Science.gov

Sample records for single-pass radar interferometer

  1. The Glacier and Ice Surface Topography Interferometer: UAVSAR's Single-pass Ka-Band Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moller, D.; Hensley, S.; Sadowy, G.; Wu, X.; Carswell, J.; Fisher, C.; Michel, T.; Lou, Y.

    2012-12-01

    In May 2009 a new radar technique for mapping ice surface topography was demonstrated in a Greenland campaign as part of the NASA International Polar Year (IPY) activities. This was achieved with the airborne Glacier and Ice Surface Topography Interferometer (GLISTIN-A): a 35.6 GHz single-pass interferometer. Although the technique of using radar interferometry for mapping terrain has been demonstrated before, this is the first such application at millimeter-wave frequencies. The proof-of-concept demonstration was achieved by interfacing Ka-band RF and antenna hardware with the Uninhabited Airborne Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR). The GLISTIN-A was implemented as a custom installation of the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center Gulfstream III. Instrument performance indicates swath widths over the ice between 5-7km, with height precisions ranging from 30cm-3m at a posting of 3m x 3m. Processing challenges were encountered in achieving the accuracy requirements on several fronts including, aircraft motion sensitivity, multipath and systematic drifts. However, through a combination of processor optimization, a modified phase-screen and motion-compensation implementations were able to minimize the impact of these systematic error sources. We will present results from the IPY data collections including system performance evaluations and imagery. This includes a large area digital elevation model (DEM) collected over Jakobshavn glacier as an illustrative science data product. Further, by intercomparison with the NASA Wallops Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM) and calibration targets we quantify the interferometric penetration bias of the Ka-band returns into the snow cover. Following the success of the IPY campaign, we are funded under the Earth Science Techonology Office (ESTO) Airborne Innovative Technology Transition (AITT) program to transition GLISTIN-A to a permanently-available pod-only system compatible with unpressurized operation. In addition

  2. The Glacier and Ice Surface Topography Interferometer: UAVSAR's Single-pass Ka-Band Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moller, D.; Hensley, S.; Wu, X.; Michel, T.; Muellerschoen, R.; Carswell, J.; Fisher, C.; Miller, T.; Milligan, L.; Sadowy, G.; Sanchez-Barbetty, M.; Lou, Y.

    2013-12-01

    In May 2009 a new radar technique for mapping ice surface topography was demonstrated in a Greenland campaign as part of the NASA International Polar Year (IPY) activities. This was achieved with the airborne Glacier and Ice Surface Topography Interferometer (GLISTIN-A): a 35.6 GHz single-pass interferometer. The proof-of-concept demonstration was achieved by interfacing Ka-band RF and antenna hardware with the Uninhabited Airborne Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR). The GLISTIN-A was implemented as a custom installation of the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center Gulfstream III. Instrument performance indicated swath widths over the ice between 5-7km, with height precisions ranging from 30cm-3m at a posting of 3m x 3m. Following the success of the IPY campaign, the Earth Science Techonology Office (ESTO) Airborne Innovative Technology Transition (AITT) program funded the upgrade of GLISTIN-A to a permanently-available pod-only system compatible with unpressurized operation. The AITT made three fundamental upgrades to improve system performance: 1. State-of-the-art solid-state power amplifiers (80W peak) were integrated directly on the antenna panel reducing front-end losses; 2. A ping-pong capability was incorporated to effectively double the baseline thereby improving height measurement precision by a factor of two; and 3. A high-fidelity calibration loop was implemented which is critical for routine processing. Upon completion of our engineering flights in February 2013, GLISTIN-A flew a brief campaign to Alaska (4/24-4/27/13). The purpose was to fully demonstrate GLISTIN-A's ability to generate high-precision, high resolution maps of ice surface topography with swaths in excess of 10km. Furthermore, the question of the utility of GLISTIN-A for sea-ice mapping, tracking and inventory has received a great deal of interest. To address this GLISTIN-A collected data over sea-ice in the Beaufort sea including an underflight of CryoSAT II. Note that there are

  3. EcoSAR: NASA's P-band fully polarimetric single pass interferometric airborne radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osmanoglu, B.; Rincon, R. F.; Fatoyinbo, T. E.; Lee, S. K.; Sun, G.; Daniyan, O.; Harcum, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    EcoSAR is a new airborne synthetic aperture radar imaging system, developed at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. It is a P-band sensor that employs a non-conventional and innovative design. The EcoSAR system was designed as a multi-disciplinary instrument to image the 3-dimensional surface of the earth from a single pass platform with two antennas. EcoSAR's principal mission is to penetrate the forest canopy to return vital information about the canopy structure and estimate biomass. With a maximum bandwidth of 200 MHz in H and 120 MHz in V polarizations it can provide sub-meter resolution imagery of the study area. EcoSAR's dual antenna, 32 transmit and receive channel architecture provides a test-bed for developing new algorithms in InSAR data processing such as single pass interferometry, full polarimetry, post-processing synthesis of multiple beams, simultaneous measurement over both sides of the flight track, selectable resolution and variable incidence angle. The flexible architecture of EcoSAR will create new opportunities in radar remote sensing of forest biomass, permafrost active layer thickness, and topography mapping. EcoSAR's first test flight occurred between March 27th and April 1st, 2014 over the Andros Island in Bahamas and Corcovado and La Selva National Parks in Costa Rica. The 32 channel radar system collected about 6 TB of radar data in about 12 hours of data collection. Due to the existence of radio and TV communications in the operational frequency band, acquired data contains strong radar frequency interference, which had to be removed prior to beamforming and focusing. Precise locations of the antennas are tracked using high-rate GPS and inertial navigation units, which provide necessary information for accurate processing of the imagery. In this presentation we will present preliminary imagery collected during the test campaign, show examples of simultaneous dual track imaging, as well as a single pass interferogram. The

  4. Single pass interferometric synthetic aperture radar spacecraft formations for planetary exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Rego, Paul J.

    The dissertation investigates formations of a space based exploration system consisting of an interplanetary capable spacecraft and two smaller deployable spacecraft. Spacecraft formations are optimized for single pass spot-light interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR) imaging during planetary flybys. Two major system models are developed; (1) relative spacecraft motion, and (2) pixel height measurement variance. A generalized nonlinear relative motion model is developed. Assumptions of circular orbit and/or equal gravity gradient are applied to the nonlinear model and shown to yield relative motion equations commonly found in the spacecraft formation flying literature. An analysis shows that the generalized trajectory model with an equal gravity gradient assumption provides sufficient accuracy for a single pass IFSAR flyby. A pixel height variance model is developed to address issues unique to single pass multiple baseline space based systems. A bistatic IFSAR system is assumed with the radar transmitter aboard the leader spacecraft and radar receivers aboard all three spacecraft. Modeled noises include internal sensor noise, spatial decorrelation noise, non-parallel ground track (grid rotation) decorrelation noise, and system parameter uncertainties. With expected observation ranges in excess of 500 kilometers, large baselines are required to maximize IFSAR height sensitivity. An analysis of optimal correlation is presented that extends the work of Rodriguez & Martin (1992) to include model uncertainties. Analysis also considers the ability of post processing algorithms to unwrap the modulo-2pi phase difference measurements, an issue of particular concern for large baseline IFSAR systems. This issue is addressed through development of maximum baseline constraints computed from post processing algorithm performance specifications. Four IFSAR formation scenarios are investigated. Each mimics the planned flyby of the Kilauea volcano by the Air Force Tech

  5. Orbit Determination of LEO Satellites for a Single Pass through a Radar: Comparison of Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khutorovsky, Z.; Kamensky, S.; Sbytov, N.; Alfriend, K. T.

    2007-01-01

    The problem of determining the orbit of a space object from measurements based on one pass through the field of view of a radar is not a new one. Extensive research in this area has been carried out in the USA and Russia since the late 50s when these countries started the development of ballistic missile defense (BMD) and Early Warning systems. In Russia these investigations got additional stimulation in the early 60s after the decision to create a Space Surveillance System, whose primary task would be the maintenance of the satellite catalog. These problems were the focus of research interest until the middle 70s when the appropriate techniques and software were implemented for all radars. Then for more than 20 years no new research papers appeared on this subject. This produced an impression that all the problems of track determination based on one pass had been solved and there was no need for further research. In the late 90s interest in this problem arose again in relation to the following. It was estimated that there would be greater than 100,000 objects with size greater than 1-2 cm and collision of an operational spacecraft with any of these objects could have catastrophic results. Thus, for prevention of hazardous approaches and collisions with valuable spacecraft the existing satellite catalog should be extended by at least an order of magnitude This is a very difficult scientific and engineering task. One of the issues is the development of data fusion procedures and the software capable of maintaining such a huge catalog in near real time. The number of daily processed measurements (of all types, radar and optical) for such a system may constitute millions, thus increasing the number of measurements by at least an order of magnitude. Since we will have ten times more satellites and measurements the computer effort required for the correlation of measurements will be two orders of magnitude greater. This could create significant problems for processing

  6. Information content of a single pass of phase-delay data from a short baseline connected element interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thurman, S. W.

    1990-01-01

    An analytic development of the information array obtained with a single tracking pass of phase-delay measurements made from a short baseline interferometer is presented. Phase-delay observations can be made with great precision from two antennas using a single, common distributed frequency standard, hence the name connected element. With the information array, closed-form expressions are developed for the error covariance in declination and right ascension. These equations serve as useful tools for analyzing the relative merits of candidate station locations for connected element interferometry (CEI). The navigation performance of a short baseline interferometer located at the Deep Space Network's (DSN's) Goldstone intracomplex is compared with that which is presently achievable using Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) over intercontinental baselines. The performance of an intracomplex pair of short baselines formed by three stations is also investigated, along with the use of a single baseline in conjunction with conventional two-way Doppler data. The phase-delay measurement accuracy and data rate used in the analysis are based on the expected performance of an experimental connected element system presently under construction at Goldstone. The results indicate that the VLBI system that will be used during the Galileo mission can determine the declination and right ascension of a distant spacecraft to an accuracy of 20 to 25 nrad, while the CEI triad system and the combination of CEI-Doppler system are both capable of 30 to 70 nrad performance.

  7. Radar Interferometer for Topographic Mapping of Glaciers and Ice Sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moller, Delwyn K.; Sadowy, Gregory A.; Rignot, Eric J.; Madsen, Soren N.

    2007-01-01

    A report discusses Ka-band (35-GHz) radar for mapping the surface topography of glaciers and ice sheets at high spatial resolution and high vertical accuracy, independent of cloud cover, with a swath-width of 70 km. The system is a single- pass, single-platform interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) with an 8-mm wavelength, which minimizes snow penetration while remaining relatively impervious to atmospheric attenuation. As exhibited by the lower frequency SRTM (Shuttle Radar Topography Mission) AirSAR and GeoSAR systems, an InSAR measures topography using two antennas separated by a baseline in the cross-track direction, to view the same region on the ground. The interferometric combination of data received allows the system to resolve the pathlength difference from the illuminated area to the antennas to a fraction of a wavelength. From the interferometric phase, the height of the target area can be estimated. This means an InSAR system is capable of providing not only the position of each image point in along-track and slant range as with a traditional SAR but also the height of that point through interferometry. Although the evolution of InSAR to a millimeter-wave center frequency maximizes the interferometric accuracy from a given baseline length, the high frequency also creates a fundamental problem of swath coverage versus signal-to-noise ratio. While the length of SAR antennas is typically fixed by mass and stowage or deployment constraints, the width is constrained by the desired illuminated swath width. As the across-track beam width which sets the swath size is proportional to the wavelength, a fixed swath size equates to a smaller antenna as the frequency is increased. This loss of antenna size reduces the two-way antenna gain to the second power, drastically reducing the signal-to-noise ratio of the SAR system. This fundamental constraint of high-frequency SAR systems is addressed by applying digital beam-forming (DBF) techniques to

  8. Gadanki Ionospheric Radar Interferometer (GIRI): System Description, Capabilities and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durga rao, Meka; Jayaraman, Achuthan; Patra, Amit; Kamaraj, Pandian; Jayaraj, Katta; Raghavendra, J.; Yasodha, Polisetti

    2016-07-01

    A 30-MHz radar has been developed at National Atmospheric Research Laboratory for dedicated probing of ionosphere and to study the low latitude ionospheric plasma irregularities. The radar has the beam steering capability to scan a larger part of the sky up to ±45o in East-West direction, which will overcome the limitation of slit camera picture obtained by the fixed beam of the Gadanki MST radar on the ionospheric plasma irregularity/structures. The system is also configured for pulse-to-pulse beam steering, employs multi-channel receiving system to carryout Interferometry/Imaging experiments. The radar system employs 20x8 phased antenna array, Direct Digital Synthesizers to generate pulse coded excitation signals, high power solid-state Transmit-Receive modules to generate a peak power of 150 kW, low loss coaxial beam forming and feeder network and multi-channel direct IF digital receiver. Round-the-clock observations are being made with uninterrupted operations and high quality E-and F-Region Range-Time-Intensity and conical maps are obtained with the system. In this paper we present, the system design philosophy, realization, initial observations and also the capability of the system to augment for Meteor observations.

  9. Multifrequency, single pass free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Szoke, Abraham; Prosnitz, Donald

    1985-01-01

    A method for simultaneous amplification of laser beams with a sequence of frequencies in a single pass, using a relativistic beam of electrons grouped in a sequence of energies corresponding to the sequence of laser beam frequencies. The method allows electrons to pass from one potential well or "bucket" to another adjacent bucket, thus increasing efficiency of trapping and energy conversion.

  10. Onboard Interferometric SAR Processor for the Ka-Band Radar Interferometer (KaRIn)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esteban-Fernandez, Daniel; Rodriquez, Ernesto; Peral, Eva; Clark, Duane I.; Wu, Xiaoqing

    2011-01-01

    An interferometric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) onboard processor concept and algorithm has been developed for the Ka-band radar interferometer (KaRIn) instrument on the Surface and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission. This is a mission- critical subsystem that will perform interferometric SAR processing and multi-look averaging over the oceans to decrease the data rate by three orders of magnitude, and therefore enable the downlink of the radar data to the ground. The onboard processor performs demodulation, range compression, coregistration, and re-sampling, and forms nine azimuth squinted beams. For each of them, an interferogram is generated, including common-band spectral filtering to improve correlation, followed by averaging to the final 1 1-km ground resolution pixel. The onboard processor has been prototyped on a custom FPGA-based cPCI board, which will be part of the radar s digital subsystem. The level of complexity of this technology, dictated by the implementation of interferometric SAR processing at high resolution, the extremely tight level of accuracy required, and its implementation on FPGAs are unprecedented at the time of this reporting for an onboard processor for flight applications.

  11. Auroral ion acoustic wave enhancement observed with a radar interferometer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlatter, N. M.; Belyey, V.; Gustavsson, B.; Ivchenko, N.; Whiter, D.; Dahlgren, H.; Tuttle, S.; Grydeland, T.

    2015-07-01

    Measurements of naturally enhanced ion acoustic line (NEIAL) echoes obtained with a five-antenna interferometric imaging radar system are presented. The observations were conducted with the European Incoherent SCATter (EISCAT) radar on Svalbard and the EISCAT Aperture Synthesis Imaging receivers (EASI) installed at the radar site. Four baselines of the interferometer are used in the analysis. Based on the coherence estimates derived from the measurements, we show that the enhanced backscattering region is of limited extent in the plane perpendicular to the geomagnetic field. Previously it has been argued that the enhanced backscatter region is limited in size; however, here the first unambiguous observations are presented. The size of the enhanced backscatter region is determined to be less than 900 × 500 m, and at times less than 160 m in the direction of the longest antenna separation, assuming the scattering region to have a Gaussian scattering cross section in the plane perpendicular to the geomagnetic field. Using aperture synthesis imaging methods volumetric images of the NEIAL echo are obtained showing the enhanced backscattering region to be aligned with the geomagnetic field. Although optical auroral emissions are observed outside the radar look direction, our observations are consistent with the NEIAL echo occurring on field lines with particle precipitation.

  12. Dilution in single pass arc welds

    SciTech Connect

    DuPont, J.N.; Marder, A.R.

    1996-06-01

    A study was conducted on dilution of single pass arc welds of type 308 stainless steel filler metal deposited onto A36 carbon steel by the plasma arc welding (PAW), gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), gas metal arc welding (GMAW), and submerged arc welding (SAW) processes. Knowledge of the arc and melting efficiency was used in a simple energy balance to develop an expression for dilution as a function of welding variables and thermophysical properties of the filler metal and substrate. Comparison of calculated and experimentally determined dilution values shows the approach provides reasonable predictions of dilution when the melting efficiency can be accurately predicted. The conditions under which such accuracy is obtained are discussed. A diagram is developed from the dilution equation which readily reveals the effect of processing parameters on dilution to aid in parameter optimization.

  13. Single Pass Multi-component Harvester

    SciTech Connect

    Reed Hoskinson; J. Richard Hess

    2004-08-01

    Abstract. In order to meet the U. S. government’s goal of supplementing the energy available from petroleum by increasing the production of energy from renewable resources, increased production of bioenergy has become one of the new goals of the United States government and our society. U.S. Executive Orders and new Federal Legislation have mandated changes in government procedures and caused reorganizations within the government to support these goals. The Biomass Research and Development Initiative is a multi-agency effort to coordinate and accelerate all U.S. Federal biobased products and bioenergy research and development. The Initiative is managed by the National Biomass Coordination Office, which is staffed by both the DOE and the USDA. One of the most readily available sources of biomass from which to produce bioenergy is an agricultural crop residue, of which straw from small grains is the most feasible residue with which to start. For the straw residue to be used its collection must be energy efficient and its removal must not impact the sustainability of the growing environment. In addition, its collection must be economically advantageous to the producer. To do all that, a single pass multi-component harvester system is most desirable. Results from our first prototype suggest that current combines probably do adequate threshing and that a separate chassis can be developed that does additional separation and that is economically feasible.

  14. The Single Pass Multi-component Harvester

    SciTech Connect

    Reed Hoskinson; John R. Hess

    2004-08-01

    collection must be economically advantageous to the producer. To do all that, a single pass multi-component harvester system is most desirable. Results from our first prototype suggest that current combines probably do adequate threshing and that a separate chassis can be developed that does additional separation and that is economically feasible.

  15. Single-pass Airborne InSAR for Wide-swath, High-Resolution Cryospheric Surface Topography Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moller, D.; Hensley, S.; Wu, X.; Muellerschoen, R.

    2014-12-01

    In May 2009 a mm-wave single-pass interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) for the first time demonstrated ice surface topography swath-mapping in Greenland. This was achieved with the airborne Glacier and Ice Surface Topography Interferometer (GLISTIN-A). Ka-band (35.6GHz) was chosen for high-precision topographic mapping from a compact sensor with minimal surface penetration. In recent years, the system was comprehensively upgraded for improved performance, stability and calibration. In April 2013, after completing the upgrades, GLISTIN-A flew a brief campaign to Alaska. The primary purpose was to demonstrate the InSAR's ability to generate high-precision, high resolution maps of ice surface topography with swaths in excess of 10km. Comparison of GLISTIN-A's elevations over glacial ice with lidar verified the precision requirements and established elevation accuracies to within 2 m without tie points. Feature tracking of crevasses on Columbia Glacier using data acquired with a 3-day separation exhibit an impressive velocity mapping capability. Furthermore, GLISTIN-A flew over the Beaufort sea to determine if we could not only map sea ice, but also measure freeboard. Initial analysis has established we can measure sea-ice freeboard using height differences from the top of the sea-ice and the sea surface in open leads. In the future, a campaign with lidar is desired for a quantitative validation. Another proof-of-concept collection mapped snow-basins for hydrology. Snow depth measurements using summer and winter collections in the Sierras were compared with lidar measurements. Unsurprisingly when present, trees complicate the interpretation, but additional filtering and processing is in work. For each application, knowledge of the interferometric penetration is important for scientific interpretation. We present analytical predictions and experimental data to upper bound the elevation bias of the InSAR measurements over snow and snow-covered ice.

  16. Amplified spontaneous emission in a single pass free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Li Hua; Krinsky, S.

    1988-01-01

    We discuss the relationship of the effective start-up noise in a single pass free electron laser to the spontaneous radiation emitted in the initial gain length of the wiggler magnet. Also, it is noted that the number of modes in the output is related to the phase space volume occupied by the spontaneous radiation emitted in the first gain length. 12 refs.

  17. Comparison of medium frequency pulsed radar interferometer and correlation analysis winds, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meek, C. E.; Reid, I. M.; Manson, A. H.

    1986-01-01

    In principle, the interferometer analysis determines the radial velocity and direction of single scatterers provided that each has a sufficiently different Doppler frequency to permit separation by spectral analysis. In fact, scatterers will not have constant radial velocity, and their Doppler frequencies as well as their directions will be modulated by their horizontal motion. Thus, there is a tradeoff between the poorer resolution but less smeared scatterers on shorter records and the higher resolution (longer) records. Three or more non-collinear scatterers are sufficient to determine the wind. It appears that the velocity found from the combined interferometer peaks agrees well with the apparent velocity from correlation methods, but the true velocity is a factor of 2 smaller. This difference might be resolved by searching for scatters showing regular movement between adjacent records.

  18. Observations of storm time midlatitude ion-neutral coupling using SuperDARN radars and NATION Fabry-Perot interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, P. P.; H. Baker, J. B.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Makela, J. J.; Fisher, D. J.; Harding, B. J.; Frissell, N. A.; Thomas, E. G.

    2015-10-01

    Ion drag is known to play an important role in driving neutral thermosphere circulation at auroral latitudes, especially during the main phase of geomagnetic storms. During the recovery phase, the neutrals are known to drive the ions and generate ionospheric electric fields and currents via the disturbance dynamo mechanism. At midlatitudes, the precise interplay between ions and neutrals is less understood largely because of the paucity of measurements that have been available. In this work, we investigate ion-neutral coupling at middle latitudes using colocated ion drift velocity measurements obtained from Super Dual Auroral Radar Network radars and neutral wind velocity and temperature measurements obtained from the North American Thermosphere Ionosphere Observing Network (NATION) Fabry-Perot interferometers. We examine one recent storm period on 2-3 October 2013 during both the main phase and late recovery phase. By using ion-neutral momentum exchange theory and a time-lagged correlation analysis, we analyze the coupling time scales and dominant driving mechanisms. We observe that during the main phase the neutrals respond to the ion convection on a time scale of ˜84 min which is significantly faster than what would be expected from local ion drag momentum forcing alone. This suggests that other storm time influences are important for driving the neutrals during the main phase, such as Joule heating. During the late recovery phase, the neutrals are observed to drive the ion convection without any significant time delay, consistent with the so-called "neutral fly wheel effect" or disturbance dynamo persisting well into the late recovery phase.

  19. Optimizing spacecraft formations for single-pass IFSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Rego, Paul J.; Jamshidi, Mohammad

    2003-11-01

    Formation structure and relative spacecraft velocities for a multiple baseline single pass IFSAR system are investigated to optimize a composite interferometric observation over several subapertures. Two major system models are developed: (1) relative spacecraft motion, and (2) pixel height measurement variance. Analysis demonstrates that a generalized Keplerian trajectory model with an equal gravity gradient assumption provides sufficient accuracy over typical IFSAR flyby aperture lengths. A pixel height variance model is developed to address issues unique to single pass multiple baseline space-based systems. A bistatic spotlight mode IFSAR system is assumed. Bistatic operation is not necessary, but the reduced future costs of deploying high performance sensor arrays of smaller receiver spacecraft drive the development of this important technology. Modeled noises for the multiple baseline system include internal sensor noise, spatial decorrelation noise, non-parallel ground track (grid rotation) decorrelation noise, and system parameter uncertainties. With expected observation ranges in excess of 500 kilometers, large baselines are required to maximize IFSAR height sensitivity. An analysis of optimal correlation is presented that extends the work of Rodriguez & Martin (1992) to include model uncertainties. Four IFSAR formation scenarios have been investigated. The system trajectory mimics the planned flyby of the Kilauea volcano by the Air Force TechSat 21 multiple spacecraft demonstration. Supposed formations include (1) a free-fall cluster formation, (2) an optimal formation assuming adequate thrust, and (3) a free-fall flyby after optimal initial formation. Results demonstrate pixel height errors at the spotlight aim point to range from 1 to 4 meters over the several 1-second subaperture lengths, and 0.2 to 0.5 meters over the 47-second full aperture length. A fourth scenario investigates performance over a hyperbolic flyby trajectory.

  20. Error Analysis for High Resolution Topography with Bi-Static Single-Pass SAR Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muellerschoen, Ronald J.; Chen, Curtis W.; Hensley, Scott; Rodriguez, Ernesto

    2006-01-01

    We present a flow down error analysis from the radar system to topographic height errors for bi-static single pass SAR interferometry for a satellite tandem pair. Because of orbital dynamics the baseline length and baseline orientation evolve spatially and temporally, the height accuracy of the system is modeled as a function of the spacecraft position and ground location. Vector sensitivity equations of height and the planar error components due to metrology, media effects, and radar system errors are derived and evaluated globally for a baseline mission. Included in the model are terrain effects that contribute to layover and shadow and slope effects on height errors. The analysis also accounts for nonoverlapping spectra and the non-overlapping bandwidth due to differences between the two platforms' viewing geometries. The model is applied to a 514 km altitude 97.4 degree inclination tandem satellite mission with a 300 m baseline separation and X-band SAR. Results from our model indicate that global DTED level 3 can be achieved.

  1. Nonlinear Effects in Single-Pass ICRF Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arefiev, A. V.; Breizman, B. N.

    1999-01-01

    The Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) concept employs Ion Cyclotron Resonant Frequency (ICRF) heating as the main power deposition mechanism. Since the ions accelerate to the full energy in a single pass through the cyclotron resonance, their response to the RF-field will be essentially nonlinear - hence the motivation to amend the commonly used linear approach to the problem. In a collisionless plasma, the energy gain of an accelerated ion is limited by the time the particle spends at the resonance. This time is affected by: (1) incident flow velocity, (2) longitudinal grad B force, (3) ambipolar electric field, and (4) ponderomotive force of the RF-field. Our analysis shows that the grad B force is the dominant factor at low to moderate levels of RF-power. We present nonlinear scaling for the energy gain and the absorption efficiency with RF-power and plasma parameters. We also demonstrate that the nonlinear regime exhibits a steep decrease in the plasma density at the resonance.

  2. Milestone experiments for single pass UV/X-ray FELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Zvi, Ilan

    1995-04-01

    In the past decade, significant advances have been made in the theory and technology of high brightness electron beams and single pass FELs. These developments facilitate the construction of practical UV and X-ray FELs and has prompted proposals to the DOE for the construction of such facilities. There are several important experiments to be performed before committing to the construction of dedicated user facilities. Two experiments are under construction in the IR, the UCLA self-amplified spontaneous emission experiment and the BNL laser seeded harmonic generation experiment. A multi-institution collaboration is being organized about a 210 MeV electron linac available at BNL and the 10 m long NISUS wiggler. This experiment will be done in the UV and will test various experimental aspects of electron beam dynamics, FEL exponential regime with gain guiding, start-up from noise, seeding and harmonic generation. These experiments will advance the state of FEL research and lead towards future dedicated users' facilities.

  3. Fine Resolution Topographic Mapping of the Jovian Moons: A Ka-Band High Resolution Topographic Mapping Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madsen, S. N.; Carsey, F. D.; Turtle, E. P.

    2003-01-01

    The topographic data set obtained by MOLA has provided an unprecedented level of information about Mars' geologic features. The proposed flight of JIMO provides an opportunity to accomplish a similar mapping of and comparable scientific discovery for the Jovian moons through use of an interferometric imaging radar analogous to the Shuttle radar that recently generated a new topographic map of Earth. A Ka-band single pass across-track synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometer can provide very high resolution surface elevation maps. The concept would use two antennas mounted at the ends of a deployable boom (similar to the Shuttle Radar Topographic Mapper) extended orthogonal to the direction of flight. Assuming an orbit altitude of approximately 100km and a ground velocity of approximately 1.5 km/sec, horizontal resolutions at the 10 meter level and vertical resolutions at the sub-meter level are possible.

  4. Fine resolution topographic mapping of the Jovian moons: a Ka-band high resolution topographic mapping interferometric synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madsen, Soren N.; Carsey, Frank D.; Turtle, Elizabeth P.

    2003-01-01

    The topographic data set obtained by MOLA has provided an unprecedented level of information about Mars' geologic features. The proposed flight of JIMO provides an opportunity to accomplish a similar mapping of and comparable scientific discovery for the Jovian moons through us of an interferometric imaging radar analogous to the Shuttle radar that recently generated a new topographic map of Earth. A Ka-band single pass across-track synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometer can provide very high resolution surface elevation maps. The concept would use two antennas mounted at the ends of a deployable boom (similar to the Shuttle Radar Topographic Mapper) extended orthogonal to the direction of flight. Assuming an orbit altitude of approximately 100 km and a ground velocity of approximately 1.5 km/sec, horizontal resolutions at the 10 meter level and vertical resolutions at the sub-meter level are possible.

  5. Evaluating single-pass catch as a tool for identifying spatial pattern in fish distribution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bateman, D.S.; Gresswell, R.E.; Torgersen, C.E.

    2005-01-01

    We evaluate the efficacy of single-pass electrofishing without blocknets as a tool for collecting spatially continuous fish distribution data in headwater streams. We compare spatial patterns in abundance, sampling effort, and length-frequency distributions from single-pass sampling of coastal cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki clarki) to data obtained from a more precise multiple-pass removal electrofishing method in two mid-sized (500–1000 ha) forested watersheds in western Oregon. Abundance estimates from single- and multiple-pass removal electrofishing were positively correlated in both watersheds, r = 0.99 and 0.86. There were no significant trends in capture probabilities at the watershed scale (P > 0.05). Moreover, among-sample variation in fish abundance was higher than within-sample error in both streams indicating that increased precision of unit-scale abundance estimates would provide less information on patterns of abundance than increasing the fraction of habitat units sampled. In the two watersheds, respectively, single-pass electrofishing captured 78 and 74% of the estimated population of cutthroat trout with 7 and 10% of the effort. At the scale of intermediate-sized watersheds, single-pass electrofishing exhibited a sufficient level of precision to be effective in detecting spatial patterns of cutthroat trout abundance and may be a useful tool for providing the context for investigating fish-habitat relationships at multiple scales.

  6. Determining the 630nm emission altitude using modelling and observations from a tristatic configuration of Fabry-Perot Interferometers and EISCAT radars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aruliah, Anasuya; Kosch, Michael

    Anasuya Aruliah, a.aruliah@ucl.ac.uk University College London, London, United Kingdom Michael Kosch, m.kosch@lancaster.ac.uk Lancaster University, Lancaster, United Kingdom Tristatic team Anasuya Aruliah,Ho-Ching Iris Yiu,Ian McWhirter, Michael Kosch,Kazuo Shiokawa,Shin-ichiro Oyama,Satonori Nozawa,Vikki Howells,Ian McCrea During early February 2010 a tristatic FPI-EISCAT experiment was run in order to investigate the peak emission altitude of the 630nm airglow and auroral emission in the region of the auroral oval. Two UCL Fabry-Perot Interferometers and a new STEL FPI have been located close to the three EISCAT radars at Tromsø, Kiruna and Sodankylü. The radars were pointed a at a common volume seen by all three FPIs, on assuming a peak emission height of 235km. This altitude is generally assumed to be fairly steady for FPI studies probing the behaviour of the upper atmosphere, though the height is a little different at other latitudes. The smoothing effect of the large viscosity of the upper thermosphere is invoked as a reason why the actual altitude is not too important, and there has been little investigation of the appropriateness of this assumption. However, mesoscale variability in the ionosphere has now been identified as producing a similar quantity of heating as does steady state convection; and FPIs and the CHAMP satellite have shown mesoscale structure in the high-latitude thermosphere. This indicates a need to revisit old assumptions that were based on the premise of thermospheric variability being large-scale. The STEL FPI at Ramfjord has a fully variable pointing direction mechanism and was programmed to point rapidly at successive volumes that would overlap the UCL KEOPS/Kiruna FPI look direction if the emission volume was 195km, 215km, 235km and 255km. Cross-correlation of the temperatures and intensity measurements would then identify the peak emission height. The EISCAT radar provided ionospheric parameters to model the 630nm emission profile

  7. KARIN: The Ka-Band Radar Interferometer for the Proposed Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esteban-Fernandez, Daniel; Peral, Eva; McWatters, Dalia; Pollard, Brian; Rodriguez, Ernesto; Hughes, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Over the last two decades, several nadir profiling radar altimeters have provided our first global look at the ocean basin-scale circulation and the ocean mesoscale at wavelengths longer than 100 km. Due to sampling limitations, nadir altimetry is unable to resolve the small wavelength ocean mesoscale and sub-mesoscale that are responsible for the vertical mixing of ocean heat and gases and the dissipation of kinetic energy from large to small scales. The proposed Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission would be a partnership between NASA, CNES (Centre National d'Etudes Spaciales) and the Canadian Space Agency, and would have as one of its main goals the measurement of ocean topography with kilometer-scale spatial resolution and centimeter scale accuracy. In this paper, we provide an overview of all ocean error sources that would contribute to the SWOT mission.

  8. Emittance Reduction between EBIS LINAC and Booster by Electron Beam Cooling; Is Single Pass Cooling Possible?

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch,A.

    2008-04-01

    Electron beam cooling is examined as an option to reduce momentum of gold ions exiting the EBIS LINAC before injection into the booster. Electron beam parameters are based on experimental data (obtained at BNL) of electron beams extracted from a plasma cathode. Preliminary calculations indicate that single pass cooling is feasible; momentum spread can be reduced by more than an order of magnitude in less than one meter.

  9. Performance evaluation of pyrochlore ceramic waste forms by single pass flow through testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, P.; Bourcier, W. L.; Esser, B. K.; Shaw, H. F.

    2000-07-01

    Titanate-based ceramic waste forms for the disposal of nuclear wastes have been the subjects of numerous studies over the past decades. In order to assess the performance of this ceramic in a potential Yucca Mountain high-level waste (HLW) repository, it is necessary to understand the kinetics and mechanisms of corrosion of the ceramic under repository conditions. To this end, we are conducting single pass flow-through (SPFT) dissolution tests on ceramics relevant to Pu disposition.

  10. Relationship between in vitro transendothelial permeability and in vivo single-pass brain extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Pirro, J.P.; Di Rocco, R.J.; Narra, R.K.

    1994-09-01

    In vitro transendothelial permeability was compared to in vivo rat single-pass cerebral extractions to evaluate which method would best estimate the blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability of several SPECT imaging agents. Six {sup 99m}Tc complexes and seven non-Tc complexes were tested in vitro using monolayers of primary bovine brain microvessel endothelial cells and in vivo using the rat single-pass cerebral extraction model. In vitro transendothelial permeability indices (PI) were determined by measuring the average percent of radioactivity traversing the monolayers as a function of time. In vivo single-pass cerebral extractions were determined using an indicator fractionation method. A positive correlation between extraction and PI was found for the non-TC complexes (r{sup 2} = 0.96). The CBF imaging agents {sup 99m}Tc-ECD and {sup 99m}Tc-PnAO have high values for E and PI, demonstrating that these agents penetrate the BBB and have a high membrane permeability, while the heart imaging agent {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi had low values for both E and PI. The low PI and E values for {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi are consistent with a low brain uptake for this agent, except in cases of disruption of the BBB. In contrast to {sup 99m}Tc-ECD, {sup 99m}Tc-PnAO and {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi, which had concordant values for E and PI, two highly lipophilic boronic acid adducts of technetium dioxime (BATOs), {sup 99m}Tc-teboroxime and {sup 99m}Tc-ECD, {sup 99m}Tc-Cl(DMG){sub 3}2MP, had low negative values for PI, but high values for E. In addition, after 3 hr of incubation, the monolayer-to-medium concentration ratio of the BATOs was 642:1 and 744:1, respectively. This compares with values of 89:1 ({sup 99m}Tc-PnAO), 25:1 ({sup 99m}Tc-ECD) and 34:1 ({sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi). These data suggest that the high in vivo single-pass extraction of the BATOs may be explained by a hydrophobic interaction with the luminal surface of the capillary endothelial cell plasma membrane.

  11. Assessing the efficacy of single-pass backpack electrofishing to characterize fish community structure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meador, M.R.; McIntyre, J.P.; Pollock, K.H.

    2003-01-01

    Two-pass backpack electrofishing data collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program were analyzed to assess the efficacy of single-pass backpack electrofishing. A two-capture removal model was used to estimate, within 10 river basins across the United States, proportional fish species richness from one-pass electrofishing and probabilities of detection for individual fish species. Mean estimated species richness from first-pass sampling (p??s1) ranged from 80.7% to 100% of estimated total species richness for each river basin, based on at least seven samples per basin. However, p??s1 values for individual sites ranged from 40% to 100% of estimated total species richness. Additional species unique to the second pass were collected in 50.3% of the samples. Of these, cyprinids and centrarchids were collected most frequently. Proportional fish species richness estimated for the first pass increased significantly with decreasing stream width for 1 of the 10 river basins. When used to calculate probabilities of detection of individual fish species, the removal model failed 48% of the time because the number of individuals of a species was greater in the second pass than in the first pass. Single-pass backpack electrofishing data alone may make it difficult to determine whether characterized fish community structure data are real or spurious. The two-pass removal model can be used to assess the effectiveness of sampling species richness with a single electrofishing pass. However, the two-pass removal model may have limited utility to determine probabilities of detection of individual species and, thus, limit the ability to assess the effectiveness of single-pass sampling to characterize species relative abundances. Multiple-pass (at least three passes) backpack electrofishing at a large number of sites may not be cost-effective as part of a standardized sampling protocol for large-geographic-scale studies. However, multiple

  12. A Study of Single-Pass Ion Effects at the ALS.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrd, J. M.; Thomson, J.; Chao, A. W.; Heifets, S.; Minty, M. G.; Seeman, J. T.; Stupakov, G. V.; Zimmermann, F.; Raubenheimer, T. O.

    1997-05-01

    We report studies of single-pass ion effects performed at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). To enhance the ion effects, the ALS vacuum pressure was intentionally increased to about 50 nTorr by a remotely controlled inflow of helium gas. At this pressure we observe, on a synchrotron light monitor, a blowup of the vertical beam size for as few as 10 consecutive bunches (97% empty ring). No blow-up is observed when a single bunch is stored in the ring. For gaps in the fill pattern of 25 and 50%, where conventional ion trapping is not expected, we observe an approximate doubling of the vertical emittance. Nonuniform beam loss for vertical beam scraping indicates that the tail of the bunch train is driven by the instabilty more than the head. Therefore, the blow-up appears to be caused by a single-pass ion effect. In some but not all studies we also observed coherent vertical betatron oscillations, as evidenced by a pattern of lower betatron sidebands, whose envelope peaked around the estimated ion frequency. Both the beam-size blow-up and the betatron sidebands are consistent with theoretical predictions for the `fast beam-ion instability'.

  13. AN EXPERIMENTAL TEST OF SUPERRADIANCE IN A SINGLE PASS SEEDED FEL.

    SciTech Connect

    WATANABE, T.; LIU, D.; MURPHY, J.B.; ROSE, J.; SHAFTAN, T.; TSANG, T.; WANG, X.J.; YU, L.H.

    2005-08-21

    Superradiance and nonlinear evolution of a FEL pulse in a single-pass FEL were experimentally demonstrated at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) Source Development Laboratory (SDL). The experiment was performed using a 1.5 ps high-brightness electron beam and a 100fs Ti:Sapphire seed laser. The seed laser and electron beam interact in the 10 meter long NISUS undulator with a period of 3.89 cm. The FEL spectrum, energy and pulse length along the undulator were measured. FEL saturation was observed, and gain of more the 200 (relative to seed laser) was measured. Both FEL spectrum widening and pulse length shortening were observed; FEL pulses as short as 65 fs FWHM were measured. The superradiance and nonlinear evolution were also simulated using the numerical code GENESIS1.3 yielding good agreement with the experimental results.

  14. Single pass electron beam cooling of gold ions between EBIS LINAC and booster is theoretically possible!

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch, A.

    2011-01-01

    Electron beam cooling is examined as an option to reduce momentum of gold ions exiting the EBIS LINAC before injection into the booster. Electron beam parameters are based on experimental data (obtained at BNL) of electron beams extracted from a plasma cathode. Many issues, regarding a low energy high current electron beam that is needed for electron beam cooling to reduce momentum of gold ions exiting the EBIS LINAC before injection into the booster, were examined. Computations and some experimental data indicate that none of these issues is a show stopper. Preliminary calculations indicate that single pass cooling is feasible; momentum spread can be reduced by more than an order of magnitude in about one meter. Hence, this option cooling deserves further more serious considerations.

  15. Beam-Beam Simulations for a Single Pass SuperB-Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Biagini, M.E.; Raimondi, P.; Seeman, J.; Schulte, D.; /CERN

    2007-05-18

    A study of beam-beam collisions for an asymmetric single pass SuperB-Factory is presented [1]. In this scheme an e{sup -} and an e{sup +} beam are first stored and damped in two Damping Rings (DR), then extracted, compressed and focused to the IP. After collision the two beams are re-injected in the DR to be damped and extracted for collision again. The explored beam parameters are similar to those used in the design of the International Linear Collider, except for the beam energies. Flat beams and round beams were compared in the simulations in order to optimize both luminosity performances and beam blowup after collision. With such approach a luminosity of the order of 10{sup 36} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} can be achieved.

  16. High-Accuracy Elevation Data at Large Scales from Airborne Single-Pass SAR Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, Guy; Moller, Delwyn; Mentgen, Felix

    2015-12-01

    Digital elevation models (DEMs) are essential data sets for disaster risk management and humanitarian relief services as well as many environmental process models. At present, on the hand, globally available DEMs only meet the basic requirements and for many services and modeling studies are not of high enough spatial resolution and lack accuracy in the vertical. On the other hand, LiDAR-DEMs are of very high spatial resolution and great vertical accuracy but acquisition operations can be very costly for spatial scales larger than a couple of hundred square km and also have severe limitations in wetland areas and under cloudy and rainy conditions. The ideal situation would thus be to have a DEM technology that allows larger spatial coverage than LiDAR but without compromising resolution and vertical accuracy and still performing under some adverse weather conditions and at a reasonable cost. In this paper, we present a novel single pass In-SAR technology for airborne vehicles that is cost-effective and can generate DEMs with a vertical error of around 0.3 m for an average spatial resolution of 3 m. To demonstrate this capability, we compare a sample single-pass In-SAR Ka-band DEM of the California Central Valley from the NASA/JPL airborne GLISTIN-A to a high-resolution LiDAR DEM. We also perform a simple sensitivity analysis to floodplain inundation. Based on the findings of our analysis, we argue that this type of technology can and should be used to replace large regions of globally available lower resolution DEMs, particularly in coastal, delta and floodplain areas where a high number of assets, habitats and lives are at risk from natural disasters. We conclude with a discussion on requirements, advantages and caveats in terms of instrument and data processing.

  17. Single-pass GPU-raycasting for structured adaptive mesh refinement data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaehler, Ralf; Abel, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement (SAMR) is a popular numerical technique to study processes with high spatial and temporal dynamic range. It reduces computational requirements by adapting the lattice on which the underlying differential equations are solved to most efficiently represent the solution. Particularly in astrophysics and cosmology such simulations now can capture spatial scales ten orders of magnitude apart and more. The irregular locations and extensions of the refined regions in the SAMR scheme and the fact that different resolution levels partially overlap, poses a challenge for GPU-based direct volume rendering methods. kD-trees have proven to be advantageous to subdivide the data domain into non-overlapping blocks of equally sized cells, optimal for the texture units of current graphics hardware, but previous GPU-supported raycasting approaches for SAMR data using this data structure required a separate rendering pass for each node, preventing the application of many advanced lighting schemes that require simultaneous access to more than one block of cells. In this paper we present the first single-pass GPU-raycasting algorithm for SAMR data that is based on a kD-tree. The tree is efficiently encoded by a set of 3D-textures, which allows to adaptively sample complete rays entirely on the GPU without any CPU interaction. We discuss two different data storage strategies to access the grid data on the GPU and apply them to several datasets to prove the benefits of the proposed method.

  18. Non-destructive single-pass low-noise detection of ions in a beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Stefan; Murböck, Tobias; Birkl, Gerhard; Andelkovic, Zoran; Vogel, Manuel; Nörtershäuser, Wilfried; Stahl, Stefan

    2015-11-15

    We have conceived, built, and operated a device for the non-destructive single-pass detection of charged particles in a beamline. The detector is based on the non-resonant pick-up and subsequent low-noise amplification of the image charges induced in a cylindrical electrode surrounding the particles’ beam path. The first stage of the amplification electronics is designed to be operated from room temperature down to liquid helium temperature. The device represents a non-destructive charge counter as well as a sensitive timing circuit. We present the concept and design details of the device. We have characterized its performance and show measurements with low-energy highly charged ions (such as Ar{sup 13+}) passing through one of the electrodes of a cylindrical Penning trap. This work demonstrates a novel approach of non-destructive, low noise detection of charged particles which is, depending on the bunch structure, suitable, e.g., for ion traps, low-energy beamlines or accelerator transfer sections.

  19. Non-destructive single-pass low-noise detection of ions in a beamline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Stefan; Murböck, Tobias; Andelkovic, Zoran; Birkl, Gerhard; Nörtershäuser, Wilfried; Stahl, Stefan; Vogel, Manuel

    2015-11-01

    We have conceived, built, and operated a device for the non-destructive single-pass detection of charged particles in a beamline. The detector is based on the non-resonant pick-up and subsequent low-noise amplification of the image charges induced in a cylindrical electrode surrounding the particles' beam path. The first stage of the amplification electronics is designed to be operated from room temperature down to liquid helium temperature. The device represents a non-destructive charge counter as well as a sensitive timing circuit. We present the concept and design details of the device. We have characterized its performance and show measurements with low-energy highly charged ions (such as Ar13+) passing through one of the electrodes of a cylindrical Penning trap. This work demonstrates a novel approach of non-destructive, low noise detection of charged particles which is, depending on the bunch structure, suitable, e.g., for ion traps, low-energy beamlines or accelerator transfer sections.

  20. Non-destructive single-pass low-noise detection of ions in a beamline.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Stefan; Murböck, Tobias; Andelkovic, Zoran; Birkl, Gerhard; Nörtershäuser, Wilfried; Stahl, Stefan; Vogel, Manuel

    2015-11-01

    We have conceived, built, and operated a device for the non-destructive single-pass detection of charged particles in a beamline. The detector is based on the non-resonant pick-up and subsequent low-noise amplification of the image charges induced in a cylindrical electrode surrounding the particles' beam path. The first stage of the amplification electronics is designed to be operated from room temperature down to liquid helium temperature. The device represents a non-destructive charge counter as well as a sensitive timing circuit. We present the concept and design details of the device. We have characterized its performance and show measurements with low-energy highly charged ions (such as Ar(13+)) passing through one of the electrodes of a cylindrical Penning trap. This work demonstrates a novel approach of non-destructive, low noise detection of charged particles which is, depending on the bunch structure, suitable, e.g., for ion traps, low-energy beamlines or accelerator transfer sections. PMID:26628124

  1. Augmented Binary Substitution: Single-pass CDR germ-lining and stabilization of therapeutic antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Sue; Fennell, Brian J.; Apgar, James R.; Lambert, Matthew; McDonnell, Barry; Grant, Joanne; Wade, Jason; Franklin, Edward; Foy, Niall; Ní Shúilleabháin, Deirdre; Fields, Conor; Darmanin-Sheehan, Alfredo; King, Amy; Paulsen, Janet E.; Tchistiakova, Lioudmila; Cunningham, Orla; Finlay, William J. J.

    2015-01-01

    Although humanized antibodies have been highly successful in the clinic, all current humanization techniques have potential limitations, such as: reliance on rodent hosts, immunogenicity due to high non-germ-line amino acid content, v-domain destabilization, expression and formulation issues. This study presents a technology that generates stable, soluble, ultrahumanized antibodies via single-step complementarity-determining region (CDR) germ-lining. For three antibodies from three separate key immune host species, binary substitution CDR cassettes were inserted into preferred human frameworks to form libraries in which only the parental or human germ-line destination residue was encoded at each position. The CDR-H3 in each case was also augmented with 1 ± 1 random substitution per clone. Each library was then screened for clones with restored antigen binding capacity. Lead ultrahumanized clones demonstrated high stability, with affinity and specificity equivalent to, or better than, the parental IgG. Critically, this was mainly achieved on germ-line frameworks by simultaneously subtracting up to 19 redundant non-germ-line residues in the CDRs. This process significantly lowered non-germ-line sequence content, minimized immunogenicity risk in the final molecules and provided a heat map for the essential non-germ-line CDR residue content of each antibody. The ABS technology therefore fully optimizes the clinical potential of antibodies from rodents and alternative immune hosts, rendering them indistinguishable from fully human in a simple, single-pass process. PMID:26621728

  2. Parametric analysis of plastic strain and force distribution in single pass metal spinning

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhary, Shashank E-mail: mohantejesh93@gmail.com E-mail: ksuresh@hyderabad.bits-pilani.ac.in; Tejesh, Chiruvolu Mohan E-mail: mohantejesh93@gmail.com E-mail: ksuresh@hyderabad.bits-pilani.ac.in; Regalla, Srinivasa Prakash E-mail: mohantejesh93@gmail.com E-mail: ksuresh@hyderabad.bits-pilani.ac.in; Suresh, Kurra E-mail: mohantejesh93@gmail.com E-mail: ksuresh@hyderabad.bits-pilani.ac.in

    2013-12-16

    Metal spinning also known as spin forming is one of the sheet metal working processes by which an axis-symmetric part can be formed from a flat sheet metal blank. Parts are produced by pressing a blunt edged tool or roller on to the blank which in turn is mounted on a rotating mandrel. This paper discusses about the setting up a 3-D finite element simulation of single pass metal spinning in LS-Dyna. Four parameters were considered namely blank thickness, roller nose radius, feed ratio and mandrel speed and the variation in forces and plastic strain were analysed using the full-factorial design of experiments (DOE) method of simulation experiments. For some of these DOE runs, physical experiments on extra deep drawing (EDD) sheet metal were carried out using En31 tool on a lathe machine. Simulation results are able to predict the zone of unsafe thinning in the sheet and high forming forces that are hint to the necessity for less-expensive and semi-automated machine tools to help the household and small scale spinning workers widely prevalent in India.

  3. High-efficiency, multicrystal, single-pass, continuous-wave second harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S Chaitanya; Samanta, G K; Devi, Kavita; Ebrahim-Zadeh, M

    2011-06-01

    We describe the critical design parameters and present detailed experimental and theoretical studies for efficient, continuous-wave (cw), single-pass second harmonic generation (SHG) based on novel cascaded multicrystal scheme, providing >55% conversion efficiency and multiwatt output powers at 532 nm for a wide range of input fundamental powers at 1064 nm. Systematic characterization of the technique in single-crystal, double-crystal and multicrystal schemes has been performed and the results are compared. Optimization of vital parameters including focusing and phase-matching temperature at the output of each stage is investigated and strategies to achieve optimum SHG efficiency and power are discussed. Relevant theoretical calculations to estimate the effect of dispersion between the fundamental and the SH beam in air are also presented. The contributions of thermal effects on SHG efficiency roll-off have been studied from quasi-cw measurements. Using this multicrystal scheme, stable SH power with a peak-to-peak fluctuation better than 6.5% over more than 2 hours is achieved in high spatial beam quality with M2<1.6.

  4. Texture Evolution of Single-Pass Hot-Rolled 5052/AZ31/5052 Clad Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Huihui; Liang, Wei; Yang, Fuqian; Zheng, Liuwei; Li, Xianrong; Fan, Haiwei

    2016-08-01

    Three-layered 5052/AZ31/5052 clad sheets with maximum rolling reductions of 33% and 48% were prepared, using single-pass hot rolling followed by thermal annealing at 200°C for 1 h. The evolutions of microstructures and textures were analyzed. The experimental results show that the AZ31 layer exhibited a typical deformation microstructure with rolling-induced twins. The AZ31 layer with the 33% rolling reduction possessed a texture with the basal pole tilting about 35° away from normal direction to transverse direction and the majority of twins consists of {10 bar{1} 1}-{10 bar{1} 2} double twins and {10 bar{1} 2} tensile twins. The AZ31 layer with the 48% rolling reduction possessed a typical basal texture because {10 bar{1} 1} compression twins were activated by c-axis strain to compete with the tensile twins. No intermetallics were observed after annealing, and recrystallization occurred preferentially at the interface between AZ31 and 5052. The typical rolling texture of the 5052 layer disappeared, and the stable {001} <110> rotation cube component was dominant. The tensile test of the rolled three-layered 5052/AZ31/5052 clad sheets was performed. The tensile experimental results show that the annealed clad sheets with 33% rolling reduction and smaller degree of recrystallization have the largest elongation of 22.5% and larger ultimate tensile strength (UTS) than the annealed clad sheets with 48% rolling reduction.

  5. Aerosol Nanoencapsulation: Single-Pass Floating Self-Assembly of Biofunctional Hybrid Nanoplatforms.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Jeong Hoon

    2016-07-20

    Multifunctional nanoplatforms were prepared via floating self-assembly using a hard nanoparticle (NP) as the core and a modified-polymer (MP, cholesterol-chitosan linked with polyethylenimine) droplet as the shell in a single-pass aerosol nanoencapsulation process. The floating hard NPs (silica, calcium carbonate, gold-decorated graphene oxide, and thiol-capped gold) were directly injected into MP droplets at the opening of a spraying device. Subsequently, the solvent was thermally extracted from the droplets, resulting in the formation of biofunctional nanoplatforms. Measured in vitro, the genes complexed with the nanoplatforms were transfected into target cells, exhibiting higher efficiencies for the MP particles alone without a significant increase in in vitro cell cytotoxicity. The aerosol encapsulation could be further extended to prepare other combinations [gold-silica and gold-calcium carbonate including doxorubicin (Dox)] using the MP, and their hybrid natures demonstrated photothermal cancer cell killing and chemo-thermal Dox release capabilities through surface plasmon resonance heating. PMID:27383730

  6. Double-Sided Single-Pass Submerged Arc Welding for 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jian; Yuan, Yi; Wang, Xiaoming; Yao, Zongxiang

    2013-09-01

    The duplex stainless steel (DSS), which combines the characteristics of ferritic steel and austenitic steel, is used widely. The submerged arc welding (SAW) method is usually applied to join thick plates of DSS. However, an effective welding procedure is needed in order to obtain ideal DSS welds with an appropriate proportion of ferrite (δ) and austenite (γ) in the weld zone, particularly in the melted zone and heat-affected zone. This study evaluated the effectiveness of a high efficiency double-sided single-pass (DSSP) SAW joining method for thick DSS plates. The effectiveness of the converse welding procedure, characterizations of weld zone, and mechanical properties of welded joint are analyzed. The results show an increasing appearance and continuous distribution feature of the σ phase in the fusion zone of the leading welded seam. The converse welding procedure promotes the σ phase to precipitate in the fusion zone of leading welded side. The microhardness appears to significantly increase in the center of leading welded side. Ductile fracture mode is observed in the weld zone. A mixture fracture feature appears with a shear lip and tears in the fusion zone near the fusion line. The ductility, plasticity, and microhardness of the joints have a significant relationship with σ phase and heat treatment effect influenced by the converse welding step. An available heat input controlling technology of the DSSP formation method is discussed for SAW of thick DSS plates.

  7. An interpretation and guide to single-pass beam shaping methods using SLMs and DMDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stilgoe, Alexander B.; Kashchuk, Anatolii V.; Preece, Daryl; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina

    2016-06-01

    Exquisite manipulations of light can be performed with devices such as spatial light modulators (SLMs) and digital micromirror devices (DMDs). These devices can be used to simulate transverse paraxial beam wavefunction eigenstates such as the Hermite-Laguerre-Gaussian mode families. We investigate several beam shaping methods in terms of the wavefunctions of scattered light. Our analysis of the efficiency, behaviour and limitations of beam shaping methods is applied to both theory and experiment. The deviation from the ideal output from a valid beam shaping method is shown to be due to experimental factors which are not necessarily being accounted for. Incident beam mode shape, aberration, and the amplitude/phase transfer functions of the DMD and SLM impact the distribution of scattered light and hence the effectiveness and efficiency of a beam shaping method. Correcting for these particular details of the optical system accounts for all differences in efficiency and mode fidelity between experiment and theory. We explicitly show the impact of experimental parameter variations so that these problems may be diagnosed and corrected in an experimental beam shaping apparatus. We show that several beam shaping methods can be used for the production of beam modes in a single pass and the choice is based on the particular experimental conditions.

  8. An interpretation and guide to single-pass beam shaping methods using SLMs and DMDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stilgoe, Alexander B.; Kashchuk, Anatolii V.; Preece, Daryl; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina

    2016-06-01

    Exquisite manipulations of light can be performed with devices such as spatial light modulators (SLMs) and digital micromirror devices (DMDs). These devices can be used to simulate transverse paraxial beam wavefunction eigenstates such as the Hermite–Laguerre–Gaussian mode families. We investigate several beam shaping methods in terms of the wavefunctions of scattered light. Our analysis of the efficiency, behaviour and limitations of beam shaping methods is applied to both theory and experiment. The deviation from the ideal output from a valid beam shaping method is shown to be due to experimental factors which are not necessarily being accounted for. Incident beam mode shape, aberration, and the amplitude/phase transfer functions of the DMD and SLM impact the distribution of scattered light and hence the effectiveness and efficiency of a beam shaping method. Correcting for these particular details of the optical system accounts for all differences in efficiency and mode fidelity between experiment and theory. We explicitly show the impact of experimental parameter variations so that these problems may be diagnosed and corrected in an experimental beam shaping apparatus. We show that several beam shaping methods can be used for the production of beam modes in a single pass and the choice is based on the particular experimental conditions.

