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Sample records for singly charged peptide

  1. Enhanced identification of peptides lacking basic residues by LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis of singly charged peptides.

    PubMed

    Biniossek, Martin L; Schilling, Oliver

    2012-05-01

    Peptide sequences lacking basic residues (arginine, lysine, or histidine, referred to as "base-less") are of particular importance in proteomic experiments targeting protein C-termini or employing nontryptic proteases such as GluC or chymotrypsin. We demonstrate enhanced identification of base-less peptides by focused analysis of singly charged precursors in liquid chromatography (LC) electrospray ionization (ESI) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Singly charged precursors are often excluded from fragmentation and sequence analysis in LC-MS/MS. We generated different pools of base-less and base-containing peptides by tryptic and nontryptic digestion of bacterial proteomes. Focused LC-MS/MS analysis of singly charged precursor ions yielded predominantly base-less peptide identifications. Similar numbers of base-less peptides were identified by LC-MS/M Sanalysis targeting multiply charged precursors. There was little redundancy between the base-less sequences derived by both MS/MS schemes. In the present experimental outcome, additional LC-MS/MS analysis of singly charged precursors substantially increased the identification rate of base-less sequences derived from multiply charged precursors. In conclusion, LC-MS/MS based identification of base-less peptides is substantially enhanced by additional focused analysis of singly charged precursors.

  2. Fragmentation of singly, doubly, and triply charged hydrogen deficient peptide radical cations in infrared multiphoton dissociation and electron induced dissociation.

    PubMed

    Kalli, Anastasia; Hess, Sonja

    2012-02-01

    Gas phase fragmentation of hydrogen deficient peptide radical cations continues to be an active area of research. While collision induced dissociation (CID) of singly charged species is widely examined, dissociation channels of singly and multiply charged radical cations in infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) and electron induced dissociation (EID) have not been, so far, investigated. Here, we report on the gas phase dissociation of singly, doubly and triply charged hydrogen deficient peptide radicals, [M + nH]((n+1)+·) (n=0, 1, 2), in MS(3) IRMPD and EID and compare the observed fragmentation pathways to those obtained in MS(3) CID. Backbone fragmentation in MS(3) IRMPD and EID was highly dependent on the charge state of the radical precursor ions, whereas amino acid side chain cleavages were largely independent of the charge state selected for fragmentation. Cleavages at aromatic amino acids, either through side chain loss or backbone fragmentation, were significantly enhanced over other dissociation channels. For singly charged species, the MS(3) IRMPD and EID spectra were mainly governed by radical-driven dissociation. Fragmentation of doubly and triply charged radical cations proceeded through both radical- and charge-driven processes, resulting in the formation of a wide range of backbone product ions including, a-, b-, c-, y-, x-, and z-type. While similarities existed between MS(3) CID, IRMPD, and EID of the same species, several backbone product ions and side chain losses were unique for each activation method. Furthermore, dominant dissociation pathways in each spectrum were dependent on ion activation method, amino acid composition, and charge state selected for fragmentation.

  3. Adhesion through single peptide aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Aubin-Tam, Marie-Eve; Appleyard, David C.; Ferrari, Enrico; Garbin, Valeria; Fadiran, Oluwatimilehin O.; Kunkel, Jacquelyn; Lang, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Aptamer and antibody mediated adhesion is central to biological function and valuable in the engineering of “lab on a chip” devices. Single molecule force spectroscopy using optical tweezers enables direct non-equilibrium measurement of these non-covalent interactions for three peptide aptamers selected for glass, polystyrene, and carbon nanotubes. A comprehensive examination of the strong attachment between anti-fluorescein 4-4-20 and fluorescein was also carried out using the same assay. Bond lifetime, barrier width, and free energy of activation are extracted from unbinding histogram data using three single molecule pulling models. The evaluated aptamers appear to adhere stronger than the fluorescein antibody under no- and low-load conditions, yet weaker than antibodies at loads above ~25pN. Comparison to force spectroscopy data of other biological linkages shows the diversity of load dependent binding and provides insight into linkages used in biological processes and those designed for engineered systems. PMID:20795685

  4. Electron Transport in Short Peptide Single Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Jing; Brisendine, Joseph; Ng, Fay; Nuckolls, Colin; Koder, Ronald; Venkarataman, Latha

    We present a study of the electron transport through a series of short peptides using scanning tunneling microscope-based break junction method. Our work is motivated by the need to gain a better understanding of how various levels of protein structure contribute to the remarkable capacity of proteins to transport charge in biophysical processes such as respiration and photosynthesis. We focus here on short mono, di and tri-peptides, and probe their conductance when bound to gold electrodes in a native buffer environment. We first show that these peptides can bind to gold through amine, carboxyl, thiol and methyl-sulfide termini. We then focus on two systems (glycine and alanine) and show that their conductance decays faster than alkanes terminated by the same linkers. Importantly, our results show that the peptide bond is less conductive than a sigma carbon-carbon bond. This work was supported in part by NSF-DMR 1507440.

  5. Influence of turn (or fold) and local charge in fragmentation of the peptide analogue molecule CH3CO-Gly-NH2 following single-photon VUV (118.22 nm) ionization.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Atanu; Bernstein, Elliot R

    2011-10-01

    The radical cationic reactivity of the peptide analogue molecule CH(3)CO-Gly-NH(2) is addressed both experimentally and theoretically. The radical cation intermediate of CH(3)CO-Gly-NH(2) is created by single-photon ionization of this molecule at 118.22 nm (~10.5 eV). The two most stable conformers (C(7) and C(5)) of this molecule exhibit different folds along the backbone: the C(7) conformer has a γ-turn structure, and the C(5) conformer has a β-strand structure. The experimental results show that the radical cation intermediate of CH(3)CO-Gly-NH(2) dissociates and generates a fragment-ion signal at 73 amu that is observed through TOFMS. Theoretical results show how the fragment-ion signal at 73 amu is generated by only one conformer of CH(3)CO-Gly-NH(2) (C(7)) and how local charge and specific hydrogen bonding in the molecule influence fragmentation of the radical cation intermediate of CH(3)CO-Gly-NH(2). The specific fold of the molecule controls fragmentation of this reactive radical cation intermediate. Whereas the radical cation of the C(7) conformer dissociates through a hydrogen-transfer mechanism followed by HNCO elimination, the radical cation of the C(5) conformer does not dissociate at all. CASSCF calculations show that positive charge in the radical cationic C(7) conformer is localized at the NH(2)CO moiety of the molecular ion. This site-specific localization of the positive charge enhances the acidity of the terminal NH(2) group, facilitating hydrogen transfer from the NH(2) to the COCH(3) end of the molecular ion. Positive charge in the C(5) conformer of the CH(3)CO-Gly-NH(2) radical cation is, however, localized at the COCH(3) end of the molecular ion, and this conformer does not have enough energy to surmount the energy barrier to dissociation on the ion potential energy surface. CASSCF results show that conformation-specific localization of charge in the CH(3)CO-Gly-NH(2) molecular ion occurs as a result of the different hydrogen

  6. Effects of cations on protein and peptide charging in electrospray ionization from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Susa, Anna C; Mortensen, Daniel N; Williams, Evan R

    2014-06-01

    The effects of eight different cations with ionic radii between 69 and 337 pm on the charging of peptides and proteins with electrospray ionization from aqueous acetate salt solutions are reported. Significant adduction occurs for all cations except NH4(+), and the average protein charge is lower when formed from solutions containing salts compared with solutions without salts added. Circular dichroism and ion mobility results show the protein conformations are different in pure water compared with salt solutions, which likely affects the extent of charging. The average charge of protein and peptide ions formed from solutions with Li(+) and Cs(+), which have Gibbs solvation free energies (GSFEs) that differ by 225 kJ/mol, is similar. Lower charge states are typically formed from solutions with tetramethylammonium and tetraethylammonium that have lower GSFE values. Loss of the larger cations that have the lowest GSFEs is facile when adducted protein ions are collisionally activated, resulting in the formation of lower analyte charge states. This reaction pathway provides a route to produce abundant singly protonated protein ions under native mass spectrometry conditions. The average protein and peptide charge with NH4(+) is nearly the same as that with Rb(+) and K(+), cations with similar GSFE and ionic radii. This indicates that proton transfer from NH4(+) to proteins plays an insignificant role in the extent of protein charging in native mass spectrometry.

  7. Correlation of charge, hydrophobicity, and structure with antimicrobial activity of S1 and MIRIAM peptides.

    PubMed

    Leptihn, Sebastian; Har, Jia Yi; Wohland, Thorsten; Ding, Jeak Ling

    2010-11-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are key elements of the innate immune system. Many of them interact with membranes of bacteria leading to perturbation of the lipid bilayer and eventually to inactivation of the pathogen. The emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria has necessitated innovations of new and more powerful classes of antimicrobials. Here we present the in-depth study of an antimicrobial peptide, MIRIAM, derived from Sushi1 (S1), a well-characterized peptide from the horseshoe crab. MIRIAM interacts strongly with negatively charged lipids, forming an α-helical structure. MIRIAM was found to neutralize LPS and kill Gram-negative bacteria with high efficiency, while not releasing LPS. The promising therapeutic potential of MIRIAM is shown by hemolytic assays, which demonstrate that eukaryotic membranes are unaffected at bactericidal concentrations. Nanoparticle-conjugated MIRIAM used in single-molecule fluorescence and electron microscopy experiments showed that MIRIAM targets bacterial membranes to kill bacteria similarly to parental S1. Furthermore, fragments derived from MIRIAM and S1 provided insights on their molecular mechanisms of action, in particular, the relationships of functional motifs comprised by charge, hydrophobicity, and structure within each peptide. We conclude that the combination of charge, hydrophobicity, and length of the peptide is important. A close interaction of amino acids in a single molecule in a carefully balanced ensemble of sequence position and secondary structure is crucial.

  8. Basophile: Accurate Fragment Charge State Prediction Improves Peptide Identification Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Dong; Dasari, Surendra; Chambers, Matthew C.; Holman, Jerry D.; Chen, Kan; Liebler, Daniel; Orton, Daniel J.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Chung, Chang Y.; Rose, Kristie L.; Tabb, David L.

    2013-03-07

    In shotgun proteomics, database search algorithms rely on fragmentation models to predict fragment ions that should be observed for a given peptide sequence. The most widely used strategy (Naive model) is oversimplified, cleaving all peptide bonds with equal probability to produce fragments of all charges below that of the precursor ion. More accurate models, based on fragmentation simulation, are too computationally intensive for on-the-fly use in database search algorithms. We have created an ordinal-regression-based model called Basophile that takes fragment size and basic residue distribution into account when determining the charge retention during CID/higher-energy collision induced dissociation (HCD) of charged peptides. This model improves the accuracy of predictions by reducing the number of unnecessary fragments that are routinely predicted for highly-charged precursors. Basophile increased the identification rates by 26% (on average) over the Naive model, when analyzing triply-charged precursors from ion trap data. Basophile achieves simplicity and speed by solving the prediction problem with an ordinal regression equation, which can be incorporated into any database search software for shotgun proteomic identification.

  9. Statistical characterization of the charge state and residue dependence of low-energy CID peptide dissociation patterns.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yingying; Triscari, Joseph M; Tseng, George C; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Lipton, Mary S; Smith, Richard D; Wysocki, Vicki H

    2005-09-15

    Data mining was performed on 28 330 unique peptide tandem mass spectra for which sequences were assigned with high confidence. By dividing the spectra into different sets based on structural features and charge states of the corresponding peptides, chemical interactions involved in promoting specific cleavage patterns in gas-phase peptides were characterized. Pairwise fragmentation maps describing cleavages at all Xxx-Zzz residue combinations for b and y ions reveal that the difference in basicity between Arg and Lys results in different dissociation patterns for singly charged Arg- and Lys-ending tryptic peptides. While one dominant protonation form (proton localized) exists for Arg-ending peptides, a heterogeneous population of different protonated forms or more facile interconversion of protonated forms (proton partially mobile) exists for Lys-ending peptides. Cleavage C-terminal to acidic residues dominates spectra from singly charged peptides that have a localized proton and cleavage N-terminal to Pro dominates those that have a mobile or partially mobile proton. When Pro is absent from peptides that have a mobile or partially mobile proton, cleavage at each peptide bond becomes much more prominent. Whether the above patterns can be found in b ions, y ions, or both depends on the location of the proton holder(s) in multiply protonated peptides. Enhanced cleavages C-terminal to branched aliphatic residues (Ile, Val, Leu) are observed in both b and y ions from peptides that have a mobile proton, as well as in y ions from peptides that have a partially mobile proton; enhanced cleavages N-terminal to these residues are observed in b ions from peptides that have a partially mobile proton. Statistical tools have been designed to visualize the fragmentation maps and measure the similarity between them. The pairwise cleavage patterns observed expand our knowledge of peptide gas-phase fragmentation behaviors and may be useful in algorithm development that employs

  10. Basophile: Accurate Fragment Charge State Prediction Improves Peptide Identification Rates

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Dong; Dasari, Surendra; Chambers, Matthew C.; Holman, Jerry D.; Chen, Kan; Liebler, Daniel; Orton, Daniel J.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Chung, Chang Y.; et al

    2013-03-07

    In shotgun proteomics, database search algorithms rely on fragmentation models to predict fragment ions that should be observed for a given peptide sequence. The most widely used strategy (Naive model) is oversimplified, cleaving all peptide bonds with equal probability to produce fragments of all charges below that of the precursor ion. More accurate models, based on fragmentation simulation, are too computationally intensive for on-the-fly use in database search algorithms. We have created an ordinal-regression-based model called Basophile that takes fragment size and basic residue distribution into account when determining the charge retention during CID/higher-energy collision induced dissociation (HCD) of chargedmore » peptides. This model improves the accuracy of predictions by reducing the number of unnecessary fragments that are routinely predicted for highly-charged precursors. Basophile increased the identification rates by 26% (on average) over the Naive model, when analyzing triply-charged precursors from ion trap data. Basophile achieves simplicity and speed by solving the prediction problem with an ordinal regression equation, which can be incorporated into any database search software for shotgun proteomic identification.« less

  11. Single-molecule studies on individual peptides and peptide assemblies on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanlian; Wang, Chen

    2013-10-13

    This review is intended to reflect the recent progress in single-molecule studies of individual peptides and peptide assemblies on surfaces. The structures and the mechanism of peptide assembly are discussed in detail. The contents include the following topics: structural analysis of single peptide molecules, adsorption and assembly of peptides on surfaces, folding structures of the amyloid peptides, interaction between amyloid peptides and dye or drug molecules, and modulation of peptide assemblies by small molecules. The explorations of peptide adsorption and assembly will benefit the understanding of the mechanisms for protein-protein interactions, protein-drug interactions and the pathogenesis of amyloidoses. The investigations on peptide assembly and its modulations could also provide a potential approach towards the treatment of the amyloidoses.

  12. Mechanism of Reversible Peptide-Bilayer Attachment: Combined Simulation and Experimental Single-Molecule Study.

    PubMed

    Schwierz, Nadine; Krysiak, Stefanie; Hugel, Thorsten; Zacharias, Martin

    2016-01-26

    The binding of peptides and proteins to lipid membrane surfaces is of fundamental importance for many membrane-mediated cellular processes. Using closely matched molecular dynamics simulations and atomic force microscopy experiments, we study the force-induced desorption of single peptide chains from phospholipid bilayers to gain microscopic insight into the mechanism of reversible attachment. This approach allows quantification of desorption forces and decomposition of peptide-membrane interactions into energetic and entropic contributions. In both simulations and experiments, the desorption forces of peptides with charged and polar side chains are much smaller than those for hydrophobic peptides. The adsorption of charged/polar peptides to the membrane surface is disfavored by the energetic components, requires breaking of hydrogen bonds involving the peptides, and is favored only slightly by entropy. By contrast, the stronger adsorption of hydrophobic peptides is favored both by energy and by entropy and the desorption forces increase with increasing side-chain hydrophobicity. Interestingly, the calculated net adsorption free energies per residue correlate with experimental results of single residues, indicating that side-chain free energy contributions are largely additive. This observation can help in the design of peptides with tailored adsorption properties and in the estimation of membrane binding properties of peripheral membrane proteins. PMID:26717083

  13. Dynamic Peptide Library for the Discovery of Charge Transfer Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Berdugo, Cristina; Nalluri, Siva Krishna Mohan; Javid, Nadeem; Escuder, Beatriu; Miravet, Juan F; Ulijn, Rein V

    2015-11-25

    Coupling of peptide self-assembly to dynamic sequence exchange provides a useful approach for the discovery of self-assembling materials. In here, we demonstrate the discovery and optimization of aqueous, gel-phase nanostructures based on dynamically exchanging peptide sequences that self-select to maximize charge transfer of n-type semiconducting naphthalenediimide (NDI)-dipeptide bioconjugates with various π-electron-rich donors (dialkoxy/hydroxy/amino-naphthalene or pyrene derivatives). These gel-phase peptide libraries are characterized by spectroscopy (UV-vis and fluorescence), microscopy (TEM), HPLC, and oscillatory rheology and it is found that, of the various peptide sequences explored (tyrosine Y-NDI with tyrosine Y, phenylalanine F, leucine L, valine V, alanine A or glycine G-NH2), the optimum sequence is tyrosine-phenylalanine in each case; however, both its absolute and relative yield amplification is dictated by the properties of the donor component, indicating cooperativity of peptide sequence and donor/acceptor pairs in assembly. The methodology provides an in situ discovery tool for nanostructures that enable dynamic interfacing of supramolecular electronics with aqueous (biological) systems. PMID:26540455

  14. Gas-Phase Dissociation Pathways of Multiply Charged Peptide Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Jurchen, John C.; Garcia, David E.; Williams, Evan R.

    2005-01-01

    Numerous studies of cluster formation and dissociation have been conducted to determine properties of matter in the transition from the condensed phase to the gas phase using materials as diverse as atomic nuclei, noble gasses, metal clusters, and amino acids. Here, electrospray ionization is used to extend the study of cluster dissociation to peptides including leucine enkephalin with 7–19 monomer units and 2–5 protons, and somatostatin with 5 monomer units and 4 protons under conditions where its intramolecular disulfide bond is either oxidized or reduced. Evaporation of neutral monomers and charge separation by cluster fission are the competing dissociation pathways of both peptides. The dominant fission product for all leucine enkephalin clusters studied is a proton-bound dimer, presumably due to the high gas-phase stability of this species. The branching ratio of the fission and evaporation processes for leucine enkephalin clusters appears to be determined by the value of z2/n for the cluster where z is the charge and n the number of monomer units in the cluster. Clusters with low and high values of z2/n dissociate primarily by evaporation and cluster fission respectively, with a sharp transition between dissociation primarily by evaporation and primarily by fission measured at a z2/n value of ~0.5. The dependence of the dissociation pathway of a cluster on z2/n is similar to the dissociation of atomic nuclei and multiply charged metal clusters indicating that leucine enkephalin peptide clusters exist in a state that is more disordered, and possibly fluid, rather than highly structured in the dissociative transition state. The branching ratio, but not the dissociation pathway of [somatostatin5 + 4H]4+ is altered by the reduction of its internal disulfide bond indicating that monomer conformational flexibility plays a role in peptide cluster dissociation. PMID:14652186

  15. Role of acetylation and charge in antimicrobial peptides based on human beta-defensin-3.

    PubMed

    Papanastasiou, Emilios Andrew; Hua, Quyen; Sandouk, Aline; Son, U Hyon; Christenson, Andrew James; Van Hoek, Monique Louise; Bishop, Barney Michael

    2009-07-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides are an evolutionarily ancient and essential element of innate immunity in higher organisms. The precise mechanism by which these peptides exert their antimicrobial activity on bacteria is not well understood. Decapeptides based on the C-terminus of human beta-defensin-3 were designed and evaluated to study the role of charge in defining the antimicrobial activity and selectivity of these peptides against Escherichia coli. Acetylated derivatives of these peptides were prepared in order to further evaluate how positively charged primary amines contribute to potency in these small antimicrobial peptides. These peptides enabled us to explore the relationship between net charge, charge distribution and antimicrobial activity. While the results indicate that net charge is a major factor in antimicrobial activity in these peptides, the actual relationship between charge and potency appears to be more complex.

  16. EKylation: Addition of an Alternating-Charge Peptide Stabilizes Proteins.

    PubMed

    Liu, Erik J; Sinclair, Andrew; Keefe, Andrew J; Nannenga, Brent L; Coyle, Brandon L; Baneyx, François; Jiang, Shaoyi

    2015-10-12

    For nearly 40 years, therapeutic proteins have been stabilized by chemical conjugation of polyethylene glycol (PEG), but recently zwitterionic materials have proved to be a more effective substitute. In this work, we demonstrate that genetic fusion of alternating-charge extensions consisting of anionic glutamic acid (E) and cationic lysine (K) is an effective strategy for protein stabilization. This bioinspired "EKylation" method not only confers the stabilizing benefits of poly(zwitterions) but also allows for rapid biosynthesis of target constructs. Poly(EK) peptides of different predetermined lengths were appended to the C-terminus of a native β-lactamase and its destabilized TEM-19 mutant. The EK-modified enzymes retained biological activity and exhibited increased stability to environmental stressors such as high temperature and high-salt solutions. This one-step strategy provides a broadly applicable alternative to synthetic polymer conjugation that is biocompatible and degradable. PMID:26407134

  17. Structural Heterogeneity of Doubly-Charged Peptide b-Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaojuan; Huang, Yiqun; O'Connor, Peter B.; Lin, Cheng

    2011-02-01

    Performing collisionally activated dissociation (CAD) and electron capture dissociation (ECD) in tandem has shown great promise in providing comprehensive sequence information that was otherwise unobtainable by using either fragmentation method alone or in duet. However, the general applicability of this MS3 approach in peptide sequencing may be undermined by the formation of non-direct sequence ions, as sometimes observed under CAD, particularly when multiple stages of CAD are involved. In this study, varied-sized doubly-charged b-ions from three tachykinin peptides were investigated by ECD. Sequence scrambling was observed in ECD of all b-ions from neurokinin A (HKTDSFVGLM-NH2), suggesting the presence of N- and C-termini linked macro-cyclic conformers. On the contrary, none of the b-ions from eledoisin (pEPSKDAFIGLM-NH2) produced non-direct sequence ions under ECD, as it does not contain a free N-terminal amino group. ECD of several b-ions from Substance P (RPKPQQFFGLM-NH2) showed series of cm-Lys fragment ions which suggested that the macro-cyclic structure may also be formed by connecting the C-terminal carbonyl group and the ɛ-amino group of the lysine side chain. Theoretical investigation of selected Substance P b-ions revealed several low energy conformers, including both linear oxazolones and macro-ring structures, in corroboration with the experimental observation. This study showed that a b-ion may exist as a mixture of several forms, with their propensities influenced by its N-terminus, length, and certain side-chain groups. Further, the presence of several macro-cyclic structures may result in erroneous sequence assignment when the combined CAD and ECD methods are used in peptide sequencing.

  18. Charge transport in single crystal organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Wei

    Organic electronics have engendered substantial interest in printable, flexible and large-area applications thanks to their low fabrication cost per unit area, chemical versatility and solution processability. Nevertheless, fundamental understanding of device physics and charge transport in organic semiconductors lag somewhat behind, partially due to ubiquitous defects and impurities in technologically useful organic thin films, formed either by vacuum deposition or solution process. In this context, single-crystalline organic semiconductors, or organic single crystals, have therefore provided the ideal system for transport studies. Organic single crystals are characterized by their high chemical purity and outstanding structural perfection, leading to significantly improved electrical properties compared with their thin-film counterparts. Importantly, the surfaces of the crystals are molecularly flat, an ideal condition for building field-effect transistors (FETs). Progress in organic single crystal FETs (SC-FETs) is tremendous during the past decade. Large mobilities ~ 1 - 10 cm2V-1s-1 have been achieved in several crystals, allowing a wide range of electrical, optical, mechanical, structural, and theoretical studies. Several challenges still remain, however, which are the motivation of this thesis. The first challenge is to delineate the crystal structure/electrical property relationship for development of high-performance organic semiconductors. This thesis demonstrates a full spectrum of studies spanning from chemical synthesis, single crystal structure determination, quantum-chemical calculation, SC-OFET fabrication, electrical measurement, photoelectron spectroscopy characterization and extensive device optimization in a series of new rubrene derivatives, motivated by the fact that rubrene is a benchmark semiconductor with record hole mobility ~ 20 cm2V-1s-1. With successful preservation of beneficial pi-stacking structures, these rubrene derivatives form

  19. Peptide vectors for gene delivery: from single peptides to multifunctional peptide nanocarriers.

    PubMed

    Raad, Markus de; Teunissen, Erik A; Mastrobattista, Enrico

    2014-07-01

    The therapeutic use of nucleic acids relies on the availability of sophisticated delivery systems for targeted and intracellular delivery of these molecules. Such a gene delivery should possess essential characteristics to overcome several extracellular and intracellular barriers. Peptides offer an attractive platform for nonviral gene delivery, as several functional peptide classes exist capable of overcoming these barriers. However, none of these functional peptide classes contain all the essential characteristics required to overcome all of the barriers associated with successful gene delivery. Combining functional peptides into multifunctional peptide vectors will be pivotal for improving peptide-based gene delivery systems. By using combinatorial strategies and high-throughput screening, the identification of multifunctional peptide vectors will accelerate the optimization of peptide-based gene delivery systems.

  20. Cavity cooling a single charged levitated nanosphere.

    PubMed

    Millen, J; Fonseca, P Z G; Mavrogordatos, T; Monteiro, T S; Barker, P F

    2015-03-27

    Optomechanical cavity cooling of levitated objects offers the possibility for laboratory investigation of the macroscopic quantum behavior of systems that are largely decoupled from their environment. However, experimental progress has been hindered by particle loss mechanisms, which have prevented levitation and cavity cooling in a vacuum. We overcome this problem with a new type of hybrid electro-optical trap formed from a Paul trap within a single-mode optical cavity. We demonstrate a factor of 100 cavity cooling of 400 nm diameter silica spheres trapped in vacuum. This paves the way for ground-state cooling in a smaller, higher finesse cavity, as we show that a novel feature of the hybrid trap is that the optomechanical cooling becomes actively driven by the Paul trap, even for singly charged nanospheres. PMID:25860743

  1. Evidence for a near-resonant charge transfer mechanism for double-stranded peptide nucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Venkatramani, Ravindra; Davis, Kathryn L; Wierzbinski, Emil; Bezer, Silvia; Balaeff, Alexander; Keinan, Shahar; Paul, Amit; Kocsis, Laura; Beratan, David N; Achim, Catalina; Waldeck, David H

    2011-01-12

    We present evidence for a near-resonant mechanism of charge transfer in short peptide nucleic acid (PNA) duplexes obtained through electrochemical, STM break junction (STM-BJ), and computational studies. A seven base pair (7-bp) PNA duplex with the sequence (TA)(3)-(XY)-(TA)(3) was studied, in which XY is a complementary nucleobase pair. The experiments showed that the heterogeneous charge transfer rate constant (k(0)) and the single-molecule conductance (σ) correlate with the oxidation potential of the purine base in the XY base pair. The electrochemical measurements showed that the enhancement of k(0) is independent, within experimental error, of which of the two PNA strands contains the purine base of the XY base pair. 7-bp PNA duplexes with one or two GC base pairs had similar measured k(0) and conductance values. While a simple superexchange model, previously used to rationalize charge transfer in single stranded PNA (Paul et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2009, 131, 6498-6507), describes some of the experimental observations, the model does not explain the absence of an enhancement in the experimental k(0) and σ upon increasing the G content in the duplexes from one to two. Moreover, the superexchange model is not consistent with other studies (Paul et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2010, 114, 14140), that showed a hopping charge transport mechanism is likely important for PNA duplexes longer than seven base pairs. A quantitative computational analysis shows that a near-resonant charge transfer regime, wherein a mix of superexchange and hopping mechanisms are expected to coexist, can rationalize all of the experimental results. PMID:21141966

  2. Single molecule resolution of the antimicrobial action of quantum dot-labeled sushi peptide on live bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Leptihn, Sebastian; Har, Jia Yi; Chen, Jianzhu; Ho, Bow; Wohland, Thorsten; Ding, Jeak Ling

    2009-01-01

    Background Antimicrobial peptides are found in all kingdoms of life. During the evolution of multicellular organisms, antimicrobial peptides were established as key elements of innate immunity. Most antimicrobial peptides are thought to work by disrupting the integrity of cell membranes, causing pathogen death. As antimicrobial peptides target the membrane structure, pathogens can only acquire resistance by a fundamental change in membrane composition. Hence, the evolution of pathogen resistance has been a slow process. Therefore antimicrobial peptides are valuable alternatives to classical antibiotics against which multiple drug-resistant bacteria have emerged. For potential therapeutic applications as antibiotics a thorough knowledge of their mechanism of action is essential. Despite the increasingly comprehensive understanding of the biochemical properties of these peptides, the actual mechanism by which antimicrobial peptides lyse microbes is controversial. Results Here we investigate how Sushi 1, an antimicrobial peptide derived from the horseshoe crab (Carcinoscorpius rotundicauda), induces lysis of Gram-negative bacteria. To follow the entire process of antimicrobial action, we performed a variety of experiments including transmission electron microscopy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy as well as single molecule tracking of quantum dot-labeled antimicrobial peptides on live bacteria. Since in vitro measurements do not necessarily correlate with the in vivo action of a peptide we developed a novel fluorescent live bacteria lysis assay. Using fully functional nanoparticle-labeled Sushi 1, we observed the process of antimicrobial action at the single-molecule level. Conclusion Recently the hypothesis that many antimicrobial peptides act on internal targets to kill the bacterium has been discussed. Here, we demonstrate that the target sites of Sushi 1 are outer and inner membranes and are not cytosolic. Further, our findings suggest four successive

  3. Charge Effect on the Quantum Dots-Peptide Self-Assembly Using Fluorescence Coupled Capillary Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianhao; Li, Jingyan; Teng, Yiwan; Bi, Yanhua; Hu, Wei; Li, Jinchen; Wang, Cheli; Qiu, Lin; Jiang, Pengju

    2016-04-01

    We present a molecular characterization of metal-affinity driven self-assembly between CdSe-ZnS quantum dots and a series of hexahistidine peptides with different charges. In particular, we uti- lized fluorescence coupled capillary electrophoresis to test the self-assembly process of quantum dots with peptides in solution. Four peptides with different charges can be efficiently separated by fluorescence coupled capillary electrophoresis. The migration time appeared to be influenced by the charges of the peptide. In addition, the kinetics of self-assembly process of quantum dots with one of the peptides manifested a bi-phasic kinetics followed by a saturating stage. This work revealed that there exist two types of binding sites on the surface of quantum dots for peptide 1: one type termed "high priority" binding site and a "low priority" site which is occupied after the first binding sites are fully occupied. The total self-assembly process finishes in solution within 80 s. Our work represents the systematic investigation of the details of self-assembly kinetics utilizing high-resolution fluorescence coupled capillary electrophoresis. The charge effect of peptide coating quantum dots provides a new way of preparing bioprobes.

  4. Pronase E-Based Generation of Fluorescent Peptide Fragments: Tracking Intracellular Peptide Fate in Single Cells.

    PubMed

    Mainz, Emilie R; Dobes, Nicholas C; Allbritton, Nancy L

    2015-08-01

    The ability to track intracellular peptide proteolysis at the single cell level is of growing interest, particularly as short peptide sequences continue to play important roles as biosensors, therapeutics, and endogenous participants in antigen processing and intracellular signaling. We describe a rapid and inexpensive methodology to generate fluorescent peptide fragments from a parent sequence with diverse chemical properties, including aliphatic, nonpolar, basic, acidic, and non-native amino acids. Four peptide sequences with existing biochemical applications were fragmented using incubation with Pronase E and/or formic acid, and in each case a complete set of fluorescent fragments was generated for use as proteolysis standards in chemical cytometry. Fragment formation and identity was monitored with capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection (CE-LIF) and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) to confirm the presence of all sequences and yield fragmentation profiles across Pronase E concentrations which can readily be used by others. As a pilot study, Pronase E-generated standards from an Abl kinase sensor and an ovalbumin antigenic peptide were then employed to identify proteolysis products arising from the metabolism of these sequences in single cells. The Abl kinase sensor fragmented at 4.2 ± 4.8 zmol μM(-1) s(-1) and the majority of cells possessed similar fragment identities. In contrast, an ovalbumin epitope peptide was degraded at 8.9 ± 0.1 zmol μM(-1) s(-1), but with differential fragment formation between individual cells. Overall, Pronase E-generated peptide standards were a rapid and efficient method to identify proteolysis products from cells. PMID:26171808

  5. Computational insights into the charge relaying properties of β-turn peptides in protein charge transfers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ru; Liu, Jinxiang; Yang, Hongfang; Wang, Shoushan; Zhang, Meng; Bu, Yuxiang

    2015-02-01

    Density functional theory calculations suggest that β-turn peptide segments can act as a novel dual-relay elements to facilitate long-range charge hopping transport in proteins, with the N terminus relaying electron hopping transfer and the C terminus relaying hole hopping migration. The electron- or hole-binding ability of such a β-turn is subject to the conformations of oligopeptides and lengths of its linking strands. On the one hand, strand extension at the C-terminal end of a β-turn considerably enhances the electron-binding of the β-turn N terminus, due to its unique electropositivity in the macro-dipole, but does not enhance hole-forming of the β-turn C terminus because of competition from other sites within the β-strand. On the other hand, strand extension at the N terminal end of the β-turn greatly enhances hole-binding of the β-turn C terminus, due to its distinct electronegativity in the macro-dipole, but does not considerably enhance electron-binding ability of the N terminus because of the shared responsibility of other sites in the β-strand. Thus, in the β-hairpin structures, electron- or hole-binding abilities of both termini of the β-turn motif degenerate compared with those of the two hook structures, due to the decreased macro-dipole polarity caused by the extending the two terminal strands. In general, the high polarity of a macro-dipole always plays a principal role in determining charge-relay properties through modifying the components and energies of the highest occupied and lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals of the β-turn motif, whereas local dipoles with low polarity only play a cooperative assisting role. Further exploration is needed to identify other factors that influence relay properties in these protein motifs.

  6. Multipole correction of atomic monopole models of molecular charge distribution. I. Peptides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokalski, W. A.; Keller, D. A.; Ornstein, R. L.; Rein, R.

    1993-01-01

    The defects in atomic monopole models of molecular charge distribution have been analyzed for several model-blocked peptides and compared with accurate quantum chemical values. The results indicate that the angular characteristics of the molecular electrostatic potential around functional groups capable of forming hydrogen bonds can be considerably distorted within various models relying upon isotropic atomic charges only. It is shown that these defects can be corrected by augmenting the atomic point charge models by cumulative atomic multipole moments (CAMMs). Alternatively, sets of off-center atomic point charges could be automatically derived from respective multipoles, providing approximately equivalent corrections. For the first time, correlated atomic multipoles have been calculated for N-acetyl, N'-methylamide-blocked derivatives of glycine, alanine, cysteine, threonine, leucine, lysine, and serine using the MP2 method. The role of the correlation effects in the peptide molecular charge distribution are discussed.

  7. Extended Coverage of Singly and Multiply Phosphorylated Peptides from a Single Titanium Dioxide Microcolumn.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Masaki; Kyono, Yutaka; Sugiyama, Naoyuki; Ishihama, Yasushi

    2015-10-20

    We developed a novel approach to enlarge phosphoproteome coverage by selective elution depending on the number of phosphoryl group of peptides from a single titanium dioxide (TiO2) microcolumn using hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC). In this approach, acidic methylphosphonate buffer including organic solvent is used for selective elution of singly phosphorylated peptides from an aliphatic hydroxy acid-modified metal oxide chromatography (HAMMOC) microcolumn and basic elution conditions with phosphate, ammonium hydroxide, and pyrrolidine are then employed for eluting multiply phosphorylated peptides retained by the HAMMOC microcolumn. Finally, we successfully identified 11 300 nonredundant phosphopeptides from triplicate analyses of 100 μg of HeLa cell lysates using this approach. This simple strategy made it possible to accomplish comprehensive and efficient phosphoproteome analysis from limited sample amounts loaded onto a single HAMMOC microcolumn without additional fractionation or enrichment approaches.

  8. A Maple Program That Illustrates the Effect of pH on Peptide Charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolik, Charles W.

    1998-11-01

    One topic covered early in an introductory biochemistry course is acid-base chemistry and the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation (buffer equation). Using this equation a biochemistry student can determine the partial charges of amino acids in a peptide chain. This is an important concept to master for a student who is learning the structure-function relationship in proteins. The program described in this paper, written for Maple V, release 3 (Waterloo Maple Software, Waterloo, ON, Canada), uses the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation to calculate the partial charges of individual amino acids and the net charge of a peptide over the pH range 0 to 14. The amino acid sequence of a peptide is entered and an animated histogram is displayed illustrating the partial charge of the amino acids over the pH range. A graph showing the net charge of the peptide from pH 0 to 14 is also given. The program has been used with success in an introductory biochemistry course as an in-class demonstration as well as for individual homework assignments. The program is available through the Web page of the Journal of Chemical Education.

  9. Stabilization of charges on isolated ionic groups sequestered in proteins by polarized peptide units.

    PubMed

    Quiocho, F A; Sack, J S; Vyas, N K

    Electrostatic interactions are of considerable importance in protein structure and function, and in a variety of cellular and biochemical processes. Here we report three similar findings from highly refined atomic structures of periplasmic binding proteins. Hydrogen bonds, acting primarily through backbone peptide units, are mainly responsible for the involvement of the positively charged arginine 151 residue in the ligand site of the arabinose-binding protein, for the association between teh sulphate-binding protein and the completely buried sulphate dianion, and for the formation of the complex of the leucine/isoleucine/valine-binding protein with the leucine zwitterion. We propose a general mechanism in which the isolated charges on the various buried, desolvated ionic groups are stabilized by the polarized peptide units. This mechanism also has broad application to processes requiring binding of uncompensated ions and charged ligands and stabilization of enzyme reaction charged intermediates, as well as activation of catalytic residues.

  10. Bioproduction of highly charged designer peptide surfactants via a chemically cleavable coiled-coil heteroconcatemer.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Nicholas L; Paquet, Nicolas; Dickinson, Ellyce L; Dexter, Annette F

    2015-02-01

    Designer peptides have recently attracted attention as self-assembling fibrils, hydrogelators and green surfactants with the potential for sustainable bioproduction. Carboxylate-rich peptides in particular have shown potential as salt-resistant emulsifiers; however the expression of highly charged peptides of this kind remains a challenge. To achieve expression of a strongly anionic helical surfactant peptide, we paired the peptide with a cationic helical partner in a coiled-coil miniprotein and optimized the polypeptide sequence for net charge, hydropathy and predicted protease resistance (via the Guruprasad instability index). Our design permitted expression of a soluble concatemer that accumulates to high levels (22% of total protein) in E. coli. The concatemer showed high stability to heat and proteases, allowing isolation by simple heat and pH precipitation steps that yield concatemer at 133 mg per gram of dry cell weight and >99% purity. Aspartate-proline sites were included in the concatemer to allow cleavage with heat and acid to give monomeric peptides. We characterized the acid cleavage pathway of the concatemer by coupled liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and modeled the kinetic pathways involved. The outcome represents the first detailed kinetic characterization of protein cleavage at aspartate-proline sites, and reveals unexpected cleavage preferences, such as favored cleavage at the C-termini of peptide helices. Chemical denaturation of the concatemer showed an extremely high thermodynamic stability of 38.9 kcal mol(-1) , with cleavage decreasing the stability of the coiled coil to 32.8 kcal mol(-1) . We determined an interfacial pressure of 29 mN m(-1) for both intact and cleaved concatemer at the air-water interface, although adsorption was slightly more rapid for the cleaved peptides. The cleaved peptides could be used to prepare heat-stable emulsions with droplet sizes in the nanometer range.

  11. Specificity and mechanism of action of alpha-helical membrane-active peptides interacting with model and biological membranes by single-molecule force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shiyu; Zhao, Guangxu; Huang, Yibing; Cai, Mingjun; Shan, Yuping; Wang, Hongda; Chen, Yuxin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, to systematically investigate the targeting specificity of membrane-active peptides on different types of cell membranes, we evaluated the effects of peptides on different large unilamellar vesicles mimicking prokaryotic, normal eukaryotic, and cancer cell membranes by single-molecule force spectroscopy and spectrum technology. We revealed that cationic membrane-active peptides can exclusively target negatively charged prokaryotic and cancer cell model membranes rather than normal eukaryotic cell model membranes. Using Acholeplasma laidlawii, 3T3-L1, and HeLa cells to represent prokaryotic cells, normal eukaryotic cells, and cancer cells in atomic force microscopy experiments, respectively, we further studied that the single-molecule targeting interaction between peptides and biological membranes. Antimicrobial and anticancer activities of peptides exhibited strong correlations with the interaction probability determined by single-molecule force spectroscopy, which illustrates strong correlations of peptide biological activities and peptide hydrophobicity and charge. Peptide specificity significantly depends on the lipid compositions of different cell membranes, which validates the de novo design of peptide therapeutics against bacteria and cancers. PMID:27363513

  12. Specificity and mechanism of action of alpha-helical membrane-active peptides interacting with model and biological membranes by single-molecule force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shiyu; Zhao, Guangxu; Huang, Yibing; Cai, Mingjun; Shan, Yuping; Wang, Hongda; Chen, Yuxin

    2016-07-01

    In this study, to systematically investigate the targeting specificity of membrane-active peptides on different types of cell membranes, we evaluated the effects of peptides on different large unilamellar vesicles mimicking prokaryotic, normal eukaryotic, and cancer cell membranes by single-molecule force spectroscopy and spectrum technology. We revealed that cationic membrane-active peptides can exclusively target negatively charged prokaryotic and cancer cell model membranes rather than normal eukaryotic cell model membranes. Using Acholeplasma laidlawii, 3T3-L1, and HeLa cells to represent prokaryotic cells, normal eukaryotic cells, and cancer cells in atomic force microscopy experiments, respectively, we further studied that the single-molecule targeting interaction between peptides and biological membranes. Antimicrobial and anticancer activities of peptides exhibited strong correlations with the interaction probability determined by single-molecule force spectroscopy, which illustrates strong correlations of peptide biological activities and peptide hydrophobicity and charge. Peptide specificity significantly depends on the lipid compositions of different cell membranes, which validates the de novo design of peptide therapeutics against bacteria and cancers.

  13. Specificity and mechanism of action of alpha-helical membrane-active peptides interacting with model and biological membranes by single-molecule force spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shiyu; Zhao, Guangxu; Huang, Yibing; Cai, Mingjun; Shan, Yuping; Wang, Hongda; Chen, Yuxin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, to systematically investigate the targeting specificity of membrane-active peptides on different types of cell membranes, we evaluated the effects of peptides on different large unilamellar vesicles mimicking prokaryotic, normal eukaryotic, and cancer cell membranes by single-molecule force spectroscopy and spectrum technology. We revealed that cationic membrane-active peptides can exclusively target negatively charged prokaryotic and cancer cell model membranes rather than normal eukaryotic cell model membranes. Using Acholeplasma laidlawii, 3T3-L1, and HeLa cells to represent prokaryotic cells, normal eukaryotic cells, and cancer cells in atomic force microscopy experiments, respectively, we further studied that the single-molecule targeting interaction between peptides and biological membranes. Antimicrobial and anticancer activities of peptides exhibited strong correlations with the interaction probability determined by single-molecule force spectroscopy, which illustrates strong correlations of peptide biological activities and peptide hydrophobicity and charge. Peptide specificity significantly depends on the lipid compositions of different cell membranes, which validates the de novo design of peptide therapeutics against bacteria and cancers. PMID:27363513

  14. Modulating Charge Transfer Through Cyclic D,L α-Peptide Self-Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Horne, W. Seth; Ashkenasy, Nurit; Ghadiri, M. Reza

    2007-01-01

    We describe a concise solid support-based synthetic method for the preparation of cyclic D,L α-peptides bearing 1,4,5,8-naphthalenetetracarboxylic diimide (NDI) side chains. Studies of the structural and photoluminescence properties of these molecules in solution show that the hydrogen bond directed self-assembly of the cyclic D,L α-peptide backbone promotes intermolecular NDI excimer formation. The efficiency of NDI charge transfer in the resulting supramolecular assemblies is shown to depend on the length of the linker between the NDI and the peptide backbone, the distal NDI substituent, and the number of NDIs incorporated in a given structure. The design rationale and synthetic strategies described here should provide a basic blueprint for a series of self-assembling cyclic D,L α-peptide nanotubes with interesting optical and electronic properties. PMID:15624124

  15. Single molecule detection using charge-coupled device array technology

    SciTech Connect

    Denton, M.B.

    1992-07-29

    A technique for the detection of single fluorescent chromophores in a flowing stream is under development. This capability is an integral facet of a rapid DNA sequencing scheme currently being developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory. In previous investigations, the detection sensitivity was limited by the background Raman emission from the water solvent. A detection scheme based on a novel mode of operating a Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) is being developed which should greatly enhance the discrimination between fluorescence from a single molecule and the background Raman scattering from the solvent. Register shifts between rows in the CCD are synchronized with the sample flow velocity so that fluorescence from a single molecule is collected in a single moving charge packet occupying an area approaching that of a single pixel while the background is spread evenly among a large number of pixels. Feasibility calculations indicate that single molecule detection should be achieved with an excellent signal-to-noise ratio.

  16. Fluoroolefins as peptide mimetics: a computational study of structure, charge distribution, hydration, and hydrogen bonding.

    PubMed

    Urban, Joseph J; Tillman, Brendon G; Cronin, William Andrew

    2006-09-28

    The design of peptide mimetic compounds is greatly facilitated by the identification of functionalities that can act as peptide replacements. The fluoroalkene moiety has recently been employed for that purpose. The purpose of this work is to characterize prototypical fluoroalkenes (fluoroethylene and 2-fluoro-2-butene) with respect to key properties of peptides (amides) including structure, charge distribution, hydration, and hydrogen bonding. The results are compared to those obtained for model peptides (formamide, N-methylacetamide). Calculations have been carried out at the MP2 and B3LYP levels of theory with the 6-311++G(2d,p) and 6-311++G(2d,2p) basis sets. The results suggest that the fluoroalkene is similar in steric requirements to a peptide bond but that there is less charge separation. Calculations of the hydration free energies with the PCM bulk continuum solvent model indicate that the fluoroalkene has much smaller hydration free energies than an amide but that the difference in solvation free energy for cis and trans isomers is comparable. In studies of complexes with water molecules, the fluoroalkene is found to engage in interactions that are analogous to backbone hydrogen-bonding interactions that govern many properties of natural peptides and proteins but with smaller interaction energies. In addition, key structural differences are noted when the fluoroalkene is playing the role of hydrogen-bond acceptor which may have implications in binding, aggregation, and conformational preferences in fluoroalkene peptidomimetics. The issue of cooperativity in hydrogen-bonding interactions in complexes with multiple waters has also been investigated. The fluoroalkene is found to exhibit cooperative effects that mirror those of the peptide but are smaller in magnitude. Thus, pairwise addivitity of interactions appears to more adequately describe the fluoroalkenes than the peptides they are intended to mimic.

  17. The influence of the localised charge of C- and N-termini on peptide self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Bortolini, C; Jones, N C; Hoffmann, S V; Besenbacher, F; Dong, M

    2016-01-14

    The charge of a peptide influences final assembled structures. It is important to consider not only global charge, but also local, such as that found on the terminal residues. This work investigates the change of peptide self-assembly through the selection of different amino acid sequences and by varying the local charge of the residues on the C- and N-termini. PMID:26472087

  18. Charged two-exciton emission from a single semiconductor nanocrystal

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Fengrui; Zhang, Qiang; Zhang, Chunfeng; Wang, Xiaoyong; Xiao, Min

    2015-03-30

    Here, we study the photoluminescence (PL) time trajectories of single CdSe/ZnS nanocrystals (NCs) as a function of the laser excitation power. At the low laser power, the PL intensity of a single NC switches between the “on” and “off” levels arising from the neutral and positively charged single excitons, respectively. With the increasing laser power, an intermediate “grey” level is formed due to the optical emission from a charged multiexciton state composed of two excitons and an extra electron. Both the inter-photon correlation and the PL decay measurements demonstrate that lifetime-indistinguishable photon pairs are emitted from this negatively charged two-exciton state.

  19. Effect of the Surface on Charge Reduction and Desorption Kinetics of Soft Landed Peptide Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Hadjar, Omar; Wang, Peng; Futrell, Jean H.; Laskin, Julia

    2009-06-01

    Charge reduction and desorption kinetics of ions and neutral molecules produced by soft-landing of mass-selected singly and doubly protonated Gramicidin S (GS) on different surfaces was studied using time dependant in situ secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) integrated in a specially designed Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR MS) research instrument. Soft-landing targets utilized in this study included inert self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of 1-dodecane thiol (HSAM) and its fluorinated analog (FSAM) on gold and hydrophilic carboxyl-terminated (COOH-SAM) and amine-terminated (NH2-SAM) SAM surfaces. We observed efficient neutralization of soft-landed ions on the COOH-SAM surface, partial retention of only one proton on the HSAM surface and efficient retention of two protons on the FSAM surface. Slow desorption rates measured experimentally indicate fairly strong binding between peptide molecules and SAM surfaces with the binding energy of 20-25 kcal/mol.

  20. Strong Electrostatic Interactions Lead to Entropically Favorable Binding of Peptides to Charged Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sprenger, K G; Pfaendtner, Jim

    2016-06-01

    Thermodynamic analyses can provide key insights into the origins of protein self-assembly on surfaces, protein function, and protein stability. However, obtaining quantitative measurements of thermodynamic observables from unbiased classical simulations of peptide or protein adsorption is challenging because of sampling limitations brought on by strong biomolecule/surface binding forces as well as time scale limitations. We used the parallel tempering metadynamics in the well-tempered ensemble (PTMetaD-WTE) enhanced sampling method to study the adsorption behavior and thermodynamics of several explicitly solvated model peptide adsorption systems, providing new molecular-level insight into the biomolecule adsorption process. Specifically studied were peptides LKα14 and LKβ15 and trpcage miniprotein adsorbing onto a charged, hydrophilic self-assembled monolayer surface functionalized with a carboxylic acid/carboxylate headgroup and a neutral, hydrophobic methyl-terminated self-assembled monolayer surface. Binding free energies were calculated as a function of temperature for each system and decomposed into their respective energetic and entropic contributions. We investigated how specific interfacial features such as peptide/surface electrostatic interactions and surface-bound ion content affect the thermodynamic landscape of adsorption and lead to differences in surface-bound conformations of the peptides. Results show that upon adsorption to the charged surface, configurational entropy gains of the released solvent molecules dominate the configurational entropy losses of the bound peptide. This behavior leads to an apparent increase in overall system entropy upon binding and therefore to the surprising and seemingly nonphysical result of an apparent increased binding free energy at elevated temperatures. Opposite effects and conclusions are found for the neutral surface. Additional simulations demonstrate that by adjusting the ionic strength of the solution

  1. Optical tracing of multiple charges in single-electron devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faez, Sanli; van der Molen, Sense Jan; Orrit, Michel

    2014-11-01

    Single molecules that exhibit narrow optical transitions at cryogenic temperatures can be used as local electric-field sensors. We derive the single-charge sensitivity of aromatic organic dye molecules, based on quantum mechanical considerations. Through numerical modeling, we demonstrate that by using currently available technologies it is possible to optically detect charging events in a granular network with a sensitivity better than 10-5e /√{Hz } and track positions of multiple electrons, simultaneously, with nanometer spatial resolution. Our results pave the way for minimally invasive optical inspection of electronic and spintronic nanodevices and building hybrid optoelectronic interfaces that function at both single-photon and single-electron levels.

  2. Ionization detector, electrode configuration and single polarity charge detection method

    DOEpatents

    He, Z.

    1998-07-07

    An ionization detector, an electrode configuration and a single polarity charge detection method each utilize a boundary electrode which symmetrically surrounds first and second central interlaced and symmetrical electrodes. All of the electrodes are held at a voltage potential of a first polarity type. The first central electrode is held at a higher potential than the second central or boundary electrodes. By forming the first and second central electrodes in a substantially interlaced and symmetrical pattern and forming the boundary electrode symmetrically about the first and second central electrodes, signals generated by charge carriers are substantially of equal strength with respect to both of the central electrodes. The only significant difference in measured signal strength occurs when the charge carriers move to within close proximity of the first central electrode and are received at the first central electrode. The measured signals are then subtracted and compared to quantitatively measure the magnitude of the charge. 10 figs.

  3. Ionization detector, electrode configuration and single polarity charge detection method

    DOEpatents

    He, Zhong

    1998-01-01

    An ionization detector, an electrode configuration and a single polarity charge detection method each utilize a boundary electrode which symmetrically surrounds first and second central interlaced and symmetrical electrodes. All of the electrodes are held at a voltage potential of a first polarity type. The first central electrode is held at a higher potential than the second central or boundary electrodes. By forming the first and second central electrodes in a substantially interlaced and symmetrical pattern and forming the boundary electrode symmetrically about the first and second central electrodes, signals generated by charge carriers are substantially of equal strength with respect to both of the central electrodes. The only significant difference in measured signal strength occurs when the charge carriers move to within close proximity of the first central electrode and are received at the first central electrode. The measured signals are then subtracted and compared to quantitatively measure the magnitude of the charge.

  4. Charge Distribution and Imperfect Amphipathicity Affect Pore Formation by Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Mihajlovic, Maja

    2012-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides often permeabilize biological membranes via a pore mechanism. Two pore types have been proposed: toroidal, where the pore is partly lined by lipid, and barrel-stave, where a cylindrical pore is completely lined by peptides. What drives the preference of antimicrobial peptides for a certain pore type is not yet fully understood. According to neutron scattering and oriented circular dichroism, melittin and MG-H2 induce toroidal pores whereas alamethicin forms barrel-stave pores. In previous work we found that indeed melittin seems to favor toroidal pores whereas alamethicin favors cylindrical pores. Here we designed mutants of these two peptides and the magainin analogue MG-H2, aimed to probe how the distribution of charges along the helix and its imperfectly amphipathic structure influence pore formation. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the peptides in a pre-formed cylindrical pore have been performed. The duration of the simulations was 136 ns to 216 ns. We found that a melittin mutant with lysine 7 neutralized favors cylindrical pores whereas a MG-H2 mutant with lysines in the N-terminal half of these peptides neutralized and an alamethicin mutant with a positive charge at the position 7 form semitoroidal pores. These results suggest that charged residues within the N-terminal half are important for the toroidal pore formation. Toroidal pores produced by MG-H2 are more disordered than the melittin pores, likely because of the charged residues located in the middle of the MG-H2 helix (K11 and K14). Imperfect amphipathicity of melitin seems to play a role in its preference for toroidal pores since the substitutions of charged residues located within the nonpolar face by hydrophobic residues suppress evolution of a toroidal pore. The mutations change the position of lysine 7 near the N-terminus, relative to the lower leaflet headgroups. The MD simulations also show that the melittin P14A mutant forms a toroidal pore, but its

  5. Charge transfer dissociation (CTD) mass spectrometry of peptide cations using kiloelectronvolt helium cations.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, William D; Jackson, Glen P

    2014-11-01

    A kiloelectronvolt beam of helium ions is used to ionize and fragment precursor peptide ions starting in the 1+ charge state. The electron affinity of helium cations (24.6 eV) exceeds the ionization potential of protonated peptides and can therefore be used to abstract an electron from--or charge exchange with--the isolated precursor ions. Kiloelectronvolt energies are used, (1) to overcome the Coulombic repulsion barrier between the cationic reactants, (2) to overcome ion-defocussing effects in the ion trap, and (3) to provide additional activation energy. Charge transfer dissociation (CTD) of the [M+H](+) precursor of Substance P gives product ions such as [M+H](2+•) and a dominant series of a ions in both the 1+ and 2+ charge states. These observations, along with the less-abundant a + 1 ions, are consistent with ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD) results of others and indicate that C-C(α) cleavages are possible through charge exchange with helium ions. Although the efficiencies and timescale of CTD are not yet suitable for on-line chromatography, this new approach to ion activation provides an additional potential tool for the interrogation of gas phase ions.

  6. Structure-dependent charge density as a determinant of antimicrobial activity of peptide analogues of defensin.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yang; Liu, Shouping; Jiang, Ping; Zhou, Lei; Li, Jing; Tang, Charles; Verma, Chandra; Mu, Yuguang; Beuerman, Roger W; Pervushin, Konstantin

    2009-08-01

    Defensins are small (3-5 kDa) cysteine-rich cationic proteins found in both vertebrates and invertebrates constituting the front line of host innate immunity. Despite intensive research, bactericidal and cytotoxic mechanisms of defensins are still largely unknown. Moreover, we recently demonstrated that small peptides derived from defensins are even more potent bactericidal agents with less toxicity toward host cells. In this paper, structures of three C-terminal (R36-K45) analogues of human beta-defensin-3 were studied by 1H NMR spectroscopy and extensive molecular dynamics simulations. Because of indications that these peptides might target the inner bacterial membrane, they were reconstituted in dodecylphosphocholine or dodecylphosphocholine/1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-[phospho-rac-(1-glycerol)] mixed micelles, and lipid bicelles mimicking the phospholipid-constituted bilayer membrane of mammalian and bacterial cells. The results show that the binding affinity and partitioning into the lipid phase and the ability to dimerize and accrete well-defined structures upon interactions with lipid membranes contribute to compactization of positive charges within peptide oligomers. The peptide charge density, mediated by corresponding three-dimensional structures, was found to directly correlate with the antimicrobial activity. These novel observations may provide a new rationale for the design of improved antimicrobial agents.

  7. Photoinitated charge separation in a hybrid titanium dioxide metalloporphyrin peptide material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, H. Christopher; Liu, Yuzi; Dimitrijevic, Nada M.; Rajh, Tijana

    2014-08-01

    In natural systems, electron flow is mediated by proteins that spatially organize donor and acceptor molecules with great precision. Achieving this guided, directional flow of information is a desirable feature in photovoltaic media. Here, we design self-assembled peptide materials that organize multiple electronic components capable of performing photoinduced charge separation. Two peptides, c16-AHL3K3-CO2H and c16-AHL3K9-CO2H, self-assemble into fibres and provide a scaffold capable of binding a metalloporphyrin via histidine axial ligation and mineralize titanium dioxide (TiO2) on the lysine-rich surface of the resulting fibrous structures. Electron paramagnetic resonance studies of this self-assembled material under continuous light excitation demonstrate charge separation induced by excitation of the metalloporphyrin and mediated by the peptide assembly structure. This approach to dye-sensitized semiconducting materials offers a means to spatially control the dye molecule with respect to the semiconducting material through careful, strategic peptide design.

  8. Charge-pairing mechanism of phosphorylation effect upon amyloid fibrillation of human tau core peptide.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Masafumi; Hirata, Akiyoshi; Tainaka, Kazuki; Morii, Takashi; Konno, Takashi

    2008-11-11

    Phosphorylation of a fibrillogenic protein, human tau, is believed to play crucial roles in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. For elucidating molecular mechanisms of the phosphorylation effect on tau fibrillation, we synthesized a peptide, VQIVY 310K (PHF6) and its phosphorylated derivative (PHF6pY). PHF6 is a partial peptide surrounding a plausible in vivo phosphorylation site Tyr310 and forms amyloid-type fibrils similar to those generated by full-length tau. Fibrillation of PHF6 and PHF6pY were studied by spectroscopic and microscopic methods, and the critical concentration of the fibrillation was determined for comparing the fibril stability. The results showed that the phosphorylation strongly influenced the fibrillation propensity of PHF6 by changing its dependency on pH and ionic strength. On the basis of the observations, we suggested that charged sites on the phosphate group and its electrostatic pairing with the neighboring charged residues were physical origins of the phosphorylation effect. To verify this charge-pairing mechanism, we conducted experiments using a series of PHF6 derivatives with non-native charge distributions. The electrostatic interaction in an intermolecular mode was also demonstrated by the system composed of two different peptide species, which found that fibrillation of nonphosphorylated PHF6 was drastically enhanced when a trace amount of phosphorylated PHF6 molecules coexisted. A simulation analysis utilizing crystal coordinates of the PHF6 fibril was also performed for interpreting the experimental results in a molecular level. The present study using the model peptide system gave us a microscopically insightful view on the roles of tau phosphorylation in amyloid-related diseases.

  9. Surface charge modulated aptasensor in a single glass conical nanopore.

    PubMed

    Cai, Sheng-Lin; Cao, Shuo-Hui; Zheng, Yu-Bin; Zhao, Shuang; Yang, Jin-Lei; Li, Yao-Qun

    2015-09-15

    In this work, we have proposed a label-free nanopore-based biosensing strategy for protein detection by performing the DNA-protein interaction inside a single glass conical nanopore. A lysozyme binding aptamer (LBA) was used to functionalize the walls of glass nanopore via siloxane chemistry and negatively charged recognition sites were thus generated. The covalent modification procedures and their recognition towards lysozyme of the single conical nanopore were characterized via ionic current passing through the nanopore membrane, which was measured by recording the current-voltage (I-V) curves in 1mM KCl electrolyte at pH=7.4. With the occurring of recognition event, the negatively charged wall was partially neutralized by the positively charged lysozyme molecules, leading to a sensitive change of the surface charge-dependent current-voltage (I-V) characteristics. Our results not only demonstrate excellent selectivity and sensitivity towards the target protein, but also suggest a route to extend this nanopore-based sensing strategy to the biosensing platform designs of a wide range of proteins based on a charge modulation.

  10. Probing the Nature of Charge Transfer at Nano-Bio Interfaces: Peptides on Metal Oxide Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tarakeshwar, Pilarisetty; Palma, Julio L; Holland, Gregory P; Fromme, Petra; Yarger, Jeffery L; Mujica, Vladimiro

    2014-10-16

    Characterizing the nano-bio interface has been a long-standing endeavor in the quest for novel biosensors, biophotovoltaics, and biocompatible electronic devices. In this context, the present computational work on the interaction of two peptides, A6K (Ac-AAAAAAK-NH2) and A7 (Ac-AAAAAAA-NH2) with semiconducting TiO2 nanoparticles is an effort to understand the peptide-metal oxide nanointerface. These investigations were spurred by recent experimental observations that nanostructured semiconducting metal oxides templated with A6K peptides not only stabilize large proteins like photosystem-I (PS-I) but also exhibit enhanced charge-transfer characteristics. Our results indicate that α-helical structures of A6K are not only energetically more stabilized on TiO2 nanoparticles, but the resulting hybrids also exhibit enhanced electron transfer characteristics. This enhancement can be attributed to substantial changes in the electronic characteristics at the peptide-TiO2 interface. Apart from understanding the mechanism of electron transfer (ET) in peptide-stabilized PS-I on metal oxide nanoparticles, the current work also has implications in the development of novel solar cells and photocatalysts.

  11. First Observation of Charge Reduction and Desorption Kinetics of Multiply Protonated Peptides Soft Landed onto Self-Assembled Monolayer Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Hadjar, Omar; Futrell, Jean H.; Laskin, Julia

    2007-12-13

    The kinetics of charge reduction and desorption of different species produced by soft-landing of mass-selected ions was studied using in situ secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR MS). The improved SIMS capability described in this work utilizes an in-line 8 keV Cs+ ion gun and allows us to interrogate the surface both during the ion deposition and after the deposition is terminated. As a model system doubly protonated ions of Gramicidin S were deposited onto a fluorinated self-assembled monolayer (FSAM) surface. Our results demonstrate for the first time that various peptide-related peaks in FT-ICR SIMS spectra follow very different kinetics. We obtained unique kinetics signatures for doubly protonated, singly protonated and neutral peptides retained on the surface and followed their evolution as a function of time. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with a kinetic model that takes into account charge reduction and thermal desorption of different species from the surface.

  12. Optimization of Single-Sided Charge-Sharing Strip Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamel, L.A.; Benoit, M.; Donmez, B.; Macri, J. R.; McConnell, M. L.; Ryan, J. M.; Narita, T.

    2006-01-01

    Simulation of the charge sharing properties of single-sided CZT strip detectors with small anode pads are presented. The effect of initial event size, carrier repulsion, diffusion, drift, trapping and detrapping are considered. These simulations indicate that such a detector with a 150 m pitch will provide good charge sharing between neighboring pads. This is supported by a comparison of simulations and measurements for a similar detector with a coarser pitch of 225 m that could not provide sufficient sharing. The performance of such a detector used as a gamma-ray imager is discussed.

  13. Charge Blinking Statistics of Semiconductor Nanocrystals Revealed by Carbon Nanotube Single Charge Sensors.

    PubMed

    Zbydniewska, Ewa; Duzynska, Anna; Popoff, Michka; Hourlier, Djamila; Lenfant, Stéphane; Judek, Jaroslaw; Zdrojek, Mariusz; Mélin, Thierry

    2015-10-14

    We demonstrate the relation between the optical blinking of colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) and their electrical charge blinking for which we provide the first experimental observation of power-law statistics. To show this, we harness the performance of CdSe/ZnS NCs coupled with carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs), which act as single charge-sensitive electrometers with submillisecond time resolution, at room temperature. A random telegraph signal (RTS) associated with the NC single-trap charging is observed and exhibits power-law temporal statistics (τ(-α), with α in the range of ∼1-3), and a Lorentzian current noise power spectrum with a well-defined 1/f(2) corner. The spectroscopic analysis of the NC-CNTFET devices is consistent with the charging of NC defect states with a charging energy of Ec ≥ 200 meV. These results pave the way for a deeper understanding of the physics and technology of nanocrystal-based optoelectronic devices.

  14. Charge Blinking Statistics of Semiconductor Nanocrystals Revealed by Carbon Nanotube Single Charge Sensors.

    PubMed

    Zbydniewska, Ewa; Duzynska, Anna; Popoff, Michka; Hourlier, Djamila; Lenfant, Stéphane; Judek, Jaroslaw; Zdrojek, Mariusz; Mélin, Thierry

    2015-10-14

    We demonstrate the relation between the optical blinking of colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) and their electrical charge blinking for which we provide the first experimental observation of power-law statistics. To show this, we harness the performance of CdSe/ZnS NCs coupled with carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs), which act as single charge-sensitive electrometers with submillisecond time resolution, at room temperature. A random telegraph signal (RTS) associated with the NC single-trap charging is observed and exhibits power-law temporal statistics (τ(-α), with α in the range of ∼1-3), and a Lorentzian current noise power spectrum with a well-defined 1/f(2) corner. The spectroscopic analysis of the NC-CNTFET devices is consistent with the charging of NC defect states with a charging energy of Ec ≥ 200 meV. These results pave the way for a deeper understanding of the physics and technology of nanocrystal-based optoelectronic devices. PMID:26418364

  15. Charged-particle spectroscopy in organic semiconducting single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciavatti, A.; Sellin, P. J.; Basiricò, L.; Fraleoni-Morgera, A.; Fraboni, B.

    2016-04-01

    The use of organic materials as radiation detectors has grown, due to the easy processability in liquid phase at room temperature and the possibility to cover large areas by means of low cost deposition techniques. Direct charged-particle detectors based on solution-grown Organic Semiconducting Single Crystals (OSSCs) are shown to be capable to detect charged particles in pulse mode, with very good peak discrimination. The direct charged-particle detection in OSSCs has been assessed both in the planar and in the vertical axes, and a digital pulse processing algorithm has been used to perform pulse height spectroscopy and to study the charge collection efficiency as a function of the applied bias voltage. Taking advantage of the charge spectroscopy and the good peak discrimination of pulse height spectra, an Hecht-like behavior of OSSCs radiation detectors is demonstrated. It has been possible to estimate the mobility-lifetime value in organic materials, a fundamental parameter for the characterization of radiation detectors, whose results are equal to μτcoplanar = (5 .5 ± 0.6 ) × 10-6 cm2/V and μτsandwich = (1 .9 ± 0.2 ) × 10-6 cm2/V, values comparable to those of polycrystalline inorganic detectors. Moreover, alpha particles Time-of-Flight experiments have been carried out to estimate the drift mobility value. The results reported here indicate how charged-particle detectors based on OSSCs possess a great potential as low-cost, large area, solid-state direct detectors operating at room temperature. More interestingly, the good detection efficiency and peak discrimination observed for charged-particle detection in organic materials (hydrogen-rich molecules) are encouraging for their further exploitation in the detection of thermal and high-energy neutrons.

  16. ``Hot spots'' growth on single nanowire controlled by electric charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Shaobo; Liu, Xuehua; He, Ting; Tian, Lei; Wang, Wenhui; Sun, Rui; He, Weina; Zhang, Xuetong; Zhang, Jinping; Ni, Weihai; Zhou, Xiaochun

    2016-06-01

    ``Hot spots'' - a kind of highly active site, which are usually composed of some unique units, such as defects, interfaces, catalyst particles or special structures - can determine the performance of nanomaterials. In this paper, we study a model system, i.e. ``hot spots'' on a single Ag nanowire in the galvanic replacement reaction (GRR), by dark-field microscopy. The research reveals that electric charge can be released by the formation reaction of AgCl, and consequently the electrochemical potential on Ag nanowire drops. The electric charge could induce the reduction of Ag+ to form the ``hot spots'' on the nanowire during the GRR. The appearance probability of ``hot spots'' is almost even along the Ag nanowire, while it is slightly lower near the two ends. The spatial distance between adjacent ``hot spots'' is also controlled by the charge, and obeys a model based on Boltzmann distribution. In addition, the distance distribution here has an advantage in electron transfer and energy saving. Therefore, it's necessary to consider the functions of electric charge during the synthesis or application of nanomaterials.``Hot spots'' - a kind of highly active site, which are usually composed of some unique units, such as defects, interfaces, catalyst particles or special structures - can determine the performance of nanomaterials. In this paper, we study a model system, i.e. ``hot spots'' on a single Ag nanowire in the galvanic replacement reaction (GRR), by dark-field microscopy. The research reveals that electric charge can be released by the formation reaction of AgCl, and consequently the electrochemical potential on Ag nanowire drops. The electric charge could induce the reduction of Ag+ to form the ``hot spots'' on the nanowire during the GRR. The appearance probability of ``hot spots'' is almost even along the Ag nanowire, while it is slightly lower near the two ends. The spatial distance between adjacent ``hot spots'' is also controlled by the charge, and obeys a

  17. Ion-ion reactions with fixed-charge modified proteins to produce ions in a single, very high charge state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Brian L.; Krusemark, Casey J.; Ledvina, Aaron R.; Coon, Joshua J.; Belshaw, Peter J.; Smith, Lloyd M.

    2008-10-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) of denatured proteins produces a mass spectrum with a broad distribution of multiply charged ions. Attaching fixed positive charges, specifically quaternary ammonium groups, to proteins at their carboxylic acid groups generates substantially higher charge states compared to the corresponding unmodified proteins in positive-mode ESI. Ion-ion reactions of these modified proteins with reagent anions leads to charge reduction by proton transfer. These proton transfer reactions cannot remove charge from the quaternary ammonium groups, which do not have a proton to transfer to the anion. Thus, one might expect charge reduction to stop at a single charge state equal to the number of fixed charges on the modified protein. However, ion-ion reactions yield charge states lower than this number of fixed charges due to anion attachment (adduction) to the proteins. Charge reduction via ion-molecule reactions involving gas-phase bases also give adducts on the modified protein ions in low charge states. Such adducts are avoided by keeping the ions in charge states well above the number of fixed charges. In the present work protein ions were selectively "parked" within an ion trap mass spectrometer in a high charge state by mild radiofrequency excitation that dramatically slows their ion-ion reaction rate--a technique termed "ion parking". The combination of ion parking with the fixed-charge modified proteins permits generation of a large population of ions in a single, very high charge state.

  18. Acidity-Mediated, Electrostatic Tuning of Asymmetrically Charged Peptides Interactions with Protein Nanopores.

    PubMed

    Asandei, Alina; Chinappi, Mauro; Kang, Hee-Kyoung; Seo, Chang Ho; Mereuta, Loredana; Park, Yoonkyung; Luchian, Tudor

    2015-08-01

    Despite success in probing chemical reactions and dynamics of macromolecules on submillisecond time and nanometer length scales, a major impasse faced by nanopore technology is the need to cheaply and controllably modulate macromolecule capture and trafficking across the nanopore. We demonstrate herein that tunable charge separation engineered at the both ends of a macromolecule very efficiently modulates the dynamics of macromolecules capture and traffic through a nanometer-size pore. In the proof-of-principle approach, we employed a 36 amino acids long peptide containing at the N- and C-termini uniform patches of glutamic acids and arginines, flanking a central segment of asparagines, and we studied its capture by the α-hemolysin (α-HL) and the mean residence time inside the pore in the presence of a pH gradient across the protein. We propose a solution to effectively control the dynamics of peptide interaction with the nanopore, with both association and dissociation reaction rates of peptide-α-HL interactions spanning orders of magnitude depending upon solution acidity on the peptide addition side and the transmembrane electric potential, while preserving the amplitude of the blockade current signature. PMID:26144534

  19. Profiling Signaling Peptides in Single Mammalian Cells Using Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Rubakhin, Stanislav S.; Churchill, James D.; Greenough, William T.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2008-01-01

    The peptide content of individual mammalian cells is profiled using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Both enzymatic and non-enzymatic procedures, including a glycerol cell stabilization method, are reported for the isolation of individual mammalian cells in a manner compatible with MALDI MS measurements. Guided microdeposition of MALDI matrix allows samples to be created with suitable analyte-to-matrix ratios. More than fifteen peptides are observed in individual rat intermediate pituitary cells. The combination of accurate mass data, expected cleavages by proteolytic enzymes, and post-source decay sequencing allows identification of fourteen of these peptides as pro-opiomelanocortin prohormone-derived molecules. These protocols permit the classification of individual mammalian cells by peptide profile, the elucidation of cell-specific prohormone processing, and the discovery of new signaling peptides on a cell-to-cell basis in a wide variety of mammalian cell types. PMID:17037931

  20. Charge, Color, and Conformation: Spectroscopy on Isomer-Selected Peptide Ions.

    PubMed

    Choi, Chang Min; Simon, Anne-Laure; Chirot, Fabien; Kulesza, Alexander; Knight, Geoffrey; Daly, Steven; MacAleese, Luke; Antoine, Rodolphe; Dugourd, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    Monitoring the chromism induced by intramolecular hydrogen and charge transfers within proteins as well as the isomerization of both protein and cofactor is essential not only to understand photoactive signaling pathways but also to design targeted opto-switchable proteins. We used a dual-ion mobility drift tube coupled to a tunable picosecond laser to explore the optical and structural properties of a peptide chain bound to a chromophore-a prototype system allowing for a proton transfer coupled to conformational change. With the support of molecular dynamics and DFT calculations, we show how proton transfer between the peptide and its cofactor can dramatically modify the optical properties of the system and demonstrate that these changes can be triggered by collisional activation in the gas phase.

