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Sample records for sinus hair follicle

  1. Bioengineering the Hair Follicle

    PubMed Central

    Parimoo, S; Zheng, Y; Barrows, T; Boucher, M; Washenik, K

    2007-01-01

    The hair follicle develops from the primitive embryonic epidermis as a result of complex epithelial-mesenchymal interactions. The full follicle, consisting of epithelial cylinders under control of a proximal lying mesenchymal papilla, grows in cycles giving rise to a new hair shaft during each cycle. The ability to cycle endows the follicle with regenerative properties. The evolution of hair follicle engineering began with the recognition in the early 1960's that hair follicles could be transplanted clinically into a foreign site and still grow a shaft typical of the donor site. Since that time, it has been found that the follicular papilla has hair follicle inducing properties and that the hair follicle houses within it epithelial stem cells that can respond to hair inductive signals. These findings have laid the foundation for isolating hair-forming cells, for expanding the cells in culture, and for forming new follicles in vivo. PMID:19279694

  2. The Hair Follicle Enigma.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Bruno A

    2017-03-07

    The hair follicle is a mini organ endowed with a unique structure and cyclic behavior. Despite the intense research efforts which have been devoted at deciphering the hair follicle biology over the past 70 years, one must admit that hair follicle remains an enigma. In this brief review, various aspects of hair follicle biology will be addressed, and more importantly, unsolved questions and new possible research tracks will be highlighted, including hair follicle glycobiology and exosome mediated cell-cell interactions. Even though bricks of knowledge are solidly being acquired, an integrative picture remains to emerge. One can predict that computer science, algorithms and bioinformatics will assist in fostering our understanding hair biology. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Hair Follicle Pigmentation

    PubMed Central

    Slominski, Andrzej; Wortsman, Jacobo; Plonka, Przemyslaw M.; Schallreuter, Karin U.; Paus, Ralf; Tobin, Desmond J.

    2005-01-01

    Hair shaft melanin components (eu- or/and pheomelanin) are a long-lived record of precise interactions in the hair follicle pigmentary unit, e.g., between follicular melanocytes, keratinocytes, and dermal papilla fibroblasts. Follicular melanogenesis (FM) involves sequentially the melanogenic activity of follicular melanocytes, the transfer of melanin granules into cortical and medulla keratinocytes, and the formation of pigmented hair shafts. This activity is in turn regulated by an array of enzymes, structural and regulatory proteins, transporters, and receptors and their ligands, acting on the developmental stages, cellular, and hair follicle levels. FM is stringently coupled to the anagen stage of the hair cycle, being switched-off in catagen to remain absent through telogen. At the organ level FM is precisely coupled to the life cycle of melanocytes with changes in their compartmental distribution and accelerated melanoblast/melanocyte differentiation with enhanced secretory activity. The melanocyte compartments in the upper hair follicle also provides a reservoir for the repigmentation of epidermis and, for the cyclic formation of new anagen hair bulbs. Melanin synthesis and pigment transfer to bulb keratinocytes are dependent on the availability of melanin precursors, and regulation by signal transduction pathways intrinsic to skin and hair follicle, which are both receptor dependent and independent, act through auto-, para- or intracrine mechanisms and can be modified by hormonal signals. The important regulators are MC1 receptor its and adrenocorticotropic hormone, melanocyte stimulating hormone, agouti protein ligands (in rodents), c-Kit, and the endothelin receptors with their ligands. Melanin itself has a wide range of bioactivities that extend far beyond its determination of hair color. PMID:15654948

  4. Hair follicle differentiation and regulation.

    PubMed

    Rogers, George E

    2004-01-01

    Ten years ago, Hardy (1992) wrote a timely review on the major features of hair follicle development and hair growth which she referred to as a secret life. Many of these secrets are now being revealed. The information discussed in this brief review comprises the structure of the hair and hair follicle, the continuing characterisation of the genes for keratin and keratin associated proteins, the determination of the location of their expression in the different cell layers of the hair follicle, molecular signals which control keratin gene expression and post-translational events in the terminal stages of hair formation.

  5. Hair follicle growth controls.

    PubMed

    Stenn, K S; Combates, N J; Eilertsen, K J; Gordon, J S; Pardinas, J R; Parimoo, S; Prouty, S M

    1996-10-01

    Research in hair biology has embarked in the pursuit for molecules that control hair growth. Many molecules already have been associated with the controls of hair patterning, hair maturation, and hair cycling and differentiation. Knowing how these molecules work gives us the tools for understanding and treating patients with hair disorders.

  6. Integral hair lipid in human hair follicle.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won-Soo

    2011-12-01

    Integral hair lipid (IHL) is bound to the keratinized cell surface to make an environmentally resistant lipid envelope. It is mainly positioned on the hair cuticle and inner root sheath. IHL in the hair follicle may regard as hair barrier to be similar to the epidermal lipid layer functioning as skin barrier. Major constituents of IHL are fatty acid, phytosphingosine, ceramide in decreasing order. Minor constituents of IHL are cholesterol, cholesterol sulfate and cholesterol oleate. Cuticle or cortical cell surface in hair are abundant in fatty acids unlike the keratinized area of epidermis or sebaceous gland, and about 30-40% of such fatty acids are composed of 18-methyl-eicosanoic acid which is known to be bound to proteins by ester or thioester bond. Various factors including moisture, solvent, oxidative damage during bleaching or permanent waving affect IHL. Photochemical changes also can occur in IHL as well as in hair protein and hair pigment. Lipid metabolism is thought to play an essential role in lipid envelope of hair, but also involvement in hair development and function. Copyright © 2011 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of transient receptor potential (TRP) channel agonists and antagonists on slowly adapting type II mechanoreceptors in the rat sinus hair follicle.

    PubMed

    Cahusac, Peter M B

    2009-12-01

    The possible functional role of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels was investigated by testing various TRP agonists and antagonists in an isolated rat sinus hair follicle preparation. Extracellular recordings from slowly adapting type II mechanoreceptor units were made. The antagonist capsazepine depressed spontaneous and mechanically evoked activity, with an IC(50) of 82 microM. In one-third of units, capsazepine caused a selective depression of mechanically evoked firing, such that the existing spontaneous firing was interrupted by an absence of activity during the mechanical stimulus. The broad spectrum TRP blocker ruthenium red (30 microM) had inconsistent effects, although in some units a delayed onset (following wash) bursting and paroxysmal firing ensued. The agonist icilin (50-100 microM) had an excitatory effect on spontaneous firing, and (-)-menthol (200 microM) had inconsistent effects. Cinnamaldehyde (1-2 mM) depressed all types of activity equally, mechanically evoked and spontaneous. Camphor (0.5-2 mM) also depressed all types of activity, although it had a preferential effect on spontaneous activity. Capsaicin (1-10 microM) and allyl isothiocyanate (50-100 microM) had no clear effects. These results rule out any role for TRPA1 and TRPV1 channels in mechanotransduction processes of slowly adapting type II mechanoreceptors.

  8. Immunohistochemical study of hair follicle stem cells in regenerated hair follicles induced by Wnt10b

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiming; Xing, Yizhan; Guo, Haiying; Ma, Xiaogen; Li, Yuhong

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of the periodic regeneration of hair follicles is complicated. Although Wnt10b has been reported to induce hair follicle regeneration, the characteristics of induced hair follicles, especially the target cells of Wnt10b, have not yet been clearly elucidated. Thus, we systematically evaluated the expression and proliferation patterns of Wnt10b-induced hair follicles. We found that Wnt10b promoted the proliferation of hair follicle stem cells from 24 hours after AdWnt10b injection. Seventy-two hours after AdWnt10b injection, cells outside of bulge area began to proliferate. When the induced hair follicle entered full anagen, although the hair follicle stem cells were normal, canonical Wnt signaling was maintained in the hair precortex cells. Our results reveal that the target cells that overexpressed Wnt10b included hair follicle stem cells, hair precortex cells, and matrix cells. PMID:27766026

  9. Proteomic Analysis of Hair Follicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishioka, Noriaki; Terada, Masahiro; Yamada, Shin; Seki, Masaya; Takahashi, Rika; Majima, Hideyuki J.; Higashibata, Akira; Mukai, Chiaki

    2013-02-01

    Hair root cells actively divide in a hair follicle, and they sensitively reflect physical conditions. By analyzing the human hair, we can know stress levels on the human body and metabolic conditions caused by microgravity environment and cosmic radiation. The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has initiated a human research study to investigate the effects of long-term space flight on gene expression and mineral metabolism by analyzing hair samples of astronauts who stayed in the International Space Station (ISS) for 6 months. During long-term flights, the physiological effects on astronauts include muscle atrophy and bone calcium loss. Furthermore, radiation and psychological effects are important issue to consider. Therefore, an understanding of the effects of the space environment is important for developing countermeasures against the effects experienced by astronauts. In this experiment, we identify functionally important target proteins that integrate transcriptome, mineral metabolism and proteome profiles from human hair. To compare the protein expression data with the gene expression data from hair roots, we developed the protein processing method. We extracted the protein from five strands of hair using ISOGEN reagents. Then, these extracted proteins were analyzed by LC-MS/MS. These collected profiles will give us useful physiological information to examine the effect of space flight.

  10. Ion beam microanalysis of human hair follicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kertész, Zs.; Szikszai, Z.; Pelicon, P.; Simčič, J.; Telek, A.; Bíró, T.

    2007-07-01

    Hair follicle is an appendage organ of the skin which is of importance to the survival of mammals and still maintains significance for the human race - not just biologically, but also through cosmetic and commercial considerations. However data on composition of hair follicles are scarce and mostly limited to the hair shaft. In this study we provide detailed information on the elemental distribution in human hair follicles in different growth phases (anagen and catagen) using a scanning proton microprobe. The analysis of skin samples obtained from human adults undergoing plastic surgery and of organ-cultured human hair follicles may yield a new insight into the function, development and cyclic activity of the hair follicle.

  11. Non-competitive metabotropic glutamate 1 receptor antagonists block activity of slowly adapting type I mechanoreceptor units in the rat sinus hair follicle.

    PubMed

    Cahusac, P M B; Mavulati, S C

    2009-10-20

    Previous studies suggested that Group I metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors play a role in mechanotransduction processes of slowly adapting type I mechanoreceptors. Using an isolated rat sinus hair follicle preparation we tested a range of compounds. Surprisingly, only non-competitive mGlu1 receptor antagonists produced profound and long-lasting depression of mechanically evoked firing. 6-Amino-N-cyclohexyl-N,3-dimethylthiazolo[3,2-alpha]benzimidazole-2-carboxamide hydrochloride (YM-298198) had an IC(50) of 8.7 muM (95% CI 5.7 to 13.2 microM), representing the most potent known blocker of type I mechanoreceptors. The derivative 6-amino-N-cyclohexyl-3-methylthiazolo[3,2-alpha]benzimidazole-2-carboxamide hydrochloride (desmethyl YM-298198) had a comparable potency. Another compound 7-(hydroxyimino)cyclopropa[b]chromen-1a-carboxylate ethyl ester (CPCCOEt) had a similar depressant effect, although it was less potent with an approximate IC(50) of 100 microM. Between three and seven times the concentration of CPCCOEt and YM-298198 respectively was required to produce similar depressions in slowly adapting type II units. No depression, and some weak excitatory effects, were observed using the following ligands: the competitive mGlu1 receptor antagonist alpha-amino-5-carboxy-3-methyl-2-thiopheneacetic acid (3-MATIDA) (300 microM), the phosphoserine phosphatase inhibitor dl-2-amino-3-phosphonopropionic acid (dl-AP3) (2 mM), non-competitive mGlu5 receptor antagonists 3-((2-methyl-1,3-thiazol-4-yl)ethynyl)pyridine; (S)-3,5-DHPG, (S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (MTEP) (10 microM) and 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine hydrochloride (MPEP) (100 microM), the mGlu1 receptor agonist (S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine ((S)-3,5-DHPG) (500 microM), and the mGlu5 receptor agonist (RS)-2-chloro-5-hydroxyphenylglycine (CHPG) (1 mM). The results suggest that the non-competitive mGlu1 receptor antagonists are not acting at conventional mGlu1 receptors but at other binding sites, possibly

  12. Biology of the hair follicle: the basics.

    PubMed

    Krause, Karoline; Foitzik, Kerstin

    2006-03-01

    The mammalian hair follicle represents a unique, highly regenerative neuroectodermal-mesodermal interaction system that contains numerous stem cells. It is the only organ in the mammalian organism that undergoes life-long cycles of rapid growth (anagen), regression (catagen), and resting periods (telogen). These transformations are controlled by changes in the local signaling milieu, based on changes in expression/activity of a constantly growing number of cytokines, hormones, neurotransmitters, and their cognate receptors as well as of transcription factors and enzymes that have become recognized as key mediators of hair follicle cycling. Transplantation experiments have shown that the driving force of cycling, the "hair cycle clock," is located in the hair follicle itself. However, the exact underlying molecular mechanisms that drive this oscillator system remain unclear. These controls of hair follicle cycling are of great clinical interest because hair loss or unwanted hair growth largely reflect undesired changes in hair follicle cycling. To develop therapeutic agents for the management of these hair cycle abnormalities, it is critical to decipher and pharmacologically target the key molecular controls that underlie the enigmatic "hair cycle clock."

  13. Depletion of CD200+ Hair Follicle Stem Cells in Human Prematurely Gray Hair Follicles

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, Sujata; Kumar, Anil; Dhawan, Jyoti; Sharma, Vinod K; Gupta, Somesh

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Melanocyte stem cells (MelSCs) are known to be depleted in gray hair follicles. Hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) are important for maintenance of stemness of MelSCs. Methods: We compared the proportion of CD200+ (Cluster of Differentiation 200 positive) stem cells in the outer root sheath cell suspension of gray and pigmented hair follicles of three patients with the premature graying of hair. In addition, explants culture for HFSCs was also carried out from gray and pigmented hair follicles. Cultured HFSCs were also differentiated into melanocytes. Results: The mean ± SD CD200+ HFSCs population were 9.4 ± 1.4% and 3.5 ± 0.5% for pigmented and gray hair follicles, respectively (P = 0.002). In explants culture, the growth of HFSCs from the gray hair follicle stopped at around day 20–22, whereas the growth of the cells from the pigmented follicle continued. Conclusion: CD200+ HFSCs are depleted in prematurely gray hair in the humans. CD200+ hair follicle stem cell yield is poorer in gray hair explant culture than pigmented hair explant culture. PMID:24023430

  14. Human hair growth ex vivo is correlated with in vivo hair growth: selective categorization of hair follicles for more reliable hair follicle organ culture.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Oh Sang; Oh, Jun Kyu; Kim, Mi Hyang; Park, So Hyun; Pyo, Hyun Keol; Kim, Kyu Han; Cho, Kwang Hyun; Eun, Hee Chul

    2006-02-01

    Of the numerous assays used to assess hair growth, hair follicle organ culture model is one of the most popular and powerful in vitro systems. Changes in hair growth are commonly employed as a measurement of follicular activity. Hair cycle stage of mouse vibrissa follicles in vivo is known to determine subsequent hair growth and follicle behavior in vitro and it is recommended that follicles be taken at precisely the same cyclic stage. This study was performed to evaluate whether categorization of human hair follicles by the growth in vivo could be used to select follicles of the defined anagen stage for more consistent culture. Occipital scalp samples were obtained from three subjects, 2 weeks later after hair bleaching. Hair growth and follicle length of isolated anagen VI follicles were measured under a videomicroscope. Follicles were categorized into four groups according to hair growth and some were cultured ex vivo for 6 days. Follicles showed considerable variations with respect to hair growth and follicle length; however, these two variables were relatively well correlated. Hair growth in culture was closely related with hair growth rate in vivo. Moreover, minoxidil uniquely demonstrated a significant increase of hair growth in categorized hair follicles assumed at a similar early anagen VI stage of hair cycle. Selection of follicles at a defined stage based on hair-growth rate would permit a more reliable outcome in human hair follicle organ culture.

  15. Transglutaminase from Hair Follicle of Guinea Pig

    PubMed Central

    Chung, S. I.; Folk, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    Two transglutaminases are found in homogenates of the inner root sheaths of guinea pig hair-follicles. One is indistinguishable from the well-characterized liver transglutaminase [J. Biol. Chem., 246, 1093 (1971)]. The other, which is present in far greater quantity, has not been detected in other organs or tissues. Gel filtration and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis studies indicate that the native hair-follicle enzyme, of molecular weight 54,000, is composed of two subunits of identical molecular weight. Specificity studies suggest that the intermolecular cross-linking of fibrin and fibrinogen that is catalyzed by this enzyme is a result of the formation of ε(γ-glutamyl)lysine bonds. The probable participation of hair-follicle transglutaminase in the formation of these cross-links in the proteins of hair is discussed. Images PMID:4501114

  16. Aging of the Hair Follicle Pigmentation System

    PubMed Central

    Tobin, Desmond J

    2009-01-01

    Skin and hair phenotypes are powerful cues in human communication. They impart much information, not least about our racial, ethnic, health, gender and age status. In the case of the latter parameter, we experience significant change in pigmentation in our journey from birth to puberty and through to young adulthood, middle age and beyond. The hair follicle pigmentary unit is perhaps one of our most visible, accessible and potent aging sensors, with marked dilution of pigment intensity occurring long before even subtle changes are seen in the epidermis. This dichotomy is of interest as both skin compartments contain melanocyte subpopulations of similar embryologic (i.e., neural crest) origin. Research groups are actively pursuing the study of the differential aging of melanocytes in the hair bulb versus the epidermis and in particular are examining whether this is in part linked to the stringent coupling of follicular melanocytes to the hair growth cycle. Whether some follicular melanocyte subpopulations are affected, like epidermal melanocytes, by UV irradiation is not yet clear. A particular target of research into hair graying or canities is the nature of the melanocyte stem compartment and whether this is depleted due to reactive oxygen species-associated damage, coupled with an impaired antioxidant status, and a failure of melanocyte stem cell renewal. Over the last few years, we and others have developed advanced in vitro models and assay systems for isolated hair follicle melanocytes and for intact anagen hair follicle organ culture which may provide research tools to elucidate the regulatory mechanisms of hair follicle pigmentation. Long term, it may be feasible to develop strategies to modulate some of these aging-associated changes in the hair follicle that impinge particularly on the melanocyte populations. PMID:20927229

  17. Hair follicle transplantation on scar tissue.

    PubMed

    Jung, Soyeon; Oh, Suk Joon; Hoon Koh, Sung

    2013-07-01

    Hair transplantation is a continuously evolving field. The procedure was originally developed by Dr. Orentreich in 1959, but he applied it only to the androgenic alopecia. Potential applications for hair grafting extend beyond treatment of hair loss. Our study group consisted of 25 cases of 23 patients. The causes of scar resulting to hair loss were burns, operation, and trauma. The scalp strips or follicular unit extracts were harvested from occipital, posterior auricular, dog-eared scalp, adjacent scalp area, and nuchal area. The recipient sites were scalp, eyebrow, lip, and eyelid. The follow-up cases over 6 months after operation were 18 among total 25 cases. The result after hair follicle transplantation was excellent (44.4%), good (38.9%), fair (11.1%), and poor (5.6%). The hair follicle transplantation on the scar tissue is more difficult than grafting on normal tissue because the scar is accompanied by poor blood circulation and stiffness of tissue. The patients with burned scar achieved more favorable result than did others. Incision scars are deeper than burned scars, and their success rates are poor. We should recommend the patients that hair follicle transplantation on the scar may need secondary or more operations for the aesthetically better result.

  18. Alterations in Hair Follicle Dynamics in Women

    PubMed Central

    Piérard-Franchimont, Claudine; Piérard, Gérald E.

    2013-01-01

    Endocrine changes supervening after parturition and menopause participate in the control of sebum production and hair growth modulation. The ensuing conditions include some peculiar aspects of hair loss (effluvium), alopecia, and facial hirsutism. The hair cycling is of major clinical relevance because most hair growth disorders result from disturbances in this chronobiological feature. Of note, any correlation between a biologic abnormality and hair cycling disturbance does not prove a relationship of causality. The proportion of postmenopausal women is rising in the overall population. Therefore, the prevalence of these hair follicle disturbances is globally on the rise. Current therapies aim at correcting the underlying hormonal imbalances, and at improving the overall cosmetic appearance. However, in absence of pathogenic diagnosis and causality criteria, chances are low that a treatment given by the whims of fate will adequately control hair effluvium. The risk and frequency of therapeutic inertia are further increased. When the hair loss is not controlled and/or compensated by growth of new hairs, several clinical aspects of alopecia inexorably develop. Currently, there is little evidence supporting any specific treatment for these endocrine hair disorders in post-partum and postmenopausal women. Current hair treatment strategies are symptomatic and nonspecific so current researchers aim at developing new, targeted methods. PMID:24455742

  19. Alterations in hair follicle dynamics in women.

    PubMed

    Piérard-Franchimont, Claudine; Piérard, Gérald E

    2013-01-01

    Endocrine changes supervening after parturition and menopause participate in the control of sebum production and hair growth modulation. The ensuing conditions include some peculiar aspects of hair loss (effluvium), alopecia, and facial hirsutism. The hair cycling is of major clinical relevance because most hair growth disorders result from disturbances in this chronobiological feature. Of note, any correlation between a biologic abnormality and hair cycling disturbance does not prove a relationship of causality. The proportion of postmenopausal women is rising in the overall population. Therefore, the prevalence of these hair follicle disturbances is globally on the rise. Current therapies aim at correcting the underlying hormonal imbalances, and at improving the overall cosmetic appearance. However, in absence of pathogenic diagnosis and causality criteria, chances are low that a treatment given by the whims of fate will adequately control hair effluvium. The risk and frequency of therapeutic inertia are further increased. When the hair loss is not controlled and/or compensated by growth of new hairs, several clinical aspects of alopecia inexorably develop. Currently, there is little evidence supporting any specific treatment for these endocrine hair disorders in post-partum and postmenopausal women. Current hair treatment strategies are symptomatic and nonspecific so current researchers aim at developing new, targeted methods.

  20. Putting the Human Hair Follicle Cycle on the Map.

    PubMed

    Panteleyev, Andrey A

    2016-01-01

    A detailed characterization of the normal (in situ) human hair follicle cycle, supplemented with expressional data on specific hair follicle markers, has been awaited by basic hair researchers and dermatologists. Combining this hair cycle guide, together with a thorough analysis of the human-on-mouse hair xenograft model, provides solid ground for examining human hair cycle biology and pathology and for hair cycle-related pharmacological testing.

  1. Induced pluripotent stem cells from human hair follicle keratinocytes as a potential source for in vitro hair follicle cloning

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sheng Jye; Ho, Shu Cheow; Mok, Pooi Ling; Tan, Kian Lee; Ong, Alan H.K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Human hair follicles are important for the renewal of new hairs and their development. The generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from hair follicles is easy due to its accessibility and availability. The pluripotent cells derived from hair follicles not only have a higher tendency to re-differentiate into hair follicles, but are also more suited for growth in hair scalp tissue microenvironment. Methods In this study, human hair follicular keratinocytes were used to generate iPSCs, which were then further differentiated in vitro into keratinocytes. The derived iPSCs were characterised by using immunofluorescence staining, flow cytometry, and reverse-transcription PCR to check for its pluripotency markers expression. Results The iPSC clones expressed pluripotency markers such as TRA-1-60, TRA-1-81, SSEA4, OCT4, SOX2, NANOG, LEFTY, and GABRB. The well-formed three germ layers were observed during differentiation using iPSCs derived from hair follicles. The successful formation of keratioctyes from iPSCs was confirmed by the expression of cytokeratin 14 marker. Discussion Hair follicles represent a valuable keratinocytes source for in vitro hair cloning for use in treating hair balding or grafting in burn patients. Our significant findings in this report proved that hair follicles could be used to produce pluripotent stem cells and suggested that the genetic and micro-environmental elements of hair follicles might trigger higher and more efficient hair follicles re-differentiation. PMID:27867768

  2. Mesenchymal-epithelial interactions during hair follicle morphogenesis and cycling

    PubMed Central

    Sennett, Rachel; Rendl, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Embryonic hair follicle induction and formation are regulated by mesenchymal-epithelial interactions between specialized dermal cells and epidermal stem cells that switch to a hair fate. Similarly, during postnatal hair growth, communication between mesenchymal dermal papilla cells and surrounding epithelial matrix cells coordinates hair shaft production. Adult hair follicle regeneration in the hair cycle again is thought to be controlled by activating signals originating from the mesenchymal compartment and acting on hair follicle stem cells. Although many signaling pathways are implicated in hair follicle formation and growth, the precise nature, timing, and intersection of these inductive and regulatory signals remains elusive. The goal of this review is to summarize our current understanding and to discuss recent new insights into mesenchymal-epithelial interactions during hair follicle morphogenesis and cycling. PMID:22960356

  3. Gene and stem cell therapy of the hair follicle.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Robert M

    2005-01-01

    The hair follicle is a highly complex appendage of the skin containing a multiplicity of cell types. The follicle undergoes constant cycling through the life of the organism including growth and resorption with growth dependent on specific stem cells. The targeting of the follicle by genes and stem cells to change its properties, in particular, the nature of the hair shaft is discussed. Hair follicle delivery systems are described such as liposomes and viral vectors for gene therapy. The nature of the hair follicle stem cells is discussed, in particular, its pluripotency.

