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Sample records for sinorhizobium meliloti srna

  1. Sulfite oxidation in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Jeremy J; Kappler, Ulrike

    2009-12-01

    Sulfite-oxidizing enzymes (SOEs) are crucial for the metabolism of many cells and are particularly important in bacteria oxidizing inorganic or organic sulfur compounds. However, little is known about SOE diversity and metabolic roles. Sinorhizobium meliloti contains four candidate genes encoding SOEs of three different types, and in this work we have investigated the role of SOEs in S. meliloti and their possible link to the metabolism of the organosulfonate taurine. Low level SOE activity (approximately 1.4 U/mg) was present under all conditions tested while growth on taurine and thiosulfate induced high activities (5.5-8.8 U/mg) although S. meliloti cannot metabolize thiosulfate. Protein purification showed that although expression of two candidate genes matched SOE activity patterns, only a single group 2 SOE, SorT (SMc04049), is responsible for this activity. SorT is a heme-free, periplasmic homodimer (78 kDa) that has low homology to other bacterial SOEs. SorT has an apparent k(cat) of 343 s(-1) and high affinities for both sulfite (K(Mapp_pH8) 15.5 microM) and ferricyanide (K(Mapp_pH8) 3.44 microM), but not cytochrome c, suggesting a need for a high redox potential natural electron acceptor. K(Mapp_sulfite) was nearly invariant with pH which is in contrast to all other well characterized SOEs. SorT is part of an operon (SMc04049-04047) also containing a gene for a cytochrome c and an azurin, and these might be the natural electron acceptors for the enzyme. Phylogenetic analysis of SorT-related SOEs and enzymes of taurine degradation indicate that there is no link between the two processes.

  2. 40 CFR 721.9518 - Sinorhizobium meliloti strain RMBPC-2.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Substances § 721.9518 Sinorhizobium meliloti strain RMBPC-2. (a) Microorganism and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The microorganism identified as Sinorhizobium meliloti strain RMBPC-2 (PMN P-92... premanufacture notice or significant new use notice for this microorganism, the significant new use is any...

  3. Control of hydroxyproline catabolism in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    White, Catharine E; Gavina, Jennilee M A; Morton, Richard; Britz-McKibbin, Philip; Finan, Turlough M

    2012-09-01

    Hydroxyproline (Hyp) in decaying organic matter is a rich source of carbon and nitrogen for microorganisms. A bacterial pathway for Hyp catabolism is known; however, genes and function relationships are not established. In the pathway, trans-4-hydroxy-L-proline (4-L-Hyp) is epimerized to cis-4-hydroxy-D-proline (4-D-Hyp), and then, in three enzymatic reactions, the D-isomer is converted via Δ-pyrroline-4-hydroxy-2-carboxylate (HPC) and α-ketoglutarate semialdehyde (KGSA) to α-ketoglutarate (KG). Here a transcriptional analysis of cells growing on 4-L-Hyp, and the regulation and functions of genes from a Hyp catabolism locus of the legume endosymbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti are reported. Fourteen hydroxyproline catabolism genes (hyp), in five transcripts hypR, hypD, hypH, hypST and hypMNPQO(RE)XYZ, were negatively regulated by hypR. hypRE was shown to encode 4-hydroxyproline 2-epimerase and a hypRE mutant grew with 4-D-Hyp but not 4-L-Hyp. hypO, hypD and hypH are predicted to encode 4-D-Hyp oxidase, HPC deaminase and α-KGSA dehydrogenase respectively. The functions for hypS, hypT, hypX, hypY and hypZ remain to be determined. The data suggest 4-Hyp is converted to the tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediate α-ketoglutarate via the pathway established biochemically for Pseudomonas. This report describes the first molecular characterization of a Hyp catabolism locus.

  4. Diversity of field isolates of sinorhizobium meliloti nodulating alfalfa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most alfalfa seed is treated with a rhizobial inoculant consisting of one or more strains of Sinorhizobium meliloti before planting to enhance nodulation of seedlings. However, little is known about the persistence of inoculated strains later in the season. There is also a paucity of information on ...

  5. PCR Analysis of "expR" Gene Regulating Biosynthesis of Exopolysaccharides in "Sinorhizobium Meliloti"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorroche, Fernando G.; Giordano, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Exopolysaccharide (EPS) production by the rhizobacterium "Sinorhizobium meliloti" is essential for root nodule formation on its legume host (alfalfa), and for establishment of a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis between the two partners. Production of EPS II (galactoglucan) by certain "S. meliloti" strains results in a mucoid colony phenotype. Other…

  6. Expression of the Sinorhizobium meliloti small RNA gene mmgR is controlled by the nitrogen source.

    PubMed

    Ceizel Borella, Germán; Lagares, Antonio; Valverde, Claudio

    2016-05-01

    Small non-coding regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) are key players in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Hundreds of sRNAs have been identified in Sinorhizobium meliloti, but their biological function remains unknown for most of them. In this study, we characterized the expression pattern of the gene encoding the 77-nt sRNA MmgR in S. meliloti strain 2011. A chromosomal transcriptional reporter fusion (PmmgR-gfp) showed that the mmgR promoter is active along different stages of the interaction with alfalfa roots. In pure cultures, PmmgR-gfp activity paralleled the sRNA abundance indicating that mmgR expression is primarily controlled at the level of transcriptional initiation. PmmgR-gfp activity was higher during growth in rhizobial defined medium (RDM) than in TY medium. Furthermore, PmmgR-gfp was induced at 60 min after shifting growing cells from TY to RDM medium, i.e. shorter than the cell doubling time. In defined RDM medium containing NO3 (-), both PmmgR-gfp and MmgR level were repressed by the addition of tryptone or single amino acids, suggesting that mmgR expression depends on the cellular nitrogen (N) status. In silico analysis failed to detect conserved motifs upstream the promoter RNA polymerase binding site, but revealed a strongly conserved motif centered at -28 that may be linked to the observed regulatory pattern by the N source. PMID:27010014

  7. Expression of the Sinorhizobium meliloti small RNA gene mmgR is controlled by the nitrogen source.

    PubMed

    Ceizel Borella, Germán; Lagares, Antonio; Valverde, Claudio

    2016-05-01

    Small non-coding regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) are key players in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Hundreds of sRNAs have been identified in Sinorhizobium meliloti, but their biological function remains unknown for most of them. In this study, we characterized the expression pattern of the gene encoding the 77-nt sRNA MmgR in S. meliloti strain 2011. A chromosomal transcriptional reporter fusion (PmmgR-gfp) showed that the mmgR promoter is active along different stages of the interaction with alfalfa roots. In pure cultures, PmmgR-gfp activity paralleled the sRNA abundance indicating that mmgR expression is primarily controlled at the level of transcriptional initiation. PmmgR-gfp activity was higher during growth in rhizobial defined medium (RDM) than in TY medium. Furthermore, PmmgR-gfp was induced at 60 min after shifting growing cells from TY to RDM medium, i.e. shorter than the cell doubling time. In defined RDM medium containing NO3 (-), both PmmgR-gfp and MmgR level were repressed by the addition of tryptone or single amino acids, suggesting that mmgR expression depends on the cellular nitrogen (N) status. In silico analysis failed to detect conserved motifs upstream the promoter RNA polymerase binding site, but revealed a strongly conserved motif centered at -28 that may be linked to the observed regulatory pattern by the N source.

  8. Diversity of Sinorhizobium meliloti from the Central Asian Alfalfa Gene Center

    PubMed Central

    Roumiantseva, Marina L.; Andronov, Evgeny E.; Sharypova, Larissa A.; Dammann-Kalinowski, Tatjana; Keller, Mathias; Young, J. Peter W.; Simarov, Boris V.

    2002-01-01

    Sinorhizobium meliloti was isolated from nodules and soil from western Tajikistan, a center of diversity of the host plants (Medicago, Melilotus, and Trigonella species). There was evidence of recombination, but significant disequilibrium, between and within the chromosome and megaplasmids. The most frequent alleles matched those in the published genome sequence. PMID:12200335

  9. Phylogenetic distribution and evolutionary pattern of an α-proteobacterial small RNA gene that controls polyhydroxybutyrate accumulation in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Lagares, Antonio; Roux, Indra; Valverde, Claudio

    2016-06-01

    It has become clear that sRNAs play relevant regulatory functions in bacteria. However, a comprehensive understanding of their biological roles considering evolutionary aspects has not been achieved for most of them. Thus, we have characterized the evolutionary and phylogenetic aspects of the Sinorhizobium meliloti mmgR gene encoding the small RNA MmgR, which has been recently reported to be involved in the regulation of polyhydroxybutyrate accumulation in this bacterium. We constructed a covariance model from a multiple sequence and structure alignment of mmgR close homologs that allowed us to extend the search and to detect further remote homologs of the sRNA gene. From our results, mmgR seemed to evolve from a common ancestor of the α-proteobacteria that diverged from the order of Rickettsiales. We have found mmgR homologs in most current species of α-proteobacteria, with a few exceptions in which genomic reduction events or gene rearrangements seem to explain its absence. Furthermore, a strong microsyntenic relationship was found between a large set of mmgR homologs and homologs of a gene encoding a putative N-formyl glutamate amidohydrolase (NFGAH) that allowed us to trace back the evolutionary path of this group of mmgR orthologs. Among them, structure and sequence traits have been completely conserved throughout evolution, namely a Rho-independent terminator and a 10-mer (5'-UUUCCUCCCU-3') that is predicted to remain in a single-stranded region of the sRNA. We thus propose the definition of the new family of α-proteobacterial sRNAs αr8, as well as the subfamily αr8s1 which encompass S. meliloti mmgR orthologs physically linked with the downstream open reading frame encoding a putative NFGAH. So far, mmgR is the trans-encoded small RNA with the widest phylogenetic distribution of well recognized orthologs among α-proteobacteria. Expression of the expected MmgR transcript in rhizobiales other than S. meliloti (Sinorhizobium fredii, Rhizobium

  10. Phylogenetic distribution and evolutionary pattern of an α-proteobacterial small RNA gene that controls polyhydroxybutyrate accumulation in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Lagares, Antonio; Roux, Indra; Valverde, Claudio

    2016-06-01

    It has become clear that sRNAs play relevant regulatory functions in bacteria. However, a comprehensive understanding of their biological roles considering evolutionary aspects has not been achieved for most of them. Thus, we have characterized the evolutionary and phylogenetic aspects of the Sinorhizobium meliloti mmgR gene encoding the small RNA MmgR, which has been recently reported to be involved in the regulation of polyhydroxybutyrate accumulation in this bacterium. We constructed a covariance model from a multiple sequence and structure alignment of mmgR close homologs that allowed us to extend the search and to detect further remote homologs of the sRNA gene. From our results, mmgR seemed to evolve from a common ancestor of the α-proteobacteria that diverged from the order of Rickettsiales. We have found mmgR homologs in most current species of α-proteobacteria, with a few exceptions in which genomic reduction events or gene rearrangements seem to explain its absence. Furthermore, a strong microsyntenic relationship was found between a large set of mmgR homologs and homologs of a gene encoding a putative N-formyl glutamate amidohydrolase (NFGAH) that allowed us to trace back the evolutionary path of this group of mmgR orthologs. Among them, structure and sequence traits have been completely conserved throughout evolution, namely a Rho-independent terminator and a 10-mer (5'-UUUCCUCCCU-3') that is predicted to remain in a single-stranded region of the sRNA. We thus propose the definition of the new family of α-proteobacterial sRNAs αr8, as well as the subfamily αr8s1 which encompass S. meliloti mmgR orthologs physically linked with the downstream open reading frame encoding a putative NFGAH. So far, mmgR is the trans-encoded small RNA with the widest phylogenetic distribution of well recognized orthologs among α-proteobacteria. Expression of the expected MmgR transcript in rhizobiales other than S. meliloti (Sinorhizobium fredii, Rhizobium

  11. Genomic characterization of Sinorhizobium meliloti AK21, a wild isolate from the Aral Sea Region.

    PubMed

    Molina-Sánchez, María Dolores; López-Contreras, José Antonio; Toro, Nicolás; Fernández-López, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    The symbiotic, nitrogen-fixing bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti has been widely studied due to its ability to improve crop yields through direct interactions with leguminous plants. S. meliloti AK21 is a wild type strain that forms nodules on Medicago plants in saline and drought conditions in the Aral Sea Region. The aim of this work was to establish the genetic similarities and differences between S. meliloti AK21 and the reference strain S. meliloti 1021. Comparative genome hybridization with the model reference strain S. meliloti 1021 yielded 365 variable genes, grouped into 11 regions in the three main replicons in S. meliloti AK21. The most extensive regions of variability were found in the symbiotic plasmid pSymA, which also contained the largest number of orthologous and polymorphic sequences identified by suppression subtractive hybridization. This procedure identified a large number of divergent sequences and others without homology in the databases, the further investigation of which could provide new insight into the alternative metabolic pathways present in S. meliloti AK21. We identified a plasmid replication module from the repABC replicon family, together with plasmid mobilization-related genes (traG and a VirB9-like protein), which suggest that this indigenous isolate harbors an accessory plasmid. Furthermore, the transcriptomic profiles reflected differences in gene content and regulation between S. meliloti AK21 and S. meliloti 1021 (ExpR and PhoB regulons), but provided evidence for an as yet unknown, alternative mechanism involving activation of the cbb3 terminal oxidase. Finally, phenotypic microarrays characterization revealed a greater versatility of substrate use and chemical degradation than for S. meliloti 1021.

  12. Genomic characterization of Sinorhizobium meliloti AK21, a wild isolate from the Aral Sea Region.

    PubMed

    Molina-Sánchez, María Dolores; López-Contreras, José Antonio; Toro, Nicolás; Fernández-López, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    The symbiotic, nitrogen-fixing bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti has been widely studied due to its ability to improve crop yields through direct interactions with leguminous plants. S. meliloti AK21 is a wild type strain that forms nodules on Medicago plants in saline and drought conditions in the Aral Sea Region. The aim of this work was to establish the genetic similarities and differences between S. meliloti AK21 and the reference strain S. meliloti 1021. Comparative genome hybridization with the model reference strain S. meliloti 1021 yielded 365 variable genes, grouped into 11 regions in the three main replicons in S. meliloti AK21. The most extensive regions of variability were found in the symbiotic plasmid pSymA, which also contained the largest number of orthologous and polymorphic sequences identified by suppression subtractive hybridization. This procedure identified a large number of divergent sequences and others without homology in the databases, the further investigation of which could provide new insight into the alternative metabolic pathways present in S. meliloti AK21. We identified a plasmid replication module from the repABC replicon family, together with plasmid mobilization-related genes (traG and a VirB9-like protein), which suggest that this indigenous isolate harbors an accessory plasmid. Furthermore, the transcriptomic profiles reflected differences in gene content and regulation between S. meliloti AK21 and S. meliloti 1021 (ExpR and PhoB regulons), but provided evidence for an as yet unknown, alternative mechanism involving activation of the cbb3 terminal oxidase. Finally, phenotypic microarrays characterization revealed a greater versatility of substrate use and chemical degradation than for S. meliloti 1021. PMID:26090306

  13. The stress-related, rhizobial small RNA RcsR1 destabilizes the autoinducer synthase encoding mRNA sinI in Sinorhizobium meliloti

    PubMed Central

    Baumgardt, Kathrin; Šmídová, Klára; Rahn, Helen; Lochnit, Günter; Robledo, Marta; Evguenieva-Hackenberg, Elena

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Quorum sensing is a cell density-dependent communication system of bacteria relying on autoinducer molecules. During the analysis of the post-transcriptional regulation of quorum sensing in the nitrogen fixing plant symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti, we predicted and verified a direct interaction between the 5'-UTR of sinI mRNA encoding the autoinducer synthase and a small RNA (sRNA), which we named RcsR1. In vitro, RcsR1 prevented cleavage in the 5'-UTR of sinI by RNase E and impaired sinI translation. In line with low ribosomal occupancy and transcript destabilization upon binding of RcsR1 to sinI, overproduction of RcsR1 in S. meliloti resulted in lower level and shorter half-life of sinI mRNA, and in decreased autoinducer amount. Although RcsR1 can influence quorum sensing via sinI, its level did not vary at different cell densities, but decreased under salt stress and increased at low temperature. We found that RcsR1 and its stress-related expression pattern, but not the interaction with sinI homologs, are conserved in Sinorhizobium, Rhizobium and Agrobacterium. Consistently, overproduction of RcsR1 in S. meliloti and Agrobacterium tumefaciens inhibited growth at high salinity. We identified conserved targets of RcsR1 and showed that most conserved interactions and the effect on growth under salt stress are mediated by the first stem-loop of RcsR1, while its central part is responsible for the species-specific interaction with sinI. We conclude that RcsR1 is an ancient, stress-related riboregulator in rhizobia and propose that it links stress responses to quorum sensing in S. meliloti. PMID:26588798

  14. The stress-related, rhizobial small RNA RcsR1 destabilizes the autoinducer synthase encoding mRNA sinI in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Baumgardt, Kathrin; Šmídová, Klára; Rahn, Helen; Lochnit, Günter; Robledo, Marta; Evguenieva-Hackenberg, Elena

    2016-05-01

    Quorum sensing is a cell density-dependent communication system of bacteria relying on autoinducer molecules. During the analysis of the post-transcriptional regulation of quorum sensing in the nitrogen fixing plant symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti, we predicted and verified a direct interaction between the 5'-UTR of sinI mRNA encoding the autoinducer synthase and a small RNA (sRNA), which we named RcsR1. In vitro, RcsR1 prevented cleavage in the 5'-UTR of sinI by RNase E and impaired sinI translation. In line with low ribosomal occupancy and transcript destabilization upon binding of RcsR1 to sinI, overproduction of RcsR1 in S. meliloti resulted in lower level and shorter half-life of sinI mRNA, and in decreased autoinducer amount. Although RcsR1 can influence quorum sensing via sinI, its level did not vary at different cell densities, but decreased under salt stress and increased at low temperature. We found that RcsR1 and its stress-related expression pattern, but not the interaction with sinI homologs, are conserved in Sinorhizobium, Rhizobium and Agrobacterium. Consistently, overproduction of RcsR1 in S. meliloti and Agrobacterium tumefaciens inhibited growth at high salinity. We identified conserved targets of RcsR1 and showed that most conserved interactions and the effect on growth under salt stress are mediated by the first stem-loop of RcsR1, while its central part is responsible for the species-specific interaction with sinI. We conclude that RcsR1 is an ancient, stress-related riboregulator in rhizobia and propose that it links stress responses to quorum sensing in S. meliloti. PMID:26588798

  15. Alfalfa Root Nodule Invasion Efficiency Is Dependent on Sinorhizobium meliloti Polysaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Pellock, Brett J.; Cheng, Hai-Ping; Walker, Graham C.

    2000-01-01

    The soil bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti is capable of entering into a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with Medicago sativa (alfalfa). Particular low-molecular-weight forms of certain polysaccharides produced by S. meliloti are crucial for establishing this symbiosis. Alfalfa nodule invasion by S. meliloti can be mediated by any one of three symbiotically important polysaccharides: succinoglycan, EPS II, or K antigen (also referred to as KPS). Using green fluorescent protein-labeled S. meliloti cells, we have shown that there are significant differences in the details and efficiencies of nodule invasion mediated by these polysaccharides. Succinoglycan is highly efficient in mediating both infection thread initiation and extension. However, EPS II is significantly less efficient than succinoglycan at mediating both invasion steps, and K antigen is significantly less efficient than succinoglycan at mediating infection thread extension. In the case of EPS II-mediated symbioses, the reduction in invasion efficiency results in stunted host plant growth relative to plants inoculated with succinoglycan or K-antigen-producing strains. Additionally, EPS II- and K-antigen-mediated infection threads are 8 to 10 times more likely to have aberrant morphologies than those mediated by succinoglycan. These data have important implications for understanding how S. meliloti polysaccharides are functioning in the plant-bacterium interaction, and models are discussed. PMID:10894742

  16. Sinorhizobium meliloti putA Gene Regulation: a New Model within the Family Rhizobiaceae

    PubMed Central

    Soto, María José; Jiménez-Zurdo, José Ignacio; van Dillewijn, Pieter; Toro, Nicolás

    2000-01-01

    Proline dehydrogenase (PutA) is a bifunctional enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of proline to glutamate. In Sinorhizobium meliloti, as in other microorganisms, the putA gene is transcriptionally activated in response to proline. In Rhodobacter capsulatus, Agrobacterium, and most probably in Bradyrhizobium, this activation is dependent on an Lrp-like protein encoded by the putR gene, located immediately upstream of putA. Interestingly, sequence and genetic analysis of the region upstream of the S. meliloti putA gene did not reveal such a putR locus or any other encoded transcriptional activator of putA. Furthermore, results obtained with an S. meliloti putA null mutation indicate the absence of any proline-responsive transcriptional activator and that PutA serves as an autogenous repressor. Therefore, the model of S. meliloti putA regulation completely diverges from that of its Rhizobiaceae relatives and resembles more that of enteric bacteria. However, some differences have been found with the latter model: (i) S. meliloti putA gene is not catabolite repressed, and (ii) the gene encoding for the major proline permease (putP) does not form part of an operon with the putA gene. PMID:10715000

  17. Biodegradation of 3,3',4,4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl by Sinorhizobium meliloti NM.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaomi; Teng, Ying; Luo, Yongming; Dick, Richard P

    2016-02-01

    A rhizobial strain, Sinorhizobium meliloti NM, could use 3,3',4,4'-tetrachloro-biphenyl (PCB 77) as the sole carbon and energy source for growth in mineral salt medium. The degradation efficiency of PCB 77 by strain NM and the bacterial growth increased with a decrease in PCB 77 concentration (5-0.25mgL(-1)). The addition of secondary carbon sources, phenolic acids and one surfactant influenced PCB 77 degradation, rhizobial growth and biofilm formation. The highest degradation efficiency was observed in the presence of caffeic acid. Benzoate and chloride ions were detected as the PCB 77 metabolites. The up-regulation of benzoate metabolism-related gene expression was also observed using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. This report is the first to demonstrate Sinorhizobium using coplanar tetrachlorobiphenyl as a sole carbon and energy source, indicating the potential wide benefit to the field of rhizobia-assisted bioremediation. PMID:26679048

  18. Transcriptomic Analysis of Sinorhizobium meliloti and Medicago truncatula Symbiosis Using Nitrogen Fixation-Deficient Nodules.

    PubMed

    Lang, Claus; Long, Sharon R

    2015-08-01

    The bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti interacts symbiotically with legume plant hosts such as Medicago truncatula to form nitrogen-fixing root nodules. During symbiosis, plant and bacterial cells differentiate in a coordinated manner, resulting in specialized plant cells that contain nitrogen-fixing bacteroids. Both plant and bacterial genes are required at each developmental stage of symbiosis. We analyzed gene expression in nodules formed by wild-type bacteria on six plant mutants with defects in nitrogen fixation. We observed differential expression of 482 S. meliloti genes with functions in cell envelope homeostasis, cell division, stress response, energy metabolism, and nitrogen fixation. We simultaneously analyzed gene expression in M. truncatula and observed differential regulation of host processes that may trigger bacteroid differentiation and control bacterial infection. Our analyses of developmentally arrested plant mutants indicate that plants use distinct means to control bacterial infection during early and late symbiotic stages.

  19. Novel pathway for arsenic detoxification in the legume symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hung-Chi; Cheng, Jiujun; Finan, Turlough M; Rosen, Barry P; Bhattacharjee, Hiranmoy

    2005-10-01

    We report a novel pathway for arsenic detoxification in the legume symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti. Although a majority of ars operons consist of three genes, arsR (transcriptional regulator), arsB [As(OH)3/H+ antiporter], and arsC (arsenate reductase), the S. meliloti ars operon includes an aquaglyceroporin (aqpS) in place of arsB. The presence of AqpS in an arsenic resistance operon is interesting, since aquaglyceroporin channels have previously been shown to adventitiously facilitate uptake of arsenite into cells, rendering them sensitive to arsenite. To understand the role of aqpS in arsenic resistance, S. meliloti aqpS and arsC were disrupted individually. Disruption of aqpS resulted in increased tolerance to arsenite but not arsenate, while cells with an arsC disruption showed selective sensitivity to arsenate. The results of transport experiments in intact cells suggest that AqpS is the only protein of the S. meliloti ars operon that facilitates transport of arsenite. Coexpression of S. meliloti aqpS and arsC in a strain of E. coli lacking the ars operon complemented arsenate but not arsenite sensitivity. These results imply that, when S. meliloti is exposed to environmental arsenate, arsenate enters the cell through phosphate transport systems and is reduced to arsenite by ArsC. Internally generated arsenite flows out of the cell by downhill movement through AqpS. Thus, AqpS confers arsenate resistance together with ArsC-catalyzed reduction. This is the first report of an aquaglyceroporin with a physiological function in arsenic resistance.

  20. Sinorhizobium meliloti requires a cobalamin-dependent ribonucleotide reductase for symbiosis with its plant host.

    PubMed

    Taga, Michiko E; Walker, Graham C

    2010-12-01

    Vitamin B(12) (cobalamin) is a critical cofactor for animals and protists, yet its biosynthesis is limited to prokaryotes. We previously showed that the symbiotic nitrogen-fixing alphaproteobacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti requires cobalamin to establish a symbiotic relationship with its plant host, Medicago sativa (alfalfa). Here, the specific requirement for cobalamin in the S. meliloti-alfalfa symbiosis was investigated. Of the three known cobalamin-dependent enzymes in S. meliloti, the methylmalonyl CoA mutase (BhbA) does not affect symbiosis, whereas disruption of the metH gene encoding the cobalamin-dependent methionine synthase causes a significant defect in symbiosis. Expression of the cobalamin-independent methionine synthase MetE alleviates this symbiotic defect, indicating that the requirement for methionine synthesis does not reflect a need for the cobalamin-dependent enzyme. To investigate the function of the cobalamin-dependent ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) encoded by nrdJ, S. meliloti was engineered to express an Escherichia coli cobalamin-independent (class Ia) RNR instead of nrdJ. This strain is severely defective in symbiosis. Electron micrographs show that these cells can penetrate alfalfa nodules but are unable to differentiate into nitrogen-fixing bacteroids and, instead, are lysed in the plant cytoplasm. Flow cytometry analysis indicates that these bacteria are largely unable to undergo endoreduplication. These phenotypes may be due either to the inactivation of the class Ia RNR by reactive oxygen species, inadequate oxygen availability in the nodule, or both. These results show that the critical role of the cobalamin-dependent RNR for survival of S. meliloti in its plant host can account for the considerable resources that S. meliloti dedicates to cobalamin biosynthesis.

  1. Zinc Resistance Mechanisms of P1B-type ATPases in Sinorhizobium meliloti CCNWSX0020

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Mingmei; Li, Zhefei; Liang, Jianqiang; Wei, Yibing; Rensing, Christopher; Wei, Gehong

    2016-01-01

    The Sinorhizobium meliloti (S. meliloti) strain CCNWSX0020 displayed tolerance to high levels exposures of multiple metals and growth promotion of legume plants grown in metal-contaminated soil. However, the mechanism of metal-resistant strain remains unknown. We used five P1B-ATPases deletions by designating as ∆copA1b, ∆fixI1, ∆copA3, ∆zntA and ∆nia, respectively to investigate the role of P1B-ATPases in heavy metal resistance of S. meliloti. The ∆copA1b and ∆zntA mutants were sensitive to zinc (Zn), cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) in different degree, whereas the other mutants had no significant influence on the metal resistance. Moreover, the expression of zntA was induced by Zn, Cd and Pb whereas copA1b was induced by copper (Cu) and silver (Ag). This two deletions could led to the increased intracellular concentrations of Zn, Pb and Cd, but not of Cu. Complementation of ∆copA1b and ∆zntA mutants showed a restoration of tolerance to Zn, Cd and Pb to a certain extent. Taken together, the results suggest an important role of copA1b and zntA in Zn homeostasis and Cd and Pb detoxification in S. meliloti CCNWSX0020. PMID:27378600

  2. Fatty acid-releasing activities in Sinorhizobium meliloti include unusual diacylglycerol lipase

    PubMed Central

    Sahonero-Canavesi, Diana X.; Sohlenkamp, Christian; Sandoval-Calderón, Mario; Lamsa, Anne; Pogliano, Kit; López-Lara, Isabel M.; Geiger, Otto

    2016-01-01

    Summary Phospholipids are well known for their membrane forming properties and thereby delimit any cell from the exterior world. In addition, membrane phospholipids can act as precursors for signals and other biomolecules during their turnover. Little is known about phospholipid signalling, turnover and remodelling in bacteria. Recently, we showed that a FadD-deficient mutant of Sinorhizobium meliloti, unable to convert free fatty acids to their coenzyme A derivatives, accumulates free fatty acids during the stationary phase of growth. Enzymatic activities responsible for the generation of these free fatty acids were unknown in rhizobia. Searching the genome of S. meliloti, we identified a potential lysophospholipase (SMc04041) and two predicted patatin-like phospholipases A (SMc00930, SMc01003). Although SMc00930 as well as SMc01003 contribute to the release of free fatty acids in S. meliloti, neither one can use phospholipids as substrates. Here we show that SMc01003 converts diacylglycerol to monoacylglycerol and a fatty acid, and that monoacylglycerol can be further degraded by SMc01003 to another fatty acid and glycerol. A SMc01003-deficient mutant of S. meliloti transiently accumulates diacylglycerol, suggesting that SMc01003 also acts as diacylglycerol lipase (DglA) in its native background. Expression of the DglA lipase in Escherichia coli causes lysis of cells in stationary phase of growth. PMID:25711932

  3. Regulation of Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021 rrnA-reporter gene fusions in response to cold shock.

    PubMed

    Gustafson, Ann M; O'Connell, Kevin P; Thomashow, Michael F

    2002-09-01

    We previously reported that mutants of Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021 carrying luxAB insertions in each of the three 16S rRNA genes exhibited a dramatic (> or = 28-fold) increase in luminescence following a temperature downshift from 30 to 15 degrees C. These results raised the possibility that the rRNA operons (rrn) of S. meliloti were cold shock loci. In testing this possibility, we found that fusion of the S. meliloti 1021 rrnA promoter to two different reporter genes, luxAB and uidA, resulted in hybrid genes that were transiently upregulated (as measured by transcript accumulation) about four- to sixfold in response to a temperature downshift. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the rrn promoters are transiently upregulated in response to cold shock. However, much of the apparent cold shock regulation of the initial luxAB insertions was due to an unexpected mechanism: an apparent temperature-dependent inhibition of translation. Specifically, the rrnA sequences from +1 to +172 (relative to the start of transcription) were found to greatly decrease the ability of S. meliloti to translate hybrid rrn-luxAB transcripts into active protein at 30 degrees C. This effect, however, was largely eliminated at 15 degrees C. Possible mechanisms for the apparent transient increase in rrnA promoter activity and temperature-dependent inhibition of translation are discussed.

  4. Zinc Resistance Mechanisms of P1B-type ATPases in Sinorhizobium meliloti CCNWSX0020.

    PubMed

    Lu, Mingmei; Li, Zhefei; Liang, Jianqiang; Wei, Yibing; Rensing, Christopher; Wei, Gehong

    2016-01-01

    The Sinorhizobium meliloti (S. meliloti) strain CCNWSX0020 displayed tolerance to high levels exposures of multiple metals and growth promotion of legume plants grown in metal-contaminated soil. However, the mechanism of metal-resistant strain remains unknown. We used five P1B-ATPases deletions by designating as ∆copA1b, ∆fixI1, ∆copA3, ∆zntA and ∆nia, respectively to investigate the role of P1B-ATPases in heavy metal resistance of S. meliloti. The ∆copA1b and ∆zntA mutants were sensitive to zinc (Zn), cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) in different degree, whereas the other mutants had no significant influence on the metal resistance. Moreover, the expression of zntA was induced by Zn, Cd and Pb whereas copA1b was induced by copper (Cu) and silver (Ag). This two deletions could led to the increased intracellular concentrations of Zn, Pb and Cd, but not of Cu. Complementation of ∆copA1b and ∆zntA mutants showed a restoration of tolerance to Zn, Cd and Pb to a certain extent. Taken together, the results suggest an important role of copA1b and zntA in Zn homeostasis and Cd and Pb detoxification in S. meliloti CCNWSX0020. PMID:27378600

  5. Fatty acid-releasing activities in Sinorhizobium meliloti include unusual diacylglycerol lipase.

    PubMed

    Sahonero-Canavesi, Diana X; Sohlenkamp, Christian; Sandoval-Calderón, Mario; Lamsa, Anne; Pogliano, Kit; López-Lara, Isabel M; Geiger, Otto

    2015-09-01

    Phospholipids are well known for their membrane-forming properties and thereby delimit any cell from the exterior world. In addition, membrane phospholipids can act as precursors for signals and other biomolecules during their turnover. Little is known about phospholipid signalling, turnover and remodelling in bacteria. Recently, we showed that a FadD-deficient mutant of Sinorhizobium meliloti, unable to convert free fatty acids to their coenzyme A derivatives, accumulates free fatty acids during the stationary phase of growth. Enzymatic activities responsible for the generation of these free fatty acids were unknown in rhizobia. Searching the genome of S. meliloti, we identified a potential lysophospholipase (SMc04041) and two predicted patatin-like phospholipases A (SMc00930, SMc01003). Although SMc00930 as well as SMc01003 contribute to the release of free fatty acids in S. meliloti, neither one can use phospholipids as substrates. Here we show that SMc01003 converts diacylglycerol to monoacylglycerol and a fatty acid, and that monoacylglycerol can be further degraded by SMc01003 to another fatty acid and glycerol. A SMc01003-deficient mutant of S. meliloti transiently accumulates diacylglycerol, suggesting that SMc01003 also acts as diacylglycerol lipase (DglA) in its native background. Expression of the DglA lipase in Escherichia coli causes lysis of cells in stationary phase of growth.

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of the RmInt1 Group II Intronless Sinorhizobium meliloti Strain RMO17

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Abarca, Francisco; Nisa-Martínez, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    We report the complete genome sequence of the RmInt1 group II intronless Sinorhizobium meliloti strain RMO17 isolated from Medicago orbicularis nodules from Spanish soil. The genome consists of 6.73 Mb distributed between a single chromosome and two megaplasmids (the chromid pSymB and pSymA). PMID:25301650

  7. Cloning-free genome engineering in Sinorhizobium meliloti advances applications of Cre/loxP site-specific recombination.

    PubMed

    Döhlemann, Johannes; Brennecke, Meike; Becker, Anke

    2016-09-10

    The soil-dwelling α-proteobacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti serves as model for studies of symbiotic nitrogen fixation, a highly important process in sustainable agriculture. Here, we report advancements of the genetic toolbox accelerating genome editing in S. meliloti. The hsdMSR operon encodes a type-I restriction-modification (R-M) system. Transformation of S. meliloti is counteracted by the restriction endonuclease HsdR degrading DNA which lacks the appropriate methylation pattern. We provide a stable S. meliloti hsdR deletion mutant showing enhanced transformation with Escherichia coli-derived plasmid DNA and demonstrate that using an E. coli plasmid donor, expressing S. meliloti methyl transferase genes, is an alternative strategy of increasing the transformation efficiency of S. meliloti. Furthermore, we devise a novel cloning-free genome editing (CFGE) method for S. meliloti, Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Xanthomonas campestris, and demonstrate the applicability of this method for intricate applications of the Cre/lox recombination system in S. meliloti. An enhanced Cre/lox system, allowing for serial deletions of large genomic regions, was established. An assay of lox spacer mutants identified a set of lox sites mediating specific recombination. The availability of several non-promiscuous Cre recognition sites enables simultaneous specific Cre/lox recombination events. CFGE combined with Cre/lox recombination is put forward as powerful approach for targeted genome editing, involving serial steps of manipulation to expedite the genetic accessibility of S. meliloti as chassis.

  8. Cloning-free genome engineering in Sinorhizobium meliloti advances applications of Cre/loxP site-specific recombination.

    PubMed

    Döhlemann, Johannes; Brennecke, Meike; Becker, Anke

    2016-09-10

    The soil-dwelling α-proteobacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti serves as model for studies of symbiotic nitrogen fixation, a highly important process in sustainable agriculture. Here, we report advancements of the genetic toolbox accelerating genome editing in S. meliloti. The hsdMSR operon encodes a type-I restriction-modification (R-M) system. Transformation of S. meliloti is counteracted by the restriction endonuclease HsdR degrading DNA which lacks the appropriate methylation pattern. We provide a stable S. meliloti hsdR deletion mutant showing enhanced transformation with Escherichia coli-derived plasmid DNA and demonstrate that using an E. coli plasmid donor, expressing S. meliloti methyl transferase genes, is an alternative strategy of increasing the transformation efficiency of S. meliloti. Furthermore, we devise a novel cloning-free genome editing (CFGE) method for S. meliloti, Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Xanthomonas campestris, and demonstrate the applicability of this method for intricate applications of the Cre/lox recombination system in S. meliloti. An enhanced Cre/lox system, allowing for serial deletions of large genomic regions, was established. An assay of lox spacer mutants identified a set of lox sites mediating specific recombination. The availability of several non-promiscuous Cre recognition sites enables simultaneous specific Cre/lox recombination events. CFGE combined with Cre/lox recombination is put forward as powerful approach for targeted genome editing, involving serial steps of manipulation to expedite the genetic accessibility of S. meliloti as chassis. PMID:27393468

  9. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of the Hfq-Regulon in Sinorhizobium meliloti 2011

    PubMed Central

    Sobrero, Patricio; Schlüter, Jan-Philip; Lanner, Ulrike; Schlosser, Andreas; Becker, Anke; Valverde, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    Riboregulation stands for RNA-based control of gene expression. In bacteria, small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) are a major class of riboregulatory elements, most of which act at the post-transcriptional level by base-pairing target mRNA genes. The RNA chaperone Hfq facilitates antisense interactions between target mRNAs and regulatory sRNAs, thus influencing mRNA stability and/or translation rate. In the α-proteobacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti strain 2011, the identification and detection of multiple sRNAs genes and the broadly pleitropic phenotype associated to the absence of a functional Hfq protein both support the existence of riboregulatory circuits controlling gene expression to ensure the fitness of this bacterium in both free living and symbiotic conditions. In order to identify target mRNAs subject to Hfq-dependent riboregulation, we have compared the proteome of an hfq mutant and the wild type S. meliloti by quantitative proteomics following protein labelling with 15N. Among 2139 univocally identified proteins, a total of 195 proteins showed a differential abundance between the Hfq mutant and the wild type strain; 65 proteins accumulated ≥2-fold whereas 130 were downregulated (≤0.5-fold) in the absence of Hfq. This profound proteomic impact implies a major role for Hfq on regulation of diverse physiological processes in S. meliloti, from transport of small molecules to homeostasis of iron and nitrogen. Changes in the cellular levels of proteins involved in transport of nucleotides, peptides and amino acids, and in iron homeostasis, were confirmed with phenotypic assays. These results represent the first quantitative proteomic analysis in S. meliloti. The comparative analysis of the hfq mutant proteome allowed identification of novel strongly Hfq-regulated genes in S. meliloti. PMID:23119037

  10. Function of Succinoglycan Polysaccharide in Sinorhizobium meliloti Host Plant Invasion Depends on Succinylation, Not Molecular Weight

    PubMed Central

    Mendis, Hajeewaka C.; Madzima, Thelma F.; Queiroux, Clothilde

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The acidic polysaccharide succinoglycan produced by the rhizobial symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021 is required for this bacterium to invade the host plant Medicago truncatula and establish a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis. S. meliloti mutants that cannot make succinoglycan cannot initiate invasion structures called infection threads in plant root hairs. S. meliloti exoH mutants that cannot succinylate succinoglycan are also unable to form infection threads, despite the fact that they make large quantities of succinoglycan. Succinoglycan produced by exoH mutants is refractory to cleavage by the glycanases encoded by exoK and exsH, and thus succinoglycan produced by exoH mutants is made only in the high-molecular-weight (HMW) form. One interpretation of the symbiotic defect of exoH mutants is that the low-molecular-weight (LMW) form of succinoglycan is required for infection thread formation. However, our data demonstrate that production of the HMW form of succinoglycan by S. meliloti 1021 is sufficient for invasion of the host M. truncatula and that the LMW form is not required. Here, we show that S. meliloti strains deficient in the exoK- and exsH-encoded glycanases invade M. truncatula and form a productive symbiosis, although they do this with somewhat less efficiency than the wild type. We have also characterized the polysaccharides produced by these double glycanase mutants and determined that they consist of only HMW succinoglycan and no detectable LMW succinoglycan. This demonstrates that LMW succinoglycan is not required for host invasion. These results suggest succinoglycan function is not dependent upon the presence of a small, readily diffusible form. PMID:27329751

  11. Mixed Nodule Infection in Sinorhizobium meliloti-Medicago sativa Symbiosis Suggest the Presence of Cheating Behavior.

    PubMed

    Checcucci, Alice; Azzarello, Elisa; Bazzicalupo, Marco; Galardini, Marco; Lagomarsino, Alessandra; Mancuso, Stefano; Marti, Lucia; Marzano, Maria C; Mocali, Stefano; Squartini, Andrea; Zanardo, Marina; Mengoni, Alessio

    2016-01-01

    In the symbiosis between rhizobia and legumes, host plants can form symbiotic root nodules with multiple rhizobial strains, potentially showing different symbiotic performances in nitrogen fixation. Here, we investigated the presence of mixed nodules, containing rhizobia with different degrees of mutualisms, and evaluate their relative fitness in the Sinorhizobium meliloti-Medicago sativa model symbiosis. We used three S. meliloti strains, the mutualist strains Rm1021 and BL225C and the non-mutualist AK83. We performed competition experiments involving both in vitro and in vivo symbiotic assays with M. sativa host plants. We show the occurrence of a high number (from 27 to 100%) of mixed nodules with no negative effect on both nitrogen fixation and plant growth. The estimation of the relative fitness as non-mutualist/mutualist ratios in single nodules shows that in some nodules the non-mutualist strain efficiently colonized root nodules along with the mutualist ones. In conclusion, we can support the hypothesis that in S. meliloti-M. sativa symbiosis mixed nodules are formed and allow non-mutualist or less-mutualist bacterial partners to be less or not sanctioned by the host plant, hence allowing a potential form of cheating behavior to be present in the nitrogen fixing symbiosis. PMID:27379128

  12. Desiccation induces viable but Non-Culturable cells in Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Sinorhizobium meliloti is a microorganism commercially used in the production of e.g. Medicago sativa seed inocula. Many inocula are powder-based and production includes a drying step. Although S. meliloti survives drying well, the quality of the inocula is reduced during this process. In this study we determined survival during desiccation of the commercial strains 102F84 and 102F85 as well as the model strain USDA1021. The survival of S. meliloti 1021 was estimated during nine weeks at 22% relative humidity. We found that after an initial rapid decline of colony forming units, the decline slowed to a steady 10-fold reduction in colony forming units every 22 days. In spite of the reduction in colony forming units, the fraction of the population identified as viable (42-54%) based on the Baclight live/dead stain did not change significantly over time. This change in the ability of viable cells to form colonies shows (i) an underestimation of the survival of rhizobial cells using plating methods, and that (ii) in a part of the population desiccation induces a Viable But Non Culturable (VBNC)-like state, which has not been reported before. Resuscitation attempts did not lead to a higher recovery of colony forming units indicating the VBNC state is stable under the conditions tested. This observation has important consequences for the use of rhizobia. Finding methods to resuscitate this fraction may increase the quality of powder-based seed inocula. PMID:22260437

  13. Mixed Nodule Infection in Sinorhizobium meliloti-Medicago sativa Symbiosis Suggest the Presence of Cheating Behavior.

    PubMed

    Checcucci, Alice; Azzarello, Elisa; Bazzicalupo, Marco; Galardini, Marco; Lagomarsino, Alessandra; Mancuso, Stefano; Marti, Lucia; Marzano, Maria C; Mocali, Stefano; Squartini, Andrea; Zanardo, Marina; Mengoni, Alessio

    2016-01-01

    In the symbiosis between rhizobia and legumes, host plants can form symbiotic root nodules with multiple rhizobial strains, potentially showing different symbiotic performances in nitrogen fixation. Here, we investigated the presence of mixed nodules, containing rhizobia with different degrees of mutualisms, and evaluate their relative fitness in the Sinorhizobium meliloti-Medicago sativa model symbiosis. We used three S. meliloti strains, the mutualist strains Rm1021 and BL225C and the non-mutualist AK83. We performed competition experiments involving both in vitro and in vivo symbiotic assays with M. sativa host plants. We show the occurrence of a high number (from 27 to 100%) of mixed nodules with no negative effect on both nitrogen fixation and plant growth. The estimation of the relative fitness as non-mutualist/mutualist ratios in single nodules shows that in some nodules the non-mutualist strain efficiently colonized root nodules along with the mutualist ones. In conclusion, we can support the hypothesis that in S. meliloti-M. sativa symbiosis mixed nodules are formed and allow non-mutualist or less-mutualist bacterial partners to be less or not sanctioned by the host plant, hence allowing a potential form of cheating behavior to be present in the nitrogen fixing symbiosis.

  14. The Sinorhizobium meliloti RNA chaperone Hfq influences central carbon metabolism and the symbiotic interaction with alfalfa

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The bacterial Hfq protein is able to interact with diverse RNA molecules, including regulatory small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs), and thus it is recognized as a global post-transcriptional regulator of gene expression. Loss of Hfq has an extensive impact in bacterial physiology which in several animal pathogens influences virulence. Sinorhizobium meliloti is a model soil bacterium known for its ability to establish a beneficial nitrogen-fixing intracellular symbiosis with alfalfa. Despite the predicted general involvement of Hfq in the establishment of successful bacteria-eukaryote interactions, its function in S. meliloti has remained unexplored. Results Two independent S. meliloti mutants, 2011-3.4 and 1021Δhfq, were obtained by disruption and deletion of the hfq gene in the wild-type strains 2011 and 1021, respectively, both exhibiting similar growth defects as free-living bacteria. Transcriptomic profiling of 1021Δhfq revealed a general down-regulation of genes of sugar transporters and some enzymes of the central carbon metabolism, whereas transcripts specifying the uptake and metabolism of nitrogen sources (mainly amino acids) were more abundant than in the wild-type strain. Proteomic analysis of the 2011-3.4 mutant independently confirmed these observations. Symbiotic tests showed that lack of Hfq led to a delayed nodulation, severely compromised bacterial competitiveness on alfalfa roots and impaired normal plant growth. Furthermore, a large proportion of nodules (55%-64%) elicited by the 1021Δhfq mutant were non-fixing, with scarce content in bacteroids and signs of premature senescence of endosymbiotic bacteria. RT-PCR experiments on RNA from bacteria grown under aerobic and microoxic conditions revealed that Hfq contributes to regulation of nifA and fixK1/K2, the genes controlling nitrogen fixation, although the Hfq-mediated regulation of fixK is only aerobiosis dependent. Finally, we found that some of the recently identified S. meliloti s

  15. Cyclic Di-GMP Regulates Multiple Cellular Functions in the Symbiotic Alphaproteobacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti

    PubMed Central

    Schäper, Simon; Krol, Elizaveta; Skotnicka, Dorota; Kaever, Volkhard; Hilker, Rolf; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sinorhizobium meliloti undergoes major lifestyle changes between planktonic states, biofilm formation, and symbiosis with leguminous plant hosts. In many bacteria, the second messenger 3′,5′-cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP, or cdG) promotes a sessile lifestyle by regulating a plethora of processes involved in biofilm formation, including motility and biosynthesis of exopolysaccharides (EPS). Here, we systematically investigated the role of cdG in S. meliloti Rm2011 encoding 22 proteins putatively associated with cdG synthesis, degradation, or binding. Single mutations in 21 of these genes did not cause evident changes in biofilm formation, motility, or EPS biosynthesis. In contrast, manipulation of cdG levels by overproducing endogenous or heterologous diguanylate cyclases (DGCs) or phosphodiesterases (PDEs) affected these processes and accumulation of N-Acyl-homoserine lactones in the culture supernatant. Specifically, individual overexpression of the S. meliloti genes pleD, SMb20523, SMb20447, SMc01464, and SMc03178 encoding putative DGCs and of SMb21517 encoding a single-domain PDE protein had an impact and resulted in increased levels of cdG. Compared to the wild type, an S. meliloti strain that did not produce detectable levels of cdG (cdG0) was more sensitive to acid stress. However, it was symbiotically potent, unaffected in motility, and only slightly reduced in biofilm formation. The SMc01790-SMc01796 locus, homologous to the Agrobacterium tumefaciens uppABCDEF cluster governing biosynthesis of a unipolarly localized polysaccharide, was found to be required for cdG-stimulated biofilm formation, while the single-domain PilZ protein McrA was identified as a cdG receptor protein involved in regulation of motility. IMPORTANCE We present the first systematic genome-wide investigation of the role of 3′,5′-cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP, or cdG) in regulation of motility, biosynthesis of exopolysaccharides, biofilm formation, quorum sensing, and symbiosis in a

  16. Crystal structure of the flavoprotein ArsH from Sinorhizobium meliloti

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Jun; Yang, Hung-Chi; Rosen, Barry P.; Bhattacharjee, Hiranmoy

    2007-01-01

    Purified ArsH from Sinorhizobium meliloti exhibits NADPH:FMN-dependent reduction of molecular O2 to hydrogen peroxide and catalyzes reduction of azo dyes. The structure of ArsH was determined at 1.8 Å resolution. ArsH crystallizes with eight molecules in the asymmetric unit forming two tetramers. Each monomer has a core domain with a central five-stranded parallel β-sheet and two monomers interact to form a classical flavodoxin-like dimer. The N- and C-terminal extensions of ArsH are involved in interactions between subunits and tetramer formation. The structure may provide insight in how ArsH participates in arsenic detoxification. PMID:17673204

  17. Alteration of enod40 expression modifies medicago truncatula root nodule development induced by sinorhizobium meliloti

    PubMed Central

    Charon, C; Sousa, C; Crespi, M; Kondorosi, A

    1999-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms involved in the control of root nodule organogenesis in the plant host are poorly understood. One of the nodulin genes associated with the earliest phases of this developmental program is enod40. We show here that transgenic Medicago truncatula plants overexpressing enod40 exhibit accelerated nodulation induced by Sinorhizobium meliloti. This resulted from increased initiation of primordia, which was accompanied by a proliferation response of the region close to the root tip and enhanced root length. The root cortex of the enod40-transformed plants showed increased sensitivity to nodulation signals. T(1) and T(2) descendants of two transgenic lines with reduced amounts of enod40 transcripts (probably from cosuppression) formed only a few and modified nodulelike structures. Our results suggest that induction of enod40 is a limiting step in primordium formation, and its function is required for appropriate nodule development. PMID:10521525

  18. Inactivation of group II intron RmInt1 in the Sinorhizobium meliloti genome.

    PubMed

    Molina-Sánchez, María Dolores; Toro, Nicolás

    2015-07-09

    Group II introns are self-splicing catalytic RNAs that probably originated in bacteria and act as mobile retroelements. The dispersal and dynamics of group II intron spread within a bacterial genome are thought to follow a selection-driven extinction model. Likewise, various studies on the evolution of group II introns have suggested that they are evolving toward an inactive form by fragmentation, with the loss of the intron 3'-terminus, but with some intron fragments remaining and continuing to evolve in the genome. RmInt1 is a mobile group II intron that is widespread in natural populations of Sinorhizobium meliloti, but some strains of this species have no RmInt1 introns. We studied the splicing ability and mobility of the three full-length RmInt1 copies harbored by S. meliloti 1021, and obtained evidence suggesting that specific mutations may lead to the impairment of intron splicing and retrohoming. Our data suggest that the RmInt1 copies in this strain are undergoing a process of inactivation.

  19. Extracellular polymeric substances from copper-tolerance Sinorhizobium meliloti immobilize Cu²⁺.

    PubMed

    Hou, Wenjie; Ma, Zhanqiang; Sun, Liangliang; Han, Mengsha; Lu, Jianjun; Li, Zhenxiu; Mohamad, Osama Abdalla; Wei, Gehong

    2013-10-15

    The copper tolerance gene of wild-type heavy metal-tolerance Sinorhizobium meliloti CCNWSX0020 was mutated by transposon Tn5-a. The mutant was sensitive up to 1.4mM Cu(2+). Production, components, surface morphology, and functional groups of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of the wild-type strains were compared with sensitive mutant in immobilization of Cu(2+). EPS produced by S. meliloti CCNWSX0020 restricts uptake of Cu(2+). The cell wall EPS were categorized based on the compactness and fastness: soluble EPS (S-EPS), loosely bound EPS (LB-EPS), and tightly bound EPS (TB-EPS). LB-EPS played a more important role than S-EPS and TB-EPS in Cu(2+) immobilization. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis LB-EPS had rough surface and many honeycomb pores, making them conducive to copper entry; therefore, they may play a role as a microbial protective barrier. Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) analysis further confirm that proteins and carbohydrates were the main extracellular compounds which had functional groups such as carboxyl (COOH), hydroxyl (OH), and amide (NH), primarily involved in metal ion binding.

  20. [Influence of salt stress on the genetically polymorphic system of Sinorhizobium meliloti-Medicago truncatula].

    PubMed

    Kurchak, O N; Provorov, N A; Onishchuk, O P; Vorobyov, N I; Roumiantseva, M L; Simarov, B V

    2014-07-01

    The impacts of salt stress (75 mM NaC1) on the ecological efficiency of the genetically polymorphic Sinorhizobium meliloti-Medicago truncatula system were studied. Its impact on a symbiotic system results in an increase of the partners' variability for symbiotic traits and of the symbiosis integrity as indicated by: a) the specificity of the partners' interactions--the nonadditive inputs of their genotypes into the variation of symbiotic parameters; and b) the correlative links between these parameters. The structure of the nodDI locus and the content correlates to the efficiency of the symbiosis between S. meliloti and M. truncatula genotypes under stress conditions more sufficiently than in the absence of stress. Correlations between the symbiotic efficiency of rhizobia strains and their growth rate outside symbiosis are expressed under stress conditions, not in the absence of stress. Under salt stress symbiotic effectiveness was decreased for M. truncatula line F83005.5, which was salt sensitive for mineral nutrition. The inhibition of symbiotic activity for this line is linked with decreased nodule formation, whereas for Jemalong 6 and DZA315.16 lines it is associated with repressed N2-fixation. It was demonstrated for the first time that salt stress impairs the M. truncatula habitus (the mass : height ratio increased 2- to 6-fold), which in the salt-resistant cultivar Jemalong 6 is normalized as the result of rhizobia inoculation.

  1. Entropy-driven motility of Sinorhizobium meliloti on a semi-solid surface.

    PubMed

    Dilanji, Gabriel E; Teplitski, Max; Hagen, Stephen J

    2014-06-01

    Sinorhizobium meliloti growing on soft agar can exhibit an unusual surface spreading behaviour that differs from other bacterial surface motilities. Bacteria in the colony secrete an exopolysaccharide-rich mucoid fluid that expands outward on the surface, carrying within it a suspension of actively dividing cells. The moving slime disperses the cells in complex and dynamic patterns indicative of simultaneous bacterial growth, swimming and aggregation. We find that while flagellar swimming is required to maintain the cells in suspension, the spreading and the associated pattern formation are primarily driven by the secreted exopolysaccharide EPS II, which creates two entropy-increasing effects: an osmotic flow of water from the agar to the mucoid fluid and a crowding or depletion attraction between the cells. Activation of these physical/chemical phenomena may be a useful function for the high molecular weight EPS II, a galactoglucan whose biosynthesis is tightly regulated by the ExpR/SinI/SinR quorum-sensing system: unlike bacterial colonies that spread via bacterium-generated, physical propulsive forces, S. meliloti under quorum conditions may use EPS II to activate purely entropic forces within its environment, so that it can disperse by passively 'surfing' on those forces.

  2. Metabolic modelling reveals the specialization of secondary replicons for niche adaptation in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    diCenzo, George C; Checcucci, Alice; Bazzicalupo, Marco; Mengoni, Alessio; Viti, Carlo; Dziewit, Lukasz; Finan, Turlough M; Galardini, Marco; Fondi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The genome of about 10% of bacterial species is divided among two or more large chromosome-sized replicons. The contribution of each replicon to the microbial life cycle (for example, environmental adaptations and/or niche switching) remains unclear. Here we report a genome-scale metabolic model of the legume symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti that is integrated with carbon utilization data for 1,500 genes with 192 carbon substrates. Growth of S. meliloti is modelled in three ecological niches (bulk soil, rhizosphere and nodule) with a focus on the role of each of its three replicons. We observe clear metabolic differences during growth in the tested ecological niches and an overall reprogramming following niche switching. In silico examination of the inferred fitness of gene deletion mutants suggests that secondary replicons evolved to fulfil a specialized function, particularly host-associated niche adaptation. Thus, genes on secondary replicons might potentially be manipulated to promote or suppress host interactions for biotechnological purposes. PMID:27447951

  3. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of the recombinant dihydropyrimidinase from Sinorhizobium meliloti CECT4114

    SciTech Connect

    Martínez-Rodríguez, Sergio; González-Ramírez, Luis Antonio; Clemente-Jiménez, Josefa María; Rodríguez-Vico, Felipe; Las Heras-Vázquez, Francisco Javier; Gavira, Jose A.; García-Ruíz, Juan Manuel

    2006-12-01

    The dihydropyrimidinase from S. meliloti CECT4114, with activity towards both hydantoin and dihydrouracil substrates, was crystallized, and diffraction data were collected to 1.85 Å resolution. Dihydropyrimidinases are involved in the reductive pathway of pyrimidine degradation, catalysing the hydrolysis of 5,6-dihydrouracil and 5,6-dihydrothymine to the corresponding N-carbamoyl β-amino acids. This enzyme has often been referred to as hydantoinase owing to its industrial application in the production of optically pure amino acids starting from racemic mixtures of 5-monosubstituted hydantoins. Recombinant dihydropyrimidinase from Sinorhizobium meliloti CECT4114 (SmelDhp) has been expressed, purified and crystallized. Crystallization was performed using the counter-diffusion method with capillaries of 0.3 mm inner diameter. Crystals of SmelDhp suitable for data collection and structure determination were grown in the presence of agarose at 0.1%(w/v) in order to ensure mass transport controlled by diffusion. X-ray data were collected to a resolution of 1.85 Å. The crystal belongs to the orthorhombic space group C222{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 124.89, b = 126.28, c = 196.10 Å and two molecules in the asymmetric unit. A molecular-replacement solution has been determined and refinement is in progress.

  4. Entropy-driven motility of Sinorhizobium meliloti on a semi-solid surface.

    PubMed

    Dilanji, Gabriel E; Teplitski, Max; Hagen, Stephen J

    2014-06-01

    Sinorhizobium meliloti growing on soft agar can exhibit an unusual surface spreading behaviour that differs from other bacterial surface motilities. Bacteria in the colony secrete an exopolysaccharide-rich mucoid fluid that expands outward on the surface, carrying within it a suspension of actively dividing cells. The moving slime disperses the cells in complex and dynamic patterns indicative of simultaneous bacterial growth, swimming and aggregation. We find that while flagellar swimming is required to maintain the cells in suspension, the spreading and the associated pattern formation are primarily driven by the secreted exopolysaccharide EPS II, which creates two entropy-increasing effects: an osmotic flow of water from the agar to the mucoid fluid and a crowding or depletion attraction between the cells. Activation of these physical/chemical phenomena may be a useful function for the high molecular weight EPS II, a galactoglucan whose biosynthesis is tightly regulated by the ExpR/SinI/SinR quorum-sensing system: unlike bacterial colonies that spread via bacterium-generated, physical propulsive forces, S. meliloti under quorum conditions may use EPS II to activate purely entropic forces within its environment, so that it can disperse by passively 'surfing' on those forces. PMID:24741008

  5. Metabolic modelling reveals the specialization of secondary replicons for niche adaptation in Sinorhizobium meliloti

    PubMed Central

    diCenzo, George C.; Checcucci, Alice; Bazzicalupo, Marco; Mengoni, Alessio; Viti, Carlo; Dziewit, Lukasz; Finan, Turlough M.; Galardini, Marco; Fondi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The genome of about 10% of bacterial species is divided among two or more large chromosome-sized replicons. The contribution of each replicon to the microbial life cycle (for example, environmental adaptations and/or niche switching) remains unclear. Here we report a genome-scale metabolic model of the legume symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti that is integrated with carbon utilization data for 1,500 genes with 192 carbon substrates. Growth of S. meliloti is modelled in three ecological niches (bulk soil, rhizosphere and nodule) with a focus on the role of each of its three replicons. We observe clear metabolic differences during growth in the tested ecological niches and an overall reprogramming following niche switching. In silico examination of the inferred fitness of gene deletion mutants suggests that secondary replicons evolved to fulfil a specialized function, particularly host-associated niche adaptation. Thus, genes on secondary replicons might potentially be manipulated to promote or suppress host interactions for biotechnological purposes. PMID:27447951

  6. Sinorhizobium meliloti chemoreceptor McpU mediates chemotaxis toward host plant exudates through direct proline sensing.

    PubMed

    Webb, Benjamin A; Hildreth, Sherry; Helm, Richard F; Scharf, Birgit E

    2014-06-01

    Bacterial chemotaxis is an important attribute that aids in establishing symbiosis between rhizobia and their legume hosts. Plant roots and seeds exude a spectrum of molecules into the soil to attract their bacterial symbionts. The alfalfa symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti possesses eight chemoreceptors to sense its environment and mediate chemotaxis toward its host. The methyl accepting chemotaxis protein McpU is one of the more abundant S. meliloti chemoreceptors and an important sensor for the potent attractant proline. We established a dominant role of McpU in sensing molecules exuded by alfalfa seeds. Mass spectrometry analysis determined that a single germinating seed exudes 3.72 nmol of proline, producing a millimolar concentration near the seed surface which can be detected by the chemosensory system of S. meliloti. Complementation analysis of the mcpU deletion strain verified McpU as the key proline sensor. A structure-based homology search identified tandem Cache (calcium channels and chemotaxis receptors) domains in the periplasmic region of McpU. Conserved residues Asp-155 and Asp-182 of the N-terminal Cache domain were determined to be important for proline sensing by evaluating mutant strains in capillary and swim plate assays. Differential scanning fluorimetry revealed interaction of the isolated periplasmic region of McpU (McpU40-284) with proline and the importance of Asp-182 in this interaction. Using isothermal titration calorimetry, we determined that proline binds with a Kd (dissociation constant) of 104 μM to McpU40-284, while binding was abolished when Asp-182 was substituted by Glu. Our results show that McpU is mediating chemotaxis toward host plants by direct proline sensing.

  7. Sinorhizobium meliloti Chemoreceptor McpU Mediates Chemotaxis toward Host Plant Exudates through Direct Proline Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Benjamin A.; Hildreth, Sherry; Helm, Richard F.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial chemotaxis is an important attribute that aids in establishing symbiosis between rhizobia and their legume hosts. Plant roots and seeds exude a spectrum of molecules into the soil to attract their bacterial symbionts. The alfalfa symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti possesses eight chemoreceptors to sense its environment and mediate chemotaxis toward its host. The methyl accepting chemotaxis protein McpU is one of the more abundant S. meliloti chemoreceptors and an important sensor for the potent attractant proline. We established a dominant role of McpU in sensing molecules exuded by alfalfa seeds. Mass spectrometry analysis determined that a single germinating seed exudes 3.72 nmol of proline, producing a millimolar concentration near the seed surface which can be detected by the chemosensory system of S. meliloti. Complementation analysis of the mcpU deletion strain verified McpU as the key proline sensor. A structure-based homology search identified tandem Cache (calcium channels and chemotaxis receptors) domains in the periplasmic region of McpU. Conserved residues Asp-155 and Asp-182 of the N-terminal Cache domain were determined to be important for proline sensing by evaluating mutant strains in capillary and swim plate assays. Differential scanning fluorimetry revealed interaction of the isolated periplasmic region of McpU (McpU40-284) with proline and the importance of Asp-182 in this interaction. Using isothermal titration calorimetry, we determined that proline binds with a Kd (dissociation constant) of 104 μM to McpU40-284, while binding was abolished when Asp-182 was substituted by Glu. Our results show that McpU is mediating chemotaxis toward host plants by direct proline sensing. PMID:24657863

  8. Striking Complexity of Lipopolysaccharide Defects in a Collection of Sinorhizobium meliloti Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Gordon R. O.; Sharypova, Larissa A.; Scheidle, Heiko; Jones, Kathryn M.; Niehaus, Karsten; Becker, Anke; Walker, Graham C.

    2003-01-01

    Although the role that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) plays in the symbiosis between Sinorhizobium meliloti and alfalfa has been studied for over a decade, its function in this process remains controversial and poorly understood. This is largely due to a lack of mutants affected by its synthesis. In one of the definitive studies concerning this issue, Clover et al. (R. H. Clover, J. Kieber, and E. R. Signer, J. Bacteriol. 171:3961-3967, 1989) identified a series of mutants with putative LPS defects, judged them to be symbiotically proficient on Medicago sativa, and concluded that LPS might not have a symbiotic function in S. meliloti. The mutations in these strains were never characterized at the molecular level nor was the LPS from most of them analyzed. We have transduced these mutations from the Rm2011 background from which they were originally isolated into the sequenced strain Rm1021 and have characterized the resulting strains in greater detail. We found the LPS from these mutants to display a striking complexity of phenotypes on polyacrylamide electrophoresis gels, including additional rough LPS bands and alterations in the molecular weight distribution of the smooth LPS. We found that some of the mutants contain insertions in genes that are predicted to be involved in the synthesis of carbohydrate components of LPS, including ddhB, lpsB, lpsC, and lpsE. The majority, however, code for proteins predicted to be involved in a wide variety of functions not previously recognized to play a role in LPS synthesis, including a possible transcription elongation factor (GreA), a possible queuine synthesis protein, and a possible chemotaxis protein. Furthermore, using more extensive assays, we have found that most of these strains have symbiotic deficiencies. These results support more recent findings that alterations in LPS structure can affect the ability of S. meliloti to form an effective symbiosis. PMID:12813079

  9. Effect of Microgravity on Sinorhizobium meliloti: Initial Results from the SyNRGE Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Michael S.; Stutte, Gary W.

    2011-01-01

    SyNRGE (Symbiotic Nodulation in a Reduced Gravity Environment) was a sortie mission on STS-135 in the Biological Research in Canisters (BRIe) hardware to study the effect of microgravity on a plant-microbe symbiosis resulting in biological nitrogen fixation. Medicago truncatula, a model species of the legume family, was innoculated with its bacterial symbiont, Sinorhizobium meliloti, to observe early events associated with infection and nodulation in Petri Dish Fixation Units (PDFUs). Two sets of experiments were conducted in orbit and in 24-hour delayed ground controls. Experiment one was designed to determine if S. meliloti infect M. truncatula and initiate physiological changes associated with nodule formation. Roots of five-day-old M. truncatula cultivar Jemalong A17 (Enodll::gus) were innoculated 24 hr before launch with either S. meliloti strain 1021 or strain ABS7 and integrated into BRIC-PDFU hardware placed in a 4 C Cold Bag for launch on Atlantis. Innoculated plants and uninoculated controls were maintained in the dark at ambient temperature in the middeck of STS-135 for 11 days before fixation in RNA/ate/M by crew activation of the PDFU. Experiment two was designed to determine if microgravity altered the process of bacterial infection and host plant nodule formation. Seeds of two M. truncatula cultivar Jemalong A17 lines, the Enodll::gus used in experiment 1, and SUNN, a super-nodulating mutant of A17, were germinated on orbit for 11 days in the middeck cabin and returned to Earth alive inside of BRIC-PDFU's at 4 C S. meliloti strains 1021 and ABS7 were cultivated separately in broth culture on orbit and also returned to Earth alive. After landing, flight- and ground-grown plants and bacteria were transferred from BRIC-PDFU's into Nunc(TradeMark) 4-well plates for reciprocity crosses. Rates of plant growth and nodule development on Buffered Nodulation Medium (lacking nitrogen) were measured for 14 days. Bacteria cultivated in microgravity in the

  10. Exploring the symbiotic pangenome of the nitrogen-fixing bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti

    SciTech Connect

    Galardini, Marco; Mengoni, Alessio; Brilli, Matteo; Pini, Francesco; Fioravanti, Antonella; Lucas, Susan; Lapidus, Alla L.; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Woyke, Tanja; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ivanova, N; Daligault, Hajnalka E.; Bruce, David; Detter, J. Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Teshima, Hazuki; Mocali, Stefano; Bazzicalupo, Marco; Biondi, Emanuele

    2011-01-01

    Background: Sinorhizobium meliloti is a model system for the studies of symbiotic nitrogen fixation. An extensive polymorphism at the genetic and phenotypic level is present in natural populations of this species, especially in relation with symbiotic promotion of plant growth. AK83 and BL225C are two nodule-isolated strains with diverse symbiotic phenotypes; BL225C is more efficient in promoting growth of the Medicago sativa plants than strain AK83. In order to investigate the genetic determinants of the phenotypic diversification of S. meliloti strains AK83 and BL225C, we sequenced the complete genomes for these two strains. Results: With sizes of 7.14 Mbp and 6.97 Mbp, respectively, the genomes of AK83 and BL225C are larger than the laboratory strain Rm1021. The core genome of Rm1021, AK83, BL225C strains included 5124 orthologous groups, while the accessory genome was composed by 2700 orthologous groups. While Rm1021 and BL225C have only three replicons (Chromosome, pSymA and pSymB), AK83 has also two plasmids, 260 and 70 Kbp long. We found 65 interesting orthologous groups of genes that were present only in the accessory genome, consequently responsible for phenotypic diversity and putatively involved in plant-bacterium interaction. Notably, the symbiosis inefficient AK83 lacked several genes required for microaerophilic growth inside nodules, while several genes for accessory functions related to competition, plant invasion and bacteroid tropism were identified only in AK83 and BL225C strains. Presence and extent of polymorphism in regulons of transcription factors involved in symbiotic interaction were also analyzed. Our results indicate that regulons are flexible, with a large number of accessory genes, suggesting that regulons polymorphism could also be a key determinant in the variability of symbiotic performances among the analyzed strains.

  11. Novel mixed-linkage β-glucan activated by c-di-GMP in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Mendoza, Daniel; Rodríguez-Carvajal, Miguel Ángel; Romero-Jiménez, Lorena; Farias, Gabriela de Araujo; Lloret, Javier; Gallegos, María Trinidad; Sanjuán, Juan

    2015-02-17

    An artificial increase of cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) levels in Sinorhizobium meliloti 8530, a bacterium that does not carry known cellulose synthesis genes, leads to overproduction of a substance that binds the dyes Congo red and calcofluor. Sugar composition and methylation analyses and NMR studies identified this compound as a linear mixed-linkage (1 → 3)(1 → 4)-β-D-glucan (ML β-glucan), not previously described in bacteria but resembling ML β-glucans found in plants and lichens. This unique polymer is hydrolyzed by the specific endoglucanase lichenase, but, unlike lichenan and barley glucan, it generates a disaccharidic → 4)-β-D-Glcp-(1 → 3)-β-D-Glcp-(1 → repeating unit. A two-gene operon bgsBA required for production of this ML β-glucan is conserved among several genera within the order Rhizobiales, where bgsA encodes a glycosyl transferase with domain resemblance and phylogenetic relationship to curdlan synthases and to bacterial cellulose synthases. ML β-glucan synthesis is subjected to both transcriptional and posttranslational regulation. bgsBA transcription is dependent on the exopolysaccharide/quorum sensing ExpR/SinI regulatory system, and posttranslational regulation seems to involve allosteric activation of the ML β-glucan synthase BgsA by c-di-GMP binding to its C-terminal domain. To our knowledge, this is the first report on a linear mixed-linkage (1 → 3)(1 → 4)-β-glucan produced by a bacterium. The S. meliloti ML β-glucan participates in bacterial aggregation and biofilm formation and is required for efficient attachment to the roots of a host plant, resembling the biological role of cellulose in other bacteria.

  12. Alfalfa forage digestibility, quality and yield under future climate change scenarios vary with Sinorhizobium meliloti strain.

    PubMed

    Sanz-Sáez, Álvaro; Erice, Gorka; Aguirreolea, Jone; Muñoz, Fernando; Sánchez-Díaz, Manuel; Irigoyen, Juan José

    2012-05-15

    Elevated CO(2) may decrease alfalfa forage quality and in vitro digestibility through a drop in crude protein and an enhancement of fibre content. The aim of the present study was to analyse the effect of elevated CO(2), elevated temperature and Sinorhizobium meliloti strains (102F78, 102F34 and 1032 GMI) on alfalfa yield, forage quality and in vitro dry matter digestibility. This objective is in line with the selection of S. meliloti strains in order to maintain high forage yield and quality under future climate conditions. Plants inoculated with the 102F34 strain showed more DM production than those inoculated with 1032GMI; however, these strains did not show significant differences with 102F78 plants. Neutral or acid detergent fibres were not enhanced in plants inoculated with the 102F34 strain under elevated CO(2) or temperature and hence, in vitro dry matter digestibility was unaffected. Crude protein content, an indicator of forage quality, was negatively related to shoot yield. Plants inoculated with 102F78 showed a similar shoot yield to those inoculated with 102F34, but had higher crude protein content at elevated CO(2) and temperature. Under these climate change conditions, 102F78 inoculated plants produced higher quality forage. However, the higher digestibility of plants inoculated with the 102F34 strain under any CO(2) or temperature conditions makes them more suitable for growing under climate change conditions. In general, elevated CO(2) in combination with high temperature (Climate Change scenario) reduced IVDMD and CP content and enhanced fibre content, which means that animal production will be negatively affected.

  13. Novel mixed-linkage β-glucan activated by c-di-GMP in Sinorhizobium meliloti

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Mendoza, Daniel; Rodríguez-Carvajal, Miguel Ángel; Romero-Jiménez, Lorena; Farias, Gabriela de Araujo; Lloret, Javier; Gallegos, María Trinidad; Sanjuán, Juan

    2015-01-01

    An artificial increase of cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) levels in Sinorhizobium meliloti 8530, a bacterium that does not carry known cellulose synthesis genes, leads to overproduction of a substance that binds the dyes Congo red and calcofluor. Sugar composition and methylation analyses and NMR studies identified this compound as a linear mixed-linkage (1→3)(1→4)-β-d-glucan (ML β-glucan), not previously described in bacteria but resembling ML β-glucans found in plants and lichens. This unique polymer is hydrolyzed by the specific endoglucanase lichenase, but, unlike lichenan and barley glucan, it generates a disaccharidic →4)-β-d-Glcp-(1→3)-β-d-Glcp-(1→ repeating unit. A two-gene operon bgsBA required for production of this ML β-glucan is conserved among several genera within the order Rhizobiales, where bgsA encodes a glycosyl transferase with domain resemblance and phylogenetic relationship to curdlan synthases and to bacterial cellulose synthases. ML β-glucan synthesis is subjected to both transcriptional and posttranslational regulation. bgsBA transcription is dependent on the exopolysaccharide/quorum sensing ExpR/SinI regulatory system, and posttranslational regulation seems to involve allosteric activation of the ML β-glucan synthase BgsA by c-di-GMP binding to its C-terminal domain. To our knowledge, this is the first report on a linear mixed-linkage (1→3)(1→4)-β-glucan produced by a bacterium. The S. meliloti ML β-glucan participates in bacterial aggregation and biofilm formation and is required for efficient attachment to the roots of a host plant, resembling the biological role of cellulose in other bacteria. PMID:25650430

  14. Novel mixed-linkage β-glucan activated by c-di-GMP in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Mendoza, Daniel; Rodríguez-Carvajal, Miguel Ángel; Romero-Jiménez, Lorena; Farias, Gabriela de Araujo; Lloret, Javier; Gallegos, María Trinidad; Sanjuán, Juan

    2015-02-17

    An artificial increase of cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) levels in Sinorhizobium meliloti 8530, a bacterium that does not carry known cellulose synthesis genes, leads to overproduction of a substance that binds the dyes Congo red and calcofluor. Sugar composition and methylation analyses and NMR studies identified this compound as a linear mixed-linkage (1 → 3)(1 → 4)-β-D-glucan (ML β-glucan), not previously described in bacteria but resembling ML β-glucans found in plants and lichens. This unique polymer is hydrolyzed by the specific endoglucanase lichenase, but, unlike lichenan and barley glucan, it generates a disaccharidic → 4)-β-D-Glcp-(1 → 3)-β-D-Glcp-(1 → repeating unit. A two-gene operon bgsBA required for production of this ML β-glucan is conserved among several genera within the order Rhizobiales, where bgsA encodes a glycosyl transferase with domain resemblance and phylogenetic relationship to curdlan synthases and to bacterial cellulose synthases. ML β-glucan synthesis is subjected to both transcriptional and posttranslational regulation. bgsBA transcription is dependent on the exopolysaccharide/quorum sensing ExpR/SinI regulatory system, and posttranslational regulation seems to involve allosteric activation of the ML β-glucan synthase BgsA by c-di-GMP binding to its C-terminal domain. To our knowledge, this is the first report on a linear mixed-linkage (1 → 3)(1 → 4)-β-glucan produced by a bacterium. The S. meliloti ML β-glucan participates in bacterial aggregation and biofilm formation and is required for efficient attachment to the roots of a host plant, resembling the biological role of cellulose in other bacteria. PMID:25650430

  15. Contribution of Individual Chemoreceptors to Sinorhizobium meliloti Chemotaxis Towards Amino Acids of Host and Nonhost Seed Exudates.

    PubMed

    Webb, Benjamin A; Helm, Richard F; Scharf, Birgit E

    2016-03-01

    Plant seeds and roots exude a spectrum of molecules into the soil that attract bacteria to the spermosphere and rhizosphere, respectively. The alfalfa symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti utilizes eight chemoreceptors (McpT to McpZ and IcpA) to mediate chemotaxis. Using a modified hydrogel capillary chemotaxis assay that allows data quantification and larger throughput screening, we defined the role of S. meliloti chemoreceptors in sensing its host, Medicago sativa, and a closely related nonhost, Medicago arabica. S. meliloti wild type and most single-deletion strains displayed comparable chemotaxis responses to host or nonhost seed exudate. However, while the mcpZ mutant responded like wild type to M. sativa exudate, its reaction to M. arabica exudate was reduced by 80%. Even though the amino acid (AA) amounts released by both plant species were similar, synthetic AA mixtures that matched exudate profiles contributed differentially to the S. meliloti wild-type response to M. sativa (23%) and M. arabica (37%) exudates, with McpU identified as the most important chemoreceptor for AA. Our results show that S. meliloti is equally attracted to host and nonhost legumes; however, AA play a greater role in attraction to M. arabica than to M. sativa, with McpZ being specifically important in sensing M. arabica.

  16. Contribution of Individual Chemoreceptors to Sinorhizobium meliloti Chemotaxis Towards Amino Acids of Host and Nonhost Seed Exudates.

    PubMed

    Webb, Benjamin A; Helm, Richard F; Scharf, Birgit E

    2016-03-01

    Plant seeds and roots exude a spectrum of molecules into the soil that attract bacteria to the spermosphere and rhizosphere, respectively. The alfalfa symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti utilizes eight chemoreceptors (McpT to McpZ and IcpA) to mediate chemotaxis. Using a modified hydrogel capillary chemotaxis assay that allows data quantification and larger throughput screening, we defined the role of S. meliloti chemoreceptors in sensing its host, Medicago sativa, and a closely related nonhost, Medicago arabica. S. meliloti wild type and most single-deletion strains displayed comparable chemotaxis responses to host or nonhost seed exudate. However, while the mcpZ mutant responded like wild type to M. sativa exudate, its reaction to M. arabica exudate was reduced by 80%. Even though the amino acid (AA) amounts released by both plant species were similar, synthetic AA mixtures that matched exudate profiles contributed differentially to the S. meliloti wild-type response to M. sativa (23%) and M. arabica (37%) exudates, with McpU identified as the most important chemoreceptor for AA. Our results show that S. meliloti is equally attracted to host and nonhost legumes; however, AA play a greater role in attraction to M. arabica than to M. sativa, with McpZ being specifically important in sensing M. arabica. PMID:26713349

  17. [Symbiosis between the nodule bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti and alfalfa (Medicago sativa) under salinization conditions].

    PubMed

    Ibragimova, M V; Rumiantseva, M L; Onishchuk, O P; Belova, V S; Kurchak, O N; Andronov, E E; Dziubenko, N I; Simarov, B V

    2006-01-01

    Two hundred forty-three isolates of alfalfa nodule bacteria (Sinorhizobium meliloti) were obtained from legume nodules and soils sampled in the northern Aral region, experiencing secondary salinization. Isolates obtained from nodules (N isolates) were significantly more salt-tolerant than those from soils (S isolates) when grown in a liquid medium with 3.5% NaCl. It was found that wild species of alfalfa, melilot, and trigonella preferably formed symbioses with salt-tolerant nodule bacteria in both salinized and nonsalinized soils. Only two alfalfa species, Medicago falcata and M. trautvetteri, formed efficient symbioses in soils contrasting in salinity. The formation of efficient symbiosis with alfalfa in the presence of 0.6% NaCl was studied in 36 isolates (N and S) differing in salt tolerance and symbiotic efficiency. Fifteen isolates formed efficient symbioses in the presence of salt. The increase in the dry weight of the plants was 25-68% higher than in the control group. The efficiency of symbiotic interaction under salinization conditions depended on the efficiency of the isolates under standard conditions but did not correlate with the source of nodule bacteria (soil or nodule) or their salt tolerance. The results indicate that nodule bacterium strains forming efficient symbioses under salinization conditions can be found.

  18. A locus necessary for the transport and catabolism of erythritol in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Geddes, Barney A; Pickering, Brad S; Poysti, Nathan J; Collins, Heather; Yudistira, Harry; Oresnik, Ivan J

    2010-10-01

    In this work we have genetically defined an erythritol utilization locus in Sinorhizobium meliloti. A cosmid containing the locus was isolated by complementation of a transposon mutant and was subsequently mutagenized using Tn5 : : B20. The locus was found to consist of five transcriptional units, each of which was necessary for the utilization of erythritol. Genetic complementation experiments using genes putatively annotated as erythritol catabolic genes clearly showed that, of the 17 genes at this locus, six genes are not necessary for the utilization of erythritol as a sole carbon source. The remaining genes encode EryA, EryB, EryC and TpiB as well as an uncharacterized ABC-type transporter. Transport experiments using labelled erythritol showed that components of the ABC transporter are necessary for the uptake of erythritol. The locus also contains two regulators: EryD, a SorC class regulator, and SMc01615, a DeoR class regulator. Quantitative RT-PCR experiments showed that each of these regulators negatively regulates its own transcription. In addition, induction of the erythritol locus was dependent upon EryD and a product of erythritol catabolism. Further characterization of polar mutations revealed that in addition to erythritol, the locus contains determinants for adonitol and l-arabitol utilization. The context of the mutations suggests that the locus is important for both the transport and catabolism of adonitol and l-arabitol.

  19. Characterization of the Rhizobium (Sinorhizobium) meliloti high- and low-affinity phosphate uptake systems.

    PubMed Central

    Voegele, R T; Bardin, S; Finan, T M

    1997-01-01

    Genetic studies have suggested that Rhizobium (Sinorhizobium) meliloti contains two distinct phosphate (Pi) transport systems, encoded by the phoCDET genes and the orfA-pit genes, respectively. Here we present data which show that the ABC-type PhoCDET system has a high affinity for Pi (Km, 0.2 microM) and that Pi uptake by this system is severely inhibited by phosphonates. This high-affinity uptake system was induced under Pi-limiting conditions and was repressed in the presence of excess Pi. Uptake via the OrfA-Pit system was examined in (i) a phoC mutant which showed increased expression of the orfA-pit genes as a result of a promoter-up mutation and (ii) a phoB mutant (PhoB is required for phoCDET expression). Pi uptake in both strains exhibited saturation kinetics (Km, 1 to 2 microM) and was not inhibited by phosphonates. This uptake system was active in wild-type cells grown with excess Pi and appeared to be repressed when the cells were starved for Pi. Thus, our biochemical data show that the OrfA-Pit and PhoCDET uptake systems are differentially expressed depending on the state of the cell with respect to phosphate availability. PMID:9393684

  20. Identification of nolR-regulated proteins in Sinorhizobium meliloti using proteome analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, H; Higgins, J; Kondorosi, E; Kondorosi, A; Djordjevic, M A; Weinman, J J; Rolfe, B G

    2000-11-01

    Extractable proteins from Sinorhizobium meliloti strains AK631 and EK698 (a Tn5-induced noIR-deficient mutant of AK631), grown in tryptone agar (TA) medium with or without the addition of the plant signal luteolin, were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and compared. Analysis of silver-stained gels showed that the noIR mutant had 189 proteins that were significantly altered in their levels (101 protein spots up- and 88 downregulated). Coomassie-stained preparative two-dimensional (2-D) gels or polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membranes blotted from preparative gels showed that at least 52 of the altered proteins could be reproducibly detected and isolated from the noIR mutant. These 52 altered protein spots were classified into five groups based on an assessment of protein abundance by computer analysis and the effect of the presence or absence of luteolin addition to the growth medium. N-terminal microsequencing of 38 proteins revealed that the most striking feature of the consequence of the noIR mutation is the number and broad spectrum of cellular functions that are affected by the loss of the NoIR function. These include proteins involved in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, heat shock and cold shock proteins, protein synthesis, a translation elongation factor, oxidative stress and cell growth and maintenance functions. We propose that the NoIR repressor is a global regulatory protein which responds to environmental factors to fine-tune intracellular metabolism. PMID:11271500

  1. Insights into the history of a bacterial group II intron remnant from the genomes of the nitrogen-fixing symbionts Sinorhizobium meliloti and Sinorhizobium medicae.

