental group C contained three overdenture support foundations: two free standing MDIs in the canine region and at the midline, and one simulated tooth root with MDI screwed in. Experimental group D contained four overdenture support foundations: two free standing MDIs in the right canine region and the first premolar region, and two simulated tooth roots with MDIs screwed in at the same MDI position, but on the left side of the model. Each group was further divided into two subgroups according to attachment type used. Five samples were prepared for each group. Retention force (N) values were recorded initially (0 cycles) and after 360, 720, 1440

  2. Single-Visit Pulp Revascularization of a Nonvital Immature Permanent Tooth Using Biodentine

    PubMed Central

    Aldakak, Mohammad Mhd Nader; Capar, Ismail Davut; Rekab, Mohammad Salem; Abboud, Souad

    2016-01-01

    An 11-year-old female patient was referred with a chief complaint of pain in the right mandibular second premolar. Clinical and radiographic examinations showed secondary caries under an old composite restoration, a negative response to a pulp test and an immature root with an open apex. After root canal cleaning and shaping, bleeding was invoked in the canal up to 2 mm short of the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ). After 10 min to allow clotting at this level, a plug of Biodentine was placed over the blood clot and the tooth was temporized with glass ionomer cement. At the next visit, the tooth was free of symptoms and a permanent filling was placed. Clinical and radiographic examinations during a two-year follow-up showed complete root maturation and intact supporting soft tissues without sinus tract, pain or swelling. Conclusion: The use of Biodentine in a single-visit apexification protocol to treat an immature permanent tooth with necrotic pulp can create a suitable environment for revascularization, resulting in the completion of root maturation. PMID:27471541

  3. Fabricating a tooth- and implant-supported maxillary obturator for a patient after maxillectomy with computer-guided surgery and CAD/CAM technology: A clinical report.

    PubMed

    Noh, Kwantae; Pae, Ahran; Lee, Jung-Woo; Kwon, Yong-Dae

    2016-05-01

    An obturator prosthesis with insufficient retention and support may be improved with implant placement. However, implant surgery in patients after maxillary tumor resection can be complicated because of limited visibility and anatomic complexity. Therefore, computer-guided surgery can be advantageous even for experienced surgeons. In this clinical report, the use of computer-guided surgery is described for implant placement using a bone-supported surgical template for a patient with maxillary defects. The prosthetic procedure was facilitated and simplified by using computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacture (CAD/CAM) technology. Oral function and phonetics were restored using a tooth- and implant-supported obturator prosthesis. No clinical symptoms and no radiographic signs of significant bone loss around the implants were found at a 3-year follow-up. The treatment approach presented here can be a viable option for patients with insufficient remaining zygomatic bone after a hemimaxillectomy. PMID:26774316

  4. Immediate Provisionalization and Nonfunctional Loading of a Single Implant in the Maxillary Esthetic Zone: A Clinical Presentation and Parameters for Consideration

    PubMed Central

    Michalakis, Konstantinos X.; Kalpidis, Christos D. R.; Kirmanidou, Yvone; Hirayama, Hiroshi; Calvani, Pasquale Lino; Pissiotis, Argiris L.

    2013-01-01

    Restoration of single tooth loss with implant supported prosthesis is now considered a highly predictable treatment. However, the maxillary anterior region still presents a challenge for both the prosthodontist and the periodontist because of the inherent difficulties encountered in the provisionalization and harmonic incorporation of the definitive prosthesis into patient's dentogingival complex. This paper presents a clinical case of a single implant placed immediately after the extraction of a maxillary central incisor, followed by immediate provisionalization and nonfunctional loading. The surgical and the restorative techniques are described, and the parameters of consideration for this approach are presented. PMID:24383012

  5. Are Dental Implants the Answer to Tooth Loss in Patients with Parkinson's Disease?

    PubMed

    Packer, Mark E

    2015-05-01

    Individuals with Parkinson's disease present a challenge to dental clinicians as this degenerative disease leads to problems accessing care and maintaining an adequate level of oral health. This article provides an overview of the implications of Parkinson's disease on oral health and explores the role of dental implants in the management of such patients.

  6. A technique for fabricating single screw-retained implant-supported interim crowns in conjunction with implant surgery.

    PubMed

    McRory, M Eric; Cagna, David R

    2014-06-01

    This article presents an intraoral technique for fabricating single screw-retained implant-supported interim crowns immediately after surgical implant placement in extraction sites. The technique may be used with any implant system that provides a provisional abutment or an open-tray impression coping that can be modified for use as a provisional abutment. PMID:24461941

  7. Optima XE Single Wafer High Energy Ion Implanter

    SciTech Connect

    Satoh, Shu; Ferrara, Joseph; Bell, Edward; Patel, Shital; Sieradzki, Manny

    2008-11-03

    The Optima XE is the first production worthy single wafer high energy implanter. The new system combines a state-of-art single wafer endstation capable of throughputs in excess of 400 wafers/hour with a production-proven RF linear accelerator technology. Axcelis has been evolving and refining RF Linac technology since the introduction of the NV1000 in 1986. The Optima XE provides production worthy beam currents up to energies of 1.2 MeV for P{sup +}, 2.9 MeV for P{sup ++}, and 1.5 MeV for B{sup +}. Energies as low as 10 keV and tilt angles as high as 45 degrees are also available., allowing the implanter to be used for a wide variety of traditional medium current implants to ensure high equipment utilization. The single wafer endstation provides precise implant angle control across wafer and wafer to wafer. In addition, Optima XE's unique dose control system allows compensation of photoresist outgassing effects without relying on traditional pressure-based methods. We describe the specific features, angle control and dosimetry of the Optima XE and their applications in addressing the ever-tightening demands for more precise process controls and higher productivity.

  8. Single Visit Apexification Procedure of a Traumatically Injured Tooth with a Novel Bioinductive Material (Biodentine)

    PubMed Central

    Jingarwar, Mahesh Madhukar; Pathak, Anuradha

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim of this article is to present a case wherein single visit apexification of a traumatically injured tooth was done with a bioactive material–Biodentine. An injury sustained between the ages of 6 and 14 can adversely affect pulpal health and interrupt root development. In these instances, apexification is generally the preferred treatment. A 10 years old male patient presented with coronal fracture of the left upper central incisor. Clinical and radiographic assessment showed negative pulpal sensibility and arrested apical root development. Artificial apical barrier induction with Biodentine followed by endodontic treatment and prosthetic rehabilitation was decided as the line of treatment. To conclude, this bioactive and biocompatible calcium-based cement can regenerate damaged dental tissues and represents a promising alternative to the conventional multivisit apexification technique. Clinical significance: Biodentine which is a biologically active cement can be an efficient alternative to the conventional apexification materials which were hitherto recommended. How to cite this article: Bajwa NK, Jingarwar MM, Pathak A. Single Visit Apexification Procedure of a Traumatically Injured Tooth with a Novel Bioinductive Material (Biodentine). Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(1):58-61. PMID:26124583

  9. Evaluation of stress distributions in peri-implant and periodontal bone tissues in 3- and 5-unit tooth and implant-supported fixed zirconia restorations by finite elements analysis

    PubMed Central

    Guven, Sedat; Beydemir, Koksal; Dundar, Serkan; Eratilla, Veysel

    2015-01-01

    Objective: In this study, it is aimed to compare the distribution of stress on periodontal and peri-implant bone tissues in 3- and 5-unit-dental and implant-supported zirconia restorations using finite element analysis. Materials and Methods: Stress distribution formed in periodontal and peri-implant bone tissues as a result of chewing forces was analyzed in dental and implant-supported three-dimensional (3D) finite element models of zirconia restoration with 5-unit placed on the numbers of 43, 44, 45, 46, and 47 and with 3-unit placed on the number of 45, 46, and 47. Four different loading conditions were used. 200 N force was applied in 30° from the buccal inclination of number 43, 45, and 47 restorations separately and totally 850 N force was applied in 30° from the buccal inclination of whole restoration. The study was performed through static nonlinear analysis with the 3D finite element analysis method. Results: Stress accumulation in bone tissues in the tooth-supported model was found less than in implant-supported models. Stress accumulation was observed in the cervical portion of the implant in implant-supported models, and stress accumulation was observed surrounding bone of roots in tooth-supported models. The highest stress values were occurred in 5 unit implant-supported model in all loadings. Conclusion: In posterior restorations increased in the number of supported teeth and implant can reduce the destructive forces on periodontal and peri-implant bone tissues and may allow longer period retention of the restorations in the mouth. PMID:26430359

  10. Process Performance of Optima XEx Single Wafer High Energy Implanter

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J. H.; Yoon, Jongyoon; Kondratenko, S.; David, J.; Rubin, L. M.; Jang, I. S.; Cha, J. C.; Joo, Y. H.; Lee, A. B.; Jin, S. W.

    2011-01-07

    To meet the process requirements for well formation in future CMOS memory production, high energy implanters require more robust angle, dose, and energy control while maintaining high productivity. The Optima XEx high energy implanter meets these requirements by integrating a traditional LINAC beamline with a robust single wafer handling system. To achieve beam angle control, Optima XEx can control both the horizontal and vertical beam angles to within 0.1 degrees using advanced beam angle measurement and correction. Accurate energy calibration and energy trim functions accelerate process matching by eliminating energy calibration errors. The large volume process chamber and UDC (upstream dose control) using faraday cups outside of the process chamber precisely control implant dose regardless of any chamber pressure increase due to PR (photoresist) outgassing. An optimized RF LINAC accelerator improves reliability and enables singly charged phosphorus and boron energies up to 1200 keV and 1500 keV respectively with higher beam currents. A new single wafer endstation combined with increased beam performance leads to overall increased productivity. We report on the advanced performance of Optima XEx observed during tool installation and volume production at an advanced memory fab.

  11. Speech perception by four single-channel cochlear implant users.

    PubMed

    Dent, L J; Simmons, F B; White, R L; Roberts, L A

    1987-12-01

    Four profoundly deaf adults, each a recent recipient of a scala tympani implant, underwent auditory and auditory-visual speech comprehension evaluations. Two subjects had multiple-electrode auditory prostheses, and 2 had single-electrode implants. All subjects were tested preoperatively with a high-power hearing aid, and postoperatively with a single-channel wearable sound processor. Reported here are the results of the first formal speech recognition tests which were conducted during the 8 months after the sound processor fitting. Three subjects had used the single-channel processor on a daily basis for up to 8 months at the time of postoperative testing. The 4th subject was a nonuser. On listening tests, a comparison between pre- and post-implant scores revealed little difference for any subject. On postoperative speechreading tasks, all subjects identified medial consonant phonemes and 2-digit numerals better with stimulation than without. The 3 frequent users of the device experienced significant improvement on connected-discourse tracking, and their speechreading of videotaped and live voice CID Everyday Sentences (Davis & Silverman, 1978) was enhanced with the addition of stimulation. The nonuser was a very proficient speechreader at the outset and exhibited no significant difference on connected-discourse tracking with and without stimulation. Moreover her ability to speechread Everyday Sentences was hampered slightly by the addition of stimulation. This single-channel sound processor functioned as a sensory supplement for the 3 frequent users, but no subject was able to use the processor as a sensory substitute. PMID:3695442

  12. Three-dimensional evaluation of tooth movement in Class II malocclusions treated without extraction by orthodontic mini-implant anchorage

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Dler; Mohammed, Hnd; Koo, Seung-Hwan; Kang, Kyung-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to analyze tooth movement and arch width changes in maxillary dentition following nonextraction treatment with orthodontic mini-implant (OMI) anchorage in Class II division 1 malocclusions. Methods Seventeen adult patients diagnosed with Angle's Class II division 1 malocclusion were treated by nonextraction with OMIs as anchorage for distalization of whole maxillary dentition. Three-dimensional virtual maxillary models were superimposed with the best-fit method at the pretreatment and post-treatment stages. Linear, angular, and arch width variables were measured using Rapidform 2006 software, and analyzed by the paired t-test. Results All maxillary teeth showed statistically significant movement posteriorly (p < 0.05). There were no significant changes in the vertical position of the maxillary teeth, except that the second molars were extruded (0.86 mm, p < 0.01). The maxillary first and second molars were rotated distal-in (4.5°, p < 0.001; 3.0°, p < 0.05, respectively). The intersecond molar width increased slightly (0.1 mm, p > 0.05) and the intercanine, interfirst premolar, intersecond premolar, and interfirst molar widths increased significantly (2.2 mm, p < 0.01; 2.2 mm, p < 0.05; 1.9 mm, p < 0.01; 2.0 mm, p < 0.01; respectively). Conclusions Nonextraction treatment with OMI anchorage for Class II division 1 malocclusions could retract the whole maxillary dentition to achieve a Class I canine and molar relationship without a change in the vertical position of the teeth; however, the second molars were significantly extruded. Simultaneously, the maxillary arch was shown to be expanded with distal-in rotation of the molars. PMID:27668191

  13. Three-dimensional evaluation of tooth movement in Class II malocclusions treated without extraction by orthodontic mini-implant anchorage

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Dler; Mohammed, Hnd; Koo, Seung-Hwan; Kang, Kyung-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to analyze tooth movement and arch width changes in maxillary dentition following nonextraction treatment with orthodontic mini-implant (OMI) anchorage in Class II division 1 malocclusions. Methods Seventeen adult patients diagnosed with Angle's Class II division 1 malocclusion were treated by nonextraction with OMIs as anchorage for distalization of whole maxillary dentition. Three-dimensional virtual maxillary models were superimposed with the best-fit method at the pretreatment and post-treatment stages. Linear, angular, and arch width variables were measured using Rapidform 2006 software, and analyzed by the paired t-test. Results All maxillary teeth showed statistically significant movement posteriorly (p < 0.05). There were no significant changes in the vertical position of the maxillary teeth, except that the second molars were extruded (0.86 mm, p < 0.01). The maxillary first and second molars were rotated distal-in (4.5°, p < 0.001; 3.0°, p < 0.05, respectively). The intersecond molar width increased slightly (0.1 mm, p > 0.05) and the intercanine, interfirst premolar, intersecond premolar, and interfirst molar widths increased significantly (2.2 mm, p < 0.01; 2.2 mm, p < 0.05; 1.9 mm, p < 0.01; 2.0 mm, p < 0.01; respectively). Conclusions Nonextraction treatment with OMI anchorage for Class II division 1 malocclusions could retract the whole maxillary dentition to achieve a Class I canine and molar relationship without a change in the vertical position of the teeth; however, the second molars were significantly extruded. Simultaneously, the maxillary arch was shown to be expanded with distal-in rotation of the molars.

  14. Dose Control System in the Optima XE Single Wafer High Energy Ion Implanter

    SciTech Connect

    Satoh, Shu; Yoon, Jongyoon; David, Jonathan

    2011-01-07

    Photoresist outgassing can significantly compromise accurate dosimetry of high energy implants. High energy implant even at a modest beam current produces high beam powers which create significantly worse outgassing than low and medium energy implants and the outgassing continues throughout the implant due to the low dose in typical high energy implant recipes. In the previous generation of high energy implanters, dose correction by monitoring of process chamber pressure during photoresist outgassing has been used. However, as applications diversify and requirements change, the need arises for a more versatile photoresist correction system to match the versatility of a single wafer high energy ion implanter. We have successfully developed a new dosimetry system for the Optima XE single wafer high energy ion implanter which does not require any form of compensation due to the implant conditions. This paper describes the principles and performance of this new dose system.

  15. Metal-reinforced single implant mandibular overdenture retained by an attachment: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Grageda, Edgar; Rieck, Bastian

    2014-01-01

    Results of studies have shown that a single implant mandibular overdenture significantly increases the satisfaction and quality of life of patients with edentulism. The single implant-retained overdenture has the additional advantage of being less expensive and invasive than a 2-implant supported overdenture but has a high incidence of fracture of the acrylic resin base at the point of the implant. The treatment, design, and fabrication of a metal-reinforced single-implant mandibular overdenture with the Locator attachment as a retention device is described.

  16. The relationship between smile attractiveness and esthetic parameters of patients with lateral agenesis treated with tooth recontouring or implants

    PubMed Central

    De-Marchi, Luciana Manzotti; Pini, Núbia Inocencya Pavesi; Pascotto, Renata Corrêa

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to associate smile esthetic judgment with dentofacial attributes of patients with unilateral and bilateral agenesis of maxillary lateral incisors treated with recontouring of canines or implants and patients with no agenesis (control). Material and methods Forty-six participants were divided into two groups: those treated with recontouring (N = 26) and those treated with implants (N = 20). The participants in the control group (N = 22) were selected among dentistry students at the State University of Maringá, Brazil. Photographs of posed smiles (17 cm × 10 cm) were evaluated with a 100-mm Visual Analog Scale. Smile attractiveness was judged by two groups: laypersons and dentists (N = 20 in each group). Judgment was classified into Unpleasant and Pleasant. Measurements of 11 smile attributes were done with ImageTool Version 3.0. These measurements were correlated with the type of judgment using the Pearson correlation coefficient. Results The two groups of evaluators showed no rating difference (analysis of variance, P = 0.64), thus they were placed into a single group. No significant correlation was found between esthetic judgment and six smile attributes (incisor exposure, interlabial gap, width 3 to 3, smile index, right buccal corridor, and buccal corridor ratio). The control group showed more correlations with the unpleasant judgment type than the other groups. Conclusion Some correlations between smile attributes and esthetic judgment were found, but other features of smiles not evaluated in this study may interfere in smile attractiveness. PMID:23674925

  17. Integration of an Axcelis Optima HD Single Wafer High Current Implanter for p- and n-S/D Implants in an Existing Batch Implanter Production Line

    SciTech Connect

    Schmeide, Matthias; Kontratenko, Serguei; Krimbacher, Bernhard; Mueller, Ralf Peter

    2008-11-03

    This paper is focused on the integration and qualification of an Axcelis Optima HD single wafer high current spot beam implanter in an existing 200 mm production line with different types of Axcelis batch implanters for high current applications. Both the design of the beamline and the beam shape are comparable between single wafer and batch high current spot beam implanters. In contrast to the single wafer high current ribbon beam implanter, energy contamination is not a concern for the considered spot beam tool because the drift mode can be used down to energies in the 2 keV region. The most important difference between single wafer and batch high current implanters is the significantly higher dose rate and, therefore, the higher damage rate for the single wafer tool due to the different scanning architecture. The results of the integration of high dose implantations, mainly for p- and n-S/D formation, for DRAM 110 nm without pre-amorphization implantation (PAI), CMOS Logic from around 250 nm down to 90 nm without and with PAI, are presented and discussed. Dopant concentration profile analysis using SIMS was performed for different technologies and implantation conditions. The impurity activation was measured using sheet resistance and in some cases spreading resistance technique was applied. The amorphous layer thickness was measured using TEM. Finally, device data are presented in combination with dose, energy and beam current variations. The results have shown that the integration of implantation processes into crystalline structure without PAI is more complex and time consuming than implantations into amorphous layer where the damage difference due to the different dose rates is negligible.

  18. Cochlear implantation and management of chronic suppurative otitis media: single stage procedure?

    PubMed

    Basavaraj, S; Shanks, M; Sivaji, N; Allen, Agnes A

    2005-10-01

    In a series of 360 patients who underwent cochlear implantation at our center, four patients (five procedures) had cochlear implantation with obliteration of the mastoid cavity and management of cholesteatoma as a single-staged procedure. Three patients were bilaterally deaf secondary to CSOM and had bilateral mastoid cavities, and in one patient congenital cholesteatoma was identified during cochlear implantation. A mastoidectomy or revision mastoidectomy with obliteration of the mastoid cavity and cochlear implantation was performed as a single stage procedure. Cholesteatoma reoccurred in one patient 9 years after cochlear implantation. Surgical procedures, complications, follow-up and outcomes are discussed. PMID:15756568

  19. A single-channel implantable microstimulator for functional neuromuscular stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ziaie, B; Nardin, M D; Coghlan, A R; Najafi, K

    1997-10-01

    This paper describes a single-channel implantable microstimulator for functional neuromuscular stimulation. This device measures 2 x 2 x 10 mm3 and can be inserted into paralyzed muscle groups by expulsion from a hypodermic needle. Power and data to the device are supplied from outside by RF telemetry using an amplitude-modulated 2-MHz RF carrier generated using a high-efficiency class-E transmitter. The transmitted signal carries a 5-b address which selects one of the 32 possible microstimulators. The selected device then delivers up to 2 microC of charge store in a tantalum chip capacitor for up to 200 microseconds (10 mA) into loads of < 800 omega through a high-current thin-film iridium-oxide (IrOx) electrode (approximately 0.3 mm2 in area). A bi-CMOS receiver circuitry is used to: generate two regulated voltage supplies (4.5 and 9 V), recover a 2-MHz clock from the carrier, demodulate the address code, and activate the output current delivery circuitry upon the reception of an external command. The overall power dissipation of the receiver circuitry is 45-55 mW. The implant is hermetically packaged using a custom-made glass capsule.

  20. Fractures related to occlusal overload with single posterior implants: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Heather J; Schulte, John K; Vallee, Mark C

    2008-04-01

    This clinical report describes 2 patient situations in which fractures related to occlusal overload occurred with a single posterior implants. The initial clinical presentation of both patients appeared to be screw loosening, but upon further examination, implant and abutment fractures were identified. Several factors are described that have been implicated in the etiology of implant fractures, including occlusal overload, implant location, inadequate fit of the prosthesis, design of the prosthesis, progressive bone loss, metal fatigue, implant diameter, manufacturing defects, and galvanic activity. This article describes the management of implant and abutment fractures and discusses possible mechanisms of failure for the patient situations presented. Careful treatment planning and execution of implant therapy is necessary to minimize the risk of implant and component fractures. PMID:18395533

  1. Single ion implantation for single donor devices using Geiger mode detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielejec, E.; Seamons, J. A.; Carroll, M. S.

    2010-02-01

    Electronic devices that are designed to use the properties of single atoms such as donors or defects have become a reality with recent demonstrations of donor spectroscopy, single photon emission sources, and magnetic imaging using defect centers in diamond. Ion implantation, an industry standard for atom placement in materials, requires augmentation for single ion capability including a method for detecting a single ion arrival. Integrating single ion detection techniques with the single donor device construction region allows single ion arrival to be assured. Improving detector sensitivity is linked to improving control over the straggle of the ion as well as providing more flexibility in lay-out integration with the active region of the single donor device construction zone by allowing ion sensing at potentially greater distances. Using a remotely located passively gated single ion Geiger mode avalanche diode (SIGMA) detector we have demonstrated 100% detection efficiency at a distance of >75 µm from the center of the collecting junction. This detection efficiency is achieved with sensitivity to ~600 or fewer electron-hole pairs produced by the implanted ion. Ion detectors with this sensitivity and integrated with a thin dielectric, for example a 5 nm gate oxide, using low energy Sb implantation would have an end of range straggle of <2.5 nm. Significant reduction in false count probability is, furthermore, achieved by modifying the ion beam set-up to allow for cryogenic operation of the SIGMA detector. Using a detection window of 230 ns at 1 Hz, the probability of a false count was measured as ~10-1 and 10-4 for operation temperatures of ~300 K and ~77 K, respectively. Low temperature operation and reduced false, 'dark', counts are critical to achieving high confidence in single ion arrival. For the device performance in this work, the confidence is calculated as a probability of >98% for counting one and only one ion for a false count probability of 10-4 at

  2. Survival of single crystal sapphire implants supporting mandibular overdentures.

    PubMed

    Berge, T I; Grønningsaeter, A G

    2000-04-01

    One hundred and sixteen sapphire (Bioceram, Kyocera) implants were inserted in 30 patients between 1984 and 1991 to support mandibular overdentures. Survival analyses were made on the basis of clinical and radiographic follow-up evaluation for 15 patients with 56 implants. For the 15 patients who were lost to follow-up, 7 of whom were deceased, reviews of records and available radiographs determined outcome and observation time. The resulting Kaplan-Meier cumulative survival rate for the sapphire implants was 68.66%, mean survival time 11.44 years, 95% confidence interval 10.56-12.32 years. Uni- and multivariate analysis using the Cox Regression model, indicated an increased risk of implant failure in patients over 60 years at time of operation, and in patients who smoke. Limited experience in implant surgery were associated with increased implant failure rate. A qualitative analysis of survived implants showed a mean annual bone loss of 0.2 mm, moderate to excellent plaque control, and excellent to good subjective global assessment of the treatment. The long-term results of the sapphire implant system used for mandibular overdenture support are inferior to other implants systems.

  3. Single Tooth Replacement Using InCeram Resin Bonded Fixed Partial Denture: A Clinical Report

    PubMed Central

    Moslehifard, Elnaz; Farid, Farzaneh

    2014-01-01

    This clinical report describes a treatment option for replacement of a missing mandibular anterior tooth using InCeram resin bonded fixed partial denture (RBFPD). The conventional approach for replacing mandibular incisors dictates the placement of either a conventional porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM) bridge, Maryland bridge, or fiber-reinforced composite veneer bridge and several appearance-related disadvantages have been reported in the use of a prosthesis that incorporates a metal substructure. The InCeram bridge is a minimally invasive restoration and eliminates undesirable incisal graying frequently observed in metal RBFPDs. This method was successfully clinically applied to overcome shortcomings of other approaches that may require a minimal invasive technique to preserve lasting sound tooth structure. PMID:24910683

  4. Biomaterial selection for tooth regeneration.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zhenglin; Nie, Hemin; Wang, Shuang; Lee, Chang Hun; Li, Ang; Fu, Susan Y; Zhou, Hong; Chen, Lili; Mao, Jeremy J

    2011-10-01

    Biomaterials are native or synthetic polymers that act as carriers for drug delivery or scaffolds for tissue regeneration. When implanted in vivo, biomaterials should be nontoxic and exert intended functions. For tooth regeneration, biomaterials have primarily served as a scaffold for (1) transplanted stem cells and/or (2) recruitment of endogenous stem cells. This article critically synthesizes our knowledge of biomaterial use in tooth regeneration, including the selection of native and/or synthetic polymers, three-dimensional scaffold fabrication, stem cell transplantation, and stem cell homing. A tooth is a complex biological organ. Tooth loss represents the most common organ failure. Tooth regeneration encompasses not only regrowth of an entire tooth as an organ, but also biological restoration of individual components of the tooth including enamel, dentin, cementum, or dental pulp. Regeneration of tooth root represents perhaps more near-term opportunities than the regeneration of the whole tooth. In the adult, a tooth owes its biological vitality, arguably more, to the root than the crown. Biomaterials are indispensible for the regeneration of tooth root, tooth crown, dental pulp, or an entire tooth.

  5. Biomaterial Selection for Tooth Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhenglin; Nie, Hemin; Wang, Shuang; Lee, Chang Hun; Li, Ang; Fu, Susan Y.; Zhou, Hong

    2011-01-01

    Biomaterials are native or synthetic polymers that act as carriers for drug delivery or scaffolds for tissue regeneration. When implanted in vivo, biomaterials should be nontoxic and exert intended functions. For tooth regeneration, biomaterials have primarily served as a scaffold for (1) transplanted stem cells and/or (2) recruitment of endogenous stem cells. This article critically synthesizes our knowledge of biomaterial use in tooth regeneration, including the selection of native and/or synthetic polymers, three-dimensional scaffold fabrication, stem cell transplantation, and stem cell homing. A tooth is a complex biological organ. Tooth loss represents the most common organ failure. Tooth regeneration encompasses not only regrowth of an entire tooth as an organ, but also biological restoration of individual components of the tooth including enamel, dentin, cementum, or dental pulp. Regeneration of tooth root represents perhaps more near-term opportunities than the regeneration of the whole tooth. In the adult, a tooth owes its biological vitality, arguably more, to the root than the crown. Biomaterials are indispensible for the regeneration of tooth root, tooth crown, dental pulp, or an entire tooth. PMID:21699433

  6. Aesthetic Surgical Approach for Bone Dehiscence Treatment by Means of Single Implant and Interdental Tissue Regeneration: A Case Report with Five Years of Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Lombardo, Giorgio; Pighi, Jacopo; Corrocher, Giovanni; Mascellaro, Anna; Lehrberg, Jeffrey; Marincola, Mauro; Nocini, Pier Francesco

    2016-01-01

    The replacement of single anterior teeth by means of endosseous implants implies the achievement of success in restoring both aesthetic and function. However, the presence of wide endoperiodontal lesions can lead to horizontal hard and soft tissues defects after tooth extraction, making it impossible to correctly place an implant in the compromised alveolar socket. Vertical augmentation procedures have been proposed to solve these clinical situations, but the amount of new regenerated bone is still not predictable. Furthermore, bone augmentation can be complicated by the presence of adjacent teeth, especially if they bring with them periodontal defects. Therefore, it is used to restore periodontal health of adjacent teeth before making any augmentation procedures and to wait a certain healing period before placing an implant in vertically augmented sites, otherwise risking to obtain a nonsatisfactory aesthetic result. All of these procedures, however, lead to an expansion of treatment time which should affect patient compliance. For this reason, this case report suggests a surgical technique to perform vertical bone augmentation at a single gap left by a central upper incisor while placing an implant and simultaneously to regenerate the periodontal attachment of an adjacent lateral incisor, without compromising the aesthetic result. PMID:27119031

  7. Comparison of tooth displacement between buccal mini-implants and palatal plate anchorage for molar distalization: a finite element study.

    PubMed

    Yu, Il-Jun; Kook, Yoon-Ah; Sung, Sang-Jin; Lee, Kee-Joon; Chun, Youn-Sic; Mo, Sung-Seo

    2014-08-01

    The purposes of this study were to mechanically evaluate distalization modalities through the application of skeletal anchorage using finite element analysis. Base models were constructed from commercial teeth models. A finite element model was created and three treatment modalities were modified to make 10 models. Modalities 1 and 2 placed mini-implants in the buccal side, and modality 3 placed a plate on the palatal side. Distalization with the palatal plate in modality 3 showed bodily molar movement and insignificant displacement of the incisors. Placing mini-implants on the buccal side in modalities 1 and 2 caused the first molar to be distally tipped and extruded, while the incisors were labially flared and intruded. Distalization with the palatal plate rather than mini-implants on the buccal side provided bodily molar movement without tipping or extrusion. It is recommended to use our findings as a clinical guide for the application of skeletal anchorage devices for molar distalization.

  8. A Conservative Treatment Approach to Replacing a Missing Anterior Tooth

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Kunwarjeet; Gupta, Nidhi; Unnikrishnan, Nandini; Kapoor, Vikram; Arora, Dhruv; Khinnavar, Poonam K.

    2014-01-01

    An implant-supported crown or conventionally fixed partial denture is the most common treatment modality to replace a missing anterior tooth but a more conservative approach, with a fiber reinforced composite resin FPD, can be used to replace a missing anterior tooth in young patients or when the patient does not agree for an implant, or conventional FPD or RPD therapy. It is an esthetic, conservative single sitting chairside procedure which can be used as a definitive treatment alternative in certain clinical situations for esthetic and functional replacement of a missing anterior tooth. To achieve desirable results, putty matrix was used for proper positioning of the pontic during direct fabrication of FRCFPD. PMID:25254122

  9. Development of patient-based questionnaire about aesthetic and functional differences between overdentures implant-supported and overdentures tooth-supported. Study of 43 patients with a follow up of 1 year

    PubMed Central

    GARGARI, M.; PRETE, V.; PUJIA, M.; CERUSO, F. M.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Development of patient-based questionnaire about aesthetic and functional differences between overdentures implant-supported and overdentures tooth-supported. Study of 43 patients with a follow up of 1 year. Objective The aim of this study is to compare functional efficiency and patients satisfaction between tooth-supported and implant-supported overdenture through a questionnaire that accurately reflects the real concerns of patients with dental prosthesis. Methods Forty-three patients were selected from the out patient clinic, Department of Dentistry “Fra G.B. Orsenigo Ospedale San Pietro F.B.F.”, Rome, Italy. Their age were ranging from 61 to 83 years. Eighteen patients were rehabilitated with overdentures supported by natural teeth and twenty-five with overdentures implant-supported. Discussion and Result The questionnaire proposed one year after the insertion of the prosthetis has showed that there isn’t difference statistically significant in terms of function, phonetics and aesthetics between overdenture implant-supported and tooth-supported. Conclusions The results of the questionnaire showed that the patients generally had a high level of satisfaction concern to the masticatory function, esthetics and phonetics. In addition, on average, they haven’t difficulty in removal and insertion of the denture and in oral hygiene. They haven’t in both groups problems related to fractures. PMID:23741602

  10. Single Word and Sentence Intelligibility in Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khwaileh, Fadwa A.; Flipsen, Peter, Jr.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the intelligibility of speech produced by 17 children (aged 4-11 years) with cochlear implants. Stimulus items included sentences from the Beginners' Intelligibility Test (BIT) and words from the Children Speech Intelligibility Measure (CSIM). Naive listeners responded by writing sentences heard or with two types of responses…

  11. The single-piece milled titanium implant bridge.

    PubMed

    Parel, Stephen M

    2003-02-01

    This new implant technology is part of the Procera product line (Nobel Biocare), and is available through a growing network of dental laboratories. It offers the possibility of a consistently excellent passive fit compared with conventional casting techniques, and essentially eliminates the labor intensive process of sectioning and soldering sometimes associated with gold alloy castings. Eliminating the distortion commonly associated with multiple firings of long-span ceramic restorations is also a significant benefit. PMID:12680267

  12. Iridium 192 nomogram system for single plane implants

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, D.J. Jr.; Memula, N.; Doss, L.L.

    1986-02-01

    Nomograms for square planar arrays spanning the range from 3 X 3 cm to 10 X 10 cm were developed. The nomograms are intended to be used for pretreatment planning of implant geometry, so that the therapist may enter the operating room with a plan for the optimal implant in mind. We show that clinically useful implants are those in which the reference isodoses are fully coupled. Decoupling occurs when ribbon spacing exceeds approximately 1.2 cm and leads to undesirable ''cold spots'' within the treatment volume. Ribbon spacing of 1.0 cm is recommended. This represents a trade-off between adequate ribbon coupling and minimum tissue damage from trocar placement. For clinically useful arrays, the area enclosed by the reference isodose contour (85% of the maximum dose rate) is approximately 50% of the array area. Reference isodose contour and its enclosed area are independent of seed strength for a given array, as long as all seeds within the array are of equal strength.

  13. Mandibular single crystal sapphire implants: changes in crestal bone levels over three years.

    PubMed

    Fartash, B; Eliasson, S; Arvidson, K

    1995-09-01

    A total of 190 single crystal sapphire implants, 85 short (4S9S) and 105 long (4S9L), were monitored with panoramic and intraoral radiographs for 3 years. The implants were used as abutments for overdentures in edentulous mandibles in 51 patients. Within the first year, 2 patients lost one implant each due to pain and lack of osseointegration. Neither was replaced and the superstructures remained stable. At baseline registration, i.e., immediately after the prosthetic installation, the bone height relative to the length of the implant was calculated. The mean bone implant score (BIS) was 63.55 +/- 1.34% (mean +/- SE). BIS decreased during the first year 62.18 +/- 1.51%. At the 2- and 3-year recordings, the mean BIS were 61.81 +/- 1.58% and 61.73 +/- 1.63%, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in BIS changes over the 3-year period or between men and women. The decrease in mean BIS was greater for implants in the premolar region than in the incisor region and for short implants than for long implants.

  14. The local structure and ferromagnetism in Fe-implanted SrTiO₃ single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Lobacheva, O. Chavarha, M.; Yiu, Y. M.; Sham, T. K.; Goncharova, L. V.

    2014-07-07

    We report a connection between the local structure of low-level Fe impurities and vacancies as the cause of ferromagnetic behavior observed in strontium titanate single crystals (STO), which were implanted with Fe and Si ions at different doses then annealed in oxygen. The effects of Fe doping and post-implantation annealing of STO were studied by X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopy and Superconducting Quantum Interference Device magnetometry. XANES spectra for Fe and Ti K- and L-edge reveal the changes in the local environment of Fe and Ti following the implantation and annealing steps. The annealing in oxygen atmosphere partially healed implantation damages and changed the oxidation state of the implanted iron from metallic Fe⁰ to Fe²⁺/Fe³⁺ oxide. The STO single crystals were weak ferromagnets prior to implantation. The maximum saturation moment was obtained after our highest implantation dose of 2×10¹⁶ Fe atom/cm², which could be correlated with the metallic Fe⁰ phases in addition to the presence of O/Ti vacancies. After recrystallization annealing, the ferromagnetic response disappears. Iron oxide phases with Fe²⁺ and Fe³⁺ corresponding to this regime were identified and confirmed by calculations using Real Space Multiple Scattering program (FEFF9).

  15. The local structure and ferromagnetism in Fe-implanted SrTiO3 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobacheva, O.; Chavarha, M.; Yiu, Y. M.; Sham, T. K.; Goncharova, L. V.

    2014-07-01

    We report a connection between the local structure of low-level Fe impurities and vacancies as the cause of ferromagnetic behavior observed in strontium titanate single crystals (STO), which were implanted with Fe and Si ions at different doses then annealed in oxygen. The effects of Fe doping and post-implantation annealing of STO were studied by X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopy and Superconducting Quantum Interference Device magnetometry. XANES spectra for Fe and Ti K- and L-edge reveal the changes in the local environment of Fe and Ti following the implantation and annealing steps. The annealing in oxygen atmosphere partially healed implantation damages and changed the oxidation state of the implanted iron from metallic Fe0 to Fe2+/Fe3+ oxide. The STO single crystals were weak ferromagnets prior to implantation. The maximum saturation moment was obtained after our highest implantation dose of 2 × 1016 Fe atom/cm2, which could be correlated with the metallic Fe0 phases in addition to the presence of O/Ti vacancies. After recrystallization annealing, the ferromagnetic response disappears. Iron oxide phases with Fe2+ and Fe3+ corresponding to this regime were identified and confirmed by calculations using Real Space Multiple Scattering program (FEFF9).

  16. An in situ annealing study of lead implanted single crystal calcium titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rankin, J.; Hobbs, L. W.; Boatner, L. A.; White, C. W.

    1987-07-01

    In situ annealing studies have been carried out in ion-implanted single crystals of CaTiO3. These crystals were implanted along both the a and b axes of this orthorhombic perovskite structure (Pcmn). A VCR connected to a television system on a transmission electron microscope was used to observe the regrowth process and monitor the growth rate. Samples were annealed in a single tilt hot stage at approx. 475 C. The near-surface region of this material, approximately 190 nm, is turned amorphous by the implantation of 540 KeV Pb ions at a fluence of 1(10 to the 15th power/sq cm). Annealing at 475 C results in the epitaxial regrowth of the damaged region. The regrowth process begins at the original amorphous crystalline interface and proceeds outward to the surface. This phenomenon has been studied for implantations along both the <010> and the <100> crystallographic directions. For constant accelerating voltage and fluence of the implanted lead ions, transmission electron microscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy indicate that the regrowth rate is linear with time but strongly dependent on the oxygen partial pressure in the annealing atmosphere, and the implantation and subsequent regrowth direction. strongly dependent on the oxygen partial pressure in the annealing atmosphere, and the implantation and subsequent regrowth direction.

  17. [Biological implant in single-stage reconstruction of mammary gland for cancer].

    PubMed

    Zikiriakhodzhaev, A D; Ermoshchenkova, M V

    2015-01-01

    Brief literature review about features of biological implants application for mammary gland reconstruction is presented in the article. Possible complications after such materials use, first experience of acellular dermal matrix administration for single-stage mammary gland reconstruction in 6 patients with breast cancer are also described. We offered surgical techniques, complications and methods of its treatment. We presented advantages of biological implant use which are consisted in decrease of surgical damage and duration of surgery, opportunity for enlargement of pocket for implant, decrease of pain syndrome. PMID:25909549

  18. Angled Screw Channel: An Alternative to Cemented Single-Implant Restorations--Three Clinical Examples.

    PubMed

    Gjelvold, Björn; Sohrabi, Majid Melvin; Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos

    2016-01-01

    This article presents three cases of single labially tilted implants restored with screw-retained single crowns. Individualized abutments with an angled screw channel were used to avoid an unesthetic vestibular access channel. This individualized abutment allows the dentist and dental technician to use the screw-retained restorations where a cemented reconstruction would otherwise have been needed. PMID:26757334

  19. Tooth Decay

    MedlinePlus

    ... in your mouth made up mostly of germs. Tooth decay starts in the outer layer, called the enamel. Without a filling, the decay can get deep into the tooth and its nerves and cause a toothache or ...

  20. Tooth abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... swelling within the tooth. This causes a painful toothache . The toothache may stop if the pulp of the tooth ... tissue. Symptoms The main symptom is a severe toothache. The pain is continuous. It can be described ...

  1. Tooth Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... include eating, speaking and even smiling. But tooth disorders are nothing to smile about. They include problems ... your teeth. Fortunately, you can prevent many tooth disorders by taking care of your teeth and keeping ...

  2. Tooth extraction

    MedlinePlus

    Pulling a tooth; Tooth removal ... The procedure will take place in the dental office. It may involve removing one or more teeth. You may be asked to take antibiotics before the procedure. You will get a ...

  3. Oxygen recoil implant from SiO{sub 2} layers into single-crystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.; Chen, Y.; Li, D.; Oak, S.; Srivastav, G.; Banerjee, S.; Tasch, A.; Merrill, P.; Bleiler, R.

    2001-06-01

    It is important to understand the distribution of recoil-implanted atoms and the impact on device performance when ion implantation is performed at a high dose through surface materials into single crystalline silicon. For example, in ultralarge scale integration impurity ions are often implanted through a thin layer of screen oxide and some of the oxygen atoms are inevitably recoil implanted into single-crystalline silicon. Theoretical and experimental studies have been performed to investigate this phenomenon. We have modified the Monte Carlo ion implant simulator, UT-Marlowe (B. Obradovic, G. Wang, Y. Chen, D. Li, C. Snell, and A. F. Tasch, UT-MARLOWE Manual, 1999), which is based on the binary collision approximation, to follow the full cascade and to dynamically modify the stoichiometry of the Si layer as oxygen atoms are knocked into it. CPU reduction techniques are used to relieve the demand on computational power when such a full cascade simulation is involved. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) profiles of oxygen have been carefully obtained for high dose As and BF{sub 2} implants at different energies through oxide layers of various thicknesses, and the simulated oxygen profiles are found to agree very well with the SIMS data. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  4. An in situ annealing study of lead implanted single crystal calcium titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rankin, J.; Hobbs, L. W.; Boatner, L. A.; White, C. W.

    1988-05-01

    In situ annealing studies have been carried out in ion-implanted single crystals of CaTiO 3. These crystals were implanted along both the a and b axes of this orthorhombic perovskite structure (Pcmn). Through the use of a Panasonic video cassette recorder connected to a Gatan television system on a JEOL 200CX transmission electron microscope, the regrowth process was observed and the growth rate monitored. Samples were annealed in a Gatan single tilt hot stage at ˜ 475° C. The near-surface region of this material, approximately 190 nm, is turned amorphous by the implantation of 540 keV Pb ions at a fluence of 1 × 10 15/cm 2. Annealing at 475° C results in the epitaxial regrowth of the damaged region. The regrowth process begins at the original amorphous/crystalline interface and proceeds outward to the surface. This phenomenon has been studied for implantations along both the <010> and the <100> crystallographic directions. For constant accelerating voltage and fluence of the implanted lead ions, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) [C.W. White et al., to be published in Proc. of Radiation Effects in Insulators, Lyon, France, 1987.] indicate that the regrowth rate is linear with time but strongly dependent on the oxygen partial pressure in the annealing atmosphere, and the implantation and subsequent regrowth direction.

  5. Creating a Single-Visit, Fibre-Reinforced, Composite Resin Bridge by Using a Natural Tooth Pontic: A Viable Alternative to a PFM Bridge

    PubMed Central

    Khetarpal, Ambica; Talwar, Sangeeta; Verma, Mahesh

    2013-01-01

    Background: The rehabilitation of an anterior tooth space presents a confronting situation. Several modalities are presently available to address the challenge of an immediate replacement of a missing anterior tooth. These include a removable temporary acrylic prosthesis or resin-bonded bridges. Fibre-Reinforced Composite (FRC) bridges are preferable if they are fixed and if a cost-effective tooth replacement is desired. Also, they provide an aesthetic and a conservative treatment choice as the abutment teeth require a minimal or no preparation. Methods: This article is describing two cases with an immediate replacement of the maxillary incisor teeth by a single visit technique, with the use of FRC Resin (Ribbond) bridges and natural tooth crowns as pontics. Results and Conclusions: The procedure was completed at the chair side, thereby avoiding the laboratory costs. A two year follow up of the cases has shown a successful outcome. Creating an adhesive FRC bridge by using a natural tooth pontic is a successful treatment option for the direct aesthetic replacement of missing anterior teeth. PMID:23730674

  6. Mechanism of apatite formation on hydrogen plasma-implanted single-crystal silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xuanyong; Fu, Ricky K. Y.; Chu, Paul K.; Ding, Chuanxian

    2004-10-01

    Hydrogen is implanted into single-crystal silicon wafers using plasma ion immersion implantation to improve the surface bioactivity and the mechanism of apatite formation is investigated. Our micro-Raman and transmission electron microscopy results reveal the presence of a disordered silicon surface containing Si-H bonds after hydrogen implantation. When the sample is immersed in a simulated body fluid, the Si-H bonds on the silicon wafer initially react with water to produce a negatively charged surface containing the functional group (Si-O-) that subsequently induces the formation of apatite. A good understanding of the formation mechanism of apatite on hydrogen implanted silicon is not only important from the viewpoint of biophysics but also vital to the actual use of silicon-based microchips and MEMS inside a human body.

  7. Mechanism for diamond nucleation and growth on single crystal copper surfaces implanted with carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ong, T. P.; Xiong, Fulin; Chang, R. P. H.; White, C. W.

    1992-01-01

    The nucleation and growth of diamond crystals on single-crystal copper surfaces implanted with carbon ions is studied. Microwave plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition is used for diamond growth. The single-crystal copper substrates were implanted either at room or elevated temperature with carbon ions prior to diamond nucleation. This procedure leads to the formation of a graphite film on the copper surface which greatly enhances diamond crystallite nucleation. A simple lattice model is constructed for diamond growth on graphite as 111 line (diamond) parallel to 0001 line (graphite) and 110 line (diamond) parallel to 1 1 -2 0 (graphite).

  8. Single-walled carbon nanotube growth from ion implanted Fe catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yongho; Sippel-Oakley, Jennifer; Ural, Ant

    2006-10-09

    The authors present experimental evidence that single-walled carbon nanotubes can be grown by chemical vapor deposition from ion implanted iron catalyst. They systematically characterize the effect of ion implantation dose and energy on the catalyst nanoparticles and nanotubes formed at 900 deg. C. They also fabricate a micromachined silicon grid for direct transmission electron microscopy characterization of the as-grown nanotubes. This work opens up the possibility of controlling the origin of single-walled nanotubes at the nanometer scale and of integrating them into nonplanar three-dimensional device structures with precise dose control.

  9. Energy harvesting from mastication forces via a smart tooth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bani-Hani, Muath; Karami, M. Amin

    2016-04-01

    The batteries of the current pacing devices are relatively large and occupy over 60 percent of the size of pulse generators. Therefore, they cannot be placed in the subtle areas of human body. In this paper, the mastication force and the resulting tooth pressure are converted to electricity. The pressure energy can be converted to electricity by using the piezoelectric effect. The tooth crown is used as a power autonomous pulse generator. We refer to this envisioned pulse generator as the smart tooth. The smart tooth is in the form of a dental implant. A piezoelectric vibration energy harvester is designed and modeled for this purpose. The Piezoelectric based energy harvesters investigated and analyzed in this paper initially includes a single degree of freedom piezoelectric based stack energy harvester which utilizes a harvesting circuit employing the case of a purely resistive circuit. The next step is utilizing and investigating a bimorph piezoelectric beam which is integrated/embedded in the smart tooth implant. Mastication process causes the bimorph beam to buckle or return to unbuckled condition. The transitions results in vibration of the piezoelectric beam and thus generate energy. The power estimated by the two mechanisms is in the order of hundreds of microwatts. Both scenarios of the energy harvesters are analytically modeled. The exact analytical solution of the piezoelectric beam energy harvester with Euler-Bernoulli beam assumptions is presented. The electro-mechanical coupling and the geometric nonlinearities have been included in the model for the piezoelectric beam.

  10. Impact of crestal and subcrestal implant placement in peri-implant bone: A prospective comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Pellicer-Chover, Hilario; Peñarrocha-Diago, María; Peñarrocha-Oltra, David; Gomar-Vercher, Sonia; Agustín-Panadero, Rubén

    2016-01-01

    Background To assess the influence of the crestal or subcrestal placement of implants upon peri-implant bone loss over 12 months of follow-up. Material and Methods Twenty-six patients with a single hopeless tooth were recruited in the Oral Surgery Unit (Valencia University, Valencia, Spain). The patients were randomized into two treatment groups: group A (implants placed at crestal level) or group B (implants placed at subcrestal level). Control visits were conducted by a trained clinician at the time of implant placement and 12 months after loading. A previously established standard protocol was used to compile general data on all patients (sex and age, implant length and diameter, and brushing frequency). Implant success rate, peri-implant bone loss and the treatment of the exposed implant surface were studied. The level of statistical significance was defined as 5% (α=0.05). Results Twenty-three patients (8 males and 15 females, mean age 49.8±11.6 years, range 28-75 years) were included in the final data analyses, while three were excluded. All the included subjects were nonsmokers with a brushing frequency of up to twice a day in 85.7% of the cases. The 23 implants comprised 10 crestal implants and 13 subcrestal implants. After implant placement, the mean bone position with respect to the implant platform in group A was 0.0 mm versus 2.16±0.88 mm in group B. After 12 months of follow-up, the mean bone positions were -0.06±1.11 mm and 0.95±1.50 mm, respectively - this representing a bone loss of 0.06±1.11 mm in the case of the crestal implants and of 1.22±1.06 mm in the case of the subcrestal implants (p=0.014). Four crestal implants and 5 subcrestal implants presented peri-implant bone levels below the platform, leaving a mean exposed treated surface of 1.13 mm and 0.57 mm, respectively. The implant osseointegration success rate at 12 months was 100% in both groups. Conclusions Within the limitations of this study, bone loss was found to be greater in

  11. Peri-implant biomechanical responses to standard, short-wide, and mini implants supporting single crowns under axial and off-axial loading (an in vitro study).

    PubMed

    Kheiralla, Lamia Sayed; Younis, Jihan Farouk

    2014-02-01

    This study compared the biomechanical responses of 3 single crowns supported by 3 different implants under axial and off-axial loading. A standard implant (3.75 mm diameter, 13 mm length), a mini implant (3 mm diameter, 13 mm length), and a short-wide implant (5.7 mm diameter, 8 mm length) were embedded in epoxy resin by the aid of a surveyor to ensure their parallelism. Each implant supported a full metal crown made of Ni-Cr alloy with standardized dimensions. Strain gauges and finite element analysis (FEA) were used to measure the strain induced under axial and off-axial functional loads of 300 N. Results showed that mini implants recorded the highest microstrains, under both axial and off-axial loading. All implants showed a considerable increase in strain values under off-axial loading. Standard and short-wide implants proved to be preferable in supporting crowns, as the standard implant showed the lowest strains under axial and off-axial loading using FEA simulation, while the short-wide implant showed the lowest strains under nonaxial loading using strain gauge analysis.

  12. Formation of oriented nitrides by N+ ion implantation in iron single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, A. R. G.; da Silva, R. C.; Ferreira, L. P.; Carvalho, M. D.; Silva, C.; Franco, N.; Godinho, M.; Cruz, M. M.

    2014-01-01

    Iron single crystals were implanted with nitrogen at room temperature, with a fluence of 5×1017 cm-2 and 50 keV energy, to produce iron nitride phases and characterize the influence of the crystal orientation. The stability and evolution of the nitride phases and diffusion of implanted nitrogen were studied as a function of successive annealing treatments at 250 °C in vacuum. The composition, structure and magnetic properties were characterized using RBS/channeling, X-Ray Diffraction, Magnetic Force Microscopy, Magneto-optical Kerr Effect and Conversion Electron Mössbauer Spectroscopy. In the as-implanted state the formation of Fe2N phase was clearly identified in all single crystals. This phase is not stable at 250 °C and annealing at this temperature promotes the formation of ɛ-Fe3N, or γ'-Fe4N, depending on the orientation of the substrate. class="graphical"

  13. In Vitro Assessment of Single-Retainer Tooth-Colored Adhesively Fixed Partial Dentures for Posterior Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Bortolotto, Tissiana; Monaco, Carlo; Onisor, Ioana; Krejci, Ivo

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to investigate, by means of marginal adaptation and fracture strength, three different types of single retainer posterior fixed partial dentures (FPDs) for the replacement of a missing premolar. Two-unit cantilever FPDs were fabricated from composite resin, feldspathic porcelain, and fiber-reinforced composite resin. After luting procedures and margin polishing, all specimens were subjected to a Scanning Electron Microscopic marginal evaluation both prior to and after thermomechanical loading with a custom made chewing simulator comprising both thermal and mechanical loads. The results indicated that the highest score of marginal adaptation, that is, the closest score to 100% of continuous margins, at the tooth-composite resin interface was attained by the feldspathic porcelain group (88.1% median), followed by the fiber-reinforced composite resin group (78.9% median). The worse results were observed in the composite resin group (58.05% median). Fracture strength was higher in feldspathic porcelain (196N median) when compared to resin composite (114.9 N median). All the fixed prostheses made of fiber-reinforced composite resin detached from the abutment teeth before fracturing, suggesting that the adhesive surface's retainer should be increased. PMID:20652071

  14. Cell proliferation in teeth reconstructed from dispersed cells of embryonic tooth germs in a three-dimensional scaffold.

    PubMed

    Iwatsuki, Shinji; Honda, Masaki J; Harada, Hidemitsu; Ueda, Minoru

    2006-08-01

    Tissue engineering can now reproduce tooth from postnatal tooth cells. However, crown formation is not accurately reconstituted, even when the complex structure of the enamel dentin is reproduced. Here, we showed that a tissue-engineered (TE) tooth, exhibiting morphogenesis according to regular crown-cusp pattern formation, was produced by embryonic tooth germ cells in a three-dimensional scaffold. Heterogeneous cells dissociated from embryonic day 14 (E14) mice tooth germs were seeded on a scaffold and implanted under a kidney capsule in adult mice. The developmental process of the implants was examined for up to 14 d. At 5 d, the cells had formed initial tooth germ, followed by enamel-covered dentin tissue formed symmetrically. To study the developmental process, we examined the growth pattern using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU)-labeling analysis. The initial cell-proliferation patterns of the TE teeth were similar to that at the cap and early bell stages in natural teeth. This was particularly true in the cervical loop, which showed a similar distribution pattern of BrdU-positive cells in TE- and natural teeth. These results suggested that even when embryonic tooth germs are dissociated, the single cells can reconstitute tooth, and that enamel organ morphogenesis proceeds as in natural teeth.

  15. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy method and studies of implant damage in single crystal diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Hickey, D.P.; Kuryliw, E.; Siebein, K.; Jones, K.S.; Chodelka, R.; Elliman, R.

    2006-07-15

    Few transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies of single crystal diamond have been reported, most likely due to the time and difficulty involved in sample preparation. A method is described for creating a TEM cross section of single crystal diamond using a focused ion beam and in situ lift-out. The method results in samples approximately 10 {mu}m long by 3 {mu}m deep with an average thickness of 100-300 nm. The total time to prepare a cross-sectional TEM sample of diamond is less than 5 h. The method also allows for additional thinning to facilitate high resolution TEM imaging, and can be applied to oddly shaped diamond samples. This sample preparation technique has been applied to the study of ion implantation damage in single crystal diamond and its evolution upon annealing. High-pressure-high-temperature diamonds were implanted with Si{sup +} at an energy of 1 MeV and a temperature of 30 deg. C. One sample, with a (110) surface, was implanted with a dose of 1x10{sup 14} Si cm{sup -2} and annealed at 950 deg. C for 10 and 40 min. No significant defect formation or evolution was discernible by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. Another sample, with a (100) orientation, was implanted with 1 MeV at 1x10{sup 15} Si cm{sup -2} and annealed at 1050 deg. C for 10 min. Prior to annealing, a heavily damaged but still crystalline region was observed. Upon annealing, the sample showed no signs of conversion either to an amorphous form of carbon or to graphite. This is unexpected as the energy and dose are above the previously reported graphitization threshold for diamond. Higher annealing temperatures and possibly a high vacuum will be required for future study of defect formation, evolution, and phase transformations in ion-implanted single crystal diamond.

  16. High-Sensitivity Temperature Sensing Using an Implanted Single Nitrogen-Vacancy Center Array in Diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guanzhong; Wang, Junfeng; Advanced Thinfilm Laboratory, University of Science; Technology of China Team

    2015-03-01

    We present a high-sensitivity temperature detection using an implanted single Nitrogen-Vacancy center array in diamond. The high-order Thermal Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (TCPMG) method was performed on the implanted single nitrogen vacancy (NV) center in diamond in a static magnetic field. We demonstrated that under small detunings for the two driving microwave frequencies, the oscillation frequency of the induced fluorescence of the NV center equals approximately to the average of the detunings of the two driving fields. On basis of the conclusion, the zero-field splitting D for the NV center and the corresponding temperature could be determined. The experiment showed that the coherence time for the high-order TCPMG was effectively extended, particularly up to 108 μs for TCPMG-8, about 14 times of the value 7.7 μs for thermal Ramsey method. This coherence time corresponded to a thermal sensitivity of 10.1 mK/Hz1/2. We also detected the temperature distribution on the surface of a diamond chip by using the implanted NV center array with the TCPMG-3. Our approach implies the feasibility for using implanted NV centers in high-quality diamonds to detect temperatures with high-sensitivity and nanoscale resolution. This work was supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (2013CB921800, 2011CB921400) and the Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11374280, 50772110).