  4. Melanocyte stem cells: a melanocyte reservoir in hair follicles for hair and skin pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Emi K

    2011-06-01

    Most mammals are coated with pigmented hair. Melanocytes in each hair follicle produce melanin pigments for the hair during each hair cycle. The key to understanding the mechanism of cyclic melanin production is the melanocyte stem cell (MelSC) population, previously known as 'amelanotic melanocytes'. The MelSCs directly adhere to hair follicle stem cells, the niche cells for MelSCs and reside in the hair follicle bulge-subbulge area, the lower permanent portion of the hair follicle, to serve as a melanocyte reservoir for skin and hair pigmentation. MelSCs form a stem cell system within individual hair follicles and provide a 'hair pigmentary unit' for each cycle of hair pigmentation. This review focuses on the identification of MelSCs and their characteristics and explains the importance of the MelSC population in the mechanisms of hair pigmentation, hair greying, and skin repigmentation. 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  5. Reflectance spectroscopy for noninvasive evaluation of hair follicle stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Caihua; Guan, Yue; Wang, Jianru; Zhong, Xiewei; Liu, Xiuli; Zhu, Dan

    2015-05-01

    Hair follicle offers an excellent model for systems biology and regenerative medicine. So far, the stages of hair follicle growth have been evaluated by histological examination. In this work, a noninvasive spectroscopy was proposed by measuring the diffuse reflectance of mouse skin and analyzing the melanin value. Results show that the skin diffuse reflectance was relatively high when hair follicles were at the telogen stage and at the beginning of the anagen stage, and decreased with the progression of the anagen stage. When the hair follicle entered into the catagen stage, the diffuse reflectance gradually increased. The changes in the melanin content of skin had contrary dynamics. Substages of the hair follicle cycle could be distinguished by comparing the changes in melanin value with the histological examination. This study provided a new method for noninvasive evaluation of the hair follicle stage, and should be valuable for basic and therapeutic investigations on hair regeneration.

  6. The hair follicle as a target for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S; Domashenko, A; Cotsarelis, G

    2001-01-01

    The hair follicle possesses progenitor cells for continued hair follicle cycling and for epidermal keratinocytes, melanocytes and Langerhans cells. These different cell types can be targeted by topical gene delivery to mouse skin. Using a combination of liposomes and DNA, we demonstrated the feasibility of targeting hair follicle cells in human scalp xenografts as well. We defined liposome composition and stage of the hair cycle as important parameters influencing transfection of human hair follicles. Transfection occurred only during anagen onset. Considerations and obstacles for using gene therapy to treat alopecias and skin disease are discussed. A theoretical framework for future gene therapy treatments for cutaneous and systemic disorders is presented.

  7. Hierarchical patterning modes orchestrate hair follicle morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Glover, James D.; Wells, Kirsty L.; Matthäus, Franziska; Painter, Kevin J.; Ho, William; Riddell, Jon; Johansson, Jeanette A.; Ford, Matthew J.; Jahoda, Colin A. B.; Klika, Vaclav; Mort, Richard L.

    2017-01-01

    Two theories address the origin of repeating patterns, such as hair follicles, limb digits, and intestinal villi, during development. The Turing reaction–diffusion system posits that interacting diffusible signals produced by static cells first define a prepattern that then induces cell rearrangements to produce an anatomical structure. The second theory, that of mesenchymal self-organisation, proposes that mobile cells can form periodic patterns of cell aggregates directly, without reference to any prepattern. Early hair follicle development is characterised by the rapid appearance of periodic arrangements of altered gene expression in the epidermis and prominent clustering of the adjacent dermal mesenchymal cells. We assess the contributions and interplay between reaction–diffusion and mesenchymal self-organisation processes in hair follicle patterning, identifying a network of fibroblast growth factor (FGF), wingless-related integration site (WNT), and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signalling interactions capable of spontaneously producing a periodic pattern. Using time-lapse imaging, we find that mesenchymal cell condensation at hair follicles is locally directed by an epidermal prepattern. However, imposing this prepattern’s condition of high FGF and low BMP activity across the entire skin reveals a latent dermal capacity to undergo spatially patterned self-organisation in the absence of epithelial direction. This mesenchymal self-organisation relies on restricted transforming growth factor (TGF) β signalling, which serves to drive chemotactic mesenchymal patterning when reaction–diffusion patterning is suppressed, but, in normal conditions, facilitates cell movement to locally prepatterned sources of FGF. This work illustrates a hierarchy of periodic patterning modes operating in organogenesis. PMID:28700594

  8. Modulating hair follicle size with Wnt10b/DKK1 during hair regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lei, Mingxing; Guo, Haiying; Qiu, Weiming; Lai, Xiangdong; Yang, Tian; Widelitz, Randall B; Chuong, Cheng-Ming; Lian, Xiaohua; Yang, Li

    2014-06-01

    Hair follicles have characteristic sizes corresponding to their cycle-specific stage. However, how the anagen hair follicle specifies its size remains elusive. Here, we showed that in response to prolonged ectopic Wnt10b-mediated β-catenin activation, regenerating anagen hair follicles grew larger in size. In particular, the hair bulb, dermal papilla and hair shaft became enlarged, while the formation of different hair types (Guard, Awl, Auchene and Zigzag) was unaffected. Interestingly, we found that the effect of exogenous WNT10b was mainly on Zigzag and less on the other kinds of hairs. We observed dramatically enhanced proliferation within the matrix, DP and hair shaft of the enlarged AdWnt10b-treated hair follicles compared with those of normal hair follicles at P98. Furthermore, expression of CD34, a specific hair stem cell marker, was increased in its number to the bulge region after AdWnt10b treatment. Ectopic expression of CD34 throughout the ORS region was also observed. Many CD34-positive hair stem cells were actively proliferating in AdWnt10b-induced hair follicles. Importantly, subsequent co-treatment with the Wnt inhibitor, DKK1, reduced hair follicle enlargement and decreased proliferation and ectopic localization of hair stem cells. Moreover, injection of DKK1 during early anagen significantly reduced the width of prospective hairs. Together, these findings strongly suggest that Wnt10b/DKK1 can modulate hair follicle size during hair regeneration.

  9. Extensive Hair Shaft Growth after Mouse Whisker Follicle Isolation, Cryopreservation and Transplantation in Nude Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Wenluo; Li, Lingna; Tran, Benjamin; Kajiura, Satoshi; Amoh, Yasuyuki; Liu, Fang; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that whole hair follicles could be cryopreserved to maintain their stem-cells differentation potential. In the present study, we demonstrated that cryopreserved mouse whisker hair follicles maintain their hair growth potential. DMSO better cryopreserved mouse whisker follicles compared to glycerol. Cryopreserved hair follicles also maintained the hair follicle-associated-pluripotent (HAP) stem cells, evidenced by P75NTR expression. Subcutaneous transplantation of DMSO-cryopreserved hair follicles in nude mice resulted in extensive hair fiber growth over 8 weeks, indicating the functional recovery of hair shaft growth of cryopreserved hair follicles. PMID:26716690

  10. Introduction to Hair-Follicle-Associated Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Robert M

    2016-01-01

    Nestin-expressing stem cells of the hair follicle, discovered by our laboratory, have been shown to be able to form outer-root sheaths of the follicle as well as neurons and many other non-follicle cell types. We have termed the nestin-expressing stem cells of the hair follicle as hair-follicle-associated pluripotent (HAP) stem cells. We have shown that the HAP stem cells from the hair follicle can effect the repair of peripheral nerve and spinal cord injury. The hair follicle stem cells differentiate into neuronal and glial cells after transplantation to the injured peripheral nerve and spinal cord, and enhance injury repair and locomotor recovery. When the excised hair follicle with its nerve stump was placed in Gelfoam(®) 3D histoculture, HAP stem cells grew and extended the hair follicle nerve which consisted of βIII-tubulin-positive fibers with F-actin expression at the tip. These findings indicate that βIII-tubulin-positive fibers elongating from the whisker follicle sensory nerve stump were growing axons. The growing whisker sensory nerve was highly enriched in HAP stem cells, which appeared to play a major role in its elongation and interaction with other nerves in 3D Gelfoam(®) histoculture, including the sciatic nerve, the trigeminal nerve, and the trigeminal nerve ganglion. These results suggest that a major function of the HAP stem cells in the hair follicle is for growth of the follicle sensory nerve. Recently, we have shown that HAP stem cells can differentiate into beating cardiac muscle cells. HAP stem cells have critical advantages for regenerative medicine over embryonic stem (ES) cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells in that they are highly accessible from each patient, thereby eliminating immunological issues since they are autologous, require no genetic manipulation, are non-tumorigenic, and do not present ethical issues.

  11. [The hair follicle as a target for gene therapy].

    PubMed

    Cotsarelis, G

    2002-05-01

    The hair follicle possesses progenitor cells required for continuous hair follicle cycling and for epidermal keratinocytes, melanocytes and Langerhans cells. These different cell types can be the target of topical gene delivery in the skin of the mouse. Using a combination of liposomes and DNA, we demonstrate the feasibility of targeting hair follicle cells in human scalp xenografts. We consider liposome composition and stage of the hair cycle as important parameters influencing transfection of human hair follicles. Transfection is possible only during the early anagen phase. Factors and obstacles for the use of gene therapy in treating alopecia and skin diseases are discussed. A theoretical framework for future treatment of cutaneous and systemic disorders using gene therapy is presented.

  12. Role of the vitamin D receptor in hair follicle biology.

    PubMed

    Demay, Marie B; MacDonald, Paul N; Skorija, Kristi; Dowd, Diane R; Cianferotti, Luisella; Cox, Megan

    2007-03-01

    The vitamin D receptor (VDR) is expressed in numerous cells and tissues, including the skin. The critical requirement for cutaneous expression of the VDR has been proven by investigations in mice and humans lacking functional receptors. These studies demonstrate that absence of the VDR leads to the development of alopecia. The hair follicle is formed by reciprocal interactions between an epidermal placode, which gives rise to the hair follicle keratinocytes and the underlying mesoderm which gives rise to the dermal papilla. Hair follicle morphogenesis ends the second week of life in mice. Studies in VDR null mice have failed to demonstrate a cutaneous abnormality during this period of hair follicle morphogenesis. However, VDR null mice are unable to initiate a new hair cycle after the period of morphogenesis is complete, therefore, do not grow new hair. Investigations in transgenic mice have demonstrated that restricted expression of the VDR to keratinocytes is capable of preventing alopecia in the VDR null mice, thus demonstrating that the epidermal component of the hair follicle requires VDR expression to maintain normal hair follicle homeostasis. Studies were then performed to determine which regions of the VDR were required for these actions. Investigations in mice lacking the first zinc finger of the VDR have demonstrated that they express a truncated receptor containing an intact ligand binding and AF2 domain. These mice are a phenocopy of mice lacking the VDR, thus demonstrate the critical requirement of the DNA binding domain for hair follicle homeostasis. Transgenic mice expressing VDRs with mutations in either the ligand-binding domain or the AF2 domain were generated. These investigations demonstrated that mutant VDRs incapable of ligand-dependent transactivation were able to prevent alopecia. Investigations are currently underway to define the mechanism by which the unliganded VDR maintains hair follicle homeostasis.

  13. Modulating hair follicle size with Wnt10b-DKK1 pair during hair regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Mingxing; Guo, Haiying; Qiu, Weiming; Lai, Xiangdong; Yang, Tian; Widelitz, Randall B.; Chuong, Cheng-Ming; Lian, Xiaohua; Yang, Li

    2015-01-01

    Hair follicles have characteristic sizes corresponding to their cycle specific stage. However, how the anagen hair follicle specifies its size remains elusive. Here, we show that in response to prolonged ectopic Wnt10b-mediated β-catenin activation, regenerating anagen hair follicles grow larger in size. In particular, the hair bulb, dermal papilla and hair shaft become enlarged. While the formation of different hair types (Guard, Awl, Auchene, and Zigzag) is unaffected. Interestingly, we found the effect of exogenous WNT10b was mainly on Zigzag and less on the other kinds of hairs. We observed dramatically enhanced proliferation within the matrix, DP and hair shaft of the enlarged AdWnt10b-treated hair follicles compared with those of normal hair follicles at P98. Furthermore, expression of CD34, a specific hair stem cell marker, was increased in its number to the bulge region after AdWnt10b treatment. Ectopic expression of CD34 throughout the ORS region was also observed. Many CD34 positive hair stem cells were actively proliferating in AdWnt10b-induced hair follicles. Importantly, subsequent co-treatment with the Wnt inhibitor, DKK1, reduced hair follicle enlargement, decreased proliferation and maintained proper hair stem cell localization. Moreover, injection of DKK1 during early anagen significantly reduced the width of prospective hairs. Together, these findings strongly suggest that a balance of Wnt10b/DKK1 governs reciprocal signaling between cutaneous epithelium and mesenchyme to regulate proper hair follicle size. PMID:24750467

  14. Direct immunofluorescence on hair follicles--present and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Alexandru, Adina; Zurac, Sabina; Salavastru, Carmen M; Andrei, Razvan; Tebeica, Tiberiu; Staniceanu, Florica; Tiplica, George S

    2013-06-01

    Direct immunofluorescence (DIF) is an important tool for evaluating bullous autoimmune and connective tissue disorders. We report 21 cases of pemphigus vulgaris, bullous pemphigoid and lupus erythematosus that were investigated by performing DIF on scalp hair follicles. The study was done using a simplified technique of preparing the hairs for DIF testing. The anagen hairs tested positive in pemphigus vulgaris patients while the telogen hairs were negative. In bullous pemphigoid and lupus erythematosus cases hair DIF presented negative results.Hair DIF has the potential of taking the place of skin or mucosal DIF in pemphigus patients if performed on anagen hair follicles. The technique used to perform hair DIF is important in obtaining reliable results and eliminating the possibility of generating false-negative testing. Larger studies are needed in order to validate this method.

  15. Effects of gamma rays on the regeneration of murine hair follicles in the natural hair cycle.

    PubMed

    Sugaya, Kimihiko

    2017-09-01

    This review evaluates the effects of γ-rays on the regeneration of murine hair follicles in the natural hair cycle. A series of studies were performed to investigate this issue, in which the whole bodies of C57BL/10JHir mice in the 1st telogen phase of the hair cycle were irradiated with γ-rays. The dermis of the irradiated skin showed a decrease in hair follicle density and induction of curved hair follicles along with the presence of white hairs and hypopigmented hair bulbs in the 2nd and 3rd anagen phases. An increased frequency of hypopigmented hair bulbs was still observed in the later hair cycle at postnatal day 200. There was no significant difference in the number of stem cells in the hair bulge region between control and irradiated skin. These results show that the effects of γ-rays on the pigmentation of murine hair follicles are persistently carried over to later hair cycles, although those on the number and structure of hair follicles appear to be hidden by the effects of aging. Our findings may be important for understanding the mechanisms of the actions of stem cells on hair regeneration in connection with age-related phenotypes.

  16. Hair follicle changes following intense pulsed light axillary hair reduction: histometrical, histological and immunohistochemical evaluation.

    PubMed

    El-Domyati, Moetaz; Hosam, Wael; Moftah, Noha H; Abdel Raouf, Hamza; Saad, Selwet M

    2017-04-01

    Intense pulsed light (IPL) has been used for years in hair reduction; however, no previous studies discussed quantitative histological and immunohistochemical changes of hair follicles after IPL. Accordingly, this study aims to objectively quantify histological and immunohistochemical changes of hair follicles after IPL hair reduction. Right axillae of 21 volunteers were subjected to 6 IPL sessions using Quanta system IPL and evaluated at 1 week and 1 month after last session (i.e., 3 and 4 months from the start of treatment, respectively) in comparison to baseline and left control axillae. Using hair count, histological and immunohistochemical assessment of vertical and serial transverse sections coupled with computerized morphometric analysis, determination of hair reduction percentage, measurement of hair shaft (HS) diameter, calculation of percentage of hair follicle types and quantitative evaluation of PCNA, Ki67 and P53 markers were performed. After IPL, there was significant decrease of hair count, HS diameter, percentage of terminal anagen follicles, terminal/vellus (T/V) ratio, anagen/telogen (A/T) ratio and expression of PCNA and Ki67; however, significant increase of percentage of terminal telogen and total vellus follicles with vellus-like type and P53 expression was identified. So, reduction of hair number and thickness occurred after IPL by induction of telogenesis and miniaturization through decreased hair follicle proliferation and increase in DNA damage that could favor apoptosis.

  17. Strength of Occipital Hair as an Explanation for Pilonidal Sinus Disease Caused by Intruding Hair.

    PubMed

    Doll, Dietrich; Bosche, Friederike D; Stauffer, Verena K; Sinicina, Inga; Hoffmann, Sebastian; van der Zypen, Dominic; Luedi, Markus M

    2017-09-01

    Pilonidal sinus disease is thought to be caused by intrusion of hair into healthy skin; loose hair in the intergluteal fold is thought to promote disease. However, compelling evidence to support these postulates is lacking; the cause of pilonidal sinus disease remains uncertain. To determine whether particular properties of hair are associated with susceptibility to pilonidal sinus disease, we compared physical properties of hairs of patients with pilonidal sinus disease with hairs from control subjects who were matched for sex, BMI, and age. This was an experimental study with establishment of a mechanical strength test for single hairs to quantify the maximum vertical force that a hair could exert, following tests of strength of occipital, lumbar, and intergluteal hair. Hair from patients with pilonidal sinus disease and matched control subjects were harvested from patients of the St. Marienhospital Vechta Department of Procto-Surgery. A total of 17 adult patients with pilonidal sinus disease and 217 control subjects were included. ANOVA and intraclass and interclass variations of data gained from mechanical strength tests of occipital, lumbar, and intergluteal hair were included. Vertical hair strength was significantly greater in patients with pilonidal sinus disease. Occipital hair exhibited 20% greater, glabella sacralis 1.1 times greater, and intergluteal hair 2 times greater strength in patients with pilonidal sinus disease than in matched control subjects (all p = 0.0001). In addition, patients with pilonidal sinus disease presented with significantly more hair at the glabella sacralis and in the intergluteal fold. The study was limited by its relatively small number of patients from a specific cohort of European patients. Occipital hair exhibited considerable vertical strength. Because occipital hair exerted the greatest force and cut hair fragments were found in the pilonidal nest in large quantities, these data suggest that pilonidal sinus disease is

  18. Hormonal regulation of hair follicles exhibits a biological paradox.

    PubMed

    Randall, Valerie Anne

    2007-04-01

    Hair's importance for insulation and camouflage or human communication means that hairs need to change with season, age or sexual development. Regular, regenerating hair follicle growth cycles produce new hairs which may differ in colour and/or size, e.g., beard development. Hormones of the pineal-hypothalamus-pituitary axis coordinate seasonal changes, while androgens regulate most sexual aspects with paradoxically different effects depending on body site; compare beard growth and balding! Hormones affect follicular mesenchymal-epithelial interactions altering growing time, dermal papilla size and dermal papilla cell, keratinocyte and melanocyte activity. Greater understanding of these mechanisms should improve treatments for poorly controlled hair disorders, alopecia and hirsutism.

  19. Dynamic ultrastructural changes of the connective tissue sheath of human hair follicles during hair cycle.

    PubMed

    Ito, M; Sato, Y

    1990-01-01

    Ultrastructural changes of the connective tissue sheath (CTS), including the hyaline membrane, of human hair follicles during the hair cycle, were studied in normal scalp skin specimens. In early anagen, the CTS was composed of a thin basal lamina and surrounding collagen tissue. The collagen tissue gradually thickened during the development of the hair and hair follicle. In mature anagen hair follicles, the collagen tissue was separated into three layers. The inner collagen layer, just outside the basal lamina, was thin and composed of collagen fibres running longitudinally parallel to the hair axis. The middle collagen layer was very thick with its collagen fibres running transversely against the hair axis and surrounding the inner hair tissue. Many fibroblasts were present among the collagen fibres in the middle layer, whereas the inner layer contained almost none. In the outer collagen layer, collagen fibres ran in various directions parallel to the outer surface of the outer root sheath cells. In late anagen, the basal lamina became very thick. In catagen, the basal lamine and the inner collagen layer became corrugated and showed oedematous change and degeneration. Surrounding fibroblasts showed active production of new collagen fibres, which seemed to fill the spaces left by the retraction of the hair follicle and hyaline membrane. These ultrastructural changes of the CTS show that there may be dynamic metabolic changes of the connective tissue around human hair follicles during the hair cycle.

  20. Various Types of Minor Trauma to Hair Follicles During Follicular Unit Extraction for Hair Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Hyun; You, Seung Hyun

    2017-03-01

    When performing follicular unit extraction (FUE), various types of minor hair follicle trauma unapparent during follicular unit strip surgery are likely to occur. However, no studies have examined such damage. In total, 100 grafts were randomly selected from each of 42 patients who underwent FUE with a 1-mm-diameter sharp punch. A ×5.5 magnifying loupe and a ×60 magnifying binocular microscope were used. The transection rate (TR), paring, fractures of and damage to the dermal papilla (DP) areas, and hair bulb partial injury were assessed. Observation with the magnifying loupe revealed an average TR of 7.40%, and 4.31, 1.90, 1.52, and 0.43 hair follicles per 100 grafts exhibited paring, fracture, DP partial injury, and hair bulb partial injury, respectively. An average of 9.21 telogen hairs were observed. Microscopic examination revealed a TR of 6.34%, and 9.07, 1.95, 0.79, and 1.24 hair follicles per 100 grafts exhibited paring, fracture, DP injury, and hair bulb partial injury, respectively. An average of 16.62 telogen hairs were observed. Various types of minor hair follicle damage occur during FUE as shown by loupe and microscopic examination of the grafts. Especially paring and hair bulb injury were more apparent under microscopic examination. These minor hair follicle injuries should be considered when choosing operative method or surgical techniques.

  1. Stem cell dynamics in the hair follicle niche

    PubMed Central

    Rompolas, Panteleimon; Greco, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    Hair follicles are skin appendages of the mammalian skin that have the ability to periodically and stereotypically regenerate in order to continuously produce new hair over our lifetime. The ability of the hair follicle to regenerate is due to the presence of stem cells that along with other cell populations and non-cellular components, including molecular signals and extracellular material, make up a niche microenvironment. Mounting evidence suggests that the niche is critical for regulating stem cell behavior and thus the process of regeneration. Here we review the literature concerning past and current studies that have utilized mouse genetic models, combined with other approaches to dissect the molecular and cellular composition of the hair follicle niche. We also discuss our current understanding of how stem cells operate within the niche during the process of tissue regeneration and the factors that regulate their behavior. PMID:24361866

  2. Human hair follicle: reservoir function and selective targeting.

    PubMed

    Blume-Peytavi, U; Vogt, A

    2011-10-01

    Penetration of topically applied compounds may occur via the stratum corneum, skin appendages and hair follicles. The follicular infundibulum increases the surface area, disrupts the epidermal barrier towards the lower parts of the follicle, and serves as a reservoir. Topical delivery of active compounds to specific targets within the skin, especially to distinct hair follicle compartments or cell populations, may help to treat local inflammatory reactions selectively, with reduced systemic side-effects. Various in vitro and in vivo methods exist for studying the hair follicle structure and follicular penetration pathways. These include cyanoacrylate skin surface stripping, confocal microscopy and cyanoacrylate scalp follicle biopsy. The complex anatomical structure as well as the cyclical activity of the hair follicle must be taken into consideration when designing delivery systems. In addition, delivery into and retention inside the infundibular reservoir are controlled by, for example, molecule or particle size, their polarity and the type of preparation. Preferred penetration depth and storage time must also be considered. Particles with release mechanisms should be preferred; however, the release of drugs from nanoparticles still requires further investigations.

  3. Identification of cannabinoid type 1 receptor in dog hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Mercati, Francesca; Dall'Aglio, Cecilia; Pascucci, Luisa; Boiti, Cristiano; Ceccarelli, Piero

    2012-01-01

    In veterinary medicine, there is an increasing interest in the study of the endo-cannabinoid system and the possible use of the cannabinoids for the treatment of several diseases. Cannabinoid receptors (CB) are widely distributed in human and laboratory animal tissues, justifying the involvement of the endo-cannabinoid system in a great number of metabolic ways. Since there are no data regarding cannabinoid receptors in hair follicles of domestic animals, we investigated the presence and localization of CB1 receptor in dog hair follicles. By using a goat anti-CB1 polyclonal antibody, we observed CB1 receptor in the proximal part of both primary and secondary hair follicles. Staining was localized in the inner root sheath cells. We suppose that the endo-cannabinoid system is involved in the molecular mechanisms regulating hair follicle activity in dog. The identification of CB1 receptor at the level of the inner root sheath may help in the understanding of hair follicle biology and the possibility that cannabinoid molecules could be considered as suitable therapeutic tools in dog.

  4. Miz1 is required for hair follicle structure and hair morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gebhardt, Anneli; Kosan, Christian; Herkert, Barbara; Möröy, Tarik; Lutz, Werner; Eilers, Martin; Elsässer, Hans-Peter

    2007-08-01

    Previous work has implicated the Myc-binding transcription factor Miz1 in the control of keratinocyte proliferation and in the cellular response to TGFbeta. Miz1 is expressed in basal keratinocytes of the interfollicular epidermis and in hair follicles. Here we have conditionally knocked out the POZ/BTB transactivation domain of Miz1 in keratinocytes using a keratin 14 (K14)-Cre mouse deleter strain. K14Cre(+)/Miz1(lox/lox) mice have rough fur as a result of altered hair follicle orientation, irregular hair pigmentation and disturbed hair fiber structure. A regional thickening of the epidermis at the hair funnel orifice was accompanied by suprabasal proliferation, indicating a delayed exit of keratinocytes from the cell cycle. In addition, the catagen of the hair cycle was delayed in K14Cre(+)/Miz1(lox/lox) mice and intrafollicular keratinocyte proliferation was increased. In aged K14Cre(+)/Miz1(lox/lox) animals, the number of hair follicles remained unchanged but the number of visible hairs, especially of zigzag hairs, was reduced and a pigmentary incontinence into the dermis developed. Our data show that Miz1 is involved in controlling proliferation and differentiation in hair follicles and in hair fiber morphogenesis.

