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Sample records for single-cell stat5 signal

  1. Stat5 signaling specifies basal versus stress erythropoietic responses through distinct binary and graded dynamic modalities.

    PubMed

    Porpiglia, Ermelinda; Hidalgo, Daniel; Koulnis, Miroslav; Tzafriri, Abraham R; Socolovsky, Merav

    2012-08-01

    Erythropoietin (Epo)-induced Stat5 phosphorylation (p-Stat5) is essential for both basal erythropoiesis and for its acceleration during hypoxic stress. A key challenge lies in understanding how Stat5 signaling elicits distinct functions during basal and stress erythropoiesis. Here we asked whether these distinct functions might be specified by the dynamic behavior of the Stat5 signal. We used flow cytometry to analyze Stat5 phosphorylation dynamics in primary erythropoietic tissue in vivo and in vitro, identifying two signaling modalities. In later (basophilic) erythroblasts, Epo stimulation triggers a low intensity but decisive, binary (digital) p-Stat5 signal. In early erythroblasts the binary signal is superseded by a high-intensity graded (analog) p-Stat5 response. We elucidated the biological functions of binary and graded Stat5 signaling using the EpoR-HM mice, which express a "knocked-in" EpoR mutant lacking cytoplasmic phosphotyrosines. Strikingly, EpoR-HM mice are restricted to the binary signaling mode, which rescues these mice from fatal perinatal anemia by promoting binary survival decisions in erythroblasts. However, the absence of the graded p-Stat5 response in the EpoR-HM mice prevents them from accelerating red cell production in response to stress, including a failure to upregulate the transferrin receptor, which we show is a novel stress target. We found that Stat5 protein levels decline with erythroblast differentiation, governing the transition from high-intensity graded signaling in early erythroblasts to low-intensity binary signaling in later erythroblasts. Thus, using exogenous Stat5, we converted later erythroblasts into high-intensity graded signal transducers capable of eliciting a downstream stress response. Unlike the Stat5 protein, EpoR expression in erythroblasts does not limit the Stat5 signaling response, a non-Michaelian paradigm with therapeutic implications in myeloproliferative disease. Our findings show how the binary and

  2. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5B (STAT5B) modulates adipocyte differentiation via MOF.

    PubMed

    Gao, Peng; Zhang, Yuchao; Liu, Yuantao; Chen, Jicui; Zong, Chen; Yu, Cong; Cui, Shang; Gao, Weina; Qin, Dandan; Sun, Wenchuan; Li, Xia; Wang, Xiangdong

    2015-12-01

    The role and mechanism of signal transducer and activator of transcription 5B (STAT5B) in adipogenesis remain unclear. In this study, our data showed that Males absent on the first (MOF) protein expression was increased during 3 T3-L1 preadipocytes differentiation accompanied with STAT5B expression increasing. Over-expression STAT5B enhanced MOF promoter trans-activation in HeLa cells. Mutagenesis assay and ChIP analysis exhibited that STAT5B was able to bind MOF promoter. Knocking-down STAT5B in 3 T3-L1 preadipocytes led to decreased expression of MOF, but resulted in increased expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α (C/EBPα) and fatty acid-binding protein 4 (Fabp4), which were important factors or enzymes for adipogenesis. We also found that knocking-down MOF in 3 T3-L1 preadipocytes resulted in increased expression of PPARγ, C/EBPα and Fabp4, which was in the same trend as STAT5B knocking-down. Over-expression MOF resulted in reduced promoter trans-activation activity of C/EBPα. These results suggest that STAT5B and MOF work as negative regulators in adipogenesis, and STAT5B modulates preadipocytes differentiation partially by regulating MOF expression.

  3. Dasatinib (BMS-354825) inhibits Stat5 signaling associated with apoptosis in chronic myelogenous leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Nam, Sangkil; Williams, Ann; Vultur, Adina; List, Alan; Bhalla, Kapil; Smith, David; Lee, Francis Y; Jove, Richard

    2007-04-01

    Dasatinib (BMS-354825) is a novel, oral, potent, multi-targeted kinase inhibitor of Bcr-Abl and Src family kinases (SFK) and is a promising cancer therapeutic agent. Preclinical data indicate that dasatinib is 325-fold more potent than imatinib against cells expressing wild-type Bcr-Abl, and that dasatinib is active against 18 of 19 Bcr-Abl mutations known to cause imatinib resistance. Phase I clinical data show that dasatinib is well tolerated and highly effective for the treatment of imatinib-resistant/imatinib-intolerant chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia. However, the molecular mechanism of action of dasatinib is not fully understood. In this study, we confirm that dasatinib inhibits tyrosine phosphorylation of SFKs, including Src, Hck, and Lyn, in K562 human CML cells. Significantly, downstream signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (Stat5) signaling is also blocked by dasatinib as shown by decreases in levels of phosphorylated Stat5 and Stat5 DNA-binding activities. In addition, dasatinib down-regulates expression of Stat5 target genes, including Bcl-x, Mcl-1, and cyclin D1. Consistent with these results, blockade of Stat5 signaling by dasatinib is accompanied by inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis. Surprisingly, Stat5 DNA-binding activities are enhanced with increasing cell density, which is associated with resistance to apoptosis by dasatinib. Our findings indicate that inhibition of Stat5 signaling downstream of Bcr-Abl/SFKs contributes to the action of dasatinib, and, conversely, that increasing cell density up-regulates Stat5 activation and confers resistance to dasatinib. Moreover, the level of phosphorylated Stat5 in CML cells represents a mechanistically relevant biomarker for monitoring inhibition of Bcr-Abl signaling by dasatinib in CML patients using convenient immunocytochemical assays.

  4. Oncogenic Kit controls neoplastic mast cell growth through a Stat5/PI3-kinase signaling cascade

    PubMed Central

    Harir, Noria; Boudot, Cédric; Friedbichler, Katrin; Sonneck, Karoline; Kondo, Rudin; Martin-Lannerée, Séverine; Kenner, Lukas; Kerenyi, Marc; Yahiaoui, Saliha; Gouilleux-Gruart, Valérie; Gondry, Jean; Bénit, Laurence; Dusanter-Fourt, Isabelle; Lassoued, Kaïss; Valent, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The D816V-mutated variant of Kit triggers multiple signaling pathways and is considered essential for malignant transformation in mast cell (MC) neoplasms. We here describe that constitutive activation of the Stat5-PI3K-Akt-cascade controls neoplastic MC development. Retrovirally transduced active Stat5 (cS5F) was found to trigger PI3K and Akt activation, and to transform murine bone marrow progenitors into tissue-infiltrating MCs. Primary neoplastic Kit D816V+ MCs in patients with mastocytosis also displayed activated Stat5, which was found to localize to the cytoplasm and to form a signaling complex with PI3K, with consecutive Akt activation. Finally, the knock-down of either Stat5 or Akt activity resulted in growth inhibition of neoplastic Kit D816V+ MCs. These data suggest that a downstream Stat5-PI3K-Akt signaling cascade is essential for Kit D816V-mediated growth and survival of neoplastic MCs. PMID:18579792

  5. GH/STAT5 signaling during the growth period in livers of mice overexpressing GH.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Carolina S; Piazza, Verónica G; Díaz, María E; Boparai, Ravneet K; Arum, Oge; Ramírez, María C; González, Lorena; Becú-Villalobos, Damasia; Bartke, Andrzej; Turyn, Daniel; Miquet, Johanna G; Sotelo, Ana I

    2015-04-01

    GH/STAT5 signaling is desensitized in the liver in adult transgenic mice overexpressing GH; however, these animals present greater body size. To assess whether the STAT5 pathway is active during the growth period in the liver in these animals, and how signaling modulators participate in this process, growing transgenic mice and normal siblings were evaluated. STAT5 does not respond to an acute GH-stimulus, but displays higher basal phosphorylation in the livers of growing GH-overexpressing mice. GH receptor and the positive modulators glucocorticoid receptor and HNF1 display greater abundance in transgenic animals, supporting the activity of STAT5. The negative modulators cytokine-induced suppressor and PTP1B are increased in GH-overexpressing mice. The suppressors SOCS2 and SOCS3 exhibit higher mRNA levels in transgenic mice but lower protein content, indicating that they are being actively degraded. Therefore, STAT5 signaling is increased in the liver in GH-transgenic mice during the growth period, with a balance between positive and negative effectors resulting in accelerated but controlled growth.

  6. Indirubin derivatives induce apoptosis of chronic myelogenous leukemia cells involving inhibition of Stat5 signaling.

    PubMed

    Nam, Sangkil; Scuto, Anna; Yang, Fan; Chen, Wenyong; Park, Sungman; Yoo, Hwa-Seung; Konig, Heiko; Bhatia, Ravi; Cheng, Xinlai; Merz, Karl-Heinz; Eisenbrand, Gerhard; Jove, Richard

    2012-06-01

    Indirubin is the major active anti-tumor component of a traditional Chinese herbal medicine used for treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). While previous studies indicate that indirubin is a promising therapeutic agent for CML, the molecular mechanism of action of indirubin is not fully understood. We report here that indirubin derivatives (IRDs) potently inhibit Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 5 (Stat5) protein in CML cells. Compound E804, which is the most potent in this series of IRDs, blocked Stat5 signaling in human K562 CML cells, imatinib-resistant human KCL-22 CML cells expressing the T315I mutant Bcr-Abl (KCL-22M), and CD34-positive primary CML cells from patients. Autophosphorylation of Src family kinases (SFKs) was strongly inhibited in K562 and KCL-22M cells at 5 μM E804, and in primary CML cells at 10 μM E804, although higher concentrations partially inhibited autophosphorylation of Bcr-Abl. Previous studies indicate that SFKs cooperate with Bcr-Abl to activate downstream Stat5 signaling. Activation of Stat5 was strongly blocked by E804 in CML cells. E804 down-regulated expression of Stat5 target proteins Bcl-x(L) and Mcl-1, associated with induction of apoptosis. In sum, our findings identify IRDs as potent inhibitors of the SFK/Stat5 signaling pathway downstream of Bcr-Abl, leading to apoptosis of K562, KCL-22M and primary CML cells. IRDs represent a promising structural class for development of new therapeutics for wild type or T315I mutant Bcr-Abl-positive CML patients.

  7. Growth hormone STAT5-mediated signaling and its modulation in mice liver during the growth period.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Carolina S; Piazza, Verónica G; Ratner, Laura D; Matos, Marina N; González, Lorena; Rulli, Susana B; Miquet, Johanna G; Sotelo, Ana I

    2013-01-01

    Postnatal growth exhibits two instances of rapid growth in mice: the first is perinatal and independent of growth hormone (GH), the second is peripuberal and GH-dependent. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5b (STAT5b) is the main GH-signaling mediator and it is related to IGF1 synthesis and somatic growth. The aim of this work was to assess differential STAT5 sensitivity to GH during the growth period in mouse liver of both sexes. Three representative ages were selected: 1-week-old animals, in the GH-independent phase of growth; 2.5-week-old mice, at the onset of the GH-dependent phase of growth; and 9-week-old young adults. GH-signaling mediators were assessed by immunoblotting, quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. GH-induced STAT5 phosphorylation is low at one-week and maximal at 2.5-weeks of age when compared to young adults, accompanied by higher protein content at the onset of growth. Suppressor CIS and phosphatase PTP1B exhibit high levels in one-week animals, which gradually decline, while SOCS2 and SOCS3 display higher levels at adulthood. Nuclear phosphorylated STAT5 is low in one-week animals while in 2.5-week animals it is similar to 9-week control; expression of SOCS3, an early response GH-target gene, mimics this pattern. STAT5 coactivators glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and hepatic nuclear factor 1 (HNF1) abundance is higher in adulthood. Therefore, GH-induced STAT5 signaling presents age-dependent activity in liver, with its maximum coinciding with the onset of GH-dependent phase of growth, accompanied by an age-dependent variation of modulating factors. This work contributes to elucidate the molecular mechanisms implicated in GH responsiveness during growth.

  8. STAT5 acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Kosan, Christian; Ginter, Torsten; Heinzel, Thorsten; Krämer, Oliver H

    2013-01-01

    The cytokine-inducible transcription factors signal transducer and activator of transcription 5A and 5B (STAT5A and STAT5B) are important for the proper development of multicellular eukaryotes. Disturbed signaling cascades evoking uncontrolled expression of STAT5 target genes are associated with cancer and immunological failure. Here, we summarize how STAT5 acetylation is integrated into posttranslational modification networks within cells. Moreover, we focus on how inhibitors of deacetylases and tyrosine kinases can correct leukemogenic signaling nodes involving STAT5. Such small molecules can be exploited in the fight against neoplastic diseases and immunological disorders. PMID:24416653

  9. Interleukins 7 and 15 Maintain Human T Cell Proliferative Capacity through STAT5 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Adam; Kaur, Mandeep; Iliopoulou, Bettina P.; Phennicie, Ryan; Hanson, Amanda; Chen, Jianzhu

    2016-01-01

    T lymphocytes require signals from self-peptides and cytokines, most notably interleukins 7 and 15 (IL-7, IL-15), for survival. While mouse T cells die rapidly if IL-7 or IL-15 is withdrawn, human T cells can survive prolonged withdrawal of IL-7 and IL-15. Here we show that IL-7 and IL-15 are required to maintain human T cell proliferative capacity through the STAT5 signaling pathway. T cells from humanized mice proliferate better if stimulated in the presence of human IL-7 or IL-15 or if T cells are exposed to human IL-7 or IL-15 in mice. Freshly isolated T cells from human peripheral blood lose proliferative capacity if cultured for 24 hours in the absence of IL-7 or IL-15. We further show that phosphorylation of STAT5 correlates with proliferation and inhibition of STAT5 reduces proliferation. These results reveal a novel role of IL-7 and IL-15 in maintaining human T cell function, provide an explanation for T cell dysfunction in humanized mice, and have significant implications for in vitro studies with human T cells. PMID:27855183

  10. How Intrinsic Molecular Dynamics Control Intramolecular Communication in Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription Factor STAT5

    PubMed Central

    Langenfeld, Florent; Guarracino, Yann; Arock, Michel; Trouvé, Alain; Tchertanov, Luba

    2015-01-01

    Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription STAT5 is a key mediator of cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. While STAT5 activity is tightly regulated in normal cells, its constitutive activation directly contributes to oncogenesis and is associated with a broad range of hematological and solid tumor cancers. Therefore the development of compounds able to modulate pathogenic activation of this protein is a very challenging endeavor. A crucial step of drug design is the understanding of the protein conformational features and the definition of putative binding site(s) for such modulators. Currently, there is no structural data available for human STAT5 and our study is the first footprint towards the description of structure and dynamics of this protein. We investigated structural and dynamical features of the two STAT5 isoforms, STAT5a and STAT5b, taken into account their phosphorylation status. The study was based on the exploration of molecular dynamics simulations by different analytical methods. Despite the overall folding similarity of STAT5 proteins, the MD conformations display specific structural and dynamical features for each protein, indicating first, sequence-encoded structural properties and second, phosphorylation-induced effects which contribute to local and long-distance structural rearrangements interpreted as allosteric event. Further examination of the dynamical coupling between distant sites provides evidence for alternative profiles of the communication pathways inside and between the STAT5 domains. These results add a new insight to the understanding of the crucial role of intrinsic molecular dynamics in mediating intramolecular signaling in STAT5. Two pockets, localized in close proximity to the phosphotyrosine-binding site and adjacent to the channel for communication pathways across STAT5, may constitute valid targets to develop inhibitors able to modulate the function-related communication properties of this signaling

  11. Growth hormone (GH)/STAT5 signaling during the growth period in liver of mice overexpressing GH

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Carolina S; Piazza, Verónica G; Díaz, María E; Boparai, Ravneet K; Arum, Oge; Ramírez, María C; González, Lorena; Becú-Villalobos, Damasia; Bartke, Andrzej; Turyn, Daniel; Miquet, Johanna G; Sotelo, Ana I

    2016-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH)/STAT5 signaling is desensitized in liver of adult transgenic mice overexpressing GH; however, these animals present greater body size. To assess if the STAT5 pathway is active during the growth period in liver of these animals, and how signaling modulators participate in this process, growing transgenic mice and normal siblings were evaluated. STAT5 does not respond to an acute GH-stimulus but presents higher basal phosphorylation in liver of growing GH-overexpressing mice. GH receptor and positive modulators GR and HNF1 display greater abundance in transgenic animals, supporting STAT5 activity. Negative modulators CIS and PTP1B are increased in GH-overexpressing mice. Suppressors SOCS2 and SOCS3 exhibit higher mRNA levels in transgenic mice but lower protein content, suggesting they are being actively degraded. Therefore, STAT5 signaling is increased in liver of GH-transgenic mice during the growth period, with a balance between positive and negative effectors resulting in an accelerated but controlled growth. PMID:25691498

  12. IGF-1R modulation of acute GH-induced STAT5 signaling: role of protein tyrosine phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Gan, Yujun; Zhang, Yue; Buckels, Ashiya; Paterson, Andrew J; Jiang, Jing; Clemens, Thomas L; Zhang, Zhong-Yin; Du, Keyong; Chang, Yingzi; Frank, Stuart J

    2013-11-01

    GH is a potent anabolic and metabolic factor that binds its cell surface receptor (GHR), activating the GHR-associated tyrosine kinase, Janus kinase 2, which phosphorylates and activates the latent transcription factor, signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5). Some GH actions are mediated by the elaboration of IGF-1, which exerts effects by binding and activating the heterotetrameric tyrosine kinase growth factor receptor, IGF-1R. In addition to this GH-GHR-IGF-1-IGF-1R scheme, we have demonstrated in primary osteoblasts and in islet β-cells that then deletion or silencing of IGF-1R results in diminished GH-induced STAT5 phosphorylation, suggesting that the presence of IGF-1R may facilitate GH signaling. In this study, we explore potential roles for protein tyrosine phosphatase activity in modulating GH-induced signaling, comparing conditions in which IGF-1R is present or diminished. We confirm that in mouse primary osteoblasts harboring loxP sites flanking the IGF-1R gene, infection with an adenovirus that expresses the Cre recombinase results in IGF-1R deletion and diminished acute GH-induced STAT5 phosphorylation. Furthermore, we present a new model of IGF-1R silencing, in which expression of short hairpin RNA directed at IGF-1R greatly reduces IGF-1R abundance in LNCaP human prostate cancer cells. In both models, treatment with a chemical inhibitor of protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B (PTP-1B), but not one of src homology region 2 domain-containing phosphotase-1 (SHP-1) and SHP-2, reverses the loss of GH-induced STAT5 phosphorylation in cells lacking IGF-1R but has no effect in cells with intact IGF-1R. Furthermore, expression of either a dominant-negative PTP-1B or the PTP-1B-interacting inhibitory protein, constitutive photomorphogenesis 1, also rescues acute GH-induced STAT5 signaling in IGF-1R-deficient cells but has no effect in IGF-1R replete cells. By expressing a substrate-trapping mutant PTP-1B, we demonstrate that tyrosine

  13. Angiogenesis Induced by Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 5A (STAT5A) Is Dependent on Autocrine Activity of Proliferin*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xinhai; Qiao, Dianhua; Meyer, Kristy; Pier, Thomas; Keles, Sunduz; Friedl, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Multiple secreted factors induce the formation of new blood vessels (angiogenesis). The signal transduction events that orchestrate the numerous cellular activities required for angiogenesis remain incompletely understood. We have shown previously that STAT5 plays a pivotal role in angiogenesis induced by FGF2 and FGF8b. To delineate the signaling pathway downstream of STAT5, we expressed constitutively active (CA) or dominant-negative (DN) mutant STAT5A in mouse brain endothelial cells (EC). We found that the conditioned medium from CA-STAT5A but not from dominant-negative STAT5A overexpressing EC is sufficient to induce EC invasion and tube formation, indicating that STAT5A regulates the secretion of autocrine proangiogenic factors. Conversely, CA-STAT5A-induced conditioned medium had no effect on EC proliferation. Using a comparative genome-wide transcription array screen, we identified the prolactin family member proliferin (PLF1 and PLF4) as a candidate autocrine factor. The CA-STAT5A-dependent transcription and secretion of PLF by EC was confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. CA-STAT5A binds to the PLF1 promoter region, suggesting a direct transcriptional regulation. Knockdown of PLF expression by shRNA or by blocking of PLF activity with neutralizing antibodies removed the CA-STAT5A-dependent proangiogenic activity from the conditioned medium of EC. Similarly, the ability of concentrated conditioned medium from CA-STAT5A transfected EC to induce angiogenesis in Matrigel plugs in vivo was abolished when PLF was depleted from the medium. These observations demonstrate a FGF/STAT5/PLF signaling cascade in EC and implicate PLF as autocrine regulator of EC invasion and tube formation. PMID:22199350

  14. Hypoxic tumor kinase signaling mediated by STAT5A in development of castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Røe, Kathrine; Bratland, Åse; Vlatkovic, Ljiljana; Ragnum, Harald Bull; Saelen, Marie Grøn; Olsen, Dag Rune; Marignol, Laure; Ree, Anne Hansen

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we hypothesized that androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) in prostate cancer, although initially efficient, induces changes in the tumor kinome, which subsequently promote development of castration-resistant (CR) disease. Recognizing the correlation between tumor hypoxia and poor prognosis in prostate cancer, we further hypothesized that such changes might be influenced by hypoxia. Microarrays with 144 kinase peptide substrates were applied to analyze CWR22 prostate carcinoma xenograft samples from ADT-naïve, androgen-deprived (AD), long-term AD (ADL), and CR disease stages. The impact of hypoxia was assessed by matching the xenograft kinase activity profiles with those acquired from hypoxic and normoxic prostate carcinoma cell cultures, whereas the clinical relevance was evaluated by analyzing prostatectomy tumor samples from patients with locally advanced disease, either in ADT-naïve or early CR disease stages. By using this novel peptide substrate microarray method we revealed high kinase activity mediated by signal transducer and activator of transcription 5A (STAT5A) in CR prostate cancer. Additionally, we uncovered high STAT5A kinase activity already in regressing ADL xenografts, before renewed CR growth was evidenced. Finally, since increased STAT5A kinase activity also was detected after exposing prostate carcinoma cells to hypoxia, we propose long-term ADT to induce tumor hypoxia and stimulate STAT5A kinase activity, subsequently leading to renewed CR tumor growth. Hence, the study detected STAT5A as a candidate to be further investigated for its potential as marker of advanced prostate cancer and as possible therapeutic target protein.

  15. STAT5-regulated microRNA-193b controls haematopoietic stem and progenitor cell expansion by modulating cytokine receptor signalling

    PubMed Central

    Haetscher, Nadine; Feuermann, Yonatan; Wingert, Susanne; Rehage, Maike; Thalheimer, Frederic B.; Weiser, Christian; Bohnenberger, Hanibal; Jung, Klaus; Schroeder, Timm; Serve, Hubert; Oellerich, Thomas; Hennighausen, Lothar; Rieger, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) require the right composition of microRNAs (miR) for proper life-long balanced blood regeneration. Here we show a regulatory circuit that prevents excessive HSC self-renewal by upregulation of miR-193b upon self-renewal promoting thrombopoietin (TPO)-MPL-STAT5 signalling. In turn, miR-193b restricts cytokine signalling, by targeting the receptor tyrosine kinase c-KIT. We generated a miR-193b knockout mouse model to unravel the physiological function of miR-193b in haematopoiesis. MiR-193b−/− mice show a selective gradual enrichment of functional HSCs, which are fully competent in multilineage blood reconstitution upon transplantation. The absence of miR-193b causes an accelerated expansion of HSCs, without altering cell cycle or survival, but by decelerating differentiation. Conversely, ectopic miR-193b expression restricts long-term repopulating HSC expansion and blood reconstitution. MiR-193b-deficient haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells exhibit increased basal and cytokine-induced STAT5 and AKT signalling. This STAT5-induced microRNA provides a negative feedback for excessive signalling to restrict uncontrolled HSC expansion. PMID:26603207

  16. Jak2-Stat5a/b Signaling Induces Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition and Stem-Like Cell Properties in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Talati, Pooja G.; Gu, Lei; Ellsworth, Elyse M.; Girondo, Melanie A.; Trerotola, Marco; Hoang, David T.; Leiby, Benjamin; Dagvadorj, Ayush; McCue, Peter A.; Lallas, Costas D.; Trabulsi, Edouard J.; Gomella, Leonard; Aplin, Andrew E.; Languino, Lucia; Fatatis, Alessandro; Rui, Hallgeir; Nevalainen, Marja T.

    2016-01-01

    Active Stat5a/b predicts early recurrence and disease-specific death in prostate cancer (PC), which both typically are caused by development of metastatic disease. Herein, we demonstrate that Stat5a/b induces epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of PC cells, as shown by Stat5a/b regulation of EMT marker expression (Twist1, E-cadherin, N-cadherin, vimentin, and fibronectin) in PC cell lines, xenograft tumors in vivo, and patient-derived PCs ex vivo using organ explant cultures. Jak2-Stat5a/b signaling induced functional end points of EMT as well, indicated by disruption of epithelial cell monolayers and increased migration and adhesion of PC cells to fibronectin. Knockdown of Twist1 suppressed Jak2-Stat5a/b–induced EMT properties of PC cells, which were rescued by re-introduction of Twist1, indicating that Twist1 mediates Stat5a/b-induced EMT in PC cells. While promoting EMT, Jak2-Stat5a/b signaling induced stem-like properties in PC cells, such as sphere formation and expression of cancer stem cell markers, including BMI1. Mechanistically, both Twist1 and BMI1 were critical for Stat5a/b induction of stem-like features, because genetic knockdown of Twist1 suppressed Stat5a/b-induced BMI1 expression and sphere formation in stem cell culture conditions, which were rescued by re-introduction of BMI1. By using human prolactin knock-in mice, we demonstrate that prolactin-Stat5a/b signaling promoted metastases formation of PC cells in vivo. In conclusion, our data support the concept that Jak2-Stat5a/b signaling promotes metastatic progression of PC by inducing EMT and stem cell properties in PC cells. PMID:26362718

  17. Mitochondrial translocation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) in leukemic T cells and cytokine-stimulated cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chueh, Fu-Yu; Leong, King-Fu; Yu, Chao-Lan

    2010-11-26

    Research highlights: {yields} STAT5 interacts with a mitochondrial protein PDC-E2 in a leukemic T cell line LSTRA. {yields} Tyrosine-phosphorylated STAT5, but not STAT3, is present in LSTRA mitochondria. {yields} Cytokines induce mitochondrial translocation of STAT5, but not STAT1 or STAT3. {yields} Cytokine-induced mitochondrial translocation of tyrosine-phosphorylated STAT5 is transient. {yields} Mitochondrial STAT5 binds to a putative STAT5 site in the mitochondrial DNA in vitro. -- Abstract: Signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) were first identified as key signaling molecules in response to cytokines. Constitutive STAT activation also has been widely implicated in oncogenesis. We analyzed STAT5-associated proteins in a leukemic T cell line LSTRA, which exhibits constitutive tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of STAT5. A cellular protein was found to specifically interact with STAT5 in LSTRA cells by co-immunoprecipitation. Sequencing analysis and subsequent immunoblotting confirmed the identity of this STAT5-associated protein as the E2 component of mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC-E2). Consistent with this interaction, both subcellular fractionation and immunofluorescence microscopy revealed mitochondrial localization of STAT5 in LSTRA cells. Mitochondrial localization of tyrosine-phosphorylated STAT5 also occurred in cytokine-stimulated cells. A time course experiment further demonstrated the transient kinetics of STAT5 mitochondrial translocation after cytokine stimulation. In contrast, cytokine-induced STAT1 and STAT3 activation did not result in their translocation into mitochondria. Furthermore, we showed that mitochondrial STAT5 bound to the D-loop regulatory region of mitochondrial DNA in vitro. It suggests a potential role of STAT5 in regulating the mitochondrial genome. Proliferative metabolism toward aerobic glycolysis is well known in cancer cells as the Warburg effect and is also observed in cytokine

  18. MiR-211/STAT5A Signaling Modulates Migration of Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Improve its Therapeutic Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xinyang; Chen, Panpan; Wu, Yan; Wang, Kan; Xu, Yinchuan; Chen, Han; Zhang, Ling; Wu, Rongrong; Webster, Keith A; Yu, Hong; Zhu, Wei; Wang, Jian'an

    2016-07-01

    Our previous study showed that the therapeutic effects of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) transplantation were improved by enhancing migration. MicroRNA-211 (miR-211) can modulate the migratory properties of some cell types by mechanisms that are not fully understood. This study was designed to investigate a possible role for miR-211 in MSC migration, and whether genetic manipulation of miR-211 in MSCs could be used to enhance its beneficial effects of cell transplantation. Transwell assays confirmed that MSCs migration of was significantly impaired by miR-211 knockdown but enhanced by miR-211 overexpression. MiR-211 overexpressing MSCs also exhibited significantly increased cell engraftment in the peri-infarct areas of female rat hearts 2 days after intravenous transplantation of male MSCs as shown by GFP tracking and SYR gene quantification. This conferred a significant decrease in infarct size and improved cardiac performance. By using a loss or gain of gene function approach, we demonstrated that miR-211 targeted STAT5A to modulate MSCs migration, possibly by interacting with MAPK signaling. Furthermore, the beneficial effects of miR-211 overexpression in MSCs were abolished by simultaneous overexpression of STAT5A whereas the negative effects of miR-211 silencing on MSC migration were rescued by simultaneous downregulation of STAT5A. Finally, using ChIP-PCR and luciferase assays, we provide novel evidence that STAT3 can directly bind to promoter elements that activate miR-211 expression. STAT3/miR-211/STAT5A signaling plays a key role in MSCs migration. Intravenous infusion of genetically modified miR-211 overexpressing MSCs conveys enhanced protection from adverse post-MI remodeling compared with unmodified MSCs. Stem Cells 2016;34:1846-1858.

  19. Co-operating STAT5 and AKT signaling pathways in chronic myeloid leukemia and mastocytosis: possible new targets of therapy.

    PubMed

    Bibi, Siham; Arslanhan, Melis Dilara; Langenfeld, Florent; Jeanningros, Sylvie; Cerny-Reiterer, Sabine; Hadzijusufovic, Emir; Tchertanov, Luba; Moriggl, Richard; Valent, Peter; Arock, Michel

    2014-03-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia and systemic mastocytosis are myeloid neoplasms sharing a number of pathogenetic and clinical features. In both conditions, an aberrantly activated oncoprotein with tyrosine kinase activity, namely BCR-ABL1 in chronic myeloid leukemia, and mutant KIT, mostly KIT D816V, in systemic mastocytosis, is key to disease evolution. The appreciation of the role of such tyrosine kinases in these diseases has led to the development of improved therapies with tyrosine kinase-targeted inhibitors. However, most drugs, including new KIT D816V-blocking agents, have failed to achieve long-lasting remissions in advanced systemic mastocytosis, and there is a similar problem in chronic myeloid leukemia, where imatinib-resistant patients sometimes fail to achieve remission, even with second- or third-line BCR-ABL1 specific tyrosine kinase inhibitors. During disease progression, additional signaling pathways become activated in neoplastic cells, but most converge into major downstream networks. Among these, the AKT and STAT5 pathways appear most critical and may result in drug-resistant chronic myeloid leukemia and systemic mastocytosis. Inhibition of phosphorylation of these targets has proven their crucial role in disease-evolution in both malignancies. Together, these observations suggest that STAT5 and AKT are key drivers of oncogenesis in drug-resistant forms of the diseases, and that targeting STAT5 and AKT might be an interesting approach in these malignancies. The present article provides an overview of our current knowledge about the critical role of AKT and STAT5 in the pathophysiology of chronic myeloid leukemia and systemic mastocytosis and on their potential value as therapeutic targets in these neoplasms.

  20. Co-operating STAT5 and AKT signaling pathways in chronic myeloid leukemia and mastocytosis: possible new targets of therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bibi, Siham; Arslanhan, Melis Dilara; Langenfeld, Florent; Jeanningros, Sylvie; Cerny-Reiterer, Sabine; Hadzijusufovic, Emir; Tchertanov, Luba; Moriggl, Richard; Valent, Peter; Arock, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia and systemic mastocytosis are myeloid neoplasms sharing a number of pathogenetic and clinical features. In both conditions, an aberrantly activated oncoprotein with tyrosine kinase activity, namely BCR-ABL1 in chronic myeloid leukemia, and mutant KIT, mostly KIT D816V, in systemic mastocytosis, is key to disease evolution. The appreciation of the role of such tyrosine kinases in these diseases has led to the development of improved therapies with tyrosine kinase-targeted inhibitors. However, most drugs, including new KIT D816V-blocking agents, have failed to achieve long-lasting remissions in advanced systemic mastocytosis, and there is a similar problem in chronic myeloid leukemia, where imatinib-resistant patients sometimes fail to achieve remission, even with second- or third-line BCR-ABL1 specific tyrosine kinase inhibitors. During disease progression, additional signaling pathways become activated in neoplastic cells, but most converge into major downstream networks. Among these, the AKT and STAT5 pathways appear most critical and may result in drug-resistant chronic myeloid leukemia and systemic mastocytosis. Inhibition of phosphorylation of these targets has proven their crucial role in disease-evolution in both malignancies. Together, these observations suggest that STAT5 and AKT are key drivers of oncogenesis in drug-resistant forms of the diseases, and that targeting STAT5 and AKT might be an interesting approach in these malignancies. The present article provides an overview of our current knowledge about the critical role of AKT and STAT5 in the pathophysiology of chronic myeloid leukemia and systemic mastocytosis and on their potential value as therapeutic targets in these neoplasms. PMID:24598853

  1. Hepatic oxidative stress promotes insulin-STAT-5 signaling and obesity by inactivating protein tyrosine phosphatase N2

    PubMed Central

    Gurzov, Esteban N.; Tran, Melanie; Fernandez-Rojo, Manuel A; Merry, Troy L; Zhang, Xinmei; Xu, Yang; Fukushima, Atsushi; Waters, Michael J; Watt, Matthew J; Andrikopoulos, Sofianos; Neel, Benjamin G; Tiganis, Tony

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic insulin resistance is a key contributor to the pathogenesis of obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Paradoxically the development of insulin resistance in the liver is not universal, but pathway-selective, such that insulin fails to suppress gluconeogenesis but promotes lipogenesis, contributing to the hyperglycemia, steatosis and hypertriglyceridemia that underpin the deteriorating glucose control and microvascular complications in T2D. The molecular basis for the pathway-specific insulin resistance remains unknown. Here we report that oxidative stress accompanying obesity inactivates protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) in the liver, which activates select signaling pathways that exacerbate disease progression. In obese mice, hepatic PTPN2 (TCPTP) inactivation promoted lipogenesis and steatosis and insulin-STAT-5 signaling. The enhanced STAT-5 signaling increased hepatic IGF-1 production, which suppressed central growth hormone release and exacerbated the development of obesity and T2D. Our studies define a mechanism for the development of selective insulin resistance with wide-ranging implications for diseases characterised by oxidative stress. PMID:24954415

  2. STAT5-Interacting Proteins: A Synopsis of Proteins that Regulate STAT5 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Able, Ashley A.; Burrell, Jasmine A.; Stephens, Jacqueline M.

    2017-01-01

    Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription (STATs) are key components of the JAK/STAT pathway. Of the seven STATs, STAT5A and STAT5B are of particular interest for their critical roles in cellular differentiation, adipogenesis, oncogenesis, and immune function. The interactions of STAT5A and STAT5B with cytokine/hormone receptors, nuclear receptors, transcriptional regulators, proto-oncogenes, kinases, and phosphatases all contribute to modulating STAT5 activity. Among these STAT5 interacting proteins, some serve as coactivators or corepressors to regulate STAT5 transcriptional activity and some proteins can interact with STAT5 to enhance or repress STAT5 signaling. In addition, a few STAT5 interacting proteins have been identified as positive regulators of STAT5 that alter serine and tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT5 while other proteins have been identified as negative regulators of STAT5 via dephosphorylation. This review article will discuss how STAT5 activity is modulated by proteins that physically interact with STAT5. PMID:28287479

  3. Sleeping Beauty transposon screen identifies signaling modules that cooperate with STAT5 activation to induce B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Heltemes-Harris, L M; Larson, J D; Starr, T K; Hubbard, G K; Sarver, A L; Largaespada, D A; Farrar, M A

    2016-06-30

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) activation occurs frequently in human progenitor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). To identify gene alterations that cooperate with STAT5 activation to initiate leukemia, we crossed mice expressing a constitutively active form of STAT5 (Stat5b-CA) with mice in which a mutagenic Sleeping Beauty transposon (T2/Onc) was mobilized only in B cells. Stat5b-CA mice typically do not develop B-ALL (<2% penetrance); in contrast, 89% of Stat5b-CA mice in which the T2/Onc transposon had been mobilized died of B-ALL by 3 months of age. High-throughput sequencing approaches were used to identify genes frequently targeted by the T2/Onc transposon; these included Sos1 (74%), Kdm2a (35%), Jak1 (26%), Bmi1 (19%), Prdm14 or Ncoa2 (13%), Cdkn2a (10%), Ikzf1 (8%), Caap1 (6%) and Klf3 (6%). Collectively, these mutations target three major cellular processes: (i) the Janus kinase/STAT5 pathway (ii) progenitor B-cell differentiation and (iii) the CDKN2A tumor-suppressor pathway. Transposon insertions typically resulted in altered expression of these genes, as well as downstream pathways including STAT5, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) and p38. Importantly, expression of Sos1 and Kdm2a, and activation of p38, correlated with survival, further underscoring the role these genes and associated pathways have in B-ALL.

  4. Sleeping Beauty transposon screen identifies signaling modules that cooperate with STAT5 activation to induce B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Heltemes-Harris, Lynn M.; Larson, Jon D.; Starr, Timothy K.; Hubbard, Gregory K.; Sarver, Aaron L.; Largaespada, David A.; Farrar, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    STAT5 activation occurs frequently in human progenitor B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). To identify gene alterations that cooperate with STAT5 activation to initiate leukemia we crossed mice expressing a constitutively active form of STAT5 (Stat5b-CA) to mice in which a mutagenic Sleeping Beauty transposon (T2/Onc) was mobilized only in B cells. Stat5b-CA mice typically do not develop B-ALL (<2% penetrance); in contrast, 89% of Stat5b–CA mice in which the T2/Onc transposon had been mobilized died of B-ALL by 3 months of age. High-throughput sequencing approaches were used to identify genes frequently targeted by the T2/Onc transposon; these included Sos1 (74%), Kdm2a (35%), Jak1 (26%), Bmi1 (19%), Prdm14 or Ncoa2 (13%), Cdkn2a (10%), Ikzf1 (8%), Caap1 (6%) and Klf3 (6%). Collectively, these mutations target three major cellular processes: (i) the JAK/STAT5 pathway (ii) progenitor B cell differentiation and (iii) the CDKN2A tumor suppressor pathway. Transposon insertions typically resulted in altered expression of these genes, as well as downstream pathways including STAT5, ERK and p38. Importantly, expression of Sos1 and Kdm2a, and activation of p38, correlated with survival, further underscoring the role these genes and associated pathways play in B-ALL. PMID:26500062

  5. JAK2V617F/STAT5 signaling pathway promotes cell proliferation through activation of Pituitary Tumor Transforming Gene 1 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Xu-Liang; Wei, Wu; Xu, Hong-Liang; Zhang, Mei-Xiang; Qin, Xiao-Qi; Shi, Wen-Zhi; Jiang, Zhi-Ping; Chen, Yi-Jian; Chen, Fang-Ping

    2010-08-06

    Research highlights: {yields} AG490, a member of tyrosine kinase inhibitors, could inhibit the JAK2V617F/STAT5 signaling pathway in HEL cell which harbor JAK2V617F mutation. {yields} Inhibition of the JAK2V617F/STAT5 signaling pathway inhibited the growth of HEL cells. {yields} JAK2V617F mutation promotes cell proliferation through activation of PTTG1 expression. {yields} JAK2V617F/STAT5 signaling pathway regulate PTTG1 expression at transcriptional level. -- Abstract: Gain-of-function mutations of JAK2 play crucial roles in the development of myeloproliferative neoplasms; however, the underlying downstream events of this activated signaling pathway are not fully understood. Our experiment was designed and performed to address one aspect of this issue. Here we report that AG490, a potent JAK2V617F kinase inhibitor, effectively inhibits the proliferation of HEL cells. Interestingly, AG490 also decreases the expression of PTTG1, a possible target gene of the aberrant signaling pathway, in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, the promoter activity analyses reveal that the inhibition of the PTTG1 expression is affected at the transcriptional level. Thus, our results suggest that the JAK2V617F/STAT5 signaling pathway promotes cell proliferation through the transcriptional activation of PTTG1.

  6. STAT5 in Cancer and Immunity.

    PubMed

    Rani, Aradhana; Murphy, John J

    2016-04-01

    Signal transducers and activators of transcription 5 (STAT5a and STAT5b) are highly homologous proteins that are encoded by 2 separate genes and are activated by Janus-activated kinases (JAK) downstream of cytokine receptors. STAT5 proteins are activated by a wide variety of hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cytokines and growth factors, all of which use the JAK-STAT signalling pathway as their main mode of signal transduction. STAT5 proteins critically regulate vital cellular functions such as proliferation, differentiation, and survival. The physiological importance of STAT5 proteins is underscored by the plethora of primary human tumors that have aberrant constitutive activation of these proteins, which significantly contributes to tumor cell survival and malignant progression of disease. STAT5 plays an important role in the maintenance of normal immune function and homeostasis, both of which are regulated by specific members of IL-2 family of cytokines, which share a common gamma chain (γ(c)) in their receptor complex. STAT5 critically mediates the biological actions of members of the γ(c) family of cytokines in the immune system. Essentially, STAT5 plays a critical role in the function and development of Tregs, and consistently activated STAT5 is associated with a suppression in antitumor immunity and an increase in proliferation, invasion, and survival of tumor cells. Thus, therapeutic targeting of STAT5 is promising in cancer.

  7. A Sequence of the CIS Gene Promoter Interacts Preferentially with Two Associated STAT5A Dimers: a Distinct Biochemical Difference between STAT5A and STAT5B

    PubMed Central

    Verdier, Frédérique; Rabionet, Raquel; Gouilleux, Fabrice; Beisenherz-Huss, Christian; Varlet, Paule; Muller, Odile; Mayeux, Patrick; Lacombe, Catherine; Gisselbrecht, Sylvie; Chretien, Stany

    1998-01-01

    Two distinct genes encode the closely related signal transducer and activator of transcription proteins STAT5A and STAT5B. The molecular mechanisms of gene regulation by STAT5 and, particularly, the requirement for both STAT5 isoforms are still undetermined. Only a few STAT5 target genes, among them the CIS (cytokine-inducible SH2-containing protein) gene, have been identified. We cloned the human CIS gene and studied the human CIS gene promoter. This promoter contains four STAT binding elements organized in two pairs. By electrophoretic mobility shift assay studies using nuclear extracts of UT7 cells stimulated with erythropoietin, we showed that these four sequences bound to STAT5-containing complexes that exhibited different patterns and affinities: the three upstream STAT binding sequences bound to two distinct STAT5-containing complexes (C0 and C1) and the downstream STAT box bound only to the slower-migrating C1 band. Using nuclear extracts from COS-7 cells transfected with expression vectors for the prolactin receptor, STAT5A, and/or STAT5B, we showed that the C1 complex was composed of a STAT5 tetramer and was dependent on the presence of STAT5A. STAT5B lacked this property and bound with a stronger affinity than did STAT5A to the four STAT sequences as a homodimer (C0 complex). This distinct biochemical difference between STAT5A and STAT5B was confirmed with purified activated STAT5 recombinant proteins. Moreover, we showed that the presence on the same side of the DNA helix of a second STAT sequence increased STAT5 binding and that only half of the palindromic STAT binding sequence was sufficient for the formation of a STAT5 tetramer. Again, STAT5A was essential for this cooperative tetrameric association. This property distinguishes STAT5A from STAT5B and could be essential to explain the transcriptional regulation diversity of STAT5. PMID:9742102

  8. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) paralog dose governs T cell effector and regulatory functions

    PubMed Central

    Villarino, Alejandro; Laurence, Arian; Robinson, Gertraud W; Bonelli, Michael; Dema, Barbara; Afzali, Behdad; Shih, Han-Yu; Sun, Hong-Wei; Brooks, Stephen R; Hennighausen, Lothar; Kanno, Yuka; O'Shea, John J

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor STAT5 is fundamental to the mammalian immune system. However, the relationship between its two paralogs, STAT5A and STAT5B, and the extent to which they are functionally distinct, remain uncertain. Using mouse models of paralog deficiency, we demonstrate that they are not equivalent for CD4+ 'helper' T cells, the principal orchestrators of adaptive immunity. Instead, we find that STAT5B is dominant for both effector and regulatory (Treg) responses and, therefore, uniquely necessary for immunological tolerance. Comparative analysis of genomic distribution and transcriptomic output confirm that STAT5B has fargreater impact but, surprisingly, the data point towards asymmetric expression (i.e. paralog dose), rather than distinct functional properties, as the key distinguishing feature. Thus, we propose a quantitative model of STAT5 paralog activity whereby relative abundance imposes functional specificity (or dominance) in the face of widespread structural homology. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08384.001 PMID:26999798

  9. CUZD1 is a critical mediator of the JAK/STAT5 signaling pathway that controls mammary gland development during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Quanxi; Kannan, Athilakshmi; Anandan, Lavanya; Lydon, John P.; Bagchi, Indrani C.; Bagchi, Milan K.

    2017-01-01

    In the mammary gland, genetic circuits controlled by estrogen, progesterone, and prolactin, act in concert with pathways regulated by members of the epidermal growth factor family to orchestrate growth and morphogenesis during puberty, pregnancy and lactation. However, the precise mechanisms underlying the crosstalk between the hormonal and growth factor pathways remain poorly understood. We have identified the CUB and zona pellucida-like domain-containing protein 1 (CUZD1), expressed in mammary ductal and alveolar epithelium, as a novel mediator of mammary gland proliferation and differentiation during pregnancy and lactation. Cuzd1-null mice exhibited a striking impairment in mammary ductal branching and alveolar development during pregnancy, resulting in a subsequent defect in lactation. Gene expression profiling of mammary epithelium revealed that CUZD1 regulates the expression of a subset of the EGF family growth factors, epiregulin, neuregulin-1, and epigen, which act in an autocrine fashion to activate ErbB1 and ErbB4 receptors. Proteomic studies further revealed that CUZD1 interacts with a complex containing JAK1/JAK2 and STAT5, downstream transducers of prolactin signaling in the mammary gland. In the absence of CUZD1, STAT5 phosphorylation in the mammary epithelium during alveologenesis was abolished. Conversely, elevated expression of Cuzd1 in mammary epithelial cells stimulated prolactin-induced phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of STAT5. Chromatin immunoprecipitation confirmed co-occupancy of phosphorylated STAT5 and CUZD1 in the regulatory regions of epiregulin, a potential regulator of epithelial proliferation, and whey acidic protein, a marker of epithelial differentiation. Collectively, these findings suggest that CUZD1 plays a critical role in prolactin-induced JAK/STAT5 signaling that controls the expression of key STAT5 target genes involved in mammary epithelial proliferation and differentiation during alveolar development. PMID

  10. The dipeptide Pro-Asp promotes IGF-1 secretion and expression in hepatocytes by enhancing JAK2/STAT5 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Songbo; Wang, Guoqing; Zhang, Mengyuan; Zhuang, Lu; Wan, Xiaojuan; Xu, Jingren; Wang, Lina; Zhu, Xiaotong; Gao, Ping; Xi, Qianyun; Zhang, Yongliang; Shu, Gang; Jiang, Qingyan

    2016-11-15

    It has been implicated that IGF-1 secretion can be regulated by dietary protein. However, whether the dipeptides, one of digested products of dietary protein, have influence on IGF-1 secretion remain largely unknown. Our study aimed to investigate the effects of the dipeptide Pro-Asp on IGF-1 secretion and expression in hepatocytes and to explore the possible underlying mechanisms. Our findings demonstrated that Pro-Asp promoted the secretion and gene expression of IGF-1 in HepG2 cells and primary porcine hepatocytes. Meanwhile, Pro-Asp activated the ERK and Akt signaling pathways, downstream of IGF-1. In addition, Pro-Asp enhanced GH-mediated JAK2/STAT5 signaling pathway, while inhibition of JAK2/STAT5 blocked the promotive effect of Pro-Asp on IGF-1 secretion and expression. Moreover, acute injection of Pro-Asp stimulated IGF-1 expression and activated JAK2/STAT5 signaling pathway in mice liver. Together, these results suggested that the dipeptide Pro-Asp promoted IGF-1 secretion and expression in hepatocytes by enhancing GH-mediated JAK2/STAT5 signaling pathway.

  11. Caveolin-1-deficient Mice Show Accelerated Mammary Gland Development During Pregnancy, Premature Lactation, and Hyperactivation of the Jak-2/STAT5a Signaling Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Park, David S.; Lee, Hyangkyu; Frank, Philippe G.; Razani, Babak; Nguyen, Andrew V.; Parlow, Albert F.; Russell, Robert G.; Hulit, James; Pestell, Richard G.; Lisanti, Michael P.

    2002-01-01

    It is well established that mammary gland development and lactation are tightly controlled by prolactin signaling. Binding of prolactin to its cognate receptor (Prl-R) leads to activation of the Jak-2 tyrosine kinase and the recruitment/tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT5a. However, the mechanisms for attenuating the Prl-R/Jak-2/STAT5a signaling cascade are just now being elucidated. Here, we present evidence that caveolin-1 functions as a novel suppressor of cytokine signaling in the mammary gland, akin to the SOCS family of proteins. Specifically, we show that caveolin-1 expression blocks prolactin-induced activation of a STAT5a-responsive luciferase reporter in mammary epithelial cells. Furthermore, caveolin-1 expression inhibited prolactin-induced STAT5a tyrosine phosphorylation and DNA binding activity, suggesting that caveolin-1 may negatively regulate the Jak-2 tyrosine kinase. Because the caveolin-scaffolding domain bears a striking resemblance to the SOCS pseudosubstrate domain, we examined whether Jak-2 associates with caveolin-1. In accordance with this homology, we demonstrate that Jak-2 cofractionates and coimmunoprecipitates with caveolin-1. We next tested the in vivo relevance of these findings using female Cav-1 (−/−) null mice. If caveolin-1 normally functions as a suppressor of cytokine signaling in the mammary gland, then Cav-1 null mice should show premature development of the lobuloalveolar compartment because of hyperactivation of the prolactin signaling cascade via disinhibition of Jak-2. In accordance with this prediction, Cav-1 null mice show accelerated development of the lobuloalveolar compartment, premature milk production, and hyperphosphorylation of STAT5a (pY694) at its Jak-2 phosphorylation site. In addition, the Ras-p42/44 MAPK cascade is hyper-activated. Because a similar premature lactation phenotype is observed in SOCS1 (−/−) null mice, we conclude that caveolin-1 is a novel suppressor of cytokine signaling. PMID:12388746

  12. CD8+ T cells promote proliferation of benign prostatic hyperplasia epithelial cells under low androgen level via modulation of CCL5/STAT5/CCND1 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Hu, Shuai; Liu, Jie; Cui, Yun; Fan, Yu; Lv, Tianjing; Liu, Libo; Li, Jun; He, Qun; Han, Wenke; Yu, Wei; Sun, Yin; Jin, Jie

    2017-02-20

    Previous studies by our group have shown that low intra-prostatic dihydrotestosterone (DHT) induced BPH epithelial cells (BECs) to recruit CD8+ T cells. However, the influence of the recruited CD8+ T cells on BECs under a low androgen level is still unknown. Here, we found CD8+ T cells have the capacity to promote proliferation of BECs in low androgen condition. Mechanism dissection revealed that interaction between CD8+ T cells and BECs through secretion of CCL5 might promote the phosphorylation of STAT5 and a higher expression of CCND1 in BECs. Suppressed CCL5/STAT5 signals via CCL5 neutralizing antibody or STAT5 inhibitor Pimozide led to reverse CD8+ T cell-enhanced BECs proliferation. IHC analysis from Finasteride treated patients showed PCNA expression in BECs was highly correlated to the level of CD8+ T cell infiltration and the expression of CCL5. Consequently, our data indicated infiltrating CD8+ T cells could promote the proliferation of BECs in low androgen condition via modulation of CCL5/STAT5/CCND1 signaling. The increased secretion of CCL5 from the CD8+ T cells/BECs interaction might help BECs survive in a low DHT environment. Targeting these signals may provide a new potential therapeutic approach to better treat BPH patients who failed the therapy of 5α-reductase inhibitors.

  13. CD8+ T cells promote proliferation of benign prostatic hyperplasia epithelial cells under low androgen level via modulation of CCL5/STAT5/CCND1 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Hu, Shuai; Liu, Jie; Cui, Yun; Fan, Yu; Lv, Tianjing; Liu, Libo; Li, Jun; He, Qun; Han, Wenke; Yu, Wei; Sun, Yin; Jin, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies by our group have shown that low intra-prostatic dihydrotestosterone (DHT) induced BPH epithelial cells (BECs) to recruit CD8+ T cells. However, the influence of the recruited CD8+ T cells on BECs under a low androgen level is still unknown. Here, we found CD8+ T cells have the capacity to promote proliferation of BECs in low androgen condition. Mechanism dissection revealed that interaction between CD8+ T cells and BECs through secretion of CCL5 might promote the phosphorylation of STAT5 and a higher expression of CCND1 in BECs. Suppressed CCL5/STAT5 signals via CCL5 neutralizing antibody or STAT5 inhibitor Pimozide led to reverse CD8+ T cell-enhanced BECs proliferation. IHC analysis from Finasteride treated patients showed PCNA expression in BECs was highly correlated to the level of CD8+ T cell infiltration and the expression of CCL5. Consequently, our data indicated infiltrating CD8+ T cells could promote the proliferation of BECs in low androgen condition via modulation of CCL5/STAT5/CCND1 signaling. The increased secretion of CCL5 from the CD8+ T cells/BECs interaction might help BECs survive in a low DHT environment. Targeting these signals may provide a new potential therapeutic approach to better treat BPH patients who failed the therapy of 5α-reductase inhibitors. PMID:28216616

  14. Signal Transducer and Activator of  Transcription (STAT)5 Activation by BCR/ABL Is Dependent on Intact Src Homology (SH)3 and SH2 Domains of BCR/ABL and Is Required for Leukemogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nieborowska-Skorska, Malgorzata; Wasik, Mariusz A.; Slupianek, Artur; Salomoni, Paolo; Kitamura, Toshio; Calabretta, Bruno; Skorski, Tomasz

    1999-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)5 is constitutively activated in BCR/ ABL-expressing cells, but the mechanisms and functional consequences of such activation are unknown. We show here that BCR/ABL induces phosphorylation and activation of STAT5 by a mechanism that requires the BCR/ABL Src homology (SH)2 domain and the proline-rich binding site of the SH3 domain. Upon expression in 32Dcl3 growth factor–dependent myeloid precursor cells, STAT5 activation–deficient BCR/ABL SH3+SH2 domain mutants functioned as tyrosine kinase and activated Ras, but failed to protect from apoptosis induced by withdrawal of interleukin 3 and/or serum and did not induce leukemia in severe combined immunodeficiency mice. In complementation assays, expression of a dominant-active STAT5B mutant (STAT5B-DAM), but not wild-type STAT5B (STAT5B-WT), in 32Dcl3 cells transfected with STAT5 activation–deficient BCR/ABL SH3+SH2 mutants restored protection from apoptosis, stimulated growth factor–independent cell cycle progression, and rescued the leukemogenic potential in mice. Moreover, expression of a dominant-negative STAT5B mutant (STAT5B-DNM) in 32Dcl3 cells transfected with wild-type BCR/ABL inhibited apoptosis resistance, growth factor–independent proliferation, and the leukemogenic potential of these cells. In retrovirally infected mouse bone marrow cells, expression of STAT5B-DNM inhibited BCR/ABL-dependent transformation. Moreover, STAT5B-DAM, but not STAT5B-WT, markedly enhanced the ability of STAT5 activation–defective BCR/ABL SH3+SH2 mutants to induce growth factor–independent colony formation of primary mouse bone marrow progenitor cells. However, STAT5B-DAM did not rescue the growth factor–independent colony formation of kinase-deficient K1172R BCR/ABL or the triple mutant Y177F+R522L+ Y793F BCR/ABL, both of which also fail to activate STAT5. Together, these data demonstrate that STAT5 activation by BCR/ABL is dependent on signaling from more

  15. Antiapoptotic effects of erythropoietin in differentiated neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells require activation of both the STAT5 and AKT signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Um, Moonkyoung; Lodish, Harvey F

    2006-03-03

    The hematopoietic cytokine erythropoietin (Epo) prevents neuronal death during ischemic events in the brain and in neurodegenerative diseases, presumably through its antiapoptotic effects. To explore the role of different signaling pathways in Epo-mediated antiapoptotic effects in differentiated human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, we employed a prolactin receptor (PrlR)/erythropoietin receptor (EpoR) chimera system, in which binding of prolactin (Prl) to the extracellular domain activates EpoR signaling in the cytosol. On induction of apoptosis by staurosporine, Prl supports survival of the SH-SY5Y cells expressing the wild-type PrlR/EpoR chimera. In these cells Prl treatment strongly activates the STAT5, AKT, and MAPK signaling pathways and induces weak activation of the p65 NF-kappaB factor. Selective mutation of the eight tyrosine residues of the EpoR cytoplasmic domain results in impaired or absent activation of either STAT5 (mutation of Tyr(343)) or AKT (mutation of Tyr(479)) or both (mutation of all eight tyrosine residues). Most interestingly, Prl treatment does not prevent apoptosis in cells expressing mutant PrlR/EpoR chimeras in which either the STAT5 or the AKT signaling pathways are not activated. In contrast, ERK 1/2 is fully activated by all mutant PrlR/EpoR chimeras, comparable with the level seen with the wild-type PrlR/EpoR chimera, implying that activation of the MAPK signaling pathway per se is not sufficient for antiapoptotic activity. Therefore, the antiapoptotic effects of Epo in neuronal cells require the combinatorial activation of multiple signaling pathways, including STAT5, AKT, and potentially MAPK as well, in a manner similar to that observed in hematopoietic cells.

  16. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5b (Stat5b) serine 193 is a novel cytokine-induced phospho-regulatory site that is constitutively activated in primary hematopoietic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Abhisek; Ross, Jeremy A; Rodriguez, Georgialina; Nagy, Zsuzsanna S; Wilson, Harry L; Kirken, Robert A

    2012-05-11

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5b (Stat5b) is a critical node in the signaling network downstream of external (cytokines or growth factors) or internal (oncogenic tyrosine kinases) stimuli. Maximum transcriptional activation of Stat5b requires both tyrosine and serine phosphorylation. Although the mechanisms governing tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of Stat5b have been extensively studied, the role of serine phosphorylation remains to be fully elucidated. Using mass spectrometry and phospho-specific antibodies, we identified Ser-193 as a novel site of cytokine-induced phosphorylation within human Stat5b. Stat5b Ser(P)-193 was detected in activated primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells or lymphoid cell lines in response to several γ common (γc) cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-2, IL-7, IL-9, and IL-15. Kinetic and spatial analysis indicated that Stat5b Ser-193 phosphorylation was rapid and transient and occurred in the cytoplasmic compartment of the cell prior to Stat5b translocation to the nucleus. Moreover, inducible Stat5b Ser-193 phosphorylation was sensitive to inhibitors of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), whereas inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) induced phosphorylation of Ser-193. Reconstitution assays in HEK293 cells in conjunction with site-directed mutagenesis, EMSA, and reporter assays indicated that Ser(P)-193 is required for maximal Stat5b transcriptional activity. Indeed, Stat5b Ser-193 was found constitutively phosphorylated in several lymphoid tumor cell lines as well as primary leukemia and lymphoma patient tumor cells. Taken together, IL-2 family cytokines tightly control Stat5b Ser-193 phosphorylation through a rapamycin-sensitive mechanism. Furthermore, constitutive Ser-193 phosphorylation is associated with Stat5b proto-oncogenic activity and therefore may serve as a novel therapeutic target for treating hematopoietic malignancies.

  17. Nectin-4 Co-stimulates the Prolactin Receptor by Interacting with SOCS1 and Inhibiting Its Activity on the JAK2-STAT5a Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Maruoka, Masahiro; Kedashiro, Shin; Ueda, Yuki; Mizutani, Kiyohito; Takai, Yoshimi

    2017-03-03

    Cell surface cytokine receptors are regulated by their cis-interacting stimulatory and inhibitory co-receptors. We previously showed that the immunoglobulin-like cell adhesion molecule nectin-4 cis-interacts with the prolactin receptor through the extracellular region and stimulates prolactin-induced prolactin receptor activation and signaling, resulting in alveolar development in the mouse mammary gland. However, it remains unknown how this interaction stimulates these effects. We show here that the cis-interaction of the extracellular region of nectin-4 with the prolactin receptor was not sufficient for eliciting these effects and that nectin-4's cytoplasmic region was also required for eliciting these effects. The cytoplasmic region of nectin-4 directly interacted with suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) 1, but not SOCS3, JAK2, or STAT5a, and inhibited SOCS1's interaction with JAK2, eventually resulting in the increased phosphorylation of STAT5a. The juxtamembrane region of nectin-4 interacts with the Src homology 2 domain of SOCS1. Both the interactions of nectin-4 with the extracellular region of the prolactin receptor and the interactions of SOCS1 with nectin-4's cytoplasmic region were required for the stimulatory effect of nectin-4 on the prolactin-induced prolactin receptor activation. The third immunoglobulin-like domain of nectin-4 and the second fibronectin type-III domain of the prolactin receptor were involved in this cis-interaction, and both the extracellular and transmembrane regions of nectin-4 and the prolactin receptor were required for this direct interaction. These results indicate that nectin-4 serves as a stimulatory co-receptor for the prolactin receptor by regulating the feedback inhibition of SOCS1 in the JAK2-STAT5a signaling pathway.

  18. Environmentally relevant concentrations of arsenite and monomethylarsonous acid inhibit IL-7/STAT5 cytokine signaling pathways in mouse CD3+CD4-CD8- double negative thymus cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huan; Lauer, Fredine T; Liu, Ke Jian; Hudson, Laurie G; Burchiel, Scott W

    2016-04-15

    Environmental arsenic exposure is a public health issue. Immunotoxicity induced by arsenic has been reported in humans and animal models. The purpose of this study was to evaluate mechanisms of As(+3) and MMA(+3) toxicity in mouse thymus cells. Because we know that MMA(+3) inhibits IL-7 signaling in mouse bone marrow pre-B cells, we studied the influence of As(+3) and MMA(+3) on T cell development in the thymus at the earliest stage of T cell development (CD4-CD8-, double negative, DN) which requires IL-7 dependent signaling. We found in a DN thymus cell line (D1) that a low concentration of MMA(+3) (50 nM) suppressed IL-7 dependent JAK1, 3 and STAT5 signaling. As(+3) suppressed STAT5 and JAK3 at higher concentrations (500 nM). Cell surface expression of the IL-7 receptor (CD127) was also suppressed by 50 nM MMA(+)3, but was increased by 500 NM As(+3), indicating possible differences in the mechanisms of action of these agents. A decrease in cyclin D1 protein expression was observed in D1 cells exposed to As(+3) at 500 nM and MMA(+3) starting at 50 nM, suggesting that arsenic at these environmentally-relevant doses suppresses early T cell development through the inhibition of IL-7 signaling pathway.

  19. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription (Stat) 5 is mediated by PDGF beta-receptor and is not dependent on c-src, fyn, jak1 or jak2 kinases.

    PubMed Central

    Paukku, K; Valgeirsdóttir, S; Saharinen, P; Bergman, M; Heldin, C H; Silvennoinen, O

    2000-01-01

    Several growth factors activate signal transducers and activators of transcription (Stats) but the mechanism of Stat activation in receptor tyrosine kinase signalling has remained elusive. In the present study we have analysed the roles of different platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced tyrosine kinases in the activation of Stat5. Co-expression experiments in insect and mammalian cells demonstrated that both PDGF beta-receptor (PDGF beta-R) and Jak1, but not c-Src, induced the activation of Stat5. Furthermore, immune-complex-purified PDGF beta-R was able to phosphorylate Stat5 directly. The role of the cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases in the PDGF-induced activation of Stat5 was further investigated by overexpressing kinase-negative (KN) and wild-type Jak and c-Src kinases. Jak1-KN or Jak2-KN had no effect but both Src-KN and wild-type c-Src similarly decreased the PDGF-beta-R-induced activation of Stat5. The activation of both Src and Stat5 is dependent on the same tyrosine residues Tyr(579) and Tyr(581) in PDGF beta-R; thus the observed inhibition by Src might result from competition for binding of Stat5 to the receptor. Finally, fibroblasts derived from Src(-/-) and Fyn(-/-) mice showed normal pattern of PDGF-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of Stat5. Taken together, these results indicate that Stat5 is a direct substrate for PDGF beta-R and that the activation does not require Jak1, Jak2, c-Src or Fyn tyrosine kinases. PMID:10642538

  20. An invertebrate signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) ortholog from the disk abalone, Haliotis discus discus: Genomic structure, early developmental expression, and immune responses to bacterial and viral stresses.

    PubMed

    Bathige, S D N K; Umasuthan, Navaneethaiyer; Park, Hae-Chul; Lee, Jehee

    2016-03-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) family members are key signaling molecules that transduce cellular responses from the cell membrane to the nucleus upon Janus kinase (JAK) activation. Although seven STAT members have been reported in mammals, very limited information on STAT genes in molluscans is available. In this study, we identified and characterized a STAT paralog that is homologous to STAT5 from the disk abalone, Haliotis discus discus, and designated as AbSTAT5. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence for AbSTAT5 (790 amino acids) with other counterparts revealed conserved residues important for functions and typical domain regions, including the N-terminal domain, coiled-coil domain, DNA-binding domain, linker domain, and Src homology 2 (SH2) domains as mammalian counterparts. Analysis of STAT phylogeny revealed that AbSTAT5 was clustered with the molluscan subgroup in STAT5 clade with distinct evolution. According to the genomic structure of AbSTAT5, the coding sequence was distributed into 20 exons with 19 introns. Immunologically essential transcription factor-binding sites, such as GATA-1, HNF, SP1, C/EBP, Oct-1, AP1, c-Jun, and Sox-2, were predicted at the 5'-proximal region of AbSTAT5. Expression of AbSTAT5 mRNA was detected in different stages of embryonic development and observed at considerably higher levels in the morula and late veliger stages. Tissue-specific expressional studies revealed that the highest level of AbSTAT5 transcripts was detected in hemocytes, followed by gill tissues. Temporal expressions of AbSTAT5 were analyzed upon live bacterial (Vibrio parahemolyticus and Listeria monocytogenes), viral (viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus), and pathogen-associated molecular pattern (lipopolysaccharides and Poly I:C) stimulations, and significant elevations indicated immune modulation. These results suggest that AbSTAT5 may be involved in maintaining innate immune responses from developmental to adult stages in

  1. Serotonin suppresses β-casein expression via inhibition of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) protein phosphorylation in human mammary epithelial cells MCF-12A.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Takeshi; Kimura, Soichiro; Takahashi, Katsuo; Morimoto, Yasunori; Sanbe, Atsushi; Ueda, Hideo; Kudo, Kenzo

    2014-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) has an important physiological role in controlling lactation, namely, milk volume homeostasis, within mammary glands. The objectives of this study were to evaluate whether exogenous 5-HT can suppress β-casein expression, a differentiation marker, produced in human mammary epithelial cells, and to determine whether 5-HT can attenuate β-casein signaling via the prolactin (PRL) receptor (PRLr) and Janus kinase 2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) pathway. PRL treatment increased the mRNA level of β-casein in the MCF-12A human mammary epithelial cell line, and the highest level occurred at days 7 and 14 of culture. In contrast, PRLr expression was not affected significantly by PRL treatment. PRL treatment in MCF-12A cells increased levels of β-casein and phosphorylated STAT5 (pSTAT5) proteins in a concentration-dependent manner, with a slight increase of STAT5 protein. β-Casein expression was inhibited by 0.1 mM 5-HT in a time-dependent manner. Additionally, treatment with 0.1 mM 5-HT for 72 h decreased protein levels of β-casein and pSTAT5, with a slight decrease in STAT5 levels. These results suggest that exogenous 5-HT can inhibit STAT5 phosphorylation, resulting in a decrease in β-Casein expression. In conclusion, we showed that exogenous 5-HT decreased β-casein expression in MCF-12A human mammary epithelial cells, and that 5-HT was responsible for inhibiting phosphorylation of STAT5, resulting in a decline in lactational function.

  2. Aberrant STAT5 and PI3K/mTOR pathway signaling occurs in human CRLF2-rearranged B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Tasian, Sarah K.; Doral, Michelle Y.; Borowitz, Michael J.; Wood, Brent L.; Chen, I-Ming; Harvey, Richard C.; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Willman, Cheryl L.; Hunger, Stephen P.; Mullighan, Charles G.

    2012-01-01

    Adults and children with high-risk CRLF2-rearranged acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) respond poorly to current cytotoxic chemotherapy and suffer unacceptably high rates of relapse, supporting the need to use alternative therapies. CRLF2 encodes the thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) receptor, which activates cell signaling in normal lymphocytes on binding its ligand, TSLP. We hypothesized that aberrant cell signaling occurs in CRLF2-rearranged ALL and can be targeted by signal transduction inhibitors of this pathway. In a large number of primary CRLF2-rearranged ALL samples, we observed increased basal levels of pJAK2, pSTAT5, and pS6. We thus characterized the biochemical sequelae of CRLF2 and JAK alterations in CRLF2-rearranged ALL primary patient samples via analysis of TSLP-mediated signal transduction. TSLP stimulation of these leukemias further induced robust JAK/STAT and PI3K/mTOR pathway signaling. JAK inhibition abrogated phosphorylation of JAK/STAT and, surprisingly, of PI3K/mTOR pathway members, suggesting an interconnection between these signaling networks and providing a rationale for testing JAK inhibitors in clinical trials. The PI3K/mTOR pathway inhibitors rapamycin, PI103, and PP242 also inhibited activated signal transduction and translational machinery proteins of the PI3K/mTOR pathway, suggesting that signal transduction inhibitors targeting this pathway also may have therapeutic relevance for patients with CRLF2-rearranged ALL and merit further preclinical testing. PMID:22685175

  3. JAK2/STAT5/Bcl-xL signalling is essential for erythropoietin-mediated protection against apoptosis induced in PC12 cells by the amyloid β−peptide Aβ25–35

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Rong; Hu, Jing; Huang, Chengfang; Wang, Min; Xiang, Jizhou; Li, Gang

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Erythropoietin (EPO) exerts neuroprotective actions in the CNS, including protection against apoptosis induced by the amyloid β−peptide Aβ25–35. However, it remains unclear which signalling pathway activated by EPO is involved in this neuroprotection. Here, we have investigated whether JAK2/STAT5/Bcl-xL and ERK1/2 signalling pathways are essential for EPO-mediated protection against apoptosis induced by Aβ25–35. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH EPO was added to cultures of PC12 cells, 1 h before Aβ25–35. For kinase inhibitor studies, AG490 and PD98059 were added to PC12 cells, 0.5 h before the addition of EPO. Transfection with siRNA was used to knockdown STAT5. Activation of JAK2/STAT5/Bcl-xL and ERK1/2 signalling pathways were investigated by Western blotting. Cell viability was measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl) 2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide assay and apoptosis was detected by TUNEL and acridine orange–ethidium bromide double staining. KEY RESULTS EPO increased phosphorylation of JAK2 and STAT5 in PC12 cells treated with Aβ25–35. Furthermore, EPO modulated the nuclear translocation of phospho-STAT5, which increased expression of Bcl-xL and decreased levels of caspase-3. These beneficial effects were blocked by the JAK2 inhibitor, AG490 or STAT5 knockdown. However, the ERK1/2 pathway did not play a crucial role in our model. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS EPO protected PC12 cells against Aβ25–35-induced neurotoxicity. Activation of JAK2/STAT5/Bcl-xL pathway was important in EPO-mediated neuroprotection. EPO may serve as a novel protective agent against Aβ25–35-induced cytotoxicity in, for instance, Alzheimer's disease. PMID:24597613

  4. EPO improves the proliferation and inhibits apoptosis of trophoblast and decidual stromal cells through activating STAT-5 and inactivating p38 signal in human early pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yu Qing; Zhang, Yu Quan; Li, Ming Qing; Du, Mei Rong; Wei, Wei Wei; Li, Da Jin

    2011-01-01

    The erythropoietin (EPO) belongs to the family of angiogenic factors, which is regulated by Hypoxia-inducible factor- 1α (HIF-1α). As known, EPO are expressed in human villi and decidua, but the function is not clear. In this study, we investigated the expression and roles of HIF-1α, EPO and its receptor (EPOR) in the biological functions of trophoblast and decidual stromal cell (DSC) in human early pregnancy. The expression of EPO, EPOR and HIF-1α was evaluated in the villi and deciduas by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Thereafter, we silenced HIF-1α expression in HTR-8/SVneo cell line and decidual stromal cells (DSCs). The effects of EPO on the proliferation and apoptosis of trophoblasts and DSCs, and activation of signal molecules were investigated by BrdU proliferation assay, flow cytometry and western blot, respectively. We have observed that the HIF-1α silence results in the lower expression of EPO in trophoblasts and DSCs. The anti-EPO neutralizing antibody can inactivate the phosphorylation of STAT5 and activate p38 of these cells in a dosage-dependent manner. Furthermore, the expressions of EPO, EPOR and HIF-1α in the villi and decidua from the unexplained miscarriage were significantly lower than that of the normal early pregnancy. This study suggests that HIF-1α may regulate the expression of EPO, which plays a favorable regulatory role in the proliferation and survival of human first-trimester trophoblast cells and DSCs via inactivating p38 and activating STAT5 in an autocrine manner, while the inadequate EPO expression at maternal-fetal interface may lead to pregnancy wastage in humans.