  17. High-sensitivity temperature sensing using an implanted single nitrogen-vacancy center array in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junfeng; Feng, Fupan; Zhang, Jian; Chen, Jihong; Zheng, Zhongcheng; Guo, Liping; Zhang, Wenlong; Song, Xuerui; Guo, Guoping; Fan, Lele; Zou, Chongwen; Lou, Liren; Zhu, Wei; Wang, Guanzhong

    2015-04-01

    We presented a high-sensitivity temperature detection using an implanted single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center array in diamond. The high-order thermal Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (TCPMG) method was performed on the implanted single NV center in diamond in a static magnetic field. We demonstrated that under small detunings for the two driving microwave frequencies, the oscillation frequency of the induced fluorescence of the NV center equals approximately the average of the detunings of the two driving fields. On the basis of the conclusion, the zero-field splitting D for the NV center and the corresponding temperature could be determined. The experiment showed that the coherence time for the high-order TCPMG was effectively extended, particularly up to 108 μ s for TCPMG-8, about 14 times the value 7.7 μ s for thermal Ramsey method. This coherence time corresponded to a thermal sensitivity of 10.1 mK/Hz1 /2. We also detected the temperature distribution on the surface of a diamond chip in three different circumstances by using the implanted NV center array with the TCPMG-3 method. The experiment implies the feasibility of using implanted NV centers in high-quality diamonds to detect temperatures in biology, chemistry, materials science, and microelectronic systems with high sensitivity and nanoscale resolution.

  18. Tooth anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    The part of the tooth you can see is called the crown. The outer surface of the crown is made of enamel. Just beneath the enamel is dentin, a substance harder than bone. The gum surrounds the base (root) of the tooth. ...

  19. Immediate Nonfunctional Loading of Two Single-Maxillary Postextractive Implants: 6-Year Postloading Results of Two Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Ariano, Vincenzo; Mancini, Manuele; Cardi, Andrea; Condò, Roberta; Cerroni, Loredana; Pasquantonio, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of the study was to evaluate and compare crestal bone loss of single-maxillary immediate postextractive implants and immediate nonfunctional loading (INFL) during 72 months of follow-up. Material and Methods. Two single titanium implants (Certain Prevail, Biomet 3I, USA) were placed in two patients using INFL technique. Implant stability and crestal bone level were measured on periapical radiographs at 1, 3, and 6 months after surgery. Results. All osseointegrated implants were clinically successful after 6 years of functional loading. Conclusion. Within the limit of the present case report, the paper supports the concept that INFL of single dental implant can be a successful treatment procedure. PMID:27293915

  20. Screw-retained crown restorations of single implants: A step-by-step clinical guide

    PubMed Central

    Assaf, Mohammad; Gharbyeh, Alaa’ Z. Abu

    2014-01-01

    This paper shows the clinical steps for preparing a screw-retained crown for the restoration of a single implant. Impression-taking using open-tray technique and delivery of the crown is presented in a step-by-step manner elucidated by detailed photographs. Furthermore, the advantages and disadvantages of screw-retained crowns are discussed in comparison with the cemented restorations. PMID:25512742

  1. An Automatic Segmentation and Classification Framework Based on PCNN Model for Single Tooth in MicroCT Images.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liansheng; Li, Shusheng; Chen, Rongzhen; Liu, Sze-Yu; Chen, Jyh-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Accurate segmentation and classification of different anatomical structures of teeth from medical images plays an essential role in many clinical applications. Usually, the anatomical structures of teeth are manually labelled by experienced clinical doctors, which is time consuming. However, automatic segmentation and classification is a challenging task because the anatomical structures and surroundings of the tooth in medical images are rather complex. Therefore, in this paper, we propose an effective framework which is designed to segment the tooth with a Selective Binary and Gaussian Filtering Regularized Level Set (GFRLS) method improved by fully utilizing three dimensional (3D) information, and classify the tooth by employing unsupervised learning Pulse Coupled Neural Networks (PCNN) model. In order to evaluate the proposed method, the experiments are conducted on the different datasets of mandibular molars and the experimental results show that our method can achieve better accuracy and robustness compared to other four state of the art clustering methods. PMID:27322421

  2. An Automatic Segmentation and Classification Framework Based on PCNN Model for Single Tooth in MicroCT Images

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liansheng; Li, Shusheng; Chen, Rongzhen; Liu, Sze-Yu; Chen, Jyh-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Accurate segmentation and classification of different anatomical structures of teeth from medical images plays an essential role in many clinical applications. Usually, the anatomical structures of teeth are manually labelled by experienced clinical doctors, which is time consuming. However, automatic segmentation and classification is a challenging task because the anatomical structures and surroundings of the tooth in medical images are rather complex. Therefore, in this paper, we propose an effective framework which is designed to segment the tooth with a Selective Binary and Gaussian Filtering Regularized Level Set (GFRLS) method improved by fully utilizing three dimensional (3D) information, and classify the tooth by employing unsupervised learning Pulse Coupled Neural Networks (PCNN) model. In order to evaluate the proposed method, the experiments are conducted on the different datasets of mandibular molars and the experimental results show that our method can achieve better accuracy and robustness compared to other four state of the art clustering methods. PMID:27322421

  3. Tooth-Bleaching: A Review of the Efficacy and Adverse Effects of Various Tooth Whitening Products.

    PubMed

    Majeed, Abdul; Farooq, Imran; Grobler, Sias R; Rossouw, R J

    2015-12-01

    Tooth bleaching (whitening) is one of the most common and inexpensive method for treating discolouration of teeth. Dental aesthetics, especially tooth colour, is of great importance to majority of the people; and discolouration of even a single tooth can negatively influence the quality of life. Therefore, a review of the literature was carried out (limited to aesthetic tooth-bleaching) to provide a broad overview of the efficacy and adverse effects of various tooth whitening products on soft and hard oral tissues.

  4. Silver migration and trapping in ion implanted ZnO single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azarov, Alexander; Vines, Lasse; Rauwel, Protima; Monakhov, Edouard; Svensson, Bengt G.

    2016-05-01

    Potentially, group-Ib elements (Cu, Ag, and Au) incorporated on Zn sites can be used for p-type doping of ZnO, and in the present paper, we use ion implantation to introduce Ag atoms in wurtzite ZnO single crystals. Monitoring the Li behavior, being a residual impurity in the crystals, as a tracer, we demonstrate that Zn interstitials assist the Ag diffusion and lead to Ag pile-up behind the implanted region after annealing above 800 °C. At even higher temperatures, a pronounced Ag loss from the sample surface occurs and concurrently the Ag atoms exhibit a trap-limited diffusion into the crystal bulk with an activation energy of ˜2.6 eV. The dominant traps are most likely Zn vacancies and substitutional Li atoms, yielding substitutional Ag atoms. In addition, formation of an anomalous multipeak Ag distribution in the implanted near-surface region after annealing can be attributed to local implantation-induced stoichiometry disturbances leading to trapping of the Ag atoms by O and Zn vacancies in the vicinity of the surface and in the end-of-range region, respectively.

  5. Tooth Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... to determine if you need to see your dentist right away. SYMPTOMS DIAGNOSIS SELF-CARE Begin Here ... You have TOOTH LOSS. DENTAL EMERGENCY See your dentist or go to the emergency room right away. ...

  6. Magnetic and electrical characterization of TiO2 single crystals co-implanted with iron and cobalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, C.; Costa, A. R. G.; da Silva, R. C.; Alves, L. C.; Ferreira, L. P.; Carvalho, M. D.; Franco, N.; Godinho, M.; Cruz, M. M.

    2014-09-01

    Single-crystals of TiO2 rutile were co-implanted with iron and cobalt to investigate the combined role of these ions in the magnetic properties of the system. The implantations were carried out using an energy of 150 keV and different fluences to investigate their influence in the magnetic and electrical properties of the implanted samples. For the higher fluences the as implanted single crystals exhibit superparamagnetic behaviour associated with the formation of nanosized magnetic aggregates. Annealing treatments were performed at 673 K and 1073 K, inducing recovery of the lattice structure and the evolution of the formed phases. Iron and cobalt play different roles in the implanted region, the presence of iron inhibiting the formation of cobalt aggregates during annealing at 1073 K.

  7. In vitro analysis of residual tooth structure of maxillary anterior teeth after different prosthetic finish line preparations for full-coverage single crowns.

    PubMed

    Borelli, Bruna; Sorrentino, Roberto; Goracci, Cecilia; Zarone, Fernando; Ferrari, Marco

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate residual dentin thickness (RDT) after different tooth preparations, 90 sound maxillary anterior teeth were selected and divided into 3 groups according to tooth type (n = 30), namely, maxillary central incisors, maxillary lateral incisors, and maxillary canines. In each group, specimens were randomly divided and prepared for single-crown coverage with shoulder (SHO, n = 10, control), slight chamfer (CHA, n = 10), and knife-edge (KNE, n = 10) finish lines. After tooth preparation, specimens were sectioned and divided into 4 subgroups (buccal, distal, palatal, and mesial) according to measurement area. RDT values were compared by using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test (P = 0.05). Significant differences were found between SHO and the other two groups (P < 0.05) but not between CHA and KNE (P > 0.05). SHO was significantly more aggressive than CHA and KNE, which were comparable. Interproximal areas became critical due to thin RDT, which could potentially compromise the structural and biological integrity of teeth. The choice of finish line should be guided by careful clinical evaluation.

  8. Posterior tooth replacement with dental implants in sites augmented with rhBMP-2 at time of extraction--a case series.

    PubMed

    Levin, Barry P; Tawil, Peter

    2012-02-01

    This case series demonstrates seven molar-site implants placed in six consecutively treated patients. All sites were augmented with rhBMP-2 (1.50 mg/cc)/ACS (recombinant human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2/Absorbable Collagen Sponge) at extraction to regenerate bone-facilitating implant placement. In four patients, osteotomies were initiated with trephines to evaluate qualitatively for native bone and for the absence of residual ACS. All sites facilitated implant placement after augmentation. All seven implants achieved primary stabilization and were functionally loaded. No implants were lost or developed complications. It can be concluded that augmenting molar extraction sockets with rhBMP-2/ACS can allow standard implant placement in the posterior dentition that is capable of withstanding a functional load.

  9. MIND+ system; More universal dose patterns by single-step ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Yasuharu; Ninomiya, Shiro; Ochi, Akihiro; Ueno, Yusuke; Yamada, Tatsuya; Kimura, Yasuhiko; Kudo, Tetsuya; Koike, Masazumi; Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Ookita, Yoshiaki; Tsukihara, Mitsukuni; Sato, Fumiaki; Fuse, Genshu; Ueno, Kazuyoshi; Sugitani, Michiro

    2012-11-01

    Electrical characteristics of semi-conductor devices within a wafer are expected to be uniform based on control of the dose pattern during the ion implant process. SEN developed the MIND system (Mapping of Intentional Non-uniform Dosage), to provide such dose pattern control. This capability has been enhanced with MIND+. The new system provides improved two-dimensional dose pattern control with more degrees of freedom and greater accuracy than the original MIND system. In addition, MIND+ can generate practical dose patterns (see below) while using a single step implant. As a result, MIND+ provides a very powerful tool for yield enhancement without sacrificing throughput. This paper will provide more detail on the capabilities and practical applications of the MIND+ system.

  10. Home monitoring report from a single lead Lumax DX implantable cardioverter defibrillator: New observations in a new system.

    PubMed

    Konstantino, Yuval; Kleiman, Alex; Amit, Guy

    2016-06-01

    A 56-year-old man underwent a single lead Lumax 640 DX implantable cardioverter defibrillator implantation for primary prevention of sudden cardiac death. A DX system consists of a single lead, which provides atrial as well as ventricular electrograms, and enhances atrial arrhythmia detection. Three months after the implantation, high-frequency episodes were detected on the far field and the atrial channels, but not on the bipolar right ventricular channel; these were classified as atrial tachycardia. In the present report, we discussed the unusual pattern of the artifacts that was related to an electromagnetic interference detected by the novel DX system. PMID:27354868

  11. Open questions in electronic sputtering of solids by slow highly charged ions with respect to applications in single ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Schenkel, T.; Rangelow, I.W.; Keller, R.; Park, S.J.; Nilsson, J.; Persaud, A.; Radmilivitc, V.R.; Liddle, J.A.; Grabiec, P.; Bokor, J.; Schneider, D.H.

    2003-07-16

    In this article we discuss open questions in electronic sputtering of solids by slow, highly charged ions in the context of their application in a single ion implantation scheme. High yields of secondary electrons emitted when highly charged dopant ions impinge on silicon wafers allow for formation of non-Poissonian implant structures such as single atom arrays. Control of high spatial resolution and implant alignment require the use of nanometer scale apertures. We discuss electronic sputtering issues on mask lifetimes, and damage to silicon wafers.

  12. Single Phosphorus Ion Implantation into Prefabricated Nanometre Cells of Silicon Devices for Quantum Bit Fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Changyi; Jamieson, David N.; Pakes, Chris; Prawer, Steven; Dzurak, Andrew; Stanley, Fay; Spizziri, Paul; Macks, Linda; Gauja, Eric; Clark, Robert G.

    2003-06-01

    In the near future, devices that employ single atoms to store or manipulate information will be constructed. For example, a solid-state quantum computer has been proposed that encodes information in the nuclear spin of shallow arrays of single 31P atoms (quantum bits or qubits) in a matrix of pure silicon. Construction of these devices presents formidable challenges. One strategy is to use single ion implantation, with the energy range of 10 to 20 keV, to load the qubits into prefabricated cells of the device with a period of a few tens of nanometres. We have developed a method of single ion implantation that employs detector electrodes adjacent to the prefabricated qubit cells that can detect on-line single keV ion strikes appropriate for the fabrication of shallow arrays. Our method of the sub-20 keV single ion detection utilizes a pure silicon substrate with a very high resistivity, a thin (5 nm) SiO2 surface layer, biased electrodes applied to the surface and sensitive electronics that can detect the charge transient from single keV ion strikes. We show that our detectors have a near 100% efficiency for keV ions, extremely thin dead layer thickness (˜5 nm) and a wide sensitive region extending laterally from the electrodes (greater than 15 μm) where the nanometre cells can be constructed. We compare the method with the other methods, such as those of measuring the secondary electrons or phonons induced by single ion impacts.

  13. Tooth - abnormal shape

    MedlinePlus

    Hutchinson incisors; Abnormal tooth shape; Peg teeth; Mulberry teeth; Conical teeth ... The appearance of normal teeth varies, especially the molars. ... conditions. Specific diseases can affect tooth shape, tooth ...

  14. Towards a single-chip, implantable RFID system: is a single-cell radio possible?

    PubMed

    Burke, Peter; Rutherglen, Christopher

    2010-08-01

    We present an overview of progress towards single-chip RFID solutions. To date heterogeneous integration has been appropriate for non-biological systems. However, for in-vivo sensors and even drug delivery systems, a small form factor is required. We discuss fundamental limits on the size of the form factor, the effect of the antenna, and propose a unified single-chip RFID solution appropriate for a broad range of biomedical in-vivo device applications, both current and future. Fundamental issues regarding the possibility of single cell RF radios to interface with biological function are discussed.

  15. Immediate placement of single implant simultaneously with immediate loading in a fresh socket associated to periapical infection: A clinical case report

    PubMed Central

    Agustín-Panadero, Rubén; Serra-Pastor, Blanca; Chust-López, Cesar; Fons-Font, Antonio; Ferreiroa, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Early restoration of the masticatory function, phonatory and aesthetics is some of the current goals of the therapy based on endosseous implants. Facing the classic protocols of implant insertion, which recommend a period of several months between extraction and implant placement, alternatives have been developed that demonstrate that immediate implant placement after tooth extraction permits adequate osseointegration, even in those cases where there is a periapical disease. The immediate restoration of implants after placement is a possibility where aesthetic requirements are high. This article presents a case with immediate implant placement and immediate loading of a first upper premolar with prior periapical pathology due to a vertical fracture. The immediate prosthetic was performed using the extracted crown, which is adapted to be attached to a titanium temporary abutment using a resin cement. After a 4 month healing period work began on the final prosthetic crown. The screw crown was made of zirconium oxide with a covering feldspathic ceramic. At the 12-month follow-up, there were no mechanical or biological complications. The patient gave high satisfaction marks for the overall treatment, giving visual analogue scale score of nine. Immediate post-extraction implants have arisen as an alternative to traditional implants on completely healed bone. Their main aim is to reduce treatment time and number of surgical procedures, along with other objectives such as reduced bone re-absorption and improved aesthetics. Key words:Post-extraction implants, immediate loading prosthetic, implant-retained prosthesis, periapical disease, vertical fracture. PMID:25810833

  16. Immediate placement of single implant simultaneously with immediate loading in a fresh socket associated to periapical infection: A clinical case report.

    PubMed

    Agustín-Panadero, Rubén; Serra-Pastor, Blanca; Chust-López, Cesar; Fons-Font, Antonio; Ferreiroa, Alberto

    2015-02-01

    Early restoration of the masticatory function, phonatory and aesthetics is some of the current goals of the therapy based on endosseous implants. Facing the classic protocols of implant insertion, which recommend a period of several months between extraction and implant placement, alternatives have been developed that demonstrate that immediate implant placement after tooth extraction permits adequate osseointegration, even in those cases where there is a periapical disease. The immediate restoration of implants after placement is a possibility where aesthetic requirements are high. This article presents a case with immediate implant placement and immediate loading of a first upper premolar with prior periapical pathology due to a vertical fracture. The immediate prosthetic was performed using the extracted crown, which is adapted to be attached to a titanium temporary abutment using a resin cement. After a 4 month healing period work began on the final prosthetic crown. The screw crown was made of zirconium oxide with a covering feldspathic ceramic. At the 12-month follow-up, there were no mechanical or biological complications. The patient gave high satisfaction marks for the overall treatment, giving visual analogue scale score of nine. Immediate post-extraction implants have arisen as an alternative to traditional implants on completely healed bone. Their main aim is to reduce treatment time and number of surgical procedures, along with other objectives such as reduced bone re-absorption and improved aesthetics. Key words:Post-extraction implants, immediate loading prosthetic, implant-retained prosthesis, periapical disease, vertical fracture. PMID:25810833

  17. Mechanical behavior of single-layer ceramized zirconia abutments for dental implant prosthetic rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Melendo, Manuel; Llena-Blasco, Oriol; Bruguera, August; Llena-Blasco, Jaime; Yáñez-Vico, Rosa-María; García-Calderón, Manuel; Vaquero-Aguilar, Cristina; Velázquez-Cayón, Rocío; Gutiérrez-Pérez, José-Luis

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study was undertaken to characterize the mechanical response of bare (as-received) and single-layer ceramized zirconia abutments with both internal and external connections that have been developed to enhanced aesthetic restorations. Material and Methods: Sixteen zirconia implant abutments (ZiReal Post®, Biomet 3i, USA) with internal and external connections have been analyzed. Half of the specimens were coated with a 0.5mm-thick layer of a low-fusing fluroapatite ceramic. Mechanical tests were carried out under static (constant cross-head speed of 1mm/min until fracture) and dynamic (between 100 and 400N at a frequency of 1Hz) loading conditions. The failure location was identified by electron microscopy. The removal torque of the retaining screws after testing was also evaluated. Results: The average fracture strength was above 300N for all the abutments, regardless of connection geometry and coating. In most of the cases (94%), failure occurred by abutment fracture. No significant differences were observed either in fatigue behavior and removal torque between the different abutment groups. Conclusions: Mechanical behavior of Zireal zirconia abutments is independent of the type of internal/external connection and the presence/absence of ceramic coating. This may be clinically valuable in dental rehabilitation to improve the aesthetic outcome of zirconia-based dental implant systems. Key words:Dental implant, zirconia, ceramic structure, mechanical properties. PMID:25674313

  18. Soft Tissue Stability around Single Implants Inserted to Replace Maxillary Lateral Incisors: A 3D Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Mangano, F. G.; Picciocchi, G.; Park, K. B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the soft tissue stability around single implants inserted to replace maxillary lateral incisors, using an innovative 3D method. Methods. We have used reverse-engineering software for the superimposition of 3D surface models of the dentogingival structures, obtained from intraoral scans of the same patients taken at the delivery of the final crown (S1) and 2 years later (S2). The assessment of soft tissues changes was performed via calculation of the Euclidean surface distances between the 3D models, after the superimposition of S2 on S1; colour maps were used for quantification of changes. Results. Twenty patients (8 males, 12 females) were selected, 10 with a failing/nonrestorable lateral incisor (test group: immediate placement in postextraction socket) and 10 with a missing lateral incisor (control group: conventional placement in healed ridge). Each patient received one immediately loaded implant (Anyridge®, Megagen, Gyeongbuk, South Korea). The superimposition of the 3D surface models taken at different times (S2 over S1) revealed a mean (±SD) reduction of 0.057 mm (±0.025) and 0.037 mm (±0.020) for test and control patients, respectively. This difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.069). Conclusions. The superimposition of the 3D surface models revealed an excellent peri-implant soft tissue stability in both groups of patients, with minimal changes registered along time. PMID:27298621

  19. Soft Tissue Stability around Single Implants Inserted to Replace Maxillary Lateral Incisors: A 3D Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Mangano, F G; Luongo, F; Picciocchi, G; Mortellaro, C; Park, K B; Mangano, C

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the soft tissue stability around single implants inserted to replace maxillary lateral incisors, using an innovative 3D method. Methods. We have used reverse-engineering software for the superimposition of 3D surface models of the dentogingival structures, obtained from intraoral scans of the same patients taken at the delivery of the final crown (S1) and 2 years later (S2). The assessment of soft tissues changes was performed via calculation of the Euclidean surface distances between the 3D models, after the superimposition of S2 on S1; colour maps were used for quantification of changes. Results. Twenty patients (8 males, 12 females) were selected, 10 with a failing/nonrestorable lateral incisor (test group: immediate placement in postextraction socket) and 10 with a missing lateral incisor (control group: conventional placement in healed ridge). Each patient received one immediately loaded implant (Anyridge®, Megagen, Gyeongbuk, South Korea). The superimposition of the 3D surface models taken at different times (S2 over S1) revealed a mean (±SD) reduction of 0.057 mm (±0.025) and 0.037 mm (±0.020) for test and control patients, respectively. This difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.069). Conclusions. The superimposition of the 3D surface models revealed an excellent peri-implant soft tissue stability in both groups of patients, with minimal changes registered along time. PMID:27298621

  20. Binaural release from masking with single- and multi-electrode stimulation in children with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Todd, Ann E; Goupell, Matthew J; Litovsky, Ruth Y

    2016-07-01

    Cochlear implants (CIs) provide children with access to speech information from a young age. Despite bilateral cochlear implantation becoming common, use of spatial cues in free field is smaller than in normal-hearing children. Clinically fit CIs are not synchronized across the ears; thus binaural experiments must utilize research processors that can control binaural cues with precision. Research to date has used single pairs of electrodes, which is insufficient for representing speech. Little is known about how children with bilateral CIs process binaural information with multi-electrode stimulation. Toward the goal of improving binaural unmasking of speech, this study evaluated binaural unmasking with multi- and single-electrode stimulation. Results showed that performance with multi-electrode stimulation was similar to the best performance with single-electrode stimulation. This was similar to the pattern of performance shown by normal-hearing adults when presented an acoustic CI simulation. Diotic and dichotic signal detection thresholds of the children with CIs were similar to those of normal-hearing children listening to a CI simulation. The magnitude of binaural unmasking was not related to whether the children with CIs had good interaural time difference sensitivity. Results support the potential for benefits from binaural hearing and speech unmasking in children with bilateral CIs. PMID:27475132

  1. Environment-adaptive speech enhancement for bilateral cochlear implants using a single processor.

    PubMed

    Mirzahasanloo, Taher S; Kehtarnavaz, Nasser; Gopalakrishna, Vanishree; Loizou, Philipos C

    2013-05-01

    A computationally efficient speech enhancement pipeline in noisy environments based on a single-processor implementation is developed for utilization in bilateral cochlear implant systems. A two-channel joint objective function is defined and a closed form solution is obtained based on the weighted-Euclidean distortion measure. The computational efficiency and no need for synchronization aspects of this pipeline make it a suitable solution for real-time deployment. A speech quality measure is used to show its effectiveness in six different noisy environments as compared to a similar one-channel enhancement pipeline when using two separate processors or when using independent sequential processing.

  2. Environment-adaptive speech enhancement for bilateral cochlear implants using a single processor☆

    PubMed Central

    Mirzahasanloo, Taher S.; Kehtarnavaz, Nasser; Gopalakrishna, Vanishree; Loizou, Philipos C.

    2013-01-01

    A computationally efficient speech enhancement pipeline in noisy environments based on a single-processor implementation is developed for utilization in bilateral cochlear implant systems. A two-channel joint objective function is defined and a closed form solution is obtained based on the weighted-Euclidean distortion measure. The computational efficiency and no need for synchronization aspects of this pipeline make it a suitable solution for real-time deployment. A speech quality measure is used to show its effectiveness in six different noisy environments as compared to a similar one-channel enhancement pipeline when using two separate processors or when using independent sequential processing. PMID:24610967

  3. Test Tube Tooth: The Next Big Thing.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Preeti; Tahir, Mohammed; Yadav, Harsh; Sureka, Rakshit; Garg, Aarti

    2016-06-01

    Unlike some vertebrates and fishes, humans do not have the capacity for tooth regeneration after the loss of permanent teeth. Although artificial replacement with removable dentures, fixed prosthesis and implants is possible through advances in the field of prosthetic dentistry, it would be ideal to recreate a third set of natural teeth to replace lost dentition. For many years now, researchers in the field of tissue engineering have been trying to bioengineer dental tissues as well as whole teeth. In order to attain a whole tooth through dental engineering, that has the same or nearly same biological, mechanical and physical properties of a natural tooth, it's necessary to deal with all the cells and tissues which are concerned with the formation, maintenance and repair of the tooth. In this article we review the steps involved in odontogenesis or organogenesis of a tooth and progress in the bioengineering of a whole tooth. PMID:27504430

  4. Test Tube Tooth: The Next Big Thing

    PubMed Central

    Tahir, Mohammed; Yadav, Harsh; Sureka, Rakshit; Garg, Aarti

    2016-01-01

    Unlike some vertebrates and fishes, humans do not have the capacity for tooth regeneration after the loss of permanent teeth. Although artificial replacement with removable dentures, fixed prosthesis and implants is possible through advances in the field of prosthetic dentistry, it would be ideal to recreate a third set of natural teeth to replace lost dentition. For many years now, researchers in the field of tissue engineering have been trying to bioengineer dental tissues as well as whole teeth. In order to attain a whole tooth through dental engineering, that has the same or nearly same biological, mechanical and physical properties of a natural tooth, it’s necessary to deal with all the cells and tissues which are concerned with the formation, maintenance and repair of the tooth. In this article we review the steps involved in odontogenesis or organogenesis of a tooth and progress in the bioengineering of a whole tooth. PMID:27504430

  5. Computer methods for automating preoperative dental implant planning: implant positioning and size assignment.

    PubMed

    Galanis, Christos C; Sfantsikopoulos, Michael M; Koidis, Petros T; Kafantaris, Nikolaos M; Mpikos, Pavlos G

    2007-04-01

    The paper presents computer-aided methods that allocate a dental implant and suggest its size, during the pre-operative planning stage, in conformance with introduced optimization criteria and established clinical requirements. Based on computed tomography data of the jaw and prosthesis anatomy, single tooth cases are planned for the best-suited implant insertion at a user-defined region. An optimum implantation axis line is produced and cylindrical implants of various candidate sizes are then automatically positioned, while their occlusal end is leveled to bone ridge, and evaluated. Radial safety margins are used for the assessment of the implant safety distance from neighboring anatomical structures and bone quantity and quality are estimated and taken into consideration. A case study demonstrates the concept and allows for its discussion.

  6. Consecutive Case Series of Healed Single-Molar Sites Immediately Restored with Wide-Diameter Implants: A 1-Year Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Antoun, Hadi; Cherfane, Pierre; Sojod, Bouchra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. To evaluate outcomes of wide-diameter (6 mm) implants immediately provisionalized with cement-retained single crowns in posterior molar sites. Materials and Methods. Forty-eight consecutive patients received a total of 53 moderately rough-surface, 6 mm diameter implants in healed sites. All implants were immediately provisionalized with a cement-retained provisional crown. Final prosthesis with cement-retained porcelain fused to metal crowns was delivered 3-6 months later. Patients were followed up for 1 year. Outcome measures were implant failures and success rate, complications, marginal bone levels, bone level changes, papilla index, bleeding on probing, and inflammation. Results. One patient was lost to follow-up. At one year, the implant survival and success rate were 98.1%. The mean marginal bone loss after 1 year was -0.17 ± 1.84 mm. Ideal papilla score was recorded at 83.8% of the sites. More than 95.6% of the sites showed no bleeding or inflammation. No procedure-related or device-related adverse events were reported. Conclusion. Wide-diameter (6 mm) implants can safely and successfully replace single posterior molars. Longer follow-up studies are necessary to evaluate the long-term success of these implants. PMID:27195008

  7. Consecutive Case Series of Healed Single-Molar Sites Immediately Restored with Wide-Diameter Implants: A 1-Year Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Cherfane, Pierre; Sojod, Bouchra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. To evaluate outcomes of wide-diameter (6 mm) implants immediately provisionalized with cement-retained single crowns in posterior molar sites. Materials and Methods. Forty-eight consecutive patients received a total of 53 moderately rough-surface, 6 mm diameter implants in healed sites. All implants were immediately provisionalized with a cement-retained provisional crown. Final prosthesis with cement-retained porcelain fused to metal crowns was delivered 3–6 months later. Patients were followed up for 1 year. Outcome measures were implant failures and success rate, complications, marginal bone levels, bone level changes, papilla index, bleeding on probing, and inflammation. Results. One patient was lost to follow-up. At one year, the implant survival and success rate were 98.1%. The mean marginal bone loss after 1 year was −0.17 ± 1.84 mm. Ideal papilla score was recorded at 83.8% of the sites. More than 95.6% of the sites showed no bleeding or inflammation. No procedure-related or device-related adverse events were reported. Conclusion. Wide-diameter (6 mm) implants can safely and successfully replace single posterior molars. Longer follow-up studies are necessary to evaluate the long-term success of these implants. PMID:27195008

  8. Efficacy of adding a supporting implant in stress distribution of long-span fixed partial dentures: a 3D finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Shurbaji Mozayek, Rami; Allaf, Mirza; B Abuharb, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background. Long span is seen in many clinical situations. Treatmentplanning options of these cases are difficult and may require FPD, RPD or ISP. Each option has its own disadvantages, including mechanical problems, patient comfort and cost. This article will evaluate the stress distribution of a different treatment option, which consists of adding a single sup-porting implant to the FPD by using 3D finite element analysis. Methods. Three models, each consisting of 5 units, were created as follows: 1. Tooth Pontic Pontic Pontic Tooth; 2. Tooth Pontic Implant Pontic Tooth; 3. Tooth Pontic Pontic Implant Tooth. An axial force was applied to the prostheses by using 3D finite element method and stresses were evaluated. Results. The maximum stress was found in the prostheses in all the models; the highest stress values in all the shared components of the models were almost similar. Stress in implants was lower in the second model than the third one. Conclusion. Adding a supporting implant in long-span FPD has no advantages while it has the disadvantages of complicating treatment and the complications that may occur to the implant and surrounding bone. PMID:27429723

  9. Efficacy of adding a supporting implant in stress distribution of long-span fixed partial dentures: a 3D finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shurbaji Mozayek, Rami; Allaf, Mirza; B. Abuharb, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background. Long span is seen in many clinical situations. Treatmentplanning options of these cases are difficult and may require FPD, RPD or ISP. Each option has its own disadvantages, including mechanical problems, patient comfort and cost. This article will evaluate the stress distribution of a different treatment option, which consists of adding a single sup-porting implant to the FPD by using 3D finite element analysis. Methods. Three models, each consisting of 5 units, were created as follows: 1. Tooth Pontic Pontic Pontic Tooth; 2. Tooth Pontic Implant Pontic Tooth; 3. Tooth Pontic Pontic Implant Tooth. An axial force was applied to the prostheses by using 3D finite element method and stresses were evaluated. Results. The maximum stress was found in the prostheses in all the models; the highest stress values in all the shared components of the models were almost similar. Stress in implants was lower in the second model than the third one. Conclusion. Adding a supporting implant in long-span FPD has no advantages while it has the disadvantages of complicating treatment and the complications that may occur to the implant and surrounding bone. PMID:27429723

  10. Esthetic soft tissue ridge augmentation around dental implant: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hamdan, Khalid S.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this case report is to present a method to correct soft tissue ridge deformity around dental implant using acellular dermal matrix (ADM). A 25-year-old female patient presented with a missing maxillary first left premolar, which had class I soft tissue defect. The missing tooth was replaced with single implant supported prosthesis and the soft tissue defect was corrected using ADM utilizing the envelop technique. A 5-years follow-up is presented showing the long-term stability of this technique and the predictability of using the ADM as an alternative method to connective tissue graft to correct the soft tissue defect around dental implant. PMID:23960518

  11. Clinical and biologic factors related to oral implant failure: a 2-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Moheng, Patrick; Feryn, Jean-Marc

    2005-09-01

    failure. In multilevel logistic regression analysis, only tobacco consumption and single-tooth replacement or removable prosthesis were independent and significant predictive factors of oral implant failure. Serum osteocalcin, and urinary pyridinoline and deoxypyridinoline were not predictive of oral implant failure in this study. These results suggest that oral implants are more likely to fail for posterior single-tooth replacements and removable prostheses rather than for complete edentulous fixed bridgeworks or overdentures. Tobacco smoking has been identified as a major risk factor of oral implant failure.

  12. Immediate implant placement in mandible and prosthetic rehabilitation by means of all-zirconium oxide restorations: case report of a woman with a history of periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Walker, Petra; Enkling, Norbert; Mericske-Stern, Regina; Kolgeci, Remzi; Bassetti, Renzo

    2014-05-01

    Owing to its single surgical intervention, immediate implant placement has the advantage of shortening treatment time, and thus positively affects patient morbidity. According to the bone resorption pattern after tooth extraction, bone loss should be anticipated if immediate implant placement is considered. The present case report aims to present a possible treatment option and to demonstrate that a partially edentulous arch may be rehabilitated esthetically by immediate implant placement and by corresponding anticipatory measures.

  13. Single-Port Parastomal Hernia Repair by Using 3-D Textile Implants

    PubMed Central

    Emmanuel, Klaus; Schrittwieser, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    Background: Parastomal hernias (PSHs) are a frequent complication and remain a surgical challenge. We present a new option for single-port PSH repair with equilateral stoma relocation using preshaped, prosthetic 3-dimensional implants and flat mesh insertion in intraperitoneal onlay placement for additional augmentation of the abdominal wall. Methods: We describe our novel technique in detail and performed an analysis of prospectively collected data from patients who underwent single-port PSH repair, focusing on feasibility, conversions, and complications. Results: From September 2013 to January 2014, 9 patients with symptomatic PSHs were included. Two conversions to reduced-port laparoscopy using a second 3-mm trocar were required because of difficult adhesiolysis, dissection, and reduction of the hernia sac content. No major intra- or postoperative complications or reoperations were encountered. One patient incurred a peristomal wound healing defect that could be treated conservatively. Conclusion: We found that single-port PSH repair using preshaped, elastic 3-dimensional devices and additional flat mesh repair of the abdominal wall is feasible, safe, and beneficial, relating to optimal coverage of unstable stoma edges with wide overlap to all sides and simultaneous augmentation of the midline in the IPOM technique. The stoma relocation enables prolapse treatment and prevention. The features of a modular and rotatable multichannel port system offer benefits in clear dissection ongoing from a single port. Long-term follow-up data on an adequate number of patients are awaited to examine efficacy. PMID:25392655

  14. Stress Distribution in Single Dental Implant System: Three-Dimensional Finite Element Analysis Based on an In Vitro Experimental Model.

    PubMed

    Rezende, Carlos Eduardo Edwards; Chase-Diaz, Melody; Costa, Max Doria; Albarracin, Max Laurent; Paschoeto, Gabriela; Sousa, Edson Antonio Capello; Rubo, José Henrique; Borges, Ana Flávia Sanches

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to analyze the stress distribution in single implant system and to evaluate the compatibility of an in vitro model with finite element (FE) model. The in vitro model consisted of Brånemark implant; multiunit set abutment of 5 mm height; metal-ceramic screw-retained crown, and polyurethane simulating the bone. Deformations were recorded in the peri-implant region in the mesial and distal aspects, after an axial 300 N load application at the center of the occlusal aspect of the crown, using strain gauges. This in vitro model was scanned with micro CT to design a three-dimensional FE model and the strains in the peri-implant bone region were registered to check the compatibility between both models. The FE model was used to evaluate stress distribution in different parts of the system. The values obtained from the in vitro model (20-587 με) and the finite element analysis (81-588 με) showed agreement among them. The highest stresses because of axial and oblique load, respectively were 5.83 and 40 MPa for the cortical bone, 55 and 1200 MPa for the implant, and 80 and 470 MPa for the abutment screw. The FE method proved to be effective for evaluating the deformation around single implant. Oblique loads lead to higher stress concentrations. PMID:26192032

  15. Single-stage implantation in the atrophic alveolar ridge of the mandible with the Norian skeletal repair system.

    PubMed

    Hölzle, Frank; Bauer, Florian; Kesting, Marco R; Mücke, Thomas; Deppe, Herbert; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Swaid, Sami

    2011-10-01

    Dental implants have played a part in rehabilitation of the jaws for more than 40 years, but in some cases they alone are inadequate because of extreme alveolar resorption. Correction may necessitate a two-stage procedure with additional interventions. We have made a preliminary study of the use of the Norian skeletal repair system (SRS), a carbonated calcium phosphate bone cement used to augment the alveolar ridge as a single-stage procedure, with the placement of implants. Ten edentulous patients with insufficient vertical bone in the interforaminal area were treated. After a horizontal osteotomy and crestal mobilisation of the alveolar ridge, implants were placed through the crestal part and fixed in the basal part of the mandible. Norian SRS was used to fill the gap created. The prostheses were inserted 3 months later. Forty implants were inserted. The follow up period was 60 months, and no fractures or dislocations developed. One of the implants was lost and there was one wound dehiscence, but no surgical intervention or revision was necessary. Radiographs showed good consolidation of the bony structure in all cases. We have described a reliable, single-stage procedure for augmentation and implantation in a highly atrophic alveolar crest. A 98% survival is comparable with those of other techniques. Further clinical trials are necessary to replicate these promising results.

  16. Calibration of radiographs by a reference metal ball affects preoperative selection of implant size.

    PubMed

    Schropp, Lars; Stavropoulos, Andreas; Gotfredsen, Erik; Wenzel, Ann

    2009-12-01

    The aim was to evaluate the impact of a reference ball for calibration of periapical and panoramic radiographs on preoperative selection of implant size for three implant systems. Presurgical digital radiographs (70 panoramic, 43 periapical) from 70 patients scheduled for single-tooth implant treatment, recorded with a metal ball placed in the edentulous area, were evaluated by three observers with the intent to select the appropriate implant size. Four reference marks corresponding to the margins of the metal ball were manually placed on the digital image by means of computer software. Additionally, an implant with proper dimensions for the respective site was outlined by manually placing four reference marks. The diameter of the metal ball and the unadjusted length and width of the implant were calculated. Implant size was adjusted according to a "standard" calibration method (SCM; magnification factor 1.25 in panoramic images and 1.05 in periapical images) and according to a reference ball calibration method (RCM; true magnification). Based on the unadjusted as well as the adjusted implant dimensions, the implant size was selected among those available in a given implant system. For periapical radiographs, when comparing SCM and RCM with unadjusted implant dimensions, implant size changed in 42% and 58%, respectively. When comparing SCM and RCM, implant size changed in 24%. For panoramic radiographs, comparing SCM and RCM changed implant size in 48%. The use of a reference metal ball for calibration of periapical and panoramic radiographs when selecting implant size during treatment planning might be advantageous. PMID:19221809

  17. Characterization of the beam transmission improvements for p- and n-LDD implantations on a single wafer high current spot beam implanter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeide, Matthias; Kondratenko, Serguei; Deichler, Josef

    2012-11-01

    This paper focuses on the characterization of the biased beam guide option installed in the 200 mm Axcelis Optima HDx single wafer high current spot beam implanter and its use for energy contamination free, drift mode p-LDD and n-LDD implantations. Biased beam guide mode allows reduction of space charge potential and corresponding transmission loss from beam blow up, resulting in horizontally and vertically smaller ion beams. Smaller, highly focused beams have several advantages, such as improved beam transmission, higher dose rate, and require reduced overscan area. Higher beam transmission and higher beam current combined with reduced overscan are two factors that directly affect throughput and productivity. We demonstrate these improvements for several important logic processes. A characterization of the effects of beam guide bias voltage for a 90 nm CMOS logic is reported in detail. The p-LDD and n-LDD implantations investigated were BF2+, As+, and As2+ in the energy range between 3 keV and 5 keV, both with and without Germanium pre-amorphization. The presented and discussed results include beam parameters, throughput results, beam setup performance, and device data. The results have shown that the biased beam guide mode can significantly improve the throughput for the LDD implantations in the energy range of interest.

  18. Nature of Defects Induced by Au Implantation in Hexagonal Silicon Carbide Single Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Gentils, Aurelie; Barthe, Marie-France; Egger, Werner; Sperr, Peter

    2009-03-10

    Pulsed-slow-positron-beam-based positron lifetime spectroscopy was used to investigate the nature of vacancy defects induced by 20 MeV Au implantation in single crystals 6H-SiC. Preliminary analysis of the data shows that at lower fluence, below 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2}, a positron lifetime of 220 ps has been obtained: it could be associated with the divacancy V{sub Si}-V{sub C} in comparison with the literature. At higher fluence, above 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}, a positron lifetime of 260-270 ps, increasing with the incident positron energy, has been observed after decomposition of the lifetime spectra. By comparison with lifetime calculations, open-volumes such as quadrivacancy (V{sub Si}-V{sub C}){sub 2} clusters could be associated with this value.

  19. Neuronavigation-assisted single transseptal catheter implantation and shunt in patients with posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus and accentuated lateral ventricles dilatation

    PubMed Central

    Carvi Nievas, Mario N.

    2011-01-01

    Background: To assess the treatment of posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus with accentuated lateral ventricles dilatation by employing a single biventricular neuronavigation-assisted transseptal-implanted catheter with programmable valve and distal peritoneal derivation. Methods: A neuronavigation-assisted single transseptal biventricular catheter implantation with distal peritoneal shunt system was performed in 11 patients with posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus and accentuated lateral ventricles dilatations between 2001 and 2010. Patients with concomitant third ventricle dilatation were excluded. Several sequential frustrated attempts of temporary drainage occlusion on both sides confirmed the isolation of the lateral ventricles. Neuronavigation was employed to accurately establish the catheter surgical corridor (trajectory) across the lateral ventricles and throughout the septum pellucidum. The neurological and radiological outcomes were assessed at least 6 months after the procedure. Results: Catheter implantation was successfully performed in all patients. Only one catheter was found to be monoventricular on delayed computer tomography controls. Procedure-related complications (bleeding of infections) were not observed. No additional neurological deficits were found after shunt surgery. Six months after procedure, none required additional ventricular catheter implantations or shunt revisions. Radiological and clinical controls confirmed the shunt function and the improved neurological status of all patients. Conclusion: Single neuronavigation-assisted transseptal-implanted biventricular catheter is a valid option for the treatment of posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus with accentuated lateral ventricles dilatation. This technique reduces the number of catheters and minimizes the complexity and timing of the surgical procedure as well as potential infection's risks associated with the use of multiple shunting systems. PMID:21541201

  20. Accuracy of computer-assisted implant placement with insertion templates

    PubMed Central

    Naziri, Eleni; Schramm, Alexander; Wilde, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of computer-assisted implant insertion based on computed tomography and template-guided implant placement. Material and methods: A total of 246 implants were placed with the aid of 3D-based transfer templates in 181 consecutive partially edentulous patients. Five groups were formed on the basis of different implant systems, surgical protocols and guide sleeves. After virtual implant planning with the CoDiagnostiX Software, surgical guides were fabricated in a dental laboratory. After implant insertion, the actual implant position was registered intraoperatively and transferred to a model cast. Deviations between the preoperative plan and postoperative implant position were measured in a follow-up computed tomography of the patient’s model casts and image fusion with the preoperative computed tomography. Results: The median deviation between preoperative plan and postoperative implant position was 1.0 mm at the implant shoulder and 1.4 mm at the implant apex. The median angular deviation was 3.6º. There were significantly smaller angular deviations (P=0.000) and significantly lower deviations at the apex (P=0.008) in implants placed for a single-tooth restoration than in those placed at a free-end dental arch. The location of the implant, whether in the upper or lower jaw, did not significantly affect deviations. Increasing implant length had a significant negative influence on deviations from the planned implant position. There was only one significant difference between two out of the five implant systems used. Conclusion: The data of this clinical study demonstrate the accuracy and predictable implant placement when using laboratory-fabricated surgical guides based on computed tomography. PMID:27274440

  1. Evaluating residual dentin thickness following various mandibular anterior tooth preparations for zirconia full-coverage single crowns: an in vitro analysis.

    PubMed

    Borelli, Bruna; Sorrentino, Roberto; Goracci, Cecilia; Amato, Massimo; Zarone, Fernando; Ferrari, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the residual dentin thickness (RDT) after different tooth preparations. Ninety mandibular anterior teeth were divided into three groups: central incisors, lateral incisors, and canines. Specimens were prepared for single-crown coverage with shoulder, slight chamfer, and knife-edge finish lines. Specimens were sectioned and divided into four subgroups according to measurement areas: (1) buccal, (2) distal, (3) lingual, and (4) mesial. The RDT was analyzed statistically by means of one-way analysis of variance and Tukey post hoc test (P = .05). Significant differences were found for shoulder but not for slight chamfer and knife-edge finish lines. The interproximal areas wound up being critical due to thin RDT, potentially interfering with the structural and biologic integrity of teeth.

  2. Single-blind randomized clinical trial to evaluate clinical and radiological outcomes after one year of immediate versus delayed implant placement supporting full-arch prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Pellicer-Chover, Hilario; Peñarrocha-Oltra, David; Bagán, Leticia; Fichy-Fernandez, Antonio J.; Canullo, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate and compare peri-implant health, marginal bone loss and success of immediate and delayed implant placement for rehabilitation with full-arch fixed prostheses. Material and Methods: The present study was a prospective, randomized, single-blind, clinical preliminary trial. Patients were randomized into two treatment groups. In Group A implants were placed immediately post-extraction and in Group B six months after extraction. The following control time-points were established: one week, six months and twelve months after loading. Measurements were taken of peri-implant crevicular fluid volume, plaque index, gingival retraction, keratinized mucosa, probing depth, modified gingival index and presence of mucositis. Implant success rates were evaluated for the two groups. The study sample included fifteen patients (nine women and six men) with a mean average age of 63.7 years. One hundred and forty-four implants were placed: 76 placed in healed sites and 68 placed immediately. Results: At the moment of prosthetic loading, keratinized mucosa width and probing depth were higher in immediate implants than delayed implants, with statistically significant differences. However, after six and twelve months, differences between groups had disappeared. Bone loss was 0.54 ± 0.39 mm for immediate implants and 0.66 ± 0.25 mm for delayed implants (p=0.201). No implants failed in either group. Conclusions: The present study with a short follow-up and a small sample yielded no statistically significant differences in implant success and peri-implant marginal bone loss between immediate and delayed implants with fixed full-arch prostheses. Peri-implant health showed no statistically significant differences for any of the studied parameters (crevicular fluid volume, plaque index, gingival retraction, keratinized mucosa, probing depth, modified gingival index and presence of mucositis) at the twelve-month follow-up. Key words:Immediate implants, delayed implants

  3. Temporary Ectopic Implantation of a Single Finger Using a Perforator as a Feeding Vessel, and Subsequent Prefabricated Chimeric Flap Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Takumi, Yamamoto; Hisako, Hara; Yusuke, Yamamoto; Azusa, Oshima; Kazuki, Kikuchi; Harunosuke, Kato; Kumiko, Sata; Kentaro, Doi; Takeshi, Todokoro; Jun, Araki; Makoto, Mihara; Takuya, Higashino; Takuya, Iida; Isao, Koshima

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Ectopic implantation was first reported by Godina in 1986. We herein present 2 cases in which amputated fingers were salvaged and reconstructed by means of temporary ectopic implantation utilizing perforator anastomoses and chimeric flaps. Methods: Case 1. A 30-year-old man injured his right hand. All of the fingers were completely crushed with the exception of the little finger. We performed an ectopic implantation by using the superficial circumflex iliac artery perforator. Three months later, the little finger was transplanted with the superficial circumflex iliac artery perforator flap, vascularized nerve, and the 2nd metacarpal bone. Case 2. A 29-year-old man suffered a degloving injury of the index finger. The digital artery was anastomosed to deep inferior epigastric artery perforator. One month later, a deep inferior epigastric artery perforator flap containing the ectopically transplanted index finger was transplanted, but the index fingertip became pale and necrotized. After debridement, a hemipulp transplantation was performed. Results/Conclusions: As the diameter of perforators is similar to that of digital arteries, and perforators are capable of supplying large areas of tissue, they can be used as recipient vessels for ectopic implantation in finger salvage procedures. Another advantage of perforators as feeding vessels in ectopic implantation is the possibility of forming an ectopic chimera; the finger can be incorporated as a part of the chimeric reconstructive flap. With respect to these advantages, the perforator can be used as a feeder in an ectopic implantation of single finger.

  4. Methods for implantation of micro-wire bundles and optimization of single/multiunit recordings from human mesial temporal lobe

    PubMed Central

    Misra, A; Burke, JF; Ramayya, A; Jacobs, J; Sperling, MR; Moxon, KA; Kahana, MJ; Evans, JJ; Sharan, AD

    2014-01-01

    Objective The authors report methods developed for the implantation of micro-wire bundles into mesial temporal lobe structures and subsequent single neuron recording in epileptic patients undergoing in-patient diagnostic monitoring. This is done with the intention of lowering the perceived barriers to routine single neuron recording from deep brain structures in the clinical setting. Approach Over a 15 month period, 11 patients were implanted with platinum micro-wire bundles into mesial temporal structures. Protocols were developed for A) monitoring electrode integrity through impedance testing, B) ensuring continuous 24-7 recording, C) localizing micro-wire position and “splay” pattern and D) monitoring grounding and referencing to maintain the quality of recordings. Main Result Five common modes of failure were identified: 1) broken micro-wires from acute tensile force, 2) broken micro-wires from cyclic fatigue at stress points, 3) poor in-vivo micro-electrode separation, 4) motion artifact and 5) deteriorating ground connection and subsequent drop in common mode noise rejection. Single neurons have been observed up to 14 days post implantation and on 40% of micro-wires. Significance Long-term success requires detailed review of each implant by both the clinical and research teams to identify failure modes, and appropriate refinement of techniques while moving forward. This approach leads to reliable unit recordings without prolonging operative times, which will help increase the availability and clinical viability of human single neuron data. PMID:24608589

  5. Comparison of marginal bone loss and patient satisfaction in single and double-implant assisted mandibular overdenture by immediate loading

    PubMed Central

    Khoshhal, Masume; Ebrahimzadeh, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to compare the coronal bone level and patient satisfaction in 1-implant and 2-implant assisted mandibular overdentures. MATERIALS AND METHODS Twenty patients who had maladaptive mandibular dentures were treated in this study. Patients were randomly divided into two groups. The first group received 1 implant (Simple line II, Implantium, South Korea) in their mandibular midline and the second group received 2 implants in their B and D regions (according to Misch's category). If the primary stability of each implant was at least 60 ISQ, ball attachment was placed and denture relined with soft liner. After 6 weeks, retentive cap incorporated with hard acrylic resin. In the 6 and 12 months recalls, periapical digital radiograph were made and visual analogue scale questionnaires were used to record patient satisfaction. The Friedman test was done for comparing the presurgical and postsurgical parameters in each group and the U-Mann Whitney test (P<.05) was done for comparison of post-treatment results between the two groups. RESULTS All implants achieved sufficient primary stability to be immediately loaded. Patient satisfaction was high, and there were no significant differences between two groups (P>.05). In addition, mean marginal bone loss was 0.6 ± 0.67 mm in the first group and 0.6 ± 0.51 mm in the second group, after 12 month. Mean marginal bone loss showed no significant differences between two groups. CONCLUSION This preliminary one-year result indicated that mandibular overdentures anchored to a single implant can be a safe and cost-effective method as a starting step for implant-overdenture treatment. PMID:26140170

  6. Finite Element Analysis of Bone Stress around Micro-Implants of Different Diameters and Lengths with Application of a Single or Composite Torque Force

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ying-juan; Chang, Shao-hai; Ye, Jian-tao; Ye, Yu-shan; Yu, Yan-song

    2015-01-01

    Background Stress on the bone surrounding dental micro-implants affects implant success. Purpose To compare the stress on the bone surrounding a micro-implant after application of a single force (SF) of 200 g or a composite force (CF) of 200 g and 6 N.mm torque. Materials and Methods Finite element models were developed for micro-implant diameters of 1.2, 1.6, and 2.0 mm, and lengths of 6, 8, 10, and 12 mm and either a SF or CF was applied. The maximum equivalent stress (Max EQS) of the bone surrounding the micro-implant was determined, and the relationships among type of force, diameter, and length were evaluated. Results The Max EQS of the CF exceeded that of the SF (P< 0.05). The effect of force on stress was related to implant diameter, but not to implant length. The larger CF led to greater instability of the micro-implant and the effect was most pronounced at an implant diameter of 1.2 mm. The use of implant diameters of 1.6 mm and 2.0 mm produced no significant difference in implant stability when either a CF or SF was applied. Conclusion When considering the use of an implant to perform three-dimensional control on the teeth, the implant diameter chosen should be > 1.2 mm. PMID:26659581

  7. Seal Out Tooth Decay

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topics > Tooth Decay (Caries) > Seal Out Tooth Decay Seal Out Tooth Decay Main Content What are dental ... back teeth decay so easily? Who should get seal​ants? Should sealants be put on baby teeth? ...

  8. Single-cell RNA sequencing: revealing human pre-implantation development, pluripotency and germline development.

    PubMed

    Petropoulos, S; Panula, S P; Schell, J P; Lanner, F

    2016-09-01

    Early human development is a dynamic, heterogeneous, complex and multidimensional process. During the first week, the single-cell zygote undergoes eight to nine rounds of cell division generating the multicellular blastocyst, which consists of hundreds of cells forming spatially organized embryonic and extra-embryonic tissues. At the level of transcription, degradation of maternal RNA commences at around the two-cell stage, coinciding with embryonic genome activation. Although numerous efforts have recently focused on delineating this process in humans, many questions still remain as thorough investigation has been limited by ethical issues, scarce availability of human embryos and the presence of minute amounts of DNA and RNA. In vitro cultures of embryonic stem cells provide some insight into early human development, but such studies have been confounded by analysis on a population level failing to appreciate cellular heterogeneity. Recent technical developments in single-cell RNA sequencing have provided a novel and powerful tool to explore the early human embryo in a systematic manner. In this review, we will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the techniques utilized to specifically investigate human development and consider how the technology has yielded new insights into pre-implantation development, embryonic stem cells and the establishment of the germ line.

  9. Single-cell RNA sequencing: revealing human pre-implantation development, pluripotency and germline development.

    PubMed

    Petropoulos, S; Panula, S P; Schell, J P; Lanner, F

    2016-09-01

    Early human development is a dynamic, heterogeneous, complex and multidimensional process. During the first week, the single-cell zygote undergoes eight to nine rounds of cell division generating the multicellular blastocyst, which consists of hundreds of cells forming spatially organized embryonic and extra-embryonic tissues. At the level of transcription, degradation of maternal RNA commences at around the two-cell stage, coinciding with embryonic genome activation. Although numerous efforts have recently focused on delineating this process in humans, many questions still remain as thorough investigation has been limited by ethical issues, scarce availability of human embryos and the presence of minute amounts of DNA and RNA. In vitro cultures of embryonic stem cells provide some insight into early human development, but such studies have been confounded by analysis on a population level failing to appreciate cellular heterogeneity. Recent technical developments in single-cell RNA sequencing have provided a novel and powerful tool to explore the early human embryo in a systematic manner. In this review, we will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the techniques utilized to specifically investigate human development and consider how the technology has yielded new insights into pre-implantation development, embryonic stem cells and the establishment of the germ line. PMID:27046137

  10. Intentional replantation of periodontally compromised hopeless tooth.

    PubMed

    Nagappa, G; Aspalli, Shivanand; Devanoorkar, Archana; Shetty, Sudhir; Parab, Prachi

    2013-09-01

    Aesthetic considerations have influenced the management of dental maladies in varying degrees for many years. Even single tooth mal-alignment makes the patient to approach a dentist. Intentional replantation is a procedure in which an intentional tooth extraction is performed followed by reinsertion of the extracted tooth. Many authors agree that it should be reserved as the last resort to save a tooth after other procedures have failed or would likely to fail. The main reason of failure in replanted teeth is root resorption, specifically ankylosis or replacement resorption. Although the success rate is not always high, intentional replantation may be a treatment alternative that deserves consideration to maintain the natural dentition and avoid extraction of the tooth. Here is case report of a patient desiring alignment of malpositioned periodontally involved anterior single tooth due to various causes treated by intentional replantation.