  9. Keck Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    At the summit of Mauna Kea, Hawaii, NASA astronomers have linked the two 10-meter (33-foot) telescopes at the W. M. Keck Observatory. The linked telescopes, which together are called the Keck Interferometer, make up the world's most powerful optical telescope system. The Keck Interferometer will search for planets around nearby stars and study dust clouds around those stars that may hamper future space-based searches for habitable, Earthlike planets. The Keck Interferometer is part of NASA's Origins program, which seeks to answer two fundamental questions: How did we get here? Are we alone?

  10. Multifunctional metal-polymer nanoagglomerates from single-pass aerosol self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byeon, Jeong Hoon

    2016-08-01

    In this study, gold (Au)-iron (Fe) nanoagglomerates were capped by a polymer mixture (PM) consisting of poly(lactide-co-glycolic acid), protamine sulfate, and poly-l-lysine via floating self-assembly in a single-pass aerosol configuration as multibiofunctional nanoplatforms. The Au-Fe nanoagglomerates were directly injected into PM droplets (PM dissolved in dichloromethane) in a collison atomizer and subsequently heat-treated to liberate the solvent from the droplets, resulting in the formation of PM-capped Au-Fe nanoagglomerates. Measured in vitro, the cytotoxicities of the nanoagglomerates (>98.5% cell viability) showed no significant differences compared with PM particles alone (>98.8%), thus implying that the nanoagglomerates are suitable for further testing of biofunctionalities. Measurements of gene delivery performance revealed that the incorporation of the Au-Fe nanoagglomerates enhanced the gene delivery performance (3.2 × 106 RLU mg‑1) of the PM particles alone (2.1 × 106 RLU mg‑1), which may have been caused by the PM structural change from a spherical to a hairy structure (i.e., the change followed the agglomerated backbone). Combining the X-ray-absorbing ability of Au and the magnetic property of Fe led to magnetic resonance (MR)-computed tomography (CT) contrast ability in a phantom; and the signal intensities [which reached 64 s‑1 T2-relaxation in MR and 194 Hounsfield units (HUs) in CT at 6.0 mg mL‑1] depended on particle concentration (0.5–6.0 mg mL‑1).

  11. Multifunctional metal-polymer nanoagglomerates from single-pass aerosol self-assembly

    PubMed Central

    Byeon, Jeong Hoon

    2016-01-01

    In this study, gold (Au)-iron (Fe) nanoagglomerates were capped by a polymer mixture (PM) consisting of poly(lactide-co-glycolic acid), protamine sulfate, and poly-l-lysine via floating self-assembly in a single-pass aerosol configuration as multibiofunctional nanoplatforms. The Au-Fe nanoagglomerates were directly injected into PM droplets (PM dissolved in dichloromethane) in a collison atomizer and subsequently heat-treated to liberate the solvent from the droplets, resulting in the formation of PM-capped Au-Fe nanoagglomerates. Measured in vitro, the cytotoxicities of the nanoagglomerates (>98.5% cell viability) showed no significant differences compared with PM particles alone (>98.8%), thus implying that the nanoagglomerates are suitable for further testing of biofunctionalities. Measurements of gene delivery performance revealed that the incorporation of the Au-Fe nanoagglomerates enhanced the gene delivery performance (3.2 × 106 RLU mg−1) of the PM particles alone (2.1 × 106 RLU mg−1), which may have been caused by the PM structural change from a spherical to a hairy structure (i.e., the change followed the agglomerated backbone). Combining the X-ray-absorbing ability of Au and the magnetic property of Fe led to magnetic resonance (MR)-computed tomography (CT) contrast ability in a phantom; and the signal intensities [which reached 64 s−1 T2-relaxation in MR and 194 Hounsfield units (HUs) in CT at 6.0 mg mL−1] depended on particle concentration (0.5–6.0 mg mL−1). PMID:27507668

  12. Modeling and optimization of single-pass laser amplifiers for high-repetition-rate laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Ozawa, Akira; Udem, Thomas; Zeitner, Uwe D.; Haensch, Theodor W.; Hommelhoff, Peter

    2010-09-15

    We propose a model for a continuously pumped single-pass amplifier for continuous and pulsed laser beams. The model takes into account Gaussian shape and focusing geometry of pump and seed beam. As the full-wave simulation is complex we have developed a largely simplified numerical method that can be applied to rotationally symmetric geometries. With the tapered-shell model we treat (focused) propagation and amplification of an initially Gaussian beam in a gain crystal. The implementation can be done with a few lines of code that are given in this paper. With this code, a numerical parameter optimization is straightforward and example results are shown. We compare the results of our simple model with those of a full-wave simulation and show that they agree well. A comparison of model and experimental data also shows good agreement. We investigate in detail different regimes of amplification, namely the unsaturated, the fully saturated, and the intermediate regime. Because the amplification process is affected by spatially varying saturation and exhibits a nonlinear response against pump and seed power, no analytical expression for the expected output is available. For modeling of the amplification we employ a four-level system and show that if the fluorescence lifetime of the gain medium is larger than the inverse repetition rate of the seed beam, continuous-wave amplification can be employed to describe the amplification process of ultrashort pulse trains. We limit ourselves to this regime, which implies that if titanium:sapphire is chosen as gain medium the laser repetition rate has to be larger than a few megahertz. We show detailed simulation results for titanium:sapphire for a large parameter set.

  13. Multifunctional metal-polymer nanoagglomerates from single-pass aerosol self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byeon, Jeong Hoon

    2016-08-01

    In this study, gold (Au)-iron (Fe) nanoagglomerates were capped by a polymer mixture (PM) consisting of poly(lactide-co-glycolic acid), protamine sulfate, and poly-l-lysine via floating self-assembly in a single-pass aerosol configuration as multibiofunctional nanoplatforms. The Au-Fe nanoagglomerates were directly injected into PM droplets (PM dissolved in dichloromethane) in a collison atomizer and subsequently heat-treated to liberate the solvent from the droplets, resulting in the formation of PM-capped Au-Fe nanoagglomerates. Measured in vitro, the cytotoxicities of the nanoagglomerates (>98.5% cell viability) showed no significant differences compared with PM particles alone (>98.8%), thus implying that the nanoagglomerates are suitable for further testing of biofunctionalities. Measurements of gene delivery performance revealed that the incorporation of the Au-Fe nanoagglomerates enhanced the gene delivery performance (3.2 × 106 RLU mg-1) of the PM particles alone (2.1 × 106 RLU mg-1), which may have been caused by the PM structural change from a spherical to a hairy structure (i.e., the change followed the agglomerated backbone). Combining the X-ray-absorbing ability of Au and the magnetic property of Fe led to magnetic resonance (MR)-computed tomography (CT) contrast ability in a phantom; and the signal intensities [which reached 64 s-1 T2-relaxation in MR and 194 Hounsfield units (HUs) in CT at 6.0 mg mL-1] depended on particle concentration (0.5-6.0 mg mL-1).

  14. Multifunctional metal-polymer nanoagglomerates from single-pass aerosol self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Jeong Hoon

    2016-01-01

    In this study, gold (Au)-iron (Fe) nanoagglomerates were capped by a polymer mixture (PM) consisting of poly(lactide-co-glycolic acid), protamine sulfate, and poly-l-lysine via floating self-assembly in a single-pass aerosol configuration as multibiofunctional nanoplatforms. The Au-Fe nanoagglomerates were directly injected into PM droplets (PM dissolved in dichloromethane) in a collison atomizer and subsequently heat-treated to liberate the solvent from the droplets, resulting in the formation of PM-capped Au-Fe nanoagglomerates. Measured in vitro, the cytotoxicities of the nanoagglomerates (>98.5% cell viability) showed no significant differences compared with PM particles alone (>98.8%), thus implying that the nanoagglomerates are suitable for further testing of biofunctionalities. Measurements of gene delivery performance revealed that the incorporation of the Au-Fe nanoagglomerates enhanced the gene delivery performance (3.2 × 10(6) RLU mg(-1)) of the PM particles alone (2.1 × 10(6) RLU mg(-1)), which may have been caused by the PM structural change from a spherical to a hairy structure (i.e., the change followed the agglomerated backbone). Combining the X-ray-absorbing ability of Au and the magnetic property of Fe led to magnetic resonance (MR)-computed tomography (CT) contrast ability in a phantom; and the signal intensities [which reached 64 s(-1) T2-relaxation in MR and 194 Hounsfield units (HUs) in CT at 6.0 mg mL(-1)] depended on particle concentration (0.5-6.0 mg mL(-1)). PMID:27507668

  15. Part II/Addendum Electron Beam Cooling between EBIS LINAC and Booster; Is Single Pass Cooling Possible?

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch,A.

    2008-07-01

    Due to some miscommunication, incomplete data was erroneously used in examining electron beam cooling for reducing momentum of gold ions exiting the EBIS LINAC before injection into the booster. Corrected calculations still indicate that single pass cooling is, in principle, feasible; momentum spread can be reduced by an order of magnitude in about one meter. Preliminary results suggest that this cooling deserves further consideration.

  16. The MST Radar Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roettger, J.

    1984-01-01

    The coherent radar technique is reviewed with special emphasis to mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere (MST) radars operating in the VHF band. Some basic introduction to Doppler radar measurements and the radar equation is followed by an outline of the characteristics of atmospheric turbulence, viewed from the scattering and reflection processes of radar signals. Radar signal acquisition and preprocessing, namely coherent detection, digital sampling, pre-integration and coding, is briefly discussed. The data analysis is represented in terms of the correlation and spectrum analysis, yielding the essential parameters: power, signal-to-noise ratio, average and fluctuating velocity and persistency. The techniques to measure wind velocities, viz. the different modes of the Doppler method as well as the space antenna method are surveyed and the feasibilities of the MST radar interferometer technique are elucidated. A general view on the criteria to design phased array antennas is given. An outline of the hardware of a typical MST radar system is presented.

  17. Intestinal permeability of metformin using single-pass intestinal perfusion in rats

    PubMed Central

    Song, Nai-Ning; Li, Quan-Sheng; Liu, Chang-Xiao

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To characterize the intestinal transport and mechanism of metformin in rats and to investigate whether or not metformin is a substrate for P-glycoprotein (P-gp). METHODS: The effective intestinal permeability of metformin was investigated using single-pass intestinal perfusion (SPIP) technique in male Waster rats. SPIP was performed in three isolated intestinal segments (duodenum, jejunum and ileum) at the same concentration of metformin (50 μg/mL) to test if the intestinal transport of metformin exhibited site-dependent changes, and in a same isolated intestinal segment (duodenal segment) at three different concentrations of metformin (10, 50, 200 μg/mL) to test if the intestinal transport of metformin exhibited concentration-dependent changes. Besides, P-gp inhibitor verapamil (400 μg/mL) was co-perfused with metformin (50 μg/mL) in the duodenum segment to find out if the intestinal absorption of metformin was affected by P-gp exiting along the gastrointestinal track. Stability studies were conducted to ensure that the loss of metformin could be attributed to intestinal absorption. RESULTS: The effective permeability values (Peff) of metformin in the jejunum and ileum at 50 μg/mL were significantly lower than those in the duodenum at the same concentration. Besides, Peff values in the duodenum at high concentration (200 μg/mL) were found to be significantly lower than those at low and medium concentrations (10 and 50 μg/mL). Moreover the co-perfusion with verapamil did not increase the Peff value of metformin at 50 μg/mL in the duodenum. CONCLUSION: Metformin could be absorbed from the whole intestine, with the main absorption site at duodenum. This concentration-dependent permeability behavior in the duodenum indicates that metformin is transported by both passive and active carrier-mediated saturable mechanism. The Peff value can not be increased by co-perfusion with verapamil, indicating that absorption of metformin is not efficiently transported

  18. Single pass, THz spectral range free-electron laser driven by a photocathode hybrid rf linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lurie, Yu.; Friedman, A.; Pinhasi, Y.

    2015-07-01

    A single pass, THz spectral range free-electron laser (FEL) driven by a photocathode hybrid rf-LINAC is considered, taking the Israeli THz FEL project developed in Ariel University as an example. Two possible configurations of such FEL are discussed: an enhanced coherent spontaneous emission FEL, and a prebunched FEL utilizing periodically modulated short electron beam pulses. A general study of the FEL configurations is carried out in the framework of a space-frequency approach, realized in WB3D numerical code. The configurations are studied and compared based on preliminary parameters of a drive hybrid rf-LINAC gun under development in University of California, Los Angeles.

  19. Generation of coherent soft x-rays using a single-pass free-electron laser amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.F.; Goldstein, J.C.; Newnam, B.E.; McVey, B.D.

    1988-01-01

    We consider a single-pass free-electron laser (FEL) amplifier, driven by an rf-linac followed by a damping ring for reduced emittance, for use in generating coherent light in the soft x-ray region. The dependence of the optical gain on electron-beam quality, studied with the three-dimensional FEL simulation code FELEX, is given and related to the expected power of self-amplified spontaneous emission. We discuss issues for the damping ring designed to achieve the required electron beam quality. The idea of a multipass regenerative amplifier is also presented.

  20. Michelson Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Ryan

    2007-01-01

    The Michelson Interferometer is a device used in many applications, but here it was used to measure small differences in distance, in the milli-inch range, specifically for defects in the Orbiter windows. In this paper, the method of using the Michelson Interferometer for measuring small distances is explained as well as the mathematics of the system. The coherence length of several light sources was calculated in order to see just how small a defect could be measured. Since white light is a very broadband source, its coherence length is very short and thus can be used to measure small defects in glass. After finding the front and back reflections from a very thin glass slide with ease and calculating the thickness of it very accurately, it was concluded that this system could find and measure small defects on the Orbiter windows. This report also discusses a failed attempt for another use of this technology as well as describes an area of promise for further analysis. The latter of these areas has applications for finding possible defects in Orbiter windows without moving parts.

  1. Using a Ground Based radar interferometer during emergency: the case of A3 motorway (Salerno Reggio-Calabria) treated by landslide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Ventisette, Chiara; Intrieri, Emanuele; Luzi, Guido; Casagli, Nicola

    2010-05-01

    An application of Ground Based radar interferometry (GB-InSAR) technique to monitor a landslide threatening infrastructures in emergency conditions is presented. During December 2008 and January 2009 intense rainfalls occurred in Italy, especially in the southern regions. These rain events occurred in the last days of January, worsened the already critical hydrogeological conditions of some areas and triggered many landslides. One of these landslides, named Santa Trada landslide, is located close to a periodical stream called Fiumara di Santa Trada, near Villa San Giovanni municipality (Reggio Calabria, Calabria Region). The volume involved is about 100 000 m3. This estimate represents the case of a collapse of the landslide which destabilize a larger part of the slope, involving other areas delimited by some fractures observed upstream. Nevertheless the landslide does not directly threaten the roadway, its complete collapse would hit the pillars of a motorway viaduct. Through GB-InSAR data it has been possible to obtain an overview of the area affected by movement and to quantify the displacements magnitude. The main benefit of the system was not only limited to the capability of fully characterizing the landslide in spatial terms, it also permitted emergency operators to follow, during the whole campaign, the evolution of the mass movement and to study its cinematic behaviour. This aspect is fundamental to evaluate the volume of the material involved and to assess the temporal evolution of the risk scenario. The GB-InSAR installed at Santa Trada points up toward the landslide from a distance of 250 m. The apparatus produces a synthesized radar image of the observed area every 6 minutes, night and day, with a pixel resolution of about 0.75 m in range and 1.2 m on average in cross range, performing a millimeter accuracy on the final displacement maps. The interferometric analysis of sequences of consecutive images allows the operator to derive the entire line of

  2. A bounding estimate of neutron dose based on measured photon dose around single pass reactors at the Hanford site.

    PubMed

    Taulbee, Timothy D; Glover, Samuel E; Macievic, Gregory V; Hunacek, Mickey; Smith, Cheryl; DeBord, Gary W; Morris, Donald; Fix, Jack

    2010-07-01

    Neutron and photon radiation survey records have been used to evaluate and develop a neutron to photon (NP) ratio to reconstruct neutron doses to workers around Hanford's single pass reactors that operated from 1945 to 1972. A total of 5,773 paired neutron and photon measurements extracted from 57 boxes of survey records were used in the development of the NP ratio. The development of the NP ratio enables the use of the recorded dose from an individual's photon dosimeter badge to be used to estimate the unmonitored neutron dose. The Pearson rank correlation between the neutron and photon measurements was 0.71. The NP ratio best fit a lognormal distribution with a geometric mean (GM) of 0.8, a geometric standard deviation (GSD) of 2.95, and the upper 95 th % of this distribution was 4.75. An estimate of the neutron dose based on this NP ratio is considered bounding due to evidence that up to 70% of the total photon exposure received by workers around the single pass reactors occurs during shutdown maintenance and refueling activities when there is no significant neutron exposure. Thus when this NP ratio is applied to the total measured photon dose from an individual film badge dosimeter, the resulting neutron dose is considered bounded.

  3. Determination of Site of Absorption of Propranolol in Rat Gut Using In Situ Single-Pass Intestinal Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Nagare, N.; Damre, Anagha; Singh, K. S.; Mallurwar, S. R.; Iyer, Seethalakshmi; Naik, A.; Chintamaneni, Meena

    2010-01-01

    Previously, permeability and site of intestinal absorption of propranolol have been reported using the Ussing chamber. In the present study, the utility of Single-Pass Intestinal Perfusion to study permeability and site of intestinal absorption of propranolol was evaluated in rats. Drug permeability in different regions of rat intestine viz. duodenum, jejunum, ileum and colon was measured. Propranolol (30 μg/ml) solution was perfused in situ in each intestinal segment of rats. Effective permeability (Peff) of propranolol in each segment was calculated and site of absorption was determined. The Peff of propranolol in rat duodenum, jejunum, ileum and colon was calculated to be 0.3316×10-4 cm/s, 0.4035×10-4cm/s, 0.5092×10-4 cm/s and 0.7167×10-4 cm/s, respectively. The above results suggest that permeability of propranolol was highest through colon compared to other intestinal sites, which is in close agreement to that reported previously. In conclusion, in situ single pass intestinal perfusion can be used effectively to study intestinal permeability as well as site of intestinal absorption of compounds in rats. PMID:21694996

  4. Determination of site of absorption of propranolol in rat gut using in situ single-pass intestinal perfusion.

    PubMed

    Nagare, N; Damre, Anagha; Singh, K S; Mallurwar, S R; Iyer, Seethalakshmi; Naik, A; Chintamaneni, Meena

    2010-09-01

    Previously, permeability and site of intestinal absorption of propranolol have been reported using the Ussing chamber. In the present study, the utility of Single-Pass Intestinal Perfusion to study permeability and site of intestinal absorption of propranolol was evaluated in rats. Drug permeability in different regions of rat intestine viz. duodenum, jejunum, ileum and colon was measured. Propranolol (30 μg/ml) solution was perfused in situ in each intestinal segment of rats. Effective permeability (Peff) of propranolol in each segment was calculated and site of absorption was determined. The Peff of propranolol in rat duodenum, jejunum, ileum and colon was calculated to be 0.3316×10(-4) cm/s, 0.4035×10(-4)cm/s, 0.5092×10(-4) cm/s and 0.7167×10(-4) cm/s, respectively. The above results suggest that permeability of propranolol was highest through colon compared to other intestinal sites, which is in close agreement to that reported previously. In conclusion, in situ single pass intestinal perfusion can be used effectively to study intestinal permeability as well as site of intestinal absorption of compounds in rats.

  5. Constitutive Cleavage of the Single-Pass Transmembrane Protein Alcadeinα Prevents Aberrant Peripheral Retention of Kinesin-1

    PubMed Central

    Maruta, Chiaki; Saito, Yuhki; Hata, Saori; Gotoh, Naoya; Suzuki, Toshiharu; Yamamoto, Tohru

    2012-01-01

    Various membrane proteins are shed by proteinases, constitutively and/or when stimulated by external signals. While the physiological significance of external signal-induced cleavages has been intensely investigated, relatively little is known about the function of constitutive cleavages. Alcadeinα (Alcα; also called Calsyntenin-1) is an evolutionarily conserved type I single-pass transmembrane protein that binds to kinesin-1 light chain (KLC) to activate kinesin-1's transport of Alcα-containing vesicles. We found that Alcα was constitutively and efficiently cleaved to liberate its ectodomain into the extracellular space, and that full-length Alcα protein was rarely detected on the cell surface. The secretion efficiency of the ectodomain was unaltered by a mutation that both abolished Alcα's KLC-binding activity and attenuated its peripheral transport, suggesting that Alcα's cleavage occurred, at least partly, en route to the cell surface. We further demonstrated that uncleavable mutant Alcα proteins readily accumulated on the cell surface and induced aberrant peripheral recruitment of KLC1 and kinesin heavy chain. Our observations suggest that Alcα is efficiently processed in part to minimize the inappropriate peripheral retention of kinesin-1. This role might exemplify the functional relevance of the constitutive cleavage of single-pass transmembrane proteins. PMID:22905201

  6. Investigation of fluoride removal from low-salinity groundwater by single-pass constant-voltage capacitive deionization.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wangwang; Kovalsky, Peter; Cao, Baichuan; Waite, T David

    2016-08-01

    Capacitive deionization (CDI) is attracting increasing attention as an emerging technology for the facile removal of ionic species from water. In this work, the feasibility of fluoride removal from low-salinity groundwaters by single-pass constant-voltage CDI was investigated and a model developed to describe the dynamic fluoride electrosorption behavior. Effects of operating parameters including charging voltage and pump flow rate as well as impact of fluoride and chloride feed concentrations on the effluent fluoride concentration and equilibrium fluoride adsorption capacity were studied and the obtained data used to validate the model. Using the validated model, the effects of various design parameters, including arrangement of multiple CDI cells, on fluoride removal were assessed. Single-pass constant-voltage CDI was found to be effective in removing fluoride from low-salinity groundwaters but, as expected, removal efficiency was compromised in waters of high salinity. The relatively simple electrosorption model developed here provided a satisfactory description of both fluoride removal and current evolution and would appear to be a useful tool for prediction of CDI performance over a range of operating conditions, cell arrangements and feed water compositions though scope for model improvement exists.

  7. Three-colour entanglement produced by the single-pass quasi-phase-matching fourth harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Youbin; Wang, HuaiJun; Zhao, Junwei; Ji, Fengmin; Wang, Yajuan

    2016-08-01

    Three-colour continuous-variable entanglement produced by single-pass cascaded quasi-phase-matching fourth harmonic generation is investigated. The fourth harmonic can be generated through cascaded double-frequency processes in a quasiperiodic optical superlattice by using quasi-phase-matching technology. The conversion dynamics of the cascaded double-frequency processes is studied using quantum stochastic methods. The nature of the entanglement is discussed by applying a necessary and sufficient criterion for continuous-variable entanglement. Strong three-colour entanglement among the fundamental, second-, and fourth-harmonic beams with a double frequency interval can be produced without an optical oscillator cavity. This is experimentally feasible and has potential applications in quantum communication and computation networks.

  8. {open_quotes}Optical Guiding{close_quotes} limits on extraction efficiencies of single-pass, tapered wiggler amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Fawley, W.M.

    1995-08-01

    Single-pass, tapered wiggler amplifiers have an attractive feature of being able, in theory at least, of extracting a large portion of the electron beam energy into light. In circumstances where an optical FEL wiggler length is significantly longer than the Rayleigh length Z{sub R} corresponding to the electron beam radius, diffraction losses must be controlled via the phenomenon of optical guiding. Since the strength of the guiding depends upon the effective refractive index n exceeding one, and since (n-1) is inversely proportional to the optical electric field, there is a natural limiting mechanism to the on-axis field strength and thus the rate at which energy may be extracted from the electron beam. In particular, the extraction efficiency for a prebunched beam asymptotically grows linearly with z rather than quadratically. We present analytical and numerical simulation results concerning this behavior and discuss its applicability to various FEL designs including oscillator/amplifier-radiator configurations.

  9. Single Pass Flow-Through (SPFT) Test Results of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) Waste Forms used for LAW Immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Neeway, James J.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Williams, Benjamin D.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Strandquist, Sara C.; Dage, DeNomy C.; Brown, Christopher F.

    2012-03-20

    Several supplemental technologies for treating and immobilizing Hanford low activity waste (LAW) are being evaluated. One such immobilization technology being considered is the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) granular product. The FBSR granular product is composed of insoluble sodium aluminosilicate (NAS) feldspathoid minerals. Production of the FBSR mineral product has been demonstrated both at the industrial and laboratory scale. Single-Pass Flow-Through (SPFT) tests at various flow rates have been conducted with the granular products fabricated using these two methods. Results show that the materials exhibit a relatively low forward dissolution rate on the order of 10-3 g/(m2d) with the material made in the laboratory giving slightly higher values.

  10. Lucretia: A Matlab-Based Toolbox for the Modellingand Simulation of Single-Pass Electron Beam Transport Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tenenbaum, P.; /SLAC

    2005-09-30

    We report on Lucretia, a new simulation tool for the study of single-pass electron beam transport systems. Lucretia supports a combination of analytic and tracking techniques to model the tuning and operation of bunch compressors, linear accelerators, and beam delivery systems of linear colliders and linac-driven Free Electron Laser (FEL) facilities. Extensive use of Matlab scripting, graphics, and numerical capabilities maximize the flexibility of the system, and emphasis has been placed on representing and preserving the fixed relationships between elements (common girders, power supplies, etc.) which must be respected in the design of tuning algorithms. An overview of the code organization, some simple examples, and plans for future development are discussed.

  11. Single-Pass Percutaneous Liver Biopsy for Diffuse Liver Disease Using an Automated Device: Experience in 154 Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera-Sanfeliz, Gerant Kinney, Thomas B.; Rose, Steven C.; Agha, Ayad K.M.; Valji, Karim; Miller, Franklin J.; Roberts, Anne C.

    2005-06-15

    Purpose: To describe our experience with ultrasound (US)-guided percutaneous liver biopsies using the INRAD 18G Express core needle biopsy system.Methods: One hundred and fifty-four consecutive percutaneous core liver biopsy procedures were performed in 153 men in a single institution over 37 months. The medical charts, pathology reports, and radiology files were retrospectively reviewed. The number of needle passes, type of guidance, change in hematocrit level, and adequacy of specimens for histologic analysis were evaluated.Results: All biopsies were performed for histologic staging of chronic liver diseases. The majority of patients had hepatitis C (134/153, 90.2%). All patients were discharged to home after 4 hr of postprocedural observation. In 145 of 154 (94%) biopsies, a single needle pass was sufficient for diagnosis. US guidance was utilized in all but one of the procedures (153/154, 99.4%). The mean hematocrit decrease was 1.2% (44.1-42.9%). Pain requiring narcotic analgesia, the most frequent complication, occurred in 28 of 154 procedures (18.2%). No major complications occurred. The specimens were diagnostic in 152 of 154 procedures (98.7%).Conclusions: Single-pass percutaneous US-guided liver biopsy with the INRAD 18G Express core needle biopsy system is safe and provides definitive pathologic diagnosis of chronic liver disease. It can be performed on an outpatient basis. Routine post-biopsy monitoring of hematocrit level in stable, asymptomatic patients is probably not warranted.

  12. Current Profile Measurements from Moderate to Strong Lower Hybrid Single-Pass Damping on Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumgaard, R. T.; Wallace, G. M.; Scott, S. D.; Shiraiwa, S.; Faust, I.; Parker, R. R.

    2015-11-01

    Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD) is an effective tool to non-inductively drive up to 100% of the plasma current on Alcator C-Mod. Measurements with an upgraded MSE diagnostic show that the fast-electron current profile is broader than the Ohmic current profile but still located the plasma core in agreement with strongly centrally peaked fast electron bremsstrahlung (FEB) measurements. Scans in a regime of high current drive efficiency across a range of density, LHCD power, launched n||, and plasma current show the driven current profile, FEB profile shapes, and current drive efficiency are sensitive only to total plasma current. Simulations using ray-tracing Fokker Planck codes show that the rays make 1-3 bounces through the plasma edge to bridge the spectral gap. Although in agreement with the total current, the simulations qualitatively disagree with experiment regarding current and FEB profiles as well as sensitivity to power and density. Simulations at higher plasma temperature and current predict stronger single-pass damping and preliminary experiments show increased current drive efficiency. Experiments to determine if the profile discrepancies persist when the ray bounces play a reduced role are planned, including companion experiments in D and He resulting in different edge plasma conditions. This work was performed on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak, a DoE Office of Science user facility, and is supported by USDoE awards DE-FC02-99ER54512 and DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  13. Merits of a sub-harmonic approach to a single-pass, 1.5-{Angstrom} FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Fawley, W.M.; Nuhn, H.D.; Bonifacio, R.; Scharlemann, E.T.

    1995-03-01

    SLAC/SSRL and collaborators elsewhere are studying th physics of a single-pass, FEL amplifier operating in th 1 -- 2 {Angstrom}, wavelength region based on electron beams from the SLAC linac at {approximately} 15 GeV energy. Hoping to reduce the total wiggler length needed to reach saturation when starting from shot noise, we have examined the benefits of making the first part of the wiggler resonant at a subharmonic wavelength (e.g. 4.5 {Angstrom}) at which the gain length can be significantly shorter. This leads to bunching of the electron beam at both the subharmonic and fundaments wavelengths, thus providing a strong coherent ``seed`` for exponential growth of radiation at the fundamental in the second part of the wiggler. Using both multi-harmonic and multi-frequency 2D FEL simulation codes, we have examined the predicted performance of such devices and the sensitivity to electron beam parameters such as current, emittance, and instantaneous energy spread.

  14. {open_quotes}Optical guiding{close_quotes} limits on extraction efficiencies of single-pass, tapered wiggler amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Fawley, W.M.

    1995-12-31

    Single-pass, tapered wiggler amplifiers have an attractive feature of being able, in theory at least, of extracting a large portion of the electron beam energy into light. In circumstances where an optical FEL`s wiggler length is significantly longer than the Rayleigh length Z{sub R} corresponding to the electron beam radius, diffraction losses must be controlled via the phenomenon of {open_quotes}optical guiding{close_quotes}. Since the strength of the guiding depends upon the effective refractive index {eta}{sub r} exceeding one, and since ({eta}{sub r}-1) is inversely proportional to the optical electric field, there is a natural {open_quotes}limiting{close_quotes} mechanism to the on-axis field strength and thus the rate at which energy may be extracted from the electron beam. In particular, the extraction efficiency for a prebunched beam asymptotically grows linearly with z rather than quadratically. We present analytical and numerical simulation results concerning this behavior and discuss its applicability to various FEL designs including oscillator/amplifier-radiator configurations.

  15. Single-frequency blue light generation by single-pass sum-frequency generation in a coupled ring cavity tapered laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjarlin Jensen, Ole; Michael Petersen, Paul

    2013-09-01

    A generic approach for generation of tunable single frequency light is presented. 340 mW of near diffraction limited, single-frequency, and tunable blue light around 459 nm is generated by sum-frequency generation (SFG) between two tunable tapered diode lasers. One diode laser is operated in a ring cavity and another tapered diode laser is single-passed through a nonlinear crystal which is contained in the coupled ring cavity. Using this method, the single-pass conversion efficiency is more than 25%. In contrast to SFG in an external cavity, the system is entirely self-stabilized with no electronic locking.

  16. Special relativity and interferometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, D.; Kim, Y. S.

    1988-01-01

    A new generation of gravitational wave detectors is expected to be based on interferometers. Yurke et al. (1986) introduced a class of interferometers characterized by SU(1,1) which can in principle achieve a phase sensitivity approaching 1/N, where N is thte total number of photons entering the interferometer. It is shown here that the SU(1,1) interferometer can serve as an analog computer for Wigner's little group of the Poincare\\'| group.

  17. An efficient continuous-wave and Q-switched single-pass two-stage Ho:YLF MOPA system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiatkowski, Jacek; Jabczynski, Jan Karol; Zendzian, Waldemar

    2015-04-01

    We report on the efficient operation of an Ho:YLF laser single-pass in-band pumped by a Tm-doped fiber laser. The research in a continuous-wave (CW) operation in an oscillator scheme was done for a crystal of 0.5 at% Ho dopant concentration and the length of 30 mm for the output coupler transmittances of TOC=10%, 20%, 30% and 40%. At room temperature, for the output coupling transmission of 20%, the maximum CW output power of 24.5 W for 82.5 W of incident pump power, corresponding to the slope efficiency of 35.4% and optical-to-optical conversion efficiency of 29.7% was achieved. The highest slope efficiency of 81.6% with respect to absorbed pump power was obtained. Carrying out the measurements of the laser spectrum, for the out-coupling transmittance of TOC=30%, we observed a very short time wavelength shift between 2051.5 and 2062.4 nm in an Ho:YLF laser operation. Trying to fully utilize the pump power unabsorbed by the active crystal in an oscillator stage, an amplifier system based on two additional Ho:YLF crystals was developed. For the output coupling transmission of 40% the slope efficiency increased from 31.5% in an oscillator scheme to 47.3% with respect to the incident pump power in a two-stage amplifier scheme with a beam quality parameter of M2 better than 1.1. For a Q-switched operation, for the maximum incident pump power and the pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of 1 kHz, pulse energies of 18.5 mJ with a 22 ns FWHM pulse width corresponding to 841 kW peak power in the amplifier system were recorded.

  18. Physicochemical properties of bio-oil and biochar produced by fast pyrolysis of stored single-pass corn stover and cobs.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ajay; Darr, Matthew J; Dalluge, Dustin; Medic, Dorde; Webster, Keith; Brown, Robert C

    2012-12-01

    Short harvest window of corn (Zea mays) stover necessitates its storage before utilization; however, there is not enough work towards exploring the fast pyrolysis behavior of stored biomass. This study investigated the yields and the physicochemical properties (proximate and ultimate analyses, higher heating values and acidity) of the fast pyrolysis products obtained from single-pass stover and cobs stored either inside a metal building or anaerobically within plastic wraps. Biomass samples were pyrolyzed in a 183 cm long and 2.1cm inner diameter free-fall fast pyrolysis reactor. Yields of bio-oil, biochar and non-condensable gases from different biomass samples were in the ranges of 45-55, 25-37 and 11-17 wt.%, respectively, with the highest bio-oil yield from the ensiled single-pass stover. Bio-oils generated from ensiled single-pass cobs and ensiled single-pass stover were, respectively, the most and the least acidic with the modified acid numbers of 95.0 and 65.2 mg g(-1), respectively.

  19. Evaluation of Intermittent Hemodialysis in Critically Ill Cancer Patients with Acute Kidney Injury Using Single-Pass Batch Equipment

    PubMed Central

    Torres da Costa e Silva, Verônica; Costalonga, Elerson C.; Oliveira, Ana Paula Leandro; Hung, James; Caires, Renato Antunes; Hajjar, Ludhmila Abrahão; Fukushima, Julia T.; Soares, Cilene Muniz; Bezerra, Juliana Silva; Oikawa, Luciane; Yu, Luis; Burdmann, Emmanuel A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Data on renal replacement therapy (RRT) in cancer patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) in the intensive care unit (ICU) is scarce. The aim of this study was to assess the safety and the adequacy of intermittent hemodialysis (IHD) in critically ill cancer patients with AKI. Methods and Findings In this observational prospective cohort study, 149 ICU cancer patients with AKI were treated with 448 single-pass batch IHD procedures and evaluated from June 2010 to June 2012. Primary outcomes were IHD complications (hypotension and clotting) and adequacy. A multiple logistic regression was performed in order to identify factors associated with IHD complications (hypotension and clotting). Patients were 62.2 ± 14.3 years old, 86.6% had a solid cancer, sepsis was the main AKI cause (51%) and in-hospital mortality was 59.7%. RRT session time was 240 (180–300) min, blood/dialysate flow was 250 (200–300) mL/min and UF was 1000 (0–2000) ml. Hypotension occurred in 25% of the sessions. Independent risk factors (RF) for hypotension were dialysate conductivity (each ms/cm, OR 0.81, CI 0.69–0.95), initial mean arterial pressure (each 10 mmHg, OR 0.49, CI 0.40–0.61) and SOFA score (OR 1.16, CI 1.03–1.30). Clotting and malfunctioning catheters (MC) occurred in 23.8% and 29.2% of the procedures, respectively. Independent RF for clotting were heparin use (OR 0.57, CI 0.33–0.99), MC (OR 3.59, CI 2.24–5.77) and RRT system pressure increase over 25% (OR 2.15, CI 1.61–4.17). Post RRT blood tests were urea 71 (49–104) mg/dL, creatinine 2.71 (2.10–3.8) mg/dL, bicarbonate 24.1 (22.5–25.5) mEq/L and K 3.8 (3.5–4.1) mEq/L. Conclusion IHD for critically ill patients with cancer and AKI offered acceptable hemodynamic stability and provided adequate metabolic control. PMID:26938932

  20. Phase shifting interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, G.E.

    1999-08-03

    An interferometer is disclosed which has the capability of measuring optical elements and systems with an accuracy of {lambda}/1000 where {lambda} is the wavelength of visible light. Whereas current interferometers employ a reference surface, which inherently limits the accuracy of the measurement to about {lambda}/50, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical reference wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. Whereas current interferometers illuminate the optic to be tested with an aberrated wavefront which also limits the accuracy of the measurement, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical measurement wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. This interferometer is adjustable to give unity fringe visibility, which maximizes the signal-to-noise, and has the means to introduce a controlled prescribed relative phase shift between the reference wavefront and the wavefront from the optics under test, which permits analysis of the interference fringe pattern using standard phase extraction algorithms. 11 figs.

  1. Phase shifting interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    1999-01-01

    An interferometer which has the capability of measuring optical elements and systems with an accuracy of .lambda./1000 where .lambda. is the wavelength of visible light. Whereas current interferometers employ a reference surface, which inherently limits the accuracy of the measurement to about .lambda./50, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical reference wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. Whereas current interferometers illuminate the optic to be tested with an aberrated wavefront which also limits the accuracy of the measurement, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical measurement wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. This interferometer is adjustable to give unity fringe visibility, which maximizes the signal-to-noise, and has the means to introduce a controlled prescribed relative phase shift between the reference wavefront and the wavefront from the optics under test, which permits analysis of the interference fringe pattern using standard phase extraction algorithms.

  2. Feasibility of dual-chamber (DDD) pacing via a single-pass (VDD) pacing lead employing a floating atrial ring (dipole): case series, future considerations, and refinements.

    PubMed

    Kassotis, John; Voigt, Louis; Mongwa, Mbu; Reddy, C V R

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the feasibility of DDD pacing from a standard single-pass VDD pacemaker system. Over the past 2 decades significant advances have been made in the development of single-pass VDD pacing systems. These have been shown in long-term prospective studies to effectively preserve atrioventricular (AV)synchrony in patients with AV block and normal sinus node function. What remains problematic is the development of a single-pass pacing system capable of DDD pacing. Such a lead configuration would be useful in those patients with peripheral venous anomalies and in younger patients with congenital anomalies, which may require lead revisions in the future. In addition, with the increased use of resynchronization (biventricular pacing) therapy, the availability of a reliable single-pass lead will minimize operative time, enhance patient safety, and minimize the amount of hardware within the heart. The feasibility of DDD pacing via a Medtronic Capsure VDD-2 (Model #5038) pacing lead was evaluated. Twenty patients who presented with AV block and normal sinus node function were recruited for this study. Atrial pacing thresholds and sensitivities were assessed intraoperatively in the supine position with various respiratory maneuvers. Five patients who agreed to participate in long-term follow-up received a dual-chamber generator and were evaluated periodically over a 12-month period. Mean atrial sensitivity was 2.35 +/- 0.83 mV at the time of implantation. Effective atrial stimulation was possible in all patients at the time of implantation (mean stimulation threshold 3.08 +/- 1.04 V at 0.5 ms [bipolar], 3.34 +/- 0.95 V at 0.5 ms [unipolar]). Five of the 20 patients received a Kappa KDR701 generator, and atrial electrical properties were followed up over a 1-year period. There was no significant change in atrial pacing threshold or incidence of phrenic nerve stimulation over the 1-year follow-up. A standard single-pass VDD pacing lead

  3. Sub-Aperture Interferometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Feng

    2010-01-01

    Sub-aperture interferometers -- also called wavefront-split interferometers -- have been developed for simultaneously measuring displacements of multiple targets. The terms "sub-aperture" and "wavefront-split" signify that the original measurement light beam in an interferometer is split into multiple sub-beams derived from non-overlapping portions of the original measurement-beam aperture. Each measurement sub-beam is aimed at a retroreflector mounted on one of the targets. The splitting of the measurement beam is accomplished by use of truncated mirrors and masks, as shown in the example below

  4. Michelson and His Interferometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shankland, Robert S.

    1974-01-01

    Presents a brief historical account of Michelson's invention of his interferometer with some subsequent ingenious applications of its capabilities for precise measurement discussed in details, including the experiment on detrmination of the diameters for heavenly bodies. (CC)

  5. The Palomar Testbed Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colavita, M. M.; Wallace, J. K.; Hines, B. E.; Gursel, Y.; Malbet, F.; Palmer, D. L.; Pan, X. P.; Shao, M.; Yu, J. W.; Boden, A. F.

    1999-01-01

    The Palomar Testbed Interferometer (PTI) is a long-baseline infrared interferometer located at Palomar Observatory, California. It was built as a testbed for interferometric techniques applicable to the Keck Interferometer. First fringes were obtained in 1995 July. PTI implements a dual-star architecture, tracking two stars simultaneously for phase referencing and narrow-angle astrometry. The three fixed 40 cm apertures can be combined pairwise to provide baselines to 110 m. The interferometer actively tracks the white-light fringe using an array detector at 2.2 microns and active delay lines with a range of +/-38 m. Laser metrology of the delay lines allows for servo control, and laser metrology of the complete optical path enables narrow-angle astrometric measurements. The instrument is highly automated, using a multiprocessing computer system for instrument control and sequencing.

  6. Dual surface interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Pardue, R.M.; Williams, R.R.

    1980-09-12

    A double-pass interferometer is provided which allows direct measurement of relative displacement between opposed surfaces. A conventional plane mirror interferometer may be modified by replacing the beam-measuring path cube-corner reflector with an additional quarterwave plate. The beam path is altered to extend to an opposed plane mirrored surface and the reflected beam is placed in interference with a retained reference beam split from dual-beam source and retroreflected by a reference cube-corner reflector mounted stationary with the interferometer housing. This permits direct measurement of opposed mirror surfaces by laser interferometry while doubling the resolution as with a conventional double-pass plane mirror laser interferometer system.

  7. Dual surface interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Pardue, Robert M.; Williams, Richard R.

    1982-01-01

    A double-pass interferometer is provided which allows direct measurement of relative displacement between opposed surfaces. A conventional plane mirror interferometer may be modified by replacing the beam-measuring path cube-corner reflector with an additional quarter-wave plate. The beam path is altered to extend to an opposed plane mirrored surface and the reflected beam is placed in interference with a retained reference beam split from dual-beam source and retroreflected by a reference cube-corner reflector mounted stationary with the interferometer housing. This permits direct measurement of opposed mirror surfaces by laser interferometry while doubling the resolution as with a conventional double-pass plane mirror laser interferometer system.

  8. Phase shifting diffraction interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, G.E.

    1996-08-29

    An interferometer which has the capability of measuring optical elements and systems with an accuracy of {lambda}/1000 where {lambda} is the wavelength of visible light. Whereas current interferometers employ a reference surface, which inherently limits the accuracy of the measurement to about {lambda}/50, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical reference wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. This interferometer is adjustable to give unity fringe visibility, which maximizes the signal-to-noise, and has the means to introduce a controlled prescribed relative phase shift between the reference wavefront and the wavefront from the optics under test, which permits analysis of the interference fringe pattern using standard phase extraction algorithms. 8 figs.

  9. Phase shifting diffraction interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    1996-01-01

    An interferometer which has the capability of measuring optical elements and systems with an accuracy of .lambda./1000 where .lambda. is the wavelength of visible light. Whereas current interferometers employ a reference surface, which inherently limits the accuracy of the measurement to about .lambda./50, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical reference wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. This interferometer is adjustable to give unity fringe visibility, which maximizes the signal-to-noise, and has the means to introduce a controlled prescribed relative phase shift between the reference wavefront and the wavefront from the optics under test, which permits analysis of the interference fringe pattern using standard phase extraction algorithms.

  10. Compact deep UV laser system at 222.5 nm by single-pass frequency doubling of high-power GaN diode laser emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruhnke, Norman; Müller, André; Eppich, Bernd; Güther, Reiner; Maiwald, Martin; Sumpf, Bernd; Erbert, Götz; Tränkle, Günther

    2016-03-01

    Deep ultraviolet (DUV) lasers emitting below 300 nm are of great interest for many applications, for instance in medical diagnostics or for detecting biological agents. Established DUV lasers, e.g. gas lasers or frequency quadrupled solid-state lasers, are relatively bulky and have high power consumptions. A compact and reliable laser diode based system emitting in the DUV could help to address applications in environments where a portable and robust light source with low power consumption is needed. In this work, a compact DUV laser system based on single-pass frequency doubling of highpower GaN diode laser emission is presented. A commercially available high-power GaN laser diode from OSRAM Opto Semiconductors serves as a pump source. The laser diode is spectrally stabilized in an external cavity diode laser (ECDL) setup in Littrow configuration. The ECDL system reaches a maximum optical output power of 700 mW, maintaining narrowband emission below 60 pm (FWHM) at 445 nm over the entire operating range. By direct single pass frequency doubling in a BBO crystal with a length of 7.5 mm a maximum DUV output power of 16 μW at a wavelength of 222.5 nm is generated. The presented concept enables compact and efficient diode laser based light sources emitting in the DUV spectral range that are potentially suitable for in situ applications where a small footprint and low power consumption is essential.

  11. 1.2 MW peak power, all-solid-state picosecond laser with a microchip laser seed and a high gain single-passing bounce geometry amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunhua; Shen, Lifeng; Zhao, Zhiliang; Liu, Bin; Jiang, Hongbo; Chen, Jun; Liu, Chong

    2016-11-01

    A semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM) based passively Q-switched microchip Nd:YVO4 seed laser with pulse duration of 90 ps at repetition rate of 100 kHz is amplified by single-passing a Nd:YVO4 bounce amplifier with varying seed input power from 20 μW to 10 mW. The liquid pure metal greasy thermally conductive material is used to replace the traditional thin indium foil as the thermal contact material for better heat load transfer of the Nd:YVO4 bounce amplifier. Temperature distribution at the pump surface is measured by an infrared imager to compare with the numerically simulated results. A highest single-passing output power of 11.3 W is obtained for 10 mW averaged seed power, achieving a pulse peak power of ~1.25 MW and pulse energy of ~113 μJ. The beam quality is well preserved with M2 ≤1.25. The simple configuration of this bounce laser amplifier made the system flexible, robust and cost-effective, showing attractive potential for further applications.

  12. Radar reflectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1986-07-01

    This TOP describes a method for measuring the radar reflectivity characteristics of aircraft. It uses a rotating platform and various radar systems to obtain calibrated radar Automatic Gain Control values for each degree of aspect angle for the aircraft. The purpose of this test is to provide comparable values of radar reflectivity for Army aircraft at various radar frequencies and parameter for fixed positions and aspect angles on the aircraft. Data collected on each specific aircraft can be used to evaluate radar reflectivity characteristics of aircraft skin material, paint, and structural changes such as flat versus curved surfaces.

  13. PDX multichannel interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Bitzer, R.; Ernst, W.; Cutsogeorge, G.

    1980-10-01

    A 10 channel, 140 GHz homodyne interferometer is described for use on PDX. One feature of this interferometer is the separation of the signal source and electronics from the power splitters, delay line, and receiving systems. The latter is situated near the upper and lower vacuum ports between the toroidal field magnets. A second feature is the signal stabilization of the EIO source by means of an AFC system. The complete interferometer is described including block diagrams, circuit diagrams, test data, and magnetic field test conducted on the preamplifiers, microwave diodes, isolators, etc., to determine the extent of magnetic shielding required. The description of the tracking filters and digital phase display circuit is referenced to accompanying reports.

  14. Heterodyne Interferometer Angle Metrology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, Inseob; Weilert, Mark A.; Wang, Xu; Goullioud, Renaud

    2010-01-01

    A compact, high-resolution angle measurement instrument has been developed that is based on a heterodyne interferometer. The common-path heterodyne interferometer metrology is used to measure displacements of a reflective target surface. In the interferometer setup, an optical mask is used to sample the measurement laser beam reflecting back from a target surface. Angular rotations, around two orthogonal axes in a plane perpendicular to the measurement- beam propagation direction, are determined simultaneously from the relative displacement measurement of the target surface. The device is used in a tracking telescope system where pitch and yaw measurements of a flat mirror were simultaneously performed with a sensitivity of 0.1 nrad, per second, and a measuring range of 0.15 mrad at a working distance of an order of a meter. The nonlinearity of the device is also measured less than one percent over the measurement range.

  15. Optical interferometer testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwood, Gary H.

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs on optical interferometer testbed presented at the MIT Space Research Engineering Center 3rd Annual Symposium are included. Topics covered include: space-based optical interferometer; optical metrology; sensors and actuators; real time control hardware; controlled structures technology (CST) design methodology; identification for MIMO control; FEM/ID correlation for the naked truss; disturbance modeling; disturbance source implementation; structure design: passive damping; low authority control; active isolation of lightweight mirrors on flexible structures; open loop transfer function of mirror; and global/high authority control.

  16. Single-pass UV generation at 222.5 nm based on high-power GaN external cavity diode laser.

    PubMed

    Ruhnke, N; Müller, A; Eppich, B; Güther, R; Maiwald, M; Sumpf, B; Erbert, G; Tränkle, G

    2015-05-01

    We demonstrate a compact system for single-pass frequency doubling of high-power GaN diode laser radiation. The deep UV laser light at 222.5 nm is generated in a β-BaB2O4 (BBO) crystal. A high-power GaN external cavity diode laser (ECDL) system in Littrow configuration with narrowband emission at 445 nm is used as pump source. At a pump power of 680 mW, a maximum UV power of 16 μW in continuous-wave operation at 222.5 nm is achieved. This concept enables a compact diode laser-based system emitting in the deep ultraviolet spectral range.

  17. N-isopropyl-(/sup 123/I)p-iodoamphetamine: single-pass brain uptake and washout; binding to brain synaptosomes; and localization in dog and monkey brain

    SciTech Connect

    Winchell, H.S.; Horst, W.D.; Braun, L.; Oldendorf, W.H.; Hattner, R.; Parker, H.

    1980-10-01

    The kinetics of N-isopropyl-p-(/sup 123/I)iodoamphetamine in rat brains were determined by serial measurements of brain uptake index (BUI) after intracarotid injection; also studied were its effects on amine uptake and release in rat's brain cortical synaptosomes; and its in vivo distribution in the dog and monkey. No specific localization in brain nuclei of the dog was seen, but there was progressive accumulation in the eyes. Rapid initial brain uptake in the ketamine-sedated monkey was noted, and further slow brain uptake occurred during the next 20 min but without retinal localization. High levels of brain activity were maintained for several hours. The quantitative initial single-pass clearance of the agent in the brain suggests its use in evaluation of regional brain perfusion. Its interaction with brain amine-binding sites suggests its possible application in studies of cerebral amine metabolism.

  18. High-power, high-repetition-rate performance characteristics of β-BaB₂O₄ for single-pass picosecond ultraviolet generation at 266 nm.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S Chaitanya; Casals, J Canals; Wei, Junxiong; Ebrahim-Zadeh, M

    2015-10-19

    We report a systematic study on the performance characteristics of a high-power, high-repetition-rate, picosecond ultraviolet (UV) source at 266 nm based on β-BaB2O4 (BBO). The source, based on single-pass fourth harmonic generation (FHG) of a compact Yb-fiber laser in a two-crystal spatial walk-off compensation scheme, generates up to 2.9 W of average power at 266 nm at a pulse repetition rate of ~80 MHz with a single-pass FHG efficiency of 35% from the green to UV. Detrimental issues such as thermal effects have been studied and confirmed by performing relevant measurements. Angular and temperature acceptance bandwidths in BBO for FHG to 266 nm are experimentally determined, indicating that the effective interaction length is limited by spatial walk-off and thermal gradients under high-power operation. The origin of dynamic color center formation due to two-photon absorption in BBO is investigated by measurements of intensity-dependent transmission at 266 nm. Using a suitable theoretical model, two-photon absorption coefficients as well as the color center densities have been estimated at different temperatures. The measurements show that the two-photon absorption coefficient in BBO at 266 nm is ~3.5 times lower at 200°C compared to that at room temperature. The long-term power stability as well as beam pointing stability is analyzed at different output power levels and focusing conditions. Using cylindrical optics, we have circularized the generated elliptic UV beam to a circularity of >90%. To our knowledge, this is the first time such high average powers and temperature-dependent two-photon absorption measurements at 266 nm are reported at repetition rates as high as ~80 MHz.

  19. High-power, high-repetition-rate performance characteristics of β-BaB₂O₄ for single-pass picosecond ultraviolet generation at 266 nm.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S Chaitanya; Casals, J Canals; Wei, Junxiong; Ebrahim-Zadeh, M

    2015-10-19

    We report a systematic study on the performance characteristics of a high-power, high-repetition-rate, picosecond ultraviolet (UV) source at 266 nm based on β-BaB2O4 (BBO). The source, based on single-pass fourth harmonic generation (FHG) of a compact Yb-fiber laser in a two-crystal spatial walk-off compensation scheme, generates up to 2.9 W of average power at 266 nm at a pulse repetition rate of ~80 MHz with a single-pass FHG efficiency of 35% from the green to UV. Detrimental issues such as thermal effects have been studied and confirmed by performing relevant measurements. Angular and temperature acceptance bandwidths in BBO for FHG to 266 nm are experimentally determined, indicating that the effective interaction length is limited by spatial walk-off and thermal gradients under high-power operation. The origin of dynamic color center formation due to two-photon absorption in BBO is investigated by measurements of intensity-dependent transmission at 266 nm. Using a suitable theoretical model, two-photon absorption coefficients as well as the color center densities have been estimated at different temperatures. The measurements show that the two-photon absorption coefficient in BBO at 266 nm is ~3.5 times lower at 200°C compared to that at room temperature. The long-term power stability as well as beam pointing stability is analyzed at different output power levels and focusing conditions. Using cylindrical optics, we have circularized the generated elliptic UV beam to a circularity of >90%. To our knowledge, this is the first time such high average powers and temperature-dependent two-photon absorption measurements at 266 nm are reported at repetition rates as high as ~80 MHz. PMID:26480467

  20. Radar principles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sato, Toru

    1989-01-01

    Discussed here is a kind of radar called atmospheric radar, which has as its target clear air echoes from the earth's atmosphere produced by fluctuations of the atmospheric index of refraction. Topics reviewed include the vertical structure of the atmosphere, the radio refractive index and its fluctuations, the radar equation (a relation between transmitted and received power), radar equations for distributed targets and spectral echoes, near field correction, pulsed waveforms, the Doppler principle, and velocity field measurements.

  1. Mesoscopic Interferometers for Electron Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Rohrlich, D.

    2005-09-15

    Mesoscopic interferometers are electronic analogues of optical interferometers, with 'quantum point contacts' playing the role of optical beam splitters. Mesoscopic analogues of two-slit, Mach-Zehnder and Fabry-Perot interferometers have been built. A fundamental difference between electron and photon interferometry is that electron interferometry is nonlocal.

  2. Dual beam optical interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutierrez, Roman C. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A dual beam interferometer device is disclosed that enables moving an optics module in a direction, which changes the path lengths of two beams of light. The two beams reflect off a surface of an object and generate different speckle patterns detected by an element, such as a camera. The camera detects a characteristic of the surface.

  3. Rotatable shear plate interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Duffus, Richard C.

    1988-01-01

    A rotatable shear plate interferometer comprises a transparent shear plate mounted obliquely in a tubular supporting member at 45.degree. with respect to its horizontal center axis. This tubular supporting member is supported rotatably around its center axis and a collimated laser beam is made incident on the shear plate along this center axis such that defocus in different directions can be easily measured.

  4. Ultrasonic Interferometers Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    I have been tinkering with ultrasonic transducers once more. In earlier notes I reported on optics-like experiments performed with ultrasonics, described a number of ultrasonic interferometers, and showed how ultrasonic transducers can be used for Fourier analysis. This time I became interested in trying the technique of using two detectors in…

  5. Holographic lateral shear interferometer.

    PubMed

    Malacara, D; Mallick, S

    1976-11-01

    A new type of lateral shear holographic interferometer is described. It can be used to test lenses as well as spherical and aspherical surfaces. A null pattern with straight fringes can be obtained for an aspherical surface, provided one has a prototype that can be used for making the hologram.

  6. Preliminary Results from the 2015 NMT Interferometer Campaign in Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, M. A.; Rison, W.; Krehbiel, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    The New Mexico Tech Broadband Interferometer was deployed within the eastern portion of the Colorado Lightning Mapping Array between May 20 and June 13, 2015. The location was such that the CHILL radar could provide coverage for select storms. The 20 to 80 MHz VHF broadband interferometer was augmented by fast and slow antenna data for discerning both impulsive and overall charge motion. A substantial fraction of the flashes recorded during the Colorado campaign were observed to be inverted intraclouds. This was particularly true of a close tornadic storm on June 6 which was also distinguished by a large number of precursor events. We will detail some illuminative examples from this and other storms. We will also analyze the effect substantially longer baseline lengths and increased sensitivity had on the performance of the interferometer relative to previous campaigns as well as in comparison to the Lightning Mapping Array.

