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Sample records for single-donor platelet transfusions

  1. [Prophylactic platelet transfusions].

    PubMed

    Ilmakunnas, Minna; Remes, Kari; Hiippala, Seppo; Mäkisalo, Heikki; Åberg, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    The consumption of platelet products in Finland is exceptionally high. For the most part, platelets are transfused pre-operatively to thrombocytopenic patients in order to prevent hemorrhage. Most of the minor procedures could, however, be conducted even if the patients'platelet levels would be lower than usual. In cardiac surgery, platelets are used because of the hemorrhagic diathesis associated with platelet inhibitors. Platelet inhibitors will, however, also bind to transfused platelets, whereby instead of prophylactic platelet transfusions it would be more sensible to leave the thorax open and not carry out ineffective platelet transfusions until the effect of the inhibitors has run out. We outline the prophylactic use of platelets based on recent international clinical practice guidelines. PMID:27400590

  2. A prospective quality evaluation of single donor platelets (SDP) - an experience of a tertiary healthcare center in India.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Prashant; Tiwari, Aseem Kumar; Sharma, Jyoti; Singh, Mukesh Bikram; Dixit, Surbhi; Raina, Vimarsh

    2012-04-01

    Quality assurance of single donor platelets (SDP) is incomplete unless clinical response to platelet transfusion is measured. The primary objective of the study was to evaluate the quality of SDP derived from plateletpheresis procedures and to evaluate the response to platelet transfusion. Procedures were performed on 2287 accepted donors while 271 donors were deferred. Platelet count <1.5 lac/μl and hemoglobin <12.5 g/dl were the leading cause of deferral. The median platelet yield in a SDP bag was found to be 3.1×10(11). The median corrected count increment (CCI) and post-transfusion platelet recovery (PPR) were found to be 10110×m(2)/μl and 24.5%, respectively. In India, the criteria for the selection of plateletpheresis donors should be revisited. Based on quality parameters, the Fresenius COM.TEC cell separator is comparable to other cell separators.

  3. Pooled platelet concentrates: an alternative to single donor apheresis platelets?

    PubMed

    Pietersz, R N I

    2009-10-01

    Three types of platelet concentrates (PC) are compared: PC either processed with the platelet-rich plasma (PRP) or the Buffy coat (BC) method from whole blood units and PC obtained by apheresis. Leuko-reduction (LR) pre-storage is advocated to improve quality of the PC during storage and reduce adverse reactions in recipients. Standardization of methods allow preparation of PC with comparable yields of approximately 400 x 10(9) platelets in pooled non-LR-PRP, approximately 370 x 10(9) in pooled LR-BC-PC and in LR apheresis PC the number of platelets can be targeted on 350 x 10(9) or more with devices of various manufacturers. While viral transmission can be prevented by outstanding laboratory tests, the risk of bacterial contamination should be reduced by improved arm disinfection, deviation of the first 20-30 ml of blood and culture or rapid detection assays of the PC pre-issue. In a large prospective multicenter trial no significant difference was observed between cultures of apheresis PC (n = 15,198): 0.09% confirmed positive units versus 0.06% in pooled BC-PC (n = 37,045), respectively. Though platelet activation as measured by CD62 expression may differ in vitro in PC obtained with various apheresis equipment, and also between PC processed with the two whole blood methods there is scarce literature about the clinical impact of these findings. In conclusion the final products of LR-PC derived from whole blood or obtained by apheresis can be comparable, provided the critical steps of the processing method are identified and covered and the process is in control.

  4. Namibia’s transition from whole blood–derived pooled platelets to single-donor apheresis platelet collections

    PubMed Central

    Pitman, John P.; Basavaraju, Sridhar V.; Shiraishi, Ray W.; Wilkinson, Robert; von Finckenstein, Bjorn; Lowrance, David W.; Marfin, Anthony A.; Postma, Maarten; Mataranyika, Mary; Sibinga, Cees Th. Smit

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Few African countries separate blood donations into components; however, demand for platelets (PLTs) is increasing as regional capacity to treat causes of thrombocytopenia, including chemotherapy, increases. Namibia introduced single-donor apheresis PLT collections in 2007 to increase PLT availability while reducing exposure to multiple donors via pooling. This study describes the impact this transition had on PLT availability and safety in Namibia. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS Annual national blood collections and PLT units issued data were extracted from a database maintained by the Blood Transfusion Service of Namibia (NAMBTS). Production costs and unit prices were analyzed. RESULTS In 2006, NAMBTS issued 771 single and pooled PLT doses from 3054 whole blood (WB) donations (drawn from 18,422 WB donations). In 2007, NAMBTS issued 486 single and pooled PLT doses from 1477 WB donations (drawn from 18,309 WB donations) and 131 single-donor PLT doses. By 2011, NAMBTS issued 837 single-donor PLT doses per year, 99.1% of all PLT units. Of 5761 WB donations from which PLTs were made in 2006 to 2011, a total of 20 (0.35%) were from donors with confirmed test results for human immunodeficiency virus or other transfusion-transmissible infections (TTIs). Of 2315 single-donor apheresis donations between 2007 and 2011, none of the 663 donors had a confirmed positive result for any pathogen. As apheresis replaced WB-derived PLTs, apheresis production costs dropped by a mean of 8.2% per year, while pooled PLT costs increased by an annual mean of 21.5%. Unit prices paid for apheresis- and WB-derived PLTs increased by 9 and 7.4% per year on average, respectively. CONCLUSION Namibia’s PLT transition shows that collections from repeat apheresis donors can reduce TTI risk and production costs. PMID:25727921

  5. Platelet transfusion practice during dengue fever epidemic.

    PubMed

    Kumar, N D; Tomar, V; Singh, B; Kela, K

    2000-01-01

    Blood components especially platelet concentrates due to their short shelf life are frequently in limited supply. Appropriate use of blood components is required to ensure their availability for needy patients as well as to avoid the unnecessary risk of transfusion-transmitted diseases. Medical audit of blood transfusion practice, which forms an important part of quality assurance programme in a transfusion centre, can provide grounds for improvement in transfusion medicine practice. During the epidemic of dengue fever in Oct., 1996, 1837 patients were admitted as dengue haemorrhagic fever in a teaching hospital in Delhi. Two hundred and eight patients (11.3%) were given platelet transfusions. Retrospective analysis of these platelet transfusions was done. It was observed that in only 52 (25%) out of 208 patients the information on platelet counts was provided. History of active bleeding was obtained only in 65 (31.2%) patients. About 35% patients received unnecessary prophylactic transfusions and during 89% of the transfusion episodes inappropriate dose of platelet concentrate was given. Information regarding post-transfusion recovery could be obtained in only 16.5% of transfusion episodes. The study emphasises the need for development of specific guidelines for transfusion of blood components, constant interaction and co-ordination amongst clinicians and transfusion centre for implementation of these guidelines, and a regular medical audit to review the optimal utilisation of blood components.

  6. The development and specificity of antiidiotypic antibodies in renal transplant recipients receiving single-donor blood transfusions.

    PubMed

    Phelan, D L; Rodey, G E; Anderson, C B

    1989-07-01

    Multiple pretransplant sera obtained from alloimmunized renal transplant recipients were tested for the presence of antiidiotypic-like antibodies (AB2) that inhibit donor-specific HLA antibodies in the microlymphocytotoxicity assay. Fourteen patients received repetitive single-donor blood transfusions (SDT). In this patient group, sera were collected prior to each blood transfusion and prior to transplantation. Three additional patients were studied in whom prior donor-specific HLA antibodies had been lost over a period of 6 months preceding transplantation. Donor-specific AB2-like antibodies were found in the sera of 13/14 SDT patients who did not develop HLA antibodies, and in the 3 patients who had lost donor-specific HLA antibodies. All patients had received prior random blood transfusions in the year preceding the study. Five (38%) of the SDT patients had detectable donor-specific AB2 prior to the initiation of single-donor blood transfusion, presumably related to previous blood transfusions. In the remaining six SDT patients in whom complete serum sets were available, AB2 always appeared after the first blood transfusion. The specificity of HLA antibodies inhibited by AB2 was studied, and antibodies against HLA-A, -B, -C, -DR, and DQw were all identified. Thus, there was no predilection for patients to develop AB2 against locus-specific HLA gene products. This study also confirms the apparent polymorphism of putative crossreactive idiotypes. Approximately 25% of donor-specific HLA antibodies were not inhibited by relevant AB2. This study confirms and extends previous observations that alloimmunization is associated in many patients with the development of antiidiotypic-like antibodies that are capable of inhibiting the binding and cytotoxicity of HLA alloantibodies. PMID:2473550

  7. [Single-donor (apheresis) platelets and pooled whole-blood-derived platelets--significance and assessment of both blood products].

    PubMed

    Hitzler, Walter E

    2014-01-01

    The transfusion efficacy of ATK, which contain fully functional platelets, is beyond all doubt. The equivalence of ATK and PTK has been subject of many studies. Some of those studies show the superiority of ATK's, while others do not, but there have been no studies that demonstrated a superiority of PTK's. The superiority of platelets stored in plasma and in third generation additive solution was demonstrated in clinical studies; therefore, it cannot be said that all the platelet concentrates on the German market are equivalent in efficacy. Of decisive importance, above all, is the risk of transfusion-transmitted infections with known pathogens, or those not yet discovered. This risk is different for ATK compared to PTK. Taking this difference in risk and the difference in donor exposure of transfused patients into account, it can definitely be said that ATK and PTK are not equivalent. In 2012, the Robert-Koch-Institute (RKI) published a mathematical risk model for different platelet concentrates and assessed the risk of transmitting known pathogens such as HIV, HCV, and HBV. The risk was higher for PTK compared to ATK. The relative risks for PTK derived from 4BCs were 2.2 (95%--CI: 2.1-2.4) for HIV, 2.7 (95%--CI: 2.5-3.0) for HCV, and 2.2 (95%--CI: 2.8-3.7) for HBV. At the present time, these are the relative risks of transfusion-transmitted infections with the traditional pathogens for PTK compared to ATK. In addition to the RKI assessed risks, there is the theoretical risk of a new, unknown agent, transmitted through blood exposure. The magnitude of this risk is hardly predictable for PTK. The experience gathered so far, especially in the last three decades, with the emergence of HIV, prions, and West Nil virus, shows that the biological nature of a next transfusion-transmissible infectious agent cannot be predictable. This agent, if we think at a conventional sexually transmissible agent with nucleic acid and long latent period, would spread first in areas with

  8. Platelet transfusion therapy: from 1973 to 2005.

    PubMed

    Brand, Anneke; Novotny, Vera; Tomson, Bert

    2006-06-01

    Platelet transfusions are indispensable for supportive care of patients with hematological diseases. We describe the developments in platelet products for transfusion since the 1970s, when, in particular, support for patients with allo-antibodies against human leukocyte antigens was a laborious exercise with a high failure rate. Currently, due to many stepwise innovations, platelet transfusions are of low immunogenicity and sufficiently available, they have a shelf life up to 7 days, and even matched platelets can often be routinely delivered, provided that there is good communication between all partners in the chain. Future improvements can be expected from uniform type and screen approaches for immunized patients and cross-matching by computer. For efficient use of health care resources, blood banks and stem cell donor banks could share their typed donor files. PMID:16728262

  9. [Indications and surveillance of platelet transfusions in surgery].

    PubMed

    Coffe, C; Bardiaux, L; Couteret, Y; Devillers, M; Leroy, M; Morel, P; Pouthier-Stein, F; Hervé, P

    1995-01-01

    Surgery, after hematology, is the biggest consumer of homologous platelet concentrates. Platelet transfusion is indicated to prevent or control bleeding associated with deficiencies in platelet number or function. In surgery, general patterns (in function of pre-surgery platelet count) can be adopted in most of the indications for platelets. In emergency situations, and in some particular cases (related to the patient, the type of operation, etc.), the transfusion procedure depends on the team's experience, the results of the available clinical and biological tests, and the drugs. Strict monitoring is required during the transfusion procedure. The efficacy of the transfusion must be controlled 1 h and 24 hours after the transfusion, and a number of factors must be assessed, namely the immunological impact of the transfusion (on red blood cells, leukocytes and platelets) and the occurrence of infectious diseases transmitted via transfusion. In addition, for a possible future transfusion, a strategy must be proposed. PMID:7767484

  10. Platelet Transfusion – The New Immunology of an Old Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Stolla, Moritz; Refaai, Majed A.; Heal, Joanna M.; Spinelli, Sherry L.; Garraud, Olivier; Phipps, Richard P.; Blumberg, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Platelet transfusion has been a vital therapeutic approach in patients with hematologic malignancies for close to half a century. Randomized trials show that prophylactic platelet transfusions mitigate bleeding in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. However, even with prophylactic transfusions, as many as 75% of patients, experience hemorrhage. While platelet transfusion efficacy is modest, questions and concerns have arisen about the risks of platelet transfusion therapy. The acknowledged serious risks of platelet transfusion include viral transmission, bacterial sepsis, and acute lung injury. Less serious adverse effects include allergic and non-hemolytic febrile reactions. Rare hemolytic reactions have occurred due to a common policy of transfusing without regard to ABO type. In the last decade or so, new concerns have arisen; platelet-derived lipids are implicated in transfusion-related acute lung injury after transfusion. With the recognition that platelets are immune cells came the discoveries that supernatant IL-6, IL-27 sCD40L, and OX40L are closely linked to febrile reactions and sCD40L with acute lung injury. Platelet transfusions are pro-inflammatory, and may be pro-thrombotic. Anti-A and anti-B can bind to incompatible recipient or donor platelets and soluble antigens, impair hemostasis and thus increase bleeding. Finally, stored platelet supernatants contain biological mediators such as VEGF and TGF-β1 that may compromise the host versus tumor response. This is particularly of concern in patients receiving many platelet transfusions, as for acute leukemia. New evidence suggests that removing stored supernatant will improve clinical outcomes. This new view of platelets as pro-inflammatory and immunomodulatory agents suggests that innovative approaches to improving platelet storage and pre-transfusion manipulations to reduce toxicity could substantially improve the efficacy and safety of this long-employed therapy. PMID:25699046

  11. Clinical perspectives of platelet transfusions: defining the optimal dose.

    PubMed

    Strauss, R G

    1995-01-01

    To halt bleeding in patients with severe thrombocytopenia due to bone marrow failure, it is desirable to achieve a post-transfusion blood platelet count of 40 x 10(9)/L by platelet transfusions. Based on calculations of corrected count increments, each 1 x 10(11) platelets transfused will increase the blood platelet count approximately 10 x 10(9)/L per each square meter of patient body surface area. Thus, the post-transfusion blood platelet count will be approximately 20 x 10(9)/L following transfusion of 3 x 10(11) platelets to a 5 foot, 8 inch patient weighing 170 pounds (2.0 m2), who is bleeding because of a pre-transfusion platelet count of 5 x 10(9)/L. The post-transfusion platelet count likely will be even lower in sick patients (sepsis, amphotericin B plus antibiotic therapy, splenomegaly, graft-vs.-host disease, etc.) or if platelets are lost from the unit by leukofiltration before transfusion. Although a dose of 3 x 10(11) platelets is acceptable, in a regulatory sense for product quality, it is inadequate to control bleeding in most thrombocytopenic adult patients. Adjusting dose for body size, bleeding patients with pre-transfusion blood platelet of < 10 x 10(9)/L and weighing > 120 pounds should receive approximately 6 x 10(11) platelets, those weighing 30 to 120 pounds should receive 3 x 10(11) platelets, and infants weighing < 30 pounds (15 kg) should receive 5-10 ml/kg of platelet concentrate.

  12. Resveratrol preserves the function of human platelets stored for transfusion.

    PubMed

    Lannan, Katie L; Refaai, Majed A; Ture, Sara K; Morrell, Craig N; Blumberg, Neil; Phipps, Richard P; Spinelli, Sherry L

    2016-03-01

    Stored platelets undergo biochemical, structural and functional changes that lead to decreased efficacy and safety of platelet transfusions. Not only do platelets acquire markers of activation during storage, but they also fail to respond normally to agonists post-storage. We hypothesized that resveratrol, a cardioprotective antioxidant, could act as a novel platelet storage additive to safely prevent unwanted platelet activation during storage, while simultaneously preserving normal haemostatic function. Human platelets treated with resveratrol and stored for 5 d released less thromboxane B2 and prostaglandin E2 compared to control platelets. Resveratrol preserved the ability of platelets to aggregate, spread and respond to thrombin, suggesting an improved ability to activate post-storage. Utilizing an in vitro model of transfusion and thromboelastography, clot strength was improved with resveratrol treatment compared to conventionally stored platelets. The mechanism of resveratrol's beneficial actions on stored platelets was partly mediated through decreased platelet apoptosis in storage, resulting in a longer half-life following transfusion. Lastly, an in vivo mouse model of transfusion demonstrated that stored platelets are prothrombotic and that resveratrol delayed vessel occlusion time to a level similar to transfusion with fresh platelets. We show resveratrol has a dual ability to reduce unwanted platelet activation during storage, while preserving critical haemostatic function.

  13. Dose of Prophylactic Platelet Transfusions and Prevention of Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Slichter, Sherrill J.; Kaufman, Richard M.; Assmann, Susan F.; McCullough, Jeffrey; Triulzi, Darrell J.; Strauss, Ronald G.; Gernsheimer, Terry B.; Ness, Paul M.; Brecher, Mark E.; Josephson, Cassandra D.; Konkle, Barbara A.; Woodson, Robert D.; Ortel, Thomas L.; Hillyer, Christopher D.; Skerrett, Donna L.; McCrae, Keith R.; Sloan, Steven R.; Uhl, Lynne; George, James N.; Aquino, Victor M.; Manno, Catherine S.; McFarland, Janice G.; Hess, John R.; Leissinger, Cindy; Granger, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND We conducted a trial of prophylactic platelet transfusions to evaluate the effect of platelet dose on bleeding in patients with hypoproliferative thrombocytopenia. METHODS We randomly assigned hospitalized patients undergoing hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation or chemotherapy for hematologic cancers or solid tumors to receive prophylactic platelet transfusions at a low dose, a medium dose, or a high dose (1.1×1011, 2.2×1011, or 4.4×1011 platelets per square meter of body-surface area, respectively), when morning platelet counts were 10,000 per cubic millimeter or lower. Clinical signs of bleeding were assessed daily. The primary end point was bleeding of grade 2 or higher (as defined on the basis of World Health Organization criteria). RESULTS In the 1272 patients who received at least one platelet transfusion, the primary end point was observed in 71%, 69%, and 70% of the patients in the low-dose group, the medium-dose group, and the high-dose group, respectively (differences were not significant). The incidences of higher grades of bleeding, and other adverse events, were similar among the three groups. The median number of platelets transfused was significantly lower in the low-dose group (9.25×1011) than in the medium-dose group (11.25×1011) or the high-dose group (19.63×1011) (P = 0.002 for low vs. medium, P<0.001 for high vs. low and high vs. medium), but the median number of platelet transfusions given was significantly higher in the low-dose group (five, vs. three in the medium-dose and three in the high-dose group; P<0.001 for low vs. medium and low vs. high). Bleeding occurred on 25% of the study days on which morning platelet counts were 5000 per cubic millimeter or lower, as compared with 17% of study days on which platelet counts were 6000 to 80,000 per cubic millimeter (P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS Low doses of platelets administered as a prophylactic transfusion led to a decreased number of platelets transfused per patient but an

  14. Evaluation of platelet cross-matching in the management of patients refractory to platelet transfusions

    PubMed Central

    Salama, Osama S.; Aladl, Doaa A.; El Ghannam, Doaa M.; Elderiny, Wesam E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cross-match-compatible platelets are used to support thrombocytopenic patients who are refractory to randomly selected platelets. However, few studies have addressed the efficacy of using this strategy for patients requiring intensive platelet transfusion therapy. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of cross-match-compatible platelets in an unselected group of patients refractory to platelets from random donors. Materials and methods A total of 406 cross-match-compatible platelet components were administered to 40 evaluable patients who were refractory to random-donor platelets. A solid-phase red cell adherence method was used for platelet cross-matching. The corrected count increment was used to monitor the effectiveness of each platelet transfusion. Multivariate analysis was performed to detect whether any variables could predict the response to transfusion. Results Statistically significant improvements were found in the mean corrected count increment when comparing cross-match-compatible platelets with randomly selected and incompatible platelets (p<0.001 for each). Compatible platelet transfusions were associated with a good response in 72.9% of cases while incompatible platelets were associated with a poor response in 66.7% of transfusion events (p<0.001). In the presence of clinical factors or alloimmunisation, compatible platelets were associated with good responses in 67.9% and 28.0% respectively vs 100% and 93.3% in their absence (p=0.009, p<0.001). Multivariate analysis revealed that cross-matching and alloimmunisation were the strongest predictors of transfusion response at 1 hour, while ABO compatibility, type of units received, followed by alloimmunisation then clinical factors were predictors at 24 hours. Discussion Platelet cross-matching using the solid-phase red cell adherence technique is an effective and rapid first-line approach for the management of patients refractory to platelet transfusions. PMID:24931840

  15. Improving platelet transfusion safety: biomedical and technical considerations

    PubMed Central

    Garraud, Olivier; Cognasse, Fabrice; Tissot, Jean-Daniel; Chavarin, Patricia; Laperche, Syria; Morel, Pascal; Lefrère, Jean-Jacques; Pozzetto, Bruno; Lozano, Miguel; Blumberg, Neil; Osselaer, Jean-Claude

    2016-01-01

    Platelet concentrates account for near 10% of all labile blood components but are responsible for more than 25% of the reported adverse events. Besides factors related to patients themselves, who may be particularly at risk of side effects because of their underlying illness, there are aspects of platelet collection and storage that predispose to adverse events. Platelets for transfusion are strongly activated by collection through disposal equipment, which can stress the cells, and by preservation at 22 °C with rotation or rocking, which likewise leads to platelet activation, perhaps more so than storage at 4 °C. Lastly, platelets constitutively possess a very large number of bioactive components that may elicit pro-inflammatory reactions when infused into a patient. This review aims to describe approaches that may be crucial to minimising side effects while optimising safety and quality. We suggest that platelet transfusion is complex, in part because of the complexity of the “material” itself: platelets are highly versatile cells and the transfusion process adds a myriad of variables that present many challenges for preserving basal platelet function and preventing dysfunctional activation of the platelets. The review also presents information showing - after years of exhaustive haemovigilance - that whole blood buffy coat pooled platelet components are extremely safe compared to the gold standard (i.e. apheresis platelet components), both in terms of acquired infections and of immunological/inflammatory hazards. PMID:26674828

  16. Detection of septic transfusion reactions to platelet transfusions by active and passive surveillance.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hong; Xiao, Wenbin; Lazarus, Hillard M; Good, Caryn E; Maitta, Robert W; Jacobs, Michael R

    2016-01-28

    Septic transfusion reactions (STRs) resulting from transfusion of bacterially contaminated platelets are a major hazard of platelet transfusion despite recent interventions. Active and passive surveillance for bacterially contaminated platelets was performed over 7 years (2007-2013) by culture of platelet aliquots at time of transfusion and review of reported transfusion reactions. All platelet units had been cultured 24 hours after collection and released as negative. Five sets of STR criteria were evaluated, including recent AABB criteria; sensitivity and specificity of these criteria, as well as detection by active and passive surveillance, were determined. Twenty of 51,440 platelet units transfused (0.004%; 389 per million) were bacterially contaminated by active surveillance and resulted in 5 STRs occurring 9 to 24 hours posttransfusion; none of these STRs had been reported by passive surveillance. STR occurred only in neutropenic patients transfused with high bacterial loads. A total of 284 transfusion reactions (0.55%) were reported by passive surveillance. None of these patients had received contaminated platelets. However, 6 to 93 (2.1%-32.7%) of these 284 reactions met 1 or more STR criteria, and sensitivity of STR criteria varied from 5.1% to 45.5%. These results document the continued occurrence of bacterial contamination of platelets resulting in STR in neutropenic patients, failure of passive surveillance to detect STR, and lack of specificity of STR criteria. These findings highlight the limitations of reported national STR data based on passive surveillance and the need to implement further measures to address this problem such as secondary testing or use of pathogen reduction technologies.

  17. Platelet transfusion prophylaxis for patients with haematological malignancies: where to now?

    PubMed

    Stanworth, S J; Hyde, C; Brunskill, S; Murphy, M F

    2005-12-01

    National guidelines for platelet transfusion in many countries recommend that the general platelet transfusion trigger for prophylaxis is 10x10(9)/l. This annotation reviews the evidence for this threshold level and discusses other current unresolved issues relevant to platelet transfusion practice such as the optimal dose and the clinical benefit of a strategy for the prophylactic use of platelet transfusions when the platelet count falls below a given threshold. PMID:16351634

  18. Platelet transfusions in platelet consumptive disorders are associated with arterial thrombosis and in-hospital mortality.

    PubMed

    Goel, Ruchika; Ness, Paul M; Takemoto, Clifford M; Krishnamurti, Lakshmanan; King, Karen E; Tobian, Aaron A R

    2015-02-26

    While platelets are primary mediators of hemostasis, there is emerging evidence to show that they may also mediate pathologic thrombogenesis. Little data are available on risks and benefits associated with platelet transfusions in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) and immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). This study utilized the Nationwide Inpatient Sample to evaluate the current in-hospital platelet transfusion practices and their association with arterial/venous thrombosis, acute myocardial infarction (AMI), stroke, and in-hospital mortality over 5 years (2007-2011). Age and gender-adjusted odds ratios (adjOR) associated with platelet transfusions were calculated. There were 10 624 hospitalizations with TTP; 6332 with HIT and 79 980 with ITP. Platelet transfusions were reported in 10.1% TTP, 7.1% HIT, and 25.8% ITP admissions. Platelet transfusions in TTP were associated with higher odds of arterial thrombosis (adjOR = 5.8, 95%CI = 1.3-26.6), AMI (adjOR = 2.0, 95%CI = 1.2-3.3) and mortality (adjOR = 2.0,95%CI = 1.3-3.0), but not venous thrombosis. Platelet transfusions in HIT were associated with higher odds of arterial thrombosis (adjOR = 3.4, 95%CI = 1.2-9.5) and mortality (adjOR = 5.2, 95%CI = 2.6-10.5) but not venous thrombosis. Except for AMI, all relationships remained significant after adjusting for clinical severity and acuity. No associations were significant for ITP. Platelet transfusions are associated with higher odds of arterial thrombosis and mortality among TTP and HIT patients.

  19. Comparison of different platelet count thresholds to guide administration of prophylactic platelet transfusion for preventing bleeding in patients with haematological disorders after chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Estcourt, Lise J; Stanworth, Simon; Doree, Carolyn; Trivella, Marialena; Hopewell, Sally; Murphy, Michael F; Tinmouth, Alan

    2014-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To determine whether different platelet transfusion thresholds for administration of prophylactic platelet transfusions (platelet transfusions given to prevent bleeding) affect the efficacy and safety of prophylactic platelet transfusions in preventing bleeding in patients with haematological disorders after chemotherapy with or without stem cell transplantation. PMID:25722651

  20. National comparative audit of the use of platelet transfusions in the UK.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, H; Lowe, D; Dobson, P; Grant-Casey, J; Parris, E; Dalton, D; Hickling, K; Waller, F; Howell, C; Murphy, M F

    2007-12-01

    The objective of this national audit was to examine the use of platelet transfusions against audit standards developed from national guidelines. Hospitals were asked to provide data on 40 consecutive patients receiving platelet transfusions (15 haematology patients, 10 cardiac, 10 critical care and five in other clinical specialties). One hundred and eighty-seven UK hospitals participated, including 168/263 (64%) hospitals in England. A total of 4421 patients receiving platelet transfusions were audited. The reason for transfusion was documented in the medical records for 93% of transfusions and 57% were used for prophylaxis (in the absence of bleeding). Overall 3726/4421 (84%) of the transfusions were evaluable and 43% (1601/3726) were found to be non-compliant with the audit standards. A major non-compliance was failure to measure the platelet count before transfusion (29% of transfusions). Other non-compliances included the use of platelet transfusion in the absence of bleeding in 11% of cardiac surgery patients receiving platelet transfusions, the use of a threshold platelet count more than 10 x 10(9)/L for 60% of prophylactic platelet transfusions in haematology patients without risk factors indicating the need for a higher threshold, and a threshold platelet count more than 30 x 10(9)/L for 59% of prophylactic platelet transfusions in critical care. The reasons for the high rate of non-compliance were not explored in this audit, but this is a topic worthy of further study. The main recommendations were that hospitals should ensure there are written local guidelines for platelet transfusions, clinicians must be provided with training about their appropriate use, and hospitals should carry out regular audits of practice. More research should be carried out to develop the evidence base for the use of platelet transfusions, more detailed guidelines should be developed for platelet transfusions in critical care and cardiac surgery, and the audit should be repeated

  1. Transfusion-related acute lung injury: transfusion, platelets and biological response modifiers.

    PubMed

    Tariket, Sofiane; Sut, Caroline; Hamzeh-Cognasse, Hind; Laradi, Sandrine; Pozzetto, Bruno; Garraud, Olivier; Cognasse, Fabrice

    2016-05-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) may be induced by plasma, platelet concentrates and red blood cell concentrates. The mechanism leading to TRALI is thought to involve two steps. The priming step consists of previous inflammatory pathological conditions or external factors attracting leukocytes to lung vessels and creating conditions favorable for the second step, in which anti-HLA or anti-HNA antibodies or biologically active lipids, usually in transfused blood products, stress leukocytes and inflame lung epithelia. Platelets may be involved in the pathogenesis of TRALI because of their secretory potential and capacity to interact with other immune cells. There is no drug based-prophylaxis, but transfusion strategies are used to mitigate the risk of TRALI. PMID:26855042

  2. Ethical Questions about Platelet Transfusions at the End of Life.

    PubMed

    Sherbeck, John P; Boss, Renee D

    2016-01-01

    This case of platelet transfusion in palliative care illustrates a common dilemma in transfusion medicine: approval of the use of a scarce, yet potentially life-saving, resource. As in this case, these decisions often involve seriously ill patients with acute needs and evolving goals of care. The use of resources to treat the patient at hand must be balanced against maintaining adequate resources to treat future patients. In this setting, the ethical principles of beneficence and social justice are in conflict. PMID:27550559

  3. The Signaling Role of CD40 Ligand in Platelet Biology and in Platelet Component Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Aoui, Chaker; Prigent, Antoine; Sut, Caroline; Tariket, Sofiane; Hamzeh-Cognasse, Hind; Pozzetto, Bruno; Richard, Yolande; Cognasse, Fabrice; Laradi, Sandrine; Garraud, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    The CD40 ligand (CD40L) is a transmembrane molecule of crucial interest in cell signaling in innate and adaptive immunity. It is expressed by a variety of cells, but mainly by activated T-lymphocytes and platelets. CD40L may be cleaved into a soluble form (sCD40L) that has a cytokine-like activity. Both forms bind to several receptors, including CD40. This interaction is necessary for the antigen specific immune response. Furthermore, CD40L and sCD40L are involved in inflammation and a panoply of immune related and vascular pathologies. Soluble CD40L is primarily produced by platelets after activation, degranulation and cleavage, which may present a problem for transfusion. Soluble CD40L is involved in adverse transfusion events including transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI). Although platelet storage designed for transfusion occurs in sterile conditions, platelets are activated and release sCD40L without known agonists. Recently, proteomic studies identified signaling pathways activated in platelet concentrates. Soluble CD40L is a good candidate for platelet activation in an auto-amplification loop. In this review, we describe the immunomodulatory role of CD40L in physiological and pathological conditions. We will focus on the main signaling pathways activated by CD40L after binding to its different receptors. PMID:25479079

  4. Platelet Transfusion – the Art and Science of Compromise

    PubMed Central

    Cid, Joan; Harm, Sarah K.; Yazer, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Many modern therapies depend on platelet (PLT) transfusion support. PLTs have a 4- to 7-day shelf life and are frequently in short supply. In order to optimize the inventory PLTs are often transfused to adults without regard for ABO compatibility. Hemolytic reactions are infrequent despite the presence of ‘high titer’ anti-A and anti-B antibodies in some of the units. Despite the low risk for hemolysis, some centers provide only ABO identical PLTs to their recipients; this practice might have other beneficial outcomes that remain to be proven. Strategies to mitigate the risk of hemolysis and the clinical and laboratory outcomes following ABO-matched and mismatched transfusions will be discussed. Although the PLTs themselves do not carry the D antigen, a small number of RBCs are also transfused with every PLT dose. The quantity of RBCs varies by the type of PLT preparation, and even a small quantity of D+ RBCs can alloimmunize a susceptible D− host. Thus PLT units are labeled as D+/–, and most transfusion services try to prevent the transfusion of D+ PLTs to D– females of childbearing age. A similar policy for patients with hematological diseases is controversial, and the elements and mechanisms of anti-D alloimmunization will be discussed. PMID:23922541

  5. Platelet transfusion in chemotherapy patients: comparison of the effect of intravenous infusion pumps versus gravity transfusion.

    PubMed

    Meess, A

    2015-01-01

    Platelet concentrates are given to patients suffering with severe thrombocytopenia usually by a gravity transfusion procedure. Increasing patient numbers that are in need of this treatment increase the pressure on hospital staff and space. In order to combat time issues, the use of medical devices such as intravenous infusion pumps are thought to be beneficial for time and simultaneously for safety in transfusion practices. By using infusion pumps, platelet concentrates can be transfused in less time and provide accurate volume measurements. Manufacturers of infusion pumps claim that these devices are safe to be used for blood products including platelet concentrates. However, published studies were performed on older models and newer devices are on the market now. The purpose of this study is to evaluate infusion pumps, which are claimed to be suitable for blood products and to investigate the impact the pumps had on platelets. Furthermore, the study revealed if the intravenous infusion pumps are safe to be used for platelet transfusion as claimed by manufacturers. A simulated transfusion was performed using the Carefusion Alaris GP Plus volumetric pump and Fresenius Kabi Volumat Agilia infusion pump. Samples were taken from expired platelet concentrates before and after passage through the pump. All samples were investigated for full blood count that included platelet count, mean platelet volume (MPV), platelet distribution width (PDW) and a plateletcrit (PCT). The samples were then centrifuged to achieve platelet-poor plasma and then tested for lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). A power calculation performed on the statistical power analysis program G*power indicated a requirement of 82 samples for a power of 80%. Statistical analysis was performed with the IBM SPSS statistic software. A paired sample t-test was used to calculate mean, standard deviation and P values for the infusion pumps used. The Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test was used to evaluate results that had a non

  6. Platelet transfusion in chemotherapy patients: comparison of the effect of intravenous infusion pumps versus gravity transfusion.

    PubMed

    Meess, A

    2015-01-01

    Platelet concentrates are given to patients suffering with severe thrombocytopenia usually by a gravity transfusion procedure. Increasing patient numbers that are in need of this treatment increase the pressure on hospital staff and space. In order to combat time issues, the use of medical devices such as intravenous infusion pumps are thought to be beneficial for time and simultaneously for safety in transfusion practices. By using infusion pumps, platelet concentrates can be transfused in less time and provide accurate volume measurements. Manufacturers of infusion pumps claim that these devices are safe to be used for blood products including platelet concentrates. However, published studies were performed on older models and newer devices are on the market now. The purpose of this study is to evaluate infusion pumps, which are claimed to be suitable for blood products and to investigate the impact the pumps had on platelets. Furthermore, the study revealed if the intravenous infusion pumps are safe to be used for platelet transfusion as claimed by manufacturers. A simulated transfusion was performed using the Carefusion Alaris GP Plus volumetric pump and Fresenius Kabi Volumat Agilia infusion pump. Samples were taken from expired platelet concentrates before and after passage through the pump. All samples were investigated for full blood count that included platelet count, mean platelet volume (MPV), platelet distribution width (PDW) and a plateletcrit (PCT). The samples were then centrifuged to achieve platelet-poor plasma and then tested for lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). A power calculation performed on the statistical power analysis program G*power indicated a requirement of 82 samples for a power of 80%. Statistical analysis was performed with the IBM SPSS statistic software. A paired sample t-test was used to calculate mean, standard deviation and P values for the infusion pumps used. The Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test was used to evaluate results that had a non

  7. [Septic shock following platelet transfusion contaminated with Citrobacter koseri in a child with postchemotherapy febrile neutropenia].

    PubMed

    Tichit, R; Saumet, L; Marchandin, H; Haouy, S; Latry, P; Sirvent, N

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial transfusion risk is currently the greatest infectious risk of blood transfusion. We report the case of a child with postchemotherapy febrile neutropenia who presented septic shock following platelet transfusion contaminated with Citrobacter koseri. The life-threatening development could have been avoided by strict compliance with good clinical practice. The stability of mortality rates due to adverse effects of bacterial proliferation during platelet transfusions in France since 1994 calls for optimization of all preventive measures throughout the transfusion chain and perfect knowledge of transfusion rules by medical staff and care givers.

  8. Ultraviolet irradiation of platelet concentrates: feasibility in transfusion practice.

    PubMed

    Andreu, G; Boccaccio, C; Lecrubier, C; Fretault, J; Coursaget, J; LeGuen, J P; Oleggini, M; Fournel, J J; Samama, M

    1990-06-01

    Ultraviolet (UV)-B irradiation abolishes lymphocyte functions (the ability to respond and to stimulate) in mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC). This effect may have practical application in the prevention or reduction of transfusion-induced alloimmunization against HLA class I antigens. To study this, platelet concentrates (PCs) were obtained with a cell separator, suspended in autologous plasma in a final volume of 400 mL, and transferred into a large (22 X 30 cm) cell culture bag. This plastic showed a good transmittance of UV-B rays at 310 nm (54%). PCs were placed between two quartz plates (surface of irradiation = 25 X 37 cm), and the two sides were irradiated simultaneously. Energy delivered to the surface of the plastic bag was automatically monitored. The ability to respond (in MLC and to phytohemagglutinin) and to stimulate allogeneic lymphocytes was completely abolished with energy of 0.75 J per cm2 (irradiation time less than 3 min). The temperature increase during irradiation was negligible. Platelet aggregation (collagen, adrenalin, ADP, arachidonic acid, ristocetin) was not impaired if UV-B energy was below 3 J per cm2. Recovery and survival of autologous 111In-labeled platelets were studied in four volunteers; no differences were found between UV-B-treated (1.5 J/cm2) platelets and untreated platelets. These results show that a large-scale clinical trial using UV-B-irradiated PCs to prevent HLA alloimmunization is feasible.

  9. Ultraviolet irradiation of platelet concentrates: Feasibility in transfusion practice

    SciTech Connect

    Andreu, G.; Boccaccio, C.; Lecrubier, C.; Fretault, J.; Coursaget, J.; LeGuen, J.P.; Oleggini, M.; Fournel, J.J.; Samama, M. )

    1990-06-01

    Ultraviolet (UV)-B irradiation abolishes lymphocyte functions (the ability to respond and to stimulate) in mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC). This effect may have practical application in the prevention or reduction of transfusion-induced alloimmunization against HLA class I antigens. To study this, platelet concentrates (PCs) were obtained with a cell separator, suspended in autologous plasma in a final volume of 400 mL, and transferred into a large (22 X 30 cm) cell culture bag. This plastic showed a good transmittance of UV-B rays at 310 nm (54%). PCs were placed between two quartz plates (surface of irradiation = 25 X 37 cm), and the two sides were irradiated simultaneously. Energy delivered to the surface of the plastic bag was automatically monitored. The ability to respond (in MLC and to phytohemagglutinin) and to stimulate allogeneic lymphocytes was completely abolished with energy of 0.75 J per cm2 (irradiation time less than 3 min). The temperature increase during irradiation was negligible. Platelet aggregation (collagen, adrenalin, ADP, arachidonic acid, ristocetin) was not impaired if UV-B energy was below 3 J per cm2. Recovery and survival of autologous 111In-labeled platelets were studied in four volunteers; no differences were found between UV-B-treated (1.5 J/cm2) platelets and untreated platelets. These results show that a large-scale clinical trial using UV-B-irradiated PCs to prevent HLA alloimmunization is feasible.

  10. Low incidence of anti-D alloimmunization following D+ platelet transfusion: The Anti-D Alloimmunization after D-incompatible Platelet Transfusions (ADAPT) study

    PubMed Central

    Cid, Joan; Lozano, Miguel; Ziman, Alyssa; West, Kamille A.; O'Brien, Kerry L.; Murphy, Michael F.; Wendel, Silvano; Vázquez, Alejandro; Ortín, Xavier; Hervig, Tor A.; Delaney, Meghan; Flegel, Willy A.; Yazer, Mark H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The reported frequency of D alloimmunization in D- recipients after transfusion of D+ platelets varies. This study was designed to determine the frequency of D alloimmunization, previously reported to be an average of 5%±2%. A primary anti-D immune response was defined as the detection of anti-D ≥28 days following the first D+ platelet transfusion. Data were collected on 485 D- recipients of D+ platelets in 11 centres between 2010-2012. Their median age was 60 (range 2-100) years. Diagnoses included: haematological (203/485, 42%), oncological (64/485, 13%) and other diseases (218/485, 45%). Only 7/485 (1.44%; 95%CI 0.58-2.97%) recipients had a primary anti-D response after a median serological follow-up of 77 days (range: 28-2111). There were no statistically significant differences between the primary anti-D formers and the other patients, in terms of gender, age, receipt of immunosuppressive therapy, proportion of patients with haematological/oncological diseases, transfusion of whole blood-derived or apheresis platelets or both, and total number of transfused platelet products. This is the largest study with the longest follow-up of D alloimmunization following D+ platelet transfusion. The low frequency of D alloimmunization should be considered when deciding whether to administer Rh Immune Globulin to D- males and D- females without childbearing potential after transfusion of D+ platelets. PMID:25283094

  11. Low frequency of anti-D alloimmunization following D+ platelet transfusion: the Anti-D Alloimmunization after D-incompatible Platelet Transfusions (ADAPT) study.

    PubMed

    Cid, Joan; Lozano, Miguel; Ziman, Alyssa; West, Kamille A; O'Brien, Kerry L; Murphy, Michael F; Wendel, Silvano; Vázquez, Alejandro; Ortín, Xavier; Hervig, Tor A; Delaney, Meghan; Flegel, Willy A; Yazer, Mark H

    2015-02-01

    The reported frequency of D alloimmunization in D- recipients after transfusion of D+ platelets varies. This study was designed to determine the frequency of D alloimmunization, previously reported to be an average of 5 ± 2%. A primary anti-D immune response was defined as the detection of anti-D ≥ 28 d following the first D+ platelet transfusion. Data were collected on 485 D- recipients of D+ platelets in 11 centres between 2010 and 2012. Their median age was 60 (range 2-100) years. Diagnoses included: haematological (203/485, 42%), oncological (64/485, 13%) and other diseases (218/485, 45%). Only 7/485 (1·44%; 95% CI 0·58-2·97%) recipients had a primary anti-D response after a median serological follow-up of 77 d (range: 28-2111). There were no statistically significant differences between the primary anti-D formers and the other patients, in terms of gender, age, receipt of immunosuppressive therapy, proportion of patients with haematological/oncological diseases, transfusion of whole blood-derived or apheresis platelets or both, and total number of transfused platelet products. This is the largest study with the longest follow-up of D alloimmunization following D+ platelet transfusion. The low frequency of D alloimmunization should be considered when deciding whether to administer Rh Immune Globulin to D- males and D- females without childbearing potential after transfusion of D+ platelets. PMID:25283094

  12. Low frequency of anti-D alloimmunization following D+ platelet transfusion: the Anti-D Alloimmunization after D-incompatible Platelet Transfusions (ADAPT) study.

    PubMed

    Cid, Joan; Lozano, Miguel; Ziman, Alyssa; West, Kamille A; O'Brien, Kerry L; Murphy, Michael F; Wendel, Silvano; Vázquez, Alejandro; Ortín, Xavier; Hervig, Tor A; Delaney, Meghan; Flegel, Willy A; Yazer, Mark H

    2015-02-01

    The reported frequency of D alloimmunization in D- recipients after transfusion of D+ platelets varies. This study was designed to determine the frequency of D alloimmunization, previously reported to be an average of 5 ± 2%. A primary anti-D immune response was defined as the detection of anti-D ≥ 28 d following the first D+ platelet transfusion. Data were collected on 485 D- recipients of D+ platelets in 11 centres between 2010 and 2012. Their median age was 60 (range 2-100) years. Diagnoses included: haematological (203/485, 42%), oncological (64/485, 13%) and other diseases (218/485, 45%). Only 7/485 (1·44%; 95% CI 0·58-2·97%) recipients had a primary anti-D response after a median serological follow-up of 77 d (range: 28-2111). There were no statistically significant differences between the primary anti-D formers and the other patients, in terms of gender, age, receipt of immunosuppressive therapy, proportion of patients with haematological/oncological diseases, transfusion of whole blood-derived or apheresis platelets or both, and total number of transfused platelet products. This is the largest study with the longest follow-up of D alloimmunization following D+ platelet transfusion. The low frequency of D alloimmunization should be considered when deciding whether to administer Rh Immune Globulin to D- males and D- females without childbearing potential after transfusion of D+ platelets.

  13. Effectiveness of Pooled Platelet Transfusion in Concordant and Discordant Groups among Dengue Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chowdappa, Vijaya; Masamatti, Smita Surendra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Dengue affects more than 50 million people per year and is one of the most common causes of severe thrombocytopaenia. Thrombocytopaenia is a common complication of dengue and other viral fevers apart from malaria, typhoid, leptospirosis, leukaemia and megaloblastic anaemia. A platelet count of <20,000/μl is characteristically seen in dengue haemorrhagic fever and dengue fever. It results from immune complex mediated platelet destruction or bone marrow suppression. Severe thrombocytopaenia <10,000/μl is one of the indications for prophylactic platelet transfusion therapy to prevent haemorrhage. Aim To evaluate the effectiveness of transfusion of ABO compatible and ABO incompatible pooled platelet units in severe thrombocytopaenia cases. Materials and Methods In this study ABO compatible and incompatible pooled platelet units were transfused to serologically confirmed dengue cases having thrombocytopaenia with or without bleeding manifestations. Each of the adult patients received 4-6 units of pooled platelet concentrates prepared from random donor whole blood suspended in plasma for severe thrombocytopaenia. Pre and post transfusion platelet counts were compared. Children aged less than 12 years, pregnant women and patients with splenomegaly those on ayurvedic and homeopathic therapy, recipients of packed red cells on the same day of platelet transfusion and recipients of multiple platelet transfusions within 24 hours were excluded from the study. Results The median post transfusion platelet increments (PPI) and corrected count increments (CCI) at 4hour post transfusion were 25,000/μL (5,000-80,000/μL) and 18,000/μL (range 8,000/μL- 47,500/μL) respectively among the responders. Median PPI and CCI at 24 hours were 45,000/μL and 28,863/μL among the responders. The median CCI at 4 hour post transfusion among the non-responders was 850/μL and at 24hours was 1,425/μL. At 24 hours responders showed significantly higher PPI as compared to non

  14. Effectiveness of Pooled Platelet Transfusion in Concordant and Discordant Groups among Dengue Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chowdappa, Vijaya; Masamatti, Smita Surendra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Dengue affects more than 50 million people per year and is one of the most common causes of severe thrombocytopaenia. Thrombocytopaenia is a common complication of dengue and other viral fevers apart from malaria, typhoid, leptospirosis, leukaemia and megaloblastic anaemia. A platelet count of <20,000/μl is characteristically seen in dengue haemorrhagic fever and dengue fever. It results from immune complex mediated platelet destruction or bone marrow suppression. Severe thrombocytopaenia <10,000/μl is one of the indications for prophylactic platelet transfusion therapy to prevent haemorrhage. Aim To evaluate the effectiveness of transfusion of ABO compatible and ABO incompatible pooled platelet units in severe thrombocytopaenia cases. Materials and Methods In this study ABO compatible and incompatible pooled platelet units were transfused to serologically confirmed dengue cases having thrombocytopaenia with or without bleeding manifestations. Each of the adult patients received 4-6 units of pooled platelet concentrates prepared from random donor whole blood suspended in plasma for severe thrombocytopaenia. Pre and post transfusion platelet counts were compared. Children aged less than 12 years, pregnant women and patients with splenomegaly those on ayurvedic and homeopathic therapy, recipients of packed red cells on the same day of platelet transfusion and recipients of multiple platelet transfusions within 24 hours were excluded from the study. Results The median post transfusion platelet increments (PPI) and corrected count increments (CCI) at 4hour post transfusion were 25,000/μL (5,000-80,000/μL) and 18,000/μL (range 8,000/μL- 47,500/μL) respectively among the responders. Median PPI and CCI at 24 hours were 45,000/μL and 28,863/μL among the responders. The median CCI at 4 hour post transfusion among the non-responders was 850/μL and at 24hours was 1,425/μL. At 24 hours responders showed significantly higher PPI as compared to non

  15. An audit of the use of platelet transfusions at Universitas Academic Hospital, Bloemfontein, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Sonnekus, P H; Louw, V J; Ackermann, A M; Barrett, C L; Joubert, G; Webb, M J

    2014-12-01

    An audit was performed at a tertiary hospital in Bloemfontein, South Africa, to establish whether clinicians adhered to local platelet transfusion guidelines. The audit showed poor compliance with local guidelines, with 34% of platelet transfusions not aligned with guidelines and 29.9% of transfusions administered to patients with platelet counts of ≥ 150 × 10(9)/L. When compared to medical disciplines, surgical disciplines tended significantly more to transfuse platelets inappropriately (17.1% and 53.7%, respectively; p < 0.0001). Documentation was poor and in 48.4% of orders for platelets, the indication for the platelet transfusion was not clearly stated. Considerable cost could be avoided with improved adherence to guidelines. This study emphasises the need for improving education in transfusion medicine amongst medical doctors. It is hoped that the information gleaned from this study would assist in the design of educational programmes in transfusion medicine as we attempt to close the existing gaps in knowledge and skills in the field, while ensuring that blood is transfused in a cost-effective and appropriate manner.

  16. Challenges and promises for the development of donor-independent platelet transfusions.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Michele P; Sullivan, Spencer K; Fuentes, Rudy; French, Deborah L; Poncz, Mortimer

    2013-04-25

    Platelet transfusions are often a life-saving intervention, and the use of platelet transfusions has been increasing. Donor-derived platelet availability can be challenging. Compounding this concern are additional limitations of donor-derived platelets, including variability in product unit quality and quantity, limited shelf life and the risks of product bacterial contamination, other transfusion-transmitted infections, and immunologic reactions. Because of these issues, there has been an effort to develop strategies to generate platelets from exogenously generated precursor cells. If successful, such platelets have the potential to be a safer, more consistent platelet product, while reducing the necessity for human donations. Moreover, ex vivo-generated autologous platelets or precursors may be beneficial for patients who are refractory to allogeneic platelets. For patients with inherited platelet disorders, ex vivo-generated platelets offer the promise of a treatment via the generation of autologous gene-corrected platelets. Theoretically, ex vivo-generated platelets also offer targeted delivery of ectopic proteins to sites of vascular injury. This review summarizes the current, state-of-the-art methodologies in delivering a clinically relevant ex vivo-derived platelet product, and it discusses significant challenges that must be overcome for this approach to become a clinical reality.

  17. Role of platelet transfusion in the management of dengue patients in a tertiary care hospital

    PubMed Central

    Makroo, R. N.; Raina, V.; Kumar, P.; Kanth, R. K.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Objective: While medical fraternity globally recognizes the role of platelet transfusion in the management of hospitalized dengue patients the exact indications and situations in which these are to be transfused may vary. Since there is inherent risk associated with the transfusion of blood/blood-component, it is imperative for each institution (or country) to lay their own criteria for transfusion of these blood components. The present study was conducted to lay precise criteria and transfusion trigger for platelet transfusion in our set-up. Materials and Methods: The present study was conducted on 225 serologically confirmed dengue patients admitted at Indraprastha Apollo Hospitals between 1st of August to 30th of November 2005. Clinical data, reports of hematological investigation, platelets requirements and data obtained from daily follow-up were analyzed. The clinicians followed the guidelines issued by the Directorate of Health services, NCT of Delhi. Results: In the serologically confirmed cases, the prevalence of thrombocytopenia (count less than 100,000/cumm) was 84.88% on admission and bleeding was recorded in 22 (9.7%) patients. About 96 (42.6%) patients of dengue cases received platelet transfusion. Among them 47 (20.88%) patients had a platelet count < 20,000/cumm, 43 (19.11%) had a platelet count in the range of 21-40,000/cumm while 6 (2.66%) patients had the platelet count in between 41 and 50,000/cumm. Out of 49 patients with a platelet count >20,000/cumm, 18 patients had haemorrhagic manifestations such as petechiae, gum-bleeding, epistaxis, etc., which necessitates the use of platelet transfusion. However, 31 patients received inappropriate platelet transfusion. Conclusion: This study suggests that bleeding occurs more often in patients with severe thrombocytopenia. High-risk patients having platelet count < 20,000/cumm and risk of bleeding require urgent platelet transfusion. Patients with platelet count 21-40,000/cumm are in

  18. When less is more: can we abandon prophylactic platelet transfusion in Dengue fever?

    PubMed

    Kurukularatne, Changa; Dimatatac, Frederico; Teo, Diana Lt; Lye, David C; Leo, Yee Sin

    2011-12-01

    Dengue fever (DF) has several hematological manifestations including thrombocytopenia and increased bleeding risk. Prophylactic platelet transfusion-in the absence of major bleeding-is utilized in DF with thrombocytopenia with the intention of preventing hemorrhagic complications. However, prophylactic platelet transfusion in DF is neither standardized nor supported by clinical evidence. We conclude that risks, costs and poor resource utilization associated with prophylactic platelet transfusion in DF far outweigh any potential hematological benefit, and as such, should not constitute routine clinical practice. PMID:22294065

  19. Intracranial hemorrhage and platelet transfusion after administration of anti-platelets agents: Fukushima Prefecture.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yuhko; Sato, Taku; Sakuma, Jun; Ichikawa, Masahiro; Kishida, Yugo; Oda, Keiko; Watanabe, Yoichi; Goto, Takeshi; Sato, Masahiro; Nollet, Kenneth E; Saito, Kiyoshi; Ohto, Hitoshi

    2016-06-01

    We conducted a case series study to assess intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in the context of anti-platelets agents (APAs) and platelet (PLT) transfusion in Fukushima Prefecture.This study included patients who were newly diagnosed with ICH between January 2008 and June 2014 in the neurosurgical hospitals of Fukushima Prefecture. Four of ten neurosurgical hospitals responded to our questionnaire. Of 287 ICH patients, 51 (20.6%) were on APA therapy, of whom PLT transfusion was given to only one persistently bleeding patient who was on dual anti-platelet therapy. In a follow-up survey, 30 out of 51 ICH patients on APA therapy, average age 75 years, were analyzed, of whom 21 (70%) were male. The predominant underlying disease was diabetes mellitus. It is interesting to note that peripheral artery disease and aortic aneurysm were among the indications for APAs. ICH was mainly observed supratentorially. Hematoma enlargement was observed in 13 (44.8%) cases. By day 7, 3 patients (10%) had died from complications of ICH. In this study, we show that ICH during APA therapy matched what was observed in Kanagawa Prefecture. Whether or not a national survey differs, we anticipate greater statistical validity and an opportunity to improve patient outcomes in Japan and around the world. PMID:27210309

  20. Economic evaluation of pooled solvent/detergent treated plasma versus single donor fresh-frozen plasma in patients receiving plasma transfusions in the United States.

    PubMed

    Huisman, Eline L; de Silva, Shamika U; de Peuter, Maria A

    2014-08-01

    This study assessed the cost-effectiveness of Octaplas™ versus fresh frozen plasma (FFP) in patients receiving plasma transfusions in the United States (US). Acute and long-term complications of plasma transfusions were modelled in a decision tree followed by a Markov model, using a healthcare payer perspective. Over a lifetime time horizon, patients receiving Octaplas™ accumulate slightly more life years (0.00613 [95% uncertainty interval (95%UI): 0.00166-0.01561]) and quality-adjusted life years (QALY) (0.023 [95%UI: 0.012-0.044]) at lower cost compared with those treated with FFP. Octaplas™ demonstrated to be the dominant treatment option over FFP (95%UI: Dominant-US$ 15,764/QALY).

  1. Neonatal Transfusion Practice: When do Neonates Need Red Blood Cells or Platelets?

    PubMed

    Del Vecchio, Antonio; Franco, Caterina; Petrillo, Flavia; D'Amato, Gabriele

    2016-09-01

    Based on small studies and not on statistically valid clinical trials, guidelines for neonatal transfusions remain controversial and practices vary greatly. Premature infants and critically ill neonates in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) often require blood transfusions and extremely preterm neonates receive at least one red blood cell transfusion during their hospital stay. Transfusions to neonates convey both benefits and risks and consequently it is imperative to establish specific guidelines to improve practice and avoid unnecessary transfusions. Appropriate and lifesaving platelet transfusion in thrombocytopenic bleeding neonates pertains to 2% of all neonates in NICUs. Inversely, 98% of platelet transfusions are given prophylactically, in the absence of bleeding, with the assumption that this reduces the risk of a serious hemorrhage. To date, no evidence base is available for assigning a platelet transfusion trigger to NICU patients. Each NICU should approve specific guidelines that best suit its local clinical practice. Therefore, whatever guidelines are chosen in deciding when to transfuse, what is most important is to adhere strictly to the guidelines adopted, thus limiting unnecessary transfusions that convey no benefits and carry both known and unknown risks. PMID:27603540

  2. Thromboelastometric Monitoring of the Hemostatic Effect of Platelet Concentrates Transfusion in Thrombocytopenic Children Undergoing Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Cristina; Cadamuro, Janne; Jones, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Prophylactic platelet concentrates transfusion represents a therapeutic choice in patients with chemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia. This prospective, non-interventional study evaluated the effects of platelet concentrates transfusion on thromboelastometric parameters of platelet function in 36 transfusion occasions for 11 thrombocytopenic children undergoing chemotherapy. Pre- and posttransfusion (1-2 hours) blood samples were analyzed using standard coagulation tests and thromboelastometry (ROTEM) measurements (EXTEM and FIBTEM tests). Platelet component of the clot was calculated based on the EXTEM and FIBTEM maximum clot elasticity (MCE) results. After transfusion, mean platelet count increased from 16.5 × 109/L to 43.0 × 109/L (P < .001) and platelet component increased from 34.1 to 73.0 (P < .001). Statistically significant increases for posttransfusion EXTEM parameters A10, A20, and maximum clot firmness (MCF) were observed compared to pretransfusion values (P < .001). The EXTEM α-angle values increased posttransfusion (P < .05). The FIBTEM measurements were comparable pre- and posttransfusion. The study showed that platelet concentrates transfusion in thrombocytopenic children undergoing chemotherapy improves platelet-related coagulation pattern. PMID:25525046

  3. Dengue hemorrhagic fever in Trinidad and Tobago: a case for a conservative approach to platelet transfusion.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anu; Charles, Kenneth; Chadee, Dave; Teelucksingh, Surujpaul

    2012-03-01

    Dengue fever is endemic to Trinidad and Tobago. A retrospective analysis of all adult admissions at a tertiary hospital in Trinidad treated for dengue during January 1-December 31, 2008 was performed. A total of 186 patients were treated during this period: 98.9% (184) of the patients were thrombocytopenic; 45.2% were severely thrombocytopenic; 13 patients showed development of minor hemorrhage and only one case of major hemorrhage; platelet transfusion was given for 7% (13) of the cases; and 6 cases for which platelet transfusion was given did not show evidence of plasma leakage (12 of these cases did not show evidence of hemorrhage). There was a strong association between the lowest platelet value and hemoconcentration (χ(2) = 13.16, P < 0.025). No association was found between giving a platelet transfusion and hemoconcentration or hemorrhage. Thrombocytopenia seen in dengue resolves spontaneously and independent of any transfusion used.

  4. Septic shock during platelet transfusion in a patient with acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Haesebaert, Julie; Bénet, Thomas; Michallet, Mauricette; Vanhems, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Although rare, transfusion-associated bacterial contamination (TABC) is nowadays the main risk associated with platelet concentrate (PC) transfusion. Consequences vary from spontaneously resolving symptoms to severe sepsis and death. In this report we have summarised a case of bacterial contamination and sepsis during PC transfusion in a patient with acute myeloid leukaemia. Fifteen minutes after the PC transfusion began, she developed chills and rapidly worsened to septic shock. The episode was managed appropriately. The patient's blood cultures and PC unit cultures grew Escherichia coli. The microbiological susceptibilities of isolates from the patient and platelet bag were identical. No other source of E coli was found. Donor and blood products issued from the same donation investigations were negative. The causality between sepsis and PC transfusion might be difficult to confirm. As no method is available in daily practice to eliminate TABC risk, physicians should always consider TABC by immediately stopping the transfusion and conducting appropriate investigations. PMID:24172770

  5. Successful treatment of ibrutinib-associated central nervous system hemorrhage with platelet transfusion support

    PubMed Central

    Stiefel, Michael F.; Barrientos, Jacqueline; Shaikh, Azfar; Ahmed, Nasir; Baskind, Paul; Liu, Delong

    2016-01-01

    Ibrutinib is a novel targeted therapy for B-cell malignancies. Hemorrhagic events were reported in the original trials, however the mechanism of bleeding is just being elucidated. Recent studies have demonstrated platelet dysfunction as a mechanism of bleeding. Currently we report two patients who developed life-threatening central nervous system hemorrhage while receiving ibrutinib for chronic lymphoid leukemia (CLL) and mantle cell lymphoma, respectively. Both patients improved rapidly after platelet transfusions even though their platelet counts were normal or only mildly reduced at the time of hemorrhage. We suggest that platelet transfusions can ameliorate the platelet dysfunction defect of ibrutinib and can support the patient through the critical period until new platelet production occurs. PMID:27583253

  6. A therapeutic-only versus prophylactic platelet transfusion strategy for preventing bleeding in patients with haematological disorders after chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Estcourt, Lise J; Crighton, Gemma L; Wood, Erica M; Stanworth, Simon; Trivella, Marialena; Doree, Carolyn; Tinmouth, Alan; Murphy, Michael F

    2014-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To determine whether a therapeutic-only platelet transfusion policy (platelet transfusions given when patient bleeds) is as effective and safe as a prophylactic platelet transfusion policy (platelet transfusions given to prevent bleeding usually when the platelet count falls below a given trigger level) in patients with haematological disorders undergoing myelosuppressive chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation. PMID:25722649

  7. Comparison of different platelet transfusion thresholds prior to insertion of central lines in patients with thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Estcourt, Lise J; Desborough, Michael; Hopewell, Sally; Doree, Carolyn; Stanworth, Simon J

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with a low platelet count (thrombocytopenia) often require the insertion of central lines (central venous catheters (CVCs)). CVCs have a number of uses; these include: administration of chemotherapy; intensive monitoring and treatment of critically-ill patients; administration of total parenteral nutrition; and long-term intermittent intravenous access for patients requiring repeated treatments. Current practice in many countries is to correct thrombocytopenia with platelet transfusions prior to CVC insertion, in order to mitigate the risk of serious procedure-related bleeding. However, the platelet count threshold recommended prior to CVC insertion varies significantly from country to country. This indicates significant uncertainty among clinicians of the correct management of these patients. The risk of bleeding after a central line insertion appears to be low if an ultrasound-guided technique is used. Patients may therefore be exposed to the risks of a platelet transfusion without any obvious clinical benefit. Objectives To assess the effects of different platelet transfusion thresholds prior to the insertion of a central line in patients with thrombocytopenia (low platelet count). Search methods We searched for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2015, Issue 2), MEDLINE (from 1946), EMBASE (from 1974), the Transfusion Evidence Library (from 1950) and ongoing trial databases to 23 February 2015. Selection criteria We included RCTs involving transfusions of platelet concentrates, prepared either from individual units of whole blood or by apheresis, and given to prevent bleeding in patients of any age with thrombocytopenia requiring insertion of a CVC. Data collection and analysis We used standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. Main results One RCT was identified that compared different platelet transfusion thresholds prior to insertion of a CVC in people with chronic liver

  8. Platelet and not erythrocyte microparticles are procoagulant in transfused thalassaemia major patients.

    PubMed

    Agouti, Imane; Cointe, Sylvie; Robert, Stéphane; Judicone, Coralie; Loundou, Anderson; Driss, Fathi; Brisson, Alain; Steschenko, Dominique; Rose, Christian; Pondarré, Corinne; Bernit, Emmanuelle; Badens, Catherine; Dignat-George, Françoise; Lacroix, Romaric; Thuret, Isabelle

    2015-11-01

    The level of circulating platelet-, erythrocyte-, leucocyte- and endothelial-derived microparticles detected by high-sensitivity flow cytometry was investigated in 37 β-thalassaemia major patients receiving a regular transfusion regimen. The phospholipid procoagulant potential of the circulating microparticles and the microparticle-dependent tissue factor activity were evaluated. A high level of circulating erythrocyte- and platelet-microparticles was found. In contrast, the number of endothelial microparticles was within the normal range. Platelet microparticles were significantly higher in splenectomized than in non-splenectomized patients, independent of platelet count (P < 0·001). Multivariate analysis indicated that phospholipid-dependent procoagulant activity was influenced by both splenectomy (P = 0·001) and platelet microparticle level (P < 0·001). Erythrocyte microparticles were not related to splenectomy, appear to be devoid of proper procoagulant activity and no relationship between their production and haemolysis, dyserythropoiesis or oxidative stress markers could be established. Intra-microparticle labelling with anti-HbF antibodies showed that they originate only partially (median of 28%) from thalassaemic erythropoiesis. In conclusion, when β-thalassaemia major patients are intensively transfused, the procoagulant activity associated with thalassaemic erythrocyte microparticles is probably diluted by transfusions. In contrast, platelet microparticles, being both more elevated and more procoagulant, especially after splenectomy, may contribute to the residual thrombotic risk reported in splenectomized multi-transfused β-thalassaemia major patients.

  9. Different doses of prophylactic platelet transfusion for preventing bleeding in patients with haematological disorders after chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Estcourt, Lise J; Stanworth, Simon; Doree, Carolyn; Trivella, Marialena; Hopewell, Sally; Murphy, Michael F; Tinmouth, Alan

    2014-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To determine whether different doses of prophylactic platelet transfusions (platelet transfusions given to prevent bleeding) affect their efficacy and safety in preventing bleeding in patients with haematological disorders after chemotherapy with or without stem cell transplantation. PMID:25722652

  10. Spleen Uptake on Bone Scan After Frequent Platelet and RBC Transfusions.

    PubMed

    De Marini, Pierre; Laplace, Annegret; Matuszak, Julien; Fornecker, Luc-Matthieu; Namer, Izzie Jacques

    2016-10-01

    A 21-year-old man, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipient, was referred to our nuclear medicine department for a suspicion of knee osteonecrosis. Bone scan with Tc-HMDP did not show abnormal bone uptake but an intense spleen accumulation. F-FDG PET/CT performed on the same day showed no pathological spleen uptake. The patient had secondary hemochromatosis resulting from frequent transfusions in the setting of a chronic graft versus host disease with hemolysis and thrombocytopenia. The last RBC and platelet transfusions were performed 9 and 2 days before the examination, respectively. Secondary hemochromatosis and recent transfusions may explain our findings.

  11. Current trends in platelet transfusions practice: The role of ABO-RhD and human leukocyte antigen incompatibility

    PubMed Central

    Valsami, Serena; Dimitroulis, Dimitrios; Gialeraki, Argyri; Chimonidou, Maria; Politou, Marianna

    2015-01-01

    Platelet transfusions have contributed to the revolutionary modern treatment of hypoproliferative thrombocytopenia. Despite the long-term application of platelet transfusion in therapeutics, all aspects of their optimal use (i.e., in cases of ABO and/or Rh (D incompatibility) have not been definitively determined yet. We reviewed the available data on transfusion practices and outcome in ABO and RhD incompatibility and platelet refractoriness due to anti-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies. Transfusion of platelets with major ABO-incompatibility is related to reduced posttransfusion platelet (PLT) count increments, compared to ABO-identical and minor, but still are equally effective in preventing clinical bleeding. ABO-minor incompatible transfusions pose the risk of an acute hemolytic reaction of the recipient that is not always related to high anti-A, B donor titers. ABO-identical PLT transfusion seems to be the most effective and safest therapeutic strategy. Exclusive ABO-identical platelet transfusion policy could be feasible, but alternative approaches could facilitate platelet inventory management. Transfusion of platelets from RhD positive donors to RhD negative patients is considered to be effective and safe though is associated with low rate of anti-D alloimmunization due to contaminating red blood cells. The prevention of D alloimmunization is recommended only for women of childbearing age. HLA alloimmunization is a major cause of platelet refractoriness. Managing patients with refractoriness with cross-matched or HLA-matched platelets is the current practice although data are still lacking for the efficacy of this practice in terms of clinical outcome. Leukoreduction contributes to the reduction of both HLA and anti-D alloimmunization. PMID:26420927

  12. [Platelet transfusion and immunization anti-Rh1: implication for immunoprophylaxis].

    PubMed

    Chambost, H

    2014-11-01

    Rhesus (Rh) antigens are not expressed on platelets but residual red cells carry the risk of anti-D iso-immunization in transfusion recipients of platelet concentrates (PC). The main theoretical risk associated with this reaction relates to female subjects due to potential obstetrical situations of maternal-foetal Rh incompatibility. Isogroup PC transfusion in this system is therefore advised. However, logistical constraints impose frequent Rh-incompatible transfusions that require the recommendation of anti-Rh immunoglobulin in a girl of childbearing age in this situation. This recommendation, already restricted to a group of patients deserves to be questioned over a decade after being issued. Data from published reports are difficult to interpret because of the heterogeneity of the few series (CP type, immune status, timing of biological tests) but the current techniques for preparing products and most common use of CP apheresis limited the risk of immunization. Moreover, platelet transfusions are particularly relevant to immunocompromised populations which, to what extent (heavy chemotherapy and/or hematopoietic stem cells recipients) seems to be protected from this risk. It is noteworthy that the clinical consequences that may be expected from such immunization are not reported. Although some authors emphasize significant isoimmunization rates (maximum 19%), the heterogeneous conditions and the lack of evidence of clinical consequence suggest evaluating the recommendations or revising them towards more targeted indications of seroprophylaxis. PMID:25282489

  13. Thromboerythrocytes. In vitro studies of a potential autologous, semi-artificial alternative to platelet transfusions.

    PubMed

    Coller, B S; Springer, K T; Beer, J H; Mohandas, N; Scudder, L E; Norton, K J; West, S M

    1992-02-01

    In an attempt to overcome the limitations and drawbacks of using fresh platelets for transfusion therapy of thrombocytopenic patients, we have performed in vitro experiments on an autologous, semi-artificial alternative to platelet transfusions. Based on our previous studies of the interactions of unactivated and activated platelets with beads coated with peptides of various lengths, all of which contained the arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) cell recognition sequence, the peptide Ac-CGGRGDF-NH2 was chosen for covalent coupling to erythrocytes. A heterobifunctional crosslinking reagent (N-maleimido-6-aminocaproyl ester of 1-hydroxy-2-nitrobenzene-4-sulfonic acid) was used to crosslink via the peptide's free sulfhydryl group and the erythrocyte's surface amino groups. Approximately 0.5-1.5 x 10(6) peptide molecules bound per erythrocyte after 2 h of incubation, and most of the peptides appeared to crosslink to glycophorin A. The resulting cells, termed thromboerythrocytes, interacted selectively with activated platelets to form mixed aggregates. Studies with fluid phase RGD peptides and monoclonal antibodies indicated that the RGD peptides on the thromboerythrocytes interacted with the GPIIb/IIIa receptors on activated platelets. Thromboerythrocytes could also bind to platelets adherent to collagen. There was minimal erythrocyte hemolysis during the formation of thromboerythrocytes and studies of thromboerythrocyte osmotic fragility and cellular deformability showed no significant changes from control erythrocytes. Whereas there is a 20:1 ratio of erythrocytes to platelets in the circulation of normal individuals, the erythrocytes from as little as 50 ml of blood could be transformed into the equivalent of 2 U of platelets by numbers (equivalent to 18 U of platelets by mass), and reinfused into the same individual within several hours. These data encourage us to proceed to in vivo studies to assess the hemostatic efficacy of thromboerythrocytes in

  14. Cross-match-compatible platelets improve corrected count increments in patients who are refractory to randomly selected platelets

    PubMed Central

    Elhence, Priti; Chaudhary, Rajendra K.; Nityanand, Soniya

    2014-01-01

    Background Cross-match-compatible platelets are used for the management of thrombocytopenic patients who are refractory to transfusions of randomly selected platelets. Data supporting the effectiveness of platelets that are compatible according to cross-matching with a modified antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (MAC-ELISA or MACE) are limited. This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of cross-match-compatible platelets in an unselected group of refractory patients. Materials and methods One hundred ABO compatible single donor platelet transfusions given to 31 refractory patients were studied. Patients were defined to be refractory if their 24-hour corrected count increment (CCI) was <5×109/L following two consecutive platelet transfusions. Platelets were cross-matched by MACE and the CCI was determined to monitor the effectiveness of platelet transfusions. Results The clinical sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of the MACE-cross-matched platelets for post-transfusion CCI were 88%, 54.6%, 39.3% and 93.2%, respectively. The difference between adequate and inadequate post-transfusion 24-hour CCI for MACE cross-matched-compatible vs incompatible single donor platelet transfusions was statistically significant (p=0.000). The 24-hour CCI (mean±SD) was significantly higher for cross-match-compatible platelets (9,250±026.6) than for incompatible ones (6,757.94±2,656.5) (p<0.0001). Most of the incompatible cross-matches (73.2%) were due to anti-HLA antibodies, alone (55.3% of cases) or together with anti-platelet glycoprotein antibodies (17.9%). Discussion The clinical sensitivity and negative predictive value of platelet cross-matching by MACE were high in this study and such tests may, therefore, be used to select compatible platelets for refractory patients. A high negative predictive value demonstrates the greater chance of an adequate response with cross-matched-compatible platelets. PMID

  15. Prophylactic plasma and platelet transfusion in the critically Ill patient: just useless and expensive or even harmful?