  11. Intentional replantation of periodontally compromised hopeless tooth

    PubMed Central

    Nagappa, G.; Aspalli, Shivanand; Devanoorkar, Archana; Shetty, Sudhir; Parab, Prachi

    2013-01-01

    Aesthetic considerations have influenced the management of dental maladies in varying degrees for many years. Even single tooth mal-alignment makes the patient to approach a dentist. Intentional replantation is a procedure in which an intentional tooth extraction is performed followed by reinsertion of the extracted tooth. Many authors agree that it should be reserved as the last resort to save a tooth after other procedures have failed or would likely to fail. The main reason of failure in replanted teeth is root resorption, specifically ankylosis or replacement resorption. Although the success rate is not always high, intentional replantation may be a treatment alternative that deserves consideration to maintain the natural dentition and avoid extraction of the tooth. Here is case report of a patient desiring alignment of malpositioned periodontally involved anterior single tooth due to various causes treated by intentional replantation. PMID:24174765

  12. Evaluation of Hi-Tec Implant Restoration in Mandibular First Molar Region- A Prospective Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Sreeram, Roopa Rani. S.; Prasad, L Krishna; Chakravarthi, P Srinivas; Devi, Naga Neelima; Sreeram, Sanjay Krishna

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Missing teeth lead to loss of structural balance, inefficient function, poor aesthetics and psychological effects on human beings, which needs restoration for normal contour, function and aesthetics. Several natural or synthetic substitutes are being used for replacement of missing tooth since centuries. Implants are the latest modality of replacement. So, the study was aimed to assess clinical success rate of Hi-Tec implant; which is economical and new in market. Results of the study will help clinician for appropriate implant selection. Materials and Methods The study included 10 patients from 19 to 31 years and needed restoration of missing mandibular first molar. Restoration had done using Hi Tec Single-tooth implants with metal-ceramic single crown prosthesis after three months of osseointegration. The implants were evaluated clinically (bleeding on probing, probing depth, implant mobility- periotest) and radiographically (marginal bone loss and peri-implant radiolucency) for six years. The observers were blinded for the duration of the study to prevent bias. Results All the patients had uneventful post-surgical healing. No bleeding on probing, Implant mobility, peri-implant radiolucency with minimal marginal bone loss and constant probing depths were observed well within the normal range during follow-up periods. Conclusion Two stage single-tooth Hi Tec implant restoration can be used as a successful treatment modality for replacing mandibular first molar in an economic way. However, these results were obtained after 6 years of follow up with a smaller sample size, so long term multi center studies with a larger sample size is recommended for the predictability of success rate conclusively. PMID:26436053

  13. Tooth-Bleaching: A Review of the Efficacy and Adverse Effects of Various Tooth Whitening Products.

    PubMed

    Majeed, Abdul; Farooq, Imran; Grobler, Sias R; Rossouw, R J

    2015-12-01

    Tooth bleaching (whitening) is one of the most common and inexpensive method for treating discolouration of teeth. Dental aesthetics, especially tooth colour, is of great importance to majority of the people; and discolouration of even a single tooth can negatively influence the quality of life. Therefore, a review of the literature was carried out (limited to aesthetic tooth-bleaching) to provide a broad overview of the efficacy and adverse effects of various tooth whitening products on soft and hard oral tissues. PMID:26691365

  14. Blistering and cracking of LiTaO3 single crystal under helium ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Changdong; Lu, Fei; Ma, Yujie

    2015-03-01

    Blistering and cracking in LiTaO3 surface are investigated after 200-keV helium ion implantation and subsequent post-implantation annealing. Rutherford backscattering/channeling is used to examine the lattice damage caused by ion implantation. Blistering is observed through optical microscopy in a dynamic heating process. Atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy measurements are used to detect the LiTaO3 surface morphology. Experimental results show that blistering and flaking are dependent on implantation fluence, beam current, and also annealing temperature. We speculate that the surface cracking of He+-implanted LiTaO3 results from the implantation-induced stress and compression.

  15. Cochlear implant artifact attenuation in late auditory evoked potentials: a single channel approach.

    PubMed

    Mc Laughlin, Myles; Lopez Valdes, Alejandro; Reilly, Richard B; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2013-08-01

    Recent evidence suggests that late auditory evoked potentials (LAEP) provide a useful objective metric of performance in cochlear implant (CI) subjects. However, the CI produces a large electrical artifact that contaminates LAEP recordings and confounds their interpretation. Independent component analysis (ICA) has been used in combination with multi-channel recordings to effectively remove the artifact. The applicability of the ICA approach is limited when only single channel data are needed or available, as is often the case in both clinical and research settings. Here we developed a single-channel, high sample rate (125 kHz), and high bandwidth (0-100 kHz) acquisition system to reduce the CI stimulation artifact. We identified two different artifacts in the recording: 1) a high frequency artifact reflecting the stimulation pulse rate, and 2) a direct current (DC, or pedestal) artifact that showed a non-linear time varying relationship to pulse amplitude. This relationship was well described by a bivariate polynomial. The high frequency artifact was completely attenuated by a 35 Hz low-pass filter for all subjects (n = 22). The DC artifact could be caused by an impedance mismatch. For 27% of subjects tested, no DC artifact was observed when electrode impedances were balanced to within 1 kΩ. For the remaining 73% of subjects, the pulse amplitude was used to estimate and then attenuate the DC artifact. Where measurements of pulse amplitude were not available (as with standard low sample rate systems), the DC artifact could be estimated from the stimulus envelope. The present artifact removal approach allows accurate measurement of LAEPs from CI subjects from single channel recordings, increasing their feasibility and utility as an accessible objective measure of CI function.

  16. Productivity Improvement for the SHX--SEN's Single-Wafer High-Current Ion Implanter

    SciTech Connect

    Ninomiya, Shiro; Ochi, Akihiro; Kimura, Yasuhiko; Yumiyama, Toshio; Kudo, Tetsuya; Kurose, Takeshi; Kariya, Hiroyuki; Tsukihara, Mitsukuni; Ishikawa, Koji; Ueno, Kazuyoshi

    2011-01-07

    Equipment productivity is a critical issue for device fabrication. For ion implantation, productivity is determined both by ion current at the wafer and by utilization efficiency of the ion beam. Such improvements not only result in higher fabrication efficiency but also reduce consumption of both electrical power and process gases. For high-current ion implanters, reduction of implant area is a key factor to increase efficiency. SEN has developed the SAVING system (Scanning Area Variation Implantation with Narrower Geometrical pattern) to address this opportunity. In this paper, three variations of the SAVING system are introduced along with discussion of their effects on fab productivity.

  17. Synthesis of Room-Temperature Ferromagnetic Cr-doped TiO₂(110) Rutile Single Crystals using Ion Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Shutthanandan, V.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Droubay, Timothy C.; Heald, Steve M.; Engelhard, Mark H.; McCready, David E.; Chambers, Scott A.; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Mun, B. S.

    2006-01-01

    Ferromagnetic Cr-doped rutile TiO₂ single crystals were synthesized by high-temperature ion implantation. The associated structural, compositional and magnetic properties were studied by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, proton induced x-ray emission, x-ray diffraction, Cr K- and L-shell near-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometry. Cr was distributed uniformly to the depth of about 300 nm with an average concentration of ~1 at. %. The samples are semiconducting and ferromagnetic as implanted, with a saturation magnetization of 0.29 B/Cr atom at room temperature. Cr is in a formal oxidation state of +3 throughout the implanted region, and no CrO₂ is detected.

  18. Comparison of Maxillary Molar Distalization with an Implant-Supported Distal Jet and a Traditional Tooth-Supported Distal Jet Appliance

    PubMed Central

    Cozzani, Mauro; Pasini, Marco; Zallio, Francesco; Ritucci, Robert; Mutinelli, Sabrina; Mazzotta, Laura; Giuca, Maria Rita; Piras, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Aim. To investigate and compare the efficiency of two appliances for molar distalization: the bone-anchored distal screw (DS) and the traditional tooth-supported distal jet (DJ) for molar distalization and anchorage loss. Methods. Tests (18 subjects) were treated with a DS and controls (18 subjects) were treated with a DJ. Lateral cephalograms were obtained before and at the end of molar distalization and were analysed. Shapiro Wilk test, unpaired t-test, and Wilcoxon rank-sum test were applied according to values distribution. The α level was fixed at 0.05. Results. Maxillary first molars were successfully distalized into a Class I relationship in all patients. The mean molar distalization and treatment time were similar in both groups. The DS group exhibited a spontaneous distalization (2.1 ± 0.9 mm) of the first premolar with control of anchorage loss, distal tipping, extrusion, and skeletal changes. Conclusions. The DS is an adequate compliance-free distalizing appliance that can be used safely for the correction of Class II malocclusions. In comparison to the traditional DJ, the DS enables not only a good rate of molar distalization, but also a spontaneous distalization of the first premolars. PMID:25018770

  19. Implantable cardioverter defibrillator therapy in pediatric and congenital heart disease patients: a single tertiary center experience in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Bo Kyung; Bang, Ji Seok; Choi, Eun Young; Kim, Gi Beom; Kwon, Bo Sang; Noh, Chung Il; Choi, Jung Yun; Kim, Woong Han

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The use of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) to prevent sudden cardiac death is increasing in children and adolescents. This study investigated the use of ICDs in children with congenital heart disease. Methods This retrospective study was conducted on the clinical characteristics and effectiveness of ICD implantation at the department of pediatrics of a single tertiary center between 2007 and 2011. Results Fifteen patients underwent ICD implantation. Their mean age at the time of implantation was 14.5±5.4 years (range, 2 to 22 years). The follow-up duration was 28.9±20.4 months. The cause of ICD implantation was cardiac arrest in 7, sustained ventricular tachycardia in 6, and syncope in 2 patients. The underlying disorders were as follows: ionic channelopathy in 6 patients (long QT type 3 in 4, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia [CPVT] in 1, and J wave syndrome in 1), cardiomyopathy in 5 patients, and postoperative congenital heart disease in 4 patients. ICD coils were implanted in the pericardial space in 2 children (ages 2 and 6 years). Five patients received appropriate ICD shock therapy, and 2 patients received inappropriate shocks due to supraventricular tachycardia. During follow-up, 2 patients required lead dysfunction-related revision. One patient with CPVT suffered from an ICD storm that was resolved using sympathetic denervation surgery. Conclusion The overall ICD outcome was acceptable in most pediatric patients. Early diagnosis and timely ICD implantation are recommended for preventing sudden death in high-risk children and patients with congenital heart disease. PMID:23559974

  20. [Bruxism and overload of periodontium and implants].

    PubMed

    Jacobs, R; De Laat, A

    2000-07-01

    Bruxism is responsible for occlusal tooth wear but can not induce nor aggravate gingivitis or periodontitis. Bruxism induces jiggling forces, which cause a clinical tooth hypermobility, radiologically seen as a widened periodontal space. Although there is no direct causal relation between bruxism and implant failure, implant overload may lead to fractures of the components and bone loss. PMID:11385782

  1. Dental cell sheet biomimetic tooth bud model.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Nelson; Smith, Elizabeth E; Angstadt, Shantel; Zhang, Weibo; Khademhosseini, Ali; Yelick, Pamela C

    2016-11-01

    Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine technologies offer promising therapies for both medicine and dentistry. Our long-term goal is to create functional biomimetic tooth buds for eventual tooth replacement in humans. Here, our objective was to create a biomimetic 3D tooth bud model consisting of dental epithelial (DE) - dental mesenchymal (DM) cell sheets (CSs) combined with biomimetic enamel organ and pulp organ layers created using GelMA hydrogels. Pig DE or DM cells seeded on temperature-responsive plates at various cell densities (0.02, 0.114 and 0.228 cells 10(6)/cm(2)) and cultured for 7, 14 and 21 days were used to generate DE and DM cell sheets, respectively. Dental CSs were combined with GelMA encapsulated DE and DM cell layers to form bioengineered 3D tooth buds. Biomimetic 3D tooth bud constructs were cultured in vitro, or implanted in vivo for 3 weeks. Analyses were performed using micro-CT, H&E staining, polarized light (Pol) microscopy, immunofluorescent (IF) and immunohistochemical (IHC) analyses. H&E, IHC and IF analyses showed that in vitro cultured multilayered DE-DM CSs expressed appropriate tooth marker expression patterns including SHH, BMP2, RUNX2, tenascin and syndecan, which normally direct DE-DM interactions, DM cell condensation, and dental cell differentiation. In vivo implanted 3D tooth bud constructs exhibited mineralized tissue formation of specified size and shape, and SHH, BMP2 and RUNX2and dental cell differentiation marker expression. We propose our biomimetic 3D tooth buds as models to study optimized DE-DM cell interactions leading to functional biomimetic replacement tooth formation.

  2. Dental cell sheet biomimetic tooth bud model.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Nelson; Smith, Elizabeth E; Angstadt, Shantel; Zhang, Weibo; Khademhosseini, Ali; Yelick, Pamela C

    2016-11-01

    Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine technologies offer promising therapies for both medicine and dentistry. Our long-term goal is to create functional biomimetic tooth buds for eventual tooth replacement in humans. Here, our objective was to create a biomimetic 3D tooth bud model consisting of dental epithelial (DE) - dental mesenchymal (DM) cell sheets (CSs) combined with biomimetic enamel organ and pulp organ layers created using GelMA hydrogels. Pig DE or DM cells seeded on temperature-responsive plates at various cell densities (0.02, 0.114 and 0.228 cells 10(6)/cm(2)) and cultured for 7, 14 and 21 days were used to generate DE and DM cell sheets, respectively. Dental CSs were combined with GelMA encapsulated DE and DM cell layers to form bioengineered 3D tooth buds. Biomimetic 3D tooth bud constructs were cultured in vitro, or implanted in vivo for 3 weeks. Analyses were performed using micro-CT, H&E staining, polarized light (Pol) microscopy, immunofluorescent (IF) and immunohistochemical (IHC) analyses. H&E, IHC and IF analyses showed that in vitro cultured multilayered DE-DM CSs expressed appropriate tooth marker expression patterns including SHH, BMP2, RUNX2, tenascin and syndecan, which normally direct DE-DM interactions, DM cell condensation, and dental cell differentiation. In vivo implanted 3D tooth bud constructs exhibited mineralized tissue formation of specified size and shape, and SHH, BMP2 and RUNX2and dental cell differentiation marker expression. We propose our biomimetic 3D tooth buds as models to study optimized DE-DM cell interactions leading to functional biomimetic replacement tooth formation. PMID:27565550

  3. Chick tooth induction revisited.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jinglei; Cho, Sung-Won; Ishiyama, Mikio; Mikami, Masato; Hosoya, Akihiro; Kozawa, Yukishige; Ohshima, Hayato; Jung, Han-Sung

    2009-07-15

    Teeth have been missing from Aves for almost 100 million years. However, it is believed that the avian oral epithelium retains the molecular signaling required to induce odontogenesis, and this has been widely examined using heterospecific recombinations with mouse dental mesenchyme. It has also been argued that teeth can form from the avian oral epithelium owing to contamination of the mouse mesenchyme with mouse dental epithelial cells. To investigate the possibility of tooth formation from chick oral epithelium and the characteristics of possible chick enamel, we applied LacZ transgenic mice during heterospecific recombination and examined the further tooth formation. Transmission electron microscopy was used to identify the two tissues during development after heterospecific recombination. No mixing was detected between chick oral epithelium and mouse dental mesenchyme after 2 days, and secretory ameloblasts with Tomes' processes were observed after 1 week. Teeth were formed after 3 weeks with a single cusp pattern, possibly determined by epithelial factors, which is similar to that of the avian tooth in the late Jurassic period. These recombinant teeth were smaller than mouse molars, whereas perfect structures of both ameloblasts and enamel showed histological characteristics similar to those of mice. Together these observations consistent with previous report that odontogenesis is initially directed by species-specific mesenchymal signals interplaying with common epithelial signals. PMID:19226602

  4. Chick tooth induction revisited.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jinglei; Cho, Sung-Won; Ishiyama, Mikio; Mikami, Masato; Hosoya, Akihiro; Kozawa, Yukishige; Ohshima, Hayato; Jung, Han-Sung

    2009-07-15

    Teeth have been missing from Aves for almost 100 million years. However, it is believed that the avian oral epithelium retains the molecular signaling required to induce odontogenesis, and this has been widely examined using heterospecific recombinations with mouse dental mesenchyme. It has also been argued that teeth can form from the avian oral epithelium owing to contamination of the mouse mesenchyme with mouse dental epithelial cells. To investigate the possibility of tooth formation from chick oral epithelium and the characteristics of possible chick enamel, we applied LacZ transgenic mice during heterospecific recombination and examined the further tooth formation. Transmission electron microscopy was used to identify the two tissues during development after heterospecific recombination. No mixing was detected between chick oral epithelium and mouse dental mesenchyme after 2 days, and secretory ameloblasts with Tomes' processes were observed after 1 week. Teeth were formed after 3 weeks with a single cusp pattern, possibly determined by epithelial factors, which is similar to that of the avian tooth in the late Jurassic period. These recombinant teeth were smaller than mouse molars, whereas perfect structures of both ameloblasts and enamel showed histological characteristics similar to those of mice. Together these observations consistent with previous report that odontogenesis is initially directed by species-specific mesenchymal signals interplaying with common epithelial signals.

  5. Attainment of dual-band edge work function by using a single metal gate and single high-k dielectric via ion implantation for HP CMOS device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qiuxia; Xu, G.; Zhou, H.; Zhu, H.; Liu, J.; Wang, Y.; Li, J.; Xiang, J.; Liang, Q.; Wu, H.; Zhong, J.; Xu, M.; Xu, W.; Ma, X.; Wang, X.; Tong, X.; Chen, D.; Yan, J.; Zhao, C.; Ye, T.

    2016-01-01

    Attainment of dual band-edge effective work functions by using a single metal gate and single high k gate dielectric via P/BF2 implantation into a TiN metal gate for HP HKMG CMOS device applications are investigated under a gate-last process flow for the first time. The flat band voltage (VFB) modulations of about -750 mV/570 mV for N-/P-type MOS device with P/BF2 implanted TiN/HfO2/ILSiO2 gate stack are obtained respectively in the experiment range. Suitable low threshold voltages of CMOSFETs are gotten while simultaneously shrinking the EOT. The effects of P/BF2 ion implantation energy, dose and TiN gate thickness on the properties of implanted TiN/HfO2/ILSiO2 gate stack are studied, the possible mechanisms are discussed. This technique has been successfully integrated into the fabrications of aggressively scaled HP HKMG CMOSFETs and 32 CMOS frequency dividers under a gate-last process flow.

  6. Split course interstitial brachytherapy with a source shift: the results of a new iridium implant technique versus single course implants for salvage irradiation of base of tongue cancers in 55 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Housset, M.; Baillet, F.; Delanian, S.; Brunel, P.; Maulard, C.; Michel-Langlet, P.; Huart, J.; Maylin, C.; Boisserie, G. )

    1991-05-01

    Between January 1973 and December 1984, 55 patients with prior irradiation of the oropharynx underwent salvage irradiation for recurrent (26 patients) or second cancers (29 patients) of the base of tongue. The initial irradiation had delivered from 45 to 80 Gy to the base of tongue. One of two techniques of Iridium implantation was used for salvage. Single course implants, delivering 60 Gy, were used until June 1981 in a total of 31 patients. After June 1981, split course implants with a source shift were used in 24 patients in the hope of decreasing treatment complications. The first and second course of the split course implants delivered 35 and 30 Gy, respectively, at a 1-month interval. The active lines of the second implant were placed parallel to and between the position of the lines of the first implant. This shift in the source position resulted in a more uniform dose within the treated volume with a 60% reduction in the high dose sleeves. The overall 3-year survival was 19% (28% T less than or equal to 3 cm). The overall local failure rate was 45.5% (25/55). The difference between the local failure rate after single course implants (52%) and after split course implants (37.5%) was not statistically significative. The response observed after the first course of a split course implant proved to be a reliable indication of the probability of achieving local control after a full course of treatment: 2/14 failures (14%) if the response was greater than or equal to 75% versus 7/10 (70%) if the response was less than 75%. The only complication noted in the 40 patients achieving immediate local control after either implant technique was mucosal necrosis. The introduction of split course implants was followed by a two and a half fold decrease in the incidence of necrosis: 43% (9/21) in the single course group and 16% (3/19) in the split course group.

  7. Fabrication and characterization of a co-planar detector in diamond for low energy single ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, J. B. S.; Aguirre, B. A.; Pacheco, J. L.; Vizkelethy, G.; Bielejec, E.

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate low energy single ion detection using a co-planar detector fabricated on a diamond substrate and characterized by ion beam induced charge collection. Histograms are taken with low fluence ion pulses illustrating quantized ion detection down to a single ion with a signal-to-noise ratio of approximately 10. We anticipate that this detection technique can serve as a basis to optimize the yield of single color centers in diamond. The ability to count ions into a diamond substrate is expected to reduce the uncertainty in the yield of color center formation by removing Poisson statistics from the implantation process.

  8. Evaluation of immediately loaded dental implants bioactivated with platelet-rich plasma placed in the mandibular posterior region: A clinico-radiographic study

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Ullas; Mehta, D. S.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The purpose of the present study was to clinically and radiographically assess the soft and hard tissue changes around the immediately loaded single tooth implants bioactivated with platelet-rich plasma (PRP), placed in the mandibular posterior region. Materials and Methods: A total of 11 patients having single tooth edentulous space in the mandibular posterior region were selected. An endosseous implant was placed after clinical and radiographic examination in each selected site using single stage surgical approach. The patients were followed up at 3, 6, 9, and at 12 months of post implant insertion. The patients were subjected to recording of clinical parameters like modified plaque index, modified gingival index, probing depth, and clinical implant mobility scale. Radiographs made at different intervals were subjected to assessment of bone level mesial and distal to each implant using computer assisted image analysis. Results: Scores for clinical parameters were minimal and comparable. The probing depth around the implant was measured during the follow-up period and the changes observed were statistically non-significant. None of the implants were clinically mobile during the follow-up period. Radiographically, the peri-implant bone resorption both on mesial and distal sides was within normal limit after one year of immediate loading. Finally, the overall success rate for the immediately loaded bioactivated implant placed in the mandibular posterior region was recorded as 100%. Interpretation and Conclusion: The use of platelet-rich plasma may lead to improved early bone apposition around the implant; and thus, results in increased rate of osseointegration. Single stage implant procedure with the adjunctive use of PRP enhances the ability of peri-implant healing tissue to create favorable soft and hard tissue relationships. It also gives the added advantage of psychological boost for the patient by getting fixed replacement of tooth

  9. Immediate replacement of two radicularly fractured and avulsed anterior teeth with cylindrical endosseous implants: a case report.

    PubMed

    Marcus, M D; Dzyak, W R

    1990-11-01

    Occasionally, absolutely healthy teeth are traumatized to the extent that they must be extracted. The use of cylindrical endosseous implants as single-tooth replacements is gaining acceptance. The case of a healthy young adult who suffered a traumatic injury that rendered his maxillary left central and lateral incisors nonrestorable is reviewed.

  10. Single-stage immediate breast reconstruction using a skin-sparing incision and definitive saline implants compared with a two-stage reconstruction using tissue expansion plus implants

    PubMed Central

    Plant, Mathew A; Scilley, Christopher G; Speechley, Mark

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Losing a breast to cancer has significant psychological ramifications, and it has been shown that minimizing this loss can have a profound impact. As a result, breast-conserving therapy or mastectomy followed by breast reconstruction have become the preferred surgical treatments for breast cancer. Limited available breast skin following mastectomy has traditionally necessitated the use of autologous tissue or tissue expansion; however, when reconstructing larger breasts, autologous tissue grafts rarely provide enough tissue and tissue expanders can often take several months to achieve the necessary tissue volume. The skin-sparing mastectomy offers a solution to this lack of skin, and as a result many new options for immediate breast reconstruction have presented. The present pilot study looks at a new method of immediate breast reconstruction involving a Wise pattern skin-sparing mastectomy with placement of a definitive, submuscular saline implant as a way to maintain a large breast size without requiring the patient to undergo a long and painful tissue expansion process. METHODS: A retrospective, case-control study was performed on 12 women who had undergone bilateral mastectomies with immediate reconstruction either with a tissue expander and later placement of definitive saline implant (control group) (n=5) or who had undergone a single-stage reconstruction involving the placement of a definitive submuscular saline implant (experimental group) (n=7). Patients were compared with respect to change in breast size, number of reoperations and operations in total, as well as satisfaction with their reconstruction. RESULTS: Patient satisfaction in both groups was relatively high and there was no statistically significant difference found between the two groups. The experimental group decreased in bra size by 1.4 cup sizes on average whereas the control group experienced no change on average; however, one-third of patient data had to be discarded for

  11. Formation of single crystalline tellurium supersaturated silicon pn junctions by ion implantation followed by pulsed laser melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiyuan, Wang; Yongguang, Huang; Dewei, Liu; Xiaoning, Zhu; Xiao, Cui; Hongliang, Zhu

    2013-06-01

    Pn junctions based on single crystalline tellurium supersaturated silicon were formed by ion implantation followed by pulsed laser melting (PLM). P type silicon wafers were implanted with 245 keV 126Te+ to a dose of 2 × 1015 ions/cm2, after a PLM process (248 nm, laser fluence of 0.30 and 0.35 J/cm2, 1-5 pulses, duration 30 ns), an n+ type single crystalline tellurium supersaturated silicon layer with high carrier density (highest concentration 4.10 × 1019 cm-3, three orders of magnitude larger than the solid solution limit) was formed, it shows high broadband optical absorption from 400 to 2500 nm. Current—voltage measurements were performed on these diodes under dark and one standard sun (AM 1.5), and good rectification characteristics were observed. For present results, the samples with 4-5 pulses PLM are best.

  12. Arsenic implantation-induced intermixing effects on AlGaAs/GaAs single QW structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X. Q.; Li, Z. F.; Chen, X. S.; Lu, W.; Shen, S. C.; Tan, H. H.; Yuan, S.; Jagadish, C.

    2000-06-01

    The effects of intermixing Al 0.54Ga 0.46As/GaAs/Al 0.54Ga 0.46As quantum well (QW) enhanced by arsenic ion implantation and subsequent annealing have been investigated by photoluminescence and photo-modulated reflectance measurements. Comparing with as-grown QW, obvious blueshifts of all the transitions were observed. The H 22 transition was found to be much less sensitive to the implantation doses than that of H 11. The experimental results are different from the theoretical results calculated by using the model of error function profile of Al composition. The results are fruitful for understanding the potential profile after intermixing enhanced by arsenic ion implantation, and also for the application of implantation enhanced intermixing effects on devices, such as QW lasers and photodetectors, opto-nonlinear devices, etc..

  13. Cochlear implantation in children with single-sided deafness: does aetiology and duration of deafness matter?

    PubMed

    Arndt, Susan; Prosse, Susanne; Laszig, Roland; Wesarg, Thomas; Aschendorff, Antje; Hassepass, Frederike

    2015-01-01

    For adult patients with single-sided deafness (SSD), treatment with a cochlear implant (CI) is well established as an acceptable and beneficial hearing rehabilitation method administered routinely in clinical practice. In contrast, for children with SSD, CI has been applied less often to date, with the rationale to decide either on a case-by-case basis or under the realm of clinical research. The aim of our clinical study was to evaluate the longitudinal benefits of CI for a group of children diagnosed with SSD and to compare their outcomes with respect to patient characteristics. Evaluating a pool of paediatric SSD patients presenting for possible CI surgery revealed that the primary aetiology of deafness was congenital cochlear nerve deficiency. A subgroup of children meeting the CI candidacy criteria for the affected ear (the majority with acquired hearing loss) were enrolled in the study. Preliminary group results suggest substantial improvements in speech comprehension in noise and in the ability to localise sound, which was demonstrated through objective and subjective assessments after CI treatment for the group, with results varying from patient to patient. Our study shows a trend towards superior outcomes for children with acquired hearing loss and a shorter duration of hearing loss compared to congenitally deafened children who had a longer duration of SSD. This indicates an interactive influence of the age at onset, aetiology and duration of deafness upon the restoration of binaural integration and the overall benefits of sound stimulation to two ears after CI treatment. Continued longitudinal investigation of these children and further studies in larger groups may provide more guidance on the optimal timing of treatment for paediatric patients with acquired and congenital SSD. PMID:25999052

  14. Cochlear implantation in children with single-sided deafness: does aetiology and duration of deafness matter?

    PubMed

    Arndt, Susan; Prosse, Susanne; Laszig, Roland; Wesarg, Thomas; Aschendorff, Antje; Hassepass, Frederike

    2015-01-01

    For adult patients with single-sided deafness (SSD), treatment with a cochlear implant (CI) is well established as an acceptable and beneficial hearing rehabilitation method administered routinely in clinical practice. In contrast, for children with SSD, CI has been applied less often to date, with the rationale to decide either on a case-by-case basis or under the realm of clinical research. The aim of our clinical study was to evaluate the longitudinal benefits of CI for a group of children diagnosed with SSD and to compare their outcomes with respect to patient characteristics. Evaluating a pool of paediatric SSD patients presenting for possible CI surgery revealed that the primary aetiology of deafness was congenital cochlear nerve deficiency. A subgroup of children meeting the CI candidacy criteria for the affected ear (the majority with acquired hearing loss) were enrolled in the study. Preliminary group results suggest substantial improvements in speech comprehension in noise and in the ability to localise sound, which was demonstrated through objective and subjective assessments after CI treatment for the group, with results varying from patient to patient. Our study shows a trend towards superior outcomes for children with acquired hearing loss and a shorter duration of hearing loss compared to congenitally deafened children who had a longer duration of SSD. This indicates an interactive influence of the age at onset, aetiology and duration of deafness upon the restoration of binaural integration and the overall benefits of sound stimulation to two ears after CI treatment. Continued longitudinal investigation of these children and further studies in larger groups may provide more guidance on the optimal timing of treatment for paediatric patients with acquired and congenital SSD.

  15. Stress distribution in bone: single-unit implant prostheses veneered with porcelain or a new composite material.

    PubMed

    Juodzbalys, Gintaras; Kubilius, Ricardas; Eidukynas, Valdas; Raustia, Aune M

    2005-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to simulate dynamic and static occlusal loading on one unit fixed, implant-supported prostheses veneered with porcelain and with GRADIA in a 3-dimensional finite element model of the human mandible to analyze and compare the resultant stresses in the superstructures and in the supporting bone. Calculation and visualization of stress, deformation, and displacement of complex structures under simulated forces were evaluated by finite element analysis (FEA) using ANSYS. The device employed was from the OSTEOFIX Dental Implant System (Oulu, Finland), and the veneering materials used were standard dental porcelain and GC GRADIA (Tokyo, Japan), a new composite material. Two different loading conditions were considered: static and transitional or impact, each delivered in three different directions: horizontal (Fh) at 0 degrees , vertical (Fv) at 90 degrees , and oblique (Fo) at 120 degrees . The proportion of the force: magnitude was fh:fv:fo = 1:3.5:7. A vertical load of 500 N, a horizontal load of 143 N, and an oblique load of 1000 N were applied. The results showed that the highest stresses in the bone-implant interface occurred in the region of cortical bone adjacent to the first thread of implants in all models and varied within 6.5%. Maximum stresses and displacements were higher (7%) in those models with statically loaded implants as compared with those that had been dynamically loading. The direction of loading played a major role in determining stress levels and they varied at up to 85%. It was shown that with dynamic loads, the peak of 1.568 mm was registered in the model with the GRADIA veneering material. This displacement was 6.5% higher than that found with the Vita VMK 68 veneers. These results suggest that the implant superstructure-fixed single crown veneering materials-porcelain and GRADIA played minor influences to the displacements and stresses in the implant supported bone with a 1% variance. One of the reasons for this

  16. Single-Dose Local Simvastatin Injection Improves Implant Fixation via Increased Angiogenesis and Bone Formation in an Ovariectomized Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Jie; Yang, Ning; Fu, Xin; Cui, Yueyi; Guo, Qi; Ma, Teng; Yin, Xiaoxue; Leng, Huijie; Song, Chunli

    2015-01-01

    Background Statins have been reported to promote bone formation. However, taken orally, their bioavailability is low to the bones. Implant therapies require a local repair response, topical application of osteoinductive agents, or biomaterials that promote implant fixation. Material/Methods The present study evaluated the effect of a single local injection of simvastatin on screw fixation in an ovariectomized rat model of osteoporosis. Results Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, micro-computed tomography, histology, and biomechanical tests revealed that 5 and 10 mg simvastatin significantly improved bone mineral density by 18.2% and 22.4%, respectively (P<0.05); increased bone volume fraction by 51.0% and 57.9%, trabecular thickness by 16.4% and 18.9%, trabeculae number by 112.0% and 107.1%, and percentage of osseointegration by 115.7% and 126.3%; and decreased trabeculae separation by 34.1% and 36.6%, respectively (all P<0.01). Bone mineral apposition rate was significantly increased (P<0.01). Furthermore, implant fixation was significantly increased (P<0.05), and bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) expression was markedly increased. Local injection of a single dose of simvastatin also promoted angiogenesis. Vessel number, volume, thickness, surface area, and vascular volume per tissue volume were significantly increased (all P<0.01). Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), VEGF receptor-2, von Willebrand factor, and platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 expression were enhanced. Conclusions A single local injection of simvastatin significantly increased bone formation, promoted osseointegration, and enhanced implant fixation in ovariectomized rats. The underlying mechanism appears to involve enhanced BMP2 expression and angiogenesis in the target bone. PMID:25982481

  17. Tooth Germ-Like Construct Transplantation for Whole-Tooth Regeneration: An In Vivo Study in the Miniature Pig.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kai-Chiang; Kitamura, Yutaka; Wu, Chang-Chin; Chang, Hao-Hueng; Ling, Thai-Yen; Kuo, Tzong-Fu

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of whole-tooth regeneration using a tooth germ-like construct. Dental pulp from upper incisors, canines, premolars, and molars were extracted from sexually mature miniature pigs. Pulp tissues were cultured and expanded in vitro to obtain dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), and cells were differentiated into odontoblasts and osteoblasts. Epithelial cells were isolated from gingival epithelium. The epithelial cells, odontoblasts, and osteoblasts were seeded onto the surface, upper, and lower layers, respectively, of a bioactive scaffold. The lower first and second molar tooth germs were removed bilaterally and the layered cell/scaffold constructs were transplanted to the mandibular alveolar socket of a pig. At 13.5 months postimplantation, seven of eight pigs developed two teeth with crown, root, and pulp structures. Enamel-like tissues, dentin, cementum, odontoblasts, and periodontal tissues were found upon histological inspection. The regenerated tooth expressed dentin matrix protein-1 and osteopontin. All pigs had regenerated molar teeth regardless of the original tooth used to procure the DPSCs. Pigs that had tooth germs removed or who received empty scaffolds did not develop teeth. Although periodontal ligaments were generated, ankylosis was found in some animals. This study revealed that implantation of a tooth germ-like structure generated a complete tooth with a high success rate. The implant location may influence the morphology of the regenerated tooth.

  18. Advantages and Disadvantages of Double Threaded Dental Implant Screws As Opposed to Single-Threaded: A Study from a Biomechanical Perspective by the Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez-Arenal, A.; de Cos Juez, F. J.; Lasheras, F. Sánchez; Quevedo, M. Mauvezin

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of the present article is to study the advantages from a biomechanical point of view of the use of a double-threaded dental implant over the more common single-threaded one. For this purpose a 3D model of a portion of the jaw was generated. In this model four different bone areas were distinguished (transition cortical, transition trabecular, bulk cortical and bulk trabecular). Not only was the portion of the jaw created with CAD software but also two different implants geometries, one with only one thread (single-threaded) and the other with two threads (double-threaded). The loading condition was defined as 150 N intrusive forces and 15 N lingual-labial forces acting on the implant. The results of the present study shown that from a macroscopic point of view, the choice of one or other of the dental implants does not make a significant difference in the general behaviour of the jaw. In spite of this and notwithstanding the effects of the transition bone-implant, the stress distribution achieved by the single-threaded dental implant is more uniform. This effect is better for the biomechanics of the jaw. The advantage presented by the double threaded implant is that due to its larger surface the osseointegration is better than in the single-threaded version.

  19. Human fetal islet transplantation in type 1 diabetic patients: comparison of metabolic effects between single and multiple implantation regimens.

    PubMed

    Djordjevic, P B; Lalic, N M; Jotic, A; Paunovic, I; Lalic, K; Raketic, N; Nikolic, D; Zamaklar, M; Rajkovic, N; Lukic, L; Dimitrijevic-Sreckovic, V; Dragasevic, M; Nikolic, D; Markovic, I

    2004-11-01

    Previous studies suggest that multiple transplantations might be equally efficient to a single regimen for human adult islets. The aim of this study was to compare metabolic parameters after each of the two regimens of human fetal islet (HFI) transplantation in type 1 diabetics. In group A (single transplant, n = 9), 180 +/- 20 x 1000 HFI equivalents (IEQs) were implanted by a single IM injection; in group B (multiple transplants, n = 8) islets were implanted as three consecutive injections (60 +/- 10 x 1000 IEQs) at 7-day intervals. We analyzed the metabolic parameters on days -1, 30, 60, 90, 120, 150, and 180 after the procedure. Among the metabolic parameters, we evaluated insulin secretion capacity-ISC (C peptide, RIA), metabolic control (HbA1c, chromatography), and insulin daily dose IDD. We found that C peptide levels increased, peaking on day 90 (A: 0.38 +/- 0.15; B: 0.34 +/- 0.19 nmol/L, P = NS) and then rapidly decreasing without differences, the HbA1c levels and IDD decreased in the same manner without differences between the groups. Our results demonstrate that multiple and single islet transplant regimens are equally efficient to temporarily restore a significant ISC with improvement of metabolic and clinical parameters. The results imply that the two regimens have an equal clinical value.

  20. Overview of Tooth Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... as when chewing or when tapped by a dental instrument. Pain in a tooth suggests tooth decay or gum ... fractured. Sinus congestion can cause similar symptoms of pain in the area of the upper ... CONSUMERS: ...

  1. Tooth-Colored Fillings

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dental Implants Dentures Direct Bonding Implants versus Bridges Orthodontics and Aligners Periodontal Plastic Surgery Porcelain Crowns Porcelain ... Dental Implants Dentures Direct Bonding Implants versus Bridges Orthodontics and Aligners Periodontal Plastic Surgery Porcelain Crowns Porcelain ...

  2. Alveolar Ridge Contouring with Free Connective Tissue Graft at Implant Placement: A 5-Year Consecutive Clinical Study.

    PubMed

    Hanser, Thomas; Khoury, Fouad

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated volume stability after alveolar ridge contouring with free connective tissue grafts at implant placement in single-tooth gaps. A total of 52 single-tooth gaps with labial volume deficiencies in the maxilla (incisors, canines, and premolars) were consecutively treated with implants and concomitant free palatal connective tissue grafts in 46 patients between 2006 and 2009. Implants had to be covered with at least 2 mm peri-implant local bone after insertion. At implant placement, a free connective tissue graft from the palate was fixed inside a labial split-thickness flap to form an existing concave buccal alveolar ridge contour due to tissue volume deficiency into a convex shape. Standardized volumetric measurements of the labial alveolar contour using a template were evaluated before connective tissue grafting and at 2 weeks, 1 year, and 5 years after implantprosthetic incorporation. Tissue volume had increased significantly (P < .05) in all six reference points representing the outer alveolar soft tissue contour of the implant before connective tissue grafting to baseline (2 weeks after implant-prosthetic incorporation). Statistically, 50% of the reference points (P > .05) kept their volume from baseline to 1 year after prosthetic incorporation and from baseline to 5 years after prosthetic incorporation, respectively, whereas reference points located within the area of the implant sulcus showed a significant (P < .05) decrease in volume. Clinically, 5 years after prosthetic incorporation the originally concave buccal alveolar contour was still convex in all implants, leading to a continuous favorable anatomical shape and improved esthetic situation. Intraoral radiographs confirmed osseointegration and stable peri-implant parameters with a survival rate of 100% after a follow-up of approximately 5 years. Implant placement with concomitant free connective tissue grafting appears to be an appropriate long-term means to contour preexisting buccal

  3. A photoluminescence study of CuInSe2 single crystals ion implanted with 5 keV hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakushev, M. V.; Krustok, J.; Grossberg, M.; Volkov, V. A.; Mudryi, A. V.; Martin, R. W.

    2016-03-01

    CuInSe2 single crystals ion implanted with 5 keV hydrogen at doses from 3  ×  1014 to 1016 cm-2 are studied by photoluminescence (PL). The PL spectra before and after implantation reveal two bands, a main dominant band centred at 0.96 eV and a lower intensity band centred at 0.93 eV. Detailed analysis of the shape of these bands, their temperature and excitation intensity dependencies allow the recombination mechanisms to be identified as band-to-tail (BT) and band-to-impurity (BI), respectively. The implantation causes gradual red shifts of the bands increasing linearly with the dose. The average depth of potential fluctuations is also estimated to increase with the dose and saturates for doses above 1015 cm-2. A model is proposed which associates the potential fluctuations with the antisite defects copper on indium site and indium on copper site. The saturation is explained by full randomization of copper and indium atoms on the cation sub-lattice.

  4. Immediate versus conventional loaded single implants in the posterior mandible: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Moraschini, V; Porto Barboza, E

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this meta-analysis was to compare implant survival, marginal bone loss, and complications between immediate and conventional loading of single implants installed in the posterior mandible. An extensive electronic search was performed of PubMed, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials to identify relevant articles published up to January 2015. After the selection process, five studies met the eligibility criteria and were included. The results of the meta-analysis were expressed in terms of the odds ratio (OR) or standardized mean difference (SMD), with a confidence interval (CI) of 95%. Results were pooled according to heterogeneity using the fixed- or random-effects model. There was no statistically significant difference between the two techniques (immediate loading vs. conventional loading) with regard to implant survival (OR 1.71, 95% CI 0.40 to 7.36; P=0.47). There was no statistically significant difference in marginal bone loss (SMD -0.58, 95% CI -1.55 to 0.38; P=0.24). The reported mechanical and biological complications were common to both types of intervention, with the exception of probing depth, which was greater following the immediate loading technique (SMD 0.13, 95% CI -0.19 to 0.44), although this was not statistically significant (P=0.43).

  5. Single-Stage Anterior Debridement and Fibular Allograft Implantation Followed by Posterior Instrumentation for Complicated Infectious Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Tzu-Chun; Yang, Shih-Chieh; Chen, Hung-Shu; Kao, Yu-Hsien; Tu, Yuan-Kun; Chen, Wen-Jer

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Complicated infectious spondylitis is an infrequent infection with severe spinal destruction, and is indicated for combined anterior and posterior surgeries. Staged debridement and subsequent reconstruction is advocated in the literature. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility and clinical outcome of patients who underwent single-stage combined anterior debridement and fibular allograft implantation followed by supplemental posterior fixation for complicated infectious spondylitis. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 20 patients who underwent single-stage combined anterior and posterior surgeries for complicated infectious spondylitis from January 2005 to December 2010. Complicated infectious spondylitis was defined as at least 1 vertebral osteomyelitis with pathological fracture or severe bony destruction and adjacent discitis, based on imaging studies. The severity of the neurological status was evaluated using the Frankel scale. The clinical outcomes were assessed by careful physical examination and regular serological tests to determine the visual analog scale (VAS) score and Macnab criteria. Correction of the sagittal Cobb angle on radiography was also compared before and after surgery. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to analyze patient surgical prognosis and radiological findings. All patients with complicated infectious spondylitis were successfully treated by single-stage combined anterior and posterior surgeries. No patients experienced neurologic deterioration. The average VAS score was 7.8 before surgery and significantly decreased to 2.1 at discharge. Three patients had excellent outcomes and 17 had good outcomes, based on Macnab criteria. The average length of the allograft for reconstruction was 64.0 mm. Kyphotic deformity improved in all patients, with an average correction angle of 13.4°. There was no implant breakage or allograft dislodgement during at least 36 months of follow-up. Single

  6. Sound source localization and speech understanding in complex listening environments by single-sided deaf listeners after cochlear implantation

    PubMed Central

    Zeitler, Daniel M.; Dorman, Michael F.; Natale, Sarah J.; Loiselle, Louise; Yost, William A.; Gifford, Rene H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess improvements in sound source localization and speech understanding in complex listening environments following unilateral cochlear implantation for single-sided deafness (SSD). Study Design Non-randomized, open, prospective case series Setting Tertiary referral center Patients Nine subjects with a unilateral cochlear implant (CI) for SSD (SSD-CI) were tested. Reference groups for the task of sound source localization included young (n=45) and older (n=12) normal hearing (NH) subjects and 27 bilateral CI (BCI) subjects. Intervention Unilateral cochlear implantation Main outcome measures Sound source localization was tested with 13 loudspeakers in a 180 arc in front of the subject. Speech understanding was tested with the subject seated in an 8-loudspeaker sound system arrayed in a 360-degree pattern. Directionally appropriate noise, originally recorded in a restaurant, was played from each loudspeaker. Speech understanding in noise was tested using the Azbio sentence test and sound source localization quantified using root mean square error. Results All CI subjects showed poorer-than-normal sound source localization. SSD-CI subjects showed a bimodal distribution of scores - six subjects had scores near the mean of those obtained by BCI subjects, while three had scores just outside the 95th percentile of NH listeners. Speech understanding improved significantly in the restaurant environment when the signal was presented to the side of the CI. Conclusions Cochlear implantation for SSD can offer improved speech understanding in complex listening environments and improved sound source localization in both children and adults. On tasks of sound source localization, SSD-CI patients typically perform as well as BCI patients and, in some cases, achieve scores at the upper boundary of normal performance. PMID:26375967

  7. Resin-bonded restorations: a strategy for managing anterior tooth loss in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Zitzmann, Nicola U; Özcan, Mutlu; Scherrer, Susanne S; Bühler, Julia M; Weiger, Roland; Krastl, Gabriel

    2015-04-01

    In children or adolescents with anterior tooth loss, space closure with the patient's own teeth should be considered as the first choice to avoid lifelong restorative needs. Thorough diagnostics and treatment planning are required when autotransplantation or orthodontic space closure is considered. If these options are not indicated and a single tooth implant restoration is considered, implant placement should be postponed until adulthood, particularly in young women and in patients with hyperdivergent skeletal growth pattern. A ceramic resin-bonded fixed dental prosthesis with 1 retainer is an excellent treatment solution for the interim period; it may also serve as a long-term restoration, providing that sound enamel structure is present, sufficient framework dimensions have been provided, adhesive cementation techniques have been meticulously applied, and functional contacts of the cantilever pontic avoided. In contrast, a resin-bonded fixed dental prosthesis with a metal framework and retentive preparation is indicated if the palatal enamel structure is compromised, interocclusal clearance is limited, splinting (such as after orthodontic treatment) is required, or more than 1 tooth has to be replaced. PMID:25702966

  8. Simplified type 3 implant placement, after alveolar ridge preservation: a case study

    PubMed Central

    CECCHETTI, F.; GERMANO, F.; BARTULI, F.N.; ARCURI, L.; SPUNTARELLI, M.

    2014-01-01

    Alveolar ridge, after tooth extraction, could reduce its volume up to 50% in buccal-lingual width in the first twelve months and residual dimensions could interfere with correct three dimensional placement of implants and influence negatively treatment outcomes with regard to function and aesthetic aspects. Over the last decades, several approaches have been proposed and tested in order to prevent ridge volumetric contraction and provide maximum bone availability for implant procedure. This article presents a case study with a single anterior tooth replacement, illustrating socket seal technique followed by a type 3 timing implant placement. Immediately after tooth extraction, residual socket was grafted using Deproteinized Bovine Bone Mineral and a free gingival punch harvested from palate. After 3 months, a root-form titanium implant was inserted without additional regenerative procedures. Follow-up examination revealed favourable preservation of soft tissue width and height in the aesthetic area. Socket seal approach maximizes soft tissue healing, preserving ridge envelope and the subsequent implant placement, furthermore, results simplified, as any augmentation techniques are required. Clinical advantages of this method include predictable preservation of the soft tissues, favourable healing features, easy handling of graft materials and a positive benefit-cost ratio. PMID:25992262

  9. Measurement of tooth movement.

    PubMed

    Isaacson, R J; Worms, F W; Speidel, T M

    1976-09-01

    1. Tooth movement relative to the alveolar bone can be precisely described only by superimposing on fixed points in the bone. Implants are the best known way today. Over short-term studies laminagraphy and the use of bony trabeculations are also useful. Remodeling occurs extensively on bony surfaces, making them too labile for use as stable landmarks. To project small amounts of tooth movement based on the use of such methods is so questionable as to represent little better than a guess or a clinical impression. 2. Growth can be separated into vertical and anteroposterior vectors with respect to the dentition. Since the occlusion is the concern, orientation of vertical and anteroposterior vectors to the occlusal plane is a reasonable baseline. The vertical and anteroposterior dental changes may not show a linear relationship in the anterior and posterior parts of the mouth when jaw rotations are occurring. 3. Growth can be disproportionate in either the vertical and/or the anteroposteroir plane of space. If the vertical increments of the anterior face differ from the vertical increments at the posterior face, mandibular rotations occur. This growth is accompanied by dental compensations that tend to mask the rotation. Therefore, open bite and deep bite are frequently skeletal growth problems. 4. Disproportional forward growth of the maxilla or mandible in an anteroposterior direction can lead to Class II or III relations. The growth that leads to Class II or Class III is accompanied by dental migrations that tend to mask this disproportionate growth. Orthodontic treatment of growth disproportionalities usually represents attempts to make the teeth further compensate. If surgical options are elected, the dental compensations should be removed prior to surgery in order to achieve a full surgical correction. 5. The teeth tend to move and grow in the opposite direction of the growth disproportionality. The teeth tend to mask the disproportionality. Thus, in an open

  10. Key systemic and environmental risk factors for implant failure.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Dolphus R; Jasper, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Dental implants are an important treatment option for patients interested in replacing lost or missing teeth. Although a robust body of literature has reviewed risk factors for tooth loss, the evidence for risk factors associated with dental implants is less well defined. This article focuses on key systemic risk factors relating to dental implant failure, as well as on perimucositis and peri-implantitis.

  11. Current trends in dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Gaviria, Laura; Salcido, John Paul; Guda, Teja

    2014-01-01

    Tooth loss is very a very common problem; therefore, the use of dental implants is also a common practice. Although research on dental implant designs, materials and techniques has increased in the past few years and is expected to expand in the future, there is still a lot of work involved in the use of better biomaterials, implant design, surface modification and functionalization of surfaces to improve the long-term outcomes of the treatment. This paper provides a brief history and evolution of dental implants. It also describes the types of implants that have been developed, and the parameters that are presently used in the design of dental implants. Finally, it describes the trends that are employed to improve dental implant surfaces, and current technologies used for the analysis and design of the implants. PMID:24868501

  12. Current trends in dental implants.

    PubMed

    Gaviria, Laura; Salcido, John Paul; Guda, Teja; Ong, Joo L

    2014-04-01

    Tooth loss is very a very common problem; therefore, the use of dental implants is also a common practice. Although research on dental implant designs, materials and techniques has increased in the past few years and is expected to expand in the future, there is still a lot of work involved in the use of better biomaterials, implant design, surface modification and functionalization of surfaces to improve the long-term outcomes of the treatment. This paper provides a brief history and evolution of dental implants. It also describes the types of implants that have been developed, and the parameters that are presently used in the design of dental implants. Finally, it describes the trends that are employed to improve dental implant surfaces, and current technologies used for the analysis and design of the implants.

  13. Dynamic transcriptional symmetry-breaking in pre-implantation mammalian embryo development revealed by single-cell RNA-seq.

    PubMed

    Shi, Junchao; Chen, Qi; Li, Xin; Zheng, Xiudeng; Zhang, Ying; Qiao, Jie; Tang, Fuchou; Tao, Yi; Zhou, Qi; Duan, Enkui

    2015-10-15

    During mammalian pre-implantation embryo development, when the first asymmetry emerges and how it develops to direct distinct cell fates remain longstanding questions. Here, by analyzing single-blastomere transcriptome data from mouse and human pre-implantation embryos, we revealed that the initial blastomere-to-blastomere biases emerge as early as the first embryonic cleavage division, following a binomial distribution pattern. The subsequent zygotic transcriptional activation further elevated overall blastomere-to-blastomere biases during the two- to 16-cell embryo stages. The trends of transcriptional asymmetry fell into two distinct patterns: for some genes, the extent of asymmetry was minimized between blastomeres (monostable pattern), whereas other genes, including those known to be lineage specifiers, showed ever-increasing asymmetry between blastomeres (bistable pattern), supposedly controlled by negative or positive feedbacks. Moreover, our analysis supports a scenario in which opposing lineage specifiers within an early blastomere constantly compete with each other based on their relative ratio, forming an inclined 'lineage strength' that pushes the blastomere onto a predisposed, yet flexible, lineage track before morphological distinction.

  14. Comparative evaluation of chewing function with removable partial dentures and fixed prostheses supported by the single-crystal sapphire implant in the Kennedy Class II partially edentulous mandible.

    PubMed

    Akagawa, Y; Okane, H; Kondo, N; Tsuga, K; Tsuru, H

    1989-01-01

    Differential chewing function with removable partial dentures (RPDs) and fixed prostheses supported by the single-crystal sapphire implant was evaluated in five subjects with Kennedy Class II partially edentulous mandibles by means of electromyography. Rehabilitation with the single-crystal sapphire implant resulted in regular chewing patterns with a low variation coefficient and higher activity of chewing-side masticatory muscles compared to RPD rehabilitation. This difference in chewing function between the two rehabilitation modalities could be the result of differences in stability of occlusion and neurophysiologic feedback systems.

  15. Tooth formation - delayed or absent

    MedlinePlus

    Delayed or absent tooth formation; Teeth - delayed or absent formation ... The age at which a tooth comes in varies. Most infants get their first tooth between 6 and 9 months, but it may be earlier or later. ...

  16. Anisotropy of electrical conductivity in dc due to intrinsic defect formation in α-Al2O3 single crystal implanted with Mg ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tardío, M.; Egaña, A.; Ramírez, R.; Muñoz-Santiuste, J. E.; Alves, E.

    2016-07-01

    The electrical conductivity in α-Al2O3 single crystals implanted with Mg ions in two different crystalline orientations, parallel and perpendicular to c axis, was investigated. The samples were implanted at room temperature with energies of 50 and 100 keV and fluences of 1 × 1015, 5 × 1015 and 5 × 1016 ions/cm2. Optical characterization reveals slight differences in the absorption bands at 6.0 and 4.2 eV, attributed to F type centers and Mie scattering from Mg precipitates, respectively. DC electrical measurements using the four and two-point probe methods, between 295 and 490 K, were used to characterize the electrical conductivity of the implanted area (Meshakim and Tanabe, 2001). Measurements in this temperature range indicate that: (1) the electrical conductivity is thermally activated independently of crystallographic orientation, (2) resistance values in the implanted region decrease with fluence levels, and (3) the I-V characteristic of electrical contacts in samples with perpendicular c axis orientation is clearly ohmic, whereas contacts are blocking in samples with parallel c axis. When thin layers are sequentially removed from the implanted region by immersing the sample in a hot solution of nitric and fluorhydric acids the electrical resistance increases until reaching the values of non-implanted crystal (Jheeta et al., 2006). We conclude that the enhancement in conductivity observed in the implanted regions is related to the intrinsic defects created by the implantation rather than to the implanted Mg ions (da Silva et al., 2002; Tardío et al., 2001; Tardío et al., 2008).