  5. Targeted expression of GFP in the hair follicle using ex vivo viral transduction.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Robert M; Li, Lingna

    2008-03-17

    There are many cell types in the hair follicle, including hair matrix cells which form the hair shaft and stem cells which can initiate the hair shaft during early anagen, the growth phase of the hair cycle, as well as pluripotent stem cells that play a role in hair follicle growth but have the potential to differentiate to non-follicle cells such as neurons. These properties of the hair follicle are discussed. The various cell types of the hair follicle are potential targets for gene therapy. Gene delivery system for the hair follicle using viral vectors or liposomes for gene targeting to the various cell types in the hair follicle and the results obtained are also discussed [corrected].

  6. Wls is expressed in the epidermis and regulates embryonic hair follicle induction in mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sixia; Zhu, Xuming; Liu, Yanfang; Tao, Yixin; Feng, Guoyin; He, Lin; Guo, Xizhi; Ma, Gang

    2012-01-01

    Wnt proteins are secreted molecules that play multiple roles during hair follicle development and postnatal hair cycling. Wntless (Wls) is a cargo protein required for the secretion of various Wnt ligands. However, its role during hair follicle development and hair cycling remains unclear. Here, we examined the expression of Wls during hair follicle induction and postnatal hair cycling. We also conditionally deleted Wls with K14-cre to investigate its role in hair follicle induction. K14-cre;Wls(c/c) mice exhibited abnormal hair follicle development, which is possibly caused by impaired canonical Wnt signaling. Meanwhile, Wnt5a is also expressed in embryonic epidermis, but Wnt5a null mice showed no significant defect in embryonic hair follicle morphogenesis. Therefore, Wls may regulate hair follicle induction by mediating the Wnt/β-catenin pathway.

  7. Concise Review: Mechanisms of Quiescent Hair Follicle Stem Cell Regulation.

    PubMed

    Yi, Rui

    2017-08-30

    Maintaining a pool of adult stem cells is essential for tissue homeostasis and wound repair. In mammalian tissues, notably hair follicles, blood, and muscle, stem cells acquire quiescence and infrequently divide for self-renewal. Mechanistic understanding of stem cell quiescence is critical for applying these multipotent cells in regenerative medicine and interrogating their roles in human diseases such as cancer. Quiescent and dividing epithelial stem cells located in hair follicle are conspicuously organized in a spatiotemporally specific manner, allowing them to be studied at a considerable depth. Recent advancements in mouse genetics, genomics, and imaging have revealed unprecedented insights into establishment, maintenance, and regulation of quiescent hair follicle stem cells. This concise review summarizes the progress with a focus on mechanisms mediated by signaling pathways and transcription factors and discusses their implications in the understanding of stem cell biology. Stem Cells 2017. © 2017 AlphaMed Press.

  8. The hair follicle as an estrogen target and source.

    PubMed

    Ohnemus, Ulrich; Uenalan, Murat; Inzunza, José; Gustafsson, Jan-Ake; Paus, Ralf

    2006-10-01

    For many decades, androgens have dominated endocrine research in hair growth control. Androgen metabolism and the androgen receptor currently are the key targets for systemic, pharmacological hair growth control in clinical medicine. However, it has long been known that estrogens also profoundly alter hair follicle growth and cycling by binding to locally expressed high-affinity estrogen receptors (ERs). Besides altering the transcription of genes with estrogen-responsive elements, 17beta-estradiol (E2) also modifies androgen metabolism within distinct subunits of the pilosebaceous unit (i.e., hair follicle and sebaceous gland). The latter displays prominent aromatase activity, the key enzyme for androgen conversion to E2, and is both an estrogen source and target. Here, we chart the recent renaissance of estrogen research in hair research; explain why the hair follicle offers an ideal, clinically relevant test system for studying the role of sex steroids, their receptors, and interactions in neuroectodermal-mesodermal interaction systems in general; and illustrate how it can be exploited to identify novel functions and signaling cross talks of ER-mediated signaling. Emphasizing the long-underestimated complexity and species-, gender-, and site-dependence of E2-induced biological effects on the hair follicle, we explore targets for pharmacological intervention in clinically relevant hair cycle manipulation, ranging from androgenetic alopecia and hirsutism via telogen effluvium to chemotherapy-induced alopecia. While defining major open questions, unsolved clinical challenges, and particularly promising research avenues in this area, we argue that the time has come to pay estrogen-mediated signaling the full attention it deserves in future endocrinological therapy of common hair growth disorders.

  9. 7-Phloroeckol promotes hair growth on human follicles in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bak, Soon-Sun; Sung, Young Kwan; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2014-08-01

    7-Phloroeckol, phloroglucinol derivative isolated from marine brown algae, has anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory responses and MMP inhibitory activities. In this study, we evaluated the hair growth-promoting effects of 7-phloroeckol in human hair follicles. To investigate cell viability of human dermal papilla cells (DPCs) and outer root sheath (ORS) cells in the presence or absence of 7-phloroeckol treatment, MTT assay was employed. Moreover, gene expression and protein concentration of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 was measured by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. 7-Phloroeckol induced an increase in proliferation of DPCs and ORS cells. In addition, hair shaft growth was measured using the hair-follicle organ culture system. 7-Phloroeckol resulted in elongation of the hair shaft in cultured human hair follicles. 7-Phloroeckol induced an IGF-1 mRNA expression and protein concentration in DPCs and conditioned media, respectively. These results suggest that 7-phloroeckol promotes hair growth through stimulation of DPCs and ORS cells.

  10. Hair follicle characteristics as early marker of Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Miranda, J Jaime; Taype-Rondan, Alvaro; Tapia, Jose Carlos; Gastanadui-Gonzalez, Maria Gabriela; Roman-Carpio, Ricardo

    2016-10-01

    Type 2 Diabetes mellitus (DM2) includes a continuum of metabolic disorders characterized by hyperglycemia that causes several chronic long-term complications such as coronary artery disease, peripheral arterial disease, nephropathy, and neuropathy. The hair follicle could reveal signs of early vascular impairment, yet its relationship to early metabolic injuries has been largely ignored. We propose that in earlier stages of the continuum of DM2-related metabolic disorders, a group of susceptible patients who do not yet meet the diagnostic criteria to be considered as persons with DM2 may present chronic vascular impairment and end organ damage, including hair follicle damage, which can be evaluated to identify an early risk marker. This hypothesis is based in the association found between insulin resistance and alopecia in non-diabetic persons, and the hair loss on the lower limbs as a manifestation of long-term peripheral arterial disease among subjects with DM2. In order to test this hypothesis, studies are required to evaluate if hair follicle characteristics are related to and can predict hyperglycemic complications, and if they do so, which feature of the hair follicle, such as hair growth, best characterizes such DM2-related conditions. If this hypothesis were proven to be true, significant advances towards a personalized approach for early prevention strategies and management of DM2 would be made. By focusing on the hair follicles, early stages of metabolic-related organ damage could be identified using non-invasive low-cost techniques. In so doing, this approach could provide early identification of DM2-susceptible individuals and lead to the early initiation of adequate primary prevention strategies to reduce or avoid the onset of large internal organ damage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Perivascular hair follicle stem cells associate with a venule annulus.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ying; Woo, Wei-Meng; Nagao, Keisuke; Li, Wenling; Terunuma, Atsushi; Mukouyama, Yoh-Suke; Oro, Anthony E; Vogel, Jonathan C; Brownell, Isaac

    2013-10-01

    The perivascular microenvironment helps in maintaining stem cells in many tissues. We sought to determine whether there is a perivascular niche for hair follicle stem cells. The association of vessels and follicle progenitor cells began by embryonic day 14.5, when nascent hair placodes had blood vessels approaching them. By birth, a vascular annulus stereotypically surrounded the keratin 15 negative (K15-) stem cells in the upper bulge and remained associated with the K15- upper bulge throughout the hair cycle. The angiogenic factor Egfl6 was expressed by the K15- bulge and was localized adjacent to the vascular annulus, which comprised post-capillary venules. Although denervation altered the phenotype of upper bulge stem cells, the vascular annulus persisted in surgically denervated mouse skin. The importance of the perivascular niche was further suggested by the fact that vascular annuli formed around the upper bulge of de novo-reconstituted hair follicles before their innervation. Together, these findings demonstrate that the upper bulge is associated with a perivascular niche during the establishment and maintenance of this specialized region of hair follicle stem cells.

  12. Perivascular Hair Follicle Stem Cells Associate with a Venule Annulus

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Ying; Woo, Wei-Meng; Nagao, Keisuke; Li, Wenling; Terunuma, Atsushi; Mukouyama, Yoh-suke; Oro, Anthony E.; Vogel, Jonathan C.; Brownell, Isaac

    2013-01-01

    The perivascular microenvironment helps maintain stem cells in many tissues. We sought to determine if there is a perivascular niche for hair follicle stem cells. The association of vessels and follicle progenitor cells began by embryonic day 14.5 (E14.5), when nascent hair placodes had blood vessels approaching them. By birth, a vascular annulus stereotypically surrounded the Keratin 15 negative (K15−) stem cells in the upper bulge, and remained associated with the K15− upper bulge throughout the hair cycle. The angiogenic factor Egfl6 was expressed by the K15− bulge and localized adjacent to the vascular annulus, which was comprised of post-capillary venules. Although denervation altered the phenotype of upper bulge stem cells, the vascular annulus persisted in surgically denervated mouse skin. The importance of the perivascular niche was further suggested by the fact that vascular annuli formed around the upper bulge of de novo reconstituted hair follicles prior to their innervation. Together, these findings demonstrate that the upper bulge is associated with a perivascular niche during the establishment and maintenance of this specialized region of hair follicle stem cells. PMID:23558405

  13. Organization and expression of hair follicle genes.

    PubMed

    Rogers, G E; Powell, B C

    1993-07-01

    Several families of proteins are expressed in the growth of hair and an estimated 50-100 proteins constitute the final hair fiber. The cumbersome nomenclature for naming these different proteins has led to a proposal to modify that which is currently used for epidermal keratins. Investigations of the organization of hair genes indicate that the members of each family are clustered in the genome and their expression could be under some general control. Interestingly, the protein called trichohyalin, markedly distinct from the hair proteins, is produced in the inner root sheath cells and the gene for it has been found to be located at the same human chromosome locus as the genes for profilaggrin, involucrin, and loricrin. A mainstream objective is to identify controls responsible for the production in the hair cortex of keratin intermediate filaments (IFs) and two large groups of keratin-associated proteins (KAPs) rich in the amino acids cysteine or glycine/tyrosine. A specific family of cysteine-rich proteins is expressed in the hair cuticle. Comparisons of promoter regions of IF genes and KAP genes, including a recently characterized gene for a glycine/tyrosine-rich protein, have revealed putative hair-specific motifs in addition to known elements that regulate gene expression. In the sheep, the patterns of expression in hair differentiation are particularly interesting insofar as there are distinct segments of para- and orthocortical type cells that have significantly different pathways of expression. The testing of candidate hair-specific regulatory sequences by mouse transgenesis has produced several interesting hair phenotypes. Transgenic sheep over-expressing keratin genes but showing no hair growth change have been obtained and compared with the equivalent transgenic hair-loss mice. Studies of the effects of amino acid supply on the rate of hair growth have demonstrated that with cysteine supplementation of sheep a perturbation occurs in which there is a

  14. Observing Cells in Plucked Hair Follicles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, John

    1991-01-01

    A simple technique is described by which the cells attached to plucked hair can be observed and used to demonstrate dividing and differentiating cell populations. The necessary equipment and the procedure are listed. (Author/KR)

  15. Observing Cells in Plucked Hair Follicles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, John

    1991-01-01

    A simple technique is described by which the cells attached to plucked hair can be observed and used to demonstrate dividing and differentiating cell populations. The necessary equipment and the procedure are listed. (Author/KR)

  16. Topical liposome targeting of dyes, melanins, genes, and proteins selectively to hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, R M

    1998-01-01

    For therapeutic and cosmetic modification of hair, we have developed a hair-follicle-selective macromolecule and small molecule targeting system with topical application of phosphatidylcholine-based liposomes. Liposome-entrapped melanins, proteins, genes, and small-molecules have been selectively targeted to the hair follicle and hair shafts of mice. Liposomal delivery of these molecules is time dependent. Negligible amounts of delivered molecules enter the dermis, epidermis, or bloodstream thereby demonstrating selective follicle delivery. Naked molecules are trapped in the stratum corneum and are unable to enter the follicle. The potential of the hair-follicle liposome delivery system for therapeutic use for hair disease as well as for cosmesis has been demonstrated in 3-dimensional histoculture of hair-growing skin and mouse in vivo models. Topical liposome selective delivery to hair follicles has demonstrated the ability to color hair with melanin, the delivery of the active lac-Z gene to hair matrix cells and delivery of proteins as well. Liposome-targeting of molecules to hair follicles has also been achieved in human scalp in histoculture. Liposomes thus have high potential in selective hair follicle targeting of large and small molecules, including genes, opening the field of gene therapy and other molecular therapy of the hair process to restore hair growth, physiologically restore or alter hair pigment, and to prevent or accelerate hair loss.

  17. Endogenous retinoids in the hair follicle and sebaceous gland.

    PubMed

    Everts, Helen B

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin A and its derivatives (retinoids) are critically important in the development and maintenance of multiple epithelial tissues, including skin, hair, and sebaceous glands, as shown by the detrimental effects of either vitamin A deficiency or toxicity. Thus, precise levels of retinoic acid (RA, active metabolite) are needed. These precise levels of RA are achieved by regulating several steps in the conversion of dietary vitamin A (retinol) to RA and RA catabolism. This review discusses the localization of RA synthesis to specific sites within the hair follicle and sebaceous gland, including their stem cells, during both homeostasis and disease states. It also discusses what is known about the specific roles of RA within the hair follicle and sebaceous gland. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Retinoid and Lipid Metabolism. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Fundamental hair follicle biology and fine fibre production in animals.

    PubMed

    Galbraith, H

    2010-09-01

    Hair 'fine' fibre is an important commercial product of farmed and certain wild animal species. The fibre is produced in follicles embedded in skin. These have properties in common with other tissues of the integument and have importance in determining yield and quality of fibre. Means of understanding and improving these characteristics are informed by knowledge of integumental and follicle biology. This paper reviews contemporary information that identifies the major fibre-producing species and their production characteristic. It surveys knowledge describing fundamental biology of the integument and considers information derived for the hair follicle from studies on a number of species including genetically modified mice. It identifies the composition of the follicle and describes components and interrelationships between epidermal hair-fibre producing epidermis and fibroblast- and connective tissue-containing dermis. The structure of different primary and secondary follicle types, and associated structures, are described. Focus is given to the alterations in anatomy and in behaviour from active to inactive state, which occurs during the hair follicle cycle. Information is provided on the anatomical substructures (hair medulla, cortex, cuticles and supporting sheaths and dermal papilla), cellular and extracellular composition, and adhesion and chemical signalling systems, which regulate development from the early embryo to post-natal state and subsequent cycling. Such signalling involves the dermis and its specialist fibroblasts, which secrete signalling molecules, which along with those from local epidermis and systemic sources, largely determine structure and function of epidermal cells. Such chemical signalling typically includes endocrine-, paracrine-, autocrine- and juxtacrine-acting molecules and interactions with their receptors located on cell membranes or intracellularly with transduction of message mediated by transcription factors at gene level

  19. A Guide to Studying Human Hair Follicle Cycling In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Oh, Ji Won; Kloepper, Jennifer; Langan, Ewan A; Kim, Yongsoo; Yeo, Joongyeub; Kim, Min Ji; Hsi, Tsai-Ching; Rose, Christian; Yoon, Ghil Suk; Lee, Seok-Jong; Seykora, John; Kim, Jung Chul; Sung, Young Kwan; Kim, Moonkyu; Paus, Ralf; Plikus, Maksim V

    2016-01-01

    Hair follicles (HFs) undergo lifelong cyclical transformations, progressing through stages of rapid growth (anagen), regression (catagen), and relative "quiescence" (telogen). Given that HF cycling abnormalities underlie many human hair growth disorders, the accurate classification of individual cycle stages within skin biopsies is clinically important and essential for hair research. For preclinical human hair research purposes, human scalp skin can be xenografted onto immunocompromised mice to study human HF cycling and manipulate long-lasting anagen in vivo. Although available for mice, a comprehensive guide on how to recognize different human hair cycle stages in vivo is lacking. In this article, we present such a guide, which uses objective, well-defined, and reproducible criteria, and integrates simple morphological indicators with advanced, (immuno)-histochemical markers. This guide also characterizes human HF cycling in xenografts and highlights the utility of this model for in vivo hair research. Detailed schematic drawings and representative micrographs provide examples of how best to identify human HF stages, even in suboptimally sectioned tissue, and practical recommendations are given for designing human-on-mouse hair cycle experiments. Thus, this guide seeks to offer a benchmark for human hair cycle stage classification, for both hair research experts and newcomers to the field.

  20. A guide to studying human hair follicle cycling in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Ji Won; Kloepper, Jennifer; Langan, Ewan A.; Kim, Yongsoo; Yeo, Joongyeub; Kim, Min Ji; Hsi, Tsai-Ching; Rose, Christian; Yoon, Ghil Suk; Lee, Seok-Jong; Seykora, John; Kim, Jung Chul; Sung, Young Kwan

    2015-01-01

    Hair follicles (HFs) undergo life-long cyclical transformations, progressing through stages of rapid growth (anagen), regression (catagen), and relative “quiescence” (telogen). Since HF cycling abnormalities underlie many human hair growth disorders, the accurate classification of individual cycle stages within skin biopsies is clinically important and essential for hair research. For preclinical human hair research purposes, human scalp skin can be xenografted onto immunocompromised mice to study human HF cycling and manipulate long-lasting anagen in vivo. While available for mice, a comprehensive guide on how to recognize different human hair cycle stages in vivo is lacking. Here, we present such a guide, which uses objective, well-defined, and reproducible criteria and integrates simple morphological indicators with advanced, (immuno)-histochemical markers. This guide also characterizes human HF cycling in xenografts and highlights the utility of this model for in vivo hair research. Detailed schematic drawings and representative micrographs provide examples of how best to identify human HF stages, even in sub-optimally sectioned tissue, and practical recommendations are given for designing human-on-mouse hair cycle experiments. Thus, this guide seeks to offer a benchmark for human hair cycle stage classification, for both hair research experts and newcomers to the field. PMID:26763421

  1. The hair follicle and its stem cells as drug delivery targets.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Robert M

    2006-05-01

    The hair follicle is a skin appendage with a complex structure containing many cell types that produce highly specialised proteins. The hair follicle is in a continuous cycle: anagen is the hair growth phase, catagen the involution phase and telogen is the resting phase. The follicle offers many potential therapeutic targets. Hoffman and colleagues have pioneered hair-follicle-specific targeting using liposomes to deliver small and large molecules, including genes. They have also pioneered ex vivo hair-follicle targeting with continued expression of the introduced gene following transplantation. Recently, it has been discovered that hair follicle stem cells are highly pluripotent and can form neurons, glial cells and other cell types, and this has suggested that hair follicle stem cells may serve as gene therapy targets for regenerative medicine.

  2. Protease activity, localization and inhibition in the human hair follicle.

    PubMed

    Bhogal, R K; Mouser, P E; Higgins, C A; Turner, G A

    2014-02-01

    In humans, the process of hair shedding, referred to as exogen, is believed to occur independently of the other hair cycle phases. Although the actual mechanisms involved in hair shedding are not fully known, it has been hypothesized that the processes leading to the final step of hair shedding may be driven by proteases and/or protease inhibitor activity. In this study, we investigated the presence of proteases and protease activity in naturally shed human hairs and assessed enzyme inhibition activity of test materials. We measured enzyme activity using a fluorescence-based assay and protein localization by indirect immunohistochemistry (IHC). We also developed an ex vivo skin model for measuring the force required to pull hair fibres from skin. Our data demonstrate the presence of protease activity in the tissue material surrounding club roots. We also demonstrated the localization of specific serine protease protein expression in human hair follicle by IHC. These data provide evidence demonstrating the presence of proteases around the hair club roots, which may play a role during exogen. We further tested the hypothesis that a novel protease inhibitor system (combination of Trichogen) and climbazole) could inhibit protease activity in hair fibre club root extracts collected from a range of ethnic groups (U.K., Brazil, China, first-generation Mexicans in the U.S.A., Thailand and Turkey) in both males and females. Furthermore, we demonstrated that this combination is capable of increasing the force required to remove hair in an ex vivo skin model system. These studies indicate the presence of proteolytic activity in the tissue surrounding the human hair club root and show that it is possible to inhibit this activity with a combination of Trichogen and climbazole. This technology may have potential to reduce excessive hair shedding. © 2013 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  3. The effects of gamma rays on the regeneration of hair follicles are carried over to later hair cycles.

    PubMed

    Sugaya, Kimihiko; Ishihara, Yoshie; Inoue, Sonoe; Hirobe, Tomohisa

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the effects of gamma rays on the regeneration of hair follicles are carried over to later hair cycles. The whole bodies of C57BL/10JHir mice in the 1st telogen phase were irradiated with (60)Co γ-rays. Mice were examined for the effects on hair follicles, including their number, morphology and pigmentation in the 3rd anagen phase. Effects of γ-rays on hair follicle stem cells were investigated by the indirect immunolabeling of keratin 15 (K15). Decreased hair follicle density and induction of curved hair follicles were observed in the dermis of irradiated skin. In addition, white hair and hypopigmented hair bulbs were found. The number of K15-positive hair follicle stem cells in the hair bulge region of irradiated skin appeared to decrease slightly but not significantly. These results suggest that the effects of γ-rays are carried over to a later hair cycle to affect the number, structure and pigmentation of hair follicles in the 3rd anagen phase when stem cells and committed progenitors for keratinocytes and melanocytes are irradiated in the 1st telogen phase.

  4. Does D matter? The role of vitamin D in hair disorders and hair follicle cycling.

    PubMed

    Amor, Karrie T; Rashid, Rashid M; Mirmirani, Paradi

    2010-02-15

    The role of vitamin D in the proliferation and differentiation of keratinocytes is well known within the field of dermatology. We sought to evaluate the role that vitamin D and the vitamin D receptor play in the hair cycle and assess how this can be clinically applied to the treatment of hair disorders. A MEDLINE search (1955-July 2009) was preformed to find relevant articles pertaining to vitamin D, the vitamin D receptor, and hair loss. The vitamin D receptor, independent of vitamin D, plays an important role in hair cycling, specifically anagen initiation. The role of vitamin D in hair follicle cycling is not as well understood. The review is broad and there are limited human studies available to date. Additional studies to evaluate the role of vitamin D in the hair cycle should be done. Treatments that up regulate the vitamin D receptor may be successful in treating hair disorders and are a potential area of further study.

  5. Hair follicles stimulation effects of gelatin nanofibers containing silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tura, V; Hagiu, B A; Mangalagiu, I I

    2010-04-01

    In the present work we studied gelatin nanofibers containing silver nanoparticles of 14 +/- 6 nm mean diameter, prepared by electrospinning. The electrospinnable solution was obtained by drop-wise adding a AgNO3/acetic acid solution to gelatin which had previously been dissolved in a mixture of formic acid and acetic acid. The silver metallic nanoparticles were formed due to the reducing action of the formic acid. The resulted material was characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Subcutaneous implants in rabbits demonstrated that the gelatin nanofibers containing silver nanoparticles were resorbed with no inflammatory reactions. An increased number of secondary hair follicles developed in tissue regions close to implants, suggesting the existence of a stimulation effect of silver nanoparticles on hair follicles.

  6. Histological evaluation of hair follicle due to papain's depilatory effect.

    PubMed

    Traversa, Eduardo; Machado-Santelli, Gláucia Maria; Velasco, Maria Valéria Robles

    2007-04-20

    Histological alterations in the skin and hair follicle of mice were evaluated as a result of the application of gel and cream formulas containing papain as a harmless treatment for hirsutism. Papain is a proteolytic enzyme and it has been used in pharmaceutical, cosmetic and nutrition areas. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a depilatory product, through histological analysis using light microscopy. Gel and cream formulas containing papain were developed and daily applied on the back of two groups of mice for 31 days. The depilatory effect of the gel formula applied on the first group was less evident. The second group treated with the cream formula presented an intensive depilatory effect; the morphometrical analysis showed dilation of about 55% of the hair follicle lumen and an increase of the thickness of epidermis. Papain cream had a significantly higher depilatory effect than the papain gel.