    PubMed

    Görlinger, Klaus; Saner, Fuat H

    2015-01-01

    It is still common practice to correct abnormal standard laboratory test results, such as increased INR or low platelet count, prior to invasive interventions, such as tracheostomy, central venous catheter insertion or liver biopsy, in critically ill patients. Data suggest that 30-90 % of plasma transfused for these indications is unnecessary and puts the patient at risk. Plasma transfusion is associated with a high risk of transfusion-associated adverse events such as transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO), transfusion-related lung injury (TRALI), transfusion-related immunomodulation (TRIM), and anaphylaxis/allergic reactions. Therefore, the avoidance of inappropriate plasma transfusion bears a high potential of improving patient outcomes. The prospective study by Durila et al., published recently in BMC Anesthesiology, provides evidence that tracheostomies can be performed without prophylactic plasma transfusion and bleeding complications in critically ill patients despite increased INR in case of normal thromboelastometry (ROTEM) results. Thromboelastometry-based restrictive transfusion management helped avoid unnecessary plasma and platelet transfusion, and should reduce the incidence of transfusion-related adverse events and transfusion-associated hospital costs. Therefore, the authors believe that thromboelastometry-based strategies should be implemented to optimize patient blood management in perioperative medicine. PMID:26054337

  16. Alternative agents versus prophylactic platelet transfusion for preventing bleeding in patients with haematological disorders after chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Estcourt, Lise J; Gregg, Richard; Stanworth, Simon; Doree, Carolyn; Trivella, Marialena; Murphy, Michael F; Tinmouth, Alan

    2014-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To determine whether alternative agents (e.g. artificial platelet substitutes, platelet-poor plasma, fibrinogen, rFVIIa, thrombopoietin mimetics) are as effective and safe as the use of platelet transfusions for the prevention of bleeding (prophylactic platelet transfusion) in patients with haematological disorders who are undergoing myelosuppressive chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation. Antifibrinolytics (lysine analogues) will not be included in this review because they have been the focus of another Cochrane review (Wardrop 2013). PMID:25722650

  17. ESPRE: a knowledge-based system to support platelet transfusion decisions.

    PubMed

    Sielaff, B H; Connelly, D P; Scott, E P

    1989-05-01

    ESPRE is a knowledge-based system which aids in the review of requests for platelet transfusions in the hospital blood bank. It is a microcomputer-based decision support system written in LISP and utilizes a hybrid frame and rule architecture. By automatically obtaining most of the required patient data directly from the hospital's main laboratory computers via a direct link, very little keyboard entry is required. Assessment of time trends computed from the data constitutes an important aspect of this system. To aid the blood bank personnel in deciding on the appropriateness of the requested transfusion, the system provides an explanatory report which includes a list of patient-specific data, a list of the conditions for which a transfusion would be appropriate for the particular patient (given the clinical condition), and the conclusions drawn by the system. In an early clinical evaluation of ESPRE, out of a random sample of 75 platelet transfusion requests, there were only three disagreements between ESPRE and blood bank personnel. PMID:2656504

  18. Platelet concentrates for topical use: bedside device and blood transfusion technology. Quality and versatility.

    PubMed

    Borzini, Piero; Balbo, Valeria; Mazzucco, Laura

    2012-06-01

    More or less after a decade of experimental and pioneering manual procedures to prepare platelet-rich plasma (PRP) for topical use, several portable and bedside devices were made available to prepare the PRP at the point-of-care. This technical opportunity increased the number of patients who got access to the treatment with autologous PRP and PRP-gel. Since topical treatment of tissue with PRP and PRP-gel was restricted to autologous preparation, blood transfusion centers that professionally prepare donor-derived platelet concentrates were not able to cover the overwhelming request for autologous PRP supply. Principally for logistic and organization reasons blood transfusion centers usually fail the challenge of prompt delivery of PRP to the physician over large territory. Nevertheless the blood bank production of platelet concentrates is associated with high standardization and quality controls not achievable from bedside and portable devices. Furthermore it easy to demonstrate that high-volume blood bank-produced platelet concentrates are less expensive than low-volume PRP produced by portable and bedside devices. Taking also in consideration the ever-increasing safety of the blood components, the relationship between bedside device-produced and blood-bank-produced PRP might be reconsidered. Here we discuss this topic concluding that the variety of sources of PRP production is an opportunity for versatility and that, ultimately, versatility is an opportunity for the patient's care.

  19. Preoperative platelet transfusions and perioperative red blood cell requirements in patients with thrombocytopenia undergoing noncardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Matthew A.; Jia, Qing; Clifford, Leanne; Wilson, Gregory; Brown, Michael J.; Hanson, Andrew C.; Schroeder, Darrell R.; Kor, Daryl J.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Perioperative hemorrhage impacts patient outcomes and health care resource utilization, yet the risks of transfusion therapies are significant. In patients with preoperative thrombocytopenia, the effects of prophylactic preoperative platelet (PLT) transfusion on perioperative bleeding complications remain uncertain. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS This is a retrospective cohort study of noncardiac surgical patients between January 1, 2008, and December 31, 2011. Propensity-adjusted analyses were used to evaluate associations between preoperative thrombocytopenia, preoperative PLT transfusion, and the outcomes of interest, with a primary outcome of perioperative red blood cell (RBC) transfusion. RESULTS A total of 13,978 study participants were included; 860 (6.2%) had a PLT count of not more than 100 × 109/L with 71 (8.3%) receiving PLTs preoperatively. Administration of PLTs was associated with higher rates of perioperative RBC transfusion (66.2% vs. 49.1%, p 0.0065); however, in propensity-adjusted analysis there was no significant difference between groups (odds ratio [OR] [95% confidence interval {95% CI}], 1.68 [0.95–2.99]; p =0.0764]. Patients receiving PLTs had higher rates of intensive care unit (ICU) admission (OR [95% CI], 1.95 [1.10–3.46]; p =0.0224) and longer hospital lengths of stay (estimate [95% bootstrap CI], 7.2 [0.8–13.9] days; p =0.0006) in propensity-adjusted analyses. CONCLUSION Preoperative PLT transfusion did not attenuate RBC requirements in patients with thrombocytopenia undergoing noncardiac surgery. Moreover, preoperative PLT transfusion was associated with increased ICU admission rates and hospital duration. These findings suggest that more conservative management of preoperative thrombocytopenia may be warranted. PMID:26559936

  20. Alternative agents versus prophylactic platelet transfusion for preventing bleeding in patients with thrombocytopenia due to chronic bone marrow failure: a network meta-analysis and systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Desborough, Michael; Estcourt, Lise J; Chaimani, Anna; Doree, Carolyn; Hopewell, Sally; Trivella, Marialena; Hadjinicolaou, Andreas V; Vyas, Paresh; Stanworth, Simon J

    2016-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To compare the relative efficacy of different treatments for thrombocytopenia (artificial platelet substitutes, platelet-poor plasma, fibrinogen, rFVIIa, rFXIII, thrombopoietin mimetics, antifibrinolytic drugs or platelet transfusions) in patients with chronic bone marrow failure and to derive a hierarchy of potential alternate treatments to platelet transfusions. PMID:27069420

  1. A study of platelet alloantibody in multiply-transfused haematology patients.

    PubMed

    Linn, Y C; Prakash, P; Ong, Y W

    1995-03-01

    This paper studies the prevalence of platelet antibody in multiply-transfused leukaemia and other transfusion-dependent non-leukaemic patients, using a solid phase red cell adherence (SPRCA) assay and a microlymphocytotoxicity (LCT) test. A positivity rate of 26% in the leukaemic patients and 72% in non-leukaemic patients was obtained with the SPRCA assay, compared to a higher positivity rate of 69% and 83% in the respective groups using the LCT test. Several explanations are proposed. The lower sensitivity of the SPRCA assay suggests that the LCT test may need to be run concurrently for higher diagnostic yield. This paper also compares the performance between an in-house SPRCA test method and the commercial Capture P test kit, and good concordance was shown in repeated occasions.

  2. Single-Donor Leukophoretic Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhardt, R. N.

    1977-01-01

    Leukocyte separation-and-retrieval device utilizes granulocyte and monocyte property of leukoadhesion to glass surfaces as basis of their separation from whole blood. Device is used with single donor technique and has application in biological and chemical processing, veterinary research and clinical care.

  3. Pyelolithotomy in a patient with Glanzmann thrombasthenia and antiglycoprotein IIb/IIIa antibodies: the shortest possible duration of treatment with recombinant activated factor VII and platelet transfusions.

    PubMed

    Devecioğlu, Omer; Unüvar, Ayşegül; Anak, Sema; Bilge, Ilmay; Ander, Haluk; Ziylan, Orhan

    2003-01-01

    Transfusion of platelet concentrates remains the first-line therapy for Glanzmann thrombasthenia in case of bleeding or preparation for surgery. However, development of antibodies to platelet glycoprotein (Gp) IIb/IIIa complex or human leukocyte antigens (HLA) is frequent and the main cause of platelet refractoriness. Recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) is a potent alternative for patients with Glanzmann thrombasthenia with anti-platelet antibodies. We describe a case of Glanzmann thrombasthenia with alloantibodies to platelet Gp IIb/IIIa complex who underwent a successful pyelolithotomy operation under the coverage of recombinant activated factor VIIa and platelet transfusions. PMID:12718376

  4. Comparison of different platelet count thresholds to guide administration of prophylactic platelet transfusion for preventing bleeding in people with haematological disorders after myelosuppressive chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Estcourt, Lise J; Stanworth, Simon J; Doree, Carolyn; Hopewell, Sally; Trivella, Marialena; Murphy, Michael F

    2015-01-01

    Background Platelet transfusions are used in modern clinical practice to prevent and treat bleeding in people who are thrombocytopenic due to bone marrow failure. Although considerable advances have been made in platelet transfusion therapy in the last 40 years, some areas continue to provoke debate, especially concerning the use of prophylactic platelet transfusions for the prevention of thrombocytopenic bleeding. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2004, and previously updated in 2012 that addressed four separate questions: prophylactic versus therapeutic-only platelet transfusion policy; prophylactic platelet transfusion threshold; prophylactic platelet transfusion dose; and platelet transfusions compared to alternative treatments. This review has now been split into four smaller reviews looking at these questions individually; this review compares prophylactic platelet transfusion thresholds. Objectives To determine whether different platelet transfusion thresholds for administration of prophylactic platelet transfusions (platelet transfusions given to prevent bleeding) affect the efficacy and safety of prophylactic platelet transfusions in preventing bleeding in people with haematological disorders undergoing myelosuppressive chemotherapy or haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Search methods We searched for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (Cochrane Library 2015, Issue 6, 23 July 2015), MEDLINE (from 1946), Embase (from 1974), CINAHL (from 1937), the Transfusion Evidence Library (from 1950), and ongoing trial databases to 23 July 2015. Selection criteria We included RCTs involving transfusions of platelet concentrates, prepared either from individual units of whole blood or by apheresis, and given to prevent bleeding in people with haematological disorders (receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy or undergoing HSCT) that compared different thresholds for

  5. Recurrent life-threatening reactions to platelet transfusion in an aplastic anaemia patient with a paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria clone.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, M; Bates, G; Richardson, D; Burrows, L

    2014-09-01

    A 60-year-old woman was diagnosed with non-severe aplastic anaemia when she presented with anaemia and thrombocytopenia. She developed recurrent life-threatening hypotensive reactions during transfusion of leukodepleted platelet concentrates, and washed platelet concentrates prevented the development of such reactions subsequently. A paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria clone was detected on investigating for aplastic anaemia, which has been speculated to play a role in the recurrent hypotensive reactions.

  6. A therapeutic-only versus prophylactic platelet transfusion strategy for preventing bleeding in patients with haematological disorders after myelosuppressive chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Crighton, Gemma L; Estcourt, Lise J; Wood, Erica M; Trivella, Marialena; Doree, Carolyn; Stanworth, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Background Platelet transfusions are used in modern clinical practice to prevent and treat bleeding in thrombocytopenic patients with bone marrow failure. Although considerable advances have been made in platelet transfusion therapy in the last 40 years, some areas continue to provoke debate, especially concerning the use of prophylactic platelet transfusions for the prevention of thrombocytopenic bleeding. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2004 and updated in 2012 that addressed four separate questions: therapeutic-only versus prophylactic platelet transfusion policy; prophylactic platelet transfusion threshold; prophylactic platelet transfusion dose; and platelet transfusions compared to alternative treatments. We have now split this review into four smaller reviews looking at these questions individually; this review is the first part of the original review. Objectives To determine whether a therapeutic-only platelet transfusion policy (platelet transfusions given when patient bleeds) is as effective and safe as a prophylactic platelet transfusion policy (platelet transfusions given to prevent bleeding, usually when the platelet count falls below a given trigger level) in patients with haematological disorders undergoing myelosuppressive chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation. Search methods We searched for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Cochrane Library 2015, Issue 6), MEDLINE (from 1946), Embase (from 1974), CINAHL (from 1937), the Transfusion Evidence Library (from 1950) and ongoing trial databases to 23 July 2015. Selection criteria RCTs involving transfusions of platelet concentrates prepared either from individual units of whole blood or by apheresis, and given to prevent or treat bleeding in patients with malignant haematological disorders receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy or undergoing HSCT. Data collection and analysis We used standard methodological procedures

  7. Suitability of measurement of swirling as a marker of platelet shape change in concentrates stored for transfusion.

    PubMed

    Mathai, Jaisy; Resmi, K R; Sulochana, P V; Sathyabhama, S; Baby Saritha, G; Krishnan, Lissy K

    2006-09-01

    Platelet discoid shape is known to correlate with in vivo viability after transfusion. Measurement of shape change requires invasive sampling and laborious assays, which is difficult to perform in a blood transfusion center as a routine test for quality control of stored platelets. The objective of this study was to establish suitability of swirling assessment in stored platelet suspension as a routine test for quality check, by comparing platelet shape change measurement carried out in parallel. The study was done in two types of bags obtained from different manufactures (Groups 1 and 2). Platelet concentrates (PC) were stored for 120 h and samples drawn at 24-h intervals, optical analysis at 540 nm was carried out to quantify shape change in response to an agonist adenosine diphosphate (ADP). The same bags were subjected to swirling assessment, by two blood bank personnel independently and graded as positive (+, ++, +++) or as negative, based on the silky appearance of the suspension. Swirling negative platelets were prepared by storing platelets at 4 degrees C for 24 h and were compared with swirling positive platelets. Other parameters studied in the samples drawn at 24-h intervals were platelet count, mean platelet volume, and blood gases. Swirling assessment results correlated well with shape change measurement at each study period with a P value significant at 0.02 and 0.04 for group 1 and 2 bags, respectively. In the negative swirling controls, extent of shape change was lower than the extent in test bags, showing reduced capacity to respond to ADP at 4 degrees C. The results of the study indicate that by simple swirling measurements, stored PC can be monitored for loss of discoid shape before they are transfused. Gas tension and pH were with in permissible limits. Therefore, inspection of swirling can be a reliable method of quality control as it correlates with platelet function. The platelets that retain the discoid shape in vitro at the time of

  8. The association between red blood cell and platelet transfusion and subsequently developing idiopathic pneumonia syndrome after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Vusse, Lisa K. Vande; Madtes, David K.; Guthrie, Katherine A.; Gernsheimer, Terry B.; Curtis, J. Randall; Watkins, Timothy R.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Blood transfusions are common during hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and may contribute to lung injury. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS This study examined the associations between red blood cell (RBC) and platelet (PLT) transfusions and idiopathic pneumonia syndrome (IPS) among 914 individuals who underwent myeloablative allogeneic HSCT between 1997 and 2001. Patients received allogeneic blood transfusions at their physicians' discretion. RBCs, PLTs, and a composite of “other” transfusions were quantified as the sum of units received each 7-day period from 6 days before transplant until IPS onset, death, or Posttransplant Day 120. RBC and PLT transfusions were modeled as separate time-varying exposures in proportional hazards models adjusted for IPS risk factors (age, baseline disease, irradiation dose) and other transfusions. Timing of PLT transfusion relative to myeloid engraftment and PLT ABO blood group (match vs. mismatch) were included as potential interaction terms. RESULTS Patients received a median of 9 PLT and 10 RBC units. There were 77 IPS cases (8.4%). Each additional PLT unit transfused in the prior week was associated with 16% higher IPS risk (hazard ratio, 1.16; 95% confidence interval, 1.09–1.23; p < 0.001). Recent RBC and PLT transfusions were each significantly associated with greater risk of IPS when examined without the other; only PLT transfusions retained significance when both exposures were included in the model. The PLT association was not modified by engraftment or ABO mismatch. CONCLUSION PLT transfusions are associated with greater risk of IPS after myeloablative HSCT. RBCs may also contribute; however, these findings need confirmation. PMID:24033082

  9. Effects of platelet and plasma transfusion on outcome in traumatic brain injury patients with moderate bleeding diatheses.

    PubMed

    Anglin, Catherine O; Spence, Jeffrey S; Warner, Matthew A; Paliotta, Christopher; Harper, Caryn; Moore, Carol; Sarode, Ravi; Madden, Christopher; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon

    2013-03-01

    Object Coagulopathy and thrombocytopenia are common after traumatic brain injury (TBI), yet transfusion thresholds for mildly to moderately abnormal ranges of international normalized ratio and platelet count remain controversial. This study evaluates associations between fresh frozen plasma (FFP) and platelet transfusions with long-term functional outcome and survival in TBI patients with moderate hemostatic laboratory abnormalities. Methods This study is a retrospective review of prospectively collected data of patients with mild to severe TBI. Data include patient demographics, several initial injury severity metrics, daily laboratory values, Glasgow Outcome Score- Extended (GOSE) scores, Functional Status Examination (FSE) scores, and survival to 6 months. Correlations were evaluated between these variables and transfusion of FFP, platelets, packed red blood cells (RBCs), cryoprecipitate, recombinant factor VIIa, and albumin. Ordinal regression was performed to account for potential confounding variables to further define relationships between transfusion status and long-term outcome. By analyzing collected data, mild to moderate coagulopathy was defined as an international normalized ratio 1.4-2.0, moderate thrombocytopenia as platelet count 50 × 10(9)/L to 107 × 10(9)/L, and moderate anemia as 21%-30% hematocrit. Results In patients with mild to moderate laboratory hematological abnormalities, univariate analysis shows significant correlations between poor outcome scores and FFP, platelet, or packed RBC transfusion; the volume of FFP or packed RBCs transfused also correlated with poor outcome. Several measures of initial injury and laboratory abnormalities also correlated with poor outcome. Patient age, initial Glasgow Coma Scale score, and highest recorded serum sodium were included in the ordinal regression model using backward variable selection. In the moderate coagulopathy subgroup, patients transfused with FFP were more likely to have a lower GOSE

  10. Soluble Mediators in Platelet Concentrates Modulate Dendritic Cell Inflammatory Responses in an Experimental Model of Transfusion.

    PubMed

    Perros, Alexis J; Christensen, Anne-Marie; Flower, Robert L; Dean, Melinda M

    2015-10-01

    The transfusion of platelet concentrates (PCs) is widely used to treat thrombocytopenia and severe trauma. Ex vivo storage of PCs is associated with a storage lesion characterized by partial platelet activation and the release of soluble mediators, such as soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L), RANTES, and interleukin (IL)-8. An in vitro whole blood culture transfusion model was employed to assess whether mediators present in PC supernatants (PC-SNs) modulated dendritic cell (DC)-specific inflammatory responses (intracellular staining) and the overall inflammatory response (cytometric bead array). Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was included in parallel cultures to model the impact of PC-SNs on cell responses following toll-like receptor-mediated pathogen recognition. The impact of both the PC dose (10%, 25%) and ex vivo storage period was investigated [day 2 (D2), day 5 (D5), day 7 (D7)]. PC-SNs alone had minimal impact on DC-specific inflammatory responses and the overall inflammatory response. However, in the presence of LPS, exposure to PC-SNs resulted in a significant dose-associated suppression of the production of DC IL-12, IL-6, IL-1α, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1β and storage-associated suppression of the production of DC IL-10, TNF-α, and IL-8. For the overall inflammatory response, IL-6, TNF-α, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, and inflammatory protein (IP)-10 were significantly suppressed and IL-8, IL-10, and IL-1β significantly increased following exposure to PC-SNs in the presence of LPS. These data suggest that soluble mediators present in PCs significantly suppress DC function and modulate the overall inflammatory response, particularly in the presence of an infectious stimulus. Given the central role of DCs in the initiation and regulation of the immune response, these results suggest that modulation of the DC inflammatory profile is a probable mechanism contributing to transfusion-related complications. PMID:26133961

  11. A therapeutic-only versus prophylactic platelet transfusion strategy for preventing bleeding in patients with haematological disorders after myelosuppressive chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Crighton, Gemma L; Estcourt, Lise J; Wood, Erica M; Trivella, Marialena; Doree, Carolyn; Stanworth, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Background Platelet transfusions are used in modern clinical practice to prevent and treat bleeding in thrombocytopenic patients with bone marrow failure. Although considerable advances have been made in platelet transfusion therapy in the last 40 years, some areas continue to provoke debate, especially concerning the use of prophylactic platelet transfusions for the prevention of thrombocytopenic bleeding. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2004 and updated in 2012 that addressed four separate questions: therapeutic-only versus prophylactic platelet transfusion policy; prophylactic platelet transfusion threshold; prophylactic platelet transfusion dose; and platelet transfusions compared to alternative treatments. We have now split this review into four smaller reviews looking at these questions individually; this review is the first part of the original review. Objectives To determine whether a therapeutic-only platelet transfusion policy (platelet transfusions given when patient bleeds) is as effective and safe as a prophylactic platelet transfusion policy (platelet transfusions given to prevent bleeding, usually when the platelet count falls below a given trigger level) in patients with haematological disorders undergoing myelosuppressive chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation. Search methods We searched for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Cochrane Library 2015, Issue 6), MEDLINE (from 1946), Embase (from 1974), CINAHL (from 1937), the Transfusion Evidence Library (from 1950) and ongoing trial databases to 23 July 2015. Selection criteria RCTs involving transfusions of platelet concentrates prepared either from individual units of whole blood or by apheresis, and given to prevent or treat bleeding in patients with malignant haematological disorders receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy or undergoing HSCT. Data collection and analysis We used standard methodological procedures

  12. Platelet storage for transfusion in synthetic media: further optimization of ingredients and definition of their roles.

    PubMed

    Murphy, S; Shimizu, T; Miripol, J

    1995-11-15

    Currently, most platelet concentrates (PC) are stored for transfusion at 20 degrees C to 24 degrees C in autologous plasma. There are potential advantages in replacing some of this plasma with a synthetic medium. In this study, our major goals were to define the optimal ingredients and their concentrations in such a medium and to gain insight into the mechanism by which each ingredient confers benefit. In addition, we wished to validate a new polyvinyl chloride container plasticized with di-n-decyl phthalate (DnDP) for PC storage. PC derived from donations of whole blood were stored for 7 days in autologous plasma or a basic synthetic medium (BSM) containing 15 mmol/L glucose, 21 mmol/L citrate, and physiologic concentrations of salts other than bicarbonate within either the DnDP container or a licensed polyolefin container, PL-732. Metabolic events were characterized and a panel of in vitro tests were used to monitor platelet quality as systematic changes in the BSM were made. Platelet quality was as least as good, if not better, after storage in DnDP in comparison to PL-732. pH consistently decreased to less than 6.0 because of inadequate buffering of lactic acid in BSM alone. However, pH and the in vitro tests were well maintained by either the serial addition of bicarbonate (BSM + B) or the addition of at least 15 mmol/L acetate and 10 mmol/L phosphate (BSM + AP). The benefits of BSM + AP were traced to a decrease in lactic acid production by 33% and 19% relative to plasma and BSM + B, respectively, and the vigorous oxidation of acetate (0.66 +/- 0.09 mmol/d/10(12 platelets). The rates of lactate production and acetate consumption were similar and the pH during storage correlated with difference between the two rates, suggesting that acetate oxidation has an alkalinizing effect equivalent on a molar basis to the acidifying effect of production of lactate and a hydrogen ion. When pyruvate replaced acetate, it was also metabolized vigorously (0.52 +/- 0.06 mmol

  13. In vitro and in vivo characterization of ultraviolet light C-irradiated human platelets in a 2 event mouse model of transfusion.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Li; Chi, Xuan; Vostal, Jaroslav G

    2013-01-01

    UV-based pathogen reduction technologies have been developed in recent years to inactivate pathogens and contaminating leukocytes in platelet transfusion products in order to prevent transfusion-transmitted infections and alloimmunization. UVC-based technology differs from UVA or UVB-based technologies in that it uses a specific wavelength at 254 nm without the addition of any photosensitizers. Previously, it was reported that UVC irradiation induces platelet aggregation and activation. To understand if UVC-induced changes of platelet quality correlate with potential adverse events when these platelets are transfused into animals, we used a 2-event SCID mouse model in which the predisposing event was LPS treatment and the second event was infusion of UVC-irradiated platelets. We analyzed lung platelet accumulation, protein content in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid as an indication of lung injury, and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) release in mice received UVC-irradiated or untreated control platelets. Our results showed UVC-irradiated platelets accumulated in lungs of the mice in a dose-dependent manner. High-doses of UVC-irradiated platelets were sequestered in the lungs to a similar level as we previously reported for UVB-irradiated platelets. Unlike UVB-platelets, UVC-platelets did not lead to lung injury or induce MIP-2 release. This could potentially be explained by our observation that although UVC treatment activated platelet surface αIIbβ3, it failed to activate platelet cells. It also suggests lung platelet accumulation and subsequent lung damage are due to different and separate mechanisms which require further investigation.

  14. Fate in humans of the plasticizer, DI (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, arising from transfusion of platelets stored in vinyl plastic bags. [plasticizer migration into human blood from vinyl plastic bags during transfusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, R. J.; Schiffer, C. A.

    1975-01-01

    Platelet concentrates were shown to contain 18-38 mg/100 ml of a phthalate plasticizer (DEHP) which arose by migration from the vinyl plastic packs in which the plateletes were prepared and stored. Transfusion of these platelets into 6 adult patients with leukemia resulted in peak blood plasma levels of DEHP ranging from 0.34 - 0.83 mg/100 ml. The blood levels fell mono-exponentially with a mean rate of 2.83 percent per minute and a half-life of 28.0 minutes. Urine was assayed by a method that would measure unchanged DEHP as well as all phthalic acid-containing metabolities. In two patients, at most 60 and 90% of the infused dose, respectively, was excreted in the urine collected for 24 hours post-transfusion. These estimates, however, could be high due to the simultaneous excretion of DEHP remaining from previous transfusions or arising from uncontrolled environmental exposures.

  15. Different doses of prophylactic platelet transfusion for preventing bleeding in people with haematological disorders after myelosuppressive chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Estcourt, Lise J; Stanworth, Simon; Doree, Carolyn; Trivella, Marialena; Hopewell, Sally; Blanco, Patricia; Murphy, Michael F

    2015-01-01

    Background Platelet transfusions are used in modern clinical practice to prevent and treat bleeding in people who are thrombocytopenic due to bone marrow failure. Although considerable advances have been made in platelet transfusion therapy in the last 40 years, some areas continue to provoke debate, especially concerning the use of prophylactic platelet transfusions for the prevention of thrombocytopenic bleeding. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2004, and updated in 2012 that addressed four separate questions: prophylactic versus therapeutic-only platelet transfusion policy; prophylactic platelet transfusion threshold; prophylactic platelet transfusion dose; and platelet transfusions compared to alternative treatments. This review has now been split into four smaller reviews; this review compares different platelet transfusion doses. Objectives To determine whether different doses of prophylactic platelet transfusions (platelet transfusions given to prevent bleeding) affect their efficacy and safety in preventing bleeding in people with haematological disorders undergoing myelosuppressive chemotherapy with or without haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Search methods We searched for randomised controlled trials in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (Cochrane Library 2015, Issue 6), MEDLINE (from 1946), Embase (from 1974), CINAHL (from 1937), the Transfusion Evidence Library (from 1950), and ongoing trial databases to 23 July 2015. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials involving transfusions of platelet concentrates, prepared either from individual units of whole blood or by apheresis, and given to prevent bleeding in people with malignant haematological disorders or undergoing HSCT that compared different platelet component doses (low dose 1.1 × 1011/m2 ± 25%, standard dose 2.2 × 1011/m2 ± 25%, high dose 4.4 × 1011/m2 ± 25%). Data collection and analysis We used the standard

  16. De novo protein synthesis in mature platelets: a consideration for transfusion medicine.

    PubMed

    Schubert, P; Devine, D V

    2010-08-01

    Platelet function in thrombosis and haemostasis is reasonably well understood at the molecular level with respect to the proteins involved in cellular structure, signalling networks and platelet interaction with clotting factors and other cells. However, the natural history of these proteins has only recently garnered the attention of platelet researchers. De novo protein synthesis in platelets was discovered 40 years ago; however, it was generally dismissed as merely an interesting minor phenomenon until studies over the past few years renewed interest in this aspect of platelet proteins. It is now accepted that anucleate platelets not only have the potential to synthesize proteins, but this capacity seems to be required to fulfil their function. With translational control as the primary mode of regulation, platelets are able to express biologically relevant gene products in a timely and signal-dependent manner. Platelet protein synthesis during storage of platelet concentrates is a nascent area of research. Protein synthesis does occur, although not for all proteins found in the platelet protein profile. Furthermore, mRNA appears to be well preserved under standard storage conditions. Although its significance is not yet understood, the ability to replace proteins may form a type of cellular repair mechanism during storage. Disruption by inappropriate storage conditions or processes that block protein synthesis such as pathogen reduction technologies may have direct effects on the ability of platelets to synthesize proteins during storage.

  17. Antibodies against human platelet alloantigens and human leucocyte antigen class 1 in Saudi Arabian multiparous women and multi-transfused patients

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ouda, Sarah K.; Al-Banyan, Abdulmajeed A.; Al-Gahtani, Farjah H.; Abdel-Gader, Abdel-Galil M.; Al-Dakhil, Lateefa O.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the frequency of alloimmunization against human platelet antigens (HPAs) and human leucocyte antigen class 1 (HLA1) in multiparous women and multi-transfused patients. Methods: This prospective study was conducted between January and August 2013, on 50 multiparous women with no history of previous blood transfusion recruited from the Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinic, and 50 patients, who received multiple platelet transfusions, recruited from the Hematology/Oncology Ward, King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Results: The frequency of alloimmunization among multiparous pregnant women was 76%, as follows: 16% against HLA1 only, 8% against HPAs only, 52% against both HPAs and HLA1 antigens. In multi-transfused patients, the rate of alloimmunization was 42% as follows: 2% against HLA1 only, 22% against HPAs only, 18% against both HPAs and HLA1 antigens. The frequency of alloimmunization increases with the number of pregnancies, but not with the number of platelet transfusions. Conclusion: Alloimmunization against HPAs and HLA1 is very common among Saudi multiparous women and multi-transfused patients, which encourages the search for the extent of the possible complications in the fetus and newborn and in multitransfused patients and how to prevent their occurrence. PMID:25987107

  18. The Use of Splenectomy to Manage Platelet Transfusion Refractoriness due to Anti-Human Leukocyte Antibodies in Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Mauro, Margherita; Camoglio, Francesco; Piccoli, Pierluigi; De Bortoli, Massimiliano; Balter, Rita; Pegoraro, Anna; Cesaro, Simone

    2016-01-01

    In patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), refractoriness to platelet transfusion has been associated with graft failure, delayed engraftment, early mortality and decreased overall survival. Therapeutic strategies include plasma exchange, immunoglobulins, rituximab, and splenectomy. We describe here three patients with refractoriness to platelet transfusion due to anti-human leukocyte antibodies who were splenectomized before HSCT (two cases) and after HSCT (one case) due to the lack of efficacy of other therapies. Splenectomy was uneventful. All three patients achieved a full donor engraftment. We suggest that splenectomy is feasible and effective in HSCT patients to reduce the risk of graft failure or delayed engraftment. PMID:27114815

  19. Fibrinogen concentrate as first-line therapy in aortic surgery reduces transfusion requirements in patients with platelet counts over or under 100×109/L

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Cristina; Rahe-Meyer, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Background Administration of fibrinogen concentrate, targeting improved maximum clot firmness (MCF) of the thromboelastometric fibrin-based clot quality test (FIBTEM) is effective as first-line haemostatic therapy in aortic surgery. We performed a post-hoc analysis of data from a randomised, placebo-controlled trial of fibrinogen concentrate, to investigate whether fibrinogen concentrate reduced transfusion requirements for patients with platelet counts over or under 100×109/L. Material and methods Aortic surgery patients with coagulopathic bleeding after cardiopulmonary bypass were randomised to receive either fibrinogen concentrate (n=29) or placebo (n=32). Platelet count was measured upon removal of the aortic clamp, and coagulation and haematology parameters were measured peri-operatively. Transfusion of allogeneic blood components was recorded and compared between groups. Results After cardiopulmonary bypass, haemostatic and coagulation parameters worsened in all groups; plasma fibrinogen level (determined by the Clauss method) decreased by 43–58%, platelet count by 53–64%, FIBTEM maximum clot firmness (MCF) by 38–49%, FIBTEM maximum clot elasticity (MCE) by 43–54%, extrinsically activated test (EXTEM) MCF by 11–22%, EXTEM MCE by 25–41% and the platelet component of the clot by 23–39%. Treatment with fibrinogen concentrate (mean dose 7–9 g in the 4 groups) significantly reduced post-operative allogeneic blood component transfusion requirements when compared to placebo both for patients with a platelet count ≥100×109/L and for patients with a platelet count <100×109/L. Discussion FIBTEM-guided administration of fibrinogen concentrate reduced transfusion requirements when used as a first-line haemostatic therapy during aortic surgery in patients with platelet counts over or under 100×109/L. PMID:25369608

  20. Platelet donation drives: a novel initiative to recruit platelet donors.

    PubMed

    Tendulkar, Anita; Shah, Sneha; Patil, Dipali; Tambe, Manisha

    2014-06-01

    The most important strategy to ensure a safe and an adequate supply of blood and blood products is motivation, recruitment, selection and retention of voluntary non remunerated blood donors. With a view of the increased platelet necessity in our oncology setup, the first platelet donation drive in the city and to the best of our knowledge, in India was conducted by our hospital in November 2009. The aim was to identify target groups and expand our donor database. It was also essential that the donor's contribution is acknowledged and appropriately felicitated. A campaign called "Save a Life" was initiated and publicized locally. A core team consisting of Transfusion Medicine specialists, clinicians and an NGO (nongovernment organization) was formed. The best suitable date and venue were finalized for the platelet camp. The audience was addressed and willing donors were registered as volunteer platelet donors with our institute. In a span of 40 months, 15 platelet camps were organized in colleges, social organizations, and corporate offices. A total of 1035 donors were registered out of which, 382 (37%) donated platelets in our hospital. 125/382 (33.2%) donated Single Donor Platelets (SDP) more than once. The largest number of platelet donations by a single camp donor was 24 times. Due to multiple donations from donors, the SDP number was enhanced considerably and lead to addition of 699 SDP units to our inventory. The annual indoor and camp voluntary platelet donor numbers increased from 142 in 2006 to 631 in 2012 due to platelet drives. All platelet donations were altruistic as no incentives were offered to the donors. Ready availability of platelets and planning SDP inventory as per patient blood group requirements had a positive impact on clinical services.

  1. Plasma free fatty acid metabolism during storage of platelet concentrates for transfusion.

    PubMed

    Cesar, J; DiMinno, G; Alam, I; Silver, M; Murphy, S

    1987-01-01

    New containers allow storage of platelet concentrates (PC) at 22 degrees C for up to 7 days, during which glycolytic and oxidative metabolism is vigorous. Recent evidence suggests that 85 percent of adenosine triphosphate regeneration is based on oxidative metabolism and that substrates other than glucose may be used. Because platelets can oxidize free fatty acids (FFA) as a possible source of energy during storage, the authors studied their availability, distribution, and turnover. Plasma FFA concentration was unchanged after 1 day of PC storage but significantly increased on Days 3, 5, and 7. Platelet-free plasma (PFP) stored under the same conditions as PC demonstrated a progressive increase in FFA, suggesting that some of the FFA accumulating in PC were derived from plasma rather than platelets. Indeed, during PC storage, plasma triglycerides decreased significantly, suggesting that they are a possible source of the increased levels of FFA found on Day 3 and thereafter. Thus, PC have a plasma FFA pool available continuously for oxidation during storage. Studies with radiolabeled palmitate suggested that FFA oxidation by platelets occurs during storage. The current findings show that plasma FFA could be a significant substrate for oxidative metabolism during storage of PC and that the oxidized FFA are replenished at least in part from plasma. These results may allow platelet storage to be improved, particularly in synthetic media. PMID:3629676

  2. Parvovirus B19 Passive Transmission by Transfusion of Intercept® Blood System-Treated Platelet Concentrate

    PubMed Central

    Gowland, Peter; Fontana, Stefano; Stolz, Martin; Andina, Nicola; Niederhauser, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Pathogen reduction methods for blood components are effective for a large number of viruses though less against small, non-enveloped viruses such as Parvovirus B19 (B19V). This article describes the passive transmission by transfusion of two B19V-contaminated pooled platelet concentrates (PCs) which were treated with the Intercept® blood pathogen reduction system. Case Reports Two transfusion cases of B19V-contaminated Intercept-treated pooled PCs were described. Due to the analysis delay, the PCs were already transfused. The viral content of each donation was 4.87 × 1010 IU/ml in case 1and 1.46 × 108 IU/ml in case 2. B19V (52 IU/ml) was detected in the recipient of the case 1 PC, whereas no virus could be detected in the case 2 PC recipient. A B19V IgM response and a transient boost of the underlying B19V IgG immune status and was observed in recipient 1. Recipient of the case 2 PC remained B19V IgG- and IgM-negative. B19V DNA sequence and phylogenetic analysis revealed a 100% homology between donor and recipient. Conclusion This report describes passive B19V transmission by a PC with very high B19 viral load which elicited a transient boost of the B19V immunity, but not by a PC with a lower B19V content, suggesting that there is a B19 viral load threshold value at which B19V inactivation is exceeded. PMID:27403092

  3. Platelet Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Shifrin, Megan M; Widmar, S Brian

    2016-03-01

    Antithrombotic medications have become standard of care for management of acute coronary syndrome. Platelet adhesion, activation, and aggregation are essential components of platelet function; platelet-inhibiting medications interfere with these components and reduce incidence of thrombosis. Active bleeding is a contraindication for administration of platelet inhibitors. There is currently no reversal agent for platelet inhibitors, although platelet transfusion may be used to correct active bleeding after administration of platelet inhibitors. PMID:26897422

  4. Platelets

    MedlinePlus

    ... are related to immunity and fighting infection. Platelet Production Platelets are produced in the bone marrow, the ... platelet destruction and also decreased bone marrow platelet production. These problems are caused by autoantibodies. Antibodies are ...

  5. A randomized controlled trial comparing standard- and low-dose strategies for transfusion of platelets (SToP) to patients with thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Heddle, Nancy M; Cook, Richard J; Tinmouth, Alan; Kouroukis, C Tom; Hervig, Tor; Klapper, Ellen; Brandwein, Joseph M; Szczepiorkowski, Zbigniew M; AuBuchon, James P; Barty, Rebecca L; Lee, Ker-Ai

    2009-02-12

    A noninferiority study was performed comparing low-dose and standard-dose prophylactic platelet transfusions. A double-blind randomized controlled trial (RCT) was performed in 6 sites in 3 countries. Thrombocytopenic adults requiring prophylactic platelet transfusion were randomly allocated to standard-dose (300-600 x 10(9) platelets/product) or low-dose (150- < 300 x 10(9) platelets/product) platelets. The primary outcome (World Health Organization [WHO] bleeding > or = grade 2) was assessed daily through clinical examination, patient interview, and chart review. A WHO grade was assigned through adjudication. The Data Safety Monitoring Board stopped the study because the difference in the grade 4 bleeding reached the prespecified threshold of 5%. At this time, 129 patients had been randomized and 119 patients were included in the analysis (58 low dose; 61 standard dose). Three patients in the low-dose arm (5.2%) had grade 4 bleeds compared with none in the standard-dose arm. WHO bleeding grade 2 or higher was 49.2% (30/61) in the standard-dose arm and 51.7% (30/58) in the low-dose group (relative risk [RR], 1.052; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.737-1.502). A higher rate of grade 4 bleeding in patients receiving low-dose prophylactic platelet transfusions resulted in this RCT being stopped. Whether this finding was due to chance or represents a real difference requires further investigation. These clinical studies are registered on (http://www.clinicaltrials.gov) as NCT00420914.

  6. A randomized controlled trial comparing standard- and low-dose strategies for transfusion of platelets (SToP) to patients with thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Heddle, Nancy M; Cook, Richard J; Tinmouth, Alan; Kouroukis, C Tom; Hervig, Tor; Klapper, Ellen; Brandwein, Joseph M; Szczepiorkowski, Zbigniew M; AuBuchon, James P; Barty, Rebecca L; Lee, Ker-Ai

    2009-02-12

    A noninferiority study was performed comparing low-dose and standard-dose prophylactic platelet transfusions. A double-blind randomized controlled trial (RCT) was performed in 6 sites in 3 countries. Thrombocytopenic adults requiring prophylactic platelet transfusion were randomly allocated to standard-dose (300-600 x 10(9) platelets/product) or low-dose (150- < 300 x 10(9) platelets/product) platelets. The primary outcome (World Health Organization [WHO] bleeding > or = grade 2) was assessed daily through clinical examination, patient interview, and chart review. A WHO grade was assigned through adjudication. The Data Safety Monitoring Board stopped the study because the difference in the grade 4 bleeding reached the prespecified threshold of 5%. At this time, 129 patients had been randomized and 119 patients were included in the analysis (58 low dose; 61 standard dose). Three patients in the low-dose arm (5.2%) had grade 4 bleeds compared with none in the standard-dose arm. WHO bleeding grade 2 or higher was 49.2% (30/61) in the standard-dose arm and 51.7% (30/58) in the low-dose group (relative risk [RR], 1.052; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.737-1.502). A higher rate of grade 4 bleeding in patients receiving low-dose prophylactic platelet transfusions resulted in this RCT being stopped. Whether this finding was due to chance or represents a real difference requires further investigation. These clinical studies are registered on (http://www.clinicaltrials.gov) as NCT00420914. PMID:19109560

  7. Intractable intraoperative bleeding requiring platelet transfusion during emergent cholecystectomy in a patient with dual antiplatelet therapy after drug-eluting coronary stent implantation (with video)

    PubMed Central

    Fujikawa, Takahisa; Noda, Tomohiro; Tada, Seiichiro; Tanaka, Akira

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of a 76-year-old man, receiving dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) with aspirin and ticlopidine for the past 6 years after implantation of drug-eluting coronary stent, developed a severe hypochondriac pain. After diagnosing severe acute cholecystitis by an enhanced CT, emergent laparotomy under continuation of DAPT was attempted. During the operation, intractable bleeding from the adhesiolysed liver surface was encountered, which required platelet transfusion. Subtotal cholecystectomy with abdominal drainage was performed, and the patient recovered without any postoperative bleeding or thromboembolic complications. Like the present case, the final decision should be made to perform platelet transfusion when life-threatening DAPT-induced intraoperative bleeding occurs during an emergent surgery, despite the elevated risk of stent thrombosis. PMID:23536626

  8. [Photochemical inactivation of pathogens in platelets and plasma: five years of clinical use in routine and hemovigilance. Towards a change of paradigm in transfusion safety].

    PubMed

    Cazenave, J-P

    2011-04-01

    The transfusion of labile blood products is vital and essential for patients in absence of alternative treatment. Patients and doctors have always feared transfusion-transmitted infections by blood, blood components and blood-derived drugs. Photochemical inactivation of platelet concentrates and plasma, using a technique associating amotosalen and UVA, has been used for five years in a French region for the whole population and a large spectrum of patients, with efficacy and safety. It would seem wise to introduce labile blood products, submitted to pathogen inactivation by a technique already approved by a regulatory agency and not to wait for a perfect system including red blood cells concentrates. Universal implementation of pathogen inactivation in labile blood products is a major and key step to improve safety against infection in transfusion.

  9. The mean fluorescence intensities of anti-HLA antibodies detected using micro-bead flow cytometry predict the risk of platelet transfusion refractoriness.

    PubMed

    Beligaswatte, Ashanka; Tsiopelas, Eleni; Humphreys, Ian; Bennett, Greg; Robinson, Kathryn; Davis, Ken; Bardy, Peter

    2013-08-01

    There are no accepted methods to predict the development of platelet transfusion refractoriness (PTR) due to human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-alloimmunization. Hence, matched platelets are usually given only to patients demonstrating PTR, necessarily resulting in some ineffective random donor platelets (RDPLT) transfusions. To assess its utility in predicting PTR, we retrospectively tested samples from 387 patients receiving chemotherapy for acute leukaemia or autologous transplantation using a micro-bead flow cytometry assay. The average of the mean fluorescence intensities (avgMFI) of the class I beads in the screening assay was correlated with outcomes of RDPLT transfusions during a 2 week period. Antibodies were detected in 57 patients; 66 developed PTR, of whom 28 were alloimmunized. avgMFI usefully predicted the development of PTR (area under the receiver operating curve 0.87, 95% confidence interval: 0.77-0.96). A logistic regression model estimated the probability of PTR to be >90% when avgMFI >5440. These results indicate that micro-bead flow cytometry assays could inform a risk-adapted strategy for managing thrombocytopaenic HLA allo-immunized patients.

  10. Transfusion of Plasma, Platelets, and Red Blood Cells in a 1:1:1 vs a 1:1:2 Ratio and Mortality in Patients With Severe Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Holcomb, John B.; Tilley, Barbara C.; Baraniuk, Sarah; Fox, Erin E.; Wade, Charles E.; Podbielski, Jeanette M.; del Junco, Deborah J.; Brasel, Karen J.; Bulger, Eileen M.; Callcut, Rachael A.; Cohen, Mitchell Jay; Cotton, Bryan A.; Fabian, Timothy C.; Inaba, Kenji; Kerby, Jeffrey D.; Muskat, Peter; O’Keeffe, Terence; Rizoli, Sandro; Robinson, Bryce R. H.; Scalea, Thomas M.; Schreiber, Martin A.; Stein, Deborah M.; Weinberg, Jordan A.; Callum, Jeannie L.; Hess, John R.; Matijevic, Nena; Miller, Christopher N.; Pittet, Jean-Francois; Hoyt, David B.; Pearson, Gail D.; Leroux, Brian; van Belle, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Severely injured patients experiencing hemorrhagic shock often require massive transfusion. Earlier transfusion with higher blood product ratios (plasma, platelets, and red blood cells), defined as damage control resuscitation, has been associated with improved outcomes; however, there have been no large multicenter clinical trials. OBJECTIVE To determine the effectiveness and safety of transfusing patients with severe trauma and major bleeding using plasma, platelets, and red blood cells in a 1:1:1 ratio compared with a 1:1:2 ratio. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Pragmatic, phase 3, multisite, randomized clinical trial of 680 severely injured patients who arrived at 1 of 12 level I trauma centers in North America directly from the scene and were predicted to require massive transfusion between August 2012 and December 2013. INTERVENTIONS Blood product ratios of 1:1:1 (338 patients) vs 1:1:2 (342 patients) during active resuscitation in addition to all local standard-of-care interventions (uncontrolled). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Primary outcomes were 24-hour and 30-day all-cause mortality. Prespecified ancillary outcomes included time to hemostasis, blood product volumes transfused, complications, incidence of surgical procedures, and functional status. RESULTS No significant differences were detected in mortality at 24 hours (12.7% in 1:1:1 group vs 17.0% in 1:1:2 group; difference, −4.2% [95% CI, −9.6% to 1.1%]; P = .12) or at 30 days (22.4% vs 26.1%, respectively; difference, −3.7% [95% CI, −10.2% to 2.7%]; P = .26). Exsanguination, which was the predominant cause of death within the first 24 hours, was significantly decreased in the 1:1:1 group (9.2% vs 14.6% in 1:1:2 group; difference, −5.4% [95% CI, −10.4% to −0.5%]; P = .03). More patients in the 1:1:1 group achieved hemostasis than in the 1:1:2 group (86% vs 78%, respectively; P = .006). Despite the 1:1:1 group receiving more plasma (median of 7 U vs 5 U, P < .001) and

  11. Blood Transfusion (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... help to clot the blood and control bleeding. Plasma , the pale yellow liquid part of whole blood. ... patients with bleeding problems, transfusions with platelets or plasma can help to control or prevent bleeding complications. ...

  12. A study protocol for a randomised controlled trial evaluating clinical effects of platelet transfusion products: the Pathogen Reduction Evaluation and Predictive Analytical Rating Score (PREPAReS) trial

    PubMed Central

    Ypma, Paula F; van der Meer, Pieter F; Heddle, Nancy M; van Hilten, Joost A; Stijnen, Theo; Middelburg, Rutger A; Hervig, Tor; van der Bom, Johanna G; Brand, Anneke; Kerkhoffs, Jean-Louis H

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Patients with chemotherapy-induced thrombocytopaenia frequently experience minor and sometimes severe bleeding complications. Unrestrictive availability of safe and effective blood products is presumed by treating physicians as well as patients. Pathogen reduction technology potentially offers the opportunity to enhance safety by reducing bacterial and viral contamination of platelet products along with a potential reduction of alloimmunisation in patients receiving multiple platelet transfusions. Methods and analysis To test efficacy, a randomised, single-blinded, multicentre controlled trial was designed to evaluate clinical non-inferiority of pathogen-reduced platelet concentrates treated by the Mirasol system, compared with standard plasma-stored platelet concentrates using the percentage of patients with WHO grade ≥2 bleeding complications as the primary endpoint. The upper limit of the 95% CI of the non-inferiority margin was chosen to be a ≤12.5% increase in this percentage. Bleeding symptoms are actively monitored on a daily basis. The adjudication of the bleeding grade is performed by 3 adjudicators, blinded to the platelet product randomisation as well as by an automated computer algorithm. Interim analyses evaluating bleeding complications as well as serious adverse events are performed after each batch of 60 patients. The study started in 2010 and patients will be enrolled up to a maximum of 618 patients, depending on the results of consecutive interim analyses. A flexible stopping rule was designed allowing stopping for non-inferiority or futility. Besides analysing effects of pathogen reduction on clinical efficacy, the Pathogen Reduction Evaluation and Predictive Analytical Rating Score (PREPAReS) is designed to answer several other pending questions and translational issues related to bleeding and alloimmunisation, formulated as secondary and tertiary endpoints. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval was obtained in all 3

  13. When to transfuse preterm babies

    PubMed Central

    Bell, EF

    2009-01-01

    The physiological anaemia experienced by preterm babies is exacerbated by common care practices such as early clamping of the umbilical cord at birth and gradual exsanguination by phlebotomy for laboratory monitoring. The need for subsequent transfusion with red blood cells can be reduced by delaying cord clamping for 30–60 s in infants who do not require immediate resuscitation. The need for transfusions can be further reduced by limiting phlebotomy losses, providing good nutrition, and using standard guidelines for transfusion based on haemoglobin or haematocrit. What those guidelines should be is not clear. Analysis of two recent large clinical trials comparing restrictive and liberal transfusion guidelines leads to several conclusions. Restrictive transfusion guidelines may reduce the number of transfusions given, but there is no reduction in donor exposures if a single-donor transfusion programme is used. There is some evidence that more liberal transfusion guidelines may help to prevent brain injury, but information on the impact of transfusion practice on long-term outcome is lacking. Until further guidance emerges, transfusion thresholds lower than those used in the two trials should not be used, as there is no evidence that lower thresholds are safe. PMID:18653585

  14. Provision of HPA-1a (PlA1)-negative platelets for neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia: screening, testing, and transfusion protocol.

    PubMed

    Munizza, M; Nance, S; Keashen-Schnell, M A; Sherwood, W; Murphy, S

    1999-01-01

    HPA-1a-negative platelet products are not routinely available for newborns with alloimmune thrombocytopenia. In this article we describe a program established to identify normal pheresis donors who are HPA-1a-negative and to organize their future donations so that our regional blood center would always have an HPA-1a-negative platelet product available. The solid phase red cell adherence assay was used for initial screening of platelet pheresis products. HPA-1a-negative donors were confirmed with the platelet suspension immunofluorescence test using three anti-HPA-1a sera. Screening of 2600 plateletpheresis donor samples identified 40 HPA-1a-negative donors. Of these, 36 are active and are coded for recognition on the daily pheresis inventory sheet. Theoretically, assuming four donations per year and donors' cooperation with scheduling, these 36 donors would enable us to have at least one HPA-1a-negative product available every day. In addition, a decision tree for patient management using platelet serology and availability of HPA-1a-negative products was developed. The GTI-PAK trade mark 12 is the major technique used for serologic screening of mothers of patients thought to have neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia. By screening pheresis donors and developing a clinical decision tree, HPA-1a-negative products, a rare resource, can be fully utilized.

  15. The virucidal effect of platelet concentrates: preliminary study and first conclusions.

    PubMed

    Maurice, A; Marchand-Arvier, M; Edert, D; Le Faou, A; Gondrexon, G; Vigneron, C

    2002-06-01

    Despite the increased safety of blood components, achieved through improved donor selection and testing, transfusion recipients remain at risk of transfusion-associated diseases. Transfusion of cellular blood components has been implicated in transmission of viral, bacterial and protozoan diseases. Investigators have studied a myriad of processes for pathogen depletion and/or inactivation. No successful treatments, apart the leukodepletion, have already been identified for red cells and platelets. And more, several evidences indicate that platelets play a key role in host defence against infection. High levels of pathogens were added to single-donor platelet concentrates (PC) containing 3 to 5 10(11) platelets in 300 ml. The infectivity of each pathogen was measured with established biologic assays. The following levels of pathogen inactivation were achieved : >10(2.63) plaque-forming units (PFU) per ml of adenovirus 5 (ADV5), >10(5.6) PFU per ml of Poliovirus 1 (P1) and >10(4.1) PFU per ml of vaccinia virus (VaV). In conclusion, the PC show a potential virucidal effect. This inactivation process has been found with bacteria and still remains unknown for viruses.

  16. Transfusion practices in trauma.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, V Trichur; Cattamanchi, Srihari

    2014-09-01

    Resuscitation of a severely traumatised patient with the administration of crystalloids, or colloids along with blood products is a common transfusion practice in trauma patients. The determination of this review article is to update on current transfusion practices in trauma. A search of PubMed, Google Scholar, and bibliographies of published studies were conducted using a combination of key-words. Recent articles addressing the transfusion practises in trauma from 2000 to 2014 were identified and reviewed. Trauma induced consumption and dilution of clotting factors, acidosis and hypothermia in a severely injured patient commonly causes trauma-induced coagulopathy. Early infusion of blood products and early control of bleeding decreases trauma-induced coagulopathy. Hypothermia and dilutional coagulopathy are associated with infusion of large volumes of crystalloids. Hence, the predominant focus is on damage control resuscitation, which is a combination of permissive hypotension, haemorrhage control and haemostatic resuscitation. Massive transfusion protocols improve survival in severely injured patients. Early recognition that the patient will need massive blood transfusion will limit the use of crystalloids. Initially during resuscitation, fresh frozen plasma, packed red blood cells (PRBCs) and platelets should be transfused in the ratio of 1:1:1 in severely injured patients. Fresh whole blood can be an alternative in patients who need a transfusion of 1:1:1 thawed plasma, PRBCs and platelets. Close monitoring of bleeding and point of care coagulation tests are employed, to allow goal-directed plasma, PRBCs and platelets transfusions, in order to decrease the risk of transfusion-related acute lung injury. PMID:25535424

  17. Transfusion practices in trauma

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, V Trichur; Cattamanchi, Srihari

    2014-01-01

    Resuscitation of a severely traumatised patient with the administration of crystalloids, or colloids along with blood products is a common transfusion practice in trauma patients. The determination of this review article is to update on current transfusion practices in trauma. A search of PubMed, Google Scholar, and bibliographies of published studies were conducted using a combination of key-words. Recent articles addressing the transfusion practises in trauma from 2000 to 2014 were identified and reviewed. Trauma induced consumption and dilution of clotting factors, acidosis and hypothermia in a severely injured patient commonly causes trauma-induced coagulopathy. Early infusion of blood products and early control of bleeding decreases trauma-induced coagulopathy. Hypothermia and dilutional coagulopathy are associated with infusion of large volumes of crystalloids. Hence, the predominant focus is on damage control resuscitation, which is a combination of permissive hypotension, haemorrhage control and haemostatic resuscitation. Massive transfusion protocols improve survival in severely injured patients. Early recognition that the patient will need massive blood transfusion will limit the use of crystalloids. Initially during resuscitation, fresh frozen plasma, packed red blood cells (PRBCs) and platelets should be transfused in the ratio of 1:1:1 in severely injured patients. Fresh whole blood can be an alternative in patients who need a transfusion of 1:1:1 thawed plasma, PRBCs and platelets. Close monitoring of bleeding and point of care coagulation tests are employed, to allow goal-directed plasma, PRBCs and platelets transfusions, in order to decrease the risk of transfusion-related acute lung injury. PMID:25535424

  18. Differences in non-MHC restricted cytotoxic activities of human peripheral blood lymphocytes after transfusion with allogeneic leukocytes or platelets possessing class I and/or class II MHC molecules.

    PubMed

    Pócsik, E; Mihalik, R; Réti, M; Gyódi, E; Pálóczi, K; Mayer, K; Kassai, M; Herold, M; Huber, C; Petrányi, G G

    1990-12-01

    MHC-unrestricted cytotoxic activity of peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from 4-6 healthy donors was investigated before and after transfusion with allogeneic leukocytes or platelets. Natural killer and lectin-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (LDCC) of PBL was tested against K562 and Raji target cells in a 4-h and 16-h 51Cr-release assay, respectively. After allotransfusion with leukocytes, we found increased cytotoxic activity of each donor's PBL against all the three targets on day 3 or 7. The highest non-specific cytotoxic activity was detected against the relatively NK resistant Raji target cells. The increase of cytotoxic activity was lowest against the LDCC target (PHA-treated Raji) cells. On the contrary, no changes in cytotoxic activity against any targets were observed after allotransfusion with platelets (possessing class I HLA antigens but no HLA class II molecules). Our results suggest that HLA class II molecules, presumably by inducing immune responses, are essential for activation/generation of non-specific killing of tumor targets after leukocyte transfusion. Thrombocytes, known to be less immunogenic than leukocytes, are not effective in in vivo enhancing of non-specific cytotoxicity. Cellular activation of PBL following leukocyte allotransfusion was confirmed by detection of elevated serum neopterin and beta-2-microglobulin levels on day 3. This was not the case after platelet allotransfusion. In addition, the expression of ICAM-1 antigen (as a molecule involved directly in MHC-unrestricted cytotoxicity) was also found to be increased in two donors' PBL on day 3 after leukocyte transfusion in contrast to transfusion with platelets.

  19. Massive Transfusion in Children.

    PubMed

    Karam, Oliver; Tucci, Marisa

    2016-10-01

    Massive transfusions occur frequently in pediatric trauma patients, among some children undergoing surgery, or in children with critical illness. Over the last years, many authors have studied different aspects of massive transfusions, starting with an operative definition. Some information is available on transfusion strategies and adjunctive treatments. Areas that require additional investigation include: studies to assess which children benefit from transfusion protocols based on fixed ratios of blood components vs transfusion strategies based on biophysical parameters and laboratory tests; whether goal-directed therapies that are personalized to the recipient will improve outcomes; or which laboratory tests best define the risk of bleeding and what clinical indicators should prompt the start and stop of massive transfusion protocols. In addition, critical issues that require further study include transfusion support with whole blood vs reconstituted whole blood prepared from packed red blood cells, plasma, and platelets; and the generation of high quality evidence that would lead to treatments which decrease adverse consequences of transfusion and improve outcomes.

  20. Clinical and blood bank factors in the management of platelet refractoriness and alloimmunization.

    PubMed

    Friedberg, R C; Donnelly, S F; Boyd, J C; Gray, L S; Mintz, P D

    1993-06-15

    Numerous independent and interdependent factors are involved in the posttransfusion platelet response. Factors such as ABO match and platelet age are related to circumstances potentially under the control of the blood bank physician and therefore may permit circumvention by an active transfusion service. On the other hand, factors such as fever or sepsis may be unavoidable, being related more to the individual patient or clinical condition. To evaluate which factors could be circumvented, we prospectively followed the 1-hour corrected count increments (CCIs) for 962 single-donor apheresis platelet transfusions to 71 refractory hematologic oncology inpatients, with concomitant recording of implicated factors. Stepwise regression analysis allowed for determination of which concurrent and confounding clinical-, patient-, and blood bank-related factors significantly affected the CCIs. Although many implicated factors proved to be independently associated with an increased or decreased CCI, we found that no single variable consistently explained the CCI variation across the patient population. Each patient appeared sensitive to one or a few particular factors, but because of marked intraindividual variation, it was not possible to identify a priori which factors were important for a given patient. The single exception was a solid-phase red blood cell adherence assay used to cross-match platelets, but only for alloimmunized patients. We also evaluated the utility of requesting HLA-matched platelets from the local suppliers and maintained a clear distinction between platelets simply ordered as HLA matched and actually HLA-identical platelets. Accounting for the confounding clinical-, patient-, and blood bank-related factors, the cross-match assay was a better predictor of an adequate CCI than ordering platelets as HLA matched.

  1. What Is a Blood Transfusion?

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells, white blood cells, platelets (PLATE-lets), and plasma. Blood is transfused either as whole blood (with all its parts) or, more often, as individual parts. Blood Types Every person has one of the following blood types: A, B, AB, ...

  2. Single donor electronics and quantum functionalities with advanced CMOS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jehl, Xavier; Niquet, Yann-Michel; Sanquer, Marc

    2016-03-01

    Recent progresses in quantum dots technology allow fundamental studies of single donors in various semiconductor nanostructures. For the prospect of applications figures of merits such as scalability, tunability, and operation at relatively large temperature are of prime importance. Beyond the case of actual dopant atoms in a host crystal, similar arguments hold for small enough quantum dots which behave as artificial atoms, for instance for single spin control and manipulation. In this context, this experimental review focuses on the silicon-on-insulator devices produced within microelectronics facilities with only very minor modifications to the current industrial CMOS process and tools. This is required for scalability and enabled by shallow trench or mesa isolation. It also paves the way for real integration with conventional circuits, as illustrated by a nanoscale device coupled to a CMOS circuit producing a radio-frequency drive on-chip. At the device level we emphasize the central role of electrostatics in etched silicon nanowire transistors, which allows to understand the characteristics in the full range from zero to room temperature.

  3. Transfusion-associated bacterial sepsis.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, S J; Friedman, L I; Dodd, R Y

    1994-01-01

    The incidence of sepsis caused by transfusion of bacterially contaminated blood components is similar to or less than that of transfusion-transmitted hepatitis C virus infection, yet significantly exceeds those currently estimated for transfusion-associated human immunodeficiency and hepatitis B viruses. Outcomes are serious and may be fatal. In addition, transfusion of sterile allogenic blood can have generalized immunosuppressive effects on recipients, resulting in increased susceptibility to postoperative infection. This review examines the frequency of occurrence of transfusion-associated sepsis, the organisms implicated, and potential sources of bacteria. Approaches to minimize the frequency of sepsis are discussed, including the benefits and disadvantages of altering the storage conditions for blood. In addition, the impact of high levels of bacteria on the gross characteristics of erythrocyte and platelet concentrates is described. The potentials and limitations of current tests for detecting bacteria in blood are also discussed. PMID:7923050

  4. Platelet lipidomic.

    PubMed

    Dolegowska, B; Lubkowska, A; De Girolamo, L

    2012-01-01

    Lipids account for 16-19 percent dry platelet matter and includes 65 percent phospholipids, 25 percent neutral lipids and about 8 percent glycosphingolipids. The cell membrane that surrounds platelets is a bilayer that contains different types phospholipids symmetrically distributed in resting platelets, such as phosphatidylserine (PS), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylcholine, and sphingomyelin. The collapse of lipid asymmetry is exposure of phosphatidylserine in the external leaflet of the plasma bilayer, where it is known to serve at least two major functions: providing a platform for development of the blood coagulation cascade and presenting the signal that induces phagocytosis of apoptotic cells. During activation, this asymmetrical distribution becomes disrupted, and PS and PE become exposed on the cell surface. The transbilayer movement of phosphatidylserine is responsible for the platelet procoagulant activity. Exposure of phosphatidylserine is a flag for macrophage recognition and clearance from the circulation. Platelets, stored at room temperature for transfusion for more than 5 days, undergo changes collectively known as platelet storage lesions. Thus, the platelet lipid composition and its possible modifications over time are crucial for efficacy of platelet rich plasma therapy. Moreover, a number of substances derived from lipids are contained into platelets. Eicosanoids are lipid signaling mediators generated by the action of lipoxygenase and include prostaglandins, thromboxane A2, 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid. Isoprostanes have a chemical structure similar to this of prostanoids, but are differently produced into the particle, and are ligands for prostaglandins receptors, exhibiting biological activity like thromboxane A2. Endocannabinoids are derivatives from arachidonic acid which could reduce local pain. Phospholipids growth factors (sphingolipids, lysophosphatidic acid, platelet-activating factor) are involved in tissue

  5. Dynamic light scattering can determine platelet function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Nathan

    2011-10-01

    Platelet transfusions are life-saving procedures for patients who are bleeding or undergoing chemotherapy. The effectiveness of transfusions depends on the number of platelets transfused and the platelet function. Platelet function correlates with proportion of discoid to activated platelets, morphology response to temperature stress, and inversely correlates with microparticle content. ThromboLUX is a novel device that determines platelet function by measuring all of these characteristics using dynamic light scattering (DLS). During periods of stress, such as decreased temperature, cytoskeletal rearrangements will cause normal, discoid platelets to activate and become spiny spheres. The formation of pseudopods of various lengths facilitates the clotting cascade and also increases the apparent size of platelets. ThromboLUX uses a 37-20-37 C temperature cycle that mimics the bleeding, storage, and transfusion process. As the temperature fluctuates, DLS will measure the changing platelet hydrodynamic radius and the size of any microparticles present. ThromboLUX analysis of platelet concentrates in vitro would allow determination of high platelet function units before transfusion and would therefore improve transfusion outcomes and patient safety. This study examined how DLS is able to distinguish between discoid and activated platelets as well as measure the parameters that contribute to high platelet function.

  6. Metabolomics in transfusion medicine.

    PubMed

    Nemkov, Travis; Hansen, Kirk C; Dumont, Larry J; D'Alessandro, Angelo

    2016-04-01

    Biochemical investigations on the regulatory mechanisms of red blood cell (RBC) and platelet (PLT) metabolism have fostered a century of advances in the field of transfusion medicine. Owing to these advances, storage of RBCs and PLT concentrates has become a lifesaving practice in clinical and military settings. There, however, remains room for improvement, especially with regard to the introduction of novel storage and/or rejuvenation solutions, alternative cell processing strategies (e.g., pathogen inactivation technologies), and quality testing (e.g., evaluation of novel containers with alternative plasticizers). Recent advancements in mass spectrometry-based metabolomics and systems biology, the bioinformatics integration of omics data, promise to speed up the design and testing of innovative storage strategies developed to improve the quality, safety, and effectiveness of blood products. Here we review the currently available metabolomics technologies and briefly describe the routine workflow for transfusion medicine-relevant studies. The goal is to provide transfusion medicine experts with adequate tools to navigate through the otherwise overwhelming amount of metabolomics data burgeoning in the field during the past few years. Descriptive metabolomics data have represented the first step omics researchers have taken into the field of transfusion medicine. However, to up the ante, clinical and omics experts will need to merge their expertise to investigate correlative and mechanistic relationships among metabolic variables and transfusion-relevant variables, such as 24-hour in vivo recovery for transfused RBCs. Integration with systems biology models will potentially allow for in silico prediction of metabolic phenotypes, thus streamlining the design and testing of alternative storage strategies and/or solutions.

  7. Transfusion of blood and blood products: indications and complications.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sanjeev; Sharma, Poonam; Tyler, Lisa N

    2011-03-15

    Red blood cell transfusions are used to treat hemorrhage and to improve oxygen delivery to tissues. Transfusion of red blood cells should be based on the patient's clinical condition. Indications for transfusion include symptomatic anemia (causing shortness of breath, dizziness, congestive heart failure, and decreased exercise tolerance), acute sickle cell crisis, and acute blood loss of more than 30 percent of blood volume. Fresh frozen plasma infusion can be used for reversal of anticoagulant effects. Platelet transfusion is indicated to prevent hemorrhage in patients with thrombocytopenia or platelet function defects. Cryoprecipitate is used in cases of hypofibrinogenemia, which most often occurs in the setting of massive hemorrhage or consumptive coagulopathy. Transfusion-related infections are less common than noninfectious complications. All noninfectious complications of transfusion are classified as noninfectious serious hazards of transfusion. Acute complications occur within minutes to 24 hours of the transfusion, whereas delayed complications may develop days, months, or even years later.

  8. Update on massive transfusion.

    PubMed

    Pham, H P; Shaz, B H

    2013-12-01

    Massive haemorrhage requires massive transfusion (MT) to maintain adequate circulation and haemostasis. For optimal management of massively bleeding patients, regardless of aetiology (trauma, obstetrical, surgical), effective preparation and communication between transfusion and other laboratory services and clinical teams are essential. A well-defined MT protocol is a valuable tool to delineate how blood products are ordered, prepared, and delivered; determine laboratory algorithms to use as transfusion guidelines; and outline duties and facilitate communication between involved personnel. In MT patients, it is crucial to practice damage control resuscitation and to administer blood products early in the resuscitation. Trauma patients are often admitted with early trauma-induced coagulopathy (ETIC), which is associated with mortality; the aetiology of ETIC is likely multifactorial. Current data support that trauma patients treated with higher ratios of plasma and platelet to red blood cell transfusions have improved outcomes, but further clinical investigation is needed. Additionally, tranexamic acid has been shown to decrease the mortality in trauma patients requiring MT. Greater use of cryoprecipitate or fibrinogen concentrate might be beneficial in MT patients from obstetrical causes. The risks and benefits for other therapies (prothrombin complex concentrate, recombinant activated factor VII, or whole blood) are not clearly defined in MT patients. Throughout the resuscitation, the patient should be closely monitored and both metabolic and coagulation abnormalities corrected. Further studies are needed to clarify the optimal ratios of blood products, treatment based on underlying clinical disorder, use of alternative therapies, and integration of laboratory testing results in the management of massively bleeding patients.