  17. Simultaneous Labyrinthectomy and Cochlear Implantation for Patients with Single-Sided Ménière's Disease and Profound Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Doobe, G.; Ernst, A.; Ramalingam, R.; Mittmann, P.; Todt, I.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the treatment outcome of a simultaneous labyrinthectomy and cochlear implantation in patients with single-sided Ménière's disease and profound sensorineural hearing loss. Study Design. Prospective study. Method. Five patients with single-sided Ménière's disease with active vertigo and functional deafness were included. In all cases, simultaneous cochlear implantation combined with labyrinthectomy surgery was performed. The outcome has been evaluated by the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) and speech recognition. Results. The combined labyrinthectomy and cochlear implantation led in all patients to a highly significant reduction of dizziness up to a restitutio ad integrum. After activation of the cochlear implant and rehabilitation, a mean monosyllabic speech understanding of 69% at 65 dB was observed. Conclusion. For patients with single-sided Ménière's disease and profound sensorineural hearing loss the simultaneous labyrinthectomy and cochlear implantation are efficient method for the treatment of vertigo as well as the rehabilitation of the auditory system. PMID:26380275

  18. Patients awareness and attitude towards dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Kohli, Shivani; Bhatia, Shekhar; Kaur, Arvinder; Rathakrishnan, Tiviya

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The aim of the study was to assess the awareness of the patients regarding implant-retained prosthesis as an option for tooth replacement and the knowledge about tooth replacement as a whole including source of information and attitude towards it amongst Malaysian population. Materials and Methods: Information on demographic characteristics, knowledge about implant as an option for missing tooth replacement, source of information and knowledge about other options of tooth replacement were obtained from patients visiting various dental outpatient departments of hospital and private dental clinics using nationwide self-explanatory survey. Results: Amongst the 1013 response retrieved, 27% of respondents felt moderately well informed about the dental implant treatment. Only 9% of the respondents had dental implant treatment before and 17% felt well informed about different alternatives of replacing missing teeth. The dentists were the main source of information regarding dental implant treatment modality followed by friends and electronic media. 55.6% respondents felt implant to be as good as own teeth during function whereas high cost was the major limiting factor for implant treatment. Conclusion: 56% of Malaysian population was aware of dental implant as an alternative for replacing missing teeth. Necessary efforts and measures should be made to raise the awareness of dental implant treatment in the country. PMID:26752875

  19. Methods for implantation of micro-wire bundles and optimization of single/multi-unit recordings from human mesial temporal lobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, A.; Burke, J. F.; Ramayya, A. G.; Jacobs, J.; Sperling, M. R.; Moxon, K. A.; Kahana, M. J.; Evans, J. J.; Sharan, A. D.

    2014-04-01

    Objective. The authors report methods developed for the implantation of micro-wire bundles into mesial temporal lobe structures and subsequent single neuron recording in epileptic patients undergoing in-patient diagnostic monitoring. This is done with the intention of lowering the perceived barriers to routine single neuron recording from deep brain structures in the clinical setting. Approach. Over a 15 month period, 11 patients were implanted with platinum micro-wire bundles into mesial temporal structures. Protocols were developed for (A) monitoring electrode integrity through impedance testing, (B) ensuring continuous 24-7 recording, (C) localizing micro-wire position and ‘splay’ pattern and (D) monitoring grounding and referencing to maintain the quality of recordings. Main results. Five common modes of failure were identified: (1) broken micro-wires from acute tensile force, (2) broken micro-wires from cyclic fatigue at stress points, (3) poor in vivo micro-electrode separation, (4) motion artifact and (5) deteriorating ground connection and subsequent drop in common mode noise rejection. Single neurons have been observed up to 14 days post-implantation and on 40% of micro-wires. Significance. Long-term success requires detailed review of each implant by both the clinical and research teams to identify failure modes, and appropriate refinement of techniques while moving forward. This approach leads to reliable unit recordings without prolonging operative times, which will help increase the availability and clinical viability of human single neuron data.

  20. A Single-Chip Full-Duplex High Speed Transceiver for Multi-Site Stimulating and Recording Neural Implants.

    PubMed

    Mirbozorgi, S Abdollah; Bahrami, Hadi; Sawan, Mohamad; Rusch, Leslie A; Gosselin, Benoit

    2016-06-01

    We present a novel, fully-integrated, low-power full-duplex transceiver (FDT) to support high-density and bidirectional neural interfacing applications (high-channel count stimulating and recording) with asymmetric data rates: higher rates are required for recording (uplink signals) than stimulation (downlink signals). The transmitter (TX) and receiver (RX) share a single antenna to reduce implant size and complexity. The TX uses impulse radio ultra-wide band (IR-UWB) based on an edge combining approach, and the RX uses a novel 2.4-GHz on-off keying (OOK) receiver. Proper isolation (>20 dB) between the TX and RX path is implemented 1) by shaping the transmitted pulses to fall within the unregulated UWB spectrum (3.1-7 GHz), and 2) by space-efficient filtering (avoiding a circulator or diplexer) of the downlink OOK spectrum in the RX low-noise amplifier. The UWB 3.1-7 GHz transmitter can use either OOK or binary phase shift keying (BPSK) modulation schemes. The proposed FDT provides dual band 500-Mbps TX uplink data rate and 100 Mbps RX downlink data rate, and it is fully integrated into standard TSMC 0.18- μm CMOS within a total size of 0.8 mm(2). The total measured power consumption is 10.4 mW in full duplex mode (5 mW at 100 Mbps for RX, and 5.4 mW at 500 Mbps or 10.8 pJ/bit for TX). Additionally, a 3-coil inductive link along with on-chip power management circuits allows to powering up the implantable transceiver wirelessly by delivering 25 mW extracted from a 13.56-MHz carrier signal, at a total efficiency of 41.6%. PMID:26469635

  1. Beads in the Tooth

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Ila

    2011-01-01

    Foreign objects in a tooth are often diagnosed accidentally. A detailed case history, clinical and radiographic examinations are necessary to know the exact nature, size, location of the foreign body and the difficulty involved in its retrieval. In the present case, two beads, one radiopaque and one radiolucent were found in the same tooth at different places of 11-year-old girl. Patient did not reveal proper history out of fear. Both the foreign objects were discovered during routine endodontic procedure which were removed following simple clinical procedure causing minimal damage to the internal tooth structure.

  2. Specific route mapping visualized with GFP of single-file streaming contralateral and systemic metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma cells beginning within hours of orthotopic implantation [correction of implantion].

    PubMed

    Rashidi, Babak; Moossa, Abdool R; Hoffman, Robert M

    2013-08-01

    In this study, we visualized the origin of Lewis lung carcinoma metastasis after transducing tumor cells with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and transplanting them orthotopically in the middle lobe of the right lung of nude mice. Metastasis was visualized in live tissue at single cell resolution by GFP-expression as early as 18 h post-tumor transplant. At this time, single-file streaming lung carcinoma cells already had invaded inferiorly via a tubular lymphatic structure crossing the lower lobes of the lung to the ipsilateral diaphragmatic surface. By post-implantation day 2, the ipsilateral lower lobes of the lung were involved with metastatic cells. By post-implantation day 3, the ipsilateral lower lobes of the lung and the ipsilateral diaphragmatic surface were highly involved with streaming metastatic cells trafficking in single file. By day 4 post-implantation, cancer cells invaded across the diaphragm to the contralateral diaphragmatic surface. Metastatic cells then invaded superiorly through a lymphatic vessel to involve the contralateral mediastinal lymph nodes. In this model of lung cancer, the origin of metastasis was an inferior invasion from the implanted tumor via a lymphatic duct to the ipsilateral diaphragmatic surface. The cancer cells from this site invaded on the surface of the diaphragm to the contralateral diaphragmatic surface and proceeded superiorly through a lymphatic duct to contralateral lymph nodes. Other organs such as the kidneys and the adrenal glands later became involved with metastasis with the contralateral mediastinal lymph nodes as the source. The use of GFP and the highly metastatic orthotopic lung cancer model allowed the visualization of the origin of metastasis at the single-cell level and demonstrated the critical role of lymphatic ducts and the diaphragmatic surface as the path to the contralateral side.

  3. Tooth in oropharynx.

    PubMed

    Nagarajappa, D; Manjunatha, Bs

    2011-09-01

    The incidence of ectopic teeth has increased. In many cases, the etiology of ectopic teeth cannot be identified. Ectopic tooth in deciduous dentition period is very rare and information is limited about its causes and characteristics. The conditions commonly associated with an increased prevalence of ectopic teeth include cleft lip and palate, cleidocranial dysplasia, and Gardner syndrome. The diagnosis is made by the clinical and radiological examinations. The indication for extraction in ectopic teeth cases is in general determined by the presence of symptomatology, or by the need for preventing future complications. We present a case of an ectopic maxillary tooth in a 4 year-old boy. In addition, this report also addresses a young patient with a tooth in the oropharynx with the objective of non traumatic etiology, and such a clinical presentation is extremely rare. The authors believe the case presented here is the first documented case of an ectopic supernumerary tooth seen in the oropharynx. PMID:22144844

  4. Replacing a Missing Tooth

    MedlinePlus

    ... majority of patients with clefts will require full orthodontic treatment, especially if the cleft has passed through ... later replacement of the missing lateral incisor. During orthodontic treatment, an artificial tooth may be attached to ...

  5. Allogenous tooth fragment reattachment

    PubMed Central

    Maitin, Nitin; Maitin, Shipra; Rastogi, Khushboo; Bhushan, Rajarshi

    2013-01-01

    Coronal fractures of the anterior teeth are a common form of dental trauma and its sequelae may impair the establishment and accomplishment of an adequate treatment plan. Among the various treatment options, reattachment of a crown fragment obtained from a previously extracted tooth is a conservative treatment that should be considered for crown fractures of anterior teeth. This article reports reattachment of an allogenous tooth fragment in a fractured maxillary lateral incisor in a 38-year-old patient. It is suggested that allogenous reattachment in a fractured anterior tooth serves to be a better alternative and should be further researched. Aesthetic and functional rehabilitation of a fractured complicated anterior crown using allogenous tooth fragment is a better alternative to other more conventional treatment options. PMID:23845684

  6. Tooth - abnormal colors

    MedlinePlus

    ... thickness of enamel or the calcium or protein content of the enamel. This can cause color changes. Metabolic diseases may ... or coffee Genetic defects that affect the tooth enamel, such as ... from environmental sources (natural high water fluoride levels) ...

  7. Teeth and tooth nerves.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, C; Fried, K; Tuisku, F; Johansson, C S

    1995-02-01

    (1) Although our knowledge on teeth and tooth nerves has increased substantially during the past 25 years, several important issues remain to be fully elucidated. As a result of the work now going on at many laboratories over the world, we can expect exciting new findings and major break-throughs in these and other areas in a near future. (2) Dentin-like and enamel-like hard tissues evolved as components of the exoskeletal bony armor of early vertebrates, 500 million years ago, long before the first appearance of teeth. It is possible that teeth developed from tubercles (odontodes) in the bony armor. The presence of a canal system in the bony plates, of tubular dentin, of external pores in the enamel layer and of a link to the lateral line system promoted hypotheses that the bony plates and tooth precursors may have had a sensory function. The evolution of an efficient brain, of a head with paired sense organs and of toothed jaws concurred with a shift from a sessile filter-feeding life to active prey hunting. (3) The wide spectrum of feeding behaviors exhibited by modern vertebrates is reflected by a variety of dentition types. While the teeth are continuously renewed in toothed non-mammalian vertebrates, tooth turnover is highly restricted in mammals. As a rule, one set of primary teeth is replaced by one set of permanent teeth. Since teeth are richly innervated, the turnover necessitates a local neural plasticity. Another factor calling for a local plasticity is the relatively frequent occurrence of age-related and pathological dental changes. (4) Tooth development is initiated through interactions between the oral epithelium and underlying neural crest-derived mesenchymal cells. The interactions are mediated by cell surface molecules, extracellular matrix molecules and soluble molecules. The possibility that the initiating events might involve a neural component has been much discussed. With respect to mammals, the experimental evidence available does not

  8. Electron Spin Resonance Experiments on a Single Electron in Silicon Implanted with Phosphorous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhman, Dwight R.; Nguyen, K.; Tracy, L. A.; Carr, S.; Borchardt, J.; Bishop, N.; Ten Eyck, G.; Pluym, T.; Wendt, J.; Lilly, M. P.; Carroll, M. S.

    2015-03-01

    In this talk we will discuss the results of our ongoing experiments involving electron spin resonance (ESR) on a single electron in a natural silicon sample. The sample consists of an SET, defined by lithographic polysilicon gates, coupled to nearby phosphorous donors. The SET is used to detect charge transitions and readout the spin of the electron being investigated with ESR. The measurements were done with the sample at dilution refrigerator temperatures in the presence of a 1.3 T magnetic field. We will present data demonstrating Rabi oscillations of a single electron in this system as well as measurements of the coherence time, T2. We will also discuss our results using these and various other pulsing schemes in the context of a donor-SET system. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, a U.S. DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences user facility. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  9. Tooth whitening: current status.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Kimberly; Berry, Thomas G; Woolum, James

    2010-09-01

    This article reviews the history of tooth whitening and its rapid evolution and briefly discusses tooth whitening agents and protocols. The active ingredients and mode of action during the whitening process are explained. The factors affecting the speed of whitening and its final results are discussed, as well as adverse effects and safety precautions. Protocols are explained in detail, and the predicted outcomes, including those for tetracycline-stained teeth, are covered.

  10. Reptilian tooth development.

    PubMed

    Richman, Joy M; Handrigan, Gregory R

    2011-04-01

    Dental patterns in vertebrates range from absence of teeth to multiple sets of teeth that are replaced throughout life. Despite this great variation, most of our understanding of tooth development is derived from studies on just a few model organisms. Here we introduce the reptile as an excellent model in which to study the molecular basis for early dental specification and, most importantly, for tooth replacement. We review recent snake studies that highlight the conserved role of Shh in marking the position of the odontogenic band. The distinctive molecular patterning of the dental lamina in the labial-lingual and oral-aboral axes is reviewed. We explain how these early signals help to specify the tooth-forming and non-tooth forming sides of the dental lamina as well as the presumptive successional lamina. Next, the simple architecture of the reptilian enamel organ is contrasted with the more complex, mammalian tooth bud and we discuss whether or not there is an enamel knot in reptilian teeth. The role of the successional lamina during tooth replacement in squamate reptiles is reviewed and we speculate on the possible formation of a vestigial, post-permanent dentition in mammals. In support of these ideas, we present data on agamid teeth in which development of a third generation is arrested. We suggest that in diphyodont mammals, similar mechanisms may be involved in reducing tooth replacement capacity. Finally, we review the location of label-retaining cells and suggest ways in which these putative dental epithelial stem cells contribute to continuous tooth replacement.

  11. Increase in elastic anisotropy of single crystal tungsten upon He-ion implantation measured with laser-generated surface acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, R. A.; Hofmann, F.; Vega-Flick, A.; Eliason, J. K.; Maznev, A. A.; Every, A. G.; Nelson, K. A.

    2016-10-01

    We report the experimental observation of an increase in the elastic anisotropy of tungsten upon He-ion implantation, probed optically using transient grating spectroscopy. Surface acoustic wave (SAW) velocity measurements were performed on a (110) oriented tungsten single crystal as a function of in-plane propagation direction for unimplanted and implanted samples. Our measurements allow us to finely resolve the remarkably small elastic anisotropy of the samples investigated. SAW velocity calculations are used to interpret the experimental data and to extract the Zener anisotropy parameter η and the elastic constant C44. Upon ion implantation, we observe an increase in the quantity (η-1 ) by a factor of 2.6. The surprising increase in elastic anisotropy agrees with previous theoretical predictions based on ab initio calculations of the effect of self-interstitial atoms and He-filled vacancy defects on the elastic properties of tungsten.

  12. Three-unit bridge construction in anterior single-pontic areas using a metal-free restorative.

    PubMed

    Narcisi, E M

    1999-02-01

    A new glass-ceramic material, IPS Empress 2, is revolutionizing esthetic restorative dentistry by allowing metal-free, three-unit bridge construction in anterior and premolar single-pontic areas. The case discussed in this article illustrates the material's application in the dual-arch restoration of a young woman with congenitally missing teeth. The material was used as an alternative to single-tooth implant restorations to place two maxillary three-unit bridges, one mandibular three-unit bridge, and two mandibular porcelain veneers. IPS Empress 2 provides an esthetic alternative to porcelain-fused-to-metal restorations by facilitating attractive, functional tooth restoration.

  13. Functional tooth regenerative therapy: tooth tissue regeneration and whole-tooth replacement.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Masamitsu; Tsuji, Takashi

    2014-07-01

    Oral and general health is compromised by irreversible dental problems, including dental caries, periodontal disease and tooth injury. Regenerative therapy for tooth tissue repair and whole-tooth replacement is currently considered a novel therapeutic concept with the potential for the full recovery of tooth function. Several types of stem cells and cell-activating cytokines have been identified in oral tissues. These cells are thought to be candidate cell sources for tooth tissue regenerative therapies because they have the ability to differentiate into tooth tissues in vitro and in vivo. Whole-tooth replacement therapy is regarded as an important model for the development of an organ regenerative concept. A novel three-dimensional cell-manipulation method, designated the organ germ method, has been developed to recapitulate organogenesis. This method involves compartmentalisation of epithelial and mesenchymal cells at a high cell density to mimic multicellular assembly conditions and epithelial-mesenchymal interactions. A bioengineered tooth germ can generate a structurally correct tooth in vitro and erupt successfully with the correct tooth structure when transplanted into the oral cavity. We have ectopically generated a bioengineered tooth unit composed of a mature tooth, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone, and that tooth unit was successfully engrafted into an adult jawbone through bone integration. Such bioengineered teeth were able to perform normal physiological tooth functions, such as developing a masticatory potential in response to mechanical stress and a perceptive potential for noxious stimuli. In this review, we describe recent findings and technologies underpinning tooth regenerative therapy.

  14. Characterization and quantification of proteins secreted by single human embryos prior to implantation

    PubMed Central

    Poli, Maurizio; Ori, Alessandro; Child, Tim; Jaroudi, Souraya; Spath, Katharina; Beck, Martin; Wells, Dagan

    2015-01-01

    The use of in vitro fertilization (IVF) has revolutionized the treatment of infertility and is now responsible for 1–5% of all births in industrialized countries. During IVF, it is typical for patients to generate multiple embryos. However, only a small proportion of them possess the genetic and metabolic requirements needed in order to produce a healthy pregnancy. The identification of the embryo with the greatest developmental capacity represents a major challenge for fertility clinics. Current methods for the assessment of embryo competence are proven inefficient, and the inadvertent transfer of non-viable embryos is the principal reason why most IVF treatments (approximately two-thirds) end in failure. In this study, we investigate how the application of proteomic measurements could improve success rates in clinical embryology. We describe a procedure that allows the identification and quantification of proteins of embryonic origin, present in attomole concentrations in the blastocoel, the enclosed fluid-filled cavity that forms within 5-day-old human embryos. By using targeted proteomics, we demonstrate the feasibility of quantifying multiple proteins in samples derived from single blastocoels and that such measurements correlate with aspects of embryo viability, such as chromosomal (ploidy) status. This study illustrates the potential of high-sensitivity proteomics to measure clinically relevant biomarkers in minute samples and, more specifically, suggests that key aspects of embryo competence could be measured using a proteomic-based strategy, with negligible risk of harm to the living embryo. Our work paves the way for the development of “next-generation” embryo competence assessment strategies, based on functional proteomics. PMID:26471863

  15. Dental Implant Systems

    PubMed Central

    Oshida, Yoshiki; Tuna, Elif B.; Aktören, Oya; Gençay, Koray

    2010-01-01

    Among various dental materials and their successful applications, a dental implant is a good example of the integrated system of science and technology involved in multiple disciplines including surface chemistry and physics, biomechanics, from macro-scale to nano-scale manufacturing technologies and surface engineering. As many other dental materials and devices, there are crucial requirements taken upon on dental implants systems, since surface of dental implants is directly in contact with vital hard/soft tissue and is subjected to chemical as well as mechanical bio-environments. Such requirements should, at least, include biological compatibility, mechanical compatibility, and morphological compatibility to surrounding vital tissues. In this review, based on carefully selected about 500 published articles, these requirements plus MRI compatibility are firstly reviewed, followed by surface texturing methods in details. Normally dental implants are placed to lost tooth/teeth location(s) in adult patients whose skeleton and bony growth have already completed. However, there are some controversial issues for placing dental implants in growing patients. This point has been, in most of dental articles, overlooked. This review, therefore, throws a deliberate sight on this point. Concluding this review, we are proposing a novel implant system that integrates materials science and up-dated surface technology to improve dental implant systems exhibiting bio- and mechano-functionalities. PMID:20480036

  16. Choice of a dental implant system.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Peter R; Gartner, Judith L; Norkin, Frederic J

    2005-04-01

    Many dentists are bewildered by the intricacies and complexities of dental implants. They are constantly besieged by product advertisements and can find it difficult to choose which systems to work with. Some dentists are so intimidated by the subject that they choose to avoid getting involved with implants and instead stick to traditional tooth replacement systems. By breaking implants down into 4 main components, the body, collar, connection, and restorative post, it is easier to understand the structure and function of dental implants. Each portion should be designed to achieve certain objectives. Once these structural components are understood, it is easier to compare and contrast differing implant systems.

  17. TEM investigation of the surface layer structure [111]{sub B2} of the single NiTi crystal modified by the Si-ion beam implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Girsova, S. L. Poletika, T. M.; Meisner, S. N. Meisner, L. L.

    2015-10-27

    The study was carried on for the single NiTi crystals subjected to the Si-ion beam implantation. Using the transmission electron microscopy technique (TEM), the surface layer structure [111]{sub B2} was examined for the treated material. The modified near-surface sublayers were found to have different composition. Thus the uppermost sublayer contained mostly oxides; the lower-lying modified sublayer material was in an amorphous state and the thin underlying sublayer had a defect structure.

  18. Acoustic tooth cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    An acoustic oral hygiene unit is described that uses acoustic energy to oscillate mild abrasive particles in a water suspension which is then directed in a low pressure stream onto the teeth. The oscillating abrasives scrub the teeth clean removing food particles, plaque, calculous, and other foreign material from tooth surfaces, interproximal areas, and tooth-gingiva interface more effectively than any previous technique. The relatively low power output and the basic design makes the invention safe and convenient for everyday use in the home without special training. This invention replaces all former means of home dental prophylaxis, and requires no augmentation to fulfill all requirements for daily oral hygienic care.

  19. Three-Dimensional Finite Element Analysis of Anterior Single Implant-Supported Prostheses with Different Bone Anchorages

    PubMed Central

    Verri, Fellippo Ramos; Santiago Júnior, Joel Ferreira; Almeida, Daniel Augusto de Faria; Verri, Ana Caroline Gonçales; de Souza Batista, Victor Eduardo; Lemos, Cleidiel Aparecido Araujo; Noritomi, Pedro Yoshito; Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the stress distribution of monocortical and bicortical implant placement of external hexagon connection in the anterior region of the maxilla by 3D finite element analysis (FEA). 3D models were simulated to represent a bone block of anterior region of the maxilla containing an implant (4.0 × 10.0 mm) and an implant-supported cemented metalloceramic crown of the central incisor. Different techniques were tested (monocortical, bicortical, and bicortical associated with nasal floor elevation). FEA was performed in FEMAP/NeiNastran software using loads of 178 N at 0°, 30°, and 60° in relation to implant long axis. The von Mises, maximum principal stress, and displacement maps were plotted for evaluation. Similar stress patterns were observed for all models. Oblique loads increased the stress concentration on fixation screws and in the cervical area of the implants and bone around them. Bicortical technique showed less movement tendency in the implant and its components. Cortical bone of apical region showed increase of stress concentration for bicortical techniques. Within the limitations of this study, oblique loading increased the stress concentrations for all techniques. Moreover, bicortical techniques showed the best biomechanical behavior compared with monocortical technique in the anterior maxillary area. PMID:26351654

  20. Maryland Bridge: An Interim Prosthesis for Tooth Replacement in Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Jyoti, Sapna; Kaul, Rupali Borkar; Sethi, Ntasha

    2011-01-01

    A space in the anterior region of the dental arch of a youngster, either due to trauma or a congenitally missing tooth, can not only lead to psychological trauma but also create a functional dilemma for the dentist, as the usual treatment options of implant, removable partial denture and fixed partial denture available for adults, are often inapplicable or inconvenient for an adolescent. In such a situation, a resin-bonded fixed partial denture (RBFPD), such as Maryland Bridge fulfills all the requirements of an ideal interim solution till growth completion is achieved and a more permanent tooth replacement option can be explored.

  1. Tooth patterning and evolution.

    PubMed

    Salazar-Ciudad, Isaac

    2012-12-01

    Teeth are a good system for studying development and evolution. Tooth development is largely independent of the rest of the body and teeth can be grown in culture to attain almost normal morphology. Their development is not affected by the patterns of movement or sensorial perception in the embryo. Teeth are hard and easily preserved. Thus, there is plenty of easily accessible information about the patterns of morphological variation occurring between and within species. This review summarises recent work and describes how tooth development can be understood as the coupling between a reaction-diffusion system and differential growth produced by diffusible growth factors: which growth factors are involved, how they affect each other's expression and how they affect the spatial patterns of proliferation that lead to final morphology. There are some aspects of tooth development, however, that do not conform to some common assumptions in many reaction-diffusion models. Those are discussed here since they provide clues about how reaction-diffusion systems may work in actual developmental systems. Mathematical models implementing what we know about tooth development are discussed.

  2. Tooth decay - early childhood

    MedlinePlus

    Bottle mouth; Bottle carries; Baby bottle tooth decay; Early childhood caries (ECC) ... Your child needs strong, healthy baby teeth to chew food and to talk. Baby teeth also make space in children's jaws for their adult teeth to grow in straight. ...

  3. The Rachitic Tooth

    PubMed Central

    Nociti, Francisco H.; Somerman, Martha J.

    2014-01-01

    Teeth are mineralized organs composed of three unique hard tissues, enamel, dentin, and cementum, and supported by the surrounding alveolar bone. Although odontogenesis differs from osteogenesis in several respects, tooth mineralization is susceptible to similar developmental failures as bone. Here we discuss conditions fitting under the umbrella of rickets, which traditionally referred to skeletal disease associated with vitamin D deficiency but has been more recently expanded to include newly identified factors involved in endocrine regulation of vitamin D, phosphate, and calcium, including phosphate-regulating endopeptidase homolog, X-linked, fibroblast growth factor 23, and dentin matrix protein 1. Systemic mineral metabolism intersects with local regulation of mineralization, and factors including tissue nonspecific alkaline phosphatase are necessary for proper mineralization, where rickets can result from loss of activity of tissue nonspecific alkaline phosphatase. Individuals suffering from rickets often bear the additional burden of a defective dentition, and transgenic mouse models have aided in understanding the nature and mechanisms involved in tooth defects, which may or may not parallel rachitic bone defects. This report reviews dental effects of the range of rachitic disorders, including discussion of etiologies of hereditary forms of rickets, a survey of resulting bone and tooth mineralization disorders, and a discussion of mechanisms, known and hypothesized, involved in the observed dental pathologies. Descriptions of human pathology are augmented by analysis of transgenic mouse models, and new interpretations are brought to bear on questions of how teeth are affected under conditions of rickets. In short, the rachitic tooth will be revealed. PMID:23939820

  4. Key systemic and environmental risk factors for implant failure.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Dolphus R; Jasper, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Dental implants are an important treatment option for patients interested in replacing lost or missing teeth. Although a robust body of literature has reviewed risk factors for tooth loss, the evidence for risk factors associated with dental implants is less well defined. This article focuses on key systemic risk factors relating to dental implant failure, as well as on perimucositis and peri-implantitis. PMID:25434557

  5. [Tooth extraction in irradiated areas].

    PubMed

    Gourmet, René; Chaux-Bodard, Anne-Ga lle

    2002-04-01

    Tooth avulsion after head and neck radiotherapy has always been and is still a risk gesture when the avulsion is situated on the irradiation sites. The post-operating effects can become complicated with a delay in healing which can eventually induce an osteoradionecrosis. Dental treatment before the begining of radiotherapy aiming at the elimination of any suspicious tooth, and the generalisation of fluorotherapy aiming at limiting the decayed degeneration, did not make the avulsion indication disappear. At present tooth avulsion is still possible in case of tooth infection or broken tooth.

  6. Computation of tooth axes of existent and missing teeth from 3D CT images.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Wu, Lin; Guo, Huayan; Qiu, Tiantian; Huang, Yuanliang; Lin, Bin; Wang, Lisheng

    2015-12-01

    Orientations of tooth axes are important quantitative information used in dental diagnosis and surgery planning. However, their computation is a complex problem, and the existing methods have respective limitations. This paper proposes new methods to compute 3D tooth axes from 3D CT images for existent teeth with single root or multiple roots and to estimate 3D tooth axes from 3D CT images for missing teeth. The tooth axis of a single-root tooth will be determined by segmenting the pulp cavity of the tooth and computing the principal direction of the pulp cavity, and the estimation of tooth axes of the missing teeth is modeled as an interpolation problem of some quaternions along a 3D curve. The proposed methods can either avoid the difficult teeth segmentation problem or improve the limitations of existing methods. Their effectiveness and practicality are demonstrated by experimental results of different 3D CT images from the clinic.

  7. Characterization of single-sided gate-to-drain non-overlapped implantation nMOSFETs for multi-functional non-volatile memory applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeng, E. S.; Chen, Y. F.; Chang, C. C.; Peng, K. M.; Chou, S. W.; Ho, C. W.; Huang, C. F.; Gong, J.

    2012-02-01

    Novel single-sided non-overlapped implantation (SNOI) nMOSFETs are characterized for their capability of multiple programmable memory functions. These devices can be operated as mask ROMs, EEPROMs or anti-fuses by using a pure logic processing. To function as mask ROMs, they can be mask-coded with the source drain extension (SDE) implantation. They can also be used as EEPROM devices by trapping charges in the side-wall nitride spacers. Furthermore, SNOI devices can be used as antifuses by introducing the punch-through stress at the drain side. The SNOI devices were successfully demonstrated for antifuse operations with an extremely high program/initial readout current ratio exceeding 10 9 and a program speed as high as 1 μs. These novel SNOI devices not only provide non-volatile memory solutions in standard CMOS processing but also give a flexible choice among mask ROM, antifuse and EEPROM functions.

  8. A novel root analogue dental implant using CT scan and CAD/CAM: selective laser melting technology.

    PubMed

    Figliuzzi, M; Mangano, F; Mangano, C

    2012-07-01

    Direct laser metal forming (DLMF) is a new technique which allows solids with complex geometry to be produced by annealing metal powder microparticles in a focused laser beam, according to a computer-generated three-dimensional (3D) model. For dental implants, the fabrication process involves the laser-induced fusion of titanium microparticles, in order to build, layer by layer, the desired object. Modern computed tomography (CT) acquisition and 3D image conversion, combined with the DLMF process, allows the fabrication of custom-made, root-analogue implants (RAI), perfect copies of the radicular units that need replacing. This report demonstrates the successful clinical use of a custom-made, root-analogue DLMF implant. CT images of the residual non-restorable root of a right maxillary premolar were acquired and modified with specific software into a 3D model. From this model, a custom-made, root-analogue, DLMF implant was fabricated. Immediately after tooth extraction, the root-analogue implant was placed in the extraction socket and restored with a single crown. At the 1-year follow-up examination, the custom-made implant showed almost perfect functional and aesthetic integration. The possibility of fabricating custom-made, root-analogue DLMF implants opens new interesting perspectives for immediate placement of dental implants.

  9. A single implantable cardioverter-defibrillator shock unmasking an electrical storm of 389 ventricular tachycardia episodes triggering device therapies.

    PubMed

    Arias, Miguel A; Valverde, Irene; Puchol, Alberto; Castellanos, Eduardo; Rodríguez-Padial, Luis; Sánchez, Ana M; Alvarez-Temiño, María; Palomino, Miguel

    2008-11-01

    We describe the case of a patient with ischemic cardiomyopathy who presented the first implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) shock approximately 5 months after implantation. Device interrogation surprisingly revealed the occurrence of 389 ventricular tachyarrhythmia episodes terminated by asymptomatic antitachycardia pacing (ATP) except for the episode requiring shock. The present case of electrical storm highlights how contemporary tiered ATP schemes constitute a valuable but underused form of termination for ventricular tachyarrhythmias in ICD patients, reducing the number of painful shocks and their adverse consequences.

  10. Revitalization of traumatized immature tooth with platelet-rich fibrin

    PubMed Central

    Faizuddin, Umrana; Solomon, Raji Viola; Mattapathi, Jayadev; Guniganti, Sushma Shravani

    2015-01-01

    Endodontic treatment options for immature, nonvital teeth conventionally include surgical endodontics, apexification with calcium hydroxide, or single visit mineral trioxide aggregate plug. Regeneration is a new concept which is been introduced in the treatment of traumatized open apex tooth. Regeneration of pulp-dentin complex in an infected necrotic tooth with an open apex is possible if the canal is effectively disinfected. The purpose of this case report is to add a new vista in regenerative, endodontic therapy by using platelet-rich fibrin for revitalization of immature nonvital tooth. PMID:26681870

  11. Three tooth kinematic coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, L.C.

    2000-05-23

    A three tooth kinematic coupling is disclosed based on having three theoretical line contacts formed by mating teeth rather than six theoretical point contacts. The geometry requires one coupling half to have curved teeth and the other coupling half to have flat teeth. Each coupling half has a relieved center portion which does not effect the kinematics, but in the limit as the face width approaches zero, three line contacts become six point contacts. As a result of having line contact, a three tooth coupling has greater load capacity and stiffness. The kinematic coupling has application for use in precision fixturing for tools or workpieces, and as a registration device for a work or tool changer or for optics in various products.

  12. Three tooth kinematic coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, Layton C.

    2000-01-01

    A three tooth kinematic coupling based on having three theoretical line contacts formed by mating teeth rather than six theoretical point contacts. The geometry requires one coupling half to have curved teeth and the other coupling half to have flat teeth. Each coupling half has a relieved center portion which does not effect the kinematics, but in the limit as the face width approaches zero, three line contacts become six point contacts. As a result of having line contact, a three tooth coupling has greater load capacity and stiffness. The kinematic coupling has application for use in precision fixturing for tools or workpieces, and as a registration device for a work or tool changer or for optics in various products.

  13. Gear tooth topological modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kish, Jules G. (Inventor); Isabelle, Charles (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The topology of parallel axis gears, such as spur and helical gears is modified to produce quieter and more smoothly operating gear sets with more uniform load distribution. A finite element analysis of the gear in its operating mode is made to produce a plot of radial and tangential deflections of the pinion and gear tooth surfaces which will occur when the gears are loaded during operation. The resultant plot is then inverted to produce a plot, or set of coordinates, which will define the path of travel of the gear tooth grinding wheel, which path is a mirror image of the plot of the finite element analysis. The resulting gears, when subjected to operating loads, will thus be deflected tangentially and radially to their optimum operating, or theoretical true involute, positions so as to produce quieter, smoother, and more evenly loaded gear trains.

  14. Morphological variations in a tooth family through ontogeny in Pleurodeles waltl (Lissamphibia, Caudata).

    PubMed

    Davit-Béal, Tiphaine; Allizard, Françoise; Sire, Jean-Yves

    2006-09-01

    Most nonmammalian species replace their teeth continuously (so-called polyphyodonty), which allows morphological and structural modifications to occur during ontogeny. We have chosen Pleurodeles waltl, a salamander easy to rear in the laboratory, as a model species to establish the morphological foundations necessary for future molecular approaches aiming to understand not only molecular processes involved in tooth development and replacement, but also their changes, notably during metamorphosis, that might usefully inform studies of modifications of tooth morphology during evolution. In order to determine when (in which developmental stage) and how (progressively or suddenly) tooth modifications take place during ontogeny, we concentrated our observations on a single tooth family, located at position I, closest to the symphysis on the left lower jaw. We monitored the development and replacement of the six first teeth in a large growth series ranging from 10-day-old embryos (tooth I1) to adult specimens (tooth I6), using light (LM), scanning (SEM), and transmission electron (TEM) microscopy. A timetable of the developmental and functional period is provided for the six teeth, and tooth development is compared in larvae and young adults. In P. waltl the first functional tooth is not replaced when the second generation tooth forms, in contrast to what occurs for the later generation teeth, leading to the presence of two functional teeth in a single position during the first 2 months of life. Larval tooth I1 shows dramatically different features when compared to adult tooth I6: a dividing zone has appeared between the dentin cone and the pedicel; the pulp cavity has enlarged, allowing accommodation of large blood vessels; the odontoblasts are well organized along the dentin surface; tubules have appeared in the dentin; and teeth have become bicuspidate. Most of these modifications take place progressively from one tooth generation to the next, but the change from

  15. Tooth movement - clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Sastre, Julien; Le Gall, Michel

    2010-06-01

    The tissue-based phenomena and the tissue interactions responsible for tooth displacement can be modulated by varying the intensity of the applied forces or by means of medicated molecules absorbed by the patient or prescribed by the orthodontist. However, harmful side-effects such as inflammatory root resorption or replacement resorption (ankylosis) can occur requiring appropriate management on the part of the practitioner. PMID:20457024

  16. Tooth whitening in children.

    PubMed

    Donly, Kevin J; Donly, Adriana Segura; Baharloo, Laila; Rojas-Candelas, Edith; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Zhou, Xiaojie; Gerlach, Robert W

    2002-01-01

    Although there are several case reports of vital tooth bleaching in children, there is limited clinical trial evidence of the safety or efficacy of this practice. Accordingly, a new clinical trial was conducted to evaluate the effects of 2 different bleaching systems, a 6.5% hydrogen peroxide strip system and a 10% carbamide peroxide tray system, in a population of preteens and teens. A total of 106 volunteers, aged 11 to 18 years, took part in this 8-week study. Patients were randomized by a ratio of 2:1 to the strip or tray groups, with each group treating the maxillary arch first and then the mandibular arch for 4 consecutive weeks each. Individuals assigned to the strip group used the system twice daily for 30 minutes (a total of 56 contact hours over the 8-week study). Those assigned to the tray group used that system overnight (approximately 448 contact hours). Digital images were obtained at baseline and after every 2-week treatment period. Average tooth color was determined in L*, a*, b* color space, where L* indicated lightness, a* indicated red-green, and b* indicated yellow-blue. Both systems significantly whitened teeth (P < 0.0001). While there were no significant differences between groups with respect to the primary whitening response (delta b*) on the maxillary teeth, 4 weeks of overnight treatment with the 10% carbamide peroxide tray (approximately 224 contact hours) yielded statistically significant whitening (P < 0.05) on the mandibular teeth compared with the 6.5% hydrogen peroxide strip used for 28 hours. Both tooth-whitening systems had similar sensitivity/irritation reported after instructed use. This research demonstrates that tooth whitening in teens may be safely accomplished using either the short-contact-time hydrogen peroxide bleaching strips or the overnight carbamide peroxide tray systems tested in this study.

  17. Tooth whitening in children.

    PubMed

    Donly, Kevin J; Donly, Adriana Segura; Baharloo, Laila; Rojas-Candelas, Edith; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Zhou, Xiaojie; Gerlach, Robert W

    2002-01-01

    Although there are several case reports of vital tooth bleaching in children, there is limited clinical trial evidence of the safety or efficacy of this practice. Accordingly, a new clinical trial was conducted to evaluate the effects of 2 different bleaching systems, a 6.5% hydrogen peroxide strip system and a 10% carbamide peroxide tray system, in a population of preteens and teens. A total of 106 volunteers, aged 11 to 18 years, took part in this 8-week study. Patients were randomized by a ratio of 2:1 to the strip or tray groups, with each group treating the maxillary arch first and then the mandibular arch for 4 consecutive weeks each. Individuals assigned to the strip group used the system twice daily for 30 minutes (a total of 56 contact hours over the 8-week study). Those assigned to the tray group used that system overnight (approximately 448 contact hours). Digital images were obtained at baseline and after every 2-week treatment period. Average tooth color was determined in L*, a*, b* color space, where L* indicated lightness, a* indicated red-green, and b* indicated yellow-blue. Both systems significantly whitened teeth (P < 0.0001). While there were no significant differences between groups with respect to the primary whitening response (delta b*) on the maxillary teeth, 4 weeks of overnight treatment with the 10% carbamide peroxide tray (approximately 224 contact hours) yielded statistically significant whitening (P < 0.05) on the mandibular teeth compared with the 6.5% hydrogen peroxide strip used for 28 hours. Both tooth-whitening systems had similar sensitivity/irritation reported after instructed use. This research demonstrates that tooth whitening in teens may be safely accomplished using either the short-contact-time hydrogen peroxide bleaching strips or the overnight carbamide peroxide tray systems tested in this study. PMID:11913290

  18. The management of an endodontically abscessed tooth: patient health state utility, decision-tree and economic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Balevi, Ben; Shepperd, Sasha

    2007-01-01

    Background A frequent encounter in clinical practice is the middle-aged adult patient complaining of a toothache caused by the spread of a carious infection into the tooth's endodontic complex. Decisions about the range of treatment options (conventional crown with a post and core technique (CC), a single tooth implant (STI), a conventional dental bridge (CDB), and a partial removable denture (RPD)) have to balance the prognosis, utility and cost. Little is know about the utility patients attach to the different treatment options for an endontically abscessed mandibular molar and maxillary incisor. We measured patients' dental-health-state utilities and ranking preferences of the treatment options for these dental problems. Methods Forty school teachers ranked their preferences for conventional crown with a post and core technique, a single tooth implant, a conventional dental bridge, and a partial removable denture using a standard gamble and willingness to pay. Data previously reported on treatment prognosis and direct "out-of-pocket" costs were used in a decision-tree and economic analysis Results The Standard Gamble utilities for the restoration of a mandibular 1st molar with either the conventional crown (CC), single-tooth-implant (STI), conventional dental bridge (CDB) or removable-partial-denture (RPD) were 74.47 [± 6.91], 78.60 [± 5.19], 76.22 [± 5.78], 64.80 [± 8.1] respectively (p < 0.05). Their respective Willingness-to-Pay ($CDN) were 1,782.05 [± 361.42], 1,871.79 [± 349.44], 1,605.13 [± 348.10], 1,351.28 [± 368.62] (p < 0.05). The standard gamble utilities for the restoration of a maxillary central incisor with a CC, STI, CDB and RPD were 88.50 [± 6.12], 90.68 [± 3.41], 89.78 [± 3.81] and 91.10 [± 3.57] respectively (p > 0.05). Their respective willingness-to-pay ($CDN) were: 1,782.05 [± 361.42], 1,871.79 [± 349.44], 1,605.13 [± 348.10] and 1,351.28 [± 368.62]. A statistical difference was found between the utility of treating a

  19. Finite Element Analysis of Bone Stress for Miniscrew Implant Proximal to Root Under Occlusal Force and Implant Loading.

    PubMed

    Shan, Li-Hua; Guo, Na; Zhou, Guan-jun; Qie, Hui; Li, Chen-Xi; Lu, Lin

    2015-10-01

    Because of the narrow interradicular spaces and varying oral anatomies of individual patients, there is a very high risk of root proximity during the mini implants inserting. The authors hypothesized that normal occlusal loading and implant loading affected the stability of miniscrew implants placed in proximity or contact with the adjacent root. The authors implemented finite element analysis (FEA) to examine the effectiveness of root proximity and root contact. Stress distribution in the bone was assessed at different degrees of root proximity by generating 4 finite element models: the implant touches the root surface, the implant was embedded in the periodontal membrane, the implant touches the periodontal surface, and the implant touches nothing. Finite element analysis was then carried out with simulations of 2 loading conditions for each model: condition A, involving only tooth loading and condition B, involving both tooth and implant loading. Under loading condition A, the maximum stress on the bone for the implant touching the root was the distinctly higher than that for the other models. For loading condition B, peak stress areas for the implant touching the root were the area around the neck of the mini implant and the point of the mini implant touches the root. The results of this study suggest that normal occlusal loading and implant loading contribute to the instability of the mini implant when the mini implant touches the root. PMID:26207429

  20. Two stage gear tooth dynamics program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Linda S.

    1989-01-01

    The epicyclic gear dynamics program was expanded to add the option of evaluating the tooth pair dynamics for two epicyclic gear stages with peripheral components. This was a practical extension to the program as multiple gear stages are often used for speed reduction, space, weight, and/or auxiliary units. The option was developed for either stage to be a basic planetary, star, single external-external mesh, or single external-internal mesh. The two stage system allows for modeling of the peripherals with an input mass and shaft, an output mass and shaft, and a connecting shaft. Execution of the initial test case indicated an instability in the solution with the tooth paid loads growing to excessive magnitudes. A procedure to trace the instability is recommended as well as a method of reducing the program's computation time by reducing the number of boundary condition iterations.

  1. Cost-effectiveness of Anterior Implants versus Fixed Dental Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Zitzmann, N.U.; Krastl, G.; Weiger, R.; Kühl, S.; Sendi, P.

    2013-01-01

    For the restoration of an anterior missing tooth, implant-supported single crowns (ISCs) or fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) are indicated, but it is not clear which type of restoration is more cost-effective. A self-selected trial was performed with 15 patients with ISCs and 11 with FDPs. Patient preferences were recorded with visual analog scales before treatment, 1 month following restoration, and then annually. Quality-adjusted tooth years (QATYs) were estimated by considering the type of reconstruction for replacing the missing tooth and its effect on the adjacent teeth. A stochastic cost-effectiveness model was developed using Monte Carlo simulation. The expected costs and QATYs were summarized in cost-effectiveness acceptability curves. ISC was the dominant strategy, with a QATY increase of 0.01 over 3 years and 0.04 over 10 years with a higher probability of being cost-effective. While both treatment options provided satisfactory long-term results from the patient’s perspective, the lower initial costs, particularly laboratory fees, were responsible for the dominance of ISCs over FDPs. PMID:24158338

  2. Cost-effectiveness of anterior implants versus fixed dental prostheses.

    PubMed

    Zitzmann, N U; Krastl, G; Weiger, R; Kühl, S; Sendi, P

    2013-12-01

    For the restoration of an anterior missing tooth, implant-supported single crowns (ISCs) or fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) are indicated, but it is not clear which type of restoration is more cost-effective. A self-selected trial was performed with 15 patients with ISCs and 11 with FDPs. Patient preferences were recorded with visual analog scales before treatment, 1 month following restoration, and then annually. Quality-adjusted tooth years (QATYs) were estimated by considering the type of reconstruction for replacing the missing tooth and its effect on the adjacent teeth. A stochastic cost-effectiveness model was developed using Monte Carlo simulation. The expected costs and QATYs were summarized in cost-effectiveness acceptability curves. ISC was the dominant strategy, with a QATY increase of 0.01 over 3 years and 0.04 over 10 years with a higher probability of being cost-effective. While both treatment options provided satisfactory long-term results from the patient's perspective, the lower initial costs, particularly laboratory fees, were responsible for the dominance of ISCs over FDPs.

  3. Cochlear Implants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Catherine; Scott, Larry

    This brochure explains what a cochlear implant is, lists the types of individuals with deafness who may be helped by a cochlear implant, describes the process of evaluating people for cochlear implants, discusses the surgical process for implanting the aid, traces the path of sound through the cochlear implant to the brain, notes the costs of…

  4. Minimally invasive treatment of soft tissue deficiency around an implant-supported restoration in the esthetic zone: modified VISTA technique case report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chun-Teh; Hamalian, Techkouhie; Schulze-Späte, Ulrike

    2015-02-01

    The horizontal and vertical soft tissue dimension around an implant-supported restoration in the maxillary anterior is one of the determining factors for achieving an esthetic result. In this case report, the patient presented with a deficiency in both dimensions around a single-tooth implanted-supported restoration in the anterior maxilla. The soft tissue defects were augmented with a connective tissue graft that was placed underneath the buccal peri-implant tissue using a frenum access incision and a supraperiosteal tunneling approach (modified vestibular Incision supraperiosteal tunnel access [VISTA] technique). This novel technique resulted in an increase in tissue height and width, which suggests its potential use around implant-supported restorations.

  5. Tooth regeneration: a revolution in stomatology and evolution in regenerative medicine

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Sibel; Fu, Susan Y; Kim, Keith; Zhou, Hong; Lee, Chang Hun; Li, Ang; Kim, Sahng Gyoon; Wang, Shuang; Mao, Jeremy J

    2011-01-01

    A tooth is a complex biological organ and consists of multiple tissues including the enamel, dentin, cementum and pulp. Tooth loss is the most common organ failure. Can a tooth be regenerated? Can adult stem cells be orchestrated to regenerate tooth structures such as the enamel, dentin, cementum and dental pulp, or even an entire tooth? If not, what are the therapeutically viable sources of stem cells for tooth regeneration? Do stem cells necessarily need to be taken out of the body, and manipulated ex vivo before they are transplanted for tooth regeneration? How can regenerated teeth be economically competitive with dental implants? Would it be possible to make regenerated teeth affordable by a large segment of the population worldwide? This review article explores existing and visionary approaches that address some of the above-mentioned questions. Tooth regeneration represents a revolution in stomatology as a shift in the paradigm from repair to regeneration: repair is by metal or artificial materials whereas regeneration is by biological restoration. Tooth regeneration is an extension of the concepts in the broad field of regenerative medicine to restore a tissue defect to its original form and function by biological substitutes. PMID:21789959

  6. Rapid maxillary expansion assisted by palatal mini-implants in adolescents - preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Chane-Fane, Caroline; Darqué, François

    2015-03-01

    Our preliminary clinical study compares the transverse skeletal and dento-alveolar modifications occurring after rapid maxillary expansion with purely dental anchorage or with dental anchorage assisted by palatal mini-implants, in endognathic adolescents aged 12 to 17. Nine patients were treated by means of tooth- and implant-supported expansion, and 7 others by means of a purely tooth-borne expander. The changes, 4 months after expansion, were measured on impressions and front-view X-rays in the 2 groups, and on three-dimensional X-rays for 6 patients treated by tooth- and implant-supported expansion. In our sample, tooth- and implant-supported expansion preserved the alveolar bone of 14/24 and gave rise to less buccal tipping of 16/26 than purely tooth-borne expansion.

  7. Clinical management of implant prostheses in patients with bruxism.

    PubMed

    Komiyama, Osamu; Lobbezoo, Frank; De Laat, Antoon; Iida, Takashi; Kitagawa, Tsuyoshi; Murakami, Hiroshi; Kato, Takao; Kawara, Misao

    2012-01-01

    There is general agreement that excessive stress to the bone-implant interface may result in implant overload and failure. Early failure of the implant due to excessive loading occurs shortly after uncovering the implant. Excess load on a final restoration after successful implant integration can result in physical failure of the implant structure. Many clinicians believe that overload of dental implants is a risk factor for vertical peri-implant bone loss and/or may be detrimental for the suprastructure in implant prostheses. It has been documented that occlusal parafunction, such as, bruxism (tooth grinding and clenching) affects the outcome of implant prostheses, but there is no evidence for a causal relation between the failures and overload of dental implants. In spite of this lack of evidence, often metal restorations are preferred instead of porcelain for patients in whom bruxism is presumed on the basis of tooth wear. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the importance of the occlusal scheme used in implant restorations for implant longevity and to suggest a clinical approach and occlusal materials for implant prostheses in order to prevent complications related to bruxism. PMID:22701484

  8. Surgical-prosthetic management of facial soft tissue defects on anterior single implant-supported restorations: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Paniz, Gianluca; Mazzocco, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    The surgical correction of soft tissue defects on the facial aspects of dental implants is documented as an unpredictable procedure. Since the customization of the prosthetic emergence profile contributes significantly to the final esthetic outcome of the soft tissue, a combined surgical-prosthetic approach has been described in the literature. In the case presented in this article, a multidisciplinary approach was used to treat a patient's anterior sextant. It included the treatment of a previously placed implant, perfectly osseointegrated, with a 2 mm recession of the facial soft tissue. Two connective tissue grafting procedures were performed, in conjunction with the modification of the prosthetic profile of the provisional restoration and the definitive abutment. The final esthetic outcome satisfied the patient and resolved the main complaint, and is documented to have been stable for 5 years. PMID:25874274

  9. Surgical-prosthetic management of facial soft tissue defects on anterior single implant-supported restorations: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Paniz, Gianluca; Mazzocco, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    The surgical correction of soft tissue defects on the facial aspects of dental implants is documented as an unpredictable procedure. Since the customization of the prosthetic emergence profile contributes significantly to the final esthetic outcome of the soft tissue, a combined surgical-prosthetic approach has been described in the literature. In the case presented in this article, a multidisciplinary approach was used to treat a patient's anterior sextant. It included the treatment of a previously placed implant, perfectly osseointegrated, with a 2 mm recession of the facial soft tissue. Two connective tissue grafting procedures were performed, in conjunction with the modification of the prosthetic profile of the provisional restoration and the definitive abutment. The final esthetic outcome satisfied the patient and resolved the main complaint, and is documented to have been stable for 5 years.

  10. Single phase formation of Co-implanted ZnO thin films by swift heavy ion irradiation: Optical studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Ravi; Singh, Fouran; Angadi, Basavaraj; Choi, Ji-Won; Choi, Won-Kook; Jeong, Kwangho; Song, Jong-Han; Khan, M. Wasi; Srivastava, J. P.; Kumar, Ajay; Tandon, R. P.

    2006-12-01

    Low temperature photoluminescence and optical absorption studies on 200 MeV Ag{sup +15} ion irradiated Co-implanted ZnO thin films were studied. The Co clusters present in as implanted samples were observed to be dissolved using 200 MeV Ag{sup +15} ion irradiation with a fluence of 1x10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2}. The photoluminescence spectrum of pure ZnO thin film was characterized by the I{sub 4} peak due to the neutral donor bound excitons and the broad green emission. The Co-doped ZnO films show three sharp levels and two shoulders corresponding to 3t{sub 2g} and 2e{sub g} levels of crystal field splitted Co d orbitals, respectively. The ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy also shows the systematic variation of band gap after 200 MeV Ag{sup +15} ion irradiation.

  11. Efficacy of intraoperative vancomycin powder use in intrathecal baclofen pump implantation procedures: single institutional series in a high risk population.

    PubMed

    Ghobrial, George M; Thakkar, Vismay; Singhal, Saurabh; Oppenlander, Mark E; Maulucci, Christopher M; Harrop, James S; Jallo, Jack; Prasad, Srinivas; Saulino, Michael; Sharan, Ashwini D

    2014-10-01

    We aimed to assess the efficacy of intraoperative vancomycin powder in intrathecal baclofen pump placement patients, a high risk population. A retrospective review was conducted using prospectively collected data at an academic tertiary care unit. The neurosurgical adult patient population was queried for all intrathecal baclofen pump implantation procedures. Patients were then reviewed for the use of intraoperative crystalline vancomycin powder. Those with a history of prior surgical site infection, chronic systemic infections or osteomyelitis were excluded. Anhydrous, crystalline vancomycin was utilized in the wound bed after completion of implantation, distributed evenly in the case of multiple incisions. Patients received 500 mg or 1,000 mg of crystallized vancomycin, evenly distributed through the wound layers based on a 70 kg weight cutoff. Intraoperative institutional standards of infection prophylaxis were unchanged throughout the study period. Infection rate of baclofen pump placement prior to the use of vancomycin powder from 2001-2009 at the same institution was monitored. Wound infection rate was tracked for a 12 month postoperative period. Six patients out of 26 baclofen pump implantations (23%) in this cohort were identified to have seven infections despite vancomycin powder placement in the lumbar and catheter wounds. Prior infection rates have been investigated for intrathecal drug delivery systems from 2001 to 2009 at the same institution with an overall infection rate of 3% (8/274). The use of vancomycin powder in patients with implants in this series did not reduce infection rates compared to published historical controls, and was elevated compared to institutional controls. Further prospective study of this high risk patient population is warranted.

  12. Tooth loss caused by displaced elastic during simple preprosthetic orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Dianiskova, Simona; Calzolari, Chiara; Migliorati, Marco; Silvestrini-Biavati, Armando; Isola, Gaetano; Savoldi, Fabio; Dalessandri, Domenico; Paganelli, Corrado

    2016-09-16

    The use of elastics to close a diastema or correct tooth malpositions can create unintended consequences if not properly controlled. The American Association of Orthodontists recently issued a consumer alert, warning of "a substantial risk for irreparable damage" from a new trend called "do-it-yourself" orthodontics, consisting of patients autonomously using elastics to correct tooth position. The elastics can work their way below the gums and around the roots of the teeth, causing damage to the periodontium and even resulting in tooth loss. The cost of implants to replace these teeth would well exceed the cost of proper orthodontic care. This damage could also occur in a dental office, when a general dentist tries to perform a simplified orthodontic correction of a minor tooth malposition. The present case report describes a case of tooth loss caused by a displaced intraoral elastic, which occurred during a simple preprosthetic orthodontic treatment. PMID:27672645

  13. Autogenous wisdom tooth transplantation: A case series with 6-9 months follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Nimčenko, Tatjana; Omerca, Gražvydas; Bramanti, Ennio; Cervino, Gabriele; Laino, Luigi; Cicciù, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Tooth transplantation can be considered a valid and predictable treatment option for rehabilitating young patients with permanent teeth loss. This study presents several cases of successful autogenous tooth transplantation with a 6-9 months follow-up. Tooth auto-transplantation can be considered a reasonable option for replacing missing teeth when a donor tooth is available. The auto-transplantation of a right mandibular third molar with compromised function and esthetics to replace the residual roots resulting from coronal destruction due to extensive carious lesion of the second molar in the same quadrant as shown in the presented cases can result a viable treatment alternative especially in a young patient that cannot undergo dental implant therapy. Transplantation of mature third molar seems to be a promising method for replacing a lost permanent molar tooth and restoring esthetics and function. This clinical procedure showed excellent functional and esthetical long-term results in the analyzed cases. PMID:25540668

  14. Tooth loss caused by displaced elastic during simple preprosthetic orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Dianiskova, Simona; Calzolari, Chiara; Migliorati, Marco; Silvestrini-Biavati, Armando; Isola, Gaetano; Savoldi, Fabio; Dalessandri, Domenico; Paganelli, Corrado

    2016-09-16

    The use of elastics to close a diastema or correct tooth malpositions can create unintended consequences if not properly controlled. The American Association of Orthodontists recently issued a consumer alert, warning of "a substantial risk for irreparable damage" from a new trend called "do-it-yourself" orthodontics, consisting of patients autonomously using elastics to correct tooth position. The elastics can work their way below the gums and around the roots of the teeth, causing damage to the periodontium and even resulting in tooth loss. The cost of implants to replace these teeth would well exceed the cost of proper orthodontic care. This damage could also occur in a dental office, when a general dentist tries to perform a simplified orthodontic correction of a minor tooth malposition. The present case report describes a case of tooth loss caused by a displaced intraoral elastic, which occurred during a simple preprosthetic orthodontic treatment.