  7. Condor equatorial electrojet campaign: Radar results

    SciTech Connect

    Kudeki, E.; Fejer, B.G.; Farley, D.T.; Hanuise, C.

    1987-12-01

    A review of the experimental and theoretical background to the Condor equatorial electrojet compaign is followed by the presentation and discussion of VHF radar interferometer and HF radar backscatter data taken concurrently with two rocket in situ experiments reported in companion papers (Pfaff et al., this issue (a, b). Both experiments were conducted in strongly driven periods with the on-line radar interferometer displaying signatures of what has been interpreted in earlier radar work (Kudeki et al., 1982) as kilometer scale gradient drift waves. Low-frequency density fluctuations detected by in situ rocket sensors confirm the earlier interpretation. VHF radar/rocket data comparisons also indicate the existence of a turbulent layer in the upper portion of the daytime electrojet at about 108 km altitude driven purely by the two-stream instability. Nonlinear mode coupling of linearly growing two-stream waves to linearly damped 3-m vertical modes could account for the radar echoes scattered from this layer, which showed no indication of large-scale gradient drift waves. Nonlinear mode coupling may therefore compete with the wave-induced anomalous diffusion mechanism proposed recently by Sudan (1983) for the saturation of directly excited two-stream waves. Nighttime radar data show a bifurcated layer with the two parts having comparable echo strength but oppositely directed zonal drift velocities. The lower layer shows narrow backscatter spectra; the upper layer is characterized by kilometer scale waves and vertically propagating type 1 waves.

  8. The Antarctic Planet Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swain, Mark R.; Walker, Christopher K.; Traub, Wesley A.; Storey, John W.; CoudeduForesto, Vincent; Fossat, Eric; Vakili, Farrok; Stark, Anthony A.; Lloyd, James P.; Lawson, Peter R.; Burrows, Adam S.; Ireland, Michael; Millan-Gabet, Rafael; vanBelle, Gerard T.; Lane, Benjamin; Vasisht, Gautam; Travouillon, Tony

    2004-01-01

    The Antarctic Planet Interferometer is an instrument concept designed to detect and characterize extrasolar planets by exploiting the unique potential of the best accessible site on earth for thermal infrared interferometry. High-precision interferometric techniques under development for extrasolar planet detection and characterization (differential phase, nulling and astrometry) all benefit substantially from the slow, low-altitude turbulence, low water vapor content, and low temperature found on the Antarctic plateau. At the best of these locations, such as the Concordia base being developed at Dome C, an interferometer with two-meter diameter class apertures has the potential to deliver unique science for a variety of topics, including extrasolar planets, active galactic nuclei, young stellar objects, and protoplanetary disks.

  9. The Glacier and Land Ice Surface Topography Interferometer (GLISTIN): A Novel Ka-band Digitally Beamformed Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moller, Delwyn K.; Heavey, Brandon; Hodges, Richard; Rengarajan, Sembiam; Rignot, Eric; Rogez, Francois; Sadowy, Gregory; Simard, Marc; Zawadzki, Mark

    2006-01-01

    The estimation of the mass balance of ice sheets and glaciers on Earth is a problem of considerable scientific and societal importance. A key measurement to understanding, monitoring and forecasting these changes is ice-surface topography, both for ice-sheet and glacial regions. As such NASA identified 'ice topographic mapping instruments capable of providing precise elevation and detailed imagery data for measurements on glacial scales for detailed monitoring of ice sheet, and glacier changes' as a science priority for the most recent Instrument Incubator Program (IIP) opportunities. Funded under this opportunity is the technological development for a Ka-Band (35GHz) single-pass digitally beamformed interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR). Unique to this concept is the ability to map a significant swath impervious of cloud cover with measurement accuracies comparable to laser altimeters but with variable resolution as appropriate to the differing scales-of-interest over ice-sheets and glaciers.

  10. Multipulsed dynamic moire interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Deason, Vance A.

    1991-01-01

    An improved dynamic moire interferometer comprised of a lasing medium providing a plurality of beams of coherent light, a multiple q-switch producing multiple trains of 100,000 or more pulses per second, a combining means collimating multiple trains of pulses into substantially a single train and directing beams to specimen gratings affixed to a test material, and a controller, triggering and sequencing the emission of the pulses with the occurrence and recording of a dynamic loading event.

  11. Optical and Infrared Interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ten Brummelaar, Theo A.; McAlister, Harold A.

    Stellar interferometers achieve limiting angular resolution inaccessible to evennext-generation single-aperture telescopes. Arrays of small or modest apertureshave achieved baselines exceeding 300 m producing submilliarcsecond resolutionsat visible and near-infrared wavelengths. The technical cost and challenge inbuilding interferometric arrays is substantial due to the very high toleranceimposed by optical physics on the precision of beam combination and optical pathlength matching for two or more telescopes. This chapter presents the basic theoryand overall design considerations for an interferometer with an emphasis on thepractical aspects of constructing a working instrument that overcomes obstaclesimposed by the atmosphere, submicron path length matching requirements,limitations on number of telescopes and their layout, light losses throughmultiple reflections and transmissions necessary to superimpose telescopebeams in the beam-combining laboratory, and other realities of the art ofinterferometry. The basic design considerations for an interferometer arelaid out starting with site selection and telescope placement and thenfollowed through to beam combination and measurement of interferometricvisibility and closure phase after the encountering of numerous subsystems byincoming wavefronts. These subsystems include active wavefront sensing fortip/tilt correction or even full-up adaptive optics, telescope design fordirecting collimated beams over large distances, diffraction losses, polarizationmatching, optical path length insertion and active compensation, correctionfor atmospheric refraction and differential dispersion in glass and air,separation of light into visible and near-infrared channels, alignment over longoptical paths, high-precision definition of the three-dimensional layout of aninterferometric array, and, finally, a variety of beam-combining schemes fromsimple two-way combiners to multitelescope imaging combiners in thepupil and image planes. Much

  12. The Keck Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colavita, M. M.; Wizinowich, P. L.; Akeson, R. L.; Ragland, S.; Woillez, J. M.; Millan-Gabet, R.; Serabyn, E.; Abajian, M.; Acton, D. S.; Appleby, E.; Beletic, J. W.; Beichman, C. A.; Bell, J.; Berkey, B. C.; Berlin, J.; Boden, A. F.; Booth, A. J.; Boutell, R.; Chaffee, F. H.; Chan, D.; Chin, J.; Chock, J.; Cohen, R.; Cooper, A.; Crawford, S. L.; Creech-Eakman, M. J.; Dahl, W.; Eychaner, G.; Fanson, J. L.; Felizardo, C.; Garcia-Gathright, J. I.; Gathright, J. T.; Hardy, G.; Henderson, H.; Herstein, J. S.; Hess, M.; Hovland, E. E.; Hrynevych, M. A.; Johansson, E.; Johnson, R. L.; Kelley, J.; Kendrick, R.; Koresko, C. D.; Kurpis, P.; Le Mignant, D.; Lewis, H. A.; Ligon, E. R.; Lupton, W.; McBride, D.; Medeiros, D. W.; Mennesson, B. P.; Moore, J. D.; Morrison, D.; Nance, C.; Neyman, C.; Niessner, A.; Paine, C. G.; Palmer, D. L.; Panteleeva, T.; Papin, M.; Parvin, B.; Reder, L.; Rudeen, A.; Saloga, T.; Sargent, A.; Shao, M.; Smith, B.; Smythe, R. F.; Stomski, P.; Summers, K. R.; Swain, M. R.; Swanson, P.; Thompson, R.; Tsubota, K.; Tumminello, A.; Tyau, C.; van Belle, G. T.; Vasisht, G.; Vause, J.; Vescelus, F.; Walker, J.; Wallace, J. K.; Wehmeier, U.; Wetherell, E.

    2013-10-01

    The Keck Interferometer (KI) combined the two 10 m W. M. Keck Observatory telescopes on Mauna Kea, Hawaii, as a long-baseline near- and mid-infrared interferometer. Funded by NASA, it operated from 2001 until 2012. KI used adaptive optics on the two Keck telescopes to correct the individual wavefronts, as well as active fringe tracking in all modes for path-length control, including the implementation of cophasing to provide long coherent integration times. KI implemented high sensitivity fringe-visibility measurements at H (1.6 μm), K (2.2 μm), and L (3.8 μm) bands, and nulling measurements at N band (10 μm), which were used to address a broad range of science topics. Supporting these capabilities was an extensive interferometer infrastructure and unique instrumentation, including some additional functionality added as part of the NSF-funded ASTRA program. This paper provides an overview of the instrument architecture and some of the key design and implementation decisions, as well as a description of all of the key elements and their configuration at the end of the project. The objective is to provide a view of KI as an integrated system, and to provide adequate technical detail to assess the implementation. Included is a discussion of the operational aspects of the system, as well as of the achieved system performance. Finally, details on V2 calibration in the presence of detector nonlinearities as applied in the data pipeline are provided.

  13. Improved straightness interferometer for nanometrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chien-Ming

    2005-02-01

    The interferometers which measure the displacement parallel to the measurement axis are called linear interferometers, while those measure the displacement orthogonal to the measurement axis are called straightness interferometers. Theoretically, the orthogonal characteristic between the displacement and the measurement axis does not introduce optical path difference (OPD) and thus, makes null signal. These lead to the straightness interferometer difficult to be implemented. A generalized laser interferometer system based on three design principles, the heterodyne frequency, the avoiding mixing, and the perfect symmetry, is described. These design principles give rise to the interferometer a highly stable system with no periodic nonlinearity. A novel straightness sensor, consisting of a straightness prism and a straightness reflector, is incorporated into the generalized system to form a straightness interferometer. With the help of a Hewlett-Packard commercial linear interferometer, the validity of the developed straightness interferometer has verified. Based on the present design, the interferometer has a gain of 0.348, a periodic nonlinearity of less than 40 picometers, and a displacement noise of 4 pm/√Hz at bandwidth 7.8 kHz. This system is useful in precision straightness measurement.

  14. Weather Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivekanandan, Jothiram

    2004-10-01

    Weather radar is an indispensable component for remote sensing of the atmosphere, and the data and products derived from weather radar are routinely used in climate and weather-related studies to examine trends, structure, and evolution. The need for weather remote sensing is driven by the necessity to understand and explain a specific atmospheric science phenomenon. The importance of remote sensing is especially evident in high-profile observational programs, such as the WSR-88D (Weather Surveillance Radar) network, TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission), and ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement). A suite of ground-based and airborne radar instruments is maintained and deployed for observing wind, clouds, and precipitation. Weather radar observation has become an integral component of weather forecasting and hydrology and climate studies. The inclusion of weather radar observations in numerical weather modeling has enhanced severe storm forecasting, aviation weather, hurricane intensity and movement, and the global water cycle.

  15. Single-Pass Flow-Through Test Elucidation of Weathering Behavior and Evaluation of Contaminant Release Models for Hanford Tank Residual Radioactive Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Cantrell, Kirk J.; Carroll, Kenneth C.; Buck, Edgar C.; Neiner, Doinita; Geiszler, Keith N.

    2013-01-01

    Contaminant release models are required to evaluate and predict long-term environmental impacts of even residual amounts of high-level radioactive waste after cleanup and closure of radioactively contaminated sites such as the DOE’s Hanford Site. More realistic and representative models have been developed for release of uranium, technetium, and chromium from Hanford Site tanks C-202, C-203, and C-103 residual wastes using data collected with a single-pass flow-through test (SPFT) method. These revised models indicate that contaminant release concentrations from these residual wastes will be considerably lower than previous estimates based on batch experiments. For uranium, a thermodynamic solubility model provides an effective description of uranium release, which can account for differences in pore fluid chemistry contacting the waste that could occur through time and as a result of different closure scenarios. Under certain circumstances in the SPFT experiments various calcium rich precipitates (calcium phosphates and calcite) form on the surfaces of the waste particles, inhibiting dissolution of the underlying uranium phases in the waste. This behavior was not observed in previous batch experiments. For both technetium and chromium, empirical release models were developed. In the case of technetium, release from all three wastes was modeled using an equilibrium Kd model. For chromium release, a constant concentration model was applied for all three wastes.

  16. Capric Acid Absorption in the Presence of Hydroxypropyl-β-Cyclodextrin in the Rat Ileum using the In Situ Single-Pass Perfusion Technique.

    PubMed

    Hymas, Richard V; Ho, Norman F H; Higuchi, William I

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was to gain quantitative mechanistic insight into the role cyclodextrin carriers may play in the intestinal absorption of highly lipophilic molecules. The physical model approach was employed to investigate capric acid absorption in the rat ileum using the in situ single-pass method with 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPB) present in the perfusate. Two physical models were examined: the flat surface model in which the intestinal wall was treated as a hollow, smooth, circular cylinder, and the villus model in which the intestinal surface allowed for the presence of villi. Capric acid absorption was found to be essentially 100% aqueous boundary layer controlled at low HPB concentrations and increasingly membrane controlled at the higher HPB concentrations. Theoretical calculations based on the experimental data and model parameters were found to be consistent with: at low HPB concentrations, capric acid was mainly absorbed at the villus tips and there was very little capric acid penetration into the intervillus space; in contrast, at 50 mM HPB, there was considerable capric acid penetration into the intervillus space, this corresponding to around a 4.5-fold increase in the accessible area for absorption when compared with 0 mM HPB.

  17. Absorption characteristic of paeoniflorin-6'-O-benzene sulfonate (CP-25) in in situ single-pass intestinal perfusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-Dan; Wang, Chun; Zhou, Peng; Yu, Jun; Asenso, James; Ma, Yong; Wei, Wei

    2016-09-01

    1. Paeoniflorin-6'-O-benzene sulfonate (CP-25) was synthesized to improve the poor oral absorption of paeoniflorin (Pae). 2. This study was performed to investigate the absorptive behavior and mechanism of CP-25 in in situ single-pass intestinal perfusion in rats, using Pae as a control. 3. The results showed that intestinal absorption of CP-25 was neither segmental nor sex dependent. However, the main segment of intestine that absorbed Pae was the duodenum. Furthermore, passive transport was confirmed to be the main absorption pattern of CP-25. More importantly, the absorption of CP-25 was much higher than Pae in the small intestine. 4. Among the ABC transporter inhibitors, the absorption rate of Pae increased in the presence of P-gp inhibitors verapamil and GF120918, which indicated that Pae was a substrate of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), however, such was not observed in the presence of breast cancer resistance protein and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2. Finally, the ABC transporter inhibitors did not have any significant impact on CP-25 as demonstrated in the parallel studies. 5. CP-25 could improve the poor absorption of Pae, which may be attributed to both the lipid solubility enhancement and its resistance to P-gp-mediated efflux. PMID:26711120

  18. Solvent drag in jejunal absorption of salicylic acid and antipyrine obtained by in situ single-pass perfusion method in rat.

    PubMed

    Hirasawa, T; Muraoka, T; Karino, A; Hayashi, M; Awazu, S

    1984-04-01

    The in situ single-pass perfusion method in an individual rat was developed to discuss the solvent drag in drug intestinal absorption without the individual differences. In this method the apparent water influx (influx') was used as a measure of solvent drag in the same manner as the previous paper. Consequently the sieving coefficients of salicylic acid and antipyrine in one rat are not significantly different from one but in the other are significantly smaller than one, resulting in 0.6-0.7 in average. And it was also shown that the reflection from the membrane in the solvent drag can be detected more precisely and efficiently by this method than the recirculating method in the previous paper. The D2O absorption clearance (CLD2O) was equal to net water flux as estimated theoretically when the D2O concentration in lumen was equal to that in plasma, indicating that D2O can be absorbed by water absorption even in the absence of the concentration gradient. Estimating the real water influx from the net water flux obtained under such condition, the minimal contribution ratio of the solvent drag to the total absorption clearance of salicylic acid and antipyrine was calculated to be approximately 12%.

  19. Absorption characteristic of paeoniflorin-6'-O-benzene sulfonate (CP-25) in in situ single-pass intestinal perfusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-Dan; Wang, Chun; Zhou, Peng; Yu, Jun; Asenso, James; Ma, Yong; Wei, Wei

    2016-09-01

    1. Paeoniflorin-6'-O-benzene sulfonate (CP-25) was synthesized to improve the poor oral absorption of paeoniflorin (Pae). 2. This study was performed to investigate the absorptive behavior and mechanism of CP-25 in in situ single-pass intestinal perfusion in rats, using Pae as a control. 3. The results showed that intestinal absorption of CP-25 was neither segmental nor sex dependent. However, the main segment of intestine that absorbed Pae was the duodenum. Furthermore, passive transport was confirmed to be the main absorption pattern of CP-25. More importantly, the absorption of CP-25 was much higher than Pae in the small intestine. 4. Among the ABC transporter inhibitors, the absorption rate of Pae increased in the presence of P-gp inhibitors verapamil and GF120918, which indicated that Pae was a substrate of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), however, such was not observed in the presence of breast cancer resistance protein and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2. Finally, the ABC transporter inhibitors did not have any significant impact on CP-25 as demonstrated in the parallel studies. 5. CP-25 could improve the poor absorption of Pae, which may be attributed to both the lipid solubility enhancement and its resistance to P-gp-mediated efflux.

  20. Planetary Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neish, Catherine D.; Carter, Lynn M.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the principles of planetary radar, and the primary scientific discoveries that have been made using this technique. The chapter starts by describing the different types of radar systems and how they are used to acquire images and accurate topography of planetary surfaces and probe their subsurface structure. It then explains how these products can be used to understand the properties of the target being investigated. Several examples of discoveries made with planetary radar are then summarized, covering solar system objects from Mercury to Saturn. Finally, opportunities for future discoveries in planetary radar are outlined and discussed.

  1. 5.7  W cw single-frequency laser at 671  nm by single-pass second harmonic generation of a 17.2  W injection-locked 1342  nm Nd : YVO4 ring laser using periodically poled MgO : LiNbO3.

    PubMed

    Koch, Peter; Ruebel, Felix; Bartschke, Juergen; L'huillier, Johannes A

    2015-11-20

    We demonstrate a continuous wave single-frequency laser at 671.1 nm based on a high-power 888 nm pumped Nd:YVO4 ring laser at 1342.2 nm. Unidirectional operation of the fundamental ring laser is achieved with the injection-locking technique. A Nd:YVO4 microchip laser serves as the injecting seed source, providing a tunable single-frequency power of up to 40 mW. The ring laser emits a single-frequency power of 17.2 W with a Gaussian beam profile and a beam propagation factor of M2<1.1. A 60-mm-long periodically poled MgO-doped LiNbO3 crystal is used to generate the second harmonic in a single-pass scheme. Up to 5.7 W at 671.1 nm with a Gaussian shaped beam profile and a beam propagation factor of M2<1.2 are obtained, which is approximately twice the power of previously reported lasers. This work opens possibilities in cold atoms experiments with lithium, allowing the use of larger ensembles in magneto-optical traps or higher diffraction orders in atomic beam interferometers.

  2. 5.7  W cw single-frequency laser at 671  nm by single-pass second harmonic generation of a 17.2  W injection-locked 1342  nm Nd : YVO4 ring laser using periodically poled MgO : LiNbO3.

    PubMed

    Koch, Peter; Ruebel, Felix; Bartschke, Juergen; L'huillier, Johannes A

    2015-11-20

    We demonstrate a continuous wave single-frequency laser at 671.1 nm based on a high-power 888 nm pumped Nd:YVO4 ring laser at 1342.2 nm. Unidirectional operation of the fundamental ring laser is achieved with the injection-locking technique. A Nd:YVO4 microchip laser serves as the injecting seed source, providing a tunable single-frequency power of up to 40 mW. The ring laser emits a single-frequency power of 17.2 W with a Gaussian beam profile and a beam propagation factor of M2<1.1. A 60-mm-long periodically poled MgO-doped LiNbO3 crystal is used to generate the second harmonic in a single-pass scheme. Up to 5.7 W at 671.1 nm with a Gaussian shaped beam profile and a beam propagation factor of M2<1.2 are obtained, which is approximately twice the power of previously reported lasers. This work opens possibilities in cold atoms experiments with lithium, allowing the use of larger ensembles in magneto-optical traps or higher diffraction orders in atomic beam interferometers. PMID:26836563

  3. Improved Skin Friction Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westphal, R. V.; Bachalo, W. D.; Houser, M. H.

    1986-01-01

    An improved system for measuring aerodynamic skin friction which uses a dual-laser-beam oil-film interferometer was developed. Improvements in the optical hardware provided equal signal characteristics for each beam and reduced the cost and complexity of the system by replacing polarization rotation by a mirrored prism for separation of the two signals. An automated, objective, data-reduction procedure was implemented to eliminate tedious manual manipulation of the interferometry data records. The present system was intended for use in two-dimensional, incompressible flows over a smooth, level surface without pressure gradient, but the improvements discussed are not limited to this application.

  4. Spaceborne radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. K.; Eckerman, J.; Meneghini, R.; Atlas, D.; Boerner, W. M.; Cherry, S.; Clark, J. F.; Doviak, R. J.; Goldhirsh, J.; Lhermitte, R. M.

    1981-01-01

    The spaceborne radar panel considered how radar could be used to measure precipitation from satellites. The emphasis was on how radar could be used with radiometry (at microwave, visible (VIS), and infrared (IR) wavelengths) to reduce the uncertainties of measuring precipitation with radiometry alone. In addition, the fundamental electromagnetic interactions involved in the measurements were discussed to determine the key work areas for research and development to produce effective instruments. Various approaches to implementing radar systems on satellites were considered for both shared and dedicated instruments. Finally, a research and development strategy was proposed for establishing the parametric relations and retrieval algorithms required for extracting precipitation information from the radar and associated radiometric data.

  5. Wavelength independent interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochberg, Eric B. (Inventor); Page, Norman A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A polychromatic interferometer utilizing a plurality of parabolic reflective surfaces to properly preserve the fidelity of light wavefronts irrespective of their wavelengths as they pass through the instrument is disclosed. A preferred embodiment of the invention utilizes an optical train which comprises three off-axis parabolas arranged in conjunction with a beam-splitter and a reference mirror to form a Twyman-Green interferometer. An illumination subsystem is provided and comprises a pair of lasers at different preselected wavelengths in the visible spectrum. The output light of the two lasers is coaxially combined by means of a plurality of reflectors and a grating beam combiner to form a single light source at the focal point of the first parabolic reflection surface which acts as a beam collimator for the rest of the optical train. By using visible light having two distinct wavelengths, the present invention provides a long equivalent wavelength interferogram which operates at visible light wherein the effective wavelength is equal to the product of the wavelengths of the two laser sources divided by their difference in wavelength. As a result, the invention provides the advantages of what amounts to long wavelength interferometry but without incurring the disadvantage of the negligible reflection coefficient of the human eye to long wavelength frequencies which would otherwise defeat any attempt to form an interferogram at that low frequency using only one light source.

  6. The Fizeau Interferometer Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Xiaolei; Carpenter, Kenneth G.; Lyon, Richard G,; Huet, Hubert; Marzouk, Joe; Solyar, Gregory

    2003-01-01

    The Fizeau Interferometer Testbed (FIT) is a collaborative effort between NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, the Naval Research Laboratory, Sigma Space Corporation, and the University of Maryland. The testbed will be used to explore the principles of and the requirements for the full, as well as the pathfinder, Stellar Imager mission concept. It has a long term goal of demonstrating closed-loop control of a sparse array of numerous articulated mirrors to keep optical beams in phase and optimize interferometric synthesis imaging. In this paper we present the optical and data acquisition system design of the testbed, and discuss the wavefront sensing and control algorithms to be used. Currently we have completed the initial design and hardware procurement for the FIT. The assembly and testing of the Testbed will be underway at Goddard's Instrument Development Lab in the coming months.

  7. The Stress-Relief Cracking Susceptibility of a New Ferritic Steel - Part I: Single-Pass Heat-Affected Zone Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    NAWROCKI,J.G.; DUPONT,J.N.; ROBINO,CHARLES V.; MARDER,A.R.

    1999-12-15

    The stress-relief cracking susceptibility of single-pass welds in a new ferritic steel, HCM2S, has been evaluated and compared to 2.25Cr-1Mo steel using Gleeble techniques. Simulated coarse-grained heat-affected zones (CGHAZ) were produced under a range of energy inputs and tested at various post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) temperatures. Both alloys were tested at a stress of 325 MPa. The 2.25 Cr-1Mo steel was also tested at 270 MPa to normalize for the difference in yield strength between the two materials. Light optical and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize the CGHAZ microstructure. The ''as-welded'' CGHAZ of each alloy consisted of lath martensite or bainite and had approximately equal prior austenite grain sizes. The as-welded hardness of the 2.25Cr-1Mo steel CGHAZ was significantly higher than that of the HCM2S alloy. Over the range studied energy input had no effect on the as-welded microstructure or hardness of either alloy. The energy input also had no effect on the stress-relief cracking susceptibility of either material. Both alloys failed intergranularly along prior austenite grain boundaries under all test conditions. The 2.25Cr-1Mo steel samples experienced significant macroductility and some microductility when tested at 325 MPa. The ductility decreased significantly when tested at 270 MPa but was still higher that than of HCM2S at each test condition. The time to failure decreased with increasing PWHT Temperature for each material. There was no significant difference in the times to failure between the two materials. Varying energy input and stress had no effect on the time-to failure. The ductility, as measured by reduction in are% increased with increasing PWHT temperature for 2.25 Cr-1Mo steel tested at both stresses. However, PWHT temperature had no effect on the ductility of HCM2S. The hardness of the CGHAZ for 2.25Cr-1Mo steel decreased significantly after PWHT, but remained constant for HCM2S. The differences in stress

  8. The Keck Interferometer Nuller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serabyn, E.; Mennesson, B.; Colavita, M. M.; Koresko, C.; Kuchner, M. J.

    2012-01-01

    The Keck Interferometer Nuller (KIN), the first operational separated-aperture infrared nulling interferometer, was designed to null the mid-infrared emission from nearby stars so as to ease the measurement of faint circumstellar emission. This paper describes the basis of the KIN's four-beam, two-stage measurement approach and compares it 10 the simpler case of a two-beam nuller. In the four-beam KIN system, the starlight is first nulled in a pair of nullers operating on parallel 85 m Keck-Keck baselines, after which "cross-combination" on 4 m baselines across the Keck apertures is used to modulate and detect residual coherent off-axis emission. Comparison to the constructive itellar fringe provides calibration. The response to an extended source is similar in the two cases, except that the four-beam response includes a term due to the visibility of the source on the cross-combiner baseline-a small effect for relatively compact sources. The characteristics of the dominant null depth errors are also compared for the two cases. In the two-beam nuller, instrumental imperfections and asymmetries lead to a series of quadratic, positivedefinite null leakage terms. For the four-beam nuller, the leakage is instead a series of correlation cross-tenns combining corresponding errors in each of the two nullers, which contribute offsets only to the extent that these errors are correlated on the timescale of the measurement. This four-beam architecture has allowed a significant (approx. order of magnitude) improvement in mid-infrared long-baseline fringe-visibility accuracies.

  9. MIT's interferometer CST testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyde, Tupper; Kim, ED; Anderson, Eric; Blackwood, Gary; Lublin, Leonard

    1990-01-01

    The MIT Space Engineering Research Center (SERC) has developed a controlled structures technology (CST) testbed based on one design for a space-based optical interferometer. The role of the testbed is to provide a versatile platform for experimental investigation and discovery of CST approaches. In particular, it will serve as the focus for experimental verification of CSI methodologies and control strategies at SERC. The testbed program has an emphasis on experimental CST--incorporating a broad suite of actuators and sensors, active struts, system identification, passive damping, active mirror mounts, and precision component characterization. The SERC testbed represents a one-tenth scaled version of an optical interferometer concept based on an inherently rigid tetrahedral configuration with collecting apertures on one face. The testbed consists of six 3.5 meter long truss legs joined at four vertices and is suspended with attachment points at three vertices. Each aluminum leg has a 0.2 m by 0.2 m by 0.25 m triangular cross-section. The structure has a first flexible mode at 31 Hz and has over 50 global modes below 200 Hz. The stiff tetrahedral design differs from similar testbeds (such as the JPL Phase B) in that the structural topology is closed. The tetrahedral design minimizes structural deflections at the vertices (site of optical components for maximum baseline) resulting in reduced stroke requirements for isolation and pointing of optics. Typical total light path length stability goals are on the order of lambda/20, with a wavelength of light, lambda, of roughly 500 nanometers. It is expected that active structural control will be necessary to achieve this goal in the presence of disturbances.

  10. The Keck Interferometer Nuller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serabyn, E.; Mennesson, B.; Colavita, M. M.; Koresko, C.; Kuchner, M. J.

    2012-03-01

    The Keck Interferometer Nuller (KIN), the first operational separated-aperture infrared nulling interferometer, was designed to null the mid-infrared emission from nearby stars so as to ease the measurement of faint circumstellar emission. This paper describes the basis of the KIN's four-beam, two-stage measurement approach and compares it to the simpler case of a two-beam nuller. In the four-beam KIN system, the starlight is first nulled in a pair of nullers operating on parallel 85 m Keck-Keck baselines, after which "cross-combination" on 4 m baselines across the Keck apertures is used to modulate and detect residual coherent off-axis emission. Comparison to the constructive stellar fringe provides calibration. The response to an extended source is similar in the two cases, except that the four-beam response includes a term due to the visibility of the source on the cross-combiner baseline—a small effect for relatively compact sources. The characteristics of the dominant null depth errors are also compared for the two cases. In the two-beam nuller, instrumental imperfections and asymmetries lead to a series of quadratic, positive-definite null leakage terms. For the four-beam nuller, the leakage is instead a series of correlation cross-terms combining corresponding errors in each of the two nullers, which contribute offsets only to the extent that these errors are correlated on the timescale of the measurement. This four-beam architecture has allowed a significant (~order of magnitude) improvement in mid-infrared long-baseline fringe-visibility accuracies.

  11. MIT's interferometer CST testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyde, Tupper; Kim, Ed; Anderson, Eric; Blackwood, Gary; Lublin, Leonard

    1990-12-01

    The MIT Space Engineering Research Center (SERC) has developed a controlled structures technology (CST) testbed based on one design for a space-based optical interferometer. The role of the testbed is to provide a versatile platform for experimental investigation and discovery of CST approaches. In particular, it will serve as the focus for experimental verification of CSI methodologies and control strategies at SERC. The testbed program has an emphasis on experimental CST--incorporating a broad suite of actuators and sensors, active struts, system identification, passive damping, active mirror mounts, and precision component characterization. The SERC testbed represents a one-tenth scaled version of an optical interferometer concept based on an inherently rigid tetrahedral configuration with collecting apertures on one face. The testbed consists of six 3.5 meter long truss legs joined at four vertices and is suspended with attachment points at three vertices. Each aluminum leg has a 0.2 m by 0.2 m by 0.25 m triangular cross-section. The structure has a first flexible mode at 31 Hz and has over 50 global modes below 200 Hz. The stiff tetrahedral design differs from similar testbeds (such as the JPL Phase B) in that the structural topology is closed. The tetrahedral design minimizes structural deflections at the vertices (site of optical components for maximum baseline) resulting in reduced stroke requirements for isolation and pointing of optics. Typical total light path length stability goals are on the order of lambda/20, with a wavelength of light, lambda, of roughly 500 nanometers. It is expected that active structural control will be necessary to achieve this goal in the presence of disturbances.

  12. Radar history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putley, Ernest

    2008-07-01

    The invention of radar, as mentioned in Chris Lavers' article on warship stealth technology (March pp21-25), continues to be a subject of discussion. Here in Malvern we have just unveiled a blue plaque to commemorate the physicist Albert Percival Rowe, who arrived in 1942 as the head of the Telecommunications Research Establishment (TRE), which was the Air Ministry research facility responsible for the first British radar systems.

  13. Development of HRO interferometer at Kochi University of Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Masa-Yuki; Horiuchi, Hirotaka; Okamoto, Goro; Hamaguchi, Haruko; Noguchi, Kazuya

    2007-12-01

    As a typical radio meteor observation method, the Ham-band Radio meteor Observation (HRO) has been spread to many amateur meteor observers in the world, resulting in worldwide continuous detection of each meteor echo at precise time of appearance in any weather condition as well as in daytime. However, direction finding of incoming electromagnetic waves by meteors is difficult to obtain by a usual HRO system. An application of HRO with interferometer technique was developed in 2004-2005 in Kochi University of Technology (KUT), Japan. Within a context of the forwardscattering radar method, an HRO interferometer (HRO-IF) with 3 antennas was developed. Detailed structure of the HRO-IF system at KUT as well as calibration experiments of establishing accurate direction determination are presented.

  14. A compact, low-cost, wide-angle radar test bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorman, John D.; Majumder, Uttam; Reed, John C.; Dilsavor, Ronald L.; Minardi, Michael; Zelnio, Edmund G.

    2006-05-01

    Recent technology developments in digital radio, low-cost inertial navigation systems and unmanned air vehicle design are converging to enable and make practical several new radar sensing modes such as simultaneous SAR/GMTI from persistent staring-mode radar, 3D SAR from a single-pass, single phase center radar and wide-angle radar tracking of dismounts. One of the challenges for algorithm developers is a lack of high-quality target and clutter signature data from the new radar modes. AFRL's Sensor Directorate and SET Corporation are developing a compact, low-cost wide-angle radar test bed capable of simulating a variety of radar modes, including 3D SAR, SAR/GMTI from staring-mode radar and ultra-fine resolution range-Doppler. We provide an overview of the wide-angle radar test bed architecture, its modular design and our implementation approach. We then describe several non-conventional wide-angle radar sensor modes and outline a corresponding series of test bed data collection experiments that could be used to support the development of new tracking and recognition algorithms.

  15. Balloon Exoplanet Nulling Interferometer (BENI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Clampin, Mark; Woodruff, Robert A.; Vasudevan, Gopal; Ford, Holland; Petro, Larry; Herman, Jay; Rinehart, Stephen; Carpenter, Kenneth; Marzouk, Joe

    2009-01-01

    We evaluate the feasibility of using a balloon-borne nulling interferometer to detect and characterize exosolar planets and debris disks. The existing instrument consists of a 3-telescope Fizeau imaging interferometer with 3 fast steering mirrors and 3 delay lines operating at 800 Hz for closed-loop control of wavefront errors and fine pointing. A compact visible nulling interferometer is under development which when coupled to the imaging interferometer would in-principle allow deep suppression of starlight. We have conducted atmospheric simulations of the environment above 100,000 feet and believe balloons are a feasible path forward towards detection and characterization of a limited set of exoplanets and their debris disks. Herein we will discuss the BENI instrument, the balloon environment and the feasibility of such as mission.

  16. Compact portable diffraction moire interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Deason, V.A.; Ward, M.B.

    1988-05-23

    A compact and portable moire interferometer used to determine surface deformations of an object. The improved interferometer is comprised of a laser beam, optical and fiber optics devices coupling the beam to one or more evanescent wave splitters, and collimating lenses directing the split beam at one or more specimen gratings. Observations means including film and video cameras may be used to view and record the resultant fringe patterns. 7 figs.

  17. Compact portable diffraction moire interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Deason, Vance A.; Ward, Michael B.

    1989-01-01

    A compact and portable moire interferometer used to determine surface deformations of an object. The improved interferometer is comprised of a laser beam, optical and fiber optics devices coupling the beam to one or more evanescent wave splitters, and collimating lenses directing the split beam at one or more specimen gratings. Observation means including film and video cameras may be used to view and record the resultant fringe patterns.

  18. Fiber Sagnac interferometer temperature sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Starodumov, A.N.; Zenteno, L.A.; Monzon, D.; De La Rosa, E.

    1997-01-01

    A modified Sagnac interferometer-based fiber temperature sensor is proposed. Polarization independent operation and high temperature sensitivity of this class of sensors make them cost effective instruments for temperature measurements. A comparison of the proposed sensor with Bragg grating and long-period grating fiber sensors is derived. A temperature-induced spectral displacement of 0.99 nm/K is demonstrated for an internal stress birefringent fiber-based Sagnac interferometer. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Surface profiling interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Takacs, Peter Z.; Qian, Shi-Nan

    1989-01-01

    The design of a long-trace surface profiler for the non-contact measurement of surface profile, slope error and curvature on cylindrical synchrotron radiation (SR) mirrors. The optical system is based upon the concept of a pencil-beam interferometer with an inherent large depth-of-field. The key feature of the optical system is the zero-path-difference beam splitter, which separates the laser beam into two colinear, variable-separation probe beams. A linear array detector is used to record the interference fringe in the image, and analysis of the fringe location as a function of scan position allows one to reconstruct the surface profile. The optical head is mounted on an air bearing slide with the capability to measure long aspheric optics, typical of those encountered in SR applications. A novel feature of the optical system is the use of a transverse "outrigger" beam which provides information on the relative alignment of the scan axis to the cylinder optic symmetry axis.

  20. Michelson Interferometer (MINT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacis, Andrew; Carlson, Barbara

    1993-09-01

    MINT is a Michelson interferometer designed to measure the thermal emission from the earth at high spectral resolution (2/cm) over a broad spectral range (250-1700/cm, 6-40 mu m) with contiguous 3-pixel wide (12 mrad, 8 km field of view) along-track sampling. MINT is particularly well suited for monitoring cloud properties (cloud cover, effective temperature, optical thickness, ice/water phase, and effective particle size) both day and night, as well as tropospheric water vapor, ozone, and temperature. The key instrument characteristics that make MINT ideally suited for decadal monitoring purposes are: high wavelength to wavelength precision across the full IR spectrum with high spectral resolution; space-proven long-term durability and calibration stability; and small size, low cost, low risk instrument incorporating the latest detector and electronics technology. MINT also incorporates simplicity in design and operation by utilizing passively cooled DTGS detectors and nadir viewing geometry (with target motion compensation). MINT measurement objectives, instrument characteristics, and key advantages are summarized in this paper.

  1. Michelson Interferometer (MINT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacis, Andrew; Carlson, Barbara

    1993-01-01

    MINT is a Michelson interferometer designed to measure the thermal emission from the earth at high spectral resolution (2/cm) over a broad spectral range (250-1700/cm, 6-40 mu m) with contiguous 3-pixel wide (12 mrad, 8 km field of view) along-track sampling. MINT is particularly well suited for monitoring cloud properties (cloud cover, effective temperature, optical thickness, ice/water phase, and effective particle size) both day and night, as well as tropospheric water vapor, ozone, and temperature. The key instrument characteristics that make MINT ideally suited for decadal monitoring purposes are: high wavelength to wavelength precision across the full IR spectrum with high spectral resolution; space-proven long-term durability and calibration stability; and small size, low cost, low risk instrument incorporating the latest detector and electronics technology. MINT also incorporates simplicity in design and operation by utilizing passively cooled DTGS detectors and nadir viewing geometry (with target motion compensation). MINT measurement objectives, instrument characteristics, and key advantages are summarized in this paper.

  2. First Results of the TOPSAR C-Band / L-Band Interferometer: Calibration and Differential Penetration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, Paul A.; Hensley, Scott

    1996-01-01

    The NASA/JPL TOPSAR instrument recently was extended from a single wavelength C-band dual aperture synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometer to include a second wavelength at the L-band. Adding the second wavelength invites comparison of wavelength-diverse effects in topographic mapping of surfaces, with the principal goal of understanding the penetration of the radar signals in vegetation canopies, and determining the inferred topographic height. A first analysis of these data was conducted at two sites. Elkhorn Slough near Monterey, California presented flat, vegetation free terrain required for calibrating the radar interferometer parameters. A second site stretching from San Jose to Santa Cruz, California, which is heavily vegetated, provided the first test case for wavelength diverse penetration studies. Preliminary results show that: (a) the interferometer calibration determined at Elkhorn Slough is extenable to Laurel Quad and gives confidence in the C- and L-band height measurements; (b) Clear differences were observed between the C- and L-band heights associated with vegetation, with the C-band derived topographic heights generally higher than those from L-band. The noise level in the L-band interferometer is presently the limiting factor in penetration studies.

  3. A 250 GHz microwave interferometer for divertor experiments on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    James, R.A.; Nilson, D.G.; Stever, R.D.; Hill, D.N.; Casper, T.A.

    1994-01-31

    A new 250 GHz, two-frequency microwave interferometer system has been developed to diagnose divertor plasmas on DIII-D. This diagnostic will measure the line-averaged density across both the inner and outer, lower divertor legs. With a cut-off density of over 7 {times} 10{sup 14} cm{sup {minus}3}, temporal measurements of ELMs, MARFs and plasma detachment are expected. The outer leg system will use a double pass method while the inner leg system will be single pass. Two special 3D carbon composite tiles are used, one to protect the microwave antennas mounted directly under the strike point and the other as the outer leg reflecting surface. Performance, design constraints, and the thermalmechanical design of the 3D carbon composite tiles are discussed.

  4. TIMED Doppler Interferometer: Overview and recent results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Killeen, T. L.; Wu, Q.; Solomon, S. C.; Ortland, D. A.; Skinner, W. R.; Niciejewski, R. J.; Gell, D. A.

    2006-10-01

    The Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) satellite carries a limb-scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer designed to perform remote-sensing measurements of upper atmosphere winds and temperatures globally. This instrument is called the TIMED Doppler Interferometer, or TIDI. This paper provides an overview of the TIDI instrument design, on-orbit performance, operational modes, data processing and inversion procedures, and a summary of wind results to date. Daytime and nighttime neutral winds in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere/ionosphere (MLTI) are measured on TIDI using four individual scanning telescopes that collect light from various upper atmosphere airglow layers on both the cold and warm sides of the high-inclination TIMED spacecraft. The light is spectrally analyzed using an ultrastable plane etalon Fabry-Perot system with sufficient spectral resolution to determine the Doppler line characteristics of atomic and molecular emissions emanating from the MLTI. The light from all four telescopes and from an internal calibration field passes through the etalon and is combined on a single image plane detector using a Circle-to-Line Interferometer Optic (CLIO). The four geophysical fields provide orthogonal line-of-sight measurements to either side of the satellite's path and these are analyzed to produce altitude profiles of vector winds in the MLTI. The TIDI wind measurements presented here are from the molecular oxygen (0-0) band, covering the altitude region 85-105 km. The unique TIDI design allows for more extended local time coverage of wind structures than previous wind-measuring instruments from high-inclination satellites. The TIDI operational performance has been nominal except for two anomalies: (1) higher than expected background white light caused by a low-level light leak and (2) ice deposition on cold optical surfaces. Both anomalies are well understood and the instrumental modes and data analysis techniques have been

  5. Planetary radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    The radar astronomy activities supported by the Deep Space Network during June, July, and August 1980 are reported. The planetary bodies observed were Venus, Mercury, and the asteroid Toro. Data were obtained at both S and X band, and the observations were considered successful.

  6. Status of the Jicamarca radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farley, T.

    1984-12-01

    The capabilities of the large 50-MHz radar at Jicamarca for mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere MST observations were discussed in some detail. Hence this description will be quite brief and will concentrate on recent improvements in the facility. The radar is located about 20 km from Lima, Peru. It is well shielded by surrounding mountains, and most of the ground clutter is restricted to ranges of 15 km or less. The antenna consists of 18,432 half-wave dipoles (9216 crossed pairs) covering an area of 290 m by 290 m and divided up into 64 independent modules which can be individually phased and/or used as separate antennas in any way desired. The whole array can be steered about 3 degrees from the on-axis position (the limit is the beam width of the individual modules, which cannot be steered), and any polarization can be arranged. Even with this limited steerability it is straightforward to determine vector wind velocities by pointing segments of the antenna in different directions. The radar can also be used as in interferometer.

  7. The NIST Length Scale Interferometer

    PubMed Central

    Beers, John S.; Penzes, William B.

    1999-01-01

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) interferometer for measuring graduated length scales has been in use since 1965. It was developed in response to the redefinition of the meter in 1960 from the prototype platinum-iridium bar to the wavelength of light. The history of the interferometer is recalled, and its design and operation described. A continuous program of modernization by making physical modifications, measurement procedure changes and computational revisions is described, and the effects of these changes are evaluated. Results of a long-term measurement assurance program, the primary control on the measurement process, are presented, and improvements in measurement uncertainty are documented.

  8. TRMM radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okamoto, Kenichi

    1993-01-01

    The results of a conceptual design study and the performance of key components of the Bread Board Model (BBM) of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) radar are presented. The radar, which operates at 13.8 GHz and is designed to meet TRMM mission objectives, has a minimum measurable rain rate of 0.5 mm/h with a range resolution of 250 m, a horizontal resolution of about 4 km, and a swath width of 220 km. A 128-element active phased array system is adopted to achieve contiguous scanning within the swath. The basic characteristics of BBM were confirmed by experiments. The development of EM started with the cooperation of NASDA and CRL.

  9. Microwave interferometer controls cutting depth of plastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heisman, R. M.; Iceland, W. F.

    1969-01-01

    Microwave interferometer system controls the cutting of plastic materials to a prescribed depth. The interferometer is mounted on a carriage with a spindle and cutting tool. A cross slide, mounted on the carriage, allows the interferometer and cutter to move toward or away from the plastic workpiece.

  10. Interferometer for the measurement of plasma density

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Abram R.

    1980-01-01

    An interferometer which combines the advantages of a coupled cavity interferometer requiring alignment of only one light beam, and a quadrature interferometer which has the ability to track multi-fringe phase excursions unambiguously. The device utilizes a Bragg cell for generating a signal which is electronically analyzed to unambiguously determine phase modulation which is proportional to the path integral of the plasma density.

  11. Triangle interferometer and its optimization.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Xu, Jiayan; Xiao, Jinhong; Wang, Zhengming

    1991-12-01

    The optimal configuration of the triangle for determining the ERP is an equilateral triangle or an isosceles right triangle. Analysing the data observed by Connected Element Interferometer at Green Bank shows that the accuracy of the ERP solved from three baselines' observations is much better than that of those solved from only two.

  12. Holographic Twyman-Green interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. W.; Breckinridge, J. B.

    1982-01-01

    A dichromated gelatin off-axis Fresnel zone plate was designed, fabricated, and used in a new type of interferometer for optical metrology. This single hologram optical element combines the functions of a beam splitter, beam diverger, and aberrated null lens. Data presented show the successful application for an interferometric test of an f/6, 200-mm diam parabolic mirror.

  13. Mesospheric wind measurements using a medium-frequency imaging Doppler interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, G. W.; scatterers.

    1986-01-01

    Wind results from a medium-frequency radar operated as an imaging Doppler interferometer are presented. Ten independent antennas, together with mesospheric wind motions, were used to Doppler-sort and then echo-locate individual scattering points. The three-dimensional location and radial velocity of each discrete scattering point was determined. Mean winds were then determined by a least squares fit to the radial velocities of the ensemble of scatterers.

  14. First Results of the TOPSAR C-Band/L-Band Interferometer: Calibration and Differential Penetration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, Paul A.; Hensley, Scott

    1996-01-01

    The NASA/JPL TOPSAR instrument recently was extended from a single- wavelength C-band (5.6 cm-lambda) dual aperture synthetic aperture radar interferometer to include a second wavelength at L-band (24 cm). Adding the second wavelength invites comparison of wavelength-diverse effects in topographic mapping of surfaces, with the principal goal of understanding the penetration of the radar signals in vegetation canopies, and determining the inferred topographic height. A first analysis of these data was conducted at two sites. Elkhorn Slough near Monterey, California presented flat, vegetation free terrain required for calibrating the radar interferometric parameters. A second site stretching from San Jose to Santa Cruz, CA, which is heavily vegetated, provided the first test case for wavelength diverse penetration studies. Preliminary results show that: (a) the interferometer calibration determined at Elkhorn Slough is extendable to Laurel Quad and gives confidence in the C- and L-band height measurements; and (b) Clear differences are observed between the C- and L-band heights associated with vegetation, with C-band-derived topographic heights generally higher than those from L-band. The noise level in the L-band interferometer is presently the limiting factor in penetration studies.

  15. Observation and theory of the radar aurora

    SciTech Connect

    Sahr, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    Plasma density irregularities occurring near the Aurora Borealis cause scattering of HF, VHF, and UHF radio waves. Analysis of the resulting radar signal provides great detail about the spatial and temporal characteristics of these auroral E region irregularities. Observations are presented of the radar aurora from recent campaigns in northern Sweden. After reviewing the basic theory and observations of auroral electrojet irregularities, a simple nonlinear fluid theory of electrojet ion-acoustic waves is introduced, and reduced to a form of the three-wave interaction equations. This theory provides a simple mechanism for excitation of linearly stable waves at large aspect and flow angles, as well as a prediction of the power spectra that a coherent scatter radar should observe. In addition, this theory may be able to account for type 3 waves without resorting to ion gyro modes, such as the electrostatic ion-cyclotron wave. During the course of the research a simple new radar transmitting mode and signal processing algorithm was generated which very simply solves a frequency aliasing problem that often occurs in CUPRI auroral radar studies. Several new radar data analysis routines were developed, including the principally cross-beam image and scatter plots of the second versus first moments of the power spectrum of the irregularities. Analysis of vertical interferometer data shows that type 3 waves originate at ordinary electrojet altitudes, not in the upper E region, from which it is concluded that the electrostatic ion-cyclotron mode does not generate type 3 waves. The measured height of type 3 waves and other spectral analyses provide support for the pure ion-acoustic theory of type 3 waves. Suggestions are offered for hardware improvements to the CUPRI radar, new experiments to test new and existing theories.

  16. Nulling at the Keck Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colavita, M. Mark; Serabyn, Gene; Wizinowich, Peter L.; Akeson, Rachel L.

    2006-01-01

    The nulling mode of the Keck Interferometer is being commissioned at the Mauna Kea summit. The nuller combines the two Keck telescope apertures in a split-pupil mode to both cancel the on-axis starlight and to coherently detect the residual signal. The nuller, working at 10 um, is tightly integrated with the other interferometer subsystems including the fringe and angle trackers, the delay lines and laser metrology, and the real-time control system. Since first 10 um light in August 2004, the system integration is proceeding with increasing functionality and performance, leading to demonstration of a 100:1 on-sky null in 2005. That level of performance has now been extended to observations with longer coherent integration times. An overview of the overall system is presented, with emphasis on the observing sequence, phasing system, and differences with respect to the V2 system, along with a presentation of some recent engineering data.

  17. A Strontium87 Ion Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Christopher J.; Archibald, James L., II; Jackson, Jarom; Anderson, Dean; Hermansen, Michael; Cunningham, Mark; Durfee, Dallin S.

    2011-05-01

    We describe a matter-wave interferometer based on Sr87+. The ions are generated from a laser-cooled strontium beam that is photo-ionized using a two-photon transition to an auto- ionizing state in the continuum. The ionization occurs between two electrodes, allowing us to accelerate the ions to any desired energy from a few meV to 20 keV. Each ion's quantum wave is split and recombined using stimulated Raman transitions between the hyperfine ground states of Sr87+. The two required optical frequencies for this transition are created by frequency-shifting a master laser in opposite directions by half of the 5 GHz ground-state hyperfine splitting. We can then determine the interferometer phase from the fluorescence of one of the ground states. We will discuss the theory of operation, experimental methods, and potential applications of the device. NSF, NIST

  18. A Slow Ion Strontium Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Christopher; Durfee, Dallin

    2009-10-01

    I will discuss an interferometer centered around a laser-cooled source of ^87Sr^+ ions, which will be split and recombined using stimulated Raman transitions. This will take place inside a conducting cylinder allowing the interferometer to measure electric and magnetic fields with unprecedented precision. Practical applications for the device include the precision measurement of the evolution of fields near solids to reveal their electronic structure. It will also be used for fundamental tests of the basic laws of electromagnetism and the search for a non-zero photon rest mass. The device should detect possible photon rest mass more than 100 times smaller than previous laboratory experiments. Both the details of the device and the theory connecting deviations from Coulomb's inverse-square law to a theory of massive photons will be discussed.

  19. Lensless reflective point diffraction interferometer.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wenhua; Chen, Lei; Zheng, Donghui; Yang, Ying; Han, Zhigang; Li, Jinpeng

    2016-07-01

    A lensless reflective point diffraction interferometer (LRPDI) is proposed for dynamic wavefront measurement. The point diffraction interferometer is integrated on a small substrate with properly designed thin film, which is used for generating the interferogram with high carrier frequency at a CCD target. By lensless imaging, the complex amplitude at the CCD target can be propagated to the conjugated plane of the exit pupil of an incident wavefront, which not only avoids the edge diffraction in the interferogram, but also eliminates systematic error. The accuracy of LRPDI is demonstrated by simulation and experiment, and a precision better than 1/150 wavelength is achieved. The new design with lensless imaging processing is suitable for dynamic wavefront measurement. PMID:27409204

  20. Fiber optic synthetic aperture interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hercher, Michael

    1990-08-01

    This report describes a Fiber Optic Stellar Interferometer built by Optra, Inc. for the purposes of (1) measuring stellar diameters using a pair of small portable telescopes (rather than a large observatory telescope), and (2) measuring atmospheric turbulence. The key element of this concept is the use of singlemode optical fibers to link the separate small telescopes with the interferometer module. We have shown that the proposed turbulence measurements are entirely feasible using a distant light source (preferably a laser). The demonstration of the ability to obtain white light fringes through the fibers was not successful. We believe that this is due to a mismatch in the lengths of the fibers, and we have proposed a simple and flexible solution to this problem.

  1. Stellar Interferometer Technology Experiment (SITE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawley, Edward F.; Miller, David; Laskin, Robert; Shao, Michael

    1995-01-01

    The MIT Space Engineering Research Center and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory stand ready to advance science sensor technology for discrete-aperture astronomical instruments such as space-based optical interferometers. The objective of the Stellar Interferometer Technology Experiment (SITE) is to demonstrate system-level functionality of a space-based stellar interferometer through the use of enabling and enhancing Controlled-Structures Technologies (CST). SITE mounts to the Mission Peculiar Experiment Support System inside the Shuttle payload bay. Starlight, entering through two apertures, is steered to a combining plate where it is interferred. Interference requires 27 nanometer pathlength (phasing) and 0.29 archsecond wavefront-tilt (pointing) control. The resulting 15 milli-archsecond angular resolution exceeds that of current earth-orbiting telescopes while maintaining low cost by exploiting active optics and structural control technologies. With these technologies, unforeseen and time-varying disturbances can be rejected while relaxing reliance on ground alignment and calibration. SITE will reduce the risk and cost of advanced optical space systems by validating critical technologies in their operational environment. Moreover, these technologies are directly applicable to commercially driven applications such as precision matching, optical scanning, and vibration and noise control systems for the aerospace, medical, and automotive sectors. The SITE team consists of experienced university, government, and industry researchers, scientists, and engineers with extensive expertise in optical interferometry, nano-precision opto-mechanical control and spaceflight experimentation. The experience exists and the technology is mature. SITE will validate these technologies on a functioning interferometer science sensor in order to confirm definitely their readiness to be baselined for future science missions.

  2. Unequal-Arms Michelson Interferometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinto, Massimo; Armstrong, J. W.

    1999-01-01

    Michelson interferometers allow phase measurements many orders of magnitude below the phase stability of the laser light injected into their two almost equal-length arms. If, however, the two arms are unequal, the laser fluctuations can not be removed by simply recombining the two beams. This is because the laser jitters experience different time delays in the two arms, and therefore can not cancel at the photo detector. We present here a method for achieving exact laser noise cancellation, even in an unequal-arm interferometer. The method presented in this paper requires a separate readout of the relative phase in each arm, made by interfering the returning beam in each arm with a fraction of the outgoing beam. By linearly combining the two data sets with themselves, after they have been properly time-shifted, we show that it is possible to construct a new data set that is free of laser fluctuations. An application of this technique to future planned space-based laser interferometer detectors of gravitational radiation is discussed.

  3. Polarized-interferometer feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raab, F. H.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of using a polarized-interferometer system as a rendezvous and docking sensor for two cooperating spacecraft was studied. The polarized interferometer is a radio frequency system for long range, real time determination of relative position and attitude. Range is determined by round trip signal timing. Direction is determined by radio interferometry. Relative roll is determined from signal polarization. Each spacecraft is equipped with a transponder and an antenna array. The antenna arrays consist of four crossed dipoles that can transmit or receive either circularly or linearly polarized signals. The active spacecraft is equipped with a sophisticated transponder and makes all measurements. The transponder on the passive spacecraft is a relatively simple repeater. An initialization algorithm is developed to estimate position and attitude without any a priori information. A tracking algorithm based upon minimum variance linear estimators is also developed. Techniques to simplify the transponder on the passive spacecraft are investigated and a suitable configuration is determined. A multiple carrier CW signal format is selected. The dependence of range accuracy and ambiguity resolution error probability are derived and used to design a candidate system. The validity of the design and the feasibility of the polarized interferometer concept are verified by simulation.

  4. Unequal-Arms Michelson Interferometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinto, Massimo; Armstrong, J. W.

    2000-01-01

    Michelson interferometers allow phase measurements many orders of magnitude below the phase stability of the laser light injected into their two almost equal-length arms. If, however, the two arms are unequal, the laser fluctuations can not be removed by simply recombining the two beams. This is because the laser jitters experience different time delays in the two arms, and therefore can not cancel at the photo detector. We present here a method for achieving exact laser noise cancellation, even in an unequal-arm interferometer. The method presented in this paper requires a separate readout of the relative phase in each arm, made by interfering the returning beam in each arm with a fraction of the outgoing beam. By linearly combining the two data sets with themselves, after they have been properly time shifted, we show that it is possible to construct a new data set that is free of laser fluctuations. An application of this technique to future planned space-based laser interferometer detector3 of gravitational radiation is discussed.