  9. Platelet adhesiveness and aggregation in congenital afibrinogenemia. An investigation of three patients with post-transfusion, cross-correction studies between two of them.

    PubMed

    Girolami, A; De Marco, L; Virgolini, L; Peruffo, R; Fabris, F

    1975-02-01

    Platelet adhesiveness and aggregation were studied in three patients with congenital afibrinogenemia. The results obtained may be summarized as follows: The retention of platelets to a glass-bead filter determined with the Salzman method was significantly decreased; it was normal after fibrinogen infusion. With a modification of the Hellem test the values obtained were slightly decreased. Adrenalin-induced aggregation was absent whereas ADP-and collagen-induced aggregation was near normal or slightly decreased. Thrombofax aggregation was absent in citrated plasma. The abnormalities of platelet aggregation were corrected after fibrinogen infusion or after addition in vitro of fibrinogen, hemofilia A plasma and PPP obtained from an afibrinogenemic patient after fibrinogen infusion. The abnormalities of platelet aggregation were corrected well by ADP, collagen and Thrombofax in heparinized blood, but only a slight correction of adrenalin-induced aggregation was noted. Thrombin aggregation proved to be normal with the higher concentrations, whereas it was defective with the lower ones. Ristocetin aggregation was normal in citrated plasma at the concentration of 1.5 mg per ml but it was absent at the lower concentration (1.0 mg per ml). Ristocetin aggregation was, on the other hand absent in heparinized blood regardless of the concentration. These findings are in agreement with the presence of a prolonged bleeding time in congenital afibrinogenemia and suggest that fibrinogen plays an important role in platelet aggregation and adhesiveness.

  10. Defining an appropriate leucoreduction strategy by serial assessment of cytokine levels in platelet concentrates prepared by different methods

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Daljit; Sharma, Ratti Ram; Marwaha, Neelam

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Different methods of platelet concentrate preparations leave behind certain number of residual leukocytes, accounting for most of the febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reactions, especially in multitransfused patients. Various inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and IL-6 are generated during storage and have been implicated for these adverse effects. We have studied the levels of these cytokines and their correlation with leucocyte contents in platelet concentrates prepared by three different methods. Study Design and Methods: Five pools of platelet rich plasma platelet concentrates (PRP-PC) and buffy-coat platelet concentrates (BC-PC) each were prepared and divided into two halves. One half of the pool was leucofiltered (LF), whereas the other half was stored as such. Ten apheresis units were also included in the study. All the platelet concentrates were assessed for leucocyte load and cytokine content (IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α) on different days of storage (0, 3, and 5) using Nageotte chamber and commercially available immunoassays respectively. Results: There was a statistically significant rise in cytokine levels (IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α) in nonleucofiltered (NLF) random donor platelet concentrates (RDPs) (PRP-PC and BC-PC) during storage (day 3 and 5) whereas LF RDP concentrates (PRP-PC and BC-PC) and apheresis platelet concentrates (AP-PC) did not show any significant rise in cytokine levels (on day 3 and 5) over the baseline values at day 0. Conclusion: This data suggests that although AP-PCs are superior to PRP-PC (NLF) and BC-PC (NLF) in terms of in vitro quality control parameters and cytokine generation during storage, BC-PC mode of platelet preparation followed by leucofiltration is the best method to store platelets and minimise the cytokine accumulation. This strategy is best suited for transfusion in multitransfused hematooncologic patients, who cannot afford single

  11. State of the Art in Platelet Function Testing

    PubMed Central

    E. Kehrel, Beate; F. Brodde, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Summary Platelets perform many functions in hemostasis but also in other areas of physiology and pathology. Therefore, it is obvious that many different function tests have been developed, each one conceived and standardized for a special purpose. This review will summarize the different fields in which platelet function testing is currently in use; diagnostics of patients with bleeding disorders, monitoring patients’ response to anti-platelet therapy, monitoring in transfusion medicine (blood donors, platelet concentrates, and after transfusion), and monitoring in perioperative medicine to predict bleeding tendency. The second part of the review outlines different methods for platelet function testing, spanning bleeding time, and platelet counting as well as determining platelet adhesion, platelet secretion, platelet aggregation, platelet morphology, platelet signal transduction, platelet procoagulant activity, platelet apoptosis, platelet proteomics, and molecular biology. PMID:23653569

  12. Immunological complications of blood transfusions.

    PubMed

    Brand, Anneke

    2016-01-01

    Most adverse blood transfusion (BT) events are immune-mediated and in the majority of severe reactions antibodies can be identified as causal factors. Alloimmunization not only causes symptomatic reactions, transfused cells can also be (silently) destroyed. Immunization by BT can contribute to hemolytic disease of the newborn as well as to allograft rejection after transplantation. Reversely, pregnancy and transplantation may evoke immunity hampering transfusion therapy. Besides causing mortality and morbidity, alloimmunization has a huge economic impact. Transfusion reactions prolong hospital stay, require diagnostic tests and complex donor selection procedures and create the need for typed donor registries. In the 1970s, Opeltz and colleagues described that pre-transplantation BT impaired rejection of renal transplants. Leukocytes were essential for this immunosuppressive BT effect that raised concern about negative effects on cancer growth and resistance against infections. Studies on the mechanism were however preliminary abandoned when calcineurin inhibitors for prevention of graft rejection became available and since all blood products underwent leukoreduction in most countries as precautionary measure against transmission of variant Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease. Whether current leukoreduced BT are immunosuppressive and for which patients or circumstances this may contribute to worse outcome, is unknown. The last decades of the previous century, leukoreduction of cellular blood products for leukemia patients significantly reduced the incidence of immunological platelet transfusion refractoriness. The first decade of this century the avoidance of plasma- and platelet-products from females, that may contain donor-derived leukocyte antibodies, decreased transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) by more than 30%. These were major achievements. Challenge for the near future is to further reduce alloimmunization in particular against red blood cells (RBC) as a

  13. Bacterial contamination of platelet concentrates: pathogen detection and inactivation methods

    PubMed Central

    Védy, Dana; Robert, Daniel; Gasparini, Danielle; Canellini, Giorgia; Waldvogel, Sophie; Tissot, Jean-Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Whereas the reduction of transfusion related viral transmission has been a priority during the last decade, bacterial infection transmitted by transfusion still remains associated to a high morbidity and mortality, and constitutes the most frequent infectious risk of transfusion. This problem especially concerns platelet concentrates because of their favorable bacterial growth conditions. This review gives an overview of platelet transfusion-related bacterial contamination as well as on the different strategies to reduce this problem by using either bacterial detection or inactivation methods.

  14. Identification of platelet refractoriness in oncohematologic patients

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Aline Aparecida; Zulli, Roberto; Soares, Sheila; de Castro, Vagner; Moraes-Souza, Helio

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To identify the occurrence and the causes of platelet refractoriness in oncohematologic patients. INTRODUCTION: Platelet refractoriness (unsatisfactory post-transfusion platelet increment) is a severe problem that impairs the treatment of oncohematologic patients and is not routinely investigated in most Brazilian services. METHODS: Forty-four episodes of platelet concentrate transfusion were evaluated in 16 patients according to the following parameters: corrected count increment, clinical conditions and detection of anti-platelet antibodies by the platelet immunofluorescence test (PIFT) and panel reactive antibodies against human leukocyte antigen class I (PRA-HLA). RESULTS: Of the 16 patients evaluated (median age: 53 years), nine (56%) were women, seven of them with a history of pregnancy. An unsatisfactory increment was observed in 43% of the transfusion events, being more frequent in transfusions of random platelet concentrates (54%). Platelet refractoriness was confirmed in three patients (19%), who presented immunologic and non-immunologic causes. Alloantibodies were identified in eight patients (50%) by the PIFT and in three (19%) by the PRA-HLA. Among alloimmunized patients, nine (64%) had a history of transfusion, and three as a result of pregnancy (43%). Of the former, two were refractory (29%). No significant differences were observed, probably as a result of the small sample size. CONCLUSION: The high rate of unsatisfactory platelet increment, refractoriness and alloimmunization observed support the need to set up protocols for the investigation of this complication in all chronically transfused patients, a fundamental requirement for the guarantee of adequate management. PMID:21437433

  15. Mean platelet volume as an indicator of platelet rejuvenation following bone-marrow transplantation. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Seanger, D.G.

    1986-07-01

    Thrombocytopenia of unpredictable duration and severity is an expected outcome of the radiation/chemotherapy protocols performed prior to bone-marrow transplantation. Serial evaluation of the platelet count and mean platelet volume of patients diagnosed with acute leukemia demonstrated the mean platelet volume to increase into reference limits 24 to 40 hours prior to a rise in the platelet count in those patients whose bone-marrow successfully responded to induction chemotherapy. Serial platelet counts and measurements of mean platelet volume were performed on 31 patients following bone marrow transplantation. Numerous platelet transfusions, together with sustained thrombocytopenia, inhibited accurate assessment of 29 of 31 patients. Two patients, however, demonstrated a rise in the mean platelet volume prior to an increase in the platelet count. Both of these patients received no platelet transfusions during the period preceding or following the rise in the platelet count. It was proposed that the serial evaluation of the mean platelet volume may assist practitioners in the decision-making process of deciding whether platlet transfusions are required, or an increase in the number of circulating platelets is imminent. A decision not to transfuse would have the direct benefit of decreasing patient costs, in conjunction with eliminating a potential source for the development of an antibody against platelets.

  16. Platelet utilization: a Canadian Blood Services research and development symposium.

    PubMed

    Webert, Kathryn E; Alam, Asim Q; Chargé, Sophie B; Sheffield, William P

    2014-04-01

    Considerable progress has been made in recent years in understanding platelet biology and in strengthening the clinical evidence base around platelet transfusion thresholds and appropriate platelet dosing. Platelet alloimmunization rates have also declined. Nevertheless, controversies and uncertainties remain that are relevant to how these products can best be used for the benefit of platelet transfusion recipients. Platelets are unique among the blood products directly derived from whole blood or apheresis donations in requiring storage, with shaking, at ambient temperature. Storage is accordingly constrained between the need to limit the growth of any microbes in the product and the need to minimize losses in platelet function associated with storage. Proteomic and genomic approaches are being applied to the platelet storage lesion. Platelet inventory management is made challenging by these constraints. Although bacterial screening has enhanced the safety of platelet transfusions, pathogen reduction technology may offer further benefits. Continuing clinical investigations are warranted to understand the value of transfusing platelets prophylactically or only in response to bleeding in different patient groups and how best to manage the most grievously injured trauma patients. Patients refractory to platelet transfusions also require expert clinical management. The engineering of platelet substitute products is an active area of research, but considerable hurdles remain before any clinical uses may be contemplated. Roles for platelets in biological areas distinct from hemostasis are also emerging. Platelet utilization is variably affected by all of the above factors, by demographic changes, by new medications, and by new patient care approaches. PMID:24629305

  17. Platelet utilization: a Canadian Blood Services research and development symposium.

    PubMed

    Webert, Kathryn E; Alam, Asim Q; Chargé, Sophie B; Sheffield, William P

    2014-04-01

    Considerable progress has been made in recent years in understanding platelet biology and in strengthening the clinical evidence base around platelet transfusion thresholds and appropriate platelet dosing. Platelet alloimmunization rates have also declined. Nevertheless, controversies and uncertainties remain that are relevant to how these products can best be used for the benefit of platelet transfusion recipients. Platelets are unique among the blood products directly derived from whole blood or apheresis donations in requiring storage, with shaking, at ambient temperature. Storage is accordingly constrained between the need to limit the growth of any microbes in the product and the need to minimize losses in platelet function associated with storage. Proteomic and genomic approaches are being applied to the platelet storage lesion. Platelet inventory management is made challenging by these constraints. Although bacterial screening has enhanced the safety of platelet transfusions, pathogen reduction technology may offer further benefits. Continuing clinical investigations are warranted to understand the value of transfusing platelets prophylactically or only in response to bleeding in different patient groups and how best to manage the most grievously injured trauma patients. Patients refractory to platelet transfusions also require expert clinical management. The engineering of platelet substitute products is an active area of research, but considerable hurdles remain before any clinical uses may be contemplated. Roles for platelets in biological areas distinct from hemostasis are also emerging. Platelet utilization is variably affected by all of the above factors, by demographic changes, by new medications, and by new patient care approaches.

  18. Transfusion immunomodulation from a clinical perspective: an update.

    PubMed

    Refaai, Majed A; Blumberg, Neil

    2013-12-01

    Accumulated evidence demonstrates that allogeneic blood transfusions have clinically significant effects on the recipient's immune system. This transfusion immunomodulation effect is associated with an increased rate of cancer recurrence (uncertain causality) and post-operative infection (established causality). The exact mechanisms of transfusion immunomodulation are still unknown. Data suggests that transfusion immunomodulation is a biologic effect strongly associated with the infusion of allogeneic leukocytes. Soluble mediators that accumulate in transfused red cells and platelets during storage are also possible causes of post-transfusion complications. Some approaches can mitigate these effects. Most important is adopting more conservative transfusion practices. Leukoreduction (proven) and plasma depletion (proposed) are other methods to significantly reduce transfusion immunomodulation and its clinical sequela.

  19. Quality of transfusion products in blood banking.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo; Capuzzo, Enrico; Turdo, Rosalia; Glingani, Claudia

    2014-03-01

    The primary goal in transfusion medicine and cellular therapies is to promote high standards of quality and produce ever safer and more efficacious products. The establishment of a transfusion service quality management system, which includes several organizational structures, responsibilities, policies, processes, procedures, and resources, is now mandatory and widely regulated worldwide. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the quality system in transfusion medicine as applied to the production of blood components, including red blood cells, platelets, and fresh frozen plasma. PMID:24474089

  20. Thromboelastography: Clinical Application, Interpretation, and Transfusion Management.

    PubMed

    Collins, Shawn; MacIntyre, Carolyn; Hewer, Ian

    2016-04-01

    The coagulation cascade is a dynamic process dependent on many factors. It involves interaction between primary hemostasis, platelet clot formation, secondary hemostasis, thrombin generation, and fibrinolysis. The assessment of this process is particularly important in the surgical patient to properly manage hemostatic issues. Traditionally, coagulation tests used to guide transfusion management have included platelet count, activated partial thromboplastin time, prothrombin time, international normalized ratio, and activated clotting time, among others. Although these tests provide the practitioner with valuable information, they lack the ability to measure platelet function. The ability to measure whole blood coagulation, including platelet function, and not just the number of platelets, can be critical when a healthcare provider is determining what products are appropriate for a particular patient during surgery. One possible solution to this deficit in traditional coagulation monitoring is thromboelastography. Thromboelastography provides a more complete picture of coagulation status, taking into account more factors involved in the clotting process, including platelet function and temperature. PMID:27311154

  1. Use of a solid phase red blood cell adherence method for pretransfusion platelet compatibility testing.

    PubMed

    Rachel, J M; Summers, T C; Sinor, L T; Plapp, F V

    1988-07-01

    A solid phase red blood cell adherence method has been used for platelet antibody detection and crossmatching for refractory platelet recipients. Patient sera were first screened for HLA or platelet-specific antibodies, then crossmatched with potential apheresis platelet donors. The overall correlation of platelet crossmatch results with transfusion outcome was 97% in patients with no evidence of nonimmune platelet destruction. The solid phase red blood cell adherence method provided a feasible and effective alternative to HLA matching as a means of donor selection for refractory platelet recipients. The speed and simplicity of this method may allow most hospital laboratories to perform platelet antibody screening before routine platelet transfusions.

  2. Massive Bleeding and Massive Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Meißner, Andreas; Schlenke, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Massive bleeding in trauma patients is a serious challenge for all clinicians, and an interdisciplinary diagnostic and therapeutic approach is warranted within a limited time frame. Massive transfusion usually is defined as the transfusion of more than 10 units of packed red blood cells (RBCs) within 24 h or a corresponding blood loss of more than 1- to 1.5-fold of the body's entire blood volume. Especially male trauma patients experience this life-threatening condition within their productive years of life. An important parameter for clinical outcome is to succeed in stopping the bleeding preferentially within the first 12 h of hospital admission. Additional coagulopathy in the initial phase is induced by trauma itself and aggravated by consumption and dilution of clotting factors. Although different aspects have to be taken into consideration when viewing at bleedings induced by trauma compared to those caused by major surgery, the basic strategy is similar. Here, we will focus on trauma-induced massive hemorrhage. Currently there are no definite, worldwide accepted algorithms for blood transfusion and strategies for optimal coagulation management. There is increasing evidence that a higher ratio of plasma and RBCs (e.g. 1:1) endorsed by platelet transfusion might result in a superior survival of patients at risk for trauma-induced coagulopathy. Several strategies have been evolved in the military environment, although not all strategies should be transferred unproven to civilian practice, e.g. the transfusion of whole blood. Several agents have been proposed to support the restoration of coagulation. Some have been used for years without any doubt on their benefit-to-risk profile, whereas great enthusiasm of other products has been discouraged by inefficacy in terms of blood transfusion requirements and mortality or significant severe side effects. This review surveys current literature on fluid resuscitation, blood transfusion, and hemostatic agents currently

  3. [Flow cytometry: applications in transfusion medicine].

    PubMed

    Boval, B

    2000-06-01

    In transfusion medicine, flow cytometry (FCM) is a methodology combining laser radiation, optics and a computerized treatment of numerous results. We can measure size, cellularity and fluorescence intensity of cells or particles in suspension after the binding of appropriate fluorescent antibodies or fluorescent dyes. The main utilisation of FCM in transfusion medicine is for quality control of the process of leukocyte reduction in red cell concentrates or in platelet units, using commercial kits. In addition, it is used for the enumeration of CD 34 positive cells before bone marrow transplantation and for control of platelet function in platelet units. For clinical investigations, FCM may be used for red cell phenotyping, essentially to detect minor populations (chimerism), for the estimation of red cell survival, or for the detection of fetal erythrocytes. In the field of platelet immunology, FCM is an essential tool for detecting platelet antibodies (auto or allo), for platelet phenotyping or for cross-matching. In the future perhaps, FCM will permit us to detect bacterial contamination or prion protein in transfused blood cells. PMID:10919227

  4. Blood Transfusion and Donation

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the United States receive life-saving blood transfusions. During a transfusion, you receive whole blood or parts of blood ... liver failure or a severe infection. Most blood transfusions go very smoothly. Some infectious agents, such as ...

  5. Massive transfusion and massive transfusion protocol

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Vijaya; Shetmahajan, Madhavi

    2014-01-01

    Haemorrhage remains a major cause of potentially preventable deaths. Rapid transfusion of large volumes of blood products is required in patients with haemorrhagic shock which may lead to a unique set of complications. Recently, protocol based management of these patients using massive transfusion protocol have shown improved outcomes. This section discusses in detail both management and complications of massive blood transfusion. PMID:25535421

  6. Massive transfusion and massive transfusion protocol.

    PubMed

    Patil, Vijaya; Shetmahajan, Madhavi

    2014-09-01

    Haemorrhage remains a major cause of potentially preventable deaths. Rapid transfusion of large volumes of blood products is required in patients with haemorrhagic shock which may lead to a unique set of complications. Recently, protocol based management of these patients using massive transfusion protocol have shown improved outcomes. This section discusses in detail both management and complications of massive blood transfusion.

  7. Metalloproteolytic receptor shedding…platelets "acting their age".

    PubMed

    Andrews, Robert K; Gardiner, Elizabeth E

    2016-09-01

    Whilst significant effort has been focused on development of tools and approaches to clinically modulate activation processes that consume platelets, the platelet receptors that initiate activation processes remain untargeted. The modulation of receptor levels is also linked to underlying platelet aging processes which influence normal platelet lifespan and also the functionality and survival of stored platelets that are used in transfusion. In this review, we will focus on platelet adhesion receptors initiating thrombus formation, and discuss how regulation of levels of these receptors impact platelet function and platelet survival. PMID:27459696

  8. The effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors on platelet function in whole blood and platelet concentrates.

    PubMed

    Reikvam, Anne-Grete; Hustad, Steinar; Reikvam, Håkon; Apelseth, Torunn Oveland; Nepstad, Ina; Hervig, Tor Audun

    2012-01-01

    Several studies report that patients who are treated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) for depression may have increased risk of bleeding, particularly from the gastrointestinal tract. This may be related to low intraplatelet serotonin concentrations. Several blood banks do not store platelets from donors using SSRIs for transfusion, although the possible effects of SSRIs on platelet storage are not documented. We conducted a case-control pilot study of apheresis platelet concentrates prepared from donors using SSRIs (n=8) and from donors without medication (n=10). The platelet concentrates were stored for 5 days. Light transmission aggregometry (LTA), thrombelastography (TEG), and flow cytometric analyses were preformed for in vitro measurements of platelet function. Platelet function and platelet serotonin content were investigated in whole blood and in platelet concentrates stored for up to 5 days. LTA, TEG, and flow cytometric analysis of glycoprotein expression did not reveal any significant differences between the two groups. All 18 platelet concentrates performed well according to the standards set for platelet quality in relation to transfusion. Blood donors using SSRIs had significantly lower platelet serotonin compared to blood donors without medication. The results from our pilot study indicate that platelets from donors using SSRIs may be suitable for transfusion after storage for 5 days, but further laboratory and clinical studies are necessary to confirm this.

  9. Outcomes of an automated procedure for the selection of effective platelets for patients refractory to random donors based on cross-matching locally available platelet products.

    PubMed

    Rebulla, Paolo; Morelati, Fernanda; Revelli, Nicoletta; Villa, Maria Antonietta; Paccapelo, Cinzia; Nocco, Angela; Greppi, Noemi; Marconi, Maurizio; Cortelezzi, Agostino; Fracchiolla, Nicola; Martinelli, Giovanni; Deliliers, Giorgio Lambertenghi

    2004-04-01

    In 1999, we implemented an automated platelet cross-matching (XM) programme to select compatible platelets from the local inventory for patients refractory to random donor platelets. In this study, we evaluated platelet count increments in 40 consecutive refractory patients (8.3% of 480 consecutive platelet recipients) given 569 cross-match-negative platelets between April 1999 and December 2001. XM was performed automatically with a commercially available immunoadherence assay. Pre-, 1- and 24-h post-transfusion platelet counts (mean +/- SD) for the 569 XM-negative platelet transfusions containing 302 +/- 71 x 109 platelets were 7.7 +/- 5.5, 32.0 +/- 21.0 and 16.8 +/- 15.5 x 109/l respectively. Increments were significantly higher (P < 0.05, t-test) than those observed in the same patients given 303 random platelet pools (dose = 318 +/- 52 x 109 platelets) during the month before refractoriness was detected, when pre-, 1- and 24-h post-transfusion counts were 7.0 +/- 8.6, 15.9 +/- 16.1 and 9.6 +/- 12.8 x 109/l respectively. The cost of the platelet XM disposable kit per transfusion to produce 1-h post-transfusion platelet count increments >10 x 109/l was euro 447. This programme enabled the rapid selection of effective platelets for refractory patients, from the local inventory. PMID:15015974

  10. Outcomes of an automated procedure for the selection of effective platelets for patients refractory to random donors based on cross-matching locally available platelet products.

    PubMed

    Rebulla, Paolo; Morelati, Fernanda; Revelli, Nicoletta; Villa, Maria Antonietta; Paccapelo, Cinzia; Nocco, Angela; Greppi, Noemi; Marconi, Maurizio; Cortelezzi, Agostino; Fracchiolla, Nicola; Martinelli, Giovanni; Deliliers, Giorgio Lambertenghi

    2004-04-01

    In 1999, we implemented an automated platelet cross-matching (XM) programme to select compatible platelets from the local inventory for patients refractory to random donor platelets. In this study, we evaluated platelet count increments in 40 consecutive refractory patients (8.3% of 480 consecutive platelet recipients) given 569 cross-match-negative platelets between April 1999 and December 2001. XM was performed automatically with a commercially available immunoadherence assay. Pre-, 1- and 24-h post-transfusion platelet counts (mean +/- SD) for the 569 XM-negative platelet transfusions containing 302 +/- 71 x 109 platelets were 7.7 +/- 5.5, 32.0 +/- 21.0 and 16.8 +/- 15.5 x 109/l respectively. Increments were significantly higher (P < 0.05, t-test) than those observed in the same patients given 303 random platelet pools (dose = 318 +/- 52 x 109 platelets) during the month before refractoriness was detected, when pre-, 1- and 24-h post-transfusion counts were 7.0 +/- 8.6, 15.9 +/- 16.1 and 9.6 +/- 12.8 x 109/l respectively. The cost of the platelet XM disposable kit per transfusion to produce 1-h post-transfusion platelet count increments >10 x 109/l was euro 447. This programme enabled the rapid selection of effective platelets for refractory patients, from the local inventory.

  11. Multilineage potential and proteomic profiling of human dental stem cells derived from a single donor

    SciTech Connect

    Patil, Rajreddy; Kumar, B. Mohana; Lee, Won-Jae; Jeon, Ryoung-Hoon; Jang, Si-Jung; Lee, Yeon-Mi; Park, Bong-Wook; Byun, June-Ho; Ahn, Chun-Seob; Kim, Jae-Won; Rho, Gyu-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Dental tissues provide an alternative autologous source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for regenerative medicine. In this study, we isolated human dental MSCs of follicle, pulp and papilla tissue from a single donor tooth after impacted third molar extraction by excluding the individual differences. We then compared the morphology, proliferation rate, expression of MSC-specific and pluripotency markers, and in vitro differentiation ability into osteoblasts, adipocytes, chondrocytes and functional hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs). Finally, we analyzed the protein expression profiles of undifferentiated dental MSCs using 2DE coupled with MALDI-TOF-MS. Three types of dental MSCs largely shared similar morphology, proliferation potential, expression of surface markers and pluripotent transcription factors, and differentiation ability into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes. Upon hepatogenic induction, all MSCs were transdifferentiated into functional HLCs, and acquired hepatocyte functions by showing their ability for glycogen storage and urea production. Based on the proteome profiling results, we identified nineteen proteins either found commonly or differentially expressed among the three types of dental MSCs. In conclusion, three kinds of dental MSCs from a single donor tooth possessed largely similar cellular properties and multilineage potential. Further, these dental MSCs had similar proteomic profiles, suggesting their interchangeable applications for basic research and call therapy. - Highlights: • Isolated and characterized three types of human dental MSCs from a single donor. • MSCs of dental follicle, pulp and papilla had largely similar biological properties. • All MSCs were capable of transdifferentiating into functional hepatocyte-like cells. • 2DE proteomics with MALDI-TOF/MS identified 19 proteins in three types of MSCs. • Similar proteomic profiles suggest interchangeable applications of dental MSCs.

  12. Serial haematology results in transfused and non-transfused dogs naturally infected with Babesia rossi.

    PubMed

    Scheepers, E; Leisewitz, A L; Thompson, P N; Christopher, M M

    2011-09-01

    This prospective longitudinal study investigated the progression of haematological changes in 32 transfused and 54 non-transfused dogs naturally infected with Babesia rossi over the 1st 6 days following diagnosis and treatment. The effect of patient age on the results of complete blood counts was determined. Haematology data were analysed at presentation and at 24 hours, 3 days and 6 days after presentation. Dogs were treated with diminazene aceturate at diagnosis and a blood transfusion was given if deemed clinically required. Mildly to moderately regenerative normocytic normochromic anaemia was observed in all dogs throughout the study period. Transfused dogs more often had an inflammatory leukogram at presentation and at 24 hours, than dogs that were not transfused. In dogs with a left shift, a concurrent normal or decreased segmented neutrophil count was found more commonly than neutrophilia. Severe thrombocytopenia that resolved within a week was common. Blood transfusion alleviated the anaemia, but had no significant effect on white blood cell or platelet responses. Blood cell responses were not significantly influenced by age. In conclusion, the red blood cell and white blood cell responses were less than expected in dogs with babesiosis, given the degree of anaemia and inflammation present. The magnitude of thrombocytopenia and rapid return of the platelet count to normal suggested a possible immune-mediated mechanism for the thrombocytopenia.

  13. Multiwavelength UV/visible spectroscopy for the quantitative investigation of platelet quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattley, Yvette D.; Leparc, German F.; Potter, Robert L.; Garcia-Rubio, Luis H.

    1998-04-01

    The quality of platelets transfused is vital to the effectiveness of the transfusion. Freshly prepared, discoid platelets are the most effective treatment for preventing spontaneous hemorrhage or for stopping an abnormal bleeding event. Current methodology for the routine testing of platelet quality involves random pH testing of platelet rich plasma and visual inspection of platelet rich plasma for a swirling pattern indicative of the discoid shape of the cells. The drawback to these methods is that they do not provide a quantitative and objective assay for platelet functionality that can be used on each platelet unit prior to transfusion. As part of a larger project aimed at characterizing whole blood and blood components with multiwavelength UV/vis spectroscopy, isolated platelets and platelet in platelet rich plasma have been investigated. Models based on Mie theory have been developed which allow for the extraction of quantitative information on platelet size, number and quality from multi-wavelength UV/vis spectra. These models have been used to quantify changes in platelet rich plasma during storage. The overall goal of this work is to develop a simple, rapid quantitative assay for platelet quality that can be used prior to platelet transfusion to ensure the effectiveness of the treatment. As a result of this work, the optical properties for isolated platelets, platelet rich plasma and leukodepleted platelet rich plasma have been determined.

  14. ESR Experiments on a Single Donor Electron in Isotopically Enriched Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tracy, Lisa; Luhman, Dwight; Carr, Stephen; Borchardt, John; Bishop, Nathaniel; Ten Eyck, Gregory; Pluym, Tammy; Wendt, Joel; Witzel, Wayne; Blume-Kohout, Robin; Nielsen, Erik; Lilly, Michael; Carroll, Malcolm

    In this talk we will discuss electron spin resonance experiments in single donor silicon qubit devices fabricated at Sandia National Labs. A self-aligned device structure consisting of a polysilicon gate SET located adjacent to the donor is used for donor electron spin readout. Using a cryogenic HEMT amplifier next to the silicon device, we demonstrate spin readout at 100 kHz bandwidth and Rabi oscillations with 0.96 visibility. Electron spin resonance measurements on these devices show a linewidth of 30 kHz and coherence times T2* = 10 us and T2 = 0.3 ms. We also discuss estimates of the fidelity of our donor electron spin qubit measurements using gate set tomography. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, a U.S. DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences user facility. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000. ESR Experiments on a Single Donor Electron in Isotopically Enriched Silicon.

  15. Evaluation of strained silicon on insulator for SET based single donor spin read-out

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Peter; Ten Eyck, Greg; Ward, Daniel; Dominguez, Jason; Childs, Kenton; Wendt, Joel; Lilly, Michael; Carroll, Malcolm

    2015-03-01

    Recent successes in realizing single donor control and achieving very high fidelity gate operations has driven interest in silicon-based donor qubits. A number of proposals for donor to donor coupling rely on vertical field for Stark shift and ionization to a nearby interface. Back gating silicon on insulator is one approach to achieving sufficient field strengths. We present low temperature measurements of back gated FET structures and donor implanted SETs fabricated from strained silicon on insulator substrates with a low doped handle. This strained silicon system is useful for studying the effects of strain on both single donor physics and may provide insight into the behavior of strained silicon channels for quantum dots. We use FET thresholds to characterize the oxide/Si defect density. Back gating influences the transient time response, mobility, and FET threshold. These parameters are also modified by above band gap light illumination. Two transport channels are observed, which also strongly depend on back gate voltage and illumination. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, an Office of Science User Facility operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  16. Extending The Shelf Life Of Blood Platelets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surgenor, Douglas M.

    1988-01-01

    New method of storing human blood platelets extends vitality for transfusions. Packaged as suspension in sterile liquid in plastic blood bags. Each bag placed between pair of plastic grids, and rubberbands placed around sandwich thus formed to hold together. Stored upright in open air or in container through which air pumped at rate of at least 45 L/min. Ensures that platelets receive ample oxygen and expiratory carbon dioxide form platelets removed before pH drops to harmful levels.

  17. Platelet-Rich Plasma and Platelet Gel: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Everts, Peter A.M.; Knape, Johannes T.A.; Weibrich, Gernot; Schönberger, Jacques P.A.M.; Hoffmann, Johannes; Overdevest, Eddy P.; Box, Henk A.M.; van Zundert, André

    2006-01-01

    Abstract: Strategies to reduce blood loss and transfusion of allogeneic blood products during surgical procedures are important in modern times. The most important and well-known autologous techniques are preoperative autologous predonation, hemodilution, perioperative red cell salvage, postoperative wound blood autotransfusion, and pharmacologic modulation of the hemostatic process. At present, new developments in the preparation of preoperative autologous blood component therapy by whole blood platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and platelet-poor plasma (PPP) sequestration have evolved. This technique has been proven to reduce the number of allogeneic blood transfusions during open heart surgery and orthopedic operations. Moreover, platelet gel and fibrin sealant derived from PRP and PPP mixed with thrombin, respectively, can be exogenously applied to tissues to promote wound healing, bone growth, and tissue sealing. However, to our disappointment, not many well-designed scientific studies are available, and many anecdotic stories exist, whereas questions remain to be answered. We therefore decided to study perioperative blood management in more detail with emphasis on the application and production of autologous platelet gel and the use of fibrin sealant. This review addresses a large variety of aspects relevant to platelets, platelet-rich plasma, and the application of platelet gel. In addition, an overview of recent animal and human studies is presented. PMID:16921694

  18. Photodynamic decontamination of blood for transfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Hur, Ehud; Margolis-Nunno, H.; Gottlieb, P.; Lustigman, S.; Horowitz, Bernard

    1995-01-01

    Currently transfused cellular components of blood are not available in a sterile form and carry a small risk of transmitting viral and parasite diseases. Using phthalocyanines and red light, lipid enveloped viruses, e.g., HIV-1, can be inactivated in red blood cell concentrates (RBCC). Under conditions leading to virus sterilization the blood borne parasites Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas disease) and Plasmodium falciparum (malaria) could be eliminated to undetectable levels (> 4 log10 kill). RBC damage during treatment could be avoided by increasing the light fluence rate to 80 mW/cm2, and by including the free radical scavenger glutathione and the vitamin E derivative Trolox during light exposure. Similar sterilization of platelet concentrates was achieved with the psoralen derivative AMT and UVA light. Platelet damage due to PUVA treatment was avoided by including the plant flavonoid rutin during irradiation. It is concluded that elimination of the risk of transmitting pathogens during blood transfusion is feasible with photochemical treatments.

  19. Transfusion support in patients with dengue fever.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Paramjit; Kaur, Gagandeep

    2014-09-01

    Dengue fever has emerged as a global public health problem in the recent decades. The clinical spectrum of the disease ranges from dengue fever to dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. The disease is characterized by increased capillary permeability, thrombocytopenia and coagulopathy. Thrombocytopenia with hemorrhagic manifestations warrants platelet transfusions. There is lack of evidence-based guidelines for transfusion support in patients with dengue fever. This contributes to inappropriate use of blood components and blood centers constantly face the challenge of inventory management during dengue outbreaks. The current review is aimed to highlight the role of platelets and other blood components in the management of dengue. The review was performed after searching relevant published literature in PubMed, Science Direct, Google scholar and various text books and journal articles.

  20. Types of Blood Transfusions

    MedlinePlus

    ... especially in the joints (knees, ankles, and elbows). Plasma Transfusions Plasma is the liquid part of your blood. It's ... or a severe infection, you may need a plasma transfusion. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Updated: January 30, ...

  1. Recent Developments in Transplantation and Transfusion Medicine.

    PubMed

    Edinur, Hisham A; Chambers, Geoffrey K; Dunn, Paul P J

    2015-07-28

    Transplantation and transfusion are related and clinically important areas of multidisciplinary expertise, including pre-operative treatment, donor recruitment, tissue matching, and post-operative care. We have seen significant developments in these areas, especially in the late 20th and early 21st century. This paper reviews the latest advances in modern transplantation and transfusion medicine, including several new genetic markers (e.g., major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene A, killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor, and human platelet antigens) for donor and recipient matching, genotyping platforms (e.g., next-generation sequencer and Luminex technology), donor recruitment strategies, and several clinical applications in which genotyping has advantages over agglutination tests (e.g., genotyping of weakly expressed antigens and determination of blood groups and human leukocyte antigen types in multi-transfused patients). We also highlight the roles of population studies and international collaborations in moving towards more efficient donor recruitment strategies.

  2. Preoperative Thromboelastometry as a Predictor of Transfusion Requirements during Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Fayed, Nirmeen; Mourad, Wessam; Yassen, Khaled; Görlinger, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Background The ability to predict transfusion requirements may improve perioperative bleeding management as an integral part of a patient blood management program. Therefore, the aim of our study was to evaluate preoperative thromboelastometry as a predictor of transfusion requirements for adult living donor liver transplant recipients. Methods The correlation between preoperative thromboelastometry variables in 100 adult living donor liver transplant recipients and intraoperative blood transfusion requirements was examined by univariate and multivariate linear regression analysis. Thresholds of thromboelastometric parameters for prediction of packed red blood cells (PRBCs), fresh frozen plasma (FFP), platelets, and cryoprecipitate transfusion requirements were determined with receiver operating characteristics analysis. The attending anesthetists were blinded to the preoperative thromboelastometric analysis. However, a thromboelastometry-guided transfusion algorithm with predefined trigger values was used intraoperatively. The transfusion triggers in this algorithm did not change during the study period. Results Univariate analysis confirmed significant correlations between PRBCs, FFP, platelets or cryoprecipitate transfusion requirements and most thromboelastometric variables. Backward stepwise logistic regression indicated that EXTEM coagulation time (CT), maximum clot firmness (MCF) and INTEM CT, clot formation time (CFT) and MCF are independent predictors for PRBC transfusion. EXTEM CT, CFT and FIBTEM MCF are independent predictors for FFP transfusion. Only EXTEM and INTEM MCF were independent predictors of platelet transfusion. EXTEM CFT and MCF, INTEM CT, CFT and MCF as well as FIBTEM MCF are independent predictors for cryoprecipitate transfusion. Thromboelastometry-based regression equation accounted for 63% of PRBC, 83% of FFP, 61% of cryoprecipitate, and 44% of platelet transfusion requirements. Conclusion Preoperative thromboelastometric analysis is

  3. Detection of microbial contamination in platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Tracy L.; Leparc, German; Huffman, Debra E.; Gennaccaro, Angela L.; Garcia-Lopez, Alicia; Klungness, Greta; Stephans, Christie; Garcia-Rubio, Luis H.

    2005-03-01

    In the United States, approximately 100 patients develop fatal sepsis associated with platelet transfusions every year. Current culture methods take 24-48 hours to acquire results, which in turn decrease the shelf life of platelets. Many of the microorganisms that contaminate platelets can replicate easily at room temperature, which is the necessary storage temperature to keep platelets functional. Therefore, there is a need for in-situ quality control assessment of the platelet quality. For this purpose, a real time spectrophotometric technique has been developed. The Spectral Acquisition Processing Detection (SAPD) method, comprised of a UV-vis spectrophotometer and modeling algorithms, is a rapid method that can be performed prior to platelet transfusion to decrease the risk of bacterial infection to patients. The SAPD method has been used to determine changes in cell suspensions, based on size, shape, chemical composition and internal structure. Changes in these cell characteristics can in turn be used to determine microbial contamination, platelet aging and other physiologic changes. Detection limits of this method for platelet suspensions seeded with bacterial contaminants were identified to be less than 100 cfu/ml of sample. Bacterial counts below 1000 cfu/ml are not considered clinically significant. The SAPD method can provide real-time identification of bacterial contamination of platelets affording patients an increased level of safety without causing undue strain on laboratory budgets or personnel while increasing the time frame that platelets can be used by dramatically shortening contaminant detection time.

  4. Platelet Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... higher risk of blood clots. With other platelet disorders, the platelets do not work as they should. For example, in von Willebrand Disease, the platelets cannot stick together or cannot attach ...

  5. Single ion implantation for single donor devices using Geiger mode detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielejec, E.; Seamons, J. A.; Carroll, M. S.

    2010-02-01

    Electronic devices that are designed to use the properties of single atoms such as donors or defects have become a reality with recent demonstrations of donor spectroscopy, single photon emission sources, and magnetic imaging using defect centers in diamond. Ion implantation, an industry standard for atom placement in materials, requires augmentation for single ion capability including a method for detecting a single ion arrival. Integrating single ion detection techniques with the single donor device construction region allows single ion arrival to be assured. Improving detector sensitivity is linked to improving control over the straggle of the ion as well as providing more flexibility in lay-out integration with the active region of the single donor device construction zone by allowing ion sensing at potentially greater distances. Using a remotely located passively gated single ion Geiger mode avalanche diode (SIGMA) detector we have demonstrated 100% detection efficiency at a distance of >75 µm from the center of the collecting junction. This detection efficiency is achieved with sensitivity to ~600 or fewer electron-hole pairs produced by the implanted ion. Ion detectors with this sensitivity and integrated with a thin dielectric, for example a 5 nm gate oxide, using low energy Sb implantation would have an end of range straggle of <2.5 nm. Significant reduction in false count probability is, furthermore, achieved by modifying the ion beam set-up to allow for cryogenic operation of the SIGMA detector. Using a detection window of 230 ns at 1 Hz, the probability of a false count was measured as ~10-1 and 10-4 for operation temperatures of ~300 K and ~77 K, respectively. Low temperature operation and reduced false, 'dark', counts are critical to achieving high confidence in single ion arrival. For the device performance in this work, the confidence is calculated as a probability of >98% for counting one and only one ion for a false count probability of 10-4 at

  6. Nuclear-driven electron spin rotations in a coupled silicon quantum dot and single donor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey-Collard, Patrick; Jacobson, Noah Tobias; Rudolph, Martin; Ten Eyck, Gregory A.; Wendt, Joel R.; Pluym, Tammy; Lilly, Michael P.; Pioro-Ladrière, Michel; Carroll, Malcolm S.

    Single donors in silicon are very good qubits. However, a central challenge is to couple them to one another. To achieve this, many proposals rely on using a nearby quantum dot (QD) to mediate an interaction. In this work, we demonstrate the coherent coupling of electron spins between a single 31P donor and an enriched 28Si metal-oxide-semiconductor few-electron QD. We show that the electron-nuclear spin interaction can drive coherent rotations between singlet and triplet electron spin states. Moreover, we are able to tune electrically the exchange interaction between the QD and donor electrons. The combination of single-nucleus-driven rotations and voltage-tunable exchange provides all elements for future all-electrical control of a spin qubit, and requires only a single dot and no additional magnetic field gradients. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, an Office of Science User Facility operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  7. Case report: solid-phase platelet crossmatching to support the alloimmunized patient.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, B A

    1995-01-01

    Platelet crossmatching by a solid-phase red cell adherence assay was used to provide compatible platelets for two alloimmunized patients with leukemia. In this study, a successful platelet transfusion was defined as giving a corrected count increment (CCI) of >7,500 in a posttransfusion sample. For patient A, a total of 205 random platelet concentrates (PCs) were crossmatched. Eleven were considered compatible. These 11 PCs were transfused during five transfusion episodes. Four of the five transfusions produced CCIs of >7,500 and were considered successful. Individually, eight of the eleven units were considered in vivo compatible, and five of the eight donors of these units agreed to become apheresis donors. Platelets from three of these five apheresis donors gave CCIs of >7,500. For patient B, 1,074 random PCs were crossmatched, and 332 were considered compatible. These units were administered during 78 different transfusions. Seventy-one of these transfusion episodes resulted in CCIs of >7,500. In addition, 19 apheresis donors were identified by platelet crossmatching, and they provided platelets for 38 of 39 successful transfusions for Patient B. Platelet crossmatching should therefore be considered when a blood bank is called upon to support a refractory thrombocytopenic patient.

  8. Evidence that platelet buoyant density, but not size, correlates with platelet age in man

    SciTech Connect

    Mezzano, D.; Hwang, K.; Catalano, P.; Aster, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    Following infusion of 51Cr-labeled autologous platelets into normal subjects, high-density (HD) and low-density (LD) platelet cohorts were isolated by prolonged centrifugation in isosmotic arabino-galactan (Stractan). Specific radio-activity of LD platelets declined rapidly post-infusion (T1/2 . 1.5 days), but specific radioactivity of HD platelets remained constant or increased over a 3--4-day period and gradually declined for 6--7 days thereafter. These differences were exaggerated when platelet cohorts enriched in LD or HD cells by slow centrifugation in high-density albumin were labeled and transfused. Mean survival of a platelet cohort enriched with HD cells was significantly (P less than 0.02) shorter (7.73 days) than that of a cohort enriched with LD cells (9.33) days). In normal subjects treated with aspirin, capacity for thromboxane synthesis was regained more rapidly (P less than 0.05) in LD than in HD platelets. HD and LD platelets differed only slightly in mean volume (HD platelets . 7.57 mu3, LD platelets . 6.87 mu3, 0.05 less than P less than 0.01). We believe the most logical interpretation of these findings is that under normal conditions in man, newly formed platelets are less dense on the average than total platelets and become more dense as they age in the circulation. Thus, specific radioactivity of LD platelets declines rapidly as these platelets move into a more dense compartment and are replaced by newly formed, unlabelled cells; specific radioactivity of HD platelets remains constant or increases as labelled platelets enter this compartment in numbers equal to or greater than the number leaving it at the end of their life span. The similarity in mean volumes of LD and HD platelets suggests that platelet size is unrelated to platelet age under normal conditions.

  9. Platelet-mimetic strategies for modulating the wound environment and inflammatory responses

    PubMed Central

    Nandi, Seema

    2016-01-01

    Platelets closely interface with the immune system to fight pathogens, target wound sites, and regulate tissue repair. Natural platelet levels within the body can be depleted for a variety of reasons, including excessive bleeding following traumatic injury, or diseases such as cancer and bacterial or viral infections. Platelet transfusions are commonly used to improve platelet count and hemostatic function in these cases, but transfusions can be complicated by the contamination risks and short storage life of donated platelets. Lyophilized platelets that can be freeze-dried and stored for longer periods of time and synthetic platelet-mimetic technologies that can enhance or replace the functions of natural platelets, while minimizing adverse immune responses have been explored as alternatives to transfusion. Synthetic platelets typically comprise nanoparticles surface-decorated with peptides or ligands to recreate specific biological characteristics of platelets, including targeting of wound and disease sites and facilitating platelet aggregation. Recent efforts in synthetic platelet design have additionally focused on matching platelet shape and mechanics to recreate the marginalization and clot contraction capabilities of natural platelets. The ability to specifically tune the properties of synthetic platelet-mimetic materials has shown utility in a variety of applications including hemostasis, drug delivery, and targeted delivery of cancer therapeutics. PMID:27190260

  10. [Transfusions in geriatrics].

    PubMed

    Moulias, Sophie; Lesure, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Elderly people are Darticularlv Drone to anaemia and the need for transfusions. However, in response to the known adverse effects of red blood cell transfusions, particularly in the context of chronic anaemia, new recommendations have been issued. it is always necessary to consider this procedure on a case-by-case basis, analysing the risk-benefit ratio. PMID:25966521

  11. Alternatives to Blood Transfusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... in cancer patients undergoing laparoscopic colorectal resection: risk factors and impact on survival. Tech Coloproctol. 2013 Oct;17(5):549-554. Hay SN, Scanga L, Brecher ME. Life, death, and the risk of transfusion: a university hospital experience. Transfusion . 2006;46(9):1491-1493. ...

  12. [Transfusions in geriatrics].

    PubMed

    Moulias, Sophie; Lesure, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Elderly people are Darticularlv Drone to anaemia and the need for transfusions. However, in response to the known adverse effects of red blood cell transfusions, particularly in the context of chronic anaemia, new recommendations have been issued. it is always necessary to consider this procedure on a case-by-case basis, analysing the risk-benefit ratio.

  13. Insights into Platelet Storage and the Need for Multiple Approaches.

    PubMed

    Handigund, Mallikarjun; Cho, Yong Gon

    2015-01-01

    Upon accidental injury and the treatment of many diseases, patients may need a transfusion of blood components in order to achieve hemostasis. Platelets are small enucleated cells derived from bone marrow megakaryocytes that undergo change upon activation at sites of vascular injury and play a vital role in vascular repair and antimicrobial host defense, collectively contributing to hemostasis. They are the common blood components transfused whenever there is need, but supplies do not equal the demand as platelets are required in many medical and surgical procedures. In addition, surplus supplies of platelet concentrate are often discarded as they have a short shelf life. Currently, platelet concentrates are stored at room temperature for a maximum of 5 days from the date of collection; the temporal aspect is an added hurdle in the growing demand for platelet concentrates. Many investigations have been carried out in attempt to improve the quality and lengthen the shelf life of platelets, but the few that have succeeded are not commercially viable. Moreover, currently there is a declining trend in platelet research, quelling the hope of platelet storage improvement. Successful strategies would be a boon for medicine in particular and humanity in general. This review deals with past and current efforts toward improving the quality of platelet concentrates by reducing platelet storage lesions and increasing the viable storage period for platelets. Also presented are new perspectives based on past and current efforts, which should be investigated for platelet research in this decade.

  14. [Respiratory complications after transfusion].

    PubMed

    Bernasinski, M; Mertes, P-M; Carlier, M; Dupont, H; Girard, M; Gette, S; Just, B; Malinovsky, J-M

    2014-05-01

    Respiratory complications of blood transfusion have several possible causes. Transfusion-Associated Circulatory Overload (TACO) is often the first mentioned. Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI), better defined since the consensus conference of Toronto in 2004, is rarely mentioned. French incidence is low. Non-hemolytic febrile reactions, allergies, infections and pulmonary embolism are also reported. The objective of this work was to determine the statistical importance of the different respiratory complications of blood transfusion. This work was conducted retrospectively on transfusion accidents in six health centers in Champagne-Ardenne, reported to Hemovigilance between 2000 and 2009 and having respiratory symptoms. The analysis of data was conducted by an expert committee. Eighty-three cases of respiratory complications are found (316,864 blood products). We have counted 26 TACO, 12 TRALI (only 6 cases were identified in the original investigation of Hemovigilance), 18 non-hemolytic febrile reactions, 16 cases of allergies, 5 transfusions transmitted bacterial infections and 2 pulmonary embolisms. Six new TRALI were diagnosed previously labeled TACO for 2 of them, allergy and infection in 2 other cases and diagnosis considered unknown for the last 2. Our study found an incidence of TRALI 2 times higher than that reported previously. Interpretation of the data by a multidisciplinary committee amended 20% of diagnoses. This study shows the imperfections of our system for reporting accidents of blood transfusion when a single observer analyses the medical records.

  15. Understanding platelet generation from megakaryocytes: implications for in vitro-derived platelets.

    PubMed

    Sim, Xiuli; Poncz, Mortimer; Gadue, Paul; French, Deborah L

    2016-03-10

    Platelets are anucleate cytoplasmic discs derived from megakaryocytes that circulate in the blood and have major roles in hemostasis, thrombosis, inflammation, and vascular biology. Platelet transfusions are required to prevent the potentially life-threatening complications of severe thrombocytopenia seen in a variety of medical settings including cancer therapy, trauma, and sepsis. Platelets used in the clinic are currently donor-derived which is associated with concerns over sufficient availability, quality, and complications due to immunologic and/or infectious issues. To overcome our dependence on donor-derived platelets for transfusion, efforts have been made to generate in vitro-based platelets. Work in this area has advanced our understanding of the complex processes that megakaryocytes must undergo to generate platelets both in vivo and in vitro. This knowledge has also defined the challenges that must be overcome to bring in vitro-based platelet manufacturing to a clinical reality. This review will focus on our understanding of committed megakaryocytes and platelet release in vivo and in vitro, and how this knowledge can guide the development of in vitro-derived platelets for clinical application.

  16. Understanding platelet generation from megakaryocytes: implications for in vitro–derived platelets

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Xiuli; Poncz, Mortimer; Gadue, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Platelets are anucleate cytoplasmic discs derived from megakaryocytes that circulate in the blood and have major roles in hemostasis, thrombosis, inflammation, and vascular biology. Platelet transfusions are required to prevent the potentially life-threatening complications of severe thrombocytopenia seen in a variety of medical settings including cancer therapy, trauma, and sepsis. Platelets used in the clinic are currently donor-derived which is associated with concerns over sufficient availability, quality, and complications due to immunologic and/or infectious issues. To overcome our dependence on donor-derived platelets for transfusion, efforts have been made to generate in vitro–based platelets. Work in this area has advanced our understanding of the complex processes that megakaryocytes must undergo to generate platelets both in vivo and in vitro. This knowledge has also defined the challenges that must be overcome to bring in vitro–based platelet manufacturing to a clinical reality. This review will focus on our understanding of committed megakaryocytes and platelet release in vivo and in vitro, and how this knowledge can guide the development of in vitro–derived platelets for clinical application. PMID:26787738

  17. Monoclonal platelet antigen capture assays (MAIPA) and reagents: a statement.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, C; Freedman, J; Foxcroft, Z; Husebekk, A; Metcalfe, P; Muniz-Diaz, E; Ouwehand, W; Panzer, S; Rozman, P; Skogen, B

    2007-11-01

    This statement concerning the monoclonal-specific immobilization of platelet antigens (MAIPA) has been written on behalf of the International Society of Blood Transfusion--Working Party on Platelet Immunology. The MAIPA technique is considered as the gold standard reference technique in platelet immunology. The assay performed with reagents labelled for 'research only' is acceptable as long as it is regularly evaluated by participation of laboratories in national or international workshops held with reference laboratories. PMID:18070272

  18. [Autologous blood transfusion].

    PubMed

    Rosencher, N; Conseiller, C

    2001-06-30

    Autologous blood transfusion techniques are the principal means of reducing allogeneic blood exposure. Those techniques were developed in order to prevent the risk of contamination by viruses, mainly HVB, HCV and HIV. However that risk has become so small that all studies show an exorbitant cost/efficiency ratio. Autologous blood transfusion would therefore be of no interest in terms of public health but a recent experimental study suggested a possible transmission of the BSE agent through blood. Until the matter is settled, the precaution principle means we should prefer alternative techniques to allogeneic blood whenever possible, hence a renewed interest in autologous transfusion. PMID:11503506

  19. Intraoperative transfusion practices in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Meier, J.; Filipescu, D.; Kozek-Langenecker, S.; Llau Pitarch, J.; Mallett, S.; Martus, P.; Matot, I.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Transfusion of allogeneic blood influences outcome after surgery. Despite widespread availability of transfusion guidelines, transfusion practices might vary among physicians, departments, hospitals and countries. Our aim was to determine the amount of packed red blood cells (pRBC) and blood products transfused intraoperatively, and to describe factors determining transfusion throughout Europe. Methods. We did a prospective observational cohort study enrolling 5803 patients in 126 European centres that received at least one pRBC unit intraoperatively, during a continuous three month period in 2013. Results. The overall intraoperative transfusion rate was 1.8%; 59% of transfusions were at least partially initiated as a result of a physiological transfusion trigger- mostly because of hypotension (55.4%) and/or tachycardia (30.7%). Haemoglobin (Hb)- based transfusion trigger alone initiated only 8.5% of transfusions. The Hb concentration [mean (sd)] just before transfusion was 8.1 (1.7) g dl−1 and increased to 9.8 (1.8) g dl−1 after transfusion. The mean number of intraoperatively transfused pRBC units was 2.5 (2.7) units (median 2). Conclusion. Although European Society of Anaesthesiology transfusion guidelines are moderately implemented in Europe with respect to Hb threshold for transfusion (7–9 g dl−1), there is still an urgent need for further educational efforts that focus on the number of pRBC units to be transfused at this threshold. Clinical trial registration. NCT 01604083. PMID:26787795

  20. [Blood transfusion and inflammation as of yesterday, today and tomorrow].

    PubMed

    Garraud, O; Hamzeh-Cognasse, H; Laradi, S; Pozzetto, B; Cognasse, F

    2015-08-01

    Blood transfusion is made possible principally by use of donated homologous components that - in turn - can be perceived as sources of danger by recipients. This may create an innate immune response dominated by inflammation, especially when transfusion is repeated. Residual leukocytes in blood components can source inflammatory lesions but considerably less than used to be prior to systematic, early and stringent - in process - leukoreduction. Every blood component can cause inflammation, though barely in the case of therapeutic plasma (in such a case, this is mainly restricted to allergy). Iron that may be freed by red blood cells but also processing and storage lesions such as the emission of microparticles can reveal themselves as pro-inflammatory. Platelets in platelet components represent the main source of inflammatory and/or allergic hazards in transfusion; this is linked with processing and storage lesions but also with the platelet physiology itself. It is of utmost importance to avoid inflammatory adverse events in patients that are fragile because of their primary condition and/or treatment; this stands for their safety, as inflammation can be extremely severe and even lethal, and also for their comfort; this increases efficacy of transfusion programs while reducing the overall costs.

  1. Platelet antibodies.

    PubMed

    Pulkrabek, S M

    1996-12-01

    The proper diagnosis of patients with immune-mediated thrombocytopenias can be accomplished by using the advances made in the field of platelet serology. These techniques range from solid phase red cell adherence to sequencing platelet antigen amino acids by polymerase chain reaction. This article describes platelet antigens, the clinical tests available to detect platelet antigens and antibodies, and the value of these tests in supporting clinical diagnoses.

  2. Decreased transfusion requirements in patients given stem cell allografts using a non-myeloablative conditioning regimen: a single institution experience.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Argüelles, Guillermo J; López-Martínez, Briceida; Gómez-Rangel, David; Estrada, Erick; Marín-López, Antonio; Bravo-Hernández, Gerardo; Manuel Hernández, Juan

    2003-06-01

    We report our experience of allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation using non-myeloablative conditioning regimens delivered and supported on an outpatient basis. A group of 44 patients underwent 47 allograft procedures using peripheral blood stem cells. Approximately one third of the individuals did not require red blood cells transfusions: the median of transfused red blood cells units was 1 (range 0-10). In addition one out of three did not require platelet transfusions either, the median of platelet transfusions being 1 (range 0-6). In fourteen allografts (30%) neither red blood cells nor platelet transfusions were used. An inverse correlation was found between the number of CD34 cells infused and the PRBC and PLT transfusion requirements, those patients receiving high numbers of CD34 cells needing fewer transfusions of both PRBC and platelets. The possibility of conducting allografts without transfusion of blood products in some patients may result in a decrease in both cost and the risks stemming from exposure to human blood derivatives.

  3. Platelet-TLR7 mediates host survival and platelet count during viral infection in the absence of platelet-dependent thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Koupenova, Milka; Vitseva, Olga; MacKay, Christopher R; Beaulieu, Lea M; Benjamin, Emelia J; Mick, Eric; Kurt-Jones, Evelyn A; Ravid, Katya; Freedman, Jane E

    2014-07-31

    Viral infections have been associated with reduced platelet counts, the biological significance of which has remained elusive. Here, we show that infection with encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) rapidly reduces platelet count, and this response is attributed to platelet Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7). Platelet-TLR7 stimulation mediates formation of large platelet-neutrophil aggregates, both in mouse and human blood. Intriguingly, this process results in internalization of platelet CD41-fragments by neutrophils, as assessed biochemically and visualized by microscopy, with no influence on platelet prothrombotic properties. The mechanism includes TLR7-mediated platelet granule release, translocation of P-selectin to the cell surface, and a consequent increase in platelet-neutrophil adhesion. Viral infection of platelet-depleted mice also led to increased mortality. Transfusion of wild-type, TLR7-expressing platelets into TLR7-deficient mice caused a drop in platelet count and increased survival post EMCV infection. Thus, this study identifies a new link between platelets and their response to single-stranded RNA viruses that involves activation of TLR7. Finally, platelet-TLR7 stimulation is independent of thrombosis and has implications to the host immune response and survival.

  4. Transfusion Related Acute Lung Injury after Cesarean Section in a Patient with HELLP Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Moon, Kyoung Min; Han, Min Soo; Rim, Ch'ang Bum; Kim, So Ri; Shin, Sang Ho; Kang, Min Seok; Lee, Jun Ho; Kim, Jihye; Kim, Sang Il

    2016-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a serious adverse reaction of transfusion, and presents as hypoxemia and non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema within 6 hours of transfusion. A 14-year-old primigravida woman at 34 weeks of gestation presented with upper abdominal pain without dyspnea. Because she showed the syndrome of HELLP (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count), an emergency cesarean section delivery was performed, and blood was transfused. In the case of such patients, clinicians should closely observe the patient's condition at least during the 6 hours while the patient receives blood transfusion, and should suspect TRALI if the patient complains of respiratory symptoms such as dyspnea. Furthermore, echocardiography should be performed to distinguish between the different types of transfusion-related adverse reactions.

  5. Platelet concentrates, from whole blood or collected by apheresis?

    PubMed

    van der Meer, Pieter F

    2013-04-01

    Platelet concentrates can be isolated from donated whole blood with the platelet-rich plasma-method or the buffy coat-method. Alternatively, platelets can be obtained by apheresis, harvesting the platelets but returning all other cells to the donor. The quality and characteristics of platelets during storage are affected by a number of factors, such as anticoagulant, centrifugation and processing after collection, and pre- or post storage pooling, but when comparing literature on the various methods, most differences balance out. To have sufficient platelets to treat an adult patient, whole-blood-derived platelet concentrates need pooling of multiple donations, thereby increasing the risk of infectious agent transmission at least two-fold as compared with apheresis units. Allo immunization rates, acute reaction rates, and transfusion related acute lung injury rates are not different. Apheresis donation procedures have fewer adverse events. All these factors need to be considered and weighed when selecting a method of platelet collection for a blood center.

  6. Platelet MicroRNAs: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Dahiya, Neetu; Sarachana, Tewarit; Vu, Long; Becker, Kevin G; Wood, William H; Zhang, Yongqing; Atreya, Chintamani D

    2015-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short ~22-nucleotide noncoding RNA that have been found to influence the expression of many genes and cellular processes by either repressing translation or degrading messenger RNA transcripts. Platelet miRNA expression has been shown to be perturbed during ex vivo storage of platelets and in platelet-associated disorders. Although bioinformatics-based miRNA target predictions have been established, direct experimental validation of the role of miRNAs in platelet biology has been rather slow. Target prediction studies are, nonetheless, valuable in directing the design of appropriate experiments to test specific miRNA:messenger RNA interactions relevant to the underlying mechanisms of platelet function in general and in disease as well as in ex vivo storage-associated "storage lesions," a collective term used to include physiologic, biochemical, and morphologic changes that occur in stored platelets. This brief review will focus on emerging human platelet miRNA studies to emphasize their potential role relevant to transfusion medicine field in terms of regulating platelet signaling pathways, markers of platelet associated disorders, and remote impactors of gene expression (intercellular biomodulators) as well as potential platelet quality markers of storage and pathogen reduction treatments.

  7. Platelet receptor expression and shedding: glycoprotein Ib-IX-V and glycoprotein VI.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Elizabeth E; Andrews, Robert K

    2014-04-01

    Quantity, quality, and lifespan are 3 important factors in the physiology, pathology, and transfusion of human blood platelets. The aim of this review is to discuss the proteolytic regulation of key platelet-specific receptors, glycoprotein(GP)Ib and GPVI, involved in the function of platelets in hemostasis and thrombosis, and nonimmune or immune thrombocytopenia. The scope of the review encompasses the basic science of platelet receptor shedding, practical aspects related to laboratory analysis of platelet receptor expression/shedding, and clinical implications of using the proteolytic fragments as platelet-specific biomarkers in vivo in terms of platelet function and clearance. These topics can be relevant to platelet transfusion regarding both changes in platelet receptor expression occurring ex vivo during platelet storage and/or clinical use of platelets for transfusion. In this regard, quantitative analysis of platelet receptor profiles on blood samples from individuals could ultimately enable stratification of bleeding risk, discrimination between causes of thrombocytopenia due to impaired production vs enhanced clearance, and monitoring of response to treatment prior to change in platelet count.

  8. Platelet concentrates: Balancing between efficacy and safety?

    PubMed

    Lozano, Miguel; Cid, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Platelet transfusions continue to be the mainstay to treat patients with quantitative and qualitative platelet disorders. Each year, about 10 millions of platelet transfusions are administered to patients worldwide with marked differences in usage between regions depending on socioeconomic development of the countries. Unfortunately, its use is associated to immune and non-immune side effects. Among the non-immune, bacterial contamination is still the major infectious risk. When bacterial culture methods are introduced for preventing bacterial septic reactions it has been found that this strategy reduce to one half the septic reactions, but do not eliminate completely that risk. To remove completely the risk, a new bacteria detection test at the time of issuance in the case of platelets stored for four or five days would be needed. Pathogen inactivation (PI) methods already in the market (based in the addition of amotosalen (A-L) or riboflavin (R-L) and the illumination with ultraviolet light) or under development (ultraviolet light C and agitation) have shown to be efficacious in the inactivation of bacteria and no cases of septic reactions associated to a pathogen-reduced product has been identified. However, it has been shown that PI technologies have measurable effects on platelet in vitro parameters and reduce the recovery and survival of treated platelets in vivo. Although these effects do not hamper the hemostatic capacity of treated platelets, an increased usage associated with PI technologies has been reported. This increase in utilization seems to be the toll to be paid if we want to completely eliminate the risk of bacterial sepsis in the recipients of platelet transfusion. PMID:27476010

  9. Stability of lyophilized human platelets loaded with small molecule carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Wang, J X; Yang, C; Wan, W; Liu, M X; Ren, S P; Quan, G B; Han, Y

    2011-01-01

    Long-term preservation of platelets is a great challenge for blood transfusion centers, due to the required narrow storage temperature arange (22 ± 2 degree C). Short shelf life and potential bacterial growth often lead to the shortage of high-quality platelets. Freeze-dried preservation is thus believed to be a potential solution for long-term platelet storage without losing the hemostasis function. Here we report a new platelet preservation method, which uses small molecule carbohydrates to extend storage time and to maintain platelet function. The activities of lyophilized platelets that were stabilized with small molecule carbohydrate (e.g., cell viability, mean platelet volume, activation characteristics, and aggregation kinetics) were maintained after storage of 30, 60, and 90 days at room temperature, 4 degree C, and -20 degree C. The recovery of freeze-dried platelets was 87 percent in comparison to fresh platelets. The mean platelet volume of rehydrated platelets increased (from 6.8 fl to 8.0 fl). About 40 percent of rehydrated platelets was in the early-activated stage (PCA-1 positive) and 30 percent was in the terminal-activated stage (CD62P positive). The cell viability was about 60 percent as measured with CMFDA vital probes. The aggregation rate of rehydrated platelets after 90-day storage was similar to fresh platelets stored at 22 degree C ± 2 degree C.

  10. The annual cost of blood transfusions in the UK.

    PubMed

    Varney, S J; Guest, J F

    2003-08-01

    This study estimated the annual UK cost of blood transfusions in 2000/2001, updating a study we performed in 1994/1995. The analysis was based on published data, information from interviews with National Health Service (NHS) personnel and a structured questionnaire for blood donors. The annual cost of provision and transfusion of blood products increased by 256% in real terms, to pounds 898 million in 2000/2001, whereas the number of whole-blood donations increased by 2% to 2.8 million. The number of apheresis donations decreased by 52% to 70 000. Total blood product units issued to hospitals in 2000/2001 increased by 17% and were used in an estimated 1.7 million transfusions. The estimated NHS cost for an adult transfusion was pounds 635 for red blood cells, pounds 378 for fresh frozen plasma, pounds 347 for platelets and pounds 834 for cryoprecipitate. Blood donors incurred an annual direct cost of pounds 8.1 million and 3.1 million hours of used leisure time. There was also an indirect cost of pounds 7.2 million arising from lost productivity. The large increases since 1994/1995 reflect a real increase in expenditure by the blood transfusion services, partly due to the introduction of leucodepletion, greater hospital resource use due to more transfusions being undertaken and under-recording of hospital activity in 1994/1995. PMID:12880391

  11. Laryngospasm after autologous blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jung; Grecu, Loreta

    2006-07-01

    Although perioperative autologous blood transfusions are associated with few side effects, transfusion reactions can occur and can be life-threatening. We report the occurrence of postoperative laryngospasm in a patient who underwent spinal anesthesia for hip surgery. The laryngospasm could not be attributed to any cause other than the autologous blood transfusion and recurred when the transfusion was restarted. Laryngospasm was successfully treated both times with positive pressure ventilation. Autologous transfusions can trigger febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reactions, which may result in airway compromise.

  12. [History of blood transfusion].

    PubMed

    Izaguirre Avila, Raúl; de Micheli, Alfredo

    2002-01-01

    The idea of transfusing blood of an animal to another or from an animal to a man or from one to another man, is very ancient. When the doctrine of blood circulation was diffused, in the first third of the XVII century, this idea was give fresh impetus. On began also to inject some substance into the blood, wich will permit to introduce medicaments intravenously. It is worthy to be remembered that in the same year when the Harveyan monography De motu cordis et sanguinis in animalibus was published (1628), the Paduan professor Giovanni Colle suggested a procedure for blood transfusions. Later (1645) the Tuscan physician Francesco Folli showed another procedure, in the presence of the great duke of Toscana, Ferdinando II de Medici. On his side, the surgeon Giovanni Guglielmo Riva realized blood transfusions from animals to men in 1668. Transfusions were already carried out by Richard Lower in London and by Jean-Baptiste Denis in Paris. During the XVIII century, blood transfusions were not effectuated because of some failure occurred in the formed century and of the proscription by civil and religious authorities. Nevertheless these were renewed during the first third of the XIX century in England as well as in the continental Europe. In Mexico the first blood transfusion was effectuated in 1845 by the physician Matias D. Beistegui. At the time persisted the problem of blood coagulation, which could be resolved during the XX century in North America (Crile, 1906) as well as in Latin America (Luis Agote, 1914). Moreover the blood groups were described in 1900 by the Austrian physician Karl Landsteiner, who identified later the Rh factor. It seems completely justified the inscription shining on the façade of the National Archive in Washington: "The past is only prologue".

  13. Platelet proteomics.

    PubMed

    Zufferey, Anne; Fontana, Pierre; Reny, Jean-Luc; Nolli, Severine; Sanchez, Jean-Charles

    2012-01-01

    Platelets are small cell fragments, produced by megakaryocytes, in the bone marrow. They play an important role in hemostasis and diverse thrombotic disorders. They are therefore primary targets of antithrombotic therapies. They are implicated in several pathophysiological pathways, such as inflammation or wound repair. In blood circulation, platelets are activated by several pathways including subendothelial matrix and thrombin, triggering the formation of the platelet plug. Studying their proteome is a powerful approach to understand their biology and function. However, particular attention must be paid to different experimental parameters, such as platelet quality and purity. Several technologies are involved during the platelet proteome processing, yielding information on protein identification, characterization, localization, and quantification. Recent technical improvements in proteomics combined with inter-disciplinary strategies, such as metabolomic, transcriptomics, and bioinformatics, will help to understand platelets biological mechanisms. Therefore, a comprehensive analysis of the platelet proteome under different environmental conditions may contribute to elucidate complex processes relevant to platelet function regarding bleeding disorders or platelet hyperreactivity and identify new targets for antiplatelet therapy.