    PubMed

    Toro, N; Martínez-Rodríguez, L; Martínez-Abarca, F

    2014-10-01

    Group II introns are self-splicing catalytic RNAs that act as mobile retroelements. In bacteria, they are thought to be tolerated to some extent because they self-splice and home preferentially to sites outside of functional genes, generally within intergenic regions or in other mobile genetic elements, by mechanisms including the divergence of DNA target specificity to prevent target site saturation. RmInt1 is a mobile group II intron that is widespread in natural populations of Sinorhizobium meliloti and was first described in the GR4 strain. Like other bacterial group II introns, RmInt1 tends to evolve toward an inactive form by fragmentation, with loss of the 3' terminus. We identified genomic evidence of a fragmented intron closely related to RmInt1 buried in the genome of the extant S. meliloti/S. medicae species. By studying this intron, we obtained evidence for the occurrence of intron insertion before the divergence of ancient rhizobial species. This fragmented group II intron has thus existed for a long time and has provided sequence variation, on which selection can act, contributing to diverse genetic rearrangements, and to generate pan-genome divergence after strain differentiation. The data presented here suggest that fragmented group II introns within intergenic regions closed to functionally important neighboring genes may have been microevolutionary forces driving adaptive evolution of these rhizobial species.

  2. Purification and Properties of a Glucuronan Lyase from Sinorhizobium meliloti M5N1CS (NCIMB 40472)

    PubMed Central

    Da Costa, Alexandre; Michaud, Philippe; Petit, Emmanuel; Heyraud, Alain; Colin-Morel, Philippe; Courtois, Bernard; Courtois, Josiane

    2001-01-01

    A glucuronan lyase extracted from Sinorhizobium meliloti strain M5N1CS was purified to homogeneity by anion-exchange chromatography. The purified enzyme corresponds to a monomer with a molecular mass of 20 kDa and a pI of 4.9. A specific activity was found only for polyglucuronates leading to the production of 4,5-unsaturated oligoglucuronates. The enzyme activity was optimal at pH 6.5 and 50°C. Zn2+, Cu2+, and Hg2+ (1 mM) inhibited the enzyme activity. No homology of the enzyme N-terminal amino acid sequence was found with any of the previously published protein sequences. This enzyme purified from S. meliloti strain M5N1CS corresponding to a new lyase was classified as an endopolyglucuronate lyase. PMID:11679345

  3. Sinorhizobium meliloti flavin secretion and bacteria-host interaction: role of the bifunctional RibBA protein.

    PubMed

    Yurgel, Svetlana N; Rice, Jennifer; Domreis, Elizabeth; Lynch, Joseph; Sa, Na; Qamar, Zeeshan; Rajamani, Sathish; Gao, Mengsheng; Roje, Sanja; Bauer, Wolfgang D

    2014-05-01

    Sinorhizobium meliloti, the nitrogen-fixing bacterial symbiont of Medicago spp. and other legumes, secretes a considerable amount of riboflavin. This precursor of the cofactors flavin mononucleotide and flavin adenine dinucleotide is a bioactive molecule that has a beneficial effect on plant growth. The ribBA gene of S. meliloti codes for a putative bifunctional enzyme with dihydroxybutanone phosphate synthase and guanosine triphosphate (GTP) cyclohydrolase II activities, catalyzing the initial steps of the riboflavin biosynthesis pathway. We show here that an in-frame deletion of ribBA does not cause riboflavin auxotrophy or affect the ability of S. meliloti to establish an effective symbiosis with the host plant but does affect the ability of the bacteria to secrete flavins, colonize host-plant roots, and compete for nodulation. A strain missing the RibBA protein retains considerable GTP cyclohydrolase II activity. Based on these results, we hypothesize that S. meliloti has two partly interchangeable modules for biosynthesis of riboflavin, one fulfilling the internal need for flavins in bacterial metabolism and the other producing riboflavin for secretion. Our data also indicate that bacteria-derived flavins play a role in communication between rhizobia and the legume host and that the RibBA protein is important in this communication process even though it is not essential for riboflavin biosynthesis and symbiosis.

  4. The conserved polarity factor podJ1 impacts multiple cell envelope-associated functions in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Fields, Alexander T; Navarrete, Charlene S; Zare, Alaa Ziad; Huang, Zhenzhong; Mostafavi, Mina; Lewis, Jainee C; Rezaeihaghighi, Yasha; Brezler, Benjamin J; Ray, Shatarupa; Rizzacasa, Anne L; Barnett, Melanie J; Long, Sharon R; Chen, Esther J; Chen, Joseph C

    2012-06-01

    Although diminutive in size, bacteria possess highly diverse and spatially confined cellular structures. Two related alphaproteobacteria, Sinorhizobium meliloti and Caulobacter crescentus, serve as models for investigating the genetic basis of morphological variations. S. meliloti, a symbiont of leguminous plants, synthesizes multiple flagella and no prosthecae, whereas C. crescentus, a freshwater bacterium, has a single polar flagellum and stalk. The podJ gene, originally identified in C. crescentus for its role in polar organelle development, is split into two adjacent open reading frames, podJ1 and podJ2, in S. meliloti. Deletion of podJ1 interferes with flagellar motility, exopolysaccharide production, cell envelope integrity, cell division and normal morphology, but not symbiosis. As in C. crescentus, the S. meliloti PodJ1 protein appears to act as a polarity beacon and localizes to the newer cell pole. Microarray analysis indicates that podJ1 affects the expression of at least 129 genes, the majority of which correspond to observed mutant phenotypes. Together, phenotypic characterization, microarray analysis and suppressor identification suggest that PodJ1 controls a core set of conserved elements, including flagellar and pili genes, the signalling proteins PleC and DivK, and the transcriptional activator TacA, while alternative downstream targets have evolved to suit the distinct lifestyles of individual species.

  5. Tn5-Induced and Spontaneous Switching of Sinorhizobium meliloti to Faster-Swarming Behavior†

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xueming; Bauer, Wolfgang D.

    1999-01-01

    Tn5 mutants of Sinorhizobium meliloti RMB7201 which swarmed 1.5 to 2.5 times faster than the parental strain in semisolid agar, moist sand, and viscous liquid were identified. These faster-swarming (FS) mutants outgrew the wild type 30- to 40-fold within 2 days in mixed swarm colonies. The FS mutants survived and grew as well as or better than the wild type under all of the circumstances tested, except in a soil matrix subjected to air drying. Exopolysaccharide (EPS) synthesis was reduced in each of the FS mutants when they were grown on defined succinate-nitrate medium, but the extent of reduction was different for each. It appears that FS behavior likely results from a modest, general derepression of motility involving an increased proportion of motile and flagellated cells and an increased average number of flagella per cell and increased average flagellar length. Spontaneous FS variants of RMB7201 were obtained at a frequency of about 1 per 10,000 to 20,000 cells by either enrichment from the periphery of swarm colonies or screening of colonies for reduced EPS synthesis on succinate-nitrate plates. The spontaneous FS variants and Tn5 FS mutants were symbiotically effective and competitive in alfalfa nodulation. Reversion of FS variants to wild-type behavior was sporadic, indicating that reversion is affected by unidentified environmental factors. Based on phenotypic and molecular differences between individual FS variants and mutants, it appears that there may be multiple genetic configurations that result in FS behavior in RMB7201. The facile isolation of spontaneous FS variants of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa indicates that switching to FS behavior may be fairly common among bacterial species. The substantial growth advantage of FS mutants and variants wherever nutrient gradients exist suggests that switching to FS forms may be an important behavioral adaptation in natural environments. PMID:10049888

  6. Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus genes orthologous with pSymA-borne genes of Sinorhizobium meliloti: suggested roles in eukaryotic host interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ‘Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus,’ is a psyllid-vectored, obligate phytopathogen associated with citrus huanglongbing disease. Sinorhizobium meliloti strain 1021, a nitrogen-fixing, root-nodulating bacterial microsymbiont of alfalfa, has a 3.5 Mbp circular chromosome and two megaplasmids including 1.3 Mb...

  7. 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus' proteins orthologous with pSymA-encoded proteins of Sinorhizobium meliloti: hypothetical roles in plant host interation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A nitrogen-fixing alfalfa-nodulating microsymbiont, Sinorhizobium meliloti, has a genome consisting of a 3.5 Mbp circular chromosome and two megaplasmids totaling 3.0 Mbp, one a 1.3 Mbp pSymA carrying nonessential ‘accessory’ genes including nif, nod and others involved in plant interaction. Predict...

  8. Rhizobia from Lanzarote, the Canary Islands, that nodulate Phaseolus vulgars have characteristics in common with Sinorhizobium meliloti isolates from mainland Spain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Common bean and Medicago rhizobia isolated from five locations on the island of Lanzarote, the Canary Islands, by partial analysis of 10 chromosomal genes were shown to exhibit close similarity to Sinorhizobium meliloti. Several bean isolates from Lanzarote, mainland Spain and Tunisia nodulated Leu...

  9. l-Hydroxyproline and d-Proline Catabolism in Sinorhizobium meliloti

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Siyun; White, Catharine E.; diCenzo, George C.; Zhang, Ye; Stogios, Peter J.; Savchenko, Alexei

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sinorhizobium meliloti forms N2-fixing root nodules on alfalfa, and as a free-living bacterium, it can grow on a very broad range of substrates, including l-proline and several related compounds, such as proline betaine, trans-4-hydroxy-l-proline (trans-4-l-Hyp), and cis-4-hydroxy-d-proline (cis-4-d-Hyp). Fourteen hyp genes are induced upon growth of S. meliloti on trans-4-l-Hyp, and of those, hypMNPQ encodes an ABC-type trans-4-l-Hyp transporter and hypRE encodes an epimerase that converts trans-4-l-Hyp to cis-4-d-Hyp in the bacterial cytoplasm. Here, we present evidence that the HypO, HypD, and HypH proteins catalyze the remaining steps in which cis-4-d-Hyp is converted to α-ketoglutarate. The HypO protein functions as a d-amino acid dehydrogenase, converting cis-4-d-Hyp to Δ1-pyrroline-4-hydroxy-2-carboxylate, which is deaminated by HypD to α-ketoglutarate semialdehyde and then converted to α-ketoglutarate by HypH. The crystal structure of HypD revealed it to be a member of the N-acetylneuraminate lyase subfamily of the (α/β)8 protein family and is consistent with the known enzymatic mechanism for other members of the group. It was also shown that S. meliloti can catabolize d-proline as both a carbon and a nitrogen source, that d-proline can complement l-proline auxotrophy, and that the catabolism of d-proline is dependent on the hyp cluster. Transport of d-proline involves the HypMNPQ transporter, following which d-proline is converted to Δ1-pyrroline-2-carboxylate (P2C) largely via HypO. The P2C is converted to l-proline through the NADPH-dependent reduction of P2C by the previously uncharacterized HypS protein. Thus, overall, we have now completed detailed genetic and/or biochemical characterization of 9 of the 14 hyp genes. IMPORTANCE Hydroxyproline is abundant in proteins in animal and plant tissues and serves as a carbon and a nitrogen source for bacteria in diverse environments, including the rhizosphere, compost, and the mammalian gut

  10. The Plasmid Mobilome of the Model Plant-Symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti: Coming up with New Questions and Answers.

    PubMed

    Lagares, Antonio; Sanjuán, Juan; Pistorio, Mariano

    2014-10-01

    Rhizobia are Gram-negative Alpha- and Betaproteobacteria living in the underground which have the ability to associate with legumes for the establishment of nitrogen-fixing symbioses. Sinorhizobium meliloti in particular-the symbiont of Medicago, Melilotus, and Trigonella spp.-has for the past decades served as a model organism for investigating, at the molecular level, the biology, biochemistry, and genetics of a free-living and symbiotic soil bacterium of agricultural relevance. To date, the genomes of seven different S. meliloti strains have been fully sequenced and annotated, and several other draft genomic sequences are also available. The vast amount of plasmid DNA that S. meliloti frequently bears (up to 45% of its total genome), the conjugative ability of some of those plasmids, and the extent of the plasmid diversity has provided researchers with an extraordinary system to investigate functional and structural plasmid molecular biology within the evolutionary context surrounding a plant-associated model bacterium. Current evidence indicates that the plasmid mobilome in S. meliloti is composed of replicons varying greatly in size and having diverse conjugative systems and properties along with different evolutionary stabilities and biological roles. While plasmids carrying symbiotic functions (pSyms) are known to have high structural stability (approaching that of chromosomes), the remaining plasmid mobilome (referred to as the non-pSym, functionally cryptic, or accessory compartment) has been shown to possess remarkable diversity and to be highly active in conjugation. In light of the modern genomic and current biochemical data on the plasmids of S. meliloti, the current article revises their main structural components, their transfer and regulatory mechanisms, and their potential as vehicles in shaping the evolution of the rhizobial genome. PMID:26104371

  11. Construction and Environmental Release of a Sinorhizobium meliloti Strain Genetically Modified To Be More Competitive for Alfalfa Nodulation

    PubMed Central

    van Dillewijn, Pieter; Soto, María José; Villadas, Pablo J.; Toro, Nicolás

    2001-01-01

    Highly efficient nitrogen-fixing strains selected in the laboratory often fail to increase legume production in agricultural soils containing indigenous rhizobial populations because they cannot compete against these populations for nodule formation. We have previously demonstrated, with a Sinorhizobium meliloti PutA− mutant strain, that proline dehydrogenase activity is required for colonization and therefore for the nodulation efficiency and competitiveness of S. meliloti on alfalfa roots (J. I. Jiménez-Zurdo, P. van Dillewijn, M. J. Soto, M. R. de Felipe, J. Olivares, and N. Toro, Mol. Plant-Microbe Interact. 8:492–498, 1995). In this work, we investigated whether the putA gene could be used as a means of increasing the competitiveness of S. meliloti strains. We produced a construct in which a constitutive promoter was placed 190 nucleotides upstream from the start codon of the putA gene. This resulted in an increase in the basal expression of this gene, with this increase being even greater in the presence of the substrate proline. We found that the presence of multicopy plasmids containing this putA gene construct increased the competitiveness of S. meliloti in microcosm experiments in nonsterile soil planted with alfalfa plants subjected to drought stress only during the first month. We investigated whether this construct also increased the competitiveness of S. meliloti strains under agricultural conditions by using it as the inoculum in a contained field experiment at León, Spain. We found that the frequency of nodule occupancy was higher with inoculum containing the modified putA gene for samples that were analyzed after 34 days but not for samples that were analyzed later. PMID:11525978

  12. Ectoine-induced proteins in Sinorhizobium meliloti include an Ectoine ABC-type transporter involved in osmoprotection and ectoine catabolism.

    PubMed

    Jebbar, Mohamed; Sohn-Bösser, Linda; Bremer, Erhard; Bernard, Théophile; Blanco, Carlos

    2005-02-01

    To understand the mechanisms of ectoine-induced osmoprotection in Sinorhizobium meliloti, a proteomic examination of S. meliloti cells grown in minimal medium supplemented with ectoine was undertaken. This revealed the induction of 10 proteins. The protein products of eight genes were identified by using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Five of these genes, with four other genes whose products were not detected on two-dimensional gels, belong to the same gene cluster, which is localized on the pSymB megaplasmid. Four of the nine genes encode the characteristic components of an ATP-binding cassette transporter that was named ehu, for ectoine/hydroxyectoine uptake. This transporter was encoded by four genes (ehuA, ehuB, ehuC, and ehuD) that formed an operon with another gene cluster that contains five genes, named eutABCDE for ectoine utilization. On the basis of sequence homologies, eutABCDE encode enzymes with putative and hypothetical functions in ectoine catabolism. Analysis of the properties of ehuA and eutA mutants suggests that S. meliloti possesses at least one additional ectoine catabolic pathway as well as a lower-affinity transport system for ectoine and hydroxyectoine. The expression of ehuB, as determined by measurements of UidA activity, was shown to be induced by ectoine and hydroxyectoine but not by glycine betaine or by high osmolality.

  13. sinI- and expR-dependent quorum sensing in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Gao, Mengsheng; Chen, Hancai; Eberhard, Anatol; Gronquist, Matthew R; Robinson, Jayne B; Rolfe, Barry G; Bauer, Wolfgang D

    2005-12-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) in Sinorhizobium meliloti, the N-fixing bacterial symbiont of Medicago host plants, involves at least half a dozen different N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) signals and perhaps an equal number of AHL receptors. The accumulation of 55 proteins was found to be dependent on SinI, the AHL synthase, and/or on ExpR, one of the AHL receptors. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry identified 3-oxo-C(14)-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C(14)-HSL), C(16)-HSL, 3-oxo-C(16)-HSL, C(16:1)-HSL, and 3-oxo-C(16:1)-HSL as the sinI-dependent AHL QS signals accumulated by the 8530 expR(+) strain under the conditions used for proteome analysis. The 8530 expR(+) strain secretes additional, unidentified QS-active compounds. Addition of 200 nM C(14)-HSL or C(16:1)-HSL, two of the known SinI AHLs, affected the levels of 75% of the proteins, confirming that their accumulation is QS regulated. A number of the QS-regulated proteins have functions plausibly related to symbiotic interactions with the host, including ExpE6, IdhA, MocB, Gor, PckA, LeuC, and AglE. Seven of 10 single-crossover beta-glucuronidase (GUS) transcriptional reporters in genes corresponding to QS-regulated proteins showed significantly different activities in the sinI and expR mutant backgrounds and in response to added SinI AHLs. The sinI mutant and several of the single-crossover strains were significantly delayed in the ability to initiate nodules on the primary root of the host plant, Medicago truncatula, indicating that sinI-dependent QS regulation and QS-regulated proteins contribute importantly to the rate or efficiency of nodule initiation. The sinI and expR mutants were also defective in surface swarming motility. The sinI mutant was restored to normal swarming by 5 nM C(16:1)-HSL.

  14. Altered susceptibility to infection by Sinorhizobium meliloti and Nectria haematococca in alfalfa roots with altered cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Woo, H-H; Hirsch, A M; Hawes, M C

    2004-07-01

    Most infections of plant roots are initiated in the region of elongation; the mechanism for this tissue-specific localization pattern is unknown. In alfalfa expressing PsUGT1 antisense mRNA under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter, the cell cycle in roots is completed in 48 h instead of 24 h, and border cell number is decreased by more than 99%. These plants were found to exhibit increased root-tip infection by a fungal pathogen and reduced nodule formation by a bacterial symbiont. Thus, the frequency of infection in the region of elongation by Nectria haematocca was unaffected, but infection of the root tip was increased by more than 90%; early stages of Sinorhizobium meliloti infection and nodule morphology were normal, but the frequency of nodulation was fourfold lower than in wild-type roots.

  15. Sinorhizobium meliloti Functionally Replaces 3-Oxoacyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase (FabG) by Overexpressing NodG During Fatty Acid Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Mao, Ya-Hui; Li, Feng; Ma, Jin-Cheng; Hu, Zhe; Wang, Hai-Hong

    2016-06-01

    In Sinorhizobium meliloti, the nodG gene is located in the nodFEG operon of the symbiotic plasmid. Although strong sequence similarity (53% amino acid identities) between S. meliloti NodG and Escherichia coli FabG was reported in 1992, it has not been determined whether S. meliloti NodG plays a role in fatty acid synthesis. We report that expression of S. meliloti NodG restores the growth of the E. coli fabG temperature-sensitive mutant CL104 under nonpermissive conditions. Using in vitro assays, we demonstrated that NodG is able to catalyze the reduction of the 3-oxoacyl-ACP intermediates in E. coli fatty acid synthetic reaction. Moreover, although deletion of the S. meliloti nodG gene does not cause any growth defects, upon overexpression of nodG from a plasmid, the S. meliloti fabG gene encoding the canonical 3-oxoacyl-ACP reductase (OAR) can be disrupted without any effects on growth or fatty acid composition. This indicates that S. meliloti nodG encodes an OAR and can play a role in fatty acid synthesis when expressed at sufficiently high levels. Thus, a bacterium can simultaneously possess two or more OARs that can play a role in fatty acid synthesis. Our data also showed that, although SmnodG increases alfalfa nodulation efficiency, it is not essential for alfalfa nodulation. PMID:26975437

  16. Identification and Analysis of Medicago truncatula Auxin Transporter Gene Families Uncover their Roles in Responses to Sinorhizobium meliloti Infection.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chenjia; Yue, Runqing; Bai, Youhuang; Feng, Rong; Sun, Tao; Wang, Xiaofei; Yang, Yanjun; Tie, Shuanggui; Wang, Huizhong

    2015-10-01

    Auxin transport plays a pivotal role in the interaction between legume species and nitrogen-fixing bacteria to form symbioses. Auxin influx carriers auxin resistant 1/like aux 1 (AUX/LAX), efflux carriers pin-formed (PIN) and efflux/conditional P-glycoprotein (PGP/ABCB) are three major protein families participating in auxin polar transport. We used the latest Medicago truncatula genome sequence to characterize and analyze the M. truncatula LAX (MtLAX), M. truncatula PIN (MtPIN) and M. truncatula ABCB (MtABCB) families. Transient expression experiments indicated that three representative auxin transporters (MtLAX3, MtPIN7 and MtABCB1) showed cell plasma membrane localizations. The expression of most MtLAX, MtPIN and MtABCB genes was up-regulated in the roots and was down-regulated in the shoots by Sinorhizobium meliloti infection in the wild type (WT). However, the expression of these genes was down-regulated in both the roots and shoots of an infection-resistant mutant, dmi3. The different expression patterns between the WT and the mutant roots indicated that auxin relocation may be involved in rhizobial infection responses. Furthermore, IAA contents were significantly up-regulated in the shoots and down-regulated in the roots after Sinorhizobium meliloti infection in the WT. Inoculation of roots with rhizobia may reduce the auxin loading from shoots to roots by inhibiting the expression of most auxin transporter genes. However, the rate of change of gene expression and IAA contents in the dmi3 mutant were obviously lower than in the WT. The identification and expression analysis of auxin transporter genes helps us to understand the roles of auxin in the regulation of nodule formation in M. truncatula.

  17. Resuscitation of viable but not culturable Sinorhizobium meliloti 41 pRP4-luc: effects of oxygen and host plant.

    PubMed

    Basaglia, Marina; Povolo, Silvana; Casella, Sergio

    2007-03-01

    A plasmid-borne, firefly-derived, luciferase gene (luc) was inserted and stably inherited in Sinorhizobium meliloti 41 as a reporter gene. The strain obtained, S. meliloti 41/pRP4-luc, and its parental strain served as a model system for viable but not culturable (VBNC) resuscitation experiments in both in vitro and soil samples. Incubation under oxygen (02) concentrations varying from 1% to atmospheric levels did not result in resuscitation. A demonstration of recovery was attained through exposure to the appropriate concentrations of antibiotics, bacteriostatic chloramphenicol, and bactericidal ampicillin. The resuscitation ratio was 1 recovered VBNC cell in every 10(5) 5-cyano-2,3-di-4-tolyl-tetrazolium chloride (CTC+) bacteria. Although isolated VBNC rhizobia were unable to nodulate Medicago sativa, which apparently did not enhance VBNC reversion, resuscitated bacteria maintained their symbiotic properties. Soil experiments showed that the lack of O2 leads to onset of VBNC status as in liquid microcosm, but the number of recoverable and culturable cells decreased more drastically in soil. PMID:17253091

  18. Genome-engineered Sinorhizobium meliloti for the production of poly(lactic-co-3-hydroxybutyric) acid copolymer.

    PubMed

    Tran, Tam T; Charles, Trevor C

    2016-02-01

    Economically competitive commercial production of biodegradable bioplastics with desirable properties is an important goal. In this study, we demonstrate the use of chromosome engineering of an alternative bacterial host, Sinorhizobium meliloti, for production of the copolymer, poly(lactate-co-3-hydroxybutyrate). Codon-optimized genes for 2 previously engineered enzymes, Clostridium propionicum propionate CoA transferase (Pct532Cp) and Pseudomonas sp. strain MBEL 6-19 polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthase 1 (PhaC1400Ps6-19), were introduced into S. meliloti Rm1021 by chromosome integration, replacing the native phbC gene. On the basis of phenotypic analysis and detection of polymer product by gas chromatography analysis, synthesis and accumulation of the copolymer was confirmed. The chromosome integrant strain, with the introduced genes under the control of the native phbC promoter, is able to produce over 15% cell dry mass of poly(lactate-co-3-hydroxybutyrate), containing 30 mol% lactate, from growth on mannitol. We were also able to purify the polymer from the culture and confirm the structure by NMR and GC-MS. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of production of this copolymer in the Alphaproteobacteria. Further optimization of this system may eventually yield strains that are able to produce economically viable commercial product. PMID:26639519

  19. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of an active-site mutant hydantoin racemase from Sinorhizobium meliloti CECT4114

    SciTech Connect

    Martínez-Rodríguez, Sergio; González-Ramírez, Luis Antonio; Clemente-Jiménez, Josefa María; Rodríguez-Vico, Felipe; Las Heras-Vázquez, Francisco Javier; Gavira, Jose Antonio García-Ruiz, Juan Ma.

    2008-01-01

    Crystals of an active-site mutated hydantoin racemase from S. meliloti have been obtained in the presence and absence of d,l-5-isopropyl-hydantoin and characterized by X-ray diffraction. A recombinant active-site mutant of hydantoin racemase (C76A) from Sinorhizobium meliloti CECT 4114 (SmeHyuA) has been crystallized in the presence and absence of the substrate d,l-5-isopropyl hydantoin. Crystals of the SmeHyuA mutant suitable for data collection and structure determination were grown using the counter-diffusion method. X-ray data were collected to resolutions of 2.17 and 1.85 Å for the free and bound enzymes, respectively. Both crystals belong to space group R3 and contain two molecules of SmeHyuA per asymmetric unit. The crystals of the free and complexed SmeHyuA have unit-cell parameters a = b = 85.43, c = 152.37 Å and a = b = 85.69, c = 154.38 Å, crystal volumes per protein weight (V{sub M}) of 1.94 and 1.98 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and solvent contents of 36.7 and 37.9%, respectively.

  20. Sinorhizobium meliloti SyrA Mediates the Transcriptional Regulation of Genes Involved in Lipopolysaccharide Sulfation and Exopolysaccharide Biosynthesis▿

    PubMed Central

    Keating, David H.

    2007-01-01

    Sinorhizobium meliloti is a gram-negative soil bacterium found either in free-living form or as a nitrogen-fixing endosymbiont of leguminous plants such as Medicago sativa (alfalfa). S. meliloti synthesizes an unusual sulfate-modified form of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). A recent study reported the identification of a gene, lpsS, which encodes an LPS sulfotransferase activity in S. meliloti. Mutants bearing a disrupted version of lpsS exhibit an altered symbiosis, in that they elicit more nodules than wild type. However, under free-living conditions, the lpsS mutant displayed no change in LPS sulfation. These data suggest that the expression of lpsS is differentially regulated, such that it is transcriptionally repressed during free-living conditions but upregulated during symbiosis. Here, I show that the expression of lpsS is upregulated in strains that constitutively express the symbiotic regulator SyrA. SyrA is a small protein that lacks an apparent DNA binding domain and is predicted to be located in the cytoplasmic membrane yet is sufficient to upregulate lpsS transcription. Furthermore, SyrA can mediate the transcriptional upregulation of exo genes involved in the biosynthesis of the symbiotic exopolysaccharide succinoglycan. The SyrA-mediated transcriptional upregulation of lpsS and exo transcription is blocked in mutants harboring a mutation in chvI, which encodes the response regulator of a conserved two-component system. Thus, SyrA likely acts indirectly to promote transcriptional upregulation of lpsS and exo genes through a mechanism that requires the ExoS/ChvI two-component system. PMID:17209018

  1. HpdR Is a Transcriptional Activator of Sinorhizobium meliloti hpdA, Which Encodes a Herbicide-Targeted 4-Hydroxyphenylpyruvate Dioxygenase▿

    PubMed Central

    Loprasert, Suvit; Whangsuk, Wirongrong; Dubbs, James M.; Sallabhan, Ratiboot; Somsongkul, Kumpanart; Mongkolsuk, Skorn

    2007-01-01

    Sinorhizobium meliloti hpdA, which encodes the herbicide target 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase, is positively regulated by HpdR. Gel mobility shift and DNase I footprinting analyses revealed that HpdR binds to a region that spans two conserved direct-repeat sequences within the hpdR-hpdA intergenic space. HpdR-dependent hpdA transcription occurs in the presence of 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate, tyrosine, and phenylalanine, as well as during starvation. PMID:17337579

  2. Rhizobia from Lanzarote, the Canary Islands, That Nodulate Phaseolus vulgaris Have Characteristics in Common with Sinorhizobium meliloti Isolates from Mainland Spain▿

    PubMed Central

    Zurdo-Piñeiro, José Luis; García-Fraile, Paula; Rivas, Raúl; Peix, Alvaro; León-Barrios, Milagros; Willems, Anne; Mateos, Pedro Francisco; Martínez-Molina, Eustoquio; Velázquez, Encarna; van Berkum, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The stable, low-molecular-weight (LMW) RNA fractions of several rhizobial isolates of Phaseolus vulgaris grown in the soil of Lanzarote, an island of the Canary Islands, were identical to a less-common pattern found within Sinorhizobium meliloti (assigned to group II) obtained from nodules of alfalfa and alfalfa-related legumes grown in northern Spain. The P. vulgaris isolates and the group II LMW RNA S. meliloti isolates also were distinguishable in that both had two conserved inserts of 20 and 46 bp in the 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer region that were not present in other strains of S. meliloti. The isolates from P. vulgaris nodulated bean but not Medicago sativa, while those recovered from Medicago, Melilotus, and Trigonella spp. nodulated both host legumes. The bean isolates also were distinguished from those of Medicago, Melilotus, and Trigonella spp. by nodC sequence analysis. The nodC sequences of the bean isolates were most similar to those reported for S. meliloti bv. mediterranense and Sinorhizobium fredii bv. mediterranense (GenBank accession numbers DQ333891 and AF217267, respectively). None of the evidence placed the bean isolates from Lanzarote in the genus Rhizobium, which perhaps is inconsistent with seed-borne transmission of Rhizobium etli from the Americas to the Canaries as an explanation for the presence of bean-nodulating rhizobia in soils of Lanzarote. PMID:19218416

  3. A CsrA/RsmA translational regulator gene encoded in the replication region of a Sinorhizobium meliloti cryptic plasmid complements Pseudomonas fluorescens rsmA/E mutants.

    PubMed

    Agaras, Betina; Sobrero, Patricio; Valverde, Claudio

    2013-02-01

    Members of the CsrA/RsmA family are global regulatory proteins that bind to mRNAs, usually at the ribosome-binding site, to control mRNA translation and stability. Their activity is counteracted by small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs), which offer several binding sites to compete with mRNA binding. The csrA/rsmA genes are widespread in prokaryotic chromosomes, although certain phylogenetic groups such as Alphaproteobacteria lack this type of global regulator. Interestingly, a csrA/rsmA-like sequence was identified in the replication region of plasmid pMBA19a from the alphaproteobacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti. This rsmA-like allele (rsmA(Sm)) is 58 % identical to Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri chromosomal rsmA and bears an unusual C-terminal extension that may fold into an extra α-helix. Homology-based modelling of RsmA(Sm) suggests that all key mRNA-binding residues are conserved and correctly positioned in the RNA-binding pocket. In fact, a 1.6 kb fragment from pMBA19a encompassing the rsmA(Sm) locus restored rsmA/E-dependent phenotypes of rsmA/E gacS Pseudomonas fluorescens mutants. The functionality of RsmA(Sm) was confirmed by the gain of control over target aprA'-'lacZ and hcnA'-'lacZ translational fusions in the same mutant background. The RsmA(Sm) activity correlated with Western blot detection of the polypeptide. Phenotype and translational fusion data from rsmA/E P. fluorescens mutants expressing RsmX/Y/Z RNAs indicated that RsmA(Sm) is able to bind these antagonistic sRNAs. In agreement with the latter observation, it was also found that the sRNA RsmY was stabilized by RsmA(Sm). Deletion of the C-terminal extra α-helix of RsmA(Sm) affected its cellular concentration, but increased its relative RNA-binding activity. This is believed to be the first report of the presence and characterization of a functional csrA/rsmA homologue in a mobile genetic element. PMID:23175505

  4. Control of inducer accumulation plays a key role in succinate-mediated catabolite repression in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Bringhurst, Ryan M; Gage, Daniel J

    2002-10-01

    The symbiotic, nitrogen-fixing bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti favors succinate and related dicarboxylic acids as carbon sources. As a preferred carbon source, succinate can exert catabolite repression upon genes needed for the utilization of many secondary carbon sources, including the alpha-galactosides raffinose and stachyose. We isolated lacR mutants in a genetic screen designed to find S. meliloti mutants that had abnormal succinate-mediated catabolite repression of the melA-agp genes, which are required for the utilization of raffinose and other alpha-galactosides. The loss of catabolite repression in lacR mutants was seen in cells grown in minimal medium containing succinate and raffinose and grown in succinate and lactose. For succinate and lactose, the loss of catabolite repression could be attributed to the constitutive expression of beta-galactoside utilization genes in lacR mutants. However, the inactivation of lacR did not cause the constitutive expression of alpha-galactoside utilization genes but caused the aberrant expression of these genes only when succinate was present. To explain the loss of diauxie in succinate and raffinose, we propose a model in which lacR mutants overproduce beta-galactoside transporters, thereby overwhelming the inducer exclusion mechanisms of succinate-mediated catabolite repression. Thus, some raffinose could be transported by the overproduced beta-galactoside transporters and cause the induction of alpha-galactoside utilization genes in the presence of both succinate and raffinose. This model is supported by the restoration of diauxie in a lacF lacR double mutant (lacF encodes a beta-galactoside transport protein) grown in medium containing succinate and raffinose. Biochemical support for the idea that succinate-mediated repression operates by preventing inducer accumulation also comes from uptake assays, which showed that cells grown in raffinose and exposed to succinate have a decreased rate of raffinose transport

  5. Effects of AiiA-mediated quorum quenching in Sinorhizobium meliloti on quorum-sensing signals, proteome patterns, and symbiotic interactions.

    PubMed

    Gao, Mengsheng; Chen, Hancai; Eberhard, Anatol; Gronquist, Matthew R; Robinson, Jayne B; Connolly, Mary; Teplitski, Max; Rolfe, Barry G; Bauer, Wolfgang D

    2007-07-01

    Many behaviors in bacteria, including behaviors important to pathogenic and symbiotic interactions with eukaryotic hosts, are regulated by a mechanism called quorum sensing (QS). A "quorum-quenching" approach was used here to identify QS-regulated behaviors in the N-fixing bacterial symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti. The AiiA lactonase from Bacillus produced in S. meliloti was shown to enzymatically inactivate S. meliloti's N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) QS signals, thereby disrupting normal QS regulation. Sixty proteins were differentially accumulated in the AiiA-producing strain versus the control in early log or early stationary phase cultures. Fifty-two of these QS-regulated proteins, with putative functions that include cell division, protein processing and translation, metabolite transport, oxidative stress, and amino acid metabolism, were identified by peptide mass fingerprinting. Transcription of representative genes was reduced significantly in the AiiA-producing strain, although the effects of AiiA on protein accumulation did not always correspond to effects on transcription. The QS signal-deficient strain was reduced significantly in nodule initiation during the first 12 h after inoculation onto Medicago truncatula host plants. The AiiA lactonase also was found to substantially inactivate two of the AHL mimic compounds secreted by M. truncatula. This suggests some structural similarity between bacterial AHLs and these mimic compounds. It also indicates that quorum quenching could be useful in identifying Sinorhizobium genes that are affected by such host QS mimics in planta.

  6. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of an active-site mutant hydantoin racemase from Sinorhizobium meliloti CECT4114

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Rodríguez, Sergio; González-Ramírez, Luis Antonio; Clemente-Jiménez, Josefa María; Rodríguez-Vico, Felipe; Las Heras-Vázquez, Francisco Javier; Gavira, Jose Antonio; García-Ruiz, Juan Ma.

    2008-01-01

    A recombinant active-site mutant of hydantoin racemase (C76A) from Sinorhizobium meliloti CECT 4114 (SmeHyuA) has been crystallized in the presence and absence of the substrate d,l-5-isopropyl hydantoin. Crystals of the SmeHyuA mutant suitable for data collection and structure determination were grown using the counter-diffusion method. X-ray data were collected to resolutions of 2.17 and 1.85 Å for the free and bound enzymes, respectively. Both crystals belong to space group R3 and contain two molecules of SmeHyuA per asymmetric unit. The crystals of the free and complexed SmeHyuA have unit-cell parameters a = b = 85.43, c = 152.37 Å and a = b = 85.69, c = 154.38 Å, crystal volumes per protein weight (V M) of 1.94 and 1.98 Å3 Da−1 and solvent contents of 36.7 and 37.9%, respectively. PMID:18097103

  7. MALDI mass spectrometry-assisted molecular imaging of metabolites during nitrogen fixation in the Medicago truncatula-Sinorhizobium meliloti symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Ye, Hui; Gemperline, Erin; Venkateshwaran, Muthusubramanian; Chen, Ruibing; Delaux, Pierre-Marc; Howes-Podoll, Maegen; Ané, Jean-Michel; Li, Lingjun

    2013-07-01

    Symbiotic associations between leguminous plants and nitrogen-fixing rhizobia culminate in the formation of specialized organs called root nodules, in which the rhizobia fix atmospheric nitrogen and transfer it to the plant. Efficient biological nitrogen fixation depends on metabolites produced by and exchanged between both partners. The Medicago truncatula-Sinorhizobium meliloti association is an excellent model for dissecting this nitrogen-fixing symbiosis because of the availability of genetic information for both symbiotic partners. Here, we employed a powerful imaging technique - matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)/mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) - to study metabolite distribution in roots and root nodules of M. truncatula during nitrogen fixation. The combination of an efficient, novel MALDI matrix [1,8-bis(dimethyl-amino) naphthalene, DMAN] with a conventional matrix 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) allowed detection of a large array of organic acids, amino acids, sugars, lipids, flavonoids and their conjugates with improved coverage. Ion density maps of representative metabolites are presented and correlated with the nitrogen fixation process. We demonstrate differences in metabolite distribution between roots and nodules, and also between fixing and non-fixing nodules produced by plant and bacterial mutants. Our study highlights the benefits of using MSI for detecting differences in metabolite distributions in plant biology.

  8. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a highly stable novel SGNH hydrolase (Est24) from Sinorhizobium meliloti

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Bum Han; Nguyen, Duy Duc; Ngo, Tri Duc; Oh, Changsuk; Pandian, Ramesh; Kim, Kyeong Kyu; Kim, T. Doohun

    2014-01-01

    The SGNH hydrolase family includes enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of a broad range of substrates. Here, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of a novel SGNH hydrolase (Est24) from Sinorhizobium meliloti were performed. Recombinant Est24 protein containing an N-­terminal His tag was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. Est24 was then crystallized using a solution consisting of 0.2 M ammonium phosphate pH 4.6, 20% polyethylene glycol 3350. X-ray diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 1.45 Å with an R merge of 9.4%. The Est24 crystals belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 129.09, b = 88.63, c = 86.15 Å, α = 90.00, β = 114.30, γ = 90.00°. A molecular-replacement solution was obtained using the crystal structure of Mycobacterium smegmatis arylesterase as a template and structure refinement of Est24 is in progress. PMID:24637754

  9. Effect of a Sinorhizobium meliloti Strain with a Modified putA Gene on the Rhizosphere Microbial Community of Alfalfa

    PubMed Central

    van Dillewijn, Pieter; Villadas, Pablo J.; Toro, Nicolás

    2002-01-01

    The success of a rhizobial inoculant in the soil depends to a large extent on its capacity to compete against indigenous strains. M403, a Sinorhizobium meliloti strain with enhanced competitiveness for nodule occupancy, was recently constructed by introducing a plasmid containing an extra copy of a modified putA (proline dehydrogenase) gene. This strain and M401, a control strain carrying the same plasmid without the modified gene, were used as soil inoculants for alfalfa in a contained field release experiment at León, Spain. In this study, we determined the effects of these two strains on the indigenous microbial community. 16S rRNA genes were obtained from the rhizosphere of alfalfa inoculated with strain M403 or strain M401 or from noninoculated plants by amplification of DNA from soil with bacterial group-specific primers. These genes were analyzed and compared by restriction fragment length polymorphism and temperature gradient gel electrophoresis. The results allowed us to differentiate between alterations in the microbial community apparently caused by inoculation and by the rhizosphere effect and seasonal fluctuations induced by the alfalfa plants and by the environment. Only moderate inoculation-dependent effects could be detected, while the alfalfa plants appeared to have a much stronger influence on the microbial community. PMID:12200266

  10. Effects of engineered Sinorhizobium meliloti on cytokinin synthesis and tolerance of alfalfa to extreme drought stress.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ji; Li, Xiao-Lin; Luo, Li

    2012-11-01

    Cytokinin is required for the initiation of leguminous nitrogen fixation nodules elicited by rhizobia and the delay of the leaf senescence induced by drought stress. A few free-living rhizobia have been found to produce cytokinin. However, the effects of engineered rhizobia capable of synthesizing cytokinin on host tolerance to abiotic stresses have not yet been described. In this study, two engineered Sinorhizobium strains overproducing cytokinin were constructed. The tolerance of inoculated alfalfa plants to severe drought stress was assessed. The engineered strains, which expressed the Agrobacterium ipt gene under the control of different promoters, synthesized more zeatins than the control strain under free-living conditions, but their own growth was not affected. After a 4-week inoculation period, the effects of engineered strains on alfalfa growth and nitrogen fixation were similar to those of the control strain under nondrought conditions. After being subjected to severe drought stress, most of the alfalfa plants inoculated with engineered strains survived, and the nitrogenase activity in their root nodules showed no apparent change. A small elevation in zeatin concentration was observed in the leaves of these plants. The expression of antioxidant enzymes increased, and the level of reactive oxygen species decreased correspondingly. Although the ipt gene was transcribed in the bacteroids of engineered strains, the level of cytokinin in alfalfa nodules was identical to that of the control. These findings suggest that engineered Sinorhizobium strains synthesizing more cytokinin could improve the tolerance of alfalfa to severe drought stress without affecting alfalfa nodulation or nitrogen fixation.

  11. Expanding the regulatory network that controls nitrogen fixation in Sinorhizobium meliloti: elucidating the role of the two-component system hFixL-FxkR.

    PubMed

    Reyes-González, Alma; Talbi, Chouhra; Rodríguez, Susana; Rivera, Patricia; Zamorano-Sánchez, David; Girard, Lourdes

    2016-06-01

    In Sinorhizobium meliloti, nitrogen fixation is regulated in response to oxygen concentration through the FixL-FixJ two-component system (TCS). Besides this conserved TCS, the field isolate SM11 also encodes the hFixL-FxkR TCS, which is responsible for the microoxic response in Rhizobium etli. Through genetic and physiological assays, we evaluated the role of the hFixL-FxkR TCS in S. meliloti SM11. Our results revealed that this regulatory system activates the expression of a fixKf orthologue (fixKa), in response to low oxygen concentration. Null mutations in either hFixL or FxkR promote upregulation of fixK1, a direct target of FixJ. Furthermore, the absence of this TCS translates into higher nitrogen fixation values as well as higher expression of fixN1 in nodules. Individual mutations in each of the fixK-like regulators encoded in the S. meliloti SM11 genome do not completely restrict fixN1 or fixN2 expression, pointing towards redundancy among these regulators. Both copies of fixN are necessary to achieve optimal levels of nitrogen fixation. This work provides evidence that the hFixL-FxkR TCS is activated in response to low oxygen concentration in S. meliloti SM11 and that it negatively regulates the expression of fixK1, fixN1 and nitrogen fixation. PMID:27010660

  12. Brucella melitensis MucR, an Orthologue of Sinorhizobium meliloti MucR, Is Involved in Resistance to Oxidative, Detergent, and Saline Stresses and Cell Envelope Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Mirabella, A.; Terwagne, M.; Zygmunt, M. S.; Cloeckaert, A.; De Bolle, X.

    2013-01-01

    Brucella spp. and Sinorhizobium meliloti are alphaproteobacteria that share not only an intracellular lifestyle in their respective hosts, but also a crucial requirement for cell envelope components and their timely regulation for a successful infectious cycle. Here, we report the characterization of Brucella melitensis mucR, which encodes a zinc finger transcriptional regulator that has previously been shown to be involved in cellular and mouse infections at early time points. MucR modulates the surface properties of the bacteria and their resistance to environmental stresses (i.e., oxidative stress, cationic peptide, and detergents). We show that B. melitensis mucR is a functional orthologue of S. meliloti mucR, because it was able to restore the production of succinoglycan in an S. meliloti mucR mutant, as detected by calcofluor staining. Similar to S. meliloti MucR, B. melitensis MucR also represses its own transcription and flagellar gene expression via the flagellar master regulator ftcR. More surprisingly, we demonstrate that MucR regulates a lipid A core modification in B. melitensis. These changes could account for the attenuated virulence of a mucR mutant. These data reinforce the idea that there is a common conserved circuitry between plant symbionts and animal pathogens that regulates the relationship they have with their hosts. PMID:23161025

  13. Expanding the regulatory network that controls nitrogen fixation in Sinorhizobium meliloti: elucidating the role of the two-component system hFixL-FxkR.

    PubMed

    Reyes-González, Alma; Talbi, Chouhra; Rodríguez, Susana; Rivera, Patricia; Zamorano-Sánchez, David; Girard, Lourdes

    2016-06-01

    In Sinorhizobium meliloti, nitrogen fixation is regulated in response to oxygen concentration through the FixL-FixJ two-component system (TCS). Besides this conserved TCS, the field isolate SM11 also encodes the hFixL-FxkR TCS, which is responsible for the microoxic response in Rhizobium etli. Through genetic and physiological assays, we evaluated the role of the hFixL-FxkR TCS in S. meliloti SM11. Our results revealed that this regulatory system activates the expression of a fixKf orthologue (fixKa), in response to low oxygen concentration. Null mutations in either hFixL or FxkR promote upregulation of fixK1, a direct target of FixJ. Furthermore, the absence of this TCS translates into higher nitrogen fixation values as well as higher expression of fixN1 in nodules. Individual mutations in each of the fixK-like regulators encoded in the S. meliloti SM11 genome do not completely restrict fixN1 or fixN2 expression, pointing towards redundancy among these regulators. Both copies of fixN are necessary to achieve optimal levels of nitrogen fixation. This work provides evidence that the hFixL-FxkR TCS is activated in response to low oxygen concentration in S. meliloti SM11 and that it negatively regulates the expression of fixK1, fixN1 and nitrogen fixation.

  14. CbrA is a stationary-phase regulator of cell surface physiology and legume symbiosis in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Katherine E; Campbell, Gordon R; Lloret, Javier; Walker, Graham C

    2006-06-01

    Sinorhizobium meliloti produces an exopolysaccharide called succinoglycan that plays a critical role in promoting symbiosis with its host legume, alfalfa (Medicago sativa). We performed a transposon mutagenesis and screened for mutants with altered succinoglycan production and a defect in symbiosis. In this way, we identified a putative two-component histidine kinase associated with a PAS sensory domain, now designated CbrA (calcofluor-bright regulator A). The cbrA::Tn5 mutation causes overproduction of succinoglycan and results in increased accumulation of low-molecular-weight forms of this exopolysaccharide. Our results suggest the cbrA::Tn5 allele leads to this succinoglycan phenotype through increased expression of exo genes required for succinoglycan biosynthesis and modification. Interestingly, CbrA-dependent regulation of exo and exs genes is observed almost exclusively during stationary-phase growth. The cbrA::Tn5 mutant also has an apparent cell envelope defect, based on increased sensitivity to a number of toxic compounds, including the bile salt deoxycholate and the hydrophobic dye crystal violet. Growth of the cbrA mutant is also slowed under oxidative-stress conditions. The CbrA-regulated genes exsA and exsE encode putative inner membrane ABC transporters with a high degree of similarity to lipid exporters. ExsA is homologous to the Escherichia coli MsbA protein, which is required for lipopolysaccharide transport, while ExsE is a member of the eukaryotic family of ABCD/hALD peroxisomal membrane proteins involved in transport of very long-chain fatty acids, which are a unique component of the lipopolysaccharides of alphaproteobacteria. Thus, CbrA could play a role in regulating the lipopolysaccharide or lipoprotein components of the cell envelope. PMID:16740957

  15. Improvement of phosphate solubilization and Medicago plant yield by an indole-3-acetic acid-overproducing strain of Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Carmen; Defez, Roberto

    2010-07-01

    Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) are the most limiting factors for plant growth. Some microorganisms improve the uptake and availability of N and P, minimizing chemical fertilizer dependence. It has been published that the RD64 strain, a Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021 strain engineered to overproduce indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), showed improved nitrogen fixation ability compared to the wild-type 1021 strain. Here, we present data showing that RD64 is also highly effective in mobilizing P from insoluble sources, such as phosphate rock (PR). Under P-limiting conditions, the higher level of P-mobilizing activity of RD64 than of the 1021 wild-type strain is connected with the upregulation of genes coding for the high-affinity P transport system, the induction of acid phosphatase activity, and the increased secretion into the growth medium of malic, succinic, and fumaric acids. Medicago truncatula plants nodulated by RD64 (Mt-RD64), when grown under P-deficient conditions, released larger amounts of another P-solubilizing organic acid, 2-hydroxyglutaric acid, than plants nodulated by the wild-type strain (Mt-1021). It has already been shown that Mt-RD64 plants exhibited higher levels of dry-weight production than Mt-1021 plants. Here, we also report that P-starved Mt-RD64 plants show significant increases in both shoot and root fresh weights when compared to P-starved Mt-1021 plants. We discuss how, in a Rhizobium-legume model system, a balanced interplay of different factors linked to bacterial IAA overproduction rather than IAA production per se stimulates plant growth under stressful environmental conditions and, in particular, under P starvation. PMID:20511434

  16. Functional Expression of Sinorhizobium meliloti BetS, a High-Affinity Betaine Transporter, in Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA110

    PubMed Central

    Boscari, Alexandre; Mandon, Karine; Poggi, Marie-Christine; Le Rudulier, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    Among the Rhizobiaceae, Bradyrhizobium japonicum strain USDA110 appears to be extremely salt sensitive, and the presence of glycine betaine cannot restore its growth in medium with an increased osmolarity (E. Boncompagni, M. Østerås, M. C. Poggi, and D. Le Rudulier, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 65:2072-2077, 1999). In order to improve the salt tolerance of B. japonicum, cells were transformed with the betS gene of Sinorhizobium meliloti. This gene encodes a major glycine betaine/proline betaine transporter from the betaine choline carnitine transporter family and is required for early osmotic adjustment. Whereas betaine transport was absent in the USDA110 strain, such transformation induced glycine betaine and proline betaine uptake in an osmotically dependent manner. Salt-treated transformed cells accumulated large amounts of glycine betaine, which was not catabolized. However, the accumulation was reversed through rapid efflux during osmotic downshock. An increased tolerance of transformant cells to a moderate NaCl concentration (80 mM) was also observed in the presence of glycine betaine or proline betaine, whereas the growth of the wild-type strain was totally abolished at 80 mM NaCl. Surprisingly, the deleterious effect due to a higher salt concentration (100 mM) could not be overcome by glycine betaine, despite a significant accumulation of this compound. Cell viability was not significantly affected in the presence of 100 mM NaCl, whereas 75% cell death occurred at 150 mM NaCl. The absence of a potential gene encoding Na+/H+ antiporters in B. japonicum could explain its very high Na+ sensitivity. PMID:15466533

  17. Medicago sativa--Sinorhizobium meliloti Symbiosis Promotes the Bioaccumulation of Zinc in Nodulated Roots.

    PubMed

    Zribi, Kais; Nouairi, Issam; Slama, Ines; Talbi-Zribi, Ons; Mhadhbi, Haythem

    2015-01-01

    In this study we investigated effects of Zn supply on germination, growth, inorganic solutes (Zn, Ca, Fe, and Mg) partitioning and nodulation of Medicago sativa This plant was cultivated with and without Zn (2 mM). Treatments were plants without (control) and with Zn tolerant strain (S532), Zn intolerant strain (S112) and 2 mM urea nitrogen fertilisation. Results showed that M. sativa germinates at rates of 50% at 2 mM Zn. For plants given nitrogen fertilisation, Zn increased plant biomass production. When grown with symbionts, Zn supply had no effect on nodulation. Moreover, plants with S112 showed a decrease of shoot and roots biomasses. However, in symbiosis with S532, an increase of roots biomass was observed. Plants in symbiosis with S. meliloti accumulated more Zn in their roots than nitrogen fertilised plants. Zn supply results in an increase of Ca concentration in roots of fertilised nitrogen plants. However, under Zn supply, Fe concentration decreased in roots and increased in nodules of plants with S112. Zn supply showed contrasting effects on Mg concentrations for plants with nitrogen fertilisation (increase) and plants with S112 (decrease). The capacity of M. sativa to accumulate Zn in their nodulated roots encouraged its use in phytostabilisation processes.

  18. Nodulation by Sinorhizobium meliloti originated from a mining soil alleviates Cd toxicity and increases Cd-phytoextraction in Medicago sativa L.

    PubMed Central

    Ghnaya, Tahar; Mnassri, Majda; Ghabriche, Rim; Wali, Mariem; Poschenrieder, Charlotte; Lutts, Stanley; Abdelly, Chedly

    2015-01-01

    Besides their role in nitrogen supply to the host plants as a result of symbiotic N fixation, the association between legumes and Rhizobium could be useful for the rehabilitation of metal-contaminated soils by phytoextraction. A major limitation presents the metal-sensitivity of the bacterial strains. The aim of this work was to explore the usefulness of Sinorhizobium meliloti originated from a mining site for Cd phytoextraction by Medicago sativa. Inoculated and non-inoculated plants were cultivated for 60 d on soils containing 50 and/or 100 mg Cd kg−1 soil. The inoculation hindered the occurrence of Cd- induced toxicity symptoms that appeared in the shoots of non-inoculated plants. This positive effect of S. meliloti colonization was accompanied by an increase in biomass production and improved nutrient acquisition comparatively to non-inoculated plants. Nodulation enhanced Cd absorption by the roots and Cd translocation to the shoots. The increase of plant biomass concomitantly with the increase of Cd shoot concentration in inoculated plants led to higher potential of Cd-phytoextraction in these plants. In the presence of 50 mg Cd kg−1 in the soil, the amounts of Cd extracted in the shoots were 58 and 178 μg plant−1 in non-inoculated and inoculated plants, respectively. This study demonstrates that this association M. sativa-S. meliloti may be an efficient biological system to extract Cd from contaminated soils. PMID:26528320

  19. Differential Effects of Dimethylsulfoniopropionate, Dimethylsulfonioacetate, and Other S-Methylated Compounds on the Growth of Sinorhizobium meliloti at Low and High Osmolarities

    PubMed Central

    Pichereau, Vianney; Pocard, Jean-Alain; Hamelin, Jack; Blanco, Carlos; Bernard, Théophile

    1998-01-01

    An extract from the marine alga Ulva lactuca was highly osmoprotective in salt-stressed cultures of Sinorhizobium meliloti 102F34. This beneficial activity was due to algal 3-dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), which was accumulated as a dominant compatible solute and strongly reduced the accumulation of endogenous osmolytes in stressed cells. Synthetic DMSP also acted as a powerful osmoprotectant and was accumulated as a nonmetabolizable cytosolic osmolyte (up to a concentration of 1,400 nmol/mg of protein) throughout the growth cycles of the stressed cultures. In contrast, 2-dimethylsulfonioacetate (DMSA), the sulfonium analog of the universal osmoprotectant glycine betaine (GB), was highly toxic to unstressed cells and was not osmoprotective in stressed cells of wild-type strains of S. meliloti. Nonetheless, the transport and accumulation of DMSA, like the transport and accumulation of DMSP and GB, were osmoregulated and increased fourfold in stressed cells of strain 102F34. Strikingly, DMSA was not toxic and became highly osmoprotective in mutants that are impaired in their ability to demethylate GB and DMSA. Furthermore, 2-methylthioacetate and thioglycolic acid (TGA), the demethylation products of DMSA, were excreted, apparently as a mechanism of cellular detoxification. Also, exogenous TGA and DMSA displayed similar inhibitory effects in strain 102F34. Thus, on the basis of these findings and other physiological and biochemical evidence, we infer that the toxicity of DMSA in wild-type strains of S. meliloti stems from its catabolism via the GB demethylation pathway. This is the first report describing the toxicity of DMSA in any organism and a metabolically stable osmoprotectant (DMSP) in S. meliloti. PMID:16349544

  20. A Sinorhizobium meliloti-specific N-acyl homoserine lactone quorum-sensing signal increases nodule numbers in Medicago truncatula independent of autoregulation

    PubMed Central

    Veliz-Vallejos, Debora F.; van Noorden, Giel E.; Yuan, Mengqi; Mathesius, Ulrike

    2014-01-01

    N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) act as quorum sensing signals that regulate cell-density dependent behaviors in many gram-negative bacteria, in particular those important for plant-microbe interactions. AHLs can also be recognized by plants, and this may influence their interactions with bacteria. Here we tested whether the exposure to AHLs affects the nodule-forming symbiosis between legume hosts and rhizobia. We treated roots of the model legume, Medicago truncatula, with a range of AHLs either from its specific symbiont, Sinorhizobium meliloti, or from the potential pathogens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Agrobacterium vitis. We found increased numbers of nodules formed on root systems treated with the S. meliloti-specific AHL, 3-oxo-C14-homoserine lactone, at a concentration of 1 μM, while the other AHLs did not result in significant changes to nodule numbers. We did not find any evidence for altered nodule invasion by the rhizobia. Quantification of flavonoids that could act as nod gene inducers in S. meliloti did not show any correlation with increased nodule numbers. The effects of AHLs were specific for an increase in nodule numbers, but not lateral root numbers or root length. Increased nodule numbers following 3-oxo-C14-homoserine lactone treatment were under control of autoregulation of nodulation and were still observed in the autoregulation mutant, sunn4 (super numeric nodules4). However, increases in nodule numbers by 3-oxo-C14-homoserine lactone were not found in the ethylene-insensitive sickle mutant. A comparison between M. truncatula with M. sativa (alfalfa) and Trifolium repens (white clover) showed that the observed effects of AHLs on nodule numbers were specific to M. truncatula, despite M. sativa nodulating with the same symbiont. We conclude that plant perception of the S. meliloti-specific 3-oxo-C14-homoserine lactone influences nodule numbers in M. truncatula via an ethylene-dependent, but autoregulation-independent mechanism. PMID

  1. Overproduction and increased molecular weight account for the symbiotic activity of the rkpZ-modified K polysaccharide from Sinorhizobium meliloti Rm1021.

    PubMed

    Sharypova, L A; Chataigné, G; Fraysse, N; Becker, A; Poinsot, V

    2006-12-01

    K polysaccharides (KPSs) of Sinorhizobium meliloti strains are strain-specific surface polysaccharides analogous to the group II K antigens of Escherichia coli. The K(R)5 antigen of strain AK631 is a highly polymerized disaccharide of pseudaminic and glucuronic acids. During invasion of host plants, this K antigen is able to replace the structurally different exopolysaccharide succinoglycan (EPS I) and promotes the formation of a nitrogen-fixing (Fix(+)) symbiosis. The KPS of strain Rm1021 is a homopolymer of 3-deoxy-D-manno-2 octulosonic acid (Kdo). The Kdo polysaccharide is covalently linked to the lipid anchor, has a low molecular weight (LMW), and is symbiotically inactive. On introduction of the Rm41-specific rkpZ gene into strain Rm1021, a modified KPS is expressed that is able to substitute EPS I during symbiosis with the host plant. To better understand the nature of modification conferred by rkpZ, we performed a structural analysis of the KPS using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), and gas chromatography (GC-MS). The modified KPS retained primary polyKdo structure, but its degree of polymerization (DP) and level of production were increased significantly. In contrast to the wild-type polyKdo, only a part of polyKdo was lipidated. Shorter polysaccharide chains were lipid-free, whereas longer polysaccharide chains were lipidated. Sinorhizobium meliloti Rm1021 was found to carry two paralogs of rkpZ. Both genes are involved in polyKdo production, but they only show partial functional activity as compared with the rkpZ of Rm41.

  2. Sinorhizobium meliloti Phage ΦM9 Defines a New Group of T4 Superfamily Phages with Unusual Genomic Features but a Common T=16 Capsid

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Matthew C.; Tatum, Kelsey B.; Lynn, Jason S.; Brewer, Tess E.; Lu, Stephen; Washburn, Brian K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Relatively little is known about the phages that infect agriculturally important nitrogen-fixing rhizobial bacteria. Here we report the genome and cryo-electron microscopy structure of the Sinorhizobium meliloti-infecting T4 superfamily phage ΦM9. This phage and its close relative Rhizobium phage vB_RleM_P10VF define a new group of T4 superfamily phages. These phages are distinctly different from the recently characterized cyanophage-like S. meliloti phages of the ΦM12 group. Structurally, ΦM9 has a T=16 capsid formed from repeating units of an extended gp23-like subunit that assemble through interactions between one subunit and the adjacent E-loop insertion domain. Though genetically very distant from the cyanophages, the ΦM9 capsid closely resembles that of the T4 superfamily cyanophage Syn9. ΦM9 also has the same T=16 capsid architecture as the very distant phage SPO1 and the herpesviruses. Despite their overall lack of similarity at the genomic and structural levels, ΦM9 and S. meliloti phage ΦM12 have a small number of open reading frames in common that appear to encode structural proteins involved in interaction with the host and which may have been acquired by horizontal transfer. These proteins are predicted to encode tail baseplate proteins, tail fibers, tail fiber assembly proteins, and glycanases that cleave host exopolysaccharide. IMPORTANCE Despite recent advances in the phylogenetic and structural characterization of bacteriophages, only a small number of phages of plant-symbiotic nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria have been studied at the molecular level. The effects of phage predation upon beneficial bacteria that promote plant growth remain poorly characterized. First steps in understanding these soil bacterium-phage dynamics are genetic, molecular, and structural characterizations of these groups of phages. The T4 superfamily phages are among the most complex phages; they have large genomes packaged within an icosahedral head and a long

  3. Genetic and functional characterization of a yet-unclassified rhizobial Dtr (DNA-transfer-and-replication) region from a ubiquitous plasmid conjugal system present in Sinorhizobium meliloti, in Sinorhizobium medicae, and in other nonrhizobial Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Giusti, María de los Ángeles; Pistorio, Mariano; Lozano, Mauricio J; Tejerizo, Gonzalo A Torres; Salas, María Eugenia; Martini, María Carla; López, José Luis; Draghi, Walter O; Del Papa, María Florencia; Pérez-Mendoza, Daniel; Sanjuán, Juan; Lagares, Antonio

    2012-05-01

    Rhizobia are Gram-negative bacteria that live in soils and associate with leguminous plants to establish nitrogen-fixing symbioses. The ability of these bacteria to undergo horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is thought to be one of the main features to explain both the origin of their symbiotic life-style and the plasticity and dynamics of their genomes. In our laboratory we have previously characterized at the species level the non-pSym plasmid mobilome in Sinorhizobium meliloti, the symbiont of Medicago spp., and have found a high incidence of conjugal activity in many plasmids (Pistorio et al., 2008). In this work we characterized the Dtr (DNA-transfer-and-replication) region of one of those plasmids, pSmeLPU88b. This mobilization region was found to represent a previously unclassified Dtr type in rhizobia (hereafter type-IV), highly ubiquitous in S. meliloti and found in other genera of Gram-negative bacteria as well; including Agrobacterium, Ochrobactrum, and Chelativorans. The oriT of the type-IV Dtr described here could be located by function within a DNA fragment of 278 bp, between the divergent genes parA and mobC. The phylogenetic analysis of the cognate relaxase MobZ indicated that this protein groups close to the previously defined MOB(P3) and MOB(P4) type of enzymes, but is located in a separate and novel cluster that we have designated MOB(P0). Noteworthy, MOB(P0) and MOB(P4) relaxases were frequently associated with plasmids present in rhizospheric soil bacteria. A comparison of the nod-gene locations with the phylogenetic topology of the rhizobial relaxases revealed that the symbiotic genes are found on diverse plasmids bearing any of the four Dtr types, thus indicating that pSym plasmids are not specifically associated with any particular mobilization system. Finally, we demonstrated that the type-IV Dtr promoted the mobilization of plasmids from S. meliloti to Sinorhizobium medicae as well as from these rhizobia to other bacteria by means of their own

  4. Proteomic Analysis of Wild-Type Sinorhizobium meliloti Responses to N-Acyl Homoserine Lactone Quorum-Sensing Signals and the Transition to Stationary Phase†

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hancai; Teplitski, Max; Robinson, Jayne B.; Rolfe, Barry G.; Bauer, Wolfgang D.

    2003-01-01

    Proteome analysis revealed that two long-chain N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) produced by Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021 induced significant differences in the accumulation of more than 100 polypeptides in early-log-phase cultures of the wild type. Fifty-six of the corresponding proteins have been identified by peptide mass fingerprinting. The proteins affected by addition of these two AHLs had diverse functions in carbon and nitrogen metabolism, energy cycles, metabolite transport, DNA synthesis, and protein turnover. Two hours of exposure to 3-oxo-C16:1-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C16:1-HL) affected the accumulation of 40 of the 56 identified proteins, whereas comparable exposure to C14-HL affected 13 of the 56 proteins. Levels of four proteins were affected by both AHLs. Exposure to 3-oxo-C16:1-HL for 8 h affected the accumulation of 17 proteins, 12 of which had reduced accumulation. Of the 80 proteins identified as differing in accumulation between early-log- and early-stationary-phase cultures, only 13 were affected by exposure to 3-oxo-C16:1-HL or C14-HL. These results provide a foundation for future studies of the functions regulated by AHL quorum sensing in S. meliloti and help to establish proteomic analysis as a powerful global approach to the identification of quorum-sensing regulatory patterns in wild-type bacteria. PMID:12923075

  5. A consolidated analysis of the physiologic and molecular responses induced under acid stress in the legume-symbiont model-soil bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti

    PubMed Central

    Draghi, W. O.; Del Papa, M. F.; Hellweg, C.; Watt, S. A.; Watt, T. F.; Barsch, A.; Lozano, M. J.; Lagares, A.; Salas, M. E.; López, J. L.; Albicoro, F. J.; Nilsson, J. F.; Torres Tejerizo, G. A.; Luna, M. F.; Pistorio, M.; Boiardi, J. L.; Pühler, A.; Weidner, S.; Niehaus, K.; Lagares, A.

    2016-01-01

    Abiotic stresses in general and extracellular acidity in particular disturb and limit nitrogen-fixing symbioses between rhizobia and their host legumes. Except for valuable molecular-biological studies on different rhizobia, no consolidated models have been formulated to describe the central physiologic changes that occur in acid-stressed bacteria. We present here an integrated analysis entailing the main cultural, metabolic, and molecular responses of the model bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti growing under controlled acid stress in a chemostat. A stepwise extracellular acidification of the culture medium had indicated that S. meliloti stopped growing at ca. pH 6.0–6.1. Under such stress the rhizobia increased the O2 consumption per cell by more than 5-fold. This phenotype, together with an increase in the transcripts for several membrane cytochromes, entails a higher aerobic-respiration rate in the acid-stressed rhizobia. Multivariate analysis of global metabolome data served to unequivocally correlate specific-metabolite profiles with the extracellular pH, showing that at low pH the pentose-phosphate pathway exhibited increases in several transcripts, enzymes, and metabolites. Further analyses should be focused on the time course of the observed changes, its associated intracellular signaling, and on the comparison with the changes that operate during the sub lethal acid-adaptive response (ATR) in rhizobia. PMID:27404346

  6. Nod factor-treated Medicago truncatula roots and seeds show an increased number of nodules when inoculated with a limiting population of Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Macchiavelli, Raúl E; Brelles-Mariño, Graciela

    2004-12-01

    Medicago truncatula is a model legume plant that interacts symbiotically with Sinorhizobium meliloti, the alfalfa symbiont. This process involves a molecular dialogue between the bacterium and the plant. Legume roots exude flavonoids that induce the expression of a set of rhizobial genes, the nod genes, which are essential for nodulation and determination of the host range. In turn, nod genes control the synthesis of lipo-chito-oligosaccharides (LCOs), Nod factors, which are bacteria-to-plant signal molecules mediating recognition and nodule organogenesis. M. truncatula roots or seeds have been treated with Nod factors and hydroponically growing seedlings have been inoculated with a limiting population of S. meliloti. It has been shown that submicromolar concentrations of Nod factors increase the number of nodules per plant on M. truncatula. Compared with roots, this increase is more noticeable when seeds are treated. M. truncatula seeds are receptive to submicromolar concentrations of Nod factors, suggesting the possibility of a high affinity LCO perception system in seeds or embryos as well. PMID:15361530

  7. Large-scale genetic variation of the symbiosis-required megaplasmid pSymA revealed by comparative genomic analysis of Sinorhizobium meliloti natural strains

    PubMed Central

    Giuntini, Elisa; Mengoni, Alessio; De Filippo, Carlotta; Cavalieri, Duccio; Aubin-Horth, Nadia; Landry, Christian R; Becker, Anke; Bazzicalupo, Marco

    2005-01-01

    Background Sinorhizobium meliloti is a soil bacterium that forms nitrogen-fixing nodules on the roots of leguminous plants such as alfalfa (Medicago sativa). This species occupies different ecological niches, being present as a free-living soil bacterium and as a symbiont of plant root nodules. The genome of the type strain Rm 1021 contains one chromosome and two megaplasmids for a total genome size of 6 Mb. We applied comparative genomic hybridisation (CGH) on an oligonucleotide microarrays to estimate genetic variation at the genomic level in four natural strains, two isolated from Italian agricultural soil and two from desert soil in the Aral Sea region. Results From 4.6 to 5.7 percent of the genes showed a pattern of hybridisation concordant with deletion, nucleotide divergence or ORF duplication when compared to the type strain Rm 1021. A large number of these polymorphisms were confirmed by sequencing and Southern blot. A statistically significant fraction of these variable genes was found on the pSymA megaplasmid and grouped in clusters. These variable genes were found to be mainly transposases or genes with unknown function. Conclusion The obtained results allow to conclude that the symbiosis-required megaplasmid pSymA can be considered the major hot-spot for intra-specific differentiation in S. meliloti. PMID:16283928

  8. A consolidated analysis of the physiologic and molecular responses induced under acid stress in the legume-symbiont model-soil bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Draghi, W O; Del Papa, M F; Hellweg, C; Watt, S A; Watt, T F; Barsch, A; Lozano, M J; Lagares, A; Salas, M E; López, J L; Albicoro, F J; Nilsson, J F; Torres Tejerizo, G A; Luna, M F; Pistorio, M; Boiardi, J L; Pühler, A; Weidner, S; Niehaus, K; Lagares, A

    2016-07-11

    Abiotic stresses in general and extracellular acidity in particular disturb and limit nitrogen-fixing symbioses between rhizobia and their host legumes. Except for valuable molecular-biological studies on different rhizobia, no consolidated models have been formulated to describe the central physiologic changes that occur in acid-stressed bacteria. We present here an integrated analysis entailing the main cultural, metabolic, and molecular responses of the model bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti growing under controlled acid stress in a chemostat. A stepwise extracellular acidification of the culture medium had indicated that S. meliloti stopped growing at ca. pH 6.0-6.1. Under such stress the rhizobia increased the O2 consumption per cell by more than 5-fold. This phenotype, together with an increase in the transcripts for several membrane cytochromes, entails a higher aerobic-respiration rate in the acid-stressed rhizobia. Multivariate analysis of global metabolome data served to unequivocally correlate specific-metabolite profiles with the extracellular pH, showing that at low pH the pentose-phosphate pathway exhibited increases in several transcripts, enzymes, and metabolites. Further analyses should be focused on the time course of the observed changes, its associated intracellular signaling, and on the comparison with the changes that operate during the sub lethal acid-adaptive response (ATR) in rhizobia.

  9. A consolidated analysis of the physiologic and molecular responses induced under acid stress in the legume-symbiont model-soil bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Draghi, W O; Del Papa, M F; Hellweg, C; Watt, S A; Watt, T F; Barsch, A; Lozano, M J; Lagares, A; Salas, M E; López, J L; Albicoro, F J; Nilsson, J F; Torres Tejerizo, G A; Luna, M F; Pistorio, M; Boiardi, J L; Pühler, A; Weidner, S; Niehaus, K; Lagares, A

    2016-01-01

    Abiotic stresses in general and extracellular acidity in particular disturb and limit nitrogen-fixing symbioses between rhizobia and their host legumes. Except for valuable molecular-biological studies on different rhizobia, no consolidated models have been formulated to describe the central physiologic changes that occur in acid-stressed bacteria. We present here an integrated analysis entailing the main cultural, metabolic, and molecular responses of the model bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti growing under controlled acid stress in a chemostat. A stepwise extracellular acidification of the culture medium had indicated that S. meliloti stopped growing at ca. pH 6.0-6.1. Under such stress the rhizobia increased the O2 consumption per cell by more than 5-fold. This phenotype, together with an increase in the transcripts for several membrane cytochromes, entails a higher aerobic-respiration rate in the acid-stressed rhizobia. Multivariate analysis of global metabolome data served to unequivocally correlate specific-metabolite profiles with the extracellular pH, showing that at low pH the pentose-phosphate pathway exhibited increases in several transcripts, enzymes, and metabolites. Further analyses should be focused on the time course of the observed changes, its associated intracellular signaling, and on the comparison with the changes that operate during the sub lethal acid-adaptive response (ATR) in rhizobia. PMID:27404346

  10. A Novel Sinorhizobium meliloti Operon Encodes an α-Glucosidase and a Periplasmic-Binding-Protein-Dependent Transport System for α-Glucosides

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Laura B.; Walker, Graham C.

    1999-01-01

    The most abundant carbon source transported into legume root nodules is photosynthetically produced sucrose, yet the importance of its metabolism by rhizobia in planta is not yet known. To identify genes involved in sucrose uptake and hydrolysis, we screened a Sinorhizobium meliloti genomic library and discovered a segment of S. meliloti DNA which allows Ralstonia eutropha to grow on the α-glucosides sucrose, maltose, and trehalose. Tn5 mutagenesis localized the required genes to a 6.8-kb region containing five open reading frames which were named agl, for α-glucoside utilization. Four of these (aglE, aglF, aglG, and aglK) appear to encode a periplasmic-binding-protein-dependent sugar transport system, and one (aglA) appears to encode an α-glucosidase with homology to family 13 of glycosyl hydrolases. Cosmid-borne agl genes permit uptake of radiolabeled sucrose into R. eutropha cells. Analysis of the properties of agl mutants suggests that S. meliloti possesses at least one additional α-glucosidase as well as a lower-affinity transport system for α-glucosides. It is possible that the Fix+ phenotype of agl mutants on alfalfa is due to these additional functions. Loci found by DNA sequencing to be adjacent to aglEFGAK include a probable regulatory gene (aglR), zwf and edd, which encode the first two enzymes of the Entner-Doudoroff pathway, pgl, which shows homology to a gene encoding a putative phosphogluconolactonase, and a novel Rhizobium-specific repeat element. PMID:10400573

  11. Genes conferring copper resistance in Sinorhizobium meliloti CCNWSX0020 also promote the growth of Medicago lupulina in copper-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhefei; Ma, Zhanqiang; Hao, Xiuli; Rensing, Christopher; Wei, Gehong

    2014-03-01

    Sinorhizobium meliloti CCNWSX0020, isolated from root nodules of Medicago lupulina growing in gold mine tailings in the northwest of China, displayed both copper resistance and growth promotion of leguminous plants in copper-contaminated soil. Nevertheless, the genetic and biochemical mechanisms responsible for copper resistance in S. meliloti CCNWSX0020 remained uncharacterized. To investigate genes involved in copper resistance, an S. meliloti CCNWSX0020 Tn5 insertion library of 14,000 mutants was created. Five copper-sensitive mutants, named SXa-1, SXa-2, SXc-1, SXc-2, and SXn, were isolated, and the disrupted regions involved were identified by inverse PCR and subsequent sequencing. Both SXa-1 and SXa-2 carried a transposon insertion in lpxXL (SM0020_18047), encoding the LpxXL C-28 acyltransferase; SXc-1 and SXc-2 carried a transposon insertion in merR (SM0020_29390), encoding the regulatory activator; SXn contained a transposon insertion in omp (SM0020_18792), encoding a hypothetical outer membrane protein. The results of reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) combined with transposon gene disruptions revealed that SM0020_05862, encoding an unusual P-type ATPase, was regulated by the MerR protein. Analysis of the genome sequence showed that this P-type ATPase did not contain an N-terminal metal-binding domain or a CPC motif but rather TPCP compared with CopA from Escherichia coli. Pot experiments were carried out to determine whether growth and copper accumulation of the host plant M. lupulina were affected in the presence of the wild type or the different mutants. Soil samples were subjected to three levels of copper contamination, namely, the uncontaminated control and 47.36 and 142.08 mg/kg, and three replicates were conducted for each treatment. The results showed that the wild-type S. meliloti CCNWSX0020 enabled the host plant to grow better and accumulate copper ions. The plant dry weight and copper content of M. lupulina inoculated with the 5 copper

  12. Genes conferring copper resistance in Sinorhizobium meliloti CCNWSX0020 also promote the growth of Medicago lupulina in copper-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhefei; Ma, Zhanqiang; Hao, Xiuli; Rensing, Christopher; Wei, Gehong

    2014-03-01

    Sinorhizobium meliloti CCNWSX0020, isolated from root nodules of Medicago lupulina growing in gold mine tailings in the northwest of China, displayed both copper resistance and growth promotion of leguminous plants in copper-contaminated soil. Nevertheless, the genetic and biochemical mechanisms responsible for copper resistance in S. meliloti CCNWSX0020 remained uncharacterized. To investigate genes involved in copper resistance, an S. meliloti CCNWSX0020 Tn5 insertion library of 14,000 mutants was created. Five copper-sensitive mutants, named SXa-1, SXa-2, SXc-1, SXc-2, and SXn, were isolated, and the disrupted regions involved were identified by inverse PCR and subsequent sequencing. Both SXa-1 and SXa-2 carried a transposon insertion in lpxXL (SM0020_18047), encoding the LpxXL C-28 acyltransferase; SXc-1 and SXc-2 carried a transposon insertion in merR (SM0020_29390), encoding the regulatory activator; SXn contained a transposon insertion in omp (SM0020_18792), encoding a hypothetical outer membrane protein. The results of reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) combined with transposon gene disruptions revealed that SM0020_05862, encoding an unusual P-type ATPase, was regulated by the MerR protein. Analysis of the genome sequence showed that this P-type ATPase did not contain an N-terminal metal-binding domain or a CPC motif but rather TPCP compared with CopA from Escherichia coli. Pot experiments were carried out to determine whether growth and copper accumulation of the host plant M. lupulina were affected in the presence of the wild type or the different mutants. Soil samples were subjected to three levels of copper contamination, namely, the uncontaminated control and 47.36 and 142.08 mg/kg, and three replicates were conducted for each treatment. The results showed that the wild-type S. meliloti CCNWSX0020 enabled the host plant to grow better and accumulate copper ions. The plant dry weight and copper content of M. lupulina inoculated with the 5 copper

  13. Genes Conferring Copper Resistance in Sinorhizobium meliloti CCNWSX0020 Also Promote the Growth of Medicago lupulina in Copper-Contaminated Soil

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhefei; Ma, Zhanqiang; Hao, Xiuli; Rensing, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Sinorhizobium meliloti CCNWSX0020, isolated from root nodules of Medicago lupulina growing in gold mine tailings in the northwest of China, displayed both copper resistance and growth promotion of leguminous plants in copper-contaminated soil. Nevertheless, the genetic and biochemical mechanisms responsible for copper resistance in S. meliloti CCNWSX0020 remained uncharacterized. To investigate genes involved in copper resistance, an S. meliloti CCNWSX0020 Tn5 insertion library of 14,000 mutants was created. Five copper-sensitive mutants, named SXa-1, SXa-2, SXc-1, SXc-2, and SXn, were isolated, and the disrupted regions involved were identified by inverse PCR and subsequent sequencing. Both SXa-1 and SXa-2 carried a transposon insertion in lpxXL (SM0020_18047), encoding the LpxXL C-28 acyltransferase; SXc-1 and SXc-2 carried a transposon insertion in merR (SM0020_29390), encoding the regulatory activator; SXn contained a transposon insertion in omp (SM0020_18792), encoding a hypothetical outer membrane protein. The results of reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) combined with transposon gene disruptions revealed that SM0020_05862, encoding an unusual P-type ATPase, was regulated by the MerR protein. Analysis of the genome sequence showed that this P-type ATPase did not contain an N-terminal metal-binding domain or a CPC motif but rather TPCP compared with CopA from Escherichia coli. Pot experiments were carried out to determine whether growth and copper accumulation of the host plant M. lupulina were affected in the presence of the wild type or the different mutants. Soil samples were subjected to three levels of copper contamination, namely, the uncontaminated control and 47.36 and 142.08 mg/kg, and three replicates were conducted for each treatment. The results showed that the wild-type S. meliloti CCNWSX0020 enabled the host plant to grow better and accumulate copper ions. The plant dry weight and copper content of M. lupulina inoculated with the 5 copper

  14. Identification and characterization of the intracellular poly-3-hydroxybutyrate depolymerase enzyme PhaZ of Sinorhizobium meliloti

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background S. meliloti forms indeterminate nodules on the roots of its host plant alfalfa (Medicago sativa). Bacteroids of indeterminate nodules are terminally differentiated and, unlike their non-terminally differentiated counterparts in determinate nodules, do not accumulate large quantities of Poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) during symbiosis. PhaZ is in intracellular PHB depolymerase; it represents the first enzyme in the degradative arm of the PHB cycle in S. meliloti and is the only enzyme in this half of the PHB cycle that remains uncharacterized. Results The S. meliloti phaZ gene was identified by in silico analysis, the ORF was cloned, and a S. meliloti phaZ mutant was constructed. This mutant exhibited increased PHB accumulation during free-living growth, even when grown under non-PHB-inducing conditions. The phaZ mutant demonstrated no reduction in symbiotic capacity; interestingly, analysis of the bacteroids showed that this mutant also accumulated PHB during symbiosis. This mutant also exhibited a decreased capacity to tolerate long-term carbon starvation, comparable to that of other PHB cycle mutants. In contrast to other PHB cycle mutants, the S. meliloti phaZ mutant did not exhibit any decrease in rhizosphere competitiveness; however, this mutant did exhibit a significant increase in succinoglycan biosynthesis. Conclusions S. meliloti bacteroids retain the capacity to synthesize PHB during symbiosis; interestingly, accumulation does not occur at the expense of symbiotic performance. phaZ mutants are not compromised in their capacity to compete for nodulation in the rhizosphere, perhaps due to increased succinoglycan production resulting from upregulation of the succinoglycan biosynthetic pathway. The reduced survival capacity of free-living cells unable to access their accumulated stores of PHB suggests that PHB is a crucial metabolite under adverse conditions. PMID:20346169

  15. [Bacterial contamination and presence of Sinorhizobium meliloti in irrigation canal water from the Neuquén River].