  5. Pathologic complete response after preoperative anti-HER2 therapy correlates with alterations in PTEN, FOXO, phosphorylated Stat5, and autophagy protein signaling

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To define protein molecular characteristics of tumor cells prior to, and immediately following, preoperative human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-targeted therapy that correlate with pathologic complete response (pCR) or non response (no pCR) to preoperative HER2-directed therapy and chemotherapy. Methods This open-label, phase II study randomized patients with HER2-positive stage II or III invasive breast cancer to trastuzumab, lapatinib, or both, 2 weeks prior to and during chemotherapy with FEC75 for 4 courses; then paclitaxel 80 mg/m2 weekly for 12 courses, then surgery. Core needle biopsies were collected at baseline and after 2 weeks of anti-HER2 therapy prior to chemotherapy. Data were correlated with pCR, defined as absence of invasive tumor in breast and lymph nodes. Results Of 100 enrolled patients, the analysis population included those who had surgery and received ≥75% chemotherapy (78% [n = 78]). pCRs by arm are: trastuzumab (n = 26), 54% [n = 14]; lapatinib (n = 29), 45% [n = 13]; trastuzumab plus lapatinib (n = 23), 74% [n = 17]). Paired biopsy specimens were available for 49 patients (63%). Tumor cells of patients with pCR in the trastuzumab or lapatinib treatment arms showed nonphosphorylated FOXO, phosphorylated Stat5, and sparse signal-transduction protein network crosstalk representing different patterns of connections with PI3K and autophagy proteins compared with no pCR. Conclusion In this exploratory study, pCR with preoperative anti-HER2 therapy and chemotherapy correlated with the levels and phosphorylation status of specific baseline signal pathway proteins in tumor cells. These data may provide candidate biomarkers to stratify initial treatment and potential combination therapies for future study. Tissue preservation technology introduced here makes this procedure widely feasible. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00524303 PMID:24304724

  6. An SH2 domain model of STAT5 in complex with phospho-peptides define ``STAT5 Binding Signatures''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianti, Eleonora; Zauhar, Randy J.

    2015-05-01

    The signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) is a member of the STAT family of proteins, implicated in cell growth and differentiation. STAT activation is regulated by phosphorylation of protein monomers at conserved tyrosine residues, followed by binding to phospho-peptide pockets and subsequent dimerization. STAT5 is implicated in the development of severe pathological conditions, including many cancer forms. However, nowadays a few STAT5 inhibitors are known, and only one crystal structure of the inactive STAT5 dimer is publicly available. With a view to enabling structure-based drug design, we have: (1) analyzed phospho-peptide binding pockets on SH2 domains of STAT5, STAT1 and STAT3; (2) generated a model of STAT5 bound to phospho-peptides; (3) assessed our model by docking against a class of known STAT5 inhibitors (Müller et al. in ChemBioChem 9:723-727, 2008); (4) used molecular dynamics simulations to optimize the molecular determinants responsible for binding and (5) proposed unique "Binding Signatures" of STAT5. Our results put in place the foundations to address STAT5 as a target for rational drug design, from sequence, structural and functional perspectives.

  7. Surviving apoptosis: life-death signaling in single cells

    PubMed Central

    Flusberg, Deborah A.; Sorger, Peter K.

    2015-01-01

    Tissue development and homeostasis are regulated by opposing pro-survival and pro-death signals. An interesting feature of the Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) family of ligands is that they simultaneously activate opposing signals within a single cell via the same ligand-receptor complex. The magnitude of pro-death events such as caspase activation and pro-survival events such as NF-κB activation vary not only from one cell type to the next but also among individual cells of the same type due to intrinsic and extrinsic noise. The molecules involved in these pro-survival/pro-death pathways, and the different phenotypes that result from their activities, have been recently reviewed. Here we focus on the impact of cell-to-cell variability in the strength of these opposing signals on shaping cell fate decisions. PMID:25920803

  8. Time-Dependent Regulation of IL-2R α-Chain (CD25) Expression by TCR Signal Strength and IL-2-Induced STAT5 Signaling in Activated Human Blood T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shatrova, Alla N.; Mityushova, Elena V.; Vassilieva, Irina O.; Aksenov, Nikolay D.; Zenin, Valery V.; Nikolsky, Nikolay N.; Marakhova, Irina I.

    2016-01-01

    The expression of the IL-2R α-chain (IL-2Rα) is regulated at the transcriptional level via TCR- and IL-2R-signaling. The question is how to precede in time the activation signals to induce the IL-2Rα expression in native primary T cells. By comparing the effects of selective drugs on the dynamics of CD25 expression during the mitogen stimulation of human peripheral blood lymphocytes, we identified distinct Src- and JAK-dependent stages of IL-2Rα upregulation. PP2, a selective inhibitor of TCR-associated Src kinase, prevents CD25 expression at initial stages of T cell activation, prior to the cell growth. This early IL-2Rα upregulation underlies the T cell competence and the IL-2 responsiveness. We found that the activated with “weak” mitogen, the population of blood lymphocytes has some pool of competent CD25+ cells bearing a high affinity IL-2R. A distinct pattern of IL-2R signaling in resting and competent T lymphocytes has been shown. Based on the inhibitory effect of WHI-P131, a selective drug of JAK3 kinase activity, we concluded that in quiescent primary T lymphocytes, the constitutive STAT3 and the IL-2-induced prolonged STAT5 activity (assayed by tyrosine phosphorylation) is mostly JAK3-independent. In competent T cells, in the presence of IL-2 JAK3/STAT5 pathway is switched to maintain the higher and sustained IL-2Rα expression as well as cell growth and proliferation. We believe that understanding the temporal coordination of antigen- and cytokine-evoked signals in primary T cells may be useful for improving immunotherapeutic strategies. PMID:27936140

  9. Antagonizing STAT5B dimerization with an osmium complex

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li-Juan; Wang, Wanhe; Kang, Tian-Shu; Liang, Jia-Xin; Liu, Chenfu; Kwong, Daniel W. J.; Wong, Vincent Kam Wai; Ma, Dik-Lung; Leung, Chung-Hang

    2016-01-01

    Targeting STAT5 is an appealing therapeutic strategy for the treatment of hematologic malignancies and inflammation. Here, we present the novel osmium(II) complex 1 as the first metal-based inhibitor of STAT5B dimerization. Complex 1 exhibited superior inhibitory activity against STAT5B DNA binding compared to STAT5A DNA binding. Moreover, 1 repressed STAT5B transcription and blocked STAT5B dimerization via binding to the STAT5B protein, thereby inhibiting STAT5B translocation to the nucleus. Furthermore, 1 was able to selectively inhibit STAT5B phosphorylation without affecting the expression level of STAT5B. PMID:27853239

  10. Stat5a increases lactation of dairy cow mammary gland epithelial cells cultured in vitro.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao Fei; Li, Meng; Li, Qing Zhang; Lu, Li Min; Tong, Hui Li; Gao, Xue Jun

    2012-10-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5a (Stat5a) transduces signals of extracellular cytokines and growth factors to the nucleus of mammary gland epithelial cells and thereby regulates gene transcription during pregnancy, lactation, and weaning. However, its function on the milk production of dairy cows needs further investigation. In this experiment, the effects of Stat5a on lactation ability of dairy cow mammary gland epithelial cells (DCMECs) were analyzed. Eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3.1+-stat5a-αS1 was constructed by inserting stat5a gene into the plasmid vector pcDNA3.1+ and replacing CMV promoter with α-S1-casein 5' flanking sequence. The recombinant vector was stably transfected into DCMECs after geneticin (G418) selection. The proliferation and viability of DCMECs, expression of β-casein and stat5a gene, and the content of lactose were detected. The results showed that stat5a gene in eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3.1+-stat5a-αS1 was highly expressed in DCMECs and could increase the lactation ability of DCMECs. The associativity of Stat5a with nutrients on the lactation ability of DCMECs was also evaluated. Lysine (Lys), methionine (Met), sodium acetate, β-sodium hydroxybutyrate, and glucose all had more positive effects on the lactation function of DCMECs after pcDNA3.1+-stat5a-αS1 transfection. The proliferation and viability of DCMECs, expression of β-casein and stat5a gene, and contents of lactose and triglyceride were detected. The results revealed that nutrients could promote expression of Stat5a gene to increase lactation of DCMECs. These data help to clarify the function of stat5 gene on lactation and gene regulatory networks linking stat5a.

  11. Chemical and Hormonal Effects on STAT5b-Dependent Sexual Dimorphism of the Liver Transcriptome.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The growth hormone (GH)-activated transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 5b (STAT5b) is a key regulator of sexually dimorphic gene expression in the liver. Suppression of hepatic STAT5b signaling is associated with lipid metabolic dysfunction leadi...

  12. Subcellular optogenetics – controlling signaling and single-cell behavior

    PubMed Central

    Karunarathne, W. K. Ajith; O'Neill, Patrick R.; Gautam, Narasimhan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Variation in signaling activity across a cell plays a crucial role in processes such as cell migration. Signaling activity specific to organelles within a cell also likely plays a key role in regulating cellular functions. To understand how such spatially confined signaling within a cell regulates cell behavior, tools that exert experimental control over subcellular signaling activity are required. Here, we discuss the advantages of using optogenetic approaches to achieve this control. We focus on a set of optical triggers that allow subcellular control over signaling through the activation of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), receptor tyrosine kinases and downstream signaling proteins, as well as those that inhibit endogenous signaling proteins. We also discuss the specific insights with regard to signaling and cell behavior that these subcellular optogenetic approaches can provide. PMID:25433038

  13. Phosphorylated STAT5 regulates p53 expression via BRCA1/BARD1-NPM1 and MDM2

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Zhuo; Aerts, Joeri L; Vandenplas, Hugo; Wang, Jiance A; Gorbenko, Olena; Chen, Jack P; Giron, Philippe; Heirman, Carlo; Goyvaerts, Cleo; Zacksenhaus, Eldad; Minden, Mark D; Stambolic, Vuk; Breckpot, Karine; De Grève, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) and nucleophosmin (NPM1) are critical regulators of multiple biological and pathological processes. Although a reciprocal regulatory relationship was established between STAT5A and a NPM–ALK fusion protein in T-cell lymphoma, no direct connection between STAT5 and wild-type NPM1 has been documented. Here we demonstrate a mutually regulatory relationship between STAT5 and NPM1. Induction of STAT5 phosphorylation at Y694 (P-STAT5) diminished NPM1 expression, whereas inhibition of STAT5 phosphorylation enhanced NPM1 expression. Conversely, NPM1 not only negatively regulated STAT5 phosphorylation but also preserved unphosphorylated STAT5 level. Mechanistically, we show that NPM1 downregulation by P-STAT5 is mediated by impairing the BRCA1-BARD1 ubiquitin ligase, which controls the stability of NPM1. In turn, decreased NPM1 levels led to suppression of p53 expression, resulting in enhanced cell survival. This study reveals a new STAT5 signaling pathway regulating p53 expression via NPM1 and uncovers new therapeutic targets for anticancer treatment in tumors driven by STAT5 signaling. PMID:28005077

  14. Phosphorylated STAT5 regulates p53 expression via BRCA1/BARD1-NPM1 and MDM2.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhuo; Aerts, Joeri L; Vandenplas, Hugo; Wang, Jiance A; Gorbenko, Olena; Chen, Jack P; Giron, Philippe; Heirman, Carlo; Goyvaerts, Cleo; Zacksenhaus, Eldad; Minden, Mark D; Stambolic, Vuk; Breckpot, Karine; De Grève, Jacques

    2016-12-22

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) and nucleophosmin (NPM1) are critical regulators of multiple biological and pathological processes. Although a reciprocal regulatory relationship was established between STAT5A and a NPM-ALK fusion protein in T-cell lymphoma, no direct connection between STAT5 and wild-type NPM1 has been documented. Here we demonstrate a mutually regulatory relationship between STAT5 and NPM1. Induction of STAT5 phosphorylation at Y694 (P-STAT5) diminished NPM1 expression, whereas inhibition of STAT5 phosphorylation enhanced NPM1 expression. Conversely, NPM1 not only negatively regulated STAT5 phosphorylation but also preserved unphosphorylated STAT5 level. Mechanistically, we show that NPM1 downregulation by P-STAT5 is mediated by impairing the BRCA1-BARD1 ubiquitin ligase, which controls the stability of NPM1. In turn, decreased NPM1 levels led to suppression of p53 expression, resulting in enhanced cell survival. This study reveals a new STAT5 signaling pathway regulating p53 expression via NPM1 and uncovers new therapeutic targets for anticancer treatment in tumors driven by STAT5 signaling.

  15. Coregulation of genetic programs by the transcription factors NFIB and STAT5.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Gertraud W; Kang, Keunsoo; Yoo, Kyung Hyun; Tang, Yong; Zhu, Bing-Mei; Yamaji, Daisuke; Colditz, Vera; Jang, Seung Jian; Gronostajski, Richard M; Hennighausen, Lothar

    2014-05-01

    Mammary-specific genetic programs are activated during pregnancy by the common transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 5. More than one third of these genes carry nuclear factor I/B (NFIB) binding motifs that coincide with STAT5 in vivo binding, suggesting functional synergy between these two transcription factors. The role of NFIB in this governance was investigated in mice from which Nfib had been inactivated in mammary stem cells or in differentiating alveolar epithelium. Although NFIB was not required for alveolar expansion, the combined absence of NFIB and STAT5 prevented the formation of functional alveoli. NFIB controlled the expression of mammary-specific and STAT5-regulated genes and chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing established STAT5 and NFIB binding at composite regulatory elements containing histone H3 lysine dimethylation enhancer marks and progesterone receptor binding. By integrating previously published chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing data sets, the presence of NFIB-STAT5 modules in other cell types was investigated. Notably, genomic sites bound by NFIB in hair follicle stem cells were also occupied by STAT5 in mammary epithelium and coincided with enhancer marks. Many of these genes were under NFIB control in both hair follicle stem cells and mammary alveolar epithelium. We propose that NFIB-STAT5 modules, possibly in conjunction with other transcription factors, control cell-specific genetic programs.

  16. Coregulation of Genetic Programs by the Transcription Factors NFIB and STAT5

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Gertraud W.; Kang, Keunsoo; Yoo, Kyung Hyun; Tang, Yong; Zhu, Bing-Mei; Yamaji, Daisuke; Colditz, Vera; Jang, Seung Jian; Gronostajski, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    Mammary-specific genetic programs are activated during pregnancy by the common transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 5. More than one third of these genes carry nuclear factor I/B (NFIB) binding motifs that coincide with STAT5 in vivo binding, suggesting functional synergy between these two transcription factors. The role of NFIB in this governance was investigated in mice from which Nfib had been inactivated in mammary stem cells or in differentiating alveolar epithelium. Although NFIB was not required for alveolar expansion, the combined absence of NFIB and STAT5 prevented the formation of functional alveoli. NFIB controlled the expression of mammary-specific and STAT5-regulated genes and chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing established STAT5 and NFIB binding at composite regulatory elements containing histone H3 lysine dimethylation enhancer marks and progesterone receptor binding. By integrating previously published chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing data sets, the presence of NFIB-STAT5 modules in other cell types was investigated. Notably, genomic sites bound by NFIB in hair follicle stem cells were also occupied by STAT5 in mammary epithelium and coincided with enhancer marks. Many of these genes were under NFIB control in both hair follicle stem cells and mammary alveolar epithelium. We propose that NFIB-STAT5 modules, possibly in conjunction with other transcription factors, control cell-specific genetic programs. PMID:24678731

  17. Technologies for Genome-Wide Identification of Stat5 Regulated Genes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    preinfected with adenovirus carrying either wild type or dominant-negative Stat5, were harvested and RNA was isolated as described in the Materials and...maintain tight control of signal transduction pathways, both for rapid induction and cessation of signaling. The protein CIS1 was isolated independently...differential suppression of Stat5 regulated transcripts and large-scale gene chip analysis. As a result of this work, rapid progress in genome-wide

  18. STAT5 is a key transcription factor for IL-3-mediated inhibition of RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jongwon; Seong, Semun; Kim, Jung Ha; Kim, Kabsun; Kim, Inyoung; Jeong, Byung-chul; Nam, Kwang-Il; Kim, Kyung Keun; Hennighausen, Lothar; Kim, Nacksung

    2016-01-01

    Among the diverse cytokines involved in osteoclast differentiation, interleukin (IL)-3 inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis. However, the mechanism underlying IL-3-mediated inhibition of osteoclast differentiation is not fully understood. Here we demonstrate that the activation of signal transducers and activators of transcription 5 (STAT5) by IL-3 inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis through the induction of the expression of Id genes. We found that STAT5 overexpression inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis. However, RANKL did not regulate the expression or activation of STAT5 during osteoclast differentiation. STAT5 deficiency prevented IL-3-mediated inhibition of osteoclastogenesis, suggesting a key role of STAT5 in IL-3-mediated inhibition of osteoclast differentiation. In addition, IL-3-induced STAT5 activation upregulated the expression of Id1 and Id2, which are negative regulators of osteoclastogenesis. Overexpression of ID1 or ID2 in STAT5-deficient cells reversed osteoclast development recovered from IL-3-mediated inhibition. Importantly, microcomputed tomography and histomorphometric analysis revealed that STAT5 conditional knockout mice showed reduced bone mass, with an increased number of osteoclasts. Furthermore, IL-3 inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation less effectively in the STAT5 conditional knockout mice than in the wild-type mice after RANKL injection. Taken together, our findings indicate that STAT5 contributes to the remarkable IL-3-mediated inhibition of RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis by activating Id genes and their associated pathways. PMID:27485735

  19. Nongenomic STAT5-dependent effects on Golgi apparatus and endoplasmic reticulum structure and function.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jason E; Yang, Yang-Ming; Liang, Feng-Xia; Gough, Daniel J; Levy, David E; Sehgal, Pravin B

    2012-03-01

    We report unexpected nongenomic functions of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 5 species in the cytoplasm aimed at preserving the structure and function of the Golgi apparatus and rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in vascular cells. Immunoimaging and green fluorescent protein-tagged-STAT5a protein localization studies showed the constitutive association of nonphosphorylated STAT5a, and to a lesser extent STAT5b, with the Golgi apparatus and of STAT5a with centrosomes in human pulmonary arterial endothelial and smooth muscle cells. Acute knockdown of STAT5a/b species using small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), including in the presence of an mRNA synthesis inhibitor (5,6-dichloro-1-β-d-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole), produced a dramatic phenotype within 1 day, consisting of dilatation and fragmentation of Golgi cisternae, a marked tubule-to-cyst change in the ER, increased accumulation of reticulon-4 (RTN4)/Nogo-B and atlastin-3 (ATL3) at cyst-zone boundaries, cystic separation of the outer and inner nuclear membranes, accompanied by scalloped/lunate distortion of the nucleus, with accumulation of RTN4 on convex sides of distorted nuclei. These cells showed inhibition of vesicular stomatitis virus G protein glycoprotein trafficking, mitochondrial fragmentation, and reduced mitochondrial function. STAT5a/b(-/-) mouse embryo fibroblasts also showed altered ER/Golgi dynamics. RTN4 knockdown using siRNA did not affect development of the cystic phenotype; ATL3 siRNA led to effacement of cyst-zone boundaries. In magnetic-bead cross-immunopanning assays, ATL3 bound both STAT5a and STAT5b. Remarkably, this novel cystic ER/lunate nucleus phenotype was characteristic of vascular cells in arterial lesions of idiopathic pulmonary hypertension, an unrelentingly fatal human disease. These data provide evidence of a STAT-family protein regulating the structure of a cytoplasmic organelle and implicate this mechanism in the pathogenesis of a human disease.

  20. Epithelial defect in prostates of Stat5a-null mice.

    PubMed

    Nevalainen, M T; Ahonen, T J; Yamashita, H; Chandrashekar, V; Bartke, A; Grimley, P M; Robinson, G W; Hennighausen, L; Rui, H

    2000-07-01

    The transcription factor Stat5a critically mediates prolactin (PRL)-induced mammary gland development and lactogenesis. PRL also stimulates growth and differentiation of prostate tissue. Specifically, hyperprolactinemia gives rise to prostate hyperplasia, and prostate size is reduced in PRL-deficient mice. We therefore investigated the importance of Stat5a for prostate development and function by examining Stat5a-null mice. The absence of Stat5a in mice was associated with a distinct prostate morphology characterized by an increased prevalence of local disorganization within acinar epithelium of ventral prostates. Affected acini were typically filled with desquamated, granular epithelial cells that had become embedded in dense, coagulated secretory material. These features were reminiscent of acinar cyst formation and degeneration frequently observed in human benign prostate hyperplasia, however, cystic changes in prostate acini of Stat5a-deficient mice were not associated with increased prostate size or morphologic hallmarks of epithelial hyperplasia. Instead, immunohistochemistry of the prostate-specific secretory marker, probasin, suggested that hypersecretory function of the epithelium could underlie local congestion and cyst formation in prostates of Stat5a-null mice. Serum testosterone and PRL levels were normal in Stat5a knockout mice, but prostate PRL receptor expression was reduced as determined by immunohistochemistry. Expression levels or activation states of other PRL signal transduction proteins, including Stat5b, Stat3, Stat1, ERK1, and ERK2 were not altered. The present study offers the first evidence for a direct role of Stat5a in the maintenance of normal tissue architecture and function of the mouse prostate.

  1. Systems biology. Conditional density-based analysis of T cell signaling in single-cell data.

    PubMed

    Krishnaswamy, Smita; Spitzer, Matthew H; Mingueneau, Michael; Bendall, Sean C; Litvin, Oren; Stone, Erica; Pe'er, Dana; Nolan, Garry P

    2014-11-28

    Cellular circuits sense the environment, process signals, and compute decisions using networks of interacting proteins. To model such a system, the abundance of each activated protein species can be described as a stochastic function of the abundance of other proteins. High-dimensional single-cell technologies, such as mass cytometry, offer an opportunity to characterize signaling circuit-wide. However, the challenge of developing and applying computational approaches to interpret such complex data remains. Here, we developed computational methods, based on established statistical concepts, to characterize signaling network relationships by quantifying the strengths of network edges and deriving signaling response functions. In comparing signaling between naïve and antigen-exposed CD4(+) T lymphocytes, we find that although these two cell subtypes had similarly wired networks, naïve cells transmitted more information along a key signaling cascade than did antigen-exposed cells. We validated our characterization on mice lacking the extracellular-regulated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) ERK2, which showed stronger influence of pERK on pS6 (phosphorylated-ribosomal protein S6), in naïve cells as compared with antigen-exposed cells, as predicted. We demonstrate that by using cell-to-cell variation inherent in single-cell data, we can derive response functions underlying molecular circuits and drive the understanding of how cells process signals.

  2. Protein phosphatase 2A regulates interleukin-2 receptor complex formation and JAK3/STAT5 activation.

    PubMed

    Ross, Jeremy A; Cheng, Hanyin; Nagy, Zsuzsanna S; Frost, Jeffrey A; Kirken, Robert A

    2010-02-05

    Reversible protein phosphorylation plays a key role in interleukin-2 (IL-2) receptor-mediated activation of Janus tyrosine kinase 3 (JAK3) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) in lymphocytes. Although the mechanisms governing IL-2-induced tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of JAK3/STAT5 have been extensively studied, the role of serine/threonine phosphorylation in controlling these effectors remains to be elucidated. Using phosphoamino acid analysis, JAK3 and STAT5 were determined to be serine and tyrosine-phosphorylated in response to IL-2 stimulation of the human natural killer-like cell line, YT. IL-2 stimulation also induced serine/threonine phosphorylation of IL-2Rbeta, but not IL-2Rgamma. To investigate the regulation of serine/threonine phosphorylation in IL-2 signaling, the roles of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) and 2A (PP2A) were examined. Inhibition of phosphatase activity by calyculin A treatment of YT cells resulted in a significant induction of serine phosphorylation of JAK3 and STAT5, and serine/threonine phosphorylation of IL-2Rbeta. Moreover, inhibition of PP2A, but not PP1, diminished IL-2-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of IL-2Rbeta, JAK3, and STAT5, and abolished STAT5 DNA binding activity. Serine/threonine phosphorylation of IL-2Rbeta by a staurosporine-sensitive kinase also blocked its association with JAK3 and IL-2Rgamma in YT cells. Taken together, these data indicate that serine/threonine phosphorylation negatively regulates IL-2 signaling at multiple levels, including receptor complex formation and JAK3/STAT5 activation, and that this regulation is counteracted by PP2A. These findings also suggest that PP2A may serve as a therapeutic target for modulating JAK3/STAT5 activation in human disease.

  3. Single cell kinase signaling assay using pinched flow coupled droplet microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Ramji, Ramesh; Wang, Ming; Bhagat, Ali Asgar S; Tan Shao Weng, Daniel; Thakor, Nitish V; Teck Lim, Chwee; Chen, Chia-Hung

    2014-05-01

    Droplet-based microfluidics has shown potential in high throughput single cell assays by encapsulating individual cells in water-in-oil emulsions. Ordering cells in a micro-channel is necessary to encapsulate individual cells into droplets further enhancing the assay efficiency. This is typically limited due to the difficulty of preparing high-density cell solutions and maintaining them without cell aggregation in long channels (>5 cm). In this study, we developed a short pinched flow channel (5 mm) to separate cell aggregates and to form a uniform cell distribution in a droplet-generating platform that encapsulated single cells with >55% encapsulation efficiency beating Poisson encapsulation statistics. Using this platform and commercially available Sox substrates (8-hydroxy-5-(N,N-dimethylsulfonamido)-2-methylquinoline), we have demonstrated a high throughput dynamic single cell signaling assay to measure the activity of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) in lung cancer cells triggered by cell surface ligand binding. The phosphorylation of the substrates resulted in fluorescent emission, showing a sigmoidal increase over a 12 h period. The result exhibited a heterogeneous signaling rate in individual cells and showed various levels of drug resistance when treated with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, gefitinib.

  4. BAYESIAN HIERARCHICAL MODELING FOR SIGNALING PATHWAY INFERENCE FROM SINGLE CELL INTERVENTIONAL DATA1

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Ruiyan; Zhao, Hongyu

    2011-01-01

    Recent technological advances have made it possible to simultaneously measure multiple protein activities at the single cell level. With such data collected under different stimulatory or inhibitory conditions, it is possible to infer the causal relationships among proteins from single cell interventional data. In this article we propose a Bayesian hierarchical modeling framework to infer the signaling pathway based on the posterior distributions of parameters in the model. Under this framework, we consider network sparsity and model the existence of an association between two proteins both at the overall level across all experiments and at each individual experimental level. This allows us to infer the pairs of proteins that are associated with each other and their causal relationships. We also explicitly consider both intrinsic noise and measurement error. Markov chain Monte Carlo is implemented for statistical inference. We demonstrate that this hierarchical modeling can effectively pool information from different interventional experiments through simulation studies and real data analysis. PMID:22162986

  5. Lineage-Specific and Non-specific Cytokine-Sensing Genes Respond Differentially to the Master Regulator STAT5.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xianke; Willi, Michaela; Shin, Ha Youn; Hennighausen, Lothar; Wang, Chaochen

    2016-12-20

    STAT5, a member of the family of signal transducers and activators of transcription, senses cytokines and controls the biology of cell lineages, including mammary, liver, and T cells. Here, we show that STAT5 activates lineage-specific and widely expressed genes through different mechanisms. STAT5 preferentially binds to promoter sequences of cytokine-responsive genes expressed across cell types and to putative enhancers of lineage-specific genes. While chromatin accessibility of STAT5-based enhancers was dependent on cytokine exposure, STAT5-responsive promoters of widely expressed target genes were generally constitutively accessible. While the contribution of STAT5 to enhancers is well established, its role on promoters is poorly understood. To address this, we focused on Socs2, a widely expressed cytokine-sensing gene. Upon deletion of the STAT5 response elements from the Socs2 promoter in mice, cytokine induction was abrogated, while basal activity remained intact. Our data suggest that promoter-bound STAT5 modulates cytokine responses and enhancer-bound STAT5 is mandatory for gene activation.

  6. Intramolecular hydrophobic interactions are critical mediators of STAT5 dimerization.

    PubMed

    Fahrenkamp, Dirk; Li, Jinyu; Ernst, Sabrina; Schmitz-Van de Leur, Hildegard; Chatain, Nicolas; Küster, Andrea; Koschmieder, Steffen; Lüscher, Bernhard; Rossetti, Giulia; Müller-Newen, Gerhard

    2016-10-18

    STAT5 is an essential transcription factor in hematopoiesis, which is activated through tyrosine phosphorylation in response to cytokine stimulation. Constitutive activation of STAT5 is a hallmark of myeloid and lymphoblastic leukemia. Using homology modeling and molecular dynamics simulations, a model of the STAT5 phosphotyrosine-SH2 domain interface was generated providing first structural information on the activated STAT5 dimer including a sequence, for which no structural information is available for any of the STAT proteins. We identified a novel intramolecular interaction mediated through F706, adjacent to the phosphotyrosine motif, and a unique hydrophobic interface on the surface of the SH2 domain. Analysis of corresponding STAT5 mutants revealed that this interaction is dispensable for Epo receptor-mediated phosphorylation of STAT5 but essential for dimer formation and subsequent nuclear accumulation. Moreover, the herein presented model clarifies molecular mechanisms of recently discovered leukemic STAT5 mutants and will help to guide future drug development.

  7. Intramolecular hydrophobic interactions are critical mediators of STAT5 dimerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahrenkamp, Dirk; Li, Jinyu; Ernst, Sabrina; Schmitz-van de Leur, Hildegard; Chatain, Nicolas; Küster, Andrea; Koschmieder, Steffen; Lüscher, Bernhard; Rossetti, Giulia; Müller-Newen, Gerhard

    2016-10-01

    STAT5 is an essential transcription factor in hematopoiesis, which is activated through tyrosine phosphorylation in response to cytokine stimulation. Constitutive activation of STAT5 is a hallmark of myeloid and lymphoblastic leukemia. Using homology modeling and molecular dynamics simulations, a model of the STAT5 phosphotyrosine-SH2 domain interface was generated providing first structural information on the activated STAT5 dimer including a sequence, for which no structural information is available for any of the STAT proteins. We identified a novel intramolecular interaction mediated through F706, adjacent to the phosphotyrosine motif, and a unique hydrophobic interface on the surface of the SH2 domain. Analysis of corresponding STAT5 mutants revealed that this interaction is dispensable for Epo receptor-mediated phosphorylation of STAT5 but essential for dimer formation and subsequent nuclear accumulation. Moreover, the herein presented model clarifies molecular mechanisms of recently discovered leukemic STAT5 mutants and will help to guide future drug development.

  8. Intramolecular hydrophobic interactions are critical mediators of STAT5 dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Fahrenkamp, Dirk; Li, Jinyu; Ernst, Sabrina; Schmitz-Van de Leur, Hildegard; Chatain, Nicolas; Küster, Andrea; Koschmieder, Steffen; Lüscher, Bernhard; Rossetti, Giulia; Müller-Newen, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    STAT5 is an essential transcription factor in hematopoiesis, which is activated through tyrosine phosphorylation in response to cytokine stimulation. Constitutive activation of STAT5 is a hallmark of myeloid and lymphoblastic leukemia. Using homology modeling and molecular dynamics simulations, a model of the STAT5 phosphotyrosine-SH2 domain interface was generated providing first structural information on the activated STAT5 dimer including a sequence, for which no structural information is available for any of the STAT proteins. We identified a novel intramolecular interaction mediated through F706, adjacent to the phosphotyrosine motif, and a unique hydrophobic interface on the surface of the SH2 domain. Analysis of corresponding STAT5 mutants revealed that this interaction is dispensable for Epo receptor-mediated phosphorylation of STAT5 but essential for dimer formation and subsequent nuclear accumulation. Moreover, the herein presented model clarifies molecular mechanisms of recently discovered leukemic STAT5 mutants and will help to guide future drug development. PMID:27752093

  9. Stat5-deficient hematopoiesis is permissive for Myc-induced B-cell leukemogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhengqi; Medrzycki, Magdalena; Bunting, Silvia T; Bunting, Kevin D

    2015-10-06

    Despite being an attractive molecular target for both lymphoid and myeloid leukemias characterized by activated tyrosine kinases, the molecular and physiological consequences of reduced signal transducer and activator of transcription-5 (Stat5) during leukemogenesis are not well known. Stat5 is a critical regulator of mouse hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) self-renewal and is essential for normal lymphocyte development. We report that pan-hematopoietic deletion in viable adult Vav1-Cre conditional knockout mice as well as Stat5ab(null/null) fetal liver transplant chimeras generated HSCs with reduced expression of quiescence regulating genes (Tie2, Mpl, Slamf1, Spi1, Cited2) and increased expression of B-cell development genes (Satb1, Dntt, Btla, Flk2). Using a classical murine B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) model, we demonstrate that these HSCs were also poised to produce a burst of B-cell precursors upon expression of Bcl-2 combined with oncogenic Myc. This strong selective advantage for leukemic transformation in the background of Stat5 deficient hematopoiesis was permissive for faster initiation of Myc-induced transformation to B-ALL. However, once established, the B-ALL progression in secondary transplant recipients was Stat5-independent. Overall, these studies suggest that Stat5 can play multiple important roles that not only preserve the HSC compartment but can limit accumulation of potential pre-leukemic lymphoid populations.

  10. Antagonism of B cell enhancer networks by STAT5 drives leukemia and poor patient survival.

    PubMed

    Katerndahl, Casey D S; Heltemes-Harris, Lynn M; Willette, Mark J L; Henzler, Christine M; Frietze, Seth; Yang, Rendong; Schjerven, Hilde; Silverstein, Kevin A T; Ramsey, Laura B; Hubbard, Gregory; Wells, Andrew D; Kuiper, Roland P; Scheijen, Blanca; van Leeuwen, Frank N; Müschen, Markus; Kornblau, Steven M; Farrar, Michael A

    2017-04-03

    The transcription factor STAT5 has a critical role in B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). How STAT5 mediates this effect is unclear. Here we found that activation of STAT5 worked together with defects in signaling components of the precursor to the B cell antigen receptor (pre-BCR), including defects in BLNK, BTK, PKCβ, NF-κB1 and IKAROS, to initiate B-ALL. STAT5 antagonized the transcription factors NF-κB and IKAROS by opposing regulation of shared target genes. Super-enhancers showed enrichment for STAT5 binding and were associated with an opposing network of transcription factors, including PAX5, EBF1, PU.1, IRF4 and IKAROS. Patients with a high ratio of active STAT5 to NF-κB or IKAROS had more-aggressive disease. Our studies indicate that an imbalance of two opposing transcriptional programs drives B-ALL and suggest that restoring the balance of these pathways might inhibit B-ALL.

  11. Unidirectional signal propagation in primary neurons micropatterned at a single-cell resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, H.; Matsumura, R.; Takaoki, H.; Katsurabayashi, S.; Hirano-Iwata, A.; Niwano, M.

    2016-07-01

    The structure and connectivity of cultured neuronal networks can be controlled by using micropatterned surfaces. Here, we demonstrate that the direction of signal propagation can be precisely controlled at a single-cell resolution by growing primary neurons on micropatterns. To achieve this, we first examined the process by which axons develop and how synapses form in micropatterned primary neurons using immunocytochemistry. By aligning asymmetric micropatterns with a marginal gap, it was possible to pattern primary neurons with a directed polarization axis at the single-cell level. We then examined how synapses develop on micropatterned hippocampal neurons. Three types of micropatterns with different numbers of short paths for dendrite growth were compared. A normal development in synapse density was observed when micropatterns with three or more short paths were used. Finally, we performed double patch clamp recordings on micropatterned neurons to confirm that these synapses are indeed functional, and that the neuronal signal is transmitted unidirectionally in the intended orientation. This work provides a practical guideline for patterning single neurons to design functional neuronal networks in vitro with the direction of signal propagation being controlled.

  12. Chemical and Hormonal Effects on STAT5b-Dependent Sexual Dimorphism of the Liver Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Oshida, Keiyu; Waxman, David J.; Corton, J. Christopher

    2016-01-01

    The growth hormone (GH)-activated transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 5b (STAT5b) is a key regulator of sexually dimorphic gene expression in the liver. Suppression of hepatic STAT5b signaling is associated with lipid metabolic dysfunction leading to steatosis and liver cancer. In the companion publication, a STAT5b biomarker gene set was identified and used in a rank-based test to predict both increases and decreases in liver STAT5b activation status/function with high (≥ 97%) accuracy. Here, this computational approach was used to identify chemicals and hormones that activate (masculinize) or suppress (feminize) STAT5b function in a large, annotated mouse liver and primary hepatocyte gene expression compendium. Exposure to dihydrotestosterone and thyroid hormone caused liver masculinization, whereas glucocorticoids, fibroblast growth factor 15, and angiotensin II caused liver feminization. In mouse models of diabetes and obesity, liver feminization was consistently observed and was at least partially reversed by leptin or resveratrol exposure. Chemical-induced feminization of male mouse liver gene expression profiles was a relatively frequent phenomenon: of 156 gene expression biosets from chemically-treated male mice, 29% showed feminization of liver STAT5b function, while <1% showed masculinization. Most (93%) of the biosets that exhibited feminization of male liver were also associated with activation of one or more xenobiotic-responsive receptors, most commonly constitutive activated receptor (CAR) or peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα). Feminization was consistently associated with increased expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (Pparg) but not other lipogenic transcription factors linked to steatosis. GH-activated STAT5b signaling in mouse liver is thus commonly altered by diverse chemicals, and provides a linkage between chemical exposure and dysregulated gene expression

  13. Targeting STAT5 in Hematological Malignancies through Inhibition of the Bromodomain and Extra-Terminal (BET) Bromodomain Protein BRD2

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Suhu; Walker, Sarah R.; Nelson, Erik A.; Cerulli, Robert; Xiang, Michael; Toniolo, Patricia A.; Qi, Jun; Stone, Richard M.; Wadleigh, Martha; Bradner, James E.; Frank, David A.

    2014-01-01

    The transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) is constitutively activated in a wide range of leukemias and lymphomas, and drives the expression of genes necessary for proliferation, survival, and self-renewal. Thus, targeting STAT5 is an appealing therapeutic strategy for hematological malignancies. Given the importance of bromodomain-containing proteins in transcriptional regulation, we considered the hypothesis that a pharmacological bromodomain inhibitor could inhibit STAT5-dependent gene expression. We found that the small molecule bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) bromodomain inhibitor JQ1 decreases STAT5-dependent (but not STAT3-dependent) transcription of both heterologous reporter genes and endogenous STAT5 target genes. JQ1 reduces STAT5 function in leukemia and lymphoma cells with constitutive STAT5 activation, or inducibly activated by cytokine stimulation. Among the BET bromodomain sub-family of proteins, it appears that BRD2 is the critical mediator for STAT5 activity. In experimental models of acute T cell lymphoblastic leukemias, where activated STAT5 contributes to leukemia cell survival, Brd2 knock-down or JQ1 treatment shows strong synergy with tyrosine kinase inhibitors in inducing leukemia cells apoptosis. By contrast, mononuclear cells isolated form umbilical cord blood, which is enriched in normal hematopoietic precursor cells, were unaffected by these combinations. These findings indicate a unique functional association between BRD2 and STAT5, and suggest that combinations of JQ1 and tyrosine kinase inhibitors may be an important rational strategy for treating leukemias and lymphomas driven by constitutive STAT5 activation. PMID:24435449

  14. Study of Signal Detection, Integration, and Propagation in Quorum Sensing at the Single Cell Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Tao; Bassler, Bonnie; Wingreen, Ned

    2007-03-01

    Bacteria respond to their environment and to each other and accordingly adjust their gene-expression levels. Accurate signal detection, appropriate signal integration, and faithful signal propagation are essential for a cell to make correct adjustments in response to various extracellular cues. To better understand this information processing by living cells, we studied a model system -- the quorum-sensing circuit in Vibrio harveyi. Quorum sensing is a process in which bacteria communicate with each other by diffusible chemical molecules, termed ``autoinducers'', to commit to coordinated developmental decisions. Three types of autoinducers are detected coincidently by three parallel receptors. The signals are then integrated into the same signaling pathway and propagated by phosphorylation or dephosphorylation of the pathway components. To quantitatively measure the intracellular response, we applied a fluorescent protein reporter, whose production is regulated by a phosphorylated protein in the pathway. By single-cell microscopy, we can explore features of this information-processing circuit such as coincidence detection, signal integration, noise reduction or filtering, and especially the fidelity in signal processing achieved in the presence of inevitable fluctuations.

  15. Novel iodoacetamido benzoheterocyclic derivatives with potent antileukemic activity are inhibitors of STAT5 phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Romagnoli, Romeo; Baraldi, Pier Giovanni; Prencipe, Filippo; Lopez-Cara, Carlota; Rondanin, Riccardo; Simoni, Daniele; Hamel, Ernest; Grimaudo, Stefania; Pipitone, Rosaria Maria; Meli, Maria; Tolomeo, Manlio

    2015-01-01

    Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 5 (STAT5) protein, a component of the STAT family of signaling proteins, is considered to be an attractive therapeutic target because of its involvement in the progression of acute myeloid leukemia. In an effort to discover potent molecules able to inhibit the phosphorylation-activation of STAT5, twenty-two compounds were synthesized and evaluated on the basis of our knowledge of the activity of 2-(3′,4′,5′-trimethoxybenzoyl)-3-iodoacetamido-6-methoxybenzo[b]furan derivative 1 as a potent STAT5 inhibitor. Most of these molecules, structurally related to compound 1, were characterized by the presence of a common 3′,4′,5′-trimethoxybenzoyl moiety at the 2-position of different benzoheterocycles such as benzo[b]furan, benzo[b]thiophene, indole and N-methylindole. Effects on biological activity of the iodoacetamido group and of different moieties (methyl and methoxy) at the C-3 to C-7 positions were examined. In the series of benzo[b]furan derivatives, moving the iodoacetylamino group from the C-4 to the C-5 or C-6 positions did not significantly affect antiproliferative activity. Compounds 4, 15, 20 and 23 blocked STAT5 signals and induced apoptosis of K562 BCR–ABL positive cells. For compound 23, the trimethoxybenzoyl moiety at the 2-position of the benzo[b]furan core was not essential for potent inhibition of STAT5 activation. PMID:26629859

  16. Protein Signaling Networks from Single Cell Fluctuations and Information Theory Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Young Shik; Remacle, F.; Fan, Rong; Hwang, Kiwook; Wei, Wei; Ahmad, Habib; Levine, R.D.; Heath, James R.

    2011-01-01

    Protein signaling networks among cells play critical roles in a host of pathophysiological processes, from inflammation to tumorigenesis. We report on an approach that integrates microfluidic cell handling, in situ protein secretion profiling, and information theory to determine an extracellular protein-signaling network and the role of perturbations. We assayed 12 proteins secreted from human macrophages that were subjected to lipopolysaccharide challenge, which emulates the macrophage-based innate immune responses against Gram-negative bacteria. We characterize the fluctuations in protein secretion of single cells, and of small cell colonies (n = 2, 3,···), as a function of colony size. Measuring the fluctuations permits a validation of the conditions required for the application of a quantitative version of the Le Chatelier's principle, as derived using information theory. This principle provides a quantitative prediction of the role of perturbations and allows a characterization of a protein-protein interaction network. PMID:21575571

  17. Protein signaling networks from single cell fluctuations and information theory profiling.

    PubMed

    Shin, Young Shik; Remacle, F; Fan, Rong; Hwang, Kiwook; Wei, Wei; Ahmad, Habib; Levine, R D; Heath, James R

    2011-05-18

    Protein signaling networks among cells play critical roles in a host of pathophysiological processes, from inflammation to tumorigenesis. We report on an approach that integrates microfluidic cell handling, in situ protein secretion profiling, and information theory to determine an extracellular protein-signaling network and the role of perturbations. We assayed 12 proteins secreted from human macrophages that were subjected to lipopolysaccharide challenge, which emulates the macrophage-based innate immune responses against Gram-negative bacteria. We characterize the fluctuations in protein secretion of single cells, and of small cell colonies (n = 2, 3,···), as a function of colony size. Measuring the fluctuations permits a validation of the conditions required for the application of a quantitative version of the Le Chatelier's principle, as derived using information theory. This principle provides a quantitative prediction of the role of perturbations and allows a characterization of a protein-protein interaction network.

  18. Stat5 Promotes Survival of Mammary Epithelial Cells through Transcriptional Activation of a Distinct Promoter in Akt1▿

    PubMed Central

    Creamer, Bradley A.; Sakamoto, Kazuhito; Schmidt, Jeffrey W.; Triplett, Aleata A.; Moriggl, Richard; Wagner, Kay-Uwe

    2010-01-01

    The signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (Stat5) plays a pivotal role in the proliferation, secretory differentiation, and survival of mammary epithelial cells. However, there is little information about Stat5 target genes that facilitate these biological processes. We provide here experimental evidence that the prolactin-mediated phosphorylation of Stat5 regulates the transcriptional activation of the Akt1 gene. Stat5 binds to consensus sequences within the Akt1 locus in a growth factor-dependent manner to initiate transcription of a unique Akt1 mRNA from a distinct promoter, which is only active in the mammary gland. Elevating the levels of active Akt1 restores the expression of cyclin D1 and proliferation of Jak2-deficient mammary epithelial cells, which provides evidence that Akt1 acts downstream of Jak/Stat signaling. The ligand-inducible expression of Stat5 in transgenic females mediates a sustained upregulation of Akt1 in mammary epithelial cells during the onset of postlactational involution. Stat5-expressing mammary glands exhibit a delay in involution despite induction of proapoptotic signaling events. Collectively, the results of the present study elucidate an underlying mechanism by which active Stat5 mediates evasion from apoptosis and self-sufficiency in growth signals. PMID:20385773

  19. Single-Cell Migration in Complex Microenvironments: Mechanics and Signaling Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Michael; Spill, Fabian; Kamm, Roger D.; Zaman, Muhammad H.

    2016-01-01

    Cells are highly dynamic and mechanical automata powered by molecular motors that respond to external cues. Intracellular signaling pathways, either chemical or mechanical, can be activated and spatially coordinated to induce polarized cell states and directional migration. Physiologically, cells navigate through complex microenvironments, typically in three-dimensional (3D) fibrillar networks. In diseases, such as metastatic cancer, they invade across physiological barriers and remodel their local environments through force, matrix degradation, synthesis, and reorganization. Important external factors such as dimensionality, confinement, topographical cues, stiffness, and flow impact the behavior of migrating cells and can each regulate motility. Here, we review recent progress in our understanding of single-cell migration in complex microenvironments. PMID:26639083

  20. Single-cell transcriptome analyses reveal signals to activate dormant neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yuping; Coskun, Volkan; Liang, Aibing; Yu, Juehua; Cheng, Liming; Ge, Weihong; Shi, Zhanping; Zhang, Kunshan; Li, Chun; Cui, Yaru; Lin, Haijun; Luo, Dandan; Wang, Junbang; Lin, Connie; Dai, Zachary; Zhu, Hongwen; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Jie; Liu, Hailiang; deVellis, Jean; Horvath, Steve; Sun, Yi Eve; Li, Siguang

    2015-05-21

    The scarcity of tissue-specific stem cells and the complexity of their surrounding environment have made molecular characterization of these cells particularly challenging. Through single-cell transcriptome and weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA), we uncovered molecular properties of CD133(+)/GFAP(-) ependymal (E) cells in the adult mouse forebrain neurogenic zone. Surprisingly, prominent hub genes of the gene network unique to ependymal CD133(+)/GFAP(-) quiescent cells were enriched for immune-responsive genes, as well as genes encoding receptors for angiogenic factors. Administration of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) activated CD133(+) ependymal neural stem cells (NSCs), lining not only the lateral but also the fourth ventricles and, together with basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), elicited subsequent neural lineage differentiation and migration. This study revealed the existence of dormant ependymal NSCs throughout the ventricular surface of the CNS, as well as signals abundant after injury for their activation.

  1. Optimization and utilization of the SureFire phospho-STAT5 assay for a cell-based screening campaign.

    PubMed

    Binder, Christina; Lafayette, Amy; Archibeque, Ivonne; Sun, Yu; Plewa, Cherylene; Sinclair, Angus; Emkey, Renee

    2008-02-01

    The family of signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) consists of seven transcription factors that respond to a variety of cytokines, hormones, and growth factors. STATs are activated by tyrosine phosphorylation, which results in their dimerization and translocation into the nucleus where they exert their effect on transcription of regulated target genes. The phosphorylation of STATs is mediated mainly by Janus kinases (JAKs). The JAK/STAT pathway plays a critical role in hematopoietic and immune cell function. Here we focus on one member of the STAT family, STAT5. STAT5 is phosphorylated by several JAKs, including Jak3, Jak2, and Tyk2, in response to interleukin-2, erythropoietin (EPO), and interleukin-22, respectively. Activation of STAT5 is essential to T cell development and has been associated with hematologic malignancies. Therefore, the ability to assess STAT5 phosphorylation is important for discovery efforts targeting these indications. The assay formats available to detect phosphorylated STAT5 (pSTAT5) are relatively low throughput and involve lengthy protocols. These formats include western blot analysis, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and flow cytometry. The SureFire (Perkin Elmer, Waltham, MA) pSTAT5 assay is a homogeneous assay that utilizes AlphaScreen (Perkin Elmer) technology to detect pSTAT5 in cell lysates. We have used this assay format to evaluate EPO-induced STAT5 phosphorylation in HEL cells and successfully complete a small-scale screening campaign to identify inhibitors of this event. The results obtained in these studies demonstrate that the SureFire pSTAT5 assay is a robust, reliable assay format that is amenable to high-throughput screening (HTS) applications.

  2. STAT5 and CD4 + T Cell Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Owen, David L.; Farrar, Michael A.

    2017-01-01

    STAT5 plays a critical role in the development and function of many cell types. Here, we review the role of STAT5 in the development of T lymphocytes in the thymus and its subsequent role in the differentiation of distinct CD4 + helper and regulatory T-cell subsets. PMID:28163905

  3. Evidence for Extracellular ATP as a Stress Signal in a Single-Celled Organism

    PubMed Central

    Sivaramakrishnan, Venketesh

    2015-01-01

    ATP is omnipresent in biology and acts as an extracellular signaling molecule in mammals. Information regarding the signaling function of extracellular ATP in single-celled eukaryotes is lacking. Here, we explore the role of extracellular ATP in cell volume recovery during osmotic swelling in the amoeba Dictyostelium. Release of micromolar ATP could be detected during cell swelling and regulatory cell volume decrease (RVD) phases during hypotonic challenge. Scavenging ATP with apyrase caused profound cell swelling and loss of RVD. Apyrase-induced swelling could be rescued by 100 μM βγ-imidoATP. N-Ethylmalemide (NEM), an inhibitor of vesicular exocytosis, caused heightened cell swelling, loss of RVD, and inhibition of ATP release. Amoebas with impaired contractile vacuole (CV) fusion (drainin knockout [KO] cells) displayed increased swelling but intact ATP release. One hundred micromolar Gd3+ caused cell swelling while blocking any recovery by βγ-imidoATP. ATP release was 4-fold higher in the presence of Gd3+. Cell swelling was associated with an increase in intracellular nitric oxide (NO), with NO-scavenging agents causing cell swelling. Swelling-induced NO production was inhibited by both apyrase and Gd3+, while NO donors rescued apyrase- and Gd3+-induced swelling. These data suggest extracellular ATP released during cell swelling is an important signal that elicits RVD. Though the cell surface receptor for ATP in Dictyostelium remains elusive, we suggest ATP operates through a Gd3+-sensitive receptor that is coupled with intracellular NO production. PMID:26048010

  4. Dynamic analysis of MAPK signaling using a high-throughput microfluidic single-cell imaging platform.

    PubMed

    Taylor, R J; Falconnet, D; Niemistö, A; Ramsey, S A; Prinz, S; Shmulevich, I; Galitski, T; Hansen, C L

    2009-03-10

    Cells have evolved biomolecular networks that process and respond to changing chemical environments. Understanding how complex protein interactions give rise to emergent network properties requires time-resolved analysis of cellular response under a large number of genetic perturbations and chemical environments. To date, the lack of technologies for scalable cell analysis under well-controlled and time-varying conditions has made such global studies either impossible or impractical. To address this need, we have developed a high-throughput microfluidic imaging platform for single-cell studies of network response under hundreds of combined genetic perturbations and time-varying stimulant sequences. Our platform combines programmable on-chip mixing and perfusion with high-throughput image acquisition and processing to perform 256 simultaneous time-lapse live-cell imaging experiments. Nonadherent cells are captured in an array of 2,048 microfluidic cell traps to allow for the imaging of eight different genotypes over 12 h and in response to 32 unique sequences of stimulation, generating a total of 49,000 images per run. Using 12 devices, we carried out >3,000 live-cell imaging experiments to investigate the mating pheromone response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae under combined genetic perturbations and changing environmental conditions. Comprehensive analysis of 11 deletion mutants reveals both distinct thresholds for morphological switching and new dynamic phenotypes that are not observed in static conditions. For example, kss1Delta, fus3Delta, msg5Delta, and ptp2Delta mutants exhibit distinctive stimulus-frequency-dependent signaling phenotypes, implicating their role in filtering and network memory. The combination of parallel microfluidic control with high-throughput imaging provides a powerful tool for systems-level studies of single-cell decision making.

  5. Validation of a multicolor staining to monitor phosphoSTAT5 levels in regulatory T-cell subsets

    PubMed Central

    Ehx, Grégory; Hannon, Muriel; Beguin, Yves; Humblet-Baron, Stéphanie; Baron, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are key players in immune tolerance. They express the transcription factor FOXP3 and are dependent of the STAT5 signaling for their homeostasis. So far, the study of phosphorylated epitopes by flow cytometry required treating the cells with methanol, which is harmful for several epitopes. METHODS Here we assessed whether the PerFix EXPOSE reagent kit (PFE)(Beckman Coulter) allowed monitoring the phosphorylation level of STAT5 in Treg subpopulations together with complex immunophenotyping. Results observed with the PFE kit were compared to those observed without cell permeabilization for surface markers, with paraformaldehyde permeabilization for non-phosphorylated intracellular epitopes, and with methanol-based permeabilization for phosphoSTAT5 staining. RESULTS In human PBMCs, the PFE kit allowed the detection of surface antigens, FOXP3, KI67 and phosphoSTAT5 in similar proportions to what was observed without permeabilization (for surface antigens), or with PFA or methanol permeabilizations for FOXP3/KI67 and phosphoSTAT5, respectively. Comparable observations were made with murine splenocytes. Further, the PFE kit allowed determining the response of different human and murine Treg subsets to IL-2. It also allowed demonstrating that human Treg subsets with the highest levels of phosphoSTAT5 had also the highest suppressive activity in vitro, and that anti-thymocyte glogulin (ATG) induced Treg independently of the STAT5 pathway, both in vitro and in vivo. CONCLUSIONS We have validated a multicolor staining method that allows monitoring phosphoSTAT5 levels in Treg subsets. This staining could be useful to monitor responses of various Treg subsets to IL-2 therapy. PMID:26657728

  6. Angiotensin-(1-7) has a dual role on growth-promoting signalling pathways in rat heart in vivo by stimulating STAT3 and STAT5a/b phosphorylation and inhibiting angiotensin II-stimulated ERK1/2 and Rho kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Giani, Jorge F; Gironacci, Mariela M; Muñoz, Marina C; Turyn, Daniel; Dominici, Fernando P

    2008-05-01

    Angiotensin (ANG) II contributes to cardiac remodelling by inducing the activation of several signalling molecules, including ERK1/2, Rho kinase and members of the STAT family of proteins. Angiotensin-(1-7) is produced in the heart and inhibits the proliferative actions of ANG II, although the mechanisms of this inhibition are poorly understood. Accordingly, in the present study we examined whether ANG-(1-7) affects the ANG II-mediated activation of ERK1/2 and Rho kinase, STAT3 and STAT5a/b in rat heart in vivo. We hypothesized that ANG-(1-7) inhibits these growth-promoting pathways, counterbalancing the trophic action of ANG II. Solutions of normal saline (0.9% NaCl) containing ANG II (8 pmol kg(-1)) plus ANG-(1-7) in increasing doses (from 0.08 to 800 pmol kg(-1)) were administered via the inferior vena cava to anaesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rats. After 5 min, hearts were removed and ERK1/2, Rho kinase, STAT3 and STAT5a/b phosphorylation was determined by Western blotting using phosphospecific antibodies. Angiotensin II stimulated ERK1/2 and Rho kinase phosphorylation (2.3 +/- 0.2- and 2.1 +/- 0.2-fold increase over basal values, respectively), while ANG-(1-7) was without effect. The ANG II-mediated phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Rho kinase was prevented in a dose-dependent manner by ANG-(1-7) and disappeared in the presence of the Mas receptor antagonist d-Ala7-ANG-(1-7). Both ANG II and ANG-(1-7) increased STAT3 and STAT5a/b phosphorylation to a similar extent (130-140% increase). The ANG-(1-7)-stimulated STAT phosphorylation was blocked by the AT(1) receptor antagonist losartan and not by d-Ala7-ANG-(1-7). Our results show a dual action of ANG-(1-7), that is, a stimulatory effect on STAT3 and 5a/b phosphorylation through AT(1) receptors and a blocking action on ANG II-stimulated ERK1/2 and Rho kinase phosphorylation through Mas receptor activation. The latter effect could be representative of a mechanism for a protective role of ANG-(1-7) in the heart by

  7. Transcriptional regulation of the cyclin D1 promoter by STAT5: its involvement in cytokine-dependent growth of hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, I; Kitamura, T; Wakao, H; Tanaka, H; Hashimoto, K; Albanese, C; Downward, J; Pestell, R G; Kanakura, Y

    1999-01-01

    STAT5 is a member of a family of transcription factors that participate in the signal transduction pathways of many hormones and cytokines. Although STAT5 is suggested to play a crucial role in the biological effects of cytokines, its downstream target(s) associated with cell growth control is largely unknown. In a human interleukin-3 (IL-3)-dependent cell line F-36P-mpl, the induced expression of dominant-negative (dn)-STAT5 and of dn-ras led to inhibition of IL-3-dependent cell growth, accompanying the reduced expression of cyclin D1 mRNA. Also, both constitutively active forms of STAT5A (1*6-STAT5A) and ras (H-rasG12V) enabled F-36P-mpl cells to proliferate without added growth factors. In NIH 3T3 cells, 1*6-STAT5A and H-rasG12V individually and cooperatively transactivated the cyclin D1 promoter in luciferase assays. Both dn-STAT5 and dn-ras suppressed IL-3-induced cyclin D1 promoter activities in F-36P-mpl cells. Using a series of mutant cyclin D1 promoters, 1*6-STAT5A was found to transactivate the cyclin D1 promoter through the potential STAT-binding sequence at -481 bp. In electrophoretic mobility shift assays, STAT5 bound to the element in response to IL-3. Furthermore, the inhibitory effect of dn-STAT5 on IL-3-dependent growth was restored by expression of cyclin D1. Thus STAT5, in addition to ras signaling, appears to mediate transcriptional regulation of cyclin D1, thereby contributing to cytokine-dependent growth of hematopoietic cells. PMID:10064602

  8. Constitutive STAT5 Activation Correlates With Better Survival in Cervical Cancer Patients Treated With Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Helen H.W.; Chou, Cheng-Yang; Wu, Yuan-Hua; Hsueh, Wei-Ting; Hsu, Chiung-Hui; Guo, How-Ran; Lee, Wen-Ying; Su, Wu-Chou

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Constitutively activated signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) factors, in particular STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5, have been detected in a wide variety of human primary tumors and have been demonstrated to directly contribute to oncogenesis. However, the expression pattern of these STATs in cervical carcinoma is still unknown, as is whether or not they have prognostic significance. This study investigated the expression patterns of STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5 in cervical cancer and their associations with clinical outcomes in patients treated with radical radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 165 consecutive patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) Stages IB to IVA cervical cancer underwent radical radiation therapy, including external beam and/or high-dose-rate brachytherapy between 1989 and 2002. Immunohistochemical studies of their formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues were performed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify and to evaluate the effects of these factors affecting patient survival. Results: Constitutive activations of STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5 were observed in 11%, 22%, and 61% of the participants, respectively. While STAT5 activation was associated with significantly better metastasis-free survival (p < 0.01) and overall survival (p = 0.04), STAT1 and STAT3 activation were not. Multivariate analyses showed that STAT5 activation, bulky tumor ({>=}4 cm), advanced stage (FIGO Stages III and IV), and brachytherapy (yes vs. no) were independent prognostic factors for cause-specific overall survival. None of the STATs was associated with local relapse. STAT5 activation (odds ratio = 0.29, 95% confidence interval = 0.13-0.63) and advanced stage (odds ratio = 2.54; 95% confidence interval = 1.03-6.26) were independent predictors of distant metastasis. Conclusions: This is the first report to provide the overall expression patterns and prognostic significance of

  9. Visual detection of STAT5B gene expression in living cell using the hairpin DNA modified gold nanoparticle beacon.

    PubMed

    Xue, Jianpeng; Shan, Lingling; Chen, Haiyan; Li, Yang; Zhu, Hongyan; Deng, Dawei; Qian, Zhiyu; Achilefu, Samuel; Gu, Yueqing

    2013-03-15

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5B (STAT5B) is an important protein in JAK-STAT signaling pathway that is responsible for the metastasis and proliferation of tumor cells. Determination of the STAT5B messenger Ribonucleic Acid (mRNA) relating to the STAT5B expression provides insight into the mechanism of tumor progression. In this study, we designed and used a special hairpin deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) for human STAT5B mRNA to functionalize gold nanoparticles, which served as a beacon for detecting human STAT5B expression. Up to 90% quenching efficiency was achieved. Upon hybridizing with the target mRNA, the hairpin DNA modified gold nanoparticle beacons (hDAuNP beacons) release the fluorophores attached at 5' end of the oligonucleotide sequence. The fluorescence properties of the beacon before and after the hybridization with the complementary DNA were confirmed in vitro. The stability of hDAuNP beacons against degradation by DNase I and GSH indicated that the prepared beacon is stable inside cells. The detected fluorescence in MCF-7 cancer cells correlates with the specific STAT5B mRNA expression, which is consistent with the result from PCR measurement. Fluorescence microscopy showed that the hDAuNP beacons internalized in cells without using transfection agents, with intracellular distribution in the cytoplasm rather than the nucleus. The results demonstrated that this beacon could directly provide quantitative measurement of the intracellular STAT5B mRNA in living cells. Compared to the previous approaches, this beacon has advantages of higher target to background ratio of detection and an increased resistance to nuclease degradation. The strategy reported in this study is a promising approach for the intracellular measurement of RNA or protein expression in living cells, and has great potential in the study of drug screening and discovery.

  10. pSTAT5 and ERK exhibit different expression in myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Wiśniewska-Chudy, Ewa; Szylberg, Łukasz; Dworacki, Grzegorz; Mizera-Nyczak, Ewa; Marszałek, Andrzej

    2017-04-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are clonal hematopoietic progenitor cell disorders characterized by the proliferation of one or more hematopoietic lineages. The classical MPNs include polycythemia vera (PV), essential thrombocythemia (ET) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF) entities. These disorders are characterized by bone marrow morphology typical for each disease, and by the presence of JAK2V617F mutation in the marrow and blood. However, JAK2V617F cannot account for the phenotypic heterogeneity of MPNs because approximately half of all cases of ET and PMF show no evidence of this molecular marker. Therefore, the search for novel markers of these diseases is necessary to improve pathomorphological and molecular diagnostics. This study aimed to investigate the changes in expression patterns of the proteins STAT5 (the signal transducers and activators of transcription 5) and ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase) in bone marrow trephine specimens, derived both from patients with wild-type and mutant (V617F) forms of JAK2 kinase. Furthermore, the changes in STAT5 and ERK2 gene expression levels in the same patients were also investigated. The results of our immunohistochemical, immunoblotting and RT-qPCR studies revealed at least four major unique features of three types of MPNs. These include: i) more pronounced expression of phosphoSTAT5 protein in patients with JAK2V617F mutation compared to patients with wild-type of JAK2 kinase ii) different expression pattern of pSTAT5 in the nucleus and the cytoplasm of megakaryocytes and other bone marrow cells; iii) approximately 5-fold higher expression level of STAT5a gene in PV in comparison to patients with PMF and approximately 2-fold higher than in ET patients; iv) different, intracellular expression patterns of ERK2 and ERK1/2 antigens allowed to distinguish each subtype of MPN. These abnormalities in expression patterns of STAT5 and ERK proteins and genes provide some novel molecular features of MPNs and

  11. STAT5B mutations in heterozygous state have negative impact on height: another clue in human stature heritability

    PubMed Central

    Scalco, Renata C; Hwa, Vivian; Domené, Horacio M.; Jasper, Héctor G.; Belgorosky, Alicia; Marino, Roxana; Pereira, Alberto M.; Tonelli, Carlos A.; Wit, Jan M.; Rosenfeld, Ron G.; Jorge, Alexander A.L.

    2016-01-01

    Context and objective Growth hormone insensitivity with immune dysfunction caused by signal transducer and activator of transcription 5B (STAT5B) mutations is an autosomal recessive condition. Heterozygous mutations in other genes involved in growth regulation were previously associated with a mild height reduction. Our objective was to assess for the first time the phenotype of heterozygous STAT5B mutations. Methods We genotyped and performed clinical and laboratorial evaluations in 52 relatives of 2 previously described Brazilian brothers with homozygous STAT5B c.424_427del mutation (21 heterozygous). Additionally, we obtained height data and genotype from 1,104 adult control individuals from the same region in Brazil and identified 5 additional families harboring the same mutation (18 individuals, 11 heterozygous). Furthermore, we gathered the available height data from first-degree relatives of patients with homozygous STAT5B mutations (17 individuals from 7 families). Data from heterozygous individuals and non-carriers were compared. Results Individuals carrying heterozygous STAT5B c.424_427del mutation were 0.6 SDS shorter than their non-carrier relatives (p= 0.009). Heterozygous subjects also had significantly lower SDS for serum concentrations of IGF-1 (p=0.028) and IGFBP-3 (p=0.02) than their non-carrier relatives. The 17 heterozygous first-degree relatives of patients carrying homozygous STAT5B mutations had an average height SDS of −1.4 ± 0.8 when compared with population-matched controls (p < 0.001). Conclusions STAT5B mutations in heterozygous state have a significant negative impact on height (approximately 3.9 cm). This effect is milder than the effect seen in the homozygous state, with height usually within the normal range. Our results support the hypothesis that heterozygosity of rare pathogenic variants contributes to normal height heritability. PMID:26034074

  12. Development of a STAT5 phosphorylation assay as a rapid bioassay to assess interleukin-7 potency.

    PubMed

    Zumpe, C; Engel, K; Wiedemann, N; Metzger, A U; Pischetsrieder, M; Bachmann, C L

    2011-10-01

    Interleukin (IL)-7 is a cytokine inducing the Janus Kinase (JAK)/Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT) pathway. As a consequence of IL-7 activating this pathway, STAT5 is phosphorylated. In pharmaceutical quality control, the potency of biopharmaceuticals is commonly assessed by proliferation assays. This is also possible for IL-7 conjugates. However, the disadvantage of these classical "endpoint-assays" is that they require very long incubation times, up to several days, since they measure the downstream events of a cellular response. As an alternative to this, we developed a rapid intracellular phosphorylation assay, measuring IL-7 induced STAT5 phosphorylation in Kit 225 cells. The Kit 225 human T cell line expresses the IL-7 receptor and is responsive to IL-7, therefore making it a good candidate cell line for assay development. Like the Kinase receptor activation (KIRA) assay, developed by Sadick et al. [1], the STAT5 phosphorylation assay was performed using two separate microtiter plates: the first one for cell stimulation and lysis, the second one for enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay (ELISA). The assay showed a high accuracy and precision with a mean recovery of 102% and a mean coefficient of variation of 9%. In comparison to the classical proliferation assay, the phosphorylation assay is much faster. Thus, the assay procedure time can at least be reduced from six to three days by using STAT5 phosphorylation instead of proliferation as an endpoint due to the shorter incubation time with IL-7. Moreover, the phosphorylation assay shows a wider dynamic range and higher signal to noise ratios and is thus more robust than the proliferation assay.mAs a consequence, this assay could serve as reliable, accurate, precise and fast alternative to the classical proliferation assay for IL-7. This study also serves as an example for the typical steps during development and qualification / validation of a potency assay for quality control testing.

  13. Single-Cell Measurements of IgE-Mediated FcεRI Signaling Using an Integrated Microfluidic Platform

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yanli; Barua, Dipak; Liu, Peng; Wilson, Bridget S.; Oliver, Janet M.; Hlavacek, William S.; Singh, Anup K.

    2013-03-27

    Heterogeneity in responses of cells to a stimulus, such as a pathogen or allergen, can potentially play an important role in deciding the fate of the responding cell population and the overall systemic response. Measuring heterogeneous responses requires tools capable of interrogating individual cells. Cell signaling studies commonly do not have single-cell resolution because of the limitations of techniques used such as Westerns, ELISAs, mass spectrometry, and DNA microarrays. Microfluidics devices are increasingly being used to overcome these limitations. In this paper, we report on a microfluidic platform for cell signaling analysis that combines two orthogonal single-cell measurement technologies: on-chip flow cytometry and optical imaging. The device seamlessly integrates cell culture, stimulation, and preparation with downstream measurements permitting hands-free, automated analysis to minimize experimental variability. The platform was used to interrogate IgE receptor (FcεRI) signaling, which is responsible for triggering allergic reactions, in RBL-2H3 cells. Following on-chip crosslinking of IgE-FcεRI complexes by multivalent antigen, we monitored signaling events including protein phosphorylation, calcium mobilization and the release of inflammatory mediators. The results demonstrate the ability of our platform to produce quantitative measurements on a cell-by-cell basis from just a few hundred cells. Finally, model-based analysis of the Syk phosphorylation data suggests that heterogeneity in Syk phosphorylation can be attributed to protein copy number variations, with the level of Syk phosphorylation being particularly sensitive to the copy number of Lyn.

  14. Notch signalling inhibits the adipogenic differentiation of single-cell-derived mesenchymal stem cell clones isolated from human adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Osathanon, Thanaphum; Subbalekha, Keskanya; Sastravaha, Panunn; Pavasant, Prasit

    2012-01-01

    ADSCs (adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells) are candidate adult stem cells for regenerative medicine. Notch signalling participates in the differentiation of a heterogeneous ADSC population. We have isolated, human adipose tissue-derived single-cell clones using a cloning ring technique and characterized for their stem cell characteristics. The role of Notch signalling in the differentiation capacity of these adipose-derived single-cell-clones has also been investigated. All 14 clones expressed embryonic and mesenchymal stem cell marker genes. These clones could differentiate into both osteogenic and adipogenic lineages. However, the differentiation potential of each clone was different. Low adipogenic clones had significantly higher mRNA expression levels of Notch 2, 3 and 4, Jagged1, as well as Delta1, compared with those of high adipogenic clones. In contrast, no changes in expression of Notch signalling component mRNA between low and high osteogenic clones was found. Notch receptor mRNA expression decreased with the adipogenic differentiation of both low and high adipogenic clones. The γ-secretase inhibitor, DAPT (N-[N-(3,5-difluorophenacetyl)-l-alanyl]-(S)-phenylglycine t-butyl ester), enhanced adipogenic differentiation. Correspondingly, cells seeded on a Notch ligand (Jagged1) bound surface showed lower intracellular lipid accumulation. These results were noted in both low and high adipogenic clones, indicating that Notch signalling inhibited the adipogenic differentiation of adipose ADSC clones, and could be used to identify an adipogenic susceptible subpopulation for soft-tissue augmentation application.

  15. Single-cell measurements of IgE-mediated FcεRI signaling using an integrated microfluidic platform.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanli; Barua, Dipak; Liu, Peng; Wilson, Bridget S; Oliver, Janet M; Hlavacek, William S; Singh, Anup K

    2013-01-01

    Heterogeneity in responses of cells to a stimulus, such as a pathogen or allergen, can potentially play an important role in deciding the fate of the responding cell population and the overall systemic response. Measuring heterogeneous responses requires tools capable of interrogating individual cells. Cell signaling studies commonly do not have single-cell resolution because of the limitations of techniques used such as Westerns, ELISAs, mass spectrometry, and DNA microarrays. Microfluidics devices are increasingly being used to overcome these limitations. Here, we report on a microfluidic platform for cell signaling analysis that combines two orthogonal single-cell measurement technologies: on-chip flow cytometry and optical imaging. The device seamlessly integrates cell culture, stimulation, and preparation with downstream measurements permitting hands-free, automated analysis to minimize experimental variability. The platform was used to interrogate IgE receptor (FcεRI) signaling, which is responsible for triggering allergic reactions, in RBL-2H3 cells. Following on-chip crosslinking of IgE-FcεRI complexes by multivalent antigen, we monitored signaling events including protein phosphorylation, calcium mobilization and the release of inflammatory mediators. The results demonstrate the ability of our platform to produce quantitative measurements on a cell-by-cell basis from just a few hundred cells. Model-based analysis of the Syk phosphorylation data suggests that heterogeneity in Syk phosphorylation can be attributed to protein copy number variations, with the level of Syk phosphorylation being particularly sensitive to the copy number of Lyn.

  16. Stat5 is critical for the development and maintenance of myeloproliferative neoplasm initiated by Nf1 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sachs, Zohar; Been, Raha A; DeCoursin, Krista J; Nguyen, Hanh T; Mohd Hassan, Nurul A; Noble-Orcutt, Klara E; Eckfeldt, Craig E; Pomeroy, Emily J; Diaz-Flores, Ernesto; Geurts, Jennifer L; Diers, Miechaleen D; Hasz, Diane E; Morgan, Kelly J; MacMillan, Margaret L; Shannon, Kevin M; Largaespada, David A; Wiesner, Stephen M

    2016-10-01

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia is a rare myeloproliferative neoplasm characterized by hyperactive RAS signaling. Neurofibromin1 (encoded by the NF1 gene) is a negative regulator of RAS activation. Patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 harbor loss-of-function mutations in NF1 and have a 200- to 500-fold increased risk of juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia. Leukemia cells from patients with juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia display hypersensitivity to certain cytokines, such as granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. The granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor utilizes pre-associated JAK2 to initiate signals after ligand binding. JAK2 subsequently activates STAT5, among other downstream effectors. Although STAT5 is gaining recognition as an important mediator of growth factor signaling in myeloid leukemias, the contribution of STAT5 to the development of hyperactive RAS-initiated myeloproliferative disease has not been well described. In this study, we investigated the consequence of STAT5 attenuation via genetic and pharmacological approaches in Nf1-deficient murine models of juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia. We found that homozygous Stat5 deficiency extended the lifespan of Nf1-deficient mice and eliminated the development of myeloproliferative neoplasm associated with Nf1 gene loss. Likewise, we found that JAK inhibition with ruxolitinib attenuated myeloproliferative neoplasm in Nf1-deficient mice. Finally, we found that primary cells from a patient with KRAS-mutant juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia displayed reduced colony formation in response to JAK2 inhibition. Our findings establish a central role for STAT5 activation in the pathogenesis of juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia and suggest that targeting this pathway may be of clinical utility in these patients.