  1. Charge, Color, and Conformation: Spectroscopy on Isomer-Selected Peptide Ions.

    PubMed

    Choi, Chang Min; Simon, Anne-Laure; Chirot, Fabien; Kulesza, Alexander; Knight, Geoffrey; Daly, Steven; MacAleese, Luke; Antoine, Rodolphe; Dugourd, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    Monitoring the chromism induced by intramolecular hydrogen and charge transfers within proteins as well as the isomerization of both protein and cofactor is essential not only to understand photoactive signaling pathways but also to design targeted opto-switchable proteins. We used a dual-ion mobility drift tube coupled to a tunable picosecond laser to explore the optical and structural properties of a peptide chain bound to a chromophore-a prototype system allowing for a proton transfer coupled to conformational change. With the support of molecular dynamics and DFT calculations, we show how proton transfer between the peptide and its cofactor can dramatically modify the optical properties of the system and demonstrate that these changes can be triggered by collisional activation in the gas phase. PMID:26756462

  2. Charge, Color, and Conformation: Spectroscopy on Isomer-Selected Peptide Ions

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring the chromism induced by intramolecular hydrogen and charge transfers within proteins as well as the isomerization of both protein and cofactor is essential not only to understand photoactive signaling pathways but also to design targeted opto-switchable proteins. We used a dual-ion mobility drift tube coupled to a tunable picosecond laser to explore the optical and structural properties of a peptide chain bound to a chromophore—a prototype system allowing for a proton transfer coupled to conformational change. With the support of molecular dynamics and DFT calculations, we show how proton transfer between the peptide and its cofactor can dramatically modify the optical properties of the system and demonstrate that these changes can be triggered by collisional activation in the gas phase. PMID:26756462

  3. "Hot spots" growth on single nanowire controlled by electric charge.

    PubMed

    Xi, Shaobo; Liu, Xuehua; He, Ting; Tian, Lei; Wang, Wenhui; Sun, Rui; He, Weina; Zhang, Xuetong; Zhang, Jinping; Ni, Weihai; Zhou, Xiaochun

    2016-06-01

    "Hot spots" - a kind of highly active site, which are usually composed of some unique units, such as defects, interfaces, catalyst particles or special structures - can determine the performance of nanomaterials. In this paper, we study a model system, i.e. "hot spots" on a single Ag nanowire in the galvanic replacement reaction (GRR), by dark-field microscopy. The research reveals that electric charge can be released by the formation reaction of AgCl, and consequently the electrochemical potential on Ag nanowire drops. The electric charge could induce the reduction of Ag(+) to form the "hot spots" on the nanowire during the GRR. The appearance probability of "hot spots" is almost even along the Ag nanowire, while it is slightly lower near the two ends. The spatial distance between adjacent "hot spots" is also controlled by the charge, and obeys a model based on Boltzmann distribution. In addition, the distance distribution here has an advantage in electron transfer and energy saving. Therefore, it's necessary to consider the functions of electric charge during the synthesis or application of nanomaterials.

  4. "Hot spots" growth on single nanowire controlled by electric charge.

    PubMed

    Xi, Shaobo; Liu, Xuehua; He, Ting; Tian, Lei; Wang, Wenhui; Sun, Rui; He, Weina; Zhang, Xuetong; Zhang, Jinping; Ni, Weihai; Zhou, Xiaochun

    2016-06-01

    "Hot spots" - a kind of highly active site, which are usually composed of some unique units, such as defects, interfaces, catalyst particles or special structures - can determine the performance of nanomaterials. In this paper, we study a model system, i.e. "hot spots" on a single Ag nanowire in the galvanic replacement reaction (GRR), by dark-field microscopy. The research reveals that electric charge can be released by the formation reaction of AgCl, and consequently the electrochemical potential on Ag nanowire drops. The electric charge could induce the reduction of Ag(+) to form the "hot spots" on the nanowire during the GRR. The appearance probability of "hot spots" is almost even along the Ag nanowire, while it is slightly lower near the two ends. The spatial distance between adjacent "hot spots" is also controlled by the charge, and obeys a model based on Boltzmann distribution. In addition, the distance distribution here has an advantage in electron transfer and energy saving. Therefore, it's necessary to consider the functions of electric charge during the synthesis or application of nanomaterials. PMID:27240743

  5. Differential 14N/15N-Labeling of Peptides Using N-Terminal Charge Derivatization with a High-Proton Affinity for Straightforward de novo Peptide Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Nihashi, Yoichiro; Miyashita, Masahiro; Awane, Hiroyuki; Miyagawa, Hisashi

    2013-01-01

    While de novo peptide sequencing is essential in many situations, it remains a difficult task. This is because peptide fragmentation results in complicated and often incomplete product ion spectra. In a previous study, we demonstrated that N-terminal charge derivatization with 4-amidinobenzoic acid (Aba) resulted in improved peptide fragmentation under low-energy CID conditions. However, even with this derivatization, some ambiguity exists, due to difficulties in discriminating between N- and C-terminal fragments. In this study, to specifically identify b-ions from complex product ion spectra, the differential 14N/15N-labeling of peptides was performed using Aba derivatization. 15N-Labeled Aba was synthesized in the form of a succinimide ester. Peptides were derivatized individually with 14N-Aba or 15N-Aba and analyzed by ESI-MS/MS using a linear ion trap-Orbitrap hybrid FTMS system. The N-terminal fragments (i.e., b-ions) were then identified based on m/z differences arising from isotope labeling. By comparing the spectra between 14N- and 15N-Aba derivatized peptides, b-ions could be successfully identified based on the m/z shifts, which provided reliable sequencing results for all of the peptides examined in this study. The method developed in this study allows the easy and reliable de novo sequencing of peptides, which is useful in peptidomics and proteomics studies. PMID:24860714

  6. Single-Molecule Motions of MHC Class II Rely on Bound Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kozono, Haruo; Matsushita, Yufuku; Ogawa, Naoki; Kozono, Yuko; Miyabe, Toshihiro; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Ichiyanagi, Kouhei; Okimoto, Noriaki; Taiji, Makoto; Kanagawa, Osami; Sasaki, Yuji C.

    2015-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II protein can bind peptides of different lengths in the region outside the peptide-binding groove. Peptide-flanking residues (PFRs) contribute to the binding affinity of the peptide for MHC and change the immunogenicity of the peptide/MHC complex with regard to T cell receptor (TCR). The mechanisms underlying these phenomena are currently unknown. The molecular flexibility of the peptide/MHC complex may be an important determinant of the structures recognized by certain T cells. We used single-molecule x-ray analysis (diffracted x-ray tracking (DXT)) and fluorescence anisotropy to investigate these mechanisms. DXT enabled us to monitor the real-time Brownian motion of the peptide/MHC complex and revealed that peptides without PFRs undergo larger rotational motions than peptides with PFRs. Fluorescence anisotropy further revealed that peptides without PFRs exhibit slightly larger motions on the nanosecond timescale. These results demonstrate that peptides without PFRs undergo dynamic motions in the groove of MHC and consequently are able to assume diverse structures that can be recognized by T cells. PMID:25606683

  7. Charge sensitivity of superconducting single-electron transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korotkov, Alexander N.

    1996-10-01

    It is shown that the noise-limited charge sensitivity of a single-electron transistor using superconductors (of either SISIS- or NISIN-type) operating near the threshold of quasiparticle tunneling, can be considerably higher than that of a similar transistor made of normal metals or semiconductors. The reason is that the superconducting energy gap, in contrast to the Coulomb blockade, is not smeared by the finite temperature. We also discuss the increase of the maximum operation temperature due to superconductivity and the peaklike features on the I-V curve of SISIS structures.

  8. Correlating single-molecule and ensemble-average measurements of peptide adsorption onto different inorganic materials.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seong-Oh; Jackman, Joshua A; Mochizuki, Masahito; Yoon, Bo Kyeong; Hayashi, Tomohiro; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2016-06-01

    The coating of solid-binding peptides (SBPs) on inorganic material surfaces holds significant potential for improved surface functionalization at nano-bio interfaces. In most related studies, the goal has been to engineer peptides with selective and high binding affinity for a target material. The role of the material substrate itself in modulating the adsorption behavior of a peptide molecule remains less explored and there are few studies that compare the interaction of one peptide with different inorganic substrates. Herein, using a combination of two experimental techniques, we investigated the adsorption of a 16 amino acid-long random coil peptide to various inorganic substrates - gold, silicon oxide, titanium oxide and aluminum oxide. Quartz crystal microbalance-dissipation (QCM-D) experiments were performed in order to measure the peptide binding affinity for inorganic solid supports at the ensemble average level, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments were conducted in order to determine the adhesion force of a single peptide molecule. A positive trend was observed between the total mass uptake of attached peptide and the single-molecule adhesion force on each substrate. Peptide affinity for gold was appreciably greater than for the oxide substrates. Collectively, the results obtained in this study offer insight into the ways in which inorganic materials can differentially influence and modulate the adhesion of SBPs.

  9. Correlating single-molecule and ensemble-average measurements of peptide adsorption onto different inorganic materials.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seong-Oh; Jackman, Joshua A; Mochizuki, Masahito; Yoon, Bo Kyeong; Hayashi, Tomohiro; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2016-06-01

    The coating of solid-binding peptides (SBPs) on inorganic material surfaces holds significant potential for improved surface functionalization at nano-bio interfaces. In most related studies, the goal has been to engineer peptides with selective and high binding affinity for a target material. The role of the material substrate itself in modulating the adsorption behavior of a peptide molecule remains less explored and there are few studies that compare the interaction of one peptide with different inorganic substrates. Herein, using a combination of two experimental techniques, we investigated the adsorption of a 16 amino acid-long random coil peptide to various inorganic substrates - gold, silicon oxide, titanium oxide and aluminum oxide. Quartz crystal microbalance-dissipation (QCM-D) experiments were performed in order to measure the peptide binding affinity for inorganic solid supports at the ensemble average level, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments were conducted in order to determine the adhesion force of a single peptide molecule. A positive trend was observed between the total mass uptake of attached peptide and the single-molecule adhesion force on each substrate. Peptide affinity for gold was appreciably greater than for the oxide substrates. Collectively, the results obtained in this study offer insight into the ways in which inorganic materials can differentially influence and modulate the adhesion of SBPs. PMID:27174015

  10. Single-carbon discrimination by selected peptides for individual detection of volatile organic compounds

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Soomi; Lee, Ki-Young; Min, Sun-Joon; Yoo, Yong Kyoung; Hwang, Kyo Seon; Kim, Sang Kyung; Yi, Hyunjung

    2015-01-01

    Although volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are becoming increasingly recognized as harmful agents and potential biomarkers, selective detection of the organic targets remains a tremendous challenge. Among the materials being investigated for target recognition, peptides are attractive candidates because of their chemical robustness, divergence, and their homology to natural olfactory receptors. Using a combinatorial peptide library and either a graphitic surface or phenyl-terminated self-assembled monolayer as relevant target surfaces, we successfully selected three interesting peptides that differentiate a single carbon deviation among benzene and its analogues. The heterogeneity of the designed target surfaces provided peptides with varying affinity toward targeted molecules and generated a set of selective peptides that complemented each other. Microcantilever sensors conjugated with each peptide quantitated benzene, toluene and xylene to sub-ppm levels in real time. The selection of specific receptors for a group of volatile molecules will provide a strong foundation for general approach to individually monitoring VOCs. PMID:25779765

  11. CTL responses induced by a single immunization with peptide encapsulated in biodegradable microparticles.

    PubMed

    Partidos, C D; Vohra, P; Jones, D; Farrar, G; Steward, M W

    1997-08-01

    A synthetic peptide representing a measles virus (MV) cytotoxic T cell epitope (CTL) when encapsulated in poly (D,L-lactide co-glycolide) (PLG) 50:50 microparticles induced a strong CTL response after a single intraperitoneal immunization of mice which was greater than that following administration of the peptide in Freund's complete adjuvant. A 100 micrograms dose of encapsulated peptide was shown to be more effective for CTL priming than 50 and 25 micrograms doses. A vaccine formulation prepared by simply mixing empty 50:50 PLG microparticles with the peptide resulted in the induction of CTL responses comparable to those induced by the encapsulated peptide. Moreover, a CTL response against MV-infected target cells was observed. These findings highlight the potential immunostimulatory effect of PLG microparticles for the induction of MV and peptide-specific CTL responses.

  12. Single-carbon discrimination by selected peptides for individual detection of volatile organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Soomi; Lee, Ki-Young; Min, Sun-Joon; Yoo, Yong Kyoung; Hwang, Kyo Seon; Kim, Sang Kyung; Yi, Hyunjung

    2015-03-01

    Although volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are becoming increasingly recognized as harmful agents and potential biomarkers, selective detection of the organic targets remains a tremendous challenge. Among the materials being investigated for target recognition, peptides are attractive candidates because of their chemical robustness, divergence, and their homology to natural olfactory receptors. Using a combinatorial peptide library and either a graphitic surface or phenyl-terminated self-assembled monolayer as relevant target surfaces, we successfully selected three interesting peptides that differentiate a single carbon deviation among benzene and its analogues. The heterogeneity of the designed target surfaces provided peptides with varying affinity toward targeted molecules and generated a set of selective peptides that complemented each other. Microcantilever sensors conjugated with each peptide quantitated benzene, toluene and xylene to sub-ppm levels in real time. The selection of specific receptors for a group of volatile molecules will provide a strong foundation for general approach to individually monitoring VOCs.

  13. Topological charge analysis of ultrafast single skyrmion creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Gen; Li, Yufan; Kong, Lingyao; Lake, Roger K.; Chien, C. L.; Zang, Jiadong

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic skyrmions are topologically nontrivial spin textures of potential interest for future information storage applications, and for such purposes, the control and understanding of single skyrmion creation is required. A scheme is analyzed to create single Néel-type and Bloch-type skyrmions in helimagnetic thin films utilizing the dynamical excitations induced by the Oersted field and the spin transfer torque given by a vertically injected spin-polarized current. A topological charge analysis using a lattice version of the topological charge provides insight into the locally triggered transition from a trivial to a nontrivial topological spin texture of the Néel or Bloch type skyrmion. The topological protection of the magnetic skyrmion is determined by the symmetric Heisenberg exchange energy. The critical switching current density is ˜107A/cm 2 , which decreases with the easy-plane type uniaxial anisotropy and thermal fluctuations. The in-plane spin polarization of the injected current performs better than out-of-plane polarization, and it provides ultrafast switching times (within 100 ps) and reliable switching outcomes.

  14. Light-Induced Charge Transport within a Single Asymmetric Nanowire

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chong; Hwang, Yun Yeong; Jeong, Hoon Eui; Yang, Peidong

    2011-01-21

    Artificial photosynthetic systems using semiconductor materials have been explored for more than three decades in order to store solar energy in chemical fuels such as hydrogen. By mimicking biological photosynthesis with two light-absorbing centers that relay excited electrons in a nanoscopic space, a dual-band gap photoelectrochemical (PEC) system is expected to have higher theoretical energy conversion efficiency than a single band gap system. This work demonstrates the vectorial charge transport of photo-generated electrons and holes within a single asymmetric Si/TiO2 nanowire using Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). Under UV illumination, higher surface potential was observed on the n-TiO₂ side, relative to the potential of the p-Si side, as a result of majority carriers’ recombination at the Si/TiO₂ interface. These results demonstrate a new approach to investigate charge separation and transport in a PEC system. This asymmetric nanowire heterostructure, with a dual band gap configuration and simultaneously exposed anode and cathode surfaces represents an ideal platform for the development of technologies for the generation of solar fuels, although better photoanode materials remain to be discovered.

  15. Single phase dynamic CMOS PLA using charge sharing technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhong, Y. B.; Tsang, C. P.

    1991-01-01

    A single phase dynamic CMOS NOR-NOR programmable logic array (PLA) using triggered decoders and charge sharing techniques for high speed and low power is presented. By using the triggered decoder technique, the ground switches are eliminated, thereby, making this new design much faster and lower power dissipation than conventional PLA's. By using the charge-sharing technique in a dynamic CMOS NOR structure, a cascading AND gate can be implemented. The proposed PLA's are presented with a delay-time of 15.95 and 18.05 nsec, respectively, which compare with a conventional single phase PLA with 35.5 nsec delay-time. For a typical example of PLA like the Signetics 82S100 with 16 inputs, 48 input minterms (m) and 8 output minterms (n), the 2-SOP PLA using the triggered 2-bit decoder is 2.23 times faster and has 2.1 times less power dissipation than the conventional PLA. These results are simulated using maximum drain current of 600 micro-A, gate length of 2.0 micron, V sub DD of 5 V, the capacitance of an input miniterm of 1600 fF, and the capacitance of an output minterm of 1500 fF.

  16. Modified atomic force microscope applied to the measurement of elastic modulus for a single peptide molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptak, Arkadiusz; Takeda, Seiji; Nakamura, Chikashi; Miyake, Jun; Kageshima, Masami; Jarvis, Suzanne P.; Tokumoto, Hiroshi

    2001-09-01

    A modified atomic force microscopy (AFM) system, based on a force modulation technique, has been used to find an approximate value for the elastic modulus of a single peptide molecule directly from a mechanical test. For this purpose a self-assembled monolayer built from two kinds of peptides, reactive (able to anchor to the AFM tip) and nonreactive, was synthesized. In a typical experiment a single C3K30C (C=cysteine, K=lysine) peptide molecule was stretched between a Au(111) substrate and the gold-coated tip of an AFM cantilever to which it was attached via gold-sulfur bonds. The amplitude of the cantilever oscillations, due to an external force applied via a magnetic particle to the cantilever, was recorded by a lock-in amplifier and recalculated into stiffness of the stretched molecule. A longitudinal Young's modulus for the α-helix of a single peptide molecule and for the elongated state of this molecule has been estimated. The obtained values; 1.2±0.3 and 50±15 GPa, for the peptide α-helix and elongated peptide backbone, respectively, seem to be reasonable comparing them to the Young's modulus of protein crystals and linear organic polymers. We believe this research opens up a means by which scientists can perform quantitative studies of the elastic properties of single molecule, especially of biologically important polymers like peptides or DNA.

  17. Note: Charge transfer in a hydrated peptide group is determined mainly by its intrinsic hydrogen-bond energetics

    SciTech Connect

    Mirkin, Noemi G.; Krimm, Samuel

    2014-01-28

    Charge transfer in a hydrogen-bonded N-methylacetamide(H{sub 2}O){sub 3} system is obtained from ωB97X-D/6-31++G** and CHelpG atomic charge calculations of individual peptide-water interactions as well as that of the entire complex. In the latter, the electron transfer to water is 0.19 e, influenced primarily by the hydrogen bonds to the C=O group. The values of such charge transfer are paralleled by the corresponding intrinsic hydrogen-bond energies. These results support the desirability of incorporating charge transfer in molecular mechanics energy functions.

  18. A single autoimmune T cell receptor recognizes more than a million different peptides.

    PubMed

    Wooldridge, Linda; Ekeruche-Makinde, Julia; van den Berg, Hugo A; Skowera, Anna; Miles, John J; Tan, Mai Ping; Dolton, Garry; Clement, Mathew; Llewellyn-Lacey, Sian; Price, David A; Peakman, Mark; Sewell, Andrew K

    2012-01-01

    The T cell receptor (TCR) orchestrates immune responses by binding to foreign peptides presented at the cell surface in the context of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. Effective immunity requires that all possible foreign peptide-MHC molecules are recognized or risks leaving holes in immune coverage that pathogens could quickly evolve to exploit. It is unclear how a limited pool of <10(8) human TCRs can successfully provide immunity to the vast array of possible different peptides that could be produced from 20 proteogenic amino acids and presented by self-MHC molecules (>10(15) distinct peptide-MHCs). One possibility is that T cell immunity incorporates an extremely high level of receptor degeneracy, enabling each TCR to recognize multiple peptides. However, the extent of such TCR degeneracy has never been fully quantified. Here, we perform a comprehensive experimental and mathematical analysis to reveal that a single patient-derived autoimmune CD8(+) T cell clone of pathogenic relevance in human type I diabetes recognizes >one million distinct decamer peptides in the context of a single MHC class I molecule. A large number of peptides that acted as substantially better agonists than the wild-type "index" preproinsulin-derived peptide (ALWGPDPAAA) were identified. The RQFGPDFPTI peptide (sampled from >10(8) peptides) was >100-fold more potent than the index peptide despite differing from this sequence at 7 of 10 positions. Quantification of this previously unappreciated high level of CD8(+) T cell cross-reactivity represents an important step toward understanding the system requirements for adaptive immunity and highlights the enormous potential of TCR degeneracy to be the causative factor in autoimmune disease. PMID:22102287

  19. A single autoimmune T cell receptor recognizes more than a million different peptides.

    PubMed

    Wooldridge, Linda; Ekeruche-Makinde, Julia; van den Berg, Hugo A; Skowera, Anna; Miles, John J; Tan, Mai Ping; Dolton, Garry; Clement, Mathew; Llewellyn-Lacey, Sian; Price, David A; Peakman, Mark; Sewell, Andrew K

    2012-01-01

    The T cell receptor (TCR) orchestrates immune responses by binding to foreign peptides presented at the cell surface in the context of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. Effective immunity requires that all possible foreign peptide-MHC molecules are recognized or risks leaving holes in immune coverage that pathogens could quickly evolve to exploit. It is unclear how a limited pool of <10(8) human TCRs can successfully provide immunity to the vast array of possible different peptides that could be produced from 20 proteogenic amino acids and presented by self-MHC molecules (>10(15) distinct peptide-MHCs). One possibility is that T cell immunity incorporates an extremely high level of receptor degeneracy, enabling each TCR to recognize multiple peptides. However, the extent of such TCR degeneracy has never been fully quantified. Here, we perform a comprehensive experimental and mathematical analysis to reveal that a single patient-derived autoimmune CD8(+) T cell clone of pathogenic relevance in human type I diabetes recognizes >one million distinct decamer peptides in the context of a single MHC class I molecule. A large number of peptides that acted as substantially better agonists than the wild-type "index" preproinsulin-derived peptide (ALWGPDPAAA) were identified. The RQFGPDFPTI peptide (sampled from >10(8) peptides) was >100-fold more potent than the index peptide despite differing from this sequence at 7 of 10 positions. Quantification of this previously unappreciated high level of CD8(+) T cell cross-reactivity represents an important step toward understanding the system requirements for adaptive immunity and highlights the enormous potential of TCR degeneracy to be the causative factor in autoimmune disease.

  20. Modifying the electronic properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes using designed surfactant peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samarajeewa, Dinushi R.; Dieckmann, Gregg R.; Nielsen, Steven O.; Musselman, Inga H.

    2012-07-01

    The electronic properties of carbon nanotubes can be altered significantly by modifying the nanotube surface. In this study, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were functionalized noncovalently using designed surfactant peptides, and the resultant SWCNT electronic properties were investigated. These peptides have a common amino acid sequence of X(Valine)5(Lysine)2, where X indicates an aromatic amino acid containing either an electron-donating or electron-withdrawing functional group (i.e. p-amino-phenylalanine or p-cyano-phenylalanine). Circular dichroism spectra showed that the surfactant peptides primarily have random coil structures in an aqueous medium, both alone and in the presence of SWCNTs, simplifying analysis of the peptide/SWCNT interaction. The ability of the surfactant peptides to disperse individual SWCNTs in solution was verified using atomic force microscopy and ultraviolet-visible-near-infrared spectroscopy. The electronic properties of the surfactant peptide/SWCNT composites were examined using the observed nanotube Raman tangential band shifts and the observed additional features near the Fermi level in the scanning tunneling spectroscopy dI/dV spectra. The results revealed that SWCNTs functionalized with surfactant peptides containing electron-donor or electron-acceptor functional groups showed n-doped or p-doped altered electronic properties, respectively. This work unveils a facile and versatile approach to modify the intrinsic electronic properties of SWCNTs using a simple peptide structure, which is easily adaptable to obtain peptide/SWCNT composites for the design of tunable nanoscale electronic devices.The electronic properties of carbon nanotubes can be altered significantly by modifying the nanotube surface. In this study, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were functionalized noncovalently using designed surfactant peptides, and the resultant SWCNT electronic properties were investigated. These peptides have a common amino

  1. Structure-function relationship of Val/Arg-rich peptides: effects of net charge and pro on activity.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qingquan; Jiao, Wenjing; Lv, Yinfeng; Dong, Na; Zhu, Xin; Shan, Anshan

    2014-09-01

    Our previous study reported Val/Arg-rich peptides, and the relationship was linear between hydrophobicity and antimicrobial potency within a certain range. Here, we further develop a new series of analogs to investigate the effect of net charge and Pro residue on activity. Replacement of Gly with Ala or Pro led to the decrease in antimicrobial activity. The substitution of Gly with Ala retained its hemolytic activity, while the substitution with Pro significantly decreased the toxicity, suggesting positive effect of Pro on hemolytic activity. The increase in net charge from +4 to +6 significantly improved antimicrobial activity and decreased the hemolysis. However, antibacterial and hemolytic activities were not affected by increasing the net charge from +6 to +8, indicating a moderate net positive charge. The peptides produced larger blue shifts in PE/PG than in PC/cholesterol, suggesting a stronger affinity with negatively charged membrane over zwitterionic membrane. Lowering the net charge or insert of Pro led to the lack of α-helical structure in SDS micelles, which may be correlated with weakened antimicrobial potency. This study indicated that Val/Arg-rich peptides should have moderate net charge and Pro may play a role in reducing the toxicity against red blood cells.

  2. The Negatively Charged Regions of Lactoferrin Binding Protein B, an Adaptation against Anti-Microbial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Morgenthau, Ari; Beddek, Amanda; Schryvers, Anthony B.

    2014-01-01

    Lactoferrin binding protein B (LbpB) is a bi-lobed membrane bound lipoprotein that is part of the lactoferrin receptor complex in a variety of Gram-negative pathogens. Despite high sequence diversity among LbpBs from various strains and species, a cluster of negatively charged amino acids is invariably present in the protein’s C-terminal lobe in all species except Moraxella bovis. The function of LbpB in iron acquisition has yet to be experimentally demonstrated, whereas in vitro studies have shown that LbpB confers protection against lactoferricin, a short cationic antimicrobial peptide released from the N- terminus of lactoferrin. In this study we demonstrate that the negatively charged regions can be removed from the Neisseria meningitidis LbpB without compromising stability, and this results in the inability of LbpB to protect against the bactericidal effects of lactoferricin. The release of LbpB from the cell surface by the autotransporter NalP reduces the protection against lactoferricin in the in vitro killing assay, attributed to removal of LbpB during washing steps, but is unlikely to have a similar impact in vivo. The protective effect of the negatively charged polysaccharide capsule in the killing assay was less than the protection conferred by LbpB, suggesting that LbpB plays a major role in protection against cationic antimicrobial peptides in vivo. The selective release of LbpB by NalP has been proposed to be a mechanism for evading the adaptive immune response, by reducing the antibody binding to the cell surface, but may also provide insights into the primary function of LbpB in vivo. Although TbpB and LbpB have been shown to be major targets of the human immune response, the selective release of LbpB suggests that unlike TbpB, LbpB may not be essential for iron acquisition, but important for protection against cationic antimicrobial peptides. PMID:24465982

  3. The negatively charged regions of lactoferrin binding protein B, an adaptation against anti-microbial peptides.

    PubMed

    Morgenthau, Ari; Beddek, Amanda; Schryvers, Anthony B

    2014-01-01

    Lactoferrin binding protein B (LbpB) is a bi-lobed membrane bound lipoprotein that is part of the lactoferrin receptor complex in a variety of Gram-negative pathogens. Despite high sequence diversity among LbpBs from various strains and species, a cluster of negatively charged amino acids is invariably present in the protein's C-terminal lobe in all species except Moraxella bovis. The function of LbpB in iron acquisition has yet to be experimentally demonstrated, whereas in vitro studies have shown that LbpB confers protection against lactoferricin, a short cationic antimicrobial peptide released from the N- terminus of lactoferrin. In this study we demonstrate that the negatively charged regions can be removed from the Neisseria meningitidis LbpB without compromising stability, and this results in the inability of LbpB to protect against the bactericidal effects of lactoferricin. The release of LbpB from the cell surface by the autotransporter NalP reduces the protection against lactoferricin in the in vitro killing assay, attributed to removal of LbpB during washing steps, but is unlikely to have a similar impact in vivo. The protective effect of the negatively charged polysaccharide capsule in the killing assay was less than the protection conferred by LbpB, suggesting that LbpB plays a major role in protection against cationic antimicrobial peptides in vivo. The selective release of LbpB by NalP has been proposed to be a mechanism for evading the adaptive immune response, by reducing the antibody binding to the cell surface, but may also provide insights into the primary function of LbpB in vivo. Although TbpB and LbpB have been shown to be major targets of the human immune response, the selective release of LbpB suggests that unlike TbpB, LbpB may not be essential for iron acquisition, but important for protection against cationic antimicrobial peptides. PMID:24465982

  4. Short Peptides Enhance Single Cell Adhesion and Viability onMicroarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Veiseh, Mandana; Veiseh, Omid; Martin, Michael C.; Asphahani,Fareid; Zhang, Miqin

    2007-01-19

    Single cell patterning holds important implications forbiology, biochemistry, biotechnology, medicine, and bioinformatics. Thechallenge for single cell patterning is to produce small islands hostingonly single cells and retaining their viability for a prolonged period oftime. This study demonstrated a surface engineering approach that uses acovalently bound short peptide as a mediator to pattern cells withimproved single cell adhesion and prolonged cellular viabilityon goldpatterned SiO2 substrates. The underlying hypothesis is that celladhesion is regulated bythe type, availability, and stability ofeffective cell adhesion peptides, and thus covalently bound shortpeptides would promote cell spreading and, thus, single cell adhesion andviability. The effectiveness of this approach and the underlyingmechanism for the increased probability of single cell adhesion andprolonged cell viability by short peptides were studied by comparingcellular behavior of human umbilical cord vein endothelial cells on threemodelsurfaces whose gold electrodes were immobilized with fibronectin,physically adsorbed Arg-Glu-Asp-Val-Tyr, and covalently boundLys-Arg-Glu-Asp-Val-Tyr, respectively. The surface chemistry and bindingproperties were characterized by reflectance Fourier transform infraredspectroscopy. Both short peptides were superior to fibronectin inproducing adhesion of only single cells, whereas the covalently boundpeptide also reduced apoptosis and necrosisof adhered cells. Controllingcell spreading by peptide binding domains to regulate apoptosis andviability represents a fundamental mechanism in cell-materialsinteraction and provides an effective strategy in engineering arrays ofsingle cells.

  5. Charge density wave transition in single-layer titanium diselenide

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chen, P.; Chan, Y. -H.; Fang, X. -Y.; Zhang, Y.; Chou, M. Y.; Mo, S. -K.; Hussain, Z.; Fedorov, A. -V.; Chiang, T. -C.

    2015-11-16

    A single molecular layer of titanium diselenide (TiSe2) is a promising material for advanced electronics beyond graphene--a strong focus of current research. Such molecular layers are at the quantum limit of device miniaturization and can show enhanced electronic effects not realizable in thick films. We show that single-layer TiSe2 exhibits a charge density wave (CDW) transition at critical temperature TC=232±5 K, which is higher than the bulk TC=200±5 K. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements reveal a small absolute bandgap at room temperature, which grows wider with decreasing temperature T below TC in conjunction with the emergence of (2 × 2) ordering.more » The results are rationalized in terms of first-principles calculations, symmetry breaking and phonon entropy effects. The behavior of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) gap implies a mean-field CDW order in the single layer and an anisotropic CDW order in the bulk.« less

  6. Charge density wave transition in single-layer titanium diselenide

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P.; Chan, Y. -H.; Fang, X. -Y.; Zhang, Y.; Chou, M. Y.; Mo, S. -K.; Hussain, Z.; Fedorov, A. -V.; Chiang, T. -C.

    2015-11-16

    A single molecular layer of titanium diselenide (TiSe2) is a promising material for advanced electronics beyond graphene--a strong focus of current research. Such molecular layers are at the quantum limit of device miniaturization and can show enhanced electronic effects not realizable in thick films. We show that single-layer TiSe2 exhibits a charge density wave (CDW) transition at critical temperature TC=232±5 K, which is higher than the bulk TC=200±5 K. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements reveal a small absolute bandgap at room temperature, which grows wider with decreasing temperature T below TC in conjunction with the emergence of (2 × 2) ordering. The results are rationalized in terms of first-principles calculations, symmetry breaking and phonon entropy effects. The behavior of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) gap implies a mean-field CDW order in the single layer and an anisotropic CDW order in the bulk.

  7. Charge density wave transition in single-layer titanium diselenide.

    PubMed

    Chen, P; Chan, Y-H; Fang, X-Y; Zhang, Y; Chou, M Y; Mo, S-K; Hussain, Z; Fedorov, A-V; Chiang, T-C

    2015-01-01

    A single molecular layer of titanium diselenide (TiSe2) is a promising material for advanced electronics beyond graphene-a strong focus of current research. Such molecular layers are at the quantum limit of device miniaturization and can show enhanced electronic effects not realizable in thick films. We show that single-layer TiSe2 exhibits a charge density wave (CDW) transition at critical temperature TC=232±5 K, which is higher than the bulk TC=200±5 K. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements reveal a small absolute bandgap at room temperature, which grows wider with decreasing temperature T below TC in conjunction with the emergence of (2 × 2) ordering. The results are rationalized in terms of first-principles calculations, symmetry breaking and phonon entropy effects. The observed Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) behaviour of the gap implies a mean-field CDW order in the single layer and an anisotropic CDW order in the bulk. PMID:26568512

  8. Comparative simulation studies of native and single-site mutant human beta-defensin-1 peptides.

    PubMed

    Toubar, Rabab A; Zhmurov, Artem; Barsegov, Valeri; Marx, Kenneth A

    2013-01-01

    Human defensins play important roles in a broad range of biological functions, such as microbial defense and immunity. Yet, little is known about their molecular properties, i.e. secondary structure stability, structural variability, important side chain interactions, surface charge distribution, and resistance to thermal fluctuations, and how these properties are related to their functions. To assess these factors, we studied the native human β-defensin-1 monomer and dimer as well as several single-site mutants using molecular dynamics simulations. The results showed that disulfide bonds are important determinants in maintaining the defensins' structural integrity, as no structural transitions were observed at 300 K and only minor structural unfolding was detected upon heating to 500 K. The α-helix was less thermally stable than the core β-sheet structure held together by hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions. The monomer α-helix stability was directly correlated, whereas the end-to-end distance was inversely correlated to the experimentally measured β-defensin-1 chemotactic activity, in the order: mutant 2 (Gln24Glu) > mutant 3 (Lys31Ala) = wild type > mutant 1 (Asn4Ala). The structural stability of the β-defensin-1 dimer species exhibited an inverse correlation to their chemotactic activity. In dimers formed by mutants 2 and 3, we observed sliding of one monomer upon the surface of the other in the absence of unbinding. This dynamic sliding feature may enhance the molecular oligomerization of β-defensin-1 peptides contributing to their antibacterial activity. It could also help these peptides orient correctly in the CC chemokine receptor 6 binding site, thereby initiating their chemotactic activity. In agreement with this notion, the remarkable sliding behavior was observed only for the mutants with the highest chemotactic activity.

  9. Charge transport in single CuO nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Junnan; Yin, Bo; Wu, Fei; Myung, Yoon; Banerjee, Parag

    2014-11-03

    Charge transport in single crystal, p-type cupric oxide (CuO) nanowire (NW) was studied through temperature based (120 K–400 K) current-voltage measurements. CuO NW with a diameter of 85 nm was attached to Au electrodes 2.25 μm apart, using dielectrophoresis. At low electrical field (<0.89 × 10{sup 3 }V/cm), an ohmic conduction is observed with an activation energy of 272 meV. The injected electrons fill traps with an average energy, E{sub T} = 26.6 meV and trap density, N{sub T} = 3.4 × 10{sup 15 }cm{sup −3}. After the traps are saturated, space charge limited current mechanism becomes dominant. For 120 K ≤ T ≤ 210 K phonon scattering limits mobility. For T ≥ 220 K, a thermally activated mobility is observed and is attributed to small polaron hopping with an activation energy of 44 meV. This mechanism yields a hole mobility of 0.0015 cm{sup 2}/V s and an effective hole concentration of 4 × 10{sup 18 }cm{sup −3} at 250 K.

  10. Production and properties of singly and multiply charged Kr clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Lezius, M.; Scheier, P.; Stamatovic, A.; Mark, T. D.

    1989-09-01

    Kr clusters produced in a supersonic nozzle expansion have been studied by electron impact ionization mass spectrometry. Mass resolved spectra (with /ital n/ up to 180) show two homologous series consisting of Kr/sup +//sub /ital n// and Kr/sup 2+//sub /ital n// ions. The distribution of Kr/sup +//sub /ital n// ions shows distinct magic number effects, the observed abundance anomalies being very similar to the ones observed in Ar and Xe. This confirms the superior stability of closed-shell and -subshell icosahedral structures. Moreover, we have found evidence for the occurrence of Kr/sup 3+//sub /ital n// and Kr/sup 4+//sub /ital n// ions. It was possible to determine appearance sizes of these multiply charged cluster ions (yielding /ital n//sub 2/=69, /ital n//sub 3/=156, and /ital n//sub 4/=264), and to study the electron energy dependence of singly and doubly charged cluster ions (yielding a linear threshold law). These results are discussed in view of various theoretical considerations and previous results where available.

  11. Charge transport in single CuO nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Junnan; Yin, Bo; Wu, Fei; Myung, Yoon; Banerjee, Parag

    2014-11-01

    Charge transport in single crystal, p-type cupric oxide (CuO) nanowire (NW) was studied through temperature based (120 K-400 K) current-voltage measurements. CuO NW with a diameter of 85 nm was attached to Au electrodes 2.25 μm apart, using dielectrophoresis. At low electrical field (<0.89 × 103 V/cm), an ohmic conduction is observed with an activation energy of 272 meV. The injected electrons fill traps with an average energy, ET = 26.6 meV and trap density, NT = 3.4 × 1015 cm-3. After the traps are saturated, space charge limited current mechanism becomes dominant. For 120 K ≤ T ≤ 210 K phonon scattering limits mobility. For T ≥ 220 K, a thermally activated mobility is observed and is attributed to small polaron hopping with an activation energy of 44 meV. This mechanism yields a hole mobility of 0.0015 cm2/V s and an effective hole concentration of 4 × 1018 cm-3 at 250 K.

  12. High speed single charge coupled device Cranz-Schardin camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deblock, Y.; Ducloux, O.; Derbesse, L.; Merlen, A.; Pernod, P.

    2007-03-01

    This article describes an ultrahigh speed visualization system based on a miniaturization of the Cranz-Schardin principle. It uses a set of high power light emitting diodes (LEDs) (Golden Dragon) as the light source and a highly sensitive charge coupled device (CCD) camera for reception. Each LED is fired in sequence and images the refraction index variation between two relay lenses, on a partial region of a CCD image sensor. The originality of this system consists in achieving several images on a single CCD during a frame time. The number of images is 4. The time interval between successive firings determines the speed of the imaging system. This time lies from 100nsto10μs. The light pulse duration lies from 100nsto10μs. The principle and the optical and electronic parts of such a system are described. As an example, some images of acoustic waves propagating in water are presented.

  13. Singly charged energetic helium emitted in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hovestadt, D.; Hoefner, H.; Klecker, B.; Scholer, M.; Gloeckler, G.; Ipavich, F. M.; Fan, C. Y.; Fisk, L. A.; Ogallagher, J. J.

    1981-01-01

    First direct charge state measurements of 0.41-1.05 MeV per nucleon helium accelerated at the sun reveal surprisingly large abundances of singly ionized helium, with typical He(+)/He(++) ratios between 0.04 and 0.21. This unexpected overabundance of He(+) was observed in each of the three large solar-flare particle events which occurred between 1978 August and 1979 October. The data were obtained with the Max-Planck-Institut/University of Maryland Experiment on board the ISEE-3 spacecraft. The observations suggest either strong coronal temperature inhomogeneities including cool regions of approximately 100,000 K or injection of 'cold' chromospheric/photospheric material into the flare acceleration region.

  14. Slowing down single-molecule trafficking through a protein nanopore reveals intermediates for peptide translocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mereuta, Loredana; Roy, Mahua; Asandei, Alina; Lee, Jong Kook; Park, Yoonkyung; Andricioaei, Ioan; Luchian, Tudor

    2014-01-01

    The microscopic details of how peptides translocate one at a time through nanopores are crucial determinants for transport through membrane pores and important in developing nano-technologies. To date, the translocation process has been too fast relative to the resolution of the single molecule techniques that sought to detect its milestones. Using pH-tuned single-molecule electrophysiology and molecular dynamics simulations, we demonstrate how peptide passage through the α-hemolysin protein can be sufficiently slowed down to observe intermediate single-peptide sub-states associated to distinct structural milestones along the pore, and how to control residence time, direction and the sequence of spatio-temporal state-to-state dynamics of a single peptide. Molecular dynamics simulations of peptide translocation reveal the time- dependent ordering of intermediate structures of the translocating peptide inside the pore at atomic resolution. Calculations of the expected current ratios of the different pore-blocking microstates and their time sequencing are in accord with the recorded current traces.

  15. Intrinsic Charge Carrier Mobility in Single-Layer Black Phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Rudenko, A N; Brener, S; Katsnelson, M I

    2016-06-17

    We present a theory for single- and two-phonon charge carrier scattering in anisotropic two-dimensional semiconductors applied to single-layer black phosphorus (BP). We show that in contrast to graphene, where two-phonon processes due to the scattering by flexural phonons dominate at any practically relevant temperatures and are independent of the carrier concentration n, two-phonon scattering in BP is less important and can be considered negligible at n≳10^{13}  cm^{-2}. At smaller n, however, phonons enter in the essentially anharmonic regime. Compared to the hole mobility, which does not exhibit strong anisotropy between the principal directions of BP (μ_{xx}/μ_{yy}∼1.4 at n=10^{13} cm^{-2} and T=300  K), the electron mobility is found to be significantly more anisotropic (μ_{xx}/μ_{yy}∼6.2). Absolute values of μ_{xx} do not exceed 250 (700)  cm^{2} V^{-1} s^{-1} for holes (electrons), which can be considered as an upper limit for the mobility in BP at room temperature. PMID:27367397

  16. Intrinsic Charge Carrier Mobility in Single-Layer Black Phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudenko, A. N.; Brener, S.; Katsnelson, M. I.

    2016-06-01

    We present a theory for single- and two-phonon charge carrier scattering in anisotropic two-dimensional semiconductors applied to single-layer black phosphorus (BP). We show that in contrast to graphene, where two-phonon processes due to the scattering by flexural phonons dominate at any practically relevant temperatures and are independent of the carrier concentration n , two-phonon scattering in BP is less important and can be considered negligible at n ≳1013 cm-2 . At smaller n , however, phonons enter in the essentially anharmonic regime. Compared to the hole mobility, which does not exhibit strong anisotropy between the principal directions of BP (μx x/μy y˜1.4 at n =1013 cm-2 and T =300 K ), the electron mobility is found to be significantly more anisotropic (μx x/μy y˜6.2 ). Absolute values of μx x do not exceed 250 (700 ) cm2 V-1 s-1 for holes (electrons), which can be considered as an upper limit for the mobility in BP at room temperature.

  17. Computational analysis of binding free energies between peptides and single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Y.; Liu, G. R.; Li, Z. R.; Lu, C.

    2006-07-01

    Coating carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with peptides can solubilize the nanotubes in water solvent. To explore the utilization of CNTs in solvent and the affinities of CNTs for different peptides, binding free energies of peptides to single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are calculated and analyzed. The interactions between different peptides and SWCNTs are simulated using molecular dynamics (MD) methods. The binding free energies of peptides onto the outer-surface of the SWCNTs are then estimated based on thermodynamics theory. The estimated results of binding free energies are qualitatively comparable to binding affinities observed in experiments. Furthermore, the conformations of the binding peptides, as well as the energetic contributions to total binding free energies are analyzed to reveal the physical mechanisms of the interactions, which would be difficult to observe using experimental approaches. The van der Waals interaction is found to play a key role in binding of peptides to SWCNTs. Other effects such as hydrophobicity and aromatic rings of peptides are also examined. The findings of this study provide better understanding of the binding strength between proteins and CNTs, and therefore have potential applications in both scientific research and in industry for controlling CNT self-assembly, designing bio-functionalized CNTs as biosensors, and drug and gene delivery devices.

  18. Diameter-selective solubilization of single-walled carbon nanotubes by reversible cyclic peptides.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Acevedo, Alfonso; Xie, Hui; Zorbas, Vasiliki; Sampson, William M; Dalton, Alan B; Baughman, Ray H; Draper, Rockford K; Musselman, Inga H; Dieckmann, Gregg R

    2005-07-01

    We have utilized reversible cyclic peptides (RCPs)-peptides containing alternating l- and d-amino acids with N- and C-termini derivatized with thiol-containing groups allowing reversible peptide cyclization-to solubilize and noncovalently functionalize carbon single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) in aqueous solution. Solubilization occurs through wrapping of RCPs around the circumference of a SWNT, followed by the formation of head-to-tail covalent bonds, yielding closed rings on the nanotubes. By controlling the length of the RCPs, we have demonstrated limited diameter-selective solubilization of the SWNTs as revealed by UV/vis/NIR and Raman spectroscopies, as well as atomic force microscopy. PMID:15984878

  19. Interaction of self-assembling beta-sheet peptides with phospholipid monolayers: the role of aggregation state, polarity, charge and applied field.

    PubMed

    Protopapa, Elisabeth; Maude, Steven; Aggeli, Amalia; Nelson, Andrew

    2009-03-01

    Studies of beta-sheet peptide/phospholipid interactions are important for an understanding of the folding of beta-sheet-rich membrane proteins and the action of antimicrobial and toxic peptides. Further, self-assembling peptides have numerous applications in medicine and therefore an insight is required into the relation between peptide molecular structure and biomembrane activity. We previously developed one of the simplest known model peptide systems which, above a critical concentration (c*) in solution, undergoes nucleated one-dimensional self-assembly from a monomeric random coil into a hierarchy of well defined beta-sheet structures. Here we examine the effects of peptide aggregation, polarity, charge, and applied field on peptide interactions with dioleoyl phosphatidylcholine (DOPC) monolayers using electrochemical techniques. The interactions of six systematically altered 11 residue beta-sheet tape-forming peptides were investigated. The following findings with respect to 11 residue beta-sheet peptide-DOPC interaction arose from the study: (i) The solution monomer peptide species is the monolayer active moeity. (ii) Amphiphilic peptides are more monolayer active than polar peptides in the absence of applied electric field. (iii) Positive charge on amphiphilic peptides facilitates monolayer interaction in the absence of applied electric field. (iv) Negative applied electric field facilitates monolayer interaction with positively charged amphiphilic and polar peptides. (v) Neutral amphiphilic peptides permeabilize DOPC layers to ions to the greatest extent. (vi) The beta-sheet tape forming peptides are shown to be significantly less monolayer disruptive than antimicrobial peptides. These conclusions will greatly contribute to the rational design of new peptide-based biomaterials and biosensors.

  20. The ornithine transcarbamylase leader peptide directs mitochondrial import through both its midportion structure and net positive charge

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    The cytoplasmically synthesized precursor of the mitochondrial matrix enzyme, ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC), is targeted to mitochondria by its NH2-terminal leader peptide. We previously established through mutational analysis that the midportion of the OTC leader peptide is functionally required. In this article, we report that study of additional OTC precursors, altered in either a site-directed or random manner, reveals that (a) the midportion, but not the NH2-terminal half, is sufficient by itself to direct import, (b) the functional structure in the midportion is unlikely to be an amphiphilic alpha-helix, (c) the four arginines in the leader peptide contribute collectively to import function by conferring net positive charge, and (d) surprisingly, proteolytic processing of the leader peptide does not require the presence of a specific primary structure at the site of cleavage, in order to produce the mature OTC subunit. PMID:3624306

  1. Antimicrobial Peptide Lactoferricin B-Induced Rapid Leakage of Internal Contents from Single Giant Unilamellar Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Moniruzzaman, Md; Alam, Jahangir Md; Dohra, Hideo; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2015-09-29

    Enzymatic digestion of bovine lactoferrin generates lactoferricin B (Lfcin B), a 25-mer peptide with strong antimicrobial activity of unknown mechanism. To elucidate the mechanistic basis of Lfcin B bactericidal activity, we investigated the interaction of Lfcin B with Escherichia coli and liposomes of lipid membranes. Lfcin B induced the influx of a membrane-impermeant fluorescent probe, SYTOX green, from the outside of E. coli into its cytoplasm. Lfcin B induced gradual leakage of calcein from large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) of dioleoylphosphatidylglycerol (DOPG)/dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) membranes. To clarify the cause of Lfcin B-induced leakage of calcein from the LUVs, we used the single giant unilamellar vesicle (GUV) method to investigate the interaction of Lfcin B with calcein-containing DOPG/DOPC-GUVs. We observed that a rapid leakage of calcein from a GUV started stochastically; statistical analysis provided a rate constant for Lfcin B-induced pore formation, kp. On the other hand, phase-contrast microscopic images revealed that Lfcin B induced a rapid leakage of sucrose from the single GUVs with concomitant appearance of a spherical GUV of smaller diameter. Because of the very fast leakage, and at the present time resolution of the experiments (33 ms), we could not follow the evolution of pore nor the process of the structural changes of the GUV. Here we used the term "local rupture" to express the rapid leakage of sucrose and determined the rate constant of local rupture, kL. On the basis of the comparison between kp and kL, we concluded that the leakage of calcein from single GUVs occurred as a result of a local rupture in the GUVs and that smaller pores inducing leakage of calcein were not formed before the local rupture. The results of the effect of the surface charge density of lipid membranes and that of salt concentration in buffer on kp clearly show that kp increases with an increase in the extent of electrostatic interactions due to

  2. Antimicrobial Peptide Lactoferricin B-Induced Rapid Leakage of Internal Contents from Single Giant Unilamellar Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Moniruzzaman, Md; Alam, Jahangir Md; Dohra, Hideo; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2015-09-29

    Enzymatic digestion of bovine lactoferrin generates lactoferricin B (Lfcin B), a 25-mer peptide with strong antimicrobial activity of unknown mechanism. To elucidate the mechanistic basis of Lfcin B bactericidal activity, we investigated the interaction of Lfcin B with Escherichia coli and liposomes of lipid membranes. Lfcin B induced the influx of a membrane-impermeant fluorescent probe, SYTOX green, from the outside of E. coli into its cytoplasm. Lfcin B induced gradual leakage of calcein from large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) of dioleoylphosphatidylglycerol (DOPG)/dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) membranes. To clarify the cause of Lfcin B-induced leakage of calcein from the LUVs, we used the single giant unilamellar vesicle (GUV) method to investigate the interaction of Lfcin B with calcein-containing DOPG/DOPC-GUVs. We observed that a rapid leakage of calcein from a GUV started stochastically; statistical analysis provided a rate constant for Lfcin B-induced pore formation, kp. On the other hand, phase-contrast microscopic images revealed that Lfcin B induced a rapid leakage of sucrose from the single GUVs with concomitant appearance of a spherical GUV of smaller diameter. Because of the very fast leakage, and at the present time resolution of the experiments (33 ms), we could not follow the evolution of pore nor the process of the structural changes of the GUV. Here we used the term "local rupture" to express the rapid leakage of sucrose and determined the rate constant of local rupture, kL. On the basis of the comparison between kp and kL, we concluded that the leakage of calcein from single GUVs occurred as a result of a local rupture in the GUVs and that smaller pores inducing leakage of calcein were not formed before the local rupture. The results of the effect of the surface charge density of lipid membranes and that of salt concentration in buffer on kp clearly show that kp increases with an increase in the extent of electrostatic interactions due to

  3. Ferromagnetism in Silicon Single Crystals with Positively Charged Vacancy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu; Zhang, Xinghong; Yuan, Quan; Han, Jiecai; Zhou, Shengqiang; Song, Bo

    Defect-induced ferromagnetism provides an alternative for organic and semiconductor spintronics. Here, we investigated the magnetism in Silicon after neutron irradiation and try to correlate the observed magnetism to particular defects in Si. Commercially available p-type Si single crystal wafer is cut into pieces for performing neutron irradiations. The magnetic impurities are ruled out as they can not be detected by secondary ion mass spectroscopy. With positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy, the positron trapping center corresponding to lifetime 375 ps is assigned to a kind of stable vacancy clusters of hexagonal rings (V6) and its concentration is enhanced by increasing neutron doses. After irradiation, the samples still show strong diamagnetism. The weak ferromagnetic signal in Si after irradiation enhances and then weakens with increasing irradiation doses. The saturation magnetization at room temperature is almost the same as that at 5 K. The X-ray magnetic circular dichroism further provides the direct evidence that Silicon is the origin of this ferromagnetism. Using first-principles calculations, it is found that positively charged V6 brings the spin polarization and the defects have coupling with each other. The work is financially supported by the Helmholtz Postdoc Programme (Initiative and Networking Fund, PD-146).

  4. Probing the charge-transfer dynamics in DNA at the single-molecule level.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Kiyohiko; Matsutani, Eri; Maruyama, Atsushi; Majima, Tetsuro

    2011-10-01

    Photoinduced charge-transfer fluorescence quenching of a fluorescent dye produces the nonemissive charge-separated state, and subsequent charge recombination makes the reaction reversible. While the information available from the photoinduced charge-transfer process provides the basis for monitoring the microenvironment around the fluorescent dyes and such monitoring is particularly important in live-cell imaging and DNA diagnosis, the information obtainable from the charge recombination process is usually overlooked. When looking at fluorescence emitted from each single fluorescent dye, photoinduced charge-transfer, charge-migration, and charge recombination cause a "blinking" of the fluorescence, in which the charge-recombination rate or the lifetime of the charge-separated state (τ) is supposed to be reflected in the duration of the off time during the single-molecule-level fluorescence measurement. Herein, based on our recently developed method for the direct observation of charge migration in DNA, we utilized DNA as a platform for spectroscopic investigations of charge-recombination dynamics for several fluorescent dyes: TAMRA, ATTO 655, and Alexa 532, which are used in single-molecule fluorescence measurements. Charge recombination dynamics were observed by transient absorption measurements, demonstrating that these fluorescent dyes can be used to monitor the charge-separation and charge-recombination events. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) of ATTO 655 modified DNA allowed the successful measurement of the charge-recombination dynamics in DNA at the single-molecule level. Utilizing the injected charge just like a pulse of sound, such as a "ping" in active sonar systems, information about the DNA sequence surrounding the fluorescent dye was read out by measuring the time it takes for the charge to return.

  5. Conformation-specific spectroscopy of capped glutamine-containing peptides: role of a single glutamine residue on peptide backbone preferences.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Patrick S; Dean, Jacob C; McBurney, Carl; Kang, Hyuk; Gellman, Samuel H; Zwier, Timothy S

    2016-04-28

    The conformational preferences of a series of short, aromatic-capped, glutamine-containing peptides have been studied under jet-cooled conditions in the gas phase. This work seeks a bottom-up understanding of the role played by glutamine residues in directing peptide structures that lead to neurodegenerative diseases. Resonant ion-dip infrared (RIDIR) spectroscopy is used to record single-conformation infrared spectra in the NH stretch, amide I and amide II regions. Comparison of the experimental spectra with the predictions of calculations carried out at the DFT M05-2X/6-31+G(d) level of theory lead to firm assignments for the H-bonding architectures of a total of eight conformers of four molecules, including three in Z-Gln-OH, one in Z-Gln-NHMe, three in Ac-Gln-NHBn, and one in Ac-Ala-Gln-NHBn. The Gln side chain engages actively in forming H-bonds with nearest-neighbor amide groups, forming C8 H-bonds to the C-terminal side, C9 H-bonds to the N-terminal side, and an amide-stacked geometry, all with an extended (C5) peptide backbone about the Gln residue. The Gln side chain also stabilizes an inverse γ-turn in the peptide backbone by forming a pair of H-bonds that bridge the γ-turn and stabilize it. Finally, the entire conformer population of Ac-Ala-Gln-NHBn is funneled into a single structure that incorporates the peptide backbone in a type I β-turn, stabilized by the Gln side chain forming a C7 H-bond to the central amide group in the β-turn not otherwise involved in a hydrogen bond. This β-turn backbone structure is nearly identical to that observed in a series of X-(AQ)-Y β-turns in the protein data bank, demonstrating that the gas-phase structure is robust to perturbations imposed by the crystalline protein environment.

  6. Using blocking peptides to control and analyze the mechanical properties of single fibrin fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddi, Pranav; O'Brien, E. Tim, III; Gorkun, Oleg; Falvo, Michael R.

    2011-10-01

    Fibrin is the main structural protein involved in blood clotting, and exhibits high strength and elasticity. Fibrin study traditionally focuses on fully formed clots, whereas we employ new AFM nanoManipulation techniques to study single fibrin fiber mechanics. We used 4 and 10 residue peptides to interfere with the knob-hole and αC interactions involved in fibrin polymerization to evaluate the contribution of each interaction to the fiber's mechanical properties. We varied the concentration of each peptide present during polymerization to find the concentration that inhibited polymerization by half. The presence of either peptide during fibrin polymerization did not affect single fiber breaking strain (δLL0). The breaking force of all treated fibers reduced from 10-50nN to 2-10nN, suggesting treated fibers are thinner or are the same diameter with some inhibition of interactions. Fibers polymerized with the knob-hole targeting peptide visibly lost elasticity after 100% strain, while fibers polymerized with the αC targeting peptide lost elasticity after reaching 150% strain, suggesting that the knob-hole interactions control single fiber elasticity.

  7. Bioelectronic interfaces by spontaneously organized peptides on 2D atomic single layer materials

    PubMed Central

    Hayamizu, Yuhei; So, Christopher R.; Dag, Sefa; Page, Tamon S.; Starkebaum, David; Sarikaya, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Self-assembly of biological molecules on solid materials is central to the “bottom-up” approach to directly integrate biology with electronics. Inspired by biology, exquisite biomolecular nanoarchitectures have been formed on solid surfaces. We demonstrate that a combinatorially-selected dodecapeptide and its variants self-assemble into peptide nanowires on two-dimensional nanosheets, single-layer graphene and MoS2. The abrupt boundaries of nanowires create electronic junctions via spatial biomolecular doping of graphene and manifest themselves as a self-assembled electronic network. Furthermore, designed peptides form nanowires on single-layer MoS2 modifying both its electric conductivity and photoluminescence. The biomolecular doping of nanosheets defined by peptide nanostructures may represent the crucial first step in integrating biology with nano-electronics towards realizing fully self-assembled bionanoelectronic devices. PMID:27653460

  8. Bioelectronic interfaces by spontaneously organized peptides on 2D atomic single layer materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayamizu, Yuhei; So, Christopher R.; Dag, Sefa; Page, Tamon S.; Starkebaum, David; Sarikaya, Mehmet

    2016-09-01

    Self-assembly of biological molecules on solid materials is central to the “bottom-up” approach to directly integrate biology with electronics. Inspired by biology, exquisite biomolecular nanoarchitectures have been formed on solid surfaces. We demonstrate that a combinatorially-selected dodecapeptide and its variants self-assemble into peptide nanowires on two-dimensional nanosheets, single-layer graphene and MoS2. The abrupt boundaries of nanowires create electronic junctions via spatial biomolecular doping of graphene and manifest themselves as a self-assembled electronic network. Furthermore, designed peptides form nanowires on single-layer MoS2 modifying both its electric conductivity and photoluminescence. The biomolecular doping of nanosheets defined by peptide nanostructures may represent the crucial first step in integrating biology with nano-electronics towards realizing fully self-assembled bionanoelectronic devices.

  9. Role of Charge and Solvation in the Structure and Dynamics of Alanine-Rich Peptide AKA2 in AOT Reverse Micelles.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Anna Victoria; Małolepsza, Edyta; Domínguez, Laura; Lu, Qing; Straub, John E

    2015-07-23

    The propensity of peptides to form α-helices has been intensely studied using theory, computation, and experiment. Important model peptides for the study of the coil-to-helix transition have been alanine-lysine (AKA) peptides in which the lysine residues are placed on opposite sides of the helix avoiding charge repulsion while enhancing solubility. In this study, the effects of capped versus zwitterionic peptide termini on the secondary structure of alanine-rich peptides in reverse micelles are explored. The reverse micelles are found to undergo substantial shape fluctuations, a property observed in previous studies of AOT reverse micelles in the absence of solvated peptide. The peptides are observed to interact with water, as well as the AOT surfactant, including interactions between the nonpolar residues and the aliphatic surfactant tails. Computation of IR spectra for the amide I band of the peptide allows for direct comparison with experimental spectra. The results demonstrate that capped AKA2 peptides form more stable α helices than zwitterionic AKA2 peptides in reverse micelles. The rotational anisotropy decay of water is found to be distinctly different in the presence or absence of peptide within the reverse micelle, suggesting that the introduction of peptide significantly alters the number of free waters within the reverse micelle nanopool. However, neither the nature of the peptide termini (capped or charged) nor the degree of peptide helicity is found to significantly alter the balance of interactions between the peptides and the environment. Observed changes in the degree of helicity in AKA2 peptides in bulk solution and in reverse micelle environments result from changes in peptide confinement and hydration as well as direct nonpolar and polar interactions with the water-surfactant interface.

  10. Role of Charge and Solvation in the Structure and Dynamics of Alanine-Rich Peptide AKA2 in AOT Reverse Micelles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The propensity of peptides to form α-helices has been intensely studied using theory, computation, and experiment. Important model peptides for the study of the coil-to-helix transition have been alanine–lysine (AKA) peptides in which the lysine residues are placed on opposite sides of the helix avoiding charge repulsion while enhancing solubility. In this study, the effects of capped versus zwitterionic peptide termini on the secondary structure of alanine-rich peptides in reverse micelles are explored. The reverse micelles are found to undergo substantial shape fluctuations, a property observed in previous studies of AOT reverse micelles in the absence of solvated peptide. The peptides are observed to interact with water, as well as the AOT surfactant, including interactions between the nonpolar residues and the aliphatic surfactant tails. Computation of IR spectra for the amide I band of the peptide allows for direct comparison with experimental spectra. The results demonstrate that capped AKA2 peptides form more stable α helices than zwitterionic AKA2 peptides in reverse micelles. The rotational anisotropy decay of water is found to be distinctly different in the presence or absence of peptide within the reverse micelle, suggesting that the introduction of peptide significantly alters the number of free waters within the reverse micelle nanopool. However, neither the nature of the peptide termini (capped or charged) nor the degree of peptide helicity is found to significantly alter the balance of interactions between the peptides and the environment. Observed changes in the degree of helicity in AKA2 peptides in bulk solution and in reverse micelle environments result from changes in peptide confinement and hydration as well as direct nonpolar and polar interactions with the water–surfactant interface. PMID:25337983

  11. Role of Charge and Solvation in the Structure and Dynamics of Alanine-Rich Peptide AKA2 in AOT Reverse Micelles.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Anna Victoria; Małolepsza, Edyta; Domínguez, Laura; Lu, Qing; Straub, John E

    2015-07-23

    The propensity of peptides to form α-helices has been intensely studied using theory, computation, and experiment. Important model peptides for the study of the coil-to-helix transition have been alanine-lysine (AKA) peptides in which the lysine residues are placed on opposite sides of the helix avoiding charge repulsion while enhancing solubility. In this study, the effects of capped versus zwitterionic peptide termini on the secondary structure of alanine-rich peptides in reverse micelles are explored. The reverse micelles are found to undergo substantial shape fluctuations, a property observed in previous studies of AOT reverse micelles in the absence of solvated peptide. The peptides are observed to interact with water, as well as the AOT surfactant, including interactions between the nonpolar residues and the aliphatic surfactant tails. Computation of IR spectra for the amide I band of the peptide allows for direct comparison with experimental spectra. The results demonstrate that capped AKA2 peptides form more stable α helices than zwitterionic AKA2 peptides in reverse micelles. The rotational anisotropy decay of water is found to be distinctly different in the presence or absence of peptide within the reverse micelle, suggesting that the introduction of peptide significantly alters the number of free waters within the reverse micelle nanopool. However, neither the nature of the peptide termini (capped or charged) nor the degree of peptide helicity is found to significantly alter the balance of interactions between the peptides and the environment. Observed changes in the degree of helicity in AKA2 peptides in bulk solution and in reverse micelle environments result from changes in peptide confinement and hydration as well as direct nonpolar and polar interactions with the water-surfactant interface. PMID:25337983

  12. Peptide secondary structure modulates single-walled carbon nanotube fluorescence as a chaperone sensor for nitroaromatics

    PubMed Central

    Heller, Daniel A.; Pratt, George W.; Zhang, Jingqing; Nair, Nitish; Hansborough, Adam J.; Boghossian, Ardemis A.; Reuel, Nigel F.; Barone, Paul W.; Strano, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    A class of peptides from the bombolitin family, not previously identified for nitroaromatic recognition, allows near-infrared fluorescent single-walled carbon nanotubes to transduce specific changes in their conformation. In response to the binding of specific nitroaromatic species, such peptide–nanotube complexes form a virtual “chaperone sensor,” which reports modulation of the peptide secondary structure via changes in single-walled carbon nanotubes, near-infrared photoluminescence. A split-channel microscope constructed to image quantized spectral wavelength shifts in real time, in response to nitroaromatic adsorption, results in the first single-nanotube imaging of solvatochromic events. The described indirect detection mechanism, as well as an additional exciton quenching-based optical nitroaromatic detection method, illustrate that functionalization of the carbon nanotube surface can result in completely unique sites for recognition, resolvable at the single-molecule level. PMID:21555544

  13. From Peptides to Proteins: Systematic Control of Net Molecular Charge and Hydrophilicity on the Kinetics of Calcite Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elhadj, S.; de Yoreo, J. J.; Hoyer, J. J.; Dove, P. M.

    2006-12-01

    The compartment-specific compositions of biologic molecules isolated from biominerals suggest that control of mineral growth may be linked to biochemical features. Here we define a systematic relationship between the ability of biomolecules in solution to promote the growth of calcite (CaCO3) and their net negative molecular charge and hydrophilicity. The degree of enhancement is dependent on peptide composition, but not on peptide sequence. Data analysis shows that this rate enhancement arises from an increase in the kinetic coefficient. We interpret the mechanism of growth enhancement to be a catalytic process whereby biomolecules reduce the magnitude of the diffusive barrier, Ek, by perturbations that displace water molecules- a water shell destruction mechanism. The result is a decrease in the repulsive barrier for attachment of solutes to the solid phase. This previously unrecognized relationship also rationalizes recently reported data showing acceleration of calcite growth rates over rates measured in the pure system by nanomolar levels of abalone nacre proteins. These findings show that the growth-modifying properties of small model peptides may be scaled up to analyze mineralization processes that are mediated by more complex proteins. We suggest that enhancement of calcite growth may now be estimated a priori from the composition of peptide sequences and the calculated values of hydrophilicity and net molecular charge without need for detailed tests for each biomolecule. This insight may contribute to an improved understanding of mineralization in diverse systems of biomineralization.

  14. Single-File Charge Storage in Conducting Nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Alpha A.; Kondrat, Svyatoslav; Kornyshev, Alexei A.

    2014-07-01

    Charging of a conducting tubular nanopore in a nanostructured electrode is treated using an exactly solvable 1D lattice model, including ion correlations screened by ion-image interactions. Analytical expressions are obtained for the accumulated charge and capacitance as a function of voltage. They show that the mechanism of charge storage, and the qualitative form of the capacitance-voltage curve, are sensitive to how favorable it is for ions to occupy the unpolarized pore, and the pore radius. Qualitative predictions of the theory are corroborated by Monte Carlo simulations. These results highlight the effect of ion affinity to unpolarized pores on the charge and energy storage in supercapacitors. Furthermore, they suggest that the question of the occupancy of unpolarized pores could be answered by measuring the capacitance-voltage dependence.

  15. Contactless measurements of charge migration within single molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaya, Kiyonobu; Iwayama, Hiroshi; Sugishima, Akinori; Ohmasa, Yoshinori; Yao, Makoto

    2010-06-07

    Contactless measurements of charge migration were carried out for three pi-conjugated molecules in each of which a bromine atom and an oxygen atom are located on the opposite sides of the aromatic ring. A core hole was generated selectively in the Br atom by x-ray absorption, followed by the Auger cascade, and the subsequent charge migration within the molecule was examined by detecting an O{sup +} ion by means of the coincidence momentum imaging measurements.

  16. The Effect of Single Particle Charge Limits on Particle Charge Distributions in Dusty Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girshick, Steven; Le Picard, Romain

    2013-09-01

    There is a limit to the number of electrons that can coexist on a dust particle in a plasma. This limit depends on the particle's surface potential, electron affinity and the inter-electron Coulomb repulsion. We conducted numerical simulations that examine the effect of charge limits on steady-state particle charge distributions, as well as on the time required to reach steady state. Attachment of electrons to a cloud of nanoparticles can severely deplete the electron density and increase the ion density, causing the electron-to-ion density ratio to be much less than unity. At sufficiently high values of the density ratio, e.g. above about 0.1 for 80-nm-diameter Si particles, the charge limit strongly constrains particle charge. At lower values of the density ratio, e.g. around 0.01, particles are much less negatively charged even in the absence of a charge limit, and therefore the limit makes only a small difference. However, in this regime the charge distribution still deviates from the Gaussian form predicted by previous work that neglects charge limits. For the case of Maxwellian electron velocity distributions, we find that whether or not particle charge distributions are significantly affected by charge limits depends on the dimensionless asymmetry charging factor p and on particle size. The factor p in turn depends on the ratios of electron-to-ion density, temperature and mass. Partially supported by the US NSF (grant CHE-1124752), US DOE Office of Fusion Energy Science (grant DE-SC0001939), and the Minnesota Supercomputing Institute.

  17. Visualizing Cyclic Peptide Hydration at the Single-Molecule Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yumin; Deng, Ke; Qiu, Xiaohui; Wang, Chen

    2013-08-01

    The role of water molecules in the selective transport of potassium ions across cell membranes is important. Experimental investigations of valinomycin-water interactions remain huge challenge due to the poor solubility of valinomycin in water. Herein, we removed this experimental obstacle by introducing gaseous water and valinomycin onto a Cu(111) surface to investigate the hydration of valinomycin. By combining scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) with density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we revealed that water could affect the adsorption structure of valinomycin. Hydrogen bond interactions occurred primarily at the carbonyl oxygen of valinomycin and resulted in the formation of valinomycin hydrates. The single-molecule perspective revealed in our investigation could provide new insight into the role of water on the conformation transition of valinomycin, which might provide a new molecular basis for the ion transport mechanism at the water/membrane interface.

  18. Electrical detection of the biological interaction of a charged peptide via gallium arsenide junction-field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kangho; Nair, Pradeep R; Alam, Muhammad A; Janes, David B; Wampler, Heeyeon P; Zemlyanov, Dmitry Y; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2008-06-01

    GaAs junction-field-effect transistors (JFETs) are utilized to achieve label-free detection of biological interaction between a probe transactivating transcriptional activator (TAT) peptide and the target trans-activation-responsive (TAR) RNA. The TAT peptide is a short sequence derived from the human immunodeficiency virus-type 1 TAT protein. The GaAs JFETs are modified with a mixed adlayer of 1-octadecanethiol (ODT) and TAT peptide, with the ODT passivating the GaAs surface from polar ions in physiological solutions and the TAT peptide providing selective binding sites for TAR RNA. The devices modified with the mixed adlayer exhibit a negative pinch-off voltage (V(P)) shift, which is attributed to the fixed positive charges from the arginine-rich regions in the TAT peptide. Immersing the modified devices into a TAR RNA solution results in a large positive V(P) shift (>1 V) and a steeper subthreshold slope ( approximately 80 mVdecade), whereas "dummy" RNA induced a small positive V(P) shift ( approximately 0.3 V) without a significant change in subthreshold slopes ( approximately 330 mVdecade). The observed modulation of device characteristics is analyzed with analytical modeling and two-dimensional numerical device simulations to investigate the electronic interactions between the GaAs JFETs and biological molecules.

  19. Electrical detection of the biological interaction of a charged peptide via gallium arsenide junction-field-effect transistors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kangho; Nair, Pradeep R.; Alam, Muhammad A.; Janes, David B.; Wampler, Heeyeon P.; Zemlyanov, Dmitry Y.; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2008-01-01

    GaAs junction-field-effect transistors (JFETs) are utilized to achieve label-free detection of biological interaction between a probe transactivating transcriptional activator (TAT) peptide and the target trans-activation-responsive (TAR) RNA. The TAT peptide is a short sequence derived from the human immunodeficiency virus-type 1 TAT protein. The GaAs JFETs are modified with a mixed adlayer of 1-octadecanethiol (ODT) and TAT peptide, with the ODT passivating the GaAs surface from polar ions in physiological solutions and the TAT peptide providing selective binding sites for TAR RNA. The devices modified with the mixed adlayer exhibit a negative pinch-off voltage (VP) shift, which is attributed to the fixed positive charges from the arginine-rich regions in the TAT peptide. Immersing the modified devices into a TAR RNA solution results in a large positive VP shift (>1 V) and a steeper subthreshold slope (∼80 mV∕decade), whereas “dummy” RNA induced a small positive VP shift (∼0.3 V) without a significant change in subthreshold slopes (∼330 mV∕decade). The observed modulation of device characteristics is analyzed with analytical modeling and two-dimensional numerical device simulations to investigate the electronic interactions between the GaAs JFETs and biological molecules. PMID:19484151

  20. Electrical detection of the biological interaction of a charged peptide via gallium arsenide junction-field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kangho; Nair, Pradeep R.; Alam, Muhammad A.; Janes, David B.; Wampler, Heeyeon P.; Zemlyanov, Dmitry Y.; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2008-06-01

    GaAs junction-field-effect transistors (JFETs) are utilized to achieve label-free detection of biological interaction between a probe transactivating transcriptional activator (TAT) peptide and the target trans-activation-responsive (TAR) RNA. The TAT peptide is a short sequence derived from the human immunodeficiency virus-type 1 TAT protein. The GaAs JFETs are modified with a mixed adlayer of 1-octadecanethiol (ODT) and TAT peptide, with the ODT passivating the GaAs surface from polar ions in physiological solutions and the TAT peptide providing selective binding sites for TAR RNA. The devices modified with the mixed adlayer exhibit a negative pinch-off voltage (VP) shift, which is attributed to the fixed positive charges from the arginine-rich regions in the TAT peptide. Immersing the modified devices into a TAR RNA solution results in a large positive VP shift (>1 V) and a steeper subthreshold slope (˜80 mV/decade), whereas "dummy" RNA induced a small positive VP shift (˜0.3 V) without a significant change in subthreshold slopes (˜330 mV/decade). The observed modulation of device characteristics is analyzed with analytical modeling and two-dimensional numerical device simulations to investigate the electronic interactions between the GaAs JFETs and biological molecules.