    PubMed

    Gili, P; Marando, G; Irisarri, J; Sagardoy, M

    2001-01-01

    A survey of the changes in populations of heterotrophic bacteria, coliform microorganisms and S. meliloti was conducted in samples taken from the water irrigation channels of the Neuquén River (Argentina). Fifty-six water samples were collected during the spring-summer seasons of 1997-1999 years. Both the heterotrophic plate count bacterial and the number of coliforms oscillated between 110-5050 CFU/ml and 8-1400 CFU/100 ml, respectively, during the period this study was carried out. Fecal coliforms were detected in 91.1% of the water samples investigated. Moreover, the results showed that S. meliloti capable of nodulating alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) Cuf 101 were present in 68% of the water samples and in effectiveness studies, no isolate out of 25 evaluated could be classified as superior N fixers. That is, they did not produce plants equal in weight to nitrate-grown plants (KNO3 0.05%). All the S. meliloti strains were resistant to novobiocin and bacitracin, while 72% of the microsymbionts demonstrated resistance to between seven and ten antibiotics. Results presented in this study showed that irrigation waters of the Neuquén river could act as dispersal agents of both ineffective S. meliloti strains and thermotolerant coliform bacteria.

  16. Single-plant, Sterile Microcosms for Nodulation and Growth of the Legume Plant Medicago truncatula with the Rhizobial Symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Kathryn M.

    2013-01-01

    Rhizobial bacteria form symbiotic, nitrogen-fixing nodules on the roots of compatible host legume plants. One of the most well-developed model systems for studying these interactions is the plant Medicago truncatula cv. Jemalong A17 and the rhizobial bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021. Repeated imaging of plant roots and scoring of symbiotic phenotypes requires methods that are non-destructive to either plants or bacteria. The symbiotic phenotypes of some plant and bacterial mutants become apparent after relatively short periods of growth, and do not require long-term observation of the host/symbiont interaction. However, subtle differences in symbiotic efficiency and nodule senescence phenotypes that are not apparent in the early stages of the nodulation process require relatively long growth periods before they can be scored. Several methods have been developed for long-term growth and observation of this host/symbiont pair. However, many of these methods require repeated watering, which increases the possibility of contamination by other microbes. Other methods require a relatively large space for growth of large numbers of plants. The method described here, symbiotic growth of M. truncatula/S. meliloti in sterile, single-plant microcosms, has several advantages. Plants in these microcosms have sufficient moisture and nutrients to ensure that watering is not required for up to 9 weeks, preventing cross-contamination during watering. This allows phenotypes to be quantified that might be missed in short-term growth systems, such as subtle delays in nodule development and early nodule senescence. Also, the roots and nodules in the microcosm are easily viewed through the plate lid, so up-rooting of the plants for observation is not required. PMID:24121837

  17. The expression of MaEXP1, a Melilotus alba expansin gene, is upregulated during the sweetclover-Sinorhizobium meliloti interaction.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Walter; Hirsch, Ann M

    2004-06-01

    Expansins are a highly conserved group of cell wall-localized proteins that appear to mediate changes in cell wall plasticity during cell expansion or differentiation. The accumulation of expansin protein or the mRNA for specific expansin gene family members has been correlated with the growth of various plant organs. Because expansin proteins are closely associated with plant cell wall expansion, and as part of a larger study to determine the role of different gene products in the legume-Rhizobium spp. symbiosis, we investigated whether a Melilotus alba (white sweetclover) expansin gene is expressed during nodule development. A cDNA fragment encoding an expansin gene (EXP) was isolated from Sinorhizobium meliloti-inoculated sweetclover root RNA by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction using degenerate primers, and a full-length sweetclover expansin sequence (MaEXP1) was obtained using 5' and 3' rapid amplification of cDNA end cloning. The predicted amino acid of the sweetclover expansin is highly conserved with the various alpha-expansins in the GenBank database. MaEXP1 contains a series of eight cysteines and four tryptophans that are conserved in the alpha-expansin protein family. Northern analysis and whole-mount in situ hybridization analyses indicate that MaEXP1 mRNA expression is enhanced in roots within hours after inoculation with S. meliloti and in nodules. Western and immunolocalization studies using a cucumber expansin antibody demonstrated that a cross-reacting protein accumulated in the expanding cells of the nodule.

  18. Contribution of NFP LysM Domains to the Recognition of Nod Factors during the Medicago truncatula/Sinorhizobium meliloti Symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Bensmihen, Sandra; de Billy, Françoise; Gough, Clare

    2011-01-01

    The root nodule nitrogen fixing symbiosis between legume plants and soil bacteria called rhizobia is of great agronomical and ecological interest since it provides the plant with fixed atmospheric nitrogen. The establishment of this symbiosis is mediated by the recognition by the host plant of lipo-chitooligosaccharides called Nod Factors (NFs), produced by the rhizobia. This recognition is highly specific, as precise NF structures are required depending on the host plant. Here, we study the importance of different LysM domains of a LysM-Receptor Like Kinase (LysM-RLK) from Medicago truncatula called Nod factor perception (NFP) in the recognition of different substitutions of NFs produced by its symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti. These substitutions are a sulphate group at the reducing end, which is essential for host specificity, and a specific acyl chain at the non-reducing end, that is critical for the infection process. The NFP extracellular domain (ECD) contains 3 LysM domains that are predicted to bind NFs. By swapping the whole ECD or individual LysM domains of NFP for those of its orthologous gene from pea, SYM10 (a legume plant that interacts with another strain of rhizobium producing NFs with different substitutions), we showed that NFP is not directly responsible for specific recognition of the sulphate substitution of S. meliloti NFs, but probably interacts with the acyl substitution. Moreover, we have demonstrated the importance of the NFP LysM2 domain for rhizobial infection and we have pinpointed the importance of a single leucine residue of LysM2 in that step of the symbiosis. Together, our data put into new perspective the recognition of NFs in the different steps of symbiosis in M. truncatula, emphasising the probable existence of a missing component for early NF recognition and reinforcing the important role of NFP for NF recognition during rhizobial infection. PMID:22087221

  19. A vapBC-type toxin-antitoxin module of Sinorhizobium meliloti influences symbiotic efficiency and nodule senescence of Medicago sativa.

    PubMed

    Lipuma, Justine; Cinege, Gyöngyi; Bodogai, Monica; Oláh, Boglárka; Kiers, Aurélie; Endre, Gabriella; Dupont, Laurence; Dusha, Ilona

    2014-12-01

    The symbiotic nitrogen-fixing soil bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti carries a large number of toxin-antitoxin (TA) modules both on the chromosome and megaplasmids. One of them, the vapBC-5 module that belongs to the type II systems was characterized here. It encodes an active toxin vapC-5, and was shown to be controlled negatively by the complex of its own proteins. Different mutants of the vapBC-5 genes exhibited diverse effects on symbiotic efficiency during interaction with the host plant Medicago sativa. The absence of the entire vapBC-5 region had no influence on nodule formation and nitrogen fixation properties. The strain carrying an insertion in the antitoxin gene showed a reduced nitrogen fixation capacity resulting in a lower plant yield. In contrast, when the toxin gene was mutated, the strain developed more efficient symbiosis with the host plant. The nitrogen fixing root nodules had a delayed senescent phenotype and contained elevated level of plant-derived molecules characteristic of later steps of nodule development. The longer bacteroid viability and abundance of active nitrogen fixing zone resulted in increased production of plant material. These data indicate that modification of the toxin/antitoxin production may influence bacteroid metabolism and may have an impact on the adaptation to changing environmental conditions. PMID:25156344

  20. Genetic characterization of a complex locus necessary for the transport and catabolism of erythritol, adonitol and L-arabitol in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Geddes, Barney A; Oresnik, Ivan J

    2012-08-01

    The Sinorhizobium meliloti locus necessary for the utilization of erythritol as a sole carbon source, contains 17 genes, including genes that encode an ABC transporter necessary for the transport of erythritol, as well as the genes encoding EryA, EryB, EryC, TpiB and the regulators EryD and EryR (SMc01615). Construction of defined deletions and complementation experiments show that the other genes at this locus encode products that are necessary for the catabolism of adonitol (ribitol) and l-arabitol, but not d-arabitol. These analyses show that aside from one gene that is specific for the catabolism of l-arabitol (SMc01619, lalA), the rest of the catabolic genes are necessary for both polyols (SMc01617, rbtC; SMc01618, rbtB; SMc01622, rbtA). Genetic and biochemical data show that in addition to utilizing erythritol as a substrate, EryA is also capable of utilizing adonitol and l-arabitol. Similarly, transport experiments using labelled erythritol show that adonitol, l-arabitol and erythritol share a common transporter (MptABCDE). Quantitative RT-PCR experiments show that transcripts containing genes necessary for adonitol and l-arabitol utilization are induced by these sugars in an eryA-dependent manner.

  1. The Pattern of Secreted Molecules During the Co-Inoculation of Alfalfa Plants With Sinorhizobium meliloti and Delftia sp. strain JD2: An Interaction That Improves Plant Yield.

    PubMed

    Morel, M A; Cagide, C; Minteguiaga, M A; Dardanelli, M S; Castro-Sowinski, S

    2015-02-01

    Delftia sp. strain JD2 is a plant-growth-promoting bacterium that enhances legume nodulation and growth, acting as nodule-assisting bacterium during the co-inoculation of plants with rhizobial strains. In this work, we evaluate how the co-inoculation of alfalfa with Sinorhizobium meliloti U143 and JD2 increases plant yield under greenhouse conditions and we analyze the pattern of secreted bioactive compounds which may be involved in the microbe-plant communication. The chemical composition of extracellular cultures (EC) produced in hydroponic conditions (collected 4, 7, and 14 days after bacterial treatment) were characterized using different chromatographic and elucidation techniques. In addition, we assessed the effect that plant irrigation with cell-free EC, produced during co-inoculation experiments, would have on plant yield. Results showed increased alfalfa shoot and root matter, suggesting that U143-JD2 co-inoculation might be a beneficial agricultural practice. The pattern of secreted secondary metabolites among treatments showed important differences. Qualitative and quantitative changes in phenolic compounds (including flavonoids), organic acids, and volatile compounds were detected during the early microbe-plant interaction, suggesting that the production of some molecules positively affects the microbe-plant association. Finally, the irrigation of co-inoculated plants with cell-free EC under greenhouse conditions increased plant yield over agronomic expectations. This effect might be attributed to the bioactive secondary metabolites incorporated during the irrigation.

  2. Relaxed Sugar Donor Selectivity of a Sinorhizobium meliloti Ortholog of the Rhizobium leguminosarum Mannosyl Transferase LpcC. Role of the Lipopolysaccharide Core in Symbiosis of Rhizobiaceae with Plants*

    PubMed Central

    Kanipes, Margaret I.; Kalb, Suzanne R.; Cotter, Robert J.; Hozbor, Daniela F.; Lagares, Antonio; Raetz, Christian R. H.

    2008-01-01

    The lpcC gene of Rhizobium leguminosarum and the lpsB gene of Sinorhizobium meliloti encode protein orthologs that are 58% identical over their entire lengths of about 350 amino acid residues. LpcC and LpsB are required for symbiosis with pea and Medicago plants, respectively. S. meliloti lpsB complements a mutant of R. leguminosarum defective in lpcC, but the converse does not occur. LpcC encodes a highly selective mannosyl transferase that utilizes GDP-mannose to glycosylate the inner 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonic acid (Kdo) residue of the lipopolysaccharide precursor Kdo2-lipid IVA. We now demonstrate that LpsB can also efficiently mannosylate the same acceptor substrate as does LpcC. Unexpectedly, however, the sugar nucleotide selectivity of LpsB is greatly relaxed compared with that of LpcC. Membranes of the wild-type S. meliloti strain 2011 catalyze the glycosylation of Kdo2-[4′-32P]lipid IVA at comparable rates using a diverse set of sugar nucleotides, including GDP-mannose, ADP-mannose, UDP-glucose, and ADP-glucose. This complex pattern of glycosylation is due entirely to LpsB, since membranes of the S. meliloti lpsB mutant 6963 do not glycosylate Kdo2-[4′-32P]lipid IVA in the presence of any of these sugar nucleotides. Expression of lpsB in E. coli using a T7lac promoter-driven construct results in the appearance of similar multiple glycosyl transferase activities seen in S. meliloti 2011 membranes. Constructs expressing lpcC display only mannosyl transferase activity. We conclude that LpsB, despite its high degree of similarity to LpcC, is a much more versatile glycosyltransferase, probably accounting for the inability of lpcC to complement S. meliloti lpsB mutants. Our findings have important implications for the regulation of core glycosylation in S. meliloti and other bacteria containing LpcC orthologs. PMID:12591936

  3. A comparative genomics screen identifies a Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021 sodM-like gene strongly expressed within host plant nodules

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background We have used the genomic data in the Integrated Microbial Genomes system of the Department of Energy’s Joint Genome Institute to make predictions about rhizobial open reading frames that play a role in nodulation of host plants. The genomic data was screened by searching for ORFs conserved in α-proteobacterial rhizobia, but not conserved in closely-related non-nitrogen-fixing α-proteobacteria. Results Using this approach, we identified many genes known to be involved in nodulation or nitrogen fixation, as well as several new candidate genes. We knocked out selected new genes and assayed for the presence of nodulation phenotypes and/or nodule-specific expression. One of these genes, SMc00911, is strongly expressed by bacterial cells within host plant nodules, but is expressed minimally by free-living bacterial cells. A strain carrying an insertion mutation in SMc00911 is not defective in the symbiosis with host plants, but in contrast to expectations, this mutant strain is able to out-compete the S. meliloti 1021 wild type strain for nodule occupancy in co-inoculation experiments. The SMc00911 ORF is predicted to encode a “SodM-like” (superoxide dismutase-like) protein containing a rhodanese sulfurtransferase domain at the N-terminus and a chromate-resistance superfamily domain at the C-terminus. Several other ORFs (SMb20360, SMc01562, SMc01266, SMc03964, and the SMc01424-22 operon) identified in the screen are expressed at a moderate level by bacteria within nodules, but not by free-living bacteria. Conclusions Based on the analysis of ORFs identified in this study, we conclude that this comparative genomics approach can identify rhizobial genes involved in the nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with host plants, although none of the newly identified genes were found to be essential for this process. PMID:22587634

  4. Molecular modeling and computational analyses suggests that the Sinorhizobium meliloti periplasmic regulator protein ExoR adopts a superhelical fold and is controlled by a unique mechanism of proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Wiech, Eliza M; Cheng, Hai-Ping; Singh, Shaneen M

    2015-01-01

    The Sinorhizobium meliloti periplasmic ExoR protein and the ExoS/ChvI two-component system form a regulatory mechanism that directly controls the transformation of free-living to host-invading cells. In the absence of crystal structures, understanding the molecular mechanism of interaction between ExoR and the ExoS sensor, which is believed to drive the key regulatory step in the invasion process, remains a major challenge. In this study, we present a theoretical structural model of the active form of ExoR protein, ExoRm, generated using computational methods. Our model suggests that ExoR possesses a super-helical fold comprising 12 α-helices forming six Sel1-like repeats, including two that were unidentified in previous studies. This fold is highly conducive to mediating protein–protein interactions and this is corroborated by the identification of putative protein binding sites on the surface of the ExoRm protein. Our studies reveal two novel insights: (a) an extended conformation of the third Sel1-like repeat that might be important for ExoR regulatory function and (b) a buried proteolytic site that implies a unique proteolytic mechanism. This study provides new and interesting insights into the structure of S. meliloti ExoR, lays the groundwork for elaborating the molecular mechanism of ExoRm cleavage, ExoRm–ExoS interactions, and studies of ExoR homologs in other bacterial host interactions. PMID:25492513

  5. Salt-tolerant rhizobia isolated from a Tunisian oasis that are highly effective for symbiotic N2-fixation with Phaseolus vulgaris constitute a novel biovar (bv. mediterranense) of Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Mnasri, Bacem; Mrabet, Moncef; Laguerre, Gisèle; Aouani, Mohamed Elarbi; Mhamdi, Ridha

    2007-01-01

    Nodulation of common bean was explored in six oases in the south of Tunisia. Nineteen isolates were characterized by PCR-RFLP of 16S rDNA. Three species of rhizobia were identified, Rhizobium etli, Rhizobium gallicum and Sinorhizobium meliloti. The diversity of the symbiotic genes was then assessed by PCR-RFLP of nodC and nifH genes. The majority of the symbiotic genotypes were conserved between oases and other soils of the north of the country. Sinorhizobia isolated from bean were then compared with isolates from Medicago truncatula plants grown in the oases soils. All the nodC types except for nodC type p that was specific to common bean isolates were shared by both hosts. The four isolates with nodC type p induced N(2)-fixing effective nodules on common bean but did not nodulate M. truncatula and Medicago sativa. The phylogenetic analysis of nifH and nodC genes showed that these isolates carry symbiotic genes different from those previously characterized among Medicago and bean symbionts, but closely related to those of S. fredii Spanish and Tunisian isolates effective in symbiosis with common bean but unable to nodulate soybean. The creation of a novel biovar shared by S. meliloti and S. fredii, bv. mediterranense, was proposed.

  6. Novel rkp Gene Clusters of Sinorhizobium meliloti Involved in Capsular Polysaccharide Production and Invasion of the Symbiotic Nodule: the rkpK Gene Encodes a UDP-Glucose Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Kereszt, Attila; Kiss, Ernő; Reuhs, Bradley L.; Carlson, Russell W.; Kondorosi, Ádám; Putnoky, Péter

    1998-01-01

    The production of exopolysaccharide (EPS) was shown to be required for the infection process by rhizobia that induce the formation of indeterminate nodules on the roots of leguminous host plants. In Sinorhizobium meliloti (also known as Rhizobium meliloti) Rm41, a capsular polysaccharide (KPS) analogous to the group II K antigens of Escherichia coli can replace EPS during symbiotic nodule development and serve as an attachment site for the strain-specific bacteriophage φ16-3. The rkpA to -J genes in the chromosomal rkp-1 region code for proteins that are involved in the synthesis, modification, and transfer of an as-yet-unknown lipophilic molecule which might function as a specific lipid carrier during KPS biosynthesis. Here we report that with a phage φ16-3-resistant population obtained after random Tn5 mutagenesis, we have identified novel mutants impaired in KPS production by genetic complementation and biochemical studies. The mutations represent two novel loci, designated the rkp-2 and rkp-3 regions, which are required for the synthesis of rhizobial KPS. The rkp-2 region harbors two open reading frames (ORFs) organized in monocistronic transcription units. Although both genes are required for normal lipopolysaccharide production, only the second one, designated rkpK, is involved in the synthesis of KPS. We have demonstrated that RkpK possesses UDP-glucose dehydrogenase activity, while the protein product of ORF1 might function as a UDP-glucuronic acid epimerase. PMID:9765575

  7. Rhizobia from Lanzarote, the Canary Islands, that nodulate Phaseolus vulgaris have characteristics in common with LMW RNA group II Sinorhizobium meliloti of Medicago, Melilotus and Trigonella from soils of mainland Spain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several isolates from nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris grown in soil of Lanzarote, an island of the Canaries, had electrophoretic LMW RNA patterns identical with a less common pattern within S. meliloti (assigned as group II) obtained from nodules of alfalfa and alfalfa-related legumes grown in northe...

  8. A survey of sRNA families in α-proteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    del Val, Coral; Romero-Zaliz, Rocío; Torres-Quesada, Omar; Peregrina, Alexandra; Toro, Nicolás; Jiménez-Zurdo, Jose I

    2012-01-01

    We have performed a computational comparative analysis of six small non-coding RNA (sRNA) families in α-proteobacteria. Members of these families were first identified in the intergenic regions of the nitrogen-fixing endosymbiont S. meliloti by a combined bioinformatics screen followed by experimental verification. Consensus secondary structures inferred from covariance models for each sRNA family evidenced in some cases conserved motifs putatively relevant to the function of trans-encoded base-pairing sRNAs i.e., Hfq-binding signatures and exposed anti Shine-Dalgarno sequences. Two particular family models, namely αr15 and αr35, shared own sub-structural modules with the Rfam model suhB (RF00519) and the uncharacterized sRNA family αr35b, respectively. A third sRNA family, termed αr45, has homology to the cis-acting regulatory element speF (RF00518). However, new experimental data further confirmed that the S. meliloti αr45 representative is an Hfq-binding sRNA processed from or expressed independently of speF, thus refining the Rfam speF model annotation. All the six families have members in phylogenetically related plant-interacting bacteria and animal pathogens of the order of the Rhizobiales, some occurring with high levels of paralogy in individual genomes. In silico and experimental evidences predict differential regulation of paralogous sRNAs in S. meliloti 1021. The distribution patterns of these sRNA families suggest major contributions of vertical inheritance and extensive ancestral duplication events to the evolution of sRNAs in plant-interacting bacteria. PMID:22418845

  9. A survey of sRNA families in α-proteobacteria.

    PubMed

    del Val, Coral; Romero-Zaliz, Rocío; Torres-Quesada, Omar; Peregrina, Alexandra; Toro, Nicolás; Jiménez-Zurdo, Jose I

    2012-02-01

    We have performed a computational comparative analysis of six small non-coding RNA (sRNA) families in α-proteobacteria. Members of these families were first identified in the intergenic regions of the nitrogen-fixing endosymbiont S. meliloti by a combined bioinformatics screen followed by experimental verification. Consensus secondary structures inferred from covariance models for each sRNA family evidenced in some cases conserved motifs putatively relevant to the function of trans-encoded base-pairing sRNAs i.e., Hfq-binding signatures and exposed anti Shine-Dalgarno sequences. Two particular family models, namely αr15 and αr35, shared own sub-structural modules with the Rfam model suhB (RF00519) and the uncharacterized sRNA family αr35b, respectively. A third sRNA family, termed αr45, has homology to the cis-acting regulatory element speF (RF00518). However, new experimental data further confirmed that the S. meliloti αr45 representative is an Hfq-binding sRNA processed from or expressed independently of speF, thus refining the Rfam speF model annotation. All the six families have members in phylogenetically related plant-interacting bacteria and animal pathogens of the order of the Rhizobiales, some occurring with high levels of paralogy in individual genomes. In silico and experimental evidences predict differential regulation of paralogous sRNAs in S. meliloti 1021. The distribution patterns of these sRNA families suggest major contributions of vertical inheritance and extensive ancestral duplication events to the evolution of sRNAs in plant-interacting bacteria. PMID:22418845

  10. Divergent genes in potential inoculant Sinorhizobium strains are related to DNA replication, recombination, and repair.

    PubMed

    Penttinen, Petri; Greco, Dario; Muntyan, Victoria; Terefework, Zewdu; De Lajudie, Philippe; Roumiantseva, Marina; Becker, Anke; Auvinen, Petri; Lindström, Kristina

    2016-06-01

    To serve as inoculants of legumes, nitrogen-fixing rhizobium strains should be competitive and tolerant of diverse environments. We hybridized the genomes of symbiotically efficient and salt tolerant Sinorhizobium inoculant strains onto the Sinorhizobium meliloti Rm1021 microarray. The number of variable genes, that is, divergent or putatively multiplied genes, ranged from 503 to 1556 for S. meliloti AK23, S. meliloti STM 1064 and S. arboris HAMBI 1552. The numbers of divergent genes affiliated with the symbiosis plasmid pSymA and related to DNA replication, recombination and repair were significantly higher than expected. The variation was mainly in the accessory genome, implying that it was important in shaping the adaptability of the strains.

  11. The genus name Ensifer Casida 1982 takes priority over Sinorhizobium Chen et al. 1988, and Sinorhizobium morelense Wang et al. 2002 is a later synonym of Ensifer adhaerens Casida 1982. Is the combination "Sinorhizobium adhaerens" (Casida 1982) Willems et al. 2003 legitimate? Request for an Opinion.

    PubMed

    Young, J M

    2003-11-01

    The synonymy of the genera Ensifer and Sinorhizobium was recently reported, but it was proposed that the later-named genus, Sinorhizobium, take priority in nomenclature. There is no justification in the International Code of Nomenclature of Bacteria (Prokaryotes) for this step; Ensifer is the correct name of the genus, with Ensifer adhaerens as the type species. Species previously allocated to Sinorhizobium are here proposed as the new combinations Ensifer arboris, Ensifer fredii, Ensifer kostiensis, Ensifer kummerowiae, Ensifer medicae, Ensifer meliloti, Ensifer saheli, Ensifer terangae and Ensifer xinjiangensis. Sinorhizobium morelense was proposed in 2002 [Wang, E. T., Tan, Z. Y., Willems, A., Fernández-López, M., Reinhold-Hurek, B. & Martínez-Romero, E., Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 52, 1687-1693, 2002], but a consideration of all published data indicate that it is a nitrogen-fixing genomovar and later heterotypic synonym of Ensifer adhaerens. A Request for an Opinion is made as to whether or not the combination "Sinorhizobium adhaerens" (Casida 1982) Willems et al. 2003 is legitimate.

  12. Generalized transduction in Rhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Martin, M O; Long, S R

    1984-07-01

    Generalized transduction of Rhizobium meliloti 1021 was carried out by bacteriophage N3. Genetic markers on the chromosome and the pSym megaplasmid were transduced, along with markers on several IncP plasmids. Cotransduction between transposon Tn5 insertions and integrated recombinant plasmid markers permitted correlation of cotransductional frequencies and known physical distances. Bacteriophage N3 was capable of infecting several commonly used strains of R. meliloti.

  13. Nodule carbohydrate catabolism is enhanced in the Medicago truncatula A17-Sinorhizobium medicae WSM419 symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Larrainzar, Estíbaliz; Gil-Quintana, Erena; Seminario, Amaia; Arrese-Igor, Cesar; González, Esther M.

    2014-01-01

    The symbiotic association between Medicago truncatula and Sinorhizobium meliloti is a well-established model system in the legume–Rhizobium community. Despite its wide use, the symbiotic efficiency of this model has been recently questioned and an alternative microsymbiont, S. medicae, has been proposed. However, little is known about the physiological mechanisms behind the higher symbiotic efficiency of S. medicae WSM419. In the present study, we inoculated M. truncatula Jemalong A17 with either S. medicae WSM419 or S. meliloti 2011 and compared plant growth, photosynthesis, N2-fixation rates, and plant nodule carbon and nitrogen metabolic activities in the two systems. M. truncatula plants in symbiosis with S. medicae showed increased biomass and photosynthesis rates per plant. Plants grown in symbiosis with S. medicae WSM419 also showed higher N2-fixation rates, which were correlated with a larger nodule biomass, while nodule number was similar in both systems. In terms of plant nodule metabolism, M. truncatula–S. medicae WSM419 nodules showed increased sucrose-catabolic activity, mostly associated with sucrose synthase, accompanied by a reduced starch content, whereas nitrogen-assimilation activities were comparable to those measured in nodules infected with S. meliloti 2011. Taken together, these results suggest that S. medicae WSM419 is able to enhance plant carbon catabolism in M. truncatula nodules, which allows for the maintaining of high symbiotic N2-fixation rates, better growth and improved general plant performance. PMID:25221545

  14. Sinorhizobium fredii HH103 bacteroids are not terminally differentiated and show altered O-antigen in nodules of the Inverted Repeat-Lacking Clade legume Glycyrrhiza uralensis.

    PubMed

    Crespo-Rivas, Juan C; Guefrachi, Ibtissem; Mok, Kenny C; Villaécija-Aguilar, José A; Acosta-Jurado, Sebastián; Pierre, Olivier; Ruiz-Sainz, José E; Taga, Michiko E; Mergaert, Peter; Vinardell, José M

    2016-09-01

    In rhizobial species that nodulate inverted repeat-lacking clade (IRLC) legumes, such as the interaction between Sinorhizobium meliloti and Medicago, bacteroid differentiation is driven by an endoreduplication event that is induced by host nodule-specific cysteine rich (NCR) antimicrobial peptides and requires the participation of the bacterial protein BacA. We have studied bacteroid differentiation of Sinorhizobium fredii HH103 in three host plants: Glycine max, Cajanus cajan and the IRLC legume Glycyrrhiza uralensis. Flow cytometry, microscopy analyses and viability studies of bacteroids as well as confocal microscopy studies carried out in nodules showed that S. fredii HH103 bacteroids, regardless of the host plant, had deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) contents, cellular sizes and survival rates similar to those of free-living bacteria. Contrary to S. meliloti, S. fredii HH103 showed little or no sensitivity to Medicago NCR247 and NCR335 peptides. Inactivation of S. fredii HH103 bacA neither affected symbiosis with Glycyrrhiza nor increased bacterial sensitivity to Medicago NCRs. Finally, HH103 bacteroids isolated from Glycyrrhiza, but not those isolated from Cajanus or Glycine, showed an altered lipopolysaccharide. Our studies indicate that, in contrast to the S. meliloti-Medicago model symbiosis, bacteroids in the S. fredii HH103-Glycyrrhiza symbiosis do not undergo NCR-induced and bacA-dependent terminal differentiation. PMID:26521863

  15. Two different stable low molecular weight RNA (LMW RNA) profiles within Sinorhizobium meliloti and within Sinorhizobium medicae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    LMW RNA profiles of 179 isolates from Medicago, Melilotus and Trigonella species growing in a field site in northern Spain were analysed. Four different LMW RNA profiles designated I through IV were identified. Most of the isolates displayed either LMW RNA profile I or III (37 and 45%, respectively)...

  16. NAD(P)+-Malic Enzyme Mutants of Sinorhizobium sp. Strain NGR234, but Not Azorhizobium caulinodans ORS571, Maintain Symbiotic N2 Fixation Capabilities

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ye; Aono, Toshihiro; Poole, Phillip

    2012-01-01

    C4-dicarboxylic acids appear to be metabolized via the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle in N2-fixing bacteria (bacteroids) within legume nodules. In Sinorhizobium meliloti bacteroids from alfalfa, NAD+-malic enzyme (DME) is required for N2 fixation, and this activity is thought to be required for the anaplerotic synthesis of pyruvate. In contrast, in the pea symbiont Rhizobium leguminosarum, pyruvate synthesis occurs via either DME or a pathway catalyzed by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK) and pyruvate kinase (PYK). Here we report that dme mutants of the broad-host-range Sinorhizobium sp. strain NGR234 formed nodules whose level of N2 fixation varied from 27 to 83% (plant dry weight) of the wild-type level, depending on the host plant inoculated. NGR234 bacteroids had significant PCK activity, and while single pckA and single dme mutants fixed N2 at reduced rates, a pckA dme double mutant had no N2-fixing activity (Fix−). Thus, NGR234 bacteroids appear to synthesize pyruvate from TCA cycle intermediates via DME or PCK pathways. These NGR234 data, together with other reports, suggested that the completely Fix− phenotype of S. meliloti dme mutants may be specific to the alfalfa-S. meliloti symbiosis. We therefore examined the ME-like genes azc3656 and azc0119 from Azorhizobium caulinodans, as azc3656 mutants were previously shown to form Fix− nodules on the tropical legume Sesbania rostrata. We found that purified AZC3656 protein is an NAD(P)+-malic enzyme whose activity is inhibited by acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) and stimulated by succinate and fumarate. Thus, whereas DME is required for symbiotic N2 fixation in A. caulinodans and S. meliloti, in other rhizobia this activity can be bypassed via another pathway(s). PMID:22307295

  17. Generalized transduction in Rhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Sik, T; Horváth, J; Chatterjee, S

    1980-01-01

    The phage 11 of R. meliloti performs generalized transduction. This was confirmed by the variety of single markers transferred and by separating transducing particles containing BUdR-labelled bacterial DNA. The transduction frequencies depended on the marker. Linked alleles were mapped by cotransduction on fragments of bacterial DNA equal in size to the phage DNA. With crosses between antibiotic resistancy and auxotrophic markers a partial map was constructed with str, cml, pur-19, and leu-44 sites. With a few multi-auxotrophic mutants linkage data of conjugation were compared with the linkage by cotransduction.

  18. Arsenite oxidation by a facultative chemolithoautotrophic Sinorhizobium sp. KGO-5 isolated from arsenic-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Dong, Dan; Ohtsuka, Toshihiko; Dong, Dian Tao; Amachi, Seigo

    2014-01-01

    A chemolithoautotrophic arsenite-oxidizing bacterium, designated strain KGO-5, was isolated from arsenic-contaminated industrial soil. Strain KGO-5 was phylogenetically closely related with Sinorhizobium meliloti with 16S rRNA gene similarity of more than 99%, and oxidized 5 mM arsenite under autotrophic condition within 60 h with a doubling time of 3.0 h. Additions of 0.01-0.1% yeast extract enhanced the growth significantly, and the strain still oxidized arsenite efficiently with much lower doubling times of approximately 1.0 h. Arsenite-oxidizing capacities (11.2-54.1 μmol h(-1) mg dry cells(-1)) as well as arsenite oxidase (Aio) activities (1.76-10.0 mU mg protein(-1)) were found in the cells grown with arsenite, but neither could be detected in the cells grown without arsenite. Strain KGO-5 possessed putative aioA gene, which is closely related with AioA of Ensifer adhaerens. These results suggest that strain KGO-5 is a facultative chemolithoautotrophic arsenite oxidizer, and its Aio is induced by arsenic. PMID:25051896

  19. Mixed Nodule Infection in Sinorhizobium meliloti–Medicago sativa Symbiosis Suggest the Presence of Cheating Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Checcucci, Alice; Azzarello, Elisa; Bazzicalupo, Marco; Galardini, Marco; Lagomarsino, Alessandra; Mancuso, Stefano; Marti, Lucia; Marzano, Maria C.; Mocali, Stefano; Squartini, Andrea; Zanardo, Marina; Mengoni, Alessio

    2016-01-01

    In the symbiosis between rhizobia and legumes, host plants can form symbiotic root nodules with multiple rhizobial strains, potentially showing different symbiotic performances in nitrogen fixation. Here, we investigated the presence of mixed nodules, containing rhizobia with different degrees of mutualisms, and evaluate their relative fitness in the Sinorhizobium meliloti–Medicago sativa model symbiosis. We used three S. meliloti strains, the mutualist strains Rm1021 and BL225C and the non-mutualist AK83. We performed competition experiments involving both in vitro and in vivo symbiotic assays with M. sativa host plants. We show the occurrence of a high number (from 27 to 100%) of mixed nodules with no negative effect on both nitrogen fixation and plant growth. The estimation of the relative fitness as non-mutualist/mutualist ratios in single nodules shows that in some nodules the non-mutualist strain efficiently colonized root nodules along with the mutualist ones. In conclusion, we can support the hypothesis that in S. meliloti–M. sativa symbiosis mixed nodules are formed and allow non-mutualist or less-mutualist bacterial partners to be less or not sanctioned by the host plant, hence allowing a potential form of cheating behavior to be present in the nitrogen fixing symbiosis. PMID:27379128

  20. The RpiR-Like Repressor IolR Regulates Inositol Catabolism in Sinorhizobium meliloti▿†

    PubMed Central

    Kohler, Petra R. A.; Choong, Ee-Leng; Rossbach, Silvia

    2011-01-01

    Sinorhizobium meliloti, the nitrogen-fixing symbiont of alfalfa, has the ability to catabolize myo-, scyllo-, and d-chiro-inositol. Functional inositol catabolism (iol) genes are required for growth on these inositol isomers, and they play a role during plant-bacterium interactions. The inositol catabolism genes comprise the chromosomally encoded iolA (mmsA) and the iolY(smc01163)RCDEB genes, as well as the idhA gene located on the pSymB plasmid. Reverse transcriptase assays showed that the iolYRCDEB genes are transcribed as one operon. The iol genes were weakly expressed without induction, but their expression was strongly induced by myo-inositol. The putative transcriptional regulator of the iol genes, IolR, belongs to the RpiR-like repressor family. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that IolR recognized a conserved palindromic sequence (5′-GGAA-N6-TTCC-3′) in the upstream regions of the idhA, iolY, iolR, and iolC genes. Complementation assays found IolR to be required for the repression of its own gene and for the downregulation of the idhA-encoded myo-inositol dehydrogenase activity in the presence and absence of inositol. Further expression studies indicated that the late pathway intermediate 2-keto-5-deoxy-d-gluconic acid 6-phosphate (KDGP) functions as the true inducer of the iol genes. The iolA (mmsA) gene encoding methylmalonate semialdehyde dehydrogenase was not regulated by IolR. The S. meliloti iolA (mmsA) gene product seems to be involved in more than only the inositol catabolic pathway, since it was also found to be essential for valine catabolism, supporting its more recent annotation as mmsA. PMID:21784930

  1. Conserved nodulation genes in Rhizobium meliloti and Rhizobium trifolii

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, R.F.; Tu, J.K.; Long, S.R.

    1985-06-01

    Plasmids which contained wild-type or mutated Rhizobium meliloti nodulation (Nod) genes were introduced into Nod/sup -/ R. trifolii mutants ANU453 and ANU851 and tested for their ability to nodulate clover. Cloned wild-type and mutated R. meliloti Nod gene segments restored ANU851 to Nod/sup +/, with the exception of nodD mutants. Similarly, wild-type and mutant R. meliloti nod genes complemented ANU453 to Nod/sup +/, except for nod CII mutants. Thus, ANU851 identifies the equivalent of the R. meliloti nodD genes, and ANU453 specifies the equivalent of the R. meliloti nodCII genes. In addition, cloned wild-type R. trifolii nod genes were introduced into seven R. meliloti Nod/sup -/ mutants. All seven mutants were restored to Nod/sup +/ on alfalfa. Our results indicate that these genes represent common nodulation functions and argue for an allelic relationship between nod genes in R. meliloti and R. trifolii.

  2. (Analysis of the Rhizobium meliloti surface):

    SciTech Connect

    Signer, E.R.

    1988-03-03

    We have identified a number of genes in Rhizobium meliloti that affect outer membrane lipopolysaccharides (LPS). These include three genes defined by mutants with different patterns of resistance to a panel of bacteriophages, of which Class 2 and 3 are closely linked to each other but not to Class 1 or 4;another gene, closely linked to Class 2 and 3, defined only by its ability to suppress Class 1 defects;and three genes, unlinked to each other, defined by mutants with increased sensitivity to deoxycholate. Of the mutants that define these genes, only those in Class 2 have a clear effect on alfalfa symbiosis, having a Fix phenotype.

  3. Analysis of the Rhizobium meliloti surface

    SciTech Connect

    Signer, E.R.

    1991-01-01

    This project, originally oriented toward the role of the bacterial surface in nodulation and nitrogen fixation, has focused on rhizobial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS mutants from R. meliloti strain SU47 were isolated by selecting bacteria resistant to bacteriophage or deoxycholate solubilization. The four best characterized, of the 13 groups obtained, all map to the bacterial chromosome. All mutants elicit Fix{sup +} nodules on alfalfa, giving little evidence for a role of LPS in symbiosis in R. meliloti, as opposed to other Rhicobium sp. exo mutants (reduced or eliminated extracellular polysaccharide (EPS)) elicit Fix{sup {minus}} nodules on alfalfa, indicating EPS has a role in symbiosis. However, strain SU47 lacks the gene 1psZ, which can repress the Fix{sup {minus}} phenotype caused by exo mutants. 1psZ{sup +} does not restore EPS, but instead alters LPS. This suggests that in R. meliloti, either EPS or a specific LPS conformation is required to generate Fix{sup +} nodules in alfalfa. Mutation at 1psX, 1psY, 1psI or 1psN prevent 1psZ{sup +} suppression of exo, presumably because all five genes (1psI, N, X, Y, Z) are required to obtain the proper form of LPS that can substitute for EPS. In support of the hypothesis, LPS from 1psX, 1psY, or 1psZ have characteristic structures, none of which match wild type LPS. 1psZ{sup +} has been cloud and sequenced. The 1psZ{sup +} protein has a predicted molecular weight of 48,589 and is probably cytoplasmic. 1psZ is constitutively expressed, and 1psZ{sup +} does not suppress exoC, suggesting the exoC product, phosphoglucomutase, may play a role in LPS processing. During this work, a host restriction difference between strains SU47 and Rm 41, inactivable by incubation 42{degree}, was identified. (MHB)

  4. A FIELD STUDY WITH GENETICALLY ENGINEERED ALFALFA INOCULATED WITH RECOMBINANT SINORHIZOBIUM MELILOTI: EFFECTS ON THE SOIL ECOSYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The agricultural use of genetically engineered plants and microorganisms has become increasingly common. Because genetically engineered plants and microorganisms can produce compounds foreign to their environment, there is concern that they may become established outside of thei...

  5. A Functional myo-Inositol Dehydrogenase Gene Is Required for Efficient Nitrogen Fixation and Competitiveness of Sinorhizobium fredii USDA191 To Nodulate Soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.)

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Guoqiao; Krishnan, Ammulu Hari; Kim, Yong-Woong; Wacek, Thomas J.; Krishnan, Hari B.

    2001-01-01

    Inositol derivative compounds provide a nutrient source for soil bacteria that possess the ability to degrade such compounds. Rhizobium strains that are capable of utilizing certain inositol derivatives are better colonizers of their host plants. We have cloned and determined the nucleotide sequence of the myo-inositol dehydrogenase gene (idhA) of Sinorhizobium fredii USDA191, the first enzyme responsible for inositol catabolism. The deduced IdhA protein has a molecular mass of 34,648 Da and shows significant sequence similarity with protein sequences of Sinorhizobium meliloti IdhA and MocA; Bacillus subtilis IolG, YrbE, and YucG; and Streptomyces griseus StrI. S. fredii USDA191 idhA mutants revealed no detectable myo-inositol dehydrogenase activity and failed to grow on myo-inositol as a sole carbon source. Northern blot analysis and idhA-lacZ fusion expression studies indicate that idhA is inducible by myo-inositol. S. fredii USDA191 idhA mutant was drastically affected in its ability to reduce nitrogen and revealed deteriorating bacteroids inside the nodules. The number of bacteria recovered from such nodules was about threefold lower than the number of bacteria isolated from nodules initiated by S. fredii USDA191. In addition, the idhA mutant was also severely affected in its ability to compete with the wild-type strain in nodulating soybean. Under competitive conditions, nodules induced on soybean roots were predominantly occupied by the parent strain, even when the idhA mutant was applied at a 10-fold numerical advantage. Thus, we conclude that a functional idhA gene is required for efficient nitrogen fixation and for competitive nodulation of soybeans by S. fredii USDA191. PMID:11274120

  6. sinI- and expR-Dependent Quorum Sensing in Sinorhizobium meliloti†

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Mengsheng; Chen, Hancai; Eberhard, Anatol; Gronquist, Matthew R.; Robinson, Jayne B.; Rolfe, Barry G.; Bauer, Wolfgang D.

    2005-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) in Sinorhizobium meliloti, the N-fixing bacterial symbiont of Medicago host plants, involves at least half a dozen different N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) signals and perhaps an equal number of AHL receptors. The accumulation of 55 proteins was found to be dependent on SinI, the AHL synthase, and/or on ExpR, one of the AHL receptors. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry identified 3-oxo-C14-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C14-HSL), C16-HSL, 3-oxo-C16-HSL, C16:1-HSL, and 3-oxo-C16:1-HSL as the sinI-dependent AHL QS signals accumulated by the 8530 expR+ strain under the conditions used for proteome analysis. The 8530 expR+ strain secretes additional, unidentified QS-active compounds. Addition of 200 nM C14-HSL or C16:1-HSL, two of the known SinI AHLs, affected the levels of 75% of the proteins, confirming that their accumulation is QS regulated. A number of the QS-regulated proteins have functions plausibly related to symbiotic interactions with the host, including ExpE6, IdhA, MocB, Gor, PckA, LeuC, and AglE. Seven of 10 single-crossover β-glucuronidase (GUS) transcriptional reporters in genes corresponding to QS-regulated proteins showed significantly different activities in the sinI and expR mutant backgrounds and in response to added SinI AHLs. The sinI mutant and several of the single-crossover strains were significantly delayed in the ability to initiate nodules on the primary root of the host plant, Medicago truncatula, indicating that sinI-dependent QS regulation and QS-regulated proteins contribute importantly to the rate or efficiency of nodule initiation. The sinI and expR mutants were also defective in surface swarming motility. The sinI mutant was restored to normal swarming by 5 nM C16:1-HSL. PMID:16291666

  7. Isolation and characterization of the recA gene of Rhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed Central

    Better, M; Helinski, D R

    1983-01-01

    Interspecific complementation of an Escherichia coli recA mutant with plasmids containing a gene bank of Rhizobium meliloti DNA was used to identify a clone which contains the recA gene of R. meliloti. The R. meliloti recA protein can function in recombination and in response to DNA damage when expressed in an E. coli recA host, and hybridization studies have shown that DNA sequence homology exists between the recA gene of E. coli and that of R. meliloti. The isolated R. meliloti recA DNA was used to construct a recA R. meliloti, and this bacterium was not deficient in its ability to carry out symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Images PMID:6305915

  8. Identification of bacterial sRNA regulatory targets using ribosome profiling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Rennie, William; Liu, Chaochun; Carmack, Charles S.; Prévost, Karine; Caron, Marie-Pier; Massé, Eric; Ding, Ye; Wade, Joseph T.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria express large numbers of non-coding, regulatory RNAs known as ‘small RNAs’ (sRNAs). sRNAs typically regulate expression of multiple target messenger RNAs (mRNAs) through base-pairing interactions. sRNA:mRNA base-pairing often results in altered mRNA stability and/or altered translation initiation. Computational identification of sRNA targets is challenging due to the requirement for only short regions of base-pairing that can accommodate mismatches. Experimental approaches have been applied to identify sRNA targets on a genomic scale, but these focus only on those targets regulated at the level of mRNA stability. Here, we utilize ribosome profiling (Ribo-seq) to experimentally identify regulatory targets of the Escherichia coli sRNA RyhB. We not only validate a majority of known RyhB targets using the Ribo-seq approach, but also discover many novel ones. We further confirm regulation of a selection of known and novel targets using targeted reporter assays. By mutating nucleotides in the mRNA of a newly discovered target, we demonstrate direct regulation of this target by RyhB. Moreover, we show that Ribo-seq distinguishes between mRNAs regulated at the level of RNA stability and those regulated at the level of translation. Thus, Ribo-seq represents a powerful approach for genome-scale identification of sRNA targets. PMID:26546513

  9. Biochemical and Molecular Phylogenetic Study of Agriculturally Useful Association of a Nitrogen-Fixing Cyanobacterium and Nodule Sinorhizobium with Medicago sativa L.

    PubMed Central

    Karaushu, E. V.; Kravzova, T. R.; Vorobey, N. A.; Kiriziy, D. A.; Olkhovich, O. P.; Taran, N. Yu.; Kots, S. Ya.; Omarova, E.

    2015-01-01

    Seed inoculation with bacterial consortium was found to increase legume yield, providing a higher growth than the standard nitrogen treatment methods. Alfalfa plants were inoculated by mono- and binary compositions of nitrogen-fixing microorganisms. Their physiological and biochemical properties were estimated. Inoculation by microbial consortium of Sinorhizobium meliloti T17 together with a new cyanobacterial isolate Nostoc PTV was more efficient than the single-rhizobium strain inoculation. This treatment provides an intensification of the processes of biological nitrogen fixation by rhizobia bacteria in the root nodules and an intensification of plant photosynthesis. Inoculation by bacterial consortium stimulates growth of plant mass and rhizogenesis and leads to increased productivity of alfalfa and to improving the amino acid composition of plant leaves. The full nucleotide sequence of the rRNA gene cluster and partial sequence of the dinitrogenase reductase (nifH) gene of Nostoc PTV were deposited to GenBank (JQ259185.1, JQ259186.1). Comparison of these gene sequences of Nostoc PTV with all sequences present at the GenBank shows that this cyanobacterial strain does not have 100% identity with any organisms investigated previously. Phylogenetic analysis showed that this cyanobacterium clustered with high credibility values with Nostoc muscorum. PMID:26114100

  10. Genetic basis of sRNA quantitative variation analyzed using an experimental population derived from an elite rice hybrid

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jia; Yao, Wen; Zhu, Dan; Xie, Weibo; Zhang, Qifa

    2015-01-01

    We performed a genetic analysis of sRNA abundance in flag leaf from an immortalized F2 (IMF2) population in rice. We identified 53,613,739 unique sRNAs and 165,797 sRNA expression traits (s-traits). A total of 66,649 s-traits mapped 40,049 local-sQTLs and 30,809 distant-sQTLs. By defining 80,362 sRNA clusters, 22,263 sRNA cluster QTLs (scQTLs) were recovered for 20,249 of all the 50,139 sRNA cluster expression traits (sc-traits). The expression levels for most of s-traits from the same genes or the same sRNA clusters were slightly positively correlated. While genetic co-regulation between sRNAs from the same mother genes and between sRNAs and their mother genes was observed for a portion of the sRNAs, most of the sRNAs and their mother genes showed little co-regulation. Some sRNA biogenesis genes were located in distant-sQTL hotspots and showed correspondence with specific length classes of sRNAs suggesting their important roles in the regulation and biogenesis of the sRNAs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03913.001 PMID:25821986

  11. Genetic basis of sRNA quantitative variation analyzed using an experimental population derived from an elite rice hybrid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia; Yao, Wen; Zhu, Dan; Xie, Weibo; Zhang, Qifa

    2015-03-30

    We performed a genetic analysis of sRNA abundance in flag leaf from an immortalized F2 (IMF2) population in rice. We identified 53,613,739 unique sRNAs and 165,797 sRNA expression traits (s-traits). A total of 66,649 s-traits mapped 40,049 local-sQTLs and 30,809 distant-sQTLs. By defining 80,362 sRNA clusters, 22,263 sRNA cluster QTLs (scQTLs) were recovered for 20,249 of all the 50,139 sRNA cluster expression traits (sc-traits). The expression levels for most of s-traits from the same genes or the same sRNA clusters were slightly positively correlated. While genetic co-regulation between sRNAs from the same mother genes and between sRNAs and their mother genes was observed for a portion of the sRNAs, most of the sRNAs and their mother genes showed little co-regulation. Some sRNA biogenesis genes were located in distant-sQTL hotspots and showed correspondence with specific length classes of sRNAs suggesting their important roles in the regulation and biogenesis of the sRNAs.

  12. Rhizobia with different symbiotic efficiencies nodulate Acaciella angustissima in Mexico, including Sinorhizobium chiapanecum sp. nov. which has common symbiotic genes with Sinorhizobium mexicanum

    PubMed Central

    Rincón-Rosales, Reiner; Lloret, Lourdes; Ponce, Edith; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza

    2009-01-01

    Bacteria from nodules of the legume Acaciella angustissima native to the south of Mexico were characterized genetically and their nodulation and competitiveness were evaluated. Phylogenetic studies derived from rpoB gene sequences indicated that A. angustissima is nodulated by Sinorhizobium mexicanum, Rhizobium tropici, Mesorhizobium plurifarium and Agrobacterium tumefaciens and by bacteria related to Sinorhizobium americanum, Sinorhizobium terangae, Rhizobium etli and Rhizobium gallicum. A new lineage related to S. terangae is recognized based on the sequences of gyrA, nolR, recA, rpoB and rrs genes, DNA–DNA hybridization and phenotypic characteristics. The name for this new species is Sinorhizobium chiapanecum and its type strain is ITTG S70T. The symbiotic genes nodA and nifH were similar to those from S. mexicanum strains, which are Acaciella symbionts as well, with nodA gene sequences grouped within a cluster of nod genes from strains that nodulate plants from the Mimosoideae subfamily of the Leguminosae. Sinorhizobium isolates were the most frequently obtained from A. angustissima nodules and were among the best strains to promote plant growth in A. angustissima and to compete in interstrain nodule competition assays. Lateral transfer of symbiotic genes is not evident among the genera that nodulate A. angustissima (Rhizobium, Sinorhizobium and Mesorhizobium) but may occur among the sympatric and closely related sinorhizobia that nodulate Acaciella. PMID:19120461

  13. Transformation of Rhizobium meliloti 41 with plasmid DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, G B; Kálmán, Z

    1982-01-01

    Plasmid pGV1106, a derivative of the wide-host-range plasmid S-a of the W incompatibility group, was introduced into Rhizobium meliloti 41 by plasmid-mediated mobilization to overcome the restriction of foreign DNA. The mobilized plasmid pKK2 differed from the original pGV1106 by an extra piece of DNA of 1.3 kilobase pairs which supposedly originated from pJB3JI used for mobilization. If pKK2 was isolated from R. meliloti 41, it could be successfully reintroduced by transformation. The transformation frequency was low (10 to 54 colonies per micrograms of plasmid DNA) but reproducible, and several lines of evidence showed that it was the consequence of plasmid DNA uptake. The small size (10.3 kilobases) and elevated copy number (10 to 15 copies per cell) of pKK2 make it a potentially useful cloning vector for the study of symbiotic nitrogen fixation genes of R. meliloti 41. Images PMID:6279558

  14. Identification of metE as a Second Target of the sRNA scr5239 in Streptomyces coelicolor

    PubMed Central

    Vockenhuber, Michael-Paul; Heueis, Nona; Suess, Beatrix

    2015-01-01

    While transcriptional regulation of the primary and secondary metabolism of the model organism Streptomyces coelicolor is well studied, little is still known about the role small noncoding RNAs (sRNAs) play in regulating gene expression in this organism. Here, we report the identification of a second target of the sRNA scr5239, an sRNA highly conserved in streptomycetes. The 159 nt long sRNA binds its target, the mRNA of the cobalamin independent methionine synthase metE (SCO0985), at the 5’ end of its open reading frame thereby repressing translation. We show that a high methionine level induces expression of scr5239 itself. This leads, in a negative feedback loop, to the repression of methionine biosynthesis. In contrast to the first reported target of this sRNA, the agarase dagA, this interaction seems to be conserved in a wide number of streptomycetes. PMID:25785836

  15. Rhizobium meliloti mutants that overproduce the R. meliloti acidic Calcofluor-binding exopolysaccharide

    SciTech Connect

    Doherty, D.; Glazebrook, J.; Walker, G.C. ); Leigh, J.A. )

    1988-09-01

    The acidic Calcofluor-binding exopolysaccharide of Rhizobium meliloti Rm1021 plays one or more critical roles in nodule invasion and possible in nodule development. Two loci, exoR and exoS, that effect the regulation of synthesis of this exopolysaccharide were identified by screening for derivatives of strain Rm1021 that formed mucoid colonies that fluoresced extremely brightly under UV light when grown on medium containing Calcofluor. The exopolysaccharide produced in large quantities by the exoR95::Tn5 and exoS96::Tn5 strains was indistinguishable from that produced by the parental strain Rm1021, and its synthesis required the function of at least the exoA, exoB, and exoF genes. Both the exoR and exoS loci were located on the chromosome, and the exo96::Tn5 mutation was 84% linked to the trp-33 mutation by {Phi}M12 transduction. Synthesis of the Calcofluor-binding exopolysaccharide by strain Rm1021 was greatly stimulated by starvation for ammonia. In contrast, the exoR95::Tn5 mutant produced high levels of exopolysaccharide regardless of the presence or absence of ammonia in the medium. The exoS96::Tn5 mutant produced elevated amounts of exopolysaccharide in the presence of ammonia, but higher amounts were observed after starvation for ammonia. The presence of either mutation increased the level of expression of exoF::TnphoA and exoP::TnphoA fusions. Analyses of results obtained when alfalfa seedlings were inoculated with the exoR95::Tn5 strain indicated that the mutant strain could not invade nodules. However, pseudorevertants that retained the original exoR95::Tn5 mutant but acquired unlinked suppressors so that they produced an approximately normal amount of exopolysaccharide were able to invade nodules and fix nitrogen.

  16. The Symbiotic Biofilm of Sinorhizobium fredii SMH12, Necessary for Successful Colonization and Symbiosis of Glycine max cv Osumi, Is Regulated by Quorum Sensing Systems and Inducing Flavonoids via NodD1

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Montaño, Francisco; Jiménez-Guerrero, Irene; Del Cerro, Pablo; Baena-Ropero, Irene; López-Baena, Francisco Javier; Ollero, Francisco Javier; Bellogín, Ramón; Lloret, Javier; Espuny, Rosario

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial surface components, especially exopolysaccharides, in combination with bacterial Quorum Sensing signals are crucial for the formation of biofilms in most species studied so far. Biofilm formation allows soil bacteria to colonize their surrounding habitat and survive common environmental stresses such as desiccation and nutrient limitation. This mode of life is often essential for survival in bacteria of the genera Mesorhizobium, Sinorhizobium, Bradyrhizobium, and Rhizobium. The role of biofilm formation in symbiosis has been investigated in detail for Sinorhizobium meliloti and Bradyrhizobium japonicum. However, for S. fredii this process has not been studied. In this work we have demonstrated that biofilm formation is crucial for an optimal root colonization and symbiosis between S. fredii SMH12 and Glycine max cv Osumi. In this bacterium, nod-gene inducing flavonoids and the NodD1 protein are required for the transition of the biofilm structure from monolayer to microcolony. Quorum Sensing systems are also required for the full development of both types of biofilms. In fact, both the nodD1 mutant and the lactonase strain (the lactonase enzyme prevents AHL accumulation) are defective in soybean root colonization. The impairment of the lactonase strain in its colonization ability leads to a decrease in the symbiotic parameters. Interestingly, NodD1 together with flavonoids activates certain quorum sensing systems implicit in the development of the symbiotic biofilm. Thus, S. fredii SMH12 by means of a unique key molecule, the flavonoid, efficiently forms biofilm, colonizes the legume roots and activates the synthesis of Nod factors, required for successfully symbiosis. PMID:25166872

  17. Bacterial Molecular Signals in the Sinorhizobium fredii-Soybean Symbiosis.

    PubMed

    López-Baena, Francisco J; Ruiz-Sainz, José E; Rodríguez-Carvajal, Miguel A; Vinardell, José M

    2016-01-01

    Sinorhizobium (Ensifer) fredii (S. fredii) is a rhizobial species exhibiting a remarkably broad nodulation host-range. Thus, S. fredii is able to effectively nodulate dozens of different legumes, including plants forming determinate nodules, such as the important crops soybean and cowpea, and plants forming indeterminate nodules, such as Glycyrrhiza uralensis and pigeon-pea. This capacity of adaptation to different symbioses makes the study of the molecular signals produced by S. fredii strains of increasing interest since it allows the analysis of their symbiotic role in different types of nodule. In this review, we analyze in depth different S. fredii molecules that act as signals in symbiosis, including nodulation factors, different surface polysaccharides (exopolysaccharides, lipopolysaccharides, cyclic glucans, and K-antigen capsular polysaccharides), and effectors delivered to the interior of the host cells through a symbiotic type 3 secretion system. PMID:27213334

  18. Bacterial Molecular Signals in the Sinorhizobium fredii-Soybean Symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    López-Baena, Francisco J.; Ruiz-Sainz, José E.; Rodríguez-Carvajal, Miguel A.; Vinardell, José M.

    2016-01-01

    Sinorhizobium (Ensifer) fredii (S. fredii) is a rhizobial species exhibiting a remarkably broad nodulation host-range. Thus, S. fredii is able to effectively nodulate dozens of different legumes, including plants forming determinate nodules, such as the important crops soybean and cowpea, and plants forming indeterminate nodules, such as Glycyrrhiza uralensis and pigeon-pea. This capacity of adaptation to different symbioses makes the study of the molecular signals produced by S. fredii strains of increasing interest since it allows the analysis of their symbiotic role in different types of nodule. In this review, we analyze in depth different S. fredii molecules that act as signals in symbiosis, including nodulation factors, different surface polysaccharides (exopolysaccharides, lipopolysaccharides, cyclic glucans, and K-antigen capsular polysaccharides), and effectors delivered to the interior of the host cells through a symbiotic type 3 secretion system. PMID:27213334

  19. A Novel Mechanism of Host-Pathogen Interaction through sRNA in Bacterial Outer Membrane Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Koeppen, Katja; Hampton, Thomas H.; Jarek, Michael; Scharfe, Maren; Gerber, Scott A.; Mielcarz, Daniel W.; Demers, Elora G.; Dolben, Emily L.; Hammond, John H.; Hogan, Deborah A.; Stanton, Bruce A.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial outer membrane vesicle (OMV)-mediated delivery of proteins to host cells is an important mechanism of host-pathogen communication. Emerging evidence suggests that OMVs contain differentially packaged short RNAs (sRNAs) with the potential to target host mRNA function and/or stability. In this study, we used RNA-Seq to characterize differentially packaged sRNAs in Pseudomonas aeruginosa OMVs, and to show transfer of OMV sRNAs to human airway cells. We selected one sRNA for further study based on its stable secondary structure and predicted mRNA targets. Our candidate sRNA (sRNA52320), a fragment of a P. aeruginosa methionine tRNA, was abundant in OMVs and reduced LPS-induced as well as OMV-induced IL-8 secretion by cultured primary human airway epithelial cells. We also showed that sRNA52320 attenuated OMV-induced KC cytokine secretion and neutrophil infiltration in mouse lung. Collectively, these findings are consistent with the hypothesis that sRNA52320 in OMVs is a novel mechanism of host-pathogen interaction whereby P. aeruginosa reduces the host immune response. PMID:27295279

  20. Selecting Rhizobium meliloti for inoculation of alfalfa planted in acid soils

    SciTech Connect

    Lowendorf, H.S.; Alexander, M.

    1983-01-01

    The study was conducted to obtain Rhizobium meliloti strains suitable for use with alfalfa grown in acid soils. Thirteen strains of R. meliloti were examined for their ability to grow in acidified culture media and seven of these were characterized for the ability to surive in acid and limed nonsterile soils or grow in the presence of the host legume, Medicago sativa L. The pH values of the most acid, defined medium that permitted growth of the bacteria from a small inoculum ranged from pH 5.3 to 6.0. For R. meliloti 411SE1 and GH1-1SE1, the minimum pH that allowed for growth, the critical pH, was not a dependable indicator of survival in a more acid medium. Strains of R. meliloti with relatively low critical pH values survived better in a limed soil but not in acid soils than strains with higher critical pH values. Three strains of R. meliloti previously identified as good inoculants for alfalfa in acid soils did not consistently survive beter than other strains in a planted or unplanted acid soil of pH 5.3. However, the plants increase the population densities of these three strains more than other strains. These results suggest that R. meliloti strains suitable for inoculation of alfalfa in acid soils may be selected not by simple saprophytic properties but by their stimulation by the host legume in acid soils.

  1. Acidic Residues in the Hfq Chaperone Increase the Selectivity of sRNA Binding and Annealing.

    PubMed

    Panja, Subrata; Santiago-Frangos, Andrew; Schu, Daniel J; Gottesman, Susan; Woodson, Sarah A

    2015-11-01

    Hfq facilitates gene regulation by small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs), thereby affecting bacterial attributes such as biofilm formation and virulence. Escherichia coli Hfq recognizes specific U-rich and AAN motifs in sRNAs and target mRNAs, after which an arginine patch on the rim promotes base pairing between their complementary sequences. In the cell, Hfq must discriminate between many similar RNAs. Here, we report that acidic amino acids lining the sRNA binding channel between the inner pore and rim of the Hfq hexamer contribute to the selectivity of Hfq's chaperone activity. RNase footprinting, in vitro binding and stopped-flow fluorescence annealing assays showed that alanine substitution of D9, E18 or E37 strengthened RNA interactions with the rim of Hfq and increased annealing of non-specific or U-tailed RNA oligomers. Although the mutants were less able than wild-type Hfq to anneal sRNAs with wild-type rpoS mRNA, the D9A mutation bypassed recruitment of Hfq to an (AAN)4 motif in rpoS, both in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that acidic residues normally modulate access of RNAs to the arginine patch. We propose that this selectivity limits indiscriminate target selection by E. coli Hfq and enforces binding modes that favor genuine sRNA and mRNA pairs.

  2. MicA sRNA links the PhoP regulon to cell envelope stress

    PubMed Central

    Coornaert, Audrey; Lu, Alisa; Mandin, Pierre; Springer, Mathias; Gottesman, Susan; Guillier, Maude

    2010-01-01

    Numerous small RNAs regulators of gene expression exist in bacteria. A large class of them binds to the RNA chaperone Hfq and act by base-pairing interactions with their target-mRNA, thereby affecting their translation and/or stability. They often have multiple direct targets, some of which may be regulators themselves, and production of a single sRNA can therefore affect the expression of dozens of genes. We show in this study that the synthesis of the E. coli pleiotropic PhoPQ two-component system is repressed by MicA, a σE-dependent sRNA regulator of porin biogenesis. MicA directly pairs with phoPQ mRNA in the translation initiation region of phoP and presumably inhibits translation by competiting with ribosome binding. Consequently, MicA down-regulates several members of the PhoPQ regulon. By linking PhoPQ to σE, our findings suggest that major cellular processes such as Mg2+ transport, virulence, LPS modification or resistance to antimicrobial peptides are modulated in response to envelope stress. In addition, we found that Hfq strongly affects the expression of phoP independently of MicA, raising the possibility that even more sRNAs, that remain to be identified, could regulate PhoPQ synthesis. PMID:20345657

  3. sRNATarBase: a comprehensive database of bacterial sRNA targets verified by experiments.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yuan; Wu, Jiayao; Liu, Qian; Zhao, Yalin; Ying, Xiaomin; Cha, Lei; Wang, Ligui; Li, Wuju

    2010-11-01

    Bacterial sRNAs are an emerging class of small regulatory RNAs, 40-500 nt in length, which play a variety of important roles in many biological processes through binding to their mRNA or protein targets. A comprehensive database of experimentally confirmed sRNA targets would be helpful in understanding sRNA functions systematically and provide support for developing prediction models. Here we report on such a database--sRNATarBase. The database holds 138 sRNA-target interactions and 252 noninteraction entries, which were manually collected from peer-reviewed papers. The detailed information for each entry, such as supporting experimental protocols, BLAST-based phylogenetic analysis of sRNA-mRNA target interaction in closely related bacteria, predicted secondary structures for both sRNAs and their targets, and available binding regions, is provided as accurately as possible. This database also provides hyperlinks to other databases including GenBank, SWISS-PROT, and MPIDB. The database is available from the web page http://ccb.bmi.ac.cn/srnatarbase/.

  4. Lipopolysaccharide mutants of Rhizobium meliloti are not defective in symbiosis

    SciTech Connect

    Clover, R.H.; Kieber, J.; Signer, E.R. )

    1989-07-01

    Mutants of Rhizobium meliloti selected primarily for bacteriophage resistance fall into 13 groups. Mutants in the four best-characterized groups (class A, lpsB, lpsC, and class D), which map to the rhizobial chromosome, appear to affect lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as judged by the reactivity with monoclonal antibodies and behavior on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels of extracted LPS. Mutations in all 13 groups, in an otherwise wild-type genetic background, are Fix{sup +} on alfalfa. This suggests that LPS does not play a major role in symbiosis. Mutations in lpsB, however, are Fix{sup {minus}} in one particular genetic background, evidently because of the cumulative effect of several independent background mutations. In addition, an auxotrophic mutation evidently equivalent to Escherichia coli carAB is Fix{sup {minus}} on alfalfa.

  5. Potential effects of Thiram on Medicago - R. meliloti symbiotic association.

    PubMed

    Sirois, J C; Peterson, E A; Miller, R W

    1981-01-01

    The effects of Thiram and 2 commercial Thiram formulations on the growth and respiration of rhizobia were tested to compare the extent of bacteriostasis under controlled conditions. Although bacteriostasis was measurable at all concentrations tested, liquid cultures grew to maximum optical density in Thiram suspensions containing less than 10 micrograms/ml. Percentage germination, root elongation, and subsequent nodulation by R. meliloti of 2 cultivars of alfalfa, were determined in thiram suspensions to determine potential physiological effects of the fungicide on the host plant. Conditions were identified which produced enhancement or inhibition of germination, root elongation and development of nodular nitrogenase activity. At concentrations of the fungicide recommended for seed application, only minor, temporary bacteriostasis was observed as a possible negative effect while germination rates of fungi-contaminated seed were markedly increased.

  6. Genetic regulation of nitrogen fixation in Rhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Cebolla, A; Palomares, A J

    1994-12-01

    The soil bacterium Rhizobium meliloti fixes dinitrogen when associated with root nodules formed on its plant host, Medicago sativa (alfalfa). The expression of most of the known genes required for nitrogen fixation (nif and fix genes), including the structural genes for nitrogenase, is induced in response to a decrease in oxygen concentration. Induction of nif and fix gene expression by low oxygen is physiologically relevant because a low-oxygen environment is maintained in root nodules to prevent inactivation of the highly oxygen-sensitive nitrogenase enzyme. The genes responsible for sensing and transducing the low oxygen signal, fixL and fixJ, encode proteins (FixL and FixJ, respectively) that are homologous to a large family of bacterial proteins involved in signal transduction, the two component regulatory system proteins. The two components consist of a sensor protein, to which FixL is homologous, and a response regulator protein, to which FixJ is homologous. The sensor protein respond to an activating signal by autophosphorylating and then transferring the phosphate to its cognate response regulator protein. The phosphorylated response regulator, which is often a transcriptional activator, is then able to activate its target. A cascade model of nif and fix gene regulation in R. meliloti has been proposed, whereby FixL acts as an oxygen sensor as the initial event in the cascade and transmits this information to FixJ. FixJ, which possesses a putative helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motif, then activates transcription of the nifA and fixK genes. The nifA and fixK gene products, are transcriptional activators of at least 14 other nif and fix genes.

  7. Structure and biological roles of Sinorhizobium fredii HH103 exopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Navarro, Dulce N; Rodríguez-Carvajal, Miguel A; Acosta-Jurado, Sebastián; Soto, María J; Margaret, Isabel; Crespo-Rivas, Juan C; Sanjuan, Juan; Temprano, Francisco; Gil-Serrano, Antonio; Ruiz-Sainz, José E; Vinardell, José M

    2014-01-01

    Here we report that the structure of the Sinorhizobium fredii HH103 exopolysaccharide (EPS) is composed of glucose, galactose, glucuronic acid, pyruvic acid, in the ratios 5∶2∶2∶1 and is partially acetylated. A S. fredii HH103 exoA mutant (SVQ530), unable to produce EPS, not only forms nitrogen fixing nodules with soybean but also shows increased competitive capacity for nodule occupancy. Mutant SVQ530 is, however, less competitive to nodulate Vigna unguiculata. Biofilm formation was reduced in mutant SVQ530 but increased in an EPS overproducing mutant. Mutant SVQ530 was impaired in surface motility and showed higher osmosensitivity compared to its wild type strain in media containing 50 mM NaCl or 5% (w/v) sucrose. Neither S. fredii HH103 nor 41 other S. fredii strains were recognized by soybean lectin (SBL). S. fredii HH103 mutants affected in exopolysaccharides (EPS), lipopolysaccharides (LPS), cyclic glucans (CG) or capsular polysaccharides (KPS) were not significantly impaired in their soybean-root attachment capacity, suggesting that these surface polysaccharides might not be relevant in early attachment to soybean roots. These results also indicate that the molecular mechanisms involved in S. fredii attachment to soybean roots might be different to those operating in Bradyrhizobium japonicum.

  8. Structure and Biological Roles of Sinorhizobium fredii HH103 Exopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Acosta-Jurado, Sebastián; Soto, María J.; Margaret, Isabel; Crespo-Rivas, Juan C.; Sanjuan, Juan; Temprano, Francisco; Gil-Serrano, Antonio; Ruiz-Sainz, José E.; Vinardell, José M.

    2014-01-01

    Here we report that the structure of the Sinorhizobium fredii HH103 exopolysaccharide (EPS) is composed of glucose, galactose, glucuronic acid, pyruvic acid, in the ratios 5∶2∶2∶1 and is partially acetylated. A S. fredii HH103 exoA mutant (SVQ530), unable to produce EPS, not only forms nitrogen fixing nodules with soybean but also shows increased competitive capacity for nodule occupancy. Mutant SVQ530 is, however, less competitive to nodulate Vigna unguiculata. Biofilm formation was reduced in mutant SVQ530 but increased in an EPS overproducing mutant. Mutant SVQ530 was impaired in surface motility and showed higher osmosensitivity compared to its wild type strain in media containing 50 mM NaCl or 5% (w/v) sucrose. Neither S. fredii HH103 nor 41 other S. fredii strains were recognized by soybean lectin (SBL). S. fredii HH103 mutants affected in exopolysaccharides (EPS), lipopolysaccharides (LPS), cyclic glucans (CG) or capsular polysaccharides (KPS) were not significantly impaired in their soybean-root attachment capacity, suggesting that these surface polysaccharides might not be relevant in early attachment to soybean roots. These results also indicate that the molecular mechanisms involved in S. fredii attachment to soybean roots might be different to those operating in Bradyrhizobium japonicum. PMID:25521500

  9. Structure and biological roles of Sinorhizobium fredii HH103 exopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Navarro, Dulce N; Rodríguez-Carvajal, Miguel A; Acosta-Jurado, Sebastián; Soto, María J; Margaret, Isabel; Crespo-Rivas, Juan C; Sanjuan, Juan; Temprano, Francisco; Gil-Serrano, Antonio; Ruiz-Sainz, José E; Vinardell, José M

    2014-01-01

    Here we report that the structure of the Sinorhizobium fredii HH103 exopolysaccharide (EPS) is composed of glucose, galactose, glucuronic acid, pyruvic acid, in the ratios 5∶2∶2∶1 and is partially acetylated. A S. fredii HH103 exoA mutant (SVQ530), unable to produce EPS, not only forms nitrogen fixing nodules with soybean but also shows increased competitive capacity for nodule occupancy. Mutant SVQ530 is, however, less competitive to nodulate Vigna unguiculata. Biofilm formation was reduced in mutant SVQ530 but increased in an EPS overproducing mutant. Mutant SVQ530 was impaired in surface motility and showed higher osmosensitivity compared to its wild type strain in media containing 50 mM NaCl or 5% (w/v) sucrose. Neither S. fredii HH103 nor 41 other S. fredii strains were recognized by soybean lectin (SBL). S. fredii HH103 mutants affected in exopolysaccharides (EPS), lipopolysaccharides (LPS), cyclic glucans (CG) or capsular polysaccharides (KPS) were not significantly impaired in their soybean-root attachment capacity, suggesting that these surface polysaccharides might not be relevant in early attachment to soybean roots. These results also indicate that the molecular mechanisms involved in S. fredii attachment to soybean roots might be different to those operating in Bradyrhizobium japonicum. PMID:25521500

  10. Self-incompatibility: Smi silences through a novel sRNA pathway.

    PubMed

    Finnegan, E Jean; Liang, Dacheng; Wang, Ming-Bo

    2011-05-01

    Self-incompatibility in Brassicaceae is determined by the interaction between S-Locus Protein 11 (SP11) on the pollen and S-receptor kinase (SRK) in the stigma. Pollen from heterozygotes generally displays products of both SP11 alleles, but in some heterozygotes SP11 expression is monoallelic, with one allele (SP11(R)) being silenced by promoter methylation. An exciting development in understanding the mechanism behind monoallelic silencing came recently when Y. Tarutani et al. [Nature 2010;466:983-986] identified a 24-nucleotide sRNA (termed Smi) derived from a non-coding gene within the dominant S-haplotype, and suggested that Smi directs promoter methylation. We propose that rather than having a direct effect on DNA methylation, Smi is the first step in a novel cis-acting siRNA pathway that directs widespread monoallelic SP11(R) promoter methylation. PMID:21306936

  11. Self-incompatibility: Smi silences through a novel sRNA pathway.

    PubMed

    Finnegan, E Jean; Liang, Dacheng; Wang, Ming-Bo

    2011-05-01

    Self-incompatibility in Brassicaceae is determined by the interaction between S-Locus Protein 11 (SP11) on the pollen and S-receptor kinase (SRK) in the stigma. Pollen from heterozygotes generally displays products of both SP11 alleles, but in some heterozygotes SP11 expression is monoallelic, with one allele (SP11(R)) being silenced by promoter methylation. An exciting development in understanding the mechanism behind monoallelic silencing came recently when Y. Tarutani et al. [Nature 2010;466:983-986] identified a 24-nucleotide sRNA (termed Smi) derived from a non-coding gene within the dominant S-haplotype, and suggested that Smi directs promoter methylation. We propose that rather than having a direct effect on DNA methylation, Smi is the first step in a novel cis-acting siRNA pathway that directs widespread monoallelic SP11(R) promoter methylation.

  12. Rhizobium meliloti contains a novel second homolog of the cell division gene ftsZ.

    PubMed Central

    Margolin, W; Long, S R

    1994-01-01

    We have identified a second homolog of the cell division gene, ftsZ, in the endosymbiont Rhizobium meliloti. The ftsZ2 gene was cloned by screening a genomic lambda library with a probe derived from PCR amplification of a highly conserved domain. It encodes a 36-kDa protein which shares a high level of sequence similarity with the FtsZ proteins of Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis and FtsZ1 (Z1) of R. meliloti but lacks the carboxy-terminal region conserved in other FtsZ proteins. The identity of the ftsZ2 gene product was confirmed both by in vitro transcription-translation in an R. meliloti S-30 extract and by overproduction in R. meliloti cells. As with Z1, the overproduction of FtsZ2 in E. coli inhibited cell division and induced filamentation, although to a lesser extent than with Z1. However, the expression of ftsZ2 in E. coli under certain conditions caused some cells to coil dramatically, a phenotype not observed during Z1 overproduction. Although several Tn3-GUS (glucuronidase) insertions in a plasmid-borne ftsZ2 gene failed to cross into the chromosome, one interruption in the chromosomal ftsZ2 gene was isolated, suggesting that ftsZ2 is nonessential for viability. The two ftsZ genes were genetically mapped to the R. meliloti main chromosome, approximately 100 kb apart. Images PMID:8144471

  13. Complete genome sequence of the broad-host-range strain Sinorhizobium fredii USDA257

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here we announce the complete genome sequence of the symbiotic and nitrogen fixing bacterium Sinorhizobium fredii USDA257. The genome shares a high degree of similarity with the closely related broad-host-range strains S. fredii NGR234 and HH103. Most striking, the USDA257 genome encodes for a wealt...

  14. Common loci for Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Rhizobium meliloti exopolysaccharide synthesis and their roles in plant interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Cangelosi, G.A.; Hung, L.; Puvanesarajah, V.; Stacey, G.; Ozga, D.A.; Leigh, J.A.; Nester, E.W.

    1987-05-01

    The authors isolated approximately 100 analogous EPS-deficient (Exo) mutants of the closely related plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens, including strains whose EPS deficiencies were specifically complemented by each of five cloned, R. meliloti exo loci. They also cloned A. tumefaciens genes which complemented EPS defects in three of the R. meliloti Exo mutants. In two of these cases, symbiotic defects were also complemented. All of the A. tumefaciens Exo mutants formed normal crown gall tumors on four different plant hosts, except ExoC mutants, which were nontumorigenic and unable to attach to plant cells in vitro. Like their R. meliloti counterparts, A. tumefaciens Exo mutants were deficient in production of succinoglycan, the major acidic EPS species produced by both genera. A. tumefaciens ExoC mutants also produced extremely low levels of another major EPS, cyclic 1,2-..beta..-D-glucan. This deficiency has been noted previously in a different set of nontumorigenic, attachment-defective A. tumefaciens mutants.

  15. A 13C-NMR study of exopolysaccharide synthesis in Rhizobium meliloti Su47 strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavernier, P.; Portais, J.-C.; Besson, I.; Courtois, J.; Courtois, B.; Barbotin, J.-N.

    1998-02-01

    Metabolic pathways implied in the synthesis of succinoglycan produced by the Su47 strain of R. meliloti were evaluated by 13C-NMR spectroscopy after incubation with [1{-}13C] or [2{-}13C] glucose. The biosynthesis of this polymer by R. meliloti from glucose occurred by a direct polymerisation of the introduced glucose and by the pentose phosphate pathway. Les voies métaboliques impliquées dans la synthèse du succinoglycane produit par la souche Su47 de R. meliloti ont été évaluées par la spectroscopie de RMN du carbone 13 après incubation des cellules avec du [1{-}13C] ou [2{-}13C] glucose. La biosynthèse de ce polymère à partir du glucose se produit par polymérisation directe du glucose et par la voie des pentoses phosphate.

  16. Regulation of Syrm and Nodd3 in Rhizobium Meliloti

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, J. A.; Mulligan, J. T.; Long, S. R.

    1993-01-01

    The early steps of symbiotic nodule formation by Rhizobium on plants require coordinate expression of several nod gene operons, which is accomplished by the activating protein NodD. Three different NodD proteins are encoded by Sym plasmid genes in Rhizobium meliloti, the alfalfa symbiont. NodD1 and NodD2 activate nod operons when Rhizobium is exposed to host plant inducers. The third, NodD3, is an inducer-independent activator of nod operons. We previously observed that nodD3 carried on a multicopy plasmid required another closely linked gene, syrM, for constitutive nod operon expression. Here, we show that syrM activates expression of the nodD3 gene, and that nodD3 activates expression of syrM. The two genes constitute a self-amplifying positive regulatory circuit in both cultured Rhizobium and cells within the symbiotic nodule. We find little effect of plant inducers on the circuit or on expression of nodD3 carried on pSyma. This regulatory circuit may be important for regulation of nod genes within the developing nodule. PMID:8325480

  17. Rhizobium meliloti chromosomal loci required for suppression of exopolysaccharide mutations by lipopolysaccharide

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M.N.V.; Brzoska, P.M.; Signer, E.R. ); Hollingsworth, R.I. )

    1990-11-01

    Mutants of alfalfa symbiont Rhizobium meliloti SU47 that fail to make extracellular polysaccharide (exo mutants) induce the formation of nodules that are devoid of bacteria and consequently do not fix nitrogen. This Fix{sup {minus}} phenotype can be suppressed by an R. meliloti Rm41 gene that affects lipopolysaccharide structure. Here we describe mutations preventing suppression that map at two new chromosomal loci, lpsY and lpsX, present in both strains. Two other lps mutations isolated previously from SU47 also prevented suppression.

  18. Rhizobium meliloti nodD genes mediate host-specific activation of nodABC.

    PubMed Central

    Honma, M A; Asomaning, M; Ausubel, F M

    1990-01-01

    To differentiate among the roles of the three nodD genes of Rhizobium meliloti 1021, we studied the activation of a nodC-lacZ fusion by each of the three nodD genes in response to root exudates from several R. meliloti host plants and in response to the flavone luteolin. We found (i) that the nodD1 and nodD2 products (NodD1 and NodD2) responded differently to root exudates from a variety of hosts, (ii) that NodD1 but not NodD2 responded to luteolin, (iii) that NodD2 functioned synergistically with NodD1 or NodD3, (iv) that NodD2 interfered with NodD1-mediated activation of nodC-lacZ in response to luteolin, and (v) that a region adjacent to and upstream of nodD2 was required for NodD2-mediated activation of nodC-lacZ. We also studied the ability of each of the three R. meliloti nodD genes to complement nodD mutations in R. trifolii and Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234. We found (i) that nodD1 complemented an R. trifolii nodD mutation but not a Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234 nodD1 mutation and (ii) that R. meliloti nodD2 or nodD3 plus R. meliloti syrM complemented the nodD mutations in both R. trifolii and Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234. Finally, we determined the nucleotide sequence of the R. meliloti nodD2 gene and found that R. meliloti NodD1 and NodD2 are highly homologous except in the C-terminal region. Our results support the hypothesis that R. meliloti utilizes the three copies of nodD to optimize the interaction with each of its legume hosts. PMID:2298703

  19. Phage-mediated Delivery of Targeted sRNA Constructs to Knock Down Gene Expression in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Bernheim, Aude G; Libis, Vincent K; Lindner, Ariel B; Wintermute, Edwin H

    2016-01-01

    RNA-mediated knockdowns are widely used to control gene expression. This versatile family of techniques makes use of short RNA (sRNA) that can be synthesized with any sequence and designed to complement any gene targeted for silencing. Because sRNA constructs can be introduced to many cell types directly or using a variety of vectors, gene expression can be repressed in living cells without laborious genetic modification. The most common RNA knockdown technology, RNA interference (RNAi), makes use of the endogenous RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) to mediate sequence recognition and cleavage of the target mRNA. Applications of this technique are therefore limited to RISC-expressing organisms, primarily eukaryotes. Recently, a new generation of RNA biotechnologists have developed alternative mechanisms for controlling gene expression through RNA, and so made possible RNA-mediated gene knockdowns in bacteria. Here we describe a method for silencing gene expression in E. coli that functionally resembles RNAi. In this system a synthetic phagemid is designed to express sRNA, which may designed to target any sequence. The expression construct is delivered to a population of E. coli cells with non-lytic M13 phage, after which it is able to stably replicate as a plasmid. Antisense recognition and silencing of the target mRNA is mediated by the Hfq protein, endogenous to E. coli. This protocol includes methods for designing the antisense sRNA, constructing the phagemid vector, packaging the phagemid into M13 bacteriophage, preparing a live cell population for infection, and performing the infection itself. The fluorescent protein mKate2 and the antibiotic resistance gene chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) are targeted to generate representative data and to quantify knockdown effectiveness. PMID:27023729

  20. Novel small RNA (sRNA) landscape of the starvation-stress response transcriptome of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Amin, Shivam V; Roberts, Justin T; Patterson, Dillon G; Coley, Alexander B; Allred, Jonathan A; Denner, Jason M; Johnson, Justin P; Mullen, Genevieve E; O'Neal, Trenton K; Smith, Jason T; Cardin, Sara E; Carr, Hank T; Carr, Stacie L; Cowart, Holly E; DaCosta, David H; Herring, Brendon R; King, Valeria M; Polska, Caroline J; Ward, Erin E; Wise, Alice A; McAllister, Kathleen N; Chevalier, David; Spector, Michael P; Borchert, Glen M

    2016-01-01

    Small RNAs (sRNAs) are short (∼50-200 nucleotides) noncoding RNAs that regulate cellular activities across bacteria. Salmonella enterica starved of a carbon-energy (C) source experience a host of genetic and physiological changes broadly referred to as the starvation-stress response (SSR). In an attempt to identify novel sRNAs contributing to SSR control, we grew log-phase, 5-h C-starved and 24-h C-starved cultures of the virulent Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Typhimurium strain SL1344 and comprehensively sequenced their small RNA transcriptomes. Strikingly, after employing a novel strategy for sRNA discovery based on identifying dynamic transcripts arising from "gene-empty" regions, we identify 58 wholly undescribed Salmonella sRNA genes potentially regulating SSR averaging an ∼1,000-fold change in expression between log-phase and C-starved cells. Importantly, the expressions of individual sRNA loci were confirmed by both comprehensive transcriptome analyses and northern blotting of select candidates. Of note, we find 43 candidate sRNAs share significant sequence identity to characterized sRNAs in other bacteria, and ∼70% of our sRNAs likely assume characteristic sRNA structural conformations. In addition, we find 53 of our 58 candidate sRNAs either overlap neighboring mRNA loci or share significant sequence complementarity to mRNAs transcribed elsewhere in the SL1344 genome strongly suggesting they regulate the expression of transcripts via antisense base-pairing. Finally, in addition to this work resulting in the identification of 58 entirely novel Salmonella enterica genes likely participating in the SSR, we also find evidence suggesting that sRNAs are significantly more prevalent than currently appreciated and that Salmonella sRNAs may actually number in the thousands.