  17. Exploring dual inhibitors for STAT1 and STAT5 receptors utilizing virtual screening and dynamics simulation validation.

    PubMed

    Raj, Utkarsh; Kumar, Himansu; Gupta, Saurabh; Varadwaj, Pritish Kumar

    2016-10-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) proteins are latent cytoplasmic transcription factors that transduce signals from cytokines and growth factors to the nucleus and thereby regulate the expression of a variety of target genes. Although mutations of STATs have not been reported in human tumors but the activity of several members of the family, such as STAT1 and STAT5, is deregulated in a variety of human carcinoma. STAT1 and STAT5 share a structural similarity with a highly conserved SH2 domain which is responsible for the activation of STAT proteins on interaction with phosphotyrosine motifs for specific STAT-receptor contacts and STAT dimerization. The purpose of this study is to identify domain-specific dual inhibitors for both STAT1 and STAT5 proteins from a database of natural products and natural product-like compounds comprising of over 90,000 compounds. Virtual screening-based molecular docking was performed in order to find novel natural dual inhibitors. Further, the study was supported by the 50-ns molecular dynamics simulation for receptor-ligand complexes (STAT1-STOCK-1N-69677 and STAT5-STOCK-1N-69677). Analysis of molecular interactions in the SH2 domains of both STAT1 and STAT5 proteins with the ligand revealed few conserved amino acid residues which are responsible to stabilize the ligands within the binding pocket through bonded and non-bonded interactions. This study suggested that compound STOCK-1N-69677 might putatively act as a dual inhibitor of STAT1 and STAT5 receptors, through its binding to the SH2 domain.

  18. Determining the Limitations and Benefits of Noise in Gene Regulation and Signal Transduction through Single Cell, Microscopy-Based Analysis.

    PubMed

    Harton, Marie D; Batchelor, Eric

    2017-03-11

    Stochastic fluctuations, termed "noise," in the level of biological molecules can greatly impact cellular functions. While biological noise can sometimes be detrimental, recent studies have provided an increasing number of examples in which biological noise can be functionally beneficial. Rather than provide an exhaustive review of the growing literature in this field, in this review, we focus on single-cell studies based on quantitative microscopy that have generated a deeper understanding of the sources, characteristics, limitations, and benefits of biological noise. Specifically, we highlight studies showing how noise can help coordinate the expression of multiple downstream target genes, impact the channel capacity of signaling networks, and interact synergistically with oscillatory dynamics to enhance the sensitivity of signal processing. We conclude with a discussion of current challenges and future opportunities.

  19. Single-Cell Measurements of IgE-Mediated FcεRI Signaling Using an Integrated Microfluidic Platform

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Yanli; Barua, Dipak; Liu, Peng; ...

    2013-03-27

    Heterogeneity in responses of cells to a stimulus, such as a pathogen or allergen, can potentially play an important role in deciding the fate of the responding cell population and the overall systemic response. Measuring heterogeneous responses requires tools capable of interrogating individual cells. Cell signaling studies commonly do not have single-cell resolution because of the limitations of techniques used such as Westerns, ELISAs, mass spectrometry, and DNA microarrays. Microfluidics devices are increasingly being used to overcome these limitations. In this paper, we report on a microfluidic platform for cell signaling analysis that combines two orthogonal single-cell measurement technologies: on-chipmore » flow cytometry and optical imaging. The device seamlessly integrates cell culture, stimulation, and preparation with downstream measurements permitting hands-free, automated analysis to minimize experimental variability. The platform was used to interrogate IgE receptor (FcεRI) signaling, which is responsible for triggering allergic reactions, in RBL-2H3 cells. Following on-chip crosslinking of IgE-FcεRI complexes by multivalent antigen, we monitored signaling events including protein phosphorylation, calcium mobilization and the release of inflammatory mediators. The results demonstrate the ability of our platform to produce quantitative measurements on a cell-by-cell basis from just a few hundred cells. Finally, model-based analysis of the Syk phosphorylation data suggests that heterogeneity in Syk phosphorylation can be attributed to protein copy number variations, with the level of Syk phosphorylation being particularly sensitive to the copy number of Lyn.« less

  20. Differential contributions of STAT5A and STAT5B to stress protection and tyrosine kinase inhibitor resistance of chronic myeloid leukemia stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Casetti, Luana; Martin-Lannerée, Séverine; Najjar, Imen; Plo, Isabelle; Augé, Sylvie; Roy, Lydia; Chomel, Jean-Claude; Lauret, Evelyne; Turhan, Ali G; Dusanter-Fourt, Isabelle

    2013-04-01

    STAT5 fulfills essential roles in hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) self-renewal and chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), a prototypical stem cell malignancy. However, the specific contributions of the two related genes STAT5A and STAT5B have not been determined. In this study, we used a RNAi-based strategy to establish participation of these genes to CML disease and persistence following targeted therapy. We showed that STAT5A/STAT5B double-knockdown triggers CML cell apoptosis and suppresses both normal and CML HSC long-term clonogenic potential. STAT5A and STAT5B exhibited similar prosurvival activity, but STAT5A attenuation alone was ineffective at impairing growth of normal and CML CD34(+) cells isolated at diagnosis. In contrast, STAT5A attenuation was sufficient to enhance basal oxidative stress and DNA damage of normal CD34(+) and CML cells. Furthermore, it weakened the ability to manage exogenous oxidative stress, increased p53 (TRP53)/CHK-2 (CHEK2) stress pathway activation, and enhanced prolyl hydroxylase domain (PHD)-3 (EGLN3) mRNA expression. Only STAT5A and its transactivation domain-deficient mutant STAT5AΔ749 specifically rescued these activities. STAT5A attenuation was also active at inhibiting growth of CML CD34(+) cells from patients with acquired resistance to imatinib. Our findings show that STAT5A has a selective role in contributing to stress resistance through unconventional mechanisms, offering new opportunities to eradicate the most primitive and tyrosine kinase inhibitor-resistant CML cells with an additional potential to eradicate persistent stem cell populations.

  1. Fibronectin Modulates Cell Adhesion and Signaling to Promote Single Cell Migration of Highly Invasive Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Grasieli de Oliveira; Bernardi, Lisiane; Lauxen, Isabel; Sant’Ana Filho, Manoel; Horwitz, Alan Rick; Lamers, Marcelo Lazzaron

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration is regulated by adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) through integrins and activation of small RhoGTPases, such as RhoA and Rac1, resulting in changes to actomyosin organization. During invasion, epithelial-derived tumor cells switch from laminin-enriched basal membrane to collagen and fibronectin-enriched connective tissue. How this switch affects the tumor migration is still unclear. We tested the hypothesis that ECM dictates the invasiveness of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC). We analyzed the migratory properties of two OSCC lines, a low invasive cell line with high e-cadherin levels (Linv/HE-cad) or a highly invasive cell line with low e-cadherin levels (Hinv/LE-cad), plated on different ECM components. Compared to laminin, fibronectin induced non-directional collective migration and decreased RhoA activity in Linv/HE-cad OSCC. For Hinv/LE-cad OSCC, fibronectin increased Rac1 activity and induced smaller adhesions, resulting in a fast single cell migration in both 2D and 3D environments. Consistent with these observations, human OSCC biopsies exhibited similar changes in cell-ECM adhesion distribution at the invasive front of the tumor, where cells encounter fibronectin. Our results indicate that ECM composition might induce a switch from collective to single cell migration according to tumor invasiveness due to changes in cell-ECM adhesion and the resulting signaling pathways that alter actomyosin organization. PMID:26978651

  2. Label-Free Imaging of Dynamic and Transient Calcium Signaling in Single Cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jin; Li, Jinghong

    2015-11-09

    Cell signaling consists of diverse events that occur at various temporal and spatial scales, ranging from milliseconds to hours and from single biomolecules to cell populations. The pathway complexities require the development of new techniques that detect the overall signaling activities and are not limited to quantifying a single event. A plasmonic-based electrochemical impedance microscope (P-EIM) that can provide such data with excellent temporal and spatial resolution and does not require the addition of any labels for detection has now been developed. The highly dynamic and transient calcium signaling activities at the early stage of G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) stimulation were thus studied. It could be shown that a subpopulation of cells is more responsive towards agonist stimulation, and the heterogeneity of the local distributions and the transient activities of the ion channels during agonist-activated calcium flux in single HeLa cells were investigated.

  3. IL-7 promotes Glut1 trafficking and glucose uptake via STAT5-mediated activation of Akt to support T-cell survival.

    PubMed

    Wofford, Jessica A; Wieman, Heather L; Jacobs, Sarah R; Zhao, Yuxing; Rathmell, Jeffrey C

    2008-02-15

    Lymphocyte homeostasis requires coordination of metabolic processes with cellular energetic and biosynthetic demands but mechanisms that regulate T-cell metabolism are uncertain. We show that interleukin-7 (IL-7) is a key regulator of glucose uptake in T lymphocytes. To determine how IL-7 affects glucose uptake, we analyzed IL-7 signaling mechanisms and regulation of the glucose transporter, Glut1. The IL-7 receptor (IL-7R) stimulated glucose uptake and cell-surface localization of Glut1 in a manner that required IL-7R Y449, which promoted rapid signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) activation and a delayed yet sustained activation of Akt. Each pathway was necessary for IL-7 to promote glucose uptake, as Akt1(-/-) T cells or PI3-kinase inhibition and RNAi of STAT5 led to defective glucose uptake in response to IL-7. STAT5 and Akt acted in a linear pathway, with STAT5-mediated transcription leading to Akt activation, which was necessary for STAT5 and IL-7 to promote glucose uptake and prevent cell death. Importantly, IL-7 required glucose uptake to promote cell survival. These data demonstrate that IL-7 promotes glucose uptake via a novel signaling mechanism in which STAT5 transcriptional activity promotes Akt activation to regulate Glut1 trafficking and glucose uptake that is critical for IL-7 to prevent T-cell death and maintain homeostasis.

  4. Reduced Levels of Hspa9 Attenuates Stat5 Activation in Mouse B-cells

    PubMed Central

    Krysiak, Kilannin; Tibbitts, Justin F.; Shao, Jin; Liu, Tuoen; Ndonwi, Matthew; Walter, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    HSPA9 is located on chromosome 5q31.2 in humans, a region that is commonly deleted in patients with myeloid malignancies [del(5q)], including myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). HSPA9 expression is reduced by 50% in patients with del(5q)-associated MDS, consistent with haploinsufficient levels. Zebrafish mutants and knockdown studies in human and mouse cells have implicated a role for HSPA9 in hematopoiesis. To comprehensively evaluate the effects of Hspa9 haploinsufficiency on hematopoiesis, we generated an Hspa9 knockout mouse model. While homozygous knockout of Hspa9 is embryonic lethal, mice with heterozygous deletion of Hspa9 (Hspa9+/−) are viable and have a 50% reduction in Hspa9 expression. Hspa9+/− mice have normal basal hematopoiesis and do not develop MDS. However, Hspa9+/− mice have a cell- intrinsic reduction in bone marrow CFU-PreB colony formation without alterations in the number of B-cell progenitors in vivo, consistent with a functional defect in Hspa9+/− B-cell progenitors. We further reduced Hspa9 expression (<50%) using RNAi and observe reduced B-cell progenitors in vivo, indicating that appropriate levels (≥50%) of Hspa9 are required for normal B- lymphopoiesis in vivo. Knockdown of Hspa9 in an IL-7 dependent mouse B-cell line reduced Stat5 phosphorylation following IL-7 receptor stimulation, supporting a role for Hspa9 in Stat5 signaling in B-cells. Collectively, these data implicate a role for Hspa9 in B-lymphopoiesis and Stat5 activation downstream of IL-7 signaling. PMID:25550197

  5. Single-cell E. coli response to an instantaneously applied chemotactic signal.

    PubMed

    Sagawa, Takashi; Kikuchi, Yu; Inoue, Yuichi; Takahashi, Hiroto; Muraoka, Takahiro; Kinbara, Kazushi; Ishijima, Akihiko; Fukuoka, Hajime

    2014-08-05

    In response to an attractant or repellant, an Escherichia coli cell controls the rotational direction of its flagellar motor by a chemotaxis system. When an E. coli cell senses an attractant, a reduction in the intracellular concentration of a chemotaxis protein, phosphorylated CheY (CheY-P), induces counterclockwise (CCW) rotation of the flagellar motor, and this cellular response is thought to occur in several hundred milliseconds. Here, to measure the signaling process occurring inside a single E. coli cell, including the recognition of an attractant by a receptor cluster, the inactivation of histidine kinase CheA, and the diffusion of CheY and CheY-P molecules, we applied a serine stimulus by instantaneous photorelease from a caged compound and examined the cellular response at a temporal resolution of several hundred microseconds. We quantified the clockwise (CW) and CCW durations immediately after the photorelease of serine as the response time and the duration of the response, respectively. The results showed that the response time depended on the distance between the receptor and motor, indicating that the decreased CheY-P concentration induced by serine propagates through the cytoplasm from the receptor-kinase cluster toward the motor with a timing that is explained by the diffusion of CheY and CheY-P molecules. The response time included 240 ms for enzymatic reactions in addition to the time required for diffusion of the signaling molecule. The measured response time and duration of the response also revealed that the E. coli cell senses a similar serine concentration regardless of whether the serine concentration is increasing or decreasing. These detailed quantitative findings increase our understanding of the signal transduction process that occurs inside cells during bacterial chemotaxis.

  6. Mechanics governs single-cell signaling and multi-cell robustness in biofilm infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Vernita

    In biofilms, bacteria and other microbes are embedded in extracellular polymers (EPS). Multiple types of EPS can be produced by a single bacterial strain - the reasons for this redundancy are not well-understood. Our work suggests that different polymers may confer distinct mechanical benefits. Our model organism is Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic human pathogen that forms chronic biofilm infections associated with increased antibiotic resistance and evasion of the immune defense. Biofilms initiate when bacteria attach to a surface, sense the surface, and change their gene expression. Changes in gene expression are regulated by a chemical signal, cyclic-di-GMP. We find that one EPS material, called ``PEL,'' enhances surface sensing by increasing mechanical coupling of single bacteria to the surface. Measurements of bacterial motility suggest that PEL may increase frictional interactions between the surface and the bacteria. Consistent with this, we show that bacteria increase cyclic-di-GMP signaling in response to mechanical shear stress. Mechanosensing has long been known to be important to the function of cells in higher eukaryotes, but this is one of only a handful of studies showing that bacteria can sense and respond to mechanical forces. For the mature biofilm, the embedding polymer matrix can protect bacteria both chemically and mechanically. P. aeruginosa infections in the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung often last for decades, ample time for the infecting strain(s) to evolve. Production of another EPS material, alginate, is well-known to tend to increase over time in CF infections. Alginate chemically protects biofilms, but also makes them softer and weaker. Recently, it is being increasingly recognized that bacteria in chronic CF infections also evolve to increase PSL production. We use oscillatory bulk rheology to determine the unique contributions of EPS materials to biofilm mechanics. Unlike alginate, increased PSL stiffens biofilms. Increasing both

  7. Mechanical signals in plant development: a new method for single cell studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, T. M.; Lintilhac, P. M.

    1997-01-01

    Cell division, which is critical to plant development and morphology, requires the orchestration of hundreds of intracellular processes. In the end, however, cells must make critical decisions, based on a discrete set of mechanical signals such as stress, strain, and shear, to divide in such a way that they will survive the mechanical loads generated by turgor pressure and cell enlargement within the growing tissues. Here we report on a method whereby tobacco protoplasts swirled into a 1.5% agarose entrapment medium will survive and divide. The application of a controlled mechanical load to agarose blocks containing protoplasts orients the primary division plane of the embedded cells. Photoelastic analysis of the agarose entrapment medium can identify the lines of principal stress within the agarose, confirming the hypothesis that cells divide either parallel or perpendicular to the principal stress tensors. The coincidence between the orientation of the new division wall and the orientation of the principal stress tensors suggests that the perception of mechanical stress is a characteristic of individual plant cells. The ability of a cell to determine a shear-free orientation for a new partition wall may be related to the applied load through the deformation of the matrix material. In an isotropic matrix a uniaxial load will produce a rotationally symmetric strain field, which will define a shear-free plane. Where high stress intensities combine with the loading geometry to produce multiaxial loads there will be no axis of rotational symmetry and hence no shear free plane. This suggests that two mechanisms may be orienting the division plane, one a mechanism that works in rotationally symmetrical fields, yielding divisions perpendicular to the compressive tensor, parallel to the long axis of the cell, and one in asymmetric fields, yielding divisions parallel to the short axis of the cell and the compressive tensor.

  8. Cytometry-based single-cell analysis of intact epithelial signaling reveals MAPK activation divergent from TNF-α-induced apoptosis in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Alan J; Banerjee, Amrita; McKinley, Eliot T; Scurrah, Cherie' R; Herring, Charles A; Gewin, Leslie S; Masuzaki, Ryota; Karp, Seth J; Franklin, Jeffrey L; Gerdes, Michael J; Irish, Jonathan M; Coffey, Robert J; Lau, Ken S

    2015-01-01

    Understanding heterogeneous cellular behaviors in a complex tissue requires the evaluation of signaling networks at single-cell resolution. However, probing signaling in epithelial tissues using cytometry-based single-cell analysis has been confounded by the necessity of single-cell dissociation, where disrupting cell-to-cell connections inherently perturbs native cell signaling states. Here, we demonstrate a novel strategy (Disaggregation for Intracellular Signaling in Single Epithelial Cells from Tissue—DISSECT) that preserves native signaling for Cytometry Time-of-Flight (CyTOF) and fluorescent flow cytometry applications. A 21-plex CyTOF analysis encompassing core signaling and cell-identity markers was performed on the small intestinal epithelium after systemic tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) stimulation. Unsupervised and supervised analyses robustly selected signaling features that identify a unique subset of epithelial cells that are sensitized to TNF-α-induced apoptosis in the seemingly homogeneous enterocyte population. Specifically, p-ERK and apoptosis are divergently regulated in neighboring enterocytes within the epithelium, suggesting a mechanism of contact-dependent survival. Our novel single-cell approach can broadly be applied, using both CyTOF and multi-parameter flow cytometry, for investigating normal and diseased cell states in a wide range of epithelial tissues. PMID:26519361

  9. Growth hormone, but not insulin, activates STAT5 proteins in adipocytes in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zvonic, Sanjin; Story, David J; Stephens, Jacqueline M; Mynatt, Randall L

    2003-03-07

    STAT 5 proteins are latent transcription factors which have been shown to be activated by growth hormone (GH) in many cell types. However, some recent studies also suggest that STAT 5B is a physiological substrate of the insulin receptor. In our studies, we have shown that physiological levels of insulin do not induce STAT 5 tyrosine phosphorylation or affect the nuclear distribution of STATs 5A or 5B in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Moreover, we did not observe the activation of STAT 5 in the adipose tissue or skeletal muscle of mice following an acute intraperitoneal injection of insulin. However, acute GH administration, both in vitro and in vivo, resulted in the activation of STAT 5 proteins. In summary, our results indicate that STAT 5 proteins are not activated by physiological levels of insulin in adipose tissue.

  10. Low-coverage single-cell mRNA sequencing reveals cellular heterogeneity and activated signaling pathways in developing cerebral cortex

    PubMed Central

    Pollen, Alex A; Nowakowski, Tomasz J; Shuga, Joe; Wang, Xiaohui; Leyrat, Anne A; Lui, Jan H; Li, Nianzhen; Szpankowski, Lukasz; Fowler, Brian; Chen, Peilin; Ramalingam, Naveen; Sun, Gang; Thu, Myo; Norris, Michael; Lebofsky, Ronald; Toppani, Dominique; Kemp, Darnell; Wong, Michael; Clerkson, Barry; Jones, Brittnee N; Wu, Shiquan; Knutsson, Lawrence; Alvarado, Beatriz; Wang, Jing; Weaver, Lesley S; May, Andrew P; Jones, Robert C; Unger, Marc A; Kriegstein, Arnold R; West, Jay AA

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale surveys of single-cell gene expression have the potential to reveal rare cell populations and lineage relationships, but require efficient methods for cell capture and mRNA sequencing1–4. Although cellular barcoding strategies allow parallel sequencing of single cells at ultra-low depths5, the limitations of shallow sequencing have not been directly investigated. By capturing 301 single cells from 11 populations using microfluidics and analyzing single-cell transcriptomes across downsampled sequencing depths, we demonstrate that shallow single-cell mRNA sequencing (~50,000 reads per cell) is sufficient for unbiased cell-type classification and biomarker identification. In developing cortex we identify diverse cell types including multiple progenitor and neuronal subtypes, and we identify EGR1 and FOS as previously unreported candidate targets of Notch signaling in human but not mouse radial glia. Our strategy establishes an efficient method for unbiased analysis and comparison of cell populations from heterogeneous tissue by microfluidic single-cell capture and low-coverage sequencing of many cells. PMID:25086649

  11. Sensitization of osteosarcoma cells to apoptosis by oncostatin M depends on STAT5 and p53.

    PubMed

    Chipoy, C; Brounais, B; Trichet, V; Battaglia, S; Berreur, M; Oliver, L; Juin, P; Rédini, F; Heymann, D; Blanchard, F

    2007-10-11

    Oncostatin M (OSM), a cytokine of the interleukin-6 family, induces growth arrest and differentiation of osteoblastic cells into glial-like/osteocytic cells. Here, we asked whether OSM regulates apoptosis of normal or transformed (osteosarcoma) osteoblasts. We show that OSM sensitizes cells to apoptosis induced by various death inducers such as staurosporine, ultraviolet or tumor necrosis factor-alpha. Apoptosis is mediated by the mitochondrial pathway, with release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria to the cytosol and activation of caspases-9 and -3. DNA micro-arrays revealed that OSM modulates the expression of Bax, Bad, Bnip3, Bcl-2 and Mcl-1. Pharmacological inhibitors, dominant-negative signal transducer and activator of transcriptions (STATs), stable RNA interference and knockout cells indicated that the transcription factors p53 and STAT5, which are activated by OSM, are implicated in the sensitization to apoptosis, being responsible for Bax induction and Bcl-2 reduction, respectively. These results indicate that, in addition to growth arrest and induced differentiation, OSM also sensitizes normal and transformed osteoblasts to apoptosis by a mechanism implicating (i) activation and nuclear translocation of STAT5 and p53 and (ii) an increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. Therefore, association of OSM with kinase inhibitors such as Sts represents new therapeutic opportunities for wild-type p53 osteosarcoma.

  12. Glioma-derived macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) promotes mast cell recruitment in a STAT5-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Põlajeva, Jelena; Bergström, Tobias; Edqvist, Per-Henrik; Lundequist, Anders; Sjösten, Anna; Nilsson, Gunnar; Smits, Anja; Bergqvist, Michael; Pontén, Fredrik; Westermark, Bengt; Pejler, Gunnar; Forsberg Nilsson, Karin; Tchougounova, Elena

    2014-02-01

    Recently, glioma research has increased its focus on the diverse types of cells present in brain tumors. We observed previously that gliomas are associated with a profound accumulation of mast cells (MCs) and here we investigate the underlying mechanism. Gliomas express a plethora of chemoattractants. First, we demonstrated pronounced migration of human MCs toward conditioned medium from cultures of glioma cell lines. Subsequent cytokine array analyses of media from cells, cultured in either serum-containing or -free conditions, revealed a number of candidates which were secreted in high amounts in both cell lines. Among these, we then focused on macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), which has been reported to be pro-inflammatory and -tumorigenic. Infiltration of MCs was attenuated by antibodies that neutralized MIF. Moreover, a positive correlation between the number of MCs and the level of MIF in a large cohort of human glioma tissue samples was observed. Further, both glioma-conditioned media and purified MIF promoted differential phosphorylation of a number of signaling molecules, including signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5), in MCs. Inhibition of pSTAT5 signaling significantly attenuated the migration of MCs toward glioma cell-conditioned medium shown to contain MIF. In addition, analysis of tissue microarrays (TMAs) of high-grade gliomas revealed a direct correlation between the level of pSTAT5 in MCs and the level of MIF in the medium. In conclusion, these findings indicate the important influence of signaling cascades involving MIF and STAT5 on the recruitment of MCs to gliomas.

  13. Sustained activation of STAT5 is essential for chromatin remodeling and maintenance of mammary-specific function

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Ren; Nelson, Celeste M.; Muschler, John L.; Veiseh, Mandana; Vonderhaar, Barbara K.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2009-06-03

    Epithelial cells, once dissociated and placed in two-dimensional (2D) cultures, rapidly lose tissue-specific functions. We showed previously that in addition to prolactin, signaling by laminin-111 was necessary to restore functional differentiation of mammary epithelia. Here, we elucidate two additional aspects of laminin-111 action. We show that in 2D cultures, the prolactin receptor is basolaterally localized and physically segregated from its apically placed ligand. Detachment of the cells exposes the receptor to ligation by prolactin leading to signal transducers and activators of transcription protein 5 (STAT5) activation, but only transiently and not sufficiently for induction of milk protein expression. We show that laminin-111 reorganizes mammary cells into polarized acini, allowing both the exposure of the prolactin receptor and sustained activation of STAT5. The use of constitutively active STAT5 constructs showed that the latter is necessary and sufficient for chromatin reorganization and {beta}-casein transcription. These results underscore the crucial role of continuous laminin signaling and polarized tissue architecture in maintenance of transcription factor activation, chromatin organization, and tissue-specific gene expression.

  14. The STAT5 inhibitor pimozide decreases survival of chronic myelogenous leukemia cells resistant to kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Erik A.; Walker, Sarah R.; Weisberg, Ellen; Bar-Natan, Michal; Barrett, Rosemary; Gashin, Laurie B.; Terrell, Shariya; Klitgaard, Josephine L.; Santo, Loredana; Addorio, Martha R.; Ebert, Benjamin L.; Griffin, James D.

    2011-01-01

    The transcription factor STAT5 is an essential mediator of the pathogenesis of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). In CML, the BCR/ABL fusion kinase causes the constitutive activation of STAT5, thereby driving the expression of genes promoting survival. BCR/ABL kinase inhibitors have become the mainstay of therapy for CML, although CML cells can develop resistance through mutations in BCR/ABL. To overcome this problem, we used a cell-based screen to identify drugs that inhibit STAT-dependent gene expression. Using this approach, we identified the psychotropic drug pimozide as a STAT5 inhibitor. Pimozide decreases STAT5 tyrosine phosphorylation, although it does not inhibit BCR/ABL or other tyrosine kinases. Furthermore, pimozide decreases the expression of STAT5 target genes and induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in CML cell lines. Pimozide also selectively inhibits colony formation of CD34+ bone marrow cells from CML patients. Importantly, pimozide induces similar effects in the presence of the T315I BCR/ABL mutation that renders the kinase resistant to presently available inhibitors. Simultaneously inhibiting STAT5 with pimozide and the kinase inhibitors imatinib or nilotinib shows enhanced effects in inhibiting STAT5 phosphorylation and in inducing apoptosis. Thus, targeting STAT5 may be an effective strategy for the treatment of CML and other myeloproliferative diseases. PMID:21233313

  15. Single-cell imaging of caspase-1 dynamics reveals an all-or-none inflammasome signaling response.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ting; Yamaguchi, Yoshifumi; Shirasaki, Yoshitaka; Shikada, Koichi; Yamagishi, Mai; Hoshino, Katsuaki; Kaisho, Tsuneyasu; Takemoto, Kiwamu; Suzuki, Toshihiko; Kuranaga, Erina; Ohara, Osamu; Miura, Masayuki

    2014-08-21

    Inflammasome-mediated caspase-1 activation is involved in cell death and the secretion of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β). Although the dynamics of caspase-1 activation, IL-1β secretion, and cell death have been examined with bulk assays in population-level studies, they remain poorly understood at the single-cell level. In this study, we conducted single-cell imaging using a genetic fluorescence resonance energy transfer sensor that detects caspase-1 activation. We determined that caspase-1 exhibits all-or-none (digital) activation at the single-cell level, with similar activation kinetics irrespective of the type of inflammasome or the intensity of the stimulus. Real-time concurrent detection of caspase-1 activation and IL-1β release demonstrated that dead macrophages containing activated caspase-1 release a local burst of IL-1β in a digital manner, which identified these macrophages as the main source of IL-1β within cell populations. Our results highlight the value of single-cell analysis in enhancing understanding of the inflammasome system and chronic inflammatory diseases.

  16. STAT5 Outcompetes STAT3 To Regulate the Expression of the Oncogenic Transcriptional Modulator BCL6

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Sarah R.; Nelson, Erik A.; Yeh, Jennifer E.; Pinello, Luca; Yuan, Guo-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Inappropriate activation of the transcription factors STAT3 and STAT5 has been shown to drive cancer pathogenesis through dysregulation of genes involved in cell survival, growth, and differentiation. Although STAT3 and STAT5 are structurally related, they can have opposite effects on key genes, including BCL6. BCL6, a transcriptional repressor, has been shown to be oncogenic in diffuse large B cell lymphoma. BCL6 also plays an important role in breast cancer pathogenesis, a disease in which STAT3 and STAT5 can be activated individually or concomitantly. To determine the mechanism by which these oncogenic transcription factors regulate BCL6 transcription, we analyzed their effects at the levels of chromatin and gene expression. We found that STAT3 increases expression of BCL6 and enhances recruitment of RNA polymerase II phosphorylated at a site associated with transcriptional initiation. STAT5, in contrast, represses BCL6 expression below basal levels and decreases the association of RNA polymerase II at the gene. Furthermore, the repression mediated by STAT5 is dominant over STAT3-mediated induction. STAT5 exerts this effect by displacing STAT3 from one of the two regulatory regions to which it binds. These findings may underlie the divergent biology of breast cancers containing activated STAT3 alone or in conjunction with activated STAT5. PMID:23716595

  17. Rapamycin reduces fibroblast proliferation without causing quiescence and induces STAT5A/B-mediated cytokine production

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, Zoe E; MacKay, Kimberly; Sander, Michelle; Trost, Brett; Dawicki, Wojciech; Wickramarathna, Aruna; Gordon, John; Eramian, Mark; Kill, Ian R; Bridger, Joanna M; Kusalik, Anthony; Mitchell, Jennifer A; Eskiw, Christopher H

    2015-01-01

    Rapamycin is a well-known inhibitor of the Target of Rapamycin (TOR) signaling cascade; however, the impact of this drug on global genome function and organization in normal primary cells is poorly understood. To explore this impact, we treated primary human foreskin fibroblasts with rapamycin and observed a decrease in cell proliferation without causing cell death. Upon rapamycin treatment chromosomes 18 and 10 were repositioned to a location similar to that of fibroblasts induced into quiescence by serum reduction. Although similar changes in positioning occurred, comparative transcriptome analyses demonstrated significant divergence in gene expression patterns between rapamycin-treated and quiescence-induced fibroblasts. Rapamycin treatment induced the upregulation of cytokine genes, including those from the Interleukin (IL)-6 signaling network, such as IL-8 and the Leukemia Inhibitory Factor (LIF), while quiescent fibroblasts demonstrated up-regulation of genes involved in the complement and coagulation cascade. In addition, genes significantly up-regulated by rapamycin treatment demonstrated increased promoter occupancy of the transcription factor Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 5A/B (STAT5A/B). In summary, we demonstrated that the treatment of fibroblasts with rapamycin decreased proliferation, caused chromosome territory repositioning and induced STAT5A/B-mediated changes in gene expression enriched for cytokines. PMID:26652669

  18. Low-dose interleukin-2 promotes STAT-5 phosphorylation, Treg survival and CTLA-4-dependent function in autoimmune liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Jeffery, H C; Jeffery, L E; Lutz, P; Corrigan, M; Webb, G J; Hirschfield, G M; Adams, D H; Oo, Y H

    2017-02-08

    CD4(+) CD25(high) CD127(low) forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3(+) ) regulatory T cells (Treg ) are essential for the maintenance of peripheral tolerance. Impaired Treg function and an imbalance between effector and Tregs contribute to the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. We reported recently that the hepatic microenvironment is deficient in interleukin (IL)-2, a cytokine essential for Treg survival and function. Consequently, few liver-infiltrating Treg demonstrate signal transducer and activator of transcription-5 (STAT-5) phosphorylation. To establish the potential of IL-2 to enhance Treg therapy, we investigated the effects of very low dose Proleukin (VLDP) on the phosphorylation of STAT-5 and the subsequent survival and function of Treg and T effector cells from the blood and livers of patients with autoimmune liver diseases. VLDP, at less than 5 IU/ml, resulted in selective phosphorylation of STAT-5 in Treg but not effector T cells or natural killer cells and associated with increased expression of cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4), FoxP3 and CD25 and the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 in Treg with the greatest enhancement of regulatory phenotype in the effector memory Treg population. VLDP also maintained expression of the liver-homing chemokine receptor CXCR3. VLDP enhanced Treg function in a CTLA-4-dependent manner. These findings open new avenues for future VLDP cytokine therapy alone or in combination with clinical grade Treg in autoimmune liver diseases, as VLDP could not only enhance regulatory phenotype and functional property but also the survival of intrahepatic Treg .

  19. Cutting Edge: Selective Tyrosine Dephosphorylation of Interferon-Activated Nuclear STAT5 by the VHR Phosphatase1

    PubMed Central

    Hoyt, Richard; Zhu, Wei; Cerignoli, Fabio; Alonso, Andres; Mustelin, Tomas; David, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Cytokine-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the transcription factor STAT5 is required for its transcriptional activity. In this article we show that the small dual-specificity phosphatase VHR selectively dephosphorylates IFN-α- and β-activated, tyrosine-phosphorylated STAT5, leading to the subsequent inhibition of STAT5 function. Phosphorylation of VHR at Tyr138 was required for its phosphatase activity toward STAT5. In addition, the Src homology 2 domain of STAT5 was required for the effective dephosphorylation of STAT5 by VHR. The tyrosine kinase Tyk2, which mediates the phosphorylation of STAT5, was also responsible for the phosphorylation of VHR at Tyr138. PMID:17785772

  20. Nuclear staining of fgfr-2/stat-5 and runx-2 in mucinous breast cancer.

    PubMed

    May, María; Mosto, Julián; Vazquez, Paula Martinez; Gonzalez, Pedro; Rojas, Paola; Gass, Hugo; Lanari, Claudia; Molinolo, Alfredo A

    2016-02-01

    Mucinous carcinoma (MBC) is a rare subtype of breast cancer characterized by the production of variable amounts of mucin, with a prognosis better than that of non-mucinous carcinomas (NMBC). The aim of this project was to evaluate the expression of STAT-5, RUNX-2, and FGFR-2 in a cohort of MBC and compare it with that of NMBC using standard immunohistochemistry. STAT-5 and RUNX-2 are two transcription factors with cytoplasmic and/or nuclear localization that have been related to FGFR-2, a tyrosine kinase growth factor receptor that can interact with STAT-5 and with PR in the nuclei of breast cancer cells. Membranous, cytoplasmic, and nuclear staining were evaluated and expressed as the percentage of stained cells (0-100%) multiplied by the staining intensity (0-3), thus obtaining an index ranging from 0 to 300. Nuclear and/or cytoplasmic immunoreactivity of the three proteins were detected in a high number of NMBC. Nuclear FGFR-2 staining correlated with nuclear STAT-5 (p<0.05) and nuclear RUNX-2 (p<0.01) in both tumor types; however MBC had a significant higher expression of nuclear FGFR-2 (p<0.01) and RUNX-2 (p<0.05) than that of NMBC, and displayed positive immunoreactivity of the 3 proteins in 70.8% of the cases. These results suggest that these proteins may have a role in the progression of the mucinous phenotype, in which nuclear STAT-5 may inhibit RUNX-2 prometastatic effect.

  1. Stat5b Is Essential for Natural Killer Cell–mediated Proliferation and Cytolytic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Imada, Kazunori; Bloom, Eda T.; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Horvath-Arcidiacono, Judith A.; Udy, Garry B.; Davey, Helen W.; Leonard, Warren J.

    1998-01-01

    We have analyzed the immune system in Stat5-deficient mice. Although Stat5a−/− splenocytes have a partial defect in anti-CD3-induced proliferation that can be overcome by high dose interleukin (IL)-2, we now demonstrate that defective proliferation in Stat5b−/− splenocytes cannot be corrected by this treatment. Interestingly, this finding may be at least partially explained by diminished expression of the IL-2 receptor β chain (IL-2Rβ), which is a component of the receptors for both IL-2 and IL-15, although other defects may also exist. Similar to the defect in proliferation in activated splenocytes, freshly isolated splenocytes from Stat5b−/− mice exhibited greatly diminished proliferation in response to IL-2 and IL-15. This results from both a decrease in the number and responsiveness of natural killer (NK) cells. Corresponding to the diminished proliferation, basal as well as IL-2– and IL-15–mediated boosting of NK cytolytic activity was also greatly diminished. These data indicate an essential nonredundant role for Stat5b for potent NK cell–mediated proliferation and cytolytic activity. PMID:9841920

  2. Single cell analysis of low-power laser irradiation-induced activation of signaling pathway in cell proliferation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Da; Gao, Xuejuan

    2007-02-01

    Low-power laser irradiation (LPLI) has been shown to promote cell proliferation in various cell types, yet the mechanism of which has not been fully clarified. Investigating the signaling pathways involved in the laser irradiation is important for understanding these processes. The small G protein Ras works as a binary switch in many important intracellular signaling pathways and, therefore, has been one of the focal targets of signal-transduction investigations and drug development. The Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase) signaling pathway is a network that governs proliferation, differentiation and cell survival. Recent studies suggest that Ras/Raf signaling pathway is involved in the LPLI-induced cell proliferation. On the other hand, Protein kinase Cs (PKCs), the Ca 2+ activated, phospholipid-dependent serine/threonine protein kinases, have been recently presumed to be involved in the regulation of cell proliferation induced by LPLI. In this report, to monitor the direct activations of Ras and PKCs after LPLI treatment in living cells in real time, Raichu-Ras reporter and C kinase activity reporter (CKAR) were utilized, both of which were constructed based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique. The direct activation of Ras is predominantly initiated from the different microdomains of the plasma membrane. The results are monitored during cell proliferation induced by LPLI (0.8 J/cm2) in serum-starved COS-7 cells expressing Raichu-Ras reporter using FRET imaging on laser scanning confocal microscope. Furthermore, the increasing activation of PKCs is also monitored during cell proliferation induced by LPLI (0.8 J/cm2) in serum-starved human lung adenocarcinoma cells (ASTC-a-1) expressing CKAR reporter using the similar way. Taken together, the dynamic increases of H-Ras and PKCs activities are observed during the processes of cell proliferation induced by LPLI.

  3. Single-cell mass cytometry reveals intracellular survival/proliferative signaling in FLT3-ITD-mutated AML stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Lina; Qiu, Peng; Zeng, Zhihong; Jorgensen, Jeffrey L; Mak, Duncan H; Burks, Jared K; Schober, Wendy; McQueen, Teresa J; Cortes, Jorge; Tanner, Scott D; Roboz, Gail J; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Kornblau, Steven M; Guzman, Monica L; Andreeff, Michael; Konopleva, Marina

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the unique phenotypes and complex signaling pathways of leukemia stem cells (LSCs) will provide insights and druggable targets that can be used to eradicate acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Current work on AML LSCs is limited by the number of parameters that conventional flow cytometry (FCM) can analyze because of cell autofluorescence and fluorescent dye spectral overlap. Single-cell mass cytometry (CyTOF) substitutes rare earth elements for fluorophores to label antibodies, which allows measurements of up to 120 parameters in single cells without correction for spectral overlap. The aim of this study was the evaluation of intracellular signaling in antigen-defined stem/progenitor cell subsets in primary AML. CyTOF and conventional FCM yielded comparable results on LSC phenotypes defined by CD45, CD34, CD38, CD123, and CD99. Intracellular phosphoprotein responses to ex vivo cell signaling inhibitors and cytokine stimulation were assessed in myeloid leukemia cell lines and one primary AML sample. CyTOF and conventional FCM results were confirmed by western blotting. In the primary AML sample, we investigated the cell responses to ex vivo stimulation with stem cell factor and BEZ235-induced inhibition of PI3K and identified activation patterns in multiple PI3K downstream signaling pathways including p-4EBP1, p-AKT, and p-S6, particularly in CD34(+) subsets. We evaluated multiple signaling pathways in antigen-defined subpopulations in primary AML cells with FLT3-ITD mutations. The data demonstrated the heterogeneity of cell phenotype distribution and distinct patterns of signaling activation across AML samples and between AML and normal samples. The mTOR targets p-4EBP1 and p-S6 were exclusively found in FLT3-ITD stem/progenitor cells, but not in their normal counterparts, suggesting both as novel targets in FLT3 mutated AML. Our data suggest that CyTOF can identify functional signaling pathways in antigen-defined subpopulations in primary AML, which may

  4. Interaction between FGFR-2, STAT5, and progesterone receptors in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Cerliani, Juan P; Guillardoy, Tomás; Giulianelli, Sebastián; Vaque, José P; Gutkind, J Silvio; Vanzulli, Silvia I; Martins, Rubén; Zeitlin, Eduardo; Lamb, Caroline A; Lanari, Claudia

    2011-05-15

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptor 2 (FGFR-2) polymorphisms have been associated with an increase in estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor (PR)-positive breast cancer risk; however, a clear mechanistic association between FGFR-2 and steroid hormone receptors remains elusive. In previous works, we have shown a cross talk between FGF2 and progestins in mouse mammary carcinomas. To investigate the mechanisms underlying these interactions and to validate our findings in a human setting, we have used T47D human breast cancer cells and human cancer tissue samples. We showed that medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) and FGF2 induced cell proliferation and activation of ERK, AKT, and STAT5 in T47D and in murine C4-HI cells. Nuclear interaction between PR, FGFR-2, and STAT5 after MPA and FGF2 treatment was also showed by confocal microscopy and immunoprecipitation. This effect was associated with increased transcription of PRE and/or GAS reporter genes, and of PR/STAT5-regulated genes and proteins. Two antiprogestins and the FGFR inhibitor PD173074, specifically blocked the effects induced by FGF2 or MPA respectively. The presence of PR/FGFR-2/STAT5 complexes bound to the PRE probe was corroborated by using NoShift transcription and chromatin immunoprecipitation of the MYC promoter. Additionally, we showed that T47D cells stably transfected with constitutively active FGFR-2 gave rise to invasive carcinomas when transplanted into NOD/SCID mice. Nuclear colocalization between PR and FGFR-2/STAT5 was also observed in human breast cancer tissues. This study represents the first demonstration of a nuclear interaction between FGFR-2 and STAT5, as PR coactivators at the DNA progesterone responsive elements, suggesting that FGFRs are valid therapeutic targets for human breast cancer treatment.

  5. Single-Cell Analyses Reveal That KISS1R-Expressing Cells Undergo Sustained Kisspeptin-Induced Signaling That Is Dependent upon An Influx of Extracellular Ca2+

    PubMed Central

    Pampillo, Macarena; Min, Le; Kaiser, Ursula B.; Bhattacharya, Moshmi

    2012-01-01

    The kisspeptin receptor (KISS1R) is a Gαq/11-coupled seven-transmembrane receptor activated by a group of peptides referred to as kisspeptins (Kps). The Kp/KISS1R signaling system is a powerful regulator of GnRH secretion, and inactivating mutations in this system are associated with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. A recent study revealed that Kp triggers prolonged signaling; not from the inability of the receptor to undergo rapid desensitization, but instead from the maintenance of a dynamic and active pool of KISS1R at the cell surface. To investigate this further, we hypothesized that if a dynamic pool of receptor is maintained at the cell surface for a protracted period, chronic Kp-10 treatment would trigger the sustained activation of Gαq/11 as evidenced through the prolonged activation of phospholipase C, protein kinase C, and prolonged mobilization of intracellular Ca2+. Through single-cell analyses, we tested our hypothesis in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells and found that was indeed the case. We subsequently determined that prolonged KISS1R signaling was not a phenomenon specific to HEK 293 cells but is likely a conserved property of KISS1R-expressing cells because evidence of sustained KISS1R signaling was also observed in the GT1–7 GnRH neuronal and Chinese hamster ovary cell lines. While exploring the regulation of prolonged KISS1R signaling, we identified a critical role for extracellular Ca2+. We found that although free intracellular Ca2+, primarily derived from intracellular stores, was sufficient to trigger the acute activation of a major KISS1R secondary effector, protein kinase C, it was insufficient to sustain chronic KISS1R signaling; instead extracellular Ca2+ was absolutely required for this. PMID:23070548

  6. Introduction: why analyze single cells?

    PubMed

    Di Carlo, Dino; Tse, Henry Tat Kwong; Gossett, Daniel R

    2012-01-01

    Powerful methods in molecular biology are abundant; however, in many fields including hematology, stem cell biology, tissue engineering, and cancer biology, data from tools and assays that analyze the average signals from many cells may not yield the desired result because the cells of interest may be in the minority-their behavior masked by the majority-or because the dynamics of the populations of interest are offset in time. Accurate characterization of samples with high cellular heterogeneity may only be achieved by analyzing single cells. In this chapter, we discuss the rationale for performing analyses on individual cells in more depth, cover the fields of study in which single-cell behavior is yielding new insights into biological and clinical questions, and speculate on how single-cell analysis will be critical in the future.

  7. Single-Cell Analysis Reveals that Insulation Maintains Signaling Specificity between Two Yeast MAPK Pathways with Common Components

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Jesse C.; Klimenko, Evguenia S.; Thorner, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells use multiple mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades to evoke appropriate responses to external stimuli. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the MAPK Fus3 is activated by pheromone-binding G protein-coupled receptors to promote mating, whereas the MAPK Hog1 is activated by hyperosmotic stress to elicit the high osmolarity glycerol (HOG) response. Although these MAPK pathways share several upstream components, exposure to either pheromone or osmolyte alone triggers only the appropriate response. We used fluorescent localization- and transcription-specific reporters to assess activation of these pathways in individual cells on the minute and hour timescale, respectively. Dual activation of these two MAPK pathways occurred over a broad range of stimulant concentrations and temporal regimes in wild-type cells subjected to co-stimulation. Thus, signaling specificity is achieved through an “insulation” mechanism, not a “cross-inhibition” mechanism. Furthermore, we showed that there was a critical period during which Hog1 activity had to occur for proper insulation of the HOG pathway. PMID:20959523

  8. Over-expression of Stat5b confers protection against diabetes in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice via up-regulation of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +} regulatory T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Yulan; Purohit, Sharad; Chen, Xueqin; Yi, Bing; She, Jin-Xiong

    2012-08-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This is the first study to provide direct evidence of the role of Stat5b in NOD mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Over-expression of wild type Stat5b transgene protects NOD mice against diabetes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This protection may be mediated by the up-regulation of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +} Tregs. -- Abstract: The signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) family of proteins play a critical role in cytokine signaling required for fine tuning of immune regulation. Previous reports showed that a mutation (L327M) in the Stat5b protein leads to aberrant cytokine signaling in the NOD mice. To further elaborate the role of Stat5b in diabetes, we established a NOD transgenic mouse that over-expresses the wild type Stat5b gene. The incidences of spontaneous diabetes as well as cyclophosphamide-induced diabetes were significantly reduced and delayed in the Stat5b transgenic NOD mice compared to their littermate controls. The total cell numbers of CD4{sup +} T cells and especially CD8{sup +} T cells in the spleen and pancreatic lymph node were increased in the Stat5b transgenic NOD mice. Consistent with these findings, CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} T cells from the Stat5b transgenic NOD mice showed a higher proliferation capacity and up-regulation of multiple cytokines including IL-2, IFN-{gamma}, TNF-{alpha} and IL-10 as well as anti-apoptotic gene Bcl-xl. Furthermore, the number and proportion of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +} regulatory T cells were significantly increased in transgenic mice although in vitro suppression ability of the regulatory T-cells was not affected by the transgene. Our results suggest that Stat5b confers protection against diabetes in the NOD mice by regulating the numbers and function of multiple immune cell types, especially by up-regulating CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +} regulatory T cells.

  9. Jak3, STAT3, and STAT5 inhibit expression of miR-22, a novel tumor suppressor microRNA, in cutaneous T-Cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Sibbesen, Nina A; Kopp, Katharina L; Litvinov, Ivan V; Jønson, Lars; Willerslev-Olsen, Andreas; Fredholm, Simon; Petersen, David L; Nastasi, Claudia; Krejsgaard, Thorbjørn; Lindahl, Lise M; Gniadecki, Robert; Mongan, Nigel P; Sasseville, Denis; Wasik, Mariusz A; Iversen, Lars; Bonefeld, Charlotte M; Geisler, Carsten; Woetmann, Anders; Odum, Niels

    2015-08-21

    Aberrant activation of Janus kinase-3 (Jak3) and its key down-stream effectors, Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription-3 (STAT3) and STAT5, is a key feature of malignant transformation in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL). However, it remains only partially understood how Jak3/STAT activation promotes lymphomagenesis. Recently, non-coding microRNAs (miRNAs) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of this malignancy. Here, we show that (i) malignant T cells display a decreased expression of a tumor suppressor miRNA, miR-22, when compared to non-malignant T cells, (ii) STAT5 binds the promoter of the miR-22 host gene, and (iii) inhibition of Jak3, STAT3, and STAT5 triggers increased expression of pri-miR-22 and miR-22. Curcumin, a nutrient with anti-Jak3 activity and histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) also trigger increased expression of pri-miR-22 and miR-22. Transfection of malignant T cells with recombinant miR-22 inhibits the expression of validated miR-22 targets including NCoA1, a transcriptional co-activator in others cancers, as well as HDAC6, MAX, MYCBP, PTEN, and CDK2, which have all been implicated in CTCL pathogenesis. In conclusion, we provide the first evidence that de-regulated Jak3/STAT3/STAT5 signalling in CTCL cells represses the expression of the gene encoding miR-22, a novel tumor suppressor miRNA.

  10. Single cell transcriptomics of hypothalamic warm sensitive neurons that control core body temperature and fever response Signaling asymmetry and an extension of chemical neuroanatomy.

    PubMed

    Eberwine, James; Bartfai, Tamas

    2011-03-01

    We report on an 'unbiased' molecular characterization of individual, adult neurons, active in a central, anterior hypothalamic neuronal circuit, by establishing cDNA libraries from each individual, electrophysiologically identified warm sensitive neuron (WSN). The cDNA libraries were analyzed by Affymetrix microarray. The presence and frequency of cDNAs were confirmed and enhanced with Illumina sequencing of each single cell cDNA library. cDNAs encoding the GABA biosynthetic enzyme Gad1 and of adrenomedullin, galanin, prodynorphin, somatostatin, and tachykinin were found in the WSNs. The functional cellular and in vivo studies on dozens of the more than 500 neurotransmitters, hormone receptors and ion channels, whose cDNA was identified and sequence confirmed, suggest little or no discrepancy between the transcriptional and functional data in WSNs; whenever agonists were available for a receptor whose cDNA was identified, a functional response was found. Sequencing single neuron libraries permitted identification of rarely expressed receptors like the insulin receptor, adiponectin receptor 2 and of receptor heterodimers; information that is lost when pooling cells leads to dilution of signals and mixing signals. Despite the common electrophysiological phenotype and uniform Gad1 expression, WSN transcriptomes show heterogeneity, suggesting strong epigenetic influence on the transcriptome. Our study suggests that it is well-worth interrogating the cDNA libraries of single neurons by sequencing and chipping.

  11. STAT5 proteins are involved in down-regulation of iron regulatory protein 1 gene expression by nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Starzynski, Rafal Radoslaw; Gonçalves, Ana Sofia; Muzeau, Françoise; Tyrolczyk, Zofia; Smuda, Ewa; Drapier, Jean-Claude; Beaumont, Carole; Lipinski, Pawel

    2006-12-01

    RNA-binding activity of IRP1 (iron regulatory protein 1) is regulated by the insertion/extrusion of a [4Fe-4S] cluster into/from the IRP1 molecule. NO (nitic oxide), whose ability to activate IRP1 by removing its [4Fe-4S] cluster is well known, has also been shown to down-regulate expression of the IRP1 gene. In the present study, we examine whether this regulation occurs at the transcriptional level. Analysis of the mouse IRP1 promoter sequence revealed two conserved putative binding sites for transcription factor(s) regulated by NO and/or changes in intracellular iron level: Sp1 (promoter-selective transcription factor 1) and MTF1 (metal transcription factor 1), plus GAS (interferon-gamma-activated sequence), a binding site for STAT (signal transducer and activator of transcription) proteins. In order to define the functional activity of these sequences, reporter constructs were generated through the insertion of overlapping fragments of the mouse IRP1 promoter upstream of the luciferase gene. Transient expression assays following transfection of HuH7 cells with these plasmids revealed that while both the Sp1 and GAS sequences are involved in basal transcriptional activity of the IRP1 promoter, the role of the latter is predominant. Analysis of protein binding to these sequences in EMSAs (electrophoretic mobility-shift assays) using nuclear extracts from mouse RAW 264.7 macrophages stimulated to synthesize NO showed a significant decrease in the formation of Sp1-DNA and STAT-DNA complexes, compared with controls. We have also demonstrated that the GAS sequence is involved in NO-dependent down-regulation of IRP1 transcription. Further analysis revealed that levels of STAT5a and STAT5b in the nucleus and cytosol of NO-producing macrophages are substantially lower than in control cells. These findings provide evidence that STAT5 proteins play a role in NO-mediated down-regulation of IRP1 gene expression.

  12. Distinct roles of STAT3 and STAT5 in the pathogenesis and targeted therapy of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Sarah R.; Xiang, Michael; Frank, David A.

    2013-01-01

    The transcription factors STAT3 and STAT5 play important roles in the regulation of mammary gland function during pregnancy, lactation, and involution. Given that STAT3 and STAT5 regulate genes involved in proliferation and survival, it is not surprising that inappropriate activation of STAT3 and STAT5 occurs commonly in breast cancer. Although these proteins are structurally similar, they have divergent and opposing effects on gene expression and cellular phenotype. Notably, when STAT5 and STAT3 are activated simultaneously, STAT5 has a dominant effect, and leads to decreased proliferation and increased sensitivity to cell death. Similarly, in breast cancer, activation of both STAT5 and STAT3 is associated with longer patient survival than activation of STAT3 alone. Pharmacological inhibitors of STAT3 and STAT5 are being developed for cancer therapy, though understanding the activation state and functional interaction of STAT3 and STAT5 in a patient's tumor may be critical for the optimal use of this strategy. PMID:23531638

  13. STAT5A Regulates the Survival of Mammary Epithelial Cells and the Development of Mammary Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-07-01

    cleared. Gel was dried according to the man- stored in 7 0% ethanol until processed by standard embedding and ufacturer’s protocol (Research Products...fixative, and stored in 70% ethanol until processed and technical support and Dr. J. Shillingford for developing the Stat5a by standard embedding and...that the process of involution could remove significant numbers of cells that could potentially contribute to the development of tumors. But it also

  14. STAT5a promotes the transcription of mature mmu-miR-135a in 3T3-L1 cells by binding to both miR-135a-1 and miR-135a-2 promoter elements.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiajie; Cheng, Xiaoyan; Peng, Yongdong; Zheng, Rong; Chai, Jin; Jiang, Siwen

    2016-08-01

    Despite extensive research on the role of miR-135a in biological processes, very little attention has been paid to the regulation of its transcription. We have previously reported that miR-135a suppresses 3T3-L1 preadipocyte differentiation and adipogenesis by directly targeting the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene and activating the canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, but the regulatory elements that regulate the expression of the two isoforms of miR-135a (miR-135a-1 and miR-135a-2) remain poorly understood. Here, by using deletion analysis, we predicted two binding sites (-874/-856 and -2020/-2002) for the transcription factor Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription 5a (STAT5a) within the core promoters of miR-135a-1 and miR-135a-2 (-1128/-556 and -2264/-1773), and the subsequent site-directed mutagenesis indicated that the two STAT5a binding sites regulated the activity of the miR-135a-1 and miR-135a-2 promoters. The binding of STAT5a to the miR-135a-1/2 core promoters in vitro and in cell culture was identified by electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. Overexpression and RNAi knockdown of STAT5a showed that the transcription factor regulated the endogenous miR-135a expression. Additionally, The expression time frame of STAT5a and APC indicated a potential negative feedback between them. In sum, the overall results from this study indicate that STAT5a regulates miR-135a transcription by binding to both miR-135a-1 and miR135a-2 promoter elements and the findings provide novel insights into the molecular regulatory mechanisms of miR-135a during adipogenesis.

  15. STAT5 induces miR-21 expression in cutaneous T cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Lindahl, Lise M.; Fredholm, Simon; Joseph, Claudine; Nielsen, Boye Schnack; Jønson, Lars; Willerslev-Olsen, Andreas; Gluud, Maria; Blümel, Edda; Petersen, David L.; Sibbesen, Nina; Hu, Tengpeng; Nastasi, Claudia; Krejsgaard, Thorbjørn; Jæhger, Ditte; Persson, Jenny L.; Mongan, Nigel; Wasik, Mariusz A.; Litvinov, Ivan V.; Sasseville, Denis; Koralov, Sergei B.; Bonefeld, Charlotte M.; Geisler, Carsten; Woetmann, Anders; Ralfkiaer, Elisabeth; Iversen, Lars; Odum, Niels

    2016-01-01

    In cutaneous T cell lymphomas (CTCL), miR-21 is aberrantly expressed in skin and peripheral blood and displays anti-apoptotic properties in malignant T cells. It is, however, unclear exactly which cells express miR-21 and what mechanisms regulate miR-21. Here, we demonstrate miR-21 expression in situ in both malignant and reactive lymphocytes as well as stromal cells. qRT-PCR analysis of 47 patients with mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sezary Syndrome (SS) confirmed an increased miR-21 expression that correlated with progressive disease. In cultured malignant T cells miR-21 expression was inhibited by Tofacitinib (CP-690550), a clinical-grade JAK3 inhibitor. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis showed direct binding of STAT5 to the miR-21 promoter. Cytokine starvation ex vivo triggered a decrease in miR-21 expression, whereas IL-2 induced an increased miR-21 expression in primary SS T cells and cultured cytokine-dependent SS cells (SeAx). siRNA-mediated depletion of STAT5 inhibited constitutive- and IL-2-induced miR-21 expression in cytokine-independent and dependent T cell lines, respectively. IL-15 and IL-2 were more potent than IL-21 in inducing miR-21 expression in the cytokine-dependent T cells. In conclusion, we provide first evidence that miR-21 is expressed in situ in CTCL skin lesions, induced by IL-2 and IL-15 cytokines, and is regulated by STAT5 in malignant T cells. Thus, our data provide novel evidence for a pathological role of IL-2Rg cytokines in promoting expression of the oncogenic miR-21 in CTCL. PMID:27329723

  16. Single-Cell Metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Emara, Samy; Amer, Sara; Ali, Ahmed; Abouleila, Yasmine; Oga, April; Masujima, Tsutomu

    2017-01-01

    The dynamics of a cell is always changing. Cells move, divide, communicate, adapt, and are always reacting to their surroundings non-synchronously. Currently, single-cell metabolomics has become the leading field in understanding the phenotypical variations between them, but sample volumes, low analyte concentrations, and validating gentle sample techniques have proven great barriers toward achieving accurate and complete metabolomics profiling. Certainly, advanced technologies such as nanodevices and microfluidic arrays are making great progress, and analytical techniques, such as matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI), are gaining popularity with high-throughput methodology. Nevertheless, live single-cell mass spectrometry (LCSMS) values the sample quality and precision, turning once theoretical speculation into present-day applications in a variety of fields, including those of medicine, pharmaceutical, and agricultural industries. While there is still room for much improvement, it is clear that the metabolomics field is progressing toward analysis and discoveries at the single-cell level.

  17. Single Cell Oncogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xin

    It is believed that cancer originates from a single cell that has gone through generations of evolution of genetic and epigenetic changes that associate with the hallmarks of cancer. In some cancers such as various types of leukemia, cancer is clonal. Yet in other cancers like glioblastoma (GBM), there is tremendous tumor heterogeneity that is likely to be caused by simultaneous evolution of multiple subclones within the same tissue. It is obvious that understanding how a single cell develops into a clonal tumor upon genetic alterations, at molecular and cellular levels, holds the key to the real appreciation of tumor etiology and ultimate solution for therapeutics. Surprisingly very little is known about the process of spontaneous tumorigenesis from single cells in human or vertebrate animal models. The main reason is the lack of technology to track the natural process of single cell changes from a homeostatic state to a progressively cancerous state. Recently, we developed a patented compound, photoactivatable (''caged'') tamoxifen analogue 4-OHC and associated technique called optochemogenetic switch (OCG switch), which we believe opens the opportunity to address this urgent biological as well as clinical question about cancer. We propose to combine OCG switch with genetically engineered mouse models of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and high grade astrocytoma (including GBM) to study how single cells, when transformed through acute loss of tumor suppressor genes PTEN and TP53 and gain of oncogenic KRAS, can develop into tumor colonies with cellular and molecular heterogeneity in these tissues. The abstract is for my invited talk in session ``Beyond Darwin: Evolution in Single Cells'' 3/18/2016 11:15 AM.

  18. The STAT5 Inhibitor Pimozide Displays Efficacy in Models of Acute Myelogenous Leukemia Driven by FLT3 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Erik A.; Walker, Sarah R.; Xiang, Michael; Weisberg, Ellen; Bar-Natan, Michal; Barrett, Rosemary; Liu, Suiyang; Kharbanda, Surender; Christie, Amanda L.; Nicolais, Maria; Griffin, James D.; Stone, Richard M.; Kung, Andrew L.

    2012-01-01

    Activation of the transcription factor STAT5 is essential for the pathogenesis of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) containing the FLT3 internal tandem duplication (ITD) mutation. FLT3 ITD is a constitutively active tyrosine kinase that drives the activation of STAT5, leading to the growth and survival of AML cells. Although there has been some success in identifying tyrosine kinase inhibitors that block the function of FLT3 ITD, there remains a continued need for effective treatment of this disease. We have identified the psychotropic drug pimozide as an effective inhibitor of STAT5 function. Pimozide inhibits the tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT5, leading to the death of AML cells through the induction of apoptosis. Pimozide shows a combinatorial effect with the tyrosine kinase inhibitors midostaurin (PKC412) and sunitinib in the inhibition of STAT5 tyrosine phosphorylation and the induction of apoptosis. Significantly, pimozide reduces the tumor burden in a mouse model of FLT3-driven AML. Therefore, identifying STAT5 inhibitors may provide a new avenue for the treatment of AML, and these may be effective alone or in combination with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. PMID:23264850

  19. Spatiotemporally controlled single cell sonoporation

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Zhenzhen; Liu, Haiyan; Mayer, Michael; Deng, Cheri X.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents unique approaches to enable control and quantification of ultrasound-mediated cell membrane disruption, or sonoporation, at the single-cell level. Ultrasound excitation of microbubbles that were targeted to the plasma membrane of HEK-293 cells generated spatially and temporally controlled membrane disruption with high repeatability. Using whole-cell patch clamp recording combined with fluorescence microscopy, we obtained time-resolved measurements of single-cell sonoporation and quantified the size and resealing rate of pores. We measured the intracellular diffusion coefficient of cytoplasmic RNA/DNA from sonoporation-induced transport of an intercalating fluorescent dye into and within single cells. We achieved spatiotemporally controlled delivery with subcellular precision and calcium signaling in targeted cells by selective excitation of microbubbles. Finally, we utilized sonoporation to deliver calcein, a membrane-impermeant substrate of multidrug resistance protein-1 (MRP1), into HEK-MRP1 cells, which overexpress MRP1, and monitored the calcein efflux by MRP1. This approach made it possible to measure the efflux rate in individual cells and to compare it directly to the efflux rate in parental control cells that do not express MRP1. PMID:23012425

  20. Imaging of single cell responses to ER stress indicates that the relative dynamics of IRE1/XBP1 and PERK/ATF4 signalling rather than a switch between signalling branches determine cell survival.

    PubMed

    Walter, F; Schmid, J; Düssmann, H; Concannon, C G; Prehn, J H M

    2015-09-01

    An accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) triggers the unfolded protein response (UPR) mediated via the activation of three transmembrane proteins IRE1, PERK and ATF6. Signalling through these proteins is aimed at enhancing the ER folding capacity and reducing the folding load. If these processes fail to re-establish protein homeostasis within the ER, then cell death prevails via apoptosis. How the shift from pro-survival to pro-apoptotic signalling is regulated remains unclear with both IRE1 and PERK signalling associated with pro-survival as well as pro-apoptotic signalling. To investigate the temporal activation of IRE1 and PERK in live cells and their relationship to cellular fate, we devised single cell reporters for both ER stress signalling branches. SH-SY5Y neural cells stably expressing these fluorescent protein reporter constructs to monitor IRE1-splicing activity and PERK-mediated ATF4-translation were imaged using single cell and high content time lapse live cell microscopy. We could correlate an early onset and attenuation of XBP1 splicing in the IRE1-reporter cells as cytoprotective. Indeed, silencing of IRE1 expression using shRNA inhibited splicing of XBP1 resulting in an early onset of cell death. In contrast, in the PERK-reporter cells, we observed that a slow rate of ATF4-translation and late re-initiation of general translation coincided with cells which were resistant to ER stress-induced cell death. Interestingly, whereas silencing of PERK did not affect overall levels of cell death in response to ER stress, it did increase sensitivity to ER stressors at early time points following treatment. Our results suggest that apoptosis activation in response to ER stress is not caused by a preferential activation of a single UPR branch, or by a switch from one branch to the other. Rather, our data indicated that the relative timing of IRE1 and PERK signalling determines the shift from cell survival to apoptosis.

  1. Stimulation of prolactin receptor induces STAT-5 phosphorylation and cellular invasion in glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Alkharusi, Amira; Yu, Shengze; Landázuri, Natalia; Zadjali, Fahad; Davodi, Belghis; Nyström, Thomas; Gräslund, Torbjörn; Rahbar, Afsar; Norstedt, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and aggressive primary brain tumor in humans and is characterized with poor outcome. In this study, we investigated components of prolactin (Prl) system in cell models of GBM and in histological tissue sections obtained from GBM patients. Expression of Prolactin receptor (PrlR) was detected at high levels in U251-MG, at low levels in U87-MG and barely detectable in U373 cell lines and in 66% of brain tumor tissues from 32 GBM patients by immunohistochemical technique. In addition, stimulation of U251-MG and U87-MG cells but not U373 with Prl resulted in increased STAT5 phosphorylation and only in U251-MG cells with increased cellular invasion. Furthermore, STAT5 phosphorylation and cellular invasion induced in Prl stimulated cells were significantly reduced by using a Prl receptor antagonist that consists of Prl with four amino acid replacements. We conclude that Prl receptor is expressed at different levels in the majority of GBM tumors and that blocking of PrlR in U251-MG cells significantly reduce cellular invasion. PMID:27788487

  2. Single-cell nanosurgery.

    PubMed

    Zeigler, Maxwell B; Chiu, Daniel T

    2013-01-01

    This chapter explains the steps necessary to perform laser surgery upon single adherent mammalian cells, where individual organelles are extracted from the cells by optical tweezers and the cells are monitored post-surgery to check their viability. Single-cell laser nanosurgery is used in an increasing range of methodologies because it offers great flexibility. Its main advantages are (a) there is not any physical contact with the cells so they remain in a sterile environment, (b) high spatial selectivity so that single organelles can be extracted from specific areas of individual cells, (c) the method can be conducted in the cell's native media, and (d) in comparison to other techniques that target single cells, such as micromanipulators, laser nanosurgery has a comparatively high throughput.

  3. Gold nanoparticle-based beacon to detect STAT5b mRNA expression in living cells: a case optimized by bioinformatics screen.

    PubMed

    Deng, Dawei; Li, Yang; Xue, Jianpeng; Wang, Jie; Ai, Guanhua; Li, Xin; Gu, Yueqing

    2015-01-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA), a single-strand ribonucleic acid with functional gene information is usually abnormally expressed in cancer cells and has become a promising biomarker for the study of tumor progress. Hairpin DNA-coated gold nanoparticle (hDAuNP) beacon containing a bare gold nanoparticle (AuNP) as fluorescence quencher and thiol-terminated fluorescently labeled stem-loop-stem oligonucleotide sequences attached by Au-S bond is currently a new nanoscale biodiagnostic platform capable of mRNA detection, in which the design of the loop region sequence is crucial for hybridizing with the target mRNA. Hence, in this study, to improve the sensitivity and selectivity of hDAuNP beacon simultaneously, the loop region of hairpin DNA was screened by bioinformatics strategy. Here, signal transducer and activator of transcription 5b (STAT5b) mRNA was selected and used as a practical example. The results from the combined characterizations using optical techniques, flow cytometry assay, and cell microscopic imaging showed that after optimization, the as-prepared hDAuNP beacon had higher selectivity and sensitivity for the detection of STAT5b mRNA in living cells, as compared with our previous beacon. Thus, the bioinformatics method may be a promising new strategy for assisting in the designing of the hDAuNP beacon, extending its application in the detection of mRNA expression and the resultant mRNA-based biological processes and disease pathogenesis.

  4. Single cell wound repair

    PubMed Central

    Abreu-Blanco, Maria Teresa; Verboon, Jeffrey M

    2011-01-01

    Cell wounding is a common event in the life of many cell types, and the capacity of the cell to repair day-to-day wear-and-tear injuries, as well as traumatic ones, is fundamental for maintaining tissue integrity. Cell wounding is most frequent in tissues exposed to high levels of stress. Survival of such plasma membrane disruptions requires rapid resealing to prevent the loss of cytosolic components, to block Ca2+ influx and to avoid cell death. In addition to patching the torn membrane, plasma membrane and cortical cytoskeleton remodeling are required to restore cell function. Although a general understanding of the cell wound repair process is in place, the underlying mechanisms of each step of this response are not yet known. We have developed a model to study single cell wound repair using the early Drosophila embryo. Our system combines genetics and live imaging tools, allowing us to dissect in vivo the dynamics of the single cell wound response. We have shown that cell wound repair in Drosophila requires the coordinated activities of plasma membrane and cytoskeleton components. Furthermore, we identified an unexpected role for E-cadherin as a link between the contractile actomyosin ring and the newly formed plasma membrane plug. PMID:21922041

  5. IL-2 enhances cervical cancer cells proliferation and JAK3/STAT5 phosphorylation at low doses, while at high doses IL-2 has opposite effects.

    PubMed

    Valle-Mendiola, Arturo; Weiss-Steider, Benny; Rocha-Zavaleta, Leticia; Soto-Cruz, Isabel

    2014-05-01

    The IL-2R signaling is critical for normal lymphocyte proliferation. However, the role of the IL-2 signaling in cervical cancer is not yet fully understood. We show that in IL-2R-expressing cervical cancer cells, JAK1 molecules are not phosphorylated. At low doses of IL-2, the constitutive phosphorylation of JAK3 and STAT5 increases in the tumor cells and decreases in lymphocytes, whereas the opposite occurs at high doses of IL-2. Using AG-490, the activation of JAK3 and the proliferation of cervical cancer cells were inhibited. We describe differences in the response of molecules downstream the IL-2R in lymphocytes and tumor cells.

  6. Single Cell Physiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neveu, Pierre; Sinha, Deepak Kumar; Kettunen, Petronella; Vriz, Sophie; Jullien, Ludovic; Bensimon, David

    The possibility to control at specific times and specific places the activity of biomolecules (enzymes, transcription factors, RNA, hormones, etc.) is opening up new opportunities in the study of physiological processes at the single cell level in a live organism. Most existing gene expression systems allow for tissue specific induction upon feeding the organism with exogenous inducers (e.g., tetracycline). Local genetic control has earlier been achieved by micro-injection of the relevant inducer/repressor molecule, but this is an invasive and possibly traumatic technique. In this chapter, we present the requirements for a noninvasive optical control of the activity of biomolecules and review the recent advances in this new field of research.

  7. Deletion of STAT5a/b in Vascular Smooth Muscle Abrogates the Male Bias in Hypoxic Pulmonary Hypertension in Mice: Implications in the Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang-Ming; Yuan, Huijuan; Edwards, John G; Skayian, Yester; Ochani, Kanta; Miller, Edmund J; Sehgal, Pravin B

    2014-01-01

    Chronic hypoxia typically elicits pulmonary hypertension (PH) in mice with a male-dominant phenotype. There is an opposite-sex bias in human PH, with a higher prevalence in women, but greater survival (the “estrogen paradox”). We investigated the involvement of the STAT5a/b species, previously established to mediate sexual dimorphism in other contexts, in the sex bias in PH. Mice with heterozygous or homozygous deletions of the STAT5a/b locus in vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were generated in crosses between STAT5a/bfl/fl and transgelin (SM22α)-Cre+/+ parents. Wild-type (wt ) males subjected to chronic hypoxia showed significant PH and pulmonary arterial remodeling, with wt females showing minimal changes (a male-dominant phenotype). However, in conditional STAT5+/− or STAT5−/− mice, hypoxic females showed the severest manifestations of PH (a female-dominant phenotype). Immunofluorescence studies on human lung sections showed that obliterative pulmonary arterial lesions in patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) or hereditary pulmonary arterial hypertension (HPAH), both male and female, overall had reduced STAT5a/b, reduced PY-STAT5 and reduced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) GTPase atlastin-3 (ATL3). Studies of SMCs and endothelial cell (EC) lines derived from vessels isolated from lungs of male and female IPAH patients and controls revealed instances of coordinate reductions in STAT5a, STAT5b and ATL3 in IPAH-derived cells, including SMCs and ECs from the same patient. Taken together, these data provide the first definitive evidence for a contribution of STAT5a/b to the sex bias in PH in the hypoxic mouse and implicate reduced STAT5 in the pathogenesis of the human disease. PMID:25470773

  8. IL-2 Modulates the TCR Signaling Threshold for CD8 but Not CD4 T Cell Proliferation on a Single-Cell Level.

    PubMed

    Au-Yeung, Byron B; Smith, Geoffrey Alexander; Mueller, James L; Heyn, Cheryl S; Jaszczak, Rebecca Garrett; Weiss, Arthur; Zikherman, Julie

    2017-03-15

    Lymphocytes integrate Ag and cytokine receptor signals to make cell fate decisions. Using a specific reporter of TCR signaling that is insensitive to cytokine signaling, Nur77-eGFP, we identify a sharp, minimal threshold of cumulative TCR signaling required for proliferation in CD4 and CD8 T cells that is independent of both Ag concentration and affinity. Unexpectedly, IL-2 reduces this threshold in CD8 but not CD4 T cells, suggesting that integration of multiple mitogenic inputs may alter the minimal requirement for TCR signaling in CD8 T cells. Neither naive CD4 nor naive CD8 T cells are responsive to low doses of IL-2. We show that activated CD8 T cells become responsive to low doses of IL-2 more quickly than CD4 T cells, and propose that this relative delay in turn accounts for the differential effects of IL-2 on the minimal TCR signaling threshold for proliferation in these populations. In contrast to Nur77-eGFP, c-Myc protein expression integrates mitogenic signals downstream of both IL-2 and the TCR, yet marks an invariant minimal threshold of cumulative mitogenic stimulation required for cell division. Our work provides a conceptual framework for understanding the regulation of clonal expansion of CD8 T cells by subthreshold TCR signaling in the context of mitogenic IL-2 signals, thereby rendering CD8 T cells exquisitely dependent upon environmental cues. Conversely, CD4 T cell proliferation requires an invariant minimal intensity of TCR signaling that is not modulated by IL-2, thereby restricting responses to low-affinity or low-abundance self-antigens even in the context of an inflammatory milieu.