  7. Therapeutic strategy for hair regeneration: Hair cycle activation, niche environment modulation, wound-induced follicle neogenesis and stem cell engineering

    PubMed Central

    Chueh, Shan-Chang; Lin, Sung-Jan; Chen, Chih-Chiang; Lei, Mingxing; Wang, Ling Mei; Widelitz, Randall B.; Hughes, Michael W.; Jiang, Ting-Xing; Chuong, Cheng Ming

    2013-01-01

    Introduction There are major new advancements in the fields of stem cell biology, developmental biology, regenerative hair cycling, and tissue engineering. The time is ripe to integrate, translate and apply these findings to tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Readers will learn about new progress in cellular and molecular aspects of hair follicle development, regeneration and potential therapeutic opportunities these advances may offer. Areas covered Here we use hair follicle formation to illustrate this progress and to identify targets for potential strategies in therapeutics. Hair regeneration is discussed in four different categories. (1) Intra-follicle regeneration (or renewal) is the basic production of hair fibers from hair stem cells and dermal papillae in existing follicles. (2) Chimeric follicles via epithelial-mesenchymal recombination to identify stem cells and signaling centers. (3) Extra-follicular factors including local dermal and systemic factors can modulate the regenerative behavior of hair follicles, and may be relatively easy therapeutic targets. (4) Follicular neogenesis means the de novo formation of new follicles. In addition, scientists are working to engineer hair follicles, which require hair forming competent epidermal cells and hair inducing dermal cells. Expert opinion Ideally self-organizing processes similar to those occurring during embryonic development should be elicited with some help from biomaterials. PMID:23289545

  8. Effects of Wnt-10b on hair shaft growth in hair follicle cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Ouji, Yukiteru . E-mail: oujix@naramed-u.ac.jp; Yoshikawa, Masahide; Moriya, Kei; Ishizaka, Shigeaki

    2007-08-03

    Wnts are deeply involved in the proliferation and differentiation of skin epithelial cells. We previously reported the differentiation of cultured primary skin epithelial cells toward hair shaft and inner root sheath (IRS) of the hair follicle via {beta}-catenin stabilization caused by Wnt-10b, however, the effects of Wnt-10b on cultured hair follicles have not been reported. In the present study, we examined the effects of Wnt-10b on shaft growth using organ cultures of whisker hair follicles in serum-free conditions. No hair shaft growth was observed in the absence of Wnt-10b, whereas its addition to the culture promoted elongation of the hair shaft, intensive incorporation of BrdU in matrix cells flanking the dermal papilla (DP), and {beta}-catenin stabilization in DP and IRS cells. These results suggest a promoting effect of Wnt-10b on hair shaft growth that is involved with stimulation of the DP via Wnt-10b/{beta}-catenin signalling, proliferation of matrix cells next to the DP, and differentiation of IRS cells by Wnt-10b.

  9. Hair follicle signaling networks: a dermal papilla-centric approach.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Raul; Guerrero-Juarez, Christian F; Plikus, Maksim V

    2013-10-01

    Functional testing of dermal papilla (DP) signaling inputs into hair follicle (HF) morphogenesis and regeneration is becoming possible with the advent of new Cre lines. Targeted deletion of the signature genes in early DP precursors has revealed significant signaling redundancy during HF morphogenesis. Furthermore, the DP lineage commitment program can be exploited for generating highly inductive DP cells to be used in HF bioengineering assays.

  10. Targeting to the hair follicles: current status and potential.

    PubMed

    Wosicka, Hanna; Cal, Krzysztof

    2010-02-01

    The pilosebaceous unit is a complex structure that undergoes a specific growth cycle and comprises a few important drug targeting sites. For example, drugs can be targeted to the bulge region with stem cells or to the sebaceous glands. Interest in pilosebaceous units is directed towards their utilization as reservoirs for localized therapy and also as a transport pathway for systemic drug delivery. Improved investigative methods, such as differential stripping, are being developed in order to determine follicular penetration. This article reviews relevant aspects of effective follicle-targeting formulations and delivery systems as well as the activity status of hair follicles, and variations in follicle size and distribution throughout various body regions. Each of these factors strongly affects follicular permeation. We provide examples of improved penetration of particle-based formulations and of a size-dependent manner of follicular penetration. Contradictions are also discussed, indicating the need for detailed future investigations.

  11. The feasibility of targeted selective gene therapy of the hair follicle.

    PubMed

    Li, L; Hoffman, R M

    1995-07-01

    Loss of hair and hair colour is associated with ageing, and when it involves the scalp hair, it can be distressing to both sexes. Hair loss resulting from cancer chemotherapy is particularly distressing. However, safe, effective therapies directed to hair have only just started to be developed. The hair follicle is a complex skin appendage composed of epidermal and dermal tissue, with specialized keratinocytes, the hair matrix cells, forming the hair shaft. Specific therapy of the hair follicle depends on selective targeting of specific cells of the hair follicle. We have developed the histoculture of intact hair-growing skin on sponge-gel matrices. We have recently found in histocultured skin that liposomes can selectively target hair follicles to deliver both small and large molecules. That liposomes can target the hair follicle for delivery has been confirmed independently. Two decades ago we introduced the technique of entrapping DNA in liposomes for use in gene therapy. In this report we describe the selective targeting of the lacZ reporter gene to the hair follicles in mice after topical application of the gene entrapped in liposomes. These results demonstrate that highly selective, safe gene therapy for the hair process is feasible.

  12. Differential sensitivity of epidermal cell subpopulations to beta-catenin-induced ectopic hair follicle formation.

    PubMed

    Baker, Christopher M; Verstuyf, Annemieke; Jensen, Kim B; Watt, Fiona M

    2010-07-01

    Wnt signalling is required for hair follicle development and for the growth phase (anagen) of postnatal follicles. When the pathway is activated at high levels in adult mouse epidermis, ectopic follicles form from existing follicles, interfollicular epidermis (IFE) and sebaceous glands, revealing a remarkable ability of the tissue to be reprogrammed. To compare the competence of different epidermal cell populations to form ectopic follicles, we expressed a 4-hydroxy-tamoxifen (4OHT) inducible, stabilised beta-catenin transgene (DeltaNbeta-cateninER) under the control of two different promoters. We targeted the reservoir of stem cells in the hair follicle bulge via the keratin 15 (K15) promoter and targeted the sebaceous glands and base of the follicle (bulb) with a truncated K5 promoter (DeltaK5). No ectopic follicles formed in the IFE in either model, establishing the autonomy of the IFE stem cell compartment in undamaged epidermis. Activation of beta-catenin in the bulge stimulated proliferation and bulge expansion. Existing hair follicles entered anagen, but no ectopic follicles formed. DeltaK5DeltaNbeta-cateninER expressing hair follicles also entered anagen on 4OHT treatment. In addition, a subpopulation of cells at the base of the sebaceous gland readily formed ectopic follicles, resulting in complete and reversible conversion of sebaceous glands into hair follicles. Combined activation of beta-catenin and the vitamin D receptor enhanced differentiation of sebaceous gland-derived hair follicles and stimulated ectopic follicle formation in the hair follicle bulb, but not in the bulge. Our results suggest that the bulge and sebaceous gland are, respectively, non-permissive and permissive niches for Wnt induced hair follicle differentiation. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Differential sensitivity of epidermal cell subpopulations to β-catenin-induced ectopic hair follicle formation

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Christopher M.; Verstuyf, Annemieke; Jensen, Kim B.; Watt, Fiona M.

    2010-01-01

    Wnt signalling is required for hair follicle development and for the growth phase (anagen) of postnatal follicles. When the pathway is activated at high levels in adult mouse epidermis, ectopic follicles form from existing follicles, interfollicular epidermis (IFE) and sebaceous glands, revealing a remarkable ability of the tissue to be reprogrammed. To compare the competence of different epidermal cell populations to form ectopic follicles, we expressed a 4-hydroxy-tamoxifen (4OHT) inducible, stabilised β-catenin transgene (ΔNβ-cateninER) under the control of two different promoters. We targeted the reservoir of stem cells in the hair follicle bulge via the keratin 15 (K15) promoter and targeted the sebaceous glands and base of the follicle (bulb) with a truncated K5 promoter (ΔK5). No ectopic follicles formed in the IFE in either model, establishing the autonomy of the IFE stem cell compartment in undamaged epidermis. Activation of β-catenin in the bulge stimulated proliferation and bulge expansion. Existing hair follicles entered anagen, but no ectopic follicles formed. ΔK5ΔNβ-cateninER expressing hair follicles also entered anagen on 4OHT treatment. In addition, a subpopulation of cells at the base of the sebaceous gland readily formed ectopic follicles, resulting in complete and reversible conversion of sebaceous glands into hair follicles. Combined activation of β-catenin and the vitamin D receptor enhanced differentiation of sebaceous gland-derived hair follicles and stimulated ectopic follicle formation in the hair follicle bulb, but not in the bulge. Our results suggest that the bulge and sebaceous gland are, respectively, non-permissive and permissive niches for Wnt induced hair follicle differentiation. PMID:20398648

  14. The angiogenic properties of the rat vibrissa hair follicle associate with the bulb.

    PubMed

    Stenn, K S; Fernandez, L A; Tirrell, S J

    1988-03-01

    As the hair follicle is one of the most rapidly growing tissues in the body, it must be nourished by a rich blood supply. Histological studies have indicated that the number of vessels about a growing follicle exceeds that about a resting follicle, so we postulated that the hair follicle might provide its own angiogenic stimulus during certain phases of its growth. Reported here are experiments testing the angiogenic properties of the growing (anagen) hair follicle. Using the rabbit corneal pocket angiogenesis assay and cycled anagen rat vibrissae hair follicles, we found that the mesenchymal dermal papilla had no angiogenic properties, but the anagen bulb was angiogenic. These findings suggest a mechanism for the cycling of hair follicles and an example of normal epithelium to mesenchyme interactions.

  15. Cutaneous Retinoic Acid Levels Determine Hair Follicle Development and Downgrowth*

    PubMed Central

    Okano, Junko; Levy, Clara; Lichti, Ulrike; Sun, Hong-Wei; Yuspa, Stuart H.; Sakai, Yasuo; Morasso, Maria I.

    2012-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is essential during embryogenesis and for tissue homeostasis, whereas excess RA is well known as a teratogen. In humans, excess RA is associated with hair loss. In the present study, we demonstrate that specific levels of RA, regulated by Cyp26b1, one of the RA-degrading enzymes, are required for hair follicle (hf) morphogenesis. Mice with embryonic ablation of Cyp26b1 (Cyp26b1−/−) have excessive endogenous RA, resulting in arrest of hf growth at the hair germ stage. The altered hf development is rescued by grafting the mutant skin on immunodeficient mice. Our results show that normalization of RA levels is associated with reinitiation of hf development. Conditional deficiency of Cyp26b1 in the dermis (En1Cre;Cyp26b1f/−) results in decreased hair follicle density and specific effect on hair type, indicating that RA levels also influence regulators of hair bending. Our results support the model of RA-dependent dermal signals regulating hf downgrowth and bending. To elucidate target gene pathways of RA, we performed microarray and RNA-Seq profiling of genes differentially expressed in Cyp26b1−/− skin and En1Cre;Cyp26b1f/− tissues. We show specific effects on the Wnt-catenin pathway and on members of the Runx, Fox, and Sox transcription factor families, indicating that RA modulates pathways and factors implicated in hf downgrowth and bending. Our results establish that proper RA distribution is essential for morphogenesis, development, and differentiation of hfs. PMID:23007396

  16. Stem cells from human hair follicles: first mechanical isolation for immediate autologous clinical use in androgenetic alopecia and hair loss.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Pietro; Scioli, Maria G; Bielli, Alessandra; Orlandi, Augusto; Cervelli, Valerio

    2017-01-01

    Hair follicles are known to contain a well-characterized niche for adult stem cells: the bulge, which contains epithelial and melanocytic stem cells. Stem cells in the hair bulge, a clearly demarcated structure within the lower permanent portion of hair follicles, can generate the interfollicular epidermis, hair follicle structures, and sebaceous glands. The bulge epithelial stem cells can also reconstitute in an artificial in vivo system to a new hair follicle. In this study, we have developed a new method to isolate human adult stem cells by mechanical centrifugation of punch biopsy from human hair follicles without culture condition. Here, we used human follicle stem cells (HFSCs), to improve the hair density in 11 patients (38 to 61 years old) affected by AGA in stage 3-5 as determined by the Norwood-Hamilton classification scale. The primary outcomes were microscopic identification and counting of HFSCs. The secondary outcomes were clinical preliminary results and safety and feasibility in HFSCs-treated scalp. Each scalp tissue suspension contained about 3,728.5±664.5 cells. The percentage of hair follicle-derived mesenchymal stem cells CD44+ [from dermal papilla (DP)] was about 5%+0.7% whereas the percentage of hair follicle epithelial stem cells CD200+ (from the bulge) was about 2.6%+0.3%. In total, 23 weeks after the last treatment with HFSCs mean hair count and hair density increases over baseline values. In particular, a 29%±5% increase in hair density for the treated area and less than a 1% increase in hair density for the placebo area. We have shown that the isolated cells are capable to improve the hair density in patients affected by androgenetic alopecia (AGA). These cells appear to be located in the bulge area of human.

  17. At the dawn of hair research - testing the limits of hair follicle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Plikus, Maksim V

    2014-05-01

    In the late 1960s, tissue recombination studies by Roy Oliver on the model of rat vibrissae provided invaluable information about the morphogenetic properties of hair follicles. Now more than ever, the field is hopeful that a clinically reproducible procedure for cell-based hair regeneration is achievable. Highly inductive mesenchymal cells are thought to be the key ingredient necessary to achieve robust hair regeneration, and efforts are underway to develop protocols to improve the naturally low inductive properties of human dermal papilla cells. In this respect, the original studies by Oliver provide essential rodent research benchmarks, which current-day human studies should aim to reach.

  18. Red Ginseng Extract Promotes the Hair Growth in Cultured Human Hair Follicles

    PubMed Central

    Park, Gyeong-Hun; Park, Ki-young; Cho, Hong-il; Lee, Sang-Min; Han, Ji Su; Chang, Sung Eun; Lee, Mi Woo; Choi, Jee Ho; Moon, Kee Chan; Shin, Hyoseung; Kang, Yong Jung; Lee, Dong Hun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Ginseng has been shown to promote hair growth in several recent studies. However, its effects on human hair follicles and its mechanisms of action have not been sufficiently elucidated. This study aimed to investigate the hair growth-promoting effects of red ginseng extract (RGE) and its ginsenosides. The proliferative activities of cultured human hair follicles treated with RGE and ginsenoside-Rb1 were assessed using Ki-67 immunostaining. Their effects on isolated human dermal papilla cells (hDPCs) were evaluated using cytotoxicity assays, immunoblot analysis of signaling proteins, and the determination of associated growth factors. We examined the ability of RGE and ginsenosides to protect hair matrix keratinocyte proliferation against dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-induced suppression and their effects on the expression of androgen receptor. The in vivo hair growth-promoting effect of RGE was also investigated in C57BL/6 mice. Both RGE and ginsenoside-Rb1 enhanced the proliferation of hair matrix keratinocytes. hDPCs treated with RGE or ginsenoside-Rb1 exhibited substantial cell proliferation and the associated phosphorylation of ERK and AKT. Moreover, RGE, ginsenoside-Rb1, and ginsenoside-Rg3 abrogated the DHT-induced suppression of hair matrix keratinocyte proliferation and the DHT-induced upregulation of the mRNA expression of androgen receptor in hDPCs. Murine experiments revealed that the subcutaneous injection of 3% RGE resulted in more rapid hair growth than the negative control. In conclusion, RGE and its ginsenosides may enhance hDPC proliferation, activate ERK and AKT signaling pathways in hDPCs, upregulate hair matrix keratinocyte proliferation, and inhibit the DHT-induced androgen receptor transcription. These results suggest that red ginseng may promote hair growth in humans. PMID:25396716

  19. Red ginseng extract promotes the hair growth in cultured human hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Park, Gyeong-Hun; Park, Ki-young; Cho, Hong-il; Lee, Sang-Min; Han, Ji Su; Won, Chong Hyun; Chang, Sung Eun; Lee, Mi Woo; Choi, Jee Ho; Moon, Kee Chan; Shin, Hyoseung; Kang, Yong Jung; Lee, Dong Hun

    2015-03-01

    Ginseng has been shown to promote hair growth in several recent studies. However, its effects on human hair follicles and its mechanisms of action have not been sufficiently elucidated. This study aimed to investigate the hair growth-promoting effects of red ginseng extract (RGE) and its ginsenosides. The proliferative activities of cultured human hair follicles treated with RGE and ginsenoside-Rb1 were assessed using Ki-67 immunostaining. Their effects on isolated human dermal papilla cells (hDPCs) were evaluated using cytotoxicity assays, immunoblot analysis of signaling proteins, and the determination of associated growth factors. We examined the ability of RGE and ginsenosides to protect hair matrix keratinocyte proliferation against dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-induced suppression and their effects on the expression of androgen receptor. The in vivo hair growth-promoting effect of RGE was also investigated in C57BL/6 mice. Both RGE and ginsenoside-Rb1 enhanced the proliferation of hair matrix keratinocytes. hDPCs treated with RGE or ginsenoside-Rb1 exhibited substantial cell proliferation and the associated phosphorylation of ERK and AKT. Moreover, RGE, ginsenoside-Rb1, and ginsenoside-Rg3 abrogated the DHT-induced suppression of hair matrix keratinocyte proliferation and the DHT-induced upregulation of the mRNA expression of androgen receptor in hDPCs. Murine experiments revealed that the subcutaneous injection of 3% RGE resulted in more rapid hair growth than the negative control. In conclusion, RGE and its ginsenosides may enhance hDPC proliferation, activate ERK and AKT signaling pathways in hDPCs, upregulate hair matrix keratinocyte proliferation, and inhibit the DHT-induced androgen receptor transcription. These results suggest that red ginseng may promote hair growth in humans.

  20. Activin B promotes initiation and development of hair follicles in mice.

    PubMed

    Jia, Qin; Zhang, Min; Kong, Yanan; Chen, Shixuan; Chen, Yinghua; Wang, Xueer; Zhang, Lei; Lang, Weiya; Zhang, Lu; Zhang, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Activin B has been reported to promote the regeneration of hair follicles during wound healing. However, its role in the development and life cycle of hair follicles has not been elucidated. In our study, the effect of activin B on mouse hair follicles of cultured and neonatal mouse skin was investigated. In these models, PBS or activin B (5, 10 or 50 ng/ml) was applied, and hair follicle development was monitored. Hair follicle initiation and development was examined using hematoxylin and eosin staining, alkaline phosphatase activity staining, Oil Red O+ staining, and the detection of TdT-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end-labeling cell apoptosis. Activin B was found to efficiently induce the initiation of hair follicles in the skin of both cultured and neonatal mice and to promote the development of hair follicles in neonatal mouse skin. Moreover, activin-B-treated hair follicles were observed to enter the anagen stage from the telogen stage and to remain in the anagen stage. These results demonstrate that activin B promotes the initiation and development of hair follicles in mice.

  1. The Hair in the Sinus: Sharp-Ended Rootless Head Hair Fragments can be Found in Large Amounts in Pilonidal Sinus Nests.

    PubMed

    Bosche, Friederike; Luedi, Markus M; van der Zypen, Dominic; Moersdorf, Philipp; Krapohl, Bjoern; Doll, Dietrich

    2017-06-21

    Hair has been identified as the causative agent of Pilonidal Sinus Disease (PSD). Stiffer, dark hair as well as hairiness has been postulated as causative factors. Astonishingly, despite the early clinical significance of this condition (Hodges in Boston Med Surg J 2:485-486, 1880), macroscopic and microscopic examinations of hair inside pilonidal sinus cavities have been scarce. The purpose of this study was to study the morphological aspects of the hair found in PSD in order to determine the origin of the hair. Hair from inside pilonidal sinus cavities was collected intraoperatively from 20 PSD patients. Additionally, occipital, lumbar and intergluteal hair was harvested from the same patients and compared to the hair of volunteer-matched pair patients admitted to the hospital at the same time for non-PSD surgery. Intra- and intergroup variations of hair length were characterized with analysis of variance. Numbers and lengths of pilonidal sinus nest hair were recorded. Hair was examined clinically and with light and scanning electron microscopy using surface enhancing gold and carbon dust coating techniques. Analysis of 624 pilonidal sinus nest hair samples from 20 independent sinus cavities revealed that hair within pilonidal sinus nests is rootless in 74%. Shorter hair was found inside the pilonidal sinus compared to other sites (length 0.9 ± 0.7 cm p < 0.0001). Furthermore, hair found inside of the sinus was significantly shorter than hair protruding from pores (p < 0.000). Hair samples show razor sharp but no broken or split ends. On electron microscopy, these spiky hair ends resemble cut hair ends. Pilonidal hair nests contained between 1 and over 400 hair fragments. Short hair fragments with rootless sharp cut ends were found within pilonidal sinus cavities. Morphologically, these fragments resemble short cut rather than intact body hair. Since short cut hair, e.g., derived from the head potentially enters the pilonidal cavity more easily than

  2. Profiling the response of human hair follicles to ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhongfa; Fischer, Tobias W; Hasse, Sybille; Sugawara, Koji; Kamenisch, York; Krengel, Sven; Funk, Wolfgang; Berneburg, Mark; Paus, Ralf

    2009-07-01

    Excessive UVR ranks among the most harmful environmental influences on human skin. However, the direct impact of UVR on human skin appendages remains to be systematically investigated. Organ-cultured human anagen hair follicles in vitro were irradiated, and reduction of hair shaft elongation, premature catagen entry, and reduced hair matrix keratinocyte proliferation were observed upon irradiation with UVB (20/50 mJ cm(-2)). At 20 mJ cm(-2), apoptotic cell death prevailed (casp-3/p53 activation), whereas at 50 mJ cm(-2), necrotic cell death was predominant (lactate dehydrogenase increase). Mitochondrial common deletion and oxidatively damaged genomic DNA (8-OH-dG) was mainly observed at 20 mJ cm(-2). Follicular melanogenesis and ACTH immunoreactivity drastically declined, but alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone remained unchanged, whereas transforming growth factor-beta(2) expression shifted from the outer toward the inner root sheath. Both the number of Giemsa+ mast cells and the degree of mast-cell degranulation increased in the connective tissue sheath (CTS), and CD117 immunoreactivity of CTS cells and matrix keratinocytes was upregulated. Thus, UVR differentially modifies hair growth and cycle, promotes cell death, and induces complex regulatory events in human hair follicles in vitro. The leads from this human organ model, which is a living and human tissue interaction system under physiologically relevant in situ conditions, may encourage its use for general investigation of UV-induced effects as well as for testing possible agents for their UV-protective potency.

  3. Mast cells as modulators of hair follicle cycling.

    PubMed

    Maurer, M; Paus, R; Czarnetzki, B M

    1995-08-01

    While the central role of mast cells (MC) in allergy and inflammation is well-appreciated, much less is known about their physiological functions. The impressive battery of potent growth modulatory MC products, and increasing evidence of MC involvement in hyperproliferative and fibrotic disorders suggest that tissue remodelling may be one of those, namely in the skin. Here, we delineate why this may best be studied by analysing the potential role of MC in hair growth regulation. On the background of numerous, yet widely under-appreciated hints from the older literature, we summarize and discuss our recent observations from the C57BL/6 mouse model for hair research which support the concept that MC are functionally important modulators of hair follicle cycling, specifically during anagen development. This invites to exploit the murine hair cycle as a model for dissecting the physiological growth modulatory functions of MC and encourages the exploration of MC-targeting pharmaceutical strategies for the treatment of hair growth disorders.

  4. Conditional telomerase induction causes proliferation of hair follicle stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Sarin, Kavita Y.; Cheung, Peggie; Gilison, Daniel; Lee, Eunice; Tennen, Ruth I.; Wang, Estee; Artandi, Maja K.; Oro, Anthony E.; Artandi, Steven E.

    2005-01-01

    TERT, the protein component of telomerase1,2, serves to maintain telomere function through the de novo addition of telomere repeats to chromosome ends and is reactivated in 90% of human cancers. In normal tissues, TERT is expressed in stem cells and in progenitor cells3, but its role in these compartments is not fully understood. Here, we show that conditional transgenic induction of TERT in mouse skin epithelium causes a rapid transition from telogen, the resting phase of the hair follicle cycle, to anagen, the active phase, thereby facilitating robust hair growth. TERT overexpression promotes this developmental transition by causing proliferation of quiescent, multipotent stem cells in the hair follicle bulge region. This new function for TERT does not require the telomerase RNA component (TERC), which encodes the template for telomere addition, and therefore operates through a novel mechanism independent of its activity in synthesizing telomere repeats. These data indicate that, in addition to its established role in extending telomeres, TERT can promote proliferation of resting stem cells through a non-canonical pathway. PMID:16107853

  5. Effect of helium-neon laser irradiation on hair follicle growth cycle of Swiss albino mice.

    PubMed

    Shukla, S; Sahu, K; Verma, Y; Rao, K D; Dube, A; Gupta, P K

    2010-01-01

    We report the results of a study carried out to investigate the effect of helium-neon (He-Ne) laser (632.8 nm) irradiation on the hair follicle growth cycle of testosterone-treated and untreated mice. Both histology and optical coherence tomography (OCT) were used for the measurement of hair follicle length and the relative percentage of hair follicles in different growth phases. A positive correlation (R = 0.96) was observed for the lengths of hair follicles measured by both methods. Further, the ratios of the lengths of hair follicles in the anagen and catagen phases obtained by both methods were nearly the same. However, the length of the hair follicles measured by both methods differed by a factor of 1.6, with histology showing smaller lengths. He-Ne laser irradiation (at approximately 1 J/cm(2)) of the skin of both the control and the testosterone-treated mice was observed to lead to a significant increase (p < 0.05) in % anagen, indicating stimulation of hair growth. The study also demonstrates that OCT can be used to monitor the hair follicle growth cycle, and thus hair follicle disorders or treatment efficacy during alopecia.

  6. Distributions of sulphur and other elements in human hair follicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ollerhead, R. W.; Legge, G. J. F.; Jones, L. N.