  5. Radar and Lidar Radar DEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liskovich, Diana; Simard, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Using radar and lidar data, the aim is to improve 3D rendering of terrain, including digital elevation models (DEM) and estimates of vegetation height and biomass in a variety of forest types and terrains. The 3D mapping of vegetation structure and the analysis are useful to determine the role of forest in climate change (carbon cycle), in providing habitat and as a provider of socio-economic services. This in turn will lead to potential for development of more effective land-use management. The first part of the project was to characterize the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission DEM error with respect to ICESat/GLAS point estimates of elevation. We investigated potential trends with latitude, canopy height, signal to noise ratio (SNR), number of LiDAR waveform peaks, and maximum peak width. Scatter plots were produced for each variable and were fitted with 1st and 2nd degree polynomials. Higher order trends were visually inspected through filtering with a mean and median filter. We also assessed trends in the DEM error variance. Finally, a map showing how DEM error was geographically distributed globally was created.

  6. Using dynamic interferometric synthetic aperature radar (InSAR) to image fast-moving surface waves

    DOEpatents

    Vincent, Paul

    2005-06-28

    A new differential technique and system for imaging dynamic (fast moving) surface waves using Dynamic Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is introduced. This differential technique and system can sample the fast-moving surface displacement waves from a plurality of moving platform positions in either a repeat-pass single-antenna or a single-pass mode having a single-antenna dual-phase receiver or having dual physically separate antennas, and reconstruct a plurality of phase differentials from a plurality of platform positions to produce a series of desired interferometric images of the fast moving waves.

  7. Nonlocal polarization interferometer for entanglement detection

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Brian P.; Humble, Travis S.; Grice, Warren P.

    2014-10-30

    We report a nonlocal interferometer capable of detecting entanglement and identifying Bell states statistically. This is possible due to the interferometer's unique correlation dependence on the antidiagonal elements of the density matrix, which have distinct bounds for separable states and unique values for the four Bell states. The interferometer consists of two spatially separated balanced Mach-Zehnder or Sagnac interferometers that share a polarization-entangled source. Correlations between these interferometers exhibit nonlocal interference, while single-photon interference is suppressed. This interferometer also allows for a unique version of the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt Bell test where the local reality is the photon polarization. In conclusion, we present the relevant theory and experimental results.

  8. Nonlocal polarization interferometer for entanglement detection

    DOE PAGES

    Williams, Brian P.; Humble, Travis S.; Grice, Warren P.

    2014-10-30

    We report a nonlocal interferometer capable of detecting entanglement and identifying Bell states statistically. This is possible due to the interferometer's unique correlation dependence on the antidiagonal elements of the density matrix, which have distinct bounds for separable states and unique values for the four Bell states. The interferometer consists of two spatially separated balanced Mach-Zehnder or Sagnac interferometers that share a polarization-entangled source. Correlations between these interferometers exhibit nonlocal interference, while single-photon interference is suppressed. This interferometer also allows for a unique version of the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt Bell test where the local reality is the photon polarization. In conclusion, wemore » present the relevant theory and experimental results.« less

  9. Keck Interferometer Science: Present and Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akeson, Rachel L.

    2004-01-01

    The Keck Interferometer is a NASA funded project developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the William M. Keck Observatory and the Michelson Science Center at the California Institute of Technology. A technical description of the interferometer is given elsewhere in this volume. This paper will discuss the science topics and goals of the Keck Interferometer project, including a brief description of the Key Science projects, the science projects executed to date and the current availability of the interferometer for new projects. The Keck Interferometer Project consists of the Keck-Keck Interferometer, which combines the two Keck lo-meter telescopes on an 85-meter baseline, and the Outrigger Telescopes Project, a proposal to add four to six 1.8-meter telescopes that would work in conjunction with the two Kecks.

  10. Continuous-wave quasi-phase-matched generation of 60thinspthinspmW at 465thinspthinspnm by single-pass frequency doubling of a laser diode in backswitch-poled lithium niobate

    SciTech Connect

    Batchko, R.G.; Fejer, M.M.; Byer, R.L.; Woll, D.; Wallenstein, R.; Shur, V.Y.; Erman, L.

    1999-09-01

    We report continuous-wave single-pass second-harmonic generation (SHG) in 4-{mu}m -period 0.5-mm-thick backswitch-poled lithium niobate. Pump sources at 920{endash}930thinspthinspnm include both Ti:sapphire and diode-oscillator{endash}amplifier lasers. SHG of a Ti:sapphire laser at 6.1{percent}/W efficiency, producing 61thinspthinspmW of power at 460thinspthinspnm, is demonstrated in 50-mm-long periodically poled lithium niobate samples with a nonlinear coefficient d{sub eff}{approx}9 pm/V , and 60thinspthinspmW at 465thinspthinspnm and 2.8{percent}/W efficiency is obtained by SHG of a laser-diode source. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital Optical Society of America}

  11. Alignment of a two-beam interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tubbs, E. F.

    1980-01-01

    Two beam interferometers have been proposed for space applications such as sensing the shape of a large antenna. Since alignment and adjustment of interferometers have long been considered difficult laboratory tasks, the question of making their operation sufficiently automatic for space applications is a serious one. As a first step in addressing this question certain manual procedures, which may not be well known, have been collected from widely scattered sources. These techniques are illustrated by two examples: (1) the alignment of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer and the adjustment of fringe location. (2) The adjustment of a Michelson interferometer for zero path difference (white light fringes).

  12. A Thermal-beam Calcium Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Christopher; van Zjill, Marshall; Washburn, Matthew; Archibald, James; Christensen, Dan; Birrell, Jeremiah; Burdett, Adam; Durfee, Dallin

    2007-06-01

    We report on the construction of a next-generation atom interferometer. Our research includes developing passive stabilization techniques, low-noise laser current drivers, high-speed scan-balancing lock circuits, and high-speed low-noise photo-detecting units. Our efforts have lead to developing an extremely stable laser locked to an ultra-high finesse optical cavity for use in a Ramsey-Bord'e interferometer scheme. The interferometer itself is based on a thermal calcium beam and will be upgraded in the future to a dual species Ca/Sr interferometer sensitive enough to improve measurements of possible time variance of the fine structure constant.

  13. Ordinary SQUID interferometers and superfluid helium matter wave interferometers: The role of quantum fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Golovashkin, A. I.; Zherikhina, L. N. Tskhovrebov, A. M.; Izmailov, G. N.; Ozolin, V. V.

    2010-08-15

    When comparing the operation of a superfluid helium matter wave quantum interferometer (He SQUID) with that of an ordinary direct-current quantum interferometer (dc SQUID), we estimate their resolution limitation that correspond to quantum fluctuations. An alternative mode of operation of the interferometer as a unified macroquantum system is considered.

  14. The proposed flatland radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, J. L.; Gage, K. S.; Vanzandt, T. E.; Nastrom, G. D.

    1986-01-01

    A flexible very high frequency (VHF) stratosphere-troposphere (ST) radar configured for meteorological research is to be constructed near Urbana, Illinois. Measurement of small vertical velocities associated with synoptic-scale meteorology can be performed. A large Doppler microwave radar (CHILL) is located a few km from the site of the proposed ST radar. Since the microwave radar can measure the location and velocity of hydrometeors and the VHF ST radar can measure clear (or cloudy) air velocities, simultaneous observations by these two radars of stratiform or convective weather systems would provide valuable meteorological information.

  15. Single Pass Electron Cooling Simulations for MEIC

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, G. I.; Pogorelov, I. V.; Schwartz, B. T.; Zhang, Yuhong; Zhang, He

    2013-12-01

    Cooling of medium energy protons is critical for the proposed Jefferson Lab Medium Energy Ion Collider (MEIC). We present simulations of electron cooling of protons up to 60 GeV. In the beam frame in which the proton and electrons are co-propagating, their motion is non-relativistic. We use a binary collision model which treats the cooling process as the sum of a large number of two-body collisions which are calculated exactly. This model can treat even very close collisions between an electron and ion with high accuracy. We also calculate dynamical friction using a delta-f PIC model. The code VSim (formerly Vorpal) is used to perform the simulations. We compare the friction rates with that obtained by a 3D integral over electron velocities which is used by BETACOOL.

  16. Finland HF and Esrange MST radar observations of polar mesosphere summer echoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, T.; Arnold, N. F.; Kirkwood, S.; Nishitani, N.; Lester, M.

    2003-04-01

    Peculiar near range echoes observed in summer with the SuperDARN HF radar in Finland are presented. The echoes were detected at four frequencies of 9, 11, 13 and 15 MHz at slant ranges of 105 250 km for about 100 min. Interferometer measurements indicate that the echoes are returned from 80 100 km altitudes with elevation angles of 20° 60

  17. Interferometer for Space Station Windows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Gregory

    2003-01-01

    Inspection of space station windows for micrometeorite damage would be a difficult task insitu using current inspection techniques. Commercially available optical profilometers and inspection systems are relatively large, about the size of a desktop computer tower, and require a stable platform to inspect the test object. Also, many devices currently available are designed for a laboratory or controlled environments requiring external computer control. This paper presents an approach using a highly developed optical interferometer to inspect the windows from inside the space station itself using a self- contained hand held device. The interferometer would be capable as a minimum of detecting damage as small as one ten thousands of an inch in diameter and depth while interrogating a relatively large area. The current developmental state of this device is still in the proof of concept stage. The background section of this paper will discuss the current state of the art of profilometers as well as the desired configuration of the self-contained, hand held device. Then, a discussion of the developments and findings that will allow the configuration change with suggested approaches appearing in the proof of concept section.

  18. The DELTA Synchrotron Light Interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Berges, U.

    2004-05-12

    Synchrotron radiation sources like DELTA, the Dortmund Electron Accelerator, a third generation synchrotron light source, need an optical monitoring system to measure the beam size at different points of the ring with high resolution and accuracy. These measurements also allow an investigation of the emittance of the storage ring, an important working parameter for the efficiency of working beamlines with experiments using the synchrotron radiation. The resolution limits of the different types of optical synchrotron light monitors at DELTA are investigated. The minimum measurable beamsize with the normal synchrotron light monitor using visible light at DELTA is about 80 {mu}m. Due to this a synchrotron light interferometer was built up and tested at DELTA. The interferometer uses the same beamline in the visible range. The minimum measurable beamsize is with about 8 {mu}m one order of magnitude smaller. This resolution is sufficient for the expected small vertical beamsizes at DELTA. The electron beamsize and emittance were measured with both systems at different electron beam energies of the storage ring. The theoretical values of the present optics are smaller than the measured emittance. So possible reasons for beam movements are investigated.

  19. Perimitrax: the next generation in guided radar perimeter security technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maki, Melvin C.; Hill, Charles R.

    1997-01-01

    The first application of 'leaky' or 'ported' coaxial cables to radar system for covert detection of human intruders for outdoor perimeter security was in the early 1970's. Early systems were relatively rudimentary using large central processors and difficult to manufacture sensing cables. However, since that time these systems have evolved in both design and performance and been proven to have both high detection performance and low false and nuisance response in such diverse, all-weather perimeter applications as military bases, corrections, and industrial sites. This paper introduces the latest generation of guided radar security technology now being fielded. This generation features more flexible and modular 'plug and play' electronics, matched to both large and small installations from the sensor zone end, up to the control and display. Advanced signal processing is now included which is tuned to discriminate the unique features of the intruder from those of the environment. Such processing capitalize on the ability to look at and classify features of larger perimeters. New 'TR' technology sensor cables have ben developed which are manufactured in a single pass approach to provide more uniformity of sensor performance. These sensor include both a siamese design for single slot burial, and also a small diameter dual cable for wider zone requirements. This paper will outline the major elements of guided radar sensors and overview the new components and architecture of this latest generation. It will discuss the results of early operational performance testing, and the new benefits for diverse applications from government, to corrections and airports.

  20. Multimode interferometer for guided matter waves.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Erika; Calarco, Tommaso; Folman, Ron; Andersson, Mauritz; Hessmo, Björn; Schmiedmayer, Jörg

    2002-03-11

    Atoms can be trapped and guided with electromagnetic fields, using nanofabricated structures. We describe the fundamental features of an interferometer for guided matter waves, built of two combined Y-shaped beam splitters. We find that such a device is expected to exhibit high contrast fringes even in a multimode regime, analogous to a white light interferometer.

  1. CIST....CORRTEX interferometer simulation test

    SciTech Connect

    Heinle, R.A.

    1994-12-01

    Testing was performed in order to validate and cross calibrate an RF interferometer and the crush threshold of cable. Nitromethane was exploded (inside of PVC pipe). The explosion was used to crush the interferometer sensor cables which had been placed inside and outside the pipe. Results are described.

  2. Study Of Space-Based Optical Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redding, David C.; Laskin, Robert A.; Breckenridge, William G.; Shao, Michael

    1992-01-01

    Report discusses calibration and operation of conceptual Focus Mission Interferometer (FMI), consisting of component instruments mounted at widely separated locations on large truss structure in orbit 1,400 km above Earth. Includes six telescopes in linear array. Outputs combined in pairlike fashion so FMI operates as three distinct two-telescope interferometers. Accurate enough for submilliarcsecond astrometry.

  3. Dual-prism interferometer for collimation testing

    SciTech Connect

    Hii, King Ung; Kwek, Kuan Hiang

    2009-01-10

    An air-wedge lateral-shear interferometer using two prisms is presented. With a variable shear, the interferometer is suitable for testing collimation of a wide range of beam sizes down to a few millimeters in diameter. No antireflection coatings are necessary. Collimation for a light source with short coherent length is also demonstrated.

  4. Liquid-Crystal Point-Diffraction Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercer, Carolyn R.

    1996-01-01

    Liquid-crystal point-diffraction interferometer (LCPDI) invented to combine flexible control of liquid-crystal phase-shifts with robustness of point-diffraction interferometers. Produces interferograms indicative of shapes of wavefronts of laser beams having passed through or reflected from objects of interest. Interferograms combined in computers to produce phase maps describing wavefronts.

  5. Orientational atom interferometers sensitive to gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect

    Lorek, Dennis; Laemmerzahl, Claus; Wicht, Andreas

    2010-02-15

    We present an atom interferometer that differs from common atom interferometers as it is not based on the spatial splitting of electronic wave functions, but on orienting atoms in space. As an example we present how an orientational atom interferometer based on highly charged hydrogen-like atoms is affected by gravitational waves. We show that a monochromatic gravitational wave will cause a frequency shift that scales with the binding energy of the system rather than with its physical dimension. For a gravitational wave amplitude of h=10{sup -23} the frequency shift is of the order of 110 {mu}Hz for an atom interferometer based on a 91-fold charged uranium ion. A frequency difference of this size can be resolved by current atom interferometers in 1 s.

  6. Customizable Digital Receivers for Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moller, Delwyn; Heavey, Brandon; Sadowy, Gregory

    2008-01-01

    Compact, highly customizable digital receivers are being developed for the system described in 'Radar Interferometer for Topographic Mapping of Glaciers and Ice Sheets' (NPO-43962), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 31, No. 7 (August 2007), page 72. The receivers are required to operate in unison, sampling radar returns received by the antenna elements in a digital beam-forming (DBF) mode. The design of these receivers could also be adapted to commercial radar systems. At the time of reporting the information for this article, there were no commercially available digital receivers capable of satisfying all of the operational requirements and compact enough to be mounted directly on the antenna elements. A provided figure depicts the overall system of which the digital receivers are parts. Each digital receiver includes an analog-to-digital converter (ADC), a demultiplexer (DMUX), and a field-programmable gate array (FPGA). The ADC effects 10-bit band-pass sampling of input signals having frequencies up to 3.5 GHz. The input samples are demultiplexed at a user-selectable rate of 1:2 or 1:4, then buffered in part of the FPGA that functions as a first-in/first-out (FIFO) memory. Another part of the FPGA serves as a controller for the ADC, DMUX, and FIFO memory and as an interface between (1) the rest of the receiver and (2) a front-panel data port (FPDP) bus, which is an industry-standard parallel data bus that has a high data-rate capability and multichannel configuration suitable for DBF. Still other parts of the FPGA in each receiver perform signal-processing functions. The digital receivers can be configured to operate in a stand-alone mode, or in a multichannel mode as needed for DBF. The customizability of the receiver makes it applicable to a broad range of system architectures. The capability for operation of receivers in either a stand-alone or a DBF mode enables the use of the receivers in an unprecedentedly wide variety of radar systems.

  7. Interferometer real time control development for SIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Charles E.

    2003-02-01

    Real Time Control (RTC) for the Space Interferometry Mission will build on the real time core interferometer control technology under development at JPL since the mid 1990s, with heritage from the ground based MKII and Palomar Testbed Interferometer projects developed in the late '80s and early '90s. The core software and electronics technology for SIM interferometer real time control is successfully operating on several SIM technology demonstration testbeds, including the Real-time Interferometer Control System Testbed, System Testbed-3, and the Microarcsecond Metrology testbed. This paper provides an overview of the architecture, design, integration, and test of the SIM flight interferometer real time control to meet challenging flight system requirements for the high processor throughput, low-latency interconnect, and precise synchronization to support microarcsecond-level astrometric measurements for greater than five years at 1 AU in Earth-trailing orbit. The electronics and software architecture of the interferometer real time control core and its adaptation to a flight design concept are described. Control loops for pointing and pathlength control within each of four flight interferometers and for coordination of control and data across interferometers are illustrated. The nature of onboard data processing to fit average downlink rates while retaining post-processed astrometric measurement precision and accuracy is also addressed. Interferometer flight software will be developed using a software simulation environment incorporating models of the metrology and starlight sensors and actuators to close the real time control loops. RTC flight software and instrument flight electronics will in turn be integrated utilizing the same simulation architecture for metrology and starlight component models to close real time control loops and verify RTC functionality and performance prior to delivery to flight interferometer system integration at Lockheed Martin

  8. Doppler radar results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bracalente, Emedio M.

    1992-01-01

    The topics are covered in viewgraph form and include the following: (1) a summary of radar flight data collected; (2) a video of combined aft cockpit, nose camera, and radar hazard displays; (3) a comparison of airborne radar F-factor measurements with in situ and Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) F-factors for some sample events; and (4) a summary of wind shear detection performance.

  9. Radar measurement instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartl, P.

    1983-02-01

    The radar techniques used for Earth observation are reviewed. Range, direction and speed measuring techniques, and the principles of scatterometers, side-looking radar, altimeters and SAR are discussed. The ERS-1 radar package including the active microwave instrumentation and the radar altimeter are described. The analysis of the calibration problems leads to the conclusion that only the test of the system loop as a whole, besides the individual part tests, can provide a calibration in the absolute sense.

  10. Rain-Mapping Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Im, K. E.; Li, F. K.; Wilson, W. J.; Rosing, D.

    1988-01-01

    Orbiting radar system measures rates of rainfall from 0.5 to 60 mm/h. Radar waves scattered and absorbed by rainfall to extents depending on wavelength, polarization, rate of rainfall, and distribution of sizes and shapes of raindrops. Backscattered radar signal as function of length of path through rain used to infer detailed information about rain. Accumulated radar return signals processed into global maps of monthly average rainfall for use in climatological studies.

  11. The Provence ST radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crochet, M.

    1986-01-01

    Since the Alpex Campaign, when 3 Stratosphere-Troposphere (ST) radar operated in Camarque as a cooperative effort of the Aeronomy Laboratory of NOAA, CO, and LSEET from Toulon, a 50 MHz Very High Frequency (VHF) ST radar was developed, improved, and tested. The operating characteristics, main objectives, preliminary results, and future experiment costs of the VHF ST radar are discussed.

  12. Radar: Human Safety Net

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritz, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Radar is a technology that can be used to detect distant objects not visible to the human eye. A predecessor of radar, called the telemobiloscope, was first used to detect ships in the fog in 1904 off the German coast. Many scientists have worked on the development and refinement of radar (Hertz with electromagnetic waves; Popov with determining…

  13. Controlling radar signature

    SciTech Connect

    Foulke, K.W. )

    1992-08-01

    Low observable technologies for military and tactical aircraft are reviewed including signature-reduction techniques and signal detection/jamming. Among the applications considered are low-signature sensors and the reduction of radar cross section in conjunction with radar-absorbing structures and materials. Technologies for reducing radar cross section are shown to present significant technological challenges, although they afford enhanced aircraft survivability.

  14. Interferometer for measuring dynamic corneal topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micali, Jason Daniel

    The cornea is the anterior most surface of the eye and plays a critical role in vision. A thin fluid layer, the tear film, coats the outer surface of the cornea and serves to protect, nourish, and lubricate the cornea. At the same time, the tear film is responsible for creating a smooth continuous surface where the majority of refraction takes place in the eye. A significant component of vision quality is determined by the shape of the cornea and stability of the tear film. It is desirable to possess an instrument that can measure the corneal shape and tear film surface with the same accuracy and resolution that is currently performed on common optical elements. A dual interferometer system for measuring the dynamic corneal topography is designed, built, and verified. The completed system is validated by testing on human subjects. The system consists of two co-aligned polarization splitting Twyman-Green interferometers designed to measure phase instantaneously. The primary interferometer measures the surface of the tear film while the secondary interferometer simultaneously tracks the absolute position of the cornea. Eye motion, ocular variation, and a dynamic tear film surface will result in a non-null configuration of the surface with respect to the interferometer system. A non-null test results in significant interferometer induced errors that add to the measured phase. New algorithms are developed to recover the absolute surface topography of the tear film and corneal surface from the simultaneous interferometer measurements. The results are high-resolution and high-accuracy surface topography measurements of the in vivo cornea that are captured at standard camera frame rates. This dissertation will cover the development and construction of an interferometer system for measuring the dynamic corneal topography of the human eye. The discussion starts with the completion of an interferometer for measuring the tear film. The tear film interferometer is part of an

  15. Beam shuttering interferometer and method

    DOEpatents

    Deason, Vance A.; Lassahn, Gordon D.

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus resulting in the simplification of phase shifting interferometry by eliminating the requirement to know the phase shift between interferograms or to keep the phase shift between interferograms constant. The present invention provides a simple, inexpensive means to shutter each independent beam of the interferometer in order to facilitate the data acquisition requirements for optical interferometry and phase shifting interferometry. By eliminating the requirement to know the phase shift between interferograms or to keep the phase shift constant, a simple, economical means and apparatus for performing the technique of phase shifting interferometry is provide which, by thermally expanding a fiber optical cable changes the optical path distance of one incident beam relative to another.

  16. Beam shuttering interferometer and method

    DOEpatents

    Deason, V.A.; Lassahn, G.D.

    1993-07-27

    A method and apparatus resulting in the simplification of phase shifting interferometry by eliminating the requirement to know the phase shift between interferograms or to keep the phase shift between interferograms constant. The present invention provides a simple, inexpensive means to shutter each independent beam of the interferometer in order to facilitate the data acquisition requirements for optical interferometry and phase shifting interferometry. By eliminating the requirement to know the phase shift between interferograms or to keep the phase shift constant, a simple, economical means and apparatus for performing the technique of phase shifting interferometry is provide which, by thermally expanding a fiber optical cable changes the optical path distance of one incident beam relative to another.

  17. X-ray shearing interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Koch, Jeffrey A.

    2003-07-08

    An x-ray interferometer for analyzing high density plasmas and optically opaque materials includes a point-like x-ray source for providing a broadband x-ray source. The x-rays are directed through a target material and then are reflected by a high-quality ellipsoidally-bent imaging crystal to a diffraction grating disposed at 1.times. magnification. A spherically-bent imaging crystal is employed when the x-rays that are incident on the crystal surface are normal to that surface. The diffraction grating produces multiple beams which interfere with one another to produce an interference pattern which contains information about the target. A detector is disposed at the position of the image of the target produced by the interfering beams.

  18. Angle interferometer cross axis errors

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, J.B.; Carter, D.L.; Thompson, S.L.

    1994-01-01

    Angle interferometers are commonly used to measure surface plate flatness. An error can exist when the centerline of the double comer cube mirror assembly is not square to the surface plate and the guide bar for the mirror sled is curved. Typical errors can be one to two microns per meter. A similar error can exist in the calibration of rotary tables when the centerline of the double comer cube mirror assembly is not square to the axes of rotation of the angle calibrator and the calibrator axis is not parallel to the rotary table axis. Commercial double comer cube assemblies typically have non-parallelism errors of ten milli-radians between their centerlines and their sides and similar values for non-squareness between their centerlines and end surfaces. The authors have developed a simple method for measuring these errors and correcting them by remachining the reference surfaces.

  19. Three-beam atom interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinderthür, H.; Pautz, A.; Rieger, V.; Ruschewitz, F.; Peng, J. L.; Sengstock, K.; Ertmer, W.

    1997-09-01

    We present an atom interferometer based on the interference of three partial matter waves in three different internal and external states. Coherent laser excitation acts as a beamsplitter to create a superposition state of the ground state and two Zeeman sublevels of the metastable state of magnesium atoms. The interference pattern of the output ports shows high contrast and the characteristics of three-beam interferences as known from optical interferometry. In comparison to two-beam interferometry a reduction of the fringe width of (32+/-8)% is observed. This offers various possibilities for improved measurements of quantum-mechanical phases due to the internal atomic-state sensitive coupling of external potentials. This is demonstrated for the interaction of magnesium atoms with an external magnetic field.

  20. Thermal Conductance of Andreev Interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Z.; Chandrasekhar, V.

    2005-04-01

    We calculate the thermal conductance GT of diffusive Andreev interferometers, which are hybrid loops with one superconducting arm and one normal-metal arm. The presence of the superconductor suppresses GT; however, unlike a conventional superconductor, GT/GTN does not vanish as the temperature T→0, but saturates at a finite value that depends on the resistance of the normal-superconducting interfaces, and their distance from the path of the temperature gradient. The reduction of GT is determined primarily by the suppression of the density of states in the proximity-coupled normal metal along the path of the temperature gradient. GT is also a strongly nonlinear function of the thermal current, as found in recent experiments.

  1. Cloud and Precipitation Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, Martin; Höller, Hartmut; Schmidt, Kersten

    Precipitation or weather radar is an essential tool for research, diagnosis, and nowcasting of precipitation events like fronts or thunderstorms. Only with weather radar is it possible to gain insights into the three-dimensional structure of thunderstorms and to investigate processes like hail formation or tornado genesis. A number of different radar products are available to analyze the structure, dynamics and microphysics of precipitation systems. Cloud radars use short wavelengths to enable detection of small ice particles or cloud droplets. Their applications differ from weather radar as they are mostly orientated vertically, where different retrieval techniques can be applied.

  2. Airborne rain mapping radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, W. J.; Parks, G. S.; Li, F. K.; Im, K. E.; Howard, R. J.

    1988-01-01

    An airborne scanning radar system for remote rain mapping is described. The airborne rain mapping radar is composed of two radar frequency channels at 13.8 and 24.1 GHz. The radar is proposed to scan its antenna beam over + or - 20 deg from the antenna boresight; have a swath width of 7 km; a horizontal spatial resolution at nadir of about 500 m; and a range resolution of 120 m. The radar is designed to be applicable for retrieving rainfall rates from 0.1-60 mm/hr at the earth's surface, and for measuring linear polarization signatures and raindrop's fall velocity.

  3. Challenges to Airborne and Orbital Radar Sounding in the Presence of Surface Clutter: Lessons Learned (so far) from the Dry Valleys of Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, J. W.; Peters, M. E.; Kempf, S. D.; Morse, D. L.; Blankenship, D. D.

    2005-12-01

    The search for life and in-situ resources for exploration on Mars targets both liquid and solid water, whether distributed or in reservoirs. Massive surface ice may cover potential habitats or other features of great interest. Ice-rich layering in the high latitudes holds clues to the climatic history of the planet. Multiple geophysical methods will clearly be necessary to fully characterize these various states of water (and other forms of ice), but radar sounding will be a critical component of the effort. Orbital radar sounders are already being employed and plans for surface-based and suborbital, above-surface radar sounders are being discussed. The difficulties in interpreting data from each type of platform are quite different. Given the lack of existing orbital radar sounding data from any planetary body, the analysis of airborne radar sounding data is quite useful for assessing the advantages and disadvantages of above-surface radar sounding on Mars. In addition to over 300,000 line-km of data collected over the Antarctic ice sheet by airborne radar sounding, we have recently analyzed data from the Dry Valleys of Antarctica where conditions and features emulate Mars in several respects. These airborne radar sounding data were collected over an ice-free area of Taylor Valley, ice-covered lakes, Taylor Glacier, and Beacon Valley. The pulsed radar (52.5 - 67.5 MHz chirp) was coherently recorded. Pulse compression and unfocused SAR processing were applied. One of the most challenging aspects of above-surface radar sounding is the determination of echo sources. This can, of course, be problematic for surface-based radar sounders given possible subsurface scattering geometries, but it is most severe for above-surface sounders because echoes from cross-track surface topography (surface clutter) can have similar time delays to those from the subsurface. We have developed two techniques to accomplish the identification of this surface clutter in single-pass airborne

  4. Continuous-Wave Deep Blue Generation in a Periodically Poled MgO:LiNbO3 Crystal by Single-Pass Frequency Doubling of a 912-nm Nd:GdVO4 Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuuchi, Kiminori; Morikawa, Akihiro; Sugita, Tomoya; Yamamoto, Kazuhisa; Pavel, Nicolaie; Taira, Takunori

    2004-10-01

    Continuous-wave blue light generation at 456 nm is reported in bulk periodically poled MgO:LiNbO3 by single-pass frequency doubling of a Nd:GdVO4 laser operating at 912 nm. The Nd:GdVO4 laser had a maximum output power of 2.6 W for 15.7 W pump power, with a beam M2 factor of 1.4. MgO:LiNbO3 samples of 1.0-mm thickness and 4.2 μm domain period were fabricated by using a high-voltage multipulse poling method. A maximum blue power of 167 mW with 8.3% infrared-to-blue conversion efficiency and 4.2%/W normalized conversion efficiency was obtained. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on continuous-wave deep blue (below 460 nm) generation by quasi-phase matching in periodically poled MgO:LiNbO3.

  5. Single-pass, efficient type-I phase-matched frequency doubling of high-power ultrashort-pulse Yb-fiber laser using LiB_3O_5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Mukesh Kumar; Kumar, Samir; Das, Ritwick

    2016-05-01

    We report 48 % efficient single-pass second harmonic generation of high-power ultrashort-pulse ({≈ }250 fs) Yb-fiber laser by utilizing type-I phase matching in LiB_3O_5 (LBO) crystal. The choice of LBO among other borate crystals for high-power frequency doubling is essentially motivated by large thermal conductivity, low birefringence and weak group velocity dispersion. By optimally focussing the beam in a 4-mm-long LBO crystal, we have generated about 2.3 W of average power at 532 nm using 4.8 W of available pump power at 1064 nm. The ultrashort green pulses were found out to be near-transform limited sech^2 pulses with a pulse width of Δ τ ≈ 150 fs and being delivered at 78 MHz repetition rate. Due to appreciably low spatial walk-off angle for LBO ({≈ }0.4°), we obtain M^2<1.26 for the SH beam which signifies marginal distortion in comparison with the pump beam (M^2<1.15). We also discuss the impact of third-order optical nonlinearity of the LBO crystal on the generated ultrashort SH pulses.

  6. Multidimensional radar picture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waz, Mariusz

    2010-05-01

    In marine navigation systems, the three-dimensional (3D) visualization is often and often used. Echosonders and sonars working in hydroacustic systems can present pictures in three dimensions. Currently, vector maps also offer 3D presentation. This presentation is used in aviation and underwater navigation. In the nearest future three-dimensional presentation may be obligatory presentation in displays of navigation systems. A part of these systems work with radar and communicates with it transmitting data in a digital form. 3D presentation of radar picture require a new technology to develop. In the first step it is necessary to compile digital form of radar signal. The modern navigation radar do not present data in three-dimensional form. Progress in technology of digital signal processing make it possible to create multidimensional radar pictures. For instance, the RSC (Radar Scan Converter) - digital radar picture recording and transforming tool can be used to create new picture online. Using RSC and techniques of modern computer graphics multidimensional radar pictures can be generated. The radar pictures mentioned should be readable for ECDIS. The paper presents a method for generating multidimensional radar picture from original signal coming from radar receiver.

  7. Planetary radar astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostro, Steven J.

    1987-01-01

    The scientific aims, theoretical principles, techniques and instrumentation, and future potential of radar observations of solar-system objects are discussed in a general overview. Topics examined include the history of radar technology, echo detectability, the Arecibo and Goldstone radar observatories, echo time delay and Doppler shift, radar waveforms, albedo and polarization ratio, measurement of dynamical properties, and the dispersion of echo power. Consideration is given to angular scattering laws; the radar signatures of the moon and inner planets, Mars, and asteroids; topographic relief; delay-Doppler radar maps and their physical interpretation; and radar observations of the icy Galilean satellites of Jupiter, comets, and the rings of Saturn. Diagrams, drawings, photographs, and sample maps and images are provided.

  8. Radar stage uncertainty

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fulford, J.M.; Davies, W.J.

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey is investigating the performance of radars used for stage (or water-level) measurement. This paper presents a comparison of estimated uncertainties and data for radar water-level measurements with float, bubbler, and wire weight water-level measurements. The radar sensor was also temperature-tested in a laboratory. The uncertainty estimates indicate that radar measurements are more accurate than uncorrected pressure sensors at higher water stages, but are less accurate than pressure sensors at low stages. Field data at two sites indicate that radar sensors may have a small negative bias. Comparison of field radar measurements with wire weight measurements found that the radar tends to measure slightly lower values as stage increases. Copyright ASCE 2005.

  9. The Millimeter-Wave Bolometric Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ali, S.; Ade, P. A. R.; Bock, J. J.; Novak, G.; Piccirillo, L.; Timbie, P.; Tucker, G. S.

    2004-01-01

    The Millimeter-wave Bolometric Interferometer (MBI) is a proposed ground-based instrument designed for a wide range of cosmological and astrophysical observations including studies of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). MBI combines the advantages of two well-developed technologies - interferometers and bolometric detectors. Interferometers have many advantages over .filled-aperture telescopes and are particularly suitable for high resolution imaging. Cooled bolometers are the highest sensitivity detectors at millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths. The combination of these two technologies results in an instrument with both high sensitivity and high angular resolution.

  10. X-ray Interferometer Using Prism Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Yoshio

    2004-05-12

    Two-beam X-ray interferometer using refractive optics has been developed. A prism made of acrylic resin is used as the beam deflector for hard X-ray wavefront dividing interferometer. This configuration is the same as that of the Fresnel's bi-prism interferometer or the Leith-Upatnieks type two-beam holography in visible light region. Therefore, quantitative analysis of the degree of transversal coherence can be performed by measuring the visibility of interference fringes. It is also possible to realize two-beam holographic imaging in hard X-ray regions.

  11. Comparative Sensitivities of Gravitational Wave Detectors Based on Atom Interferometers and Light Interferometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John G.; Thorpe, J. I.

    2012-01-01

    We consider a class of proposed gravitational wave detectors based on multiple atomic interferometers separated by large baselines and referenced by common laser systems. We compute the sensitivity limits of these detectors due to intrinsic phase noise of the light sources, non-inertial motion of the light sources, and atomic shot noise and compare them to sensitivity limits for traditional light interferometers. We find that atom interferometers and light interferometers are limited in a nearly identical way by intrinsic phase noise and that both require similar mitigation strategies (e.g. multiple arm instruments) to reach interesting sensitivities. The sensitivity limit from motion of the light sources is slightly different and favors the atom interferometers in the low-frequency limit, although the limit in both cases is severe. Whether this potential advantage outweighs the additional complexity associated with including atom interferometers will require further study.

  12. The CryoSat Interferometer after 6 years in orbit: calibration and achievable performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scagliola, Michele; Fornari, Marco; De Bartolomei, Maurizio; Bouffard, Jerome; Parrinello, Tommaso

    2016-04-01

    The main payload of CryoSat is a Ku-band pulse width limited radar altimeter, called SIRAL (Synthetic interferometric radar altimeter). When commanded in SARIn (synthetic aperture radar interferometry) mode, through coherent along-track processing of the returns received from two antennas, the interferometric phase related to the first arrival of the echo is used to retrieve the angle of arrival of the scattering in the across-track direction. In fact, the across-track echo direction can be derived by exploiting the precise knowledge of the baseline vector (i.e. the vector between the two antennas centers of phase) and simple geometry. The end-to-end calibration strategy for the CryoSat interferometer consists on in-orbit calibration campaigns following the approach described in [1]. From the beginning of the CryoSat mission, about once a year the interferometer calibration campaigns have been periodically performed by rolling left and right the spacecraft of about ±0.4 deg. This abstract is aimed at presenting our analysis of the calibration parameters and of the achievable performance of the CryoSat interferometer over the 6 years of mission. Additionally, some further studies have been performed to assess the accuracy of the roll angle computed on ground as function of the aberration (the apparent displacement of a celestial object from its true position, caused by the relative motion of the observer and the object) correction applied to the attitude quaternions, provided by the Star Tracker mounted on-board. In fact, being the roll information crucial to obtain an accurate estimate of the angle of arrival, the data from interferometer calibration campaigns have been used to verify how the application of the aberration correction affects the roll information and, in turns, the measured angle of arrival. [1] Galin, N.; Wingham, D.J.; Cullen, R.; Fornari, M.; Smith, W.H.F.; Abdalla, S., "Calibration of the CryoSat-2 Interferometer and Measurement of Across

  13. 2. VIEW SOUTHWEST, prime search radar tower, height finder radar ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW SOUTHWEST, prime search radar tower, height finder radar towards, height finder radar towers, and radar tower (unknown function) - Fort Custer Military Reservation, P-67 Radar Station, .25 mile north of Dickman Road, east of Clark Road, Battle Creek, Calhoun County, MI

  14. Development of newly designed VHF interferometer system for observing earthquake-related atmospheric anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Isao; Fujiwara, Hironobu; Kamogawa, Masashi; Iyono, Atsushi; Kroumov, Valeri; Azakami, Takashi

    2009-01-01

    Temporal correlation between atmospheric anomalies and earthquakes has recently been verified statistically through measuring VHF FM radio waves transmitted beyond the line-of-sight. In order to locate the sources of such atmospheric anomalies, we developed a VHF interferometer system (bistatic-radar type) capable of finding the arrival direction of FM radio waves scattered possibly by earthquake-related atmospheric anomalies. In general, frequency modulation of FM radio waves produces ambiguity of arrival direction. However, our system, employing high-sampling rates of the order of kHz, can precisely measure the arrival direction of FM radio waves by stacking received signals. PMID:20009381

  15. Single and double superimposing interferometer systems

    DOEpatents

    Erskine, David J.

    2000-01-01

    Interferometers which can imprint a coherent delay on a broadband uncollimated beam are described. The delay value can be independent of incident ray angle, allowing interferometry using uncollimated beams from common extended sources such as lamps and fiber bundles, and facilitating Fourier Transform spectroscopy of wide angle sources. Pairs of such interferometers matched in delay and dispersion can measure velocity and communicate using ordinary lamps, wide diameter optical fibers and arbitrary non-imaging paths, and not requiring a laser.

  16. Mathematical interpretation of radial shearing interferometers.

    PubMed

    Malacara, D

    1974-08-01

    The procedure for computing a radial shearing interferometric pattern is given. The interferometric pattern is analyzed to obtain the wavefront shape. Restricting the discussion to wavefronts having rotational symmetry, we give two different methods of finding the wavefront. One approach is to scan along a diameter of the interferometric pattern and the other is to examine the shape of the fringes. The relative sensitivity of a radial shearing interferometer with respect to that of a Twyman-Green interferometer is also analyzed.

  17. Achromatic self-referencing interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Feldman, M.

    1994-04-19

    A self-referencing Mach-Zehnder interferometer is described for accurately measuring laser wavefronts over a broad wavelength range (for example, 600 nm to 900 nm). The apparatus directs a reference portion of an input beam to a reference arm and a measurement portion of the input beam to a measurement arm, recombines the output beams from the reference and measurement arms, and registers the resulting interference pattern ([open quotes]first[close quotes] interferogram) at a first detector. Optionally, subportions of the measurement portion are diverted to second and third detectors, which respectively register intensity and interferogram signals which can be processed to reduce the first interferogram's sensitivity to input noise. The reference arm includes a spatial filter producing a high quality spherical beam from the reference portion, a tilted wedge plate compensating for off-axis aberrations in the spatial filter output, and mirror collimating the radiation transmitted through the tilted wedge plate. The apparatus includes a thermally and mechanically stable baseplate which supports all reference arm optics, or at least the spatial filter, tilted wedge plate, and the collimator. The tilted wedge plate is mounted adjustably with respect to the spatial filter and collimator, so that it can be maintained in an orientation in which it does not introduce significant wave front errors into the beam propagating through the reference arm. The apparatus is polarization insensitive and has an equal path length configuration enabling measurement of radiation from broadband as well as closely spaced laser line sources. 3 figures.

  18. Achromatic self-referencing interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Feldman, Mark

    1994-01-01

    A self-referencing Mach-Zehnder interferometer for accurately measuring laser wavefronts over a broad wavelength range (for example, 600 nm to 900 nm). The apparatus directs a reference portion of an input beam to a reference arm and a measurement portion of the input beam to a measurement arm, recombines the output beams from the reference and measurement arms, and registers the resulting interference pattern ("first" interferogram) at a first detector. Optionally, subportions of the measurement portion are diverted to second and third detectors, which respectively register intensity and interferogram signals which can be processed to reduce the first interferogram's sensitivity to input noise. The reference arm includes a spatial filter producing a high quality spherical beam from the reference portion, a tilted wedge plate compensating for off-axis aberrations in the spatial filter output, and mirror collimating the radiation transmitted through the tilted wedge plate. The apparatus includes a thermally and mechanically stable baseplate which supports all reference arm optics, or at least the spatial filter, tilted wedge plate, and the collimator. The tilted wedge plate is mounted adjustably with respect to the spatial filter and collimator, so that it can be maintained in an orientation in which it does not introduce significant wave front errors into the beam propagating through the reference arm. The apparatus is polarization insensitive and has an equal path length configuration enabling measurement of radiation from broadband as well as closely spaced laser line sources.

  19. Keck Interferometer Nuller science highlights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mennesson, Bertrand; Millan-Gabet, Rafael; Colavita, M. M.; Serabyn, E.; Hinz, P.; Kuchner, M.; Liu, W.; Barry, R.; Stark, C.; Ragland, S.; Woillez, J.; Traub, W.; Absil, O.; Defrère, Denis; Augereau, J. C.; Lebreton, J.

    2012-07-01

    We report here on some of the major astronomical observations obtained by the Keck Interferometer Nuller (KIN), the high dynamic range instrument recombining the Keck Telescopes at wavelengths of 8 to 13 microns. A few science targets were observed during the commissioning phase (2004-2007). These early observations aimed at demonstrating the KIN’s ability to spatially resolve and characterize circumstellar dust emission around a variety of targets, ranging from evolved stars to young debris disks. Science operations started then in 2008 with the more demanding KIN exozodi key science programs, augmented by observations of YSOs and hot debris disks between 2009 and 2011. The last KIN observations were gathered in 2011B, and the interpretation of some of the results depicted here is still preliminary (exo-zodi survey) or pending (complicated behavior observed in YSOs). We discuss in particular the initial results of the KIN’s exo-zodi observations, which targeted a total of 40 nearby main sequence single stars. We look for trends in this sample, searching for possible correlations between the measured KIN excesses and basic stellar properties such as spectral type or the presence of dust inferred from separate observations.

  20. Meteor radar signal processing and error analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Chunmei

    discarded due to the potential of producing a biased estimate. The precision of the estimated parameters can then be computed using their CRB values as a proxy for the estimated variance. These errors propagate to form the instrumental errors on the height and horizontal wind measurements. Thirdly, the interferometer configuration of interferometric meteor radar system is studied. The interferometer uses the phase differences measured at different sensor pairs to determine the DOA of the meteor trail. Typically Jones cross is used in most of current meteor radar systems, such as MEDAC and SKYiMet. We have evaluated this configuration with other array geometries,such as 'T', 'L' and circular array to examine their performance on the precision of the DOA estimates. The results show that 'T' array has an overall better CRB than other geometries, while with the yagi antenna pattern as a course determination of the DOA range, the circular array performs the best with the lowest sidelobes on the spatial spectral. A Matlab based planar array design package designed for determination and visualization of the DOA estimation performance for a user designed antenna array was developed. Fourthly, based on the special configuration of the South Pole COBRA system, a low cost computational phase calibration method is proposed. Accurate knowledge of the receiver phase ofsets is another factor that can affect system performance. Lastly, the postprocessing results of the meteor echoes collected during 2005 from the South Pole COBRA system are presented. This radar system is shown to have a precision of 2m/s in the horizontal winds, an azimuth precision of 1o, and an elevation precision of 3o. Preliminary scientific results are presented to verify the effectiveness of our processing scheme, and include the seasonal variation of meteor rates as a function of height, and the vertical structure of large semidiurnal tide observed over the South Pole austral summer. The processing schemes and

  1. Laser radar in robotics

    SciTech Connect

    Carmer, D.C.; Peterson, L.M.

    1996-02-01

    In this paper the authors describe the basic operating principles of laser radar sensors and the typical algorithms used to process laser radar imagery for robotic applications. The authors review 12 laser radar sensors to illustrate the variety of systems that have been applied to robotic applications wherein information extracted from the laser radar data is used to automatically control a mechanism or process. Next, they describe selected robotic applications in seven areas: autonomous vehicle navigation, walking machine foot placement, automated service vehicles, manufacturing and inspection, automotive, military, and agriculture. They conclude with a discussion of the status of laser radar technology and suggest trends seen in the application of laser radar sensors to robotics. Many new applications are expected as the maturity level progresses and system costs are reduced.

  2. Planetary radar studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, T. W.; Cutts, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    A catalog of lunar and radar anomalies was generated to provide a base for comparison with Venusian radar signatures. The relationships between lunar radar anomalies and regolith processes were investigated, and a consortium was formed to compare lunar and Venusian radar images of craters. Time was scheduled at the Arecibo Observatory to use the 430 MHz radar to obtain high resolution radar maps of six areas of the lunar suface. Data from 1978 observations of Mare Serenitas and Plato are being analyzed on a PDP 11/70 computer to construct the computer program library necessary for the eventual reduction of the May 1981 and subsequent data acquisitions. Papers accepted for publication are presented.

  3. 3. VIEW NORTHWEST, height finder radar towers, and radar tower ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW NORTHWEST, height finder radar towers, and radar tower (unknown function) - Fort Custer Military Reservation, P-67 Radar Station, .25 mile north of Dickman Road, east of Clark Road, Battle Creek, Calhoun County, MI

  4. 30. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #318, showing radar control. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #318, showing radar control. Console and line printers - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Perimeter Acquisition Radar Building, Limited Access Area, between Limited Access Patrol Road & Service Road A, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  5. Interlaboratory study of the reproducibility of the single-pass flow-through test method : measuring the dissolution rate of LRM glass at 70 {sup {degree}}C and pH 10.

    SciTech Connect

    Ebert, W. L.; Chemical Engineering

    2006-02-28

    An international interlaboratory study (ILS) was conducted to evaluate the precision with which single-pass flow-through (SPFT) tests can be conducted by following a method to be standardized by the American Society for Testing and Materials - International. Tests for the ILS were conducted with the low-activity reference material (LRM) glass developed previously for use as a glass test standard. Tests were conducted at 70 {+-} 2 C using a LiCl/LiOH solution as the leachant to impose an initial pH of about 10 (at 70 C). Participants were provided with LRM glass that had been crushed and sieved to isolate the -100 +200 mesh size fraction, and then washed to remove fines. Participants were asked to conduct a series of tests using different solution flow rate-to-sample mass ratios to generate a range of steady-state Si concentrations. The glass dissolution rate under each test condition was calculated using the steady-state Si concentration and solution flow rate that were measured in the test. The glass surface area was estimated from the mass of glass used in the test and the Si content of LRM glass was known. A linear relationship between the rate and the steady-state Si concentration (at Si concentrations less than 10 mg/L) was used to estimate the forward dissolution rate, which is the rate in the absence of dissolved Si. Participants were asked to sample the effluent solution at least five times after reaction times of between 3 and 14 days to measure the Si concentration and flow rate, and to verify that steady-state was achieved. Results were provided by seven participants and the data sets provided by five participants were sufficient to determine the forward rates independently.

  6. 50 MHz continuous wave interferometer observations of the unstable mid-latitude E-region ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haldoupis, C.; Bourdillon, A.; Kamburelis, A.; Hussey, G. C.; Koehler, J. A.

    2003-07-01

    In this paper we describe the conversion of SESCAT (Sporadic-E SCATter experiment), a bistatic 50 MHz continuous wave (CW) Doppler radar located on the island of Crete, Greece, to a single (east-west) baseline interferometer. The first results show that SESCAT, which provides high quality Doppler spectra and excellent temporal resolution, has its measurement capabilities enhanced significantly when operated as an interferometer, as it can also study short-term dynamics of localized scattering regions within mid-latitude sporadic E-layers. The interferometric observations reveal that the aspect sensitive area viewed by the radar often contains a few zonally located backscatter regions, presumably blobs or patches of unstable metallic ion plasma, which drift across the radar field-of-view with the neutral wind. On average, these active regions of backscatter have mean zonal scales ranging from a few kilometers to several tens of kilometers and drift with westward speeds from ~ 20 m/s to 100 m/s, and occasionally up to 150 m/s. The cross-spectral analysis shows that mid-latitude type 1 echoes occur much more frequently than has been previously assumed and they originate in single and rather localized areas of elevated electric fields. On the other hand, typical bursts of type 2 echoes are often found to result from two adjacent regions in azimuth undergoing the same bulk motion westwards but producing scatter of opposite Doppler polarity, a fact that contradicts the notion of isotropic turbulence to which type 2 echoes are attributed. Finally, quasi-periodic (QP) echoes are observed simply to be due to sequential unstable plasma patches or blobs which traverse across the radar field-of-view, sometimes in a wave-like fashion.

  7. Comparison of atom interferometers and light interferometers as space-based gravitational wave detectors.

    PubMed

    Baker, John G; Thorpe, J I

    2012-05-25

    We consider a class of proposed gravitational-wave detectors based on multiple atomic interferometers separated by large baselines and referenced by common laser systems. We compute the sensitivity limits of these detectors due to intrinsic phase noise of the light sources, noninertial motion of the light sources, and atomic shot noise and compare them to sensitivity limits for traditional light interferometers. We find that atom interferometers and light interferometers are limited in a nearly identical way by intrinsic phase noise and that both require similar mitigation strategies (e.g., multiple-arm instruments) to reach interesting sensitivities. The sensitivity limit from motion of the light sources is slightly different and, in principle, favors the atom interferometers in the low-frequency limit, although the limit in both cases is severe. PMID:23003235

  8. Comparison of Atom Interferometers and Light Interferometers as Space-Based Gravitational Wave Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John G.

    2012-01-01

    We consider a class of proposed gravitational wave detectors based on multiple atomic interferometers separated by large baselines and referenced by common laser systems. We compute the sensitivity limits of these detectors due to intrinsic phase noise of the light sources, non-inertial motion of the light sources, and atomic shot noise and compare them to sensitivity limits for traditional light interferometers. We find that atom interferometers and light interferometers are limited in a nearly identical way by intrinsic phase noise and that both require similar mitigation strategies (e.g. multiple arm instruments) to reach interesting sensitivities. The sensitivity limit from motion of the light sources is slightly different and favors the atom interferometers in the low-frequency limit, although the limit in both cases is severe.

  9. Furnace control apparatus using polarizing interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Thomas J.; Kotidis, Petros A.; Woodroffe, Jaime A.; Rostler, Peter S.

    1995-01-01

    A system for non-destructively measuring an object and controlling industrial processes in response to the measurement is disclosed in which an impulse laser generates a plurality of sound waves over timed increments in an object. A polarizing interferometer is used to measure surface movement of the object caused by the sound waves and sensed by phase shifts in the signal beam. A photon multiplier senses the phase shift and develops an electrical signal. A signal conditioning arrangement modifies the electrical signals to generate an average signal correlated to the sound waves which in turn is correlated to a physical or metallurgical property of the object, such as temperature, which property may then be used to control the process. External, random vibrations of the workpiece are utilized to develop discernible signals which can be sensed in the interferometer by only one photon multiplier. In addition the interferometer includes an arrangement for optimizing its sensitivity so that movement attributed to various waves can be detected in opaque objects. The interferometer also includes a mechanism for sensing objects with rough surfaces which produce speckle light patterns. Finally the interferometer per se, with the addition of a second photon multiplier is capable of accurately recording beam length distance differences with only one reading.

  10. Process control system using polarizing interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Thomas J.; Kotidis, Petros A.; Woodroffe, Jaime A.; Rostler, Peter S.

    1994-01-01

    A system for non-destructively measuring an object and controlling industrial processes in response to the measurement is disclosed in which an impulse laser generates a plurality of sound waves over timed increments in an object. A polarizing interferometer is used to measure surface movement of the object caused by the sound waves and sensed by phase shifts in the signal beam. A photon multiplier senses the phase shift and develops an electrical signal. A signal conditioning arrangement modifies the electrical signals to generate an average signal correlated to the sound waves which in turn is correlated to a physical or metallurgical property of the object, such as temperature, which property may then be used to control the process. External, random vibrations of the workpiece are utilized to develop discernible signals which can be sensed in the interferometer by only one photon multiplier. In addition the interferometer includes an arrangement for optimizing its sensitivity so that movement attributed to various waves can be detected in opaque objects. The interferometer also includes a mechanism for sensing objects with rough surfaces which produce speckle light patterns. Finally the interferometer per se, with the addition of a second photon multiplier is capable of accurately recording beam length distance differences with only one reading.

  11. Furnace control apparatus using polarizing interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, T.J.; Kotidis, P.A.; Woodroffe, J.A.; Rostler, P.S.

    1995-03-28

    A system for nondestructively measuring an object and controlling industrial processes in response to the measurement is disclosed in which an impulse laser generates a plurality of sound waves over timed increments in an object. A polarizing interferometer is used to measure surface movement of the object caused by the sound waves and sensed by phase shifts in the signal beam. A photon multiplier senses the phase shift and develops an electrical signal. A signal conditioning arrangement modifies the electrical signals to generate an average signal correlated to the sound waves which in turn is correlated to a physical or metallurgical property of the object, such as temperature, which property may then be used to control the process. External, random vibrations of the workpiece are utilized to develop discernible signals which can be sensed in the interferometer by only one photon multiplier. In addition the interferometer includes an arrangement for optimizing its sensitivity so that movement attributed to various waves can be detected in opaque objects. The interferometer also includes a mechanism for sensing objects with rough surfaces which produce speckle light patterns. Finally the interferometer per se, with the addition of a second photon multiplier is capable of accurately recording beam length distance differences with only one reading. 38 figures.

  12. Process control system using polarizing interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, T.J.; Kotidis, P.A.; Woodroffe, J.A.; Rostler, P.S.

    1994-02-15

    A system for nondestructively measuring an object and controlling industrial processes in response to the measurement is disclosed in which an impulse laser generates a plurality of sound waves over timed increments in an object. A polarizing interferometer is used to measure surface movement of the object caused by the sound waves and sensed by phase shifts in the signal beam. A photon multiplier senses the phase shift and develops an electrical signal. A signal conditioning arrangement modifies the electrical signals to generate an average signal correlated to the sound waves which in turn is correlated to a physical or metallurgical property of the object, such as temperature, which property may then be used to control the process. External, random vibrations of the workpiece are utilized to develop discernible signals which can be sensed in the interferometer by only one photon multiplier. In addition the interferometer includes an arrangement for optimizing its sensitivity so that movement attributed to various waves can be detected in opaque objects. The interferometer also includes a mechanism for sensing objects with rough surfaces which produce speckle light patterns. Finally the interferometer per se, with the addition of a second photon multiplier is capable of accurately recording beam length distance differences with only one reading. 38 figures.

  13. The AEI 10 m prototype interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goßler, S.; Bertolini, A.; Born, M.; Chen, Y.; Dahl, K.; Gering, D.; Gräf, C.; Heinzel, G.; Hild, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Kranz, O.; Kühn, G.; Lück, H.; Mossavi, K.; Schnabel, R.; Somiya, K.; Strain, K. A.; Taylor, J. R.; Wanner, A.; Westphal, T.; Willke, B.; Danzmann, K.

    2010-04-01

    A 10 m prototype interferometer facility is currently being set up at the AEI in Hannover, Germany. The prototype interferometer will be housed inside a 100 m3 ultra-high vacuum envelope. Seismically isolated optical tables inside the vacuum system will be interferometrically interconnected via a suspension platform interferometer. Advanced isolation techniques will be used, such as inverted pendulums and geometrical anti-spring filters in combination with multiple-cascaded pendulum suspensions, containing an all-silica monolithic last stage. The light source is a 35 W Nd:YAG laser, geometrically filtered by passing it through a photonic crystal fibre and a rigid pre-modecleaner cavity. Laser frequency stabilisation will be achieved with the aid of a high finesse suspended reference cavity in conjunction with a molecular iodine reference. Coating thermal noise will be reduced by the use of Khalili cavities as compound end mirrors. Data acquisition and control of the experiments is based on the AdvLIGO digital control and data system. The aim of the project is to test advanced techniques for GEO 600 as well as to conduct experiments in macroscopic quantum mechanics. Reaching standard quantum-limit sensitivity for an interferometer with 100 g mirrors and subsequently breaching this limit, features most prominently among these experiments. In this paper we present the layout and current status of the AEI 10 m Prototype Interferometer project.