  9. Digital microfluidic immunocytochemistry in single cells

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Alphonsus H. C.; Chamberlain, M. Dean; Situ, Haozhong; Lee, Victor; Wheeler, Aaron R.

    2015-01-01

    We report a new technique called Digital microfluidic Immunocytochemistry in Single Cells (DISC). DISC automates protocols for cell culture, stimulation and immunocytochemistry, enabling the interrogation of protein phosphorylation on pulsing with stimulus for as little as 3 s. DISC was used to probe the phosphorylation states of platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) and the downstream signalling protein, Akt, to evaluate concentration- and time-dependent effects of stimulation. The high time resolution of the technique allowed for surprising new observations—for example, a 10 s pulse stimulus of a low concentration of PDGF is sufficient to cause >30% of adherent fibroblasts to commit to Akt activation. With the ability to quantitatively probe signalling events with high time resolution at the single-cell level, we propose that DISC may be an important new technique for a wide range of applications, especially for screening signalling responses of a heterogeneous cell population. PMID:26104298

  10. The dual role of LSD1 and HDAC3 in STAT5-dependent transcription is determined by protein interactions, binding affinities, motifs and genomic positions

    PubMed Central

    Nanou, Aikaterini; Toumpeki, Chrisavgi; Lavigne, Matthieu D.; Lazou, Vassiliki; Demmers, Jeroen; Paparountas, Triantafillos; Thanos, Dimitris; Katsantoni, Eleni

    2017-01-01

    STAT5 interacts with other factors to control transcription, and the mechanism of regulation is of interest as constitutive active STAT5 has been reported in malignancies. Here, LSD1 and HDAC3 were identified as novel STAT5a interacting partners in pro-B cells. Characterization of STAT5a, LSD1 and HDAC3 target genes by ChIP-seq and RNA-seq revealed gene subsets regulated by independent or combined action of the factors and LSD1/HDAC3 to play dual role in their activation or repression. Genes bound by STAT5a alone or in combination with weakly associated LSD1 or HDAC3 were enriched for the canonical STAT5a GAS motif, and such binding induced activation or repression. Strong STAT5 binding was seen more frequently in intergenic regions, which might function as distal enhancer elements. Groups of genes bound weaker by STAT5a and stronger by LSD1/HDAC3 showed an absence of the GAS motif, and were differentially regulated based on their genomic binding localization and binding affinities. These genes exhibited increased binding frequency in promoters, and in conjunction with the absence of GAS sites, the data indicate a requirement for stabilization by additional factors, which might recruit LSD1/HDAC3. Our study describes an interaction network of STAT5a/LSD1/HDAC3 and a dual function of LSD1/HDAC3 on STAT5-dependent transcription, defined by protein–protein interactions, genomic binding localization/affinity and motifs. PMID:27651463

  11. Apoptosis induction-related cytosolic calcium responses revealed by the dual FRET imaging of calcium signals and caspase-3 activation in a single cell.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Akitoshi; Miyauchi, Hiroshi; Kogure, Takako; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Michikawa, Takayuki; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko

    2015-04-24

    Stimulus-induced changes in the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration control cell fate decision, including apoptosis. However, the precise patterns of the cytosolic Ca(2+) signals that are associated with apoptotic induction remain unknown. We have developed a novel genetically encoded sensor of activated caspase-3 that can be applied in combination with a genetically encoded sensor of the Ca(2+) concentration and have established a dual imaging system that enables the imaging of both cytosolic Ca(2+) signals and caspase-3 activation, which is an indicator of apoptosis, in the same cell. Using this system, we identified differences in the cytosolic Ca(2+) signals of apoptotic and surviving DT40 B lymphocytes after B cell receptor (BCR) stimulation. In surviving cells, BCR stimulation evoked larger initial Ca(2+) spikes followed by a larger sustained elevation of the Ca(2+) concentration than those in apoptotic cells; BCR stimulation also resulted in repetitive transient Ca(2+) spikes, which were mediated by the influx of Ca(2+) from the extracellular space. Our results indicate that the observation of both Ca(2+) signals and cells fate in same cell is crucial to gain an accurate understanding of the function of intracellular Ca(2+) signals in apoptotic induction.

  12. Single cell microfluidics for systems oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Rong

    2012-02-01

    The singular term ``cancer'' is never one kind of disease, but deceivingly encompasses a large number of heterogeneous disease states, which makes it impossible to completely treat cancer using a generic approach. Rather systems approaches are urgently required to assess cancer heterogeneity, stratify patients and enable the most effective, individualized treatment. The heterogeneity of tumors at the single cell level is reflected by the hierarchical complexity of the tumor microenvironment. To identify all the cellular components, including both tumor and infiltrating immune cells, and to delineate the associated cell-to-cell signaling network that dictates tumor initiation, progression and metastasis, we developed a single cell microfluidics chip that can analyze a panel of proteins that are potentially associated inter-cellular signaling network in tumor microenvironment from hundreds of single cells in parallel. This platform integrates two advanced technologies -- microfluidic single cell handling and ultra-high density protein array. This device was first tested for highly multiplexed profiling of secreted proteins including tumor-immune signaling molecules from monocytic leukemia cells. We observed profound cellular heterogeneity with all functional phenotypes quantitatively identified. Correlation analysis further indicated the existence of an intercellular cytokine network in which TNFα-induced secondary signaling cascades further increased functional cellular diversity. It was also exploited to evaluate polyfunctionality of tumor antigen-specific T cells from melanoma patients being treated with adoptive T cell transfer immunotherapy. This platform could be further extended to analyze both solid tumor cells (e.g. human lung carcinoma cells) and infiltrating immune cells (e.g. macrophages) so as to enable systems analysis of the complex tumor microenvironment from small amounts of clinical specimens, e.g. skinny needle biopsies. Thus, it could potentially

  13. IL-2 phosphorylates STAT5 to drive IFN-γ production and activation of human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Herr, Florence; Lemoine, Roxane; Gouilleux, Fabrice; Meley, Daniel; Kazma, Ihab; Heraud, Audrey; Velge-Roussel, Florence; Baron, Christophe; Lebranchu, Yvon

    2014-06-15

    Human dendritic cells (hDCs) produce IL-2 and express IL-2R α-chain (CD25), but the role of IL-2 in DC functions is not well defined. A recent study suggested that the main function of CD25 on hDCs was to transpresent IL-2 to activate T lymphocytes. Our results demonstrate the expression of the three chains of the IL-2R on hDCs and that IL-2 induces STAT5 phosphorylation. Interestingly, use of inhibitors of p-STAT5 revealed that IL-2 increases LPS-induced IFN-γ through STAT5 phosphorylation. Finally, we report that IL-2 increases the ability of hDCs to activate helpless CD8(+) T cells, most likely because of IL-2-triggered IFN-γ synthesis, as we previously described. For the first time, to our knowledge, we disclose that IL-2 induces monocyte-derived hDC's functional maturation and activation through IL-2R binding. Interestingly, our study suggests a direct effect of anti-CD25 mAbs on hDCs that may contribute to their clinical efficacy.

  14. Ultrasensitive proteomic quantitation of cellular signaling by digitized nanoparticle-protein counting

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Thomas; Agarwal, Anupriya; Ramunno-Johnson, Damien; O’Hare, Thomas; Gönen, Mehmet; Tyner, Jeffrey W.; Druker, Brian J.; Vu, Tania Q.

    2016-01-01

    Many important signaling and regulatory proteins are expressed at low abundance and are difficult to measure in single cells. We report a molecular imaging approach to quantitate protein levels by digitized, discrete counting of nanoparticle-tagged proteins. Digitized protein counting provides ultrasensitive molecular detection of proteins in single cells that surpasses conventional methods of quantitating total diffuse fluorescence, and offers a substantial improvement in protein quantitation. We implement this digitized proteomic approach in an integrated imaging platform, the single cell-quantum dot platform (SC-QDP), to execute sensitive single cell phosphoquantitation in response to multiple drug treatment conditions and using limited primary patient material. The SC-QDP: 1) identified pAKT and pERK phospho-heterogeneity and insensitivity in individual leukemia cells treated with a multi-drug panel of FDA-approved kinase inhibitors, and 2) revealed subpopulations of drug-insensitive CD34+ stem cells with high pCRKL and pSTAT5 signaling in chronic myeloid leukemia patient blood samples. This ultrasensitive digitized protein detection approach is valuable for uncovering subtle but important differences in signaling, drug insensitivity, and other key cellular processes amongst single cells. PMID:27320899

  15. Single-cell Transcriptome Study as Big Data

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Pingjian; Lin, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The rapid growth of single-cell RNA-seq studies (scRNA-seq) demands efficient data storage, processing, and analysis. Big-data technology provides a framework that facilitates the comprehensive discovery of biological signals from inter-institutional scRNA-seq datasets. The strategies to solve the stochastic and heterogeneous single-cell transcriptome signal are discussed in this article. After extensively reviewing the available big-data applications of next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based studies, we propose a workflow that accounts for the unique characteristics of scRNA-seq data and primary objectives of single-cell studies. PMID:26876720

  16. Sources of Cell-to-cell Variability in Canonical Nuclear Factor-κB (NF-κB) Signaling Pathway Inferred from Single Cell Dynamic Images*

    PubMed Central

    Kalita, Mridul K.; Sargsyan, Khachik; Tian, Bing; Paulucci-Holthauzen, Adriana; Najm, Habib N.; Debusschere, Bert J.; Brasier, Allan R.

    2011-01-01

    The canonical nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway controls a gene network important in the cellular inflammatory response. Upon activation, NF-κB/RelA is released from cytoplasmic inhibitors, from where it translocates into the nucleus, subsequently activating negative feedback loops producing either monophasic or damped oscillatory nucleo-cytoplasmic dynamics. Although the population behavior of the NF-κB pathway has been extensively modeled, the sources of cell-to-cell variability are not well understood. We describe an integrated experimental-computational analysis of NF-κB/RelA translocation in a validated cell model exhibiting monophasic dynamics. Quantitative measures of cellular geometry and total cytoplasmic concentration and translocated RelA amounts were used as priors in Bayesian inference to estimate biophysically realistic parameter values based on dynamic live cell imaging studies of enhanced GFP-tagged RelA in stable transfectants. Bayesian inference was performed on multiple cells simultaneously, assuming identical reaction rate parameters, whereas cellular geometry and initial and total NF-κB concentration-related parameters were cell-specific. A subpopulation of cells exhibiting distinct kinetic profiles was identified that corresponded to differences in the IκBα translation rate. We conclude that cellular geometry, initial and total NF-κB concentration, IκBα translation, and IκBα degradation rates account for distinct cell-to-cell differences in canonical NF-κB translocation dynamics. PMID:21868381

  17. Sources of cell-to-cell variability in canonical nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway inferred from single cell dynamic images.

    PubMed

    Kalita, Mridul K; Sargsyan, Khachik; Tian, Bing; Paulucci-Holthauzen, Adriana; Najm, Habib N; Debusschere, Bert J; Brasier, Allan R

    2011-10-28

    The canonical nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway controls a gene network important in the cellular inflammatory response. Upon activation, NF-κB/RelA is released from cytoplasmic inhibitors, from where it translocates into the nucleus, subsequently activating negative feedback loops producing either monophasic or damped oscillatory nucleo-cytoplasmic dynamics. Although the population behavior of the NF-κB pathway has been extensively modeled, the sources of cell-to-cell variability are not well understood. We describe an integrated experimental-computational analysis of NF-κB/RelA translocation in a validated cell model exhibiting monophasic dynamics. Quantitative measures of cellular geometry and total cytoplasmic concentration and translocated RelA amounts were used as priors in Bayesian inference to estimate biophysically realistic parameter values based on dynamic live cell imaging studies of enhanced GFP-tagged RelA in stable transfectants. Bayesian inference was performed on multiple cells simultaneously, assuming identical reaction rate parameters, whereas cellular geometry and initial and total NF-κB concentration-related parameters were cell-specific. A subpopulation of cells exhibiting distinct kinetic profiles was identified that corresponded to differences in the IκBα translation rate. We conclude that cellular geometry, initial and total NF-κB concentration, IκBα translation, and IκBα degradation rates account for distinct cell-to-cell differences in canonical NF-κB translocation dynamics.

  18. Plant single-cell and single-cell-type metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Misra, Biswapriya B; Assmann, Sarah M; Chen, Sixue

    2014-10-01

    In conjunction with genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics, plant metabolomics is providing large data sets that are paving the way towards a comprehensive and holistic understanding of plant growth, development, defense, and productivity. However, dilution effects from organ- and tissue-based sampling of metabolomes have limited our understanding of the intricate regulation of metabolic pathways and networks at the cellular level. Recent advances in metabolomics methodologies, along with the post-genomic expansion of bioinformatics knowledge and functional genomics tools, have allowed the gathering of enriched information on individual cells and single cell types. Here we review progress, current status, opportunities, and challenges presented by single cell-based metabolomics research in plants.

  19. Bcr-abl regulates Stat5 through Shp2, the interferon consensus sequence binding protein (Icsbp/Irf8), growth arrest specific 2 (Gas2) and calpain

    PubMed Central

    Hjort, Elizabeth E.; Huang, Weiqi; Hu, Liping; Eklund, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Icsbp/Irf8 is an interferon regulatory transcription factor that functions as a suppressor of myeloid leukemias. Consistent with this activity, Icsbp represses a set of genes encoding proteins that promote cell proliferation/survival. One such gene encodes Gas2, a calpain inhibitor. We previously found that increased Gas2-expression in Bcr-abl+ cells stabilized βcatenin; a Calpain substrate. This was of interest, because βcatenin contributes to disease progression in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Calpain has additional substrates implicated in leukemogenesis, including Stat5. In the current study, we hypothesized that Stat5 activity in CML is regulated by Gas2/Calpain. We found that Bcr-abl-induced, Shp2-dependent dephosphorylation of Icsbp impaired repression of GAS2 by this transcription factor. The consequent decrease in Calpain activity stabilized Stat5 protein; increasing the absolute abundance of both phospho and total Stat5. This enhanced repression of the IRF8 promoter by Stat5 in a manner dependent on Icsbp, Gas2 and Calpain, but not Stat5 tyrosine phosphorylation. During normal myelopoiesis, increased expression and phosphorylation of Icsbp inhibits Calpain. In contrast, constitutive activation of Shp2 in Bcr-abl+ cells impairs regulation of Gas2/Calpain by Icsbp, aberrantly stabilizing Stat5 and enhancing IRF8 repression. This novel feedback mechanism enhances leukemogenesis by increasing Stat5 and decreasing Icsbp. Bcr-abl targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) provide long term disease control, but CML is not cured by these agents. Our studies suggest targeting Calpain might be a rational therapeutic approach to decrease persistent leukemia stem cells (LSCs) during TKI-treatment. PMID:27769062

  20. Lyn- and PLC-beta3-dependent regulation of SHP-1 phosphorylation controls Stat5 activity and myelomonocytic leukemia-like disease.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Wenbin; Ando, Tomoaki; Wang, Huan-You; Kawakami, Yuko; Kawakami, Toshiaki

    2010-12-23

    Hyperactivation of the transcription factor Stat5 leads to various leukemias. Stat5 activity is regulated by the protein phosphatase SHP-1 in a phospholipase C (PLC)-β3-dependent manner. Thus, PLC-β3-deficient mice develop myeloproliferative neoplasm, like Lyn (Src family kinase)- deficient mice. Here we show that Lyn/PLC-β3 doubly deficient lyn(-/-);PLC-β3(-/-) mice develop a Stat5-dependent, fatal myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasm, similar to human chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML). In hematopoietic stem cells of lyn(-/-);PLC-β3(-/-) mice that cause the CMML-like disease, phosphorylation of SHP-1 at Tyr(536) and Tyr(564) is abrogated, resulting in reduced phosphatase activity and constitutive activation of Stat5. Furthermore, SHP-1 phosphorylation at Tyr(564) by Lyn is indispensable for maximal phosphatase activity and for suppression of the CMML-like disease in these mice. On the other hand, Tyr(536) in SHP-1 can be phosphorylated by Lyn and another kinase(s) and is necessary for efficient interaction with Stat5. Therefore, we identify a novel Lyn/PLC-β3-mediated regulatory mechanism of SHP-1 and Stat5 activities.

  1. Single Cell Electrical Characterization Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Mansor, Muhammad Asraf; Ahmad, Mohd Ridzuan

    2015-01-01

    Electrical properties of living cells have been proven to play significant roles in understanding of various biological activities including disease progression both at the cellular and molecular levels. Since two decades ago, many researchers have developed tools to analyze the cell’s electrical states especially in single cell analysis (SCA). In depth analysis and more fully described activities of cell differentiation and cancer can only be accomplished with single cell analysis. This growing interest was supported by the emergence of various microfluidic techniques to fulfill high precisions screening, reduced equipment cost and low analysis time for characterization of the single cell’s electrical properties, as compared to classical bulky technique. This paper presents a historical review of single cell electrical properties analysis development from classical techniques to recent advances in microfluidic techniques. Technical details of the different microfluidic techniques are highlighted, and the advantages and limitations of various microfluidic devices are discussed. PMID:26053399

  2. Single Cell Isolation and Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ping; Zhang, Wenhua; Xin, Hongbo; Deng, Glenn

    2016-01-01

    Individual cell heterogeneity within a population can be critical to its peculiar function and fate. Subpopulations studies with mixed mutants and wild types may not be as informative regarding which cell responds to which drugs or clinical treatments. Cell to cell differences in RNA transcripts and protein expression can be key to answering questions in cancer, neurobiology, stem cell biology, immunology, and developmental biology. Conventional cell-based assays mainly analyze the average responses from a population of cells, without regarding individual cell phenotypes. To better understand the variations from cell to cell, scientists need to use single cell analyses to provide more detailed information for therapeutic decision making in precision medicine. In this review, we focus on the recent developments in single cell isolation and analysis, which include technologies, analyses and main applications. Here, we summarize the historical background, limitations, applications, and potential of single cell isolation technologies. PMID:27826548

  3. Role of STAT5b in Breast Cancer Progression and Metastasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    J, Jove R: STATs in oncogenesis. Oncogene 2000, 19(21):2474- 2488. 3. Turkson J, Jove R: STAT proteins: novel molecular targets for cancer drug...Cell Physiol 2003, 197(2):157-168. 7. Haura EB, Turkson J, Jove R: Mechanisms of disease: Insights into the emerging role of signal transducers and

  4. Quantitative assessments of glycolysis from single cells.

    PubMed

    Shin, Young Shik; Kim, Jungwoo; Johnson, Dazy; Dooraghi, Alex A; Mai, Wilson X; Ta, Lisa; Chatziioannou, Arion F; Phelps, Michael E; Nathanson, David A; Heath, James R

    2015-06-01

    The most common positron emission tomography (PET) radio-labeled probe for molecular diagnostics in patient care and research is the glucose analog, 2-deoxy-2-[F-18]fluoro-D-glucose ((18)F-FDG). We report on an integrated microfluidics-chip/beta particle imaging system for in vitro(18)F-FDG radioassays of glycolysis with single cell resolution. We investigated the kinetic responses of single glioblastoma cancer cells to targeted inhibitors of receptor tyrosine kinase signaling. Further, we find a weak positive correlation between cell size and rate of glycolysis.

  5. Quantitative assessments of glycolysis from single cells

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Young Shik; Kim, Jungwoo; Johnson, Dazy; Dooraghi, Alex A.; Mai, Wilson X.; Ta, Lisa; Chatziioannou, Arion F.; Phelps, Michael E.; Nathanson, David A.; Heath, James R.

    2015-01-01

    The most common positron emission tomography (PET) radio-labeled probe for molecular diagnostics in patient care and research is the glucose analog, 2-deoxy-2-[F-18]fluoro-D-glucose (18F-FDG). We report on an integrated microfluidics-chip/beta particle imaging system for in vitro 18F-FDG radioassays of glycolysis with single cell resolution. We investigated the kinetic responses of single glioblastoma cancer cells to targeted inhibitors of receptor tyrosine kinase signaling. Further, we find a weak positive correlation between cell size and rate of glycolysis. PMID:26835505

  6. Progress toward single cell metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Rubakhin, Stanislav S.; Lanni, Eric J.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2012-01-01

    The metabolome refers to the entire set of small molecules, or metabolites, within a biological sample. These molecules are involved in many fundamental intracellular functions and reflect the cell’s physiological condition. The ability to detect and identify metabolites and determine and monitor their amounts at the single cell level enables an exciting range of studies of biological variation and functional heterogeneity between cells, even within a presumably homogenous cell population. Significant progress has been made in the development and application of bioanalytical tools for single cell metabolomics based on mass spectrometry, microfluidics, and capillary separations. Remarkable improvements in the sensitivity, specificity, and throughput of these approaches enable investigation of multiple metabolites simultaneously in a range of individual cell samples. PMID:23246232

  7. Pseudotime estimation: deconfounding single cell time series

    PubMed Central

    Reid, John E.; Wernisch, Lorenz

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Repeated cross-sectional time series single cell data confound several sources of variation, with contributions from measurement noise, stochastic cell-to-cell variation and cell progression at different rates. Time series from single cell assays are particularly susceptible to confounding as the measurements are not averaged over populations of cells. When several genes are assayed in parallel these effects can be estimated and corrected for under certain smoothness assumptions on cell progression. Results: We present a principled probabilistic model with a Bayesian inference scheme to analyse such data. We demonstrate our method’s utility on public microarray, nCounter and RNA-seq datasets from three organisms. Our method almost perfectly recovers withheld capture times in an Arabidopsis dataset, it accurately estimates cell cycle peak times in a human prostate cancer cell line and it correctly identifies two precocious cells in a study of paracrine signalling in mouse dendritic cells. Furthermore, our method compares favourably with Monocle, a state-of-the-art technique. We also show using held-out data that uncertainty in the temporal dimension is a common confounder and should be accounted for in analyses of repeated cross-sectional time series. Availability and Implementation: Our method is available on CRAN in the DeLorean package. Contact: john.reid@mrc-bsu.cam.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27318198

  8. Magnetic levitation of single cells.

    PubMed

    Durmus, Naside Gozde; Tekin, H Cumhur; Guven, Sinan; Sridhar, Kaushik; Arslan Yildiz, Ahu; Calibasi, Gizem; Ghiran, Ionita; Davis, Ronald W; Steinmetz, Lars M; Demirci, Utkan

    2015-07-14

    Several cellular events cause permanent or transient changes in inherent magnetic and density properties of cells. Characterizing these changes in cell populations is crucial to understand cellular heterogeneity in cancer, immune response, infectious diseases, drug resistance, and evolution. Although magnetic levitation has previously been used for macroscale objects, its use in life sciences has been hindered by the inability to levitate microscale objects and by the toxicity of metal salts previously applied for levitation. Here, we use magnetic levitation principles for biological characterization and monitoring of cells and cellular events. We demonstrate that each cell type (i.e., cancer, blood, bacteria, and yeast) has a characteristic levitation profile, which we distinguish at an unprecedented resolution of 1 × 10(-4) g ⋅ mL(-1). We have identified unique differences in levitation and density blueprints between breast, esophageal, colorectal, and nonsmall cell lung cancer cell lines, as well as heterogeneity within these seemingly homogenous cell populations. Furthermore, we demonstrate that changes in cellular density and levitation profiles can be monitored in real time at single-cell resolution, allowing quantification of heterogeneous temporal responses of each cell to environmental stressors. These data establish density as a powerful biomarker for investigating living systems and their responses. Thereby, our method enables rapid, density-based imaging and profiling of single cells with intriguing applications, such as label-free identification and monitoring of heterogeneous biological changes under various physiological conditions, including antibiotic or cancer treatment in personalized medicine.

  9. NO-1886 suppresses diet-induced insulin resistance and cholesterol accumulation through STAT5-dependent upregulation of IGF1 and CYP7A1.

    PubMed

    Li, Qinkai; Yin, Weidong; Cai, Manbo; Liu, Yi; Hou, Hongjie; Shen, Qingyun; Zhang, Chi; Xiao, Junxia; Hu, Xiaobo; Wu, Qishisan; Funaki, Makoto; Nakaya, Yutaka

    2010-01-01

    Insulin resistance and dyslipidemia are both considered to be risk factors for metabolic syndrome. Low levels of IGF1 are associated with insulin resistance. Elevation of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) concomitant with depression of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) increase the risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Liver secretes IGF1 and catabolizes cholesterol regulated by the rate-limiting enzyme of bile acid synthesis from cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1). NO-1886, a chemically synthesized lipoprotein lipase activator, suppresses diet-induced insulin resistance with the improvement of HDL-C. The goal of the present study is to evaluate whether NO-1886 upregulates IGF1 and CYP7A1 to benefit glucose and cholesterol metabolism. By using human hepatoma cell lines (HepG2 cells) as an in vitro model, we found that NO-1886 promoted IGF1 secretion and CYP7A1 expression through the activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5). Pretreatment of cells with AG 490, the inhibitor of STAT pathway, completely abolished NO-1886-induced IGF1 secretion and CYP7A1 expression. Studies performed in Chinese Bama minipigs pointed out an augmentation of plasma IGF1 elicited by a single dose administration of NO-1886. Long-term supplementation with NO-1886 recovered hyperinsulinemia and low plasma levels of IGF1 suppressed LDL-C and facilitated reverse cholesterol transport by decreasing hepatic cholesterol accumulation through increasing CYP7A1 expression in high-fat/high-sucrose/high-cholesterol diet minipigs. These findings indicate that NO-1886 upregulates IGF1 secretion and CYP7A1 expression to improve insulin resistance and hepatic cholesterol accumulation, which may represent an alternative therapeutic avenue of NO-1886 for T2DM and metabolic syndrome.

  10. Nanowire-based single-cell endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Ruoxue; Park, Ji-Ho; Choi, Yeonho; Heo, Chul-Joon; Yang, Seung-Man; Lee, Luke P.; Yang, Peidong

    2012-03-01

    One-dimensional smart probes based on nanowires and nanotubes that can safely penetrate the plasma membrane and enter biological cells are potentially useful in high-resolution and high-throughput gene and drug delivery, biosensing and single-cell electrophysiology. However, using such probes for optical communication across the cellular membrane at the subwavelength level remains limited. Here, we show that a nanowire waveguide attached to the tapered tip of an optical fibre can guide visible light into intracellular compartments of a living mammalian cell, and can also detect optical signals from subcellular regions with high spatial resolution. Furthermore, we show that through light-activated mechanisms the endoscope can deliver payloads into cells with spatial and temporal specificity. Moreover, insertion of the endoscope into cells and illumination of the guided laser did not induce any significant toxicity in the cells.

  11. Over-expression of mitochondrial ferritin affects the JAK2/STAT5 pathway in K562 cells and causes mitochondrial iron accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Santambrogio, Paolo; Erba, Benedetta Gaia; Campanella, Alessandro; Cozzi, Anna; Causarano, Vincenza; Cremonesi, Laura; Gallì, Anna; Della Porta, Matteo Giovanni; Invernizzi, Rosangela; Levi, Sonia

    2011-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial ferritin is a nuclear encoded iron-storage protein localized in mitochondria. It has anti-oxidant properties related to its ferroxidase activity, and it is able to sequester iron avidly into the organelle. The protein has a tissue-specific pattern of expression and is also highly expressed in sideroblasts of patients affected by hereditary sideroblastic anemia and by refractory anemia with ringed sideroblasts. The present study examined whether mitochondrial ferritin has a role in the pathogenesis of these diseases. Design and Methods We analyzed the effect of mitochondrial ferritin over-expression on the JAK2/STAT5 pathway, on iron metabolism and on heme synthesis in erythroleukemic cell lines. Furthermore its effect on apoptosis was evaluated on human erythroid progenitors. Results Data revealed that a high level of mitochondrial ferritin reduced reactive oxygen species and Stat5 phosphorylation while promoting mitochondrial iron loading and cytosolic iron starvation. The decline of Stat5 phosphorylation induced a decrease of the level of anti-apoptotic Bcl-xL transcript compared to that in control cells; however, transferrin receptor 1 transcript increased due to the activation of the iron responsive element/iron regulatory protein machinery. Also, high expression of mitochondrial ferritin increased apoptosis, limited heme synthesis and promoted the formation of Perls-positive granules, identified by electron microscopy as iron granules in mitochondria. Conclusions Our results provide evidence suggesting that Stat5-dependent transcriptional regulation is displaced by strong cytosolic iron starvation status induced by mitochondrial ferritin. The protein interferes with JAK2/STAT5 pathways and with the mechanism of mitochondrial iron accumulation. PMID:21712541

  12. Molecular circuits for associative learning in single-celled organisms

    PubMed Central

    Fernando, Chrisantha T.; Liekens, Anthony M.L.; Bingle, Lewis E.H.; Beck, Christian; Lenser, Thorsten; Stekel, Dov J.; Rowe, Jonathan E.

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate how a single-celled organism could undertake associative learning. Although to date only one previous study has found experimental evidence for such learning, there is no reason in principle why it should not occur. We propose a gene regulatory network that is capable of associative learning between any pre-specified set of chemical signals, in a Hebbian manner, within a single cell. A mathematical model is developed, and simulations show a clear learned response. A preliminary design for implementing this model using plasmids within Escherichia coli is presented, along with an alternative approach, based on double-phosphorylated protein kinases. PMID:18835803

  13. Activation of Stat 5b in erythroid progenitors correlates with the ability of ErbB to induce sustained cell proliferation.

    PubMed Central

    Mellitzer, G; Wessely, O; Decker, T; Meinke, A; Hayman, M J; Beug, H

    1996-01-01

    Self renewal of normal erythroid progenitors is induced by the receptor tyrosine kinase c-ErbB, whereas other receptors (c-Kit/Epo-R) regulate erythroid differentiation. To address possible mechanisms that could explain this selective activity of c-ErbB, we analyzed the ability of these receptors to activate the different members of the Stat transcription factor family. Ligand activation of c-ErbB induced the tyrosine phosphorylation, DNA-binding, and reporter gene transcription of Stat 5b in erythroblasts. In contrast, ligand activation of c-Kit was unable to induce any of these effects in the same cells. Activation of the erythropoietin receptor caused specific DNA-binding of Stat 5b, but failed to induce reporter gene transcription. These biochemical findings correlate perfectly with the selective ability of c-ErbB to cause sustained self renewal in erythroid progenitors. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8790376

  14. Research highlights: microfluidic-enabled single-cell epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Manjima; Khojah, Reem; Tay, Andy; Di Carlo, Dino

    2015-11-07

    Individual cells are the fundamental unit of life with diverse functions from metabolism to motility. In multicellular organisms, a single genome can give rise to tremendous variability across tissues at the single-cell level due to epigenetic differences in the genes that are expressed. Signals from the local environment or a history of signals can drive these variations, and tissues have many cell types that play separate roles. This epigenetic heterogeneity is of biological importance in normal functions such as tissue morphogenesis and can contribute to development or resistance of cancer, or other disease states. Therefore, an improved understanding of variations at the single cell level are fundamental to understanding biology and developing new approaches to combating disease. Traditional approaches to characterize epigenetic modifications of chromatin or the transcriptome of cells have often focused on blended responses of many cells in a tissue; however, such bulk measures lose spatial and temporal differences that occur from cell to cell, and cannot uncover novel or rare populations of cells. Here we highlight a flurry of recent activity to identify the mRNA profiles from thousands of single-cells as well as chromatin accessibility and histone marks on single to few hundreds of cells. Microfluidics and microfabrication have played a central role in the range of new techniques, and will likely continue to impact their further development towards routine single-cell epigenetic analysis.

  15. The role of nanotechnology in single-cell detection: a review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changling; Zhang, Yuxiang; Xia, Mingdian; Zhu, Xingxi; Qi, Shitao; Shen, Huaqiang; Liu, Tiebing; Tang, Liming

    2014-10-01

    Biological processes in single cells, such as signal transduction, DNA duplication, and protein synthesis and trafficking, occur in subcellular compartments at nanoscale level. Achieving high spatial-temporal resolution, high sensitivity, and high specificity in single-cell detection poses a great challenge. Nanotechnology, which has been widely applied in the fields of medicine, electronics, biomaterials, and energy production, has the potential to provide solutions for single-cell detection. Here we present a review of the use of nanotechnology in single-cell detection over the past two decades. First, we review the main areas of scientific interest, including morphology, ion concentration, DNA, RNA, protein, intracellular temperature, elements, and mechanical properties. Second, four categories of application of nanotechnology to single-cell detection are described: nanomanipulation, nanodevices, nanomaterials as labels, and nano Secondary ion mass spectrometry. Finally, the prospects and future trends in single-cell detection and analysis are discussed.

  16. Microfluidics for single-cell genetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Thompson, A M; Paguirigan, A L; Kreutz, J E; Radich, J P; Chiu, D T

    2014-09-07

    The ability to correlate single-cell genetic information to cellular phenotypes will provide the kind of detailed insight into human physiology and disease pathways that is not possible to infer from bulk cell analysis. Microfluidic technologies are attractive for single-cell manipulation due to precise handling and low risk of contamination. Additionally, microfluidic single-cell techniques can allow for high-throughput and detailed genetic analyses that increase accuracy and decrease reagent cost compared to bulk techniques. Incorporating these microfluidic platforms into research and clinical laboratory workflows can fill an unmet need in biology, delivering the highly accurate, highly informative data necessary to develop new therapies and monitor patient outcomes. In this perspective, we describe the current and potential future uses of microfluidics at all stages of single-cell genetic analysis, including cell enrichment and capture, single-cell compartmentalization and manipulation, and detection and analyses.

  17. Microfluidic-based single cell trapping using a combination of stagnation point flow and physical barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Miao; Chen, Zongzheng; Xiang, Cheng; Liu, Bo; Xie, Handi; Qin, Kairong

    2016-06-01

    Single cell trapping in vitro by microfluidic device is an emerging approach for the study of the relationship between single cells and their dynamic biochemical microenvironments. In this paper, a hydrodynamic-based microfluidic device for single cell trapping is designed using a combination of stagnation point flow and physical barrier. The microfluidic device overcomes the weakness of the traditional ones, which have been only based upon either stagnation point flows or physical barriers, and can conveniently load dynamic biochemical signals to the trapped cell. In addition, it can connect with a programmable syringe pump and a microscope to constitute an integrated experimental system. It is experimentally verified that the microfluidic system can trap single cells in vitro even under flow disturbance and conveniently load biochemical signals to the trapped cell. The designed micro-device would provide a simple yet effective experimental platform for further study of the interactions between single cells and their microenvironments.

  18. Studying bacterial quorum-sensing at the single cell level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delfino Perez, Pablo; Pelakh, Leslie; Young, Jonathan; Johnson, Elaine; Hagen, Stephen

    2010-03-01

    Like many bacterial species, Vibrio fischeri can detect its own population density through a quorum sensing (QS) mechanism. The bacterium releases a signal molecule (AI, autoinducer), which accumulates at high population density and triggers a genetic switch. In V.fischeri this leads to bioluminescence. Little is known about how stochastic gene expression affects QS at the level of single cells. We are imaging the luminescence of individual V.fischeri cells in a flow chamber and directly measuring the intercell variability in AI activation of the QS circuit. Our single-cell luminescence experiments allow us to track cells over time and characterize variations in their response to AI levels. We find heterogeneous response to the external signal: at a given AI concentration some cells may be strongly luminescent while others are virtually dark. The analysis of noise in the individual cell response can eventually lead to a better understanding of how cells use QS to gather information about their environment.

  19. Single-cell chromatin accessibility reveals principles of regulatory variation.

    PubMed

    Buenrostro, Jason D; Wu, Beijing; Litzenburger, Ulrike M; Ruff, Dave; Gonzales, Michael L; Snyder, Michael P; Chang, Howard Y; Greenleaf, William J

    2015-07-23

    Cell-to-cell variation is a universal feature of life that affects a wide range of biological phenomena, from developmental plasticity to tumour heterogeneity. Although recent advances have improved our ability to document cellular phenotypic variation, the fundamental mechanisms that generate variability from identical DNA sequences remain elusive. Here we reveal the landscape and principles of mammalian DNA regulatory variation by developing a robust method for mapping the accessible genome of individual cells by assay for transposase-accessible chromatin using sequencing (ATAC-seq) integrated into a programmable microfluidics platform. Single-cell ATAC-seq (scATAC-seq) maps from hundreds of single cells in aggregate closely resemble accessibility profiles from tens of millions of cells and provide insights into cell-to-cell variation. Accessibility variance is systematically associated with specific trans-factors and cis-elements, and we discover combinations of trans-factors associated with either induction or suppression of cell-to-cell variability. We further identify sets of trans-factors associated with cell-type-specific accessibility variance across eight cell types. Targeted perturbations of cell cycle or transcription factor signalling evoke stimulus-specific changes in this observed variability. The pattern of accessibility variation in cis across the genome recapitulates chromosome compartments de novo, linking single-cell accessibility variation to three-dimensional genome organization. Single-cell analysis of DNA accessibility provides new insight into cellular variation of the 'regulome'.

  20. Automated Single Cell Data Decontamination Pipeline

    SciTech Connect

    Tennessen, Kristin; Pati, Amrita

    2014-03-21

    Recent technological advancements in single-cell genomics have encouraged the classification and functional assessment of microorganisms from a wide span of the biospheres phylogeny.1,2 Environmental processes of interest to the DOE, such as bioremediation and carbon cycling, can be elucidated through the genomic lens of these unculturable microbes. However, contamination can occur at various stages of the single-cell sequencing process. Contaminated data can lead to wasted time and effort on meaningless analyses, inaccurate or erroneous conclusions, and pollution of public databases. A fully automated decontamination tool is necessary to prevent these instances and increase the throughput of the single-cell sequencing process

  1. Single cell sequencing: a distinct new field.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Song, Yuanlin

    2017-12-01

    Single cell sequencing (SCS) has become a new approach to study biological heterogeneity. The advancement in technologies for single cell isolation, amplification of genome/transcriptome and next-generation sequencing enables SCS to reveal the inherent properties of a single cell from the large scale of the genome, transcriptome or epigenome at high resolution. Recently, SCS has been widely applied in various clinical and research fields, such as cancer biology and oncology, immunology, microbiology, neurobiology and prenatal diagnosis. In this review, we will discuss the development of SCS methods and focus on the latest clinical and research applications of SCS.

  2. Attenuation of IL-7 receptor signaling is not required for allelic exclusion.

    PubMed

    Will, Wynette M; Aaker, Joshua D; Burchill, Matthew A; Harmon, Ian R; O'Neil, Jennifer J; Goetz, Christine A; Hippen, Keli L; Farrar, Michael A

    2006-03-15

    Allelic exclusion prevents pre-B cells from generating more than one functional H chain, thereby ensuring the formation of a unique pre-BCR. The signaling processes underlying allelic exclusion are not clearly understood. IL-7R-dependent signals have been clearly shown to regulate the accessibility of the Ig H chain locus. More recent work has suggested that pre-BCR-dependent attenuation of IL-7R signaling returns the H chain loci to an inaccessible state; this process has been proposed to underlie allelic exclusion. Importantly, this model predicts that preventing pre-BCR-dependent down-regulation of IL-7R signaling should interfere with allelic exclusion. To test this hypothesis, we made use of transgenic mice that express a constitutively active form of STAT5b (STAT5b-CA). STAT5b-CA expression restores V(D)J recombination in IL-7R(-/-) B cells, demonstrating that IL-7 regulates H chain locus accessibility and V(D)J recombination via STAT5 activation. To examine the effects of constitutively active STAT5b on allelic exclusion, we crossed STAT5b-CA mice (which express the IgM(b) allotype) to IgM(a) allotype congenic mice. We found no difference in the percentage of IgM(a)/IgM(b)-coexpressing B cells in STAT5b-CA vs littermate control mice; identical results were observed when crossing STAT5b-CA mice with hen egg lysozyme (HEL) H chain transgenic mice. The HEL transgene enforces allelic exclusion, preventing rearrangement of endogenous H chain genes; importantly, rearrangement of endogenous H chain genes was suppressed to a similar degree in STAT5b-CA vs HEL mice. Thus, attenuation of IL-7R/STAT5 signaling is not required for allelic exclusion.

  3. Single-cell approaches for molecular classification of endocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Koh, James; Allbritton, Nancy L.; Sosa, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review In this review, we summarize recent developments in single-cell technologies that can be employed for the functional and molecular classification of endocrine cells in normal and neoplastic tissue. Recent findings The emergence of new platforms for the isolation, analysis, and dynamic assessment of individual cell identity and reactive behavior enables experimental deconstruction of intratumoral heterogeneity and other contexts, where variability in cell signaling and biochemical responsiveness inform biological function and clinical presentation. These tools are particularly appropriate for examining and classifying endocrine neoplasias, as the clinical sequelae of these tumors are often driven by disrupted hormonal responsiveness secondary to compromised cell signaling. Single-cell methods allow for multidimensional experimental designs incorporating both spatial and temporal parameters with the capacity to probe dynamic cell signaling behaviors and kinetic response patterns dependent upon sequential agonist challenge. Summary Intratumoral heterogeneity in the provenance, composition, and biological activity of different forms of endocrine neoplasia presents a significant challenge for prognostic assessment. Single-cell technologies provide an array of powerful new approaches uniquely well suited for dissecting complex endocrine tumors. Studies examining the relationship between clinical behavior and tumor compositional variations in cellular activity are now possible, providing new opportunities to deconstruct the underlying mechanisms of endocrine neoplasia. PMID:26632769

  4. Epigenetics reloaded: the single-cell revolution.

    PubMed

    Bheda, Poonam; Schneider, Robert

    2014-11-01

    Mechanistically, how epigenetic states are inherited through cellular divisions remains an important open question in the chromatin field and beyond. Defining the heritability of epigenetic states and the underlying chromatin-based mechanisms within a population of cells is complicated due to cell heterogeneity combined with varying levels of stability of these states; thus, efforts must be focused toward single-cell analyses. The approaches presented here constitute the forefront of epigenetics research at the single-cell level using classic and innovative methods to dissect epigenetics mechanisms from the limited material available in a single cell. This review further outlines exciting future avenues of research to address the significance of epigenetic heterogeneity and the contributions of microfluidics technologies to single-cell isolation and analysis.

  5. Efficient Synergistic Single-Cell Genome Assembly.

    PubMed

    Movahedi, Narjes S; Embree, Mallory; Nagarajan, Harish; Zengler, Karsten; Chitsaz, Hamidreza

    2016-01-01

    As the vast majority of all microbes are unculturable, single-cell sequencing has become a significant method to gain insight into microbial physiology. Single-cell sequencing methods, currently powered by multiple displacement genome amplification (MDA), have passed important milestones such as finishing and closing the genome of a prokaryote. However, the quality and reliability of genome assemblies from single cells are still unsatisfactory due to uneven coverage depth and the absence of scattered chunks of the genome in the final collection of reads caused by MDA bias. In this work, our new algorithm Hybrid De novo Assembler (HyDA) demonstrates the power of coassembly of multiple single-cell genomic data sets through significant improvement of the assembly quality in terms of predicted functional elements and length statistics. Coassemblies contain significantly more base pairs and protein coding genes, cover more subsystems, and consist of longer contigs compared to individual assemblies by the same algorithm as well as state-of-the-art single-cell assemblers SPAdes and IDBA-UD. Hybrid De novo Assembler (HyDA) is also able to avoid chimeric assemblies by detecting and separating shared and exclusive pieces of sequence for input data sets. By replacing one deep single-cell sequencing experiment with a few single-cell sequencing experiments of lower depth, the coassembly method can hedge against the risk of failure and loss of the sample, without significantly increasing sequencing cost. Application of the single-cell coassembler HyDA to the study of three uncultured members of an alkane-degrading methanogenic community validated the usefulness of the coassembly concept. HyDA is open source and publicly available at http://chitsazlab.org/software.html, and the raw reads are available at http://chitsazlab.org/research.html.

  6. A nuclear protein tyrosine phosphatase TC-PTP is a potential negative regulator of the PRL-mediated signaling pathway: dephosphorylation and deactivation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 5a and 5b by TC-PTP in nucleus.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Naohito; Matsuda, Tsukasa

    2002-01-01

    In the present study we examined involvement of nuclear protein tyrosine phosphatase TC-PTP in PRL-mediated signaling. TC-PTP could dephosphorylate signal transducer and activator of transcription 5a (STAT5a) and STAT5b, but the apparent dephosphorylation activity of TC-PTP was weaker than that of cytosolic PTP1B 30 min after PRL stimulation in transfected COS-7 cells, whereas both STAT5a and STAT5b were dephosphorylated to the same extent by recombinant TC-PTP and PTP1B in vitro. Tyrosine-phosphorylated STAT5 was coimmunoprecipitated with substrate trapping mutants of TC-PTP, suggesting that STAT5 is a specific substrate of TC-PTP. These observations were further extended in mammary epithelial COMMA-1D cells stably expressing TC-PTP. A time-course study revealed that dephosphorylation of STAT5 by TC-PTP was delayed compared with that by cytosolic PTP1B due to nuclear localization of TC-PTP throughout PRL stimulation in mammary epithelial cells. Endogenous beta-casein gene expression and beta-casein gene promoter activation in COS-7 cells were largely suppressed by TC-PTP wild type as well as catalytically inactive mutants, suggesting that stable complexes formed between STAT5 and TC-PTP in the nucleus. Taken together, we conclude that TC-PTP is catalytically competent with respect to dephosphorylation and deactivation of PRL-activated STAT5 in the nucleus.

  7. Single-cell transcriptomics for microbial eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Kolisko, Martin; Boscaro, Vittorio; Burki, Fabien; Lynn, Denis H; Keeling, Patrick J

    2014-11-17

    One of the greatest hindrances to a comprehensive understanding of microbial genomics, cell biology, ecology, and evolution is that most microbial life is not in culture. Solutions to this problem have mainly focused on whole-community surveys like metagenomics, but these analyses inevitably loose information and present particular challenges for eukaryotes, which are relatively rare and possess large, gene-sparse genomes. Single-cell analyses present an alternative solution that allows for specific species to be targeted, while retaining information on cellular identity, morphology, and partitioning of activities within microbial communities. Single-cell transcriptomics, pioneered in medical research, offers particular potential advantages for uncultivated eukaryotes, but the efficiency and biases have not been tested. Here we describe a simple and reproducible method for single-cell transcriptomics using manually isolated cells from five model ciliate species; we examine impacts of amplification bias and contamination, and compare the efficacy of gene discovery to traditional culture-based transcriptomics. Gene discovery using single-cell transcriptomes was found to be comparable to mass-culture methods, suggesting single-cell transcriptomics is an efficient entry point into genomic data from the vast majority of eukaryotic biodiversity.

  8. Technologies for Single-Cell Isolation.

    PubMed

    Gross, Andre; Schoendube, Jonas; Zimmermann, Stefan; Steeb, Maximilian; Zengerle, Roland; Koltay, Peter

    2015-07-24

    The handling of single cells is of great importance in applications such as cell line development or single-cell analysis, e.g., for cancer research or for emerging diagnostic methods. This review provides an overview of technologies that are currently used or in development to isolate single cells for subsequent single-cell analysis. Data from a dedicated online market survey conducted to identify the most relevant technologies, presented here for the first time, shows that FACS (fluorescence activated cell sorting) respectively Flow cytometry (33% usage), laser microdissection (17%), manual cell picking (17%), random seeding/dilution (15%), and microfluidics/lab-on-a-chip devices (12%) are currently the most frequently used technologies. These most prominent technologies are described in detail and key performance factors are discussed. The survey data indicates a further increasing interest in single-cell isolation tools for the coming years. Additionally, a worldwide patent search was performed to screen for emerging technologies that might become relevant in the future. In total 179 patents were found, out of which 25 were evaluated by screening the title and abstract to be relevant to the field.

  9. Technologies for Single-Cell Isolation

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Andre; Schoendube, Jonas; Zimmermann, Stefan; Steeb, Maximilian; Zengerle, Roland; Koltay, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The handling of single cells is of great importance in applications such as cell line development or single-cell analysis, e.g., for cancer research or for emerging diagnostic methods. This review provides an overview of technologies that are currently used or in development to isolate single cells for subsequent single-cell analysis. Data from a dedicated online market survey conducted to identify the most relevant technologies, presented here for the first time, shows that FACS (fluorescence activated cell sorting) respectively Flow cytometry (33% usage), laser microdissection (17%), manual cell picking (17%), random seeding/dilution (15%), and microfluidics/lab-on-a-chip devices (12%) are currently the most frequently used technologies. These most prominent technologies are described in detail and key performance factors are discussed. The survey data indicates a further increasing interest in single-cell isolation tools for the coming years. Additionally, a worldwide patent search was performed to screen for emerging technologies that might become relevant in the future. In total 179 patents were found, out of which 25 were evaluated by screening the title and abstract to be relevant to the field. PMID:26213926

  10. Current techniques for single-cell lysis.

    PubMed

    Brown, Robert B; Audet, Julie

    2008-10-06

    Owing to the small quantities of analytes and small volumes involved in single-cell analysis techniques, manipulation strategies must be chosen carefully. The lysis of single cells for downstream chemical analysis in capillaries and lab-on-a-chip devices can be achieved by optical, acoustic, mechanical, electrical or chemical means, each having their respective strengths and weaknesses. Selection of the most appropriate lysis method will depend on the particulars of the downstream cell lysate processing. Ultrafast lysis techniques such as the use of highly focused laser pulses or pulses of high voltage are suitable for applications requiring high temporal resolution. Other factors, such as whether the cells are adherent or in suspension and whether the proteins to be collected are desired to be native or denatured, will determine the suitability of detergent-based lysis methods. Therefore, careful selection of the proper lysis technique is essential for gathering accurate data from single cells.

  11. Single-cell sequencing in cancer research.

    PubMed

    Mato Prado, Mireia; Frampton, Adam E; Stebbing, Justin; Krell, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide single-cell sequencing investigations have the potential to classify individual cells within a tumor mass. In recent years, various single-cell DNA and RNA quantification techniques have facilitated significant advances in our ability to classify subpopulations of cells within a heterogeneous population. These approaches provide the possibility of unraveling the complex variability in genetic, epigenetic and transcriptional interactions that occur within identical cells in a tumor. This should enhance our knowledge of the underlying biological phenotypes and could have a huge impact in designing more precise anticancer treatments in order to improve outcomes and avoid tumor resistance. In addition, single-cell sequencing analysis has the potential to allow the development of better diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers, and thus aid the delivery of more personalized targeted cancer therapy. Nevertheless, further research is still required to overcome technical, biological and computational problems before clinical application.

  12. An automated programmable platform enabling multiplex dynamic stimuli delivery and cellular response monitoring for high-throughput suspension single-cell signaling studies† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4lc01070a Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    He, Luye; Kniss, Ariel; San-Miguel, Adriana; Rouse, Tel; Kemp, Melissa L.

    2015-01-01

    Cell signaling events are orchestrated by dynamic external biochemical cues. By rapidly perturbing cells with dynamic inputs and examining the output from these systems, one could study the structure and dynamic properties of a cellular signaling network. Conventional experimental techniques limit the implementation of these systematic approaches due to the lack of sophistication in manipulating individual cells and the fluid microenvironment around them; existing microfluidic technologies thus far are mainly targeting adherent cells. In this paper we present an automated platform to interrogate suspension cells with dynamic stimuli while simultaneously monitoring cellular responses in a high-throughput manner at single-cell resolution. We demonstrate the use of this platform in an experiment to measure Jurkat T cells in response to distinct dynamic patterns of stimuli; we find cells exhibit highly heterogeneous responses under each stimulation condition. More interestingly, these cells act as low-pass filters, only entrained to the low frequency stimulus signals. We also demonstrate that this platform can be easily programmed to actively generate arbitrary dynamic signals. We envision our platform to be useful in other contexts to study cellular signaling dynamics, which may be difficult using conventional experimental methods. PMID:25609410

  13. Dynamics of single-cell gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Diane; Hasty, Jeff

    2006-01-01

    Cellular behavior has traditionally been investigated by utilizing bulk-scale methods that measure average values for a population of cells. Such population-wide studies mask the behavior of individual cells and are often insufficient for characterizing biological processes in which cellular heterogeneity plays a key role. A unifying theme of many recent studies has been a focus on the development and utilization of single-cell experimental techniques that are capable of probing key biological phenomena in individual living cells. Recently, novel information about gene expression dynamics has been obtained from single-cell experiments that draw upon the unique capabilities of fluorescent reporter proteins. PMID:17130866

  14. Single Cell Genomics: Advances and Future Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Macaulay, Iain C.; Voet, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    Advances in whole-genome and whole-transcriptome amplification have permitted the sequencing of the minute amounts of DNA and RNA present in a single cell, offering a window into the extent and nature of genomic and transcriptomic heterogeneity which occurs in both normal development and disease. Single-cell approaches stand poised to revolutionise our capacity to understand the scale of genomic, epigenomic, and transcriptomic diversity that occurs during the lifetime of an individual organism. Here, we review the major technological and biological breakthroughs achieved, describe the remaining challenges to overcome, and provide a glimpse into the promise of recent and future developments. PMID:24497842

  15. Thermomicrocapillaries as temperature biosensors in single cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herth, Simone; Giesguth, Miriam; Wedel, Waldemar; Reiss, Günther; Dietz, Karl-Josef

    2013-03-01

    Temperature is an important physical parameter in biology and its deviation from optimum can cause damage in biosystems. Thermocouples based on the Seebeck effect can be structured on glass microcapillaries to obtain thermomicrocapillaries (TMCs) usable in a micromanipulation setup. The suitability of the setup was proven by monitoring the temperature increase upon illumination of leaves and single cells following insertion of the TMC. The increase was 1.5 K in green tissue and 0.75 K in white leaf sections due to lower absorption. In single cells of trichomes, the increase was 0.5 K due to heat dissipation to the surrounding air.

  16. Limiting Energy Dissipation Induces Glassy Kinetics in Single-Cell High-Precision Responses

    PubMed Central

    Das, Jayajit

    2016-01-01

    Single cells often generate precise responses by involving dissipative out-of-thermodynamic-equilibrium processes in signaling networks. The available free energy to fuel these processes could become limited depending on the metabolic state of an individual cell. How does limiting dissipation affect the kinetics of high-precision responses in single cells? I address this question in the context of a kinetic proofreading scheme used in a simple model of early-time T cell signaling. Using exact analytical calculations and numerical simulations, I show that limiting dissipation qualitatively changes the kinetics in single cells marked by emergence of slow kinetics, large cell-to-cell variations of copy numbers, temporally correlated stochastic events (dynamic facilitation), and ergodicity breaking. Thus, constraints in energy dissipation, in addition to negatively affecting ligand discrimination in T cells, can create a fundamental difficulty in determining single-cell kinetics from cell-population results. PMID:26958894

  17. Capillary Electrophoretic Technologies for Single Cell Metabolomics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapainis, Theodore E.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the functioning of the brain is hindered by a lack of knowledge of the full complement of neurotransmitters and neuromodulatory compounds. Single cell measurements aid in the discovery of neurotransmitters used by small subsets of neurons that would be diluted below detection limits or masked by ubiquitous compounds when working with…

  18. [Single-cell sequencing and tumour heterogeneity].

    PubMed

    Jordan, Bertrand

    2014-12-01

    The heterogeneity of tumours is now beginning to be documented precisely by single-cell new-generation sequencing. Recently published results on breast tumours show that each of the cells analysed displays a unique pattern of point mutations. This extensive genetic diversity is present before any treatment, and is likely to cause resistance to initially successful targeted therapies.

  19. Microfluidic single-cell analysis for systems immunology.

    PubMed

    Junkin, Michael; Tay, Savaş

    2014-04-07

    The immune system constantly battles infection and tissue damage, but exaggerated immune responses lead to allergies, autoimmunity and cancer. Discrimination of self from foreign and the fine-tuning of immunity are achieved by information processing pathways, whose regulatory mechanisms are little understood. Cell-to-cell variability and stochastic molecular interactions result in diverse cellular responses to identical signaling inputs, casting doubt on the reliability of traditional population-averaged analyses. Furthermore, dynamic molecular and cellular interactions create emergent properties that change over multiple time scales. Understanding immunity in the face of complexity and noisy dynamics requires time-dependent analysis of single-cells in a proper context. Microfluidic systems create precisely defined microenvironments by controlling fluidic and surface chemistries, feature sizes, geometries and signal input timing, and thus enable quantitative multi-parameter analysis of single cells. Such qualities allow observable dynamic environments approaching in vivo levels of biological complexity. Seamless parallelization of functional units in microfluidic devices allows high-throughput measurements, an essential feature for statistically meaningful analysis of naturally variable biological systems. These abilities recapitulate diverse scenarios such as cell-cell signaling, migration, differentiation, antibody and cytokine production, clonal selection, and cell lysis, thereby enabling accurate and meaningful study of immune behaviors in vitro.

  20. Condensing Raman spectrum for single-cell phenotype analysis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background In recent years, high throughput and non-invasive Raman spectrometry technique has matured as an effective approach to identification of individual cells by species, even in complex, mixed populations. Raman profiling is an appealing optical microscopic method to achieve this. To fully utilize Raman proling for single-cell analysis, an extensive understanding of Raman spectra is necessary to answer questions such as which filtering methodologies are effective for pre-processing of Raman spectra, what strains can be distinguished by Raman spectra, and what features serve best as Raman-based biomarkers for single-cells, etc. Results In this work, we have proposed an approach called rDisc to discretize the original Raman spectrum into only a few (usually less than 20) representative peaks (Raman shifts). The approach has advantages in removing noises, and condensing the original spectrum. In particular, effective signal processing procedures were designed to eliminate noise, utilising wavelet transform denoising, baseline correction, and signal normalization. In the discretizing process, representative peaks were selected to signicantly decrease the Raman data size. More importantly, the selected peaks are chosen as suitable to serve as key biological markers to differentiate species and other cellular features. Additionally, the classication performance of discretized spectra was found to be comparable to full spectrum having more than 1000 Raman shifts. Overall, the discretized spectrum needs about 5storage space of a full spectrum and the processing speed is considerably faster. This makes rDisc clearly superior to other methods for single-cell classication. PMID:26681607

  1. Copy number variants calling for single cell sequencing data by multi-constrained optimization.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bo; Cai, Hongmin; Zhang, Changsheng; Yang, Xi; Han, Guoqiang

    2016-08-01

    Variations in DNA copy number carry important information on genome evolution and regulation of DNA replication in cancer cells. The rapid development of single-cell sequencing technology allows one to explore gene expression heterogeneity among single-cells, thus providing important cancer cell evolution information. Single-cell DNA/RNA sequencing data usually have low genome coverage, which requires an extra step of amplification to accumulate enough samples. However, such amplification will introduce large bias and makes bioinformatics analysis challenging. Accurately modeling the distribution of sequencing data and effectively suppressing the bias influence is the key to success variations analysis. Recent advances demonstrate the technical noises by amplification are more likely to follow negative binomial distribution, a special case of Poisson distribution. Thus, we tackle the problem CNV detection by formulating it into a quadratic optimization problem involving two constraints, in which the underling signals are corrupted by Poisson distributed noises. By imposing the constraints of sparsity and smoothness, the reconstructed read depth signals from single-cell sequencing data are anticipated to fit the CNVs patterns more accurately. An efficient numerical solution based on the classical alternating direction minimization method (ADMM) is tailored to solve the proposed model. We demonstrate the advantages of the proposed method using both synthetic and empirical single-cell sequencing data. Our experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method achieves excellent performance and high promise of success with single-cell sequencing data.

  2. Parallel single-cell analysis microfluidic platform.

    PubMed

    van den Brink, Floris T G; Gool, Elmar; Frimat, Jean-Philippe; Bomer, Johan; van den Berg, Albert; Le Gac, Séverine

    2011-11-01

    We report a PDMS microfluidic platform for parallel single-cell analysis (PaSCAl) as a powerful tool to decipher the heterogeneity found in cell populations. Cells are trapped individually in dedicated pockets, and thereafter, a number of invasive or non-invasive analysis schemes are performed. First, we report single-cell trapping in a fast (2-5  min) and reproducible manner with a single-cell capture yield of 85% using two cell lines (P3x63Ag8 and MCF-7), employing a protocol which is scalable and easily amenable to automation. Following this, a mixed population of P3x63Ag8 and MCF-7 cells is stained in situ using the nucleic acid probe (Hoechst) and a phycoerythrin-labeled monoclonal antibody directed at EpCAM present on the surface of the breast cancer cells MCF-7 and absent on the myeloma cells P3x63Ag8 to illustrate the potential of the device to analyze cell population heterogeneity. Next, cells are porated in situ using chemicals in a reversible (digitonin) or irreversible way (lithium dodecyl sulfate). This is visualized by the transportation of fluorescent dyes through the membrane (propidium iodide and calcein). Finally, an electrical protocol is developed for combined cell permeabilization and electroosmotic flow (EOF)-based extraction of the cell content. It is validated here using calcein-loaded cells and visualized through the progressive recovery of calcein in the side channels, indicating successful retrieval of individual cell content.

  3. Analysis of mitochondria isolated from single cells.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Ryan D; Navratil, Marian; Poe, Bobby G; Xiong, Guohua; Olson, Karen J; Ahmadzadeh, Hossein; Andreyev, Dmitry; Duffy, Ciarán F; Arriaga, Edgar A

    2007-01-01

    Bulk studies are not suitable to describe and study cell-to-cell variation, which is of high importance in biological processes such as embryogenesis, tissue differentiation, and disease. Previously, capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection (CE-LIF) was used to measure the properties of organelles isolated from millions of cells. As such, these bulk measurements reported average properties for the organelles of cell populations. Similar measurements for organelles released from single cells would be highly relevant to describe the subcellular variations among cells. Toward this goal, here we introduce an approach to analyze the mitochondria released from single mammalian cells. Osteosarcoma 143B cells are labeled with either the fluorescent mitochondrion-specific 10-N-nonyl acridine orange (NAO) or via expression of the fluorescent protein DsRed2. Subsequently, a single cell is introduced into the CE-LIF capillary where the organelles are released by a combined treatment of digitonin and trypsin. After this treatment, an electric field is applied and the released organelles electromigrate toward the LIF detector. From an electropherogram, the number of detected events per cell, their individual electrophoretic mobilities, and their individual fluorescence intensities are calculated. The results obtained from DsRed2 labeling, which is retained in intact mitochondria, and NAO labeling, which labels all mitochondria, are the basis for discussion of the strengths and limitations of this single-cell approach.

  4. Single cell elemental analysis using nuclear microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, M. Q.; Thong, P. S. P.; Kara, U.; Watt, F.

    1999-04-01

    The use of Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE), Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) and Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (STIM) to provide quantitative elemental analysis of single cells is an area which has high potential, particularly when the trace elements such as Ca, Fe, Zn and Cu can be monitored. We describe the methodology of sample preparation for two cell types, the procedures of cell imaging using STIM, and the quantitative elemental analysis of single cells using RBS and PIXE. Recent work on single cells at the Nuclear Microscopy Research Centre,National University of Singapore has centred around two research areas: (a) Apoptosis (programmed cell death), which has been recently implicated in a wide range of pathological conditions such as cancer, Parkinson's disease etc, and (b) Malaria (infection of red blood cells by the malaria parasite). Firstly we present results on the elemental analysis of human Chang liver cells (ATTCC CCL 13) where vanadium ions were used to trigger apoptosis, and demonstrate that nuclear microscopy has the capability of monitoring vanadium loading within individual cells. Secondly we present the results of elemental changes taking place in individual mouse red blood cells which have been infected with the malaria parasite and treated with the anti-malaria drug Qinghaosu (QHS).

  5. Entrainment of heterogeneous glycolytic oscillations in single cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustavsson, Anna-Karin; Adiels, Caroline B.; Mehlig, Bernhard; Goksör, Mattias

    2015-03-01

    Cell signaling, gene expression, and metabolism are affected by cell-cell heterogeneity and random changes in the environment. The effects of such fluctuations on cell signaling and gene expression have recently been studied intensively using single-cell experiments. In metabolism heterogeneity may be particularly important because it may affect synchronisation of metabolic oscillations, an important example of cell-cell communication. This synchronisation is notoriously difficult to describe theoretically as the example of glycolytic oscillations shows: neither is the mechanism of glycolytic synchronisation understood nor the role of cell-cell heterogeneity. To pin down the mechanism and to assess its robustness and universality we have experimentally investigated the entrainment of glycolytic oscillations in individual yeast cells by periodic external perturbations. We find that oscillatory cells synchronise through phase shifts and that the mechanism is insensitive to cell heterogeneity (robustness) and similar for different types of external perturbations (universality).

  6. Single-cell SNP analyses and interpretations based on RNA-Seq data for colon cancer research.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiahuan; Zhou, Qian; Wang, Yangfan; Ning, Kang

    2016-09-28

    Single-cell sequencing is useful for illustrating the cellular heterogeneities inherent in many intricate biological systems, particularly in human cancer. However, owing to the difficulties in acquiring, amplifying and analyzing single-cell genetic material, obstacles remain for single-cell diversity assessments such as single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analyses, rendering biological interpretations of single-cell omics data elusive. We used RNA-Seq data from single-cell and bulk colon cancer samples to analyze the SNP profiles for both structural and functional comparisons. Colon cancer-related pathways with single-cell level SNP enrichment, including the TGF-β and p53 signaling pathways, were also investigated based on both their SNP enrichment patterns and gene expression. We also detected a certain number of fusion transcripts, which may promote tumorigenesis, at the single-cell level. Based on these results, single-cell analyses not only recapitulated the SNP analysis results from the bulk samples but also detected cell-to-cell and cell-to-bulk variations, thereby aiding in early diagnosis and in identifying the precise mechanisms underlying cancers at the single-cell level.

  7. Get to Understand More from Single-Cells: Current Studies of Microfluidic-Based Techniques for Single-Cell Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Shih-Jie; Yao, Da-Jeng

    2015-01-01

    This review describes the microfluidic techniques developed for the analysis of a single cell. The characteristics of microfluidic (e.g., little sample amount required, high-throughput performance) make this tool suitable to answer and to solve biological questions of interest about a single cell. This review aims to introduce microfluidic related techniques for the isolation, trapping and manipulation of a single cell. The major approaches for detection in single-cell analysis are introduced; the applications of single-cell analysis are then summarized. The review concludes with discussions of the future directions and opportunities of microfluidic systems applied in analysis of a single cell. PMID:26213918

  8. Measuring and Modeling Apoptosis in Single Cells

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Sabrina L.; Sorger, Peter K.

    2011-01-01

    Cell death plays an essential role in the development of tissues and organisms, the etiology of disease, and the responses of cells to therapeutic drugs. Here we review progress made over the last decade in using mathematical models and quantitative, often single-cell, data to study apoptosis. We discuss the delay that follows exposure of cells to prodeath stimuli, control of mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization, switch-like activation of effector caspases, and variability in the timing and probability of death from one cell to the next. Finally, we discuss challenges facing the fields of biochemical modeling and systems pharmacology. PMID:21414484

  9. Degradation of the Transcription Factors NF-κB, STAT3, and STAT5 Is Involved in Entamoeba histolytica-Induced Cell Death in Caco-2 Colonic Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyeong Ah; Min, Arim; Lee, Young Ah

    2014-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is a tissue-invasive protozoan parasite causing dysentery in humans. During infection of colonic tissues, amoebic trophozoites are able to kill host cells via apoptosis or necrosis, both of which trigger IL-8-mediated acute inflammatory responses. However, the signaling pathways involved in host cell death induced by E. histolytica have not yet been fully defined. In this study, we examined whether calpain plays a role in the cleavage of pro-survival transcription factors during cell death of colonic epithelial cells, induced by live E. histolytica trophozoites. Incubation with amoebic trophozoites induced activation of m-calpain in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Moreover, incubation with amoebae resulted in marked degradation of STAT proteins (STAT3 and STAT5) and NF-κB (p65) in Caco-2 cells. However, IκB, an inhibitor of NF-κB, was not cleaved in Caco-2 cells following adherence of E. histolytica. Entamoeba-induced cleavage of STAT proteins and NF-κB was partially inhibited by pretreatment of cells with a cell-permeable calpain inhibitor, calpeptin. In contrast, E. histolytica did not induce cleavage of caspase-3 in Caco-2 cells. Furthermore, pretreatment of Caco-2 cells with a calpain inhibitor, calpeptin (but not the pan-caspase inhibitor, z-VAD-fmk) or m-calpain siRNA partially reduced Entamoeba-induced DNA fragmentation in Caco-2 cells. These results suggest that calpain plays an important role in E. histolytica-induced degradation of NF-κB and STATs in colonic epithelial cells, which ultimately accelerates cell death. PMID:25352693

  10. Degradation of the transcription factors NF-κB, STAT3, and STAT5 is involved in Entamoeba histolytica-induced cell death in Caco-2 colonic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyeong Ah; Min, Arim; Lee, Young Ah; Shin, Myeong Heon

    2014-10-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is a tissue-invasive protozoan parasite causing dysentery in humans. During infection of colonic tissues, amoebic trophozoites are able to kill host cells via apoptosis or necrosis, both of which trigger IL-8-mediated acute inflammatory responses. However, the signaling pathways involved in host cell death induced by E. histolytica have not yet been fully defined. In this study, we examined whether calpain plays a role in the cleavage of pro-survival transcription factors during cell death of colonic epithelial cells, induced by live E. histolytica trophozoites. Incubation with amoebic trophozoites induced activation of m-calpain in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Moreover, incubation with amoebae resulted in marked degradation of STAT proteins (STAT3 and STAT5) and NF-κB (p65) in Caco-2 cells. However, IκB, an inhibitor of NF-κB, was not cleaved in Caco-2 cells following adherence of E. histolytica. Entamoeba-induced cleavage of STAT proteins and NF-κB was partially inhibited by pretreatment of cells with a cell-permeable calpain inhibitor, calpeptin. In contrast, E. histolytica did not induce cleavage of caspase-3 in Caco-2 cells. Furthermore, pretreatment of Caco-2 cells with a calpain inhibitor, calpeptin (but not the pan-caspase inhibitor, z-VAD-fmk) or m-calpain siRNA partially reduced Entamoeba-induced DNA fragmentation in Caco-2 cells. These results suggest that calpain plays an important role in E. histolytica-induced degradation of NF-κB and STATs in colonic epithelial cells, which ultimately accelerates cell death.

  11. Single-cell ATAC-seq: strength in numbers.

    PubMed

    Pott, Sebastian; Lieb, Jason D

    2015-08-21

    Single-cell ATAC-seq detects open chromatin in individual cells. Currently data are sparse, but combining information from many single cells can identify determinants of cell-to-cell chromatin variation.

  12. Single molecule and single cell epigenomics.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Byung-Ryool; McElwee, John L; Soloway, Paul D

    2015-01-15

    Dynamically regulated changes in chromatin states are vital for normal development and can produce disease when they go awry. Accordingly, much effort has been devoted to characterizing these states under normal and pathological conditions. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (ChIP-seq) is the most widely used method to characterize where in the genome transcription factors, modified histones, modified nucleotides and chromatin binding proteins are found; bisulfite sequencing (BS-seq) and its variants are commonly used to characterize the locations of DNA modifications. Though very powerful, these methods are not without limitations. Notably, they are best at characterizing one chromatin feature at a time, yet chromatin features arise and function in combination. Investigators commonly superimpose separate ChIP-seq or BS-seq datasets, and then infer where chromatin features are found together. While these inferences might be correct, they can be misleading when the chromatin source has distinct cell types, or when a given cell type exhibits any cell to cell variation in chromatin state. These ambiguities can be eliminated by robust methods that directly characterize the existence and genomic locations of combinations of chromatin features in very small inputs of cells or ideally, single cells. Here we review single molecule epigenomic methods under development to overcome these limitations, the technical challenges associated with single molecule methods and their potential application to single cells.

  13. Single Cell Chromatography, LDRD Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Knize, M G; Bailey, C G

    2007-02-22

    A limitation in the mass spectrometry of biological materials is the reduced ion formation caused by sample complexity. We proposed to develop an enabling technology, single cell planar chromatography, which will greatly increase the amount of chemical information that can be obtained from single biological cells when using imaging mass spectrometry or other surface analysis methods. The sample preparation methods were developed for the time-of-flight secondary mass spectrometer (ToF-SIMS) at LLNL. This instrument has a measured zeptomole (10{sup -21} mole, 600 atoms) limit-of-detection for a molecule with a mass to charge ratio of 225[1]. Our goal was to use planar chromatographic separation to approach similar low limits of detection even with the chemically complex contents of a single cell. The process was proposed to reduce ion suppression and at the same time expose more of the cell contents to the ion beam. The method of work was to deposit biological cells on a silicon chip with suitable chromatographic and electrical properties, dissolve the cell with a droplet of solvent, allow the solvent to evaporate, and then allow the movement of cell contents laterally by immersing an edge of the chip in to a chromatographic solvent, that then moves through the chromatographic matrix allowing the components to interact with, and be separated by, the chromatographic substrate. This process is a miniaturized version of thin layer chromatography with detection by surface mass spectrometry.