  1. Deterministic Electrical Charge-State Initialization of Single Nitrogen-Vacancy Center in Diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doi, Y.; Makino, T.; Kato, H.; Takeuchi, D.; Ogura, M.; Okushi, H.; Morishita, H.; Tashima, T.; Miwa, S.; Yamasaki, S.; Neumann, P.; Wrachtrup, J.; Suzuki, Y.; Mizuochi, N.

    2014-01-01

    Apart from applications in classical information-processing devices, the electrical control of atomic defects in solids at room temperature will have a tremendous impact on quantum devices that are based on such defects. In this study, we demonstrate the electrical manipulation of individual prominent representatives of such atomic solid-state defects, namely, the negative charge state of single nitrogen-vacancy defect centers (NV-) in diamond. We experimentally demonstrate, deterministic, purely electrical charge-state initialization of individual NV centers. The NV centers are placed in the intrinsic region of a p-i-n diode structure that facilitates the delivery of charge carriers to the defect for charge-state switching. The charge-state dynamics of a single NV center were investigated by time-resolved measurements and a nondestructive single-shot readout of the charge state. Fast charge-state switching rates (from negative to neutrally charged defects), which are greater than 0.72 ± 0.10 μs-1, were realized. Furthermore, in no-operation mode, the realized charge states were stable for presumably much more than 0.45 s. We believe that the results obtained are useful not only for ultrafast electrical control of qubits, long T2 quantum memory, and quantum sensors associated with single NV centers but also for classical memory devices based on single atomic storage bits working under ambient conditions.

  2. Structural transformation of peptide amphiphile self-assembly induced by headgroup charge and size regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Changrui; Bedzyk, Michael; Olvera, Monica; Kewalramani, Sumit; Palmer, Liam

    The ability to control the nano and the meso-scale architecture of molecular assemblies is one of the major challenges in nanoscience. Significantly, structural transformations of amphiphilic aggregates induced by variations in environmental conditions have attracted attention due to their biotechnological relevance. Here, we study the assembly in aqueous solution for a modular series of peptide amphiphiles with 3, 2 or 1 lysine groups conjugated to a C16 carbon tail (C16K3, C16K2 and C16K1) . This system design allow us to probe how the equilibrium structure of the self-assembly can be tuned by controlling the coupling between steric (via choice of headgroup: K3, K2, or K1) and electrostatic (via solution pH) interactions. Solution small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies reveal that depending on pH and number of lysines in the lipid headgroup, amphiphiles can assemble into a range of structures: spherical micelles, bilayer ribbons and vesicles. We also perform detailed phase space mapping of pH-and headgroup size dependency of the structures of assembly over 0.1-100 nm length scales via SAXS/WAXS. The experimental results in conjunction with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations deduce quantitative relations between pH-dependent molecular charges, steric constraints and self-assembly morphologies, which is significant for developing experimental routes to obtain assembly structures with specific nano- and meso-scale features through controlled external stimuli.

  3. High resolution time-of-flight mass analysis of the entire range of intact singly-charged proteins.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeonghoon; Chen, Huijuan; Liu, Tiancheng; Berkman, Clifford E; Reilly, Peter T A

    2011-12-15

    The proof of principle for high-resolution analysis of intact singly charged proteins of any size is presented. Singly charged protein ions were produced by electrospray ionization followed by surface-induced charge reduction at atmospheric pressure. The inlet and trapping system "stops" the forward momentum of the protein ions over a very broad range to be captured by the digitally produced electric fields of a large radius linear ion trap whereupon they are moved into a smaller radius linear ion trap and collected and concentrated in front of its exit end-cap electrode using digital waveform manipulation. The protein ions are then ejected on demand from the end of the small radius linear quadrupole in a tightly collimated ion beam with an instrumentally defined kinetic energy into the acceleration region of an orthogonal acceleration reflectron time-of-flight mass analyzer where their flight times were measured and detected with a Photonis BiPolar TOF detector. We present results that clearly prove that massive singly charged ions can yield high-resolution mass spectra with very low chemical noise and without loss of sensitivity with increasing mass across the entire spectrum. Analysis of noncovalently bound protein complexes was demonstrated with streptavidin-Cy5 bound with a biotinylated peptide mimic. Our results suggest proteins across the entire range can be directly quantified using our mass analysis technique. We present evidence that solvent molecules noncovalently adduct onto the proteins while yielding consistent flight time distributions. Finally, we provide a look into future that will result from the ability to rapidly measure and quantify protein distributions.

  4. Antitumor potential of a synthetic interferon-alpha/PLGF-2 positive charge peptide hybrid molecule in pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Hongmei; Chen, Naifei; Guo, Rui; Wang, Hong; Li, Wei; Wang, Guanjun; Cui, Jiuwei; Jin, Haofan; Hu, Ji-Fan

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the most aggressive malignant disease, ranking as the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death among men and women in the United States. Interferon alpha (IFNα) has been used to treat pancreatic cancer, but its clinical application has been significantly hindered due to the low antitumor activity. We used a “cDNA in-frame fragment library” screening approach to identify short peptides that potentiate the antitumor activity of interferons. A short positively charged peptide derived from the C-terminus of placental growth factor-2 (PLGF-2) was selected to enhance the activity of IFNα. For this, we constructed a synthetic interferon hybrid molecule (SIFα) by fusing the positively charged PLGF-2 peptide to the C-terminus of the human IFNα. Using human pancreatic cell lines (ASPC and CFPAC1) as a model system, we found that SIFα exhibited a significantly higher activity than did the wild-type IFNα in inhibiting the tumor cell growth. The enhanced activity of the synthetic SIFα was associated with the activation of interferon pathway target genes and the increased binding of cell membrane receptor. This study demonstrates the potential of a synthetic SIFα as a novel antitumor agent. PMID:26584517

  5. Single electron charge sensitivity of liquid-gated carbon nanotube transistors.

    PubMed

    Sharf, Tal; Wang, Neng-Ping; Kevek, Joshua W; Brown, Morgan A; Wilson, Heather; Heinze, Stefan; Minot, Ethan D

    2014-09-10

    Random telegraph signals corresponding to activated charge traps were observed with liquid-gated CNT FETs. The high signal-to-noise ratio that we observe demonstrates that single electron charge sensing is possible with CNT FETs in liquids at room temperature. We have characterized the gate-voltage dependence of the random telegraph signals and compared to theoretical predictions. The gate-voltage dependence clearly identifies the sign of the activated trapped charge. PMID:25160798

  6. Direct force measurement of single DNA-peptide interactions using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ji W; Shin, Dongjin; Kwak, June M; Seog, Joonil

    2013-06-01

    The selective interactions between DNA and miniature (39 residues) engineered peptide were directly measured at the single-molecule level by using atomic force microscopy. This peptide (p007) contains an α-helical recognition site similar to leucine zipper GCN4 and specifically recognizes the ATGAC sequence in the DNA with nanomolar affinity. The average rupture force was 42.1 pN, which is similar to the unbinding forces of the digoxigenin-antidigoxigenin complex, one of the strongest interactions in biological systems. The single linear fit of the rupture forces versus the logarithm of pulling rates showed a single energy barrier with a transition state located at 0.74 nm from the bound state. The smaller koff compared with that of other similar systems was presumably due to the increased stability of the helical structure by putative folding residues in p007. This strong sequence-specific DNA-peptide interaction has a potential to be utilized to prepare well-defined mechanically stable DNA-protein hybrid nanostructures.

  7. Supramolecular modification of ion chemistry: modulation of peptide charge state and dissociation behavior through complexation with cucurbit[n]uril (n = 5, 6) or alpha-cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haizhen; Grabenauer, Megan; Bowers, Michael T; Dearden, David V

    2009-02-26

    Electrospray Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry, ion mobility spectrometry, and computational methods were utilized to characterize the complexes between lysine or pentalysine with three prototypical host molecules: alpha-cyclodextrin (alpha-CD), cucurbit[5]uril (CB[5]), and cucurbit[6]uril (CB[6]). Ion mobility measurements show lysine forms externally bound, singly charged complexes with either alpha-CD or CB[5], but a doubly charged complex with the lysine side chain threaded through the host cavity of CB[6]. These structural differences result in distinct dissociation behaviors in collision-induced dissociation (CID) experiments: the alpha-CD complex dissociates via the simple loss of intact lysine, whereas the CB[5] complex dissociates to yield [CB[5] + H(3)O](+), and the CB[6] complex loses neutral NH(3) and CO, the product ion remaining a doubly charged complex. These results are consistent with B3LYP/6-31G* binding energies (kJ mol(-1)) of D(Lys + H(+)-alpha-CD) = 281, D(Lys + H(+)-CB[5]) = 327, and D(Lys + 2H(2+)-CB[6]) = 600. B3LYP/6-31G* geometry optimizations show complexation with alpha-CD stabilizes the salt bridge form of protonated lysine, whereas complexation with CB[6] stabilizes doubly protonated lysine. Complexation of the larger polypeptide pentalysine with alpha-CD forms a nonspecific adduct: no modification of the pentalysine charge state distribution is observed, and dissociation occurs via the simple loss of alpha-CD. Complexation of pentalysine with the cucurbiturils is more specific: the observed charge state distribution shifts higher on complexation, and fragmentation patterns are significantly altered relative to uncomplexed pentalysine: C-terminal fragment ions appear that are consistent with charge stabilization by the cucurbiturils, and the cucurbiturils are retained on the fragment ions. Molecular mechanics calculations suggest CB[5] binds to two protonated sites on pentalysine without threading onto the

  8. Charge division using carbon filaments for obtaining coordinate information from detection of single electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, F.; Shapiro, S.; Ashford, V.; McShurley, D.; Reif, R.; Lirth, D.W.G.S.; Williams, S.

    1985-09-01

    Seven micron diameter Carbon filaments forming the anode of a multiwire proportional chamber have been used to detect single electrons. Charge division techniques applied to the 5 cm long wire resulted in a position resolution of sigma/L < 2% for a collected signal charge of 30 fC.

  9. A singly charged ion source for radioactive 11C ion acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katagiri, K.; Noda, A.; Nagatsu, K.; Nakao, M.; Hojo, S.; Muramatsu, M.; Suzuki, K.; Wakui, T.; Noda, K.

    2016-02-01

    A new singly charged ion source using electron impact ionization has been developed to realize an isotope separation on-line system for simultaneous positron emission tomography imaging and heavy-ion cancer therapy using radioactive 11C ion beams. Low-energy electron beams are used in the electron impact ion source to produce singly charged ions. Ionization efficiency was calculated in order to decide the geometric parameters of the ion source and to determine the required electron emission current for obtaining high ionization efficiency. Based on these considerations, the singly charged ion source was designed and fabricated. In testing, the fabricated ion source was found to have favorable performance as a singly charged ion source.

  10. Phospholipid membrane-interaction of a peptide from S4 segment of KvAP K(+) channel and the influence of the positive charges and an identified heptad repeat in its interaction with a S3 peptide.

    PubMed

    Verma, Richa; Ghosh, Jimut Kanti

    2011-06-01

    In order to examine the ability of S3 and S4 segments of a Kv channel to interact with each other, two wild type short peptides derived from the S3 and S4 segments of KvAP channel were synthesized. Additionally, to evaluate the role of positive charges and an identified heptad repeat in the S4 segment, two S4 mutants of the same size as the S4 peptide, one with substitution of two leucine residues in the heptad repeat sequence by two alanine residues and in the other two arginine residues replaced by two glutamines residues were synthesized. Our results show that only the wild type S4 peptide, but not its mutants, self-assembled and permeabilized negatively charged phospholipid vesicles. The S3 peptide showed lesser affinity toward the same kind of lipid vesicles and localized onto its surface. However, the S3 peptide interacted only with S4 wild type peptide, but not with S4 mutants, and altered its localization onto the phospholipid membrane with increased resistance against the proteolytic enzyme, proteinase-k, in the presence of the S4 peptide. The results demonstrate that the selected, synthetic S3 and S4 segments possess the required amino acid sequences to interact with each other and show that the positive charges and the identified heptad repeat in S4 contribute to its assembly and interaction with S3 segment.

  11. Temperature dependence of charge transport in conjugated single molecule junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huisman, Eek; Kamenetska, Masha; Venkataraman, Latha

    2011-03-01

    Over the last decade, the break junction technique using a scanning tunneling microscope geometry has proven to be an important tool to understand electron transport through single molecule junctions. Here, we use this technique to probe transport through junctions at temperatures ranging from 5K to 300K. We study three amine-terminated (-NH2) conjugated molecules: a benzene, a biphenyl and a terphenyl derivative. We find that amine groups bind selectively to undercoordinate gold atoms gold all the way down to 5K, yielding single molecule junctions with well-defined conductances. Furthermore, we find that the conductance of a single molecule junction increases with temperature and we present a mechanism for this temperature dependent transport result. Funded by a Rubicon Grant from The Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO) and the NSEC program of NSF under grant # CHE-0641523.

  12. Bridging Adhesion of Mussel-Inspired Peptides: Role of Charge, Chain Length, and Surface Type

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (Dopa)-containing proteins of marine mussels provide attractive design paradigms for engineering synthetic polymers that can serve as high performance wet adhesives and coatings. Although the role of Dopa in promoting adhesion between mussels and various substrates has been carefully studied, the context by which Dopa mediates a bridging or nonbridging macromolecular adhesion to surfaces is not understood. The distinction is an important one both for a mechanistic appreciation of bioadhesion and for an intelligent translation of bioadhesive concepts to engineered systems. On the basis of mussel foot protein-5 (Mfp-5; length 75 res), we designed three short, simplified peptides (15–17 res) and one relatively long peptide (30 res) into which Dopa was enzymatically incorporated. Peptide adhesion was tested using a surface forces apparatus. Our results show that the short peptides are capable of weak bridging adhesion between two mica surfaces, but this adhesion contrasts with that of full length Mfp-5, in that (1) while still dependent on Dopa, electrostatic contributions are much more prominent, and (2) whereas Dopa surface density remains similar in both, peptide adhesion is an order of magnitude weaker (adhesion energy Ead ∼ −0.5 mJ/m2) than full length Mfp-5 adhesion. Between two mica surfaces, the magnitude of bridging adhesion was approximately doubled (Ead ∼ −1 mJ/m2) upon doubling the peptide length. Notably, the short peptides mediate much stronger adhesion (Ead ∼ −3.0 mJ/m2) between mica and gold surfaces, indicating that a long chain length is less important when different interactions are involved on each of the two surfaces. PMID:25540823

  13. Photon correlation studies of charge variation in a single GaAlAs quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piętka, B.; Suffczyński, J.; Goryca, M.; Kazimierczuk, T.; Golnik, A.; Kossacki, P.; Wysmolek, A.; Gaj, J. A.; Stępniewski, R.; Potemski, M.

    2013-01-01

    Complex charge variation processes in low-density, direct-type GaAlAs quantum dots embedded in a type-II GaAs/AlAs bilayer are studied by single-photon correlation measurements. Two groups of excitonic transitions are distinguished in the single quantum dot (QD) photoluminescence spectra, namely due to recombination of neutral and charged multiexcitonic complexes. The radiative cascades are found within each group. Three characteristic time scales are identified in the QD emission dynamics. The fastest one (of the order of 1 ns) is related to excitonic radiative recombination. The two remaining ones are related to the QD charge state variation. The one of 100-ns range (typical blinking time scale) corresponds to random capture of single carriers under a quasiresonant excitation. The slowest processes, in the range of seconds, are related to charge fluctuations in the surrounding of the dot.

  14. A Study of Charged Current Single Charged Pion Productions on Carbon in a Few-GeV Neutrino Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Hiraide, Katsuki

    2009-01-01

    Understanding single charged pion production via neutrino-nucleus charged current interaction in the neutrino energy region of a few GeV is essential for future neutrino oscillation experiments since this process is a dominant background for vμ → vx oscillation measurements. There are two contributions to this process: single pion production via baryonic resonance (vμN → μ-+) and coherent pion production interacting with the entire nucleus (vμA → μ-+), where N is nucleon in the nucleus and A is the nucleus. The purpose of the study presented in this thesis is a precise measurement of charged current single charged pion productions, resonant and coherent pion productions, with a good final state separation in the neutrino energy region of a few GeV. In this thesis, we focus on the study of charged current coherent pion production from muon neutrinos scattering on carbon, vμ 12C → μ-12+, in the SciBooNE experiment. This is motivated by the fact that without measuring this component first, the precise determination of resonant pion production cross section can not be achieved since the contribution of coherent pion production in the region of small muon scattering angle is not small. Furthermore, the coherent process is particularly interesting because it is deeply rooted in fundamental physics via Adler's partially conserved axial-vector current theorem. We took data from June 2007 until August 2008, in both the neutrino and antineutrino beam. In total, 2.52 x 1020 protons on target were collected. We have performed a search for charged current coherent pion production by using SciBooNE's full neutrino data set, corresponding to 0.99 x 1020 protons on target. No evidence for coherent pion production is observed. We set 90% confidence level upper limits on the cross section ratio of charged

  15. A novel single-domain peptide, anti-LPS factor from prawn: synthesis of peptide, antimicrobial properties and complete molecular characterization.

    PubMed

    Arockiaraj, Jesu; Kumaresan, Venkatesh; Bhatt, Prasanth; Palanisamy, Rajesh; Gnanam, Annie J; Pasupuleti, Mukesh; Kasi, Marimuthu; Chaurasia, Mukesh Kumar

    2014-03-01

    In this study, we reported a complete molecular characterization including bioinformatics features, gene expression, peptide synthesis and its antimicrobial activities of an anti-lipopolysaccharide (LPS) factor (ALF) cDNA identified from the established cDNA library of freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii (named as MrALF). The mature protein has an estimated molecular weight of 11.240 kDa with an isoelectric point of 9.46. The bioinformatics analysis showed that the MrALF contains an antimicrobial peptide (AMP) region between T54 and P77 with two conserved cysteine residues (Cys55 and Cys76) which have an anti-parallel β-sheet confirmation. The β-sheet is predicted as cationic with hydrophobic nature containing a net charge of +5. The depicted AMP region is determined to be amphipathic with a predicted hydrophobic face 'FPVFI'. A highest MrALF gene expression was observed in hemocytes and is up-regulated with virus [white spot syndrome baculovirus (WSBV)], bacteria (Aeromonas hydrophila) and Escherichia coli LPS at various time points. The LPS binding region of MrALF peptide was synthesized to study the antimicrobial property, bactericidal efficiency and hemolytic capacity. The peptide showed antimicrobial activity against both the Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. The bactericidal assay showed that the peptide recognized the LPS of bacterial cell walls and binding on its substrate and thereby efficiently distinguishing the pathogens. The hemolytic activity of MrALF peptide is functioning in a concentration dependant manner. In summary, the comprehensive analysis of MrALF showed it to be an effective antimicrobial peptide and thus it plays a crucial role in the defense mechanism of M. rosenbergii. PMID:24269604

  16. Large Silver Halide Single Crystals as Charged Particle Track Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kusmiss, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    The trajectory of the particle is made visible under a microscope by the accumulation of metallic silver at regions of the lattice damaged by the particle. This decoration of the particle track is accomplished by exposure of the crystal to light. The decoration of normally present lattice imperfections such as dislocations can be suppressed by the addition to the crystal of less than ten parts per million of a suitable polyvalent metal impurity. An account of some preliminary attempts to grow thin single crystals of AgCl is given also, and suggestions for a more refined technique are offered.

  17. Quantum charge fluctuations and the polarizability of the single-electron box

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, Konrad

    2004-03-01

    We have made the most precise and accurate measurements of the charge of a nanoscale circuit to date. Using the speed and sensitivity of a radio-frequency single electron transistor (RF-SET), we measure the charge on the island of a single electron box with an accuracy of two thousandths of an electron. We easily detect the addition of single electrons to the box. Furthermore, we can resolve fine structure, about one percent of an electron's charge, associated with the time-averaged quantum fluctuations of charge onto and off of the island. We are able to compare this fine structure to theories of this effect in two different regimes. First, in a regime where both thermal and quantum fluctuations are important, we find that the island charge behaves like a local magnetic moment in the Kondo problem, as initially predicted by Matveev (K. A. Matveev, Sov. Phys. JETP 72, 892 (1991)). Second, in a regime of pure quantum fluctuations we find excellent agreement between our measurements and a theory that treats the quantum fluctuations of charge perturbatively (G. Göppert and H. Grabert, Phys. Rev. B 63, 125307 (2001)). Our ablility to resolve this effect, which is the equivalent of the Lamb shift in this solid state system, illustrates the exceptional charge sensitivity that can achieved with the RF-SET.

  18. Single-file diffusion of macroscopic charged particles.

    PubMed

    Coste, C; Delfau, J-B; Even, C; Saint Jean, M

    2010-05-01

    In this paper, we study a macroscopic system of electrically interacting metallic beads organized as a sequence along an annulus. A random mechanical shaking mimics the thermal excitation. We exhibit non-Fickian diffusion (single-file diffusion) at large time. We measure the mobility of the particles and compare it to theoretical expectations. We show that our system cannot be accurately described by theories assuming only hard-sphere interactions. Its behavior is qualitatively described by a theory extended to more realistic potentials [M. Kollmann, Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 180602 (2003)]. A correct quantitative agreement is shown and we interpret the discrepancies by the violation of the assumption of overdamped dynamics, which is a key point in the theory. We recast previous results on colloids with known interaction potentials and compare them quantitatively to the theory. Focusing on the transition between ordinary and single-file diffusions, we exhibit a dimensionless crossover time that is of order 1 both for colloids and our system, although the time and length scales differ by several orders of magnitude.

  19. Evidence for charge exchange effects in electronic excitations in Al by slow singly charged He ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccardi, P.; Sindona, A.; Dukes, C. A.

    2016-09-01

    We report on experiments of secondary electron emission in the interaction of helium ions with aluminum surfaces. Comparison between the electron emission induced by the impact of 3He+ and 4He+ on Al illustrates similarities and differences between the two projectiles. The intensity of emission shows the same dependence on velocity for the two isotopes, showing that KEE yields for helium ions impact on Al are dominated by direct excitation of valence electrons and not by electron promotion. Electron promotion and charge transfer processes are unambiguously identified by the observation of Auger electron emission from Al, at energies below the excitation threshold of Al-Al collisions, indicating energy losses for the projectiles higher than those commonly considered.

  20. Single molecule detection using charge-coupled device array technology. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Denton, M.B.

    1992-07-29

    A technique for the detection of single fluorescent chromophores in a flowing stream is under development. This capability is an integral facet of a rapid DNA sequencing scheme currently being developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory. In previous investigations, the detection sensitivity was limited by the background Raman emission from the water solvent. A detection scheme based on a novel mode of operating a Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) is being developed which should greatly enhance the discrimination between fluorescence from a single molecule and the background Raman scattering from the solvent. Register shifts between rows in the CCD are synchronized with the sample flow velocity so that fluorescence from a single molecule is collected in a single moving charge packet occupying an area approaching that of a single pixel while the background is spread evenly among a large number of pixels. Feasibility calculations indicate that single molecule detection should be achieved with an excellent signal-to-noise ratio.

  1. Introducing charge transfer functionality into prebiotically relevant β-sheet peptide fibrils.

    PubMed

    Ivnitski, Denis; Amit, Moran; Rubinov, Boris; Cohen-Luria, Rivka; Ashkenasy, Nurit; Ashkenasy, Gonen

    2014-06-28

    Incorporation of naphthalene diimide moieties as side chains of short amphiphilic peptide results in the formation of fibrils that exhibit substantial intermolecular π-stacking interactions. These interactions can be manipulated without affecting the structure. The new system is suggested as a first step towards functional self-synthesizing materials. PMID:24828820

  2. Single liposome analysis of peptide translocation by the ABC transporter TAPL

    PubMed Central

    Zollmann, Tina; Moiset, Gemma; Tumulka, Franz; Tampé, Robert; Poolman, Bert; Abele, Rupert

    2015-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters use ATP to drive solute transport across biological membranes. Members of this superfamily have crucial roles in cell physiology, and some of the transporters are linked to severe diseases. However, understanding of the transport mechanism, especially of human ABC exporters, is scarce. We reconstituted the human lysosomal polypeptide ABC transporter TAPL, expressed in Pichia pastoris, into lipid vesicles (liposomes) and performed explicit transport measurements. We analyzed solute transport at the single liposome level by monitoring the coincident fluorescence of solutes and proteoliposomes in the focal volume of a confocal microscope. We determined a turnover number of eight peptides per minute, which is two orders of magnitude higher than previously estimated from macroscopic measurements. Moreover, we show that TAPL translocates peptides against a large concentration gradient. Maximal filling is not limited by an electrochemical gradient but by trans-inhibition. Countertransport and reversibility studies demonstrate that peptide translocation is a strictly unidirectional process. Altogether, these data are included in a refined model of solute transport by ABC exporters. PMID:25646430

  3. Identification of peptides using gold nanoparticle-assisted single-drop microextraction coupled with AP-MALDI mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sudhir, Putty-Reddy; Wu, Hui-Fen; Zhou, Zi-Cong

    2005-11-15

    A novel technique, gold nanoparticle-assisted single-drop microextraction (SDME) combined with atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (AP-MALDI-MS) for the identification of peptides has been described. The SDME of peptides from aqueous solution was achieved using gold nanoparticles prepared in toluene as the acceptor phase. A simple phenomenon of isoelectric point (pI) of the peptides has been utilized successfully to extract the peptides into a single drop of nanogold in toluene. After extraction, a single-drop nano gold solution was directly spotted onto the target plate with an equal volume of matrix, proportional, variant-cyanohydroxy cinnamic acid ( proportional, variant-CHCA) and analyzed in AP-MALDI-MS. The parameters, such as solvent selection, extraction time, agitation rate, and pH effect, were optimized for the SDME technique. Using this technique, in aqueous solution, the lowest concentration detected for Met- and Leu-enkephalin peptides was 0.2 and 0.17 microM, respectively. In addition, the application of this technique to obtain the signal for the selected peptides in a mass spectrum in the presence of matrix interferences such as 1% Triton X-100 and 6.5 M urea has been showed. The application was extended to identify the peptides spiked into urine.

  4. Covalent monofunctionalization of peptide-coated quantum dots for single-molecule assays.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Samuel; Pinaud, Fabien; Beutel, Oliver; You, Changjiang; Piehler, Jacob; Dahan, Maxime

    2010-06-01

    Fluorescent probes for biological imaging of single molecules (SM) have many stringent design requirements. In the case of quantum dot (QD) probes, it remains a challenge to control their functional properties with high precision. Here, we describe the simple preparation of QDs with reduced size and monovalency. Our approach combines a peptide surface coating, stable covalent conjugation of targeting units and purification by gel electrophoresis. We precisely characterize these probes by ensemble and SM techniques and apply them to tracking individual proteins in living cells. PMID:20433164

  5. Detection of single-nucleotide variations by monitoring the blinking of fluorescence induced by charge transfer in DNA.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Kiyohiko; Majima, Tetsuro; Maruyama, Atsushi

    2013-08-19

    Charge transfer dynamics in DNA: Photo-induced charge separation and charge-recombination dynamics in DNA was assessed by monitoring the blinking of fluorescence. Single nucleotide variations, mismatch and one base deletion, were differentiated based on the length of the off-time of the blinking, which corresponds to the lifetime of the charge-separated state. PMID:23846860

  6. Gold plasmonic effects on charge transport through single molecule junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adak, Olgun; Venkataraman, Latha

    2014-03-01

    We study the impact of surface plasmon polaritons, the coupling of electromagnetic waves to collective electron oscillations on metal surfaces, on the conductance of single-molecule junctions. We use a scanning-tunneling microscope based break junction setup that is built into an optical microscope to form molecular junctions. Coherent 685nm light is used to illuminate the molecular junctions formed with 4,4'-bipyridine with diffraction limited focusing performance. We employ a lock-in type technique to measure currents induced by light. Furthermore, the thermal expansion due to laser heating is mimicked by mechanically modulating inter-electrode separation. For each junction studied, we measure current, and use AC techniques to determine molecular junction resonance levels and coupling strengths. We use a cross correlations analysis technique to analyze and compare the effect of light to that of the mechanical modulation. Our results show that junction transmission characteristics are not altered under illumination, within the resolution of our instrument. We argue that photo-currents measured with lock-in techniques in these kinds of structures are due to thermal effects. This work was funded by the Center for Re-Defining Photovoltaic Efficiency through Molecule Scale Control, an EFRC funded by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Contract No. DESC0001085.

  7. Comment on ‘The effect of single-particle charge limits on charge distributions in dusty plasmas’

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heijmans, L. C. J.; van de Wetering, F. M. J. H.; Nijdam, S.

    2016-09-01

    It was recently suggested that the electron affinity may pose an additional upper limit on the charge of a single particle in a plasma, in addition to the electron field emission limit. Here we will, however, show that these two limits both rely on the same physical process and that the limit is only relevant for small particles, because it relies on electron tunneling. Plasma-produced particles of only several nanometres (≲ 10~\\text{nm} ) in size are actively studied, for example in the application of quantum dots and the implications of the proposed charge limit are certainly significant there. However, care must be taken to extend the results to larger particles, which are also actively studied in the field of dusty plasma physics, where typically the limit can be neglected, as we will also show.

  8. Double Layer Charging for Conductivity Enhancement of Pure Metallic and Semiconducting Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayo, Nathanael; Kuznetsov, Alexander; Zakhidov, Anvar

    2011-03-01

    Injecting high electronic charge densities can profoundly change the optical, electrical, and magnetic properties of materials. Evidence suggests a possibility of significantly improving conductivity of carbon nanotubes through double layer charge injection. Double layer charge injection can prove to be a powerful method when applied to carbon nanotubes because of theirs high surface area and chemical stability. Investigation has commenced on the effect of charging on various types of carbon nanotubes, specifically 99% purified single wall semiconducting and single wall metallic tubes. An electrical double layer is electrochemically introduced upon a sheet of carbon nanotubes via application of potential (up to +/- 5 volts) to a sample immersed in ionic-liquid-based electrolyte. Resistance of carbon nanotube as a function of applied charging voltage is recorded to determine the effects of charge injection. Results show that the electrical double layer considerably reduces the resistance across both samples. ESR/LFMA studies combined with low temperature magnetic and transport measurements are conducted to search for charge injection induced superconductivity in carbon nanotubes. Supported by AFOSR grant FA 9550-09-1-0384.

  9. High-sensitivity single NV magnetometry by spin-to-charge state mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaskula, Jean-Christophe; Shields, Brendan; Bauch, Erik; Lukin, Mikhail; Walsworth, Ronald; Trifonov, Alexei

    2015-05-01

    Nitrogen-Vacancy (NV) centers in diamond are atom-like quantum system in a solid state matrix whom its structure allows optical readout of the electronic spin. However, the optimal duration of optical readout is limited by a singlet state lifetime making single shot spin readout out of reach. On the other side, the NV center charge state readout can be extremely efficient (up to 99% fidelity) by using excitation at 594 nm. We will present a new method of spin readout utilizing a spin-depending photoionization process to map the electronic spin state of the NV onto the its charge state. Moreover, pre-selection on the charged state allows to minimize data acquisition time. This scheme improves single NV AC magnetometry by a factor of 5 and will benefit other single NV center experiments as well.

  10. Ion/ion reactions of MALDI-derived peptide ions: increased sequence coverage via covalent and electrostatic modification upon charge inversion.

    PubMed

    Stutzman, John R; McLuckey, Scott A

    2012-12-18

    Atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (AP-MALDI)-derived tryptic peptide ions have been subjected to ion/ion reactions with doubly deprotonated 4-formyl-1,3-benzenedisulfonic acid (FBDSA) in the gas-phase. The ion/ion reaction produces a negatively charged electrostatic complex composed of the peptide cation and reagent dianion, whereupon dehydration of the complex via collision-induced dissociation (CID) produces a Schiff base product anion. Collisional activation of modified lysine-terminated tryptic peptide anions is consistent with a covalent modification of unprotonated primary amines (i.e., N-terminus and ε-NH(2) of lysine). Modified arginine-terminated tryptic peptides have shown evidence of a covalent modification at the N-terminus and a noncovalent interaction with the arginine residue. The modified anions yield at least as much sequence information upon CID as the unmodified cations for the small tryptic peptides examined here and more sequence information for the large tryptic peptides. This study represents the first demonstration of gas-phase ion/ion reactions involving MALDI-derived ions. In this case, covalent and electrostatic modification charge inversion is shown to enhance MALDI tandem mass spectrometry of tryptic peptides. PMID:23078018

  11. Salt effects on hydrophobic interaction and charge screening in the folding of a negatively charged peptide to a coiled coil (leucine zipper).

    PubMed

    Jelesarov, I; Dürr, E; Thomas, R M; Bosshard, H R

    1998-05-19

    The stability of a coiled coil or leucine zipper is controlled by hydrophobic interactions and electrostatic forces between the constituent helices. We have designed a 30-residue peptide with the repeating seven-residue pattern of a coiled coil, (abcdefg)n, and with Glu in positions e and g of each heptad. The glutamate side chains prevented folding at pH values above 6 because of electrostatic repulsion across the helix dimer interface as well as within the individual helices. Protonation of the carboxylates changed the conformation from a random coil monomer to a coiled coil dimer. Folding at alkaline pH where the peptide had a net charge of -7e was promoted by the addition of salts. The nature of the charge screening cation was less important than that of the anion. The high salt concentrations (>1 M) necessary to induce folding indicated that the salt-induced folding resulted from alterations in the protein-water interaction. Folding was promoted by the kosmotropic anions sulfate and fluoride and to a lesser extent by the weak kosmotrope formate, whereas chloride and the strong chaotrope perchlorate were ineffective. Kosmotropes are excluded from the protein surface, which is preferentially hydrated, and this promotes folding by strengthening hydrophobic interactions at the coiled coil interface. Although charge neutralization also contributed to folding, it was effective only when the screening cation was partnered by a good kosmotropic anion. Folding conformed to a two-state transition from random coil monomer to coiled coil dimer and was enthalpy driven and characterized by a change in the heat capacity of unfolding of 3.9 +/- 1.2 kJ mol-1 K-1. The rate of folding was analyzed by fluorescence stopped-flow measurements. Folding occurred in a biphasic reaction in which the rapid formation of an initial dimer (kf = 2 x 10(7) M-1 s-1) was followed by an equally rapid concentration-independent rearrangement to the folded dimer (k > 100 s-1).

  12. Salt effects on hydrophobic interaction and charge screening in the folding of a negatively charged peptide to a coiled coil (leucine zipper).

    PubMed

    Jelesarov, I; Dürr, E; Thomas, R M; Bosshard, H R

    1998-05-19

    The stability of a coiled coil or leucine zipper is controlled by hydrophobic interactions and electrostatic forces between the constituent helices. We have designed a 30-residue peptide with the repeating seven-residue pattern of a coiled coil, (abcdefg)n, and with Glu in positions e and g of each heptad. The glutamate side chains prevented folding at pH values above 6 because of electrostatic repulsion across the helix dimer interface as well as within the individual helices. Protonation of the carboxylates changed the conformation from a random coil monomer to a coiled coil dimer. Folding at alkaline pH where the peptide had a net charge of -7e was promoted by the addition of salts. The nature of the charge screening cation was less important than that of the anion. The high salt concentrations (>1 M) necessary to induce folding indicated that the salt-induced folding resulted from alterations in the protein-water interaction. Folding was promoted by the kosmotropic anions sulfate and fluoride and to a lesser extent by the weak kosmotrope formate, whereas chloride and the strong chaotrope perchlorate were ineffective. Kosmotropes are excluded from the protein surface, which is preferentially hydrated, and this promotes folding by strengthening hydrophobic interactions at the coiled coil interface. Although charge neutralization also contributed to folding, it was effective only when the screening cation was partnered by a good kosmotropic anion. Folding conformed to a two-state transition from random coil monomer to coiled coil dimer and was enthalpy driven and characterized by a change in the heat capacity of unfolding of 3.9 +/- 1.2 kJ mol-1 K-1. The rate of folding was analyzed by fluorescence stopped-flow measurements. Folding occurred in a biphasic reaction in which the rapid formation of an initial dimer (kf = 2 x 10(7) M-1 s-1) was followed by an equally rapid concentration-independent rearrangement to the folded dimer (k > 100 s-1). PMID:9585569

  13. Dynamical Interactions of 5-Fluorouracil Drug with Dendritic Peptide Vectors: The Impact of Dendrimer Generation, Charge, Counterions, and Structured Water.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Sergio; Seal, Prasenjit; Ouyang, Defang; Parekh, Harendra S; Kannam, Sridhar Kumar; Smith, Sean C

    2016-06-30

    Molecular dynamics simulations are utilized to investigate the interactions between the skin cancer drug 5-fluorouracil (5FU) and peptide-based dendritic carrier systems. We find that these drug-carrier interactions do not conform to the traditional picture of long-time retention of the drug within a hydrophobic core of the dendrimer carrier. Rather, 5FU, which is moderately soluble in its own right, experiences weak, transient chattering interactions all over the dendrimer, mediated through multiple short-lived hydrogen bonding and close contact events. We find that charge on the periphery of the dendrimer actually has a negative effect on the frequency of drug-carrier interactions due to a counterion screening effect that has not previously been observed. However, charge is nevertheless an important feature since neutral dendrimers are shown to have a significant mutual attraction that can lead to clustering or agglomeration. This clustering is prevented due to charge repulsion for the titrated dendrimers, such that they remain independent in solution.

  14. Dynamical Interactions of 5-Fluorouracil Drug with Dendritic Peptide Vectors: The Impact of Dendrimer Generation, Charge, Counterions, and Structured Water.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Sergio; Seal, Prasenjit; Ouyang, Defang; Parekh, Harendra S; Kannam, Sridhar Kumar; Smith, Sean C

    2016-06-30

    Molecular dynamics simulations are utilized to investigate the interactions between the skin cancer drug 5-fluorouracil (5FU) and peptide-based dendritic carrier systems. We find that these drug-carrier interactions do not conform to the traditional picture of long-time retention of the drug within a hydrophobic core of the dendrimer carrier. Rather, 5FU, which is moderately soluble in its own right, experiences weak, transient chattering interactions all over the dendrimer, mediated through multiple short-lived hydrogen bonding and close contact events. We find that charge on the periphery of the dendrimer actually has a negative effect on the frequency of drug-carrier interactions due to a counterion screening effect that has not previously been observed. However, charge is nevertheless an important feature since neutral dendrimers are shown to have a significant mutual attraction that can lead to clustering or agglomeration. This clustering is prevented due to charge repulsion for the titrated dendrimers, such that they remain independent in solution. PMID:27267604

  15. Single-molecule visualization of dynamic transitions of pore-forming peptides among multiple transmembrane positions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying; Qian, Zhenyu; Ma, Li; Hu, Shuxin; Nong, Daguan; Xu, Chunhua; Ye, Fangfu; Lu, Ying; Wei, Guanghong; Li, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Research on the dynamics of single-membrane proteins remains underdeveloped due to the lack of proper approaches that can probe in real time the protein's insertion depth in lipid bilayers. Here we report a single-molecule visualization method to track both vertical insertion and lateral diffusion of membrane proteins in supported lipid bilayers by exploiting the surface-induced fluorescence attenuation (SIFA) of fluorophores. The attenuation follows a d−4 dependency, where d is the fluorophore-to-surface distance. The method is validated by observing the antimicrobial peptide LL-37 to transfer among five transmembrane positions: the surface, the upper leaflet, the centre, the lower leaflet and the bottom of the lipid bilayer. These results demonstrate the power of SIFA to study protein-membrane interactions and provide unprecedented in-depth understanding of molecular mechanisms of the insertion and translocation of membrane proteins. PMID:27686409

  16. Charge-dependent transport switching of single molecular ions in a weak polyelectrolyte multilayer.

    PubMed

    Tauzin, Lawrence J; Shuang, Bo; Kisley, Lydia; Mansur, Andrea P; Chen, Jixin; de Leon, Al; Advincula, Rigoberto C; Landes, Christy F

    2014-07-22

    The tunable nature of weak polyelectrolyte multilayers makes them ideal candidates for drug loading and delivery, water filtration, and separations, yet the lateral transport of charged molecules in these systems remains largely unexplored at the single molecule level. We report the direct measurement of the charge-dependent, pH-tunable, multimodal interaction of single charged molecules with a weak polyelectrolyte multilayer thin film, a 10 bilayer film of poly(acrylic acid) and poly(allylamine hydrochloride) PAA/PAH. Using fluorescence microscopy and single-molecule tracking, two modes of interaction were detected: (1) adsorption, characterized by the molecule remaining immobilized in a subresolution region and (2) diffusion trajectories characteristic of hopping (D ∼ 10(-9) cm(2)/s). Radius of gyration evolution analysis and comparison with simulated trajectories confirmed the coexistence of the two transport modes in the same single molecule trajectories. A mechanistic explanation for the probe and condition mediated dynamics is proposed based on a combination of electrostatics and a reversible, pH-induced alteration of the nanoscopic structure of the film. Our results are in good agreement with ensemble studies conducted on similar films, confirm a previously-unobserved hopping mechanism for charged molecules in polyelectrolyte multilayers, and demonstrate that single molecule spectroscopy can offer mechanistic insight into the role of electrostatics and nanoscale tunability of transport in weak polyelectrolyte multilayers.

  17. Charge-Dependent Transport Switching of Single Molecular Ions in a Weak Polyelectrolyte Multilayer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The tunable nature of weak polyelectrolyte multilayers makes them ideal candidates for drug loading and delivery, water filtration, and separations, yet the lateral transport of charged molecules in these systems remains largely unexplored at the single molecule level. We report the direct measurement of the charge-dependent, pH-tunable, multimodal interaction of single charged molecules with a weak polyelectrolyte multilayer thin film, a 10 bilayer film of poly(acrylic acid) and poly(allylamine hydrochloride) PAA/PAH. Using fluorescence microscopy and single-molecule tracking, two modes of interaction were detected: (1) adsorption, characterized by the molecule remaining immobilized in a subresolution region and (2) diffusion trajectories characteristic of hopping (D ∼ 10–9 cm2/s). Radius of gyration evolution analysis and comparison with simulated trajectories confirmed the coexistence of the two transport modes in the same single molecule trajectories. A mechanistic explanation for the probe and condition mediated dynamics is proposed based on a combination of electrostatics and a reversible, pH-induced alteration of the nanoscopic structure of the film. Our results are in good agreement with ensemble studies conducted on similar films, confirm a previously-unobserved hopping mechanism for charged molecules in polyelectrolyte multilayers, and demonstrate that single molecule spectroscopy can offer mechanistic insight into the role of electrostatics and nanoscale tunability of transport in weak polyelectrolyte multilayers. PMID:24960617

  18. Charge-dependent transport switching of single molecular ions in a weak polyelectrolyte multilayer.

    PubMed

    Tauzin, Lawrence J; Shuang, Bo; Kisley, Lydia; Mansur, Andrea P; Chen, Jixin; de Leon, Al; Advincula, Rigoberto C; Landes, Christy F

    2014-07-22

    The tunable nature of weak polyelectrolyte multilayers makes them ideal candidates for drug loading and delivery, water filtration, and separations, yet the lateral transport of charged molecules in these systems remains largely unexplored at the single molecule level. We report the direct measurement of the charge-dependent, pH-tunable, multimodal interaction of single charged molecules with a weak polyelectrolyte multilayer thin film, a 10 bilayer film of poly(acrylic acid) and poly(allylamine hydrochloride) PAA/PAH. Using fluorescence microscopy and single-molecule tracking, two modes of interaction were detected: (1) adsorption, characterized by the molecule remaining immobilized in a subresolution region and (2) diffusion trajectories characteristic of hopping (D ∼ 10(-9) cm(2)/s). Radius of gyration evolution analysis and comparison with simulated trajectories confirmed the coexistence of the two transport modes in the same single molecule trajectories. A mechanistic explanation for the probe and condition mediated dynamics is proposed based on a combination of electrostatics and a reversible, pH-induced alteration of the nanoscopic structure of the film. Our results are in good agreement with ensemble studies conducted on similar films, confirm a previously-unobserved hopping mechanism for charged molecules in polyelectrolyte multilayers, and demonstrate that single molecule spectroscopy can offer mechanistic insight into the role of electrostatics and nanoscale tunability of transport in weak polyelectrolyte multilayers. PMID:24960617

  19. Control of charging energy in chemically assembled nanoparticle single-electron transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kano, Shinya; Tanaka, Daisuke; Sakamoto, Masanori; Teranishi, Toshiharu; Majima, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    We show the control of a charging energy in chemically assembled nanoparticle single-electron transistors (SETs) by altering the core diameter of Au nanoparticles. The charging energy is a fundamental parameter that decides the operating temperature of SETs. Practical application of SETs requires us to regulate the value of the charging energy by tuning the diameter of quantum dots. In this study, we used 3.0, 5.0 and 6.2 nm diameter synthesized Au nanoparticles as a quantum dot in the SETs. The total capacitances and charging energy of the SETs were evaluated from the rhombic Coulomb diamonds attributed to a single Coulomb island. The capacitance and charging energy matched with a concentric sphere model much better than with a simple sphere model. The operating temperatures of the SETs suggested that a charging energy 2.2 times greater than the thermal energy was required for stable operation, in theory. These results will help us to select an appropriate core diameter for the Au nanoparticles in practical SETs.

  20. Nanojunctions in conducting polypyrrole single nanowire made by focused electron beam: Charge transport characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Koo, Min Ho; Hong, Young Ki; Park, Dong Hyuk; Jo, Seong Gi; Joo, Jinsoo

    2011-07-15

    A focused electron (E)-beam with various doses was irradiated on the intended positions of conducting polypyrrole (PPy) single nanowire (NW) to fabricate nanojunctions. The current-voltage characteristics and their temperature dependence of the PPy single NW with nanojunctions were measured and analyzed. By increasing the E-beam dose and the number of nanojunctions, the current level of the single NW was dramatically decreased, and the conductance gap became more severe as the temperature decreased. The charge transport behavior varied from three-dimensional variable range hopping to fluctuation induced tunneling models, depending on the dose of focused E-beam. From micro-Raman spectra, the focused E-beam irradiation induced the de-doped states and conformational modification of polymer chains in the nanojunctions. The results suggest that the nanojunctions made by focused E-beam acted as a quasi-potential barrier for charge conduction in the conducting PPy single NW.

  1. Charge transport and photoresponses in a single-stranded DNA/single-walled carbon nanotube composite film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Wonseon; Lee, Eunmo; Kue Park, Jun; Eui Lee, Cheol

    2013-06-01

    Electrical conductivity and photoresponse measurements have been carried out on a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)/single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) composite film in comparison to those of a SWNT film. While the temperature-dependent electrical conductivity of the pristine SWNT film was described well by the combined mechanism of a three-dimensional variable-range hopping and hopping conduction, that of the ssDNA/SWNT composite film followed a fluctuation-induced tunneling model. Besides, competition of photoexcited charge carrier generation and oxygen adsorption/photodesorption in the photoresponses of the films was observed and discussed in view of the role of the DNA wrapping. Thus, the biopolymer coating of the SWNTs is shown to play a significant role in modifying the charge dynamics of the composite system.

  2. MONO1001: A source for singly charged ions applied to the production of multicharged fullerene beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maunoury, L.; Andersen, J. U.; Cederquist, H.; Huber, B. A.; Hvelplund, P.; Leroy, R.; Manil, B.; Pacquet, J. Y.; Pedersen, U. V.; Rangamma, J.; Tomita, S.

    2004-05-01

    The present article reports on a recent study of the production of multiply charged fullerene beams based on an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source (ECRIS). As collision studies in fundamental physics are demanding intense beams of multiply charged ions of small molecules, clusters, and particularly of fullerenes, we have further developed the ion source ECRIS MONO1000 [P. Jardin et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 73, 789 (2002)], originally devoted to produce singly charged ions, towards the production of multiply charged fullerene beams. In this article, the test measurements performed at the Electrostatic Ion Storage Ring Århus rf power (ELISA) facility will be described. Typical mass spectra (from pure C60 and C70 powder) will be shown and the influence of several source parameters (rf power, support gas, gas pressure,…) will be discussed specifying the conditions necessary for an optimum ion source operation.

  3. Dynamic electrochemical impedance spectroscopy reconstructed from continuous impedance measurement of single frequency during charging/discharging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jun; Li, Zhe; Zhang, Jianbo

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a novel implementation of dynamic electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (DEIS) is proposed. The method first measures the impedance continuously at a single frequency during one charging/discharging cycle, then repeats the measurement at a number of other selected frequencies. The impedance spectrum at a specific SOC is obtained by interpolating and collecting the impedance at all of the selected frequencies. The charge transfer resistance, Rct, from the DEIS is smaller than that from the steady EIS in a wide state-of-charge (SOC) range from 0.4 to 1.0, the Rct during charging is generally smaller than that during discharging for the battery chemistry used in this study.

  4. Measuring the size and charge of single nanoscale objects in solution using an electrostatic fluidic trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mojarad, Nassiredin; Krishnan, Madhavi

    2012-07-01

    Measuring the size and charge of objects suspended in solution, such as dispersions of colloids or macromolecules, is a significant challenge. Measurements based on light scattering are inherently biased to larger entities, such as aggregates in the sample, because the intensity of light scattered by a small object scales as the sixth power of its size. Techniques that rely on the collective migration of species in response to external fields (electric or hydrodynamic, for example) are beset with difficulties including low accuracy and dispersion-limited resolution. Here, we show that the size and charge of single nanoscale objects can be directly measured with high throughput by analysing their thermal motion in an array of electrostatic traps. The approach, which is analogous to Millikan's oil drop experiment, could in future be used to detect molecular binding events with high sensitivity or carry out dynamic single-charge resolved measurements at the solid/liquid interface.

  5. Development of a Charged Particle Microbeam for Targeted and Single Particle Subcellular Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yanch, Jacquelyn C.

    2004-03-12

    The development of a charged particle microbeam for single particle, subcellular irradiations at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Laboratory for Accelerator Beam Applications (MIT LABA) was initiated under this NEER aeard. The Microbeam apparatus makes use of a pre-existing electrostatic accelerator with a horizontal beam tube.

  6. A tetrastable naphthalenediimide: anion induced charge transfer, single and double electron transfer for combinational logic gates.

    PubMed

    Ajayakumar, M R; Hundal, Geeta; Mukhopadhyay, Pritam

    2013-09-11

    Herein we demonstrate the formation of the first tetrastable naphthalenediimide (NDI, 1a) molecule having multiple distinctly readable outputs. Differential response of 1a to fluoride anions induces intramolecular charge transfer (ICT), single/double electron transfer (SET/DET) leading to a set of combinational logic gates for the first time with a NDI moiety. PMID:23752683

  7. A unique charged tyrosine-containing member of the adipokinetic hormone/red-pigment-concentrating hormone peptide family isolated and sequenced from two beetle species.

    PubMed

    Gäde, G

    1991-05-01

    An identical neuropeptide was isolated from the corpora cardiaca of two beetle species, Melolontha melolontha and Geotrupes stercorosus. Its primary structure was determined by pulsed-liquid-phase sequencing employing Edman chemistry after enzymically deblocking the N-terminal pyroglutamate residue. The C-terminus was also blocked, as indicated by the lack of digestion when the peptide was incubated with carboxypeptidase A. The sequence of this peptide, which is designated Mem-CC, is pGlu-Leu-Asn-Tyr-Ser-Pro-Asp-Trp-NH2. It is a new member of the adipokinetic hormone/red-pigment-concentrating hormone (AKH/RPCH) family of peptides with two unusual structural features: it is charged and contains a tyrosine residue at position 4, where all other family members have a phenylalanine residue. Structure-activity studies in the migratory locust (Locusta migratoria) and the American cockroach (Periplaneta americana) revealed that the peptide was poorly active, owing to its structural uniqueness. PMID:2039445

  8. Single-molecule spectroscopy of amino acids and peptides by recognition tunnelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yanan; Ashcroft, Brian; Zhang, Peiming; Liu, Hao; Sen, Suman; Song, Weisi; Im, Jongone; Gyarfas, Brett; Manna, Saikat; Biswas, Sovan; Borges, Chad; Lindsay, Stuart

    2014-06-01

    The human proteome has millions of protein variants due to alternative RNA splicing and post-translational modifications, and variants that are related to diseases are frequently present in minute concentrations. For DNA and RNA, low concentrations can be amplified using the polymerase chain reaction, but there is no such reaction for proteins. Therefore, the development of single-molecule protein sequencing is a critical step in the search for protein biomarkers. Here, we show that single amino acids can be identified by trapping the molecules between two electrodes that are coated with a layer of recognition molecules, then measuring the electron tunnelling current across the junction. A given molecule can bind in more than one way in the junction, and we therefore use a machine-learning algorithm to distinguish between the sets of electronic `fingerprints' associated with each binding motif. With this recognition tunnelling technique, we are able to identify D and L enantiomers, a methylated amino acid, isobaric isomers and short peptides. The results suggest that direct electronic sequencing of single proteins could be possible by sequentially measuring the products of processive exopeptidase digestion, or by using a molecular motor to pull proteins through a tunnel junction integrated with a nanopore.

  9. Charge dynamics of a single donor coupled to a few-electron quantum dot in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzeo, G.; Prati, E.; Belli, M.; Leti, G.; Cocco, S.; Fanciulli, M.; Guagliardo, F.; Ferrari, G.

    2012-05-01

    We report on the charge transfer dynamics between a silicon quantum dot and an individual phosphorous donor extracted from the current through the quantum dot as a probe for the donor ionization state. We employ a silicon n-metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) with two side gates at a single metallization level to control both the device conductance and the donor charge. The elastic nature of the process is demonstrated by temperature and magnetic field independent tunneling times. The Fano factor approaches 1/2 revealing that the process is sub-poissonian.

  10. Mutagenesis and nuclear magnetic resonance analyses of the fusion peptide of Helicoverpa armigera single nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus F protein.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ying; Jiang, Ling; Wang, Manli; Yin, Feifei; Deng, Fei; Liu, Maili; Hu, Zhihong; Wang, Hualin

    2008-08-01

    The entry of enveloped viruses into cells is normally mediated by fusion between viral and cellular membranes, in which the fusion peptide plays a crucial role. The fusion peptides of group II nucleopolyhedrovirus (NPV) F proteins are quite conserved, with a hydrophobic region located at the N terminal of the F(1) fragment. For this report, we used mutagenesis and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to study the structure and function of the fusion peptide of the Helicoverpa armigera single-nucleocapsid NPV (HearNPV) F protein (HaF). Five mutations in the fusion peptide of HaF, N(1)G, N(1)L, I(2)N, G(3)L, and D(11)L, were generated separately, and the mutated f genes were transformed into the f-null HearNPV bacmid. The mutations N(1)L, I(2)N, and D(11)L were found to completely abolish the ability of the recombinant bacmids to produce infectious budded virus, while the mutations N(1)G and G(3)L did not. The low-pH-induced envelope fusion assay demonstrated that the N(1)G substitution increased the fusogenicity of HaF, while the G(3)L substitution reduced its fusogenicity. NMR spectroscopy was used to determine the structure of a synthetic fusion peptide of HaF in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles at pH 5.0. The fusion peptide appeared to be an amphiphilic structure composed of a flexible coil in the N terminus from N(1) to N(5), a 3(10)-helix from F(6) to G(8), a turn at S(9), and a regular alpha-helix from V(10) to D(19). The data provide the first NMR structure of a baculovirus fusion peptide and allow us to further understand the relationship of structure and function of the fusion peptide.

  11. Unsupervised vector-based classification of single-molecule charge transport data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemmer, Mario; Inkpen, Michael S.; Kornysheva, Katja; Long, Nicholas J.; Albrecht, Tim

    2016-10-01

    The stochastic nature of single-molecule charge transport measurements requires collection of large data sets to capture the full complexity of a molecular system. Data analysis is then guided by certain expectations, for example, a plateau feature in the tunnelling current distance trace, and the molecular conductance extracted from suitable histogram analysis. However, differences in molecular conformation or electrode contact geometry, the number of molecules in the junction or dynamic effects may lead to very different molecular signatures. Since their manifestation is a priori unknown, an unsupervised classification algorithm, making no prior assumptions regarding the data is clearly desirable. Here we present such an approach based on multivariate pattern analysis and apply it to simulated and experimental single-molecule charge transport data. We demonstrate how different event shapes are clearly separated using this algorithm and how statistics about different event classes can be extracted, when conventional methods of analysis fail.

  12. Unsupervised vector-based classification of single-molecule charge transport data

    PubMed Central

    Lemmer, Mario; Inkpen, Michael S.; Kornysheva, Katja; Long, Nicholas J.; Albrecht, Tim

    2016-01-01

    The stochastic nature of single-molecule charge transport measurements requires collection of large data sets to capture the full complexity of a molecular system. Data analysis is then guided by certain expectations, for example, a plateau feature in the tunnelling current distance trace, and the molecular conductance extracted from suitable histogram analysis. However, differences in molecular conformation or electrode contact geometry, the number of molecules in the junction or dynamic effects may lead to very different molecular signatures. Since their manifestation is a priori unknown, an unsupervised classification algorithm, making no prior assumptions regarding the data is clearly desirable. Here we present such an approach based on multivariate pattern analysis and apply it to simulated and experimental single-molecule charge transport data. We demonstrate how different event shapes are clearly separated using this algorithm and how statistics about different event classes can be extracted, when conventional methods of analysis fail. PMID:27694904

  13. Charge noise, spin-orbit coupling, and dephasing of single-spin qubits

    SciTech Connect

    Bermeister, Adam; Keith, Daniel; Culcer, Dimitrie

    2014-11-10

    Quantum dot quantum computing architectures rely on systems in which inversion symmetry is broken, and spin-orbit coupling is present, causing even single-spin qubits to be susceptible to charge noise. We derive an effective Hamiltonian for the combined action of noise and spin-orbit coupling on a single-spin qubit, identify the mechanisms behind dephasing, and estimate the free induction decay dephasing times T{sub 2}{sup *} for common materials such as Si and GaAs. Dephasing is driven by noise matrix elements that cause relative fluctuations between orbital levels, which are dominated by screened whole charge defects and unscreened dipole defects in the substrate. Dephasing times T{sub 2}{sup *} differ markedly between materials and can be enhanced by increasing gate fields, choosing materials with weak spin-orbit, making dots narrower, or using accumulation dots.

  14. Spectroscopy of Charge Carriers and Traps in Field-Doped Single Crystal Organic Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Xiaoyang

    2014-12-10

    The proposed research aims to achieve quantitative, molecular level understanding of charge carriers and traps in field-doped crystalline organic semiconductors via in situ linear and nonlinear optical spectroscopy, in conjunction with transport measurements and molecular/crystal engineering. Organic semiconductors are emerging as viable materials for low-cost electronics and optoelectronics, such as organic photovoltaics (OPV), organic field effect transistors (OFETs), and organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). Despite extensive studies spanning many decades, a clear understanding of the nature of charge carriers in organic semiconductors is still lacking. It is generally appreciated that polaron formation and charge carrier trapping are two hallmarks associated with electrical transport in organic semiconductors; the former results from the low dielectric constants and weak intermolecular electronic overlap while the latter can be attributed to the prevalence of structural disorder. These properties have lead to the common observation of low charge carrier mobilities, e.g., in the range of 10-5 - 10-3 cm2/Vs, particularly at low carrier concentrations. However, there is also growing evidence that charge carrier mobility approaching those of inorganic semiconductors and metals can exist in some crystalline organic semiconductors, such as pentacene, tetracene and rubrene. A particularly striking example is single crystal rubrene (Figure 1), in which hole mobilities well above 10 cm2/Vs have been observed in OFETs operating at room temperature. Temperature dependent transport and spectroscopic measurements both revealed evidence of free carriers in rubrene. Outstanding questions are: what are the structural features and physical properties that make rubrene so unique? How do we establish fundamental design principles for the development of other organic semiconductors of high mobility? These questions are critically important but not comprehensive, as the nature of

  15. A sensitive charge scanning probe based on silicon single electron transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lina, Su; Xinxing, Li; Hua, Qin; Xiaofeng, Gu

    2016-04-01

    Single electron transistors (SETs) are known to be extremely sensitive electrometers owing to their high charge sensitivity. In this work, we report the design, fabrication, and characterization of a silicon-on-insulator-based SET scanning probe. The fabricated SET is located about 10 μm away from the probe tip. The SET with a quantum dot of about 70 nm in diameter exhibits an obvious Coulomb blockade effect measured at 4.1 K. The Coulomb blockade energy is about 18 meV, and the charge sensitivity is in the order of 10-5-10-3 e/Hz1/2. This SET scanning probe can be used to map charge distribution and sense dynamic charge fluctuation in nanodevices or circuits under test, realizing high sensitivity and high spatial resolution charge detection. Project supported by the Instrument Developing Project of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (No. YZ201152), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11403084), the Fundamental Research Funds for Central Universities (Nos. JUSRP51510, JUDCF12032), and the Graduate Student Innovation Program for Universities of Jiangsu Province (No. CXLX12_0724).

  16. Charging and discharging of single colloidal particles at oil/water interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Peng; Xing, Xiaochen; Li, Ye; Ngai, To; Jin, Fan

    2014-05-01

    The physical behavior of solid colloids trapped at a fluid-fluid interface remains in itself an open fundamental issue. Here, we show that the gradients of surface tension can induce particles to jet towards the oil/water interface with velocities as high as ~ 60 mm/s when particle suspensions come in contact with the interface. We hypothesize that rubbing between the particles and oil lead to the spontaneous accumulation of negative charges on the hemisphere of those interfacial particles that contact the oil phase by means of triboelectrification. The charging process is highly dependent on the sliding distances, and gives rise to long-ranged repulsions that protect interfacial particles from coagulating at the interface by the presence of electrolyte. These triboelectric charges, however, are compensated within several hours, which affect the stability of interfacial particles. Importantly, by charging different kinds of colloidal particles using various spreading solvents and dispersion methods, we have demonstrated that charging and discharging of single colloidal particles at oil/water interfaces impacts a broad range of dynamical behavior.

  17. Charging and discharging of single colloidal particles at oil/water interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Peng; Xing, XiaoChen; Li, Ye; Ngai, To; Jin, Fan

    2014-01-01

    The physical behavior of solid colloids trapped at a fluid-fluid interface remains in itself an open fundamental issue. Here, we show that the gradients of surface tension can induce particles to jet towards the oil/water interface with velocities as high as ≈ 60 mm/s when particle suspensions come in contact with the interface. We hypothesize that rubbing between the particles and oil lead to the spontaneous accumulation of negative charges on the hemisphere of those interfacial particles that contact the oil phase by means of triboelectrification. The charging process is highly dependent on the sliding distances, and gives rise to long-ranged repulsions that protect interfacial particles from coagulating at the interface by the presence of electrolyte. These triboelectric charges, however, are compensated within several hours, which affect the stability of interfacial particles. Importantly, by charging different kinds of colloidal particles using various spreading solvents and dispersion methods, we have demonstrated that charging and discharging of single colloidal particles at oil/water interfaces impacts a broad range of dynamical behavior. PMID:24786477

  18. Isolation of Camelid Single-Domain Antibodies Against Native Proteins Using Recombinant Multivalent Peptide Ligands.

    PubMed

    Alturki, Norah A; Henry, Kevin A; MacKenzie, C Roger; Arbabi-Ghahroudi, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Generation of antibodies against desired epitopes on folded proteins may be hampered by various characteristics of the target protein, including antigenic and immunogenic dominance of irrelevant epitopes and/or steric occlusion of the desired epitope. In such cases, peptides encompassing linear epitopes of the native protein represent attractive alternative reagents for immunization and screening. Peptide antigens are typically prepared by fusing or conjugating the peptide of interest to a carrier protein. The utility of such antigens depends on many factors including the peptide's amino acid sequence, display valency, display format (synthetic conjugate vs. recombinant fusion) and characteristics of the carrier. Here we provide detailed protocols for: (1) preparation of DNA constructs encoding peptides fused to verotoxin (VT) multimerization domain; (2) expression, purification, and characterization of the multivalent peptide-VT ligands; (3) concurrent panning of a non-immune phage-displayed camelid VHH library against the peptide-VT ligands and native protein; and (4) identification of VHHs enriched via panning using next-generation sequencing techniques. These methods are simple, rapid and can be easily adapted to yield custom peptide-VT ligands that appear to maintain the antigenic structures of the peptide. However, we caution that peptide sequences should be chosen with great care, taking into account structural, immunological, and biophysical information on the protein of interest.

  19. Single housing during early adolescence causes time-, area- and peptide-specific alterations in endogenous opioids of rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Granholm, L; Roman, E; Nylander, I

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE A number of experimental procedures require single housing to assess individual behaviour and physiological responses to pharmacological treatments. The endogenous opioids are closely linked to social interaction, especially early in life, and disturbance in the social environment may affect opioid peptides and thereby confound experimental outcome. The aim of the present study was to examine time-dependent effects of single housing on opioid peptides in rats. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Early adolescent Sprague Dawley rats (post-natal day 22) were subjected to either prolonged (7 days) or short (30 min) single housing. Several brain regions were dissected and immunoreactive levels of Met-enkephalin-Arg6Phe7 (MEAP), dynorphin B and nociception/orphanin FQ, as well as serum corticosterone were measured using RIA. KEY RESULTS Prolonged single housing reduced immunoreactive MEAP in hypothalamus, cortical regions, amygdala, substantia nigra and periaqueductal grey. Short single housing resulted in an acute stress response as indicated by high levels of corticosterone, accompanied by elevated immunoreactive nociceptin/orphanin FQ in medial prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens and amygdala. Neither short nor prolonged single housing affected dynorphin B. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Disruption in social environmental conditions of rats, through single housing during early adolescence, resulted in time-, area- and peptide-specific alterations in endogenous opioids in the brain. These results provide further evidence for an association between early life social environment and opioids. Furthermore, the results have implications for experimental design; in any pharmacological study involving opioid peptides, it is important to distinguish between effects induced by housing and treatment. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http

  20. Single-Molecule Protein Folding: A Study of the Surface-Mediated Conformational Dynamics of a Model Amphipathic Peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Joy; English, Douglas

    2004-03-01

    Most surface-active polypeptides, composed of 10-50 amino acids, are devoid of well-defined tertiary structure. The conformation of these proteins is greatly dependent upon their environment and may assume totally different characteristics in an aqueous environment, in a detergent micelle, or in an organic solvent. Most antimicrobial peptides are helix-forming and are activated upon interaction with a membrane-mimicking environment. We are seeking to physically characterize the mechanism of membrane-peptide interaction through studying a simple model peptide, MT-1. MT-1 was designed as a nonhomologous analogue of melittin, the principle component in bee venom. We are using single molecule spectroscopy to examine the induction of secondary structure upon interaction of MT-1 with various membrane-mimicking interfaces. Specifically, we monitor coil-to-helix transition through single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (sm-FRET) to determine conformational distributions of folded and unfolded peptides at an interface. Studies with MT-1 will focus upon the biologically relevant issues of orientation, aggregation, and folding at surfaces using both ensemble and single molecule experiments.

  1. Floating gate memory with charge storage dots array formed by Dps protein modified with site-specific binding peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamitake, Hiroki; Uenuma, Mutsunori; Okamoto, Naofumi; Horita, Masahiro; Ishikawa, Yasuaki; Yamashita, Ichro; Uraoka, Yukiharu

    2015-05-01

    We report a nanodot (ND) floating gate memory (NFGM) with a high-density ND array formed by a biological nano process. We utilized two kinds of cage-shaped proteins displaying SiO2 binding peptide (minTBP-1) on their outer surfaces: ferritin and Dps, which accommodate cobalt oxide NDs in their cavities. The diameters of the cobalt NDs were regulated by the cavity sizes of the proteins. Because minTBP-1 is strongly adsorbed on the SiO2 surface, high-density cobalt oxide ND arrays were obtained by a simple spin coating process. The densities of cobalt oxide ND arrays based on ferritin and Dps were 6.8 × 1011 dots cm-2 and 1.2 × 1012 dots cm-2, respectively. After selective protein elimination and embedding in a metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitor, the charge capacities of both ND arrays were evaluated by measuring their C-V characteristics. The MOS capacitor embedded with the Dps ND array showed a wider memory window than the device embedded with the ferritin ND array. Finally, we fabricated an NFGM with a high-density ND array based on Dps, and confirmed its competent writing/erasing characteristics and long retention time.

  2. Floating gate memory with charge storage dots array formed by Dps protein modified with site-specific binding peptides.

    PubMed

    Kamitake, Hiroki; Uenuma, Mutsunori; Okamoto, Naofumi; Horita, Masahiro; Ishikawa, Yasuaki; Yamashita, Ichro; Uraoka, Yukiharu

    2015-05-15

    We report a nanodot (ND) floating gate memory (NFGM) with a high-density ND array formed by a biological nano process. We utilized two kinds of cage-shaped proteins displaying SiO2 binding peptide (minTBP-1) on their outer surfaces: ferritin and Dps, which accommodate cobalt oxide NDs in their cavities. The diameters of the cobalt NDs were regulated by the cavity sizes of the proteins. Because minTBP-1 is strongly adsorbed on the SiO2 surface, high-density cobalt oxide ND arrays were obtained by a simple spin coating process. The densities of cobalt oxide ND arrays based on ferritin and Dps were 6.8 × 10(11) dots cm(-2) and 1.2 × 10(12) dots cm(-2), respectively. After selective protein elimination and embedding in a metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitor, the charge capacities of both ND arrays were evaluated by measuring their C-V characteristics. The MOS capacitor embedded with the Dps ND array showed a wider memory window than the device embedded with the ferritin ND array. Finally, we fabricated an NFGM with a high-density ND array based on Dps, and confirmed its competent writing/erasing characteristics and long retention time.

  3. Charge transfer at junctions of a single layer of graphene and a metallic single walled carbon nanotube.

    PubMed

    Paulus, Geraldine L C; Wang, Qing Hua; Ulissi, Zachary W; McNicholas, Thomas P; Vijayaraghavan, Aravind; Shih, Chih-Jen; Jin, Zhong; Strano, Michael S

    2013-06-10

    Junctions between a single walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) and a monolayer of graphene are fabricated and studied for the first time. A single layer graphene (SLG) sheet grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is transferred onto a SiO₂/Si wafer with aligned CVD-grown SWNTs. Raman spectroscopy is used to identify metallic-SWNT/SLG junctions, and a method for spectroscopic deconvolution of the overlapping G peaks of the SWNT and the SLG is reported, making use of the polarization dependence of the SWNT. A comparison of the Raman peak positions and intensities of the individual SWNT and graphene to those of the SWNT-graphene junction indicates an electron transfer of 1.12 × 10¹³ cm⁻² from the SWNT to the graphene. This direction of charge transfer is in agreement with the work functions of the SWNT and graphene. The compression of the SWNT by the graphene increases the broadening of the radial breathing mode (RBM) peak from 3.6 ± 0.3 to 4.6 ± 0.5 cm⁻¹ and of the G peak from 13 ± 1 to 18 ± 1 cm⁻¹, in reasonable agreement with molecular dynamics simulations. However, the RBM and G peak position shifts are primarily due to charge transfer with minimal contributions from strain. With this method, the ability to dope graphene with nanometer resolution is demonstrated. PMID:23281165

  4. Measuring single electron charging energy in self-assembled single nanoparticle devices: Coulomb blockade threshold vs. Arrhenius energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhirani, Al-Amin; Zabet-Khosousi, Amir

    2009-03-01

    Single-nanoparticle (NP) devices formed by self-assembling NPs onto alkanedithiol-functionalized break junctions exhibit Coulomb blockade (CB) conductance suppressions at low temperatures. We have studied temperature dependence of conductance inside the CB region and find multiple activation energies (Ea): A small Ea at low temperatures, and a larger Ea at high temperatures. The small Ea is independent of NP size and is attributed to an energy state located at the metal--molecule contact. The larger Ea scales with NP size and is attributed to single electron charging energy of the NPs. Importantly, we observe a significant (˜5--100 fold) discrepancy between values of charging energies obtained from CB voltage thresholds and Ea. To account for the discrepancy, we propose a model in which electrons are temporarily localized at the energy states near the metal--molecule interface and lose energy. The proposed model is supported by ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy of alkanedithiol monolayers on gold which indicates a presence of energy states close to the Fermi level of gold likely arising from gold--thiolate bonds. A suitably modified Orthodox theory successfully describes our measurements.

  5. Formation of peptides from amino acids by single or multiple additions of ATP to suspensions of nucleoproteinoid microparticles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakashima, T.; Fox, S. W.

    1981-01-01

    The synthesis of peptides from individual amino acids or pairs of amino acids and ATP in the presence of catalysis by nucleoproteinoid microparticles is investigated. Experiments were performed with suspensions formed from the condensation of lysine-rich and acidic proteinoids with polyadenylic acid, to which were added glycine, phenylalanine, proline, lysine or glycine-phenylalanine mixtures, and ATP either at once or serially. Peptide yields are found to be greatest for equal amounts of acidic and basic proteinoids. The addition of imidazole is found to alter the preference of glycine-phenylalanine mixtures to form mixed heteropeptides rather than homopeptides. A rapid ATP decay in the peptide synthesis reaction is observed, and a greater yield is obtained for repeated small additions than for a single addition of ATP. The experimental system has properties similar to modern cells, and represents an organizational unit ready for the evolution of associated biochemical pathways.