    1989-04-01

    Distributions of sulphur and other elements have been measured in several different specimens of human hair follicles. Whole specimens, longitudinal bisections, and 10 μm thick longitudinal sections have been analyzed by PIXE using the Melbourne scanning proton microprobe. Elemental maps consistently showed that sulphur contents of the presumptive hair shaft (PHS) were uniformly low from 0 to 400 μm (bulb end), increased continuously from about 400 to 800 μm, and reached a plateau. Sulphur levels were uniformly low in the inner root sheath. These observations are consistent with previous protein analysis of PHS sections, indicating sequential synthesis of the major classes of keratin proteins. Maps of other elements indicated that Si, Ca, and Fe tended to be concentrated randomly, whereas, P, Cl, K, and Zn were more uniformly distributed. Average relative concentrations of Si, P, Cl, K, Ca, Fe, Cu, and Zn were estimated from total X-ray spectra.

  7. Strategies to enhance epithelial-mesenchymal interactions for human hair follicle bioengineering.

    PubMed

    Ohyama, Manabu; Veraitch, Ophelia

    2013-05-01

    Hair follicle morphogenesis and regeneration depend on intensive but well-orchestrated interactions between epithelial and mesenchymal components. Accordingly, the enhancement of this crosstalk represents a promising approach to achieve successful bioengineering of human hair follicles. The present article summarizes the techniques, both currently available and potentially feasible, to promote epithelial-mesenchymal interactions (EMIs) necessary for human hair follicle regeneration. The strategies include the preparation of epithelial components with high receptivity to trichogenic dermal signals and/or mesenchymal cell populations with potent hair inductive capacity. In this regard, bulge epithelial stem cells, keratinocytes predisposed to hair follicle fate or keratinocyte precursor cells with plasticity may provide favorable epithelial cell populations. Dermal papilla cells sustaining intrinsic hair inductive capacity, putative dermal papilla precursor cells in the dermal sheath/neonatal dermis or trichogenic dermal cells derived from undifferentiated stem/progenitor cells are promising candidates as hair inductive dermal cells. The most established protocol for in vivo hair follicle reconstitution is co-grafting of epithelial and mesenchymal components into immunodeficient mice. In theory, combination of individually optimized cellular components of respective lineages should elicit most intensive EMIs to form hair follicles. Still, EMIs can be further ameliorated by the modulation of non-cell autonomous conditions, including cell compartmentalization to replicate the positional relationship in vivo and humanization of host environment by preparing human stromal bed. These approaches may not always synergistically intensify EMIs, however, step-by-step investigation probing optimal combinations should maximally enhance EMIs to achieve successful human hair follicle bioengineering.

  8. [Protective effects of minocycline against hair follicle damage induced by cytosine arabinoside in vitro].

    PubMed

    Wu, Xian-jie; Zheng, Min; Lu, Zhong-fa

    2004-07-01

    To investigate the protective effects of minocycline against hair follicle damage induced by cytosine arabinoside (Ara-c). An in vitro organ culture of mouse vibrissa follicles was used and different concentrations of Ara-c and minocycline were added in the culture media. The total growth length, growth speed and growth period of hair were observed with invert microscopy and the survival of hair bulb cells was measured by MTT method. Minocycline (0.3 x 10(-6) approximately 10(-5) mol/L) improved hair follicle total growth length, growth speed and hair growth period and also improved survival of hair bulb cells in vitro organ culture, which were inhibited by Ara-c. Minocycline can protect hair follicle directly from damage induced by Ara-c.

  9. Foxi3 deficiency compromises hair follicle stem cell specification and activation

    PubMed Central

    Shirokova, Vera; Biggs, Leah C.; Jussila, Maria; Ohyama, Takahiro; Groves, Andrew K.; Mikkola, Marja L.

    2017-01-01

    The hair follicle is an ideal system to study stem cell specification and homeostasis due to its well characterized morphogenesis and stereotypic cycles of stem cell activation upon each hair cycle to produce a new hair shaft. The adult hair follicle stem cell niche consists of two distinct populations, the bulge and the more activation-prone secondary hair germ. Hair follicle stem cells are set aside during early stages of morphogenesis. This process is known to depend on the Sox9 transcription factor, but otherwise the establishment of the hair follicle stem cell niche is poorly understood. Here we show that that mutation of Foxi3, a Forkhead family transcription factor mutated in several hairless dog breeds, compromises stem cell specification. Further, loss of Foxi3 impedes hair follicle downgrowth and progression of the hair cycle. Genome-wide profiling revealed a number of downstream effectors of Foxi3 including transcription factors with a recognized function in hair follicle stem cells such as Lhx2, Runx1, and Nfatc1, suggesting that the Foxi3 mutant phenotype results from simultaneous downregulation of several stem cell signature genes. We show that Foxi3 displays a highly dynamic expression pattern during hair morphogenesis and cycling, and identify Foxi3 as a novel secondary hair germ marker. Absence of Foxi3 results in poor hair regeneration upon hair plucking, and a sparse fur phenotype in unperturbed mice that exacerbates with age, caused by impaired secondary hair germ activation leading to progressive depletion of stem cells. Thus, Foxi3 regulates multiple aspects of hair follicle development and homeostasis. PMID:26992132

  10. Analysis of apoptotic cell death in human hair follicles in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Soma, T; Ogo, M; Suzuki, J; Takahashi, T; Hibino, T

    1998-12-01

    We analyzed changes of growth and apoptotic cell death in human hair follicles. In anagen hair follicles, terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate-biotin nick labeling-positive cells were observed in the keratogenous zone of the upper bulb matrix, the inner root sheath, and the companion layer of the outer root sheath. DNA ladder formation was also detected in anagen hair follicles. In catagen hair follicles, the lower bulb matrix cells around the dermal papilla and the outer layer cells of the outer root sheath became strongly positive, showing that apoptosis in catagen hair is distinct from that in anagen hair. We also confirmed the mRNA expression of four caspases (caspase-1, caspase-3, caspase-4, and caspase-7) in anagen hair follicles by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and in situ hybridization. When human anagen hair follicles were cultured in the presence of transforming growth factor-beta or tumor necrosis factor-alpha in the serum-free medium, transforming growth factor-beta but not tumor necrosis factor-alpha induced catagen-like morphologic changes, which were indistinguishable from normal catagen hair follicles. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha, however, strongly inhibited the elongation of the hair shaft in a dose-dependent manner, accompanied by abnormal morphology and increased cell death in the bulb matrix cells. Our results suggest that apoptosis in hair follicles involves two different types. One is related to the terminal differentiation of follicular epithelial cells in anagen hair. The other occurs as a major driving force to eliminate the distinct portion of epithelial components in catagen hair. Furthermore, this study strongly indicates that the transforming growth factor-beta pathway is involved in the induction of catagen phase in human hair cycle.

  11. Hair follicle nevi and accessory tragi: variable quantity of adipose tissue in connective tissue framework.

    PubMed

    Ban, M; Kamiya, H; Yamada, T; Kitajima, Y

    1997-01-01

    Controversy exists about the histologic differences between hair follicle nevi and accessory tragi. We examined 10 congenital lesions histologically, possible diagnoses of which were hair follicle nevi or accessory tragi. Two specimens out of the 10 had tiny, mature hair follicles surrounded by thick fibrous root sheaths, a few fat cells, and no cartilage. The subcutaneous fat cells of their bases were segmented by a connective tissue framework. They had histologic features of hair follicle nevi. One specimen had cartilage and abundant fat cells with a connective tissue framework in the nodule, as well as a conglomeration of numerous well-differentiated hair follicles. It possessed both elements of a hair follicle nevus and an accessory tragus. Seven specimens had abundant subcutaneous fat and showed a prominent connective tissue framework. These were typical accessory tragi. The present study suggests that the number of fat cells in the nodule or papule differs between these two conditions. All the lesions studied revealed a connective tissue framework in the subcutaneous fat. Histologic features of both hair follicle nevi and accessory tragi can coexist in a single lesion. Hair follicle nevi may represent incomplete accessory tragi with scant fat cells.

  12. Nestin-positive hair follicle pluripotent stem cells can promote regeneration of impinged peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Amoh, Yasuyuki; Aki, Ryoichi; Hamada, Yuko; Niiyama, Shiro; Eshima, Koji; Kawahara, Katsumasa; Sato, Yuichi; Tani, Yoichi; Hoffman, Robert M; Katsuoka, Kensei

    2012-01-01

    Nestin-positive, keratin 15 (K15)-negative multipotent hair follicle stem cells are located above the hair follicle bulge. We have termed this location the hair follicle pluripotent stem cell area. We have previously shown that transplantation of nestin-expressing hair follicle stem cells can regenerate peripheral nerve and spinal cord injuries. In the present study, we regenerated the impinged sciatic nerve by transplanting hair follicle pluripotent stem cells. Human hair follicle stem cells were transplanted around the impinged sciatic nerve of ICR nude (nu/nu) mice. The hair follicle stem cells were transplanted between impinged sciatic nerve fragments of the mouse where they differentiated into glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive Schwann cells and promoted the recovery of pre-existing axons. The regenerated sciatic nerve functionally recovered. These multipotent hair follicle stem cells thereby provide a potential accessible, autologous source of stem cells for regeneration therapy of nerves degenerated by compression between bony or other hard surfaces. © 2011 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  13. Three different clinical faces of the same histopathological entity: hair follicle nevus, trichofolliculoma and accessory tragus*

    PubMed Central

    Karabulut, Yasemin Yuyucu; Şenel, Engin; Karabulut, Hacı Halil; Dölek, Yasemin

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hair follicle nevus is a rare, congenital hamartoma with follicular differentiation characterized histologically by numerous, tiny, mature hair follicles. Trichofolliculoma, the histopathological features of which are quite similar to those of hair follicle nevus, is also a hamartoma that differs from hair follicle. Accessory tragus is a relatively common, benign congenital abnormality of the external ear with an incidence rate of 1 to 10 per 1,000 live births. OBJECTIVE This study seeks to assess the discriminatory value of currently available, histological criteria in the differential diagnosis of hair follicle nevus, accessory tragi and trichofolliculoma. METHODS Twenty-one patients comprising 9 cases of hair follicle nevus, 8 accessory tragi patients and 4 trichofolliculoma cases, were recruited to perform the study. RESULTS There were 10 males and 11 females in the study group. No significant difference was observed between the three study groups in terms of age, gender or histopathological parameters such as density of hair follicles, subcutaneous fat score and presence of connective tissue framework. Cartilaginous component was seen in 8 cases that were diagnosed as accessory tragi, while central cyst and radiating hair follicles were seen in 4 cases which were diagnosed as trichofolliculoma. CONCLUSION The results of our study showed that diagnostic discrimination of these diseases could be made only with the clinicopathologic correlation because of their clinical and histopathological similarities. PMID:26375221

  14. Epidermal stem cells and skin tissue engineering in hair follicle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Balañá, María Eugenia; Charreau, Hernán Eduardo; Leirós, Gustavo José

    2015-01-01

    The reconstitution of a fully organized and functional hair follicle from dissociated cells propagated under defined tissue culture conditions is a challenge still pending in tissue engineering. The loss of hair follicles caused by injuries or pathologies such as alopecia not only affects the patients’ psychological well-being, but also endangers certain inherent functions of the skin. It is then of great interest to find different strategies aiming to regenerate or neogenerate the hair follicle under conditions proper of an adult individual. Based upon current knowledge on the epithelial and dermal cells and their interactions during the embryonic hair generation and adult hair cycling, many researchers have tried to obtain mature hair follicles using different strategies and approaches depending on the causes of hair loss. This review summarizes current advances in the different experimental strategies to regenerate or neogenerate hair follicles, with emphasis on those involving neogenesis of hair follicles in adult individuals using isolated cells and tissue engineering. Most of these experiments were performed using rodent cells, particularly from embryonic or newborn origin. However, no successful strategy to generate human hair follicles from adult cells has yet been reported. This review identifies several issues that should be considered to achieve this objective. Perhaps the most important challenge is to provide three-dimensional culture conditions mimicking the structure of living tissue. Improving culture conditions that allow the expansion of specific cells while protecting their inductive properties, as well as methods for selecting populations of epithelial stem cells, should give us the necessary tools to overcome the difficulties that constrain human hair follicle neogenesis. An analysis of patent trends shows that the number of patent applications aimed at hair follicle regeneration and neogenesis has been increasing during the last decade. This

  15. Combination of infrared thermography and reflectance spectroscopy for precise classification of hair follicle stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianru; Guan, Yue; Liu, Caihua; Zhu, Dan

    2015-03-01

    Hair follicles enjoy continual cycle of anagen, catagen and telogen all life. They not only provide a unique opportunity to study the physiological mechanism of organ regeneration, but also benefit to guide the treatment of organ repair in regenerative medicine. Usually, the histological examination as a gold standard has been applied to determine the stage of hair follicle cycle, but noninvasive classification of hair cycle in vivo remains unsolved. In this study, the thermal infrared imager was applied to measure the temperature change of mouse dorsal skin with hair follicle cycle, and the change of diffuse reflectance was monitored by the optical fiber spectrometer. Histological examination was used to verify the hair follicle stages. The results indicated that the skin temperature increased at the beginning of anagen. After having stayed a high value for several days, the temperature began to decrease. At the same time, the skin diffuse reflectance decreased until the end of this period. Then the temperature increased gradually after slightly decreased when the hair follicle entered into catagen stage, and the diffuse reflectance increased at this time. In telogen, both the temperature and the diffuse reflectance went back to a steady state all the time. Sub-stages of hair follicle cycle could be distinguished based on the joint curves. This study provided a new method to noninvasively recognize the hair follicle stage, and should be valuable for the basic and therapeutic investigations on hair regeneration.

  16. Wnt7b is an important intrinsic regulator of hair follicle stem cell homeostasis and hair follicle cycling.

    PubMed

    Kandyba, Eve; Kobielak, Krzysztof

    2014-04-01

    The hair follicle (HF) is an exceptional mini-organ to study the mechanisms which regulate HF morphogenesis, cycling, hair follicle stem cell (hfSCs) homeostasis, and progeny differentiation. During morphogenesis, Wnt signaling is well-characterized in the initiation of HF patterning but less is known about which particular Wnt ligands are required and whether individual Wnt ligands act in an indispensable or redundant manner during postnatal hfSCs anagen onset and HF cycle progression. Previously, we described the function of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling target gene WNT7a in intrinsic regulation of hfSCs homeostasis in vivo. Here, we investigated the role of Wnt7b, which was also intrinsically upregulated in hfSCs during physiological and precocious anagen after BMP inhibition in vivo. We demonstrated Wnt7b to be a direct target of canonical BMP signaling in hfSCs and using Wnt7b conditional gene targeting during HF morphogenesis revealed disrupted HF cycling including a shorter anagen, premature catagen onset with overall shorter hair production, and diminished HF differentiation marker expression. Additionally, we observed that postnatal ablation of Wnt7b resulted in delayed HF activation, affecting both the hair germ and bulge hfSCs but still maintaining a two-step sequence of HF stimulation. Interestingly, Wnt7b cKO hfSCs participated in reformation of the new HF bulge, but with slower self-renewal. These findings demonstrate the importance of intrinsic Wnt7b expression in hfSCs regulation and normal HF cycling and surprisingly reveal a nonredundant role for Wnt7b in the control of HF anagen length and catagen entry which was not compensated by other Wnt ligands.

  17. In-vitro and in-vivo study of dye diffusion into the human skin and hair follicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genina, Elina A.; Bashkatov, Alexey N.; Sinichkin, Yurii P.; Kochubey, Vyacheslav I.; Lakodina, Nina A.; Perpelitzina, Olga A.; Altshuler, Gregory B.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2000-11-01

    We present experimental results on in vitro and in vivo investigation of dye diffusion into the human skin and hair follicles. It was shown that dyeing as a method of enhancement of the absorption coefficient of hair follicle tissue components can be used for selective photodestruction of hair follicle and surrounding tissues. Strength and depth of hair follicle dyeing inside the skin were determined for various dyes.

  18. A simple assay for the study of human hair follicle damage induced by ionizing irradiation.

    PubMed

    Poeggeler, Burkhard; Bodó, Enikö; Nadrowitz, Roger; Dunst, Juergen; Paus, Ralf

    2010-08-01

    Due to its rapidly proliferating matrix keratinocytes, the hair follicle is highly sensitive to ionizing irradiation (IR)-induced skin damage and thus an instructive and clinically relevant model organ for investigating the effects of IR on rapidly dividing epithelial-mesenchymal interaction systems. Here, we have assessed the impact of IR on organ-cultured human scalp hair follicles. We show that IR significantly inhibits the proliferation and induces apoptosis of hair follicle matrix keratinocytes, disrupts normal hair follicle pigmentation, and upregulates a number of quantitative toxicity and viability markers (oxidative stress indicators, DNA oxidative damage, LDH release). This introduces human hair follicle organ culture as an excellent novel research tool for radiobiology and invites exploitation as a preclinical assay system for testing candidate radioprotectants.

  19. Bald scalp in men with androgenetic alopecia retains hair follicle stem cells but lacks CD200-rich and CD34-positive hair follicle progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Garza, Luis A; Yang, Chao-Chun; Zhao, Tailun; Blatt, Hanz B; Lee, Michelle; He, Helen; Stanton, David C; Carrasco, Lee; Spiegel, Jeffrey H; Tobias, John W; Cotsarelis, George

    2011-02-01

    Androgenetic alopecia (AGA), also known as common baldness, is characterized by a marked decrease in hair follicle size, which could be related to the loss of hair follicle stem or progenitor cells. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed bald and non-bald scalp from AGA individuals for the presence of hair follicle stem and progenitor cells. Cells expressing cytokeratin15 (KRT15), CD200, CD34, and integrin, α6 (ITGA6) were quantitated via flow cytometry. High levels of KRT15 expression correlated with stem cell properties of small cell size and quiescence. These KRT15(hi) stem cells were maintained in bald scalp samples. However, CD200(hi)ITGA6(hi) and CD34(hi) cell populations--which both possessed a progenitor phenotype, in that they localized closely to the stem cell-rich bulge area but were larger and more proliferative than the KRT15(hi) stem cells--were markedly diminished. In functional assays, analogous CD200(hi)Itga6(hi) cells from murine hair follicles were multipotent and generated new hair follicles in skin reconstitution assays. These findings support the notion that a defect in conversion of hair follicle stem cells to progenitor cells plays a role in the pathogenesis of AGA.

  20. Epithelial Wnt ligand secretion is required for adult hair follicle growth and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Myung, Peggy S; Takeo, Makoto; Ito, Mayumi; Atit, Radhika P

    2013-01-01

    β-Catenin, a key transducer molecule of Wnt signaling, is required for adult hair follicle growth and regeneration. However, the cellular source of Wnt ligands required for Wnt/β-catenin activation during anagen induction is unknown. In this study, we genetically deleted Wntless (Wls), a gene required for Wnt ligand secretion by Wnt-producing cells, specifically in the hair follicle epithelium during telogen phase. We show that epithelial Wnt ligands are required for anagen, as loss of Wls in the follicular epithelium resulted in a profound hair cycle arrest. Both the follicular epithelium and dermal papilla showed markedly decreased Wnt/β-catenin signaling during anagen induction compared with control hair follicles. Surprisingly, hair follicle stem cells that are responsible for hair regeneration maintained expression of stem cell markers but exhibited significantly reduced proliferation. Finally, we demonstrate that epidermal Wnt ligands are critical for adult wound-induced de novo hair formation. Collectively, these data show that Wnt ligands secreted by the hair follicle epithelium are required for adult hair follicle regeneration and provide new insight into potential cellular targets for the treatment of hair disorders such as alopecia.

  1. Wnt/β-catenin signaling in dermal condensates is required for hair follicle formation

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Su-Yi; Sennett, Rachel; Rezza, Amélie; Clavel, Carlos; Grisanti, Laura; Zemla, Roland; Najam, Sara; Rendl, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Broad dermal Wnt signaling is required for patterned induction of hair follicle placodes and subsequent Wnt signaling in placode stem cells is essential for induction of dermal condensates, cell clusters of precursors for the hair follicle dermal papilla (DP). Progression of hair follicle formation then requires coordinated signal exchange between dermal condensates and placode stem cells. However, it remains unknown whether continued Wnt signaling in DP precursor cells plays a role in this process, largely due to the long-standing inability to specifically target dermal condensates for gene ablation. Here we use the Tbx18Cre knockin mouse line to ablate the Wnt-responsive transcription factor β-catenin specifically in these cells at E14.5 during the first wave of guard hair follicle formation. In the absence of β-catenin, canonical Wnt signaling is effectively abolished in these cells. Sox2+ dermal condensates initiate normally, however by E16.5 guard hair follicle numbers are strongly reduced and by E18.5 most whiskers and guard hair follicles are absent, suggesting that active Wnt signaling in dermal condensates is important for hair follicle formation to proceed after induction. To explore the molecular mechanisms by which Wnt signaling in dermal condensates regulates hair follicle formation, we analyze genome-wide the gene expression changes in embryonic β-catenin null DP precursor cells. We find altered expression of several signaling pathway genes, including Fgfs and Activin, both previously implicated in hair follicle formation. In summary, these data reveal a functional role of Wnt signaling in DP precursors for embryonic hair follicle formation and identify Fgf and Activin signaling as potential effectors of Wnt signaling-regulated events. PMID:24309208

  2. The advantages of hair follicle pluripotent stem cells over embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells for regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Amoh, Yasuyuki; Katsuoka, Kensei; Hoffman, Robert M

    2010-12-01

    Multipotent adult stem cells have many potential therapeutic applications. Our recent findings suggest that hair follicles are a promising source of easily accessible multipotent stem cells. Stem cells in the hair follicle area express the neural stem cell marker nestin, suggesting that hair-follicle stem cells and neural stem cells have common features. Nestin-expressing hair follicle stem cells can form neurons and other cell types, and thus adult hair follicle stem cells could have important therapeutic applications, particularly for neurologic diseases. Transplanted hair follicle stem cells promote the functional recovery of injured peripheral nerve and spinal cord. Recent findings suggest that direct transplantation of hair-follicle stem cells without culture can promote nerve repair, which makes them potentially clinically practical. Human hair follicle stem cells as well as mouse hair follicle stem cells promote nerve repair and can be applied to test the hypothesis that human hair follicle stem cells can provide a readily available source of neurologically therapeutic stem cells. The use of hair follicle stem cells for nerve regeneration overcomes critical problems of embryonic stem cells or induced pluripotent stem cells in that the hair follicle stem cells are multipotent, readily accessible, non-oncogenic, and are not associated with ethical issues.

  3. [Transducin beta-TrCP expressed in developmental hair follicle of mice].

    PubMed

    Shen, Yong-dai; He, Yong-hong; Yang, Lin; Tang, Wei; Liu, Lei; Tian, Wei-dong

    2008-07-01

    To identify the expression of antagonist beta-TrCP protein in Sonic hedgehog signal transduction pathway and Wnt signal transduction pathway in hair follicle tissues. The heads of day 18 embryo, and one day and six-days-old postnatal mice were acquired and treated with 40 g/L paraformaldehyde fixation for 48 h and paraffin embedding. The expression of beta-TrCP proteins was examined using LsAB (labelled streptavidin-biotin) method. beta-TrCP proteins were expressed in the cytoplasm of the hair stems of hair follicle, hair cuticle, cuticle of root sheath, Huxley's layer of internal root sheath cells, external root sheath and mesenchymal tissues, but not in connective tissue sheath and Henle's layer of internal root sheath. TrCP express in the developmental hair follicle tissues, which implicates that beta-TrCP regulate the developmental hair follicle by mediating the signal transduction pathways.

  4. A neuroendocrinological perspective on human hair follicle pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Paus, Ralf

    2011-02-01

    The role of neurohormones and neuropeptides in human hair follicle (HF) pigmentation extends far beyond the control of melanin synthesis by α-MSH and ACTH and includes melanoblast differentiation, reactive oxygen species scavenging, maintenance of HF immune privilege, and remodeling of the HF pigmentary unit (HFPU). It is now clear that human HFs are not only a target of multiple neuromediators, but also are a major non-classical production site for neurohormones such as CRH, proopiomelanocortin, ACTH, α-MSH, ß-endorphin, TRH, and melatonin. Moreover, human HFs have established a functional peripheral equivalent of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. By charting the author's own meanderings through the jungle of hair pigmentation research, the current perspectives essay utilizes four clinical observations - hair repigmentation, canities, poliosis, and 'overnight greying'- as points of entry into the enigmas and challenges of .pigmentary HF neuroendocrinology. After synthesizing key principles and defining major open questions in the field, selected research avenues are delineated that appear clinically most promising. In this context, novel neuroendocrinological strategies to retard or reverse greying and to reduce damage to the HFPU are discussed. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  5. Expression of amelogenin and effects of cyclosporin A in developing hair follicles in rats.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Hong-Il; Lee, Gye-Hyeok; Lee, Su-Young; Kang, Jee-Hae; Moon, Jung-Sun; Kim, Min-Seok; Kim, Sun-Hun

    2016-01-01

    Amelogenin, an enamel matrix protein has been considered to be exclusively expressed by ameloblasts during odontogenesis. However, burgeoning evidence indicates that amelogenin is also expressed in non-mineralizing tissues. Under the hypothesis that amelogenin may be a functional molecule in developing hair follicles which share developmental features with odontogenesis, this study for the first time elucidated the presence and functional changes of amelogenin and its receptors during rat hair follicle development. Amelogenin was specifically localized in the outer epithelial root sheath of hair follicles. Its expression appeared in the deeper portion of hair follicles, i.e. the bulbar and suprabulbar regions rather than the superficial region. Lamp-1, an amelogenin receptor, was localized in either follicular cells or outer epithelial sheath cells, reflecting functional changes during development. The expression of amelogenin splicing variants increased in a time-dependent manner during postnatal development of hair follicles. Amelogenin expression was increased by treatment with cyclosporin A, which is an inducer of anagen in the hair follicle, whereas the level of Lamp-1 and -2 was decreased by cyclosporin A treatment. These results suggest that amelogenin may be a functional molecule involved in the development of the hair follicle rather than an inert hair shaft matrix protein. © 2015 Anatomical Society.