  14. Microfabricated devices for single cell analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yuanfang

    BioMEMS or lab-on-a-chip technology is promising technology and enables the possibility of microchip devices with higher throughput or better performance for single cell analysis. We have designed and fabricated microdevices for single cell analysis, with impedance based device for fast cell screening and microchannel based flow systems for high throughput, high time resolution quantal exocytosis measurement with automatic cell positioning and reusability. The automatic cell positioning is realized by differential forces of fluidic dynamics. Microelectrodes are patterned at automatic trap positions for electrochemical detection quantal release of hormones like catecholamines secreted by cells. We also developed diamond-like carbon (DLC) microelectrodes onto chip device for low noise exocytosis measurement. The DLC microelectrodes were deposited by magnetron sputtering process with nitrogen doping and a bottom ITO conductive layer. Test results show the developed DLC can detect exocytosis with low noise and a stable background current which are comparable to that of carbon-fiber electrodes. They are batch producible at low cost and can realize high-throughput on-chip measurement of quantal exocytosis. The technology developed in this research can have wide ranging applications in fields such as electrophysiology, cell based sensors, high throughput screening of new drug development.

  15. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells adhere to physiologic STAT3- vs STAT5-dependent hematopoietic programming, establishing diverse tumor-mediated mechanisms of immunologic escape.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Peter A; Ko, Jennifer S; Storkus, Walter J; Spencer, Christopher D; Bradley, Judy M; Gorman, Jessica E; McCurry, Dustin B; Zorro-Manrique, Soroya; Dominguez, Anna Lucia; Pathangey, Latha B; Rayman, Patricia A; Rini, Brian I; Gendler, Sandra J; Finke, James H

    2012-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, sunitinib, is astonishingly effective in its capacity to reduce MDSCs in peripheral tissues such as blood (human) and spleen (mouse), restoring responsiveness of bystander T lymphocytes to TcR stimulation. Sunitinib blocks proliferation of undifferentiated MDSCs and decreases survival of more differentiated neutrophilic MDSC (n-MDSC) progeny. Ironically, sunitinib's profound effects are observed even in a total absence of detectable anti-tumor therapeutic response. This is best explained by the presence of disparate MDSC-conditioning stimuli within individual body compartments, allowing sensitivity and resistance to sunitinib to coexist within the same mouse or patient. The presence or absence of GM-CSF is likely the major determinant in each compartment, given that GM-CSF's capacity to preempt STAT3-dependent with dominant STAT5-dependent hematopoietic programming confers sunitinib resistance and redirects differentiation from the n-MDSC lineage to the more versatile monocytoid (m-MDSC) lineage. The clinical sunitinib experience underscores that strategies for MDSC and Treg depletions must be mindful of disparities among body compartments to avoid sanctuary effects. Ironically, m-MDSCs manifesting resistance to sunitinib also have the greatest potential to differentiate into tumoricidal accessory cells, by virtue of their capacity to respond to T cell-secreted IFN-γ or to TLR agonists with nitric oxide and peroxynitrate production.

  16. Correlations Between Single Cell Signaling Dynamics and Protein Expressions Profiles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-16

    the need for fluorescent or radioactive labels. These deter- minations have been performed within picoliter volumes using microfluidic channels...developments are addressing this. Future efforts will fully integrate the microfluidic nanophysiometer, OCIBD analyte detection system, MALDI-TOF protein...upon full integration of the microfluidic nanophysiometer, OCIBD analyte detection system, MALDI-TOF protein traps, and cell loading (for internalization

  17. Design and Analysis of Single-Cell Sequencing Experiments.

    PubMed

    Grün, Dominic; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2015-11-05

    Recent advances in single-cell sequencing hold great potential for exploring biological systems with unprecedented resolution. Sequencing the genome of individual cells can reveal somatic mutations and allows the investigation of clonal dynamics. Single-cell transcriptome sequencing can elucidate the cell type composition of a sample. However, single-cell sequencing comes with major technical challenges and yields complex data output. In this Primer, we provide an overview of available methods and discuss experimental design and single-cell data analysis. We hope that these guidelines will enable a growing number of researchers to leverage the power of single-cell sequencing.

  18. Quantum dot imaging platform for single-cell molecular profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zrazhevskiy, Pavel; Gao, Xiaohu

    2013-03-01

    Study of normal cell physiology and disease pathogenesis heavily relies on untangling the complexity of intracellular molecular mechanisms and pathways. To achieve this goal, comprehensive molecular profiling of individual cells within the context of microenvironment is required. Here we report the development of a multicolour multicycle in situ imaging technology capable of creating detailed quantitative molecular profiles for individual cells at the resolution of optical imaging. A library of stoichiometric fluorescent probes is prepared by linking target-specific antibodies to a universal quantum dot-based platform via protein A in a quick and simple procedure. Surprisingly, despite the potential for multivalent binding between protein A and antibody and the intermediate affinity of this non-covalent bond, fully assembled probes do not aggregate or exchange antibodies, facilitating highly multiplexed parallel staining. This single-cell molecular profiling technology is expected to open new opportunities in systems biology, gene expression studies, signalling pathway analysis and molecular diagnostics.

  19. Hand-Held and Integrated Single-Cell Pipettes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Successful single-cell isolation is a primary step for subsequent chemical and biological analyses of single cells. Conventional single-cell isolation methods often encounter operational complexity, limited efficiency, deterioration of cell viability, incompetence in the isolation of a single-cell into nanoliter liquid, and/or inability to select single adherent cells with specific phenotypes. Here, we develop a hand-held single-cell pipet (hSCP) that is rapid, operationally simple, highly efficient, and inexpensive for unbiased isolation of single viable suspended cells directly from submicroliter cell suspensions into nanoliter droplets without the assistance of any additional equipment. An integrated SCP (iSCP) has also been developed for selective isolation of single suspended and adherent cells according to the fluorescence imaging and morphological features. The isolated single cells can be conveniently transferred into standard 96-/384-well plates, Petri dishes, or vials for cloning, PCR, and other single-cell biochemical assays. PMID:25036187

  20. Digital Microfluidics for Manipulation and Analysis of a Single Cell.

    PubMed

    He, Jie-Long; Chen, An-Te; Lee, Jyong-Huei; Fan, Shih-Kang

    2015-09-15

    The basic structural and functional unit of a living organism is a single cell. To understand the variability and to improve the biomedical requirement of a single cell, its analysis has become a key technique in biological and biomedical research. With a physical boundary of microchannels and microstructures, single cells are efficiently captured and analyzed, whereas electric forces sort and position single cells. Various microfluidic techniques have been exploited to manipulate single cells through hydrodynamic and electric forces. Digital microfluidics (DMF), the manipulation of individual droplets holding minute reagents and cells of interest by electric forces, has received more attention recently. Because of ease of fabrication, compactness and prospective automation, DMF has become a powerful approach for biological application. We review recent developments of various microfluidic chips for analysis of a single cell and for efficient genetic screening. In addition, perspectives to develop analysis of single cells based on DMF and emerging functionality with high throughput are discussed.

  1. Single-cell protein from waste cellulose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunlap, C. E.; Callihan, C. D.

    1973-01-01

    The recycle, reuse, or reclamation of single cell protein from liquid and solid agricultural waste fibers by a fermentation process is reported. It is shown that cellulose comprises the bulk of the fibers at 50% to 55% of the dry weight of the refuse and that its biodegradability is of prime importance in the choice of a substrate. The application of sodium hydroxide followed by heat and pressure serves to de-polymerize and disrupt lignin structure while swelling the cellulose to increase water uptake and pore volume. Some of the lignin, hemi-celluloses, ash, and cellulose of the material is hydrolized and solubilized. Introduction of microorganisms to the substrate fibers mixed with nutrients produces continuous fermentation of cellulose for further protein extraction and purification.

  2. Single-cell sequencing for drug discovery and drug development.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hongjin; Wang, Charles; Wu, Shixiu

    2016-11-16

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS), particularly single-cell sequencing, has revolutionized the scale and scope of genomic and biomedical research. Recent technological advances in NGS and single-cell studies have made the deep whole-genome (DNA-seq), whole epigenome and whole-transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) at single-cell level feasible. NGS at the single-cell level expands our view of genome, epigenome and transcriptome and allows the genome, epigenome and transcriptome of any organism to be explored without a priori assumptions and with unprecedented throughput. And it does so with single-nucleotide resolution. NGS is also a very powerful tool for drug discovery and drug development. In this review, we describe the current state of single-cell sequencing techniques, which can provide a new, more powerful and precise approach for analyzing effects of drugs on treated cells and tissues. Our review discusses single-cell whole genome/exome sequencing (scWGS/scWES), single-cell transcriptome sequencing (scRNA-seq), single-cell bisulfite sequencing (scBS), and multiple omics of single-cell sequencing. We also highlight the advantages and challenges of each of these approaches. Finally, we describe, elaborate and speculate the potential applications of single-cell sequencing for drug discovery and drug development.

  3. Self-digitization microfluidic chip for absolute quantification of mRNA in single cells.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Alison M; Gansen, Alexander; Paguirigan, Amy L; Kreutz, Jason E; Radich, Jerald P; Chiu, Daniel T

    2014-12-16

    Quantification of mRNA in single cells provides direct insight into how intercellular heterogeneity plays a role in disease progression and outcomes. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), the current gold standard for evaluating gene expression, is insufficient for providing absolute measurement of single-cell mRNA transcript abundance. Challenges include difficulties in handling small sample volumes and the high variability in measurements. Microfluidic digital PCR provides far better sensitivity for minute quantities of genetic material, but the typical format of this assay does not allow for counting of the absolute number of mRNA transcripts samples taken from single cells. Furthermore, a large fraction of the sample is often lost during sample handling in microfluidic digital PCR. Here, we report the absolute quantification of single-cell mRNA transcripts by digital, one-step reverse transcription PCR in a simple microfluidic array device called the self-digitization (SD) chip. By performing the reverse transcription step in digitized volumes, we find that the assay exhibits a linear signal across a wide range of total RNA concentrations and agrees well with standard curve qPCR. The SD chip is found to digitize a high percentage (86.7%) of the sample for single-cell experiments. Moreover, quantification of transferrin receptor mRNA in single cells agrees well with single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization experiments. The SD platform for absolute quantification of single-cell mRNA can be optimized for other genes and may be useful as an independent control method for the validation of mRNA quantification techniques.

  4. Fast and high resolution single-cell BRET imaging

    PubMed Central

    Goyet, Elise; Bouquier, Nathalie; Ollendorff, Vincent; Perroy, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Resonance Energy Transfer (RET)-based technologies are used to report protein-protein interactions in living cells. Among them, Bioluminescence-initiated RET (BRET) provides excellent sensitivity but the low light intensity intrinsic to the bioluminescent process hampers its use for the localization of protein complexes at the sub-cellular level. Herein we have characterized the methodological conditions required to reliably perform single-cell BRET imaging using an extremely bright luciferase, Nanoluciferase (Nluc). With this, we achieved an unprecedented performance in the field of protein-protein interaction imaging in terms of temporal and spatial resolution, duration of signal stability, signal sensitivity and dynamic range. As proof-of-principle, an Nluc-containing BRET-based sensor of ERK activity enabled the detection of subtle, transient and localized variations in ERK activity in neuronal dendritic spines, induced by the activation of endogenous synaptic NMDA receptors. This development will improve our comprehension of both the spatio-temporal dynamics of protein-protein interactions and the activation patterns of specific signaling pathways. PMID:27302735

  5. Gravisensing in single-celled systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, M.; Limbach, C.

    Single-celled systems are favourable cell types for studying several aspects of gravisensing and gravitropic responses. Whether and how actin is involved in both processes in higher plant statocytes is still a matter of intensive debate. In single-celled and tip-growing characean rhizoids and protonemata, however, there is clear evidence that actin is a central keyplayer controlling polarized growth and the mechanisms of gravity sensing and growth reorientation. Both cell types exhibit a unique actin polymerization in the extending tip, strictly colocalized with the prominent ER-aggregate in the center of the Spitzenkoerper. The local accumulation of ADF and profilin in this central array suggest that actin polymerization is controlled by these actin-binding proteins, which can be regulated by calcium, pH and a variety of other parameters. Distinct actin filaments extend even into the outermost tip and form a dense meshwork in the apical and subapical region, before they become bundled by villin to form two populations of thick actin cables that generate rotational cytoplasmic streaming in the basal region. Actomyosin not only mediates the delivery of secretory vesicles to the growing tip and controls the incorporation pattern of cell wall material, but also coordinates the tip-focused distribution pattern of calcium channels in the apical membrane. They establish the tip-high calcium gradient, a prerequisite for exocytosis. Microgravity experiments have added much to our understanding that both cell types use an efficient actomyosin-based system to control and correct the position of their statoliths and to direct sedimenting statoliths to confined graviperception sites at the plasma membrane. Actin's involvement in the graviresponses is more indirect. The upward growth of negatively gravitropic protonemata was shown to be preceded by a statolith-induced relocalization the Ca2+-calcium gradient to the upper flank that does not occur in positively gravitropic

  6. PHASE I SINGLE CELL ELECTROLYZER TEST RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Steimke, J; Timothy Steeper, T

    2008-08-05

    This document reports the results of Phase I Single Cell testing of an SO{sub 2}-Depolarized Water Electrolyzer. Testing was performed primarily during the first quarter of FY 2008 at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) using an electrolyzer cell designed and built at SRNL. Other facility hardware were also designed and built at SRNL. This test further advances this technology for which work began at SRNL in 2005. This research is valuable in achieving the ultimate goal of an economical hydrogen production process based on the Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) Cycle. The focus of this work was to conduct single cell electrolyzer tests to further develop the technology of SO{sub 2}-depolarized electrolysis as part of the HyS Cycle. The HyS Cycle is a hybrid thermochemical cycle that may be used in conjunction with advanced nuclear reactors or centralized solar receivers to produce hydrogen by water-splitting. Like all other sulfur-based cycles, HyS utilizes the high temperature thermal decomposition of sulfuric acid to produce oxygen and regenerate sulfur dioxide. The unique aspect of HyS is the generation of hydrogen in a water electrolyzer that is operated under conditions where dissolved sulfur dioxide depolarizes the anodic reaction, resulting in substantial voltage reduction. Low cell voltage is essential for both thermodynamic efficiency and hydrogen cost. Sulfur dioxide is oxidized at the anode, producing sulfuric acid that is sent to the high temperature acid decomposition portion of the cycle. The electrolyzer cell uses the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) concept. The anode and cathode are formed by spraying platinum containing catalyst on both sides of a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM). In most testing the material of the PEM was NafionR. The electrolyzer cell active area can be as large as 54.8 cm{sup 2}. Feed to the anode of the electrolyzer is a sulfuric acid solution containing sulfur dioxide. The partial pressure of sulfur dioxide could be varied in the

  7. Plasma membrane and cytoskeleton dynamics during single-cell wound healing.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Eric; Mandato, Craig A

    2015-10-01

    Wounding leads not only to plasma membrane disruption, but also to compromised cytoskeleton structures. This results not only in unwarranted exchanges between the cytosol and extracellular milieu, but also in loss of tensegrity, which may further endanger the cell. Tensegrity can be described as the interplay between the tensile forces generated by the apparent membrane tension, actomyosin contraction, and the cytoskeletal structures resisting those changes (e.g., microtubules). It is responsible for the structural integrity of the cell and for its ability to sense mechanical signals. Recent reviews dealing with single-cell healing mostly focused on the molecular machineries controlling the traffic and fusion of specific vesicles, or their role in different pathologies. In this review, we aim to take a broader view of the different modes of single cell repair, while focussing on the different ways the changes in plasmalemma surface area and composition, plasmalemma tension, and cytoskeletal dynamics may influence and affect single-cell repair.

  8. Using measures of single-cell physiology and physiological state to understand organismic aging.

    PubMed

    Mendenhall, Alexander; Driscoll, Monica; Brent, Roger

    2016-02-01

    Genetically identical organisms in homogeneous environments have different lifespans and healthspans. These differences are often attributed to stochastic events, such as mutations and 'epimutations', changes in DNA methylation and chromatin that change gene function and expression. But work in the last 10 years has revealed differences in lifespan- and health-related phenotypes that are not caused by lasting changes in DNA or identified by modifications to DNA or chromatin. This work has demonstrated persistent differences in single-cell and whole-organism physiological states operationally defined by values of reporter gene signals in living cells. While some single-cell states, for example, responses to oxygen deprivation, were defined previously, others, such as a generally heightened ability to make proteins, were, revealed by direct experiment only recently, and are not well understood. Here, we review technical progress that promises to greatly increase the number of these measurable single-cell physiological variables and measureable states. We discuss concepts that facilitate use of single-cell measurements to provide insight into physiological states and state transitions. We assert that researchers will use this information to relate cell level physiological readouts to whole-organism outcomes, to stratify aging populations into groups based on different physiologies, to define biomarkers predictive of outcomes, and to shed light on the molecular processes that bring about different individual physiologies. For these reasons, quantitative study of single-cell physiological variables and state transitions should provide a valuable complement to genetic and molecular explanations of how organisms age.

  9. The potential of single-cell profiling in plants.

    PubMed

    Efroni, Idan; Birnbaum, Kenneth D

    2016-04-05

    Single-cell transcriptomics has been employed in a growing number of animal studies, but the technique has yet to be widely used in plants. Nonetheless, early studies indicate that single-cell RNA-seq protocols developed for animal cells produce informative datasets in plants. We argue that single-cell transcriptomics has the potential to provide a new perspective on plant problems, such as the nature of the stem cells or initials, the plasticity of plant cells, and the extent of localized cellular responses to environmental inputs. Single-cell experimental outputs require different analytical approaches compared with pooled cell profiles and new tools tailored to single-cell assays are being developed. Here, we highlight promising new single-cell profiling approaches, their limitations as applied to plants, and their potential to address fundamental questions in plant biology.

  10. The added value of single-cell gene expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Ståhlberg, Anders; Rusnakova, Vendula; Kubista, Mikael

    2013-03-01

    Cells are the basic unit of life and they have remarkable abilities to respond individually as well as in concert to internal and external stimuli in a specific manner. Studying complex tissues and whole organs requires understanding of cell heterogeneity and responses to stimuli at the single-cell level. In this review, we discuss the potential of single-cell gene expression profiling, focusing on data analysis and biological interpretation. We exemplify several aspects of the added value of single-cell analysis by comparing the same experimental data at both single-cell and cell population level. Data normalization and handling of missing data are two important steps in data analysis that are performed differently at single-cell level compared with cell population level. Furthermore, we discuss how single-cell gene expression data can be viewed and how subpopulations of cells can be identified and characterized.

  11. Single-cell sequencing technologies: current and future.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jialong; Cai, Wanshi; Sun, Zhongsheng

    2014-10-20

    Intensively developed in the last few years, single-cell sequencing technologies now present numerous advantages over traditional sequencing methods for solving the problems of biological heterogeneity and low quantities of available biological materials. The application of single-cell sequencing technologies has profoundly changed our understanding of a series of biological phenomena, including gene transcription, embryo development, and carcinogenesis. However, before single-cell sequencing technologies can be used extensively, researchers face the serious challenge of overcoming inherent issues of high amplification bias, low accuracy and reproducibility. Here, we simply summarize the techniques used for single-cell isolation, and review the current technologies used in single-cell genomic, transcriptomic, and epigenomic sequencing. We discuss the merits, defects, and scope of application of single-cell sequencing technologies and then speculate on the direction of future developments.

  12. Silicon dioxide thin film mediated single cell nucleic acid isolation.

    PubMed

    Bogdanov, Evgeny; Dominova, Irina; Shusharina, Natalia; Botman, Stepan; Kasymov, Vitaliy; Patrushev, Maksim

    2013-01-01

    A limited amount of DNA extracted from single cells, and the development of single cell diagnostics make it necessary to create a new highly effective method for the single cells nucleic acids isolation. In this paper, we propose the DNA isolation method from biomaterials with limited DNA quantity in sample, and from samples with degradable DNA based on the use of solid-phase adsorbent silicon dioxide nanofilm deposited on the inner surface of PCR tube.

  13. Silicon Dioxide Thin Film Mediated Single Cell Nucleic Acid Isolation

    PubMed Central

    Bogdanov, Evgeny; Dominova, Irina; Shusharina, Natalia; Botman, Stepan; Kasymov, Vitaliy; Patrushev, Maksim

    2013-01-01

    A limited amount of DNA extracted from single cells, and the development of single cell diagnostics make it necessary to create a new highly effective method for the single cells nucleic acids isolation. In this paper, we propose the DNA isolation method from biomaterials with limited DNA quantity in sample, and from samples with degradable DNA based on the use of solid-phase adsorbent silicon dioxide nanofilm deposited on the inner surface of PCR tube. PMID:23874571

  14. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma regulates expression of signal transducer and activator of transcription 5A

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Hanne; Haldosen, Lars-Arne . E-mail: Lars-Arne.Haldosen@mednut.ki.se

    2006-05-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5A (STAT5A) has been shown to be important for terminal differentiation of mammary epithelial cells. In order to understand regulation of expression of STAT5A, the 5' end of the mouse Stat5a gene was isolated. Putative regulatory elements was searched for and several peroxisome proliferator response elements (PPREs) were found, one with high (12/13 nucleotides) and three with less (8-10/13) similarity to the reported consensus sequence. Mouse mammary epithelial HC11 cells were treated with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) ligand, the thiazolidinedione (TZD) troglitazone, and an increase in STAT5A protein expression was seen. The 5' flank of Stat5a gene was cloned in a luciferase reporter vector. A concentration dependent activation of the STAT5A-luciferase reporter was detected, when transiently transfected HC11 cells were treated with TZD. The activation could be inhibited by treatment with a PPAR{gamma} antagonist. It has earlier been shown that epidermal growth factor (EGF) induces MAPK phosphorylation of PPAR{gamma} resulting in a less transcriptionally active receptor. In HC11 cells, EGF inhibited TZD induced STAT5A-reporter activity suggesting that our previously reported EGF-mediated suppression of STAT5A expression is mediated in all or partly through inhibition of PPAR{gamma} activity. Furthermore, the MEK inhibitor PD98059 inhibited the EGF effect. All together, data presented suggest that PPAR{gamma} participates in regulation of STAT5A expression.

  15. Single cell analysis: the new frontier in 'Omics'

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Daojing; Bodovitz, Steven

    2010-01-14

    Cellular heterogeneity arising from stochastic expression of genes, proteins, and metabolites is a fundamental principle of cell biology, but single cell analysis has been beyond the capabilities of 'Omics' technologies. This is rapidly changing with the recent examples of single cell genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics. The rate of change is expected to accelerate owing to emerging technologies that range from micro/nanofluidics to microfabricated interfaces for mass spectrometry to third- and fourth-generation automated DNA sequencers. As described in this review, single cell analysis is the new frontier in Omics, and single cell Omics has the potential to transform systems biology through new discoveries derived from cellular heterogeneity.

  16. Laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy of single cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, De

    Raman scattering is an inelastic collision between the vibrating molecules inside the sample and the incident photons. During this process, energy exchange takes place between the photon and the scattering molecule. By measuring the energy change of the photon, the molecular vibration mode can be probed. The vibrational spectrum contains valuable information about the disposition of atomic nuclei and chemical bonds within a molecule, the chemical compositions and the interactions between the molecule and its surroundings. In this dissertation, laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) technique is applied for the analysis of biological cells and human cells at single cell level. In LTRS, an individual cell is trapped in aqueous medium with laser tweezers, and Raman scattering spectra from the trapped cell are recorded in real-time. The Raman spectra of these cells can be used to reveal the dynamical processes of cell growth, cell response to environment changes, and can be used as the finger print for the identification of a bacterial cell species. Several biophysical experiments were carried out using LTRS: (1) the dynamic germination process of individual spores of Bacillus thuringiensis was detected via Ca-DPA, a spore-specific biomarker molecule; (2) inactivation and killing of Bacillus subtilis spores by microwave irradiation and wet heat were studied at single cell level; (3) the heat shock activation process of single B. subtilis spores were analyzed, in which the reversible transition from glass-like state at low temperature to liquid-like state at high temperature in spore was revealed at the molecular level; (4) the kinetic processes of bacterial cell lysis of E. coli by lysozyme and by temperature induction of lambda phage were detected real-time; (5) the fixation and rehydration of human platelets were quantitatively evaluated and characterized with Raman spectroscopy method, which provided a rapid way to quantify the quality of freeze-dried therapeutic

  17. Single cell mechanics of keratinocyte cells.

    PubMed

    Lulevich, Valentin; Yang, Hsin-ya; Isseroff, R Rivkah; Liu, Gang-yu

    2010-11-01

    Keratinocytes represent the major cell type of the uppermost layer of human skin, the epidermis. Using AFM-based single cell compression, the ability of individual keratinocytes to resist external pressure and global rupturing forces is investigated and compared with various cell types. Keratinocytes are found to be 6-70 times stiffer than other cell types, such as white blood, breast epithelial, fibroblast, or neuronal cells, and in contrast to other cell types they retain high mechanic strength even after the cell's death. The absence of membrane rupturing peaks in the force-deformation profiles of keratinocytes and their high stiffness during a second load cycle suggests that their unique mechanical resistance is dictated by the cytoskeleton. A simple analytical model enables the quantification of Young's modulus of keratinocyte cytoskeleton, as high as 120-340 Pa. Selective disruption of the two major cytoskeletal networks, actin filaments and microtubules, does not significantly affect keratinocyte mechanics. F-actin is found to impact cell deformation under pressure. During keratinocyte compression, the plasma membrane stretches to form peripheral blebs. Instead of blebbing, cells with depolymerized F-actin respond to pressure by detaching the plasma membrane from the cytoskeleton underneath. On the other hand, the compression force of keratinocytes expressing a mutated keratin (cell line, KEB-7) is 1.6-2.2 times less than that for the control cell line that has normal keratin networks. Therefore, we infer that the keratin intermediate filament network is responsible for the extremely high keratinocyte stiffness and resilience. This could manifest into the rugged protective nature of the human epidermis.

  18. Hepatic growth hormone and glucocorticoid receptor signaling in body growth, steatosis and metabolic liver cancer development.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Kristina M; Themanns, Madeleine; Friedbichler, Katrin; Kornfeld, Jan-Wilhelm; Esterbauer, Harald; Tuckermann, Jan P; Moriggl, Richard

    2012-09-25

    Growth hormone (GH) and glucocorticoids (GCs) are involved in the control of processes that are essential for the maintenance of vital body functions including energy supply and growth control. GH and GCs have been well characterized to regulate systemic energy homeostasis, particular during certain conditions of physical stress. However, dysfunctional signaling in both pathways is linked to various metabolic disorders associated with aberrant carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. In liver, GH-dependent activation of the transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 5 controls a variety of physiologic functions within hepatocytes. Similarly, GCs, through activation of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), influence many important liver functions such as gluconeogenesis. Studies in hepatic Stat5 or GR knockout mice have revealed that they similarly control liver function on their target gene level and indeed, the GR functions often as a cofactor of STAT5 for GH-induced genes. Gene sets, which require physical STAT5-GR interaction, include those controlling body growth and maturation. More recently, it has become evident that impairment of GH-STAT5 signaling in different experimental models correlates with metabolic liver disease, ranging from hepatic steatosis to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). While GH-activated STAT5 has a protective role in chronic liver disease, experimental disruption of GC-GR signaling rather seems to ameliorate metabolic disorders under metabolic challenge. In this review, we focus on the current knowledge about hepatic GH-STAT5 and GC-GR signaling in body growth, metabolism, and protection from fatty liver disease and HCC development.

  19. Short Peptides Enhance Single Cell Adhesion and Viability on Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Veiseh, Mandana; Veiseh, Omid; Martin, Michael C.; Asphahani, Fareid; Zhang, Miqin

    2011-01-01

    Single cell patterning holds important implications for biology, biochemistry, biotechnology, medicine, and bioinformatics. The challenge for single cell patterning is to produce small islands hosting only single cells and retaining their viability for a prolonged period of time. This study demonstrated a surface engineering approach that uses a covalently-bound short peptide as a mediator to pattern cells with improved single cell adhesion and prolonged cellular viability on gold patterned SiO2 substrates. The underlying hypothesis is that cell adhesion is regulated by the type, availability and stability of effective cell adhesion peptides, and thus covalently bound short peptides would promote cell spreading and thus, single cell adhesion and viability. The effectiveness of this approach and the underlying mechanism for the increased probability of single cell adhesion and prolonged cell viability by short peptides were studied by comparing cellular behavior of human umbilical cord vein endothelial cells on three model surfaces whose gold electrodes were immobilized with fibronectin, physically adsorbed Arg-Glu-Asp-Val-Tyr, and covalently-bound Lys-Arg-Glu-Asp-Val-Tyr, respectively. The surface chemistry and binding properties were characterized by reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Both short peptides were superior to fibronectin in producing adhesion of only single cells, while the covalently bound peptide also reduced apoptosis and necrosis of adhered cells. Controlling cell spreading by peptide binding domains to regulate apoptosis and viability represents a fundamental mechanism in cell-materials interaction and provides an effective strategy in engineering arrays of single cells. PMID:17371055

  20. UV Decontamination of MDA Reagents for Single Cell Genomics

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Janey; Tighe, Damon; Sczyrba, Alexander; Malmatrom, Rex; Clingenpeel, Scott; Malfatti, Stephanie; Rinke, Christian; Wang, Zhong; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Woyke, Tanja

    2011-03-18

    Single cell genomics, the amplification and sequencing of genomes from single cells, can provide a glimpse into the genetic make-up and thus life style of the vast majority of uncultured microbial cells, making it an immensely powerful and increasingly popular tool. This is accomplished by use of multiple displacement amplification (MDA), which can generate billions of copies of a single bacterial genome producing microgram-range DNA required for shotgun sequencing. Here, we address a key challenge inherent to this approach and propose a solution for the improved recovery of single cell genomes. While DNA-free reagents for the amplification of a single cell genome are a prerequisite for successful single cell sequencing and analysis, DNA contamination has been detected in various reagents, which poses a considerable challenge. Our study demonstrates the effect of UV irradiation in efficient elimination of exogenous contaminant DNA found in MDA reagents, while maintaining Phi29 activity. Consequently, we also find that increased UV exposure to Phi29 does not adversely affect genome coverage of MDA amplified single cells. While additional challenges in single cell genomics remain to be resolved, the proposed methodology is relatively quick and simple and we believe that its application will be of high value for future single cell sequencing projects.

  1. Single Cell Characterization of Prostate Cancer Circulating Tumor Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    single cell sequencing protocol for CTCs (Figure 3). So far, using their protocol we have done whole transcriptome amplification and mRNA seq on 6 single...perform additional single cell sequencing profiles. In our application we also hypothesized that there would be heterogeneity in gene expression

  2. Single cell sequencing approaches for complex biological systems.

    PubMed

    Baslan, Timour; Hicks, James

    2014-06-01

    Biological phenotype is the output of complex interactions between heterogeneous cells within a specified niche. These interactions are tightly governed and regulated by the genetic, epigenetic, and transcriptional states of single cells, with deregulation of these states resulting in disease. As such, genome wide single cell investigations are bound to enhance our knowledge of the underlying principles that govern biological systems. Recent technological advances have enabled such investigations in the form of single-cell sequencing. Here, we review the most recent developments in genome wide profiling of single cells, discuss some of the novel biological observations gleaned by such investigations, and touch upon the promise of single cell sequencing in unraveling biological systems.

  3. Detection of Copy Number Alterations Using Single Cell Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Knouse, Kristin A; Wu, Jie; Hendricks, Austin

    2017-02-17

    Detection of genomic changes at single cell resolution is important for characterizing genetic heterogeneity and evolution in normal tissues, cancers, and microbial populations. Traditional methods for assessing genetic heterogeneity have been limited by low resolution, low sensitivity, and/or low specificity. Single cell sequencing has emerged as a powerful tool for detecting genetic heterogeneity with high resolution, high sensitivity and, when appropriately analyzed, high specificity. Here we provide a protocol for the isolation, whole genome amplification, sequencing, and analysis of single cells. Our approach allows for the reliable identification of megabase-scale copy number variants in single cells. However, aspects of this protocol can also be applied to investigate other types of genetic alterations in single cells.

  4. Single Nanowire Probe for Single Cell Endoscopy and Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Ruoxue

    The ability to manipulate light in subwavelength photonic and plasmonic structures has shown great potentials in revolutionizing how information is generated, transformed and processed. Chemically synthesized nanowires, in particular, offers a unique toolbox not only for highly compact and integrated photonic modules and devices, including coherent and incoherent light sources, waveguides, photodetectors and photovoltaics, but also for new types of nanoscopic bio-probes for spot cargo delivery and in-situ single cell endoscopy and sensing. Such nanowire probes would enable us to carry out intracellular imaging and probing with high spatial resolution, monitor in-vivo biological processes within single living cells and greatly improve our fundamental understanding of cell functions, intracellular physiological processes, and cellular signal pathways. My work is aimed at developing a material and instrumental platform for such single nanowire probe. Successful optical integration of Ag nanowire plasmonic waveguides, which offers deep subwavelength mode confinement, and conventional photonic waveguides was demonstrated on a single nanowire level. The highest plasmonic-photonic coupling efficiency coupling was found at small coupling angles and low input frequencies. The frequency dependent propagation loss was observed in Ag nanowire and was confirmed by quantitative measurement and in agreement with theoretical expectations. Rational integration of dielectric and Ag nanowire waveguide components into hybrid optical-plasmonic routing devices has been demonstrated. This capability is essential for incorporating sub-100nm Ag nanowire waveguides into optical fiber based nanoprobes for single cell endoscopy. The nanoprobe system based on single nanowire waveguides was demonstrated by optically coupling semiconductor or metal nanowire with an optical fiber with tapered tip. This nanoprobe design requires minimal instrumentation which makes it cost efficient and readily

  5. Single-Cell RNA-Seq with Waterfall Reveals Molecular Cascades underlying Adult Neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jaehoon; Berg, Daniel A; Zhu, Yunhua; Shin, Joseph Y; Song, Juan; Bonaguidi, Michael A; Enikolopov, Grigori; Nauen, David W; Christian, Kimberly M; Ming, Guo-li; Song, Hongjun

    2015-09-03

    Somatic stem cells contribute to tissue ontogenesis, homeostasis, and regeneration through sequential processes. Systematic molecular analysis of stem cell behavior is challenging because classic approaches cannot resolve cellular heterogeneity or capture developmental dynamics. Here we provide a comprehensive resource of single-cell transcriptomes of adult hippocampal quiescent neural stem cells (qNSCs) and their immediate progeny. We further developed Waterfall, a bioinformatic pipeline, to statistically quantify singe-cell gene expression along a de novo reconstructed continuous developmental trajectory. Our study reveals molecular signatures of adult qNSCs, characterized by active niche signaling integration and low protein translation capacity. Our analyses further delineate molecular cascades underlying qNSC activation and neurogenesis initiation, exemplified by decreased extrinsic signaling capacity, primed translational machinery, and regulatory switches in transcription factors, metabolism, and energy sources. Our study reveals the molecular continuum underlying adult neurogenesis and illustrates how Waterfall can be used for single-cell omics analyses of various continuous biological processes.

  6. CellStress - open source image analysis program for single-cell analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smedh, Maria; Beck, Caroline; Sott, Kristin; Goksör, Mattias

    2010-08-01

    This work describes our image-analysis software, CellStress, which has been developed in Matlab and is issued under a GPL license. CellStress was developed in order to analyze migration of fluorescent proteins inside single cells during changing environmental conditions. CellStress can also be used to score information regarding protein aggregation in single cells over time, which is especially useful when monitoring cell signaling pathways involved in e.g. Alzheimer's or Huntington's disease. Parallel single-cell analysis of large numbers of cells is an important part of the research conducted in systems biology and quantitative biology in order to mathematically describe cellular processes. To quantify properties for single cells, large amounts of data acquired during extended time periods are needed. Manual analyses of such data involve huge efforts and could also include a bias, which complicates the use and comparison of data for further simulations or modeling. Therefore, it is necessary to have an automated and unbiased image analysis procedure, which is the aim of CellStress. CellStress utilizes cell contours detected by CellStat (developed at Fraunhofer-Chalmers Centre), which identifies cell boundaries using bright field images, and thus reduces the fluorescent labeling needed.

  7. Microchip-based single-cell functional proteomics for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yao; Yang, Liu; Wei, Wei; Shi, Qihui

    2017-03-29

    Cellular heterogeneity has been widely recognized but only recently have single cell tools become available that allow characterizing heterogeneity at the genomic and proteomic levels. We review the technological advances in microchip-based toolkits for single-cell functional proteomics. Each of these tools has distinct advantages and limitations, and a few have advanced toward being applied to address biological or clinical problems that traditional population-based methods fail to address. High-throughput single-cell proteomic assays generate high-dimensional data sets that contain new information and thus require developing new analytical frameworks to extract new biology. In this review article, we highlight a few biological and clinical applications in which microchip-based single-cell proteomic tools provide unique advantages. The examples include resolving functional heterogeneity and dynamics of immune cells, dissecting cell-cell interaction by creating a well-controlled on-chip microenvironment, capturing high-resolution snapshots of immune system functions in patients for better immunotherapy and elucidating phosphoprotein signaling networks in cancer cells for guiding effective molecularly targeted therapies.

  8. Probing single cells of purple sulfur bacteria with Raman spectroscopy: carotenoids and elemental sulfur.

    PubMed

    Oren, Aharon; Mana, Lily; Jehlička, Jan

    2015-03-01

    We explored the use of Raman spectroscopy to simultaneously monitor the presence of different biomarkers (carotenoids, elemental sulfur) within single cells of the purple sulfur photosynthetic bacteria Allochromatium vinosum and A. warmingii. Raman microspectrometry using excitation at 532 nm allowed the detection of different carotenoids. Raman signals of elemental sulfur appeared soon after feeding starved cells with sulfide. Raman spectroscopy is thus a convenient and sensitive technique to qualitatively and semiquantitatively assess the presence of different compounds of interest within single bacterial cells.

  9. Single cell studies of the cell cycle and some models

    PubMed Central

    Mitchison, JM

    2005-01-01

    Analysis of growth and division often involves measurements made on cell populations, which tend to average data. The value of single cell analysis needs to be appreciated, and models based on findings from single cells should be taken into greater consideration in our understanding of the way in which cell size and division are co-ordinated. Examples are given of some single cell analyses in mammalian cells, yeast and other microorganisms. There is also a short discussion on how far the results are in accord with simple models. PMID:15703075

  10. Massively multiplex single-cell Hi-C.

    PubMed

    Ramani, Vijay; Deng, Xinxian; Qiu, Ruolan; Gunderson, Kevin L; Steemers, Frank J; Disteche, Christine M; Noble, William S; Duan, Zhijun; Shendure, Jay

    2017-03-01

    We present single-cell combinatorial indexed Hi-C (sciHi-C), a method that applies combinatorial cellular indexing to chromosome conformation capture. In this proof of concept, we generate and sequence six sciHi-C libraries comprising a total of 10,696 single cells. We use sciHi-C data to separate cells by karyotypic and cell-cycle state differences and identify cell-to-cell heterogeneity in mammalian chromosomal conformation. Our results demonstrate that combinatorial indexing is a generalizable strategy for single-cell genomics.

  11. Supramolecular Probes for Assessing Glutamine Uptake Enable Semi-Quantitative Metabolic Models in Single Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Min; Wei, Wei; Su, Yapeng; Johnson, Dazy; Heath, James R.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a supramolecular surface competition assay for quantifying glutamine uptake from single cells. Cy3-labeled cyclodextrins were immobilized on a glass surface as a supramolecular host/FRET donor, and adamantane-BHQ2 conjugates were employed as the guest/quencher. An adamantane-labeled glutamine analog was selected through screening a library of compounds and validated by cell uptake experiments. When integrated onto a single cell barcode chip (SCBC) with a multiplex panel of 15 other metabolites, associated metabolic enzymes, and phosphoproteins, the resultant data provided input for a steady state model that describes energy potential in single cells, and correlates that potential with receptor tyrosine kinase signaling. We utilize this integrated assay to interrogate a dose-dependent response of model brain cancer cells to EGFR inhibition. We find that low dose (1 μM erlotinib) drugging actually increases cellular energy potential even as glucose uptake and phosphoprotein signaling is repressed. We also identify new interactions between phosphoprotein signaling and cellular energy processes that may help explain the facile resistance exhibited by certain cancer patients to EGFR inhibitors. PMID:26916347

  12. Single-cell hydrogel encapsulation for enhanced survival of human marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Karoubi, Golnaz; Ormiston, Mark L; Stewart, Duncan J; Courtman, David W

    2009-10-01

    Inadequate extracellular matrix cues and subsequent apoptotic cell death are among crucial factors currently limiting cell viability and organ retention in cell-based therapeutic strategies for vascular regeneration. Here we describe the use of a single-cell hydrogel capsule to provide enhanced cell survival of adherent cells in transient suspension culture. Human marrow stromal cells (hMSCs) were singularly encapsulated in agarose capsules containing the immobilized matrix molecules, fibronectin and fibrinogen to ameliorate cell-matrix survival signals. MSCs in the enriched capsules demonstrated increased viability, greater metabolic activity and enhanced cell-cytoskeletal patterning. Increased cell viability resulted from the re-induction of cell-matrix interactions likely via integrin clustering and subsequent activation of the extracellular signal regulated MAPK (ERK)/mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascade. Proof of principle in-vivo studies, investigating autologous MSC delivery into Fisher 344 rat hindlimb, depicted a significant increase in the number of engrafted cells using the single-cell encapsulation system. Incorporation of immobilized adhesion molecules compensates, at least in part, for the missing cell-matrix cues, thereby attenuating the initial anoikis stimuli and providing protection from subsequent apoptosis. Thus, this single-cell encapsulation strategy may markedly enhance therapeutic cell survival in targeted tissues.

  13. Cloning of Plasmodium falciparum by single-cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Miao, Jun; Li, Xiaolian; Cui, Liwang

    2010-10-01

    Malaria parasite cloning is traditionally carried out mainly by using the limiting dilution method, which is laborious, imprecise, and unable to distinguish multiply-infected RBCs. In this study, we used a parasite engineered to express green fluorescent protein (GFP) to evaluate a single-cell sorting method for rapidly cloning Plasmodium falciparum. By dividing a two-dimensional scattergram from a cell sorter into 17 gates, we determined the parameters for isolating singly-infected erythrocytes and sorted them into individual cultures. Pre-gating of the engineered parasites for GFP allowed the isolation of almost 100% GFP-positive clones. Compared with the limiting dilution method, the number of parasite clones obtained by single-cell sorting was much higher. Molecular analyses showed that parasite isolates obtained by single-cell sorting were highly homogenous. This highly efficient single-cell sorting method should prove very useful for cloning both P. falciparum laboratory populations from genetic manipulation experiments and clinical samples.

  14. Atomic force microscopy for the examination of single cell rheology.

    PubMed

    Okajima, Takaharu

    2012-11-01

    Rheological properties of living cells play important roles in regulating their various biological functions. Therefore, measuring cell rheology is crucial for not only elucidating the relationship between the cell mechanics and functions, but also mechanical diagnosis of single cells. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is becoming a useful technique for single cell diagnosis because it allows us to measure the rheological properties of adherent cells at any region on the surface without any modifications. In this review, we summarize AFM techniques for examining single cell rheology in frequency and time domains. Recent applications of AFM for investigating the statistical analysis of single cell rheology in comparison to other micro-rheological techniques are reviewed, and we discuss what specificity and universality of cell rheology are extracted using AFM.

  15. Droplet microfluidics--a tool for single-cell analysis.

    PubMed

    Joensson, Haakan N; Andersson Svahn, Helene

    2012-12-03

    Droplet microfluidics allows the isolation of single cells and reagents in monodisperse picoliter liquid capsules and manipulations at a throughput of thousands of droplets per second. These qualities allow many of the challenges in single-cell analysis to be overcome. Monodispersity enables quantitative control of solute concentrations, while encapsulation in droplets provides an isolated compartment for the single cell and its immediate environment. The high throughput allows the processing and analysis of the tens of thousands to millions of cells that must be analyzed to accurately describe a heterogeneous cell population so as to find rare cell types or access sufficient biological space to find hits in a directed evolution experiment. The low volumes of the droplets make very large screens economically viable. This Review gives an overview of the current state of single-cell analysis involving droplet microfluidics and offers examples where droplet microfluidics can further biological understanding.

  16. Virtual Microfluidics for digital quantification and single-cell sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Liyi; Brito, Ilana L.; Alm, Eric J.; Blainey, Paul C.

    2016-01-01

    Interest in highly parallelized analysis of single molecules and single cells is growing rapidly. Here we develop hydrogel-based virtual microfluidics as a simple alternative to complex engineered microfluidic systems for the compartmentalization of nucleic acid amplification reactions. We applied digital multiple displacement amplification (dMDA) to purified DNA templates, cultured bacterial cells, and human microbiome samples in the virtual microfluidics system and demonstrated recovery and whole-genome sequencing of single-cell MDA products. Our results from control samples showed excellent coverage uniformity and markedly reduced chimerism compared with single-cell data obtained from conventional liquid MDA reactions. We also demonstrate the applicability of the hydrogel method for genomic studies of naturally occurring microbes in human microbiome samples. The virtual microfluidics approach is a simple and robust method that will enable many laboratories to perform single-cell genomic analyses. PMID:27479330

  17. Inside Single Cells: Quantitative Analysis with Advanced Optics and Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yi; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Single cell explorations offer a unique window to inspect molecules and events relevant to mechanisms and heterogeneity constituting the central dogma of biology. A large number of nucleic acids, proteins, metabolites and small molecules are involved in determining and fine-tuning the state and function of a single cell at a given time point. Advanced optical platforms and nanotools provide tremendous opportunities to probe intracellular components with single-molecule accuracy, as well as promising tools to adjust single cell activity. In order to obtain quantitative information (e.g. molecular quantity, kinetics and stoichiometry) within an intact cell, achieving the observation with comparable spatiotemporal resolution is a challenge. For single cell studies both the method of detection and the biocompatibility are critical factors as they determine the feasibility, especially when considering live cell analysis. Although a considerable proportion of single cell methodologies depend on specialized expertise and expensive instruments, it is our expectation that the information content and implication will outweigh the costs given the impact on life science enabled by single cell analysis. PMID:25430077

  18. High-Throughput Single-Cell Manipulation in Brain Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Steinmeyer, Joseph D.; Yanik, Mehmet Fatih

    2012-01-01

    The complexity of neurons and neuronal circuits in brain tissue requires the genetic manipulation, labeling, and tracking of single cells. However, current methods for manipulating cells in brain tissue are limited to either bulk techniques, lacking single-cell accuracy, or manual methods that provide single-cell accuracy but at significantly lower throughputs and repeatability. Here, we demonstrate high-throughput, efficient, reliable, and combinatorial delivery of multiple genetic vectors and reagents into targeted cells within the same tissue sample with single-cell accuracy. Our system automatically loads nanoliter-scale volumes of reagents into a micropipette from multiwell plates, targets and transfects single cells in brain tissues using a robust electroporation technique, and finally preps the micropipette by automated cleaning for repeating the transfection cycle. We demonstrate multi-colored labeling of adjacent cells, both in organotypic and acute slices, and transfection of plasmids encoding different protein isoforms into neurons within the same brain tissue for analysis of their effects on linear dendritic spine density. Our platform could also be used to rapidly deliver, both ex vivo and in vivo, a variety of genetic vectors, including optogenetic and cell-type specific agents, as well as fast-acting reagents such as labeling dyes, calcium sensors, and voltage sensors to manipulate and track neuronal circuit activity at single-cell resolution. PMID:22536416

  19. Single Cell Analysis: From Technology to Biology and Medicine.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xinghua

    2014-01-01

    Single-cell analysis heralds a new era that allows "omics" analysis, notably genomics, transcriptomics, epigenomics and proteomics at the single-cell level. It enables the identification of the minor subpopulations that may play a critical role in a biological process of a population of cells, which conventionally are regarded as homogeneous. It provides an ultra-sensitive tool to clarify specific molecular mechanisms and pathways and reveal the nature of cell heterogeneity. It also facilitates the clinical investigation of patients when a very low quantity or a single cell is available for analysis, such as noninvasive prenatal diagnosis and cancer screening, and genetic evaluation for in vitro fertilization. Within a few short years, single-cell analysis, especially whole genomic sequencing and transcriptomic sequencing, is becoming robust and broadly accessible, although not yet a routine practice. Here, with single cell RNA-seq emphasized, an overview of the discipline, progresses, and prospects of single-cell analysis and its applications in biology and medicine are given with a series of logic and theoretical considerations.

  20. Single-cell bioelectrical impedance platform for monitoring cellular response to drug treatment

    PubMed Central

    Asphahani, Fareid; Wang, Kui; Thein, Myo; Veiseh, Omid; Yung, Sandy; Xu, Jian; Zhang, Miqin

    2011-01-01

    The response of cells to a chemical or biological agent in terms of their impedance changes in real-time is a useful mechanism that can be utilized for a wide variety of biomedical and environmental applications. The use of a single-cell based analytical platform could be an effective approach to acquiring more sensitive cell impedance measurements, particularly in applications where only diminutive changes in impedance are expected. Here, we report the development of an on-chip cell impedance biosensor with two types of electrodes that hosts individual cells and cell populations, respectively, to study its efficacy in detecting cellular response. Human glioblastoma (U87MG) cells were patterned on single- and multi-cell electrodes through ligand-mediated natural cell adhesion. We comparatively investigated how these cancer cells on both types of electrodes respond to an ion channel inhibitor, chlorotoxin (CTX), in terms of their shape alternations and impedance changes to exploit the fine detectability of the single-cell based system. The detecting electrodes hosting single cells exhibited a significant reduction in the real impedance signal, while electrodes hosting confluent monolayer of cells showed little to no impedance change. When single-cell electrodes were treated with CTX of different doses, a dose-dependent impedance change was observed. This enables us to identify the effective dose needed for this particular treatment. Our study demonstrated that this single-cell impedance system may potentially serve as a useful analytical tool for biomedical applications such as environmental toxin detection and drug evaluation. PMID:21301069

  1. Single-cell PCR of genomic DNA enabled by automated single-cell printing for cell isolation.

    PubMed

    Stumpf, F; Schoendube, J; Gross, A; Rath, C; Niekrawietz, S; Koltay, P; Roth, G

    2015-07-15

    Single-cell analysis has developed into a key topic in cell biology with future applications in personalized medicine, tumor identification as well as tumor discovery (Editorial, 2013). Here we employ inkjet-like printing to isolate individual living single human B cells (Raji cell line) and load them directly into standard PCR tubes. Single cells are optically detected in the nozzle of the microfluidic piezoelectric dispenser chip to ensure printing of droplets with single cells only. The printing process has been characterized by using microbeads (10µm diameter) resulting in a single bead delivery in 27 out of 28 cases and relative positional precision of ±350µm at a printing distance of 6mm between nozzle and tube lid. Process-integrated optical imaging enabled to identify the printing failure as void droplet and to exclude it from downstream processing. PCR of truly single-cell DNA was performed without pre-amplification directly from single Raji cells with 33% success rate (N=197) and Cq values of 36.3±2.5. Additionally single cell whole genome amplification (WGA) was employed to pre-amplify the single-cell DNA by a factor of >1000. This facilitated subsequent PCR for the same gene yielding a success rate of 64% (N=33) which will allow more sophisticated downstream analysis like sequencing, electrophoresis or multiplexing.

  2. Flagellates as model system for gravity detection of single cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebert, Michael; Richter, Peter; Daiker, Viktor; Schuster, Martin; Tebart, Jenny; Strauch, Sebastian M.; Donat-Peter, H.

    Euglena gracilis is a unicellular, photosynthetic organism which uses light and gravity as en-vironmental hints to reach and stay in horizons of the water column which are optimal for growth and reproduction. The orientation in respect to light (so called positive and nega-tive phototaxis, i.e. movement toward or away of a light source) was well known and fairly good understood. In contrast, knowledge about the movement away from the centre of gravity (negative gravitaxis) was rather scarce. Over a century it was unclear whether orientation in respect to the gravity vector is based on a physical or a physiological mechanism. Recent results clearly favour the latter. Knock-down mutants (RNAi) were characterized which define certain key components of the gravitactic signal transduction chain. These key components include a TRP-like channel, a gravitaxis-specific calmodulin and a protein kinase A. The molecular characterization of these components is currently performed and will be presented. Euglena is not only a model system for the close understanding of gravity detection in single cells, but can also be used as photosynthetic component, i.e. oxygen source and carbon dioxide as well as nitrogenic components sink in Closed Environmental Systems (CES). Due CES are systems of choice in times of scarce flight opportunities. They allow a massive sample sharing and combine possibilities to do microgravity research for biologists but also for engineers, physicists and material scientists. Recent attempts include Aquacells and Omegahab. In the near future miniaturized systems (Chinese ShenZhou) as well as advanced CES will be flown or tested, respectively. Current attempts and plans will be presented.

  3. Detecting kinase activities from single cell lysate using concentration-enhanced mobility shift assay.

    PubMed

    Cheow, Lih Feng; Sarkar, Aniruddh; Kolitz, Sarah; Lauffenburger, Douglas; Han, Jongyoon

    2014-08-05

    Electrokinetic preconcentration coupled with mobility shift assays can give rise to very high detection sensitivities. We describe a microfluidic device that utilizes this principle to detect cellular kinase activities by simultaneously concentrating and separating substrate peptides with different phosphorylation states. This platform is capable of reliably measuring kinase activities of single adherent cells cultured in nanoliter volume microwells. We also describe a novel method utilizing spacer peptides that significantly increase separation resolution while maintaining high concentration factors in this device. Thus, multiplexed kinase measurements can be implemented with single cell sensitivity. Multiple kinase activity profiling from single cell lysate could potentially allow us to study heterogeneous activation of signaling pathways that can lead to multiple cell fates.

  4. Bioinformatics approaches to single-cell analysis in developmental biology.

    PubMed

    Yalcin, Dicle; Hakguder, Zeynep M; Otu, Hasan H

    2016-03-01

    Individual cells within the same population show various degrees of heterogeneity, which may be better handled with single-cell analysis to address biological and clinical questions. Single-cell analysis is especially important in developmental biology as subtle spatial and temporal differences in cells have significant associations with cell fate decisions during differentiation and with the description of a particular state of a cell exhibiting an aberrant phenotype. Biotechnological advances, especially in the area of microfluidics, have led to a robust, massively parallel and multi-dimensional capturing, sorting, and lysis of single-cells and amplification of related macromolecules, which have enabled the use of imaging and omics techniques on single cells. There have been improvements in computational single-cell image analysis in developmental biology regarding feature extraction, segmentation, image enhancement and machine learning, handling limitations of optical resolution to gain new perspectives from the raw microscopy images. Omics approaches, such as transcriptomics, genomics and epigenomics, targeting gene and small RNA expression, single nucleotide and structural variations and methylation and histone modifications, rely heavily on high-throughput sequencing technologies. Although there are well-established bioinformatics methods for analysis of sequence data, there are limited bioinformatics approaches which address experimental design, sample size considerations, amplification bias, normalization, differential expression, coverage, clustering and classification issues, specifically applied at the single-cell level. In this review, we summarize biological and technological advancements, discuss challenges faced in the aforementioned data acquisition and analysis issues and present future prospects for application of single-cell analyses to developmental biology.

  5. Single-cell analysis delineates a trajectory toward the human early otic lineage

    PubMed Central

    Ealy, Megan; Ellwanger, Daniel C.; Kosaric, Nina; Stapper, Andres P.; Heller, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Efficient pluripotent stem cell guidance protocols for the production of human posterior cranial placodes such as the otic placode that gives rise to the inner ear do not exist. Here we use a systematic approach including defined monolayer culture, signaling modulation, and single-cell gene expression analysis to delineate a developmental trajectory for human otic lineage specification in vitro. We found that modulation of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and WNT signaling combined with FGF and retinoic acid treatments over the course of 18 days generates cell populations that develop chronological expression of marker genes of non-neural ectoderm, preplacodal ectoderm, and early otic lineage. Gene expression along this differentiation path is distinct from other lineages such as endoderm, mesendoderm, and neural ectoderm. Single-cell analysis exposed the heterogeneity of differentiating cells and allowed discrimination of non-neural ectoderm and otic lineage cells from off-target populations. Pseudotemporal ordering of human embryonic stem cell and induced pluripotent stem cell-derived single-cell gene expression profiles revealed an initially synchronous guidance toward non-neural ectoderm, followed by comparatively asynchronous occurrences of preplacodal and otic marker genes. Positive correlation of marker gene expression between both cell lines and resemblance to mouse embryonic day 10.5 otocyst cells implied reasonable robustness of the guidance protocol. Single-cell trajectory analysis further revealed that otic progenitor cell types are induced in monolayer cultures, but further development appears impeded, likely because of lack of a lineage-stabilizing microenvironment. Our results provide a framework for future exploration of stabilizing microenvironments for efficient differentiation of stem cell-generated human otic cell types. PMID:27402757

  6. Isolation and Characterization of Single Cells from Zebrafish Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Samsa, Leigh Ann; Fleming, Nicole; Magness, Scott; Qian, Li; Liu, Jiandong

    2017-01-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a powerful model organism to study vertebrate development. Though many aspects of zebrafish embryonic development have been described at the morphological level, little is known about the molecular basis of cellular changes that occur as the organism develops. With recent advancements in microfluidics and multiplexing technologies, it is now possible to characterize gene expression in single cells. This allows for investigation of heterogeneity between individual cells of specific cell populations to identify and classify cell subtypes, characterize intermediate states that occur during cell differentiation, and explore differential cellular responses to stimuli. This study describes a protocol to isolate viable, single cells from zebrafish embryos for high throughput multiplexing assays. This method may be rapidly applied to any zebrafish embryonic cell type with fluorescent markers. An extension of this method may also be used in combination with high throughput sequencing technologies to fully characterize the transcriptome of single cells. As proof of principle, the relative abundance of cardiac differentiation markers was assessed in isolated, single cells derived from nkx2.5 positive cardiac progenitors. By evaluation of gene expression at the single cell level and at a single time point, the data support a model in which cardiac progenitors coexist with differentiating progeny. The method and work flow described here is broadly applicable to the zebrafish research community, requiring only a labeled transgenic fish line and access to microfluidics technologies. PMID:27022828

  7. [Recent progress in single-cell RNA-Seq analysis].

    PubMed

    Lu, Wen; Fuchou, Tang

    2014-11-01

    Cell heterogeneity is a general feature of biological tissues. Standard transcriptome analysis approaches require tens of thousands of cells to provide an average view of gene expression and ignore the information of gene expression heterogeneity. The single-cell RNA-Seq technologies profile gene expression at the single-cell level and serve as powerful tools to identify distinct phenotypic cell types within a heterogeneous population. The single-cell RNA-Seq technologies have been developed rapidly in recent years. The methodological progress includes a variety of cDNA amplification methods, the quantitative analysis of the sensitivity and noise of the technologies, and the development of the low-coverage high-throughput single-cell RNA-Seq and the in situ RNA-Seq technologies. Furthermore, the scope of application is extended from early embryonic development to tissue and organ development, immunology and oncology. In this review, we discuss recent progress in methodology and applications of the single-cell RNA-Seq technologies.

  8. Detection of aneuploidy in single cells using comparative genomic hybridization.

    PubMed

    Voullaire, L; Wilton, L; Slater, H; Williamson, R

    1999-09-01

    The ability of comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) to detect aneuploidy following universal amplification of DNA from a single cell, or a small number of cells, was investigated with a view to preimplantation diagnosis following in vitro fertilization, and prenatal diagnosis using fetal erythroblasts obtained from maternal blood. The DNA obtained from lysed single cells was amplified using degenerate oligonucleotide-primed PCR (DOP-PCR). This product was labelled using nick translation and hybridized together with normal reference genomic DNA. The CGH fluorescent ratio profiles obtained could be used to determine aneuploidy with cut-off thresholds of 0.75 and 1.25. Deviation in the profiles in the heterochromatic regions was reduced by using, as a reference sample, normal genomic DNA that had also undergone DOP-PCR. Single cells known to be trisomic for chromosomes 13, 18 or 21 were analysed using this technique. The resolution of CGH with amplified DNA from a single cell is of the order of 40 Mb, sufficient for the diagnosis of trisomy 21, and possibly segmental aneuploidy of equivalent size. These results, and those of others, demonstrate that diagnosis of chromosomal aneuploidy in single cells is possible using CGH with DOP-PCR amplified DNA.

  9. Single cell electroporation using proton beam fabricated biochips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homhuan, S.; Zhang, B.; Sheu, F.-S.; Bettiol, A. A.; Watt, F.

    2010-05-01

    We report the design and fabrication of a novel single cell electroporation biochip fabricated by the Proton Beam Writing technique (PBW), a new technique capable of direct-writing high-aspect-ratio nano and microstructures. The biochip features nickel micro-electrodes with straight-side walls between which individual cells are positioned. By applying electrical impulses across the electrodes, SYTOX® Green nucleic acid stain is incorporated into mouse neuroblastoma (N2a) cells. When the stain binds with DNA inside the cell nucleus, green fluorescence is observed upon excitation from a halogen lamp. Three parameters; electric field strength, pulse duration, and the number of pulses have been considered and optimized for the single cell electroporation. The results show that our biochip gives successfully electroporated cells . This single cell electroporation system represents a promising method for investigating the introduction of a wide variety of fluorophores, nanoparticles, quantum dots, DNAs and proteins into cells.

  10. Review of methods to probe single cell metabolism and bioenergetics

    PubMed Central

    Vasdekis, Andreas E.; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Single cell investigations have enabled unexpected discoveries, such as the existence of biological noise and phenotypic switching in infection, metabolism and treatment. Herein, we review methods that enable such single cell investigations specific to metabolism and bioenergetics. Firstly, we discuss how to isolate and immobilize individuals from a cell suspension, including both permanent and reversible approaches. We also highlight specific advances in microbiology for its implications in metabolic engineering. Methods for probing single cell physiology and metabolism are subsequently reviewed. The primary focus therein is on dynamic and high-content profiling strategies based on label-free and fluorescence microspectroscopy and microscopy. Non-dynamic approaches, such as mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance, are also briefly discussed. PMID:25448400

  11. Single-cell RNA-seq: advances and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Saliba, Antoine-Emmanuel; Westermann, Alexander J; Gorski, Stanislaw A; Vogel, Jörg

    2014-08-01

    Phenotypically identical cells can dramatically vary with respect to behavior during their lifespan and this variation is reflected in their molecular composition such as the transcriptomic landscape. Single-cell transcriptomics using next-generation transcript sequencing (RNA-seq) is now emerging as a powerful tool to profile cell-to-cell variability on a genomic scale. Its application has already greatly impacted our conceptual understanding of diverse biological processes with broad implications for both basic and clinical research. Different single-cell RNA-seq protocols have been introduced and are reviewed here-each one with its own strengths and current limitations. We further provide an overview of the biological questions single-cell RNA-seq has been used to address, the major findings obtained from such studies, and current challenges and expected future developments in this booming field.

  12. Massively parallel digital transcriptional profiling of single cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Grace X Y; Terry, Jessica M; Belgrader, Phillip; Ryvkin, Paul; Bent, Zachary W; Wilson, Ryan; Ziraldo, Solongo B; Wheeler, Tobias D; McDermott, Geoff P; Zhu, Junjie; Gregory, Mark T; Shuga, Joe; Montesclaros, Luz; Underwood, Jason G; Masquelier, Donald A; Nishimura, Stefanie Y; Schnall-Levin, Michael; Wyatt, Paul W; Hindson, Christopher M; Bharadwaj, Rajiv; Wong, Alexander; Ness, Kevin D; Beppu, Lan W; Deeg, H Joachim; McFarland, Christopher; Loeb, Keith R; Valente, William J; Ericson, Nolan G; Stevens, Emily A; Radich, Jerald P; Mikkelsen, Tarjei S; Hindson, Benjamin J; Bielas, Jason H

    2017-01-16

    Characterizing the transcriptome of individual cells is fundamental to understanding complex biological systems. We describe a droplet-based system that enables 3' mRNA counting of tens of thousands of single cells per sample. Cell encapsulation, of up to 8 samples at a time, takes place in ∼6 min, with ∼50% cell capture efficiency. To demonstrate the system's technical performance, we collected transcriptome data from ∼250k single cells across 29 samples. We validated the sensitivity of the system and its ability to detect rare populations using cell lines and synthetic RNAs. We profiled 68k peripheral blood mononuclear cells to demonstrate the system's ability to characterize large immune populations. Finally, we used sequence variation in the transcriptome data to determine host and donor chimerism at single-cell resolution from bone marrow mononuclear cells isolated from transplant patients.

  13. Single-cell technologies to study the immune system.

    PubMed

    Proserpio, Valentina; Mahata, Bidesh

    2016-02-01

    The immune system is composed of a variety of cells that act in a coordinated fashion to protect the organism against a multitude of different pathogens. The great variability of existing pathogens corresponds to a similar high heterogeneity of the immune cells. The study of individual immune cells, the fundamental unit of immunity, has recently transformed from a qualitative microscopic imaging to a nearly complete quantitative transcriptomic analysis. This shift has been driven by the rapid development of multiple single-cell technologies. These new advances are expected to boost the detection of less frequent cell types and transient or intermediate cell states. They will highlight the individuality of each single cell and greatly expand the resolution of current available classifications and differentiation trajectories. In this review we discuss the recent advancement and application of single-cell technologies, their limitations and future applications to study the immune system.

  14. Dense transcript profiling in single cells by image correlation decoding

    PubMed Central

    Coskun, Ahmet F.; Cai, Long

    2016-01-01

    Recent work in sequential fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH) has demonstrated the ability to uniquely encode a large number of molecular species in single cells. However, the multiplexing capacity is practically limited by the density of the barcoded objects in the cell. Here, we present a general method using image correlation to resolve the temporal barcodes in sequential hybridization experiments, allowing high density objects to be decoded. Using this correlation FISH (corrFISH) approach, we profiled the gene expression of ribosomal proteins in single cells in cell cultures and in mouse thymus tissue sections. In tissues, corrFISH revealed cell type specific gene expression of ribosomal proteins. The combination of sequential barcoding FISH and correlation analyses provides a general strategy for multiplexing a large number of RNA molecules and potentially other high copy number molecules in single cells. PMID:27271198

  15. Single-cell RNA-seq: advances and future challenges

    PubMed Central

    Saliba, Antoine-Emmanuel; Westermann, Alexander J.; Gorski, Stanislaw A.; Vogel, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Phenotypically identical cells can dramatically vary with respect to behavior during their lifespan and this variation is reflected in their molecular composition such as the transcriptomic landscape. Single-cell transcriptomics using next-generation transcript sequencing (RNA-seq) is now emerging as a powerful tool to profile cell-to-cell variability on a genomic scale. Its application has already greatly impacted our conceptual understanding of diverse biological processes with broad implications for both basic and clinical research. Different single-cell RNA-seq protocols have been introduced and are reviewed here—each one with its own strengths and current limitations. We further provide an overview of the biological questions single-cell RNA-seq has been used to address, the major findings obtained from such studies, and current challenges and expected future developments in this booming field. PMID:25053837

  16. Massively parallel digital transcriptional profiling of single cells

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Grace X. Y.; Terry, Jessica M.; Belgrader, Phillip; Ryvkin, Paul; Bent, Zachary W.; Wilson, Ryan; Ziraldo, Solongo B.; Wheeler, Tobias D.; McDermott, Geoff P.; Zhu, Junjie; Gregory, Mark T.; Shuga, Joe; Montesclaros, Luz; Underwood, Jason G.; Masquelier, Donald A.; Nishimura, Stefanie Y.; Schnall-Levin, Michael; Wyatt, Paul W.; Hindson, Christopher M.; Bharadwaj, Rajiv; Wong, Alexander; Ness, Kevin D.; Beppu, Lan W.; Deeg, H. Joachim; McFarland, Christopher; Loeb, Keith R.; Valente, William J.; Ericson, Nolan G.; Stevens, Emily A.; Radich, Jerald P.; Mikkelsen, Tarjei S.; Hindson, Benjamin J.; Bielas, Jason H.

    2017-01-01

    Characterizing the transcriptome of individual cells is fundamental to understanding complex biological systems. We describe a droplet-based system that enables 3′ mRNA counting of tens of thousands of single cells per sample. Cell encapsulation, of up to 8 samples at a time, takes place in ∼6 min, with ∼50% cell capture efficiency. To demonstrate the system's technical performance, we collected transcriptome data from ∼250k single cells across 29 samples. We validated the sensitivity of the system and its ability to detect rare populations using cell lines and synthetic RNAs. We profiled 68k peripheral blood mononuclear cells to demonstrate the system's ability to characterize large immune populations. Finally, we used sequence variation in the transcriptome data to determine host and donor chimerism at single-cell resolution from bone marrow mononuclear cells isolated from transplant patients. PMID:28091601

  17. Single-cell sequencing in stem cell biology.

    PubMed

    Wen, Lu; Tang, Fuchou

    2016-04-15

    Cell-to-cell variation and heterogeneity are fundamental and intrinsic characteristics of stem cell populations, but these differences are masked when bulk cells are used for omic analysis. Single-cell sequencing technologies serve as powerful tools to dissect cellular heterogeneity comprehensively and to identify distinct phenotypic cell types, even within a 'homogeneous' stem cell population. These technologies, including single-cell genome, epigenome, and transcriptome sequencing technologies, have been developing rapidly in recent years. The application of these methods to different types of stem cells, including pluripotent stem cells and tissue-specific stem cells, has led to exciting new findings in the stem cell field. In this review, we discuss the recent progress as well as future perspectives in the methodologies and applications of single-cell omic sequencing technologies.

  18. Wishbone identifies bifurcating developmental trajectories from single-cell data

    PubMed Central

    Setty, Manu; Tadmor, Michelle D; Reich-Zeliger, Shlomit; Angel, Omer; Salame, Tomer Meir; Kathail, Pooja; Choi, Kristy; Bendall, Sean; Friedman, Nir; Pe’er, Dana

    2016-01-01

    Recent single-cell analysis technologies offer an unprecedented opportunity to elucidate developmental pathways. Here we present Wishbone, an algorithm for positioning single cells along bifurcating developmental trajectories with high resolution. Wishbone uses multi-dimensional single-cell data, such as mass cytometry or RNA-seq data, as input and orders cells according to their developmental progression by pinpointing bifurcation points and labeling each cell as pre-bifurcation or as one of two post-bifurcation cell fates. Using 30-channel mass cytometry data, we show that Wishbone accurately recovers the known stages of T cell development in the mouse thymus, including the bifurcation point. We also apply the algorithm to mouse myeloid differentiation and demonstrate its generalization to additional lineages. A comparison of Wishbone to diffusion maps, SCUBA and Monocle shows that it outperforms these methods both in the accuracy of ordering cells and in the correct identification of branch points. PMID:27136076

  19. Exploring viral infection using single-cell sequencing.

    PubMed

    Rato, Sylvie; Golumbeanu, Monica; Telenti, Amalio; Ciuffi, Angela

    2016-11-02

    Single-cell sequencing (SCS) has emerged as a valuable tool to study cellular heterogeneity in diverse fields, including virology. By studying the viral and cellular genome and/or transcriptome, the dynamics of viral infection can be investigated at single cell level. Most studies have explored the impact of cell-to-cell variation on the viral life cycle from the point of view of the virus, by analyzing viral sequences, and from the point of view of the cell, mainly by analyzing the cellular host transcriptome. In this review, we will focus on recent studies that use single-cell sequencing to explore viral diversity and cell variability in response to viral replication.

  20. Future medical applications of single-cell sequencing in cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Advances in whole genome amplification and next-generation sequencing methods have enabled genomic analyses of single cells, and these techniques are now beginning to be used to detect genomic lesions in individual cancer cells. Previous approaches have been unable to resolve genomic differences in complex mixtures of cells, such as heterogeneous tumors, despite the importance of characterizing such tumors for cancer treatment. Sequencing of single cells is likely to improve several aspects of medicine, including the early detection of rare tumor cells, monitoring of circulating tumor cells (CTCs), measuring intratumor heterogeneity, and guiding chemotherapy. In this review we discuss the challenges and technical aspects of single-cell sequencing, with a strong focus on genomic copy number, and discuss how this information can be used to diagnose and treat cancer patients. PMID:21631906

  1. Microfluidic whole genome amplification device for single cell sequencing.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhilong; Lu, Sijia; Huang, Yanyi

    2014-10-07

    We developed a microfluidic device to perform multiplex single-cell whole-genome amplification (WGA) using multiple annealing and looping-based amplification cycles (MALBAC). This device, made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), allows us to monitor the whole process of cell loading and single-cell WGA for sequencing. We show that the genome coverage of MALBAC amplifications is reproducible between chambers on a single chip and between different chips, which enables data normalization using standard samples to accurately identify copy number variations (CNVs). This device provides an easy-to-operate approach to perform single cell sequencing library preparation with minimum hands-on time. It reduces the requirement of manual expertise as well as the risk of contamination, which is essential in future applications especially the medical diagnosis.

  2. Future medical applications of single-cell sequencing in cancer.

    PubMed

    Navin, Nicholas; Hicks, James

    2011-05-31

    Advances in whole genome amplification and next-generation sequencing methods have enabled genomic analyses of single cells, and these techniques are now beginning to be used to detect genomic lesions in individual cancer cells. Previous approaches have been unable to resolve genomic differences in complex mixtures of cells, such as heterogeneous tumors, despite the importance of characterizing such tumors for cancer treatment. Sequencing of single cells is likely to improve several aspects of medicine, including the early detection of rare tumor cells, monitoring of circulating tumor cells (CTCs), measuring intratumor heterogeneity, and guiding chemotherapy. In this review we discuss the challenges and technical aspects of single-cell sequencing, with a strong focus on genomic copy number, and discuss how this information can be used to diagnose and treat cancer patients.

  3. A polymeric micro total analysis system for single-cell analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Hsuan-Hong

    fluidic transportation, optical lysis of single cells, separation, and analysis of the lysates by electrophoresis and LIF detection. In comparison with the control experiment, the migration times of the fluorescent signals for the cytosolic fluorophores were in good agreement with those for the standard fluorophores, which confirmed the feasibility of the analytical processes.