  1. Phage-mediated Delivery of Targeted sRNA Constructs to Knock Down Gene Expression in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Lindner, Ariel B.; Wintermute, Edwin H.

    2016-01-01

    RNA-mediated knockdowns are widely used to control gene expression. This versatile family of techniques makes use of short RNA (sRNA) that can be synthesized with any sequence and designed to complement any gene targeted for silencing. Because sRNA constructs can be introduced to many cell types directly or using a variety of vectors, gene expression can be repressed in living cells without laborious genetic modification. The most common RNA knockdown technology, RNA interference (RNAi), makes use of the endogenous RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) to mediate sequence recognition and cleavage of the target mRNA. Applications of this technique are therefore limited to RISC-expressing organisms, primarily eukaryotes. Recently, a new generation of RNA biotechnologists have developed alternative mechanisms for controlling gene expression through RNA, and so made possible RNA-mediated gene knockdowns in bacteria. Here we describe a method for silencing gene expression in E. coli that functionally resembles RNAi. In this system a synthetic phagemid is designed to express sRNA, which may designed to target any sequence. The expression construct is delivered to a population of E. coli cells with non-lytic M13 phage, after which it is able to stably replicate as a plasmid. Antisense recognition and silencing of the target mRNA is mediated by the Hfq protein, endogenous to E. coli. This protocol includes methods for designing the antisense sRNA, constructing the phagemid vector, packaging the phagemid into M13 bacteriophage, preparing a live cell population for infection, and performing the infection itself. The fluorescent protein mKate2 and the antibiotic resistance gene chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) are targeted to generate representative data and to quantify knockdown effectiveness. PMID:27023729

  2. A multicopy sRNA of Listeria monocytogenes regulates expression of the virulence adhesin LapB

    PubMed Central

    Sievers, Susanne; Sternkopf Lillebæk, Eva Maria; Jacobsen, Kirstine; Lund, Anja; Mollerup, Maria Storm; Nielsen, Pia Kiil; Kallipolitis, Birgitte Haahr

    2014-01-01

    The multicopy sRNA LhrC of the intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes has been shown to be induced under infection-relevant conditions, but its physiological role and mechanism of action is not understood. In an attempt to pinpoint the exact terms of LhrC expression, cell envelope stress could be defined as a specific inducer of LhrC. In this process, the two-component system LisRK was shown to be indispensable for expression of all five copies of LhrC. lapB mRNA, encoding a cell wall associated protein that was recently identified as an important virulence factor, was disclosed to be directly bound by LhrC leading to an impediment of its translation. Although LhrC binds to Hfq, it does not require the RNA chaperone for stability or lapB mRNA interaction. The mechanism of LhrC-lapB mRNA binding was shown to involve three redundant CU-rich sites and a structural rearrangement in the sRNA. This study represents an extensive depiction of a so far uncharacterized multicopy sRNA and reveals interesting new aspects concerning its regulation, virulence association and mechanism of target binding. PMID:25034691

  3. An inhibitor of eIF2 activity in the sRNA pool of eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Centrella, Michael; Porter, David L; McCarthy, Thomas L

    2011-08-15

    Eukaryotic protein synthesis is a multi-step and highly controlled process that includes an early initiation complex containing eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2), GTP, and methionine-charged initiator methionyl-tRNA (met-tRNAi). During studies to reconstruct formation of the ternary complex containing these molecules, we detected a potent inhibitor in low molecular mass RNA (sRNA) preparations of eukaryotic tRNA. The ternary complex inhibitor (TCI) was retained in the total sRNA pool after met-tRNAi was charged by aminoacyl tRNA synthetase, co-eluted with sRNA by size exclusion chromatography, but resolved from met-tRNAi by ion exchange chromatography. The adverse effect of TCI was not overcome by high GTP or magnesium omission and was independent of GTP regeneration. Rather, TCI suppressed the rate of ternary complex formation, and disrupted protein synthesis and the accumulation of heavy polymeric ribosomes in reticulocyte lysates in vitro. Lastly, a component or components in ribosome depleted cell lysate significantly reversed TCI activity. Since assembly of the met-tRNAi/eIF2/GTP ternary complex is integral to protein synthesis, awareness of TCI is important to avoid confusion in studies of translation initiation. A clear definition of TCI may also allow a better appreciation of physiologic or pathologic situations, factors, and events that control protein synthesis in vivo.

  4. Characterization, nucleotide sequence, and conserved genomic locations of insertion sequence ISRm5 in Rhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed Central

    Laberge, S; Middleton, A T; Wheatcroft, R

    1995-01-01

    A target for ISRm3 transposition in Rhizobium meliloti IZ450 is another insertion sequence element, named ISRm5. ISRm5 is 1,340 bp in length and possesses terminal inverted repeats of unequal lengths (27 and 28 bp) and contain five mismatches. An open reading frame that spans 89% of the length of one DNA strand encodes a putative transposase with significant similarity to the putative transposases of 11 insertion sequence elements from diverse bacterial species, including ISRm3 from R. meliloti. Multiple copies and variants of ISRm5 occur in the R. meliloti genome, often in close association with ISRm3. Five ISRm5 copies in two strains were studied, and each was found to be located between 8-bp direct repeats. At two of these loci, which were shown to be highly conserved in R. meliloti, the copies of ISRm5 were found to be associated with pairs of short inverted repeats resembling transcription terminators. This structural arrangement not only may provide a conserved niche for ISRm5 but also may be a preferred target for transposition. PMID:7768811

  5. Flavonoids Released Naturally from Alfalfa Seeds Enhance Growth Rate of Rhizobium meliloti1

    PubMed Central

    Hartwig, Ueli A.; Joseph, Cecillia M.; Phillips, Donald A.

    1991-01-01

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) releases different flavonoids from seeds and roots. Imbibing seeds discharge 3′,4′,5,7-substituted flavonoids; roots exude 5-deoxy molecules. Many, but not all, of these flavonoids induce nodulation (nod) genes in Rhizobium meliloti. The dominant flavonoid released from alfalfa seeds is identified here as quercetin-3-O-galactoside, a molecule that does not induce nod genes. Low concentrations (1-10 micromolar) of this compound, as well as luteolin-7-O-glucoside, another major flavonoid released from germinating seeds, and the aglycones, quercetin and luteolin, increase growth rate of R. meliloti in a defined minimal medium. Tests show that the 5,7-dihydroxyl substitution pattern on those molecules was primarily responsible for the growth effect, thus explaining how 5-deoxy flavonoids in root exudates fail to enhance growth of R. meliloti. Luteolin increases growth by a mechanism separate from its capacity to induce rhizobial nod genes, because it still enhanced growth rate of R. meliloti lacking functional copies of the three known nodD genes. Quercetin and luteolin also increased growth rate of Pseudomonas putida. They had no effect on growth rate of Bacillus subtilis or Agrobacterium tumefaciens, but they slowed growth of two fungal pathogens of alfalfa. These results suggest that alfalfa can create ecochemical zones for controlling soil microbes by releasing structurally different flavonoids from seeds and roots. PMID:16668056

  6. A phosphate transport system is required for symbiotic nitrogen fixation by Rhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed Central

    Bardin, S; Dan, S; Osteras, M; Finan, T M

    1996-01-01

    The bacterium Rhizobium meliloti forms N2-fixing root nodules on alfalfa plants. The ndvF locus, located on the 1,700-kb pEXO megaplasmid of R. meliloti, is required for nodule invasion and N2 fixation. Here we report that ndvF contains four genes, phoCDET, which encode an ABC-type transport system for the uptake of Pi into the bacteria. The PhoC and PhoD proteins are homologous to the Escherichia coli phosphonate transport proteins PhnC and PhnD. The PhoT and PhoE proteins are homologous to each other and to the E. coli phosphonate transport protein PhnE. We show that the R. meliloti phoD and phoE genes are induced in response to phosphate starvation and that the phoC promoter contains two elements which are similar in sequence to the PHO boxes present in E. coli phosphate-regulated promoters. The R. meliloti ndvF mutants grow poorly at a phosphate concentration of 2 mM, and we hypothesize that their symbiotic phenotype results from their failure to grow during the nodule infection process. Presumably, the PhoCDET transport system is employed by the bacteria in the soil environment, where the concentration of available phosphate is normally 0.1 to 1 microM. PMID:8755882

  7. Ammonia Inhibition of Plasmid pRmeGR4a Conjugal Transfer between Rhizobium meliloti Strains

    PubMed Central

    Herrera-Cervera, J. A.; Olivares, J.; Sanjuan, J.

    1996-01-01

    We have examined nutritional factors influencing conjugal transfer of the two nonsymbiotic large plasmids, pRmeGR4a and pRmeGR4b, of Rhizobium meliloti GR4. To monitor transfer, each plasmid was tagged with a different antibiotic resistance marker. Transfer of plasmid pRmeGR4b was dependent upon the presence of plasmid pRmeGR4a on the same donor cell. Transconjugants for pRmeGR4b were obtained at frequencies 5-to 10-fold higher than transconjugants carrying both plasmids, indicating that mobilization of pRmeGR4b by pRmeGR4a probably occurred in trans. Conjugal transfer of the tagged plasmids between R. meliloti strains was tested on minimal medium supplemented with single amino acids, nitrate, or ammonium as the single nitrogen source. A higher number of transconjugants was obtained when glutamate was the only nitrogen source, whereas conjugation was virtually undetectable on ammonium. No relationship was found between donor or recipient growth rate and plasmid transfer rate on a given nitrogen source. Furthermore, in media containing both glutamate and ammonium as nitrogen sources, transfer was reduced almost 100-fold compared with that in media containing glutamate alone. Inhibition was readily detected at 2.5 mM or higher concentrations of either ammonium chloride or ammonium sulfate and appeared to be specific for exogenously supplied ammonium. Inhibition of conjugal transfer between R. meliloti strains by ammonium was only observed for rhizobial plasmids, not for a heterologous plasmid such as RP4. Apparently, ammonium did not affect the plasmid-encoded transfer machinery, as it had no influence on rhizobial plasmid transfer from R. meliloti to Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The effect of ammonium seemed to take place on R. meliloti recipient cells, thereby reducing the efficiency of plasmid conjugation, probably by affecting mating pair formation or stabilization. PMID:16535284

  8. Cellular Response of Sinorhizobium sp. Strain A2 during Arsenite Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, Koh; Huang, He; Hamamura, Natsuko

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic (As) is a widely distributed toxic element in the environment and microorganisms have developed resistance mechanisms in order to tolerate it. The cellular response of the chemoorganotrophic arsenite (As[III])-oxidizing α-Proteobacteria, Sinorhizobium sp. strain A2, to arsenic was examined in the present study. Several proteins associated with arsenite oxidase and As resistance were shown to be accumulated in the presence of As(III). A shift in central carbon metabolism from the tricarboxylic acid pathway to glyoxylate pathway was also observed in response to oxidative stress. Our results revealed the strategy of the As(III)-oxidizing Sinorhizobium strain to mitigate arsenic toxicity and oxidative damage by multiple metabolic adaptations. PMID:26477790

  9. Isolation and characterization of Rhizobium meliloti mutants affected in exopolysaccharide production.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Navarro, D N; Palomares, A J; Casadesús, J

    1991-06-01

    Rhizobium meliloti mutants affected in the production of exopolysaccharide (EPS) were isolated after N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine mutagenesis. The mutants were classified into three phenotypic classes: (I) Exo-, rough mutants lacking exopolysaccharide; (II) Exos (for "small") which form tiny, compact colonies and synthesize reduced amounts of EPS; and (III) Exoc (for "constitutive"), hypermucoid mutants which overproduce EPS. Hypermucoid strains showed increased resistance to desiccation. All the mutants were able to nodulate, although a significant decrease in infectivity degree and/or competitiveness was found in rough and compact strains. Two mutants proved to be deficient in nitrogen fixation. Complementation analysis with cloned R. meliloti exo genes could not be applied to the study of these Fix- mutants because introduction of plasmids derived from cosmid vector pLAFR1 caused loss of nodulating ability. However, complementation of calcofluor staining and EPS production was observed. Complementation with certain exo genes also caused a marked increase in motility.

  10. Siderophore-mediated iron transport correlates with the presence of specific iron-regulated proteins in the outer membrane of Rhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed Central

    Reigh, G; O'Connell, M

    1993-01-01

    A universal chemical assay used to detect the production of siderophores in a range of Rhizobium strains showed that production is strain specific. Iron nutrition bioassays carried out on Rhizobium meliloti strains to determine cross-utilization of their siderophores showed that R. meliloti 2011, 220-5, and 220-3 could each use the siderophores produced by the other two but not the siderophore produced by R. meliloti DM4 (and vice versa). Mutants of R. meliloti 2011 and 220-5 defective in siderophore production were isolated by Tn5-mob mutagenesis. The Tn5-mob-containing EcoRI fragment of mutant R. meliloti 220-5-1 was cloned into pUC19. By using this fragment as a probe, the presence of a homologous region was observed in R. meliloti 2011 and 220-3 but not in R. meliloti DM4. A complementing cosmid from a gene bank of R. meliloti 2011 was identified by using the same probe. Introduction of this cosmid into R. meliloti 102F34, a strain not producing a siderophore, resulted in the ability of this strain to produce a siderophore and also in the ability to utilize the siderophores produced by R. meliloti 2011, 220-5, and 220-3 but not the siderophore produced by R. meliloti DM4. A comparative analysis of the outer membrane proteins prepared from iron-deficient cultures of R. meliloti 102F34 and 102F34 harboring the cosmid revealed the presence, in the latter, of a low-iron-induced outer membrane protein corresponding to a low-iron-induced protein in R. meliloti 2011, 220-5, and 220-3. This protein is not present in R. meliloti DM4. The results suggest that R. meliloti 2011, 220-5, and 220-3 produce siderophores that are identical or sufficiently similar in structure to be transported by the membrane transport system of each strain while also indicating that utilization of a particular siderophore is correlated with the presence of specific outer membrane proteins. Images PMID:8416915

  11. Growth and Movement of Spot Inoculated Rhizobium meliloti on the Root Surface of Alfalfa 1

    PubMed Central

    Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo; Wrobel-Boerner, Elizabeth; Bauer, Wolfgang D.

    1992-01-01

    Inoculum droplets of approximately 10 nanoliter volume and containing about 10 Rhizobium meliloti cells were placed onto the root surface of alfalfa seedlings in plastic growth pouches at either the root tip, the position of the smallest emergent root hairs, or at a site midway between these points. The droplets were initially confined to an area of about 0.2 square millimeter at the point of application. By 48 and 96 hours after inoculation, the inoculum bacteria and their progeny were distributed over several centimeters of the root between the initial site of deposition and the growing root tip, reaching densities of 103 to 104 bacteria per centimeter near the site of initial deposition and decreasing exponentially from that point toward the root tip. Graphite particles deposited on the root surface close to the growing tip were similarly distributed along the root length by 48 and 96 hours, suggesting that passive displacement by root cell elongation was primarily responsible for the spread of bacteria. A nonmotile mutant of R. meliloti colonized alfalfa roots to the same extent as the wild type and was usually distributed in the same manner, indicating that bacterial motility contributed little under these conditions to long distance spread of the bacteria. However, when applied in low numbers, R. meliloti mutants defective in motility or chemotaxis were considerably less efficient in initiating nodules near the point of inoculation than the wild type. This implies that motility and/or chemotaxis contribute significantly to local exploration for suitable infection sites. Almost all nodules on the primary root formed within a few millimeters of the spot-inoculation site, indicating that, under our experimental conditions, movement and multiplication of R. meliloti on the root surface were not sufficient to maintain an adequate population in the infectible region of the root during root growth. PMID:16668744

  12. Definition and evolution of a new symbiovar, sv. rigiduloides, among Ensifer meliloti efficiently nodulating Medicago species.

    PubMed

    Gubry-Rangin, Cécile; Béna, Gilles; Cleyet-Marel, Jean-Claude; Brunel, Brigitte

    2013-10-01

    Understanding functional diversity is one of the main goals of microbial ecology, and definition of new bacterial ecotypes contributes significantly to this objective. Nitrogen-fixing bacteria provide a good system for investigation of ecotypes/biovars/symbiovars, as they present different specific associations with several host plants. This specific symbiosis is reflected both in the nodulation and fixation efficiency and in genetic characters of the bacteria, and several biovars have already been described in the bacterial species Ensifer meliloti. In the present study, the species affiliation of E. meliloti strains trapped from nodules sampled from Medicago rigiduloïdes roots was analyzed using housekeeping recA genes and DNA-DNA hybridization. The genetic diversity of these isolates was also investigated using several symbiotic markers: nodulation (nodA, nodB, nodC) and nitrogen fixation (nifH) genes, as well as the performance of phenotypic tests of nodulation capacity and nitrogen fixation efficiency. These analyses led to the proposal of a new bacterial symbiovar, E. meliloti sv. rigiduloides, that fixed nitrogen efficiently on M. rigiduloïdes, but not on Medicago truncatula. Using phylogenetic reconstructions, including the different described symbiovars, several hypotheses of lateral gene transfer and gene loss are proposed to explain the emergence of symbiovars within this species. The widespread geographical distribution of this symbiovar around the Mediterranean Basin, in contrast to restriction of M. rigiduloïdes to Eastern European countries, suggests that these isolates might also be associated with other plant species. The description of a new symbiovar within E. meliloti confirms the need for accurate bacterial ecological classification, especially for analysis of bacterial populations. PMID:23871297

  13. Early recognition in the Rhizobium meliloti-alfalfa symbiosis: root exudate factor stimulates root adsorption of homologous rhizobia.

    PubMed Central

    Wall, L G; Favelukes, G

    1991-01-01

    Adsorption of Rhizobium meliloti to alfalfa roots before their infection and nodule formation shows the specificity of the symbiotic association (G. Caetano-Anollés and G. Favelukes, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 52:377-382, 1986). The time course of specific adsorption of R. meliloti (10(3) to 10(4) cells per ml) to roots shows an initial lag period of 3 h, suggesting that either or both symbionts must become conditioned for the adsorption process. Preincubation of R. meliloti L5-30 for 3 h with dialyzed alfalfa root exudate (RE) markedly increased early adsorption of rhizobia to alfalfa roots. The activity in RE was linked to a nondialyzable, thermolabile, trypsin-sensitive factor(s), very different from the root-exuded flavonoid compounds also involved in early Rhizobium-legume interactions. The lack of activity in the RE from plants grown in 5 mM NO3- suggested its negative regulation by the nitrogen nutritional status of the plant. Preincubation of R. meliloti with heterologous clover RE did not stimulate adsorption of rhizobial cells to roots. A short pretreatment of RE with homologous (but not heterologous) strains eliminated the stimulatory activity from solution. The stimulation of adsorption of R. meliloti to alfalfa roots was strongly dependent on the growth phase of the rhizobia, being greater at the late exponential stage. Nevertheless, the capacity of R. meliloti L5-30 to eliminate from solution the stimulatory activity in RE appeared to be constitutive in the rhizobia. The low concentration of rhizobial cells used in these experiments was critical to detect the stimulation of adsorption. The early interaction of spontaneously released alfalfa root macromolecular factor(s) and free-living R. meliloti, which shows the specificity and regulatory properties characteristic of infection and nodulation, would be an initial recognition event in the rhizosphere which triggers the process of symbiotic association. PMID:2045369

  14. Chemotaxis of Rhizobium meliloti towards Nodulation Gene-Inducing Compounds from Alfalfa Roots

    PubMed Central

    Dharmatilake, Amitha J.; Bauer, Wolfgang D.

    1992-01-01

    Luteolin, a flavone present in seed exudates of alfalfa, induces nodulation genes (nod) in Rhizobium meliloti and also serves as a biochemically specific chemoattractant for the bacterium. The present work shows that R. meliloti RCR2011 is capable of very similar chemotactic responses towards 4′,7-dihydroxyflavone, 4′,7-Dihydroxyflavanone, and 4,4′-dihydroxy-2-methoxychalcone, the three principal nod gene inducers secreted by alfalfa roots. Chemotactic responses to the root-secreted nod inducers in capillary assays were usually two- to four-fold above background and, for the flavone and flavonone, occurred at concentrations lower than those required for half-maximal induction of the nodABC genes. Complementation experiments indicated that the lack of chemotactic responsiveness to luteolin seen in nodD1 and nodA mutants of R. meliloti was not due to mutations in the nod genes, as previously thought. Thus, while nod gene induction and flavonoid chemotaxis have the same biochemical specificity, these two functions appear to have independent receptors or transduction pathways. The wild-type strain was found to suffer selective, spontaneous loss of chemotaxis towards flavonoids during laboratory subculture. PMID:16348685

  15. Osmotic control of glycine betaine biosynthesis and degradation in Rhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, L T; Pocard, J A; Bernard, T; Le Rudulier, D

    1988-01-01

    Intracellular accumulation of glycine betaine has been shown to confer an enhanced level of osmotic stress tolerance in Rhizobium meliloti. In this study, we used a physiological approach to investigate the mechanism by which glycine betaine is accumulated in osmotically stressed R. meliloti. Results from growth experiments, 14C labeling of intermediates, and enzyme activity assays are presented. The results provide evidence for the pathway of biosynthesis and degradation of glycine betaine and the osmotic effects on this pathway. High osmolarity in the medium decreased the activities of the enzymes involved in the degradation of glycine betaine but not those of enzymes that lead to its biosynthesis from choline. Thus, the concentration of the osmoprotectant glycine betaine is increased in stressed cells. This report demonstrates the ability of the osmolarity of the growth medium to regulate the use of glycine betaine as a carbon and nitrogen source or as an osmoprotectant. The mechanisms of osmoregulation in R. meliloti and Escherichia coli are compared. PMID:3290197

  16. Osmotic control of glycine betaine biosynthesis and degradation in Rhizobium meliloti

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.T.; Pocard, J.A.; Bernard, T.; Le Rudulier, D.

    1988-07-01

    Intracellular accumulation of glycine betaine has been shown to confer an enhanced level of osmotic stress tolerance in Rhizobium meliloti. In this study, the authors used a physiological approach to investigate the mechanism by which glycine betaine is accumulated in osmotically stressed R. meliloti. Results from growth experiments, /sup 14/C labeling of intermediates, and enzyme activity assays are presented. The results provide evidence for the pathway of biosynthesis and degradation of glycine betaine and the osmotic effects on this pathway. High osmolarity in the medium decreased the activities of the enzymes involved in the degradation of glycine betaine but not those of enzymes that lead to its biosynthesis from choline. Thus, the concentration of the osmoprotectant glycine betaine is increased in stressed cells. This report demonstrates the ability of the osmolarity of the growth medium to regulate the use of glycine betaine as a carbon and nitrogen source or as an osmoprotectant. The mechanisms of osmoregulation in R. meliloti and Escherichia coli are compared.

  17. Stable Tagging of Rhizobium meliloti with the Firefly Luciferase Gene for Environmental Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Cebolla, Angel; Ruiz-Berraquero, Francisco; Palomares, Antonio Jose

    1993-01-01

    A system for stable tagging of gram-negative bacteria with the firefly luciferase gene, luc, is described. A previously constructed fusion constitutively expressing luc from the λpR promoter was used. Stable integration into the bacterial genome was achieved by use of mini-Tn5 delivery vectors. The procedure developed was applied for tagging of representative gram-negative bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, Rhizobium meliloti, Pseudomonas putida, and Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The system permitted the detection of tagged R. meliloti in the presence of more than 105 CFU per plate without the use of any selective markers (such as antibiotic resistance genes). No significant differences in growth rates or soil survival were found between the marked strain and the wild-type strain. Studies of bioluminescent R. meliloti also revealed a good correlation between cell biomass and bioluminescence. The firefly luciferase tagging system is an easy, safe, and sensitive method for the detection and enumeration of bacteria in the environment. Images PMID:16349015

  18. Nodules Initiated by Rhizobium meliloti Exopolysaccharide Mutants Lack a Discrete, Persistent Nodule Meristem 1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Cheng; Signer, Ethan R.; Hirsch, Ann M.

    1992-01-01

    Infection of alfalfa with Rhizobium meliloti exo mutants deficient in exopolysaccharide results in abnormal root nodules that are devoid of bacteria and fail to fix nitrogen. Here we report further characterization of these abnormal nodules. Tightly curled root hairs or shepherd's crooks were found after inoculation with Rm 1021-derived exo mutants, but curling was delayed compared with wild-type Rm 1021. Infection threads were initiated in curled root hairs by mutants as well as by wild-type R. meliloti, but the exo mutant-induced threads aborted within the peripheral cells of the developing nodule. Also, nodules elicited by Rm 1021-derived exo mutants were more likely to develop on secondary roots than on the primary root. In contrast with wild-type R. meliloti-induced nodules, the exo mutant-induced nodules lacked a well defined apical meristem, presumably due to the abortion of the infection threads. The relationship of these findings to the physiology of nodule development is discussed. ImagesFigure 3Figure 1Figure 2Figure 4 PMID:16668605

  19. Multiple genetic controls on Rhizobium meliloti syrA, a regulator of exopolysaccharide abundance.

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, M J; Swanson, J A; Long, S R

    1998-01-01

    Exopolysaccharides (EPS) are produced by a wide assortment of bacteria including plant pathogens and rhizobial symbionts. Rhizobium meliloti mutants defective in EPS production fail to invade alfalfa nodules. Production of EPS in R. meliloti is likely controlled at several levels. We have characterized a new gene of this regulatory circuit. syrA was identified by its ability to confer mucoid colony morphology and by its ability to suppress the colonial phenotype of an exoD mutant. Here we show that syrA encodes a 9-kD hydrophobic protein that has sequence similarity to two other EPS regulatory proteins: ExoX of Rhizobium NGR234 and R. meliloti, and Psi of R. leguminosarum bv. phaseoli. The syrA transcription start site lies 522 nucleotides upstream of a non-canonical TTG start codon. The syrA promoter region is similar to the promoter region of the nodulation regulatory protein, nodD3. We found that in free-living bacteria, syrA expression is activated by the regulatory locus, syrM, but not by nodD3. In planta, syrM is not required for expression of syrA. Instead, expression of the nitrogen fixation (nifHDKE) genes upstream of syrA plays a role. Specific and distinct sets of genetic controls may operate at different times during nodule invasion. PMID:9475718

  20. Competitive Abilities of Rhizobium meliloti Strains Considered to Have Potential as Inoculants

    PubMed Central

    van Rensburg, Henri Jansen; Strijdom, Barend W.

    1982-01-01

    Twenty four strains of Rhizobium meliloti considered to have potential for inoculant production were grouped in pairs and tested for their ability to compete for nodulation on Medicago sativa, Medicago truncatula, and Medicago littoralis. At the outset, each pair of strains, which consisted of a wild type and a selected streptomycin-resistant mutant of another strain, was tested in an autoclaved soil. Six strain pairs, each consisting of a good and a poor competitor, reacted consistently when tested in each of five other autoclaved soils; eight pairs consisting of strains with comparable competitive abilities varied in their reactions in some of the soils, or even in the same soil when retested. An effect of soil pH on competitive ability was observed with some of these strains. Not all of the strains identified as good competitors on one or more of the Medicago spp. in the autoclaved soils were able to nodulate these plants satisfactorily in a field soil containing an established population of R. meliloti. Strain RF24, which seemed to be the best competitor on each of the three Medicago spp., grouped among the less effective strains on two of the legumes. Two strains of R. meliloti frequently used for inoculant production differed markedly with regard to competitive ability; this places some doubt on the relevancy of singling out competitive ability for special attention when selecting a strain for inoculant production. PMID:16346072

  1. [Effects of Rhizobium meliloti on PCBs degradation and transformation in solution culture].

    PubMed

    Xu, Li; Teng, Ying; Luo, Yong-Ming; Li, Zhen-Gao

    2010-01-01

    The capability of Rhizobium meliloti on degrading 2,4,4'-trichlorobiphenyl and 18 kinds of polychlorinated biphenyl congener mixtures was studied by shaking flask experiment. The results showed that the degradation capability of Rhizobium meliloti to 2, 4, 4'-trichlorobiphenyl increased gradually with the increasing concentration of 2, 4, 4'-trichlorobiphenyl. After 7 days, the degradation rates of 2, 4, 4'-trichlorobiphenyl under 1.0, 5.0 10.0, 25.0, 50.0 mg x L(-1) concentration of 2, 4, 4'-trichlorobiphenyl were 34.0%, 48.3%, 69.7%, 96.0%, 98.5% respectively. Meanwhile some new intermediate products were found in the solution culture. The capability of Rhizobium meliloti on degrading 18 kinds of polychlorinated biphenyls congener mixtures appeared in a trend from low to high, then decreased to a certain balance with the increasing concentration of the mixture. The highest degradation rate was 54.7%, and moreover, a transformation process from higher chlorinated PCBs congeners to lower chlorinated PCBs congeners emerged.

  2. C/D box sRNA, CRISPR RNA and tRNA processing in an archaeon with a minimal fragmented genome.

    PubMed

    Richter, Hagen; Mohr, Sabine; Randau, Lennart

    2013-02-01

    The analysis of deep sequencing data allows for a genome-wide overview of all the small RNA molecules (the 'sRNome') that are present in a single organism. In the present paper, we review the processing of CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) RNA, C/D box sRNA (small non-coding RNA) and tRNA in Nanoarchaeum equitans. The minimal and fragmented genome of this tiny archaeon permits a sequencing depth that enables the identification of processing intermediates in the study of RNA processing pathways. These intermediates include circular C/D box sRNA molecules and tRNA half precursors.

  3. Desulfurization of benzothiophene by the Gram-negative bacterium, Sinorhizobium sp. KT55.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Y; Onaka, T; Matsui, T; Maruhashi, K; Kurane, R

    2001-09-01

    Sinorhizobium sp. KT55 was the first Gram-negative isolate to be capable of utilizing benzothiophene as the sole source of sulfur. By GC-MS analysis of metabolites of benzothiophene by this strain, benzothiophene sulfone, benzo[e][1,2]oxathiin S-oxide and o-hydroxystyrene were detected, suggesting that the benzothiophene desulfurization pathway of this strain is benzothiophene-->benzothiophene sulfoxide-->benzothiophene sulfone-->benzo[e][1,2]oxathiin S-oxide-->o-hydroxystyrene. Desulfurization activity of this strain was significantly repressed by methionine, cysteine, sulfate, dimethyl sulfoxide, and Casamino acids.

  4. A new cis-encoded sRNA, BsrH, regulating the expression of hemH gene in Brucella abortus 2308.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xiaowei; Dong, Hao; Wu, Qingmin

    2015-01-01

    A total of 129 sRNA candidates were identified in Brucella abortus 2308 in our previous work, and one candidate with potential to regulate expression of hemH gene was further analyzed in this study. We found that the novel sRNA can inhibit the expression of hemH and called it BsrH (Brucella sRNA regulating HemH). The expression level of BsrH was tested in four different stress conditions. A significant upregulation was detected during the growth in acidic and Brucella minimal media, as well as in the presence of hydroxyl peroxide, while iron deficiency caused the opposite effect. As expected, BsrH strongly affected the survival ratio of the Brucella cells under iron-limitation conditions, though overexpression of BsrH did not affect Brucella virulence. Thus, we conclude that BsrH plays a regulatory role in bacterial heme biosynthesis and can be considered as the first Brucella sRNA involved in stress responses.

  5. A nopA deletion mutant of Sinorhizobium fredii USDA257, a soybean symbiont, is impaired in nodulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sinorhizobium fredii USDA257 employs type III secretion system (T3SS) to deliver effector proteins into the host cells through filamentous surface appendages, called pili. The NopA protein is the major component of USDA257 pili. The promoter region of USDA257 nopA posses a well conserved tts box. Se...

  6. The VrrA sRNA controls a stationary phase survival factor Vrp of Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Sabharwal, Dharmesh; Song, Tianyan; Papenfort, Kai; Wai, Sun Nyunt

    2015-01-01

    Small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) are emerging regulatory elements in bacteria. The Vibrio cholerae sRNA VrrA has previously been shown to down-regulate outer membrane proteins (OmpA and OmpT) and biofilm matrix protein (RbmC) by base-pairing with the 5' region of the corresponding mRNAs. In this study, we present an additional target of VrrA in V. cholerae, the mRNA coding for the ribosome binding protein Vrp. Vrp is homologous to ribosome-associated inhibitor A (RaiA) of Escherichia coli which facilitates stationary phase survival through ribosome hibernation. We show that VrrA down-regulates Vrp protein synthesis by base-pairing to the 5' region of vrp mRNA and that the regulation requires the RNA chaperone protein, Hfq. We further demonstrate that Vrp is highly expressed during stationary phase growth and associates with the ribosome of V. cholerae. The effect of the Vrp protein in starvation survival is synergistic with that of the VC2530 protein, a homolog of the E. coli hibernation promoting factor HPF, suggesting a combined role for these proteins in ribosome hibernation in V. cholerae. Vrp and VC2530 are important for V. cholerae starvation survival under nutrient deficient conditions. While VC2530 is down-regulated in cells lacking vrrA, mutation of vrp results in VC2530 activation. This is the first report indicating a regulatory role for an sRNA, modulating stationary factors involved in bacterial ribosome hibernation.

  7. Anoxic growth of Ensifer meliloti 1021 by N2O-reduction, a potential mitigation strategy

    PubMed Central

    Bueno, Emilio; Mania, Daniel; Frostegard, Ǻsa; Bedmar, Eulogio J.; Bakken, Lars R.; Delgado, Maria J.

    2015-01-01

    Denitrification in agricultural soils is a major source of N2O. Legume crops enhance N2O emission by providing N-rich residues, thereby stimulating denitrification, both by free-living denitrifying bacteria and by the symbiont (rhizobium) within the nodules. However, there are limited data concerning N2O production and consumption by endosymbiotic bacteria associated with legume crops. It has been reported that the alfalfa endosymbiont Ensifer meliloti strain 1021, despite possessing and expressing the complete set of denitrification enzymes, is unable to grow via nitrate respiration under anoxic conditions. In the present study, we have demonstrated by using a robotized incubation system that this bacterium is able to grow through anaerobic respiration of N2O to N2. N2O reductase (N2OR) activity was not dependent on the presence of nitrogen oxyanions or NO, thus the expression could be induced by oxygen depletion alone. When incubated at pH 6, E. meliloti was unable to reduce N2O, corroborating previous observations found in both, extracted soil bacteria and Paracoccus denitrificans pure cultures, where expression of functional N2O reductase is difficult at low pH. Furthermore, the presence in the medium of highly reduced C-substrates, such as butyrate, negatively affected N2OR activity. The emission of N2O from soils can be lowered if legumes plants are inoculated with rhizobial strains overexpressing N2O reductase. This study demonstrates that strains like E. meliloti 1021, which do not produce N2O but are able to reduce the N2O emitted by other organisms, could act as even better N2O sinks. PMID:26074913

  8. Genetic structure of natural populations of the nitrogen-fixing bacterium Rhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed Central

    Eardly, B D; Materon, L A; Smith, N H; Johnson, D A; Rumbaugh, M D; Selander, R K

    1990-01-01

    The genetic structure of populations of the symbiotic nitrogen-fixing soil bacterium Rhizobium meliloti was examined by analysis of electrophoretically demonstrable allelic variation in 14 metabolic, presumably chromosomal, enzyme genes. A total of 232 strains were examined, most of which were isolated from southwest Asia, where there is an unsurpassed number of indigenous host species for R. meliloti. The collection consisted of 115 isolates recovered from annual species of Medicago in Syria, Turkey, and Jordan; 85 isolates cultured from two perennial species of Medicago (M. sativa [alfalfa] and M. falcata) in northern Pakistan and Nepal; and 32 isolates collected at various localities in North and South America, Europe, South Africa, New Zealand, and Australia, largely from M. sativa. Fifty distinctive multilocus genotypes (electrophoretic types [ETs]) were identified, and cluster analysis revealed two primary phylogenetic divisions separated at a genetic distance of 0.83. By the criterion of genetic differentiation conventionally applied in defining species limits among members of the family Enterobacteriaceae and certain other bacteria, the two primary divisions of R. meliloti represent distinct evolutionary species. Division A included 35 ETs represented by 209 strains from the eastern Mediterranean basin, northern Pakistan, Nepal, and various other localities worldwide. This division contained the nine commercial alfalfa inoculant strains examined. Division B included 15 ETs represented by 23 isolates, 21 of which were isolated from annual medic species growing in previously uninoculated soils in the eastern Mediterranean basin. The two remaining strains in division B, both representing the same ET, were isolated in the United States and Australia.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:1689982

  9. Anoxic growth of Ensifer meliloti 1021 by N2O-reduction, a potential mitigation strategy.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Emilio; Mania, Daniel; Frostegard, Ǻsa; Bedmar, Eulogio J; Bakken, Lars R; Delgado, Maria J

    2015-01-01

    Denitrification in agricultural soils is a major source of N2O. Legume crops enhance N2O emission by providing N-rich residues, thereby stimulating denitrification, both by free-living denitrifying bacteria and by the symbiont (rhizobium) within the nodules. However, there are limited data concerning N2O production and consumption by endosymbiotic bacteria associated with legume crops. It has been reported that the alfalfa endosymbiont Ensifer meliloti strain 1021, despite possessing and expressing the complete set of denitrification enzymes, is unable to grow via nitrate respiration under anoxic conditions. In the present study, we have demonstrated by using a robotized incubation system that this bacterium is able to grow through anaerobic respiration of N2O to N2. N2O reductase (N2OR) activity was not dependent on the presence of nitrogen oxyanions or NO, thus the expression could be induced by oxygen depletion alone. When incubated at pH 6, E. meliloti was unable to reduce N2O, corroborating previous observations found in both, extracted soil bacteria and Paracoccus denitrificans pure cultures, where expression of functional N2O reductase is difficult at low pH. Furthermore, the presence in the medium of highly reduced C-substrates, such as butyrate, negatively affected N2OR activity. The emission of N2O from soils can be lowered if legumes plants are inoculated with rhizobial strains overexpressing N2O reductase. This study demonstrates that strains like E. meliloti 1021, which do not produce N2O but are able to reduce the N2O emitted by other organisms, could act as even better N2O sinks. PMID:26074913

  10. Isolation and characterization of a gene coding for a novel aspartate aminotransferase from Rhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed Central

    Alfano, J R; Kahn, M L

    1993-01-01

    Aspartate aminotransferase (AAT) is an important enzyme in aspartate catabolism and biosynthesis and, by converting tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates to amino acids, AAT is also significant in linking carbon metabolism with nitrogen metabolism. To examine the role of AAT in symbiotic nitrogen fixation further, plasmids encoding three different aminotransferases from Rhizobium meliloti 104A14 were isolated by complementation of an Escherichia coli auxotroph that lacks three aminotransferases. pJA10 contained a gene, aatB, that coded for a previously undescribed AAT, AatB. pJA30 encoded an aromatic aminotransferase, TatA, that had significant AAT activity, and pJA20 encoded a branched-chain aminotransferase designated BatA. Genes for the latter two enzymes, tatA and batA, were previously isolated from R. meliloti. aatB is distinct from but hybridizes to aatA, which codes for AatA, a protein required for symbiotic nitrogen fixation. The DNA sequence of aatB contained an open reading frame that could encode a protein 410 amino acids long and with a monomer molecular mass of 45,100 Da. The amino acid sequence of aatB is unusual, and AatB appears to be a member of a newly described class of AATs. AatB expressed in E. coli has a Km for aspartate of 5.3 mM and a Km for 2-oxoglutarate of 0.87 mM. Its pH optimum is between 8.0 and 8.5. Mutations were constructed in aatB and tatA and transferred to the genome of R. meliloti 104A14. Both mutants were prototrophs and were able to carry out symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Images PMID:8320232

  11. Chrysoeriol and Luteolin Released from Alfalfa Seeds Induce nod Genes in Rhizobium meliloti1

    PubMed Central

    Hartwig, Ueli A.; Maxwell, Carl A.; Joseph, Cecillia M.; Phillips, Donald A.

    1990-01-01

    Flavonoid signals from alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) seed and root exudates induce transcription of nodulation (nod) genes in Rhizobium meliloti. The flavone luteolin previously was isolated from alfalfa seeds by other workers and identified as the first nod gene inducer for R. meliloti. Our recent study of `Moapa 69' alfalfa root exudates found no luteolin but did identify three other nod gene inducers: 4,4′-dihydroxy-2′-methoxychalcone, 4′,7-dihydroxyflavone, and 4′,7-dihydroxyflavanone. The goal of the current study was to identify and quantify nod gene-inducing flavonoids that may influence Rhizobium populations around a germinating alfalfa seed. Aqueous rinses of Moapa 69 alfalfa seeds were collected and assayed for induction of a nodABC-lacZ fusion in R. meliloti. During the first 4 hours of imbibition, total nod gene-inducing activity was released from seeds at 100-fold higher rates than from roots of 72-hour-old seedlings. Five flavonoids were purified and identified by spectroscopic analyses (ultraviolet/visible absorbance, proton nuclear magnetic resonance, and mass spectroscopy) and comparison with authentic standards. Two very active nod gene-inducing flavonoids, chrysoeriol (3′-methoxyluteolin) and luteolin, were identified in seed rinses. Luteolin required a higher concentration (18 nanomolar) than chrysoeriol (5 nanomolar) for half-maximum induction of nodABC-lacZ in R. meliloti, and both were less active than 4,4′-dihydroxy-2′-methoxychalcone (2 nanomolar) from root exudates. Seeds exuded three other luteolin derivatives: luteolin-7-O-glucoside, 5-methoxyluteolin, and 3′,5-dimethoxyluteolin. Their combined quantities were 24-fold greater than that of luteolin plus chrysoeriol. Most nod gene-inducing activity of these luteolin derivatives apparently is associated with degradation to luteolin and chrysoeriol. However, their presence in large quantities suggests that they may contribute significantly to nod gene-inducing activity in the

  12. (Genetics and biochemistry of Rhizobium meliloti acidic extracellular heteropolysaccharide and its role in nodulation): Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Leigh, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    We have been working with two polysaccharides secreted by Rhizobium meliloti that promote nodule invasion, succinoglycan and EPSb. R. meliloti mutants in succinoglycan synthesis are designated Exo-, and fail to invade alfalfa root nodules. Multiple forms of succinoglycan are produced by R. meliloti, and this raises the question, which form is involved in nodule invasion We observed that a low molecular weight oligosaccharide form is secreted by wild type R. meliloti as well as the high molecular weight polymer. The oligosaccharide, in turn, also has multiple forms. Recently we have found that multiple subfractions of the oligosaccharide are secreted that apparently differ in size. Although these fractions appeared identical by proton NMR spectroscopy, they migrated in at least three distinct fractions in anion exchange chromatography. Also, in a EPLC sizing system we have recently begun using, we observed distinct low molecular weight fractions. We are currently collaborating with Steve Levery and S. Hakomori of the Biomembrane Institute, Seattle, to measure the molecular weights of these fractions by mass spectrometry. One likely outcome is that the fractions represent one, two, three, and possibly greater numbers of subunits of succinoglycan. Recently we determined that the ratios of total sugar constituents to reducing ends is consistent with this interpretation.

  13. Rhizobium meliloti exopolysaccharide Mutants Elicit Feedback Regulation of Nodule Formation in Alfalfa 1

    PubMed Central

    Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo; Lagares, Antonio; Bauer, Wolfgang D.

    1990-01-01

    Nodule formation by wild-type Rhizobium meliloti is strongly suppressed in younger parts of alfalfa (Medicago sativum L.) root systems as a feedback response to development of the first nodules (G Caetano-Anollés, WD Bauer [1988] Planta 175: 546-557). Mutants of R. meliloti deficient in exopolysaccharide synthesis can induce the formation of organized nodular structures (pseudonodules) on alfalfa roots but are defective in their ability to invade and multiply within host tissues. The formation of empty pseudonodules by exo mutants was found to elicit a feedback suppression of nodule formation similar to that elicited by the wild-type bacteria. Inoculation of an exo mutant onto one side of a split-root system 24 hours before inoculation of the second side with wild-type cells suppressed wild-type nodule formation on the second side in proportion to the extent of pseudonodule formation by the exo mutants. The formation of pseudonodules is thus sufficient to elicit systemic feedback control of nodulation in the host root system: infection thread development and internal proliferation of the bacteria are not required for elicitation of feedback. Pseudonodule formation by the exo mutants was found to be strongly suppressed in split-root systems by prior inoculation on the opposite side with the wild type. Thus, feedback control elicited by the wild-type inhibits Rhizobium-induced redifferentiation of host root cells. PMID:16667284

  14. Extended region of nodulation genes in Rhizobium meliloti 1021. I. Phenotypes of Tn5 insertion mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, J.A.; Tu, J.K.; Ogawa, J.; Sanga, R.; Fisher, R.F.; Long, S.R.

    1987-10-01

    Rhizobium meliloti Nod/sup -/ mutant WL131, a derivative of wild-type strain 102F51, was complemented by a clone bank of wild-type R. meliloti 1021 DNA, and clone pRmJT5 was recovered. Transfer of pRmJT5 conferred alfalfa nodulation on other Rhizobium species, indicating a role in host range determination for pRmJT5. Mutagenesis of pRmJT5 revealed several segments in which transposon insertion causes delay in nodulation, and/or marked reduction of the number of nodules formed on host alfalfa plants. The set of mutants indicated five regions in which nod genes are located; one mutant, nod-216, is located in a region not previously reported to encode a nodulation gene. Other mutant phenotypes correlated with the positions of open reading frames for nodH, nodF and nodE, and with a 2.2-kb EcoRI fragment. A mutant in nodG had no altered phenotype in this strain. One nodulation mutant was shown to be a large deletion of the common nod gene region. The authors present a discussion comparing the various studies made on this extended nod gene region.

  15. A second exopolysaccharide of Rhizobium meliloti strain SU47 that can function in root nodule invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Zhan, Hangjun; Levery, S.B.; Lee, C.C.; Leigh, J.A. )

    1989-05-01

    Rhizobium meliloti strain SU47 produces the calcofluor-binding exopolysaccharide, succinoglycan, that is required for alfalfa root nodule invasion. Strains derived from R. meliloti SU47 secreted an acidic exopolysaccharide, EPSb, that replaced succinoglycan in nodule invasion. EPSb, which has not formerly been identified among the Rhizobiaceae, consisted of the repeating unit 4,6-O-(1-carboxyethylidene)-{alpha}-D-Galp1{yields}3(X-O-Ac)-{beta}-D-Glcp1{yields}3. EPSb synthesis occurred either in strains containing a mutation in a locus designated mucR or in strains with a recombinant cosmid pMuc. mucR mapped slightly counterclockwise from pyr49 on the chromosome, while pMuc contained genes mapping to the megaplasmid pRmeSU47b. In exoA, -F, and -H mutants, which are deficient in normal succinoglycan secretion and nodule invasion, a transposon Tn5 insertion in mucR or the presence of pMuc resulted in EPSb secretion and a restoration of nodule invasion on Medicago sativa and Melilotus alba. Mutants in exoB and exoC were incapable of succinoglycan and EPSb secretion as well as nodule invasion. A mutant that secreted succinoglycan but was incapable of EPSb secretion invaded nodules normally.

  16. Rhizobium meliloti exopolysaccharide mutants elicit feedback regulation of nodule formation in alfalfa

    SciTech Connect

    Caetano-Anolles, G.; Lagares, A.; Bauer, W.D. )

    1990-02-01

    Nodule formation by wild-type Rhizobium meliloti is strongly suppressed in younger parts of alfalfa (Medicago sativum L.) root systems as a feedback response to development of the first nodules. Mutants of R. meliloti deficient in exopolysaccharide synthesis can induce the formation of organized nodular structures (pseudonodules) on alfalfa roots but are defective in their ability to invade and multiply within host tissues. The formation of empty pseudonodules by exo mutants was found to elicit a feedback suppression of nodule formation similar to that elicited by the wild-type bacteria. Inoculation of an exo mutant onto one side of a split-root system 24 hours before inoculation of the second side with wild-type cells suppressed wild-type nodule formation on the second side in proportion to the extent of pseudonodule formation by the exo mutants. The formation of pseudonodules is thus sufficient to elicit systemic feedback control of nodulation in the host root system: infection thread development and internal proliferation of the bacteria are not required for elicitation of feedback. Pseudonodule formation by the exo mutants was found to be strongly suppressed in split-root systems by prior inoculation on the opposite side with the wild type. Thus, feedback control elicited by the wild-type inhibits Rhizobium-induced redifferentiation of host root cells.

  17. Rhizobium meliloti produces a family of sulfated lipooligosaccharides exhibiting different degrees of plant host specificity.

    PubMed Central

    Schultze, M; Quiclet-Sire, B; Kondorosi, E; Virelizer, H; Glushka, J N; Endre, G; Géro, S D; Kondorosi, A

    1992-01-01

    We have shown that a Rhizobium meliloti strain overexpressing nodulation genes excreted high amounts of a family of N-acylated and 6-O-sulfated N-acetyl-beta-1,4-D-glucosamine penta-, tetra-, and trisaccharide Nod factors. Either a C(16:2) or a C(16:3) acyl chain is attached to the nonreducing end subunit, whereas the sulfate group is bound to the reducing glucosamine. One of the tetrasaccharides is identical to the previously described NodRm-1 factor. The two pentasaccharides as well as NodRm-1 were purified and tested for biological activity. In the root hair deformation assay the pentasaccharides show similar activities on the host plants Medicago sativa and Melilotus albus and on the non-host plant Vicia sativa at a dilution of up to 0.01-0.001 microM, in contrast to NodRm-1, which displays a much higher specific activity for Medicago and Melilotus than for Vicia. The active concentration range of the pentasaccharides is more narrow on Medicago than on Melilotus and Vicia. In addition to root hair deformation, the different Nod factors were shown to induce nodule formation on M. sativa. We suggest that the production of a series of active signal molecules with different degrees of specificity might be important in controlling the symbiosis of R. meliloti with several different host plants or under different environmental conditions. Images PMID:1729688

  18. A cis-encoded sRNA, Hfq and mRNA secondary structure act independently to suppress IS200 transposition

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Michael J.; Trussler, Ryan S.; Haniford, David B.

    2015-01-01

    IS200 is found throughout Enterobacteriaceae and transposes at a notoriously low frequency. In addition to the transposase protein (TnpA), IS200 encodes an uncharacterized Hfq-binding sRNA that is encoded opposite to the tnpA 5'UTR. In the current work we asked if this sRNA represses tnpA expression. We show here that the IS200 sRNA (named art200 for antisense regulator of transposase IS200) basepairs with tnpA to inhibit translation initiation. Unexpectedly, art200-tnpA pairing is limited to 40 bp, despite 90 nt of perfect complementarity. Additionally, we show that Hfq and RNA secondary structure in the tnpA 5'UTR each repress tnpA expression in an art200-independent manner. Finally, we show that disrupting translational control of tnpA expression leads to increased IS200 transposition in E. coli. The current work provides new mechanistic insight into why IS200 transposition is so strongly suppressed. The possibility of art200 acting in trans to regulate a yet-unidentified target is discussed as well as potential applications of the IS200 system for designing novel riboregulators. PMID:26044710

  19. Synthesis and characterization of a new four-layer Aurivillius phase Bi 2SrNa 2Nb 4O 15 and its protonated form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Zhenhua; Tang, Kaibin; Zeng, Suyuan; Wang, Dong; Li, Tanwei; Zheng, Huagui

    2008-10-01

    A new four-layer Aurivillius phase Bi 2SrNa 2Nb 4O 15 has been synthesized by solid-state reaction of Bi 2SrNb 2O 9 and NaNbO 3 at 1100 °C. The detailed structure determination of Bi 2SrNa 2Nb 4O 15 performed by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) shows that it crystallizes in the space group I4/ mmm [ a˜3.9021(1) Å, c˜40.7554(10) Å]. Protonated form of Bi 2SrNa 2Nb 4O 15 was obtained by the substitution of bismuth oxide sheets with protons via acid treatment. The conversion into the protonated forms was achieved easily using 6 M HCl at room temperature. Preservation of the structure of the perovskite-like slabs and contraction in the c-axis were confirmed by X-ray analysis. The compositions of the resulting products were determined to be H 1.8[Sr 0.8Bi 0.2Na 2Nb 4O 13] by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XFS) and thermogravimetry.

  20. Dual-function sRNA encoded peptide SR1P modulates moonlighting activity of B. subtilis GapA

    PubMed Central

    Gimpel, Matthias; Brantl, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT SR1 is a dual-function sRNA from B. subtilis that acts as a base-pairing regulatory RNA and as a peptide-encoding mRNA. Both functions of SR1 are highly conserved. Previously, we uncovered that the SR1 encoded peptide SR1P binds the glycolytic enzyme GapA resulting in stabilization of gapA mRNA. Here, we demonstrate that GapA interacts with RNases Y and J1, and this interaction was RNA-independent. About 1% of GapA molecules purified from B. subtilis carry RNase J1 and about 2% RNase Y. In contrast to the GapA/RNase Y interaction, the GapA/RNaseJ1 interaction was stronger in the presence of SR1P. GapA/SR1P-J1/Y displayed in vitro RNase activity on known RNase J1 substrates. Moreover, the RNase J1 substrate SR5 has altered half-lives in a ΔgapA strain and a Δsr1 strain, suggesting in vivo functions of the GapA/SR1P/J1 interaction. Our results demonstrate that the metabolic enzyme GapA moonlights in recruiting RNases while GapA bound SR1P promotes binding of RNase J1 and enhances its activity. PMID:27449348

  1. Antagonistic functions between the RNA chaperone Hfq and an sRNA regulate sensitivity to the antibiotic colicin.

    PubMed

    Salvail, Hubert; Caron, Marie-Pier; Bélanger, Justine; Massé, Eric

    2013-10-16

    The RNA chaperone Hfq is a key regulator of the function of small RNAs (sRNAs). Hfq has been shown to facilitate sRNAs binding to target mRNAs and to directly regulate translation through the action of sRNAs. Here, we present evidence that Hfq acts as the repressor of cirA mRNA translation in the absence of sRNA. Hfq binding to cirA prevents translation initiation, which correlates with cirA mRNA instability. In contrast, RyhB pairing to cirA mRNA promotes changes in RNA structure that displace Hfq, thereby allowing efficient translation as well as mRNA stabilization. Because CirA is a receptor for the antibiotic colicin Ia, in addition to acting as an Fur (Ferric Uptake Regulator)-regulated siderophore transporter, translational activation of cirA mRNA by RyhB promotes colicin sensitivity under conditions of iron starvation. Altogether, these results indicate that Fur and RyhB modulate an unexpected feed-forward loop mechanism related to iron physiology and colicin sensitivity. PMID:24065131

  2. RNomics in Escherichia coli detects new sRNA species and indicates parallel transcriptional output in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Jörg; Bartels, Verena; Tang, Thean Hock; Churakov, Gennady; Slagter-Jäger, Jacoba G.; Hüttenhofer, Alexander; Wagner, E. Gerhart H.

    2003-01-01

    Recent bioinformatics-aided searches have identified many new small RNAs (sRNAs) in the intergenic regions of the bacterium Escherichia coli. Here, a shot-gun cloning approach (RNomics) was used to generate cDNA libraries of small sized RNAs. Besides many of the known sRNAs, we found new species that were not predicted previously. The present work brings the number of sRNAs in E.coli to 62. Experimental transcription start site mapping showed that some sRNAs were encoded from independent genes, while others were processed from mRNA leaders or trailers, indicative of a parallel transcriptional output generating sRNAs co-expressed with mRNAs. Two of these RNAs (SroA and SroG) consist of known (THI and RFN) riboswitch elements. We also show that two recently identified sRNAs (RyeB and SraC/RyeA) interact, resulting in RNase III-dependent cleavage. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the first case of two non-coding RNAs interacting by a putative antisense mechanism. In addition, intracellular metabolic stabilities of sRNAs were determined, including ones from previous screens. The wide range of half-lives (<2 to >32 min) indicates that sRNAs cannot generally be assumed to be metabolically stable. The experimental characterization of sRNAs analyzed here suggests that the definition of an sRNA is more complex than previously assumed. PMID:14602901

  3. Antagonistic functions between the RNA chaperone Hfq and an sRNA regulate sensitivity to the antibiotic colicin

    PubMed Central

    Salvail, Hubert; Caron, Marie-Pier; Bélanger, Justine; Massé, Eric

    2013-01-01

    The RNA chaperone Hfq is a key regulator of the function of small RNAs (sRNAs). Hfq has been shown to facilitate sRNAs binding to target mRNAs and to directly regulate translation through the action of sRNAs. Here, we present evidence that Hfq acts as the repressor of cirA mRNA translation in the absence of sRNA. Hfq binding to cirA prevents translation initiation, which correlates with cirA mRNA instability. In contrast, RyhB pairing to cirA mRNA promotes changes in RNA structure that displace Hfq, thereby allowing efficient translation as well as mRNA stabilization. Because CirA is a receptor for the antibiotic colicin Ia, in addition to acting as an Fur (Ferric Uptake Regulator)-regulated siderophore transporter, translational activation of cirA mRNA by RyhB promotes colicin sensitivity under conditions of iron starvation. Altogether, these results indicate that Fur and RyhB modulate an unexpected feed-forward loop mechanism related to iron physiology and colicin sensitivity. PMID:24065131

  4. Organization, structure and symbiotic function of Rhizobium meliloti nodulation genes determining host specificity for alfalfa.

    PubMed

    Horvath, B; Kondorosi, E; John, M; Schmidt, J; Török, I; Györgypal, Z; Barabas, I; Wieneke, U; Schell, J; Kondorosi, A

    1986-08-01

    In R. meliloti we have identified four nodulation genes determining plant host-range specificity and have designated them hsnABC and D. The genes code for 9.7, 41.7, 26.7, and 28.6 kd proteins, respectively, and are organized into two transcriptional units. Mutations in these genes affect nodulation of their natural plant hosts Medicago sativa and Melilotus albus to different extents and hsnD mutants have an altered host-range. These Nod- mutations are not complementable by nodulation genes of other Rhizobium species such as R. leguminosarum. The hsn genes determine plant-specific infection through root hairs: hsnD is required for host-specific root hair curling and nodule initiation while the hsnABC genes control infection thread growth from the root hairs.

  5. Regulation of symbiotic nitrogen fixation in root nodules of alfalfa (Medicago sativa) infected with Rhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Kamberger, W

    1977-10-24

    Symbiotic nitrogen fixation of Rhizobium meliloti bacteroids in Medicago sativa root nodules was suppressed by several inorganic nitrogen sources. Amino acids like glutamine, glutamic acid and aspartic acid, which can serve as sole nitrogen sources for the unnodulated plant did not influence nitrogenase activity of effective nodules, even at high concetrations. Ammonia and nitrate suppressed symbiotic nitrogen fixation in vivo only at concentrations much higher than those needed for suppression of nitrogenase activity in free living nitrogen fixing bacteria. The kinetics of suppression were slow compared with that of free living nitrogen fixing bacteria. On the other hand, nitrite, which acts as a direct inhibitor of nitrogenase, suppressed very quickly and at low concentrations. Glutamic acid and glutamine enhanced the effect of ammonia dramatically, while the suppression by nitrate was enhanced only slightly.

  6. Ensifer meliloti is the preferred symbiont of Medicago arborea in eastern Morocco soils.

    PubMed

    Guerrouj, Kamal; Pérez-Valera, Eduardo; Abdelmoumen, Hanaa; Bedmar, Eulogio J; Missbah El Idrissi, Mustapha

    2013-08-01

    Polyphasic characterization of 61 bacteria isolated from root nodules of Medicago arborea (Medic tree) plants growing in 4 arid soils of the arid eastern area of Morocco was studied. All the isolates characterized were fast growers. The phenotypic, symbiotic, and cultural characteristics analyzed allowed the description of a broad physiological diversity among the isolates. The results obtained suggest that the phenotype of these rhizobia might have evolved to adapt to the local conditions. The genetic characterization consisted of an analysis of the rep-PCR (repetitive extragenic palindromic polymerase chain reaction) fingerprints and a PCR-based RFLP (restriction fragment length polymorphism) of the 16S rDNA patterns. The diversity of the isolates was investigated by rep-PCR, giving a similarity of 62%, delineated into 3 clusters, 4 groups, and 6 subclusters. This wide diversity was also observed by a phenotypic approach, where the carbohydrate assimilation test was the most discriminating. The results show a relationship between rep-PCR fingerprinting and sugar assimilation, which are complementary in diversity investigation. The nearly complete 16S rRNA gene sequence from representative strains of each soil showed they are closely related to members of the genus Ensifer of the family Rhizobiaceae within the Alphaproteobacteria and shows the highest similitude values (99.93%/100%) with Ensifer meliloti LMG 6133(T) (X67222). Sequencing of the symbiotic nodC gene from 7 representative strains revealed they had 94.89% identity with the nodC sequence of the type strain E. meliloti LMG 6133(T) (EF428922). Therefore, the 61 M. arborea isolates from the 4 different soils have the same phylogenetic affiliation, which proves the restricted host specificity among M. arborea species.

  7. Production of nodulation factors by Rhizobium meliloti: fermentation, purification and characterization of glycolipids.

    PubMed

    Kohring, B; Baier, R; Niehaus, K; Pühler, A; Flaschel, E

    1997-12-01

    Lipooligosaccharides, synthesized by soil bacteria of the genera Rhizobium, are known to have multifunctional effects on a wide variety of plants as signal substances in symbiosis initiation, cell response elicitation and growth regulation. These so called nodulation (Nod-) factors represent interesting biotechnological products with respect to fundamental studies of symbiotic interactions as well as for potential applications. Therefore, a batch fermentation process on a scale of 30 l has been developed by means of the Rhizobium meliloti strain R.m. 1021 (pEK327) strongly overexpressing the genes for the synthesis of Nod factors. Induction by the flavone luteolin led to growth associated production of the lipooligosaccharides. Ultrafiltration was used for separating the biomass from the filtrate containing the extracellular Nod factors. Simultaneously, ultrafiltration reduced the amount of lipophilic substances, which would otherwise interfere with processes downstream. The second separation step consisted in adsorption on XAD-2, a nonspecific hydrophobic adsorptive resin. Adsorption of Nod factors was carried out by batch operation of a stirred tank. Desorption was performed by elution with methanol in a fixed bed column. A semi-preparative reversed phase HPLC (Polygoprep 100-30 C18) was chosen as the final purification step. The Nod factors were obtained after evaporation and lyophilization. Thus, about 600 mg of Nod factors were produced from 20 l of fermentation broth. The Nod factors produced by Rhizobium meliloti R.m. 1021 (pEK327) were identified by liquid secondary ion mass spectrometry and by reversed-phase HPLC as fluorescent derivatives of 2-aminobenzamide. The biological activity of the products was demonstrated by means of the root hair deformation (HAD-) assay.

  8. The structure of Sinorhizobium meliloti phage ΦM12, which has a novel T=19l triangulation number and is the founder of a new group of T4-superfamily phages.

    PubMed

    Stroupe, M Elizabeth; Brewer, Tess E; Sousa, Duncan R; Jones, Kathryn M

    2014-02-01

    ΦM12 is the first example of a T=19l geometry capsid, encapsulating the recently sequenced genome. Here, we present structures determined by cryo-EM of full and empty capsids. The structure reveals the pattern for assembly of 1140 HK97-like capsid proteins, pointing to interactions at the pseudo 3-fold symmetry axes that hold together the asymmetric unit. The particular smooth surface of the capsid, along with a lack of accessory coat proteins encoded by the genome, suggest that this interface is the primary mechanism for capsid assembly. Two-dimensional averages of the tail, including the neck and baseplate, reveal that ΦM12 has a relatively narrow neck that attaches the tail to the capsid, as well as a three-layer baseplate. When free from DNA, the icosahedral edges expand by about 5nm, while the vertices stay at the same position, forming a similarly smooth, but bowed, T=19l icosahedral capsid.

  9. Sinorhizobium meliloti strains TII7 and A5 by Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST) have chromsomes identical with Rm1021 and form an effective and ineffective symbiosis with Medicago truncatula line Jemalong A17, respectively

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The strains TII7 and A5 formed an effective and ineffective symbiosis with Medicago truncatula Jemalong A17, respectively. Both were shown to have identical chromsomes with strains Rm1021 and RCR2011 using a Multilocus Sequence Typing method. The 2260 bp segments of DNA stretching from the 3’ end ...

  10. Relevance of the Branch Point Adenosine, Coordination Loop, and 3′ Exon Binding Site for in Vivo Excision of the Sinorhizobium meliloti Group II Intron RmInt1*

    PubMed Central

    Molina-Sánchez, María Dolores; Barrientos-Durán, Antonio; Toro, Nicolás

    2011-01-01

    Excision of the bacterial group II intron RmInt1 has been demonstrated in vivo, resulting in the formation of both intron lariat and putative intron RNA circles. We show here that the bulged adenosine in domain VI of RmInt1 is required for splicing via the branching pathway, but branch site mutants produce small numbers of RNA molecules in which the first G residue of the intron is linked to the last C residue. Mutations in the coordination loop in domain I reduced splicing efficiency, but branched templates clearly predominated among splicing products. We also found that a single substitution at the EBS3 position (G329C), preventing EBS3-IBS3 pairing, resulted in the production of 50 to 100 times more RNA molecules in which the 5′ and 3′ extremities were joined. We provide evidence that these intron molecules may correspond to both, intron circles linked by a 2′-5′ phosphodiester bond, and tandem, head-to-tail intron copies. PMID:21521690

  11. Rhizobium meliloti NodP and NodQ form a multifunctional sulfate-activating complex requiring GTP for activity.

    PubMed Central

    Schwedock, J S; Liu, C; Leyh, T S; Long, S R

    1994-01-01

    The nodulation genes nodP and nodQ are required for production of Rhizobium meliloti nodulation (Nod) factors. These sulfated oligosaccharides act as morphogenic signals to alfalfa, the symbiotic host of R. meliloti. In previous work, we have shown that nodP and nodQ encode ATP sulfurylase, which catalyzes the formation of APS (adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate) and PPi. In the subsequent metabolic reaction, APS is converted to PAPS (3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulfate) by APS kinase. In Escherichia coli, cysD and cysN encode ATP sulfurylase; cysC encodes APS kinase. Here, we present genetic, enzymatic, and sequence similarity data demonstrating that nodP and nodQ encode both ATP sulfurylase and APS kinase activities and that these enzymes associate into a multifunctional protein complex which we designate the sulfate activation complex. We have previously described the presence of a putative GTP-binding site in the nodQ sequence. The present report also demonstrates that GTP enhances the rate of PAPS synthesis from ATP and sulfate (SO4(2-)) by NodP and NodQ expressed in E. coli. Thus, GTP is implicated as a metabolic requirement for synthesis of the R. meliloti Nod factors. Images PMID:7961471

  12. Extended region of nodulation genes in Rhizobium meliloti 1021. II. Nucleotide sequence, transcription start sites and protein products

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, R.F.; Swanson, J.A.; Mulligan, J.T.; Long, S.R.

    1987-10-01

    The authors have established the DNA sequence and analyzed the transcription and translation products of a series of putative nodulation (nod) genes in Rhizobium meliloti strain 1021. Four loci have been designated nodF, nodE, nodG and nodH. The correlation of transposon insertion positions with phenotypes and open reading frames was confirmed by sequencing the insertion junctions of the transposons. The protein products of these nod genes were visualized by in vitro expression of cloned DNA segments in a R. meliloti transcription-translation system. In addition, the sequence for nodG was substantiated by creating translational fusions in all three reading frames at several points in the sequence; the resulting fusions were expressed in vitro in both E. coli and R. meliloti transcription-translation systems. A DNA segment bearing several open reading frames downstream of nodG corresponds to the putative nod gene mutated in strain nod-216. The transcription start sites of nodF and nodH were mapped by primer extension of RNA from cells induced with the plant flavone, luteolin. Initiation of transcription occurs approximately 25 bp downstream from the conserved sequence designated the nod box, suggesting that this conserved sequence acts as an upstream regulator of inducible nod gene expression. Its distance from the transcription start site is more suggestive of an activator binding site rather than an RNA polymerase binding site.

  13. Construction and pilot screening of a signature-tagged mutant library of Sinorhizobium fredii.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Wang, Yuan Chun; Wu, Li Juan; Liu, Jian Xin; Zhang, Pan; Jiao, Jian; Yan, Hui; Liu, Tao; Tian, Chang Fu; Chen, Wen Xin

    2016-03-01

    Sinorhizobium fredii is well known for its ability to establish symbiosis with diverse legumes such as Glycine max (soybean, determinate nodules) and Cajanus cajan (pigeon pea, indeterminate nodules). In order to make screening of S. fredii genes related to symbiosis cost-effective, we constructed a large Tn5 insertion mutant library of S. fredii CCBAU45436 using the signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM) technique. This STM library contains a total of 25,500 independent mutants distributed in 17 sublibraries tagged by corresponding distinct DNA bar-code sequences. After the pilot screening of 255 mutants in 15 batches, Tag85-4, Tag4-17, Tag4-11 and Tag10-13 were found to have attenuated competitiveness (0-30 % in nodule occupation) compared to the wild-type strain when inoculated on soybean. Further characterization of these mutants suggests that Tag4-11 (a pyrC mutant) and Tag10-13 (a nrdJ mutant) are defective in establishing symbiosis with soybean. The pyrC mutant induced uninfected pseudonodules while the nrdJ mutant formed significantly more nodules containing bacteroids with poor persistence ability. When these two mutants were tested on pigeon pea, host-specific symbiotic defects were found. These results demonstrated the STM library as a valuable resource for identifying S. fredii genes relevant to symbiosis. PMID:26472206

  14. Evidence of Autoinducer-Dependent and -Independent Heterogeneous Gene Expression in Sinorhizobium fredii NGR234

    PubMed Central

    Grote, Jessica; Krysciak, Dagmar; Schorn, Andrea; Dahlke, Renate I.; Soonvald, Liina; Müller, Johannes; Hense, Burkhard A.; Schwarzfischer, Michael; Sauter, Margret; Schmeisser, Christel

    2014-01-01

    Populations of genetically identical Sinorhizobium fredii NGR234 cells differ significantly in their expression profiles of autoinducer (AI)-dependent and AI-independent genes. Promoter fusions of the NGR234 AI synthase genes traI and ngrI showed high levels of phenotypic heterogeneity during growth in TY medium on a single-cell level. However, adding very high concentrations of N-(3-oxooctanoyl-)-l-homoserine lactone resulted in a more homogeneous expression profile. Similarly, the lack of internally synthesized AIs in the background of the NGR234-ΔtraI or the NGR234-ΔngrI mutant resulted in a highly homogenous expression of the corresponding promoter fusions in the population. Expression studies with reporter fusions of the promoter regions of the quorum-quenching genes dlhR and qsdR1 and the type IV pilus gene cluster located on pNGR234b suggested that factors other than AI molecules affect NGR234 phenotypic heterogeneity. Further studies with root exudates and developing Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings provide the first evidence that plant root exudates have strong effects on the heterogeneity of AI synthase and quorum-quenching genes in NGR234. Therefore, plant-released octopine appears to play a key role in modulation of heterogeneous gene expression. PMID:25002427

  15. Complete genome sequence of the Medicago microsymbiont Ensifer (Sinorhizobium) medicae strain WSM419

    SciTech Connect

    Reeve, Wayne; Chain, Patrick S. G.; O'Hara, Graham; Ardley, Julie; Nandesena, Kemanthi; Brau, Lambert; Tiwari, Ravi; Malfatti, Stephanie; Kiss, Hajnalka; Lapidus, Alla L.; Copeland, A; Nolan, Matt; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Markowitz, Victor; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Gollagher, Margaret; Yates, Ron; Dilworth, Michael; Howieson, John

    2010-01-01

    Ensifer (Sinorhizobium) medicae is an effective nitrogen fixing microsymbiont of a diverse range of annual Medicago (medic) species. Strain WSM419 is an aerobic, motile, non-spore forming, Gram-negative rod isolated from a M. murex root nodule collected in Sardinia, Italy in 1981. WSM419 was manufactured commercially in Australia as an inoculant for annual medics during 1985 to 1993 due to its nitrogen fixation, saprophytic competence and acid tolerance properties. Here we describe the basic features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first report of a complete genome sequence for a microsymbiont of the group of annual medic species adapted to acid soils. We reveal that its genome size is 6,817,576 bp encoding 6,518 protein-coding genes and 81 RNA only encoding genes. The genome contains a chromosome of size 3,781,904 bp and 3 plasmids of size 1,570,951 bp, 1,245,408 bp and 219,313 bp. The smallest plasmid is a feature unique to this medic microsymbiont.

  16. The Impact of 18 Ancestral and Horizontally-Acquired Regulatory Proteins upon the Transcriptome and sRNA Landscape of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Colgan, Aoife M.; Diard, Médéric; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich; Puente, José L.; Sivasankaran, Sathesh K.; Hokamp, Karsten; Hinton, Jay C. D.

    2016-01-01

    We know a great deal about the genes used by the model pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to cause disease, but less about global gene regulation. New tools for studying transcripts at the single nucleotide level now offer an unparalleled opportunity to understand the bacterial transcriptome, and expression of the small RNAs (sRNA) and coding genes responsible for the establishment of infection. Here, we define the transcriptomes of 18 mutants lacking virulence-related global regulatory systems that modulate the expression of the SPI1 and SPI2 Type 3 secretion systems of S. Typhimurium strain 4/74. Using infection-relevant growth conditions, we identified a total of 1257 coding genes that are controlled by one or more regulatory system, including a sub-class of genes that reflect a new level of cross-talk between SPI1 and SPI2. We directly compared the roles played by the major transcriptional regulators in the expression of sRNAs, and discovered that the RpoS (σ38) sigma factor modulates the expression of 23% of sRNAs, many more than other regulatory systems. The impact of the RNA chaperone Hfq upon the steady state levels of 280 sRNA transcripts is described, and we found 13 sRNAs that are co-regulated with SPI1 and SPI2 virulence genes. We report the first example of an sRNA, STnc1480, that is subject to silencing by H-NS and subsequent counter-silencing by PhoP and SlyA. The data for these 18 regulatory systems is now available to the bacterial research community in a user-friendly online resource, SalComRegulon. PMID:27564394

  17. The Impact of 18 Ancestral and Horizontally-Acquired Regulatory Proteins upon the Transcriptome and sRNA Landscape of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Colgan, Aoife M; Kröger, Carsten; Diard, Médéric; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich; Puente, José L; Sivasankaran, Sathesh K; Hokamp, Karsten; Hinton, Jay C D

    2016-08-01

    We know a great deal about the genes used by the model pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to cause disease, but less about global gene regulation. New tools for studying transcripts at the single nucleotide level now offer an unparalleled opportunity to understand the bacterial transcriptome, and expression of the small RNAs (sRNA) and coding genes responsible for the establishment of infection. Here, we define the transcriptomes of 18 mutants lacking virulence-related global regulatory systems that modulate the expression of the SPI1 and SPI2 Type 3 secretion systems of S. Typhimurium strain 4/74. Using infection-relevant growth conditions, we identified a total of 1257 coding genes that are controlled by one or more regulatory system, including a sub-class of genes that reflect a new level of cross-talk between SPI1 and SPI2. We directly compared the roles played by the major transcriptional regulators in the expression of sRNAs, and discovered that the RpoS (σ38) sigma factor modulates the expression of 23% of sRNAs, many more than other regulatory systems. The impact of the RNA chaperone Hfq upon the steady state levels of 280 sRNA transcripts is described, and we found 13 sRNAs that are co-regulated with SPI1 and SPI2 virulence genes. We report the first example of an sRNA, STnc1480, that is subject to silencing by H-NS and subsequent counter-silencing by PhoP and SlyA. The data for these 18 regulatory systems is now available to the bacterial research community in a user-friendly online resource, SalComRegulon. PMID:27564394

  18. Genetics and biochemistry of the Rhizobium meliloti acidic extracellular heteropolysaccharide and its role in nodulation: Annual report for the period 1 June 1986-31 May 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Leigh, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    This document briefly describes studies of the genetics and biochemistry of Rhizobium meliloti exopolysaccharides and their role in alfalfa root nodule formation. Previously the author demonstrated that a large set of mutants (Exo/sup -/) of R. meliloti failed to secrete succinoglycan, an acidic exopolysaccharide of known structure. These mutations belonged to five different loci in the R. meliloti genome. All of the mutants shared the inability to enter alfalfa root nodules, providing strong correlative evidence that succinoglycan is involved in a certain phase in nodule development. In the past year, this research group characterized mutants that were previously designated ''haloless'' mutants. These mutants were thought to be unable to degrade the secreted polysaccharide into diffusible fragments that ordinarily form a halo of binding of a polysaccharide specific dye surrounding a colony of growth. The research team discovered a second acidic exopolysaccharide that is synthesized by certain mutant derivatives of our strain of R. meliloti. This polysaccharide appeared quite distinct from succinoglycan by NMR spectroscopy and appeared to replace succinoglycan in a Tn5-induced mutant called ''halo-clearing'', and in wild type strains containing a certain cosmid from the R. meliloti clone bank. 2 figs.

  19. Antagonistic control of the turnover pathway for the global regulatory sRNA CsrB by the CsrA and CsrD proteins

    PubMed Central

    Vakulskas, Christopher A.; Leng, Yuanyuan; Abe, Hazuki; Amaki, Takumi; Okayama, Akihiro; Babitzke, Paul; Suzuki, Kazushi; Romeo, Tony

    2016-01-01

    The widely conserved protein CsrA (carbon storage regulator A) globally regulates bacterial gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. In many species, CsrA activity is governed by untranslated sRNAs, CsrB and CsrC in Escherichia coli, which bind to multiple CsrA dimers, sequestering them from lower affinity mRNA targets. Both the synthesis and turnover of CsrB/C are regulated. Their turnover requires the housekeeping endonuclease RNase E and is activated by the presence of a preferred carbon source via the binding of EIIAGlc of the glucose transport system to the GGDEF-EAL domain protein CsrD. We demonstrate that the CsrB 3′ segment contains the features necessary for CsrD-mediated decay. RNase E cleavage in an unstructured segment located immediately upstream from the intrinsic terminator is necessary for subsequent degradation to occur. CsrA stabilizes CsrB against RNase E cleavage by binding to two canonical sites adjacent to the necessary cleavage site, while CsrD acts by overcoming CsrA-mediated protection. Our genetic, biochemical and structural studies establish a molecular framework for sRNA turnover by the CsrD-RNase E pathway. We propose that CsrD evolution was driven by the selective advantage of decoupling Csr sRNA decay from CsrA binding, connecting it instead to the availability of a preferred carbon source. PMID:27235416

  20. Box C/D sRNA stem ends act as stabilizing anchors for box C/D di-sRNPs

    PubMed Central

    Yip, W. S. Vincent; Shigematsu, Hideki; Taylor, David W.; Baserga, Susan J.

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) modifications are essential for ribosome function in all cellular organisms. Box C/D small (nucleolar) ribonucleoproteins [s(no)RNPs] catalyze 2′-O-methylation, one rRNA modification type in Eukarya and Archaea. Negatively stained electron microscopy (EM) models of archaeal box C/D sRNPs have demonstrated the dimeric sRNP (di-sRNP) architecture, which has been corroborated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies. Due to limitations of the structural techniques, the orientation of the box C/D sRNAs has remained unclear. Here, we have used cryo-EM to elucidate the sRNA orientation in a M. jannaschii box C/D di-sRNP. The cryo-EM reconstruction suggests a parallel orientation of the two sRNAs. Biochemical and structural analyses of sRNPs assembled with mutant sRNAs indicate a potential interaction between the sRNA stem ends. Our results suggest that the parallel arrangement of the sRNAs juxtaposes their stem ends into close proximity to allow for a stabilizing interaction that helps maintain the di-sRNP architecture. PMID:27342279

  1. The symbiotic defect of Rhizobium meliloti exopolysaccharide mutants is suppressed by lpsZ sup + , a gene involved in lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M.N.V.; Klein, S.; Signer, E.R. ); Hollingsworth, R.I. )

    1990-05-01

    exo mutants of Rhizobium meliloti SU47, which fail to secrete acidic extracellular polysaccharide (EPS), induce Fix{sup {minus}} nodules on alfalfa. However, mutants of R. meliloti Rm41 carrying the same exo lesions induce normal Fix{sup +} nodules. The authors show that such induction is due to a gene from strain Rm41, which they call lpsZ{sup +}, that is missing in strain SU47. lpsZ{sup +} does not restore EPS production but instead alters the composition an structure of lipopolysaccharide. In both SU47 and Rm41, either lpsZ{sup +} or exo{sup +} is sufficient for normal nodulation. This suggests that in R. meliloti EPS and lipopolysaccharide can perform the same function in nodule development.

  2. Performance of fenugreek bioinoculated with Rhizobium meliloti strains under semi-arid condition.

    PubMed

    Singh, N K; Patel, D B

    2016-01-01

    Rhizobium meliloti strains were isolated from the fields of S.D. Agricultural University (Gujarat, India) and were maintained in the Congo Red Yeast Extract Mannitol Agar medium. These strains were tested for their effectiveness for fenugreek crop grown under semi-arid condition. Among the six Rhizobium strains, FRS-7 strain showed best plant growth parameters like shoot length, shoot dry weight, shoot total nitrogen, root length, root dry weight, root total nitrogen, seed yield, 1000 grain weight, number of root nodules, and nodules fresh and dry weight. The performance of this strain was better as compared to 20 kgN ha(-1) treatment through urea and was even far better over control plot. Seed yields obtained with FRS-7 during two years were 10.14 and 9.66 q ha(-1); which was about 36.8% and 45.9% high over control. This strain resulted in saving of about 20 kgN ha(-1) accompanied with better crop yield and soil health. Results of the present experiments can be utilized in integrated nutrient management for cultivation of fenugreek in semi-arid areas to provide sustainability to agricultural productivity in such regions. PMID:26930857

  3. Role of motility and chemotaxis in efficiency of nodulation by Rhizobium meliloti. [Medicago sation

    SciTech Connect

    Caetano-Anolles, G.; Wall, L.G.; De Micheli, A.T.; Macchi, E.M.; Bauer, W.D.; Favelukes, G. )

    1988-04-01

    Spontaneous mutants of Rhizobium meliloti L5-30 defective in motility or chemotaxis were isolated and compared against the parent with respect to symbiotic competence. Each of the mutants were able to generate normal nodules on the host plant alfalfa (Medicago sativa), but had slightly delayed nodule formation, diminished nodulation int he initially susceptible region of the host root, and relatively low representation in nodules following co-inoculation with equal numbers of the parent. When inoculated in growth pouches with increasing dosages of the parental strain, the number of nodules formed in the initially susceptible region of the root increased sigmoidally, with an optimum concentration of about 10{sup 5} to 10{sup 6} bacteria/plant. The dose-response behavior of the nonmotile and nonchemotactic mutants was similar, but they required 10- to 30-fold higher concentrations of bacteria to generate the same number of nodules. The distribution frequencies of nodules at different positions along the primary root were very similar for the mutants and parent, indicating that reduced nodulation by the mutants in dose-response experiments probably reflects reduced efficiency of nodule initiation rather than developmentally delayed nodule initiation. The number of bacteria that firmly adsorbed to the host root surface during several hours of incubation was 5- to 20-fold greater for the parent than the mutants.