  6. Single Molecule Spectroelectrochemistry of Interfacial Charge Transfer Dynamics In Hybrid Organic Solar Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Shanlin

    2014-11-16

    Our research under support of this DOE grant is focused on applied and fundamental aspects of model organic solar cell systems. Major accomplishments are: 1) we developed a spectroelectorchemistry technique of single molecule single nanoparticle method to study charge transfer between conjugated polymers and semiconductor at the single molecule level. The fluorescence of individual fluorescent polymers at semiconductor surfaces was shown to exhibit blinking behavior compared to molecules on glass substrates. Single molecule fluorescence excitation anisotropy measurements showed the conformation of the polymer molecules did not differ appreciably between glass and semiconductor substrates. The similarities in molecular conformation suggest that the observed differences in blinking activity are due to charge transfer between fluorescent polymer and semiconductor, which provides additional pathways between states of high and low fluorescence quantum efficiency. Similar spectroelectrochemistry work has been done for small organic dyes for understand their charge transfer dynamics on various substrates and electrochemical environments; 2) We developed a method of transferring semiconductor nanoparticles (NPs) and graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets into organic solvent for a potential electron acceptor in bulk heterojunction organic solar cells which employed polymer semiconductor as the electron donor. Electron transfer from the polymer semiconductor to semiconductor and GO in solutions and thin films was established through fluorescence spectroscopy and electroluminescence measurements. Solar cells containing these materials were constructed and evaluated using transient absorption spectroscopy and dynamic fluorescence techniques to understand the charge carrier generation and recombination events; 3) We invented a spectroelectorchemistry technique using light scattering and electroluminescence for rapid size determination and studying electrochemistry of single NPs in an

  7. Structure and switching of single-stranded DNA tethered to a charged nanoparticle surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin-Jun, Zhao; Zhi-Fu, Gao

    2016-07-01

    Using a molecular theory, we investigate the temperature-dependent self-assembly of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) tethered to a charged nanoparticle surface. Here the size, conformations, and charge properties of ssDNA are taken into account. The main results are as follows: i) when the temperature is lower than the critical switching temperature, the ssDNA will collapse due to the existence of electrostatic interaction between ssDNA and charged nanoparticle surface; ii) for the short ssDNA chains with the number of bases less than 10, the switching of ssDNA cannot happen, and the critical temperature does not exist; iii) when the temperature increases, the electrostatic attractive interaction between ssDNA and charged nanoparticle surface becomes weak dramatically, and ssDNA chains will stretch if the electrostatic attractive interaction is insufficient to overcome the elastic energy of ssDNA and the electrostatic repulsion energy. These findings accord well with the experimental observations. It is predicted that the switching of ssDNA will not happen if the grafting densities are too high. Project supported by the Joint Funds of Xinjiang Natural Science Foundation, China (Grant No. 2015211C298).

  8. Thermally Induced Charge Reversal of Layer-by-Layer Assembled Single-Component Polymer Films.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Joseph J; Tardy, Blaise L; Ejima, Hirotaka; Guo, Junling; Cui, Jiwei; Liang, Kang; Choi, Gwan H; Yoo, Pil J; De Geest, Bruno G; Caruso, Frank

    2016-03-23

    Temperature can be harnessed to engineer unique properties for materials useful in various contexts and has been shown to affect the layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly of polymer thin films and cause physical changes in preassembled polymer thin films. Herein we demonstrate that exposure to relatively low temperatures (≤ 100 °C) can induce physicochemical changes in cationic polymer thin films. The surface charge of polymer films containing primary and secondary amines reverses after heating (from positive to negative), and different characterization techniques are used to show that the change in surface charge is related to oxidation of the polymer that specifically occurs in the thin film state. This charge reversal allows for single-polymer LbL assembly to be performed with poly(allylamine) hydrochloride (PAH) through alternating heat/deposition steps. Furthermore, the negative charge induced by heating reduces the fouling and cell-association of PAH-coated planar and particulate substrates, respectively. This study highlights a unique property of thin films which is relevant to LbL assembly and biofouling and is of interest for the future development of thin polymer films for biomedical systems. PMID:26953514

  9. Gate-tuned spin to charge conversion in semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shigematsu, Ei; Nagano, Hiroshi; Dushenko, Sergey; Ando, Yuichiro; Tsuda, Tetsuya; Kuwabata, Susumu; Takenobu, Taishi; Tanaka, Takeshi; Kataura, Hiromichi; Shinjo, Teruya; Shiraishi, Masashi

    Interconversion of spin and charge current is a hot topic in the molecular spintronics. It was achieved for the first time in a conducting conjugated polymer 1, and shortly followed by spin-charge conversion in graphene. However, control over carrier type has not been shown yet. In this study we focused on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT). Spin injection into semiconductor from metal ferromagnet is challenging due to the presence of Schottky barrier and conductance mismatch problem. To bypass it, we used ionic liquid electric gate and ferrimagnetic insulator. We prepared SWNT layer on top of ferrimagnetic yttrium iron garnet substrate. Using spin pumping we successfully observed spin-charge conversion in metallic SWNT. As for a semiconducting SWNT, we applied a top gate using ionic liquid. The drain-source current vs. gate voltage dependence showed tuning of the Fermi level and changing of carrier type. Under gate voltage application we measured electromotive force induced by spin pumping. Detected voltage changed its sign together with carrier type. This is first evidence of spin-charge conversion in carbon nanotubes 2. 1 K. Ando et al., Nature Mater. 12, 622 (2013). 2 E. Shigematsu et al., submitted.

  10. Probing the origin of structural stability of single and double stapled p53 peptide analogs bound to MDM2.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zuojun; Streu, Kristina; Krilov, Goran; Mohanty, Udayan

    2014-06-01

    The stabilization of secondary structure is believed to play an important role in the peptide-protein binding interaction. In this study, the α-helical conformation and structural stability of single and double stapled all-hydrocarbon cross-linked p53 peptides when bound and unbound to MDM2 are investigated. We determined the effects of the peptide sequence, the stereochemistry of the cross-linker, the conformation of the double bond in the alkene bridge, and the length of the bridge, to the relative stability of the α-helix structure. The binding affinity calculations by WaterMap provided over one hundred hydration sites in the MDM2 binding pocket where water density is greater than twice that of the bulk, and the relative value of free energy released by displacing these hydration sites. In agreement with the experimental data, potentials of mean force obtained by weighted histogram analysis methods indicated the order of peptides from lowest to highest binding affinity. Our study provides a comprehensive rationalization of the relationship between peptide stapling strategy, the secondary structural stability, and the binding affinity of p53/MDM2 complex. We hope our efforts can help to further the development of a new generation p53/MDM2 inhibitors that can reactivate the function of p53 as tumor suppressor gene.

  11. Photoinduced charge transfer from vacuum-deposited molecules to single-layer transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osada, Kazuki; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Ohno, Shinya; Suzuki, Takanori

    2016-06-01

    Variations of photoluminescence (PL) and Raman spectra of single-layer MoS2, MoSe2, WS2, and WSe2 due to the vacuum deposition of C60 or copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) molecules have been investigated. PL spectra are decomposed into two competitive components, an exciton and a charged exciton (trion), depending on carrier density. The variation of PL spectra is interpreted in terms of charge transfer across the interfaces between transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) and dopant molecules. We find that deposited C60 molecules inject photoexcited electrons into MoS2, MoSe2, and WS2 or holes into WSe2. CuPc molecules also inject electrons into MoS2, MoSe2, and WS2, while holes are depleted from WSe2 to CuPc. We then propose a band alignment between TMDs and dopant molecules. Peak shifts of Raman spectra and doped carrier density estimated using a three-level model also support the band alignment. We thus demonstrate photoinduced charge transfer from dopant molecules to single-layer TMDs.

  12. Superconducting single electron transistor for charge sensing in Si/SiGe-based quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhen

    Si-based quantum devices, including Si/SiGe quantum dots (QD), are promising candidates for spin-based quantum bits (quits), which are a potential platform for quantum information processing. Meanwhile, qubit readout remains a challenging task related to semiconductor-based quantum computation. This thesis describes two readout devices for Si/SiGe QDs and the techniques for developing them from a traditional single electron transistor (SET). By embedding an SET in a tank circuit and operating it in the radio-frequency (RF) regime, a superconducting RF-SET has quick response as well as ultra high charge sensitivity and can be an excellent charge sensor for the QDs. We demonstrate such RF-SETs for QDs in a Si/SiGe heterostructure. Characterization of the SET in magnetic fields is studied for future exploration of advanced techniques such as spin detection and spin state manipulation. By replacing the tank circuit with a high-quality-factor microwave cavity, the embedded SET will be operated in the supercurrent regime as a single Cooper pair transistor (CPT) to further increase the charge sensitivity and reduce any dissipation. The operating principle and implementation of the cavity-embedded CPT (cCPT) will be introduced.

  13. Peptide-catalyzed, bioinspired silicification for single-cell encapsulation in the imidazole-buffered system.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji Hun; Choi, Insung S; Yang, Sung Ho

    2015-03-28

    Inspired by biosilicification of glass sponges, we designed a catalytic peptide, which formed silica structures in the imidazole-buffered solution. The peptide was adsorbed selectively onto the surface of yeast cells, and the bioinspired silicification led to the formation of a cytoprotective silica shell on individual yeast cells.

  14. Charge trapping in aligned single-walled carbon nanotube arrays induced by ionizing radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Esqueda, Ivan S.; Cress, Cory D.; Che, Yuchi; Cao, Yu; Zhou, Chongwu

    2014-02-07

    The effects of near-interfacial trapping induced by ionizing radiation exposure of aligned single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) arrays are investigated via measurements of gate hysteresis in the transfer characteristics of aligned SWCNT field-effect transistors. Gate hysteresis is attributed to charge injection (i.e., trapping) from the SWCNTs into radiation-induced traps in regions near the SWCNT/dielectric interface. Self-consistent calculations of surface-potential, carrier density, and trapped charge are used to describe hysteresis as a function of ionizing radiation exposure. Hysteresis width (h) and its dependence on gate sweep range are investigated analytically. The effects of non-uniform trap energy distributions on the relationship between hysteresis, gate sweep range, and total ionizing dose are demonstrated with simulations and verified experimentally.

  15. Charge Manipulation in Molecules Encapsulated Inside Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagi, Kazuhiro; Moriya, Rieko; Cuong, Nguyen Thanh; Otani, Minoru; Okada, Susumu

    2013-02-01

    We report clear experimental evidence for the charge manipulation of molecules encapsulated inside single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) using electrochemical doping techniques. We encapsulated β-carotene (Car) inside SWCNTs and clarified electrochemical doping characteristics of their Raman spectra. C=C streching modes of encapsulated Car and a G band of SWCNTs showed clearly different doping behaviors as the electrochemical potentials were shifted. Electron extraction from encapsulated Car was clearly achieved. However, electrochemical characteristics of Car inside SWCNTs and doping mechanisms elucidated by calculations based on density-functional theory indicate the difficulty of charge manipulation of molecules inside SWCNTs due to the presence of strong on-site Coulomb repulsion energy at the molecules.

  16. Electrical detection of ferromagnetic resonance in single layers of permalloy: Evidence of magnonic charge pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azevedo, A.; Cunha, R. O.; Estrada, F.; Alves Santos, O.; Mendes, J. B. S.; Vilela-Leão, L. H.; Rodríguez-Suárez, R. L.; Rezende, S. M.

    2015-07-01

    The generation of a DC voltage in single layers of permalloy (Ni81Fe19 ) when the magnetization is undergoing ferromagnetic resonance is investigated in a series of samples with thickness varying from 4.0 to 150 nm. By sweeping the external field at a fixed microwave frequency, we measure a DC voltage at the ends of the layer as a function of the in-plane angle for each sample. The asymmetric voltage signal generated at the resonance field is a superposition of symmetric Lorentzian and antisymmetric Lorentzian derivative line shapes. The in-plane dependence of both symmetric and antisymmetric signals cannot be explained as due to spin rectification (SRE) only. The results are well explained by a model that takes into account in addition to the SRE the contribution of the recent discovered effect of magnonic charge pumping that converts magnetization dynamics into charge current by means of the spin orbit coupling.

  17. Normal mode analysis of single bunch, charge density dependent behavior in electron/positron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrlichman, Michael

    Accelerator science in coming years will be increasingly dependent upon high single-bunch charges and/or small emittances. Under these conditions, single-particle dynamics are not a sufficient description of beam behavior and interactions between the beam particles must be taken into account. One such interaction is when collisions between the particles that compose a bunch perturb the motion of the colliding particles significantly and frequently enough to impact the beam dynamics. Multiple, small-angle, collisions blow up the emittance of the bunch and are referred to as intrabeam scattering (IBS). Here are documented the theoretical and experimental studies of IBS in storage rings undertaken as part of the CesrTA program. Under the conditions where IBS becomes dominant, other multi-particle effects can also appear. The additional effects we investigate include potential well distortion, coherent current-dependent tune shift, and direct space charge. CesrTA design and analysis is conducted in a normal mode coordinates environment which allows for natural handling of coupling. To that end, we develop a 6D normal modes decomposition of the linear beam optics. Multi-particle effects are also important for Energy Recovery Linear Accelerators (ERLs). Because the beam circulates for only a short period of time in an ERL, the beam lifetime imposed by Touschek scattering is not significant. However, the particles scattered out of the bunch can generate a radiation hazard where they collide with the beam pipe. We re-derive Piwinski's original Touschek scattering equation to check its validity when applied to ERL beams, then repurpose the formula to generate a profile of where scattered particles are generated and where they are lost. The results presented here advance our understanding of charge-dependent behavior in the sorts of high charge-density accelerators that will be implemented in coming years.

  18. Gas-phase doubly charged complexes of cyclic peptides with copper in +1, +2 and +3 formal oxidation states: formation, structures and electron capture dissociation.

    PubMed

    Afonso, Carlos; Tabet, Jean-Claude; Giorgi, Gianluca; Tureček, František

    2012-02-01

    Copper complexes with a cyclic D-His-β-Ala-L-His-L-Lys and all-L-His-β-Ala-His-Lys peptides were generated by electrospray which were doubly charged ions that had different formal oxidation states of Cu(I), Cu(II) and Cu(III) and different protonation states of the peptide ligands. Electron capture dissociation showed no substantial differences between the D-His and L-His complexes. All complexes underwent peptide cross-ring cleavages upon electron capture. The modes of ring cleavage depended on the formal oxidation state of the Cu ion and peptide protonation. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations, using the B3LYP with an effective core potential at Cu and M06-2X functionals, identified several precursor ion structures in which the Cu ion was threecoordinated to pentacoordinated by the His and Lys side-chain groups and the peptide amide or enolimine groups. The electronic structure of the formally Cu(III) complexes pointed to an effective Cu(I) oxidation state with the other charge residing in the peptide ligand. The relative energies of isomeric complexes of the [Cu(c-HAHK + H)](2+) and [Cu(c-HAHK - H)](2+) type with closed electronic shells followed similar orders when treated by the B3LYP and M06-2X functionals. Large differences between relative energies calculated by these methods were obtained for open-shell complexes of the [Cu(c-HAHK)](2+) type. Charge reduction resulted in lowering the coordination numbers for some Cu complexes that depended on the singlet or triplet spin state being formed. For [Cu(c-HAHK - H)](2+) complexes, solution H/D exchange involved only the N-H protons, resulting in the exchange of up to seven protons, as established by ultra-high mass resolution measurements. Contrasting the experiments, DFT calculations found the lowest energy structures for the gas-phase ions that were deprotonated at the peptide C(α) positions.

  19. On the charge transfer between single-walled carbon nanotubes and graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Rahul Pierce, Neal; Dasgupta, Archi

    2014-08-18

    It is important to understand the electronic interaction between single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and graphene in order to use them efficiently in multifunctional hybrid devices. Here, we deposited SWNT bundles on graphene-covered copper and SiO{sub 2} substrates by chemical vapor deposition and investigated the charge transfer between them by Raman spectroscopy. Our results revealed that, on both copper and SiO{sub 2} substrates, graphene donates electrons to the SWNTs, resulting in p-type doped graphene and n-type doped SWNTs.

  20. Excitation of singlet levels of a singly charged scandium ion in e-Sc collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Yu. M.

    2011-09-01

    The excitation of singlet levels of the singly charged scandium ion is experimentally studied in collisions of slow electrons with scandium atoms. At the exciting electron energy of 30 eV, 59 excitation cross sections are measured. In the electron energy range of 0-200 eV, seven optical excitation functions are recorded. On the basis of these data the total excitation cross sections are calculated for 11 even and 9 odd levels of Sc II, as well as the contribution of cascade population to 8 even and 7 odd levels.

  1. Observation of Frenkel and charge transfer excitons in pentacene single crystals using spectroscopic generalized ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Dongchen; Su, Haibin; Bastjan, M.; Jurchescu, O. D.; Palstra, T. M.; Wee, Andrew T. S.; Rübhausen, M.; Rusydi, A.

    2013-09-01

    We report on the emerging and admixture of Frenkel and charge transfer (CT) excitons near the absorption onset in pentacene single crystals. Using high energy-resolution spectroscopic generalized ellipsometry with in-plane polarization dependence, the excitonic nature of three lowest lying excitations is discussed. Their distinct polarization dependence strongly indicates the presence of both Frenkel and CT types of excitons near the excitation onset. In particular, the peculiar polarization behavior of the second excitation can only be rationalized by taking into account the inherent CT transition dipole moment. This observation has important implications for the pentacene-based optoelectronic devices.

  2. Observation of spin-charge conversion in chemical-vapor-deposition-grown single-layer graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Ohshima, Ryo; Sakai, Atsushi; Ando, Yuichiro; Shiraishi, Masashi; Shinjo, Teruya; Kawahara, Kenji; Ago, Hiroki

    2014-10-20

    Conversion of pure spin current to charge current in single-layer graphene (SLG) is investigated by using spin pumping. Large-area SLG grown by chemical vapor deposition is used for the conversion. Efficient spin accumulation in SLG by spin pumping enables observing an electromotive force produced by the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE) of SLG. The spin Hall angle of SLG is estimated to be 6.1 × 10{sup −7}. The observed ISHE in SLG is ascribed to its non-negligible spin-orbit interaction in SLG.

  3. Charging a capacitor from an external fluctuating potential using a single conical nanopore.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Vicente; Ramirez, Patricio; Cervera, Javier; Nasir, Saima; Ali, Mubarak; Ensinger, Wolfgang; Mafe, Salvador

    2015-01-01

    We explore the electrical rectification of large amplitude fluctuating signals by an asymmetric nanostructure operating in aqueous solution. We show experimentally and theoretically that a load capacitor can be charged to voltages close to 1 V within a few minutes by converting zero time-average potentials of amplitudes in the range 0.5-3 V into average net currents using a single conical nanopore. This process suggests that significant energy conversion and storage from an electrically fluctuating environment is feasible with a nanoscale pore immersed in a liquid electrolyte solution, a system characteristic of bioelectronics interfaces, electrochemical cells, and nanoporous membranes. PMID:25830563

  4. Charging a capacitor from an external fluctuating potential using a single conical nanopore.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Vicente; Ramirez, Patricio; Cervera, Javier; Nasir, Saima; Ali, Mubarak; Ensinger, Wolfgang; Mafe, Salvador

    2015-04-01

    We explore the electrical rectification of large amplitude fluctuating signals by an asymmetric nanostructure operating in aqueous solution. We show experimentally and theoretically that a load capacitor can be charged to voltages close to 1 V within a few minutes by converting zero time-average potentials of amplitudes in the range 0.5-3 V into average net currents using a single conical nanopore. This process suggests that significant energy conversion and storage from an electrically fluctuating environment is feasible with a nanoscale pore immersed in a liquid electrolyte solution, a system characteristic of bioelectronics interfaces, electrochemical cells, and nanoporous membranes.

  5. Charging a Capacitor from an External Fluctuating Potential using a Single Conical Nanopore

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Vicente; Ramirez, Patricio; Cervera, Javier; Nasir, Saima; Ali, Mubarak; Ensinger, Wolfgang; Mafe, Salvador

    2015-01-01

    We explore the electrical rectification of large amplitude fluctuating signals by an asymmetric nanostructure operating in aqueous solution. We show experimentally and theoretically that a load capacitor can be charged to voltages close to 1 V within a few minutes by converting zero time-average potentials of amplitudes in the range 0.5–3 V into average net currents using a single conical nanopore. This process suggests that significant energy conversion and storage from an electrically fluctuating environment is feasible with a nanoscale pore immersed in a liquid electrolyte solution, a system characteristic of bioelectronics interfaces, electrochemical cells, and nanoporous membranes. PMID:25830563

  6. Charge modulation infrared spectroscopy of rubrene single-crystal field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, R.; Yada, H.; Makino, M.; Matsui, Y.; Miwa, K.; Uemura, T.; Takeya, J.; Okamoto, H.

    2013-03-01

    Polarized absorption spectra of hole carriers in rubrene single crystal field-effect transistors were measured in the infrared region (725-8000 cm-1) by charge modulation spectroscopy. The absorptions, including the superimposed oscillatory components due to multiple reflections within thin crystals, monotonically increased with decreasing frequency. The spectra and their polarization dependences were well reproduced by the analysis based on the Drude model, in which the absorptions due to holes in rubrene and electrons in the gate electrodes (silicon), and multiple reflections were fully considered. The results support the band transport of hole carriers in rubrene.

  7. Passive water-lipid peptide translocators with conformational switches: from single-molecule probe to cellular assay.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Ariel; Crespo, Alejandro; Blau, Axel

    2007-12-20

    Peptide design for unassisted passive water-lipid translocation remains a challenge, notwithstanding its importance for drug delivery. We introduce a design paradigm based on conformational switches operating as passive translocation vehicles. The interfacial behavior of the molecular prototype, probed in single-molecule AFM experiments, reveals a near-barrierless translocation. The associated free-energy agrees with mesoscopic measurements, and the in vitro behavior is quantitatively reproduced in cellular assays. The prototypes herald the advent of novel nanobiomaterials for passive translocation.

  8. Peptide-coated semiconductor quantum dots and their applications in biological imaging of single molecules in live cells and organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinaud, Fabien Florent

    2007-12-01

    A new surface chemistry has been developed for the solubilization and biofunctionalization of inorganic semiconductor nanocrystals fluorescent probes, also known as quantum dots. This chemistry is based on the surface coating of quantum dots with custom-designed polycysteine peptides and yields water-soluble, small, monodispersed and colloidally stable probes that remain bright and photostable in complex biological milieus. This peptide coating strategy was successfully tested on several types of core and core-shell quantum dots emitting from the visible (e.g. CdSe/ZnS) to the NIR spectrum range (e.g. CdTe/CdSe/ZnS). By taking advantage of the versatile physico-chemical properties of peptides, a peptide "toolkit" was designed and employed to impart several biological functions to individual quantum dots and control their biochemical activity at the nanometer scale. These biofunctionalized peptide-coated quantum dots were exploited in very diverse biological applications. Near-infrared emitting quantum dot probes were engineered with optimized blood circulation and biodistribution properties for in vivo animal imaging. Visible emitting quantum dots were used for single molecule tracking of raft-associated GPI-anchored proteins in live cells. This last application revealed the presence of discrete and non-caveolar lipid microdomains capable of impeding free lateral diffusions in the plasma membrane of Hela cells. Imaging and tracking of peptide-coated quantum dots provided the first direct evidence that microdomains having the composition and behavior expected for lipid rafts can induce molecular compartmentalization in the membrane of living cells.

  9. Electronic transport in single-helical protein molecules: Effects of multiple charge conduction pathways and helical symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Sourav; Karmakar, S. N.

    2016-07-01

    We propose a tight-binding model to investigate electronic transport properties of single helical protein molecules incorporating both the helical symmetry and the possibility of multiple charge transfer pathways. Our study reveals that due to existence of both the multiple charge transfer pathways and helical symmetry, the transport properties are quite rigid under influence of environmental fluctuations which indicates that these biomolecules can serve as better alternatives in nanoelectronic devices than its other biological counterparts e.g., single-stranded DNA.

  10. Reversal of the surface charge asymmetry in purple membrane due to single amino acid substitutions.

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, K C; Rayfield, G W; Needleman, R

    1996-01-01

    Twenty-seven mutant bacteriorhodopsin's were screened to determine the PKa for reversal of the permanent electric dipole moment. The photoelectric response of an aqueous purple-membrane suspension was used to determine the direction of the purple-membrane dipole moment as a function of pH. The pK(a) for the dipole reversal of wild-type bacteriorhodopsin is 4.5. Six of the 27 mutant bacteriorhodopsin's were found to have a pK(a) for dipole reversal larger than that of wild-type bacteriorhodopsin. Two of these mutants, L93T and L93W, involve a neutral amino acid substitution in the interior of the protein. The direction of the purple-membrane permanent electric dipole moment is determined by the purple-membrane surface charge asymmetry. We conclude that these two substitutions, which do not involve charge replacement, alter the pK(a) for the reversal of the purple-membrane surface charge asymmetry. We suggest that these changes to the pK(a) are due to altered protein folding at the surface of the purple-membrane induced by single-site substitutions in the protein interior. PMID:9172760

  11. Modifying the surface charge of single track-etched conical nanopores in polyimide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, M.; Schiedt, B.; Healy, K.; Neumann, R.; Ensinger, W.

    2008-02-01

    Chemical modification of nanopore surfaces is of great interest as it means that the surface composition is no longer fixed by the choice of substrate material, even to the point where large biomolecules can be attached to the pore walls. Controlling nanopore transport characteristics is one important application of surface modification which is very relevant given the significant interest in sensors based on the transport of ions and molecules through nanopores. Reported here is a method to change the surface charge polarity of single track-etched conical nanopores in polyimide, which also has the potential to attach more complex molecules to the carboxyl groups on the nanopore walls. These carboxyl groups were converted into terminal amino groups, first by activation with N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N-ethylcarbodiimide (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) followed by the covalent coupling of ethylenediamine. This results in a changed surface charge polarity. Regeneration of a carboxyl-terminated surface was also possible, by reaction of the amino groups with succinic anhydride. The success of these reactions was confirmed by measurements of the pore's pH sensitive current-voltage (I-V) characteristics before and after the chemical modification, which depend on surface charge. The permselectivity of the pores also changed accordingly with the modification.

  12. Field-induced conductance switching by charge-state alternation in organometallic single-molecule junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Florian; Kastlunger, Georg; Lissel, Franziska; Egler-Lucas, Carolina; Semenov, Sergey N.; Venkatesan, Koushik; Berke, Heinz; Stadler, Robert; Lörtscher, Emanuel

    2016-02-01

    Charge transport through single molecules can be influenced by the charge and spin states of redox-active metal centres placed in the transport pathway. These intrinsic properties are usually manipulated by varying the molecule's electrochemical and magnetic environment, a procedure that requires complex setups with multiple terminals. Here we show that oxidation and reduction of organometallic compounds containing either Fe, Ru or Mo centres can solely be triggered by the electric field applied to a two-terminal molecular junction. Whereas all compounds exhibit bias-dependent hysteresis, the Mo-containing compound additionally shows an abrupt voltage-induced conductance switching, yielding high-to-low current ratios exceeding 1,000 at bias voltages of less than 1.0 V. Density functional theory calculations identify a localized, redox-active molecular orbital that is weakly coupled to the electrodes and closely aligned with the Fermi energy of the leads because of the spin-polarized ground state unique to the Mo centre. This situation provides an additional slow and incoherent hopping channel for transport, triggering a transient charging effect in the entire molecule with a strong hysteresis and large high-to-low current ratios.

  13. Theoretical description of charge migration with a single Slater-determinant and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuleff, Alexander I.; Dreuw, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Triggered by the interest to study charge migration in large molecular systems, a simple methodology has recently been proposed based on straightforward density functional theory calculations. This approach describes the time evolution of the initially created hole density in terms of the time evolution of the ionized highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO). Here we demonstrate that this time-dependent analog of Koopmans' theorem is not valid, and instead of the time evolution of the HOMO, the time evolution of the orbitals that remain occupied in the cation determines the evolution of the initially created hole in the framework of time-dependent single-determinant theories. Numerical examples underline that for a proper description of charge migration processes, an explicit treatment of the electron correlation is indispensable. Moreover, they also demonstrate that the attempts to describe charge migration based on Kohn-Sham density functional theory using conventional exchange-correlation functionals are doomed to fail due to the well-known self-interaction error.

  14. Chiral Charge Density Wave and Superconductivity in CuxTiSe2 Single Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karapetrov, Goran; Husanikova, P.; Cambel, V.; Szabó, P.; Samuely, P.; Fedor, J.; Iavarone, M.

    2015-03-01

    We investigate atomic scale scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy in CuxTiSe2 single crystals at low temperatures. We map the CDW and superconducting phase diagram as a function of copper doping. STM measurements reveal coexistence of chiral charge density wave and superconductivity. In case of optimally doped and overdoped cases we find that the amplitude of charge density wave modulation is strongly suppressed with respect to strongly underdoped case (x < 0 . 06) with the chiral domain size remaining approximately the same. Superconductivity exhibits BCS character at variety of dopings with 2 Δ / kTc ~ 3 . 6 ÷ 3 . 7 indicating an intermediate coupling strength. Application of the external magnetic field introduces the Abrikosov vortex lattice that is weakly pinned. The size of the vortex core extracted from vortex images corresponds to the one extracted from the magnetization measurements. Our results suggest that, if charge density wave quantum critical point exist, it should be well above the optimal copper concentration of x=0.08. This work is supported by the Army Research Office Grant #W911NF-14-1-0567.

  15. Low energy singly and multiply charged ion irradiation of astrophysical ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawes, A.; Holtom, P. D.; Mukerji, R. J.; Davis, M. P.; Sivaraman, B.; McCullough, R. W.; Williams, I.; Mason, N. J.

    Ion induced processes play an important role in the chemical modification of astrophysical ices, both on the surfaces of satellites in the outer solar system and in the depths of dark molecular clouds where few photons penetrate. To date many laboratory studies have been developed to study energetic singly charged ion interactions with astrophysical ice analogues (e.g. Mennella, et al 2004; Strazzulla, Baratta & Palumbo 2001; Gerakines, Moore, & Hudson 2000) and have been found to produce new chemical species and cause significant effects on ice morphology (Palumbo 2005). However, the effects of low energy and multiply charged ions have not yet been investigated. Such ions are prevalent in many astrophysical environments: as primary and secondary particles generated by cosmic ray bombardment and as constituents of planetary magnetospheres (e.g. Jupiter and Saturn). These ions comprise a rich variety of reactive species in a variety of charge states with typical kinetic energies of few keV. The effect of slow, multiply charged ions (MCIs) with the surfaces of astrophysical ices and their possible effect on chemical processing is unclear. However, studies of MCI impacts with insulator surfaces suggest that they may play an important role due to surplus potential energy imparted at the surface of the target (Winter & Aumayr 2001). We have developed a research program to study ion interactions with astrophysical ices using an Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source at Queens University Belfast. Such a source can produce different species of ions with variable energy and different charge states. Ices are prepared in situ by depositing gas onto a cold infrared transmitting window. Samples are analysed using FTIR spectroscopy during irradiation. We have conducted a series of experiments to investigate the effects of ion charge state (potential vs. kinetic energy effects), ion energy (nuclear vs. electronic stopping processes) and sample temperature. In this poster

  16. Charge carrier trapping and acoustic phonon modes in single CdTe nanowires.

    PubMed

    Lo, Shun Shang; Major, Todd A; Petchsang, Nattasamon; Huang, Libai; Kuno, Masaru K; Hartland, Gregory V

    2012-06-26

    Semiconductor nanostructures produced by wet chemical synthesis are extremely heterogeneous, which makes single particle techniques a useful way to interrogate their properties. In this paper the ultrafast dynamics of single CdTe nanowires are studied by transient absorption microscopy. The wires have lengths of several micrometers and lateral dimensions on the order of 30 nm. The transient absorption traces show very fast decays, which are assigned to charge carrier trapping into surface defects. The time constants vary for different wires due to differences in the energetics and/or density of surface trap sites. Measurements performed at the band edge compared to the near-IR give slightly different time constants, implying that the dynamics for electron and hole trapping are different. The rate of charge carrier trapping was observed to slow down at high carrier densities, which was attributed to trap-state filling. Modulations due to the fundamental and first overtone of the acoustic breathing mode were also observed in the transient absorption traces. The quality factors for these modes were similar to those measured for metal nanostructures, and indicate a complex interaction with the environment.

  17. Tuning Charge and Correlation Effects for a Single Molecule on a Graphene Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Hsin-Zon; Wickenburg, Sebastian; Lu, Jiong; Lischner, Johannes; Omrani, Arash A.; Riss, Alexander; Karrasch, Christoph; Jung, Han Sae; Khajeh, Ramin; Wong, Dillon; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Zettl, Alex; Louie, Steven G.; Crommie, Michael F.

    Controlling electronic devices down to the single molecule level is a grand challenge of nanotechnology. Single-molecules have been integrated into devices capable of tuning electronic response, but a drawback for these systems is that their microscopic structure remains unknown due to inability to image molecules in the junction region. Here we present a combined STM and nc-AFM study demonstrating gate-tunable control of the charge state of individual F4TCNQ molecules at the surface of a graphene field effect transistor. This is different from previous studies in that the Fermi level of the substrate was continuously tuned across the molecular orbital energy level. Using STS we have determined the resulting energy level evolution of the LUMO, its associated vibronic modes, and the graphene Dirac point (ED). We show that the energy difference between ED and the LUMO increases as EF is moved away from ED due to electron-electron interactions that renormalize the molecular quasiparticle energy. This is attributed to gate-tunable image-charge screening in graphene and corroborated by ab initio calculations.

  18. Spiro-OMeTAD single crystals: Remarkably enhanced charge-carrier transport via mesoscale ordering

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Dong; Qin, Xiang; Li, Yuan; He, Yao; Zhong, Cheng; Pan, Jun; Dong, Huanli; Xu, Wei; Li, Tao; Hu, Wenping; Brédas, Jean-Luc; Bakr, Osman M.

    2016-01-01

    We report the crystal structure and hole-transport mechanism in spiro-OMeTAD [2,2′,7,7′-tetrakis(N,N-di-p-methoxyphenyl-amine)9,9′-spirobifluorene], the dominant hole-transporting material in perovskite and solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells. Despite spiro-OMeTAD’s paramount role in such devices, its crystal structure was unknown because of highly disordered solution-processed films; the hole-transport pathways remained ill-defined and the charge carrier mobilities were low, posing a major bottleneck for advancing cell efficiencies. We devised an antisolvent crystallization strategy to grow single crystals of spiro-OMeTAD, which allowed us to experimentally elucidate its molecular packing and transport properties. Electronic structure calculations enabled us to map spiro-OMeTAD’s intermolecular charge-hopping pathways. Promisingly, single-crystal mobilities were found to exceed their thin-film counterparts by three orders of magnitude. Our findings underscore mesoscale ordering as a key strategy to achieving breakthroughs in hole-transport material engineering of solar cells. PMID:27152342

  19. Solubilization of single-walled carbon nanotubes using a peptide aptamer in water below the critical micelle concentration.

    PubMed

    Li, Zha; Kameda, Tomoshi; Isoshima, Takashi; Kobatake, Eiry; Tanaka, Takeshi; Ito, Yoshihiro; Kawamoto, Masuki

    2015-03-24

    The solubilizing ability of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in water with several dispersants was investigated. Among the dispersants, including low-molecular-weight surfactants, peptides, DNA, and a water-soluble polymer, the peptide aptamer, A2 (IFRLSWGTYFS), exhibited the highest dispersion capability below the critical micelle concentration at a concentration of 0.02 w/v%. The dispersion of supernatant aqueous solution of SWCNTs containing aptamer A2 was essentially unchanged for several months after high-speed ultracentrifugation and gave rise to an efficient and stable dispersion of the SWCNTs in water. From the results of isothermal titration calorimetry and molecular dynamics simulations, the effective binding capability of A2 was due to π-π interaction between aromatic groups in the peptide aptamer and the side walls of SWCNTs. Interestingly, the peptide aptamer showed the possibility of diameter separation of semiconducting SWCNTs using a uniform density gradient ultracentrifuge. These phenomena are encouraging results toward an effective approach to the dispersion and separation of SWCNTs. PMID:25746134

  20. Amino-Terminal Extended Peptide Single-Chain Trimers are Potent Synthetic Agonists for Memory Human CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Carreno, Beatriz M.; Becker-Hapak, Michelle; Chan, Megan; Lie, Wen-Rong; Wang, Xiaoli; Hansen, Ted H.; Linette, Gerald P.

    2012-01-01

    Upon antigen exposure, most memory T cells undergo re-stimulation induced cell death. Here we describe a novel synthetic agonist, an amino-terminal extended decamer peptide expressed as a single chain trimer, the AT-SCT, that preferentially promotes the growth of memory human CD8+ T cells with minimal re-stimulation-induced cell death. Using the CMV pp65 and melanoma gp100 antigens, we observe the in vitro numerical expansion of a clonally diverse poly-functional population of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells from normal individuals and vaccinated melanoma patients, respectively. Memory CD8+ T cells stimulated with AT-SCT presented on MHC class I/II null cells show reduced cytokine production, slower kinetics of TCR down-regulation and decreased cell death when compared to native nonamer SCT-activated T cells. However, both ERK phosphorylation and cell cycle kinetics are identical in AT-SCT- and SCT-activated T cells. Probing of SCT and AT-SCT peptide-MHC (p-MHC) complexes using fluorochrome-conjugated TCR multimers suggest that nonamer and decamer-linked peptides may be anchored differently to HLA-A2 peptide binding groove. Our findings demonstrate that modified p-MHC structures such as AT-SCT can be engineered as T cell agonists to promote the growth and expansion of memory human CD8+ T cells. PMID:22573808

  1. Single residue deletions along the length of the influenza HA fusion peptide lead to inhibition of membrane fusion function

    SciTech Connect

    Langley, William A.; Thoennes, Sudha; Bradley, Konrad C.; Galloway, Summer E.; Talekar, Ganesh R.; Cummings, Sandra F.; Vareckova, Eva; Russell, Rupert J.; Steinhauer, David A.

    2009-11-25

    A panel of eight single amino acid deletion mutants was generated within the first 24 residues of the fusion peptide domain of the of the hemagglutinin (HA) of A/Aichi/2/68 influenza A virus (H3N2 subtype). The mutant HAs were analyzed for folding, cell surface transport, cleavage activation, capacity to undergo acid-induced conformational changes, and membrane fusion activity. We found that the mutant DELTAF24, at the C-terminal end of the fusion peptide, was expressed in a non-native conformation, whereas all other deletion mutants were transported to the cell surface and could be cleaved into HA1 and HA2 to activate membrane fusion potential. Furthermore, upon acidification these cleaved HAs were able to undergo the characteristic structural rearrangements that are required for fusion. Despite this, all mutants were inhibited for fusion activity based on two separate assays. The results indicate that the mutant fusion peptide domains associate with target membranes in a non-functional fashion, and suggest that structural features along the length of the fusion peptide are likely to be relevant for optimal membrane fusion activity.

  2. Electroactive chitosan nanoparticles for the detection of single-nucleotide polymorphisms using peptide nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Kerman, Kagan; Saito, Masato; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2008-08-01

    Here we report an electrochemical biosensor that would allow for simple and rapid analysis of nucleic acids in combination with nuclease activity on nucleic acids and electroactive bionanoparticles. The detection of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) using PNA probes takes advantage of the significant structural and physicochemical differences between the full hybrids and SNPs in PNA/DNA and DNA/DNA duplexes. Ferrocene-conjugated chitosan nanoparticles (Chi-Fc) were used as the electroactive indicator of hybridization. Chi-Fc had no affinity towards the neutral PNA probe immobilized on a gold electrode (AuE) surface. When the PNA probe on the electrode surface hybridized with a full-complementary target DNA, Chi-Fc electrostatically attached to the negatively-charged phosphate backbone of DNA on the surface and gave rise to a high electrochemical oxidation signal from ferrocene at approximately 0.30 V. Exposing the surface to a single-stranded DNA specific nuclease, Nuclease S1, was found to be very effective for removing the nonspecifically adsorbed SNP DNA. An SNP in the target DNA to PNA made it susceptible to the enzymatic digestion. After the enzymatic digestion and subsequent exposure to Chi-Fc, the presence of SNPs was determined by monitoring the changes in the electrical current response of Chi-Fc. The method provided a detection limit of 1 fM (S/N = 3) for the target DNA oligonucleotide. Additionally, asymmetric PCR was employed to detect the presence of genetically modified organism (GMO) in standard Roundup Ready soybean samples. PNA-mediated PCR amplification of real DNA samples was performed to detect SNPs related to alcohol dehydrogenase (ALDH). Chitosan nanoparticles are promising biomaterials for various analytical and pharmaceutical applications.

  3. Observation of Charge Separation and Space-Charge Region in Single-Crystal P3HT/C60 Heterojunction Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyung Sun; Lee, Ki Seok; Baek, Jangmi; Lee, Lynn; Son, Byung Hee; Koo Lee, Yong-Eun; Ahn, Yeong Hwan; Park, Won Il; Kang, Youngjong; Sung, Myung M

    2016-08-22

    We directly observed charge separation and a space-charge region in an organic single-crystal p-n heterojunction nanowire, by means of scanning photocurrent microscopy. The axial p-n heterojunction nanowire had a well-defined planar junction, consisted of P3HT (p-type) and C60 (n-type) single crystals and was fabricated by means of the recently developed inkjet-assisted nanotransfer printing technique. The depletion region formed at the p-n junction was directly observed by exploring the spatial distribution of photogenerated carriers along the heterojunction nanowire under various applied bias voltages. Our study provides a facile approach toward the precise characterization of charge transport in organic heterojunction systems as well as the design of efficient nanoscale organic optoelectronic devices. PMID:27461905

  4. Observation of Charge Separation and Space-Charge Region in Single-Crystal P3HT/C60 Heterojunction Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyung Sun; Lee, Ki Seok; Baek, Jangmi; Lee, Lynn; Son, Byung Hee; Koo Lee, Yong-Eun; Ahn, Yeong Hwan; Park, Won Il; Kang, Youngjong; Sung, Myung M

    2016-08-22

    We directly observed charge separation and a space-charge region in an organic single-crystal p-n heterojunction nanowire, by means of scanning photocurrent microscopy. The axial p-n heterojunction nanowire had a well-defined planar junction, consisted of P3HT (p-type) and C60 (n-type) single crystals and was fabricated by means of the recently developed inkjet-assisted nanotransfer printing technique. The depletion region formed at the p-n junction was directly observed by exploring the spatial distribution of photogenerated carriers along the heterojunction nanowire under various applied bias voltages. Our study provides a facile approach toward the precise characterization of charge transport in organic heterojunction systems as well as the design of efficient nanoscale organic optoelectronic devices.

  5. Optimization for Single-Spike X-Ray FELs at LCLS with a Low Charge Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.; Ding, Y.; Huang, Z.; /SLAC

    2011-12-14

    The Linac Coherent Light Source is an x-ray free-electron laser at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, which is operating at x-ray wavelengths of 20-1.2 Angstrom with peak brightness nearly ten orders of magnitude beyond conventional synchrotron radiation sources. At the low charge operation mode (20 pC), the x-ray pulse length can be <10 fs. In this paper we report our numerical optimization and simulations to produce even shorter x-ray pulses by optimizing the machine and undulator setup at 20 pC charge. In the soft x-ray regime, with combination of slotted-foil or undulator taper, a single spike x-ray pulse is achievable with peak FEL power of a few 10s GW. Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the world's first hard x-ray Free electron laser (FEL), has started operation since 2009. With nominal operation charge of 250 pC, the generated x-ray pulse length is from 70 fs to a few hundred fs. This marks the beginning of a new era of ultrashort x-ray sciences. In addition, a low charge (20pC) operation mode has also been established. Since the collective effects are reduced at the low charge mode, we can increase the compression factor and still achieve a few kA peak current. The expected electron beam and x-ray pulses are less than 10 fs. There are growing interests in even shorter x-ray pulses, such as fs to sub-fs regime. One of the simple solutions is going to even lower charge. As discussed, single-spike x-ray pulses can be generated using 1 pC charge. However, this charge level is out of the present LCLS diagnostic range. 20 pC is a reasonable operation charge at LCLS, based on the present diagnostic system. At 20 pC in the soft x-ray wavelength regime, we have experimentally demonstrated that FEL can work at undercompression or over-compression mode, such as 1 degree off the full-compression; at full-compression, however, there is almost no lasing. In hard x-ray wavelength regime, we observed that there are reasonable photons generated even at full

  6. Imidate-Based Cross-Linkers for Structural Proteomics: Increased Charge of Protein and Peptide Ions and CID and ECD Fragmentation Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koolen, Hector H. F.; Gomes, Alexandre F.; Schwab, Nicolas V.; Eberlin, Marcos N.; Gozzo, Fabio C.

    2014-07-01

    Chemical cross-linking is an attractive low-resolution technique for structural studies of protein complexes. Distance constraints obtained from cross-linked peptides identified by mass spectrometry (MS) are used to construct and validate protein models. Amidinating cross-linkers such as diethyl suberthioimidate (DEST) have been used successfully in chemical cross-linking experiments. In this work, the application of a commercial diimidate cross-linking reagent, dimethyl suberimidate (DMS), was evaluated with model peptides and proteins. The peptides were designed with acetylated N-termini followed by random sequences containing two Lys residues separated by an Arg residue. After cross-linking reactions, intra- and intermolecular cross-linked species were submitted to CID and ECD dissociations to study their fragmentation features in the gas phase. Fragmentation of intramolecular peptides by collision induced dissociation (CID) demonstrates a unique two-step fragmentation pathway involving formation of a ketimine as intermediate. Electron capture and electron transfer dissociation (ECD and ETD) experiments demonstrated that the cyclic moiety is not dissociated. Intermolecular species demonstrated previously described fragmentation behavior in both CID and ECD experiments. The charge state distributions (CSD) obtained after reaction with DMS were compared with those obtained with disuccinimidyl suberate (DSS). CSDs for peptides and proteins were increased after their reaction with DMS, owing to the higher basicity of DMS modified species. These features were also observed in LC-MS experiments with bovine carbonic anhydrase II (BCA) after cross-linking with DMS and tryptic proteolysis. Cross-linked peptides derived from this protein were identified at high confidence and those species were in agreement with the crystal structure of BCA.

  7. The Fate of a Normal Human Cell Traversed by a Single Charged Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, C.; Zahnreich, S.; Kraft, D.; Friedrich, T.; Voss, K.-O.; Durante, M.; Ritter, S.

    2012-09-01

    The long-term ``fate'' of normal human cells after single hits of charged particles is one of the oldest unsolved issues in radiation protection and cellular radiobiology. Using a high-precision heavy-ion microbeam we could target normal human fibroblasts with exactly one or five carbon ions and measured the early cytogenetic damage and the late behaviour using single-cell cloning. Around 70% of the first cycle cells presented visible aberrations in mFISH after a single ion traversal, and about 5% of the cells were still able to form colonies. In one third of selected high-proliferative colonies we observed clonal (radiation-induced) aberrations. Terminal differentiation and markers of senescence (PCNA, p16) in the descendants of cells traversed by one carbon ion occurred earlier than in controls, but no evidence of radiation-induced chromosomal instability was found. We conclude that cells surviving single-ion traversal, often carrying clonal chromosome aberrations, undergo accelerated senescence but maintain chromosomal stability.

  8. The fate of a normal human cell traversed by a single charged particle.

    PubMed

    Fournier, C; Zahnreich, S; Kraft, D; Friedrich, T; Voss, K O; Durante, M; Ritter, S

    2012-01-01

    The long-term "fate" of normal human cells after single hits of charged particles is one of the oldest unsolved issues in radiation protection and cellular radiobiology. Using a high-precision heavy-ion microbeam we could target normal human fibroblasts with exactly one or five carbon ions and measured the early cytogenetic damage and the late behaviour using single-cell cloning. Around 70% of the first cycle cells presented visible aberrations in mFISH after a single ion traversal, and about 5% of the cells were still able to form colonies. In one third of selected high-proliferative colonies we observed clonal (radiation-induced) aberrations. Terminal differentiation and markers of senescence (PCNA, p16) in the descendants of cells traversed by one carbon ion occurred earlier than in controls, but no evidence of radiation-induced chromosomal instability was found. We conclude that cells surviving single-ion traversal, often carrying clonal chromosome aberrations, undergo accelerated senescence but maintain chromosomal stability. PMID:22966418

  9. Soluble expression, purification and functional characterization of a coil peptide composed of a positively charged and hydrophobic motif.

    PubMed

    Riahi, Nesrine; Cappadocia, Laurent; Henry, Olivier; Omichinski, James; De Crescenzo, Gregory

    2016-02-01

    A de novo heterodimeric coiled-coil system formed by the association of two synthetic peptides, the Ecoil and Kcoil, has been previously designed and proven to be an excellent and versatile tool for various biotechnology applications. However, based on the challenges encountered during its chemical synthesis, the Kcoil peptide has been designated as a "difficult peptide". In this study, we explore the expression of the Kcoil peptide by a bacterial system as well as its subsequent purification. The maximum expression level was observed when the peptide was fused to thioredoxin and the optimized purification process consisted of three chromatographic steps: immobilized-metal affinity chromatography followed by cation-exchange chromatography and, finally, a reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. This entire process led to a final volumetric production yield of 1.5 mg of pure Kcoil peptide per liter of bacterial culture, which represents a significant step towards the cost-effective production and application of coiled-coil motifs. Our results thus demonstrate for the first time that bacterial production is a viable alternative to the chemical synthesis of de novo designed coil peptides. PMID:26459292

  10. Effects of Lipid Composition on the Entry of Cell-Penetrating Peptide Oligoarginine into Single Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Sharmin, Sabrina; Islam, Md Zahidul; Karal, Mohammad Abu Sayem; Alam Shibly, Sayed Ul; Dohra, Hideo; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2016-08-01

    The cell-penetrating peptide R9, an oligoarginine comprising nine arginines, has been used to transport biological cargos into cells. However, the mechanisms underlying its translocation across membranes remain unclear. In this report, we investigated the entry of carboxyfluorescein (CF)-labeled R9 (CF-R9) into single giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) of various lipid compositions and the CF-R9-induced leakage of a fluorescent probe, Alexa Fluor 647 hydrazide (AF647), using a method developed recently by us. First, we investigated the interaction of CF-R9 with dioleoylphosphatidylglycerol (DOPG)/dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) GUVs containing AF647 and small DOPG/DOPC vesicles. The fluorescence intensity of the GUV membrane due to CF-R9 (i.e., the rim intensity) increased with time to a steady-state value, and then the fluorescence intensity of the membranes of the small vesicles in the GUV lumen increased without leakage of AF647. This result indicates that CF-R9 entered the GUV lumen from the outside by translocating across the lipid membrane without forming pores through which AF647 could leak. The fraction of entry of CF-R9 at 6 min in the absence of pore formation, Pentry (6 min), increased with an increase in CF-R9 concentration, but the CF-R9 concentration in the lumen was low. We obtained similar results for dilauroyl-PG (DLPG)/ditridecanoyl-PC (DTPC) (2/8) GUVs. The values of Pentry (6 min) of CF-R9 for DLPG/DTPC (2/8) GUVs were larger than those obtained with DOPG/DOPC (2/8) GUVs at the same CF-R9 concentrations. In contrast, a high concentration of CF-R9 induced pores in DLPG/DTPC (4/6) GUVs through which CF-R9 entered the GUV lumen, so the CF-R9 concentration in the lumen was higher. However, CF-R9 could not enter DOPG/DOPC/cholesterol (2/6/4) GUVs. Analysis of the rim intensity showed that CF-R9 was located only in the outer monolayer of the DOPG/DOPC/cholesterol (2/6/4) GUVs. On the basis of analyses of these results, we discuss the elementary

  11. Biofunctionalization of Surfaces with Peptides, Proteins, or Subcellular Organelles: Single-Molecule Studies and Nanomedical Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katranidis, A.; Choli-Papadopoulou, T.

    Immobilization of biologically active proteins and enzymes on surfaces is very important for the production of biofunctionalized surfaces for applications in medicine such as biosensors and in the diagnostics field. There are various approaches to immobilize and control the release of peptides/proteins from different surfaces. The identification of successful techniques to functionalize a particular material is a challenge. On the other hand, biomaterials are at the moment of great benefit for medicinal purposes and a lot of knowledge from different fields is required in order to design biomimetic scaffolds or biomimetic materials. The used methodologies are different for different materials and are mainly based on the special chemistry of the surfaces. Peptides with distinct properties are desired instead of entire proteins. However, in some cases, proteins cannot be replaced by peptide segments and therefore biochemical knowledge, such as in protein and/or genetic engineering is required.

  12. Folded structure and insertion depth of the frog-skin antimicrobial Peptide esculentin-1b(1-18) in the presence of differently charged membrane-mimicking micelles.

    PubMed

    Manzo, Giorgia; Casu, Mariano; Rinaldi, Andrea C; Montaldo, Nicola P; Luganini, Anna; Gribaudo, Giorgio; Scorciapino, Mariano A

    2014-11-26

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are effectors of the innate immunity of most organisms. Their role in the defense against pathogen attack and their high selectivity for bacterial cells make them attractive for the development of a new class of antimicrobial drugs. The N-terminal fragment of the frog-skin peptide esculentin-1b (Esc(1-18)) has shown broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity. Similarly to most cationic AMPs, it is supposed to act by binding to and damaging the negatively charged plasma membrane of bacteria. Differently from many other AMPs, Esc(1-18) activity is preserved in biological fluids such as serum. In this work, a structural investigation was performed through NMR spectroscopy. The 3D structure was obtained in the presence of either zwitterionic or negatively charged micelles as membrane models for eukaryotic and prokaryotic membranes, respectively. Esc(1-18) showed a higher affinity for and deeper insertion into the latter and adopted an amphipathic helical structure characterized by a kink at the residue G8. These findings were confirmed by measuring penetration into lipid monolayers. The presence of negatively charged lipids in the bilayer appears to be necessary for Esc(1-18) to bind, to fold in the right three-dimensional structure, and, ultimately, to exert its biological role as an AMP.

  13. Single bunch transverse instability in a circular accelerator with chromaticity and space charge

    SciTech Connect

    Balbekov, V.

    2015-10-21

    The transverse instability of a bunch in a circular accelerator is elaborated in this paper. A new tree-modes model is proposed and developed to describe the most unstable modes of the bunch. This simple and flexible model includes chromaticity and space charge, and can be used with any bunch and wake forms. The dispersion equation for the bunch eigentunes is obtained in form of a third-order algebraic equation. The known head-tail and TMCI modes appear as the limiting cases which are distinctly bounded at zero chromaticity only. It is shown that the instability parameters depend only slightly on the bunch model but they are rather sensitive to the wake shape. In particular, space charge effects are investigated in the paper and it is shown that their influence depends on sign of wake field enhancing the bunch stability if the wake is negative. In addition, the resistive wall wake is considered in detail including a comparison of single and collective effects. A comparison of the results with earlier publications is carried out.

  14. Single bunch transverse instability in a circular accelerator with chromaticity and space charge

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Balbekov, V.

    2015-10-21

    The transverse instability of a bunch in a circular accelerator is elaborated in this paper. A new tree-modes model is proposed and developed to describe the most unstable modes of the bunch. This simple and flexible model includes chromaticity and space charge, and can be used with any bunch and wake forms. The dispersion equation for the bunch eigentunes is obtained in form of a third-order algebraic equation. The known head-tail and TMCI modes appear as the limiting cases which are distinctly bounded at zero chromaticity only. It is shown that the instability parameters depend only slightly on the bunchmore » model but they are rather sensitive to the wake shape. In particular, space charge effects are investigated in the paper and it is shown that their influence depends on sign of wake field enhancing the bunch stability if the wake is negative. In addition, the resistive wall wake is considered in detail including a comparison of single and collective effects. A comparison of the results with earlier publications is carried out.« less

  15. Production and properties of singly, doubly, and triply charged N/sub 2/ clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Scheier, P.; Stamatovic, A.; Maerk, T.D.

    1988-04-01

    Clusters of N/sub 2/ molecules formed in a supersonic nozzle expansion have been studied by electron impact ionization mass spectrometry. Mass resolved spectra (with n up to 190) show three homologous series, i.e., consisting of (N/sub 2/)/sup +//sub n/, (N/sub 2/)/sub n/N+, and ((N/sub 2/)/sub n/ N)/sup 2 +/ ions. The distribution of (N/sub 2/)/sup +//sub n/ ions shows distinct magic number effects. Moreover, there is evidence for the existence of (N/sub 2/)/sup 2 +//sub n/ and (N/sub 2/)/sup 3 +//sub n/ ions. The critical appearance sizes of observed multiply charged cluster ions are (N/sub 2/)/sup 2 +//sub 99/, (N/sub 2/)/sub 99/N/sup 2 +/, and (N/sub 2/)/sup 3 +//sub 215/. These results are compared with theoretical predictions. Moreover, a study of the electron energy dependence of singly and doubly charged N/sub 2/ cluster ions close to threshold (appearance energies) gives new insight into the ionization mechanism

  16. Further studies of single-sided charge-sharing CZT strip detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donmez, Burcin; Macri, John R.; McConnell, Mark L.; Ryan, James M.; Widholm, Mark; Narita, Tomohiko; Hamel, Louis-Andre

    2005-08-01

    We report progress in the study of a thick CZT strip detector module designed to perform gamma-ray spectroscopy and 3-D imaging. We report preliminary performance measurements of 7.5 mm thick single-sided charge-sharing strip detector prototype devices. This design features both row and column contacts on the anode surface. This electron-only approach addresses problems associated with poor hole transport in CZT that limit the thickness and energy range of double-sided strip detectors. This work includes laboratory and simulation studies aimed at developing compact, efficient, detector modules for 0.05 to 1 MeV gamma measurements while minimizing the number and complexity of the electronic readout channels. This is particularly important in space-based coded aperture and Compton telescope instruments that require large area, large volume detector arrays. Such arrays will be required for the NASA Black Hole Finder Probe (BHFP)and Advanced Compton Telescope (ACT). This new design requires an anode pattern with contacts whose dimensions and spacing are roughly the size of the ionization charge cloud. The first prototype devices have 125 μm anode contacts on 225 μm pitch. Our results demonstrate the principle of operation but suggest that even finer anode contact feature sizes will be necessary to achieve the desired performance.

  17. Single-Sided Charge-Sharing CZT Strip Detectors for Gamma Ray Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donmez, Burcin; Ryan, James; Macri, John; McConnell, Mark; Narita, Tomohiko; Hamel, Louis-Andre

    2006-04-01

    We report progress in the study of thick single-sided charge-sharing cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) strip detector modules designed to perform gamma-ray spectroscopy and 3-D imaging. We report laboratory and simulation measurements of prototype detectors with 11x11 unit cells (15x15x7.5mm^3). We report measurements of the 3-D spatial resolution. Our studies are aimed at developing compact, efficient, detector modules for 0.05 to 1 MeV gamma measurements while minimizing the number and complexity of the electronic readout channels. This is particularly important in space-based coded aperture and Compton telescope instruments that require large area, large volume detector arrays. Such arrays will be required for the NASA's Black Hole Finder Probe (BHFP) and Advanced Compton Telescope (ACT). This design requires an anode pattern with contacts whose dimensions and spacing are roughly the size of the ionization charge cloud. The first prototype devices have 125 μm anode contacts on 225 μm pitch. Our studies conclude that finer pitch contacts will be required to improve imaging efficiency.

  18. Single-crystal organic charge-transfer interfaces probed using Schottky-gated heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez Lezama, Ignacio; Nakano, Masaki; Minder, Nikolas A; Chen, Zhihua; Di Girolamo, Flavia V; Facchetti, Antonio; Morpurgo, Alberto F

    2012-09-01

    Organic semiconductors based on small conjugated molecules generally behave as insulators when undoped, but the heterointerfaces of two such materials can show electrical conductivity as large as in a metal. Although charge transfer is commonly invoked to explain the phenomenon, the details of the process and the nature of the interfacial charge carriers remain largely unexplored. Here we use Schottky-gated heterostructures to probe the conducting layer at the interface between rubrene and PDIF-CN(2) single crystals. Gate-modulated conductivity measurements demonstrate that interfacial transport is due to electrons, whose mobility exhibits band-like behaviour from room temperature to ~150 K, and remains as high as ~1 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) at 30 K for the best devices. The electron density decreases linearly with decreasing temperature, an observation that can be explained quantitatively on the basis of the heterostructure band diagram. These results elucidate the electronic structure of rubrene/PDIF-CN(2) interfaces and show the potential of Schottky-gated organic heterostructures for the investigation of transport in molecular semiconductors. PMID:22820687

  19. Characterization of Single-Sided Charge-Sharing CZT Strip Detectors for Gamma-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donmez, Burcin; Macri, John R.; Ryan, James M.; Legere, Jason S.; McConnell, Mark L.; Widholm, Mark; Narita, Tomohiko; Hamel, Louis-Andre

    2006-01-01

    We report progress in the study of thick single-sided charge-sharing cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) strip detector modules designed to perform spectroscopy and 3-D imaging of gamma-rays. We report laboratory measurements including spectroscopy, efficiency and 3-D imaging capability of prototype detectors (15 15 7.5 cu mm) with 11x11 unit cells. We also report on Monte Carlo simulations (GEANT4 v7.1) to investigate the effect of multihits on detector performance in both spectroscopy and imaging. We compare simulation results with data obtained from laboratory measurements and discuss the implications for future strip detector designs. Keywords: CZT, strip detectors, gamma-ray

  20. Modifications of gallium phosphide single crystals using slow highly charged ions and swift heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Said, A. S.; Wilhelm, R. A.; Heller, R.; Akhmadaliev, Sh.; Schumann, E.; Sorokin, M.; Facsko, S.; Trautmann, C.

    2016-09-01

    GaP single crystals were irradiated with slow highly charged ions (HCI) using 114 keV 129Xe(33-40)+ and with various swift heavy ions (SHI) of 30 MeV I9+ and 374 MeV-2.2 GeV 197Au25+. The irradiated surfaces were investigated by scanning force microscopy (SFM). The irradiations with SHI lead to nanohillocks protruding from the GaP surfaces, whereas no changes of the surface topography were observed after the irradiation with HCI. This result indicates that a potential energy above 38.5 keV is required for surface nanostructuring of GaP. In addition, strong coloration of the GaP crystals was observed after irradiation with SHI. The effect was stronger for higher energies. This was confirmed by measuring an increased extinction coefficient in the visible light region.

  1. Charge transfer processes and ultraviolet induced absorption in Yb:YAG single crystal laser materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rydberg, S.; Engholm, M.

    2013-06-01

    Charge transfer (CT) transitions and UV induced color centers in Yb:YAG single crystals have been investigated. A simultaneous pair formation of a stable Yb2+ ion and a hole related (O-) color center (hole polaron) are observed through a CT-process. Slightly different types of hole related color centers are formed in Yb:YAG crystals containing small levels of iron impurities. Furthermore, excitation spectroscopy on the UV irradiated Yb:YAG samples could confirm an energy transfer process between Yb3+ and Yb2+ ions. The findings are important for an increased knowledge of the physical loss mechanisms observed in Yb-doped laser materials, such as the nonlinear decay process in Yb:YAG crystals as well as the photodarkening phenomenon in Yb-doped fiber lasers.

  2. Processing integral-skin polyolefin foams in single-charge rotational foam molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pop-Iliev, Remon

    This thesis focuses on establishing the scientific and engineering foundations for gaining a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms and critical parameters governing the processing of integral-skin low-density polyolefin foams in rotational foam molding. The presented research is particularly intended to broaden the knowledge in the field of manufacturing adjacent, but clearly distinct, layers of non-cellular and cellular structures, consisting of identical or compatible plastic grades, using a single-charge processing concept. Although this technology is beneficial for the efficacy of the molding process and the structural homogeneity of the moldings, its optimization raised a fairly large number of fundamental issues that had to be resolved through further research. In this context, an attempt has been made to establish rigorous, experimentally validated, theoretical models that describe the phenomena identified as the fundamental challenges of this technology. The major contributions of this thesis include: (i) optimization of the single-charge rotational foam molding process for the manufacture of both PE/PE and PE/PP integral-skin cellular composites, (ii) development of a two-step oven temperature profile that prevents the foamable resins invading the solid skin layer and ensures that skin formation always completes prior to the activation of the foamable resin, (iii) fundamental study of the adherence behavior of powders and foamable pellets to a high-temperature rotating mold wall, (iv) fundamental study of the lifespan of CBA-blown bubbles in non-pressurized non-isothermal polymer melts using hot-stage optical microscopy and digital imaging, (v) development of a detailed theoretical model involving diffusion, surface tension, and viscosity to simulate the observed foaming mechanism, and (vi) fundamental study of the rotofoamablility of polyolefin resins using both dry blending and melt compounding based methods and characterization of rheological and

  3. Passive water-lipid peptide translocators with conformational switches: From single-molecule probe to cellular assay

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Ariel; Crespo, Alejandro; Blau, Axel

    2008-01-01

    Peptide design for unassisted passive water/lipid translocation remains a challenge, notwithstanding its importance for drug delivery. We introduce a design paradigm based on conformational switches operating as passive translocation vehicles. The interfacial behavior of the molecular prototype, probed in single-molecule AFM experiments, reveals a near-barrierless translocation. The associated free-energy agrees with mesoscopic measurements, and the in vitro behavior is quantitatively reproduced in cellular assays. The prototypes herald the advent of novel nano-biomaterials for passive translocation. PMID:18044863

  4. Manipulating the charge state and conductance of a single molecule on a semiconductor surface by electrostatic gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Blanco, Jesus; Nacci, Christophe; Erwin, Steven C.; Kanisawa, Kiyoshi; Locane, Elina; Thomas, Mark; von Oppen, Felix; Brouwer, Piet; Foelsch, Stefan

    2015-03-01

    We studied the charge state and tunneling conductance of single phthalocyanine molecules adsorbed on InAs(111)A using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) at 5 K. On the InAs(111)A surface, native +1 charged indium adatoms can be repositioned by the STM tip using atom manipulation. This allows us to electrostatically gate an individual adsorbed molecule by placing charged adatoms nearby or, alternatively, by repositioning the molecule within the electrostatic potential landscape created by an STM-engineered adatom corral. By stepwise increasing the gating potential, the molecular charge state can be tuned from neutral to -1, as well as to bistable intermediate states. We find that the molecule changes its orientational conformation when the charge state is switched. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy measurements reveal that the conductance gap of the single-molecule tunneling junction can be precisely controlled by the electrostatic gating. We discuss the observed gating-dependent single-molecule tunneling conductance in terms of charge transport through a gated quantum dot. Granted by the German Research Foundation (FO 362/4-1; SFB 658).

  5. Charge transfer structure-reactivity dependence of fullerene-single-walled carbon nanotube heterojunctions.

    PubMed

    Hilmer, Andrew J; Tvrdy, Kevin; Zhang, Jingqing; Strano, Michael S

    2013-08-14

    Charge transfer at the interface between single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) of distinct chiral vectors and fullerenes of various molecular weights is of interest both fundamentally and because of its importance in emerging photovoltaic and optoelectronic devices. One approach for generating isolated, discretized fullerene-SWCNT heterojunctions for spectroscopic investigation is to form an amphiphile, which is able to disperse the latter at the single-SWCNT level in aqueous solution. Herein, we synthesize a series of methanofullerene amphiphiles, including derivatives of C60, C70, and C84, and investigated their electron transfer with SWCNT of specific chirality, generating a structure-reactivity relationship. In the cases of two fullerene derivatives, lipid-C61-polyethylene glycol (PEG) and lipid-C71-PEG, band gap dependent, incomplete quenching was observed across all SWCNT species, indicating that the driving force for electron transfer is small. This is further supported by a variant of Marcus theory, which predicts that the energy offsets between the nanotube conduction bands and the C61 and C71 LUMO levels are less than the exciton binding energy in SWCNT. In contrast, upon interfacing nanotubes with C85 methanofullerene, a complete quenching of all semiconducting SWCNT is observed. This enhancement in quenching efficiency is consistent with the deeper LUMO level of C85 methanofullerene in comparison with the smaller fullerene adducts, and suggests its promise as for SWCNT-fullerene heterojunctions.

  6. Charging the Quantum Capacitance of Graphene with a Single Biological Ion Channel

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of cell and organelle membranes (lipid bilayers) with nanoelectronics can enable new technologies to sense and measure electrophysiology in qualitatively new ways. To date, a variety of sensing devices have been demonstrated to measure membrane currents through macroscopic numbers of ion channels. However, nanoelectronic based sensing of single ion channel currents has been a challenge. Here, we report graphene-based field-effect transistors combined with supported lipid bilayers as a platform for measuring, for the first time, individual ion channel activity. We show that the supported lipid bilayers uniformly coat the single layer graphene surface, acting as a biomimetic barrier that insulates (both electrically and chemically) the graphene from the electrolyte environment. Upon introduction of pore-forming membrane proteins such as alamethicin and gramicidin A, current pulses are observed through the lipid bilayers from the graphene to the electrolyte, which charge the quantum capacitance of the graphene. This approach combines nanotechnology with electrophysiology to demonstrate qualitatively new ways of measuring ion channel currents. PMID:24754625

  7. Single amino acid mutation in alpha-helical peptide affect second harmonic generation hyperpolarizability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jing; Wang, Jin-Yun; Zhang, Min-Yi; Chai, Guo-Liang; Lin, Chen-Sheng; Cheng, Wen-Dan

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the effect of side chain on the first-order hyperpolarizability in α-helical polyalanine peptide with the 10th alanine mutation (Acetyl(ala)9X(ala)7NH2). Structures of various substituted peptides are optimized by ONIOM (DFT: AM1) scheme, and then linear and nonlinear optical properties are calculated by SOS//CIS/6-31G∗ method. The polarizability and first-order hyperpolarizability increase obviously only when 'X' represents phenylalanine, tyrosine and tryptophan. We also discuss the origin of nonlinear optical response and determine what caused the increase of first-order hyperpolarizability. Our results strongly suggest that side chains containing benzene, phenol and indole have important contributions to first-order hyperpolarizability.

  8. Synthesis and Mechanism Insight of a Peptide-Grafted Hyperbranched Polymer Nanosheet with Weak Positive Charges but Excellent Intrinsically Antibacterial Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jingyi; Wang, Mingzhi; Wang, Fangyingkai; Du, Jianzhong

    2016-06-13

    Antimicrobial resistance is an increasingly problematic issue in the world and there is a present and urgent need to develop new antimicrobial therapies without drug resistance. Antibacterial polymers are less susceptible to drug resistance but they are prone to inducing serious side effects due to high positive charge. Herein we report a peptide-grafted hyperbranched polymer which can self-assemble into unusual nanosheets with highly effective intrinsically antibacterial activity but weak positive charges (+ 6.1 mV). The hyperbranched polymer was synthesized by sequential Michael addition-based thiol-ene and free radical mediated thiol-ene reactions, and followed by ring-opening polymerization of N-carboxyanhydrides (NCAs). The nanosheet structure was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies. Furthermore, a novel "wrapping and penetrating" antibacterial mechanism of the nanosheets was revealed by TEM and it is the key to significantly decrease the positive charges but have a very low minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 16 μg mL(-1) against typical Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Overall, our synthetic strategy demonstrates a new insight for synthesizing antibacterial nanomaterials with weak positive charges. Moreover, the unique antibacterial mechanism of our nanosheets may be extended for designing next-generation antibacterial agents without drug resistance.

  9. Open questions in electronic sputtering of solids by slow highly charged ions with respect to applications in single ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Schenkel, T.; Rangelow, I.W.; Keller, R.; Park, S.J.; Nilsson, J.; Persaud, A.; Radmilivitc, V.R.; Liddle, J.A.; Grabiec, P.; Bokor, J.; Schneider, D.H.

    2003-07-16

    In this article we discuss open questions in electronic sputtering of solids by slow, highly charged ions in the context of their application in a single ion implantation scheme. High yields of secondary electrons emitted when highly charged dopant ions impinge on silicon wafers allow for formation of non-Poissonian implant structures such as single atom arrays. Control of high spatial resolution and implant alignment require the use of nanometer scale apertures. We discuss electronic sputtering issues on mask lifetimes, and damage to silicon wafers.

  10. Electron Capture Dissociation of Trivalent Metal Ion-Peptide Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Flick, Tawnya G.; Donald, William A.; Williams, Evan R.

    2013-01-01

    With electrospray ionization from aqueous solutions, trivalent metal ions readily adduct to small peptides resulting in formation of predominantly (peptide + MT – H)2+, where MT = La, Tm, Lu, Sm, Ho, Yb, Pm, Tb, or Eu, for peptides with molecular weights below ~1000 Da, and predominantly (peptide + MT)3+ for larger peptides. ECD of (peptide + MT – H)2+ results in extensive fragmentation from which nearly complete sequence information can be obtained, even for peptides for which only singly protonated ions are formed in the absence of the metal ions. ECD of these doubly charged complexes containing MT results in significantly higher electron capture efficiency and sequence coverage than peptide-divalent metal ion complexes that have the same net charge. Formation of salt-bridge structures in which the metal ion coordinates to a carboxylate group are favored even for (peptide + MT)3+. ECD of these latter complexes for large peptides results in electron capture by the protonation site located remotely from the metal ion and predominantly c/z fragments for all metals, except Eu3+, which undergoes a one electron reduction and only loss of small neutral molecules and b/y fragments are formed. These results indicate that solvation of the metal ion in these complexes is extensive, resulting in similar electrochemical properties of these metal ions both in the peptide environment and in water. PMID:23283726

  11. Single-stranded DNA detection by solvent-induced assemblies of a metallo-peptide-based complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Priyadip; Reches, Meital

    2016-05-01

    DNA detection is highly important for the sensitive sensing of different pathogenic bacteria and viruses. The major challenge is to create a sensor that can selectively detect very small concentrations of DNA without the need for amplification or complicated equipment. Different technologies such as optical, electrochemical and microgravimetric approaches can detect DNA fragments. Here we show, for the first time, the use of self-assembled nanostructures generated by a metallo-peptide as an optical sensing platform for DNA detection. The system can selectively detect single stranded DNA fragments by fluorescence measurements as it can discriminate even one base mismatch and can perform in the presence of other interfering proteins. This system may be useful in lab-on-a-chip applications.DNA detection is highly important for the sensitive sensing of different pathogenic bacteria and viruses. The major challenge is to create a sensor that can selectively detect very small concentrations of DNA without the need for amplification or complicated equipment. Different technologies such as optical, electrochemical and microgravimetric approaches can detect DNA fragments. Here we show, for the first time, the use of self-assembled nanostructures generated by a metallo-peptide as an optical sensing platform for DNA detection. The system can selectively detect single stranded DNA fragments by fluorescence measurements as it can discriminate even one base mismatch and can perform in the presence of other interfering proteins. This system may be useful in lab-on-a-chip applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Peptide and receptor synthesis, characterization of the final and intermediate products, experimental details and additional figures including SEM, TEM, DLS, XRD, UV analysis and AFM topographic analysis. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr07714a

  12. Testing multistage gain and offset trimming in a single photon counting IC with a charge sharing elimination algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzyżanowska, A.; Gryboś, P.; Szczygieł, R.; Maj, P.