  14. Noncooperative rendezvous radar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A fire control radar system was developed, assembled, and modified. The baseline system and modified angle tracking system are described along with the performance characteristics of the baseline and modified systems. Proposed changes to provide additional techniques for radar evaluation are presented along with flight test data.

  15. The PROUST radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertin, F.; Glass, M.; Ney, R.; Petitdidier, M.

    1986-01-01

    The Stratosphere-Troposphere (ST) radar called PROUST works at 935 MHz using the same klystron and antenna as the coherent-scatter radar. The use of this equipment for ST work has required some important modifications of the transmitting system and the development of receiving, data processing and acquisition (1984,1985) equipment. The modifications are discussed.

  16. Decoders for MST radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodman, R. F.

    1983-01-01

    Decoding techniques and equipment used by MST radars are described and some recommendations for new systems are presented. Decoding can be done either by software in special-purpose (array processors, etc.) or general-purpose computers or in specially designed digital decoders. Both software and hardware decoders are discussed and the special case of decoding for bistatic radars is examined.

  17. Determination of radar MTF

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, D.

    1994-11-15

    The ultimate goal of the Current Meter Array (CMA) is to be able to compare the current patterns detected with the array with radar images of the water surface. The internal wave current patterns modulate the waves on the water surface giving a detectable modulation of the radar cross-section (RCS). The function relating the RCS modulations to the current patterns is the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF). By comparing radar images directly with co-located CMA measurements the MTF can be determined. In this talk radar images and CMA measurements from a recent experiment at Loch Linnhe, Scotland, will be used to make the first direct determination of MTF for an X and S band radar at low grazing angles. The technical problems associated with comparing radar images to CMA data will be explained and the solution method discussed. The results suggest the both current and strain rate contribute equally to the radar modulation for X band. For S band, the strain rate contributes more than the current. The magnitude of the MTF and the RCS modulations are consistent with previous estimates when the wind is blowing perpendicular to the radar look direction.

  18. Java Radar Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaczek, Mariusz P.

    2005-01-01

    Java Radar Analysis Tool (JRAT) is a computer program for analyzing two-dimensional (2D) scatter plots derived from radar returns showing pieces of the disintegrating Space Shuttle Columbia. JRAT can also be applied to similar plots representing radar returns showing aviation accidents, and to scatter plots in general. The 2D scatter plots include overhead map views and side altitude views. The superposition of points in these views makes searching difficult. JRAT enables three-dimensional (3D) viewing: by use of a mouse and keyboard, the user can rotate to any desired viewing angle. The 3D view can include overlaid trajectories and search footprints to enhance situational awareness in searching for pieces. JRAT also enables playback: time-tagged radar-return data can be displayed in time order and an animated 3D model can be moved through the scene to show the locations of the Columbia (or other vehicle) at the times of the corresponding radar events. The combination of overlays and playback enables the user to correlate a radar return with a position of the vehicle to determine whether the return is valid. JRAT can optionally filter single radar returns, enabling the user to selectively hide or highlight a desired radar return.

  19. GeoSAR: A Radar Terrain Mapping System for the New Millennium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Thomas; vanZyl, Jakob; Hensley, Scott; Reis, James; Munjy, Riadh; Burton, John; Yoha, Robert

    2000-01-01

    GeoSAR Geographic Synthetic Aperture Radar) is a new 3 year effort to build a unique, dual-frequency, airborne Interferometric SAR for mapping of terrain. This is being pursued via a Consortium of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Calgis, Inc., and the California Department of Conservation. The airborne portion of this system will operate on a Calgis Gulfstream-II aircraft outfitted with P- and X-band Interferometric SARs. The ground portions of this system will be a suite of Flight Planning Software, an IFSAR Processor and a Radar-GIS Workstation. The airborne P-band and X-band radars will be constructed by JPL with the goal of obtaining foliage penetration at the longer P-band wavelengths. The P-band and X-band radar will operate at frequencies of 350 Mhz and 9.71 Ghz with bandwidths of either 80 or 160 Mhz. The airborne radars will be complemented with airborne laser system for measuring antenna positions. Aircraft flight lines and radar operating instructions will be computed with the Flight Planning Software The ground processing will be a two-step step process. First, the raw radar data will be processed into radar images and interferometer derived Digital Elevation Models (DEMs). Second, these radar images and DEMs will be processed with a Radar GIS Workstation which performs processes such as Projection Transformations, Registration, Geometric Adjustment, Mosaicking, Merging and Database Management. JPL will construct the IFSAR Processor and Calgis, Inc. will construct the Radar GIS Workstation. The GeoSAR Project was underway in November 1996 with a goal of having the radars and laser systems fully integrated onto the Calgis Gulfstream-II aircraft in early 1999. Then, Engineering Checkout and Calibration-Characterization Flights will be conducted through November 1999. The system will be completed at the end of 1999 and ready for routine operations in the year 2000.

  20. Micropower impulse radar imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, M.S.

    1995-11-01

    From designs developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in radar and imaging technologies, there exists the potential for a variety of applications in both public and private sectors. Presently tests are being conducted for the detection of buried mines and the analysis of civil structures. These new systems use a patented ultra-wide band (impulse) radar technology known as Micropower Impulse Radar (GPR) imaging systems. LLNL has also developed signal processing software capable of producing 2-D and 3-D images of objects embedded in materials such as soil, wood and concrete. My assignment while at LLNL has focused on the testing of different radar configurations and applications, as well as assisting in the creation of computer algorithms which enable the radar to scan target areas of different geometeries.

  1. Spaceborne weather radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meneghini, Robert; Kozu, Toshiaki

    1990-01-01

    The present work on the development status of spaceborne weather radar systems and services discusses radar instrument complementarities, the current forms of equations for the characterization of such aspects of weather radar performance as surface and mirror-image returns, polarimetry, and Doppler considerations, and such essential factors in spaceborne weather radar design as frequency selection, scanning modes, and the application of SAR to rain detection. Attention is then given to radar signal absorption by the various atmospheric gases, rain drop size distribution and wind velocity determinations, and the characteristics of clouds, as well as the range of available estimation methods for backscattering, single- and dual-wavelength attenuation, and polarimetric and climatological characteristics.

  2. The calmodulin-like proteins AtCML4 and AtCML5 are single-pass membrane proteins targeted to the endomembrane system by an N-terminal signal anchor sequence

    PubMed Central

    Ruge, Henning; Flosdorff, Sandra; Ebersberger, Ingo; Chigri, Fatima; Vothknecht, Ute C.

    2016-01-01

    Calmodulins (CaMs) are important mediators of Ca2+ signals that are found ubiquitously in all eukaryotic organisms. Plants contain a unique family of calmodulin-like proteins (CMLs) that exhibit greater sequence variance compared to canonical CaMs. The Arabidopsis thaliana proteins AtCML4 and AtCML5 are members of CML subfamily VII and possess a CaM domain comprising the characteristic double pair of EF-hands, but they are distinguished from other members of this subfamily and from canonical CaMs by an N-terminal extension of their amino acid sequence. Transient expression of yellow fluorescent protein-tagged AtCML4 and AtCML5 under a 35S-promoter in Nicotiana benthamiana leaf cells revealed a spherical fluorescence pattern. This pattern was confirmed by transient expression in Arabidopsis protoplasts under the native promoter. Co-localization analyses with various endomembrane marker proteins suggest that AtCML4 and AtCML5 are localized to vesicular structures in the interphase between Golgi and the endosomal system. Further studies revealed AtCML5 to be a single-pass membrane protein that is targeted into the endomembrane system by an N-terminal signal anchor sequence. Self-assembly green fluorescent protein and protease protection assays support a topology with the CaM domain exposed to the cytosolic surface and not the lumen of the vesicles, indicating that AtCML5 could sense Ca2+ signals in the cytosol. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that AtCML4 and AtCML5 are closely related paralogues originating from a duplication event within the Brassicaceae family. CML4/5-like proteins seem to be universally present in eudicots but are absent in some monocots. Together these results show that CML4/5-like proteins represent a flowering plant-specific subfamily of CMLs with a potential function in vesicle transport within the plant endomembrane system. PMID:27029353

  3. The calmodulin-like proteins AtCML4 and AtCML5 are single-pass membrane proteins targeted to the endomembrane system by an N-terminal signal anchor sequence.

    PubMed

    Ruge, Henning; Flosdorff, Sandra; Ebersberger, Ingo; Chigri, Fatima; Vothknecht, Ute C

    2016-06-01

    Calmodulins (CaMs) are important mediators of Ca(2+) signals that are found ubiquitously in all eukaryotic organisms. Plants contain a unique family of calmodulin-like proteins (CMLs) that exhibit greater sequence variance compared to canonical CaMs. The Arabidopsis thaliana proteins AtCML4 and AtCML5 are members of CML subfamily VII and possess a CaM domain comprising the characteristic double pair of EF-hands, but they are distinguished from other members of this subfamily and from canonical CaMs by an N-terminal extension of their amino acid sequence. Transient expression of yellow fluorescent protein-tagged AtCML4 and AtCML5 under a 35S-promoter in Nicotiana benthamiana leaf cells revealed a spherical fluorescence pattern. This pattern was confirmed by transient expression in Arabidopsis protoplasts under the native promoter. Co-localization analyses with various endomembrane marker proteins suggest that AtCML4 and AtCML5 are localized to vesicular structures in the interphase between Golgi and the endosomal system. Further studies revealed AtCML5 to be a single-pass membrane protein that is targeted into the endomembrane system by an N-terminal signal anchor sequence. Self-assembly green fluorescent protein and protease protection assays support a topology with the CaM domain exposed to the cytosolic surface and not the lumen of the vesicles, indicating that AtCML5 could sense Ca(2+) signals in the cytosol. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that AtCML4 and AtCML5 are closely related paralogues originating from a duplication event within the Brassicaceae family. CML4/5-like proteins seem to be universally present in eudicots but are absent in some monocots. Together these results show that CML4/5-like proteins represent a flowering plant-specific subfamily of CMLs with a potential function in vesicle transport within the plant endomembrane system. PMID:27029353

  4. Fabry-Perot interferometer based Mie Doppler lidar for low tropospheric wind observation.

    PubMed

    Xia, Haiyun; Sun, Dongsong; Yang, Yuanhong; Shen, Fahua; Dong, Jingjing; Kobayashi, Takao

    2007-10-10

    Similar in principle to recent implementations of a lidar system at 355 nm [Opt. Lett. 25, 1231 (2000), Appl. Opt. 44, 6023 (2005)], an incoherent-detection Mie Doppler wind lidar at 1064 nm was developed and deployed in 2005 [Opt. Rev. 12, 409 (2005)] for wind measurements in the low troposphere, taking advantage of aerosol scattering for signal enhancement. We present a number of improvements made to the original 1064 nm system to increase its robustness for long-period operation. These include a multimode fiber for receiving the reference signal, a mode scrambler to allow uniform illumination over the Fabry-Perot interferometer, and a fast scannable Fabry-Perot interferometer for calibration and for the determination of outgoing laser frequency during the wind observation. With these improvements in stability, the standard deviation of peak transmission and FWHM of the Fabry-Perot interferometer was determined to be 0.49% and 0.36%, respectively. The lidar wind measurements were validated within a dynamic range of +/-40 m/s. Comparison experiments with both wind profiler radar and Vaisala wiresonde show good agreement with expected observation error. An example of 24 h continuous observations of wind field and aerosol backscatter coefficients in the boundary layer with 1 min and 30 m temporal and spatial resolution and 3 m/s tolerated wind velocity error is presented and fully demonstrates the stability and robustness of this lidar.

  5. Modeling the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waluschka, Eugene; Pedersen, Tracy R.; McNamara, paul

    2005-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), shown below, will detect gravitational waves produced by objects such as binary black holes or objects falling into black holes (extreme mass ratio inspirals) over a frequency range of l0(exp -4) to 0.1 Hz. Within the conceptual frame work of Newtonian physics, a gravitational wave produces a strain, (Delta)l/l, with magnitudes of the order of Earth based gravitational wave detectors, such as the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) project, use Michelson interferometers with arm lengths l = 4 km to detect these strains. Earth induced seismic noise limits ground-based instruments detecting gravitational waves with frequencies lower than approx. 1 Hz.

  6. Circular common-path point diffraction interferometer.

    PubMed

    Du, Yongzhao; Feng, Guoying; Li, Hongru; Vargas, J; Zhou, Shouhuan

    2012-10-01

    A simple and compact point-diffraction interferometer with circular common-path geometry configuration is developed. The interferometer is constructed by a beam-splitter, two reflection mirrors, and a telescope system composed by two lenses. The signal and reference waves travel along the same path. Furthermore, an opaque mask containing a reference pinhole and a test object holder or test window is positioned in the common focal plane of the telescope system. The object wave is divided into two beams that take opposite paths along the interferometer. The reference wave is filtered by the reference pinhole, while the signal wave is transmitted through the object holder. The reference and signal waves are combined again in the beam-splitter and their interference is imaged in the CCD. The new design is compact, vibration insensitive, and suitable for the measurement of moving objects or dynamic processes.

  7. Matter-wave interferometers using TAAP rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navez, P.; Pandey, S.; Mas, H.; Poulios, K.; Fernholz, T.; von Klitzing, W.

    2016-07-01

    We present two novel matter-wave Sagnac interferometers based on ring-shaped time-averaged adiabatic potentials, where the atoms are put into a superposition of two different spin states and manipulated independently using elliptically polarized rf-fields. In the first interferometer the atoms are accelerated by spin-state-dependent forces and then travel around the ring in a matter-wave guide. In the second one the atoms are fully trapped during the entire interferometric sequence and are moved around the ring in two spin-state-dependent ‘buckets’. Corrections to the ideal Sagnac phase are investigated for both cases. We experimentally demonstrate the key atom-optical elements of the interferometer such as the independent manipulation of two different spin states in the ring-shaped potentials under identical experimental conditions.

  8. A high sensitive roll angle interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Yanfen; Hou, Wenmei; Hu, Kai; Ju, Aisong

    2013-01-01

    A roll angle interferometer with high sensitivity is designed in this paper. Two sets of centrosymmetric beams are used to travel through the measurement and reference arms of the roll angle interferometer which contains two specific optical devices: wedge prism assembly and wedge mirror assembly. The optical path change in both arms caused by roll is converted into phase shift which can be measured by interferometer. Because of the adoption of the centrosymmetric measurement structure, the straightness errors, yaw error and pitch error can be avoided and the dead path is minimized, so that the stability and the accuracy of the measurement can be greatly enhanced. The resolution for the roll measurement is about 0.006″ with the measurement range of ±1°.

  9. 4. VIEW NORTHEAST, radar tower (unknown function), prime search radar ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW NORTHEAST, radar tower (unknown function), prime search radar tower, emergency power building, and height finder radar tower - Fort Custer Military Reservation, P-67 Radar Station, .25 mile north of Dickman Road, east of Clark Road, Battle Creek, Calhoun County, MI

  10. 5. VIEW EAST, height finder radar towers, radar tower (unknown ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW EAST, height finder radar towers, radar tower (unknown function), prime search radar tower, operations building, and central heating plant - Fort Custer Military Reservation, P-67 Radar Station, .25 mile north of Dickman Road, east of Clark Road, Battle Creek, Calhoun County, MI

  11. Digital holographic Michelson interferometer for nanometrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevrygin, Alexander A.; Korotkov, V. I.; Pulkin, S. A.; Tursunov, I. M.; Venediktov, D. V.; Venediktov, V. Yu.; Volkov, O. V.

    2014-11-01

    The paper considers the dynamic holographic interferometry schemes with amplification (multiplication) of holographic fringes and with correction for distortions, imposed by the interferometer scheme elements. The use of digital microscope and of the matrix light modulator with direct addressing provides the completely digital closed-loop performance of the overall system for real-time evaluation of nano-scale objects size. Considered schemes were verified in the laboratory experiment, using the Michelson micro-interferometer, equipped by the USB-microscope and digital holography stage, equipped by the Holoeye spatial light modulator.

  12. Progress Toward a Cold Ion Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archibald, James; Christopher, Erickson; Jackson, Jarom; Durfee, Dallin

    2012-06-01

    We describe progress on a cold ion matter-wave interferometer. The ions are generated by laser-cooling strontium and then photo-ionizing the atoms with a two-photon transition to an auto- ionizing state in the continuum. Each ion's quantum wave will be split and recombined using stimulated Raman transitions between the hyperfine ground states of Sr^87+. The interferometer phase will be determined by measuring the fraction of ions exiting in each hyperfine state. We will discuss the theory of operation, experimental methods, and potential applications of the device.

  13. Self-referenced interferometer for cylindrical surfaces.

    PubMed

    Šarbort, Martin; Řeřucha, Šimon; Holá, Miroslava; Buchta, Zdeněk; Lazar, Josef

    2015-11-20

    We present a new interferometric method for shape measurement of hollow cylindrical tubes. We propose a simple and robust self-referenced interferometer where the reference and object waves are represented by the central and peripheral parts, respectively, of the conical wave generated by a single axicon lens. The interferogram detected by a digital camera is characterized by a closed-fringe pattern with a circular carrier. The interference phase is demodulated using spatial synchronous detection. The capabilities of the interferometer are experimentally tested for various hollow cylindrical tubes with lengths up to 600 mm.

  14. Characterization of the wind imaging interferometer.

    PubMed

    Hersom, C H; Shepherd, G G

    1995-06-01

    The Wind Imaging Interferometer is a field-widened Michelson interferometer onboard the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite. The characterization of the instrument required a pixel-by-pixel evaluation of the instrument performance. Some of the configurations, techniques, and results of the characterization are summarized. Throughput was excellent and equivalent to a total system quantum efficiency of ~10%. Localized spatial noise in response has been attributed to scattering from residual surface effects on the CCD. Instrument visibility factors greater than 90% were measured with distinct distribution patterns over the field of view that were different for the night and day apertures. The instrument phase for zero wind was determined with laboratory airglow sources.

  15. Initial measurements of the angular velocity of walking humans using an active millimeter-wave correlation interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zilevu, Kojo S.; Kammerman, Kelly L.; Nanzer, Jeffrey A.

    2013-05-01

    The design of a 29.5 GHz experimental active interferometer for the measurement of the angular velocity of moving humans is presented in this paper, as well as initial measurements of walking humans. Measurement of the angular motion of moving objects is a desirable function in remote security sensing applications. Doppler radar sensors are able to measure the signature of moving humans based on micro-Doppler analysis; however, a person moving with little to no radial velocity produces negligible Doppler returns. Measurement of the angular movement of humans can be done with traditional radar techniques however the process involves either continuous tracking with narrow beamwidth or angle-of arrival estimation algorithms. Recently, the authors presented a new method of measuring the angular velocity of moving objects using interferometry. The method measures the angular velocity of an object without tracking or complex processing. The frequency shift imparted on the signal response is proportional to the angular velocity of the object as it passes through the interferometer beam pattern. The experimental system consists of a transmitter and two separate receivers with two widely spaced antennas. The received signals in each of the two channels are downconverted and digitized, and post-processed offline. Initial results of a walking person passing through the interferometer beam pattern are presented, which verify the expected operation of the receiver derived from the initial theory.

  16. (presentation) Precision Mechanisms for Space Interferometers: A Tutorial

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agronin, Michael L.

    1993-01-01

    To maximize salability, spaceborne interferometer designs must minimize actuator cost while maximizing science quality and quantity. Interferometer designers must have the knowledge to design a system with the simplist, most reliable, and least expensive actuators possible.

  17. Goldstone solar system radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurgens, Raymond F.

    1988-01-01

    Planning, direction, experimental design, and coordination of data-acquisition and engineering activities in support of all Goldstone planetary radar astronomy were performed. This work demands familiarity with the various components of a planetary radar telescope (transmitter, receiver, antenna, computer hardware and software) as well as knowledge of how the entire system must function as a cohesive unit to meet the particular scientific objectives at hand in a given observation. Support radar data-processing facilities, currently being used for virtually all Goldstone data reduction includes: a VAX 11/780 computer system, an FPS 5210 array processor, terminals, tape drives, and image-display devices, as well as a large body of data-reduction software to accommodate the variety of data-acquisition formats and strategems. Successful 113-cm radar observation of Callisto and the near-Earth asteroid 1981 Midas and Goldstone/VLA radar observations of Saturn's rings were obtained. Quick-look verification programs from data taken with phase-coded cw (i.e., ranging) waveforms, applicable to Venus, the Moon, and small bodies were completed. Definition of scientific and engineering requirements on instrument performance, radar system configuration, and personnel, for all 1988 Goldstone radar investigations was accomplished.

  18. Electronically scanned optical-fiber Young's white-light interferometer.

    PubMed

    Chen, S; Rogers, A J; Meggitt, B T

    1991-05-15

    An optical-fiber version of Young's interferometer that uses a low-coherent-light source and a linear chargecoupled-device detector is described. With its unique, simple structure, this interferometer greatly reduces the spatial coherence mismatch from which other electronically scanned white-light interferometers suffer. Experimental results are presented for the use of this interferometer as a strain or temperature sensor with a large dynamic range.

  19. High-resolution interferometric radar images of equatorial spread F scattering structures using Capon's method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zewdie, G. K.; Rodrigues, F. S.; Paula, E. R.

    2015-12-01

    Coherent backscatter radar imaging techniques use measurements made by multiple antenna baselines (visibility estimates) to infer the spatial distribution of the scatterers (brightness function) responsible for the observed echoes. It has been proposed that the Capon method for spectral estimation can be used for high-resolution estimation of the brightness distribution. We investigate the application of the Capon method to measurements made by a small (7-baseline) 30 MHz ionospheric coherent backscatter radar interferometer in Sao Luis, Brazil. The longest baseline of the interferometer is only 15 times the wavelength of radar signal (10 m), and the ionospheric radar soundings have been made using only 4-8 kW transmitters. Nevertheless, we have been able to obtain high-resolution (kilometric scales in the zonal direction) images of scattering structures during equatorial spread F (ESF) events over a wide field of view (+/- 10 degrees off zenith). We will present numerical simulations demonstrating the performance of the technique for the Sao Luis radar setup as well as results of the Capon technique applied to actual measurements. We will discuss the behavior of the ESF scattering structures as seen in the Capon images. The high-resolution images can assist our interpretation of plasma instabilities in the equatorial ionosphere and serve to test our ability to model the behavior of ionospheric irregularities during space weather events such as those associated with ESF.

  20. Radar Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    This lecture was just a taste of radar remote sensing techniques and applications. Other important areas include Stereo radar grammetry. PolInSAR for volumetric structure mapping. Agricultural monitoring, soil moisture, ice-mapping, etc. The broad range of sensor types, frequencies of observation and availability of sensors have enabled radar sensors to make significant contributions in a wide area of earth and planetary remote sensing sciences. The range of applications, both qualitative and quantitative, continue to expand with each new generation of sensors.

  1. An electron Talbot-Lau interferometer and magnetic field sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Bach, Roger; Batelaan, Herman; Gronniger, Glen

    2013-12-16

    We present a demonstration of a three grating Talbot-Lau interferometer for electrons. As a proof of principle, the interferometer is used to measure magnetic fields. The device is similar to the classical Moiré deflectometer. The possibility to extend this work to build a scaled-up electron deflectometer or interferometer for sensitive magnetic field sensing is discussed.

  2. Control of Formation-Flying Multi-Element Space Interferometers with Direct Interferometer-Output Feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Hui-Ling; Cheng, Victor H. L.; Lyon, Richard G.; Carpenter, Kenneth G.

    2007-01-01

    The long-baseline space interferometer concept involving formation flying of multiple spacecrafts holds great promise as future space missions for high-resolution imagery. A major challenge of obtaining high-quality interferometric synthesized images from long-baseline space interferometers is to accurately control these spacecraft and their optics payloads in the specified configuration. Our research focuses on the determination of the optical errors to achieve fine control of long-baseline space interferometers without resorting to additional sensing equipment. We present a suite of estimation tools that can effectively extract from the raw interferometric image relative x/y, piston translational and tip/tilt deviations at the exit pupil aperture. The use of these error estimates in achieving control of the interferometer elements is demonstrated using simulated as well as laboratory-collected interferometric stellar images.

  3. Control of Formation-Flying Multi-Element Space Interferometers with Direct Interferometer-Output Feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Hui-Ling; Cheng, H. L.; Lyon, Richard G.; Carpenter, Kenneth G.

    2007-01-01

    The long-baseline space interferometer concept involving formation flying of multiple spacecraft holds great promise as future space missions for high-resolution imagery. A major challenge of obtaining high-quality interferometric synthesized images from long-baseline space interferometers is to accurately control these spacecraft and their optics payloads in the specified configuration. Our research focuses on the determination of the optical errors to achieve fine control of long-baseline space interferometers without resorting to additional sensing equipment. We present a suite of estimation tools that can effectively extract from the raw interferometric image relative x/y, piston translational and tip/tilt deviations at the exit pupil aperture. The use of these error estimates in achieving control of the interferometer elements is demonstrated using simulated as well as laboratory-collected interferometric stellar images.

  4. Plasmonic interferometers: From physics to biosensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xie

    Optical interferometry has a long history and wide range of applications. In recent years, plasmonic interferometer arouses great interest due to its compact size and enhanced light-matter interaction. They have demonstrated attractive applications in biomolecule sensing, optical modulation/switching, and material characterization, etc. In this work, we first propose a practical far-field method to extract the intrinsic phase dispersion, revealing important phase information during interactions among free-space light, nanostructure, and SPs. The proposed approach is confirmed by both simulation and experiment. Then we design novel plasmonic interferometer structure for sensitive optical sensing applications. To overcome two major limitations suffered by previously reported double-slit plasmonic Mach-Zehnder interferometer (PMZI), two new schemes are proposed and investigated. (1) A PMZI based on end-fire coupling improves the SP coupling efficiency and enhance the interference contrast more than 50 times. (2) In another design, a multi-layered metal-insulator-metal PMZI releases the requirement for single-slit illumination, which enables sensitive, high-throughput sensing applications based on intensity modulation. We develop a sensitive, low-cost and high-throughput biosensing platform based on intensity modulation using ring-hole plasmonic interferometers. This biosensor is then integrated with cell-phone-based microscope, which is promising to develop a portable sensor for point-of-care diagnostics, epidemic disease control and food safety monitoring.

  5. Keck Interferometer autoaligner : algorithms and techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hrynevych, Michael A.; Tsubota, Kevin; Smythe, Robert; Dahla, Wayne; Bella, Jim; Colavita, M. Mark; Gathright, John; Meggars, Forest; Neyman, Christoper; Rudeen, Andy; van Belle, Gerard; Wizinowich, Peter

    2004-01-01

    The Keck Interferometer includes an autoalignment system consisting of pop-up targets located at strategic locations along the beam trains of each arm of the instrument along with a sensor and control system. We briefly describe the hardware of the system and then proceed to a description of the two operational modes of the system.

  6. A Microwave Interferometer on an Air Track.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polley, J. Patrick

    1993-01-01

    Uses an air track and microwave transmitters and receivers to make a Michelson interferometer. Includes three experiments: (1) measuring the wavelength of microwaves, (2) measuring the wavelength of microwaves by using the Doppler Effect, and (3) measuring the Doppler shift. (MVL)

  7. Orbiting stellar interferometer for astrometry and imaging.

    PubMed

    Colavita, M M; Shao, M; Rayman, M D

    1993-04-01

    The orbiting stellar interferometer (OSI) is a concept for a first-generation space interferometer with astrometric and imaging goals and is responsive to the recommendations of the Astronomy and Astrophysics Survey Committee for an astrometric interferometer mission. The OSI, as developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory over the past several years, is a triple Michelson interferometer with articulating siderostats and optical delay lines. Two point designs for the instrument are described.

    The 18-m design uses an 18-m maximum baseline and aperture diameters of 40 cm; the targeted astrometric performance is a wide-field accuracy of 10 microarsec for 16-mag objects in 100 s of integration time and for 20-mag objects in 1 h. The instrument would also be capable of synthesis imaging with a resolution of 5 marcsec, which corresponds to the diffraction limit of the 18-m base line. The design uses a deployed structure, which would fold to fit into an Atlas HAS shroud, for insertion into a 900-km sun-synchronous orbit In addition to the 18-m point design a 7-m point design that uses a shorter base line in order to simplify deployment is also discussed. OSI's high performance is made possible by utilizing laser metrology and controlled-optics technology.

  8. The effect of rotations on Michelson interferometers

    SciTech Connect

    Maraner, Paolo

    2014-11-15

    In the contest of the special theory of relativity, it is shown that uniform rotations induce a phase shift in Michelson interferometers. The effect is second order in the ratio of the interferometer’s speed to the speed of light, further suppressed by the ratio of the interferometer’s arms length to the radius of rotation and depends on the interferometer’s position in the co-rotating frame. The magnitude of the phase shift is just beyond the sensitivity of turntable rotated optical resonators used in present tests of Lorentz invariance. It grows significantly large in Earth’s rotated kilometer-scale Fabry–Perot enhanced interferometric gravitational-wave detectors where it appears as a constant bias. The effect can provide the means of sensing center and radius of rotations. - Highlights: • Rotations induce a phase shift in Michelson interferometers. • Earth’s rotation induces a constant bias in Michelson interferometers. • Michelson interferometers can be used to sense center and radius of rotations.

  9. Aircraft radar antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrank, Helmut E.

    1987-04-01

    Many changes have taken place in airborne radar antennas since their beginnings over forty years ago. A brief historical review of the advances in technology is presented, from mechanically scanned reflectors to modern multiple function phased arrays. However, emphasis is not on history but on the state-of-the-art technology and trends for future airborne radar systems. The status of rotating surveillance antennas is illustrated by the AN/APY-1 Airborne Warning and Control System (AWACS) slotted waveguide array, which achieved a significant breakthrough in sidelobe suppression. Gimballed flat plate arrays in nose radomes are typified by the AN/APG-66 (F-16) antenna. Multifunction phased arrays are presented by the Electronically Agile Radar (EAR) antenna, which has achieved significant advances in performance versatility and reliability. Trends toward active aperture, adaptive, and digital beamforming arrays are briefly discussed. Antennas for future aircraft radar systems must provide multiple functions in less aperture space, and must perform more reliably.

  10. Laser Radar Animation

    NASA Video Gallery

    Laser and radar instruments aboard NASA aircraft provide measurements of the snow and ice surface and down to the bedrock under the ice. Lasers, with a shorter wavelength, measure the surface eleva...

  11. Multispectral imaging radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porcello, L. J.; Rendleman, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    A side-looking radar, installed in a C-46 aircraft, was modified to provide it with an initial multispectral imaging capability. The radar is capable of radiating at either of two wavelengths, these being approximately 3 cm and 30 cm, with either horizontal or vertical polarization on each wavelength. Both the horizontally- and vertically-polarized components of the reflected signal can be observed for each wavelength/polarization transmitter configuration. At present, two-wavelength observation of a terrain region can be accomplished within the same day, but not with truly simultaneous observation on both wavelengths. A multiplex circuit to permit this simultaneous observation has been designed. A brief description of the modified radar system and its operating parameters is presented. Emphasis is then placed on initial flight test data and preliminary interpretation. Some considerations pertinent to the calibration of such radars are presented in passing.

  12. Accurate measurement of interferometer group delay using field-compensated scanning white light interferometer.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiaoke; Wang, Ji; Ge, Jian

    2010-10-10

    Interferometers are key elements in radial velocity (RV) experiments in astronomy observations, and accurate calibration of the group delay of an interferometer is required for high precision measurements. A novel field-compensated white light scanning Michelson interferometer is introduced as an interferometer calibration tool. The optical path difference (OPD) scanning was achieved by translating a compensation prism, such that even if the light source were in low spatial coherence, the interference stays spatially phase coherent over a large interferometer scanning range. In the wavelength region of 500-560 nm, a multimode fiber-coupled LED was used as the light source, and high optical efficiency was essential in elevating the signal-to-noise ratio of the interferogram signal. The achromatic OPD scanning required a one-time calibration, and two methods using dual-laser wavelength references and an iodine absorption spectrum reference were employed and cross-verified. In an experiment measuring the group delay of a fixed Michelson interferometer, Fourier analysis was employed to process the interferogram data. The group delay was determined at an accuracy of 1×10(-5), and the phase angle precision was typically 2.5×10(-6) over the wide wavelength region.

  13. Downhole pulse radar

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Hsi-Tien

    1989-01-01

    A borehole logging tool generates a fast rise-time, short duration, high peak-power radar pulse having broad energy distribution between 30 MHz and 300 MHz through a directional transmitting and receiving antennas having barium titanate in the electromagnetically active region to reduce the wavelength to within an order of magnitude of the diameter of the antenna. Radar returns from geological discontinuities are sampled for transmission uphole.

  14. Downhole pulse radar

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Hsi-Tien

    1987-09-28

    A borehole logging tool generates a fast rise-time, short duration, high peak-power radar pulse having broad energy distribution between 30 MHz and 300 MHz through a directional transmitting and receiving antennas having barium titanate in the electromagnetically active region to reduce the wavelength to within an order of magnitude of the diameter of the antenna. Radar returns from geological discontinuities are sampled for transmission uphole. 7 figs.

  15. Phased-array radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brookner, E.

    1985-02-01

    The operating principles, technology, and applications of phased-array radars are reviewed and illustrated with diagrams and photographs. Consideration is given to the antenna elements, circuitry for time delays, phase shifters, pulse coding and compression, and hybrid radars combining phased arrays with lenses to alter the beam characteristics. The capabilities and typical hardware of phased arrays are shown using the US military systems COBRA DANE and PAVE PAWS as examples.

  16. On wave radar measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewans, Kevin; Feld, Graham; Jonathan, Philip

    2014-09-01

    The SAAB REX WaveRadar sensor is widely used for platform-based wave measurement systems by the offshore oil and gas industry. It offers in situ surface elevation wave measurements at relatively low operational costs. Furthermore, there is adequate flexibility in sampling rates, allowing in principle sampling frequencies from 1 to 10 Hz, but with an angular microwave beam width of 10° and an implied ocean surface footprint in the order of metres, significant limitations on the spatial and temporal resolution might be expected. Indeed there are reports that the accuracy of the measurements from wave radars may not be as good as expected. We review the functionality of a WaveRadar using numerical simulations to better understand how WaveRadar estimates compare with known surface elevations. In addition, we review recent field measurements made with a WaveRadar set at the maximum sampling frequency, in the light of the expected functionality and the numerical simulations, and we include inter-comparisons between SAAB radars and buoy measurements for locations in the North Sea.

  17. A generalized, periodic nonlinearity-reduced interferometer for straightness measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Chienming

    2008-06-15

    Periodic nonlinearity is a systematic error limiting the accuracy of displacement measurements at the nanometer level. However, an interferometer with a displacement measurement accuracy of less than 1 nm is required in nanometrology and in fundamental scientific research. To meet this requirement, a generalized, periodic nonlinearity-reduced interferometer, based on three construction principles has been developed for straightness measurements. These three construction principles have resulted in an interferometer with a highly stable design with reduced periodic nonlinearity. Verifications by a straightness interferometer have demonstrated that the periodic nonlinearity was less than 40 pm. The results also demonstrate that the interferometer design is capable of subnanometer accuracy and is useful in nanometrology.

  18. The Mask Designs for Space Interferometer Mission (SIM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Xu

    2008-01-01

    The Space Interferometer Mission (SIM) consists of three interferometers (science, guide1, and guide2) and two optical paths (metrology and starlight). The system requirements for each interferometer/optical path combination are different and sometimes work against each other. A diffraction model is developed to design and optimize various masks to simultaneously meet the system requirements of three interferometers. In this paper, the details of this diffraction model will be described first. Later, the mask design for each interferometer will be presented to demonstrate the system performance compliance. In the end, a tolerance sensitivity study on the geometrical dimension, shape, and the alignment of these masks will be discussed.

  19. Atomic multiwave interferometer for Aharonov-Casher-phase measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Min-Kang; Zhang, Ke; Duan, Xiao-Chun; Ke, Yi; Shao, Cheng-Gang; Hu, Zhong-Kun

    2016-02-01

    We present an atomic multiwave interferometer with magnetic sublevels to precisely determine the Aharonov-Casher (AC) geometric phase. Simulations show that this interferometer has sharper fringes than a normal two-wave interferometer, which means a higher phase resolution can be achieved. Moreover, atoms evolving in a single hyperfine structure state make the interferometer insensitive to the dc Stark phase shift. This dc Stark shift is one of the main noise sources in AC phase measurements. The constraint of the photon rest mass is also discussed when using this atomic interferometer to measure the Aharonov-Casher phase.

  20. Investigation of Space Interferometer Control Using Imaging Sensor Output Feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leitner, Jesse A.; Cheng, Victor H. L.

    2003-01-01

    Numerous space interferometry missions are planned for the next decade to verify different enabling technologies towards very-long-baseline interferometry to achieve high-resolution imaging and high-precision measurements. These objectives will require coordinated formations of spacecraft separately carrying optical elements comprising the interferometer. High-precision sensing and control of the spacecraft and the interferometer-component payloads are necessary to deliver sub-wavelength accuracy to achieve the scientific objectives. For these missions, the primary scientific product of interferometer measurements may be the only source of data available at the precision required to maintain the spacecraft and interferometer-component formation. A concept is studied for detecting the interferometer's optical configuration errors based on information extracted from the interferometer sensor output. It enables precision control of the optical components, and, in cases of space interferometers requiring formation flight of spacecraft that comprise the elements of a distributed instrument, it enables the control of the formation-flying vehicles because independent navigation or ranging sensors cannot deliver the high-precision metrology over the entire required geometry. Since the concept can act on the quality of the interferometer output directly, it can detect errors outside the capability of traditional metrology instruments, and provide the means needed to augment the traditional instrumentation to enable enhanced performance. Specific analyses performed in this study include the application of signal-processing and image-processing techniques to solve the problems of interferometer aperture baseline control, interferometer pointing, and orientation of multiple interferometer aperture pairs.

  1. A compact semiconductor digital interferometer and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britsky, Oleksander I.; Gorbov, Ivan V.; Petrov, Viacheslav V.; Balagura, Iryna V.

    2015-05-01

    The possibility of using semiconductor laser interferometers to measure displacements at the nanometer scale was demonstrated. The creation principles of miniature digital Michelson interferometers based on semiconductor lasers were proposed. The advanced processing algorithm for the interferometer quadrature signals was designed. It enabled to reduce restrictions on speed of measured movements. A miniature semiconductor digital Michelson interferometer was developed. Designing of the precision temperature stability system for miniature low-cost semiconductor laser with 0.01ºС accuracy enabled to use it for creation of compact interferometer rather than a helium-neon one. Proper firmware and software was designed for the interferometer signals real-time processing and conversion in to respective shifts. In the result the relative displacement between 0-500 mm was measured with a resolution of better than 1 nm. Advantages and disadvantages of practical use of the compact semiconductor digital interferometer in seismometers for the measurement of shifts were shown.

  2. GEOS-3 ocean current investigation using radar altimeter profiling. [Gulf Stream surface topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leitao, C. D.; Huang, N. E.; Parra, C. G.

    1978-01-01

    Both quasi-stationary and dynamic departures from the marine geoid were successfully detected using altitude measurements from the GEOS-3 radar altimeter. The quasi-stationary departures are observed either as elevation changes in single pass profiles across the Gulf Stream or at the crowding of contour lines at the western and northern areas of topographic maps generated using altimeter data spanning one month or longer. Dynamic features such as current meandering and spawned eddies can be monitored by comparing monthly mean maps. Comparison of altimeter inferred eddies with IR detected thermal rings indicates agreement of the two techniques. Estimates of current velocity are made using derived slope estimates in conjunction with the geostrophic equation.

  3. Interferometer for Low-Uncertainty Vector Metrology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toland, Ronald W.; Leviton, Douglas B.

    2006-01-01

    A simplified schematic diagram of a tilt-sensing unequal-path interferometer set up to measure the orientation of the normal vector of one surface of a cube mounted on a structure under test is described herein. This interferometer has been named a "theoferometer" to express both its interferometric nature and the intention to use it instead of an autocollimating theodolite. The theoferometer optics are mounted on a plate, which is in turn mounted on orthogonal air bearings for near-360 rotation in azimuth and elevation. Rough alignment of the theoferometer to the test cube is done by hand, with fine position adjustment provided by a tangent arm drive using linear inchwormlike motors.

  4. Analysis of a free oscillation atom interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Kafle, Rudra P.; Zozulya, Alex A.; Anderson, Dana Z.

    2011-09-15

    We analyze a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC)-based free oscillation atom Michelson interferometer in a weakly confining harmonic magnetic trap. A BEC at the center of the trap is split into two harmonics by a laser standing wave. The harmonics move in opposite directions with equal speeds and turn back under the influence of the trapping potential at their classical turning points. The harmonics are allowed to pass through each other and a recombination pulse is applied when they overlap at the end of a cycle after they return for the second time. We derive an expression for the contrast of the interferometric fringes and obtain the fundamental limit of performance of the interferometer in the parameter space.

  5. Integrated nonlinear interferometer with wavelength multicasting functionality.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weili; Yu, Yu; Zhang, Xinliang

    2016-08-01

    Nonlinear interference based on four wave mixing (FWM) is extremely attractive due to its phase sensitivity. On the other hand, wavelength multicasting, which supports data point-to-multipoint connections, is a key functionality to increase the network efficiency and simplify the transmitter and receiver in the wavelength-division multiplexing systems. We propose and experimentally demonstrate a nonlinear interferometer with wavelength multicasting functionality based on single-stage FWM in an integrated silicon waveguide. With a three-pump and dual-signal input, four phase sensitive idlers are obtained at the interferometer output. For a proof-of-concept application, we further theoretically demonstrate the multicasting logic exclusive-OR (XOR) gate for both intensity and phase modulated signals. The proposed scheme would be potentially applied in various on-chip applications for future optical communication system. PMID:27505786

  6. Thermal-noise-limited underground interferometer CLIO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agatsuma, Kazuhiro; Arai, Koji; Fujimoto, Masa-Katsu; Kawamura, Seiji; Kuroda, Kazuaki; Miyakawa, Osamu; Miyoki, Shinji; Ohashi, Masatake; Suzuki, Toshikazu; Takahashi, Ryutaro; Tatsumi, Daisuke; Telada, Souichi; Uchiyama, Takashi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; collaborators, CLIO

    2010-04-01

    We report on the current status of CLIO (Cryogenic Laser Interferometer Observatory), which is a prototype interferometer for LCGT (large scale cryogenic gravitational-wave telescope). LCGT is a Japanese next-generation interferometric gravitational-wave detector featuring the use of cryogenic mirrors and a quiet underground site. The main purpose of CLIO is to demonstrate a reduction of the mirror thermal noise by cooling the sapphire mirrors. CLIO is located in an underground site of the Kamioka mine, 1000 m deep from the mountain top, to verify its advantages. After a few years of commissioning work, we have achieved a thermal-noise-limited sensitivity at room temperature. One of the main results of noise hunting was the elimination of thermal noise caused by a conductive coil holder coupled with a pendulum through magnets.

  7. Adaptive DFT-based Interferometer Fringe Tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Edward; Pedretti, Ettore; Bregman, Jesse; Mah, Robert W.; Traub, Wesley A.

    2004-01-01

    An automatic interferometer fringe tracking system has been developed, implemented, and tested at the Infrared Optical Telescope Array (IOTA) observatory at Mt. Hopkins, Arizona. The system can minimize the optical path differences (OPDs) for all three baselines of the Michelson stellar interferometer at IOTA. Based on sliding window discrete Fourier transform (DFT) calculations that were optimized for computational efficiency and robustness to atmospheric disturbances, the algorithm has also been tested extensively on off-line data. Implemented in ANSI C on the 266 MHz PowerPC processor running the VxWorks real-time operating system, the algorithm runs in approximately 2.0 milliseconds per scan (including all three interferograms), using the science camera and piezo scanners to measure and correct the OPDs. The adaptive DFT-based tracking algorithm should be applicable to other systems where there is a need to detect or track a signal with an approximately constant-frequency carrier pulse.

  8. A continuous cold atomic beam interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Hongbo; Feng, Yanying Yan, Xueshu; Jiang, Zhikun; Chen, Shu; Wang, Xiaojia; Zhou, Zhaoying

    2015-03-07

    We demonstrate an atom interferometer that uses a laser-cooled continuous beam of {sup 87}Rb atoms having velocities of 10–20 m/s. With spatially separated Raman beams to coherently manipulate the atomic wave packets, Mach–Zehnder interference fringes are observed at an interference distance of 2L = 19 mm. The apparatus operates within a small enclosed area of 0.07 mm{sup 2} at a bandwidth of 190 Hz with a deduced sensitivity of 7.8×10{sup −5} rad/s/√(Hz) for rotations. Using a low-velocity continuous atomic source in an atom interferometer enables high sampling rates and bandwidths without sacrificing sensitivity and compactness, which are important for applications in real dynamic environments.

  9. Phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Medecki, Hector

    1998-01-01

    Disclosed is a point diffraction interferometer for evaluating the quality of a test optic. In operation, the point diffraction interferometer includes a source of radiation, the test optic, a beam divider, a reference wave pinhole located at an image plane downstream from the test optic, and a detector for detecting an interference pattern produced between a reference wave emitted by the pinhole and a test wave emitted from the test optic. The beam divider produces separate reference and test beams which focus at different laterally separated positions on the image plane. The reference wave pinhole is placed at a region of high intensity (e.g., the focal point) for the reference beam. This allows reference wave to be produced at a relatively high intensity. Also, the beam divider may include elements for phase shifting one or both of the reference and test beams.

  10. Phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Medecki, H.

    1998-11-10

    Disclosed is a point diffraction interferometer for evaluating the quality of a test optic. In operation, the point diffraction interferometer includes a source of radiation, the test optic, a beam divider, a reference wave pinhole located at an image plane downstream from the test optic, and a detector for detecting an interference pattern produced between a reference wave emitted by the pinhole and a test wave emitted from the test optic. The beam divider produces separate reference and test beams which focus at different laterally separated positions on the image plane. The reference wave pinhole is placed at a region of high intensity (e.g., the focal point) for the reference beam. This allows reference wave to be produced at a relatively high intensity. Also, the beam divider may include elements for phase shifting one or both of the reference and test beams. 8 figs.

  11. Characterization of the Wind Imaging Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hersom, C. H.; Shepherd, G. G.

    1995-06-01

    The Wind Imaging Interferometer is a field-widened Michelson interferometer onboard the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite. The characterization of the instrument required a pixel-by-pixel evaluation of the instrument performance. Some of the configurations, techniques, and results of the characterization are summarized. Throughput was excellent and equivalent to a total system quantum efficiency of approximately 10%. Localized spatial noise in response has been attributed to scattering from residual surface effects on the CCD. Instrument visibility factors greater than 90% were measured with distinct distribution patterns over the field of view that were different for the night and day apertures. The instrument phase for zero wind was determined with laboratory airglow sources.

  12. Data Processing for Atmospheric Phase Interferometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, Roberto J.; Nessel, James A.; Morabito, David D.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a detailed discussion of calibration procedures used to analyze data recorded from a two-element atmospheric phase interferometer (API) deployed at Goldstone, California. In addition, we describe the data products derived from those measurements that can be used for site intercomparison and atmospheric modeling. Simulated data is used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm and as a means for validating our procedure. A study of the effect of block size filtering is presented to justify our process for isolating atmospheric fluctuation phenomena from other system-induced effects (e.g., satellite motion, thermal drift). A simulated 24 hr interferometer phase data time series is analyzed to illustrate the step-by-step calibration procedure and desired data products.

  13. An interferometer based phase control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, J. H.; Rice, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    An interferometer based phase control system for focusing and pointing the solar power satellite (SPS) power beam is discussed. The system is ground based and closed loop. One receiving antenna is required on Earth. A conventional uplink data channel transmits an 8 bit phase error correction back to the SPS for sequential calibration of each power module. Beam pointing resolution is better than 140 meters at the rectenna.

  14. Interferometer-based phase control system

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, J.H.; Rice, J.S.

    1980-01-01

    An interferometer-based phase control system for focusing and pointing the SPS power beam is discussed. The system is ground based and closed loop. One receiving antenna is required on earth. A conventional uplink data channel transmits an 8-bit phase error correction back to the SPS for sequential calibration of each power module. Beam pointing resolution is better than 140 meters at the Rectenna. 1 ref.

  15. Mach-Zehnder interferometer and the teleporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralph, T. C.

    2000-04-01

    We suggest a self-testing teleportation configuration for photon qubits based on a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. That is, Bob can tell how well the input state has been teleported without knowing what that input state was. One could imagine building a ``locked'' teleporter based on this configuration. The analysis is performed for continuous variable teleportation but the arrangement could be applied equally to discrete manipulations.

  16. Large aperture ac interferometer for optical testing.

    PubMed

    Moore, D T; Murray, R; Neves, F B

    1978-12-15

    A 20-cm clear aperture modified Twyman-Green interferometer is described. The system measures phase with an AC technique called phase-lock interferometry while scanning the aperture with a dual galvanometer scanning system. Position information and phase are stored in a minicomputer with disk storage. This information is manipulated with associated software, and the wavefront deformation due to a test component is graphically displayed in perspective and contour on a CRT terminal. PMID:20208642

  17. Electronic transmittance phase extracted from mesoscopic interferometers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The usual experimental set-up for measuring the wave function phase shift of electrons tunneling through a quantum dot (QD) embedded in a ring (i.e., the transmittance phase) is the so-called ‘open’ interferometer as first proposed by Schuster et al. in 1997, in which the electrons back-scattered at source and the drain contacts are absorbed by additional leads in order to exclude multiple interference. While in this case one can conveniently use a simple two-path interference formula to extract the QD transmittance phase, the open interferometer has also a number of draw-backs, such as a reduced signal and some uncertainty regarding the effects of the extra leads. Here we present a meaningful theoretical study of the QD transmittance phase in ‘closed’ interferometers (i.e., connected only to source and drain leads). By putting together data from existing literature and giving some new proofs, we show both analytically and by numerical simulations that the existence of phase lapses between consecutive resonances of the ‘bare’ QD is related to the signs of the corresponding Fano parameters - of the QD + ring system. More precisely, if the Fano parameters have the same sign, the transmittance phase of the QD exhibits a Π lapse. Therefore, closed mesoscopic interferometers can be used to address the ‘universal phase lapse’ problem. Moreover, the data from already existing Fano interference experiments from Kobayashi et al. in 2003 can be used to infer the phase lapses. PMID:23061877

  18. The lunar interferometer for solar physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dame, L.; Martic, M.; Porteneuve, J.; Schnur, G. F. O.

    1992-12-01

    The concept of a Lunar Interferometer for Solar Physics (LISP) is presented. The choice of a configuration for the imaging complex and the optical and mechanical design are discussed. Particular attention is paid to the rationale for a compact two dimensional array and the use of a novel mechanical support structure based on linear mounting rods is proposed. These two conceptual choices optimize imaging capacities and room and mass issues for transportation to the Moon.

  19. A Study of Imaging Interferometer Simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Ronald J.

    2002-01-01

    Several new space science mission concepts under development at NASA-GSFC for astronomy are intended to carry out synthetic imaging using Michelson interferometers or direct (Fizeau) imaging with sparse apertures. Examples of these mission concepts include the Stellar Imager (SI), the Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT), the Submillimeter Probe of the Evolution of Cosmic Structure (SPECS), and the Fourier-Kelvin Stellar Interferometer (FKSI). We have been developing computer-based simulators for these missions. These simulators are aimed at providing a quantitative evaluation of the imaging capabilities of the mission by modelling the performance on different realistic targets in terms of sensitivity, angular resolution, and dynamic range. Both Fizeau and Michelson modes of operation can be considered. Our work is based on adapting a computer simulator called imSIM, which was initially written for the Space Interferometer Mission in order to simulate the imaging mode of new missions such as those listed. In a recent GSFC-funded study we have successfully written a preliminary version of a simulator SISIM for the Stellar Imager and carried out some preliminary studies with it. In a separately funded study we have also been applying these methods to SPECS/SPIRIT.

  20. Model-based phase-shifting interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dong; Zhang, Lei; Shi, Tu; Yang, Yongying; Chong, Shiyao; Miao, Liang; Huang, Wei; Shen, Yibing; Bai, Jian

    2015-10-01

    A model-based phase-shifting interferometer (MPI) is developed, in which a novel calculation technique is proposed instead of the traditional complicated system structure, to achieve versatile, high precision and quantitative surface tests. In the MPI, the partial null lens (PNL) is employed to implement the non-null test. With some alternative PNLs, similar as the transmission spheres in ZYGO interferometers, the MPI provides a flexible test for general spherical and aspherical surfaces. Based on modern computer modeling technique, a reverse iterative optimizing construction (ROR) method is employed for the retrace error correction of non-null test, as well as figure error reconstruction. A self-compiled ray-tracing program is set up for the accurate system modeling and reverse ray tracing. The surface figure error then can be easily extracted from the wavefront data in forms of Zernike polynomials by the ROR method. Experiments of the spherical and aspherical tests are presented to validate the flexibility and accuracy. The test results are compared with those of Zygo interferometer (null tests), which demonstrates the high accuracy of the MPI. With such accuracy and flexibility, the MPI would possess large potential in modern optical shop testing.

  1. Hybrid photonic chip interferometer for embedded metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, P.; Martin, H.; Maxwell, G.; Jiang, X.

    2014-03-01

    Embedded metrology is the provision of metrology on the manufacturing platform, enabling measurement without the removal of the work piece. Providing closer integration of metrology upon the manufacturing platform can lead to the better control and increased throughput. In this work we present the development of a high precision hybrid optical chip interferometer metrology device. The complete metrology sensor system is structured into two parts; optical chip and optical probe. The hybrid optical chip interferometer is based on a silica-on-silicon etched integrated-optic motherboard containing waveguide structures and evanescent couplers. Upon the motherboard, electro-optic components such as photodiodes and a semiconductor gain block are mounted and bonded to provide the required functionality. The key structure in the device is a tunable laser module based upon an external-cavity diode laser (ECDL). Within the cavity is a multi-layer thin film filter which is rotated to select the longitudinal mode at which the laser operates. An optical probe, which uses a blazed diffracting grating and collimating objective lens, focuses light of different wavelengths laterally over the measurand. Incident laser light is then tuned in wavelength time to effectively sweep an `optical stylus' over the surface. Wavelength scanning and rapid phase shifting can then retrieve the path length change and thus the surface height. We give an overview of the overall design of the final hybrid photonic chip interferometer, constituent components, device integration and packaging as well as experimental test results from the current version now under evaluation.

  2. 33. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #320, perimeter acquisition radar ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #320, perimeter acquisition radar operations center (PAROC), contains the tactical command and control group equipment required to control the par site. Showing spacetrack monitor console - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Perimeter Acquisition Radar Building, Limited Access Area, between Limited Access Patrol Road & Service Road A, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  3. Phase modulating the Urbana radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrington, L. J., Jr.; Bowhill, S. A.

    1983-01-01

    The design and operation of a switched phase modulation system for the Urbana Radar System are discussed. The system is implemented and demonstrated using a simple procedure. The radar system and circuits are described and analyzed.

  4. Characteristics of Sunset radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    Located in a narrow canyon 15 km west of Boulder, Colorado, the Sunset pulsed Doppler radar was the first radar designed and constructed specifically as a VHF ST radar. The antenna system is a phased array of coaxial-colinear dopoles with computer-controlled phase shifters for each line of dipoles. It operates at a frequency of 40.475 MHz and a wavelength of 7.41M. Peak transmitter power is 100 kW. Aperture efficiency is 0.58 and resistive loss is 0.30 for its 3600 sq m area. The practical steering rate is 1 record/minute/position to any arbitrary antenna beam position. The first clear-air turbulence echoes and wind velocity measurements were obtained in 1974. Significant accomplishments are listed.

  5. Mercury radar speckle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holin, Igor V.

    2010-06-01

    Current data reveal that Mercury is a dynamic system with a core which has not yet solidified completely and is at least partially decoupled from the mantle. Radar speckle displacement experiments have demonstrated that the accuracy in spin-dynamics determination for Earth-like planets can approach 10 -5. The extended analysis of space-time correlation properties of radar echoes shows that the behavior of speckles does not prevent estimation of Mercury's instantaneous spin-vector components to accuracy of a few parts in 10 7. This limit can be reached with more powerful radar facilities and leads to constraining the interior in more detail from effects of spin dynamics, e.g., from observation of the core-mantle interplay through high precision monitoring of the 88-day spin-variation of Mercury's crust.

  6. The MST Radar Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balsley, B. B.

    1985-01-01

    The past ten year have witnessed the development of a new radar technique to examine the structure and dynamics of the atmosphere between roughly 1 to 100 km on a continuous basis. The technique is known as the MST (for Mesosphere-Stratosphere-Troposphere) technique and is usable in all weather conditions, being unaffected by precipitation or cloud cover. MST radars make use of scattering from small scale structure in the atmospheric refractive index, with scales of the order of one-half the radar wavelength. Pertinent scale sizes for middle atmospheric studies typically range between a fraction of a meter and a few meters. The structure itself arises primarily from atmospheric turbulence. The technique is briefly described along with the meteorological parameters it measures.

  7. Radar data smoothing filter study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, J. V.

    1984-01-01

    The accuracy of the current Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) data smoothing techniques for a variety of radars and payloads is examined. Alternative data reduction techniques are given and recommendations are made for improving radar data processing at WFF. A data adaptive algorithm, based on Kalman filtering and smoothing techniques, is also developed for estimating payload trajectories above the atmosphere from noisy time varying radar data. This algorithm is tested and verified using radar tracking data from WFF.