  6. Targeted expression of SV40 T antigen in the hair follicle of transgenic mice produces an aberrant hair phenotype.

    PubMed

    Keough, R; Powell, B; Rogers, G

    1995-03-01

    Directed expression of SV40 large T antigen (TAg) in transgenic mice can induce tissue-specific tumorigenesis and useful cell lines exhibiting differentiated characteristics can be established from resultant tumor cells. In an attempt to produce an immortalised mouse hair follicle cortical cell line for the study of hair keratin gene control, SV40 TAg expression was targeted to the hair follicles of transgenic mice using a sheep hair gene promoter. Expression of SV40 TAg in the follicle cortex disrupted normal fiber ultrastructure, producing a marked phenotypic effect. Affected hairs were wavy or severely kinked (depending on the severity of the phenotype) producing an appearance ranging from a ruffled coat to a stubble covering the back of the mouse. The transgenic hairs appeared to be weakened at the base of the fibers, leading to premature hair-loss and a thinner pelage, or regions of temporary nudity. No follicle tumors or neoplasia were apparent and immortalisation of cortical cells could not be established in culture. In situ hybridisation studies in the hair follicle using histone H3 as a cell proliferation marker suggested that cell proliferation had ceased prior to commencement of K2.10-TAg expression and was not re-established in the differentiating cortical cells. Hence, TAg was unable to induce cell immortalisation at that stage of cortical cell differentiation. However, transgenic mice developed various other abnormalities including vertebral abnormalities and bladder, liver and intestinal tumors, which resulted in reduced life expectancy.

  7. A new path in defining light parameters for hair growth: Discovery and modulation of photoreceptors in human hair follicle.

    PubMed

    Buscone, Serena; Mardaryev, Andrei N; Raafs, Bianca; Bikker, Jan W; Sticht, Carsten; Gretz, Norbert; Farjo, Nilofer; Uzunbajakava, Natallia E; Botchkareva, Natalia V

    2017-09-01

    Though devices for hair growth based on low levels of light have shown encouraging results, further improvements of their efficacy is impeded by a lack of knowledge on the exact molecular targets that mediate physiological response in skin and hair follicle. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of selected light-sensitive receptors in the human hair follicle and to study the impact of UV-free blue light on hair growth ex vivo. The expression of Opsin receptors in human skin and hair follicles has been characterized using RT-qPCR and immunofluorescence approaches. The functional significance of Opsin 3 was assessed by silencing its expression in the hair follicle cells followed by a transcriptomic profiling. Proprietary LED-based devices emitting two discrete visible wavelengths were used to access the effects of selected optical parameters on hair growth ex vivo and outer root sheath cells in vitro. The expression of OPN2 (Rhodopsin) and OPN3 (Panopsin, Encephalopsin) was detected in the distinct compartments of skin and anagen hair follicle. Treatment with 3.2 J/cm(2) of blue light with 453 nm central wavelength significantly prolonged anagen phase in hair follicles ex vivo that was correlated with sustained proliferation in the light-treated samples. In contrast, hair follicle treatment with 3.2 J/cm(2) of 689 nm light (red light) did not significantly affect hair growth ex vivo. Silencing of OPN3 in the hair follicle outer root sheath cells resulted in the altered expression of genes involved in the control of proliferation and apoptosis, and abrogated stimulatory effects of blue light (3.2 J/cm(2) ; 453 nm) on proliferation in the outer root sheath cells. We provide the first evidence that (i) OPN2 and OPN3 are expressed in human hair follicle, and (ii) A 453 nm blue light at low radiant exposure exerts a positive effect on hair growth ex vivo, potentially via interaction with OPN3. Lasers Surg. Med. 49:705-718, 2017. © 2017

  8. Promotion of hair growth by ginseng radix on cultured mouse vibrissal hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Hideaki; Yamazaki, Miho; Asanuma, Yusuke; Kubo, Michinori

    2003-08-01

    A 70% methanol extract from red ginseng (steamed and dried roots of Panax ginseng C. A. Meyer, a kind of Ginseng Radix) had superior activity to that of white ginseng (peeled and dried root of P. ginseng, another kind of Ginseng Radix) in a hair growth promoting assay using mouse vibrissal follicles in organ culture. Of the major constituents of P. ginseng, ginsenoside-Rb(1) (G-Rb(1)) exhibited activity, but ginsenoside-Rg(1) (G-Rg(1)) and -Ro (G-Ro) were ineffective. Additionally, 20(S)-ginsenoside-Rg(3) (20(S)-G-Rg(3)) formed by the processing of red ginseng from the crude root of P. ginseng also showed hair growth promoting activity. These results indicate that Ginseng Radix possesses hair growth promoting activity, and its bioactive components are partially attributable to the ginseng saponin components mentioned above.

  9. Transient activation of beta-catenin signalling in adult mouse epidermis is sufficient to induce new hair follicles but continuous activation is required to maintain hair follicle tumours.

    PubMed

    Lo Celso, Cristina; Prowse, David M; Watt, Fiona M

    2004-04-01

    When beta-catenin signalling is disturbed from mid-gestation onwards lineage commitment is profoundly altered in postnatal mouse epidermis. We have investigated whether adult epidermis has the capacity for beta-catenin-induced lineage conversion without prior embryonic priming. We fused N-terminally truncated, stabilised beta-catenin to the ligand-binding domain of a mutant oestrogen receptor (DeltaNbeta-cateninER). DeltaNbeta-cateninER was expressed in the epidermis of transgenic mice under the control of the keratin 14 promoter and beta-catenin activity was induced in adult epidermis by topical application of 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4OHT). Within 7 days of daily 4OHT treatment resting hair follicles were recruited into the hair growth cycle and epithelial outgrowths formed from existing hair follicles and from interfollicular epidermis. The outgrowths expressed Sonic hedgehog, Patched and markers of hair follicle differentiation, indicative of de novo follicle formation. The interfollicular epidermal differentiation program was largely unaffected but after an initial wave of sebaceous gland duplication sebocyte differentiation was inhibited. A single application of 4OHT was as effective as repeated doses in inducing new follicles and growth of existing follicles. Treatment of epidermis with 4OHT for 21 days resulted in conversion of hair follicles to benign tumours resembling trichofolliculomas. The tumours were dependent on continuous activation of beta-catenin and by 28 days after removal of the drug they had largely regressed. We conclude that interfollicular epidermis and sebaceous glands retain the ability to be reprogrammed in adult life and that continuous beta-catenin signalling is required to maintain hair follicle tumours.

  10. Epidermal Wnt controls hair follicle induction by orchestrating dynamic signaling crosstalk between the epidermis and dermis.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jiang; Hsu, Wei

    2013-04-01

    A signal first arising in the dermis to initiate the development of hair follicles has been described for many decades. Wnt is the earliest signal known to be intimately involved in hair follicle induction. However, it is not clear whether the inductive signal of Wnt arises intradermally or intraepidermally. Whether Wnt acts as the first dermal signal to initiate hair follicle development also remains unclear. Here we report that Wnt production mediated by Gpr177, the mouse Wls ortholog, is essential for hair follicle induction. Gpr177, encoding a multipass transmembrane protein, regulates Wnt sorting and secretion. Cell type-specific abrogation of the signal reveals that only epidermal, but not dermal, production of Wnt is required. An intraepidermal Wnt signal is necessary and sufficient for hair follicle initiation. However, the subsequent development depends on reciprocal signaling crosstalk of epidermal and dermal cells. Wnt signals within the epidermis and dermis and crossing between the epidermis and dermis have distinct roles and specific functions in skin development. This study not only defines the cell type responsible for Wnt production, but also reveals a highly dynamic regulation of Wnt signaling at different steps of hair follicle morphogenesis. Our findings uncover a mechanism underlying hair follicle development orchestrated by the Wnt pathway.

  11. Shh expression is required for embryonic hair follicle but not mammary gland development.

    PubMed

    Michno, Kinga; Boras-Granic, Kata; Mill, Pleasantine; Hui, C C; Hamel, Paul A

    2003-12-01

    The embryonic mammary gland and hair follicle are both derived from the ventral ectoderm, and their development depends on a number of common fundamental developmental pathways. While the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway is required for hair follicle morphogenesis, the role of this pathway during embryonic mammary gland development remains undetermined. We demonstrate here that, unlike the hair follicle, both Shh and Ihh are expressed in the developing embryonic mouse mammary rudiment as early as E12.5. In Shh(-/-) embryos, hair follicle development becomes arrested at an early stage, while the mammary rudiment, which continues to express Ihh, develops in a manner indistinguishable from that of wild-type littermates. The five pairs of mammary buds in Shh(-/-) female embryos exhibit normal branching morphogenesis at E16.5, forming a rudimentary ductal structure identical to wild-type embryonic mammary glands. We further demonstrate that loss of Hh signaling causes altered cyclin D1 expression in the embryonic dermal mesenchyme. Specifically, cyclin D1 is expressed at E14.5 principally in the condensed mesenchymal cells of the presumptive hair follicles and in both mesenchymal and epithelial cells of the mammary rudiments in wild-type and Shh-deficient embryos. By E18.5, robust cyclin D1 expression is maintained in mammary rudiments of both wild-type and Shh-deficient embryos. In hair follicles of wild-type embryos by E18.5, cyclin D1 expression switches to follicular epithelial cells. In contrast, strong cyclin D1 expression is observed principally in the mesenchymal cells of arrested hair follicles in Shh(-/-) embryos at E18.5. These data reveal that, despite the common embryonic origin of hair follicles and mammary glands, distinct patterns of Hh-family expression occur in these two tissues. Furthermore, these data suggest that cyclin D1 expression in the embryonic hair follicle is mediated by both Hh-independent and Hh-dependent mechanisms.

  12. Jagged 1 is a beta-catenin target gene required for ectopic hair follicle formation in adult epidermis.

    PubMed

    Estrach, Soline; Ambler, Carrie A; Lo Celso, Cristina; Hozumi, Katsuto; Watt, Fiona M

    2006-11-01

    The Wnt and Notch signalling pathways regulate hair follicle maintenance, but how they intersect is unknown. We show that Notch signalling is active in the hair follicle pre-cortex, a region of high Wnt activity, where commitment to hair lineages occurs. Deletion of jagged 1 (Jag1) results in inhibition of the hair growth cycle and conversion of hair follicles into cysts of cells undergoing interfollicular epidermal differentiation. Conversely, activation of Notch in adult epidermis triggers expansion of the base of the hair follicle, sebaceous gland enlargement and abnormal clumping of the follicles. In adult epidermis, the induction of new hair follicle formation by beta-catenin is prevented by blocking Notch signalling pharmacologically or through Jag1 deletion. Conversely, activation of both pathways accelerates growth and differentiation of ectopic follicles. beta-catenin stimulates Notch signalling by inducing Jag1 transcription. We conclude that the Notch pathway acts downstream of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway to determine epidermal cell fate.

  13. Delineating immune-mediated mechanisms underlying hair follicle destruction in the mouse mutant defolliculated.

    PubMed

    Ruge, Fiona; Glavini, Aikaterini; Gallimore, Awen M; Richards, Hannah E; Thomas, Christopher P; O'Donnell, Valerie B; Philpott, Michael P; Porter, Rebecca M

    2011-03-01

    Defolliculated (Gsdma3(Dfl)/+) mice have a hair loss phenotype that involves an aberrant hair cycle, altered sebaceous gland differentiation with reduced sebum production, chronic inflammation, and ultimately the loss of the hair follicle. Hair loss in these mice is similar to that seen in primary cicatricial, or scarring alopecias in which immune targeting of hair follicle stem cells has been proposed as a key factor resulting in permanent hair follicle destruction. In this study we examine the mechanism of hair loss in GsdmA3(Dfl)/+ mice. Aberrant expression patterns of stem cell markers during the hair cycle, in addition to aberrant behavior of the melanocytes leading to ectopic pigmentation of the hair follicle and epidermis, indicated the stem cell niche was not maintained. An autoimmune mechanism was excluded by crossing the mice with rag1-/- mice. However, large numbers of macrophages and increased expression of ICAM-1 were still present and may be involved either directly or indirectly in the hair loss. Reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry of sebaceous gland differentiation markers revealed reduced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ), a potential cause of reduced sebum production, as well as the potential involvement of the innate immune system in the hair loss. As reduced PPARγ expression has recently been implicated as a cause for lichen planopilaris, these mice may be useful for testing therapies.

  14. Regeneration of Murine Hair Follicles is Inhibited by Low-Dose-Rate Gamma Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Sugaya, Kimihiko; Hirobe, Tomohisa; Ishihara, Yoshie; Inoue, Sonoe

    2016-10-01

    To determine whether the effects of low-dose-rate gamma (γ) irradiation are identifiable in the regeneration of murine hair follicles, we irradiated whole bodies of C57BL/10JHir mice in the first telogen phase of the hair cycle with (137)Cs γ-rays. The mice were examined for effects on hair follicles, including number, morphology, and pigmentation in the second anagen phase. Effects of γ-radiation on melanocyte stem cells were also investigated by the indirect immunolabeling of tyrosinase-related protein 2 (TRP2). Irradiated skin showed a decrease in hair follicle density and the induction of curved hair follicles along with the presence of white hairs and hypopigmented hair bulbs. There was a small, but not significant, change in the number of TRP2-positive melanocyte stem cells in the hair bulge region of the irradiated skin. These results suggest that low-dose rate γ-irradiation does not deplete melanocyte stem cells, but can damage stem cells and progenitors for both keratinocytes and melanocytes, thereby affecting the structure and pigmentation of regenerated hair follicles in the 2(nd) anagen phase.

  15. Runx1 modulates developmental, but not injury-driven, hair follicle stem cell activation.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Karen M; Lee, Song Eun; McDermitt, David J; Waghmare, Sanjeev K; Zhang, Ying V; Woo, Hyun Nyun; Tumbar, Tudorita

    2008-03-01

    Aml1/Runx1 controls developmental aspects of several tissues, is a master regulator of blood stem cells, and plays a role in leukemia. However, it is unclear whether it functions in tissue stem cells other than blood. Here, we have investigated the role of Runx1 in mouse hair follicle stem cells by conditional ablation in epithelial cells. Runx1 disruption affects hair follicle stem cell activation, but not their maintenance, proliferation or differentiation potential. Adult mutant mice exhibit impaired de novo production of hair shafts and all temporary hair cell lineages, owing to a prolonged quiescent phase of the first hair cycle. The lag of stem cell activity is reversed by skin injury. Our work suggests a degree of functional overlap in Runx1 regulation of blood and hair follicle stem cells at an equivalent time point in the development of these two tissues.

  16. Protection against chemotherapy-induced alopecia: targeting ATP-binding cassette transporters in the hair follicle?

    PubMed

    Haslam, Iain S; Pitre, Aaron; Schuetz, John D; Paus, Ralf

    2013-11-01

    Currently, efficacious treatments for chemotherapy-induced alopecia (hair loss) are lacking, and incidences of permanent hair loss following high-dose chemotherapy are on the increase. In this article, we describe mechanisms by which the pharmacological defense status of the hair follicle might be enhanced, thereby reducing the accumulation of cytotoxic cancer drugs and preventing or reducing hair loss and damage. We believe this could be achieved via the selective increase in ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter expression within the hair follicle epithelium, following application of topical agonists for regulatory nuclear receptors. Clinical application would require the development of hair follicle-targeted formulations, potentially utilizing nanoparticle technology. This novel approach has the potential to yield entirely new therapeutic options for the treatment and management of chemotherapy-induced alopecia, providing significant psychological and physical benefit to cancer patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Regenerative metamorphosis in hairs and feathers: follicle as a programmable biological printer

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Ji Won; Lin, Sung-Jan; Plikus, Maksim V.

    2015-01-01

    Present-day hairs and feathers are marvels of biological engineering perfected over 200 million years of convergent evolution. Prominently, both follicle types coevolved regenerative cycling, wherein active filament making (anagen) is intermitted by a phase of relative quiescence (telogen). Such regenerative cycling enables follicles to “reload” their morphogenetic program and make qualitatively different filaments in the consecutive cycles. Indeed, many species of mammals and birds undergo regenerative metamorphosis, prominently changing their integument between juvenile and adult forms. This phenomenon is inconspicuous in mice, which led to the conventional perception that hair type is hardwired during follicle morphogenesis and cannot switch. A series of recent works by Chi and Morgan change this perception, and show that many mouse follicles naturally switch hair morphologies, for instance from “wavy” zigzag to straight awl, in the second growth cycle. A series of observations and genetic experiments show that back and forth hair type switching depends on the number of cells in the follicle's dermal papilla, with the critical threshold being around 40-50 cells. Pigmentation is another parameter that hair and feather follicles can reload between cycles, and even midway through anagen. Recent works show that hair and feather pigmentation “printing” programs coevolved to rely on pulsed expression of Agouti, a melanocortin receptor-1 antagonist, in the follicular mesenchyme. Here, we discuss broader implications of hair and feather regenerative plasticity. PMID:25557541

  18. A technique for hair-grafting in between existing follicles in patients with early pattern baldness.

    PubMed

    Brandy, D A

    2000-08-01

    When using follicular hair transplantation on patients with early male or female pattern baldness, there can be significant trauma to preexisting hair follicles. This becomes especially important in view of the fact that finastride and minoxidil can stop or slow hair loss. To develop a system that averts damage to preexisting hair follicles in patients with early male or female pattern baldness. A Lutex headlight (2.5-3.5x loupe magnification system) is used to make 1.0-1.5 mm spear incisions in between the hair follicles in patients with early male or female pattern balding. Magnification is also utilized during the graft cutting and placement phases of the operation. This headlight-loupe magnification system has dramatically decreased the amount of permanent hair loss and anagen effluvium on 144 patients with early male and female pattern baldness. With less permanent hair loss there is greater density observed with each progressive session. Hair surgeons now have a method to consistently and significantly minimize the amount of damage to preexisting hair follicles in patients in the early stages of male and female pattern baldness. This becomes even more important in light of the fact that more and more patients are using finastride or minoxidil to stop the thinning process. Existing hairs can therefore be preserved.

  19. Sgk3 links growth factor signaling to maintenance of progenitor cells in the hair follicle.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Laura; Okada, Hitoshi; Pasolli, Hilda Amalia; Wakeham, Andrew; You-Ten, Annick Itie; Mak, Tak W; Fuchs, Elaine

    2005-08-15

    Tyrosine kinase growth factor receptor signaling influences proliferation, survival, and apoptosis. Hair follicles undergo cycles of proliferation and apoptotic regression, offering an excellent paradigm to study how this transition is governed. Several factors are known to affect the hair cycle, but it remains a mystery whether Akt kinases that are downstream of growth factor signaling impact this equilibrium. We now show that an Akt relative, Sgk (serum and glucocorticoid responsive kinase) 3, plays a critical role in this process. Hair follicles of mice lacking Sgk3 fail to mature normally. Proliferation is reduced, apoptosis is increased, and follicles prematurely regress. Maintenance of the pool of transiently amplifying matrix cells is impaired. Intriguingly, loss of Sgk3 resembles the gain of function of epidermal growth factor signaling. Using cultured primary keratinocytes, we find that Sgk3 functions by negatively regulating phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase signaling. Our results reveal a novel and important function for Sgk3 in controlling life and death in the hair follicle.

  20. Point scanning confocal microscopy facilitates 3D human hair follicle imaging in tissue sections.

    PubMed

    Kloepper, Jennifer E; Bíró, Tamás; Paus, Ralf; Cseresnyés, Zoltán

    2010-07-01

    Efficiency is a key factor in determining whether a scientific method becomes widely accepted in practical applications. In dermatology, morphological characterisation of intact hair follicles by traditional methods can be rather inefficient. Samples are embedded, sliced, imaged and digitally reconstructed, which can be time-consuming. Confocal microscopy, on the other hand, is more efficient and readily applicable to study intact hair follicles. Modern confocal microscopes deliver and collect light very efficiently and thus allow high spatial resolution imaging of relatively thick samples. In this letter, we report that we successfully imaged entire intact human hair follicles using point scanning confocal microscopy. Light delivery and light-collection were further improved by preparing the samples in 2,2'-Thiodiethanol (TDE), thus reducing refractive index gradients. The relatively short total scan times and the high quality of the acquired 3D images make confocal microscopy a desirable method for studying intact hair follicles under normal and pathological conditions.

  1. Methods for the isolation and 3D culture of dermal papilla cells from human hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Topouzi, Helena; Logan, Niall J; Williams, Greg; Higgins, Claire A

    2017-06-01

    The dermal papilla is a cluster of mesenchymal cells located at the base of the hair follicle which have a number of important roles in the regulation of hair growth. As a consequence, in vitro models of these cells are widely used to study the molecular mechanisms which underlie hair follicle induction, growth and maintenance. While dermal papilla from rodent hair follicles can be digested prior to cell isolation, the unique extracellular matrix composition found in human dermal papilla renders enzymes such as trypsin and collagenase insufficient for digestion of the dermal papilla into a single cell suspension. As such, to grow human dermal papilla cells in vitro, the papilla has to first be isolated via a micro-dissection approach from the follicle. In this article we describe the micro-dissection and culture methods, which we use within our laboratory, for the study of human dermal papilla cells. © 2017 The Authors. Experimental Dermatology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Decoction and Fermentation of Selected Medicinal Herbs Promote Hair Regrowth by Inducing Hair Follicle Growth in Conjunction with Wnts Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Su Kil; Kim, Seung Tae; Lee, Do Ik; Park, Jun Sub; Jo, Bo Ram; Park, Jung Youl; Heo, Jong; Joo, Seong Soo

    2016-01-01

    It is well recognized that regulating the hair follicle cycle in association with Wnt signaling is one of the most interesting targets for promoting hair regrowth. In this study, we examined whether selected herbal medicines processed by decoction and fermentation promote hair growth by upregulating the number and size of hair follicles and Wnt signaling, including activation of β-catenin and Akt in telogen-synchronized C57BL/6N mice. The results revealed that the fermented extract after decoction (FDE) more effectively promoted hair growth than that of a nonfermented extract (DE). Notably, FDE effectively enhanced formation of hair follicles with clearer differentiation between the inner and outer root sheath, which is observed during the anagen phase. Mechanistic evidence was found for increased β-catenin and Akt phosphorylation levels in dorsal skin tissue along with elevated expression of hair regrowth-related genes, such as Wnt3/10a/10b, Lef1, and fibroblast growth factor 7. In conclusion, our findings suggest that FDE plays an important role in regulating the hair cycle by increasing expression of hair regrowth-related genes and activating downstream Wnt signaling targets. PMID:27110266

  3. Decoction and Fermentation of Selected Medicinal Herbs Promote Hair Regrowth by Inducing Hair Follicle Growth in Conjunction with Wnts Signaling.

    PubMed

    Jang, Su Kil; Kim, Seung Tae; Lee, Do Ik; Park, Jun Sub; Jo, Bo Ram; Park, Jung Youl; Heo, Jong; Joo, Seong Soo

    2016-01-01

    It is well recognized that regulating the hair follicle cycle in association with Wnt signaling is one of the most interesting targets for promoting hair regrowth. In this study, we examined whether selected herbal medicines processed by decoction and fermentation promote hair growth by upregulating the number and size of hair follicles and Wnt signaling, including activation of β-catenin and Akt in telogen-synchronized C57BL/6N mice. The results revealed that the fermented extract after decoction (FDE) more effectively promoted hair growth than that of a nonfermented extract (DE). Notably, FDE effectively enhanced formation of hair follicles with clearer differentiation between the inner and outer root sheath, which is observed during the anagen phase. Mechanistic evidence was found for increased β-catenin and Akt phosphorylation levels in dorsal skin tissue along with elevated expression of hair regrowth-related genes, such as Wnt3/10a/10b, Lef1, and fibroblast growth factor 7. In conclusion, our findings suggest that FDE plays an important role in regulating the hair cycle by increasing expression of hair regrowth-related genes and activating downstream Wnt signaling targets.