  4. Ensifer meliloti overexpressing Escherichia coli phytase gene ( appA) improves phosphorus (P) acquisition in maize plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Vikas; Kumar, Ajit; Archana, G.; Kumar, G. Naresh

    2016-10-01

    The Escherichia coli phytase gene appA encoding enzyme AppA was cloned in a broad host range plasmid pBBR1MCS2 ( lac promoter), termed pVA1, and transformed into the Ensifer meliloti 1020. Transformation of pVA1 in Ensifer meliloti { E. m (pVA1)} increased its phosphatase and phytase activity by ˜9- and ˜50-fold, respectively, compared to the transformants containing empty plasmid as control { E. m (pBBR1MCS2)}. The western blot experiments using rabbit anti-AppA antibody showed that AppA is translocated into the periplasm of the host after its expression. Ensifer meliloti harboring AppA protein { E. m (pVA1)} and { E. m (pBBR1MCS2)} could acidify the unbuffered phytate minimal media (pH 8.0) containing Ca-phytate or Na-phytate as sole organic P (Po) source to below pH 5.0 and released P. However, both { E. m (pVA1)} and { E. m (pBBR1MCS2)} neither dropped pH of the medium nor released P when the medium was buffered at pH 8.0 using Tris-Cl, indicating that acidification of medium was important for the enzymatic hydrolysis of phytate. Further experiments proved that maize plants inoculated with { E. m. (pVA1)} showed increase in growth under sterile semi solid agar (SSA) medium containing Na-phytate as sole P source. The present study could be helpful in generating better transgenic bioinoculants harboring phosphate mineralization properties that ultimately promote plant growth.

  5. Ensifer meliloti overexpressing Escherichia coli phytase gene (appA) improves phosphorus (P) acquisition in maize plants.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vikas; Kumar, Ajit; Archana, G; Kumar, G Naresh

    2016-10-01

    The Escherichia coli phytase gene appA encoding enzyme AppA was cloned in a broad host range plasmid pBBR1MCS2 (lac promoter), termed pVA1, and transformed into the Ensifer meliloti 1020. Transformation of pVA1 in Ensifer meliloti {E. m (pVA1)} increased its phosphatase and phytase activity by ∼9- and ∼50-fold, respectively, compared to the transformants containing empty plasmid as control {E. m (pBBR1MCS2)}. The western blot experiments using rabbit anti-AppA antibody showed that AppA is translocated into the periplasm of the host after its expression. Ensifer meliloti harboring AppA protein {E. m (pVA1)} and {E. m (pBBR1MCS2)} could acidify the unbuffered phytate minimal media (pH 8.0) containing Ca-phytate or Na-phytate as sole organic P (Po) source to below pH 5.0 and released P. However, both {E. m (pVA1)} and {E. m (pBBR1MCS2)} neither dropped pH of the medium nor released P when the medium was buffered at pH 8.0 using Tris-Cl, indicating that acidification of medium was important for the enzymatic hydrolysis of phytate. Further experiments proved that maize plants inoculated with {E. m. (pVA1)} showed increase in growth under sterile semi solid agar (SSA) medium containing Na-phytate as sole P source. The present study could be helpful in generating better transgenic bioinoculants harboring phosphate mineralization properties that ultimately promote plant growth. PMID:27597170

  6. The nitrogenase proteins of Rhizobium meliloti: purification and properties of the MoFe and Fe components.

    PubMed

    Miller, R W; Yu, Z; Zarkadas, C G

    1993-04-21

    The alfalfa-Rhizobium meliloti symbiosis contributes a major portion of biologically fixed nitrogen to temperate zone forage crop production. Highly-purified molybdenum-iron (MoFe) and iron (Fe) nitrogenase components were obtained for the first time from extracts of R. meliloti bacteroids. Intact bacteroid cells were isolated anaerobically from 100 g quantities of alfalfa nodules following storage in liquid nitrogen. Centrifuged bacteroid extracts showed a marked reduction in specific activity when assayed at protein concentrations less than 1 mg/ml. Both nitrogenase proteins were resolved and purified to homogeneity as determined spectroscopically and by SDS-PAGE. The purified MoFe protein differed in several respects from previously characterized nitrogenase proteins. Saturation of the acetylene-reducing and proton-reducing activities of the R. meliloti MoFe protein required higher relative concentrations of Fe protein than nitrogenase proteins purified from free living diazotrophs. Electron allocation to dinitrogen reduction was sustained at component ratios similar to those present in bacteroid extracts, suggesting that while the observed saturation effects were not detrimental to physiological function in the symbiotic system, overall activity could be enhanced by higher levels of iron protein. Analyses of the MoFe protein gave 22 Fe, 22 labile sulfide and 1.7 Mo atoms per molecular unit of 215 kDa. Dithionite-reduced MoFe protein contained a spin 3/2 iron centre but had a lower visible absorbance at 360 nm than the equivalent Azotobacter chroococcum component. Amino-acid composition indicated a notably lesser tryptophan content, and cysteine content greater than that of the equivalent tetrameric protein of free living diazotrophs. Ratios of acidic and basic residues were similar to other MoFe proteins. Calculation of hydrophobicity and discriminant parameters gave values midway between those expected for soluble cytoplasmic proteins and peripheral membrane

  7. Role of Motility and Chemotaxis in Efficiency of Nodulation by Rhizobium meliloti1

    PubMed Central

    Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo; Wall, Luis G.; De Micheli, Ana T.; Macchi, Edgardo M.; Bauer, Wolfgang D.; Favelukes, Gabriel

    1988-01-01

    Spontaneous mutants of Rhizobium meliloti L5-30 defective in motility or chemotaxis were isolated and compared against the parent with respect to symbiotic competence. Each of the mutants was able to generate normal nodules on the host plant alfalfa (Medicago sativa), but had slightly delayed nodule formation, diminished nodulation in the initially susceptible region of the host root, and relatively low representation in nodules following co-inoculation with equal numbers of the parent. When inoculated in growth pouches with increasing dosages of the parental strain, the number of nodules formed in the initially susceptible region of the root increased sigmoidally, with an optimum concentration of about 105 to 106 bacteria/plant. The dose-response behavior of the nonmotile and nonchemotactic mutants was similar, but they required 10- to 30-fold higher concentrations of bacteria to generate the same number of nodules. The distribution frequencies of nodules at different positions along the primary root were very similar for the mutants and parent, indicating that reduced nodulation by the mutants in dose-response experiments probably reflects reduced efficiency of nodule initiation rather than developmentally delayed nodule initiation. The number of bacteria that firmly adsorbed to the host root surface during several hours of incubation was 5- to 20-fold greater for the parent than the mutants. The mutants were also somewhat less effective than their parent as competitors in root adsorption assays. It appears that motility and chemotaxis are quantitatively important traits that facilitate the initial contact and adsorption of symbiotic rhizobia to the host root surface, increase the efficiency of nodule initiation, and increase the rate of infection development. Images Fig. 2 PMID:16666059

  8. Rhizobium meliloti Genes Encoding Catabolism of Trigonelline Are Induced under Symbiotic Conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Boivin, C; Camut, S; Malpica, CA; Truchet, G; Rosenberg, C

    1990-01-01

    Rhizobium meliloti trc genes controlling the catabolism of trigonelline, a plant secondary metabolite often abundant in legumes, are closely linked to nif-nod genes on the symbiotic megaplasmid pSym [Boivin, C., Malpica, C., Rosenberg, C., Denarie, J., Goldman, A., Fleury, V., Maille, M., Message, B., and Tepfer, D. (1989). In Molecular Signals in the Microbe-Plant Symbiotic and Pathogenic Systems. (Berlin: Springer-Verlag), pp. 401-407]. To investigate the role of trigonelline catabolism in the Rhizobium-legume interaction, we studied the regulation of trc gene expression in free-living and in endosymbiotic bacteria using Escherichia coli lacZ as a reporter gene. Experiments performed with free-living bacteria indicated that trc genes were organized in at least four transcription units and that the substrate trigonelline was a specific inducer for three of them. Noninducing trigonelline-related compounds such as betaines appeared to antagonize the inducing effect of trigonelline. None of the general or symbiotic regulatory genes ntrA, dctB/D, or nodD seemed to be involved in trigonelline catabolism. trc fusions exhibiting a low basal and a high induced [beta]-galactosidase activity when present on pSym were used to monitor trc gene expression in alfalfa tissue under symbiotic conditions. Results showed that trc genes are induced during all the symbiotic steps, i.e., in the rhizosphere, infection threads, and bacteroids of alfalfa, suggesting that trigonelline is a nutrient source throughout the Rhizobium-legume association. PMID:12354952

  9. Rhizobium meliloti produces a family of sulfated lipo-oligosaccharides exhibiting different degrees of plant host specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Schultze, M.; Kondorosi, E.; Quiclet-Sire, B.; Gero, S.D. ); Virelizier, H. ); Glushka, J.N. ); Endre, G.; Kondorosi, A. Inst. of Genetics, Szeged )

    1992-01-01

    The authors have shown that a Rhizobium meliloti strain over expressing nodulation genes excreted high amounts of a family of N-acylated and 6-O-sulfated N-acetyl-{beta}-1,4-D-glucosamine penta-, tetra-, and trisaccharide Nod factors. Either a C{sub 16:2} or a C{sub 16:3} acyl chain is attached to the nonreducing end subunit, whereas the sulfate group is bound to the reducing glucosamine. In the root hair deformation assay the pentasaccharides show similar activities on the host plants Medicago sativa and Melilotus albus and on the non-host plant Vicia sativa at a dilution of up to 0.01-0.001 {mu}M, in contrast to NodRm-1, which displays a much higher specific activity for Medicago and melilotus than for Vicia. The active concentration range of the pentasaccharides is more narrow on medicago than on Melilotus and Vicia. In addition to root hair deformation, the different Nod factors were shown to induce nodule formation on M. sativa. They suggest that the production of a series of active signal molecules with different degrees of specificity might be important in controlling the symbiosis of R. meliloti with several different host plants or under different environmental conditions.

  10. Morphology of root nodules and nodule-like structures formed by Rhizobium and Agrobacterium strains containing a Rhizobium meliloti megaplasmid

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    We examined expression of the megaplasmid pRme41b of Rhizobium meliloti in two different Rhizobium sp. Strains and in Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Transfer of pRme41b into these bacteria was facilitated by insertion of a recombinant plasmid coding for mobilization functions of RP4 into the nif region (Kondorosi, A., E. Kondorosi, C.E. Pankhurst, W. J. Broughton, and Z. Banfalvi, 1982, Mol. Gen. Genet., 188:433-439). In all cases, transconjugants formed nodule-like structures on the roots of Medicago sativa. These structures were largely composed of meristematic cells but they were not invaded by bacteria. Bacteria were found only within infection threads in root hairs, and within intercellular spaces of the outermost cells of the structures. The donor strain of R. meliloti containing pAK11 or pAK12 in pRme41b initially produced nodules on M. sativa that did not fix nitrogen (Fix- ). In these nodules, bacteria were released from infection threads into the host cells but they did not multiply appreciably. Any bacteroids formed degenerated prematurely. In some cases, however, reversion to a Fix+ phenotype occurred after 4 to 6 wk. Bacteria released into newly infected cells in these nodules showed normal development into bacteriods. PMID:6885919

  11. Attenuation of Symbiotic Effectiveness by Rhizobium meliloti SAF22 Related to the Presence of a Cryptic Plasmid

    PubMed Central

    Velazquez, E.; Mateos, P. F.; Pedrero, P.; Dazzo, F. B.; Martinez-Molina, E.

    1995-01-01

    Several wild-type strains of Rhizobium meliloti isolated from alfalfa nodules exhibited different plasmid profiles, yet did not differ in growth rate in yeast-mannitol medium, utilization of 43 different carbon sources, intrinsic resistance to 14 antibiotics, or detection of 16 enzyme activities. In contrast, three measures of effectiveness in symbiotic nitrogen fixation with alfalfa (shoot length, dry weight, and nitrogen content) indicated that R. meliloti SAF22, whose plasmid profile differs from those of the other strains tested, is significantly less effective than other wild-type strains in symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Light microscopy of nodules infected with strain SAF22 showed an abnormal center of nitrogen fixation zone III, with bacteria occupying a smaller portion of the infected host cells and vacuoles occupying a significantly larger portion of adjacent uninfected host cells. In contrast, the effective nodules infected with other wild types or plasmid pRmSAF22c-cured segregants of SAF22 did not display this cytological abnormality. PMID:16535033

  12. Molecular Characterization of a Novel Temperate Sinorhizobium Bacteriophage, ФLM21, Encoding DNA Methyltransferase with CcrM-Like Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Dziewit, Lukasz; Oscik, Karolina; Bartosik, Dariusz

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT ΦLM21 is a temperate phage isolated from Sinorhizobium sp. strain LM21 (Alphaproteobacteria). Genomic analysis and electron microscopy suggested that ΦLM21 is a member of the family Siphoviridae. The phage has an isometric head and a long noncontractile tail. The genome of ΦLM21 has 50,827 bp of linear double-stranded DNA encoding 72 putative proteins, including proteins responsible for the assembly of the phage particles, DNA packaging, transcription, replication, and lysis. Virion proteins were characterized using mass spectrometry, leading to the identification of the major capsid and tail components, tape measure, and a putative portal protein. We have confirmed the activity of two gene products, a lytic enzyme (a putative chitinase) and a DNA methyltransferase, sharing sequence specificity with the cell cycle-regulating methyltransferase (CcrM) of the bacterial host. Interestingly, the genome of Sinorhizobium phage ΦLM21 shows very limited similarity to other known phage genome sequences and is thus considered unique. IMPORTANCE Prophages are known to play an important role in the genomic diversification of bacteria via horizontal gene transfer. The influence of prophages on pathogenic bacteria is very well documented. However, our knowledge of the overall impact of prophages on the survival of their lysogenic, nonpathogenic bacterial hosts is still limited. In particular, information on prophages of the agronomically important Sinorhizobium species is scarce. In this study, we describe the isolation and molecular characterization of a novel temperate bacteriophage, ΦLM21, of Sinorhizobium sp. LM21. Since we have not found any similar sequences, we propose that this bacteriophage is a novel species. We conducted a functional analysis of selected proteins. We have demonstrated that the phage DNA methyltransferase has the same sequence specificity as the cell cycle-regulating methyltransferase CcrM of its host. We point out that this phenomenon of

  13. Identification of a Rhizobium meliloti pSym2011 region controlling the host specificity of root hair curling and nodulation.

    PubMed Central

    Truchet, G; Debellé, F; Vasse, J; Terzaghi, B; Garnerone, A M; Rosenberg, C; Batut, J; Maillet, F; Dénarié, J

    1985-01-01

    In Rhizobium meliloti 2011 nodulation genes (nod) required to nodulate specifically alfalfa are located on a pSym megaplasmid. Nod- derivatives carrying large pSym deletions were isolated. By complementation of these strains with in vivo- and in vitro-constructed episomes containing pSym of sequences and introduction of these episomes into Agrobacterium tumefaciens, we show (i) that from a region of pSym of about 360 kilobases, genes required for specific alfalfa nodulation are clustered in a DNA fragment of less than 30 kilobases and (ii) that a nod region located between nifHDK and the common nod genes is absolutely required for alfalfa nodulation and controls the specificity of root hair curling and nodule organogenesis initiation. Images PMID:4066612

  14. In vitro sulfotransferase activity of NodH, a nodulation protein of Rhizobium meliloti required for host-specific nodulation.

    PubMed Central

    Ehrhardt, D W; Atkinson, E M; Faull, K F; Freedberg, D I; Sutherlin, D P; Armstrong, R; Long, S R

    1995-01-01

    Early stages of nodulation involve the exchange of signals between the bacterium and the host plant. Bacterial nodulation (nod) genes are required for Rhizobium spp. to synthesize lipooligosaccharide morphogens, termed Nod factors. The common nod genes encode enzymes that synthesize the factor core structure, which is modified by host-specific gene products. Here we show direct in vitro evidence that Rhizobium meliloti NodH, a host-specific nodulation gene, catalyzes the transfer of sulfate from 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulfate to the terminal 6-O position of Nod factors, and we show substrate requirements for the reaction. Our results indicate that polymerization of the chitooligosaccharide backbone likely precedes sulfation and that sulfation is not absolutely dependent on the presence or the particular structure of the N-acyl modification. NodH sulfation provides a tool for the enzymatic in vitro synthesis of novel Nod factors, or putative Nod factors intermediates, with high specific activity. PMID:7592390

  15. Mitochondrial COI and 16sRNA evidence for a single species hypothesis of E. vitis, J. formosana and E. onukii in East Asia.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jian-Yu; Han, Bao-Yu; Xiao, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Tea green leafhopper is one of the most damaging tea pests in main tea production regions of East Asia. For lack of recognized morphological characters, the dominant species of tea green leafhoppers in Mainland China, Taiwan and Japan have always been named as Empoasca vitis Göthe, Jacobiasca formosana Paoli and Empoasca onukii MATSUDA, respectively. Furthermore, nothing is known about the genetic relationships among them. In this study, we collected six populations from Mainland China, four populations from Japan and one population from Taiwan, and examined the genetic distances in the COI and 16sRNA regions of mtDNA among them. The results showed that the genetic distances based on single gene or the combined sequences among eleven leafhopper populations were 0.3-1.2%, which were all less than the species boundary of 2%. Moreover, there were at least two haplotypes shared by two distinct populations from different regions. The phylogenetic analysis based on single gene or combined sets also supported that tea green leafhoppers from Mainland China, Taiwan and Japan were closely related to each other, and there were at least two specimens from different regions clustered ahead of those from the same region. Therefore, we propose that the view of recognizing the dominant species of tea green leafhoppers in three adjacent tea production regions of East Asia as different species is unreliable or questionable and suggest that they are a single species. PMID:25506929

  16. MicL, a new σE-dependent sRNA, combats envelope stress by repressing synthesis of Lpp, the major outer membrane lipoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Monica S.; Updegrove, Taylor B.; Gogol, Emily B.; Shabalina, Svetlana A.; Gross, Carol A.; Storz, Gisela

    2014-01-01

    In enteric bacteria, the transcription factor σE maintains membrane homeostasis by inducing synthesis of proteins involved in membrane repair and two small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) that down-regulate synthesis of abundant membrane porins. Here, we describe the discovery of a third σE-dependent sRNA, MicL (mRNA-interfering complementary RNA regulator of Lpp), transcribed from a promoter located within the coding sequence of the cutC gene. MicL is synthesized as a 308-nucleotide (nt) primary transcript that is processed to an 80-nt form. Both forms possess features typical of Hfq-binding sRNAs but surprisingly target only a single mRNA, which encodes the outer membrane lipoprotein Lpp, the most abundant protein of the cell. We show that the copper sensitivity phenotype previously ascribed to inactivation of the cutC gene is actually derived from the loss of MicL and elevated Lpp levels. This observation raises the possibility that other phenotypes currently attributed to protein defects are due to deficiencies in unappreciated regulatory RNAs. We also report that σE activity is sensitive to Lpp abundance and that MicL and Lpp comprise a new σE regulatory loop that opposes membrane stress. Together MicA, RybB, and MicL allow σE to repress the synthesis of all abundant outer membrane proteins in response to stress. PMID:25030700

  17. The CpxQ sRNA Negatively Regulates Skp To Prevent Mistargeting of β-Barrel Outer Membrane Proteins into the Cytoplasmic Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Koren, Daria

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The promoter most strongly induced upon activation of the Cpx two-component envelope stress response is the cpxP promoter. The 3′ untranscribed region (UTR) of the cpxP transcript is shown to produce a small RNA (sRNA), CpxQ. We investigated the role of CpxQ in combating envelope stress. Remarkably, the two effectors specified by the transcript are deployed to combat distinct stresses in different cellular compartments. CpxP acts in both a regulatory negative-feedback loop and as an effector that combats periplasmic protein misfolding. We find that CpxQ combats toxicity at the inner membrane (IM) by downregulating the synthesis of the periplasmic chaperone Skp. Our data indicate that this regulation prevents Skp from inserting β-barrel outer membrane proteins (OMPs) into the IM, a lethal event that likely collapses the proton motive force. Our findings suggest that Skp can fold and directly insert OMPs into a lipid bilayer in vivo without the aid of the Bam complex. PMID:27048800

  18. Genetic analysis of a region of the Rhizobium meliloti pSym plasmid specifying catabolism of trigonelline, a secondary metabolite present in legumes.

    PubMed Central

    Boivin, C; Barran, L R; Malpica, C A; Rosenberg, C

    1991-01-01

    Genes controlling the catabolism of trigonelline, a secondary metabolite that is often present in legumes, are located on the pSym megaplasmid of Rhizobium meliloti. To investigate the role of bacterial trigonelline catabolism in the Rhizobium-legume symbiosis, we identified and characterized the R. meliloti RCR2011 genetic loci (trc) controlling trigonelline catabolism. Tn5-B20 mutagenesis showed that the trc region is a continuous DNA segment of 9 kb located 4 kb downstream of the nifAB and fdxN genes. Trc mutants fell into two classes according to their phenotype and location: (i) mutants carrying Tn5-B20 insertions in the right-hand part of the trc region were incapable of growing on trigonelline as the sole carbon and/or nitrogen source, and (ii) insertions in the left-hand part of the trc region resulted in delayed growth on trigonelline as the sole carbon and/or nitrogen source. No significant defect in nodule formation or nitrogen fixation was detected for mutants of either class. Screening of a set of R. meliloti strains from various geographical origins showed that all of these strains are able to catabolize trigonelline and show sequence homology between their megaplasmids and a trc probe. Images PMID:1850402

  19. The product of the Rhizobium meliloti ilvC gene is required for isoleucine and valine synthesis and nodulation of alfalfa.

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, O M; Grasso, D H

    1991-01-01

    Tn5-induced mutants of Rhizobium meliloti that require the amino acids isoleucine and valine for growth on minimal medium were studied. In one mutant, 1028, the defect is associated with an inability to induce nodules on alfalfa. The Tn5 mutation in 1028 is located in a chromosomal 5.5-kb EcoRI fragment. Complementation analysis with cloned DNA indicated that 2.0 kb of DNA from the 5.5-kb EcoRI fragment restored the wild-type phenotype in the Ilv- Nod- mutant. This region was further characterized by DNA sequence analysis and was shown to contain a coding sequence homologous to those for Escherichia coli IlvC and Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ilv5. Genes ilvC and ilv5 code for the enzyme acetohydroxy acid isomeroreductase (isomeroreductase), the second enzyme in the parallel pathways for the biosynthesis of isoleucine and valine. Enzymatic assays confirmed that strain 1028 was a mutant defective in isomeroreductase activity. In addition, it was shown that the ilvC genes of Rhizobium meliloti and E. coli are functionally equivalent. We demonstrated that in ilvC mutant 1028 the common nodulation genes nodABC are not activated by the inducer luteolin. E. coli ilvC complemented both defective properties (Ilv- and Nod-) found in mutant 1028. These findings demonstrate that R. meliloti requires an active isomeroreductase enzyme for successful nodulation of alfalfa. PMID:1744032

  20. Insights into the noncoding RNome of nitrogen-fixing endosymbiotic α-proteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Zurdo, José I; Valverde, Claudio; Becker, Anke

    2013-02-01

    Symbiotic chronic infection of legumes by rhizobia involves transition of invading bacteria from a free-living environment in soil to an intracellular state as differentiated nitrogen-fixing bacteroids within the nodules elicited in the host plant. The adaptive flexibility demanded by this complex lifestyle is likely facilitated by the large set of regulatory proteins encoded by rhizobial genomes. However, proteins are not the only relevant players in the regulation of gene expression in bacteria. Large-scale high-throughput analysis of prokaryotic genomes is evidencing the expression of an unexpected plethora of small untranslated transcripts (sRNAs) with housekeeping or regulatory roles. sRNAs mostly act in response to environmental cues as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression through protein-assisted base-pairing interactions with target mRNAs. Riboregulation contributes to fine-tune a wide range of bacterial processes which, in intracellular animal pathogens, largely compromise virulence traits. Here, we summarize the incipient knowledge about the noncoding RNome structure of nitrogen-fixing endosymbiotic bacteria as inferred from genome-wide searches for sRNA genes in the alfalfa partner Sinorhizobium meliloti and further comparative genomics analysis. The biology of relevant S. meliloti RNA chaperones (e.g., Hfq) is also reviewed as a first global indicator of the impact of riboregulation in the establishment of the symbiotic interaction.

  1. The Sinorhizobium fredii HH103 Genome: A Comparative Analysis With S. fredii Strains Differing in Their Symbiotic Behavior With Soybean.

    PubMed

    Vinardell, José-María; Acosta-Jurado, Sebastián; Zehner, Susanne; Göttfert, Michael; Becker, Anke; Baena, Irene; Blom, Jochem; Crespo-Rivas, Juan Carlos; Goesmann, Alexander; Jaenicke, Sebastian; Krol, Elizaveta; McIntosh, Matthew; Margaret, Isabel; Pérez-Montaño, Francisco; Schneiker-Bekel, Susanne; Serranía, Javier; Szczepanowski, Rafael; Buendía, Ana-María; Lloret, Javier; Bonilla, Ildefonso; Pühler, Alfred; Ruiz-Sainz, José-Enrique; Weidner, Stefan

    2015-07-01

    Sinorhizobium fredii HH103 is a fast-growing rhizobial strain infecting a broad range of legumes including both American and Asiatic soybeans. In this work, we present the sequencing and annotation of the HH103 genome (7.25 Mb), consisting of one chromosome and six plasmids and representing the structurally most complex sinorhizobial genome sequenced so far. Comparative genomic analyses of S. fredii HH103 with strains USDA257 and NGR234 showed that the core genome of these three strains contains 4,212 genes (61.7% of the HH103 genes). Synteny plot analysis revealed that the much larger chromosome of USDA257 (6.48 Mb) is colinear to the HH103 (4.3 Mb) and NGR324 chromosomes (3.9 Mb). An additional region of the USDA257 chromosome of about 2 Mb displays similarity to plasmid pSfHH103e. Remarkable differences exist between HH103 and NGR234 concerning nod genes, flavonoid effect on surface polysaccharide production, and quorum-sensing systems. Furthermore a number of protein secretion systems have been found. Two genes coding for putative type III-secreted effectors not previously described in S. fredii, nopI and gunA, have been located on the HH103 genome. These differences could be important to understand the different symbiotic behavior of S. fredii strains HH103, USDA257, and NGR234 with soybean.

  2. The Sinorhizobium (Ensifer) fredii HH103 Type 3 Secretion System Suppresses Early Defense Responses to Effectively Nodulate Soybean.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Guerrero, Irene; Pérez-Montaño, Francisco; Monreal, José Antonio; Preston, Gail M; Fones, Helen; Vioque, Blanca; Ollero, Francisco Javier; López-Baena, Francisco Javier

    2015-07-01

    Plants that interact with pathogenic bacteria in their natural environments have developed barriers to block or contain the infection. Phytopathogenic bacteria have evolved mechanisms to subvert these defenses and promote infection. Thus, the type 3 secretion system (T3SS) delivers bacterial effectors directly into the plant cells to alter host signaling and suppress defenses, providing an appropriate environment for bacterial multiplication. Some rhizobial strains possess a symbiotic T3SS that seems to be involved in the suppression of host defenses to promote nodulation and determine the host range. In this work, we show that the inactivation of the Sinorhizobium (Ensifer) fredii HH103 T3SS negatively affects soybean nodulation in the early stages of the symbiotic process, which is associated with a reduction of the expression of early nodulation genes. This symbiotic phenotype could be the consequence of the bacterial triggering of soybean defense responses associated with the production of salicylic acid (SA) and the impairment of the T3SS mutant to suppress these responses. Interestingly, the early induction of the transcription of GmMPK4, which negatively regulates SA accumulation and defense responses in soybean via WRKY33, could be associated with the differential defense responses induced by the parental and the T3SS mutant strain.

  3. Stable isotope labelling reveals that NaCl stress decreases the production of Ensifer (Sinorhizobium) arboris lipochitooligosaccharide signalling molecules.

    PubMed

    Penttinen, Petri; Räsänen, Leena A; Lortet, Gilles; Lindström, Kristina

    2013-12-01

    Ensifer (Sinorhizobium) arboris is a symbiont of salt-tolerant leguminous trees in the genera Acacia and Prosopis that are utilized in the prevention of soil erosion and desertification and in phytoremediation of salinized soil. Signalling between the plant and the rhizobia is essential for the formation of effective symbiosis that increases the success of reclaiming saline sites. We assessed the effect of salt stress on the growth and the production of lipochitooligosaccharide signalling molecules (LCOs) of S. arboris HAMBI 2361, an LCO-overproducing derivative of the S. arboris type strain HAMBI 1552. The strain tolerated NaCl up to 750 mM. To obtain both qualitative and quantitative information on the LCO production under salt stress, we devised a method where LCOs were differentially labelled by stable isotopes of nitrogen, (14)N and (15)N, and analysed by mass spectrometry. Under control conditions, the strain produced altogether 27 structural LCO variants. In 380 mM NaCl, 13 LCO variants were produced in detectable amounts, and six of these were reliably quantified, ranging from one-tenth to one-third of the non-stressed one.

  4. Rhizobium meliloti nifN (fixF) gene is part of an operon regulated by a nifA-dependent promoter and codes for a polypeptide homologous to the nifK gene product.

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, O M; Reiländer, H; Arnold, W; Pühler, A

    1987-01-01

    An essential gene for symbiotic nitrogen fixation (fixF) is located near the common nodulation region of Rhizobium meliloti. A DNA fragment carrying fixF was characterized by hybridization with Klebsiella pneumoniae nif DNA and by nucleotide sequence analysis. The fixF gene was found to be related to K. pneumoniae nifN and was therefore renamed as the R. meliloti nifN gene. Upstream of the nifN coding region a second open reading frame was identified coding for a putative polypeptide of 110 amino acids (ORF110). By fragment-specific Tn5 mutagenesis it was shown that the nifN gene and ORF110 form an operon. The control region of this operon contains a nif promoter and also the putative nifA-binding sequence. For the deduced amino acid sequence of the nifN gene product a striking homology to the R. meliloti nifK protein was found. One cysteine residue and its adjacent amino acid sequence, which are highly conserved in the R. meliloti nifK, R. meliloti nifN, and K. pneumoniae nifN proteins, may play a role in binding the FeMo cofactor. Images PMID:3316182

  5. Conservation of gene order and content in the circular chromosomes of 'Candidatus Liberibacter' asiaticus and other rhizbiales

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The intracellular plant pathogen ‘Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus’ is a member of the Rhizobiales, as are the nitrogen fixing Sinorhizobium meliloti and Bradyrhizobium japonicum, the plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens and the intracellular mammalian pathogen Bartonella henselae. Whole genome compar...

  6. Comparison of the 'Ca Liberibacter asiaticus' genome adapted for an intracellular lifestyle with other members of the rhizobiales

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An intracellular plant pathogen ‘Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus,’ a member of the Rhizobiales, is related to Sinorhizobium meliloti, Bradyrhizobium japonicum, Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Bartonella henselae, an intracellular mammalian pathogen. Whole chromosome comparisons identified at least 52 clust...

  7. Three phylogenetic groups of nodA and nifH genes in Sinorhizobium and Mesorhizobium isolates from leguminous trees growing in Africa and Latin America.

    PubMed

    Haukka, K; Lindström, K; Young, J P

    1998-02-01

    The diversity and phylogeny of nodA and nifH genes were studied by using 52 rhizobial isolates from Acacia senegal, Prosopis chilensis, and related leguminous trees growing in Africa and Latin America. All of the strains had similar host ranges and belonged to the genera Sinorhizobium and Mesorhizobium, as previously determined by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The restriction patterns and a sequence analysis of the nodA and nifH genes divided the strains into the following three distinct groups: sinorhizobia from Africa, sinorhizobia from Latin America, and mesorhizobia from both regions. In a phylogenetic tree also containing previously published sequences, the nodA genes of our rhizobia formed a branch of their own, but within the branch no correlation between symbiotic genes and host trees was apparent. Within the large group of African sinorhizobia, similar symbiotic gene types were found in different chromosomal backgrounds, suggesting that transfer of symbiotic genes has occurred across species boundaries. Most strains had plasmids, and the presence of plasmid-borne nifH was demonstrated by hybridization for some examples. The nodA and nifH genes of Sinorhizobium teranga ORS1009T grouped with the nodA and nifH genes of the other African sinorhizobia, but Sinorhizobium saheli ORS609T had a totally different nodA sequence, although it was closely related based on the 16S rRNA gene and nifH data. This might be because this S. saheli strain was originally isolated from Sesbania sp., which belongs to a different cross-nodulation group than Acacia and Prosopis spp. The factors that appear to have influenced the evolution of rhizobial symbiotic genes vary in importance at different taxonomic levels.

  8. Three Phylogenetic Groups of nodA and nifH Genes in Sinorhizobium and Mesorhizobium Isolates from Leguminous Trees Growing in Africa and Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Haukka, Kaisa; Lindström, Kristina; Young, J. Peter W.

    1998-01-01

    The diversity and phylogeny of nodA and nifH genes were studied by using 52 rhizobial isolates from Acacia senegal, Prosopis chilensis, and related leguminous trees growing in Africa and Latin America. All of the strains had similar host ranges and belonged to the genera Sinorhizobium and Mesorhizobium, as previously determined by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The restriction patterns and a sequence analysis of the nodA and nifH genes divided the strains into the following three distinct groups: sinorhizobia from Africa, sinorhizobia from Latin America, and mesorhizobia from both regions. In a phylogenetic tree also containing previously published sequences, the nodA genes of our rhizobia formed a branch of their own, but within the branch no correlation between symbiotic genes and host trees was apparent. Within the large group of African sinorhizobia, similar symbiotic gene types were found in different chromosomal backgrounds, suggesting that transfer of symbiotic genes has occurred across species boundaries. Most strains had plasmids, and the presence of plasmid-borne nifH was demonstrated by hybridization for some examples. The nodA and nifH genes of Sinorhizobium teranga ORS1009T grouped with the nodA and nifH genes of the other African sinorhizobia, but Sinorhizobium saheli ORS609T had a totally different nodA sequence, although it was closely related based on the 16S rRNA gene and nifH data. This might be because this S. saheli strain was originally isolated from Sesbania sp., which belongs to a different cross-nodulation group than Acacia and Prosopis spp. The factors that appear to have influenced the evolution of rhizobial symbiotic genes vary in importance at different taxonomic levels. PMID:9464375

  9. The sRNA NsiR4 is involved in nitrogen assimilation control in cyanobacteria by targeting glutamine synthetase inactivating factor IF7.

    PubMed

    Klähn, Stephan; Schaal, Christoph; Georg, Jens; Baumgartner, Desirée; Knippen, Gernot; Hagemann, Martin; Muro-Pastor, Alicia M; Hess, Wolfgang R

    2015-11-10

    Glutamine synthetase (GS), a key enzyme in biological nitrogen assimilation, is regulated in multiple ways in response to varying nitrogen sources and levels. Here we show a small regulatory RNA, NsiR4 (nitrogen stress-induced RNA 4), which plays an important role in the regulation of GS in cyanobacteria. NsiR4 expression in the unicellular Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and in the filamentous, nitrogen-fixing Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 is stimulated through nitrogen limitation via NtcA, the global transcriptional regulator of genes involved in nitrogen metabolism. NsiR4 is widely conserved throughout the cyanobacterial phylum, suggesting a conserved function. In silico target prediction, transcriptome profiling on pulse overexpression, and site-directed mutagenesis experiments using a heterologous reporter system showed that NsiR4 interacts with the 5'UTR of gifA mRNA, which encodes glutamine synthetase inactivating factor (IF)7. In Synechocystis, we observed an inverse relationship between the levels of NsiR4 and the accumulation of IF7 in vivo. This NsiR4-dependent modulation of gifA (IF7) mRNA accumulation influenced the glutamine pool and thus [Formula: see text] assimilation via GS. As a second target, we identified ssr1528, a hitherto uncharacterized nitrogen-regulated gene. Competition experiments between WT and an ΔnsiR4 KO mutant showed that the lack of NsiR4 led to decreased acclimation capabilities of Synechocystis toward oscillating nitrogen levels. These results suggest a role for NsiR4 in the regulation of nitrogen metabolism in cyanobacteria, especially for the adaptation to rapid changes in available nitrogen sources and concentrations. NsiR4 is, to our knowledge, the first identified bacterial sRNA regulating the primary assimilation of a macronutrient. PMID:26494284

  10. The sRNA NsiR4 is involved in nitrogen assimilation control in cyanobacteria by targeting glutamine synthetase inactivating factor IF7.

    PubMed

    Klähn, Stephan; Schaal, Christoph; Georg, Jens; Baumgartner, Desirée; Knippen, Gernot; Hagemann, Martin; Muro-Pastor, Alicia M; Hess, Wolfgang R

    2015-11-10

    Glutamine synthetase (GS), a key enzyme in biological nitrogen assimilation, is regulated in multiple ways in response to varying nitrogen sources and levels. Here we show a small regulatory RNA, NsiR4 (nitrogen stress-induced RNA 4), which plays an important role in the regulation of GS in cyanobacteria. NsiR4 expression in the unicellular Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and in the filamentous, nitrogen-fixing Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 is stimulated through nitrogen limitation via NtcA, the global transcriptional regulator of genes involved in nitrogen metabolism. NsiR4 is widely conserved throughout the cyanobacterial phylum, suggesting a conserved function. In silico target prediction, transcriptome profiling on pulse overexpression, and site-directed mutagenesis experiments using a heterologous reporter system showed that NsiR4 interacts with the 5'UTR of gifA mRNA, which encodes glutamine synthetase inactivating factor (IF)7. In Synechocystis, we observed an inverse relationship between the levels of NsiR4 and the accumulation of IF7 in vivo. This NsiR4-dependent modulation of gifA (IF7) mRNA accumulation influenced the glutamine pool and thus [Formula: see text] assimilation via GS. As a second target, we identified ssr1528, a hitherto uncharacterized nitrogen-regulated gene. Competition experiments between WT and an ΔnsiR4 KO mutant showed that the lack of NsiR4 led to decreased acclimation capabilities of Synechocystis toward oscillating nitrogen levels. These results suggest a role for NsiR4 in the regulation of nitrogen metabolism in cyanobacteria, especially for the adaptation to rapid changes in available nitrogen sources and concentrations. NsiR4 is, to our knowledge, the first identified bacterial sRNA regulating the primary assimilation of a macronutrient.

  11. The sRNA NsiR4 is involved in nitrogen assimilation control in cyanobacteria by targeting glutamine synthetase inactivating factor IF7

    PubMed Central

    Klähn, Stephan; Schaal, Christoph; Georg, Jens; Baumgartner, Desirée; Knippen, Gernot; Hagemann, Martin; Muro-Pastor, Alicia M.; Hess, Wolfgang R.

    2015-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS), a key enzyme in biological nitrogen assimilation, is regulated in multiple ways in response to varying nitrogen sources and levels. Here we show a small regulatory RNA, NsiR4 (nitrogen stress-induced RNA 4), which plays an important role in the regulation of GS in cyanobacteria. NsiR4 expression in the unicellular Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and in the filamentous, nitrogen-fixing Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 is stimulated through nitrogen limitation via NtcA, the global transcriptional regulator of genes involved in nitrogen metabolism. NsiR4 is widely conserved throughout the cyanobacterial phylum, suggesting a conserved function. In silico target prediction, transcriptome profiling on pulse overexpression, and site-directed mutagenesis experiments using a heterologous reporter system showed that NsiR4 interacts with the 5′UTR of gifA mRNA, which encodes glutamine synthetase inactivating factor (IF)7. In Synechocystis, we observed an inverse relationship between the levels of NsiR4 and the accumulation of IF7 in vivo. This NsiR4-dependent modulation of gifA (IF7) mRNA accumulation influenced the glutamine pool and thus NH4+ assimilation via GS. As a second target, we identified ssr1528, a hitherto uncharacterized nitrogen-regulated gene. Competition experiments between WT and an ΔnsiR4 KO mutant showed that the lack of NsiR4 led to decreased acclimation capabilities of Synechocystis toward oscillating nitrogen levels. These results suggest a role for NsiR4 in the regulation of nitrogen metabolism in cyanobacteria, especially for the adaptation to rapid changes in available nitrogen sources and concentrations. NsiR4 is, to our knowledge, the first identified bacterial sRNA regulating the primary assimilation of a macronutrient. PMID:26494284

  12. The multicopy sRNA LhrC controls expression of the oligopeptide-binding protein OppA in Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Sievers, Susanne; Lund, Anja; Menendez-Gil, Pilar; Nielsen, Aaraby; Storm Mollerup, Maria; Lambert Nielsen, Stine; Buch Larsson, Pernille; Borch-Jensen, Jonas; Johansson, Jörgen; Kallipolitis, Birgitte Haahr

    2015-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is the causative agent of the foodborne disease listeriosis. During infection, L. monocytogenes produces an array of non-coding RNAs, including the multicopy sRNA LhrC. These five, nearly identical sRNAs are highly induced in response to cell envelope stress and target the virulence adhesin lapB at the post-transcriptional level. Here, we demonstrate that LhrC controls expression of additional genes encoding cell envelope-associated proteins with virulence function. Using transcriptomics and proteomics, we identified a set of genes affected by LhrC in response to cell envelope stress. Three targets were significantly down-regulated by LhrC at both the RNA and protein level: lmo2349, tcsA and oppA. All three genes encode membrane-associated proteins: A putative substrate binding protein of an amino acid ABC transporter (Lmo2349); the CD4+ T cell-stimulating antigen TcsA, and the oligopeptide binding protein OppA, of which the latter 2 are required for full virulence of L. monocytogenes. For OppA, we show that LhrC acts by direct base paring to the ribosome binding site of the oppA mRNA, leading to an impediment of its translation and a decreased mRNA level. The sRNA-mRNA interaction depends on 2 of 3 CU-rich regions in LhrC allowing binding of 2 oppA mRNAs to a single LhrC molecule. Finally, we found that LhrC contributes to infection in macrophage-like cells. These findings demonstrate a central role for LhrC in controlling the level of OppA and other virulence-associated cell envelope proteins in response to cell envelope stress. PMID:26176322

  13. Integration Host Factor Is Required for RpoN-Dependent hrpL Gene Expression and Controls Motility by Positively Regulating rsmB sRNA in Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Hoon; Zhao, Youfu

    2016-01-01

    Erwinia amylovora requires an hrp-type III secretion system (T3SS) to cause disease. It has been reported that HrpL, the master regulator of T3SS, is transcriptionally regulated by sigma factor 54 (RpoN), YhbH, and HrpS. In this study, the role of integration host factor (IHF) in regulating hrpL and T3SS gene expression was investigated. IHF is a nucleoid-associated protein that regulates gene expression by influencing nucleoid structure and DNA bending. Our results showed that both ihfA and ihfB mutants of E. amylovora did not induce necrotic lesions on pear fruits. Growth of both mutants was greatly reduced, and expression of the hrpL and T3SS genes was significantly down-regulated as compared with those of the wild type. In addition, expression of the ihfA, but not the ihfB gene, was under auto-suppression by IHF. Furthermore, both ihfA and ihfB mutants were hypermotile, due to significantly reduced expression of small RNA (sRNA) rsmB. Electrophoresis mobility shift assay further confirmed that IHF binds to the promoters of the hrpL and ihfA genes, as well as the rsmB sRNA gene. These results indicate that IHF is required for RpoN-dependent hrpL gene expression and virulence, and controls motility by positively regulating the rsmB sRNA in E. amylovora.

  14. Concurrent synthesis and release of nod-gene-inducing flavonoids from alfalfa roots. [Medicago sativa L. ; Rhizobium meliloti

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, C.A.; Phillips, D.A. )

    1990-08-01

    Flavonoid signals from alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) induce transcription of nodulation (nod) genes in Rhizobium meliloti. Alfalfa roots release three major nod-gene inducers: 4{prime},7-dihydroxyflavanone, 4{prime},7-dihydroxyflavone, and 4,4{prime}-dihydroxy-2{prime}-methoxychalcone. The objective of the present study was to define temporal relationships between synthesis and exudation for those flavonoids. Requirements for concurrent flavonoid biosynthesis were assessed by treating roots of intact alfalfa seedlings with (U-{sup 14}C)-L-phenylalanine in the presence or absence of the phenylalanine ammonia-lyase inhibitor L-2-aminoxy-3-phenylpropionic acid (AOPP). In the absence of AOPP, each of the three flavonoids in exudates contained {sup 14}C. In the presence of AOPP, {sup 14}C labeling and release of all the exuded nod-gene inducers were reduced significantly. AOPP inhibited labeling and release of the strongest nod-gene inducer, methoxychalcone, by more than 90%. The release process responsible for exudation of nod-gene inducers appears to be specific rather than a general phenomenon such as a sloughing off of cells during root growth.

  15. Biosynthesis of Rhizobium meliloti lipooligosaccharide Nod factors: NodA is required for an N-acyltransferase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Atkinson, E.M.; Long, S.R. ); Palcic, M.M.; Hindsgaul, O. )

    1994-08-30

    Rhizobium bacteria synthesize N-acylated [beta]-1,4-N-acetylglucosamine lipooligosaccharides, called Nod factors, which act as morphogenic signal molecules to legume roots during development of nitrogen-fixing nodules. The biosynthesis of Nod factors is genetically dependent upon the nodulation (nod) genes, including the common nod genes nodABC. We used the Rhizobium meliloti NodH sulfotransferase to prepare [sup 35]S-labeled oligosaccharides which served as metabolic tracers for Nod enzyme activities. This approach provides a general method for following chitooligosaccharide modifications. We found nodAB-dependent conversion of N-acetylchitotetraose (chitotetraose) monosulfate into hydrophobic compounds which by chromatographic and chemical tests were equivalent to acylated Nod factors. Sequential incubation of labeled intermediates with Escherichia coli containing either NodA or NodB showed that NodB was required before NodA during Nod factor biosynthesis. The acylation activity was sensitive to oligosaccharide chain length, with chitotetraose serving as a better substrate than chitobiose or chitotriose. We constructed a putative Nod factor intermediate, GlcN-[beta]1,4-(GlcNac)[sub 3], by enzymatic synthesis and labeled it by NodH-mediated sulfation to create a specific metabolic probe. Acylation of this oligosaccharide required only NodA. These results confirm previous reports that NodB is an N-deacetylase and suggest that NodA is an N-acyltransferase. 31 refs., 6 figs.

  16. Quantifying the rate of biofilm growth of S. meliloti strains in microfluidics via the diffusion coefficient of microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorian, Matthew; Seitaridou, Effrosyni

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the rate of biofilm growth is essential for studying genes and preventing unwanted biofilms. In this study, the diffusion coefficient (D) of polystyrene microspheres was used to quantify biofilm growth rates of Sinorhizobia meliloti, a nitrogen fixing bacteria that forms a symbiotic relationship with alfalfa plants. Five strains were studied, two wild types (8530 expR+ and 1021) and three mutants in the exopolysaccharide (EPS I, EPS II) synthesis (8530 exoY , 9034 expG , and 9030-2 expA 1); 1021 and 9030-2 expA 1 are known to be unable to form biofilms. Each strain was inserted into a microfluidic channel with the microspheres. As the cultures grew, the spheres' D values were obtained every 24 hours for 4 days using fluorescence microscopy. Although the D values for 9030-2 expA 1 were inconclusive, 8530 expR+ , 8530 exoY , and 9034 expG showed significant decreases in D between 3 days of growth (| z | > 2 . 25 , p < 0 . 025). The data also indicated that 8530 expR+ and 8530 exoY grew at similar rates. There was no significant change in D for 1021 (χ2(2) = 5 . 76 , p > 0 . 05), which shows the lack of a structured biofilm community. Thus, D can be used as an indicator of the presence of a biofilm and its development.

  17. A plasmid of Rhizobium meliloti 41 encodes catabolism of two compounds from root exudate of Calystegium sepium.

    PubMed Central

    Tepfer, D; Goldmann, A; Pamboukdjian, N; Maille, M; Lepingle, A; Chevalier, D; Dénarié, J; Rosenberg, C

    1988-01-01

    Our objectives were to identify substances produced by plant roots that might act as nutritional mediators of specific plant-bacterium relationships and to delineate the bacterial genes responsible for catabolizing these substances. We discovered new compounds, which we call calystegins, that have the characteristics of nutritional mediators. They were detected in only 3 of 105 species of higher plants examined: Calystegia sepium, Convolvulus arvensis (both of the Convolvulaceae family), and Atropa belladonna. Calystegins are abundant in organs in contact with the rhizosphere and are not found, or are observed only in small quantities, in aerial plant parts. Just as the synthesis of calystegins is infrequent in the plant kingdom, their catabolism is rare among rhizosphere bacteria that associate with plants and influence their growth. Of 42 such bacteria tested, only one (Rhizobium meliloti 41) was able to catabolize calystegins and use them as a sole source of carbon and nitrogen. The calystegin catabolism gene(s) (cac) in this strain is located on a self-transmissible plasmid (pRme41a), which is not essential to nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with legumes. We suggest that under natural conditions calystegins provide an exclusive carbon and nitrogen source to rhizosphere bacteria which are able to catabolize these compounds. Calystegins (and the corresponding microbial catabolic genes) might be used to analyze and possibly modify rhizosphere ecology. Images PMID:2981046

  18. Exopolysaccharide Production by Sinorhizobium fredii HH103 Is Repressed by Genistein in a NodD1-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Acosta-Jurado, Sebastián; Navarro-Gómez, Pilar; Murdoch, Piedad del Socorro; Crespo-Rivas, Juan-Carlos; Jie, Shi; Cuesta-Berrio, Lidia; Ruiz-Sainz, José-Enrique; Rodríguez-Carvajal, Miguel-Ángel

    2016-01-01

    In the rhizobia-legume symbiotic interaction, bacterial surface polysaccharides, such as exopolysaccharide (EPS), lipopolysaccharide (LPS), K-antigen polysaccharide (KPS) or cyclic glucans (CG), appear to play crucial roles either acting as signals required for the progression of the interaction and/or preventing host defence mechanisms. The symbiotic significance of each of these polysaccharides varies depending on the specific rhizobia-legume couple. In this work we show that the production of exopolysaccharide by Sinorhizobium fredii HH103, but not by other S. fredii strains such as USDA257 or NGR234, is repressed by nod gene inducing flavonoids such as genistein and that this repression is dependent on the presence of a functional NodD1 protein. In agreement with the importance of EPS for bacterial biofilms, this reduced EPS production upon treatment with flavonoids correlates with decreased biofilm formation ability. By using quantitative RT-PCR analysis we show that expression of the exoY2 and exoK genes is repressed in late stationary cultures of S. fredii HH103 upon treatment with genistein. Results presented in this work show that in S. fredii HH103 EPS production is regulated just in the opposite way than other bacterial signals such as Nod factors and type 3 secreted effectors: it is repressed by flavonoids and NodD1 and enhanced by the nod repressor NolR. These results are in agreement with our previous observations showing that lack of EPS production by S. fredii HH103 is not only non-detrimental but even beneficial for symbiosis with soybean. PMID:27486751

  19. NopC Is a Rhizobium-Specific Type 3 Secretion System Effector Secreted by Sinorhizobium (Ensifer) fredii HH103.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Guerrero, Irene; Pérez-Montaño, Francisco; Medina, Carlos; Ollero, Francisco Javier; López-Baena, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    Sinorhizobium (Ensifer) fredii HH103 is a broad host-range nitrogen-fixing bacterium able to nodulate many legumes, including soybean. In several rhizobia, root nodulation is influenced by proteins secreted through the type 3 secretion system (T3SS). This specialized secretion apparatus is a common virulence mechanism of many plant and animal pathogenic bacteria that delivers proteins, called effectors, directly into the eukaryotic host cells where they interfere with signal transduction pathways and promote infection by suppressing host defenses. In rhizobia, secreted proteins, called nodulation outer proteins (Nops), are involved in host-range determination and symbiotic efficiency. S. fredii HH103 secretes at least eight Nops through the T3SS. Interestingly, there are Rhizobium-specific Nops, such as NopC, which do not have homologues in pathogenic bacteria. In this work we studied the S. fredii HH103 nopC gene and confirmed that its expression was regulated in a flavonoid-, NodD1- and TtsI-dependent manner. Besides, in vivo bioluminescent studies indicated that the S. fredii HH103 T3SS was expressed in young soybean nodules and adenylate cyclase assays confirmed that NopC was delivered directly into soybean root cells by means of the T3SS machinery. Finally, nodulation assays showed that NopC exerted a positive effect on symbiosis with Glycine max cv. Williams 82 and Vigna unguiculata. All these results indicate that NopC can be considered a Rhizobium-specific effector secreted by S. fredii HH103. PMID:26569401

  20. NopC Is a Rhizobium-Specific Type 3 Secretion System Effector Secreted by Sinorhizobium (Ensifer) fredii HH103

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Carlos; Ollero, Francisco Javier; López-Baena, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    Sinorhizobium (Ensifer) fredii HH103 is a broad host-range nitrogen-fixing bacterium able to nodulate many legumes, including soybean. In several rhizobia, root nodulation is influenced by proteins secreted through the type 3 secretion system (T3SS). This specialized secretion apparatus is a common virulence mechanism of many plant and animal pathogenic bacteria that delivers proteins, called effectors, directly into the eukaryotic host cells where they interfere with signal transduction pathways and promote infection by suppressing host defenses. In rhizobia, secreted proteins, called nodulation outer proteins (Nops), are involved in host-range determination and symbiotic efficiency. S. fredii HH103 secretes at least eight Nops through the T3SS. Interestingly, there are Rhizobium-specific Nops, such as NopC, which do not have homologues in pathogenic bacteria. In this work we studied the S. fredii HH103 nopC gene and confirmed that its expression was regulated in a flavonoid-, NodD1- and TtsI-dependent manner. Besides, in vivo bioluminescent studies indicated that the S. fredii HH103 T3SS was expressed in young soybean nodules and adenylate cyclase assays confirmed that NopC was delivered directly into soybean root cells by means of the T3SS machinery. Finally, nodulation assays showed that NopC exerted a positive effect on symbiosis with Glycine max cv. Williams 82 and Vigna unguiculata. All these results indicate that NopC can be considered a Rhizobium-specific effector secreted by S. fredii HH103. PMID:26569401

  1. The Sesbania Root Symbionts Sinorhizobium saheli and S. teranga bv. sesbaniae Can Form Stem Nodules on Sesbania rostrata, although They Are Less Adapted to Stem Nodulation than Azorhizobium caulinodans

    PubMed Central

    Boivin, C.; Ndoye, I.; Lortet, G.; Ndiaye, A.; De Lajudie, P.; Dreyfus, B.

    1997-01-01

    Sesbania species can establish symbiotic interactions with rhizobia from two taxonomically distant genera, including the Sesbania rostrata stem-nodulating Azorhizobium sp. and Azorhizobium caulinodans and the newly described Sinorhizobium saheli and Sinorhizobium teranga bv. sesbaniae, isolated from the roots of various Sesbania species. A collection of strains from both groups were analyzed for their symbiotic properties with different Sesbania species. S. saheli and S. teranga bv. sesbaniae strains were found to effectively stem nodulate Sesbania rostrata, showing that stem nodulation is not restricted to Azorhizobium. Sinorhizobia and azorhizobia, however, exhibited clear differences in other aspects of symbiosis. Unlike Azorhizobium, S. teranga bv. sesbaniae and S. saheli did not induce effective stem nodules on plants previously inoculated on the roots, although stem nodulation was arrested at different stages. For Sesbania rostrata root nodulation, Sinorhizobium appeared more sensitive than Azorhizobium to the presence of combined nitrogen. S. saheli and S. teranga bv. sesbaniae were effective symbionts with all Sesbania species tested, while Azorhizobium strains fixed nitrogen only in symbiosis with Sesbania rostrata. In a simple screening test, S. saheli and S. teranga bv. sesbaniae were incapable of asymbiotic nitrogenase activity. Thus, Azorhizobium can easily be distinguished from Sinorhizobium among Sesbania symbionts on the basis of symbiotic and free-living nitrogen fixation. The ability of Azorhizobium to overcome the systemic plant control appears to be a stem adaptation function. This last property, together with its host-specific symbiotic nitrogen fixation, makes Azorhizobium highly specialized for stem nodulation of the aquatic legume Sesbania rostrata. PMID:16535538

  2. Distribution of hydrogen-metabolizing bacteria in alfalfa field soil. [Medicago sativa L. ; Convolvulus arvensis L. ; Rhizobium meliloti

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, S.D.; Kapulnik, Y.; Phillips, D.A.

    1986-11-01

    H/sub 2/ evolved by alfalfa root nodules during the process of N/sub 2/ fixation may be an important factor influencing the distribution of soil bacteria. To test this hypothesis under field conditions, over 700 bacterial isolates were obtained from fallow soil or from the 3-mm layer of soil surrounding alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) root nodules, alfalfa roots, or bindweed (Convolvulus arvensis L.) roots. Bacteria were isolated under either aerobic or microaerophilic conditions and were tested for their capacity to metabolize H/sub 2/. Isolates showing net H/sub 2/ uptake and /sup 3/H/sub 2/ incorporation activity under laboratory conditions were assigned a Hup/sup +/ phenotype, whereas organisms with significant H/sub 2/ output capacity were designated as a Hout/sup +/ phenotype. Under aerobic isolation conditions two Hup/sup +/ isolates were obtained, whereas under microaerophilic conditions five Hup/sup +/ and two Hout/sup +/ isolates were found. The nine isolates differed on the basis of 24 standard bacteriological characteristics or fatty acid composition. Five of the nine organisms were isolated from soil around root nodules, whereas the other four were found distributed among the other three soil environments. On the basis of the microaerophilic isolations, 4.8% of the total procaryotic isolates from soil around root nodules were capable of oxidizing H/sub 2/, and 1.2% could produce H/sub 2/. Two of the Hup/sup +/ isolates were identified as Rhizobium meliloti by root nodulation tests, but the fact that none of the isolates reduced C/sub 2/H/sub 2/ under the assay conditions suggested that the H/sub 2/ metabolism traits were associated with various hydrogenase systems rather than with nitrogenase activity.

  3. Genes for the catabolism and synthesis of an opine-like compound in Rhizobium meliloti are closely linked and on the Sym plasmid

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Peter J.; Heycke, Nina; Banfalvi, Zsofia; Tate, Max E.; de Bruijn, Frans; Kondorosi, Adam; Tempé, Jacques; Schell, Jeff

    1987-01-01

    In alfalfa nodules induced by Rhizobium meliloti strain L5-30 the compound L-3-O-methyl-scyllo-inosamine (3-O-MSI) is synthesized. This compound is also catabolized specifically by this strain. Its biological properties are therefore similar to the Agrobacterium opines. To answer the question whether opine-like compounds (“Rhizopines”) play a role in a plant symbiotic interaction, we isolated the genes for the catabolism of 3-O-MSI (moc genes) and for the induction of its synthesis in the nodule [mos gene(s)]. moc and mos genes were shown to be closely linked and located on the Sym plasmid of L5-30, suggesting that they have co-evolved and may be important in symbiosis. These genes have been cloned into a broad host-range vector that can be mobilized into other R. meliloti strains where they are expressed. The location of the mos genes in the bacteria extends the opine concept, initially developed for a plant pathological interaction, to a symbiotic one. Images PMID:16593802

  4. Nodules are induced on alfalfa roots by Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Rhizobium trifolii containing small segments of the Rhizobium meliloti nodulation region

    SciTech Connect

    Hirsch, A.M.; Drake, D.; Jacobs, T.W.; Long, S.R.

    1985-01-01

    Regions of the Rhizobium meliloti nodulation genes from the symbiotic plasmid were transferred to Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Rhizobium trifolii by conjugation. The A. tumefaciens and R. trifolii trans-conjugants were unable to elicit curling of alfalfa root hairs, but were able to induce nodule development at a low frequency. These were judged to be genuine nodules on the basis of cytological and developmental criteria. Like genuine alfalfa nodules, the nodules were initiated from divisions of the inner root cortical cells. They developed a distally positioned meristem and several peripheral vascular bundles. An endodermis separated the inner tissues of the nodule from the surrounding cortex. No infection threads were found to penetrate either root hairs or the nodule cells. Bacteria were found only in intercellular spaces. Thus, alfalfa nodules induced by A. tumefaciens and R. trifolii transconjugants carrying small nodulation clones of R. meliloti were completely devoid of intracellular bacteria. When these strains were inoculated onto white clover roots, small nodule-like protrusions developed that, when examined cytologically, were found to more closely resemble roots than nodules. Although the meristem was broadened and lacked a root cap, the protrusions had a central vascular bundle and other rootlike features. The results suggest that morphogenesis of alfalfa root nodules can be uncoupled from infection thread formation. The genes encoded in the 8.7-kilobase nodulation fragment are sufficient in A. tumefaciens or R. trifolii backgrounds for nodule morphogenesis.

  5. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of Ensifer meliloti strain 4H41, an effective salt- and drought-tolerant microsymbiont of Phaseolus vulgaris

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mhamdi, Ridha; Ardley, Julie; Tian, Rui; Seshadri, Rekha; Reddy, T. B. K.; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; et al

    2015-07-02

    We report that Ensifer meliloti 4H41 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that can exist as a soil saprophyte or as a legume microsymbiont of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). Strain 4H41 was isolated in 2002 from root nodules of P. vulgaris grown in South Tunisia from the oasis of Rjim-Maatoug. Strain 4H41 is salt- and drought-tolerant and highly effective at fixing nitrogen with P. vulgaris. Here we describe the features of E. meliloti 4H41, together with genome sequence information and its annotation. The 6,795,637 bp high-quality permanent draft genome is arranged into 47 scaffolds of 47 contigs containing 6,350more » protein-coding genes and 72 RNA-only encoding genes, and is one of the rhizobial genomes sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Genomic Encyclopedia for Bacteria and Archaea-Root Nodule Bacteria (GEBA-RNB) project proposal.« less

  6. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of Ensifer meliloti strain 4H41, an effective salt- and drought-tolerant microsymbiont of Phaseolus vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Mhamdi, Ridha; Ardley, Julie; Tian, Rui; Seshadri, Rekha; Reddy, T. B. K.; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Reeve, Wayne

    2015-07-02

    We report that Ensifer meliloti 4H41 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that can exist as a soil saprophyte or as a legume microsymbiont of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). Strain 4H41 was isolated in 2002 from root nodules of P. vulgaris grown in South Tunisia from the oasis of Rjim-Maatoug. Strain 4H41 is salt- and drought-tolerant and highly effective at fixing nitrogen with P. vulgaris. Here we describe the features of E. meliloti 4H41, together with genome sequence information and its annotation. The 6,795,637 bp high-quality permanent draft genome is arranged into 47 scaffolds of 47 contigs containing 6,350 protein-coding genes and 72 RNA-only encoding genes, and is one of the rhizobial genomes sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Genomic Encyclopedia for Bacteria and Archaea-Root Nodule Bacteria (GEBA-RNB) project proposal.

  7. Sinorhizobium teranga bv. acaciae ORS1073 and Rhizobium sp. strain ORS1001, two distantly related Acacia-nodulating strains, produce similar Nod factors that are O carbamoylated, N methylated, and mainly sulfated.

    PubMed Central

    Lorquin, J; Lortet, G; Ferro, M; Mear, N; Promé, J C; Boivin, C

    1997-01-01

    We have determined the structures of Nod factors produced by strains representative of Sinorhizobium teranga bv. acaciae and the so-called cluster U from the Rhizobium loti branch, two genetically different symbionts of particular Acacia species. Compounds from both strains were found to be similar, i.e., mainly sulfated, O carbamoylated, and N methylated, indicating a close relationship between host specificity and Nod factor structure, regardless of the taxonomy of the bacterial symbiont. PMID:9139935

  8. Colonization and nitrogenase activity of Triticum aestivum (cv. Baccross and Mahdavi) to the dual inoculation with Azospirillum brasilense and Rhizobium meliloti plus 2,4-D.

    PubMed

    Mehry, Askary; Akbar, Mostajeran; Giti, Emtiazi

    2008-06-15

    The potential enhancement of root colonization and nitrogenase activity of wheat cultivars (Baccross and Mahdavi) was studied with application of two Azospirillum brasilense strains (native and Sp7) co-inoculated with two Rhizobium meliloti strains (native and DSMZ 30135). The results indicated that the colonization was different due to the strains and cultivars of wheat were used. Native A. brasilense colonized wheat root better than Sp7 strain. However, Baccross cv. reacted better with native Azospirillum compared to Mahdavi cv. which reacted better with Sp7. When plants inoculated with dual inoculants (SP7 with standard Rhizobium), the colonization of Azospirillum were increased significantly (from 1.67 x 10(5) to 22 x 10(5) cfu g(-1) FW for Baccras cv. and 3.67 x 10(5) to 26 x 10(5) cfu g(-1) FW for Mahdavi cultivar). When the standard Rhizobium as co-inoculants changed to the native Rhizobium, the colonization of Azospirillum was higher when compared to the single inoculants but was almost the same when compared to the standard Rhizobium. When the standard or native strains of Rhizobium used as single inoculation of wheat roots, the number of Rhizobium in the wheat roots were not changed significantly. However, when plants co-inoculated with Rhizobium and Azospirillum, the colonization of Rhizobium was increased. Co-inoculation of standard strain of R. melilot with A. brasilense Sp7 showed that the colonization of Rhizobium were increased from 0.67 x 10(5) to 21 x 10(5) cfu g(-1) FW for Baccross cv. and 0.33 x 10(5) to 18 x 10(5) cfu g(-1) FW for Mahdavi cv. This behavior was the same when inoculation of Rhizobium was happened with the native one. In dual inoculation, the highest nitrogenase activity was measured in combination of the local strains (native A. brasilense with the native R. meliloti) and the lower one belongs to the combination of standard strains (Sp7 with standard R. meliloti). The difference in nirtogenase activity for different cultivars of

  9. Molecular basis of a microbe-mediated enhancement of symbiotic N/sub 2/-fixation. [Rhizobium meliloti; Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci

    SciTech Connect

    Unkefer, P.J.; Knight, T.J.

    1987-04-01

    Improvement of biological nitrogen fixation represents a potential source of both increased food production and decreased dependence on costly chemical fertilizer. They report the results of an investigation of the molecular basis of a unique, microbial-mediated mechanism for increased growth and nitrogen fixation rates in alfalfa. Inoculation of alfalfa plants with both Rhizobium meliloti and Pseudomonas syringae pv tabaci provides increased growth and N/sub 2/-fixation rates of alfalfa. Tabaci produces tabtoxinine-..beta..-lactam (T..beta..L), an exocellular product and glutamine synthetase (GS) inhibitor. The association of this pathogen with nodulating alfalfa plants appears to alter the normal regulation of nitrogen fixation such that nitrogenase activity is stimulated and GS activity is inhibited. Studies of the soluble amino acids in these nodules and the activities of the ammonia assimilatory enzymes indicate alternative pathways of ammonia assimilation are being employed.

  10. Genetics and biochemistry of the Rhizobium meliloti acidic extracellular heteropolysaccharide and its role in nodulation: Annual report for the period 1 June 1987-31 May 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Leigh, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    The symbiotic association of Rhizobium with legumes results in a vital supply of inexpensive nitrogen for the growth of crops such as soybean and alfalfa. In a complex series of events, the bacterial symbiont, Rhizobium, induces the formation of a specialilzed root structure, the nodule. Rhizobium then enters the cells of the nodule and fixes nitrogen. We are interested in an extracellular polysaccharide, produced by Rhizobium, which is required for nodule entry. We have found that R. meliloti mutants which produce the polysaccharide but fail to enter nodules, actually produce an abnormal form of the polysacchardie which lacks succinate. Recently we have discovered a second polysaccharide which can be produced in place of the first polysacchaaride and also satisfy the requirement for nodule entry. We are studying the gentic regulation of the production of the two polysaccharides.

  11. Characterization of genes for synthesis and catabolism of a new rhizopine induced in nodules by Rhizobium meliloti Rm220-3: extension of the rhizopine concept.

    PubMed Central

    Saint, C P; Wexler, M; Murphy, P J; Tempé, J; Tate, M E; Murphy, P J

    1993-01-01

    Rhizopines are selective growth substrates synthesized in nodules only by strains of rhizobia capable of their catabolism. We report the isolation and study of genes for the synthesis and catabolism of a new rhizopine, scyllo-inosamine (sIa), from alfalfa nodules induced by Rhizobium meliloti Rm220-3. This compound is similar in structure to the previously described rhizopine 3-O-methyl-scyllo-inosamine from R. meliloti L5-30 (P.J. Murphy, N. Heycke, Z. Banfalvi, M.E. Tate, F.J. de Bruijn, A. Kondorosi, J. Tempé, and J. Schell, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 84:493-497, 1987). The synthesis (mos) and catabolism (moc) genes for the Rm220-3 rhizopine are closely linked and located on the nod-nif Sym plasmid. The mos genes are directly controlled by the NifA/NtrA regulatory system. A comparison of the sequence of the 5' regions of the two mos loci shows very extensive conservation of sequence as well as strong homology to the nifH coding region. Restriction mapping and hybridization to DNA from the four open reading frames (ORFs) of the L5-30 mos locus indicate the absence of mosA and presence of the other three ORFs (ORF1 and mosB and -C) in Rm220-3. We suggest that the L5-30 mosA gene product is involved in the conversion of scyllo-inosamine to 3-O-methyl-scyllo-inosamine. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the moc regions of both strains shows that they are very similar. Regulation studies indicate that the moc region is not controlled by the common regulatory gene nifA, ntrA, and ntrC. We discuss the striking similarities in gene structure, location, and regulation between these two rhizopine loci in relation to the rhizopine concept. Images PMID:8349560

  12. ndvF, a novel locus located on megaplasmid pRmeSU47b (pEXO) of Rhizobium meliloti, is required for normal nodule development.

    PubMed Central

    Charles, T C; Newcomb, W; Finan, T M

    1991-01-01

    Rhizobium meliloti strains carrying either of two overlapping deletions (delta 5408 and delta F114) of the megaplasmid pRmeSU47b form nodules on alfalfa which fail to fix N2 (Fix-). Strains carrying these deletions also fail to fluoresce on media containing calcofluor, indicating a defect in synthesis of the acidic exopolysaccharide (Exo-) of R. meliloti. We have isolated cosmid clones (pTH21 and pTH22) which complement the Fix- but not the Exo- phenotype of the strains carrying the delta 5408 and delta F114 deletions. In addition, cosmid clones which complement the Exo- phenotype fail to complement the Fix- phenotype of these deletions; thus, the Exo- phenotype is not related to the Fix- phenotype. A 5-kb region within a 7.3-kb BamHI restriction fragment was found to be required for complementation of the Fix- phenotype of the delta 5408 and delta F114 deletion strains. Tn5 insertions in the 5-kb region generated a Fix- phenotype when recombined into the wild-type genome. We have designated this locus ndvF, for nodule development. TnphoA mutagenesis of this region generated active alkaline-phosphatase gene fusions, indicating that ndvF encodes extracytoplasmic protein(s). Induction of nodules by the ndvF mutants was delayed by 2 to 3 days compared with induction by the wild-type strain. Light microscopy of nodules elicited by strains carrying the large 150-kb delta F114 deletion, a 12-kb deletion removing ndvF, or an individual ndvF::Tn5 insertion mutation demonstrated that many nodules contained few infected cortical cells, indicating that nodule development was blocked early in the infection process, before the release of bacteria from the infection threads. Images PMID:1648074

  13. High-Resolution Transcriptomic Analyses of Sinorhizobium sp. NGR234 Bacteroids in Determinate Nodules of Vigna unguiculata and Indeterminate Nodules of Leucaena leucocephala

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Tian, Chang Fu; Chen, Wen Feng; Wang, Lei; Sui, Xin Hua; Chen, Wen Xin

    2013-01-01

    The rhizobium-legume symbiosis is a model system for studying mutualistic interactions between bacteria and eukaryotes. Sinorhizobium sp. NGR234 is distinguished by its ability to form either indeterminate nodules or determinate nodules with diverse legumes. Here, we presented a high-resolution RNA-seq transcriptomic analysis of NGR234 bacteroids in indeterminate nodules of Leucaena leucocephala and determinate nodules of Vigna unguiculata. In contrast to exponentially growing free-living bacteria, non-growing bacteroids from both legumes recruited several common cellular functions such as cbb3 oxidase, thiamine biosynthesis, nitrate reduction pathway (NO-producing), succinate metabolism, PHB (poly-3-hydroxybutyrate) biosynthesis and phosphate/phosphonate transporters. However, different transcription profiles between bacteroids from two legumes were also uncovered for genes involved in the biosynthesis of exopolysaccharides, lipopolysaccharides, T3SS (type three secretion system) and effector proteins, cytochrome bd ubiquinol oxidase, PQQ (pyrroloquinoline quinone), cytochrome c550, pseudoazurin, biotin, phasins and glycolate oxidase, and in the metabolism of glutamate and phenylalanine. Noteworthy were the distinct expression patterns of genes encoding phasins, which are thought to be involved in regulating the surface/volume ratio of PHB granules. These patterns are in good agreement with the observed granule size difference between bacteroids from L. leucocephala and V. unguiculata. PMID:23936444

  14. A transcriptomic analysis of the effect of genistein on Sinorhizobium fredii HH103 reveals novel rhizobial genes putatively involved in symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Montaño, F.; Jiménez-Guerrero, I.; Acosta-Jurado, S.; Navarro-Gómez, P.; Ollero, F. J.; Ruiz-Sainz, J. E.; López-Baena, F. J.; Vinardell, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Sinorhizobium fredii HH103 is a rhizobial soybean symbiont that exhibits an extremely broad host-range. Flavonoids exuded by legume roots induce the expression of rhizobial symbiotic genes and activate the bacterial protein NodD, which binds to regulatory DNA sequences called nod boxes (NB). NB drive the expression of genes involved in the production of molecular signals (Nod factors) as well as the transcription of ttsI, whose encoded product binds to tts boxes (TB), inducing the secretion of proteins (effectors) through the type 3 secretion system (T3SS). In this work, a S. fredii HH103 global gene expression analysis in the presence of the flavonoid genistein was carried out, revealing a complex regulatory network. Three groups of genes differentially expressed were identified: i) genes controlled by NB, ii) genes regulated by TB, and iii) genes not preceded by a NB or a TB. Interestingly, we have found differentially expressed genes not previously studied in rhizobia, being some of them not related to Nod factors or the T3SS. Future characterization of these putative symbiotic-related genes could shed light on the understanding of the complex molecular dialogue established between rhizobia and legumes. PMID:27539649

  15. MucR Is Required for Transcriptional Activation of Conserved Ion Transporters to Support Nitrogen Fixation of Sinorhizobium fredii in Soybean Nodules.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jian; Wu, Li Juan; Zhang, Biliang; Hu, Yue; Li, Yan; Zhang, Xing Xing; Guo, Hui Juan; Liu, Li Xue; Chen, Wen Xin; Zhang, Ziding; Tian, Chang Fu

    2016-05-01

    To achieve effective symbiosis with legume, rhizobia should fine-tune their background regulation network in addition to activating key genes involved in nodulation (nod) and nitrogen fixation (nif). Here, we report that an ancestral zinc finger regulator, MucR1, other than its paralog, MucR2, carrying a frameshift mutation, is essential for supporting nitrogen fixation of Sinorhizobium fredii CCBAU45436 within soybean nodules. In contrast to the chromosomal mucR1, mucR2 is located on symbiosis plasmid, indicating its horizontal transfer potential. A MucR2 homolog lacking the frameshift mutation, such as the one from S. fredii NGR234, can complement phenotypic defects of the mucR1 mutant of CCBAU45436. RNA-seq analysis revealed that the MucR1 regulon of CCBAU45436 within nodules exhibits significant difference compared with that of free-living cells. MucR1 is required for active expression of transporters for phosphate, zinc, and elements essential for nitrogenase activity (iron, molybdenum, and sulfur) in nodules but is dispensable for transcription of key genes (nif/fix) involved in nitrogen fixation. Further reverse genetics suggests that S. fredii uses high-affinity transporters to meet the demand for zinc and phosphate within nodules. These findings, together with the horizontal transfer potential of the mucR homolog, imply an intriguing evolutionary role of this ancestral regulator in supporting nitrogen fixation.

  16. High-resolution transcriptomic analyses of Sinorhizobium sp. NGR234 bacteroids in determinate nodules of Vigna unguiculata and indeterminate nodules of Leucaena leucocephala.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Tian, Chang Fu; Chen, Wen Feng; Wang, Lei; Sui, Xin Hua; Chen, Wen Xin

    2013-01-01

    The rhizobium-legume symbiosis is a model system for studying mutualistic interactions between bacteria and eukaryotes. Sinorhizobium sp. NGR234 is distinguished by its ability to form either indeterminate nodules or determinate nodules with diverse legumes. Here, we presented a high-resolution RNA-seq transcriptomic analysis of NGR234 bacteroids in indeterminate nodules of Leucaena leucocephala and determinate nodules of Vigna unguiculata. In contrast to exponentially growing free-living bacteria, non-growing bacteroids from both legumes recruited several common cellular functions such as cbb3 oxidase, thiamine biosynthesis, nitrate reduction pathway (NO-producing), succinate metabolism, PHB (poly-3-hydroxybutyrate) biosynthesis and phosphate/phosphonate transporters. However, different transcription profiles between bacteroids from two legumes were also uncovered for genes involved in the biosynthesis of exopolysaccharides, lipopolysaccharides, T3SS (type three secretion system) and effector proteins, cytochrome bd ubiquinol oxidase, PQQ (pyrroloquinoline quinone), cytochrome c550, pseudoazurin, biotin, phasins and glycolate oxidase, and in the metabolism of glutamate and phenylalanine. Noteworthy were the distinct expression patterns of genes encoding phasins, which are thought to be involved in regulating the surface/volume ratio of PHB granules. These patterns are in good agreement with the observed granule size difference between bacteroids from L. leucocephala and V. unguiculata.

  17. High-resolution transcriptomic analyses of Sinorhizobium sp. NGR234 bacteroids in determinate nodules of Vigna unguiculata and indeterminate nodules of Leucaena leucocephala.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Tian, Chang Fu; Chen, Wen Feng; Wang, Lei; Sui, Xin Hua; Chen, Wen Xin

    2013-01-01

    The rhizobium-legume symbiosis is a model system for studying mutualistic interactions between bacteria and eukaryotes. Sinorhizobium sp. NGR234 is distinguished by its ability to form either indeterminate nodules or determinate nodules with diverse legumes. Here, we presented a high-resolution RNA-seq transcriptomic analysis of NGR234 bacteroids in indeterminate nodules of Leucaena leucocephala and determinate nodules of Vigna unguiculata. In contrast to exponentially growing free-living bacteria, non-growing bacteroids from both legumes recruited several common cellular functions such as cbb3 oxidase, thiamine biosynthesis, nitrate reduction pathway (NO-producing), succinate metabolism, PHB (poly-3-hydroxybutyrate) biosynthesis and phosphate/phosphonate transporters. However, different transcription profiles between bacteroids from two legumes were also uncovered for genes involved in the biosynthesis of exopolysaccharides, lipopolysaccharides, T3SS (type three secretion system) and effector proteins, cytochrome bd ubiquinol oxidase, PQQ (pyrroloquinoline quinone), cytochrome c550, pseudoazurin, biotin, phasins and glycolate oxidase, and in the metabolism of glutamate and phenylalanine. Noteworthy were the distinct expression patterns of genes encoding phasins, which are thought to be involved in regulating the surface/volume ratio of PHB granules. These patterns are in good agreement with the observed granule size difference between bacteroids from L. leucocephala and V. unguiculata. PMID:23936444

  18. A transcriptomic analysis of the effect of genistein on Sinorhizobium fredii HH103 reveals novel rhizobial genes putatively involved in symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Montaño, F; Jiménez-Guerrero, I; Acosta-Jurado, S; Navarro-Gómez, P; Ollero, F J; Ruiz-Sainz, J E; López-Baena, F J; Vinardell, J M

    2016-01-01

    Sinorhizobium fredii HH103 is a rhizobial soybean symbiont that exhibits an extremely broad host-range. Flavonoids exuded by legume roots induce the expression of rhizobial symbiotic genes and activate the bacterial protein NodD, which binds to regulatory DNA sequences called nod boxes (NB). NB drive the expression of genes involved in the production of molecular signals (Nod factors) as well as the transcription of ttsI, whose encoded product binds to tts boxes (TB), inducing the secretion of proteins (effectors) through the type 3 secretion system (T3SS). In this work, a S. fredii HH103 global gene expression analysis in the presence of the flavonoid genistein was carried out, revealing a complex regulatory network. Three groups of genes differentially expressed were identified: i) genes controlled by NB, ii) genes regulated by TB, and iii) genes not preceded by a NB or a TB. Interestingly, we have found differentially expressed genes not previously studied in rhizobia, being some of them not related to Nod factors or the T3SS. Future characterization of these putative symbiotic-related genes could shed light on the understanding of the complex molecular dialogue established between rhizobia and legumes. PMID:27539649

  19. A Stress-Induced Small RNA Modulates Alpha-Rhizobial Cell Cycle Progression

    PubMed Central

    Robledo, Marta; Frage, Benjamin; Wright, Patrick R.; Becker, Anke

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms adjusting replication initiation and cell cycle progression in response to environmental conditions are crucial for microbial survival. Functional characterization of the trans-encoded small non-coding RNA (trans-sRNA) EcpR1 in the plant-symbiotic alpha-proteobacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti revealed a role of this class of riboregulators in modulation of cell cycle regulation. EcpR1 is broadly conserved in at least five families of the Rhizobiales and is predicted to form a stable structure with two defined stem-loop domains. In S. meliloti, this trans-sRNA is encoded downstream of the divK-pleD operon. ecpR1 belongs to the stringent response regulon, and its expression was induced by various stress factors and in stationary phase. Induced EcpR1 overproduction led to cell elongation and increased DNA content, while deletion of ecpR1 resulted in reduced competitiveness. Computationally predicted EcpR1 targets were enriched with cell cycle-related mRNAs. Post-transcriptional repression of the cell cycle key regulatory genes gcrA and dnaA mediated by mRNA base-pairing with the strongly conserved loop 1 of EcpR1 was experimentally confirmed by two-plasmid differential gene expression assays and compensatory changes in sRNA and mRNA. Evidence is presented for EcpR1 promoting RNase E-dependent degradation of the dnaA mRNA. We propose that EcpR1 contributes to modulation of cell cycle regulation under detrimental conditions. PMID:25923724

  20. Rhodobacter sphaeroides rdxA, a homolog of Rhizobium meliloti fixG, encodes a membrane protein which may bind cytoplasmic [4Fe-4S] clusters.