  15. Tooth loss caused by displaced elastic during simple preprosthetic orthodontic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Dianiskova, Simona; Calzolari, Chiara; Migliorati, Marco; Silvestrini-Biavati, Armando; Isola, Gaetano; Savoldi, Fabio; Dalessandri, Domenico; Paganelli, Corrado

    2016-01-01

    The use of elastics to close a diastema or correct tooth malpositions can create unintended consequences if not properly controlled. The American Association of Orthodontists recently issued a consumer alert, warning of “a substantial risk for irreparable damage” from a new trend called “do-it-yourself” orthodontics, consisting of patients autonomously using elastics to correct tooth position. The elastics can work their way below the gums and around the roots of the teeth, causing damage to the periodontium and even resulting in tooth loss. The cost of implants to replace these teeth would well exceed the cost of proper orthodontic care. This damage could also occur in a dental office, when a general dentist tries to perform a simplified orthodontic correction of a minor tooth malposition. The present case report describes a case of tooth loss caused by a displaced intraoral elastic, which occurred during a simple preprosthetic orthodontic treatment. PMID:27672645

  16. Tooth loss caused by displaced elastic during simple preprosthetic orthodontic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Dianiskova, Simona; Calzolari, Chiara; Migliorati, Marco; Silvestrini-Biavati, Armando; Isola, Gaetano; Savoldi, Fabio; Dalessandri, Domenico; Paganelli, Corrado

    2016-01-01

    The use of elastics to close a diastema or correct tooth malpositions can create unintended consequences if not properly controlled. The American Association of Orthodontists recently issued a consumer alert, warning of “a substantial risk for irreparable damage” from a new trend called “do-it-yourself” orthodontics, consisting of patients autonomously using elastics to correct tooth position. The elastics can work their way below the gums and around the roots of the teeth, causing damage to the periodontium and even resulting in tooth loss. The cost of implants to replace these teeth would well exceed the cost of proper orthodontic care. This damage could also occur in a dental office, when a general dentist tries to perform a simplified orthodontic correction of a minor tooth malposition. The present case report describes a case of tooth loss caused by a displaced intraoral elastic, which occurred during a simple preprosthetic orthodontic treatment.

  17. Rescue of a periodontally compromised tooth by non-surgical treatment: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This article describes a case of the successful non-surgical management of a periodontally compromised maxillary premolar. Methods A combination therapy, including root planing, occlusal adjustment, and tooth splinting, was applied. Clinical and radiographic examinations were performed during the 16-month follow-up period. Results All periodontal parameters were improved. There were dramatic decreases (3–6 mm) in the probing pocket depth, tooth mobility, and marginal bone loss. Interestingly, gradual resolution of the periapical radiolucency and alveolar bone regeneration were observed in the radiographs, and the periodontal condition was maintained during the follow-up period. Conclusions Within the limits of this study, these results demonstrate the importance of natural tooth preservation through proper periodontal treatment and occlusal adjustment of the periodontally compromised tooth, which is typically targeted for tooth extraction and dental implantation. PMID:27127693

  18. Interleukin-1β level in peri-implant crevicular fluid and its correlation with the clinical and radiographic parameters

    PubMed Central

    Kajale, Aniruddha M.; Mehta, Dhoom S.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Assessing only the clinical and radiographic parameters for evaluation of dental implants may not be enough as they often reflect extensive inflammatory changes in the periodontal tissues. As peri-implant crevicular fluid (PICF) can give us a more prompt and objective measure of the disease activity, the purpose of this case series is to assess the peri-implant health status of single tooth dental implants not only clinically and radiographically but also biochemically. Materials and Methods: Thirteen patients were subjected to dental implants at single edentulous sites using a conventional surgical approach. At baseline, 6 months, and 12 months after implant placement, the clinical and radiographic parameters were recorded. Additionally, IL-1β in PICF was estimated using the ELISA kit at 6th and 12th month. Results: The clinical and radiographic parameters differed significantly around the implants at different time intervals with IL-1β levels showing highly significant differences between 6 months (31.79 ± 12.26 pg/μl) and 12 months (113.09 ± 51.11 pg/μl). However, Spearman's correlation coefficient showed no correlation with the clinical and radiographic parameters. Interpretation and Conclusion: Assessment of the various parameters confirmed that all the implants had a healthy peri-implant status. Although the levels of IL-1β in PICF were elevated at the 12th month, they were well within the healthy range as observed by previous studies. This indicates that IL-1β, a biochemical marker, can be used as an adjunct to clinical and radiographic parameters in the assessment of EARLY inflammatory changes around implants. PMID:24872632

  19. Metagenomic analysis of the peri-implant and periodontal microflora in patients with clinical signs of gingivitis or mucositis.

    PubMed

    Heuer, Wieland; Kettenring, Andreas; Stumpp, Sascha Nico; Eberhard, Jörg; Gellermann, Eva; Winkel, Andreas; Stiesch, Meike

    2012-06-01

    The long-term success of osseointegrated oral implants is endangered by inflammation of peri-implant hard and soft tissues caused by bacterial biofilms that may have been initiated by bacterial transmission from the adjacent dentition. The present study aimed to compare the bacterial communities at inflamed implant and tooth sites by broad-range PCR techniques to evaluate the etiological processes of peri-implant and periodontal diseases and potential future therapeutic strategies. Eighteen samples of peri-implant and periodontal microflora were collected from nine partially edentulous patients with implant-retained crowns or bridges revealing clinical signs of gingivitis or mucositis. The clinical parameters plaque index (PI), probing depth (PD), and bleeding on probing were recorded. Amplified fragments of bacterial 16S rRNA genes were separated by use of single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis, and sequences were determined to identify the predominant bacterial genera. The clinical parameters PI and PD were significantly different at implants (PI = 0.4 ± 0.7, PD = 3.1 ± 0.6 mm) compared with teeth (PI = 1.8 ± 0.8, PD = 2.5 ± 0.2 mm). A total of 20 different genera were found at the inflamed tooth and implant sites. The microbial diversity of the microflora surrounding the remaining dentition (12.0 ± 3.8) was significantly higher (p = 0.01) than the diversity of the peri-implant microflora at implant-retained crowns or bridges (6.3 ± 2.3). Within the limitations of the present study, the microbial diversity of the investigated implants and teeth with clinical signs of mucositis or gingivitis exhibits substantial differences, demonstrating that transmission of the complete bacterial microflora from teeth to implants could be excluded. Furthermore, broad-range molecular biological detection methods specify bacterial genera and species in the peri-implant and periodontal microflora which were not in the focus of research interests so far. PMID

  20. Pathologic tooth migration.

    PubMed

    Brunsvold, Michael A

    2005-06-01

    Pathologic tooth migration (PTM) is a common complication of moderate to severe periodontitis and is often the motivation for patients to seek periodontal therapy. In this review of the literature, available information concerning prevalence, etiology, treatment, and prevention of pathologic tooth migration is summarized. Prevalence of PTM among periodontal patients has been reported to range from 30.03% to 55.8%. A survey of the literature regarding chief complaints of periodontal patients support these high prevalence findings. The etiology of PTM appears to be multifactorial. Periodontal bone loss appears to be a major factor in the etiology of PTM. Many aspects of occlusion can contribute to abnormal migration of teeth, and more than one of those factors may be present in an individual patient. Soft tissue forces of the tongue, cheeks, and lips are known to cause tooth movement and in some situations can cause PTM. Also considered important in the etiology of PTM is pressure produced from inflammatory tissues within periodontal pockets. Because extrusion is a common form of PTM, clinical observations support the theory that eruption forces sometimes play a role in the etiology of PTM. Many oral habits have been associated with PTM which are often difficult for the therapist to detect. Most cases of severe PTM require a team approach to achieve success. Periodontal, orthodontic, and prosthodontic treatment are often required. Many patient variables enter into the selection of treatment for PTM. In early stages of PTM, spontaneous correction of migrated teeth sometimes occurs after periodontal therapy. Light intrusive forces are used successfully to treat extrusion and flaring forms of PTM. Based on the literature reviewed, it appears that many cases of PTM could be prevented through the early diagnosis and treatment of periodontal disease, occlusal contributing factors, gingival enlargement, and oral habits. PMID:15948679

  1. Using a fiber-reinforced composite fixed partial denture to restore a missing posterior tooth: a case report.

    PubMed

    Soares, Carlos Jose; Barreto, Bruno Castro Ferreira; Santos-Filho, Paulo Cesar de Freitas; Raposo, Luis Henrique de Araujo; Martins, Luis Roberto Marcondes

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of new adhesive technologies, fiber-reinforced composite fixed partial dentures (FRC-FPDs) have become an inexpensive, esthetic and useful restorative option for patients missing a single tooth. This article describes a case involving an inlay-retained FRC-FPD with a prefabricated fiber-reinforced pontic substructure. In addition, a 6-year follow-up is presented. The FRC-FPD fully restored the single missing molar with simple and conservative intracoronal preparations in the proximal teeth and was deemed clinically acceptable after the evaluation period. The clinical procedures to build a FRC-FPD with a prefabricated fiber-reinforced pontic substructure typically are finished by the clinician in 1 or 2 visits without laboratory assistance, making it a viable alternative for patients who cannot afford implant-based treatment or a conventional metal-ceramic FPD. PMID:23649577

  2. Using a fiber-reinforced composite fixed partial denture to restore a missing posterior tooth: a case report.

    PubMed

    Soares, Carlos Jose; Barreto, Bruno Castro Ferreira; Santos-Filho, Paulo Cesar de Freitas; Raposo, Luis Henrique de Araujo; Martins, Luis Roberto Marcondes

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of new adhesive technologies, fiber-reinforced composite fixed partial dentures (FRC-FPDs) have become an inexpensive, esthetic and useful restorative option for patients missing a single tooth. This article describes a case involving an inlay-retained FRC-FPD with a prefabricated fiber-reinforced pontic substructure. In addition, a 6-year follow-up is presented. The FRC-FPD fully restored the single missing molar with simple and conservative intracoronal preparations in the proximal teeth and was deemed clinically acceptable after the evaluation period. The clinical procedures to build a FRC-FPD with a prefabricated fiber-reinforced pontic substructure typically are finished by the clinician in 1 or 2 visits without laboratory assistance, making it a viable alternative for patients who cannot afford implant-based treatment or a conventional metal-ceramic FPD.

  3. Reinforced composite restoration following trauma to a mandibular tooth: technique and follow-up treatment.

    PubMed

    Smidt, Ami; Sharon, Eldad; Adler, Mordekhai Lipovetsky

    2012-10-01

    The loss of an entire tooth in the anterior region is accompanied by impairment of esthetics, function, phonetics, and self-esteem. It is common knowledge that treatment with implants during childhood or early adolescence is not an option. Splinting of adjacent teeth during growth and development may interfere with the independent process of teeth realignment and repositioning during that phase of life. Other creative solutions must be offered, such as free-standing composite buildup restorations on compromised broken teeth or single wing/cantilevered restorations adhered to one neighboring tooth during the growth period. The positive effects of reinforced composite materials were researched and presented in the literature. Their use is clearly indicated for interim and economical restorations. Long-term follow-up on a mandibular incisor that experienced trauma, losing its clinical crown and vitality when the patient was 12 years of age, is discussed with all the various aspects of material selection, future considerations, and long-term follow-up to adulthood, when a conventional crown was prepared and delivered.

  4. Single-Rooted Extraction Sockets: Classification and Treatment Protocol.

    PubMed

    El Chaar, Edgar; Oshman, Sarah; Fallah Abed, Pooria

    2016-09-01

    Clinicians have many treatment techniques from which to choose when extracting a failing tooth and replacing it with an implant-supported restoration and when successful management of an extraction socket during the course of tooth replacement is necessary to achieve predictable and esthetic outcomes. This article presents a straightforward, yet thorough, classification for extraction sockets of single-rooted teeth and provides guidance to clinicians in the selection of appropriate and predictable treatment. The presented classification of extraction sockets for single-rooted teeth focuses on the topography of the extraction socket, while the protocol for treatment of each socket type factors in the shape of the remaining bone, the biotype, and the location of the socket whether it be in the mandible or maxilla. This system is based on the biologic foundations of wound healing and can help guide clinicians to successful treatment outcomes. PMID:27608197

  5. Clinical outcome of a two-piece implant system with an internal hexagonal connection: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Andreasi Bassi, M; Lopez, M A; Confalone, L; Gaudio, R M; Lombardo, L; Lauritano, D

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective clinical study was to evaluate the survival rate (SVR - i.e. fixtures still in place at the end of the observation period) and success rate (SCR - i.e. bone resorption around implant neck) of an implant system characterized by cylindrical and tapered implants, both provided with an internal hexagonal connection. In the period between January 1996 and October 2011, 52 implants with internal hexagonal connection were inserted in 21 females and 31 males, mean age 54±11 years. The mean post-surgical follow-up was 44.6±34.4 months. Several parameters were evaluated as potential outcome conditioners: age, gender, smoking, replaced tooth, periodontal disease, fixture shape (i.e. cylindrical or tapered), jaw location (i.e. maxilla or mandible), bone graft, immediate loading, post-extractive placement, type of prosthesis (i.e. single crown or bridge), edentulism, implant diameter and length. An SPSS statistical program was used and Cox regression analysis performed. SVR was 100% since no fixtures were lost. SCR, expressed through the mean marginal bone loss, was 77%. No significant differences were found, for most of the parameters analyzed, with the exception of prosthetic bridges, where implants supporting this type of rehabilitation showed a worse clinical outcome in comparison to single crown rehabilitations. Internal hexagonal connection is a reliable tool for oral rehabilitation. PMID:27469542

  6. Treatment of Necrotic Calcified Tooth Using Intentional Replantation Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Arvin, Armita; Darvish, Alireza; Aflaki, Sareh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. If the teeth are impacted by a chronic irritant, the pulp space possibly will undergo calcific changes that may impede access opening during root canal treatment. In such cases that conventional endodontic treatment is impossible or impractical, intentional replantation may be considered as a last solution to preserve the tooth. Methods. After failing to perform conventional root canal therapy for a necrotic calcified right mandibular second premolar, the tooth was gently extracted. The root apex was resected and the root end cavity was prepared and filled with calcium enriched mixture (CEM) cement. Then, the extracted tooth was replanted in its original position. Results. After a year the tooth was asymptomatic, and the size of periapical radiolucency was remarkably reduced and no clinical sign of ankylosis was observed. Conclusion. Intentional replantation of the necrotic calcified teeth could be considered as an alternative to teeth extraction, especially for the single-rooted teeth and when nonsurgical and surgical endodontic procedures seem impossible. PMID:24716000

  7. Treatment of necrotic calcified tooth using intentional replantation procedure.

    PubMed

    Moradi Majd, Nima; Arvin, Armita; Darvish, Alireza; Aflaki, Sareh; Homayouni, Hamed

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. If the teeth are impacted by a chronic irritant, the pulp space possibly will undergo calcific changes that may impede access opening during root canal treatment. In such cases that conventional endodontic treatment is impossible or impractical, intentional replantation may be considered as a last solution to preserve the tooth. Methods. After failing to perform conventional root canal therapy for a necrotic calcified right mandibular second premolar, the tooth was gently extracted. The root apex was resected and the root end cavity was prepared and filled with calcium enriched mixture (CEM) cement. Then, the extracted tooth was replanted in its original position. Results. After a year the tooth was asymptomatic, and the size of periapical radiolucency was remarkably reduced and no clinical sign of ankylosis was observed. Conclusion. Intentional replantation of the necrotic calcified teeth could be considered as an alternative to teeth extraction, especially for the single-rooted teeth and when nonsurgical and surgical endodontic procedures seem impossible.

  8. Surgical results of cranioplasty with a polymethylmethacrylate customized cranial implant in pediatric patients: a single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Fiaschi, Pietro; Pavanello, Marco; Imperato, Alessia; Dallolio, Villiam; Accogli, Andrea; Capra, Valeria; Consales, Alessandro; Cama, Armando; Piatelli, Gianluca

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Cranioplasty is a reconstructive procedure used to restore skull anatomy and repair skull defects. Optimal skull reconstruction is a challenge for neurosurgeons, and the strategy used to achieve the best result remains a topic of debate, especially in pediatric patients for whom the continuing skull growth makes the choice of material more difficult. When the native bone flap, which is universally accepted as the preferred option in pediatric patients, is unavailable, the authors' choice of prosthetic material is a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) implant designed using a custom-made technique. In this paper the authors present the results of their clinical series of 12 custom-made PMMA implants in pediatric patients. METHODS A retrospective study of the patients who had undergone cranioplasty at Gaslini Children's Hospital between 2006 and 2013 was conducted. A total of 12 consecutive cranioplasties in 12 patients was reviewed, in which a patient-specific PMMA implant was manufactured using a virtual 3D model and then transformed into a physical model using selective laser sintering or 3D printing. All patients or parents were administered a questionnaire to assess how the patient/parent judged the aesthetic result. RESULTS Patient age at craniectomy ranged from 5 months to 12.5 years, with a mean age of 84.33 months at cranioplasty. The mean extension of the custom-made plastic was 56.83 cm(2). The mean time between craniectomy and cranioplasty was 9.25 months. The mean follow-up duration was 55.7 months. No major complications were recorded; 3 patients experienced minor/moderate complications (prosthesis dislocation, granuloma formation, and fluid collection). CONCLUSIONS In this patient series, PMMA resulted in an extremely low complication rate and the custom-made technique was associated with an excellent grade of patient or parent satisfaction on long-term follow up. PMID:26824593

  9. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

    MedlinePlus

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease is a group of disorders passed down through families that affect the nerves outside the brain ... Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease slowly gets worse. Some parts of the body may become numb, and pain can range from ...

  10. [Aftercare for durability and profitability of single-unit and multi-unit fixed dental prostheses].

    PubMed

    de Baat, C; van Loveren, C; van der Maarel-Wierink, C D; Witter, D J; Creugers, N H J

    2013-01-01

    An important aim ofa treatment with single-unit and multi-unit fixed dental prostheses is a durable and profitable treatment outcome. That requires aftercare, too. First, the frequency of routine oral examinations should be assessed, using an individual risk profile. The objectives of the routine oral examinations are the prevention and, when necessary, the treatment of pathological conditions and complications. With regard to prevention, attention should be paid to information and instruction, oral biofilm and calculus, non-functional activities, hard tooth tissues, periodontal and peri-implant tissues, and saliva. Subsequently, it can be determined whether the intended durability and profitability have been achieved or can still be achieved, whether or not through indicated adjustments. Special attention should be paid to endodontically treated teeth. Restorative, repair or replacement treatments may be indicated in case ofcomplications, such as loose single- or multi-unitfixed dental prosthesis, fracture of a fixed dental prosthesis unit, lost tooth pulp vitality, tooth root fracture, and implant or implant abutment problems.

  11. Immediate 3-dimensional ridge augmentation after extraction of periodontally hopeless tooth using chinblock graft

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Ankit; Thomas, Raison; A. Baron, Tarunkumar; Shah, Rucha; Mehta, Dhoom-Singh

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to evaluate clinically and radiographically, the efficacy of immediate ridge augmentation to reconstruct the vertical and horizontal dimensions at extraction sites of periodontally hopeless tooth using an autogenous chin block graft. Material and Methods A total of 11 patients (7 male & 4 female) with localized advanced bone loss around single rooted teeth having hopeless prognosis and indicated for extraction were selected for the study. The teeth were atraumatically extracted and deficient sites were augmented using autogenous chin block graft. Parameters like clinically soft tissue height - width and also radiographic ridge height -width were measured before and 6 months after augmentation. Obtained results were tabulated and analysed statistically. Results After 6 months of immediate ridge augmentation, the mean gain in radiographic vertical height and horizontal width was 7.64 + 1.47 mm (P = 0.005) and 5.28 + 0.46 mm (P = 0.007) respectively which was found to be statistically significant (P < 0.05). Mean change of width gain of 0.40mm and height loss of 0.40mm of soft tissue parameters, from the baseline till completion of the study at 6 months was observed. Conclusions The present study showed predictable immediate ridge augmentation with autogenous chin block graft at periodontally compromised extraction site. It can provide adequate hard and soft tissue foundation for perfect 3-Dimensional prosthetic positioning of implant in severely deficient ridges. Key words:Immediate ridge augmentation, periondontally hopeless tooth, autogenous chin graft, dental implant. PMID:26644832

  12. Risk Assessment for Tooth Wear.

    PubMed

    Kontaxopoulou, Isavella; Alam, Sonia

    2015-08-01

    Tooth wear has an increasing prevalence in the UK population. The aetiology is commonly multifactorial, and the aetiopathology is through a combination of erosion, attrition, abrasion and abfraction. Erosion is associated with intrinsic or extrinsic acids, and therefore subjects with reflux disease and eating disorders are at increased risk. Fruit juice, fruits and carbonated drink consumption, frequency of consumption and specific habits are also risk factors. Attrition is more prevalent in bruxists. Other habits need to be considered when defining the risk of tooth wear. Abrasion is usually associated with toothbrushing and toothpastes, especially in an already acidic environment. Patients with extensive lesions that affect dentin may be at higher risk, as well as those presenting with unstained lesions. Monitoring of the progress of tooth wear is recommended to identify those with active tooth wear. Indices for tooth wear are a helpful aid. PMID:26556515

  13. Risk Assessment for Tooth Wear.

    PubMed

    Kontaxopoulou, Isavella; Alam, Sonia

    2015-08-01

    Tooth wear has an increasing prevalence in the UK population. The aetiology is commonly multifactorial, and the aetiopathology is through a combination of erosion, attrition, abrasion and abfraction. Erosion is associated with intrinsic or extrinsic acids, and therefore subjects with reflux disease and eating disorders are at increased risk. Fruit juice, fruits and carbonated drink consumption, frequency of consumption and specific habits are also risk factors. Attrition is more prevalent in bruxists. Other habits need to be considered when defining the risk of tooth wear. Abrasion is usually associated with toothbrushing and toothpastes, especially in an already acidic environment. Patients with extensive lesions that affect dentin may be at higher risk, as well as those presenting with unstained lesions. Monitoring of the progress of tooth wear is recommended to identify those with active tooth wear. Indices for tooth wear are a helpful aid.

  14. Two-year study of alternative conservative treatment modalities for early anterior permanent tooth loss.

    PubMed

    Tulunoğlu, Ozlem; Cinar, Cagdaş; Bal, Cenkhan; Bal, Bilge Turhan

    2010-11-01

    Premature tooth loss in children may consist of single or multiple, primary or permanent, and anterior or posterior units of the dentition. This tooth loss may be due to either trauma or caries and, in some cases, to congenital or genetic defects. With anterior tooth loss cases, there are several problems the dental practitioner must consider. These are space maintenance, masticatory function, speech and esthetic appearance.

  15. Surgical Management of Fractured Orthodontic Mini- Implant- A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Anoop; Sumra, Nida

    2015-01-01

    The idea of absolute anchorage has always been an elusive goal for clinicians. Orthodontic mini-implants or temporary anchorage devices allow tooth movements previously thought to be impossible or difficult. Although extensive literature exists on use of temporary anchorage devices, their failures have been hardly focused upon, especially implant fracture. The following case report describes successful management of fractured orthodontic mini-implant. PMID:25738088

  16. Assessing image-guided implant surgery in today's clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Norkin, Frederic J; Ganeles, Jeffrey; Zfaz, Samuel; Modares, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    As implant dentistry has progressed, greater emphasis has been placed on natural-looking tooth replacement, minimally invasive techniques, and better cost efficiencies, with implant positioning being guided by the desired prosthetic outcome. Image-guided surgery is a technique that merges preoperative diagnostic imaging with computer-based planning tools to facilitate surgical and restorative plans and procedures. This article discusses the intricacies of guided implant surgery, including 3-dimensional presurgical planning and the challenges of maintaining guide stability during surgical execution.

  17. Evaluation of crestal bone loss and stability of immediate functional loading versus immediate non-functional loading of single-mandibular posterior implants: A pilot randomized controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Mantena, Satyanarayana Raju; Sivagami, G.; Gottumukkala, Sruthima NVS

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study is to evaluate and compare the crestal bone loss and stability of single mandibular posterior dental implants placed in immediate functional loading (IFL) and immediate nonfunctional loading (INFL) during 6 months after placement. Materials and Methods: Forty single piece root form titanium implants were placed in 20 patients using IFL and INFL techniques. The change in the level of crestal bone was measured on standardized digital periapical radiographs using SOPRO imaging software and stability of implants using resonance frequency analyser taken at the baseline, 1, 3, and 6 months. The measurements were statistically analyzed using the independent and paired t-test (P < 0.05, statistically significant). Results: The mean change in the crestal bone level from baseline to 6 months was significant in both techniques. The implant stability quotient (ISQ) values at first and third months were lower than those at the baseline for both the groups. However, the ISQ values at the sixth month were similar to baseline for both the groups. The crestal bone changes and the ISQ values when compared between the groups showed no statistically significant difference. Conclusion: IFL of dental implants have equivalent results and success rate as that of immediately provisionalized implants within the limitations of this study. PMID:25426151

  18. Clinical outcome of 215 transmucosal implants with a conical connection: a retrospective study after 5-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Lopez, M A; Andreasi Bassi, M; Confalone, L; Gaudio, R M; Lombardo, L; Lauritano, D

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective clinical study was to evaluate the survival rate (i.e. SVR – fixtures still in place at the end of the observation period) and success rate (i.e. SCR - bone resorption around implant neck) of an implant system characterized by cylindrical and tapered implants, both types of implant being equipped with a conical connection with an internal octagon (COC), both implant types having a 1.8 mm smooth neck, positioned above the bone crest level. A total of 65 subjects received 215 COCs between January 1996 and October 2011. All COCs were placed and restored by three experienced dental surgeons. The mean follow-up was 84±44 months. The patients involved in the study were both male (30) and female (35), of whom 30 were smokers (less than 20 cigarettes/day) and none was diabetic. The implants differed in terms of diameter and length, and were inserted both in the mandible (97) and in the maxilla (118). Sixty-seven implants were single tooth rehabilitations, and 148 prosthetic bridges. Fourteen had guided bone regeneration (GBR), and 10 were placed in post-extractive sites. Forty of the implants were provided with passing-screw abutments and 175 with full-screw abutments. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. None of the implants failed before prosthetic restoration, resulting in an SVR=100% after loading. The radiographic and clinical data revealed well-maintained, hard and soft tissue around the COCs, with an SCR=92.6%. Cox regression analyses did not detect any variables with statistical impact on the clinical outcome. In conclusion, Shiner XT implants are reliable tools for oral rehabilitation. PMID:27469549

  19. Partial tooth gear bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A partial gear bearing including an upper half, comprising peak partial teeth, and a lower, or bottom, half, comprising valley partial teeth. The upper half also has an integrated roller section between each of the peak partial teeth with a radius equal to the gear pitch radius of the radially outwardly extending peak partial teeth. Conversely, the lower half has an integrated roller section between each of the valley half teeth with a radius also equal to the gear pitch radius of the peak partial teeth. The valley partial teeth extend radially inwardly from its roller section. The peak and valley partial teeth are exactly out of phase with each other, as are the roller sections of the upper and lower halves. Essentially, the end roller bearing of the typical gear bearing has been integrated into the normal gear tooth pattern.

  20. Remote monitoring of patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices: a Southeast Asian, single-centre pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Paul Chun Yih; Lee, Audry Shan Yin; Chua, Kelvin Chi Ming; Lim, Eric Tien Siang; Chong, Daniel Thuan Tee; Tan, Boon Yew; Ho, Kah Leng; Teo, Wee Siong; Ching, Chi Keong

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Remote monitoring of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIED) has been shown to improve patient safety and reduce in-office visits. We report our experience with remote monitoring via the Medtronic CareLink® network. METHODS Patients were followed up for six months with scheduled monthly remote monitoring transmissions in addition to routine in-office checks. The efficacy of remote monitoring was evaluated by recording compliance to transmissions, number of device alerts requiring intervention and time from transmission to review. Questionnaires were administered to evaluate the experiences of patients, physicians and medical technicians. RESULTS A total of 57 patients were enrolled; 16 (28.1%) had permanent pacemakers, 34 (59.6%) had implantable cardioverter defibrillators and 7 (12.3%) had cardiac resynchronisation therapy defibrillators. Overall, of 334 remote transmissions scheduled, 73.7% were on time, 14.5% were overdue and 11.8% were missed. 84.6% of wireless transmissions were on time, compared to 53.8% of non-wireless transmissions. Among all transmissions, 4.4% contained alerts for which physicians were informed and only 1.8% required intervention. 98.6% of remote transmissions were reviewed by the second working day. 73.2% of patients preferred remote monitoring. Physicians agreed that remote transmissions provided information equivalent to in-office checks 97.1% of the time. 77.8% of medical technicians felt that remote monitoring would help the hospital improve patient management. No adverse events were reported. CONCLUSION Remote monitoring of CIED is safe and feasible. It has possible benefits to patient safety through earlier detection of arrhythmias or device malfunction, permitting earlier intervention. Wireless remote monitoring, in particular, may improve compliance to device monitoring. Patients may prefer remote monitoring due to possible improvements in quality of life. PMID:27439396

  1. Analysis on the stress of the bone surrounding mini-implant with different diameters and lengths under torque.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yingjuan; Chang, Shaohai; Ye, Jiantao; Ye, Yushan; Yu, Yansong

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the stress of the bone around the mini-implant under the two kinds of force: the composite force which contains torque and traditional single force. There were 96 finite element models formed by the combination of mini-implant and bone, with diameters of 1.2 mm, 1.6 mm, 2.0 mm and corresponding length being 6 mm, 8 mm, 10 mm, 12 mm, respectively. Each size corresponded to 8 models. Group SF (each size n=4) was loaded with 200 g single force, while Group CF (each size n=4) was loaded with composite force which contained 6N mm torque and 200 g single force. The maximum equivalent stress (Max EQS) of the bone surrounding mini implant with different loading directions was calculated, and the relationship of force direction, diameter and length was also evaluated. The Max EQS of Group CF was higher than that of Group SF. The effect of force direction on the stress was related to the diameter of mini implant, but had nothing to do with its length. The Max EQS of the cortical bone around mini implant in Group CF was higher (P<0.05) than that in Group SF. In contrast, there was no significant difference (P>0.05) between Group SF and Group CF in terms of bone stress when the diameter of mini implant was 1.6 mm or 2.0 mm. In our study, it is demonstrated that the diameter of mini-implant is better to be larger than 1.2 mm when a mini-implant is used in a torque control of tooth. The impact of this feature in the clinical setting needs to be verified.

  2. Chick limbs with mouse teeth: an effective in vivo culture system for tooth germ development and analysis.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Eiki; Wu, Changshan; Shimo, Tsuyoshi; Pacifici, Maurizio

    2003-01-01

    Mouse tooth germ development is currently studied by three main approaches: in wild-type and mutant mouse lines, after transplantation of tooth germs to ectopic sites, and in organ culture. The in vivo approaches are the most physiological but do not provide accessibility to tooth germs for further experimental manipulation. Organ cultures, although readily accessible, do not sustain full tooth germ development and are appropriate for short-term analysis. Thus, we sought to establish a new approach that would combine experimental accessibility with sustained development. We implanted fragments of embryonic day 12 mouse embryo first branchial arch containing early bud stage tooth germs into the lateral mesenchyme of day 4-5 chick embryo wing buds in ovo. Eggs were reincubated, and implanted tissues were examined by histochemistry and in situ hybridization over time. The tooth germs underwent seemingly normal growth, differentiation, and morphogenesis. They reached the cap, bell, and crown stages in approximately 3, 6, and 10 days, respectively, mimicking in a striking manner native temporal patterns. To examine mechanisms regulating tooth germ development, we first implanted tooth germ fragments, microinjected them with neutralizing antibodies to the key signaling molecule Sonic hedgehog (Shh), and examined them over time. Tooth germ development was markedly delayed, as revealed by poor morphogenesis and lack of mature ameloblasts and odontoblasts displaying characteristic traits such as an elongated cell shape, nuclear relocalization, and amelogenin gene expression. These phenotypic changes began to be reversed upon further incubation. The data show that the limb bud represents an effective, experimentally accessible as well as economical system for growth and analysis of developing tooth germs. The inhibitory effects of Shh neutralizing antibody treatment are discussed in relation to roles of this signaling pathway proposed by this and other groups previously.

  3. Role of multiple cusps in tooth fracture.

    PubMed

    Barani, Amir; Bush, Mark B; Lawn, Brian R

    2014-07-01

    The role of multiple cusps in the biomechanics of human molar tooth fracture is analysed. A model with four cusps at the bite surface replaces the single dome structure used in previous simulations. Extended finite element modelling, with provision to embed longitudinal cracks into the enamel walls, enables full analysis of crack propagation from initial extension to final failure. The cracks propagate longitudinally around the enamel side walls from starter cracks placed either at the top surface (radial cracks) or from the tooth base (margin cracks). A feature of the crack evolution is its stability, meaning that extension occurs steadily with increasing applied force. Predictions from the model are validated by comparison with experimental data from earlier publications, in which crack development was followed in situ during occlusal loading of extracted human molars. The results show substantial increase in critical forces to produce longitudinal fractures with number of cuspal contacts, indicating a capacity for an individual tooth to spread the load during mastication. It is argued that explicit critical force equations derived in previous studies remain valid, at the least as a means for comparing the capacity for teeth of different dimensions to sustain high bite forces.

  4. Atraumatic extraction, implant placement and immediate provisionalization.

    PubMed

    Tavarez, Rudys Rodolfo de Jesus; Calixto, Amanda Martins; Maia Filho, Etevaldo Matos; Bandeca, Matheus Coelho; Firoozmand, Leily Macedo; Gomes, Mario Gilson Nina; Malheiros, Adriana Santos

    2014-01-01

    Front tooth extraction typically results in significant loss of hard and soft tissue volume, both in the vestibular-lingual and mesiodistal directions. As these changes can compromise the esthetic results of prosthetic rehabilitation, extraction techniques that cause minimal trauma to the remnant tissues are applied in combination with immediate implant placement to minimize such alterations. The case reported in the present article illustrates a therapeutic plan consisting of atraumatic extraction followed by immediate implant placement and provisionalization. When carefully indicated and planned, our results indicate that this technique may provide promising immediate results relative to the maintenance and stability of the peri-implanted tissues. PMID:25576122

  5. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy of a Single Implant With Two Fractions Combined With External Beam Radiotherapy for Hormone-Naive Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Morio Mori, Takashi; Shirai, Shintaro; Kishi, Kazushi; Inagaki, Takeshi; Hara, Isao

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the preliminary outcomes of high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy of a single implant with two fractions and external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for hormone-naive prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between March 2000 and Sept 2003, a total of 53 patients with tumor Stage T1c-T3b N0 M0 prostate cancer were treated with HDR brachytherapy boost doses (7.5 Gy/fraction) and 50-Gy EBRT during a 5.5-week period. Median follow-up was 61 months. Patients were divided into groups with localized (T1c-T2b) and advanced disease (T3a-T3b). We used the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) definition for biochemical failure. According to recommendations of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group-ASTRO Phoenix Consensus Conference, biochemical failure-free control rates (BF-FCRs) at 3 years were investigated as 2 years short of the median follow-up. Results: Between April 2000 and Sept 2007, Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events Version 2.0 late Grade 2 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity rates were 0% and 3.8%, respectively. Erectile preservation was 25% at 5 years. Overall survival was 88.1% and cause-specific survival was 100%. At 3 years, ASTRO BF-FCRs of the localized and advanced groups were 100% and 42%, respectively (p = 0.001). Conclusions: The HDR brachytherapy of a single implant with two fractions plus EBRT is effective in treating patients with localized hormone-naive prostate cancer, with the least genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities; however, longer median BF-FCR follow-up is required to assess these findings.

  6. Fabrication and characterization of a co-planar detector in diamond for low energy single ion implantation

    DOE PAGES

    Abraham, John Bishoy Sam; Pacheco, Jose L.; Aguirre, Brandon Adrian; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Bielejec, Edward S.

    2016-08-09

    We demonstrate low energy single ion detection using a co-planar detector fabricated on a diamond substrate and characterized by ion beam induced charge collection. Histograms are taken with low fluence ion pulses illustrating quantized ion detection down to a single ion with a signal-to-noise ratio of approximately 10. We anticipate that this detection technique can serve as a basis to optimize the yield of single color centers in diamond. In conclusion, the ability to count ions into a diamond substrate is expected to reduce the uncertainty in the yield of color center formation by removing Poisson statistics from the implantationmore » process.« less

  7. Zirconia Implants in Esthetic Areas: 4-Year Follow-Up Evaluation Study

    PubMed Central

    Borgonovo, Andrea Enrico; Censi, Rachele; Vavassori, Virna; Arnaboldi, Oscar; Maiorana, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. The aim is to evaluate the survival and success rates, as well as the marginal bone loss (MBL) and periodontal indexes of zirconia implants positioned in the esthetic jaw areas. Materials and Method. 13 patients were selected and 20 one-piece zirconia implants were used for the rehabilitation of single tooth or partially edentulous ridge in the esthetic jaw areas. Six months after surgery and then once a year, a clinical-radiographic evaluation was performed in order to estimate peri-implant tissue health and marginal bone loss. Results. The survival and success rates were 100%. The average marginal bone loss from baseline to 48 months after surgery was +2.1 mm. Four years after surgery, the median and the mode for visible Plaque Index and Bleeding On Probing resulted 1 whereas Probing Pocket Depth amounted to 3 mm (SD = ±0.49 mm). Conclusion. One-piece zirconia dental implants are characterized by high biocompatibility, low plaque adhesion, and absence of microgap that can be related to the clinical success of these implants even in the esthetic areas. PMID:26124836

  8. Esthetic management of double tooth associated with talon cusp using a laminate veneer.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Wayne José Batista; do Couto, Cintia Fernandes; Barros, Renata Nunes; Zarranz, Laila; Jorge, Mônica Zacharias; de Gouvêa, Cresus Vínicius Depes

    2014-01-01

    Double tooth and talon cusp are tooth shape anomalies with rare co-occurrences in a single tooth. Double tooth is a developmental anomaly that leads to the eruption of fused teeth and may contribute to compromised esthetics, pain, caries, and tooth crowding. Talon cusp is a rare developmental extra cusp-like projection on the cingulum area that may cause functional and esthetic problems. Differential diagnosis of these anomalies may be complicated. A multidisciplinary approach for the esthetic and functional rehabilitation of double teeth is important. Various treatment methods have been described in the literature for the different types and morphological variations of double teeth. The purpose of this paper is to report the case of an unusual combination of double tooth and talon cusp on a permanent maxillary incisor and describe its esthetic and functional rehabilitation using a porcelain laminate veneer. PMID:25514262

  9. Rehabilitation of mandibular edentulism by single crystal sapphire implants and overdentures: 3-12 year results in 86 patients. A dual center international study.

    PubMed

    Fartash, B; Tangerud, T; Silness, J; Arvidson, K

    1996-09-01

    86 patients, in 2 Scandinavian centers, participated in a prospective study of mandibular edentulism, treated with overdentures supported by Bioceram sapphire implants. Implant success and prosthesis stability as well as parameters for peri-implant health were evaluated. Masticatory function and complications were also documented. The study began in 1991 and clinical treatment of the last patients was completed in 1991. The patients have been followed for at least 3 years, and up to 12 years. 4 patients were lost to follow-up. Of the initial 324 implants, 7 implants failed before prosthetic treatment. 3 patients lost 1 implant each within the 1st year, and 4 patients lost all 4 implants. 16 implants were lost between 36 and 42 months in function, due to lack of osseointegration and pain. The loss of implants could be attributable to an association, not statistically verified, between bone quality and anatomy, with heavy smoking as a risk factor. Based on the remaining implants, the cumulative implant success rates were 95.2%, 91.3%, 91.3%, 91.3% at 3, 5, 10 and 12 year follow-up respectively. The cumulative success rates for overdentures were 96.4%, 92.8% and 92.8% respectively, for the same follow-up periods. Indices for the health of the peri-implant mucosa disclosed no serious inflammatory reactions in the surrounding soft tissues. Patient satisfaction with this form of oral rehabilitation was high in all but 2 patients who experienced discomfort.

  10. Detecting gear tooth fracture in a high contact ratio face gear mesh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zakrajsek, James J.; Handschuh, Robert F.; Lewicki, David G.; Decker, Harry J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper summarized the results of a study in which three different vibration diagnostic methods were used to detect gear tooth fracture in a high contact ratio face gear mesh. The NASA spiral bevel gear fatigue test rig was used to produce unseeded fault, natural failures of four face gear specimens. During the fatigue tests, which were run to determine load capacity and primary failure mechanisms for face gears, vibration signals were monitored and recorded for gear diagnostic purposes. Gear tooth bending fatigue and surface pitting were the primary failure modes found in the tests. The damage ranged from partial tooth fracture on a single tooth in one test to heavy wear, severe pitting, and complete tooth fracture of several teeth on another test. Three gear fault detection techniques, FM4, NA4*, and NB4, were applied to the experimental data. These methods use the signal average in both the time and frequency domain. Method NA4* was able to conclusively detect the gear tooth fractures in three out of the four fatigue tests, along with gear tooth surface pitting and heavy wear. For multiple tooth fractures, all of the methods gave a clear indication of the damage. It was also found that due to the high contact ratio of the face gear mesh, single tooth fractures did not significantly affect the vibration signal, making this type of failure difficult to detect.

  11. Early- and mid-term outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Data from a single-center registry

    PubMed Central

    Bagienski, Maciej; Dziewierz, Artur; Rzeszutko, Lukasz; Sorysz, Danuta; Trebacz, Jaroslaw; Sobczynski, Robert; Tomala, Marek; Stapor, Maciej; Gackowski, Andrzej; Dudek, Dariusz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a less invasive treatment option for elderly, high-risk patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis (AS) than aortic valve replacement. More importantly, TAVI improves survival and quality of life as compared to medical treatment in inoperable patients. Aim To assess early- and mid-term clinical outcomes after TAVI. Material and methods All consecutive high-risk patients with severe symptomatic AS undergoing TAVI from November 2008 to August 2014 were enrolled. The clinical and procedural characteristics, as well as clinical outcomes including mortality during 12-month follow-up, were assessed. Results A total of 101 consecutive patients underwent TAVI for native aortic valve stenosis (100%). Patients were elderly, with a median age of 81.0 (76.0–84.0) years, 60.4% were female and 83.2% presented with NYHA III/IV. Median baseline EuroSCORE I and STS scores were 14.0 (10.0–22.5)% and 12.0 (5.0–24.0)%, respectively. The main periprocedural and in-hospital complications were minor vascular complications, bleeding requiring blood transfusions, and the need for a permanent pacemaker. In-hospital, 30-day, 6-month and 12-month mortality rates were 6.9%, 10.9%, 15.8% and 17.8%, respectively. Conclusions A mortality rate of < 20% after 12 months seems acceptable given the high-risk population enrolled. PMID:27279871

  12. General anaesthesia vs. conscious sedation for transfemoral aortic valve implantation: a single UK centre before-and-after study.

    PubMed

    Miles, L F; Joshi, K R; Ogilvie, E H; Densem, C G; Klein, A A; O'Sullivan, M; Martinez, G; Sudarshan, C D; Abu-Omar, Y; Irons, J F

    2016-08-01

    Reported data suggest that 99% of transfemoral, transcatheter aortic valve implantations in the UK are performed under general anaesthesia. This before-and-after study is the first UK comparison of conscious sedation vs. general anaesthesia for this procedure. Patients who underwent general anaesthesia received tracheal intubation, positive pressure ventilation, radial arterial and central venous access and urinary catheterisation. Anaesthesia was maintained with propofol or sevoflurane. Patients who received conscious sedation had a fascia iliaca and ilioinguinal nerve block and low-dose remifentanil infusion, without invasive monitoring or urinary catheterisation. Recruitment took place between August 2012 and July 2015, with a 6-month crossover period between November 2013 and June 2014. A total of 88 patients were analysed, evenly divided between the two groups. Patients receiving conscious sedation had a shorter anaesthetic time (mean (SD) 121 (28) min vs. 145 (41) min; p < 0.001) and recovery room time (110 (50) min vs. 155 (48) min; p = 0.001), lower requirement for inotropes (4.6% vs 81.8%; OR (95% CI) 0.1 (0.002-0.050); p < 0.001) and a lower incidence of malignant dysrhythmia (0% vs 11.4%; p = 0.020). Conscious sedation appears a feasible alternative to general anaesthesia for this procedure and is associated with a reduced requirement for inotropic support and improved efficiency.

  13. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... electrodes are inserted. The electronic device at the base of the electrode array is then placed under ... FDA approval for implants The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates cochlear implant devices for both adults ...

  14. Dental Implants.

    PubMed

    Zohrabian, Vahe M; Sonick, Michael; Hwang, Debby; Abrahams, James J

    2015-10-01

    Dental implants restore function to near normal in partially or completely edentulous patients. A root-form implant is the most frequently used type of dental implant today. The basis for dental implants is osseointegration, in which osteoblasts grow and directly integrate with the surface of titanium posts surgically embedded into the jaw. Radiologic assessment is critical in the preoperative evaluation of the dental implant patient, as the exact height, width, and contour of the alveolar ridge must be determined. Moreover, the precise locations of the maxillary sinuses and mandibular canals, as well as their relationships to the site of implant surgery must be ascertained. As such, radiologists must be familiar with implant design and surgical placement, as well as augmentation procedures utilized in those patients with insufficient bone in the maxilla and mandible to support dental implants.

  15. Isotropic plasticity of β-type Ti-29Nb-13Ta-4.6Zr alloy single crystals for the development of single crystalline β-Ti implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagihara, Koji; Nakano, Takayoshi; Maki, Hideaki; Umakoshi, Yukichi; Niinomi, Mitsuo

    2016-07-01

    β-type Ti-29Nb-13Ta-4.6Zr alloy is a promising novel material for biomedical applications. We have proposed a ‘single crystalline β-Ti implant’ as new hard tissue replacements for suppressing the stress shielding by achieving a drastic reduction in the Young’s modulus. To develop this, the orientation dependence of the plastic deformation behavior of the Ti-29Nb-13Ta-4.6Zr single crystal was first clarified. Dislocation slip with a Burgers vector parallel to <111> was the predominant deformation mode in the wide loading orientation. The orientation dependence of the yield stress due to <111> dislocations was small, in contrast to other β-Ti alloys. In addition, {332} twin was found to be operative at the loading orientation around [001]. The asymmetric features of the {332} twin formation depending on the loading orientation could be roughly anticipated by their Schmid factors. However, the critical resolved shear stress for the {332} twins appeared to show orientation dependence. The simultaneous operation of <111> slip and {332} twin were found to be the origin of the good mechanical properties with excellent strength and ductility. It was clarified that the Ti-29Nb-13Ta-4.6Zr alloy single crystal shows the “plastically almost-isotropic and elastically highly-anisotropic” nature, that is desirable for the development of ‘single crystalline β-Ti implant’.

  16. Isotropic plasticity of β-type Ti-29Nb-13Ta-4.6Zr alloy single crystals for the development of single crystalline β-Ti implants

    PubMed Central

    Hagihara, Koji; Nakano, Takayoshi; Maki, Hideaki; Umakoshi, Yukichi; Niinomi, Mitsuo

    2016-01-01

    β-type Ti-29Nb-13Ta-4.6Zr alloy is a promising novel material for biomedical applications. We have proposed a ‘single crystalline β-Ti implant’ as new hard tissue replacements for suppressing the stress shielding by achieving a drastic reduction in the Young’s modulus. To develop this, the orientation dependence of the plastic deformation behavior of the Ti-29Nb-13Ta-4.6Zr single crystal was first clarified. Dislocation slip with a Burgers vector parallel to <111> was the predominant deformation mode in the wide loading orientation. The orientation dependence of the yield stress due to <111> dislocations was small, in contrast to other β-Ti alloys. In addition, {332} twin was found to be operative at the loading orientation around [001]. The asymmetric features of the {332} twin formation depending on the loading orientation could be roughly anticipated by their Schmid factors. However, the critical resolved shear stress for the {332} twins appeared to show orientation dependence. The simultaneous operation of <111> slip and {332} twin were found to be the origin of the good mechanical properties with excellent strength and ductility. It was clarified that the Ti-29Nb-13Ta-4.6Zr alloy single crystal shows the “plastically almost-isotropic and elastically highly-anisotropic” nature, that is desirable for the development of ‘single crystalline β-Ti implant’. PMID:27417073

  17. Long-Term Outcomes After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation from a Single High-Volume Center (The Milan Experience).

    PubMed

    Ruparelia, Neil; Latib, Azeem; Buzzatti, Nicola; Giannini, Francesco; Figini, Filippo; Mangieri, Antonio; Regazzoli, Damiano; Stella, Stefano; Sticchi, Alessandro; Kawamoto, Hiroyoshi; Tanaka, Akihito; Agricola, Eustachio; Monaco, Fabrizio; Castiglioni, Alessandro; Ancona, Marco; Cioni, Micaela; Spagnolo, Pietro; Chieffo, Alaide; Montorfano, Matteo; Alfieri, Ottavio; Colombo, Antonio

    2016-03-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is now the treatment of choice for patients with symptomatic aortic stenosis who are inoperable or with high surgical risk. Data with regards to contemporary clinical practice and long-term outcomes are sparse. To evaluate temporal changes in TAVI practice and explore procedural and long-term clinical outcomes of patients in a contemporary "real-world" population, outcomes of 829 patients treated from November 2007 to May 2015, at the San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy, were retrospectively analyzed. Median follow-up was 568 days, with the longest follow-up of 2,677 days. Overall inhospital mortality was 3.5%. During the study period, there was a trend toward treating younger, lower risk patients. Overall mortality rates were 3.5% (30 days), 14% (1 year), 22% (2 years), 29% (3 years), 37% (4 years), 47% (5 years), 53% (6 years), and 72% (7 years). The survival probability at 5 years was significantly higher in patients treated through the transfemoral (TF) route compared to other vascular access sites (log rank p <0.001). Non-TF vascular access and residual paravalvular leak ≥2 (after TAVI) were identified as independent predictors for both all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. No patient required further aortic valve intervention for TAVI prosthesis degeneration. In conclusion, there is a trend toward treating younger, lower-risk patients. Non-TF vascular access approach and ≥2 PVL after TAVI were identified as independent predictors for both overall and cardiovascular mortality with no cases of prosthesis degeneration suggesting acceptable durability.

  18. Functional tooth restoration utilising split germs through re-regionalisation of the tooth-forming field

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Naomi; Oshima, Masamitsu; Tanaka, Chie; Ogawa, Miho; Nakajima, Kei; Ishida, Kentaro; Moriyama, Keiji; Tsuji, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The tooth is an ectodermal organ that arises from a tooth germ under the regulation of reciprocal epithelial-mesenchymal interactions. Tooth morphogenesis occurs in the tooth-forming field as a result of reaction-diffusion waves of specific gene expression patterns. Here, we developed a novel mechanical ligation method for splitting tooth germs to artificially regulate the molecules that control tooth morphology. The split tooth germs successfully developed into multiple correct teeth through the re-regionalisation of the tooth-forming field, which is regulated by reaction-diffusion waves in response to mechanical force. Furthermore, split teeth erupted into the oral cavity and restored physiological tooth function, including mastication, periodontal ligament function and responsiveness to noxious stimuli. Thus, this study presents a novel tooth regenerative technology based on split tooth germs and the re-regionalisation of the tooth-forming field by artificial mechanical force. PMID:26673152

  19. Biomechanical stress in bone surrounding an implant under simulated chewing.

    PubMed

    Ishigaki, Shoichi; Nakano, Tamaki; Yamada, Shinichi; Nakamura, Takashi; Takashima, Fumio

    2003-02-01

    The concept of reducing nonaxial loading of dental implants has been widely regarded as the standard procedure. The aim of this study was to reveal the biomechanical stress distribution in supporting bone around an implant and a natural tooth under chewing function. Three-dimensional finite element models of the mandibular first molar and the titanium implant both with the mandible in the molar region were constructed. The directions of displacement constraints were determined according to the angles of the closing pathways of chopping type and grinding type chewing patterns. The tooth model showed smooth stress distribution in the supporting bone with low stress concentration around the neck of the tooth. The implant model showed stress concentration in the supporting bone around the neck of the implant, especially in the buccal area. The grinding type model of the implant showed higher tensile stress concentration than the chopping type model at the lingual neck of the implant. The results of this study suggested the importance of considering occlusion under chewing function for understanding the biomechanics of oral implants.

  20. Comparison of Long-term Survival of Implants and Endodontically Treated Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Setzer, F.C.; Kim, S.

    2014-01-01

    The outcomes of both dental implants and endodontically treated teeth have been extensively studied. However, there is still a great controversy over when to keep a natural tooth and when to extract it for a dental implant. This article reviews the benefits and disadvantages of both treatment options and discusses success vs. survival outcomes, as well as the impact of technical advances for modern endodontics and endodontic microsurgery on the long-term prognosis of tooth retention. PMID:24065635

  1. The effect of intravertebral anesthesia on bone cement implantation syndrome in aged patients: A single-center 5-year retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qian; Huang, Chun; Zhang, Ya-Jun

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the effect of commonly used intravertebral anesthesia on bone cement implantation syndrome (BCIS) in aged patients undergoing hemiarthroplasty.The medical records of 1210 aged patients receiving hemiarthroplasty under intravertebral anesthesia were retrospectively reviewed. Anesthesia charts for all patients were reviewed for central venous pressure, mean arterial pressure, arterial oxygen saturation, and heart rate before, during, and after cementation. Each patient was classified into no BCIS (grade 0) or BCIS grade 1, 2, or 3 according to the degree of hypotension, arterial desaturation, or loss of consciousness around cementation. Changes in these grades after cementation were compared according to the ways of intravertebral anesthesia used.Among all included patients, 72.2% (874/1210) showed grade 1 or higher grade of BCIS after cementation. Compared with spinal-epidural anesthesia, single epidural anesthesia showed adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence interval) of 1.25 (1.13-1.43) for grade 1, 1.36 (0.83-2.06) for grade 2, and 3.55 (1.52-7.06) for marked postoperatively grade 3 of BCIS versus grade 0 (Type III P < 0.0001).Single epidural anesthesia was associated with increased odds for elevation of these grades after cementation compared with spinal-epidural anesthesia. PMID:27603378

  2. Clinical measurement of tooth wear: Tooth wear indices

    PubMed Central

    López-Frías, Francisco J.; Castellanos-Cosano, Lizett; Martín-González, Jenifer; Llamas-Carreras, José M.

    2012-01-01

    Attrition, erosion, and abrasion result in alterations to the tooth and manifest as tooth wear. Each classification corresponds to a different process with specific clinical features. Classifications made so far have no accurate prevalence data because the indexes do not necessarily measure a specific etiology, or because the study populations can be diverse in age and characteristics. Tooth wears (attrition, erosion and abrasion) is perceived internationally as a growing problem. However, the interpretation and comparison of clinical and epidemiological studies, it is increasingly difficult because of differences in terminology and the large number of indicators/indices that have been developed for the diagnosis, classification and monitoring of the loss of dental hard tissue. These indices have been designed to identify increasing severity and are usually numerical, none have universal acceptance, complicating the evaluation of the true increase in prevalence reported. This article considers the ideal requirements for an erosion index. A literature review is conducted with the aim of analyzing the evolution of the indices used today and discuss whether they meet the clinical needs and research in dentistry. Key words:Tooth wear, tooth wear indices, attrition, erosion, abrasion, abfraction. PMID:24558525

  3. [Hearing implants].

    PubMed

    Stokroos, Robert J; George, Erwin L J

    2013-01-01

    In the Netherlands, more than 1.5 million people suffer from sensorineural hearing loss or deafness. However, fitting conventional hearing aids does not provide a solution for everyone. In recent decades, developments in medical technology have produced implantable and other devices that restore both sensorineural and conductive hearing losses. These hearing devices can be categorized into bone conductive devices, implantable middle ear prostheses, cochlear implants and auditory brainstem implants. Furthermore, new implants aimed at treating tinnitus and loss of vestibular function have recently been developed.