    2015-12-01

    Designing a hybrid pixel detector readout electronics operating in a single photon counting mode is a very challenging process, where many main parameters are optimized in parallel (e.g. gain, noise, and threshold dispersion). Additional requirements for a smaller pixel size with extended functionality push designers to use new deep sub-micron technologies. Minimizing the channel size is possible, however, with a decreased pixel size, the charge sharing effect becomes a more important issue. To overcome this problem, we designed an integrated circuit prototype produced in CMOS 40 nm technology, which has an extended functionality of a single pixel. A C8P1 algorithm for the charge sharing effect compensation was implemented. In the algorithm's first stage the charge is rebuilt in a signal rebuilt hub fed by the CSA (charge sensitive amplifier) outputs from four neighbouring pixels. Then, the pixel with the biggest amount of charge is chosen, after a comparison with all the adjacent ones. In order to process the data in such a complicated way, a certain architecture of a single channel was proposed, which allows for: ṡ processing the signal with the possibility of total charge reconstruction (by connecting with the adjacent pixels), ṡ a comparison of certain pixel amplitude to its 8 neighbours, ṡ the extended testability of each block inside the channel to measure CSA gain dispersion, shaper gain dispersion, threshold dispersion (including the simultaneous generation of different pulse amplitudes from different pixels), ṡ trimming all the necessary blocks for proper operation. We present a solution for multistage gain and offset trimming implemented in the IC prototype. It allows for minimization of the total charge extraction errors, minimization of threshold dispersion in the pixel matrix and minimization of errors of comparison of certain pixel pulse amplitudes with all its neighbours. The detailed architecture of a single channel is presented together

  13. Time-resolved measurements with single droplet introduction to investigate space-charge effects in plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Stewart, I I; Olesik, J W

    1999-02-01

    An investigation of the space-charge induced effects of high concentrations of Pb+ matrix ions on Li+ analyte ions in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is presented using a vertically oriented mass spectrometer with single droplet introduction. Greater reproducibility and stability in droplet-to-droplet sample introduction using the monodisperse microparticulate injector (MDMI) was achieved with the vertical orientation. Typical variation (%RSD) in the droplet-to-droplet arrival times, and mass spectrometry peak analytical areas are better than 5%. With this precision, a more quantitative description of the space-charge effect on a single cloud of ions is obtained. Both radial and axial space-charge effects were found to occur in the ion beam. Radial effects result in a loss in intensity because of poor transmission or collisions at surfaces within the mass spectrometer. Axial effects modify the kinetic energy distribution of background ion beam components (e.g., 16O+ and 40Ar+) and sampled ion cloud constituents (e.g., 7Li+). However, axial effects do not appear to generate significant broadening of sampled ion clouds within the mass spectrometer. At the point of charge separation and high ion-beam charge density, the ion cloud maxima for Li and Pb are not coincident. This is because of mass dependent diffusion in the ICP as the ion clouds approach the sampling orifice. Space-charge induced ion loss occurs predominantly at a localized region after the Li+ sampled cloud peak maximum. When the Pb concentration in the sample is sufficiently high the 7Li+ sampled signal has a bimodal peak shape. The existence of the dip and its relative location in the bimodal 7Li+ sampled signal suggests that space-charge effects are localized to the region of high charge density occurring just after charge separation.

  14. Single-Shot Charge Readout Using a Cryogenic Heterojunction Bipolar Transistor Preamplifier Inline with a Silicon Single Electron Transistor at Millikelvin Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curry, Matthew; England, Troy; Wendt, Joel; Pluym, Tammy; Lilly, Michael; Carr, Stephen; Carroll, Malcolm

    Single-shot readout is a requirement for many implementations of quantum information processing. The single-shot readout fidelity is dependent on the signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) and bandwidth of the readout detection technique. Several different approaches are being pursued to enhance read-out including RF-reflectometry, RF-transmission, parametric amplification, and transistor-based cryogenic preamplification. The transistor-based cryogenic preamplifier is attractive in part because of the reduced experimental complexity compared with the RF techniques. Here we present single-shot charge readout using a cryogenic Heterojunction-Bipolar-Transistor (HBT) inline with a silicon SET charge-sensor at millikelvin temperatures. For the relevant range of HBT DC-biasing, the current gain is 100 to 2000 and the power dissipation is 50 nW to 5 μW, with the microfabricated SET and discrete HBT in an integrated package mounted to the mixing chamber stage of a dilution refrigerator. We experimentally demonstrate a SNR of up to 10 with a bandwidth of 1 MHz, corresponding to a single-shot time-domain charge-sensitivity of approximately 10-4 e / √Hz. This measured charge-sensitivity is comparable to the values reported using the RF techniques. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  15. Synchrotron radiation-based Fourier-transform infrared spectromicroscopy for characterization of the protein/peptide distribution in single microspheres.

    PubMed

    Wang, Manli; Lu, Xiaolong; Yin, Xianzhen; Tong, Yajun; Peng, Weiwei; Wu, Li; Li, Haiyan; Yang, Yan; Gu, Jingkai; Xiao, Tiqiao; Chen, Min; Zhang, Jiwen

    2015-05-01

    The present study establishes a visualization method for the measurement of the distribution and localization of protein/peptide constituents within a single poly-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) microsphere using synchrotron radiation-based Fourier-transform infrared spectromicroscopy (SR-FTIR). The representative infrared wavenumbers specific for protein/peptide (Exenatide) and excipient (PLGA) were identified and chemical maps at the single microsphere level were generated by measuring and plotting the intensity of these specific bands. For quantitative analysis of the distribution within microspheres, Matlab software was used to transform the map file into a 3D matrix and the matrix values specific for the drug and excipient were extracted. Comparison of the normalized SR-FTIR maps of PLGA and Exenatide indicated that PLGA was uniformly distributed, while Exenatide was relatively non-uniformly distributed in the microspheres. In conclusion, SR-FTIR is a rapid, nondestructive and sensitive detection technology to provide the distribution of chemical constituents and functional groups in microparticles and microspheres. PMID:26579456

  16. Synchrotron radiation-based Fourier-transform infrared spectromicroscopy for characterization of the protein/peptide distribution in single microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Manli; Lu, Xiaolong; Yin, Xianzhen; Tong, Yajun; Peng, Weiwei; Wu, Li; Li, Haiyan; Yang, Yan; Gu, Jingkai; Xiao, Tiqiao; Chen, Min; Zhang, Jiwen

    2015-01-01

    The present study establishes a visualization method for the measurement of the distribution and localization of protein/peptide constituents within a single poly-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) microsphere using synchrotron radiation–based Fourier-transform infrared spectromicroscopy (SR-FTIR). The representative infrared wavenumbers specific for protein/peptide (Exenatide) and excipient (PLGA) were identified and chemical maps at the single microsphere level were generated by measuring and plotting the intensity of these specific bands. For quantitative analysis of the distribution within microspheres, Matlab software was used to transform the map file into a 3D matrix and the matrix values specific for the drug and excipient were extracted. Comparison of the normalized SR-FTIR maps of PLGA and Exenatide indicated that PLGA was uniformly distributed, while Exenatide was relatively non-uniformly distributed in the microspheres. In conclusion, SR-FTIR is a rapid, nondestructive and sensitive detection technology to provide the distribution of chemical constituents and functional groups in microparticles and microspheres. PMID:26579456

  17. Direct Measurement of Pore Dynamics and Leakage Induced by a Model Antimicrobial Peptide in Single Vesicles and Cells.

    PubMed

    Burton, Matthew G; Huang, Qi M; Hossain, Mohammed A; Wade, John D; Palombo, Enzo A; Gee, Michelle L; Clayton, Andrew H A

    2016-06-28

    Antimicrobial peptides are promising therapeutic alternatives to counter growing antimicrobial resistance. Their precise mechanism of action remains elusive, however, particularly with respect to live bacterial cells. We investigated the interaction of a fluorescent melittin analogue with single giant unilamellar vesicles, giant multilamellar vesicles, and bilamellar Gram-negative Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria. Time-lapse fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy was employed to determine the population distribution of the fluorescent melittin analogue between pore state and membrane surface state, and simultaneously measure the leakage of entrapped fluorescent species from the vesicle (or bacterium) interior. In giant unilamellar vesicles, leakage from vesicle interior was correlated with an increase in level of pore states, consistent with a stable pore formation mechanism. In giant multilamellar vesicles, vesicle leakage occurred more gradually and did not appear to correlate with increased pore states. Instead pore levels remained at a low steady-state level, which is more in line with coupled equilibria. Finally, in single bacterial cells, significant increases in pore levels were observed over time, which were correlated with only partial loss of cytosolic contents. These observations suggested that pore formation, as opposed to complete dissolution of membrane, was responsible for the leakage of contents in these systems, and that the bacterial membrane has an adaptive capacity that resists peptide attack. We interpret the three distinct pore dynamics regimes in the context of the increasing physical and biological complexity of the membranes. PMID:27281288

  18. Covalent and non-covalent binding in the ion/ion charge inversion of peptide cations with benzene-disulfonic acid anions.

    PubMed

    Stutzman, John R; Luongo, Carl A; McLuckey, Scott A

    2012-06-01

    Protonated angiotensin II and protonated leucine enkephalin-based peptides, which included YGGFL, YGGFLF, YGGFLH, YGGFLK and YGGFLR, were subjected to ion/ion reactions with the doubly deprotonated reagents 4-formyl-1,3-benzenedisulfonic acid (FBDSA) and 1,3-benzenedisulfonic acid (BDSA). The major product of the ion/ion reaction is a negatively charged complex of the peptide and reagent. Following dehydration of [M + FBDSA-H](-) via collisional-induced dissociation (CID), angiotensin II (DRVYIHPF) showed evidence for two product populations, one in which a covalent modification has taken place and one in which an electrostatic modification has occurred (i.e. no covalent bond formation). A series of studies with model systems confirmed that strong non-covalent binding of the FBDSA reagent can occur with subsequent ion trap CID resulting in dehydration unrelated to the adduct. Ion trap CID of the dehydration product can result in cleavage of amide bonds in competition with loss of the FBDSA adduct. This scenario is most likely for electrostatically bound complexes in which the peptide contains both an arginine residue and one or more carboxyl groups. Otherwise, loss of the reagent species from the complex, either as an anion or as a neutral species, is the dominant process for electrostatically bound complexes. The results reported here shed new light on the nature of non-covalent interactions in gas phase complexes of peptide ions that can be used in the rationale design of reagent ions for specific ion/ion reaction applications. PMID:22707160

  19. Single-molecule investigation of the interactions between reconstituted planar lipid membranes and an analogue of the HP(2-20) antimicrobial peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Mereuta, Loredana; Luchian, Tudor Park, Yoonkyung; Hahm, Kyung-Soo

    2008-09-05

    In this study, we employed electrophysiology experiments carried out at the single-molecule level to study the mechanism of action of the HPA3 peptide, an analogue of the linear antimicrobial peptide, HP(2-20), isolated from the N-terminal region of the Helicobacter pylori ribosomal protein. Amplitude analysis of currents fluctuations induced by HPA3 peptide at various potentials in zwitterionic lipid membranes reveal the existence of reproducible conductive states in the stochastic behavior of such events, which directly supports the existence of transmembrane pores induced the peptide. From our data recorded both at the single-pore and macroscopic levels, we propose that the HPA3 pore formation is electrophoretically facilitated by trans-negative transmembrane potentials, and HPA3 peptides translocate into the trans monolayers after forming the pores. We present evidence according to which the decrease in the membrane dipole potential of a reconstituted lipid membranes leads to an augmentation of the membrane activity of HPA3 peptides, and propose that a lower electric dipole field of the interfacial region of the membrane caused by phloretin facilitates the surface-bound HPA3 peptides to break free from one leaflet of the membrane, insert into the membrane and contribute to pore formation spanning the entire thickness of the membrane.

  20. Design of Asymmetric Peptide Bilayer Membranes.

    PubMed

    Li, Sha; Mehta, Anil K; Sidorov, Anton N; Orlando, Thomas M; Jiang, Zhigang; Anthony, Neil R; Lynn, David G

    2016-03-16

    Energetic insights emerging from the structural characterization of peptide cross-β assemblies have enabled the design and construction of robust asymmetric bilayer peptide membranes. Two peptides differing only in their N-terminal residue, phosphotyrosine vs lysine, coassemble as stacks of antiparallel β-sheets with precisely patterned charged lattices stabilizing the bilayer leaflet interface. Either homogeneous or mixed leaflet composition is possible, and both create nanotubes with dense negative external and positive internal solvent exposed surfaces. Cross-seeding peptide solutions with a preassembled peptide nanotube seed leads to domains of different leaflet architecture within single nanotubes. Architectural control over these cross-β assemblies, both across the bilayer membrane and along the nanotube length, provides access to highly ordered asymmetric membranes for the further construction of functional mesoscale assemblies.

  1. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    DOEpatents

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  2. Partial Dissolution of Charge Order Phase Observed in β-(BEDT-TTF)2PF6 Single Crystal Field Effect Transistor.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Masatoshi; Moritoshi, Norifumi; Kuniyoshi, Shigekazu; Yamauchi, Hiroshi; Kudo, Kazuhiro; Masu, Hyuma

    2016-04-01

    The effect of an applied gate electric field on the charge-order phase in β-(BEDT-TTF)2PF6 single-crystal field-effect transistor structure was observed at around room temperature by technical improvement with respect to sample preparation and electrical measurements. A relatively slight but systematic increase of the electrical conductance induced by the applied gate electric field and its temperature dependence was observed at around the metal-insulator transition temperature (TMI). The temperature dependence of the modulated electrical conductance demonstrated that TMI was shifted toward the lower side by application of a gate electric field, which corresponds to partial dissolution of the charge-order phase. The thickness of the partially dissolved charge order region was estimated to be several score times larger than the charge accumulation region. PMID:27451615

  3. Image analysis of single event transient effects on charge coupled devices irradiated by protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zujun; Xue, Yuanyuan; Liu, Jing; He, Baoping; Yao, Zhibin; Ma, Wuying

    2016-10-01

    The experiments of single event transient (SET) effects on charge coupled devices (CCDs) irradiated by protons are presented. The radiation experiments have been carried out at the accelerator protons with the energy of 200 MeV and 60 MeV.The incident angles of the protons are at 30°and 90° to the plane of the CCDs to obtain the images induced by the perpendicularity and incline incident angles. The experimental results show that the typical characteristics of the SET effects on a CCD induced by protons are the generation of a large number of dark signal spikes (hot pixels) which are randomly distributed in the "pepper" images. The characteristics of SET effects are investigated by observing the same imaging area at different time during proton radiation to verify the transient effects. The experiment results also show that the number of dark signal spikes increases with increasing integration time during proton radiation. The CCDs were tested at on-line and off-line to distinguish the radiation damage induced by the SET effects or DD effects. The mechanisms of the dark signal spike generation induced by the SET effects and the DD effects are demonstrated respectively.

  4. Variable single electron charging energies and percolation effects in molecularly linked nanoparticle films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trudeau, Paul-Emile; Escorcia, Alioska; Dhirani, Al-Amin

    2004-03-01

    We study electrical transport in strongly coupled, molecularly linked, gold nanoparticle (NP) films whose bulk DC conductances are governed by percolation phenomena. Films with fewer NPs exhibit current suppression below a threshold voltage, likely due to single-electron charging of NP clusters. In some cases, the thresholds are very large ( 1 V) and suppression persists to room temperature. The thresholds tend to decrease with increasing amounts of NPs in the film, and eventually, metal-like conductance is observed down to at least 10 K. The observed trend towards metal-like conductance, despite the presence of film disorder, is enabled by strong inter-NP coupling and increasing film connectivity. The latter is an inherent property of molecularly linked NP films due to both robust chemical inter-NP linkages provided by alkane dithiol linker molecules, coupled with the ability to grow chains of connected NPs to arbitrary lengths through cyclical Au/dithol treatments. In the case of small thresholds, our data is well-described by a high temperature approximation of 'orthodox' theory for a linear array of tunnel junctions.

  5. Influence of confinement on single-electron charging in a network of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar Pal, S.; Schouteden, K.; Van Haesendonck, C.

    2011-08-01

    We investigated the single-electron tunneling (SET) behavior in a network of ligand stabilized Au nanoparticles (NPs) that are self-organized on an Au(111) surface by means of low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. We demonstrate that for a proper combination of ligand chain length and NP radius the ligand shell is able to isolate a particle from the neighboring ones. This results in SET spectra with a clear Coulomb blockade and a regular staircase, similar to SET spectra obtained for isolated particles. A fraction of the investigated particles exhibits additional fine structure on top of the Coulomb charging peaks in the tunneling conductance spectra. The origin of the fine structure can be related to quantum size effects due to the very small NP size rather than to inter-particle capacitive coupling. Our findings indicate the possibility of using an individual particle in the self-organized network as the central Coulomb island in a double-barrier tunnel junction configuration, similar to the case of an isolated particle.

  6. Variable single electron charging energies and percolation effects in molecularly linked nanoparticle films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trudeau, P.-E.; Escorcia, A.; Dhirani, A.-A.

    2003-09-01

    We study electrical transport in strongly coupled, molecularly linked, gold nanoparticle (NP) films whose bulk dc conductances are governed by percolation phenomena. Films with fewer NPs exhibit current suppression below a threshold voltage, likely due to single-electron charging of NP clusters. In some cases, the thresholds are very large (˜1 V) and suppression persists to room temperature. The thresholds tend to decrease with increasing amounts of NPs in the film, and eventually, metal-like conductance is observed down to at least 10 K. The observed trend toward metal-like conductance, despite the presence of film disorder, is enabled by strong inter-NP coupling and increasing film connectivity. The latter is an inherent property of molecularly linked NP films due to both robust chemical inter-NP linkages provided by alkane dithiol linker molecules, coupled with the ability to grow chains of connected NPs to arbitrary lengths through cyclical Au/dithol treatments. In the case of small thresholds, our data is well described by a high-temperature approximation of "orthodox" theory for a linear array of tunnel junctions.

  7. Charged single alpha-helices in proteomes revealed by a consensus prediction approach.

    PubMed

    Gáspári, Zoltán; Süveges, Dániel; Perczel, András; Nyitray, László; Tóth, Gábor

    2012-04-01

    Charged single α-helices (CSAHs) constitute a recently recognized protein structural motif. Its presence and role is characterized in only a few proteins. To explore its general features, a comprehensive study is necessary. We have set up a consensus prediction method available as a web service (at http://csahserver.chem.elte.hu) and downloadable scripts capable of predicting CSAHs from protein sequences. Using our method, we have performed a comprehensive search on the UniProt database. We found that the motif is very rare but seems abundant in proteins involved in symbiosis and RNA binding/processing. Although there are related proteins with CSAH segments, the motif shows no deep conservation in protein families. We conclude that CSAH-containing proteins, although rare, are involved in many key biological processes. Their conservation pattern and prevalence in symbiosis-associated proteins suggest that they might be subjects of relatively rapid molecular evolution and thus can contribute to the emergence of novel functions.

  8. Single photon emission at 1.55 μm from charged and neutral exciton confined in a single quantum dash

    SciTech Connect

    Dusanowski, Ł. Syperek, M.; Mrowiński, P.; Rudno-Rudziński, W.; Misiewicz, J.; Sęk, G.; Somers, A.; Kamp, M.; Höfling, S.; Reithmaier, J. P.

    2014-07-14

    We investigate charged and neutral exciton complexes confined in a single self-assembled InAs/InGaAlAs/InP quantum dash emitting at 1.55 μm. The emission characteristics have been probed by measuring high-spatial-resolution polarization-resolved photoluminescence and cross-correlations of photon emission statistics at T = 5 K. The photon auto-correlation histogram of the emission from both the neutral and charged exciton indicates a clear antibunching dip with as-measured g{sup (2)}(0) values of 0.18 and 0.31, respectively. It proves that these exciton complexes confined in single quantum dashes of InP-based material system can act as true single photon emitters being compatible with standard long-distance fiber communication technology.

  9. Novel pH-sensitive charge-reversal cell penetrating peptide conjugated PEG-PLA micelles for docetaxel delivery: in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Ouahab, Ammar; Cheraga, Nihad; Onoja, Vitus; Shen, Yan; Tu, Jiasheng

    2014-05-15

    In order to create a pH-sensitive charge-reversal system for cell penetrating peptides (CPP) to prevent non-specific internalization of the drug; and concomitantly enhance the physical stability and tumor targetability of poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(d,l-lactide) (PEG-PLA) micelles, two sets of novel PEG-PLA micelles were developed. Cell penetrating decapeptide arginine-glycine (RG)5 and a pH-sensitive masking decapeptide histidine-glutamic acid (HE)5 were conjugated at the PEG free end to produce pH sensitive with peptides outside micelles (PHPO), while the pH sensitive with peptides inside micelles (PHPI) are the micelles obtained with the two peptides conjugated to the free end of the PLA block. The polymers were successfully synthesized and characterized by (1)H NMR and GPC. The mixed micelles were prepared and characterized for their loading efficiency, particle size and zeta potential. The surface charge of PHPO was greatly affected by the pH of the solution and (RG)5:(HE)5 ratio at the surface. The pH value of the solution at which the surface charge of PHPO reversed could be manipulated by the feed ratio of (RG)5-PEG-PLA (RGO) and (HE)5-PEG-PLA (HEO), hence, HEO:RGO molar ratio of 45:55 was selected for tumor targeting. Docetaxel (DTX) was sufficiently solubilized by DTX-PHPO with a loading efficiency of 90.18 ± 1.65%. At pH 7.4, DTX loaded mPEG-PLA (DTX-PM) (41.2 ± 0.3 nm), DTX-PHPO (195.3 ± 1.9 nm) and DTX-PHPI (190.9 ± 4.5 nm) showed sustained DTX release of less than 55% within 48 h. However, at pH 6.8 DTX-PHPI released 87.29 ± 0.24%, while DTX-PHPO released 70.49 ± 0.39% of the initial DTX amount within 48 h. Moreover, the physical stability of DTX-PHPO was increased due to the electrostatic interaction of the two peptides. The cellular uptake of DTX-PHPO in SGC-7901 cells and the cell killing effect tested on MCF-7 cells were enhanced by 2 folds at pH 6.8 compared to pH 7.4. Hence, DTX-PHPO is highly pH-sensitive in mildly acidic pH and exhibited

  10. Anion transport properties of amine and amide-sidechained peptides are affected by charge and phospholipid composition†

    PubMed Central

    You, Lei; Li, Ruiqiong; Gokel, George W.

    2009-01-01

    Four synthetic anion transporters (SATs) having the general formula (n-C18H37)2N-COCH2OCH2CO-(Gly)3Pro-Lys(ε-N-R)-(Gly)2-O-n-C7H15 were prepared and studied. The group R was Cbz, H (TFA salt), t-Boc, and dansyl in peptides 1, 2, 3, and 4 respectively. The glutamine analog (GGGPQAG sequence) was also included. A dansyl-substituted fluorescent SAT was used to probe peptide insertion; the dansyl sidechain resides in an environment near the bilayer’s midpolar regime. When the lysine sidechain was free or protected amine, little effect was noted on final Cl− transport rate in DOPC : DOPA (7 : 3) liposomes. This stands in contrast to the significant retardation of transport previously observed when a negative glutamate residue was present in the peptide sequence. It was also found that Cl− release from liposomes depended on the phospholipid composition of the vesicles. Chloride transport diminished significantly for the free lysine containing SAT, 2, when the lipid was altered from DOPC : DOPA to pure DOPC. Amide-sidechained SATs 1 and 5 showed a relatively small decrease in Cl− transport. The effect of lipid composition on Cl− transport was explained by differences in electrostatic interaction between amino acid sidechain and lipid headgroup, which was modeled by computation. PMID:18688484

  11. Measurement and accumulation of electric charge on a single dielectric particle trapped in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Haesung; LeBrun, Thomas W.

    2016-03-01

    Normally occurring charges on small particles provide a means to control the motion of the particles. Using a piezoelectric transducer to launch microparticles into a trap, we can vary particle-surface interactions to transfer charge to the particle via contact electrification. This allows more detailed studies of contact electrification itself as well generation of higher charge states for precision measurements of force or nonlinear dynamics using electric field modulation. In practice, particles may be repeatedly landed on the substrate and relaunched during loading. This leads to charge transfer so that the net charge on the polystyrene (PS) particle becomes sufficient to allow electrostatic forcing to drive ballistic motion over a range of displacement two orders of magnitude greater than thermal fluctuations. An increase in charge from 1000 to 3000 electrons is demonstrated and the induced motion of the trapped particle is accurately described using simple classical mechanics in phase space.

  12. Infrared Multiphoton Dissociation of Peptide Cations in a Dual Pressure Linear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Myles W.; Smith, Suncerae I.; Ledvina, Aaron R.; Madsen, James A.; Coon, Joshua J.; Schwartz, Jae C.; Stafford, George C.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2009-01-01

    A dual pressure linear ion trap mass spectrometer was modified to permit infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) in each of the two cells - the first a high pressure cell operated at nominally 5 × 10-3 Torr and the second a low pressure cell operated at nominally 3 × 10-4 Torr. When IRMPD was performed in the high pressure cell, most peptide ions did not undergo significant photodissociation; however, in the low pressure cell peptide cations were efficiently dissociated with less than 25 ms of IR irradiation regardless of charge state. IRMPD of peptide cations allowed the detection of low m/z product ions including the y1 fragments and immonium ions which are not typically observed by ion trap collision induced dissociation (CID). Photodissociation efficiencies of ~100% and MS/MS (tandem mass spectrometry) efficiencies of greater than 60% were observed for both multiply and singly protonated peptides. In general, higher sequence coverage of peptides was obtained using IRMPD over CID. Further, greater than 90% of the product ion current in the IRMPD mass spectra of doubly charged peptide ions was composed of singly charged product ions compared to the CID mass spectra in which the abundances of the multiply and singly charged product ions were equally divided. Highly charged primary product ions also underwent efficient photodissociation to yield singly charged secondary product ions, thus simplifying the IRMPD product ion mass spectra. PMID:19739654

  13. Peptide docking of HIV-1 p24 with single chain fragment variable (scFv) by CDOCKER algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karim, Hana Atiqah Abdul; Tayapiwatana, Chatchai; Nimmanpipug, Piyarat; Zain, Sharifuddin M.; Rahman, Noorsaadah Abdul; Lee, Vannajan Sanghiran

    2014-10-01

    In search for the important residues that might have involve in the binding interaction between the p24 caspid protein of HIV-1 fragment (MET68 - PRO90) with the single chain fragment variable (scFv) of FAB23.5, modern computational chemistry approach has been conducted and applied. The p24 fragment was initially taken out from the 1AFV protein molecule consisting of both light (VL) and heavy (VH) chains of FAB23.5 as well as the HIV-1 caspid protein. From there, the p24 (antigen) fragment was made to dock back into the protein pocket receptor (antibody) by using the CDOCKER algorithm to conduct the molecular docking process. The score calculated from the CDOCKER gave 15 possible docked poses with various docked ligand's positions, the interaction energy as well as the binding energy. The best docked pose that imitates the original antigen's position was determined and further processed to the In Situ minimization to obtain the residues interaction energy as well as to observe the hydrogen bonds interaction in the protein-peptide complex. Based on the results demonstrated, the specific residues in the complex that have shown immense lower interaction energies in the 5Å vicinity region from the peptide are from the heavy chain (VH:TYR105) and light chain (VL: ASN31, TYR32, and GLU97). Those residues play vital roles in the binding mechanism of Antibody-Antigen (Ab-Ag) complex of p24 with FAB23.5.

  14. Single sequence of a helix-loop peptide confers functional anticodon recognition on two tRNA synthetases.

    PubMed Central

    Auld, D S; Schmimmel, P

    1996-01-01

    The specific aminoacylation of RNA oligonucleotides whose sequences are based on the acceptor stems of tRNAs can be viewed as an operational RNA code for amino acids that may be related to the development of the genetic code. Many synthetases also have direct interactions with tRNA anticodon triplets and, in some cases, these interactions are thought to be essential for aminoacylation specificity. In these instances, an unresolved question is whether interactions with parts of the tRNA outside of the anticodon are sufficient for decoding genetic information. Escherichia coli isoleucyl- and methionyl-tRNA synthetases are closely related enzymes that interact with their respective anticodons. We used binary combinatorial mutagenesis of a 10 amino acid anticodon binding peptide in these two enzymes to identify composite sequences that would confer function to both enzymes despite their recognizing different anticodons. A single peptide was found that confers function to both enzymes in vivo and in vitro. Thus, even in enzymes where anticodon interactions are normally important for distinguishing one tRNA from another, these interactions can be 'neutralized' without losing specificity of amino-acylation. We suggest that acceptor helix interactions may play a role in providing the needed specificity. Images PMID:8605884

  15. Invariance of single-file water mobility in gramicidin-like peptidic pores as function of pore length.

    PubMed

    Portella, Guillem; Pohl, Peter; de Groot, Bert L

    2007-06-01

    We investigated the structural and energetic determinants underlying water permeation through peptidic nanopores, motivated by recent experimental findings that indicate that water mobility in single-file water channels displays nonlinear length dependence. To address the molecular mechanism determining the observed length dependence, we studied water permeability in a series of designed gramicidin-like channels of different length using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. We found that within the studied range of length the osmotic water permeability is independent of pore length. This result is at variance with textbook models, where the relationship is assumed to be linear. Energetic analysis shows that loss of solvation rather than specific water binding sites in the pore form the main energetic barrier for water permeation, consistent with our dynamics results. For this situation, we propose a modified expression for osmotic permeability that fully takes into account water motion collectivity and does not depend on the pore length. Different schematic barrier profiles are discussed that explain both experimental and computational interpretations, and we propose a set of experiments aimed at validation of the presented results. Implications of the results for the design of peptidic channels with desired permeation characteristics are discussed.

  16. Active charge state control of single NV centres in diamond by in-plane Al-Schottky junctions

    PubMed Central

    Schreyvogel, C.; Polyakov, V.; Wunderlich, R.; Meijer, J.; Nebel, C. E.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate an active control of the charge state of a single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centre by using in-plane Schottky-diode geometries with aluminium on hydrogen-terminated diamond surface. A switching between NV+, NV0 and NV− can be performed with the Al-gates which apply electric fields in the hole depletion region of the Schottky junction that induces a band bending modulation, thereby shifting the Fermi-level over NV charge transition levels. We simulated the in-plane band structure of the Schottky junction with the Software ATLAS by solving the drift-diffusion model and the Poisson-equation self-consistently. We simulated the IV-characteristics, calculated the width of the hole depletion region, the position of the Fermi-level intersection with the NV charge transition levels for different reverse bias voltages applied on the Al-gate. We can show that the field-induced band bending modulation in the depletion region causes a shifting of the Fermi-level over NV charge transition levels in such a way that the charge state of a single NV centre and thus its electrical and optical properties is tuned. In addition, the NV centre should be approx. 1–2 μm away from the Al-edge in order to be switched with moderate bias voltages. PMID:26177799

  17. Three-dimensional graphite electrodes in CVD single crystal diamond detectors: Charge collection dependence on impinging β-particles geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conte, G.; Allegrini, P.; Pacilli, M.; Salvatori, S.; Kononenko, T.; Bolshakov, A.; Ralchenko, V.; Konov, V.

    2015-11-01

    The charge collection performance of a three-dimensional diamond-graphite detector is reported. Buried graphite pillars with high aspect ratio were formed inside a single crystal synthetic diamond slab by using a femtosecond IR laser with 200 kHz of repetition rate. Grouped in two series and connected by graphite strips on the surface, eight independent 3D electrodes were used to collect the charge carriers generated by energy deposited in the detector by 90Sr,Y β-particles. Different impinging configurations were used to test charge collection and signal dependence on voltage. Reversing the bias polarity the pulse height distribution does not changes and the charge collection saturation of any group of connected pillars was observed around ±80 V (0.53 V/μm). The average charge collected by one pillars row is Qav=1.60±0.02 fC, with electrons impinging orthogonally the rows, in such a way demonstrating full charge collection.

  18. Molecular adsorption on ZnO(1010) single-crystal surfaces: morphology and charge transfer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jixin; Ruther, Rose E; Tan, Yizheng; Bishop, Lee M; Hamers, Robert J

    2012-07-17

    While ZnO has excellent electrical properties, it has not been widely used for dye-sensitized solar cells, in part because ZnO is chemically less stable than widely used TiO(2). The functional groups typically used for surface passivation and for attaching dye molecules either bind weakly or etch the ZnO surface. We have compared the formation of molecular layers from alkane molecules with terminal carboxylic acid, alcohol, amine, phosphonic acid, or thiol functional groups on single-crystal zinc oxide (1010) surfaces. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images show that alkyl carboxylic acids etch the surface whereas alkyl amine and alkyl alcohols bind only weakly on the ZnO(1010) surface. Phosphonic acid-terminated molecules were found to bind to the surface in a heterogeneous manner, forming clusters of molecules. Alkanethiols were found to bind to the surface, forming highly uniform monolayers with some etching detected after long immersion times in an alkanethiol solution. Monolayers of hexadecylphosphonic acid and octadecanethiol were further analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and electrochemical measurements. AFM scratching shows that thiols were bound strongly to the ZnO surface, suggesting the formation of strong Zn-S covalent bonds. Surprisingly, the tridentate phosphonic acids adhered much more weakly than the monodentate thiol. The influence of organic grafting on the charge transfer to ZnO was studied by time-resolved surface photovoltage measurements and electrochemical impedance measurements. Our results show that the grafting of thiols to ZnO leads to robust surfaces and reduces the surface band bending due to midgap surface states.

  19. Production of charged (singly and multiply) phosphorous beams with electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Maunoury, L.; Kantas, S.; Leroy, R.; Pacquet, J.Y.

    2006-03-15

    Within the framework of biological application linked to ion irradiation, the fabrication of radioactive stents by ion implantation provides a significant improvement of the recovery of arteries after a treatment of stenosed coronary arteries [P. Fehsenfeld et al., Semin Interv Cardiol. 3, 157 (1998); E. Huttel et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 73, 825 (2002); M.-A. Golombeck et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. B 206, 495 (2003)]. For this appliance, the suitable radioactive ion is {sup 32}P. Obviously, in order to have a minimum loss of these radioactive ions through the ionization process, it is imperative to have high ionization efficiency. In this article, the production of such singly and multiply charged phosphorous beams is investigated using two different electron cyclotron resonance ion sources: MONO1000/1001 [P. Jardin et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 73, 789 (2002)] and SUPERSHyPIE [J. Y. Pacquet et al., EP Patent No. 97 401294 (pending); R. Leroy et al., 14th International Workshop on ECR Ion Sources, May 1999 (unpublished)]. Spectra and above all efficiencies [J. Y. Pacquet et al., GANIL R 02 07; GANIL R 03 08] (31% of ionization efficiency for phosphorous atoms and compound with MONO1000/1001 and 43% of ionization efficiency for phosphorous atoms with SUPERSHyPIE) of these beams will be presented as well as the intensities (227 e{mu}A for P{sup +} with MONO1000/1001 and 145 e{mu}A for P{sup 7+} with SUPERSHyPIE) of such beams.

  20. Back-action-induced excitation of electrons in a silicon quantum dot with a single-electron transistor charge sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Horibe, Kosuke; Oda, Shunri; Kodera, Tetsuo

    2015-02-02

    Back-action in the readout of quantum bits is an area that requires a great deal of attention in electron spin based-quantum bit architecture. We report here back-action measurements in a silicon device with quantum dots and a single-electron transistor (SET) charge sensor. We observe the back-action-induced excitation of electrons from the ground state to an excited state in a quantum dot. Our measurements and theoretical fitting to the data reveal conditions under which both suitable SET charge sensor sensitivity for qubit readout and low back-action-induced transition rates (less than 1 kHz) can be achieved.

  1. Charge integration successive approximation analog-to-digital converter for focal plane applications using a single amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Zhimin (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An analog-to-digital converter for on-chip focal-plane image sensor applications. The analog-to-digital converter utilizes a single charge integrating amplifier in a charge balancing architecture to implement successive approximation analog-to-digital conversion. This design requires minimal chip area and has high speed and low power dissipation for operation in the 2-10 bit range. The invention is particularly well suited to CMOS on-chip applications requiring many analog-to-digital converters, such as column-parallel focal-plane architectures.

  2. A surface charge-switchable and folate modified system for co-delivery of proapoptosis peptide and p53 plasmid in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Si; Rong, Lei; Lei, Qi; Cao, Peng-Xi; Qin, Si-Yong; Zheng, Di-Wei; Jia, Hui-Zhen; Zhu, Jing-Yi; Cheng, Si-Xue; Zhuo, Ren-Xi; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2016-01-01

    To improve the tumor therapeutic efficiency and reduce undesirable side effects, ternary FK/p53/PEG-PLL(DA) complexes with a detachable surface shielding layer were designed. The FK/p53/PEG-PLL(DA) complexes were fabricated by coating the folate incorporated positively charged FK/p53 complexes with charge-switchable PEG-shield (PEG-PLL(DA)) through electrostatic interaction. At the physiological pH 7.4 in the bloodstream, PEG-PLL(DA) could extend the circulating time by shielding the positively charged FK/p53 complexes. After the accumulation of the FK/p53/PEG-PLL(DA) complexes in tumor sites, tumor-acidity-triggered charge switch led to the detachment of PEG-PLL(DA) from the FK/p53 complexes, and resulted in efficient tumor cell entry by folate-mediated uptake and electrostatic attraction. Stimulated by the high content glutathione (GSH) in cytoplasm, the cleavage of disulfide bond resulted in the liberation of proapoptosis peptide C-KLA(TPP) and the p53 gene, which exerted the combined tumor therapy by regulating both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways. Both in vitro and in vivo studies confirmed that the ternary detachable complexes FK/p53/PEG-PLL(DA) could enhance antitumor efficacy and reduce adverse effects to normal cells. These findings indicate that the tumor-triggered decomplexation of FK/p53/PEG-PLL(DA) supplies a useful strategy for targeting delivery of different therapeutic agents in synergetic anticancer therapy.

  3. A single peptide-major histocompatibility complex ligand triggers digital cytokine secretion in CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jun; Brameshuber, Mario; Zeng, Xun; Xie, Jianming; Li, Qi-jing; Chien, Yueh-hsiu; Valitutti, Salvatore; Davis, Mark M

    2013-11-14

    We have developed a single-molecule imaging technique that uses quantum-dot-labeled peptide-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) ligands to study CD4(+) T cell functional sensitivity. We found that naive T cells, T cell blasts, and memory T cells could all be triggered by a single pMHC to secrete tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-2 (IL-2) cytokines with a rate of ∼1,000, ∼10,000, and ∼10,000 molecules/min, respectively, and that additional pMHCs did not augment secretion, indicating a digital response pattern. We also found that a single pMHC localized to the immunological synapse induced the slow formation of a long-lasting T cell receptor (TCR) cluster, consistent with a serial engagement mechanism. These data show that scaling up CD4(+) T cell cytokine responses involves increasingly efficient T cell recruitment rather than greater cytokine production per cell. PMID:24120362

  4. Single CdSe/ZnS nanocrystals in an ion trap: charge and mass determination and photophysics evolution with changing mass, charge, and temperature.

    PubMed

    Bell, David M; Howder, Collin R; Johnson, Ryan C; Anderson, Scott L

    2014-03-25

    We report measurements of fluorescence intermittency (blinking) and spectral behavior for single semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots (QDs) isolated in the gas phase and discuss the effects on fluorescence of the QD charge state and heating to the point of sublimation. Core-shell CdSe/ZnS QDs were trapped in a quadrupole ion trap and detected by laser-induced fluorescence. The mass (M) and charge (Q) were determined nondestructively, and both were followed continuously over the course of hours or days. Emission spectra of the trapped QDs are significantly red-shifted relative to the solution-phase emission from the same particles. The temperature of the trapped QDs is determined by the balance between laser heating and collisional cooling and thermal emission, and it is possible to heat the particles to remove ligands or to the point of sublimation. QDs are observed to be emissive during sublimation, for up to 85% mass loss, with emission intensity roughly proportional to the surface area. Eventually, the fluorescence quantum yield drops suddenly, and the QDs begin to blink. The method used is versatile and will allow studies of quantum dot optical properties as a function of size, ligand removal, heating, surface oxidation, and other manipulations, where these properties are continuously correlated with the mass and charge.

  5. STM studies of an atomic-scale gate electrode formed by a single charged vacancy in GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Donghun; Daughton, David; Gupta, Jay

    2009-03-01

    Electric-field control of spin-spin interactions at the atomic level is desirable for the realization of spintronics and spin-based quantum computation. Here we demonstrate the realization of an atomic-scale gate electrode formed by a single charged vacancy on the GaAs(110) surface[1]. We can position these vacancies with atomic precision using the tip of a home-built, low temperature STM. Tunneling spectroscopy of single Mn acceptors is used to quantify the electrostatic field as a function of distance from the vacancy. Single Mn acceptors are formed by substituting Mn adatoms for Ga atoms in the first layer of the p-GaAs(110) surface[2]. Depending on the distance, the in-gap resonance of single Mn acceptors can shift as much as 200meV. Our data indicate that the electrostatic field decays according to a screened Coulomb potential. The charge state of the vacancy can be switched to neutral, as evidenced by the Mn resonance returning to its unperturbed position. Reversible control of the local electric field as well as charged states of defects in semiconductors can open new insights such as realizing an atomic-scale gate control and studying spin-spin interactions in semiconductors. http://www.physics.ohio-state.edu/sim jgupta [1] D. Lee and J.A. Gupta (in preparation) [2] D. Kitchen et al., Nature 442, 436-439 (2006)

  6. Effective control of the charge and magnetic states of transition-metal atoms on single-layer boron nitride.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bing; Xiang, Hongjun; Yu, Jaejun; Wei, Su-Huai

    2012-05-18

    Developing approaches to effectively control the charge and magnetic states is critical to the use of magnetic nanostructures in quantum information devices but is still challenging. Here we suggest that the magnetic and charge states of transition-metal (TM) doped single-layer boron-nitride (SLBN) systems can be easily controlled by the (internal) defect engineering and (external) electric fields (Eext). The relative positions and symmetries of the in-gap levels induced by defect engineering and the TM d-orbital energy levels effectively determine the charge states and magnetic properties of the TM/SLBN system. Remarkably, the application of an Eext can easily control the size of the crystal field splitting of the TM d orbitals and thus, leading to the spin crossover in TM/SLBN, which could be used as Eext-driven nonvolatile memory devices. Our conclusion obtained from TM/SLBN is valid generally in other TM adsorbed layered semiconductors.

  7. Multi-Hierarchical Self-Assembly of Collagen Mimetic Peptides into AAB Type Heterotrimers, Nanofibers and Hydrogels Driven by Charged Pair Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Leary, Lesley Russell

    2011-12-01

    Replicating the multi-hierarchical self-assembly of collagen (peptide chain to triple helix to nanofiber and, finally, to a hydrogel) has long attracted scientists, both from the fundamental science perspective of supramolecular chemistry and for the potential biomedical applications perceived in tissue engineering. In terms of triple helical formation, collagen is the most abundant protein in the human body with at least 28 types, yet research involving collagen mimetic systems has only recently began to consider the innate ability of collagen to control helix composition and register. Collagen triple helices can be homotrimeric or heterotrimeric and while some types of natural collagen form only one specific composition of helix, others can form multiple. It is critical to fully understand and, if possible, reproduce the control that native collagen has on helix composition and register. In terms of nanofiber formation, many approaches to drive the self-assembly of synthetic systems through the same steps as natural collagen have been partially successful, but none have simultaneously demonstrated all levels of structural assembly. In this work, advancements in the ability to control helix composition and replicate the multi-hierarchical assembly of collagen are described. Both positive and negative design for the assembly of AAB type collagen heterotrimers were utilized by promoting heterotrimer formation though the use of charged amino acids to form intra-helix electrostatic interactions, while simultaneously discouraging homotrimers, resulting in the identification of multiple peptide systems with full control over the composition of the resulting triple helix. Similar salt-bridged hydrogen bonds between charged residues were incorporated into nanofiber forming peptides, one of which successfully assembled into sticky-ended triple helices, nanofibers with characteristic triple helical packing visible in the solution state, and strong hydrogels that are

  8. Use of a Spreadsheet to Calculate the Net Charge of Peptides and Proteins as a Function of pH: An Alternative to Using "Canned" Programs to Estimate the Isoelectric Point of These Important Biomolecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sims, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    An approach is presented that utilizes a spreadsheet to allow students to explore different means of calculating and visualizing how the charge on peptides and proteins varies as a function of pH. In particular, the concept of isoelectric point is developed to allow students to compare the results of their spreadsheet calculations with those of…

  9. Screening Nonspecific Interactions of Peptides without Background Interference

    PubMed Central

    Keefe, Andrew J.; Caldwell, Kyle; Nowinski, Ann K.; White, Andrew D.; Thakkar, Amit; Jiang, Shaoyi

    2013-01-01

    The need to discover new peptide sequences to perform particular tasks has lead to a variety of peptide screening methods: phage display, yeast display, bacterial display and resin display. These are effective screening methods because the role of background binding is often insignificant. In the field of nonfouling materials, however, a premium is placed on chemistries that have extremely low levels of nonspecific binding. Due to the presence of background binding, it is not possible to use traditional peptide screening methods to select for nonfouling chemistries. Here, we developed a peptide screening method, as compared to traditional methods, that can successfully evaluate the effectiveness of nonfouling peptide sequences. We have tested the effect of different peptide lengths and chemistries on the adsorption of protein. The order of residues within a single sequence was also adjusted to determine the effect of charge segregation on protein adsorption. PMID:23246063

  10. Lepton production at the LHC from singly- and doubly-charged bilepton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sá Borges, J.; Coutinho, Y. A.; Barreto, E. R.

    2013-03-01

    Some extensions of the standard model predict the existence of particles having two units of leptonic charge, known as bileptons. One of such models is based on the SU(3)c × SU(3)L × U(1)X symmetry group (3-3-1). Our search uses the minimal version of this model, having exotic charges for the quarks and gauge bosons. It predicts the existence of bileptons as vector particles having one unit of electric charge (V±) or two units of electric charge (Y±±). Our aim is to establish the signatures for the production of four fermions in pp collisions at the LHC for 7 TeV center of mass energy. We present the total cross section and we show the leptons invariant mass and transverse momentum distributions. We conclude that LHC collider can show a clear signature for a process induced by bileptons as a signal of new physics.

  11. Chemically assembled double-dot single-electron transistor analyzed by the orthodox model considering offset charge

    SciTech Connect

    Kano, Shinya; Maeda, Kosuke; Majima, Yutaka; Tanaka, Daisuke; Sakamoto, Masanori; Teranishi, Toshiharu

    2015-10-07

    We present the analysis of chemically assembled double-dot single-electron transistors using orthodox model considering offset charges. First, we fabricate chemically assembled single-electron transistors (SETs) consisting of two Au nanoparticles between electroless Au-plated nanogap electrodes. Then, extraordinary stable Coulomb diamonds in the double-dot SETs are analyzed using the orthodox model, by considering offset charges on the respective quantum dots. We determine the equivalent circuit parameters from Coulomb diamonds and drain current vs. drain voltage curves of the SETs. The accuracies of the capacitances and offset charges on the quantum dots are within ±10%, and ±0.04e (where e is the elementary charge), respectively. The parameters can be explained by the geometrical structures of the SETs observed using scanning electron microscopy images. Using this approach, we are able to understand the spatial characteristics of the double quantum dots, such as the relative distance from the gate electrode and the conditions for adsorption between the nanogap electrodes.

  12. Ionization in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization: singly charged molecular ions are the lucky survivors.

    PubMed

    Karas, M; Glückmann, M; Schäfer, J

    2000-01-01

    A new model for the ionization processes in UV matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) which accounts for the major phenomena observed is presented and discussed. The model retains elements of earlier approaches, such as photoionization and photochemical reactions, but it redefines these in the light of new working questions, most importantly why only singly charged ions are detected. Based on experimental evidence, the formation of singly and multiply charged clusters by a deficiency/excess of ions and also by photoionization and subsequent photochemical processes is pointed out to be the major ionization processes, which typically occur in parallel. The generation of electrons and their partial loss into the surrounding vacuum and solid, on the one hand, results in a positively charged ion-neutral plume facilitating a high overall ionization yield. On the other hand, these electrons, and also the large excess of protonated matrix ions in the negative ion mode, induce effective ion reneutralization in the plume. These neutralization processes are most effective for the highly charged cluster ions initially formed. Their fragmentation behaviour is evidenced in fast metastable fragmentation characteristics and agrees well with an electron capture dissociation mechanism and the enthalpy transfer upon neutralization forms the rationale for the prominent fragmentation and intense chemical noise accompanying successful MALDI. Within the course of the paper, cross-correlations with other desorption/ionization techniques and with earlier discussions on their mechanisms are drawn.

  13. Chemically assembled double-dot single-electron transistor analyzed by the orthodox model considering offset charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kano, Shinya; Maeda, Kosuke; Tanaka, Daisuke; Sakamoto, Masanori; Teranishi, Toshiharu; Majima, Yutaka

    2015-10-01

    We present the analysis of chemically assembled double-dot single-electron transistors using orthodox model considering offset charges. First, we fabricate chemically assembled single-electron transistors (SETs) consisting of two Au nanoparticles between electroless Au-plated nanogap electrodes. Then, extraordinary stable Coulomb diamonds in the double-dot SETs are analyzed using the orthodox model, by considering offset charges on the respective quantum dots. We determine the equivalent circuit parameters from Coulomb diamonds and drain current vs. drain voltage curves of the SETs. The accuracies of the capacitances and offset charges on the quantum dots are within ±10%, and ±0.04e (where e is the elementary charge), respectively. The parameters can be explained by the geometrical structures of the SETs observed using scanning electron microscopy images. Using this approach, we are able to understand the spatial characteristics of the double quantum dots, such as the relative distance from the gate electrode and the conditions for adsorption between the nanogap electrodes.

  14. On the charge transfer in the "single-sheet graphene-intercalated metal layer-SiC substrate" system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davydov, S. Yu.

    2014-02-01

    The proposed scheme for the consideration of charge transfer in the three-layer Gr/Me/SiC system (where Gr is a single-sheet graphene, Me is an intercalated metal layer, and SiC is a substrate) contains three stages. At the first stage, a metal monolayer adsorbed on silicon carbide is considered and the charge of adatoms in this monolayer is calculated. At the second stage, the shift of the Dirac point of free-standing single-layer graphene in an electrostatic field induced by charged adatoms of the monolayer is estimated. At the third stage, a weak interaction between Me/SiC and free-standing graphene is included, which allows electrons to tunnel but does not significantly distort the density of states of free-standing graphene. Estimations are performed for n- and p-type 6 H-SiC(0001) substrates and Cu, Ag, and Au layers. The charge state of the graphene sheet and the shift of the Dirac point with respect to the Fermi level of the system are calculated. A comparison with the available experimental and theoretical results shows that the proposed scheme works quite satisfactorily.

  15. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION Single-charge rotating black holes in four-dimensional gauged supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, David D. K.

    2011-02-01

    We consider four-dimensional U(1)4 gauged supergravity, and obtain asymptotically AdS4, non-extremal, charged, rotating black holes with one non-zero U(1) charge. The thermodynamic quantities are computed. We obtain a generalization that includes a NUT parameter. The general solution has a discrete symmetry involving inversion of the rotation parameter, and has a string frame metric that admits a rank-2 Killing-Stäckel tensor.

  16. Utilizing carbon nanotube electrodes to improve charge injection and transport in bis(trifluoromethyl)-dimethyl-rubrene ambipolar single crystal transistors.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wei; Prabhumirashi, Pradyumna L; Nakayama, Yasuo; McGarry, Kathryn A; Geier, Michael L; Uragami, Yuki; Mase, Kazuhiko; Douglas, Christopher J; Ishii, Hisao; Hersam, Mark C; Frisbie, C Daniel

    2013-11-26

    We have examined the significant enhancement of ambipolar charge injection and transport properties of bottom-contact single crystal field-effect transistors (SC-FETs) based on a new rubrene derivative, bis(trifluoromethyl)-dimethyl-rubrene (fm-rubrene), by employing carbon nanotube (CNT) electrodes. The fundamental challenge associated with fm-rubrene crystals is their deep-lying HOMO and LUMO energy levels, resulting in inefficient hole injection and suboptimal electron injection from conventional Au electrodes due to large Schottky barriers. Applying thin layers of CNT network at the charge injection interface of fm-rubrene crystals substantially reduces the contact resistance for both holes and electrons; consequently, benchmark ambipolar mobilities have been achieved, reaching 4.8 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) for hole transport and 4.2 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) for electron transport. We find that such improved injection efficiency in fm-rubrene is beneficial for ultimately unveiling its intrinsic charge transport properties so as to exceed those of its parent molecule, rubrene, in the current device architecture. Our studies suggest that CNT electrodes may provide a universal approach to ameliorate the charge injection obstacles in organic electronic devices regardless of charge carrier type, likely due to the electric field enhancement along the nanotube located at the crystal/electrode interface.

  17. Effect of body biasing on single-event induced charge collection in deep N-well technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yi; Hu, Jian-Guo; Qin, Jun-Rui; Tan, Hong-Zhou

    2015-07-01

    As the device size decreases, the soft error induced by space ions is becoming a great concern for the reliability of integrated circuits (ICs). At present, the body biasing technique is widely used in highly scaled technologies. In the paper, using the three-dimensional technology computer-aided design (TCAD) simulation, we analyze the effect of the body biasing on the single-event charge collection in deep N-well technology. Our simulation results show that the body biasing mainly affects the behavior of the source, and the effect of body biasing on the charge collection for the nMOSFET and pMOSFET is quite different. For the nMOSFET, the RBB will increase the charge collection, while the FBB will reduce the charge collection. For the pMOSFET, the effect of RBB on the SET pulse width is small, while the FBB has an adverse effect. Moreover, the differenceof the effect of body biasing on the charge collection is compared in deep N-well and twin well.

  18. Utilizing carbon nanotube electrodes to improve charge injection and transport in bis(trifluoromethyl)-dimethyl-rubrene ambipolar single crystal transistors.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wei; Prabhumirashi, Pradyumna L; Nakayama, Yasuo; McGarry, Kathryn A; Geier, Michael L; Uragami, Yuki; Mase, Kazuhiko; Douglas, Christopher J; Ishii, Hisao; Hersam, Mark C; Frisbie, C Daniel

    2013-11-26

    We have examined the significant enhancement of ambipolar charge injection and transport properties of bottom-contact single crystal field-effect transistors (SC-FETs) based on a new rubrene derivative, bis(trifluoromethyl)-dimethyl-rubrene (fm-rubrene), by employing carbon nanotube (CNT) electrodes. The fundamental challenge associated with fm-rubrene crystals is their deep-lying HOMO and LUMO energy levels, resulting in inefficient hole injection and suboptimal electron injection from conventional Au electrodes due to large Schottky barriers. Applying thin layers of CNT network at the charge injection interface of fm-rubrene crystals substantially reduces the contact resistance for both holes and electrons; consequently, benchmark ambipolar mobilities have been achieved, reaching 4.8 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) for hole transport and 4.2 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) for electron transport. We find that such improved injection efficiency in fm-rubrene is beneficial for ultimately unveiling its intrinsic charge transport properties so as to exceed those of its parent molecule, rubrene, in the current device architecture. Our studies suggest that CNT electrodes may provide a universal approach to ameliorate the charge injection obstacles in organic electronic devices regardless of charge carrier type, likely due to the electric field enhancement along the nanotube located at the crystal/electrode interface. PMID:24175573

  19. A depot-forming glucagon-like peptide-1 fusion protein reduces blood glucose for five days with a single injection

    PubMed Central

    Amiram, M.; Luginbuhl, K. M.; Li, X.; Feinglos, M. N.; Chilkoti, A.

    2013-01-01

    Peptide drugs are an exciting class of pharmaceuticals for the treatment of a variety of diseases; however, their short half-life dictates multiple and frequent injections causing undesirable side-effects. Herein, we describe a novel peptide delivery system that seeks to combine the attractive features of prolonged circulation time with a prolonged release formulation. This system consists of glucagon-like peptide-1, a type-2 diabetes drug fused to a thermally responsive, elastin-like-polypeptide (ELP) that undergoes a soluble-insoluble phase transition between room temperature and body temperature, thereby forming an injectable depot. We synthesized a set of GLP-1-ELP fusions and verified their proteolytic stability and potency in vitro. Significantly, a single injection of depot forming GLP-1-ELP fusions reduced blood glucose levels in mice for up to 5 days, 120 times longer than an injection of the native peptide. These findings demonstrate the unique advantages of using ELPs to release peptide-ELP fusions from a depot combined with enhanced systemic circulation to create a tunable peptide delivery system. PMID:23928357

  20. Immunoreactive prohormone atrial natriuretic peptides 1-30 and 31-67 - Existence of a single circulating amino-terminal peptide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yu-Ming; Whitson, Peggy A.; Cintron, Nitza M.

    1990-01-01

    Sep-Pak C18 extraction of human plasma and radioimmunoassay using antibodies which recognize atrial natriuretic peptide (99-128) and the prohormone sequences 1-30 and 31-67 resulted in mean values from 20 normal subjects of 26.2 (+/- 9.2), 362 (+/- 173) and 368 (+/- 160) pg/ml, respectively. A high correlation coefficient between values obtained using antibodies recognizing prohormone sequences 1-30 and 31-67 was observed (R = 0.84). Extracted plasma immunoreactivity of 1-30 and 31-67 both eluted at 46 percent acetonitrile. In contrast, chromatographic elution of synthetic peptides 1-30 and 31-67 was observed at 48 and 39 percent acetonitrile, respectively. Data suggest that the radioimmunoassay of plasma using antibodies recognizing prohormone sequences 1-30 and 31-67 may represent the measurement of a unique larger amino-terminal peptide fragment containing antigenic sites recognized by both antisera.

  1. Side-chain control of porosity closure in single- and multiple-peptide-based porous materials by cooperative folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martí-Gastaldo, C.; Antypov, D.; Warren, J. E.; Briggs, M. E.; Chater, P. A.; Wiper, P. V.; Miller, G. J.; Khimyak, Y. Z.; Darling, G. R.; Berry, N. G.; Rosseinsky, M. J.

    2014-04-01

    Porous materials are attractive for separation and catalysis—these applications rely on selective interactions between host materials and guests. In metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), these interactions can be controlled through a flexible structural response to the presence of guests. Here we report a MOF that consists of glycyl-serine dipeptides coordinated to metal centres, and has a structure that evolves from a solvated porous state to a desolvated non-porous state as a result of ordered cooperative, displacive and conformational changes of the peptide. This behaviour is driven by hydrogen bonding that involves the side-chain hydroxyl groups of the serine. A similar cooperative closure (reminiscent of the folding of proteins) is also displayed with multipeptide solid solutions. For these, the combination of different sequences of amino acids controls the framework's response to the presence of guests in a nonlinear way. This functional control can be compared to the effect of single-point mutations in proteins, in which exchange of single amino acids can radically alter structure and function.

  2. Effects of Voluntary Locomotion and Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide on the Dynamics of Single Dural Vessels in Awake Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yu-Rong

    2016-01-01

    The dura mater is a vascularized membrane surrounding the brain and is heavily innervated by sensory nerves. Our knowledge of the dural vasculature has been limited to pathological conditions, such as headaches, but little is known about the dural blood flow regulation during behavior. To better understand the dynamics of dural vessels during behavior, we used two-photon laser scanning microscopy (2PLSM) to measure the diameter changes of single dural and pial vessels in the awake mouse during voluntary locomotion. Surprisingly, we found that voluntary locomotion drove the constriction of dural vessels, and the dynamics of these constrictions could be captured with a linear convolution model. Dural vessel constrictions did not mirror the large increases in intracranial pressure (ICP) during locomotion, indicating that dural vessel constriction was not caused passively by compression. To study how behaviorally driven dynamics of dural vessels might be altered in pathological states, we injected the vasodilator calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), which induces headache in humans. CGRP dilated dural, but not pial, vessels and significantly reduced spontaneous locomotion but did not block locomotion-induced constrictions in dural vessels. Sumatriptan, a drug commonly used to treat headaches, blocked the vascular and behavioral the effects of CGRP. These findings suggest that, in the awake animal, the diameters of dural vessels are regulated dynamically during behavior and during drug-induced pathological states. SIGNIFICANT STATEMENT The vasculature of the dura has been implicated in the pathophysiology of headaches, but how individual dural vessels respond during behavior, both under normal conditions and after treatment with the headache-inducing peptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), is poorly understood. To address these issues, we imaged individual dural vessels in awake mice and found that dural vessels constricted during voluntary locomotion, and

  3. Addition of positive charges at the C-terminal peptide region of CssII, a mammalian scorpion peptide toxin, improves its affinity for sodium channels Nav1.6.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Georgina; Restano-Cassulini, Rita; Ortiz, Ernesto; Possani, Lourival D; Corzo, Gerardo

    2011-01-01

    CssII is a β-scorpion peptide that modifies preferentially sodium currents of the voltage-dependent Na(+) channel (Nav) sub-type 1.6. Previously, we have found that the C-terminal amidation of CssII increases its affinity for Nav, which opens at more negative potentials in the presence of CssII. Although C-terminal amidation in vitro conditions is possible, five CssII peptide toxin variants with C-terminal residues modified were heterologously expressed (rN66S, rN66H, rN66R, r[T64R/N66S] and r[T64R/N66R], in which r stands for recombinant, the capital letters to the amino acid residues and the numbers indicate the position of the given residue into the primary sequence of the toxin) and correctly folded. A secondary structure prediction of CssII agrees with the experimental secondary structure obtained by circular dichroism; so all bacterial expressed neurotoxin variants maintained the typical α/β secondary structure motif of most Na(+) channel scorpion toxins. The electrophysiological properties of all recombinant variants were examined, and it was found that substitutions of threonine (T) and asparagine (N) at the C-terminal region for arginine (R) (r[T64R/N66R]) increase their affinity for Nav1.6. Although, the molecular interactions involved in this mechanism are still not clearly determined, there is experimental evidence supporting the suspicion that incorporation of basic charged amino acid residues at the C-terminal tail of a group of α-scorpion toxin was favored by natural selection.

  4. Single-Conformation IR and UV Spectroscopy of a Prototypical Heterogeneous α/β-PEPTIDE: is it a Mixed-Helix Former?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blodgett, Karl N.; Walsh, Patrick S.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2016-06-01

    Synthetic foldamers are non-natural polymers designed to fold into unique secondary structures that either mimic nature's preferred secondary structures, or expand their possibilities. Among the most studied synthetic foldamers are β-peptides, which lengthen the distance between amide groups from the single substituted carbon spacer in α-peptides by one additional carbon. We present data on a mixed α/β tri-peptide in which a single β-residue with a conformationally constrained cis-2-aminocyclohexanecarboxylic acid (cis-ACHC) substitution is inserted in an α-peptide backbone to form Ac-Ala-β-ACHC-Ala-NHBn. This αβα structure is known in longer sequences to prefer formation of a 9/11 mixed helix. Under isolated, jet cooled conditions, four unique conformers were observed in the expansion. The dominant conformer is configured in a tetramer cycle with every amide carbonyl and amine group involved in hydrogen bonding, giving rise to a tightly folded C12/C7/C8/C7 structure reminiscent of a β-turn. This talk will describe the conformation specific IR and UV spectroscopy methods used to study this mixed peptide, as well as its experimentally observed conformational preferences.

  5. Probing the Efficacy of Peptide-Based Inhibitors against Acid- and Zinc-Promoted Oligomerization of Amyloid-β Peptide via Single-Oligomer Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Lyndsey R.; Dukes, Kyle D.; Lammi, Robin K.

    2011-01-01

    One avenue for prevention and treatment of Alzheimer's disease involves inhibiting the aggregation of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ). Given the deleterious effects reported for Aβ dimers and trimers, it is important to investigate inhibition of the earliest association steps. We have employed quantized photobleaching of dye-labeled Aβ peptides to characterize four peptide-based inhibitors of fibrillogenesis and/or cytotoxicity, assessing their ability to inhibit association in the smallest oligomers (n = 2–5). Inhibitors were tested at acidic pH and in the presence of zinc, conditions that may promote oligomerization in vivo. Distributions of peptide species were constructed by examining dozens of surface-tethered monomers and oligomers, one at a time. Results show that all four inhibitors shift the distribution of Aβ species toward monomers; however, efficacies vary for each compound and sample environment. Collectively, these studies highlight promising design strategies for future oligomerization inhibitors, affording insight into oligomer structures and inhibition mechanisms in two physiologically significant environments. PMID:21945664

  6. Density functional theory study of neutral, singly, and multiply charged Polycylcic Aromatic Hydrocarbon molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zettergren, Henning; Holm, Anne I. S.; Johansson, Henrik; Cederquist, Henrik

    2012-11-01

    We have studied multiply ionization for a range of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their charge dependent stabilities with respect to H-, H+-, C2H2- and C2H2+-emissions by means of Density Functional Theory. The adiabatic dissociation energies reveal information about the competition between these channels as functions of PAH charge state and provide predictions of the thermodynamical stability limits, while the sequences of ionization energies may e.g. be used to extract absolute ionization cross sections of astrophysical relevance.

  7. Frequency and Distribution of Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms within mprF in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Clinical Isolates and Their Role in Cross-Resistance to Daptomycin and Host Defense Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Bayer, Arnold S.; Mishra, Nagendra N.; Chen, Liang; Kreiswirth, Barry N.; Rubio, Aileen

    2015-01-01

    MprF is responsible for the lysinylation of phosphatidylglycerol (PG) to synthesize the positively charged phospholipid (PL) species, lysyl-PG (L-PG). It has been proposed that the single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the mprF open reading frame (ORF) are associated with a gain-in-function phenotype in terms of daptomycin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus. (Note that although the official term is daptomycin nonsusceptibility, we use the term daptomycin resistance in this paper for ease of presentation.) Using 22 daptomycin-susceptible (DAPs)/daptomycin-resistant (DAPr) clinical methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strain pairs, we assessed (i) the frequencies and distribution of putative mprF gain-in-function SNPs, (ii) the relationships of the SNPs to both daptomycin resistance and cross-resistance to the prototypical endovascular host defense peptide (HDP) thrombin-induced platelet microbicidal protein (tPMP), and (iii) the impact of mprF SNPs on positive surface charge phenotype and modifications of membrane PL profiles. Most of the mprF SNPs identified in our DAPr strains were clustered within the two MprF loci, (i) the central bifunctional domain and (ii) the C-terminal synthase domain. Moreover, we were able to correlate the presence and location of mprF SNPs in DAPr strains with HDP cross-resistance, positive surface charge, and L-PG profiles. Although DAPr strains with mprF SNPs in the bifunctional domain showed higher resistance to tPMPs than DAPr strains with SNPs in the synthase domain, this relationship was not observed in positive surface charge assays. These results demonstrated that both charge-mediated and -unrelated mechanisms are involved in DAP resistance and HDP cross-resistance in S. aureus. PMID:26055370

  8. Electrode configuration and signal subtraction technique for single polarity charge carrier sensing in ionization detectors

    DOEpatents

    Luke, P.

    1996-06-25

    An ionization detector electrode and signal subtraction apparatus and method provide at least one first conductive trace formed onto the first surface of an ionization detector. The first surface opposes a second surface of the ionization detector. At least one second conductive trace is also formed on the first surface of the ionization detector in a substantially interlaced and symmetrical pattern with the at least one first conductive trace. Both of the traces are held at a voltage potential of a first polarity type. By forming the traces in a substantially interlaced and symmetric pattern, signals generated by a charge carrier are substantially of equal strength with respect to both of the traces. The only significant difference in measured signal strength occurs when the charge carrier moves to within close proximity of the traces and is received at the collecting trace. The measured signals are then subtracted and compared to quantitatively measure the magnitude of the charge and to determine the position at which the charge carrier originated within the ionization detector. 9 figs.

  9. Electrode configuration and signal subtraction technique for single polarity charge carrier sensing in ionization detectors

    DOEpatents

    Luke, Paul

    1996-01-01

    An ionization detector electrode and signal subtraction apparatus and method provides at least one first conductive trace formed onto the first surface of an ionization detector. The first surface opposes a second surface of the ionization detector. At least one second conductive trace is also formed on the first surface of the ionization detector in a substantially interlaced and symmetrical pattern with the at least one first conductive trace. Both of the traces are held at a voltage potential of a first polarity type. By forming the traces in a substantially interlaced and symmetric pattern, signals generated by a charge carrier are substantially of equal strength with respect to both of the traces. The only significant difference in measured signal strength occurs when the charge carrier moves to within close proximity of the traces and is received at the collecting trace. The measured signals are then subtracted and compared to quantitatively measure the magnitude of the charge and to determine the position at which the charge carrier originated within the ionization detector.

  10. Sensing the charge state of single gold nanoparticles via work function measurements.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingjie; Pluchery, Olivier; Caillard, Louis; Lamic-Humblot, Anne-Félicie; Casale, Sandra; Chabal, Yves J; Salmeron, Miquel

    2015-01-14

    Electrostatic interactions at the nanoscale can lead to novel properties and functionalities that bulk materials and devices do not have. Here we used Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) to study the work function (WF) of gold nanoparticles (NPs) deposited on a Si wafer covered by a monolayer of alkyl chains, which provide a tunnel junction. We find that the WF of Au NPs is size-dependent and deviates strongly from that of the bulk Au. We attribute the WF change to the charging of the NPs, which is a consequence of the difference in WF between Au and the substrate. For an NP with 10 nm diameter charged with ∼ 5 electrons, the WF is found to be only ∼ 3.6 eV. A classical electrostatic model is derived that explains the observations in a quantitative way. We also demonstrate that the WF and charge state of Au NPs are influenced by chemical changes of the underlying substrate. Therefore, Au NPs could be used for chemical and biological sensing, whose environmentally sensitive charge state can be read out by work function measurements.

  11. Biocatalytic self-assembly of supramolecular charge-transfer nanostructures based on n-type semiconductor-appended peptides.

    PubMed

    Nalluri, Siva Krishna Mohan; Berdugo, Cristina; Javid, Nadeem; Frederix, Pim W J M; Ulijn, Rein V

    2014-06-01

    The reversible in situ formation of a self-assembly building block (naphthalenediimide (NDI)-dipeptide conjugate) by enzymatic condensation of NDI-functionalized tyrosine (NDI-Y) and phenylalanine-amide (F-NH2) to form NDI-YF-NH2 is described. This coupled biocatalytic condensation/assembly approach is thermodynamically driven and gives rise to nanostructures with optimized supramolecular interactions as evidenced by substantial aggregation induced emission upon assembly. Furthermore, in the presence of di-hydroxy/alkoxy naphthalene donors, efficient charge-transfer complexes are produced. The dynamic formation of NDI-YF-NH2 and electronic and H-bonding interactions are analyzed and characterized by different methods. Microscopy (TEM and AFM) and rheology are used to characterize the formed nanostructures. Dynamic nanostructures, whose formation and function are driven by free-energy minimization, are inherently self-healing and provide opportunities for the development of aqueous adaptive nanotechnology. PMID:24788665

  12. Charge state control in single InAs/GaAs quantum dots by external electric and magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Jing; Cao, Shuo; Gao, Yunan; Sun, Yue; Jin, Kuijuan; Xu, Xiulai; Geng, Weidong; Williams, David A.

    2014-07-28

    We report a photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy study of charge state control in single self-assembled InAs/GaAs quantum dots by applying electric and/or magnetic fields at 4.2 K. Neutral and charged exciton complexes were observed under applied bias voltages from −0.5 V to 0.5 V by controlling the carrier tunneling. The highly negatively charged exciton emission becomes stronger with increasing pumping power, arising from the fact that electrons have a smaller effective mass than holes and are more easily captured by the quantum dots. The integrated PL intensity of negatively charged excitons is affected significantly by a magnetic field applied along the sample growth axis. This observation is explained by a reduction in the electron drift velocity caused by an applied magnetic field, which increases the probability of non-resonantly excited electrons being trapped by localized potentials at the wetting layer interface, and results in fewer electrons distributed in the quantum dots. The hole drift velocity is also affected by the magnetic field, but it is much weaker.

  13. Quantitation of peptide hormone in single cultured secretory neurons of the crab, Cardisoma carnifex.

    PubMed

    Keller, R; Grau, S; Cooke, I M

    1995-09-01

    The content of crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) in single cultured neurons of the crab Cardisoma carnifex was determined by a sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), using purified CHH (1-50 pg) of the crab Carcinus maenas as standard. The somata were dissociated from the group of approximately 150 peptidergic neurons that form the X-organ--sinus gland neuroendocrine system. As previously reported, the neurons show immediate regenerative outgrowth in defined culture conditions, and develop, generally, into one of two morphological types: cells that produce broad, lamelliform growth cones (veils), and others that are characterized by branching of neurites. In this study, all but one of 64 veiling cells taken after various times in culture up to 12 days contained CHH. They could be readily categorized as having "high" (> 33 pg; mean 86 +/- 5, S.E., n = 47) or "low" (< or = 33 pg; mean 22 +/- 2.5; n = 17) Carcinus CHH equivalents. Thus, CHH is associated with neurons showing veiling outgrowth, but veiling neurons with low CHH form a distinct, but not morphologically distinguishable group. They may contain an isoform of CHH with limited cross-reactivity. In 24 branching neurons assayed, Carcinus CHH equivalents averaged 7.2 +/- 2 pg. This figure includes 14 neurons in which CHH was undetectable, and one that had 40 pg of Carcinus CHH equivalents. There was no significant change of the hormone content in cells of either type during 6 days of culturing.

  14. Human renal carcinoma expresses two messages encoding a parathyroid hormone-like peptide: Evidence for the alternative splicing of a single-copy gene

    SciTech Connect

    Thiede, M.A.; Strewler, G.J.; Nissenson, R.A.; Rosenblatt, M.; Rodan, G.A. )

    1988-07-01

    A peptide secreted by tumors associated with the clinical syndrome of humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy was recently purified from human renal carcinoma cell line 786-0. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of this peptide has considerable similarity with those of parathyroid hormone (PTH) and of peptides isolated from human breast and lung carcinoma (cell line BEN). In this study the authors obtained the nucleotide sequence of a 1595-base cDNA complementary to mRNA encoding the PTH-like peptide produced by 786-0 cells. The cDNA contains an open reading frame encoding a leader sequence of 36 amino acids and a 139-residue peptide, in which 8 of the first 13 residues are identical to the N terminus of PTH. Through the first 828 bases the sequence of this cDNA is identical with one recently isolated from a BEN cell cDNA library; however, beginning with base 829 the sequences diverge, shortening the open reading frame by 2 amino acids. Differential RNA blot analysis revealed that 786-0 cells express two major PTH-like peptide mRNAs with different 3{prime} untranslated sequences, one of which hybridizes with the presently described sequence and the other one with that reported for the BEN cell PTH-like peptide cDNA. Primer-extension analysis of 786-0 poly(A){sup +} RNA together with Southern blot analysis of human DNA confirmed the presence of a single-copy gene coding for multiple mRNAs through alternate splicing. In addition, the 3{prime} untranslated sequence of the cDNA described here has significant similarity to the c-myc protooncogene.