  14. Analysis of immediate transfusion incidents reported in a regional blood bank

    PubMed Central

    de Sousa Neto, Adriana Lemos; Barbosa, Maria Helena

    2011-01-01

    Background Blood transfusion is imperative when treating certain patients; however, it is not risk free. In addition to the possible transmission of contagious infectious diseases, incidents can occur immediately after transfusion and at a later time. Aims This study aimed to examine the immediate transfusion incidents reported in a regional blood bank in the state of Minas Gerais between December 2006 and December 2009. A retrospective quantitative epidemiological study was conducted. Data were obtained from 202 transfusion incident reports of 42 health institutions served by the blood bank. Data processing and analysis were carried out using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software. Results The rate of immediate transfusion incidents reported in the period was 0.24%; febrile non-hemolytic reactions were the most common type of incident (56.4%). The most frequent clinical manifestations listed in transfusion incident reports were chills (26.9%) and fever (21.6%). There was a statistically significant association (p-value < 0.05) between the infusion of platelet concentrates and febrile non-hemolytic reactions and between fresh frozen plasma and febrile non-hemolytic reaction. The majority (73.3%) of transfused patients who suffered immediate transfusion incidents had already been transfused and 36.5% of the cases had previous transfusion incident reports. Conclusions Data from the present study corroborate the implementation of new professional training programs aimed at blood transfusion surveillance. These measures should emphasize prevention, identification and reporting of immediate transfusion incidents aiming to increase blood transfusion quality and safety. PMID:23049336

  15. Study of acute transfusion reactions in a teaching hospital of Sikkim: A hemovigilance initiative

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Dhruva Kumar; Datta, Supratim; Gupta, Amlan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Blood transfusions are inherently associated with risks ranging in severity from minor to life-threatening. Continuous monitoring of transfusion related complications can promote understanding of factors contributing to transfusion reactions and help to formulate necessary remedial measures. This study was designed to analyze the frequency and nature of transfusion reactions reported to the blood bank of a remote North East Indian teaching hospital. Materials and Methods: All acute transfusion reactions (ATRs) reported to the blood bank over a period of 20 months (May 2013 to January 2015) were reviewed and analyzed. The risk of transfusion reactions associated with each individual component was assessed. Results: A total of 3455 units of whole blood and component transfusions were carried out of which a total of 32 (0.92%) ATRs were encountered. Packed red blood cells (PRBCs) (n = 15, P = 0.06) and whole blood (WB) (n = 13, P = 0.83) were most commonly implicated. Allergic reaction was the most frequent transfusion reaction encountered (65.6%), seen most commonly with PRBC (risk of 0.76%, P = 0.42), and WB (risk of 0.68%, P = 0.63) transfusions. This was followed by febrile reactions (28.1%), which were seen more commonly with PRBCs (risk of 0.57%, P = 0.016). No reactions were observed with platelet transfusions. Conclusion: The overall incidence of transfusion reactions in this hospital is slightly higher than those having more advanced transfusion facilities in India. The lack of leukoreduction facilities in our hospital could be a likely cause for the same. The use of leukoreduced WB and PRBCs could possibly reduce the overall incidence of ATRs in general and febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reactions in particular. PMID:26285707

  16. Viability and functional integrity of washed platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Pineda, A.A.; Zylstra, V.W.; Clare, D.E.; Dewanjee, M.K.; Forstrom, L.A.

    1989-07-01

    The viability and functional integrity of saline- and ACD-saline-washed platelets were compared with those of unwashed platelets. After template bleeding time (TBT) was measured, 15 healthy volunteers underwent plateletpheresis and ingested 600 mg of aspirin. Autologous /sup 111/In-labeled platelets were transfused: unwashed (n = 5), washed with 0.9 percent saline solution (SS) (n = 5), and washed with a buffered 12.6 percent solution of ACD-A in 0.9 percent saline solution (n = 5). After transfusion, we measured TBT at 1, 4, and 24 hours; platelet survival at 10 minutes and 1, 4, and 24 hours and daily for 6 days; and the percentage of uptake in liver and spleen by quantitative whole-body radionuclide scintigraphy at 24 and 190 hours. We found that saline washing affected platelet recovery, 23.47 +/- 12 percent (p less than 0.001) as compared to 52.43 +/- 17 percent (p less than 0.002) for ACD-saline and 73.17 +/- 8 percent for control; that saline washing resulted in a greater liver uptake than control and ACD-saline-washed platelets (31.9 +/- 8% (p less than 0.001) vs 17.7 +/- 4.1 and 19.3 +/- 2.1% (p greater than 0.1), respectively); that, unlike control and ACD-saline-washed platelets, saline-washed platelets did not shorten bleeding time; and that neither type of washing affected survival. Although ACD-saline washing affects recovery, it also results in intact function, normal survival, higher recovery than SS platelets, and no significant liver uptake.

  17. Transfusion interventions in critical bleeding requiring massive transfusion: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    McQuilten, Zoe K; Crighton, Gemma; Engelbrecht, Sunelle; Gotmaker, Robert; Brunskill, Susan J; Murphy, Michael F; Wood, Erica M

    2015-04-01

    Critical bleeding (CB) requiring massive transfusion (MT) can occur in a variety of clinical contexts and is associated with substantial mortality and morbidity. In 2011, the Australian National Blood Authority (NBA) published patient blood management guidelines for CB and MT, which found limited high-quality evidence from which only 2 recommendations could be made. The aim of this systematic review (SR) was to update these guidelines and identify evidence gaps still to be addressed. A comprehensive search was performed for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and SRs using MeSH index and free text terms in MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library (Issue 11, 2012), EMBASE, CINHAL, PUBMED, and the Transfusion Evidence Library up to July 15, 2014. The evidence was grouped according to 4 questions based on the original guideline relating to transfusion interventions: (1) effect of dose, timing, and ratio of red blood cells (RBCs) to component therapy on patient outcomes; (2) effect of RBC transfusion on patient outcomes; (3) effect of fresh frozen plasma, platelet, cryoprecipitate, fibrinogen concentrate, and prothrombin complex concentrate on patient outcomes; and (4) effect of recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) on patient outcomes. From this search, 19 studies were identified: 6 RCTs and 13 SRs. Two of the RCTs were pilot/feasibility studies, 3 were investigating rFVIIa, and 1 compared restrictive versus liberal RBC transfusion in upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Overall, limited new evidence was identified and substantial evidence gaps remain, particularly with regard to the effect of component therapies, including ratio of RBC to component therapies, on patient outcomes. Clinical trials to address these questions are required. PMID:25716645

  18. Transfusion interventions in critical bleeding requiring massive transfusion: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    McQuilten, Zoe K; Crighton, Gemma; Engelbrecht, Sunelle; Gotmaker, Robert; Brunskill, Susan J; Murphy, Michael F; Wood, Erica M

    2015-04-01

    Critical bleeding (CB) requiring massive transfusion (MT) can occur in a variety of clinical contexts and is associated with substantial mortality and morbidity. In 2011, the Australian National Blood Authority (NBA) published patient blood management guidelines for CB and MT, which found limited high-quality evidence from which only 2 recommendations could be made. The aim of this systematic review (SR) was to update these guidelines and identify evidence gaps still to be addressed. A comprehensive search was performed for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and SRs using MeSH index and free text terms in MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library (Issue 11, 2012), EMBASE, CINHAL, PUBMED, and the Transfusion Evidence Library up to July 15, 2014. The evidence was grouped according to 4 questions based on the original guideline relating to transfusion interventions: (1) effect of dose, timing, and ratio of red blood cells (RBCs) to component therapy on patient outcomes; (2) effect of RBC transfusion on patient outcomes; (3) effect of fresh frozen plasma, platelet, cryoprecipitate, fibrinogen concentrate, and prothrombin complex concentrate on patient outcomes; and (4) effect of recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) on patient outcomes. From this search, 19 studies were identified: 6 RCTs and 13 SRs. Two of the RCTs were pilot/feasibility studies, 3 were investigating rFVIIa, and 1 compared restrictive versus liberal RBC transfusion in upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Overall, limited new evidence was identified and substantial evidence gaps remain, particularly with regard to the effect of component therapies, including ratio of RBC to component therapies, on patient outcomes. Clinical trials to address these questions are required.

  19. Logistics of massive transfusions.

    PubMed

    DeLoughery, Thomas G

    2010-01-01

    Care of the patient with massive bleeding involves more than aggressive surgery and infusion of large amounts of blood products. The proper management of massive transfusions-whether they are in trauma patients or other bleeding patients-requires coordination of the personnel in the surgical suite or the emergency department, the blood bank, and laboratory.

  20. Decitabine reduces transfusion dependence in older patients with acute myeloid leukemia: results from a post hoc analysis of a randomized phase III study.

    PubMed

    He, Jianming; Xiu, Liang; De Porre, Peter; Dass, Ramesh; Thomas, Xavier

    2015-04-01

    This post hoc analysis of the DACO-016 phase III study evaluates the impact of decitabine on transfusion dependence and survival in 485 elderly patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Red blood cell (RBC) and platelet (PLT) transfusion independence, defined as no transfusions for ≥ 8 consecutive weeks, was measured in both decitabine (n = 242) and treatment choice (TC, n = 243) arms. More RBC transfusion dependent patients at baseline became transfusion independent with decitabine than with TC (26% vs. 13%; p = 0.0026). Similar results were obtained for patients who were PLT transfusion dependent at baseline (31% vs. 13%; p = 0.0069). When excluding patients who attained complete remission (CR), survival was improved in patients who achieved RBC or PLT transfusion independence, suggesting that reaching CR is not a prerequisite for deriving benefit from treatment with decitabine. In addition, patients who achieved transfusion independence with decitabine had increased treatment continuation, even in the absence of CR.

  1. Morganella morganii causing fatal sepsis in a platelet recipient and also isolated from a donor's stool.

    PubMed

    Golubić-Cepulić, B; Budimir, A; Plecko, V; Plenković, F; Mrsić, M; Sarlija, D; Vuk, T; Skrlin, J; Kalenić, S; Labar, B

    2004-06-01

    Bacterial contamination of blood products causes significant patient morbidity and mortality. Contaminated platelet transfusion is a frequent cause of bacteraemia and sepsis because of the storage conditions of platelets. A fatal case of Morganella morganii platelet transfusion associated with sepsis is described, along with procedures traced back to the isolation of M. morganii from a donor's stool. Molecular typing was performed, and the same M. morganii strain was found in blood and post-mortem organ cultures of platelet recipient and platelet bag and in the donor's stool. The route of contamination is unknown. The contamination could be due to either insufficient venipuncture site disinfection or the donor's transient bacteraemia. Patient died 5 days after the transfusion.

  2. [Antibodies, human leukocyte antigens, and biomodulators in transfusion-related acute adverse effects].

    PubMed

    Martínez Álvarez, Julio César

    2013-01-01

    With the onset of the AIDS epidemic, major changes occurred in blood banking and transfusion medicine. These changes occurred mainly in donor selection and screening tests for infectious diseases, blood centers modified their organizational philosophy regarding quality. Transfusion of blood products are procedures that allow us to correct the haematology deficiencies for which was indicated. But today, despite the strict controls that precede transfusion,recipients may have undesirable effects, which are known as adverse effects or adverse reactions to transfusion. Antibodies and antigens of the HLA system plays a role in a series of events related to transfusion, such as immunological platelet refractoriness, febrile non-haemolytic transfusion reactions, transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) and transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease. The determination of anti-HLA antibodies is evidence that in most developed countries is used on a daily basis in the regular assessment of patients multitransfused or waiting lists for organs from deceased donors. The biomodulators are able to modify biological responses which act in sequence to lead to the differentiation of T lymphocytes. These agents may subcategorizes those which facilitate a normal immune response, those stimulates the immune response, those are capable of inducing immunosuppression not cytotoxic, and those enhancing the ability of the host to tolerate damage by cytotoxic treatment (transfusion or transplant).

  3. Platelet generation in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Biao; Zheng, Jiansheng

    2016-01-01

    Platelet (PLT) transfusion, which is the primary cell therapy for thrombocytopenia, has been a source of concern in recent years due to its limitations of donor-dependent supply and soaring costs. In vitro platelet generation on an industrial scale is a possible solution requiring exploration. The technology of platelet generation ex vivo has been widely studied across the world, though the mechanisms of physiological thrombopoiesis and platelet biology function in vivo still remain elusive today. Various culture systems have been studied, most of which proved quite inefficient in generating functional platelets ex vivo, so there is still a long way to reach our ultimate goal of generating a fully functional platelet in vitro on an industrial scale. This review integrates the latest research into physiological platelet biogenesis and ex vivo-platelet/megakaryocyte (MK) generation protocols with a focus on the ability to generate PLT/MK in large quantities, summarizes current culture systems based on induced human pluripotent stem cells and adipose-derived stem cells, and discusses significant challenges that must be overcome for these approaches to be perfected. PMID:27390629

  4. [Correlation of hemogram changes during pregnancy of healthy women with postpartum blood transfusion].

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Chen, Lin-Feng; Wang, Shu-Ying; Wang, Yan; Shi, Hong-Mei; Wang, De-Qing

    2012-10-01

    This study was aimed to explore the correlation of hemogram changes during pregnancy of healthy women with postpartum blood transfusion. The outpatient and inpatient information of expectant lying-in women in our hospitals was collected, the route blood test, lever and kidney function and blood coagulation function tests were performed from the 4th to the 10th month of pregnancy. The pregnant women without underlying diseases and non-elderly pregnant women with single fetus were selected as the subjects of study. They were divided into postpartum blood transfusion group and non-blood transfusion group. The white blood cell (WBC) count, hemoglobin (Hb) level, platelet (Plt) count, plateletocrit (PCT), mean platelet volume (MPV), platelet distribution width (PDW) were compared in 2 groups. The results showed that 68 cases out of 450 expectant lying-in women received blood transfusion, among them 30 cases with complete data of puerperal transfusion were taken as blood transfusion group, the 28 cases of non transfusion puerperal as control group. There was no significant difference of hemogram changes between the two groups. However, there was a slight decline in Plt count and Hb level of late pregnant women. What is more, there was no correlation between Plt count change and the PCT, MPV and PDW. It is concluded that the changes of hemogram during pregnancy has no correlation with postpartum hemorrhage and blood transfusion in healthy pregnant women, the Plt count and Hb level of pregnant women slightly decline. Nevertheless, PCT, MPV and PDW are within the normal range.

  5. Platelet Count

    MedlinePlus

    ... rash Small purplish spots on the skin called purpura, caused by bleeding under the skin Testing may ... Idiopathic thrombocytopenia (ITP), also known as immune thrombocytopenic purpura, is the result of antibody production against platelets. ...

  6. Human platelet antigen genotyping of platelet donors in southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Merzoni, J; Fagundes, I S; Lunardi, L W; Lindenau, J D-R; Gil, B C; Jobim, M; Dias, V G; Merzoni, L; Sekine, L; Onsten, T G H; Jobim, L F

    2015-10-01

    Human platelet antigens (HPA) are immunogenic structures that result from single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) leading to single amino acid substitutions. This study sought to determine the allele and genotype frequencies of HPA-1, HPA-2, HPA-3, HPA-4, HPA-5 and HPA-15 in platelet donors from the state of Rio Grande do Sul (RS), Brazil, and compare their allele frequencies to those observed in other populations. HPA genotyping was performed by PCR-SSP method. The study sample comprised 201 platelet donors (167 Caucasians and 34 non-Caucasians). Allele 'a' was that most commonly found for HPA-1 to 5 in both groups. The HPA-15ab genotype predominated over homozygous genotypes of this system. Fisher's exact test revealed statistically significant differences for the HPA-5 system, with a greater prevalence of the HPA-5b allele in non-Caucasians. The neighbour-joining method and principal components analysis revealed genetic proximity between our Caucasian group and European populations. We conclude that the allele frequencies of HPA-1 to 5 and HPA-15 found in our Caucasian sample are similar to those reported for European populations. These findings corroborate the ethnic makeup of the population of RS. The higher frequency of the HPA-5b allele found in the non-Caucasian group of our sample suggests the possibility of allosensitization in patients who receive platelet transfusions from genetically incompatible donors.

  7. [Ethical issues in transfusion medicine].

    PubMed

    Tissot, J-D; Danic, B; Cabaud, J-J; Garraud, O

    2016-09-01

    Ethics is on the cross road of off values that are present along the ways of transfusion medicine. This is an important tool to afford opinions as well as debates that always emerge when discussing transfusion medicine. The wording is particularly important; this was one among several others that characterized the soul of Jean-Jacques Lefrère when he opened the doors of the ethical issues of transfusion medicine. PMID:27443188

  8. Assessment of Impact of Training in Improving Knowledge of Blood Transfusion among Clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Paramjit; Kaur, Gagandeep; Kaur, Ravneet; Sood, Tanvi

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Blood is a precious resource that needs to be prescribed, handled, stored and transfused as per guidelines to ensure recipient safety. The present study aims to assess the basic knowledge of clinicians pertaining to safe transfusion practice, impart relevant training, and assess the impact of such training programs. Methods A total of 25 fresh bachelor of medicine and bachelor of surgery graduates were enrolled for the study. The participants were given a pre-assessment questionnaire related to the entire transfusion chain followed by interactive training of the participants and post-training re-assessment. Results The mean score in the pre-training assessment was 51% while in the post-training assessment the mean score was 85.4%; the difference was statistically significant. There were significant differences in knowledge pertaining to storage temperature, shelf life of red cells and platelets, alternate group choice for fresh frozen plasma, and documentation of transfusion reaction. The participants had inadequate knowledge pertaining to cross-match procedure and management of transfusion reactions. Conclusion The study assessed the knowledge and awareness of clinicians regarding blood transfusion practice. Mandatory training and inclusion of transfusion medicine as a subject at undergraduate level can help in improving transfusion practice and ensuring recipient safety. PMID:25053936

  9. Congenital platelet function defects

    MedlinePlus

    Platelet storage pool disorder; Glanzmann's thrombasthenia; Bernard-Soulier syndrome; Platelet function defects - congenital ... disorder may also cause severe bleeding. Platelet storage pool disorder (also called platelet secretion disorder) occurs when ...

  10. Transfusion Management and Immunohematologic Complications in Liver Transplantation: Experience of a Single Institution

    PubMed Central

    Solves, Pilar; Carpio, Nelly; Moscardo, Federico; Lancharro, Aima; Cano, Isabel; Moya, Angel; López-Andujar, Rafael; Sanz, Miguel Ángel

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective Liver transplantation (LT) has traditionally been associated with major blood loss and consequently high blood transfusion requirements. Our objective was to analyze transfusion management and incidence of immunohematologic complications in patients undergoing LT at our institution. Methods A retrospective analysis of immunohematologic events and transfusion outcomes was carried out at La Fe University Hospital in Valencia. Data from 654 patients were reviewed: 654 underwent only one LT while 36 underwent second LT. Results Patients received a median of 3 red blood cell (RBC) concentrates, 2 platelets concentrates (PCs) and 2 fresh frozen plasma units (FFPs). Variables significantly influencing RBC transfusions were: the MELD score, hemoglobin levels, and the platelet counts before LT. 27 patients (4.1%) had a positive antibody screening before transplant. Immunohematologic events occurred in 8% of the patients, mostly in the first month after LT, and involved hemolysis in 13 cases. Mortality was significantly higher in patients developing immunohematologic disorders (42.8 vs. 18.3%; p < 0.001). In the multivariable analysis, only ABO minor incompatibility between donor and recipient significantly increased the appearance of immunohematologic incidences (OR 4.92, 95% CI 2.31–10.50; p < 0.001). Conclusion Transfusion management of patients that underwent LT can be complicated by immunohematologic problems. Blood banks should implement the DAT test in each transfusion to detect them. PMID:25960710

  11. Optimization of platelet concentrate quality: application of proteomic technologies to donor management.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Peter; Culibrk, Brankica; Karwal, Simrath; Slichter, Sherrill J; Devine, Dana V

    2012-12-01

    Quality management of blood products is essential for blood banking. It is influenced by both processing and donor characteristics and assured by monitoring routine in vitro parameters to defined product specifications. However, these measures correlate poorly with the in vivo behavior of transfused platelets and cannot be used to select optimal donors. Since radiolabeled platelet recovery and survival studies are expensive and time consuming, there is an ongoing search for simpler measures that predict platelet transfusion outcomes. We performed a pilot study using semi-qualitative proteomics to assess changes in the platelet protein profile of donors with either acceptable or unacceptable in vivo radiolabeled autologous platelet recovery and survival measurements. Proteins changing during a 9-day storage period included cytoskeletal elements talin, vinculin and moesin as well as signal transduction proteins 14-3-3, RhoGDI and Rap1. Two of nine donations exhibited a decrease in these proteins and poor in vivo platelet recovery and survival whereas the remaining donors showed acceptable platelet recovery and survival and expected protein profiles. Analyses revealed a significant correlation between protein levels of Rap1 and RhoGDI during storage and platelet recovery and survival. This study provides for the first time preliminary data showing evidence of the utility of protein profiling to predict platelet transfusion quality. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Integrated omics.

  12. Transfusion service disaster planning.

    PubMed

    Bundy, K L; Foss, M L; Stubbs, J R

    2008-01-01

    The Mayo Clinic, in Rochester, Minnesota, recently set forth a directive to develop a Mayo Emergency Incident Command System (MEICS) plan to respond to major disasters. The MEICS plan that was developed interfaces with national response plans to ensure effective communication and coordination between our institution and local, state, and federal agencies to establish a common language and communication structure. The MEICS plan addresses multiple aspects of dealing with resource needs during a crisis, including the need for blood and transfusion medicine services. The MEICS plan was developed to supplement our current local emergency preparedness procedures and provide a mechanism for responding to the escalating severity of an emergency to deal with situations of a magnitude that is outside the normal experience. A plan was developed to interface the existing Transfusion Medicine disaster plan standard operating procedures (SOP) with the institutional and Department of Laboratory Medicine (DLMP) MEICS plans. The first step in developing this interface was defining MEICS. Other major steps were defining the chain of command, developing a method for visually indicating who is "in charge," planning communication, defining the actions to be taken, assessing resource needs, developing flowcharts and updating SOPs, and developing a blood rationing team to deal with anticipated blood shortages. Several key features of the interface and updated disaster plan that were developed are calling trees for response personnel, plans for relocating leadership to alternative command centers, and action sheets to assist with resource assessment. The action sheets also provide documentation of key actions by response personnel.

  13. Platelet antibody detection by flow cytometry: an effective method to evaluate and give transfusional support in platelet refractoriness

    PubMed Central

    Bub, Carolina Bonet; Martinelli, Beatriz Moraes; Avelino, Thayná Mendonça; Gonçalez, Ana Cláudia; Barjas-Castro, Maria de Lourdes; Castro, Vagner

    2013-01-01

    Background Immune platelet refractoriness is mainly caused by human leukocyte antigen antibodies (80-90% of cases) and, to a lesser extent, by human platelet antigen antibodies. Refractoriness can be diagnosed by laboratory tests and patients should receive compatible platelet transfusions. A fast, effective and low cost antibody-screening method which detects platelet human leukocyte/platelet antigen antibodies is essential in the management of immune platelet refractoriness. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of the flow cytometry platelet immunofluorescence test to screen for immune platelet refractoriness. Methods A group of prospective hematologic patients with clinically suspected platelet refractoriness treated in a referral center in Campinas, SP during July 2006 and July 2011 was enrolled in this study. Platelet antibodies were screened using the flow cytometry platelet immunofluorescence test. Anti-human leukocyte antigen antibodies were detected by commercially available methods. The sensitivity, specificity and predictive values of the immunofluorescence test were determined taking into account that the majority of antiplatelet antibodies presented human leukocyte antigen specificity. Results Seventy-six samples from 32 female and 38 male patients with a median age of 43.5 years (range: 5-84 years) were analyzed. The sensitivity of the test was 86.11% and specificity 75.00% with a positive predictive value of 75.61% and a negative predictive value of 85.71%. The accuracy of the method was 80.26%. Conclusion This study shows that the flow cytometry platelet immunofluorescence test has a high correlation with the anti-human leukocyte antigen antibodies. Despite a few limitations, the method seems to be efficient, fast and feasible as the initial screening for platelet antibody detection and a useful tool to crossmatch platelets for the transfusional support of patients with immune platelet refractoriness. PMID:24106442

  14. Polymorphisms in canine platelet glycoproteins identify potential platelet antigens.

    PubMed

    Callan, Mary Beth; Werner, Petra; Mason, Nicola J; Meny, Geralyn M; Raducha, Michael G; Henthorn, Paula S

    2013-08-01

    Human alloimmune thrombocytopenic conditions caused by exposure to a platelet-specific alloantigen include neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia, posttransfusion purpura, and platelet transfusion refractoriness. More than 30 platelet-specific alloantigens have been defined in the human platelet antigen (HPA) system; however, there is no previous information on canine platelet-specific alloantigens. Using the HPA system as a model, we evaluated the canine ITGB3, ITGA2B, and GP1BB genes encoding GPIIIa (β3), GPIIb (αIIb), and GPIbβ, respectively, which account for 21 of 27 HPA, to determine whether amino acid polymorphisms are present in the orthologous canine genes. A secondary objective was to perform a pilot study to assess possible association between specific alleles of these proteins and a diagnosis of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) in dogs. By using genomic DNA from dogs of various breeds with and without ITP, sequencing of PCR products encompassing all coding regions and exon-intron boundaries for these 3 genes revealed 4 single-nucleotide polymorphisms in ITGA2B resulting in amino acid polymorphisms in the canine genome, 3 previously reported and 1 newly identified (Gly[GGG]/Arg[AGG] at amino acid position 576 of ITGA2B. Of 16 possible ITGA2B protein alleles resulting from unique combinations of the 4 polymorphic amino acids, 5 different protein isoforms were present in homozygous dogs and explain all of the genotype combinations in heterozygous dogs. There was no amino acid polymorphism or protein isoform that was specific for a particular breed or for the diagnosis of ITP. PMID:24209971

  15. Proteasome proteolysis supports stimulated platelet function and thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nilaksh; Li, Wei; Willard, Belinda; Silverstein, Roy L.; McIntyre, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Proteasome inhibitors are in use to treat hematologic cancers, but also reduce thrombosis. Whether the proteasome participates in platelet activation or function is opaque since little is known of the proteasome in these terminally differentiated cells. Approach and Results Platelets displayed all three primary proteasome protease activities, which MG132 and bortezomib (Velcade®) inhibited. Proteasome substrates are marked by ubiquitin, and platelets contained a functional ubiquitination system that modified the proteome by mono- and poly-ubiquitination. Systemic MG132 strongly suppressed formation of occlusive, platelet-rich thrombi in FeCl3-damaged carotid arteries. Transfusion of platelets treated ex vivo with MG132 and washed prior to transfusion into thrombocytopenic mice also reduced carotid artery thrombosis. Proteasome inhibition reduced platelet aggregation by low thrombin concentrations and ristocetin-stimulated agglutination through the GPIb-IX-V complex. This receptor was not appropriately internalized after proteasome inhibition in stimulated platelets, and spreading and clot retraction after MG132 exposure also were decreased. The effects of proteasome inhibitors were not confined to a single receptor as MG132 suppressed thrombin-, ADP-, and LPS-stimulated microparticle shedding. Proteasome inhibition increased ubiquitin decoration of cytoplasmic proteins, including the cytoskeletal proteins Filamin A and Talin-1. Mass spectrometry revealed a single MG132-sensitive tryptic cleavage after R1745 in an extended Filamin A loop, which would separate its actin-binding domain from its carboxy terminal GPIbα binding domain. Conclusions Platelets contain a ubiquitin/proteasome system that marks cytoskeletal proteins for proteolytic modification to promote productive platelet-platelet and platelet-wall interactions. PMID:24177323

  16. [Modern coagulation management reduces the transfusion rate of allogenic blood products].

    PubMed

    Weber, Christian Friedrich

    2012-06-01

    Evaluating the patient's individual bleeding history with a standardized questionnaire, using "point-of-care" - methods for coagulation analyses and providing autologous transfusion techniques are preconditions of a modern coagulation management. Therapy of coagulopathic patients should be based on structured hemotherapy algorithms. Surgical haemostasis and the maintenance of the basic conditions for haemostasis are elementary requirements for an effective therapy. In cases of diffuse bleeding, early antifibrinolytic therapy should be considered. Coagulation factor deficiencies should be corrected "goal-directed" using coagulation factor concentrates. Transfusion of fresh frozen plasma is only indicated in the clinical setting of massive transfusions. DDAVP and transfusion of platelet concentrates are options to optimize primary haemostasis. In cases of on-going bleeding, recombinant activated coagulation factor VII represents an option for "ultima-ratio" therapy.

  17. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome associated with blood-product transfusions

    SciTech Connect

    Jett, J.R.; Kuritsky, J.N.; Katzmann, J.A.; Homburger, H.A.

    1983-11-01

    A 53-year-old white man had fever, malaise, and dyspnea on exertion. His chest roentgenogram was normal, but pulmonary function tests showed impaired diffusion capacity and a gallium scan showed marked uptake in the lungs. Results of an open-lung biopsy documented Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. Immunologic test results were consistent with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. The patient denied having homosexual contact or using intravenous drugs. Twenty-nine months before the diagnosis of pneumocystis pneumonia was made, the patient had had 16 transfusions of whole blood, platelets, and fresh-frozen plasma during coronary artery bypass surgery at another medical center. This patient is not a member of any currently recognized high-risk group and is believed to have contracted the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome from blood and blood-product transfusions.

  18. Effect of Mirasol pathogen reduction technology system on in vitro quality of MCS+ apheresis platelets.

    PubMed

    Mastroianni, Maria Adele; Llohn, Abid Hussain; Akkök, Çiğdem Akalın; Skogheim, Ruby; Ødegaard, Elna Rathe; Nybruket, Monica Jenssen; Flesland, Annika; Mousavi, Seyed Ali

    2013-10-01

    Reducing the risk of pathogen transmission to transfusion recipients is one of the great concerns in transfusion medicine. Important among the measures suggested to minimise pathogen transmission is pathogen reduction technology (PRT) systems. The present study examined the effects of Mirasol PRT system on MCS+ apheresis platelets in vitro quality measures during a seven-day storage period at 22°C. Statistical analysis indicated no significant difference in platelet concentrations between the control and treated platelet concentrates (PCs) during the storage period. Glucose and lactate levels were measured to determine metabolic activities of control and treated platelets. In both control and treated platelets, the amount of glucose consumed and lactate produced increased significantly with storage time, but glucose consumption and lactate production rates were significantly higher in treated platelets compared with control platelets. The mean pH of treated PCs was decreased at all time points relative to control PCs but remained within acceptable limits. The expression of P-selectin was also higher in Mirasol PRT treated platelets throughout the storage period, but differences were not statistically significant on Days 1 and 4. Finally, visual inspection of swirling indicated that Mirasol PRT treatment of platelets is associated with platelet shape change. Overall, our results show that MCS+ apheresis platelets treated with Mirasol PRT can preserve adequate in vitro properties for at least 5 days of storage.

  19. Omic approaches to quality biomarkers for stored platelets: are we there yet?

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Sandhya; Kannan, Meganathan; Atreya, Chintamani D

    2010-07-01

    At present, there is no single biomarker that serves as the "gold standard" predictive of the quality of stored platelets used for transfusion. Some of the measurable features of platelets such as morphology, biochemical status, physiologic response to osmotic stress and agonist-induced changes, and measurement of process-associated activation indicators of platelets are considered useful in assessing the in vitro quality of stored platelets. Such in vitro measurements combined with in vivo survival estimations using radiolabeled platelets in healthy volunteers provide reasonable estimates of in vivo platelet function after transfusion. Thus, the current practice of estimating the quality and functional aspects of ex vivo stored platelets involves utilization of a battery of tests that dates back to pre-omic era. On the other hand, during the last decade, seminal discoveries have been made in platelet molecular and cell biology by using "omic"-based approaches such as proteomics, genomics, and transcriptomics. Can we mobilize some of these discoveries toward developing reliable quality biomarkers for stored platelets? To address this topic, we briefly review current practices and provide insights into some of the omic approaches that could be helpful in identifying quality storage biomarkers of platelets in the near future. We also briefly discuss here some of the challenges in using proteomic approaches and advantages of using one of the transcriptomics approaches toward platelet biomarker development.

  20. [Ethics and blood transfusion].

    PubMed

    Tissot, J-D; Garraud, O; Danic, B; Cabaud, J-J; Lefrère, J-J

    2013-09-01

    Blood donation is an act of solidarity. Most often, this act is done on a volunteer basis and, depending on countries and circumstances, is not remunerated. The increase in need, the always-greater number of deferral criteria, the safety issues and the changes in the structures of our societies are among the many subjects for ethical debates. Taking these into account, the actors of the transfusion must analyze certain parameters: the value of a donation, the meaning of volunteering, the appropriateness of remunerating the act of giving a part of one's self, no longer as a donation or an expression of altruism and solidarity, but as a commercial act regimented by economic laws. PMID:23916572

  1. Substantial Improvements in Performance Indicators Achieved in a Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell Cryopreservation Quality Assurance Program Using Single Donor Samples▿

    PubMed Central

    Dyer, Wayne B.; Pett, Sarah L.; Sullivan, John S.; Emery, Sean; Cooper, David A.; Kelleher, Anthony D.; Lloyd, Andrew; Lewin, Sharon R.

    2007-01-01

    Storage of high-quality cryopreserved peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) is often a requirement for multicenter clinical trials and requires a reproducibly high standard of practice. A quality assurance program (QAP) was established to assess an Australia-wide network of laboratories in the provision of high-quality PBMC (determined by yield, viability, and function), using blood taken from single donors (human immunodeficiency virus [HIV] positive and HIV negative) and shipped to each site for preparation and cryopreservation of PBMC. The aim of the QAP was to provide laboratory accreditation for participation in clinical trials and cohort studies which require preparation and cryopreservation of PBMC and to assist all laboratories to prepare PBMC with a viability of >80% and yield of >50% following thawing. Many laboratories failed to reach this standard on the initial QAP round. Interventions to improve performance included telephone interviews with the staff at each laboratory, two annual wet workshops, and direct access to a senior scientist to discuss performance following each QAP round. Performance improved substantially in the majority of sites that initially failed the QAP (P = 0.002 and P = 0.001 for viability and yield, respectively). In a minority of laboratories, there was no improvement (n = 2), while a high standard was retained at the laboratories that commenced with adequate performance (n = 3). These findings demonstrate that simple interventions and monitoring of PBMC preparation and cryopreservation from multiple laboratories can significantly improve performance and contribute to maintenance of a network of laboratories accredited for quality PBMC fractionation and cryopreservation. PMID:17050740

  2. Early, Prehospital Activation of the Walking Blood Bank Based on Mechanism of Injury Improves Time to Fresh Whole Blood Transfusion.

    PubMed

    Bassett, Aaron K; Auten, Jonathan D; Zieber, Tara J; Lunceford, Nicole L

    2016-01-01

    Balanced component therapy (BCT) remains the mainstay in trauma resuscitation of the critically battle injured. In austere medical environments, access to packed red blood cells, apheresis platelets, and fresh frozen plasma is often limited. Transfusion of warm, fresh whole blood (FWB) has been used to augment limited access to full BCT in these settings. The main limitation of FWB is that it is not readily available for transfusion on casualty arrival. This small case series evaluates the impact early, mechanism-of-injury (MOI)-based, preactivation of the walking blood bank has on time to transfusion. We report an average time of 18 minutes to FWB transfusion from patient arrival. Early activation of the walking blood bank based on prehospital MOI may further reduce the time to FWB transfusion.

  3. Acquired dysfunction due to the circulation of "exhausted" platelets.

    PubMed

    Pareti, F I; Capitanio, A; Mannucci, L; Ponticelli, C; Mannucci, P M

    1980-08-01

    An acquired platelet functional defect was found to be present in eight patients who presented with various clinical conditions--three with renal allograft rejection, three with the hemolytic uremic syndrome or thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, one with acute consumption coagulopathy due to an incompatible transfusion and one with systemic lupus erythematosus. They showed defective platelet aggregation and reduced levels of adenine nucleotides and serotonin with abnormal uptake and storage of the amine. The bleeding time was more prolonged than predicted from the platelet count. These abnormalities were strikingly similar to those occurring in patients with congenital storage pool deficiency. The acquired defect is thought to be related to the presence in the circulation of "exhausted" platelets following their in vivo exposure to inducers of the release reaction such as damaged endothelium, thrombin and immune complexes. The bleeding tendency of the underlying diseases might be aggravated by the impairment of platelet function. PMID:7405945

  4. [Economic environment and blood transfusion].

    PubMed

    Durand-Zaleski, I

    2015-08-01

    The increasing pressure on healthcare resources affects blood donation and transfusion. We attempted a survey of the efficiency of different strategies, actual or proposed to improve the management of blood products. We found an important disconnect between the cost effectiveness ratio of strategies and their uptake by policy makers. In other words, the least efficient strategies are those which increase transfusion safety by increasing the number of biological markers and are those preferred by health authorities in developed countries. Other more efficient strategies are more slowly implemented and included a systematic use of transfusion guidelines, reducing blood losses or increasing pre operative blood levels in elective surgeries.

  5. Proteomics meets blood banking: identification of protein targets for the improvement of platelet quality.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Peter; Devine, Dana V

    2010-01-01

    Proteomics has brought new perspectives to the fields of hematology and transfusion medicine in the last decade. The steady improvement of proteomic technology is propelling novel discoveries of molecular mechanisms by studying protein expression, post-translational modifications and protein interactions. This review article focuses on the application of proteomics to the identification of molecular mechanisms leading to the deterioration of blood platelets during storage - a critical aspect in the provision of platelet transfusion products. Several proteomic approaches have been employed to analyse changes in the platelet protein profile during storage and the obtained data now need to be translated into platelet biochemistry in order to connect the results to platelet function. Targeted biochemical applications then allow the identification of points for intervention in signal transduction pathways. Once validated and placed in a transfusion context, these data will provide further understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms leading to platelet storage lesion. Future aspects of proteomics in blood banking will aim to make use of protein markers identified for platelet storage lesion development to monitor proteome changes when alterations such as the use of additive solutions or pathogen reduction strategies are put in place in order to improve platelet quality for patients.

  6. Blood transfusion practices in cardiac anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Mangu, Hanumantha Rao; Samantaray, Aloka; Anakapalli, Muralidhar

    2014-01-01

    The primary reasons for blood transfusion in cardiac surgery are to correct anaemia and to improve tissue oxygen delivery. However, there is a considerable debate regarding the actual transfusion trigger at which the benefits of transfusion overweight the risk. The association between extreme haemodilution, transfusion and adverse outcome after cardio pulmonary bypass (CPB) is not clear and the current available literature is not sufficient to provide a strong recommendation regarding the safe haematocrit range during CPB. There is no quality evidence to support use of fresh red blood cell except during massive transfusion or exchange transfusion in neonate. Overall concern regarding the safety of allogeneic blood transfusion resulted in the search for autologous blood transfusion and perioperative blood salvage. The aim of this review is to provide cardiac surgery specific clinically useful guidelines pertaining to transfusion triggers, optimal haemodilution during CPB, autologous blood transfusion and role of perioperative blood salvage based on available evidence. PMID:25535425

  7. [Control of the bacterial risk of transfusion in France in 2013].

    PubMed

    Morel, P; Deschaseaux, M; Bertrand, X; Naegelen, C; Leconte des Floris, M-F; Bardiaux, L

    2013-05-01

    Bacterial contamination of blood products (BP) remains the most important infectious risks of blood transfusion in 2013. Platelet concentrates (PC) are the blood products the most at risk, whether CPA or MCPS. In France, the residual risk has been steadily declining since 1994. For the platelets, the frequency of transfusion reaction due to bacterial contamination (TRBC) is now about at one per 50,000 CP distributed. The number of deaths has remained stable since 1994 with one death per year (300,000 distributed CP). The progressive decrease in the number of cases of TRBCs is the result of steady improvement of practices and prevention methods at all stages from collection to the transfusion of BP. But if all these improvements have significantly reduced the incidence of TRBCs, mortality is not changed with the CP and the reduction of this risk is a priority for the French Blood Establishment (EFS). Detection methods of CP contaminated or pathogen inactivation are two approaches available and can provide a significant reduction (for the former) or deletion (for seconds) of the risk of transfused contaminated CP. Currently, the choice is in favor of the detection of bacteria. New detection "rapid tests" methods were added to the panel of candidates and are being evaluated. Inactivation of pathogens remains the safest prospect of eliminating this adverse effect of transfusion. Implementation of one method for bacterial detection is probably a transitional measure. PMID:23622838

  8. Blood transfusions and Jehovah's Witnesses.

    PubMed

    Thompson, H A

    1989-04-01

    Jehovah's Witnesses believe that a human must not sustain his life with another creature's blood, and they recognize no distinction "between taking blood into the mouth and taking it into the blood vessels." It is their deep-seated religious conviction that Jehovah will turn his back on anyone who receives blood transfusions (1). Thus, Jehovah's Witnesses regularly refuse transfusions for themselves and their children because they believe the procedure creates a risk of losing eternal salvation. Legally, such refusals are based on the constitutional grounds that the transfusion is an invasion of the right of privacy and a violation of the individual's freedom of religious practice. When courts review these refusals they focus on state interests that outweigh the individual's rights. With an eye toward providing guidance to Texas physicians in dealing with such refusals, this article reviews case law on the subject of blood transfusions and Jehovah's Witnesses. PMID:2727941

  9. L-carnitine effectively improves the metabolism and quality of platelet concentrates during storage.

    PubMed

    Deyhim, Mohammad Reza; Mesbah-Namin, Seyed Alireza; Yari, Fatemeh; Taghikhani, Mohammad; Amirizadeh, Naser

    2015-04-01

    Human platelets undergo structural and biochemical alternations during storage which are collectively called platelet storage lesion (PSL). PSL is characterized as metabolic and functionally changes. It causes decrease in platelet recovery and survival. Here, we evaluated the effect of L-carnitine (LC) on the metabolism, function, and mitochondrial metabolic activity of platelet during storage. Platelet-rich plasma was used to prepare platelet concentrate (PC) in Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization. For this purpose, ten PC bags from healthy donors were stored at 22 °C with gentle agitation in the presence or absence of LC. The effects of LC (15 mM) on the platelet quality were assessed by analyzing the levels of glucose, lactate, ATP, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity. Platelet aggregations induced by arachidonate and ristocetin were analyzed by aggregometer. Platelet mitochondrial melablolic activity was measured by tetrazolium salt 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay; platelet count and mean platelet volume were also determined by a hematology analyzer during 5 days of PC storage. The results indicated that LC could significantly decrease lactate concentration and glucose consumption accompanied with the increased oxygen consumption in stored PC. LDH activity also less significantly increased in LC-treated PC on days 2 and 5 of storage. Platelet aggregation in response to the ristocetin and arachidonate was significantly higher in LC-treated PC than that in untreated PC on day 5 of storage. Finally, platelet mitochondrial metabolic activity less significantly decreased in LC-treated PC compared to the control group on days 2 and 5 of storage. It seems that LC would be a good additive to reduce PSL and improve the platelet metabolism and quality of the stored PC for platelet transfusion therapy.

  10. Advances in alloimmune thrombocytopenia: perspectives on current concepts of human platelet antigens, antibody detection strategies, and genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Tomoya; Hirayama, Fumiya

    2015-01-01

    Alloimmunisation to platelets leads to the production of antibodies against platelet antigens and consequently to thrombocytopenia. Numerous molecules located on the platelet surface are antigenic and induce immune-mediated platelet destruction with symptoms that can be serious. Human platelet antigens (HPA) cause thrombocytopenias, such as neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia, post-transfusion purpura, and platelet transfusion refractoriness. Thirty-four HPA are classified into 28 systems. Assays to identify HPA and anti-HPA antibodies are critically important for preventing and treating thrombocytopenia caused by anti-HPA antibodies. Significant progress in furthering our understanding of HPA has been made in the last decade: new HPA have been discovered, antibody-detection methods have improved, and new genotyping methods have been developed. We review these advances and discuss issues that remain to be resolved as well as future prospects for preventing and treating immune thrombocytopenia. PMID:26057488

  11. Benchmarking: applications to transfusion medicine.

    PubMed

    Apelseth, Torunn Oveland; Molnar, Laura; Arnold, Emmy; Heddle, Nancy M

    2012-10-01

    Benchmarking is as a structured continuous collaborative process in which comparisons for selected indicators are used to identify factors that, when implemented, will improve transfusion practices. This study aimed to identify transfusion medicine studies reporting on benchmarking, summarize the benchmarking approaches used, and identify important considerations to move the concept of benchmarking forward in the field of transfusion medicine. A systematic review of published literature was performed to identify transfusion medicine-related studies that compared at least 2 separate institutions or regions with the intention of benchmarking focusing on 4 areas: blood utilization, safety, operational aspects, and blood donation. Forty-five studies were included: blood utilization (n = 35), safety (n = 5), operational aspects of transfusion medicine (n = 5), and blood donation (n = 0). Based on predefined criteria, 7 publications were classified as benchmarking, 2 as trending, and 36 as single-event studies. Three models of benchmarking are described: (1) a regional benchmarking program that collects and links relevant data from existing electronic sources, (2) a sentinel site model where data from a limited number of sites are collected, and (3) an institutional-initiated model where a site identifies indicators of interest and approaches other institutions. Benchmarking approaches are needed in the field of transfusion medicine. Major challenges include defining best practices and developing cost-effective methods of data collection. For those interested in initiating a benchmarking program, the sentinel site model may be most effective and sustainable as a starting point, although the regional model would be the ideal goal.

  12. Greater Volume of Acute Normovolemic Hemodilution May Aid in Reducing Blood Transfusions After Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Joshua; Paugh, Paugh; Dickinson, Timothy A.; Fuller, John; Paone, Gaetano; Theurer, Patty F.; Shann, Kenneth G.; Sundt, Thoralf M.; Prager, Richard L.; Likosky, Donald S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Perioperative red blood cell transfusions (RBC) are associated with increased morbidity and mortality after cardiac surgery. Acute normovolemic hemodilution (ANH) is recommended to reduce perioperative transfusions; however, supporting data are limited and conflicting. We describe the relationship between ANH and RBC transfusions after cardiac surgery using a multi-center registry. Methods We analyzed 13,534 patients undergoing cardiac surgery between 2010 and 2014 at any of the 26 hospitals participating in a prospective cardiovascular perfusion database. The volume of ANH (no ANH, <400mL, 400–799mL, ≥800mL) was recorded and linked to each center’s surgical data. We report adjusted relative risks reflecting the association between the use and amount of ANH and the risk of perioperative RBC transfusion. Results were adjusted for preoperative risk factors, procedure, BSA, preoperative HCT, and center. Results ANH was used in 17% of the patients. ANH was associated with a reduction in RBC transfusions (RRadj 0.74, p <0.001). Patients having ≥800mL of ANH had the most profound reduction in RBC transfusions (RRadj 0.57, p<0.001). Platelet and plasma transfusions were also significantly lower with ANH. The ANH population had superior postoperative morbidity and mortality compared to the no ANH population. Conclusions There is a significant association between ANH and reduced perioperative RBC transfusion in cardiac surgery. Transfusion reduction is most profound with larger volumes of ANH. Our findings suggest the volume of ANH, rather than just its use, may be an important feature of a center’s blood conservation strategy. PMID:26206721

  13. Development of blood transfusion product pathogen reduction treatments: a review of methods, current applications and demands.

    PubMed

    Salunkhe, Vishal; van der Meer, Pieter F; de Korte, Dirk; Seghatchian, Jerard; Gutiérrez, Laura

    2015-02-01

    Transfusion-transmitted infections (TTI) have been greatly reduced in numbers due to the strict donor selection and screening procedures, i.e. the availability of technologies to test donors for endemic infections, and routine vigilance of regulatory authorities in every step of the blood supply chain (collection, processing and storage). However, safety improvement is still a matter of concern because infection zero-risk in transfusion medicine is non-existent. Alternatives are required to assure the safety of the transfusion product and to provide a substitution to systematic blood screening tests, especially in less-developed countries or at the war-field. Furthermore, the increasing mobility of the population due to traveling poses a new challenge in the endemic screening tests routinely used, because non-endemic pathogens might emerge in a specific population. Pathogen reduction treatments sum a plethora of active approaches to eliminate or reduce potential threatening pathogen load from blood transfusion products. Despite the success of pathogen reduction treatments applied to plasma products, there is still a long way to develop and deploy pathogen reduction treatments to cellular transfusion products (such as platelets, RBCs or even to whole blood) and there is divergence on its acceptance worldwide. While the use of pathogen reduction treatments in platelets is performed routinely in a fair number of European blood banks, most of these treatments are not (or just) licensed in the USA or elsewhere in the world. The development of pathogen reduction treatments for RBC and whole blood is still in its infancy and under clinical trials. In this review, we discuss the available and emerging pathogen reduction treatments and their advantages and disadvantages. Furthermore, we highlight the importance of characterizing standard transfusion products with current and emerging approaches (OMICS) and clinical outcome, and integrating this information on a database

  14. Development of blood transfusion product pathogen reduction treatments: a review of methods, current applications and demands.

    PubMed

    Salunkhe, Vishal; van der Meer, Pieter F; de Korte, Dirk; Seghatchian, Jerard; Gutiérrez, Laura

    2015-02-01

    Transfusion-transmitted infections (TTI) have been greatly reduced in numbers due to the strict donor selection and screening procedures, i.e. the availability of technologies to test donors for endemic infections, and routine vigilance of regulatory authorities in every step of the blood supply chain (collection, processing and storage). However, safety improvement is still a matter of concern because infection zero-risk in transfusion medicine is non-existent. Alternatives are required to assure the safety of the transfusion product and to provide a substitution to systematic blood screening tests, especially in less-developed countries or at the war-field. Furthermore, the increasing mobility of the population due to traveling poses a new challenge in the endemic screening tests routinely used, because non-endemic pathogens might emerge in a specific population. Pathogen reduction treatments sum a plethora of active approaches to eliminate or reduce potential threatening pathogen load from blood transfusion products. Despite the success of pathogen reduction treatments applied to plasma products, there is still a long way to develop and deploy pathogen reduction treatments to cellular transfusion products (such as platelets, RBCs or even to whole blood) and there is divergence on its acceptance worldwide. While the use of pathogen reduction treatments in platelets is performed routinely in a fair number of European blood banks, most of these treatments are not (or just) licensed in the USA or elsewhere in the world. The development of pathogen reduction treatments for RBC and whole blood is still in its infancy and under clinical trials. In this review, we discuss the available and emerging pathogen reduction treatments and their advantages and disadvantages. Furthermore, we highlight the importance of characterizing standard transfusion products with current and emerging approaches (OMICS) and clinical outcome, and integrating this information on a database

  15. Active Hemovigilance Significantly Improves Reporting of Acute Non-infectious Adverse Reactions to Blood Transfusion.

    PubMed

    Agnihotri, Naveen; Agnihotri, Ajju

    2016-09-01

    One of the key purposes of a hemovigilance program is to improve reporting of transfusion related adverse events and subsequent data-driven improvement in blood transfusion (BT) practices. We conducted a study over 3 years to assess the impact of healthcare worker training and an active feedback programme on reporting of adverse reactions to BTs. All hospitalized patients who required a BT were included in the study. Healthcare workers involved in BT to patients were sensitized and trained in adverse reaction reporting by conducting training sessions and meetings. All the transfused patients were 'actively' monitored for any acute adverse reaction by using a uniquely coded blood issue form. A total of 18,914 blood components transfused to 5785 different patients resulted in 61 adverse reaction episodes. This incidence of 0.32 % in our study was found to be significantly higher (p < 0.005) than that reported from the same region in the past. Red blood cell units were the most frequently transfused component and thus most commonly involved in an adverse reaction (42.6 %), however apheresis platelets had the highest chance of reaction per unit transfused (0.66 %). There was no mortality associated with the BT during the study period. An active surveillance program significantly improves reporting and management of adverse reactions to BTs. PMID:27429527

  16. Evidence and triggers for the transfusion of blood and blood products.

    PubMed

    Shah, A; Stanworth, S J; McKechnie, S

    2015-01-01

    Allogeneic red cell transfusion is a commonly used treatment to improve the oxygen carrying capacity of blood during the peri-operative period. Increasing arterial oxygen content by increasing haemoglobin does not necessarily increase tissue oxygen delivery or uptake. Although the evidence-base for red cell transfusion practice is incomplete, randomised studies across a range of clinical settings, including surgery, consistently support the restrictive use of red cells, with no evidence of benefit for maintaining patients at higher haemoglobin thresholds (liberal strategy). A recent meta-analysis of 7593 patients concluded that a restrictive transfusion strategy was associated with a reduced risk of healthcare-associated infections (pneumonia, mediastinitis, wound infection, sepsis) when compared with a liberal transfusion strategy. The degree to which the optimal haemoglobin concentration or transfusion trigger should be modified for patients with additional specific risk factors (e.g. ischaemic heart disease), remains less clear and requires further research. Although most clinical practice guidelines recommend restrictive use of red cells, and many blood transfusion services have seen marked falls in overall usage of red cells, the use of other blood components such as fresh frozen plasma, platelets, and cryoprecipitate has risen. In clinical practice, administration of fresh frozen plasma is usually guided by laboratory tests of coagulation, mainly prothrombin time, international normalised ratio and activated partial thromboplastin time, but the predictive value of these tests to predict bleeding is poor.

  17. Platelet microparticle: a sensitive physiological "fine tuning" balancing factor in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Goubran, Hadi Alphonse; Burnouf, Thierry; Stakiw, Julie; Seghatchian, Jerard

    2015-02-01

    Platelet microparticles (PMPs) have long been regarded as inert "platelet dusts". They have now taken a center stage on the clinical research scene of transfusion medicine, being actually seen as long-stretch hands of platelets that exert a physiological role beyond the initial site of activation. These 0.05 µm to 0.8 µm microvesicles, delimited by a phospholipidic bilayer, are released by platelet membranes following activation by agonists, complement activation, or high shear forces. They can also be generated as a result of platelets and megakaryocyte senescence or cytoskeletal abnormalities. PMPs may orchestrate a delicate hemostatic balance in health, and act as procoagulant vectors in diseases triggering thrombosis. Furthermore, through their potential cargo of growth factors, microRNA and various bioactive molecules, they may promote healing in health, but, on the other side of the coin, can act as pro-inflammatory carriers and may contribute to cancer growth as an actor of the platelet-cancer loop. Through their cellular interactions they also interplay with the immune system. Their capacity to be generated by shear forces and contact with surfaces during the processing of blood and blood components, which may trigger transfusion reactions, make them also an integral part of transfusion medicine. Given their documented association with pathological conditions, PMP may serve as biomarkers for disease status or as a possible new target for anti-platelet drugs to treat cancer or inflammation.

  18. The duty to warn about transfusion risks.

    PubMed

    Willett, D E

    1989-03-01

    Blood banks and transfusion services should anticipate that patients contracting transfusion-transmitted diseases will claim that these facilities have a duty to warn or notify patients of potential transfusion risks. Although physicians treating patients must secure informed consent by describing significant risks and possible alternatives, precedent does not support extending informed consent requirements to the hospital or blood bank. Nonetheless, efforts to find new sources of compensation may cause judges to develop new theories of liability. Blood bank and transfusion service medical directors, therefore, are advised to provide clinicians with information regarding current or emerging transfusion risks and alternatives such as autologous transfusion, urging communication to patients when informed consent is obtained.

  19. Detection of drug-dependent platelet antibodies by use of solid-phase red cell adherence techniques.

    PubMed

    Leach, M F; Cooper, L K; Aubuchon, J P

    1995-01-01

    Many drugs have been reported to cause drug-dependent thrombocytopenia, either by the immune complex or by hapten mechanisms. Testing for the presence of these platelet antibodies has not been considered feasible for transfusion services because their presence was thought to be rare, and their detection involved complex and costly methods. We have developed a new technique for detection of these antibodies that can be performed without the need for specialized and expensive instrumentation. A solid-phase red cell adherence assay was used to detect drug-dependent platelet antibodies active by either the immune complex or the hapten mechanism. Three cases were evaluated for the presence of drug-dependent platelet antibodies. Two patients presented with thrombocytopenia that could not be attributed to other causes. The third case was evaluated for the presence of drug-dependent antibodies after poor responses to platelet transfusions. In these three cases, discontinuation of the implicated drugs, i.e., porcine heparin, quinine sulfate, amoxicillin, Bactrim, and albuterol, was followed by a correction of thrombocytopenia or improved platelet transfusion response within 72 hours. This test methodology and protocol has proven very useful in avoiding transfusions with little likelihood of benefit, and in identifying drugs interfering with platelet recovery or survival. Further investigations with this technique may expand our knowledge of the capability of this technique and of the observed frequency of drug-related immunologic platelet destruction.

  20. A liposome based platelet substitute, the plateletsome, with hemostatic efficacy.

    PubMed

    Rybak, M E; Renzulli, L A

    1993-01-01

    The complexity of platelet mediated hemostasis has hindered development of a platelet substitute for transfusion therapy. In the current study, the hemostatic efficacy of a liposome based modality, the plateletsome, is demonstrated. A deoxycholate extract of a platelet membrane fraction, with a minimum of 15 proteins including GPIb, GPIIb-IIIa and GPIV/III, was incorporated into sphingomyelin: phosphatidylcholine: monosialylganglioside or egg phosphatide small unilamellar vesicles by reverse-phase/sonication and French press extrusion. These plateletsomes decreased bleeding by 67% in the tail bleeding time in rats made thrombocytopenic (platelets < 30,000/microliters) with external irradiation (7-9Gy) by Cesium source. Efficacy was also demonstrated in the thrombocytopathic, Fawn-Hooded rat, but to a lesser extent than in the thrombocytopenic animals. Direct plateletsome infusion to the tail wound was more effective than systemic administration for all effective preparations. On post-mortem examination, no pathologic thrombi were detected by gross and histopathologic examination of the lungs, livers, kidneys, or spleens of thrombocytopenic or normal animals after plateletsome infusion. No evidence of intravascular coagulation, monitored by levels of circulating fibrinogen and platelet counts, was observed when plateletsomes were administered intravenously to rabbits. No deleterious effect, either inhibition or hyperaggregability, on platelet aggregation studies in vitro was observed. While further refinements are clearly required, this study indicates that liposomes bearing specific platelet proteins may provide a basis for a clinically applicable platelet substitute. PMID:8318606

  1. Inherited platelet disorders.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo; Lippi, Giuseppe; Veneri, Dino; Targher, Giovanni; Zaffanello, Marco; Guidi, Gian Cesare

    2008-01-01

    Inherited platelet disorders are a rare, but probably underdiagnosed, cause of symptomatic bleeding. They are characterized by abnormalities of platelet number (inherited thrombocytopenias), function (inherited disorders of platelet function) or both. This review briefly discusses the inherited platelet disorders with respect to molecular defects, diagnostic evaluation and treatment strategies.

  2. Digoxin elimination by exchange transfusion.

    PubMed

    Rosegger, H; Zach, M; Gleispach, H; Beitzke, A

    1977-02-21

    The report covers four cases presenting simultaneous indications for digitalisation and exchange transfusions. Intravenous administration of digoxin was followed: 1. by monitoring of the behaviour of the plasma digoxin level; 2. by determination of the total amount of glycoside eliminated by the blood exchange. Particular attention was paid to the effect of the delay between injection and exchange transfusion on the amount of digoxin eliminated. All four cases showed moderate falls in plasma levels. The amounts of digoxin eliminated by exchange transfusion were in reverse relationship to the delay between administration of digoxin and the blood exchange. At no time did the eliminated fraction exceed 5% of the total amount present in the body. PMID:837948

  3. Factors affecting white cell content in platelet concentrates.

    PubMed

    Champion, A B; Carmen, R A

    1985-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the factors affecting white cell content in platelet concentrates. White cell yields can be reduced 50 percent by stopping platelet-rich plasma expression when the interface is 1 cm from the top of the blood bag as compared to stopping expression when the interface reaches the top of the bag. Further reductions can be achieved by careful handling during transfer of units from the centrifuge cups to expressors (after the first spin) and by carefully balancing units against each other to ensure proper rotor balance during the first spin. Following these suggestions, blood banks should be able to produce platelet concentrates with white cell yields between 2 and 6 X 10(7) and with platelet yields between 7.5 and 8 X 10(10). Transfusion of this product may reduce febrile reactions and lower the incidence of alloimmunizations. PMID:4024231

  4. Proplatelets and stress platelets.

    PubMed

    Tong, M; Seth, P; Penington, D G

    1987-02-01

    The process of platelet formation by the fragmentation of megakaryocyte pseudopodia, termed proplatelets, demonstrable in the marrow sinusoids is poorly understood. "Stress" platelets produced under conditions of stimulated platelet production differ from normal circulating platelets with respect to volume and a number of functional characteristics. To clarify the relationship of stress platelets to proplatelets, rats were injected with heterologous platelet antiserum. Nondiscoid platelet forms, some characteristically beaded in appearance, strongly resembling bone marrow proplatelets, can be recovered in the circulation of normal rats. During the early period of recovery from acute thrombocytopenia, there was a substantial increase in the proportion of these elongated platelets in the citrated platelet rich plasma. Exposure to EDTA rendered them spherical. Circulating proplatelets may contribute significantly to the prompt increase in platelet volume during recovery from acute thrombocytopenia at a time prior to significant increase in megakaryocyte size and ploidy. PMID:3801667

  5. [Blood transfusions in Jehovah's witnesses].

    PubMed

    Aguilera, P

    1993-04-01

    Jehovah Witnesses cite religious motives to refuse transfusions of whole blood or its components for themselves and their children, even when life is endangered. An ethical analysis of decision making in health problems is made, giving priority to the alternatives chosen by the patient. One of the elements that turns a therapeutic procedure into extraordinary is the moral impossibility of its use, originated in a subjective cause. The right to act with freedom in religious matters must also be considered. It is concluded that the denial of a Jehovah Witness to be transfused must be respected. However, in the case of children, the physicians should disregard the parents rejection. PMID:8272620

  6. Blood transfusion and coagulation management.

    PubMed

    Meier, Jens

    2016-09-01

    Despite impressive progress in surgical technique, aortic surgery is still associated with relatively high morbidity and mortality. One of the most important contributors to this phenomenon is the triad of bleeding, anemia, and transfusion. All three factors are known to influence the outcome of aortic surgery to a great extent. However, over the last few years a multidisciplinary, multimodal concept has been established, which enables the physician to avoid bleeding, anemia, and transfusion as much as possible. The concept of "patient blood management" combines several established measures with the potential to improve perioperative outcome. This chapter describes these measures with regard to aortic surgery and assesses their respective efficacy. PMID:27650346

  7. A factor VIII-derived peptide enables von Willebrand factor (VWF)-binding of artificial platelet nanoconstructs without interfering with VWF-adhesion of natural platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haji-Valizadeh, Hassan; Modery-Pawlowski, Christa L.; Sen Gupta, Anirban

    2014-04-01

    There is substantial clinical interest in synthetic platelet analogs for potential application in transfusion medicine. To this end, our research is focused on self-assembled peptide-lipid nanoconstructs that can undergo injury site-selective adhesion and subsequently promote site-directed active platelet aggregation, thus mimicking platelet's primary hemostatic actions. For injury site-selective adhesion, we have utilized a coagulation factor FVIII-derived VWF-binding peptide (VBP). FVIII binds to VWF's D'-D3 domain while natural platelet GPIbα binds to VWF's A1 domain. Therefore, we hypothesized that the VBP-decorated nanoconstructs will adhere to VWF without mutual competition with natural platelets. We further hypothesized that the adherent VBP-decorated constructs can enhance platelet aggregation when co-decorated with a fibrinogen-mimetic peptide (FMP). To test these hypotheses, we used glycocalicin to selectively block VWF's A1 domain and, using fluorescence microscopy, studied the binding of fluorescently labeled VBP-decorated nanoconstructs versus platelets to ristocetin-treated VWF. Subsequently, we co-decorated the nanoconstructs with VBP and FMP and incubated them with human platelets to study construct-mediated enhancement of platelet aggregation. Decoration with VBP resulted in substantial construct adhesion to ristocetin-treated VWF even if the A1-domain was blocked by glycocalicin. In comparison, such A1-blocking resulted in significant reduction of platelet adhesion. Without A1-blocking, the VBP-decorated constructs and natural platelets could adhere to VWF concomitantly. Furthermore, the constructs co-decorated with VBP and FMP enhanced active platelet aggregation. The results indicate significant promise in utilizing the FVIII-derived VBP in developing synthetic platelet analogs that do not interfere with VWF-binding of natural platelets but allow site-directed enhancement of platelet aggregation when combined with FMP.There is substantial

  8. Strategic and operational aspects of a transfusion-free neonatal arterial switch operation.

    PubMed

    Schweiger, Martin; Dave, Hitendu; Kelly, Janet; Hübler, Michael

    2013-06-01

    Blood transfusion-free complex congenital cardiac surgery in a neonate remains a challenge for multidisciplinary cardiac teams. At our institution, a 3.5 kg neonate, born to a family of Jehovah's Witnesses and postnatally diagnosed with dextro-transposition of the great arteries (d-TGA) and a small muscular ventricular septal defect, underwent a successful arterial switch operation without blood or platelet transfusion. Key points that contributed to success were optimal preoperative haematopoetic conditioning using erythropoietin and iron, a miniaturized cardiopulmonary bypass circuit including a low prime volume oxygenator and crystalloid cardioplegia, and a well-coordinated multidisciplinary team. We report an overview of the literature regarding blood transfusion-free complex congenital cardiac surgery.

  9. Strategic and operational aspects of a transfusion-free neonatal arterial switch operation

    PubMed Central

    Schweiger, Martin; Dave, Hitendu; Kelly, Janet; Hübler, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Blood transfusion-free complex congenital cardiac surgery in a neonate remains a challenge for multidisciplinary cardiac teams. At our institution, a 3.5 kg neonate, born to a family of Jehovah's Witnesses and postnatally diagnosed with dextro-transposition of the great arteries (d-TGA) and a small muscular ventricular septal defect, underwent a successful arterial switch operation without blood or platelet transfusion. Key points that contributed to success were optimal preoperative haematopoetic conditioning using erythropoietin and iron, a miniaturized cardiopulmonary bypass circuit including a low prime volume oxygenator and crystalloid cardioplegia, and a well-coordinated multidisciplinary team. We report an overview of the literature regarding blood transfusion-free complex congenital cardiac surgery. PMID:23460601

  10. Strategic and operational aspects of a transfusion-free neonatal arterial switch operation.

    PubMed

    Schweiger, Martin; Dave, Hitendu; Kelly, Janet; Hübler, Michael

    2013-06-01

    Blood transfusion-free complex congenital cardiac surgery in a neonate remains a challenge for multidisciplinary cardiac teams. At our institution, a 3.5 kg neonate, born to a family of Jehovah's Witnesses and postnatally diagnosed with dextro-transposition of the great arteries (d-TGA) and a small muscular ventricular septal defect, underwent a successful arterial switch operation without blood or platelet transfusion. Key points that contributed to success were optimal preoperative haematopoetic conditioning using erythropoietin and iron, a miniaturized cardiopulmonary bypass circuit including a low prime volume oxygenator and crystalloid cardioplegia, and a well-coordinated multidisciplinary team. We report an overview of the literature regarding blood transfusion-free complex congenital cardiac surgery. PMID:23460601

  11. Acidosis downregulates platelet haemostatic functions and promotes neutrophil proinflammatory responses mediated by platelets.

    PubMed

    Etulain, Julia; Negrotto, Soledad; Carestia, Agostina; Pozner, Roberto Gabriel; Romaniuk, María Albertina; D'Atri, Lina Paola; Klement, Giannoula Lakka; Schattner, Mirta

    2012-01-01

    Acidosis is one of the hallmarks of tissue injury such as trauma, infection, inflammation, and tumour growth. Although platelets participate in the pathophysiology of all these processes, the impact of acidosis on platelet biology has not been studied outside of the quality control of laboratory aggregation assays or platelet transfusion optimization. Herein, we evaluate the effect of physiologically relevant changes in extracellular acidosis on the biological function of platelets, placing particular emphasis on haemostatic and secretory functions. Platelet haemostatic responses such as adhesion, spreading, activation of αIIbβ3 integrin, ATP release, aggregation, thromboxane B2 generation, clot retraction and procoagulant activity including phosphatidilserine exposure and microparticle formation, showed a statistically significant inhibition of thrombin-induced changes at pH of 7.0 and 6.5 compared to the physiological pH (7.4). The release of alpha granule content was differentially regulated by acidosis. At low pH, thrombin or collagen-induced secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor and endostatin were dramatically reduced. The release of von Willebrand factor and stromal derived factor-1α followed a similar, albeit less dramatic pattern. In contrast, the induction of CD40L was not changed by low pH, and P-selectin exposure was significantly increased. While the generation of mixed platelet-leukocyte aggregates and the increased chemotaxis of neutrophils mediated by platelets were further augmented under acidic conditions in a P-selectin dependent manner, the increased neutrophil survival was independent of P-selectin expression. In conclusion, our results indicate that extracellular acidosis downregulates most of the haemostatic platelet functions, and promotes those involved in amplifying the neutrophil-mediated inflammatory response.

  12. Platelet neuropeptide Y is critical for ischemic revascularization in mice

    PubMed Central

    Tilan, Jason U.; Everhart, Lindsay M.; Abe, Ken; Kuo-Bonde, Lydia; Chalothorn, Dan; Kitlinska, Joanna; Burnett, Mary Susan; Epstein, Stephen E.; Faber, James E.; Zukowska, Zofia

    2013-01-01

    We previously reported that the sympathetic neurotransmitter neuropeptide Y (NPY) is potently angiogenic, primarily through its Y2 receptor, and that endogenous NPY is crucial for capillary angiogenesis in rodent hindlimb ischemia. Here we sought to identify the source of NPY responsible for revascularization and its mechanisms of action. At d 3, NPY−/− mice demonstrated delayed recovery of blood flow and limb function, consistent with impaired collateral conductance, while ischemic capillary angiogenesis was reduced (∼70%) at d 14. This biphasic temporal response was confirmed by 2 peaks of NPY activation in rats: a transient early increase in neuronally derived plasma NPY and increase in platelet NPY during late-phase recovery. Compared to NPY-null platelets, collagen-activated NPY-rich platelets were more mitogenic (∼2-fold vs. ∼1.6-fold increase) for human microvascular endothelial cells, and Y2/Y5 receptor antagonists ablated this difference in proliferation. In NPY+/+ mice, ischemic angiogenesis was prevented by platelet depletion and then restored by transfusion of platelets from NPY+/+ mice, but not NPY−/− mice. In thrombocytopenic NPY−/− mice, transfusion of wild-type platelets fully restored ischemia-induced angiogenesis. These findings suggest that neuronally derived NPY accelerates the early response to femoral artery ligation by promoting collateral conductance, while platelet-derived NPY is critical for sustained capillary angiogenesis.—Tilan, J. U., Everhart, L. M., Abe, K., Kuo-Bonde, L., Chalothorn, D., Kitlinska, J., Burnett, M. S., Epstein, S. E., Faber, J. E., Zukowska, Z. Platelet neuropeptide Y is critical for ischemic revascularization in mice. PMID:23457218

  13. Overcoming blood shortages: red blood cell and platelet substitutes and membrane modifications.

    PubMed

    Davey, Richard J

    2004-03-01

    Blood shortages are increasingly common as the donor base declines and extensive restrictions on blood donation disqualify many donors. Red blood cell (RBC) and platelet substitutes have long been anticipated as alternatives to standard transfusions. However, difficulties in manufacturing, efficacy, and safety have slowed the development of these products. New understanding of the relationship between blood viscosity, oxygen transport, and vasoactivity have led to more effective RBC substitutes, several of which are in advanced clinical trials. In addition, creative approaches to RBC membrane modification, such as the enzymatic cleavage of ABH glycoproteins, may lead to a universal RBC. Advances in the understanding of platelet membrane behavior at low temperatures may lead to extended platelet storage at refrigerator temperatures. Standard transfusions of human RBCs and platelets will not be replaced soon. However, these new products will be a useful alternative for selected clinical applications and will lessen our dependence on our marginally adequate blood supply.

  14. Are Platelets Cells? And if Yes, are They Immune Cells?

    PubMed Central

    Garraud, Olivier; Cognasse, Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    Small fragments circulating in the blood were formally identified by the end of the nineteenth century, and it was suggested that they assisted coagulation via interactions with vessel endothelia. Wright, at the beginning of the twentieth century, identified their bone-marrow origin. For long, platelets have been considered sticky assistants of hemostasis and pollutants of blood or tissue samples; they were just cell fragments. As such, however, they were acknowledged as immunizing (to specific HPA and HLA markers): the platelet’s dark face. The enlightened face showed that besides hemostasis, platelets contained factors involved in healing. As early as 1930s, platelets entered the arsenal of medicines were transfused, and were soon manipulated to become a kind of glue to repair damaged tissues. Some gladly categorized platelets as cells but they were certainly not fully licensed as such for cell physiologists. Actually, platelets possess almost every characteristic of cells, apart from being capable of organizing their genes: they have neither a nucleus nor genes. This view prevailed until it became evident that platelets play a role in homeostasis and interact with cells other than with vascular endothelial cells; then began the era of physiological and also pathological inflammation. Platelets have now entered the field of immunity as inflammatory cells. Does assistance to immune cells itself suffice to license a cell as an “immune cell”? Platelets prove capable of sensing different types of signals and organizing an appropriate response. Many cells can do that. However, platelets can use a complete signalosome (apart from the last transcription step, though it is likely that this step can be circumvented by retrotranscribing RNA messages). The question has also arisen as to whether platelets can present antigen via their abundantly expressed MHC class I molecules. In combination, these properties argue in favor of allowing platelets the title of immune

  15. A factor VIII-derived peptide enables von Willebrand factor (VWF)-binding of artificial platelet nanoconstructs without interfering with VWF-adhesion of natural platelets.