  8. Imaging Radar Polarimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zebker, Howard A.; Held, Daniel N.; Brown, Walter E.

    1987-01-01

    Radar measures full polarization tensor of each element in scene in one sweep. New system comprises dual-polarized antenna, single transmitter, and four-channel receiver and digital recorder installed in aircraft, plus digital processor on ground. Produces radar-backscatter images corresponding to 10- by 10-km regions on ground. Signals recorded from orthogonal linearly polarized antennas combined in computer after flight to synthesize any desired combination of transmitted and received polarizations. Data recorded on single flight processed to provide multiple images.

  9. Microwave radar oceanographic investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, F. C.

    1988-01-01

    The Radar Ocean Wave Spectrometer (ROWS) technique was developed and demonstrated for measuring ocean wave directional spectra from air and space platforms. The measurement technique was well demonstrated with data collected in a number of flight experiments involving wave spectral comparisons with wave buoys and the Surface Contour Radar (SCR). Recent missions include the SIR-B underflight experiment (1984), FASINEX (1986), and LEWEX (1987). ROWS related activity is presently concentrating on using the aircraft instrument for wave-processes investigations and obtaining the necessary support (consensus) for a satellite instrument development program. Prospective platforms include EOS and the Canadian RADARSAT.

  10. Spaceborne Imaging Radar Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elachi, C.

    1983-01-01

    An overview of the present state of the art in the different scientific and technological fields related to spaceborne imaging radars was presented. The data acquired with the SEASAT SAR (1978) and Shuttle Imaging Radar, SIR-A (1981) clearly demonstrated the important emphasis in the 80's is going to be on in-depth research investigations conducted with the more flexible and sophisticated SIR series instruments and on long term monitoring of geophysical phenomena conducted from free-flying platforms such as ERS-1 and RADARSAT.

  11. Survey of radar ADT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trunk, G. V.

    1983-07-01

    The most recent advances in automatic detection and tracking are surveyed. The discussion deals with various noncoherent integrators that provide target enhancement, thresholding techniques for reducing false alarms and target suppression, and algorithms for estimating target position and resolving targets. Attention is also given to track-while-scan systems, and the entire tracking system is surveyed. This is followed by a discussion of the various components of the system, such as the tracking filter, maneuver-following logic, track initiation, and correlation logic. The survey concludes with a discussion of radar netting. It is emphasized that the automatic detector should be considered an integral part of the radar system.

  12. Systems and Methods for Radar Data Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunch, Brian (Inventor); Szeto, Roland (Inventor); Miller, Brad (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A radar information processing system is operable to process high bandwidth radar information received from a radar system into low bandwidth radar information that may be communicated to a low bandwidth connection coupled to an electronic flight bag (EFB). An exemplary embodiment receives radar information from a radar system, the radar information communicated from the radar system at a first bandwidth; processes the received radar information into processed radar information, the processed radar information configured for communication over a connection operable at a second bandwidth, the second bandwidth lower than the first bandwidth; and communicates the radar information from a radar system, the radar information communicated from the radar system at a first bandwidth.

  13. SEASAT Synthetic Aperture Radar Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, F. M.

    1981-01-01

    The potential of radar imagery from space altitudes is discussed and the advantages of radar over passive sensor systems are outlined. Specific reference is made to the SEASAT synthetic aperture radar. Possible applications include oil spill monitoring, snow and ice reconnaissance, mineral exploration, and monitoring phenomena in the urban environment.

  14. Nonlinear synthetic aperture radar imaging using a harmonic radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, Kyle A.; Mazzaro, Gregory J.; Ranney, Kenneth I.; Nguyen, Lam H.; Martone, Anthony F.; Sherbondy, Kelly D.; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of linear and nonlinear targets. Data are collected using a linear/nonlinear step frequency radar. We show that it is indeed possible to produce SAR images using a nonlinear radar. Furthermore, it is shown that the nonlinear radar is able to reduce linear clutter by at least 80 dB compared to a linear radar. The nonlinear SAR images also show the system's ability to detect small electronic devices in the presence of large linear clutter. The system presented here has the ability to completely ignore a 20-inch trihedral corner reflector while detecting a RF mixer with a dipole antenna attached.

  15. Two-interferometer fiber optic sensor with disturbance localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondrat, M.; Szustakowski, M.; Ciurapinski, W.; Zyczkowski, M.

    2006-09-01

    We present investigation results of a new generation of the fiber optic perimeter sensor in a Sagnac and Michelson interferometers configuration. This sensor can detect a potential intruder and determine its position along a protected zone. We propose a localization method that makes use of the inherent properties of both interferometers. After demodulation of signals from both interferometers, the obtained amplitude characteristic of the Sagnac interferometer depends on position of a disturbance along the interferometer, while amplitude characteristic of the Michelson interferometer do not depend on this position. So, quotient of both demodulated characteristics makes it possible to localize the disturbance. Arrangement of a laboratory model of the sensor and its signal processing scheme is also presented. During research of the laboratory model of the sensor, it was possible to detect the position of the disturbance with resolution of about 40m along the 6-km long sensor.

  16. Multiple interferometer interaction free measurement using polarized light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin; Pitt, Kevin; Milgie, Michael

    2016-02-01

    This paper experimentally and theoretically investigates improving interaction free measurement (IFM) efficiency using a chain of multiple interferometers with transmissive beam splitters of reflectivity less than 50%. The object measured with IFM is present or absent from one of the interferometer paths depending on the polarization of the incident light. The ability to effectively move an object in and out of the system without physically moving it makes implementing a multiple chain interferometer more practical. It also allows verifying the desired interferometer phase while simultaneously making the IFM measurement. A recursive phase model of a chain of interferometers is presented which accounts for both losses and arbitrary phase differences between each pair of arms in the chain. The recursive model predicts the photodiode power and is experimentally validated for a chain of interferometers of lengths one and two.

  17. Venus Radar Mapper (VRM): Multimode radar system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, William T. K.; Edgerton, Alvin T.

    1986-01-01

    The surface of Venus has remained a relative mystery because of the very dense atmosphere that is opaque to visible radiation and, thus, normal photographic techniques used to explore the other terrestrial objects in the solar system are useless. The atmosphere is, however, almost transparent to radar waves and images of the surface have been produced via Earth-based and orbital radars. The technique of obtaining radar images of a surface is variously called side looking radar, imaging radar, or synthetic aperture radar (SAR). The radar requires a moving platform in which the antenna is side looking. High resolution is obtained in the cross-track or range direction by conventional radar pulse encoding. In the along-track or azimuth direction, the resolution would normally be the antenna beam width, but for the SAR case, a much longer antenna (or much sharper beam) is obtained by moving past a surface target as shown, and then combining the echoes from many pulses, by using the Doppler data, to obtain the images. The radar design of the Venus Radar Mapper (VRM) is discussed. It will acquire global radar imagery and altimetry data of the surface of Venus.

  18. A Software Tool for Processing the Displacement Time Series Extracted from Raw Radar Data

    SciTech Connect

    Coppi, Francesco; Paolo Ricci, Pier; Gentile, Carmelo

    2010-05-28

    The application of high-resolution radar waveform and interferometric principles recently led to the development of a microwave interferometer, suitable to simultaneously measuring the (static or dynamic) deflection of several points on a large structure. From the technical standpoint, the sensor is a Stepped Frequency Continuous Wave (SF-CW), coherent radar, operating in the K{sub u} frequency band.In the paper, the main procedures adopted to extract the deflection time series from raw radar data and to assess the quality of data are addressed, and the MATLAB toolbox developed is described. Subsequently, other functions implemented in the software tool (e.g. evaluation of the spectral matrix of the deflection time-histories, identification of natural frequencies and operational mode shapes evaluation) are described and the application to data recorded on full-scale bridges is exemplified.

  19. A Software Tool for Processing the Displacement Time Series Extracted from Raw Radar Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppi, Francesco; Gentile, Carmelo; Paolo Ricci, Pier

    2010-05-01

    The application of high-resolution radar waveform and interferometric principles recently led to the development of a microwave interferometer, suitable to simultaneously measuring the (static or dynamic) deflection of several points on a large structure. From the technical standpoint, the sensor is a Stepped Frequency Continuous Wave (SF-CW), coherent radar, operating in the Ku frequency band. In the paper, the main procedures adopted to extract the deflection time series from raw radar data and to assess the quality of data are addressed, and the MATLAB toolbox developed is described. Subsequently, other functions implemented in the software tool (e.g. evaluation of the spectral matrix of the deflection time-histories, identification of natural frequencies and operational mode shapes evaluation) are described and the application to data recorded on full-scale bridges is exemplified.

  20. Miniaturized Ka-Band Dual-Channel Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, James P.; Moussessian, Alina; Jenabi, Masud; Custodero, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Smaller (volume, mass, power) electronics for a Ka-band (36 GHz) radar interferometer were required. To reduce size and achieve better control over RFphase versus temperature, fully hybrid electronics were developed for the RF portion of the radar s two-channel receiver and single-channel transmitter. In this context, fully hybrid means that every active RF device was an open die, and all passives were directly attached to the subcarrier. Attachments were made using wire and ribbon bonding. In this way, every component, even small passives, was selected for the fabrication of the two radar receivers, and the devices were mounted relative to each other in order to make complementary components isothermal and to isolate other components from potential temperature gradients. This is critical for developing receivers that can track each other s phase over temperature, which is a key mission driver for obtaining ocean surface height. Fully hybrid, Ka-band (36 GHz) radar transmitter and dual-channel receiver were developed for spaceborne radar interferometry. The fully hybrid fabrication enables control over every aspect of the component selection, placement, and connection. Since the two receiver channels must track each other to better than 100 millidegrees of RF phase over several minutes, the hardware in the two receivers must be "identical," routed the same (same line lengths), and as isothermal as possible. This level of design freedom is not possible with packaged components, which include many internal passive, unknown internal connection lengths/types, and often a single orientation of inputs and outputs.

  1. Manually operated low-coherence interferometer for optical information hiding.

    PubMed

    Otaka, M; Yamamoto, H; Hayasaki, Y

    2006-10-01

    A low-coherence interferometer for optical information hiding that ensures security of an optical image by hiding the image behind a light-scattering medium is demonstrated. The interferometer has a distinctive feature in that modulation of the optical-path difference between the object and reference arms is performed with a manual operation. The main advantage of the operation method is the absence of expensive optomechanical parts in the interferometer.

  2. A Comparison of Structurally Connected and Multiple Spacecraft Interferometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surka, Derek M.; Crawley, Edward F.

    1996-01-01

    Structurally connected and multiple spacecraft interferometers are compared in an attempt to establish the maximum baseline (referred to as the "cross-over baseline") for which it is preferable to operate a single-structure interferometer in space rather than an interferometer composed of numerous, smaller spacecraft. This comparison is made using the total launched mass of each configuration as the comparison metric. A framework of study within which structurally connected and multiple spacecraft interferometers can be compared is presented in block diagram form. This methodology is then applied to twenty-two different combinations of trade space parameters to investigate the effects of different orbits, orientations, truss materials, propellants, attitude control actuators, onboard disturbance sources, and performance requirements on the cross-over baseline. Rotating interferometers and the potential advantages of adding active structural control to the connected truss of the structurally connected interferometer are also examined. The minimum mass design of the structurally connected interferometer that meets all performance-requirements and satisfies all imposed constraints is determined as a function of baseline. This minimum mass design is then compared to the design of the multiple spacecraft interferometer. It is discovered that the design of the minimum mass structurally connected interferometer that meets all performance requirements and constraints in solar orbit is limited by the minimum allowable aspect ratio, areal density, and gage of the struts. In the formulation of the problem used in this study, there is no advantage to adding active structural control to the truss for interferometers in solar orbit. The cross-over baseline for missions of practical duration (ranging from one week to thirty years) in solar orbit is approximately 400 m for non-rotating interferometers and 650 m for rotating interferometers.

  3. Gravitational Wave Detection with Single-Laser Atom Interferometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Nan; Tinto, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    A new design for a broadband detector of gravitational radiation relies on two atom interferometers separated by a distance L. In this scheme, only one arm and one laser are used for operating the two atom interferometers. The innovation here involves the fact that the atoms in the atom interferometers are not only considered as perfect test masses, but also as highly stable clocks. Atomic coherence is intrinsically stable, and can be many orders of magnitude more stable than a laser.

  4. Terrestrial Planet Finder Interferometer: 2007-2008 Progress and Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, P. R.; Lay, O. P.; Martin, S. R.; Peters, R. D.; Gappinger, R. O.; Ksendzov, A.; Scharf, D. P.; Booth, A. J.; Beichman, C. A.; Serabyn, E.; Johnston, K. J.; Danchi, W. C.

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of technology development for the Terrestrial Planet Finder Interferometer (TPF-I). TPF-I is a mid-infrared space interferometer being designed with the capability of detecting Earth-like planets in the habitable zones around nearby stars. The overall technology roadmap is presented and progress with each of the testbeds is summarized. The current interferometer architecture, design trades, and the viability of possible reduced-scope mission concepts are also presented.

  5. Special topics in infrared interferometry. [Michelson interferometer development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanel, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    Topics in IR interferometry related to the development of a Michelson interferometer are treated. The selection and reading of the signal from the detector to the analog to digital converter is explained. The requirements for the Michelson interferometer advance speed are deduced. The effects of intensity modulation on the interferogram are discussed. Wavelength and intensity calibration of the interferometer are explained. Noise sources (Nyquist or Johnson noise, phonon noise), definitions of measuring methods of noise, and noise measurements are presented.

  6. Impulse radar studfinder

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1995-01-01

    An impulse radar studfinder propagates electromagnetic pulses and detects reflected pulses from a fixed range. Unmodulated pulses, about 200 ps wide, are emitted. A large number of reflected pulses are sampled and averaged. Background reflections are subtracted. Reflections from wall studs or other hidden objects are detected and displayed using light emitting diodes.

  7. Impulse radar studfinder

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1995-10-10

    An impulse radar studfinder propagates electromagnetic pulses and detects reflected pulses from a fixed range. Unmodulated pulses, about 200 ps wide, are emitted. A large number of reflected pulses are sampled and averaged. Background reflections are subtracted. Reflections from wall studs or other hidden objects are detected and displayed using light emitting diodes. 9 figs.

  8. Passive bistatic radar analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hagan, Daniel W.; Kuschel, H.; Schiller, Joachim

    2009-06-01

    Passive Bistatic Radar (PBR) research is at its zenith with several notable PBR systems currently operational, or available for deployment. Such PBRs include the Manastash Ridge Radar (MRR) developed for and by academia; Silent Sentry developed as a commercial concern by Lockheed Martin; and Homeland Alerter (HA100) also a commercial system developed by Thales. However at present, despite the existence of numerous PBR prototypes, take up of commercial passive radar technology remains slow. This is due in part to technology immaturity, in part to politics, and particularly due to the fact that monostatic radars perform so well. If PBRs are to enjoy longevity as a viable technology then it is imperative that they address certain niche application areas, with the aforementioned MRR being one prime example of this. The focus of this paper will be an analysis of a PBR system that utilised FM radio signals of opportunity to detect aircraft targets with an RCS generally not lower than 20 m2. The paper will demonstrate the theoretical detection coverage of an FM based PBR operating in a severe interference environment.

  9. Multiline radar scan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levinson, S.

    1977-01-01

    Scanning scheme is more efficient than conventional scanning. Originally designed for optical radar in space vehicles, scheme may also find uses in site-surveillance security systems and in other industrial applications. It should be particularly useful when system must run on battery energy, as would be case in power outages.

  10. Rain radar instrument definition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Nicolas; Chenebault, J.; Suinot, Noel; Mancini, Paolo L.

    1996-12-01

    As a result of a pre-phase a study, founded by ESA, this paper presents the definition of a spaceborne Rain Radar, candidate instrument for earth explorer precipitation mission. Based upon the description of user requirements for such a dedicated mission, a mission analysis defines the most suitable space segment. At system level, a parametric analysis compares pros and cons of instrument concepts associated with rain rate retrieval algorithms in order to select the most performing one. Several trade-off analysis at subsystem level leads then to the definition of the proposed design. In particular, as pulse compression is implemented in order to increase the radar sensitivity, the selected method to achieve a pulse response with a side-lobe level below--60 dB is presented. Antenna is another critical rain radar subsystem and several designs are com pared: direct radiating array, single or dual reflector illuminated by single or dual feed arrays. At least, feasibility of centralized amplification using TWTA is compared with criticality of Tx/Rx modules for distributed amplification. Mass and power budgets of the designed instrument are summarized as well as standard deviations and bias of simulated rain rate retrieval profiles. The feasibility of a compliant rain radar instrument is therefore demonstrated.

  11. Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, P. A.; Hensley, S.; Joughin, I. R.; Li, F.; Madsen, S. N.; Rodriguez, E.; Goldstein, R. M.

    1998-01-01

    Synthetic aperture radar interferometry is an imaging technique for measuring the topography of a surface, its changes over time, and other changes in the detailed characteristics of the surface. This paper reviews the techniques of interferometry, systems and limitations, and applications in a rapidly growing area of science and engineering.

  12. Radar environment simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utteridge, E. J.

    A radar environment simulator (RES) is described which combines a high degree of signal realism with flexible real-time control. The RES features interactive simulation of IF and RF, aircraft echo simulation, active jamming (including simultaneous jamming, passive jamming, and simulator control. The general design and principal components of the RES are briefly described, and its detailed performance characteristics are presented.

  13. Two-path plasmonic interferometer with integrated detector

    DOEpatents

    Dyer, Gregory Conrad; Shaner, Eric A.; Aizin, Gregory

    2016-03-29

    An electrically tunable terahertz two-path plasmonic interferometer with an integrated detection element can down convert a terahertz field to a rectified DC signal. The integrated detector utilizes a resonant plasmonic homodyne mixing mechanism that measures the component of the plasma waves in-phase with an excitation field that functions as the local oscillator in the mixer. The plasmonic interferometer comprises two independently tuned electrical paths. The plasmonic interferometer enables a spectrometer-on-a-chip where the tuning of electrical path length plays an analogous role to that of physical path length in macroscopic Fourier transform interferometers.

  14. Quantum heat engines based on electronic Mach-Zehnder interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofer, Patrick P.; Sothmann, Björn

    2015-05-01

    We theoretically investigate the thermoelectric properties of heat engines based on Mach-Zehnder interferometers. The energy dependence of the transmission amplitudes in such setups arises from a difference in the interferometer arm lengths. Any thermoelectric response is thus of purely quantum-mechanical origin. In addition to an experimentally established three-terminal setup, we also consider a two-terminal geometry as well as a four-terminal setup consisting of two interferometers. We find that Mach-Zehnder interferometers can be used as powerful and efficient heat engines which perform well under realistic conditions.

  15. Vibrationally compensated far infrared laser interferometer for plasma density measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Mansfield, D.K.; Johnson, L.C.; Mendelsohn, A.

    1980-12-01

    A modulated far-infrared laser interferometer presently operating on the PDX experiment at Princeton is described. The interferometer geometry permits the characterization of inside 'D', outside 'D', and circular discharges. To achieve this versatility, a titanium corner cube reflector, mounted inside the PDX vacuum vessel is used in conjunction with a second visible wavelength interferometer for vibration corrections. In addition, the use of room temperature quasi-optical Schottky diodes in the far-infrared interferometer is reported. The minimum detectable line average density of the system is about 5 x 10 to the 11th per cu cm.

  16. Remote sensing of sea ice thickness by a combined spatial and frequency domain interferometer: formulations, instrument design, and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, Ziad A.; Holt, Benjamin; McDonald, Kyle C.; Jordan, Rolando; Huang, John; Kuga, Yasuo; Ishimaru, Akira; Jaruwatanadilok, Sermsak; Gogineni, Prasad; Akins, Torry; Heavey, Brandon; Perovich, Don; Sturm, Matthew

    2005-10-01

    The thickness of Arctic sea ice plays a critical role in Earth's climate and ocean circulation. An accurate measurement of this parameter on synoptic scales at regular intervals would enable characterization of this important component for the understanding of ocean circulation and the global heat balance. Presented in this paper is a low frequency VHF interferometer technique and associated radar instrument design to measure sea ice thickness based on the use of backscatter correlation functions. The sea ice medium is represented as a multi-layered medium consisting of snow, sea-ice and sea water, with the interfaces between layers characterized as rough surfaces. This technique utilizes the correlation of two radar waves of different frequencies and incident and observation angles, scattered from the sea ice medium. The correlation functions relate information about the sea ice thickness. Inversion techniques such as the genetic algorithm, gradient descent, and least square methods, are used to derive sea ice thickness from the phase information related by the correlation functions. The radar instrument is designed to be implemented on a spacecraft and the initial test-bed will be on a Twin Otter aircraft. Radar system and instrument design and development parameters as well as some measurement requirements are reviewed. The ability to obtain reliable phase information for successful ice thickness retrieval for various thickness and surface interface geometries is examined.

  17. Radar Observations of Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostro, S. J.

    2003-05-01

    During the past 25 years, radar investigations have provided otherwise unavailable information about the physical and dynamical properties of more than 200 asteroids. Measurements of the distribution of echo power in time delay and Doppler frequency provide two-dimensional images with spatial resolution as fine as a decameter. Sequences of delay-Doppler images can be used to produce geologically detailed three-dimensional models, to define the rotation state precisely, to constrain the internal density distribution, and to estimate the trajectory of the object's center of mass. Radar wavelengths (4 to 13 cm) and the observer's control of transmitted and received polarizations make the observations sensitive to near-surface bulk density and macroscopic structure. Since delay-Doppler positional measurements are orthogonal to optical angle measurements and typically have much finer fractional precision, they are powerful for refining orbits and prediction ephemerides. Radar astrometry can add decades or centuries to the interval over which an asteroid's close Earth approaches can accurately be predicted and can significantly refine collision probability estimates based on optical astrometry alone. In the highly unlikely case that a small body is on course for an Earth collision in this century, radar reconnaissance would almost immediately distinguish between an impact trajectory and a near miss and would dramatically reduce the difficulty and cost of any effort to prevent the collision. The sizes and rotation periods of radar-detected asteroids span more than four orders of magnitude. These observations have revealed both stony and metallic objects, elongated and nonconvex shapes as well as nearly featureless spheroids, small-scale morphology ranging from smoother than the lunar regolith to rougher than the rockiest terrain on Mars, craters and diverse linear structures, non-principal-axis spin states, contact binaries, and binary systems.

  18. Interferometers as probes of Planckian quantum geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, Craig J.

    2012-03-01

    A theory of position of massive bodies is proposed that results in an observable quantum behavior of geometry at the Planck scale, tP. Departures from classical world lines in flat spacetime are described by Planckian noncommuting operators for position in different directions, as defined by interactions with null waves. The resulting evolution of position wave functions in two dimensions displays a new kind of directionally coherent quantum noise of transverse position. The amplitude of the effect in physical units is predicted with no parameters, by equating the number of degrees of freedom of position wave functions on a 2D space-like surface with the entropy density of a black hole event horizon of the same area. In a region of size L, the effect resembles spatially and directionally coherent random transverse shear deformations on time scale ≈L/c with typical amplitude ≈ctPL. This quantum-geometrical “holographic noise” in position is not describable as fluctuations of a quantized metric, or as any kind of fluctuation, dispersion or propagation effect in quantum fields. In a Michelson interferometer the effect appears as noise that resembles a random Planckian walk of the beam splitter for durations up to the light-crossing time. Signal spectra and correlation functions in interferometers are derived, and predicted to be comparable with the sensitivities of current and planned experiments. It is proposed that nearly colocated Michelson interferometers of laboratory scale, cross-correlated at high frequency, can test the Planckian noise prediction with current technology.

  19. Measuring Cyclic Error in Laser Heterodyne Interferometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Daniel; Abramovici, Alexander; Zhao, Feng; Dekens, Frank; An, Xin; Azizi, Alireza; Chapsky, Jacob; Halverson, Peter

    2010-01-01

    An improved method and apparatus have been devised for measuring cyclic errors in the readouts of laser heterodyne interferometers that are configured and operated as displacement gauges. The cyclic errors arise as a consequence of mixing of spurious optical and electrical signals in beam launchers that are subsystems of such interferometers. The conventional approach to measurement of cyclic error involves phase measurements and yields values precise to within about 10 pm over air optical paths at laser wavelengths in the visible and near infrared. The present approach, which involves amplitude measurements instead of phase measurements, yields values precise to about .0.1 microns . about 100 times the precision of the conventional approach. In a displacement gauge of the type of interest here, the laser heterodyne interferometer is used to measure any change in distance along an optical axis between two corner-cube retroreflectors. One of the corner-cube retroreflectors is mounted on a piezoelectric transducer (see figure), which is used to introduce a low-frequency periodic displacement that can be measured by the gauges. The transducer is excited at a frequency of 9 Hz by a triangular waveform to generate a 9-Hz triangular-wave displacement having an amplitude of 25 microns. The displacement gives rise to both amplitude and phase modulation of the heterodyne signals in the gauges. The modulation includes cyclic error components, and the magnitude of the cyclic-error component of the phase modulation is what one needs to measure in order to determine the magnitude of the cyclic displacement error. The precision attainable in the conventional (phase measurement) approach to measuring cyclic error is limited because the phase measurements are af-

  20. Phase-shifting interferometer for surface inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Siu Chung; Low, Beng-Yew; Chua, Hock-Chuan; Ho, Anthony T. S.; Neo, Wah-Peng

    1997-08-01

    A phase-shifting Twyman-Green interferometer has been constructed. Using three consecutively captured interferograms, the phase profile of a reflective surface can be determined. Results using various fringe processing techniques are compared. These methods include uniform averaging, Gaussian mask and spin filtering. For simulated fringes superimposed with random noise and fixed-pattern noise, it has been observed that a combination of weighted averaging and spin filtering could generate the best results. The computerized system has been applied to the measurement of the form errors of a silicon wafer and a cosmetic mirror, respectively. The root-mean-square error of the wafer is determined to be 11.13 nm.

  1. Modeling the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waluschka, Eugene; Pedersen, Trace R.; McNamara, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Creating an optical model of the Laser Interferometer Space antenna which can be used to predict optical sensitivities and set tolerances sufficiently well such that picometer level displacements can be reliably seen poses certain challenges. In part, because the distances between key optical elements, the proof masses, are constantly changing, at speeds of meters/second, the separation between them is about 5 million kilometers and a contributing factor to optical jitter is the self-gravity of the spacecraft. A discussion of the current state and future approach(s) to the creation of such an optical model will be presented.

  2. Cascaded Mach–Zehnder interferometer tunable filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovvyan, A. P.; Gruhler, N.; Ferrari, S.; Pernice, W. H. P.

    2016-06-01

    By cascading compact and low-loss Mach–Zehnder interferometers (MZIs) embedded within nanophotonic circuits we realize thermo-optically tunable optical filters for the visible wavelength range. Through phase tuning in either arm of the MZI, the filter response with maximum extinction can be shifted beyond one free-spectral range with low electrical power consumption. The working wavelength of our device is aligned with the emission wavelength of the silicon vacancy color center in diamond around 740 nm where we realize a filter depth beyond 36.5 dB. Our approach allows for efficient isolation of the emitted signal intensity in future hybrid nanodiamond-nanophotonic circuits.

  3. Low cost Michelson-Morley interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathare, Shirish; Kurmude, Vikrant

    2016-11-01

    The Michelson-Morley interferometer is an important and challenging experiment in many undergraduate as well as post-graduate physics laboratories. The apparatus required for this experiment is costly and delicate to handle. It also requires considerable skill to obtain a set of sharp fringes. This frontline presents a low cost (~US50) design of the experiment, which can be easily fabricated in any undergraduate laboratory. It is easy to handle as well as any part of this set up being easily replaced in case of any damage.

  4. Micro-Precision Interferometer: Pointing Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Brien, John

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the development of the wavefront tilt (pointing) control system for the JPL Micro-Precision Interferometer (MPI). This control system employs piezo-electric actuators and a digital imaging sensor with feedback compensation to reject errors in instrument pointing. Stringent performance goals require large feedback, however, several characteristics of the plant tend to restrict the available bandwidth. A robust 7th-order wavefront tilt control system was successfully implemented on the MPI instrument, providing sufficient disturbance rejection performance to satisfy the established interference fringe visibility.

  5. Modified Phasemeter for a Heterodyne Laser Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loya, Frank M.

    2010-01-01

    Modifications have been made in the design of instruments of the type described in "Digital Averaging Phasemeter for Heterodyne Interferometry". A phasemeter of this type measures the difference between the phases of the unknown and reference heterodyne signals in a heterodyne laser interferometer. The phasemeter design lacked immunity to drift of the heterodyne frequency, was bandwidth-limited by computer bus architectures then in use, and was resolution-limited by the nature of field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) then available. The modifications have overcome these limitations and have afforded additional improvements in accuracy, speed, and modularity. The modifications are summarized.

  6. Miniature interferometer terminals for earth surveying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Counselman, C. C., III; Shapiro, I. I.

    1978-01-01

    A system of miniature radio interferometer terminals was proposed for the measurement of vector baselines with uncertainties ranging from the millimeter to the centimeter level for baseline lengths ranging, respectively, from a few to a few hundred kilometers. Each terminal would have no moving parts, could be packaged in a volume of less than 0.1 cu m, and would operate unattended. These units would receive radio signals from low-power (10 w) transmitters on earth-orbiting satellites. The baselines between units could be determined virtually instantaneously and monitored continuously as long as at least four satellites were visible simultaneously.

  7. Adaptive Holographic Fiber-Optic Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozhevnikov, Nikolai M.; Lipovskaya, Margarita J.

    1990-04-01

    Interaction of phase-modulated light beams in photorefractive local inertial responce media was analysed. Interaction of this type allows to registrate phase-modulated signals adaptively under low frequency phase disturbtion. The experiments on multimode fiber-optic interferometer with demodulation element based on photorefractive bacteriorhodopsin-doped polimer film are described. As the writing of dynamic phase hologram is an inertial process the signal fluctuations with the frequencies up to 100 Hz can be canceled. The hologram efficiencies are enough to registrate high frequency phase shifts ~10-4 radn.

  8. SLC Interferometer System and Phase Distribution Upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    Akre, Ron; /SLAC

    2011-08-26

    Many of the components used in the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) phasing system date back 30 years to the construction of SLAC. At the start of SLC the phase reference system was upgraded with many of the original components remaining. The R.F. drive system phase stability requirements became tighter with operation and optimization of the SLC. This paper describes analysis done on the R.F. drive system and interferometer system during the 1996 run and down time, modifications to the systems during the 1996-97 down time, and the improvements in stability from the modifications.

  9. Neutral wind results from TIMED Doppler interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Killeen, T.; Gablehouse, R.; Gell, D.; Johnson, R.; Niciejewski, R.; Ortland, D.; Wu, Q.; Skinner, W.; Solomon, S.; Kafkalidis, J.

    2003-04-01

    Since the launch of the NASA Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) satellite in December 2001, the TIMED Doppler Interferometer (TIDI) has been collecting lower thermosphere and mesospheric data for over a year. After adjustments to the spectral sampling scheme and operational mode, the instrument has been optimized. Efforts have also been made to improve the instrument performance. Preliminary neutral winds from O2 (0-0) have been analyzed. Tidal features and their seasonal variation are shown clearly in the wind data, which are quantitatively consistent with model prediction. We will report our progress on these efforts.

  10. Mach-Zehnder interferometer for movement monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasinek, Vladimir; Cubik, Jakub; Kepak, Stanislav; Doricak, Jan; Latal, Jan; Koudelka, Petr

    2012-06-01

    Fiber optical interferometers belong to highly sensitive equipments that are able to measure slight changes like distortion of shape, temperature and electric field variation and etc. Their great advantage is that they are insensitive on ageing component, from which they are composed of. It is in virtue of herewith, that there are evaluated no changes in optical signal intensity but number interference fringes. To monitor the movement of persons, eventually to analyze the changes in state of motion we developed method based on analysis the dynamic changes in interferometric pattern. We have used Mach- Zehnder interferometer with conventional SM fibers excited with the DFB laser at wavelength of 1550 nm. It was terminated with optical receiver containing InGaAs PIN photodiode. Its output was brought into measuring card module that performs on FFT of the received interferometer signal. The signal rises with the composition of two waves passing through single interferometer arm. The optical fiber SMF 28e in one arm is referential; the second one is positioned on measuring slab at dimensions of 1x2m. A movement of persons around the slab was monitored, signal processed with FFT and frequency spectra were evaluated. They rose owing to dynamic changes of interferometric pattern. The results reflect that the individual subjects passing through slab embody characteristic frequency spectra, which are individual for particular persons. The scope of measuring frequencies proceeded from zero to 10 kHz. It was also displayed in experiments that the experimental subjects, who walked around the slab and at the same time they have had changed their state of motion (knee joint fixation), embodied characteristic changes in their frequency spectra. At experiments the stability of interferometric patterns was evaluated as from time aspects, so from the view of repeated identical experiments. Two kinds of balls (tennis and ping-pong) were used to plot the repeatability measurements and

  11. A stellar interferometer on the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porro, Irene

    The work I present in this document has been divided into two main parts, the first one related to the IOTA project and the second one related to the study on the lunar interferometer, and an introduction section. Each section can be read independently from the other, however they are presented following the logical order in which the research work has been developed. As a guide for the reader here I describe the content of each chapter, which represents the original contribution (except when it is specifically declared) to the research accomplished. This section consists in the Introduction itself, with a presentation of the motivations for this research work, and in the chapter Interferometry from the Earth and from the Moon. The first part of this chapter shows the performances which are expected to be reached by ground-based interferometers (Colavita, 1992) by using adaptive optics systems (Beckers, 1993). The evaluation is made separately for the case of high resolution imaging and for high accuracy astrometric measurements. The most optimistic results expected for ground-based instruments determine the level of the performance that has to be required from a space interferometer (both an orbiting and a lunar instrument). In the second part of the chapter I specifically deal with the case of a lunar interferometer, which allows to put together the advantages o ered by a ground-based instrument (very long baseline, a stable platform) and those offered by the space environment (absence of atmospheric turbulence, long integration times, and wavelength range of observation from the ultraviolet to the far infrared). In order to evaluate the limits of the lunar interferometer, I need to consider three subjects with which I did not explicitly dealt for the study on IOTA: the maximum length of the baseline (Tango and Twiss, 1974), the maximum integration time, and the performances obtainable at the minimum temperature of operation (Ridgway, 1990). The chapter ends with

  12. An MSK Radar Waveform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quirk, Kevin J.; Srinivasan, Meera

    2012-01-01

    The minimum-shift-keying (MSK) radar waveform is formed by periodically extending a waveform that separately modulates the in-phase and quadrature- phase components of the carrier with offset pulse-shaped pseudo noise (PN) sequences. To generate this waveform, a pair of periodic PN sequences is each passed through a pulse-shaping filter with a half sinusoid impulse response. These shaped PN waveforms are then offset by half a chip time and are separately modulated on the in-phase and quadrature phase components of an RF carrier. This new radar waveform allows an increase in radar resolution without the need for additional spectrum. In addition, it provides self-interference suppression and configurable peak sidelobes. Compared strictly on the basis of the expressions for delay resolution, main-lobe bandwidth, effective Doppler bandwidth, and peak ambiguity sidelobe, it appears that bi-phase coded (BPC) outperforms the new MSK waveform. However, a radar waveform must meet certain constraints imposed by the transmission and reception of the modulation, as well as criteria dictated by the observation. In particular, the phase discontinuity of the BPC waveform presents a significant impediment to the achievement of finer resolutions in radar measurements a limitation that is overcome by using the continuous phase MSK waveform. The phase continuity, and the lower fractional out-of-band power of MSK, increases the allowable bandwidth compared with BPC, resulting in a factor of two increase in the range resolution of the radar. The MSK waveform also has been demonstrated to have an ambiguity sidelobe structure very similar to BPC, where the sidelobe levels can be decreased by increasing the length of the m-sequence used in its generation. This ability to set the peak sidelobe level is advantageous as it allows the system to be configured to a variety of targets, including those with a larger dynamic range. Other conventionally used waveforms that possess an even greater

  13. Civilian vehicle radar data domes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dungan, Kerry E.; Austin, Christian; Nehrbass, John; Potter, Lee C.

    2010-04-01

    We present a set of simulated X-band scattering data for civilian vehicles. For ten facet models of civilian vehicles, a high-frequency electromagnetic simulation produced fully polarized, far-field, monostatic scattering for 360 degrees azimuth and elevation angles from 30 to 60 degrees. The 369 GB of phase history data is stored in a MATLAB file format. This paper describes the CVDomes data set along with example imagery using 2D backprojection, single pass 3D, and multi-pass 3D.

  14. Ultraviolet-Infrared Mapping Interferometic Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Prism and grating spectrometers have been the defacto devices for spectral mapping and imaging (hereafter referred to as hyperspectra). We have developed a new, hybrid instrument with many superior capabilities, the Digital Array Scanned Interferometer, DASI. The DASI performs the hyperspectral data acquisition in the same way as a grating or prism spectrograph, but retains the substantial advantages of the two-beam (Michelson) interferometer with additional capabilities not possessed by either of the other devices. The DASI is capable of hyperspectral studies in virtually any space or surface environment at any wavelength from below 50 nm to beyond 12 microns with available array detectors. By our efforts, we have defined simple, low cost, no-moving parts DASI's capable of carrying out hyperspectral science measurements for solar system exploration missions, e.g. for martian, asteroid, lunar, or cometary surveys. DASI capabilities can be utilized to minimize cost, weight, power, pointing, and other physical requirements while maximizing the science data return for spectral mapping missions. Our success in the development of DASI's has become and continues to be an important influence on the efforts of the best research groups developing remote sensing instruments for space and other applications.

  15. Advanced lightning location interferometer. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-25

    In January, 1994, New Mexico Institute for Mining and Technology (NM Tech) was commissioned by Los Alamos National Laboratories (LANL) to develop a three-axis interferometric lightning mapping system to be used in determining the source of certain frequency-dispersed pulse pairs which had been detected by spaceborne sensors. The existing NM Tech VHF Lightning Interferometer was a two axis system operating at 274 MHz with 6 MHz bandwidth. The third axis was to be added to refine estimates of the elevation angle to distant RF sources in that band. The system was to be initially deployed in support of an Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFTAC) effort planned for the Kennedy Space Center/Cape Canaveral AFS area in June-July of 1994. The project was, however, postponed until September of 1994. The interferometer was set up and operated at KSC near the Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR) central station. The initial setup was in two-axis configuration, and the third (vertical) axis was added at about mid-project. Though the storms were reduced in frequency and severity over what one would expect in mid-summer, several good data sets were obtained and delivered to AFTAC.

  16. Image-decrypting common path interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glueckstad, Jesper

    1999-03-01

    A new scheme for parallel optical decryption and the display of encrypted image information is presented. The scheme is based on a common path interferometer configuration providing a simple and robust optical setup. Images are encrypted directly during recording by use of a combined phase encoding and phase scrambling method. The encoding and encryption does not require sophisticated, iterative and time consuming optimization algorithms. Pixels are independently encoded and encrypted by use of a simple look-up table technique that can be performed in milliseconds on a standard personal computer. Optical decryption can subsequently be implemented in the common path interferometer by use of single phase or if desired a combined phase/amplitude key. An advantage of the presented method is that the encrypted image may selectively require recording and decryption of phase values or amplitude values or a combination thereof. Another advantage is that decryption is performed in a plane adjacent to the encrypted mask or an equivalent plane whereby generation of speckles in the decrypted image is strongly suppressed. Finally, there is no requirement of positioning a decrypting mask or spatial light modulator in the optical Fourier plane whereby an accurate three dimensional positioning requirement can be avoided.

  17. Dual-domain lateral shearing interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Naulleau, Patrick P.; Goldberg, Kenneth Alan

    2004-03-16

    The phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer (PS/PDI) was developed to address the problem of at-wavelength metrology of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) optical systems. Although extremely accurate, the fact that the PS/PDI is limited to use with coherent EUV sources, such as undulator radiation, is a drawback for its widespread use. An alternative to the PS/PDI, with relaxed coherence requirements, is lateral shearing interferometry (LSI). The use of a cross-grating, carrier-frequency configuration to characterize a large-field 4.times.-reduction EUV lithography optic is demonstrated. The results obtained are directly compared with PS/PDI measurements. A defocused implementation of the lateral shearing interferometer in which an image-plane filter allows both phase-shifting and Fourier wavefront recovery. The two wavefront recovery methods can be combined in a dual-domain technique providing suppression of noise added by self-interference of high-frequency components in the test-optic wavefront.

  18. Retrievals with the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Daniel K.; Liu, Xu; Larar, Allen M.; Smith, William L.; Taylor, Jonathan P.; Schlussel, Peter; Strow, L. Larrabee; Calbet, Xavier; Mango, Stephen A.

    2007-01-01

    The Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) on the MetOp satellite was launched on October 19, 2006. The Joint Airborne IASI Validation Experiment (JAIVEx) was conducted during April 2007 mainly for validation of the IASI on the MetOp satellite. IASI possesses an ultra-spectral resolution of 0.25/cm and a spectral coverage from 645 to 2760/cm. Ultraspectral resolution infrared spectral radiance obtained from near nadir observations provide atmospheric, surface, and cloud property information. An advanced retrieval algorithm with a fast radiative transfer model, including cloud effects, is used for atmospheric profile and cloud parameter retrieval. Preliminary retrievals of atmospheric soundings, surface properties, and cloud optical/microphysical properties with the IASI observations during the JAIVEx are obtained and presented. These retrievals are further inter-compared with those obtained from airborne FTS system, such as the NPOESS Airborne Sounder Testbed Interferometer (NAST-I), dedicated dropsondes, radiosondes, and ground based Raman Lidar. The capabilities of satellite ultra-spectral sounder such as the IASI are investigated.

  19. 15-m laser-stabilized imaging interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stebbins, Robin T.; Bender, Peter L.; Chen, Che Jen; Page, Norman A.; Meier, D.; Dupree, A. K.

    1995-06-01

    The LAser-Stabilized Imaging Interferometer (LASII) concept is being developed as an astronomical telescope for the next generation of optical resolution beyond Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The essential ingredients are: a rigid and stable structure to minimize mechanical and thermal distortion, active control of the optical geometry by a laser metrology system, a self-deploying structure fitting into a single launch vehicle, and ultraviolet operation. We have modified earlier design concepts to fit the scale of an intermediate sized NASA mission. Our present design calls for 24 0.5 m apertures in a Mills Cross configuration, supported on four trusses. A fifth truss perpendicular to the primary surface would support the secondary mirror and the laser metrology control points. Either separate interferometers or two guide telescopes would track guide stars. This instrument would have about 6 times the resolution of HST in the visible and the same collecting area. The resolution would reach 2.5 mas at 150 nm. The primary trusses would fold along the secondary truss for launch, and automatically deploy on orbit. Possible orbits are sun-synchronous at 900 km altitude, high earth orbit or solar orbit. Infrared capability could be included, if desired.

  20. Temperature Measurement Using all Fiber Fabry-Perot Interferometers Based on Phase Measurement Between Reference and Sensing Interferometer Spectral Characteristic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Njegovec, Matej; Đonlagic, Denis

    2010-04-01

    This paper presents the signal interrogator for fiber optic temperature sensors based on all-fiber miniature Fabry-Perot interferometers that are implemented by creation of the low reflectivity mirrors within optical fiber. This kind of Fabry-Perot interferometer has low finesse and nearly sinusoidal spectral characteristics. Since the optical path length between mirrors depends on refractive index and thereby temperature, change in sensor temperature shifts the sensor's spectral characteristics in wavelength domain. The presented measurement system is composed of the sensing interferometer and signal interrogator that further includes the reference interferometer. The reference interferometer is also an all-fiber interferometer with nearly identical length as sensing interferometer. The wavelength of the signal interrogator optical source was cyclically swept over available wavelength range while both interferometers' spectral responses were simultaneously recorded. The optical path length variation of the sensing interferometer was determined by direct phase difference measurement between both recorded sinusoidal spectral characteristics. This phase difference was directly correlated to the temperature difference between sensing and reference interferometer. Since reference interferometer was situated within the signal integrator its temperature was measured by the reference electrical sensors. Thus the proposed system can provide accurate absolute temperature measurements. In the proposed interrogator we used as an optical source a standard telecommunication DFB diode module with integrated thermo-electric cooler. Standard DFB diode can be shifted in wavelength for abut 2 nm, which allows interrogation of the Fabry-Perot interferometers having free spectral range below 2 nm. In case of an all fiber Fabry-Perot interferometers, this corresponds to interferometers with length that is more than 0.5 mm. Since recorded nearly sinusoidal spectral characteristics

  1. Numerical simulation and experimental verification of extended source interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Yinlong; Li, Lin; Wang, Shanshan; Wang, Xiao; Zang, Haijun; Zhu, Qiudong

    2013-12-01

    Extended source interferometer, compared with the classical point source interferometer, can suppress coherent noise of environment and system, decrease dust scattering effects and reduce high-frequency error of reference surface. Numerical simulation and experimental verification of extended source interferometer are discussed in this paper. In order to provide guidance for the experiment, the modeling of the extended source interferometer is realized by using optical design software Zemax. Matlab codes are programmed to rectify the field parameters of the optical system automatically and get a series of interferometric data conveniently. The communication technique of DDE (Dynamic Data Exchange) was used to connect Zemax and Matlab. Then the visibility of interference fringes can be calculated through adding the collected interferometric data. Combined with the simulation, the experimental platform of the extended source interferometer was established, which consists of an extended source, interference cavity and image collection system. The decrease of high-frequency error of reference surface and coherent noise of the environment is verified. The relation between the spatial coherence and the size, shape, intensity distribution of the extended source is also verified through the analysis of the visibility of interference fringes. The simulation result is in line with the result given by real extended source interferometer. Simulation result shows that the model can simulate the actual optical interference of the extended source interferometer quite well. Therefore, the simulation platform can be used to guide the experiment of interferometer which is based on various extended sources.

  2. Two-Dimensional X-Ray Grating Interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Zanette, Irene; Weitkamp, Timm; Donath, Tilman; Rutishauser, Simon; David, Christian

    2010-12-10

    We report on the design and experimental realization of a 2D x-ray grating interferometer. We describe how this interferometer has been practically implemented, discuss its performance, and present multidirectional scattering (dark-field) maps and quantitative phase images that have been retrieved using this device.

  3. The Control System for the Keck Interferometer Nuller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, Andrew; Colavita, Mark; Garcia, Jean; Koresko, Chris

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the control system for the interferometer nuller for the two Keck 10 meter telescopes. This reviews the control system that was implemented to enable operation of the Keck interferometer nuller. An overview of the control system is included.

  4. Silicon Carbide Mounts for Fabry-Perot Interferometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindemann, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Etalon mounts for tunable Fabry- Perot interferometers can now be fabricated from reaction-bonded silicon carbide structural components. These mounts are rigid, lightweight, and thermally stable. The fabrication of these mounts involves the exploitation of post-casting capabilities that (1) enable creation of monolithic structures having reduced (in comparison with prior such structures) degrees of material inhomogeneity and (2) reduce the need for fastening hardware and accommodations. Such silicon carbide mounts could be used to make lightweight Fabry-Perot interferometers or could be modified for use as general lightweight optical mounts. Heretofore, tunable Fabry-Perot interferometer structures, including mounting hardware, have been made from the low-thermal-expansion material Invar (a nickel/iron alloy) in order to obtain the thermal stability required for spectroscopic applications for which such interferometers are typically designed. However, the high mass density of Invar structures is disadvantageous in applications in which there are requirements to minimize mass. Silicon carbide etalon mounts have been incorporated into a tunable Fabry-Perot interferometer of a prior design that originally called for Invar structural components. The strength, thermal stability, and survivability of the interferometer as thus modified are similar to those of the interferometer as originally designed, but the mass of the modified interferometer is significantly less than the mass of the original version.

  5. New weather radar coming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggs, William Ward

    What would you call the next generation of radar for severe weather prediction? NEXRAD, of course. A prototype for the new system was recently completed in Norman, Okla., and by the early 1990s up to 195 stations around the United States will be tracking dangerous weather and sending faster, more accurate, and more detailed warnings to the public.NEXRAD is being built for the Departments of Commerce, Transportation, and Defense by the Unisys Corporation under a $450 million contract signed in December 1987. Th e system will be used by the National Weather Service, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), and the U.S. Air Force and Navy. The NEXRAD radar tower in Norman is expected to be operational in October.

  6. RADAR Reveals Titan Topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, R. L.; Callahan, P.; Seu, R.; Lorenz, R. D.; Paganelli, F.; Lopes, R.; Elachi, C.

    2005-01-01

    The Cassini Titan RADAR Mapper is a K(sub u)-band (13.78 GHz, lambda = 2.17 cm) linear polarized RADAR instrument capable of operating in synthetic aperture (SAR), scatterometer, altimeter and radiometer modes. During the first targeted flyby of Titan on 26 October, 2004 (referred to as Ta) observations were made in all modes. Evidence for topographic relief based on the Ta altimetry and SAR data are presented here. Additional SAR and altimetry observations are planned for the T3 encounter on 15 February, 2005, but have not been carried out at this writing. Results from the T3 encounter relevant to topography will be included in our presentation. Data obtained in the Ta encounter include a SAR image swath

  7. Floor-plan radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falconer, David G.; Ueberschaer, Ronald M.

    2000-07-01

    Urban-warfare specialists, law-enforcement officers, counter-drug agents, and counter-terrorism experts encounter operational situations where they must assault a target building and capture or rescue its occupants. To minimize potential casualties, the assault team needs a picture of the building's interior and a copy of its floor plan. With this need in mind, we constructed a scale model of a single- story house and imaged its interior using synthetic-aperture techniques. The interior and exterior walls nearest the radar set were imaged with good fidelity, but the distal ones appear poorly defined and surrounded by ghosts and artifacts. The latter defects are traceable to beam attenuation, wavefront distortion, multiple scattering, traveling waves, resonance phenomena, and other effects not accounted for in the traditional (noninteracting, isotropic point scatterer) model for radar imaging.

  8. 51. View of upper radar scanner switch in radar scanner ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. View of upper radar scanner switch in radar scanner building 105 from upper catwalk level showing emanating waveguides from upper switch (upper one-fourth of photograph) and emanating waveguides from lower radar scanner switch in vertical runs. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  9. 41. Perimeter acquisition radar building radar element and coaxial display, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. Perimeter acquisition radar building radar element and coaxial display, with drawing of typical antenna section. Drawing, from left to right, shows element, aluminum ground plane, cable connectors and hardware, cable, and back-up ring. Grey area is the concrete wall - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Perimeter Acquisition Radar Building, Limited Access Area, between Limited Access Patrol Road & Service Road A, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  10. Radar Investigations of Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostro, S.

    2004-05-01

    Radar investigations have provided otherwise unavailable information about the physical and dynamical properties of about 230 asteroids. Measurements of the distribution of echo power in time delay (range) and Doppler frequency (line-of-sight velocity) provide two-dimensional images with spatial resolution as fine as a decameter. Sequences of delay-Doppler images can be used to produce geologically detailed three-dimensional models, to define the rotation state precisely, to constrain the internal density distribution, and to estimate the trajectory of the object's center of mass. Radar wavelengths (4 to 13 cm) and the observer's control of transmitted and received polarizations make the observations sensitive to near-surface bulk density and macroscopic structure. Since delay-Doppler measurements are orthogonal to optical angle measurements and typically have much finer fractional precision, they are powerful for refining orbits and prediction ephemerides. Such astrometric measurements can add decades or centuries to the interval over which an asteroid's close Earth approaches can accurately be predicted and can significantly refine collision probability estimates based on optical astrometry alone. In the highly unlikely case that a small body is on course for an Earth collision in this century, radar reconnaissance would almost immediately distinguish between an impact trajectory and a near miss and would dramatically reduce the difficulty and cost of any effort to prevent the collision. The sizes and rotation periods of radar-detected asteroids span more than four orders of magnitude. The observations have revealed both stony and metallic objects, elongated and nonconvex shapes as well as nearly featureless spheroids, small-scale morphology ranging from smoother than the lunar regolith to rougher than the rockiest terrain on Mars, craters and diverse linear structures, non-principal-axis spin states, contact binaries, and binary systems.

  11. Goldstone solar system radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurgens, Raymond F.

    1991-01-01

    Caltech/Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) radar astronomers made use of the Very Large Array (VLA) at Socorro, NM, during February 1990, to receive radio echoes from the planet Venus. The transmitter was the 70 meter antenna at the Goldstone complex northwest of Barstow, CA. These observations contain new information about the roughness of Venus at cm to decimeter scales and are complementary to information being obtained by the Magellan spacecraft. Asteroid observations are also discussed.

  12. Design of radar receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, M. A.

    This handbook treats the design and analysis of of pulsed radar receivers, with emphasis on elements (especially IC elements) that implement optimal and suboptimal algorithms. The design methodology is developed from the viewpoint of statistical communications theory. Particular consideration is given to the synthesis of single-channel and multichannel detectors, the design of analog and digital signal-processing devices, and the analysis of IF amplifiers.

  13. Shuttle imaging radar experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elachi, C.; Brown, W.E.; Cimino, J.B.; Dixon, T.; Evans, D.L.; Ford, J.P.; Saunders, R.S.; Breed, C.; Masursky, H.; McCauley, J.F.; Schaber, G.; Dellwig, L.; England, A.; MacDonald, H.; Martin-Kaye, P.; Sabins, F.

    1982-01-01

    The shuttle imaging radar (SIR-A) acquired images of a variety of the earth's geologic areas covering about 10 million square kilometers. Structural and geomorphic features such as faults, folds, outcrops, and dunes are clearly visible in both tropical and arid regions. The combination of SIR-A and Seasat images provides additional information about the surface physical properties: topography and roughness. Ocean features were also observed, including large internal waves in the Andaman Sea. Copyright ?? 1982 AAAS.

  14. Imaging synthetic aperture radar

    DOEpatents

    Burns, Bryan L.; Cordaro, J. Thomas

    1997-01-01

    A linear-FM SAR imaging radar method and apparatus to produce a real-time image by first arranging the returned signals into a plurality of subaperture arrays, the columns of each subaperture array having samples of dechirped baseband pulses, and further including a processing of each subaperture array to obtain coarse-resolution in azimuth, then fine-resolution in range, and lastly, to combine the processed subapertures to obtain the final fine-resolution in azimuth. Greater efficiency is achieved because both the transmitted signal and a local oscillator signal mixed with the returned signal can be varied on a pulse-to-pulse basis as a function of radar motion. Moreover, a novel circuit can adjust the sampling location and the A/D sample rate of the combined dechirped baseband signal which greatly reduces processing time and hardware. The processing steps include implementing a window function, stabilizing either a central reference point and/or all other points of a subaperture with respect to doppler frequency and/or range as a function of radar motion, sorting and compressing the signals using a standard fourier transforms. The stabilization of each processing part is accomplished with vector multiplication using waveforms generated as a function of radar motion wherein these waveforms may be synthesized in integrated circuits. Stabilization of range migration as a function of doppler frequency by simple vector multiplication is a particularly useful feature of the invention; as is stabilization of azimuth migration by correcting for spatially varying phase errors prior to the application of an autofocus process.

  15. Solar Confocal Interferometers for Sub-Picometer-Resolution Spectral Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, G. Allen; Pietraszewski, Chris; West, Edward A.; Dines, Terence C.

    2006-01-01

    The confocal Fabry-Perot interferometer allows sub-picometer spectral resolution of Fraunhofer line profiles. Such high spectral resolution is needed to keep pace with the higher spatial resolution of the new set of large-aperture solar telescopes. The line-of-sight spatial resolution derived for line profile inversions would then track the improvements of the transverse spatial scale provided by the larger apertures. The confocal interferometer's unique properties allow a simultaneous increase in both etendue and spectral power. Methods: We have constructed and tested two confocal interferometers. Conclusions: In this paper we compare the confocal interferometer with other spectral imaging filters, provide initial design parameters, show construction details for two designs, and report on the laboratory test results for these interferometers, and propose a multiple etalon system for future testing of these units and to obtain sub-picometer spectral resolution information on the photosphere in both the visible and near-infrared.

  16. Lens testing with a simple wavefront shearing interferometer.

    PubMed

    Nyyssonen, D; Jerke, J M

    1973-09-01

    A lens-testing system using a simple wavefront shearing interferometer is described. This simple cube interferometer has all the interferometric adjustments built in at manufacture. In contrast to most interferometric test systems, the wavefront shearing interferometer is inexpensive, portable, relatively insensitive to vibration, does not need laser illumination, and requires only a minimum of experimental time and operational expertise. Reading of the interferograms and subsequent data reduction require the major effort in testing with the wavefront shearing interferometer. However, with automatic scanning of the interferograms and a high-speed electronic computer to perform the analysis, the data reduction may be completely automated. Operation of the wavefront shearing interferometer is described together with the method of data reduction. Experimental results are also presented.

  17. SU(1,1)-type light-atom-correlated interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hongmei; Li, Dong; Yuan, Chun-Hua; Chen, L. Q.; Ou, Z. Y.; Zhang, Weiping

    2015-08-01

    The quantum correlation of light and atomic collective excitation can be used to compose an SU(1,1)-type hybrid light-atom interferometer, where one arm in the optical SU(1,1) interferometer is replaced by the atomic collective excitation. The phase-sensing probes include not only the photon field but also the atomic collective excitation inside the interferometer. For a coherent squeezed state as the phase-sensing field, the phase sensitivity can approach the Heisenberg limit under the optimal conditions. We also study the effects of the loss of light field and the dephasing of atomic excitation on the phase sensitivity. This kind of active SU(1,1) interferometer can also be realized in other systems, such as circuit quantum electrodynamics in microwave systems, which provides a different method for basic measurement using the hybrid interferometers.