  15. Single-cell, real-time detection of oxidative stress induced in Escherichia coli by the antimicrobial peptide CM15

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhilin; Weisshaar, James C.

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotics target specific biochemical mechanisms in bacteria. In response to new drugs, pathogenic bacteria rapidly develop resistance. In contrast, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have retained broad spectrum antibacterial potency over millions of years. We present single-cell fluorescence assays that detect reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the Escherichia coli cytoplasm in real time. Within 30 s of permeabilization of the cytoplasmic membrane by the cationic AMP CM15 [combining residues 1–7 of cecropin A (from moth) with residues 2–9 of melittin (bee venom)], three fluorescence signals report oxidative stress in the cytoplasm, apparently involving O2−, H2O2, and •OH. Mechanistic studies indicate that active respiration is a prerequisite to the CM15-induced oxidative damage. In anaerobic conditions, signals from ROS are greatly diminished and the minimum inhibitory concentration increases 20-fold. Evidently the natural human AMP LL-37 also induces a burst of ROS. Oxidative stress may prove a significant bacteriostatic mechanism for a variety of cationic AMPs. If so, host organisms may use the local oxygen level to modulate AMP potency. PMID:25561551

  16. Single Charge Current in a Normal Mesoscopic Region Attached to Superconductor Leads via a Coupled Poisson Nonequilibrium Green Function Formalism

    PubMed Central

    Marin, F. P.

    2014-01-01

    We study the I-V characteristic of mesoscopic systems or quantum dot (QD) attached to a pair of superconducting leads. Interaction effects in the QD are considered through the charging energy of the QD; that is, the treatment of current transport under a voltage bias is performed within a coupled Poisson nonequilibrium Green function (PNEGF) formalism. We derive the expression for the current in full generality but consider only the regime where transport occurs only via a single particle current. We show for this case and for various charging energies values U 0 and associated capacitances of the QD the effect on the I-V characteristic. Also the influence of the coupling constants on the I-V characteristic is investigated. Our approach puts forward a novel interpretation of experiments in the strong Coulomb regime. PMID:24977220

  17. Single charge current in a normal mesoscopic region attached to superconductor leads via a coupled poisson nonequilibrium green function formalism.

    PubMed

    Verrilli, David; Marin, F P; Rangel, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    We study the I-V characteristic of mesoscopic systems or quantum dot (QD) attached to a pair of superconducting leads. Interaction effects in the QD are considered through the charging energy of the QD; that is, the treatment of current transport under a voltage bias is performed within a coupled Poisson nonequilibrium Green function (PNEGF) formalism. We derive the expression for the current in full generality but consider only the regime where transport occurs only via a single particle current. We show for this case and for various charging energies values U 0 and associated capacitances of the QD the effect on the I-V characteristic. Also the influence of the coupling constants on the I-V characteristic is investigated. Our approach puts forward a novel interpretation of experiments in the strong Coulomb regime.

  18. Influence of the charge carrier tunneling processes on the recombination dynamics in single lateral quantum dot molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermannstädter, C.; Beirne, G. J.; Witzany, M.; Heldmaier, M.; Peng, J.; Bester, G.; Wang, L.; Rastelli, A.; Schmidt, O. G.; Michler, P.

    2010-08-01

    We report on the charge carrier dynamics in single lateral quantum dot molecules and the effect of an applied electric field on the molecular states. Controllable electron tunneling manifests itself in a deviation from the typical excitonic decay behavior in dot molecules. It results in a faster population decay and can be strongly influenced by the tuning electric field and intermolecular Coulomb energies. A rate equation model is developed and compared to the experimental data to gain more insight into the charge transfer and tunneling mechanisms. Nonresonant (phonon-mediated) electron tunneling which changes the molecular exciton character from direct to indirect, and vice versa, is found to be the dominant tunable decay mechanism of excitons besides radiative recombination.

  19. Single-dose safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of the antibiotic GSK1322322, a novel peptide deformylase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Naderer, Odin J; Dumont, Etienne; Zhu, John; Kurtinecz, Milena; Jones, Lori S

    2013-05-01

    GSK1322322 is a potent inhibitor of peptide deformylase, an essential bacterial enzyme required for protein maturation. GSK1322322 is active against community-acquired skin and respiratory tract pathogens, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae, and atypical pathogens. This phase I, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 2-part, single-dose, dose escalation study (first time in humans) evaluated the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of GSK1322322 (powder-in-bottle formulation) in healthy volunteers. In part A, dose escalation included GSK1322322 doses of 100, 200, 400, 800, and 1,500 mg under fasting conditions and 800 mg administered with a high-fat meal. In part B, higher doses of GSK1322322 (2,000, 3,000, and 4,000 mg) were evaluated under fasting conditions. Of the 39 volunteers enrolled in the study, 29 and 10 volunteers were treated with GSK1322322 and placebo, respectively. Upon single-dose administration, GSK1322322 was absorbed rapidly, with median times to maximum plasma concentration (T(max)) ranging from 0.5 to 1.0 h. The maximum observed plasma concentration (C(max)) and exposure (area under the concentration-time curve [AUC]) of GSK1322322 were greater than dose proportional between 100 and 1,500 mg and less than dose proportional between 1,500 and 4,000 mg. Administration of the drug with a high-fat meal reduced the rate of absorption (reduced C(max) and delayed T(max)) without affecting the extent of absorption (no effect on AUC). GSK1322322 was generally well tolerated, with all adverse events being mild to moderate in intensity during both parts of the study. The most frequently reported adverse event was headache. Data from this study support further evaluation of GSK1322322. PMID:23403431

  20. Heat-shock protein peptide complex–96 vaccination for recurrent glioblastoma: a phase II, single-arm trial

    PubMed Central

    Bloch, Orin; Crane, Courtney A.; Fuks, Yelena; Kaur, Rajwant; Aghi, Manish K.; Berger, Mitchel S.; Butowski, Nicholas A.; Chang, Susan M.; Clarke, Jennifer L.; McDermott, Michael W.; Prados, Michael D.; Sloan, Andrew E.; Bruce, Jeffrey N.; Parsa, Andrew T.

    2014-01-01

    Background Outcomes for patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) are poor and may be improved by immunotherapy. We investigated the safety and efficacy of an autologous heat-shock protein peptide complex–96 (HSPPC-96) vaccine for patients with recurrent GBM. Methods In this open-label, single-arm, phase II study, adult patients with surgically resectable recurrent GBM were given vaccine after gross total resection. The primary endpoint was overall survival at 6 months. Secondary endpoints included overall survival, progression-free survival, safety, and immune profiling. Outcome analyses were performed in the intention-to-treat and efficacy populations. Results Between October 3, 2007 and October 24, 2011, 41 patients underwent gross total resection of recurrent GBM and received a median of 6 doses of HSPPC-96 vaccine. Following treatment, 90.2% of patients were alive at 6 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 75.9–96.8) and 29.3% were alive at 12 months (95% CI: 16.6–45.7). Median overall survival was 42.6 weeks (95% CI: 34.7–50.5). Twenty-seven (66%) patients were lymphopenic prior to therapy, and patients with lymphocyte counts below the cohort median demonstrated decreased overall survival (hazard ratio: 4.0; 95% CI: 1.4–11.8; P = .012). There were no treatment-related deaths. There were 37 serious (grades 3–5) adverse events reported, with 17 attributable to surgical resection and a single grade 3 constitutional event related to the vaccine. Conclusion The HSPPC-96 vaccine is safe and warrants further study of efficacy for the treatment of recurrent GBM. Significant pretreatment lymphopenia may impact the outcomes of immunotherapy and deserves additional investigation. PMID:24335700

  1. Fractionally Charged Zero-Energy Single-Particle Excitations in a Driven Fermi Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskalets, Michael

    2016-07-01

    A voltage pulse of a Lorentzian shape carrying half of the flux quantum excites out of a zero-temperature Fermi sea an electron in a mixed state, which looks like a quasiparticle with an effectively fractional charge e /2 . A prominent feature of such an excitation is a narrow peak in the energy distribution function lying exactly at the Fermi energy μ . Another spectacular feature is that the distribution function has symmetric tails around μ , which results in a zero-energy excitation. This sounds improbable since at zero temperature all available states below μ are fully occupied. The resolution lies in the fact that such a voltage pulse also excites electron-hole pairs, which free some space below μ and thus allow a zero-energy quasiparticle to exist. I discuss also how to address separately electron-hole pairs and a fractionally charged zero-energy excitation in an experiment.

  2. Single ion induced surface nanostructures: a comparison between slow highly charged and swift heavy ions.

    PubMed

    Aumayr, Friedrich; Facsko, Stefan; El-Said, Ayman S; Trautmann, Christina; Schleberger, Marika

    2011-10-01

    This topical review focuses on recent advances in the understanding of the formation of surface nanostructures, an intriguing phenomenon in ion-surface interaction due to the impact of individual ions. In many solid targets, swift heavy ions produce narrow cylindrical tracks accompanied by the formation of a surface nanostructure. More recently, a similar nanometric surface effect has been revealed for the impact of individual, very slow but highly charged ions. While swift ions transfer their large kinetic energy to the target via ionization and electronic excitation processes (electronic stopping), slow highly charged ions produce surface structures due to potential energy deposited at the top surface layers. Despite the differences in primary excitation, the similarity between the nanostructures is striking and strongly points to a common mechanism related to the energy transfer from the electronic to the lattice system of the target. A comparison of surface structures induced by swift heavy ions and slow highly charged ions provides a valuable insight to better understand the formation mechanisms.

  3. Single ion induced surface nanostructures: a comparison between slow highly charged and swift heavy ions.

    PubMed

    Aumayr, Friedrich; Facsko, Stefan; El-Said, Ayman S; Trautmann, Christina; Schleberger, Marika

    2011-10-01

    This topical review focuses on recent advances in the understanding of the formation of surface nanostructures, an intriguing phenomenon in ion-surface interaction due to the impact of individual ions. In many solid targets, swift heavy ions produce narrow cylindrical tracks accompanied by the formation of a surface nanostructure. More recently, a similar nanometric surface effect has been revealed for the impact of individual, very slow but highly charged ions. While swift ions transfer their large kinetic energy to the target via ionization and electronic excitation processes (electronic stopping), slow highly charged ions produce surface structures due to potential energy deposited at the top surface layers. Despite the differences in primary excitation, the similarity between the nanostructures is striking and strongly points to a common mechanism related to the energy transfer from the electronic to the lattice system of the target. A comparison of surface structures induced by swift heavy ions and slow highly charged ions provides a valuable insight to better understand the formation mechanisms. PMID:21900733

  4. Design of Accumulators and Liquid/Gas Charging of Single Phase Mechanically Pumped Fluid Loop Heat Rejection Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhandari, Pradeep; Dudik, Brenda; Birur, Gajanana; Karlmann, Paul; Bame, David; Mastropietro, A. J.

    2012-01-01

    For single phase mechanically pumped fluid loops used for thermal control of spacecraft, a gas charged accumulator is typically used to modulate pressures within the loop. This is needed to accommodate changes in the working fluid volume due to changes in the operating temperatures as the spacecraft encounters varying thermal environments during its mission. Overall, the three key requirements on the accumulator to maintain an appropriate pressure range throughout the mission are: accommodation of the volume change of the fluid due to temperature changes, avoidance of pump cavitation and prevention of boiling in the liquid. The sizing and design of such an accumulator requires very careful and accurate accounting of temperature distribution within each element of the working fluid for the entire range of conditions expected, accurate knowledge of volume of each fluid element, assessment of corresponding pressures needed to avoid boiling in the liquid, as well as the pressures needed to avoid cavitation in the pump. The appropriate liquid and accumulator strokes required to accommodate the liquid volume change, as well as the appropriate gas volumes, require proper sizing to ensure that the correct pressure range is maintained during the mission. Additionally, a very careful assessment of the process for charging both the gas side and the liquid side of the accumulator is required to properly position the bellows and pressurize the system to a level commensurate with requirements. To achieve the accurate sizing of the accumulator and the charging of the system, sophisticated EXCEL based spreadsheets were developed to rapidly come up with an accumulator design and the corresponding charging parameters. These spreadsheets have proven to be computationally fast and accurate tools for this purpose. This paper will describe the entire process of designing and charging the system, using a case study of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) fluid loops, which is en route to

  5. Pulling peptides across nanochannels: resolving peptide binding and translocation through the hetero-oligomeric channel from Nocardia farcinica.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pratik Raj; Bárcena-Uribarri, Iván; Modi, Niraj; Kleinekathöfer, Ulrich; Benz, Roland; Winterhalter, Mathias; Mahendran, Kozhinjampara R

    2012-12-21

    We investigated translocation of cationic peptides through nanochannels derived from the Gram-positive bacterium Nocardia farcinica at the single-molecule level. The two subunits NfpA and NfpB form a hetero-oligomeric cation selective channel. On the basis of amino acid comparison we performed homology modeling and obtained a channel structurally related to MspA of Mycobacterium smegmatis. The quantitative single-molecule measurements provide an insight into transport processes of solutes through nanochannels. High-resolution ion conductance measurements in the presence of peptides of different charge and length revealed the kinetics of peptide binding. The observed asymmetry in peptide binding kinetics indicated a unidirectional channel insertion in the lipid bilayer. In the case of cationic peptides, the external voltage acts as a driving force that promotes the interaction of the peptide with the channel surface. At low voltage, the peptide just binds to the channel, whereas at higher voltage, the force is strong enough to pull the peptide across the channel. This allows distinguishing quantitatively between peptide binding and translocation through the channel. PMID:23121560

  6. Spin, charge, and single-particle spectral functions of the one-dimensional quarter filled Holstein model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assaad, F. F.

    2008-10-01

    We use a recently developed extension of the weak-coupling diagrammatic determinantal quantum Monte Carlo method to investigate the spin, charge, and single-particle spectral functions of the one-dimensional quarter filled Holstein model with phonon frequency ω0=0.1t . As a function of the dimensionless electron-phonon coupling we observe a transition from a Luttinger to a Luther-Emery liquid with dominant 2kf charge fluctuations. Emphasis is placed on the temperature dependence of the single-particle spectral function. At high temperatures and in both phases it is well accounted for within a self-consistent Born approximation. In the low-temperature Luttinger liquid phase we observe features that compare favorably with a bosonization approach retaining only forward scattering. In the Luther-Emery phase, the spectral function at low temperatures shows a quasiparticle gap that matches half the spin gap, whereas at temperatures above which this quasiparticle gap closes characteristic features of the Luttinger liquid model are apparent. Our results are based on lattice simulations on chains up to L=20 for two-particle properties and on cluster dynamical mean-field theory calculations with clusters up to 12 sites for the single-particle spectral function.

  7. Mass Spectrometry of Single GABAergic Somatic Motorneurons Identifies a Novel Inhibitory Peptide, As-NLP-22, in the Nematode Ascaris suum.

    PubMed

    Konop, Christopher J; Knickelbine, Jennifer J; Sygulla, Molly S; Wruck, Colin D; Vestling, Martha M; Stretton, Antony O W

    2015-12-01

    Neuromodulators have become an increasingly important component of functional circuits, dramatically changing the properties of both neurons and synapses to affect behavior. To explore the role of neuropeptides in Ascaris suum behavior, we devised an improved method for cleanly dissecting single motorneuronal cell bodies from the many other cell processes and hypodermal tissue in the ventral nerve cord. We determined their peptide content using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS). The reduced complexity of the peptide mixture greatly aided the detection of peptides; peptide levels were sufficient to permit sequencing by tandem MS from single cells. Inhibitory motorneurons, known to be GABAergic, contain a novel neuropeptide, As-NLP-22 (SLASGRWGLRPamide). From this sequence and information from the A. suum expressed sequence tag (EST) database, we cloned the transcript (As-nlp-22) and synthesized a riboprobe for in situ hybridization, which labeled the inhibitory motorneurons; this validates the integrity of the dissection method, showing that the peptides detected originate from the cells themselves and not from adhering processes from other cells (e.g., synaptic terminals). Synthetic As-NLP-22 has potent inhibitory activity on acetylcholine-induced muscle contraction as well as on basal muscle tone. Both of these effects are dose-dependent: the inhibitory effect on ACh contraction has an IC50 of 8.3 × 10(-9) M. When injected into whole worms, As-NLP-22 produces a dose-dependent inhibition of locomotory movements and, at higher levels, complete paralysis. These experiments demonstrate the utility of MALDI TOF/TOF MS in identifying novel neuromodulators at the single-cell level. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  8. Mass Spectrometry of Single GABAergic Somatic Motorneurons Identifies a Novel Inhibitory Peptide, As-NLP-22, in the Nematode Ascaris suum.

    PubMed

    Konop, Christopher J; Knickelbine, Jennifer J; Sygulla, Molly S; Wruck, Colin D; Vestling, Martha M; Stretton, Antony O W

    2015-12-01

    Neuromodulators have become an increasingly important component of functional circuits, dramatically changing the properties of both neurons and synapses to affect behavior. To explore the role of neuropeptides in Ascaris suum behavior, we devised an improved method for cleanly dissecting single motorneuronal cell bodies from the many other cell processes and hypodermal tissue in the ventral nerve cord. We determined their peptide content using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS). The reduced complexity of the peptide mixture greatly aided the detection of peptides; peptide levels were sufficient to permit sequencing by tandem MS from single cells. Inhibitory motorneurons, known to be GABAergic, contain a novel neuropeptide, As-NLP-22 (SLASGRWGLRPamide). From this sequence and information from the A. suum expressed sequence tag (EST) database, we cloned the transcript (As-nlp-22) and synthesized a riboprobe for in situ hybridization, which labeled the inhibitory motorneurons; this validates the integrity of the dissection method, showing that the peptides detected originate from the cells themselves and not from adhering processes from other cells (e.g., synaptic terminals). Synthetic As-NLP-22 has potent inhibitory activity on acetylcholine-induced muscle contraction as well as on basal muscle tone. Both of these effects are dose-dependent: the inhibitory effect on ACh contraction has an IC50 of 8.3 × 10(-9) M. When injected into whole worms, As-NLP-22 produces a dose-dependent inhibition of locomotory movements and, at higher levels, complete paralysis. These experiments demonstrate the utility of MALDI TOF/TOF MS in identifying novel neuromodulators at the single-cell level. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26174364

  9. Mass Spectrometry of Single GABAergic Somatic Motorneurons Identifies a Novel Inhibitory Peptide, As-NLP-22, in the Nematode Ascaris suum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konop, Christopher J.; Knickelbine, Jennifer J.; Sygulla, Molly S.; Wruck, Colin D.; Vestling, Martha M.; Stretton, Antony O. W.

    2015-12-01

    Neuromodulators have become an increasingly important component of functional circuits, dramatically changing the properties of both neurons and synapses to affect behavior. To explore the role of neuropeptides in Ascaris suum behavior, we devised an improved method for cleanly dissecting single motorneuronal cell bodies from the many other cell processes and hypodermal tissue in the ventral nerve cord. We determined their peptide content using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS). The reduced complexity of the peptide mixture greatly aided the detection of peptides; peptide levels were sufficient to permit sequencing by tandem MS from single cells. Inhibitory motorneurons, known to be GABAergic, contain a novel neuropeptide, As-NLP-22 (SLASGRWGLRPamide). From this sequence and information from the A. suum expressed sequence tag (EST) database, we cloned the transcript ( As-nlp-22) and synthesized a riboprobe for in situ hybridization, which labeled the inhibitory motorneurons; this validates the integrity of the dissection method, showing that the peptides detected originate from the cells themselves and not from adhering processes from other cells (e.g., synaptic terminals). Synthetic As-NLP-22 has potent inhibitory activity on acetylcholine-induced muscle contraction as well as on basal muscle tone. Both of these effects are dose-dependent: the inhibitory effect on ACh contraction has an IC50 of 8.3 × 10-9 M. When injected into whole worms, As-NLP-22 produces a dose-dependent inhibition of locomotory movements and, at higher levels, complete paralysis. These experiments demonstrate the utility of MALDI TOF/TOF MS in identifying novel neuromodulators at the single-cell level.

  10. Investigation of electrically-active deep levels in single-crystalline diamond by particle-induced charge transient spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kada, W.; Kambayashi, Y.; Ando, Y.; Onoda, S.; Umezawa, H.; Mokuno, Y.; Shikata, S.; Makino, T.; Koka, M.; Hanaizumi, O.; Kamiya, T.; Ohshima, T.

    2016-04-01

    To investigate electrically-active deep levels in high-resistivity single-crystalline diamond, particle-induced charge transient spectroscopy (QTS) techniques were performed using 5.5 MeV alpha particles and 9 MeV carbon focused microprobes. For unintentionally-doped (UID) chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond, deep levels with activation energies of 0.35 eV and 0.43 eV were detected which correspond to the activation energy of boron acceptors in diamond. The results suggested that alpha particle and heavy ion induced QTS techniques are the promising candidate for in-situ investigation of deep levels in high-resistivity semiconductors.

  11. Charge dependence and electric quadrupole effects on single-nucleon removal in relativistic and intermediate energy nuclear collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, J. W.; Townsend, L. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1990-01-01

    Single-nucleon removal in relativistic and intermediate energy nucleus-nucleus collisions is studied using a generalization of Weizsacker-Williams theory that treats each electromagnetic multipole separately. Calculations are presented for electric dipole and quadrupole excitations and incorporate a realistic minimum impact parameter, Coulomb recoil corrections, and the uncertainties in the input photonuclear data. Discrepancies are discussed. The maximum quadrupole effect to be observed in future experiments is estimated and also an analysis of the charge dependence of the electromagnetic cross sections down to energies as low as 100 MeV/nucleon is made.

  12. Charge Dependence and Electric Quadrupole Effects on Single-Nucleon Removal in Relativistic and Intermediate Energy Nuclear Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.

    1992-01-01

    Single nucleon removal in relativistic and intermediate energy nucleus-nucleus collisions is studied using a generalization of Weizsacker-Williams theory that treats each electromagnetic multipole separately. Calculations are presented for electric dipole and quadrupole excitations and incorporate a realistic minimum impact parameter, Coulomb recoil corrections, and the uncertainties in the input photonuclear data. Discrepancies are discussed. The maximum quadrupole effect to be observed in future experiments is estimated and also an analysis of the charge dependence of the electromagnetic cross sections down to energies as low as 100 MeV/nucleon is made.

  13. The Positively Charged COOH-terminal Glycosaminoglycan-binding CXCL9(74-103) Peptide Inhibits CXCL8-induced Neutrophil Extravasation and Monosodium Urate Crystal-induced Gout in Mice.

    PubMed

    Vanheule, Vincent; Janssens, Rik; Boff, Daiane; Kitic, Nikola; Berghmans, Nele; Ronsse, Isabelle; Kungl, Andreas J; Amaral, Flavio Almeida; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Van Damme, Jo; Proost, Paul; Mortier, Anneleen

    2015-08-28

    The ELR(-)CXC chemokine CXCL9 is characterized by a long, highly positively charged COOH-terminal region, absent in most other chemokines. Several natural leukocyte- and fibroblast-derived COOH-terminally truncated CXCL9 forms missing up to 30 amino acids were identified. To investigate the role of the COOH-terminal region of CXCL9, several COOH-terminal peptides were chemically synthesized. These peptides display high affinity for glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and compete with functional intact chemokines for GAG binding, the longest peptide (CXCL9(74-103)) being the most potent. The COOH-terminal peptide CXCL9(74-103) does not signal through or act as an antagonist for CXCR3, the G protein-coupled CXCL9 receptor, and does not influence neutrophil chemotactic activity of CXCL8 in vitro. Based on the GAG binding data, an anti-inflammatory role for CXCL9(74-103) was further evidenced in vivo. Simultaneous intravenous injection of CXCL9(74-103) with CXCL8 injection in the joint diminished CXCL8-induced neutrophil extravasation. Analogously, monosodium urate crystal-induced neutrophil migration to the tibiofemural articulation, a murine model of gout, is highly reduced by intravenous injection of CXCL9(74-103). These data show that chemokine-derived peptides with high affinity for GAGs may be used as anti-inflammatory peptides; by competing with active chemokines for binding and immobilization on GAGs, these peptides may lower chemokine presentation on the endothelium and disrupt the generation of a chemokine gradient, thereby preventing a chemokine from properly performing its chemotactic function. The CXCL9 peptide may serve as a lead molecule for further development of inhibitors of inflammation based on interference with chemokine-GAG interactions.

  14. The Positively Charged COOH-terminal Glycosaminoglycan-binding CXCL9(74–103) Peptide Inhibits CXCL8-induced Neutrophil Extravasation and Monosodium Urate Crystal-induced Gout in Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Vanheule, Vincent; Janssens, Rik; Boff, Daiane; Kitic, Nikola; Berghmans, Nele; Ronsse, Isabelle; Kungl, Andreas J.; Amaral, Flavio Almeida; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Van Damme, Jo; Proost, Paul; Mortier, Anneleen

    2015-01-01

    The ELR−CXC chemokine CXCL9 is characterized by a long, highly positively charged COOH-terminal region, absent in most other chemokines. Several natural leukocyte- and fibroblast-derived COOH-terminally truncated CXCL9 forms missing up to 30 amino acids were identified. To investigate the role of the COOH-terminal region of CXCL9, several COOH-terminal peptides were chemically synthesized. These peptides display high affinity for glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and compete with functional intact chemokines for GAG binding, the longest peptide (CXCL9(74–103)) being the most potent. The COOH-terminal peptide CXCL9(74–103) does not signal through or act as an antagonist for CXCR3, the G protein-coupled CXCL9 receptor, and does not influence neutrophil chemotactic activity of CXCL8 in vitro. Based on the GAG binding data, an anti-inflammatory role for CXCL9(74–103) was further evidenced in vivo. Simultaneous intravenous injection of CXCL9(74–103) with CXCL8 injection in the joint diminished CXCL8-induced neutrophil extravasation. Analogously, monosodium urate crystal-induced neutrophil migration to the tibiofemural articulation, a murine model of gout, is highly reduced by intravenous injection of CXCL9(74–103). These data show that chemokine-derived peptides with high affinity for GAGs may be used as anti-inflammatory peptides; by competing with active chemokines for binding and immobilization on GAGs, these peptides may lower chemokine presentation on the endothelium and disrupt the generation of a chemokine gradient, thereby preventing a chemokine from properly performing its chemotactic function. The CXCL9 peptide may serve as a lead molecule for further development of inhibitors of inflammation based on interference with chemokine-GAG interactions. PMID:26183778

  15. Multidomain Peptides: Sequence-Nanostructure Relationships and Biological Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakota, Erica Laraine

    2011-12-01

    Peptides are materials that, as a result of their polymeric nature, possess enormous versatility and customizability. Multidomain peptides are a class of peptides that self-assemble to form stable, cytocompatible hydrogels. They have an ABA block motif, in which the A block is composed of charged amino acids, such as lysine, and the B block consists of alternating hydrophilic and hydrophobic amino acids, such as glutamine and leucine. The B block forms a facial amphiphile that drives self-assembly. The charged A blocks simultaneously limit self-assembly and improve solubility. Self-assembly is triggered by charge screening of these charged amino acids, enabling the formation of beta-sheet fibers. The development of an extended nanofiber network can result in the formation of a hydrogel. Systematic modifications to both the A and B blocks were investigated, and it was found that sequence modifications have a large impact on peptide nanostructure and hydrogel rheology. The first modification examined is the substitution of amino acids within the hydrophilic positions of the B block. The second set of modifications investigated was the incorporation of aromatic amino acids in the B block. Finally, the charged block was varied to generate different net charges on the peptides, a change which impacted the ability to use these peptides in cell culture. Two applications of multidomain peptide nanofibers are explored, the first of which is the delivery of novel therapies in vivo. One multidomain peptide is able to form hydrogels that undergo shear-thinning and rapid recovery. This gel can be loaded with cytokines and growth factors that have been secreted by embryonic stem cells, and these molecules can be subsequently released in a therapeutic setting. Another application for multidomain peptide is their use as biocompatible surfactants. Single-walled carbon nanotubes have been widely investigated for their unique optical and electrical properties, but their solubility in

  16. Charge transport over multiple length scales in supramolecular fiber transistors: single fiber versus ensemble performance.

    PubMed

    Mativetsky, Jeffrey M; Orgiu, Emanuele; Lieberwirth, Ingo; Pisula, Wojciech; Samorì, Paolo

    2014-01-22

    Self-assembled organic fibers combine facile solution processing with the performance benefits of single crystals. Here, the first evidence is shown of band-like transport in an n-type solution-processed small molecule system, a limited role of shallow traps, and a single fiber electron mobility that is several orders of magnitude higher than that measured in fiber ensembles or spin-cast films. PMID:24174386

  17. Minimizing the energy spread within a single bunch by shaping its charge distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Loew, G.A.; Wang, J.W.

    1985-03-01

    It has been known for some time that partial compensation of the longitudinal wake field effects can be obtained for any bunch by placing it ahead of the accelerating crest (in space), thereby letting the positive rising sinusoidal field offset the negative beam loading field. The work presented in this paper shows that it is possible to obtain complete compensation, i.e., to reduce the energy spread essentially to zero by properly shaping the longitudinal charge distribution of the bunch and by placing it at the correct position on the wave. 3 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Single-hole spectral function and spin-charge separation in the t-J model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishchenko, A. S.; Prokof'ev, N. V.; Svistunov, B. V.

    2001-07-01

    Worm algorithm Monte Carlo simulations of the hole Green function with subsequent spectral analysis were performed for 0.1<=J/t<=0.4 on lattices with up to L×L=32×32 sites at a temperature as low as T=J/40, and present, apparently, the hole spectral function in the thermodynamic limit. Spectral analysis reveals a δ-function-sharp quasiparticle peak at the lower edge of the spectrum that is incompatible with the power-law singularity and thus rules out the possibility of spin-charge separation in this parameter range. Spectral continuum features two peaks separated by a gap ~4÷5 t.

  19. Single-Step Grafting of Aminooxy-Peptides to Hyaluronan: A Simple Approach to Multifunctional Therapeutics for Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Sestak, Joshua.; Mullins, Meagan; Northrup, Laura; Thati, Shara; Siahaan, Teruna; Berkland, Cory

    2013-01-01

    The immune response to antigens is directed in part by the presence or absence of costimulatory signals. The ability to coincidently present both antigen and, for example, a peptide that inhibits or activates the costimulatory pathway, would be a valuable tool for tolerization or immunization, respectively. A simple reaction scheme utilizing oxime chemistry was identified as a means to efficiently conjugate different peptide species to hyaluronan. Peptides synthesized with an aminooxy N-terminus reacted directly to hyaluronan under slightly acidic aqueous conditions without the need for a catalyst. The resulting oxime bond was found to rapidly hydrolyze at pH 2 releasing peptide, but was stable at higher pH values (5.5 and 7). Two different peptide species, a multiple sclerosis antigen (PLP) and an ICAM-1 ligand (LABL) known to block immune cell stimulation, were functionalized with the aminooxy end group. These peptides showed similar reactivity to hyaluronan and were conjugated in an equimolar ratio. The resulting hyaluronan with grafted PLP and LABL significantly inhibited disease in mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, a model of multiple sclerosis. Aminooxy-peptides facilitate simple synthesis of multifunctional hyaluronan graft polymers, thus enabling novel approaches to antigen-specific immune modulation. PMID:23541930

  20. Charge transfer of single laser crystallized intrinsic and phosphorus-doped Si-nanocrystals visualized by Kelvin probe force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jie; Xu, Jun; Lu, Peng; Shan, Dan; Li, Wei; Chen, Kunji

    2014-10-01

    Isolated intrinsic and phosphorus doped (P-doped) Si-nanocrystals (Si-NCs) on n- and p-Si substrates are fabricated by excimer laser crystallization techniques. The formation of Si-NCs is confirmed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and conductive AFM measurements. Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) is then carried out to visualize the trapped charges in a single Si-NC dot which derives from the charge transfer between Si-NCs and Si substrates due to their different Fermi levels. The laser crystallized P-doped Si-NCs have a similar Fermi level around the mid-gap to the intrinsic counterparts, which might be caused by the inactivated impurity atoms or the surface states-related Fermi level pinning. A clear rise of the Fermi level in P-doped Si-NCs is observed after a short time thermal annealing treatment, indicating the activation of dopants in Si-NCs. Moreover, the surface charge quantity can be estimated using a simple parallel plate capacitor model for a quantitative understanding of the KPFM results at the nanoscale.

  1. Effective Control of the Charge and Magnetic States of Transition-Metal Atoms on Single-Layer Boron Nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, B.; Xiang, H. J.; Yu, J. J.; Wei, S. H.

    2012-05-18

    Developing approaches to effectively control the charge and magnetic states is critical to the use of magnetic nanostructures in quantum information devices but is still challenging. Here we suggest that the magnetic and charge states of transition-metal (TM) doped single-layer boron-nitride (SLBN) systems can be easily controlled by the (internal) defect engineering and (external) electric fields (E{sub ext}). The relative positions and symmetries of the in-gap levels induced by defect engineering and the TM d-orbital energy levels effectively determine the charge states and magnetic properties of the TM/SLBN system. Remarkably, the application of an E{sub ext} can easily control the size of the crystal field splitting of the TM d orbitals and thus, leading to the spin crossover in TM/SLBN, which could be used as E{sub ext}-driven nonvolatile memory devices. Our conclusion obtained from TM/SLBN is valid generally in other TM adsorbed layered semiconductors.

  2. Photogeneration of charge carrier correlated with amplified spontaneous emission in single crystals of a thiophene/phenylene co-oligomer.

    PubMed

    Saeki, Akinori; Seki, Shu; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Yamao, Takeshi; Hotta, Shu

    2010-04-01

    Thiophene/phenylene co-oligomers have substantial promise for the use of not only organic electronics but also organic optical devices. However, considerably less is known about the correlation between their optical and optoelectronic properties. We have investigated the charge carrier generation in 1,4-bis(5-phenylthiophen-2-yl)benzene (AC5) single crystals by flash-photolysis time-resolved microwave conductivity (TRMC) and transient absorption spectroscopy (TAS). It was found that the dependence of photocarrier generation efficiency on excitation photon density differed from that of emission efficiency once amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) and resultant spectrally narrowed emission occur upon exposure to 355 nm. In contrast, the dependences of emission and photocarrier generation efficiencies were identical when ASE was not involved at a different excitation wavelength (193 nm). An approximated analytical solution of rate equation considering ASE or singlet-singlet annihilation was applied to the experiments, exhibiting good agreement. On the basis of TRMC, TAS, and extinction coefficient of radical cation assessed by pulse radiolysis, the minimum charge carrier mobility was estimated, without electrodes, to be 0.12 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). The dynamics of charge carrier and triplet excited state is discussed, accompanying with examination by time-dependent density functional theory. The present work would open the way to a deeper understanding of the fate of excited state in optically robust organic semiconducting crystals.

  3. Dynamics of charge migration in poly(para-phenylene vinylene) films and nanocomposites with single walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulazzi, E.; Galli, D. E.; Lefrant, S.; Wéry, J.; Massuyeau, F.; Faulques, E.

    2016-02-01

    We present in this paper a comprehensive study of the migration dynamics of the charges underlying transient photoluminescence (PL) processes in poly(para-phenylene vinylene) (PPV) samples from room temperature to 13 K. In order to interpret experimental data, we have modelled the long-time PL decays (from 100 to 1000 ps) using a time function proportional to {{t}-(1+α )} in which the parameter α is evaluated in a Monte Carlo simulation on polymeric chains. The one dimensional chains (2000 sites long) are formed by random sequences of long and short conjugated segments whose bimodal distributions have been elaborated in previous works in order to reproduce the PL band shapes and peak positions. Intra-chain and inter-chain dynamics are taken into account in the migration of the photogenerated charges from short to long conjugated segments. The statistical analysis is performed by averaging over a total of 106 trials for each initial conditions. The values of α have been determined for pristine PPV films and PPV composite films with single-walled carbon nanotubes. This theoretical analysis is in good agreement with experimental data and provides a coherent description for the migration of the photogenerated charges in such inhomogeneous polymeric systems.

  4. Charge transfer of single laser crystallized intrinsic and phosphorus-doped Si-nanocrystals visualized by Kelvin probe force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jie; Xu, Jun Lu, Peng; Shan, Dan; Li, Wei; Chen, Kunji

    2014-10-07

    Isolated intrinsic and phosphorus doped (P-doped) Si-nanocrystals (Si-NCs) on n- and p-Si substrates are fabricated by excimer laser crystallization techniques. The formation of Si-NCs is confirmed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and conductive AFM measurements. Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) is then carried out to visualize the trapped charges in a single Si-NC dot which derives from the charge transfer between Si-NCs and Si substrates due to their different Fermi levels. The laser crystallized P-doped Si-NCs have a similar Fermi level around the mid-gap to the intrinsic counterparts, which might be caused by the inactivated impurity atoms or the surface states-related Fermi level pinning. A clear rise of the Fermi level in P-doped Si-NCs is observed after a short time thermal annealing treatment, indicating the activation of dopants in Si-NCs. Moreover, the surface charge quantity can be estimated using a simple parallel plate capacitor model for a quantitative understanding of the KPFM results at the nanoscale.

  5. Three Independent Techniques Localize Expression of Transcript afp-11 and Its Bioactive Peptide Products to the Paired AVK Neurons in Ascaris suum: In Situ Hybridization, Immunocytochemistry, and Single Cell Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We utilized three independent techniques, immunocytochemistry (ICC), single cell mass spectrometry (MS), and in situ hybridization (ISH), to localize neuropeptides and their transcripts in the nervous system of the nematode Ascaris suum. AF11 (SDIGISEPNFLRFa) is an endogenous peptide with potent paralytic effects on A. suum locomotory behavior. A highly specific antibody to AF11 showed robust immunostaining for AF11 in the paired AVK neurons in the ventral ganglion. We traced the processes from the AVK neurons into the ventral nerve cord and identified them as ventral cord interneurons. MS and MS/MS of single dissected AVKs detected AF11, two previously characterized peptides (AF25 and AF26), seven novel sequence-related peptides, including several sharing a PNFLRFamide C-terminus, and peptide NY, a peptide with an unrelated sequence. Also present in a subset of AVKs was AF2, a peptide encoded by the afp-4 transcript. By sequencing the afp-11 transcript, we discovered that it encodes AF11, all the AF11-related peptides detected by MS in AVK, and peptide NY. ISH detected the afp-11 transcript in AVK neurons, consistent with other techniques. ISH did not detect afp-11 in the ALA neuron, although both ICC and MS found AF11 in ca. 30% of ALAs. All 10 AF11-related peptides reduced acetylcholine-induced muscle contraction, but they differed in their rate of reversal of inhibition after removal of the peptide. PMID:23509978

  6. Three independent techniques localize expression of transcript afp-11 and its bioactive peptide products to the paired AVK neurons in Ascaris suum: in situ hybridization, immunocytochemistry, and single cell mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jarecki, Jessica L; Viola, India R; Andersen, Kari M; Miller, Andrew H; Ramaker, Megan A; Vestling, Martha M; Stretton, Antony O

    2013-03-20

    We utilized three independent techniques, immunocytochemistry (ICC), single cell mass spectrometry (MS), and in situ hybridization (ISH), to localize neuropeptides and their transcripts in the nervous system of the nematode Ascaris suum . AF11 (SDIGISEPNFLRFa) is an endogenous peptide with potent paralytic effects on A. suum locomotory behavior. A highly specific antibody to AF11 showed robust immunostaining for AF11 in the paired AVK neurons in the ventral ganglion. We traced the processes from the AVK neurons into the ventral nerve cord and identified them as ventral cord interneurons. MS and MS/MS of single dissected AVKs detected AF11, two previously characterized peptides (AF25 and AF26), seven novel sequence-related peptides, including several sharing a PNFLRFamide C-terminus, and peptide NY, a peptide with an unrelated sequence. Also present in a subset of AVKs was AF2, a peptide encoded by the afp-4 transcript. By sequencing the afp-11 transcript, we discovered that it encodes AF11, all the AF11-related peptides detected by MS in AVK, and peptide NY. ISH detected the afp-11 transcript in AVK neurons, consistent with other techniques. ISH did not detect afp-11 in the ALA neuron, although both ICC and MS found AF11 in ca. 30% of ALAs. All 10 AF11-related peptides reduced acetylcholine-induced muscle contraction, but they differed in their rate of reversal of inhibition after removal of the peptide.

  7. Single photon emission up to liquid nitrogen temperature from charged excitons confined in GaAs-based epitaxial nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Dusanowski, Ł. Syperek, M.; Maryński, A.; Misiewicz, J.; Sęk, G.; Li, L. H.; Höfling, S.; Kamp, M.; Fiore, A.

    2015-06-08

    We demonstrate a non-classical photon emitter at near infrared wavelength based on a single (In,Ga)As/GaAs epitaxially grown columnar quantum dot. Charged exciton complexes have been identified in magneto-photoluminescence. Photon auto-correlation histograms from the recombination of a trion confined in a columnar dot exhibit sub-Poissonian statistics with an antibunching dip yielding g{sup (2)}(0) values of 0.28 and 0.46 at temperature of 10 and 80 K, respectively. Our experimental findings allow considering the GaAs-based columnar quantum dot structure as an efficient single photon source operating at above liquid nitrogen temperatures, which in some characteristics can outperform the existing solutions of any material system.

  8. Azimuthal Single-Spin Asymmetries of Charged Pions in Jets in p↑ p Collisions at STAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adkins, Kevin; STAR Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The transversity distribution h1(x), which describes the transverse spin structure of quarks inside of transversely polarized protons, is only accessible through channels that couple h1(x) to another chiral odd distribution, such as the Collins fragmentation function (ΔD(z,kT)). Significant Collins asymmetries of charged pions have been observed in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SIDIS) data. These SIDIS asymmetries combined with e+e- process asymmetries from Belle have allowed for the extraction of h1(x) and ΔD(z ,kT). Uncertainties on h1(x) remain large due to the limited statistics and kinematic reach of the available data. In transversely polarized hadronic collisions, Collins asymmetries may be isolated and extracted by measuring the spin dependent azimuthal distributions of charged pions in jets. This presentation will show the first significant midrapditiy (| η | < 1) Collins asymmetries measured in √{ s} = 200 and 500 GeV p↑ p collisions. These results access higher momentum scales than the existing SIDIS data and will allow for a comprehensive study of evolution and factorization of the Collins channel.

  9. Experimental study of the stochastic heating of a single Brownian particle by charge fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Christian; Piel, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    The Brownian motion of a micro-particle, which is suspended in the sheath of a radio-frequency discharge, is studied by high-speed video microscopy. In this environment, stochastic heating by charge fluctuations is expected, which should lead to an anisotropic kinetic temperature of the particle with a preferential heating in the direction of the mean electric field in the sheath. The stochastic heating should become more effective at low gas pressures where cooling by the neutral gas becomes ineffective. Our refined experiments confirm the anisotropic heating and the temperature rise for diminishing pressure. Particle-in-cell simulations have guided us in modifying the gap width of the discharge and to specify the dependence of the plasma density on gas pressure as n i ∝ p 1 / 2 . Since the stochastic heating rate also depends on the life-time of charge fluctuations, a temperature scaling T kin ∝ p 3 / 2 results, which is in agreement with the experimental data. The experimental procedure to eliminate other spurious heating mechanisms is described in detail.

  10. Accumulative charge separation for solar fuels production: coupling light-induced single electron transfer to multielectron catalysis.

    PubMed

    Hammarström, Leif

    2015-03-17

    The conversion and storage of solar energy into a fuel holds promise to provide a significant part of the future renewable energy demand of our societies. Solar energy technologies today generate heat or electricity, while the large majority of our energy is used in the form of fuels. Direct conversion of solar energy to a fuel would satisfy our needs for storable energy on a large scale. Solar fuels can be generated by absorbing light and converting its energy to chemical energy by electron transfer leading to separation of electrons and holes. The electrons are used in the catalytic reduction of a cheap substrate with low energy content into a high-energy fuel. The holes are filled by oxidation of water, which is the only electron source available for large scale solar fuel production. Absorption of a single photon typically leads to separation of a single electron-hole pair. In contrast, fuel production and water oxidation are multielectron, multiproton reactions. Therefore, a system for direct solar fuel production must be able to accumulate the electrons and holes provided by the sequential absorption of several photons in order to complete the catalytic reactions. In this Account, the process is termed accumulative charge separation. This is considerably more complicated than charge separation on a single electron level and needs particular attention. Semiconductor materials and molecular dyes have for a long time been optimized for use in photovoltaic devices. Efforts are made to develop new systems for light harvesting and charge separation that are better optimized for solar fuel production than those used in the early devices presented so far. Significant progress has recently been made in the discovery and design of better homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts for solar fuels and water oxidation. While the heterogeneous ones perform better today, molecular catalysts based on transition metal complexes offer much greater tunability of electronic and

  11. Isolation and structure of a novel charged member of the red-pigment-concentrating hormone-adipokinetic hormone family of peptides isolated from the corpora cardiaca of the blowfly Phormia terraenovae (Diptera).

    PubMed

    Gäde, G; Wilps, H; Kellner, R

    1990-07-15

    A hypertrehalosaemic neuropeptide from the corpora cardiaca of the blowfly Phormia terraenovae has been isolated by reversed-phase h.p.l.c., and its primary structure was determined by pulsed-liquid phase sequencing employing Edman chemistry after enzymically deblocking the N-terminal pyroglutamate residue. The C-terminus was also blocked, as indicated by the lack of digestion when the peptide was incubated with carboxypeptidase A. The octapeptide has the sequence pGlu-Leu-Thr-Phe-Ser-Pro-Asp-Trp-NH2 and is clearly defined as a novel member of the RPCH/AKH (red-pigment-concentrating hormone/adipokinetic hormone) family of peptides. It is the first charged member of this family to be found. The synthetic peptide causes an increase in the haemolymph carbohydrate concentration in a dose-dependent fashion in blowflies and therefore is named 'Phormia terraenovae hypertrehalosaemic hormone' (Pht-HrTH). In addition, receptors in the fat-body of the American cockroach (Periplaneta americana) recognize the peptide, resulting in carbohydrate elevation in the blood. However, fat-body receptors of the migratory locust (Locusta migratoria) do not recognize this charged molecule, and thus no lipid mobilization is observed in this species. PMID:2386478

  12. Effect of H2 blockade and food on single-dose pharmacokinetics of GSK1322322, a peptide deformylase inhibitor antibacterial.

    PubMed

    Naderer, Odin J; Dumont, Etienne; Zhu, John; Kurtinecz, Milena; Jones, Lori S

    2013-06-01

    GSK1322322 is first in a new class of antibiotics, peptide deformylase inhibitors, and is active against multidrug-resistant respiratory and skin pathogens. Part 1 of this phase 1, randomized, single-dose (1,000 mg) study in 20 healthy volunteers compared the relative bioavailability of three different tablet formulations of GSK1322322 (fast release, intermediate release, and slow release) to that of the previously studied powder-in-bottle formulation to assess the optimal formulation for progression into clinical trials. Part 2 assessed the effect of a high-fat meal and drug interaction with an H2 blocker and an H2 blocker plus vitamin C on the pharmacokinetic profile of GSK1322322. Of the three tablet formulations, fast-release GSK1322322 provided pharmacokinetic profiles similar to those of the powder-in-bottle reference formulation (~93% relative bioavailability) and was selected for progression in part 2. When GSK1322322 was administered with a high-fat meal, the maximum observed plasma concentration (C(max)) was reduced by 20%, and the time to maximum plasma concentration (T(max)) was delayed by 1.9 h. The exposure (area under the concentration-time curve [AUC]) increased by ~20% compared to that in volunteers in the fasted state. Coadministration of GSK1322322 with an H2 blocker resulted in a slight delay in absorption (T(max) ~0.75 h later) and 58 and 38% decreases in the C(max) and AUC0-∞ values, respectively, compared to GSK1322322 alone. This effect was reversed with vitamin C intake (i.e., no delay in T(max) and the C(max) and AUC0-∞ values decreased by only 21 and 12%, respectively). GSK1322322 was generally well tolerated, and most adverse events were mild in intensity during both parts of the study. PMID:23529727

  13. Structural and Functional Characterization of a Single-chain Peptide-MHC Molecule that Modulates both Naive and Activated CD8plus T Cells

    SciTech Connect

    D Samanta; G Mukherjee; U Ramagopal; R Chaparro; S Nathenson; T DiLorenzo; S Almo

    2011-12-31

    Peptide-MHC (pMHC) multimers, in addition to being tools for tracking and quantifying antigen-specific T cells, can mediate downstream signaling after T-cell receptor engagement. In the absence of costimulation, this can lead to anergy or apoptosis of cognate T cells, a property that could be exploited in the setting of autoimmune disease. Most studies with class I pMHC multimers used noncovalently linked peptides, which can allow unwanted CD8{sup +} T-cell activation as a result of peptide transfer to cellular MHC molecules. To circumvent this problem, and given the role of self-reactive CD8{sup +} T cells in the development of type 1 diabetes, we designed a single-chain pMHC complex (scK{sup d}.IGRP) by using the class I MHC molecule H-2K{sup d} and a covalently linked peptide derived from islet-specific glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunit-related protein (IGRP{sub 206-214}), a well established autoantigen in NOD mice. X-ray diffraction studies revealed that the peptide is presented in the groove of the MHC molecule in canonical fashion, and it was also demonstrated that scK{sup d}.IGRP tetramers bound specifically to cognate CD8{sup +} T cells. Tetramer binding induced death of naive T cells and in vitro- and in vivo-differentiated cytotoxic T lymphocytes, and tetramer-treated cytotoxic T lymphocytes showed a diminished IFN-{gamma} response to antigen stimulation. Tetramer accessibility to disease-relevant T cells in vivo was also demonstrated. Our study suggests the potential of single-chain pMHC tetramers as possible therapeutic agents in autoimmune disease. Their ability to affect the fate of naive and activated CD8{sup +} T cells makes them a potential intervention strategy in early and late stages of disease.

  14. High-Resolution Size-Discrimination of Single Nonionic Synthetic Polymers with a Highly Charged Biological Nanopore.

    PubMed

    Baaken, Gerhard; Halimeh, Ibrahim; Bacri, Laurent; Pelta, Juan; Oukhaled, Abdelghani; Behrends, Jan C

    2015-06-23

    Electrophysiological studies of the interaction of polymers with pores formed by bacterial toxins (1) provide a window on single molecule interaction with proteins in real time, (2) report on the behavior of macromolecules in confinement, and (3) enable label-free single molecule sensing. Using pores formed by the staphylococcal toxin α-hemolysin (aHL), a particularly pertinent observation was that, under high salt conditions (3-4 M KCl), the current through the pore is blocked for periods of hundreds of microseconds to milliseconds by poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) oligomers (degree of polymerization approximately 10-60). Notably, this block showed monomeric sensitivity on the degree of polymerization of individual oligomers, allowing the construction of size or mass spectra from the residual current values. Here, we show that the current through the pore formed by aerolysin (AeL) from Aeromonas hydrophila is also blocked by PEG but with drastic differences in the voltage-dependence of the interaction. In contrast to aHL, AeL strongly binds PEG at high transmembrane voltages. This fact, which is likely related to AeL's highly charged pore wall, allows discrimination of polymer sizes with particularly high resolution. Multiple applications are now conceivable with this pore to screen various nonionic or charged polymers. PMID:26028280

  15. Real-Time Trapping of Intact Singly-Charged Bovine Serum Albumin Proteins with a Big Frequency-Adjusted Quadrupole

    SciTech Connect

    Koizumi, Hideya; Whitten, William B; Reilly, Pete

    2008-01-01

    High-resolution real-time particle mass measurements have not been achievable because the enormous amount of kinetic energy imparted to the particles upon expansion into vacuum competes with and overwhelms the forces applied to the charged particles within the mass spectrometer. It is possible to reduce the kinetic energy of a collimated particulate ion beam through collisions with a buffer gas while radially constraining their motion using a quadrupole guide or trap over a limited mass range. Controlling the pressure drop of the final expansion into a quadrupole trap permits a much broader mass range at the cost of sacrificing collimation. To achieve high-resolution mass analysis of massive particulate ions, an efficient trap with a large tolerance for radial divergence of the injected ions was developed that permits trapping a large range of ions for on-demand injection into an awaiting mass analyzer. The design specifications required that frequency of the trapping potential be adjustable to cover a large mass range and the trap radius be increased to increase the tolerance to divergent ion injection. The large-radius linear quadrupole ion trap was demonstrated by trapping singly-charged bovine serum albumin ions for on-demand injection into a mass analyzer. Additionally, this work demonstrates the ability to measure an electrophoretic mobility cross section (or ion mobility) of singly-charged intact proteins in the low-pressure regime. This work represents a large step toward the goal of high-resolution analysis of intact proteins, RNA, DNA, and viruses.

  16. Negative Ion MALDI Mass Spectrometry of Polyoxometalates (POMs): Mechanism of Singly Charged Anion Formation and Chemical Properties Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulicault, Jean E.; Alves, Sandra; Cole, Richard B.

    2016-08-01

    MALDI-MS has been developed for the negative ion mode analysis of polyoxometalates (POMs). Matrix optimization was performed using a variety of matrix compounds. A first group of matrixes offers MALDI mass spectra containing abundant intact singly charged anionic adduct ions, as well as abundant in-source fragmentations at elevated laser powers. A relative ranking of the ability to induce POM fragmentation is found to be: DAN > CHCA > CNA > DIT> HABA > DCTB > IAA. Matrixes of a second group provide poorer quality MALDI mass spectra without observable fragments. Sample preparation, including the testing of salt additives, was performed to optimize signals for a model POM, POMc12, the core structure of which bears four negative charges. The matrix 9-cyanoanthracene (CNA) provided the best signals corresponding to singly charged intact POMc12 anions. Decompositions of these intact anionic species were examined in detail, and it was concluded that hydrogen radical-induced mechanisms were not prevalent, but rather that the observed prompt fragments originate from transferred energy derived from initial electronic excitation of the CNA matrix. Moreover, in obtained MALDI mass spectra, clear evidence of electron transfer to analyte POM species was found: a manifestation of the POMs ability to readily capture electrons. The affinity of polyanionic POMc12 toward a variety of cations was evaluated and the following affinity ranking was established: Fe3+ > Al3+ > Li+ > Ga3+ > Co2+ > Cr3+ > Cu2+ > [Mn2+, Mg2+] > [Na+, K+]. Thus, from the available cationic species, specific adducts are preferentially formed, and evidence is given that these higher affinity POM complexes are formed in the gas phase during the early stages of plume expansion.

  17. Negative Ion MALDI Mass Spectrometry of Polyoxometalates (POMs): Mechanism of Singly Charged Anion Formation and Chemical Properties Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Boulicault, Jean E; Alves, Sandra; Cole, Richard B

    2016-08-01

    MALDI-MS has been developed for the negative ion mode analysis of polyoxometalates (POMs). Matrix optimization was performed using a variety of matrix compounds. A first group of matrixes offers MALDI mass spectra containing abundant intact singly charged anionic adduct ions, as well as abundant in-source fragmentations at elevated laser powers. A relative ranking of the ability to induce POM fragmentation is found to be: DAN > CHCA > CNA > DIT> HABA > DCTB > IAA. Matrixes of a second group provide poorer quality MALDI mass spectra without observable fragments. Sample preparation, including the testing of salt additives, was performed to optimize signals for a model POM, POMc12, the core structure of which bears four negative charges. The matrix 9-cyanoanthracene (CNA) provided the best signals corresponding to singly charged intact POMc12 anions. Decompositions of these intact anionic species were examined in detail, and it was concluded that hydrogen radical-induced mechanisms were not prevalent, but rather that the observed prompt fragments originate from transferred energy derived from initial electronic excitation of the CNA matrix. Moreover, in obtained MALDI mass spectra, clear evidence of electron transfer to analyte POM species was found: a manifestation of the POMs ability to readily capture electrons. The affinity of polyanionic POMc12 toward a variety of cations was evaluated and the following affinity ranking was established: Fe(3+) > Al(3+) > Li(+) > Ga(3+) > Co(2+) > Cr(3+) > Cu(2+) > [Mn(2+), Mg(2+)] > [Na(+), K(+)]. Thus, from the available cationic species, specific adducts are preferentially formed, and evidence is given that these higher affinity POM complexes are formed in the gas phase during the early stages of plume expansion. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27142457

  18. Inelastic Scattering and Single and Double Charge Exchange Reactions Within the A=27 Isobaric Multiplet.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinzie, Matthew Gordon

    1995-01-01

    Angular distributions for the reactions ^{27}Al, ^{28 }Si(pi^{+/- },pi^{+/-} ) at T_pi = 180 MeV and an excitation function at theta_ {rm lab.} = 5^{ rm o} for the reaction ^{27}Al(pi^{+}, pi^{-})^{27}P were measured using the Energetic Pion Channel and Spectrometer at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility in Los Alamos, New Mexico. Angular distributions for the reaction ^{27}Al(n,p)^ {27}Mg were measured at T_ {rm N} = 198 MeV using the Medium Resolution Spectrometer at Canada's Tri-University Meson Facility in Vancouver, British Columbia. Multipole matrix elements were extracted in a macroscopic manner from the pion inelastic angular distributions using the distorted-wave impulse approximation and collective -model transition densities. Microscopic calculations of these extracted matrix elements and of the pion angular distributions were examined. Double charge exchange (DCX) excitation functions to the ^{27}P ground state and an excited state were measured at nine incident pion energies from T_pi = 100 to 293.4 MeV. The systematics of DCX excitation functions to low-lying states is reviewed in light of these data. Microscopic calculations of DCX for and near A = 27 are investigated. Double giant resonances in ^{27}P were observed at the three highest energies. The (n,p) charge exchange angular distributions were obtained for theta_{rm lab.} = 0^circ, 4^circ, 8^ circ, 12^circ, 18^circ and 24^ circ. The Gamow-Teller strength distribution was measured and compared to a microscopic calculation. The constant of proportionality between reduced transition probability and cross section (the unit cross section) was generalized and examined for configuration dependence. Data for higher spin-multipole isovector excitations are presented, including low-lying spin-isospin E2 strength and negative -parity giant resonances.

  19. Identification of HLA-A24-binding peptides of Mycobacterium tuberculosis derived proteins with beta 2m linked HLA-A24 single chain expressing cells.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jie; Wang, Yan; Cheng, Tingting; Chen, Xiaowei; Gao, Bin

    2010-01-01

    Tuberculosis is caused by an intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and poses a persistent threat to global health. MHC class I-restricted CD8 cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are essential for protective immunity to Tuberculosis. Information for CTL epitopes derived from Mtb is desirable for vaccine design and assessment of T cell responses. However, the knowledge about CTL epitopes of Mtb, particularly those non-A2 HLA alleles restricted is rare. In this study, beta-2-microglobulin (beta 2m, beta(2)m) linked HLA-A24 single chain was expressed on RMA-S cell line defective in the endogenous antigen processing and applied for screening of peptides which could stabilize the HLA-A24 complex on the cell surface. From a group of peptides predicted as binders by a computer algorithm, five peptides were shown to bind to HLA-A24 protein on the cell surface. As comparison we have also identified a dozen Mtb proteins derived peptides that bind to HLA-A2 specifically. The cell line and HLA binders present here would be useful for further identification of CD8 restricted Mtb epitopes.

  20. Charge-Insensitive Single-Atom Spin-Orbit Qubit in Silicon.

    PubMed

    Salfi, Joe; Mol, Jan A; Culcer, Dimitrie; Rogge, Sven

    2016-06-17

    High fidelity entanglement of an on-chip array of spin qubits poses many challenges. Spin-orbit coupling (SOC) can ease some of these challenges by enabling long-ranged entanglement via electric dipole-dipole interactions, microwave photons, or phonons. However, SOC exposes conventional spin qubits to decoherence from electrical noise. Here, we propose an acceptor-based spin-orbit qubit in silicon offering long-range entanglement at a sweet spot where the qubit is protected from electrical noise. The qubit relies on quadrupolar SOC with the interface and gate potentials. As required for surface codes, 10^{5} electrically mediated single-qubit and 10^{4} dipole-dipole mediated two-qubit gates are possible in the predicted spin lifetime. Moreover, circuit quantum electrodynamics with single spins is feasible, including dispersive readout, cavity-mediated entanglement, and spin-photon entanglement. An industrially relevant silicon-based platform is employed. PMID:27367400

  1. Charge-Insensitive Single-Atom Spin-Orbit Qubit in Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salfi, Joe; Mol, Jan A.; Culcer, Dimitrie; Rogge, Sven

    2016-06-01

    High fidelity entanglement of an on-chip array of spin qubits poses many challenges. Spin-orbit coupling (SOC) can ease some of these challenges by enabling long-ranged entanglement via electric dipole-dipole interactions, microwave photons, or phonons. However, SOC exposes conventional spin qubits to decoherence from electrical noise. Here, we propose an acceptor-based spin-orbit qubit in silicon offering long-range entanglement at a sweet spot where the qubit is protected from electrical noise. The qubit relies on quadrupolar SOC with the interface and gate potentials. As required for surface codes, 105 electrically mediated single-qubit and 104 dipole-dipole mediated two-qubit gates are possible in the predicted spin lifetime. Moreover, circuit quantum electrodynamics with single spins is feasible, including dispersive readout, cavity-mediated entanglement, and spin-photon entanglement. An industrially relevant silicon-based platform is employed.

  2. Gradual improvements of charge carrier mobility at ionic liquid/rubrene single crystal interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokota, Yasuyuki; Hara, Hisaya; Morino, Yusuke; Bando, Ken-ichi; Ono, Sakurako; Imanishi, Akihito; Okada, Yugo; Matsui, Hiroyuki; Uemura, Takafumi; Takeya, Jun; Fukui, Ken-ichi

    2016-02-01

    We report evolution of electric characteristics of an electric double layer field-effect transistor based on the ionic liquid/rubrene single crystal interfaces. In contrast to usual devices, the field effect mobility was found to gradually increase with time for a day, followed by minor long-term fluctuations. Although the details of the evolution were somewhat device dependent, the final values of the mobility turned out to be 3-4 times larger irrespective of the initial values. These observations are explained by the evolution of the flat interface by defect-induced spontaneous dissolution of rubrene molecules at the ionic liquid/rubrene single crystal interfaces, revealed by frequency modulation atomic force microscopy.

  3. Controlling charge balance and exciton recombination by bipolar host in single-layer organic light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Xianfeng; Tao, Youtian; Wang, Qiang; Ma, Dongge; Yang, Chuluo; Wang, Lixiang; Qin, Jingui; Wang, Fosong

    2010-08-01

    Highly efficient single-layer organic light-emitting diodes with reduced efficiency roll-off are demonstrated by using a bipolar host material of 2,5-bis(2-(9H-carbazol-9-yl)phenyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazole (o-CzOXD) doped with iridium complexes as the emissive layer. For example, the green single-layer device, employing fac-tris(2-phenylpyridine)iridium Ir(ppy)3 as dopant, shows a peak current efficiency of 45.57 cd A-1, corresponding to external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 12.42%, and still exhibits efficiencies of 45.26 cd A-1 and 40.42 cd A-1 at luminance of 1000 and 10 000 cd m-2, respectively. In addition, the yellow and red single-layer devices, with bis(2-(9,9- diethyl-9H-fluoren-2-yl)-1-phenyl-1H-benzoimidazol-N ,C3)iridium(acetylacetonate) (fbi)2Ir(acac) and bis(1-phenylisoquinolinolato-C2,N)iridium(acetylacetonate) (piq)2Ir(acac) as emitter, also show high EQE of 7.04% and 7.28%, respectively. The transport properties of o-CzOXD film are well investigated by current-voltage measurement, from which both hole and electron mobility are determined. It is found that the o-CzOXD shows appealing bipolar transport character, which is favor for the balanced charge distribution in the whole doped zone. More importantly, the multifunctional role of hole trapping and electron transporting of the iridium complex in o-CzOXD further balances the charge carriers and broadens the recombination zone. As a result, the recombination of electrons and holes is significantly improved and the triplet-triplet annihilation and triplet-polaron quenching processes are effectively suppressed, eventually leading to the high efficiency as well as the reduced efficiency roll-off.

  4. Long-range charge transport in single G-quadruplex DNA molecules.

    PubMed

    Livshits, Gideon I; Stern, Avigail; Rotem, Dvir; Borovok, Natalia; Eidelshtein, Gennady; Migliore, Agostino; Penzo, Erika; Wind, Shalom J; Di Felice, Rosa; Skourtis, Spiros S; Cuevas, Juan Carlos; Gurevich, Leonid; Kotlyar, Alexander B; Porath, Danny

    2014-12-01

    DNA and DNA-based polymers are of interest in molecular electronics because of their versatile and programmable structures. However, transport measurements have produced a range of seemingly contradictory results due to differences in the measured molecules and experimental set-ups, and transporting significant current through individual DNA-based molecules remains a considerable challenge. Here, we report reproducible charge transport in guanine-quadruplex (G4) DNA molecules adsorbed on a mica substrate. Currents ranging from tens of picoamperes to more than 100 pA were measured in the G4-DNA over distances ranging from tens of nanometres to more than 100 nm. Our experimental results, combined with theoretical modelling, suggest that transport occurs via a thermally activated long-range hopping between multi-tetrad segments of DNA. These results could re-ignite interest in DNA-based wires and devices, and in the use of such systems in the development of programmable circuits. PMID:25344689

  5. Moving Away from the Reference Genome: Evaluating a Peptide Sequencing Tagging Approach for Single Amino Acid Polymorphism Identifications in the Genus Populus

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, Paul E; Adams, Rachel M; Tuskan, Gerald A; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L

    2013-01-01

    The genetic diversity across natural populations of the model organism, Populus, is extensive, containing a single nucleotide polymorphism roughly every 200 base pairs. When deviations from the reference genome occur in coding regions, they can impact protein sequences. Rather than relying on a static reference database to profile protein expression, we employed a peptide sequence tagging (PST) approach capable of decoding the plasticity of the Populus proteome. Using shotgun proteomics data from two genotypes of P. trichocarpa, a tag-based approach enabled the detection of 6,653 unexpected sequence variants. Through manual validation, our study investigated how the most abundant chemical modification (methionine oxidation) could masquerade as a sequence variant (AlaSer) when few site-determining ions existed. In fact, precise localization of an oxidation site for peptides with more than one potential placement was indeterminate for 70% of the MS/MS spectra. We demonstrate that additional fragment ions made available by high energy collisional dissociation enhances the robustness of the peptide sequence tagging approach (81% of oxidation events could be exclusively localized to a methionine). We are confident that augmenting fragmentation processes for a PST approach will further improve the identification of single amino acid polymorphism in Populus and potentially other species as well.

  6. Possibility of measuring Adler angles in charged current single pion neutrino-nucleus interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, F.

    2016-05-01

    Uncertainties in modeling neutrino-nucleus interactions are a major contribution to systematic errors in long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments. Accurate modeling of neutrino interactions requires additional experimental observables such as the Adler angles which carry information about the polarization of the Δ resonance and the interference with nonresonant single pion production. The Adler angles were measured with limited statistics in bubble chamber neutrino experiments as well as in electron-proton scattering experiments. We discuss the viability of measuring these angles in neutrino interactions with nuclei.

  7. Charge-collection efficiency of single-crystal CVD diamond detector for low-energy charged particles with energies ranging from 100 keV to 2 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Yuki; Murakami, Hiroyuki; Shimaoka, Takehiro; Tsubota, Masakatsu; Kaneko, Junichi H.

    2016-10-01

    The performance of a diamond detector created from a single-crystal diamond grown by chemical vapor deposition was studied for application in detecting charged particles having energies ranging from 100 keV to 2 MeV. Energy peaks of different low-energy ions were clearly observed. However, we observed that the pulse height for individual incident ions decreases with increasing atomic number of the ions. We estimated the charge collection efficiency of the generated charge carriers by the incident charged particles. The charge collection efficiencies are 97.0 ± 0.7% for 2 MeV helium-ions (He+). On the other hand, compared with that of He+, silicon-ions (Si+) and gold-ions (Au3+) show low charge collection efficiency: 70.6 ± 2.2% and 29.5 ± 4.2% for 2 MeV-Si+ and 2 MeV-Au3+, respectively. We also found that the charge collection efficiency decreases as the generated charge density inside the diamond crystal increases.

  8. Controllable electrostatic surface guide for cold molecules with a single charged wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Zhenxing; Guo, Chaoxiu; Hou, Shunyong; Li, Shengqiang; Deng, Lianzhong; Yin, Jianping

    2013-05-01

    We demonstrate a controllable highly efficient electrostatic surface guide for ND3 molecules in the weak-field-seeking states on a ceramic substrate over a distance of 840 mm, and study the dependences of the relative molecule number (or the overall transmission efficiency) of our single-wire guide and the guiding-center positions on the guiding voltages, both experimentally and theoretically. Our study shows that the guiding-center position and the number of the guided molecules can be easily controlled by adjusting the guiding voltages, and find that an overall transmission efficiency of higher than 50% in a single quantum state can be obtained. Our experimental results are consistent with ones of Monte Carlo simulations. Also, we discuss the transverse velocity filtering effect and the acceptance of the guided molecules in four-dimensional phase space. Both the transmission efficiency and the acceptance in two-dimensional position space are higher than that in our previous two-wire guide [Y. Xia, Y. Yin, H. Chen, L. Deng, and J. Yin, Phys. Rev. Lett.0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.100.043003 100, 043003 (2008)].

  9. Gas-Phase Synthesis of Singly and Multiply Charged Polyoxovanadate Anions Employing Electrospray Ionization and Collision Induced Dissociation

    SciTech Connect

    Al Hasan, Naila M.; Johnson, Grant E.; Laskin, Julia

    2013-07-02

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) combined with in-source fragmentation and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) experiments were used to generate a wide range of singly and multiply charged vanadium oxide cluster anions including VxOy n– and VxOyCln– ions (x = 1–14, y = 2–36, n = 1–3), protonated clusters, and ligand-bound polyoxovanadate anions. The cluster anions were produced by electrospraying a solution of tetradecavanadate, V14O36Cl(L)5 (L = Et4N+, tetraethylammonium), in acetonitrile. Under mild source conditions, ESI-MS generates a distribution of doubly and triply charged VxOyCln– and VxOyCl(L)(n–1)– clusters predominantly containing 14 vanadium atoms as well as their protonated analogs. Accurate mass measurement using a high-resolution LTQ/Orbitrap mass spectrometer (m/Δm = 60,000 at m/z 410) enabled unambiguous assignment of the elemental composition of the majority of peaks in the ESI-MS spectrum. In addition, high-sensitivity mass spectrometry allowed the charge state of the cluster ions to be assigned based on the separation of the major from the much less abundant minor isotope of vanadium. In-source fragmentation resulted in facile formation of smaller VxOyCl(1–2)– and VxOy (1–2)– anions. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) experiments enabled systematic study of the gas-phase fragmentation pathways of the cluster anions originating from solution and from in-source CID. Surprisingly simple fragmentation patterns were obtained for all singly and doubly charged VxOyCl and VxOy species generated through multiple MS/MS experiments. In contrast, cluster anions originating directly from solution produced comparatively

  10. Kinetic energy release in thermal ion--molecule reactions: The Nb sup 2+ --(benzene) single charge--transfer reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gord, J.R.; Freiser, B.S. ); Buckner, S.W. )

    1991-03-15

    We have adapted the techniques originally developed to measure ion kinetic energies in ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) spectrometry to study the single charge--transfer reaction of Nb{sup 2+} with benzene under thermal conditions in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FTICRMS). The partitioning of reaction exothermicity among the internal and translational modes available is consistent with a long-distance electron-transfer mechanism, in which the reactants approach on an ion-induced dipole attractive potential and cross to a repulsive potential at a critical separation of {similar to}7.5 A when electron transfer occurs. The reaction exothermicity, 5.08 eV, is partitioned to translation of Nb{sup +} , 0.81{plus minus}0.25 eV, translation of C{sub 6} H{sub 6}{sup +}, 1.22{plus minus}0.25 eV, and internal excitation of C{sub 6} H{sub 6}{sup +} to produce the la{sub 2{ital u}} electronic state, which is {similar to}3 eV above the ground state of the ion. We have also studied the kinetics of the reaction of Nb{sup 2+} with benzene and determined the rate constant, {ital k} = 1.4{times}10{sup {minus}9} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}, and the efficiency, 0.60, of the process. These also support the proposed charge--transfer mechanism. In addition to the charge--transfer pathway, which accounts for 95% of the reaction products, Nb{sup 2+} is observed to dehydrogenate benzene to form Nb{sup 2+} (benzyne). This process implies {ital D}(Nb{sup 2+} --benzyne){ge}79 kcal/mol.

  11. Micron resolution of MÖNCH and GOTTHARD, small pitch charge integrating detectors with single photon sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartier, S.; Bergamaschi, A.; Dinapoli, R.; Greiffenberg, D.; Johnson, I.; Jungmann, J. H.; Mezza, D.; Mozzanica, A.; Schmitt, B.; Shi, X.; Stampanoni, M.; Sun, J.; Tinti, G.

    2014-05-01

    MÖNCH, a charge integrating readout ASIC (Application Specific Integrated Circuit) prototype with a pixel pitch of 25 μm developed at PSI, allows new imaging applications in the field of micron resolution and spectral imaging. The small pixel size of this system facilitates charge sharing between pixels, which then can be exploited to gain additional information about the photon absorption position and photon energy. However, for reconstructing complete images from this information, sufficient hits need to be recorded and therefore acquisition times are potentially long. We present a fast read-out system, that is capable of acquiring enough statistics for an image in a few hours in combination with a position reconstruction algorithm, which has the potential to run in a similar amount of time on a fast computing node. We further present results of experiments with a comparable strip detector (small-pitch GOTTHARD system) showing that with the aid of single photon interpolation algorithms micron resolution is achievable. Additionally, we show that a similar position reconstruction algorithm works in the two dimensional case for MÖNCH.