    PubMed

    Haji-Valizadeh, Hassan; Modery-Pawlowski, Christa L; Sen Gupta, Anirban

    2014-05-01

    There is substantial clinical interest in synthetic platelet analogs for potential application in transfusion medicine. To this end, our research is focused on self-assembled peptide-lipid nanoconstructs that can undergo injury site-selective adhesion and subsequently promote site-directed active platelet aggregation, thus mimicking platelet's primary hemostatic actions. For injury site-selective adhesion, we have utilized a coagulation factor FVIII-derived VWF-binding peptide (VBP). FVIII binds to VWF's D'-D3 domain while natural platelet GPIbα binds to VWF's A1 domain. Therefore, we hypothesized that the VBP-decorated nanoconstructs will adhere to VWF without mutual competition with natural platelets. We further hypothesized that the adherent VBP-decorated constructs can enhance platelet aggregation when co-decorated with a fibrinogen-mimetic peptide (FMP). To test these hypotheses, we used glycocalicin to selectively block VWF's A1 domain and, using fluorescence microscopy, studied the binding of fluorescently labeled VBP-decorated nanoconstructs versus platelets to ristocetin-treated VWF. Subsequently, we co-decorated the nanoconstructs with VBP and FMP and incubated them with human platelets to study construct-mediated enhancement of platelet aggregation. Decoration with VBP resulted in substantial construct adhesion to ristocetin-treated VWF even if the A1-domain was blocked by glycocalicin. In comparison, such A1-blocking resulted in significant reduction of platelet adhesion. Without A1-blocking, the VBP-decorated constructs and natural platelets could adhere to VWF concomitantly. Furthermore, the constructs co-decorated with VBP and FMP enhanced active platelet aggregation. The results indicate significant promise in utilizing the FVIII-derived VBP in developing synthetic platelet analogs that do not interfere with VWF-binding of natural platelets but allow site-directed enhancement of platelet aggregation when combined with FMP.

  16. The haematological features and transfusion management of women who required massive transfusion for major obstetric haemorrhage in the UK: a population based study.

    PubMed

    Green, Laura; Knight, Marian; Seeney, Frances; Hopkinson, Cathy; Collins, Peter W; Collis, Rachel E; Simpson, Nigel A B; Weeks, Andrew; Stanworth, Simon J

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the coagulopathy of major-obstetric-haemorrhage (MOH) that leads to massive-transfusion (MT) is fundamental to improving outcomes. This study reports on the haematological features and transfusion management of women experiencing MT [defined as transfusion of ≥8 units of red blood cells (RBC) within 24 h of delivery]. One hundred and eighty-one cases [median (interquartile range; IQR) age 33 years (29-36)] were identified from all UK hospitals, using the UK Obstetric Surveillance System between July 2012 and June 2013. The median (IQR) estimated blood loss was 6 l (4·5-8). At presentation, the median platelet count was lowest for placenta accreta, compared with other causes, while the median prothrombin time and fibrinogen were <1·5 × mean normal and <3 g/l, respectively for all aetiologies. Median platelet count and fibrinogen fell to <75 × 10(9) /l and <2 g/l, respectively for all causes during bleeding, except for trauma. The median (IQR) units of RBC, fresh-frozen-plasma (FFP) and cryoprecipitate transfused were 10 (8-14), 6 (4-8) and 2 (2-4), respectively. The median time from the onset of bleeding to delivery of the first RBC unit was significantly shorter for women who delivered via elective caesarean section, compared with others. The coagulopathy of MT during MOH differs significantly depending on its cause, suggesting that more targeted transfusion strategies are required. PMID:26683982

  17. The haematological features and transfusion management of women who required massive transfusion for major obstetric haemorrhage in the UK: a population based study.

    PubMed

    Green, Laura; Knight, Marian; Seeney, Frances; Hopkinson, Cathy; Collins, Peter W; Collis, Rachel E; Simpson, Nigel A B; Weeks, Andrew; Stanworth, Simon J

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the coagulopathy of major-obstetric-haemorrhage (MOH) that leads to massive-transfusion (MT) is fundamental to improving outcomes. This study reports on the haematological features and transfusion management of women experiencing MT [defined as transfusion of ≥8 units of red blood cells (RBC) within 24 h of delivery]. One hundred and eighty-one cases [median (interquartile range; IQR) age 33 years (29-36)] were identified from all UK hospitals, using the UK Obstetric Surveillance System between July 2012 and June 2013. The median (IQR) estimated blood loss was 6 l (4·5-8). At presentation, the median platelet count was lowest for placenta accreta, compared with other causes, while the median prothrombin time and fibrinogen were <1·5 × mean normal and <3 g/l, respectively for all aetiologies. Median platelet count and fibrinogen fell to <75 × 10(9) /l and <2 g/l, respectively for all causes during bleeding, except for trauma. The median (IQR) units of RBC, fresh-frozen-plasma (FFP) and cryoprecipitate transfused were 10 (8-14), 6 (4-8) and 2 (2-4), respectively. The median time from the onset of bleeding to delivery of the first RBC unit was significantly shorter for women who delivered via elective caesarean section, compared with others. The coagulopathy of MT during MOH differs significantly depending on its cause, suggesting that more targeted transfusion strategies are required.

  18. [Amazing epic of blood transfusion...].

    PubMed

    Desiron, Q

    2000-01-01

    On the occasion of the 100th anniversary of the discovery of blood groups by Karl Landsteiner, the author makes a historical note on the amazing history of the blood transfusion from the origin to the beginning of the XXth century.

  19. Swiss Haemovigilance Data and Implementation of Measures for the Prevention of Transfusion Associated Acute Lung Injury (TRALI)

    PubMed Central

    Jutzi, Markus; Levy, Guy; Taleghani, Behrouz Mansouri

    2008-01-01

    Summary In Switzerland, blood donations are collected exclusively from healthy non-remunerated voluntary blood donors mainly by 13 regional Blood Transfusion Services throughout the country. Thereby, self-sufficient blood supply for a population of about 7.5 million is achieved, and approximately 300,000 units of red cells, 75,000 therapeutic units of fresh plasma, and 20,000 therapeutic units of platelets are transfused annually. Reporting to Swissmedic (the Swiss agency for therapeutic products) of all suspected adverse transfusion events on a standardised form is mandatory. Data are then analysed to estimate the risks of the most serious transfusion events. Together with transfusion of an incorrect blood component and bacterial contamination of platelet concentrates, TRALI is a significant risk of transfusion in Switzerland and occurs in approximately every 8,000–20,000 FFP transfusions according to current haemovigilance data. Among 25 reported cases between 2002 and November 2007, 4 are proven immune TRALI, 2 are highly likely immune TRALI, 10 are possibly immune TRALI, 8 are non-immune TRALI, and 1 is a suspected case which could not be confirmed as TRALI. Based on the hypothesis of an immunological trigger of TRALI, an exclusion of the transfusion of plasma from female donors can be considered as a precautionary measure which might have prevented 4 cases of proven immune TRALI, 2 cases of highly likely immune TRALI, and an unknown number of the 10 cases of possibly immune TRALI. Based on these data and encouraging preliminary reports of the effects of comparable measures in other countries, the decision was made that starting with January 1st 2007 the production of quarantined FFP is restricted to donations from men or from women confirming that they have never been pregnant (to their knowledge) or with negative tests for antibodies against HLA class I and II. The analysis of further vigilance data is needed to elucidate the efficacy of this preventive

  20. Swiss Haemovigilance Data and Implementation of Measures for the Prevention of Transfusion Associated Acute Lung Injury (TRALI).

    PubMed

    Jutzi, Markus; Levy, Guy; Taleghani, Behrouz Mansouri

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY: In Switzerland, blood donations are collected exclusively from healthy non-remunerated voluntary blood donors mainly by 13 regional Blood Transfusion Services throughout the country. Thereby, self-sufficient blood supply for a population of about 7.5 million is achieved, and approximately 300,000 units of red cells, 75,000 therapeutic units of fresh plasma, and 20,000 therapeutic units of platelets are transfused annually. Reporting to Swissmedic (the Swiss agency for therapeutic products) of all suspected adverse transfusion events on a standardised form is mandatory. Data are then analysed to estimate the risks of the most serious transfusion events. Together with transfusion of an incorrect blood component and bacterial contamination of platelet concentrates, TRALI is a significant risk of transfusion in Switzerland and occurs in approximately every 8,000-20,000 FFP transfusions according to current haemovigilance data. Among 25 reported cases between 2002 and November 2007, 4 are proven immune TRALI, 2 are highly likely immune TRALI, 10 are possibly immune TRALI, 8 are non-immune TRALI, and 1 is a suspected case which could not be confirmed as TRALI. Based on the hypothesis of an immunological trigger of TRALI, an exclusion of the transfusion of plasma from female donors can be considered as a precautionary measure which might have prevented 4 cases of proven immune TRALI, 2 cases of highly likely immune TRALI, and an unknown number of the 10 cases of possibly immune TRALI. Based on these data and encouraging preliminary reports of the effects of comparable measures in other countries, the decision was made that starting with January 1st 2007 the production of quarantined FFP is restricted to donations from men or from women confirming that they have never been pregnant (to their knowledge) or with negative tests for antibodies against HLA class I and II. The analysis of further vigilance data is needed to elucidate the efficacy of this preventive

  1. Liver Transplantation without Perioperative Transfusions Single-Center Experience Showing Better Early Outcome and Shorter Hospital Stay

    PubMed Central

    Goldaracena, Nicolás; Méndez, Patricio; Quiñonez, Emilio; Devetach, Gustavo; Koo, Lucio; Jeanes, Carlos; Anders, Margarita; Orozco, Federico; Comignani, Pablo D.; Mastai, Ricardo C.; McCormack, Lucas

    2013-01-01

    Background. Significant amounts of red blood cells (RBCs) transfusions are associated with poor outcome after liver transplantation (LT). We report our series of LT without perioperative RBC (P-RBC) transfusions to evaluate its influence on early and long-term outcomes following LT. Methods. A consecutive series of LT between 2006 and 2011 was analyzed. P-RBC transfusion was defined as one or more RBC units administrated during or ≤48 hours after LT. We divided the cohort in “No-Transfusion” and “Yes-Transfusion.” Preoperative status, graft quality, and intra- and postoperative variables were compared to assess P-RBC transfusion risk factors and postoperative outcome. Results. LT was performed in 127 patients (“No-Transfusion” = 39 versus “Yes-Transfusion” = 88). While median MELD was significantly higher in Yes-Transfusion (11 versus 21; P = 0.0001) group, platelet count, prothrombin time, and hemoglobin were significantly lower. On multivariate analysis, the unique independent risk factor associated with P-RBC transfusions was preoperative hemoglobin (P < 0.001). Incidence of postoperative bacterial infections (10 versus 27%; P = 0.03), median ICU (2 versus 3 days; P = 0.03), and hospital stay (7.5 versus 9 days; P = 0.01) were negatively influenced by P-RBC transfusions. However, 30-day mortality (10 versus 15%) and one- (86 versus 70%) and 3-year (77 versus 66%) survival were equivalent in both groups. Conclusions. Recipient MELD score was not a predictive factor for P-RBC transfusion. Patients requiring P-RBC transfusions had worse postoperative outcome. Therefore, maximum efforts must be focused on improving hemoglobin levels during waiting list time to prevent using P-RBC in LT recipients. PMID:24455193

  2. Phylogenetic analysis consistent with a clinical history of sexual transmission of HIV-1 from a single donor reveals transmission of highly distinct variants

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To combat the pandemic of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1), a successful vaccine will need to cope with the variability of transmissible viruses. Human hosts infected with HIV-1 potentially harbour many viral variants but very little is known about viruses that are likely to be transmitted, or even if there are viral characteristics that predict enhanced transmission in vivo. We show for the first time that genetic divergence consistent with a single transmission event in vivo can represent several years of pre-transmission evolution. Results We describe a highly unusual case consistent with a single donor transmitting highly related but distinct HIV-1 variants to two individuals on the same evening. We confirm that the clustering of viral genetic sequences, present within each recipient, is consistent with the history of a single donor across the viral env, gag and pol genes by maximum likelihood and Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo based phylogenetic analyses. Based on an uncorrelated, lognormal relaxed clock of env gene evolution calibrated with other datasets, the time since the most recent common ancestor is estimated as 2.86 years prior to transmission (95% confidence interval 1.28 to 4.54 years). Conclusion Our results show that an effective design for a preventative vaccine will need to anticipate extensive HIV-1 diversity within an individual donor as well as diversity at the population level. PMID:21736738

  3. Isolation of dental pulp stem cells from a single donor and characterization of their ability to differentiate after 2 years of cryopreservation

    PubMed Central

    Alsulaimani, Reem S.; Ajlan, Sumaiah A.; Aldahmash, Abdullah M.; Alnabaheen, May S.; Ashri, Nahid Y.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the viability and differentiation capacity of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) isolated from single donors after two years of cryopreservation. Methods: This prospective study was conducted between October 2010 and February 2014 in the Stem Unit, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Seventeen teeth extracted from 11 participants were processed separately to assess the minimum tissue weight needed to yield cells for culturing in vitro. Cell stemness was evaluated before passage 4 using the colony forming unit assay, immunofluorescence staining, and bi-lineage differentiation. Dental pulp stem cells were cryopreserved for 2 years. Post-thaw DPSCs were cultured until senescence and differentiated toward osteogenic, odontogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic lineages. Results: Viable cells were isolated successfully from 6 of the 11 participants. Three of these 6 cultured cell lines were identified as DPSCs. A minimum of 0.2 g of dental pulp tissue was required for successful isolation of viable cells from a single donor. Post-thaw DPSCs successfully differentiated towards osteogenic, odontogenic, chondrogenic, and adipogenic lineages. The post-thaw DPSCs were viable in vitro up to 70 days before senescence. There was no significant difference between the cells. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this investigation, viable cells from dental pulp tissue were isolated successfully from the same donor using a minimum of 2 extracted teeth. Not all isolated cells from harvested dental pulp tissue had the characteristics of DPSCs. Post-thaw DPSCs maintained their multi-lineage differentiation capacity. PMID:27146619

  4. Anucleate platelets generate progeny

    PubMed Central

    Schwertz, Hansjörg; Köster, Sarah; Kahr, Walter H. A.; Michetti, Noemi; Kraemer, Bjoern F.; Weitz, David A.; Blaylock, Robert C.; Kraiss, Larry W.; Greinacher, Andreas; Zimmerman, Guy A.

    2010-01-01

    Platelets are classified as terminally differentiated cells that are incapable of cellular division. However, we observe that anucleate human platelets, either maintained in suspension culture or captured in microdrops, give rise to new cell bodies packed with respiring mitochondria and α-granules. Platelet progeny formation also occurs in whole blood cultures. Newly formed platelets are structurally indistinguishable from normal platelets, are able to adhere and spread on extracellular matrix, and display normal signal-dependent expression of surface P-selectin and annexin V. Platelet progeny formation is accompanied by increases in biomass, cellular protein levels, and protein synthesis in expanding populations. Platelet numbers also increase during ex vivo storage. These observations indicate that platelets have a previously unrecognized capacity for producing functional progeny, which involves a form of cell division that does not require a nucleus. Because this new function of platelets occurs outside of the bone marrow milieu, it raises the possibility that thrombopoiesis continues in the bloodstream. PMID:20086251

  5. Impact of non-inhibited platelet supplementation on platelet reactivity in patients treated with prasugrel or ticagrelor for an acute coronary syndrome: An ex vivo study.

    PubMed

    Bonhomme, Fanny; Bonvini, Robert; Reny, Jean-Luc; Poncet, Antoine; Fontana, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Managing bleeding in patients receiving P2Y12 inhibitors is challenging. Few data are available regarding the efficacy of platelet transfusion in patients treated with prasugrel or ticagrelor. The aim of this study was to evaluate the minimal amount of platelet supplementation (in terms of ratio of non-inhibited platelets to inhibited platelets) necessary to restore platelet reactivity in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) of patients treated with aspirin and a prasugrel or ticagrelor loading dose for an acute coronary syndrome. PRP samples from patients were mixed ex vivo with increasing proportions of pooled PRP from healthy volunteers. Platelet reactivity was challenged with adenosine diphosphate (ADP), arachidonic acid, collagen or thrombin receptor activating peptide using light transmission aggregometry. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patient samples recovering an ADP-induced maximal aggregation (ADP-Aggmax) value above 40%. In patients treated with prasugrel (n = 32), ADP-Aggmax increased progressively with supplements of pooled PRP, with an average increase of 7.9% (95% CI [7.1; 8.8], p < 0.001) per each 20% increase in the ratio of non-inhibited platelets to inhibited platelets. A ratio of 60% was associated with 90% of patients reaching the primary endpoint. In patients treated with ticagrelor (n = 15), ADP-Aggmax did not significantly increase with any level of supplements. In conclusions, ex vivo addition of non-inhibited platelets significantly improved ADP-Aggmax in patients treated with prasugrel with a dose-dependent effect. There was no evidence of such a reversal in patients treated with ticagrelor. These results suggest that platelet transfusion may be more effective in blunting bleeding in patients treated with prasugrel, than those treated with ticagrelor. PMID:25905916

  6. Platelets Roll on Stimulated Endothelium in vivo: An Interaction Mediated by Endothelial P-Selectin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenette, Paul S.; Johnson, Robert C.; Hynes, Richard O.; Wagner, Denisa D.

    1995-08-01

    P-selectin, found in storage granules of platelets and endothelial cells, can be rapidly expressed upon stimulation. Mice lacking this membrane receptor exhibit a severe impairment of leukocyte rolling. We observed that, in addition to leukocytes, platelets were rolling in mesenteric venules of wild-type mice. To investigate the role of P-selectin in this process, resting or activated platelets from wild-type or P-selectin-deficient mice were fluorescently labeled and transfused into recipients of either genotype. Platelet-endothelial interactions were monitored by intravital microscopy. We observed rolling of either wild-type or P-selectin-deficient resting platelets on wild-type endothelium. Endothelial stimulation with the calcium ionophore A23187 increased the number of platelets rolling 4-fold. Activated P-selectin-deficient platelets behaved similarly, whereas activated wild-type platelets bound to leukocytes and were seen rolling together. Platelets of either genotype, resting or activated, interacted minimally with mutant endothelium even after A23187 treatment. The velocity of platelet rolling was 6- to 9-fold greater than that of leukocytes. Our results demonstrate that (i) platelets roll on endothelium in vivo, (ii) this interaction requires endothelial but not platelet P-selectin, and (iii) platelet rolling appears to be independent of platelet activation, indicating constitutive expression of a P-selectin ligand(s) on platelets. We have therefore observed an interesting parallel between platelets and leukocytes in that both of these blood cell types roll on stimulated vessel wall and that this process is dependent on the expression of endothelial P-selectin.

  7. Era of blood component therapy: time for mandatory pre-donation platelet count for maximizing donor safety and optimizing quality of platelets.

    PubMed

    Das, Sudipta Sekhar; Zaman, R U; Biswas, Dipak

    2013-12-01

    Blood bank regulatory agencies including the Drug and Cosmetics Act (DCA) of India do not mandate a predonation platelet count in whole blood donation. Mandating such practice will definitely optimize the quality of random donor platelets (RDP) in terms of platelet yield and patient therapeutic benefit. We observed poor platelet yield in RDP concentrates prepared at our center with a significant number not meeting the DCA guideline of ≥ 4.5 × 10(10) per bag processed from 450 ml of whole blood. Therefore we planned this study to evaluate the pre-donation hematological values in our blood donor population and effect of these values on the quality of platelet concentrates. The prospective study included 221 blood donors eligible for donating 450 ml of whole blood (WB). Following the departmental standard operating procedure (SOP) RDPs were prepared using the 'Top & Bottom' quadruple bag system and automated component extractor. Quality of RDP was assessed as per departmental protocol. All results were recorded and subsequently transcribed to SPSS working sheet. A significant (p<0.001) decrement of donor blood counts has been observed after WB donation. Mean donor Hb and platelets reduced by 0.72 g/dl and 22.1 × 10(6)/ml respectively. Quality of RDPs in terms of platelet yield was significantly better (p<0.001) when donor platelet count was >200 × 10(6)/ml. Although platelet yield significantly correlated with the donor platelet count however quality of RDPs in terms of red cell contamination showed no correlation with the donor hematocrit. Platelet yield in random donor platelets is a concern in Eastern India. A platelet yield of 4.5 × 10(10) per bag as mandated by the DCA of India was only achieved when the donor platelet count was >200 × 10(6)/ml. Posttransfusion platelet recovery (PPR) was unsatisfactory in the transfused patient. Introduction of pre-donation platelet count in whole blood donation will maximize donor safety and optimize patient platelet

  8. [Red blood transfusion in palliative care situation].

    PubMed

    Velter, C; Montheil, V; Alexandre, J; Vinant, P; Goldwasser, F

    2016-09-01

    Anemia is frequent in oncology. We debate the decision-making process of erythrocyte transfusion in palliative care situation from a case report. A patient with a prostatic metastatic cancer was in palliative situation with asthenia and coronary symptom. We analyze, in this particular case that does not describe reality of normal practice, the decision-making process of erythrocyte transfusion. These transfusions were based, in this case, on the evaluation of oncology prognosis, the short-term vital threats, life project and clinical safety of the transfusion. The patient has received 5 erythrocyte transfusions in 4 months until a multidisciplinary meeting decided to stop transfusion because of poor prognostic situation and bad tolerance of the act. This patient could be a collegial model used to measure the reasonable nature of prescription depending on the purpose and the goal of the patient but does not allow generalization. Although there is low risk of erythrocyte shortage, it seems important to train doctors to reduce abusive transfusion and define transfusion thresholds. Different levels of erythrocyte transfusion security would raise the issue of management of several stocks. Erythrocyte transfusion in palliative care can be considered subject to prognostic information and the palliative aim of the transfusions, multidisciplinary decision-making, during short hospitalizations and with evaluation of the act and consequences for the patient. PMID:27562520

  9. Anemia and transfusion of red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Cortés Buelvas, Armando

    2013-10-01

    The red cells transfusion is a mainstay in the treatment of anemic patients. These blood transfusions are not without risks. The risk-benefit profile for red cell transfusions to treat anaemia is uncertain, but they may contribute to adverse patient outcomes in some situations. The ability of a patient to tolerate anaemia depends on their clinical condition and the presence of any significant co-morbidity; maintenance of circulating volume is of paramount importance. There is no universal transfusion trigger. Advances in the development and validation of physiological, accessible, practical and reliable markers to guide therapy are expected. To improve patients' outcomes, further study is required to more fully explore the risk of anemia, optimal hemoglobin level, and the risk and efficacy of RBC transfusion. Future clinical investigations with high priority should determine the efficacy of transfusion in those classified as uncertain scenarios. In the absence of data, it is prudent that transfusion is administered with caution in these clinical scenarios.

  10. Modification of Solid Phase Red Cell Adherence Assay for the Detection of Platelet Antibodies in Patients With Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Vongchan, Preeyanat; Nawarawong, Weerasak; Linhardt, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Platelet refractoriness is caused by HLA antibodies and platelet-specific antibodies. Current methods used to detect antiplatelet antibodies have limitations. Solid phase red cell adherence (SPRCA) lacks sensitivity and requires a second assay using chloroquine-treated intact platelets to specify the response due to anti-HLA. We modified SPRCA by using 2 types of antihuman platelet antibodies with different specificities toward platelet lysate and tested samples from 361 patients (69 with unexplained thrombocytopenia and 292 with poor response to platelet transfusions not explicable by alloimmunization or the clinical situation) and 50 from healthy volunteers. Our method compared favorably with platelet suspension direct immunofluorescence. All samples from healthy volunteers were negative; of the samples from the patient population, 240 were positive (147 samples had only antiplatelet and 3 samples had only anti-HLA antibodies). This modified technique had a sensitivity of 98% and a specificity of 91%. PMID:18701420

  11. Modification of solid phase red cell adherence assay for the detection of platelet antibodies in patients with thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Vongchan, Preeyanat; Nawarawong, Weerasak; Linhardt, Robert J

    2008-09-01

    Platelet refractoriness is caused by HLA antibodies and platelet-specific antibodies. Current methods used to detect antiplatelet antibodies have limitations. Solid phase red cell adherence (SPRCA) lacks sensitivity and requires a second assay using chloroquine-treated intact platelets to specify the response due to anti-HLA. We modified SPRCA by using 2 types of antihuman platelet antibodies with different specificities toward platelet lysate and tested samples from 361 patients (69 with unexplained thrombocytopenia and 292 with poor response to platelet transfusions not explicable by alloimmunization or the clinical situation) and 50 from healthy volunteers. Our method compared favorably with platelet suspension direct immunofluorescence. All samples from healthy volunteers were negative; of the samples from the patient population, 240 were positive (147 samples had only antiplatelet and 3 samples had only anti-HLA antibodies). This modified technique had a sensitivity of 98% and a specificity of 91%.

  12. What's in the Box? The Effectiveness of a Low-Volume Massive Transfusion Protocol.

    PubMed

    Baysinger, Katherine; Barnett, Merry E; Ott, Mickey; Bromberg, William; Mcbride, Katherine; Thompson, Lynne; Goodman, Gretchen; Shaw, Eric; Dunne, James

    2016-07-01

    Transfusion ratios approaching 1:1:1 of packed red blood cells (PRBCs) to fresh frozen plasma (FFP) to platelet have been shown to improve outcomes in trauma. There is little data available to describe in what quantity that ratio should be delivered. We hypothesized that lowering the total volume of products delivered in each protocol round would not adversely affect outcomes in the bleeding trauma patient. A retrospective review of 9732 trauma patients admitted to a rural Level I trauma center over a 3-year period was performed. Patients who received a massive transfusion (greater than 10 units of blood product transfused in the first 24 hours), between January 2012 and April 2015 were identified as the study cohort. In May of 2014, our institution switched from a massive transfusion protocol (MTP) that included 6 PRBCs:6 FFP:1 platelet to a lower volume massive transfusion protocol (LVMTP) that included 4 PRBC:4 FFP:1 platelet. Data collected included patient demographics, vital signs, and outcomes. A total of 131 patients met study criteria. MTP was activated on 65 per cent of patients (57/88), receiving a massive transfusion during the 28 months before implementation of the new protocol. In contrast, LVMTP was activated in 100 per cent of patients (43/43) receiving a massive transfusion in the 12 months after implementation of the new protocol. There was no significant difference in age (36.6 vs 37.2, P = 0.87), injury severity score (29.8 vs 32.3, P = 0.45), or per cent penetrating mechanism (43.9 vs 37.2%, P = 0.503) when comparing MTP to LVMTP. In addition, there was no significant difference in mortality (47.4 vs 41.9%, P = 0.584), lengths of stay (13.5 vs 17.1, P = 0.258), or vent days (6.4 vs 8.2, P = 0.236) when comparing MTP to LVMTP. A LVMTP is safe and effective for the resuscitation of the trauma patient. PMID:27457858

  13. What's in the Box? The Effectiveness of a Low-Volume Massive Transfusion Protocol.

    PubMed

    Baysinger, Katherine; Barnett, Merry E; Ott, Mickey; Bromberg, William; Mcbride, Katherine; Thompson, Lynne; Goodman, Gretchen; Shaw, Eric; Dunne, James

    2016-07-01

    Transfusion ratios approaching 1:1:1 of packed red blood cells (PRBCs) to fresh frozen plasma (FFP) to platelet have been shown to improve outcomes in trauma. There is little data available to describe in what quantity that ratio should be delivered. We hypothesized that lowering the total volume of products delivered in each protocol round would not adversely affect outcomes in the bleeding trauma patient. A retrospective review of 9732 trauma patients admitted to a rural Level I trauma center over a 3-year period was performed. Patients who received a massive transfusion (greater than 10 units of blood product transfused in the first 24 hours), between January 2012 and April 2015 were identified as the study cohort. In May of 2014, our institution switched from a massive transfusion protocol (MTP) that included 6 PRBCs:6 FFP:1 platelet to a lower volume massive transfusion protocol (LVMTP) that included 4 PRBC:4 FFP:1 platelet. Data collected included patient demographics, vital signs, and outcomes. A total of 131 patients met study criteria. MTP was activated on 65 per cent of patients (57/88), receiving a massive transfusion during the 28 months before implementation of the new protocol. In contrast, LVMTP was activated in 100 per cent of patients (43/43) receiving a massive transfusion in the 12 months after implementation of the new protocol. There was no significant difference in age (36.6 vs 37.2, P = 0.87), injury severity score (29.8 vs 32.3, P = 0.45), or per cent penetrating mechanism (43.9 vs 37.2%, P = 0.503) when comparing MTP to LVMTP. In addition, there was no significant difference in mortality (47.4 vs 41.9%, P = 0.584), lengths of stay (13.5 vs 17.1, P = 0.258), or vent days (6.4 vs 8.2, P = 0.236) when comparing MTP to LVMTP. A LVMTP is safe and effective for the resuscitation of the trauma patient.

  14. Red blood cell transfusion triggers in acute leukemia: a randomized pilot study

    PubMed Central

    DeZern, Amy E.; Williams, Katherine; Zahurak, Marianna; Hand, Wesley; Stephens, R. Scott; King, Karen E.; Frank, Steven M.; Ness, Paul M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion thresholds have yet to be examined in large randomized trials in hematologic malignancies. This pilot study in acute leukemia uses a restrictive compared to a liberal transfusion strategy. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS A randomized (2:1) study was conducted of restrictive (LOW) hemoglobin (Hb) trigger (7 g/dL) compared to higher (HIGH) Hb trigger (8 g/dL). The primary outcome was feasibility of conducting a larger trial. The four requirements for success required that more than 50% of the eligible patients could be consented, more than 75% of the patients randomized to the LOW arm tolerated the transfusion trigger, fewer than 15% of patients crossed over from the LOW arm to the HIGH arm, and no indication for the need to pause the study for safety concerns. Secondary outcomes included fatigue, bleeding, and RBCs and platelets transfused. RESULTS Ninety patients were consented and randomly assigned to LOW to HIGH. The four criteria for the primary objective of feasibility were met. When the number of units transfused was compared, adjusting for baseline Hb, the LOW arm was transfused on average 8.0 (95% confidence interval [CI], 6.9–9.1) units/patient while the HIGH arm received 11.7 (95% CI, 10.1–13.2) units (p = 0.0003). There was no significant difference in bleeding events or neutropenic fevers between study arms. CONCLUSION This study establishes feasibility for trial of Hb thresholds in leukemia through demonstration of success in all primary outcome metrics and a favorable safety profile. This population requires further study to evaluate the equivalence of liberal and restrictive transfusion thresholds in this unique clinical setting. PMID:27198129

  15. Autologous umbilical cord blood transfusion.

    PubMed Central

    Ballin, A.; Arbel, E.; Kenet, G.; Berar, M.; Kohelet, D.; Tanay, A.; Zakut, H.; Meytes, D.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine some aspects of umbilical cord blood collection for autologous transfusion in premature infants. All 120 microbacterial cultures (aerobic and anaerobic) of cord blood samples as well as 30 cultures of mycoplasma were treated. Cord prothrombin fragment (F 1 + 2) concentrations were quantified at one and 10 minutes after clamping of the cord. F 1 + 2 concentrations assessed on 25 newborn infants were similar and no linear association with time of clamping could be drawn. This means that cord blood thrombosis is not activated for at least 10 minutes following clamping of the cord. As far as is known, the first newborn infant to benefit from this method of transfusion is reported here. The premature infant received two portions of autologous blood (on days 5 and 7). No untoward effects were noted. Blood, collected from the umbilical cord, is a safe source for autotransfusion, provided that bacteriological testing has been carried out. PMID:8535878

  16. Transfusion-transmitted parasitic infections.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gagandeep; Sehgal, Rakesh

    2010-07-01

    The transmission of parasitic organisms through transfusion is relatively rare. Of the major transfusion-transmitted diseases, malaria is a major cause of TTIP in tropical countries whereas babesiosis and Chagas' disease pose the greatest threat to donors in the USA In both cases, this is due to the increased number of potentially infected donors. There are no reliable serologic tests available to screen donors for any of these organisms and the focus for prevention remains on adherence to donor screening guidelines that address travel history and previous infection with the etiologic agent. One goal is the development of tests that are able to screen for and identify donors potentially infectious for parasitic infections without causing the deferral of a large number of non-infectious donors or significantly increasing costs. Ideally, methods to inactivate the infectious organism will provide an element of added safety to the blood supply. PMID:20859503

  17. Transfusion-transmitted parasitic infections

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Gagandeep; Sehgal, Rakesh

    2010-01-01

    The transmission of parasitic organisms through transfusion is relatively rare. Of the major transfusion-transmitted diseases, malaria is a major cause of TTIP in tropical countries whereas babesiosis and Chagas’ disease pose the greatest threat to donors in the USA In both cases, this is due to the increased number of potentially infected donors. There are no reliable serologic tests available to screen donors for any of these organisms and the focus for prevention remains on adherence to donor screening guidelines that address travel history and previous infection with the etiologic agent. One goal is the development of tests that are able to screen for and identify donors potentially infectious for parasitic infections without causing the deferral of a large number of non-infectious donors or significantly increasing costs. Ideally, methods to inactivate the infectious organism will provide an element of added safety to the blood supply. PMID:20859503

  18. Time-Dependent Decay of mRNA and Ribosomal RNA during Platelet Aging and Its Correlation with Translation Activity

    PubMed Central

    Angénieux, Catherine; Maître, Blandine; Eckly, Anita; Lanza, François; Gachet, Christian; de la Salle, Henri

    2016-01-01

    Previous investigations have indicated that RNAs are mostly present in the minor population of the youngest platelets, whereas translation in platelets could be biologically important. To attempt to solve this paradox, we studied changes in the RNA content of reticulated platelets, i.e., young cells brightly stained by thiazole orange (TObright), a fluorescent probe for RNAs. We provoked in mice strong thrombocytopenia followed by dramatic thrombocytosis characterized by a short period with a vast majority of reticulated platelets. During thrombocytosis, the TObright platelet count rapidly reached a maximum, after which TOdim platelets accumulated, suggesting that most of the former were converted into the latter within 12 h. Experiments on platelets, freshly isolated or incubated ex vivo at 37°C, indicated that their “RNA content”, here corresponding to the amounts of extracted RNA, and the percentage of TObright platelets were positively correlated. The “RNA Content” normalized to the number of platelets could be 20 to 40 fold higher when 80–90% of the cells were reticulated (20–40 fg/platelet), than when only 5–10% of control cells were TObright (less than 1fg/platelet). TObright platelets, incubated ex vivo at 37°C or transfused into mice, became TOdim within 24 h. Ex vivo at 37°C, platelets lost about half of their ribosomal and beta actin RNAs within 6 hours, and more than 98% of them after 24 hours. Accordingly, fluorescence in situ hybridization techniques confirmed the presence of beta actin mRNAs in most reticulated-enriched platelets, but detected them in only a minor subset of control platelets. In vitro, constitutive translation decreased considerably within less than 6 hours, questioning how protein synthesis in platelets, especially in non-reticulated ones, could have a biological function in vivo. Nevertheless, constitutive transient translation in young platelets under pathological conditions characterized by a dramatic increase in

  19. Platelets release mitochondria serving as substrate for bactericidal group IIA-secreted phospholipase A2 to promote inflammation.

    PubMed

    Boudreau, Luc H; Duchez, Anne-Claire; Cloutier, Nathalie; Soulet, Denis; Martin, Nicolas; Bollinger, James; Paré, Alexandre; Rousseau, Matthieu; Naika, Gajendra S; Lévesque, Tania; Laflamme, Cynthia; Marcoux, Geneviève; Lambeau, Gérard; Farndale, Richard W; Pouliot, Marc; Hamzeh-Cognasse, Hind; Cognasse, Fabrice; Garraud, Olivier; Nigrovic, Peter A; Guderley, Helga; Lacroix, Steve; Thibault, Louis; Semple, John W; Gelb, Michael H; Boilard, Eric

    2014-10-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a highly potent inflammatory trigger and is reportedly found outside the cells in blood in various pathologies. Platelets are abundant in blood where they promote hemostasis. Although lacking a nucleus, platelets contain functional mitochondria. On activation, platelets produce extracellular vesicles known as microparticles. We hypothesized that activated platelets could also release their mitochondria. We show that activated platelets release respiratory-competent mitochondria, both within membrane-encapsulated microparticles and as free organelles. Extracellular mitochondria are found in platelet concentrates used for transfusion and are present at higher levels in those that induced acute reactions (febrile nonhemolytic reactions, skin manifestations, and cardiovascular events) in transfused patients. We establish that the mitochondrion is an endogenous substrate of secreted phospholipase A2 IIA (sPLA2-IIA), a phospholipase otherwise specific for bacteria, likely reflecting the ancestral proteobacteria origin of mitochondria. The hydrolysis of the mitochondrial membrane by sPLA2-IIA yields inflammatory mediators (ie, lysophospholipids, fatty acids, and mtDNA) that promote leukocyte activation. Two-photon microscopy in live transfused animals revealed that extracellular mitochondria interact with neutrophils in vivo, triggering neutrophil adhesion to the endothelial wall. Our findings identify extracellular mitochondria, produced by platelets, at the midpoint of a potent mechanism leading to inflammatory responses. PMID:25082876

  20. Platelets release mitochondria serving as substrate for bactericidal group IIA-secreted phospholipase A2 to promote inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Boudreau, Luc H.; Duchez, Anne-Claire; Cloutier, Nathalie; Soulet, Denis; Martin, Nicolas; Bollinger, James; Paré, Alexandre; Rousseau, Matthieu; Naika, Gajendra S.; Lévesque, Tania; Laflamme, Cynthia; Marcoux, Geneviève; Lambeau, Gérard; Farndale, Richard W.; Pouliot, Marc; Hamzeh-Cognasse, Hind; Cognasse, Fabrice; Garraud, Olivier; Nigrovic, Peter A.; Guderley, Helga; Lacroix, Steve; Thibault, Louis; Semple, John W.; Gelb, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a highly potent inflammatory trigger and is reportedly found outside the cells in blood in various pathologies. Platelets are abundant in blood where they promote hemostasis. Although lacking a nucleus, platelets contain functional mitochondria. On activation, platelets produce extracellular vesicles known as microparticles. We hypothesized that activated platelets could also release their mitochondria. We show that activated platelets release respiratory-competent mitochondria, both within membrane-encapsulated microparticles and as free organelles. Extracellular mitochondria are found in platelet concentrates used for transfusion and are present at higher levels in those that induced acute reactions (febrile nonhemolytic reactions, skin manifestations, and cardiovascular events) in transfused patients. We establish that the mitochondrion is an endogenous substrate of secreted phospholipase A2 IIA (sPLA2-IIA), a phospholipase otherwise specific for bacteria, likely reflecting the ancestral proteobacteria origin of mitochondria. The hydrolysis of the mitochondrial membrane by sPLA2-IIA yields inflammatory mediators (ie, lysophospholipids, fatty acids, and mtDNA) that promote leukocyte activation. Two-photon microscopy in live transfused animals revealed that extracellular mitochondria interact with neutrophils in vivo, triggering neutrophil adhesion to the endothelial wall. Our findings identify extracellular mitochondria, produced by platelets, at the midpoint of a potent mechanism leading to inflammatory responses. PMID:25082876

  1. Platelets protect from septic shock by inhibiting macrophage-dependent inflammation via the cyclooxygenase 1 signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Binggang; Zhang, Guoying; Guo, Ling; Li, Xiang-An; Morris, Andrew J; Daugherty, Alan; Whiteheart, Sidney W; Smyth, Susan S; Li, Zhenyu

    2013-01-01

    Although it has long been known that patients with sepsis often have thrombocytopenia and that septic patients with severe thrombocytopenia have a poor prognosis and higher mortality, the role of platelets in the pathogenesis of sepsis is poorly understood. Here we report a protective role of platelets in septic shock. We show that experimental thrombocytopenia induced by intraperitoneal injection of an anti-glycoprotein Ibα monoclonal antibody increases mortality and aggravates organ failure, whereas transfusion of platelets reduces mortality in lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxemia and a bacterial infusion mouse sepsis model. Plasma concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6 are elevated by thrombocytopenia and decreased by platelet transfusion in septic mice. Furthermore, we identify that platelets protect from septic shock by inhibiting macrophage-dependent inflammation via the COX1/PGE₂/EP4-dependent pathway. Thus, these findings demonstrate a previously unappreciated role for platelets in septic shock and suggest that platelet transfusion may be effective in treating severely septic patients.

  2. Molecular genetic methods: principles and feasibility in transfusion medicine.

    PubMed

    Avent, N D

    1998-01-01

    The scale of the application of molecular biological techniques to modern medicine and research in the biological sciences is vast, and in many instances has captured widespread public appeal. The intention of this review is to summarise the impact of molecular techniques on Transfusion Medicine ranging from diagnostic testing (platelet, granulocyte and red cell genotyping; microbiological testing), stable gene integration into haematopoeitic stem cells (gene therapy), production of blood products in transgenic animals and cell lines, and the inhibition of gene expression using synthetic antisense oligodeoxynucleotides. All of these techniques involve the manipulation of genes, be it from the relatively simple examination of different alleles to the technically demanding ability to express mammalian genes in culture and other animals.

  3. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of the Clinical Appropriateness of Blood Transfusion in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Changtai; Gao, Yulu; Li, Zhiqiang; Li, Qinyun; Gao, Zongshuai; Liao, Yanqiu; Deng, Zhifeng

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The issue of the clinical appropriateness of blood transfusion has become a focus of transfusion medicine worldwide. In China, irrational uses of blood have often been reported in recent years. However, to date there lacks a systematic review of the rational uses of blood. This study aimed to determine the clinical appropriateness of blood transfusion in China. We searched PubMed, Web of Science, the Cochrane Library, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), China Science and Technology Journal Database, WanFang Database, and Chinese BioMedical Literature Database, and the retrieval cut-off date was June 31, 2015. SPSS 17.0 and MetaAnalyst 3.13 were employed as the statistics tools in this review. A pooled rate of clinical inappropriateness of transfusion was analyzed by DerSimonian–Laird method. In this study, a total of 39 observational studies were included, which related to 75,132 cases of blood transfusion. According to the meta-analysis results, the overall incidence of clinical inappropriateness of transfusion in China was estimated to be 37.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] [32.1, 42.8]). The subgroup analyses revealed that the pooled rates of clinical inappropriateness of transfusion of plasma, red blood cells (RBCs), cryoprecipitate, and platelets were 56.3% (95% CI [45.8, 66.2]), 30.9% (95% CI [27.1, 35.0]), 25.2% (95% CI [13.2, 42.7]), and 14.1% (95% CI [8.8, 21.9]), respectively. However, the pooled incidence of inappropriateness of transfusion in operative departments was 47.5% (95% CI [36.8, 58.3]), which was significantly higher than that in nonoperative departments, 25.8% (95% CI [18.7, 34.4], P < 0.05). The overall rates of inappropriate use were 36.7% (95% CI [30.2, 43.6]) in major cities and 37.5% (95% CI [31.2, 44.3]) in other cities, respectively; there was no statistically significant difference (P > 0.05). In conclusion, China has suffered from a disadvantage in the clinical appropriateness of blood transfusion

  4. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of the Clinical Appropriateness of Blood Transfusion in China.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Changtai; Gao, Yulu; Li, Zhiqiang; Li, Qinyun; Gao, Zongshuai; Liao, Yanqiu; Deng, Zhifeng

    2015-12-01

    The issue of the clinical appropriateness of blood transfusion has become a focus of transfusion medicine worldwide. In China, irrational uses of blood have often been reported in recent years. However, to date there lacks a systematic review of the rational uses of blood. This study aimed to determine the clinical appropriateness of blood transfusion in China. We searched PubMed, Web of Science, the Cochrane Library, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), China Science and Technology Journal Database, WanFang Database, and Chinese BioMedical Literature Database, and the retrieval cut-off date was June 31, 2015. SPSS 17.0 and MetaAnalyst 3.13 were employed as the statistics tools in this review. A pooled rate of clinical inappropriateness of transfusion was analyzed by DerSimonian-Laird method. In this study, a total of 39 observational studies were included, which related to 75,132 cases of blood transfusion. According to the meta-analysis results, the overall incidence of clinical inappropriateness of transfusion in China was estimated to be 37.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] [32.1, 42.8]). The subgroup analyses revealed that the pooled rates of clinical inappropriateness of transfusion of plasma, red blood cells (RBCs), cryoprecipitate, and platelets were 56.3% (95% CI [45.8, 66.2]), 30.9% (95% CI [27.1, 35.0]), 25.2% (95% CI [13.2, 42.7]), and 14.1% (95% CI [8.8, 21.9]), respectively. However, the pooled incidence of inappropriateness of transfusion in operative departments was 47.5% (95% CI [36.8, 58.3]), which was significantly higher than that in nonoperative departments, 25.8% (95% CI [18.7, 34.4], P < 0.05). The overall rates of inappropriate use were 36.7% (95% CI [30.2, 43.6]) in major cities and 37.5% (95% CI [31.2, 44.3]) in other cities, respectively; there was no statistically significant difference (P > 0.05). In conclusion, China has suffered from a disadvantage in the clinical appropriateness of blood transfusion, especially in

  5. A study on confidential unit exclusion at Shiraz Blood Transfusion Center, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Kasraian, Leila; Karimi, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Background: Confidential unit exclusion (CUE) system has been designed to enhance transfusion safety as an extra additive approach. Aims: This study was designed to survey demographic characteristics, prevalence of serologic markers, and reasons of opting CUE. Materials and Methods: The cross-sectional study was performed at Shiraz Blood Transfusion Center (Southern Iran). CUE is used for all individuals who refer for blood donation, and donors can choose their blood not to be used if they have any doubt about their blood suitability for transfusion. The prevalence rate of HIV, hepatitis B virus (HBV), and hepatitis C virus (HCV) was compared between the blood donors who opted into and out of CUE. Then, the donors were contacted to give another blood sample and the reasons of deferral. Researchers also determined whether their reasons were logical or not. Data were analyzed using comparison of proportions in MedCalc software 7. Results: Out of all the donors, 2365 ones (2.3%) opted for CUE. CUE was more frequent among men, singles, donors with low education levels, between 18 and 25 years old, and with history of previous donation (P < 0.05). The prevalence rate of HCV was higher among the donors who opted for CUE (P < 0.05), but it was not the case regarding HBV and HIV (P>0.05). Furthermore, 91.5% of the donors had opted for CUE by mistake and only 8% had chosen CUE logically. Conclusion: It is necessary to review the process of CUE, make some changes both in procedure and design, and then survey its effectiveness in blood safety. PMID:27605850

  6. A novel strategy for generating platelet-like fragments from megakaryocytic cell lines and human progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Manish J; Drachman, Jonathan G; Reems, Jo-Anna; Thorning, David; Lannutti, Brian J

    2005-01-01

    Transfusion of allogeneic platelets is the mainstay of therapy for patients with thrombocytopenic hemorrhage. However, donated platelets can only be stored for 5 days and are maintained at room temperature, increasing the risk of bacterial growth. Developing a method to produce functional platelets in vitro would greatly advance transfusion therapy. During our studies to understand megakaryocyte development, we discovered that a Src kinase inhibitor, SU6656, induces cellular enlargement, polyploidization, and cytoplasmic fragmentation of several hematopoietic cell lines. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that these fragments possess platelet-like activity. We studied a megakaryocytic cell-line, UT-7/TPO, and immature human primary megakaryocytes. After 6 days in the presence of thrombopoietin and SU6656, the majority of cells became polyploid and started shedding platelet-like fragments. These fragments were tested for aggregation and analyzed by electron microscopy. The platelet-like fragments did not undergo spontaneous activation but did show rapid and sustained aggregation in response to each of the standard agonists collagen, arachidonic acid, adenosine diphosphate, and epinephrine. Platelet-like fragments generated in SU6656 had higher amplitude and more prolonged aggregation in each of three experiments. Primary progenitors developed demarcation membranes within 72 h and evidence of dense granules and platelet-like fragments after 6 days. These cell fragments demonstrated properties consistent with platelet aggregation in response to multiple agonists without spontaneous aggregation. These studies provide evidence that SU6656 promotes megakaryocytic differentiation and thrombopoiesis in vitro. PMID:15923131

  7. Use of 8-methoxypsoralen and long-wavelength ultraviolet radiation for decontamination of platelet concentrates

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, L.; Wiesehahn, G.P.; Morel, P.A.; Corash, L. )

    1989-07-01

    Transmission of viral diseases through blood products remains an unsolved problem in transfusion medicine. We have developed a psoralen photochemical system for decontamination of platelet concentrates in which platelets are treated with long wavelength ultraviolet radiation (UVA, 320-400 nm) in the presence of 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP). Bacteria, RNA viruses, and DNA viruses ranging in genome size from 1.2 x 10(6) daltons, encompassing the size range of human pathogens, were inoculated into platelet concentrates and subjected to treatment. This system inactivated 25 to 30 logs/h of bacteria Escherichia coli or Staphylococcus aureus, 6 logs/h of bacteriophage fd, 0.9 log/h of bacteriophage R17 and 1.1 logs/h of feline leukemia virus (FeLV) in platelet concentrates maintained in standard storage bags. Platelet integrity and in vitro function before, immediately following photochemical treatment, and during prolonged storage after treatment, were evaluated by measuring: (1) extracellular pH; (2) platelet yields; (3) extracellular lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels; (4) platelet morphology; (5) platelet aggregation responsiveness; (6) thromboxane beta-2 (TXB-2) production; (7) dense body secretion; and (8) alpha granule secretion. These assays demonstrated that this photochemical inactivation system inactivated bacteria and viruses in platelet concentrates with minimal adverse effects on the in vitro function of platelets in comparison to untreated control concentrates maintained under current, standard blood bank conditions.

  8. Bench-to-bedside review: Platelets and active immune functions - new clues for immunopathology?

    PubMed

    Garraud, Olivier; Hamzeh-Cognasse, Hind; Pozzetto, Bruno; Cavaillon, Jean-Marc; Cognasse, Fabrice

    2013-08-27

    Platelets display a number of properties besides the crucial function of repairing damaged vascular endothelium and stopping bleeding; these are exploited to benefit patients receiving platelet component transfusions, which might categorize them as innate immune cells. For example, platelets specialize in pro-inflammatory activities, and can secrete a large number of molecules, many of which display biological response modifier functions. Platelets also express receptors for non-self-infectious and possibly non-infectious danger signals, and can engage infectious pathogens by mechanisms barely explained beyond observation. This relationship with infectious pathogens may involve other innate immune cells, especially neutrophils. The sophisticated interplay of platelets with bacteria may culminate in sepsis, a severe pathology characterized by significant reductions in platelet count and platelet dysfunction. How this occurs is still not fully understood. Recent findings from in-depth platelet signaling studies reveal the complexity of platelets and some of the ways they evolve along the immune continuum, from beneficial functions exemplified in endothelium repair to deleterious immunopathology as in systemic inflammatory response syndrome and acute vascular diseases. This review discusses the extended role of platelets as immune cells to emphasize their interactions with infectious pathogens sensed as potentially dangerous.

  9. Adverse events related to blood transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Sandeep; Hemlata; Verma, Anupam

    2014-01-01

    The acute blood transfusion reactions are responsible for causing most serious adverse events. Awareness about various clinical features of acute and delayed transfusion reactions with an ability to assess the serious reactions on time can lead to a better prognosis. Evidence-based medicine has changed today's scenario of clinical practice to decrease adverse transfusion reactions. New evidence-based algorithms of transfusion and improved haemovigilance lead to avoidance of unnecessary transfusions perioperatively. The recognition of adverse events under anaesthesia is always challenging. The unnecessary blood transfusions can be avoided with better blood conservation techniques during surgery and with anaesthesia techniques that reduce blood loss. Better and newer blood screening methods have decreased the infectious complications to almost negligible levels. With universal leukoreduction of red blood cells (RBCs), selection of potential donors such as use of male donors only plasma and restriction of RBC storage, most of the non-infectious complications can be avoided. PMID:25535415

  10. Managing pregnancy with HIV, HELLP syndrome and low platelets.

    PubMed

    Onyangunga, O A; Moodley, J

    2012-02-01

    Management of pregnancies with human immunodeficiency virus, haemolytic anaemia, elevated liver enzymes, low platelets (HELLP) syndrome, and low platelets presents complexities in investigations and treatments, because these conditions and their treatment affect the mother and baby. Low platelets in severe pre-eclampsia, eclampsia and HELLP syndrome are relatively common, and should be detected early once the diagnosis of pre-eclampsia, HELLP syndrome, or both, are made. The mainstay of treatment is lowering of high blood pressure with rapid-acting antihypertensive agents, prevention of convulsions or further seizures with MgSO(4), use of steroids for fetal lung maturity if necessary, followed by delivery of the baby. The use of high-dose steroids for the rapid recovery of maternal platelet counts is controversial, and should not be used routinely in women with HELLP syndrome. The use of platelet transfusion in women with severe pre-eclampsia, eclampsia and HELLP syndrome is a temporising measure, and should only be justified if the clinical circumstances warrant their use (e.g. before caesarean section when the woman has a low platelet count with evidence of bruising or bleeding from venepuncture sites). Low platelets may be an isolated finding in asymptomatic pregnant women and warrant the offer of a human immunodeficiency virus test, as it may be the first sign of this infection. Isolated low platelets may also indicate gestational thrombocytopaenia or idiothrombocytopaenic purpura. Gestational thrombocytopaenia is a benign condition and a diagnosis of exclusion. All clinicians should be aware that low platelets warrant further investigations because of the above-mentioned issues.

  11. Legal and ethical issues in safe blood transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Chandrashekar, Shivaram; Kantharaj, Ambuja

    2014-01-01

    Legal issues play a vital role in providing a framework for the Indian blood transfusion service (BTS), while ethical issues pave the way for quality. Despite licensing of all blood banks, failure to revamp the Drugs and Cosmetic Act (D and C Act) is impeding quality. Newer techniques like chemiluminescence or nucleic acid testing (NAT) find no mention in the D and C Act. Specialised products like pooled platelet concentrates or modified whole blood, therapeutic procedures like erythropheresis, plasma exchange, stem cell collection and processing technologies like leukoreduction and irradiation are not a part of the D and C Act. A highly fragmented BTS comprising of over 2500 blood banks, coupled with a slow and tedious process of dual licensing (state and centre) is a hindrance to smooth functioning of blood banks. Small size of blood banks compromises blood safety. New blood banks are opened in India by hospitals to meet requirements of insurance providers or by medical colleges as this a Medical Council of India (MCI) requirement. Hospital based blood banks opt for replacement donation as they are barred by law from holding camps. Demand for fresh blood, lack of components, and lack of guidelines for safe transfusion leads to continued abuse of blood. Differential pricing of blood components is difficult to explain scientifically or ethically. Accreditation of blood banks along with establishment of regional testing centres could pave the way to blood safety. National Aids Control Organisation (NACO) and National Blood Transfusion Council (NBTC) deserve a more proactive role in the licensing process. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) needs to clarify that procedures or tests meant for enhancement of blood safety are not illegal. PMID:25535417

  12. Legal and ethical issues in safe blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Chandrashekar, Shivaram; Kantharaj, Ambuja

    2014-09-01

    Legal issues play a vital role in providing a framework for the Indian blood transfusion service (BTS), while ethical issues pave the way for quality. Despite licensing of all blood banks, failure to revamp the Drugs and Cosmetic Act (D and C Act) is impeding quality. Newer techniques like chemiluminescence or nucleic acid testing (NAT) find no mention in the D and C Act. Specialised products like pooled platelet concentrates or modified whole blood, therapeutic procedures like erythropheresis, plasma exchange, stem cell collection and processing technologies like leukoreduction and irradiation are not a part of the D and C Act. A highly fragmented BTS comprising of over 2500 blood banks, coupled with a slow and tedious process of dual licensing (state and centre) is a hindrance to smooth functioning of blood banks. Small size of blood banks compromises blood safety. New blood banks are opened in India by hospitals to meet requirements of insurance providers or by medical colleges as this a Medical Council of India (MCI) requirement. Hospital based blood banks opt for replacement donation as they are barred by law from holding camps. Demand for fresh blood, lack of components, and lack of guidelines for safe transfusion leads to continued abuse of blood. Differential pricing of blood components is difficult to explain scientifically or ethically. Accreditation of blood banks along with establishment of regional testing centres could pave the way to blood safety. National Aids Control Organisation (NACO) and National Blood Transfusion Council (NBTC) deserve a more proactive role in the licensing process. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) needs to clarify that procedures or tests meant for enhancement of blood safety are not illegal.

  13. Rhesus monkey platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Harbury, C.B.

    1986-03-01

    The purpose of this abstract is to describe the adenine nucleotide metabolism of Rhesus monkey platelets. Nucleotides are labelled with /sup 14/C-adenine and extracted with EDTA-ethanol (EE) and perchlorate (P). Total platelet ATP and ADP (TATP, TADP) is measured in the Holmsen Luciferase assay, and expressed in nanomoles/10/sup 8/ platelets. TR=TATP/TADP. Human platelets release 70% of their TADP, with a ratio of released ATP/ADP of 0.7. Rhesus platelets release 82% of their TADP, with a ratio of released ATP/ADP of 0.33. Thus, monkey platelets contain more ADP than human platelets. Thin layer chromatography of EE gives a metabolic ratio of 11 in human platelets and 10.5 in monkey platelets. Perchlorate extracts metabolic and actin bound ADP. The human and monkey platelets ratios were 5, indicating they contain the same proportion of actin. Thus, the extra ADP contained in monkey platelets is located in the secretory granules.

  14. Peculiarities of studying the effects of pathogen reduction technologies on platelets.

    PubMed

    Osman, Abdimajid; Hitzler, Walter E; Provost, Patrick

    2016-08-01

    The transfusion of platelet concentrates (PCs) is mainly used for treatment of thrombocytopenic, trauma or surgery patients. The integrity and safety of these platelet preparations, however, is compromised by the presence of pathogens, such as viruses, bacteria and parasites. The transfer of allogeneic donor leukocytes contaminating PCs can also potentially cause adverse reactions in recipients. These considerations prompted the development and implementation of pathogen reduction technologies (PRT), which are based on chemically induced cross-linking and inactivation of nucleic acids. While the incumbent PRT may provide some protection against transfusion-transmitted infections, they are ineffective against infectious prions and may not inactivate other emerging pathogens. In addition, the safety of PRT concerning platelet viability and function has been questioned in several reports. Recent studies suggest that PRT, such as Intercept, may adversely affect the messenger RNA (mRNA) and microRNA content of platelets, as well as their functional integrity, which may compromise the clinical benefits of PRT. Here, we will discuss about the peculiarities of studying the effects of PRT on platelets, which will need to be taken into account in future studies aimed to characterize further, and polish, the rugged side of this otherwise useful and potentially important approach in transfusion medicine. PMID:27095411

  15. Clinical Response and Transfusion Reactions of Sheep Subjected to Single Homologous Blood Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Rejane Santos; Minervino, Antonio Humberto Hamad; Araújo, Carolina Akiko Sato Cabral; Rodrigues, Frederico Augusto Mazzocca Lopes; Oliveira, Francisco Leonardo Costa; Zaminhan, Janaina Larissa Rodrigues; Moreira, Thiago Rocha; Sousa, Isadora Karolina Freitas; Ortolani, Enrico Lippi; Barrêto Júnior, Raimundo Alves

    2014-01-01

    Studies in relation to blood conservation and responses to transfusion are scarce for ruminants. We evaluated the clinical manifestations of sheep that received a single homologous transfusion of whole blood, focusing on transfusion reactions. Eighteen adult sheep were subjected to a single phlebotomy to withdraw 40% of the total blood volume, which was placed into CPDA-1 bags and then divided into G0, animals that received fresh blood, and G15 and G35, animals that received blood stored for 15 or 35 days, respectively. Clinical observations were recorded throughout the transfusion, whereas heart rate, respiratory rate, and rectal temperature were assessed at the following times: 24 hours after phlebotomy and before transfusion; 30 minutes, six, twelve, 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours and eight and 16 days after transfusion. All groups presented transfusion reactions, among which hyperthermia was the most frequent (50% of animals). Tachycardia occurred most frequently in the G35 animals (50% of them). During transfusion G35 animals presented more clinical manifestation (P < 0.05). Transfusion of fresh or stored total blood improved the blood volume, but transfusion reactions occurred, demonstrating that a single transfusion of fresh or stored blood can cause inflammatory and febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reactions in sheep. PMID:25544959

  16. The EASTR Study: indications for transfusion and estimates of transfusion recipient numbers in hospitals supplied by the National Blood Service.

    PubMed

    Wells, A W; Llewelyn, C A; Casbard, A; Johnson, A J; Amin, M; Ballard, S; Buck, J; Malfroy, M; Murphy, M F; Williamson, L M

    2009-12-01

    This study provides data on National Blood Service (NBS) red blood cell (RBC, n = 9142), platelet (PLT, n = 4232) and fresh frozen plasma (FFP, n = 3584) recipients independently sampled by monthly quota from 29 representative hospitals over 12 months in 2001-2002. Hospitals were stratified by size according to total yearly RBC issues. Transfusion indications were chosen from diagnostic and procedural codes, and recipients grouped into Epidemiology and Survival of Transfusion Recipients Case-mix Groups (E-CMGs). The main E-CMGs were digestive [19% of RBC recipients; including 5% gastrointestinal (GI) bleeds and 3% colorectal surgery], musculoskeletal (15%; 12% hip and knee replacement), haematology (13%) and obstetrics and gynaecology (10%). Renal failure, fractured neck of femur, cardiac artery by-pass grafting (CABG) and paediatrics, each accounted for 3-4% recipients. FFP recipients: the main E-CMGs were digestive (21% of FFP recipients; including 7% GI bleeds and 3% colorectal surgery), hepatobiliary (15%; 7% liver disease and 2% liver transplant), cardiac (12%) and paediatrics (9%) The renal, paediatrics, vascular and haematology E-CMGs each had 6-7% of recipients. PLT recipients: the main E-CMGs were haematology (27% of PLT recipients; including 9% lymphoma and 8% acute leukaemia), cardiac (17%), paediatrics (13%), hepatobiliary (10%) and digestive (9%). Back-weighting gave national estimates of 433 000 RBC, 57 500 FFP and 41 500 PLT recipients/year in England and North Wales, median age 69, 64 and 59 years, respectively. Digestive and hepatobiliary indications emerged as the top reason for transfusion in RBC and FFP recipients, and was also a frequent indication in PLT recipients.

  17. Transfusion-Transmitted Babesia microti.

    PubMed

    Fang, Deanna C; McCullough, Jeffrey

    2016-07-01

    Because testing of donors for Babesia microti has become available, it is important to determine the kinds of patients who should receive B microti-tested blood. We searched PubMed, AABB abstracts, and FDA Web site to identify all cases of transfusion-transmitted babesiosis (TTB). Cases were analyzed for underlying medical condition, age, presence of spleen, and reason for transfusion in relation to 5 classes of recipient outcome severity. Sixty-seven reports included 256 transfusion cases where donor tested positive for B microti, 165 of which resulted in TTB. Sixty recipients did not develop disease or become test positive, and test results were not known for 31 more. The 165 cases of TTB involved hematologic (19%), neonate (10%), cardiovascular (8%), and gastrointestinal (6%) patients. Thirty-two (19%) of the 165 infected patients died with death attributed to babesiosis in 25 of the cases. Nine (5%) were asymptomatic, 27 (16%) were symptomatic but had uncomplicated disease, and 16 (10%) had complicated disease. The severity of disease was mixed among many disease categories. Patients >65 years of age included the largest number of recipients (59/165, 36%) and deaths (11/32, 34%), although deaths occurred in other age groups as well. TTB cases were predominantly due to red cells (133 of 140 specified units), with red blood cell units processed in a variety of ways and at all storage duration. TTB with complicated babesiosis and/or death occurred in patients of all age groups and with a variety of underlying medical conditions. PMID:27260107

  18. Massive transfusion: an overview of the main characteristics and potential risks associated with substances used for correction of a coagulopathy.

    PubMed

    Seghatchian, Jerard; Samama, Meyer Michel

    2012-10-01

    Massive transfusion (MT) is an empiric mode of treatment advocated for uncontrolled bleeding and massive haemorrhage, aiming at optimal resuscitation and aggressive correction of coagulopathy. Conventional guidelines recommend early administration of crystalloids and colloids in conjunction with red cells, where the red cell also plays a critical haemostatic function. Plasma and platelets are only used in patients with microvascular bleeding with PT/APTT values >1.5 times the normal values and if PLT counts are below 50×10(9)/L. Massive transfusion carries a significant mortality rate (40%), which increases with the number of volume expanders and blood components transfused. Controversies still exist over the optimal ratio of blood components with respect to overall clinical outcomes and collateral damage. While inadequate transfusion is believed to be associated with poor outcomes but empirical over transfusion results in unnecessary donor exposure with an increased rate of sepsis, transfusion overload and infusion of variable amounts of some biological response modifiers (BRMs), which have the potential to cause additional harm. Alternative strategies, such as early use of tranexamic acid are helpful. However in trauma settings the use of warm fresh whole blood (WFWB) instead of reconstituted components with a different ratio of stored components might be the most cost effective and safer option to improve the patient's survival rate and minimise collateral damage. This manuscript, after a brief summary of standard medical intervention in massive transfusion focuses on the main characteristics of various substances currently available to overcome massive transfusion coagulopathy. The relative levels of some BRMs in fresh and aged blood components of the same origin are highlighted and some myths and unresolved issues related to massive transfusion practice are discussed. In brief, the coagulopathy in MT is a complex phenomenon, often complicated by chronic

  19. Schistosomes versus platelets.

    PubMed

    Da'dara, Akram A; Skelly, Patrick J

    2014-12-01

    Schistosomes are parasitic platyhelminths that currently infect >200million people and cause the chronic debilitating disease schistosomiasis. While these large intravascular parasites can disturb blood flow, they do not appear to activate platelets and provoke thrombus formation. Host-interactive tegumental molecules have been proposed to be important in this regard. For example, tegumental apyrase, SmATPDase1 can degrade the platelet-activating molecule ADP in the extracellular environment. The parasites themselves can produce prostaglandins (or may induce prostaglandin production by host cells) which could inhibit platelet aggregation. Additional tegumental proteins have been proposed to impede the coagulation cascade and to promote fibrinolysis. Platelets have been shown to be directly toxic to schistosomes. Platelets recovered from infected rats are able to kill larval parasites in culture and platelets obtained at later times post-infection are generally better at killing. Even platelets from uninfected rats can rapidly kill larval schistosomes if first exposed to a variety of activators (such as: serum from infected rats, the IgE fraction of that serum, C-reactive protein, cytokines (TNFα or TNFβ)). Passive transfer of stimulated platelets can protect rats against a challenge schistosome infection. Cytokines (TNFα, TNFβ, IFNγ or IL-6) have been shown to similarly promote normal human platelet killing of schistosomes in vitro. Platelet antimicrobial effector molecules (e.g. platelet microbicidal proteins) may mediate such killing. While platelets can be protective against schistosomes following infection of humans and mice, platelet numbers decline (but not so in the non-permissive rat host) and coagulopathy becomes more apparent as schistosome-induced pathology increases.

  20. Modification of fresh-frozen plasma transfusion practices through educational intervention.

    PubMed

    Barnette, R E; Fish, D J; Eisenstaedt, R S

    1990-01-01

    The effect of an educational program designed to address misconceptions about the perioperative transfusion of fresh-frozen plasma (FFP) was examined. Results of a baseline audit of FFP use were compared to those of a study subsequent to the educational process. Statistical analysis of the data revealed that the decrease in the number of patients transfused with FFP, from 32 of 2077 operative cases in Group A (baseline) to 18 of 2540 operative cases in Group B (after education), was significant (p less than 0.01). Analysis of the justifications given for transfusion of FFP revealed that the increase in acceptable indications from 47 percent in Group A to 78 percent in Group B was also significant (p less than 0.05). There was no significant difference between the two groups in units of FFP transfused per patient (Group A, 3.66 +/- 3.2, vs. Group B, 2.47 +/- 1.7) or red cells (Group A, 2.84 +/- 5.2, vs. Group B, 5.22 +/- 4.4), and the patterns of platelet transfusion were similar in the two groups. There was a significant difference in the postoperative partial thromboplastin time (Group A, 38.2 +/- 8.7 vs. Group B, 56.3 +/- 24 seconds, p less than 0.01) but no significant difference in postoperative prothrombin time (Group A, 14.1 +/- 2.6 vs. Group B, 15.4 +/- 3.3 seconds). It can be concluded that an educational program designed to address misconceptions in transfusion practice can alter physician performance and thereby reduce the inappropriate use of FFP.

  1. No CLL transmission through blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Landgren, Ola

    2015-10-22

    In this issue of Blood, Hjalgrim et al used the Scandinavian Donations and Transfusions (SCANDAT2) database, which includes comprehensive information on donors and recipients of >20 million blood products handled by the Danish and Swedish blood banks between 1968 and 2010, to address the clinically relevant question of whether chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is transmitted through blood transfusions.

  2. Reducing transfusion requirements in liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Donohue, Ciara I; Mallett, Susan V

    2015-12-24

    Liver transplantation (LT) was historically associated with massive blood loss and transfusion. Over the past two decades transfusion requirements have reduced dramatically and increasingly transfusion-free transplantation is a reality. Both bleeding and transfusion are associated with adverse outcomes in LT. Minimising bleeding and reducing unnecessary transfusions are therefore key goals in the perioperative period. As the understanding of the causes of bleeding has evolved so too have techniques to minimize or reduce the impact of blood loss. Surgical "piggyback" techniques, anaesthetic low central venous pressure and haemodilution strategies and the use of autologous cell salvage, point of care monitoring and targeted correction of coagulopathy, particularly through use of factor concentrates, have all contributed to declining reliance on allogenic blood products. Pre-emptive management of preoperative anaemia and adoption of more restrictive transfusion thresholds is increasingly common as patient blood management (PBM) gains momentum. Despite progress, increasing use of marginal grafts and transplantation of sicker recipients will continue to present new challenges in bleeding and transfusion management. Variation in practice across different centres and within the literature demonstrates the current lack of clear transfusion guidance. In this article we summarise the causes and predictors of bleeding and present the evidence for a variety of PBM strategies in LT. PMID:26722645

  3. [Blood transfusion: the challenges for tomorrow?].