  4. Comparison of 2 Zero-Profile Implants in the Treatment of Single-Level Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy: A Preliminary Clinical Study of Cervical Disc Arthroplasty versus Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li-Li; Liu, Zu-De; Yuan, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) with Discover prosthesis or anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) with Zero-P cage has been widely used in the treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). However, little is known about the comparison of the 2 zero-profile implants in the treatment of single-level CSM. The aim was to compare the clinical outcomes and radiographic parameters of CDA with Discover prosthesis and ACDF with Zero-P cage for the treatment of single-level CSM. Methods A total of 128 consecutive patients who underwent 1-level CDA with Discover prosthesis or ACDF with Zero-P cage for single-level CSM between September 2009 and December 2012 were included in this study. Clinical outcomes were evaluated using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score and Neck Disability Index (NDI). For radiographic assessment, the overall sagittal alignment (OSA), functional spinal unit (FSU) angle, and range of motion (ROM) at the index and adjacent levels were measured before and after surgery. Additionally, the complications were also recorded. Results Both treatments significantly improved all clinical parameters (P < 0.05), without statistically relevant differences between the 2 groups. The OSA and FSU angle increased significantly in both groups (P <0.05). Compared with Zero-P group, ROMs at the index levels were well maintained in the Discover group (P < 0.05). However, there were no statistical differences in the ROMs of adjacent levels between the 2 groups (P > 0.05). Besides, no significant differences existed in dysphagia, subsidence, or adjacent disc degeneration between the 2 groups (P > 0.05). However, significant differences occurred in prosthesis migration in CDA group. Conclusions The results of this study showed that clinical outcomes and radiographic parameters were satisfactory and comparable with the 2 techniques. However, more attention to prosthesis migration of artificial cervical disc should be paid in the

  5. Detecting Gear Tooth Fatigue Cracks in Advance of Complete Fracture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zakrajsek, James J.; Lewicki, David G.

    1996-01-01

    Results of using vibration-based methods to detect gear tooth fatigue cracks are presented. An experimental test rig was used to fail a number of spur gear specimens through bending fatigue. The gear tooth fatigue crack in each test was initiated through a small notch in the fillet area of a tooth on the gear. The primary purpose of these tests was to verify analytical predictions of fatigue crack propagation direction and rate as a function of gear rim thickness. The vibration signal from a total of three tests was monitored and recorded for gear fault detection research. The damage consisted of complete rim fracture on the two thin rim gears and single tooth fracture on the standard full rim test gear. Vibration-based fault detection methods were applied to the vibration signal both on-line and after the tests were completed. The objectives of this effort were to identify methods capable of detecting the fatigue crack and to determine how far in advance of total failure positive detection was given. Results show that the fault detection methods failed to respond to the fatigue crack prior to complete rim fracture in the thin rim gear tests. In the standard full rim gear test all of the methods responded to the fatigue crack in advance of tooth fracture; however, only three of the methods responded to the fatigue crack in the early stages of crack propagation.

  6. Tooth polishing: The current status

    PubMed Central

    Sawai, Madhuri Alankar; Bhardwaj, Ashu; Jafri, Zeba; Sultan, Nishat; Daing, Anika

    2015-01-01

    Healthy teeth and gums make a person feel confident and fit. As people go about their daily routines and with different eating and drinking habits, the tooth enamel turns yellowish or gets stained. Polishing traditionally has been associated with the prophylaxis procedure in most dental practices, which patients know and expect. However, with overzealous use of polishing procedure, there is wearing of the superficial tooth structure. This would lead to more accumulation of local deposits. Also, it takes a long time for the formation of the fluoride-rich layer of the tooth again. Hence, now-a-days, polishing is not advised as a part of routine oral prophylaxis procedure but is done selectively based on the patients’ need. The article here, gives an insight on the different aspects of the polishing process along with the different methods and agents used for the same. PMID:26392683

  7. Biological restorations using tooth fragments.

    PubMed

    Busato, A L; Loguercio, A D; Barbosa, A N; Sanseverino, M do C; Macedo, R P; Baldissera, R A

    1998-02-01

    A "biological" restoration technique using dental fragments and adhesive materials is described. These fragments were obtained from extracted human teeth which had been previously sterilized and stored in a tooth bank. The advantages are: the use of extracted teeth as restorative material, esthetics, and treatment cost. The positive sensation of having back the missing tooth was the most mentioned comment among patients. The disadvantages are: the difficulty of obtaining teeth with the needed characteristics, problems of making an indirect restoration, matching the original color, and the non-acceptance by some patients who consider it strange to have other people's teeth placed in their mouths.

  8. Implantable Microimagers

    PubMed Central

    Ng, David C.; Tokuda, Takashi; Shiosaka, Sadao; Tano, Yasuo; Ohta, Jun

    2008-01-01

    Implantable devices such as cardiac pacemakers, drug-delivery systems, and defibrillators have had a tremendous impact on the quality of live for many disabled people. To date, many devices have been developed for implantation into various parts of the human body. In this paper, we focus on devices implanted in the head. In particular, we describe the technologies necessary to create implantable microimagers. Design, fabrication, and implementation issues are discussed vis-à-vis two examples of implantable microimagers; the retinal prosthesis and in vivo neuro-microimager. Testing of these devices in animals verify the use of the microimagers in the implanted state. We believe that further advancement of these devices will lead to the development of a new method for medical and scientific applications.

  9. Impact of diet on tooth erosion.

    PubMed

    Richards, Derek

    2016-06-01

    Data sourcesPubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, Science Direct, EBSHost, Scientific Electronic Library online (SciELO).Study selectionPopulation-based cross-sectional and longitudinal studies assessing tooth erosion and diet, conducted in children and adolescents between eight and 19 years reporting on the permanent dentition were considered.Data extraction and synthesisStudies were selected independently by two reviewers and standard data items extracted. Study quality was assessed using the STROBE (Strengthening the Reporting of Observational studies in Epidemiology) statement and Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale (NOS). The pooled effect of dietary habits on tooth erosion occurrence was calculated using a fixed and a random model (OR and 95%CI).ResultsThirteen studies involving a total of 16,661 children were included. Eleven of the studies were cross-sectional and two longitudinal. Dietary habits data were mainly obtained from brief dietary assessments (69.2%) with food amount (weighed or estimated) and food frequency questionnaires used less commonly (15.4%). Most dietary assessments were self-administered (84.6%), assessed diet on a single occasion (61.5%) and required recalls of a week or more days or usual behaviours (46.2%). Meta-analyses were carried out for carbonated/soft drinks, sports drinks, milk-based drinks, yogurt, confectionery and snacks and acidic natural fruit drinks. Higher consumption of carbonated drinks or acid snacks/sweets and for acid fruit juices increased the odds for tooth erosion, while higher intake of milk and yogurt reduced the odds of erosion (see table).ConclusionsThe evidence indicated that some dietary habits (soft drinks, acidic snacks/sweets and acidic fruit juices) increased the odds for erosion occurrence, while milk or yogurt produced a protective effect. Methodological issues were shown to partly explain the heterogeneity of the data for some dietary products. PMID:27339233

  10. Impact of diet on tooth erosion.

    PubMed

    Richards, Derek

    2016-06-01

    Data sourcesPubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, Science Direct, EBSHost, Scientific Electronic Library online (SciELO).Study selectionPopulation-based cross-sectional and longitudinal studies assessing tooth erosion and diet, conducted in children and adolescents between eight and 19 years reporting on the permanent dentition were considered.Data extraction and synthesisStudies were selected independently by two reviewers and standard data items extracted. Study quality was assessed using the STROBE (Strengthening the Reporting of Observational studies in Epidemiology) statement and Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale (NOS). The pooled effect of dietary habits on tooth erosion occurrence was calculated using a fixed and a random model (OR and 95%CI).ResultsThirteen studies involving a total of 16,661 children were included. Eleven of the studies were cross-sectional and two longitudinal. Dietary habits data were mainly obtained from brief dietary assessments (69.2%) with food amount (weighed or estimated) and food frequency questionnaires used less commonly (15.4%). Most dietary assessments were self-administered (84.6%), assessed diet on a single occasion (61.5%) and required recalls of a week or more days or usual behaviours (46.2%). Meta-analyses were carried out for carbonated/soft drinks, sports drinks, milk-based drinks, yogurt, confectionery and snacks and acidic natural fruit drinks. Higher consumption of carbonated drinks or acid snacks/sweets and for acid fruit juices increased the odds for tooth erosion, while higher intake of milk and yogurt reduced the odds of erosion (see table).ConclusionsThe evidence indicated that some dietary habits (soft drinks, acidic snacks/sweets and acidic fruit juices) increased the odds for erosion occurrence, while milk or yogurt produced a protective effect. Methodological issues were shown to partly explain the heterogeneity of the data for some dietary products.

  11. Orthodontic Tooth Movement: A Historic Prospective.

    PubMed

    Will, Leslie A

    2016-01-01

    The earliest report on orthodontic tooth movement in the English literature was published in 1911. Oppenheim carried out studies on baboons to determine what histologic changes occurred during tooth movement. Reitan and many others carried out research into the nature of tooth movement. The pressure-tension model of tooth movement developed from these studies, whereby the two sides of the tooth responded to forces as if in isolation. A second theory, proposed by Stuteville in 1938, was the hydraulic theory of tooth movement. In this theory, fluid from the vasculature, lymphatic system and intercellular spaces responds to the forces of tooth movement, damping the force and limiting movement. Bien and Baumrind expanded on this theory with their own studies in the 1960s. It is clear that both the pressure-tension and fluid flow concepts have merit, but considerable work needs to be done to ascertain the details so that tooth movement can be managed and controlled. PMID:26599117

  12. Orthodontic Tooth Movement: A Historic Prospective.

    PubMed

    Will, Leslie A

    2016-01-01

    The earliest report on orthodontic tooth movement in the English literature was published in 1911. Oppenheim carried out studies on baboons to determine what histologic changes occurred during tooth movement. Reitan and many others carried out research into the nature of tooth movement. The pressure-tension model of tooth movement developed from these studies, whereby the two sides of the tooth responded to forces as if in isolation. A second theory, proposed by Stuteville in 1938, was the hydraulic theory of tooth movement. In this theory, fluid from the vasculature, lymphatic system and intercellular spaces responds to the forces of tooth movement, damping the force and limiting movement. Bien and Baumrind expanded on this theory with their own studies in the 1960s. It is clear that both the pressure-tension and fluid flow concepts have merit, but considerable work needs to be done to ascertain the details so that tooth movement can be managed and controlled.

  13. Immediate placement and provisionalization of maxillary anterior single implant with guided bone regeneration, connective tissue graft, and coronally positioned flap procedures.

    PubMed

    Waki, Tomonori; Kan, Joseph Y K

    2016-01-01

    Immediate implant placement and provisionalization in the esthetic zone have been documented with success. The benefit of immediate implant placement and provisionalization is the preservation of papillary mucosa. However, in cases with osseous defects presenting on the facial bony plate, immediate implant placement procedures have resulted in facial gingival recession. Subepithelial connective tissue grafts for immediate implant placement and provisionalization procedures have been reported with a good esthetic outcome. Biotype conversion around implants with subepithelial connective tissue grafts have been advocated, and the resulting tissues appear to be more resistant to recession. The dimensions of peri-implant mucosa in a thick biotype were significantly greater than in a thin biotype. Connective tissue graft with coronally positioned flap procedures on natural teeth has also been documented with success. This article describes a technique combining immediate implant placement, provisionalization, guided bone regeneration (GBR), connective tissue graft, and a coronally positioned flap in order to achieve more stable peri-implant tissue in facial osseous defect situations.

  14. Quality of Life for Children with Cochlear Implants: Perceived Benefits and Problems and the Perception of Single Words and Emotional Sounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schorr, Efrat A.; Roth, Froma P.; Fox, Nathan A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined children's self-reported quality of life with a cochlear implant as related to children's actual perceptions of speech and the emotional information conveyed by sound. Effects of age at amplification with hearing aids and fitting of cochlear implants on perceived quality of life were also investigated. Method: A…

  15. Immediate placement and provisionalization of maxillary anterior single implant with guided bone regeneration, connective tissue graft, and coronally positioned flap procedures.

    PubMed

    Waki, Tomonori; Kan, Joseph Y K

    2016-01-01

    Immediate implant placement and provisionalization in the esthetic zone have been documented with success. The benefit of immediate implant placement and provisionalization is the preservation of papillary mucosa. However, in cases with osseous defects presenting on the facial bony plate, immediate implant placement procedures have resulted in facial gingival recession. Subepithelial connective tissue grafts for immediate implant placement and provisionalization procedures have been reported with a good esthetic outcome. Biotype conversion around implants with subepithelial connective tissue grafts have been advocated, and the resulting tissues appear to be more resistant to recession. The dimensions of peri-implant mucosa in a thick biotype were significantly greater than in a thin biotype. Connective tissue graft with coronally positioned flap procedures on natural teeth has also been documented with success. This article describes a technique combining immediate implant placement, provisionalization, guided bone regeneration (GBR), connective tissue graft, and a coronally positioned flap in order to achieve more stable peri-implant tissue in facial osseous defect situations. PMID:27092345

  16. A two DOF simulation of meshing in spur gear sets with modelling of the effect of individual tooth mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komitopoulos, Nikolaos; Vakouftsis, Christos

    2014-10-01

    A Two-Degree Of Freedom analytical model of meshing in a single-stage spur gear set was developed and used for time-domain dynamic simulation. Apart from the time-varying tooth stiffness, the individual tooth mass, reduced to the meshing point, was also taken into consideration and modeled. The simulations that were performed by means of MatLab software using numerical methods highlight the effect of the individual tooth mass in the dynamic response of the gear stage.

  17. Examples of model-free implant restorations using Cerec inLab 4.0 software.

    PubMed

    Reich, S; Schley, J; Kern, T; Fiedler, K; Wolfart, S

    2012-01-01

    This case report demonstrates two ways to fabricate model-free implant restorations with the Cerec inLab 4.0 software. Because the patient, a woman with a history of periodontal disease, did not wish to have a removable partial denture, implant therapy was planned for the restoration of her edentulous areas 14/15 and 24/25. In addition, the restoration was to provide functional relief of the natural maxillary anterior teeth. The two implants for the first quadrant were planned as single-tooth restorations. Each was designed as a full contour implant supra-structure using the Cerec Biogeneric abutment design technique. After completing the design phase, each restoration proposal was split into two parts: a zirconia abutment and a lithium disilicate crown. For the restoration of the second quadrant, custom 20-degree-angled abutments were individualized and acquired with the Cerec camera. A block crown was then designed, milled in burn-out acrylic resin, and fabricated from a lithium disilicate glass-ceramic ingot according to the press ceramic technique. Additionally methods of provisional restorations are discussed.

  18. Biology of tooth replacement in amniotes

    PubMed Central

    Whitlock, John A; Richman, Joy M

    2013-01-01

    Tooth replacement is a common trait to most vertebrates, including mammals. Mammals, however, have lost the capacity for continuous tooth renewal seen in most other vertebrates, and typically have only 1–2 generations of teeth. Here, we review the mechanisms of tooth replacement in reptiles and mammals, and discuss in detail the current and historical theories on control of timing and pattern of tooth replacement and development. PMID:23788284

  19. Tooth Avulsion in the School Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krause-Parello, Cheryl A.

    2005-01-01

    Tooth avulsions occur when a tooth is displaced from its socket. Tooth avulsions are common dental injuries that may occur before, during, or after school. Therefore, it is essential that school nurses be well prepared to intervene when such a dental emergency arises. It is also imperative that school nurses and school personnel are fully equipped…

  20. 21 CFR 872.3920 - Porcelain tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Porcelain tooth. 872.3920 Section 872.3920 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3920 Porcelain tooth. (a) Identification. A porcelain tooth is a prefabricated device made of porcelain powder for clinical use (§ 872.6660) intended for...

  1. 21 CFR 872.3920 - Porcelain tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Porcelain tooth. 872.3920 Section 872.3920 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3920 Porcelain tooth. (a) Identification. A porcelain tooth is a prefabricated device made of porcelain powder for clinical use (§ 872.6660) intended for...

  2. 21 CFR 872.3920 - Porcelain tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Porcelain tooth. 872.3920 Section 872.3920 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3920 Porcelain tooth. (a) Identification. A porcelain tooth is a prefabricated device made of porcelain powder for clinical use (§ 872.6660) intended for...

  3. Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is a group of genetic nerve disorders. It is named after the three doctors who first identified it. ... a nerve biopsy. There is no cure. The disease can be so mild you don't realize ...

  4. Peri-implant infections of oral biofilm etiology.

    PubMed

    Belibasakis, Georgios N; Charalampakis, Georgios; Bostanci, Nagihan; Stadlinger, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Biofilms are complex microbial communities that grow on various surfaces in nature. The oral micobiota tend to form polymicrobial biofilms, particularly on the hard mineralized surfaces of teeth, which may impact on oral health and disease. They can cause inflammation of the adjacent tooth-supporting (periodontal) tissues, leading to destructive periodontal disease and tooth loss. The emergence of osseointegrated dental implants as a restorative treatment option for replacing missing teeth has also brought along new artificial surfaces within the oral cavity, on which oral bacteria can form biofilms. As in the case of natural teeth, biofilms on implant surfaces may also trigger infection and cause inflammatory destruction of the peri-implant tissue (i.e. peri-implantitis). While there are strong similarities in the composition of the mixed microbial flora between periodontal and peri-implant infections, there are also a few distinctive differences. The immunological events underlying the pathogenesis of peri-implant infections are qualitatively similar, yet more extensive, compared to periodontal infections, resulting in a faster progression of tissue destruction. This chapter summarizes the current knowledge on the microbiology and immunology of peri-implant infections, including findings from the peri-implant crevicular fluid, the inflammatory exudate of the peri-implant tissue. Moreover, it discusses the diagnosis and current approaches for the treatment of oral infections.

  5. An automatic and effective tooth isolation method for dental radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, P.-L.; Huang, P.-W.; Cho, Y. S.; Kuo, C.-H.

    2013-03-01

    Tooth isolation is a very important step for both computer-aided dental diagnosis and automatic dental identification systems, because it will directly affect the accuracy of feature extraction and, thereby, the final results of both types of systems. This paper presents an effective and fully automatic tooth isolation method for dental X-ray images, which contains up-per-lower jaw separation, single tooth isolation, over-segmentation verification, and under-segmentation detection. The upper-lower jaw separation mechanism is based on a gray-scale integral projection to avoid possible information loss and incorporates with the angle adjustment to handle skewed images. In a single tooth isolation, an adaptive windowing scheme for locating gap valleys is proposed to improve the accuracy. In over-segmentation, an isolation-curve verification scheme is proposed to remove excessive curves; and in under-segmentation, a missing-teeth detection scheme is proposed. The experimental results demonstrate that our method achieves the accuracy rates of 95.63% and 98.71% for the upper and lower jaw images, respectively, from the test database of 60 bitewing dental radiographs, and performs better for images with severe teeth occlusion, excessive dental works, and uneven illumination than that of Nomir and Abdel-Mottaleb's method. The method without upper-lower jaw separation step also works well for panoramic and periapical images.

  6. Materials for endosseous dental implants.

    PubMed

    Wataha, J C

    1996-02-01

    The goal of placement of endosseous dental implants is to achieve osseointegration or biointegration of the bone with the implant. A wide variety of materials has been used for these implants, but only a few promote osseointegration and biointegration. Titanium and titanium alloy (Ti6A14V) have been the most widely used of these materials. The surface oxide of titanium appears to be central to the ability of this material to osseointegrate. The oxide limits dissolution of elements and promotes the deposition of biological molecules which allow bone to exist as close as 30 A to the surface of the implant. The details of the ultrastructure of the gap between the implant and bone remain undefined, and the consequences of elements which are released on the interface over time are not known. These areas of investigation are particularly important in defining the differences between commercially pure titanium implants and those made of titanium, aluminium and vanadium. The epithelial interface between the gingiva and titanium appears to contain many of the structural characteristics of the native tooth-gingiva interface, but details are still vague. The connective tissue interface with the titanium appears to be one of tightly fitting tissues rather than adhesion. Ceramic coatings appear to improve the ingrowth of bone and promote chemical integration of the implant with the bone. The characteristics of these coatings are complex and affect the bony response, but the mechanisms remain obscure. The degradation of the coatings is an issue of particular controversy. Progress in dental implantology is likely to continue as the interface between the material and bone is more clearly understood, and biological molecules and artificial tissues are developed.

  7. Histrelin Implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... response to histrelin implant. Your blood sugar and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) should be checked regularly.Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about histrelin implant.It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and ...

  8. Anatomically shaped tooth and periodontal regeneration by cell homing.

    PubMed

    Kim, K; Lee, C H; Kim, B K; Mao, J J

    2010-08-01

    Tooth regeneration by cell delivery encounters translational hurdles. We hypothesized that anatomically correct teeth can regenerate in scaffolds without cell transplantation. Novel, anatomically shaped human molar scaffolds and rat incisor scaffolds were fabricated by 3D bioprinting from a hybrid of poly-epsilon-caprolactone and hydroxyapatite with 200-microm-diameter interconnecting microchannels. In each of 22 rats, an incisor scaffold was implanted orthotopically following mandibular incisor extraction, whereas a human molar scaffold was implanted ectopically into the dorsum. Stromal-derived factor-1 (SDF1) and bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP7) were delivered in scaffold microchannels. After 9 weeks, a putative periodontal ligament and new bone regenerated at the interface of rat incisor scaffold with native alveolar bone. SDF1 and BMP7 delivery not only recruited significantly more endogenous cells, but also elaborated greater angiogenesis than growth-factor-free control scaffolds. Regeneration of tooth-like structures and periodontal integration by cell homing provide an alternative to cell delivery, and may accelerate clinical applications.

  9. Anatomically Shaped Tooth and Periodontal Regeneration by Cell Homing

    PubMed Central

    Kim, K.; Lee, C.H.; Kim, B.K.; Mao, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    Tooth regeneration by cell delivery encounters translational hurdles. We hypothesized that anatomically correct teeth can regenerate in scaffolds without cell transplantation. Novel, anatomically shaped human molar scaffolds and rat incisor scaffolds were fabricated by 3D bioprinting from a hybrid of poly-ε-caprolactone and hydroxyapatite with 200-µm-diameter interconnecting microchannels. In each of 22 rats, an incisor scaffold was implanted orthotopically following mandibular incisor extraction, whereas a human molar scaffold was implanted ectopically into the dorsum. Stromal-derived factor-1 (SDF1) and bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP7) were delivered in scaffold microchannels. After 9 weeks, a putative periodontal ligament and new bone regenerated at the interface of rat incisor scaffold with native alveolar bone. SDF1 and BMP7 delivery not only recruited significantly more endogenous cells, but also elaborated greater angiogenesis than growth-factor-free control scaffolds. Regeneration of tooth-like structures and periodontal integration by cell homing provide an alternative to cell delivery, and may accelerate clinical applications. PMID:20448245

  10. [Biological dental implant: myth or reality?].

    PubMed

    Magloire, H; Couble, M-L

    2011-09-01

    The currently available options for tooth-loss are prostheses, implants, or surgery (auto-transplantation). They all have their limitations. The emergence of tissue engineering, 15 years ago, was made possible by a better knowledge of the various stages of dental development, and the mastery of stem cell differentiation. It opened a new alternative approach for tooth regeneration. Even if animal experiments have demonstrated that it was possible to obtain a biological tooth from stem cells, two major issues remain to be discussed. Is it possible to use induced pluripotent stem cells instead of embryonic stem cells, which raise an ethical problem? Is it possible to reproduce a dental crown with an adapted shape and colour? Or should we consider the simpler creation of a biological root secondarily covered by a ceramic prosthesis? Our study mentions the main landmarks and the key cells involved in the embryological development of the tooth, establishes a mapping and a list of the various types of stem cells. It details the various methods used to create a biological implant.

  11. Biofilm and dental implant: The microbial link

    PubMed Central

    Dhir, Sangeeta

    2013-01-01

    Mouth provides a congenial environment for the growth of the microorganisms as compared to any other part of the human body by exhibiting an ideal nonshedding surface. Dental plaque happens to be a diverse community of the microorganisms found on the tooth surface. Periodontal disease and the peri-implant disease are specific infections that are originating from these resident microbial species when the balance between the host and the microbial pathogenicity gets disrupted. This review discusses the biofilms in relation to the peri-implant region, factors affecting its presence, and the associated treatment to manage this complex microbial colony. Search Methodology: Electronic search of the medline was done with the search words: Implants and biofilms/dental biofilm formation/microbiology at implant abutment interface/surface free energy/roughness and implant, periimplantitis/local drug delivery and dental implant. Hand search across the journals – clinical oral implant research, implant dentistry, journal of dental research, international journal of oral implantology, journal of prosthetic dentistry, perioodntology 2000, journal of periodontology were performed. The articles included in the review comprised of in vivo studies, in vivo (animal and human) studies, abstracts, review articles. PMID:23633764

  12. COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY OF TOOTH RESORPTION IN CATS.

    PubMed

    Lang, Linda G; Wilkinson, Thomas E; White, Tammy L; Farnsworth, Raelynn K; Potter, Kathleen A

    2016-09-01

    Tooth resorption is the most common dental disease in cats and can be a source of oral pain. The current clinical gold standard for diagnosis includes a combination of oral exam and dental radiography, however early lesions are not always detected. Computed tomography (CT) of the skull, including the dental arches, is a commonly performed diagnostic procedure, however the appearance of tooth resorption on CT and the diagnostic ability of CT to detect tooth resorption have not been evaluated. The purpose of this prospective, descriptive, diagnostic accuracy study was to characterize the CT appearance of tooth resorption in a sample of affected cats and to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of CT for tooth resorption compared to the clinical gold standard of oral exam and intraoral dental radiography. Twenty-eight cat cadaver specimens were recruited for inclusion. Each specimen was evaluated using oral exam, intraoral dental radiography, and computed tomography (four different slice thicknesses). Each tooth was evaluated for the presence or absence of tooth resorption. Teeth with lesions and a subset of normal teeth were evaluated with histopathology. On CT, tooth resorption appeared as irregularly marginated hypoattenuating defects in the mineral attenuating tooth components, most commonly involving the root or cementoenamel junction. Sensitivity for CT detection of tooth resorption was fair to poor (42.2-57.7%) and specificity was good to excellent (92.8-96.3%). Findings from this study indicated that CT has high specificity but low sensitivity for detection of tooth resorption in cats.

  13. Oral health: dentures and dental implants.

    PubMed

    Martonffy, Andrea Ildiko

    2015-01-01

    More than 35 million Americans have lost all of their teeth, and 178 million are missing at least one tooth. Left unmanaged, tooth loss, or edentulism, can lead to nutritional deficiencies, oral pain, and poor psychosocial functioning. The family physician may be the first clinician to discuss tooth loss as a health concern with the patient. A patient who is interested in replacing missing teeth may be a candidate for dentures, implants, or a combination of these. The patient's preferences, general health, degree of edentulism, ability to follow up regularly, smoking status, and overall oral health should be considered when the prosthodontist makes recommendations for treatment. Smoking can delay tissue healing; therefore, heavy smoking may be a contraindication to implant placement. If a patient chooses dentures, the family physician should perform regular oral examinations, because up to 70% of denture wearers are affected by denture stomatitis at some point. Poor fit, poor hygiene, nighttime wearing of removable dentures, and bacterial or candidal infections can all be identified and managed by the family physician. The physician also can reinforce proper wear and care instructions for dentures and proper care of implants.

  14. Bone stability around dental implants: Treatment related factors.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, Friedhelm; Hasan, Istabrak; Bourauel, Christoph; Biffar, Reiner; Mundt, Torsten

    2015-05-01

    The bone bed around dental implants is influenced by implant and augmentation materials, as well as the insertion technique used. The primary influencing factors include the dental implant design, augmentation technique, treatment protocol, and surgical procedure. In addition to these treatment-related factors, in the literature, local and systemic factors have been found to be related to the bone stability around implants. Bone is a dynamic organ that optimises itself depending on the loading condition above it. Bone achieves this optimisation through the remodelling process. Several studies have confirmed the importance of the implant design and direction of the applied force on the implant system. Equally dispersed strains and stresses in the physiological range should be achieved to ensure the success of an implant treatment. If a patient wishes to accelerate the treatment time, different protocols can be chosen. However, each one must consider the amount and quality of the available local bone. Immediate implantation is only successful if the primary stability of the implant can be provided from residual bone in the socket after tooth extraction. Immediate loading demands high primary stability and, sometimes, the distribution of mastication forces by splinting or even by inserting additional implants to ensure their success. Augmentation materials with various properties have been developed in recent years. In particular, resorption time and stableness affect the usefulness in different situations. Hence, treatment protocols can optimise the time for simultaneous implant placements or optimise the follow-up time for implant placement.

  15. Imunohistological aspects of the tissue around dental implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimigean, Victor; Nimigean, Vanda R.; Sǎlǎvǎstru, Dan I.; Moraru, Simona; BuÅ£incu, Lavinia; Ivaşcu, Roxana V.; Poll, Alexandru

    2016-03-01

    Objectives: study of soft and hard tissues around implants. Material and methods: For the immunohistochemical and histological study of the implant/soft tissue interface, we examined pieces of peri-implant mucosa harvested from 35 patients. The implant/bone interface was assessed using histologic and histomorphometric examination of hard tissues around unloaded, early loaded or delayed loaded dental implants with pre-established design, with a sandblasted and acid-etched surface, placed both in extraction sockets, or after bone healing following tooth removal. This study was performed on 9 common race dogs. Results: The histological study of the implant/soft tissue interface showed regenerative modifications and moderate chronic subepithelial inflammatory reactions. Immunohistochemical evaluation of the soft tissue biopsies revealed the presence of specific immunocompetent cells and proteins of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression. Bone-implants contacts were more obvious in the apical half of the implants and at the edges of the threads, than between them. A mature, lamelliform bone containing lacunae with osteocytes and lack of connective tissue were noticed around implants that were late placed and loaded. The new-formed bone was also abundant in the crestal zone, not only in the apical part of the implants. Conclusions: A thorough understanding of the microstructure of dental implant/soft and hard tissue interface will improve the longevity of osseointegrated implants.

  16. Management of end-stage erectile dysfunction and stress urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy by simultaneous dual implantation using a single trans-scrotal incision: surgical technique and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Salamanca, Juan I; Espinós, Estefanía Linares; Moncada, Ignacio; Portillo, Luis Del; Carballido, Joaquín

    2015-01-01

    Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and end-stage erectile dysfunction (ED) after radical prostatectomy (RP) can decrease a patient's quality of life (QoL). We describe a surgical technique involving scrotal incision for simultaneous dual implantation of an artificial urinary sphincter (AUS) and an inflatable penile prosthesis (IPP). Patients with moderate to severe SUI (>3 pads per day) and end-stage ED following RP were selected for dual implantation. An upper transverse scrotal incision was made, followed by bulbar urethra dissection and AUS cuff placement. Through the same incision, the corpora cavernosa was exposed, and an IPP positioned. Followed by extraperitoneal reservoirs placement and pumps introduced in the scrotum. Short-term, intra- and post-operative complications; continence status and erectile function; and patient satisfaction and QoL were recorded. A total of 32 patients underwent dual implantation. Early AUS-related complications were: AUS reservoir migration and urethral erosion. One case of distal corporal extrusion occurred. No prosthetic infection was reported. Over 96% of patients were socially the continent (≤1 pad per day) and > 95% had sufficient erections for intercourse. Limitations of the study were the small number of patients, the lack of the control group using a perineal approach for AUS placement and only a 12 months follow-up. IPP and AUS dual implantation using a single scrotal incision technique is a safe and effective option in patients with SUI and ED after RP. Further studies on larger numbers of patients are warranted. PMID:25657083

  17. Immediate implants in anterior maxillary arch

    PubMed Central

    Anitha, K.; Kumar, S. Senthil; Babu, M. R. Ramesh; Candamourty, Ramesh; Thirumurugan

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the study was to evaluate the osseo-integration and soft tissue status of the endosseous implants placed in immediate extraction socket. Methodology: Seven patients (4 males and 3 females) aged 20-30 years were selected for the study. Nine implants were placed in seven patients in the maxillary arch. All the patients were clinically αnd thoroughly examined. Under local anesthesia, the indicated tooth was extracted. The extracted socket was prepared using standard drills with palatal wall as guide. The longest and widest implants were placed (Hi-Tec Implants). All implants showed good primary stability. The implants used in the study were tapered design endosseous implants with Threaded implants (TI) unit plasma-sprayed surface. Surgical re-entry (secondary surgery) was performed to remove the healing cap after 6 months for supra crestal fabrication. All patients were reviewed periodically at 3rd and 6th month interval and the following clinical parameters including modified plaque index (mPlI), modified bleeding index (mBI), probing depth (PD), attachment level (AL), and distance between the implant shoulder and mucosal margin (DIM), distance between the implant shoulder and first bone-implant contact, and Clinical Mobility Index were recorded. The results were computed and subjected to statistical evaluation. Results: The mPlI, mBI, PD, AL, and DIM were evaluated around the implants at baseline, 3rd and 6th month intervals and analyzed statistically by Friedman T-test. The results of the above were shown to be statistically non-significant. The distance between the implant shoulder and first bone implant contact was evaluated around the implants at base line, 3rd and 6th month intervals. The results proved to be statistically significant (0.01) implying that there was a bone apposition around the implants. Conclusion: During the course of the study, soft tissue status around implants was found to be healthy. Osseointegration as assessed by

  18. Post-Odontoma autotransplantation of an impacted tooth: A case report.

    PubMed

    Robindro Singh, Waikhom; Aheibam, Kirankumar; Nameirakpam, Anthopia

    2015-01-01

    After years of relegation by dental implants, autotransplantation has recently become more popular because of a better understanding of its science. The prognosis of autotransplantation primarily depends upon the presence of an intact alveolar bone at the transplant site and the regeneration of a functional periodontal ligament of the transplant. Replacement of an unsalvaged or a missing tooth by a natural tooth with normal periodontium within a short duration of treatment is the ultimate challenge of autotransplantation. Meanwhile, Platelet Rich Fibrin (PRF) is popular as a biomaterial which helps in the regeneration of bone and periodontal tissues. To improve the prognosis, and also shorten the treatment time in a rare case of autotransplantation of an impacted tooth in a post-odontoma site, we did a two-stage surgical procedure aided by synthetic bone granules (Biograft) and PRF. The clinical and radiological findings at 6 months follow-up showed good result and promise.

  19. Post-Odontoma autotransplantation of an impacted tooth: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Robindro Singh, Waikhom; Aheibam, Kirankumar; Nameirakpam, Anthopia

    2015-01-01

    After years of relegation by dental implants, autotransplantation has recently become more popular because of a better understanding of its science. The prognosis of autotransplantation primarily depends upon the presence of an intact alveolar bone at the transplant site and the regeneration of a functional periodontal ligament of the transplant. Replacement of an unsalvaged or a missing tooth by a natural tooth with normal periodontium within a short duration of treatment is the ultimate challenge of autotransplantation. Meanwhile, Platelet Rich Fibrin (PRF) is popular as a biomaterial which helps in the regeneration of bone and periodontal tissues. To improve the prognosis, and also shorten the treatment time in a rare case of autotransplantation of an impacted tooth in a post-odontoma site, we did a two-stage surgical procedure aided by synthetic bone granules (Biograft) and PRF. The clinical and radiological findings at 6 months follow-up showed good result and promise. PMID:26258027

  20. Soft Tissue Surgical Procedures for Optimizing Anterior Implant Esthetics

    PubMed Central

    Ioannou, Andreas L.; Kotsakis, Georgios A.; McHale, Michelle G.; Lareau, Donald E.; Hinrichs, James E.; Romanos, Georgios E.

    2015-01-01

    Implant dentistry has been established as a predictable treatment with excellent clinical success to replace missing or nonrestorable teeth. A successful esthetic implant reconstruction is predicated on two fundamental components: the reproduction of the natural tooth characteristics on the implant crown and the establishment of soft tissue housing that will simulate a healthy periodontium. In order for an implant to optimally rehabilitate esthetics, the peri-implant soft tissues must be preserved and/or augmented by means of periodontal surgical procedures. Clinicians who practice implant dentistry should strive to achieve an esthetically successful outcome beyond just osseointegration. Knowledge of a variety of available techniques and proper treatment planning enables the clinician to meet the ever-increasing esthetic demands as requested by patients. The purpose of this paper is to enhance the implant surgeon's rationale and techniques beyond that of simply placing a functional restoration in an edentulous site to a level whereby an implant-supported restoration is placed in reconstructed soft tissue, so the site is indiscernible from a natural tooth. PMID:26124837

  1. Optical spectroscopy and tooth decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, P.; De, T.; Singh, R.

    2005-11-01

    Optical spectroscopy in the ultraviolet, visible and mid-infrared spectral regions has been used to discriminate between healthy and diseased teeth of patients in the age range 15-75 years. Spectral scans of absorbance versus wavenumber and fluorescence intensity versus wavelength have been recorded and investigated for caries and periodontal disease. Such optical diagnostics can prove very useful in the early detection and treatment of tooth decay.

  2. Cochlear implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... implant. These specialists may include: Audiologists Speech therapists Ear, nose, and throat doctors (otolaryngologists) This is a very important part of the process. You will need to work closely with your team of specialists to get ...

  3. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... additional visits are needed for activating, adjusting, and programming the various electrodes that have been implanted. Also, ... to the center for checkups once the final programming is made to the speech processor. Both children ...

  4. Variability and evolutionary trends in tooth size of Gigantopithecus blacki.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y

    1982-09-01

    The measurements of Gigantopithecus blacki teeth from Liucheng are summarized and comparative statistics are calculated. Compared to the variability of tooth size in living nonhuman primates, emphasizing Pongo because of close ecological and genetic relationships, the hypothesis of a single species for Liucheng specimens is acceptable. The Liucheng sample pattern of variability in tooth size, as well as the South African robust australopithecines, differs from living nonhuman primates in the same way; the first molar is not the least variable of the molars, and the molars are relatively variable compared with the other teeth. Sexual dimorphism may be responsible for this pattern in both cases. Later G. blacki cheek teeth are significantly larger than early G. blacki. From early G. blacki to later, the expansion ratio in tooth breadth is more than in tooth length. The pattern of expansion is like that seen in South African australopithecines. Both G. blacki and South African robust Australopithecus seem to show continued adaptation to more powerful and efficient chewing. The diet of G. blacki is not known, and its reconstruction depends on estimates of body size that differ greatly.

  5. The homology and phylogeny of chondrichthyan tooth enameloid.

    PubMed

    Gillis, J Andrew; Donoghue, Philip C J

    2007-01-01

    A systematic SEM survey of tooth microstructure in (primarily) fossil taxa spanning chondrichthyan phylogeny demonstrates the presence of a superficial cap of single crystallite enameloid (SCE) on the teeth of several basal elasmobranchs, as well as on the tooth plates of Helodus (a basal holocephalan). This suggests that the epithelial-mesenchymal interactions required for the development of enameloid during odontogenesis are plesiomorphic in chondrichthyans, and most likely in toothed gnathostomes, and provides phylogenetic support for the homology of chondrichthyan and actinopterygian enameloid. Along the neoselachian stem, we see a crownward progression, possibly modulated by heterochrony, from a monolayer of SCE lacking microstructural differentiation to the complex triple-layered tooth enameloid fabric of neoselachians. Finally, the occurrence of fully-differentiated neoselachian enameloid microstructure (including compression-resistant tangle fibered enameloid and bending-resistant parallel fibered enameloid) in Chlamydoselachus anguineus, a basal Squalean with teeth that are functionally "cladodont," is evidence that triple-layered enameloid microstructure was a preadaption to the cutting and gouging function of many neoselachian teeth, and thus may have played an integral role in the Mesozoic radiation of the neoselachian crown group.

  6. Consideration of Moving Tooth Load in Gear Crack Propagation Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Handschuh, Robert F.; Spievak, Lisa E.; Wawrzynek, Paul A.; Ingraffea, Anthony R.

    2001-01-01

    Robust gear designs consider not only crack initiation, but crack propagation trajectories for a fail-safe design. In actual gear operation, the magnitude as well as the position of the force changes as the gear rotates through the mesh. A study to determine the effect of moving gear tooth load on crack propagation predictions was performed. Two-dimensional analysis of an involute spur gear and three-dimensional analysis of a spiral-bevel pinion gear using the finite element method and boundary element method were studied and compared to experiments. A modified theory for predicting gear crack propagation paths based on the criteria of Erdogan and Sih was investigated. Crack simulation based on calculated stress intensity factors and mixed mode crack angle prediction techniques using a simple static analysis in which the tooth load was located at the highest point of single tooth contact was validated. For three-dimensional analysis, however, the analysis was valid only as long as the crack did not approach the contact region on the tooth.

  7. Management of fractured implant case using loop connector fixed partial denture

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Ashish; Gupta, Aratee; Tandan, Amrit; Kumar, Sulabh

    2013-01-01

    Dental implants treatment have become a common modality of treatment nowadays for the replacement of missing tooth/teeth, but there have been failures due to a number of reasons; one of the rare problems is the fracture of the dental implants fixture. It is of prime importance to understand the type/system of the implant to be placed in a site and the amount and direction of occlusal forces incurred after the loading of prosthesis. PMID:23709559

  8. Contraceptive implants.

    PubMed

    McDonald-Mosley, Raegan; Burke, Anne E

    2010-03-01

    Implantable contraception has been extensively used worldwide. Implants are one of the most effective and reversible methods of contraception available. These devices may be particularly appropriate for certain populations of women, including women who cannot use estrogen-containing contraception. Implants are safe for use by women with many chronic medical problems. The newest implant, Implanon (Organon International, Oss, The Netherlands), is the only device currently available in the United States and was approved in 2006. It is registered for 3 years of pregnancy prevention. Contraceptive implants have failure rates similar to tubal ligation, and yet they are readily reversible with a return to fertility within days of removal. Moreover, these contraceptive devices can be safely placed in the immediate postpartum period, ensuring good contraceptive coverage for women who may be at risk for an unintended pregnancy. Irregular bleeding is a common side effect for all progestin-only contraceptive implants. Preinsertion counseling should address possible side effects, and treatment may be offered to women who experience prolonged or frequent bleeding.

  9. Alveolar buccal bone maintenance after immediate implantation with a surgical flap approach: a study in dogs.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Paulo G; Marin, Charles; Granato, Rodrigo; Bonfante, Estevam A; Lima, Cirilo P; Oliveira, Sergio; Dohan Ehrenfest, David M; Suzuki, Mercelo

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated buccal bone maintenance after implantation with a surgical flap approach immediately following tooth extraction in a dog model. Mandibular premolars of six dogs were extracted, and threaded implants of 4-mm diameter and 8-mm length with as-machined and dual acid-etched surfaces were placed through balanced procedures in the distal root extraction sockets with a full-thickness flap design. Submerged healing was allowed for 4 weeks, and following euthanization, bone-to-implant contact and buccal and lingual bone loss were evaluated. None of the parameters evaluated were indicative of an effect of implant surface in hindering bone loss around immediately placed implants. PMID:22140672

  10. Effect of cardiac resynchronization therapy with implantable cardioverter defibrillator versus cardiac resynchronization therapy with pacemaker on mortality in heart failure patients: results of a high-volume, single-centre experience

    PubMed Central

    Kutyifa, Valentina; Geller, Laszlo; Bogyi, Peter; Zima, Endre; Aktas, Mehmet K; Ozcan, Emin Evren; Becker, David; Nagy, Vivien Klaudia; Kosztin, Annamaria; Szilagyi, Szabolcs; Merkely, Bela

    2014-01-01

    Aims There are limited and contradictory data on the effects of CRT with implantable cardioverter defibrillator (CRT-D) on mortality as compared with CRT with pacemaker (CRT-P). Methods and results We evaluated the long-term outcome of patients implanted with a CRT-D or CRT-P device in our high-volume single-centre experience. Data on all-cause mortality were derived from clinic visits and the Hungarian National Healthcare Fund Death Registry. Kaplan–Meier survival analyses and multivariate Cox regression models were used to evaluate all-cause mortality in patients with CRT-D vs. CRT-P, stratified by the aetiology of cardiomyopathy. From 2000 to 2011, 1122 CRT devices, 693 CRT-P (LVEF 28.2 ± 7.4%) and 429 CRT-D (LVEF 27.6 ± 6.4%), were implanted at our centre. During the median follow-up of 28 months, 379 patients died from any cause, 250 patients (36%) with an implanted CRT-P and 129 patients (30%) with an implanted CRT-D. There was no evidence of mortality benefit in patients implanted with a CRT-D compared with a CRT-P in the total cohort [hazard ratio (HR) 0.98, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.73–1.32, P = 0.884]. In patients with ischaemic cardiomyopathy, CRT-D treatment was associated with a significant 30% risk reduction in all-cause mortality compared with an implanted CRT-P (HR 0.70, 95% CI 0.51–0.97, P = 0.03). In non-ischaemic patients, there was no mortality benefit of CRT-D over CRT-P (HR 0.98, 95% CI 0.73–1.32, P = 0.894, interaction P-value = 0.15). Conclusions In heart failure patients with ischaemic cardiomyopathy, CRT-D was associated with a mortality benefit compared with CRT-P, but no benefit of CRT-D over CRT-P in mortality was observed in non-ischaemic cardiomyopathy. PMID:25379962

  11. Automating digital leaf measurement: the tooth, the whole tooth, and nothing but the tooth.

    PubMed

    Corney, David P A; Tang, H Lilian; Clark, Jonathan Y; Hu, Yin; Jin, Jing

    2012-01-01

    Many species of plants produce leaves with distinct teeth around their margins. The presence and nature of these teeth can often help botanists to identify species. Moreover, it has long been known that more species native to colder regions have teeth than species native to warmer regions. It has therefore been suggested that fossilized remains of leaves can be used as a proxy for ancient climate reconstruction. Similar studies on living plants can help our understanding of the relationships. The required analysis of leaves typically involves considerable manual effort, which in practice limits the number of leaves that are analyzed, potentially reducing the power of the results. In this work, we describe a novel algorithm to automate the marginal tooth analysis of leaves found in digital images. We demonstrate our methods on a large set of images of whole herbarium specimens collected from Tilia trees (also known as lime, linden or basswood). We chose the genus Tilia as its constituent species have toothed leaves of varied size and shape. In a previous study we extracted c.1600 leaves automatically from a set of c.1100 images. Our new algorithm locates teeth on the margins of such leaves and extracts features such as each tooth's area, perimeter and internal angles, as well as counting them. We evaluate an implementation of our algorithm's performance against a manually analyzed subset of the images. We found that the algorithm achieves an accuracy of 85% for counting teeth and 75% for estimating tooth area. We also demonstrate that the automatically extracted features are sufficient to identify different species of Tilia using a simple linear discriminant analysis, and that the features relating to teeth are the most useful.

  12. Implantation of INTERTAN™ nail in four patients with intertrochanteric fractures leading to single or comminute fractures: pitfalls and recommendations: a case series

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Intraoperative technical complications are occasionally encountered while implanting INTERTAN™ nails for intertrochanteric fractures. Surgeons need to pay attention to the difficulties they may encounter during the implantation of an INTERTAN™ nail. Case presentation We report four cases with intraoperative difficulties during the implantation of INTERTAN™ nails among Han Chinese patients from mainland China. In Case 1, during the operation on a 75-year-old woman, an anatomical specificity of excessive femoral shaft curvation at the coronal and sagittal planes was observed; a relatively smooth implantation was achieved by adjusting the entry point. In Case 2, due to fat obstruction, an INTERTAN™ nail was implanted at an oblique angle in 64-year-old obese woman, which resulted in an iatrogenic fracture of the proximal femur. In Case 3, an iatrogenic fracture of the distal femur developed in an 83-year-old woman because of violent hammering and underestimating of bone fragility. In Case 4, an iatrogenic fracture occurred in a 40-year-old woman around the distal locking slot during the drilling process. Conclusions Preoperative evaluation should be considered as an important preparation for the implantation of an INTERTAN™ nail. Full-length anteroposterior and lateral radiographs of the injured femur are necessary to confirm the anatomical specificity. The vertical trajectory as well as sufficient reaming is important in reducing the possibility of iatrogenic fractures, particularly for obese patients. In older patients, violent hammering should be avoided and full reaming is recommended even if the canal seems to be wide enough. For cases where hard fracture reduction is predicted, the strategy of open reduction and fixation with a dynamic hip screw seems to be more rational and should be considered as an alternative method. PMID:25416923

  13. Mechanisms of Tooth Eruption and Orthodontic Tooth Movement

    PubMed Central

    Wise, G.E.; King, G.J.

    2008-01-01

    Teeth move through alveolar bone, whether through the normal process of tooth eruption or by strains generated by orthodontic appliances. Both eruption and orthodontics accomplish this feat through similar fundamental biological processes, osteoclastogenesis and osteogenesis, but there are differences that make their mechanisms unique. A better appreciation of the molecular and cellular events that regulate osteoclastogenesis and osteogenesis in eruption and orthodontics is not only central to our understanding of how these processes occur, but also is needed for ultimate development of the means to control them. Possible future studies in these areas are also discussed, with particular emphasis on translation of fundamental knowledge to improve dental treatments. PMID:18434571

  14. Assessing image-guided implant surgery in today's clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Norkin, Frederic J; Ganeles, Jeffrey; Zfaz, Samuel; Modares, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    As implant dentistry has progressed, greater emphasis has been placed on natural-looking tooth replacement, minimally invasive techniques, and better cost efficiencies, with implant positioning being guided by the desired prosthetic outcome. Image-guided surgery is a technique that merges preoperative diagnostic imaging with computer-based planning tools to facilitate surgical and restorative plans and procedures. This article discusses the intricacies of guided implant surgery, including 3-dimensional presurgical planning and the challenges of maintaining guide stability during surgical execution. PMID:24571503

  15. Mini-Implants: New Possibilities in Interdisciplinary Treatment Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Sebastian, Biju

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of mini-implants has broadened the range of tooth movements possible by fixed appliance therapy alone. The limits of fixed orthodontic treatment have become more a matter of facial appearance than anchorage. Many complex cases which would previously have required surgery or functional appliances can now be treated with fixed appliance therapy using mini-implants. A mutilated dentition case where mini-implants were used to provide anchorage for intrusion of molars and retraction of anterior teeth is reported here to illustrate this point. PMID:25580307

  16. Three-dimensional Micro-culture System for Tooth Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Kuchler-Bopp, S; Bécavin, T; Kökten, T; Weickert, J L; Keller, L; Lesot, H; Deveaux, E; Benkirane-Jessel, N

    2016-06-01

    The arrangement of cells within a tissue plays an essential role in organogenesis, including tooth development. Progress is being made to regenerate teeth by reassociating dissociated embryonic dental cells and implanting them in vivo. In the present study, we tested the hanging drop method to study mixed epithelial-mesenchymal cell reorganization in a liquid instead of semisolid medium to see whether it could lead to tooth histogenesis and organogenesis. This method allowed the control of the proportion and number of cells to be used, and the forming microtissues showed homogeneous size. The liquid environment favored cell migrations as compared with collagen gels. Three protocols were compared. The one that sequentially combined the hanging drop and semisolid medium cultures prior to in vivo implantation gave the best results. Indeed, after implantation, teeth developed, showing a well-formed crown, mineralization of dentin and enamel, and the initiation of root formation. Vascularization and the cellular heterogeneity in the mesenchyme were similar to what was observed in developing molars. Finally, after coimplantation with a trigeminal ganglion, the dental mesenchyme, including the odontoblast layer, became innervated. The real advantage of this technique is the small number of cells required to make a tooth. This experimental model can be employed to study the development, physiology, metabolism, or toxicology in forming teeth and test other cell sources. PMID:26965424

  17. Rehabilitation with implant-retained removable dentures and its effects on perioral aesthetics: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Lupi, Saturnino Marco; Cislaghi, Matteo; Rizzo, Silvana; Rodriguez y Baena, Ruggero

    2016-01-01

    Background The onset of perioral wrinkles often prompts patients to request treatment. This aesthetic deterioration linked to aging may be associated with tooth and alveolar bone loss in fully edentulous patients. Purpose To evaluate perioral wrinkles before and after maxillary and mandibular rehabilitation with implant-retained dentures in fully edentulous patients. Methods In this prospective cohort, single-center, blinded study, patients requiring maxillary and mandibular rehabilitation with implant-retained dentures were enrolled. The patients were photographed in the same position before and after oral rehabilitation. Wrinkles were evaluated in the photographs by blinded observers using validated rating scales. The following parameters were analyzed: upper and lower radial lip lines, marionette lines, upper and lower lip fullness, nasolabial folds, corner of the mouth lines, and the labiomental crease. Statistical analysis was performed using the Wilcoxon signed ranks test for paired data, with P<0.05 considered significant. Results Upper and lower implant-retained dentures were applied in 31 patients (15 males; mean ± standard deviation age 62.13±8.69 years, range 47–77 years). The oral rehabilitation procedures significantly improved (P<0.05) the upper and lower radial lip lines, marionette lines, upper and lower lip fullness, the nasolabial folds, and the corner of the mouth lines. Conclusion Maxillary and mandibular rehabilitation with implant-retained dentures in fully edentulous patients improves perioral aesthetics. Patients requiring oral rehabilitation and desiring perioral aesthetic improvement could benefit from treatment with this type of prosthesis. PMID:27757052

  18. Tooth brushing inhibits oral bacteria in dogs.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Hayashi, Kotaro; Kijima, Saku; Nonaka, Chie; Yamazoe, Kazuaki

    2015-10-01

    In this study, scaling, polishing and daily tooth brushing were performed in 20 beagle dogs, and the number of oral bacteria was determined using a bacterial counter. The dogs were randomized into the scaling (S), scaling + polishing (SP), scaling + tooth daily brushing (SB) and scaling + polishing + tooth daily brushing (SPB) groups. Samples were collected from the buccal surface of the maxillary fourth premolars of the dogs immediately after scaling and every week thereafter from weeks 1 to 8. Throughout the study, the number of bacteria was significantly lower in the SB and SPB groups compared with the S group. The findings suggest that daily tooth brushing inhibited oral bacterial growth in the dogs.

  19. Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells: A New Therapeutic Option for Tooth Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuanwei; Yu, Yongchun; Chen, Lin; Ye, Lanfeng; Cui, Junhui; Sun, Quan; Li, Kaide; Li, Zhiyong; Liu, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Tooth regeneration is considered to be an optimistic approach to replace current treatments for tooth loss. It is important to determine the most suitable seed cells for tooth regeneration. Recently, human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) have been regarded as a promising candidate for tissue regeneration. However, it has not been reported whether hUCMSCs can be employed in tooth regeneration. Here, we report that hUCMSCs can be induced into odontoblast-like cells in vitro and in vivo. Induced hUCMSCs expressed dentin-related proteins including dentin sialoprotein (DSP) and dentin matrix protein-1 (DMP-1), and their gene expression levels were similar to those in native pulp tissue cells. Moreover, DSP- and DMP-1-positive calcifications were observed after implantation of hUCMSCs in vivo. These findings reveal that hUCMSCs have an odontogenic differentiation potency to differentiate to odontoblast-like cells with characteristic deposition of dentin-like matrix in vivo. This study clearly demonstrates hUCMSCs as an alternative therapeutic cell source for tooth regeneration.

  20. Tooth autotransplantation in a free iliac crest graft for prosthetic reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Landes, Constantin A; Glasl, Bettina; Ludwig, Björn; Rieger, Jörg; Sader, Robert

    2008-09-01

    This report documents successful tooth autotransplantation to a free iliac crest graft in an exemplar case. A 14-year-old male patient was operated thrice with increasing amounts of resection for recurrent odontogenic myxoma. When mandibular continuity resection finally was performed, a free iliac crest block autotransplant was used for reconstruction. Upon metal removal 5 months later, 3 wisdom teeth with two-thirds complete root development were transplanted to the free graft and retained by fixed orthodontic appliances including skeletal anchorage with orthodontic microscrews. Tooth graft taking was awaited for 8 weeks with retention. Following undisturbed healing without occlusal forces, 6 months of orthodontic treatment intentionally extruded the autotransplanted teeth to antagonist contact. The third and most dorsal tooth became mobile after 3 months and was lost. The surviving 2 teeth were fitted by a prosthetic bridge as extrusion into the occlusal plane was not completely successful. This exemplar case shows benefit of tooth autotransplants in selected cases of jaw reconstruction with distal bone autotransplants as alternative to dental titanium implants and suprastructures. Orthodontic microscrews can moreover support tooth movement and positioning as anchorage device in altered anatomy.

  1. A comparison of single-suture and double-suture incision closures in seaward-migrating juvenile Chinook salmon implanted with acoustic transmitters: implications for research in river basins containing hydropower structures

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Richard S.; Deters, Katherine A.; Cook, Katrina V.; Eppard, M. B.