    PubMed Central

    Neidle, E L; Kaplan, S

    1992-01-01

    In the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides, a chromosomal gene, rdxA, which encodes a 52-kDa protein, was found to be homologous to fixG, the first gene of a Rhizobium meliloti nitrogen fixation operon on the pSym plasmid (D. Kahn, M. David, O. Domergue, M.-L. Daveran, J. Ghai, P. R. Hirsch, and J. Batut, J. Bacteriol. 171:929-939, 1989). The deduced amino acid sequences of RdxA and FixG are 53% identical and 73% similar; sequence analyses suggested that each has five transmembrane helices and a central region resembling bacterial-type ferredoxins. Translational fusion proteins with an alkaline phosphatase reporter group were expressed in both R. sphaeroides and Escherichia coli and were used to assess the membrane topology of RdxA. Its ferredoxinlike sequence, which may bind two [4Fe-4S] centers, was found to be cytoplasmically located. Genetic disruptions showed that rdxA is not essential for nitrogen fixation in R. sphaeroides. Immediately downstream of rdxA, an open reading frame (ORFT2) that encoded a 48-kDa protein was found. This DNA sequence was not homologous to any region of the R. meliloti fixG operon. The N-terminal sequence of the ORFT2 gene product resembled amino acid sequences found in members of the GntR family of regulatory proteins (D. J. Haydon and J. R. Guest, FEMS Microbiol. Lett. 79:291-296, 1991). The rdxA gene was localized to the smaller of two R. sphaeroides chromosomes, upstream of and divergently transcribed from hemT, which encodes one of two 5-aminolevulinate synthase isozymes. The rdxA and hemT genes may share a transcriptional regulatory region. Southern hybridization analysis demonstrated the presence of an rdxA homolog on the R. sphaeroides large chromosome. The functions of this homolog, like those of rdxA, remain to be determined, but roles in oxidation-reduction processes are likely. Images PMID:1400197

  1. Growth of fast- and slow-growing rhizobia on ethanol. [Bradyrhizobium sp. ; Rhizobium meliloti; Rhizobium loti; Rhizobium leguminosarum; Rhizobium fredii; Bradyrhizobium japonicum

    SciTech Connect

    Sadowsky, M.J.; Bohlool, B.B.

    1986-10-01

    Free-living soybean rhizobia and Bradyrhizobium spp. (lupine) have the ability to catabolize ethanol. Of the 30 strains of rhizobia examined, only the fast- and slow-growing soybean rhizobia and the slow-growing Bradyrhizobium sp (lupine) were capable of using ethanol as a sole source of carbon and energy for growth. Two strains from each of the other Rhizobium species examined (R. meliloti, R. loti, and R. leguminosarum biovars phaseoli, trifolii, and viceae) failed to grow on ethanol. One Rhizobium fredii (fast-growing) strain, USDA 191, and one (slow-growing) Bradyrhizobium japonicum strain, USDA 110, grew in ethanol up to concentrations of 3.0 and 1.0%, respectively. While three of the R. fredii strains examined (USDA 192, USDA 194, and USDA 205) utilized 0.2% acetate, only USDA 192 utilized 0.1% n-propanol. None of the three strains utilized 0.1% methanol, formate, or n-butanol as the sole carbon source.

  2. Genetic Analysis Reveals the Essential Role of Nitrogen Phosphotransferase System Components in Sinorhizobium fredii CCBAU 45436 Symbioses with Soybean and Pigeonpea Plants.

    PubMed

    Li, Yue Zhen; Wang, Dan; Feng, Xue Ying; Jiao, Jian; Chen, Wen Xin; Tian, Chang Fu

    2015-12-18

    The nitrogen phosphotransferase system (PTS(Ntr)) consists of EI(Ntr), NPr, and EIIA(Ntr). The active phosphate moiety derived from phosphoenolpyruvate is transferred through EI(Ntr) and NPr to EIIA(Ntr). Sinorhizobium fredii can establish a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with the legume crops soybean (as determinate nodules) and pigeonpea (as indeterminate nodules). In this study, S. fredii strains with mutations in ptsP and ptsO (encoding EI(Ntr) and NPr, respectively) formed ineffective nodules on soybeans, while a strain with a ptsN mutation (encoding EIIA(Ntr)) was not defective in symbiosis with soybeans. Notable reductions in the numbers of bacteroids within each symbiosome and of poly-β-hydroxybutyrate granules in bacteroids were observed in nodules infected by the ptsP or ptsO mutant strains but not in those infected with the ptsN mutant strain. However, these defects of the ptsP and ptsO mutant strains were recovered in ptsP ptsN and ptsO ptsN double-mutant strains, implying a negative role of unphosphorylated EIIA(Ntr) in symbiosis. Moreover, the symbiotic defect of the ptsP mutant was also recovered by expressing EI(Ntr) with or without the GAF domain, indicating that the putative glutamine-sensing domain GAF is dispensable in symbiotic interactions. The critical role of PTS(Ntr) in symbiosis was also observed when related PTS(Ntr) mutant strains of S. fredii were inoculated on pigeonpea plants. Furthermore, nodule occupancy and carbon utilization tests suggested that multiple outputs could be derived from components of PTS(Ntr) in addition to the negative role of unphosphorylated EIIA(Ntr).

  3. Genetic Analysis Reveals the Essential Role of Nitrogen Phosphotransferase System Components in Sinorhizobium fredii CCBAU 45436 Symbioses with Soybean and Pigeonpea Plants

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yue Zhen; Wang, Dan; Feng, Xue Ying; Jiao, Jian; Chen, Wen Xin

    2015-01-01

    The nitrogen phosphotransferase system (PTSNtr) consists of EINtr, NPr, and EIIANtr. The active phosphate moiety derived from phosphoenolpyruvate is transferred through EINtr and NPr to EIIANtr. Sinorhizobium fredii can establish a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with the legume crops soybean (as determinate nodules) and pigeonpea (as indeterminate nodules). In this study, S. fredii strains with mutations in ptsP and ptsO (encoding EINtr and NPr, respectively) formed ineffective nodules on soybeans, while a strain with a ptsN mutation (encoding EIIANtr) was not defective in symbiosis with soybeans. Notable reductions in the numbers of bacteroids within each symbiosome and of poly-β-hydroxybutyrate granules in bacteroids were observed in nodules infected by the ptsP or ptsO mutant strains but not in those infected with the ptsN mutant strain. However, these defects of the ptsP and ptsO mutant strains were recovered in ptsP ptsN and ptsO ptsN double-mutant strains, implying a negative role of unphosphorylated EIIANtr in symbiosis. Moreover, the symbiotic defect of the ptsP mutant was also recovered by expressing EINtr with or without the GAF domain, indicating that the putative glutamine-sensing domain GAF is dispensable in symbiotic interactions. The critical role of PTSNtr in symbiosis was also observed when related PTSNtr mutant strains of S. fredii were inoculated on pigeonpea plants. Furthermore, nodule occupancy and carbon utilization tests suggested that multiple outputs could be derived from components of PTSNtr in addition to the negative role of unphosphorylated EIIANtr. PMID:26682851

  4. Possible Role of 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate (ACC) Deaminase Activity of Sinorhizobium sp. BL3 on Symbiosis with Mung Bean and Determinate Nodule Senescence.

    PubMed

    Tittabutr, Panlada; Sripakdi, Sudarat; Boonkerd, Nantakorn; Tanthanuch, Waraporn; Minamisawa, Kiwamu; Teaumroong, Neung

    2015-01-01

    Sinorhizobium sp. BL3 forms symbiotic interactions with mung bean (Vigna radiata) and contains lrpL-acdS genes, which encode the 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase enzyme that cleaves ACC, a precursor of plant ethylene synthesis. Since ethylene interferes with nodule formation in some legumes and plays a role in senescence in plant cells, BL3-enhancing ACC deaminase activity (BL3(+)) and defective mutant (BL3(-)) strains were constructed in order to investigate the effects of this enzyme on symbiosis and nodule senescence. Nodulation competitiveness was weaker in BL3(-) than in the wild-type, but was stronger in BL3(+). The inoculation of BL3(-) into mung bean resulted in less plant growth, a lower nodule dry weight, and smaller nodule number than those in the wild-type, whereas the inoculation of BL3(+) had no marked effects. However, similar nitrogenase activity was observed with all treatments; it was strongly detected 3 weeks after the inoculation and gradually declined with time, indicating senescence. The rate of plant nodulation by BL3(+) increased in a time-dependent manner. Nodules occupied by BL3(-) formed smaller symbiosomes, and bacteroid degradation was more prominent than that in the wild-type 7 weeks after the inoculation. Changes in biochemical molecules during nodulation were tracked by Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy, and the results obtained confirmed that aging processes differed in nodules occupied by BL3 and BL3(-). This is the first study to show the possible role of ACC deaminase activity in senescence in determinate nodules. Our results suggest that an increase in ACC deaminase activity in this strain does not extend the lifespan of nodules, whereas the lack of this activity may accelerate nodule senescence.

  5. Possible Role of 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate (ACC) Deaminase Activity of Sinorhizobium sp. BL3 on Symbiosis with Mung Bean and Determinate Nodule Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Tittabutr, Panlada; Sripakdi, Sudarat; Boonkerd, Nantakorn; Tanthanuch, Waraporn; Minamisawa, Kiwamu; Teaumroong, Neung

    2015-01-01

    Sinorhizobium sp. BL3 forms symbiotic interactions with mung bean (Vigna radiata) and contains lrpL-acdS genes, which encode the 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase enzyme that cleaves ACC, a precursor of plant ethylene synthesis. Since ethylene interferes with nodule formation in some legumes and plays a role in senescence in plant cells, BL3-enhancing ACC deaminase activity (BL3+) and defective mutant (BL3−) strains were constructed in order to investigate the effects of this enzyme on symbiosis and nodule senescence. Nodulation competitiveness was weaker in BL3− than in the wild-type, but was stronger in BL3+. The inoculation of BL3− into mung bean resulted in less plant growth, a lower nodule dry weight, and smaller nodule number than those in the wild-type, whereas the inoculation of BL3+ had no marked effects. However, similar nitrogenase activity was observed with all treatments; it was strongly detected 3 weeks after the inoculation and gradually declined with time, indicating senescence. The rate of plant nodulation by BL3+ increased in a time-dependent manner. Nodules occupied by BL3− formed smaller symbiosomes, and bacteroid degradation was more prominent than that in the wild-type 7 weeks after the inoculation. Changes in biochemical molecules during nodulation were tracked by Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy, and the results obtained confirmed that aging processes differed in nodules occupied by BL3 and BL3−. This is the first study to show the possible role of ACC deaminase activity in senescence in determinate nodules. Our results suggest that an increase in ACC deaminase activity in this strain does not extend the lifespan of nodules, whereas the lack of this activity may accelerate nodule senescence. PMID:26657304

  6. The type 3 effector NopL of Sinorhizobium sp. strain NGR234 is a mitogen-activated protein kinase substrate.

    PubMed

    Ge, Ying-Ying; Xiang, Qi-Wang; Wagner, Christian; Zhang, Di; Xie, Zhi-Ping; Staehelin, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Pathogenic bacteria utilize type 3 secretion systems to inject type 3 effectors (T3Es) into host cells, thereby subverting host defense reactions. Similarly, T3Es of symbiotic nitrogen-fixing rhizobia can affect nodule formation on roots of legumes. Previous work showed that NopL (nodulation outer protein L) of Sinorhizobium(Ensifer) sp. strain NGR234 is multiply phosphorylated in eukaryotic cells and that this T3E suppresses responses mediated by mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signaling in yeast (mating pheromone signaling) and plant cells (expression of pathogenesis-related defense proteins). Here, we show that NopL is a MAP kinase substrate. Microscopic observations of fluorescent fusion proteins and bimolecular fluorescence complementation analysis in onion cells indicated that NopL is targeted to the nucleus and forms a complex with SIPK (salicylic acid-induced protein kinase), a MAP kinase of tobacco. In vitro experiments demonstrated that NopL is phosphorylatyed by SIPK. At least nine distinct spots were observed after two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, indicating that NopL can be hyperphosphorylated by MAP kinases. Senescence symptoms in nodules of beans (Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Tendergreen) were analyzed to determine the symbiotic effector activity of different NopL variants with serine to alanine substitutions at identified and predicted phosphorylation sites (serine-proline motif). NopL variants with six or eight serine to alanine substitutions were partially active, whereas NopL forms with 10 or 12 substituted serine residues were inactive. In conclusion, our findings provide evidence that NopL interacts with MAP kinases and reveals the importance of serine-proline motifs for effector activity during symbiosis. PMID:26931172

  7. Structural determination of a 5-acetamido-3,5,7, 9-tetradeoxy-7-(3-hydroxybutyramido)-L-glycero-L-manno-nonulos onic acid-containing homopolysaccharide isolated from Sinorhizobium fredii HH103.

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Serrano, A M; Rodríguez-Carvajal, M A; Tejero-Mateo, P; Espartero, J L; Menendez, M; Corzo, J; Ruiz-Sainz, J E; BuendíA-Clavería, A M

    1999-01-01

    The structure of a polysaccharide from Sinorhizobium fredii HH103 has been determined. This polysaccharide was isolated by following the protocol for lipopolysaccharide extraction. On the basis of monosaccharide analysis, methylation analysis, fast atom bombardment MS, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization MS, electron-impact high-resolution MS, one-dimensional (1)H-NMR and (13)C-NMR and two-dimensional NMR experiments, the structure was shown to consist of a homopolymer of a 3:1 mixture of 5-acetamido-3,5,7, 9-tetradeoxy-7-[(R)- and (S)-3-hydroxybutyramido]-l-glycero-l-manno-nonulosonic acid. The sugar residues are attached via a glycosidic linkage to the OH group of the 3-hydroxybutyramido substituent and thus the monomers are linked via both glycosidic and amidic linkages. In contrast with the Sinorhizobium K-antigens previously reported, which are composed of a disaccharide repeating unit, the K-antigen polysacharide of S. fredii HH103 is a homopolysaccharide. PMID:10477263

  8. Genetic analysis of Rhizobium meliloti bacA-phoA fusion results in identification of degP: two loci required for symbiosis are closely linked to degP.

    PubMed Central

    Glazebrook, J; Ichige, A; Walker, G C

    1996-01-01

    The function of the Rhizobium meliloti bacA gene, which is a homolog of the Escherichia coli sbmA gene, is required for an intermediate step in nodule development. A strain carrying the bacA386::TnphoA fusion was mutagenized with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, and three mutants that had higher levels of alkaline phosphatase activity were identified. The mutations in these strains were recessive and mapped to the same genetic locus. The gene affected by these mutations was identified and sequenced and was found to be a homolog of the E. coli degP gene, which encodes a periplasmic endopeptidase. Although degP function is important for the virulence of certain intracellular pathogens of mammals, it is not required for the R. meliloti-alfalfa symbiosis. The genetic analyses involving degP were complicated by the presence of a locus immediately upstream of depP that was lethal when present in multiple copies in a DegP- background. R. meliloti derivatives carrying insertion mutations in this locus displayed an N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine oxidase-negative phenotype, elicited the formation of white cylindrical nodules that did not fix nitrogen, and grew slowly in rich medium, suggesting that the locus was a cyc gene encoding a protein involved in the biosynthesis of a component or components of a respiratory chain. The previously identified fix-382::TnphoA, which similarly causes the formation of white cylindrical nodules that do not fix nitrogen, was shown to affect a gene that is separate from this cyc gene but extremely closely linked to it. PMID:8550509

  9. Alfalfa nodules elicited by a flavodoxin-overexpressing Ensifer meliloti strain display nitrogen-fixing activity with enhanced tolerance to salinity stress.

    PubMed

    Redondo, Francisco J; Coba de la Peña, Teodoro; Lucas, M Mercedes; Pueyo, José J

    2012-12-01

    Nitrogen fixation by legumes is very sensitive to salinity stress, which can severely reduce the productivity of legume crops and their soil-enriching capacity. Salinity is known to cause oxidative stress in the nodule by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS). Flavodoxins are involved in the response to oxidative stress in bacteria and cyanobacteria. Prevention of ROS production by flavodoxin overexpression in bacteroids might lead to a protective effect on nodule functioning under salinity stress. Tolerance to salinity stress was evaluated in alfalfa nodules elicited by an Ensifer meliloti strain that overexpressed a cyanobacterial flavodoxin compared with nodules produced by the wild-type bacteria. Nitrogen fixation, antioxidant and carbon metabolism enzyme activities were determined. The decline in nitrogenase activity associated to salinity stress was significantly less in flavodoxin-expressing than in wild-type nodules. We detected small but significant changes in nodule antioxidant metabolism involving the ascorbate-glutathione cycle enzymes and metabolites, as well as differences in activity of the carbon metabolism enzyme sucrose synthase, and an atypical starch accumulation pattern in flavodoxin-containing nodules. Salt-induced structural and ultrastructural alterations were examined in detail in alfalfa wild-type nodules by light and electron microscopy and compared to flavodoxin-containing nodules. Flavodoxin reduced salt-induced structural damage, which primarily affected young infected tissues and not fully differentiated bacteroids. The results indicate that overexpression of flavodoxin in bacteroids has a protective effect on the function and structure of alfalfa nodules subjected to salinity stress conditions. Putative protection mechanisms are discussed.

  10. Rhizobium fredii and Rhizobium meliloti produce 3-deoxy-D-manno-2-octulosonic acid-containing polysaccharides that are structurally analogous to group II K antigens (capsular polysaccharides) found in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Reuhs, B L; Carlson, R W; Kim, J S

    1993-06-01

    The polysaccharide components from cultured cells of Rhizobium fredii USDA205 and Rhizobium meliloti AK631 were extracted with hot phenol-water and separated by repetitive gel filtration chromatography. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry, and gas chromatography analyses showed that both of these bacterial species produce unique polysaccharides that contain a high proportion of 3-deoxy-D-manno-2-octulosonic acid (Kdo). These polysaccharides, which constituted a major portion of the extracted carbohydrate, are not excreted into the growth media (i.e., they are not extracellular polysaccharides) and are structurally distinct from the lipopolysaccharides. The primary structure of the preponderant polysaccharide from R. fredii USDA205 was determined by high-performance anion-exchange liquid chromatography, nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry, fast atom bombardment-mass spectrometry, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry; it consists of repeating units of [-->3)-alpha-D-Galp-(1-->5)-beta-D-Kdop-(2-->]n. This molecule is structurally analogous to the constituents of one subgroup of K antigens (capsular polysaccharides) produced by Escherichia coli. Polysaccharides of this type have not previously been identified as components of rhizobial cells. The Kdo-containing polysaccharide from R. meliloti, which has not been completely characterized, appears to be structurally related to that of R. fredii.

  11. Alfalfa yield response to inoculation with recombinant strains of Rhizobium meliloti with an extra copy of dctABD and/or modified nifA expression.

    PubMed

    Bosworth, A H; Williams, M K; Albrecht, K A; Kwiatkowski, R; Beynon, J; Hankinson, T R; Ronson, C W; Cannon, F; Wacek, T J; Triplett, E W

    1994-10-01

    The construction of rhizobial strains which increase plant biomass under controlled conditions has been previously reported. However, there is no evidence that these newly constructed strains increase legume yield under agricultural conditions. This work tested the hypothesis that carefully manipulating expression of additional copies of nifA and dctABD in strains of Rhizobium meliloti would increase alfalfa yield in the field. The rationale for this hypothesis is based on the positive regulatory role that nifA plays in the expression of the nif regulon and the fact that a supply of dicarboxylic acids from the plant is required as a carbon and energy source for nitrogen fixation by the Rhizobium bacteroids in the nodule. These recombinant strains, as well as the wild-type strains from which they were derived, are ideal tools to examine the effects of modifying or increasing the expression of these genes on alfalfa biomass. The experimental design comprised seven recombinant strains, two wild-type strains, and an uninoculated control. Each treatment was replicated eight times and was conducted at four field sites in Wisconsin. Recombinant strain RMBPC-2, which has an additional copy of both nifA and dctABD, increased alfalfa biomass by 12.9% compared with the yield with the wild-type strain RMBPC and 17.9% over that in the uninoculated control plot at the site where soil nitrogen and organic matter content was lowest. These increases were statistically significant at the 5% confidence interval for each of the three harvests made during the growing season. Strain RMBPC-2 did increase alfalfa biomass at the Hancock site; however, no other significant increases or decreases in alfalfa biomass were observed with the seven other recombinant strains at that site. At three sites where this experiment was conducted, either native rhizobial populations or soil nitrogen concentrations were high. At these sites, none of the recombinant strains affected yield. We conclude that

  12. Final report for DOE grant FG02-06ER15805

    SciTech Connect

    Gage, Daniel

    2012-05-31

    DOE funding was used to investigate the role of the phosphotransferase system (PTS) in the symbiotic, nodulating bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti. This system is well studied in several bacterial species. However, it's organization and function in S. meliloti is substantially different than in the those other, well-studied bacteria. The S. meliloti PTS, through our DOE-funded work, has become a model for how this important signal transduction system works in the a-proteobacteria. We have found that the PTS is relatively simple, used for only signal transduction and not transport, and is involved in regulation of carbon metabolism in response to carbon availability and nitrogen availability.

  13. Molecular cloning of higher-plant 3-oxoacyl-(acyl carrier protein) reductase. Sequence identities with the nodG-gene product of the nitrogen-fixing soil bacterium Rhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed Central

    Slabas, A R; Chase, D; Nishida, I; Murata, N; Sidebottom, C; Safford, R; Sheldon, P S; Kekwick, R G; Hardie, D G; Mackintosh, R W

    1992-01-01

    cDNA clones encoding the fatty-acid- biosynthetic enzyme NADPH-linked 3-oxoacyl-(acyl carrier protein) (ACP) reductase were isolated from a Brassica napus (rape) developing seed library and from an Arabidopsis thaliana (thale cress) leaf library. The N-terminal end of the coding region shows features typical of a stromal-targeting plastid-transit peptide. The deduced amino acid sequences have 41% and 55% identity respectively with the nodG-gene product of Rhizobium meliloti, one of the host-specific genes that restrict infectivity of this bacterium to a small range of host plants. The probability that the nodG-gene product is a oxoreductase strengthens the hypothesis that some of the host-specific nod-gene products are enzymes which synthesize polyketides that uniquely modify the Rhizobium nodulation signal molecule. PMID:1575676

  14. Persistence and diversity of rhizobial bacteria nodulating alfalfa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most alfalfa seed is treated with an inoculant consisting of several strains of the nitrogen fixing bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti to enhance nodulation of seedlings. One strategy for increasing alfalfa forage yields, particularly in less fertile sites, is selection and use of highly competitive a...

  15. Application of Multilocus Sequence Typing To Study the Genetic Structure of Megaplasmids in Medicago-Nodulating Rhizobia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis was used to examine the relatedness and distribution of genotypic variants of the two large extrachromosomal replicons in Medicago-nodulating rhizobia (Sinorhizobium meliloti and S. medicae). One goal was to develop a strategy for the characterization of...

  16. Acacia senegal and Prosopis chilensis-nodulating rhizobia Sinorhizobium arboris HAMBI 2361 and S. kostiense HAMBI 2362 produce tetra- and pentameric LCOs that are N-methylated, O-6-carbamoylated and partially sulfated.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Petri; Soupas, Laura; Thomas-Oates, Jane; Lindström, Kristina

    2004-04-28

    Sinorhizobium arboris and S. kostiense are rhizobia that nodulate the tropical leguminous trees Acacia senegal and Prosopis chilensis. The lipochito-oligosaccharidic signalling molecules (LCOs) of S. arboris HAMBI 2361 and S. kostiense HAMBI 2362 were analyzed by mass spectrometry. The major LCOs produced by the strains were shown to be pentameric, acylated with common fatty acids, N-methylated, O-6-carbamoylated and partially sulfated, as are the LCOs characterized to date for other Acacia-nodulating rhizobia. Besides the major LCOs the two strains produced (i) tetrameric LCOs, (ii) LCOs acylated with fatty acids other than those commonly found, (iii) LCOs with only an acyl substituent and (iv) noncarbamoylated LCOs. Production of LCOs (i) to (iii) are novel among Acacia-nodulating rhizobia. The roles of the different structural characteristics of LCOs in the rhizobium-A. senegal symbiosis are discussed. Specific structural features of the LCOs are proposed to be important in the selection of effective nitrogen-fixing rhizobia by A. senegal.

  17. Melanin production by Rhizobium meliloti GR4 is linked to nonsymbiotic plasmid pRmeGR4b: cloning, sequencing, and expression of the tyrosinase gene mepA.

    PubMed Central

    Mercado-Blanco, J; García, F; Fernández-López, M; Olivares, J

    1993-01-01

    Melanin production by Rhizobium meliloti GR4 is linked to nonsymbiotic plasmid pRmeGR4b (140 MDa). Transfer of this plasmid to GR4-cured derivatives or to Agrobacterium tumefaciens enables these bacteria to produce melanin. Sequence analysis of a 3.5-kb PstI fragment of plasmid pRmeGR4b has revealed the presence of a open reading frame 1,481-bp that codes for a protein whose sequence shows strong homology to two conserved regions involved in copper binding in tyrosinases and hemocyanins. In vitro-coupled transcription-translation experiments showed that this open reading frame codes for a 55-kDa polypeptide. Melanin production in GR4 is not under the control of the RpoN-NifA regulatory system, unlike that in R. leguminosarum bv. phaseoli 8002. The GR4 tyrosinase gene could be expressed in Escherichia coli under the control of the lacZ promoter. For avoiding confusion with mel genes (for melibiose), a change of the name of the previously reported mel genes of R. leguminosarum bv. phaseoli and other organisms to mep genes (for melanin production) is proposed. Images PMID:8366027

  18. N-acyl-homoserine lactones-producing bacteria protect plants against plant and human pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Reyes, Casandra; Schenk, Sebastian T; Neumann, Christina; Kogel, Karl-Heinz; Schikora, Adam

    2014-01-01

    The implementation of beneficial microorganisms for plant protection has a long history. Many rhizobia bacteria are able to influence the immune system of host plants by inducing resistance towards pathogenic microorganisms. In this report, we present a translational approach in which we demonstrate the resistance-inducing effect of Ensifer meliloti (Sinorhizobium meliloti) on crop plants that have a significant impact on the worldwide economy and on human nutrition. Ensifer meliloti is usually associated with root nodulation in legumes and nitrogen fixation. Here, we suggest that the ability of S. meliloti to induce resistance depends on the production of the quorum-sensing molecule, oxo-C14-HSL. The capacity to enhanced resistance provides a possibility to the use these beneficial bacteria in agriculture. Using the Arabidopsis-Salmonella model, we also demonstrate that the application of N-acyl-homoserine lactones-producing bacteria could be a successful strategy to prevent plant-originated infections with human pathogens. PMID:25234390

  19. Microgravity Effects on the Early Events of Biological Nitrogen Fixation in Medicago Truncatula: Results from the SyNRGE Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutte, Gary W.; Roberts, Michael

    2012-01-01

    SyNRGE (Symbiotic Nodulation in a Reduced Gravity Environment) was a sortie mission on STS-135 in the Biological Research in Canisters (BRIC) hardware to study the effect of microgravity on a plant-microbe symbiosis resulting in biological nitrogen fixation. Medicago truncatula, a model species for th legume family, was inoculated with its bacterial symbiont, Sinorhizobium meliloti, to observe early biomolecular events associated with infection and nodulation in Petri Dish Fixation Units (PDFU's).

  20. Genetic characterization of fast-growing rhizobia able to nodulate Prosopis alba in North Spain.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Olga; Rivas, Raúl; García-Fraile, Paula; Abril, Adriana; Mateos, Pedro F; Martinez-Molina, Eustoquio; Velázquez, Encarna

    2007-12-01

    Prosopis is a Mimosaceae legume tree indigenous to South America and not naturalized in Europe. In this work 18 rhizobial strains nodulating Prosopis alba roots were isolated from a soil in North Spain that belong to eight different randomly amplified polymorphic DNA groups phylogenetically related to Sinorhizobium medicae, Sinorhizobium meliloti and Rhizobium giardinii according to their intergenic spacer and 16S rRNA gene sequences. The nodC genes of isolates close to S. medicae and S. meliloti were identical to those of S. medicae USDA 1,037(T) and S. meliloti LMG 6,133(T) and accordingly all these strains were able to nodulate both alfalfa and Prosopis. These nodC genes were phylogenetically divergent from those of the isolates close to R. giardinii that were identical to that of R. giardinii H152(T) and therefore all these strains formed nodules in common beans and Prosopis. The nodC genes of the strains isolated in Spain were phylogenetically divergent from that carried by Mesorhizobium chacoense Pr-5(T) and Sinorhizobium arboris LMG 1,4919(T) nodulating Prosopis in America and Africa, respectively. Therefore, Prosopis is a promiscuous host which can establish symbiosis with strains carrying very divergent nodC genes and this promiscuity may be an important advantage for this legume tree to be used in reforestation.

  1. Occurrence of Choline and Glycine Betaine Uptake and Metabolism in the Family Rhizobiaceae and Their Roles in Osmoprotection

    PubMed Central

    Boncompagni, Eric; Østerås, Magne; Poggi, Marie-Christine; le Rudulier, Daniel

    1999-01-01

    The role of glycine betaine and choline in osmoprotection of various Rhizobium, Sinorhizobium, Mesorhizobium, Agrobacterium, and Bradyrhizobium reference strains which display a large variation in salt tolerance was investigated. When externally provided, both compounds enhanced the growth of Rhizobium tropici, Sinorhizobium meliloti, Sinorhizobium fredii, Rhizobium galegae, Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Mesorhizobium loti, and Mesorhizobium huakuii, demonstrating their utilization as osmoprotectants. However, both compounds were inefficient for the most salt-sensitive strains, such as Rhizobium leguminosarum (all biovars), Agrobacterium rhizogenes, Rhizobium etli, and Bradyrhizobium japonicum. Except for B. japonicum, all strains exhibit transport activity for glycine betaine and choline. When the medium osmolarity was raised, choline uptake activity was inhibited, whereas glycine betaine uptake was either increased in R. leguminosarum and S. meliloti or, more surprisingly, reduced in R. tropici, S. fredii, and M. loti. The transport of glycine betaine was increased by growing the cells in the presence of the substrate. With the exception of B. japonicum, all strains were able to use glycine betaine and choline as sole carbon and nitrogen sources. This catabolic function, reported for only a few soil bacteria, could increase competitiveness of rhizobial species in the rhizosphere. Choline dehydrogenase and betaine-aldehyde dehydrogenase activities were present in the cells of all strains with the exception of M. huakuii and B. japonicum. The main physiological role of glycine betaine in the family Rhizobiaceae seems to be as an energy source, while its contribution to osmoprotection is restricted to certain strains. PMID:10224003

  2. RNA Sequencing Analysis of the Broad-Host-Range Strain Sinorhizobium fredii NGR234 Identifies a Large Set of Genes Linked to Quorum Sensing-Dependent Regulation in the Background of a traI and ngrI Deletion Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Krysciak, Dagmar; Grote, Jessica; Rodriguez Orbegoso, Mariita; Utpatel, Christian; Förstner, Konrad U.; Li, Lei; Schmeisser, Christel; Krishnan, Hari B.

    2014-01-01

    The alphaproteobacterium Sinorhizobium fredii NGR234 has an exceptionally wide host range, as it forms nitrogen-fixing nodules with more legumes than any other known microsymbiont. Within its 6.9-Mbp genome, it encodes two N-acyl-homoserine-lactone synthase genes (i.e., traI and ngrI) involved in the biosynthesis of two distinct autoinducer I-type molecules. Here, we report on the construction of an NGR234-ΔtraI and an NGR234-ΔngrI mutant and their genome-wide transcriptome analysis. A high-resolution RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis of early-stationary-phase cultures in the NGR234-ΔtraI background suggested that up to 316 genes were differentially expressed in the NGR234-ΔtraI mutant versus the parent strain. Similarly, in the background of NGR234-ΔngrI 466 differentially regulated genes were identified. Accordingly, a common set of 186 genes was regulated by the TraI/R and NgrI/R regulon. Coregulated genes included 42 flagellar biosynthesis genes and 22 genes linked to exopolysaccharide (EPS) biosynthesis. Among the genes and open reading frames (ORFs) that were differentially regulated in NGR234-ΔtraI were those linked to replication of the pNGR234a symbiotic plasmid and cytochrome c oxidases. Biotin and pyrroloquinoline quinone biosynthesis genes were differentially expressed in the NGR234-ΔngrI mutant as well as the entire cluster of 21 genes linked to assembly of the NGR234 type III secretion system (T3SS-II). Further, we also discovered that genes responsible for rhizopine catabolism in NGR234 were strongly repressed in the presence of high levels of N-acyl-homoserine-lactones. Together with nodulation assays, the RNA-seq-based findings suggested that quorum sensing (QS)-dependent gene regulation appears to be of higher relevance during nonsymbiotic growth rather than for life within root nodules. PMID:25002423

  3. Comparison of the ‘Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus’ Genome Adapted for an Intracellular Lifestyle with Other Members of the Rhizobiales

    PubMed Central

    Hartung, John S.; Shao, Jonathan; Kuykendall, L. David

    2011-01-01

    An intracellular plant pathogen ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus,’ a member of the Rhizobiales, is related to Sinorhizobium meliloti, Bradyrhizobium japonicum, nitrogen fixing endosymbionts, Agrobacterium tumefaciens, a plant pathogen, and Bartonella henselae, an intracellular mammalian pathogen. Whole chromosome comparisons identified at least 50 clusters of conserved orthologous genes found on the chromosomes of all five metabolically diverse species. The intracellular pathogens ‘Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus’ and Bartonella henselae have genomes drastically reduced in gene content and size as well as a relatively low content of guanine and cytosine. Codon and amino acid preferences that emphasize low guanosine and cytosine usage are globally employed in these genomes, including within regions of microsynteny and within signature sequences of orthologous proteins. The length of orthologous proteins is generally conserved, but not their isoelectric points, consistent with extensive amino acid substitutions to accommodate selection for low GC content. The ‘Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus’ genome apparently has all of the genes required for DNA replication present in Sinorhizobium meliloti except it has only two, rather than three RNaseH genes. The gene set required for DNA repair has only one rather than ten DNA ligases found in Sinorhizobium meliloti, and the DNA PolI of ‘Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus’ lacks domains needed for excision repair. Thus the ability of ‘Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus’ to repair mutations in its genome may be impaired. Both ‘Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus and Bartonella henselae lack enzymes needed for the metabolism of purines and pyrimidines, which must therefore be obtained from the host. The ‘Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus’ genome also has a greatly reduced set of sigma factors used to control transcription, and lacks sigma factors 24, 28 and 38. The ‘Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus’ genome has all of the hallmarks of a reduced

  4. Methods for the isolation of genes encoding novel PHB cycle enzymes from complex microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Nordeste, Ricardo F; Trainer, Maria A; Charles, Trevor C

    2010-01-01

    Development of different PHAs as alternatives to petrochemically derived plastics can be facilitated by mining metagenomic libraries for diverse PHA cycle genes that might be useful for synthesis of bioplastics. The specific phenotypes associated with mutations of the PHA synthesis pathway genes in Sinorhizobium meliloti allows for the use of powerful selection and screening tools to identify complementing novel PHA synthesis genes. Identification of novel genes through their function rather than sequence facilitates finding functional proteins that may otherwise have been excluded through sequence-only screening methodology. We present here methods that we have developed for the isolation of clones expressing novel PHA metabolism genes from metagenomic libraries.

  5. The effect of acidity on the distribution and symbiotic efficiency of rhizobia in Lithuanian soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapinskas, E. B.

    2007-04-01

    The distribution and symbiotic efficiency of nodule bacteria Rhizobium leguminosarum_bv. trifolii F., Sinorhizobium meliloti D., Rhizobium galegae L., and Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae F. in Lithuanian soils as dependent on the soil acidity were studied in the long-term field, pot, and laboratory experiments. The critical and optimal pH values controlling the distribution of rhizobia and the symbiotic nitrogen fixation were determined for every bacterial species. The relationship was found between the soil pH and the nitrogen-fixing capacity of rhizobia. A positive effect of liming of acid soils in combination with inoculation of legumes on the efficiency of symbiotic nitrogen fixation was demonstrated.

  6. Methods for the isolation of genes encoding novel PHB cycle enzymes from complex microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Nordeste, Ricardo F; Trainer, Maria A; Charles, Trevor C

    2010-01-01

    Development of different PHAs as alternatives to petrochemically derived plastics can be facilitated by mining metagenomic libraries for diverse PHA cycle genes that might be useful for synthesis of bioplastics. The specific phenotypes associated with mutations of the PHA synthesis pathway genes in Sinorhizobium meliloti allows for the use of powerful selection and screening tools to identify complementing novel PHA synthesis genes. Identification of novel genes through their function rather than sequence facilitates finding functional proteins that may otherwise have been excluded through sequence-only screening methodology. We present here methods that we have developed for the isolation of clones expressing novel PHA metabolism genes from metagenomic libraries. PMID:20830568

  7. Molecular cloning and characterization of cgt, the Brucella abortus cyclic beta-1,2-glucan transporter gene, and its role in virulence.

    PubMed

    Roset, Mara S; Ciocchini, Andrés E; Ugalde, Rodolfo A; Iñón de Iannino, Nora

    2004-04-01

    The animal pathogen Brucella abortus contains a gene cgt, which complemented Sinorhizobium meliloti nodule development (ndvA) and Agrobacterium tumefaciens chromosomal virulence (chvA) mutants. Complemented strains recovered the presence of anionic cyclic beta-1,2-glucan, motility, tumor induction in A. tumefaciens, and nodule occupancy in S. meliloti, all traits strictly associated with the presence of cyclic beta-1,2-glucan in the periplasm. Nucleotide sequencing revealed that B. abortus cgt contains a 1,797-bp open reading frame coding for a predicted membrane protein of 599 amino acids (65.9 kDa) that is 58.5 and 59.9% identical to S. meliloti NdvA and A. tumefaciens ChvA, respectively. Additionally, B. abortus cgt, like S. meliloti ndvA and A. tumefaciens chvA possesses ATP-binding motifs and the ABC signature domain features of a typical ABC transporter. Characterization of Cgt was carried out by the construction of null mutants in B. abortus 2308 and S19 backgrounds. Both mutants do not transport cyclic beta-1,2-glucan to the periplasm, as shown by the absence of anionic cyclic glucan, and they display reduced virulence in mice and defective intracellular multiplication in HeLa cells. These results suggest that cyclic beta-1,2-glucan must be transported into the periplasmatic space to exert its action as a virulence factor. PMID:15039351

  8. Multifaceted Investigation of Metabolites During Nitrogen Fixation in Medicago via High Resolution MALDI-MS Imaging and ESI-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemperline, Erin; Jayaraman, Dhileepkumar; Maeda, Junko; Ané, Jean-Michel; Li, Lingjun

    2015-01-01

    Legumes have developed the unique ability to establish a symbiotic relationship with soil bacteria known as rhizobia. This interaction results in the formation of root nodules in which rhizobia thrive and reduce atmospheric dinitrogen into plant-usable ammonium through biological nitrogen fixation (BNF). Owing to the availability of genetic information for both of the symbiotic partners, the Medicago truncatula- Sinorhizobium meliloti association is an excellent model for examining the BNF process. Although metabolites are important in this symbiotic association, few studies have investigated the array of metabolites that influence this process. Of these studies, most target only a few specific metabolites, the roles of which are either well known or are part of a well-characterized metabolic pathway. Here, we used a multifaceted mass spectrometric (MS) approach to detect and identify the key metabolites that are present during BNF using the Medicago truncatula- Sinorhizobium meliloti association as the model system. High mass accuracy and high resolution matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) and electrospray ionization (ESI) Orbitrap instruments were used in this study and provide complementary results for more in-depth characterization of the nitrogen-fixation process. We used well-characterized plant and bacterial mutants to highlight differences between the metabolites that are present in functional versus nonfunctional nodules. Our study highlights the benefits of using a combination of mass spectrometric techniques to detect differences in metabolite composition and the distributions of these metabolites in plant biology.

  9. Microorganisms from Permafrost Viable and Detectable by 16SRNA Analysis: A Model for Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsapin, A. I.; McDonald, G. D.; Andrews, M.; Bhartia, R.; Douglas, S.; Gilichinsky, D.

    1999-01-01

    Preliminary studies of Arctic and Antarctic permafrost have shown that this environment harbors microorganisms which can be isolated in pure culture, and that these organisms can survive for a long period of time (up to 20 Ma) in permafrost. It is believed that the permanent subzero temperatures in permafrost and ice environments are the main parameters ensuring the longevity of microbes. In this project we studied permafrost cores from different areas of the Siberian Arctic and Antarctic, with ages from several thousand years up to several millions years (Ma). In general, Antarctic permafrost has a higher sand content, while Siberian permafrost has a texture more characteristic of clay or normal soil. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  10. A new custom microarray for sRNA profiling in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Larrabeiti, Olatz; Plágaro, Ander Hernández; Gracia, Celine; Sevillano, Elena; Gallego, Lucía; Hajnsdorf, Eliane; Kaberdin, Vladimir R

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial small RNAs (sRNAs) play essential roles in the post-transcriptional control of gene expression. To improve their detection by conventional microarrays, we designed a custom microarray containing a group of probes targeting known and some putative Escherichia coli sRNAs. To assess its potential in detection of sRNAs, RNA profiling experiments were performed with total RNA extracted from E. coli MG1655 cells exponentially grown in rich (Luria-Bertani) and minimal (M9/glucose) media. We found that many sRNAs could yield reasonably strong and statistically significant signals corresponding to nearly all sRNAs annotated in the EcoCyc database. Besides differential expression of two sRNAs (GcvB and RydB), expression of other sRNAs was less affected by the composition of the growth media. Other examples of the differentially expressed sRNAs were revealed by comparing gene expression of the wild-type strain and its isogenic mutant lacking functional poly(A) polymerase I (pcnB). Further, northern blot analysis was employed to validate these data and to assess the existence of new putative sRNAs. Our results suggest that the use of custom microarrays with improved capacities for detection of sRNAs can offer an attractive opportunity for efficient gene expression profiling of sRNAs and their target mRNAs at the whole transcriptome level. PMID:27190161

  11. New tools for discovering the role sRNA plays in cellular regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, Douglas P.; Li, Nan; Hong-Geller, Elizabeth; Munsky, Brian; Werner, James H.

    2012-02-01

    We have used single molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization (smFISH) to study cell-to-cell heterogeneity of messenger RNA (mRNA) copy numbers for human host cells subject to a variety of external stimuli. In order to study the effect of various stimuli and genetic modifications on mRNA copy number, we have constructed an automated highthroughput multiplexed imaging system and data analysis package capable of localizing large numbers of individual mRNA transcripts in three dimensions. These experimental distributions of mRNA are used to refine and down-select regulatory models. Here we present a case example of Interleukin 1 alpha mRNA production in response to immune system stimulation. We propose a methodology for extending these methods to study the effect of small RNA on genetic expression by combining multiplexed imaging and numerical modeling at the system-level.

  12. Transcript analysis of nrrF, a Fur repressed sRNA of Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Like most microorganisms, Neisseria gonorrhoeae alters gene expression in response to iron availability. The ferric uptake regulator Fur has been shown to be involved in controlling this response, but the extent of this involvement remains unknown. It is known that in addition to working directly to...

  13. Molecular Signals Controlling the Inhibition of Nodulation by Nitrate in Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    van Noorden, Giel E.; Verbeek, Rob; Dinh, Quy Dung; Jin, Jian; Green, Alexandra; Ng, Jason Liang Pin; Mathesius, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    The presence of nitrogen inhibits legume nodule formation, but the mechanism of this inhibition is poorly understood. We found that 2.5 mM nitrate and above significantly inhibited nodule initiation but not root hair curling in Medicago trunatula. We analyzed protein abundance in M. truncatula roots after treatment with either 0 or 2.5 mM nitrate in the presence or absence of its symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti after 1, 2 and 5 days following inoculation. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis combined with mass spectrometry was used to identify 106 differentially accumulated proteins responding to nitrate addition, inoculation or time point. While flavonoid-related proteins were less abundant in the presence of nitrate, addition of Nod gene-inducing flavonoids to the Sinorhizobium culture did not rescue nodulation. Accumulation of auxin in response to rhizobia, which is also controlled by flavonoids, still occurred in the presence of nitrate, but did not localize to a nodule initiation site. Several of the changes included defense- and redox-related proteins, and visualization of reactive oxygen species indicated that their induction in root hairs following Sinorhizobium inoculation was inhibited by nitrate. In summary, the presence of nitrate appears to inhibit nodulation via multiple pathways, including changes to flavonoid metabolism, defense responses and redox changes. PMID:27384556

  14. The Effects of Clinorotation on the Host Plant, Medicago truncatula, and Its Microbial Symbionts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauzart, Ariel; Vandenbrink, Joshua; Kiss, John

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the outcome of the plant-microbe symbiosis in altered gravity is vital to developing life support systems for long-distance space travel and colonization of other planets. Thus, the aim of this research was to understand mutualistic relationships between plants and endophytic microbes under the influence of altered gravity. This project utilized the model tripartite relationship among Medicago truncatula ¬- Sinorhizobium meliloti - Rhizophagus irregularis. Plants were inoculated with rhizobial bacteria (S. meliloti), arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (R. irregularis), or both microbes, and placed on a rotating clinostat. Vertical and horizontal static controls were also performed. Clinorotation significantly reduced M. truncatula dry mass and fresh mass compared to the static controls. The addition of rhizobia treatments under clinorotation also altered total root length and root-to-shoot fresh mass ratio. Nodule size decreased under rhizobia + clinorotation treatment, and nodule density was significantly decreased compared to the vertical treatment. However, inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi was shown to increase biomass accumulation and nodule size. Thus, clinorotation significantly affected M. truncatula and its symbiotic relationships with S. meliloti and R. irregularis. In the long term, the results observed in this clinostat study on the changes of plant-microbe mutualism need to be investigated in spaceflight experiments. Thus, careful consideration of the symbiotic microbes of plants should be included in the design of bioregenerative life support systems needed for space travel.

  15. Overproduction of Indole-3-Acetic Acid in Free-Living Rhizobia Induces Transcriptional Changes Resembling Those Occurring in Nodule Bacteroids.

    PubMed

    Defez, Roberto; Esposito, Roberta; Angelini, Claudia; Bianco, Carmen

    2016-06-01

    Free-living bacteria grown under aerobic conditions were used to investigate, by next-generation RNA sequencing analysis, the transcriptional profiles of Sinorhizobium meliloti wild-type 1021 and its derivative, RD64, overproducing the main auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). Among the upregulated genes in RD64 cells, we detected the main nitrogen-fixation regulator fixJ, the two intermediate regulators fixK and nifA, and several other genes known to be FixJ targets. The gene coding for the sigma factor RpoH1 and other genes involved in stress response, regulated in a RpoH1-dependent manner in S. meliloti, were also induced in RD64 cells. Under microaerobic condition, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that the genes fixJL and nifA were up-regulated in RD64 cells as compared with 1021 cells. This work provided evidence that the overexpression of IAA in S. meliloti free-living cells induced many of the transcriptional changes that normally occur in nitrogen-fixing root nodule. PMID:27003799

  16. Enteric YaiW Is a Surface-Exposed Outer Membrane Lipoprotein That Affects Sensitivity to an Antimicrobial Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Markus F. F.; Caro-Hernandez, Paola; Tan, Karen; Runti, Giulia; Wehmeier, Silvia; Scocchi, Marco; Doerrler, William T.; Ferguson, Gail P.

    2014-01-01

    yaiW is a previously uncharacterized gene found in enteric bacteria that is of particular interest because it is located adjacent to the sbmA gene, whose bacA ortholog is required for Sinorhizobium meliloti symbiosis and Brucella abortus pathogenesis. We show that yaiW is cotranscribed with sbmA in Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi and Typhimurium strains. We present evidence that the YaiW is a palmitate-modified surface exposed outer membrane lipoprotein. Since BacA function affects the very-long-chain fatty acid (VLCFA) modification of S. meliloti and B. abortus lipid A, we tested whether SbmA function might affect either the fatty acid modification of the YaiW lipoprotein or the fatty acid modification of enteric lipid A but found that it did not. Interestingly, we did observe that E. coli SbmA suppresses deficiencies in the VLCFA modification of the lipopolysaccharide of an S. meliloti bacA mutant despite the absence of VLCFA in E. coli. Finally, we found that both YaiW and SbmA positively affect the uptake of proline-rich Bac7 peptides, suggesting a possible connection between their cellular functions. PMID:24214946

  17. Rhizobial symbiosis effect on the growth, metal uptake, and antioxidant responses of Medicago lupulina under copper stress.

    PubMed

    Kong, Zhaoyu; Mohamad, Osama Abdalla; Deng, Zhenshan; Liu, Xiaodong; Glick, Bernard R; Wei, Gehong

    2015-08-01

    The effects of rhizobial symbiosis on the growth, metal uptake, and antioxidant responses of Medicago lupulina in the presence of 200 mg kg(-1) Cu(2+) throughout different stages of symbiosis development were studied. The symbiosis with Sinorhizobium meliloti CCNWSX0020 induced an increase in plant growth and nitrogen content irrespective of the presence of Cu(2+). The total amount of Cu uptake of inoculated plants significantly increased by 34.0 and 120.4% in shoots and roots, respectively, compared with non-inoculated plants. However, although the rhizobial symbiosis promoted Cu accumulation both in shoots and roots, the increase in roots was much higher than in shoots, thus decreasing the translocation factor and helping Cu phytostabilization. The rate of lipid peroxidation was significantly decreased in both shoots and roots of inoculated vs. non-inoculated plants when measured either 8, 13, or 18 days post-inoculation. In comparison with non-inoculated plants, the activities of superoxide dismutase and ascorbate peroxidase of shoots of inoculated plants exposed to excess Cu were significantly elevated at different stages of symbiosis development; similar increases occurred in the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione reductase of inoculated roots. The symbiosis with S. meliloti CCNWSX0020 also upregulated the corresponding genes involved in antioxidant responses in the plants treated with excess Cu. The results indicated that the rhizobial symbiosis with S. meliloti CCNWSX0020 not only enhanced plant growth and metal uptake but also improved the responses of plant antioxidant defense to excess Cu stress.

  18. Occurrence and Potential Diagnostic Applications of Serological Cross-Reactivities between Brucella and Other Alpha-Proteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Delpino, M. Victoria; Fossati, Carlos A.; Baldi, Pablo C.

    2004-01-01

    Agrobacterium, Sinorhizobium, and Ochrobactrum are genera closely related to Brucella but, in contrast to the latter, are not pathogenic for humans and animals. We studied by an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) the reactivities of brucellosis sera against cytosolic (CYT) and membrane (MA) antigens from these nonpathogenic bacteria, and we evaluated the potential usefulness of these cross-reactions for the diagnosis of brucellosis in humans, sheep, cows, and dogs. Canine infection by Brucella canis was detected with high specificity by CYT antigen-based ELISAs (96% for Agrobacterium, 96% for Sinorhizobium, and 91% for Ochrobactrum), while sensitivity was variable (58% for Agrobacterium, 88% for Sinorhizobium, and 84% for Ochrobactrum). In addition, it was possible to diagnose canine disease shortly after exposure to the pathogen (15 days). Similar results for canine brucellosis were obtained with MA antigens. In contrast, normal sera from humans, sheep, and cattle reacted strongly with all the antigens (CYT and MA antigens from the three bacteria), producing high cutoff values and, consequently, low sensitivities. While for some host species the reactivity patterns of normal sera by Western blotting were similar to those produced with sera from infected individuals, the reactivity pattern of bovine sera against Sinorhizobium meliloti antigens exhibited some differential bands for the two groups of sera. These results show that crude fractions from nonpathogenic alpha-proteobacteria can be used to diagnose canine brucellosis but may need to be further separated into simpler fractions to have diagnostic usefulness in ovine, bovine, or human infection. By reducing the biosafety requirements, the use of antigens derived from these nonpathogenic bacteria would simplify the production of diagnostic kits for brucellosis, especially in settings where biosafety level-3 facilities are scarce or absent. PMID:15358645

  19. Colorimetric Detection of Some Highly Hydrophobic Flavonoids Using Polydiacetylene Liposomes Containing Pentacosa-10,12-diynoyl Succinoglycan Monomers

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Deokgyu; Jeong, Daham; Cho, Eunae; Jung, Seunho

    2015-01-01

    Flavonoids are a group of plant secondary metabolites including polyphenolic molecules, and they are well known for antioxidant, anti-allergic, anti-inflammatory and anti-viral propertied. In general, flavonoids are detected with various non-colorimetric detection methods such as column liquid chromatography, thin-layer chromatography, and electrochemical analysis. For the first time, we developed a straightforward colorimetric detection system allowing recognition of some highly hydrophobic flavonoids such as alpha-naphthoflavone and beta-naphthoflavone, visually using 10,12-pentacosadiynoic acid (PCDA) derivatized with succinoglycan monomers isolated from Sinorhizobium meliloti. Besides changes in visible spectrum, we also demonstrate fluorescence changes using our detection system in the presence of those flavonoids. The succinoglycan monomers attached to PCDA molecules may function as an unstructured molecular capturer for some highly hydrophobic flavonoids by hydrophobic interactions, and transmit their molecular interactions as a color change throughout the PCDA liposome. PMID:26600071

  20. Structural and Mechanistic Insights into C-P Bond Hydrolysis by Phosphonoacetate Hydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Vinayak; Borisova, Svetlana A.; Metcalf, William W.; van der Donk, Wilfred A.; Nair, Satish K.

    2011-12-22

    Bacteria have evolved pathways to metabolize phosphonates as a nutrient source for phosphorus. In Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021, 2-aminoethylphosphonate is catabolized to phosphonoacetate, which is converted to acetate and inorganic phosphate by phosphonoacetate hydrolase (PhnA). Here we present detailed biochemical and structural characterization of PhnA that provides insights into the mechanism of C-P bond cleavage. The 1.35 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure reveals a catalytic core similar to those of alkaline phosphatases and nucleotide pyrophosphatases but with notable differences, such as a longer metal-metal distance. Detailed structure-guided analysis of active site residues and four additional cocrystal structures with phosphonoacetate substrate, acetate, phosphonoformate inhibitor, and a covalently bound transition state mimic provide insight into active site features that may facilitate cleavage of the C-P bond. These studies expand upon the array of reactions that can be catalyzed by enzymes of the alkaline phosphatase superfamily.

  1. New Insights into the Biological Role of the Osmoregulated Periplasmic Glucans in Pathogenic and Symbiotic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Bontemps-Gallo, Sébastien; Lacroix, Jean-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Summary This review emphasizes the biological roles of the osmoregulated periplasmic glucans (OPGs). OPGs occur in almost all α, β and γ Proteobacteria. This polymer of glucose is required for full virulence. The roles of the OPGs are complex and vary depending on the species. Here, we outline the four major roles of the OPGs through four different pathogenic and one symbiotic bacterial models (Dickeya dadantii, Salmonella enterica, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Brucella abortus and Sinorhizobium meliloti). When periplasmic, the OPGs are a part of the signal transduction pathway and indirectly regulate genes involved in virulence. The OPGs can also be secreted. When outside of the cell, they interact directly with antibiotics to protect the bacterial cell or interact with the host cell to facilitate the invasion process. When OPGs are not found, as in the ε Proteobacteria, OPG-like oligosaccharides are present. Their presence strengthens the evidence that OPGs play an important role in virulence. PMID:26265506

  2. Exploring the intrinsic limits of nitrogenase transfer from bacteria to eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Soto, Gabriela; Fox, Ana Romina; Ayub, Nicolás Daniel

    2013-08-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation is widespread among the Eubacteria and Archae domains but completely absent in eukaryotes. The lack of lateral transfer of nitrogen-fixation genes from prokaryotes to eukaryotes has been partially attributed to the physiological requirements necessary for the function of the nitrogenase complex. However, symbiotic bacterial nitrogenase activity is protected by the nodule, a plant structure whose organogenesis can be trigged in the absence of bacteria. To explore the intrinsic potentiality of this plant organ, we generated rhizobium-independent nodules in alfalfa by overexpressing the MsDMI3 kinase lacking the autoinhibitory domain. These transgenic nodules showed similar levels of leghemoglobin, free oxygen, ATP, and NADPH to those of efficient Sinorhizobium meliloti B399-infected nodules, suggesting that the rhizobium-independent nodules can provide an optimal microenvironment for nitrogenase activity. Finally, we discuss the intrinsic evolutionary constraints on transfer of nitrogen-fixation genes between bacteria and eukaryotes.

  3. Optical disassembly of cellular clusters by tunable ‘tug-of-war’ tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Bezryadina, Anna S; Preece, Daryl C; Chen, Joseph C; Chen, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms underlie many persistent infections, posing major hurdles in antibiotic treatment. Here we design and demonstrate ‘tug-of-war’ optical tweezers that can facilitate the assessment of cell–cell adhesion—a key contributing factor to biofilm development, thanks to the combined actions of optical scattering and gradient forces. With a customized optical landscape distinct from that of conventional tweezers, not only can such ‘tug-of-war’ tweezers stably trap and stretch a rod-shaped bacterium in the observing plane, but, more importantly, they can also impose a tunable lateral force that pulls apart cellular clusters without any tethering or mechanical movement. As a proof of principle, we examined a Sinorhizobium meliloti strain that forms robust biofilms and found that the strength of intercellular adhesion depends on the growth medium. This technique may herald new photonic tools for optical manipulation and biofilm study, as well as other biological applications.

  4. Intermolecular complexation of low-molecular-weight succinoglycans directs solubility enhancement of pindolol.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoungtea; Cho, Eunae; Choi, Jae Min; Kim, Hwanhee; Jang, Ahri; Choi, Youngjin; Lee, Im Soon; Yu, Jae-Hyuk; Jung, Seunho

    2014-06-15

    The low-molecular-weight succinoglycans isolated from Sinorhizobium meliloti are repeating octasaccharide units consisting of monomers, dimers, and trimers. Pindolol is a beta-blocker used to treat cardiovascular disorders. We investigated the formation of complexes between pindolol and low-molecular-weight succinoglycan monomers (SGs). Even though SGs have a linear structure, the solubility of pindolol in the presence of SGs was increased up to 7-fold compared with methyl-β-cyclodextrin reported as the best solubilizer of pindolol. Complexation of SGs with pindolol was confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and scanning electron microscopy. Formation constants of complexes were determined from phase solubility diagrams. Conformation of complex was suggested based on a molecular docking study. The present study indicated that formation of pindolol/SGs complexes not only resulted in increased pindolol solubility but also could be useful for improving its clinical application as it did not affect cell viability.

  5. Harvesting of novel polyhydroxyalkanaote (PHA) synthase encoding genes from a soil metagenome library using phenotypic screening.

    PubMed

    Schallmey, Marcus; Ly, Anh; Wang, Chunxia; Meglei, Gabriela; Voget, Sonja; Streit, Wolfgang R; Driscoll, Brian T; Charles, Trevor C

    2011-08-01

    We previously reported the construction of metagenomic libraries in the IncP cosmid vector pRK7813, enabling heterologous expression of these broad-host-range libraries in multiple bacterial hosts. Expressing these libraries in Sinorhizobium meliloti, we have successfully complemented associated phenotypes of polyhydroxyalkanoate synthesis mutants. DNA sequence analysis of three clones indicates that the complementing genes are homologous to, but substantially different from, known polyhydroxyalkanaote synthase-encoding genes. Thus we have demonstrated the ability to isolate diverse genes for polyhydroxyalkanaote synthesis by functional complementation of defined mutants. Such genes might be of use in the engineering of more efficient systems for the industrial production of bioplastics. The use of functional complementation will also provide a vehicle to probe the genetics of polyhydroxyalkanaote metabolism and its relation to carbon availability in complex microbial assemblages. PMID:21631577

  6. The Transcriptional Activator LdtR from ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ Mediates Osmotic Stress Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Bojilova, Lora; Sarnegrim, Amanda; Tamayo, Cheila; Potts, Anastasia H.; Teplitski, Max; Folimonova, Svetlana Y.; Gonzalez, Claudio F.; Lorca, Graciela L.

    2014-01-01

    The causal agent of Huanglongbing disease, ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’, is a non-culturable, gram negative, phloem-limited α-proteobacterium. Current methods to control the spread of this disease are still limited to the removal and destruction of infected trees. In this study, we identified and characterized a regulon from ‘Ca. L. asiaticus’ involved in cell wall remodeling, that contains a member of the MarR family of transcriptional regulators (ldtR), and a predicted L,D-transpeptidase (ldtP). In Sinorhizobium meliloti, mutation of ldtR resulted in morphological changes (shortened rod-type phenotype) and reduced tolerance to osmotic stress. A biochemical approach was taken to identify small molecules that modulate LdtR activity. The LdtR ligands identified by thermal shift assays were validated using DNA binding methods. The biological impact of LdtR inactivation by the small molecules was then examined in Sinorhizobium meliloti and Liberibacter crescens, where a shortened-rod phenotype was induced by growth in presence of the ligands. A new method was also developed to examine the effects of small molecules on the viability of ‘Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus’, using shoots from HLB-infected orange trees. Decreased expression of ldtRLas and ldtPLas was observed in samples taken from HLB-infected shoots after 6 h of incubation with the LdtR ligands. These results provide strong proof of concept for the use of small molecules that target LdtR, as a potential treatment option for Huanglongbing disease. PMID:24763829

  7. Conservation of Gene Order and Content in the Circular Chromosomes of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ and Other Rhizobiales

    PubMed Central

    Kuykendall, L. David; Shao, Jonathan Y.; Hartung, John S.

    2012-01-01

    ‘Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus,’ an insect-vectored, obligate intracellular bacterium associated with citrus-greening disease, also called “HLB," is a member of the Rhizobiales along with nitrogen-fixing microsymbionts Sinorhizobium meliloti and Bradyrhizobium japonicum, plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens and facultative intracellular mammalian pathogen Bartonella henselae. Comparative analyses of their circular chromosomes identified 514 orthologous genes shared among all five species. Shared among all five species are 50 identical blocks of microsyntenous orthologous genes (MOGs), containing a total of 283 genes. While retaining highly conserved genomic blocks of microsynteny, divergent evolution, horizontal gene transfer and niche specialization have disrupted macrosynteny among the five circular chromosomes compared. Highly conserved microsyntenous gene clusters help define the Rhizobiales, an order previously defined by 16S RNA gene similarity and herein represented by the three families: Bartonellaceae, Bradyrhizobiaceae and Rhizobiaceae. Genes without orthologs in the other four species help define individual species. The circular chromosomes of each of the five Rhizobiales species examined had genes lacking orthologs in the other four species. For example, 63 proteins are encoded by genes of ‘Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus’ not shared with other members of the Rhizobiales. Of these 63 proteins, 17 have predicted functions related to DNA replication or RNA transcription, and some of these may have roles related to low genomic GC content. An additional 17 proteins have predicted functions relevant to cellular processes, particularly modifications of the cell surface. Seventeen unshared proteins have specific metabolic functions including a pathway to synthesize cholesterol encoded by a seven-gene operon. The remaining 12 proteins encoded by ‘Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus’ genes not shared with other Rhizobiales are of bacteriophage origin.

  8. Identification of nodule-specific cysteine-rich plant peptides in endosymbiotic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Durgo, Hajnalka; Klement, Eva; Hunyadi-Gulyas, Eva; Szucs, Attila; Kereszt, Attila; Medzihradszky, Katalin F; Kondorosi, Eva

    2015-07-01

    The symbiosis of Medicago truncatula with Sinorhizobium meliloti or Sinorhizobium medicae soil bacteria results in the formation of root nodules where bacteria inside the plant cells are irreversibly converted to polyploid, nondividing nitrogen-fixing bacteroids. Bacteroid differentiation is host-controlled and the plant effectors are symbiosis-specific secreted plant peptides. In the M. truncatula genome there are more than 600 symbiotic peptide genes including 500 small genes coding for nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides. While NCR transcripts represent >5% of the nodule transcriptome, the existence of only eight NCR peptides has been demonstrated so far. The predicted NCRs are secreted peptides targeted to the endosymbionts. Correspondingly, all the eight detected peptides were present in the bacteroids. Here, we report on large-scale detection of NCR peptides from nodules and from isolated, semipurified endosymbionts at various stages of their differentiation. In total 138 NCRs were detected in the bacteroids; 38 were cationic while the majority was anionic. The presence of early NCRs in nitrogen-fixing bacteroids indicates their high stability, and their long-term maintenance suggests persisting biological roles in the bacteroids.

  9. Cloacal Microbiome Structure in a Long-Distance Migratory Bird Assessed Using Deep 16sRNA Pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Kreisinger, Jakub; Čížková, Dagmar; Kropáčková, Lucie; Albrecht, Tomáš

    2015-01-01

    Effects of vertebrate-associated microbiota on physiology and health are of significant interest in current biological research. Most previous studies have focused on host-microbiota interactions in captive-bred mammalian models. These interactions and their outcomes are still relatively understudied, however, in wild populations and non-mammalian taxa. Using deep pyrosequencing, we described the cloacal microbiome (CM) composition in free living barn swallows Hirundo rustica, a long-distance migratory passerine bird. Barn swallow CM was dominated by bacteria of the Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria and Firmicutes phyla. Bacteroidetes, which represent an important proportion of the digestive tract microbiome in many vertebrate species, was relatively rare in barn swallow CM (< 5%). CM composition did not differ between males and females. A significant correlation of CM within breeding pair members is consistent with the hypothesis that cloacal contact during within-pair copulation may promote transfer of bacterial assemblages. This effect on CM composition had a relatively low effect size, however, possibly due to the species’ high level of sexual promiscuity. PMID:26360776

  10. Insights into the strategies used by related group II introns to adapt successfully for the colonisation of a bacterial genome.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Rodríguez, Laura; García-Rodríguez, Fernando M; Molina-Sánchez, María Dolores; Toro, Nicolás; Martínez-Abarca, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Group II introns are self-splicing RNAs and site-specific mobile retroelements found in bacterial and organellar genomes. The group II intron RmInt1 is present at high copy number in Sinorhizobium meliloti species, and has a multifunctional intron-encoded protein (IEP) with reverse transcriptase/maturase activities, but lacking the DNA-binding and endonuclease domains. We characterized two RmInt1-related group II introns RmInt2 from S. meliloti strain GR4 and Sr.md.I1 from S. medicae strain WSM419 in terms of splicing and mobility activities. We used both wild-type and engineered intron-donor constructs based on ribozyme ΔORF-coding sequence derivatives, and we determined the DNA target requirements for RmInt2, the element most distantly related to RmInt1. The excision and mobility patterns of intron-donor constructs expressing different combinations of IEP and intron RNA provided experimental evidence for the co-operation of IEPs and intron RNAs from related elements in intron splicing and, in some cases, in intron homing. We were also able to identify the DNA target regions recognized by these IEPs lacking the DNA endonuclease domain. Our results provide new insight into the versatility of related group II introns and the possible co-operation between these elements to facilitate the colonization of bacterial genomes.

  11. LDSS-P: an advanced algorithm to extract functional short motifs associated with coordinated gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Ichida, Hiroyuki; Long, Sharon R.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying functional elements in promoter sequences is a major goal in computational and experimental genome biology. Here, we describe an algorithm, Local Distribution of Short Sequences for Prokaryotes (LDSS-P), to identify conserved short motifs located at specific positions in the promoters of co-expressed prokaryotic genes. As a test case, we applied this algorithm to a symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacterium, Sinorhizobium meliloti. The LDSS-P profiles that overlap with the 5′ section of the extracytoplasmic function RNA polymerase sigma factor RpoE2 consensus sequences displayed a sharp peak between -34 and -32 from TSS positions. The corresponding genes overlap significantly with RpoE2 targets identified from previous experiments. We further identified several groups of genes that are co-regulated with characterized marker genes. Our data indicate that in S. meliloti, and possibly in other Rhizobiaceae species, the master cell cycle regulator CtrA may recognize an expanded motif (AACCAT), which is positionally shifted from the previously reported CtrA consensus sequence in Caulobacter crescentus. Bacterial one-hybrid experiments showed that base substitution in the expanded motif either increase or decrease the binding by CtrA. These results show the effectiveness of LDSS-P as a method to delineate functional promoter elements. PMID:27190233

  12. Exploitation of genetically modified inoculants for industrial ecology applications.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, John P; Walsh, Ultan F; O'Donnell, Anne; Moënne-Loccoz, Yvan; O'Gara, Fergal

    2002-08-01

    The major growth seen in the biotechnology industry in recent decades has largely been driven by the exploitation of genetic engineering techniques. The initial benefits have been predominantly in the biomedical area, with products such as vaccines and hormones that have received broad public approval. In the environmental biotechnology and industrial ecology sectors, biotechnology has the potential to make significant advances through the use of genetically modified (GM) microbial inoculants that can reduce agri-chemical usage or remediate polluted environments. Although many GM inoculants have been developed and tested under laboratory conditions, commercial exploitation has lagged behind. Here, we review scientific and regulatory requirements that must be satisfied as part of that exploitation process. Particular attention is paid to new European Union (EU) regulations (Directives) that govern the testing and release of genetically modified organisms and microbial plant protection inoculants in the EU. With regard to the release of GM inoculants, the impact of the inoculant and the fate of modified genes are important concerns. Long term monitoring of release sites is necessary to address these issues. Data are reported from the monitoring of a site 6 years after release of GM Sinorhizobium meliloti strains. It was found that despite the absence of a host plant, the GM strains persisted in the soil for at least 6 years. Horizontal transfer and microevolution of a GM plasmid between S. meliloti strains was also observed. These data illustrate the importance of assessing the long-term persistence of GM inoculants. PMID:12448755

  13. NPR1 Protein Regulates Pathogenic and Symbiotic Interactions between Rhizobium and Legumes and Non-Legumes

    PubMed Central

    Peleg-Grossman, Smadar; Golani, Yael; Kaye, Yuval; Melamed-Book, Naomi; Levine, Alex

    2009-01-01

    Background Legumes are unique in their ability to establish symbiotic interaction with rhizobacteria from Rhizobium genus, which provide them with available nitrogen. Nodulation factors (NFs) produced by Rhizobium initiate legume root hair deformation and curling that entrap the bacteria, and allow it to grow inside the plant. In contrast, legumes and non-legumes activate defense responses when inoculated with pathogenic bacteria. One major defense pathway is mediated by salicylic acid (SA). SA is sensed and transduced to downstream defense components by a redox-regulated protein called NPR1. Methodology/Principal Findings We used Arabidopsis mutants in SA defense pathway to test the role of NPR1 in symbiotic interactions. Inoculation of Sinorhizobium meliloti or purified NF on Medicago truncatula or nim1/npr1 A. thaliana mutants induced root hair deformation and transcription of early and late nodulins. Application of S. meliloti or NF on M. truncatula or A. thaliana roots also induced a strong oxidative burst that lasted much longer than in plants inoculated with pathogenic or mutualistic bacteria. Transient overexpression of NPR1 in M. truncatula suppressed root hair curling, while inhibition of NPR1 expression by RNAi accelerated curling. Conclusions/Significance We show that, while NPR1 has a positive effect on pathogen resistance, it has a negative effect on symbiotic interactions, by inhibiting root hair deformation and nodulin expression. Our results also show that basic plant responses to Rhizobium inoculation are conserved in legumes and non-legumes. PMID:20027302

  14. Aggregation by depletion attraction in cultures of bacteria producing exopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Dorken, Gary; Ferguson, Gail P.; French, Chris E.; Poon, Wilson C. K.

    2012-01-01

    In bacteria, the production of exopolysaccharides—polysaccharides secreted by the cells into their growth medium—is integral to the formation of aggregates and biofilms. These exopolysaccharides often form part of a matrix that holds the cells together. Investigating the bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti, we found that a mutant that overproduces the exopolysaccharide succinoglycan showed enhanced aggregation, resulting in phase separation of the cultures. However, the aggregates did not appear to be covered in polysaccharides. Succinoglycan purified from cultures was applied to different concentrations of cells, and observation of the phase behaviour showed that the limiting polymer concentration for aggregation and phase separation to occur decreased with increasing cell concentration, suggesting a ‘crowding mechanism’ was occurring. We suggest that, as found in colloidal dispersions, the presence of a non-adsorbing polymer in the form of the exopolysaccharide succinoglycan drives aggregation of S. meliloti by depletion attraction. This force leads to self-organization of the bacteria into small clusters of laterally aligned cells, and, furthermore, leads to aggregates clustering into biofilm-like structures on a surface. PMID:22896568

  15. LDSS-P: an advanced algorithm to extract functional short motifs associated with coordinated gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ichida, Hiroyuki; Long, Sharon R

    2016-06-20

    Identifying functional elements in promoter sequences is a major goal in computational and experimental genome biology. Here, we describe an algorithm, Local Distribution of Short Sequences for Prokaryotes (LDSS-P), to identify conserved short motifs located at specific positions in the promoters of co-expressed prokaryotic genes. As a test case, we applied this algorithm to a symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacterium, Sinorhizobium meliloti The LDSS-P profiles that overlap with the 5' section of the extracytoplasmic function RNA polymerase sigma factor RpoE2 consensus sequences displayed a sharp peak between -34 and -32 from TSS positions. The corresponding genes overlap significantly with RpoE2 targets identified from previous experiments. We further identified several groups of genes that are co-regulated with characterized marker genes. Our data indicate that in S. meliloti, and possibly in other Rhizobiaceae species, the master cell cycle regulator CtrA may recognize an expanded motif (AACCAT), which is positionally shifted from the previously reported CtrA consensus sequence in Caulobacter crescentus Bacterial one-hybrid experiments showed that base substitution in the expanded motif either increase or decrease the binding by CtrA. These results show the effectiveness of LDSS-P as a method to delineate functional promoter elements. PMID:27190233

  16. Assessing genotypic diversity and symbiotic efficiency of five rhizobial legume interactions under cadmium stress for soil phytoremediation.

    PubMed

    Guefrachi, I; Rejili, M; Mahdhi, M; Mars, M

    2013-01-01

    In the framework of soil phytoremediation using local legume plants coupled with their native root-nodulating bacteria to increase forage yields and preserve contaminated soils in arid regions of Tunisia, we investigated the diversity of bacteria from root nodules of Lathyrus sativus, Lens culinaris, Medicago marina, M. truncatula, and M. minima and the symbiotic efficiency of these five legume symbiosis under Cadmium stress. Fifty bacterial strains were characterized using physiological and biochemical features such heavy metals resistant, and PCR-RFLP of 16S rDNA. Taxonomically, the isolates nodulating L. sativus, and L. culinaris are species within the genera Rhizobium and the ones associated to Medicago sp, within the genera Sinorhizobium. The results revealed also that the cadmium tolerance of the different legumes-rhizobia interaction was as follows: M. minima < M. truncatula < M. marina < L. sativus < L. culinaris indicating that the effect of Cadmium on root nodulation and biomass production is more deleterious on M. minima-S. meliloti and M. truncatula-S. meliloti than in other symbiosis. Knowledge on genetic and functional diversity of M. marina, L. sativus and L. culinaris microsymbiotes is very useful for inoculant strain selection and can be selected to develop inoculants for soil phytoremediation. PMID:23819287

  17. FadD Is Required for Utilization of Endogenous Fatty Acids Released from Membrane Lipids ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Pech-Canul, Ángel; Nogales, Joaquina; Miranda-Molina, Alfonso; Álvarez, Laura; Geiger, Otto; Soto, María José; López-Lara, Isabel M.

    2011-01-01

    FadD is an acyl coenzyme A (CoA) synthetase responsible for the activation of exogenous long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) into acyl-CoAs. Mutation of fadD in the symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti promotes swarming motility and leads to defects in nodulation of alfalfa plants. In this study, we found that S. meliloti fadD mutants accumulated a mixture of free fatty acids during the stationary phase of growth. The composition of the free fatty acid pool and the results obtained after specific labeling of esterified fatty acids with a Δ5-desaturase (Δ5-Des) were in agreement with membrane phospholipids being the origin of the released fatty acids. Escherichia coli fadD mutants also accumulated free fatty acids released from membrane lipids in the stationary phase. This phenomenon did not occur in a mutant of E. coli with a deficient FadL fatty acid transporter, suggesting that the accumulation of fatty acids in fadD mutants occurs inside the cell. Our results indicate that, besides the activation of exogenous LCFA, in bacteria FadD plays a major role in the activation of endogenous fatty acids released from membrane lipids. Furthermore, expression analysis performed with S. meliloti revealed that a functional FadD is required for the upregulation of genes involved in fatty acid degradation and suggested that in the wild-type strain, the fatty acids released from membrane lipids are degraded by β-oxidation in the stationary phase of growth. PMID:21926226

  18. Osmotically induced synthesis of the dipeptide N-acetylglutaminylglutamine amide is mediated by a new pathway conserved among bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Sagot, Brice; Gaysinski, Marc; Mehiri, Mohamed; Guigonis, Jean-Marie; Le Rudulier, Daniel; Alloing, Geneviève

    2010-01-01

    The dipeptide N-acetylglutaminylglutamine amide (NAGGN) was discovered in the bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti grown at high osmolarity, and subsequently shown to be synthesized and accumulated by a few osmotically challenged bacteria. However, its biosynthetic pathway remained unknown. Recently, two genes, which putatively encode a glutamine amidotransferase and an acetyltransferase and are up-regulated by osmotic stress, were identified in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this work, a locus carrying the orthologous genes in S. meliloti, asnO and ngg, was identified, and the genetic and molecular characterization of the NAGGN biosynthetic pathway is reported. By using NMR experiments, it was found that strains inactivated in asnO and ngg were unable to produce the dipeptide. Such inability has a deleterious effect on S. meliloti growth at high osmolarity, demonstrating the key role of NAGGN biosynthesis in cell osmoprotection. β-Glucuronidase activity from transcriptional fusion revealed strong induction of asnO expression in cells grown in increased NaCl concentration, in good agreement with the NAGGN accumulation. The asnO–ngg cluster encodes a unique enzymatic machinery mediating nonribosomal peptide synthesis. This pathway first involves Ngg, a bifunctional enzyme that catalyzes the formation of the intermediate N-acetylglutaminylglutamine, and second AsnO, required for subsequent addition of an amide group and the conversion of N-acetylglutaminylglutamine into NAGGN. Interestingly, a strong conservation of the asnO–ngg cluster is observed in a large number of bacteria with different lifestyles, such as marine, symbiotic, and pathogenic bacteria, highlighting the ecological importance of NAGGN synthesis capability in osmoprotection and also potentially in bacteria host–cell interactions. PMID:20571117

  19. The alternative Medicago truncatula defense proteome of ROS—defective transgenic roots during early microbial infection

    PubMed Central

    Kiirika, Leonard M.; Schmitz, Udo; Colditz, Frank

    2014-01-01

    ROP-type GTPases of plants function as molecular switches within elementary signal transduction pathways such as the regulation of ROS synthesis via activation of NADPH oxidases (RBOH-respiratory burst oxidase homolog in plants). Previously, we reported that silencing of the Medicago truncatula GTPase MtROP9 led to reduced ROS production and suppressed induction of ROS-related enzymes in transgenic roots (MtROP9i) infected with pathogenic (Aphanomyces euteiches) and symbiotic microorganisms (Glomus intraradices, Sinorhizobium meliloti). While fungal infections were enhanced, S. meliloti infection was drastically impaired. In this study, we investigate the temporal proteome response of M. truncatula MtROP9i transgenic roots during the same microbial interactions under conditions of deprived potential to synthesize ROS. In comparison with control roots (Mtvector), we present a comprehensive proteomic analysis using sensitive MS protein identification. For four early infection time-points (1, 3, 5, 24 hpi), 733 spots were found to be different in abundance: 213 spots comprising 984 proteins (607 unique) were identified after S. meliloti infection, 230 spots comprising 796 proteins (580 unique) after G. intraradices infection, and 290 spots comprising 1240 proteins (828 unique) after A. euteiches infection. Data evaluation by GelMap in combination with a heatmap tool allowed recognition of key proteome changes during microbial interactions under conditions of hampered ROS synthesis. Overall, the number of induced proteins in MtROP9i was low as compared with controls, indicating a dual function of ROS in defense signaling as well as alternative response patterns activated during microbial infection. Qualitative analysis of induced proteins showed that enzymes linked to ROS production and scavenging were highly induced in control roots, while in MtROP9i the majority of proteins were involved in alternative defense pathways such as cell wall and protein degradation. PMID

  20. Flavone Synthases from Medicago truncatula Are Flavanone-2-Hydroxylases and Are Important for Nodulation1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Juan; Subramanian, Senthil; Zhang, Yansheng; Yu, Oliver

    2007-01-01

    Flavones are important copigments found in the flowers of many higher plants and play a variety of roles in plant adaptation to stress. In Medicago species, flavones also act as signal molecules during symbiotic interaction with the diazotropic bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti. They are the most potent nod gene inducers found in root exudates. However, flavone synthase II (FNS II), the key enzyme responsible for flavone biosynthesis, has not been characterized in Medicago species. We cloned two FNS II genes from Medicago truncatula using known FNS II sequences from other species and named them MtFNSII-1 and MtFNSII-2. Functional assays in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) suggested that the catalytic mechanisms of both cytochrome P450 monooxygenases were similar to the other known legume FNS II from licorice (Glycyrrhiza echinata). MtFNSII converted flavanones to 2-hydroxyflavanones instead of flavones whereas FNS II from the nonlegume Gerbera hybrida, converted flavanones to flavones directly. The two MtFNSII genes had distinct tissue-specific expression patterns. MtFNSII-1 was highly expressed in roots and seeds whereas MtFNSII-2 was highly expressed in flowers and siliques. In addition, MtFNSII-2 was inducible by S. meliloti and methyl jasmonate treatment, whereas MtFNSII-1 was not. Histochemical staining of transgenic hairy roots carrying the promoter-reporter constructs indicated that the MtFNSII-2 induction was tissue specific, mostly localized to vascular tissues and root hairs. RNA interference-mediated suppression of MtFNSII genes resulted in flavone depleted roots and led to significantly reduced nodulation when inoculated with S. meliloti. Our results provide genetic evidence supporting that flavones are important for nodulation in M. truncatula. PMID:17434990

  1. Diverse role of fast growing rhizobia in growth promotion and enhancement of psoralen content in Psoralea corylifolia L

    PubMed Central

    Prabha, Chandra; Maheshwari, D. K.; Bajpai, Vivek K.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Psoralea corylifolia (Bakuchi), a weed, which possesses a highly potent and medicinally important compound psoralen. P. corylifolia has been widely exploited since ages for its biological potential. Materials and Methods: Fifteen root nodulating bacteria as pure culture collection (PCC) were isolated from P. corylifolia in India. Further, these strains were evaluated for their effect on the psoralen content in P. corylifolia. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method was used for the estimation of psoralen in P. corylifolia seed extracts. The effectiveness of these rhizobial strains was assessed on the basis of screening of various plant growth promoting attributes. Results: The 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing analysis revealed the identity of two most effective rhizobial isolates PCC2 and PCC7 as Rhizobium leguminosarum and Sinorhizobium meliloti, respectively. The R. leguminosarum PCC2 (JN546144) and Ensifer meliloti PCC7 (JN546145) strains showed solubilization of insoluble inorganic phosphate, secreted indole acetic acid (IAA), produced siderophore, showed ACC deaminase activity, and were positive for nodulation and nitrogen fixing genes. Seeds of P. corylifolia were bacterized with combination of R. leguminosarum PCC2 and Ensifer meliloti PCC7 along with their individual application that resulted in enhancement of various early vegetative and late reproduction parameters of plants in two consecutive field trials in the year 2009 and 2010. The psoralen content in the seeds of P. corylifolia was observed to be increased in the field trials where the combination of rhizobial strains PCC2 and PCC7 was used (2.79%) compared to control (1.91%). Conclusion: These findings indicate that rhizobial strains PCC2 and PCC7 showing good plant growth promoting attributes can be effective for increasing the psoralen content in the seeds of P. corylifolia to a certain level. PMID:24143046

  2. Medicago ciliaris growing in Tunisian soils is preferentially nodulated by Sinorhizobium medicae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Variation in growth of Medicago ciliaris was recorded across soils from five different regions in Tunisia that represented different soil types and climatic zones. In four of these soils (Mateur, Enfidha, Rhayet and Soliman) this variation appeared to be related to the nodule number on the roots of ...

  3. Morphogenetic Rescue of Rhizobium meliloti Nodulation Mutants by trans-Zeatin Secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, J. B.; Long, S. R.