    PubMed

    Folléa, Gilles; Garraud, Olivier; Tiberghien, Pierre

    2015-02-01

    As any therapeutic means, blood transfusion requires regular evaluation, particularly for its indications, effectiveness and risks. The availability of randomized clinical trials, the evolution of the quality of blood components, and the economic constraints shared by all countries, all lead to rethink both transfusion therapy as a whole and the organization of the transfusion chain from donor to recipient. The main tools available to improve transfusion and the transfusion chain management are the following: programs of patient blood management (PBM) to optimize the use of blood products with a patient centred approach, blood supply management tools to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of the transfusion chain, donor management tools to adapt donor collections to the patients' needs in compliance with safety requirements for patients and donors, and coordination of these activities. A better understanding of these tools and their implementation will certainly be major challenges for transfusion medicine in the near future. Integrating these evolutions in regulations through the revision of the European Directives on blood and blood components (the review process is expected to be launched in 2015) should enroll them in the long term, for the benefit of patients, donors and all other stakeholders involved in the transfusion chain. PMID:25578549

  4. Red blood cell transfusion in newborn infants.

    PubMed

    Whyte, Robin K; Jefferies, Ann L

    2014-04-01

    Red blood cell transfusion is an important and frequent component of neonatal intensive care. The present position statement addresses the methods and indications for red blood cell transfusion of the newborn, based on a review of the current literature. The most frequent indications for blood transfusion in the newborn are the acute treatment of perinatal hemorrhagic shock and the recurrent correction of anemia of prematurity. Perinatal hemorrhagic shock requires immediate treatment with large quantities of red blood cells; the effects of massive transfusion on other blood components must be considered. Some guidelines are now available from clinical trials investigating transfusion in anemia of prematurity; however, considerable uncertainty remains. There is weak evidence that cognitive impairment may be more severe at follow-up in extremely low birth weight infants transfused at lower hemoglobin thresholds; therefore, these thresholds should be maintained by transfusion therapy. Although the risks of transfusion have declined considerably in recent years, they can be minimized further by carefully restricting neonatal blood sampling. PMID:24855419

  5. Reducing transfusion requirements in liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Donohue, Ciara I; Mallett, Susan V

    2015-01-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) was historically associated with massive blood loss and transfusion. Over the past two decades transfusion requirements have reduced dramatically and increasingly transfusion-free transplantation is a reality. Both bleeding and transfusion are associated with adverse outcomes in LT. Minimising bleeding and reducing unnecessary transfusions are therefore key goals in the perioperative period. As the understanding of the causes of bleeding has evolved so too have techniques to minimize or reduce the impact of blood loss. Surgical “piggyback” techniques, anaesthetic low central venous pressure and haemodilution strategies and the use of autologous cell salvage, point of care monitoring and targeted correction of coagulopathy, particularly through use of factor concentrates, have all contributed to declining reliance on allogenic blood products. Pre-emptive management of preoperative anaemia and adoption of more restrictive transfusion thresholds is increasingly common as patient blood management (PBM) gains momentum. Despite progress, increasing use of marginal grafts and transplantation of sicker recipients will continue to present new challenges in bleeding and transfusion management. Variation in practice across different centres and within the literature demonstrates the current lack of clear transfusion guidance. In this article we summarise the causes and predictors of bleeding and present the evidence for a variety of PBM strategies in LT. PMID:26722645

  6. Platelets and primary haemostasis.

    PubMed

    Clemetson, Kenneth J

    2012-03-01

    Platelets have a critical role in haemostasis when vessel wall is injured. Platelet receptors are involved in sequence in this process by slowing platelets down via GPIb/von Willebrand factor to bring them into contact with exposed collagen, then activating them via GPVI to release granule contents and express integrins in a matrix protein binding state. More platelets are incorporated into the growing thrombus and a series of events are set off that finishes with the exposed subendothelium protected by a non-thrombogenic platelet surface and tissue repair underway and the blood flow through the vessel maintained. GPIb is also involved in thrombin activation and, together with GPVI, in the formation of COAT platelets. In thrombosis, pathological changes occur that may lead to life-threatening blockage of vessels. Prevention of thrombosis while maintaining haemostasis remains a major goal of medical research.

  7. Reducing Non-Infectious Risks of Blood Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Gilliss, Brian M.; Looney, Mark R.; Gropper, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary As screening for transfusion-associated infections has improved, non-infectious complications of transfusion now cause the majority of morbidity and mortality associated with transfusion in the United States. For example, transfusion-related acute lung injury, transfusion-associated circulatory overload, and hemolytic transfusion-reactions are the first, second, and third leading causes of death from transfusion respectively. These complications and others are reviewed here and several controversial methods for prevention of non-infectious complications of transfusion are discussed; universal leukoreduction of red cell units, use of male-only plasma, and restriction of red cell storage age. PMID:21792054

  8. Evaluation of a BED-SIDE platelet function assay: performance and clinical utility.

    PubMed

    Lau, Wei C; Walker, C Ty; Obilby, David; Wash, Mark M; Carville, David G M; Guyer, Kirk E; Bates, Eric R

    2002-01-01

    Platelets have a pivotal role in the initial defense against insult to the vasculature and are also recognized of critical importance in the acute care settings of percutaneous coronary intervention and cardiopulmonary bypass. In these environments both platelet count and function may be markedly compromised. Unfortunately, current assays to evaluate the parameters of platelet count and function are of limited utility for bed-side testing. Moreover, it is suggested that there may be significant inter patient variation in response to antiplatelet therapy that may be exacerbated by other agents (e.g. heparin) that are routinely administered during cardiac intervention. Here we describe a practical, rapid and user-friendly whole blood platelet function assay that has been developed for use in bed-side settings. Platelet agonists were formulated with an anticoagulant and lyophilized in blood collection tubes standardised to receive a l mL fresh whole blood sample. In the presence of an agonist, platelets are activated and interact (aggregate). Using traditional cell counting principles, non-aggregated platelets are counted whereas aggregated platelets are not. The percentage (%) of functional platelets in reference to a baseline tube may then be determined. Results are available within four minutes. Platelet aggregation in whole blood demonstrated good correlation with turbidometric aggregometry for both ADP (r=0.91) and collagen (r=0.88). Moreover, in clinical settings where antiplatelet agents were administered, this rapid, bed-side, platelet function assay demonstrated utility in monitoring patient response to these therapies. This novel bed-side assay of platelet function is extremely suitable for the clinical environment with a rapid turn-around time. In addition, it provides a full haematology profile, including platelet count, and should permit enhancement of transfusion and interventional decisions. PMID:17890800

  9. Loss of matrix metalloproteinase 2 in platelets reduces arterial thrombosis in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Momi, Stefania; Falcinelli, Emanuela; Giannini, Silvia; Ruggeri, Loredana; Cecchetti, Luca; Corazzi, Teresa; Libert, Claude

    2009-01-01

    Platelet activation at a site of vascular injury is essential for the arrest of bleeding; however, excessive platelet activation at a site of arterial damage can result in the unwarranted formation of arterial thrombi, precipitating acute myocardial infarction, or ischemic stroke. Activation of platelets beyond the purpose of hemostasis may occur when substances facilitating thrombus growth and stability accumulate. Human platelets contain matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) and release it upon activation. Active MMP-2 amplifies the platelet aggregation response to several agonists by potentiating phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activation. Using several in vivo thrombosis models, we show that the inactivation of the MMP-2 gene prevented thrombosis induced by weak, but not strong, stimuli in mice but produced only a moderate prolongation of the bleeding time. Moreover, using cross-transfusion experiments and wild-type/MMP-2−/− chimeric mice, we show that it is platelet-derived MMP-2 that facilitates thrombus formation. Finally, we show that platelets activated by a mild vascular damage induce thrombus formation at a downstream arterial injury site by releasing MMP-2. Thus, platelet-derived MMP-2 plays a crucial role in thrombus formation by amplifying the response of platelets to weak activating stimuli. These findings open new possibilities for the prevention of thrombosis by the development of MMP-2 inhibitors. PMID:19808257

  10. [From donor to recipient: transfusion chain specificities in the French ultra-marine areas].

    PubMed

    Richard, P; Ould Amar, K

    2013-05-01

    Besides specific organisational requirements, the transfusional chain in French ultra-marine areas has specificities related to the epidemiology of infectious diseases and to population characteristics. We focus on some of these sociodemographic and medical peculiarities: the challenge of autosufficiency in relation to demographic trends; epidemiologic risks associated to emergent viruses such as dengue and Chikungunya, and the strategies that had been implemented to face last outbreaks; inappropriate selection criteria for eligibility to blood donation (biologic characteristics of Afro-Caribbeans not taken into account for the low hemoglobin deferral threshold; absence of guidelines for the screening of hemoglobinopathies AS/AC, present in 8% of the target population); specific indications for transfusion, such as platelet use in dengue fever or RBC transfusion in sickle cell disease. Due to the high polymorphism of erythrocyte antigens in Afro-Caribbeans, intra-ethnic transfusion facilitates compatibility for common antigens, but is responsible for the emergence of allo-antibodies difficult to identify in the absence of specific antisera or panels; molecular typing of erythrocyte antigens would allow detection of those patients at risk for immunization, expressing variant antigens or lacking high frequency antigens, as well as the characterization of RBC expressing immunogenic so called low frequency antigens. In an era of periodic emergence of new viruses in Europe (dengue, Chikungunya, West Nile virus...) and with the spreading of diseases with high transfusional requirements, such as sickle cell disease, ultra-marine services represent laboratories for the study of future trends and problems in transfusion medicine.

  11. Platelet size in man.

    PubMed

    Paulus, J M

    1975-09-01

    The shape and parameters of platelet size distributions were studied in 50 normal persons and 97 patients in order to test the proposed thesis that platelet size heterogeneity results mainly from aging in the circulation. This thesis was contradicted (1) by size distributions of age-homogeneous, newly-born cell populations which were lognormal with increased (instead of decreased) dispersion of volumes and (2) by the macrothrombocytosis found in some populations with normal age distribution. For these reasons, thrombocytopoiesis appeared to play the major role in determining platelet size. A model was built in which the volume variation of platelet territories due to megakaryocyte growth and membrane demarcation at each step of maturation was a random proportion of the previous value of the volume. This model explains the lognormal shape of both newborn and circulating platelet size distributions. It also implies that (1) the mean and standard deviation of platelet logvolumes depend on the rates of volume change of the individual platelet territories (growth rate minus demarcation rate) as well as on megakaryocyte maturation time; (2) platelet hyperdestruction causes an increase in the mean and dispersion of the rates of territory volume change; (3) Mediterranean macrothrombocytosis and some hereditary macrothrombocytotic thrombocytopenias or dysthrombocytopoieses reflect a diminished rate of territory demarcation, and (4) platelet size heterogeneity is caused mainly by the variations in territory growth and demarcation and not by aging in the circulation.

  12. Platelets enhance neutrophil transendothelial migration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Platelets are increasingly recognized as important mediators of inflammation in addition to thrombosis. While platelets have been shown to promote neutrophil (PMN) adhesion to endothelium in various inflammatory models, it is unclear whether platelets enhance neutrophil transmigration across inflame...

  13. Use of remote blood releasing system for red cell transfusion in hospice care center

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kwok Ying; Leung, Rock Yuk Yan; Cheung, Ka Chi; Lam, Clarence; Koo, Eleanor; Ng, Sylvia

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: It is quite common to have advanced cancer or end-stage renal disease patients for regular or even frequent blood transfusion in palliative care. However, due to geographical reason in some hospice centers, blood transfusion is sometimes difficult if blood bank is closed during non-office hour or not available. Methods: Here, we reported a new blood releasing system, that is, remote blood releasing system, that could be used safely by nursing staff alone when the blood bank was closed during the night time and holiday. Results: On-call nursing staff could collect red cells successful in these two cases. Conclusion: The new blood releasing system seems useful. However, larger sample sizes and longer period of study are required to estimate its efficacy and safety. The provision of antibody-positive red cells and platelet remained a limitation of this system. PMID:27489720

  14. The transfusion medicine we want.

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    The Associação Brasileira de Hematologia e Hemoterapia (ABHH), through its Board of Directors, hosted a national symposium called "Forum: The Transfusion Medicine we want", to discuss proposed policies and techniques related to the area. This meeting was held in São Paulo on August 19 and 20, 2010, with the participation of experts, authorities and representatives of organized groups of patients and users. The discussions were organized around three specific issues selected from over 100 suggestions sent to the ABHH through public consultation on the web: 1. Strategies; 2. Financing; 3. Blood products. A plenary session, held at the end of the meeting, adopted recommendations that are relevant to the different discussion topics.This document contains actions proposed by the ABHH to meet the demands discussed.

  15. The transfusion medicine we want

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The Associação Brasileira de Hematologia e Hemoterapia (ABHH), through its Board of Directors, hosted a national symposium called "Forum: The Transfusion Medicine we want", to discuss proposed policies and techniques related to the area. This meeting was held in São Paulo on August 19 and 20, 2010, with the participation of experts, authorities and representatives of organized groups of patients and users. The discussions were organized around three specific issues selected from over 100 suggestions sent to the ABHH through public consultation on the web: 1. Strategies; 2. Financing; 3. Blood products. A plenary session, held at the end of the meeting, adopted recommendations that are relevant to the different discussion topics. This document contains actions proposed by the ABHH to meet the demands discussed. PMID:23284248

  16. Serious Hazards of Transfusion (SHOT) haemovigilance and progress is improving transfusion safety

    PubMed Central

    Bolton-Maggs, Paula H B; Cohen, Hannah

    2013-01-01

    Summary The Serious Hazards of Transfusion (SHOT) UK confidential haemovigilance reporting scheme began in 1996. Over the 16 years of reporting, the evidence gathered has prompted changes in transfusion practice from the selection and management of donors to changes in hospital practice, particularly better education and training. However, half or more reports relate to errors in the transfusion process despite the introduction of several measures to improve practice. Transfusion in the UK is very safe: 2·9 million components were issued in 2012, and very few deaths are related to transfusion. The risk of death from transfusion as estimated from SHOT data in 2012 is 1 in 322 580 components issued and for major morbidity, 1 in 21 413 components issued; the risk of transfusion-transmitted infection is much lower. Acute transfusion reactions and transfusion-associated circulatory overload carry the highest risk for morbidity and death. The high rate of participation in SHOT by National Health Service organizations, 99·5%, is encouraging. Despite the very useful information gained about transfusion reactions, the main risks remain human factors. The recommendations on reduction of errors through a ‘back to basics’ approach from the first annual SHOT report remain absolutely relevant today. PMID:24032719

  17. Nitric oxide: platelet protectant properties during cardiopulmonary bypass/ECMO.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Julie

    2002-06-01

    Postoperative bleeding is a major complication in patients who have been placed on extracorporeal circulatory support for various cardiac procedures (1). The increase in hemorrhage is well documented and is associated with various factors, which include, high-dose systemic heparinization, thrombocytopenia, and impaired platelet function. Platelets activate when exposed to the large foreign surface of the extracorpeal circuit, with the largest area being the oxygenator. Despite adequate heparinization, platelet levels continue to decrease. This aggregation phenomenon has also been extensively studied, and it cannot be attributed to the use of aminocarproic acid, aprotinin, propofol, or amicar (2). Other factors found to be unrelated include, the brand or type of oxygenator, the use of heparin coatings (3), activated clotting time (ACT) levels while on bypass, the operative procedure, preoperative medications, or the types of anesthetic agents used (2). Therefore, it may be beneficial to add nitric oxide to the sweep gas to decrease platelet loss, platelet damage, postoperative bleeding, and lessening the need for post-operative blood transfusions.

  18. Deferasirox chelation therapy in patients with transfusion-dependent MDS: a 'real-world' report from two regional Italian registries: Gruppo Romano Mielodisplasie and Registro Basilicata.

    PubMed

    Maurillo, Luca; Breccia, Massimo; Buccisano, Francesco; Voso, Maria Teresa; Niscola, Pasquale; Trapè, Giulio; Tatarelli, Caterina; D'Addosio, Ada; Latagliata, Roberto; Fenu, Susanna; Piccioni, Anna Lina; Fragasso, Alberto; Aloe Spiriti, Maria A; Refrigeri, Marco; Criscuolo, Marianna; Musto, Pellegrino; Venditti, Adriano

    2015-07-01

    Deferasirox (DFX) is an orally administered iron chelator approved for use in patients with transfusion-dependent iron overload due to myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). The safety and efficacy of DFX has been explored in clinical trial settings, but there is little data on unselected patients with MDS. The aim of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the safety, compliance, efficacy and effect on haematopoiesis of DFX in a large 'real-world' MDS population. One hundred and eighteen patients with transfusion-dependent MDS were treated with DFX across 11 centres in Italy. Serum ferritin levels, haematological response, dosing, adverse events and transfusion dependence were recorded at baseline, 3, 6, 12 and 24 months following initiation of treatment. DFX reduced mean serum ferritin levels from 1790 to 1140 ng/mL (P < 0.001), with 7.1% of patients achieving transfusion independence. Significant haematological improvement was seen in erythroid (17.6%), platelet (5.9%) and neutrophil counts (7.1%). Adverse events were reported in 47.5% of patients, including gastrointestinal and renal toxicity. Regression analysis showed that higher starting doses of DFX are associated with transfusion independence at 24 months. DFX is a safe, effective treatment for transfusion-dependent MDS that can lead to transfusion independence and haematological improvement in a subset of patients. PMID:25764148

  19. Platelet Function Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the clotting process in the body ( in vivo ). A person with normal platelet function test results may still experience excessive bleeding or inappropriate clotting during and after a surgery. Most samples for platelet function testing are only stable for a very short period ...

  20. Gasotransmitters and platelets.

    PubMed

    Truss, Nicola J; Warner, Timothy D

    2011-11-01

    Platelets are essential to prevent blood loss and promote wound healing. Their activation comprises of several complex steps which are regulated by a range of mediators. Over the last few decades there has been intense interest in a group of gaseous mediators known as gasotransmitters; currently comprising nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen sulphide (H(2)S). Here we consider the action of gasotransmitters on platelet activity. NO is a well established platelet inhibitor which mediates its effects predominantly through activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase leading to a decrease in intraplatelet calcium. More recently CO has been identified as a gasotransmitter with inhibitory actions on platelets; CO acts through the same mechanism as NO but is less potent. The in vivo and platelet functions of the most recently identified gasotransmitter, H(2)S, are still the subject of investigations, but they appear generally inhibitory. Whilst there is evidence for the individual action of these mediators, it is also likely that combinations of these mediators are more relevant regulators of platelets. Furthermore, current evidence suggests that these mediators in combination alter the production of each other, and so modify the circulating levels of gasotransmitters. The use of gasotransmitters as therapeutic agents is also being explored for a range of indications. In conclusion, the importance of NO in the regulation of vascular tone and platelet activity has long been understood. Other gasotransmitters are now establishing themselves as mediators of vascular tone, and recent evidence suggests that these other gasotransmitters may also modulate platelet function.

  1. Blood transfusion in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Marouf, Rajaa

    2011-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is an inherited disease that causes chronic hemolytic anemia. Its pathognomonic signs and symptoms are caused by hemoglobin (Hb) S, which results from a single nucleotide substitution in the β-globin gene that places the amino acid valine with glutamic acid at codon 6 of the β-globin chain. Hb S is an insoluble Hb that crystalizes at low oxygen tension and other precipitating conditions leading to rigidity of red cells and clumping in small blood vessels. Patients with sickle cell disease have a variable Hb level that may range from 7.0 to 11.0 g/dL in their steady state condition. The most common cause of hospital presentation is due to acute painful crisis that results from vaso-occlusion by sickled cells. These episodes are treated with hydration and analgesia and do not require blood transfusion. Blood transfusion should be aimed to increase tissue delivery of oxygen. Hb S is known to be a low affinity Hb and so delivers oxygen at a lower partial pressure of oxygen compared to Hb A. Even with adequate pre transfusion testing and precautions, blood transfusion is never totally safe and short or long term complications may occur. Blood transfusion in patients with sickle cell disease has only limited indications such as acute hemolytic, aplastic or sequestration crises. Chronic transfusion protocols are implemented in cases of strokes or high cerebral blood flow ultrasonic studies as a prophylactic measure. Exchange blood transfusion is used in some complications of the disease such as acute chest syndrome (ACS), priapism or peri operatively. Once it is decided to transfuse blood, the transfused blood should be Hb S negative, Rh and Kell antigen matched. PMID:21981466

  2. Preparation of small volume, leuko and erythrocyte very poor platelet concentrates.

    PubMed

    Valbonesi, M; Angelini, G; Malfanti, L; Lercari, G; Fella, M; Calderisi, S; Anselmo, A; Balistreri, M

    1986-05-01

    Recently developed automated discontinuous flow centrifuge (DFC) separators can produce leuko- and erythrocyte-poor platelet concentrates (PC). According to general experience with these machines it is difficult to obtain more than 4 X 10(11) platelets, though a second program set up by Coffe et al. appears to produce PC containing approximately 5 X 10(11) platelets suspended in a plasma volume of 390 ml. At our center we employed a new Dideco cell separator equipped with the surge pump and a technique developed for the production of small volume, RBC and WBC-very poor PC. In 60 routine procedures we obtained the following results: mean processing time 87 +/- 11 minutes; final volume of PC 136 +/- 19 ml, with a mean platelet yield of 5.21 X 10(11) platelets. WBC contamination was 1.8 X 10(8) (93% lymphocytes) and RBC were 3.1 X 10(8). Plasma volume as well as WBC and RBC contamination were reduced by recirculating PC after the 6th pass. The demand for single donor platelet concentrates (PC) is increasing progressively. Recently developed automated cell separators can produce leukocyte (WBC) and erythrocyte (RBC) poor PC. With these machines it may be difficult to obtain PC containing at least 4 X 10(11) platelets and less than 1 X 10(9) leukocytes (1, 2, 3) since donor variables such as hematocrit, precounts, buffy coat formation and initial plasma light transmission are of paramount importance for the efficiency of the program. At our center a prototype discontinuous flow centrifuge (DFC) cell separator equipped with the surge pump was studied.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3733246

  3. IgG+ platelets in the marmoset: their induction, maintenance, and survival

    SciTech Connect

    Gengozian, N.; McLaughlin, C.L.

    1980-06-01

    Immunization of marmosets with platelets from another species of marmoset leads to antibody formation to the donor platelets, deposition of IgG on the host's platelets, and thrombocytopenia. This disease closely resembles posttransfusion purpura of man, which may develop after one or two transfusions of whole blood. The mode of immunization in the marmoset was found to be important: intravenous (i.v.) inoculations were without effect, while intramuscular (i.m.) immunizations led to the disease. Intramuscular inoculations were characterized by formation of 7S antibodies, as measured by indirect immunofluorescent (IF) and complement-dependent platelet cytotoxicity (PC) tests; in contrast, i.v. immunizations, while leading to 7S antibodies by the IF test, yielded only 19S antibodies reactive in the PC assay. The titers were also consistently higher with i.m. immunizations. Antibody was not limited to the donor platelets, but auto- or host-type reactivity was also present; this antibody was in very low titer and could be found only when the animal was thrombocytopenic. A primary finding was the ability to maintain increased deposition of IgG on the host's platelets in the absence of thrombocytopenia by biweekly or monthly inoculations of the donor platelet antigen. The amount of IgG found on platelets of normal and immunized marmosets was comparable to that reported for normal humans and patients with cinical immune thrombocytopenia. Finally, platelet survival studies in animals with IgG+ platelets and normal platelet counts indicated a rapid turnover, suggesting operation of a compensatory mechanism to maintain platelet levels.

  4. Optimizing Transfusion Ratios in Massive Transfusion Protocols: An Argument Against the 1:1:1 Dogma and Approach to Trauma Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Jason A; Huitron, Sonny S; George, Alan A; Simon, Clayton D

    2015-01-01

    We believe that the current practice of transfusing red blood cells (RBCs), plasma, and platelets in a 1:1:1 ratio is not optimal in massive transfusion protocols (MTPs) and is based on a simple yet profound misconception regarding the preparation of component blood products. This 1:1:1 approach ignores the additional fluids added for anticoagulation and preservation of the components and assumes that there is a one-size-fits-all ratio that must be used across all types of trauma. In this article, we explain the rationale behind our conclusion with supporting figures and suggest that although the 1:1:1 ratio might be within the range of hemostasis, it falls near the lower cusp of hemostasis, making it less than ideal. The patient in mind was one in whom transfusion was expected to exceed 10 units of packed RBCs (pRBCs) in a combat environment where the situation was too hectic for additional testing. The goal was to keep the patient within a hemostatic range until the crisis phase was averted and the transition could then be made to goal-directed therapy with point-of-care testing.

  5. [Blood transfusion and supply chain management safety].

    PubMed

    Quaranta, Jean-François; Caldani, Cyril; Cabaud, Jean-Jacques; Chavarin, Patricia; Rochette-Eribon, Sandrine

    2015-02-01

    The level of safety attained in blood transfusion now makes this a discipline better managed care activities. This was achieved both by scientific advances and policy decisions regulating and supervising the activity, as well as by the quality system, which we recall that affects the entire organizational structure, responsibilities, procedures, processes and resources in place to achieve quality management. So, an effective quality system provides a framework within which activities are established, performed in a quality-focused way and continuously monitored to improve outcomes. This system quality has to irrigate all the actors of the transfusion, just as much the establishments of blood transfusion than the health establishments. PMID:25578550

  6. [Blood transfusion and supply chain management safety].

    PubMed

    Quaranta, Jean-François; Caldani, Cyril; Cabaud, Jean-Jacques; Chavarin, Patricia; Rochette-Eribon, Sandrine

    2015-02-01

    The level of safety attained in blood transfusion now makes this a discipline better managed care activities. This was achieved both by scientific advances and policy decisions regulating and supervising the activity, as well as by the quality system, which we recall that affects the entire organizational structure, responsibilities, procedures, processes and resources in place to achieve quality management. So, an effective quality system provides a framework within which activities are established, performed in a quality-focused way and continuously monitored to improve outcomes. This system quality has to irrigate all the actors of the transfusion, just as much the establishments of blood transfusion than the health establishments.

  7. 42 CFR 493.1103 - Standard: Requirements for transfusion services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... of transfusion reactions on a continuous basis through a CLIA-certified laboratory or a laboratory... transfusion reactions. The facility must have procedures for preventing transfusion reactions and when necessary, promptly identify, investigate, and report blood and blood product transfusion reactions to...

  8. 42 CFR 493.1103 - Standard: Requirements for transfusion services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... of transfusion reactions on a continuous basis through a CLIA-certified laboratory or a laboratory... transfusion reactions. The facility must have procedures for preventing transfusion reactions and when necessary, promptly identify, investigate, and report blood and blood product transfusion reactions to...

  9. 42 CFR 493.1103 - Standard: Requirements for transfusion services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... of transfusion reactions on a continuous basis through a CLIA-certified laboratory or a laboratory... transfusion reactions. The facility must have procedures for preventing transfusion reactions and when necessary, promptly identify, investigate, and report blood and blood product transfusion reactions to...

  10. 42 CFR 493.1103 - Standard: Requirements for transfusion services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... of transfusion reactions on a continuous basis through a CLIA-certified laboratory or a laboratory... transfusion reactions. The facility must have procedures for preventing transfusion reactions and when necessary, promptly identify, investigate, and report blood and blood product transfusion reactions to...

  11. 42 CFR 493.1103 - Standard: Requirements for transfusion services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... of transfusion reactions on a continuous basis through a CLIA-certified laboratory or a laboratory... transfusion reactions. The facility must have procedures for preventing transfusion reactions and when necessary, promptly identify, investigate, and report blood and blood product transfusion reactions to...

  12. Blood Donation and Transfusion: A Primer for Health Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felts, W. Michael; Glascoff, Mary A.

    1991-01-01

    Presents a primer for health educators about blood donation and transfusion, examining the nature of human blood, the background of blood transfusion, blood donation criteria, risks related to homologous blood transfusion, directed blood donation, potential alternatives to homologous transfusion, and resources for education on the subject. (SM)

  13. Nomograms for rapid estimation of intravascular intrauterine exchange transfusion.

    PubMed

    Christmas, J T; Little, B B; Johnston, W L; Santos-Ramos, R; Theriot, S K; Brown, C E

    1990-05-01

    Fetal exchange transfusion is complicated by the fact that vascular access must be maintained while the number of exchanges needed to achieve a desired post-transfusion hematocrit is calculated. A rapid method for estimating the number of exchange transfusions would greatly simplify fetal exchange transfusion for blood group isoimmunization. In this report, we present a graphic method for determining the number of exchange transfusions necessary to achieve a post-transfusion hematocrit of 45%, using a nomogram for 5- and 10-mL exchange transfusion volumes.

  14. Bacterial contamination of blood components: Norwegian strategies in identifying donors with higher risk of inducing septic transfusion reactions in recipients.

    PubMed

    Klausen, Sofie Strand; Hervig, Tor; Seghatchian, Jerard; Reikvam, Håkon

    2014-10-01

    Bacterial contamination of blood and its cellular components remains the most common microbiological cause of transfusion associated morbidity and mortality, even in developed countries. This yet unresolved complication is seen more often in platelet transfusions, as platelet concentrates are stored at room temperature, in gas permeable containers with constant agitation, which support bacterial proliferation from relatively low undetectable levels, at the beginning of storage time, to relatively high virulent bacteria titers and endotoxin generation, at the end of shelf life. Accordingly, several combined strategies are introduced and implemented to at least reduce the potential risk of bacterial contaminated products for transfusion. These embody: improved donors arms cleaning; bacterial avoidance by diversion of the first portion of collection; reducing bacterial growth through development of newer storage media for longer platelet shelf life; bacterial load reduction by leucoreduction/viral inactivation, in some countries and eliminating the use potentially contaminated units through screening, through current available testing procedures, though none are not yet fully secure. We have not seen the same reduction in bacterial associated transfusion infections as we have observed for the sharp drop in transfusion associated transmission rates of HIV and hepatitis B and C. This great viral reduction is not only caused by the introduction of newer and more sensitive and specific detection methods for different viruses, but also the identification of donor risk groups through questionnaires and personal interviews. While search for more efficient methods for identifying potential blood donors with asymptomatic bacteremia, as well as a better way for detecting bacteria in stored blood components will be continuing, it is necessary to establish more standardized guidelines for the recognition the adverse reactions in recipients of potentially contaminated units

  15. Blood doping: the flip side of transfusion and transfusion alternatives.

    PubMed

    Cacic, Daniel Limi; Hervig, Tor; Seghatchian, Jerard

    2013-08-01

    Blood doping in sports has been a hot topic of present. Longitudinal follow up of hematological parameters in different endurance sports, during the 1990s and early 2000s, has provided considerable suspicions about extensive blood manipulation, with performance enhancing effects. Recent doping revelations in the media also prove that blood doping is not an anticipated myth but it is, in fact, real. Erythropoiesis stimulating agents and autologous blood transfusions are used in synergy with substantial effect on the maximum oxygen uptake and delivery to muscles. Whilst both methods of blood manipulation represent a potential health hazard, in the context of an elevated hematocrit, nevertheless despite a number of suspicious deaths amongst athletes, this has not yet been fully documented. A reliable test for detection of recombinant human erythropoietin was implemented in 2000, but this is probably circumvented by microdose regimens. The Athlete's Biological Passport represents the progeny of the idea of an indirect approach based on long term monitoring of hematological parameters, thus making it possible to detect autologous blood doping and erythropoietin use after the substance is excreted. Nevertheless with advances in anti-doping measures it is possible that the levels of excretion of substances used can be masked. Clearly more sensitive and specific diagnostic tools and research/development in these areas of major concern are warranted, which, combined with changes in the athlete's attitude, will help in reaching the vision of fair play.

  16. [Research advance on clinical blood transfusion and tumor therapy].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xue-Bing; Zhang, Li-Ping; Wang, Yan-Ju; Ma, Cong

    2010-08-01

    Clinical blood transfusion is one of the most important supportive therapy for patients with tumor. The blood transfusion has dual effects for patients with tumor. First, blood transfusion can rectify anemia and improve oxygen saturation, accelerate oxidation and necrosis for tumor cells; the second, blood transfusion can induce immunosuppression, tumor recurrence and postoperative infection for tumor patients. Filtering white blood cells (WBC) before blood transfusion can decrease the incidence of the adverse reactions. The rational perioperative autotransfusion for patients with tumors is focus to which the world medical sciences pay close attention. In this article, the support effect of blood transfusion for treatment of tumor patients, blood transfusion and immunosuppression, blood transfusion and postoperative infection and relapse of tumor patients, depleted leukocyte blood transfusion and autologous transfusion of tumor patients are reviewed.

  17. Multifaceted regenerative lives of expired platelets in the second decade of the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Burnouf, Thierry; Goubran, Hadi Alphonse; Seghatchian, Jerard

    2014-10-01

    A traditional concept in transfusion medicine is the expiration of platelet concentrates 5-7 days after collection due to storage conditions that favor the risks of bacterial contamination and may lead to a gradual alteration of platelet hemostatic power. Newer findings are strongly suggesting that, after their supposed expiration date, platelet concentrates still contain multiple functional growth factors and cytokines and actually have unaltered power for application in regenerative medicine and cell therapy. Expired platelets can be a valuable source of growth factors to promote the healing of wounds, and can be used for ex vivo expansion of stem cells. There is also preliminary evidence that infusible platelet membrane (IPM) from outdated platelet concentrates and thrombosomes have potential clinical applications as hemostatic products. Experimental work is certainly needed to further validate and standardize the clinical potential of "expired" platelet blood products in human clinical medicine. However, strong evidence accumulates toward a potential for further manufacturing avenues of expired platelet concentrates into valuable therapeutic and clinically relevant products.

  18. The hibernating 13-lined ground squirrel as a model organism for potential cold storage of platelets.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Scott T; Richters, Karl E; Melin, Travis E; Liu, Zhi-jian; Hordyk, Peter J; Benrud, Ryan R; Geiser, Lauren R; Cash, Steve E; Simon Shelley, C; Howard, David R; Ereth, Mark H; Sola-Visner, Martha C

    2012-05-15

    Hibernating mammals have developed many physiological adaptations to extreme environments. During hibernation, 13-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) must suppress hemostasis to survive prolonged body temperatures of 4-8°C and 3-5 heartbeats per minute without forming lethal clots. Upon arousal in the spring, these ground squirrels must be able to quickly restore normal clotting activity to avoid bleeding. Here we show that ground squirrel platelets stored in vivo at 4-8°C were released back into the blood within 2 h of arousal in the spring with a body temperature of 37°C but were not rapidly cleared from circulation. These released platelets were capable of forming stable clots and remained in circulation for at least 2 days before newly synthesized platelets were detected. Transfusion of autologous platelets stored at 4°C or 37°C showed the same clearance rates in ground squirrels, whereas rat platelets stored in the cold had a 140-fold increase in clearance rate. Our results demonstrate that ground squirrel platelets appear to be resistant to the platelet cold storage lesions observed in other mammals, allowing prolonged storage in cold stasis and preventing rapid clearance upon spring arousal. Elucidating these adaptations could lead to the development of methods to store human platelets in the cold, extending their shelf life.

  19. Characteristics of the THERAFLEX UV-Platelets pathogen inactivation system - an update.

    PubMed

    Seghatchian, Jerard; Tolksdorf, Frank

    2012-04-01

    Considerable progress has been made in the last decade in producing purer, safer, leucocyte and plasma reduced platelet concentrates (PC) with an extended shelf life. The development of different pathogen inactivation technologies (PIT) has made a substantial contribution to this trend. Preceding platelet PIT (INTERCEPT Blood System/Cerus Corporation, Concord, CA, USA; MIRASOL/Caridian BCT, Lakewood, CO, USA) are based on adding a photosensitive compound to PC. The mixture is then activated by UV light in the UVB and/or UVA spectral regions. A novel procedure, THERAFLEX UV-Platelets (MacoPharma, Mouvaux, France), was recently developed that uses short-wave ultraviolet light (UVC), without addition of any photoactive agent. This technology has proven to be highly effective in sterilising bacteria (the major cause of morbidity/mortality after platelet transfusion) as well as inactivating other transfusion transmitted DNA/RNA containing pathogens and residual leucocytes. Any PIT reflects a balance between the efficacy of pathogen inactivation and preservation of platelet quality and function. A broad spectrum of in vitro tests have become available for the assessment of platelet storage lesion (PSL), aiming to better predict clinical outcome and untoward effects of platelet therapy. Recent paired studies on the release of platelet-derived cytokines, as new platelet performance indicators, revealed a parallel increase in both THERAFLEX UV-treated and control PC throughout storage, supporting the notion that the bioavailability of platelet function is not grossly affected by UVC treatment. This is corroborated by some newer technologies for proteomic analysis, showing that the THERAFLEX UV-Platelets system results in limited disruption of integrin-regulating extracellular disulfide bonds and minimal protein alterations when compared to UVB and gamma irradiation. Moreover, standard in vitro parameters reflecting activation, metabolic activity and function of platelets

  20. Platelet-collagen adhesion enhances platelet aggregation induced by binding of VWF to platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Laduca, F.M.; Bell, W.R.; Bettigole, R.E. State Univ. of New York, Buffalo )

    1987-11-01

    Ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation (RIPA) was evaluated in the presence of platelet-collagen adhesion. RIPA of normal donor platelet-rich plasma (PRP) demonstrated a primary wave of aggregation mediated by the binding of von Willebrand factor (VWF) to platelets and a secondary aggregation wave, due to a platelet-release reaction, initiated by VWF-platelet binding and inhibitable by acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). An enhanced RIPA was observed in PRP samples to which collagen had been previously added. These subthreshold concentrations of collagen, which by themselves were insufficient to induce aggregation, caused measurable platelet-collagen adhesion. Subthreshold collagen did not cause microplatelet aggregation, platelet release of ({sup 3}H)serotonin, or alter the dose-responsive binding of {sup 125}I-labeled VWF to platelets, which occurred with increasing ristocetin concentrations. However, ASA inhibition of the platelet release reaction prevented collagen-enhanced RIPA. These results demonstrate that platelet-collagen adhesion altered the platelet-release reaction induced by the binding of VWF to platelets causing a platelet-release reaction at a level of VWF-platelet binding not normally initiating a secondary aggregation. These findings suggest that platelet-collagen adhesion enhances platelet function mediated by VWF.

  1. [Correct preparation of a transfusion: Part 1].

    PubMed

    Strobel, E; Henschler, R

    2014-09-01

    The administration of blood products is strictly regulated. Several weeks before the operation the preparation for transfusion begins with optimizing the patient's hematological and hemostaseological situation. In elective surgery blood group testing and antibody screening are performed soon after admission of the patient. The identification of the blood sample is important. Informed consent of the recipient has to be obtained. On the day before the operation a further blood sample is necessary for cross-matching if red blood cells are to be transfused. Usually blood products are issued for immediate administration. Before transfusion begins the blood product has to be checked, the identity of the patient must be controlled and in the case of red blood cell transfusions the AB0 bedside test has to be performed. PMID:25085082

  2. Twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Transfusion Syndrome, or TTTS, is a disease of the placenta. This condition affects twins or other multiples ... containing blood vessels going from one baby to the other. Blood from the smaller "donor" twin is ...

  3. Rapid induction of single donor chimerism after double umbilical cord blood transplantation preceded by reduced intensity conditioning: results of the HOVON 106 phase II study

    PubMed Central

    Somers, Judith A.E.; Braakman, Eric; van der Holt, Bronno; Petersen, Eefke J.; Marijt, Erik W.A.; Huisman, Cynthia; Sintnicolaas, Kees; Oudshoorn, Machteld; Groenendijk-Sijnke, Marlies E.; Brand, Anneke; Cornelissen, Jan J.

    2014-01-01

    Double umbilical cord blood transplantation is increasingly applied in the treatment of adult patients with high-risk hematological malignancies and has been associated with improved engraftment as compared to that provided by single unit cord blood transplantation. The mechanism of improved engraftment is, however, still incompletely understood as only one unit survives. In this multicenter phase II study we evaluated engraftment, early chimerism, recovery of different cell lineages and transplant outcome in 53 patients who underwent double cord blood transplantation preceded by a reduced intensity conditioning regimen. Primary graft failure occurred in one patient. Engraftment was observed in 92% of patients with a median time to neutrophil recovery of 36 days (range, 15–102). Ultimate single donor chimerism was established in 94% of patients. Unit predominance occurred by day 11 after transplantation and early CD4+ T-cell chimerism predicted for unit survival. Total nucleated cell viability was also associated with unit survival. With a median follow up of 35 months (range, 10–51), the cumulative incidence of relapse and non-relapse mortality rate at 2 years were 39% and 19%, respectively. Progressionfree survival and overall survival rates at 2 years were 42% (95% confidence interval, 28–56) and 57% (95% confidence interval, 43–70), respectively. Double umbilical cord blood transplantation preceded by a reduced intensity conditioning regimen using cyclophosphamide/fludarabine/4 Gy total body irradiation results in a high engraftment rate with low non-relapse mortality. Moreover, prediction of unit survival by early CD4+ lymphocyte chimerism might suggest a role for CD4+ lymphocyte mediated unit-versus-unit alloreactivity. www.trialregister.nl NTR1573. PMID:25107890

  4. Initiation and Regulation of Complement during Hemolytic Transfusion Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Stowell, Sean R.; Winkler, Anne M.; Maier, Cheryl L.; Arthur, C. Maridith; Smith, Nicole H.; Girard-Pierce, Kathryn R.; Cummings, Richard D.; Zimring, James C.; Hendrickson, Jeanne E.

    2012-01-01

    Hemolytic transfusion reactions represent one of the most common causes of transfusion-related mortality. Although many factors influence hemolytic transfusion reactions, complement activation represents one of the most common features associated with fatality. In this paper we will focus on the role of complement in initiating and regulating hemolytic transfusion reactions and will discuss potential strategies aimed at mitigating or favorably modulating complement during incompatible red blood cell transfusions. PMID:23118779

  5. Taurine and platelet aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Nauss-Karol, C.; VanderWende, C.; Gaut, Z.N.

    1986-03-01

    Taurine is a putative neurotransmitter or neuromodulator. The endogenous taurine concentration in human platelets, determined by amino acid analysis, is 15 ..mu..M/g. In spite of this high level, taurine is actively accumulated. Uptake is saturable, Na/sup +/ and temperature dependent, and suppressed by metabolic inhibitors, structural analogues, and several classes of centrally active substances. High, medium and low affinity transport processes have been characterized, and the platelet may represent a model system for taurine transport in the CNS. When platelets were incubated with /sup 14/C-taurine for 30 minutes, then resuspended in fresh medium and reincubated for one hour, essentially all of the taurine was retained within the cells. Taurine, at concentrations ranging from 10-1000 ..mu..M, had no effect on platelet aggregation induced by ADP or epinephrine. However, taurine may have a role in platelet aggregation since 35-39% of the taurine taken up by human platelets appears to be secreted during the release reaction induced by low concentrations of either epinephrine or ADP, respectively. This release phenomenon would imply that part of the taurine taken up is stored directly in the dense bodies of the platelet.

  6. Blood transfusion: uses, abuses, and hazards.

    PubMed Central

    Posey, D. H.

    1989-01-01

    Homologous blood transfusion without risk is an unobtainable goal. Infection with human immunodeficiency virus continues to occur at an average rate of one infection per 100,000 transfusions, in spite of the most sensitive and specific testing available. In the past 30 years, the number of red cell antigens identified have increased from primarily ABO and Rh to some 400 antigens, which has also contributed to the hazards of blood transfusion. These risks can be minimized by the judicious use of homologous blood in conjunction with technological advances in transfusion medicine therapy and changes in attitudes of transfusionists. In the operating theater, there has been a resurgence in intraoperative autologous transfusion therapy, and patients are individualized rather than held to an arbitrary hemoglobin standard prior to anesthesia. In the preoperative period, elective surgical candidates may predeposit autologous blood or select directed donors. The prospective recipient or the directed donor may be candidate for recombinant erythropoietin therapy as a prelude to blood donation. This article discusses the uses of blood and blood products, the hazards of blood transfusion, and precautions that can be taken to minimize risks to the patient. PMID:2666679

  7. Transfusion-associated microchimerism: the hybrid within.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Evan M; Jackman, Rachael P; Lee, Tzong-Hae; Busch, Michael P

    2013-01-01

    Microchimerism, the coexistence of genetically disparate populations of cells in a receptive host, is well described in both clinical and physiological settings, including transplantation and pregnancy. Microchimerism can also occur after allogeneic blood transfusion in traumatically injured patients, where donor cells have been observed decades after transfusion. To date, transfusion-associated microchimerism (TA-MC) appears confined to this clinical subset, most likely due to the immune perturbations that occur after severe trauma that allow foreign donor cells to survive. Transfusion-associated microchimerism appears to be unaffected by leukoreduction and has been documented after transfusion with an array of blood products. The only significant predictor of TA-MC to date is the age of red cells, with fresher units associated with higher risk. Thus far, no adverse clinical effect has been observed in limited studies of TA-MC. There are, however, hypothesized links to transfusion-associated graft vs host disease that may be unrecognized and consequently underreported. Microchimerism in other settings has gained increasing attention owing to a plausible link to autoimmune diseases, as well as its diagnostic and therapeutic potential vis-a-vis antenatal testing and adoptive immunotherapy, respectively. Furthermore, microchimerism provides a tool to further our understanding of immune tolerance and regulation.

  8. Transfusion and coagulation management in liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Clevenger, Ben; Mallett, Susan V

    2014-01-01

    There is wide variation in the management of coagulation and blood transfusion practice in liver transplantation. The use of blood products intraoperatively is declining and transfusion free transplantations take place ever more frequently. Allogenic blood products have been shown to increase morbidity and mortality. Primary haemostasis, coagulation and fibrinolysis are altered by liver disease. This, combined with intraoperative disturbances of coagulation, increases the risk of bleeding. Meanwhile, the rebalancing of coagulation homeostasis can put patients at risk of hypercoagulability and thrombosis. The application of the principles of patient blood management to transplantation can reduce the risk of transfusion. This includes: preoperative recognition and treatment of anaemia, reduction of perioperative blood loss and the use of restrictive haemoglobin based transfusion triggers. The use of point of care coagulation monitoring using whole blood viscoelastic testing provides a picture of the complete coagulation process by which to guide and direct coagulation management. Pharmacological methods to reduce blood loss include the use of anti-fibrinolytic drugs to reduce fibrinolysis, and rarely, the use of recombinant factor VIIa. Factor concentrates are increasingly used; fibrinogen concentrates to improve clot strength and stability, and prothrombin complex concentrates to improve thrombin generation. Non-pharmacological methods to reduce blood loss include surgical utilisation of the piggyback technique and maintenance of a low central venous pressure. The use of intraoperative cell salvage and normovolaemic haemodilution reduces allogenic blood transfusion. Further research into methods of decreasing blood loss and alternatives to blood transfusion remains necessary to continue to improve outcomes after transplantation. PMID:24876736

  9. Preoperative blood transfusions for sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Estcourt, Lise J; Fortin, Patricia M; Trivella, Marialena; Hopewell, Sally

    2016-01-01

    Background Sickle cell disease is one of the commonest severe monogenic disorders in the world, due to the inheritance of two abnormal haemoglobin (beta globin) genes. Sickle cell disease can cause severe pain, significant end-organ damage, pulmonary complications, and premature death. Surgical interventions are more common in people with sickle cell disease, and occur at much younger ages than in the general population. Blood transfusions are frequently used prior to surgery and several regimens are used but there is no consensus over the best method or the necessity of transfusion in specific surgical cases. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2001. Objectives To determine whether there is evidence that preoperative blood transfusion in people with sickle cell disease undergoing elective or emergency surgery reduces mortality and perioperative or sickle cell-related serious adverse events. To compare the effectiveness of different transfusion regimens (aggressive or conservative) if preoperative transfusions are indicated in people with sickle cell disease. Search methods We searched for relevant trials in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (from 1946), Embase (from 1974), the Transfusion Evidence Library (from 1980), and ongoing trial databases; all searches current to 23 March 2016. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register: 18 January 2016. Selection criteria All randomised controlled trials and quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing preoperative blood transfusion regimens to different regimens or no transfusion in people with sickle cell disease undergoing elective or emergency surgery. There was no restriction by outcomes examined, language or publication status. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently assessed trial eligibility and the risk of bias and extracted data. Main results Three trials with 990 participants were eligible for inclusion in the review. There were no

  10. Glucose ameliorates the metabolic profile and mitochondrial function of platelet concentrates during storage in autologous plasma

    PubMed Central

    Amorini, Angela M.; Tuttobene, Michele; Tomasello, Flora M.; Biazzo, Filomena; Gullotta, Stefano; De Pinto, Vito; Lazzarino, Giuseppe; Tavazzi, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Background It is essential that the quality of platelet metabolism and function remains high during storage in order to ensure the clinical effectiveness of a platelet transfusion. New storage conditions and additives are constantly evaluated in order to achieve this. Using glucose as a substrate is controversial because of its potential connection with increased lactate production and decreased pH, both parameters triggering the platelet lesion during storage. Materials and methods In this study, we analysed the morphological status and metabolic profile of platelets stored for various periods in autologous plasma enriched with increasing glucose concentrations (13.75, 27.5 and 55 mM). After 0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 days, high energy phosphates (ATP, GTP, ADP, AMP), oxypurines (hypoxanthine, xanthine, uric acid), lactate, pH, mitochondrial function, cell lysis and morphology, were evaluated. Results The data showed a significant dose-dependent improvement of the different parameters in platelets stored with increasing glucose, compared to what detected in controls. Interestingly, this phenomenon was more marked at the highest level of glucose tested and in the period of time generally used for platelet transfusion (0–6 days). Conclusion These results indicate that the addition of glucose during platelet storage ameliorates, in a dose-dependent manner, the biochemical parameters related to energy metabolism and mitochondrial function. Since there was no correspondence between glucose addition, lactate increase and pH decrease in our experiments, it is conceivable that platelet derangement during storage is not directly caused by glucose through an increase of anaerobic glycolysis, but rather to a loss of mitochondrial functions caused by reduced substrate availability. PMID:22682337

  11. Platelets prevent IFN-alpha/beta-induced lethal hemorrhage promoting CTL-dependent clearance of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus.

    PubMed

    Iannacone, Matteo; Sitia, Giovanni; Isogawa, Masanori; Whitmire, Jason K; Marchese, Patrizia; Chisari, Francis V; Ruggeri, Zaverio M; Guidotti, Luca G

    2008-01-15

    We found that mice infected with different isolates of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) develop a mild hemorrhagic anemia, which becomes severe and eventually lethal in animals depleted of platelets or lacking integrin beta3. Lethal hemorrhagic anemia is mediated by virus-induced IFN-alpha/beta that causes platelet dysfunction, mucocutaneous blood loss and suppression of erythropoiesis. In addition to the life-threatening hemorrhagic anemia, platelet-depleted mice fail to mount an efficient cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response and cannot clear LCMV. Transfusion of functional platelets into these animals reduces hemorrhage, prevents death and restores CTL-induced viral clearance in a manner partially dependent on CD40 ligand (CD40L). These results indicate that, upon activation, platelets expressing integrin beta3 and CD40L are required for protecting the host against the induction of an IFN-alpha/beta-dependent lethal hemorrhagic diathesis and for clearing LCMV infection through CTLs.

  12. Extracting Biological Meaning From Global Proteomic Data on Circulating-Blood Platelets: Effects of Diabetes and Storage Time

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, John H.; Suleiman, Atef; Daly, Don S.; Springer, David L.; Spinelli, Sherry L.; Blumberg, Neil; Phipps, Richard P.

    2008-11-25

    Transfusion of platelets into patients suffering from trauma and a variety of disease is a common medical practice that involves millions of units per year. Partial activation of platelets can result in the release of bioactive proteins and lipid mediators that increase the risk of adverse post-transfusion effects. Type-2 diabetes and storage are two factors known to cause partial activation of platelets. A global proteomic study was undertaken to investigate these effects. In this paper we discuss the methods used to interpret these data in terms of biological processes affected by diabetes and storage. The main emphasis is on the processing of proteomic data for gene ontology enrichment analysis by techniques originally designed for microarray data.

  13. Platelet-delivered therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Lyde, R; Sabatino, D; Sullivan, S K; Poncz, M

    2015-06-01

    We have proposed that modified platelets could potentially be used to correct intrinsic platelet defects as well as for targeted delivery of therapeutic molecules to sights of vascular injury. Ectopic expression of proteins within α-granules prior to platelet activation has been achieved for several proteins, including urokinase, factor (F) VIII, and partially for FIX. Potential uses of platelet-directed therapeutics will be discussed, focusing on targeted delivery of urokinase as a thromboprophylactic agent and FVIII for the treatment of hemophilia A patients with intractable inhibitors. This presentation will discuss new strategies that may be useful in the care of patients with vascular injury as well as remaining challenges and limitations of these approaches.

  14. Platelet associated antibodies

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the following: For unknown reasons (idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, or ITP ) Side effect of certain drugs such ... 2012:chap 134. Read More Antibody Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) Platelet count Serum globulin electrophoresis Thrombocytopenia Update ...

  15. Nanotechnology: Platelet mimicry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farokhzad, Omid C.

    2015-10-01

    Cloaking drug-loaded nanoparticles with platelet membranes enhances the drugs' abilities to target desired cells and tissues. This technology might improve treatments for cardiovascular and infectious diseases. See Letter p.118

  16. Platelets mediate acetaminophen hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Lam, Fong W; Rumbaut, Rolando E

    2015-10-01

    In this issue of Blood, Miyakawa et al show that platelets and protease-activated receptor (PAR)-4 contribute to acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver damage. Using various strategies in a mouse model of APAP overdose, the authors demonstrate that platelets participate in the progression of liver damage, and that the direct thrombin inhibitor lepirudin and PAR-4 deficiency attenuate hepatotoxicity. These findings have the potential to help identify future therapeutic targets for APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. PMID:26450954

  17. Cost of allogeneic and autologous blood transfusion in Canada. Canadian Cost of Transfusion Study Group.

    PubMed Central

    Tretiak, R; Laupacis, A; Rivière, M; McKerracher, K; Souêtre, E

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the cost, from a societal perspective, of blood transfusion in Canada. STUDY DESIGN: Cost-structure analysis. SETTING: Data were collected from eight hospitals and from six blood centres operated by the Canadian Red Cross Society in four provinces. OUTCOME MEASURES: Costs associated with four stages of transfusion-- collection, production, distribution and delivery--in 1933 were assessed. Costs were divided into the following categories; personnel, purchases, external services, overhead, donors' time, patients' time (for autologous transfusion), wastage and infection. RESULTS: The mean overall cost of a transfusion performed on an inpatient basis was $210 per unit of red blood cells for an allogeneic transfusion and $338 per unit of blood for an autologous transfusion. The mean cost of an allogeneic transfusion performed on an outpatient basis was $280 per unit of red blood cells. CONCLUSION: The costs determined in this study can be used in future studies comparing the cost-effectiveness of allogeneic transfusion with that of alternative methods. PMID:8625000

  18. The accuracy of platelet counting in thrombocytopenic blood samples distributed by the UK National External Quality Assessment Scheme for General Haematology.

    PubMed

    De la Salle, Barbara J; McTaggart, Paul N; Briggs, Carol; Harrison, Paul; Doré, Caroline J; Longair, Ian; Machin, Samuel J; Hyde, Keith

    2012-01-01

    A knowledge of the limitations of automated platelet counting is essential for the effective care of thrombocytopenic patients and management of platelet stocks for transfusion. For this study, 29 external quality assessment specimen pools with platelet counts between 5 and 64 × 10(9)/L were distributed to more than 1,100 users of 23 different hematology analyzer models. The same specimen pools were analyzed by the international reference method (IRM) for platelet counting at 3 reference centers. The IRM values were on average lower than the all-methods median values returned by the automated analyzers. The majority (~67%) of the automated analyzer results overestimated the platelet count compared with the IRM, with significant differences in 16.5% of cases. Performance differed between analyzer models. The observed differences may depend in part on the nature of the survey material and analyzer technology, but the findings have implications for the interpretation of platelet counts at levels of clinical decision making.

  19. Platelet preservation: agitation and containers.

    PubMed

    van der Meer, Pieter F; de Korte, Dirk

    2011-06-01

    For platelets to maintain their in vitro quality and in vivo effectiveness, they need to be stored at room temperature with gentle agitation in gas-permeable containers. The mode of agitation affects the quality of the platelets, and a gentle method of agitation, either a circular or a flat bed movement, provides the best results. Tumblers or elliptical agitators induce platelet activation and subsequent damage. As long as the platelets remain in suspension, the agitation speed is not important. Agitation of the platelet concentrates ensures that the platelets are continuously oxygenated, that sufficient oxygen can enter the storage container and that excess carbon dioxide can be expelled. During transportation of platelet concentrates, nowadays over long distances where they are held without controlled agitation, platelets may tolerate a certain period without agitation. However, evidence is accumulating that during the time without agitation, local hypoxia surrounding the platelets may induce irreversible harm to the platelets. Over the decades, more gas-permeable plastics have been used to manufacture platelet containers. The use of different plastics and their influence on the platelet quality both in vitro and in vivo is discussed. The improved gas-permeability has allowed the extension of platelet storage from 3 days in the early 1980s, to currently at least 7 days. In the light of new developments, particularly the introduction of pathogen reduction techniques, the use of platelet additive solutions and the availability of improved automated separators, further (renewed) research in this area is warranted.

  20. The role of point-of-care platelet function testing in predicting postoperative bleeding following cardiac surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Corredor, C; Wasowicz, M; Karkouti, K; Sharma, V

    2015-06-01

    This systematic review and meta-analysis appraises the utility of point-of-care platelet function tests for predicting blood loss and transfusion requirements in cardiac surgical patients, and analyses whether their use within a transfusion management algorithm is associated with improved patient outcomes. We included 30 observational studies incorporating 3044 patients in the qualitative assessment, and nine randomised controlled trials including 1057 patients in the meta-analysis. Platelet function tests demonstrated significant variability in their ability to predict blood loss and transfusion requirements. Their use within a blood transfusion algorithm demonstrated a reduction in blood loss at longest follow-up (mean difference -102.9 ml (95% CI -149.9 to -56.1 ml), p < 0.001), and transfusion of packed red cells (RR 0.86 (95% CI 0.78-0.94), p = 0.001) and fresh frozen plasma (RR 0.42 (95% CI 0.30-0.59), p < 0.001). Viscoelastic methods used in combination with other platelet function tests achieved greater reduction in blood loss (mean difference -111.8 ml (95% CI -174.9 to -49.1 ml), p = 0.0005) compared with their use alone (mean difference -90.6 ml (95% CI 166.1-15.0 ml), p = 0.02). We conclude that incorporation of point-of-care platelet function tests into transfusion management algorithms is associated with a reduction in blood loss and transfusion requirements in cardiac surgery patients. PMID:25916344

  1. Applications of ultraviolet light in the preparation of platelet concentrates

    SciTech Connect

    Pamphilon, D.H.; Corbin, S.A.; Saunders, J.; Tandy, N.P.

    1989-06-01

    Passenger lymphocytes in platelet concentrates (PCs) may induce the formation of lymphocytotoxic antibodies (LCTAbs) and subsequent refractoriness to platelet transfusions. Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation can prevent lymphocytes' acting as stimulator or responder cells in mixed-lymphocyte reactions (MLRs) and could theoretically prevent LCTAb formation in vivo. A system has been devised for the delivery of UV irradiation to PCs; platelet storage characteristics and MLRs were evaluated in UV-irradiated PCs harvested from healthy donors with the Haemonetics V50 and PCS cell separators. MLR and response to phytohemagglutinin stimulation were abolished by a dose of 3000 joules per m2 at a mean wavelength of 310 nm. Platelet aggregatory responses to adenosine diphosphate (ADP), ristocetin, collagen and epinephrine, hypotonic shock response, and pH showed no important differences when control PCs and PCs irradiated as above were compared during 5 days of storage in Fenwal PL-1240 packs. Lactate production during storage was significantly higher in UV-treated PCs (p less than 0.001), but values did not exceed 20 mmol per L. UV transmission at 310 nm in standard blood product containers, including the Fenwal PL-146, PL-1240, and PL-732, was low (less than 30%), but it was acceptable in the Delmed Cryostorage and DuPont SteriCell packs (greater than 50%). UV irradiation may provide a simple and inexpensive means of producing nonimmunogenic PCs.

  2. Platelet factor V supports hemostasis in a patient with an acquired factor V inhibitor, as shown by prothrombinase and tenase assays.

    PubMed

    Perdekamp, Maria T Grosse; Rubenstein, David A; Jesty, Jolyon; Hultin, Mae B

    2006-10-01

    A woman with gross hematuria was shown to have a severe isolated factor V deficiency due to a factor V inhibitor of 200 U/ml titer. Hematuria persisted despite multiple infusions of plasma but, after one transfusion with 1 U platelets, urine red blood cells decreased by more than 98%. To evaluate the patient's platelet function we performed prothrombinase and tenase assays with platelets from the patient and from normal donors. By prothrombinase assay, ionophore-activated patient platelets showed 42% of the activity of normal platelets in their ability to support prothrombin activation by activated factor X; whereas in a 'tenase' assay, which measures the platelets' ability to support factor X activation by activated factor IX + activated factor VIII, their activity was 117% of normal. The addition of excess bovine activated factor V to the prothrombinase assay fully corrected the defect. The results demonstrate the benefit of platelet transfusion and indicate that in this case the platelets are the primary source of factor V for hemostasis.

  3. Transfusion and blood donation in comic strips.

    PubMed

    Lefrère, Jean-Jacques; Danic, Bruno

    2013-07-01

    The representation of blood transfusion and donation of blood in the comic strip has never been studied. The comic strip, which is a relatively recent art, emerged in the 19th century before becoming a mass medium during the 20th century. We have sought, by calling on collectors and using the resources of Internet, comic strips devoted, wholly or in part, to the themes of transfusion and blood donation. We present some of them here in chronologic order, indicating the title, country of origin, year of publication, and names of authors. The theme of the superhero using transfusion to transmit his virtues or his powers is repeated throughout the 20th century in North American comic strips. More recently, comic strips have been conceived from the outset with a promotional aim. They perpetuate positive images and are directed toward a young readership, wielding humor to reduce the fear of venipuncture. Few comic strips denounce the abuse of the commercialization of products derived from the human body. The image of transfusion and blood donation given by the comic strips is not to be underestimated because their readership is primarily children, some of whom will become blood donors. Furthermore, if some readers are transfused during their lives, the impact of a memory more or less conscious of these childhood readings may resurface, both in hopes and in fears.

  4. Clinical uses of radiolabeled platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Datz, F.L.; Christian, P.E.; Baker, W.J.

    1985-12-01

    Platelets were first successfully radiolabeled in 1953. At that time, investigators were primarily interested in developing a technique to accurately measure platelet life span in both normal and thrombocytopenic patients. Studies using platelets labeled with /sup 51/Cr have shown shortened platelet survival times in a number of diseases including idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, coronary artery disease, and diabetes mellitus. More recently, labels such as /sup 111/In have been developed that allow in vivo imaging of platelets. Indium-111 platelets are being used to better understand the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis, thrombophlebitis, pulmonary embolism and clotting disorders, and to improve the clinical diagnosis of these diseases.

  5. [Management of massive transfusion - the role of the blood transfusion service].

    PubMed

    Sone, Shinji; Tsuno, Hirokazu; Okazaki, Hitoshi

    2014-12-01

    Massive transfusion (hemorrhage) is defined as blood transfusion exceeding the circulatory blood volume within 24 hours. Here, we investigated cases of massive transfusion, defined as transfusion of more than 21 units of red blood cells within 24 hours, in our institution in the period from August 2005 to March 2013. Massive transfusion accounted for approximately 1% of all blood transfusions in our institution, and the majority were cardiac surgery cases (75%), with 80% of the cases receiving blood transfusion irtfhe operating theater. Brain-dead heart and liver transplantations were started in our hospital in 2006. Due to the revision of the Organ Transplantation Law in July 2010, brain-dead organ donations increased in Japan. Massive transfusion was required in approximately 47% of heart and 41% of liver transplants, with 44% of the transplants being conducted on holidays, and 47% at night. Therefore, the implementation of a 24-hour duty system for medical technologists, including holidays, is essential for the prompt testing and supply of blood products. For improvement of the safety of blood supply, a computer network system, connecting the blood control system of the blood transfusion service, the anesthetic system of the operating theater, and the hospital general medical system, was implemented in our hospital in March 2007. In the operating theater, anesthetists can request blood products, order new blood products, cross-check the provided blood products, and register their use, using this system. At the blood transfusion service, the blood products to be provided are cross- checked against the anesthetists' requests. Through this system, the anesthetists and blood transfusion service staff can check the list of blood products available for the surgical patient as well as those already transfused, on a real-time basis. For analysis of the improvements achieved, we compared the number of non-used blood units, i.e., the number of those provided minus the

  6. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and Platelet-Rich Fibrin (PRF): surgical adjuvants, preparations for in situ regenerative medicine and tools for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Bielecki, Tomasz; Dohan Ehrenfest, David M

    2012-06-01

    The recent developement of platelet concentrate for surgical use is an evolution of the fibrin glue technologies used since many years. The initial concept of these autologous preparations was to concentrate platelets and their growth factors in a plasma solution, and to activate it into a fibrin gel on a surgical site, in order to improve local healing. These platelet suspensions were often called Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) like the platelet concentrate used in transfusion medicine, but many different technologies have in fact been developed; some of them are even no more platelet suspensions, but solid fibrin-based biomaterials called Platelet-Rich Fibrin (PRF). These various technologies were tested in many different clinical fields, particularly oral and maxillofacial surgery, Ear-Nose-Throat surgery, plastic surgery, orthopaedic surgery, sports medicine, gynecologic and cardiovascular surgery and ophthalmology. This field of research unfortunately suffers from the lack of a proper accurate terminology and the associated misunderstandings, and the literature on the topic is quite contradictory. Indeed, the effects of these preparations cannot be limited to their growth factor content: these products associate many actors of healing in synergy, such as leukocytes, fibrin matrix, and circulating progenitor cells, and are in fact as complex as blood itself. If platelet concentrates were first used as surgical adjuvants for the stimulation of healing (as fibrin glues enriched with growth factors), many applications for in situ regenerative medicine and tissue engineering were developed and offer a great potential. However, the future of this field is first dependent on his coherence and scientific clarity. The objectives of this article is to introduce the main definitions, problematics and perspectives that are described in this special issue of Current Pharmaceutical Biotechnology about platelet concentrates.

  7. Where are the systematic reviews in transfusion medicine? A study of the transfusion evidence base.

    PubMed

    Dorée, Carolyn; Stanworth, Simon; Brunskill, Susan J; Hopewell, Sally; Hyde, Chris J; Murphy, Mike F

    2010-10-01

    Transfusion medicine has become a large and complex specialty. Although there are now systematic reviews covering many aspects of transfusion, these span a large number of clinical areas and are published across more than a hundred different medical journals, making it difficult for transfusion medicine practitioners and researchers to keep abreast of the current high-level evidence. In response to this problem, NHS Blood and Transplant's Systematic Review Initiative (SRI) has produced a comprehensive overview of systematic reviews in transfusion medicine. A systematic search (to December 2009) and screening procedure were followed by the appraisal of systematic reviews according to predefined inclusion criteria. The 340 eligible systematic reviews were mapped to 10 transfusion intervention groups and 14 topic groups within clinical medicine. Trends in the systematic review literature were examined and gaps in the literature described. The spread of systematic reviews across clinical areas was found to be very uneven, with some areas underreviewed and others with multiple systematic reviews on the same topic, making the identification of the best evidence for current transfusion practice a continuing challenge. References and links to all systematic reviews included in this overview can be freely accessed via the SRI's new online database, the Transfusion Evidence Library (www.transfusionguidelines.org). PMID:20851331

  8. [Report on notifications pursuant to Section 21 German Transfusion Act for 2007].

    PubMed

    Henseler, O; Heiden, M; Haschberger, B; Hesse, J; Seitz, R

    2009-07-01

    The present report contains the data collected in 2007, pursuant to Section 21 Transfusionsgesetz (German Transfusion Act), and an analysis of the supply situation over the past eight years. The recording of the data by online reporting is in the meantime well established and generally accepted. As in previous years, all blood donation centers located in Germany transmitted data on the collection, manufacture, import and export of blood components for transfusion, so that meaningful data are available. According to these data, a total of 6.7 million blood collections were performed in 2007. The number of whole blood donations was at the level of previous years, with 4.7 million, whereas the number of apheresis donations rose again, to 1.9 million. The portion of autologous blood collections accounts for only 1.1% and thus continues to decline. Since 2003, the number of red blood cell concentrates prepared has been a constant 4.5 million transfusion units. The decrease in the portion of decay of red blood cell concentrates on the user side is particularly good news. In 2000, it accounted for 5% and in 2007, it was just above 3%, referred to the total quantity of data reported as transfused and decayed. The manufacture of platelet concentrates rose from 366,000 to 480,000 transfusion units between 2003 and 2007. The production of therapeutic single plasmas also markedly increased in 2007 compared with previous years, accounting for 1.2 million transfusion units. In 2007, 2.2 million liters of plasma for fractionation were collected in Germany. This trend went hand in hand with the increasing number of apheresis donations that year. In addition, 1.0 million liters were imported, and, at the same time, 1.8 million liters were exported. The quantity available in Germany from a pure arithmetic point of view of 1.4 million liters was almost entirely allocated to basic fractionation, so that a sufficient plasma supply can be assumed. The assessment of the degree of self

  9. Investigation of platelet function and platelet disorders using flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Rubak, Peter; Nissen, Peter H; Kristensen, Steen D; Hvas, Anne-Mette

    2016-01-01

    Patients with thrombocytopenia or platelet disorders are at risk of severe bleeding. We report the development and validation of flow cytometry assays to diagnose platelet disorders and to assess platelet function independently of platelet count. The assays were developed to measure glycoprotein levels (panel 1) and platelet function (panel 2) in sodium citrated blood. Twenty healthy volunteers and five patients diagnosed with different platelet disorders were included. Glycoprotein expression levels of the receptors Ia, Ib, IIb, IIIa and IX were measured and normalised with forward scatter (FS) as a measurement of platelet size. Platelet function was assessed by CD63, P-selectin and bound fibrinogen in response to arachidonic acid, adenosine diphosphate (ADP), collagen-related peptide, ristocetin and thrombin receptor-activation peptide-6. All patients except one with suspected δ-granule defect showed aberrant levels of glycoproteins in panel 1. Glanzmann's thrombasthenia and genetically verified Bernard-Soulier syndrome could be diagnosed using panel 1. All patients showed reduced platelet function according to at least one agonist. Using panel 2 it was possible to diagnose Bernard-Soulier syndrome, δ-granule defect and GPVI disorder. By combining the two assays, we were able to diagnose different platelet disorders and investigate platelet function independent of platelet count.

  10. Platelets and platelet-like particles mediate intercellular RNA transfer

    PubMed Central

    Risitano, Antonina; Beaulieu, Lea M.; Vitseva, Olga

    2012-01-01

    The role of platelets in hemostasis and thrombosis is clearly established; however, the mechanisms by which platelets mediate inflammatory and immune pathways are less well understood. Platelets interact and modulate the function of blood and vascular cells by releasing bioactive molecules. Although the platelet is anucleate, it contains transcripts that may mirror disease. Platelet mRNA is only associated with low-level protein translation; however, platelets have a unique membrane structure allowing for the passage of small molecules, leading to the possibility that its cytoplasmic RNA may be passed to nucleated cells. To examine this question, platelet-like particles with labeled RNA were cocultured with vascular cells. Coculture of platelet-like particles with activated THP-1, monocytic, and endothelial cells led to visual and functional RNA transfer. Posttransfer microarray gene expression analysis of THP-1 cells showed an increase in HBG1/HBG2 and HBA1/HBA2 expression that was directly related to the transfer. Infusion of wild-type platelets into a TLR2-deficient mouse model established in vivo confirmation of select platelet RNA transfer to leukocytes. By specifically transferring green fluorescent protein, we also observed external RNA was functional in the recipient cells. The observation that platelets possess the capacity to transfer cytosolic RNA suggests a new function for platelets in the regulation of vascular homeostasis. PMID:22596260

  11. Platelet size does not correlate with platelet age

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.B.; Love, D.G.; Quinn, P.G.; Valeri, C.R.

    1983-08-01

    The relationship between platelet size and in vivo aging was investigated in the baboon using size-dependent platelet subpopulations separated by counterflow centrifugation. The separation characteristics, size, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, and dense-body content of the baboon platelet subpopulations were similar to those previously observed in studies of human platelets. Three independent labeling techniques were used: (1) in vivo labeling with /sup 75/Se-methionine, (2) in vitro labeling with /sup 51/Cr, and (3) in vivo labeling with 14C-serotonin. Maximal incorporation of all three labels showed a close correlation between the mean platelet volume (MPV) of each fraction and the platelet radioactivity. The onset of incorporation and rate of accumulation of /sup 75/Se-methionine were comparable in all fractions when corrected for differences in volume, suggesting that platelet size heterogeneity was present from the time of release of the platelets from the bone marrow. Survival studies using /sup 51/Cr and /sup 14/C-serotonin showed no translocation of the label from one fraction to another in the circulation over time. In vivo survival values for the three radionuclides showed a slight but significant correlation between the lifespan and the MPV of the fractions. The data suggest that large platelets were not younger platelets, but rather platelets with a longer life-span. Platelet size heterogeneity is the result of production factors in the bone marrow and not maturation in the circulation.