  18. Dispersion interferometer using modulation amplitudes on LHD (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Akiyama, T. Yasuhara, R.; Kawahata, K.; Okajima, S.; Nakayama, K.

    2014-11-15

    Since a dispersion interferometer is insensitive to mechanical vibrations, a vibration compensation system is not necessary. The CO{sub 2} laser dispersion interferometer with phase modulations on the Large Helical Device utilizes the new phase extraction method which uses modulation amplitudes and can improve a disadvantage of the original dispersion interferometer: measurement errors caused by variations of detected intensities. The phase variation within ±2 × 10{sup 17} m{sup −3} is obtained without vibration compensation system. The measured line averaged electron density with the dispersion interferometer shows good agreement with that with the existing far infrared laser interferometer. Fringe jump errors in high density ranging up to 1.5 × 10{sup 20} m{sup −3} can be overcome by a sufficient sampling rate of about 100 kHz.

  19. Radar gun hazards

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-20

    Radar guns - hand-held units used by the law to nail speeders - have been in use since the early '60s. Now they've been accused of causing cancer. Police officers in several states have so far filed eight suits against the manufacturer, claiming that they have contracted rare forms of cancer, such as of the eyelid and the testicle, from frequent proximity to the devices. Spurred by concerns expressed by police groups, researchers at the Rochester Institute of Technology are conducting what they believe to be the first research of its kind in the nation. Last month psychologist John Violanti, an expert in policy psychology and health, sent out a one-page survey to 6,000 active and retired police officers in New York State, asking them about their health and their use of radar guns. Violanti says melanoma, leukemia, and lymph node cancer may be linked to these as well as other electromagnetic devices. The Food and Drug Administration earlier this year issued a warning about radar guns, telling users not to operate them closer than 6 inches from the body. But this may not be a sufficient safeguard since the instruments can give off crisscrossing wave emissions within a police vehicle. The survey will be used to help determine if it would be safer to mount the guns, which are currently either hand-held or mounted on dashboards, outside troopers' cars.

  20. Nordic Snow Radar Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemmetyinen, Juha; Kontu, Anna; Pulliainen, Jouni; Vehviläinen, Juho; Rautiainen, Kimmo; Wiesmann, Andreas; Mätzler, Christian; Werner, Charles; Rott, Helmut; Nagler, Thomas; Schneebeli, Martin; Proksch, Martin; Schüttemeyer, Dirk; Kern, Michael; Davidson, Malcolm W. J.

    2016-09-01

    The objective of the Nordic Snow Radar Experiment (NoSREx) campaign was to provide a continuous time series of active and passive microwave observations of snow cover at a representative location of the Arctic boreal forest area, covering a whole winter season. The activity was a part of Phase A studies for the ESA Earth Explorer 7 candidate mission CoReH2O (Cold Regions Hydrology High-resolution Observatory). The NoSREx campaign, conducted at the Finnish Meteorological Institute Arctic Research Centre (FMI-ARC) in Sodankylä, Finland, hosted a frequency scanning scatterometer operating at frequencies from X- to Ku-band. The radar observations were complemented by a microwave dual-polarization radiometer system operating from X- to W-bands. In situ measurements consisted of manual snow pit measurements at the main test site as well as extensive automated measurements on snow, ground and meteorological parameters. This study provides a summary of the obtained data, detailing measurement protocols for each microwave instrument and in situ reference data. A first analysis of the microwave signatures against snow parameters is given, also comparing observed radar backscattering and microwave emission to predictions of an active/passive forward model. All data, including the raw data observations, are available for research purposes through the European Space Agency and the Finnish Meteorological Institute. A consolidated dataset of observations, comprising the key microwave and in situ observations, is provided through the ESA campaign data portal to enable easy access to the data.

  1. Comet radar explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnham, Tony; Asphaug, Erik; Barucci, Antonella; Belton, Mike; Bockelee-Morvan, Dominique; Brownlee, Donald; Capria, Maria Teresa; Carter, Lynn; Chesley, Steve; Farnham, Tony; Gaskell, Robert; Gim, Young; Heggy, Essam; Herique, Alain; Klaasen, Ken; Kofman, Wlodek; Kreslavsky, Misha; Lisse, Casey; Orosei, Roberto; Plaut, Jeff; Scheeres, Dan

    The Comet Radar Explorer (CORE) is designed to perform a comprehensive and detailed exploration of the interior, surface, and inner coma structures of a scientifically impor-tant Jupiter family comet. These structures will be used to investigate the origins of cometary nuclei, their physical and geological evolution, and the mechanisms driving their spectacular activity. CORE is a high heritage spacecraft, injected by solar electric propulsion into orbit around a comet. It is capable of coherent deep radar imaging at decameter wavelengths, high resolution stereo color imaging, and near-IR imaging spectroscopy. Its primary objective is to obtain a high-resolution map of the interior structure of a comet nucleus at a resolution of ¿100 elements across the diameter. This structure shall be related to the surface geology and morphology, and to the structural details of the coma proximal to the nucleus. This is an ideal complement to the science from recent comet missions, providing insight into how comets work. Knowing the structure of the interior of a comet-what's inside-and how cometary activity works, is required before we can understand the requirements for a cryogenic sample return mission. But more than that, CORE is fundamental to understanding the origin of comets and their evolution in time. The mission is made feasible at low cost by the use of now-standard MARSIS-SHARAD reflec-tion radar imaging hardware and data processing, together with proven flight heritage of solar electric propulsion. Radar flight heritage has been demonstrated by the MARSIS radar on Mars Express (Picardi et al., Science 2005; Plaut et al., Science 2007), the SHARAD radar onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (Seu et al., JGR 2007), and the LRS radar onboard Kaguya (Ono et al, EPS 2007). These instruments have discovered detailed subsurface structure to depths of several kilometers in a variety of terrains on Mars and the Moon. A reflection radar deployed in orbit about a comet

  2. Solar Confocal interferometers for Sub-Picometer-Resolution Spectral Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, G. Allen; Pietraszewski, Chris; West, Edward A.; Dines. Terence C.

    2007-01-01

    The confocal Fabry-Perot interferometer allows sub-picometer spectral resolution of Fraunhofer line profiles. Such high spectral resolution is needed to keep pace with the higher spatial resolution of the new set of large-aperture solar telescopes. The line-of-sight spatial resolution derived for line profile inversions would then track the improvements of the transverse spatial scale provided by the larger apertures. In particular, profile inversion allows improved velocity and magnetic field gradients to be determined independent of multiple line analysis using different energy levels and ions. The confocal interferometer's unique properties allow a simultaneous increase in both etendue and spectral power. The higher throughput for the interferometer provides significant decrease in the aperture, which is important in spaceflight considerations. We have constructed and tested two confocal interferometers. A slow-response thermal-controlled interferometer provides a stable system for laboratory investigation, while a piezoelectric interferometer provides a rapid response for solar observations. In this paper we provide design parameters, show construction details, and report on the laboratory test for these interferometers. The field of view versus aperture for confocal interferometers is compared with other types of spectral imaging filters. We propose a multiple etalon system for observing with these units using existing planar interferometers as pre-filters. The radiometry for these tests established that high spectral resolution profiles can be obtained with imaging confocal interferometers. These sub-picometer spectral data of the photosphere in both the visible and near-infrared can provide important height variation information. However, at the diffraction-limited spatial resolution of the telescope, the spectral data is photon starved due to the decreased spectral passband.

  3. Radar studies of bird migration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, T. C.; Williams, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    Observations of bird migration with NASA radars were made at Wallops Island, Va. Simultaneous observations were made at a number of radar sites in the North Atlantic Ocean in an effort to discover what happened to those birds that were observed leaving the coast of North America headed toward Bermuda, the Caribbean and South America. Transatlantic migration, utilizing observations from a large number of radars is discussed. Detailed studies of bird movements at Wallops Island are presented.

  4. Radar-aeolian roughness project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Dobrovolskis, A.; Gaddis, L.; Iversen, J. D.; Lancaster, N.; Leach, Rodman N.; Rasnussen, K.; Saunders, S.; Vanzyl, J.; Wall, S.

    1991-01-01

    The objective is to establish an empirical relationship between measurements of radar, aeolian, and surface roughness on a variety of natural surfaces and to understand the underlying physical causes. This relationship will form the basis for developing a predictive equation to derive aeolian roughness from radar backscatter. Results are given from investigations carried out in 1989 on the principal elements of the project, with separate sections on field studies, radar data analysis, laboratory simulations, and development of theory for planetary applications.

  5. Python-ARM Radar Toolkit

    SciTech Connect

    Jonathan Helmus, Scott Collis

    2013-03-17

    The Python-ARM Radar Toolkit (Py-ART) is a collection of radar quality control and retrieval codes which all work on two unifying Python objects: the PyRadar and PyGrid objects. By building ingests to several popular radar formats and then abstracting the interface Py-ART greatly simplifies data processing over several other available utilities. In addition Py-ART makes use of Numpy arrays as its primary storage mechanism enabling use of existing and extensive community software tools.

  6. Radar data processing and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ausherman, D.; Larson, R.; Liskow, C.

    1976-01-01

    Digitized four-channel radar images corresponding to particular areas from the Phoenix and Huntington test sites were generated in conjunction with prior experiments performed to collect X- and L-band synthetic aperture radar imagery of these two areas. The methods for generating this imagery are documented. A secondary objective was the investigation of digital processing techniques for extraction of information from the multiband radar image data. Following the digitization, the remaining resources permitted a preliminary machine analysis to be performed on portions of the radar image data. The results, although necessarily limited, are reported.

  7. Thermal effects in the Input Optics of the Enhanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory interferometers.

    PubMed

    Dooley, Katherine L; Arain, Muzammil A; Feldbaum, David; Frolov, Valery V; Heintze, Matthew; Hoak, Daniel; Khazanov, Efim A; Lucianetti, Antonio; Martin, Rodica M; Mueller, Guido; Palashov, Oleg; Quetschke, Volker; Reitze, David H; Savage, R L; Tanner, D B; Williams, Luke F; Wu, Wan

    2012-03-01

    We present the design and performance of the LIGO Input Optics subsystem as implemented for the sixth science run of the LIGO interferometers. The Initial LIGO Input Optics experienced thermal side effects when operating with 7 W input power. We designed, built, and implemented improved versions of the Input Optics for Enhanced LIGO, an incremental upgrade to the Initial LIGO interferometers, designed to run with 30 W input power. At four times the power of Initial LIGO, the Enhanced LIGO Input Optics demonstrated improved performance including better optical isolation, less thermal drift, minimal thermal lensing, and higher optical efficiency. The success of the Input Optics design fosters confidence for its ability to perform well in Advanced LIGO.

  8. Exoplanet detection using a nulling interferometer.

    PubMed

    Cagigal, M; Canales, V

    2001-07-01

    The detection of extra solar planets is a topic of growing interest, which stretches current technology and knowledge to their limits. Indirect measurement confirms the existence of a considerable number. However, direct imaging is the only way to obtain information about the nature of these planets and to detect Earth-like planets, which could support life. The main problem for direct imaging is that planets are associated with a much brighter source of light. Here, we propose the use of the nulling interferometer along with a photon counting technique called Dark Speckle. Using a simple model the behavior of the technique is predicted. The signal-to-noise ratio estimated confirms that it is a promising way to detect faint objects.

  9. Hybrid layered polymer slot waveguide Young interferometer.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Leila; Hiltunen, Marianne; Stenberg, Petri; Hiltunen, Jussi; Aikio, Sanna; Roussey, Matthieu; Saarinen, Jyrki; Honkanen, Seppo

    2016-05-16

    We demonstrate a polymer slot waveguide Young interferometer coated with a bilayer of Al2O3/TiO2. The approach enables relaxed dimensions of the polymer waveguide which simplifies the fabrication of the structure with a resolution of 50 nm. The layers were coated by an atomic layer deposition technique. The feasibility of the device was investigated by exploiting the interferometric structure as a bulk refractive index sensor operating at 975 nm wavelength for detection of an ethanol-water solution. A refractive index change of 1 × 10-6 RIU with a sensing length of only 800 µm was detected. The approach confirms the possibility of realizing a low cost device with a small footprint and enhanced sensitivity by employing the TiO2 rails in the sides of the slot waveguide. PMID:27409852

  10. Genetic optimization for radio interferometer configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauci, Adam; Zarb Adami, Kristian; Abela, John; Cohanim, Babak E.

    2013-05-01

    The large bandwidth and resolution specifications of today's telescopes require the use of different types of collectors positioned over long baselines. Innovative feeds and detectors must be designed and introduced in the initial phases of development. The required level of resolution can only be achieved through a ground-breaking configuration of dishes and antennas. This work investigates the possibility of the genetic optimization of radio interferometer layouts given constraints on cable length, required UV density distribution and point-spread function. Owing to the large collecting area and the frequency range required for the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) to deliver the promised science, the configuration of the dishes within each station is an important issue. As a proof of concept, the Phase 1 specifications of this telescope are used to test the proposed framework.

  11. VINCI: the VLT Interferometer commissioning instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kervella, Pierre; Coudé du Foresto, Vincent; Glindemann, Andreas; Hofmann, Reiner

    2000-07-01

    The Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI) is a complex system, made of a large number of separated elements. To prepare an early successful operation, it will require a period of extensive testing and verification to ensure that the many devices involved work properly together, and can produce meaningful data. This paper describes the concept chosen for the VLTI commissioning instrument, LEONARDO da VINCI, and details its functionalities. It is a fiber based two-way beam combiner, associated with an artificial star and an alignment verification unit. The technical commissioning of the VLTI is foreseen as a stepwise process: fringes will first be obtained with the commissioning instrument in an autonomous mode (no other parts of the VLTI involved); then the VLTI telescopes and optical trains will be tested in autocollimation; finally fringes will be observed on the sky.

  12. Exoplanet detection using a nulling interferometer.

    PubMed

    Cagigal, M; Canales, V

    2001-07-01

    The detection of extra solar planets is a topic of growing interest, which stretches current technology and knowledge to their limits. Indirect measurement confirms the existence of a considerable number. However, direct imaging is the only way to obtain information about the nature of these planets and to detect Earth-like planets, which could support life. The main problem for direct imaging is that planets are associated with a much brighter source of light. Here, we propose the use of the nulling interferometer along with a photon counting technique called Dark Speckle. Using a simple model the behavior of the technique is predicted. The signal-to-noise ratio estimated confirms that it is a promising way to detect faint objects. PMID:19421271

  13. An 'X-banded' Tidbinbilla interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batty, Michael J.; Gardyne, R. G.; Gay, G. J.; Jauncy, David L.; Gulkis, S.; Kirk, A.

    1986-01-01

    The recent upgrading of the Tidbinbilla two-element interferometer to simultaneous S-band (2.3 GHz) and X-band (8.4 GHz) operation has provided a powerful new astronomical facility for weak radio source measurement in the Southern Hemisphere. The new X-band system has a minimum fringe spacing of 38 arcsec, and about the same positional measurement capability (approximately 2 arcsec) and sensitivity (1 s rms noise of 10 mJy) as the previous S-band system. However, the far lower confusion limit will allow detection and accurate positional measurements for sources as weak as a few millijanskys. This capability will be invaluable for observations of radio stars, X-ray sources and other weak, compact radio sources.

  14. VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector): Line-imaging interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Hemsing, W.F.; Mathews, A.R.; Warnes, R.H.; Whittemore, G.R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) technique that extends velocity measurements from single points to a line. Single-frequency argon laser light was focused through a cylindrical lens to illuminate a line on a surface. The initially stationary, flat surface was accelerated unevenly during the experiment. Motion produced a Doppler-shift of light reflected from the surface that was proportional to the velocity at each point. The Doppler-shifted image of the illuminated line was focused from the surface through a push-pull VISAR interferometer where the light was split into four quadrature-coded images. When the surface accelerated, the Doppler-shift caused the interference for each point on each line image to oscillate sinusoidally. Coherent fiber optic bundles transmitted images from the interferometer to an electronic streak camera for sweeping in time and recording on film. Data reduction combined the images to yield a continuous velocity and displacement history for all points on the surface that reflected sufficient light. The technique was demonstrated in an experiment where most of the surface was rapidly driven to a saddle shape by an exploding foil. Computer graphics were used to display the measured velocity history and to aid visualization of the surface motion. 6 refs., 8 figs.

  15. Interferometers Sharpen Measurements for Better Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade, there have been a number of innovations that have made possible the largest and most powerful telescope of its time: the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). Scheduled to launch in 2018, JWST will provide insight into what the oldest, most distant galaxies look like. When engineers build a first-of-its-kind instrument like the JWST, they often must make new tools to construct the new technology. Throughout the decades of planning, development, and construction of the JWST, NASA has worked with numerous partners to spur innovations that have enabled the telescope s creation. Though the JWST s launch date is still several years away, a number of these innovations are spinning off to provide benefits here on Earth. One of these spinoffs has emerged from the extensive testing the JWST must undergo to ensure it will function in the extreme environment of space. In order to test the JWST instruments in conditions that closely resemble those in space, NASA uses a cryogenic vacuum chamber. By dropping the temperatures down to -400 F and employing powerful pumps to remove air from the chamber, engineers can test whether the JWST instruments will function once the spacecraft leaves Earth. Traditionally, a phase-shifting interferometer is used to measure optics like the JWST s mirrors to verify their precise shape, down to tens of nanometers, during manufacturing. However, the large size of the mirrors, coupled with vibration induced by the cryo-pumps, prohibits the use of traditional phase-shifting interferometers to measure the mirrors within the chamber environment. Because the JWST will be located in deep space, far from any possible manned service mission, it was essential to find a robust solution to guarantee the performance of the mirrors.

  16. Removing interfering clutter associated with radar pulses that an airborne radar receives from a radar transponder

    DOEpatents

    Ormesher, Richard C.; Axline, Robert M.

    2008-12-02

    Interfering clutter in radar pulses received by an airborne radar system from a radar transponder can be suppressed by developing a representation of the incoming echo-voltage time-series that permits the clutter associated with predetermined parts of the time-series to be estimated. These estimates can be used to estimate and suppress the clutter associated with other parts of the time-series.

  17. Sample interchange of MST radar data from the Urbana radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowhill, S. A.; Rennier, A.

    1984-01-01

    As a first step in interchange of data from the Urbana mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere (MST) radar, a sample tape has been prepared in 9-track 1600-bpi IBM format. It includes all Urbana data for April 1978 (the first month of operation of the radar). The 300-ft tape contains 260 h of typical mesospheric power and line-of-sight velocity data.

  18. Millimeter Wave Cloud Radar (MMCR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    KB Widener; K Johnson

    2005-01-30

    The millimeter cloud radar (MMCR) systems probe the extent and composition of clouds at millimeter wavelengths. The MMCR is a zenith-pointing radar that operates at a frequency of 35 GHz. The main purpose of this radar is to determine cloud boundaries (e.g., cloud bottoms and tops). This radar will also report radar reflectivity (dBZ) of the atmosphere up to 20 km. The radar possesses a doppler capability that will allow the measurement of cloud constituent vertical velocities.

  19. A Michelson-type radio interferometer for university education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koda, Jin; Barrett, James; Shafto, Gene; Slechta, Jeff; Hasegawa, Tetsuo; Hayashi, Masahiko; Metchev, Stanimir

    2016-04-01

    We report development of a simple and affordable radio interferometer suitable as an educational laboratory experiment. The design of this interferometer is based on the Michelson and Pease stellar optical interferometer, but instead operates at the radio wavelength of ˜11 GHz (˜2.7 cm), requiring much less stringent optical accuracy in its design and use. We utilize a commercial broadcast satellite dish and feedhorn with two flat side mirrors that slide on a ladder, providing baseline coverage. This interferometer can resolve and measure the diameter of the Sun, even on a day with marginal weather. Commercial broadcast satellites provide convenient point sources for comparison to the Sun's extended disk. The mathematical background of an adding interferometer is presented, as is its design and development, including the receiver system, and sample measurements of the Sun. Results from a student laboratory report are shown. With the increasing importance of interferometry in astronomy, the lack of educational interferometers is an obstacle to training the future generation of astronomers. This interferometer provides the hands-on experience needed to fully understand the basic concepts of interferometry.

  20. Michelson-type Radio Interferometer for University Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koda, Jin; Barrett, J. W.; Hasegawa, T.; Hayashi, M.; Shafto, G.; Slechta, J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the increasing importance of interferometry in astronomy, the lack of educational interferometers is an obstacle to training the futue generation of astronomers. Students need hands-on experiments to fully understand the basic concepts of interferometry. Professional interferometers are often too complicated for education, and it is difficult to guarantee access for classes in a university course. We have built a simple and affordable radio interferometer for education and used it for an undergraduate and graduate laboratory project. This interferometer's design is based on the Michelson & Peace's stellar optical interferometer, but operates at a radio wavelength using a commercial broadcast satellite dish and receiver. Two side mirrors are surfaced with kitchen aluminum foil and slide on a ladder, providing baseline coverage. This interferometer can resolve and measure the diameter of the Sun, a nice daytime experiment which can be carried out even under a marginal weather (i.e., partial cloud coverage). Commercial broadcast satellites provide convenient point sources. By comparing the Sun and satellites, students can learn how an interferometer works and resolves structures in the sky.

  1. Interferometer for Measuring Displacement to Within 20 pm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Feng

    2003-01-01

    An optical heterodyne interferometer that can be used to measure linear displacements with an error <=20 pm has been developed. The remarkable accuracy of this interferometer is achieved through a design that includes (1) a wavefront split that reduces (relative to amplitude splits used in other interferometers) self interference and (2) a common-optical-path configuration that affords common-mode cancellation of the interference effects of thermal-expansion changes in optical-path lengths. The most popular method of displacement- measuring interferometry involves two beams, the polarizations of which are meant to be kept orthogonal upstream of the final interference location, where the difference between the phases of the two beams is measured. Polarization leakages (deviations from the desired perfect orthogonality) contaminate the phase measurement with periodic nonlinear errors. In commercial interferometers, these phase-measurement errors result in displacement errors in the approximate range of 1 to 10 nm. Moreover, because prior interferometers lack compensation for thermal-expansion changes in optical-path lengths, they are subject to additional displacement errors characterized by a temperature sensitivity of about 100 nm/K. Because the present interferometer does not utilize polarization in the separation and combination of the two interfering beams and because of the common-mode cancellation of thermal-expansion effects, the periodic nonlinear errors and the sensitivity to temperature changes are much smaller than in other interferometers

  2. Quantum metrology with parametric amplifier-based photon correlation interferometers

    PubMed Central

    Hudelist, F.; Kong, Jia; Liu, Cunjin; Jing, Jietai; Ou, Z.Y.; Zhang, Weiping

    2014-01-01

    Conventional interferometers usually utilize beam splitters for wave splitting and recombination. These interferometers are widely used for precision measurement. Their sensitivity for phase measurement is limited by the shot noise, which can be suppressed with squeezed states of light. Here we study a new type of interferometer in which the beam splitting and recombination elements are parametric amplifiers. We observe an improvement of 4.1±0.3 dB in signal-to-noise ratio compared with a conventional interferometer under the same operating condition, which is a 1.6-fold enhancement in rms phase measurement sensitivity beyond the shot noise limit. The improvement is due to signal enhancement. Combined with the squeezed state technique for shot noise suppression, this interferometer promises further improvement in sensitivity. Furthermore, because nonlinear processes are involved in this interferometer, we can couple a variety of different waves and form new types of hybrid interferometers, opening a door for many applications in metrology. PMID:24476950

  3. Planetary radar studies. [radar mapping of the Moon and radar signatures of lunar and Venus craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, T. W.; Cutts, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    Progress made in studying the evolution of Venusian craters and the evolution of infrared and radar signatures of lunar crater interiors is reported. Comparison of radar images of craters on Venus and the Moon present evidence for a steady state Venus crater population. Successful observations at the Arecibo Observatory yielded good data on five nights when data for a mix of inner and limb areas were acquired. Lunar craters with radar bright ejects are discussed. An overview of infrared radar crater catalogs in the data base is included.

  4. Broadview Radar Altimetry Toolbox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondéjar, Albert; Benveniste, Jérôme; Naeije, Marc; Escolà, Roger; Moyano, Gorka; Roca, Mònica; Terra-Homem, Miguel; Friaças, Ana; Martinho, Fernando; Schrama, Ernst; Ambrózio, Américo; Restano, Marco

    2016-07-01

    The universal altimetry toolbox, BRAT (Broadview Radar Altimetry Toolbox) which can read all previous and current altimetry missions' data, incorporates now the capability to read the upcoming Sentinel-3 L1 and L2 products. ESA endeavoured to develop and supply this capability to support the users of the future Sentinel-3 SAR Altimetry Mission. BRAT is a collection of tools and tutorial documents designed to facilitate the processing of radar altimetry data. This project started in 2005 from the joint efforts of ESA (European Space Agency) and CNES (Centre National d'Études Spatiales), and it is freely available at http://earth.esa.int/brat. The tools enable users to interact with the most common altimetry data formats. The BratGUI is the front-end for the powerful command line tools that are part of the BRAT suite. BRAT can also be used in conjunction with MATLAB/IDL (via reading routines) or in C/C++/Fortran via a programming API, allowing the user to obtain desired data, bypassing the data-formatting hassle. BRAT can be used simply to visualise data quickly, or to translate the data into other formats such as NetCDF, ASCII text files, KML (Google Earth) and raster images (JPEG, PNG, etc.). Several kinds of computations can be done within BRAT involving combinations of data fields that the user can save for posterior reuse or using the already embedded formulas that include the standard oceanographic altimetry formulas. The Radar Altimeter Tutorial, that contains a strong introduction to altimetry, shows its applications in different fields such as Oceanography, Cryosphere, Geodesy, Hydrology among others. Included are also "use cases", with step-by-step examples, on how to use the toolbox in the different contexts. The Sentinel-3 SAR Altimetry Toolbox shall benefit from the current BRAT version. While developing the toolbox we will revamp of the Graphical User Interface and provide, among other enhancements, support for reading the upcoming S3 datasets and

  5. Broadview Radar Altimetry Toolbox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escolà, Roger; Garcia-Mondejar, Albert; Moyano, Gorka; Roca, Mònica; Terra-Homem, Miguel; Friaças, Ana; Martinho, Fernando; Schrama, Ernst; Naeije, Marc; Ambrozio, Americo; Restano, Marco; Benveniste, Jérôme

    2016-04-01

    The universal altimetry toolbox, BRAT (Broadview Radar Altimetry Toolbox) which can read all previous and current altimetry missions' data, incorporates now the capability to read the upcoming Sentinel-3 L1 and L2 products. ESA endeavoured to develop and supply this capability to support the users of the future Sentinel-3 SAR Altimetry Mission. BRAT is a collection of tools and tutorial documents designed to facilitate the processing of radar altimetry data. This project started in 2005 from the joint efforts of ESA (European Space Agency) and CNES (Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales), and it is freely available at http://earth.esa.int/brat. The tools enable users to interact with the most common altimetry data formats. The BratGUI is the front-end for the powerful command line tools that are part of the BRAT suite. BRAT can also be used in conjunction with MATLAB/IDL (via reading routines) or in C/C++/Fortran via a programming API, allowing the user to obtain desired data, bypassing the data-formatting hassle. BRAT can be used simply to visualise data quickly, or to translate the data into other formats such as NetCDF, ASCII text files, KML (Google Earth) and raster images (JPEG, PNG, etc.). Several kinds of computations can be done within BRAT involving combinations of data fields that the user can save for posterior reuse or using the already embedded formulas that include the standard oceanographic altimetry formulas. The Radar Altimeter Tutorial, that contains a strong introduction to altimetry, shows its applications in different fields such as Oceanography, Cryosphere, Geodesy, Hydrology among others. Included are also "use cases", with step-by-step examples, on how to use the toolbox in the different contexts. The Sentinel-3 SAR Altimetry Toolbox shall benefit from the current BRAT version. While developing the toolbox we will revamp of the Graphical User Interface and provide, among other enhancements, support for reading the upcoming S3 datasets and

  6. Interferometric radar imaging using the AN/APG-76 radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, James D.; Holt, Hugh D., Jr.; Maney, Harold D., Jr.; Orwig, Lawrence P.

    1996-06-01

    This paper describes recent performance-enhancing modifications made to the AN/APG-76 radar. An interferometric radar equipped with a four-channel receiver and a seven-channel interferometric antenna, the AN/APG-76 has been used to demonstrate novel interferometric imaging concepts. Originally built as a tactical radar with air-to- air modes, SAR, and three-channel DPCA-like MTI modes, the modified radar's capabilities include: real-time autofocused imaging at 3- and 1-foot resolutions, elevation interferometric SAR (both single and repeat pass), polarimetric imaging, precision tracking by means of a tightly-coupled GPS-aided INS system, and moving target imaging using the inherent clutter-cancellation capabilities of the radar. The re-programmability of the on-board processor allows new real-time modes to be implemented, and high-speed data recording allows off-line analysis of data.

  7. Doppler radar flowmeter

    DOEpatents

    Petlevich, Walter J.; Sverdrup, Edward F.

    1978-01-01

    A Doppler radar flowmeter comprises a transceiver which produces an audio frequency output related to the Doppler shift in frequency between radio waves backscattered from particulate matter carried in a fluid and the radiated radio waves. A variable gain amplifier and low pass filter are provided for amplifying and filtering the transceiver output. A frequency counter having a variable triggering level is also provided to determine the magnitude of the Doppler shift. A calibration method is disclosed wherein the amplifier gain and frequency counter trigger level are adjusted to achieve plateaus in the output of the frequency counter and thereby allow calibration without the necessity of being able to visually observe the flow.

  8. EIT Based Gas Detector Design by Using Michelson Interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Abbasian, K.; Rostami, A.; Abdollahi, M. H.

    2011-12-26

    Electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) is one of the interesting phenomena of light-matter interaction which modifies matter properties for propagation of light. In other words, we can change the absorption and refractive index (RI) in neighborhood of the resonant frequency using EIT. In this paper, we have doped 3-level quantum dots in one of the Michelson Interferometer's mirror and used EIT to change its RI. So, a controllable phase difference between lights in two arms of interferometer is created. Long response time is the main drawback of Michelson interferometer based sensor, which is resolved by this technique.

  9. Fourier-transform and global contrast interferometer alignment methods

    DOEpatents

    Goldberg, Kenneth A.

    2001-01-01

    Interferometric methods are presented to facilitate alignment of image-plane components within an interferometer and for the magnified viewing of interferometer masks in situ. Fourier-transforms are performed on intensity patterns that are detected with the interferometer and are used to calculate pseudo-images of the electric field in the image plane of the test optic where the critical alignment of various components is being performed. Fine alignment is aided by the introduction and optimization of a global contrast parameter that is easily calculated from the Fourier-transform.

  10. All-guided stellar interferometer with an integrated optics recombiner.

    PubMed

    Huss, G; Schanen-Duport, L; Delage, L; Reynaud, F

    2001-06-01

    We report laboratory tests of an all-guided stellar interferometer used for optical aperture synthesis. In anticipation of use of the interferometer in space missions, this research is focused especially on compactness of the recombining device. The coherent transport and delay lines are implemented with polarization-maintaining fiber. Beam recombination is achieved by means of an integrated optics component. This two-arm interferometer operates at 670-nm mean wavelength and allows for a 24-cm correction for the differential air path. PMID:18040444

  11. A novel polarization interferometer for measuring upper atmospheric winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Ting-Kui; Zhang, Chun-Min

    2010-06-01

    A static polarization interferometer for measuring upper atmospheric winds is presented, based on two Savart plates with their optical axes perpendicular to each other. The principle and characteristics of the interferometer are described. The interferometer with a wide field of view can offer a stable benchmark optical path difference over a specified spectral region of 0.55-0.63 μm because there are no quarter wave plates. Since the instrument employs a straight line common-path configuration but without moving parts and slits, it is very compact, simple, inherently robust and has high throughput. The paper is limited to a theoretical analysis.

  12. Using the Talbot_Lau_interferometer_parameters Spreadsheet

    SciTech Connect

    Kallman, Jeffrey S.

    2015-06-04

    Talbot-Lau interferometers allow incoherent X-ray sources to be used for phase contrast imaging. A spreadsheet for exploring the parameter space of Talbot and Talbot-Lau interferometers has been assembled. This spreadsheet allows the user to examine the consequences of choosing phase grating pitch, source energy, and source location on the overall geometry of a Talbot or Talbot-Lau X-ray interferometer. For the X-ray energies required to penetrate scanned luggage the spacing between gratings is large enough that the mechanical tolerances for amplitude grating positioning are unlikely to be met.

  13. Integrated heterodyne interferometer with on-chip modulators and detectors.

    PubMed

    Cole, David B; Sorace-Agaskar, Cheryl; Moresco, Michele; Leake, Gerald; Coolbaugh, Douglas; Watts, Michael R

    2015-07-01

    We demonstrate, to our knowledge, the first on-chip heterodyne interferometer fabricated on a 300-mm CMOS compatible process that exhibits root-mean-square (RMS) position noise on the order of 2 nm. Measuring 1 mm by 6 mm, the interferometer is also, to our knowledge, the smallest heterodyne interferometer demonstrated to date and will surely impact numerous interferometric and metrology applications, including displacement measurement, laser Doppler velocimetry and vibrometry, Fourier transform spectroscopy, imaging, and light detection and ranging (LIDAR). Here we present preliminary results that demonstrate the displacement mode. PMID:26125376

  14. Fiber optic interferometer for testing conic section surfaces.

    PubMed

    Bétend-Bon, J P; Wosinski, L; Breidne, M; Robertsson, L

    1991-05-01

    A null test method for testing aspheric optical surfaces based on geometric considerations of conic sections is presented. The basic principles have been investigated experimentally by designing and building a modified Mach-Zehnder interferometer. By using optical fibers the inconvenience of alignment has partly been overcome. Phase shifting has been implemented and the measurements are performed with the help of a microcomputer. The performance of the interferometer has been investigated by testing an elliptical toroid mirror. Further improvement of the test procedure by Zernike polynomial decomposition is discussed and performed. Finally, an even more compact conic section interferometer is proposed.

  15. Method of calibrating an interferometer and reducing its systematic noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammer, Philip D. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Methods of operation and data analysis for an interferometer so as to eliminate the errors contributed by non-responsive or unstable pixels, interpixel gain variations that drift over time, and spurious noise that would otherwise degrade the operation of the interferometer are disclosed. The methods provide for either online or post-processing calibration. The methods apply prescribed reversible transformations that exploit the physical properties of interferograms obtained from said interferometer to derive a calibration reference signal for subsequent treatment of said interferograms for interpixel gain variations. A self-consistent approach for treating bad pixels is incorporated into the methods.

  16. Equatorial MST radars: Further consideration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagos, P.

    1983-01-01

    The results presented give additional support to the need of equatorial MST radars in order to obtain more information on the nature of equatorial waves in the MST region. Radar deduced winds such as obtained at Jicamarca for periods of months indicate that with these data the full range of equatorial waves, with time scales of seconds to years, can be studied.

  17. Radar image registration and rectification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naraghi, M.; Stromberg, W. D.

    1983-01-01

    Two techniques for radar image registration and rectification are presented. In the registration method, a general 2-D polynomial transform is defined to accomplish the geometric mapping from one image into the other. The degree and coefficients of the polynomial are obtained using an a priori found tiepoint data set. In the second part of the paper, a rectification procedure is developed that models the distortion present in the radar image in terms of the radar sensor's platform parameters and the topographic variations of the imaged scene. This model, the ephemeris data and the digital topographic data are then used in rectifying the radar image. The two techniques are then used in registering and rectifying two examples of radar imagery. Each method is discussed as to its benefits, shortcomings and registration accuracy.

  18. "First Light" for the VLT Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-03-01

    Excellent Fringes From Bright Stars Prove VLTI Concept Summary Following the "First Light" for the fourth of the 8.2-m telescopes of the VLT Observatory on Paranal in September 2000, ESO scientists and engineers have just successfully accomplished the next major step of this large project. On March 17, 2001, "First Fringes" were obtained with the VLT Interferometer (VLTI) - this important event corresponds to the "First Light" for an astronomical telescope. At the VLTI, it occurred when the infrared light from the bright star Sirius was captured by two small telescopes and the two beams were successfully combined in the subterranean Interferometric Laboratory to form the typical pattern of dark and bright lines known as " interferometric fringes ". This proves the success of the robust VLTI concept, in particular of the "Delay Line". On the next night, the VLTI was used to perform a scientific measurement of the angular diameter of another comparatively bright star, Alpha Hydrae ( Alphard ); it was found to be 0.00929±0.00017 arcsec . This corresponds to the angular distance between the two headlights of a car as seen from a distance of approx. 35,000 kilometres. The excellent result was obtained during a series of observations, each lasting 2 minutes, and fully confirming the impressive predicted abilities of the VLTI . This first observation with the VLTI is a monumental technological achievement, especially in terms of accuracy and stability . It crucially depends on the proper combination and functioning of a large number of individual opto-mechnical and electronic elements. This includes the test telescopes that capture the starlight, continuous and extremely precise adjustment of the various mirrors that deflect the light beams as well as the automatic positioning and motion of the Delay Line carriages and, not least, the optimal tuning of the VLT INterferometer Commissionning Instrument (VINCI). These initial observations prove the overall concept for the

  19. 30-Lens interferometer for high-energy X-rays.

    PubMed

    Lyubomirskiy, Mikhail; Snigireva, Irina; Kohn, Victor; Kuznetsov, Sergey; Yunkin, Vyacheslav; Vaughan, Gavin; Snigirev, Anatoly

    2016-09-01

    A novel high-energy multi-lens interferometer consisting of 30 arrays of planar compound refractive lenses is reported. Under coherent illumination each lens array creates a diffraction-limited secondary source. Overlapping such coherent beams produces an interference pattern demonstrating strong longitudinal functional dependence. The proposed multi-lens interferometer was tested experimentally at the 100 m-long ID11 ESRF beamline in the X-ray energy range from 30 to 65 keV. The interference pattern generated by the interferometer was recorded at fundamental and fractional Talbot distances. An effective source size (FWHM) of the order of 15 µm was determined from the first Talbot image, proving the concept that the multi-lens interferometer can be used as a high-resolution tool for beam diagnostics. PMID:27577763

  20. Two-interferometers fiber optic sensor for disturbance localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyczkowski, Marek; Ciurapinski, Wieslaw; Kondrat, Marcin

    2005-09-01

    Initial researches of Two-interferometers Fibre Optic Sensor for Disturbance Localization will be presented. The sensor is typically susceptible to environmentally induced mechanical perturbation at low frequencies. The presented sensor consists of two interferometers: Sagnac and Michelson. The Sagnac transfer function is proportional to the product of two factors: firstly the rate of change, dφ/dt, of the optical signal, induced at a point by external disturbance, and secondly the distance between the disturbance point and the Sagnac coil centre. The second interferometer transfer function gives an output proportional to φ. So, if we determine a pulsation ω of the mechanical disturbance from both interferometers output signals, we will be able to localize point where the mechanical disturbance takes place along the fibre by means of simple division of these transfer function. A laboratory arrangement of the sensor and the results of numerical signal processing are also shown.

  1. Optical frequency-modulated continuous-wave interferometers.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jesse

    2006-04-20

    I discuss optical frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) interferometers, including their principles, characteristics, specific requirements, procedure for their construction, optical configurations, primary applications, optical sources, resolution, measurement range, and stability. PMID:16633422

  2. 30-Lens interferometer for high-energy X-rays.

    PubMed

    Lyubomirskiy, Mikhail; Snigireva, Irina; Kohn, Victor; Kuznetsov, Sergey; Yunkin, Vyacheslav; Vaughan, Gavin; Snigirev, Anatoly

    2016-09-01

    A novel high-energy multi-lens interferometer consisting of 30 arrays of planar compound refractive lenses is reported. Under coherent illumination each lens array creates a diffraction-limited secondary source. Overlapping such coherent beams produces an interference pattern demonstrating strong longitudinal functional dependence. The proposed multi-lens interferometer was tested experimentally at the 100 m-long ID11 ESRF beamline in the X-ray energy range from 30 to 65 keV. The interference pattern generated by the interferometer was recorded at fundamental and fractional Talbot distances. An effective source size (FWHM) of the order of 15 µm was determined from the first Talbot image, proving the concept that the multi-lens interferometer can be used as a high-resolution tool for beam diagnostics.

  3. Orthogonal polarization Mirau interferometer using reflective-type waveplate.

    PubMed

    Tapilouw, Abraham Mario; Chen, Liang-Chia; Jen, Yi-Jun; Lin, Shyh-Tsong; Yeh, Sheng-Lih

    2013-07-15

    This work proposes an orthogonal polarization Mirau interferometry using a reflective-type waveplate to generate different polarization orientations for broadband white light interferometry. The reflective-type half-waveplate is employed as the reference arm of the Mirau interferometer to convert polarization and it generates a reference light with an orientation orthogonal to the object light. An advantage of the proposed interferometer is its ability to control the ratio of light intensity between the object and reference arms to maximize the interferometric fringe contrast. Better, more accurate calibration of standard step height has been achieved by the developed interferometer, which also can measure solder bumps that traditional Mirau interferometers usually cannot measure. PMID:23939094

  4. A Fast Ramsey-Bordé Interferometer with Cold Lithium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copenhaver, Eric; Cassella, Kayleigh; Mueller, Holger

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate light-pulse interferometry with bosonic lithium in both Mach-Zehnder and Ramsey-Bordé geometries. We capture 12 million Li-7 atoms at 200 μK and build a fast interferometer with (~ 100 ns) stimulated Raman pulses and short interrogation times (tens to hundreds of microseconds). We achieve approximately 20 % of the maximum fringe contrast, which is limited to 25 % by non-interfering atomic trajectories. The contrast decays at a rate consistent with the limit set by thermal expansion out of the Raman beam. The signal in a Ramsey-Bordé interferometer scales inversely with mass and highlights the advantage of interferometry with light atoms like lithium. This allows for a measurement of the fine structure constant with shorter interrogation times than interferometers based on heavier atoms. Additionally, fast interferometers may have applications in the detection of high frequency signals resulting from exotic physics.

  5. Coupled-Cavity Interferometer for the Optics Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, R. W.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the construction of a flexible coupled-cavity interferometer for student use. A helium-neon laser and phonograph turntable are the main components. Lists activities which may be performed with the apparatus. (Author/CP)

  6. Performance evaluation of a thermal Doppler Michelson interferometer system.

    PubMed

    Mani, Reza; Dobbie, Steven; Scott, Alan; Shepherd, Gordon; Gault, William; Brown, Stephen

    2005-11-20

    The thermal Doppler Michelson interferometer is the primary element of a proposed limb-viewing satellite instrument called SWIFT (Stratospheric Wind Interferometer for Transport studies). SWIFT is intended to measure stratospheric wind velocities in the altitude range of 15-45 km. SWIFT also uses narrowband tandem etalon filters made of germanium to select a line out of the thermal spectrum. The instrument uses the same technique of phase-stepping interferometry employed by the Wind Imaging Interferometer onboard the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite. A thermal emission line of ozone near 9 microm is used to detect the Doppler shift due to winds. A test bed was set up for this instrument that included the Michelson interferometer and the etalon filters. For the test bed work, we investigate the behavior of individual components and their combination and report the results.

  7. Mars Radar Observations with the Goldstone Solar System Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haldemann, A. F. C.; Jurgens, R. F.; Larsen, K. W.; Arvidson, R. E.; Slade, M. A.

    2002-01-01

    The Goldstone Solar System Radar (GSSR) has successfully collected radar echo data from Mars over the past 30 years. As such, the GSSR has played a role as a specific mission element within Mars exploration. The older data provided local elevation information for Mars, along with radar scattering information with global resolution. Since the upgrade to the 70-m Deep Space Network (DSN) antenna at Goldstone completed in 1986, Mars data has been collected during all but the 1997 Mars opposition. Radar data, and non-imaging delay-Doppler data in particular, requires significant data processing to extract elevation, reflectivity and roughness of the reflecting surface. The spatial resolution of these experiments is typically some 20 km in longitude by some 150 km in latitude. The interpretation of these parameters while limited by the complexities of electromagnetic scattering, do provide information directly relevant to geophysical and geomorphic analyses of Mars. The usefulness of radar data for Mars exploration has been demonstrated in the past. Radar data were critical in assessing the Viking Lander 1 site as well as, more recently, the Pathfinder landing site. In general, radar data have not been available to the Mars exploration community at large. A project funded initially by the Mars Exploration Directorate Science Office at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), and later funded by NASA's Mars Data Analysis Program has reprocessed to a common format a decade's worth of raw GSSR Mars delay-Doppler data in aid of landing site characterization for the Mars Program. These data will soon be submitted to the Planetary Data System (PDS). The radar data used were obtained between 1988 and 1995 by the GSSR, and comprise some 63 delay-Doppler radar tracks. Of these, 15 have yet to be recovered from old 9-track tapes, and some of the data may be permanently lost.

  8. Automatic Alignment of Displacement-Measuring Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halverson, Peter; Regehr, Martin; Spero, Robert; Alvarez-Salazar, Oscar; Loya, Frank; Logan, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    A control system strives to maintain the correct alignment of a laser beam in an interferometer dedicated to measuring the displacement or distance between two fiducial corner-cube reflectors. The correct alignment of the laser beam is parallel to the line between the corner points of the corner-cube reflectors: Any deviation from parallelism changes the length of the optical path between the reflectors, thereby introducing a displacement or distance measurement error. On the basis of the geometrical optics of corner-cube reflectors, the length of the optical path can be shown to be L = L(sub 0)cos theta, where L(sub 0) is the distance between the corner points and theta is the misalignment angle. Therefore, the measurement error is given by DeltaL = L(sub 0)(cos theta - 1). In the usual case in which the misalignment is small, this error can be approximated as DeltaL approximately equal to -L(sub 0)theta sup 2/2. The control system (see figure) is implemented partly in hardware and partly in software. The control system includes three piezoelectric actuators for rapid, fine adjustment of the direction of the laser beam. The voltages applied to the piezoelectric actuators include components designed to scan the beam in a circular pattern so that the beam traces out a narrow cone (60 microradians wide in the initial application) about the direction in which it is nominally aimed. This scan is performed at a frequency (2.5 Hz in the initial application) well below the resonance frequency of any vibration of the interferometer. The laser beam makes a round trip to both corner-cube reflectors and then interferes with the launched beam. The interference is detected on a photodiode. The length of the optical path is measured by a heterodyne technique: A 100- kHz frequency shift between the launched beam and a reference beam imposes, on the detected signal, an interferometric phase shift proportional to the length of the optical path. A phase meter comprising analog

  9. Superfluid helium-4 interferometers: construction and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Aditya Ajit

    This dissertation has two main goals: to highlight some new results in the field of superfluid 4He interferometry and to provide an in-depth, "hands-on" guide to the physics, design, construction, testing and operation of a continuously operating, fluxlocked 4 He dc-SHeQUID (Superfluid Helium Quantum Interference Device). Many of these topics haven't really been addressed in writing and the hapless new experimenter seeking to develop a SHeQUID is generally forced to reinvent the wheel rather than start at the frontier and push it forward. We would like to prevent that by making this a comprehensive guide to building and operating SHeQUIDs. We have optimized the fabrication of the nanoscale aperture arrays that are the very heart of the SHeQUID and resolved long-standing issues with their durability and long-term usability. A detailed report on this should assist in avoiding the many pitfalls that await those who fabricate and use these aperture arrays. We have constructed a new, modular SHeQUID that is designed to be easily adaptable to a wide array of proposed experiments without the necessity of rebuilding and reassembling key components like the displacement transducer. We have automated its working as a continuously operating, linearized (flux-locked) interferometer by using the so-called "chemical potential battery" in conjunction with a feedback system. We have also constructed a new reorientation system that is several orders of magnitude quieter than its predecessors. Together, these developments have allowed us to measure a changing rotation field in real time, a new development for this kind of device. We have also developed a module that allows control of the reorientation stage by automated data-taking software for investigating long-term drifts (by safely sweeping the stage back and forth). We have also investigated the chemical potential battery in further detail and report some fascinating nonlinear mode locking phenomena that have important

  10. Stroboscopic Interferometer for Measuring Mirror Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Robers, Ted

    2005-01-01

    Stroboscopic interferometry is a technique for measuring the modes of vibration of mirrors that are lightweight and, therefore, unavoidably flexible. The technique was conceived especially for modal characterization of lightweight focusing mirror segments to be deployed in outer space; however, the technique can be applied to lightweight mirrors designed for use on Earth as well as the modal investigation of other optical and mechanical structures. To determine the modal structure of vibration of a mirror, it is necessary to excite the mirror by applying a force that varies periodically with time at a controllable frequency. The excitation can utilize sinusoidal, square, triangular, or even asynchronous waveforms. Because vibrational modes occur at specific resonant frequencies, it is necessary to perform synchronous measurements and sweep the frequency to locate the significant resonant modes. For a given mode it is possible to step the phase of data acquisition in order to capture the modal behavior over a single cycle of the resonant frequency. In order to measure interferometrically the vibrational response of the mirror at a given frequency, an interferometer must be suitably aligned with the mirror and adjustably phase-locked with the excitation signal. As in conventional stroboscopic photography, the basic idea in stroboscopic interferometry is to capture an image of the shape of a moving object (in this case, the vibrating mirror) at a specified instant of time in the vibration cycle. Adjusting the phase difference over a full cycle causes the interference fringes to vary over the full range of motion for the mode at the excitation frequency. The interference-fringe pattern is recorded as a function of the phase difference, and, from the resulting data, the surface shape of the mirror for the given mode is extracted. In addition to the interferometer and the mirror to be tested, the equipment needed for stroboscopic interferometry includes an arbitrary

  11. Sensitivity of perimeter sensor based on Sagnac interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szustakowski, Mieczyslaw; Zyczkowski, Marek; Ciurapinski, Wieslaw M.; Palka, Norbert

    2004-09-01

    The theoretical analysis of sensitivity of the Sagnac interferometer-based sensor is presented. This setup has wide range of implementation -- one of them is a perimeter sensor for security systems. Sensor sensitivity is determined firstly by a frequency-phase sensitivity, which is connected with the interferometer principle of operation and, secondly, by electronic noise of a processing unit and attenuation of used fiber optic.

  12. Simplified Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) system

    SciTech Connect

    Sweatt, W.C.; Stanton, P.L.; Crump, O.B. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    A simplified, rugged VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector) system has been developed using a non-removable delay element and an essentially non-adjustable interferometer cavity. In this system, the critical interference adjustments are performed during fabrication of the cavity, freeing the user from this task. Prototype systems are easy to use and give extremely high quality results. 6 refs., 7 figs.

  13. Polarization Considerations for the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waluschka, Eugene; Pedersen, Trace R.; McNamara, Paul

    2005-01-01

    A polarization ray trace model of the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna's (LISA) optical path is being created. The model will be able to assess the effects of various polarizing elements and the optical coatings on the required picometer level interferometry. All of the computational steps are described in detail. This should eliminate any ambiguities associated with polarization ray trace modeling of interferometers and provide a basis for determining its limitations and serve as a clearly defined starting point for future improvements.

  14. Rainbow schlieren vs Mach-Zehnder interferometer - A comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howes, W. L.

    1985-01-01

    The rainbow schlieren apparatus is simpler, cheaper, and more easily built to large scale than the interferometer. The accuracies of the two instruments are similar but only if refraction is properly accounted for in interferometry. The measurement thresholds of both instruments are similar. The rainbow schlieren device provides more detailed information because the detection threshold of the rainbow schlieren is an order of magnitude better than that of the interferometer.

  15. Planned improvements to the Owens Valley frequency-agile interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurford, Gordon J.; Gary, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    Three small antennas will be added to the OVRO interferometer to form a five-element solar-dedicated array. This would provide up to 7 or 10 baselines (compared to the present 1 or 3). This would be sufficient to apply microwave diagnostics to most active region and burst sources. By using frequency-synthesis it would also provide an imaging capability comparable to that of an approximately 100 baseline interferometer. Expansion of the array is discussed.

  16. Bose-Einstein-condensate interferometer with macroscopic arm separation

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, O.; Deissler, B.; Hughes, K. J.; Reeves, J. M.; Sackett, C. A.

    2006-09-15

    A Michelson interferometer using Bose-Einstein condensates is demonstrated with coherence times of up to 44 ms and arm separations up to 180 {mu}m. This arm separation is larger than that observed for any previous atom interferometer. The device uses atoms weakly confined in a magnetic guide and the atomic motion is controlled using Bragg interactions with an off-resonant standing-wave laser beam.

  17. Fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer with controllable temperature sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinpu; Peng, Wei; Zhang, Yang

    2015-12-01

    We proposed a fiber taper based on the Fabry-Perot (FP) interferometer structure with controllable temperature sensitivity. The FP interferometer is formed by inserting a segment of tapered fiber tip into the capillary and subsequently splicing the other end of the capillary to a single-mode fiber (SMF), the tapered fiber endface, and the spliced face form the FP cavity. Through controlling the inserted tapered fiber length, a series of FP interferometers were made. Because the inserted taper tip has the degree of freedom along the fiber axial, when the FP interferometer is subjected to temperature variation, the thermal expansion of the fiber taper tip will resist the FP cavity length change caused by the evolution of capillary length, and we can control the temperature sensitivity by adjusting the inserted taper length. In this structure, the equivalent thermal expansion coefficient of the FP interferometer can be defined; it was used to evaluate the temperature sensitivity of the FP interferometer, which provides an effective method to eliminate the temperature effect and to enhance other measurement accuracy. We fabricated the FP interferometers and calibrated their temperature characters by measuring the wavelength shift of the resonance dips in the reflection spectrum. In a temperature range of 50°C to 150°C, the corresponding temperature sensitivities can be controlled between 0 and 1.97 pm/°C when the inserted taper is between 75 and 160 μm. Because of its controllable temperature sensitivity, ease of fabrication, and low cost, this FP interferometer can meet different temperature sensitivity requirements in various application areas, especially in the fields which need temperature insensitivity. PMID:26625075

  18. Fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer with controllable temperature sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinpu; Peng, Wei; Zhang, Yang

    2015-12-01

    We proposed a fiber taper based on the Fabry-Perot (FP) interferometer structure with controllable temperature sensitivity. The FP interferometer is formed by inserting a segment of tapered fiber tip into the capillary and subsequently splicing the other end of the capillary to a single-mode fiber (SMF), the tapered fiber endface, and the spliced face form the FP cavity. Through controlling the inserted tapered fiber length, a series of FP interferometers were made. Because the inserted taper tip has the degree of freedom along the fiber axial, when the FP interferometer is subjected to temperature variation, the thermal expansion of the fiber taper tip will resist the FP cavity length change caused by the evolution of capillary length, and we can control the temperature sensitivity by adjusting the inserted taper length. In this structure, the equivalent thermal expansion coefficient of the FP interferometer can be defined; it was used to evaluate the temperature sensitivity of the FP interferometer, which provides an effective method to eliminate the temperature effect and to enhance other measurement accuracy. We fabricated the FP interferometers and calibrated their temperature characters by measuring the wavelength shift of the resonance dips in the reflection spectrum. In a temperature range of 50°C to 150°C, the corresponding temperature sensitivities can be controlled between 0 and 1.97 pm/°C when the inserted taper is between 75 and 160 μm. Because of its controllable temperature sensitivity, ease of fabrication, and low cost, this FP interferometer can meet different temperature sensitivity requirements in various application areas, especially in the fields which need temperature insensitivity.

  19. Submillimeter laser interferometer for high density plasma diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamenev, Yu. E.; Kiselyev, V. K.; Kuleshov, E. M.; Knyaz'kov, B. N.; Kononenko, V. K.; Nesterov, P. K.; Yanovsky, M. S.

    1995-06-01

    There are presented the results of investigation of the one-channel homodyne laser interferometer λ=119 µm made on the basis of the hollow dielectric beamguide and quasioptical functional devices. The interferometer is designed for determination of the plasma electron density of the TOKAMAK-7. The density response threshold is 0.7% from the expected plasma density and the phase difference measurement total error is 5°

  20. Polarization considerations for the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waluschka, Eugene; Pedersen, Tracy R.; McNamara, Paul

    2005-08-01

    A polarization ray trace model of the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna's (LISA) optical path is being created. The model will be able to assess the effects of various polarizing elements and the optical coatings on the required, very long path length, picometer level dynamic interferometry. The computational steps are described. This should eliminate any ambiguities associated with polarization ray tracing of interferometers and provide a basis for determining the computer model's limitations and serve as a clearly defined starting point for future work.