    2013-07-15

    Reductions in the size of acoustic transmitters implanted in migrating juvenile salmonids have resulted in the ability to make shorter incisions that may warrant using only a single suture for closure. However, it is not known if one suture will sufficiently hold the incision closed, particularly when outward pressure is placed on the surgical site such as when migrating fish experience pressure changes associated with passage at hydroelectric dams. The objective of this research was to evaluate the effectiveness of single-suture incision closures on juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha). Juvenile Chinook salmon were surgically implanted with a 2012 Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) transmitter (0.30 g) and a passive integrated transponder tag (0.10 g) and incisions were closed with either one suture or two sutures. Mortality and tag retention were monitored and fish were examined after 7 and 14 days to evaluate tissue responses. In a separate experiment, surgically implanted fish were exposed to simulated turbine passage and then examined for expulsion of transmitters, expulsion of viscera through the incision, and mortal injury. With incisions closed using a single suture, there was no mortality or tag loss and similar or reduced tissue reaction compared to incisions closed with two sutures. Further, surgery time was significantly reduced when one suture was used, which leads to less handling and reduced stress. No tags were expelled during pressure scenarios and expulsion of viscera only occurred in two non-mortally injured fish (5%) with single sutures that were also exposed to very high pressure changes. No viscera expulsion was present in fish exposed to pressure scenarios likely representative of hydroturbine passage at many Columbia River dams (e.g. <2.7 ratio of pressure change; an acclimation pressure of 146.2 absolute kpa and a lowest exposure pressure of ~ 53.3 absolute kpa). Based on these results, we recommend the use of a

  2. Assessment of dehydrothermally cross‐linked collagen membrane for guided bone regeneration around peri-implant dehiscence defects: a randomized single-blinded clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to determine the clinical feasibility of using dehydrothermally cross‐linked collagen membrane (DCM) for bone regeneration around peri-implant dehiscence defects, and compare it with non-cross-linked native collagen membrane (NCM). Methods Dehiscence defects were investigated in twenty-eight patients. Defect width and height were measured by periodontal probe immediately following implant placement (baseline) and 16 weeks afterward. Membrane manipulation and maintenance were clinically assessed by means of the visual analogue scale score at baseline. Changes in horizontal thickness at 1 mm, 2 mm, and 3 mm below the top of the implant platform and the average bone density were assessed by cone-beam computed tomography at 16 weeks. Degradation of membrane was histologically observed in the soft tissue around the implant prior to re-entry surgery. Results Five defect sites (two sites in the NCM group and three sites in the DCM group) showed soft-tissue dehiscence defects and membrane exposure during the early healing period, but there were no symptoms or signs of severe complications during the experimental postoperative period. Significant clinical and radiological improvements were found in all parameters with both types of collagen membrane. Partially resorbed membrane leaflets were only observed histologically in the DCM group. Conclusions These findings suggest that, compared with NCM, DCM has a similar clinical expediency and possesses more stable maintenance properties. Therefore, it could be used effectively in guided bone regeneration around dehiscence-type defects. PMID:26732806

  3. Fracture analysis of randomized implant-supported fixed dental prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Esquivel-Upshaw, Josephine F.; Mehler, Alex; Clark, Arthur E.; Neal, Dan; Anusavice, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Fractures of posterior fixed dental all-ceramic prostheses can be caused by one or more factors including prosthesis design, flaw distribution, direction and magnitude of occlusal loading, and nature of supporting infrastructure (tooth root/implant), and presence of adjacent teeth. This clinical study of implant-supported, all-ceramic fixed dental prostheses, determined the effects of (1) presence of a tooth distal to the most distal retainer; (2) prosthesis loading either along the non-load bearing or load bearing areas; (3) presence of excursive contacts or maximum intercuspation contacts in the prosthesis; and (4) magnitude of bite force on the occurrence of veneer ceramic fracture. Methods 89 implant-supported FDPs were randomized as either a three-unit posterior metal-ceramic (Au-Pd-Ag alloy and InLine POM, Ivoclar, Vivadent) FDP or a ceramic-ceramic (ZirCAD and ZirPress, Ivoclar, Vivadent) FDP. Two implants (Osseospeed, Dentsply) and custom abutments (Atlantis, Dentsply) supported these FDPs, which were cemented with resin cement (RelyX Universal Cement). Baseline photographs were made with markings of teeth from maximum intercuspation (MI) and excursive function. Patients were recalled at 6 months and 1 to 3 years. Fractures were observed, their locations recorded, and images compared with baseline photographs of occlusal contacts. Conclusion No significant relationship exists between the occurrence of fracture and: (1) the magnitude of bite force; (2) a tooth distal to the most distal retainer; and (3) contacts in load-bearing or non-load-bearing areas. However, there was a significantly higher likelihood of fracture in areas with MI contacts only. Clinical Significance This clinical study demonstrates that there is a need to evaluate occlusion differently with implant-supported prostheses than with natural tooth supported prostheses because of the absence of a periodontal ligament. Implant supported prostheses should have minimal occlusion and

  4. A simple rule governs the evolution and development of hominin tooth size.

    PubMed

    Evans, Alistair R; Daly, E Susanne; Catlett, Kierstin K; Paul, Kathleen S; King, Stephen J; Skinner, Matthew M; Nesse, Hans P; Hublin, Jean-Jacques; Townsend, Grant C; Schwartz, Gary T; Jernvall, Jukka

    2016-02-25

    The variation in molar tooth size in humans and our closest relatives (hominins) has strongly influenced our view of human evolution. The reduction in overall size and disproportionate decrease in third molar size have been noted for over a century, and have been attributed to reduced selection for large dentitions owing to changes in diet or the acquisition of cooking. The systematic pattern of size variation along the tooth row has been described as a 'morphogenetic gradient' in mammal, and more specifically hominin, teeth since Butler and Dahlberg. However, the underlying controls of tooth size have not been well understood, with hypotheses ranging from morphogenetic fields to the clone theory. In this study we address the following question: are there rules that govern how hominin tooth size evolves? Here we propose that the inhibitory cascade, an activator-inhibitor mechanism that affects relative tooth size in mammals, produces the default pattern of tooth sizes for all lower primary postcanine teeth (deciduous premolars and permanent molars) in hominins. This configuration is also equivalent to a morphogenetic gradient, finally pointing to a mechanism that can generate this gradient. The pattern of tooth size remains constant with absolute size in australopiths (including Ardipithecus, Australopithecus and Paranthropus). However, in species of Homo, including modern humans, there is a tight link between tooth proportions and absolute size such that a single developmental parameter can explain both the relative and absolute sizes of primary postcanine teeth. On the basis of the relationship of inhibitory cascade patterning with size, we can use the size at one tooth position to predict the sizes of the remaining four primary postcanine teeth in the row for hominins. Our study provides a development-based expectation to examine the evolution of the unique proportions of human teeth. PMID:26911784

  5. A simple rule governs the evolution and development of hominin tooth size.

    PubMed

    Evans, Alistair R; Daly, E Susanne; Catlett, Kierstin K; Paul, Kathleen S; King, Stephen J; Skinner, Matthew M; Nesse, Hans P; Hublin, Jean-Jacques; Townsend, Grant C; Schwartz, Gary T; Jernvall, Jukka

    2016-02-25

    The variation in molar tooth size in humans and our closest relatives (hominins) has strongly influenced our view of human evolution. The reduction in overall size and disproportionate decrease in third molar size have been noted for over a century, and have been attributed to reduced selection for large dentitions owing to changes in diet or the acquisition of cooking. The systematic pattern of size variation along the tooth row has been described as a 'morphogenetic gradient' in mammal, and more specifically hominin, teeth since Butler and Dahlberg. However, the underlying controls of tooth size have not been well understood, with hypotheses ranging from morphogenetic fields to the clone theory. In this study we address the following question: are there rules that govern how hominin tooth size evolves? Here we propose that the inhibitory cascade, an activator-inhibitor mechanism that affects relative tooth size in mammals, produces the default pattern of tooth sizes for all lower primary postcanine teeth (deciduous premolars and permanent molars) in hominins. This configuration is also equivalent to a morphogenetic gradient, finally pointing to a mechanism that can generate this gradient. The pattern of tooth size remains constant with absolute size in australopiths (including Ardipithecus, Australopithecus and Paranthropus). However, in species of Homo, including modern humans, there is a tight link between tooth proportions and absolute size such that a single developmental parameter can explain both the relative and absolute sizes of primary postcanine teeth. On the basis of the relationship of inhibitory cascade patterning with size, we can use the size at one tooth position to predict the sizes of the remaining four primary postcanine teeth in the row for hominins. Our study provides a development-based expectation to examine the evolution of the unique proportions of human teeth.

  6. Tooth shape formation and tooth renewal: evolving with the same signals.

    PubMed

    Jernvall, Jukka; Thesleff, Irma

    2012-10-01

    Teeth are found in almost all vertebrates, and they therefore provide a general paradigm for the study of epithelial organ development and evolution. Here, we review the developmental mechanisms underlying changes in tooth complexity and tooth renewal during evolution, focusing on recent studies of fish, reptiles and mammals. Mammals differ from other living vertebrates in that they have the most complex teeth with restricted capacity for tooth renewal. As we discuss, however, limited tooth replacement in mammals has been compensated for in some taxa by the evolution of continuously growing teeth, the development of which appears to reuse the regulatory pathways of tooth replacement.

  7. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

    PubMed Central

    Sivera, Rafael; Vílchez, Juan Jesús; Martínez-Rubio, Dolores; Chumillas, María José; Vázquez, Juan Francisco; Muelas, Nuria; Bataller, Luis; Millán, José María; Palau, Fancesc; Espinós, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the genetic distribution and the phenotypic correlation of an extensive series of patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease in a geographically well-defined Mediterranean area. Methods: A thorough genetic screening, including most of the known genes involved in this disease, was performed and analyzed in this longitudinal descriptive study. Clinical data were analyzed and compared among the genetic subgroups. Results: Molecular diagnosis was accomplished in 365 of 438 patients (83.3%), with a higher success rate in demyelinating forms of the disease. The CMT1A duplication (PMP22 gene) was the most frequent genetic diagnosis (50.4%), followed by mutations in the GJB1 gene (15.3%), and in the GDAP1 gene (11.5%). Mutations in 13 other genes were identified, but were much less frequent. Sixteen novel mutations were detected and characterized phenotypically. Conclusions: The relatively high frequency of GDAP1 mutations, coupled with the scarceness of MFN2 mutations (1.1%) and the high proportion of recessive inheritance (11.6%) in this series exemplify the particularity of the genetic distribution of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease in this region. PMID:24078732

  8. [Tooth erosion - a multidisciplinary approach].

    PubMed

    Strużycka, Izabela; Rusyan, Ewa; Bogusławska-Kapała, Agnieszka

    2016-02-01

    During the last decades, an increasingly greater interest in dental erosion has been observed in clinical dental practice, in dental public health and in dental research because prevalence of erosive tooth wear is still increasing especially in young age group of population. Erosive tooth wear is a multifactorial etiology process characterized by progressive loss of hard dental tissue. It is defined as the exogenous and/or endogenous acids dissolution of the dental tissue, without bacterial involvement. In the development of dental erosive wear, interactions are required which include chemical, biological, behavioral, diet, time, socioeconomic, knowledge, education, and general health factors. Examples of risk groups could be patients with eating disorders, like anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa, gastroesophageal reflux disease, chronic alcohol abuse or dependence. Special nutrition habits groups with high consumption of soft or sport drinks, special diets like vegetarian, vegan or raw food diet, the regular intake of drugs, medications and food supplements can also increase the risk for dental erosion. Comprehensive knowledge of the different risk and protective factors is a perquisite for initiating adequate preventive measures.

  9. [Tooth erosion - a multidisciplinary approach].

    PubMed

    Strużycka, Izabela; Rusyan, Ewa; Bogusławska-Kapała, Agnieszka

    2016-02-01

    During the last decades, an increasingly greater interest in dental erosion has been observed in clinical dental practice, in dental public health and in dental research because prevalence of erosive tooth wear is still increasing especially in young age group of population. Erosive tooth wear is a multifactorial etiology process characterized by progressive loss of hard dental tissue. It is defined as the exogenous and/or endogenous acids dissolution of the dental tissue, without bacterial involvement. In the development of dental erosive wear, interactions are required which include chemical, biological, behavioral, diet, time, socioeconomic, knowledge, education, and general health factors. Examples of risk groups could be patients with eating disorders, like anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa, gastroesophageal reflux disease, chronic alcohol abuse or dependence. Special nutrition habits groups with high consumption of soft or sport drinks, special diets like vegetarian, vegan or raw food diet, the regular intake of drugs, medications and food supplements can also increase the risk for dental erosion. Comprehensive knowledge of the different risk and protective factors is a perquisite for initiating adequate preventive measures. PMID:27000809

  10. Graphene-based wireless bacteria detection on tooth enamel.

    PubMed

    Mannoor, Manu S; Tao, Hu; Clayton, Jefferson D; Sengupta, Amartya; Kaplan, David L; Naik, Rajesh R; Verma, Naveen; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G; McAlpine, Michael C

    2012-01-01

    Direct interfacing of nanosensors onto biomaterials could impact health quality monitoring and adaptive threat detection. Graphene is capable of highly sensitive analyte detection due to its nanoscale nature. Here we show that graphene can be printed onto water-soluble silk. This in turn permits intimate biotransfer of graphene nanosensors onto biomaterials, including tooth enamel. The result is a fully biointerfaced sensing platform, which can be tuned to detect target analytes. For example, via self-assembly of antimicrobial peptides onto graphene, we show bioselective detection of bacteria at single-cell levels. Incorporation of a resonant coil eliminates the need for onboard power and external connections. Combining these elements yields two-tiered interfacing of peptide-graphene nanosensors with biomaterials. In particular, we demonstrate integration onto a tooth for remote monitoring of respiration and bacteria detection in saliva. Overall, this strategy of interfacing graphene nanosensors with biomaterials represents a versatile approach for ubiquitous detection of biochemical targets.

  11. Ion channels, channelopathies, and tooth formation.

    PubMed

    Duan, X

    2014-02-01

    The biological functions of ion channels in tooth development vary according to the nature of their gating, the species of ions passing through those gates, the number of gates, localization of channels, tissue expressing the channel, and interactions between cells and microenvironment. Ion channels feature unique and specific ion flux in ameloblasts, odontoblasts, and other tooth-specific cell lineages. Both enamel and dentin have active chemical systems orchestrating a variety of ion exchanges and demineralization and remineralization processes in a stage-dependent manner. An important role for ion channels is to regulate and maintain the calcium and pH homeostasis that are critical for proper enamel and dentin biomineralization. Specific functions of chloride channels, TRPVs, calcium channels, potassium channels, and solute carrier superfamily members in tooth formation have been gradually clarified in recent years. Mutations in these ion channels or transporters often result in disastrous changes in tooth development. The channelopathies of tooth include altered eruption (CLCN7, KCNJ2, TRPV3), root dysplasia (CLCN7, KCNJ2), amelogenesis imperfecta (KCNJ1, CFTR, AE2, CACNA1C, GJA1), dentin dysplasia (CLCN5), small teeth (CACNA1C, GJA1), tooth agenesis (CLCN7), and other impairments. The mechanisms leading to tooth channelopathies are primarily related to pH regulation, calcium homeostasis, or other alterations of the niche for tooth eruption and development. PMID:24076519

  12. 21 CFR 872.3920 - Porcelain tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Porcelain tooth. 872.3920 Section 872.3920 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3920 Porcelain tooth. (a) Identification. A...

  13. 21 CFR 872.3920 - Porcelain tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Porcelain tooth. 872.3920 Section 872.3920 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3920 Porcelain tooth. (a) Identification. A...

  14. Investigation of EPR signals on tooth enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlenko, A.; Mironova-Ulmane, N.; Polakov, M.; Riekstina, D.

    2007-12-01

    Calcified tissues are involved in continues metabolic process in human organism exchanging a number of chemical elements with environment. The rate of biochemical reactions is tissue dependent and the slowest one at the tooth enamel, the most mineralized tissue of human organism. The long time stability and unique chemical composition make tooth enamel suitable for number of application. The assessment of individual radiation dose by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and evaluations of elemental composition by Instrumentation Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) are the well known procedures where properties of tooth enamel intensively used. The current work is focused on investigation of EPR signals and determination of chemical composition on several teeth samples having different origin. The EPR spectra and INAA element content of milk tooth, caries tooth, and paradantose tooth have been compared to each other. The results showed that the intensity of EPR signal is much higher for the caries tooth than the for paradantose tooth that is in agreement with depleted Ca content.

  15. Addressing Tooth Decay in Head Start Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knowlden, Adam P.; Hill, Lawrence F.; Alles-White, Monica L.; Cottrell, Randall R.

    2012-01-01

    Tooth decay is the most prevalent chronic disease of childhood. Oral health education and dental services are crucial to reducing the number of children afflicted with dental cavities. Due to limited access to preventative care, Head Start children are particularly vulnerable to tooth decay. This article outlines practical implications of a…

  16. Laser ultrasonic techniques for assessment of tooth structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blodgett, David W.; Baldwin, Kevin C.

    2000-06-01

    Dental health care and research workers require a means of imaging the structures within teeth in vivo. For example, there is a need to image the margins of a restoration for the detection of poor bonding or voids between the restorative material and the dentin. With conventional x-ray techniques, it is difficult to detect cracks and to visualize interfaces between hard media. This due to the x-ray providing only a 2 dimensional projection of the internal structure (i.e. a silhouette). In addition, a high resolution imaging modality is needed to detect tooth decay in its early stages. If decay can be detected early enough, the process can be monitored and interventional procedures, such as fluoride washes and controlled diet, can be initiated which can help the tooth to re-mineralize itself. Currently employed x-ray imaging is incapable of detecting decay at a stage early enough to avoid invasive cavity preparation followed by a restoration with a synthetic material. Other clinical applications include the visualization of periodontal defects, the localization of intraosseous lesions, and determining the degree of osseointegration between a dental implant and the surrounding bone. A means of assessing the internal structure of the tooth based upon use of high frequency, highly localized ultrasound (acoustic waves) generated by a laser pulse is discussed. Optical interferometric detection of ultrasound provides a complementary technique with a very small detection footprint. Initial results using laser-based ultrasound for assessment of dental structures are presented. Discussion will center on the adaptability of this technique to clinical applications.

  17. Immediate placement of bone level Sraumann implants: a case series.

    PubMed

    Di Felice, Roberto; D'Amario, Maurizio; De Dominicis, Alessandro; Garocchio, Santo; D'Arcangelo, Camillo; Giannoni, Mario

    2011-02-01

    Endosseous dental implants have revolutionized the methods clinicians use to treat edentulous and partially edentulous patients. Traditional implant protocol specifies a healing period of several months after tooth extraction, as well as an unloaded healing period prior to restoration. Over the last decade, numerous studies have documented successful immediate placement of endosseous dental implants in fresh extraction sites and have found positive results with early functional loading. The purpose of this article is to present a clinical treatment protocol for the immediate placement and early loading of dental implants and to report the clinical and radiographic outcomes of the SLActive surface Straumann Bone Level implant placed in either maxillary or mandibular fresh extraction sockets.

  18. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... outside of the body, behind the ear. A second part is surgically placed under the skin. An implant does not restore normal hearing. It can help a person understand speech. Children and adults can benefit from them. National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

  19. Facial implants.

    PubMed

    Arcuri, M R; Rubenstein, J T

    1998-01-01

    The application of endosseous dental implants for the retention and stabilization of extraoral prostheses and hearing aids has been shown to be effective functionally and aesthetically. Implants have reduced the need for adhesive use, simplifying cleaning procedures and thus extending the life of the prosthesis. Implant-retained prostheses have provided patients the opportunity to participate in routine activities such as work, shopping, swimming, and jogging with less fear of losing their prosthesis. The implants' impact on patients has resulted in their ability to function in society with confidence that their defects will be less noticeable and their ability to respond to the environment enhanced. The culmination of these effects have without doubt improved the overall quality of life for patients. As with any new technology, its application will encounter unanticipated problems and some limitations in use. As the art and science of this technique evolve, however, it is anticipated that it will result in the ability to provide improved health care for patients.

  20. Natural tooth as an interim prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Dhariwal, Neha S.; Gokhale, Niraj S.; Patel, Punit; Hugar, Shivayogi M.

    2016-01-01

    A traumatic injury to primary maxillary anterior tooth is one of the common causes for problems with the succedaneous tooth leading to it noneruption. A missing anterior tooth can be psychologically and socially damaging to the patient. Despite a wide range of treatment options available, sometimes, it is inevitable to save the natural tooth. This paper describes the immediate replacement of a right central incisor using a fiber-composite resin splint with the natural tooth crown as a pontic following surgical extraction of the dilacerated impacted permanent maxillary central incisor. The abutment teeth can be conserved with minimal or no preparation, thus keeping the technique reversible and can be completed at chair side thereby avoiding laboratory costs. It can be used as an interim measure until a definitive prosthesis can be fabricated as the growth is still incomplete. PMID:27433074

  1. Biologically Based Restorative Management of Tooth Wear

    PubMed Central

    Kelleher, Martin G. D.; Bomfim, Deborah I.; Austin, Rupert S.

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence and severity of tooth wear is increasing in industrialised nations. Yet, there is no high-level evidence to support or refute any therapeutic intervention. In the absence of such evidence, many currently prevailing management strategies for tooth wear may be failing in their duty of care to first and foremost improve the oral health of patients with this disease. This paper promotes biologically sound approaches to the management of tooth wear on the basis of current best evidence of the aetiology and clinical features of this disease. The relative risks and benefits of the varying approaches to managing tooth wear are discussed with reference to long-term follow-up studies. Using reference to ethical standards such as “The Daughter Test”, this paper presents case reports of patients with moderate-to-severe levels of tooth wear managed in line with these biologically sound principles. PMID:22315608

  2. Ligature-induced peri-implant infection in crestal and subcrestal implants: a clinical and radiographic study in dogs.

    PubMed

    Huang, Baoxin; Piao, Muzi; Zhang, Li; Wang, Xian'e; Xu, Li; Zhu, Weidong; Meng, Huanxin

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of implant-abutment interface (IAI) placement depths on peri-implant tissues in the presence of ligature-induced peri-implant inflammation. Materials and Methods. Two implants with screwed-in IAIs (SI) and two implants with tapped-in IAIs (TI) were inserted in one side of the mandible in six dogs eight weeks after tooth extraction. Four experimental groups were constituted: SI placed crestally, SI placed 1.5 mm subcrestally, TI placed crestally and TI placed 1.5 mm subcrestally. After 12 weeks, the healing abutments were connected. Four weeks later, cotton floss ligatures were placed around the abutments to promote plaque accumulation. Clinical and radiographic examinations were performed at 0, 6 and 12 weeks after ligature placement. The effects of the IAI placement depths on clinical and radiographic parameters were assessed. Results. The alterations of peri-implant probing depths, clinical attachment levels, distances from the IAI to the first bone-implant contact (IAI-fBIC) and depths of infrabony defect were significant larger in the subcrestal groups compared with the crestal groups during the plaque accumulation period. The alterations of clinical attachment levels, IAI-fBIC, depth of the infrabony defect and horizontal bone loss were not significantly different between the SI and TI groups after ligature placement. Conclusion. Tissue destruction in subcrestal implants may be more serious than that in crestal implants in the presence of inflamed peri-implant mucosa.

  3. Ultrasonic assessment of tooth structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blodgett, David W.

    2002-06-01

    A means of assessing the internal structure of teeth based upon use of high frequency, highly localized ultrasound (acoustic waves) generated by a short laser pulse is discussed. Some key advantages of laser-generated ultrasound over more traditional contact transducer methods are that it is noncontact and nondestructive in nature and requires no special surface preparation. Optical interferometric detection of ultrasound provides a complementary nondestructive, noncontact technique with a very small detection footprint. This combination of techniques, termed laser-based ultrasonics, holds promise for future in-vivo diagnostics of tooth health. In this paper, initial results using laser-based ultrasound for assessment of dental structures are presented on an extracted human incisor. Results show the technique to be sensitive to the enamel/dentin, dentin/pulp, and dentin/cementum junctions as well as a region of dead tracts in the dentin.

  4. Dental implants with the periodontium: a new approach for the restoration of missing teeth.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng; Dong, Qing-Shan; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Jun-Rui; Wu, Li-An; Liu, Bao-Lin

    2009-01-01

    Tooth loss is a common occurrence in mankind and damages human health. Osseointegrated dental implants have been successfully used as a popular prosthetic restoration for the missing teeth for many years. However, osseointegration, representing a direct connection between the implant and bone tissue without the periodontium, causes some inevitable problems, such as masticatory force concentration and immobility of the dental implant. Thus, an ideal dental implant should have its own peri-implant periodontium, as do the natural teeth. A number of attempts have been made to reconstruct the periodontium around the implants. Unfortunately, it has been established that a predictable periodontal reconstruction, especially the acellular cementum reconstruction on the surface of the implant, is a very difficult task. In this paper, we propose the hypothesis that the cementum may be a special phenotype of the bone tissue, on the basis of its strong similarity in development, structure, and function. In a certain condition, the bone tissue may change to cementum for special functional needs. In accordance with this hypothesis, we consider a novel approach to reconstruct the peri-implant tissues. Unlike previous studies, this approach imitates the tooth re-plantation process. The key point is to convert the implant-surrounding bone tissues to cementum as a result of adaptive changes to the implant-support demands. This hypothesis, if proven to be valid, will not only represent a breakthrough in cementum research, but also will open a new door to the restoration of missing teeth. PMID:18829177

  5. Kinematics modeling and experimentation of the multi-manipulator tooth-arrangement robot for full denture manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-de; Jiang, Jin-gang; Liang, Ting; Hu, Wei-ping

    2011-12-01

    Artificial teeth are very complicated in shape, and not easy to be grasped and manipulated accurately by a single robot. The method of tooth-arrangement by multi-manipulator for complete denture manufacturing proposed in this paper. A novel complete denture manufacturing mechanism is designed based on multi-manipulator and dental arch generator. Kinematics model of the multi-manipulator tooth-arrangement robot is built by analytical method based on tooth-arrangement principle for full denture. Preliminary experiments on tooth-arrangement are performed using the multi-manipulator tooth-arrangement robot prototype system. The multi-manipulator tooth-arrangement robot prototype system can automatically design and manufacture a set of complete denture that is suitable for a patient according to the jaw arch parameters. The experimental results verified the validity of kinematics model of the multi-manipulator tooth-arrangement robot and the feasibility of the manufacture strategy of complete denture fulfilled by multi-manipulator tooth-arrangement robot. PMID:20703775

  6. Tissue Interactions Regulating Tooth Development and Renewal.

    PubMed

    Balic, Anamaria; Thesleff, Irma

    2015-01-01

    Reciprocal interactions between epithelial and mesenchymal tissues play a fundamental role in the morphogenesis of teeth and regulate all aspects of tooth development. Extensive studies on mouse tooth development over the past 25 years have uncovered the molecular details of the signaling networks mediating these interactions (reviewed by Jussila & Thesleff, 2012; Lan, Jia, & Jiang, 2014). Five conserved signaling pathways, namely, the Wnt, BMP, FGF, Shh, and Eda, are involved in the mediation of the successive reciprocal epithelial-mesenchymal cross talk which follows the general principle of morphogenetic interactions (Davidson, 1993). The pathways regulate the expression of transcription factors which confer the identity of dental epithelium and mesenchyme. The signals and transcription factors are integrated in complex signaling networks whose fine-tuning allows the generation of the variation in tooth morphologies. In this review, we describe the principles and molecular mechanisms of the epithelial-mesenchymal interactions regulating successive stages of tooth formation: (i) the initiation of tooth development, with special reference to the shift of tooth-forming potential from epithelium to mesenchyme; (ii) the morphogenesis of the tooth crown, focusing on the roles of epithelial signaling centers; (iii) the differentiation of odontoblasts and ameloblasts, which produce dentin and enamel, respectively; and (iv) the maintenance of dental stem cells, which support the continuous growth of teeth. PMID:26589925

  7. Tissue Interactions Regulating Tooth Development and Renewal.

    PubMed

    Balic, Anamaria; Thesleff, Irma

    2015-01-01

    Reciprocal interactions between epithelial and mesenchymal tissues play a fundamental role in the morphogenesis of teeth and regulate all aspects of tooth development. Extensive studies on mouse tooth development over the past 25 years have uncovered the molecular details of the signaling networks mediating these interactions (reviewed by Jussila & Thesleff, 2012; Lan, Jia, & Jiang, 2014). Five conserved signaling pathways, namely, the Wnt, BMP, FGF, Shh, and Eda, are involved in the mediation of the successive reciprocal epithelial-mesenchymal cross talk which follows the general principle of morphogenetic interactions (Davidson, 1993). The pathways regulate the expression of transcription factors which confer the identity of dental epithelium and mesenchyme. The signals and transcription factors are integrated in complex signaling networks whose fine-tuning allows the generation of the variation in tooth morphologies. In this review, we describe the principles and molecular mechanisms of the epithelial-mesenchymal interactions regulating successive stages of tooth formation: (i) the initiation of tooth development, with special reference to the shift of tooth-forming potential from epithelium to mesenchyme; (ii) the morphogenesis of the tooth crown, focusing on the roles of epithelial signaling centers; (iii) the differentiation of odontoblasts and ameloblasts, which produce dentin and enamel, respectively; and (iv) the maintenance of dental stem cells, which support the continuous growth of teeth.

  8. Coordination of Cellular Dynamics Contributes to Tooth Epithelium Deformations

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Ritsuko; Kihira, Miho; Nakatsu, Yousuke; Nomoto, Yohei; Ogawa, Miho; Ohashi, Kazumasa; Mizuno, Kensaku; Tachikawa, Tetsuhiko; Ishimoto, Yukitaka; Morishita, Yoshihiro; Tsuji, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    The morphologies of ectodermal organs are shaped by appropriate combinations of several deformation modes, such as invagination and anisotropic tissue elongation. However, how multicellular dynamics are coordinated during deformation processes remains to be elucidated. Here, we developed a four-dimensional (4D) analysis system for tracking cell movement and division at a single-cell resolution in developing tooth epithelium. The expression patterns of a Fucci probe clarified the region- and stage-specific cell cycle patterns within the tooth germ, which were in good agreement with the pattern of the volume growth rate estimated from tissue-level deformation analysis. Cellular motility was higher in the regions with higher growth rates, while the mitotic orientation was significantly biased along the direction of tissue elongation in the epithelium. Further, these spatio-temporal patterns of cellular dynamics and tissue-level deformation were highly correlated with that of the activity of cofilin, which is an actin depolymerization factor, suggesting that the coordination of cellular dynamics via actin remodeling plays an important role in tooth epithelial morphogenesis. Our system enhances the understanding of how cellular behaviors are coordinated during ectodermal organogenesis, which cannot be observed from histological analyses. PMID:27588418

  9. Coordination of Cellular Dynamics Contributes to Tooth Epithelium Deformations.

    PubMed

    Morita, Ritsuko; Kihira, Miho; Nakatsu, Yousuke; Nomoto, Yohei; Ogawa, Miho; Ohashi, Kazumasa; Mizuno, Kensaku; Tachikawa, Tetsuhiko; Ishimoto, Yukitaka; Morishita, Yoshihiro; Tsuji, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    The morphologies of ectodermal organs are shaped by appropriate combinations of several deformation modes, such as invagination and anisotropic tissue elongation. However, how multicellular dynamics are coordinated during deformation processes remains to be elucidated. Here, we developed a four-dimensional (4D) analysis system for tracking cell movement and division at a single-cell resolution in developing tooth epithelium. The expression patterns of a Fucci probe clarified the region- and stage-specific cell cycle patterns within the tooth germ, which were in good agreement with the pattern of the volume growth rate estimated from tissue-level deformation analysis. Cellular motility was higher in the regions with higher growth rates, while the mitotic orientation was significantly biased along the direction of tissue elongation in the epithelium. Further, these spatio-temporal patterns of cellular dynamics and tissue-level deformation were highly correlated with that of the activity of cofilin, which is an actin depolymerization factor, suggesting that the coordination of cellular dynamics via actin remodeling plays an important role in tooth epithelial morphogenesis. Our system enhances the understanding of how cellular behaviors are coordinated during ectodermal organogenesis, which cannot be observed from histological analyses. PMID:27588418

  10. Microsystems Technology for Retinal Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiland, James

    2005-03-01

    The retinal prosthesis is targeted to treat age-related macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa, and other outer retinal degenerations. Simulations of artificial vision have predicted that 600-1000 individual pixels will be needed if a retinal prosthesis is to restore function such as reading large print and face recognition. An implantable device with this many electrode contacts will require microsystems technology as part of its design. An implantable retinal prosthesis will consist of several subsystems including an electrode array and hermetic packaging. Microsystems and microtechnology approaches are being investigated as possible solutions for these design problems. Flexible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate electrode arrays and silicon micromachined electrode arrays are under development. Inactive PDMS electrodes have been implanted in 3 dogs to assess mechanical biocompatibility. 3 dogs were followed for 6 months. The implanted was securely fastened to the retina with a single retinal tack. No post-operative complications were evident. The array remained within 100 microns of the retinal surface. Histological evaluation showed a well preserved retina underneath the electrode array. A silicon device with electrodes suspended on micromachined springs has been implanted in 4 dogs (2 acute implants, 2 chronic implants). The device, though large, could be inserted into the eye and positioned on the retina. Histological analysis of the retina from the spring electrode implants showed that spring mounted posts penetrated the retina, thus the device will be redesigned to reduce the strength of the springs. These initial implants will provide information for the designers to make the next generation silicon device. We conclude that microsystems technology has the potential to make possible a retinal prosthesis with 1000 individual contacts in close proximity to the retina.

  11. Short Implants: New Horizon in Implant Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Manisha; Garg, Meenu; Pathak, Chetan

    2016-01-01

    The choice of implant length is an essential factor in deciding the survival rates of these implants and the overall success of the prosthesis. Placing an implant in the posterior part of the maxilla and mandible has always been very critical due to poor bone quality and quantity. Long implants can be placed in association with complex surgical procedures such as sinus lift and bone augmentation. These techniques are associated with higher cost, increased treatment time and greater morbidity. Hence, there is need for a less invasive treatment option in areas of poor bone quantity and quality. Data related to survival rates of short implants, their design and prosthetic considerations has been compiled and structured in this manuscript with emphasis on the indications, advantages of short implants and critical biomechanical factors to be taken into consideration when choosing to place them. Studies have shown that comparable success rates can be achieved with short implants as those with long implants by decreasing the lateral forces to the prosthesis, eliminating cantilevers, increasing implant surface area and improving implant to abutment connection. Short implants can be considered as an effective treatment alternative in resorbed ridges. Short implants can be considered as a viable treatment option in atrophic ridge cases in order to avoid complex surgical procedures required to place long implants. With improvement in the implant surface geometry and surface texture, there is an increase in the bone implant contact area which provides a good primary stability during osseo-integration. PMID:27790598

  12. Anatomically guided implant site preparation technique at molar sites.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Tizcareño, Mario H; Bravo-Flores, Claudia

    2009-10-01

    Immediate postextraction implant placement in the areas of multiradicular teeth is a difficult procedure in view of having to place the implant in an ideal position without jeopardizing its initial stability. The surgeon often faces the problem of directing the initial osteotomy in the medial portion of the alveolus with the difficulty of engaging the inter-radicular septum of the extraction socket. The drill may slip continually leading to an inaccurate site preparation, and consequently to a deficient implant insertion. The fixture is often placed directly into either one of the extraction sockets of the tooth to be replaced. The anatomically guided site preparation technique is a very useful tool to perform implant placement in the areas of multiradicular teeth. This approach of implant insertion consists of a progressive preparation of the implant site using the anatomy and geometry of the root of the multiradicular teeth to be extracted as a reference and as an aid to engage the inter-radicular septum. This places the implants in a favorable and proper position from a biomechanical and occlusal standpoint. The objective of this article is to describe the anatomically guided implant site preparation technique as an aid to favorably place dental implants in multiradicular teeth postextraction.

  13. Effect of Bleaching Agents on the Nanohardness of Tooth Enamel, Composite Resin, and the Tooth-Restoration Interface.

    PubMed

    Abe, A T; Youssef, M N; Turbino, M L

    2016-01-01

    This in vitro study aimed to evaluate the nanohardness of tooth enamel, composite resin, dental adhesive, and enamel hybrid layer exposed to 35% hydrogen peroxide-based bleaching agents and analyze the tooth-restoration interface using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). This study used 40 crowns of bovine incisors, which were embedded in epoxy resin. A 2 × 2 × 2-mm cavity was prepared in the medial third of the flattened buccal surface of each tooth and restored (two-step etch-and-rinse Adper Single Bond 2 + nanocomposite resin Filtek Z350 XT). The specimens were polished and divided into four groups (n=10), corresponding to each bleaching agent used (TB: Total Blanc Office, pH=7.22-6.33; HPB: Whiteness HP Blue, pH=8.89-8.85; HP: Whiteness HP, pH=6.65-6.04; PO: Pola Office, pH=3.56-3.8), applied in accordance with manufacturer protocols. The nanohardness of the substrates was measured before and immediately after the bleaching procedure and after 7-day storage in artificial saliva with an Ultra-Microhardness Tester (DUH-211S, Shimadzu). Loads used were 100 mN for tooth enamel and composite resin and 10 mN for adhesive and enamel hybrid layer. For SEM analysis, epoxy replicas were prepared through high-precision impressions of the specimens. For nanohardness, the statistical tests two-way analysis of variance and Tukey (p<0.05) revealed that the agent with the lowest pH value (PO) was the only one to decrease the nanohardness of enamel and the enamel hybrid layer immediately after its application; however, after 7-day storage in artificial saliva, the nanohardness levels of these substrates returned to their original values. SEM analysis revealed small gaps between tooth enamel and adhesive after the exposure to all bleaching agents; however, the most evident gap in the tooth-restoration interface was observed immediately after application of agent PO. No bleaching agent used changed the nanohardness of the composite resin and adhesive layer.

  14. Effect of Bleaching Agents on the Nanohardness of Tooth Enamel, Composite Resin, and the Tooth-Restoration Interface.

    PubMed

    Abe, A T; Youssef, M N; Turbino, M L

    2016-01-01

    This in vitro study aimed to evaluate the nanohardness of tooth enamel, composite resin, dental adhesive, and enamel hybrid layer exposed to 35% hydrogen peroxide-based bleaching agents and analyze the tooth-restoration interface using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). This study used 40 crowns of bovine incisors, which were embedded in epoxy resin. A 2 × 2 × 2-mm cavity was prepared in the medial third of the flattened buccal surface of each tooth and restored (two-step etch-and-rinse Adper Single Bond 2 + nanocomposite resin Filtek Z350 XT). The specimens were polished and divided into four groups (n=10), corresponding to each bleaching agent used (TB: Total Blanc Office, pH=7.22-6.33; HPB: Whiteness HP Blue, pH=8.89-8.85; HP: Whiteness HP, pH=6.65-6.04; PO: Pola Office, pH=3.56-3.8), applied in accordance with manufacturer protocols. The nanohardness of the substrates was measured before and immediately after the bleaching procedure and after 7-day storage in artificial saliva with an Ultra-Microhardness Tester (DUH-211S, Shimadzu). Loads used were 100 mN for tooth enamel and composite resin and 10 mN for adhesive and enamel hybrid layer. For SEM analysis, epoxy replicas were prepared through high-precision impressions of the specimens. For nanohardness, the statistical tests two-way analysis of variance and Tukey (p<0.05) revealed that the agent with the lowest pH value (PO) was the only one to decrease the nanohardness of enamel and the enamel hybrid layer immediately after its application; however, after 7-day storage in artificial saliva, the nanohardness levels of these substrates returned to their original values. SEM analysis revealed small gaps between tooth enamel and adhesive after the exposure to all bleaching agents; however, the most evident gap in the tooth-restoration interface was observed immediately after application of agent PO. No bleaching agent used changed the nanohardness of the composite resin and adhesive layer. PMID:26266649

  15. Totally Implantable Venous Access Devices in Children Requiring Long-Term Chemotherapy: Analysis of Outcome in 122 Children from a Single Institution.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Gowri; Jadhav, Vinay; Ravindra S; Babu, Narendra; Ramesh S

    2016-09-01

    Children with malignancy require venous access that is reliable, safe and compliant on a long-term basis. There is little data available on utilization of totally implantable venous access devices (TIVAD) for long term chemotherapy in children in an Indian setting [1]. We report our long-term follow-up results of utilization of totally implantable venous access devices for long-term chemotherapy in children. This was a retrospective analysis of 122 children requiring long-term chemotherapy done between January 2008 and December 2013. Data collected included primary disease process, type of port, site of insertion, intraoperative events, early and late postoperative complications, and issues with utilization, maintenance and removal. 127 ports were placed in 122 children. The follow up ranged from 16 to 50 months. Internal jugular vein was accessed in 96.8 % of cases (123/127). Majority of children (61 %) had hematological malignancy. Early complications occurred in 5 children. Late complications occurred in 18 children which included port pocket infection in 3, port site skin issues in 5, catheter related issues in 3, venous thrombosis in 2 and catheter related bacteremia in 5 children respectively. Only 10 children have been lost to follow-up either due to death or discontinuation of treatment and rest are on follow up. Totally implantable venous access devices usage is safe and reliable for access needs in children for long-term chemotherapy. Their low complication and low cost maintenance should increase their utilization in children requiring long-term chemotherapy. Chemoport placement in children with hematological malignancy can be carried out safely without much impact on complication rates. Though management and compliance of children with malignancy has improved; critical analysis and standardization of port system care through prospective trials are necessary to reduce the morbidity and for cost analysis in these children. PMID:27651694

  16. Biomaterials in tooth tissue engineering: a review.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sarang; Srivastava, Dhirendra; Grover, Shibani; Sharma, Vivek

    2014-01-01

    Biomaterials play a crucial role in the field of tissue engineering. They are utilized for fabricating frameworks known as scaffolds, matrices or constructs which are interconnected porous structures that establish a cellular microenvironment required for optimal tissue regeneration. Several natural and synthetic biomaterials have been utilized for fabrication of tissue engineering scaffolds. Amongst different biomaterials, polymers are the most extensively experimented and employed materials. They can be tailored to provide good interconnected porosity, large surface area, adequate mechanical strengths, varying surface characterization and different geometries required for tissue regeneration. A single type of material may however not meet all the requirements. Selection of two or more biomaterials, optimization of their physical, chemical and mechanical properties and advanced fabrication techniques are required to obtain scaffold designs intended for their final application. Current focus is aimed at designing biomaterials such that they will replicate the local extra cellular environment of the native organ and enable cell-cell and cell-scaffold interactions at micro level required for functional tissue regeneration. This article provides an insight into the different biomaterials available and the emerging use of nano engineering principles for the construction of bioactive scaffolds in tooth regeneration.

  17. Biomaterials in Tooth Tissue Engineering: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sarang; Srivastava, Dhirendra; Grover, Shibani; Sharma, Vivek

    2014-01-01

    Biomaterials play a crucial role in the field of tissue engineering. They are utilized for fabricating frameworks known as scaffolds, matrices or constructs which are interconnected porous structures that establish a cellular microenvironment required for optimal tissue regeneration. Several natural and synthetic biomaterials have been utilized for fabrication of tissue engineering scaffolds. Amongst different biomaterials, polymers are the most extensively experimented and employed materials. They can be tailored to provide good interconnected porosity, large surface area, adequate mechanical strengths, varying surface characterization and different geometries required for tissue regeneration. A single type of material may however not meet all the requirements. Selection of two or more biomaterials, optimization of their physical, chemical and mechanical properties and advanced fabrication techniques are required to obtain scaffold designs intended for their final application. Current focus is aimed at designing biomaterials such that they will replicate the local extra cellular environment of the native organ and enable cell-cell and cell-scaffold interactions at micro level required for functional tissue regeneration. This article provides an insight into the different biomaterials available and the emerging use of nano engineering principles for the construction of bioactive scaffolds in tooth regeneration. PMID:24596804

  18. Imaging of human tooth enamel using ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Culjat, M; Singh, R S; Yoon, D C; Brown, E R

    2003-04-01

    This paper reports the results of a complete circumferential scan of a human tooth and its underlying dentino-enamel junction using ultrasound at frequencies in the 10-MHz range. The imagery shows clearly a two-dimensional contour of the dentinoenamel junction with a depth and lateral resolution of approximately 100 microm and 750 microm, respectively. The resulting sonograph is compared with an optical micrograph of the same tooth to verify the accuracy of the ultrasonic technique. The results are a significant step toward the biolocation of submillimeter size features within the tooth volume.

  19. A longitudinal comparison of tooth whitening resulting from dentifrice use.

    PubMed

    Koertge, T E; Brooks, C N; Sarbin, A G; Powers, D; Gunsolley, J C

    1998-01-01

    The effect of twice-daily brushing with one of three different dentifrices (Arm & Hammer Dental Care, Arm & Hammer Dental Care Extra Whitening, Crest) on stain removal and tooth whitening was examined in 115 volunteers over a period of 12 weeks. The facial surfaces of 12 anterior teeth were assessed for stain using a published, modified version of a standard stain index. Whiteness was measured on teeth 8 and 9 using a single Vita Lumin-Vaccum Shade Guide for consistency. At baseline, the mean facial stain scores were significantly higher (p < 0.05-0.01) for both Arm & Hammer dentifrices than for Crest. In addition, the tooth shades, as indicated by the stain guide, specifically the b* values representing yellowness, were quantified using a Minolta spectrophotometer. Arm & Hammer Dental Care Extra Whitening formula was found to be significantly better than Crest at removing naturally occurring extrinsic stain. The difference between Arm & Hammer Dental Care Extra Whitening and Crest became significant (p < 0.01) after two weeks of use, and remained intact during the balance of the study, achieving p values of 0.0002 for at least one of the three assessed parameters (total stain, proximal, and facial) at weeks 4 and 12. The study also found that Arm & Hammer Dental Care produced a significant increase in tooth whiteness by week 12, whereas Crest showed no such increase at any time during the study. These results suggest that the two Arm & Hammer Baking Soda products are more effective in reducing stain and increasing whiteness than the standard silica-based dentifrice. Their effectiveness is not related to abrasivity since they are less abrasive to tooth enamel than the silica-based product tested. PMID:10518865

  20. Evolution of High Tooth Replacement Rates in Sauropod Dinosaurs

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kathlyn M.; Fisher, Daniel C.; Wilson, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Tooth replacement rate can be calculated in extinct animals by counting incremental lines of deposition in tooth dentin. Calculating this rate in several taxa allows for the study of the evolution of tooth replacement rate. Sauropod dinosaurs, the largest terrestrial animals that ever evolved, exhibited a diversity of tooth sizes and shapes, but little is known about their tooth replacement rates. Methodology/Principal Findings We present tooth replacement rate, formation time, crown volume, total dentition volume, and enamel thickness for two coexisting but distantly related and morphologically disparate sauropod dinosaurs Camarasaurus and Diplodocus. Individual tooth formation time was determined by counting daily incremental lines in dentin. Tooth replacement rate is calculated as the difference between the number of days recorded in successive replacement teeth. Each tooth family in Camarasaurus has a maximum of three replacement teeth, whereas each Diplodocus tooth family has up to five. Tooth formation times are about 1.7 times longer in Camarasaurus than in Diplodocus (315 vs. 185 days). Average tooth replacement rate in Camarasaurus is about one tooth every 62 days versus about one tooth every 35 days in Diplodocus. Despite slower tooth replacement rates in Camarasaurus, the volumetric rate of Camarasaurus tooth replacement is 10 times faster than in Diplodocus because of its substantially greater tooth volumes. A novel method to estimate replacement rate was developed and applied to several other sauropodomorphs that we were not able to thin section. Conclusions/Significance Differences in tooth replacement rate among sauropodomorphs likely reflect disparate feeding strategies and/or food choices, which would have facilitated the coexistence of these gigantic herbivores in one ecosystem. Early neosauropods are characterized by high tooth replacement rates (despite their large tooth size), and derived titanosaurs and diplodocoids independently

  1. Regenerative Applications Using Tooth Derived Stem Cells in Other Than Tooth Regeneration: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Park, Yun-Jong; Cha, Seunghee; Park, Young-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Tooth derived stem cells or dental stem cells are categorized according to the location from which they are isolated and represent a promising source of cells for regenerative medicine. Originally, as one kind of mesenchymal stem cells, they are considered an alternative of bone marrow stromal cells. They share many commonalties but maintain differences. Considering their original function in development and the homeostasis of tooth structures, many applications of these cells in dentistry have aimed at tooth structure regeneration; however, the application in other than tooth structures has been attempted extensively. The availability from discarded or removed teeth can be an innate benefit as a source of autologous cells. Their origin from the neural crest results in exploitation of neurological and numerous other applications. This review briefly highlights current and future perspectives of the regenerative applications of tooth derived stem cells in areas beyond tooth regeneration.

  2. Regenerative Applications Using Tooth Derived Stem Cells in Other Than Tooth Regeneration: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yun-Jong; Cha, Seunghee; Park, Young-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Tooth derived stem cells or dental stem cells are categorized according to the location from which they are isolated and represent a promising source of cells for regenerative medicine. Originally, as one kind of mesenchymal stem cells, they are considered an alternative of bone marrow stromal cells. They share many commonalties but maintain differences. Considering their original function in development and the homeostasis of tooth structures, many applications of these cells in dentistry have aimed at tooth structure regeneration; however, the application in other than tooth structures has been attempted extensively. The availability from discarded or removed teeth can be an innate benefit as a source of autologous cells. Their origin from the neural crest results in exploitation of neurological and numerous other applications. This review briefly highlights current and future perspectives of the regenerative applications of tooth derived stem cells in areas beyond tooth regeneration. PMID:26798366

  3. Ligature-induced peri-implant infection in crestal and subcrestal implants: a clinical and radiographic study in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Baoxin; Piao, Muzi; Zhang, Li; Wang, Xian’e; Xu, Li; Zhu, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of implant–abutment interface (IAI) placement depths on peri-implant tissues in the presence of ligature-induced peri-implant inflammation. Materials and Methods. Two implants with screwed-in IAIs (SI) and two implants with tapped-in IAIs (TI) were inserted in one side of the mandible in six dogs eight weeks after tooth extraction. Four experimental groups were constituted: SI placed crestally, SI placed 1.5 mm subcrestally, TI placed crestally and TI placed 1.5 mm subcrestally. After 12 weeks, the healing abutments were connected. Four weeks later, cotton floss ligatures were placed around the abutments to promote plaque accumulation. Clinical and radiographic examinations were performed at 0, 6 and 12 weeks after ligature placement. The effects of the IAI placement depths on clinical and radiographic parameters were assessed. Results. The alterations of peri-implant probing depths, clinical attachment levels, distances from the IAI to the first bone-implant contact (IAI-fBIC) and depths of infrabony defect were significant larger in the subcrestal groups compared with the crestal groups during the plaque accumulation period. The alterations of clinical attachment levels, IAI-fBIC, depth of the infrabony defect and horizontal bone loss were not significantly different between the SI and TI groups after ligature placement. Conclusion. Tissue destruction in subcrestal implants may be more serious than that in crestal implants in the presence of inflamed peri-implant mucosa. PMID:26246975

  4. An overview of zirconia dental implants: basic properties and clinical application of three cases.

    PubMed

    Bankoğlu Güngör, Merve; Aydın, Cemal; Yılmaz, Handan; Gül, Esma Başak

    2014-08-01

    Due to the possible aesthetic problems of titanium implants, the developments in ceramic implant materials are increasing. Natural tooth colored ceramic implants may be an alternative to overcome aesthetic problems. The purpose of this article is to give information about the basic properties of dental zirconia implants and present 3 cases treated with two-piece zirconia implants. Two-piece zirconia dental implants, 4.0 mm diameter and 11.5 mm in length, were inserted into maxillary incisor region. They were left for 6 months to osseointegrate. Panoramic and periapical radiographs were obtained and examined for bone-implant osseointegration. During the follow-up period the patients were satisfied with their prosthesis and no complication was observed.

  5. [Dental implantations of ceramics-coated metals].

    PubMed

    Cini, L; Gasparini, F; Michieli, S; Pizzoferrato, A; Sandrolini-Cortesi, S

    1975-01-01

    Recent studies and personal experience of the Authors in the field of dental implants have encountered the same fundamental problem which arises with orthopedic prosthesis procedures. The basic problem is that of adhesion between the bone tissue and the metal implant. Chrome-cobalt alloy, Tantalum and Titanium are the metals of most recent use. The Authors therefore proceeded to investigate the behaviour of alveolar bone tissue in the proximity of artificial teeth made of alloy (platinum-gold) covered with ceramic, as used in prosthetic dentistry. The experiment was carried out in a dog and a man. In the dog, two of its mandibular teeth were substituted with the same ceramic-gold implants: the first, a replica of natural tooth, was placed in the socket and held in place by metal splint and mandibular circumferential wirings. The other implant, without a replicated crown, was left free, within the alveolus, without contacting the near or opposing teeth. A solid smooth surfaced alumina device, shaped like a small cylinder, was implanted in the upper femoral epiphysis of the same animal.

  6. Immediate Esthetic Rehabilitation of Periodontally Compromised Anterior Tooth Using Natural Tooth as Pontic

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, K. Pavan; Nujella, Surya Kumari; Gopal, S. Sujatha

    2016-01-01

    For patients who require removal of anterior teeth and their replacement various treatment modalities are available. With advancement in technology and availability of glass/polyethylene fibres, use of natural tooth as pontic with fibre reinforced composite restorations offers the promising results. The present case report describes management of periodontally compromised mandibular anterior tooth using natural tooth pontic with fibre reinforcement. A 1-year follow-up showed that the bridge was intact with good esthetics and no problem was reported. PMID:27195156

  7. Nuclear-chemical methods in a hard tooth tissue abrasion study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosman, A.; Spěváček, V.; Koníček, J.; Vopálka, D.; Houŝová, D.; Doležalová, L.

    1999-01-01

    The advanced method consists in implantation—labelling of the thin surface layers of the solid objects, e.g. hard tooth tissue, by atoms of suitable natural or artificial radionuclides. Nuclides from the uranium series were implanted into the surface by using nuclear recoil effect at alpha decay of 226Ra to 222Rn, alpha decay of 222Rn to RaA, alpha decay of RaA to RaB (beta-emitter) and further alpha or beta emitters. With regard to chosen alpha detection and to the half—lives of the radionuclides, there was actually measured the activity of 222Rn, RaA and RaC’ in the thin surface layer. This was followed by the laboratory simulation of the abrasion in the system of “toothbrush—various suspensions of the tooth-pastes—hard tooth tissue (or material standard—ivory)” in specially designed device—the dentoabrasionmeter. The activities of the tissue surface measured before and after abrasion were used for calculations of the relative drop of the surface activity. On this basis the influence of various tooth-pastes containing various abrasive substances was determined.

  8. Tooth number, World War II, nuns, and the real fountain of youth.

    PubMed

    Warpeha, Walter S

    2014-01-01

    A new appreciation for the direct relationship of mouth health to systemic health is forcing re-evaluation of previous concepts of oral health strategies. Although a person shows adaptation to loss of some permanent teeth, it appears a threshold of 10 functional pairs or 20 teeth have linkage to a number of disabling diseases of aging. The Shortened Dental Arch concept has limitations for sustainability and leaves little functional cushion. Nevertheless, when teeth are lost leaving fewer than 20, systemic disease and mortality risk increase significantly. Several theories try to explain the phenomenon. An unusually credible study, however, changes the metric to fewer teeth, nine or less, before a cognitive decline is noted. Due to a standardized high level of prosthodontic treatment in that study, some of the deleterious health effects of tooth loss appear to be mitigated. The importance of these findings has implications for tooth replacement strategies. Recognizing the huge biologic and psychological cost of tooth loss, a renewed emphasis to maintain natural teeth is indicated. When fewer than 20 teeth are viable, well-made prosthodontics, including maxillary complete denture or a mandibular partial or overdenture, both tooth- and implant-supported, could be remunerative therapies. PMID:24683924

  9. Three Ways To Be a Saber-Toothed Cat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, L. D.; Babiarz, J. P.; Naples, V. L.; Hearst, J.

    Saber-toothed carnivores, until now, have been divided into two groups: scimitar-toothed cats with shorter, coarsely serrated canines coupled with long legs for fast running, and dirk-toothed cats with more elongate, finely serrated canines coupled to short legs built for power rather than speed. In the Pleistocene of North America, as in Europe, the scimitar-cat was Homotherium; the North American dirk-tooth was Smilodon. We now describe a new sabercat from the Early Pleistocene of Florida, combining the scimitar-tooth canine with the short, massive limbs of a dirk-tooth predator. This presents a third way to construct a saber-toothed carnivore.

  10. Critical appraisal. In-office tooth whitening: pulpal effects and tooth sensitivity issues.

    PubMed

    Kwon, So Ran; Swift, Edward J

    2014-01-01

    In-office bleaching is an effective method for whitening teeth.Tooth sensitivity associated with in-office whitening is reversible and may range from mild to considerable. The incidence and severity of tooth sensitivity can be reduced by pretreatment with a desensitizer such as potassium nitrate. Histologic studies and clinical studies on long-term pulpal effects are lacking to definitively support the safety of in-office tooth whitening. Future studies on the etiology of tooth sensitivity related to whitening might greatly improve the means of preventing and managing this side effect.

  11. Robust tooth surface reconstruction by iterative deformation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaotong; Dai, Ning; Cheng, Xiaosheng; Wang, Jun; Peng, Qingjin; Liu, Hao; Cheng, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Digital design technologies have been applied extensively in dental medicine, especially in the field of dental restoration. The all-ceramic crown is an important restoration type of dental CAD systems. This paper presents a robust tooth surface reconstruction algorithm for all-ceramic crown design. The algorithm involves three necessary steps: standard tooth initial positioning and division; salient feature point extraction using Morse theory; and standard tooth deformation using iterative Laplacian Surface Editing and mesh stitching. This algorithm can retain the morphological features of the tooth surface well. It is robust and suitable for almost all types of teeth, including incisor, canine, premolar, and molar. Moreover, it allows dental technicians to use their own preferred library teeth for reconstruction. The algorithm has been successfully integrated in our Dental CAD system, more than 1000 clinical cases have been tested to demonstrate the robustness and effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  12. The pattern of histogenesis and growth of tooth plates in larval stages of extant lungfish.