  12. Exchange Transfusion in Severe Falciparum Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Khatib, Khalid Ismail

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is endemic in India with the incidence of P. falciparum Malaria increasing gradually over the last decade. Severe malaria is an acute disease, caused by P. falciparum, but increasingly also by P. vivax with major signs of organ dysfunction and/or high levels of parasitaemia (>10%) in blood smear. Use of exchange transfusion with antimalarial drug therapy as an additional modality of treatment in severe Falciparum malaria is controversial and is unclear. We report a case of severe malaria complicated by multiorgan failure and ARDS. Patient responded well to manual exchange transfusion with standard artesunate-based chemotherapy. PMID:27042503

  13. Minneapolis bridges falling down: emergency transfusion preparedness.

    PubMed

    Gorlin, Jed B; Hick, John L

    2013-12-01

    The 7/1/2007 bridge collapse into the Mississippi River was instructional from both a disaster response and a mass casualty transfusion response perspective. It is a well cited example of how community disaster response coordination can work well, especially following systematic preparation of an integrated response network. The blood center is and should be an integral part of this disaster response and should be included in drills where appropriate. We give personal perspectives on both the hospital and transfusion service response to this particularly dramatic event. PMID:23820433

  14. Minneapolis bridges falling down: emergency transfusion preparedness.

    PubMed

    Gorlin, Jed B; Hick, John L

    2013-12-01

    The 7/1/2007 bridge collapse into the Mississippi River was instructional from both a disaster response and a mass casualty transfusion response perspective. It is a well cited example of how community disaster response coordination can work well, especially following systematic preparation of an integrated response network. The blood center is and should be an integral part of this disaster response and should be included in drills where appropriate. We give personal perspectives on both the hospital and transfusion service response to this particularly dramatic event.

  15. [Blood transfusion - safety of the inventory].

    PubMed

    Tissot, Jean-Daniel; Danic, Bruno; Schneider, Thierry

    2015-02-01

    Over the years, transfusion medicine has been faced to many different problems, notably those related to transmission of pathogens. Major progresses have been accomplished in terms of security. However, nowadays, the discipline is confronted to the day-to-day variability and availability of blood products. More and more donors are excluded from blood donation due to various reasons, and the donor selection criteria have increased over the years, influencing the number of donors able to give blood. This paradox represents one of the constraints that transfusion medicine should resolve in the future. This paper presents some aspects either common or different between France and Switzerland.

  16. Does the preoperative administration of tranexamic acid reduce perioperative blood loss and transfusion requirements after head neck cancer surgery? A randomized, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Das, Anjan; Chattopadhyay, Surajit; Mandal, Debabrata; Chhaule, Subinay; Mitra, Tapobrata; Mukherjee, Anindya; Mandal, Subrata Kumar; Chattopadhyay, Sandip

    2015-01-01

    Background: Head and neck cancer (HNC) surgery is associated with high intraoperative blood loss which may require urgent blood transfusion. Many strategies have been recommended to decrease the need for allogenic transfusion. Use of perioperative tranexamic acid (TA) has a promising role. Aims: This study was to evaluate the effectiveness of single preoperative bolus dose of TA on blood loss prevention and red blood cell transfusion in patients undergoing HNC surgery. Study Design: A prospective, double-blind, and randomized controlled study. Materials and Methods: From 2007 July to 2010 January; 80 patients, aged (35–55), of American Society of Anesthesiologists II-III scheduled for unilateral HNC surgeries were randomly received either TA (Group T) in a dose of 20 mg/kg diluted to 25 cc with normal saline or an equivalent volume of normal saline (Group C) in a tertiary care hospital. Hemoglobin (Hb) concentration, platelet count, packed cell volume, fibrinogen level, D-dimer level were measured pre- and post-operatively. Results: Saline (C) Group required more blood, colloid, crystalloid for blood loss. In Group T, 32 patients did not require transfusion of any blood products compared to five patients in Group C (P < 0.0001) and only eight units of blood was transfused in Group T, whereas a total of 42 units of blood was transfused in Group C. Even after numerous transfusions, Hb% after 6 h and 24 h in Group C were significantly low in comparison with Group T (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Thus, TA significantly reduces blood loss and chances of colloid, blood, and crystalloid transfusion caused by HNC surgery. PMID:26712979

  17. Reduced Transfusion During OLT by POC Coagulation Management and TEG Functional Fibrinogen: A Retrospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    De Pietri, Lesley; Ragusa, Francesca; Deleuterio, Annalisa; Begliomini, Bruno; Serra, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients undergoing orthotopic liver transplantation are at high risk of bleeding complications. Several Authors have shown that thromboelastography (TEG)-based coagulation management and the administration of fibrinogen concentrate reduce the need for blood transfusion. Methods We conducted a single-center, retrospective cohort observational study (Modena Polyclinic, Italy) on 386 consecutive patients undergoing liver transplantation. We assessed the impact on resource consumption and patient survival after the introduction of a new TEG-based transfusion algorithm, requiring also the introduction of the fibrinogen functional thromboelastography test and a maximum amplitude of functional fibrinogen thromboelastography transfusion cutoff (7 mm) to direct in administering fibrinogen (2012-2014, n = 118) compared with a purely TEG-based algorithm previously used (2005-2011, n = 268). Results After 2012, there was a significant decrease in the use of homologous blood (1502 ± 1376 vs 794 ± 717 mL, P < 0.001), fresh frozen plasma (537 ± 798 vs 98 ± 375 mL, P < 0.001), and platelets (158 ± 280 vs 75 ± 148 mL, P < 0.005), whereas the use of fibrinogen increased (0.1 ± 0.5 vs 1.4 ± 1.8 g, P < 0.001). There were no significant differences in 30-day and 6-month survival between the 2 groups. Conclusions The implementation of a new coagulation management method featuring the addition of the fibrinogen functional thromboelastography test to the TEG test according to an algorithm which provides for the administration of fibrinogen has helped in reducing the need for transfusion in patients undergoing liver transplantation with no impact on their survival. PMID:27500243

  18. 2015 proceedings of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's State of the Science in Transfusion Medicine symposium.

    PubMed

    Spitalnik, Steven L; Triulzi, Darrell; Devine, Dana V; Dzik, Walter H; Eder, Anne F; Gernsheimer, Terry; Josephson, Cassandra D; Kor, Daryl J; Luban, Naomi L C; Roubinian, Nareg H; Mondoro, Traci; Welniak, Lisbeth A; Zou, Shimian; Glynn, Simone

    2015-09-01

    On March 25 and 26, 2015, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute sponsored a meeting on the State of the Science in Transfusion Medicine on the National Institutes of Health (NIH) campus in Bethesda, Maryland, which was attended by a diverse group of 330 registrants. The meeting's goal was to identify important research questions that could be answered in the next 5 to 10 years and which would have the potential to transform the clinical practice of transfusion medicine. These questions could be addressed by basic, translational, and/or clinical research studies and were focused on four areas: the three "classical" transfusion products (i.e., red blood cells, platelets, and plasma) and blood donor issues. Before the meeting, four working groups, one for each area, prepared five major questions for discussion along with a list of five to 10 additional questions for consideration. At the meeting itself, all of these questions, and others, were discussed in keynote lectures, small-group breakout sessions, and large-group sessions with open discourse involving all meeting attendees. In addition to the final lists of questions, provided herein, the meeting attendees identified multiple overarching, cross-cutting themes that addressed issues common to all four areas; the latter are also provided. It is anticipated that addressing these scientific priorities, with careful attention to the overarching themes, will inform funding priorities developed by the NIH and provide a solid research platform for transforming the future practice of transfusion medicine.

  19. 2015 Proceedings of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's State of the Science in Transfusion Medicine Symposium

    PubMed Central

    Spitalnik, Steven L.; Triulzi, Darrell; Devine, Dana V.; Dzik, Walter H.; Eder, Anne F.; Gernsheimer, Terry; Josephson, Cassandra D.; Kor, Daryl J.; Luban, Naomi L. C.; Roubinian, Nareg H.; Mondoro, Traci; Welniak, Lisbeth A.; Zou, Shimian; Glynn, Simone

    2015-01-01

    On March 25-26, 2015, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute sponsored a meeting on the State of the Science in Transfusion Medicine on the NIH campus in Bethesda, MD, which was attended by a diverse group of 330 registrants. The meeting's goal was to identify important research questions that could be answered in the next 5-10 years, and which would have the potential to transform the clinical practice of transfusion medicine. These questions could be addressed by basic, translational, and/or clinical research studies and were focused on four areas: the three “classical” transfusion products (i.e., red blood cells, platelets, and plasma) and blood donor issues. Prior to the meeting, four Working Groups, one for each area, prepared five major questions for discussion along with a list of 5-10 additional questions for consideration. At the meeting itself, all of these questions, and others, were discussed in Keynote lectures, small group breakout sessions, and large group sessions with open discourse involving all meeting attendees. In addition to the final lists of questions, provided herein, the meeting attendees identified multiple overarching, cross-cutting themes that addressed issues common to all four areas; the latter are also provided. It is anticipated that addressing these scientific priorities, with careful attention to the overarching themes, will inform funding priorities developed by the NIH and provide a solid research platform for transforming the future practice of transfusion medicine. PMID:26260861

  20. Platelets and the immune continuum.

    PubMed

    Semple, John W; Italiano, Joseph E; Freedman, John

    2011-04-01

    Platelets are anucleate cells that are crucial mediators of haemostasis. Most immunologists probably don't think about platelets every day, and may even consider these cells to be 'nuisances' in certain in vitro studies. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that platelets have inflammatory functions and can influence both innate and adaptive immune responses. Here, we discuss the mechanisms by which platelets contribute to immunity: these small cells are more immunologically savvy than we once thought.

  1. Fibrinogen level deteriorates before other routine coagulation parameters and massive transfusion in the early phase of severe trauma: a retrospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Mineji; Gando, Satoshi; Ono, Yuichi; Wada, Takeshi; Yanagida, Yuichiro; Sawamura, Atsushi

    2015-02-01

    In trauma, hemostatic functions should be maintained appropriately to prevent massive bleeding. This study elucidated the time-dependent changes in platelet count and coagulation variables, and the effects of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) on these changes during the early phase of trauma. Trauma patients with an injury severity score ≥16 were enrolled. The critical levels of platelet count and coagulation variables were defined according to recent trauma guidelines. Massive transfusion was defined as >10 units red cell concentrate. The time from arrival at the emergency department to reaching the critical levels and meeting the criteria for massive transfusion were evaluated. Eighty trauma patients were enrolled; 35 were diagnosed with DIC on arrival. Among all patients, fibrinogen levels reached the critical level earliest among routine coagulation parameters; other routine coagulation parameters deteriorated after the patients met the criteria for massive transfusion. Routine coagulation parameters reached their critical levels earlier in DIC patients than patients without DIC. Massive transfusion was performed more frequently in DIC patients, who met the criteria earlier. During the early phase of trauma, fibrinogen levels deteriorate earlier than other routine coagulation parameters, especially in DIC patients.

  2. The traditional vs "1:1:1" approach debate on massive transfusion in trauma should not be treated as a dichotomy.

    PubMed

    Ho, Anthony M-H; Holcomb, John B; Ng, Calvin S H; Zamora, Jorge E; Karmakar, Manoj K; Dion, Peter W

    2015-10-01

    Traditional transfusion guidelines suggest that fresh frozen plasma (FFP) should be given based on laboratory or clinical evidence of coagulopathy or acute loss of 1 blood volume. This approach tends to result in a significant lag time between the first units of erythrocytes and FFP in trauma requiring massive transfusion. In severe trauma, observational studies have found an association between increased survival and aggressive use of FFP and platelets such that FFP:platelet:erythrocyte ratio approaches 1:1:1 to 2 from the first units of erythrocytes given. There are considerable concerns over either approach, and no randomized controlled trials have been published comparing the 2 approaches. Nowadays, trauma clinicans are incorporating the strenghts of both approaches and are no longer treating them as a dichotomy. Specifically, "1:1:1" proponents have devised 1:1:1 activation criteria to minimize unnecessary FFP and platelet transfusion and are prepared to deactivate the protocol as soon as patient is stabilized. Similarly, 1:1:1 skeptics are more mindful of the need to be proactive about trauma coagulopathy and the inherent delays in FFP administration in trauma patients.

  3. Differential Expression Analysis by RNA-Seq Reveals Perturbations in the Platelet mRNA Transcriptome Triggered by Pathogen Reduction Systems.

    PubMed

    Osman, Abdimajid; Hitzler, Walter E; Ameur, Adam; Provost, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Platelet concentrates (PCs) are prepared at blood banks for transfusion to patients in certain clinical conditions associated with a low platelet count. To prevent transfusion-transmitted infections via PCs, different pathogen reduction (PR) systems have been developed that inactivate the nucleic acids of contaminating pathogens by chemical cross-linking, a mechanism that may also affect platelets' nucleic acids. We previously reported that treatment of stored platelets with the PR system Intercept significantly reduced the level of half of the microRNAs that were monitored, induced platelet activation and compromised the platelet response to physiological agonists. Using genome-wide differential expression (DE) RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq), we now report that Intercept markedly perturbs the mRNA transcriptome of human platelets and alters the expression level of >800 mRNAs (P<0.05) compared to other PR systems and control platelets. Of these, 400 genes were deregulated with DE corresponding to fold changes (FC) ≥ 2. At the p-value < 0.001, as many as 147 genes were deregulated by ≥ 2-fold in Intercept-treated platelets, compared to none in the other groups. Finally, integrated analysis combining expression data for microRNA (miRNA) and mRNA, and involving prediction of miRNA-mRNA interactions, disclosed several positive and inverse correlations between miRNAs and mRNAs in stored platelets. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that Intercept markedly deregulates the platelet mRNA transcriptome, concomitant with reduced levels of mRNA-regulatory miRNAs. These findings should enlighten authorities worldwide when considering the implementation of PR systems, that target nucleic acids and are not specific to pathogens, for the management of blood products.

  4. Utilization Management in the Blood Transfusion Service

    PubMed Central

    Peña, Jeremy Ryan Andrew; Dzik, Walter “Sunny”

    2015-01-01

    The scope of activity of the Blood Transfusion Service (BTS) makes it unique among the clinical laboratories. The combination of therapeutic and diagnostic roles necessitates a multi-faceted approach to utilization management in the BTS. We present our experience in utilization management in large academic medical center. PMID:24080431

  5. Anemia and transfusion after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Le Roux, Peter D

    2011-09-01

    Delayed cerebral ischemia after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) may be affected by a number of factors, including cerebral blood flow and oxygen delivery. Anemia affects about half of patients with SAH and is associated with worse outcome. Anemia also may contribute to the development of or exacerbate delayed cerebral ischemia. This review was designed to examine the prevalence and impact of anemia in patients with SAH and to evaluate the effects of transfusion. A literature search was made to identify original research on anemia and transfusion in SAH patients. A total of 27 articles were identified that addressed the effects of red blood cell transfusion (RBCT) on brain physiology, anemia in SAH, and clinical management with RBCT or erythropoietin. Most studies provided retrospectively analyzed data of very low-quality according to the GRADE criteria. While RBCT can have beneficial effects on brain physiology, RBCT may be associated with medical complications, infection, vasospasm, and poor outcome after SAH. The effects may vary with disease severity or the presence of vasospasm, but it remains unclear whether RBCTs are a marker of disease severity or a cause of worse outcome. Erythropoietin data are limited. The literature review further suggests that the results of the Transfusion Requirements in Critical Care Trial and subsequent observational studies on RBCT in general critical care do not apply to SAH patients and that randomized trials to address the role of RBCT in SAH are required. PMID:21769459

  6. [Transfusion of plasma: products-indications].

    PubMed

    Djoudi, R

    2013-05-01

    The use of therapeutic plasma has increased in France by more than 40% since 2002. This growth may be explained by the improvement in transfusion safety, the diminution of the risk of transmission of pathogens and the regained confidence of the physicians in blood products. Therapeutic plasma also benefits from additional procedures to reduce infectious (securisation) or immunological risks (selection of blood donors). Its application in massive transfusions has undergone a significant evolution over the last few years. A proactive attitude favouring early and important use of plasma on the basis of pre-established protocols is advocated henceforth. The prescription of therapeutic plasma for other indications must be guided by the results of biological tests and an evaluation of the haemorrhagic risk. Despite regular updating of the guidelines for good transfusion practice, plasma is still sometimes prescribed for prophylactic purposes in situations where the biological and/or clinical criteria do not justify it. Moreover, it is not recommended to use fresh frozen plasma in cases of deficiency of coagulation factors if the specific concentrates are available as intravenous fluids. Complementary clinical studies will be necessary to evaluate, in certain indications, the real benefits of the transfusion of plasma and the interest of replacing it by concentrates of coagulant factors (fibrinogen, prothrombin complex).

  7. Precautions and Adverse Reactions during Blood Transfusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... the transfused blood after it is collected. In addition to an increase in temperature, the person has chills and sometimes headache or back pain. Sometimes the person also has symptoms of an allergic reaction such as itching or a rash. Usually, acetaminophen ...

  8. [Transfusion safety. Introduction and identifying the problem].

    PubMed

    Ambriz Fernández, Raúl

    2013-01-01

    The problems that exist in our country in the security of the transfusion chain affect every step in the recruitment, donor selection, and aseptic collection, screening tests, production of blood components, storage, transportation and transfusion to recipient. Some of which can lead to fatal cases or moving slowly because of the fragmentation of our health system.With the principles of ethics, we must move towards a unified national blood system overcoming the conflicts of interest that affect the impact on administrative certifications; decrease the irrational use of resources, optimize costs and achieve a transfusion medicine security system and haemovigilance of the at the hospital. There has to be some regional blood banks well-coordinated in health institutions, with central management systems of quality and more specialized procedures,the latter can be achieved with more than 150 public blood banks, transforming them into positions of blood collection of voluntary donation of repetition. The resources would be released equip regional banks. Also required to provide education and legislation ad hoc for goals in voluntary blood donation and focused mainly the university population and centralize information for haemovigilance based computer systems specific hospitals, that reduce errors and restrict risk blood components involved in fatal cases, and reduce the possibility of punitive actions. It has international advice of the whole transfusion chain.

  9. [Blood transfusion: control of infectious risks].

    PubMed

    Laperche, Syria; Lefrère, Jean-Jacques; Morel, Pascal; Pouchol, Elodie; Pozzetto, Bruno

    2015-02-01

    From blood donor collection to transfusion of the recipient, there are several layers of protection of the blood supply. These measures combined with huge progresses over the three past decades in pathogen discovery and blood testing for specific pathogens (human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B (HBV) and C (HCV) viruses, Human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV)), provide the greatest safety. With the implementation of serological and molecular testing, at least in high-income countries, transfusion-transmitted infections have become extremely rare. However, for pathogen agents, which are not tested and especially those which are responsible for emerging infectious disease, it became apparent that full control of infectious disease had not been achieved. In addition, the immune status of the recipient has also an impact in the outcome of infectious diseases transmitted by transfusion. Blood safety is based on several measures: education and deferral of donors with risk factors for transmissible disease, blood testing, pathogen reduction interventions, and patient blood management. This paper proposes a review of the residual risk of transmission of infectious diseases by transfusion and of the additional interventions able to further reduce it.

  10. Inhibition of human platelet phospholipase A/sub 2/ by mono(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate

    SciTech Connect

    Labow, R.S.; Meek, E.; Adams, G.A.; Rock, G.

    1988-06-01

    There is evidence that the carcinogenic and teratogenic effects attributed to the plasticizer di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) are due to its major metabolite mono(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (MEHP). MEHP is also formed ex vivo by a plasma enzyme in blood products stored in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) DEHP plastic containers. People who receive large amounts of blood products, such as hemophiliacs or patients undergoing hemodialysis, cardiopulmonary bypass, or massive transfusion, are exposed to significant levels of plasticizer. In this study, the platelet was used to show that MEHP inhibits phospholipase A/sub 2/ (PLA/sub 2/), one of the enzymes important in the release of arachidonic acid from membrane phospholipids. PLA/sub 2/ was measured by the liberation of /sup 14/C-arachidonic acid from 1-stearoyl-2-(1-/sup 14/C)arachidonyl-L-3-phosphatidylcholine. MEHP inhibits PLA/sub 2/ activity noncompetitively in intact human platelets and lysates with a K/sub i/ of 3.7 x 10/sup -4/ M. DEHP does not inhibit PLA/sub 2/ in whole platelets. Inhibition of PLA/sub 2/ by MEHP occurs at only three times the circulating level of MEHP measured in neonates undergoing exchange transfusion and 20-fold the levels experienced by patients during cardiopulmonary bypass. Therefore, infants and adult patients with multisystem failure who accumulate MEHP in their blood may be at risk for decreased platelet function.

  11. Platelet transport in microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyssat, Mathilde; Le Goff, Anne; Blin, Antoine; Pujos, Justine; Magniez, Aurélie; Baruch, Dominique

    2013-11-01

    Blood platelets are small enucleated cells responsible for the arrest of bleeding. These cells have the ability to tether and translocate on injured vascular endothelium, thanks to a specific interaction between a receptor of their membrane and a protein expressed by the cells composing the inner wall of the vessel, the von Willebrand factor (VWF). Others cells have such abilities of rolling. Leucocytes, for example, translocate on surface due to a specific interaction between selectin molecules and their respective glycoprotein ligands. These kinds of cells present two modes of transport: they can either be advected by the flux, or translocate on surfaces due to specific ligand-receptor interactions. Our work consists first in studying experimentally the transport of platelets along a microchannel and then in modeling this particular cell transport. Due to these two modes of transport along a channel, platelets adhering to the surface are not equally distributed along the channel axis. We describe the evolution of the density of platelets with time and distance.

  12. Standardisation of platelet counting accuracy in blood banks by reference to an automated immunoplatelet procedure: comparative evaluation of Cell-Dyn CD4000 impedance and optical platelet counts.

    PubMed

    Johannessen, B; Haugen, T; Scott, C S

    2001-10-01

    Prophylactic and therapeutic platelet transfusions are increasingly used for patients with conditions associated with thrombocytopenia in order to prevent the development of potentially life threatening bleeding. These clinical strategies have led to a significant expansion in platelet unit manufacture, and this now represents a major resource and cost commitment for blood banks. As part of the manufacturing process, blood banks are required to implement control procedures, and the determination of platelet counts in particular is necessary to confirm that the quality of platelet unit production meets the standards defined by national or international guidelines. Apart from linearity analysis and comparisons of platelet counts given by different instruments, there has been no systematic standardisation of platelet counting methods in blood bank practice because to date there has been no suitable reference method for counting platelets in citrate anticoagulants. The recent introduction of an automated immunoplatelet procedure on the Cell-Dyn CD4000 provides a means of determining a true platelet count that is unaffected by changes induced either by storage or anticoagulant. The CD4000 in its routine configuration also provides simultaneous impedance and optical platelet counts and this study was therefore undertaken in order to compare all three different platelet counting methods in parallel with a representative series of platelet units. Platelet counts determined after sub-sampling of platelet units into EDTA vs plain non-anticoagulated tubes revealed no differences in impedance or immunoplatelet counts but generally lower optical counts when aliquoted into tubes that did not contain EDTA. This study therefore routinely used EDTA for platelet unit sub-samples. Comparative results of platelet counts for buffy coat platelet units (n = 36) aliquoted into EDTA indicated that the impedance count was higher than the reference immunoplatelet count by a mean factor of 1

  13. A multicentre randomised controlled trial of Transfusion Indication Threshold Reduction on transfusion rates, morbidity and health-care resource use following cardiac surgery (TITRe2).

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Barnaby C; Pike, Katie; Rogers, Chris A; Brierley, Rachel Cm; Stokes, Elizabeth A; Wordsworth, Sarah; Nash, Rachel L; Miles, Alice; Mumford, Andrew D; Cohen, Alan; Angelini, Gianni D; Murphy, Gavin J

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Uncertainty about optimal red blood cell transfusion thresholds in cardiac surgery is reflected in widely varying transfusion rates between surgeons and cardiac centres. OBJECTIVE To test the hypothesis that a restrictive compared with a liberal threshold for red blood cell transfusion after cardiac surgery reduces post-operative morbidity and health-care costs. DESIGN Multicentre, parallel randomised controlled trial and within-trial cost-utility analysis from a UK NHS and Personal Social Services perspective. We could not blind health-care staff but tried to blind participants. Random allocations were generated by computer and minimised by centre and operation. SETTING Seventeen specialist cardiac surgery centres in UK NHS hospitals. PARTICIPANTS Patients aged > 16 years undergoing non-emergency cardiac surgery with post-operative haemoglobin < 9 g/dl. Exclusion criteria were: unwilling to have transfusion owing to beliefs; platelet, red blood cell or clotting disorder; ongoing or recurrent sepsis; and critical limb ischaemia. INTERVENTIONS Participants in the liberal group were eligible for transfusion immediately after randomisation (post-operative haemoglobin < 9 g/dl); participants in the restrictive group were eligible for transfusion if their post-operative haemoglobin fell to < 7.5 g/dl during the index hospital stay. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES The primary outcome was a composite outcome of any serious infectious (sepsis or wound infection) or ischaemic event (permanent stroke, myocardial infarction, gut infarction or acute kidney injury) during the 3 months after randomisation. Events were verified or adjudicated by blinded personnel. Secondary outcomes included blood products transfused; infectious events; ischaemic events; quality of life (European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions); duration of intensive care or high-dependency unit stay; duration of hospital stay; significant pulmonary morbidity; all-cause mortality; resource use, costs

  14. Age of blood and recipient factors determine the severity of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Critical care patients frequently receive blood transfusions. Some reports show an association between aged or stored blood and increased morbidity and mortality, including the development of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI). However, the existence of conflicting data endorses the need for research to either reject this association, or to confirm it and elucidate the underlying mechanisms. Methods Twenty-eight sheep were randomised into two groups, receiving saline or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Sheep were further randomised to also receive transfusion of pooled and heat-inactivated supernatant from fresh (Day 1) or stored (Day 42) non-leucoreduced human packed red blood cells (PRBC) or an infusion of saline. TRALI was defined by hypoxaemia during or within two hours of transfusion and histological evidence of pulmonary oedema. Regression modelling compared physiology between groups, and to a previous study, using stored platelet concentrates (PLT). Samples of the transfused blood products also underwent cytokine array and biochemical analyses, and their neutrophil priming ability was measured in vitro. Results TRALI did not develop in sheep that first received saline-infusion. In contrast, 80% of sheep that first received LPS-infusion developed TRALI following transfusion with "stored PRBC." The decreased mean arterial pressure and cardiac output as well as increased central venous pressure and body temperature were more severe for TRALI induced by "stored PRBC" than by "stored PLT." Storage-related accumulation of several factors was demonstrated in both "stored PRBC" and "stored PLT", and was associated with increased in vitro neutrophil priming. Concentrations of several factors were higher in the "stored PRBC" than in the "stored PLT," however, there was no difference to neutrophil priming in vitro. Conclusions In this in vivo ovine model, both recipient and blood product factors contributed to the development of TRALI. Sick (LPS

  15. Haemostatic profile of reconstituted blood in a proposed 1:1:1 ratio of packed red blood cells, platelet concentrate and four different plasma preparations.

    PubMed

    Ponschab, M; Schöchl, H; Gabriel, C; Süssner, S; Cadamuro, J; Haschke-Becher, E; Gratz, J; Zipperle, J; Redl, H; Schlimp, C J

    2015-05-01

    The concept of haemostatic resuscitation implies early and high-volume plasma transfusion. We investigated the haemostatic profile of reconstituted whole blood prepared in a 1:1:1 ratio of blood, platelets and plasma. This consisted of packed red blood cells, platelet concentrate and four different plasma variants: fresh frozen; solvent-detergent; lyophilised quarantine; and lyophilised methylene blue-inactivated plasma. Haematocrit, platelet count, endogenous thrombin potential and coagulation factor activity were significantly lower in reconstituted blood compared with citrated whole blood (p < 0.01). Except for lyophilised methylene blue-inactivated plasma, no substantial differences between plasma variants in coagulation factor activity, endogenous thrombin potential and standard coagulation tests were observed. After reconstitution, haematocrit and platelet counts were slightly above recommended transfusion triggers, most thromboelastometry (ROTEM(®)) parameters were within the normal range and fibrinogen concentrations were between 1.57 g.l(-1) and 1.91 g.l(-1). Reconstitution of whole blood in a 1:1:1 ratio resulted in significant dilution of haematocrit and platelet count, but values remained above limits recommended by transfusion guidelines. Fibrinogen concentrations of reconstituted whole blood were also significantly reduced, and these were below the threshold value for supplementation recommended by recent guidelines.

  16. A factor VIII-derived peptide enables von Willebrand factor (VWF)-binding of artificial platelet nanoconstructs without interfering with VWF-adhesion of natural platelets†

    PubMed Central

    Haji-Valizadeh, Hassa n; Modery-Pawlowski, Christa L.

    2015-01-01

    There is substantial clinical interest in synthetic platelet analogs for potential application in transfusion medicine. To this end, our research is focused on self-assembled peptide–lipid nanoconstructs that can undergo injury site-selective adhesion and subsequently promote site-directed active platelet aggregation, thus mimicking platelet’s primary hemostatic actions. For injury site-selective adhesion, we have utilized a coagulation factor FVIII-derived VWF-binding peptide (VBP). FVIII binds to VWF’s D′–D3 domain while natural platelet GPIbα binds to VWF’s A1 domain. Therefore, we hypothesized that the VBP-decorated nanoconstructs will adhere to VWF without mutual competition with natural platelets. We further hypothesized that the adherent VBP-decorated constructs can enhance platelet aggregation when co-decorated with a fibrinogen-mimetic peptide (FMP). To test these hypotheses, we used glycocalicin to selectively block VWF’s A1 domain and, using fluorescence microscopy, studied the binding of fluorescently labeled VBP-decorated nanoconstructs versus platelets to ristocetin-treated VWF. Subsequently, we co-decorated the nanoconstructs with VBP and FMP and incubated them with human platelets to study construct-mediated enhancement of platelet aggregation. Decoration with VBP resulted in substantial construct adhesion to ristocetin-treated VWF even if the A1-domain was blocked by glycocalicin. In comparison, such A1-blocking resulted in significant reduction of platelet adhesion. Without A1-blocking, the VBP-decorated constructs and natural platelets could adhere to VWF concomitantly. Furthermore, the constructs co-decorated with VBP and FMP enhanced active platelet aggregation. The results indicate significant promise in utilizing the FVIII-derived VBP in developing synthetic platelet analogs that do not interfere with VWF-binding of natural platelets but allow site-directed enhancement of platelet aggregation when combined with FMP. PMID

  17. Transfusion monitoring: care practice analysis in a public teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    dos Reis, Valesca Nunes; Paixão, Isabella Bertolin; Perrone, Ana Carolina Amaral de São José; Monteiro, Maria Inês; dos Santos, Kelli Borges

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To analyze the process of recording transfusion monitoring at a public teaching hospital. Methods A descriptive and retrospective study with a quantitative approach, analyzing the instruments to record transfusion monitoring at a public hospital in a city in the State of Minas Gerais (MG). Data were collected on the correct completion of the instrument, time elapsed from transfusions, records of vital signs, type of blood component more frequently transfused, and hospital unit where transfusion was performed. Results A total of 1,012 records were analyzed, and 53.4% of them had errors in filling in the instruments, 6% of transfusions started after the recommended time, and 9.3% of patients had no vital signs registered. Conclusion Failures were identified in the process of recording transfusion monitoring, and they could result in more adverse events related to the administration of blood components. Planning and implementing strategies to enhance recording and to improve care delivered are challenging. PMID:27074233

  18. Interdisciplinary process improvement for enhancing blood transfusion safety.

    PubMed

    LaRocco, Mark; Brient, Kathy

    2010-01-01

    We describe a multipronged, multidisciplinary effort to improve the safety of blood transfusion in our hospital. System-wide practices related to the ordering, delivery, and transfusion of blood products were addressed including: (1) appropriate selection of patients and utilization of blood, (2) accurate blood product labeling and tracking, (3) reliable transportation of blood products between the transfusion service laboratory and the bedside, (4) electronic verification of patients and products at the point of transfusion, and (5) documentation of transfusion events in the patient's medical record. By implementing new technologies and focusing LEAN process improvement techniques on the preanalytical, analytical, and postanalytical phases of the transfusion cycle, we have been able to significantly reduce the risk of transfusion error in our patient population.

  19. Insomnia, platelet serotonin and platelet monoamine oxidase in chronic alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Nenadic Sviglin, Korona; Nedic, Gordana; Nikolac, Matea; Mustapic, Maja; Muck-Seler, Dorotea; Borovecki, Fran; Pivac, Nela

    2011-08-18

    Insomnia is a common sleep disorder frequently occurring in chronic alcoholic patients. Neurobiological basis of insomnia, as well as of alcoholism, is associated with disrupted functions of the main neurotransmitter systems, including the serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) system. Blood platelets are considered a limited peripheral model for the central 5-HT neurons, since both platelets and central 5-HT synaptosomes have similar dynamics of 5-HT. Platelet 5-HT concentration and platelet monoamine oxidase type B (MAO-B) are assumed to represent biomarkers for particular symptoms and behaviors in psychiatric disorders. The hypothesis of this study was that platelet 5-HT concentration and platelet MAO-B activity will be altered in chronic alcoholic patients with insomnia compared to comparable values in patients without insomnia. The study included 498 subjects: 395 male and 103 female medication-free patients with alcohol dependence and 502 healthy control subjects: 325 men and 177 women. The effects of early, middle and late insomnia (evaluated using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale), as well as sex, age and smoking on platelet 5-HT concentration and platelet MAO-B activity were evaluated using one-way ANOVA and multiple regression analysis by the stepwise method. Platelet 5-HT concentration, but not platelet MAO-B activity, was significantly reduced in alcoholic patients with insomnia compared to patients without insomnia. Multiple regression analysis revealed that platelet 5-HT concentration was affected by middle insomnia, smoking and sex, while platelet MAO activity was affected only by sex and age. The present and previous data suggest that platelet 5-HT concentration might be used, after controlling for sex and smoking, as a biomarker for insomnia in alcoholism, PTSD and in rotating shift workers.

  20. Early increase in DcR2 expression and late activation of caspases in the platelet storage lesion.

    PubMed

    Plenchette, S; Moutet, M; Benguella, M; N'Gondara, J P; Guigner, F; Coffe, C; Corcos, L; Bettaieb, A; Solary, E

    2001-10-01

    Platelet transfusion is widely used to prevent bleeding in patients with severe thrombocytopenia. The maximal storage duration of platelet concentrates is usually 5 days, due to the platelet storage lesion that impairs their functions when stored for longer times. Some of the morphological and biochemical changes that characterize this storage lesion are reminiscent of cell death by apoptosis. The present study analyzed whether proteins involved in nucleated cell apoptosis could play a role in the platelet storage lesion. Storage of leukocyte-depleted platelets obtained by apheresis is associated with a late and limited activation of caspases, mainly caspase-3. This event correlates with an increased expression of the pro-apoptotic BH3-only protein Bim in the particulate fraction and a slight and late release of the pro-apoptotic mitochondrial protein Diablo/Smac in the cytosol. Platelets do not express the death receptors Fas, DR4 and DR5 on their plasma membrane, while the expression of the decoy receptor DcR2 increases progressively during platelet storage. Addition of low concentrations of the cryoprotector dimethylsulfoxide accelerates platelet caspase activation during storage, an effect that is partially prevented by the caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk. Altogether, DcR2 expression on the plasma membrane is an early event while caspase activation is a late event during platelet storage. These observations suggest that caspases are unlikely to account for the platelet storage lesion. As a consequence, addition of caspase inhibitors may not improve the quality of platelet concentrates stored in standard conditions. PMID:11587215

  1. Dietary manipulation of platelet function.

    PubMed

    Bachmair, E M; Ostertag, L M; Zhang, X; de Roos, B

    2014-11-01

    Activated platelets contribute to plaque formation within blood vessels in the early and late stages of atherogenesis, and therefore they have been proposed as risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Anti-platelet drugs, such as aspirin, are now the most prescribed pharmacological treatment in Europe. Certain dietary bioactives also beneficially affect platelet function, and with less side effects, albeit that effects are generally more subtle. Therefore, consumption of dietary bioactives could play a role in the prevention of atherothrombotic vascular disease. Here we review the efficacy of dietary treatment strategies, especially those involving certain dietary fatty acids and polyphenols, to modulate platelet function in healthy subjects or in patients with cardiovascular disease. Variation in study populations, small study sizes and lack of comparability between methods to assess platelet function currently limit robust evidence on the efficacy of dietary bioactives in healthy subjects or specific patient groups. Also, limited knowledge of the metabolism of dietary bioactives, and therefore of the bioavailability of bioactive ingredients, restricts our ability to identify the most effective dietary regimes to improve platelet function. Implementation of uniform point-of-care tests to assess platelet function, and enhanced knowledge of the efficacy by which specific dietary compounds and their metabolites affect platelet function, may enable the identification of functional anti-platelet ingredients that are eligible for a health claim, or combined treatment strategies, including both pharmacological anti-platelet treatment as well as dietary intervention, to tackle atherothrombotic vascular disease. PMID:24858060

  2. Effects of hormones on platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Farré, Antonio López; Modrego, Javier; Zamorano-León, José J

    2014-04-01

    Platelets and their activation/inhibition mechanisms play a central role in haemostasis. It is well known agonists and antagonists of platelet activation; however, during the last years novel evidences of hormone effects on platelet activation have been reported. Platelet functionality may be modulated by the interaction between different hormones and their platelet receptors, contributing to sex differences in platelet function and even in platelet-mediated vascular damage. It has suggested aspects that apparently are well established should be reviewed. Hormones effects on platelet activity are included among them. This article tries to review knowledge about the involvement of hormones in platelet biology and activity.

  3. Differential Expression Analysis by RNA-Seq Reveals Perturbations in the Platelet mRNA Transcriptome Triggered by Pathogen Reduction Systems

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Abdimajid; Hitzler, Walter E.; Ameur, Adam; Provost, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Platelet concentrates (PCs) are prepared at blood banks for transfusion to patients in certain clinical conditions associated with a low platelet count. To prevent transfusion-transmitted infections via PCs, different pathogen reduction (PR) systems have been developed that inactivate the nucleic acids of contaminating pathogens by chemical cross-linking, a mechanism that may also affect platelets’ nucleic acids. We previously reported that treatment of stored platelets with the PR system Intercept significantly reduced the level of half of the microRNAs that were monitored, induced platelet activation and compromised the platelet response to physiological agonists. Using genome-wide differential expression (DE) RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq), we now report that Intercept markedly perturbs the mRNA transcriptome of human platelets and alters the expression level of >800 mRNAs (P<0.05) compared to other PR systems and control platelets. Of these, 400 genes were deregulated with DE corresponding to fold changes (FC) ≥2. At the p-value < 0.001, as many as 147 genes were deregulated by ≥ 2-fold in Intercept-treated platelets, compared to none in the other groups. Finally, integrated analysis combining expression data for microRNA (miRNA) and mRNA, and involving prediction of miRNA-mRNA interactions, disclosed several positive and inverse correlations between miRNAs and mRNAs in stored platelets. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that Intercept markedly deregulates the platelet mRNA transcriptome, concomitant with reduced levels of mRNA-regulatory miRNAs. These findings should enlighten authorities worldwide when considering the implementation of PR systems, that target nucleic acids and are not specific to pathogens, for the management of blood products. PMID:26172280

  4. Treatment of Platelet Products with Riboflavin and UV Light: Effectiveness Against High Titer Bacterial Contamination

    PubMed Central

    Keil, Shawn D.; Hovenga, Nick; Gilmour, Denise; Marschner, Susanne; Goodrich, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    Contamination of platelet units by bacteria has long been acknowledged as a significant transfusion risk due to their post-donation storage conditions. Products are routinely stored at 22 °C on an agitating shaker, a condition that can promote bacterial growth. Although the total number of bacteria believed to be introduced into a platelet product is extremely low, these bacteria can multiply to a very high titer prior to transfusion, potentially resulting in serious adverse events. The aim of this study was to evaluate a riboflavin based pathogen reduction process against a panel of bacteria that have been identified as common contaminants of platelet products. This panel included the following organisms: S. epidermidis, S. aureus, S. mitis, S. pyogenes, S. marcescens, Y. enterocolitica, B. neotomae, B. cereus, E. coli, P. aeruginosa and K. pneumoniae. Each platelet unit was inoculated with a high bacterial load and samples were removed both before and after treatment. A colony forming assay, using an end point dilution scheme, was used to determine the pre-treatment and post-treatment bacterial titers. Log reduction was calculated by subtracting the post-treatment titer from the pre-treatment titer. The following log reductions were observed: S. epidermidis 4.7 log (99.998%), S. aureus 4.8 log (99.998%), S. mitis 3.7 log (99.98%), S. pyogenes 2.6 log (99.7%), S. marcescens 4.0 log (99.99%), Y. enterocolitica 3.3 log (99.95%), B. neotomae 5.4 log (99.9996%), B. cereus 2.6 log (99.7%), E. coli ≥5.4 log (99.9996%), P. aeruginosa 4.7 log (99.998%) and K. pneumoniae 2.8 log (99.8%). The results from this study suggest the process could help to lower the risk of severe adverse transfusion events associated with bacterial contamination. PMID:26327141

  5. Treatment of Platelet Products with Riboflavin and UV Light: Effectiveness Against High Titer Bacterial Contamination.

    PubMed

    Keil, Shawn D; Hovenga, Nick; Gilmour, Denise; Marschner, Susanne; Goodrich, Raymond

    2015-08-24

    Contamination of platelet units by bacteria has long been acknowledged as a significant transfusion risk due to their post-donation storage conditions. Products are routinely stored at 22 °C on an agitating shaker, a condition that can promote bacterial growth. Although the total number of bacteria believed to be introduced into a platelet product is extremely low, these bacteria can multiply to a very high titer prior to transfusion, potentially resulting in serious adverse events. The aim of this study was to evaluate a riboflavin based pathogen reduction process against a panel of bacteria that have been identified as common contaminants of platelet products. This panel included the following organisms: S. epidermidis, S. aureus, S. mitis, S. pyogenes, S. marcescens, Y. enterocolitica, B. neotomae, B. cereus, E. coli, P. aeruginosa and K. pneumoniae. Each platelet unit was inoculated with a high bacterial load and samples were removed both before and after treatment. A colony forming assay, using an end point dilution scheme, was used to determine the pre-treatment and post-treatment bacterial titers. Log reduction was calculated by subtracting the post-treatment titer from the pre-treatment titer. The following log reductions were observed: S. epidermidis 4.7 log (99.998%), S. aureus 4.8 log (99.998%), S. mitis 3.7 log (99.98%), S. pyogenes 2.6 log (99.7%), S. marcescens 4.0 log (99.99%), Y. enterocolitica 3.3 log (99.95%), B. neotomae 5.4 log (99.9996%), B. cereus 2.6 log (99.7%), E. coli ≥5.4 log (99.9996%), P. aeruginosa 4.7 log (99.998%) and K. pneumoniae 2.8 log (99.8%). The results from this study suggest the process could help to lower the risk of severe adverse transfusion events associated with bacterial contamination.

  6. Saving lives and conserving blood: changing blood transfusion practices at St. John's Hospital, Springfield, Missouri.

    PubMed

    Hover, Alexander R; Madigan, Kevin; Skidmore, Lesha; Shell, Don

    2003-01-01

    We measured mean transfusion rates for 11 conditions accounting for the majority of inpatient blood transfusions and the pre-transfusion hemoglobin threshold triggering the transfusion. We then developed evidence-based recommendations for lower blood hemoglobin transfusion 'triggers.' Implementation of the transfusion guidelines and consensus building has decreased blood transfusion for the eleven conditions at St. John's Regional Health System (SJRHS) by 11.3% year to date (July 2002-March 2003).

  7. Management of patients who refuse blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Chand, N Kiran; Subramanya, H Bala; Rao, G Venkateswara

    2014-09-01

    A small group of people belonging to a certain religion, called Jehovah's witness do not accept blood transfusion or blood products, based on biblical readings. When such group of people are in need of health care, their faith and belief is an obstacle for their proper treatment, and poses legal, ethical and medical challenges for attending health care provider. Due to the rapid growth in the membership of this group worldwide, physicians attending hospitals should be prepared to manage such patients. Appropriate management of such patients entails understanding of ethical and legal issues involved, providing meticulous medical management, use of prohaemostatic agents, essential interventions and techniques to reduce blood loss and hence, reduce the risk of subsequent need for blood transfusion. An extensive literature search was performed using search engines such as Google scholar, PubMed, MEDLINE, science journals and textbooks using keywords like 'Jehovah's witness', 'blood haemodilution', 'blood salvage' and 'blood substitutes'. PMID:25535432

  8. Perioperative neonatal and paediatric blood transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Bharadwaj, Avnish; Khandelwal, Mamta; Bhargava, Suresh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Paediatric patients undergoing surgical procedures commonly require some volume of blood or blood component replacement in the perioperative period. Paediatric patients undergoing major surgery associated with substantial blood loss should be evaluated pre-operatively. Pre-operative correction of anaemia may be done considering the age, plasma volume status, clinical status and comorbidities. Maximum allowable blood loss (MABL) for surgery must be calculated, and appropriate quantity of blood and blood components should be arranged. Intraoperative monitoring of blood loss should be done, and volume of transfusion should be calculated in a protocol based manner considering the volemia and the trigger threshold for transfusion for the patient and the MABL. Early haemostasis should be achieved by judicious administration of red blood cells, blood components and pharmacological agents. PMID:25535431

  9. Blood transfusion: patient identification and empowerment.

    PubMed

    Stout, Lynn; Joseph, Sundari

    Positive patient identification is pivotal to several steps of the transfusion process; it is integral to ensuring that the correct blood is given to the correct patient. If patient misidentification occurs, this has potentially fatal consequences for patients. Historically patient involvement in healthcare has focused on clinical decision making, where the patient, having been provided with medical information, is encouraged to become involved in the decisions related to their individualised treatment. This article explores the aspects of patient contribution to patient safety relating to positive patient identification in transfusion. When involving patients in their care, however, clinicians must recognise the diversity of patients and the capacity of the patient to be involved. It must not be assumed that all patients will be willing or indeed able to participate. Additionally, clinicians' attitudes to patient involvement in patient safety can determine whether cultural change is successful.

  10. Autologous Blood Transfusion in Sports: Emerging Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Salamin, Olivier; De Angelis, Sara; Tissot, Jean-Daniel; Saugy, Martial; Leuenberger, Nicolas

    2016-07-01

    Despite being prohibited by the World Anti-Doping Agency, blood doping through erythropoietin injection or blood transfusion is frequently used by athletes to increase oxygen delivery to muscles and enhance performance. In contrast with allogeneic blood transfusion and erythropoietic stimulants, there is presently no direct method of detection for autologous blood transfusion (ABT) doping. Blood reinfusion is currently monitored with individual follow-up of hematological variables via the athlete biological passport, which requires further improvement. Microdosage is undetectable, and suspicious profiles in athletes are often attributed to exposure to altitude, heat stress, or illness. Additional indirect biomarkers may increase the sensitivity and specificity of the longitudinal approach. The emergence of "-omics" strategies provides new opportunities to discover biomarkers for the indirect detection of ABT. With the development of direct quantitative methods, transcriptomics based on microRNA or messenger RNA expression is a promising approach. Because blood donation and blood reinfusion alter iron metabolism, quantification of proteins involved in metal metabolism, such as hepcidin, may be applied in an "ironomics" strategy to improve the detection of ABT. As red blood cell (RBC) storage triggers changes in membrane proteins, proteomic methods have the potential to identify the presence of stored RBCs in blood. Alternatively, urine matrix can be used for the quantification of the plasticizer di(2-ethyhexyl)phthalate and its metabolites that originate from blood storage bags, suggesting recent blood transfusion, and have an important degree of sensitivity and specificity. This review proposes that various indirect biomarkers should be applied in combination with mathematical approaches for longitudinal monitoring aimed at improving ABT detection. PMID:27260108

  11. Principles of transfusion medicine in small animals.

    PubMed Central

    Lanevschi, A; Wardrop, K J

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this review was to provide the reader with an updated overview of small animal transfusion medicine, and an approach to integrating it into private practice, based on a review of the veterinary and human literature spanning the last 3 decades. Electronic, online databases that were searched included CAB International and Medline; multiple keywords or subject headings were searched that were appropriate to each of the sections reviewed: canine and feline blood groups, blood-typing and crossmatching, donors, blood collection, storage, blood components, blood transfusion, blood component therapy, blood substitutes, and adverse reactions. The safe use of blood component therapy requires knowledge of blood groups and antibody prevalence, and knowledge of the means to minimize the risk of adverse reactions by including the use of proper donors and screening assays that facilitate detection of serological incompatibility. The 2 assays available to the practitioner are crossmatching, which is readily done in-house, and blood typing. Blood typing is available in the form of a commercial testing kit, through use of purchased reagents, or via a request to an external laboratory. The risk of potentially fatal adverse reactions is higher in cats than in dogs. The decision to transfuse and the type of product to administer depend on several factors, such as the type of anemia and the size of the animal. In conclusion, transfusion medicine has become more feasible in small animal practice, with improved access to blood products through either on-site donors, the purchase of blood bank products, external donor programs, or the availability of blood component substitutes. PMID:11424576

  12. Platelet Immobilization on Supported Phospholipid Bilayers for Single Platelet Studies.

    PubMed

    Uhl, Eva; Donati, Alessia; Reviakine, Ilya

    2016-08-23

    The worldwide cardiovascular disease (CVD) epidemic is of grave concern. A major role in the etiology of CVDs is played by the platelets (thrombocytes). Platelets are anuclear cell fragments circulating in the blood. Their primary function is to catalyze clot formation, limiting traumatic blood loss in the case of injury. The same process leads to thrombosis in the case of CVDs, which are commonly managed with antiplatelet therapy. Platelets also have other, nonhemostatic functions in wound healing, inflammation, and tissue regeneration. They play a role in the early stages of atherosclerosis and the spread of cancer through metastases. Much remains to be learned about the regulation of these diverse platelet functions under physiological and pathological conditions. Breakthroughs in this regard are expected to come from single platelet studies and systems approaches. The immobilization of platelets at surfaces is advantageous for developing such approaches, but platelets are activated when they come in contact with foreign surfaces. In this work, we develop and validate a protocol for immobilizing platelets on supported lipid bilayers without activation due to immobilization. Our protocol can therefore be used for studying platelets with a wide variety of surface-sensitive techniques. PMID:27438059

  13. [Necessity of a 24-hour system of blood transfusion testing].

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Yuji

    2003-01-01

    The preventive effects of a 24-hour system of blood transfusion testing on mistyping of transfused blood was examined. Blood transfusion tests have been performed by blood transfusion technologists during working hours and by physicians at other times. In March 2000, we introduced a system in which technologists perform blood transfusion tests after working hours. Technologists of the Blood Transfusion Unit and Central Clinical Laboratory perform the test jointly, and column agglutination technology was introduced as the test method. A computer system setup exclusively for the testing was also introduced to perform computer cross-matching. Since transfusion error is likely to occur during emergency blood transfusion, a manual was established to prioritize safety. After introduction of the system, mistyping that may have been caused by inaccurate blood test results markedly decreased, confirming the usefulness of this system for prevention of mistyping. In addition, transfusion errors also decreased in wards and the improved system increased the safety of the entire medical care system. The frequency of mistyping was about 1% when physicians performed blood typing, showing the importance of clinical technologists for blood transfusion tests. PMID:12652691

  14. Effect of blood transfusions on canine renal allograft survival

    SciTech Connect

    Van Der Linden, C.J.; Buurman, W.A.; Vegt, P.A.; Greep, J.M.; Jeekel, J.

    1982-04-01

    In this study significantly prolonged canine renal allograft survival has been demonstrated after transfusion of 100 ml of third-party whole blood given peroperatively. Peroperative transfusions of third-party leukocyte-free blood or pure lymphocyte cell suspensions did not influence graft survival. Futhermore, no improvement in graft survival has been found after a peroperative transfuson of irradiated whole blood (2500 rad). These data suggest that delayed graft rejection after blood transfusions can only be expected after the administration of whole blood. The role of competent lymphocytes in whole blood is questionable, since a transfusion of irradiated whole blood in combination with nonirradiated lymphocytes did not lead to prolonged graft survival. Immunosuppression of the recipient directly after transfusion seems to be essential to induce the beneficial effect of blood transfusions. This has been demonstrated for a transfusion of whole blood 14 days before transplantation. A single transfusion of 100 ml of whole blood 14 days before transplantation could effectively prolong graft survival if immunosuppression with azathioprine and prednisone was started on the day of transfusion. No improvement in graft survival has been found with such a transfusion if preoperative immunosuppression has been omitted.

  15. Paul Holland: contributions to transfusion medicine.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Leo J

    2013-07-01

    Paul Holland began his career in transfusion medicine in 1963 as an assistant to Dr. Paul Schmidt in the Blood Bank at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). He served at the NIH for 20 years and retired in 1983 with the rank of Captain in the Public Health Service. He subsequently became the Medical Director/CEO of the Sacramento Medical Foundation Blood Center, now Blood Source, a position he held for the next 21 years. Paul Holland has authored/co-authored 265 articles, chapters and monographs, mostly concerning issues relating to either viral hepatitis or HIV. In addition to his research career, Paul was a very active educator, having contributed importantly to the development of many current thought leaders in transfusion medicine. His distinguished career also included important administrative roles in national and international organizations relevant to transfusion medicine. He also was the recipient of many honors and awards which has won him wide-spread renown and the respect of his many colleagues.

  16. Blood transfusion safety: a new philosophy.

    PubMed

    Franklin, I M

    2012-12-01

    Blood transfusion safety has had a chequered history, and there are current and future challenges. Internationally, there is no clear consensus for many aspects of the provision of safe blood, although pan-national legislation does provide a baseline framework in the European Union. Costs are rising, and new safety measures can appear expensive, especially when tested against some other medical interventions, such as cancer treatment and vaccination programmes. In this article, it is proposed that a comprehensive approach is taken to the issue of blood transfusion safety that considers all aspects of the process rather than considering only new measures. The need for an agreed level of safety for specified and unknown risks is also suggested. The importance of providing care and support for those inadvertently injured as a result of transfusion problems is also made. Given that the current blood safety decision process often uses a utilitarian principle for decision making--through the calculation of Quality Adjusted Life Years--an alternative philosophy is proposed. A social contract for blood safety, based on the principles of 'justice as fairness' developed by John Rawls, is recommended as a means of providing an agreed level of safety, containing costs and providing support for any adverse outcomes.

  17. [Methologic contribution to blood transfusion materials surveillance].

    PubMed

    Roussel, P; Pujol-Rey, A; Arzur, C

    2001-08-01

    To reduce seriousness and frequency of iatrogenic risk implies prevention policies and efficient operational systems for vigilance. This risk management implies definition of precise organizations and procedures able to locate and to notify quickly undesirable events. This is the case about single use medical devices (SUMD) used in blood transfusion. This article is a contribution to the organisation of the implemented material vigilance in blood transfusion, collectively carried out with actors concerned (users, manufacturers, National Commission for Material Vigilance). It presents a lot of tools and methods to favour practices harmonization, as well as preventive a curative (specifications before purchase, main part of the quality contract between customer and supplier; internal control plan; index for medical device used in transfusion; illustrated glossaries for three main families of medical devices; index about symptomatic events; definitions of seriousness levels with their operational consequences; methods to manage a single use medical device judged as defective; tool for the review of incidents according to reference and batch). Then, the management of incidents about SUMD is presented within a material vigilance system integrated into the quality system of the institution, for user as for manufacturer. This is done in a chronological order with successively description of the incident, the assessment of the impact, the management of the associated risk, the periodical review of incidents and management of matters in dispute. PMID:11642028

  18. State of the art: massive transfusion.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, L M; Etchill, E W; Raval, J S; Neal, M D

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this article was to review recent developments in the resuscitation of both trauma and non-trauma patients in haemorrhagic shock. Strategies for the resuscitation of massively haemorrhaging patients and the use of massive transfusion protocols (MTPs) have been a major focus of the trauma literature over the past several years. The application of haemostatic resuscitation practices and MTPs to non-trauma populations has long been in practice, but has only recently been the subject of active research. Medline and PubMed were reviewed for 'massive transfusion' (MT) from 2012 to present. Non-English and paediatric articles were excluded. Articles were systematically reviewed for their relevance to MT. There were eight major areas of development identified. In recent MT literature, there was an increased focus on massively haemorrhaging non-trauma patients, the role of acute traumatic coagulopathy, the use of thromboelastography (TEG), and the impact of MTPs on blood product waste and efficiency of product delivery. Other developments included additional MT prediction tools and The PRospective Observational Multicenter Major Trauma Transfusion (PROMMTT) study. There was also interest in re-evaluating the clinical relevance of the current MT definition and identifying new foci for MT. These recent developments reflect efforts to better understand and manage non-traumatic haemorrhage and to address prior limitations in the trauma literature. Inevitably, new questions have been raised, which will likely direct ongoing and future research in MT.

  19. The role of microparticles in inflammation and transfusion: A concise review.

    PubMed

    Cognasse, Fabrice; Hamzeh-Cognasse, Hind; Laradi, Sandrine; Chou, Ming-Li; Seghatchian, Jerard; Burnouf, Thierry; Boulanger, Chantal; Garraud, Olivier; Amabile, Nicolas

    2015-10-01

    Microparticles are small membrane-bound vesicles found in body fluids including peripheral blood. Microparticles are an intrinsic part of blood labile products delivered to transfused patients and have active roles in inflammation. They are delimited by a lipid bilayer composed mainly of phospholipids, cholesterol, membrane-associated proteins, intracellular components such as metabolic enzymes, proteins-involved in adhesion and fusion, cytoskeletal-associated proteins, surface glycoproteins and/or chemokines. Microparticles can trigger a pro-inflammatory message to neighbouring or target cells. Microparticles originating from platelets, leukocytes, erythrocytes, and endothelial cells are associated with a variety of pathophysiological conditions. This review summarises the role of Microparticles in modulating inflammation. PMID:26584596

  20. Osmotic stability of blood platelets

    PubMed Central

    Fantl, P.

    1968-01-01

    1. Hypotonic solutions added to human platelet-containing plasma cause a transient decrease of absorbancy of light at 610 mμ which is followed by a gradual increase of absorbancy. 2. When platelets are stored for 7 hr at 4° C the absorbancy changes with variations of osmolarity and their aggregation with adenosine diphosphate (ADP) remain the same. However, the reversal of absorbancy declines during storage of platelet-containing plasma. 3. Platelets are not aggregated by stearate. Platelets appear to be only slightly affected by stearate concentration higher than 0·8 mM, but oleate has no effect. 4. Hypertonic solutions of NaCl and urea cause increase in absorbancy of platelet-containing human plasma. Hypertonic sucrose solutions produce no more change than isotonic solutions. Hypertonic NaCl produces permanent increases in absorbancy. In human platelet-containing plasma the increased absorbancy caused by hypertonic urea is transient and declines. 5. The osmotic platelet changes occur in isolated platelets as well as in platelet-containing plasma. 6. The absorbancy of frozen and thawed platelet-containing plasma is not significantly altered by hypotonic solutions but the absorbancy changes caused by hypertonic solutions are similar to that of unfrozen plasma. 7. The immediate absorbancy changes caused by hypo- and by hypertonic solutions are the same at 5° C and 30° C and are therefore probably of a physical nature. The reversal of absorbancy and aggregation of platelets by added adenosine diphosphate have Q10 > 1 and are therefore probably of a chemical-enzymic nature. 8. Divalent cations and contact activation are not required for the osmotic platelet changes and 10-3 M-Cu2+ and Zn2+ do not interfere. Inhibitors of oxidative phosphorylation, electron transfer, sodium, potassium activated adenosine triphosphatases and adenosine triphosphate do not inhibit reversal of absorbancy of platelets exposed to hypotonic solutions. Cyanide, 5 × 10-3 M, fluoride, 1

  1. Human blood platelets at microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surgenor, D. MACN.; Ausprunk, D.; Blevins, D.; Chao, F. C.; Curby, W.

    1987-01-01

    A set of freshly collected and separated human platelet suspensions were transported, in three types of plastic containers, on a 6 day, 2 hr mission of the orbiter Columbia to study the effect of prolonged exposure of human blood cells to microgravity. A controlled environment at a temperature of 22 + or - 1 deg with air flow was provided and another set of samples held on the ground acted as controls. Paired comparisons of platelets at ug versus controls at lxg revealed superior platelet survival at microgravity. When viewed in terms of plastic type, ug platelets in containers fabricated from PVC-TOTM displayed the best overall postflight viability.

  2. Emergency whole-blood use in the field: a simplified protocol for collection and transfusion.

    PubMed

    Strandenes, Geir; De Pasquale, Marc; Cap, Andrew P; Hervig, Tor A; Kristoffersen, Einar K; Hickey, Matthew; Cordova, Christopher; Berseus, Olle; Eliassen, Håkon S; Fisher, Logan; Williams, Steve; Spinella, Philip C

    2014-05-01

    Military experience and recent in vitro laboratory data provide a biological rationale for whole-blood use in the treatment of exsanguinating hemorrhage and have renewed interest in the reintroduction of fresh whole blood and cold-stored whole blood to patient care in austere environments. There is scant evidence to support, in a field environment, that a whole blood-based resuscitation strategy is superior to a crystalloid/colloid approach even when augmented by a limited number of red blood cell (RBC) and plasma units. Recent retrospective evidence suggests that, in this setting, resuscitation with a full compliment of RBCs, plasma, and platelets may offer an advantage, especially under conditions where evacuation is delayed. No current evacuation system, military or civilian, is capable of providing RBC, plasma, and platelet units in a prehospital environment, especially in austere settings. As a result, for the vast minority of casualties, in austere settings, with life-threatening hemorrhage, it is appropriate to consider a whole blood-based resuscitation approach to provide a balanced response to altered hemostasis and oxygen debt, with the goal of reducing the risk of death from hemorrhagic shock. To optimize the successful use of fresh whole blood/cold-stored whole blood in combat field environments, proper planning and frequent training to maximize efficiency and safety will be required. Combat medics will need proper protocol-based guidance and education if whole-blood collection and transfusion are to be successfully and safely performed in austere environments. In this article, we present the Norwegian Naval Special Operation Commando unit-specific remote damage control resuscitation protocol, which includes field collection and transfusion of whole blood. This protocol can serve as a template for others to use and adjust for their own military or civilian unit-specific needs and capabilities for care in austere environments. PMID:24365879

  3. Subpopulations in purified platelets adhering on glass.

    PubMed

    Donati, Alessia; Gupta, Swati; Reviakine, Ilya

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how platelet activation is regulated is important in the context of cardiovascular disorders and their management with antiplatelet therapy. Recent evidence points to different platelet subpopulations performing different functions. In particular, procoagulant and aggregating subpopulations have been reported in the literature in platelets treated with the GPVI agonists. How the formation of platelet subpopulations upon activation is regulated remains unclear. Here, it is shown that procoagulant and aggregating platelet subpopulations arise spontaneously upon adhesion of purified platelets on clean glass surfaces. Calcium ionophore treatment of the adhering platelets resulted in one platelet population expressing both the procoagulant and the adherent population markers phosphatidylserine and the activated form of GPIIb/IIIa, while all of the platelets expressed CD62P independently of the ionophore treatment. Therefore, all platelets have the capacity to express all three activation markers. It is concluded that platelet subpopulations observed in various studies reflect the dynamics of the platelet activation process. PMID:27338300

  4. The Blood Group A Genotype Determines the Level of Expression of the Blood Group A on Platelets But Not the Anti-B Isotiter

    PubMed Central

    Lehner, Barbara; Eichelberger, Beate; Jungbauer, Christof; Panzer, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background The extent of expression of the blood group A on platelets is controversial. Further, the relation between platelets' blood group A expression and the titers of isoagglutinins has not been thoroughly investigated, so far. Methods We evaluated the relation between the genotype with platelets' blood group A and H expression estimated by flow cytometry and the titers of isoagglutinins. Results The A expression varied between genotypes and within genotypes. However, the expression in A1 was stronger than in all other genotypes (p < 0.0001). An overlap of expression levels was apparent between homozygous A1A1 and heterozygous A1 individuals. Still, The A1A1 genotype is associated with a particularly high antigen expression (p = 0.009). Platelets' A expression in A2 versus blood group O donors was also significant (p = 0.007), but there was again an overlap of expression. The secretor status had only little influence on the expression (p = 0.18). Also, isoagglutinin titers were not associated with genotypes. Conclusion: To distinguish between A1 and A2 donors may reduce incompatible platelet transfusions and therefore be favorable on platelet transfusion increment. Clinical data are needed to support this notion. PMID:26733767

  5. Survey of the use of whole blood in current blood transfusion practice.

    PubMed

    MacLennan, S; Murphy, M F

    2001-12-01

    Limited use of whole blood has continued despite a general move to blood component therapy in recent years. This paper describes the results of a questionnaire survey which was distributed to haematologists in charge of blood banks in England and North Wales to ascertain how much and for which indications whole blood was being requested. There was a 58% response rate. More than 90% of hospitals that responded had not requested whole blood during the last 12 months. Indications for the use of whole blood were primarily in paediatric practice, mostly for neonatal exchange transfusion or paediatric surgery (cardiac or craniofacial). Infrequent use in adult practice was for "major bleeding" when whole blood was available, and in cardiac surgery, when post-operative bleeding was unresponsive to standard replacement therapy. The evidence for the use of whole blood in preference to component therapy in the massive transfusion setting was reviewed, and no compelling evidence was found for its routine use for this indication. It is worth noting that, as currently supplied in the UK, "whole blood" is not strictly "whole" as the leucocyte-depletion process removes platelets. PMID:11843887

  6. Current problems and future directions of transfusion-induced alloimmunization: summary of an NHLBI working group.

    PubMed

    Zimring, James C; Welniak, Lis; Semple, John W; Ness, Paul M; Slichter, Sherrill J; Spitalnik, Steven L

    2011-02-01

    In April 2010, a working group sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute was assembled to identify research strategies to improve our understanding of alloimmunization caused by the transfusion of allogeneic blood components and to evaluate potential approaches to both reduce its occurrence and manage its effects. Significant sequelae of alloimmunization were discussed and identified, including difficulties in maintaining chronic transfusion of red blood cells and platelets, hemolytic disease of the newborn, neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia, and rejection of transplanted cells and tissues. The discussions resulted in a consensus that identified key areas of future research and developmental areas, including genetic and epigenetic recipient factors that regulate alloimmunization, biochemical specifics of transfused products that affect alloimmunization, and novel technologies for high-throughput genotyping to facilitate extensive and efficient antigen matching between donor and recipient. Additional areas of importance included analysis of unappreciated medical sequelae of alloimmunization, such as cellular immunity and its effect upon transplant and autoimmunity. In addition, support for research infrastructure was discussed, with an emphasis on encouraging collaboration and synergy of animal models biology and human clinical research. Finally, training future investigators was identified as an area of importance. In aggregate, this communication provides a synopsis of the opinions of the working group on the above issues and presents both a list of suggested priorities and the rationale for the topics of focus. The areas of research identified in this report represent potential fertile ground for the medical advancement of preventing and managing alloimmunization in its different forms and mitigating the clinical problems it presents to multiple patient populations. PMID:21251006

  7. Prevalence of Alloimmunization to Human Platelet Antigen Glycoproteins and Human Leucocyte Antigen Class I in β Thalassemia Major Patients in Western India.

    PubMed

    Philip, Joseph; Kumar, Sudeep; Chatterjee, T; Mallhi, R S

    2014-12-01

    Present management of β thalassemia major by regular packed red blood cell (PRBC) transfusions poses risk of alloimmunization not only to red blood cell antigens, but also to human platelet antigens (HPA) and Human leucocyte antigens class I (HLA I). However data in this context is very limited in Indian population. The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of alloimmunization to HPA and HLA I in β thalassemia major patients who have received multiple PRBC transfusions over the years. A cross sectional study was performed at our tertiary care blood bank. β thalassemia major patients of more than 6 years of age were included who were receiving fresh, leucoreduced and irradiated PRBC units regularly with annual requirement of more than ten PRBC transfusions. A total of 9 out of 80 (11.25 %) patients were found to be alloimmunized for HPA antigens of various specificity and 24 out of 80 (30 %) developed antibodies to HLA I. The awareness of development of alloimmunization to HPA and HLA antigens in multi PRBC transfused thalassemics, despite use of leucofilters will prompt us, to look for improvement in our current PRBC preparations to minimise platelet alloimmunisation. Further studies are required to validate the findings and build the base line data in this regard. This is of importance, especially in view of providing suitable cross-matched platelets when required in future especially when considering future haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT).

  8. [STRUCTURAL CHARACTERIZATION OF PLATELETS AND PLATELET-DERIVED MICROVESICLES].

    PubMed

    Ponomareva, A A; Nevzorova, T A; Mordakhanova, E R; Andrianova, I A; Litvinov, R I

    2016-01-01

    Platelets are the anucleated blood cells, wich together with the fibrin stop bleeding (hemostasis). Cellular microvesicles are membrane-surrounded microparticles released into extracellular space upon activation and/or apoptosis of various cells. Platelet-derived macrovesicles from the major population of circulating blood microparticles that play an important role in hemostasis and thrombosis. Despite numerous studies on the pathophysiology of platelet-derived macrovesicles, mechanisms of their formation and structural details remain poorly understood. Here we investigated the ultrastructure of parental platelets and platelet-derived microvesicles formed in vitro by quiescent cells as well as by cells stimulated with one of the following activators: arachidonic acid, ADP, thrombin, calcium ionophore A23187. Using transmission electron microscopy of human platelets and isolated microvesicles, we analyzed the intracellular origin, steps of formation, structural diversity, and size distributions of the subcellular particles. We have revealed that thrombin, unlike other stimuli, not only induced vesiculation of the plasma membrane but also caused break-up of the cells followed by formation of microparticles that are comparable with microvesicles by size. A fraction of these microparticles contained cellular organelles surrounded by a thin membrane. The size of platelet-derived macrovesicles varied from 30 nm to 500 nm, however, the size distributions depended on the nature of a cell-activating stimulus. The results obtained provide new information about the formation of platelet-derived macrovesicles and their structural diversity, wich is important to understand their multiple functions in normal and disease states. PMID:27228656

  9. [Report on notifications pursuant to Section 21 of the German Transfusion Act for the years 2008 and 2009].

    PubMed

    Henseler, O; Heiden, M; Haschberger, B; Hesse, J; Seitz, R

    2010-10-01

    This report contains the data collected in 2008 and 2009, pursuant to Section 21 of the German Transfusion Act (Transfusionsgesetz), as well as an overview of the supply situation during the last 10 years. In 2009, blood donation services reported a total of 7.5 million donations--the largest amount since 2000. At the same time, more than 4.7 million red blood cell concentrates and more than 500,000 platelet concentrates were available. The number of therapeutic single plasma units decreased to 1.1 million units in 2009. The loss rate for red blood cell concentrates is still between 3% and 4% for the users, while for the manufacturers, it has decreased slightly to 1.4%. The loss rate, for platelet concentrates, on the other hand, increased in 2009, and--what is noteworthy--especially for manufacturers of pooled platelet concentrates. The loss rate for apheresis platelet concentrates accounted for 5.2% compared to 17.5% for pooled platelet concentrates. As far as the users were concerned, loss rates for platelet concentrates largely remained unchanged with rates between 5% and 6%. Based on the data collected, the supply of blood components for transfusion can be regarded as assured. Nearly 2.9 million liters of plasma for fractionation were collected in Germany in 2009. According to reports from the pharmaceutical industry, of these, 2.6 million liters remained on the German market, of which only 56% were fractionated in this country; no statement can be made on the use of the remaining amount. Many plasma derivatives are not manufactured in Germany, despite the large amount of plasma collected. The supply with these products, however, is assured by imports. Overall, 16,409 autologous and 9,435 allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell preparations were manufactured in 2009, of which 3,382 allogeneic preparations were exported. A total of 3,181 autologous and 2,374 allogeneic preparations were transplanted; 187 of these products from imports. The large number of exported

  10. Research Opportunities to Improve Neonatal Red Blood Cell Transfusion.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ravi Mangal; Meyer, Erin K; Widness, John A

    2016-10-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion is a common and lifesaving therapy for anemic neonates and infants, particularly among those born prematurely or undergoing surgery. However, evidence-based indications for when to administer RBCs and adverse effects of RBC transfusion on important outcomes including necrotizing enterocolitis, survival, and long-term neurodevelopmental impairment remain uncertain. In addition, blood-banking practices for preterm and term neonates and infants have been largely developed using studies from older children and adults. Use of and refinements in emerging technologies and advances in biomarker discovery and neonatal-specific RBC transfusion databases may allow clinicians to better define and tailor RBC transfusion needs and practices to individual neonates. Decreasing the need for RBC transfusion and developing neonatal-specific approaches in the preparation of donor RBCs have potential for reducing resource utilization and cost, improving outcomes, and assuring blood safety. Finally, large donor-recipient-linked cohort studies can provide data to better understand the balance of the risks and benefits of RBC transfusion in neonates. These studies may also guide the translation of new research into best practices that can rapidly be integrated into routine care. This review highlights key opportunities in transfusion medicine and neonatology for improving the preparation and transfusion of RBCs into neonates and infants. We focus on timely, currently addressable knowledge gaps that can increase the safety and efficacy of preterm and term neonatal and infant RBC transfusion practices.