  4. Single-Cell Isolation and Gene Analysis: Pitfalls and Possibilities

    PubMed Central

    Hodne, Kjetil; Weltzien, Finn-Arne

    2015-01-01

    During the last two decades single-cell analysis (SCA) has revealed extensive phenotypic differences within homogenous cell populations. These phenotypic differences are reflected in the stochastic nature of gene regulation, which is often masked by qualitatively and quantitatively averaging in whole tissue analyses. The ability to isolate transcripts and investigate how genes are regulated at the single cell level requires highly sensitive and refined methods. This paper reviews different strategies currently used for SCA, including harvesting, reverse transcription, and amplification of the RNA, followed by methods for transcript quantification. The review provides the historical background to SCA, discusses limitations, and current and future possibilities in this exciting field of research. PMID:26569222

  5. Single-cell epigenomics: techniques and emerging applications.

    PubMed

    Schwartzman, Omer; Tanay, Amos

    2015-12-01

    Epigenomics is the study of the physical modifications, associations and conformations of genomic DNA sequences, with the aim of linking these with epigenetic memory, cellular identity and tissue-specific functions. While current techniques in the field are characterizing the average epigenomic features across large cell ensembles, the increasing interest in the epigenetics within complex and heterogeneous tissues is driving the development of single-cell epigenomics. We review emerging single-cell methods for capturing DNA methylation, chromatin accessibility, histone modifications, chromosome conformation and replication dynamics. Together, these techniques are rapidly becoming a powerful tool in studies of cellular plasticity and diversity, as seen in stem cells and cancer.

  6. Pooled CRISPR screening with single-cell transcriptome readout.

    PubMed

    Datlinger, Paul; Rendeiro, André F; Schmidl, Christian; Krausgruber, Thomas; Traxler, Peter; Klughammer, Johanna; Schuster, Linda C; Kuchler, Amelie; Alpar, Donat; Bock, Christoph

    2017-03-01

    CRISPR-based genetic screens are accelerating biological discovery, but current methods have inherent limitations. Widely used pooled screens are restricted to simple readouts including cell proliferation and sortable marker proteins. Arrayed screens allow for comprehensive molecular readouts such as transcriptome profiling, but at much lower throughput. Here we combine pooled CRISPR screening with single-cell RNA sequencing into a broadly applicable workflow, directly linking guide RNA expression to transcriptome responses in thousands of individual cells. Our method for CRISPR droplet sequencing (CROP-seq) enables pooled CRISPR screens with single-cell transcriptome resolution, which will facilitate high-throughput functional dissection of complex regulatory mechanisms and heterogeneous cell populations.

  7. A single cell penetration system by ultrasonic driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhaoying; Xiao, Mingfei; Yang, Xing; Wu, Ting

    2008-12-01

    The researches of single cell's control and operation are the hotspots in whole world. Among the various technologies, the transmission of ectogenic genetic materials between cell membrane is very significant. Imitating the Chinese traditional acupuncture therapy, a new ultrasonic resonance driving method, is imported to drive a cell's penetration probe. A set of the single cell penetration system was established to perform this function. This system includes four subsystems: driving part, micromanipulation part, observation and measurement part, and actuation part. Some fish egg experiments indicate that this system is workable and effective.

  8. A microfluidic device enabling high-efficiency single cell trapping

    PubMed Central

    Jin, D.; Deng, B.; Cai, W.; Tu, L.; Chen, J.; Wu, Q.; Wang, W. H.

    2015-01-01

    Single cell trapping increasingly serves as a key manipulation technique in single cell analysis for many cutting-edge cell studies. Due to their inherent advantages, microfluidic devices have been widely used to enable single cell immobilization. To further improve the single cell trapping efficiency, this paper reports on a passive hydrodynamic microfluidic device based on the “least flow resistance path” principle with geometry optimized in line with corresponding cell types. Different from serpentine structure, the core trapping structure of the micro-device consists of a series of concatenated T and inverse T junction pairs which function as bypassing channels and trapping constrictions. This new device enhances the single cell trapping efficiency from three aspects: (1) there is no need to deploy very long or complicated channels to adjust flow resistance, thus saving space for each trapping unit; (2) the trapping works in a “deterministic” manner, thus saving a great deal of cell samples; and (3) the compact configuration allows shorter flowing path of cells in multiple channels, thus increasing the speed and throughput of cell trapping. The mathematical model of the design was proposed and optimization of associated key geometric parameters was conducted based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. As a proof demonstration, two types of PDMS microfluidic devices were fabricated to trap HeLa and HEK-293T cells with relatively significant differences in cell sizes. Experimental results showed 100% cell trapping and 90% single cell trapping over 4 × 100 trap sites for these two cell types, respectively. The space saving is estimated to be 2-fold and the cell trapping speed enhancement to be 3-fold compared to previously reported devices. This device can be used for trapping various types of cells and expanded to trap cells in the order of tens of thousands on 1-cm2 scale area, as a promising tool to pattern large-scale single cells on

  9. Single-cell analysis tools for drug discovery and development.

    PubMed

    Heath, James R; Ribas, Antoni; Mischel, Paul S

    2016-03-01

    The genetic, functional or compositional heterogeneity of healthy and diseased tissues presents major challenges in drug discovery and development. Such heterogeneity hinders the design of accurate disease models and can confound the interpretation of biomarker levels and of patient responses to specific therapies. The complex nature of virtually all tissues has motivated the development of tools for single-cell genomic, transcriptomic and multiplex proteomic analyses. Here, we review these tools and assess their advantages and limitations. Emerging applications of single cell analysis tools in drug discovery and development, particularly in the field of oncology, are discussed.

  10. Dichotomy of cellular inhibition by small-molecule inhibitors revealed by single-cell analysis

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Robert M.; Erez, Amir; Altan-Bonnet, Grégoire

    2016-01-01

    Despite progress in drug development, a quantitative and physiological understanding of how small-molecule inhibitors act on cells is lacking. Here, we measure the signalling and proliferative response of individual primary T-lymphocytes to a combination of antigen, cytokine and drug. We uncover two distinct modes of signalling inhibition: digital inhibition (the activated fraction of cells diminishes upon drug treatment, but active cells appear unperturbed), versus analogue inhibition (the activated fraction is unperturbed whereas activation response is diminished). We introduce a computational model of the signalling cascade that accounts for such inhibition dichotomy, and test the model predictions for the phenotypic variability of cellular responses. Finally, we demonstrate that the digital/analogue dichotomy of cellular response as revealed on short (signal transduction) timescales, translates into similar dichotomy on longer (proliferation) timescales. Our single-cell analysis of drug action illustrates the strength of quantitative approaches to translate in vitro pharmacology into functionally relevant cellular settings. PMID:27687249

  11. Dichotomy of cellular inhibition by small-molecule inhibitors revealed by single-cell analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Robert M.; Erez, Amir; Altan-Bonnet, Grégoire

    2016-09-01

    Despite progress in drug development, a quantitative and physiological understanding of how small-molecule inhibitors act on cells is lacking. Here, we measure the signalling and proliferative response of individual primary T-lymphocytes to a combination of antigen, cytokine and drug. We uncover two distinct modes of signalling inhibition: digital inhibition (the activated fraction of cells diminishes upon drug treatment, but active cells appear unperturbed), versus analogue inhibition (the activated fraction is unperturbed whereas activation response is diminished). We introduce a computational model of the signalling cascade that accounts for such inhibition dichotomy, and test the model predictions for the phenotypic variability of cellular responses. Finally, we demonstrate that the digital/analogue dichotomy of cellular response as revealed on short (signal transduction) timescales, translates into similar dichotomy on longer (proliferation) timescales. Our single-cell analysis of drug action illustrates the strength of quantitative approaches to translate in vitro pharmacology into functionally relevant cellular settings.

  12. Single-cell RNAseq reveals cell adhesion molecule profiles in electrophysiologically defined neurons

    PubMed Central

    Földy, Csaba; Darmanis, Spyros; Aoto, Jason; Malenka, Robert C.; Quake, Stephen R.; Südhof, Thomas C.

    2016-01-01

    In brain, signaling mediated by cell adhesion molecules defines the identity and functional properties of synapses. The specificity of presynaptic and postsynaptic interactions that is presumably mediated by cell adhesion molecules suggests that there exists a logic that could explain neuronal connectivity at the molecular level. Despite its importance, however, the nature of such logic is poorly understood, and even basic parameters, such as the number, identity, and single-cell expression profiles of candidate synaptic cell adhesion molecules, are not known. Here, we devised a comprehensive list of genes involved in cell adhesion, and used single-cell RNA sequencing (RNAseq) to analyze their expression in electrophysiologically defined interneurons and projection neurons. We compared the cell type-specific expression of these genes with that of genes involved in transmembrane ion conductances (i.e., channels), exocytosis, and rho/rac signaling, which regulates the actin cytoskeleton. Using these data, we identified two independent, developmentally regulated networks of interacting genes encoding molecules involved in cell adhesion, exocytosis, and signal transduction. Our approach provides a framework for a presumed cell adhesion and signaling code in neurons, enables correlating electrophysiological with molecular properties of neurons, and suggests avenues toward understanding synaptic specificity. PMID:27531958

  13. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5a inhibited by pimozide may regulate survival of goat mammary gland epithelial cells by regulating parathyroid hormone-related protein.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Zheng, Huiling; Sun, Yongsen; Yu, Qian; Li, Lihui

    2014-11-10

    The signal transducer and activator of transcription 5a (Stat5a) modulates genes involved in proliferation and survival and plays pivotal roles in regulating the function of the mammary gland during pregnancy, lactation, and involution. However, there is little information about the effects of Stat5a on apoptosis of goat mammary gland epithelial cells (GMECs). In addition, parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) is a key regulator in cellular calcium transport, mammary gland development and breast tumor biology. This study aimed to explore the interaction of Stat5a and PTHrP in GMEC apoptosis. Quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) suggested that Stat5a was predominantly expressed in the mammary gland, lung, liver and spleen of goats. Treating the GMECs with pimozide, an inhibitor of Stat5a that decreases Stat5a tyrosine phosphorylation, increased PTHrP levels in GMECs in a dose-dependent manner and simultaneously promoted apoptosis of the GMECs. We also demonstrated that PTHrP inhibition induced GMEC apoptosis and restrained cell proliferation. In contrast, PTHrP overexpression protected GMECs from pimozide- and calcium-induced apoptosis, and promoted cell proliferation. Furthermore, pimozide and CaCl2 downregulated the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 mRNA expression, respectively, and these effects were protected by PTHrP overexpression. Interestingly, we also found that Stat5a suppressed the expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) which can induce goat mammary epithelial cell migration, but PTHrP increased MMP-9 mRNA level. Thus, Stat5a may regulate GMEC survival by regulating the expression of PTHrP.

  14. Microfluidic extraction and stretching of chromosomal DNA from single cell nuclei for DNA fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaozhu; Takebayashi, Shin-Ichiro; Bernardin, Evans; Gilbert, David M; Chella, Ravindran; Guan, Jingjiao

    2012-06-01

    We have developed a novel method for genetic characterization of single cells by integrating microfluidic stretching of chromosomal DNA and fiber fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). In this method, individually isolated cell nuclei were immobilized in a microchannel. Chromosomal DNA was released from the nuclei and stretched by a pressure-driven flow. We analyzed and optimized flow conditions to generate a millimeter-long band of stretched DNA from each nucleus. Telomere fiber FISH was successfully performed on the stretched chromosomal DNA. Individual telomere fiber FISH signals from single cells could be resolved and their lengths measured, demonstrating the ability of the method to quantify genetic features at the level of single cells.

  15. Single Cell Response to Time-dependent Stimuli using a Microfluidic Bioreactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson-Chavarria, Eric M.; Agrawal, Utsav; Tanyeri, Melikhan; Kuhlman, Thomas E.; Schroeder, Charles M.

    2014-03-01

    Cellular adaptation is critical for survival under uncertain or dynamic environmental conditions. Recent studies have reported the ability of biological systems to implement low-pass filters to distinguish high frequency noise in environmental stimuli from lower frequency input signals, yet we still lack a complete understanding of this phenomenon. In this work, we report a microfluidic-based platform for single cell analysis that provides dynamic control over periodic, time-dependent culture media. Single cells are confined in free solution by the sole action of gentle fluid flow, thereby enabling non-perturbative trapping of cells for long time scales. In this way, our microfluidic-based technique provides the ability to control external stimuli with precise methods while observing non-adherent cells over long timescales. Using this approach, we observed intranucleoid diffusion of genetic repressor proteins released from a chromosomal binding array. Overall, this microfluidic approach provides a direct method for sustaining periodic environmental conditions, measuring growth rates, and detecting gene expression of single cells in free solution. Funded by NIH Pathway to Independence (PI) Award, 4R00HG004183-03. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation through a Graduate Research Fellowship to Eric M. Johnson-Chavarria.

  16. Systematic Reconstruction of Molecular Cascades Regulating GP Development Using Single-Cell RNA-Seq.

    PubMed

    Li, Junxiang; Luo, Haofei; Wang, Rui; Lang, Jidong; Zhu, Siyu; Zhang, Zhenming; Fang, Jianhuo; Qu, Keke; Lin, Yuting; Long, Haizhou; Yao, Yi; Tian, Geng; Wu, Qiong

    2016-05-17

    The growth plate (GP) comprising sequentially differentiated cell layers is a critical structure for bone elongation and regeneration. Although several key regulators in GP development have been identified using genetic perturbation, systematic understanding is still limited. Here, we used single-cell RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) to determine the gene expression profiles of 217 single cells from GPs and developed a bioinformatics pipeline named Sinova to de novo reconstruct physiological GP development in both temporal and spatial high resolution. Our unsupervised model not only confirmed prior knowledge, but also enabled the systematic discovery of genes, potential signal pathways, and surface markers CD9/CD200 to precisely depict development. Sinova further identified the effective combination of transcriptional factors (TFs) that regulates GP maturation, and the result was validated using an in vitro EGFP-Col10a screening system. Our case systematically reconstructed molecular cascades in GP development through single-cell profiling, and the bioinformatics pipeline is applicable to other developmental processes. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

  17. Single-Cell Gene Expression Analysis of Cholinergic Neurons in the Arcuate Nucleus of the Hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Streamson; Jo, Young-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    The cholinoceptive system in the hypothalamus, in particular in the arcuate nucleus (ARC), plays a role in regulating food intake. Neurons in the ARC contain multiple neuropeptides, amines, and neurotransmitters. To study molecular and neurochemical heterogeneity of ARC neurons, we combine single-cell qRT-PCR and single-cell whole transcriptome amplification methods to analyze expression patterns of our hand-picked 60 genes in individual neurons in the ARC. Immunohistochemical and single-cell qRT-PCR analyses show choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-expressing neurons in the ARC. Gene expression patterns are remarkably distinct in each individual cholinergic neuron. Two-thirds of cholinergic neurons express tyrosine hydroxylase (Th) mRNA. A large subset of these Th-positive cholinergic neurons is GABAergic as they express the GABA synthesizing enzyme glutamate decarboxylase and vesicular GABA transporter transcripts. Some cholinergic neurons also express the vesicular glutamate transporter transcript gene. POMC and POMC-processing enzyme transcripts are found in a subpopulation of cholinergic neurons. Despite this heterogeneity, gene expression patterns in individual cholinergic cells appear to be highly regulated in a cell-specific manner. In fact, membrane receptor transcripts are clustered with their respective intracellular signaling and downstream targets. This novel population of cholinergic neurons may be part of the neural circuitries that detect homeostatic need for food and control the drive to eat. PMID:27611685

  18. Single-cell analysis reveals lineage segregation in early post-implantation mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jing; Zeng, Yanwu; Fang, Zhuoqing; Gu, Junjie; Ge, Laixiang; Tang, Fan; Qu, Zepeng; Hu, Jing; Cui, Yaru; Zhang, Kunshan; Wang, Junbang; Li, Siguang; Sun, Yi; Jin, Ying

    2017-03-15

    The mammalian post-implantation embryo has been extensively investigated at the tissue level. However, to unravel the molecular basis for the cell-fate plasticity and determination, it is essential to study the characteristics of individual cells. Especially, the individual definitive endoderm (DE) cells have not been characterized in vivo. Here, we report gene expression patterns in single cells freshly isolated from mouse embryos on days 5.5 and 6.5. Initial transcriptome data from 124 single cells yielded signature genes for the epiblast, visceral endoderm, and extra-embryonic ectoderm and revealed a unique distribution pattern of fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) ligands and receptors. Further analysis indicated that early-stage epiblast cells do not segregate into lineages of the major germ layers. Instead, some cells began to diverge from epiblast cells, displaying molecular features of the pre-mesendoderm by expressing higher levels of mesendoderm markers and lower levels of Sox3 transcripts. Analysis of single-cell high-throughput quantitative RT-PCR data from 441 cells identified a late stage of the day 6.5 embryo in which mesoderm and DE cells emerge, with many of them coexpressing Oct4 and Gata6. Analysis of single-cell RNA-seq data from 112 cells of the late-stage day 6.5 embryos revealed differentially expressed signaling genes and networks of transcription factors that might underlie the segregation of the mesoderm and DE lineages. Moreover, we discovered a subpopulation of mesoderm cells that possess molecular features of the extraembryonic mesoderm. This study provides fundamental insight into the molecular basis for lineage segregation in post-implantation mouse embryos.

  19. Inkjet-like printing of single-cells.

    PubMed

    Yusof, Azmi; Keegan, Helen; Spillane, Cathy D; Sheils, Orla M; Martin, Cara M; O'Leary, John J; Zengerle, Roland; Koltay, Peter

    2011-07-21

    Cell sorting and separation techniques are essential tools for cell biology research and for many diagnostic and therapeutic applications. For many of these applications, it is imperative that heterogeneous populations of cells are segregated according to their cell type and that individual cells can be isolated and analysed. We present a novel technique to isolate single cells encapsulated in a picolitre sized droplet that are then deposited by inkjet-like printing at defined locations for downstream genomic analysis. The single-cell-manipulator (SCM) developed for this purpose consists of a dispenser chip to print cells contained in a free flying droplet, a computer vision system to detect single-cells inside the dispenser chip prior to printing, and appropriate automation equipment to print single-cells onto defined locations on a substrate. This technique is spatially dynamic, enabling cell printing on a wide range of commonly used substrates such as microscope slides, membranes and microtiter plates. Demonstration experiments performed using the SCM resulted in a printing efficiency of 87% for polystyrene microbeads of 10 μm size. When the SCM was applied to a cervical cancer cell line (HeLa), a printing efficiency of 87% was observed and a post-SCM cell viability rate of 75% was achieved.

  20. Single-Cell Analysis: The Differences That Kill.

    PubMed

    Tay, Savaş

    2015-09-10

    Using single-cell RNA sequencing, Avraham et al. investigate how variability in macrophage response to infection is controlled by variability within the pathogen population. They find that heterogeneous expression of the Salmonella virulence factor PhoP and subsequent cell-wall modifications lead to the bimodal induction of the interferon-response in infected macrophages.

  1. Selective single cell isolation for genomics using microraft arrays

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Joshua D.; Williams, Lindsay A.; DiSalvo, Matthew; Brandt, Alicia T.; Marayati, Raoud; Sims, Christopher E.; Allbritton, Nancy L.; Prins, Jan F.; Yeh, Jen Jen; Jones, Corbin D.

    2016-01-01

    Genomic methods are used increasingly to interrogate the individual cells that compose specific tissues. However, current methods for single cell isolation struggle to phenotypically differentiate specific cells in a heterogeneous population and rely primarily on the use of fluorescent markers. Many cellular phenotypes of interest are too complex to be measured by this approach, making it difficult to connect genotype and phenotype at the level of individual cells. Here we demonstrate that microraft arrays, which are arrays containing thousands of individual cell culture sites, can be used to select single cells based on a variety of phenotypes, such as cell surface markers, cell proliferation and drug response. We then show that a common genomic procedure, RNA-seq, can be readily adapted to the single cells isolated from these rafts. We show that data generated using microrafts and our modified RNA-seq protocol compared favorably with the Fluidigm C1. We then used microraft arrays to select pancreatic cancer cells that proliferate in spite of cytotoxic drug treatment. Our single cell RNA-seq data identified several expected and novel gene expression changes associated with early drug resistance. PMID:27530426

  2. Tumor Heterogeneity, Single-Cell Sequencing, and Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Felix; Efferth, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Tumor heterogeneity has been compared with Darwinian evolution and survival of the fittest. The evolutionary ecosystem of tumors consisting of heterogeneous tumor cell populations represents a considerable challenge to tumor therapy, since all genetically and phenotypically different subpopulations have to be efficiently killed by therapy. Otherwise, even small surviving subpopulations may cause repopulation and refractory tumors. Single-cell sequencing allows for a better understanding of the genomic principles of tumor heterogeneity and represents the basis for more successful tumor treatments. The isolation and sequencing of single tumor cells still represents a considerable technical challenge and consists of three major steps: (1) single cell isolation (e.g., by laser-capture microdissection), fluorescence-activated cell sorting, micromanipulation, whole genome amplification (e.g., with the help of Phi29 DNA polymerase), and transcriptome-wide next generation sequencing technologies (e.g., 454 pyrosequencing, Illumina sequencing, and other systems). Data demonstrating the feasibility of single-cell sequencing for monitoring the emergence of drug-resistant cell clones in patient samples are discussed herein. It is envisioned that single-cell sequencing will be a valuable asset to assist the design of regimens for personalized tumor therapies based on tumor subpopulation-specific genetic alterations in individual patients. PMID:27322289

  3. Tumor Heterogeneity, Single-Cell Sequencing, and Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Felix; Efferth, Thomas

    2016-06-16

    Tumor heterogeneity has been compared with Darwinian evolution and survival of the fittest. The evolutionary ecosystem of tumors consisting of heterogeneous tumor cell populations represents a considerable challenge to tumor therapy, since all genetically and phenotypically different subpopulations have to be efficiently killed by therapy. Otherwise, even small surviving subpopulations may cause repopulation and refractory tumors. Single-cell sequencing allows for a better understanding of the genomic principles of tumor heterogeneity and represents the basis for more successful tumor treatments. The isolation and sequencing of single tumor cells still represents a considerable technical challenge and consists of three major steps: (1) single cell isolation (e.g., by laser-capture microdissection), fluorescence-activated cell sorting, micromanipulation, whole genome amplification (e.g., with the help of Phi29 DNA polymerase), and transcriptome-wide next generation sequencing technologies (e.g., 454 pyrosequencing, Illumina sequencing, and other systems). Data demonstrating the feasibility of single-cell sequencing for monitoring the emergence of drug-resistant cell clones in patient samples are discussed herein. It is envisioned that single-cell sequencing will be a valuable asset to assist the design of regimens for personalized tumor therapies based on tumor subpopulation-specific genetic alterations in individual patients.

  4. Modeling genome coverage in single-cell sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Daley, Timothy; Smith, Andrew D.

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Single-cell DNA sequencing is necessary for examining genetic variation at the cellular level, which remains hidden in bulk sequencing experiments. But because they begin with such small amounts of starting material, the amount of information that is obtained from single-cell sequencing experiment is highly sensitive to the choice of protocol employed and variability in library preparation. In particular, the fraction of the genome represented in single-cell sequencing libraries exhibits extreme variability due to quantitative biases in amplification and loss of genetic material. Results: We propose a method to predict the genome coverage of a deep sequencing experiment using information from an initial shallow sequencing experiment mapped to a reference genome. The observed coverage statistics are used in a non-parametric empirical Bayes Poisson model to estimate the gain in coverage from deeper sequencing. This approach allows researchers to know statistical features of deep sequencing experiments without actually sequencing deeply, providing a basis for optimizing and comparing single-cell sequencing protocols or screening libraries. Availability and implementation: The method is available as part of the preseq software package. Source code is available at http://smithlabresearch.org/preseq. Contact: andrewds@usc.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary material is available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25107873

  5. Single-Cell Analysis of Mast Cell Degranulation Induced by Airway Smooth Muscle-Secreted Chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Benjamin M.; Meyer, Audrey F.; Gruba, Sarah M.; Haynes, Christy L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by narrowed airways, bronchial hyper-responsiveness, mucus hyper-secretion, and airway remodeling. Mast cell (MC) infiltration into airway smooth muscle (ASM) is a defining feature of asthma, and ASM regulates the inflammatory response by secreting chemokines, including CXCL10 and CCL5. Single cell analysis offers a unique approach to study specific cellular signaling interactions within large and complex signaling networks such as the inflammatory microenvironment in asthma. Methods Carbon fiber microelectrode amperometry was used to study the effects of ASM–secreted chemokines on mouse peritoneal MC degranulation. Results MC degranulation in response to CXCL10 and CCL5 was monitored at the single cell level. Relative to IgE-mediated degranulation, CXCL10- and CCL5-stimulated MCs released a decreased amount of serotonin per granule with fewer release events per cell. Decreased serotonin released per granule was correlated with increased spike half-width and rise-time values. Conclusions MCs are directly activated with ASM-associated chemokines. CXCL10 and CCL5 induce less robust MC degranulation compared to IgE- and A23187-stimulation. The kinetics of MC degranulation are signaling pathway-dependent, suggesting a biophysical mechanism of regulated degranulation that incorporates control over granule trafficking, transport, and docking machinery. General Significance The biophysical mechanisms, including variations in number of exocytotic release events, serotonin released per granule, and the membrane kinetics of exocytosis that underlie MC degranulation in response to CXCL10 and CCL5 were characterized at the single cell level. These findings clarify the function of ASM-derived chemokines as instigators of MC degranulation relative to classical mechanisms of MC stimulation. PMID:25986989

  6. Single-cell transcriptome analysis of endometrial tissue

    PubMed Central

    Krjutškov, K.; Katayama, S.; Saare, M.; Vera-Rodriguez, M.; Lubenets, D.; Samuel, K.; Laisk-Podar, T.; Teder, H.; Einarsdottir, E.; Salumets, A.; Kere, J.

    2016-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION How can we study the full transcriptome of endometrial stromal and epithelial cells at the single-cell level? SUMMARY ANSWER By compiling and developing novel analytical tools for biopsy, tissue cryopreservation and disaggregation, single-cell sorting, library preparation, RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) and statistical data analysis. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Although single-cell transcriptome analyses from various biopsied tissues have been published recently, corresponding protocols for human endometrium have not been described. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION The frozen-thawed endometrial biopsies were fluorescence-activated cell sorted (FACS) to distinguish CD13-positive stromal and CD9-positive epithelial cells and single-cell transcriptome analysis performed from biopsied tissues without culturing the cells. We studied gene transcription, applying a modern and efficient RNA-seq protocol. In parallel, endometrial stromal cells were cultured and global expression profiles were compared with uncultured cells. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS For method validation, we used two endometrial biopsies, one from mid-secretory phase (Day 21, LH+8) and another from late-secretory phase (Day 25). The samples underwent single-cell FACS sorting, single-cell RNA-seq library preparation and Illumina sequencing. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE Here we present a complete pipeline for single-cell gene-expression studies, from clinical sampling to statistical data analysis. Tissue manipulation, starting from disaggregation and cell-type-specific labelling and ending with single-cell automated sorting, is managed within 90 min at low temperature to minimize changes in the gene expression profile. The single living stromal and epithelial cells were sorted using CD13- and CD9-specific antibodies, respectively. Of the 8622 detected genes, 2661 were more active in cultured stromal cells than in biopsy cells. In the comparison of biopsy versus cultured cells, 5603

  7. Single-cell intracellular nano-pH probes.

    PubMed

    Özel, Rıfat Emrah; Lohith, Akshar; Mak, Wai Han; Pourmand, Nader

    2015-01-01

    Within a large clonal population, such as cancerous tumor entities, cells are not identical, and the differences between intracellular pH levels of individual cells may be important indicators of heterogeneity that could be relevant in clinical practice, especially in personalized medicine. Therefore, the detection of the intracellular pH at the single-cell level is of great importance to identify and study outlier cells. However, quantitative and real-time measurements of the intracellular pH of individual cells within a cell population is challenging with existing technologies, and there is a need to engineer new methodologies. In this paper, we discuss the use of nanopipette technology to overcome the limitations of intracellular pH measurements at the single-cell level. We have developed a nano-pH probe through physisorption of chitosan onto hydroxylated quartz nanopipettes with extremely small pore sizes (~100 nm). The dynamic pH range of the nano-pH probe was from 2.6 to 10.7 with a sensitivity of 0.09 units. We have performed single-cell intracellular pH measurements using non-cancerous and cancerous cell lines, including human fibroblasts, HeLa, MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7, with the pH nanoprobe. We have further demonstrated the real-time continuous single-cell pH measurement capability of the sensor, showing the cellular pH response to pharmaceutical manipulations. These findings suggest that the chitosan-functionalized nanopore is a powerful nano-tool for pH sensing at the single-cell level with high temporal and spatial resolution.

  8. Single-cell RNA-seq reveals dynamic paracrine control of cellular variation.

    PubMed

    Shalek, Alex K; Satija, Rahul; Shuga, Joe; Trombetta, John J; Gennert, Dave; Lu, Diana; Chen, Peilin; Gertner, Rona S; Gaublomme, Jellert T; Yosef, Nir; Schwartz, Schraga; Fowler, Brian; Weaver, Suzanne; Wang, Jing; Wang, Xiaohui; Ding, Ruihua; Raychowdhury, Raktima; Friedman, Nir; Hacohen, Nir; Park, Hongkun; May, Andrew P; Regev, Aviv

    2014-06-19

    High-throughput single-cell transcriptomics offers an unbiased approach for understanding the extent, basis and function of gene expression variation between seemingly identical cells. Here we sequence single-cell RNA-seq libraries prepared from over 1,700 primary mouse bone-marrow-derived dendritic cells spanning several experimental conditions. We find substantial variation between identically stimulated dendritic cells, in both the fraction of cells detectably expressing a given messenger RNA and the transcript's level within expressing cells. Distinct gene modules are characterized by different temporal heterogeneity profiles. In particular, a 'core' module of antiviral genes is expressed very early by a few 'precocious' cells in response to uniform stimulation with a pathogenic component, but is later activated in all cells. By stimulating cells individually in sealed microfluidic chambers, analysing dendritic cells from knockout mice, and modulating secretion and extracellular signalling, we show that this response is coordinated by interferon-mediated paracrine signalling from these precocious cells. Notably, preventing cell-to-cell communication also substantially reduces variability between cells in the expression of an early-induced 'peaked' inflammatory module, suggesting that paracrine signalling additionally represses part of the inflammatory program. Our study highlights the importance of cell-to-cell communication in controlling cellular heterogeneity and reveals general strategies that multicellular populations can use to establish complex dynamic responses.

  9. Single-cell RNA-seq reveals dynamic paracrine control of cellular variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalek, Alex K.; Satija, Rahul; Shuga, Joe; Trombetta, John J.; Gennert, Dave; Lu, Diana; Chen, Peilin; Gertner, Rona S.; Gaublomme, Jellert T.; Yosef, Nir; Schwartz, Schraga; Fowler, Brian; Weaver, Suzanne; Wang, Jing; Wang, Xiaohui; Ding, Ruihua; Raychowdhury, Raktima; Friedman, Nir; Hacohen, Nir; Park, Hongkun; May, Andrew P.; Regev, Aviv

    2014-06-01

    High-throughput single-cell transcriptomics offers an unbiased approach for understanding the extent, basis and function of gene expression variation between seemingly identical cells. Here we sequence single-cell RNA-seq libraries prepared from over 1,700 primary mouse bone-marrow-derived dendritic cells spanning several experimental conditions. We find substantial variation between identically stimulated dendritic cells, in both the fraction of cells detectably expressing a given messenger RNA and the transcript's level within expressing cells. Distinct gene modules are characterized by different temporal heterogeneity profiles. In particular, a `core' module of antiviral genes is expressed very early by a few `precocious' cells in response to uniform stimulation with a pathogenic component, but is later activated in all cells. By stimulating cells individually in sealed microfluidic chambers, analysing dendritic cells from knockout mice, and modulating secretion and extracellular signalling, we show that this response is coordinated by interferon-mediated paracrine signalling from these precocious cells. Notably, preventing cell-to-cell communication also substantially reduces variability between cells in the expression of an early-induced `peaked' inflammatory module, suggesting that paracrine signalling additionally represses part of the inflammatory program. Our study highlights the importance of cell-to-cell communication in controlling cellular heterogeneity and reveals general strategies that multicellular populations can use to establish complex dynamic responses.

  10. Cryo-imaging of fluorescently labeled single cells in a mouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steyer, Grant J.; Roy, Debashish; Salvado, Olivier; Stone, Meredith E.; Wilson, David L.

    2009-02-01

    We developed a cryo-imaging system to provide single-cell detection of fluorescently labeled cells in mouse, with particular applicability to stem cells and metastatic cancer. The Case cryoimaging system consists of a fluorescence microscope, robotic imaging positioner, customized cryostat, PC-based control system, and visualization/analysis software. The system alternates between sectioning (10-40 μm) and imaging, collecting color brightfield and fluorescent blockface image volumes >60GB. In mouse experiments, we imaged quantum-dot labeled stem cells, GFP-labeled cancer and stem cells, and cell-size fluorescent microspheres. To remove subsurface fluorescence, we used a simplified model of light-tissue interaction whereby the next image was scaled, blurred, and subtracted from the current image. We estimated scaling and blurring parameters by minimizing entropy of subtracted images. Tissue specific attenuation parameters were found [uT : heart (267 +/- 47.6 μm), liver (218 +/- 27.1 μm), brain (161 +/- 27.4 μm)] to be within the range of estimates in the literature. "Next image" processing removed subsurface fluorescence equally well across multiple tissues (brain, kidney, liver, adipose tissue, etc.), and analysis of 200 microsphere images in the brain gave 97+/-2% reduction of subsurface fluorescence. Fluorescent signals were determined to arise from single cells based upon geometric and integrated intensity measurements. Next image processing greatly improved axial resolution, enabled high quality 3D volume renderings, and improved enumeration of single cells with connected component analysis by up to 24%. Analysis of image volumes identified metastatic cancer sites, found homing of stem cells to injury sites, and showed microsphere distribution correlated with blood flow patterns. We developed and evaluated cryo-imaging to provide single-cell detection of fluorescently labeled cells in mouse. Our cryo-imaging system provides extreme (>60GB), micron

  11. Microfluidic device for capture and isolation of single cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Alexander P.; Barbee, Kristopher D.; Huang, Xiaohua

    2010-08-01

    We describe a microfluidic device capable of trapping, isolating, and lysing individual cells in parallel using dielectrophoretic forces and a system of PDMS channels and valves. The device consists of a glass substrate patterned with electrodes and two PDMS layers comprising of the microfluidic channels and valve control channels. Individual cells are captured by positive dielectrophoresis using the microfabricated electrode pairs. The cells are then isolated into nanoliter compartments using pneumatically actuated PDMS valves. Following isolation, the cells are lysed open by applying an electric field using the same electrode pairs. With the ability to capture and compartmentalize single cells our device may be combined with analytical methods for in situ molecular analysis of cellular components from single cells in a highly parallel manner.

  12. Single cell induced optical confinement in biological lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karl, M.; Dietrich, C. P.; Schubert, M.; Samuel, I. D. W.; Turnbull, G. A.; Gather, M. C.

    2017-03-01

    Biological single cell lasers have shown great potential for fundamental research and next generation sensing applications. In this study, the potential of fluorescent biological cells as refractive index landscapes and active optical elements is investigated using a combined Fourier- and hyperspectral imaging technique. We show that the refractive index contrast between cell and surrounding leads to 3D confinement of photons inside living cells. The Fourier- and real-space emission characteristics of these biological lasers are closely related and can be predicted from one another. Investigations of the lasing threshold for different energy and momentum position in Fourier-space give insight into the fundamental creation of longitudinal and transverse lasing modes within the cell. These findings corroborate the potential of living biological materials for precision engineering of photonic structures and may pave the way towards low threshold polariton lasing from single cells.

  13. Cellular identity at the single-cell level.

    PubMed

    Coskun, Ahmet F; Eser, Umut; Islam, Saiful

    2016-10-20

    A single cell creates surprising heterogeneity in a multicellular organism. While every organismal cell shares almost an identical genome, molecular interactions in cells alter the use of DNA sequences to modulate the gene of interest for specialization of cellular functions. Each cell gains a unique identity through molecular coding across the DNA, RNA, and protein conversions. On the other hand, loss of cellular identity leads to critical diseases such as cancer. Most cell identity dissection studies are based on bulk molecular assays that mask differences in individual cells. To probe cell-to-cell variability in a population, we discuss single cell approaches to decode the genetic, epigenetic, transcriptional, and translational mechanisms for cell identity formation. In combination with molecular instructions, the physical principles behind cell identity determination are examined. Deciphering and reprogramming cellular types impact biology and medicine.

  14. Electrochemical Visualization of Intracellular Hydrogen Peroxide at Single Cells.

    PubMed

    He, Ruiqin; Tang, Huifen; Jiang, Dechen; Chen, Hong-yuan

    2016-02-16

    In this Letter, the electrochemical visualization of hydrogen peroxide inside one cell was achieved first using a comprehensive Au-luminol-microelectrode and electrochemiluminescence. The capillary with a tip opening of 1-2 μm was filled with the mixture of chitosan and luminol, which was coated with the thin layers of polyvinyl chloride/nitrophenyloctyl ether (PVC/NPOE) and gold as the microelectrode. Upon contact with the aqueous hydrogen peroxide, hydrogen peroxide and luminol in contact with the gold layer were oxidized under the positive potential resulting in luminescence for the imaging. Due to the small diameter of the electrode, the microelectrode tip was inserted into one cell and the bright luminescence observed at the tip confirmed the visualization of intracellular hydrogen peroxide. The further coupling of oxidase on the electrode surface could open the field in the electrochemical imaging of intracellular biomolecules at single cells, which benefited the single cell electrochemical detection.

  15. Shrink-induced single-cell plastic microwell array.

    PubMed

    Lew, Valerie; Nguyen, Diep; Khine, Michelle

    2011-12-01

    The ability to interrogate and track single cells over time in a high-throughput format would provide critical information for fundamental biological understanding of processes and for various applications, including drug screening and toxicology. We have developed an ultrarapid and simple method to create single-cell wells of controllable diameter and depth with commodity shrink-wrap film and tape. Using a programmable CO(2) laser, we cut hole arrays into the tape. The tape then serves as a shadow mask to selectively etch wells into commodity shrink-wrap film by O(2) plasma. When the shrink-wrap film retracts upon briefly heating, high-aspect plastic microwell arrays with diameters down to 20 μm are readily achieved. We calibrated the loading procedure with fluorescent microbeads. Finally, we demonstrate the utility of the wells by loading fluorescently labeled single human embryonic stem cells into the wells.

  16. Single cell profiling of surface carbohydrates on Bacillus cereus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Congzhou; Ehrhardt, Christopher J.; Yadavalli, Vamsi K.

    2015-01-01

    Cell surface carbohydrates are important to various bacterial activities and functions. It is well known that different types of Bacillus display heterogeneity of surface carbohydrate compositions, but detection of their presence, quantitation and estimation of variation at the single cell level have not been previously solved. Here, using atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based recognition force mapping coupled with lectin probes, the specific carbohydrate distributions of N-acetylglucosamine and mannose/glucose were detected, mapped and quantified on single B. cereus surfaces at the nanoscale across the entire cell. Further, the changes of the surface carbohydrate compositions from the vegetative cell to spore were shown. These results demonstrate AFM-based ‘recognition force mapping’ as a versatile platform to quantitatively detect and spatially map key bacterial surface biomarkers (such as carbohydrate compositions), and monitor in situ changes in surface biochemical properties during intracellular activities at the single cell level. PMID:25505137

  17. Adult Mouse Cortical Cell Taxonomy by Single Cell Transcriptomics

    PubMed Central

    Tasic, Bosiljka; Menon, Vilas; Nguyen, Thuc Nghi; Kim, Tae Kyung; Jarsky, Tim; Yao, Zizhen; Levi, Boaz; Gray, Lucas T.; Sorensen, Staci A.; Dolbeare, Tim; Bertagnolli, Darren; Goldy, Jeff; Shapovalova, Nadiya; Parry, Sheana; Lee, Changkyu; Smith, Kimberly; Bernard, Amy; Madisen, Linda; Sunkin, Susan M.; Hawrylycz, Michael; Koch, Christof; Zeng, Hongkui

    2016-01-01

    Nervous systems are composed of various cell types, but the extent of cell type diversity is poorly understood. Here, we construct a cellular taxonomy of one cortical region, primary visual cortex, in adult mice based on single cell RNA-sequencing. We identify 49 transcriptomic cell types including 23 GABAergic, 19 glutamatergic and seven non-neuronal types. We also analyze cell-type specific mRNA processing and characterize genetic access to these transcriptomic types by many transgenic Cre lines. Finally, we show that some of our transcriptomic cell types display specific and differential electrophysiological and axon projection properties, thereby confirming that the single cell transcriptomic signatures can be associated with specific cellular properties. PMID:26727548

  18. Investigating transcriptional states at single-cell-resolution.

    PubMed

    Tischler, Julia; Surani, M Azim

    2013-02-01

    Gene expression analysis at single-cell-resolution is a powerful tool for uncovering individual cell differences within heterogeneous cell populations and complex tissues, which can provide invaluable insights into the extent of gene expression variability. Multi-dimensional information of gene expression at the level of the individual cell can help to identify distinct and rare molecular cell 'states' within populations and aid in unravelling genetic regulatory circuits. Gene expression analysis at the single-cell-level will also enhance our understanding of the molecular basis of aberrant cell states and disease development and holds great promise for the advancement of personalized medicine. We present approaches that provide large-scale views of gene expression at the level of the individual cell.

  19. Genetic interaction mapping with microfluidic-based single cell sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Haliburton, John R.; Shao, Wenjun; Deutschbauer, Adam; Arkin, Adam; Abate, Adam R.

    2017-01-01

    Genetic interaction mapping is useful for understanding the molecular basis of cellular decision making, but elucidating interactions genome-wide is challenging due to the massive number of gene combinations that must be tested. Here, we demonstrate a simple approach to thoroughly map genetic interactions in bacteria using microfluidic-based single cell sequencing. Using single cell PCR in droplets, we link distinct genetic information into single DNA sequences that can be decoded by next generation sequencing. Our approach is scalable and theoretically enables the pooling of entire interaction libraries to interrogate multiple pairwise genetic interactions in a single culture. The speed, ease, and low-cost of our approach makes genetic interaction mapping viable for routine characterization, allowing the interaction network to be used as a universal read out for a variety of biology experiments, and for the elucidation of interaction networks in non-model organisms. PMID:28170417

  20. Genetic interaction mapping with microfluidic-based single cell sequencing.

    PubMed

    Haliburton, John R; Shao, Wenjun; Deutschbauer, Adam; Arkin, Adam; Abate, Adam R

    2017-01-01

    Genetic interaction mapping is useful for understanding the molecular basis of cellular decision making, but elucidating interactions genome-wide is challenging due to the massive number of gene combinations that must be tested. Here, we demonstrate a simple approach to thoroughly map genetic interactions in bacteria using microfluidic-based single cell sequencing. Using single cell PCR in droplets, we link distinct genetic information into single DNA sequences that can be decoded by next generation sequencing. Our approach is scalable and theoretically enables the pooling of entire interaction libraries to interrogate multiple pairwise genetic interactions in a single culture. The speed, ease, and low-cost of our approach makes genetic interaction mapping viable for routine characterization, allowing the interaction network to be used as a universal read out for a variety of biology experiments, and for the elucidation of interaction networks in non-model organisms.

  1. Recent advances in microbial single cell genomics technology and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanauskas, R.

    2015-12-01

    Single cell genomics is increasingly utilized as a powerful tool to decipher the metabolic potential, evolutionary histories and in situ interactions of environmental microorganisms. I will present several new developments of this exciting technology, which improve genomic data recovery from individual cells and allow its integration with cell's phenotypic properties. I will also demonstrate how these new technical capabilities help understanding the biology of the "microbial dark matter" inhabiting marine and terrestrial subsurface environments.

  2. Microwave-induced thermogenetic activation of single cells

    SciTech Connect

    Safronov, N. A.; Fedotov, I. V.; Ermakova, Yu. G.; Matlashov, M. E.; Belousov, V. V.; Sidorov-Biryukov, D. A.; Fedotov, A. B.; Zheltikov, A. M.

    2015-04-20

    Exposure to a microwave field is shown to enable thermogenetic activation of individual cells in a culture of cell expressing thermosensitive ion channels. Integration of a microwave transmission line with an optical fiber and a diamond quantum thermometer has been shown to allow thermogenetic single-cell activation to be combined with accurate local online temperature measurements based on an optical detection of electron spin resonance in nitrogen–vacancy centers in diamond.

  3. Single-cell magnetic imaging using a quantum diamond microscope.

    PubMed

    Glenn, David R; Lee, Kyungheon; Park, Hongkun; Weissleder, Ralph; Yacoby, Amir; Lukin, Mikhail D; Lee, Hakho; Walsworth, Ronald L; Connolly, Colin B

    2015-08-01

    We apply a quantum diamond microscope for detection and imaging of immunomagnetically labeled cells. This instrument uses nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond for correlated magnetic and fluorescence imaging. Our device provides single-cell resolution and a field of view (∼1 mm(2)) two orders of magnitude larger than that of previous NV imaging technologies, enabling practical applications. To illustrate, we quantified cancer biomarkers expressed by rare tumor cells in a large population of healthy cells.

  4. Single Cell Analysis of a Bacterial Sender-Receiver System

    PubMed Central

    Mückl, Andrea; Kapsner, Korbinian; Gerland, Ulrich; Simmel, Friedrich C.

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring gene expression dynamics on the single cell level provides important information on cellular heterogeneity and stochasticity, and potentially allows for more accurate quantitation of gene expression processes. We here study bacterial senders and receivers genetically engineered with components of the quorum sensing system derived from Aliivibrio fischeri on the single cell level using microfluidics-based bacterial chemostats and fluorescence video microscopy. We track large numbers of bacteria over extended periods of time, which allows us to determine bacterial lineages and filter out subpopulations within a heterogeneous population. We quantitatively determine the dynamic gene expression response of receiver bacteria to varying amounts of the quorum sensing inducer N-3-oxo-C6-homoserine lactone (AHL). From this we construct AHL response curves and characterize gene expression dynamics of whole bacterial populations by investigating the statistical distribution of gene expression activity over time. The bacteria are found to display heterogeneous induction behavior within the population. We therefore also characterize gene expression in a homogeneous bacterial subpopulation by focusing on single cell trajectories derived only from bacteria with similar induction behavior. The response at the single cell level is found to be more cooperative than that obtained for the heterogeneous total population. For the analysis of systems containing both AHL senders and receiver cells, we utilize the receiver cells as ‘bacterial sensors’ for AHL. Based on a simple gene expression model and the response curves obtained in receiver-only experiments, the effective AHL concentration established by the senders and their ‘sending power’ is determined. PMID:26808777

  5. Advances and Applications of Single Cell Sequencing Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Navin, Nicholas E.

    2015-01-01

    Single cell sequencing (SCS) has emerged as a powerful new set of technologies for studying rare cells and delineating complex populations. Over the past 5 years, SCS methods for DNA and RNA have had a broad impact on many diverse fields of biology, including microbiology, neurobiology, development, tissue mosaicism, immunology and cancer research. In this review, we will discuss SCS technologies and applications, as well as translational applications in the clinic. PMID:26000845

  6. Parallel single-cell sequencing links transcriptional and epigenetic heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Mabel J.; Hu, Tim Xiaoming; Krueger, Felix; Smallwood, Sebastien; Ponting, Chris P.; Voet, Thierry; Kelsey, Gavin; Stegle, Oliver; Reik, Wolf

    2015-01-01

    We report scM&T-seq, a method for parallel single-cell genome-wide methylome and transcriptome sequencing, allowing discovery of associations between transcriptional and epigenetic variation. Profiling of 61 mouse embryonic stem cells confirmed known links between DNA methylation and transcription. Notably, the method reveals novel associations between heterogeneously methylated distal regulatory elements and transcription of key pluripotency genes. PMID:26752769

  7. Advances and applications of single-cell sequencing technologies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Navin, Nicholas E

    2015-05-21

    Single-cell sequencing (SCS) has emerged as a powerful new set of technologies for studying rare cells and delineating complex populations. Over the past 5 years, SCS methods for DNA and RNA have had a broad impact on many diverse fields of biology, including microbiology, neurobiology, development, tissue mosaicism, immunology, and cancer research. In this review, we will discuss SCS technologies and applications, as well as translational applications in the clinic.

  8. Virtual microfluidics for digital quantification and single-cell sequencing.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liyi; Brito, Ilana L; Alm, Eric J; Blainey, Paul C

    2016-09-01

    We have developed hydrogel-based virtual microfluidics as a simple and robust alternative to complex engineered microfluidic systems for the compartmentalization of nucleic acid amplification reactions. We applied in-gel digital multiple displacement amplification (dMDA) to purified DNA templates, cultured bacterial cells and human microbiome samples in the virtual microfluidics system, and demonstrated whole-genome sequencing of single-cell MDA products with excellent coverage uniformity and markedly reduced chimerism compared with products of liquid MDA reactions.

  9. Parallel single-cell sequencing links transcriptional and epigenetic heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Angermueller, Christof; Clark, Stephen J; Lee, Heather J; Macaulay, Iain C; Teng, Mabel J; Hu, Tim Xiaoming; Krueger, Felix; Smallwood, Sébastien A; Ponting, Chris P; Voet, Thierry; Kelsey, Gavin; Stegle, Oliver; Reik, Wolf

    2016-03-01

    We report scM&T-seq, a method for parallel single-cell genome-wide methylome and transcriptome sequencing that allows for the discovery of associations between transcriptional and epigenetic variation. Profiling of 61 mouse embryonic stem cells confirmed known links between DNA methylation and transcription. Notably, the method revealed previously unrecognized associations between heterogeneously methylated distal regulatory elements and transcription of key pluripotency genes.

  10. Isolating single cells in a neurosphere assay using inertial microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Nathamgari, S. Shiva P.; Dong, Biqin; Zhou, Fan; Kang, Wonmo; Giraldo-Vela, Juan P.; McGuire, Tammy; McNaughton, Rebecca L.; Sun, Cheng; Kessler, John A.; Espinosa, Horacio D.

    2015-01-01

    Sphere forming assays are routinely used for in vitro propagation and differentiation of stem cells. Because the stem cell clusters can become heterogeneous and polyclonal, they must first be dissociated into a single cell suspension for further clonal analysis or differentiation studies. The dissociated population is marred by the presence of doublets, triplets and semi-cleaved/intact clusters which makes identification and further analysis of differentiation pathways difficult. In this work, we use inertial microfluidics to separate the single cells and clusters in a population of chemically dissociated neurospheres. In contrast to previous microfluidic sorting technologies which operated at high flow rates, we implement the spiral microfluidic channel in a novel focusing regime that occurs at lower flow rates. In this regime, the curvature-induced Dean’s force focuses the smaller, single cells towards the inner wall and the larger clusters towards the center. We further demonstrate that sorting in this low flow rate (and hence low shear stress) regime yields a high percentage (> 90%) of viable cells and preserves multipotency by differentiating the sorted neural stem cell population into neurons and astrocytes. The modularity of the device allows easy integration with other lab-on-a-chip devices for upstream mechanical dissociation and downstream high-throughput clonal analysis, localized electroporation and sampling. Although demonstrated in the case of the neurosphere assay, the method is equally applicable to other sphere forming assays. PMID:26511875

  11. Review of methods to probe single cell metabolism and bioenergetics

    DOE PAGES

    Vasdekis, Andreas E.; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2014-10-31

    The sampling and manipulation of cells down to the individual has been of substantial interest since the very beginning of Life Sciences. Herein, our objective is to highlight the most recent developments in single cell manipulation, as well as pioneering ones. First, flow-through methods will be discussed, namely methods in which the single cells flow continuously in an ordered manner during their analysis. This section will be followed by confinement techniques that enable cell isolation and confinement in one, two- or three-dimensions. Flow cytometry and droplet microfluidics are the two most common methods of flow-through analysis. While both are high-throughputmore » techniques, their difference lays in the fact that the droplet encapsulated cells experience a restricted and personal microenvironment, while in flow cytometry cells experience similar nutrient and stimuli initial concentrations. These methods are rather well established; however, they recently enabled immense strides in single cell phenotypic analysis, namely the identification and analysis of metabolically distinct individuals from an isogenic population using both droplet microfluidics and flow cytometry.« less

  12. Review of methods to probe single cell metabolism and bioenergetics

    SciTech Connect

    Vasdekis, Andreas E.; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2014-10-31

    The sampling and manipulation of cells down to the individual has been of substantial interest since the very beginning of Life Sciences. Herein, our objective is to highlight the most recent developments in single cell manipulation, as well as pioneering ones. First, flow-through methods will be discussed, namely methods in which the single cells flow continuously in an ordered manner during their analysis. This section will be followed by confinement techniques that enable cell isolation and confinement in one, two- or three-dimensions. Flow cytometry and droplet microfluidics are the two most common methods of flow-through analysis. While both are high-throughput techniques, their difference lays in the fact that the droplet encapsulated cells experience a restricted and personal microenvironment, while in flow cytometry cells experience similar nutrient and stimuli initial concentrations. These methods are rather well established; however, they recently enabled immense strides in single cell phenotypic analysis, namely the identification and analysis of metabolically distinct individuals from an isogenic population using both droplet microfluidics and flow cytometry.

  13. Practical, Microfabrication-Free Device for Single-Cell Isolation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Liang-I; Chao, Shih-hui; Meldrum, Deirdre R.

    2009-01-01

    Microfabricated devices have great potential in cell-level studies, but are not easily accessible for the broad biology community. This paper introduces the Microscale Oil-Covered Cell Array (MOCCA) as a low-cost device for high throughput single-cell analysis that can be easily produced by researchers without microengineering knowledge. Instead of using microfabricated structures to capture cells, MOCCA isolates cells in discrete aqueous droplets that are separated by oil on patterned hydrophilic areas across a relatively more hydrophobic substrate. The number of randomly seeded Escherichia coli bacteria in each discrete droplet approaches single-cell levels. The cell distribution on MOCCA is well-fit with Poisson distribution. In this pioneer study, we created an array of 900-picoliter droplets. The total time needed to seed cells in ∼3000 droplets was less than 10 minutes. Compared to traditional microfabrication techniques, MOCCA dramatically lowers the cost of microscale cell arrays, yet enhances the fabrication and operational efficiency for single-cell analysis. PMID:19696926

  14. A microchip for integrated single-cell genotoxicity assay.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hui; Sun, Hao; Zheng, Jianping

    2016-12-01

    With the development of large-scale biologic databases, precision medicine is becoming a frontier in biomedical research. As a main focus of precision medicine study, cancer has been widely accepted as a disease born out of inherited genetic variations or accumulating genomic damage. At the single-cell level, microfluidics or lab-on-a-chip technology for cancer study is an emerging tool for improving risk assessment, diagnostic categories and therapeutic strategies. This work presents a multi-layer microchip for single-cell gene expression profiling. Treated by three drug reagents (i.e. methyl methanesulfonate, docetaxel and colchicine) with varied concentrations and time lengths, individual human breast cancer cells (MCF-7) are then lysed on-chip, and the released mRNA templates are captured and reversely transcribed into cDNA on microbead surface. Three genes (GAPDH, CDKN1A, AURKA) are amplified and quantified simultaneously through triplex real-time polymerase chain reactions (qPCR). Readout per run is set to be eighteen, and can be further improved following same approach. The microchip is able to integrate all steps of single-cell gene expression profiling, and provide precision study of drug induced genotoxicity with reduced reagents consumption per reaction and instrumental cost.

  15. Defining cell types and states with single-cell genomics

    PubMed Central

    Trapnell, Cole

    2015-01-01

    A revolution in cellular measurement technology is under way: For the first time, we have the ability to monitor global gene regulation in thousands of individual cells in a single experiment. Such experiments will allow us to discover new cell types and states and trace their developmental origins. They overcome fundamental limitations inherent in measurements of bulk cell population that have frustrated efforts to resolve cellular states. Single-cell genomics and proteomics enable not only precise characterization of cell state, but also provide a stunningly high-resolution view of transitions between states. These measurements may finally make explicit the metaphor that C.H. Waddington posed nearly 60 years ago to explain cellular plasticity: Cells are residents of a vast “landscape” of possible states, over which they travel during development and in disease. Single-cell technology helps not only locate cells on this landscape, but illuminates the molecular mechanisms that shape the landscape itself. However, single-cell genomics is a field in its infancy, with many experimental and computational advances needed to fully realize its full potential. PMID:26430159

  16. Single Cell Genomics and Transcriptomics for Unicellular Eukaryotes

    SciTech Connect

    Ciobanu, Doina; Clum, Alicia; Singh, Vasanth; Salamov, Asaf; Han, James; Copeland, Alex; Grigoriev, Igor; James, Timothy; Singer, Steven; Woyke, Tanja; Malmstrom, Rex; Cheng, Jan-Fang

    2014-03-14

    Despite their small size, unicellular eukaryotes have complex genomes with a high degree of plasticity that allow them to adapt quickly to environmental changes. Unicellular eukaryotes live with prokaryotes and higher eukaryotes, frequently in symbiotic or parasitic niches. To this day their contribution to the dynamics of the environmental communities remains to be understood. Unfortunately, the vast majority of eukaryotic microorganisms are either uncultured or unculturable, making genome sequencing impossible using traditional approaches. We have developed an approach to isolate unicellular eukaryotes of interest from environmental samples, and to sequence and analyze their genomes and transcriptomes. We have tested our methods with six species: an uncharacterized protist from cellulose-enriched compost identified as Platyophrya, a close relative of P. vorax; the fungus Metschnikowia bicuspidate, a parasite of water flea Daphnia; the mycoparasitic fungi Piptocephalis cylindrospora, a parasite of Cokeromyces and Mucor; Caulochytrium protosteloides, a parasite of Sordaria; Rozella allomycis, a parasite of the water mold Allomyces; and the microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Here, we present the four components of our approach: pre-sequencing methods, sequence analysis for single cell genome assembly, sequence analysis of single cell transcriptomes, and genome annotation. This technology has the potential to uncover the complexity of single cell eukaryotes and their role in the environmental samples.

  17. Single-cell mutational profiling and clonal phylogeny in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Nicola E.; Ermini, Luca; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Vijayaraghavan, Gowri; Titley, Ian; Ford, Anthony; Campbell, Peter; Kearney, Lyndal; Greaves, Mel

    2013-01-01

    The development of cancer is a dynamic evolutionary process in which intraclonal, genetic diversity provides a substrate for clonal selection and a source of therapeutic escape. The complexity and topography of intraclonal genetic architectures have major implications for biopsy-based prognosis and for targeted therapy. High-depth, next-generation sequencing (NGS) efficiently captures the mutational load of individual tumors or biopsies. But, being a snapshot portrait of total DNA, it disguises the fundamental features of subclonal variegation of genetic lesions and of clonal phylogeny. Single-cell genetic profiling provides a potential resolution to this problem, but methods developed to date all have limitations. We present a novel solution to this challenge using leukemic cells with known mutational spectra as a tractable model. DNA from flow-sorted single cells is screened using multiplex targeted Q-PCR within a microfluidic platform allowing unbiased single-cell selection, high-throughput, and comprehensive analysis for all main varieties of genetic abnormalities: chimeric gene fusions, copy number alterations, and single-nucleotide variants. We show, in this proof-of-principle study, that the method has a low error rate and can provide detailed subclonal genetic architectures and phylogenies. PMID:24056532

  18. A stochastic transcriptional switch model for single cell imaging data.

    PubMed

    Hey, Kirsty L; Momiji, Hiroshi; Featherstone, Karen; Davis, Julian R E; White, Michael R H; Rand, David A; Finkenstädt, Bärbel

    2015-10-01

    Gene expression is made up of inherently stochastic processes within single cells and can be modeled through stochastic reaction networks (SRNs). In particular, SRNs capture the features of intrinsic variability arising from intracellular biochemical processes. We extend current models for gene expression to allow the transcriptional process within an SRN to follow a random step or switch function which may be estimated using reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC). This stochastic switch model provides a generic framework to capture many different dynamic features observed in single cell gene expression. Inference for such SRNs is challenging due to the intractability of the transition densities. We derive a model-specific birth-death approximation and study its use for inference in comparison with the linear noise approximation where both approximations are considered within the unifying framework of state-space models. The methodology is applied to synthetic as well as experimental single cell imaging data measuring expression of the human prolactin gene in pituitary cells.

  19. Single-Cell-Precision Microplasma-Induced Cancer Cell Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xinpei; He, Guangyuan; Ostrikov, Kostya

    2014-01-01

    The issue of single-cell control has recently attracted enormous interest. However, in spite of the presently achievable intracellular-level physiological probing through bio-photonics, nano-probe-based, and some other techniques, the issue of inducing selective, single-cell-precision apoptosis, without affecting neighbouring cells remains essentially open. Here we resolve this issue and report on the effective single-cell-precision cancer cell treatment using the reactive chemistry of the localized corona-type plasma discharge around a needle-like electrode with the spot size ∼1 µm. When the electrode is positioned with the micrometer precision against a selected cell, a focused and highly-localized micro-plasma discharge induces apoptosis in the selected individual HepG2 and HeLa cancer cells only, without affecting any surrounding cells, even in small cell clusters. This is confirmed by the real-time monitoring of the morphological and structural changes at the cellular and cell nucleus levels after the plasma exposure. PMID:24971517

  20. Direct chromosome-length haplotyping by single-cell sequencing.

    PubMed

    Porubský, David; Sanders, Ashley D; van Wietmarschen, Niek; Falconer, Ester; Hills, Mark; Spierings, Diana C J; Bevova, Marianna R; Guryev, Victor; Lansdorp, Peter M

    2016-11-01

    Haplotypes are fundamental to fully characterize the diploid genome of an individual, yet methods to directly chart the unique genetic makeup of each parental chromosome are lacking. Here we introduce single-cell DNA template strand sequencing (Strand-seq) as a novel approach to phasing diploid genomes along the entire length of all chromosomes. We demonstrate this by building a complete haplotype for a HapMap individual (NA12878) at high accuracy (concordance 99.3%), without using generational information or statistical inference. By use of this approach, we mapped all meiotic recombination events in a family trio with high resolution (median range ∼14 kb) and phased larger structural variants like deletions, indels, and balanced rearrangements like inversions. Lastly, the single-cell resolution of Strand-seq allowed us to observe loss of heterozygosity regions in a small number of cells, a significant advantage for studies of heterogeneous cell populations, such as cancer cells. We conclude that Strand-seq is a unique and powerful approach to completely phase individual genomes and map inheritance patterns in families, while preserving haplotype differences between single cells.

  1. Microfluidics-Based Single-Cell Functional Proteomics for Fundamental and Applied Biomedical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jing; Zhou, Jing; Sutherland, Alex; Wei, Wei; Shin, Young Shik; Xue, Min; Heath, James R.

    2014-06-01

    We review an emerging microfluidics-based toolkit for single-cell functional proteomics. Functional proteins include, but are not limited to, the secreted signaling proteins that can reflect the biological behaviors of immune cells or the intracellular phosphoproteins associated with growth factor-stimulated signaling networks. Advantages of the microfluidics platforms are multiple. First, 20 or more functional proteins may be assayed simultaneously from statistical numbers of single cells. Second, cell behaviors (e.g., motility) may be correlated with protein assays. Third, extensions to quantized cell populations can permit measurements of cell-cell interactions. Fourth, rare cells can be functionally identified and then separated for further analysis or culturing. Finally, certain assay types can provide a conduit between biology and the physicochemical laws. We discuss the history and challenges of the field then review design concepts and uses of the microchip platforms that have been reported, with an eye toward biomedical applications. We then look to the future of the field.

  2. Microfluidics-based single-cell functional proteomics for fundamental and applied biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing; Zhou, Jing; Sutherland, Alex; Wei, Wei; Shin, Young Shik; Xue, Min; Heath, James R

    2014-01-01

    We review an emerging microfluidics-based toolkit for single-cell functional proteomics. Functional proteins include, but are not limited to, the secreted signaling proteins that can reflect the biological behaviors of immune cells or the intracellular phosphoproteins associated with growth factor-stimulated signaling networks. Advantages of the microfluidics platforms are multiple. First, 20 or more functional proteins may be assayed simultaneously from statistical numbers of single cells. Second, cell behaviors (e.g., motility) may be correlated with protein assays. Third, extensions to quantized cell populations can permit measurements of cell-cell interactions. Fourth, rare cells can be functionally identified and then separated for further analysis or culturing. Finally, certain assay types can provide a conduit between biology and the physicochemical laws. We discuss the history and challenges of the field then review design concepts and uses of the microchip platforms that have been reported, with an eye toward biomedical applications. We then look to the future of the field.

  3. Single-cell analyses of transcriptional heterogeneity in squamous cell carcinoma of urinary bladder

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yong; Xu, Liqin; Li, Weidong; Zou, Zhihui; Liu, Chunxiao; Xu, Abai; Wu, Song

    2016-01-01

    Cell-to-cell expression heterogeneity within a single tumor is a common phenotype among various cancer types including squamous cell carcinoma. To further study the fundamentals and importance of heterogeneity of cell functions and its potential mechanisms, we performed single-cell RNA-seq (scRNA-seq) on human squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder (SCCB) and its corresponding physiologically normal epithelia. Extensive differentially expressed genes were uncovered by comparing cancer and normal single cells, which were preferentially enriched in cancer-correlated pathways, such as p53 signaling and bladder cancer pathway. Furthermore, the most diversely expressed genes were particularly enriched in MAPK signaling pathway, such as CACNG4, CACNA1E and CACNA1H, which involve in cancer evolution and heterogeneity formation. Co-expression network and hub-gene analyses revealed several remarkable “hub genes” of each regulatory module. Some of them are cancer related, such as POU2F3, NKD1 and CYP2C8, while LINC00189, GCC2 and OR9Q1 genes are rarely reported in human diseases. The genes within an interesting module are highly correlated with others, which could be treated as potential targets for SCCB patients. Our findings have fundamental implications for SCCB biology and therapeutic strategies. PMID:27602771

  4. Resonant waveguide grating imagers for single cell analysis and high throughput screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Ye

    2015-08-01

    Resonant waveguide grating (RWG) systems illuminate an array of diffractive nanograting waveguide structures in microtiter plate to establish evanescent wave for measuring tiny changes in local refractive index arising from the dynamic mass redistribution of living cells upon stimulation. Whole-plate RWG imager enables high-throughput profiling and screening of drugs. Microfluidics RWG imager not only manifests distinct receptor signaling waves, but also differentiates long-acting agonism and antagonism. Spatially resolved RWG imager allows for single cell analysis including receptor signaling heterogeneity and the invasion of cancer cells in a spheroidal structure through 3-dimensional extracellular matrix. High frequency RWG imager permits real-time detection of drug-induced cardiotoxicity. The wide coverage in target, pathway, assay, and cell phenotype has made RWG systems powerful tool in both basic research and early drug discovery process.

  5. Development of Droplet Microfluidics Enabling High-Throughput Single-Cell Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wen, Na; Zhao, Zhan; Fan, Beiyuan; Chen, Deyong; Men, Dong; Wang, Junbo; Chen, Jian

    2016-07-05

    This article reviews recent developments in droplet microfluidics enabling high-throughput single-cell analysis. Five key aspects in this field are included in this review: (1) prototype demonstration of single-cell encapsulation in microfluidic droplets; (2) technical improvements of single-cell encapsulation in microfluidic droplets; (3) microfluidic droplets enabling single-cell proteomic analysis; (4) microfluidic droplets enabling single-cell genomic analysis; and (5) integrated microfluidic droplet systems enabling single-cell screening. We examine the advantages and limitations of each technique and discuss future research opportunities by focusing on key performances of throughput, multifunctionality, and absolute quantification.

  6. Serotonergic neuron regulation informed by in vivo single-cell transcriptomics

    PubMed Central

    Spaethling, Jennifer M.; Piel, David; Dueck, Hannah; Buckley, Peter T.; Morris, Jacqueline F.; Fisher, Stephen A.; Lee, JaeHee; Sul, Jai-Yoon; Kim, Junhyong; Bartfai, Tamas; Beck, Sheryl G.; Eberwine, James H.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the recognized importance of the dorsal raphe (DR) serotonergic (5-HT) nuclei in the pathophysiology of depression and anxiety, the molecular components/putative drug targets expressed by these neurons are poorly characterized. Utilizing the promoter of an ETS domain transcription factor that is a stable marker of 5-HT neurons (Pet-1) to drive 5-HT neuronal expression of YFP, we identified 5-HT neurons in live acute slices. We isolated RNA from single 5-HT neurons in the ventromedial and lateral wings of the DR and performed single-cell RNA-Seq analysis identifying >500 G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) including receptors for classical transmitters, lipid signals, and peptides as well as dozens of orphan-GPCRs. Using these data to inform our selection of receptors to assess, we found that oxytocin and lysophosphatidic acid 1 receptors are translated and active in costimulating, with the α1-adrenergic receptor, the firing of DR 5-HT neurons, while the effects of histamine are inhibitory and exerted at H3 histamine receptors. The inhibitory histamine response provides evidence for tonic in vivo histamine inhibition of 5-HT neurons. This study illustrates that unbiased single-cell transcriptomics coupled with functional analyses provides novel insights into how neurons and neuronal systems are regulated.—Spaethling, J. M., Piel, D., Dueck, H., Buckley, P. T., Morris, J. F., Fisher, S. A., Lee, J., Sul, J.-Y., Kim, J., Bartfai, T., Beck, S. G., Eberwine, J. H. Serotonergic neuron regulation informed by in vivo single-cell transcriptomics. PMID:24192459

  7. Bidirectional Promoter Engineering for Single Cell MicroRNA Sensors in Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Sladitschek, Hanna L; Neveu, Pierre A

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs have emerged as important markers and regulators of cell identity. Precise measurements of cellular miRNA levels rely traditionally on RNA extraction and thus do not allow to follow miRNA expression dynamics at the level of single cells. Non-invasive miRNA sensors present an ideal solution but they critically depend on the performance of suitable ubiquitous promoters that reliably drive expression both in pluripotent and differentiated cell types. Here we describe the engineering of bidirectional promoters that drive the expression of precise ratiometric fluorescent miRNA sensors in single mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) and their differentiated derivatives. These promoters are based on combinations of the widely used CAG, EF1α and PGK promoters as well as the CMV and PGK enhancers. miR-142-3p, which is known to be bimodally expressed in mESCs, served as a model miRNA to gauge the precision of the sensors. The performance of the resulting miRNA sensors was assessed by flow cytometry in single stable transgenic mESCs undergoing self-renewal or differentiation. EF1α promoters arranged back-to-back failed to drive the robustly correlated expression of two transgenes. Back-to-back PGK promoters were shut down during mESC differentiation. However, we found that a back-to-back arrangement of CAG promoters with four CMV enhancers provided both robust expression in mESCs undergoing differentiation and the best signal-to-noise for measurement of miRNA activity in single cells among all the sensors we tested. Such a bidirectional promoter is therefore particularly well suited to study the dynamics of miRNA expression during cell fate transitions at the single cell level.

  8. Single Cell Adhesion Assay Using Computer Controlled Micropipette

    PubMed Central

    Salánki, Rita; Hős, Csaba; Orgovan, Norbert; Péter, Beatrix; Sándor, Noémi; Bajtay, Zsuzsa; Erdei, Anna; Horvath, Robert; Szabó, Bálint

    2014-01-01

    Cell adhesion is a fundamental phenomenon vital for all multicellular organisms. Recognition of and adhesion to specific macromolecules is a crucial task of leukocytes to initiate the immune response. To gain statistically reliable information of cell adhesion, large numbers of cells should be measured. However, direct measurement of the adhesion force of single cells is still challenging and today’s techniques typically have an extremely low throughput (5–10 cells per day). Here, we introduce a computer controlled micropipette mounted onto a normal inverted microscope for probing single cell interactions with specific macromolecules. We calculated the estimated hydrodynamic lifting force acting on target cells by the numerical simulation of the flow at the micropipette tip. The adhesion force of surface attached cells could be accurately probed by repeating the pick-up process with increasing vacuum applied in the pipette positioned above the cell under investigation. Using the introduced methodology hundreds of cells adhered to specific macromolecules were measured one by one in a relatively short period of time (∼30 min). We blocked nonspecific cell adhesion by the protein non-adhesive PLL-g-PEG polymer. We found that human primary monocytes are less adherent to fibrinogen than their in vitro differentiated descendants: macrophages and dendritic cells, the latter producing the highest average adhesion force. Validation of the here introduced method was achieved by the hydrostatic step-pressure micropipette manipulation technique. Additionally the result was reinforced in standard microfluidic shear stress channels. Nevertheless, automated micropipette gave higher sensitivity and less side-effect than the shear stress channel. Using our technique, the probed single cells can be easily picked up and further investigated by other techniques; a definite advantage of the computer controlled micropipette. Our experiments revealed the existence of a sub

  9. In situ single cell detection via microfluidic magnetic bead assay

    PubMed Central

    KC, Pawan; Zhang, Ge; Zhe, Jiang

    2017-01-01

    We present a single cell detection device based on magnetic bead assay and micro Coulter counters. This device consists of two successive micro Coulter counters, coupled with a high gradient magnetic field generated by an external magnet. The device can identify single cells in terms of the transit time difference of the cell through the two micro Coulter counters. Target cells are conjugated with magnetic beads via specific antibody and antigen binding. A target cell traveling through the two Coulter counters interacts with the magnetic field, and have a longer transit time at the 1st counter than that at the 2nd counter. In comparison, a non-target cell has no interaction with the magnetic field, and hence has nearly the same transit times through the two counters. Each cell passing through the two counters generates two consecutive voltage pulses one after the other; the pulse widths and magnitudes indicating the cell’s transit times through the counters and the cell’s size respectively. Thus, by measuring the pulse widths (transit times) of each cell through the two counters, each single target cell can be differentiated from non-target cells even if they have similar sizes. We experimentally proved that the target human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and non-target rat adipose-derived stem cells (rASCs) have significant different transit time distribution, from which we can determine the recognition regions for both cell groups quantitatively. We further demonstrated that within a mixed cell population of rASCs and HUVECs, HUVECs can be detected in situ and the measured HUVECs ratios agree well with the pre-set ratios. With the simple device structure and easy sample preparation, this method is expected to enable single cell detection in a continuous flow and can be applied to facilitate general cell detection applications such as stem cell identification and enumeration. PMID:28222140

  10. Single cell adhesion assay using computer controlled micropipette.

    PubMed

    Salánki, Rita; Hős, Csaba; Orgovan, Norbert; Péter, Beatrix; Sándor, Noémi; Bajtay, Zsuzsa; Erdei, Anna; Horvath, Robert; Szabó, Bálint

    2014-01-01

    Cell adhesion is a fundamental phenomenon vital for all multicellular organisms. Recognition of and adhesion to specific macromolecules is a crucial task of leukocytes to initiate the immune response. To gain statistically reliable information of cell adhesion, large numbers of cells should be measured. However, direct measurement of the adhesion force of single cells is still challenging and today's techniques typically have an extremely low throughput (5-10 cells per day). Here, we introduce a computer controlled micropipette mounted onto a normal inverted microscope for probing single cell interactions with specific macromolecules. We calculated the estimated hydrodynamic lifting force acting on target cells by the numerical simulation of the flow at the micropipette tip. The adhesion force of surface attached cells could be accurately probed by repeating the pick-up process with increasing vacuum applied in the pipette positioned above the cell under investigation. Using the introduced methodology hundreds of cells adhered to specific macromolecules were measured one by one in a relatively short period of time (∼30 min). We blocked nonspecific cell adhesion by the protein non-adhesive PLL-g-PEG polymer. We found that human primary monocytes are less adherent to fibrinogen than their in vitro differentiated descendants: macrophages and dendritic cells, the latter producing the highest average adhesion force. Validation of the here introduced method was achieved by the hydrostatic step-pressure micropipette manipulation technique. Additionally the result was reinforced in standard microfluidic shear stress channels. Nevertheless, automated micropipette gave higher sensitivity and less side-effect than the shear stress channel. Using our technique, the probed single cells can be easily picked up and further investigated by other techniques; a definite advantage of the computer controlled micropipette. Our experiments revealed the existence of a sub-population of

  11. Single cell array impedance analysis in a microfluidic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altinagac, Emre; Taskin, Selen; Kizil, Huseyin

    2016-10-01

    Impedance analysis of single cells is presented in this paper. Following the separation of a target cell type by dielectrophoresis in our previous work, this paper focuses on capturing the cells as a single array and performing impedance analysis to point out the signature difference between each cell type. Lab-on-a-chip devices having a titanium interdigitated electrode layer on a glass substrate and a PDMS microchannel are fabricated to capture each cell in a single form and perform impedance analysis. HCT116 (homosapiens colon colorectal carcin) and HEK293 (human embryonic kidney) cells are used in our experiments.