    PubMed

    Smith, M M

    1985-06-01

    Comparison of new data obtained in this study on Protopterus aethiopicus with that published on Protopterus aethiopicus and Neoceratodus forsteri has confirmed the suggestion that the pattern of histogenesis of tooth plates in the early larval stages is very similar in the two genera. These similarities are more apparent both when a common terminology is adopted, based on a topogenic classification, and when the fundamental assumption is made that a single morphogenetic system operates for all odontodes. The model to explain the structure of all vertebrate dentitions with separate teeth in single or multiple tooth rows has been found to apply to dipnoan dentitions with fused teeth in a composite tooth plate. In this model, the epithelial invagination surrounding the margins of the tooth plate represents the dental lamina and, where this is in contact with mesenchymal cells, cell clusters (protogerms) arise. From these protogerms new odontodes (teeth) may develop if factors to inhibit differentiation are not present. Sites for initiation of odontodes become restricted to the labial margins of existing ridges on the tooth plate. Experimental studies on mammalian tooth germs are discussed and a model proposed for control of odontogenesis and histogenesis in dipnoan dentitions. Patterns of growth of hypermineralised petrodentine have been analysed and shown to depend initially on the arrangement of odontodes, and subsequently upon the ability of special cells in the pulp to generate new and wider layers of petrodentine. The initial pattern of petrodentine depends upon the position of odontodes in the forming ridges of the tooth plate. Subsequent patterns of petrodentine depend upon the extent of replacement growth beneath the tritural surface. Specialised cells, petroblasts, secrete the petrodentine within a shell of dentine. These cells differentiate from cells of the dental papilla after odontoblasts have begun to form dentine. They are regarded as a unique type of

  13. Computer simulation of gear tooth manufacturing processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, Dimitri; Huston, Ronald L.

    1990-01-01

    The use of computer graphics to simulate gear tooth manufacturing procedures is discussed. An analytical basis for the simulation is established for spur gears. The simulation itself, however, is developed not only for spur gears, but for straight bevel gears as well. The applications of the developed procedure extend from the development of finite element models of heretofore intractable geometrical forms, to exploring the fabrication of nonstandard tooth forms.

  14. Tooth avulsions resulting from basketball net entanglement.

    PubMed

    Kumamoto, D P; Winters, J; Novickas, D; Mesa, K

    1997-09-01

    The authors conducted a survey of dentists reporting tooth avulsions from basketball net accidents. Although the number of people injured was small, the dental injuries were serious. In many cases, multiple teeth were avulsed as a result of the maxillary anterior teeth becoming entangled in the basketball net while the patients were attempting to slamdunk a basketball either on a lowered backboard or from a raised take-off area. The authors present recommendations for preventing tooth avulsions resulting from basketball net entanglement.

  15. A 3-year follow-up study of all-ceramic single and multiple crowns performed in a private practice: a prospective case series

    PubMed Central

    Tartaglia, Gianluca M.; Sidoti, Ernesto; Sforza, Chiarella

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Zirconia-based prostheses are commonly used for aesthetic crown and fixed restorations, although follow-up data are limited, especially for implant-supported crowns. The aim of this study was to evaluate the three-year clinical results of the installation of 463 zirconia core crowns by a general dental private practice. METHODS: This study followed 142 patients (69 men and 73 women; aged 28-82 years) who had received 248 single crowns (202 tooth-supported, 36 implant-supported) and 225 multiple units of up to six elements (81 tooth-supported, 144 implant-supported). Clinical events, including fracture and loss of retention, secondary caries, and marginal integrity, were recorded. The overall failure rate was computed for the fractured and lost prostheses. Aesthetic, functional, and biological properties were rated, and patient satisfaction was investigated. RESULTS: During the three-year follow-up period, four patients were lost from the study (18 crowns, 4% of the total crowns). Three of the zirconia prostheses suffered fractures in more than three units (11 crowns; one- vs. three-year follow-up, p<0.05, Wilcoxon signed-rank test), and the cumulative prosthesis survival rate was 98.2%. Twelve units lost retention and were re-cemented, and no secondary caries of the abutment teeth were reported. The aesthetic, functional, and biological properties were generally well-rated, and there were no differences between tooth- and implant-supported crowns. The lowest scores were given regarding the anatomical form of the crowns, as some minor chipping was reported. Relatively low scores were also given for the periodontal response and the adjacent mucosa. Overall, patient satisfaction was high. CONCLUSIONS: At the three-year follow-up, the zirconia-core crowns appeared to be an effective clinical solution as they had favorable aesthetic and functional properties. Only the marginal fit of the prostheses should be improved upon. PMID:22189731

  16. Osseointegration of zirconia implants compared with titanium: an in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Depprich, Rita; Zipprich, Holger; Ommerborn, Michelle; Naujoks, Christian; Wiesmann, Hans-Peter; Kiattavorncharoen, Sirichai; Lauer, Hans-Christoph; Meyer, Ulrich; Kübler, Norbert R; Handschel, Jörg

    2008-01-01

    Background Titanium and titanium alloys are widely used for fabrication of dental implants. Since the material composition and the surface topography of a biomaterial play a fundamental role in osseointegration, various chemical and physical surface modifications have been developed to improve osseous healing. Zirconia-based implants were introduced into dental implantology as an altenative to titanium implants. Zirconia seems to be a suitable implant material because of its tooth-like colour, its mechanical properties and its biocompatibility. As the osseointegration of zirconia implants has not been extensively investigated, the aim of this study was to compare the osseous healing of zirconia implants with titanium implants which have a roughened surface but otherwise similar implant geometries. Methods Forty-eight zirconia and titanium implants were introduced into the tibia of 12 minipigs. After 1, 4 or 12 weeks, animals were sacrificed and specimens containing the implants were examined in terms of histological and ultrastructural techniques. Results Histological results showed direct bone contact on the zirconia and titanium surfaces. Bone implant contact as measured by histomorphometry was slightly better on titanium than on zirconia surfaces. However, a statistically significant difference between the two groups was not observed. Conclusion The results demonstrated that zirconia implants with modified surfaces result in an osseointegration which is comparable with that of titanium implants. PMID:19077228

  17. Cracked tooth syndrome: Overview of literature

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Shamimul; Singh, Kuldeep; Salati, Naseer

    2015-01-01

    Pain is defined as an “unpleasant sensory and emotional feeling which is associated with actual or potential injury of tissue or expressed in terms of such injury.” Tooth pain usually refers to pain around the teeth or jaws mainly as a result of a dental condition. Mostly, toothaches are caused by a carious cavity, a broken tooth, an exposed tooth root or gum disease. The toothache may sometimes be the result of radiating pain from structures in the vicinity of tooth and jaws (cardiac pain, ear, nose, throat pain, and sinusitis). Therefore, evaluation by both dentists and physicians are sometimes necessary to diagnose medical illnesses causing “toothache.” Cracked tooth syndrome is a major diagnostic challenge in clinical practice. Accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment are complicated due to lack of awareness of this condition and its bizarre clinical features. Early diagnosis has been linked with successful restorative management and good prognosis. This article provides a detailed literature on the causes, classification, signs and symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment planning of cracked tooth syndrome. PMID:26539363

  18. Ultrasonographic Detection of Tooth Flaws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoncini, C. A.; Hinders, M. K.; Ghorayeb, S. R.

    2010-02-01

    The goal of our work is to adapt pulse-echo ultrasound into a high resolution imaging modality for early detection of oral diseases and for monitoring treatment outcome. In this talk we discuss our preliminary results in the detection of: demineralization of the enamel and dentin, demineralization or caries under and around existing restorations, caries on occlusal and interproximal surfaces, cracks of enamel and dentin, calculus, and periapical lesions. In vitro immersion tank experiments are compared to results from a handpiece which uses a compliant delay line to couple the ultrasound to the tooth surface. Because the waveform echoes are complex, and in order to make clinical interpretation of ultrasonic waveform data in real time, it is necessary to automatically interpret the signals. We apply the dynamic wavelet fingerprint algorithms to identify and delineate echographic features that correspond to the flaws of interest in teeth. The resulting features show a clear distinction between flawed and unflawed waveforms collected with an ultrasonic handpiece on both phantom and human cadaver teeth.

  19. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

    PubMed Central

    Manganelli, Fiore; Nolano, Maria; Pisciotta, Chiara; Provitera, Vincenzo; Fabrizi, Gian M.; Cavallaro, Tiziana; Stancanelli, Annamaria; Caporaso, Giuseppe; Shy, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate, by skin biopsy, dermal nerve fibers in 31 patients with 3 common Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) genotypes (CMT1A, late-onset CMT1B, and CMTX1), and rarer forms of CMT caused by mutations in RAB7 (CMT2B), TRPV4 (CMT2C), and GDAP1 (AR-CMT2K) genes. Methods: We investigated axonal loss by quantifying Meissner corpuscles and intrapapillary myelinated endings and evaluated morphometric changes in myelinated dermal nerve fibers by measuring fiber caliber, internodal, and nodal gap length. Results: The density of both Meissner corpuscles and intrapapillary myelinated endings was reduced in skin samples from patients with CMT1A and all the other CMT genotypes. Nodal gaps were larger in all the CMT genotypes though widening was greater in CMT1A. Perhaps an altered communication between axons and glia may be a common feature for multiple forms of CMT. Internodal lengths were shorter in all the CMT genotypes, and patients with CMT1A had the shortest internodes of all our patients. The uniformly shortened internodes in all the CMT genotypes suggest that mutations in both myelin and axon genes may developmentally impede internode formation. The extent of internodal shortening and nodal gap widening are likely both important in determining nerve conduction velocities in CMT. Conclusions: This study extends the information gained from skin biopsies on morphologic abnormalities in various forms of CMT and provides insights into potential pathomechanisms of axonal and demyelinating CMT. PMID:26362287

  20. Variations in pulp/tooth area ratio as an indicator of age: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Cameriere, Roberto; Ferrante, Luigi; Cingolani, Mariano

    2004-03-01

    This paper details a method for age determination of adults from single rooted teeth. The sample consisted of 100 Italian white Caucasian patients (46 men, 54 women) aged between 18 and 72 years. The single rooted maxillary right canine was utilized in this preliminary study. Pulp/root ration, tooth length, pulp/tooth length ratio, pulp/tooth area and pulp/root width ratios at three different levels were computed. Pearson's correlation coefficients between age and these variables showed that the ratio between pulp and tooth area correlated best with age (r2 = 0.85). Stepwise multiple regression models yielded a linear relationship between pulp/root width at mid-root level and chronological age and a linear relationship when pulp/tooth area was compared to age. Statistical analysis indicated that these two variables explain 84.9% of variations in estimated chronological age. The median of the absolute value of residual errors between actual and estimated ages was less than four years.

  1. Immediate dental implant placement with immediate loading following extraction of natural teeth

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Mayank; Kumar, Lakshya; Anwar, Mohd.; Chand, Pooran

    2015-01-01

    The loss of tooth in the esthetic area is often a traumatic experience for the patient. Patients may suffer real or perceived detrimental effects following the loss of one or more teeth. Dental implant offers the most cost-effective and long-term solution for replacement of missing teeth with high average life expectancy, providing the patient with the best sense of security and well-being. Recently, immediate implant placement after extraction of tooth with early loading has become more common. The advantages of this procedure include fewer surgical interventions, reduction in overall treatment time, reduced soft and hard tissue loss, and psychological satisfaction to the patient. This case report describes the procedure for immediate implant placement with immediate loading of implants by provisional restorations. PMID:27390509

  2. Patterning the size and number of tooth and its cusps.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jinglei; Cho, Sung-Won; Kim, Jae-Young; Lee, Min-Jung; Cha, Yoon-Geun; Jung, Han-Sung

    2007-04-15

    Mice and rats, two species of rodents, show some dental similarities such as tooth number and cusp number, and differences such as tooth size and cusp size. In this study, the tooth size, tooth number, cusp size and cusp number, which are four major factors of the tooth patterning, were investigated by the heterospecific recombinations of tissues from the molar tooth germs of mice and rats. Our results suggest that the dental epithelium and mesenchyme determine the cusp size and tooth size respectively and the cusp number is co-regulated by the tooth size and cusp size. It is also suggested that the mesenchymal cell number regulates not the tooth size but the tooth number. The relationships among these factors in tooth patterning including micropatterning (cusp size and cusp number) and macropatterning (tooth size and tooth number) were analyzed in a reaction diffusion mechanism. Key molecules determining the patterning of teeth remains to be elucidated for controlling the tooth size and cusp size of bioengineered tooth.

  3. Paresthesia of the mental nerve stem from periapical infection of mandibular canine tooth: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ozkan, Birkan Taha; Celik, Salih; Durmus, Ercan

    2008-05-01

    Sensory disturbances such as paresthesia, anesthesia, hypoesthesia, and hyperesthesia may be present in the oral cavity. Paresthesia is defined as a burning or prickling sensation or partial numbness caused by neural injury. Paresthesia in dentistry can be caused by local or systemic factors. Local factors include traumatic injuries such as mandibular fractures, expanding compressive lesions (benign or malignant neoplasia and cysts), impacted teeth, local infections (osteomyelitis, periapical, and peri-implant infections), iatrogenic lesions after tooth extractions, anesthetic injection, endodontic therapy (overfilling and apical surgery), implantology, orthodontic surgery, and preprosthetic surgery. The main purpose of this case report is to present the treatment and resolution of a mental nerve paresthesia stemming from apical pathosis of a mandibular canine tooth and the follow-up of 3 years. PMID:18442732

  4. Cochlear implants in young children.

    PubMed

    Niparko, John K; Blankenhorn, Rebecca

    2003-01-01

    The cochlear implant is best characterized as a device that provides access to the sound environment. The device enables the hearing pathway to respond to environmental and speech sounds, providing informational cues from the surroundings and from others that may escape visual detection. As the developmental effects of a profound hearing loss are multiple, cochlear implants have been applied to ever younger children in an attempt to promote a more normal level of developmental learning through audition. In deafness, transducer elements of the inner ear fail to trigger auditory nerve afferent nerves in the presence of sound input. However, large reserves of afferent fibers exist even in the auditory nerve of a profoundly deaf patient. Furthermore, these nerve fibers retain the ability to respond to prosthetic activation. Through developmental learning in the early, formative years, auditory centers of the brain appear capable of processing information from the implant to provide speech comprehension and oral language development. Multichannel implants have replaced original single channel designs. multichannel devices enable larger percentages of recipients to recognize the spoken word without visual cues because they provide spectral information in addition to temporal and intensity cues. Testing under conditions of auditory (implant)-only input reveals significant open-set speech understanding capabilities in more than 75% of children after three years of device use. The benefit provided by implants may vary with a number of conditions including: hearing history, age of deafness onset, age at implantation, etiology of deafness, linguistic abilities, and the presence of a motivated system of support of oral language development. Patient variables should be given individual consideration in judging candidacy for a cochlear implant and in planning rehabilitative and education services after surgery and activation of the device.

  5. Ridge Preservation for Implant Therapy: a Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Tomlin, Elizabeth M; Nelson, Shelby J; Rossmann, Jeffrey A

    2014-01-01

    Healing of the extraction socket after tooth removal involves retention of the blood clot followed by a sequence of events that lead to changes in the alveolar process in a three dimensional fashion. This normal healing event results in a minimal loss of vertical height (around 1 mm), but a substantial loss of width in the buccal-lingual plane (4-6 mm). During the first three months following extraction that loss has been shown to be significant and may result in both a hard tissue and soft tissue deformity affecting the ability to restore the site with acceptable esthetics. Procedures that reduce the resorptive process have been shown to be predictable and potentially capable of eliminating secondary surgery for site preparation when implant therapy is planned. The key element is prior planning by the dental therapist to act at the time of extraction to prevent the collapse of the ridge due to the loss of the alveolus. Several techniques have been employed as ridge preservation procedures involving the use of bone grafts, barrier membranes and biologics to provide a better restorative outcome. This review will explore the evidence behind each technique and their efficacy in accomplishing site preparation. The literature does not identify a single technique as superior to others; however, all accepted therapeutic procedures for ridge preservation have been shown to be more effective than blood clot alone in randomized controlled studies. PMID:24893595

  6. Clinical evaluation of immediate loading of titanium orthodontic implants

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, S.S.; Chakranarayan, A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Skeletal anchorage using dental implants, miniplates, miniscrews and microscrews provides an absolute anchorage for tooth movement. Miniscrew and microscrew implants have many benefits such as ease of placement and removal and immediate orthodontic force application. Methods Fifteen subjects in the permanent dentition with an overjet ≥6 mm received treatment with the 0.018-inch pre-adjusted edgewise appliance system (Roth prescription) and extraction of all first premolars. Titanium orthodontic implants were placed in both the upper quadrants and were immediately loaded with elastic chain from the implant head to the sectional arch wire. Result The overall success rate of immediate loaded titanium orthodontic micro implants (OMI) in the present study was 83.33%, with a mean chairside time of 15.33 min of placing two implants in each patient. Peri-implant inflammation was the only complication observed. Most failures were in the initial part of the study. There was no significant difference in the success rate of implants based on sex, side of placement (right or left) and type of malocclusion. Conclusion The OMIs used in the present study proved to be effective and well tolerated in producing immediate orthodontic anchorage for the retraction. PMID:25859080

  7. Tooth model reconstruction based upon data fusion for orthodontic treatment simulation.

    PubMed

    Yau, Hong-Tzong; Yang, Tsan-Jui; Chen, Yi-Chen

    2014-05-01

    This paper proposes a full tooth reconstruction method by integrating 3D scanner data and computed tomography (CT) image sets. In traditional dental treatment, plaster models are used to record patient׳s oral information and assist dentists for diagnoses. However, plaster models only save surface information, and are therefore unable to provide further information for clinical treatment. With the rapid development of medical imaging technology, computed tomography images have become very popular in dental treatment. Computed tomography images with complete internal information can assist the clinical diagnosis for dental implants or orthodontic treatment, and a digital dental model can be used to simulate and predict results before treatment. However, a method of producing a high quality and precise dental model has yet to be developed. To this end, this paper presents a tooth reconstruction method based on the data fusion concept via integrating external scanned data and CT-based medical images. First, a plaster model is digitized with a 3D scanner. Then, each crown can be separated from the base according to the characteristics of tooth. CT images must be processed for feature enhancement and noise reduction, and to define the tooth axis direction which will be used for root slicing. The outline of each slice of dental root can then be determined by the level set algorithm, and converted to point cloud data. Finally, the crown and root data can be registered by the iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm. With this information, a complete digital dental model can be reconstructed by the Delaunay-based region-growing (DBRG) algorithm. The main contribution of this paper is to reconstruct a high quality customized dental model with root information that can offer significant help to the planning of dental implant and orthodontic treatment. PMID:24631784

  8. Aesthetic Rehabilitation of a Complicated Crown-Root Fracture of the Maxillary Incisor: Combination of Orthodontic and Implant Treatment

    PubMed Central

    de Avila, Érica Dorigatti; de Molon, Rafael Scaf; Cardoso, Mauricio de Almeida; Capelozza Filho, Leopoldino; Campos Velo, Marilia Mattar de Amoêdo; Mollo, Francisco de Assis; Borelli Barros, Luiz Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a complex rehabilitation, of fractured tooth, with implants in anterior region considering the orthodontics extrusion to clinical success. At 7 years old, the patient fractured the maxillary left central incisor and the dentist did a crown with the fragment. Twenty years later, the patient was referred to a dental clinic for orthodontic treatment, with the chief complaint related to an accentuated deep bite, and a professional started an orthodontic treatment. After sixteen months of orthodontic treatment, tooth 21 fractured. The treatment plan included an orthodontic extrusion of tooth 21 and implant placement. This case has been followed up and the clinical and radiographic examinations show excellence esthetic results and satisfaction of patient. The forced extrusion can be a viable treatment option in the management of crown root fracture of an anterior tooth to gain bone in a vertical direction. This case emphasizes that to achieve the esthetic result a multidisciplinary approach is necessary. PMID:24872900

  9. Graphene oxide scaffold accelerates cellular proliferative response and alveolar bone healing of tooth extraction socket

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Erika; Miyaji, Hirofumi; Kato, Akihito; Takita, Hiroko; Iwanaga, Toshihiko; Momose, Takehito; Ogawa, Kosuke; Murakami, Shusuke; Sugaya, Tsutomu; Kawanami, Masamitsu

    2016-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) consisting of a carbon monolayer has been widely investigated for tissue engineering platforms because of its unique properties. For this study, we fabricated a GO-applied scaffold and assessed the cellular and tissue behaviors in the scaffold. A preclinical test was conducted to ascertain whether the GO scaffold promoted bone induction in dog tooth extraction sockets. For this study, GO scaffolds were prepared by coating the surface of a collagen sponge scaffold with 0.1 and 1 µg/mL GO dispersion. Scaffolds were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), physical testing, cell seeding, and rat subcutaneous implant testing. Then a GO scaffold was implanted into a dog tooth extraction socket. Histological observations were made at 2 weeks postsurgery. SEM observations show that GO attached to the surface of collagen scaffold struts. The GO scaffold exhibited an interconnected structure resembling that of control subjects. GO application improved the physical strength, enzyme resistance, and adsorption of calcium and proteins. Cytocompatibility tests showed that GO application significantly increased osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cell proliferation. In addition, an assessment of rat subcutaneous tissue response revealed that implantation of 1 µg/mL GO scaffold stimulated cellular ingrowth behavior, suggesting that the GO scaffold exhibited good biocompatibility. The tissue ingrowth area and DNA contents of 1 µg/mL GO scaffold were, respectively, approximately 2.5-fold and 1.4-fold greater than those of the control. Particularly, the infiltration of ED2-positive (M2) macrophages and blood vessels were prominent in the GO scaffold. Dog bone-formation tests showed that 1 µg/mL GO scaffold implantation enhanced bone formation. New bone formation following GO scaffold implantation was enhanced fivefold compared to that in control subjects. These results suggest that GO was biocompatible and had high bone-formation capability for the scaffold

  10. Graphene oxide scaffold accelerates cellular proliferative response and alveolar bone healing of tooth extraction socket.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Erika; Miyaji, Hirofumi; Kato, Akihito; Takita, Hiroko; Iwanaga, Toshihiko; Momose, Takehito; Ogawa, Kosuke; Murakami, Shusuke; Sugaya, Tsutomu; Kawanami, Masamitsu

    2016-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) consisting of a carbon monolayer has been widely investigated for tissue engineering platforms because of its unique properties. For this study, we fabricated a GO-applied scaffold and assessed the cellular and tissue behaviors in the scaffold. A preclinical test was conducted to ascertain whether the GO scaffold promoted bone induction in dog tooth extraction sockets. For this study, GO scaffolds were prepared by coating the surface of a collagen sponge scaffold with 0.1 and 1 µg/mL GO dispersion. Scaffolds were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), physical testing, cell seeding, and rat subcutaneous implant testing. Then a GO scaffold was implanted into a dog tooth extraction socket. Histological observations were made at 2 weeks postsurgery. SEM observations show that GO attached to the surface of collagen scaffold struts. The GO scaffold exhibited an interconnected structure resembling that of control subjects. GO application improved the physical strength, enzyme resistance, and adsorption of calcium and proteins. Cytocompatibility tests showed that GO application significantly increased osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cell proliferation. In addition, an assessment of rat subcutaneous tissue response revealed that implantation of 1 µg/mL GO scaffold stimulated cellular ingrowth behavior, suggesting that the GO scaffold exhibited good biocompatibility. The tissue ingrowth area and DNA contents of 1 µg/mL GO scaffold were, respectively, approximately 2.5-fold and 1.4-fold greater than those of the control. Particularly, the infiltration of ED2-positive (M2) macrophages and blood vessels were prominent in the GO scaffold. Dog bone-formation tests showed that 1 µg/mL GO scaffold implantation enhanced bone formation. New bone formation following GO scaffold implantation was enhanced fivefold compared to that in control subjects. These results suggest that GO was biocompatible and had high bone-formation capability for the scaffold

  11. A 5-year randomized trial to compare 1 or 2 implants for implant overdentures.

    PubMed

    Bryant, S R; Walton, J N; MacEntee, M I

    2015-01-01

    The hypothesis of this 5-y randomized clinical trial was that there would be no significant difference in the satisfaction of edentulous participants with removable complete overdentures attached to 1 or 2 mandibular implants. Secondary aims were to test changes in satisfaction between and within the groups from baseline to 5 y and differences between the groups in implant survival and prosthodontic maintenance over 5 y. Each of the 86 participants (mean age, 67 y) was randomly allocated to receive either 1 implant in the midline (group 1) or 2 implants in the canine areas (group 2) attached to a mandibular overdenture opposing a maxillary complete denture. Satisfaction was self-assessed by participants on a visual analog scale at baseline prior to implants, as well as at 2 mo and 1, 3, and 5 y with implant overdentures, whereas implant survival and prosthodontic maintenance were assessed by clinical examination. After 5 y, 29 participants in group 1 and 33 in group 2 were available, with most dropouts due to death. Satisfaction with the implant denture after 5 y was significantly (P < 0.001) higher than at baseline in both groups and remained with no significant difference (P = 0.32) between the groups. No implants failed in group 1 but 5 failed before loading in 4 participants in group 2. Most participants required maintenance or occasionally denture replacement, and although differences between the groups were not statistically significant, group 1 experienced almost twice as many fractured dentures usually adjacent to the implant attachment. We conclude that there were no significant differences after 5 y in satisfaction or survival of implants with mandibular overdentures retained by 1 implant or 2 implants. Additional research is required to confirm long-term treatment effectiveness of single-implant dentures and the implications of prosthetic maintenance with implant overdentures (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02117856).

  12. A comparison of the implant stability among various implant systems: clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Min; Kim, Sun-Jong; Han, Inho; Shin, Sang-Wan

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE To determine the change in stability of single-stage, three different design of implant systems in humans utilizing resonance frequency analysis for early healing period (24 weeks), without loading. MATERIAL AND METHODS Twenty-five patients were included into this study. A total of 45 implants, three different design of implant systems (group A,C,R) were placed in the posterior maxilla or mandible. The specific transducer for each implant system was used. ISQ (implant stability quotient) reading were obtained for each implant at the time of surgery, 3, 6, 8, 10, 12, 24 weeks postoperatively. Data were analyzed for different implant type, bone type, healing time, anatomical locations. RESULTS For each implant system, a two-factor mixed-model ANOVA demonstrated that a significant effect on ISQ values (group A = 0.0022, C = 0.017, R = 0.0018). For each implant system, in a two-factor mixed model ANOVA, and two-sample t-test, the main effect of jaw position (P > .005) on ISQ values were not significant. CONCLUSIONS All the implant groups A, C and R, the change patterns of ISQ over time differed by bone type. Implant stability increased greatly between week 0 and week six and showed slow increase between week six and six months (plateau effect). PMID:21165252

  13. Tooth Wear Prevalence and Sample Size Determination : A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Abd. Karim, Nama Bibi Saerah; Ismail, Noorliza Mastura; Naing, Lin; Ismail, Abdul Rashid

    2008-01-01

    Tooth wear is the non-carious loss of tooth tissue, which results from three processes namely attrition, erosion and abrasion. These can occur in isolation or simultaneously. Very mild tooth wear is a physiological effect of aging. This study aims to estimate the prevalence of tooth wear among 16-year old Malay school children and determine a feasible sample size for further study. Fifty-five subjects were examined clinically, followed by the completion of self-administered questionnaires. Questionnaires consisted of socio-demographic and associated variables for tooth wear obtained from the literature. The Smith and Knight tooth wear index was used to chart tooth wear. Other oral findings were recorded using the WHO criteria. A software programme was used to determine pathological tooth wear. About equal ratio of male to female were involved. It was found that 18.2% of subjects have no tooth wear, 63.6% had very mild tooth wear, 10.9% mild tooth wear, 5.5% moderate tooth wear and 1.8 % severe tooth wear. In conclusion 18.2% of subjects were deemed to have pathological tooth wear (mild, moderate & severe). Exploration with all associated variables gave a sample size ranging from 560 – 1715. The final sample size for further study greatly depends on available time and resources. PMID:22589636

  14. Malformations of the tooth root in humans.

    PubMed

    Luder, Hans U

    2015-01-01

    The most common root malformations in humans arise from either developmental disorders of the root alone or disorders of radicular development as part of a general tooth dysplasia. The aim of this review is to relate the characteristics of these root malformations to potentially disrupted processes involved in radicular morphogenesis. Radicular morphogenesis proceeds under the control of Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS) which determines the number, length, and shape of the root, induces the formation of radicular dentin, and participates in the development of root cementum. Formation of HERS at the transition from crown to root development appears to be very insensitive to adverse effects, with the result that rootless teeth are extremely rare. In contrast, shortened roots as a consequence of impaired or prematurely halted apical growth of HERS constitute the most prevalent radicular dysplasia which occurs due to trauma and unknown reasons as well as in association with dentin disorders. While odontoblast differentiation inevitably stops when growth of HERS is arrested, it seems to be unaffected even in cases of severe dentin dysplasias such as regional odontodysplasia and dentin dysplasia type I. As a result radicular dentin formation is at least initiated and progresses for a limited time. The only condition affecting cementogenesis is hypophosphatasia which disrupts the formation of acellular cementum through an inhibition of mineralization. A process particularly susceptible to adverse effects appears to be the formation of the furcation in multirooted teeth. Impairment or disruption of this process entails taurodontism, single-rooted posterior teeth, and misshapen furcations. Thus, even though many characteristics of human root malformations can be related to disorders of specific processes involved in radicular morphogenesis, precise inferences as to the pathogenesis of these dysplasias are hampered by the still limited knowledge on root formation

  15. Malformations of the tooth root in humans

    PubMed Central

    Luder, Hans U.

    2015-01-01

    The most common root malformations in humans arise from either developmental disorders of the root alone or disorders of radicular development as part of a general tooth dysplasia. The aim of this review is to relate the characteristics of these root malformations to potentially disrupted processes involved in radicular morphogenesis. Radicular morphogenesis proceeds under the control of Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS) which determines the number, length, and shape of the root, induces the formation of radicular dentin, and participates in the development of root cementum. Formation of HERS at the transition from crown to root development appears to be very insensitive to adverse effects, with the result that rootless teeth are extremely rare. In contrast, shortened roots as a consequence of impaired or prematurely halted apical growth of HERS constitute the most prevalent radicular dysplasia which occurs due to trauma and unknown reasons as well as in association with dentin disorders. While odontoblast differentiation inevitably stops when growth of HERS is arrested, it seems to be unaffected even in cases of severe dentin dysplasias such as regional odontodysplasia and dentin dysplasia type I. As a result radicular dentin formation is at least initiated and progresses for a limited time. The only condition affecting cementogenesis is hypophosphatasia which disrupts the formation of acellular cementum through an inhibition of mineralization. A process particularly susceptible to adverse effects appears to be the formation of the furcation in multirooted teeth. Impairment or disruption of this process entails taurodontism, single-rooted posterior teeth, and misshapen furcations. Thus, even though many characteristics of human root malformations can be related to disorders of specific processes involved in radicular morphogenesis, precise inferences as to the pathogenesis of these dysplasias are hampered by the still limited knowledge on root formation

  16. An evolutionary view on tooth development and replacement in wild Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.).

    PubMed

    Huysseune, A; Witten, P E

    2008-01-01

    To gain an insight into the evolution of tooth replacement mechanisms, we studied the development of first-generation and replacement teeth on the dentary of wild Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.), a protacanthopterygian teleost, using serially sectioned heads of early posthatching stages as well as adults. First-generation teeth develop within the oral epithelium. The anlage of the replacement tooth is first seen as a placode-like thickening of the outer dental epithelium of the predecessor, at its lingual and caudal side. Ongoing development of the replacement tooth germ is characterized by the elaboration of a population of epithelial cells, termed here the middle dental epithelium, apposed to the inner dental epithelium on the lingual side of the tooth germ. Before the formation of the new successor, a single-layered outer dental epithelium segregates from the middle dental epithelium. The dental organs of the predecessor and the successor remain broadly interconnected. The absence of a discrete successional dental lamina in salmon stands in sharp contrast to what is observed in other teleosts, even those that share with salmon the extraosseous formation of replacement teeth. The mode of tooth replacement in Atlantic salmon displays several characters similar to those observed in the shark Squalus acanthias. To interpret similarities in tooth replacement between Atlantic salmon and chondrichthyans as a case of convergence, or to see them as a result of a heterochronic shift, requires knowledge on the replacement process in more basal actinopterygian lineages. The possibility that the middle dental epithelium functionally substitutes for a successional lamina, and could be a source of stem cells, whose descendants subsequently contribute to the placode of the new replacement tooth, needs to be explored.

  17. Clinical Performance and Safety of 108 SpineJack Implantations: 1-Year Results of a Prospective Multicentre Single-Arm Registry Study

    PubMed Central

    Noriega, David; Maestretti, Gianluca; Renaud, Christian; Francaviglia, Natale; Ould-Slimane, Mourad; Queinnec, Steffen; Ekkerlein, Helmut; Hassel, Frank; Gumpert, Rainer; Sabatier, Pascal; Huet, Hervé; Plasencia, Miguel; Theumann, Nicolas; Kunsky, Alexander; Krüger, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    This prospective, consecutive, multicentre observational registry aimed to confirm the safety and clinical performance of the SpineJack system for the treatment of vertebral compression fractures (VCF) of traumatic origin. We enrolled 103 patients (median age: 61.6 years) with 108 VCF due to trauma, or traumatic VCF with associated osteoporosis. Primary outcome was back pain intensity (VAS). Secondary outcomes were Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), EuroQol-VAS, and analgesic consumption. 48 hours after surgery, a median relative decrease in pain intensity of 81.5% was observed associated with a significant reduction in analgesic intake. Improvements in disability (91.3% decrease in ODI score) and in quality of life (increase 21.1% of EQ-VAS score) were obtained 3 months after surgery. All results were maintained at 12 months. A reduction in the kyphotic angulation was observed postoperatively (−5.4 ± 6.3°; p < 0.001), remained at 12 months (−4.4 ± 6.0°, p = 0.002). No adverse events were implant-related and none required device removal. Three patients (2.9%) experienced procedure-related complications. The overall adjacent fracture rate up to 1 year after surgery was 2.9%. The SpineJack procedure is an effective, low-risk procedure for patients with traumatic VCF allowing a fast and sustained improvement in quality of life over 1 year after surgery. PMID:26844224

  18. Transfemoral Aortic Valve Implantation with the New Edwards Sapien 3 Valve for Treatment of Severe Aortic Stenosis—Impact of Valve Size in a Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Wöhrle, Jochen; Gonska, Birgid; Rodewald, Christoph; Seeger, Julia; Scharnbeck, Dominik; Rottbauer, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Aims The third generation Edwards Sapien 3 (Edwards Lifesciences Inc., Irvine, California) system was optimized to reduce residual aortic regurgitation and vascular complications. Methods and Results 235 patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis were prospectively enrolled. Transcatheter aortic valve implantations (TAVI) were performed without general anesthesia by transfemoral approach. Patients were followed for 30 days. Patients received 23mm (N = 77), 26mm (N = 91) or 29mm (N = 67) valve based on pre-procedural 256 multislice computer tomography. Mean oversizing did not differ between the 3 valves. There was no residual moderate or severe aortic regurgitation. Rate of mild aortic regurgitation and regurgitation index did not differ between groups. There was no switch to general anesthesia or conversion to surgery. Rate of major vascular complication was 3.0% with no difference between valve and delivery sheath sizes. Within 30 days rates of all cause mortality (2.6%) and stroke (2.1%) were low. Conclusions In patients with severe aortic stenosis transfemoral TAVI with the Edwards Sapien 3 valve without general anesthesia was associated with a high rate of device success, no moderate or severe residual aortic regurgitation, low rates of major vascular complication, mortality and stroke within 30 days with no difference between the 3 valve sizes. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02162069 PMID:27003573

  19. The unicorn and the narwhal: a tale of the tooth.

    PubMed

    Christen, Arden G; Christen, Joan A

    2011-01-01

    From as far back as the early Roman era, detailed descriptions and artistic images of the unicorn have been imagined. In Europe, the Mediterranean and the Far East, this creature became accepted as real. Although such an animal had never actually been seen, it was said to have the appearance of a horse, the beard and cloven hooves of a goat, the tail of a lion, and a single, spear-like horn protruding from the center of its forehead. The unicorn myth originated shortly after unidentified horn-like objects, from six to ten feet long, began to appear in ancient European marketplaces. Physicians quickly ascribed outlandish healing properties to these horns, pulverizing them for the treatment of various diseases. In 1638, a Danish zoologist challenged these claims and provided evidence that the so-called "unicorn horn" was actually the tusk (tooth) of the narwhal from the Arctic seas. However, his findings remained unheeded for the next 100 years. This paper explains how the myth of the unicorn and the purported powers contained within the substance of its magical horn evolved from the ages-old spoils of the Arctic fishing trade, where the narwhal was primarily speared for food and secondarily, for the export value of its ivory tusk. This unusually long, pointed and protruding single tooth, which breaks through the upper lip and the left jaw of each male narwhal, became a highly valuable commodity over the following centuries, due to its believed supernatural origins and curative qualities.

  20. Amorphous calcium phosphates for tooth mineralization.

    PubMed

    Tung, Ming S; Eichmiller, Frederick C

    2004-09-01

    The destruction of tooth structure through caries and erosive processes is due to two types of acidic challenges that affect the tooth in different ways. Acidic attack by cariogenic bacteria initially produces subsurface lesions that weaken the enamel and, if left unchecked, can progress through the enamel and dentin and eventually into the pulpal cavity. Erosive attack by acidic foods and beverages removes mineral from the surface of enamel and initially causes dulling and loss of tooth luster; if left unchecked, it can progress to a more severe loss of enamel thickness and contour. This article focuses on the potential means of improving the cosmetic appearance of teeth by depositing mineral into surface defects. Several approaches use the unique properties of amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) compounds, which have the highest rates of formation and dissolution among all the calcium phosphates. ACP has been shown to rapidly hydrolyze to form apatite, similar to carbonated apatite, the tooth mineral. Products containing ACP or ingredients that form ACP can include toothpastes, mouth rinses, artificial saliva, chewing gums, topically applied coatings, and other vehicles for topical use. When applied, they readily precipitate ACPs on and into tooth-surface defects. These products hopefully will provide users with new tools to restore and enhance the smoothness and luster of their teeth.

  1. [Growth factors in human tooth development].

    PubMed

    Bellone, C; Barni, T; Pagni, L; Balboni, G C; Vannelli, G B

    1990-03-01

    Our research concerns the immunohistochemical localization of EGF and IGF-I receptors in the tooth germ, using monoclonal antibodies. The results show that in the early phases of human tooth development EGF and IGF-I receptors are present. At bud stage both receptors are localized at dental laminae level, in some epithelial cells of the tooth bud and in some mesenchymal cells. At cap stage the receptors are present in the outer and inner enamel epithelium, and in some cells of stellate reticulum. As far as concerns the mesenchymal cells, some cells of dental papilla in contact with enamel organ, are intensely positive. The immunopositivity is present also in some mesenchymal cells at follicular level. At late cap stage and at early bell stage receptors are not present at inner enamel epithelium level but they can be detectable in the mesenchyma of dental papilla and in some cells of the follicle. On the basis of these results it may be hypothesized that EGF and IGF-I can act as growth factors in the modulation of cellular proliferation and differentiation during the human tooth morphogenesis. Moreover, it is possible that these substances can play a role in the mesenchymal-epithelial interaction in the developing human tooth.

  2. Detecting Tooth Damage in Geared Drive Trains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nachtsheim, Philip R.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes a method that was developed to detect gear tooth damage that does not require a priori knowledge of the frequency characteristic of the fault. The basic idea of the method is that a few damaged teeth will cause transient load fluctuations unlike the normal tooth load fluctuations. The method attempts to measure the energy in the lower side bands of the modulated signal caused by the transient load fluctuations. The method monitors the energy in the frequency interval which excludes the frequency of the lowest dominant normal tooth load fluctuation and all frequencies above it. The method reacted significantly to the tooth fracture damage results documented in the Lewis data sets which were obtained from tests of the OH-58A transmission and tests of high contact ratio spiral bevel gears. The method detected gear tooth fractures in all four of the high contact ratio spiral bevel gear runs. Published results indicate other detection methods were only able to detect faults for three out of four runs.

  3. Thermoplastic inclined plane aligner for correction of bilateral mandibular canine tooth distoclusion in a cat.

    PubMed

    Blazejewski, Stanley W

    2013-01-01

    Mandibular brachygnathia was the etiology for moderate mandibular distoclusion and bilateral palatal canine cusp penetrations in a kitten. The course of treatment included deciduous canine tooth exodontia, tooth extensions, and ultimately, aligners that incorporated inclined planes fabricated from a thermoplastic sheet that was "indirectly" vacuum thermoformed over a dental model. The thin, flexible aligners fit over the rostral maxillary teeth and palate, and were retained by a snug fit on the slightly divergent maxillary canine teeth. Advantages over "directly" applied composite inclined planes include: serial gradations of angulations for more gradual tooth movement, elimination of dental trauma from composite adhesions and removals, owner-removable and cleanable appliances, and a single anesthetic event required for dental impressions. Five progressively angled aligners were used sequentially over a 3-month period to achieve atraumatic "clinical" neutroclusion of the rostral dentition.

  4. Age of an Indonesian Fossil Tooth Determined by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Bogard, JS

    2004-04-07

    The first fossil hominid tooth recovered during 1999 excavations from the Cisanca River region in West Java, Indonesia, was associated with a series of bovid teeth from a single individual that was recovered 190 cm beneath the hominid tooth. The age of the fossil bovid teeth was determined using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) analysis as part of an effort to bracket the age of the hominid tooth. The EPR-derived age of the bovid teeth is (5.16 {+-} 2.01) x 10{sup 5} years. However, the age estimate reported here is likely an underestimate of the actual age of deposition since evidence of heating was detected in the EPR spectra of the bovid teeth, and the heating may have caused a decrease in the intensity of EPR components on which the age calculation is based.

  5. [Signal processing in contour implants].

    PubMed

    Ormezzano, Y; Deleurme, C; Vormès, E; Frachet, B

    1990-01-01

    Signal processing by cochlear implants is aimed at transmitting all the acoustic information carried by the human voice, whether in its semantic, esthetic or affective aspects, as an electrical signal. The "translating" approach, which encodes the signal according to the characteristics of the sounds, can only be ideally used in multiple-canal implants. On the contrary, our experience with various single-canal prostheses shows that our patients choose one of these according to the comfort of the signal and to its reliability rather than to the complexity of signal processing: all prostheses produce approximately the same results, whatever the method implemented. The contour implant allows an easy, effective and well-tolerated fitting at low costs.

  6. MRI artefacts after Bonebridge implantation.

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, C; Mader, I; Arndt, S; Aschendorff, A; Laszig, R; Hassepass, F

    2014-07-01

    The new transcutaneous bone conduction implant (BCI) Bonebridge (BB, MED-EL) allows the skin to remain intact and therefore overcomes some issues related to percutaneous systems, such as skin reaction around the external screw and cosmetic complaints. According to manufacturer, BB is MRI conditional up to 1,5 Tesla (T). The artefact of the neurocranium after BB implantation is extensive as shown in the present report. This has to be taken into account when patients suffering conductive, mixed or single-sided hearing loss with candidacy for a BCI are counselled. In patients with comorbid intracranial tumour or other diseases of the brain that require imaging control scans with MRI percutaneous, BCI should be the implant of choice considering the very small artefact of the percutaneous screw in MRI.

  7. Group Distal Movement of Teeth using Micro-Screw–Implant Anchorage-A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This case report describes a case of orthodontic tooth movement of a 29-year-old female patient utilizing maxillary posterior edentulous area. Micro-implants were placed at buccal edentulous spaces and inter-radicular space for retraction of entire maxillary dentition. An overjet reduction of 8mm and good posterior occlusion were achieved. PMID:24995260

  8. Insights on Metal Based Dental Implants and their Interaction with the Surrounding Tissues.

    PubMed

    Popa, Marcela; Hussien, Mohamed D; Cirstea, Alexandra; Grigore, Raluca; Lazar, Veronica; Bezirtzoglou, Eugenia; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen; Sakizlian, Monica; Stavropoulou, Elisavet; Bertesteanu, Serban

    2015-01-01

    At present, the use of dental implants is a very common practice as tooth loss is a frequent problem and can occur as a result of disease or trauma. An implant is usually made of biocompatible materials that do not cause rejection reactions and allow the implant union with the respective bone. To achieve this goal, the implant surface may have different structures and coatings, generally used to increase the adherence of the implant to the bone and to decrease the risk of the periimplantar inflammatory reactions. This review gives some insights of the metal based materials used for dental implants, their limits, improvement strategies as well as the pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of periimplantary diseases.

  9. Development of a Functional Biohybrid Implant Formed from Periodontal Tissue Utilizing Bioengineering Technology.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Kei; Oshima, Masamitsu; Yamamoto, Naomi; Tanaka, Chie; Koitabashi, Ryosuke; Inoue, Takashi; Tsuji, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    Current osseointegrated dental implants have been widely used for the rehabilitation of tooth loss. Although dental implants are considered an available treatment in the paradigm shift from traditional dental therapies, such as fixed dental bridges and removable dentures, the fundamental problems must be overcome before their clinical use in young patients who are still undergoing jawbone growth. Here, we show a novel bioengineering method for a functional biohybrid implant that is combined with adult-derived periodontal tissue and attached with bone tissue as a substitute for cementum. This biohybrid implant was successfully engrafted using the bioengineered periodontal ligament, and it restored physiological function, such as orthodontic movement through bone remodeling and appropriate responsiveness to noxious stimuli. Thus, this study represents the functional biohybrid implant's potential for clinical use as a next-generation dental implant using adult-derived tissues.

  10. Structural Morphology of Molars in Large Mammalian Herbivores: Enamel Content Varies between Tooth Positions.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Daniela E; Kaiser, Thomas M

    2015-01-01

    The distribution of dental tissues in mammalian herbivores can be very different from taxon to taxon. While grazers tend to have more elaborated and complexly folded enamel ridges, browsers have less complex enamel ridges which can even be so far reduced that they are completely lost. The gradient in relative enamel content and complexity of structures has so far not been addressed within a single species. However, several studies have noted tooth position specific wear rates in small mammals (rabbits, guinea pigs) which may be related to individual tooth morphology. We investigate whether differentiated enamel content by tooth position is also to be found in large herbivores. We use CT-scanning techniques to quantify relative enamel content in upper and lower molar teeth of 21 large herbivorous mammal species. By using a broad approach and including both perissodactyls and artiodactyls, we address phylogenetic intraspecific differences in relative enamel content. We find that enamel is highly unevenly distributed among molars (upper M1, M2, M3 and lower m1, m2, m3) in most taxa and that relative enamel content is independent of phylogeny. Overall, relative enamel content increases along the molar tooth row and is significantly higher in lower molars compared to upper molars. We relate this differential enamel content to prolonged mineralisation in the posterior tooth positions and suggest a compensatory function of m3 and M3 for functional losses of anterior teeth.

  11. Age estimation by pulp/tooth ratio in lower premolars by orthopantomography.

    PubMed

    Cameriere, Roberto; De Luca, Stefano; Alemán, Inmaculada; Ferrante, Luigi; Cingolani, Mariano

    2012-01-10

    Accurate age estimation has always been a problem for forensic scientists, and apposition of secondary dentine is often used as an indicator of age. Since 2004, in order to examine patterns of secondary dentine apposition, Cameriere et al. have been extensively studying the pulp/tooth area ratio of the canines by panoramic and peri-apical X-ray images. The main aim of this paper is to examine the relationship between age and age-related changes in the pulp/tooth area ratio in monoradicular teeth, with the exception of canines, by orthopantomography. A total of 606 orthopantomograms of Spanish white Caucasian patients (289 women and 317 men), aged between 18 and 75 years and coming from Bilbao and Granada (Spain), was analysed. Regression analysis of age of monoradicular teeth indicated that the lower premolars were the most closely correlated with age. An ANCOVA did not show significant differences between men and women. Multiple regression analysis, with age as dependent variable and pulp/tooth area ratio as predictor, yielded several formulae. R(2) ranged from 0.69 to 0.75 for a single lower premolar tooth and from 0.79 to 0.86 for multiple lower premolar teeth. Depending on the available number of premolar teeth, the mean of the absolute values of residual standard error, at 95% confidence interval, ranged between 4.34 and 6.02 years, showing that the pulp/tooth area ratio is a useful variable for assessing age with reasonable accuracy.

  12. Structural Morphology of Molars in Large Mammalian Herbivores: Enamel Content Varies between Tooth Positions

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Daniela E.; Kaiser, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    The distribution of dental tissues in mammalian herbivores can be very different from taxon to taxon. While grazers tend to have more elaborated and complexly folded enamel ridges, browsers have less complex enamel ridges which can even be so far reduced that they are completely lost. The gradient in relative enamel content and complexity of structures has so far not been addressed within a single species. However, several studies have noted tooth position specific wear rates in small mammals (rabbits, guinea pigs) which may be related to individual tooth morphology. We investigate whether differentiated enamel content by tooth position is also to be found in large herbivores. We use CT-scanning techniques to quantify relative enamel content in upper and lower molar teeth of 21 large herbivorous mammal species. By using a broad approach and including both perissodactyls and artiodactyls, we address phylogenetic intraspecific differences in relative enamel content. We find that enamel is highly unevenly distributed among molars (upper M1, M2, M3 and lower m1, m2, m3) in most taxa and that relative enamel content is independent of phylogeny. Overall, relative enamel content increases along the molar tooth row and is significantly higher in lower molars compared to upper molars. We relate this differential enamel content to prolonged mineralisation in the posterior tooth positions and suggest a compensatory function of m3 and M3 for functional losses of anterior teeth. PMID:26313359

  13. Microbial diversity of peri-implant biofilms on implant fixed bar and telescopic double crown attachments.

    PubMed

    Heuer, Wieland; Kettenring, Andreas; Demling, Anton; Stumpp, Sascha Nico; Gellermann, Eva; Winkel, Andreas; Stiesch, Meike

    2013-12-01

    One of the principal problems in oral implantation is inflammation of peri-implant hard and soft tissues caused by bacterial biofilms. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the microbial diversity of peri-implant biofilms on 2 different implant-anchored attachment types in vivo. Samples of peri-implant sulcus fluid were collected from 8 patients with implant-supported bar attachments and 8 patients with implant-anchored telescopic double crown attachments. Samples of sulcus fluid of the adjacent teeth were also collected from the partially edentulous patients with implant fixed telescopic double crowns. The mixed amplicons of 16S rRNA fragments of different bacterial origins were separated by use of single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis to identify the predominant bacterial genera. With 3.5 ± 2.1 different predominant bacterial genera in the sulcus fluid surrounding implant-supported bar attachments and 6.3 ± 3.1 different predominant genera in the sulcular fluid of implant-anchored double crown attachments, the differences were not statistically significant (P = .11). The microbial diversity in the sulcus fluid surrounding the remaining dentition was similar to that of the implant fixed telescopic attachments (6.3 ± 2.1). Aside from host response and other individual factors, the microbial diversity of peri-implant biofilms seems to be impaired by cofactors such as the possibility of cleaning the implant-supported supraconstructions and the different plaque-retaining sites. Nevertheless, these differences do not lead to statistically significant differences in the microbial diversity of peri-implant plaques. PMID:21332328

  14. PKA regulatory subunit expression in tooth development.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Sílvia Ferreira; Kawasaki, Katsushige; Kawasaki, Maiko; Volponi, Ana Angelova; Gomez, Ricardo Santiago; Gomes, Carolina Cavaliéri; Sharpe, Paul T; Ohazama, Atsushi

    2014-05-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) plays critical roles in many biological processes including cell proliferation, cell differentiation, cellular metabolism and gene regulation. Mutation in PKA regulatory subunit, PRKAR1A has previously been identified in odontogenic myxomas, but it is unclear whether PKA is involved in tooth development. The aim of the present study was to assess the expression of alpha isoforms of PKA regulatory subunit (Prkar1a and Prkar2a) in mouse and human odontogenesis by in situ hybridization. PRKAR1A and PRKAR2A mRNA transcription was further confirmed in a human deciduous germ by qRT-PCR. Mouse Prkar1a and human PRKAR2A exhibited a dynamic spatio-temporal expression in tooth development, whereas neither human PRKAR1A nor mouse Prkar2a showed their expression in odontogenesis. These isoforms thus showed different expression pattern between human and mouse tooth germs. PMID:24755349

  15. The impact of race on tooth formation.

    PubMed

    Maki, K; Morimoto, A; Nishioka, T; Kimura, M; Braham, R L

    1999-01-01

    The subjects consisted of 650 children (American white 245, Chinese 202, Japanese 203) from five to twelve years old, who came to the Department of Growth & Development, University of California, San Francisco. Mandibular first molar development was determined by inspecting panoramic radiographs and assigning a rating according to Kullman's method, which classifies tooth formation into seven stages according to growth and development. The samples in each age-stage were evaluated by their means values. Tooth formation was significantly more advanced in the American white children than in the Chinese or Japanese at all stages. The significance of the difference between Chinese and Japanese children was not identified. Tooth formation was shown to be highly correlated with chronological age, with a coefficient of more than 0.7 in all racial groups.

  16. PKA regulatory subunit expression in tooth development.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Sílvia Ferreira; Kawasaki, Katsushige; Kawasaki, Maiko; Volponi, Ana Angelova; Gomez, Ricardo Santiago; Gomes, Carolina Cavaliéri; Sharpe, Paul T; Ohazama, Atsushi

    2014-05-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) plays critical roles in many biological processes including cell proliferation, cell differentiation, cellular metabolism and gene regulation. Mutation in PKA regulatory subunit, PRKAR1A has previously been identified in odontogenic myxomas, but it is unclear whether PKA is involved in tooth development. The aim of the present study was to assess the expression of alpha isoforms of PKA regulatory subunit (Prkar1a and Prkar2a) in mouse and human odontogenesis by in situ hybridization. PRKAR1A and PRKAR2A mRNA transcription was further confirmed in a human deciduous germ by qRT-PCR. Mouse Prkar1a and human PRKAR2A exhibited a dynamic spatio-temporal expression in tooth development, whereas neither human PRKAR1A nor mouse Prkar2a showed their expression in odontogenesis. These isoforms thus showed different expression pattern between human and mouse tooth germs.

  17. Tooth-derived bone graft material

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Kyun; Lee, Junho; Kim, Kyung-Wook; Murata, Masaru; Akazawa, Toshiyuki; Mitsugi, Masaharu

    2013-01-01

    With successful extraction of growth factors and bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs) from mammalian teeth, many researchers have supported development of a bone substitute using tooth-derived substances. Some studies have also expanded the potential use of teeth as a carrier for growth factors and stem cells. A broad overview of the published findings with regard to tooth-derived regenerative tissue engineering technique is outlined. Considering more than 100 published papers, our team has developed the protocols and techniques for processing of bone graft material using extracted teeth. Based on current studies and studies that will be needed in the future, we can anticipate development of scaffolds, homogenous and xenogenous tooth bone grafts, and dental restorative materials using extracted teeth. PMID:24471027

  18. Discovery of Homo sp. tooth associated with a mammalian cave fauna of Late Middle Pleistocene age, northern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Tougard, C; Jaeger, J J

    1998-07-01

    In the context of a Thai-French paleontological project, a single human tooth, a right upper fourth premolar, has been discovered in Northern Thailand among mammalian fossil remains excavated from the "Thum Wiman Nakin" cave. Based on the fauna associated with the human tooth and the Uranium/Thorium datings from the overlying calcite beds, we attribute this site to the Late Middle Pleistocene. The human tooth was compared with teeth of Chinese and Javanese Homo erectus, Homo sapiens neanderthalensis and Homo sapiens sapiens as well as teeth of apes (Orang-utan). The tooth has archaic features of the crown which are similar to Homo erectus. It also has derived features of the root which makes it aligns with Neanderthals and modern humans. Consequently, it has been tentatively attributed to Homo sp. Homo remains have not been previously reported from Thailand, and the specimen described here is therefore the first and oldest fossil human remain from this country.

  19. Maxillary tooth displacement in the infratemporal fossa

    PubMed Central

    Roshanghias, Korosh; Peisker, Andre; Zieron, Jörg Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Wisdom tooth operations are sometimes accompanied by complications. This case report shows complications during upper jaw third molar removal. Expectable problems during oral surgery should be planned to be solved in advance. Displacement of the third molar during oral surgeries as a considerable complication is rarely discussed scientifically. A good design of flap, adequate power for extraction, and clear view on the surgical field are crucial. Three-dimensional radiographic diagnostics in terms of cone beam computed tomography is helpful after tooth displacement into the infratemporal fossa. PMID:27605997

  20. Maxillary tooth displacement in the infratemporal fossa.

    PubMed

    Roshanghias, Korosh; Peisker, Andre; Zieron, Jörg Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Wisdom tooth operations are sometimes accompanied by complications. This case report shows complications during upper jaw third molar removal. Expectable problems during oral surgery should be planned to be solved in advance. Displacement of the third molar during oral surgeries as a considerable complication is rarely discussed scientifically. A good design of flap, adequate power for extraction, and clear view on the surgical field are crucial. Three-dimensional radiographic diagnostics in terms of cone beam computed tomography is helpful after tooth displacement into the infratemporal fossa. PMID:27605997