  11. Reducing donor exposure in preterm infants requiring multiple blood transfusions.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, A.; Wilson, N.; Skacel, P.; Thomas, R.; Tidmarsh, E.; Yale, C.; de Silva, M.

    1995-01-01

    Preterm infants frequently require multiple blood transfusions. Traditionally, 'fresh' (less than seven days old) blood has been used but this often results in transfusions from multiple donors. To reduce donor exposure the policy for top-up transfusions was changed. A unit of blood under five days old with additional satellite packs was ordered for each infant and used up to its expiry date, allowing up to eight transfusions from a single donation to be given. The mean (SD) number of transfusions per infant in 43 infants transfused according to previous policy and in 29 transfused according to the new policy was similar at 5.6 (4.0) and 5.3 (3.1), respectively. However, donor exposure fell following the change in policy from 4.9 (3.5) to only 2.0 (0.9). Only one infant was exposed to more than three donors compared with 24 infants in the control group. Plasma potassium concentrations were not significantly different following transfusion of blood stored for up to 33 days. This simple change in policy has reduced donor exposure in infants requiring multiple top-up transfusions. PMID:7743280

  12. Research Opportunities to Improve Neonatal Red Blood Cell Transfusion.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ravi Mangal; Meyer, Erin K; Widness, John A

    2016-10-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion is a common and lifesaving therapy for anemic neonates and infants, particularly among those born prematurely or undergoing surgery. However, evidence-based indications for when to administer RBCs and adverse effects of RBC transfusion on important outcomes including necrotizing enterocolitis, survival, and long-term neurodevelopmental impairment remain uncertain. In addition, blood-banking practices for preterm and term neonates and infants have been largely developed using studies from older children and adults. Use of and refinements in emerging technologies and advances in biomarker discovery and neonatal-specific RBC transfusion databases may allow clinicians to better define and tailor RBC transfusion needs and practices to individual neonates. Decreasing the need for RBC transfusion and developing neonatal-specific approaches in the preparation of donor RBCs have potential for reducing resource utilization and cost, improving outcomes, and assuring blood safety. Finally, large donor-recipient-linked cohort studies can provide data to better understand the balance of the risks and benefits of RBC transfusion in neonates. These studies may also guide the translation of new research into best practices that can rapidly be integrated into routine care. This review highlights key opportunities in transfusion medicine and neonatology for improving the preparation and transfusion of RBCs into neonates and infants. We focus on timely, currently addressable knowledge gaps that can increase the safety and efficacy of preterm and term neonatal and infant RBC transfusion practices. PMID:27424006

  13. Transfusion Medicine in Sub-Saharan Africa: Conference Summary.

    PubMed

    Dzik, Walter Sunny; Kyeyune, Dorothy; Otekat, Grace; Natukunda, Bernard; Hume, Heather; Kasirye, Phillip G; Ddungu, Henry; Kajja, Isaac; Dhabangi, Aggrey; Mugyenyi, Godfrey R; Seguin, Claire; Barnes, Linda; Delaney, Meghan

    2015-07-01

    In November 2014, a 3-day conference devoted to transfusion medicine in sub-Saharan Africa was held in Kampala, Uganda. Faculty from academic institutions in Uganda provided a broad overview of issues pertinent to transfusion medicine in Africa. The conference consisted of lectures, demonstrations, and discussions followed by 5 small group workshops held at the Uganda Blood Transfusion Service Laboratories, the Ugandan Cancer Institute, and the Mulago National Referral Hospital. Highlighted topics included the challenges posed by increasing clinical demands for blood, the need for better patient identification at the time of transfusion, inadequate application of the antiglobulin reagent during pretransfusion testing, concern regarding proper recognition and evaluation of transfusion reactions, the expanded role for nurse leadership as a means to improve patient outcomes, and the need for an epidemiologic map of blood usage in Africa. Specialty areas of focus included the potential for broader application of transcranial Doppler and hydroxyurea therapy in sickle cell disease, African-specific guidelines for transfusion support of cancer patients, the challenges of transfusion support in trauma, and the importance of African-centered clinical research in pediatric and obstetric transfusion medicine. The course concluded by summarizing the benefits derived from an organized quality program that extended from the donor to the recipient. As an educational tool, the slide-audio presentation of the lectures will be made freely available at the International Society of Blood Transfusion Academy Web site: http://www.isbtweb.org/academy/.

  14. Making thawed universal donor plasma available rapidly for massively bleeding trauma patients: Experience from the Pragmatic Randomized Optimal Platelets and Plasma Ratios (PROPPR) Trial

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Deborah J.; Bai, Yu; Cooke, Rhonda K.; Marques, Marisa B.; Fontaine, Magali J.; Gottschall, Jerome L.; Carey, Patricia M.; Scanlan, Richard M.; Fiebig, Eberhard W.; Shulman, Ira A.; Nelson, Janice M.; Flax, Sherri; Duncan, Veda; Daniel-Johnson, Jennifer A.; Callum, Jeannie L.; Holcomb, John B.; Fox, Erin E.; Baraniuk, Sarah; Tilley, Barbara C.; Schreiber, Martin A.; Inaba, Kenji; Rizoli, Sandro; Podbielski, Jeanette M.; Cotton, Bryan A.; Hess, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Background The Pragmatic Randomized Optimal Platelets and Plasma Ratios (PROPPR) trial was a randomized clinical trial comparing survival after transfusion of 2 different blood component ratios for emergency resuscitation of traumatic massive hemorrhage. Transfusion services supporting the study were expected to provide thawed plasma, platelets and red blood cells within 10 minutes of request. Study Design and Methods At the 12 Level 1 trauma centers participating in PROPPR, blood components transfused and delivery times were tabulated, with a focus on universal donor (UD) plasma management. The adequacy of site plans was assessed by comparing the bedside blood availability times to study goals and the new American College of Surgeons (ACS) guidelines. Results Eleven of 12 sites were able to consistently deliver 6 units of thawed UD plasma to their trauma receiving unit within 10 minutes, and 12 units in 20 minutes. Three sites used blood group A plasma instead of AB for massive transfusion without complications. Approximately 4700 units of plasma were given to the 680 patients enrolled in the trial. No site experienced shortages of AB plasma that limited enrollment. Two of 12 sites reported wastage of thawed AB plasma approaching 25% of AB plasma prepared. Conclusion Delivering UD plasma to massively hemorrhaging patients was accomplished consistently, rapidly and without excessive wastage in high-volume trauma centers. The ACS Trauma Quality Improvement Program guidelines for massive transfusion protocol UD plasma availability are practicable in large academic trauma centers. Use of group A plasma in trauma resuscitation needs further study. PMID:25823522

  15. Co-stimulation with LPS or Poly I:C markedly enhances the anti-platelet immune response and severity of fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Li, Conglei; Chen, Pingguo; Vadasz, Brian; Ma, Li; Zhou, Hui; Lang, Sean; Freedman, John; Ni, Heyu

    2013-12-01

    Fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) is a life-threatening bleeding disorder caused by maternal antibodies against fetal/neonatal platelets. FNAIT is also linked with miscarriages, although the incidence and mechanisms of fetal death have not been well studied. IntegrinαIIbβ3 (GPIIbIIIa) and the GPIbα complex are major glycoproteins expressed on platelets and are also major antigens targeted in autoimmune thrombocytopenia (ITP), but reported cases of anti-GPIb-mediated FNAIT are rare. Bacterial and viral infections have been causally linked with the pathogenesis of immune-mediated thrombocytopenia (ITP); however, it is unknown whether these infections contribute to the severity of FNAIT. Here, immune responses against platelet antigens were examined by transfusing wild-type (WT) mouse platelets into β3-/- or GPIbα-/- mice. To mimic bacterial or viral infections, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (Poly I:C) were injected intraperitoneally following platelet transfusions. The FNAIT model was established by breeding the immunised female mice with WT male mice. We demonstrated for the first time that the platelet GPIbα has lower immunogenicity compared to β3 integrin. Interestingly, co-stimulation with LPS or Poly I:C markedly enhanced the immune response against platelet GPIbα and caused severe pathology of FNAIT (i.e. miscarriages). LPS or Poly I:C also enhanced the immune response against platelet β3 integrin. Our data suggest that bacterial and viral infections facilitate the anti-platelet GPIbα response, which may lead to a severe non-classical FNAIT (i.e. miscarriage but not neonatal bleeding) that has not been adequately reported in humans.

  16. Sensitive detection of idiotypic platelet-reactive alloantibodies by an electrical protein chip.

    PubMed

    Quiel, Annett; Jürgen, Britta; Greinacher, Andreas; Lassen, Susan; Wörl, Ralf; Witt, Sabine; Schweder, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    To prevent and treat immune-mediated platelet disorders (e.g. neonatal allo-immune thrombocytopenia and platelet transfusion refractoriness) the causative idiotypic platelet-reactive antibodies have to be detected with high sensitivity and specificity. The "Monoclonal Antibody Immobilization Platelet Assay" (MAIPA) is the diagnostic gold standard for immunotyping sera with respect to alloantibodies against human platelet antigens (HPA). However, it is labor-intensive and time-consuming. In this work, an automated protein chip assay (enzyme-linked sandwich immunoassay) based on interdigitated gold microelectrodes in combination with an electrical read-out system was developed and optimized. For this purpose, specific capture antibodies were immobilized on the gold electrodes. The binding of the target is detected via an enzyme-labeled detection antibody by a redox-recycling process that corresponds to the amount of bound target molecule. With this electrical chip assay it is possible to detect antibodies against HPA-1a, HPA-5b and HLA with high sensitivity and specificity in less than half the duration of the MAIPA protocol with similar intra- and interassay variance. PMID:22572157

  17. Sensitive detection of idiotypic platelet-reactive alloantibodies by an electrical protein chip.

    PubMed

    Quiel, Annett; Jürgen, Britta; Greinacher, Andreas; Lassen, Susan; Wörl, Ralf; Witt, Sabine; Schweder, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    To prevent and treat immune-mediated platelet disorders (e.g. neonatal allo-immune thrombocytopenia and platelet transfusion refractoriness) the causative idiotypic platelet-reactive antibodies have to be detected with high sensitivity and specificity. The "Monoclonal Antibody Immobilization Platelet Assay" (MAIPA) is the diagnostic gold standard for immunotyping sera with respect to alloantibodies against human platelet antigens (HPA). However, it is labor-intensive and time-consuming. In this work, an automated protein chip assay (enzyme-linked sandwich immunoassay) based on interdigitated gold microelectrodes in combination with an electrical read-out system was developed and optimized. For this purpose, specific capture antibodies were immobilized on the gold electrodes. The binding of the target is detected via an enzyme-labeled detection antibody by a redox-recycling process that corresponds to the amount of bound target molecule. With this electrical chip assay it is possible to detect antibodies against HPA-1a, HPA-5b and HLA with high sensitivity and specificity in less than half the duration of the MAIPA protocol with similar intra- and interassay variance.

  18. Microfluidic assessment of functional culture-derived platelets in human thrombi under flow.

    PubMed

    Kamat, Viraj; Muthard, Ryan W; Li, Ruizhi; Diamond, Scott L

    2015-10-01

    Despite their clinical significance, human platelets are not amenable to genetic manipulation, thus forcing a reliance on mouse models. Culture-derived platelets (CDPs) from human peripheral blood CD34(+) cells can be genetically altered and may eventually be used for transfusions. By use of microfluidics, the time-dependent incorporation of CD41(+)CD42(+) CDPs into clots was measured using only 54,000 CDPs doped into 27 μL of human whole blood perfused over collagen at a wall shear rate of 100 sec(-1). With the use of fluorescence-labeled human platelets (instead of CDPs) doped between 0.25% and 2% of total platelets, incorporation was highly quantitative and allowed monitoring of the anti-αIIbβ3 antagonism that occurred after collagen adhesion. CDPs were only 15% as efficient as human platelets in their incorporation into human thrombi under flow, although both cell types were equally antagonized by αIIbβ3 inhibition. Transient transfection allowed the monitoring of GFP(+) human CDP incorporation into clots. This assay quantifies genetically altered CDP function under flow. PMID:26145051

  19. Flow cytometric analysis of anti-platelet antibodies in idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Latorraca, A; Lanza, F; Moretti, S; Ferrari, L; Reverberi, R; Galluccio, L; Castoldi, G

    1994-01-01

    Anti-platelet antibody measurement may be important in defining the pathogenesis of thrombocytopenic states. In this paper we compared three anti-human immunoglobulin reagents by using them to detect anti-platelet antibodies on the platelet surface and in the serum of 14 patients with chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) and 22 thrombocytopenic disorders. Samples were analyzed by both flow cytometry and a fluorescence microscope. In ITP patients, the direct test was positive in 50% of the cases, while the indirect technique proved to be positive in a slightly higher number of those tested (56%). Furthermore, the number of positive cases was similar for the three reagents used in this study, although the mean percentage of positive platelets was higher for the kappa/lambda monoclonal reagent. These data further support the sensitivity and reproducibility of flow cytometry analysis, which was capable of detecting antiplatelet antibodies in all patients with transfused Cooley's disease (regarded as positive control), as well as in a significant number of patients with ITP or related diseases. On the basis of the data presented here, definitive proof regarding the presence of anti-platelet antibodies in patients with thrombocytopenia still has to be found, and further studies are needed in order to ascertain the autoimmune nature of these disorders. PMID:7926978

  20. Microfluidic assessment of functional culture-derived platelets in human thrombi under flow.

    PubMed

    Kamat, Viraj; Muthard, Ryan W; Li, Ruizhi; Diamond, Scott L

    2015-10-01

    Despite their clinical significance, human platelets are not amenable to genetic manipulation, thus forcing a reliance on mouse models. Culture-derived platelets (CDPs) from human peripheral blood CD34(+) cells can be genetically altered and may eventually be used for transfusions. By use of microfluidics, the time-dependent incorporation of CD41(+)CD42(+) CDPs into clots was measured using only 54,000 CDPs doped into 27 μL of human whole blood perfused over collagen at a wall shear rate of 100 sec(-1). With the use of fluorescence-labeled human platelets (instead of CDPs) doped between 0.25% and 2% of total platelets, incorporation was highly quantitative and allowed monitoring of the anti-αIIbβ3 antagonism that occurred after collagen adhesion. CDPs were only 15% as efficient as human platelets in their incorporation into human thrombi under flow, although both cell types were equally antagonized by αIIbβ3 inhibition. Transient transfection allowed the monitoring of GFP(+) human CDP incorporation into clots. This assay quantifies genetically altered CDP function under flow.

  1. The IgE-dependent pathway in allergic transfusion reactions: involvement of donor blood allergens other than plasma proteins.

    PubMed

    Matsuyama, Nobuki; Yasui, Kazuta; Amakishi, Etsuko; Hayashi, Tomoya; Kuroishi, Ayumu; Ishii, Hiroyuki; Matsukura, Harumichi; Tani, Yoshihiko; Furuta, Rika A; Hirayama, Fumiya

    2015-07-01

    On transfusion, several plasma proteins can cause anaphylaxis in patients deficient in the corresponding plasma proteins. However, little is known about other allergens, which are encountered much more infrequently. Although it has been speculated that an allergen-independent pathway underlying allergic transfusion reactions (ATRs) is elicited by biological response modifiers accumulated in blood components during storage, the exact mechanisms remain unresolved. Furthermore, it is difficult even to determine whether ATRs are induced via allergen-dependent or allergen-independent pathways. To distinguish these two pathways in ATR cases, we established a basophil activation test, in which the basophil-activating ability of supernatants of residual transfused blood of ATR cases to whole blood basophils was assessed in the presence or absence of dasatinib, an inhibitor of IgE-mediated basophil activation. Three of 37 supernatants from the platelet concentrates with ATRs activated panel blood basophils in the absence, but not in the presence, of dasatinib. The basophil activation was inhibited by treatment of anti-fish collagen I MoAb in one case, suggesting that the involvement of fish allergens may have been present in donor plasma. We concluded that unknown non-plasma proteins, some of which had epitopes similar to fish antigens, in blood component may be involved in ATRs via an allergen/IgE-dependent pathway. PMID:25840771

  2. Platelet adhesiveness in diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, S.; Pegrum, G. D.; Wolff, Sylvia; Ashton, W. L.

    1967-01-01

    Platelet adhesiveness has been assessed on whole blood from a series of 34 diabetics and 50 control subjects using adenosine diphosphate (A.D.P.) and by adherence to glass microspherules (ballotini). Using both techniques it was possible to demonstrate a significant increase in platelet adhesiveness in the diabetic patients. PMID:5614070

  3. [Adrenergic receptors of blood platelets].

    PubMed

    Lanza, F; Cazenave, J P

    1987-01-01

    Blood platelets possess adrenergic receptors and are stimulated by adrenaline in the circulation. This review summarizes the state of knowledge of the pharmacology of adrenergic receptors and the biochemical mechanisms of platelet activation by adrenaline in various physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:2837727

  4. Nutritional zinc increases platelet reactivity.

    PubMed

    Marx, G; Krugliak, J; Shaklai, M

    1991-11-01

    After ingestion of 220 mg zinc sulfate, platelet aggregation was evaluated at various time intervals (i.e., T = 0, 1, and 3 hr) and the autologous plasma analyzed by atomic absorption analysis. The zinc levels increased maximally some 0.4 +/- 0.2 microgram/ml within 3 hr after ingestion, which for the entire blood pool corresponds to only 5% of the ingested zinc. Aggregation responses of platelet rich plasma (PRP), instigated with suboptimal levels of thrombin (less than 0.2 U/ml), ADP (less than 2 microM), epinephrine (less than 2 microM), collagen (less than 2 micrograms/ml), or PAF (less than 50 ng/ml), show significant improvement to at least one aggregant. Mean +/- SEM values for delta % aggregation increase are as follows: thrombin, 51 +/- 10%; epinephrine, 21 +/- 6%; ADP, 31 +/- 6%; collagen 23 +/- 6%; and platelet aggregating factor (PAF), 56 +/- 6%. For controls, the platelets from one individual with Glanzmann thrombasthenia as well as four undosed volunteers exhibited no significant changes in platelet responsiveness. Increased platelet responsiveness to agonists after zinc sulfate ingestion was observed in PRP from blood collected in either citrate or heparin. We demonstrate that within a relatively short time period, single bolus of nutritional zinc intake can significantly increase platelet reactivity. These findings show that nutritional zinc availability is relevant to hemostasis and may pertain to the viability of platelet concentrates in blood banks.

  5. Platelets, inflammation and tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Nurden, Alan T

    2011-05-01

    Blood platelets have long been recognised to bring about primary haemostasis with deficiencies in platelet production and function manifesting in bleeding while upregulated function favourises arterial thrombosis. Yet increasing evidence indicates that platelets fulfil a much wider role in health and disease. First, they store and release a wide range of biologically active substances including the panoply of growth factors, chemokines and cytokines released from a-granules. Membrane budding gives rise to microparticles (MPs), another active participant within the blood stream. Platelets are essential for the innate immune response and combat infection (viruses, bacteria, micro-organisms). They help maintain and modulate inflammation and are a major source of pro-inflammatory molecules (e.g. P-selectin, tissue factor, CD40L, metalloproteinases). As well as promoting coagulation, they are active in fibrinolysis; wound healing, angiogenesis and bone formation as well as in maternal tissue and foetal vascular remodelling. Activated platelets and MPs intervene in the propagation of major diseases. They are major players in atherosclerosis and related diseases, pathologies of the central nervous system (Alzheimers disease, multiple sclerosis), cancer and tumour growth. They participate in other tissue-related acquired pathologies such as skin diseases and allergy, rheumatoid arthritis, liver disease; while, paradoxically, autologous platelet-rich plasma and platelet releasate are being used as an aid to promote tissue repair and cellular growth. The above mentioned roles of platelets are now discussed.

  6. Transfusion Practices Committee of a public blood bank network in Minas Gerais, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Ricardo Vilas Freire; Brener, Stela; Ferreira, Angela Melgaço; do Valle, Marcele Cunha Ribeiro; Moraes-Souza, Helio

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to verify the performance of blood transfusion committees in transfusion services linked to the public blood bank network of the state of Minas Gerais. Methods A cross-sectional observational study was conducted between 2007 and 2008 using questionnaires and proficiency tests to evaluate the reporting and investigation of transfusion reactions comparing transfusion services with and without transfusion committees in the public transfusion services of the state of Minas Gerais. Results Nineteen of Hemominas own transfusion services and 207 that contracted the services of the foundation located in 178 municipalities were visited between 2007 and 2008. Established transfusion committees were present in 63.4% of the services visited. Transfusion incidents were reported by 53 (36.8%) transfusion services with transfusion committees and by eight (9.6%) without transfusion committees (p < 0.001) with 543 (97.5%) and 14 (2.5%) notifications, respectively. Of the reported transfusion incidents, 40 (75.5%) transfusion services with transfusion committees and only two (25%) of those without transfusion committees investigated the causes. Conclusion The incidence of notification and investigation of the causes of transfusion reactions was higher in transfusion services where a transfusion committee was present. Despite these results, the performance of these committees was found to be incipient and a better organization and more effective operation are required. PMID:23323064

  7. Blood transfusion trigger in burns: a four-year retrospective analysis of blood transfusions in eleven burn centers in Ukraine

    PubMed Central

    Fuzaylov, G.; Anderson, R.; Lee, J.; Slesarenko, S.; Nagaychuk, V.; Grigorieva, T.; Kozinec, G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary One focus of improvement of burn care in Ukraine was the management of blood loss and blood transfusions in burn patients. The aim of this project was to analyze blood transfusion triggers in burn patients and outcomes at eleven major burn centers in Ukraine. This multicenter retrospective study reviewed four years of data on blood-transfused burn patients admitted to eleven major burn centers in Ukraine. Data analyzed included: demographics, characteristics of the burns, complications of burn injury, triggers for blood transfusions and outcomes. A total of 928 burn patients who received 2,693 blood transfusions from 11 major burn centers over a four-year period, were studied. Regardless of the total body surface area (TBSA) that was burned, blood transfusions were administered with a hemoglobin (Hb) trigger value of around 9 g/dL. Roughly one third (30.5%) of all transfusions were given in patients with a TBSA ≤ 10%. We demonstrated that Ukrainian doctors were using the same Hb trigger for blood transfusions for all Ukrainian burn patients, which suggested a need to change blood transfusion policy. PMID:27279803

  8. Blood transfusion and the World Wars.

    PubMed

    Boulton, Frank

    2015-01-01

    This article summarizes the remarkable development in the science and practice of blood transfusion during the 20 years either side of 1900, progressing through the challenges of surgical vascular access, the propensity of shed blood to clot and the more mysterious apparently arbitrary acute reactions (later revealed as due to blood group incompatibility), to describe in more detail, the developments at the Western Front, then giving a précis of the advances in the interwar years through to the mid-twentieth-century 'blood-banking'.

  9. Internet-based transfusion audit system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maitan, Jacek; Haley, Rebecca

    1995-03-01

    This project is aimed at developing a cost-effective working environment for the transfusion medicine specialists of American Red Cross (ARC). In this project we are developing a multimedia-based consultation environment that uses Internet and teleconferencing to increase the quality of services and to replace currently used 800 telephone lines. Through the use of Internet/LAN/ISDN the physicians can share information and references while they discuss patient cases. A multimedia interface allows the physician to access data from the office and from the house. This paper discusses the approach, current status of the project and future plans to extend the approach to other areas of medicine.

  10. Characterization of procoagulant extracellular vesicles and platelet membrane disintegration in DMSO-cryopreserved platelets

    PubMed Central

    Tegegn, Tseday Z.; De Paoli, Silvia H.; Orecna, Martina; Elhelu, Oumsalama K.; Woodle, Samuel A.; Tarandovskiy, Ivan D.; Ovanesov, Mikhail V.; Simak, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Background Freezing is promising for extended platelet (PLT) storage for transfusion. 6% DMSO cryopreserved PLTs (CPPs) are currently in clinical development. CPPs contain significant amount of platelet membrane vesicles (PMVs). PLT-membrane changes and PMV release in CPP are poorly understood, and haemostatic effects of CPP PMVs are not fully elucidated. This study aims to investigate PLT-membrane alterations in CPPs and provide comprehensive characterization of CPP PMVs, and their contribution to procoagulant activity (PCA) of CPPs. Methods CPPs and corresponding liquid-stored PLTs (LSPs) were characterized by flow cytometry (FC), fluorescence polarization (FP), nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA), electron microscopy (SEM, TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and thrombin-generation (TG) test. Results SEM and TEM revealed disintegration and vesiculation of the PLT-plasma membrane and loss of intracellular organization in 60% PLTs in CPPs. FP demonstrated that 6% DMSO alone and with freezing–thawing caused marked increase in PLT-membrane fluidity. The FC counts of annexin V-binding PMVs and CD41a+ PMVs were 68- and 56-folds higher, respectively, in CPPs than in LSPs. The AFM and NTA size distribution of PMVs in CPPs indicated a peak diameter of 100 nm, corresponding to exosome-size vesicles. TG-based PCA of CPPs was 2- and 9-folds higher per PLT and per volume, respectively, compared to LSPs. Differential centrifugation showed that CPP supernatant contributed 26% to CPP TG-PCA, mostly by the exosome-size PMVs and their TG-PCA was phosphatidylserine dependent. Conclusions Major portion of CPPs does not show activation phenotype but exhibits grape-like membrane disintegration with significant increase of membrane fluidity induced by 6% DMSO alone and further aggravated by freezing–thawing process. DMSO cryopreservation of PLTs is associated with the release of PMVs and marked increase of TG-PCA, as compared to LSPs. Exosome-size PMVs have significant

  11. Platelet-Rich Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Brian J.; Seroyer, Shane T.; Filardo, Giuseppe; Bajaj, Sarvottam; Fortier, Lisa A.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) may affect soft tissue healing via growth factors released after platelet degranulation. Because of this potential benefit, clinicians have begun to inject PRP for the treatment of tendon, ligament, muscle, and cartilage injuries and early osteoarthritis. Evidence Acquisition: A PubMed search was performed for studies relating to PRP, growth factors, and soft tissue injuries from 1990 to 2010. Relevant references from these studies were also retrieved. Results: Soft tissue injury is a major source of disability that may often be complicated by prolonged and incomplete recovery. Numerous growth factors may potentiate the healing and regeneration of tendons and ligaments. The potential benefits of biologically enhanced healing processes have led to a recent interest in the use of PRP in orthopaedic sports medicine. There has been widespread anecdotal use of PRP for muscle strains, tendinopathy, and ligament injuries and as a surgical adjuvant to rotator cuff repair, anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, and meniscal or labral repairs. Although the fascination with this emerging technology has led to a dramatic increase in its use, scientific data supporting this use are still in their infancy. Conclusions: The literature is replete with studies on the basic science of growth factors and their relation to the maintenance, proliferation, and regeneration of various tissues and tissue-derived cells. Despite the promising results of several animal studies, well-controlled human studies are lacking. PMID:23015939

  12. Diagnostic Methods for Platelet Bacteria Screening: Current Status and Developments

    PubMed Central

    Störmer, Melanie; Vollmer, Tanja

    2014-01-01

    Summary Bacterial contamination of blood components and the prevention of transfusion-associated bacterial infection still remains a major challenge in transfusion medicine. Over the past few decades, a significant reduction in the transmission of viral infections has been achieved due to the introduction of mandatory virus screening. Platelet concentrates (PCs) represent one of the highest risks for bacterial infection. This is due to the required storage conditions for PCs in gas-permeable containers at room temperature with constant agitation, which support bacterial proliferation from low contamination levels to high titers. In contrast to virus screening, since 1997 in Germany bacterial testing of PCs is only performed as a routine quality control or, since 2008, to prolong the shelf life to 5 days. In general, bacterial screening of PCs by cultivation methods is implemented by the various blood services. Although these culturing systems will remain the gold standard, the significance of rapid methods for screening for bacterial contamination has increased over the last few years. These new methods provide powerful tools for increasing the bacterial safety of blood components. This article summarizes the course of policies and provisions introduced to increase bacterial safety of blood components in Germany. Furthermore, we give an overview of the different diagnostic methods for bacterial screening of PCs and their current applicability in routine screening processes. PMID:24659944

  13. Phosphorylation of platelet actin-binding protein during platelet activation

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, R.C.; Gerrard, J.M.

    1982-03-01

    In this study we have followed the 32P-labeling of actin-binding protein as a function of platelet activation. Utilizing polyacrylamide-sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis to resolve total platelet protein samples, we found 2 to 3-fold labeling increases in actin-binding protein 30 to 60 sec after thrombin stimulation. Somewhat larger increases were observed for 40,000 and 20,000 apparent molecular weight peptides. The actin-binding protein was identified on the gels by coelectrophoresis with purified actin-binding protein, its presence in cytoskeletal cores prepared by detergent extraction of activated 32P-labeled platelets, and by direct immunoprecipitation with antibodies against guinea pig vas deferens filamin (actin-binding protein). In addition, these cytoskeletal cores indicated that the 32P-labeled actin-binding protein was closely associated with the activated platelet's cytoskeleton. Following the 32P-labeling of actin-binding protein over an 8-min time course revealed that in aggregating platelet samples rapid dephosphorylation to almost initial levels occurred between 3 and 5 min. A similar curve was obtained for the 20,000 apparent molecular weight peptide. However, rapid dephosphorylation was not observed if platelet aggregation was prevented by chelating external calcium or by using thrombasthenic platelets lacking the aggregation response. Thus, cell-cell contact would seem to be crucial in initiating the rapid dephosphorylation response.

  14. [Influence of different products of platelet membrane glycoprotein monoclonal antibodies used internationally on tests for monoclonal antibody-specific immobilization of platelet antigens].

    PubMed

    Tang, Qiu-Min; Shen, Wei-Dong; Zhong, Zhou-Lin; Zhou, Yan; Wu, Guo-Guang

    2009-08-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the influence of different platelet membrane glycoprotein monoclonal antibodies (McAb) which are common used in laboratories on the monoclonal antibody-specific immobilization of platelet antigens (MAIPA) technique according to the request of 14th International Society of Blood Transfusion Platelet Immunology Workshop. 30 participant laboratories were provided with 10 known human platelet antigen (HPA) antibodies, 1 normal serum, 9 different McAbs (against GPIIb/IIIa, GPIa/IIa, GPIb/IX and GPIV respectively), and the same protocol. Each participant laboratory carried out the test as the protocol to compare the results of different McAbs against the same glycoprotein and submitted the data to organizer. The results indicated that in McAbs against GPIIb/IIIa, AP2, Gi-5 and PL2-73 showed higher mean S/CO than that of others; in GPIa/IIa, MBC202.2 and 143.1 showed higher mean S/CO than that of others; in GPIb/IX, 142.11 and CLB-MB45 (CD42b) showed higher mean S/CO than that of others; as to GPIV, 131.4 showed higher mean S/CO. In conclusion, capture effects of various McAbs are different, so that different products of McAbs exert influences on the sensitivity of MAIPA. To use a panel of McAbs against the same glycoprotein may avoid the false negative results. PMID:19698264

  15. Management of patients who refuse blood transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Chand, N Kiran; Subramanya, H Bala; Rao, G Venkateswara

    2014-01-01

    A small group of people belonging to a certain religion, called Jehovah's witness do not accept blood transfusion or blood products, based on biblical readings. When such group of people are in need of health care, their faith and belief is an obstacle for their proper treatment, and poses legal, ethical and medical challenges for attending health care provider. Due to the rapid growth in the membership of this group worldwide, physicians attending hospitals should be prepared to manage such patients. Appropriate management of such patients entails understanding of ethical and legal issues involved, providing meticulous medical management, use of prohaemostatic agents, essential interventions and techniques to reduce blood loss and hence, reduce the risk of subsequent need for blood transfusion. An extensive literature search was performed using search engines such as Google scholar, PubMed, MEDLINE, science journals and textbooks using keywords like ‘Jehovah's witness’, ‘blood haemodilution’, ‘blood salvage’ and ‘blood substitutes’. PMID:25535432

  16. [Hepatitis E virus: Blood transfusion implications].

    PubMed

    Gallian, P; Piquet, Y; Assal, A; Djoudi, R; Chiaroni, J; Izopet, J; Tiberghien, P

    2014-11-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a non-enveloped RNA virus transmitted by the fecal-oral route. Autochthonous hepatitis E occurring in developed countries is caused by genotypes 3 and 4 and is a zoonotic infection. Humans are infected mostly after ingestion of undercooked meat from infected animals. Most HEV 3 and 4 infections are clinically inapparent. However, genotype 3 (HEV 3) can lead to chronic hepatitis in immuno-compromised patients such as organ-transplant recipients and patients with haematological malignancies. In Europe, HEV 3 is implicated in transfusion-transmitted HEV infection. In France, as observed in several European countries, prevalence of HEV RNA and specific IgG antibodies are high indicating that viral circulation is important. The systematic HEV NAT screening of blood donations used for preparation of solvent detergent plasma indicate that 1 to 2218 donation is infected by HEV RNA. The need or implementation's impacts of safety measures to prevent HEV transmission by blood transfusion are under reflexion by French's health authorities. The HEV NAT screening is the only available tool of prevention. Alternative strategies are under investigation including individual or mini pool NAT testing all or part of blood donations. PMID:25267201

  17. Contemporary issues in transfusion medicine informatics

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Gaurav; Parwani, Anil V.; Raval, Jay S.; Triulzi, Darrell J.; Benjamin, Richard J.; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2011-01-01

    The Transfusion Medicine Service (TMS) covers diverse clinical and laboratory-based services that must be delivered with accuracy, efficiency and reliability. TMS oversight is shared by multiple regulatory agencies that cover product manufacturing and validation standards geared toward patient safety. These demands present significant informatics challenges. Over the past few decades, TMS information systems have improved to better handle blood product manufacturing, inventory, delivery, tracking and documentation. Audit trails and access to electronic databases have greatly facilitated product traceability and biovigilance efforts. Modern blood bank computing has enabled novel applications such as the electronic crossmatch, kiosk-based blood product delivery systems, and self-administered computerized blood donor interview and eligibility determination. With increasing use of barcoding technology, there has been a marked improvement in patient and specimen identification. Moreover, the emergence of national and international labeling standards such as ISBT 128 have facilitated the availability, movement and tracking of blood products across national and international boundaries. TMS has only recently begun to leverage the electronic medical record to address quality issues in transfusion practice and promote standardized documentation within institutions. With improved technology, future growth is expected in blood bank automation and product labeling with applications such as radio frequency identification devices. This article reviews several of these key informatics issues relevant to the contemporary practice of TMS. PMID:21383927

  18. Total quality management in blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Smit-Sibinga, C T

    2000-01-01

    Quality management is an ongoing development resulting in consistency products and services and ever increasing customer satisfaction. The ultimum is Total Quality Management. Quality systems and quality management in transfusion medicine have gained considerable attention since the outbreak of the AIDS epidemic. Where product orientation has long been applied through quality control, Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) principles were introduced, shifting the developments in the direction of process orientation. Globally, and particularly in the more industrialised world people and system orientation has come along with the introduction of the ISO9001 concept. Harmonisation and a degree of uniformity are needed to implement a universally applicable Quality System and related Quality Management. Where the American Association of Blood Banks (AABB) is the professional organisation with the most extensive experience in quality systems in blood transfusion, the European Union and the Council of Europe now are in the process to design a quality system and management applicable to a larger variety of countries, based on a hybrid of current GMP and ISO9001 principles. The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies has developed a more universally to implement Quality Manual, with a pilot project in Honduras. It is recommendable to harmonise the various designs and bring the approaches under one common denominator. PMID:10938970

  19. The clinical efficacy of using autologous platelet rich plasma in hip arthroplasty: A retrospective comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Safdar, Atif; Shaaban, Hamid; Tibayan, Restituto; Miller, Richard; Boairdo, Richard; Guron, Gunwant

    2015-01-01

    Background: Platelet rich plasma (PRP) is a blood derivative concentrate of platelets, fibrin and growth factors obtained through withdrawal and centrifugation of autologous blood and use for its inherent hemostatic and adhesive properties to promote wound healing. Hip arthroplasty is often associated with significant perioperative complications including blood loss necessitating blood transfusions, which can lead to multiple adverse reactions, infection transmission, and longer hospital stay. Materials and Methods: We conducted this retrospective comparative study to determine whether the use of PRP can reduce the bleeding complications in hip replacement surgeries and therefore decrease analgesic requirements and shorten the hospital stay. Results: Sixty patients had consecutive hip replacement surgeries. The study group (n=23) received PRP applications while the control group (n=37) were operated without PRP applications. Postoperative drop of hemoglobin, number of red blood cell (RBC) transfusions, analgesic requirements, and duration of hospital stay were recorded. There was no significant difference in the drop of hemoglobin preoperatively and postoperatively comparing study and control groups (P=0.75). There was no difference in transfusion requirements between the two groups (P=0.16) but there was trend toward less transfusion in the PRP-treated group. There were also no statistical differences in analgesic use (P=0.83) and lengths of hospitalization (P=0.68) between the two groups. Conclusion: We concluded that there is no clinical efficacy in using PRP in hip replacement surgeries. We recommend a larger prospective study be conducted to determine its clinical utility as an optimization strategy to improve outcome after hip arthroplasty PMID:25810634

  20. A Rare Case of Transfusion Transmission of Hepatitis A Virus to Two Patients with Haematological Disease

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Suely Gonçalves Cordeiro; Leon, Luciane Almeida Amado; Alves, Gilda; Brito, Selma Magalhães; Sandes, Valcieny de Souza; Lima, Magda Maria Adorno Ferreira; Nogueira, Marta Colares; Tavares, Rita de Cássia Barbosa da Silva; Dobbin, Jane; Apa, Alexandre; de Paula, Vanessa Salete; Oliveira, Jaqueline Mendes de Oliveira; Pinto, Marcelo Alves; Ferreira Jr, Orlando da Costa; Motta, Iara de Jesus Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background This paper describes the transmission of hepatitis A virus (HAV) to two blood recipients from a healthy donor that later presented to the blood bank with jaundice. Methods The RNA of HAV was detected by qualitative nested reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (nested RT-PCR) and quantified by real-time RT-PCR. HAV RNA samples were genotyped by direct sequencing of PCR products. A sequence from a fragment of 168 bp from the VP1/2A HAV region was used to construct a phylogenetic tree. Case Report A 31-year-old male donor accepted for donation of a whole blood unit returned to the blood bank with clinical jaundice 20 days after donation. His serological and NAT tests were negative for HBV and HCV. Serological tests for HAV IgM and IgG were negative on donation sample but positive on follow-up sample, confirming donor's HAV acute infection. Both recipients of red blood cells (R1) and platelet concentrate (R2) from the same implicated donation were HAV IgM-negative and IgG-positive. Qualitative PCR was positive on samples from all three individuals and phylogenetic analysis of viruses proved HAV transmission to the two recipients of blood products. HAV viral load on donor follow-up sample and the platelet recipient was 1.3 and 1.5 × 103 IU/ml, respectively. The RBC recipient, also infected by HCV, was undergoing bone marrow transplantation and died from fulminant hepatitis, 26 days after the implicated HAV transfusion. Conclusion The blood donor, a garbage collector, spontaneously returned to the blood bank when developing jaundice. This highlights the importance of donor education to immediately report to blood banks of any signs and symptoms related to infectious disease developed after blood donation. The fact that one immunocompromised patient with HCV infection died from fulminant hepatitis after receiving a HAV-contaminated platelet transfusion underpins the importance of a HAV vaccination program for these group of patients. PMID

  1. Role of transfused red blood cells for shock and coagulopathy within remote damage control resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Spinella, Philip C; Doctor, Allan

    2014-05-01

    The philosophy of damage control resuscitation (DCR) and remote damage control resuscitation (RDCR) can be summarized by stating that the goal is to prevent death from hemorrhagic shock by "staying out of trouble instead of getting out of trouble." In other words, it is preferred to arrest the progression of shock, rather than also having to reverse this condition after significant tissue damage and organ injury cascades are established. Moreover, to prevent death from exsanguination, a balanced approach to the treatment of both shock and coagulopathy is required. This was military doctrine during World War II, but seemed to be forgotten during the last half of the 20th century. Damage control resuscitation and RDCR have revitalized the approach, but there is still more to learn about the most effective and safe resuscitative strategies to simultaneously treat shock and hemorrhage. Current data suggest that our preconceived notions regarding the efficacy of standard issue red blood cells (RBCs) during the hours after transfusion may be false. Standard issue RBCs may not increase oxygen delivery and may in fact decrease it by disturbing control of regional blood flow distribution (impaired nitric oxide processing) and failing to release oxygen, even when perfusing hypoxic tissue (abnormal oxygen affinity). Standard issue RBCs may assist with hemostasis but appear to have competing effects on thrombin generation and platelet function. If standard issue or RBCs of increased storage age are not optimal, then are there alternatives that will allow for an efficacious and safe treatment of shock while also supporting hemostasis? Studies are required to determine if fresh RBCs less than 7 to 10 days provide an outcome advantage. A resurgence in the study of whole blood stored at 4°C for up to 10 days also holds promise. Two randomized controlled trials in humans have indicated that following transfusion with either whole blood stored at 4°C or platelets stored at 4

  2. Improved traceability and transfusion safety with a new portable computerised system in a hospital with intermediate transfusion activity

    PubMed Central

    Uríz, María Jose; Antelo, Maria Luisa; Zalba, Saioa; Ugalde, Nazaret; Pena, Esther; Corcoz, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Background. A retrospective study carried out on medical records of transfused patients in our hospital in 2002 revealed that manual identification procedures were insufficient to offer satisfactory traceability. The aim of this study was to assess adequacy of transfusion traceability and compliance with proper identification procedures after introducing an electronic identification system (EIS) for transfusion safety. Materials and methods. The chosen EIS (Gricode®) was set up. Traceability was calculated as the percentage of empty blood units used returned to the Transfusion Service, compared to the number of supplied units. Compliance in the Transfusion Service was calculated as the percentage of electronic controls from dispatch of blood components/transfusion request performed, compared to the total number of transfused units. Compliance in the ward was calculated as the percentage of electronic controls from sample collection/transfusion performed, compared to the total number of samples collected. Results. This retrospective study showed that only 48.0% of the medical records were free of inaccuracies. After the implementation of the EIS (2005–2008), traceability was always above 99%. Percentage of monthly compliance from 2006 to 2008 was always above 93%, showing a significant trend to increase (p<0.05). The mean compliance in this period was higher in the Transfusion Service (97.8±0.7 SD) than in the ward (94.9±2.4 SD; p<0.001). Compliance in the ward was lowest when the system was first implemented (87.9% in April 2006) after which it progressively increased. No errors in ABO transfusions were registered. Conclusion. After implementation of the EIS, traceability and compliance reached very high levels, linked to an improvement in transfusion safety. PMID:21251464

  3. Acquired haemophilia A as a blood transfusion emergency

    PubMed Central

    Tagariello, Giuseppe; Sartori, Roberto; Radossi, Paolo; Risato, Renzo; Roveroni, Giovanni; Tassinari, Cristina; Giuffrida, Annachiara; Gandini, Giorgio; Franchini, Massimo

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Acquired haemophilia is a rare autoimmune disorder caused by autoantibodies directed in the majority of the cases against clotting factor VIII. This disorder is characterised by the sudden onset of bleeding that not rarely may be life-threatening and need transfusion support. Most reports on this condition describe the need for blood transfusions during the acute, haemorrhagic phase, but the number of transfused red cell units is often unknown. Patients and methods In the last 5 years, 14 patients with acquired haemophilia A were identified in the transfusion and haemophilia centres of Verona and Castelfranco Veneto. The transfusion support for these 14 patients was analyzed in this retrospective survey. Results The 14 patients required a total of 183 red cell units. The average transfusion requirement was 13 red cells units/patient, with a range from 0 to 38 units. Conclusions Eleven of the 14 patients studied needed strong transfusion support to enable any further management of the haemorrhages, as well as for eradication treatment of the autoantibodies to factor VIII. A relevant part of the management of haemorrhagic symptoms as well as the first choice for any further treatment (bleeding or the cure of the underlying disease) is transfusion of red blood cells. PMID:18661918

  4. First Implementation of Transfusion Consent Policy in Oman

    PubMed Central

    Al-Riyami, Arwa Z.; Al-Ghafri, Naif; Zia, Fehmida; Al-Huneini, Mohammed; Al-Rawas, Abdul-Hakeem; Al-Kindi, Salam; Jose, Sachin; Al-Khabori, Murtadha; Al-Sabti, Hilal; Daar, Shahina

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Transfusions are a common medical intervention. Discussion of the benefits, risks and alternatives with the patient is mandated by many legislations prior to planned transfusions. At the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH), Muscat, Oman, a written transfusion consent policy was introduced in March 2014. This was the first time such a policy was implemented in Oman. This study therefore aimed to assess adherence to this policy among different specialties within SQUH. Methods: The medical records of patients who underwent elective transfusions between June and August 2014 were reviewed to assess the presence of transfusion consent forms. If present, the consent forms were examined for completeness of patient, physician and witness information. Results: In total, the records of 446 transfused patients (299 adult and 147 paediatric patients) were assessed. Haematology patients accounted for 50% of adult patients and 71% of paediatric patients. Consent was obtained for 75% of adult and 91% of paediatric patients. The highest adherence rate was observed among adult and paediatric haematology specialists (95% and 97%, respectively). Consent forms were correctly filled out with all details provided for 51% and 52% of adult and paediatric patients, respectively. Among inadequately completed forms, the most common error was a lack of witness details (20–25%). Conclusion: In most cases, the pre-transfusion consent policy was successfully adhered to at SQUH. However, further work is required to ensure full compliance with the consent procedure within different specialties. Implementation of transfusion consent in other hospitals in the country is recommended.

  5. What Are the Risks of a Blood Transfusion?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the transfusion can safely be restarted. Viruses and Infectious Diseases Some infectious agents, such as HIV, can survive in blood and infect the person receiving the blood transfusion. To keep blood safe, blood ... Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD). This disease is the human version of ...

  6. Diagnosis of sickle cell disease in chronically transfused patients.

    PubMed

    Oliveri, D R; Ober, C L; Horwitz, A L

    1992-01-01

    Standard electrophoretic methods for the diagnosis of hemoglobinopathies are confounded in individuals chronically transfused. We present the accurate diagnosis of sickle cell disease in two such transfused patients by the application of polymerase chain reaction technology to analyze patient's hemoglobin beta-chain genes directly.

  7. Post-transfusion hepatitis C seroprevalence in Tanzanian children.

    PubMed

    Kitundu, J; Msengi, A; Matee, M; Fataki, M; Kazimoto, T; Mpembeni, R; Mnubhi, E; Kalokola, F

    2001-12-01

    In Tanzania, children with malaria-associated anaemia are frequently given blood transfusions, and donor blood is not screened for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. To determine the seroprevalence of HCV infection in Tanzanian children previously transfused with blood, 184 children (92 transfused, 92 not transfused) aged between 15 and 59 months matched for age and sex were screened for HCV antibodies by the particle agglutination test using Serodia anti-HCV (Fujirebio Inc., Japan). The overall prevalence of HCV infection was 7.1% (13/184). HCV seropositivity was 5.4% (5/92) among children with a history of blood transfusion and 8.6% (8/92) among the non-transfused. There was no significant difference in the prevalence of HCV infection between transfused and non-transfused children. None of the factors investigated, such as gender, the nutrition and HIV serostatus of the children and the marital and education status of their mothers, was associated with HCV seropositivity. Further studies are recommended to identify the factors associated with HCV infection in Tanzanian children.

  8. First Implementation of Transfusion Consent Policy in Oman

    PubMed Central

    Al-Riyami, Arwa Z.; Al-Ghafri, Naif; Zia, Fehmida; Al-Huneini, Mohammed; Al-Rawas, Abdul-Hakeem; Al-Kindi, Salam; Jose, Sachin; Al-Khabori, Murtadha; Al-Sabti, Hilal; Daar, Shahina

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Transfusions are a common medical intervention. Discussion of the benefits, risks and alternatives with the patient is mandated by many legislations prior to planned transfusions. At the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH), Muscat, Oman, a written transfusion consent policy was introduced in March 2014. This was the first time such a policy was implemented in Oman. This study therefore aimed to assess adherence to this policy among different specialties within SQUH. Methods: The medical records of patients who underwent elective transfusions between June and August 2014 were reviewed to assess the presence of transfusion consent forms. If present, the consent forms were examined for completeness of patient, physician and witness information. Results: In total, the records of 446 transfused patients (299 adult and 147 paediatric patients) were assessed. Haematology patients accounted for 50% of adult patients and 71% of paediatric patients. Consent was obtained for 75% of adult and 91% of paediatric patients. The highest adherence rate was observed among adult and paediatric haematology specialists (95% and 97%, respectively). Consent forms were correctly filled out with all details provided for 51% and 52% of adult and paediatric patients, respectively. Among inadequately completed forms, the most common error was a lack of witness details (20–25%). Conclusion: In most cases, the pre-transfusion consent policy was successfully adhered to at SQUH. However, further work is required to ensure full compliance with the consent procedure within different specialties. Implementation of transfusion consent in other hospitals in the country is recommended. PMID:27606107

  9. Bacterial screening of platelet concentrates on day 2 and 3 with flow cytometry: the optimal sampling time point?

    PubMed Central

    Vollmer, Tanja; Schottstedt, Volkmar; Bux, Juergen; Walther-Wenke, Gabriele; Knabbe, Cornelius; Dreier, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Background There is growing concern on the residual risk of bacterial contamination of platelet concentrates in Germany, despite the reduction of the shelf-life of these concentrates and the introduction of bacterial screening. In this study, the applicability of the BactiFlow flow cytometric assay for bacterial screening of platelet concentrates on day 2 or 3 of their shelf-life was assessed in two German blood services. The results were used to evaluate currently implemented or newly discussed screening strategies. Materials and methods Two thousand and ten apheresis platelet concentrates were tested on day 2 or day 3 after donation using BactiFlow flow cytometry. Reactive samples were confirmed by the BacT/Alert culture system. Results Twenty-four of the 2,100 platelet concentrates tested were reactive in the first test by BactiFlow. Of these 24 platelet concentrates, 12 were false-positive and the other 12 were initially reactive. None of the microbiological cultures of the initially reactive samples was positive. Parallel examination of 1,026 platelet concentrates by culture revealed three positive platelet concentrates with bacteria detected only in the anaerobic culture bottle and identified as Staphylococcus species. Two platelet concentrates were confirmed positive for Staphylcoccus epidermidis by culture. Retrospective analysis of the growth kinetics of the bacteria indicated that the bacterial titres were most likely below the diagnostic sensitivity of the BactiFlow assay (<300 CFU/mL) and probably had no transfusion relevance. Conclusions The BactiFlow assay is very convenient for bacterial screening of platelet concentrates independently of the testing day and the screening strategy. Although the optimal screening strategy could not be defined, this study provides further data to help achieve this goal. PMID:24887230

  10. Platelet Interaction with Innate Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kral, Julia Barbara; Schrottmaier, Waltraud Cornelia; Salzmann, Manuel; Assinger, Alice

    2016-01-01

    Summary Beyond their traditional role in haemostasis and thrombosis, platelets are increasingly recognised as immune modulatory cells. Activated platelets and platelet-derived microparticles can bind to leukocytes, which stimulates mutual activation and results in rapid, local release of platelet-derived cytokines. Thereby platelets modulate leukocyte effector functions and contribute to inflammatory and immune responses to injury or infection. Platelets enhance leukocyte extravasation, differentiation and cytokine release. Platelet-neutrophil interactions boost oxidative burst, neutrophil extracellular trap formation and phagocytosis and play an important role in host defence. Platelet interactions with monocytes propagate their differentiation into macrophages, modulate cytokine release and attenuate macrophage functions. Depending on the underlying pathology, platelets can enhance or diminish leukocyte cytokine production, indicating that platelet-leukocyte interactions represent a fine balanced system to restrict excessive inflammation during infection. In atherosclerosis, platelet interaction with neutrophils, monocytes and dendritic cells accelerates key steps of atherogenesis by promoting leukocyte extravasation and foam cell formation. Platelet-leukocyte interactions at sites of atherosclerotic lesions destabilise atherosclerotic plaques and promote plaque rupture. Leukocytes in turn also modulate platelet function and production, which either results in enhanced platelet destruction or increased platelet production. This review aims to summarise the key effects of platelet-leukocyte interactions in inflammation, infection and atherosclerosis. PMID:27226790

  11. Radioimmune assay of human platelet prostaglandin synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, G.J.; Machuga, E.T.

    1982-02-01

    Normal platelet function depends, in part, on platelet PG synthesis. PG synthetase (cyclo-oxygenase) catalyzes the first step in PG synthesis, the formation of PGH/sub 2/ from arachidonic acid. Inhibition of the enzyme by ASA results in an abnormality in the platelet release reaction. Patients with pparent congenital abnormalities in the enzyme have been described, and the effects have been referred to as ''aspirin-like'' defects of the platelet function. These patients lack platelet PG synthetase activity, but the actual content of PG synthetase protein in these individuals' platelets is unknown. Therefore an RIA for human platelet PG synthetase would provide new information, useful in assessing the aspirin-like defects of platelet function. An RIA for human platelet PG synthetase is described. The assay utilizes a rabbit antibody directed against the enzyme and (/sup 125/I)-labelled sheep PG synthetase as antigen. The human platelet enzyme is assayed by its ability to inhibit precipitation of the (/sup 125/I)antigen. The assay is sensitive to 1 ng of enzyme. By the immune assay, human platelets contain approximately 1200 ng of PG synethetase protein per 1.5 mg of platelet protein (approximately 10/sup 9/ platelets). This content corresponds to 10,000 enzyme molecules per platelet. The assay provides a rapid and convenient assay for the human platelet enzyme, and it can be applied to the assessment of patients with apparent platelet PG synthetase (cyclo-oxygenase) deficiency.

  12. Cyclosporine A enhances platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Grace, A A; Barradas, M A; Mikhailidis, D P; Jeremy, J Y; Moorhead, J F; Sweny, P; Dandona, P

    1987-12-01

    In view of the reported increase in thromboembolic episodes following cyclosporine A (CyA) therapy, the effect of this drug on platelet aggregation and thromboxane A2 release was investigated. The addition of CyA, at therapeutic concentrations to platelet rich plasma from normal subjects in vitro was found to increase aggregation in response to adrenaline, collagen and ADP. Ingestion of CyA by healthy volunteers was also associated with enhanced platelet aggregation. The CyA-mediated enhancement of aggregation was further enhanced by the addition in vitro of therapeutic concentrations of heparin. Platelets from renal allograft recipients treated with CyA also showed hyperaggregability and increased thromboxane A2 release, which were most marked at "peak" plasma CyA concentration and less so at "trough" concentrations. Platelet hyperaggregability in renal allograft patients on long-term CyA therapy tended to revert towards normal following the replacement of CyA with azathioprine. Hypertensive patients with renal allografts on nifedipine therapy had normal platelet function and thromboxane release in spite of CyA therapy. These observations suggest that CyA-mediated platelet activation may contribute to the pathogenesis of the thromboembolic phenomena associated with the use of this drug. The increased release of thromboxane A2 (a vasoconstrictor) may also play a role in mediating CyA-related nephrotoxicity.

  13. Platelets in inflammation and infection.

    PubMed

    Jenne, Craig N; Kubes, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Although platelets are traditionally recognized for their central role in hemostasis, many lines of research clearly demonstrate these rather ubiquitous blood components are potent immune modulators and effectors. Platelets have been shown to directly recognize, sequester and kill pathogens, to activated and recruit leukocytes to sites of infection and inflammation, and to modulate leukocyte behavior, enhancing their ability to phagocytose and kill pathogens and inducing unique effector functions, such as the production of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs). This multifaceted response to infection and inflammation is due, in part, to the huge array of soluble mediators and cell surface molecules expressed by platelets. From their earliest origins as primordial hemocytes in invertebrates to their current form as megakaryocyte-derived cytoplasts, platelets have evolved to be one of the key regulators of host intravascular immunity and inflammation. In this review, we present the diverse roles platelets play in immunity and inflammation associated with autoimmune diseases and infection. Additionally, we highlight recent advances in our understanding of platelet behavior made possible through the use of advanced imaging techniques that allow us to visualize platelets and their interactions, in real-time, within the intact blood vessels of a living host.

  14. Differential effect of plasma and red blood cell transfusion on acute lung injury and infection risk following liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Alexander B.; Burton, James R.; Austin, Gregory L.; Biggins, Scott W.; Zimmerman, Michael A.; Kam, Igal; Mandell, Susan; Silliman, Christopher C.; Rosen, Hugo; Moss, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Patients with chronic liver disease are at an increased risk of developing transfusion-associated acute lung injury (TRALI) from plasma containing blood products. Similarly, red blood cell transfusions have been associated with post-operative and nosocomial infections in surgical and critical care populations. Patients undergoing liver transplantation receive a large amount of cellular and plasma containing blood products, but it is presently unclear which blood components are associated with these post-operative complications. Results A retrospective cohort study of 525 consecutive liver transplant patients revealed a peri-operative TRALI incidence of 1.3% (7/525), 95%CI [0.6%–2.7%], associated with an increased hospital mortality (28.6% (2/7) vs. 2.9% (15/518), p=0.02) and intensive care unit (ICU) length of stay (2 days, [1–11] vs. 0 days [0–2], 0.03). Only high plasma containing blood products (plasma and platelets) were associated with the development of TRALI. A total of 14.3% (74/525) of patients developed a post-operative infection which was also associated with an increased in-hospital mortality (10.8% (8/74) vs. 2.0% (9/451), p < 0.01) and prolonged length of stay. Multivariate logistic regression identified the number of red blood cell units transfused (adj OR 1.08 95%CI [1.02–1.14], p<0.01), the presence of peri-operative renal dysfunction and re-operation to be significantly associated with post-operative infection. Conclusions Patients undergoing liver transplantation are at high risk of developing post-operative complications from blood transfusion. Plasma containing blood products were associated with the development of TRALI while red blood cells were associated with the development of post-operative infection in a dose dependent manner. PMID:21280188

  15. Fresh whole blood transfusion capability for Special Operations Forces

    PubMed Central

    Beckett, Maj Andrew; Callum, Jeannie; da Luz, Luis Teodoro; Schmid, Joanne; Funk, Christopher; Glassberg, Col Elon; Tien, Col Homer

    2015-01-01

    Summary Fresh whole blood (FWB) transfusion is an option for providing volume and oxygen carrying capacity to bleeding Special Operations soldiers who are injured in an austere environment and who are far from a regular blood bank. Retrospective data from recent conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan show an association between the use of FWB and survival. We reviewed the literature to document the issues surrounding FWB transfusion to Special Operations soldiers in the austere environment and surveyed the literature regarding best practice guidelines for and patient outcomes after FWB transfusions. Most literature regarding FWB transfusion is retrospective or historical. There is limited prospective evidence currently to change transfusion practice in tertiary care facilities, but FWB remains an option in the austere setting. PMID:26100776

  16. Fresh whole blood transfusion capability for Special Operations Forces.

    PubMed

    Beckett, Andrew; Callum, Jeannie; da Luz, Luis Teodoro; Schmid, Joanne; Funk, Christopher; Glassberg, Elon; Tien, Homer

    2015-06-01

    Fresh whole blood (FWB) transfusion is an option for providing volume and oxygen carrying capacity to bleeding Special Operations soldiers who are injured in an austere environment and who are far from a regular blood bank. Retrospective data from recent conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan show an association between the use of FWB and survival. We reviewed the literature to document the issues surrounding FWB transfusion to Special Operations soldiers in the austere environment and surveyed the literature regarding best practice guidelines for and patient outcomes after FWB transfusions. Most literature regarding FWB transfusion is retrospective or historical. There is limited prospective evidence currently to change transfusion practice in tertiary care facilities, but FWB remains an option in the austere setting. PMID:26100776

  17. The hospital transfusion committee: a step towards improved quality assurance.

    PubMed

    Calder, L; Woodfield, G

    1991-10-01

    Quality assurance has an important contribution to make in the judicious use of scarce resources. Auckland Hospital has established a transfusion committee because there was an escalating usage of blood and blood products which are expensive prescription medicines. A pilot audit of red cell transfusions indicated that 29% of red cell transfusions may have been unnecessary. A wide range of initiatives at Auckland Hospital has reduced blood product usage. Inappropriate use of blood carries an opportunity cost and may subject patients to unnecessary risk of reactions, including potential disease transmission. Strategies which need to be employed by transfusion committees include the introduction of clinical audit, physician education, restrictions on availability, and clinical budgeting. It is recommended that transfusion committees be set up in all major hospitals.

  18. Ensemble Learning Approaches to Predicting Complications of Blood Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Murphree, Dennis; Ngufor, Che; Upadhyaya, Sudhindra; Madde, Nagesh; Clifford, Leanne; Kor, Daryl J.; Pathak, Jyotishman

    2016-01-01

    Of the 21 million blood components transfused in the United States during 2011, approximately 1 in 414 resulted in complication [1]. Two complications in particular, transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) and transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO), are especially concerning. These two alone accounted for 62% of reported transfusion-related fatalities in 2013 [2]. We have previously developed a set of machine learning base models for predicting the likelihood of these adverse reactions, with a goal towards better informing the clinician prior to a transfusion decision. Here we describe recent work incorporating ensemble learning approaches to predicting TACO/TRALI. In particular we describe combining base models via majority voting, stacking of model sets with varying diversity, as well as a resampling/boosting combination algorithm called RUSBoost. We find that while the performance of many models is very good, the ensemble models do not yield significantly better performance in terms of AUC. PMID:26737958

  19. Recombinant erythropoietin and blood transfusion in selected preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, M; Sharma, E; Carsons, M

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To comprehensively identify preterm infants likely to require blood transfusion and to investigate the effectiveness of recombinant erythropoietin in this high risk subgroup. Design: Double blind randomised controlled trial. Setting: Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Middlemore Hospital, Auckland, New Zealand. Patients: Preterm infants < 33 weeks gestation and < 1700 g birth weight meeting specific criteria indicating a high possibility of requiring blood transfusion. Interventions: Predictors of blood transfusion were determined by analysis of preterm infants admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit over a two year period. Using the criteria developed, high risk infants entered the study and received erythropoietin or sham treatment until 34 weeks completed gestation. The sample size was calculated to detect a reduction of one blood transfusion per infant (significance level 5%, power 80%). Results: The selection criteria had a positive predictive value for transfusion of 91% and a negative predictive value of 94%. Mean birth weights and gestational ages were similar in the two groups. Absolute reticulocyte counts and haemoglobin values were higher in the group receiving erythropoietin. There was no significant difference in the number of blood transfusions received in the treatment and control groups. However, comparing transfusions given to < 1000 g infants after 30 days of age, there were significantly fewer transfusions in the erythropoietin group (mean (SD) 0.5 (0.7) in those receiving erythropoietin and 1.6 (1.1) in the controls). No adverse effects were noted. Conclusions: The selection criteria for the study were highly predictive of subsequent transfusion. In the group receiving erythropoietin, a reduction in transfusion requirements was apparent only in the < 1000 g birthweight group after 1 month of age. PMID:12496225

  20. European strategies against the parasite transfusion risk.

    PubMed

    Reesink, H W

    2005-02-01

    Protozoal infections are endemic in mainly tropical low income countries, affecting millions of people. Malaria, American trypanosomiasis (Trypanosoma cruzi/Chagas disease) and protozoal tickborne diseases (e.g. Babesia) can be efficiently transmitted by transfusion of cellular blood components. In non-endemic areas like Europe malaria, Chagas disease and Babesia are imported diseases resulting of travelling to endemic areas and migration of autochthons from these endemic areas. A recent International Forum showed that in Europe, as well as the USA, prevention of transfusion-associated protozoal infections depend mainly on selection of donors using questionnaires. Most countries divide donors at risk for malaria in two groups: individuals who have lived in the first 5 years of their life in malaria endemic areas and those who are borne and residing in non-endemic areas and visited the endemic area(s). The first category of donors is rejected for 3 years after their last visit to the endemic area, and in one country such donors are permanently rejected. In some countries such donors are accepted after 4 months-3 years, provided a test for malaria is non-reactive. Persons from non-endemic areas, who visited the malaria endemic area, are rejected for 4-12 months. Some countries reject these donors for 3 years or permanently when they resided for more than 6 months in the endemic area. The rejection rate of donors for malaria risk in the various countries was 0.003-0.43% of all donations. Over the last decade only a few cases of TT-malaria were reported in the various countries. In several countries donors are questioned for risk of T. cruzi infection. In some countries donors are excluded when they (or their mothers) were born in South or Central America, if they received a blood transfusion in these areas and if they lived in rural areas in these endemic countries for more than 4 weeks. In none of the countries donors are asked if they had Babesia or Leishmania. At

  1. Increasing platelet aggregability after venepuncture is platelet, not plasma derived.

    PubMed

    Terres, W; Becker, B F; Kratzer, M A; Gerlach, E

    1986-05-15

    The time course of ADP induced aggregation of human platelets was determined in aliquots of stored platelet rich plasma 3.5, 10, 30 and 100 minutes after venepuncture. The maximal rate of aggregation was found to increase throughout this entire period, even though pH (7.4), CO2 (7 volume per cent) and temperature (35 degrees C) of the samples were kept constant. The mean acceleration (+/- SEM) between 3.5 and 100 minutes was 41.7 +/- 6.9 per cent (n = 67) at an ADP-concentration of 1 mumol/l and 18.3 +/- 6.2 per cent (n = 23) at 2 mumol/l ADP. The effect did not result from changes of any platelet regulatory factors putatively present alone in the plasma. Acceleration of aggregability was only found when the platelets themselves underwent storage, but not when freshly prepared plasma was given to prestored platelets. The change in aggregability was not diminished after inhibition of platelet cyclooxygenase by oral administration of acetylsalicylic acid. PMID:3715816

  2. Controlling post-transfusion hepatitis: a proposal to publicize hepatitis rates of transfusion facilities.

    PubMed

    Finkelstein, S N; Sapolsky, H M

    1979-01-01

    A federal requirement that donor blood be labelled as either "paid" or "volunteer" took effect on May 15, 1978. A major rationale for requiring such labelling is that physicians, now that they can distinguish between categories of blood, will fear liability for post-transfusion hepatitis resulting from the use of paid blood. Thus, supporters of the labelling requirement hope that it will deter the use of high-risk commercial blood. Some paid blood, however, is not commercial blood and in fact may be safer than volunteer blood. The labelling strategy for hepatitis control, therefore, has negative as well as positive attributes. This Article considers the efficacy of blood labelling as a hepatitis control measure and proposes an alternative strategy--the periodic publicizing of hepatitis rates of facilities that perform transfusions--that, if practiced responsibly, could significantly decrease hepatitis transmission rates.

  3. Pediatric Patient Blood Management Programs: Not Just Transfusing Little Adults.

    PubMed

    Goel, Ruchika; Cushing, Melissa M; Tobian, Aaron A R

    2016-10-01

    Red blood cell transfusions are a common life-saving intervention for neonates and children with anemia, but transfusion decisions, indications, and doses in neonates and children are different from those of adults. Patient blood management (PBM) programs are designed to assist clinicians with appropriately transfusing patients. Although PBM programs are well recognized and appreciated in the adult setting, they are quite far from standard of care in the pediatric patient population. Adult PBM standards cannot be uniformly applied to children, and there currently is significant variation in transfusion practices. Because transfusing unnecessarily can expose children to increased risk without benefit, it is important to design PBM programs to standardize transfusion decisions. This article assesses the key elements necessary for a successful pediatric PBM program, systematically explores various possible pediatric specific blood conservation strategies and the current available literature supporting them, and outlines the gaps in the evidence suggesting need for further/improved research. Pediatric PBM programs are critically important initiatives that not only involve a cooperative effort between pediatric surgery, anesthesia, perfusion, critical care, and transfusion medicine services but also need operational support from administration, clinical leadership, finance, and the hospital information technology personnel. These programs also expand the scope for high-quality collaborative research. A key component of pediatric PBM programs is monitoring pediatric blood utilization and assessing adherence to transfusion guidelines. Data suggest that restrictive transfusion strategies should be used for neonates and children similar to adults, but further research is needed to assess the best oxygenation requirements, hemoglobin threshold, and transfusion strategy for patients with active bleeding, hemodynamic instability, unstable cardiac disease, and cyanotic cardiac

  4. Pediatric Patient Blood Management Programs: Not Just Transfusing Little Adults.

    PubMed

    Goel, Ruchika; Cushing, Melissa M; Tobian, Aaron A R

    2016-10-01

    Red blood cell transfusions are a common life-saving intervention for neonates and children with anemia, but transfusion decisions, indications, and doses in neonates and children are different from those of adults. Patient blood management (PBM) programs are designed to assist clinicians with appropriately transfusing patients. Although PBM programs are well recognized and appreciated in the adult setting, they are quite far from standard of care in the pediatric patient population. Adult PBM standards cannot be uniformly applied to children, and there currently is significant variation in transfusion practices. Because transfusing unnecessarily can expose children to increased risk without benefit, it is important to design PBM programs to standardize transfusion decisions. This article assesses the key elements necessary for a successful pediatric PBM program, systematically explores various possible pediatric specific blood conservation strategies and the current available literature supporting them, and outlines the gaps in the evidence suggesting need for further/improved research. Pediatric PBM programs are critically important initiatives that not only involve a cooperative effort between pediatric surgery, anesthesia, perfusion, critical care, and transfusion medicine services but also need operational support from administration, clinical leadership, finance, and the hospital information technology personnel. These programs also expand the scope for high-quality collaborative research. A key component of pediatric PBM programs is monitoring pediatric blood utilization and assessing adherence to transfusion guidelines. Data suggest that restrictive transfusion strategies should be used for neonates and children similar to adults, but further research is needed to assess the best oxygenation requirements, hemoglobin threshold, and transfusion strategy for patients with active bleeding, hemodynamic instability, unstable cardiac disease, and cyanotic cardiac

  5. [Protein kinase C activation induces platelet apoptosis].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Li-Li; Chen, Meng-Xing; Zhang, Ming-Yi; Dai, Ke-Sheng

    2013-10-01

    Platelet apoptosis elucidated by either physical or chemical compound or platelet storage occurs wildly, which might play important roles in controlling the numbers and functions of circulated platelets, or in the development of some platelet-related diseases. However, up to now, a little is known about the regulatory mechanisms of platelet apoptosis. Protein kinase C (PKC) is highly expressed in platelets and plays central roles in regulating platelet functions. Although there is evidence indicating that PKC is involved in the regulation of apoptosis of nucleated cells, it is still unclear whether PKC plays a role in platelet apoptosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of PKC in platelet apoptosis. The effects of PKC on mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure, and caspase-3 activation of platelets were analyzed by flow cytometry and Western blot. The results showed that the ΔΨm depolarization in platelets was induced by PKC activator in time-dependent manner, and the caspase-3 activation in platelets was induced by PKC in concentration-dependent manner. However, the platelets incubated with PKC inhibitor did not results in ΔΨm depolarization and PS exposure. It is concluded that the PKC activation induces platelet apoptosis through influencing the mitochondrial functions and activating caspase 3. The finds suggest a novel mechanism for PKC in regulating platelet numbers and functions, which has important pathophysiological implications for thrombosis and hemostasis.

  6. Platelet adhesiveness after blood donation.

    PubMed

    Pegrum, G D; Harrison, K M; Shaw, S

    1971-03-13

    Platelet adhesiveness to glass was measured in healthy blood donors at the time of and eight days after donating 500 ml of blood. By a whole blood method a highly significant increase was found whereas by a method using platelet-rich plasma with added adenosine diphosphate there was only a slightly significant increase. The discrepancy suggested that changes in the red cell population might influence the results. Packed red cells from 19 blood donors obtained at the time of donation and eight days later were mixed with fresh pooled platelets from the same independent persons on each occasion. The whole blood platelet adhesiveness on this mixture showed an increase in every case after blood donation. It is postulated that the increased adhesiveness is influenced by the presence of young red cells.