  4. Mutant laboratory mice with abnormalities in hair follicle morphogenesis, cycling, and/or structure: an update.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Motonobu; Schneider, Marlon R; Schmidt-Ullrich, Ruth; Paus, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Human hair disorders comprise a number of different types of alopecia, atrichia, hypotrichosis, distinct hair shaft disorders as well as hirsutism and hypertrichosis. Their causes vary from genodermatoses (e.g. hypotrichoses) via immunological disorders (e.g. alopecia areata, autoimmune cicatrical alopecias) to hormone-dependent abnormalities (e.g. androgenetic alopecia). A large number of spontaneous mouse mutants and genetically engineered mice develop abnormalities in hair follicle morphogenesis, cycling, and/or hair shaft formation, whose analysis has proven invaluable to define the molecular regulation of hair growth, ranging from hair follicle development, and cycling to hair shaft formation and stem cell biology. Also, the accumulating reports on hair phenotypes of mouse strains provide important pointers to better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying human hair growth disorders. Since numerous new mouse mutants with a hair phenotype have been reported since the publication of our earlier review on this matter a decade ago, we present here an updated, tabulated mini-review. The updated annotated tables list a wide selection of mouse mutants with hair growth abnormalities, classified into four categories: Mutations that affect hair follicle (1) morphogenesis, (2) cycling, (3) structure, and (4) mutations that induce extrafollicular events (for example immune system defects) resulting in secondary hair growth abnormalities. This synthesis is intended to provide a useful source of reference when studying the molecular controls of hair follicle growth and differentiation, and whenever the hair phenotypes of a newly generated mouse mutant need to be compared with existing ones. Copyright © 2012 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Nestin-expressing hair follicle-accessible pluripotent stem cells for nerve and spinal cord repair.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Robert M

    2014-01-01

    Nestin-expressing stem cells of the hair follicle, discovered by our laboratory, have been shown to be able to form neurons and other nonfollicle cell types. We have shown that the nestin-expressing stem cells from the hair follicle can effect the repair of peripheral nerve and spinal cord injury. The hair follicle stem cells differentiate into neuronal and glial cells after transplantation to the injured peripheral nerve and spinal cord, and enhance injury repair and locomotor recovery. We have termed these cells hair follicle-accessible pluripotent (HAP) stem cells. When the excised hair follicle with its nerve stump was placed in Gelfoam 3D histoculture, HAP stem cells grew and extended the hair follicle nerve which consisted of βIII-tubulin-positive fibers with F-actin expression at the tip. These findings indicate that βIII-tubulin-positive fibers elongating from the whisker follicle sensory nerve stump were growing axons. The growing whisker sensory nerve was highly enriched in HAP stem cells, which appeared to play a major role in its elongation and interaction with other nerves in 3D Gelfoam histoculture, including the sciatic nerve, the trigeminal nerve, and the trigeminal nerve ganglion. Our results suggest that a major function of the HAP stem cells in the hair follicle is for growth of the follicle sensory nerve. HAP stem cells have critical advantages over embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells in that they are highly accessible, require no genetic manipulation, are nontumorigenic, and do not present ethical issues for regenerative medicine. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Analysis of the penetration of a caffeine containing shampoo into the hair follicles by in vivo laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lademann, J.; Richter, H.; Schanzer, S.; Klenk, A.; Sterry, W.; Patzelt, A.

    2010-02-01

    In previous in vitro investigations, it was demonstrated that caffeine is able to stimulate the hair growth. Therefore, a penetration of caffeine into the hair follicle is necessary. In the present study, in vivo laser scanning microscopy (LSM) was used to investigate the penetration and storage of a caffeine containing shampoo into the hair follicles. It was shown that a 2-min contact time of the shampoo with the skin was enough to accumulate significant parts of the shampoo in the hair follicles. A penetration of the shampoo up to a depth of approx. 200 μm could be detected, which represents the detection limit of the LSM. At this depth, the close network of the blood capillaries surrounding the hair follicles commences. Even after 24 h, the substance was still detectable in the hair follicles. This demonstrates the long-term reservoir function of the hair follicles for topically applied substances such as caffeine.

  7. Disruption of the hedgehog signaling pathway contributes to the hair follicle cycling deficiency in Vdr knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Teichert, Arnaud; Elalieh, Hashem; Bikle, Daniel

    2010-11-01

    Mice null for the Vitamin D receptor (VdrKO) have a disrupted first hair follicle cycle and aborted subsequent hair follicle cycling. We examined the expression of different markers and mediators of hair follicle cycling in the hair follicle of the VdrKO mouse during days 13-22 when the hair follicle normally initiates and completes the first catagen. We compared the expression of those genes in mice with a nonsense mutation in hairless (Rhino), which have a similar alopecia phenotype, and to Cyp27b1 null mice which are deficient in the production of 1,25(OH)2D3, the Vdr ligand, but display normal hair follicle cycling. Our results demonstrate the down regulation of hair follicle markers and the alteration of expression of hedgehog (Hh), Wnt, Fgf, and Tgfbeta pathways in VdrKO and Rhino mice, but not in Cyp27b1KO mice. Treatment of VdrKO mice with an agonist to the Hh pathway partially restored hair follicle cycling, suggesting a role of this pathway in the regulation of hair follicle cycling by VDR. These results suggest that Vdr regulates directly or indirectly the expression of genes required for hair follicle cycling, including Hh signaling, independent of 1,25(OH)2D3. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Protease activity, localization and inhibition in the human hair follicle

    PubMed Central

    Bhogal, R K; Mouser, P E; Higgins, C A; Turner, G A

    2014-01-01

    Synopsis Objective In humans, the process of hair shedding, referred to as exogen, is believed to occur independently of the other hair cycle phases. Although the actual mechanisms involved in hair shedding are not fully known, it has been hypothesized that the processes leading to the final step of hair shedding may be driven by proteases and/or protease inhibitor activity. In this study, we investigated the presence of proteases and protease activity in naturally shed human hairs and assessed enzyme inhibition activity of test materials. Methods We measured enzyme activity using a fluorescence-based assay and protein localization by indirect immunohistochemistry (IHC). We also developed an ex vivo skin model for measuring the force required to pull hair fibres from skin. Results Our data demonstrate the presence of protease activity in the tissue material surrounding club roots. We also demonstrated the localization of specific serine protease protein expression in human hair follicle by IHC. These data provide evidence demonstrating the presence of proteases around the hair club roots, which may play a role during exogen. We further tested the hypothesis that a novel protease inhibitor system (combination of Trichogen® and climbazole) could inhibit protease activity in hair fibre club root extracts collected from a range of ethnic groups (UK, Brazil, China, first-generation Mexicans in the USA, Thailand and Turkey) in both males and females. Furthermore, we demonstrated that this combination is capable of increasing the force required to remove hair in an ex vivo skin model system. Conclusion These studies indicate the presence of proteolytic activity in the tissue surrounding the human hair club root and show that it is possible to inhibit this activity with a combination of Trichogen® and climbazole. This technology may have potential to reduce excessive hair shedding. Résumé Objectif Chez l'homme, le processus de perte de cheveux, désigné comme exog

  9. The lack of significant changes in scalp hair follicle density with advancing age.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, R; Chapman, A; Magee, J

    2005-04-01

    Age-related reduction in hair is seen in the axillary and pubic regions as well as the scalp; however, it has not been investigated qualitatively on the scalp. Horizontally sectioned scalp biopsy is an ideal tool to investigate the impact of advancing age on scalp hair follicle density and morphology. To examine the effect of age and follicle miniaturization on total hair count in 1666 horizontally sectioned mid-scalp biopsies from 928 women aged between 13 and 84 years with hair loss. Specialist hair loss referral clinic in a teaching hospital. Analysis of data set. Methods: All scalp biopsies were 4 mm in diameter and taken from the crown. Miniaturization was assessed by calculating the ratio of terminal to vellus-like hairs (T/V) at the mid-isthmus level and considered significant if the ratio was < or = 4 : 1. Fibrosis was documented when present. Linear regression was used to examine the association between total hair count, age and miniaturization. The average number of hair follicles per biopsy was 39.6 (SD +/- 10.8). A highly significant negative association (P < 0.0001) was found between age and total follicle number, although the predictive value of age in total hair count was found to be small [root error mean square (R2) < 2%]. Controlling for T/V < or = 4 : 1, the association was weakened, but remained significant. The relationship unconfounded by T/V < or = 4 : 1 shows that for every additional year of ageing, 0.077 total hair follicles (0.22%) are lost per biopsy. Age and follicular miniaturization were found to be extremely weak predictors of total hair count in women with hair loss.

  10. Tight junctions form a barrier in porcine hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Mathes, Christiane; Brandner, Johanna M; Laue, Michael; Raesch, Simon S; Hansen, Steffi; Failla, Antonio V; Vidal, Sabine; Moll, Ingrid; Schaefer, Ulrich F; Lehr, Claus-Michael

    2016-02-01

    Follicular penetration has gained increasing interest regarding (i) safety concerns about (environmentally born) xenobiotics available to the hair follicle (HF), e.g. nanomaterials or allergens which should not enter the skin, and (ii) the possibility for non-invasive follicular drug and antigen delivery. However, not much is known about barriers in the HF which have to be surpassed upon uptake and/or penetration into surrounding tissue. Thus, aim of this work was a detailed investigation of this follicular barrier function, as well as particle uptake into the HF of porcine skin which is often used as a model system for human skin for such purposes. We show that follicular tight junctions (TJs) form a continuous barrier from the infundibulum down to the suprabulbar region, complementary to the stratum corneum in the most exposed upper follicular region, but remaining as the only barrier in the less accessible lower follicular regions. In the bulbar region of the HF no TJ barrier was found, demonstrating the importance of freely supplying this hair-forming part with e.g. nutrients or hormones from the dermal microenvironment. Moreover, the dynamic character of the follicular TJ barrier was shown by modulating its permeability using EDTA. After applying polymeric model-nanoparticles (154 nm) to the skin, transmission electron microscopy revealed that the majority of the particles were localized in the upper part of the HF where the double-barrier is present. Only few penetrated deeper, reaching regions where TJs act as the only barrier, and no particles were observed in the bulbar, barrier-less region. Lastly, the equivalent expression and distribution of TJ proteins in human and porcine HF further supports the suitability of porcine skin as a predictive model to study the follicular penetration and further biological effects of dermally applied nanomaterials in humans. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Exposure to gamma-rays at the telogen phase of the hair cycle inhibits hair follicle regeneration at the anagen phase in mice.

    PubMed

    Sugaya, Kimihiko; Hirobe, Tomohisa

    2014-02-01

    The effects of ionizing radiations on somatic stem cells largely remain to be studied. Hair follicles are self-renewing structures that reconstitute themselves throughout the hair cycle, which is comprised of the following phases: Anagen (growth), catagen (regression) and telogen (resting), suggesting the presence of their own stem cells. The whole bodies of C57BL/10JHir mice in the 1st telogen phase were irradiated with γ-rays. Mice were examined for effects on hair follicles, including their number, morphology and pigmentation in the 2nd anagen phase. Decreased hair follicle density and induction of curved hair follicles were observed in the dermal skin of irradiated mice. In addition to these keratinocyte-derived anomalies, melanocyte-derived anomalies including white hair and hypopigmented hair bulbs were found. The decrease in hair follicle density and the increase in the frequency of hypopigmented hair bulbs were dependent on the dose of γ-rays. These results suggest that γ-rays damage stem cells and progenitors for keratinocytes and melanocytes, thereby affecting the structure and character of regenerated hair follicles. The density of hair follicles and pigment production in hair bulbs are established as criteria for the effects of γ-rays on the hair cycle.

  12. Promoted growth of murine hair follicles through controlled release of vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Ozeki, Makoto; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2002-06-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate whether or not the controlled release of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is effective in promoting the hair follicle growth of mice in second anagen of hair cycle. VEGF was incorporated into a biodegradable collagen hydrogel for its controlled release. Following implantation of the collagen hydrogel incorporating 0 or 2 microg of VEGF and injection of 0 or 2 microg of VEGF in the solution form into the back subcutis of mice, the hair follicle growth was evaluated photometrically and histologically in terms of the skin color of reverse side of the implanted or injected site, the skin thickness, and the area occupied by hair follicle tissue. Ten days later, the skin color of mice implanted with the collagen hydrogel incorporating 2 microg of VEGF was significantly darker than that injected with 2 pg of VEGF. The collagen hydrogel incorporating VEGF increased the hair follicle area at the implanted site to a significantly greater extent than other agents while significant angiogenetic effect in the skin tissue was observed. VEGF-free, empty collagen hydrogels did not affect the skin darkness, hair follicle growth, and the angiogenesis. Moreover, the hair shaft length was significantly elongated by the collagen hydrogel incorporating VEGF, in marked contrast to other agents. Immunohistolchemicalstaining with proliferating cell nuclear antigen revealed that the collagen hydrogel incorporating VEGF promoted the proliferation of cells around the hair follicle more frequently than free VEGF. We concluded that the controlled release of VEGF more positively acted on the hair growth cycle of mice for hair growth than the injection of free VEGF.

  13. Stem cell factor/c-Kit signalling in normal and androgenetic alopecia hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Randall, Valerie A; Jenner, Tracey J; Hibberts, Nigel A; De Oliveira, Isabel O; Vafaee, Tayyebeh

    2008-04-01

    Androgens stimulate many hair follicles to alter hair colour and size via the hair growth cycle; in androgenetic alopecia tiny, pale hairs gradually replace large, pigmented ones. Since stem cell factor (SCF) is important in embryonic melanocyte migration and maintaining adult rodent pigmentation, we investigated SCF/c-Kit signalling in human hair follicles to determine whether this was altered in androgenetic alopecia. Quantitative immunohistochemistry detected three melanocyte-lineage markers and c-Kit in four focus areas: the epidermis, infundibulum, hair bulb (where pigment is formed) and mid-follicle outer root sheath (ORS). Colocalisation confirmed melanocyte c-Kit expression; cultured follicular melanocytes also exhibited c-Kit. Few ORS cells expressed differentiated melanocyte markers or c-Kit, but NKI/beteb antibody, which also recognises early melanocyte-lineage antigens, identified fourfold more cells, confirmed by colocalisation. Occasional similar bulbar cells were seen. Melanocyte distribution, concentration and c-Kit expression were unaltered in balding follicles. Androgenetic alopecia cultured dermal papilla cells secreted less SCF, measured by ELISA, than normal cells. This identifies three types of melanocyte-lineage cells in human follicles. The c-Kit expression by dendritic, pigmenting, bulbar melanocytes and rounded, differentiated, non-pigmenting ORS melanocytes implicate SCF in maintaining pigmentation and migration into regenerating hair bulbs. Less differentiated, c-Kit-independent cells in the mid-follicle ORS stem cell niche and occasionally in the bulb, presumably a local reserve for long scalp hair growth, implicate other factors in activating stem cells. Androgens appear to reduce alopecia hair colour by inhibiting dermal papilla SCF production, impeding bulbar melanocyte pigmentation. These results may facilitate new treatments for hair colour changes in hirsutism, alopecia or greying.

  14. Foxp1 maintains hair follicle stem cell quiescence through regulation of Fgf18

    PubMed Central

    Leishman, Erin; Howard, Jeffrey M.; Garcia, Gloria E.; Miao, Qi; Ku, Amy T.; Dekker, Joseph D.; Tucker, Haley; Nguyen, Hoang

    2013-01-01

    Hair follicles cyclically degenerate and regenerate throughout adult life and require regular stem cell activation to drive the cycle. In the resting phase of the hair cycle, hair follicle stem cells are maintained in a quiescent state until they receive signals to proliferate. We found that the forkhead transcription factor Foxp1 is crucial for maintaining the quiescence of hair follicle stem cells. Loss of Foxp1 in skin epithelial cells leads to precocious stem cell activation, resulting in drastic shortening of the quiescent phase of the hair cycle. Conversely, overexpression of Foxp1 in keratinocytes prevents cell proliferation by promoting cell cycle arrest. Finally, through both gain- and loss-of-function studies, we identify fibroblast growth factor 18 (Fgf18) as the key downstream target of Foxp1. We show that exogenously supplied FGF18 can prevent the hair follicle stem cells of Foxp1 null mice from being prematurely activated. As Fgf18 controls the length of the quiescent phase and is a key downstream target of Foxp1, our data strongly suggest that Foxp1 regulates the quiescent stem cell state in the hair follicle stem cell niche by controlling Fgf18 expression. PMID:23946441

  15. An Essential Role for Dermal Primary Cilia in Hair Follicle Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lehman, Jonathan; Laag, Essam; Michaud, Edward J.; Yoder, Bradley K.

    2009-01-01

    The primary cilium is a microtubule-based organelle implicated as an essential component of a number of signaling pathways. It is present on cells throughout the mammalian body; however, its functions in most tissues remain largely unknown. Herein we demonstrate that primary cilia are present on cells in murine skin and hair follicles throughout morphogenesis and during hair follicle cycling in postnatal life. Using the Cre-lox system, we disrupted cilia assembly in the ventral dermis and evaluated the effects on hair follicle development. Mice with disrupted dermal cilia have severe hypotrichosis (lack of hair) in affected areas. Histological analyses reveal that most follicles in the mutants arrest at stage 2 of hair development and have small or absent dermal condensates. This phenotype is reminiscent of that seen in the skin of mice lacking Shh or Gli2. In situ hybridization and quantitative RT-PCR analysis indicates that the hedgehog pathway is downregulated in the dermis of the cilia mutant hair follicles. Thus, these data establish cilia as a critical signaling component required for normal hair morphogenesis and suggest that this organelle is needed on cells in the dermis for reception of signals such as sonic hedgehog. PMID:18987668

  16. Effect of 27-MHz radiofrequency on hair follicles: histological evaluation of skin treated ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Hyun; Lavoie, Amélie; Ratté, Gilles; Beaumont, Clément; Germain, Lucie; Larouche, Danielle

    2015-04-01

    A multitude of methods and treatments exist for cosmetic hair removal. Electroepilation is a commonly performed method of hair removal that is so-called "permanent"; however, there is a paucity of histological studies of the effects of radiofrequency (RF) on hair follicles. This study aimed to observe the destruction of human hair follicles and surrounding tissue after the treatment with 27.12-MHz RF, with more attention paid to the thermal destruction of bulge and bulb/dermal papilla. Human scalp specimens obtained during face-lift surgery were treated with 27.12-MHz RF. The probe tip was inserted into hair follicle, RF current was applied, and treated specimens were processed for histological analysis. Significant damages were observed on treated hair follicles. Thermal damage was lance-shaped and extended over several hundred micrometers (100-400 μm). The location of destruction areas varied, likely depending on the point of insertion of the probe. The epidermis remained intact. This study shows that the general mechanism of thermolysis is to generate damage to cells and tissues surrounding the insertion point of the filament. The results suggest that if the insertion point is close to the bulge region, there is a risk to destroy hair follicle epithelial stem cells.

  17. Pterins in human hair follicle cells and in the synchronized murine hair cycle.

    PubMed

    Schallreuter, K U; Beazley, W D; Hibberts, N A; Tobin, D J; Paus, R; Wood, J M

    1998-10-01

    Human dermal papilla cells (HDPC) express mRNA for the key enzymes for de novo synthesis/recycling and regulation of the pterin (6R)-L-erythro-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (6BH4). HDPC had significantly higher enzyme activities and 6BH4 levels in a comparative study with dermal fibroblasts, epidermal melanocytes, and keratinocytes under in vitro conditions. In addition, a significantly more rapid uptake of 14C-L-phenylalanine was demonstrated in HDPC compared with fibroblasts, whereas the differences in turnover to L-tyrosine were insignificant, suggesting a pooling of L-phenylalanine in HDPC. These results suggested that HDPC driven 6BH4 synthesis could be of major functional importance in the hair cycle. In order to follow this hypothesis in vivo, expression of enzyme activities and levels of the produced cofactor during the synchronized hair cycle were determined employing the murine model C57BL/6. These data revealed a significantly increased de novo synthesis for 6BH4 via GTP-cyclohydrolase I concomitant with high levels of 6BH4, and the induction of phenylalanine hydroxylase activities during the telogen/early anagen stage (days 0-1). Pterin levels and enzyme activities fall on day 3 and plateau during the rest of the entire cycle. In addition, thioredoxin reductase and glutathione reductase activities were measured, where the latter enzyme remained constant but thioredoxin reductase activities showed a biphasic behavior. The first peak coincided with the induction of 6BH4 de novo synthesis at the beginning of the hair cycle. The second peak was observed at mid-anagen, when melanogenesis takes place. Taken together, our results show the presence of autocrine pterin synthesis/recycling in human hair follicle cells under in vitro conditions, and a possible role for 6BH4 in the synchronized murine hair cycle.

  18. GENE EXPRESSION IN HEAD HAIR FOLLICLES PLUCKED FROM MEN AND WOMEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Characterizing gene expression in hair follicles can help to elucidate the hair growth cycle by delineating the genes and pathways involved in follicular growth and degeneration. The objectives of this study were to determine whether intact RNA could be extracted from a small num...

  19. GENE EXPRESSION IN HEAD HAIR FOLLICLES PLUCKED FROM MEN AND WOMEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Characterizing gene expression in hair follicles can help to elucidate the hair growth cycle by delineating the genes and pathways involved in follicular growth and degeneration. The objectives of this study were to determine whether intact RNA could be extracted from a small num...

  20. Spatial Distribution of Stem Cell-Like Keratinocytes in Dissected Compound Hair Follicles of the Dog

    PubMed Central

    Wiener, Dominique J.; Doherr, Marcus G.; Müller, Eliane J.; Welle, Monika M.

    2016-01-01

    Hair cycle disturbances are common in dogs and comparable to some alopecic disorders in humans. A normal hair cycle is maintained by follicular stem cells which are predominately found in an area known as the bulge. Due to similar morphological characteristics of the bulge area in humans and dogs, the shared particularity of compound hair follicles as well as similarities in follicular biomarker expression, the dog is a promising model to study human hair cycle and stem cell disorders. To gain insight into the spatial distribution of follicular keratinocytes with stem cell potential in canine compound follicles, we microdissected hair follicles in anagen and telogen from skin samples of freshly euthanized dogs. The keratinocytes isolated from different locations were investigated for their colony forming efficiency, growth and differentiation potential as well as clonal growth. Our results indicate that i) compound and single hair follicles exhibit a comparable spatial distribution pattern with respect to cells with high growth potential and stem cell-like characteristics, ii) the lower isthmus (comprising the bulge) harbors most cells with high growth potential in both, the anagen and the telogen hair cycle stage, iii) unlike in other species, colonies with highest growth potential are rather small with an irregular perimeter and iv) the keratinocytes derived from the bulbar region exhibit characteristics of actively dividing transit amplifying cells. Our results now provide the basis to conduct comparative studies of normal dogs and those with hair cycle disorders with the possibility to extend relevant findings to human patients. PMID:26788850

  1. [CO-TRANSPLANTATION OF MOUSE EPIDERMIS AND DERMIS CELLS IN INDUCING HAIR FOLLICLE REGENERATION].

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Xi, Jiafei; Liu, Daqing; Zhang, Xiuyuan; Lü, Yang; Li, Jing; Wang, Jingxue; Zhou, Junnian; Nan, Xue; Yue, Wen; Pei, Xuetao

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the co-transplantation of C57-green fluorescent protein (GFP) mouse epidermis and dermis cells subcutaneously to induce the hair follicle regeneration. C57-GFP mouse epidermis and dermis were harvested for isolation the mouse epidermis and dermis cells. The morphology of epidermis and dermis mixed cells at ratio of 1:1 of adult mouse, dermis cells of adult mouse, cultured 3rd generation dermis cells were observed by fluorescence microscope. Immunocytochemistry staining was used to detect hair follicle stem cells markers in cultured 3rd generation dermis cells from new born C57-GFP mouse. And then the epidermis and dermis mixed cells of adult mouse (group A), dermis cells of adult mouse (group B), cultured 3rd generation dermis cells of new born mouse (group C), and saline (group D) were transplanted subcutaneously into Balb/c nude mice. The skin surface of nude mice were observed at 4, 5, 6 weeks of transplantation and hair follicle formation were detected at 6 weeks by immunohistochemistry staining. The isolated C57-GFP mouse epidermis and dermis cells strongly expressed the GFP under the fluorescence microscope. Immunocytochemistry staining for hair follicle stem cells markers in cultured 3rd generation dermis cells showed strong expression of Vimentin and α-smooth muscle actin, indicating that the cells were dermal sheath cells; some cells expressed CD133, Versican, and cytokeratin 15. After transplanted for 4-6 weeks, the skin became black at the injection site in group A, indicating new hair follicle formation. However, no color change was observed in groups B, C, and D. Immunohistochemical staining showed that new complete hair follicles structures formed in group A. GFP expression could be only observed in the hair follicle dermal sheath and outer root sheath in group B, and it could also be observed in the hair follicle dermal sheath, outer root sheath, dermal papilla cells, and sweat gland in group C. The expression of GFP was negative in

  2. Isolation and culture of hair follicle pluripotent stem (hfPS) cells and their use for nerve and spinal cord regeneration.

    PubMed

    Amoh, Yasuyuki; Hoffman, Robert M

    2010-01-01

    The hair follicle is dynamic, cycling between growth (anagen), regression (catagen), and resting (telogen) phases throughout life. We have demonstrated that nestin-expressing hair follicle stem cells give rise to follicle structures during early anagen or growth phase of the hair follicle. Nestin-expressing hair follicle stem cells appear in the hair follicular stem cell area, the permanent upper hair follicle immediately below the sebaceous glands and above the bulge area. The nestin-expressing hair follicle stem cells can differentiate into neurons, glia, keratinocytes, smooth muscle cells, and melanocytes in vitro. Furthermore, the hair follicle stem cells promote the recovery of peripheral nerve and spinal cord injury. We have termed these cells hair follicle pluripotent stem (hfPS) cells. These results suggest that hfPS cells provide an important accessible, autologous source of adult stem cells with potential for use in regenerative medicine.