  12. Exciton Recombination, Energy-, and Charge Transfer in Single- and Multilayer Quantum-Dot Films on Silver Plasmonic Resonators

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Taeho; Cho, Kyung-Sang; Yun, Dong-Jin; Kim, Jinwoo; Li, Xiang-Shu; Moon, Eui-Seong; Baik, Chan-Wook; Il Kim, Sun; Kim, Miyoung; Choi, Jun Hee; Park, Gyeong-Su; Shin, Jai-Kwang; Hwang, Sungwoo; Jung, Tae-Sung

    2016-01-01

    We examine exciton recombination, energy-, and charge transfer in multilayer CdS/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) on silver plasmonic resonators using photoluminescence (PL) and excitation spectroscopy along with kinetic modeling and simulations. The exciton dynamics including all the processes are strongly affected by the separation distance between QDs and silver resonators, excitation wavelength, and QD film thickness. For a direct contact or very small distance, interfacial charge transfer and tunneling dominate over intrinsic radiative recombination and exciton energy transfer to surface plasmons (SPs), resulting in PL suppression. With increasing distance, however, tunneling diminishes dramatically, while long-range exciton-SP coupling takes place much faster (>6.5 ns) than intrinsic recombination (~200 ns) causing considerable PL enhancement. The exciton-SP coupling strength shows a strong dependence on excitation wavelengths, suggesting the state-specific dynamics of excitons and the down-conversion of surface plasmons involved. The overlayers as well as the bottom monolayer of QD multilayers exhibit significant PL enhancement mainly through long-range exciton-SP coupling. The overall emission behaviors from single- and multilayer QD films on silver resonators are described quantitatively by a photophysical kinetic model and simulations. The present experimental and simulation results provide important and useful design rules for QD-based light harvesting applications using the exciton-surface plasmon coupling. PMID:27184469

  13. Nanoscale Charge Percolation Analysis in Polymer-Sorted (7,5) Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Networks.

    PubMed

    Bottacchi, Francesca; Bottacchi, Stefano; Späth, Florian; Namal, Imge; Hertel, Tobias; Anthopoulos, Thomas D

    2016-08-01

    The current percolation in polymer-sorted semiconducting (7,5) single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) networks, processed from solution, is investigated using a combination of electrical field-effect measurements, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and conductive AFM (C-AFM) techniques. From AFM measurements, the nanotube length in the as-processed (7,5) SWNTs network is found to range from ≈100 to ≈1500 nm, with a SWNT surface density well above the percolation threshold and a maximum surface coverage ≈58%. Analysis of the field-effect charge transport measurements in the SWNT network using a 2D homogeneous random-network stick-percolation model yields an exponent coefficient for the transistors OFF currents of 16.3. This value is indicative of an almost ideal random network containing only a small concentration of metallic SWNTs. Complementary C-AFM measurements on the other hand enable visualization of current percolation pathways in the xy plane and reveal the isotropic nature of the as-spun (7,5) SWNT networks. This work demonstrates the tremendous potential of combining advanced scanning probe techniques with field-effect charge transport measurements for quantification of key network parameters including current percolation, metallic nanotubes content, surface coverage, and degree of SWNT alignment. Most importantly, the proposed approach is general and applicable to other nanoscale networks, including metallic nanowires as well as hybrid nanocomposites. PMID:27375031

  14. Spin and charge modulations in a single-hole-doped Hubbard ladder: Verification with optical lattice experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zheng; Weng, Zheng-Yu; Ho, Tin-Lun

    2016-03-01

    We show that pronounced modulations in spin and charge densities can be induced by the insertion of a single hole in an otherwise half-filled two-leg Hubbard ladder. Accompanied with these modulations is a loosely bound structure of the doped charge with a spin-1/2, in contrast to the tightly bound case where such modulations are absent. These behaviors are caused by the interference of the Berry phases associated with a string of flipped spins (or "phase strings") left behind as a hole travels through a spin bath with a short-range antiferromagnetic order. The key role of the phase strings is also reflected in how the system responds to increasing spin polarization and the on-site repulsion, addition of a second hole, and increasing asymmetry between intra- and interchain hopping. Remarkably, all these properties persist down to ladders as short as ˜10 sites, as the smoking gun of the phase-string effect. They can therefore be studied in cold-atom experiments using the recently developed fermion microscope.

  15. Bond-length alternation and charge transfer in a linear carbon chain encapsulated within a single-walled carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusznyák, Á.; Zólyomi, V.; Kürti, J.; Yang, S.; Kertesz, M.

    2005-10-01

    The physical properties of a linear carbon chain encapsulated within single-walled carbon nanotubes are investigated with density-functional theory using periodic boundary conditions. The dominant feature of an isolated carbon chain is the Peierls dimerization and the opening of a Peierls gap. The two weakly interacting subsystems (infinite carbon chain and nanotube) establish a common Fermi level, resulting in charge transfer (CT) which leads to a metallic combined system with a high density of states at the Fermi level. The rigid band model provides useful insights. Unusual physics arises from the effects of CT and chain-tube orbital hybridization which both tend to suppress the Peierls dimerization. Implications for the observed Raman spectrum of the chain-nanotube system are discussed.

  16. Charge density wave order in 1D mirror twin boundaries of single-layer MoSe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barja, Sara; Wickenburg, Sebastian; Liu, Zhen-Fei; Zhang, Yi; Ryu, Hyejin; Ugeda, Miguel M.; Hussain, Zahid; Shen, Zhi-Xun; Mo, Sung-Kwan; Wong, Ed; Salmeron, Miquel B.; Wang, Feng; Crommie, Michael F.; Ogletree, D. Frank; Neaton, Jeffrey B.; Weber-Bargioni, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    We provide direct evidence for the existence of isolated, one-dimensional charge density waves at mirror twin boundaries (MTBs) of single-layer semiconducting MoSe2. Such MTBs have been previously observed by transmission electron microscopy and have been predicted to be metallic in MoSe2 and MoS2. Our low-temperature scanning tunnelling microscopy/spectroscopy measurements revealed a substantial bandgap of 100 meV opening at the Fermi energy in the otherwise metallic one-dimensional structures. We found a periodic modulation in the density of states along the MTB, with a wavelength of approximately three lattice constants. In addition to mapping the energy-dependent density of states, we determined the atomic structure and bonding of the MTB through simultaneous high-resolution non-contact atomic force microscopy. Density functional theory calculations based on the observed structure reproduced both the gap opening and the spatially resolved density of states.

  17. ORBXYZ: a 3D single-particle orbit code for following charged-particle trajectories in equilibrium magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.V.; Cohen, R.H.; Ferguson, J.R.; Johnston, B.M.; Sharp, C.B.; Willmann, P.A.

    1981-06-30

    The single particle orbit code, TIBRO, has been modified extensively to improve the interpolation methods used and to allow use of vector potential fields in the simulation of charged particle orbits on a 3D domain. A 3D cubic B-spline algorithm is used to generate spline coefficients used in the interpolation. Smooth and accurate field representations are obtained. When vector potential fields are used, the 3D cubic spline interpolation formula analytically generates the magnetic field used to push the particles. This field has del.BETA = 0 to computer roundoff. When magnetic induction is used the interpolation allows del.BETA does not equal 0, which can lead to significant nonphysical results. Presently the code assumes quadrupole symmetry, but this is not an essential feature of the code and could be easily removed for other applications. Many details pertaining to this code are given on microfiche accompanying this report.

  18. Bond Dissociation Energies of the Tungsten Fluorides and Their Singly-Charged Ions: A Density Functional Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyall, Kenneth G.; Arnold, James (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The dissociation of WF6 and the related singly-charged cations and anions into the lower fluorides and fluorine atoms has been investigated theoretically using density functional theory (B3LYP) and relativistic effective core potentials, with estimates of spin-orbit effects included using a simple model. The inclusion of spin-orbit is essential for a correct description of the thermochemistry. The total atomization energy of the neutral and anionic WF6 is reproduced to within 25 kcal/mol, but comparison of individual bond dissociation energies with available experimental data shows discrepancies of up to 10 kcal/mol. The results are nevertheless useful to help resolve discrepancies in experimental data and provide estimates of missing data.

  19. Probing single- to multi-cell level charge transport in Geobacter sulfurreducens DL-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiaocheng; Hu, Jinsong; Petersen, Emily R.; Fitzgerald, Lisa A.; Jackan, Charles S.; Lieber, Alexander M.; Ringeisen, Bradley R.; Lieber, Charles M.; Biffinger, Justin C.

    2013-11-01

    Microbial fuel cells, in which living microorganisms convert chemical energy into electricity, represent a potentially sustainable energy technology for the future. Here we report the single-bacterium level current measurements of Geobacter sulfurreducens DL-1 to elucidate the fundamental limits and factors determining maximum power output from a microbial fuel cell. Quantized stepwise current outputs of 92(±33) and 196(±20) fA are generated from microelectrode arrays confined in isolated wells. Simultaneous cell imaging/tracking and current recording reveals that the current steps are directly correlated with the contact of one or two cells with the electrodes. This work establishes the amount of current generated by an individual Geobacter cell in the absence of a biofilm and highlights the potential upper limit of microbial fuel cell performance for Geobacter in thin biofilms.

  20. Single peptide and anti-idiotype based immunizations can broaden the antibody response against the variable V3 domain of HIV-1 in mice.

    PubMed

    Boudet, F; Keller, H; Kieny, M P; Thèze, J

    1995-05-01

    The third variable (V3) domain of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) external envelope glycoprotein gp120 is a major target of neutralizing antibodies in infected persons and in experimental immunized animals. Given the high degree of sequence variability of V3, the humoral response toward this region is very type-specific. In the present study, we evaluated the potential of a single peptide and an anti-idiotypic antibody to broaden the anti-V3 antibody specificity in BALB/c mice. We show that a synthetic peptide derived from the V3 determinant of HIV-1 MN isolate (V3MN), when used as an immunogen, was able to induce an antibody response to multiple (up to six) HIV-1 strains. The extent of this cross-reactivity, which tended to enlarge as the injections increased, appeared to be inversely correlated with the binding affinity to V3MN peptide. These data thus present evidence that, despite its great sequence heterogeneity, the V3 loop encompasses conserved amino-acid positions and/or stretches which may be less immunogenic than their variable counterparts. We additionally demonstrate that a rabbit anti-idiotype (Ab2), recognizing a binding site related idiotype on a V3-specific mouse monoclonal antibody (Ab1), could mount a broadened humoral response (Ab3) in mice. Unlike nominal antibody Ab1 which strictly reacted with the European HIV-1 LAI isolate, elicited Ab3 recognized the two divergent HIV-1 strains SF2 and 1286, originating respectively from North America and Central Africa, in addition to LAI. The reasons accounting for this Ab2-induced enlargement of the V3 antibody response are discussed. Our findings suggest that single peptide and anti-idiotype based immunizations may provide viable approaches to overcome, at least in part, HIV epitope variability. PMID:7783749

  1. Predominant Occupation of the Class I MHC Molecule H-2Kwm7 with a Single Self-peptide Suggests a Mechanism for its Diabetes-protective Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Brims, D.; Qian, J; Jarchum, I; Mikesh, L; Palmieri, E; Ramagopal, U; Malashkevich, V; Chaparro, R; Lund, T; et. al.

    2010-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease characterized by T cell-mediated destruction of insulin-producing pancreatic {beta} cells. In both humans and the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model of T1D, class II MHC alleles are the primary determinant of disease susceptibility. However, class I MHC genes also influence risk. These findings are consistent with the requirement for both CD{sup 4+} and CD{sup 8+} T cells in the pathogenesis of T1D. Although a large body of work has permitted the identification of multiple mechanisms to explain the diabetes-protective effect of particular class II MHC alleles, studies examining the protective influence of class I alleles are lacking. Here, we explored this question by performing biochemical and structural analyses of the murine class I MHC molecule H-2K{sup wm7}, which exerts a diabetes-protective effect in NOD mice. We have found that H-2K{sup wm7} molecules are predominantly occupied by the single self-peptide VNDIFERI, derived from the ubiquitous protein histone H2B. This unexpected finding suggests that the inability of H-2K{sup wm7} to support T1D development could be due, at least in part, to the failure of peptides from critical {beta}-cell antigens to adequately compete for binding and be presented to T cells. Predominant presentation of a single peptide would also be expected to influence T-cell selection, potentially leading to a reduced ability to select a diabetogenic CD{sup 8+} T-cell repertoire. The report that one of the predominant peptides bound by T1D-protective HLA-A*31 is histone derived suggests the potential translation of our findings to human diabetes-protective class I MHC molecules.

  2. Experimental and theoretical studies of the He(2+)-He system - Differential cross sections for direct, single-, and double-charge-transfer scattering at keV energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, R. S.; Dutta, C. M.; Lane, N. F.; Smith, K. A.; Stebbings, R. F.; Kimura, M.

    1992-01-01

    Measurements and calculations of differential cross sections for direct scattering, single-charge transfer, and double-charge transfer in collisions of 1.5-, 2.0-, 6.0-, and 10.0-keV (He-3)2+ with an He-4 target are reported. The measurements cover laboratory scattering angles below 1.5 deg with an angular resolution of about 0.03 deg. A quantum-mechanical molecular-state representation is employed in the calculations; in the case of single-charge transfer a two-state close-coupling calculation is carried out taking into account electron-translation effects. The theoretical calculations agree well with the experimental results for direct scattering and double-charge transfer. The present calculation identifies the origins of oscillatory structures observed in the differential cross sections.

  3. Synthetic surfactant containing SP-B and SP-C mimics is superior to single-peptide formulations in rabbits with chemical acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Juviel, José M.; Gordon, Larry M.; Waring, Alan J.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Chemical spills are on the rise and inhalation of toxic chemicals may induce chemical acute lung injury (ALI)/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Although the pathophysiology of ALI/ARDS is well understood, the absence of specific antidotes has limited the effectiveness of therapeutic interventions. Objectives. Surfactant inactivation and formation of free radicals are important pathways in (chemical) ALI. We tested the potential of lipid mixtures with advanced surfactant protein B and C (SP-B and C) mimics to improve oxygenation and lung compliance in rabbits with lavage- and chemical-induced ALI/ARDS. Methods. Ventilated young adult rabbits underwent repeated saline lung lavages or underwent intratracheal instillation of hydrochloric acid to induce ALI/ARDS. After establishment of respiratory failure rabbits were treated with a single intratracheal dose of 100 mg/kg of synthetic surfactant composed of 3% Super Mini-B (S-MB), a SP-B mimic, and/or SP-C33 UCLA, a SP-C mimic, in a lipid mixture (DPPC:POPC:POPG 5:3:2 by weight), the clinical surfactant Infasurf®, a bovine lung lavage extract with SP-B and C, or synthetic lipids alone. End-points consisted of arterial oxygenation, dynamic lung compliance, and protein and lipid content in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Potential mechanism of surfactant action for S-MB and SP-C33 UCLA were investigated with captive bubble surfactometry (CBS) assays. Results. All three surfactant peptide/lipid mixtures and Infasurf equally lowered the minimum surface tension on CBS, and also improved oxygenation and lung compliance. In both animal models, the two-peptide synthetic surfactant with S-MB and SP-C33 UCLA led to better arterial oxygenation and lung compliance than single peptide synthetic surfactants and Infasurf. Synthetic surfactants and Infasurf improved lung function further in lavage- than in chemical-induced respiratory failure, with the difference probably due to greater capillary-alveolar protein

  4. Four-body corrected first Born approximation for single charge exchange at high impact energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mančev, Ivan

    1995-06-01

    Single electron capture is investigated by means of the four-body boundary corrected first Born approximation (CB1-4B). The "post" form of the transition amplitude for a general heteronuclear case (Zp; e1) + (ZT; e2) → (Zp; e1, e2) + ZT is derived in the form of readily obtainable two-dimensional real integrals. We investigate the sensitivity of the total cross sections to the choice of ground state wave function for helium-like atoms. Also, the influence of non-captured electron on the final results is studied. As an illustration, the CB1-4B method is used to compute the total cross sections for reactions: H(1s) + H(1s) → H-(1s2) + H+, He+(1s) + H(1s) → He(1s2) + H+ and He+(1s) + He+(1s) → He(1s2) + α. The theoretical cross sections are found to be in good agreement with the available experimental data.

  5. Single and multiple doping effects on charge transport in zigzag silicene nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Wang, Xue-Feng; Vasilopoulos, Panagiotis; Chen, An-Bang; Wu, Jian-Chun

    2014-09-15

    A non-equilibrium Green's function technique combined with density functional theory is used to study the spin-dependent electronic band structure and transport properties of zigzag silicene nanoribbons (ZSiNRs) doped with aluminum (Al) or phosphorus (P) atoms. The presence of a single Al or P atom induces quasibound states in ZSiNRs that can be observed as new dips in the electron conductance. The Al atom acts as an acceptor whereas the P atom acts as a donor if it is placed at the center of the ribbon. This behavior is reversed if the dopant is placed on the edges. Accordingly, an acceptor-donor transition is observed in ZSiNRs upon changing the dopant's position. Similar results are obtained if two silicon atoms are replaced by two impurities (Al or P atoms) but the conductance is generally modified due to the impurity-impurity interaction. If the doping breaks the twofold rotational symmetry about the central line, the transport becomes spin-dependent.

  6. Studying charge-trapping defects within the silicon lattice of a p-channel CCD using a single-trap ``pumping'' technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, D.; Hall, D. J.; Murray, N. J.; Gow, J. P. D.; Holland, A.; Turner, P.; Burt, D.

    2014-12-01

    The goals of future space missions such as Euclid require unprecedented positional accuracy from the responsible detector. Charge coupled devices (CCDs) can be manufactured with exceptional charge transfer properties; however the harsh radiation environment of space leads to damage within the silicon lattice, predominantly through proton collisions. The resulting lattice defects can trap charge, degrading the positional accuracy and reducing the useful operating time of a detector. Mitigation of such effects requires precise knowledge of defects and their effects on charge transfer within a CCD. We have used the technique of single-trap ``pumping'' to study two such charge trapping defects; the silicon divacancy and the carbon interstitial, in a p-channel CCD. We show this technique can be used to give accurate information about trap parameters required for radiation damage models and correction algorithms. We also discuss some unexpected results from studying defects in this way.

  7. Cloning of a crustin-like, single whey-acidic-domain, antibacterial peptide from the haemocytes of the European lobster, Homarus gammarus, and its response to infection with bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hauton, C; Brockton, V; Smith, V J

    2006-03-01

    Degenerate PCR was used to isolate a 221-base pair nucleotide sequence of a new crustin-like antibacterial peptide from the haemocytes of the European lobster, Homarus gammarus. Rapid amplification of cDNA ends was used to extend the sequence to determine the complete open reading frame and un-translated regions. The inferred amino acid sequence of this peptide was found to be similar to crustin-like peptides isolated for several species of shrimp as well as the shore crab, Carcinus maenas. The sequence also contains a single-whey-acidic protein (WAP) domain, similar to novel antibacterial single-whey-acidic domain (SWD) peptides that have been recently described in the tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon, and the Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei. Real-time PCR was used to analyse the expression of the gene coding for this peptide. The gene is up regulated after inoculation with the Gram-positive lobster pathogen Aerococcus viridans var. homari but down regulated after inoculation with the Gram-negative bacteria Listonella anguillarum. Phylogenetic analysis of this new peptide shows that it is most related to other antimicrobial crustin peptides and that the crustins are only distantly related to the antibacterial SWD peptides recently described. PMID:16144710

  8. The Measurement of Transverse Single Spin Asymmetry of Forward Charged Hadrons in the PHENIX experiment at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Feng

    2010-02-01

    The measurement of transverse single spin asymmetries provides an opportunity to probe the parton structure of transversely polarized nucleons. We present PHENIX preliminary results of transverse single spin asymmetries of non-identified charged hadrons measured in the muon spectrometers (1.2 < η< 2.5) from transversely polarized p+p collisions at √s=200GeV as a function of xF and pT. PHENIX has lower xF and higher pT coverage than the Brahms experiment, which has made these measurements in the past. At lower xF we can study the turn-on of the asymmetry as a function of xF, and the crossover region between pQCD and TMD factorization is at higher pT. Perturbative QCD predicts that the asymmetry should decrease as 1/pT. For this purpose we also show the pT dependent asymmetry in a very narrow xF range around the turn-on region. )

  9. The Measurement of Transverse Single Spin Asymmetry of Forward Charged Hadrons in the PHENIX experiment at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Feng

    2009-11-01

    The measurement of transverse single spin asymmetries provides an opportunity to probe the parton structure of transversely polarized nucleons. We present PHENIX preliminary results of transverse single spin asymmetries of non-identified charged hadrons measured in the muon spectrometers (1.2 < η< 2.5) from transversely polarized p+p collisions at √s=200GeV as a function of xF and pT. PHENIX has lower xF and higher pT coverage than the Brahms experiment, which has made these measurements in the past. At lower xF we can study the turn-on of the asymmetry as a function of xF, and the crossover region between pQCD and TMD factorization is at higher pT. Perturbative QCD predicts that the asymmetry should decrease as 1/pT. For this purpose we also show the pT dependent asymmetry in a very narrow xF range around the turn-on region.

  10. Rapid and reproducible single-stage phosphopeptide enrichment of complex peptide mixtures: application to general and phosphotyrosine-specific phosphoproteomics experiments.

    PubMed

    Kettenbach, Arminja N; Gerber, Scott A

    2011-10-15

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is an essential regulatory component of virtually every cellular process and is frequently dysregulated in cancer. However, significant analytical barriers persist that hamper the routine application of phosphoproteomics in translational settings. Here, we present a straightforward and reproducible approach for the broadscale analysis of protein phosphorylation that relies on a single phosphopeptide enrichment step using titanium dioxide microspheres from whole cell lysate digests and compared it to the well-established SCX-TiO(2) workflow for phosphopeptide purification on a proteome-wide scale. We demonstrate the scaleabilty of our approach from 200 μg to 5 mg of total NCI-H23 non-small cell lung adenocarcinoma cell lysate digest and determine its quantitative reproducibility by label-free analysis of phosphopeptide peak areas from replicate purifications (median CV: 20% RSD). Finally, we combine this approach with immunoaffinity phosphotyrosine enrichment, enabling the identification of 3168 unique nonredundant phosphotyrosine peptides in two LC-MS/MS runs from 8 mg of HeLa peptides, each with 80% phosphotyrosine selectivity, at a peptide FDR of 0.2%. Taken together, we establish and validate a robust approach for proteome-wide phosphorylation analysis in a variety of scenarios that is easy to implement in biomedical research and translational settings. PMID:21899308

  11. Electron Capture Dissociation of Sodium-Adducted Peptides on a Modified Quadrupole/Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voinov, Valery G.; Hoffman, Peter D.; Bennett, Samuel E.; Beckman, Joseph S.; Barofsky, Douglas F.

    2015-12-01

    Electron capture dissociation (ECD), which generally preserves the position of labile post-translational modifications, can be a powerful method for de novo sequencing of proteins and peptides. In this report, ECD product-ion mass spectra of singly and doubly sodiated, nonphosphorylated, and phosphorylated peptides are presented and compared with the ECD mass spectra of their protonated counterparts. ECD of doubly charged, singly sodiated peptides yielded essentially the same sequence information as was produced by the corresponding doubly protonated peptides. The presence of several sodium binding sites on the polypeptide backbone, however, resulted in more complicated spectra. This situation is aggravated by the zwitterionic equilibrium of the free acid peptide precursors. The product-ion spectra of doubly and triply charged peptides possessing two sodium ions were further complicated by the existence of isomers created by the differential distribution of sodium binding sites. Triply charged, phosphorylated precursors containing one sodium, wherein the sodium is attached exclusively to the PO4 group, were found to be as useful for sequence analysis as the fully protonated species. Although sodium adducts are generally minimized during sample preparation, it appears that they can nonetheless provide useful sequence information. Additionally, they enable straightforward identification of a peptide's charge state, even on low-resolution instruments. The experiments were carried out using a radio frequency-free electromagnetostatic cell retrofitted into the collision-induced dissociation (CID) section of a hybrid quadrupole/time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometer.

  12. Electron Capture Dissociation of Sodium-Adducted Peptides on a Modified Quadrupole/Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Voinov, Valery G; Hoffman, Peter D; Bennett, Samuel E; Beckman, Joseph S; Barofsky, Douglas F

    2015-12-01

    Electron capture dissociation (ECD), which generally preserves the position of labile post-translational modifications, can be a powerful method for de novo sequencing of proteins and peptides. In this report, ECD product-ion mass spectra of singly and doubly sodiated, nonphosphorylated, and phosphorylated peptides are presented and compared with the ECD mass spectra of their protonated counterparts. ECD of doubly charged, singly sodiated peptides yielded essentially the same sequence information as was produced by the corresponding doubly protonated peptides. The presence of several sodium binding sites on the polypeptide backbone, however, resulted in more complicated spectra. This situation is aggravated by the zwitterionic equilibrium of the free acid peptide precursors. The product-ion spectra of doubly and triply charged peptides possessing two sodium ions were further complicated by the existence of isomers created by the differential distribution of sodium binding sites. Triply charged, phosphorylated precursors containing one sodium, wherein the sodium is attached exclusively to the PO4 group, were found to be as useful for sequence analysis as the fully protonated species. Although sodium adducts are generally minimized during sample preparation, it appears that they can nonetheless provide useful sequence information. Additionally, they enable straightforward identification of a peptide's charge state, even on low-resolution instruments. The experiments were carried out using a radio frequency-free electromagnetostatic cell retrofitted into the collision-induced dissociation (CID) section of a hybrid quadrupole/time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometer. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26266643

  13. Single neutral pion production by charged-current νbarμ interactions on hydrocarbon at = 3.6 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, T.; Palomino, J. L.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; Bercellie, A.; Bodek, A.; Bravar, A.; Brooks, W. K.; Butkevich, A.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; Carneiro, M. F.; Christy, M. E.; Chvojka, J.; da Motta, H.; Devan, J.; Dytman, S. A.; Díaz, G. A.; Eberly, B.; Felix, J.; Fields, L.; Fine, R.; Gago, A. M.; Gallagher, H.; Gran, R.; Harris, D. A.; Higuera, A.; Hurtado, K.; Kordosky, M.; Maher, E.; Manly, S.; Mann, W. A.; Marshall, C. M.; McFarland, K. S.; McGivern, C. L.; McGowan, A. M.; Miller, J.; Morfín, J. G.; Mousseau, J.; Nelson, J. K.; Norrick, A.; Osta, J.; Paolone, V.; Park, J.; Patrick, C. E.; Perdue, G. N.; Rakotondravohitra, L.; Ransome, R. D.; Ray, H.; Ren, L.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Ruterbories, D.; Schellman, H.; Schmitz, D. W.; Sobczyk, J. T.; Solano Salinas, C. J.; Tagg, N.; Tice, B. G.; Valencia, E.; Walton, T.; Wolcott, J.; Yepes-Ramirez, H.; Zavala, G.; Zhang, D.; Ziemer, B. P.

    2015-10-01

    Single neutral pion production via muon antineutrino charged-current interactions in plastic scintillator (CH) is studied using the MINERvA detector exposed to the NuMI low-energy, wideband antineutrino beam at Fermilab. Measurement of this process constrains models of neutral pion production in nuclei, which is important because the neutral-current analog is a background for νbare appearance oscillation experiments. The differential cross sections for π0 momentum and production angle, for events with a single observed π0 and no charged pions, are presented and compared to model predictions. These results comprise the first measurement of the π0 kinematics for this process.

  14. Spectral diffusion of neutral and charged exciton transitions in single CdSe/ZnS nanocrystals due to quantum-confined Stark effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihara, Toshiyuki; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiko

    2014-11-01

    Photoluminescence (PL) fluctuations of single semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs), such as PL blinking and spectral diffusion (SD), reflect the quantum nature of charges in the NCs. Through simultaneous measurements of PL spectra and lifetimes on single CdSe/ZnS NCs, PL of neutral excitons is found to exhibit a unique behavior of SD, which is accompanied by changes of radiative recombination lifetime. We find that the SD of neutral excitons originated from the quantum-confined Stark effect, which also affects the SD of charged excitons observed during PL blinking.

  15. Exclusion of exotic top-like quarks with -4/3 electric charge using jet-charge tagging in single-lepton tt¯ events at CDF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boisvert, V.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; De Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; d'Errico, M.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucà, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Martínez, M.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Song, H.; Sorin, V.; Stancari, M.; Denis, R. St.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C., III; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.

    2013-08-01

    We report on a measurement of the top-quark electric charge in tt¯ events in which one W boson originating from the top-quark pair decays into leptons and the other into hadrons. The event sample was collected by the CDF II detector in s=1.96TeV proton-antiproton collisions and corresponds to 5.6fb-1. We find the data to be consistent with the standard model and exclude the existence of an exotic quark with -4/3 electric charge and mass of the conventional top quark at the 99% confidence level.

  16. Biologically inspired stealth peptide-capped gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Nowinski, Ann K; White, Andrew D; Keefe, Andrew J; Jiang, Shaoyi

    2014-02-25

    Introduction into the human body makes most nanoparticle systems susceptible to aggregation via nonspecific protein binding. Here, we developed a peptide-capped gold nanoparticle platform that withstands aggregation in undiluted human serum at 37 °C for 24 h. This biocompatible and natural system is based on mimicking human proteins which are enriched in negatively charged glutamic acid and positively charged lysine residues on their surface. The multifunctional EKEKEKE-PPPPC-Am peptide sequence consists of a stealth glutamic acid/lysine portion combined with a surface anchoring linker containing four prolines and a cysteine. Particle stability was measured via optical spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering in single protein, high salt, and undiluted human serum solutions. In vitro cell experiments demonstrate EKEKEKE-PPPPC-Am capped gold nanoparticles effectively minimize nonspecific cell uptake by nonphagocytic bovine aortic endothelial cells and phagocytic murine macrophage RAW 264.7 cells. Cytotoxicity studies show that peptide-capped gold nanoparticles do not affect cell viability. Finally, the peptide EKEKEKE-PPPPC-Am was extended with cyclic RGD to demonstrate specific cell targeting and stealth without using poly(ethylene glycol). Adding the functional peptide via peptide sequence extension avoids complex conjugation chemistries that are used for connection to synthetic materials. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy results indicate high aortic bovine endothelial cell uptake of c[RGDfE(SGG-KEKEKE-PPPPC-Am)] capped gold nanoparticles and low uptake of the control scrambled sequence c[RDGfE(SGG-KEKEKE-PPPPC-Am)] capped gold nanoparticles.

  17. Investigation of free charge carrier dynamics in single-crystalline CVD diamond by two-photon absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Ivakin, E V; Kisialiou, I G; Ralchenko, V G; Bolshakov, A P; Ashkinazi, E E; Sharonov, G V

    2014-11-30

    By using the methods of transient gratings (TGs) and induced absorption, we have studied the kinetics of plasma of free charge carriers (FCCs) created by the action of a picosecond laser pulse in two high-purity diamond single crystals synthesised from the gas phase. The gratings with different spatial periods have been excited at the wavelengths of 266 or 213 nm (above and below the fundamental absorption edge in diamond) and probed with continuous-wave radiation in the visible region. At the moderate FCC concentrations (∼7 × 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3}), the coefficient of ambipolar diffusion and the carrier recombination time of two crystals are 20.3 and 18.9 cm{sup 2} s{sup -1} and 30 and 190 ns, respectively. The increase in the carrier concentration up to 5 × 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3} reduces the TG lifetime. We have determined the conditions under which the relaxation of the grating of carriers leads to the formation of a thermal grating, with the amplitude sufficient for its experimental observation. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  18. Ab initio investigation of sulfur monofluoride and its singly charged cation and anion in their ground electronic state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Li; Shan-Jun, Chen; Yan, Chen; Peng, Chen

    2016-03-01

    The SF radical and its singly charged cation and anion, SF+ and SF-, have been investigated on the MRCI/aug-cc-pVXZ (X = Q, 5, 6) levels of theory with Davidson correction. Both the core-valence correlation and the relativistic effect are considered. The extrapolating to the complete basis set (CBS) limit is adopted to remove the basis set truncation error. Geometrical parameters, potential energy curves (PECs), vibrational energy levels, spectroscopic constants, ionization potentials, and electron affinities of the ground electronic state for all these species are obtained. The information with respect to molecular characteristics of the SFn (n = -1, 0, +1) systems derived in this work will help to extend our knowledge and to guide further experimental or theoretical researches. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11304023 and 11447172), the Young and Middle-Aged Talent of Education Burea of Hubei Province, China (Grant No. Q20151307), and the Yangtze Youth Talents Fund of Yangtze University, China (Grant No. 2015cqr21).

  19. Beam-single and beam-two-foil experimental facility to study physics of highly charged ions

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Nissar; Wani, A.A.; Ram, R.; Abhilash, S.R.; Kumar, Rakesh; Patnaik, J.K.; De, Sankar; Karn, R.K.; Nandi, T.

    2006-03-15

    A facility for lifetime measurement of metastable states in highly charged ions using the beam-foil technique with a single-foil and a two-foil target has been developed. In the two-foil technique, one foil moves with respect to the other and the option of varying the thickness of the fixed foil online has been implemented. A holder with multiple foils is used as a fixed target, and moved along x, y, and {theta}, the angle of rotation with respect to beam direction along the z axis. Using this facility, the He-like 1s2p {sup 3}P{sub 2}{sup o} and Li-like 1s2s2p {sup 4}P{sub 5l/2}{sup o} titanium lifetimes have been measured and compared with earlier values. In addition to this, the processes which occur when excited states collide with carbon foils of different thicknesses have also been investigated. Preliminary results suggest the scope of studying intrashell transitions during ion-solid collision using this setup. In this article, the setup is described in detail and representative results are briefly discussed.

  20. Single charged-particle damage to living cells: a new method based on track-etch detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durante, M.; Grossi, G. F.; Pugliese, M.; Manti, L.; Nappo, M.; Gialanella, G.

    1994-11-01

    Biological effects of ionizing radiation are usually expressed as a function of the absorbed dose. Low doses of high-LET radiation correspond to one or few particle traversals through the cell. In order to study the biological effectiveness of single charged particles, we have developed a new method based on solid state nuclear track detectors. Cells are seeded on mylar and a LR-115 film is stuck below the mylar base. After irradiation, the LR-115 film is etched and cells observed at a phase contrast microscope connected to a video camera and an image analyzer. In this way, it is possible to measure the number of traversals through the cell nucleus or cytoplasm. Coordinates of each cell on the microscope bench are saved. After incubation for about one week, cells are fixed and stained and the colonies observed at the microscope. The fate of each irradiated cell is therefore correlated to the number of traversals. We have tested this method with two different rodent embryo fibroblast cell lines, C3H 10T1/2 and V79, exposed to 3.2 MeV accelerated α-particles (LET=124 keV/ μm). The studied endpoint was cell killing. Preliminary biological results suggest that few α-particle tracks in V79 hamster cells are sufficient to reduce surviving fraction.

  1. Self-assembly of fibronectin mimetic peptide-amphiphile nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rexeisen, Emilie Lynn

    umbilical vein endothelial cells and alpha5beta1 integrins immobilized on an AFM tip preferred binding to a fibronectin mimetic peptide that contained both hydrophilic and hydrophobic residues in the linker and a medium length spacer. Most cells require a three-dimensional scaffold in order to thrive. To incorporate the fibronectin mimetic peptide into a three-dimensional structure, a single hydrocarbon tail was attached to form a peptideamphiphile. Single-tailed peptide-amphiphiles have been shown to form nanofibers in solution and gel after screening of the electrostatic charges in the headgroup. These gels show promise as scaffolds for tissue engineering. A fibronectin mimetic peptide-amphiphile containing a linker with alternating hydrophobic and hydrophilic residues was designed to form nanofibers in solution. The critical micelle concentration of the peptide-amphiphile was determined to be 38 muM, and all subsequent experiments were performed above this concentration. Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy indicated that the peptide headgroup of the peptide-amphiphile forms an alpha+beta secondary structure; whereas, the free peptide forms a random secondary structure. Cryogenic-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and small angle neutron scattering showed that the peptide-amphiphile self-assembled into nanofibers. The cryo-TEM images showed single nanofibers with a diameter of 10 nm and lengths on the order of microns. Images of higher peptideamphiphile concentrations showed evidence of bundling between individual nanofibers, which could give rise to gelation behavior at higher concentrations. The peptide-amphiphile formed a gel at concentrations above 6 mM. A 10 mM sample was analyzed with oscillating plate rheometry and was found to have an elastic modulus within the range of living tissue, showing potential as a possible scaffold for tissue engineering.

  2. The production of Multiple Small Peptaibol Families by Single 14-Module Peptide Synthetases in Trichoderma/Hypocrea

    SciTech Connect

    Degenkolb, Thomas; Aghchehb, Razieh Karimi; Dieckmann, Ralf; Neuhof, Torsten; Baker, Scott E.; Druzhinina, Irina S.; Kubicek, Christian P.; Brückner, Hans; von Dohren, Hans

    2012-03-01

    The most common peptaibibiotic structures are 11-residue peptaibols found widely distributed in the genus Trichoderma/Hypocrea. Frequently associated are 14-residue peptaibols sharing partial sequence identity. Genome sequencing projects of 3 Trichoderma strains of the major clades reveal the presence of up to 3 types of nonribosomal peptide synthetases with 7, 14, or 18-20 amino acid adding modules. We here provide evidence that the 14-module NRPS type found in T. virens, T. reesei (teleomorph Hypocrea jecorina) and T. atroviride produces both 11- and 14- residue peptaibols based on the disruption of the respective NRPS gene of T. reesei, and bioinformatic analysis of their amino acid activating domains and modules. The structures of these peptides may be predicted from the gene structures and have been confirmed by analysis of families of 11- and 14-residue peptaibols from the strain 618, termed hypojecorins A (23 sequences determined, 4 new) and B (3 new sequences), and the recently established trichovirins A from T. virens. The distribution of 11- and 14-residue products is strain-specific and depends on growth conditions as well. Possible mechanisms of module skipping are discussed.

  3. Binding of iron(III) to the single tyrosine residue of amyloid β-peptide probed by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Takashi; Suzuki, Kiyoko; Takeuchi, Hideo

    2001-10-01

    The Fe(III) ion binds to amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) and induces significant aggregation of the peptide. In addition to the Aβ aggregation, the redox activity of the Fe(III) ion bound to Aβ is considered to play a role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. In order to understand the role of Fe(III) in Aβ aggregation and neurotoxicity, we have examined the Fe(III)-binding mode of human Aβ by Raman spectroscopy. The Raman spectra of Fe(III)-Aβ complexes excited at 514.5 nm are dominated by resonance Raman bands of metal-bound tyrosinate, evidencing that the Fe(III) ion primarily binds to Aβ via the phenolic oxygen of Tyr10. In addition, carboxylate groups of glutamate/aspartate side chains are also bound to Fe(III). On the other hand, histidine residues in the N-terminal hydrophilic region of Aβ do not bind to Fe(III). These results are in sharp contrast to the Zn(II)- or Cu(II)-induced aggregation of Aβ, in which histidine residues act as the primary metal binding sites. The Fe(III)-Tyr10 binding may play an important role in Aβ aggregation and in decreasing the reduction potential of the bound Fe(III) ion.

  4. Comparison of CID spectra of singly charged polypeptide antibiotic precursor ions obtained by positive-ion vacuum MALDI IT/RTOF and TOF/RTOF, AP-MALDI-IT and ESI-IT mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pittenauer, Ernst; Zehl, Martin; Belgacem, Omar; Raptakis, Emmanuel; Mistrik, Robert; Allmaier, Günter

    2006-04-01

    Various classes of polypeptide antibiotics, including blocked linear peptides (gramicidin D), side-chain-cyclized peptides (bacitracin, viomycin, capreomycin), side-chain-cyclized depsipeptides (virginiamycin S), real cyclic peptides (tyrocidin, gramcidin S) and side-chain-cyclized lipopeptides (polymyxin B and E, amfomycin), were investigated by low-energy collision induced dissociation (LE-CID) as well as high-energy CID (HE-CID). Ion trap (IT) based instruments with different desorption/ionization techniques such as electrospray ionization (ESI), atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (AP-MALDI) and vacuum MALDI (vMALDI) as well as a vMALDI-time-of-flight (TOF)/curved field-reflectron instrument fitted with a gas collision cell were used. For optimum comparability of data from different IT instruments, the CID conditions were standardized and only singly charged precursor ions were considered. Additionally, HE-CID data obtained from the TOF-based instrument were acquired and compared with LE-CID data from ITs. Major differences between trap-based and TOF-based CID data are that the latter data set lacks abundant additional loss of small neutrals (e.g. ammonia, water) but contains product ions down to the immonium-ion-type region, thereby allowing the detection of even single amino-acid (even unusual amino acids) substitutions. For several polypeptide antibiotics, mass spectrometric as well as tandem mass spectrometric data are shown and discussed for the first time, and some yet undescribed minor components are also reported. De novo sequencing of unusually linked minor components of (e.g. cyclic) polypeptides is practically impossible without knowledge of the exact structure and fragmentation behavior of the major components. Finally, the described standardized CID condition constitutes a basic prerequisite for creating a searchable, annotated MS(n)-database of bioactive compounds. The applied desorption/ionization techniques showed no

  5. Substitution of a single residue in Stichodactyla helianthus peptide, ShK-Dap22, reveals a novel pharmacological profile.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Richard E; Sanchez, Manuel; Linde, Ana-Rosa; Bugianesi, Randal M; Dai, Ge; Felix, John P; Koprak, Sam L; Staruch, Mary Jo; Bruguera, Marc; Cox, Rachael; Ghosh, Amrita; Hwang, Jeremy; Jones, Simmonette; Kohler, Martin; Slaughter, Robert S; McManus, Owen B; Kaczorowski, Gregory J; Garcia, Maria L

    2003-11-25

    ShK, a peptide isolated from Stichodactyla helianthus venom, blocks the voltage-gated potassium channels, K(v)1.1 and K(v)1.3, with similar high affinity. ShK-Dap(22), a synthetic derivative in which a diaminopropionic acid residue has been substituted at position Lys(22), has been reported to be a selective K(v)1.3 inhibitor and to block this channel with equivalent potency as ShK [Kalman et al. (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 273, 32697-32707]. In this study, a large body of evidence is presented which indicates that the potencies of wild-type ShK peptide for both K(v)1.3 and K(v)1.1 channels have been previously underestimated. Therefore, the affinity of ShK-Dap(22) for both channels appears to be ca. 10(2)-10(4)-fold weaker than ShK. ShK-Dap(22) does display ca. 20-fold selectivity for human K(v)1.3 vs K(v)1.1 when measured by the whole-cell voltage clamp method but not in equilibrium binding assays. ShK-Dap(22) has low affinity for K(v)1.2 channels, but heteromultimeric K(v)1.1-K(v)1.2 channels form a receptor with ca. 200-fold higher affinity for ShK-Dap(22) than K(v)1.1 homomultimers. In fact, K(v)1.1-K(v)1.2 channels bind ShK-Dap(22) with only ca. 10-fold less potency than ShK and reveal a novel pharmacology not predicted from the homomultimers of K(v)1.1 or K(v)1.2. The concentrations of ShK-Dap(22) needed to inhibit human T cell activation were ca. 10(3)-fold higher than those of ShK, in good correlation with the relative affinities of these peptides for inhibiting K(v)1.3 channels. All of these data, taken together, suggest that ShK-Dap(22) will not have the same in vivo immunosuppressant efficacy of other K(v)1.3 blockers, such as margatoxin or ShK. Moreover, ShK-Dap(22) may have undesired side effects due to its interaction with heteromultimeric K(v)1.1-K(v)1.2 channels, such as those present in brain and/or peripheral tissues. PMID:14622016

  6. Substitution of a single residue in Stichodactyla helianthus peptide, ShK-Dap22, reveals a novel pharmacological profile.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Richard E; Sanchez, Manuel; Linde, Ana-Rosa; Bugianesi, Randal M; Dai, Ge; Felix, John P; Koprak, Sam L; Staruch, Mary Jo; Bruguera, Marc; Cox, Rachael; Ghosh, Amrita; Hwang, Jeremy; Jones, Simmonette; Kohler, Martin; Slaughter, Robert S; McManus, Owen B; Kaczorowski, Gregory J; Garcia, Maria L

    2003-11-25

    ShK, a peptide isolated from Stichodactyla helianthus venom, blocks the voltage-gated potassium channels, K(v)1.1 and K(v)1.3, with similar high affinity. ShK-Dap(22), a synthetic derivative in which a diaminopropionic acid residue has been substituted at position Lys(22), has been reported to be a selective K(v)1.3 inhibitor and to block this channel with equivalent potency as ShK [Kalman et al. (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 273, 32697-32707]. In this study, a large body of evidence is presented which indicates that the potencies of wild-type ShK peptide for both K(v)1.3 and K(v)1.1 channels have been previously underestimated. Therefore, the affinity of ShK-Dap(22) for both channels appears to be ca. 10(2)-10(4)-fold weaker than ShK. ShK-Dap(22) does display ca. 20-fold selectivity for human K(v)1.3 vs K(v)1.1 when measured by the whole-cell voltage clamp method but not in equilibrium binding assays. ShK-Dap(22) has low affinity for K(v)1.2 channels, but heteromultimeric K(v)1.1-K(v)1.2 channels form a receptor with ca. 200-fold higher affinity for ShK-Dap(22) than K(v)1.1 homomultimers. In fact, K(v)1.1-K(v)1.2 channels bind ShK-Dap(22) with only ca. 10-fold less potency than ShK and reveal a novel pharmacology not predicted from the homomultimers of K(v)1.1 or K(v)1.2. The concentrations of ShK-Dap(22) needed to inhibit human T cell activation were ca. 10(3)-fold higher than those of ShK, in good correlation with the relative affinities of these peptides for inhibiting K(v)1.3 channels. All of these data, taken together, suggest that ShK-Dap(22) will not have the same in vivo immunosuppressant efficacy of other K(v)1.3 blockers, such as margatoxin or ShK. Moreover, ShK-Dap(22) may have undesired side effects due to its interaction with heteromultimeric K(v)1.1-K(v)1.2 channels, such as those present in brain and/or peripheral tissues.

  7. B-type natriuretic peptide and C-reactive protein in the prediction of atrial fibrillation risk: the CHARGE-AF Consortium of community-based cohort studies

    PubMed Central

    Sinner, Moritz F.; Stepas, Katherine A.; Moser, Carlee B.; Krijthe, Bouwe P.; Aspelund, Thor; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Fontes, João D.; Janssens, A. Cecile J.W.; Kronmal, Richard A.; Magnani, Jared W.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.; Chamberlain, Alanna M.; Lubitz, Steven A.; Schnabel, Renate B.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Wang, Thomas J.; Agarwal, Sunil K.; McManus, David D.; Franco, Oscar H.; Yin, Xiaoyan; Larson, Martin G.; Burke, Gregory L.; Launer, Lenore J.; Hofman, Albert; Levy, Daniel; Gottdiener, John S.; Kääb, Stefan; Couper, David; Harris, Tamara B.; Astor, Brad C.; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Hoogeveen, Ron C.; Arai, Andrew E.; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Stricker, Bruno H.C.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Heckbert, Susan R.; Pencina, Michael J.; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Alonso, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    Aims B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and C-reactive protein (CRP) predict atrial fibrillation (AF) risk. However, their risk stratification abilities in the broad community remain uncertain. We sought to improve risk stratification for AF using biomarker information. Methods and results We ascertained AF incidence in 18 556 Whites and African Americans from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (ARIC, n=10 675), Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS, n = 5043), and Framingham Heart Study (FHS, n = 2838), followed for 5 years (prediction horizon). We added BNP (ARIC/CHS: N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide; FHS: BNP), CRP, or both to a previously reported AF risk score, and assessed model calibration and predictive ability [C-statistic, integrated discrimination improvement (IDI), and net reclassification improvement (NRI)]. We replicated models in two independent European cohorts: Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility Reykjavik Study (AGES), n = 4467; Rotterdam Study (RS), n = 3203. B-type natriuretic peptide and CRP were significantly associated with AF incidence (n = 1186): hazard ratio per 1-SD ln-transformed biomarker 1.66 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.56–1.76], P < 0.0001 and 1.18 (95% CI, 1.11–1.25), P < 0.0001, respectively. Model calibration was sufficient (BNP, χ2 = 17.0; CRP, χ2 = 10.5; BNP and CRP, χ2 = 13.1). B-type natriuretic peptide improved the C-statistic from 0.765 to 0.790, yielded an IDI of 0.027 (95% CI, 0.022–0.032), a relative IDI of 41.5%, and a continuous NRI of 0.389 (95% CI, 0.322–0.455). The predictive ability of CRP was limited (C-statistic increment 0.003). B-type natriuretic peptide consistently improved prediction in AGES and RS. Conclusion B-type natriuretic peptide, not CRP, substantially improved AF risk prediction beyond clinical factors in an independently replicated, heterogeneous population. B-type natriuretic peptide may serve as a benchmark to evaluate novel putative AF risk biomarkers. PMID:25037055

  8. Single cell ionization by a laser trap: a preliminary study in measuring radiation dose and charge in BT20 breast carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Michele; Gao, Ying; Erenso, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a preliminary study in the application of a laser trap for ionization of living carcinoma cells is presented. The study was conducted using BT20 breast carcinoma cells cultured and harvested in our laboratory. Each cell, for a total of 50 cells, was trapped and ionized by a high intensity infrared laser at 1064 nm. The threshold radiation dose and the resultant charge from the ionization for each cell were determined. With the laser trap serving as a radiation source, the cell underwent dielectric breakdown of the membrane. When this process occurs, the cell becomes highly charged and its dielectric susceptibility changes. The charge creates an increasing electrostatic force while the changing dielectric susceptibility diminishes the strength of the trapping force. Consequently, at some instant of time the cell gets ejected from the trap. The time inside the trap while the cell is being ionized, the intensity of the radiation, and the post ionization trajectory of the cell were used to determine the threshold radiation dose and the charge for each cell. The measurement of the charge vs ionization radiation dose at single cell level could be useful in the accuracy of radiotherapy as the individual charges can collectively create a strong enough electrical interaction to cause dielectric breakdown in other cells in a tumor. PMID:27699110

  9. Single cell ionization by a laser trap: a preliminary study in measuring radiation dose and charge in BT20 breast carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Michele; Gao, Ying; Erenso, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a preliminary study in the application of a laser trap for ionization of living carcinoma cells is presented. The study was conducted using BT20 breast carcinoma cells cultured and harvested in our laboratory. Each cell, for a total of 50 cells, was trapped and ionized by a high intensity infrared laser at 1064 nm. The threshold radiation dose and the resultant charge from the ionization for each cell were determined. With the laser trap serving as a radiation source, the cell underwent dielectric breakdown of the membrane. When this process occurs, the cell becomes highly charged and its dielectric susceptibility changes. The charge creates an increasing electrostatic force while the changing dielectric susceptibility diminishes the strength of the trapping force. Consequently, at some instant of time the cell gets ejected from the trap. The time inside the trap while the cell is being ionized, the intensity of the radiation, and the post ionization trajectory of the cell were used to determine the threshold radiation dose and the charge for each cell. The measurement of the charge vs ionization radiation dose at single cell level could be useful in the accuracy of radiotherapy as the individual charges can collectively create a strong enough electrical interaction to cause dielectric breakdown in other cells in a tumor.

  10. Kinetic Energy Release of the Singly and Doubly Charged Methylene Chloride Molecule: The Role of Fast Dissociation.

    PubMed

    Alcantara, K F; Rocha, A B; Gomes, A H A; Wolff, W; Sigaud, L; Santos, A C F

    2016-09-01

    The center of mass kinetic energy release distribution (KERD) spectra of selected ionic fragments, formed through dissociative single and double photoionization of CH2Cl2 at photon energies around the Cl 2p edge, were extracted from the shape and width of the experimentally obtained time-of-flight (TOF) distributions. The KERD spectra exhibit either smooth profiles or structures, depending on the moiety and photon energy. In general, the heavier the ionic fragments, the lower their average KERDs are. In contrast, the light H(+) fragments are observed with kinetic energies centered around 4.5-5.5 eV, depending on the photon energy. It was observed that the change in the photon energy involves a change in the KERDs, indicating different processes or transitions taking place in the breakup process. In the particular case of double ionization with the ejection of two charged fragments, the KERDs present have characteristics compatible with the Coulombic fragmentation model. Intending to interpret the experimental data, singlet and triplet states at Cl 2p edge of the CH2Cl2 molecule, corresponding to the Cl (2p → 10a1*) and Cl (2p → 4b1*) transitions, were calculated at multiconfigurational self-consistent field (MCSCF) level and multireference configuration interaction (MRCI). These states were selected to form the spin-orbit coupling matrix elements, which after diagonalization result in a spin-orbit manifold. Minimum energy pathways for dissociation of the molecule were additionally calculated aiming to give support to the presence of the ultrafast dissociation mechanism in the molecular breakup.

  11. Kinetic Energy Release of the Singly and Doubly Charged Methylene Chloride Molecule: The Role of Fast Dissociation.

    PubMed

    Alcantara, K F; Rocha, A B; Gomes, A H A; Wolff, W; Sigaud, L; Santos, A C F

    2016-09-01

    The center of mass kinetic energy release distribution (KERD) spectra of selected ionic fragments, formed through dissociative single and double photoionization of CH2Cl2 at photon energies around the Cl 2p edge, were extracted from the shape and width of the experimentally obtained time-of-flight (TOF) distributions. The KERD spectra exhibit either smooth profiles or structures, depending on the moiety and photon energy. In general, the heavier the ionic fragments, the lower their average KERDs are. In contrast, the light H(+) fragments are observed with kinetic energies centered around 4.5-5.5 eV, depending on the photon energy. It was observed that the change in the photon energy involves a change in the KERDs, indicating different processes or transitions taking place in the breakup process. In the particular case of double ionization with the ejection of two charged fragments, the KERDs present have characteristics compatible with the Coulombic fragmentation model. Intending to interpret the experimental data, singlet and triplet states at Cl 2p edge of the CH2Cl2 molecule, corresponding to the Cl (2p → 10a1*) and Cl (2p → 4b1*) transitions, were calculated at multiconfigurational self-consistent field (MCSCF) level and multireference configuration interaction (MRCI). These states were selected to form the spin-orbit coupling matrix elements, which after diagonalization result in a spin-orbit manifold. Minimum energy pathways for dissociation of the molecule were additionally calculated aiming to give support to the presence of the ultrafast dissociation mechanism in the molecular breakup. PMID:27523328

  12. A single administration of the peptide NAP induces long-term protective changes against the consequences of head injury: gene Atlas array analysis.

    PubMed

    Romano, Jacob; Beni-Adani, Liana; Nissenbaum, Orlev Levy; Brenneman, Douglas E; Shohami, Esther; Gozes, Illana

    2002-01-01

    The femtomolar-acting eight-amino-acid peptide (NAP), derived from activity-dependent neuroprotective protein (ADNP), provides long-term protection against the deleterious effects of closed head injury (CHI) in mice. Fifteen minutes after injury, mice were divided into two groups, control and NAP-treated and a single subcutaneous injection of NAP or vehicle was administered. A third group served as sham-treated (not subjected to head trauma). Each mouse was assessed for its clinical function, using neurological severity score, at various time intervals following CHI, up to 30-45 d. Total cerebral cortex RNA was prepared from the site of injury of CHI mice, and from parallel regions in peptide-treated and sham brains. RNA was then reversed transcribed to yield radioactive cDNA preparations that were hybridized to Atlas array membranes containing 1200 cDNAs spots. Comparison of sham-treated individual mice showed differential expression levels of at least 15 mRNA species. Furthermore, results indicated that one of the genes that did not change among individuals but specifically increased after CHI and decreased after NAP treatment was the cell surface glycoprotein Mac-1 (CD11B antigen). Thus, Mac-1 is suggested as a marker for the long-term outcome of head injury and as a potential target for NAP protective actions.

  13. A small single-"finger" peptide from the erythroid transcription factor GATA-1 binds specifically to DNA as a zinc or iron complex.

    PubMed

    Omichinski, J G; Trainor, C; Evans, T; Gronenborn, A M; Clore, G M; Felsenfeld, G

    1993-03-01

    Sequence-specific DNA binding has been demonstrated for a synthetic peptide comprising only one of the two "finger"-like domains of the erythroid transcription factor GATA-1 (also termed Eryf-1, NF-E1, or GF-1). Quantitative analysis of gel-retardation assays yields a specific association constant of 1.2 x 10(8) M, compared with values of about 10(9) M for the full-length natural GATA-1 protein. By the use of peptides of various lengths, it was possible to delineate the smallest region necessary for specific binding. A single C-terminal finger of the double-finger motif is necessary but not sufficient for sequence-specific interaction. Basic amino acids located C-terminal to the finger (some more than 20 amino acids away) are also essential for tight binding. In addition to demonstrating that zinc is important for the formation of an active binding complex, we show that other ions, notably Fe2+, can fulfill this role. Our results make it clear that the GATA-1 metal binding motif is quite distinct from that found in the steroid hormone family and that GATA-1 is a member of a separate class of DNA binding proteins. PMID:8446581

  14. Identification of single base-pair mutation on uidA gene of Escherichia coli O157:H7 by Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNA) mediated PCR clamping.

    PubMed

    Takiya, Toshiyuki; Futo, Satoshi; Tsuna, Mika; Namimatsu, Takanori; Sakano, Tetsuya; Kawai, Keiichi; Suzuki, Tohru

    2004-02-01

    Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNA) is a new type of DNA analogue with a peptide backbone. We developed a rapid identification system of Escherichia. coli O157:H7 using PNA mediated PCR clamping. Firstly, we confirmed a single nucleotide alteration in the uidA gene (T93G), which is specific to E. coli O157: H7. We designed forward mutant DNA primer, wild type PNA, and a reverse DNA primer corresponding to the uidA sequence. PCR cycle consisted of four steps including dual annealing temperatures, 57 degrees C and 45 degrees C. Among 20 E. coli strains with various serotypes and 4 neighboring strains, the amplified bands (517 bp) were detected only in E. coli O157:H7 strains. PNA has specifically inhibited the PCR amplification from a wild type uidA gene. We successfully developed a multiplex PCR system, which detects both shigatoxin (stx) and uidA genes at once, to get reliable results by easier and rapid operation. We also analyzed kinetic parameters of PNA/DNA association using surface plasmon resonance and melting temperature using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). We discussed a selection mechanism of PCR clamping from these results. PMID:14981299

  15. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) binds to guinea pig peritoneal eosinophils: A single class of binding sites with low affinity and high capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Sakakibara, H.; Shima, K. Takamatsu, J.; Said, S.I. )

    1990-02-26

    VIP binds to specific receptors on lymphocytes and mononuclear cells and exhibits antiinflammatory properties. Eosinophils (Eos) contribute to inflammatory reactions but the regulation of Eos function is incompletely understood. The authors examined the binding of monoradioiodinated VIP, (Tyr({sup 125}I){sup 10}) VIP ({sup 125}I-VIP), to Eos in guinea pigs. The interaction of {sup 125}i-VIP with Eos was rapid, reversible, saturable and linearly dependent on the number of cells. At equilibrium the binding was competitively inhibited by native peptide or by the related peptide helodermin. Scatchard analysis suggested the presence of a single class of VIP binding sites with a low affinity and a high capacity. In the presence of isobutyl-methylxanthine, VIP, PHI or helodermin did not stimulate cyclic AMP accumulation in intact Eos, while PGE{sub 2} or 1-isoproterenol did. VIP also did not inhibit superoxide anion generation from Eos stimulated by phorbol myristate acetate. The authors conclude that: (1) VIP binds to low-affinity, specific sites on guinea pig peritoneal eosinophils; (2) this binding is not coupled to stimulation of adenylate cyclase; and (3) the possible function of these binding sites is at present unknown.

  16. Effective cytoplasmic release of siRNA from liposomal carriers by controlling the electrostatic interaction of siRNA with a charge-invertible peptide, in response to cytoplasmic pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itakura, Shoko; Hama, Susumu; Matsui, Ryo; Kogure, Kentaro

    2016-05-01

    Condensing siRNA with cationic polymers is a major strategy used in the development of siRNA carriers that can avoid degradation by nucleases and achieve effective delivery of siRNA into the cytoplasm. However, ineffective release of siRNA from such condensed forms into the cytoplasm is a limiting step for induction of RNAi effects, and can be attributed to tight condensation of siRNA with the cationic polymers, due to potent electrostatic interactions. Here, we report that siRNA condensed with a slightly acidic pH-sensitive peptide (SAPSP), whose total charge is inverted from positive to negative in response to cytoplasmic pH, is effectively released via electrostatic repulsion of siRNA with negatively charged SAPSP at cytoplasmic pH (7.4). The condensed complex of siRNA and positively-charged SAPSP at acidic pH (siRNA/SAPSP) was found to result in almost complete release of siRNA upon charge inversion of SAPSP at pH 7.4, with the resultant negatively-charged SAPSP having no undesirable interactions with endogenous mRNA. Moreover, liposomes encapsulating siRNA/SAPSP demonstrated knockdown efficiencies comparable to those of commercially available siRNA carriers. Taken together, SAPSP may be very useful as a siRNA condenser, as it facilitates effective cytoplasmic release of siRNA, and subsequent induction of specific RNAi effects.Condensing siRNA with cationic polymers is a major strategy used in the development of siRNA carriers that can avoid degradation by nucleases and achieve effective delivery of siRNA into the cytoplasm. However, ineffective release of siRNA from such condensed forms into the cytoplasm is a limiting step for induction of RNAi effects, and can be attributed to tight condensation of siRNA with the cationic polymers, due to potent electrostatic interactions. Here, we report that siRNA condensed with a slightly acidic pH-sensitive peptide (SAPSP), whose total charge is inverted from positive to negative in response to cytoplasmic pH, is

  17. Peptide nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Hamley, Ian W

    2014-07-01

    The self-assembly of different classes of peptide, including cyclic peptides, amyloid peptides and surfactant-like peptides into nanotube structures is reviewed. The modes of self-assembly are discussed. Additionally, applications in bionanotechnology and synthetic materials science are summarized.

  18. Charges in the cytoplasmic pore control intrinsic inward rectification and single-channel properties in Kir1.1 and Kir2.1 channels.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsueh-Kai; Yeh, Shih-Hao; Shieh, Ru-Chi

    2007-02-01

    An E224G mutation of the Kir2.1 channel generates intrinsic inward rectification and single-channel fluctuations in the absence of intracellular blockers. In this study, we showed that positively charged residues H226, R228 and R260, near site 224, regulated the intrinsic inward rectification and single-channel properties of the E224G mutant. By carrying out systematic mutations, we found that the charge effect on the intrinsic inward rectification and single-channel conductance is consistent with a long-range electrostatic mechanism. A Kir1.1 channel where the site equivalent to E224 in the Kir2.1 channel is a glycine residue does not show inward rectification or single-channel fluctuations. The G223K and N259R mutations of the Kir1.1 channel induced intrinsic inward rectification and reduced the single-channel conductance but did not generate large open-channel fluctuations. Substituting the cytoplasmic pore of the E224G mutant into the Kir1.1 channel induced open-channel fluctuations and intrinsic inward rectification. The single-channel conductance of the E224G mutant showed inward rectification. Also, a voltage-dependent gating mechanism decreased open probability during depolarization and contributed to the intrinsic inward rectification in the E224G mutant. In addition to an electrostatic effect, a close interaction of K(+) with channel pore may be required for generating open-channel fluctuations in the E224G mutant.

  19. Transition metals as electron traps. I. Structures, energetics, electron capture, and electron-transfer-induced dissociations of ternary copper-peptide complexes in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Turecek, Frantisek; Jones, Jace W; Holm, Anne I S; Panja, Subhasis; Nielsen, Steen Brøndsted; Hvelplund, Preben

    2009-05-01

    Electron-induced dissociations of gas-phase ternary copper-2,2'-bipyridine complexes of Gly-Gly-Gly and Gly-Gly-Leu were studied on a time scale ranging from 130 ns to several milliseconds using a combination of charge-reversal ((+)CR(-)) and electron-capture-induced dissociation (ECID) measured on a beam instrument and electron capture dissociation (ECD) measured in a Penning trap. Charge-reduced intermediates were observed on the short time scale in the (+)CR(-) and ECID experiments but not in ECD. Ion dissociations following electron transfer or capture mostly occurred by competitive bpy or peptide ligand loss, whereas peptide backbone fragmentations were suppressed in the presence of the ligated metal ion. Extensive electron structure theory calculations using density functional theory and large basis sets provided optimized structures and energies for the precursor ions, charge-reduced intermediates, and dissociation products. The Cu complexes underwent substantial structure changes upon electron capture. Cu was calculated to be pentacoordinated in the most stable singly charged complexes of the [Cu(peptide-H)bpy](+*) type where it carried a approximately +1 atomic charge. Cu coordination in charge-reduced [Cu(peptide-H)bpy] intermediates depended on the spin state. The themodynamically more stable singlet states had tricoordinated Cu, whereas triplet states had a tetracoordinated Cu. Cu was tricoordinated in stable [Cu(peptide-H)bpy](-*) products of electron transfer. [Cu(peptide)bpy](2+*) complexes contained the peptide ligand in a zwitterionic form while Cu was tetracoordinated. Upon electron capture, Cu was tri- or tetracoordinated in the [Cu(peptide)bpy](+) charge-reduced analogs and the peptide ligands underwent prototropic isomerization to canonical forms. The role of excited singlet and triplet electronic states is assessed. PMID:19132713

  20. Strategies for generating peptide radical cations via ion/ion reactions.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Joshua D; Fisher, Christine M; Bu, Jiexun; Prentice, Boone M; Redwine, James G; McLuckey, Scott A

    2015-02-01

    Several approaches for the generation of peptide radical cations using ion/ion reactions coupled with either collision induced dissociation (CID) or ultraviolet photo dissociation (UVPD) are described here. Ion/ion reactions are used to generate electrostatic or covalent complexes comprised of a peptide and a radical reagent. The radical site of the reagent can be generated multiple ways. Reagents containing a carbon-iodine (C-I) bond are subjected to UVPD with 266-nm photons, which selectively cleaves the C-I bond homolytically. Alternatively, reagents containing azo functionalities are collisionally activated to yield radical sites on either side of the azo group. Both of these methods generate an initial radical site on the reagent, which then abstracts a hydrogen from the peptide while the peptide and reagent are held together by either electrostatic interactions or a covalent linkage. These methods are demonstrated via ion/ion reactions between the model peptide RARARAA (doubly protonated) and various distonic anionic radical reagents. The radical site abstracts a hydrogen atom from the peptide, while the charge site abstracts a proton. The net result is the conversion of a doubly protonated peptide to a peptide radical cation. The peptide radical cations have been fragmented via CID and the resulting product ion mass spectra are compared to the control CID spectrum of the singly protonated, even-electron species. This work is then extended to bradykinin, a more broadly studied peptide, for comparison with other radical peptide generation methods. The work presented here provides novel methods for generating peptide radical cations in the gas phase through ion/ion reaction complexes that do not require modification of the peptide in solution or generation of non-covalent complexes in the electrospray process.

  1. Inclusive cross sections for pairs of identified light charged hadrons and for single protons in e+e- at √{s }=10.58 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidl, R.; Abdesselam, A.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Al Said, S.; Asner, D. M.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; Babu, V.; Badhrees, I.; Bakich, A. M.; Barberio, E.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Biswal, J.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Browder, T. E.; Červenkov, D.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, D.; Dalseno, J.; Dash, N.; Dingfelder, J.; Doležal, Z.; Drásal, Z.; Dutta, D.; Eidelman, S.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J. E.; Ferber, T.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Garmash, A.; Gillard, R.; Giordano, F.; Goh, Y. M.; Goldenzweig, P.; Golob, B.; Haba, J.; Hara, T.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; He, X. H.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsu, C.-L.; Iijima, T.; Inami, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jaegle, I.; Joffe, D.; Joo, K. K.; Kang, K. H.; Kato, E.; Katrenko, P.; Kawasaki, T.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kodyš, P.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, D. H.; Li, L.; Li Gioi, L.; Libby, J.; Liu, Y.; Liventsev, D.; Lukin, P.; Masuda, M.; Matvienko, D.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyake, H.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, S.; Moll, A.; Moon, H. K.; Mori, T.; Mussa, R.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nanut, T.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nayak, M.; Niiyama, M.; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Oswald, C.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Pal, B.; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Pedlar, T. K.; Pestotnik, R.; Petrič, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Ribežl, E.; Ritter, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Ryu, S.; Sahoo, H.; Sakai, K.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, S.; Santelj, L.; Sanuki, T.; Savinov, V.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Seino, Y.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Sevior, M. E.; Shebalin, V.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Simon, F.; Sohn, Y.-S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Starič, M.; Sumihama, M.; Sumisawa, K.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tamponi, U.; Teramoto, Y.; Trusov, V.; Uchida, M.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Usov, Y.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Vorobyev, V.; Vossen, A.; Wagner, M. N.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yamaoka, J.; Yashchenko, S.; Yelton, J.; Yusa, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Belle Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    We report the first double differential cross sections of two charged pions and kaons (e+e-→h h X ) in electron-positron annihilation as a function of the fractional energies of the two hadrons for any charge and hadron combination. The dependence of these dihadron cross sections on the topology (same, opposite hemisphere or anywhere) is also studied with the help of the event shape variable thrust and its axis. The ratios of these dihadron cross sections for different charges and hadron combinations directly shed light on the contributing fragmentation functions. For example, we find that the ratio of same-sign pion pairs over opposite-sign pion pairs drops toward higher fractional energies where disfavored fragmentation is expected to be suppressed. These dihadron results are obtained from a 655 fb-1 data sample collected near the ϒ (4 S ) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider. Extending the previously published single-pion and single-kaon cross sections, single-proton (e+e-→p X ) cross sections are extracted from a 159 fb-1 data subsample.

  2. Single-molecule conductance of a chemically modified, π-extended tetrathiafulvalene and its charge-transfer complex with F4TCNQ

    PubMed Central

    García, Raúl; Herranz, M Ángeles; González, M Teresa; Bollinger, Gabino Rubio; Bürkle, Marius; Zotti, Linda A; Asai, Yoshihiro; Pauly, Fabian; Cuevas, Juan Carlos; Agraït, Nicolás

    2015-01-01

    Summary We describe the synthesis and single-molecule electrical transport properties of a molecular wire containing a π-extended tetrathiafulvalene (exTTF) group and its charge-transfer complex with F4TCNQ. We form single-molecule junctions using the in situ break junction technique using a homebuilt scanning tunneling microscope with a range of conductance between 10 G0 down to 10−7 G0. Within this range we do not observe a clear conductance signature of the neutral parent molecule, suggesting either that its conductance is too low or that it does not form a stable junction. Conversely, we do find a clear conductance signature in the experiments carried out on the charge-transfer complex. Due to the fact we expected this species to have a higher conductance than the neutral molecule, we believe this supports the idea that the conductance of the neutral molecule is very low, below our measurement sensitivity. This idea is further supported by theoretical calculations. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first reported single-molecule conductance measurements on a molecular charge-transfer species. PMID:26199662

  3. Single-cell, time-resolved study of the effects of the antimicrobial peptide alamethicin on Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Barns, Kenneth J; Weisshaar, James C

    2016-04-01

    Alamethicin is a well-studied antimicrobial peptide (AMP) that kills Gram-positive bacteria. It forms narrow, barrel-stave pores in planar lipid bilayers. We present a detailed, time-resolved microscopy study of the sequence of events during the attack of alamethicin on individual, live Bacillus subtilis cells expressing GFP in the cytoplasm. At the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), the first observed symptom is the halting of growth, as judged by the plateau in measured cell length vs time. The data strongly suggest that this growth-halting event occurs prior to membrane permeabilization. Gradual degradation of the proton-motive force, inferred from a decrease in pH-dependent GFP fluorescence intensity, evidently begins minutes later and continues over about 5 min. There follows an abrupt permeabilization of the cytoplasmic membrane to the DNA stain Sytox Orange and concomitant loss of small osmolytes, causing observable cell shrinkage, presumably due to decreased turgor pressure. This permeabilization of the cytoplasmic membrane occurs uniformly across the entire membrane, not locally, on a timescale of 5s or less. GFP gradually leaks out of the cell envelope, evidently impeded by the shrunken peptidoglycan layer. Disruption of the cell envelope by alamethicin occurs in stages, with larger and larger species permeating the envelope as time evolves over tens of minutes. Some of the observed symptoms are consistent with the formation of barrel-stave pores, but the data do not rule out "chaotic pore" or "carpet" mechanisms. We contrast the effects of alamethicin and the human cathelicidin LL-37 on B. subtilis. PMID:26777771

  4. Encapsulation of bioactive whey peptides in soy lecithin-derived nanoliposomes: Influence of peptide molecular weight.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Aishwarya; McClements, David Julian; Udenigwe, Chibuike C

    2016-12-15

    Encapsulation of peptides can be used to enhance their stability, delivery and bioavailability. This study focused on the effect of the molecular weight range of whey peptides on their encapsulation within soy lecithin-derived nanoliposomes. Peptide molecular weight did not have a major impact on encapsulation efficiency or liposome size. However, it influenced peptide distribution amongst the surface, core, and bilayer regions of the liposomes, as determined by electrical charge (ζ-potential) and FTIR analysis. The liposome ζ-potential depended on peptide molecular weight, suggesting that the peptide charged groups were in different locations relative to the liposome surfaces. FTIR analysis indicated that the least hydrophobic peptide fractions interacted more strongly with choline on the liposome surfaces. The results suggested that the peptides were unequally distributed within the liposomes, even at the same encapsulation efficiency. These findings are important for designing delivery systems for commercial production of encapsulated peptides with improved functional attributes. PMID:27451165

  5. Design of Peptide-Membrane Interactions to Modulate Single-File Water Transport through Modified Gramicidin Channels

    PubMed Central

    Portella, Guillem; Polupanow, Tanja; Zocher, Florian; Boytsov, Danila A.; Pohl, Peter; Diederichsen, Ulf; de Groot, Bert L.

    2012-01-01

    Water permeability through single-file channels is affected by intrinsic factors such as their size and polarity and by external determinants like their lipid environment in the membrane. Previous computational studies revealed that the obstruction of the channel by lipid headgroups can be long-lived, in the range of nanoseconds, and that pore-length-matching membrane mimetics could speed up water permeability. To test the hypothesis of lipid-channel interactions modulating channel permeability, we designed different gramicidin A derivatives with attached acyl chains. By combining extensive molecular-dynamics simulations and single-channel water permeation measurements, we show that by tuning lipid-channel interactions, these modifications reduce the presence of lipid headgroups in the pore, which leads to a clear and selective increase in their water permeability. PMID:23083713

  6. Design of peptide-membrane interactions to modulate single-file water transport through modified gramicidin channels.

    PubMed

    Portella, Guillem; Polupanow, Tanja; Zocher, Florian; Boytsov, Danila A; Pohl, Peter; Diederichsen, Ulf; de Groot, Bert L

    2012-10-17

    Water permeability through single-file channels is affected by intrinsic factors such as their size and polarity and by external determinants like their lipid environment in the membrane. Previous computational studies revealed that the obstruction of the channel by lipid headgroups can be long-lived, in the range of nanoseconds, and that pore-length-matching membrane mimetics could speed up water permeability. To test the hypothesis of lipid-channel interactions modulating channel permeability, we designed different gramicidin A derivatives with attached acyl chains. By combining extensive molecular-dynamics simulations and single-channel water permeation measurements, we show that by tuning lipid-channel interactions, these modifications reduce the presence of lipid headgroups in the pore, which leads to a clear and selective increase in their water permeability.