    1994-01-01

    The development of nitrogen-fixing nodules is induced on the roots of legume host plants by Rhizobium bacteria. We employed a novel strategy to probe the underlying mechanism of nodule morphogenesis in alfalfa roots using pTZS, a broad host range plasmid carrying a constitutive trans-zeatin secretion (tzs) gene from Agrobacterium tumefaciens T37. This plasmid suppressed the Nod- phenotype of Rhizobium nodulation mutants such that mutants harboring pTZS stimulated the formation of nodulelike structures. Alfalfa roots formed more or fewer of these nodules according to both the nitrogen content of the environment and the position along the root at which the pTZS+ bacteria were applied, which parallels the physiological and developmental regulation of true Rhizobium nodule formation. This plasmid also conferred on Escherichia coli cells the ability to induce root cortical cell mitoses. Both the pattern of induced cell divisions and the spatially restricted expression of an alfalfa nodule-specific marker gene (MsENOD2) in pTZS-induced nodules support the conclusion that localized cytokinin production produces a phenocopy of nodule morphogenesis. PMID:12244237

  4. Effect of Microgravity on Early Events of Biological Nitrogen Fixation in Medicago Truncatula: Initial Results from the SyNRGE Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutte, Gary W.; Roberts, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    SyNRGE (Symbiotic Nodulation in a Reduced Gravity Environment) was a sortie mission on STS-135 in the Biological Research in Canisters (BRIC) hardware to study the effect of microgravity on a plant-microbe symbiosis resulting in biological nitrogen fixation. Medicago truncatula, a model species of the legume family, was inoculated with its bacterial symbiont, Sinorhizobium meliloti, to observe early events associated with infection and nodulation in Petri Dish Fixation Units (PDFUs). Two sets of experiments were conducted in orbit and in 24-hour delayed ground controls. Experiment one was designed to determine if S. meliloti infect M. truncatula and initiate physiological changes associated with nodule formation. Roots of five-day-old M. truncatula cultivar Jemalong A17 (Enodll::gus) were inoculated 24 hr before launch with either S. meliloti strain 1021 or strain ABS7 and integrated into BRIC-PDFU hardware placed in a 4 C Cold Bag for launch on Atlantis. Inoculated plants and uninoculated controls were maintained in the dark at ambient temperature in the middeck of STS-135 for 11 days before fixation in RNAlater(tM) by crew activation of the PDFU. Experiment two was designed to determine if microgravity altered the process of bacterial infection and host plant nodule formation. Seeds of two M. truncatula cultivar Jemalong A17 lines, the Enodll::gus used in experiment 1, and SUNN, a super-nodulating mutant of A17, were germinated on orbit for 11 days in the middeck cabin and returned to Earth alive inside of BRIC-PDFU's at 4 C. S. meliloti strains 1021 and ABS7 were cultivated separately in broth culture on orbit and also returned to Earth alive. After landing, flight- and groundgrown plants and bacteria were transferred from BRIC-PDFU's into Nunc(tm) 4-well plates for reciprocity crosses. Rates of plant growth and nodule development on Buffered Nodulation Medium (lacking nitrogen) were measured for 14 days. Preliminary analysis' of Experiment 1 confirms that

  5. The Nodulation of Alfalfa by the Acid-Tolerant Rhizobium sp. Strain LPU83 Does Not Require Sulfated Forms of Lipochitooligosaccharide Nodulation Signals▿

    PubMed Central

    Torres Tejerizo, Gonzalo; Del Papa, María Florencia; Soria-Diaz, M. Eugenia; Draghi, Walter; Lozano, Mauricio; Giusti, María de los Ángeles; Manyani, Hamid; Megías, Manuel; Gil Serrano, Antonio; Pühler, Alfred; Niehaus, Karsten; Lagares, Antonio; Pistorio, Mariano

    2011-01-01

    The induction of root nodules by the majority of rhizobia has a strict requirement for the secretion of symbiosis-specific lipochitooligosaccharides (nodulation factors [NFs]). The nature of the chemical substitution on the NFs depends on the particular rhizobium and contributes to the host specificity imparted by the NFs. We present here a description of the genetic organization of the nod gene cluster and the characterization of the chemical structure of the NFs associated with the broad-host-range Rhizobium sp. strain LPU83, a bacterium capable of nodulating at least alfalfa, bean, and Leucena leucocephala. The nod gene cluster was located on the plasmid pLPU83b. The organization of the cluster showed synteny with those of the alfalfa-nodulating rhizobia, Sinorhizobium meliloti and Sinorhizobium medicae. Interestingly, the strongest sequence similarity observed was between the partial nod sequences of Rhizobium mongolense USDA 1844 and the corresponding LPU83 nod genes sequences. The phylogenetic analysis of the intergenic region nodEG positions strain LPU83 and the type strain R. mongolense 1844 in the same branch, which indicates that Rhizobium sp. strain LPU83 might represent an early alfalfa-nodulating genotype. The NF chemical structures obtained for the wild-type strain consist of a trimeric, tetrameric, and pentameric chitin backbone that shares some substitutions with both alfalfa- and bean-nodulating rhizobia. Remarkably, while in strain LPU83 most of the NFs were sulfated in their reducing terminal residue, none of the NFs isolated from the nodH mutant LPU83-H were sulfated. The evidence obtained supports the notion that the sulfate decoration of NFs in LPU83 is not necessary for alfalfa nodulation. PMID:20971905

  6. A single amino acid substitution in a chitinase of the legume Medicago truncatula is sufficient to gain Nod-factor hydrolase activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lan-Yue; Cai, Jie; Li, Ru-Jie; Liu, Wei; Wagner, Christian; Wong, Kam-Bo; Xie, Zhi-Ping; Staehelin, Christian

    2016-07-01

    The symbiotic interaction between nitrogen-fixing rhizobia and legumes depends on lipo-chitooligosaccharidic Nod-factors (NFs). The NF hydrolase MtNFH1 of Medicago truncatula is a symbiotic enzyme that hydrolytically inactivates NFs with a C16 : 2 acyl chain produced by the microsymbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021. MtNFH1 is related to class V chitinases (glycoside hydrolase family 18) but lacks chitinase activity. Here, we investigated the substrate specificity of MtNFH1-related proteins. MtCHIT5a and MtCHIT5b of M. truncatula as well as LjCHIT5 of Lotus japonicus showed chitinase activity, suggesting a role in plant defence. The enzymes failed to hydrolyse NFs from S. meliloti. NFs from Rhizobium leguminosarum with a C18 : 4 acyl moiety were neither hydrolysed by these chitinases nor by MtNFH1. Construction of chimeric proteins and further amino acid replacements in MtCHIT5b were performed to identify chitinase variants that gained the ability to hydrolyse NFs. A single serine-to-proline substitution was sufficient to convert MtCHIT5b into an NF-cleaving enzyme. MtNFH1 with the corresponding proline-to-serine substitution failed to hydrolyse NFs. These results are in agreement with a substrate-enzyme model that predicts NF cleavage when the C16 : 2 moiety is placed into a distinct fatty acid-binding cleft. Our findings support the view that MtNFH1 evolved from the ancestral MtCHIT5b by gene duplication and subsequent symbiosis-related neofunctionalization. PMID:27383628

  7. Gene transfer into Solanum tuberosum via Rhizobium spp.

    PubMed

    Wendt, Toni; Doohan, Fiona; Winckelmann, Dominik; Mullins, Ewen

    2011-04-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (ATMT) is the preferred technique for gene transfer into crops. A major disadvantage of the technology remains the complexity of the patent landscape that surrounds ATMT which restricts its use for commercial applications. An alternative system has been described (Broothaerts et al. in Nature 433:629-633, 2005) detailing the propensity of three rhizobia to transform the model crop Arabidopsis thaliana, the non-food crop Nicotiana tabacum and, at a very low frequency, the monocotyledonous crop Oryza sativa. In this report we describe for the first time the genetic transformation of Solanum tuberosum using the non-Agrobacterium species Sinorhizobium meliloti, Rhizobium sp. NGR234 and Mesorhizobium loti. This was achieved by combining an optimal bacterium and host co-cultivation period with a low antibiotic regime during the callus and shoot induction stages. Using this optimized protocol the transformation frequency (calculated as % of shoots equipped with root systems with the ability to grow in rooting media supplemented with 25 μg/ml hygromycin) of the rhizobia strains was calculated at 4.72, 5.85 and 1.86% for S. meliloti, R. sp. NGR234 and M. loti respectively, compared to 47.6% for the A. tumefaciens control. Stable transgene integration and expression was confirmed via southern hybridisation, quantitative PCR analysis and histochemical screening of both leaf and/or tuber tissue. In light of the rapid advances in potato genomics, combined with the sequencing of the potato genome, the ability of alternative bacteria species to genetically transform this major food crop will provide a novel resource to the Solanaceae community as it continues to develop potato as both a food and non-food crop.

  8. Phylogenetic Co-Occurrence of ExoR, ExoS, and ChvI, Components of the RSI Bacterial Invasion Switch, Suggests a Key Adaptive Mechanism Regulating the Transition between Free-Living and Host-Invading Phases in Rhizobiales

    PubMed Central

    Heavner, Mary Ellen; Qiu, Wei-Gang; Cheng, Hai-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Both bacterial symbionts and pathogens rely on their host-sensing mechanisms to activate the biosynthetic pathways necessary for their invasion into host cells. The Gram-negative bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti relies on its RSI (ExoR-ExoS-ChvI) Invasion Switch to turn on the production of succinoglycan, an exopolysaccharide required for its host invasion. Recent whole-genome sequencing efforts have uncovered putative components of RSI-like invasion switches in many other symbiotic and pathogenic bacteria. To explore the possibility of the existence of a common invasion switch, we have conducted a phylogenomic survey of orthologous ExoR, ExoS, and ChvI tripartite sets in more than ninety proteobacterial genomes. Our analyses suggest that functional orthologs of the RSI invasion switch co-exist in Rhizobiales, an order characterized by numerous invasive species, but not in the order’s close relatives. Phylogenomic analyses and reconstruction of orthologous sets of the three proteins in Alphaproteobacteria confirm Rhizobiales-specific gene synteny and congruent RSI evolutionary histories. Evolutionary analyses further revealed site-specific substitutions correlated specifically to either animal-bacteria or plant-bacteria associations. Lineage restricted conservation of any one specialized gene is in itself an indication of species adaptation. However, the orthologous phylogenetic co-occurrence of all interacting partners within this single signaling pathway strongly suggests that the development of the RSI switch was a key adaptive mechanism. The RSI invasion switch, originally found in S. meliloti, is a characteristic of the Rhizobiales, and potentially a conserved crucial activation step that may be targeted to control host invasion by pathogenic bacterial species. PMID:26309130

  9. An antimicrobial peptide essential for bacterial survival in the nitrogen-fixing symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minsoo; Chen, Yuhui; Xi, Jiejun; Waters, Christopher; Chen, Rujin; Wang, Dong

    2015-12-01

    In the nitrogen-fixing symbiosis between legume hosts and rhizobia, the bacteria are engulfed by a plant cell membrane to become intracellular organelles. In the model legume Medicago truncatula, internalization and differentiation of Sinorhizobium (also known as Ensifer) meliloti is a prerequisite for nitrogen fixation. The host mechanisms that ensure the long-term survival of differentiating intracellular bacteria (bacteroids) in this unusual association are unclear. The M. truncatula defective nitrogen fixation4 (dnf4) mutant is unable to form a productive symbiosis, even though late symbiotic marker genes are expressed in mutant nodules. We discovered that in the dnf4 mutant, bacteroids can apparently differentiate, but they fail to persist within host cells in the process. We found that the DNF4 gene encodes NCR211, a member of the family of nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides. The phenotype of dnf4 suggests that NCR211 acts to promote the intracellular survival of differentiating bacteroids. The greatest expression of DNF4 was observed in the nodule interzone II-III, where bacteroids undergo differentiation. A translational fusion of DNF4 with GFP localizes to the peribacteroid space, and synthetic NCR211 prevents free-living S. meliloti from forming colonies, in contrast to mock controls, suggesting that DNF4 may interact with bacteroids directly or indirectly for its function. Our findings indicate that a successful symbiosis requires host effectors that not only induce bacterial differentiation, but also that maintain intracellular bacteroids during the host-symbiont interaction. The discovery of NCR211 peptides that maintain bacterial survival inside host cells has important implications for improving legume crops.

  10. A single amino acid substitution in a chitinase of the legume Medicago truncatula is sufficient to gain Nod-factor hydrolase activity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lan-Yue; Cai, Jie; Li, Ru-Jie; Liu, Wei; Wagner, Christian; Wong, Kam-Bo; Xie, Zhi-Ping; Staehelin, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The symbiotic interaction between nitrogen-fixing rhizobia and legumes depends on lipo-chitooligosaccharidic Nod-factors (NFs). The NF hydrolase MtNFH1 of Medicago truncatula is a symbiotic enzyme that hydrolytically inactivates NFs with a C16 : 2 acyl chain produced by the microsymbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021. MtNFH1 is related to class V chitinases (glycoside hydrolase family 18) but lacks chitinase activity. Here, we investigated the substrate specificity of MtNFH1-related proteins. MtCHIT5a and MtCHIT5b of M. truncatula as well as LjCHIT5 of Lotus japonicus showed chitinase activity, suggesting a role in plant defence. The enzymes failed to hydrolyse NFs from S. meliloti. NFs from Rhizobium leguminosarum with a C18 : 4 acyl moiety were neither hydrolysed by these chitinases nor by MtNFH1. Construction of chimeric proteins and further amino acid replacements in MtCHIT5b were performed to identify chitinase variants that gained the ability to hydrolyse NFs. A single serine-to-proline substitution was sufficient to convert MtCHIT5b into an NF-cleaving enzyme. MtNFH1 with the corresponding proline-to-serine substitution failed to hydrolyse NFs. These results are in agreement with a substrate-enzyme model that predicts NF cleavage when the C16 : 2 moiety is placed into a distinct fatty acid-binding cleft. Our findings support the view that MtNFH1 evolved from the ancestral MtCHIT5b by gene duplication and subsequent symbiosis-related neofunctionalization. PMID:27383628

  11. Identification of the rctA gene, which is required for repression of conjugative transfer of rhizobial symbiotic megaplasmids.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Mendoza, Daniel; Sepúlveda, Edgardo; Pando, Victoria; Muñoz, Socorro; Nogales, Joaquina; Olivares, José; Soto, Maria J; Herrera-Cervera, José A; Romero, David; Brom, Susana; Sanjuán, Juan

    2005-11-01

    An analysis of the conjugative transfer of pRetCFN42d, the symbiotic plasmid (pSym) of Rhizobium etli, has revealed a novel gene, rctA, as an essential element of a regulatory system for silencing the conjugative transfer of R. etli pSym by repressing the transcription of conjugal transfer genes in standard laboratory media. The rctA gene product lacks sequence conservation with other proteins of known function but may belong to the winged-helix DNA-binding subfamily of transcriptional regulators. Similar to that of many transcriptional repressors, rctA transcription seems to be positively autoregulated. rctA expression is greatly reduced upon overexpression of another gene, rctB, previously identified as a putative activator of R. etli pSym conjugal transfer. Thus, rctB seems to counteract the repressive action of rctA. rctA homologs are present in at least three other bacterial genomes within the order Rhizobiales, where they are invariably located adjacent to and divergently transcribed from putative virB-like operons. We show that similar to that of R. etli pSym, conjugative transfer of the 1.35-Mb symbiotic megaplasmid A of Sinorhizobium meliloti is also subjected to the inhibitory action of rctA. Our data provide strong evidence that the R. etli and S. meliloti pSym plasmids are indeed self-conjugative plasmids and that this property would only be expressed under optimal, as yet unknown conditions that entail inactivation of the rctA function. The rctA gene seems to represent novel but probably widespread regulatory systems controlling the transfer of conjugative elements within the order Rhizobiales.

  12. An antimicrobial peptide essential for bacterial survival in the nitrogen-fixing symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minsoo; Chen, Yuhui; Xi, Jiejun; Waters, Christopher; Chen, Rujin; Wang, Dong

    2015-01-01

    In the nitrogen-fixing symbiosis between legume hosts and rhizobia, the bacteria are engulfed by a plant cell membrane to become intracellular organelles. In the model legume Medicago truncatula, internalization and differentiation of Sinorhizobium (also known as Ensifer) meliloti is a prerequisite for nitrogen fixation. The host mechanisms that ensure the long-term survival of differentiating intracellular bacteria (bacteroids) in this unusual association are unclear. The M. truncatula defective nitrogen fixation4 (dnf4) mutant is unable to form a productive symbiosis, even though late symbiotic marker genes are expressed in mutant nodules. We discovered that in the dnf4 mutant, bacteroids can apparently differentiate, but they fail to persist within host cells in the process. We found that the DNF4 gene encodes NCR211, a member of the family of nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides. The phenotype of dnf4 suggests that NCR211 acts to promote the intracellular survival of differentiating bacteroids. The greatest expression of DNF4 was observed in the nodule interzone II-III, where bacteroids undergo differentiation. A translational fusion of DNF4 with GFP localizes to the peribacteroid space, and synthetic NCR211 prevents free-living S. meliloti from forming colonies, in contrast to mock controls, suggesting that DNF4 may interact with bacteroids directly or indirectly for its function. Our findings indicate that a successful symbiosis requires host effectors that not only induce bacterial differentiation, but also that maintain intracellular bacteroids during the host–symbiont interaction. The discovery of NCR211 peptides that maintain bacterial survival inside host cells has important implications for improving legume crops. PMID:26598690

  13. Large-scale identification of small noncoding RNA with strand-specific deep sequencing and characterization of a novel virulence-related sRNA in Brucella melitensis

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Zhijun; Xu, Xiaoyang; Li, Xinran; Liu, Shiwei; Lei, Shuangshuang; Yang, Mingjuan; Yu, Jiuxuan; Yuan, Jiuyun; Ke, Yuehua; Du, Xinying; Wang, Zhoujia; Ren, Zhihua; Peng, Guangneng; Wang, Yufei; Chen, Zeliang

    2016-01-01

    Brucella is the causative agent of brucellosis, a worldwide epidemic zoonosis. Small noncoding RNAs (sRNAs) are important modulators of gene expression and involved in pathogenesis and stress adaptation of Brucella. In this study, using a strand-specific RNA deep-sequencing approach, we identified a global set of sRNAs expressed by B. melitensis 16M. In total, 1321 sRNAs were identified, ranging from 100 to 600 nucleotides. These sRNAs differ in their expression levels and strand and chromosomal distributions. The role of BSR0441, one of these sRNAs, in the virulence of B. melitensis 16M was further characterized. BSR0441 was highly induced during the infection of macrophages and mice. The deletion mutant of BSR0441 showed significantly reduced spleen colonization in the middle and late phases of infection. The expression of the BSR0441 target mRNA genes was also altered in the BSR0441 mutant strain during macrophage and mice infection, which is consistent with its reduced intracellular survival capacity. In summary, Brucella encodes a large number of sRNAs, which may be involved in the stress adaptation and virulence of Brucella. Further investigation of these regulators will extend our understanding of the Brucella pathogenesis mechanism and the interactions between Brucella and its hosts. PMID:27112796

  14. Gene Expressing and sRNA Sequencing Show That Gene Differentiation Associates with a Yellow Acer palmatum Mutant Leaf in Different Light Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shu-Shun; Li, Qian-Zhong; Rong, Li-Ping; Tang, Ling; Zhang, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Acer palmatum Thunb., like other maples, is a widely ornamental-use small woody tree for leaf shapes and colors. Interestingly, we found a yellow-leaves mutant “Jingling Huangfeng” turned to green when grown in shade or low-density light condition. In order to study the potential mechanism, we performed high-throughput sequencing and obtained 1,082 DEGs in leaves grown in different light conditions that result in A. palmatum significant morphological and physiological changes. A total of 989 DEGs were annotated and clustered, of which many DEGs were found associating with the photosynthesis activity and pigment synthesis. The expression of CHS and FDR gene was higher while the expression of FLS gene was lower in full-sunlight condition; this may cause more colorful substance like chalcone and anthocyanin that were produced in full-light condition, thus turning the foliage to yellow. Moreover, this is the first available miRNA collection which contains 67 miRNAs of A. palmatum, including 46 conserved miRNAs and 21 novel miRNAs. To get better understanding of which pathways these miRNAs involved, 102 Unigenes were found to be potential targets of them. These results will provide valuable genetic resources for further study on the molecular mechanisms of Acer palmatum leaf coloration. PMID:26788511

  15. Gene Expressing and sRNA Sequencing Show That Gene Differentiation Associates with a Yellow Acer palmatum Mutant Leaf in Different Light Conditions.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu-Shun; Li, Qian-Zhong; Rong, Li-Ping; Tang, Ling; Zhang, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Acer palmatum Thunb., like other maples, is a widely ornamental-use small woody tree for leaf shapes and colors. Interestingly, we found a yellow-leaves mutant "Jingling Huangfeng" turned to green when grown in shade or low-density light condition. In order to study the potential mechanism, we performed high-throughput sequencing and obtained 1,082 DEGs in leaves grown in different light conditions that result in A. palmatum significant morphological and physiological changes. A total of 989 DEGs were annotated and clustered, of which many DEGs were found associating with the photosynthesis activity and pigment synthesis. The expression of CHS and FDR gene was higher while the expression of FLS gene was lower in full-sunlight condition; this may cause more colorful substance like chalcone and anthocyanin that were produced in full-light condition, thus turning the foliage to yellow. Moreover, this is the first available miRNA collection which contains 67 miRNAs of A. palmatum, including 46 conserved miRNAs and 21 novel miRNAs. To get better understanding of which pathways these miRNAs involved, 102 Unigenes were found to be potential targets of them. These results will provide valuable genetic resources for further study on the molecular mechanisms of Acer palmatum leaf coloration.

  16. Gene Expressing and sRNA Sequencing Show That Gene Differentiation Associates with a Yellow Acer palmatum Mutant Leaf in Different Light Conditions.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu-Shun; Li, Qian-Zhong; Rong, Li-Ping; Tang, Ling; Zhang, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Acer palmatum Thunb., like other maples, is a widely ornamental-use small woody tree for leaf shapes and colors. Interestingly, we found a yellow-leaves mutant "Jingling Huangfeng" turned to green when grown in shade or low-density light condition. In order to study the potential mechanism, we performed high-throughput sequencing and obtained 1,082 DEGs in leaves grown in different light conditions that result in A. palmatum significant morphological and physiological changes. A total of 989 DEGs were annotated and clustered, of which many DEGs were found associating with the photosynthesis activity and pigment synthesis. The expression of CHS and FDR gene was higher while the expression of FLS gene was lower in full-sunlight condition; this may cause more colorful substance like chalcone and anthocyanin that were produced in full-light condition, thus turning the foliage to yellow. Moreover, this is the first available miRNA collection which contains 67 miRNAs of A. palmatum, including 46 conserved miRNAs and 21 novel miRNAs. To get better understanding of which pathways these miRNAs involved, 102 Unigenes were found to be potential targets of them. These results will provide valuable genetic resources for further study on the molecular mechanisms of Acer palmatum leaf coloration. PMID:26788511

  17. Extensive and specific responses of a eukaryote to bacterial quorum-sensing signals

    PubMed Central

    Mathesius, Ulrike; Mulders, Susan; Gao, Mengsheng; Teplitski, Max; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo; Rolfe, Barry G.; Bauer, Wolfgang D.

    2003-01-01

    Many bacteria use N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) signals to coordinate the behavior of individual cells in a local population. The successful infection of eukaryotic hosts by bacteria seems to depend particularly on such AHL-mediated “quorum-sensing” regulation. We have used proteome analysis to show that a eukaryotic host, the model legume Medicago truncatula, is able to detect nanomolar to micromolar concentrations of bacterial AHLs from both symbiotic (Sinorhizobium meliloti) and pathogenic (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) bacteria, and that it responds in a global manner by significant changes in the accumulation of over 150 proteins, 99 of which have been identified by peptide mass fingerprinting. The accumulation of specific proteins and isoforms depended on AHL structure, concentration, and time of exposure. AHLs were also found to induce tissue-specific activation of β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter fusions to an auxin-responsive and three chalcone synthase promoters, consistent with AHL-induced changes in the accumulation of auxin-responsive and flavonoid synthesis proteins. In addition, exposure to AHLs was found to induce changes in the secretion of compounds by the plants that mimic quorum-sensing signals and thus have the potential to disrupt quorum sensing in associated bacteria. Our results indicate that eukaryotes have an extensive range of functional responses to AHLs that may play important roles in the beneficial or pathogenic outcomes of eukaryote–prokaryote interactions. PMID:12511600

  18. Choline uptake in Agrobacterium tumefaciens by the high-affinity ChoXWV transporter.

    PubMed

    Aktas, Meriyem; Jost, Kathinka A; Fritz, Christiane; Narberhaus, Franz

    2011-10-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a facultative phytopathogen that causes crown gall disease. For successful plant transformation A. tumefaciens requires the membrane lipid phosphatidylcholine (PC), which is produced via the methylation and the PC synthase (Pcs) pathways. The latter route is dependent on choline. Although choline uptake has been demonstrated in A. tumefaciens, the responsible transporter(s) remained elusive. In this study, we identified the first choline transport system in A. tumefaciens. The ABC-type choline transporter is encoded by the chromosomally located choXWV operon (ChoX, binding protein; ChoW, permease; and ChoV, ATPase). The Cho system is not critical for growth and PC synthesis. However, [14C]choline uptake is severely reduced in A. tumefaciens choX mutants. Recombinant ChoX is able to bind choline with high affinity (equilibrium dissociation constant [KD] of ≈2 μM). Since other quaternary amines are bound by ChoX with much lower affinities (acetylcholine, KD of ≈80 μM; betaine, KD of ≈470 μM), the ChoXWV system functions as a high-affinity transporter with a preference for choline. Two tryptophan residues (W40 and W87) located in the predicted ligand-binding pocket are essential for choline binding. The structural model of ChoX built on Sinorhizobium meliloti ChoX resembles the typical structure of substrate binding proteins with a so-called "Venus flytrap mechanism" of substrate binding. PMID:21803998

  19. Role of BacA in Lipopolysaccharide Synthesis, Peptide Transport, and Nodulation by Rhizobium sp. Strain NGR234▿

    PubMed Central

    Ardissone, Silvia; Kobayashi, Hajime; Kambara, Kumiko; Rummel, Coralie; Noel, K. Dale; Walker, Graham C.; Broughton, William J.; Deakin, William J.

    2011-01-01

    BacA of Sinorhizobium meliloti plays an essential role in the establishment of nitrogen-fixing symbioses with Medicago plants, where it is involved in peptide import and in the addition of very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA) to lipid A of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We investigated the role of BacA in Rhizobium species strain NGR234 by mutating the bacA gene. In the NGR234 bacA mutant, peptide import was impaired, but no effect on VLCFA addition was observed. More importantly, the symbiotic ability of the mutant was comparable to that of the wild type for a variety of legume species. Concurrently, an acpXL mutant of NGR234 was created and assayed. In rhizobia, AcpXL is a dedicated acyl carrier protein necessary for the addition of VLCFA to lipid A. LPS extracted from the NGR234 mutant lacked VLCFA, and this mutant was severely impaired in the ability to form functional nodules with the majority of legumes tested. Our work demonstrates the importance of VLCFA in the NGR234-legume symbiosis and also shows that the necessity of BacA for bacteroid differentiation is restricted to specific legume-Rhizobium interactions. PMID:21357487

  20. Structural basis of interprotein electron transfer in bacterial sulfite oxidation

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, Aaron P; Laming, Elise L; Casas Garcia, G Patricia; Kvansakul, Marc; Guss, J Mitchell; Trewhella, Jill; Calmes, Benoit; Bernhardt, Paul V; Kappler, Ulrike; Maher, Megan J

    2015-01-01

    Interprotein electron transfer underpins the essential processes of life and relies on the formation of specific, yet transient protein-protein interactions. In biological systems, the detoxification of sulfite is catalyzed by the sulfite-oxidizing enzymes (SOEs), which interact with an electron acceptor for catalytic turnover. Here, we report the structural and functional analyses of the SOE SorT from Sinorhizobium meliloti and its cognate electron acceptor SorU. Kinetic and thermodynamic analyses of the SorT/SorU interaction show the complex is dynamic in solution, and that the proteins interact with Kd = 13.5 ± 0.8 μM. The crystal structures of the oxidized SorT and SorU, both in isolation and in complex, reveal the interface to be remarkably electrostatic, with an unusually large number of direct hydrogen bonding interactions. The assembly of the complex is accompanied by an adjustment in the structure of SorU, and conformational sampling provides a mechanism for dissociation of the SorT/SorU assembly. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09066.001 PMID:26687009

  1. Photosynthetic and molecular markers of CO₂-mediated photosynthetic downregulation in nodulated alfalfa.

    PubMed

    Sanz-Sáez, Alvaro; Erice, Gorka; Aranjuelo, Iker; Aroca, Ricardo; Ruíz-Lozano, Juan Manuel; Aguirreolea, Jone; Irigoyen, Juan José; Sanchez-Diaz, Manuel

    2013-08-01

    Elevated CO₂ leads to a decrease in potential net photosynthesis in long-term experiments and thus to a reduction in potential growth. This process is known as photosynthetic downregulation. There is no agreement on the definition of which parameters are the most sensitive for detecting CO₂ acclimation. In order to investigate the most sensitive photosynthetic and molecular markers of CO₂ acclimation, the effects of elevated CO₂, and associated elevated temperature were analyzed in alfalfa plants inoculated with different Sinorhizobium meliloti strains. Plants (Medicago sativa L. cv. Aragón) were grown in summer or autumn in temperature gradient greenhouses (TGG). At the end of the experiment, all plants showed acclimation in both seasons, especially under elevated summer temperatures. This was probably due to the lower nitrogen (N) availability caused by decreased N₂-fixation under higher temperatures. Photosynthesis measured at growth CO₂ concentration, rubisco in vitro activity and maximum rate of carboxylation were the most sensitive parameters for detecting downregulation. Severe acclimation was also related with decreases in leaf nitrogen content associated with declines in rubisco content (large and small subunits) and activity that resulted in a drop in photosynthesis. Despite the sensitivity of rubisco content as a marker of acclimation, it was not coordinated with gene expression, possibly due to a lag between gene transcription and protein translation.

  2. Host Factors Influencing the Retrohoming Pathway of Group II Intron RmInt1, Which Has an Intron-Encoded Protein Naturally Devoid of Endonuclease Activity.

    PubMed

    Nisa-Martínez, Rafael; Molina-Sánchez, María Dolores; Toro, Nicolás

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial group II introns are self-splicing catalytic RNAs and mobile retroelements that have an open reading frame encoding an intron-encoded protein (IEP) with reverse transcriptase (RT) and RNA splicing or maturase activity. Some IEPs carry a DNA endonuclease (En) domain, which is required to cleave the bottom strand downstream from the intron-insertion site for target DNA-primed reverse transcription (TPRT) of the inserted intron RNA. Host factors complete the insertion of the intron. By contrast, the major retrohoming pathway of introns with IEPs naturally lacking endonuclease activity, like the Sinorhizobium meliloti intron RmInt1, is thought to involve insertion of the intron RNA into the template for lagging strand DNA synthesis ahead of the replication fork, with possible use of the nascent strand to prime reverse transcription of the intron RNA. The host factors influencing the retrohoming pathway of such introns have not yet been described. Here, we identify key candidates likely to be involved in early and late steps of RmInt1 retrohoming. Some of these host factors are common to En+ group II intron retrohoming, but some have different functions. Our results also suggest that the retrohoming process of RmInt1 may be less dependent on the intracellular free Mg2+ concentration than those of other group II introns. PMID:27588750

  3. Genomic analyses of metal resistance genes in three plant growth promoting bacteria of legume plants in Northwest mine tailings, China.

    PubMed

    Xie, Pin; Hao, Xiuli; Herzberg, Martin; Luo, Yantao; Nies, Dietrich H; Wei, Gehong

    2015-01-01

    To better understand the diversity of metal resistance genetic determinant from microbes that survived at metal tailings in northwest of China, a highly elevated level of heavy metal containing region, genomic analyses was conducted using genome sequence of three native metal-resistant plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB). It shows that: Mesorhizobium amorphae CCNWGS0123 contains metal transporters from P-type ATPase, CDF (Cation Diffusion Facilitator), HupE/UreJ and CHR (chromate ion transporter) family involved in copper, zinc, nickel as well as chromate resistance and homeostasis. Meanwhile, the putative CopA/CueO system is expected to mediate copper resistance in Sinorhizobium meliloti CCNWSX0020 while ZntA transporter, assisted with putative CzcD, determines zinc tolerance in Agrobacterium tumefaciens CCNWGS0286. The greenhouse experiment provides the consistent evidence of the plant growth promoting effects of these microbes on their hosts by nitrogen fixation and/or indoleacetic acid (IAA) secretion, indicating a potential in-site phytoremediation usage in the mining tailing regions of China.

  4. The genome sequence of the facultative intracellular pathogen Brucella melitensis.

    PubMed

    DelVecchio, Vito G; Kapatral, Vinayak; Redkar, Rajendra J; Patra, Guy; Mujer, Cesar; Los, Tamara; Ivanova, Natalia; Anderson, Iain; Bhattacharyya, Anamitra; Lykidis, Athanasios; Reznik, Gary; Jablonski, Lynn; Larsen, Niels; D'Souza, Mark; Bernal, Axel; Mazur, Mikhail; Goltsman, Eugene; Selkov, Eugene; Elzer, Philip H; Hagius, Sue; O'Callaghan, David; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; Haselkorn, Robert; Kyrpides, Nikos; Overbeek, Ross

    2002-01-01

    Brucella melitensis is a facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes abortion in goats and sheep and Malta fever in humans. The genome of B. melitensis strain 16M was sequenced and found to contain 3,294,935 bp distributed over two circular chromosomes of 2,117,144 bp and 1,177,787 bp encoding 3,197 ORFs. By using the bioinformatics suite ERGO, 2,487 (78%) ORFs were assigned functions. The origins of replication of the two chromosomes are similar to those of other alpha-proteobacteria. Housekeeping genes, including those involved in DNA replication, transcription, translation, core metabolism, and cell wall biosynthesis, are distributed on both chromosomes. Type I, II, and III secretion systems are absent, but genes encoding sec-dependent, sec-independent, and flagella-specific type III, type IV, and type V secretion systems as well as adhesins, invasins, and hemolysins were identified. Several features of the B. melitensis genome are similar to those of the symbiotic Sinorhizobium meliloti.

  5. Azide resistance in Rhizobium ciceri linked with superior symbiotic nitrogen fixation.

    PubMed

    Bhaskar, V Vijay

    2004-12-01

    Isolated azide resistant (AzR) native R. ciceri strain 18-7 was resistant to sodium azide at 10 microg/ml. To find if nif-reiteration is responsible for azide resistance and linked to superior symbiotic nitrogen fixation, transposon (Tn5) induced azide sensitive mutants were generated. Using 4 kb nif-reiterated Sinorhizobium meliloti DNA, a clone C4 that complemented azide sensitivity was isolated by DNA hybridization from genomic library of chickpea Rhizobium strain Rcd301. EcoRI restriction mapping revealed the presence of 7 recognition sites with a total insert size of 19.17 kb. Restriction analysis of C4 clone and nif-reiterated DNA (pRK 290.7) with EcoRI and XhoI revealed similar banding pattern. Wild type strain 18-7, mutant M126 and complemented mutant M126(C4) were characterized for symbiotic properties (viz., acetylene reduction assay, total nitrogen content, nodule number and fresh and dry weight of the infected plants) and explanta nitrogenase activity. Our results suggested that azide resistance, nif-reiteration, and superior symbiotic effectiveness were interlinked with no correlation between ex-planta nitrogenase activity and azide resistance in R. ciceri.

  6. Functionality of In vitro Reconstituted Group II Intron RmInt1-Derived Ribonucleoprotein Particles

    PubMed Central

    Molina-Sánchez, Maria D.; García-Rodríguez, Fernando M.; Toro, Nicolás

    2016-01-01

    The functional unit of mobile group II introns is a ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP) consisting of the intron-encoded protein (IEP) and the excised intron RNA. The IEP has reverse transcriptase activity but also promotes RNA splicing, and the RNA-protein complex triggers site-specific DNA insertion by reverse splicing, in a process called retrohoming. In vitro reconstituted ribonucleoprotein complexes from the Lactococcus lactis group II intron Ll.LtrB, which produce a double strand break, have recently been studied as a means of developing group II intron-based gene targeting methods for higher organisms. The Sinorhizobium meliloti group II intron RmInt1 is an efficient mobile retroelement, the dispersal of which appears to be linked to transient single-stranded DNA during replication. The RmInt1IEP lacks the endonuclease domain (En) and cannot cut the bottom strand to generate the 3′ end to initiate reverse transcription. We used an Escherichia coli expression system to produce soluble and active RmInt1 IEP and reconstituted RNPs with purified components in vitro. The RNPs generated were functional and reverse-spliced into a single-stranded DNA target. This work constitutes the starting point for the use of group II introns lacking DNA endonuclease domain-derived RNPs for highly specific gene targeting methods. PMID:27730127

  7. Host Factors Influencing the Retrohoming Pathway of Group II Intron RmInt1, Which Has an Intron-Encoded Protein Naturally Devoid of Endonuclease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Nisa-Martínez, Rafael; Molina-Sánchez, María Dolores; Toro, Nicolás

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial group II introns are self-splicing catalytic RNAs and mobile retroelements that have an open reading frame encoding an intron-encoded protein (IEP) with reverse transcriptase (RT) and RNA splicing or maturase activity. Some IEPs carry a DNA endonuclease (En) domain, which is required to cleave the bottom strand downstream from the intron-insertion site for target DNA-primed reverse transcription (TPRT) of the inserted intron RNA. Host factors complete the insertion of the intron. By contrast, the major retrohoming pathway of introns with IEPs naturally lacking endonuclease activity, like the Sinorhizobium meliloti intron RmInt1, is thought to involve insertion of the intron RNA into the template for lagging strand DNA synthesis ahead of the replication fork, with possible use of the nascent strand to prime reverse transcription of the intron RNA. The host factors influencing the retrohoming pathway of such introns have not yet been described. Here, we identify key candidates likely to be involved in early and late steps of RmInt1 retrohoming. Some of these host factors are common to En+ group II intron retrohoming, but some have different functions. Our results also suggest that the retrohoming process of RmInt1 may be less dependent on the intracellular free Mg2+ concentration than those of other group II introns. PMID:27588750

  8. Nanomaterials in Biosolids Inhibit Nodulation, Shift Microbial Community Composition, and Result in Increased Metal Uptake Relative to Bulk/Dissolved Metals.

    PubMed

    Judy, Jonathan D; McNear, David H; Chen, Chun; Lewis, Ricky W; Tsyusko, Olga V; Bertsch, Paul M; Rao, William; Stegemeier, John; Lowry, Gregory V; McGrath, Steve P; Durenkamp, Mark; Unrine, Jason M

    2015-07-21

    We examined the effects of amending soil with biosolids produced from a pilot-scale wastewater treatment plant containing a mixture of metal-based engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) on the growth of Medicago truncatula, its symbiosis with Sinorhizobium meliloti, and on soil microbial community structure. Treatments consisted of soils amended with biosolids generated with (1) Ag, ZnO, and TiO2 ENMs introduced into the influent wastewater (ENM biosolids), (2) AgNO3, Zn(SO4)2, and micron-sized TiO2 (dissolved/bulk metal biosolids) introduced into the influent wastewater stream, or (3) no metal added to influent wastewater (control). Soils were amended with biosolids to simulate 20 years of metal loading, which resulted in nominal metal concentrations of 1450, 100, and 2400 mg kg(-1) of Zn, Ag, and Ti, respectively, in the dissolved/bulk and ENM treatments. Tissue Zn concentrations were significantly higher in the plants grown in the ENM treatment (182 mg kg(-1)) compared to those from the bulk treatment (103 mg kg(-1)). Large reductions in nodulation frequency, plant growth, and significant shifts in soil microbial community composition were found for the ENM treatment compared to the bulk/dissolved metal treatment. These results suggest differences in metal bioavailability and toxicity between ENMs and bulk/dissolved metals at concentrations relevant to regulatory limits.

  9. Biodegradation pathway and detoxification of the diazo dye Reactive Black 5 by Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed

    Enayatizamir, Naeimeh; Tabandeh, Fatemeh; Rodríguez-Couto, Susana; Yakhchali, Bagher; Alikhani, Hossein A; Mohammadi, Leila

    2011-11-01

    The in vivo biodegradation of the diazo dye Reactive Black 5 (RB5) by Phanerochaete chrysosporium immobilised on cubes of nylon sponge and on sunflower-seed shells (SS) in laboratory-scale bioreactors was investigated. The SS cultivation led to the best results with a decolouration percentage of 90.3% in 72 h for an initial RB5 concentration of 100 mg/L. It was found that the addition of 0.4 mM veratryl alcohol (VA) into the medium considerably increased the decolouration rate in SS cultivation. However, the addition of VA had no effect in the nylon cultivation. Thin layer chromatography (TLC) revealed that RB5 was transformed into one metabolite after 24 h. UV-vis spectroscopy and Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) also confirmed the biodegradation of RB5. Toxicity of RB5 solutions before and after fungal treatment was assayed using Sinorhizobium meliloti as a sensitive soil microorganism. P. chrysosporium transformed the toxic dye RB5 into a non-toxic product.

  10. Bradyrhizobium BclA Is a Peptide Transporter Required for Bacterial Differentiation in Symbiosis with Aeschynomene Legumes.

    PubMed

    Guefrachi, Ibtissem; Pierre, Olivier; Timchenko, Tatiana; Alunni, Benoît; Barrière, Quentin; Czernic, Pierre; Villaécija-Aguilar, José-Antonio; Verly, Camille; Bourge, Mickaël; Fardoux, Joël; Mars, Mohamed; Kondorosi, Eva; Giraud, Eric; Mergaert, Peter

    2015-11-01

    Nodules of legume plants are highly integrated symbiotic systems shaped by millions of years of evolution. They harbor nitrogen-fixing rhizobium bacteria called bacteroids. Several legume species produce peptides called nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides in the symbiotic nodule cells which house the bacteroids. NCR peptides are related to antimicrobial peptides of innate immunity. They induce the endosymbionts into a differentiated, enlarged, and polyploid state. The bacterial symbionts, on their side, evolved functions for the response to the NCR peptides. Here, we identified the bclA gene of Bradyrhizobium sp. strains ORS278 and ORS285, which is required for the formation of differentiated and functional bacteroids in the nodules of the NCR peptide-producing Aeschynomene legumes. The BclA ABC transporter promotes the import of NCR peptides and provides protection against the antimicrobial activity of these peptides. Moreover, BclA can complement the role of the related BacA transporter of Sinorhizobium meliloti, which has a similar symbiotic function in the interaction with Medicago legumes.

  11. The symbiotic transcription factor MtEFD and cytokinins are positively acting in the Medicago truncatula and Ralstonia solanacearum pathogenic interaction.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Sandra; Fromentin, Justine; Vailleau, Fabienne; Vernié, Tatiana; Huguet, Stéphanie; Balzergue, Sandrine; Frugier, Florian; Gamas, Pascal; Jardinaud, Marie-Françoise

    2014-03-01

    • A plant-microbe dual biological system was set up involving the model legume Medicago truncatula and two bacteria, the soil-borne root pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum and the beneficial symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti. • Comparison of transcriptomes under symbiotic and pathogenic conditions highlighted the transcription factor MtEFD (Ethylene response Factor required for nodule Differentiation) as being upregulated in both interactions, together with a set of cytokinin-related transcripts involved in metabolism, signaling and response. MtRR4 (Response Regulator), a cytokinin primary response gene negatively regulating cytokinin signaling and known as a target of MtEFD in nodulation processes, was retrieved in this set of transcripts. • Refined studies of MtEFD and MtRR4 expression during M. truncatula and R. solanacearum interaction indicated differential kinetics of induction and requirement of central regulators of bacterial pathogenicity, HrpG and HrpB. Similar to MtRR4, MtEFD upregulation during the pathogenic interaction was dependent on cytokinin perception mediated by the MtCRE1 (Cytokinin REsponse 1) receptor. • The use of M. truncatula efd-1 and cre1-1 mutants evidenced MtEFD and cytokinin perception as positive factors for bacterial wilt development. These factors therefore play an important role in both root nodulation and root disease development.

  12. Different biochemical mechanisms ensure network-wide balancing of reducing equivalents in microbial metabolism.

    PubMed

    Fuhrer, Tobias; Sauer, Uwe

    2009-04-01

    To sustain growth, the catabolic formation of the redox equivalent NADPH must be balanced with the anabolic demand. The mechanisms that ensure such network-wide balancing, however, are presently not understood. Based on 13C-detected intracellular fluxes, metabolite concentrations, and cofactor specificities for all relevant central metabolic enzymes, we have quantified catabolic NADPH production in Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Paracoccus versutus, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Rhodobacter sphaeroides, Sinorhizobium meliloti, and Zymomonas mobilis. For six species, the estimated NADPH production from glucose catabolism exceeded the requirements for biomass synthesis. Exceptions were P. fluorescens, with balanced rates, and E. coli, with insufficient catabolic production, in which about one-third of the NADPH is supplied via the membrane-bound transhydrogenase PntAB. P. versutus and B. subtilis were the only species that appear to rely on transhydrogenases for balancing NADPH overproduction during growth on glucose. In the other four species, the main but not exclusive redox-balancing mechanism appears to be the dual cofactor specificities of several catabolic enzymes and/or the existence of isoenzymes with distinct cofactor specificities, in particular glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase. An unexpected key finding for all species, except E. coli and B. subtilis, was the lack of cofactor specificity in the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, which contrasts with the textbook view of the pentose phosphate pathway dehydrogenases as being NADP+ dependent.

  13. BluB cannibalizes flavin to form the lower ligand of vitamin B12

    PubMed Central

    Taga, Michiko E.; Larsen, Nicholas A.; Howard-Jones, Annaleise R.; Walsh, Christopher T.; Walker, Graham C.

    2009-01-01

    Vitamin B12 (cobalamin) is among the largest known non-polymeric natural products, and the only vitamin synthesized exclusively by microorganisms1. The biosynthesis of the lower ligand of vitamin B12, 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole (DMB), is poorly understood1–3. Recently, we discovered that a Sinorhizobium meliloti gene, bluB, is necessary for DMB biosynthesis4. Here we show that BluB triggers the unprecedented fragmentation and contraction of the bound flavin mononucleotide cofactor and cleavage of the ribityl tail to form DMB and D-erythrose 4-phosphate. Our structural analysis shows that BluB resembles an NAD(P)H-flavin oxidoreductase, except that its unusually tight binding pocket accommodates flavin mononucleotide but not NAD(P)H. We characterize crystallographically an early intermediate along the reaction coordinate, revealing molecular oxygen poised over reduced flavin. Thus, BluB isolates and directs reduced flavin to activate molecular oxygen for its own cannibalization. This investigation of the biosynthesis of DMB provides clarification of an aspect of vitamin B12 that was otherwise incomplete, and may contribute to a better understanding of vitamin B12-related disease. PMID:17377583

  14. Pseudomonas fluorescens and Glomus mosseae trigger DMI3-dependent activation of genes related to a signal transduction pathway in roots of Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Lisa; Weidmann, Stéphanie; Arnould, Christine; Bernard, Anne Rose; Gianinazzi, Silvio; Gianinazzi-Pearson, Vivienne

    2005-10-01

    Plant genes induced during early root colonization of Medicago truncatula Gaertn. J5 by a growth-promoting strain of Pseudomonas fluorescens (C7R12) have been identified by suppressive subtractive hybridization. Ten M. truncatula genes, coding proteins associated with a putative signal transduction pathway, showed an early and transient activation during initial interactions between M. truncatula and P. fluorescens, up to 8 d after root inoculation. Gene expression was not significantly enhanced, except for one gene, in P. fluorescens-inoculated roots of a Myc(-)Nod(-) genotype (TRV25) of M. truncatula mutated for the DMI3 (syn. MtSYM13) gene. This gene codes a Ca(2+) and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase, indicating a possible role of calcium in the cellular interactions between M. truncatula and P. fluorescens. When expression of the 10 plant genes was compared in early stages of root colonization by mycorrhizal and rhizobial microsymbionts, Glomus mosseae activated all 10 genes, whereas Sinorhizobium meliloti only activated one and inhibited four others. None of the genes responded to inoculation by either microsymbiont in roots of the TRV25 mutant. The similar response of the M. truncatula genes to P. fluorescens and G. mosseae points to common molecular pathways in the perception of the microbial signals by plant roots.

  15. The Small GTPase ROP10 of Medicago truncatula Is Required for Both Tip Growth of Root Hairs and Nod Factor-Induced Root Hair Deformation

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Ming-Juan; Wang, Qi; Li, Xiaolin; Chen, Aimin; Luo, Li; Xie, Yajun; Li, Guan; Luo, Da; Mysore, Kirankumar S.; Wen, Jiangqi; Xie, Zhi-Ping; Staehelin, Christian; Wang, Yan-Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Rhizobia preferentially enter legume root hairs via infection threads, after which root hairs undergo tip swelling, branching, and curling. However, the mechanisms underlying such root hair deformation are poorly understood. Here, we showed that a type II small GTPase, ROP10, of Medicago truncatula is localized at the plasma membrane (PM) of root hair tips to regulate root hair tip growth. Overexpression of ROP10 and a constitutively active mutant (ROP10CA) generated depolarized growth of root hairs, whereas a dominant negative mutant (ROP10DN) inhibited root hair elongation. Inoculated with Sinorhizobium meliloti, the depolarized swollen and ballooning root hairs exhibited extensive root hair deformation and aberrant infection symptoms. Upon treatment with rhizobia-secreted nodulation factors (NFs), ROP10 was transiently upregulated in root hairs, and ROP10 fused to green fluorescent protein was ectopically localized at the PM of NF-induced outgrowths and curls around rhizobia. ROP10 interacted with the kinase domain of the NF receptor NFP in a GTP-dependent manner. Moreover, NF-induced expression of the early nodulin gene ENOD11 was enhanced by the overexpression of ROP10 and ROP10CA. These data suggest that NFs spatiotemporally regulate ROP10 localization and activity at the PM of root hair tips and that interactions between ROP10 and NF receptors are required for root hair deformation and continuous curling during rhizobial infection. PMID:25794934

  16. Exploring root symbiotic programs in the model legume Medicago truncatula using EST analysis

    PubMed Central

    Journet, Etienne-Pascal; van Tuinen, Diederik; Gouzy, Jérome; Crespeau, Hervé; Carreau, Véronique; Farmer, Mary-Jo; Niebel, Andreas; Schiex, Thomas; Jaillon, Olivier; Chatagnier, Odile; Godiard, Laurence; Micheli, Fabienne; Kahn, Daniel; Gianinazzi-Pearson, Vivienne; Gamas, Pascal

    2002-01-01

    We report on a large-scale expressed sequence tag (EST) sequencing and analysis program aimed at characterizing the sets of genes expressed in roots of the model legume Medicago truncatula during interactions with either of two microsymbionts, the nitrogen-fixing bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti or the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices. We have designed specific tools for in silico analysis of EST data, in relation to chimeric cDNA detection, EST clustering, encoded protein prediction, and detection of differential expression. Our 21 473 5′- and 3′-ESTs could be grouped into 6359 EST clusters, corresponding to distinct virtual genes, along with 52 498 other M.truncatula ESTs available in the dbEST (NCBI) database that were recruited in the process. These clusters were manually annotated, using a specifically developed annotation interface. Analysis of EST cluster distribution in various M.truncatula cDNA libraries, supported by a refined R test to evaluate statistical significance and by ‘electronic northern’ representation, enabled us to identify a large number of novel genes predicted to be up- or down-regulated during either symbiotic root interaction. These in silico analyses provide a first global view of the genetic programs for root symbioses in M.truncatula. A searchable database has been built and can be accessed through a public interface. PMID:12490726

  17. Exploring root symbiotic programs in the model legume Medicago truncatula using EST analysis.

    PubMed

    Journet, Etienne-Pascal; van Tuinen, Diederik; Gouzy, Jérome; Crespeau, Hervé; Carreau, Véronique; Farmer, Mary-Jo; Niebel, Andreas; Schiex, Thomas; Jaillon, Olivier; Chatagnier, Odile; Godiard, Laurence; Micheli, Fabienne; Kahn, Daniel; Gianinazzi-Pearson, Vivienne; Gamas, Pascal

    2002-12-15

    We report on a large-scale expressed sequence tag (EST) sequencing and analysis program aimed at characterizing the sets of genes expressed in roots of the model legume Medicago truncatula during interactions with either of two microsymbionts, the nitrogen-fixing bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti or the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices. We have designed specific tools for in silico analysis of EST data, in relation to chimeric cDNA detection, EST clustering, encoded protein prediction, and detection of differential expression. Our 21 473 5'- and 3'-ESTs could be grouped into 6359 EST clusters, corresponding to distinct virtual genes, along with 52 498 other M.truncatula ESTs available in the dbEST (NCBI) database that were recruited in the process. These clusters were manually annotated, using a specifically developed annotation interface. Analysis of EST cluster distribution in various M.truncatula cDNA libraries, supported by a refined R test to evaluate statistical significance and by 'electronic northern' representation, enabled us to identify a large number of novel genes predicted to be up- or down-regulated during either symbiotic root interaction. These in silico analyses provide a first global view of the genetic programs for root symbioses in M.truncatula. A searchable database has been built and can be accessed through a public interface. PMID:12490726

  18. Predicting gene expression levels from codon biases in α-proteobacterial genomes

    PubMed Central

    Karlin, Samuel; Barnett, Melanie J.; Campbell, Allan M.; Fisher, Robert F.; Mrázek, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Predicted highly expressed (PHX) genes in five currently available high G+C complete α-proteobacterial genomes are analyzed. These include: the nitrogen-fixing plant symbionts Sinorhizobium meliloti (SINME) and Mesorhizobium loti (MESLO), the nonpathogenic aquatic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus (CAUCR), the plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens (AGRTU), and the mammalian pathogen Brucella melitensis (BRUME). Three of these genomes, SINME, AGRTU, and BRUME, contain multiple chromosomes or megaplasmids (>1 Mb length). PHX genes in these genomes are concentrated mainly in the major (largest) chromosome with few PHX genes found in the secondary chromosomes and megaplasmids. Tricarboxylic acid cycle and aerobic respiration genes are strongly PHX in all five genomes, whereas anaerobic pathways of glycolysis and fermentation are mostly not PHX. Only in MESLO (but not SINME) and BRUME are most glycolysis genes PHX. Many flagellar genes are PHX in MESLO and CAUCR, but mostly are not PHX in SINME and AGRTU. The nonmotile BRUME also carries many flagellar genes but these are generally not PHX and all but one are located in the second chromosome. CAUCR stands out among available prokaryotic genomes with 25 PHX TonB-dependent receptors. These are putatively involved in uptake of iron ions and other nonsoluble compounds. PMID:12775761

  19. Non-random distribution of macromolecules as driving forces for phenotypic variation.

    PubMed

    Jahn, Michael; Günther, Susanne; Müller, Susann

    2015-06-01

    Clonal populations employ many strategies of diversification to deal with constraints. All these strategies result in the generation of different phenotypes with diverse functions. Events like cell division are major sources of phenotypic variability due to the unequal partitioning of cellular components. In this review we concentrate on passive and active mechanisms cells employ to distribute macromolecules between their offspring. Different types of segregation are described, addressing both metabolically pertinent molecules such as PHA/PHB or polyphosphates, and components that adversely affect cells by promoting aging, such as damaged protein complexes or extrachromosomal rDNA circles. We also refer to mechanisms generating plasmid copy number (PCN) variation between cells in a population, and how elaborate partitioning systems counteract partitioning errors and ensure equal distribution. Finally, we demonstrate how simple differences in chromosomal copy number determine the fate of a cell, in this case the effect of gene dosage on the onset of sporulation in Bacillus subtilis or on a functional trait in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

  20. A comparison of the retention of pathogenic Escherichia coli O157 by sprouts, leaves and fruits

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, Stephanie L; Smith, Rachel B; Matthysse, Ann G

    2014-01-01

    The retention (binding to or association with the plant) of Escherichia coli by cut leaves and fruits after vigorous water washing was compared with that by sprouts. Retention by fruits and leaves was similar but differed from retention by sprouts in rate, effect of wounding and requirement for poly-β,1-6-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. Escherichia coli was retained by cut ends of lettuce leaves within 5 min while more than 1 h was required for retention by the intact epidermis of leaves and fruits, and more than 1 day for sprouts. Retention after 5 min at the cut leaf edge was specific for E. coli and was not shown by the plant-associated bacteria Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Sinorhizobium meliloti. Escherichia coli was retained by lettuce, spinach, alfalfa, bean, tomato, Arabidopsis thaliana, cucumber, and pepper leaves and fruits faster than by sprouts. Wounding of leaves and fruits but not sprouts increased bacterial retention. Mutations in the exopolysaccharide synthesis genes yhjN and wcaD reduced the numbers of bacteria retained. PgaC mutants were retained by cut leaves and fruits but not by sprouts. There was no significant difference in the retention of an O157 and a K12 strain by fruits or leaves. However, retention by sprouts of O157 strains was significantly greater than K12 strains. These findings suggest that there are differences in the mechanisms of E coli retention among sprouts, and leaves and fruits. PMID:25351040

  1. Environmental Signals and Regulatory Pathways That Influence Exopolysaccharide Production in Rhizobia

    PubMed Central

    Janczarek, Monika

    2011-01-01

    Rhizobia are Gram-negative bacteria that can exist either as free-living bacteria or as nitrogen-fixing symbionts inside root nodules of leguminous plants. The composition of the rhizobial outer surface, containing a variety of polysaccharides, plays a significant role in the adaptation of these bacteria in both habitats. Among rhizobial polymers, exopolysaccharide (EPS) is indispensable for the invasion of a great majority of host plants which form indeterminate-type nodules. Various functions are ascribed to this heteropolymer, including protection against environmental stress and host defense, attachment to abiotic and biotic surfaces, and in signaling. The synthesis of EPS in rhizobia is a multi-step process regulated by several proteins at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Also, some environmental factors (carbon source, nitrogen and phosphate starvation, flavonoids) and stress conditions (osmolarity, ionic strength) affect EPS production. This paper discusses the recent data concerning the function of the genes required for EPS synthesis and the regulation of this process by several environmental signals. Up till now, the synthesis of rhizobial EPS has been best studied in two species, Sinorhizobium meliloti and Rhizobium leguminosarum. The latest data indicate that EPS synthesis in rhizobia undergoes very complex hierarchical regulation, in which proteins engaged in quorum sensing and the regulation of motility genes also participate. This finding enables a better understanding of the complex processes occurring in the rhizosphere which are crucial for successful colonization and infection of host plant roots. PMID:22174640

  2. Nodule-enhanced expression of a sucrose phosphate synthase gene member (MsSPSA) has a role in carbon and nitrogen metabolism in the nodules of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Aleman, Lorenzo; Ortega, Jose Luis; Martinez-Grimes, Martha; Seger, Mark; Holguin, Francisco Omar; Uribe, Diana J; Garcia-Ibilcieta, David; Sengupta-Gopalan, Champa

    2010-01-01

    Sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) catalyzes the first step in the synthesis of sucrose in photosynthetic tissues. We characterized the expression of three different isoforms of SPS belonging to two different SPS gene families in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), a previously identified SPS (MsSPSA) and two novel isoforms belonging to class B (MsSPSB and MsSPSB3). While MsSPSA showed nodule-enhanced expression, both MsSPSB genes exhibited leaf-enhanced expression. Alfalfa leaf and nodule SPS enzymes showed differences in chromatographic and electrophoretic migration and differences in V (max) and allosteric regulation. The root nodules in legume plants are a strong sink for photosynthates with its need for ATP, reducing power and carbon skeletons for dinitrogen fixation and ammonia assimilation. The expression of genes encoding SPS and other key enzymes in sucrose metabolism, sucrose phosphate phosphatase and sucrose synthase, was analyzed in the leaves and nodules of plants inoculated with Sinorhizobium meliloti. Based on the expression pattern of these genes, the properties of the SPS isoforms and the concentration of starch and soluble sugars in nodules induced by a wild type and a nitrogen fixation deficient strain, we propose that SPS has an important role in the control of carbon flux into different metabolic pathways in the symbiotic nodules.

  3. Structural basis of interprotein electron transfer in bacterial sulfite oxidation.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Aaron P; Laming, Elise L; Casas Garcia, G Patricia; Kvansakul, Marc; Guss, J Mitchell; Trewhella, Jill; Calmes, Benoit; Bernhardt, Paul V; Hanson, Graeme R; Kappler, Ulrike; Maher, Megan J

    2015-12-19

    Interprotein electron transfer underpins the essential processes of life and relies on the formation of specific, yet transient protein-protein interactions. In biological systems, the detoxification of sulfite is catalyzed by the sulfite-oxidizing enzymes (SOEs), which interact with an electron acceptor for catalytic turnover. Here, we report the structural and functional analyses of the SOE SorT from Sinorhizobium meliloti and its cognate electron acceptor SorU. Kinetic and thermodynamic analyses of the SorT/SorU interaction show the complex is dynamic in solution, and that the proteins interact with Kd = 13.5 ± 0.8 μM. The crystal structures of the oxidized SorT and SorU, both in isolation and in complex, reveal the interface to be remarkably electrostatic, with an unusually large number of direct hydrogen bonding interactions. The assembly of the complex is accompanied by an adjustment in the structure of SorU, and conformational sampling provides a mechanism for dissociation of the SorT/SorU assembly.

  4. Bradyrhizobium BclA Is a Peptide Transporter Required for Bacterial Differentiation in Symbiosis with Aeschynomene Legumes.

    PubMed

    Guefrachi, Ibtissem; Pierre, Olivier; Timchenko, Tatiana; Alunni, Benoît; Barrière, Quentin; Czernic, Pierre; Villaécija-Aguilar, José-Antonio; Verly, Camille; Bourge, Mickaël; Fardoux, Joël; Mars, Mohamed; Kondorosi, Eva; Giraud, Eric; Mergaert, Peter

    2015-11-01

    Nodules of legume plants are highly integrated symbiotic systems shaped by millions of years of evolution. They harbor nitrogen-fixing rhizobium bacteria called bacteroids. Several legume species produce peptides called nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides in the symbiotic nodule cells which house the bacteroids. NCR peptides are related to antimicrobial peptides of innate immunity. They induce the endosymbionts into a differentiated, enlarged, and polyploid state. The bacterial symbionts, on their side, evolved functions for the response to the NCR peptides. Here, we identified the bclA gene of Bradyrhizobium sp. strains ORS278 and ORS285, which is required for the formation of differentiated and functional bacteroids in the nodules of the NCR peptide-producing Aeschynomene legumes. The BclA ABC transporter promotes the import of NCR peptides and provides protection against the antimicrobial activity of these peptides. Moreover, BclA can complement the role of the related BacA transporter of Sinorhizobium meliloti, which has a similar symbiotic function in the interaction with Medicago legumes. PMID:26106901

  5. Site-specific bacterial chromosome engineering: ΦC31 integrase mediated cassette exchange (IMCE).

    PubMed

    Heil, John R; Cheng, Jiujun; Charles, Trevor C

    2012-03-16

    The bacterial chromosome may be used to stably maintain foreign DNA in the mega-base range. Integration into the chromosome circumvents issues such as plasmid replication, plasmid stability, plasmid incompatibility, and plasmid copy number variance. This method uses the site-specific integrase from the Streptomyces phage (Φ) C31. The ΦC31 integrase catalyzes a direct recombination between two specific DNA sites: attB and attP (34 and 39 bp, respectively). This recombination is stable and does not revert. A "landing pad" (LP) sequence consisting of a spectinomycin-resistance gene, aadA (SpR), and the E. coli ß-glucuronidase gene (uidA) flanked by attP sites has been integrated into the chromosomes of Sinorhizobium meliloti, Ochrobactrum anthropi, and Agrobacterium tumefaciens in an intergenic region, the ampC locus, and the tetA locus, respectively. S. meliloti is used in this protocol. Mobilizable donor vectors containing attB sites flanking a stuffer red fluorescent protein (rfp) gene and an antibiotic resistance gene have also been constructed. In this example the gentamicin resistant plasmid pJH110 is used. The rfp gene may be replaced with a desired construct using SphI and PstI. Alternatively a synthetic construct flanked by attB sites may be sub-cloned into a mobilizable vector such as pK19mob. The expression of the ΦC31 integrase gene (cloned from pHS62) is driven by the lac promoter, on a mobilizable broad host range plasmid pRK7813. A tetraparental mating protocol is used to transfer the donor cassette into the LP strain thereby replacing the markers in the LP sequence with the donor cassette. These cells are trans-integrants. Trans-integrants are formed with a typical efficiency of 0.5%. Trans-integrants are typically found within the first 500-1,000 colonies screened by antibiotic sensitivity or blue-white screening using 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-beta-D-glucuronic acid (X-gluc). This protocol contains the mating and selection procedures for

  6. Development of new positive-selection RIVET tools: detection of induced promoters by the excision-based transcriptional activation of an aacCI (GmR)-gfp fusion.

    PubMed

    Lozano, M J; Salas, M E; Giusti, M A; Draghi, W O; Torres Tejerizo, G A; Martini, M C; Del Papa, M F; Pistorio, M; Lagares, A

    2011-09-10

    RIVET (Recombination Based in vivo Expression Technology) is a powerful genetic tool originally conceived for the identification of genes induced in complex biological niches where conventional transcriptomics is difficult to use. With a broader application, genetic recombination-based technologies have also been used, in combination with regulatory proteins and specific transcriptional regulators, for the development of highly sensitive biosensor systems. RIVET systems generally comprise two modules: a promoter-trap cassette generating genomic transcriptional fusions to the tnpR gene encoding the Tn-γδ TnpR resolvase, and a reporter cassette carrying res-flanked selection markers that are excised upon expression of tnpR to produce an irreversible, inheritable phenotypic change. We report here the construction and validation of a new set of positive-selection RIVET systems that, upon induction of the promoter-trap module, generate the transcriptional activation of an antibiotic-resistant and a green-fluorescent phenotype. Two classes of promoter-trap tools were constructed to generate transcriptional fusions to tnpR: one based on the use of a narrow-host-range plasmid (pRIVET-I), integrative in several Gram-negative bacteria, and the other based on the use of a broad-host-range plasmid (pRIVET-R). The system was evaluated in the model soil bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti, where a clear-cut phenotypic transition from Nm(R)-Gm(S)-GFP(-) to Nm(S)-Gm(R)-GFP(+) occurred upon expression of tnpR. A S. meliloti integrative RIVET library was constructed in pRIVET-I and, as expected, changes in the extracellular conditions (e.g., salt stress) triggered a significant increase in the appearance of Gm(R)-GFP(+) (excised) clones. The sacB-independent positive-selection RIVET systems here described provide suitable basic tools both for the construction of new recombination-based biosensors and for the search of bacterial markers induced when microorganisms colonize and invade

  7. Examination of Prokaryotic Multipartite Genome Evolution through Experimental Genome Reduction

    PubMed Central

    diCenzo, George C.; MacLean, Allyson M.; Milunovic, Branislava; Golding, G. Brian; Finan, Turlough M.

    2014-01-01

    Many bacteria carry two or more chromosome-like replicons. This occurs in pathogens such as Vibrio cholerea and Brucella abortis as well as in many N2-fixing plant symbionts including all isolates of the alfalfa root-nodule bacteria Sinorhizobium meliloti. Understanding the evolution and role of this multipartite genome organization will provide significant insight into these important organisms; yet this knowledge remains incomplete, in part, because technical challenges of large-scale genome manipulations have limited experimental analyses. The distinct evolutionary histories and characteristics of the three replicons that constitute the S. meliloti genome (the chromosome (3.65 Mb), pSymA megaplasmid (1.35 Mb), and pSymB chromid (1.68 Mb)) makes this a good model to examine this topic. We transferred essential genes from pSymB into the chromosome, and constructed strains that lack pSymB as well as both pSymA and pSymB. This is the largest reduction (45.4%, 3.04 megabases, 2866 genes) of a prokaryotic genome to date and the first removal of an essential chromid. Strikingly, strains lacking pSymA and pSymB (ΔpSymAB) lost the ability to utilize 55 of 74 carbon sources and various sources of nitrogen, phosphorous and sulfur, yet the ΔpSymAB strain grew well in minimal salts media and in sterile soil. This suggests that the core chromosome is sufficient for growth in a bulk soil environment and that the pSymA and pSymB replicons carry genes with more specialized functions such as growth in the rhizosphere and interaction with the plant. These experimental data support a generalized evolutionary model, in which non-chromosomal replicons primarily carry genes with more specialized functions. These large secondary replicons increase the organism's niche range, which offsets their metabolic burden on the cell (e.g. pSymA). Subsequent co-evolution with the chromosome then leads to the formation of a chromid through the acquisition of functions core to all niches (e.g. p

  8. In vitro characterization of the splicing efficiency and fidelity of the RmInt1 group II intron as a means of controlling the dispersion of its host mobile element.

    PubMed

    Chillón, Isabel; Molina-Sánchez, María Dolores; Fedorova, Olga; García-Rodríguez, Fernando Manuel; Martínez-Abarca, Francisco; Toro, Nicolás

    2014-12-01

    Group II introns are catalytic RNAs that are excised from their precursors in a protein-dependent manner in vivo. Certain group II introns can also react in a protein-independent manner under nonphysiological conditions in vitro. The efficiency and fidelity of the splicing reaction is crucial, to guarantee the correct formation and expression of the protein-coding mRNA. RmInt1 is an efficient mobile intron found within the ISRm2011-2 insertion sequence in the symbiotic bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti. The RmInt1 intron self-splices in vitro, but this reaction generates side products due to a predicted cryptic IBS1* sequence within the 3' exon. We engineered an RmInt1 intron lacking the cryptic IBS1* sequence, which improved the fidelity of the splicing reaction. However, atypical circular forms of similar electrophoretic mobility to the lariat intron were nevertheless observed. We analyzed a run of four cytidine residues at the 3' splice site potentially responsible for a lack of fidelity at this site leading to the formation of circular intron forms. We showed that mutations of residues base-pairing in the tertiary EBS3-IBS3 interaction increased the efficiency and fidelity of the splicing reaction. Our results indicate that RmInt1 has developed strategies for decreasing its splicing efficiency and fidelity. RmInt1 makes use of unproductive splicing reactions to limit the transposition of the insertion sequence into which it inserts itself in its natural context, thereby preventing potentially harmful dispersion of ISRm2011-2 throughout the genome of its host.

  9. Characterization of BKC-1 class A carbapenemase from Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical isolates in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Nicoletti, Adriana Giannini; Marcondes, Marcelo F M; Martins, Willames M B S; Almeida, Luiz G P; Nicolás, Marisa F; Vasconcelos, Ana T R; Oliveira, Vitor; Gales, Ana Cristina

    2015-09-01

    Three Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical isolates demonstrating carbapenem resistance were recovered from different patients hospitalized at two medical centers in São Paulo, Brazil. Resistance to all β-lactams, quinolones, and some aminoglycosides was observed for these isolates that were susceptible to polymyxin B. Carbapenem hydrolysis, which was inhibited by clavulanic acid, was observed for all K. pneumoniae isolates that belonged to the same pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) type and a novel sequence type (ST), ST1781 (clonal complex 442 [CC442]). A 10-kb nonconjugative incompatibility group Q (IncQ) plasmid, denominated p60136, was transferred to Escherichia coli strain TOP10 cells by electroporation. The full sequencing of p60136 showed that it was composed of a mobilization system, ISKpn23, the phosphotransferase aph3A-VI, and a 941-bp open reading frame (ORF) that codified a 313-amino acid protein. This ORF was named bla BKC-1. Brazilian Klebsiella carbapenemase-1 (BKC-1) showed a pI of 6.0 and possessed the highest identity (63%) with a β-lactamase of Sinorhizobium meliloti, an environmental bacterium. Hydrolysis studies demonstrated that purified BKC-1 not only hydrolyzed carbapenems but also penicillins, cephalosporins, and monobactams. However, the carbapenems were less efficiently hydrolyzed due to their very low kcat values (0.0016 to 0.031 s(-1)). In fact, oxacillin was the best substrate for BKC-1 (kcat /Km , 53,522.6 mM(-1) s(-1)). Here, we report a new class A carbapenemase, confirming the diversity and rapid evolution of β-lactamases in K. pneumoniae clinical isolates. PMID:26055384

  10. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Secretes Compounds That Mimic Bacterial Signals and Interfere with Quorum Sensing Regulation in Bacteria1

    PubMed Central

    Teplitski, Max; Chen, Hancai; Rajamani, Sathish; Gao, Mengsheng; Merighi, Massimo; Sayre, Richard T.; Robinson, Jayne B.; Rolfe, Barry G.; Bauer, Wolfgang D.

    2004-01-01

    The unicellular soil-freshwater alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was found to secrete substances that mimic the activity of the N-acyl-l-homoserine lactone (AHL) signal molecules used by many bacteria for quorum sensing regulation of gene expression. More than a dozen chemically separable but unidentified substances capable of specifically stimulating the LasR or CepR but not the LuxR, AhyR, or CviR AHL bacterial quorum sensing reporter strains were detected in ethyl acetate extracts of C. reinhardtii culture filtrates. Colonies of C. reinhardtii and Chlorella spp. stimulated quorum sensing-dependent luminescence in Vibrio harveyi, indicating that these algae may produce compounds that affect the AI-2 furanosyl borate diester-mediated quorum sensing system of Vibrio spp. Treatment of the soil bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti with a partially purified LasR mimic from C. reinhardtii affected the accumulation of 16 of the 25 proteins that were altered in response to the bacterium's own AHL signals, providing evidence that the algal mimic affected quorum sensing-regulated functions in this wild-type bacterium. Peptide mass fingerprinting identified 32 proteins affected by the bacterium's AHLs or the purified algal mimic, including GroEL chaperonins, the nitrogen regulatory protein PII, and a GTP-binding protein. The algal mimic was able to cancel the stimulatory effects of bacterial AHLs on the accumulation of seven of these proteins, providing evidence that the secretion of AHL mimics by the alga could be effective in disruption of quorum sensing in naturally encountered bacteria. PMID:14671013

  11. A comparison of the retention of pathogenic Escherichia coli O157 by sprouts, leaves and fruits.

    PubMed

    Mathews, Stephanie L; Smith, Rachel B; Matthysse, Ann G

    2014-11-01

    The retention (binding to or association with the plant) of Escherichia coli by cut leaves and fruits after vigorous water washing was compared with that by sprouts. Retention by fruits and leaves was similar but differed from retention by sprouts in rate, effect of wounding and requirement for poly-β,1-6-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. Escherichia coli was retained by cut ends of lettuce leaves within 5 min while more than 1 h was required for retention by the intact epidermis of leaves and fruits, and more than 1 day for sprouts. Retention after 5 min at the cut leaf edge was specific for E. coli and was not shown by the plant-associated bacteria Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Sinorhizobium meliloti. Escherichia coli was retained by lettuce, spinach, alfalfa, bean, tomato, Arabidopsis thaliana, cucumber, and pepper leaves and fruits faster than by sprouts. Wounding of leaves and fruits but not sprouts increased bacterial retention. Mutations in the exopolysaccharide synthesis genes yhjN and wcaD reduced the numbers of bacteria retained. PgaC mutants were retained by cut leaves and fruits but not by sprouts. There was no significant difference in the retention of an O157 and a K12 strain by fruits or leaves. However, retention by sprouts of O157 strains was significantly greater than K12 strains. These findings suggest that there are differences in the mechanisms of E  coli retention among sprouts, and leaves and fruits.

  12. Analyzing stochastic transcription to elucidate the nucleoid's organization

    PubMed Central

    Riva, Alessandra; Carpentier, Anne-Sophie; Barloy-Hubler, Frédérique; Chéron, Angélique; Hénaut, Alain

    2008-01-01

    Background The processes of gene transcription, translation, as well as the reactions taking place between gene products, are subject to stochastic fluctuations. These stochastic events are being increasingly examined as it emerges that they can be crucial in the cell's survival. In a previous study we had examined the transcription patterns of two bacterial species (Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis) to elucidate the nucleoid's organization. The basic idea is that genes that share transcription patterns, must share some sort of spatial relationship, even if they are not close to each other on the chromosome. We had found that picking any gene at random, its transcription will be correlated with genes at well-defined short – as well as long-range distances, leaving the explanation of the latter an open question. In this paper we study the transcription correlations when the only transcription taking place is stochastic, in other words, no active or "deterministic" transcription takes place. To this purpose we use transcription data of Sinorhizobium meliloti. Results Even when only stochastic transcription takes place, the co-expression of genes varies as a function of the distance between genes: we observe again the short-range as well as the regular, long-range correlation patterns. Conclusion We explain these latter with a model based on the physical constraints acting on the DNA, forcing it into a conformation of groups of a few successive large and transcribed loops, which are evenly spaced along the chromosome and separated by small, non-transcribed loops. We discuss the question about the link between shared transcription patterns and physiological relationship and come to the conclusion that when genes are distantly placed along the chromosome, the transcription correlation does not imply a physiological relationship. PMID:18331647

  13. Small-molecule inhibition of choline catabolism in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other aerobic choline-catabolizing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fitzsimmons, Liam F; Flemer, Stevenson; Wurthmann, A Sandy; Deker, P Bruce; Sarkar, Indra Neil; Wargo, Matthew J

    2011-07-01

    Choline is abundant in association with eukaryotes and plays roles in osmoprotection, thermoprotection, and membrane biosynthesis in many bacteria. Aerobic catabolism of choline is widespread among soil proteobacteria, particularly those associated with eukaryotes. Catabolism of choline as a carbon, nitrogen, and/or energy source may play important roles in association with eukaryotes, including pathogenesis, symbioses, and nutrient cycling. We sought to generate choline analogues to study bacterial choline catabolism in vitro and in situ. Here we report the characterization of a choline analogue, propargylcholine, which inhibits choline catabolism at the level of Dgc enzyme-catalyzed dimethylglycine demethylation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We used genetic analyses and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance to demonstrate that propargylcholine is catabolized to its inhibitory form, propargylmethylglycine. Chemically synthesized propargylmethylglycine was also an inhibitor of growth on choline. Bioinformatic analysis suggests that there are genes encoding DgcA homologues in a variety of proteobacteria. We examined the broader utility of propargylcholine and propargylmethylglycine by assessing growth of other members of the proteobacteria that are known to grow on choline and possess putative DgcA homologues. Propargylcholine showed utility as a growth inhibitor in P. aeruginosa but did not inhibit growth in other proteobacteria tested. In contrast, propargylmethylglycine was able to inhibit choline-dependent growth in all tested proteobacteria, including Pseudomonas mendocina, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas putida, Burkholderia cepacia, Burkholderia ambifaria, and Sinorhizobium meliloti. We predict that chemical inhibitors of choline catabolism will be useful for studying this pathway in clinical and environmental isolates and could be a useful tool to study proteobacterial choline catabolism in situ.

  14. Genetic and computational identification of a conserved bacterial metabolic module.

    PubMed

    Boutte, Cara C; Srinivasan, Balaji S; Flannick, Jason A; Novak, Antal F; Martens, Andrew T; Batzoglou, Serafim; Viollier, Patrick H; Crosson, Sean

    2008-12-01

    We have experimentally and computationally defined a set of genes that form a conserved metabolic module in the alpha-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus and used this module to illustrate a schema for the propagation of pathway-level annotation across bacterial genera. Applying comprehensive forward and reverse genetic methods and genome-wide transcriptional analysis, we (1) confirmed the presence of genes involved in catabolism of the abundant environmental sugar myo-inositol, (2) defined an operon encoding an ABC-family myo-inositol transmembrane transporter, and (3) identified a novel myo-inositol regulator protein and cis-acting regulatory motif that control expression of genes in this metabolic module. Despite being encoded from non-contiguous loci on the C. crescentus chromosome, these myo-inositol catabolic enzymes and transporter proteins form a tightly linked functional group in a computationally inferred network of protein associations. Primary sequence comparison was not sufficient to confidently extend annotation of all components of this novel metabolic module to related bacterial genera. Consequently, we implemented the Graemlin multiple-network alignment algorithm to generate cross-species predictions of genes involved in myo-inositol transport and catabolism in other alpha-proteobacteria. Although the chromosomal organization of genes in this functional module varied between species, the upstream regions of genes in this aligned network were enriched for the same palindromic cis-regulatory motif identified experimentally in C. crescentus. Transposon disruption of the operon encoding the computationally predicted ABC myo-inositol transporter of Sinorhizobium meliloti abolished growth on myo-inositol as the sole carbon source, confirming our cross-genera functional prediction. Thus, we have defined regulatory, transport, and catabolic genes and a cis-acting regulatory sequence that form a conserved module required for myo-inositol metabolism in

  15. Development of a Microemulsion Formulation for Antimicrobial SecA Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Nian

    2016-01-01

    In our previous study, we have identified five antimicrobial small molecules via structure based design, which inhibit SecA of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las). SecA is a critical protein translocase ATPase subunit and is involved in pre-protein translocation across and integration into the cellular membrane in bacteria. In this study, eleven compounds were identified using similarity search method based on the five lead SecA inhibitors identified previously. The identified SecA inhibitors have poor aqueous solubility. Thus a microemulsion master mix (MMX) was developed to address the solubility issue and for application of the antimicrobials. MMX consists of N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone and dimethyl sulfoxide as solvent and co-solvent, as well as polyoxyethylated castor oil, polyalkylene glycol, and polyoxyethylene tridecyl ether phosphate as surfactants. MMX has significantly improved the solubility of SecA inhibitors and has no or little phytotoxic effects at concentrations less than 5.0% (v/v). The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of the SecA inhibitors and streptomycin against eight bacteria including Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Liberibacter crescens, Rhizobium etli, Bradyrhizobium japonicum, Mesorhizobium loti, and Sinorhizobium meliloti phylogenetically related to Las were determined using the broth microdilution method. MIC and MBC results showed that the 16 SecA inhibitors have antibacterial activities comparable to that of streptomycin. Overall, we have identified 11 potent SecA inhibitors using similarity search method. We have developed a microemulsion formulation for SecA inhibitors which improved the antimicrobial activities of SecA inhibitors. PMID:26963811

  16. Partial Protection against Brucella Infection in Mice by Immunization with Nonpathogenic Alphaproteobacteria▿

    PubMed Central

    Delpino, M. Victoria; Estein, Silvia M.; Fossati, Carlos A.; Baldi, Pablo C.

    2007-01-01

    Previous findings indicate that Brucella antigens and those from nonpathogenic alphaproteobacteria (NPAP) are cross-recognized by the immune system. We hypothesized that immunization with NPAP would protect mice from Brucella infection. Mice were immunized subcutaneously with heat-killed Ochrobactrum anthropi, Sinorhizobium meliloti, Mesorhizobium loti, Agrobacterium tumefaciens, or Brucella melitensis H38 (standard positive control) before intravenous challenge with Brucella abortus 2308. Cross-reacting serum antibodies against Brucella antigens were detected at the moment of challenge in all NPAP-immunized mice. Thirty days after B. abortus challenge, splenic CFU counts were significantly lower in mice immunized with O. anthropi, M. loti, and B. melitensis H38 than in the phosphate-buffered saline controls (protection levels were 0.80, 0.66, and 1.99 log units, respectively). In mice immunized intraperitoneally with cytosoluble extracts from NPAP or Brucella abortus, protection levels were 1.58 for the latter, 0.63 for O. anthropi, and 0.40 for M. loti. To test whether the use of live NPAP would increase protection further, mice were both immunized and challenged by the oral route. Immunization with NPAP induced a significant increase in serum immunoglobulin G (IgG), but not serum or fecal IgA, against Brucella antigens. After challenge, anti-Brucella IgA increased significantly in the sera and feces of mice orally immunized with O. anthropi. For all NPAP, protection levels were higher than those obtained with systemic immunizations but were lower than those obtained by oral immunization with heat-killed B. abortus. These results show that immunization with NPAP, especially O. anthropi, confers partial protection against Brucella challenge. However, such protection is lower than that conferred by immunization with whole Brucella or its cytosoluble fraction. PMID:17715332

  17. Characterization of BKC-1 Class A Carbapenemase from Klebsiella pneumoniae Clinical Isolates in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Marcondes, Marcelo F. M.; Martins, Willames M. B. S.; Almeida, Luiz G. P.; Nicolás, Marisa F.; Vasconcelos, Ana T. R.; Oliveira, Vitor; Gales, Ana Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Three Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical isolates demonstrating carbapenem resistance were recovered from different patients hospitalized at two medical centers in São Paulo, Brazil. Resistance to all β-lactams, quinolones, and some aminoglycosides was observed for these isolates that were susceptible to polymyxin B. Carbapenem hydrolysis, which was inhibited by clavulanic acid, was observed for all K. pneumoniae isolates that belonged to the same pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) type and a novel sequence type (ST), ST1781 (clonal complex 442 [CC442]). A 10-kb nonconjugative incompatibility group Q (IncQ) plasmid, denominated p60136, was transferred to Escherichia coli strain TOP10 cells by electroporation. The full sequencing of p60136 showed that it was composed of a mobilization system, ISKpn23, the phosphotransferase aph3A-VI, and a 941-bp open reading frame (ORF) that codified a 313-amino acid protein. This ORF was named blaBKC-1. Brazilian Klebsiella carbapenemase-1 (BKC-1) showed a pI of 6.0 and possessed the highest identity (63%) with a β-lactamase of Sinorhizobium meliloti, an environmental bacterium. Hydrolysis studies demonstrated that purified BKC-1 not only hydrolyzed carbapenems but also penicillins, cephalosporins, and monobactams. However, the carbapenems were less efficiently hydrolyzed due to their very low kcat values (0.0016 to 0.031 s−1). In fact, oxacillin was the best substrate for BKC-1 (kcat/Km, 53,522.6 mM−1 s−1). Here, we report a new class A carbapenemase, confirming the diversity and rapid evolution of β-lactamases in K. pneumoniae clinical isolates. PMID:26055384

  18. Characterization, distribution, and localization of ISRl2, and insertion sequence element isolated from Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae.