  1. POLCAL - POLARIMETRIC RADAR CALIBRATION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzyl, J.

    1994-01-01

    Calibration of polarimetric radar systems is a field of research in which great progress has been made over the last few years. POLCAL (Polarimetric Radar Calibration) is a software tool intended to assist in the calibration of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems. In particular, POLCAL calibrates Stokes matrix format data produced as the standard product by the NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) airborne imaging synthetic aperture radar (AIRSAR). POLCAL was designed to be used in conjunction with data collected by the NASA/JPL AIRSAR system. AIRSAR is a multifrequency (6 cm, 24 cm, and 68 cm wavelength), fully polarimetric SAR system which produces 12 x 12 km imagery at 10 m resolution. AIRSTAR was designed as a testbed for NASA's Spaceborne Imaging Radar program. While the images produced after 1991 are thought to be calibrated (phase calibrated, cross-talk removed, channel imbalance removed, and absolutely calibrated), POLCAL can and should still be used to check the accuracy of the calibration and to correct it if necessary. Version 4.0 of POLCAL is an upgrade of POLCAL version 2.0 released to AIRSAR investigators in June, 1990. New options in version 4.0 include automatic absolute calibration of 89/90 data, distributed target analysis, calibration of nearby scenes with calibration parameters from a scene with corner reflectors, altitude or roll angle corrections, and calibration of errors introduced by known topography. Many sources of error can lead to false conclusions about the nature of scatterers on the surface. Errors in the phase relationship between polarization channels result in incorrect synthesis of polarization states. Cross-talk, caused by imperfections in the radar antenna itself, can also lead to error. POLCAL reduces cross-talk and corrects phase calibration without the use of ground calibration equipment. Removing the antenna patterns during SAR processing also forms a very important part of the calibration of SAR data. Errors in the

  2. Noncontact detection of ultrasonic waves using fiber optic Sagnac interferometer.

    PubMed

    Jang, Tae Seong; Lee, Seung Seok; Kwon, Il Bum; Lee, Wang Joo; Lee, Jung Ju

    2002-06-01

    This paper describes a fiber optic sensor suitable for noncontact detection of ultrasonic waves. This sensor is based on the fiber optic Sagnac interferometer, which has a path-matched configuration and does not require active stabilization. Quadrature phase bias between two interfering laser beams in the Sagnac loop is applied by controlling the birefringence using a fiber polarization controller. A stable quadrature phase bias can be confirmed by observing the interferometer output according to the change of phase bias. Additional signal processing is not needed for the detection of ultrasonic waves using the Sagnac interferometer. Ultrasonic oscillations produced by conventional ultrasonic piezoelectric transducers were successfully detected, and the performance of this interferometer was investigated by a power spectrum analysis of the output signal. Based on the validation of the fiber optic Sagnac interferometer, noncontact detection of laser-generated surface waves was performed. The configured Sagnac interferometer is very effective for the detection of small displacement with high frequency, such as ultrasonic waves used in conventional nondestructive testing (NDT).

  3. Development of stable monolithic wide-field Michelson interferometers.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiaoke; Ge, Jian; Chen, Zhiping

    2011-07-20

    Bulk wide-field Michelson interferometers are very useful for high precision applications in remote sensing and astronomy. A stable monolithic Michelson interferometer is a key element in high precision radial velocity (RV) measurements for extrasolar planets searching and studies. Thermal stress analysis shows that matching coefficients of thermal expansion (CTEs) is a critical requirement for ensuring interferometer stability. This requirement leads to a novel design using BK7 and LAK7 materials, such that the monolithic interferometer is free from thermal distortion. The processes of design, fabrication, and testing of interferometers are described in detail. In performance evaluations, the field angle is typically 23.8° and thermal sensitivity is typically -2.6×10(-6)/°C near 550 nm, which corresponds to ∼800 m/s/°C in the RV scale. Low-cost interferometer products have been commissioned in multiple RV instruments, and they are producing high stability performance over long term operations. PMID:21772398

  4. Long-baseline optical fiber interferometer instruments and science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotani, Takayuki; Nishikawa, Jun; Sato, Koichi; Yoshizawa, Masanori; Ohishi, Naoko; Fukushima, Toshio; Torii, Yasuo; Matsuda, Ko; Kubo, Koichi; Iwashita, Hikaru; Suzuki, Shunsaku

    2003-02-01

    Developments of fiber linked optical interferometer are reported. This interferometer is a part of MIRA-I.2 interferometer (Mitaka InfraRed and optical Array). MIRA-I.2 is an optical interferometer with a 30 meters long baseline. It consists of two 30cm siderostats, tip-tilt mirrors, vacuum pipes delay lines and detectors. We plan to use two 60 meters long polarization-maintaining fibers for arms of the interferometer, instead of vacuum pipes. The developments include dispersion and polarization compensation of fiber and fiber injection module. In laboratory experiments, dispersion compensation succeeded. The fringe visibility was 0.93 for wide-band, where the central wavelength of light was 700nm, and bandwidth was 200nm, while 0.95 with a He-Ne laser. We used BK7 glass wedge for dispersion compensation. About fiber injection module, basic optical design has completed. The results of our fiber interferometer could contribute to OHANA (Optical Hawaiian Array for Nanoradian Astronomy) project. We present new science targets, white dwarves and T Tauri stars, and an 800 m delayline concept in CFHT for the project.

  5. Highly stable polarization independent Mach-Zehnder interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Mičuda, Michal Doláková, Ester; Straka, Ivo; Miková, Martina; Dušek, Miloslav; Fiurášek, Jaromír; Ježek, Miroslav

    2014-08-15

    We experimentally demonstrate optical Mach-Zehnder interferometer utilizing displaced Sagnac configuration to enhance its phase stability. The interferometer with footprint of 27×40 cm offers individually accessible paths and shows phase deviation less than 0.4° during a 250 s long measurement. The phase drift, evaluated by means of Allan deviation, stays below 3° or 7 nm for 1.5 h without any active stabilization. The polarization insensitive design is verified by measuring interference visibility as a function of input polarization. For both interferometer's output ports and all tested polarization states the visibility stays above 93%. The discrepancy in visibility for horizontal and vertical polarization about 3.5% is caused mainly by undesired polarization dependence of splitting ratio of the beam splitter used. The presented interferometer device is suitable for quantum-information and other sensitive applications where active stabilization is complicated and common-mode interferometer is not an option as both the interferometer arms have to be accessible individually.

  6. Experimental implementation of phase locking in a nonlinear interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hailong; Jing, Jietai; Marino, A. M.

    2015-09-21

    Based upon two cascade four-wave mixing processes in two identical hot rubidium vapor cells, a nonlinear interferometer has been experimentally realized [Jing et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 99, 011110 (2011); Hudelist et al., Nat. Commun. 5, 3049 (2014)]. It has a higher degree of phase sensitivity than a traditional linear interferometer and has many potential applications in quantum metrology. Phase locking of the nonlinear interferometer is needed before it can find its way into applications. In this letter, we investigate the experimental implementation of phase locking of the relative phase between the three beams at different frequencies involved in such a nonlinear interferometer. We have utilized two different methods, namely, beat note locking and coherent modulation locking. We find that coherent modulation locking can achieve much better phase stability than beat note locking in our system. Our results pave the way for real applications of a nonlinear interferometer in precision measurement and quantum manipulation, for example, phase control in phase-sensitive N-wave mixing process, N-port nonlinear interferometer and quantum-enhanced real-time phase tracking.

  7. Large phased-array radars

    SciTech Connect

    Brookner, D.E.

    1988-12-15

    Large phased-array radars can play a very important part in arms control. They can be used to determine the number of RVs being deployed, the type of targeting of the RVs (the same or different targets), the shape of the deployed objects, and possibly the weight and yields of the deployed RVs. They can provide this information at night as well as during the day and during rain and cloud covered conditions. The radar can be on the ground, on a ship, in an airplane, or space-borne. Airborne and space-borne radars can provide high resolution map images of the ground for reconnaissance, of anti-ballistic missile (ABM) ground radar installations, missile launch sites, and tactical targets such as trucks and tanks. The large ground based radars can have microwave carrier frequencies or be at HF (high frequency). For a ground-based HF radar the signal is reflected off the ionosphere so as to provide over-the-horizon (OTH) viewing of targets. OTH radars can potentially be used to monitor stealth targets and missile traffic.

  8. A Bistatic Parasitical Radar (BIPAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartl, Philipp; Braun, Hans Martin

    1989-01-01

    After decades of remote sensing from aircraft and satellites with cameras and other optical sensors, earth observation by imaging radars becomes more and more suitable because of their night and day and all weather operations capability and their information content being complementary to those of optical sensors. The major problem with microwave sensors (radars) is that there are not enough of them presently in operation and therefore not enough data available for effective radar signature research for civil applications. It is shown that airborne bistatic real aperture radar receivers can be operated with spaceborne transmitters of opportunity. Famous candidates for those systems are high power communications or direct TV satellites illuminating the earth surface with a power denisty of more than 10(-12) Watt/sq meter. The high sophisticated status of signal processing technology today allows the realization of receivers correlating the received direct path signal from a communications satellite with its avoidable reflection on the ground. Coherent integration can improve the signal to noise ratio up to values where the radiometric resolution can satisfy users needs. The development of such parasitic radar receivers could even provide a cost effective way to open up new frequency bands for radar signature research. Advantages of these quiet systems for the purpose of classical radar reconnaissance are evident.

  9. Interception of LPI radar signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jim P.

    1991-11-01

    Most current radars are designed to transmit short duration pulses with relatively high peak power. These radars can be detected easily by the use of relatively modest EW intercept receivers. Three radar functions (search, anti-ship missile (ASM) seeker, and navigation) are examined to evaluate the effectiveness of potential low probability of intercept (LPI) techniques, such as waveform coding, antenna profile control, and power management that a radar may employ against current Electronic Warfare (EW) receivers. The general conclusion is that it is possible to design a LPI radar which is effective against current intercept EW receivers. LPI operation is most easily achieved at close ranges and against a target with a large radar cross section. The general system sensitivity requirement for the detection of current and projected LPI radars is found to be on the order of -100 dBmi which cannot be met by current EW receivers. Finally, three potential LPI receiver architectures, using channelized, superhet, and acousto-optic receivers with narrow RF and video bandwidths are discussed. They have shown some potential in terms of providing the sensitivity and capability in an environment where both conventional and LPI signals are present.

  10. 3-D Radar Imaging Reveals Deep Structures and Buried Craters Within the Martian Polar Caps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putzig, N. E.; Foss, F. J., II; Campbell, B. A.; Phillips, R. J.; Smith, I. B.

    2015-12-01

    We use Shallow Radar (SHARAD) observations on thousands of orbital passes by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter to produce fully imaged 3-D data volumes encompassing both polar ice caps of Mars. Greatly clarifying the view of subsurface features, a completed volume for Planum Boreum provides new constraints on the nature and timing of emplacement of the northern polar deposits and their relationship to climate. The standard method of mapping subsurface features with single-pass 2-D radargrams has been very fruitful (see Brothers et al. 2015, JGR 120 in press, and references therein), but a full assessment of internal structures has been hindered by interfering off-nadir echoes from spiral troughs and other variable topography prevalent on both caps. By assembling the SHARAD radargrams into a volume and applying a 3-D imaging process (migration) borrowed from seismic processing techniques, we enhance the signal-to-noise ratio while repositioning the echoes to their proper locations, thereby unraveling the interference. As part of the process, we correct ionospheric distortions and delays of the radar echoes (Campbell et al. 2014, IEEE GRSL 11 #3). Interfaces painstakingly mapped in radargrams (e.g., the basal-unit surface, a buried chasma) are clearly visible in the 3-D volume, and new features are revealed. Structures may now be mapped through trough-rich regions, including a widespread sequence that provides corroborative evidence of recent ice ages (Smith et al. 2015, LPSC XLVI #2574). Distinctive radar signatures associated with known, partially buried craters also occur elsewhere in the volume but without surface expression. Presumably, these are fully buried craters that may provide a new means to estimate the age of the deposits. Preliminary work for Planum Australe demonstrates that the 3-D processing currently underway will illuminate deep structures that are broadly obfuscated in 2-D radargrams by a shallow scatterer (Campbell et al. 2015, LPSC XLVI #2366).

  11. Hydrogen geocorona: simultaneous optical and radar observations at Arecibo

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    Observations of the geocoronal H/sub ..cap alpha../ emission with a high resolution Fabry-Perot interferometer were made simultaneously with observations of the topside F region using the incoherent scatter radar at Arecibo, for the purpose of monitoring the exobase temperature and the hydrogen velocity distribution over half of a solar cycle. The variation of H density with solar activity agrees with that of previous observations. These observations have shown that the charge exchange reaction of H with H/sup +/ perturbs the ballistic hydrogen velocity distribution above the exobase in the fall and winter months at Arecibo. The exobase temperature is hotter than would be expected for winter solar minimum conditions due to a drop of the protonosphere base during these periods. A multi-constituent analysis of the radar data places the base of the protonosphere near 550 km in the early morning hours of the late fall and early winter. A maximum in downward ion velocities is also observed during these times. For observations near the neutral equinox, the charge exchange reaction does not significantly perturb the neutral hydrogen velocity distribution.

  12. Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Demirgian, J; Dedecker, R

    2005-01-01

    The atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer (AERI) measures the absolute infrared (IR) spectral radiance (watts per square meter per steradian per wavenumber) of the sky directly above the instrument. The spectral measurement range of the instrument is 3300 to 520 wavenumbers (cm-1) or 3-19.2 microns for the normal-range instruments and 3300 to 400 cm-1 or 3-25 microns, for the extended-range polar instruments. Spectral resolution is 1.0 cm-1. Instrument field-of-view is 1.3 degrees. A calibrated sky radiance spectrum is produced every 8 minutes in normal mode and every minute in rapid sampling mode. The actual sample scan time is 20-30 sec in rapid sampling mode with periodic gaps when the instrument is looking at the blackbodies. Rapid sampling will become available in all AERIs. Rapid sampling time will eventually be reduced to data every 20 seconds. The AERI data can be used for 1) evaluating line-by-line radiative transport codes, 2) detecting/quantifying cloud effects on ground-based measurements of infrared spectral radiance (and hence is valuable for cloud property retrievals), and 3) calculating vertical atmospheric profiles of temperature and water vapor and the detection of trace gases.

  13. Implementation of a reference interferometer for nanodetection.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Serge; Yu, Wenyan; Lu, Tao

    2014-01-01

    A thermally and mechanically stabilized fiber interferometer suited for examining ultra-high quality factor microcavities is fashioned. After assessing its free spectral range (FSR), the module is put in parallel with a fiber taper-microcavity system and then calibrated through isolating and eliminating random shifts in the laser frequency (i.e. laser jitter noise). To realize the taper-microcavity junction and to maximize the optical power that is transferred to the resonator, a single-mode optical fiber waveguide is pulled. Solutions containing polystyrene nanobeads are then prepared and flown to the microcavity in order to demonstrate the system's ability to sense binding to the surface of the microcavity. Data is post-processed via adaptive curve fitting, which allows for high-resolution measurements of the quality factor as well as the plotting of time-dependent parameters, such as resonant wavelength and split frequency shifts. By carefully inspecting steps in the time-domain response and shifting in the frequency-domain response, this instrument can quantify discrete binding events. PMID:24798706

  14. With the VLT Interferometer towards Sharper Vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-05-01

    The Nova-ESO VLTI Expertise Centre Opens in Leiden (The Netherlands) European science and technology will gain further strength when the new, front-line Nova-ESO VLTI Expertise Centre (NEVEC) opens in Leiden (The Netherlands) this week. It is a joint venture of the Netherlands Research School for Astronomy (NOVA) (itself a collaboration between the Universities of Amsterdam, Groningen, Leiden, and Utrecht) and the European Southern Observatory (ESO). It is concerned with the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI). The Inauguration of the new Centre will take place on Friday, May 26, 2000, at the Gorlaeus Laboratory (Lecture Hall no. 1), Einsteinweg 55 2333 CC Leiden; the programme is available on the web. Media representatives who would like to participate in this event and who want further details should contact the Nova Information Centre (e-mail: jacques@astro.uva.nl; Tel: +31-20-5257480 or +31-6-246 525 46). The inaugural ceremony is preceded by a scientific workshop on ground and space-based optical interferometry. NEVEC: A Technology Centre of Excellence As a joint project of NOVA and ESO, NEVEC will develop in the coming years the expertise to exploit the unique interferometric possibilities of the Very Large Telescope (VLT) - now being built on Paranal mountain in Chile. Its primary goals are the * development of instrument modeling, data reduction and calibration techniques for the VLTI; * accumulation of expertise relevant for second-generation VLTI instruments; and * education in the use of the VLTI and related matters. NEVEC will develop optical equipment, simulations and software to enable interferometry with VLT [1]. The new Center provides a strong impulse to Dutch participation in the VLTI. With direct involvement in this R&D work, the scientists at NOVA will be in the front row to do observations with this unique research facility, bound to produce top-level research and many exciting new discoveries. The ESO VLTI at Paranal ESO PR Photo 14a/00

  15. Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) Handbook

    DOE Data Explorer

    Gero, Jonathan; Hackel, Denny; Garcia, Raymond

    2005-01-01

    The atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer (AERI) is a ground-based instrument that measures the downwelling infrared radiance from the Earth’s atmosphere. The observations have broad spectral content and sufficient spectral resolution to discriminate among gaseous emitters (e.g., carbon dioxide and water vapor) and suspended matter (e.g., aerosols, water droplets, and ice crystals). These upward-looking surface observations can be used to obtain vertical profiles of tropospheric temperature and water vapor, as well as measurements of trace gases (e.g., ozone, carbon monoxide, and methane) and downwelling infrared spectral signatures of clouds and aerosols.The AERI is a passive remote sounding instrument, employing a Fourier transform spectrometer operating in the spectral range 3.3–19.2 μm (520–3020 cm-1) at an unapodized resolution of 0.5 cm-1 (max optical path difference of 1 cm). The extended-range AERI (ER-AERI) deployed in dry climates, like in Alaska, have a spectral range of 3.3–25.0 μm (400–3020 cm-1) that allow measurements in the far-infrared region. Typically, the AERI averages views of the sky over a 16-second interval and operates continuously.

  16. A preliminary discussion of Dulkyn interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tourrenc, Ph.; Balakin, A. B.

    2000-01-01

    The Dulkyn interferometer in Kazan is an active ring laser where the light propagates along two different paths. It has been developed with the idea that it could detect low frequency gravitational waves on Earth. Considering Dulkyn as a detector of periodic strains of order of hsim10^{-22} at low frequencies (10^{-3}{Hz}-10^{-5}{Hz}) we calculate that 30 W is the order of magnitude of the optical power necessary to beat the photon noise in the case of a long observation time (T=4 months) and a reasonable signal to noise ratio (r=3). We estimate that the displacement noise of the mirrors must not exceed 5 × 10^{-19}{m}/sqrt{{Hz}}. Dulkyn is also sensitive to accelerations and rotations. The acceleration noise does not seem to be troublesome (widetilde{g}lesssim 0.1{m} {s}^{-2}/sqrt{{Hz}}), but the angular velocity noise must be less than 5× 10^{-11}{s}^{-1}/sqrt{{Hz}}. The maximum strain (10^{-22}) is obtained with free (pendulous) mirrors. Out of resonance, the strain is many orders of magnitude smaller when the mirrors are fixed on a rigid support. Such a case would rule out the possibility of a detection. As a conclusion we emphasize that the Dulkyn design does not bring any decisive improvement for the detection of low frequency gravitational waves on Earth.

  17. A Quasioptical Vector Interferometer for Polarization Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuss, David T.; Wollack, Edward J.; Moseley, Harvey S.; Novak, Giles

    2005-01-01

    We present a mathematical description of a Quasioptical Vector Interferometer (QVI), a device that maps an input polarization state to an output polarization state by introducing a phase delay between two linear orthogonal components of the input polarization. The advantages of such a device over a spinning wave-plate modulator for measuring astronomical polarization in the far-infrared through millimeter are: 1. The use of small, linear motions eliminates the need for cryogenic rotational bearings, 2. The phase flexibility allows measurement of Stokes V as well as Q and U, and 3. The QVI allows for both multi-wavelength and broadband modulation. We suggest two implementations of this device as an astronomical polarization modulator. The first involves two such modulators placed in series. By adjusting the two phase delays, it is possible to use such a modulator to measure Stokes Q, U, and V for passbands that are not too large. Conversely, a single QVI may be used to measure Q and V independent of frequency. In this implementation, Stokes U must be measured by rotating the instrument. We conclude this paper by presenting initial laboratory results.

  18. Macroscopic Resonant Tunneling through Andreev Interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Jeff; Goorden, Marlies; Jacquod, Philippe

    2008-03-01

    We investigate the conductance through and the spectrum of ballistic Andreev interferometers, chaotic quantum dots attached to two s-wave superconductors, as a function of the phase difference φ between the two order parameters. A combination of analytical techniques -- random matrix theory, Nazarov's circuit theory and the trajectory-based semiclassical theory -- allows us to explore the quantum-to-classical crossover in detail. When the superconductors are not phase-biased, φ=0, we recover known results that the spectrum of the quantum dot exhibits an excitation gap, while the conductance across two normal leads carrying NN channels and connected to the dot via tunnel contacts of transparency γN is γN^2 NN. In contrast, when φ=π, the excitation gap closes and the conductance becomes G γNNN in the universal regime. In the tunneling regime, γN1, resonant contributions induce an order-of-magnitude enhancement of the conductance towards G NN in the short-wavelength limit. We relate this to the emergence of a giant peak in the density of states at the Fermi level. Our predictions are corroborated by numerical simulations.

  19. 47 CFR 80.273 - Radar standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radar standards. 80.273 Section 80.273... MARITIME SERVICES Equipment Authorization for Compulsory Ships § 80.273 Radar standards. (a) Radar... with radar must comply with the following standards (all incorporated by reference, see § 80.7):...

  20. 46 CFR 121.404 - Radars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radars. 121.404 Section 121.404 Shipping COAST GUARD... Navigation Equipment § 121.404 Radars. (a) Except as allowed by paragraph (b) of this section, all self... radar system for surface navigation with a radar screen mounted at the primary operating station....

  1. 46 CFR 121.404 - Radars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radars. 121.404 Section 121.404 Shipping COAST GUARD... Navigation Equipment § 121.404 Radars. (a) Except as allowed by paragraph (b) of this section, all self... radar system for surface navigation with a radar screen mounted at the primary operating station....

  2. 47 CFR 80.273 - Radar standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radar standards. 80.273 Section 80.273... MARITIME SERVICES Equipment Authorization for Compulsory Ships § 80.273 Radar standards. (a) Radar... with radar must comply with the following standards (all incorporated by reference, see § 80.7):...

  3. FIRE_CI2_ETL_RADAR

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-11-25

    FIRE_CI2_ETL_RADAR Project Title:  FIRE II CIRRUS Discipline:  ... Platform:  Ground Station Instrument:  Radar Spatial Coverage:  (37.06, -95.34) Spatial ... Search Guide Documents:  ETL_RADAR Guide Readme Files:  Readme ETL_RADAR (PS) ...

  4. 46 CFR 121.404 - Radars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radars. 121.404 Section 121.404 Shipping COAST GUARD... Navigation Equipment § 121.404 Radars. (a) Except as allowed by paragraph (b) of this section, all self... radar system for surface navigation with a radar screen mounted at the primary operating station....

  5. 46 CFR 121.404 - Radars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radars. 121.404 Section 121.404 Shipping COAST GUARD... Navigation Equipment § 121.404 Radars. (a) Except as allowed by paragraph (b) of this section, all self... radar system for surface navigation with a radar screen mounted at the primary operating station....

  6. 47 CFR 80.273 - Radar standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radar standards. 80.273 Section 80.273... MARITIME SERVICES Equipment Authorization for Compulsory Ships § 80.273 Radar standards. (a) Radar... with radar must comply with the following standards (all incorporated by reference, see § 80.7):...

  7. 46 CFR 121.404 - Radars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radars. 121.404 Section 121.404 Shipping COAST GUARD... Navigation Equipment § 121.404 Radars. (a) Except as allowed by paragraph (b) of this section, all self... radar system for surface navigation with a radar screen mounted at the primary operating station....

  8. Radar, Insect Population Ecology, and Pest Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, C. R. (Editor); Wolf, W. (Editor); Klassen, W. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    Discussions included: (1) the potential role of radar in insect ecology studies and pest management; (2) the potential role of radar in correlating atmospheric phenomena with insect movement; (3) the present and future radar systems; (4) program objectives required to adapt radar to insect ecology studies and pest management; and (5) the specific action items to achieve the objectives.

  9. Incoherent scatter radar and in situ and chemical release measurements of

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudeki, Erhan; Pfaff, Robert; Larsen, Miguel

    2016-07-01

    Two sounding rockets collecting DC and AC electric field and plasma density measurements were launched into the equatorial ionosphere during an active E-region sunset event being monitored by ALTAIR and IRIS (UHF and VHF) radar systems. TMA and lithium vapor releases by the rockets climbing to 180 and 330 km apogees also enabled the measurements of E- and lower F-region neutral winds during this pre-reversal enhancement period followed by spread-F activity. E-region turbulence during sunset and F-region turbulence and plasma drifts that developed subsequently were monitored by ALTAIR and IRIS (a 50 MHz two-element fixed-beam radar interferometer) systems using a combination of coherent and incoherent scatter modes. Winds, drifts, and turbulence measurements of the post sunset ionosphere conducted during this equatorial vortex experiment (EVEX) and their implications for post-sunset spread-F development will be presented and discussed.

  10. Radar backscatter modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaber, G. G.; Kozak, R. C.; Gurule, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    The terrain analysis software package was restructured and documentation was added. A program was written to test Johnson Space Center's four band scatterometer data for spurious signals data. A catalog of terrain roughness statistics and calibrated four frequency multipolarization scatterometer data is being published to support the maintenance of Death Valley as a radar backscatter calibration test site for all future airborne and spacecraft missions. Test pits were dug through sand covered terrains in the Eastern Sahara to define the depth and character of subsurface interfaces responsible for either backscatter or specular response in SIR-A imagery. Blocky sandstone bedrock surfaces at about 1 m depth were responsible for the brightest SIR-A returns. Irregular very dense CaCO3 cemented sand interfaces were responsible for intermediate grey tones. Ancient river valleys had the weakest response. Reexamination of SEASAT l-band imagery of U.S. deserts continues.

  11. Radar altimeter calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, C. R.

    1983-02-01

    The operating principles and design of a radar altimeter representative of those proposed of ERS-1 are described and geophysical influences on the measurements are discussed. General aspects of calibration are examined, and the critical areas of time and frequency resolution pointed out. A method of internal calibration of delay and backscatter coefficient, by rerouting the tramsitter signal, is described. External prelaunch calibration can be carried out by airborne trials, or using a return signal simulator. It is established that airborne calibration requires high altitudes and high speeds, and is likely to be difficult and expensive. The design of a return signal simulator is shown to be very difficult. No feasible design is identified.

  12. Ganymede: observations by radar.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, R M; Morris, G A

    1975-06-20

    Radar cross-section measurements indicate that Ganymede scatters to Earth 12 percent of the power expected from a conducting sphere of the same size and distance. This compares with 8 percent for Mars, 12 percent for Venus, 6 percent for Mercury, and about 8 percent for the asteroid Toro. Furthermore, Ganymede is considerably rougher (to the scale of the wavelength used, 12.6 centimeters) than Mars, Venus, or Mercury. Roughness is made evident in this experiment by the presence of echoes away from the center of the disk. A perfectly smooth target would reflect only a glint from the center, whereas a very rough target would reflect power from over the entire disk.

  13. The Clementine bistatic radar experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nozette, S.; Lichtenberg, C.L.; Spudis, P.; Bonner, R.; Ort, W.; Malaret, E.; Robinson, M.; Shoemaker, E.M.

    1996-01-01

    During the Clementine 1 mission, a bistatic radar experiment measured the magnitude and polarization of the radar echo versus bistatic angle, ??, for selected lunar areas. Observations of the lunar south pole yield a same- sense polarization enhancement around ?? = 0. Analysis shows that the observed enhancement is localized to the permanently shadowed regions of the lunar south pole. Radar observations of periodically solar-illuminated lunar surfaces, including the north pole, yielded no such enhancement. A probable explanation for these differences is the presence of low-loss volume scatterers, such as water ice, in the permanently shadowed region at the south pole.

  14. The Clementine bistatic radar experiment.

    PubMed

    Nozette, S; Lichtenberg, C L; Spudis, P; Bonner, R; Ort, W; Malaret, E; Robinson, M; Shoemaker, E M

    1996-11-29

    During the Clementine 1 mission, a bistatic radar experiment measured the magnitude and polarization of the radar echo versus bistatic angle, beta, for selected lunar areas. Observations of the lunar south pole yield a same-sense polarization enhancement around beta = 0. Analysis shows that the observed enhancement is localized to the permanently shadowed regions of the lunar south pole. Radar observations of periodically solar-illuminated lunar surfaces, including the north pole, yielded no such enhancement. A probable explanation for these differences is the presence of low-loss volume scatterers, such as water ice, in the permanently shadowed region at the south pole.

  15. The Clementine Bistatic Radar Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nozette, S.; Lichtenberg, C. L.; Spudis, P.; Bonner, R.; Ort, W.; Malaret, E.; Robinson, M.; Shoemaker, E. M.

    1996-01-01

    During the Clementine 1 mission, a bistatic radar experiment measured the magnitude and polarization of the radar echo versus bistatic angle, beta, for selected lunar areas. Observations of the lunar south pole yield a same-sense polarization enhancement around beta = 0. Analysis shows that the observed enhancement is localized to the permanently shadowed regions of the lunar south pole. Radar observations of periodically solar-illuminated lunar surfaces, including the north pole, yielded no such enhancement. A probable explanation for these differences is the presence of low-loss volume scatterers, such as water ice, in the permanently shadowed region at the south pole.

  16. Single-pass memory system evaluation for multiprogramming workloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conte, Thomas M.; Hwu, Wen-Mei W.

    1990-01-01

    Modern memory systems are composed of levels of cache memories, a virtual memory system, and a backing store. Varying more than a few design parameters and measuring the performance of such systems has traditionally be constrained by the high cost of simulation. Models of cache performance recently introduced reduce the cost simulation but at the expense of accuracy of performance prediction. Stack-based methods predict performance accurately using one pass over the trace for all cache sizes, but these techniques have been limited to fully-associative organizations. This paper presents a stack-based method of evaluating the performance of cache memories using a recurrence/conflict model for the miss ratio. Unlike previous work, the performance of realistic cache designs, such as direct-mapped caches, are predicted by the method. The method also includes a new approach to the problem of the effects of multiprogramming. This new technique separates the characteristics of the individual program from that of the workload. The recurrence/conflict method is shown to be practical, general, and powerful by comparing its performance to that of a popular traditional cache simulator. The authors expect that the availability of such a tool will have a large impact on future architectural studies of memory systems.

  17. Hanford single-pass reactor fuel storage basin demolition.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Jason A

    2003-02-01

    The Environmental Restoration Contractor at the Hanford Site is tasked with removing auxiliary reactor structures and leaving the remaining concrete structure surrounding each reactor core. This is referred to as Interim Safe Storage. Part of placing the F Reactor into Interim Safe Storage is the demolition of the fuel storage basin, which was deactivated in 1970 by placing debris material into the basin prior to back filling with soil. Besides the debris material (wooden floor decking, handrails, and monorail pieces), the fuel storage basin contents included the possibility of spent nuclear fuel, fuel buckets, fuel spacers, process tubes, and tongs. Demolition of the fuel storage basin offered many unique radiological control challenges and innovative approaches to demolition. This paper describes how the total effective dose equivalent and contamination were controlled, how the use of a remote operated excavator was employed to remove high-dose-rate material, and how wireless technology was used to monitor changing radiological conditions.

  18. A Study of Single Pass Ion Effects at the ALS

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, J.M.; Thomson, J.; Chao, A.W.; Heifets, S.; Minty, M.G.; Seeman, J.T.; Stupakov, G.V.; Zimmermann, F.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; /CERN

    2011-09-13

    We report the results of experiments on a 'fast beam-ion instability' at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). This ion instability, which can arise even when the ions are not trapped over multiple beam passages, will likely be important for many future accelerators. In our experiments, we filled the ALS storage ring with helium gas, raising the pressure approximately two orders of magnitude above the nominal pressure. With gaps in the bunch train large enough to avoid conventional (multi-turn) ion trapping, we observed a factor of 2-3 increase in the vertical beam size along with coherent beam oscillations which increased along the bunch train. Ion trapping has long been recognized as a potential limitation in electron storage rings. The ions, generated by beam-gas collisions, become trapped in the negative potential of the beam and accumulate over multiple beam passages. The trapped ions are then observed to cause a number of deleterious effects such as an increasing beam phase space, a broadening and shifting of the beam transverse oscillation frequencies (tunes), collective beam instabilities, and beam lifetime reductions. All of these effects are of concern for the next generation of accelerators, such as the B-factories or damping rings for future linear colliders, which will store high beam currents with closely spaced bunches and ultra-low beam emittances. One of the standard solutions used to prevent ion trapping is to include a gap in the bunch train which is long compared to the bunch spacing. In this case, the ions are first strongly-focused by the passing electron bunches and then over-focused in the gap. With a sufficiently large gap, the ions can be driven to large amplitudes where they form a diffuse halo and do not affect the beam. In this paper, we describe experiments that study a new regime of transient ion instabilities predicted to arise in future electron storage rings, and linacs with bunch trains. These future rings and linacs, which will be operated with higher beam currents, small transverse beam emittances, and long bunch trains, will use ion clearing gaps to prevent conventional ion trapping. But, while the ion clearing gap may suppress the conventional ion instabilities, it will not suppress a transient beam-ion instability where ions generated and trapped during the passage of a single train lead to a fast instability. While both conventional and transient ion instabilities have the same origin, namely ions produced by the beam, they have different manifestations and, more importantly, the new transient instability can arise even after the conventional ion instability is cured. This new instability is called the 'Fast Beam-Ion Instability' (FBII). In many future rings, the FBII is predicted to have very fast growth rates, much faster than the damping rates of existing and proposed transverse feedback systems, and thus is a potential limitation. To study the FBII, we performed experiments at the ALS, a 1.5 GeV electron storage ring. At the nominal ALS pressure of about 0.24 nTorr, the FBII is not evident. To study the instability, we intentionally added helium gas to the storage-ring vacuum system until the residual gas pressure was increased about 80 nTorr. This brought the predicted growth rate of the instability at least an order of magnitude above the growth rate of conventional multibunch instabilities driven by the RF cavities and above the damping rate of the transverse feedback system (TFB) in the ALS and, thereby, established conditions very similar to those in a future storage ring. We then filled the ring with a relatively short train of bunches, suppressing conventional ion instabilities. In the following, we will first briefly describe This paper describes the experiment and results in more detail.

  19. With the VLT Interferometer towards Sharper Vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-05-01

    The Nova-ESO VLTI Expertise Centre Opens in Leiden (The Netherlands) European science and technology will gain further strength when the new, front-line Nova-ESO VLTI Expertise Centre (NEVEC) opens in Leiden (The Netherlands) this week. It is a joint venture of the Netherlands Research School for Astronomy (NOVA) (itself a collaboration between the Universities of Amsterdam, Groningen, Leiden, and Utrecht) and the European Southern Observatory (ESO). It is concerned with the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI). The Inauguration of the new Centre will take place on Friday, May 26, 2000, at the Gorlaeus Laboratory (Lecture Hall no. 1), Einsteinweg 55 2333 CC Leiden; the programme is available on the web. Media representatives who would like to participate in this event and who want further details should contact the Nova Information Centre (e-mail: jacques@astro.uva.nl; Tel: +31-20-5257480 or +31-6-246 525 46). The inaugural ceremony is preceded by a scientific workshop on ground and space-based optical interferometry. NEVEC: A Technology Centre of Excellence As a joint project of NOVA and ESO, NEVEC will develop in the coming years the expertise to exploit the unique interferometric possibilities of the Very Large Telescope (VLT) - now being built on Paranal mountain in Chile. Its primary goals are the * development of instrument modeling, data reduction and calibration techniques for the VLTI; * accumulation of expertise relevant for second-generation VLTI instruments; and * education in the use of the VLTI and related matters. NEVEC will develop optical equipment, simulations and software to enable interferometry with VLT [1]. The new Center provides a strong impulse to Dutch participation in the VLTI. With direct involvement in this R&D work, the scientists at NOVA will be in the front row to do observations with this unique research facility, bound to produce top-level research and many exciting new discoveries. The ESO VLTI at Paranal ESO PR Photo 14a/00

  20. Historical aspects of radar atmospheric dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kato, Susumu

    1989-01-01

    A review of the history of radar techniques which have been applied to atmospheric observation is given. The author starts with ionosphere observation with the ionosonde, symbolizing as it does the earliest history of radar observation, and proceeds to later developments in radar observation such as the use of partial reflection, meteor, and incoherent scatter radars. Mesosphere stratosphere troposphere (MST) radars are discussed in terms of lower atmosphere observation.

  1. Fly eye radar or micro-radar sensor technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molchanov, Pavlo; Asmolova, Olga

    2014-05-01

    To compensate for its eye's inability to point its eye at a target, the fly's eye consists of multiple angularly spaced sensors giving the fly the wide-area visual coverage it needs to detect and avoid the threats around him. Based on a similar concept a revolutionary new micro-radar sensor technology is proposed for detecting and tracking ground and/or airborne low profile low altitude targets in harsh urban environments. Distributed along a border or around a protected object (military facility and buildings, camp, stadium) small size, low power unattended radar sensors can be used for target detection and tracking, threat warning, pre-shot sniper protection and provides effective support for homeland security. In addition it can provide 3D recognition and targets classification due to its use of five orders more pulses than any scanning radar to each space point, by using few points of view, diversity signals and intelligent processing. The application of an array of directional antennas eliminates the need for a mechanical scanning antenna or phase processor. It radically decreases radar size and increases bearing accuracy several folds. The proposed micro-radar sensors can be easy connected to one or several operators by point-to-point invisible protected communication. The directional antennas have higher gain, can be multi-frequency and connected to a multi-functional network. Fly eye micro-radars are inexpensive, can be expendable and will reduce cost of defense.

  2. "First Light" for the VLT Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-03-01

    Excellent Fringes From Bright Stars Prove VLTI Concept Summary Following the "First Light" for the fourth of the 8.2-m telescopes of the VLT Observatory on Paranal in September 2000, ESO scientists and engineers have just successfully accomplished the next major step of this large project. On March 17, 2001, "First Fringes" were obtained with the VLT Interferometer (VLTI) - this important event corresponds to the "First Light" for an astronomical telescope. At the VLTI, it occurred when the infrared light from the bright star Sirius was captured by two small telescopes and the two beams were successfully combined in the subterranean Interferometric Laboratory to form the typical pattern of dark and bright lines known as " interferometric fringes ". This proves the success of the robust VLTI concept, in particular of the "Delay Line". On the next night, the VLTI was used to perform a scientific measurement of the angular diameter of another comparatively bright star, Alpha Hydrae ( Alphard ); it was found to be 0.00929±0.00017 arcsec . This corresponds to the angular distance between the two headlights of a car as seen from a distance of approx. 35,000 kilometres. The excellent result was obtained during a series of observations, each lasting 2 minutes, and fully confirming the impressive predicted abilities of the VLTI . This first observation with the VLTI is a monumental technological achievement, especially in terms of accuracy and stability . It crucially depends on the proper combination and functioning of a large number of individual opto-mechnical and electronic elements. This includes the test telescopes that capture the starlight, continuous and extremely precise adjustment of the various mirrors that deflect the light beams as well as the automatic positioning and motion of the Delay Line carriages and, not least, the optimal tuning of the VLT INterferometer Commissionning Instrument (VINCI). These initial observations prove the overall concept for the

  3. NASA Radar Images Asteroid Toutatis

    NASA Video Gallery

    This 64-frame movie of asteroid Toutatis was generated from data by Goldstone's Solar System Radar on Dec. 12 and 13, 2012. In the movie clips, the rotation of the asteroid appears faster than it o...

  4. Ground Penetrating Radar, Barrow, Alaska

    DOE Data Explorer

    John Peterson

    2015-03-06

    This is 500 MHz Ground Penetrating Radar collected along the AB Line in Intensive Site 1 beginning in October 2012 and collected along L2 in Intensive Site 0 beginning in September 2011. Both continue to the present.

  5. Radar Meteor Observations in Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elford, W. G.

    1993-01-01

    During the last decade extensive meteor studies have been carried out in Australia using radio systems operating at frequencies between 2 and 30 MHz. Part of this program has been a deliberate effort to detect meteors above the "echo ceiling" of about 105 km associated with radars operating above 30 MHz. In fact the echo ceiling has been raised to 140 km with a dramatic increase in meteor flux [1]. The other aspect of these studies has been the use a low frequency (6-30MHz) surveillance radar to detect and record meteors over the horizon, using backscatter via ionospheric F-region. The power of the radar is such that the micrometeoroid limit is being approached [2]. The surveillance radar has confirmed the new estimates of meteor flux and extended to a mass limit of 0.2 microgram.

  6. Dual interferometer system for measuring index of refraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, Eric Peter

    The optical power of a lens is determined by the surface curvature and the refractive index, n. Knowledge of the index is required for accurate lens design models and for examining material variations from sample to sample. The refractive index of glass can be accurately measured using a prism spectrometer, but measuring the index of soft contact lens materials presents many challenges. These materials are non-rigid, thin, and must remain hydrated in a saline solution during testing. Clearly an alternative to a prism spectrometer must be used to accurately measure index. A Dual Interferometer System has been designed, built and characterized as a novel method for measuring the refractive index of transparent optical materials, including soft contact lens materials. The first interferometer is a Low Coherence Interferometer in a Twyman-Green configuration with a scanning reference mirror. The contact lens material sample is placed in a measurement cuvette, where it remains hydrated. By measuring the locations of the multiple optical interfaces, the physical thickness t of the material is measured. A new algorithm has been developed for processing the low coherence signals obtained from the reflection at each optical interface. The second interferometer is a Mach-Zehnder interferometer with a tunable HeNe laser light source. This interferometer measures the optical path length (OPL) of the test sample in the cuvette in transmission as a function of five wavelengths in the visible spectrum. This is done using phase-shifting interferometry. Multiple thickness regions are used to solve 2pi phase ambiguities in the OPL. The outputs of the two interferometers are combined to determine the refractive index as a function of wavelength: n(lambda) = OPL(lambda)/t. Since both t and OPL are measured using a detector array, n is measured at hundreds of thousands of data points. A measurement accuracy of 0.0001 in refractive index is achieved with this new instrument, which is

  7. Advanced Borehole Radar for Hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, M.

    2014-12-01

    Ground Penetrating Radar is a useful tool for monitoring the hydrogeological environment. We have developed GPR systems which can be applied to these purposes, and we will demonstrate examples borehole radar measurements. In order to have longer radar detection range, frequency lower than100MHz has been normally adopted in borehole radar. Typical subsurface fractures of our interests have a few mm aperture and radar resolution is much poorer than a few cm in this frequency range. We are proposing and demonstrating to use radar polarimetry to solve this problem. We have demonstrated that a full-polarimetry borehole radar can be used for characterization of subsurface fractures. Together with signal processing for antenna characteristic compensation to equalize the signal by a dipole antenna and slot antennas, we could demonstrate that polarimetric borehole radar can estimate the surface roughness of subsurface fractures, We believe the surface roughness is closely related to water permeability through the fractures. We then developed a directional borehole radar, which uses optical field sensor. A dipole antenna in a borehole has omni-directional radiation pattern, and we cannot get azimuthal information about the scatterers. We use multiple dipole antennas set around the borehole axis, and from the phase differences, we can estimate the 3-diemnational orientation of subsurface structures. We are using optical electric field sensor for receiver of borehole radar. This is a passive sensor and connected only with optical fibers and does not require any electric power supply to operate the receiver. It has two major advantages; the first one is that the receiver can be electrically isolated from other parts, and wave coupling to a logging cable is avoided. Then, secondary, it can operate for a long time, because it does not require battery installed inside the system. It makes it possible to set sensors in fixed positions to monitor the change of environmental

  8. SMAP RADAR Calibration and Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, R. D.; Jaruwatanadilok, S.; Chaubel, M. J.; Spencer, M.; Chan, S. F.; Chen, C. W.; Fore, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission launched on Jan 31, 2015. The mission employs L-band radar and radiometer measurements to estimate soil moisture with 4% volumetric accuracy at a resolution of 10 km, and freeze-thaw state at a resolution of 1-3 km. Immediately following launch, there was a three month instrument checkout period, followed by six months of level 1 (L1) calibration and validation. In this presentation, we will discuss the calibration and validation activities and results for the L1 radar data. Early SMAP radar data were used to check commanded timing parameters, and to work out issues in the low- and high-resolution radar processors. From April 3-13 the radar collected receive only mode data to conduct a survey of RFI sources. Analysis of the RFI environment led to a preferred operating frequency. The RFI survey data were also used to validate noise subtraction and scaling operations in the radar processors. Normal radar operations resumed on April 13. All radar data were examined closely for image quality and calibration issues which led to improvements in the radar data products for the beta release at the end of July. Radar data were used to determine and correct for small biases in the reported spacecraft attitude. Geo-location was validated against coastline positions and the known positions of corner reflectors. Residual errors at the time of the beta release are about 350 m. Intra-swath biases in the high-resolution backscatter images are reduced to less than 0.3 dB for all polarizations. Radiometric cross-calibration with Aquarius was performed using areas of the Amazon rain forest. Cross-calibration was also examined using ocean data from the low-resolution processor and comparing with the Aquarius wind model function. Using all a-priori calibration constants provided good results with co-polarized measurements matching to better than 1 dB, and cross-polarized measurements matching to about 1 dB in the beta release. During the

  9. Dual-domain point diffraction interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Naulleau, Patrick P.; Goldberg, Kenneth Alan

    2000-01-01

    A hybrid spatial/temporal-domain point diffraction interferometer (referred to as the dual-domain PS/PDI) that is capable of suppressing the scattered-reference-light noise that hinders the conventional PS/PDI is provided. The dual-domain PS/PDI combines the separate noise-suppression capabilities of the widely-used phase-shifting and Fourier-transform fringe pattern analysis methods. The dual-domain PS/PDI relies on both a more restrictive implementation of the image plane PS/PDI mask and a new analysis method to be applied to the interferograms generated and recorded by the modified PS/PDI. The more restrictive PS/PDI mask guarantees the elimination of spatial-frequency crosstalk between the signal and the scattered-light noise arising from scattered-reference-light interfering with the test beam. The new dual-domain analysis method is then used to eliminate scattered-light noise arising from both the scattered-reference-light interfering with the test beam and the scattered-reference-light interfering with the "true" pinhole-diffracted reference light. The dual-domain analysis method has also been demonstrated to provide performance enhancement when using the non-optimized standard PS/PDI design. The dual-domain PS/PDI is essentially a three-tiered filtering system composed of lowpass spatial-filtering the test-beam electric field using the more restrictive PS/PDI mask, bandpass spatial-filtering the individual interferogram irradiance frames making up the phase-shifting series, and bandpass temporal-filtering the phase-shifting series as a whole.

  10. The NASA Polarimetric Radar (NPOL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, Walter A.; Wolff, David B.

    2013-01-01

    Characteristics of the NASA NPOL S-band dual-polarimetric radar are presented including its operating characteristics, field configuration, scanning capabilities and calibration approaches. Examples of precipitation science data collections conducted using various scan types, and associated products, are presented for different convective system types and previous field campaign deployments. Finally, the NASA NPOL radar location is depicted in its home base configuration within the greater Wallops Flight Facility precipitation research array supporting NASA Global Precipitation Measurement Mission ground validation.

  11. Superresolution and Synthetic Aperture Radar

    SciTech Connect

    DICKEY,FRED M.; ROMERO,LOUIS; DOERRY,ARMIN W.

    2001-05-01

    Superresolution concepts offer the potential of resolution beyond the classical limit. This great promise has not generally been realized. In this study we investigate the potential application of superresolution concepts to synthetic aperture radar. The analytical basis for superresolution theory is discussed. The application of the concept to synthetic aperture radar is investigated as an operator inversion problem. Generally, the operator inversion problem is ill posed. A criterion for judging superresolution processing of an image is presented.

  12. The First Italian Radar Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delbo, M.; di Martino, M.; Saba, L.; Montebugnoli, S.; Righini, S.; Poppi, S.; Orlati, A.; Ostro, S.; Cevolani, G.

    Radar is a uniquely powerful source of information about physical properties and orbits of solar system bodies, such as sizes, shapes, albedos, surface textures and bulk features. We discuss a project which aims at using the Sardinia Radio Telescope (SRT) as radar system for physical studies of planetary targets, and in particular of near-Earth Aster- oids (NEAs). Within the feasibility study of this project, we discuss the results of the first italian radar experiment, which has been performed in bistatic mode with the joint collabo- ration Goldstone (California)-Medicina (Bologna). We have successfully observed the NEA 1998 WT24 on December 2001. Besides the physical study of 1998 WT24, the goals of this project were to test the existing technical facilities and capabilities for crucial radar follow-up observations of near- Earth Asteroids and thus to transfer the acquired skills to SRT radar project. The case and future prospects for an SRT based planetary radar project in Europe is reviewed.

  13. Hydrologic applications of weather radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Dong-Jun; Habib, Emad; Andrieu, Hervé; Morin, Efrat

    2015-12-01

    By providing high-resolution quantitative precipitation information (QPI), weather radars have revolutionized hydrology in the last two decades. With the aid of GIS technology, radar-based quantitative precipitation estimates (QPE) have enabled routine high-resolution hydrologic modeling in many parts of the world. Given the ever-increasing need for higher-resolution hydrologic and water resources information for a wide range of applications, one may expect that the use of weather radar will only grow. Despite the tremendous progress, a number of significant scientific, technological and engineering challenges remain to realize its potential. New challenges are also emerging as new areas of applications are discovered, explored and pursued. The purpose of this special issue is to provide the readership with some of the latest advances, lessons learned, experiences gained, and science issues and challenges related to hydrologic applications of weather radar. The special issue features 20 contributions on various topics which reflect the increasing diversity as well as the areas of focus in radar hydrology today. The contributions may be grouped as follows: Radar QPE (Kwon et al.; Hall et al.; Chen and Chandrasekar; Seo and Krajewski; Sandford).

  14. Coded continuous wave meteor radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vierinen, Juha; Chau, Jorge L.; Pfeffer, Nico; Clahsen, Matthias; Stober, Gunter

    2016-03-01

    The concept of a coded continuous wave specular meteor radar (SMR) is described. The radar uses a continuously transmitted pseudorandom phase-modulated waveform, which has several advantages compared to conventional pulsed SMRs. The coding avoids range and Doppler aliasing, which are in some cases problematic with pulsed radars. Continuous transmissions maximize pulse compression gain, allowing operation at lower peak power than a pulsed system. With continuous coding, the temporal and spectral resolution are not dependent on the transmit waveform and they can be fairly flexibly changed after performing a measurement. The low signal-to-noise ratio before pulse compression, combined with independent pseudorandom transmit waveforms, allows multiple geographically separated transmitters to be used in the same frequency band simultaneously without significantly interfering with each other. Because the same frequency band can be used by multiple transmitters, the same interferometric receiver antennas can be used to receive multiple transmitters at the same time. The principles of the signal processing are discussed, in addition to discussion of several practical ways to increase computation speed, and how to optimally detect meteor echoes. Measurements from a campaign performed with a coded continuous wave SMR are shown and compared with two standard pulsed SMR measurements. The type of meteor radar described in this paper would be suited for use in a large-scale multi-static network of meteor radar transmitters and receivers. Such a system would be useful for increasing the number of meteor detections to obtain improved meteor radar data products.

  15. Analysis of Coherent Scatter Observations collected with the new Penn State VHF Meteor Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbina, J. V.; Hackett, A. L.; Dyrud, L. P.; Fentzke, J.

    2012-12-01

    The Penn State University 50 MHz radar interferometer has been installed near Penn State campus, University Park, Pennsylvania (77.97°W, 40.70°N), to make continuous meteor observations since July 5, 2012. The antenna beam is pointed to the north in the magnetic meridian plane. In azimuth the half-power beam-width is about 3.4o, while in elevation the gain pattern peaked in the direction perpendicular to the geomagnetic field at E-region heights at about 18o elevation angle. The system uses two phased sub-arrays of four 24-element COCO strings with an east-west separation of 50 m. On transmission both sub-arrays are excited simultaneously and oriented perpendicular to the Earth's geomagnetic field lines at E- region heights. On reception each sub-array is sampled independently for interferometric detection of the scattering regions. The new radar operates at a peak power of about 30 kW and can detect all three types of meteor reflections: 1) the commonly used specular meteor trails; 2) non-specular trails, which result from plasma instability and turbulence generated field aligned irregularities (FAI); and 3) meteor head-echoes, which are a radar target moving at the speed of the meteoroid. In this paper, we present first observational trends of specular, non- specular, and head-echoes collected with the new system and discuss sampling biases of each meteor observation technique. We also present the general characteristics of continuous measurements of E-region and F-region coherent echoes using this modern radar system and compare them with coherent radar events observed at other geographic mid-latitude radar stations.

  16. Fiber optic Mach-Zehnder interferometer for research of optical material properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultanov, Albert H.; Salikhov, Aydar I.

    2009-12-01

    For carrying out of measurement of refractive index of new materials and research of nonlinear effects use of the Mach-Zehnder interferometer is offered. In action principles of all interferometers are identical, they differ only in the way of coherent waves reception. Mach-Zehnder interferometer is one of Zhamen interferometer versions. Advantage given interferometer is that the distance between ways of distribution of coherent waves can be made as much as big. In given article results on stand working out on base of Mach-Zehnder interferometer for exact definition of refractive index of optical materials are presented.

  17. Conceptual design of a rotating parallel-mirror-pair interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Qisheng; Xiangli, Bin; Fu, Qiang; Qian, Lulu; Li, Yang; Tan, Zheng

    2014-02-01

    In the field of Fourier-transform spectroscopy, tilt and shearing problems caused by the moving components in a translational type of spectrometer reduce the quality of the interferogram dramatically. While, the spectrometer based on rotational motion can avoid these problems. In this paper, a novel rotational type of interferometer, called rotating parallel-mirror-pair interferometer (RPMPI), is presented. Its principle and properties are studied. This interferometer consists of one beam splitter, two fixed flat mirrors, and one rotating wedged parallel-mirror-pair (PMP). The optical path difference (OPD) is obtained by the rotational motion of the PMP. Factors that affect the maximum OPD include the wedged angle of the rotating PMP, the distance between the two parallel mirrors, the direction of the incident ray, and the range of rotating angle. This interferometer can operate either in swinging mode or continuous rotary mode depending on the range of the rotating angle. In swinging mode, the OPD function is linear. In continuous rotary mode, the sampling efficiency is higher and it can operate as an ultra rapid scanning interferometer.

  18. Influence of noise on a magnetically sensitive atom interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desavage, Sara A.; Srinivasan, Arvind; Davis, Jon P.; Zimmermann, Matthias; Efremov, Maxim; Rasel, Ernst; Schleich, Wolfgang; Welch, George R.; Mimih, Jihane; Narducci, Frank A.

    2016-05-01

    The inherent sensitivity of atom interferometer sensors has been well established and much progress has been made in the development of atom interferometer gravimeters, gravity gradiometers and gyroscopes e.g.. These interferometers use the ``clock'' transition which is magnetically insensitive. When considering interferometers with magnetically sensitive transitions operating in unshielded environments additional noise sources must be considered. The frequency content of the noise from these sources can vary dramatically, depending on the environment. In this talk, we will discuss these various noise sources and their impact on the performance of magnetically sensitive interferometers. Specifically, we identify three ways by which noise can be introduced into the system and their effect: fluctuating detuning, leading to a randomness of the interference pattern; fluctuating Rabi frequency, leading to pulse errors; non-uniformity of the magnetic field across the atom cloud, which can, under certain circumstances lead to a complete washing out of the interference pattern. Implications for our current experiments will be discussed. Sponsored by the Office of Naval Research.

  19. Polarizing optical interferometer having a dual use optical element

    DOEpatents

    Kotidis, Petros A.; Woodroffe, Jaime A.; Rostler, Peter S.

    1995-01-01

    A system for non-destructively measuring an object and controlling industrial processes in response to the measurement is disclosed in which an impulse laser generates a plurality of sound waves over timed increments in an object. A polarizing interferometer is used to measure surface movement of the object caused by the sound waves and sensed by phase shifts in the signal beam. A photon multiplier senses the phase shift and develops an electrical signal. A signal conditioning arrangement modifies the electrical signals to generate an average signal correlated to the sound waves which in turn is correlated to a physical or metallurgical property of the object, such as temperature, which property may then be used to control the process. External, random vibrations of the workpiece are utilized to develop discernible signals which can be sensed in the interferometer by only one photon multiplier. In addition the interferometer includes an arrangement for optimizing its sensitivity so that movement attributed to various waves can be detected in opaque objects. The interferometer also includes a mechanism for sensing objects with rough surfaces which produce speckle light patterns. Finally the interferometer per se, with the addition of a second photon multiplier is capable of accurately recording beam length distance differences with only one reading.

  20. Polarizing optical interferometer having a dual use optical element

    DOEpatents

    Kotidis, P.A.; Woodroffe, J.A.; Rostler, P.S.

    1995-04-04

    A system for nondestructively measuring an object and controlling industrial processes in response to the measurement is disclosed in which an impulse laser generates a plurality of sound waves over timed increments in an object. A polarizing interferometer is used to measure surface movement of the object caused by the sound waves and sensed by phase shifts in the signal beam. A photon multiplier senses the phase shift and develops an electrical signal. A signal conditioning arrangement modifies the electrical signals to generate an average signal correlated to the sound waves which in turn is correlated to a physical or metallurgical property of the object, such as temperature, which property may then be used to control the process. External, random vibrations of the workpiece are utilized to develop discernible signals which can be sensed in the interferometer by only one photon multiplier. In addition the interferometer includes an arrangement for optimizing its sensitivity so that movement attributed to various waves can be detected in opaque objects. The interferometer also includes a mechanism for sensing objects with rough surfaces which produce speckle light patterns. Finally the interferometer per se, with the addition of a second photon multiplier is capable of accurately recording beam length distance differences with only one reading. 38 figures.