  7. Forced intercalation probes (FIT Probes): thiazole orange as a fluorescent base in peptide nucleic acids for homogeneous single-nucleotide-polymorphism detection.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Olaf; Jarikote, Dilip Venkatrao; Seitz, Oliver

    2005-01-01

    Fluorescent base analogues in DNA are versatile probes of nucleic acid-nucleic acid and nucleic acid-protein interactions. New peptide nucleic acid (PNA) based probes are described in which the intercalator dye thiazole orange (TO) serves as a base surrogate. The investigation of six TO derivatives revealed that the linker length and the conjugation site decided whether a base surrogate conveys sequence-selective DNA binding and whether fluorescence is increased or decreased upon single-mismatched hybridization. One TO derivative conferred universal PNA-DNA base pairing while maintaining duplex stability and hybridization selectivity. TO fluorescence increased up to 26-fold upon hybridization. In contrast to most other probes, in which fluorescence is invariant once hybridization had occurred, the emission of TO-containing PNA probes is attenuated when forced to intercalate next to a mismatched base pair. The specificity of DNA detection is therefore not limited by the selectivity of probe-target binding and a DNA target can be distinguished from its single-base mutant under nonstringent hybridization conditions. This property should be of advantage for real-time quantitative PCR and nucleic acid detection within living cells.

  8. Impact of single-dose application of TGF-β, copper peptide, stanozolol and ascorbic acid in hydrogel on midline laparatomy wound healing in a diabetic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Konerding, Moritz A; Ziebart, Thomas; Wolloscheck, Tanja; Wellmann, Axel; Ackermann, Maximilian

    2012-08-01

    Despite numerous advances and improvements in surgical techniques the incidence of incisional hernias after laparotomy remains high. The aim of this study was to investigate possible effects of single application of ascorbic acid, stanozolol, a synthetic anabolic steroid, copper peptide and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) on laparotomy wound healing in an incisional wound model in diabetic mice. After diabetes induction with streptozotozin in Balb-c mice, midline laparatomies were carried out. Closure of the linea alba was followed by single-dose application of the agents dissolved in a hydrogel before skin closure. The functional outcome was assessed in terms of maximum tensile strength. In addition, vessel densities, collagen contents and proliferation, were measured. The breaking strength of the skin 14 days after surgery was significantly higher in ascorbic acid (ΑΑ)-treated incisional wounds, whereas the other agents did not show a significantly better functional outcome. No significant differences were seen in vessel densities. Collagen type III contents was higher in the ΑΑ-treated animals, whereas the percentage of Ki67-positive nuclei was lower compared to the other groups. These data underline the positive effect of topically applied ascorbic acid in wound healing. PMID:22614259

  9. Matrix assisted ionization: new aromatic and nonaromatic matrix compounds producing multiply charged lipid, peptide, and protein ions in the positive and negative mode observed directly from surfaces.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Inutan, Ellen D; Wang, Beixi; Lietz, Christopher B; Green, Daniel R; Manly, Cory D; Richards, Alicia L; Marshall, Darrell D; Lingenfelter, Steven; Ren, Yue; Trimpin, Sarah

    2012-10-01

    Matrix assisted inlet ionization (MAII) is a method in which a matrix:analyte mixture produces mass spectra nearly identical to electrospray ionization without the application of a voltage or the use of a laser as is required in laserspray ionization (LSI), a subset of MAII. In MAII, the sample is introduced by, for example, tapping particles of dried matrix:analyte into the inlet of the mass spectrometer and, therefore, permits the study of conditions pertinent to the formation of multiply charged ions without the need of absorption at a laser wavelength. Crucial for the production of highly charged ions are desolvation conditions to remove matrix molecules from charged matrix:analyte clusters. Important factors affecting desolvation include heat, vacuum, collisions with gases and surfaces, and even radio frequency fields. Other parameters affecting multiply charged ion production is sample preparation, including pH and solvent composition. Here, findings from over 100 compounds found to produce multiply charged analyte ions using MAII with the inlet tube set at 450 °C are presented. Of the compounds tested, many have -OH or -NH(2) functionality, but several have neither (e.g., anthracene), nor aromaticity or conjugation. Binary matrices are shown to be applicable for LSI and solvent-free sample preparation can be applied to solubility restricted compounds, and matrix compounds too volatile to allow drying from common solvents. Our findings suggest that the physical properties of the matrix such as its morphology after evaporation of the solvent, its propensity to evaporate/sublime, and its acidity are more important than its structure and functional groups.

  10. Composition and method for self-assembly and mineralization of peptide amphiphiles

    DOEpatents

    Stupp, Samuel I.; Beniash, Elia; Hartgerink, Jeffrey D.

    2009-06-30

    The present invention is directed to a composition useful for making homogeneously mineralized self assembled peptide-amphiphile nanofibers and nanofiber gels. The composition is generally a solution comprised of a positively or negatively charged peptide-amphiphile and a like signed ion from the mineral. Mixing this solution with a second solution containing a dissolved counter-ion of the mineral and/or a second oppositely charged peptide amphiphile, results in the rapid self assembly of the peptide-amphiphiles into a nanofiber gel and templated mineralization of the ions. Templated mineralization of the initially dissolved mineral cations and anions in the mixture occurs with preferential orientation of the mineral crystals along the fiber surfaces within the nanofiber gel. One advantage of the present invention is that it results in homogenous growth of the mineral throughout the nanofiber gel. Another advantage of the present invention is that the nanofiber gel formation and mineralization reactions occur in a single mixing step and under substantially neutral or physiological pH conditions. These homogeneous nanostructured composite materials are useful for medical applications especially the regeneration of damaged bone in mammals. This invention is directed to the synthesis of peptide-amphiphiles with more than one amphiphilic moment and to supramolecular compositions comprised of such multi-dimensional peptide-amphiphiles. Supramolecular compositions can be formed by self assembly of multi-dimensional peptide-amphiphiles by mixing them with a solution comprising a monovalent cation.

  11. Composition and method for self-assembly and mineralization of peptide-amphiphiles

    DOEpatents

    Stupp, Samuel I.; Beniash, Elia; Hartgerink, Jeffrey D.

    2012-02-28

    The present invention is directed to a composition useful for making homogeneously mineralized self assembled peptide-amphiphile nanofibers and nanofiber gels. The composition is generally a solution comprised of a positively or negatively charged peptide-amphiphile and a like signed ion from the mineral. Mixing this solution with a second solution containing a dissolved counter-ion of the mineral and/or a second oppositely charged peptide amphiphile, results in the rapid self assembly of the peptide-amphiphiles into a nanofiber gel and templated mineralization of the ions. Templated mineralization of the initially dissolved mineral cations and anions in the mixture occurs with preferential orientation of the mineral crystals along the fiber surfaces within the nanofiber gel. One advantage of the present invention is that it results in homogenous growth of the mineral throughout the nanofiber gel. Another advantage of the present invention is that the nanofiber gel formation and mineralization reactions occur in a single mixing step and under substantially neutral or physiological pH conditions. These homogeneous nanostructured composite materials are useful for medical applications especially the regeneration of damaged bone in mammals. This invention is directed to the synthesis of peptide-amphiphiles with more than one amphiphilic moment and to supramolecular compositions comprised of such multi-dimensional peptide-amphiphiles. Supramolecular compositions can be formed by self assembly of multi-dimensional peptide-amphiphiles by mixing them with a solution comprising a monovalent cation.

  12. Potential of prodendronic polyamines with modulated segmental charge density as novel coating for fast and efficient analysis of peptides and basic proteins by CE and CE-MS.

    PubMed

    Acunha, Tanize; Ibáñez, Clara; Pascual Reguera, María Isabel; Sarò, Mariagiovanna; Navarro, Rodrigo; Alfonso Redondo, Juan; Reinecke, Helmut; Gallardo, Alberto; Simó, Carolina; Cifuentes, Alejandro

    2015-07-01

    In this work, the suitability of a new polymer family has been investigated as capillary coatings for the analysis of peptides and basic proteins by CE. This polymer family has been designed to minimize or completely prevent protein-capillary wall interactions and to modify the EOF. These coating materials are linear polymeric chains bearing as side cationizable moiety a dentronic triamine derived from N,N,N',N'-tetraethyldiethylenetriamine (TEDETA), which is linked to the backbone through a spacer (unit labeled as TEDETAMA). Four different polymers have been prepared and evaluated: a homopolymer which comprised only of those cationizable repetitive units of TEDETAMA, and three copolymers that randomly incorporate TEDETAMA together with neutral hydrosoluble units of N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide (HPMA) at different molar percentages (25:75, 50:50 and 75:25). It has been demonstrated that the composition of the copolymers influences the EOF and therefore the separation of the investigated biopolymers. Among the novel polymers studied, poly-(TEDETAMA-co-HPMA) 50:50 copolymer was successfully applied as coating material of the inner capillary surface in CE-UV and CE-MS, providing EOF reversing together with fast and efficient baseline separation of peptides and basic proteins. Finally, the feasibility of the polymer-coated capillary was shown through the analysis of lysozyme in a cheese sample. PMID:25820626

  13. The physics of a single-event upset in integrated circuits: A review and critique of analytical models for charge collection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonroos, O.; Zoutendyk, J.

    1983-01-01

    When an energetic particle (kinetic energy 0.5 MeV) originating from a radioactive decay or a cosmic ray transverse the active regions of semiconductor devices used in integrated circuit (IC) chips, it leaves along its track a high density electron hole plasma. The subsequent decay of this plasma by drift and diffusion leads to charge collection at the electrodes large enough in most cases to engender a false reading, hence the name single-event upset (SEU). The problem of SEU's is particularly severe within the harsh environment of Jupiter's radiation belts and constitutes therefore a matter of concern for the Galileo mission. The physics of an SEU event is analyzed in some detail. Owing to the predominance of nonlinear space charge effects and the fact that positive (holes) and negative (electrons) charges must be treated on an equal footing, analytical models for the ionized-charge collection and their corresponding currents as a function of time prove to be inadequate even in the simplest case of uniformly doped, abrupt p-n junctions in a one-dimensional geometry. The necessity for full-fledged computer simulation of the pertinent equations governing the electron-hole plasma therefore becomes imperative.

  14. Antimicrobial peptides

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    With increasing antibiotics resistance, there is an urgent need for novel infection therapeutics. Since antimicrobial peptides provide opportunities for this, identification and optimization of such peptides have attracted much interest during recent years. Here, a brief overview of antimicrobial peptides is provided, with focus placed on how selected hydrophobic modifications of antimicrobial peptides can be employed to combat also more demanding pathogens, including multi-resistant strains, without conferring unacceptable toxicity. PMID:24758244

  15. Low-energy charge-density excitations in MgB2: Striking interplay between single-particle and collective behavior for large momenta.

    PubMed

    Cai, Y Q; Chow, P C; Restrepo, O D; Takano, Y; Togano, K; Kito, H; Ishii, H; Chen, C C; Liang, K S; Chen, C T; Tsuda, S; Shin, S; Kao, C C; Ku, W; Eguiluz, A G

    2006-10-27

    A sharp feature in the charge-density excitation spectra of single-crystal MgB2, displaying a remarkable cosinelike, periodic energy dispersion with momentum transfer (q) along the c* axis, has been observed for the first time by high-resolution nonresonant inelastic x-ray scattering (NIXS). Time-dependent density-functional theory calculations show that the physics underlying the NIXS data is strong coupling between single-particle and collective degrees of freedom, mediated by large crystal local-field effects. As a result, the small-q collective mode residing in the single-particle excitation gap of the B pi bands reappears periodically in higher Brillouin zones. The NIXS data thus embody a novel signature of the layered electronic structure of MgB2.

  16. Single-Tier Testing with the C6 Peptide ELISA Kit Compared with Two-Tier Testing for Lyme Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wormser, Gary P.; Schriefer, Martin; Aguero-Rosenfeld, Maria E.; Levin, Andrew; Steere, Allen C.; Nadelman, Robert B.; Nowakowski, John; Marques, Adriana; Johnson, Barbara J. B.; Dumler, J. Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Background The two-tier serologic testing protocol for Lyme disease has a number of shortcomings including low sensitivity in early disease; increased cost, time and labor; and subjectivity in the interpretation of immunoblots. Methods The diagnostic accuracy of a single-tier commercial C6 ELISA kit was compared with two-tier testing. Results The C6 ELISA was significantly more sensitive than two-tier testing with sensitivities of 66.5% (95% C.I.:61.7-71.1) and 35.2% (95%C.I.:30.6-40.1), respectively (p<0.001) in 403 sera from patients with erythema migrans. The C6 ELISA had sensitivity statistically comparable to two-tier testing in sera from Lyme disease patients with early neurological manifestations (88.6% vs. 77.3%, p=0.13) or arthritis (98.3% vs. 95.6%, p= 0.38). Te specificities of C6 ELISA and two-tier testing in over 2200 blood donors, patients with other conditions, and Lyme disease vaccine recipients were found to be 98.9% and 99.5%, respectively (p<0.05, 95% C.I. surrounding the 0.6 percentage point difference of 0.04 to 1.15). Conclusions Using a reference standard of two-tier testing, the C6 ELISA as a single step serodiagnostic test provided increased sensitivity in early Lyme disease with comparable sensitivity in later manifestations of Lyme disease. The C6 ELISA had slightly decreased specificity. Future studies should evaluate the performance of the C6 ELISA compared with two-tier testing in routine clinical practice. PMID:23062467

  17. Single-tier testing with the C6 peptide ELISA kit compared with two-tier testing for Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Wormser, Gary P; Schriefer, Martin; Aguero-Rosenfeld, Maria E; Levin, Andrew; Steere, Allen C; Nadelman, Robert B; Nowakowski, John; Marques, Adriana; Johnson, Barbara J B; Dumler, J Stephen

    2013-01-01

    For the diagnosis of Lyme disease, the 2-tier serologic testing protocol for Lyme disease has a number of shortcomings including low sensitivity in early disease; increased cost, time, and labor; and subjectivity in the interpretation of immunoblots. In this study, the diagnostic accuracy of a single-tier commercial C6 ELISA kit was compared with 2-tier testing. The results showed that the C6 ELISA was significantly more sensitive than 2-tier testing with sensitivities of 66.5% (95% confidence interval [CI] 61.7-71.1) and 35.2% (95% CI 30.6-40.1), respectively (P < 0.001) in 403 sera from patients with erythema migrans. The C6 ELISA had sensitivity statistically comparable to 2-tier testing in sera from Lyme disease patients with early neurologic manifestations (88.6% versus 77.3%, P = 0.13) or arthritis (98.3% versus 95.6%, P = 0.38). The specificities of C6 ELISA and 2-tier testing in over 2200 blood donors, patients with other conditions, and Lyme disease vaccine recipients were found to be 98.9% and 99.5%, respectively (P < 0.05, 95% CI surrounding the 0.6 percentage point difference of 0.04 to 1.15). In conclusion, using a reference standard of 2-tier testing, the C6 ELISA as a single-step serodiagnostic test provided increased sensitivity in early Lyme disease with comparable sensitivity in later manifestations of Lyme disease. The C6 ELISA had slightly decreased specificity. Future studies should evaluate the performance of the C6 ELISA compared with 2-tier testing in routine clinical practice.

  18. Application of Peptide LC Retention Time Information in a Discriminant Function for Peptide Identification by Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Strittmatter, Eric F.; Kangas, Lars J.; Petritis, Konstantinos; Mottaz, Heather M.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Shen, Yufeng; Jacobs, Jon M.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2004-07-09

    We describe the application of a peptide retention time reversed phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) prediction model previously reported (Petritis et al. Anal. Chem. 99, 2002, 11049) for improved peptide identification. The model uses peptide sequence information to generate a theoretical (predicted) elution time that can be compared with the observed elution time. Using data from a set of known proteins, the retention time parameter was incorporated into a discriminant function for use with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) data analyzed with the peptide/protein identification program SEQUEST. For singly charged ions, the number of identifications increased by 12% when the elution time metric is included compared to when mass spectral data is the sole source of information in the context of a Drosophila melanogaster database. A 3-4% improvement was obtained for doubly and triply charged ions for the same biological system. Application to the larger Rattus norvegicus (rat) and human proteome databases resulted in an 8-9% overall increase in the number of identifications, when both the discriminant function and elution time are used. The effect of adding “runner-up” hits (peptide matches that are not the highest scoring for a spectra) from SEQUEST is also explored, and we find that the number of confident identifications is further increased when these hits are also considered. Finally, application of the discriminant functions derived in this work with ~2.2 million spectra from 330 LC-MS/MS analyses of peptides from human plasma protein resulted in a 19% increase in confident peptide identifications (9551 vs 8049) using elution time information. Further improvements from the use of elution time information can be expected as both the experimental control of elution time reproducibility and the predictive capability are improved.

  19. Conformations of Cationized Peptides. Determination of Ligand Binding Geometries by Irmpd Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunbar, Robert C.; Steill, Jeffrey; Oomens, Jos; Polfer, Nick C.

    2009-06-01

    Spectroscopic study of the conformations of metalated amino acids has mapped out in some detail the preferences for canonical (charge solvated) versus zwitterionic (salt bridge) conformations. Corresponding studies of larger peptides are now possible. Here are described results for several singly and doubly charged metal ions with dipeptides and tripeptides. Factors including ion charge, size of cation, and side chain identity and sequence are found to be conformational determinants. IRMPD spectra of the ions were acquired by irradiating the cell with infrared light from the FELIX free electron laser at wavelengths in the approximate range 500 to 1900 cm^{-1}.

  20. Magnetic Field Induced Charged Exciton Studies in a GaAs/Al(0.3)Ga(0.7)As Single Heterojunction

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yongmin; Munteanu, F.M.; Perry, C.H.; Reno, J.L.; Rickel, D.G.; Simmons, J.A.

    1999-05-25

    The magnetophotoluminescence (MPL) behavior of a GaAs/Al0.3Ga0.7As single heterojunction has been investigated to 60T. We observed negatively charged singlet and triplet exciton states that are formed at high magnetic fields beyond the {nu}=l quantum Hall state. The variation of the charged exciton binding energies are in good agreement with theoretical predictions. The MPL transition intensities for these states showed intensity variations (maxima and minima) at the {nu}=l/3 and 1/5 fractional quantum Hall (FQH) state as a consequence of a large reduction of electron-hole screening at these filling factors.

  1. Charge-carrier mobilities in Cd(0.8)Zn(0.2)Te single crystals used as nuclear radiation detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burshtein, Z.; Jayatirtha, H. N.; Burger, A.; Butler, J. F.; Apotovsky, B.; Doty, F. P.

    1993-01-01

    Charge-carrier mobilities were measured for the first time in Cd(0.8)Zn(0.2)Te single crystals using time-of-flight measurements of charge carriers produced by short (10 ns) light pulses from a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser (532 nm). The electron mobility displayed a T exp -1.1 dependence on the absolute temperature T in the range 200-320 K, with a room-temperature mobility of 1350 sq cm/V s. The hole mobility displayed a T exp -2.0 dependence in the same temperature range, with a room-temperature mobility of 120 sq cm/V s. Cd(0.8)Zn(0.2)Te appears to be a very favorable material for a room-temperature electronic nuclear radiation detector.

  2. Delocalized and localized charged excitons in single CdSe/CdS dot-in-rods revealed by polarized photoluminescence blinking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihara, Toshiyuki; Sato, Ryota; Teranishi, Toshiharu; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiko

    2014-07-01

    CdSe/CdS heterostructured nanocrystals with quasi-type-II band alignments provide an interesting platform for studying the photoluminescence (PL) blinking associated with their unique morphologies. By using simultaneous measurements of the PL intensity, lifetime, and polarization anisotropy, we reveal the role of the electron delocalization during the blinking of single CdSe/CdS dot-in-rods. We found that a significant change in the PL polarization anisotropy distinguishes between two kinds of charged excitons with different electron delocalizations. We report our observation of unique polarized PL blinking governed by the band alignments and the Coulomb interactions between the charges inside and outside the dot-in-rod.

  3. Charge-collection efficiency and long-term stability of single-crystal CVD diamond detector under different carrier-drift conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Yuki; Murakami, Hiroyuki; Shimaoka, Takehiro; Tsubota, Masakatsu; Kaneko, Junichi H.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the performance of a charged-particle detector fabricated using single-crystal diamond grown by chemical vapor deposition. The detector identified four different 241Am α-particle energies (5.389, 5.443, 5.486, and 5.545 MeV) thanks to its superior energy resolution of 0.407 ± 0.004% for electron drift and 0.418 ± 0.004% for hole drift (full width at half maximum). The charge-collection efficiency inside the diamond crystal was above 97.0% for both electrons and holes. The diamond detector also exhibited no significant degradation in terms of pulse-height spectra and energy resolution during operation for more than 100 h under electron-drift conditions. In contrast, the pulse-height spectra obtained under hole-drift conditions deteriorated because of the polarization phenomenon.

  4. TEMPO-Assisted Free Radical-Initiated Peptide Sequencing Mass Spectrometry (FRIPS MS) in Q-TOF and Orbitrap Mass Spectrometers: Single-Step Peptide Backbone Dissociations in Positive Ion Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Inae; Lee, Sun Young; Hwangbo, Song; Kang, Dukjin; Lee, Hookeun; Kim, Hugh I.; Moon, Bongjin; Oh, Han Bin

    2016-09-01

    The present study demonstrates that one-step peptide backbone fragmentations can be achieved using the TEMPO [2-(2,2,6,6-tetramethyl piperidine-1-oxyl)]-assisted free radical-initiated peptide sequencing (FRIPS) mass spectrometry in a hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight (Q-TOF) mass spectrometer and a Q-Exactive Orbitrap instrument in positive ion mode, in contrast to two-step peptide fragmentation in an ion-trap mass spectrometer (reference Anal. Chem. 85, 7044-7051 (30)). In the hybrid Q-TOF and Q-Exactive instruments, higher collisional energies can be applied to the target peptides, compared with the low collisional energies applied by the ion-trap instrument. The higher energy deposition and the additional multiple collisions in the collision cell in both instruments appear to result in one-step peptide backbone dissociations in positive ion mode. This new finding clearly demonstrates that the TEMPO-assisted FRIPS approach is a very useful tool in peptide mass spectrometry research.

  5. Factors Affecting Peptide Interactions with Surface-Bound Microgels.

    PubMed

    Nyström, Lina; Nordström, Randi; Bramhill, Jane; Saunders, Brian R; Álvarez-Asencio, Rubén; Rutland, Mark W; Malmsten, Martin

    2016-02-01

    Effects of electrostatics and peptide size on peptide interactions with surface-bound microgels were investigated with ellipsometry, confocal microscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Results show that binding of cationic poly-L-lysine (pLys) to anionic, covalently immobilized, poly(ethyl acrylate-co-methacrylic acid) microgels increased with increasing peptide net charge and microgel charge density. Furthermore, peptide release was facilitated by decreasing either microgel or peptide charge density. Analogously, increasing ionic strength facilitated peptide release for short peptides. As a result of peptide binding, the surface-bound microgels displayed pronounced deswelling and increased mechanical rigidity, the latter quantified by quantitative nanomechanical mapping. While short pLys was found to penetrate the entire microgel network and to result in almost complete charge neutralization, larger peptides were partially excluded from the microgel network, forming an outer peptide layer on the microgels. As a result of this difference, microgel flattening was more influenced by the lower Mw peptide than the higher. Peptide-induced deswelling was found to be lower for higher Mw pLys, the latter effect not observed for the corresponding microgels in the dispersed state. While the effects of electrostatics on peptide loading and release were similar to those observed for dispersed microgels, there were thus considerable effects of the underlying surface on peptide-induced microgel deswelling, which need to be considered in the design of surface-bound microgels as carriers of peptide loads, for example, in drug delivery or in functionalized biomaterials. PMID:26750986

  6. The Impact of Interlayer Electronic Coupling on Charge Transport in Organic Semiconductors: A Case Study on Titanylphthalocyanine Single Crystals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zongpeng; Jiang, Lang; Cheng, Changli; Zhen, Yonggang; Zhao, Guangyao; Geng, Hua; Yi, Yuanping; Li, Liqiang; Dong, Huanli; Shuai, Zhigang; Hu, Wenping

    2016-04-18

    Traditionally, it is believed that three-dimensional transport networks are preferable to those of lower dimensions. We demonstrate that inter-layer electronic couplings may result in a drastic decrease of charge mobilities by utilizing field-effect transistors (FET) based on two phases of titanyl phthalocyanine (TiOPc) crystals. The α-phase crystals with electronic couplings along two dimensions show a maximum mobility up to 26.8 cm(2)  V(-1)  s(-1) . In sharp contrast, the β-phase crystals with extra significant inter-layer electronic couplings show a maximum mobility of only 0.1 cm(2)  V(-1)  s(-1) . Theoretical calculations on the bulk crystals and model slabs reveal that the inter-layer electronic couplings for the β-phase devices will diminish remarkably the device charge transport abilities owing to the coupling direction perpendicular to the current direction. This work provides new insights into the impact of the dimensionality and directionality of the packing arrangements on charge transport in organic semiconductors.

  7. The Impact of Interlayer Electronic Coupling on Charge Transport in Organic Semiconductors: A Case Study on Titanylphthalocyanine Single Crystals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zongpeng; Jiang, Lang; Cheng, Changli; Zhen, Yonggang; Zhao, Guangyao; Geng, Hua; Yi, Yuanping; Li, Liqiang; Dong, Huanli; Shuai, Zhigang; Hu, Wenping

    2016-04-18

    Traditionally, it is believed that three-dimensional transport networks are preferable to those of lower dimensions. We demonstrate that inter-layer electronic couplings may result in a drastic decrease of charge mobilities by utilizing field-effect transistors (FET) based on two phases of titanyl phthalocyanine (TiOPc) crystals. The α-phase crystals with electronic couplings along two dimensions show a maximum mobility up to 26.8 cm(2)  V(-1)  s(-1) . In sharp contrast, the β-phase crystals with extra significant inter-layer electronic couplings show a maximum mobility of only 0.1 cm(2)  V(-1)  s(-1) . Theoretical calculations on the bulk crystals and model slabs reveal that the inter-layer electronic couplings for the β-phase devices will diminish remarkably the device charge transport abilities owing to the coupling direction perpendicular to the current direction. This work provides new insights into the impact of the dimensionality and directionality of the packing arrangements on charge transport in organic semiconductors. PMID:26990048

  8. Predictive DFT-based approaches to charge and spin transport in single-molecule junctions and two-dimensional materials: successes and challenges.

    PubMed

    Quek, Su Ying; Khoo, Khoong Hong

    2014-11-18

    CONSPECTUS: The emerging field of flexible electronics based on organics and two-dimensional (2D) materials relies on a fundamental understanding of charge and spin transport at the molecular and nanoscale. It is desirable to make predictions and shine light on unexplained experimental phenomena independently of experimentally derived parameters. Indeed, density functional theory (DFT), the workhorse of first-principles approaches, has been used extensively to model charge/spin transport at the nanoscale. However, DFT is essentially a ground state theory that simply guarantees correct total energies given the correct charge density, while charge/spin transport is a nonequilibrium phenomenon involving the scattering of quasiparticles. In this Account, we critically assess the validity and applicability of DFT to predict charge/spin transport at the nanoscale. We also describe a DFT-based approach, DFT+Σ, which incorporates corrections to Kohn-Sham energy levels based on many-electron calculations. We focus on single-molecule junctions and then discuss how the important considerations for DFT descriptions of transport can differ in 2D materials. We conclude that when used appropriately, DFT and DFT-based approaches can play an important role in making predictions and gaining insight into transport in these materials. Specifically, we shall focus on the low-bias quasi-equilibrium regime, which is also experimentally most relevant for single-molecule junctions. The next question is how well can the scattering of DFT Kohn-Sham particles approximate the scattering of true quasiparticles in the junction? Quasiparticles are electrons (holes) that are surrounded by a constantly changing cloud of holes (electrons), but Kohn-Sham particles have no physical significance. However, Kohn-Sham particles can often be used as a qualitative approximation to quasiparticles. The errors in standard DFT descriptions of transport arise primarily from errors in the Kohn-Sham energy levels

  9. Dragging human mesenchymal stem cells with the aid of supramolecular assemblies of single-walled carbon nanotubes, molecular magnets, and peptides in a magnetic field.

    PubMed

    de Paula, Ana Cláudia C; Sáfar, Gustavo A M; Góes, Alfredo M; Bemquerer, Marcelo P; Ribeiro, Marcos A; Stumpf, Humberto O

    2015-01-01

    Human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) are an attractive cell source for therapeutic applicability in diverse fields for the repair and regeneration of damaged or malfunctioning tissues and organs. There is a growing number of cell therapies using stem cells due to their characteristics of modulation of immune system and reduction of acute rejection. So a challenge in stem cells therapy is the delivery of cells to the organ of interest, a specific site. The aim of this paper was to investigate the effects of a supramolecular assembly composed of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT), molecular magnets (lawsone-Co-phenanthroline), and a synthetic peptide (FWYANHYWFHNAFWYANHYWFHNA) in the hASCs cultures. The hASCs were isolated, characterized, expanded, and cultured with the SWCNT supramolecular assembly (SWCNT-MA). The assembly developed did not impair the cell characteristics, viability, or proliferation. During growth, the cells were strongly attached to the assembly and they could be dragged by an applied magnetic field of less than 0.3 T. These assemblies were narrower than their related allotropic forms, that is, multiwalled carbon nanotubes, and they could therefore be used to guide cells through thin blood capillaries within the human body. This strategy seems to be useful as noninvasive and nontoxic stem cells delivery/guidance and tracking during cell therapy. PMID:25688350

  10. Dragging human mesenchymal stem cells with the aid of supramolecular assemblies of single-walled carbon nanotubes, molecular magnets, and peptides in a magnetic field.

    PubMed

    de Paula, Ana Cláudia C; Sáfar, Gustavo A M; Góes, Alfredo M; Bemquerer, Marcelo P; Ribeiro, Marcos A; Stumpf, Humberto O

    2015-01-01

    Human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) are an attractive cell source for therapeutic applicability in diverse fields for the repair and regeneration of damaged or malfunctioning tissues and organs. There is a growing number of cell therapies using stem cells due to their characteristics of modulation of immune system and reduction of acute rejection. So a challenge in stem cells therapy is the delivery of cells to the organ of interest, a specific site. The aim of this paper was to investigate the effects of a supramolecular assembly composed of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT), molecular magnets (lawsone-Co-phenanthroline), and a synthetic peptide (FWYANHYWFHNAFWYANHYWFHNA) in the hASCs cultures. The hASCs were isolated, characterized, expanded, and cultured with the SWCNT supramolecular assembly (SWCNT-MA). The assembly developed did not impair the cell characteristics, viability, or proliferation. During growth, the cells were strongly attached to the assembly and they could be dragged by an applied magnetic field of less than 0.3 T. These assemblies were narrower than their related allotropic forms, that is, multiwalled carbon nanotubes, and they could therefore be used to guide cells through thin blood capillaries within the human body. This strategy seems to be useful as noninvasive and nontoxic stem cells delivery/guidance and tracking during cell therapy.

  11. Discriminating D-amino acid-containing peptide epimers by radical-directed dissociation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yuanqi; Quebbemann, Neil R; Julian, Ryan R

    2012-08-01

    The presence of a single D-amino acid in a peptide is very difficult to detect. Mass spectrometry-based approaches rely on differences in fragmentation between all L-amino acid-containing peptides and single D-amino acid-containing peptides (which are epimers) for identification. The success of this approach is dependent on the structural sensitivity of the fragmentation method. Recently, experiments have demonstrated that fragmentation initiated by radical chemistry, or radical-directed dissociation (RDD), is particularly sensitive to the structure of the ion being fragmented. Herein, RDD is used to identify the presence of D-serine, D-alanine, or D-aspartic acid in eight biologically relevant peptides. It is demonstrated that chiral disambiguation by RDD is dependent on both the initial radical site and subsequent radical migration. Fortuitously, RDD can be initiated by a variety of different radical precursors which can be associated with the peptide via covalent or noncovalent means, and RDD can be examined in all observable charge states (both positive and negative). This diversity enables numerous initial radical sites and migration pathways to be explored. For all but one of the peptides that were examined, RDD provides significantly better chiral discrimination than CID. Quantitation of peptide epimers by RDD is also described.

  12. In-plane and transverse superconducting fluctuation diamagnetism in the presence of charge-density waves in 2H-NbSe2 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, F.; Berger, H.; Cabo, L.; Carballeira, C.; Mosqueira, J.; Pavuna, D.; Vidal, F.

    2007-03-01

    The fluctuation-diamagnetism (FD) above the superconducting transition was measured in 2H-NbSe2 single crystals. The moderate uniaxial anisotropy of this compound, and some experimental improvements, allowed us to measure the superconducting fluctuation effects in the two main crystallographic directions. These results reveal that the nonlocal electrodynamic effects on the FD are highly anisotropic, and they also discard a possible contribution to the FD coming from the charge-density waves (CDWs) appearing below TCDW>TC in 2H-NbSe2 , in agreement with a phenomenological estimate.

  13. Analysis of Neutron and Singly Charged Particle Multiplicities Induced by Collision of 4.5A GeV/c 16O with Emulsion Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    El-Nagdy, M.S.; Abdel-Halim, S.M.; Nabil Yasin, M.

    2005-03-17

    The analysis of neutron n and singly charged particle Q=1 participated from 16O at 4.5A GeV/c interactions with emulsion nuclei are presented. The average multiplicities of shower particle for n and Q=1 stay more or less constant when compared with analogous data on P-A at similar momentum. The multiplicity distributions as well as the average values of the various secondary particles are studied, discussed and compared with the calculations according cascade evaporation model. The results lead to assume that the n and Q=1 from 16O tend to collide peripherally with target emulsion or in other words to make gentle reactions.

  14. A single mutation in the hepta-peptide active site of Aspergillus niger PhyA phytase leads to myriad of biochemical changes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The active site motif of proteins belonging to ‘Histidine Acid Phosphatase’ (HAP) contains a hepta-peptide region, RHGXRXP. A close comparison among fungal and yeast HAPs has revealed the fourth residue of the hepta-peptide to be E instead of A, which is the case with A. niger phyA phytase. However,...

  15. Primary structure and neuronal effects of α-bag cell peptide, a second candidate neurotransmitter encoded by a single gene in bag cell neurons of Aplysia

    PubMed Central

    Rothman, Barry S.; Mayeri, Earl; Brown, Richard O.; Yuan, Pau-Miau; Shively, John E.

    1983-01-01

    A discharge of impulse activity in a group of neuroendocrine cells, the bag cells, produces several types of prolonged responses in various identified neurons of the abdominal ganglion of Aplysia. Two excitatory responses are almost certainly mediated by egg-laying hormone, but this peptide cannot account for other responses, such as inhibition of left upper quadrant neurons. We report here the isolation from bag cell clusters of three structurally similar peptides, seven, eight, and nine residues long, that are candidate transmitters for mediating bag cell-induced inhibition. They may also serve as autoexcitatory transmitters since the seven-residue peptide produces a slow depolarization of the bag cells similar to that which occurs during bag cell discharge. The amino acid sequence of the largest peptide, termed α-bag cell peptide[1-9], is H-Ala-Pro-Arg-Leu-Arg-Phe-Tyr-Ser-Leu-OH. The other two peptides are identical to α-BCP[1-9] except that they lack the COOH-terminal Ser-Leu or leucine residues. The three peptides inhibit left upper quadrant neurons at relative potencies of 10:30:1 (seven-, eight-, and nine-residue peptides, respectively). Recent molecular genetic analysis shows that both α-BCP[1-9] and egg-laying hormone are encoded by the same bag cell-specific gene. The multiple neuronal effects of bag cells are therefore likely to be mediated by at least two transmitters that are cleaved from a common precursor molecule. PMID:16593372

  16. Efficient Covalent Bond Formation in Gas-Phase Peptide-Peptide Ion Complexes with the Photoleucine Stapler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaffer, Christopher J.; Andrikopoulos, Prokopis C.; Řezáč, Jan; Rulíšek, Lubomír; Tureček, František

    2016-04-01

    Noncovalent complexes of hydrophobic peptides GLLLG and GLLLK with photoleucine (L*) tagged peptides G(L* n L m )K (n = 1,3, m = 2,0) were generated as singly charged ions in the gas phase and probed by photodissociation at 355 nm. Carbene intermediates produced by photodissociative loss of N2 from the L* diazirine rings underwent insertion into X-H bonds of the target peptide moiety, forming covalent adducts with yields reaching 30%. Gas-phase sequencing of the covalent adducts revealed preferred bond formation at the C-terminal residue of the target peptide. Site-selective carbene insertion was achieved by placing the L* residue in different positions along the photopeptide chain, and the residues in the target peptide undergoing carbene insertion were identified by gas-phase ion sequencing that was aided by specific 13C labeling. Density functional theory calculations indicated that noncovalent binding to GL*L*L*K resulted in substantial changes of the (GLLLK + H)+ ground state conformation. The peptide moieties in [GL*L*LK + GLLLK + H]+ ion complexes were held together by hydrogen bonds, whereas dispersion interactions of the nonpolar groups were only secondary in ground-state 0 K structures. Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics for 100 ps trajectories of several different conformers at the 310 K laboratory temperature showed that noncovalent complexes developed multiple, residue-specific contacts between the diazirine carbons and GLLLK residues. The calculations pointed to the substantial fluidity of the nonpolar side chains in the complexes. Diazirine photochemistry in combination with Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics is a promising tool for investigations of peptide-peptide ion interactions in the gas phase.

  17. Manipulating the charge state of Au clusters on rutile TiO2(110) single crystal surfaces through molecular reactions probed by infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yunjun; Hu, Shujun; Yu, Min; Wang, Tingting; Huang, Shiming; Yan, Shishen; Xu, Mingchun

    2016-07-14

    The charge state of Au clusters deposited on rutile TiO2(110) single crystal surfaces was studied by UHV-FTIRS using CO as a probe. The as-deposited Au clusters on oxidized TiO2(110) surfaces are electrically neutral and are identified by the 2105-2112 cm(-1) vibrational frequency of adsorbed CO depending on Au coverage. Annealing Au/TiO2(110) in a moderate O2 atmosphere at 400 K blue shifts the CO vibrational frequency by only 2-3 cm(-1) both on bare TiO2(110) surfaces and on Au clusters. However, NO exposure blue shifts the CO vibrational frequency by 16-26 cm(-1) for CO adsorbed on Au atoms near the interface and by 3-4 cm(-1) for CO adsorbed on top of Au clusters. As the acceptors of the intense charge transfer from Au, the Oa atoms generated through (NO)2→ N2O + Oa reactions on the small fraction of the bare TiO2(110) surface reside around the Au/TiO2(110) interface perimeter, causing the neutral Au(0) to be cationic Au(δ+) states. This is a new approach to manipulate the charge state of Au clusters on oxide surfaces, which may be helpful in regulating the catalytic redox reactions on oxide supported metal systems.

  18. Modeling the Interaction between Integrin-Binding Peptide (RGD) and Rutile Surface: The Effect of Na+ on Peptide Adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Chunya; Skelton, Adam; Chen, Mingjun; Vlcek, Lukas; Cummings, Peter T

    2011-01-01

    The dynamics of a single tripeptide Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) adsorbing onto negatively charged hydroxylated rutile (110) surface in aqueous solution was studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The results indicate that the adsorbed Na{sup +} ions play an important role in determining the binding geometry of RGD. With an initial 'horseshoe' configuration, the charged side groups (COO{sup -} and NH{sub 2}) of the peptide are able to interact with the surface through direct hydrogen bonds (H bonds) in the very early stage of adsorption. The Na{sup +} ions approach the positively charged Arg side chain, competing with the Arg side chain for adsorption to the negatively charged hydroxyl oxygen. In coordination with the structural adjustment of the peptide, the Arg residue is driven to detach from the rutile surface. In contrast, the Na+ ions in close proximity to the negatively charged Asp side chain contribute to the binding of the COO{sup -} group on the surface, helping the carboxyl oxygen not involved in COO{sup -}-surface H bonds to orientate toward the hydroxyl hydrogens. Once both carboxyl oxygens form enough H bonds with the hydroxyl hydrogens, the redundant ions move toward a more favorable adsorption site.

  19. Helical hairpin structure of influenza hemagglutinin fusion peptide stabilized by charge-dipole interactions between the N-terminal amino group and the second helix.

    PubMed

    Lorieau, Justin L; Louis, John M; Bax, Ad

    2011-03-01

    The fusion domain of the influenza coat protein hemagglutinin HA2, bound to dodecyl phosphocholine micelles, was recently shown to adopt a structure consisting of two antiparallel α-helices, packed in an exceptionally tight hairpin configuration. Four interhelical H(α) to C═O aliphatic H-bonds were identified as factors stabilizing this fold. Here, we report evidence for an additional stabilizing force: a strong charge-dipole interaction between the N-terminal Gly(1) amino group and the dipole moment of helix 2. pH titration of the amino-terminal (15)N resonance, using a methylene-TROSY-based 3D NMR experiment, and observation of Gly(1 13)C' show a strongly elevated pK = 8.8, considerably higher than expected for an N-terminal amino group in a lipophilic environment. Chemical shifts of three C-terminal carbonyl carbons of helix 2 titrate with the protonation state of Gly(1)-N, indicative of a close proximity between the N-terminal amino group and the axis of helix 2, providing an optimal charge-dipole stabilization of the antiparallel hairpin fold. pK values of the side-chain carboxylate groups of Glu(11) and Asp(19) are higher by about 1 and 0.5 unit, respectively, than commonly seen for solvent-exposed side chains in water-soluble proteins, indicative of dielectric constants of ε = ∼30 (Glu(11)) and ∼60 (Asp(19)), placing these groups in the headgroup region of the phospholipid micelle.

  20. Trapping of Intact, Singly-Charged, Bovine Serum Albumin Ions Injected from the Atmosphere with a 10-cm Diameter, Frequency-Adjusted Linear Quadrupole Ion Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Koizumi, Hideya; Whitten, William B; Reilly, Pete

    2008-12-01

    High-resolution real-time particle mass measurements have not been achievable because the enormous amount of kinetic energy imparted to the particles upon expansion into vacuum competes with and overwhelms the forces applied to the charged particles within the mass spectrometer. It is possible to reduce the kinetic energy of a collimated particulate ion beam through collisions with a buffer gas while radially constraining their motion using a quadrupole guide or trap over a limited mass range. Controlling the pressure drop of the final expansion into a quadrupole trap permits a much broader mass range at the cost of sacrificing collimation. To achieve high-resolution mass analysis of massive particulate ions, an efficient trap with a large tolerance for radial divergence of the injected ions was developed that permits trapping a large range of ions for on-demand injection into an awaiting mass analyzer. The design specifications required that frequency of the trapping potential be adjustable to cover a large mass range and the trap radius be increased to increase the tolerance to divergent ion injection. The large-radius linear quadrupole ion trap was demonstrated by trapping singly-charged bovine serum albumin ions for on-demand injection into a mass analyzer. Additionally, this work demonstrates the ability to measure an electrophoretic mobility cross section (or ion mobility) of singly-charged intact proteins in the low-pressure regime. This work represents a large step toward the goal of high-resolution analysis of intact proteins, RNA, DNA, and viruses.

  1. Single/Few Bunch Space Charge Effects at 8 GeV in the Fermilab Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, D.J.; Capista, D.; Kourbanis, I.; Seiya, K.; Yang, M.-J.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    For Project X, it is planned to inject a beam of 3 10{sup 11} particles per bunch into the Main Injector. Therefore, at 8 GeV, there will be increased space charge tune shifts and an increased incoherent tune spread. In preparation for these higher intensity bunches exploratory studies have commenced looking at the transmission of different intensity bunches at different tunes. An experiment is described with results for bunch intensities between 20 and 300 10{sup 9} particles. To achieve the highest intensity bunches coalescing at 8 GeV is required, resulting in a longer bunch length. Comparisons show that similar transmission curves are obtained when the intensity and bunch length have increased by similar factors. This indicates the incoherent tune shifts are similar, as expected from theory. The results of these experiments will be used in conjugation with simulations to further study high intensity bunches in the Main Injector.

  2. The good taste of peptides.

    PubMed

    Temussi, Piero A

    2012-02-01

    The taste of peptides is seldom one of the most relevant issues when one considers the many important biological functions of this class of molecules. However, peptides generally do have a taste, covering essentially the entire range of established taste modalities: sweet, bitter, umami, sour and salty. The last two modalities cannot be attributed to peptides as such because they are due to the presence of charged terminals and/or charged side chains, thus reflecting only the zwitterionic nature of these compounds and/or the nature of some side chains but not the electronic and/or conformational features of a specific peptide. The other three tastes, that is, sweet, umami and bitter, are represented by different families of peptides. This review describes the main peptides with a sweet, umami or bitter taste and their relationship with food acceptance or rejection. Particular emphasis will be given to the sweet taste modality, owing to the practical and scientific relevance of aspartame, the well-known sweetener, and to the theoretical importance of sweet proteins, the most potent peptide sweet molecules.

  3. Tuning electronic transport via hepta-alanine peptides junction by tryptophan doping.

    PubMed

    Guo, Cunlan; Yu, Xi; Refaely-Abramson, Sivan; Sepunaru, Lior; Bendikov, Tatyana; Pecht, Israel; Kronik, Leeor; Vilan, Ayelet; Sheves, Mordechai; Cahen, David

    2016-09-27

    Charge migration for electron transfer via the polypeptide matrix of proteins is a key process in biological energy conversion and signaling systems. It is sensitive to the sequence of amino acids composing the protein and, therefore, offers a tool for chemical control of charge transport across biomaterial-based devices. We designed a series of linear oligoalanine peptides with a single tryptophan substitution that acts as a "dopant," introducing an energy level closer to the electrodes' Fermi level than that of the alanine homopeptide. We investigated the solid-state electron transport (ETp) across a self-assembled monolayer of these peptides between gold contacts. The single tryptophan "doping" markedly increased the conductance of the peptide chain, especially when its location in the sequence is close to the electrodes. Combining inelastic tunneling spectroscopy, UV photoelectron spectroscopy, electronic structure calculations by advanced density-functional theory, and dc current-voltage analysis, the role of tryptophan in ETp is rationalized by charge tunneling across a heterogeneous energy barrier, via electronic states of alanine and tryptophan, and by relatively efficient direct coupling of tryptophan to a Au electrode. These results reveal a controlled way of modulating the electrical properties of molecular junctions by tailor-made "building block" peptides.

  4. Tuning electronic transport via hepta-alanine peptides junction by tryptophan doping.

    PubMed

    Guo, Cunlan; Yu, Xi; Refaely-Abramson, Sivan; Sepunaru, Lior; Bendikov, Tatyana; Pecht, Israel; Kronik, Leeor; Vilan, Ayelet; Sheves, Mordechai; Cahen, David

    2016-09-27

    Charge migration for electron transfer via the polypeptide matrix of proteins is a key process in biological energy conversion and signaling systems. It is sensitive to the sequence of amino acids composing the protein and, therefore, offers a tool for chemical control of charge transport across biomaterial-based devices. We designed a series of linear oligoalanine peptides with a single tryptophan substitution that acts as a "dopant," introducing an energy level closer to the electrodes' Fermi level than that of the alanine homopeptide. We investigated the solid-state electron transport (ETp) across a self-assembled monolayer of these peptides between gold contacts. The single tryptophan "doping" markedly increased the conductance of the peptide chain, especially when its location in the sequence is close to the electrodes. Combining inelastic tunneling spectroscopy, UV photoelectron spectroscopy, electronic structure calculations by advanced density-functional theory, and dc current-voltage analysis, the role of tryptophan in ETp is rationalized by charge tunneling across a heterogeneous energy barrier, via electronic states of alanine and tryptophan, and by relatively efficient direct coupling of tryptophan to a Au electrode. These results reveal a controlled way of modulating the electrical properties of molecular junctions by tailor-made "building block" peptides. PMID:27621456

  5. Antimicrobial Peptide Simulations and the Influence of Force Field on the Free Energy for Pore Formation in Lipid Bilayers.

    PubMed

    Bennett, W F Drew; Hong, Chun Kit; Wang, Yi; Tieleman, D Peter

    2016-09-13

    Due to antimicrobial resistance, the development of new drugs to combat bacterial and fungal infections is an important area of research. Nature uses short, charged, and amphipathic peptides for antimicrobial defense, many of which disrupt the lipid membrane in addition to other possible targets inside the cell. Computer simulations have revealed atomistic details for the interactions of antimicrobial peptides and cell-penetrating peptides with lipid bilayers. Strong interactions between the polar interface and the charged peptides can induce bilayer deformations - including membrane rupture and peptide stabilization of a hydrophilic pore. Here, we performed microsecond-long simulations of the antimicrobial peptide CM15 in a POPC bilayer expecting to observe pore formation (based on previous molecular dynamics simulations). We show that caution is needed when interpreting results of equilibrium peptide-membrane simulations, given the length of time single trajectories can dwell in local energy minima for 100's of ns to microseconds. While we did record significant membrane perturbations from the CM15 peptide, pores were not observed. We explain this discrepancy by computing the free energy for pore formation with different force fields. Our results show a large difference in the free energy barrier (ca. 40 kJ/mol) against pore formation predicted by the different force fields that would result in orders of magnitude differences in the simulation time required to observe spontaneous pore formation. This explains why previous simulations using the Berger lipid parameters reported pores induced by charged peptides, while with CHARMM based models pores were not observed in our long time-scale simulations. We reconcile some of the differences in the distance dependent free energies by shifting the free energy profiles to account for thickness differences between force fields. The shifted curves show that all the models describe small defects in lipid bilayers in a

  6. Fe2+-Ti4+ vs. Fe2+-Fe3+ charge-transfer and short-range order in single chains of face-sharing octahedra: ellenbergerite and dumortierite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopin, C.; Langer, K.; Khomenko, V.

    2009-04-01

    In zoned pyrope megacrysts from the Dora-Maira UHP terrane, new, dark-violet colour varieties of the hexagonal, high-pressure silicate ellenbergerite extend the range of known Fe contents for this mineral from 0-0.1 to 0-0.4 atom pfu, for Ti contents commonly in the range 0.2-0.4 pfu. The new varieties show an extremely intense pleochroism, colourless for E perpendicular to c to deep Prussian blue for E//c, as compared to colourless to lilac or reddish purple for classical Fe-poor ellenbergerite. These features were the incentive for an electronic absorption spectroscopic study and a reappraisal of the interpretation of the charge transfers (CT), colour and ordering schemes in this group and the structurally related borosilicate dumortierite. Both structures are characterized by the presence of infinite single chains of face-sharing, partly vacant octahedra along the 6-fold screw axis and pseudo-hexad axis, respectively, in which the Fe and Ti atoms are partitioned. In the spectra of Fe-poor ellenbergerite, the presence of a single Fe2+-Ti4+ CT band near 19000 cm˘1 was taken as evidence for complete short-range ordering of Mg(Fe), Ti and vacancies in the octahedral single chain [1]. The E//c spectra of Fe-rich ellenbergerite show the same absorption band near 19000 cm˘1 but consistently flanked by another CT band near 14000 cm˘1 , the intensity of which increases with total Fe content. The latter is similar to the 12400 cm˘1 CT band observed as the single feature in E//c spectra of the isotructural (Ti-free and Fe-bearing) phosphoellenbergerite, and clearly assigned to Fe2+-Fe3+ CT in the octahedral single chain [1]. The same colour pattern occurs in the dumortierite group, with red Fe-poor, Ti-rich crystals showing a single CT band near 20000 cm˘1, blue Ti-poor crystals showing a single CT band near 16500 cm˘1, and violet Fe- and Ti-rich crystals showing a combination of the two bands [2]. In the light of the new data, we reinterpret the dumortierite colour

  7. Click Addition of a DNA Thread to the N-Termini of Peptides for Their Translocation through Solid-State Nanopores.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Sudipta; Song, Weisi; Borges, Chad; Lindsay, Stuart; Zhang, Peiming

    2015-10-27

    Foremost among the challenges facing single molecule sequencing of proteins by nanopores is the lack of a universal method for driving proteins or peptides into nanopores. In contrast to nucleic acids, the backbones of which are uniformly negatively charged nucleotides, proteins carry positive, negative and neutral side chains that are randomly distributed. Recombinant proteins carrying a negatively charged oligonucleotide or polypeptide at the C-termini can be translocated through a α-hemolysin (α-HL) nanopore, but the required genetic engineering limits the generality of these approaches. In this present study, we have developed a chemical approach for addition of a charged oligomer to peptides so that they can be translocated through nanopores. As an example, an oligonucleotide PolyT20 was tethered to peptides through first selectively functionalizing their N-termini with azide followed by a click reaction. The data show that the peptide-PolyT20 conjugates translocated through nanopores, whereas the unmodified peptides did not. Surprisingly, the conjugates with their peptides tethered at the 5'-end of PolyT20 passed the nanopores more rapidly than the PolyT20 alone. The PolyT20 also yielded a wider distribution of blockade currents. The same broad distribution was found for a conjugate with its peptide tethered at the 3'-end of PolyT20, suggesting that the larger blockades (and longer translocation times) are associated with events in which the 5'-end of the PolyT20 enters the pore first.

  8. Overall current-voltage characteristics of space charge controlled currents for thin films by a single carrier species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seki, Kazuhiko

    2014-08-01

    The Mott-Gurney equation (Child's law) has been frequently applied to measure the mobility of carrier transport layers. One of the main assumption in the Mott-Gurney theory is ignoring the diffusive currents. It was not obvious, however, whether the diffusive currents can be ignored for thin carrier transport layers. We obtained the current-voltage relation using analytical solutions of drift-diffusion equation coupled with the Poisson's equation. The integration constants were numerically determined using nonlinear equations obtained from boundary conditions. A simple analytical relation between the voltage and current was also derived. The analytical equation improved over the Mott-Gurney equation when the voltage is between 0.1 and 2 (V) at room temperature. By using published data, we show that both the mobility and the layer thickness can be simultaneously obtained by applying the analytical expression. The effect of diffusion on the current-voltage relation is explained by the movement of the virtual electrode formed by space charge accumulation.

  9. Lack of Effects of a Single High-Fat Meal Enriched with Vegetable n-3 or a Combination of Vegetable and Marine n-3 Fatty Acids on Intestinal Peptide Release and Adipokines in Healthy Female Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Narverud, Ingunn; Myhrstad, Mari C. W.; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Karhu, Toni; Dahl, Tuva B.; Halvorsen, Bente; Ulven, Stine M.; Holven, Kirsten B.

    2016-01-01

    Peptides released from the small intestine and colon regulate short-term food intake by suppressing appetite and inducing satiety. Intake of marine omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids (FAs) from fish and fish oils is associated with beneficial health effects, whereas the relation between intake of the vegetable n-3 fatty acid α-linolenic acid and diseases is less clear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the postprandial effects of a single high-fat meal enriched with vegetable n-3 or a combination of vegetable and marine n-3 FAs with their different unsaturated fatty acid composition on intestinal peptide release and the adipose tissue. Fourteen healthy lean females consumed three test meals with different fat quality in a fixed order. The test meal consisted of three cakes enriched with coconut fat, linseed oil, and a combination of linseed and cod liver oil. The test days were separated by 2 weeks. Fasting and postprandial blood samples at 3 and 6 h after intake were analyzed. A significant postprandial effect was observed for cholecystokinin, peptide YY, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide, amylin and insulin, which increased, while leptin decreased postprandially independent of the fat composition in the high-fat meal. In conclusion, in healthy, young, lean females, an intake of a high-fat meal enriched with n-3 FAs from different origin stimulates intestinal peptide release without any difference between the different fat compositions. PMID:27630989

  10. Lack of Effects of a Single High-Fat Meal Enriched with Vegetable n-3 or a Combination of Vegetable and Marine n-3 Fatty Acids on Intestinal Peptide Release and Adipokines in Healthy Female Subjects.

    PubMed

    Narverud, Ingunn; Myhrstad, Mari C W; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Karhu, Toni; Dahl, Tuva B; Halvorsen, Bente; Ulven, Stine M; Holven, Kirsten B

    2016-01-01

    Peptides released from the small intestine and colon regulate short-term food intake by suppressing appetite and inducing satiety. Intake of marine omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids (FAs) from fish and fish oils is associated with beneficial health effects, whereas the relation between intake of the vegetable n-3 fatty acid α-linolenic acid and diseases is less clear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the postprandial effects of a single high-fat meal enriched with vegetable n-3 or a combination of vegetable and marine n-3 FAs with their different unsaturated fatty acid composition on intestinal peptide release and the adipose tissue. Fourteen healthy lean females consumed three test meals with different fat quality in a fixed order. The test meal consisted of three cakes enriched with coconut fat, linseed oil, and a combination of linseed and cod liver oil. The test days were separated by 2 weeks. Fasting and postprandial blood samples at 3 and 6 h after intake were analyzed. A significant postprandial effect was observed for cholecystokinin, peptide YY, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide, amylin and insulin, which increased, while leptin decreased postprandially independent of the fat composition in the high-fat meal. In conclusion, in healthy, young, lean females, an intake of a high-fat meal enriched with n-3 FAs from different origin stimulates intestinal peptide release without any difference between the different fat compositions.

  11. Lack of Effects of a Single High-Fat Meal Enriched with Vegetable n-3 or a Combination of Vegetable and Marine n-3 Fatty Acids on Intestinal Peptide Release and Adipokines in Healthy Female Subjects.

    PubMed

    Narverud, Ingunn; Myhrstad, Mari C W; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Karhu, Toni; Dahl, Tuva B; Halvorsen, Bente; Ulven, Stine M; Holven, Kirsten B

    2016-01-01

    Peptides released from the small intestine and colon regulate short-term food intake by suppressing appetite and inducing satiety. Intake of marine omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids (FAs) from fish and fish oils is associated with beneficial health effects, whereas the relation between intake of the vegetable n-3 fatty acid α-linolenic acid and diseases is less clear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the postprandial effects of a single high-fat meal enriched with vegetable n-3 or a combination of vegetable and marine n-3 FAs with their different unsaturated fatty acid composition on intestinal peptide release and the adipose tissue. Fourteen healthy lean females consumed three test meals with different fat quality in a fixed order. The test meal consisted of three cakes enriched with coconut fat, linseed oil, and a combination of linseed and cod liver oil. The test days were separated by 2 weeks. Fasting and postprandial blood samples at 3 and 6 h after intake were analyzed. A significant postprandial effect was observed for cholecystokinin, peptide YY, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide, amylin and insulin, which increased, while leptin decreased postprandially independent of the fat composition in the high-fat meal. In conclusion, in healthy, young, lean females, an intake of a high-fat meal enriched with n-3 FAs from different origin stimulates intestinal peptide release without any difference between the different fat compositions. PMID:27630989

  12. Lack of Effects of a Single High-Fat Meal Enriched with Vegetable n-3 or a Combination of Vegetable and Marine n-3 Fatty Acids on Intestinal Peptide Release and Adipokines in Healthy Female Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Narverud, Ingunn; Myhrstad, Mari C. W.; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Karhu, Toni; Dahl, Tuva B.; Halvorsen, Bente; Ulven, Stine M.; Holven, Kirsten B.

    2016-01-01

    Peptides released from the small intestine and colon regulate short-term food intake by suppressing appetite and inducing satiety. Intake of marine omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids (FAs) from fish and fish oils is associated with beneficial health effects, whereas the relation between intake of the vegetable n-3 fatty acid α-linolenic acid and diseases is less clear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the postprandial effects of a single high-fat meal enriched with vegetable n-3 or a combination of vegetable and marine n-3 FAs with their different unsaturated fatty acid composition on intestinal peptide release and the adipose tissue. Fourteen healthy lean females consumed three test meals with different fat quality in a fixed order. The test meal consisted of three cakes enriched with coconut fat, linseed oil, and a combination of linseed and cod liver oil. The test days were separated by 2 weeks. Fasting and postprandial blood samples at 3 and 6 h after intake were analyzed. A significant postprandial effect was observed for cholecystokinin, peptide YY, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide, amylin and insulin, which increased, while leptin decreased postprandially independent of the fat composition in the high-fat meal. In conclusion, in healthy, young, lean females, an intake of a high-fat meal enriched with n-3 FAs from different origin stimulates intestinal peptide release without any difference between the different fat compositions.

  13. Sequencing Cyclic Peptides by Multistage Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Mohimani, Hosein; Yang, Yu-Liang; Liu, Wei-Ting; Hsieh, Pei-Wen; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Pevzner, Pavel A.

    2012-01-01

    Some of the most effective antibiotics (e.g., Vancomycin and Daptomycin) are cyclic peptides produced by non-ribosomal biosynthetic pathways. While hundreds of biomedically important cyclic peptides have been sequenced, the computational techniques for sequencing cyclic peptides are still in their infancy. Previous methods for sequencing peptide antibiotics and other cyclic peptides are based on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy, and require large amount (miligrams) of purified materials that, for most compounds, are not possible to obtain. Recently, development of mass spectrometry based methods has provided some hope for accurate sequencing of cyclic peptides using picograms of materials. In this paper we develop a method for sequencing of cyclic peptides by multistage mass spectrometry, and show its advantages over single stage mass spectrometry. The method is tested on known and new cyclic peptides from Bacillus brevis, Dianthus superbus and Streptomyces griseus, as well as a new family of cyclic peptides produced by marine bacteria. PMID:21751357

  14. Charge and spin transport in single and packed ruthenium-terpyridine molecular devices: Insight from first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morari, C.; Buimaga-Iarinca, L.; Rungger, I.; Sanvito, S.; Melinte, S.; Rignanese, G.-M.

    2016-08-01

    Using first-principles calculations, we study the electronic and transport properties of rutheniumterpyridine molecules sandwiched between two Au(111) electrodes. We analyse both single and packed molecular devices, more amenable to scaling and realistic integration approaches. The devices display all together robust negative differential resistance features at low bias voltages. Remarkably, the electrical control of the spin transport in the studied systems implies a subtle distribution of the magnetisation density within the biased devices and highlights the key role of the Au(111) electrical contacts.

  15. Charge and spin transport in single and packed ruthenium-terpyridine molecular devices: Insight from first-principles calculations.

    PubMed

    Morari, C; Buimaga-Iarinca, L; Rungger, I; Sanvito, S; Melinte, S; Rignanese, G-M

    2016-01-01

    Using first-principles calculations, we study the electronic and transport properties of rutheniumterpyridine molecules sandwiched between two Au(111) electrodes. We analyse both single and packed molecular devices, more amenable to scaling and realistic integration approaches. The devices display all together robust negative differential resistance features at low bias voltages. Remarkably, the electrical control of the spin transport in the studied systems implies a subtle distribution of the magnetisation density within the biased devices and highlights the key role of the Au(111) electrical contacts. PMID:27550064

  16. State-Selective and Total Single-Capture Cross Sections for Fast Collisions of Multiply Charged Ions with Helium Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mančev, Ivan; Milojević, Nenad; Belkić, Dževad

    2013-11-01

    The four-body boundary corrected first Born approximation (CB1-4B) is used to calculate the single electron capture cross sections for collisions between fully stripped ions (He2+, Be4+, B5+ and C6+) and helium target at intermediate and high impact energies. The main goal of this study is to assess the usefulness of the CB1-4B method at intermediate and high impact energies for these collisions. Detailed comparisons with the measurements are carried out and the obtained theoretical cross sections are in reasonable agreement with the available experimental data.

  17. Charge and spin transport in single and packed ruthenium-terpyridine molecular devices: Insight from first-principles calculations

    PubMed Central

    Morari, C.; Buimaga-Iarinca, L.; Rungger, I.; Sanvito, S.; Melinte, S.; Rignanese, G.-M.

    2016-01-01

    Using first-principles calculations, we study the electronic and transport properties of rutheniumterpyridine molecules sandwiched between two Au(111) electrodes. We analyse both single and packed molecular devices, more amenable to scaling and realistic integration approaches. The devices display all together robust negative differential resistance features at low bias voltages. Remarkably, the electrical control of the spin transport in the studied systems implies a subtle distribution of the magnetisation density within the biased devices and highlights the key role of the Au(111) electrical contacts. PMID:27550064

  18. Low-noise reset technique of an asynchronous charge-pulse-detecting pixel for single-photon X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-Sik; Han, Kwan-Young

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a low-noise reset technique of an asynchronous charge-pulse-detecting pixel for single-photon X-ray imaging. The proposed slow-slope ramp (S2R) reset scheme provides a reset-noise-discharging loop circuit and effectively eliminates the residual noise charge stored on the sampling capacitor by extending the falling transition time of the reset signal. In addition, the presented S2R reset signal generation circuit accurately and effectively controls the optimum switching voltage and the falling transition time of the reset signal. The prototype detector chip was implemented by using a 130-nm complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process. With the quantitative analysis and the measurement results, we were able to verify that the reset noise was reduced exponentially, corresponding to the falling transition time of the reset signal. Based on the chip measurement results, the reset-noise level could be decreased by more than seven-fold by virtue of the proposed reset technique.

  19. Microscopic origin of the charge transfer in single crystals based on thiophene derivatives: A combined NEXAFS and density functional theory approach.

    PubMed

    Chernenkaya, A; Morherr, A; Backes, S; Popp, W; Witt, S; Kozina, X; Nepijko, S A; Bolte, M; Medjanik, K; Öhrwall, G; Krellner, C; Baumgarten, M; Elmers, H J; Schönhense, G; Jeschke, H O; Valentí, R

    2016-07-21

    We have investigated the charge transfer mechanism in single crystals of DTBDT-TCNQ and DTBDT-F4TCNQ (where DTBDT is dithieno[2,3-d;2',3'-d'] benzo[1,2-b;4,5-b']dithiophene) using a combination of near-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (NEXAFS) and density functional theory calculations (DFT) including final state effects beyond the sudden state approximation. In particular, we find that a description that considers the partial screening of the electron-hole Coulomb correlation on a static level as well as the rearrangement of electronic density shows excellent agreement with experiment and allows to uncover the details of the charge transfer mechanism in DTBDT-TCNQ and DTBDT-F4 TCNQ, as well as a reinterpretation of previous NEXAFS data on pure TCNQ. Finally, we further show that almost the same quality of agreement between theoretical results and experiment is obtained by the much faster Z+1/2 approximation, where the core hole effects are simulated by replacing N or F with atomic number Z with the neighboring atom with atomic number Z+1/2. PMID:27448899

  20. Microscopic origin of the charge transfer in single crystals based on thiophene derivatives: A combined NEXAFS and density functional theory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernenkaya, A.; Morherr, A.; Backes, S.; Popp, W.; Witt, S.; Kozina, X.; Nepijko, S. A.; Bolte, M.; Medjanik, K.; Öhrwall, G.; Krellner, C.; Baumgarten, M.; Elmers, H. J.; Schönhense, G.; Jeschke, H. O.; Valentí, R.

    2016-07-01

    We have investigated the charge transfer mechanism in single crystals of DTBDT-TCNQ and DTBDT-F4TCNQ (where DTBDT is dithieno[2,3-d;2',3'-d'] benzo[1,2-b;4,5-b']dithiophene) using a combination of near-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (NEXAFS) and density functional theory calculations (DFT) including final state effects beyond the sudden state approximation. In particular, we find that a description that considers the partial screening of the electron-hole Coulomb correlation on a static level as well as the rearrangement of electronic density shows excellent agreement with experiment and allows to uncover the details of the charge transfer mechanism in DTBDT-TCNQ and DTBDT-F4 TCNQ, as well as a reinterpretation of previous NEXAFS data on pure TCNQ. Finally, we further show that almost the same quality of agreement between theoretical results and experiment is obtained by the much faster Z+1/2 approximation, where the core hole effects are simulated by replacing N or F with atomic number Z with the neighboring atom with atomic number Z+1/2.

  1. Microscopic origin of the charge transfer in single crystals based on thiophene derivatives: A combined NEXAFS and density functional theory approach.

    PubMed

    Chernenkaya, A; Morherr, A; Backes, S; Popp, W; Witt, S; Kozina, X; Nepijko, S A; Bolte, M; Medjanik, K; Öhrwall, G; Krellner, C; Baumgarten, M; Elmers, H J; Schönhense, G; Jeschke, H O; Valentí, R

    2016-07-21

    We have investigated the charge transfer mechanism in single crystals of DTBDT-TCNQ and DTBDT-F4TCNQ (where DTBDT is dithieno[2,3-d;2',3'-d'] benzo[1,2-b;4,5-b']dithiophene) using a combination of near-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (NEXAFS) and density functional theory calculations (DFT) including final state effects beyond the sudden state approximation. In particular, we find that a description that considers the partial screening of the electron-hole Coulomb correlation on a static level as well as the rearrangement of electronic density shows excellent agreement with experiment and allows to uncover the details of the charge transfer mechanism in DTBDT-TCNQ and DTBDT-F4 TCNQ, as well as a reinterpretation of previous NEXAFS data on pure TCNQ. Finally, we further show that almost the same quality of agreement between theoretical results and experiment is obtained by the much faster Z+1/2 approximation, where the core hole effects are simulated by replacing N or F with atomic number Z with the neighboring atom with atomic number Z+1/2.

  2. Electrical property comparison and charge transmission in p-type double gate and single gate junctionless accumulation transistor fabricated by AFM nanolithography.

    PubMed

    Dehzangi, Arash; Abdullah, A Makarimi; Larki, Farhad; Hutagalung, Sabar D; Saion, Elias B; Hamidon, Mohd N; Hassan, Jumiah; Gharayebi, Yadollah

    2012-01-01

    The junctionless nanowire transistor is a promising alternative for a new generation of nanotransistors. In this letter the atomic force microscopy nanolithography with two wet etching processes was implemented to fabricate simple structures as double gate and single gate junctionless silicon nanowire transistor on low doped p-type silicon-on-insulator wafer. The etching process was developed and optimized in the present work compared to our previous works. The output, transfer characteristics and drain conductance of both structures were compared. The trend for both devices found to be the same but differences in subthreshold swing, 'on/off' ratio, and threshold voltage were observed. The devices are 'on' state when performing as the pinch off devices. The positive gate voltage shows pinch off effect, while the negative gate voltage was unable to make a significant effect on drain current. The charge transmission in devices is also investigated in simple model according to a junctionless transistor principal. PMID:22781031

  3. A single Tisbnd Osbnd C linkage induces interfacial charge-transfer transitions between TiO2 and a π-conjugated molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujisawa, Jun-ichi; Matsumura, Shingo; Hanaya, Minoru

    2016-07-01

    Interfacial charge-transfer (ICT) transitions between wide-band-gap semiconductors such as titanium dioxide (TiO2) and π-conjugated molecules enable the absorption of visible light with colorless organic compounds and also direct photoinduced electron transfers across the interfaces. ICT transitions have been reported to be induced by a double Tisbnd Osbnd C linkage of enediol compounds with two hydroxy groups to TiO2. In this Letter, we demonstrate that a single Tisbnd Osbnd C linkage of phenol with one hydroxy group can induce ICT transitions in the visible region. Our result widely opens up the range of organic compounds available for ICT transitions from diol compounds to mono-hydroxy compounds.

  4. Electron Spin Resonance Study of Interface Trap States and Charge Carrier Concentration in Rubrene Single-Crystal Field-Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Masaki; Arai, Norimichi; Marumoto, Kazuhiro; Takeya, Jun; Shimoi, Yukihiro; Tanaka, Hisaaki; Kuroda, Shin-ichi; Takenobu, Taishi; Iwasa, Yoshihiro

    2011-08-01

    Field-induced charge carriers at the semiconductor/dielectric interface of rubrene single-crystal field-effect transistors (RSC-FETs) were studied by ESR. We fabricated bottom-contact RSC-FETs to be used for ESR measurements by laminating RSCs onto SiO2 and polymer/SiO2 gate dielectric surfaces. The observed ESR spectra depict a minimal dependence on gate voltage, whose result is in sharp contrast to those obtained using RSC-FETs fabricated by the deposition of a parylene C gate dielectric. This behavior indicates that few deep trap levels are generated by the lamination technique. The dependence of ESR intensity on drain voltage was also investigated using gradual channel approximation.

  5. Magnetic field control of the neutral and charged exciton fine structure in single quantum dashes emitting at 1.55 μm

    SciTech Connect

    Mrowiński, P.; Musiał, A.; Maryński, A.; Syperek, M.; Misiewicz, J.; Sęk, G.; Somers, A.; Reithmaier, J. P.; Höfling, S.

    2015-02-02

    We investigated the neutral and charged exciton fine structure in single InAs/InGaAlAs/InP quantum dashes emitting at 1.55 μm using polarization-resolved microphotoluminescence in a magnetic field. Inverted spin configuration of horizontally [1–10] and vertically [110] polarized transitions has been observed. An in-plane magnetic field of up to 5 Tesla has been applied to tailor the fine structure, and eventually to reduce the splitting of the bright exciton states down to zero. This inverted structure has been observed for all the investigated excitons, making it a characteristic feature for this class of nanostructures with the largest splitting reduction of 170 μeV.

  6. Epitaxial growth of large area single-crystalline few-layer MoS2 with high space charge mobility of 192 cm2 V-1 s-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lu; Nath, Digbijoy N.; Lee, Edwin W.; Lee, Choong Hee; Yu, Mingzhe; Arehart, Aaron; Rajan, Siddharth; Wu, Yiying

    2014-08-01

    We report on the vapor-solid growth of single crystalline few-layer MoS2 films on (0001)-oriented sapphire with excellent structural and electrical properties over centimeter length scale. High-resolution X-ray diffraction scans indicated that the films had good out-of-plane ordering and epitaxial registry. A carrier density of ˜2 × 1011 cm-2 and a room temperature mobility of 192 cm2/Vs were extracted from space-charge limited transport regime in the films. The electron mobility was found to exhibit in-plane anisotropy with a ratio of ˜1.8. Theoretical estimates of the temperature-dependent electron mobility including optical phonon, acoustic deformation potential, and remote ionized impurity scattering were found to satisfactorily match the measured data. The synthesis approach reported here demonstrates the feasibility of device quality few-layer MoS2 films with excellent uniformity and high quality.

  7. Novel x-ray multispectral imaging of ultraintense laser plasmas by a single-photon