  12. Single cell analytic tools for drug discovery and development

    PubMed Central

    Heath, James R.; Ribas, Antoni; Mischel, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    The genetic, functional, or compositional heterogeneity of healthy and diseased tissues presents major challenges in drug discovery and development.1-3 In cancers, heterogeneity may be essential for tumor stability,4 but its precise role in tumor biology is poorly resolved. This challenges the design of accurate disease models for use in drug development, and can confound the interpretation of biomarker levels, and of patient responses to specific therapies. The complex nature of heterogeneous tissues has motivated the development of tools for single cell genomic, transcriptomic, and multiplex proteomic analysis. We review these tools, assess their advantages and limitations, and explore their potential applications in drug discovery and development. PMID:26669673

  13. TOPAZ-2 single-cell TFE electric insulation properties study

    SciTech Connect

    Vasilchenko, A.V.; Izhvanov, O.L.

    1996-03-01

    TOPAZ-II single cell thermoinic fuel element (TFE) electric insulation parameters under testing with electric heating were measured. TFE electric design schematic, experimental procedure and measurements results are described. Collector resistance was measured in helium at 420{endash}890 K. Metal ceramic ceals insulation properties were measured in vacuum P=10{sup {minus}4} Pa and in cesium vapor P=10{sup {minus}1}{minus}260 Pa, at 420{endash}730 K. Results of separate TFE are compared with the data; that were measured during nuclear power system (NPS) Ya-21U test. Based upon this data NPS power losses were estimated. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Single-cell sequencing of the small-RNA transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Faridani, Omid R; Abdullayev, Ilgar; Hagemann-Jensen, Michael; Schell, John P; Lanner, Fredrik; Sandberg, Rickard

    2016-12-01

    Little is known about the heterogeneity of small-RNA expression as small-RNA profiling has so far required large numbers of cells. Here we present a single-cell method for small-RNA sequencing and apply it to naive and primed human embryonic stem cells and cancer cells. Analysis of microRNAs and fragments of tRNAs and small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) reveals the potential of microRNAs as markers for different cell types and states.

  15. Impaired mouse mammary gland growth and development is mediated by melatonin and its MT1G protein-coupled receptor via repression of ERα, Akt1, and Stat5.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Shulin; Mao, Lulu; Yuan, Lin; Duplessis, Tamika; Jones, Frank; Hoyle, Gary W; Frasch, Tripp; Dauchy, Robert; Blask, David E; Chakravarty, Geetika; Hill, Steven M

    2012-10-01

    To determine whether melatonin, via its MT(1)  G protein-coupled receptor, impacts mouse mammary gland development, we generated a mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV)-MT1-Flag-mammary gland over-expressing (MT1-mOE) transgenic mouse. Increased expression of the MT(1) -Flag transgene was observed in the mammary glands of pubescent MT1-mOE transgenic female mice, with further significant increases during pregnancy and lactation. Mammary gland whole mounts from MT1-mOE mice showed significant reductions in ductal growth, ductal branching, and terminal end bud formation. Elevated MT(1) receptor expression in pregnant and lactating female MT1-mOE mice was associated with reduced lobulo-alveolar development, inhibition of mammary epithelial cell proliferation, and significant reductions in body weights of suckling pups. Elevated MT(1) expression in pregnant and lactating MT1-mOE mice correlated with reduced mammary gland expression of Akt1, phospho-Stat5, Wnt4, estrogen receptor alpha, progesterone receptors A and B, and milk proteins β-casein and whey acidic protein. Estrogen- and progesterone-stimulated mammary gland development was repressed by elevated MT(1) receptor expression and exogenous melatonin administration. These studies demonstrate that the MT(1) melatonin receptor and its ligand melatonin play an important regulatory role in mammary gland development and lactation in mice through both growth suppression and alteration of developmental paradigms.

  16. 3,3'-Diindolylmethane Inhibits Flt3L/GM-CSF-induced-bone Marrow-derived CD103+ Dendritic Cell Differentiation Regulating Phosphorylation of STAT3 and STAT5

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ah-Jeong; Kim, Soo-Ji; Jeong, So-Yeon

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal immune system maintains oral tolerance to harmless antigens or nutrients. One mechanism of oral tolerance is mediated by regulatory T cell (Treg)s, of which differentiation is regulated by a subset of dendritic cell (DC)s, primarily CD103+ DCs. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a ligand-activated transcription factor, plays an important role in regulating immunity. The intestines are exposed to various AhR ligands, including endogenous metabolites and phytochemicals. It was previously reported that AhR activation induced tolerogenic DCs in mice or in cultures of bone marrow-derived DCs. However, given the variety of tolerogenic DCs, which type of tolerogenic DCs is regulated by AhR remains unknown. In this study, we found that AhR ligand 3,3'-diindolylmethane (DIM) inhibited the development of CD103+ DCs from mouse bone marrow cells stimulated with Flt3L and GM-CSF. DIM interfered with phosphorylation of STAT3 and STAT5 inhibiting the expression of genes, including Id2, E2-2, IDO-1, and Aldh1a2, which are associated with DC differentiation and functions. Finally, DIM suppressed the ability of CD103+ DCs to induce Foxp3+ Tregs. PMID:26770182

  17. Hypothyroidism decreases JAK/STAT signaling pathway in lactating rat mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Campo Verde Arboccó, Fiorella; Persia, Fabio Andres; Hapon, María Belén; Jahn, Graciela A

    2017-04-05

    Thyroid pathologies have deleterious effects on lactation. Especially hypothyroidism (HypoT) induces premature mammary involution at the end of lactation and decreases milk production and quality in mid lactation. Milk synthesis is controlled by JAK2/STAT5 signaling pathway and prolactin (PRL), which activates the pathway. In this work we analyzed the effect of chronic 6-propyl-2- thiouracil (PTU)-induced HypoT on PRL signaling pathway on mammary glands from rats on lactation (L) days 2, 7 and 14. HypoT decreased prolactin receptor expression, and expression and activation of Stat5a/b protein. Expression of members of the SOCS-CIS family, inhibitors of the JAK-STAT pathway, decreased in L2 and L7, possibly as a compensatory response of the mammary cells to maintain PRL responsiveness. However, on L14, the level of these inhibitors was normal and the transcription of α-lactoalbumin (lalba), a target gene of the PRL pathway, decreased by half. HypoT altered the transcriptional capacity of the cell and decreased mRNA levels of Prlr and Stat5b on L14. Stat5b gene has functional thyroid hormone response elements in the regulatory regions, that bind thyroid hormone receptor β (TRβ) differentially and in a thyroid hormone dependent manner. The overall decrease in the PRL signaling pathway and consequently in target gene (lalba) mRNA transcription explain the profound negative impact of HypoT on mammary function through lactation.

  18. A method for high-throughput functional imaging of single cells within heterogeneous cell preparations

    PubMed Central

    Neal, Adam S.; Rountree, Austin M.; Radtke, Jared R.; Yin, Jianzhu; Schwartz, Michael W.; Hampe, Christiane S.; Posner, Jonathan D.; Cirulli, Vincenzo; Sweet, Ian R.

    2016-01-01

    Functional characterization of individual cells within heterogeneous tissue preparations is challenging. Here, we report the development of a versatile imaging method that assesses single cell responses of various endpoints in real time, while identifying the individual cell types. Endpoints that can be measured include (but are not limited to) ionic flux (calcium, sodium, potassium and hydrogen), metabolic responsiveness (NAD(P)H, mitochondrial membrane potential), and signal transduction (H2O2 and cAMP). Subsequent to fluorescent imaging, identification of cell types using immunohistochemistry allows for mapping of cell type to their respective functional real time responses. To validate the utility of this method, NAD(P)H responses to glucose of islet alpha versus beta cells generated from dispersed pancreatic islets, followed by the construction of frequency distributions characterizing the variability in the magnitude of each individual cell responses were compared. As expected, no overlap between the glucose response frequency distributions for beta cells versus alpha cells was observed, thereby establishing both the high degree of fidelity and low rate of both false-negatives and false-positives in this approach. This novel method has the ability not only to resolve single cell level functional differences between cell types, but also to characterize functional heterogeneity within a given cell type. PMID:27982116

  19. Time-Resolved Study of Nanoparticle Induced Apoptosis Using Microfabricated Single Cell Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Röttgermann, Peter J. F.; Dawson, Kenneth A.; Rädler, Joachim O.

    2016-01-01

    Cell fate decisions like apoptosis are heterogeneously implemented within a cell population and, consequently, the population response is recognized as sum of many individual dynamic events. Here, we report on the use of micro-patterned single-cell arrays for real-time tracking of nanoparticle-induced (NP) cell death in sets of thousands of cells in parallel. Annexin (pSIVA) and propidium iodide (PI), two fluorescent indicators of apoptosis, are simultaneously monitored after exposure to functionalized polystyrene (PS−NH2) nanobeads as a model system. We find that the distribution of Annexin onset times shifts to later times and broadens as a function of decreasing NP dose. We discuss the mean time-to-death as a function of dose, and show how the EC50 value depends both on dose and time of measurement. In addition, the correlations between the early and late apoptotic markers indicate a systematic shift from apoptotic towards necrotic cell death during the course of the experiment. Thus, our work demonstrates the potential of array-based single cell cytometry for kinetic analysis of signaling cascades in a high-throughput format. PMID:27600074

  20. Fluorescence emission spectral shift measurements of membrane potential in single cells.

    PubMed

    Kao, W Y; Davis, C E; Kim, Y I; Beach, J M

    2001-08-01

    Previous measurements of transmembrane potential using the electrochromic probe di-8-ANEPPS have used the excitation spectral shift response by alternating excitation between two wavelengths centered at voltage-sensitive portions of the excitation spectrum and recording at a single wavelength near the peak of the emission spectrum. Recently, the emission spectral shift associated with the change in transmembrane potential has been used for continuous membrane potential monitoring. To characterize this form of the electrochromic response from di-8-ANEPPS, we have obtained fluorescence signals from single cells in response to step changes in transmembrane potentials set with a patch electrode, using single wavelength excitation near the peak of the dye absorption spectrum. Fluorescence changes at two wavelengths near voltage-sensitive portions of the emission spectrum and shifts in the complete emission spectrum were determined for emission from plasma membrane and internal membrane. We found that the fluorescence ratio from either dual-wavelength recordings, or from opposite sides of the emission spectrum, varied linearly with the amplitude of the transmembrane potential step between -80 and +60 mV. Voltage dependence of difference spectra exhibit a crossover point near the peak of the emission spectra with approximately equal gain and loss of fluorescence intensity on each side of the spectrum and equal response amplitude for depolarization and hyperpolarization. These results are consistent with an electrochromic mechanism of action and demonstrate how the emission spectral shift response can be used to measure the transmembrane potential in single cells.

  1. Emerging methods to study bacteriophage infection at the single-cell level.

    PubMed

    Dang, Vinh T; Sullivan, Matthew B

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria and their viruses (phages) are abundant across diverse ecosystems and their interactions influence global biogeochemical cycles and incidence of disease. Problematically, both classical and metagenomic methods insufficiently assess the host specificity of phages and phage-host infection dynamics in nature. Here we review emerging methods to study phage-host interaction and infection dynamics with a focus on those that offer resolution at the single-cell level. These methods leverage ever-increasing sequence data to identify virus signals from single-cell amplified genome datasets or to produce primers/probes to target particular phage-bacteria pairs (digital PCR and phageFISH), even in complex communities. All three methods enable study of phage infection of uncultured bacteria from environmental samples, while the latter also discriminates between phage-host interaction outcomes (e.g., lytic, chronic, lysogenic) in model systems. Together these techniques enable quantitative, spatiotemporal studies of phage-bacteria interactions from environmental samples of any ecosystem, which will help elucidate and predict the ecological and evolutionary impacts of specific phage-host pairings in nature.

  2. Sparse Regression Based Structure Learning of Stochastic Reaction Networks from Single Cell Snapshot Time Series

    PubMed Central

    Ganscha, Stefan; Claassen, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Stochastic chemical reaction networks constitute a model class to quantitatively describe dynamics and cell-to-cell variability in biological systems. The topology of these networks typically is only partially characterized due to experimental limitations. Current approaches for refining network topology are based on the explicit enumeration of alternative topologies and are therefore restricted to small problem instances with almost complete knowledge. We propose the reactionet lasso, a computational procedure that derives a stepwise sparse regression approach on the basis of the Chemical Master Equation, enabling large-scale structure learning for reaction networks by implicitly accounting for billions of topology variants. We have assessed the structure learning capabilities of the reactionet lasso on synthetic data for the complete TRAIL induced apoptosis signaling cascade comprising 70 reactions. We find that the reactionet lasso is able to efficiently recover the structure of these reaction systems, ab initio, with high sensitivity and specificity. With only < 1% false discoveries, the reactionet lasso is able to recover 45% of all true reactions ab initio among > 6000 possible reactions and over 102000 network topologies. In conjunction with information rich single cell technologies such as single cell RNA sequencing or mass cytometry, the reactionet lasso will enable large-scale structure learning, particularly in areas with partial network structure knowledge, such as cancer biology, and thereby enable the detection of pathological alterations of reaction networks. We provide software to allow for wide applicability of the reactionet lasso. PMID:27923064

  3. Single-cell analysis and sorting using droplet-based microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Mazutis, Linas; Gilbert, John; Ung, W Lloyd; Weitz, David A; Griffiths, Andrew D; Heyman, John A

    2014-01-01

    We present a droplet-based microfluidics protocol for high-throughput analysis and sorting of single cells. compartmentalization of single cells in droplets enables the analysis of proteins released from or secreted by cells, thereby overcoming one of the major limitations of traditional flow cytometry and fluorescence-activated cell sorting. as an example of this approach, we detail a binding assay for detecting antibodies secreted from single mouse hybridoma cells. secreted antibodies are detected after only 15 min by co-compartmentalizing single mouse hybridoma cells, a fluorescent probe and single beads coated with anti-mouse IgG antibodies in 50-pl droplets. the beads capture the secreted antibodies and, when the captured antibodies bind to the probe, the fluorescence becomes localized on the beads, generating a clearly distinguishable fluorescence signal that enables droplet sorting at ~200 Hz as well as cell enrichment. the microfluidic system described is easily adapted for screening other intracellular, cell-surface or secreted proteins and for quantifying catalytic or regulatory activities. In order to screen ~1 million cells, the microfluidic operations require 2–6 h; the entire process, including preparation of microfluidic devices and mammalian cells, requires 5–7 d. PMID:23558786

  4. 2D light scattering static cytometry for label-free single cell analysis with submicron resolution.

    PubMed

    Xie, Linyan; Yang, Yan; Sun, Xuming; Qiao, Xu; Liu, Qiao; Song, Kun; Kong, Beihua; Su, Xuantao

    2015-11-01

    Conventional optical cytometric techniques usually measure fluorescence or scattering signals at fixed angles from flowing cells in a liquid stream. Here we develop a novel cytometer that employs a scanning optical fiber to illuminate single static cells on a glass slide, which requires neither microfluidic fabrication nor flow control. This static cytometric technique measures two dimensional (2D) light scattering patterns via a small numerical aperture (0.25) microscope objective for label-free single cell analysis. Good agreement is obtained between the yeast cell experimental and Mie theory simulated patterns. It is demonstrated that the static cytometer with a microscope objective of a low resolution around 1.30 μm has the potential to perform high resolution analysis on yeast cells with distributed sizes. The capability of the static cytometer for size determination with submicron resolution is validated via measurements on standard microspheres with mean diameters of 3.87 and 4.19 μm. Our 2D light scattering static cytometric technique may provide an easy-to-use, label-free, and flow-free method for single cell diagnostics.

  5. High-content single-cell analysis on-chip using a laser microarray scanner.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jing; Wu, Yu; Lee, Sang-Kwon; Fan, Rong

    2012-12-07

    High-content cellomic analysis is a powerful tool for rapid screening of cellular responses to extracellular cues and examination of intracellular signal transduction pathways at the single-cell level. In conjunction with microfluidics technology that provides unique advantages in sample processing and precise control of fluid delivery, it holds great potential to transform lab-on-a-chip systems for high-throughput cellular analysis. However, high-content imaging instruments are expensive, sophisticated, and not readily accessible. Herein, we report on a laser scanning cytometry approach that exploits a bench-top microarray scanner as an end-point reader to perform rapid and automated fluorescence imaging of cells cultured on a chip. Using high-content imaging analysis algorithms, we demonstrated multiplexed measurements of morphometric and proteomic parameters from all single cells. Our approach shows the improvement of both sensitivity and dynamic range by two orders of magnitude as compared to conventional epifluorescence microscopy. We applied this technology to high-throughput analysis of mesenchymal stem cells on an extracellular matrix protein array and characterization of heterotypic cell populations. This work demonstrates the feasibility of a laser microarray scanner for high-content cellomic analysis and opens up new opportunities to conduct informative cellular analysis and cell-based screening in the lab-on-a-chip systems.

  6. Deciphering the Receptor Repertoire Encoding Specific Odorants by Time-Lapse Single-Cell Array Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Masato; Yoshimoto, Nobuo; Shimono, Ken; Kuroda, Shun’ichi

    2016-01-01

    Mammals can recognize a vast number of odorants by using olfactory receptors (ORs) known as G protein-coupled receptors. The OR gene family is one of the most diverse gene families in mammalian genomes. Because of the vast combinations of ORs and odorants, few ORs have thus far been linked to specific odorants. Here, we established a functional screening method for OR genes by using a microchamber array containing >5,400 single olfactory epithelium-derived cells from mice applied to time-lapse single-cell array cytometry. This method facilitated the prompt isolation of single olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) responding to the odorant of interest. Subsequent single-cell RT-PCR allowed us to isolate the genes encoding respective ORs. By using volatile molecules recognized as biomarkers for lung cancers, this method could deorphanize ORs and thereby reconstitute the OR-mediated signaling cascade in HEK293T cells. Thus, our system could be applied to identify any receptor by using specific ligands in the fields of physiopathology and pharmacology. PMID:26832639

  7. Emerging methods to study bacteriophage infection at the single-cell level

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Vinh T.; Sullivan, Matthew B.

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria and their viruses (phages) are abundant across diverse ecosystems and their interactions influence global biogeochemical cycles and incidence of disease. Problematically, both classical and metagenomic methods insufficiently assess the host specificity of phages and phage–host infection dynamics in nature. Here we review emerging methods to study phage–host interaction and infection dynamics with a focus on those that offer resolution at the single-cell level. These methods leverage ever-increasing sequence data to identify virus signals from single-cell amplified genome datasets or to produce primers/probes to target particular phage–bacteria pairs (digital PCR and phageFISH), even in complex communities. All three methods enable study of phage infection of uncultured bacteria from environmental samples, while the latter also discriminates between phage–host interaction outcomes (e.g., lytic, chronic, lysogenic) in model systems. Together these techniques enable quantitative, spatiotemporal studies of phage–bacteria interactions from environmental samples of any ecosystem, which will help elucidate and predict the ecological and evolutionary impacts of specific phage–host pairings in nature. PMID:25566233

  8. Single cell transcriptome analysis reveals dynamic changes in lncRNA expression during reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Daniel H.; Marinov, Georgi K.; Pepke, Shirley; Singer, Zakary S.; He, Peng; Williams, Brian; Schroth, Gary P.; Elowitz, Michael B.; Wold, Barbara J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Cellular reprogramming highlights the epigenetic plasticity of the somatic cell state. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerging roles in epigenetic regulation, but their potential functions in reprogramming cell fate have been largely unexplored. We used single-cell RNA sequencing to characterize the expression patterns of over 16,000 genes, including 437 lncRNAs, during defined stages of reprogramming to pluripotency. Self-organizing maps (SOMs) were used as an intuitive way to structure and interrogate transcriptome data at the single-cell level. Early molecular events during reprogramming involved the activation of Ras signaling pathways, along with hundreds of lncRNAs. Loss-of-function studies showed that activated lncRNAs can repress lineage-specific genes, while lncRNAs activated in multiple reprogramming cell types can regulate metabolic gene expression. Our findings demonstrate that reprogramming cells activate defined sets of functionally relevant lncRNAs and provide a resource to further investigate how dynamic changes in the transcriptome reprogram cell state. PMID:25575081

  9. High-content analysis of single cells directly assembled on CMOS sensor based on color imaging.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Saeki, Tatsuya; Sunaga, Yoshihiko; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2010-12-15

    A complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor was applied to high-content analysis of single cells which were assembled closely or directly onto the CMOS sensor surface. The direct assembling of cell groups on CMOS sensor surface allows large-field (6.66 mm×5.32 mm in entire active area of CMOS sensor) imaging within a second. Trypan blue-stained and non-stained cells in the same field area on the CMOS sensor were successfully distinguished as white- and blue-colored images under white LED light irradiation. Furthermore, the chemiluminescent signals of each cell were successfully visualized as blue-colored images on CMOS sensor only when HeLa cells were placed directly on the micro-lens array of the CMOS sensor. Our proposed approach will be a promising technique for real-time and high-content analysis of single cells in a large-field area based on color imaging.

  10. RF Breakdown in Normal Conducting Single-Cell Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgashev, V.A.; Nantista, C.D.; Tantawi, S.G.; Higashi, Y.; Higo, T.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2006-02-22

    Operating accelerating gradient in normal conducting accelerating structures is often limited by rf breakdown. The limit depends on multiple parameters, including input rf power, rf circuit, cavity shape and material. Experimental and theoretical study of the effects of these parameters on the breakdown limit in full scale structures is difficult and costly. We use 11.4 GHz single-cell traveling wave and standing wave accelerating structures for experiments and modeling of rf breakdown behavior. These test structures are designed so that the electromagnetic fields in one cell mimic the fields in prototype multicell structures for the X-band linear collider. Fields elsewhere in the test structures are significantly lower than that of the single cell. The setup uses matched mode converters that launch the circular TM{sub 01} mode into short test structures. The test structures are connected to the mode launchers with vacuum rf flanges. This setup allows economic testing of different cell geometries, cell materials and preparation techniques with short turn-around time. Simple 2D geometry of the test structures simplifies modeling of the breakdown currents and their thermal effects.

  11. Comparative studies on performance of single cell and PEMFC stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onggo, Holia; Irmawati, Yuyun; Yudianti, Rike

    2016-02-01

    Single-cell, 2-cell and 3-cell of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) with an active area of 9 cm2 per cell have been fabricated and characterized its performance and electrochemical properties. The membrane electrode assembly (MEA) was prepared by hot pressing commercial gas diffusion electrodes (Pt loading 0.5 mg/cm2) on pre-treated Nafion 117 membrane. The experimental results are presented as polarization and power output curves which show the effects of varying H2/O2 back pressures on the PEMFC performance. Three varying H2/O2 volumetric flow-rates for three different cell stacks were employed based on the optimal condition to produce good performance of stack. Cell performances for single cell, 2-cell, or 3-cell PEMFCs are slightly comparable with the power output 1.2 - 1.3 W in average. Enhancing back pressure induces increasing performance PEMFCs as indicated by changing the power from 1.19 W (open end) to 1.33W (15 psi).

  12. In vivo lipidomics using single-cell Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Huawen; Volponi, Joanne V.; Oliver, Ann E.; Parikh, Atul N.; Simmons, Blake A.; Singh, Seema

    2011-01-01

    We describe a method for direct, quantitative, in vivo lipid profiling of oil-producing microalgae using single-cell laser-trapping Raman spectroscopy. This approach is demonstrated in the quantitative determination of the degree of unsaturation and transition temperatures of constituent lipids within microalgae. These properties are important markers for determining engine compatibility and performance metrics of algal biodiesel. We show that these factors can be directly measured from a single living microalgal cell held in place with an optical trap while simultaneously collecting Raman data. Cellular response to different growth conditions is monitored in real time. Our approach circumvents the need for lipid extraction and analysis that is both slow and invasive. Furthermore, this technique yields real-time chemical information in a label-free manner, thus eliminating the limitations of impermeability, toxicity, and specificity of the fluorescent probes common in currently used protocols. Although the single-cell Raman spectroscopy demonstrated here is focused on the study of the microalgal lipids with biofuel applications, the analytical capability and quantitation algorithms demonstrated are applicable to many different organisms and should prove useful for a diverse range of applications in lipidomics. PMID:21310969

  13. Single-cell analysis of endothelial morphogenesis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jianxin A; Castranova, Daniel; Pham, Van N; Weinstein, Brant M

    2015-09-01

    Vessel formation has been extensively studied at the tissue level, but the difficulty in imaging the endothelium with cellular resolution has hampered study of the morphogenesis and behavior of endothelial cells (ECs) in vivo. We are using endothelial-specific transgenes and high-resolution imaging to examine single ECs in zebrafish. By generating mosaics with transgenes that simultaneously mark endothelial nuclei and membranes we are able to definitively identify and study the morphology and behavior of individual ECs during vessel sprouting and lumen formation. Using these methods, we show that developing trunk vessels are composed of ECs of varying morphology, and that single-cell analysis can be used to quantitate alterations in morphology and dynamics in ECs that are defective in proper guidance and patterning. Finally, we use single-cell analysis of intersegmental vessels undergoing lumen formation to demonstrate the coexistence of seamless transcellular lumens and single or multicellular enclosed lumens with autocellular or intercellular junctions, suggesting that heterogeneous mechanisms contribute to vascular lumen formation in vivo. The tools that we have developed for single EC analysis should facilitate further rigorous qualitative and quantitative analysis of EC morphology and behavior in vivo.

  14. Single-cell force spectroscopy of pili-mediated adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullan, Ruby May A.; Beaussart, Audrey; Tripathi, Prachi; Derclaye, Sylvie; El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Li, James K.; Schneider, Yves-Jacques; Vanderleyden, Jos; Lebeer, Sarah; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2013-12-01

    Although bacterial pili are known to mediate cell adhesion to a variety of substrates, the molecular interactions behind this process are poorly understood. We report the direct measurement of the forces guiding pili-mediated adhesion, focusing on the medically important probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG). Using non-invasive single-cell force spectroscopy (SCFS), we quantify the adhesion forces between individual bacteria and biotic (mucin, intestinal cells) or abiotic (hydrophobic monolayers) surfaces. On hydrophobic surfaces, bacterial pili strengthen adhesion through remarkable nanospring properties, which - presumably - enable the bacteria to resist high shear forces under physiological conditions. On mucin, nanosprings are more frequent and adhesion forces larger, reflecting the influence of specific pili-mucin bonds. Interestingly, these mechanical responses are no longer observed on human intestinal Caco-2 cells. Rather, force curves exhibit constant force plateaus with extended ruptures reflecting the extraction of membrane nanotethers. These single-cell analyses provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms by which piliated bacteria colonize surfaces (nanosprings, nanotethers), and offer exciting avenues in nanomedicine for understanding and controlling the adhesion of microbial cells (probiotics, pathogens).

  15. Current Developments in Prokaryotic Single Cell Whole Genome Amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Goudeau, Danielle; Nath, Nandita; Ciobanu, Doina; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Malmstrom, Rex

    2014-03-14

    Our approach to prokaryotic single-cell Whole Genome Amplification at the JGI continues to evolve. To increase both the quality and number of single-cell genomes produced, we explore all aspects of the process from cell sorting to sequencing. For example, we now utilize specialized reagents, acoustic liquid handling, and reduced reaction volumes eliminate non-target DNA contamination in WGA reactions. More specifically, we use a cleaner commercial WGA kit from Qiagen that employs a UV decontamination procedure initially developed at the JGI, and we use the Labcyte Echo for tip-less liquid transfer to set up 2uL reactions. Acoustic liquid handling also dramatically reduces reagent costs. In addition, we are exploring new cell lysis methods including treatment with Proteinase K, lysozyme, and other detergents, in order to complement standard alkaline lysis and allow for more efficient disruption of a wider range of cells. Incomplete lysis represents a major hurdle for WGA on some environmental samples, especially rhizosphere, peatland, and other soils. Finding effective lysis strategies that are also compatible with WGA is challenging, and we are currently assessing the impact of various strategies on genome recovery.

  16. Exploring Arabidopsis thaliana Root Endophytes via Single-Cell Genomics

    SciTech Connect

    Lundberg, Derek; Woyke, Tanja; Tringe, Susannah; Dangl, Jeff

    2014-03-19

    Land plants grow in association with microbial communities both on their surfaces and inside the plant (endophytes). The relationships between microbes and their host can vary from pathogenic to mutualistic. Colonization of the endophyte compartment occurs in the presence of a sophisticated plant immune system, implying finely tuned discrimination of pathogens from mutualists and commensals. Despite the importance of the microbiome to the plant, relatively little is known about the specific interactions between plants and microbes, especially in the case of endophytes. The vast majority of microbes have not been grown in the lab, and thus one of the few ways of studying them is by examining their DNA. Although metagenomics is a powerful tool for examining microbial communities, its application to endophyte samples is technically difficult due to the presence of large amounts of host plant DNA in the sample. One method to address these difficulties is single-cell genomics where a single microbial cell is isolated from a sample, lysed, and its genome amplified by multiple displacement amplification (MDA) to produce enough DNA for genome sequencing. This produces a single-cell amplified genome (SAG). We have applied this technology to study the endophytic microbes in Arabidopsis thaliana roots. Extensive 16S gene profiling of the microbial communities in the roots of multiple inbred A. thaliana strains has identified 164 OTUs as being significantly enriched in all the root endophyte samples compared to their presence in bulk soil.

  17. Limitations of fitting angular scattering from single cells (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xing; Cannaday, Ashley E.; Berger, Andrew J.

    2016-04-01

    The literature contains several reports of Mie-like fits to angular-domain elastic scattering measurements from multiple cells or isolated mitochondria. In these studies, the sampling volume typically contains hundreds or thousands of mitochondria, allowing for the size distribution of mitochondria to be modeled as a smooth function, (e.g. Gaussian or log-normal) with a small number of free parameters. In the case of a single-cell volume containing significantly fewer mitochondria, the true size distribution will no longer be as smooth. Increasing the number of free parameters can lead to unstable fits, however, as the forward-directed angular scattering pattern from such a population illuminated with 785 nm light is a monotonically decaying radial function with few distinct features. Using simulations, we have investigated the limitations of modeling single-cell mitochondrial scattering using smooth population distributions of Mie scatterers. In different instances, the fidelity of the estimated size information can be limited by the number of organelles, the angular detection range, or the non-ideality of the data (both speckle and shot noise). We will describe the conditions under which each of these effects dominates. We will also discuss whether mean and standard deviation are the best sizes to report from such Mie modeling, or if there are other size parameters that have greater fidelity to the true, non-smooth size distributions.

  18. Tumour evolution inferred by single-cell sequencing.

    PubMed

    Navin, Nicholas; Kendall, Jude; Troge, Jennifer; Andrews, Peter; Rodgers, Linda; McIndoo, Jeanne; Cook, Kerry; Stepansky, Asya; Levy, Dan; Esposito, Diane; Muthuswamy, Lakshmi; Krasnitz, Alex; McCombie, W Richard; Hicks, James; Wigler, Michael

    2011-04-07

    Genomic analysis provides insights into the role of copy number variation in disease, but most methods are not designed to resolve mixed populations of cells. In tumours, where genetic heterogeneity is common, very important information may be lost that would be useful for reconstructing evolutionary history. Here we show that with flow-sorted nuclei, whole genome amplification and next generation sequencing we can accurately quantify genomic copy number within an individual nucleus. We apply single-nucleus sequencing to investigate tumour population structure and evolution in two human breast cancer cases. Analysis of 100 single cells from a polygenomic tumour revealed three distinct clonal subpopulations that probably represent sequential clonal expansions. Additional analysis of 100 single cells from a monogenomic primary tumour and its liver metastasis indicated that a single clonal expansion formed the primary tumour and seeded the metastasis. In both primary tumours, we also identified an unexpectedly abundant subpopulation of genetically diverse 'pseudodiploid' cells that do not travel to the metastatic site. In contrast to gradual models of tumour progression, our data indicate that tumours grow by punctuated clonal expansions with few persistent intermediates.

  19. Epiphyseal growth plate growth hormone receptor signaling is decreased in chronic kidney disease-related growth retardation.

    PubMed

    Troib, Ariel; Landau, Daniel; Kachko, Leonid; Rabkin, Ralph; Segev, Yael

    2013-11-01

    Linear growth retardation in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been ascribed to insensitivity to growth hormone. This resistance state has been attributed to impaired growth hormone signaling through the JAK2/STAT5 pathway in liver and skeletal muscle leading to reduced insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I). Here we determine whether systemic and growth plate alterations in growth hormone signaling contribute to CKD-induced linear growth retardation using partially nephrectomized and pair-fed control 20-day-old rats. Serum growth hormone did not change in rats with CKD, yet serum IGF-I levels were decreased and growth retarded. The tibial growth plate hypertrophic zone was wider and vascularization at the primary ossification center was reduced in CKD. This was associated with a decrease in growth plate vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA and immunostainable VEGF and IGF-I levels. Growth plate growth hormone receptor and STAT5 protein levels were unchanged, while JAK2 was reduced. Despite comparable growth hormone and growth hormone receptor levels in CKD and control rats, relative STAT5 phosphorylation was significantly depressed in CKD. Of note, the mRNA of SOCS2, an inhibitor of growth hormone signaling, was increased. Thus, linear growth impairment in CKD can in part be explained by impaired long bone growth plate growth hormone receptor signaling through the JAK2/STAT5 pathway, an abnormality that may be caused by an increase in SOCS2 expression.

  20. Effective detection of variation in single-cell transcriptomes using MATQ-seq.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Kuanwei; Cao, Wenjian; Niu, Yichi; Deng, Qing; Zong, Chenghang

    2017-03-01

    The quantification of transcriptional variation in single cells, particularly within the same cell population, is currently limited by the low sensitivity and high technical noise of single-cell RNA-seq assays. We report multiple annealing and dC-tailing-based quantitative single-cell RNA-seq (MATQ-seq), a highly sensitive and quantitative method for single-cell sequencing of total RNA. By systematically determining technical noise, we show that MATQ-seq captures genuine biological variation between whole transcriptomes of single cells.

  1. Preparation of Single Cell Suspensions from Mouse Aorta

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Desheng; Yin, Changjun; Mohanta, Sarajo K.; Weber, Christian; Habenicht, Andreas J. R.

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the arterial wall characterized by lipid deposition, plaque formation, and immune cell infiltration. Innate and adaptive immune cells infiltrate the artery during development of the disease. Moreover, advanced disease leads to formation of artery tertiary lymphoid organs in the adventitia (Grabner et al., 2009; Hu et al., 2015). Various and diverse types of immune cells have been identified in the aorta adventitia vs atherosclerotic plaques (Elewa et al., 2016; Galkina et al., 2006; Lotzer et al., 2010; Mohanta et al., 2016; Mohanta et al., 2014; Moos et al., 2005; Srikakulapu et al., 2016; Zhao et al., 2004). There are conflicting reports on the number and subtypes of immune cells in the aorta depending on the age of the animals, the protocol that is used to obtain single cell suspensions, and the dietary conditions of the mice (Campbell et al., 2012; Clement et al., 2015; Galkina et al., 2006; Kyaw et al., 2012). The number of immune cells in the aorta differs as much as tenfold using different protocols (Butcher et al., 2012; Galkina et al., 2006; Gjurich et al., 2015; Grabner et al., 2009; Hu et al., 2015). These discrepant results call for a protocol that robustly documents bona fide aorta cells rather than those in the surrounding tissues or blood. Critical methodological hurdles include the removal of adjacent adipose tissue and small paraaortic lymph nodes lining the entire aortic tree that are not visible by the naked eye. A dissection microscope is therefore recommended. Moreover protocols of aorta preparations should ascertain that lymphocyte aggregates referred to as fat associated lymphoid clusters (FALCs) (Benezech et al., 2015; Elewa et al., 2015) that are often present at the border between the adipose tissue and the adventitia are removed before enzyme digestion. We propose - besides other approaches (Hu et al., 2015; Mohanta et al., 2014) - a combination of immunohistochemical staining and

  2. Real-time quantification of protein expression at the single-cell level via dynamic protein synthesis translocation reporters.

    PubMed

    Aymoz, Delphine; Wosika, Victoria; Durandau, Eric; Pelet, Serge

    2016-04-21

    Protein expression is a dynamic process, which can be rapidly induced by extracellular signals. It is widely appreciated that single cells can display large variations in the level of gene induction. However, the variability in the dynamics of this process in individual cells is difficult to quantify using standard fluorescent protein (FP) expression assays, due to the slow maturation of their fluorophore. Here we have developed expression reporters that accurately measure both the levels and dynamics of protein synthesis in live single cells with a temporal resolution under a minute. Our system relies on the quantification of the translocation of a constitutively expressed FP into the nucleus. As a proof of concept, we used these reporters to measure the transient protein synthesis arising from two promoters responding to the yeast hyper osmolarity glycerol mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway (pSTL1 and pGPD1). They display distinct expression dynamics giving rise to strikingly different instantaneous expression noise.

  3. Highly sensitive SERS detection and quantification of sialic acid on single cell using photonic-crystal fiber with gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gong, Tianxun; Cui, Ying; Goh, Douglas; Voon, Kong Kien; Shum, Perry Ping; Humbert, Georges; Auguste, Jean-Louis; Dinh, Xuan-Quyen; Yong, Ken-Tye; Olivo, Malini

    2015-02-15

    An ultrasensitive surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) based sensing platform was developed to detect the mean sialic acid level on the surface of single cell with sensitivity as low as 2 fmol. This platform adopted the use of an interference-free Raman tag, 4-(dihydroxyborophenyl) acetylene (DBA), which selectively binds to sialic acid on the cell membrane. By loading the side channel of a photonic crystal fiber with a mixture of gold nanoparticles and DBA-tagged HeLa cell, and subsequently propagating laser light through the central solid core, strong SERS signal was obtained. This SERS technique achieved accurate detection and quantification of concentration of sialic acid on a single cell, surpassing previously reported methods that required more than 10(5) cells. Moreover, this platform can be developed into a clinical diagnostic tool to potentially analyze sialic acid-related diseases such as tumor malignancy and metastasis in real-time.

  4. The dynamics of p53 in single cells: physiologically based ODE and reaction-diffusion PDE models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliaš, Ján; Dimitrio, Luna; Clairambault, Jean; Natalini, Roberto

    2014-08-01

    The intracellular signalling network of the p53 protein plays important roles in genome protection and the control of cell cycle phase transitions. Recently observed oscillatory behaviour in single cells under stress conditions has inspired several research groups to simulate and study the dynamics of the protein with the aim of gaining a proper understanding of the physiological meanings of the oscillations. We propose compartmental ODE and PDE models of p53 activation and regulation in single cells following DNA damage and we show that the p53 oscillations can be retrieved by plainly involving p53-Mdm2 and ATM-p53-Wip1 negative feedbacks, which are sufficient for oscillations experimentally, with no further need to introduce any delays into the protein responses and without considering additional positive feedback.

  5. Parallel measurement of dynamic changes in translation rates in single cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Kyuho; Jaimovich, Ariel; Dey, Gautam; Ruggero, Davide; Meyuhas, Oded; Sonenberg, Nahum; Meyer, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Protein concentrations are often regulated by dynamic changes in translation rates. Nevertheless, it has been challenging to directly monitor changes in translation in living cells. We have developed a reporter system to measure real-time changes of translation rates in human or mouse individual cells by conjugating translation regulatory motifs to sequences encoding a nuclear targeted fluorescent protein and a controllable destabilization domain. Application of the method showed that individual cells undergo marked fluctuations in the translation rate of mRNAs whose 5' terminal oligopyrimidine (5' TOP) motif regulates the synthesis of ribosomal proteins. Furthermore, we show that small reductions in amino acid levels signal through different mTOR-dependent pathways to control TOP mRNA translation, whereas larger reductions in amino acid levels control translation through eIF2A. Our study demonstrates that dynamic measurements of single-cell activities of translation regulatory motifs can be used to identify and investigate fundamental principles of translation.

  6. Ablation and analysis of small cell populations and single cells by consecutive laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Bindesh; Nemes, Peter; Vertes, Akos

    2010-10-01

    Laser ablation of single cells through a sharpened optical fiber is used for the detection of metabolites by laser ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI) mass spectrometry (MS). Ablation of the same Allium cepa epidermal cell by consecutive pulses indicates the rupture of the cell wall by the second shot. Intracellular sucrose heterogeneity is detected by subsequent laser pulses pointing to rupturing the vacuolar membrane by the third exposure. Ion production by bursts of laser pulses shows that the drying of ruptured A. cepa cells occurs in ˜50 s at low pulse rates (10 pulses/s bursts) and significantly faster at high pulse rates (100 pulses/s bursts). These results point to the competing role of cytoplasm ejection and evaporative drying in diminishing the LAESI-MS signal in ˜50 s or 100 laser pulses, whichever occurs first.

  7. Measurement of intracellular Ca2+ concentration in single cells using ratiometric calcium dyes.

    PubMed

    Srikanth, Sonal; Gwack, Yousang

    2013-01-01

    Measurement of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) is useful to study the upstream and downstream events of Ca(2+) signaling. Ca(2+)-binding proteins including EF-hand-containing proteins are important downstream effector molecules after an increase of [Ca(2+)](i). Conversely, these proteins can also act as key modulators for regulation of [Ca(2+)](i) by sensing the Ca(2+) levels in the intracellular organelles and cytoplasm. Here we describe a single-cell Ca(2+) imaging technique that was used to measure the intracellular Ca(2+) levels to examine the function of Ca(2+)-binding proteins, STIM1 and Calcium release-activated Calcium channel regulator 2A (CRACR2A), using ratiometric Ca(2+) dye Fura-2 in adherent and non-adherent cells.

  8. A Label-free Technique for the Spatio-temporal Imaging of Single Cell Secretions.

    PubMed

    Raghu, Deepa; Christodoulides, Joseph A; Delehanty, James B; Byers, Jeff M; Raphael, Marc P

    2015-11-23

    Inter-cellular communication is an integral part of a complex system that helps in maintaining basic cellular activities. As a result, the malfunctioning of such signaling can lead to many disorders. To understand cell-to-cell signaling, it is essential to study the spatial and temporal nature of the secreted molecules from the cell without disturbing the local environment. Various assays have been developed to study protein secretion, however, these methods are typically based on fluorescent probes which disrupt the relevant signaling pathways. To overcome this limitation, a label-free technique is required. In this paper, we describe the fabrication and application of a label-free localized surface plasmon resonance imaging (LSPRi) technology capable of detecting protein secretions from a single cell. The plasmonic nanostructures are lithographically patterned onto a standard glass coverslip and can be excited using visible light on commercially available light microscopes. Only a small fraction of the coverslip is covered by the nanostructures and hence this technique is well suited for combining common techniques such as fluorescence and bright-field imaging. A multidisciplinary approach is used in this protocol which incorporates sensor nanofabrication and subsequent biofunctionalization, binding kinetics characterization of ligand and analyte, the integration of the chip and live cells, and the analysis of the measured signal. As a whole, this technology enables a general label-free approach towards mapping cellular secretions and correlating them with the responses of nearby cells.

  9. JAK/STAT/SOCS-signaling pathway and colon and rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Slattery, Martha L.; Lundgreen, Abbie; Kadlubar, Susan A.; Bondurant, Kristina L.; Wolff, Roger K.

    2012-01-01

    The Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) signaling pathway is involved in immune function and cell growth. We evaluated the association between genetic variation in JAK1 (10 SNPs), JAK2 (9 SNPs), TYK2 (5 SNPs), SOCS1 (2 SNPs), SOCS2 (2 SNPs), STAT1 (16 SNPs), STAT2 (2 SNPs), STAT3 (6 SNPs), STAT4 (21 SNPs), STAT5A (2 SNPs), STAT5B (3 SNPs), STAT6 (4 SNPs) with risk of colorectal cancer. We used data from population-based case-control studies (colon cancer n=1555 cases, 1956 controls; rectal cancer n=754 cases, 959 controls). JAK2, SOCS2, STAT1, STAT3, STAT5A, STAT5B, and STAT6 were associated with colon cancer; STAT3, STAT4, STAT6, and TYK2 were associated with rectal cancer. Given the biological role of the JAK/STAT-signaling pathway and cytokines, we evaluated interaction with IFNG, TNF, and IL6; numerous statistically significant associations after adjustment for multiple comparisons were observed. The following statistically significant interactions were observed: TYK2 with aspirin/NSAID use; STAT1, STAT4, and TYK2 with estrogen status; and JAK2, STAT2, STAT4, STAT5A, STAT5B, and STAT6 with smoking status and colon cancer risk; JAK2, STAT6, and TYK2 with aspirin/NSAID use; JAK1 with estrogen status; STAT2 with cigarette smoking and rectal cancer. JAK2, SOCS1, STAT3, STAT5, and TYK2 were associated with colon cancer survival (HRR of 3.3 95% CI 2.01, 5.42 for high mutational load). JAK2, SOCS1, STAT1, STAT4, and TYK2 were associated with rectal cancer survival (HRR 2.80 95 %CI 1.63, 4.80). These data support the importance of the JAK/STAT-signaling pathway in colorectal cancer and suggest targets for intervention. PMID:22121102

  10. Single-cell protein: current status and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Tusé, D

    1984-01-01

    The consumption of microorganisms by man and animals is not a revolutionary new idea. For thousands of years man has consumed, either intentionally or unintentionally, such products as alcoholic beverages, cheeses, yogurt, and soya sauce and, along with these products, the microbial biomass responsible for their production. The rapid growth rate and high protein content of microbes and their ability to utilize inexpensive feedstocks as sources of carbon and energy for growth have made microorganisms prime candidates for use as human food and animal feed protein supplements. Yet, in spite of their promise, only a limited number of commercial-scale, single-cell protein (SCP) processes have been seen. Recently, with the advent of recombinant DNA technology a rebirth of interest in SCP has resulted. This review analyzes the answers to two questions: (1) how far have we come?; and (2) what impact, if any, will the new biotechnologies have in this field?

  11. Mechanosensitive subcellular rheostasis drives emergent single-cell mechanical homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weiqiang; Fu, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical homeostasis - a fundamental process by which cells maintain stable states under environmental perturbations - is regulated by two subcellular mechanotransducers: cytoskeleton tension and integrin-mediated focal adhesions (FAs)1-5. Here, we show that single-cell mechanical homeostasis is collectively driven by the distinct, graduated dynamics (rheostasis) of subcellular cytoskeleton tension and FAs. Such rheostasis involves a mechanosensitive pattern wherein ground states of cytoskeleton tension and FA determine their distinct reactive paths via either relaxation or reinforcement. Pharmacological perturbations of the cytoskeleton and molecularly modulated integrin catch-slip bonds biased the rheostasis and induced non-homeostasis of FAs, but not of cytoskeleton tension, suggesting a unique sensitivity of FAs in regulating homeostasis. Theoretical modeling revealed myosin-mediated cytoskeleton contractility and catch-slip-bond-like behaviors in FAs and the cytoskeleton as sufficient and necessary mechanisms for quantitatively recapitulating mechanosensitive rheostasis. Our findings highlight previously underappreciated physical nature of the mechanical homeostasis of cells. PMID:27240108

  12. Sample Targeting During Single-Particle Single-Cell Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigelow, A. W.; Randers-Pehrson, G.; Michel, K. A.; Brenner, D. J.; Dymnikov, A. D.

    2003-08-01

    An apertured microbeam is used for single-particle single-cell irradiation to study radiobiological effects at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF), Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University. The present sample targeting system involves imaging techniques and a stepping motor stage to sequentially position a cell nucleus above a vertical ion beam. An interest expressed by the biology research community in targeting subnuclear components has spurred the development of microbeam II, a next-generation facility to include a focused ion beam and a more precise sample manipulator, a voice coil stage. Sample positioning precision will rely on a feedback circuit incorporating linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) position measurements. In addition, post-lens electrostatic deflection is a contender for a point-and-shoot system that could speed up the cell irradiation process for cells within an image frame. Crucial to this development is that ion beam blow up must be minimal during deflection.

  13. Single Cell Magnetic Measurements with a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmstrom, Johanna C.; Arps, Jennifer; Dwyer, Bo; Kalisky, Beena; Kirtley, John R.; Moler, Kathryn A.; Qian, Lisa C.; Rosenberg, Aaron J.; Rutt, Brian; Tee, Sui Seng; Theis, Eric; Urbach, Elana; Wang, Yihua

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles play an important role in numerous biomedical applications such as magnetic resonance imaging and targeted drug delivery. There is a need for tools to characterize individual magnetic nanoparticles and the magnetic properties of individual cells. We use a scanning superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) to observe the magnetic fields from single mammalian cells loaded with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. We show that the SQUID is a useful tool for imaging biological magnetism and is capable of resolving cell to cell variations in magnetic dipole moments. We hope to correlate these magnetic images with real space imaging techniques such as optical and scanning electron microscopy. The visualization of single cell magnetism can be used to optimize biological magnetic imaging techniques, such as MRI, by quantifying the strength of magnetic dipole moments of in vitro magnetic labeling. This work is supported by a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship and a Gabilan Stanford Graduate Fellowship.

  14. Production and feeding of single-cell protein

    SciTech Connect

    Ferranti, M.P.; Fiechter, A.

    1983-01-01

    This book addresses the technical and economic factors which must be considered when evaluating plans for the production of animal feed proteins from agricultural and forestry wastes. The work is divided into three parts, the first focusing on pretreatment and hydrolysis of lignocellulostic materials, the second on upgrading of whey and the third on nutrition and toxicology. The presentation concludes with a Round Table discussion including evaluations and recommendations for submission to the Commission of the European Communities. CONTENTS: Special Section: Pretreatment and Degradation of Lignocellulosic Materials. Subject Area 1: Production of SCP Enriched Substrate from Cellulosic Materials. Lignin and Lignocellulose. Process Development. Carbohydrates. Subject Area 2: Single Cell Protein from Whey. Subject Area 3: Nutrition and Toxicology. Round Table Discussion: Evaluation and Recommendations. List of Participants. Index of Authors.

  15. Emergent collective chemotaxis without single-cell gradient sensing

    PubMed Central

    Camley, Brian A.; Zimmermann, Juliane; Levine, Herbert; Rappel, Wouter-Jan

    2016-01-01

    Many eukaryotic cells chemotax, sensing and following chemical gradients. However, experiments have shown that even under conditions when single cells cannot chemotax, small clusters may still follow a gradient. This behavior has been observed in neural crest cells, in lymphocytes, and during border cell migration in Drosophila, but its origin remains puzzling. Here, we propose a new mechanism underlying this “collective guidance”, and study a model based on this mechanism both analytically and computationally. Our approach posits that contact inhibition of locomotion (CIL), where cells polarize away from cell-cell contact, is regulated by the chemoattractant. Individual cells must measure the mean attractant value, but need not measure its gradient, to give rise to directional motility for a cell cluster. We present analytic formulas for how cluster velocity and chemotactic index depend on the number and organization of cells in the cluster. The presence of strong orientation effects provides a simple test for our theory of collective guidance. PMID:26991203

  16. Preparation of Neuronal Co-cultures with Single Cell Precision

    PubMed Central

    Dinh, Ngoc-Duy; Chiang, Ya-Yu; Hardelauf, Heike; Waide, Sarah; Janasek, Dirk; West, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic embodiments of the Campenot chamber have attracted great interest from the neuroscience community. These interconnected co-culture platforms can be used to investigate a variety of questions, spanning developmental and functional neurobiology to infection and disease propagation. However, conventional systems require significant cellular inputs (many thousands per compartment), inadequate for studying low abundance cells, such as primary dopaminergic substantia nigra, spiral ganglia, and Drosophilia melanogaster neurons, and impractical for high throughput experimentation. The dense cultures are also highly locally entangled, with few outgrowths (<10%) interconnecting the two cultures. In this paper straightforward microfluidic and patterning protocols are described which address these challenges: (i) a microfluidic single neuron arraying method, and (ii) a water masking method for plasma patterning biomaterial coatings to register neurons and promote outgrowth between compartments. Minimalistic neuronal co-cultures were prepared with high-level (>85%) intercompartment connectivity and can be used for high throughput neurobiology experiments with single cell precision. PMID:24894871

  17. Single cell genome analysis of an uncultured heterotrophic stramenopile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Rajat S.; Price, Dana C.; Schliep, Alexander; Cai, Guohong; Korobeynikov, Anton; Yoon, Hwan Su; Yang, Eun Chan; Bhattacharya, Debashish

    2014-04-01

    A broad swath of eukaryotic microbial biodiversity cannot be cultivated in the lab and is therefore inaccessible to conventional genome-wide comparative methods. One promising approach to study these lineages is single cell genomics (SCG), whereby an individual cell is captured from nature and genome data are produced from the amplified total DNA. Here we tested the efficacy of SCG to generate a draft genome assembly from a single sample, in this case a cell belonging to the broadly distributed MAST-4 uncultured marine stramenopiles. Using de novo gene prediction, we identified 6,996 protein-encoding genes in the MAST-4 genome. This genetic inventory was sufficient to place the cell within the ToL using multigene phylogenetics and provided preliminary insights into the complex evolutionary history of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) in the MAST-4 lineage.

  18. High resolution ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging of single cells.

    PubMed

    Strohm, Eric M; Moore, Michael J; Kolios, Michael C

    2016-03-01

    High resolution ultrasound and photoacoustic images of stained neutrophils, lymphocytes and monocytes from a blood smear were acquired using a combined acoustic/photoacoustic microscope. Photoacoustic images were created using a pulsed 532 nm laser that was coupled to a single mode fiber to produce output wavelengths from 532 nm to 620 nm via stimulated Raman scattering. The excitation wavelength was selected using optical filters and focused onto the sample using a 20× objective. A 1000 MHz transducer was co-aligned with the laser spot and used for ultrasound and photoacoustic images, enabling micrometer resolution with both modalities. The different cell types could be easily identified due to variations in contrast within the acoustic and photoacoustic images. This technique provides a new way of probing leukocyte structure with potential applications towards detecting cellular abnormalities and diseased cells at the single cell level.

  19. Mechanosensitive subcellular rheostasis drives emergent single-cell mechanical homeostasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Shinuo; Shao, Yue; Chen, Weiqiang; Fu, Jianping

    2016-09-01

    Mechanical homeostasis--a fundamental process by which cells maintain stable states under environmental perturbations--is regulated by two subcellular mechanotransducers: cytoskeleton tension and integrin-mediated focal adhesions (FAs). Here, we show that single-cell mechanical homeostasis is collectively driven by the distinct, graduated dynamics (rheostasis) of subcellular cytoskeleton tension and FAs. Such rheostasis involves a mechanosensitive pattern wherein ground states of cytoskeleton tension and FA determine their distinct reactive paths through either relaxation or reinforcement. Pharmacological perturbations of the cytoskeleton and molecularly modulated integrin catch-slip bonds biased the rheostasis and induced non-homeostasis of FAs, but not of cytoskeleton tension, suggesting a unique sensitivity of FAs in regulating homeostasis. Theoretical modelling revealed myosin-mediated cytoskeleton contractility and catch-slip-bond-like behaviours in FAs and the cytoskeleton as sufficient and necessary mechanisms for quantitatively recapitulating mechanosensitive rheostasis. Our findings highlight the previously underappreciated physical nature of the mechanical homeostasis of cells.

  20. Automated analysis of single cells using Laser Tweezers Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Casabella, S; Scully, P; Goddard, N; Gardner, P

    2016-01-21

    In recent years, significant progress has been made into the label-free detection and discrimination of individual cancer cells using Laser Tweezers Raman Spectroscopy (LTRS). However, the majority of examples reported have involved manual trapping of cells, which is time consuming and may lead to different cell lines being analysed in discrete batches. A simple, low-cost microfluidic flow chamber is introduced which allows single cells to be optically trapped and analysed in an automated fashion, greatly reducing the level of operator input required. Two implementations of the flow chamber are discussed here; a basic single-channel device in which the fluid velocity is controlled manually, and a dual-channel device which permits the automated capture and analysis of multiple cell lines with no operator input. Results are presented for the discrimination of live epithelial prostate cells and lymphocytes, together with a consideration of the consequences of traditional 'batch analysis' typically used for LTRS of live cells.

  1. Spatially resolved, highly multiplexed RNA profiling in single cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kok Hao; Boettiger, Alistair N.; Moffitt, Jeffrey R.; Wang, Siyuan; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the expression profile and spatial landscape of the transcriptome in individual cells is essential for understanding the rich repertoire of cellular behaviors. Here we report multiplexed error-robust fluorescence in situ hybridization (MERFISH), a single-molecule imaging approach that allows the copy numbers and spatial localizations of thousands of RNA species to be determined in single cells. Using error-robust encoding schemes to combat single-molecule labeling and detection errors, we demonstrated the imaging of 100 – 1000 unique RNA species in hundreds of individual cells. Correlation analysis of the ~104 – 106 pairs of genes allowed us to constrain gene regulatory networks, predict novel functions for many unannotated genes, and identify distinct spatial distribution patterns of RNAs that correlate with properties of the encoded proteins. PMID:25858977

  2. Single-cell twitching chemotaxis in developing biofilms.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Nuno M; Foster, Kevin R; Durham, William M

    2016-06-07

    Bacteria form surface-attached communities, known as biofilms, which are central to bacterial biology and how they affect us. Although surface-attached bacteria often experience strong chemical gradients, it remains unclear whether single cells can effectively perform chemotaxis on surfaces. Here we use microfluidic chemical gradients and massively parallel automated tracking to study the behavior of the pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa during early biofilm development. We show that individual cells can efficiently move toward chemoattractants using pili-based "twitching" motility and the Chp chemosensory system. Moreover, we discovered the behavioral mechanism underlying this surface chemotaxis: Cells reverse direction more frequently when moving away from chemoattractant sources. These corrective maneuvers are triggered rapidly, typically before a wayward cell has ventured a fraction of a micron. Our work shows that single bacteria can direct their motion with submicron precision and reveals the hidden potential for chemotaxis within bacterial biofilms.

  3. High Power Tests of Normal Conducting Single-Cell Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgashev, V.A.; Tantawi, S.G.; Nantista, C.D.; Higashi, Y.; Higo, T.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2007-11-07

    We report the results of the first high power tests of single-cell traveling-wave and standing-wave structures. These tests are part of an experimental and theoretical study of rf breakdown in normal conducting structures at 11.4 GHz. The goal of this study is to determine the gradient potential of normal-conducting rf-powered particle beam accelerators. The test setup consists of reusable mode converters and short test structures and is powered by SLAC's XL-4 klystron. This setup was created for economical testing of different cell geometries, cell materials and preparation techniques with short turn-around time. The mode launchers and structures were manufactured at SLAC and KEK and tested in the SLAC Klystron Test Lab.

  4. Single Cell Bottlenecks in the Pathogenesis of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Zafar, M. Ammar; Zuniga, Marisol; Roche, Aoife M.; Hamaguchi, Shigeto; Weiser, Jeffrey N.

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we studied a virulent isolate of the leading bacterial pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae in an infant mouse model of colonization, disease and transmission, both with and without influenza A (IAV) co-infection. To identify vulnerable points in the multiple steps involved in pneumococcal pathogenesis, this model was utilized for a comprehensive analysis of population bottlenecks. Our findings reveal that in the setting of IAV co-infection the organism must pass through single cell bottlenecks during bloodstream invasion from the nasopharynx within the host and in transmission between hosts. Passage through these bottlenecks was not associated with genetic adaptation by the pathogen. The bottleneck in transmission occurred between bacterial exit from one host and establishment in another explaining why the number of shed organisms in secretions is critical to overcoming it. These observations demonstrate how viral infection, and TLR-dependent innate immune responses it stimulates and that are required to control it, drive bacterial contagion. PMID:27732665

  5. Automated Mapping of Phenotype Space with Single-Cell Data

    PubMed Central

    Samusik, Nikolay; Good, Zinaida; Spitzer, Matthew H.; Davis, Kara L.; Nolan, Garry P.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate and rapid identification of cell populations is key to discovering novelty in multidimensional single cell experiments. We present a population finding algorithm X-shift that can process large datasets using fast KNN estimation of cell event density and automatically arranges populations by a marker-based classification system. X-shift analysis of mouse bone marrow data resolved the majority of known and several previously undescribed cell populations. Interestingly, previously known cell populations, as well as intermediate cell populations in early hematopoietic development, were described via novel marker combinations that were defined via routes to their locations in expressed marker space. X-shift provides a rapid, reliable approach to managed cell subset analysis that maximizes automation that not only best mimics human intuition, but as we show provides access to novel insights that “prior knowledge” might prevent the researcher from visualizing. PMID:27183440

  6. Emergent Collective Chemotaxis without Single-Cell Gradient Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camley, Brian A.; Zimmermann, Juliane; Levine, Herbert; Rappel, Wouter-Jan

    2016-03-01

    Many eukaryotic cells chemotax, sensing and following chemical gradients. However, experiments show that even under conditions when single cells cannot chemotax, small clusters may still follow a gradient. This behavior is observed in neural crest cells, in lymphocytes, and during border cell migration in Drosophila, but its origin remains puzzling. Here, we propose a new mechanism underlying this "collective guidance," and study a model based on this mechanism both analytically and computationally. Our approach posits that contact inhibition of locomotion, where cells polarize away from cell-cell contact, is regulated by the chemoattractant. Individual cells must measure the mean attractant value, but need not measure its gradient, to give rise to directional motility for a cell cluster. We present analytic formulas for how the cluster velocity and chemotactic index depend on the number and organization of cells in the cluster. The presence of strong orientation effects provides a simple test for our theory of collective guidance.

  7. Power analysis of single-cell RNA-sequencing experiments.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Valentine; Natarajan, Kedar Nath; Ly, Lam-Ha; Miragaia, Ricardo J; Labalette, Charlotte; Macaulay, Iain C; Cvejic, Ana; Teichmann, Sarah A

    2017-04-01

    Single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-seq) has become an established and powerful method to investigate transcriptomic cell-to-cell variation, thereby revealing new cell types and providing insights into developmental processes and transcriptional stochasticity. A key question is how the variety of available protocols compare in terms of their ability to detect and accurately quantify gene expression. Here, we assessed the protocol sensitivity and accuracy of many published data sets, on the basis of spike-in standards and uniform data processing. For our workflow, we developed a flexible tool for counting the number of unique molecular identifiers (https://github.com/vals/umis/). We compared 15 protocols computationally and 4 protocols experimentally for batch-matched cell populations, in addition to investigating the effects of spike-in molecular degradation. Our analysis provides an integrated framework for comparing scRNA-seq protocols.

  8. TRAVELLING WAVE AND STANDING WAVE SINGLE CELL HIGH GRADIENT TESTS

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgashev, V

    2004-08-24

    Accelerating gradient is one of the crucial parameters affecting design, construction and cost of next-generation linear accelerators. Operating accelerating gradient in normal conducting accelerating structures is limited by rf breakdown. In this paper we describe an experimental setup for study of these limits for 11.4 GHz travelingwave and standing-wave accelerating structures. The setup uses matched mode converters that launch the circular TM01 mode into short test structures. The test structures are designed so that the electromagnetic fields in one cell mimic the fields in prototype structures for the Next Linear Collider. Fields elsewhere in the test structures and in the mode converters are significantly lower than in this single cell. This setup allows economic testing of different cell geometries, cell materials and preparation techniques with short turn around time. Here we present design considerations and describe planned experiments.

  9. Single-Cell Transcriptomics Bioinformatics and Computational Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Poirion, Olivier B.; Zhu, Xun; Ching, Travers; Garmire, Lana

    2016-01-01

    The emerging single-cell RNA-Seq (scRNA-Seq) technology holds the promise to revolutionize our understanding of diseases and associated biological processes at an unprecedented resolution. It opens the door to reveal intercellular heterogeneity and has been employed to a variety of applications, ranging from characterizing cancer cells subpopulations to elucidating tumor resistance mechanisms. Parallel to improving experimental protocols to deal with technological issues, deriving new analytical methods to interpret the complexity in scRNA-Seq data is just as challenging. Here, we review current state-of-the-art bioinformatics tools and methods for scRNA-Seq analysis, as well as addressing some critical analytical challenges that the field faces. PMID:27708664

  10. Single cell genome analysis of an uncultured heterotrophic stramenopile

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Rajat S.; Price, Dana C.; Schliep, Alexander; Cai, Guohong; Korobeynikov, Anton; Yoon, Hwan Su; Yang, Eun Chan; Bhattacharya, Debashish

    2014-01-01

    A broad swath of eukaryotic microbial biodiversity cannot be cultivated in the lab and is therefore inaccessible to conventional genome-wide comparative methods. One promising approach to study these lineages is single cell genomics (SCG), whereby an individual cell is captured from nature and genome data are produced from the amplified total DNA. Here we tested the efficacy of SCG to generate a draft genome assembly from a single sample, in this case a cell belonging to the broadly distributed MAST-4 uncultured marine stramenopiles. Using de novo gene prediction, we identified 6,996 protein-encoding genes in the MAST-4 genome. This genetic inventory was sufficient to place the cell within the ToL using multigene phylogenetics and provided preliminary insights into the complex evolutionary history of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) in the MAST-4 lineage. PMID:24759094

  11. Rotational manipulation of single cells and organisms using acoustic waves

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Daniel; Ozcelik, Adem; Bojanala, Nagagireesh; Nama, Nitesh; Upadhyay, Awani; Chen, Yuchao; Hanna-Rose, Wendy; Huang, Tony Jun

    2016-01-01

    The precise rotational manipulation of single cells or organisms is invaluable to many applications in biology, chemistry, physics and medicine. In this article, we describe an acoustic-based, on-chip manipulation method that can rotate single microparticles, cells and organisms. To achieve this, we trapped microbubbles within predefined sidewall microcavities inside a microchannel. In an acoustic field, trapped microbubbles were driven into oscillatory motion generating steady microvortices which were utilized to precisely rotate colloids, cells and entire organisms (that is, C. elegans). We have tested the capabilities of our method by analysing reproductive system pathologies and nervous system morphology in C. elegans. Using our device, we revealed the underlying abnormal cell fusion causing defective vulval morphology in mutant worms. Our acoustofluidic rotational manipulation (ARM) technique is an easy-to-use, compact, and biocompatible method, permitting rotation regardless of optical, magnetic or electrical properties of the sample under investigation. PMID:27004764

  12. Single-cell resolution of morphological changes in hemogenic endothelium.

    PubMed

    Bos, Frank L; Hawkins, John S; Zovein, Ann C

    2015-08-01

    Endothelial-to-hematopoietic transition (EHT) occurs within a population of hemogenic endothelial cells during embryogenesis, and leads to the formation of the adult hematopoietic system. Currently, the prospective identification of specific endothelial cells that will undergo EHT, and the cellular events enabling this transition, are not known. We set out to define precisely the morphological events of EHT, and to correlate cellular morphology with the expression of the transcription factors RUNX1 and SOX17. A novel strategy was developed to allow for correlation of immunofluorescence data with the ultrastructural resolution of scanning electron microscopy. The approach can identify single endothelial cells undergoing EHT, as identified by the ratio of RUNX1 to SOX17 immunofluorescence levels, and the morphological changes associated with the transition. Furthermore, this work details a new technical resource that is widely applicable for correlative analyses of single cells in their native tissue environments.

  13. Dynamic staining of bacteria at a single-cell level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuñez, Vicente; Upadhyayula, Srigokul; Lin, Adam; Chau, Kenny; Vullev, Valentine I.

    2011-05-01

    Bacterial infectious diseases remain one of the major health hazards nation- and worldwide. The expedience of detection and identification of bacterial pathogens determines how early the diagnosis is, and hence, what the treatment and the outcome of the illness would be. As we have previously reported, the dynamics of fluorescence staining provides venues for the development of expedient assays for detection and identification of bacterial species[1]. We measured the kinetics of bacterial staining with cyanine and thioflavin dyes and investigated their photophysical properties. We demonstrated that the pseudo first-order kinetic constants of the fluorescence staining processes have species specificity without contrition dependence. Combining the dynamics of staining with real-time fluorescence microscopy we characterized the fluorescence staining process at the single-cell level with improved sensitivity and contrast.

  14. Whole-genome molecular haplotyping of single cells.

    PubMed

    Fan, H Christina; Wang, Jianbin; Potanina, Anastasia; Quake, Stephen R

    2011-01-01

    Conventional experimental methods of studying the human genome are limited by the inability to independently study the combination of alleles, or haplotype, on each of the homologous copies of the chromosomes. We developed a microfluidic device capable of separating and amplifying homologous copies of each chromosome from a single human metaphase cell. Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array analysis of amplified DNA enabled us to achieve completely deterministic, whole-genome, personal haplotypes of four individuals, including a HapMap trio with European ancestry (CEU) and an unrelated European individual. The phases of alleles were determined at ∼99.8% accuracy for up to ∼96% of all assayed SNPs. We demonstrate several practical applications, including direct observation of recombination events in a family trio, deterministic phasing of deletions in individuals and direct measurement of the human leukocyte antigen haplotypes of an individual. Our approach has potential applications in personal genomics, single-cell genomics and statistical genetics.

  15. Single-cell Raman spectroscopy of irradiated tumour cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Quinn

    This work describes the development and application of a novel combination of single-cell Raman spectroscopy (RS), automated data processing, and principal component analysis (PCA) for investigating radiation induced biochemical responses in human tumour cells. The developed techniques are first validated for the analysis of large data sets (˜200 spectra) obtained from single cells. The effectiveness and robustness of the automated data processing methods is demonstrated, and potential pitfalls that may arise during the implementation of such methods are identified. The techniques are first applied to investigate the inherent sources of spectral variability between single cells of a human prostate tumour cell line (DU145) cultured in vitro. PCA is used to identify spectral differences that correlate with cell cycle progression and the changing confluency of a cell culture during the first 3-4 days after sub-culturing. Spectral variability arising from cell cycle progression is (i) expressed as varying intensities of protein and nucleic acid features relative to lipid features, (ii) well correlated with known biochemical changes in cells as they progress through the cell cycle, and (iii) shown to be the most significant source of inherent spectral variability between cells. This characterization provides a foundation for interpreting spectral variability in subsequent studies. The techniques are then applied to study the effects of ionizing radiation on human tumour cells. DU145 cells are cultured in vitro and irradiated to doses between 15 and 50 Gy with single fractions of 6 MV photons from a medical linear accelerator. Raman spectra are acquired from irradiated and unirradiated cells, up to 5 days post-irradiation. PCA is used to distinguish radiation induced spectral changes from inherent sources of spectral variability, such as those arising from cell cycle. Radiation induced spectral changes are found to correlate with both the irradiated dose and the

  16. Preparation of neuronal co-cultures with single cell precision.

    PubMed

    Dinh, Ngoc-Duy; Chiang, Ya-Yu; Hardelauf, Heike; Waide, Sarah; Janasek, Dirk; West, Jonathan

    2014-05-20

    Microfluidic embodiments of the Campenot chamber have attracted great interest from the neuroscience community. These interconnected co-culture platforms can be used to investigate a variety of questions, spanning developmental and functional neurobiology to infection and disease propagation. However, conventional systems require significant cellular inputs (many thousands per compartment), inadequate for studying low abundance cells, such as primary dopaminergic substantia nigra, spiral ganglia, and Drosophilia melanogaster neurons, and impractical for high throughput experimentation. The dense cultures are also highly locally entangled, with few outgrowths (<10%) interconnecting the two cultures. In this paper straightforward microfluidic and patterning protocols are described which address these challenges: (i) a microfluidic single neuron arraying method, and (ii) a water masking method for plasma patterning biomaterial coatings to register neurons and promote outgrowth between compartments. Minimalistic neuronal co-cultures were prepared with high-level (>85%) intercompartment connectivity and can be used for high throughput neurobiology experiments with single cell precision.