    PubMed Central

    Mazurier, S I; Rigottier-Gois, L; Amarger, N

    1996-01-01

    An insertion sequence (IS) element, ISR12, from Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae strain MSDJ4184 was isolated by insertional inactivation of the sacRB gene of pSUP104-sac, which allows positive selection. ISRl2 is 932 bp long, is flanked by 17-bp imperfect terminal inverted repeats, and generated a 3-bp target site duplication. ISRl2 was found to be 63 to 77% homologous to insertion elements of the IS5 group of the IS4 superfamily. A probe incorporating a full-length copy of ISRl2 was used to screen genomic DNAs from a collection of strains and from two field populations of R. leguminosarum to detect and estimate the copy numbers of homologous sequences. Among the collection of 63 strains representing the different species and genera of members of the family Rhizobiaceae, homology to ISRl2 was found within strains belonging to Sinorhizobium meliloti and S. fredii; within four of the six recognized Rhizobium species. R. leguminosarum, R. tropici, R. etli, and R. galegae; and within Rhizobium sp. (Phaseolus) genomic species 2. The apparent copy numbers of ISRl2 varied from one to eight. Among 139 isolates of R. leguminosarum from two field populations, homology to ISRl2 was detected in 91% of the isolates from one site and in 17% from the other. Analysis of the 95 isolates that hybridize to ISRl2 revealed a total of 20 distinct hybridization patterns composed of one to three bands. Probing blots of Eckhardt gels showed that sequences with homology to ISRl2 may be found on plasmids or the chromosome. Analysis of their genomic distribution demonstrated relationships and diversity among the R. leguminosarum isolates tested. PMID:8593071

  19. Molybdate uptake by Agrobacterium tumefaciens correlates with the cellular molybdenum cofactor status.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Marie-Christine; Ali, Koral; Sonnenschein, Marleen; Robrahn, Laura; Strauss, Daria; Narberhaus, Franz; Masepohl, Bernd

    2016-09-01

    Many enzymes require the molybdenum cofactor, Moco. Under Mo-limiting conditions, the high-affinity ABC transporter ModABC permits molybdate uptake and Moco biosynthesis in bacteria. Under Mo-replete conditions, Escherichia coli represses modABC transcription by the one-component regulator, ModE, consisting of a DNA-binding and a molybdate-sensing domain. Instead of a full-length ModE protein, many bacteria have a shorter ModE protein, ModE(S) , consisting of a DNA-binding domain only. Here, we asked how such proteins sense the intracellular molybdenum status. We show that the Agrobacterium tumefaciens ModE(S) protein Atu2564 is essential for modABC repression. ModE(S) binds two Mo-boxes in the modA promoter as shown by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Northern analysis revealed cotranscription of modE(S) with the upstream gene, atu2565, which was dispensable for ModE(S) activity. To identify genes controlling ModE(S) function, we performed transposon mutagenesis. Tn5 insertions resulting in derepressed modA transcription mapped to the atu2565-modE(S) operon and several Moco biosynthesis genes. We conclude that A. tumefaciens ModE(S) activity responds to Moco availability rather than to molybdate concentration directly, as is the case for E. coli ModE. Similar results in Sinorhizobium meliloti suggest that Moco dependence is a common feature of ModE(S) regulators.

  20. Molybdate uptake by Agrobacterium tumefaciens correlates with the cellular molybdenum cofactor status.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Marie-Christine; Ali, Koral; Sonnenschein, Marleen; Robrahn, Laura; Strauss, Daria; Narberhaus, Franz; Masepohl, Bernd

    2016-09-01

    Many enzymes require the molybdenum cofactor, Moco. Under Mo-limiting conditions, the high-affinity ABC transporter ModABC permits molybdate uptake and Moco biosynthesis in bacteria. Under Mo-replete conditions, Escherichia coli represses modABC transcription by the one-component regulator, ModE, consisting of a DNA-binding and a molybdate-sensing domain. Instead of a full-length ModE protein, many bacteria have a shorter ModE protein, ModE(S) , consisting of a DNA-binding domain only. Here, we asked how such proteins sense the intracellular molybdenum status. We show that the Agrobacterium tumefaciens ModE(S) protein Atu2564 is essential for modABC repression. ModE(S) binds two Mo-boxes in the modA promoter as shown by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Northern analysis revealed cotranscription of modE(S) with the upstream gene, atu2565, which was dispensable for ModE(S) activity. To identify genes controlling ModE(S) function, we performed transposon mutagenesis. Tn5 insertions resulting in derepressed modA transcription mapped to the atu2565-modE(S) operon and several Moco biosynthesis genes. We conclude that A. tumefaciens ModE(S) activity responds to Moco availability rather than to molybdate concentration directly, as is the case for E. coli ModE. Similar results in Sinorhizobium meliloti suggest that Moco dependence is a common feature of ModE(S) regulators. PMID:27196733

  1. Rhizophagus intraradices or its associated bacteria affect gene expression of key enzymes involved in the rosmarinic acid biosynthetic pathway of basil.

    PubMed

    Battini, Fabio; Bernardi, Rodolfo; Turrini, Alessandra; Agnolucci, Monica; Giovannetti, Manuela

    2016-10-01

    In recent years, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) have been reported to enhance plant biosynthesis of secondary metabolites with health-promoting activities, such as polyphenols, carotenoids, vitamins, anthocyanins, flavonoids and lycopene. In addition, plant growth-promoting (PGP) bacteria were shown to modulate the concentration of nutraceutical compounds in different plant species. This study investigated for the first time whether genes encoding key enzymes of the biochemical pathways leading to the production of rosmarinic acid (RA), a bioactive compound showing antioxidant, antibacterial, antiviral and anti-inflammatory properties, were differentially expressed in Ocimum basilicum (sweet basil) inoculated with AMF or selected PGP bacteria, by using quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR. O. basilicum plants were inoculated with either the AMF species Rhizophagus intraradices or a combination of two PGP bacteria isolated from its sporosphere, Sinorhizobium meliloti TSA41 and Streptomyces sp. W43N. Present data show that the selected PGP bacteria were able to trigger the overexpression of tyrosine amino-transferase (TAT), hydroxyphenylpyruvate reductase (HPPR) and p-coumaroyl shikimate 3'-hydroxylase isoform 1 (CS3'H iso1) genes, 5.7-fold, 2-fold and 2.4-fold, respectively, in O. basilicum leaves. By contrast, inoculation with R. intraradices triggered TAT upregulation and HPPR and CS3'H iso1 downregulation. Our data suggest that inoculation with the two selected strains of PGP bacteria utilised here could represent a suitable biotechnological tool to be implemented for the production of O. basilicum plants with increased levels of key enzymes for the biosynthesis of RA, a compound showing important functional properties as related to human health.

  2. Rhizophagus intraradices or its associated bacteria affect gene expression of key enzymes involved in the rosmarinic acid biosynthetic pathway of basil.

    PubMed

    Battini, Fabio; Bernardi, Rodolfo; Turrini, Alessandra; Agnolucci, Monica; Giovannetti, Manuela

    2016-10-01

    In recent years, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) have been reported to enhance plant biosynthesis of secondary metabolites with health-promoting activities, such as polyphenols, carotenoids, vitamins, anthocyanins, flavonoids and lycopene. In addition, plant growth-promoting (PGP) bacteria were shown to modulate the concentration of nutraceutical compounds in different plant species. This study investigated for the first time whether genes encoding key enzymes of the biochemical pathways leading to the production of rosmarinic acid (RA), a bioactive compound showing antioxidant, antibacterial, antiviral and anti-inflammatory properties, were differentially expressed in Ocimum basilicum (sweet basil) inoculated with AMF or selected PGP bacteria, by using quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR. O. basilicum plants were inoculated with either the AMF species Rhizophagus intraradices or a combination of two PGP bacteria isolated from its sporosphere, Sinorhizobium meliloti TSA41 and Streptomyces sp. W43N. Present data show that the selected PGP bacteria were able to trigger the overexpression of tyrosine amino-transferase (TAT), hydroxyphenylpyruvate reductase (HPPR) and p-coumaroyl shikimate 3'-hydroxylase isoform 1 (CS3'H iso1) genes, 5.7-fold, 2-fold and 2.4-fold, respectively, in O. basilicum leaves. By contrast, inoculation with R. intraradices triggered TAT upregulation and HPPR and CS3'H iso1 downregulation. Our data suggest that inoculation with the two selected strains of PGP bacteria utilised here could represent a suitable biotechnological tool to be implemented for the production of O. basilicum plants with increased levels of key enzymes for the biosynthesis of RA, a compound showing important functional properties as related to human health. PMID:27179537

  3. Selective recruitment of mRNAs and miRNAs to polyribosomes in response to rhizobia infection in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Reynoso, Mauricio Alberto; Blanco, Flavio Antonio; Bailey-Serres, Julia; Crespi, Martín; Zanetti, María Eugenia

    2013-01-01

    Translation of mRNAs is a key regulatory step that contributes to the coordination and modulation of eukaryotic gene expression during development or adaptation to the environment. mRNA stability or translatability can be regulated by the action of small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs), which control diverse biological processes. Under low nitrogen conditions, leguminous plants associate with soil bacteria and develop a new organ specialized in nitrogen fixation: the nodule. To gain insight into the translational regulation of mRNAs during nodule formation, the association of mRNAs and sRNAs to polysomes was characterized in roots of the model legume Medicago truncatula during the symbiotic interaction with Sinorhizobium meliloti. Quantitative comparison of steady-state and polysomal mRNAs for 15 genes involved in nodulation identified a group of transcripts with slight or no change in total cellular abundance that were significantly upregulated at the level of association with polysomes in response to rhizobia. This group included mRNAs encoding receptors like kinases required either for nodule organogenesis, bacterial infection or both, and transcripts encoding GRAS and NF-Y transcription factors (TFs). Quantitative analysis of sRNAs in total and polysomal RNA samples revealed that mature microRNAs (miRNAs) were associated with the translational machinery, notably, miR169 and miR172, which target the NF-YA/HAP2 and AP2 TFs, respectively. Upon inoculation, levels of miR169 pronouncedly decreased in polysomal complexes, concomitant with the increased accumulation of the NF-YA/HAP2 protein. These results indicate that both mRNAs and miRNAs are subject to differential recruitment to polysomes, and expose the importance of selective mRNA translation during root nodule symbiosis.

  4. Genome sequence of Ensifer adhaerens OV14 provides insights into its ability as a novel vector for the genetic transformation of plant genomes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recently it has been shown that Ensifer adhaerens can be used as a plant transformation technology, transferring genes into several plant genomes when equipped with a Ti plasmid. For this study, we have sequenced the genome of Ensifer adhaerens OV14 (OV14) and compared it with those of Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58 (C58) and Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021 (1021); the latter of which has also demonstrated a capacity to genetically transform crop genomes, albeit at significantly reduced frequencies. Results The 7.7 Mb OV14 genome comprises two chromosomes and two plasmids. All protein coding regions in the OV14 genome were functionally grouped based on an eggNOG database. No genes homologous to the A. tumefaciens Ti plasmid vir genes appeared to be present in the OV14 genome. Unexpectedly, OV14 and 1021 were found to possess homologs to chromosomal based genes cited as essential to A. tumefaciens T-DNA transfer. Of significance, genes that are non-essential but exert a positive influence on virulence and the ability to genetically transform host genomes were identified in OV14 but were absent from the 1021 genome. Conclusions This study reveals the presence of homologs to chromosomally based Agrobacterium genes that support T-DNA transfer within the genome of OV14 and other alphaproteobacteria. The sequencing and analysis of the OV14 genome increases our understanding of T-DNA transfer by non-Agrobacterium species and creates a platform for the continued improvement of Ensifer-mediated transformation (EMT). PMID:24708309

  5. luxR homolog avhR in Agrobacterium vitis affects the development of a grape-specific necrosis and a tobacco hypersensitive response.

    PubMed

    Hao, Guixia; Zhang, Hongsheng; Zheng, Desen; Burr, Thomas J

    2005-01-01

    The luxR homolog aviR in Agrobacterium vitis strain F2/5 was recently shown to be associated with induction of a hypersensitive response (HR) on tobacco and necrosis on grape plants, indicating that the responses are regulated by quorum sensing. We now report a second luxR homolog, avhR, whose disruption (mutant M1320) results in HR-negative and reduced grape necrosis phenotypes. The deduced AvhR protein has characteristic autoinducer binding and DNA binding domains and is unique among reported functional LuxR homologs in having substitutions at highly conserved Asp70, Trp57, and Trp85 residues, which are predicted to play important roles in autoinducer binding in TraR. M1320 was fully complemented with cloned avhR. The same array of N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHL) from F2/5, M1320, and complemented M1320 were observed; however, the signal strength from extracts of 6-day-old M1320 cultures was stronger than that of F2/5. Cultures of F2/5 amended with AHL extracts from overnight and 6-day cultures of F2/5 and M1320 were not affected in ability to cause HR or necrosis. A region of about 14 kb flanking avhR was sequenced and compared with homologous regions of A. tumefaciens C58 and Sinorhizobium meliloti Rm1021 genomes. Gene order and homology are conserved between the species. A site-directed mutation in a putative gene that resides downstream of avhR and that has homology to genes belonging to the ATP-binding cassette transporter family did not affect HR or necrosis phenotypes. It was determined that avhR and aviR are expressed independently and that neither regulates the expression of a clpA homolog in F2/5. PMID:15601702

  6. Application of targeted metagenomics to explore abundance and diversity of CO₂-fixing bacterial community using cbbL gene from the rhizosphere of Arachis hypogaea.

    PubMed

    Yousuf, Basit; Keshri, Jitendra; Mishra, Avinash; Jha, Bhavanath

    2012-09-10

    Sequestration of CO(2) by autotrophic bacteria is a key process of biogeochemical carbon cycling in soil ecosystem. Rhizosphere is a rich niche of microbial activity and diversity, influenced by change in atmospheric CO(2). Structural changes in rhizosphere composition influence microbial communities and the nutrient cycling. In the present study, the bacterial diversity and population dynamics were established using cbbL and 16S rRNA gene targeted metagenomics approach from the rhizosphere of Arachis hypogaea. A total of 108 cbbL clones were obtained from the rhizospheric soil which revealed predominance of cbbL sequences affiliated to Rhizobium leguminosarum, Bradyrhizobium sp., Sinorhizobium meliloti, Ochrobactrum anthropi and a variety of uncultured cbbL harboring bacteria. The 16S rRNA gene clone library exhibited the dominance of Firmicutes (34.4%), Proteobacteria (18.3%), Actinobacteria (17.2%) and Bacteroidetes (16.1%). About 43% nucleotide sequences of 16S rRNA gene clone library were novel genera which showed <95% homology with published sequences. Gene copy number of cbbL and 16S rRNA genes, determined by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT PCR), was 9.38 ± 0.75 × 10(7) and 5.43 ± 0.79 × 10(8) (per g dry soil), respectively. The results exhibited bacterial community structure with high bacterial diversity and abundance of CO(2)-fixing bacteria, which can be explored further for their role in carbon cycling, sustainable agriculture and environment management.

  7. Disulfide cross-linking influences symbiotic activities of nodule peptide NCR247.

    PubMed

    Shabab, Mohammed; Arnold, Markus F F; Penterman, Jon; Wommack, Andrew J; Bocker, Hartmut T; Price, Paul A; Griffitts, Joel S; Nolan, Elizabeth M; Walker, Graham C

    2016-09-01

    Interactions of rhizobia with legumes establish the chronic intracellular infection that underlies symbiosis. Within nodules of inverted repeat-lacking clade (IRLC) legumes, rhizobia differentiate into nitrogen-fixing bacteroids. This terminal differentiation is driven by host nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) peptides that orchestrate the adaptation of free-living bacteria into intracellular residents. Medicago truncatula encodes a family of >700 NCR peptides that have conserved cysteine motifs. NCR247 is a cationic peptide with four cysteines that can form two intramolecular disulfide bonds in the oxidized forms. This peptide affects Sinorhizobium meliloti transcription, translation, and cell division at low concentrations and is antimicrobial at higher concentrations. By preparing the three possible disulfide-cross-linked NCR247 regioisomers, the reduced peptide, and a variant lacking cysteines, we performed a systematic study of the effects of intramolecular disulfide cross-linking and cysteines on the activities of an NCR peptide. The relative activities of the five NCR247 variants differed strikingly among the various bioassays, suggesting that the NCR peptide-based language used by plants to control the development of their bacterial partners during symbiosis is even greater than previously recognized. These patterns indicate that certain NCR bioactivities require cysteines whereas others do not. The results also suggest that NCR247 may exert some of its effects within the cell envelope whereas other activities occur in the cytoplasm. BacA, a membrane protein that is critical for symbiosis, provides protection against all bactericidal forms of NCR247. Oxidative folding protects NCR247 from degradation by the symbiotically relevant metalloprotease HrrP (host range restriction peptidase), suggesting that disulfide bond formation may additionally stabilize NCR peptides during symbiosis. PMID:27551097

  8. Ensifer, Phyllobacterium and Rhizobium species occupy nodules of Medicago sativa (alfalfa) and Melilotus alba (sweet clover) grown at a Canadian site without a history of cultivation.

    PubMed

    Bromfield, E S P; Tambong, J T; Cloutier, S; Prévost, D; Laguerre, G; van Berkum, P; Thi, T V Tran; Assabgui, R; Barran, L R

    2010-02-01

    Phage-resistant and -susceptible bacteria from nodules of alfalfa and sweet clover, grown at a site without a known history of cultivation, were identified as diverse genotypes of Ensifer, Rhizobium and Phyllobacterium species based on sequence analysis of ribosomal (16S and 23S rRNA) and protein-encoding (atpD and recA) genes, Southern hybridization/RFLP and a range of phenotypic characteristics. Among phage-resistant bacteria, one genotype of Rhizobium sp. predominated on alfalfa (frequency approximately 68 %) but was recovered infrequently ( approximately 1 %) from sweet clover. A second genotype was isolated infrequently only from alfalfa. These genotypes fixed nitrogen poorly in association with sweet clover and Phaseolus vulgaris, but were moderately effective with alfalfa. They produced a near-neutral reaction on mineral salts agar containing mannitol, which is atypical of the genus Rhizobium. A single isolate of Ensifer sp. and two of Phyllobacterium sp. were recovered only from sweet clover. All were highly resistant to multiple antibiotics. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that Ensifer sp. strain T173 is closely related to, but separate from, the non-symbiotic species 'Sinorhizobium morelense'. Strain T173 is unique in that it possesses a 175 kb symbiotic plasmid and elicits ineffective nodules on alfalfa, sweet clover, Medicago lupulina and Macroptilium atropurpureum. The two Phyllobacterium spp. were non-symbiotic and probably represent bacterial opportunists. Three genotypes of E. meliloti that were symbiotically effective with alfalfa and sweet clover were encountered infrequently. Among phage-susceptible isolates, two genotypes of E. medicae were encountered infrequently and were highly effective with alfalfa, sweet clover and Medicago polymorpha. The ecological and practical implications of the findings are discussed.

  9. The Gut of the Soil Microarthropod Folsomia candida (Collembola) Is a Frequently Changeable but Selective Habitat and a Vector for Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Thimm, Torsten; Hoffmann, Andrea; Borkott, Heinz; Charles Munch, Jean; Tebbe, Christoph C.

    1998-01-01

    Interaction potentials between soil microarthropods and microorganisms were investigated with Folsomia candida (Insecta, Collembola) in microcosm laboratory experiments. Microscopic analysis revealed that the volumes of the simple, rod-shaped guts of adult specimens varied with their feeding activity, from 0.7 to 11.2 nl. A dense layer of bacterial cells, associated with the peritrophic membrane, was detected in the midgut by scanning electron microscopy. Depending on the molting stage, which occurred at intervals of approximately 4 days, numbers of heterotrophic, aerobic gut bacteria changed from 4.9 × 102 to 2.3 × 106 CFU per specimen. A total of 11 different taxonomic bacterial groups and the filamentous fungus Acremonium charticola were isolated from the guts of five F. candida specimens. The most abundant isolate was related to Erwinia amylovora (96.2% DNA sequence similarity to its 16S rRNA gene). F. candida preferred to feed on Pseudomonas putida and three indigenous gut isolates rather than eight different type culture strains. When luciferase reporter gene-tagged bacterial strains were pulse fed to F. candida, gut isolates were continuously shed for 8 days to several weeks but Escherichia coli HB101 was shed for only 1 day. Ratios of ingested to released bacterial cells demonstrated that populations of nonindigenous gut bacteria like Sinorhizobium meliloti L33 and E. coli HB101 were reduced by more than 4 orders of magnitude but that the population of gut isolate Alcaligenes faecalis HR4 was reduced only 500-fold. This work demonstrates that F. candida represents a frequently changeable but selective habitat for bacteria in terrestrial environments and that microarthropods have to be considered factors that modify soil microbial communities. PMID:9647845

  10. Toxicogenomic Responses of the Model Legume Medicago truncatula to Aged Biosolids Containing a Mixture of Nanomaterials (TiO₂, Ag, and ZnO) from a Pilot Wastewater Treatment Plant.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun; Unrine, Jason M; Judy, Jonathan D; Lewis, Ricky W; Guo, Jing; McNear, David H; Tsyusko, Olga V

    2015-07-21

    Toxicogenomic responses in Medicago truncatula A17 were monitored following exposure to biosolids-amended soils. Treatments included biosolids produced using a pilot wastewater treatment plant with either no metal introduced into the influent (control); bulk/ionic TiO2, ZnO, and AgNO3 added to influent (bulk/dissolved treatment); or Ag, ZnO, and TiO2 engineered nanomaterials added to influent (ENM treatment) and then added to soil, which was aged in the field for 6 months. In our companion study, we found inhibition of nodulation in the ENM but not in the bulk/dissolved treatment. Gene expression profiling revealed highly distinct profiles with more than 10-fold down-regulation in 239 genes in M. truncatula roots from the ENM treatment, while gene expression patterns were similar between bulk/dissolved and control treatments. In response to ENM exposure, many of the identified biological pathways, gene ontologies, and individual genes are associated with nitrogen metabolism, nodulation, metal homeostasis, and stress responses. Expression levels of nine genes were independently confirmed with qRT-PCR. Exposure to ENMs induced unique shifts in expression profiles and biological pathways compared with bulk/dissolved treatment, despite the lack of difference in bioavailable metal fractions, metal oxidation state, and coordination environment between ENM and bulk/dissolved biosolids. As populations of Sinorhizobium meliloti Rm2011 were similar in bulk/dissolved and ENM treatments, our results suggest that inhibition of nodulation in the ENM treatment was primarily due to phytotoxicity, likely caused by enhanced bioavailability of Zn ions. PMID:26065335

  11. Mining the phytomicrobiome to understand how bacterial coinoculations enhance plant growth

    PubMed Central

    Maymon, Maskit; Martínez-Hidalgo, Pilar; Tran, Stephen S.; Ice, Tyler; Craemer, Karena; Anbarchian, Teni; Sung, Tiffany; Hwang, Lin H.; Chou, Minxia; Fujishige, Nancy A.; Villella, William; Ventosa, Jérôme; Sikorski, Johannes; Sanders, Erin R.; Faull, Kym F.; Hirsch, Ann M.

    2015-01-01

    In previous work, we showed that coinoculating Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae 128C53 and Bacillus simplex 30N-5 onto Pisum sativum L. roots resulted in better nodulation and increased plant growth. We now expand this research to include another alpha-rhizobial species as well as a beta-rhizobium, Burkholderia tuberum STM678. We first determined whether the rhizobia were compatible with B. simplex 30N-5 by cross-streaking experiments, and then Medicago truncatula and Melilotus alba were coinoculated with B. simplex 30N-5 and Sinorhizobium (Ensifer) meliloti to determine the effects on plant growth. Similarly, B. simplex 30N-5 and Bu. tuberum STM678 were coinoculated onto Macroptilium atropurpureum. The exact mechanisms whereby coinoculation results in increased plant growth are incompletely understood, but the synthesis of phytohormones and siderophores, the improved solubilization of inorganic nutrients, and the production of antimicrobial compounds are likely possibilities. Because B. simplex 30N-5 is not widely recognized as a Plant Growth Promoting Bacterial (PGPB) species, after sequencing its genome, we searched for genes proposed to promote plant growth, and then compared these sequences with those from several well studied PGPB species. In addition to genes involved in phytohormone synthesis, we detected genes important for the production of volatiles, polyamines, and antimicrobial peptides as well as genes for such plant growth-promoting traits as phosphate solubilization and siderophore production. Experimental evidence is presented to show that some of these traits, such as polyamine synthesis, are functional in B. simplex 30N-5, whereas others, e.g., auxin production, are not. PMID:26442090

  12. A Phylogenetically Conserved Group of Nuclear Factor-Y Transcription Factors Interact to Control Nodulation in Legumes1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Laloum, Tom; Lepage, Agnès; Ariel, Federico; Frances, Lisa; Gamas, Pascal; de Carvalho-Niebel, Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    The endosymbiotic association between legumes and soil bacteria called rhizobia leads to the formation of a new root-derived organ called the nodule in which differentiated bacteria convert atmospheric nitrogen into a form that can be assimilated by the host plant. Successful root infection by rhizobia and nodule organogenesis require the activation of symbiotic genes that are controlled by a set of transcription factors (TFs). We recently identified Medicago truncatula nuclear factor-YA1 (MtNF-YA1) and MtNF-YA2 as two M. truncatula TFs playing a central role during key steps of the Sinorhizobium meliloti-M. truncatula symbiotic interaction. NF-YA TFs interact with NF-YB and NF-YC subunits to regulate target genes containing the CCAAT box consensus sequence. In this study, using a yeast two-hybrid screen approach, we identified the NF-YB and NF-YC subunits able to interact with MtNF-YA1 and MtNF-YA2. In yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and in planta, we further demonstrated by both coimmunoprecipitation and bimolecular fluorescence complementation that these NF-YA, -B, and -C subunits interact and form a stable NF-Y heterotrimeric complex. Reverse genetic and chromatin immunoprecipitation-PCR approaches revealed the importance of these newly identified NF-YB and NF-YC subunits for rhizobial symbiosis and binding to the promoter of MtERN1 (for Ethylene Responsive factor required for Nodulation), a direct target gene of MtNF-YA1 and MtNF-YA2. Finally, we verified that a similar trimer is formed in planta by the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) NF-Y subunits, revealing the existence of evolutionary conserved NF-Y protein complexes to control nodulation in leguminous plants. This sheds light on the process whereby an ancient heterotrimeric TF mainly controlling cell division in animals has acquired specialized functions in plants. PMID:26432878

  13. A Phylogenetically Conserved Group of Nuclear Factor-Y Transcription Factors Interact to Control Nodulation in Legumes.

    PubMed

    Baudin, Maël; Laloum, Tom; Lepage, Agnès; Rípodas, Carolina; Ariel, Federico; Frances, Lisa; Crespi, Martin; Gamas, Pascal; Blanco, Flavio Antonio; Zanetti, Maria Eugenia; de Carvalho-Niebel, Fernanda; Niebel, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    The endosymbiotic association between legumes and soil bacteria called rhizobia leads to the formation of a new root-derived organ called the nodule in which differentiated bacteria convert atmospheric nitrogen into a form that can be assimilated by the host plant. Successful root infection by rhizobia and nodule organogenesis require the activation of symbiotic genes that are controlled by a set of transcription factors (TFs). We recently identified Medicago truncatula nuclear factor-YA1 (MtNF-YA1) and MtNF-YA2 as two M. truncatula TFs playing a central role during key steps of the Sinorhizobium meliloti-M. truncatula symbiotic interaction. NF-YA TFs interact with NF-YB and NF-YC subunits to regulate target genes containing the CCAAT box consensus sequence. In this study, using a yeast two-hybrid screen approach, we identified the NF-YB and NF-YC subunits able to interact with MtNF-YA1 and MtNF-YA2. In yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and in planta, we further demonstrated by both coimmunoprecipitation and bimolecular fluorescence complementation that these NF-YA, -B, and -C subunits interact and form a stable NF-Y heterotrimeric complex. Reverse genetic and chromatin immunoprecipitation-PCR approaches revealed the importance of these newly identified NF-YB and NF-YC subunits for rhizobial symbiosis and binding to the promoter of MtERN1 (for Ethylene Responsive factor required for Nodulation), a direct target gene of MtNF-YA1 and MtNF-YA2. Finally, we verified that a similar trimer is formed in planta by the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) NF-Y subunits, revealing the existence of evolutionary conserved NF-Y protein complexes to control nodulation in leguminous plants. This sheds light on the process whereby an ancient heterotrimeric TF mainly controlling cell division in animals has acquired specialized functions in plants.

  14. Both Plant and Bacterial Nitrate Reductases Contribute to Nitric Oxide Production in Medicago truncatula Nitrogen-Fixing Nodules1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Horchani, Faouzi; Prévot, Marianne; Boscari, Alexandre; Evangelisti, Edouard; Meilhoc, Eliane; Bruand, Claude; Raymond, Philippe; Boncompagni, Eric; Aschi-Smiti, Samira; Puppo, Alain; Brouquisse, Renaud

    2011-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a signaling and defense molecule of major importance in living organisms. In the model legume Medicago truncatula, NO production has been detected in the nitrogen fixation zone of the nodule, but the systems responsible for its synthesis are yet unknown and its role in symbiosis is far from being elucidated. In this work, using pharmacological and genetic approaches, we explored the enzymatic source of NO production in M. truncatula-Sinorhizobium meliloti nodules under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. When transferred from normoxia to hypoxia, nodule NO production was rapidly increased, indicating that NO production capacity is present in functioning nodules and may be promptly up-regulated in response to decreased oxygen availability. Contrary to roots and leaves, nodule NO production was stimulated by nitrate and nitrite and inhibited by tungstate, a nitrate reductase inhibitor. Nodules obtained with either plant nitrate reductase RNA interference double knockdown (MtNR1/2) or bacterial nitrate reductase-deficient (napA) and nitrite reductase-deficient (nirK) mutants, or both, exhibited reduced nitrate or nitrite reductase activities and NO production levels. Moreover, NO production in nodules was found to be inhibited by electron transfer chain inhibitors, and nodule energy state (ATP-ADP ratio) was significantly reduced when nodules were incubated in the presence of tungstate. Our data indicate that both plant and bacterial nitrate reductase and electron transfer chains are involved in NO synthesis. We propose the existence of a nitrate-NO respiration process in nodules that could play a role in the maintenance of the energy status required for nitrogen fixation under oxygen-limiting conditions. PMID:21139086

  15. Phosphate sink containing two-component signaling systems as tunable threshold devices.

    PubMed

    Amin, Munia; Kothamachu, Varun B; Feliu, Elisenda; Scharf, Birgit E; Porter, Steven L; Soyer, Orkun S

    2014-10-01

    Synthetic biology aims to design de novo biological systems and reengineer existing ones. These efforts have mostly focused on transcriptional circuits, with reengineering of signaling circuits hampered by limited understanding of their systems dynamics and experimental challenges. Bacterial two-component signaling systems offer a rich diversity of sensory systems that are built around a core phosphotransfer reaction between histidine kinases and their output response regulator proteins, and thus are a good target for reengineering through synthetic biology. Here, we explore the signal-response relationship arising from a specific motif found in two-component signaling. In this motif, a single histidine kinase (HK) phosphotransfers reversibly to two separate output response regulator (RR) proteins. We show that, under the experimentally observed parameters from bacteria and yeast, this motif not only allows rapid signal termination, whereby one of the RRs acts as a phosphate sink towards the other RR (i.e. the output RR), but also implements a sigmoidal signal-response relationship. We identify two mathematical conditions on system parameters that are necessary for sigmoidal signal-response relationships and define key parameters that control threshold levels and sensitivity of the signal-response curve. We confirm these findings experimentally, by in vitro reconstitution of the one HK-two RR motif found in the Sinorhizobium meliloti chemotaxis pathway and measuring the resulting signal-response curve. We find that the level of sigmoidality in this system can be experimentally controlled by the presence of the sink RR, and also through an auxiliary protein that is shown to bind to the HK (yielding Hill coefficients of above 7). These findings show that the one HK-two RR motif allows bacteria and yeast to implement tunable switch-like signal processing and provides an ideal basis for developing threshold devices for synthetic biology applications. PMID:25357192

  16. Toxicogenomic Responses of the Model Legume Medicago truncatula to Aged Biosolids Containing a Mixture of Nanomaterials (TiO₂, Ag, and ZnO) from a Pilot Wastewater Treatment Plant.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun; Unrine, Jason M; Judy, Jonathan D; Lewis, Ricky W; Guo, Jing; McNear, David H; Tsyusko, Olga V

    2015-07-21

    Toxicogenomic responses in Medicago truncatula A17 were monitored following exposure to biosolids-amended soils. Treatments included biosolids produced using a pilot wastewater treatment plant with either no metal introduced into the influent (control); bulk/ionic TiO2, ZnO, and AgNO3 added to influent (bulk/dissolved treatment); or Ag, ZnO, and TiO2 engineered nanomaterials added to influent (ENM treatment) and then added to soil, which was aged in the field for 6 months. In our companion study, we found inhibition of nodulation in the ENM but not in the bulk/dissolved treatment. Gene expression profiling revealed highly distinct profiles with more than 10-fold down-regulation in 239 genes in M. truncatula roots from the ENM treatment, while gene expression patterns were similar between bulk/dissolved and control treatments. In response to ENM exposure, many of the identified biological pathways, gene ontologies, and individual genes are associated with nitrogen metabolism, nodulation, metal homeostasis, and stress responses. Expression levels of nine genes were independently confirmed with qRT-PCR. Exposure to ENMs induced unique shifts in expression profiles and biological pathways compared with bulk/dissolved treatment, despite the lack of difference in bioavailable metal fractions, metal oxidation state, and coordination environment between ENM and bulk/dissolved biosolids. As populations of Sinorhizobium meliloti Rm2011 were similar in bulk/dissolved and ENM treatments, our results suggest that inhibition of nodulation in the ENM treatment was primarily due to phytotoxicity, likely caused by enhanced bioavailability of Zn ions.

  17. Multifunctionality and diversity of culturable bacterial communities strictly associated with spores of the plant beneficial symbiont Rhizophagus intraradices.

    PubMed

    Battini, Fabio; Cristani, Caterina; Giovannetti, Manuela; Agnolucci, Monica

    2016-02-01

    Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi (AMF) live in symbiosis with most crop plants and represent essential elements of soil fertility and plant nutrition and productivity, facilitating soil mineral nutrient uptake and protecting plants from biotic and abiotic stresses. These beneficial services may be mediated by the dense and active spore-associated bacterial communities, which sustain diverse functions, such as the promotion of mycorrhizal activity, biological control of soilborne diseases, nitrogen fixation, and the supply of nutrients and growth factors. In this work, we utilised culture-dependent methods to isolate and functionally characterize the microbiota strictly associated to Rhizophagus intraradices spores, and molecularly identified the strains with best potential plant growth promoting (PGP) activities by 16S rDNA sequence analysis. We isolated in pure culture 374 bacterial strains belonging to different functional groups-actinobacteria, spore-forming, chitinolytic and N2-fixing bacteria-and screened 122 strains for their potential PGP activities. The most common PGP trait was represented by P solubilization from phytate (69.7%), followed by siderophore production (65.6%), mineral P solubilization (49.2%) and IAA production (42.6%). About 76% of actinobacteria and 65% of chitinolytic bacteria displayed multiple PGP activities. Nineteen strains with best potential PGP activities, assigned to Sinorhizobium meliloti, Streptomyces spp., Arthrobacter phenanthrenivorans, Nocardiodes albus, Bacillus sp. pumilus group, Fictibacillus barbaricus and Lysinibacillus fusiformis, showed the ability to produce IAA and siderophores and to solubilize P from mineral phosphate and phytate, representing suitable candidates as biocontrol agents, biofertilisers and bioenhancers, in the perspective of targeted management of beneficial symbionts and their associated bacteria in sustainable food production systems. PMID:26805620

  18. Quorum Sensing in Nitrogen-Fixing Rhizobia

    PubMed Central

    González, Juan E.; Marketon, Melanie M.

    2003-01-01

    Members of the rhizobia are distinguished for their ability to establish a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with leguminous plants. While many details of this relationship remain a mystery, much effort has gone into elucidating the mechanisms governing bacterium-host recognition and the events leading to symbiosis. Several signal molecules, including plant-produced flavonoids and bacterially produced nodulation factors and exopolysaccharides, are known to function in the molecular conversation between the host and the symbiont. Work by several laboratories has shown that an additional mode of regulation, quorum sensing, intercedes in the signal exchange process and perhaps plays a major role in preparing and coordinating the nitrogen-fixing rhizobia during the establishment of the symbiosis. Rhizobium leguminosarum, for example, carries a multitiered quorum-sensing system that represents one of the most complex regulatory networks identified for this form of gene regulation. This review focuses on the recent stream of information regarding quorum sensing in the nitrogen-fixing rhizobia. Seminal work on the quorum-sensing systems of R. leguminosarum bv. viciae, R. etli, Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234, Sinorhizobium meliloti, and Bradyrhizobium japonicum is presented and discussed. The latest work shows that quorum sensing can be linked to various symbiotic phenomena including nodulation efficiency, symbiosome development, exopolysaccharide production, and nitrogen fixation, all of which are important for the establishment of a successful symbiosis. Many questions remain to be answered, but the knowledge obtained so far provides a firm foundation for future studies on the role of quorum-sensing mediated gene regulation in host-bacterium interactions. PMID:14665677

  19. Second Acyl Homoserine Lactone Production System in the Extreme Acidophile Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans▿

    PubMed Central

    Rivas, Mariella; Seeger, Michael; Jedlicki, Eugenia; Holmes, David S.

    2007-01-01

    The acidophilic proteobacterium Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans is involved in the industrial biorecovery of copper. It is found in acidic environments in biofilms and is important in the biogeochemical cycling of metals and nutrients. Its genome contains a cluster of four genes, glyQ, glysS, gph, and act, that are predicted to encode the α and β subunits of glycine tRNA synthetase, a phosphatase, and an acyltransferase, respectively (GenBank accession no. DQ149607). act, cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, produces acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) principally of chain length C14 according to gas chromatography and mass spectrometry measurements. The AHLs have biological activity as shown by in vivo studies using the reporter strain Sinorhizobium meliloti Rm41 SinI−. Reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) experiments indicate that the four genes are expressed as a single transcript, demonstrating that they constitute an operon. According to semiquantitative RT-PCR results, act is expressed more highly when A. ferrooxidans is grown in medium containing iron than when it is grown in medium containing sulfur. Since AHLs are important intercellular signaling molecules used by many bacteria to monitor their population density in quorum-sensing control of gene expression, this result suggests that A. ferrooxidans has two quorum-sensing systems, one based on Act, as described herein, and the other based on a Lux-like quorum-sensing system, reported previously. The latter system was shown to be upregulated in A. ferrooxidans grown in sulfur medium, suggesting that the two quorum-sensing systems respond to different environmental signals that may be related to their abilities to colonize and use different solid sulfur- and iron-containing minerals. PMID:17351095

  20. A CDPK isoform participates in the regulation of nodule number in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Gargantini, Pablo R; Gonzalez-Rizzo, Silvina; Chinchilla, Delphine; Raices, Marcela; Giammaria, Verónica; Ulloa, Rita M; Frugier, Florian; Crespi, Martin D

    2006-12-01

    Medicago spp. are able to develop root nodules via symbiotic interaction with Sinorhizobium meliloti. Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are involved in various signalling pathways in plants, and we found that expression of MtCPK3, a CDPK isoform present in roots of the model legume Medicago truncatula, is regulated during the nodulation process. Early inductions were detected 15 min and 3-4 days post-inoculation (dpi). The very early induction of CPK3 messengers was also present in inoculated M. truncatula dmi mutants and in wild-type roots subjected to salt stress, indicating that this rapid response is probably stress-related. In contrast, the later response was concomitant with cortical cell division and the formation of nodule primordia, and was not observed in wild-type roots inoculated with nod (-) strains. This late induction correlated with a change in the subcellular distribution of CDPK activities. Accordingly, an anti-MtCPK3 antibody detected two bands in soluble root extracts and one in the particulate fraction. CPK3::GFP fusions are targeted to the plasma membrane in epidermal onion cells, a localization that depends on myristoylation and palmitoylation sites of the protein, suggesting a dual subcellular localization. MtCPK3 mRNA and protein were also up-regulated by cytokinin treatment, a hormone linked to the regulation of cortical cell division and other nodulation-related responses. An RNAi-CDPK construction was used to silence CPK3 in Agrobacterium rhizogenes-transformed roots. Although no major phenotype was detected in these roots, when infected with rhizobia, the total number of nodules was, on average, twofold higher than in controls. This correlates with the lack of MtCPK3 induction in the inoculated super-nodulator sunn mutant. Our results suggest that CPK3 participates in the regulation of the symbiotic interaction. PMID:17132148

  1. Involvement of multiple loci in quorum quenching of autoinducer I molecules in the nitrogen-fixing symbiont Rhizobium (Sinorhizobium) sp. strain NGR234.

    PubMed

    Krysciak, D; Schmeisser, C; Preuss, S; Riethausen, J; Quitschau, M; Grond, S; Streit, W R

    2011-08-01

    Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234 is a unique alphaproteobacterium (order Rhizobiales) that forms nitrogen-fixing nodules with more legumes than any other microsymbiont. Since we have previously described the complete genome sequence of NGR234, we now report on a genome-wide functional analysis of the genes and enzymes involved in autoinducer I hydrolysis in this microbe. Altogether we identified five cosmid clones that repeatedly gave a positive result in our function-based approach for the detection of autoinducer I hydrolase genes. Of these five cosmid clones, two were located on pNGR234b and three were on cNGR234. Subcloning and in vitro mutagenesis in combination with BLAST analyses identified the corresponding open reading frames (ORFs) of all cosmid clones: dlhR, qsdR1, qsdR2, aldR, and hitR-hydR. Analyses of recombinant DlhR and QsdR1 proteins by using high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) demonstrate that these enzymes function as acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) lactonases. Furthermore, we showed that these enzymes inhibited biofilm formation and other quorum-sensing-dependent processes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Chromobacterium violaceum, and Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Finally, our experimental data suggest that competitive colonization of roots in the rhizospheres of cowpea plants is affected by DlhR and QsdR1.

  2. Cross-sectional Pilot Study of Antibiotic Resistance in Propionibacterium Acnes Strains in Indian Acne Patients Using 16S-RNA Polymerase Chain Reaction: A Comparison Among Treatment Modalities Including Antibiotics, Benzoyl Peroxide, and Isotretinoin

    PubMed Central

    Sardana, Kabir; Gupta, Tanvi; Kumar, Bipul; Gautam, Hemant K; Garg, Vijay K

    2016-01-01

    Background: Antibiotic resistance is a worldwide problem in acne patients due to regional prescription practices, patient compliance, and genomic variability in Propionibacterium acnes, though the effect of treatment on the resistance has not been comprehensively analyzed. Aims: Our primary objective was to assess the level of antibiotic resistance in the Indian patients and to assess whether there was a difference in the resistance across common treatment groups. Subjects and Methods: A cross-sectional, institutional based study was undertaken and three groups of patients were analyzed, treatment naïve, those on antibiotics and patients on benzoyl peroxide (BPO) and/isotretinoin. The follicular content was sampled and the culture was verified with 16S rRNA polymerase chain reaction, genomic sequencing, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assessment was done for erythromycin (ERY), azithromycin (AZI), clindamycin (CL), tetracycline (TET), doxycycline (DOX), minocycline (MINO), and levofloxacin (LEVO). The four groups of patients were compared for any difference in the resistant strains. Results: Of the 52 P. acnes strains isolated (80 patients), high resistance was observed to AZI (100%), ERY (98%), CL (90.4%), DOX (44.2%), and TETs (30.8%). Low resistance was observed to MINO (1.9%) and LEVO (9.6%). Statistical difference was seen in the resistance between CL and TETs; DOX/LEVO and DOX/MINO (P < 0.001). High MIC90 (≥256 μg/ml) was seen with CL, macrolides, and TETs; moreover, low MIC90 was observed to DOX (16 μg/ml), MINO (8 μg/ml), and LEVO (4 μg/ml). Though the treatment group with isotretinoin/BPO had the least number of resistant strains there was no statistical difference in the antibiotic resistance among the various groups of patients. Conclusions: High resistance was seen among the P. acnes strains to macrolides-lincosamides (AZI and CL) while MINO and LEVO resistance was low. PMID:26955094

  3. Two plant bacteria, S. meliloti and Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus, share functional znuABC homologues that encode for a high affinity Zinc uptake system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Znu system, encoded for by znuABC, can be found in multiple genera of bacteria and has been shown to be responsible for the import of zinc under low zinc conditions. Although this high-affinity uptake system is known to be important for both growth and/or pathogenesis in bacteria, it has not bee...

  4. Biosynthesis of compatible solutes in rhizobial strains isolated from Phaseolus vulgaris nodules in Tunisian fields

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Associated with appropriate crop and soil management, inoculation of legumes with microbial biofertilizers can improve food legume yield and soil fertility and reduce pollution by inorganic fertilizers. Rhizospheric bacteria are subjected to osmotic stress imposed by drought and/or NaCl, two abiotic constraints frequently found in semi-arid lands. Osmostress response in bacteria involves the accumulation of small organic compounds called compatible solutes. Whereas most studies on rhizobial osmoadaptation have focussed on the model species Sinorhizobium meliloti, little is known on the osmoadaptive mechanisms used by native rhizobia, which are good sources of inoculants. In this work, we investigated the synthesis and accumulations of compatible solutes by four rhizobial strains isolated from root nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris in Tunisia, as well as by the reference strain Rhizobium tropici CIAT 899T. Results The most NaCl-tolerant strain was A. tumefaciens 10c2, followed (in decreasing order) by R. tropici CIAT 899, R. leguminosarum bv. phaseoli 31c3, R. etli 12a3 and R. gallicum bv. phaseoli 8a3. 13C- and 1H-NMR analyses showed that all Rhizobium strains synthesized trehalose whereas A. tumefaciens 10c2 synthesized mannosucrose. Glutamate synthesis was also observed in R. tropici CIAT 899, R. leguminosarum bv. phaseoli 31c3 and A. tumefaciens 10c2. When added as a carbon source, mannitol was also accumulated by all strains. Accumulation of trehalose in R. tropici CIAT 899 and of mannosucrose in A. tumefaciens 10c2 was osmoregulated, suggesting their involvement in osmotolerance. The phylogenetic analysis of the otsA gene, encoding the trehalose-6-phosphate synthase, suggested the existence of lateral transfer events. In vivo 13C labeling experiments together with genomic analysis led us to propose the uptake and conversion pathways of different carbon sources into trehalose. Collaterally, the β-1,2-cyclic glucan from R. tropici CIAT 899 was co

  5. The replication origin of a repABC plasmid

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background repABC operons are present on large, low copy-number plasmids and on some secondary chromosomes in at least 19 α-proteobacterial genera, and are responsible for the replication and segregation properties of these replicons. These operons consist, with some variations, of three genes: repA, repB, and repC. RepA and RepB are involved in plasmid partitioning and in the negative regulation of their own transcription, and RepC is the limiting factor for replication. An antisense RNA encoded between the repB-repC genes modulates repC expression. Results To identify the minimal region of the Rhizobium etli p42d plasmid that is capable of autonomous replication, we amplified different regions of the repABC operon using PCR and cloned the regions into a suicide vector. The resulting vectors were then introduced into R. etli strains that did or did not contain p42d. The minimal replicon consisted of a repC open reading frame under the control of a constitutive promoter with a Shine-Dalgarno sequence that we designed. A sequence analysis of repC revealed the presence of a large A+T-rich region but no iterons or DnaA boxes. Silent mutations that modified the A+T content of this region eliminated the replication capability of the plasmid. The minimal replicon could not be introduced into R. etli strain containing p42d, but similar constructs that carried repC from Sinorhizobium meliloti pSymA or the linear chromosome of Agrobacterium tumefaciens replicated in the presence or absence of p42d, indicating that RepC is an incompatibility factor. A hybrid gene construct expressing a RepC protein with the first 362 amino acid residues from p42d RepC and the last 39 amino acid residues of RepC from SymA was able to replicate in the presence of p42d. Conclusions RepC is the only element encoded in the repABC operon of the R. etli p42d plasmid that is necessary and sufficient for plasmid replication and is probably the initiator protein. The oriV of this plasmid resides

  6. Mining diverse small RNA species in the deep transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Vickers, Kasey C; Roteta, Leslie A; Hucheson-Dilks, Holli; Han, Leng; Guo, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptomes of many species are proving to be exquisitely diverse, and many investigators are now using high-throughput sequencing to quantify non-protein-coding RNAs, namely small RNAs (sRNA). Unfortunately, most studies are focused solely on microRNA changes, and many investigators are not analyzing the full compendium of sRNA species present in their large datasets. We provide here a rationale to include all types of sRNAs in sRNA sequencing analyses, which will aid in the discovery of their biological functions and physiological relevance.

  7. How do base-pairing small RNAs evolve?

    PubMed Central

    Updegrove, Taylor B.; Shabalina, Svetlana A.; Storz, Gisela

    2015-01-01

    The increasing numbers of characterized base-pairing small RNAs (sRNAs) and the identification of these regulators in a broad range of bacteria are allowing comparisons between species and explorations of sRNA evolution. In this review, we describe some examples of trans-encoded base-pairing sRNAs that are species-specific and others that are more broadly distributed. We also describe examples of sRNA orthologs where different features are conserved. These examples provide the background for a discussion of mechanisms of sRNA evolution and selective pressures on the sRNAs and their mRNA target(s). PMID:25934120

  8. Arginine Patch Predicts the RNA Annealing Activity of Hfq from Gram-Negative and Gram-Positive Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Amy; Panja, Subrata; Woodson, Sarah A

    2016-06-01

    The Sm-protein Hfq facilitates interactions between small non-coding RNA (sRNA) and target mRNAs. In enteric Gram-negative bacteria, Hfq is required for sRNA regulation, and hfq deletion results in stress intolerance and reduced virulence. By contrast, the role of Hfq in Gram-positive is less established and varies among species. The RNA binding and RNA annealing activity of Hfq from Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus subtilis, and Staphylococcus aureus were compared using minimal RNAs and fluorescence spectroscopy. The results show that RNA annealing activity increases with the number of arginines in a semi-conserved patch on the rim of the Hfq hexamer and correlates with the previously reported requirement for Hfq in sRNA regulation. Thus, the amino acid sequence of the arginine patch can predict the chaperone function of Hfq in sRNA regulation in different organisms. PMID:27049793

  9. Arginine Patch Predicts the RNA Annealing Activity of Hfq from Gram-Negative and Gram-Positive Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Amy; Panja, Subrata; Woodson, Sarah A

    2016-06-01

    The Sm-protein Hfq facilitates interactions between small non-coding RNA (sRNA) and target mRNAs. In enteric Gram-negative bacteria, Hfq is required for sRNA regulation, and hfq deletion results in stress intolerance and reduced virulence. By contrast, the role of Hfq in Gram-positive is less established and varies among species. The RNA binding and RNA annealing activity of Hfq from Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus subtilis, and Staphylococcus aureus were compared using minimal RNAs and fluorescence spectroscopy. The results show that RNA annealing activity increases with the number of arginines in a semi-conserved patch on the rim of the Hfq hexamer and correlates with the previously reported requirement for Hfq in sRNA regulation. Thus, the amino acid sequence of the arginine patch can predict the chaperone function of Hfq in sRNA regulation in different organisms.

  10. Systemic delivery of siRNA in pumpkin by a plant PHLOEM SMALL RNA-BINDING PROTEIN 1-ribonucleoprotein complex.

    PubMed

    Ham, Byung-Kook; Li, Gang; Jia, Weitao; Leary, Julie A; Lucas, William J

    2014-11-01

    In plants, the vascular system, specifically the phloem, functions in delivery of small RNA (sRNA) to exert epigenetic control over developmental and defense-related processes. Although the importance of systemic sRNA delivery has been established, information is currently lacking concerning the nature of the protein machinery involved in this process. Here, we show that a PHLOEM SMALL-RNA BINDING PROTEIN 1 (PSRP1) serves as the basis for formation of an sRNA ribonucleoprotein complex (sRNPC) that delivers sRNA (primarily 24 nt) to sink organs. Assembly of this complex is facilitated through PSRP1 phosphorylation by a phloem-localized protein kinase, PSRPK1. During long-distance transport, PSRP1-sRNPC is stable against phloem phosphatase activity. Within target tissues, phosphatase activity results in disassembly of PSRP1-sRNPC, a process that is probably required for unloading cargo sRNA into surrounding cells. These findings provide an insight into the mechanism involved in delivery of sRNA associated with systemic gene silencing in plants.

  11. Construction of new synthetic biology tools for the control of gene expression in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002.

    PubMed

    Zess, Erin K; Begemann, Matthew B; Pfleger, Brian F

    2016-02-01

    Predictive control of gene expression is an essential tool for developing synthetic biological systems. The current toolbox for controlling gene expression in cyanobacteria is a barrier to more in-depth genetic analysis and manipulation. Towards relieving this bottleneck, this work describes the use of synthetic biology to construct an anhydrotetracycline-based induction system and adapt a trans-acting small RNA (sRNA) system for use in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002. An anhydrotetracycline-inducible promoter was developed to maximize intrinsic strength and dynamic range. The resulting construct, PEZtet , exhibited tight repression and a maximum 32-fold induction upon addition of anhydrotetracycline. Additionally, a sRNA system based on the Escherichia coli IS10 RNA-IN/OUT regulator was adapted for use in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002. This system exhibited 70% attenuation of target gene expression, providing a demonstration of the use of sRNAs for differential gene expression in cyanobacteria. These systems were combined to produce an inducible sRNA system, which demonstrated 59% attenuation of target gene expression. Lastly, the role of Hfq, a critical component of sRNA systems in E. coli, was investigated. Genetic studies showed that the Hfq homolog in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 did not impact repression by the engineered sRNA system. In summary, this work describes new synthetic biology tools that can be applied to physiological studies, metabolic engineering, or sRNA platforms in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002.

  12. Detection of S-Nitrosothiol and Nitrosylated Proteins in Arachis hypogaea Functional Nodule: Response of the Nitrogen Fixing Symbiont

    PubMed Central

    Maiti, Debasis; Sarkar, Tuhin Subhra; Ghosh, Sanjay

    2012-01-01

    To detect the presence of NO, ROS and RNS in nodules of crack entry legumes, we used Arachis hypogaea functional nodule. The response of two cognate partner rhizobia was compared towards NO and GSNO using S. meliloti and Bradyrhizobium sp NC921001. ROS, NO, nitrosothiol and bacteroids were detected by fluorescence microscopy. Redox enzymes and thiol pools were detected biochemically. Nitrosothiols were found to be present but ROS and NO were absent in A. hypogaea nodule. A number of S-nitrosylated proteins were also detected. The total thiol pool and most of the redox enzymes were low in nodule cytosolic extract but these were found to be high in the partner microorganisms indicating partner rhizobia could protect the nodule environment against the nitrosothiols. Both S. meliloti and Bradyrhizobium sp NC921001 were found to contain GSNO reductase. Interestingly, there was a marked difference in growth pattern between S. meliloti and Bradyrhizobium sp in presence of sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO). Bradyrhizobium sp was found to be much more tolerant to NO donor compounds than the S. meliloti. In contrast, S. meliloti showed resistance to GSNO but was sensitive to SNP. Together our data indicate that nodule environment of crack entry legumes is different than the nodules of infection mode entry in terms of NO, ROS and RNS. Based on our biochemical characterization, we propose that exchange of redox molecules and reactive chemical species is possible between the bacteroid and nodule compartment. PMID:23029073

  13. Characteristics of Pos19 – A Small Coding RNA in the Oxidative Stress Response of Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    Eisenhardt, Benjamin D.; Remes, Bernhard; Klug, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    The phototrophic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides induces several small RNAs (sRNAs) when singlet oxygen (1O2) levels are elevated, a situation also referred to as photo-oxidative stress. An RNA-seq study identified the RSs0019 sRNA, which is renamed Pos19 (photo-oxidative stress induced sRNA 19). Pos19 is part of the RpoE regulon and consequently induced upon 1O2 and peroxide stress. The 219 nt long Pos19 transcript contains a small open reading frame (sORF) of 150 nt, which is translated in vivo. Over-expression of Pos19 results in reduced mRNA levels for several genes, of which numerous are involved in sulfur metabolism. The negative effect on the potential targets is maintained even when translation of the sORF is abolished, arguing that regulation is entailed by the sRNA itself. Reporter studies further revealed that regulation of the most affected mRNA, namely RSP_0557, by Pos19 is Hfq-dependent. Direct binding of Pos19 to Hfq was shown by co-immunoprecipitation. Physiological experiments indicated Pos19 to be involved in the balance of glutathione biosynthesis. Moreover, a lack of Pos19 leads to elevated reactive oxygen species levels. Taken together our data identify the sRNA Pos19 as a coding sRNA with a distinct expression pattern and potential role under oxidative stress in the phototrophic bacterium R. sphaeroides. PMID:27669425

  14. sRNATarBase 3.0: an updated database for sRNA-target interactions in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiang; Liu, Tao; Zhao, Bo; Lu, Qixuan; Wang, Zheng; Cao, Yuan; Li, Wuju

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial sRNAs are a class of small regulatory RNAs of about 40–500 nt in length; they play multiple biological roles through binding to their target mRNAs or proteins. Therefore, elucidating sRNA targets is very important. However, only targets of a few sRNAs have been described. To facilitate sRNA functional studies such as developing sRNA target prediction models, we updated the sRNATarBase database, which was initially developed in 2010. The new version (recently moved to http://ccb1.bmi.ac.cn/srnatarbase/) contains 771 sRNA-target entries manually collected from 213 papers, and 23 290 and 11 750 predicted targets from sRNATarget and sTarPicker, respectively. Among the 771 entries, 475 and 17 were involved in validated sRNA–mRNA and sRNA–protein interactions, respectively, while 279 had no reported interactions. We also presented detailed information for 316 binding regions of sRNA-target mRNA interactions and related mutation experiments, as well as new features, including NCBI sequence viewer, sRNA regulatory network, target prediction-based GO and pathway annotations, and error report system. The new version provides a comprehensive annotation of validated sRNA-target interactions, and will be a useful resource for bacterial sRNA studies. PMID:26503244

  15. StarScan: a web server for scanning small RNA targets from degradome sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shun; Li, Jun-Hao; Wu, Jie; Zhou, Ke-Ren; Zhou, Hui; Yang, Jian-Hua; Qu, Liang-Hu

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs), including microRNAs, PIWI-interacting RNAs and small interfering RNAs, play important gene regulatory roles in animals and plants by pairing to the protein-coding and non-coding transcripts. However, computationally assigning these various sRNAs to their regulatory target genes remains technically challenging. Recently, a high-throughput degradome sequencing method was applied to identify biologically relevant sRNA cleavage sites. In this study, an integrated web-based tool, StarScan (sRNA target Scan), was developed for scanning sRNA targets using degradome sequencing data from 20 species. Given a sRNA sequence from plants or animals, our web server performs an ultrafast and exhaustive search for potential sRNA–target interactions in annotated and unannotated genomic regions. The interactions between small RNAs and target transcripts were further evaluated using a novel tool, alignScore. A novel tool, degradomeBinomTest, was developed to quantify the abundance of degradome fragments located at the 9–11th nucleotide from the sRNA 5′ end. This is the first web server for discovering potential sRNA-mediated RNA cleavage events in plants and animals, which affords mechanistic insights into the regulatory roles of sRNAs. The StarScan web server is available at http://mirlab.sysu.edu.cn/starscan/. PMID:25990732

  16. Comparative genome‐wide analysis of small RNAs of major Gram‐positive pathogens: from identification to application

    PubMed Central

    Mraheil, Mobarak A.; Billion, André; Kuenne, Carsten; Pischimarov, Jordan; Kreikemeyer, Bernd; Engelmann, Susanne; Hartke, Axel; Giard, Jean‐Christophe; Rupnik, Maja; Vorwerk, Sonja; Beier, Markus; Retey, Julia; Hartsch, Thomas; Jacob, Anette; Cemič, Franz; Hemberger, Jürgen; Chakraborty, Trinad; Hain, Torsten

    2010-01-01

    Summary In the recent years, the number of drug‐ and multi‐drug‐resistant microbial strains has increased rapidly. Therefore, the need to identify innovative approaches for development of novel anti‐infectives and new therapeutic targets is of high priority in global health care. The detection of small RNAs (sRNAs) in bacteria has attracted considerable attention as an emerging class of new gene expression regulators. Several experimental technologies to predict sRNA have been established for the Gram‐negative model organism Escherichia coli. In many respects, sRNA screens in this model system have set a blueprint for the global and functional identification of sRNAs for Gram‐positive microbes, but the functional role of sRNAs in colonization and pathogenicity for Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, Enterococcus faecalis and Clostridium difficile is almost completely unknown. Here, we report the current knowledge about the sRNAs of these socioeconomically relevant Gram‐positive pathogens, overview the state‐of‐the‐art high‐throughput sRNA screening methods and summarize bioinformatics approaches for genome‐wide sRNA identification and target prediction. Finally, we discuss the use of modified peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) as a novel tool to inactivate potential sRNA and their applications in rapid and specific detection of pathogenic bacteria. PMID:21255362

  17. [Structure of surface glycoconjugates or Rhizobium species and their function in nitrogen fixation]; Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1991-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) were isolated and purified from the surface of the Rhizobium species R. trifolii, R. leguminosarium and R. meliloti. A novel core tetrasaccharide and a trisaccharide required for nodulation were discovered. Several types of LPS from a single culture, inducible by nod gene inducers, were resolved by electrophoresis and chromatography. Other potential inducers are being investigated. At least three separate loci control LPS biosynthesis in R. meliloti. We maintain secreted, sulphated LPS involved in nodulation is attached to the cell surface, and have demonstrated sulphated, lipid-linked carbohydrates on the surface of R. meliloti. Antibodies to purified cell surface carbohydrate oligomers are being prepared. These antibodies will be used to screen bacteria, and also to identify cell surface changes associated with differentiation of a bacteria to a bacteroid.

  18. Release and Modification of nod-Gene-Inducing Flavonoids from Alfalfa Seeds 1

    PubMed Central

    Hartwig, Ueli A.; Phillips, Donald A.

    1991-01-01

    Traces of luteolin, an important rhizobial nod gene inducer in Rhizobium meliloti, are released by alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) seeds, but most luteolin in the seed exudate is conjugated as luteolin-7-O-glucoside (L7G). Processes affecting the production of luteolin from L7G in seed exudate are poorly understood. Results from this study establish that (a) seed coats are the primary source of flavonoids, including L7G, in seed exudate; (b) these flavonoids exist in seeds before imbibition; and (c) both the host plant and the symbiotic R. meliloti probably can hydrolyze L7G to luteolin. Glycolytic cleavage of L7G is promoted by glucosidase activity released from sterile seeds during the first 4 hours of imbibition. Thus, L7G from imbibing alfalfa seeds may serve as a source of the nod-gene-inducing luteolin and thereby facilitate root nodulation by R. meliloti. PMID:16668057

  19. Analysis of small RNA production patterns among the two potato spindle tuber viroid variants in tomato plants.

    PubMed

    Adkar-Purushothama, Charith Raj; Perreault, Jean-Pierre; Sano, Teruo

    2015-12-01

    In order to analyze the production of small RNA (sRNA) by viroids upon infecting the plants, the tomato plants (Solanum lycopersicum cultivar Rutgers) were inoculated with the variants of Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd). After 21-days of postinoculation, total RNA was extracted and subjected for deep-sequencing using Illumina HiSeq platform. The primers were trimmed and only 21- to 24-nt long sRNAs were filtered after quality check of the raw data. The filtered sRNA population was then mapped against both the genomic (+) and antigenomic (-) strands of the respective PSTVd variants using standard pattern-matching algorithm. The profiling of viroid derived sRNA (vd-sRNA) revealed that the viroids are susceptible to host RNA silencing mechanism. High-throughput sequence data linked to this project have been deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database under accession number GSE69225.

  20. Stress: perceptions, manifestations, and coping mechanisms of student registered nurse anesthetists.

    PubMed

    Chipas, Anthony; Cordrey, Dan; Floyd, David; Grubbs, Lindsey; Miller, Sarah; Tyre, Brooks

    2012-08-01

    Stress is a response to change from the norm. Stress affects all individuals to varying degrees and can be positive, such as eustress, or negative, such as distress. The purpose of this qualitative, cross-sectional study was to investigate the stressors of the typical student registered nurse anesthetist (SRNA), with the objective of identifying trends in the perceptions, manifestations, and coping mechanisms of stress. An online (SurveyMonkey) questionnaire composed of 54 study-specific questions was developed to assess stress in the SRNA population. The questionnaire was sent to members of the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists via email invitation. The study yielded a sample of 1,282 SRNA participants. Analysis revealed statistically significant relationships between self-reported stress and negative outcomes, such as increased sick days, decreased health and wellness, and depression. The study demonstrated that SRNAs perceive their stress as above average, and it remains a central concern for them.

  1. Heme compounds as iron sources for nonpathogenic Rhizobium bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Noya, F; Arias, A; Fabiano, E

    1997-01-01

    Many animal-pathogenic bacteria can use heme compounds as iron sources. Like these microorganisms, rhizobium strains interact with host organisms where heme compounds are available. Results presented in this paper indicate that the use of hemoglobin as an iron source is not restricted to animal-pathogenic microorganisms. We also demonstrate that heme, hemoglobin, and leghemoglobin can act as iron sources under iron-depleted conditions for Rhizobium meliloti 242. Analysis of iron acquisition mutant strains indicates that siderophore-, heme-, hemoglobin-, and leghemoglobin-mediated iron transport systems expressed by R. meliloti 242 share at least one component. PMID:9139934

  2. Rhizobia are attracted to localized sites on legume roots.

    PubMed

    Gulash, M; Ames, P; Larosiliere, R C; Bergman, K

    1984-07-01

    Clouds of Rhizobium meliloti were attracted to localized sites on the surface of the infectible region of alfalfa roots. This behavior, which required active motility and chemotaxis, was not species specific. Correlation between the behavior of various mutants and their competitiveness for nodulation suggests that cloud formation has a role in the infection of host legume roots by rhizobia.

  3. Comparative study of the fungicide Benomyl toxicity on some plant growth promoting bacteria and some fungi in pure cultures

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Awad G.; Sherif, Ashraf M.; Elhussein, Adil A.

    2014-01-01

    Six laboratory experiments were carried out to investigate the effect of the fungicide Benomyl on pure cultures of some plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB) and some fungi. The highest LD50 was recorded for Bacillus circulans and proved to be the most resistant to the fungicide, followed by Azospirillum braziliense, while Penicillium sp. was the most affected microorganism. LD50 values for the affected microorganisms were in 21–240 orders of magnitude lower in comparison with the LD50 value for Azospirillum braziliense. The results indicate a strong selectivity for Benomyl against Rhizobium meliloti and Penicillium sp. when compared to other microorganisms tested. The highest safety coefficient was recorded for Bacillus circulans followed by Azospirillum braziliense, while Rhizobium meliloti, showed the lowest safety coefficient value compared to other bacteria. The lowest toxicity index was recorded for Bacillus circulans and Azospirillum braziliense. The slope of the curves for Bacillus sp. and Rhizobium meliloti was steeper than that of the other curves, suggesting that even a slight increase of the dose of the fungicide can cause a very strong negative effect. In conclusion, Benomyl could be applied without restriction when using inocula based on growth promoting bacteria such as symbiotic nitrogen fixers (Rhizobium meliloti), non-symbiotic nitrogen fixers (Azospirillum braziliense) or potassium solibilizers (Bacillus circulans), given that the fungicide is applied within the range of the recommended field dose. PMID:26038670

  4. RNA sequencing uncovers antisense RNAs and novel small RNAs in Streptococcus pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Le Rhun, Anaïs; Beer, Yan Yan; Reimegård, Johan; Chylinski, Krzysztof; Charpentier, Emmanuelle

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Streptococcus pyogenes is a human pathogen responsible for a wide spectrum of diseases ranging from mild to life-threatening infections. During the infectious process, the temporal and spatial expression of pathogenicity factors is tightly controlled by a complex network of protein and RNA regulators acting in response to various environmental signals. Here, we focus on the class of small RNA regulators (sRNAs) and present the first complete analysis of sRNA sequencing data in S. pyogenes. In the SF370 clinical isolate (M1 serotype), we identified 197 and 428 putative regulatory RNAs by visual inspection and bioinformatics screening of the sequencing data, respectively. Only 35 from the 197 candidates identified by visual screening were assigned a predicted function (T-boxes, ribosomal protein leaders, characterized riboswitches or sRNAs), indicating how little is known about sRNA regulation in S. pyogenes. By comparing our list of predicted sRNAs with previous S. pyogenes sRNA screens using bioinformatics or microarrays, 92 novel sRNAs were revealed, including antisense RNAs that are for the first time shown to be expressed in this pathogen. We experimentally validated the expression of 30 novel sRNAs and antisense RNAs. We show that the expression profile of 9 sRNAs including 2 predicted regulatory elements is affected by the endoribonucleases RNase III and/or RNase Y, highlighting the critical role of these enzymes in sRNA regulation. PMID:26580233

  5. A small RNA targets pokeweed antiviral protein transcript.

    PubMed

    Klenov, Alexander; Neller, Kira C M; Burns, Lydia A; Krivdova, Gabriela; Hudak, Katalin A

    2016-03-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are a class of plant defense proteins with N-glycosidase activity (EC 3.2.2.22). Pokeweed antiviral protein (PAP) is a Type I RIP isolated from the pokeweed plant, Phytolacca americana, thought to confer broad-spectrum virus resistance in this plant. Through a combination of standard molecular techniques and RNA sequencing analysis, we report here that a small RNA binds and cleaves the open reading frame of PAP mRNA. Additionally, sRNA targeting of PAP is dependent on jasmonic acid (JA), a plant hormone important for defense against pathogen infection and herbivory. Levels of small RNA increased with JA treatment, as did levels of PAP mRNA and protein, suggesting that the small RNA functions to moderate the expression of PAP in response to this hormone. The association between JA and PAP expression, mediated by sRNA299, situates PAP within a signaling pathway initiated by biotic stress. The consensus sequence of sRNA299 was obtained through bioinformatic analysis of pokeweed small RNA sequencing. To our knowledge, this is the first account of a sRNA targeting a RIP gene.

  6. Regulatory RNAs in photosynthetic cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Kopf, Matthias; Hess, Wolfgang R

    2015-05-01

    Regulatory RNAs play versatile roles in bacteria in the coordination of gene expression during various physiological processes, especially during stress adaptation. Photosynthetic bacteria use sunlight as their major energy source. Therefore, they are particularly vulnerable to the damaging effects of excess light or UV irradiation. In addition, like all bacteria, photosynthetic bacteria must adapt to limiting nutrient concentrations and abiotic and biotic stress factors. Transcriptome analyses have identified hundreds of potential regulatory small RNAs (sRNAs) in model cyanobacteria such as Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 or Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, and in environmentally relevant genera such as Trichodesmium, Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus. Some sRNAs have been shown to actually contain μORFs and encode short proteins. Examples include the 40-amino-acid product of the sml0013 gene, which encodes the NdhP subunit of the NDH1 complex. In contrast, the functional characterization of the non-coding sRNA PsrR1 revealed that the 131 nt long sRNA controls photosynthetic functions by targeting multiple mRNAs, providing a paradigm for sRNA functions in photosynthetic bacteria. We suggest that actuatons comprise a new class of genetic elements in which an sRNA gene is inserted upstream of a coding region to modify or enable transcription of that region.

  7. quenched-smFISH: Counting small RNA in Pathogenic Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, Douglas; Li, Nan; Micheva-Viteva, Sofiya; Munsky, Brian; Hong-Geller, Elizabeth; Werner, James

    2014-03-01

    Here, we present a modification to single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization, quenched smFISH (q-smFISH), that enables quantitative detection and analysis of small RNA (sRNA) expressed in bacteria. We show that short nucleic acid targets can be detected when the background of unbound singly dye-labeled DNA oligomers is reduced through hybridization with a set of complementary DNA oligomers labeled with a fluorescence quencher. Exploiting an automated, multi-color wide-field microscope and GPU-accelerated data analysis package, we analyzed the statistics of sRNA expression in thousands of individual Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia pestis bacteria before and during a simulated infection. Before infection, we find only a small fraction of either bacteria express the small RNAs YSR35 or YSP8. The copy numbers of these RNA are increased during simulated infection, suggesting a role in pathogenesis. The ability to directly quantify expression level changes of sRNA in single cells as a function of external stimuli provides key information on the role of sRNA in bacterial regulatory networks.

  8. SoMART, a web server for miRNA, tasiRNA and target gene analysis in Solanaceae plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant micro(mi)RNAs and trans-acting small interfering (tasi)RNAs mediate posttranscriptional silencing of genes and play important roles in a variety of biological processes. Although bioinformatics prediction and small (s)RNA cloning are the key approaches used for identification of miRNAs, tasiRN...

  9. Novel meiotic miRNAs and indications for a role of phasiRNAs in meiosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Small RNAs (sRNA) add additional layers to the regulation of gene expression, with siRNAs directing gene silencing at the DNA level by RdDM (RNA-directed DNA methylation), and miRNAs directing post-transcriptional regulation of specific target genes, mostly by mRNA cleavage. We used manually isolate...

  10. Structure and RNA-binding properties of the bacterial LSm protein Hfq

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Over the past years, small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) emerged as important modulators of gene expression in bacteria. Guided by partial sequence complementarity, these sRNAs interact with target mRNAs and eventually affect transcript stability and translation. The physiological function of sRNAs depends on the protein Hfq, which binds sRNAs in the cell and promotes the interaction with their mRNA targets. This important physiological function of Hfq as a central hub of sRNA-mediated regulation made it one of the most intensely studied proteins in bacteria. Recently, a new model for sRNA binding by Hfq has been proposed that involves the direct recognition of the sRNA 3′ end and interactions of the sRNA body with the lateral RNA-binding surface of Hfq. This review summarizes the current understanding of the RNA binding properties of Hfq and its (s)RNA complexes. Moreover, the implications of the new binding model for sRNA-mediated regulation are discussed. PMID:23535768

  11. Experimental approaches to identify small RNAs and their diverse roles in bacteria--what we have learnt in one decade of MicA research.

    PubMed

    Van Puyvelde, Sandra; Vanderleyden, Jozef; De Keersmaecker, Sigrid C J

    2015-10-01

    Nowadays the identification of small RNAs (sRNAs) and characterization of their role within regulatory networks takes a prominent place in deciphering complex bacterial phenotypes. Compared to the study of other components of bacterial cells, this is a relatively new but fast-growing research field. Although reports on new sRNAs appear regularly, some sRNAs are already subject of research for a longer time. One of such sRNAs is MicA, a sRNA best described for its role in outer membrane remodeling, but probably having a much broader function than anticipated. An overview of what we have learnt from MicA led to the conclusion that even for this well-described sRNA, we still do not have the overall picture. More general, the story of MicA might become an experimental lead for unraveling the many sRNAs with unknown functions. In this review, three important topics in the sRNA field are covered, exemplified from the perspective of MicA: (i) identification of new sRNAs, (ii) target identification and unraveling the biological function, (iii) structural analysis. The complex mechanisms of action of MicA deliver some original insights in the sRNA field which includes the existence of dimer formation or simultaneous cis and trans regulation, and might further inspire the understanding of the function of other sRNAs.

  12. New class of gene-termini-associated human RNAs suggests a novel RNA copying mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kapranov, Philipp; Ozsolak, Fatih; Kim, Sang Woo; Foissac, Sylvain; Lipson, Doron; Hart, Chris; Roels, Steve; Borel, Christelle; Antonarakis, Stylianos E; Monaghan, A Paula; John, Bino; Milos, Patrice M

    2010-07-29

    Small (<200 nucleotide) RNA (sRNA) profiling of human cells using various technologies demonstrates unexpected complexity of sRNAs with hundreds of thousands of sRNA species present. Genetic and in vitro studies show that these RNAs are not merely degradation products of longer transcripts but could indeed have a function. Furthermore, profiling of RNAs, including the sRNAs, can reveal not only novel transcripts, but also make clear predictions about the existence and properties of novel biochemical pathways operating in a cell. For example, sRNA profiling in human cells indicated the existence of an unknown capping mechanism operating on cleaved RNA, a biochemical component of which was later identified. Here we show that human cells contain a novel type of sRNA that has non-genomically encoded 5' poly(U) tails. The presence of these RNAs at the termini of genes, specifically at the very 3' ends of known mRNAs, strongly argues for the presence of a yet uncharacterized endogenous biochemical pathway in cells that can copy RNA. We show that this pathway can operate on multiple genes, with specific enrichment towards transcript-encoding components of the translational machinery. Finally, we show that genes are also flanked by sense, 3' polyadenylated sRNAs that are likely to be capped. PMID:20671709

  13. Theoretical studies on sRNA-mediated regulation in bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Xiao-Xue; Xu, Liu-Fang; Shi, Hua-Lin

    2015-12-01

    Small RNA(sRNA)-mediated post-transcriptional regulation differs from protein-mediated regulation. Through base-pairing, sRNA can regulate the target mRNA in a catalytic or stoichiometric manner. Some theoretical models were built for comparison of the protein-mediated and sRNA-mediated modes in the steady-state behaviors and noise properties. Many experiments demonstrated that a single sRNA can regulate several mRNAs, which causes crosstalk between the targets. Here, we focus on some models in which two target mRNAs are silenced by the same sRNA to discuss their crosstalk features. Additionally, the sequence-function relationship of sRNA and its role in the kinetic process of base-pairing have been highlighted in model building. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB834100), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11121403 and 11274320), the Open Project Program of State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China (Grant No. Y4KF171CJ1), the National Natural Science Foundation for Young Scholar of China (Grant No. 11304115), and the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No. 2013M541282).

  14. First complete genome sequence of an emerging cucumber green mottle mosaic virus isolate in North America

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The complete genome sequence (6,423 nt) of an emerging Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV) isolate on cucumber in North America was determined through deep sequencing of sRNA and rapid amplification of cDNA ends. It shares 99% nucleotide sequence identity to the Asian genotype, but only 90% t...

  15. Experimental approaches to identify small RNAs and their diverse roles in bacteria – what we have learnt in one decade of MicA research

    PubMed Central

    Van Puyvelde, Sandra; Vanderleyden, Jozef; De Keersmaecker, Sigrid C J

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays the identification of small RNAs (sRNAs) and characterization of their role within regulatory networks takes a prominent place in deciphering complex bacterial phenotypes. Compared to the study of other components of bacterial cells, this is a relatively new but fast-growing research field. Although reports on new sRNAs appear regularly, some sRNAs are already subject of research for a longer time. One of such sRNAs is MicA, a sRNA best described for its role in outer membrane remodeling, but probably having a much broader function than anticipated. An overview of what we have learnt from MicA led to the conclusion that even for this well-described sRNA, we still do not have the overall picture. More general, the story of MicA might become an experimental lead for unraveling the many sRNAs with unknown functions. In this review, three important topics in the sRNA field are covered, exemplified from the perspective of MicA: (i) identification of new sRNAs, (ii) target identification and unraveling the biological function, (iii) structural analysis. The complex mechanisms of action of MicA deliver some original insights in the sRNA field which includes the existence of dimer formation or simultaneous cis and trans regulation, and might further inspire the understanding of the function of other sRNAs. PMID:25974745

  16. Expression, purification and functional characterization of recombinant Zucchini yellow mosaic virus HC-Pro.

    PubMed

    Fuellgrabe, Marc W; Boonrod, Kajohn; Jamous, Rana; Moser, Mirko; Shiboleth, Yoel; Krczal, Gabi; Wassenegger, Michael

    2011-01-01

    HC-Pro is a helper component-proteinase which acts as a multifunctional protein in the potyviral life cycle. Apart from its proteolytic activity, HC-Pro has the capacity to bind duplex small RNAs (sRNAs). To investigate HC-Pro-mediated sRNA binding in vitro, high amounts of purified protein are required. For this purpose, the Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) HC-Pro was expressed as a fusion with hexa-histidine (6xHis) or maltose-binding protein (MBP) in Escherichia coli. The expressed fusion proteins were purified by affinity chromatography. 6xHis:HC-Pro and MBP:HC-Pro were partially soluble. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assays demonstrated that only MBP:HC-Pro exhibits the sRNA binding activity. The recombinant HC-Pro bound 21 bp siRNAs as well as 19 bp and 24 bp siRNAs. A point mutation in the highly conserved FRNK box produced the HC-Pro(FINK) protein, previously shown to be associated with reduced viral symptoms and weak sRNA binding. In this study, sRNA binding of the MBP:HA-HC-Pro(FINK) was not detectable. The high yield of purified HC-Pro offers the possibility to study the biochemistry of the protein in detail.

  17. Translational control and target recognition by Escherichia coli small RNAs in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Johannes H.; Vogel, Jörg

    2007-01-01

    Small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) are an emerging class of regulators of bacterial gene expression. Most of the regulatory Escherichia coli sRNAs known to date modulate translation of trans-encoded target mRNAs. We studied the specificity of sRNA target interactions using gene fusions to green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a novel reporter of translational control by bacterial sRNAs in vivo. Target sequences were selected from both monocistronic and polycistronic mRNAs. Upon expression of the cognate sRNA (DsrA, GcvB, MicA, MicC, MicF, RprA, RyhB, SgrS and Spot42), we observed highly specific translation repression/activation of target fusions under various growth conditions. Target regulation was also tested in mutants that lacked Hfq or RNase III, or which expressed a truncated RNase E (rne701). We found that translational regulation by these sRNAs was largely independent of full-length RNase E, e.g. despite the fact that ompA fusion mRNA decay could no longer be promoted by MicA. This is the first study in which multiple well-defined E.coli sRNA target pairs have been studied in a uniform manner in vivo. We expect our GFP fusion approach to be applicable to sRNA targets of other bacteria, and also demonstrate that Vibrio RyhB sRNA represses a Vibrio sodB fusion when co-expressed in E.coli. PMID:17264113

  18. Phylogenetic and symbiotic characterization of rhizobial bacteria nodulating Argyrolobium uniflorum in Tunisian arid soils.

    PubMed

    Mahdhi, M; de Lajudie, P; Mars, M

    2008-03-01

    Forty-two bacterial isolates from root nodules of Argyrolobium uniflorum growing in the arid areas of Tunisia were characterized by phenotypic features, RFLP, and sequencing of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes. The isolates were found to be phenotypically diverse. The majority of the isolates tolerated 3% NaCl and grew at temperatures up to 40 degrees C. Phylogenetically, the new isolates were grouped in the genera Sinorhizobium (27), Rhizobium (13), and Agrobacterium (2). Except for the 2 Agrobacterium isolates, all strains induced nodulation on Argyrolobium uniflorum, but the number of nodules and nitrogen fixation efficiency varied among them. Sinorhizobium sp. strains STM 4034, STM 4036, and STM 4039, forming the most effective symbiosis, are potential candidates for inoculants in revegetalisation programs.

  19. Characterization of Rhizobial Isolates of Phaseolus vulgaris by Staircase Electrophoresis of Low-Molecular-Weight RNA

    PubMed Central

    Velázquez, Encarna; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza; Rodríguez-Navarro, Dulce Nombre; Trujillo, Martha E.; Daza, Antonio; Mateos, Pedro F.; Martínez-Molina, Eustoquio; van Berkum, Peter

    2001-01-01

    Low-molecular-weight (LMW) RNA molecules were analyzed to characterize rhizobial isolates that nodulate the common bean growing in Spain. Since LMW RNA profiles, determined by staircase electrophoresis, varied across the rhizobial species nodulating beans, we demonstrated that bean isolates recovered from Spanish soil