  17. Investigating intratumour heterogeneity by single-cell sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Shan-Cheng; Qu, Min; Sun, Ying-Hao

    2013-01-01

    Intratumour heterogeneity is a longstanding field of focus for both researchers and clinicians. It refers to the diversity amongst cells within the same tumour. Two major hypotheses have attempted to explain the existence of intratumour heterogeneity: (i) the clonal evolution (CE) theory and (ii) the cancer stem cell (CSC) model. CE theory emphasizes the evolutionary biological characteristics of the tumour, underscoring the initiation and progression of the disease. In contrast, the CSC model focuses on stem cell differentiation into distinct functions in order to stabilize the tumour microenvironment. Here we consider single-cell sequencing (SCS) as a newly developed technique for application to the investigation of intratumour heterogeneity and assess its relevance within research and clinical environments. Early detection of rare tumour cells, monitoring of circulating tumour cells (CTCs) and control of the occurrence of drug resistance are important goals in early diagnosis, prognosis prediction and individualized medicine. PMID:24141534

  18. Investigating intratumour heterogeneity by single-cell sequencing.

    PubMed

    Ren, Shan-Cheng; Qu, Min; Sun, Ying-Hao

    2013-11-01

    Intratumour heterogeneity is a longstanding field of focus for both researchers and clinicians. It refers to the diversity amongst cells within the same tumour. Two major hypotheses have attempted to explain the existence of intratumour heterogeneity: (i) the clonal evolution (CE) theory and (ii) the cancer stem cell (CSC) model. CE theory emphasizes the evolutionary biological characteristics of the tumour, underscoring the initiation and progression of the disease. In contrast, the CSC model focuses on stem cell differentiation into distinct functions in order to stabilize the tumour microenvironment. Here we consider single-cell sequencing (SCS) as a newly developed technique for application to the investigation of intratumour heterogeneity and assess its relevance within research and clinical environments. Early detection of rare tumour cells, monitoring of circulating tumour cells (CTCs) and control of the occurrence of drug resistance are important goals in early diagnosis, prognosis prediction and individualized medicine.

  19. Magnetic domain wall conduits for single cell applications.

    PubMed

    Donolato, M; Torti, A; Kostesha, N; Deryabina, M; Sogne, E; Vavassori, P; Hansen, M F; Bertacco, R

    2011-09-07

    The ability to trap, manipulate and release single cells on a surface is important both for fundamental studies of cellular processes and for the development of novel lab-on-chip miniaturized tools for biological and medical applications. In this paper we demonstrate how magnetic domain walls generated in micro- and nano-structures fabricated on a chip surface can be used to handle single yeast cells labeled with magnetic beads. In detail, first we show that the proposed approach maintains the microorganism viable, as proven by monitoring the division of labeled yeast cells trapped by domain walls over 16 hours. Moreover, we demonstrate the controlled transport and release of individual yeast cells via displacement and annihilation of individual domain walls in micro- and nano-sized magnetic structures. These results pave the way to the implementation of magnetic devices based on domain walls technology in lab-on-chip systems devoted to accurate individual cell trapping and manipulation.

  20. Single-cell resolution diagnosis of cancer cells by carbon nanotube electrical spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdolahad, M.; Janmaleki, M.; Taghinejad, M.; Taghnejad, H.; Salehi, F.; Mohajerzadeh, S.

    2013-03-01

    We report the use of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) as electrical endoscopes (biosensors) for cancer metastatic diagnosis at single-cell resolution. The device is based on direct signal extraction by means of vertically aligned conductive carbon nanotubes from a live cell membrane, which has been disrupted during carcinogenesis at its primary and progressive stages. The value of this electrical disruption depends on the cancer metastatic grade. In addition, the electrical resonance behavior of the cell, halted during cancer progression, could be monitored as a new cancer diagnostic profile. By taking a second derivative of the cell impedance with respect to applied frequency, we have arrived at a new spectroscopy tool for distinguishing cancerous stages of colon and breast carcinoma cells.We report the use of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) as electrical endoscopes (biosensors) for cancer metastatic diagnosis at single-cell resolution. The device is based on direct signal extraction by means of vertically aligned conductive carbon nanotubes from a live cell membrane, which has been disrupted during carcinogenesis at its primary and progressive stages. The value of this electrical disruption depends on the cancer metastatic grade. In addition, the electrical resonance behavior of the cell, halted during cancer progression, could be monitored as a new cancer diagnostic profile. By taking a second derivative of the cell impedance with respect to applied frequency, we have arrived at a new spectroscopy tool for distinguishing cancerous stages of colon and breast carcinoma cells. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr33430a

  1. Highly multiplexed single-cell analysis of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded cancer tissue

    PubMed Central

    Gerdes, Michael J.; Sevinsky, Christopher J.; Sood, Anup; Adak, Sudeshna; Bello, Musodiq O.; Bordwell, Alexander; Can, Ali; Corwin, Alex; Dinn, Sean; Filkins, Robert J.; Hollman, Denise; Kamath, Vidya; Kaanumalle, Sireesha; Kenny, Kevin; Larsen, Melinda; Lazare, Michael; Lowes, Christina; McCulloch, Colin C.; McDonough, Elizabeth; Pang, Zhengyu; Rittscher, Jens; Santamaria-Pang, Alberto; Sarachan, Brion D.; Seel, Maximilian L.; Seppo, Antti; Shaikh, Kashan; Sui, Yunxia; Zhang, Jingyu; Ginty, Fiona

    2013-01-01

    Limitations on the number of unique protein and DNA molecules that can be characterized microscopically in a single tissue specimen impede advances in understanding the biological basis of health and disease. Here we present a multiplexed fluorescence microscopy method (MxIF) for quantitative, single-cell, and subcellular characterization of multiple analytes in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue. Chemical inactivation of fluorescent dyes after each image acquisition round allows reuse of common dyes in iterative staining and imaging cycles. The mild inactivation chemistry is compatible with total and phosphoprotein detection, as well as DNA FISH. Accurate computational registration of sequential images is achieved by aligning nuclear counterstain-derived fiducial points. Individual cells, plasma membrane, cytoplasm, nucleus, tumor, and stromal regions are segmented to achieve cellular and subcellular quantification of multiplexed targets. In a comparison of pathologist scoring of diaminobenzidine staining of serial sections and automated MxIF scoring of a single section, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, estrogen receptor, p53, and androgen receptor staining by diaminobenzidine and MxIF methods yielded similar results. Single-cell staining patterns of 61 protein antigens by MxIF in 747 colorectal cancer subjects reveals extensive tumor heterogeneity, and cluster analysis of divergent signaling through ERK1/2, S6 kinase 1, and 4E binding protein 1 provides insights into the spatial organization of mechanistic target of rapamycin and MAPK signal transduction. Our results suggest MxIF should be broadly applicable to problems in the fields of basic biological research, drug discovery and development, and clinical diagnostics. PMID:23818604

  2. Microfluidic micropipette aspiration for measuring the deformability of single cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Quan; Park, Sunyoung; Ma, Hongshen

    2012-08-07

    We present a microfluidic technique for measuring the deformability of single cells using the pressure required to deform such cells through micrometre-scale tapered constrictions. Our technique is equivalent to whole-cell micropipette aspiration, but involves considerably simpler operation, less specialized equipment, and less technical skill. Single cells are infused into a microfluidic channel, and then deformed through a series of funnel-shaped constrictions. The constriction openings are sized to create a temporary seal with each cell as it passes through the constriction, replicating the interaction with the orifice of a micropipette. Precisely controlled deformation pressures are generated using an external source and then attenuated 100 : 1 using an on-chip microfluidic circuit. Our apparatus is capable of generating precisely controlled pressures as small as 0.3 Pa in a closed microchannel network, which is impervious to evaporative losses that normally limit the precision of such equipment. Intrinsic cell deformability, expressed as cortical tension, is determined from the threshold deformation pressure using the liquid-drop model. We measured the deformability of several types of nucleated cells and determined the optimal range of constriction openings. The cortical tension of passive human neutrophils was measured to be 37.0 ± 4.8 pN μm(-1), which is consistent with previous micropipette aspiration studies. The cortical tensions of human lymphocytes, RT4 human bladder cancer cells, and L1210 mouse lymphoma cells were measured to be 74.7 ± 9.8, 185.4 ± 25.3, and 235.4 ± 31.0 pN μm(-1) respectively. The precision and usability of our technique demonstrates its potential as a biomechanical assay for wide-spread use in biological and clinical laboratories.

  3. Production Strategies and Applications of Microbial Single Cell Oils

    PubMed Central

    Ochsenreither, Katrin; Glück, Claudia; Stressler, Timo; Fischer, Lutz; Syldatk, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) of the ω-3 and ω-6 class (e.g., α-linolenic acid, linoleic acid) are essential for maintaining biofunctions in mammalians like humans. Due to the fact that humans cannot synthesize these essential fatty acids, they must be taken up from different food sources. Classical sources for these fatty acids are porcine liver and fish oil. However, microbial lipids or single cell oils, produced by oleaginous microorganisms such as algae, fungi and bacteria, are a promising source as well. These single cell oils can be used for many valuable chemicals with applications not only for nutrition but also for fuels and are therefore an ideal basis for a bio-based economy. A crucial point for the establishment of microbial lipids utilization is the cost-effective production and purification of fuels or products of higher value. The fermentative production can be realized by submerged (SmF) or solid state fermentation (SSF). The yield and the composition of the obtained microbial lipids depend on the type of fermentation and the particular conditions (e.g., medium, pH-value, temperature, aeration, nitrogen source). From an economical point of view, waste or by-product streams can be used as cheap and renewable carbon and nitrogen sources. In general, downstream processing costs are one of the major obstacles to be solved for full economic efficiency of microbial lipids. For the extraction of lipids from microbial biomass cell disruption is most important, because efficiency of cell disruption directly influences subsequent downstream operations and overall extraction efficiencies. A multitude of cell disruption and lipid extraction methods are available, conventional as well as newly emerging methods, which will be described and discussed in terms of large scale applicability, their potential in a modern biorefinery and their influence on product quality. Furthermore, an overview is given about applications of microbial lipids or derived fatty

  4. Production Strategies and Applications of Microbial Single Cell Oils.

    PubMed

    Ochsenreither, Katrin; Glück, Claudia; Stressler, Timo; Fischer, Lutz; Syldatk, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) of the ω-3 and ω-6 class (e.g., α-linolenic acid, linoleic acid) are essential for maintaining biofunctions in mammalians like humans. Due to the fact that humans cannot synthesize these essential fatty acids, they must be taken up from different food sources. Classical sources for these fatty acids are porcine liver and fish oil. However, microbial lipids or single cell oils, produced by oleaginous microorganisms such as algae, fungi and bacteria, are a promising source as well. These single cell oils can be used for many valuable chemicals with applications not only for nutrition but also for fuels and are therefore an ideal basis for a bio-based economy. A crucial point for the establishment of microbial lipids utilization is the cost-effective production and purification of fuels or products of higher value. The fermentative production can be realized by submerged (SmF) or solid state fermentation (SSF). The yield and the composition of the obtained microbial lipids depend on the type of fermentation and the particular conditions (e.g., medium, pH-value, temperature, aeration, nitrogen source). From an economical point of view, waste or by-product streams can be used as cheap and renewable carbon and nitrogen sources. In general, downstream processing costs are one of the major obstacles to be solved for full economic efficiency of microbial lipids. For the extraction of lipids from microbial biomass cell disruption is most important, because efficiency of cell disruption directly influences subsequent downstream operations and overall extraction efficiencies. A multitude of cell disruption and lipid extraction methods are available, conventional as well as newly emerging methods, which will be described and discussed in terms of large scale applicability, their potential in a modern biorefinery and their influence on product quality. Furthermore, an overview is given about applications of microbial lipids or derived fatty

  5. A Single-Cell Genome for Thiovulum sp.

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Ian P. G.; Blainey, Paul C.

    2012-01-01

    We determined a significant fraction of the genome sequence of a representative of Thiovulum, the uncultivated genus of colorless sulfur Epsilonproteobacteria, by analyzing the genome sequences of four individual cells collected from phototrophic mats from Elkhorn Slough, California. These cells were isolated utilizing a microfluidic laser-tweezing system, and their genomes were amplified by multiple-displacement amplification prior to sequencing. Thiovulum is a gradient bacterium found at oxic-anoxic marine interfaces and noted for its distinctive morphology and rapid swimming motility. The genomic sequences of the four individual cells were assembled into a composite genome consisting of 221 contigs covering 2.083 Mb including 2,162 genes. This single-cell genome represents a genomic view of the physiological capabilities of isolated Thiovulum cells. Thiovulum is the second-fastest bacterium ever observed, swimming at 615 μm/s, and this genome shows that this rapid swimming motility is a result of a standard flagellar machinery that has been extensively characterized in other bacteria. This suggests that standard flagella are capable of propelling bacterial cells at speeds much faster than typically thought. Analysis of the genome suggests that naturally occurring Thiovulum populations are more diverse than previously recognized and that studies performed in the past probably address a wide range of unrecognized genotypic and phenotypic diversities of Thiovulum. The genome presented in this article provides a basis for future isolation-independent studies of Thiovulum, where single-cell and metagenomic tools can be used to differentiate between different Thiovulum genotypes. PMID:23023751

  6. Monomethylarsonous acid (MMA+3) Inhibits IL-7 Signaling in Mouse Pre-B Cells.

    PubMed

    Ezeh, Peace C; Xu, Huan; Lauer, Fredine T; Liu, Ke Jian; Hudson, Laurie G; Burchiel, Scott W

    2016-02-01

    Our previously published data show that As(+3) in vivo and in vitro, at very low concentrations, inhibits lymphoid, but not myeloid stem cell development in mouse bone marrow. We also showed that the As(+3) metabolite, monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(+3)), was responsible for the observed pre-B cell toxicity caused by As(+3). Interleukin-7 (IL-7) is the primary growth factor responsible for pre-lymphoid development in mouse and human bone marrow, and Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 5 (STAT5) is a transcriptional factor in the IL-7 signaling pathway. We found that MMA(+3) inhibited STAT5 phosphorylation at a concentration as low as 50 nM in mouse bone marrow pre-B cells. Inhibition of STAT5 phosphorylation by As(+3) occurred only at a concentration of 500 nM. In the IL-7 dependent mouse pre-B 2E8 cell line, we also found selective inhibition of STAT5 phosphorylation by MMA(+3), and this inhibition was dependent on effects on JAK3 phosphorylation. IL-7 receptor expression on 2E8 cell surface was also suppressed by 50 nM MMA(+3) at 18 h. As further evidence for the inhibition of STAT5, we found that the induction of several genes required in B cell development, cyclin D1, E2A, EBF1, and PAX5, were selectively inhibited by MMA(+3). Since 2E8 cells lack the enzymes responsible for the conversion of As(+3) to MMA(+3) in vitro, the results of these studies suggest that As(+3) induced inhibition of pre-B cell formation in vivo is likely dependent on the formation of MMA(+3) which in turn inhibits IL-7 signaling at several steps in mouse pre-B cells.

  7. In situ probing of cholesterol in astrocytes at the single-cell level using laser desorption ionization mass spectrometric imaging with colloidal silver.

    PubMed

    Perdian, D C; Cha, Sangwon; Oh, Jisun; Sakaguchi, Donald S; Yeung, Edward S; Lee, Young Jin

    2010-04-30

    Mass spectrometric imaging has been utilized to localize individual astrocytes and to obtain cholesterol populations at the single-cell level in laser desorption ionization (LDI) with colloidal silver. The silver ion adduct of membrane-bound cholesterol was monitored to detect individual cells. Good correlation between mass spectrometric and optical images at different cell densities indicates the ability to perform single-cell studies of cholesterol abundance. The feasibility of quantification is confirmed by the agreement between the LDI-MS ion signals and the results from a traditional enzymatic fluorometric assay. We propose that this approach could be an effective tool to study chemical populations at the cellular level.

  8. In Situ Probing of Cholesterol in Astrocytes at the Single Cell Level using Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometric Imaging with Colloidal Silver

    SciTech Connect

    Perdian, D.C.; Cha, Sangwon; Oh, Jisun; Sakaguchi, Donald S.; Yeung, Edward S.; and Lee, Young Jin

    2010-03-18

    Mass spectrometric imaging has been utilized to localize individual astrocytes and to obtain cholesterol populations at the single-cell level in laser desorption ionization (LDI) with colloidal silver. The silver ion adduct of membrane-bound cholesterol was monitored to detect individual cells. Good correlation between mass spectrometric and optical images at different cell densities indicates the ability to perform single-cell studies of cholesterol abundance. The feasibility of quantification is confirmed by the agreement between the LDI-MS ion signals and the results from a traditional enzymatic fluorometric assay. We propose that this approach could be an effective tool to study chemical populations at the cellular level.

  9. MicroBioRobots for single cell manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakar, Mahmut Selman

    One of the great challenges in nano and micro scale science and engineering is the independent manipulation of biological cells and small man-made objects with active sensing. For such biomedical applications as single cell manipulation, telemetry, and localized targeted delivery of chemicals, it is important to fabricate microstructures that can be powered and controlled without a tether in fluidic environments. These microstructures can be used to develop microrobots that have the potential to make existing therapeutic and diagnostic procedures less invasive. Actuation can be realized using various different organic and inorganic methods. Previous studies explored different forms of actuation and control with microorganisms. Bacteria, in particular, offer several advantages as controllable microactuators: they draw chemical energy directly from their environment, they are genetically modifiable, and they are scalable and configurable in the sense that any number of bacteria can be selectively patterned. Additionally, the study of bacteria inspires inorganic schemes of actuation and control. For these reasons, we chose to employ bacteria while controlling their motility using optical and electrical stimuli. In the first part of the thesis, we demonstrate a biointegrated approach by introducing MicroBioRobots (MBRs). MBRs are negative photosensitive epoxy (SU8) microfabricated structures with typical feature sizes ranging from 1-100 mum coated with a monolayer of the swarming Serratia marcescens . The adherent bacterial cells naturally coordinate to propel the microstructures in fluidic environments which we call Self-Actuation. First, we demonstrate the control of MBRs using self-actuation, DC electric fields and ultra-violet radiation and develop an experimentally-validated mathematical model for the MBRs. This model allows us to to steer the MBR to any position and orientation in a planar micro channel using visual feedback and an inverted microscope. Examples

  10. Spectrophotometric analysis at the single-cell level: elucidating dispersity within melanic immortalized cell populations.

    PubMed

    Polo-Parada, Luis; Gutiérrez-Juárez, Gerardo; Cywiak, David; Pérez-Solano, Rafael; Baker, Gary A

    2017-03-28

    It is widely held that the melanosome is an exemplar of the absorption features of melanin-containing cells, which are assumed to be uniform in both size and optical characteristics. In recent years, however, it has become increasingly apparent that this is a strikingly poor assumption. Indeed, melanin extracted from natural sources and synthetic melanin both show wide variability in their degree of polymerization (molecular weight) and spectroscopic characteristics. In the current study, imaging spectrophotometry performed on individual cells of immortalized melanin-producing cell lines revealed broad distributions in their sizes: 9.5-36.2 μm for Hs936 human melanoma cells, 10.9-20.8 μm for T47D human breast cancer cells, 5.3-43.5 μm for B16F1 mouse melanoma cells, and 6.4-54.2 μm for B16F10 mouse melanoma cells. The color appearance (from translucent to yellow to nearly black), absorption spectrum, and absorption (extinction) coefficient at 532 nm (28.73 to 364.75, 0.01 to 40.17, 5.88 to 977.19, and 0.01 to 1120 cm(-1) for Hs936, T47D, B16F1, and B16F10 cells, respectively) of an individual cell also vary widely and cannot be adequately described by a 'typical' value. In comparison, human red blood cells are much more uniform in size (6.0-8.1 μm diameter; 1.9-3.2 μm thickness), although they too show a broad range of absorptivities, with extinction coefficients in the range of 65 to 370 cm(-1) when measured at 532 nm. To further evaluate the impact of these findings on photoacoustic bioanalysis, we performed simulations of the generation of photoacoustic signals expected from these cell types. These simulations revealed that their variation in optical features exerts a pronounced effect on the amplitude and shape of the photoacoustic signals generated from these cell types. Finally, we compared the photoacoustic signal generated from these cells under ideal conditions (i.e., a single cell in isolation) versus a heterogeneous real-world sample, demonstrating

  11. Identification of Receptor Ligands and Receptor Subtypes Using Antagonists in a Capillary Electrophoresis Single-Cell Biosensor Separation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishman, Harvey A.; Orwar, Owe; Scheller, Richard H.; Zare, Richard N.

    1995-08-01

    A capillary electrophoresis system with single-cell biosensors as a detector has been used to separate and identify ligands in complex biological samples. The power of this procedure was significantly increased by introducing antagonists that inhibited the cellular response from selected ligand-receptor interactions. The single-cell biosensor was based on the ligand-receptor binding and G-protein-mediated signal transduction pathways in PC12 and NG108-15 cell lines. Receptor activation was measured as increases in cytosolic free calcium ion concentration by using fluorescence microscopy with the intracellular calcium ion indicator fluo-3 acetoxymethyl ester. Specifically, a mixture of bradykinin (BK) and acetylcholine (ACh) was fractionated and the components were identified by inhibiting the cellular response with icatibant (HOE 140), a selective antagonist to the BK B_2 receptor subtype (B_2BK), and atropine, an antagonist to muscarinic ACh receptor subtypes. Structurally related forms of BK were also identified based on inhibiting B_2BK receptors. Applications of this technique include identification of endogenous BK in a lysate of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (Hep G2) and screening for bioactivity of BK degradation products in human blood plasma. The data demonstrate that the use of antagonists with a single-cell biosensor separation system aids identification of separated components and receptor subtypes.

  12. High-throughput single-cell gene-expression profiling with multiplexed error-robust fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Moffitt, Jeffrey R; Hao, Junjie; Wang, Guiping; Chen, Kok Hao; Babcock, Hazen P; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2016-09-27

    Image-based approaches to single-cell transcriptomics, in which RNA species are identified and counted in situ via imaging, have emerged as a powerful complement to single-cell methods based on RNA sequencing of dissociated cells. These image-based approaches naturally preserve the native spatial context of RNAs within a cell and the organization of cells within tissue, which are important for addressing many biological questions. However, the throughput of these image-based approaches is relatively low. Here we report advances that lead to a drastic increase in the measurement throughput of multiplexed error-robust fluorescence in situ hybridization (MERFISH), an image-based approach to single-cell transcriptomics. In MERFISH, RNAs are identified via a combinatorial labeling approach that encodes RNA species with error-robust barcodes followed by sequential rounds of single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization (smFISH) to read out these barcodes. Here we increase the throughput of MERFISH by two orders of magnitude through a combination of improvements, including using chemical cleavage instead of photobleaching to remove fluorescent signals between consecutive rounds of smFISH imaging, increasing the imaging field of view, and using multicolor imaging. With these improvements, we performed RNA profiling in more than 100,000 human cells, with as many as 40,000 cells measured in a single 18-h measurement. This throughput should substantially extend the range of biological questions that can be addressed by MERFISH.

  13. High-throughput single-cell analysis for the proteomic dynamics study of the yeast osmotic stress response.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongfei; Yuan, Haiyu; Wang, Shujing; Ouyang, Qi; Chen, Yong; Hao, Nan; Luo, Chunxiong

    2017-02-09

    Motorized fluorescence microscopy combined with high-throughput microfluidic chips is a powerful method to obtain information about different biological processes in cell biology studies. Generally, to observe different strains under different environments, high-throughput microfluidic chips require complex preparatory work. In this study, we designed a novel and easily operated high-throughput microfluidic system to observe 96 different GFP-tagged yeast strains in one switchable culture condition or 24 different GFP-tagged yeast strains in four parallel switchable culture conditions. A multi-pipette is the only additional equipment required for high-throughput patterning of cells in the chip. Only eight connections are needed to control 96 conditions. Using these devices, the proteomic dynamics of the yeast stress response pathway were carefully studied based on single-cell data. A new method to characterize the proteomic dynamics using a single cell's data is proposed and compared to previous methods, and the new technique should be useful for studying underlying control networks. Our method provides an easy and systematic way to study signaling pathways at the single-cell level.

  14. High-throughput single-cell gene-expression profiling with multiplexed error-robust fluorescence in situ hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Moffitt, Jeffrey R.; Hao, Junjie; Wang, Guiping; Chen, Kok Hao

    2016-01-01

    Image-based approaches to single-cell transcriptomics, in which RNA species are identified and counted in situ via imaging, have emerged as a powerful complement to single-cell methods based on RNA sequencing of dissociated cells. These image-based approaches naturally preserve the native spatial context of RNAs within a cell and the organization of cells within tissue, which are important for addressing many biological questions. However, the throughput of these image-based approaches is relatively low. Here we report advances that lead to a drastic increase in the measurement throughput of multiplexed error-robust fluorescence in situ hybridization (MERFISH), an image-based approach to single-cell transcriptomics. In MERFISH, RNAs are identified via a combinatorial labeling approach that encodes RNA species with error-robust barcodes followed by sequential rounds of single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization (smFISH) to read out these barcodes. Here we increase the throughput of MERFISH by two orders of magnitude through a combination of improvements, including using chemical cleavage instead of photobleaching to remove fluorescent signals between consecutive rounds of smFISH imaging, increasing the imaging field of view, and using multicolor imaging. With these improvements, we performed RNA profiling in more than 100,000 human cells, with as many as 40,000 cells measured in a single 18-h measurement. This throughput should substantially extend the range of biological questions that can be addressed by MERFISH. PMID:27625426

  15. A review of the theory, methods and recent applications of high-throughput single-cell droplet microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagus, Todd P.; Edd, Jon F.

    2013-03-01

    Most cell biology experiments are performed in bulk cell suspensions where cell secretions become diluted and mixed in a contiguous sample. Confinement of single cells to small, picoliter-sized droplets within a continuous phase of oil provides chemical isolation of each cell, creating individual microreactors where rare cell qualities are highlighted and otherwise undetectable signals can be concentrated to measurable levels. Recent work in microfluidics has yielded methods for the encapsulation of cells in aqueous droplets and hydrogels at kilohertz rates, creating the potential for millions of parallel single-cell experiments. However, commercial applications of high-throughput microdroplet generation and downstream sensing and actuation methods are still emerging for cells. Using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) as a benchmark for commercially available high-throughput screening, this focused review discusses the fluid physics of droplet formation, methods for cell encapsulation in liquids and hydrogels, sensors and actuators and notable biological applications of high-throughput single-cell droplet microfluidics.

  16. Ultrasonic Scattering Measurements of a Live Single Cell at 86 MHz

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Changyang; Jung, Hayong; Lam, Kwok Ho; Yoon, Changhan; Shung, K. Kirk

    2016-01-01

    Cell separation and sorting techniques have been employed biomedical applications such as cancer diagnosis and cell gene expression analysis. The capability to accurately measure ultrasonic scattering properties from cells is crucial in making an ultrasonic cell sorter a reality if ultrasound scattering is to be used as the sensing mechanism as well. To assess the performance of sensing and identifying live single cells with high-frequency ultrasound, an 86-MHz lithium niobate press-focused single-element acoustic transducer was used in a high-frequency ultrasound scattering measurement system that was custom designed and developed for minimizing noise and allowing better mobility. Peak-to-peak echo amplitude, integrated backscatter (IB) coefficient, spectral parameters including spectral slope and intercept, and midband fit from spectral analysis of the backscattered echoes were measured and calculated from a live single cell of two different types on an agar surface: leukemia cells (K562 cells) and red blood cells (RBCs). The amplitudes of echo signals from K562 cells and RBCs were 48.25 ± 11.98 mVpp and 56.97 ± 7.53 mVpp, respectively. The IB coefficient was −89.39 ± 2.44 dB for K562 cells and −89.00 ± 1.19 dB for RBCs. The spectral slope and intercept were 0.30 ± 0.19 dB/MHz and −56.07 ± 17.17 dB, respectively, for K562 cells and 0.78 ± 0.092 dB/MHz and −98.18 ± 8.80 dB, respectively, for RBCs. Midband fits of K562 cells and RBCs were −31.02 ± 3.04 dB and −33.51 ± 1.55 dB, respectively. Acoustic cellular discrimination via these parameters was tested by Student’s t-test. Their values, except for the IB value, showed statistically significant difference (p < 0.001). This paper reports for the first time that ultrasonic scattering measurements can be made on a live single cell with a highly focused high-frequency ultrasound microbeam at 86 MHz. These results also suggest the feasibility of ultrasonic scattering as a sensing mechanism in

  17. Multiplex single cell profiling of chromatin accessibility by combinatorial cellular indexing.

    PubMed

    Cusanovich, Darren A; Daza, Riza; Adey, Andrew; Pliner, Hannah A; Christiansen, Lena; Gunderson, Kevin L; Steemers, Frank J; Trapnell, Cole; Shendure, Jay

    2015-05-22

    Technical advances have enabled the collection of genome and transcriptome data sets with single-cell resolution. However, single-cell characterization of the epigenome has remained challenging. Furthermore, because cells must be physically separated before biochemical processing, conventional single-cell preparatory methods scale linearly. We applied combinatorial cellular indexing to measure chromatin accessibility in thousands of single cells per assay, circumventing the need for compartmentalization of individual cells. We report chromatin accessibility profiles from more than 15,000 single cells and use these data to cluster cells on the basis of chromatin accessibility landscapes. We identify modules of coordinately regulated chromatin accessibility at the level of single cells both between and within cell types, with a scalable method that may accelerate progress toward a human cell atlas.

  18. Multiplex Single Cell Profiling of Chromatin Accessibility by Combinatorial Cellular Indexing

    PubMed Central

    Cusanovich, Darren A.; Daza, Riza; Adey, Andrew; Pliner, Hannah; Christiansen, Lena; Gunderson, Kevin L.; Steemers, Frank J.; Trapnell, Cole

    2016-01-01

    Technical advances have enabled the collection of genome and transcriptome datasets with single-cell resolution. However, single-cell characterization of the epigenome has remained challenging. Furthermore, because cells must be physically separated prior to biochemical processing, conventional single-cell preparatory methods scale linearly. We applied combinatorial cellular indexing to measure chromatin accessibility in thousands of single cells per assay, circumventing the need for compartmentalization of individual cells. We report chromatin accessibility profiles from over 15,000 single cells and use these data to cluster cells on the basis of chromatin accessibility landscapes. We identify modules of coordinately regulated chromatin accessibility at the level of single cells both between and within cell types, with a scalable method that may accelerate progress towards a human cell atlas. PMID:25953818

  19. Early single cell bifurcation of pro- and antiapoptotic states during oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Nair, Venugopalan D; Yuen, Tony; Olanow, C Warren; Sealfon, Stuart C

    2004-06-25

    In a population of cells undergoing oxidative stress, an individual cell either succumbs to apoptotic cell death or maintains homeostasis and survives. Exposure of PC-12-D(2)R cells to 200 microm hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) induces apoptosis in about half of cells after 24 h. After 1-h exposure to 200 microm H(2)O(2), both antiapoptotic extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation and pro-apoptotic Ser-15-p53 phosphorylation are observed. Microarray and real-time PCR assays of gene expression after H(2)O(2) exposure identified several transcripts, including egr1, that are rapidly induced downstream of ERK. Single cell analysis of egr1 induction and of phospho-ERK and phospho-p53 formation revealed the presence of two distinct cellular programs. Whereas the proportion of cells activating ERK versus p53 at 1 h depended on H(2)O(2) concentration, individual cells showed exclusively either phospho-p53 formation or activation of ERK and egr1 induction. Exposure to H(2)O(2) for 1 h also elicited these two non-overlapping cellular responses in both dopaminergic SN4741 cells and differentiated postmitotic PC-12-D(2)R cells. Repressing p53 with pifithrin-alpha or small interfering RNA increased ERK phosphorylation by H(2)O(2), indicating that p53-dependent suppression of ERK activity may contribute to the bi-stable single cell responses observed. By 24 h, the subset of cells in which ERK activity was suppressed exhibit caspase 3 activation and the nuclear condensation characteristic of apoptosis. These studies suggest that the individual cell rapidly and stochastically processes the oxidative stress stimulus, leading to an all-or-none cytoprotective or pro-apoptotic signaling response.

  20. Toward a single-cell-based analysis of neuropeptide expression in Periplaneta americana antennal lobe neurons.

    PubMed

    Neupert, Susanne; Fusca, Debora; Schachtner, Joachim; Kloppenburg, Peter; Predel, Reinhard

    2012-03-01

    A multitude of potential neurotransmitters and neuromodulators, including peptides, have been detected in the antennal lobe (AL), the first synaptic relay of the central olfactory pathway in the insect brain. However, the functional role of neuropeptides in this system has yet to be revealed. An important prerequisite to understanding the role of neuropeptides is to match the functionally different cell types in the AL with their peptide profiles by using electrophysiological recordings combined with immunocytochemical studies and/or single-cell mass spectrometry. The olfactory system of Periplaneta americana is particularly well suited to accomplish this goal because several physiologically distinct neuron types can be unequivocally identified. With the aim to analyze the neuropeptide inventory of the P. americana AL, this study is an essential step in this direction. First, we systematically analyzed different parts of the AL by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry to obtain the complete set of neuropeptides present. Altogether, 56 ion signals could be assigned to products of 10 neuropeptide genes (allatostatins A, B, C, SIFamide, allatotropin, FMRFamide-related peptides [myosuppressin, short neuropeptides F, extended FMRFamides], crustacean cardioactive peptide, tachykinin-related peptides). In a second step, a combination of immunocytochemistry and mass spectrometric profiling of defined AL compartments was used to reveal the spatial distribution of neuropeptide-containing cells. Finally, we demonstrated the feasibility of MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric profiling of single AL neurons, which is an important precondition for combining electrophysiology with peptide profiling at the single-cell level.

  1. CCAST: a model-based gating strategy to isolate homogeneous subpopulations in a heterogeneous population of single cells.

    PubMed

    Anchang, Benedict; Do, Mary T; Zhao, Xi; Plevritis, Sylvia K

    2014-07-01

    A model-based gating strategy is developed for sorting cells and analyzing populations of single cells. The strategy, named CCAST, for Clustering, Classification and Sorting Tree, identifies a gating strategy for isolating homogeneous subpopulations from a heterogeneous population of single cells using a data-derived decision tree representation that can be applied to cell sorting. Because CCAST does not rely on expert knowledge, it removes human bias and variability when determining the gating strategy. It combines any clustering algorithm with silhouette measures to identify underlying homogeneous subpopulations, then applies recursive partitioning techniques to generate a decision tree that defines the gating strategy. CCAST produces an optimal strategy for cell sorting by automating the selection of gating markers, the corresponding gating thresholds and gating sequence; all of these parameters are typically manually defined. Even though CCAST is optimized for cell sorting, it can be applied for the identification and analysis of homogeneous subpopulations among heterogeneous single cell data. We apply CCAST on single cell data from both breast cancer cell lines and normal human bone marrow. On the SUM159 breast cancer cell line data, CCAST indicates at least five distinct cell states based on two surface markers (CD24 and EPCAM) and provides a gating sorting strategy that produces more homogeneous subpopulations than previously reported. When applied to normal bone marrow data, CCAST reveals an efficient strategy for gating T-cells without prior knowledge of the major T-cell subtypes and the markers that best define them. On the normal bone marrow data, CCAST also reveals two major mature B-cell subtypes, namely CD123+ and CD123- cells, which were not revealed by manual gating but show distinct intracellular signaling responses. More generally, the CCAST framework could be used on other biological and non-biological high dimensional data types that are

  2. An automated approach for single-cell tracking in epifluorescence microscopy applied to E. coli growth analysis on microfluidics biochips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetita, Catalin; Kirov, Boris; Jaramillo, Alfonso; Lefevre, Christophe

    2012-03-01

    With the accumulation of knowledge for the intimate molecular mechanisms governing the processes inside the living cells in the later years, the ability to characterize the performance of elementary genetic circuits and parts at the single-cell level is becoming of crucial importance. Biological science is arriving to the point where it can develop hypothesis for the action of each molecule participating in the biochemical reactions and need proper techniques to test those hypothesis. Microfluidics is emerging as the technology that combined with high-magnification microscopy will allow for the long-term single-cell level observation of bacterial physiology. In this study we design, build and characterize the gene dynamics of genetic circuits as one of the basic parts governing programmed cell behavior. We use E. coli as model organism and grow it in microfluidics chips, which we observe with epifluorescence microscopy. One of the most invaluable segments of this technology is the consequent image processing, since it allows for the automated analysis of vast amount of single-cell observation and the fast and easy derivation of conclusions based on that data. Specifically, we are interested in promoter activity as function of time. We expect it to be oscillatory and for that we use GFP (green fluorescent protein) as a reporter in our genetic circuits. In this paper, an automated framework for single-cell tracking in phase-contrast microscopy is developed, combining 2D segmentation of cell time frames and graph-based reconstruction of their spatiotemporal evolution with fast tracking of the associated fluorescence signal. The results obtained on the investigated biological database are presented and discussed.

  3. Single cell electric impedance topography: mapping membrane capacitance.

    PubMed

    Dharia, Sameera; Ayliffe, Harold E; Rabbitt, Richard D

    2009-12-07

    Single-cell electric impedance topography (sceTopo), a technique introduced here, maps the spatial distribution of capacitance (i.e. displacement current) associated with the membranes of isolated, living cells. Cells were positioned in the center of a circular recording chamber surrounded by eight electrodes. Electrodes were evenly distributed on the periphery of the recording chamber. Electric impedance measured between adjacent electrode pairs (10 kHz-5 MHz) was used to construct topographical maps of the spatial distribution of membrane capacitance. Xenopus Oocytes were used as a model cell to develop sceTopo because these cells consist of two visually distinguishable hemispheres, each with distinct membrane composition and structure. Results showed significant differences in the imaginary component of the impedance between the two oocyte hemispheres. In addition, the same circumferential array was used to map the size of the extracellular electrical shunt path around the cell, providing a means to estimate the location and shape of the cell in the recording chamber.

  4. T cell fate and clonality inference from single cell transcriptomes

    PubMed Central

    Proserpio, Valentina; Clare, Simon; Speak, Anneliese O.; Dougan, Gordon; Teichmann, Sarah A.

    2016-01-01

    The enormous sequence diversity within T cell receptor (TCR) repertoires allows specific TCR sequences to be used as lineage markers for T cells that derive from a common progenitor. We have developed a computational method, called TraCeR, to reconstruct full-length, paired TCR sequences from T lymphocyte single-cell RNA-seq by combining existing assembly and alignment programs with “combinatorial recombinome” sequences comprising all possible TCR combinations. We validate this method to quantify its accuracy and sensitivity. Inferred TCR sequences reveal clonal relationships between T cells whilst the cells’ complete transcriptional landscapes can be quantified from the remaining RNA-seq data. This provides a powerful tool to link T cell specificity with functional response and we demonstrate this by determining the distribution of members of expanded T cell clonotypes in a mouse Salmonella infection model. Members of the same clonotype span early activated CD4+ T cells, as well as mature effector and memory cells. PMID:26950746

  5. Single-Cell Phenotype Classification Using Deep Convolutional Neural Networks.

    PubMed

    Dürr, Oliver; Sick, Beate

    2016-10-01

    Deep learning methods are currently outperforming traditional state-of-the-art computer vision algorithms in diverse applications and recently even surpassed human performance in object recognition. Here we demonstrate the potential of deep learning methods to high-content screening-based phenotype classification. We trained a deep learning classifier in the form of convolutional neural networks with approximately 40,000 publicly available single-cell images from samples treated with compounds from four classes known to lead to different phenotypes. The input data consisted of multichannel images. The construction of appropriate feature definitions was part of the training and carried out by the convolutional network, without the need for expert knowledge or handcrafted features. We compare our results against the recent state-of-the-art pipeline in which predefined features are extracted from each cell using specialized software and then fed into various machine learning algorithms (support vector machine, Fisher linear discriminant, random forest) for classification. The performance of all classification approaches is evaluated on an untouched test image set with known phenotype classes. Compared to the best reference machine learning algorithm, the misclassification rate is reduced from 8.9% to 6.6%.

  6. Single-Cell RNA-Seq Reveals Hypothalamic Cell Diversity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Renchao; Wu, Xiaoji; Jiang, Lan; Zhang, Yi

    2017-03-28

    The hypothalamus is one of the most complex brain structures involved in homeostatic regulation. Defining cell composition and identifying cell-type-specific transcriptional features of the hypothalamus is essential for understanding its functions and related disorders. Here, we report single-cell RNA sequencing results of adult mouse hypothalamus, which defines 11 non-neuronal and 34 neuronal cell clusters with distinct transcriptional signatures. Analyses of cell-type-specific transcriptomes reveal gene expression dynamics underlying oligodendrocyte differentiation and tanycyte subtypes. Additionally, data analysis provides a comprehensive view of neuropeptide expression across hypothalamic neuronal subtypes and uncover Crabp1(+) and Pax6(+) neuronal populations in specific hypothalamic sub-regions. Furthermore, we found food deprivation exhibited differential transcriptional effects among the different neuronal subtypes, suggesting functional specification of various neuronal subtypes. Thus, the work provides a comprehensive transcriptional perspective of adult hypothalamus, which serves as a valuable resource for dissecting cell-type-specific functions of this complex brain region.

  7. Synchronizing stochastic circadian oscillators in single cells of Neurospora crassa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zhaojie; Arsenault, Sam; Caranica, Cristian; Griffith, James; Zhu, Taotao; Al-Omari, Ahmad; Schüttler, Heinz-Bernd; Arnold, Jonathan; Mao, Leidong

    2016-10-01

    The synchronization of stochastic coupled oscillators is a central problem in physics and an emerging problem in biology, particularly in the context of circadian rhythms. Most measurements on the biological clock are made at the macroscopic level of millions of cells. Here measurements are made on the oscillators in single cells of the model fungal system, Neurospora crassa, with droplet microfluidics and the use of a fluorescent recorder hooked up to a promoter on a clock controlled gene-2 (ccg-2). The oscillators of individual cells are stochastic with a period near 21 hours (h), and using a stochastic clock network ensemble fitted by Markov Chain Monte Carlo implemented on general-purpose graphical processing units (or GPGPUs) we estimated that >94% of the variation in ccg-2 expression was stochastic (as opposed to experimental error). To overcome this stochasticity at the macroscopic level, cells must synchronize their oscillators. Using a classic measure of similarity in cell trajectories within droplets, the intraclass correlation (ICC), the synchronization surface ICC is measured on >25,000 cells as a function of the number of neighboring cells within a droplet and of time. The synchronization surface provides evidence that cells communicate, and synchronization varies with genotype.

  8. Mass spectrometry imaging and profiling of single cells

    PubMed Central

    Lanni, Eric J.; Rubakhin, Stanislav S.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging and profiling of individual cells and subcellular structures provide unique analytical capabilities for biological and biomedical research, including determination of the biochemical heterogeneity of cellular populations and intracellular localization of pharmaceuticals. Two mass spectrometry technologies—secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS)—are most often used in micro-bioanalytical investigations. Recent advances in ion probe technologies have increased the dynamic range and sensitivity of analyte detection by SIMS, allowing two- and three-dimensional localization of analytes in a variety of cells. SIMS operating in the mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) mode can routinely reach spatial resolutions at the submicron level; therefore, it is frequently used in studies of the chemical composition of subcellular structures. MALDI MS offers a large mass range and high sensitivity of analyte detection. It has been successfully applied in a variety of single-cell and organelle profiling studies. Innovative instrumentation such as scanning microprobe MALDI and mass microscope spectrometers enable new subcellular MSI measurements. Other approaches for MS-based chemical imaging and profiling include those based on near-field laser ablation and inductively-coupled plasma MS analysis, which offer complementary capabilities for subcellular chemical imaging and profiling. PMID:22498881

  9. Single cell viability and impact of heating by laser absorption.

    PubMed

    Wetzel, Franziska; Rönicke, Susanne; Müller, Karla; Gyger, Markus; Rose, Daniel; Zink, Mareike; Käs, Josef

    2011-09-01

    Optical traps such as tweezers and stretchers are widely used to probe the mechanical properties of cells. Beyond their large range of applications, the use of infrared laser light in optical traps causes significant heating effects in the cell. This study investigated the effect of laser-induced heating on cell viability. Common viability assays are not very sensitive to damages caused in short periods of time or are not practicable for single cell analysis. We used cell spreading, a vital ability of cells, as a new sensitive viability marker. The optical stretcher, a two beam laser trap, was used to simulate heat shocks that cells typically experience during measurements in optical traps. The results show that about 60% of the cells survived heat shocks without vital damage at temperatures of up to 58 ± 2°C for 0.5 s. By varying the duration of the heat shocks, it was shown that 60% of the cells stayed viable when exposed to 48 ± 2°C for 5 s.

  10. Embedded silver PDMS electrodes for single cell electrical impedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yuan; Xu, Zhensong; Cachia, Mark A.; Nguyen, John; Zheng, Yi; Wang, Chen; Sun, Yu

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a microfluidic device with wide channels and embedded AgPDMS electrodes for measuring the electrical properties of single cells. The work demonstrates the feasibility of using a large channel design and embedded electrodes for impedance spectroscopy to circumvent issues such as channel clogging and limited device re-usability. AgPDMS electrodes were formed on channel sidewalls for impedance detection and cell electrical properties measurement. Equivalent circuit models were used to interpret multi-frequency impedance data to quantify each cell’s cytoplasm conductivity and specific membrane capacitance. T24 cells were tested to validate the microfluidic system and modeling results. Comparisons were then made by measuring two leukemia cell lines (AML-2 and HL-60) which were found to have different cytoplasm conductivity values (0.29  ±  0.15 S m-1 versus 0.47  ±  0.20 S m-1) and specific membrane capacitance values (41  ±  25 mF m-2 versus 55  ±  26 mF m-2) when the cells were flown through the wide channel and measured by the AgPDMS electrodes.

  11. Preparation of Single Cells for Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, E S; Fortson, S L; Kulp, K S; Checchi, K D; Wu, L; Felton, J S; Wu, K J

    2007-10-24

    Characterizing chemical changes within single cells is important for determining fundamental mechanisms of biological processes that will lead to new biological insights and improved disease understanding. Imaging biological systems with mass spectrometry (MS) has gained popularity in recent years as a method for creating precise chemical maps of biological samples. In order to obtain high-quality mass spectral images that provide relevant molecular information about individual cells, samples must be prepared so that salts and other cell-culture components are removed from the cell surface and the cell contents are rendered accessible to the desorption beam. We have designed a cellular preparation protocol for imaging MS that preserves the cellular contents for investigation and removes the majority of the interfering species from the extracellular matrix. Using this method, we obtain excellent imaging results and reproducibility in three diverse cell types: MCF7 human breast cancer cells, Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, and NIH/3T3 mouse fibroblasts. This preparation technique allows routine imaging MS analysis of cultured cells, allowing for any number of experiments aimed at furthering scientific understanding of molecular processes within individual cells.

  12. Comparative Analysis of Single-Cell RNA Sequencing Methods.

    PubMed

    Ziegenhain, Christoph; Vieth, Beate; Parekh, Swati; Reinius, Björn; Guillaumet-Adkins, Amy; Smets, Martha; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Heyn, Holger; Hellmann, Ines; Enard, Wolfgang

    2017-02-16

    Single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-seq) offers new possibilities to address biological and medical questions. However, systematic comparisons of the performance of diverse scRNA-seq protocols are lacking. We generated data from 583 mouse embryonic stem cells to evaluate six prominent scRNA-seq methods: CEL-seq2, Drop-seq, MARS-seq, SCRB-seq, Smart-seq, and Smart-seq2. While Smart-seq2 detected the most genes per cell and across cells, CEL-seq2, Drop-seq, MARS-seq, and SCRB-seq quantified mRNA levels with less amplification noise due to the use of unique molecular identifiers (UMIs). Power simulations at different sequencing depths showed that Drop-seq is more cost-efficient for transcriptome quantification of large numbers of cells, while MARS-seq, SCRB-seq, and Smart-seq2 are more efficient when analyzing fewer cells. Our quantitative comparison offers the basis for an informed choice among six prominent scRNA-seq methods, and it provides a framework for benchmarking further improvements of scRNA-seq protocols.

  13. Single cell electric impedance topography: Mapping membrane capacitance

    PubMed Central

    Dharia, Sameera; Ayliffe, Harold E.

    2010-01-01

    Single-cell electric impedance topography (sceTopo), a technique introduced here, maps the spatial distribution of capacitance (i.e. displacement current) associated with the membranes of isolated, living cells. Cells were positioned in the center of a circular recording chamber surrounded by eight electrodes. Electrodes were evenly distributed on the periphery of the recording chamber. Electric impedance measured between adjacent electrode pairs (10 kHz–5 MHz) was used to construct topographical maps of the spatial distribution of membrane capacitance. Xenopus Oocytes were used as a model cell to develop sceTopo because these cells consist of two visually distinguishable hemispheres, each with distinct membrane composition and structure. Results showed significant differences in the imaginary component of the impedance between the two oocyte hemispheres. In addition, the same circumferential array was used to map the size of the extracellular electrical shunt path around the cell, providing a means to estimate the location and shape of the cell in the recording chamber. PMID:19904403

  14. QuantiLyse: reliable DNA amplification from single cells.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Kenneth E; Rice, John E; Sanchez, J Aquiles; Wangh, Lawrence J

    2002-05-01

    Amplification of DNA sequencesfrom single cells via PCR is increasingly used in basic research and clinical diagnostics but remains technically difficult. We have developed a cell lysis protocol that uses an optimized proteinase K solution, named QuantiLyse and permits reliable amplification from individual cells. This protocol was compared to other published methods by means of real-time PCR with molecular beacons. The results demonstrate that QuantiLyse treatment of single lymphocytes renders gene targets more availablefor amplification than other published proteinase K methods or lysis in water. QuantiLyse and an optimized alkaline lysis were equally effective in terms of target availability, although QuantiLyse offers greaterflexibility, as it does not require neutralization and can comprise a higher percentage of the final PCR volume. Maximum gene target availability is also obtained following QuantiLyse treatment of samples containing up to 10000 cells (the largest number tested). Thus, QuantiLyse maximizes the chances that targeted DNA sequences will be available for amplification during the first cycle of PCR, thereby reducing the variability among replicate reactions as well as the likelihood of amplification failure or allele drop-out. QuantiLyse will be useful in a range of investigations aimed at gene detection in small numbers of cells.

  15. All-optical broadband ultrasonography of single cells

    PubMed Central

    Dehoux, T.; Ghanem, M. Abi; Zouani, O. F.; Rampnoux, J.-M.; Guillet, Y.; Dilhaire, S.; Durrieu, M.-C.; Audoin, B.

    2015-01-01

    Cell mechanics play a key role in several fundamental biological processes, such as migration, proliferation, differentiation and tissue morphogenesis. In addition, many diseased conditions of the cell are correlated with altered cell mechanics, as in the case of cancer progression. For this there is much interest in methods that can map mechanical properties with a sub-cell resolution. Here, we demonstrate an inverted pulsed opto-acoustic microscope (iPOM) that operates in the 10 to 100 GHz range. These frequencies allow mapping quantitatively cell structures as thin as 10 nm and resolving the fibrillar details of cells. Using this non-invasive all-optical system, we produce high-resolution images based on mechanical properties as the contrast mechanisms, and we can observe the stiffness and adhesion of single migrating stem cells. The technique should allow transferring the diagnostic and imaging abilities of ultrasonic imaging to the single-cell scale, thus opening new avenues for cell biology and biomaterial sciences. PMID:25731090

  16. Synchronizing stochastic circadian oscillators in single cells of Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Zhaojie; Arsenault, Sam; Caranica, Cristian; Griffith, James; Zhu, Taotao; Al-Omari, Ahmad; Schüttler, Heinz-Bernd; Arnold, Jonathan; Mao, Leidong

    2016-01-01

    The synchronization of stochastic coupled oscillators is a central problem in physics and an emerging problem in biology, particularly in the context of circadian rhythms. Most measurements on the biological clock are made at the macroscopic level of millions of cells. Here measurements are made on the oscillators in single cells of the model fungal system, Neurospora crassa, with droplet microfluidics and the use of a fluorescent recorder hooked up to a promoter on a clock controlled gene-2 (ccg-2). The oscillators of individual cells are stochastic with a period near 21 hours (h), and using a stochastic clock network ensemble fitted by Markov Chain Monte Carlo implemented on general-purpose graphical processing units (or GPGPUs) we estimated that >94% of the variation in ccg-2 expression was stochastic (as opposed to experimental error). To overcome this stochasticity at the macroscopic level, cells must synchronize their oscillators. Using a classic measure of similarity in cell trajectories within droplets, the intraclass correlation (ICC), the synchronization surface ICC is measured on >25,000 cells as a function of the number of neighboring cells within a droplet and of time. The synchronization surface provides evidence that cells communicate, and synchronization varies with genotype. PMID:27786253

  17. Tumour Heterogeneity: The Key Advantages of Single-Cell Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tellez-Gabriel, Marta; Ory, Benjamin; Lamoureux, Francois; Heymann, Marie-Francoise; Heymann, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Tumour heterogeneity refers to the fact that different tumour cells can show distinct morphological and phenotypic profiles, including cellular morphology, gene expression, metabolism, motility, proliferation and metastatic potential. This phenomenon occurs both between tumours (inter-tumour heterogeneity) and within tumours (intra-tumour heterogeneity), and it is caused by genetic and non-genetic factors. The heterogeneity of cancer cells introduces significant challenges in using molecular prognostic markers as well as for classifying patients that might benefit from specific therapies. Thus, research efforts for characterizing heterogeneity would be useful for a better understanding of the causes and progression of disease. It has been suggested that the study of heterogeneity within Circulating Tumour Cells (CTCs) could also reflect the full spectrum of mutations of the disease more accurately than a single biopsy of a primary or metastatic tumour. In previous years, many high throughput methodologies have raised for the study of heterogeneity at different levels (i.e., RNA, DNA, protein and epigenetic events). The aim of the current review is to stress clinical implications of tumour heterogeneity, as well as current available methodologies for their study, paying specific attention to those able to assess heterogeneity at the single cell level. PMID:27999407

  18. Probing single-cell mechanics with picosecond ultrasonics.

    PubMed

    Dehoux, Thomas; Abi Ghanem, Maroun; Zouani, Omar F; Ducousso, Mathieu; Chigarev, Nikolay; Rossignol, Clément; Tsapis, Nicolas; Durrieu, Marie-Christine; Audoin, Bertrand

    2015-02-01

    The mechanical properties of cells play a key role in several fundamental biological processes, such as migration, proliferation, differentiation and tissue morphogenesis. The complexity of the inner cell composition and the intricate meshwork formed by transmembrane cell-substrate interactions demands a non-invasive technique to probe cell mechanics and cell adhesion at a subcell scale. In this paper we review the use of laser-generated GHz acoustic waves--a technique called picosecond ultrasonics (PU)--to probe the mechanical properties of single cells. We first describe applications to vegetal cells and biomimetic systems. We show how these systems can be used as simple models to understand more complex animal cells. We then present an opto-acoustic bio-transducer designed for in vivo measurements in physiological conditions. We illustrate the use of this transducer through the simultaneous probing of the density and compressibility of Allium cepa cells. Finally, we demonstrate that this technique can quantify animal-cell adhesion on metallic surfaces by analyzing the acoustic pulses reflected off the cell-metal interface. This innovative approach allows investigating quantitatively cell mechanics without fluorescent labels or mechanical contact to the cell.

  19. T Cell Fate at the Single-Cell Level.

    PubMed

    Buchholz, Veit R; Schumacher, Ton N M; Busch, Dirk H

    2016-05-20

    T cell responses display two key characteristics. First, a small population of epitope-specific naive T cells expands by several orders of magnitude. Second, the T cells within this proliferating population take on diverse functional and phenotypic properties that determine their ability to exert effector functions and contribute to T cell memory. Recent technological advances in lineage tracing allow us for the first time to study these processes in vivo at single-cell resolution. Here, we summarize resulting data demonstrating that although epitope-specific T cell responses are reproducibly similar at the population level, expansion potential and diversification patterns of the offspring derived from individual T cells are highly variable during both primary and recall immune responses. In spite of this stochastic response variation, individual memory T cells can serve as adult stem cells that provide robust regeneration of an epitope-specific tissue through population averaging. We discuss the relevance of these findings for T cell memory formation and clinical immunotherapy.

  20. Resolving Early Mesoderm Diversification through Single Cell Expression Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Nicola K.; Macaulay, Iain C.; Marioni, John C.; Göttgens, Berthold

    2016-01-01

    Summary In mammals, specification of the three major germ layers occurs during gastrulation, when cells ingressing through the primitive streak differentiate into the precursor cells of major organ systems. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this process remain unclear, as numbers of gastrulating cells are very limited. In the E6.5 mouse embryo, cells located at the junction between the extra-embryonic region and the epiblast on the posterior side of the embryo undergo an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and ingress through the primitive streak (PS). Subsequently, cells migrate, either surrounding the prospective ectoderm contributing to the embryo proper, or into the extra-embryonic region to form the yolk sac (YS), umbilical cord and placenta. Fate mapping has shown that mature tissues such as blood and heart originate from specific regions of the pre-gastrula epiblast1 but the plasticity of cells within the embryo and the function of key cell type-specific transcription factors remain unclear. Here we analyse 1,205 cells from the epiblast and nascent Flk1+ mesoderm of gastrulating mouse embryos using single cell RNA-sequencing, representing the first transcriptome-wide in vivo view of early mesoderm formation during mammalian gastrulation. Additionally, using knock-out mice, we study the function of Tal1, a key hematopoietic transcription factor (TF), and demonstrate, contrary to previous studies performed using retrospective assays2,3, that Tal1 knock out does not immediately bias precursor cells towards a cardiac fate. PMID:27383781

  1. The Chemopreventive Phytochemical Moringin Isolated from Moringa oleifera Seeds Inhibits JAK/STAT Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Weigl, Julia; De Nicola, Gina Rosalinda; Canistro, Donatella; Paolini, Moreno; Iori, Renato; Rascle, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Sulforaphane (SFN) and moringin (GMG-ITC) are edible isothiocyanates present as glucosinolate precursors in cruciferous vegetables and in the plant Moringa oleifera respectively, and recognized for their chemopreventive and medicinal properties. In contrast to the well-studied SFN, little is known about the molecular pathways targeted by GMG-ITC. We investigated the ability of GMG-ITC to inhibit essential signaling pathways that are frequently upregulated in cancer and immune disorders, such as JAK/STAT and NF-κB. We report for the first time that, similarly to SFN, GMG-ITC in the nanomolar range suppresses IL-3-induced expression of STAT5 target genes. GMG-ITC, like SFN, does not inhibit STAT5 phosphorylation, suggesting a downstream inhibitory event. Interestingly, treatment with GMG-ITC or SFN had a limited inhibitory effect on IFNα-induced STAT1 and STAT2 activity, indicating that both isothiocyanates differentially target JAK/STAT signaling pathways. Furthermore, we showed that GMG-ITC in the micromolar range is a more potent inhibitor of TNF-induced NF-κB activity than SFN. Finally, using a cellular system mimicking constitutive active STAT5-induced cell transformation, we demonstrated that SFN can reverse the survival and growth advantage mediated by oncogenic STAT5 and triggers cell death, therefore providing experimental evidence of a cancer chemopreventive activity of SFN. This work thus identified STAT5, and to a lesser extent STAT1/STAT2, as novel targets of moringin. It also contributes to a better understanding of the biological activities of the dietary isothiocyanates GMG-ITC and SFN and further supports their apparent beneficial role in the prevention of chronic illnesses such as cancer, inflammatory diseases and immune disorders. PMID:27304884

  2. The Chemopreventive Phytochemical Moringin Isolated from Moringa oleifera Seeds Inhibits JAK/STAT Signaling.

    PubMed

    Michl, Carina; Vivarelli, Fabio; Weigl, Julia; De Nicola, Gina Rosalinda; Canistro, Donatella; Paolini, Moreno; Iori, Renato; Rascle, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Sulforaphane (SFN) and moringin (GMG-ITC) are edible isothiocyanates present as glucosinolate precursors in cruciferous vegetables and in the plant Moringa oleifera respectively, and recognized for their chemopreventive and medicinal properties. In contrast to the well-studied SFN, little is known about the molecular pathways targeted by GMG-ITC. We investigated the ability of GMG-ITC to inhibit essential signaling pathways that are frequently upregulated in cancer and immune disorders, such as JAK/STAT and NF-κB. We report for the first time that, similarly to SFN, GMG-ITC in the nanomolar range suppresses IL-3-induced expression of STAT5 target genes. GMG-ITC, like SFN, does not inhibit STAT5 phosphorylation, suggesting a downstream inhibitory event. Interestingly, treatment with GMG-ITC or SFN had a limited inhibitory effect on IFNα-induced STAT1 and STAT2 activity, indicating that both isothiocyanates differentially target JAK/STAT signaling pathways. Furthermore, we showed that GMG-ITC in the micromolar range is a more potent inhibitor of TNF-induced NF-κB activity than SFN. Finally, using a cellular system mimicking constitutive active STAT5-induced cell transformation, we demonstrated that SFN can reverse the survival and growth advantage mediated by oncogenic STAT5 and triggers cell death, therefore providing experimental evidence of a cancer chemopreventive activity of SFN. This work thus identified STAT5, and to a lesser extent STAT1/STAT2, as novel targets of moringin. It also contributes to a better understanding of the biological activities of the dietary isothiocyanates GMG-ITC and SFN and further supports their apparent beneficial role in the prevention of chronic illnesses such as cancer, inflammatory diseases and immune disorders.

  3. G&T-seq: parallel sequencing of single-cell genomes and transcriptomes.

    PubMed

    Macaulay, Iain C; Haerty, Wilfried; Kumar, Parveen; Li, Yang I; Hu, Tim Xiaoming; Teng, Mabel J; Goolam, Mubeen; Saurat, Nathalie; Coupland, Paul; Shirley, Lesley M; Smith, Miriam; Van der Aa, Niels; Banerjee, Ruby; Ellis, Peter D; Quail, Michael A; Swerdlow, Harold P; Zernicka-Goetz, Magdalena; Livesey, Frederick J; Ponting, Chris P; Voet, Thierry

    2015-06-01

    The simultaneous sequencing of a single cell's genome and transcriptome offers a powerful means to dissect genetic variation and its effect on gene expression. Here we describe G&T-seq, a method for separating and sequencing genomic DNA and full-length mRNA from single cells. By applying G&T-seq to over 220 single cells from mice and humans, we discovered cellular properties that could not be inferred from DNA or RNA sequencing alone.

  4. Single-Cell RNA Sequencing of the Bronchial Epithelium in Smokers With Lung Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0234 TITLE: Single-Cell RNA Sequencing of the Bronchial Epithelium in Smokers With Lung Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Single-Cell RNA Sequencing of the Bronchial Epithelium in Smokers With Lung Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH...single cell RNA sequencing on airway epithelial cells obtained from smokers with and without lung cancer to identify cell-type dependent gene expression

  5. Microfluidic Impedance Flow Cytometry Enabling High-Throughput Single-Cell Electrical Property Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian; Xue, Chengcheng; Zhao, Yang; Chen, Deyong; Wu, Min-Hsien; Wang, Junbo

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews recent developments in microfluidic impedance flow cytometry for high-throughput electrical property characterization of single cells. Four major perspectives of microfluidic impedance flow cytometry for single-cell characterization are included in this review: (1) early developments of microfluidic impedance flow cytometry for single-cell electrical property characterization; (2) microfluidic impedance flow cytometry with enhanced sensitivity; (3) microfluidic impedance and optical flow cytometry for single-cell analysis and (4) integrated point of care system based on microfluidic impedance flow cytometry. We examine the advantages and limitations of each technique and discuss future research opportunities from the perspectives of both technical innovation and clinical applications. PMID:25938973

  6. Phenotype classification of single cells using SRS microscopy, RNA sequencing, and microfluidics (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streets, Aaron M.; Cao, Chen; Zhang, Xiannian; Huang, Yanyi

    2016-03-01

    Phenotype classification of single cells reveals biological variation that is masked in ensemble measurement. This heterogeneity is found in gene and protein expression as well as in cell morphology. Many techniques are available to probe phenotypic heterogeneity at the single cell level, for example quantitative imaging and single-cell RNA sequencing, but it is difficult to perform multiple assays on the same single cell. In order to directly track correlation between morphology and gene expression at the single cell level, we developed a microfluidic platform for quantitative coherent Raman imaging and immediate RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) of single cells. With this device we actively sort and trap cells for analysis with stimulated Raman scattering microscopy (SRS). The cells are then processed in parallel pipelines for lysis, and preparation of cDNA for high-throughput transcriptome sequencing. SRS microscopy offers three-dimensional imaging with chemical specificity for quantitative analysis of protein and lipid distribution in single cells. Meanwhile, the microfluidic platform facilitates single-cell manipulation, minimizes contamination, and furthermore, provides improved RNA-Seq detection sensitivity and measurement precision, which is necessary for differentiating biological variability from technical noise. By combining coherent Raman microscopy with RNA sequencing, we can better understand the relationship between cellular morphology and gene expression at the single-cell level.

  7. Ultra-high throughput detection of single cell β-galactosidase activity in droplets using micro-optical lens array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Jiseok; Vrignon, Jérémy; Gruner, Philipp; Karamitros, Christos S.; Konrad, Manfred; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2013-11-01

    We demonstrate the use of a hybrid microfluidic-micro-optical system for the screening of enzymatic activity at the single cell level. Escherichia coli β-galactosidase activity is revealed by a fluorogenic assay in 100 pl droplets. Individual droplets containing cells are screened by measuring their fluorescence signal using a high-speed camera. The measurement is parallelized over 100 channels equipped with microlenses and analyzed by image processing. A reinjection rate of 1 ml of emulsion per minute was reached corresponding to more than 105 droplets per second, an analytical throughput larger than those obtained using flow cytometry.

  8. Understanding the link between single cell and population scale responses of Escherichia coli in differing ligand gradients

    PubMed Central

    Edgington, Matthew P.; Tindall, Marcus J.

    2015-01-01

    We formulate an agent-based population model of Escherichia coli cells which incorporates a description of the chemotaxis signalling cascade at the single cell scale. The model is used to gain insight into the link between the signalling cascade dynamics and the overall population response to differing chemoattractant gradients. Firstly, we consider how the observed variation in total (phosphorylated and unphosphorylated) signalling protein concentration affects the ability of cells to accumulate in differing chemoattractant gradients. Results reveal that a variation in total cell protein concentration between cells may be a mechanism for the survival of cell colonies across a wide range of differing environments. We then study the response of cells in the presence of two different chemoattractants. In doing so we demonstrate that the population scale response depends not on the absolute concentration of each chemoattractant but on the sensitivity of the chemoreceptors to their respective concentrations. Our results show the clear link between single cell features and the overall environment in which cells reside. PMID:26693274

  9. Defining the three cell lineages of the human blastocyst by single-cell RNA-seq

    PubMed Central

    Blakeley, Paul; Fogarty, Norah M. E.; del Valle, Ignacio; Wamaitha, Sissy E.; Hu, Tim Xiaoming; Elder, Kay; Snell, Philip; Christie, Leila; Robson, Paul; Niakan, Kathy K.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we provide fundamental insights into early human development by single-cell RNA-sequencing of human and mouse preimplantation embryos. We elucidate conserved transcriptional programs along with those that are human specific. Importantly, we validate our RNA-sequencing findings at the protein level, which further reveals differences in human and mouse embryo gene expression. For example, we identify several genes exclusively expressed in the human pluripotent epiblast, including the transcription factor KLF17. Key components of the TGF-β signalling pathway, including NODAL, GDF3, TGFBR1/ALK5, LEFTY1, SMAD2, SMAD4 and TDGF1, are also enriched in the human epiblast. Intriguingly, inhibition of TGF-β signalling abrogates NANOG expression in human epiblast cells, consistent with a requirement for this pathway in pluripotency. Although the key trophectoderm factors Id2, Elf5 and Eomes are exclusively localized to this lineage in the mouse, the human orthologues are either absent or expressed in alternative lineages. Importantly, we also identify genes with conserved expression dynamics, including Foxa2/FOXA2, which we show is restricted to the primitive endoderm in both human and mouse embryos. Comparison of the human epiblast to existing embryonic stem cells (hESCs) reveals conservation of pluripotency but also additional pathways more enriched in hESCs. Our analysis highlights significant differences in human preimplantation development compared with mouse and provides a molecular blueprint to understand human embryogenesis and its relationship to stem cells. PMID:26293300

  10. Defining the three cell lineages of the human blastocyst by single-cell RNA-seq.

    PubMed

    Blakeley, Paul; Fogarty, Norah M E; del Valle, Ignacio; Wamaitha, Sissy E; Hu, Tim Xiaoming; Elder, Kay; Snell, Philip; Christie, Leila; Robson, Paul; Niakan, Kathy K

    2015-09-15

    Here, we provide fundamental insights into early human development by single-cell RNA-sequencing of human and mouse preimplantation embryos. We elucidate conserved transcriptional programs along with those that are human specific. Importantly, we validate our RNA-sequencing findings at the protein level, which further reveals differences in human and mouse embryo gene expression. For example, we identify several genes exclusively expressed in the human pluripotent epiblast, including the transcription factor KLF17. Key components of the TGF-β signalling pathway, including NODAL, GDF3, TGFBR1/ALK5, LEFTY1, SMAD2, SMAD4 and TDGF1, are also enriched in the human epiblast. Intriguingly, inhibition of TGF-β signalling abrogates NANOG expression in human epiblast cells, consistent with a requirement for this pathway in pluripotency. Although the key trophectoderm factors Id2, Elf5 and Eomes are exclusively localized to this lineage in the mouse, the human orthologues are either absent or expressed in alternative lineages. Importantly, we also identify genes with conserved expression dynamics, including Foxa2/FOXA2, which we show is restricted to the primitive endoderm in both human and mouse embryos. Comparison of the human epiblast to existing embryonic stem cells (hESCs) reveals conservation of pluripotency but also additional pathways more enriched in hESCs. Our analysis highlights significant differences in human preimplantation development compared with mouse and provides a molecular blueprint to understand human embryogenesis and its relationship to stem cells.

  11. Metal nanoparticle fluorophore: a powerful fluorescence probe in single cell imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Fu, Yi; Zhao, Richard Y.; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2010-02-01

    Metal nanoparticle fluorophores have been developed using metal-enhanced fluorescence (MEF) principle. Compared with the conventional organic fluorophores, the metal fluorophores display the increasing brightness and shortening lifetime as well as the lengthening photostability and reducing photoblinking. Conjugated the metal fluorophores on the surfaces of cell lines, the cell images were recorded on a scanning confocal microscopy in the either emission intensity or lifetime. The emission spots by the conjugated metal fluorophores were isolated distinctly from the cell images because of their brighter signals and shorter lifetimes. Collected in the three-dimension, the total number of emission signals could be counted quantitatively and the distribution could be described on the cell surfaces. It was noticed that the emission intensity over the cell image was increased with an increase of the number of metal fluorophore on the cell surface and simultaneously the lifetime was altered. A quantitative regression curve was achieved between the amount of metal fluorophore on the cell surface and the emission intensity or lifetime over the entire cell image. Based on this regression curve, the target molecules on the cell surfaces could be quantified readily through the cell intensity and/or lifetime at the single cell level instead of the direct count to the emission spots. As novel molecule imaging agents, these metal fluorophores are being applied in the quantification and distribution of target molecule on the cell surface for the clinical diagnostic research.

  12. Indium Tin Oxide devices for amperometric detection of vesicular release by single cells.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Anne; Fulcrand, Rémy; Darchen, François; Guille Collignon, Manon; Lemaître, Frédéric; Amatore, Christian

    2012-03-01

    The microfabrication and successful testing of a series of three ITO (Indium Tin Oxide) microsystems for amperometric detection of cells exocytosis are reported. These microdevices have been optimized in order to simultaneously (i) enhance signal-to-noise ratios, as required electrochemical monitoring, by defining appropriate electrodes geometry and size, and (ii) provide surface conditions which allow cells to be cultured over during one or two days, through apposite deposition of a collagen film. The intrinsic electrochemical quality of the microdevices as well as the effect of different collagen treatments were assessed by investigating the voltammetric responses of two classical redox systems, Ru(NH(3))(6)(3+/2+) and Fe(CN)(6)(3-/4-). This established that a moderate collagen treatment does not incur any significant alteration of voltammetric responses or degradation of the excellent signal-to-noise ratio. Among these three microdevices, the most versatile one involved a configuration in which the ITO microelectrodes were delimited by a microchannel coiled into a spiral. Though providing extremely good electrochemical responses this specific design allowed proper seeding and culture of cells permitting either single cell or cell cluster stimulation and analysis.

  13. Modeling Bacterial Population Growth from Stochastic Single-Cell Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Ignacio; Theodoropoulos, Constantinos

    2014-01-01

    A few bacterial cells may be sufficient to produce a food-borne illness outbreak, provided that they are capable of adapting and proliferating on a food matrix. This is why any quantitative health risk assessment policy must incorporate methods to accurately predict the growth of bacterial populations from a small number of pathogens. In this aim, mathematical models have become a powerful tool. Unfortunately, at low cell concentrations, standard deterministic models fail to predict the fate of the population, essentially because the heterogeneity between individuals becomes relevant. In this work, a stochastic differential equation (SDE) model is proposed to describe variability within single-cell growth and division and to simulate population growth from a given initial number of individuals. We provide evidence of the model ability to explain the observed distributions of times to division, including the lag time produced by the adaptation to the environment, by comparing model predictions with experiments from the literature for Escherichia coli, Listeria innocua, and Salmonella enterica. The model is shown to accurately predict experimental growth population dynamics for both small and large microbial populations. The use of stochastic models for the estimation of parameters to successfully fit experimental data is a particularly challenging problem. For instance, if Monte Carlo methods are employed to model the required distributions of times to division, the parameter estimation problem can become numerically intractable. We overcame this limitation by converting the stochastic description to a partial differential equation (backward Kolmogorov) instead, which relates to the distribution of division times. Contrary to previous stochastic formulations based on random parameters, the present model is capable of explaining the variability observed in populations that result from the growth of a small number of initial cells as well as the lack of it compared to

  14. Single-cell census of mechanosensitive channels in living bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bialecka-Fornal, Maja; Lee, Heun Jin; DeBerg, Hannah A; Gandhi, Chris S; Phillips, Rob

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria are subjected to a host of different environmental stresses. One such insult occurs when cells encounter changes in the osmolarity of the surrounding media resulting in an osmotic shock. In recent years, a great deal has been learned about mechanosensitive (MS) channels which are thought to provide osmoprotection in these circumstances by opening emergency release valves in response to membrane tension. However, even the most elementary physiological parameters such as the number of MS channels per cell, how MS channel expression levels influence the physiological response of the cells, and how this mean number of channels varies from cell to cell remain unanswered. In this paper, we make a detailed quantitative study of the expression of the mechanosensitive channel of large conductance (MscL) in different media and at various stages in the growth history of bacterial cultures. Using both quantitative fluoresce