  3. Wnt5a Suppresses β-catenin Signaling during Hair Follicle Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Yizhan; Ma, Xiaogen; Guo, Haiying; Deng, Fang; Yang, Jin; Li, Yuhong

    2016-01-01

    Hair follicles display periodic growth. Wnt signaling is a critical regulator for hair follicle regeneration. Previously, we reported that Wnt5a inhibits the telogen-to-anagen transition of hair follicles, but the mechanism by which this process occurs has not yet been reported. Here, we determined the expression patterns of Wnt signaling pathway molecules by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, western blot, and immunohistochemistry and found that β-catenin signaling was suppressed by Wnt5a. We then compared the phenotypes and expression patterns following β-catenin knockdown and Wnt5a overexpression during hair follicle regeneration induced by hair depilation and observed similar patterns. In addition, we performed a rescue experiment in the JB6 cell line and found that the inhibitory effect of Wnt5a on cell proliferation could be rescued by the addition of Wnt3a. Our data reveal that Wnt5a suppresses the activation of β-catenin signaling during hair follicle regeneration. PMID:27499692

  4. Clinically applicable transplantation procedure of dermal papilla cells for hair follicle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Aoi, Noriyuki; Inoue, Keita; Kato, Harunosuke; Suga, Hirotaka; Higashino, Takuya; Eto, Hitomi; Doi, Kentaro; Araki, Jun; Iida, Takuya; Katsuta, Tomoya; Yoshimura, Kotaro

    2012-02-01

    Dermal papilla cells (DPCs) interact with epithelial stem cells and induce hair folliculogenesis. Cell-based therapies using expanded DPCs for hair regeneration have been unsuccessful in humans. Two major challenges remain: first, expanded DPCs obtained from adult hair follicles have functional limitations; second, a clinically applicable method is needed for transplanting DPCs. This study aimed to identify an efficient, minimally invasive and economical DPC transplantation procedure for use in clinical settings. Five clinically applicable transplantation procedures were tested, termed the Pinhole, Laser, Slit, Non-vascularized sandwich (NVS) and Hemi-vascularized sandwich (HVS) methods. Labelled rat dermal papilla tissue was transplanted into rat sole skin, and hair follicle regeneration was evaluated histologically. Regenerated follicles and labelled DPCs were detected for all methods, although some follicles showed abnormal growth, i.e. a cystic or inverted appearance. The HVS method, pioneered here, resulted in significantly larger number of regenerated follicles that were more mature and regular than those observed using the other methods. Moreover, hair growth was detected after expanded adult-derived DPC transplantation using the HVS method. These results suggest that direct contact of epithelial and dermal components and better vascularization/oxygenation of the recipient site are critical for hair regeneration in cell-based therapies. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. The Dermal Papilla: An Instructive Niche for Epithelial Stem and Progenitor Cells in Development and Regeneration of the Hair Follicle

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    The dermal papilla (DP) of the hair follicle is both a chemical and physical niche for epithelial progenitor cells that regenerate the cycling portion of the hair follicle and generate the hair shaft. Here, we review experiments that revealed the importance of the DP in regulating the characteristics of the hair shaft and frequency of hair follicle regeneration. More recent work showed that the size of this niche is dynamic and actively regulated and reduction in DP cell number per follicle is sufficient to cause hair thinning and loss. The formation of the DP during follicle neogenesis provides a context to contemplate the mechanisms that maintain DP size and the potential to exploit these processes for hair preservation or restoration. PMID:24985131

  6. Aqueous extract of red deer antler promotes hair growth by regulating the hair cycle and cell proliferation in hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing-jie; Li, Zheng; Gu, Li-juan; Wang, Yun-bo; Lee, Mi-ra; Sung, Chang-keun

    2014-01-01

    Deer antlers are the only mammalian appendage capable of regeneration. We aimed to investigate the effect of red deer antler extract in regulating hair growth, using a mouse model. The backs of male mice were shaved at eight weeks of age. Crude aqueous extracts of deer antler were prepared at either 4 °C or 100 °C and injected subcutaneously to two separate groups of mice (n = 9) at 1 mL/day for 10 consecutive days, with water as a vehicle control group. The mice skin quantitative hair growth parameters were measured and 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine was used to identify label-retaining cells. We found that, in both the 4 °C and the 100 °C deer antler aqueous extract-injection groups, the anagen phase was extended, while the number of BrdU-incorporated cells was dramatically increased. These results indicate that deer antler aqueous extract promotes hair growth by extending the anagen phase and regulating cell proliferation in the hair follicle region.

  7. Potassium channel openers stimulate DNA synthesis in mouse epidermal keratinocyte and whole hair follicle cultures.

    PubMed

    Harmon, C S; Lutz, D; Ducote, J

    1993-01-01

    We have conducted studies using primary mouse epidermal keratinocyte and whole hair follicle cultures to investigate the mechanism of the hypertrichotic activity of potassium channel openers. In a time course study, the extent of stimulation of epidermal keratinocyte DNA synthesis by minoxidil increased as the rate of DNA synthesis in control cultures declined. Minoxidil stimulation of DNA synthesis in 7-day cultures required prolonged (> 1 day) exposure to the agent. Pinacidil and diazoxide also stimulated DNA synthesis in mouse epidermal keratinocyte cultures. In addition, minoxidil, pinacidil, diazoxide, and cromakalim stimulated DNA synthesis in whole-organ cultures of mouse hair follicles. These results suggest that potassium channel openers retard the loss of proliferative activity of differentiating keratinocytes and support the hypothesis that these agents stimulate hair growth through a direct effect on hair follicles.

  8. Establishment of human hair follicle mesenchymal stem cells with overexpressed human hepatocyte growth factor.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dan; Cheng, Hongjing; Liu, Jinyu; Zhang, Lei

    2017-06-01

    Chronic liver disease has become a major health problem that causes serious damage to human health. Since the existing treatment effect was not ideal, we need to seek new treatment methods. We utilized the gene recombination technology to obtain the human hair mesenchymal stem cells which overexpression of human hepatocyte growth factor (hHGF). Furthermore, we verified the property of transfected cells through detecting surface marker by flow cytometry. We show here establishment of the hHGF-overexpressing lentivirus vector, and successfully transfection to human hair follicle mesenchymal stem cells. The verified experiments could demonstrate the human hair follicle mesenchymal stem cells which have been transfected still have the properties of stem cells. We successfully constructed human hair follicle mesenchymal stem cells which overexpression hHGF, and maintain the same properties compared with pro-transfected cells.

  9. CD34 Expression by Hair Follicle Stem Cells Is Required for Skin Tumor Development in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Trempus, Carol S.; Morris, Rebecca J.; Ehinger, Matthew; Elmore, Amy; Bortner, Carl D.; Ito, Mayumi; Cotsarelis, George; Nijhof, Joanne G.W.; Peckham, John; Flagler, Norris; Kissling, Grace; Humble, Margaret M.; King, Leon C.; Adams, Linda D.; Desai, Dhimant; Amin, Shantu; Tennant, Raymond W.

    2007-01-01

    The cell surface marker CD34 marks mouse hair follicle bulge cells, which have attributes of stem cells, including quiescence and multipotency. Using a CD34 knockout (KO) mouse, we tested the hypothesis that CD34 may participate in tumor development in mice because hair follicle stem cells are thought to be a major target of carcinogens in the two-stage model of mouse skin carcinogenesis. Following initiation with 200 nmol 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA), mice were promoted with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) for 20 weeks. Under these conditions, CD34KO mice failed to develop papillomas. Increasing the initiating dose of DMBA to 400 nmol resulted in tumor development in the CD34KO mice, albeit with an increased latency and lower tumor yield compared with the wild-type (WT) strain. DNA adduct analysis of keratinocytes from DMBA-initiated CD34KO mice revealed that DMBA was metabolically activated into carcinogenic diol epoxides at both 200 and 400 nmol. Chronic exposure to TPA revealed that CD34KO skin developed and sustained epidermal hyperplasia. However, CD34KO hair follicles typically remained in telogen rather than transitioning into anagen growth, confirmed by retention of bromodeoxyuridine-labeled bulge stem cells within the hair follicle. Unique localization of the hair follicle progenitor cell marker MTS24 was found in interfollicular basal cells in TPA-treated WT mice, whereas staining remained restricted to the hair follicles of CD34KO mice, suggesting that progenitor cells migrate into epidermis differently between strains. These data show that CD34 is required for TPA-induced hair follicle stem cell activation and tumor formation in mice. PMID:17483328

  10. Ageing processes influence keratin and KAP expression in human hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Giesen, Melanie; Gruedl, Sabine; Holtkoetter, Olaf; Fuhrmann, Guido; Koerner, Andrea; Petersohn, Dirk

    2011-09-01

    In many cultures, a youthful look is strictly linked to strong and healthy hair. Source of the hair fibre is the hair follicle, a highly specialized skin appendage. Biological alterations because of intrinsic or extrinsic stimuli can destabilize this perfectly organized system, thus effecting hair growth or metabolism. Also, ageing could be characterized as a disturbance in this well-balanced machinery. Albeit the predominant symptom of hair ageing, greying, is addressed in a plurality of research activities, further age-related changes, e.g. related to hair structure, remain obscure. Therefore, we characterized hair follicles of two volunteer panels (below 25 years, above 50 years) on the molecular level, especially focussing on alterations influencing gene expression of keratins and keratin-associated proteins. We showed that concordantly to other biological systems the hair follicle undergoes several modifications during the ageing process associated among others with a significant decline in these structural proteins. Providing strategies to fight against these age-related changes is a challenge for hair science. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. Trps1 deficiency inhibits the morphogenesis of secondary hair follicles via decreased Noggin expression

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yujing; Nakanishi, Masako; Sato, Fuyuki; Oikawa, Kosuke; Muragaki, Yasuteru; Zhou, Gengyin

    2015-01-16

    Highlights: • The number of secondary hair follicles is reduced by half in Trps1 KO embryonic skin compared to wild-type skin. • Noggin expression is significantly decreased and BMP signaling is promoted in Trps1 KO embryonic skin. • Treatment with a Noggin or BMP inhibitor rescued the decreased number of hair follicles in Trps1 KO skin graft cultures. • Cell proliferation and apoptosis of the epidermis were normalized by Noggin treatment. - Abstract: A representative phenotype of patients with tricho-rhino-phalangeal syndrome (TRPS) is sparse hair. To understand the developmental defects of these patient’s hair follicles, we analyzed the development of hair follicles histologically and biochemically using Trps1 deficient (KO) mice. First, we compared the numbers of primary hair follicles in wild-type (WT) and KO embryos at different developmental stages. No differences were observed in the E14.5 skins of WT and KO mice. However, at later time points, KO fetal skin failed to properly develop secondary hair follicles, and the number of secondary hair follicles present in E18.5 KO skin was approximately half compared to that of WT skin. Sonic hedgehog expression was significantly decreased in E17.5 KO skin, whereas no changes were observed in Eda/Edar expression in E14.5 or E17.5 skins. In addition, Noggin expression was significantly decreased in E14.5 and E17.5 KO skin compared to WT skin. In parallel with the suppression of Noggin expression, BMP signaling was promoted in the epidermal cells of KO skins compared to WT skins as determined by immunohistochemistry for phosphorylated Smad1/5/8. The reduced number of secondary hair follicles was restored in skin graft cultures treated with a Noggin and BMP inhibitor. Furthermore, decreased cell proliferation, and increased apoptosis in KO skin was rescued by Noggin treatment. Taken together, we conclude that hair follicle development in Trps1 KO embryos is impaired directly or indirectly by decreased Noggin

  12. Predicting the spatiotemporal dynamics of hair follicle patterns in the developing mouse

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chi Wa; Niu, Ben; Warren, Mya; Pevny, Larysa Halyna; Lovell-Badge, Robin; Hwa, Terence; Cheah, Kathryn S. E.

    2014-01-01

    Reaction–diffusion models have been used as a paradigm for describing the de novo emergence of biological patterns such as stripes and spots. In many organisms, these initial patterns are typically refined and elaborated over the subsequent course of development. Here we study the formation of secondary hair follicle patterns in the skin of developing mouse embryos. We used the expression of sex-determining region Y box 2 to identify and distinguish the primary and secondary hair follicles and to infer the spatiotemporal dynamics of the follicle formation process. Quantitative analysis of the specific follicle patterns observed reveals a simple geometrical rule governing the formation of secondary follicles, and motivates an expansion–induction (EI) model in which new follicle formation is driven by the physical growth of the embryo. The EI model requires only one diffusible morphogen and provides quantitative, accurate predictions on the relative positions and timing of secondary follicle formation, using only the observed configuration of primary follicles as input. The same model accurately describes the positions of additional follicles that emerge from skin explants treated with an activator. Thus, the EI model provides a simple and robust mechanism for predicting secondary space-filling patterns in growing embryos. PMID:24550288

  13. Growth of secondary hair follicles of the Cashmere goat in vitro and their response to prolactin and melatonin.

    PubMed Central

    Ibraheem, M; Galbraith, H; Scaife, J; Ewen, S

    1994-01-01

    The isolation and viability in vitro of anagen secondary hair follicles of the Cashmere goat were studied. Isolated hair follicles were used to determine the effects on hair shaft elongation, of prolactin and melatonin, hormones considered to influence hair follicle growth and activity in vivo. Intact hair follicles were isolated from the dermal layer of the skin singly or in groups using watchmakers' forceps under a dissecting microscope. The isolated follicles were maintained floating in Williams E medium. The medium was supplemented with 1 of 6 concentrations of ovine prolactin (0, 50, 200, 400, 800 and 4000 micrograms/l) for the culture of hair follicles isolated during July and August, and with 1 of 5 concentrations of melatonin (0, 50, 150, 300, 600 ng/l) for the culture of hair follicles isolated during September and October. There was clear evidence of DNA synthesis, observed by autoradiography, in matrix cells of freshly isolated follicles incubated for 6 h in the presence of [methyl-3H]-thymidine. Similar measurements after 96 h of maintenance indicated a marked reduction in the incorporation of [methyl-3H]-thymidine in matrix cells of the follicles studied. Prolactin and melatonin were shown to have a stimulating effect on hair shaft elongation of secondary follicles during 24 h periods of measurement and cumulatively over 120 h. Maximum hair follicle growth was observed in follicles exposed to 400 micrograms/l of prolactin and follicles exposed to 300 ng/l of melatonin. The number of follicles remaining viable during each 24 h measuring period was not affected by prolactin, but was significantly reduced by melatonin treatment after 96 h of maintenance.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7559108

  14. THE ELECTRON MICROSCOPY OF THE HUMAN HAIR FOLLICLE

    PubMed Central

    Birbeck, M. S. C.; Mercer, E. H.

    1957-01-01

    1. The presumptive cortical cells of hair in the undifferentiated matrix of the bulb contain mitochondria, agranular vesicles, and many small dense R.N.P. particles, but no keratin, pigment granules, or endoplasmic reticulum. 2. In the mid-bulb region intercellular adhesion is limited to small localised areas. Intercellular gaps are common and the cell surfaces are irregularly convoluted. The melanocyte processes penetrate the cell gaps. The relation between their pigment-bearing tips and the involutions of the cell membranes suggests an active phagocytosis of the tips. 3. Fibrous keratin first appears in loose parallel strands of fine filaments (ca. 60 A diameter) in the mid-bulb. The filaments, the long mitochondria, and elongated nucleus are all parallel to the long axis of the cell and the axis of the follicle. 4. At the level of the constriction of the bulb and above, a dense amorphous substance appears between the fine filaments and apparently acts as adhesive cement. The bundles of filaments now form well defined fibrils. The packing of the filaments within the fibrils is in places hexagonal and elsewhere in the form of "whorls." 5. At higher levels further filaments and interfilamentous cement are added together and the whole cytoplasmic space becomes packed with fibrils which finally condense to massive blocks of keratin. The residual cellular material occupies the interstices. 6. The addition of the interfilamentous substance is regarded as an essential factor in keratinisation. Keratin is considered to be a complex made of fine filaments (α-filaments) embedded in an amorphous substance (γ-keratin) which has the higher cystine content. 7. The wide-angle fibre-type x-ray pattern is thought to be due to scattering by the fine α-filaments and some low angle lateral spacings to the filament-plus-cement structure. PMID:13438903

  15. Complex changes in the apoptotic and cell differentiation programs during initiation of the hair follicle response to chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sharova, Tatyana Y; Poterlowicz, Krzysztof; Botchkareva, Natalia V; Kondratiev, Nikita A; Aziz, Ahmar; Spiegel, Jeffrey H; Botchkarev, Vladimir A; Sharov, Andrey A

    2014-12-01

    Chemotherapy has severe side effects in normal rapidly proliferating organs, such as hair follicles, and causes massive apoptosis in hair matrix keratinocytes followed by hair loss. To define the molecular signature of hair follicle response to chemotherapy, human scalp hair follicles cultured ex vivo were treated with doxorubicin (DXR), and global microarray analysis was performed 3 hours after treatment. Microarray data revealed changes in expression of 504 genes in DXR-treated hair follicles versus controls. Among these genes, upregulations of several tumor necrosis factor family of apoptotic receptors (FAS, TRAIL (tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) receptors 1/2), as well as of a large number of keratin-associated protein genes, were seen after DXR treatment. Hair follicle apoptosis induced by DXR was significantly inhibited by either TRAIL-neutralizing antibody or caspase-8 inhibitor, thus suggesting a previously unreported role for TRAIL receptor signaling in mediating DXR-induced hair loss. These data demonstrate that the early phase of the hair follicle response to DXR includes upregulation of apoptosis-associated markers, as well as substantial reorganization of the terminal differentiation programs in hair follicle keratinocytes. These data provide an important platform for further studies toward the design of effective approaches for the management of chemotherapy-induced hair loss.

  16. Committed differentiation of hair follicle bulge cells into sebocytes: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Fu, Gang; Gao, Qiang-Guo; Lian, Xiao-Hua; Yu, Jin; Xiang, Ming-Ming; Yang, Tian

    2010-02-01

    Several studies have shown that hair follicle bugle cells can differentiate into hair follicles and contribute to the formation of the epidermis and sebaceous gland. Although many lines of evidence have suggested that the renewal and maintenance of the sebaceous gland depends on hair follicle bulge cells, direct evidence supporting the in vitro differentiation of follicle bulge cells into sebaceous gland cells has not been found. Rat vibrissa follicle bulge cells were isolated, cultured, and transfected with green fluorescent protein (GFPC1) plasmids carrying the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma2 (PPARgamma2 ) gene. The transfected cells were cultured in modified medium, and the morphologic changes of the cells were observed. Moreover, the expression of epithelial membrane antigens (EMAs) by the cells was detected by immunocytochemistry, and adipogenesis of the cells was evaluated. After induction culture, the cell body enlarged gradually and contained abundant cytoplasm; lipid droplets appeared in the cytoplasm of some cells, and the cells resembled sebocytes of the sebaceous gland. The cells were positive on oil red O and EMA staining. The expression of PPARgamma2 mRNA and protein was significantly upregulated in PPARgamma2-transfected cells. The rate of oil red O-stained and EMA-positive cells was higher in PPARgamma2-transfected cells after induction than in bulge-PPARgamma2 cells and non-transfected bulge cells. Rat vibrissa hair follicle bulge cells may differentiate into sebocytes in vitro, and the PPARgamma2 gene plays a crucial role.

  17. IMPAIRED SKIN AND HAIR FOLLICLE DEVELOPMENT IN RUNX2 DEFICIENT MICE

    PubMed Central

    Glotzer, Donald J.; Zelzer, Elazar; Olsen, Bjorn R.

    2008-01-01

    The transcription factor, Runx2, is known to play crucial roles in skeletal and tooth morphogenesis. Here we document that Runx2 has a regulatory role in skin and hair follicle development. The expression of Runx2 is restricted to hair follicles and is dynamic, pari passu with follicle development. Follicle maturation is delayed in the absence of Runx2 and overall skin and epidermal thickness of Runx2 null embryos is significantly reduced. The Runx2 null epidermis is hypoplastic, displaying reduced expression of Keratin 14, Keratin 1 and markers of proliferation. The expression pattern of Runx2 in the bulb epithelium of mature hair follicles is asymmetric and strikingly similar to that of Sonic hedgehog. This suggests that Runx2 may be a regulator of hedgehog signaling in skin as it is in bones and teeth. Supporting this possibility, we demonstrate that Sonic hedgehog, Patched1 and Gli1 transcripts are reduced in the skin of Runx2 null embryos. Moreover, we document Patched1 expression in epidermal basal cells and show that the skin of Sonic+/− embryos is thinner than that of wild-type littermates. These observations suggest that Runx2 and hedgehog signaling are involved in the well known, but unexplained, coupling of skin thickness to hair follicle development. PMID:18262513

  18. Expression of retinoid nuclear receptor superfamily members in human hair follicles and its implication in hair growth.

    PubMed

    Billoni, N; Gautier, B; Mahé, Y F; Bernard, B A

    1997-09-01

    Since clinical evidence of hair loss and hair depigmentation following etretinate therapy has been reported, we decided to study the expression levels of several members of the retinoid nuclear receptor superfamily in dermal and epithelial compartments of the human hair follicle. Additionally, we evaluated the effects of several ligands for these receptors on human hair growth in culture in vitro. We observed that the cellular/ cytoplasmic retinoic acid (RA) binding protein-II and the retinoid-X-receptor-alpha were constantly and strongly expressed in both compartments at levels comparable to those of vitamin D receptor. In dermal papilla cells, by contrast with RAR beta which was always expressed, RAR alpha and RAR gamma were not constantly expressed. In dermal sheath fibroblasts, both RAR alpha, RAR beta and RAR gamma mRNAs were moderately expressed, while in the epithelial compartment, namely the plucked hair, we observed the expression of the same genes in the absence of RAR beta. We also observed that RAR agonists all-trans RA and CD367 inhibited the survival of human hair follicles in culture in vitro, while RXR agonist CD2425 stimulated hair growth and survival at levels comparable to those of 1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, suggesting that RXR agonists might stimulate hair growth in humans in vivo.

  19. Expression and location of phospho-Artemis (Serine516) in hair follicles during induced growth of mouse hair.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xian-Jie; Zhu, Jian-Wei; Liu, Hai; Lu, Zhong-Fa; Zheng, Min

    2012-05-01

    Artemis has been implicated in having a role in NHEJ, and it is also a multifunctional protein. Previous studies have found Omenn syndrome-like phenotype due to Artemis mutations and associated with alopecia. As Artemis phosphorylation in its c-terminus including Serine516 is prerequisite for the Artemis endonuclease reaction, we postulate that Artemis (Serine516) may be expressed in hair follicle and relate to hair cycling. In this study, hair growth in C57BL/6 mice was induced by plucking the telogen hair on the back. Expression of Artemis (Serine516) in hair follicles during the hair growth cycle was evaluated by immunofluorescence using cryosections and a specific polyclonal anti-Artemis (Serine516) immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody. It was detected in germ cells, cap, and club hair adjoining the epidermis in telogen. In anagen II, intense staining for Artemis (Serine516) was found in the whole interfollicular epidermis, and in strand keratinocytes. In anagen IV, intense staining for Artemis (Serine516) was detected in basal cells and upper of outer root sheath (ORS) and inner root sheath (IRS). But only upper ORS and lower medulla were stained positive in anagen VI. Upper ORS and lower cortex were positively stained with Artemis (Serine516) in catagen. Based on the phenomenon that the expression of Artemis (Serine516) in mid-anagen and mature anagen was stronger than that in telogen and catagen, we suggest it may take roles in induced growth of mouse hair.

  20. 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate activates hair follicle melanocytes for hair pigmentation via Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Weiming; Tang, Hui; Guo, Haiying; Lei, Mingxing; Yan, Hongtao; Lian, Xiaohua; Wu, Jinjin

    2016-11-01

    Melanocyte stem cells (McSCs) undergo cyclical activation and quiescence together with hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs). This process is strictly controlled by the autonomous and extrinsic signaling environment. However, the modulation of factors important for the activation of McSCs for hair pigmentation remains unclear. 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) mimics vital signaling pathways involved in melanocyte growth and melanogenesis in vitro. To investigate whether TPA regulates quiescent McSCs for hair pigmentation, we topically smeared TPA on 7-week-old mouse dorsal skin and found that TPA stimulated hair growth and hair matrix pigmentation. These changes were associated with a significant increase in the number of hair bulb melanocytes. Moreover, in the TPA-treated group, hair bulge McSCs and hair bulb melanoblasts actively proliferated. At the molecular level, nuclear β-catenin, a key factor of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, was highly synthesized in melanocytes and keratinocytes in TPA-induced hair bulbs. Inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling by injecting Dickkopf1 plasmids into TPA-treated skin decreased hair matrix pigmentation and inhibited the proliferation and differentiation of McSCs. Our findings suggest that the topical application of TPA stimulates the proliferation and differentiation of McSCs and their progeny for hair matrix pigmentation by activating Wnt/β-catenin signaling. This might provide a useful experimental model for the study of signals controlling the activation of McSCs.

  1. Tbx18 targets dermal condensates for labeling, isolation, and gene ablation during embryonic hair follicle formation.

    PubMed

    Grisanti, Laura; Clavel, Carlos; Cai, Xiaoqiang; Rezza, Amelie; Tsai, Su-Yi; Sennett, Rachel; Mumau, Melanie; Cai, Chen-Leng; Rendl, Michael

    2013-02-01

    How cell fate decisions of stem and progenitor cells are regulated by their microenvironment or niche is a central question in stem cell and regenerative biology. Although functional analysis of hair follicle epithelial stem cells by gene targeting is well established, the molecular and genetic characterization of the dermal counterpart during embryonic morphogenesis has been lacking because of the absence of cell type-specific drivers. Here, we report that T-box transcription factor Tbx18 specifically marks dermal papilla (DP) precursor cells during embryonic hair follicle morphogenesis. With Tbx18(LacZ), Tbx18(H2BGFP), and Tbx18(Cre) knock-in mouse models, we demonstrate LacZ and H2BGFP (nuclear green fluorescent protein) expression and Cre activity in dermal condensates of nascent first-wave hair follicles at E14.5. As Tbx18 expression becomes more widespread throughout the dermis at later developmental stages, we use tamoxifen-inducible Cre-expressing mice, Tbx18(MerCreMer), to exclusively target DP precursor cells and their progeny. Finally, we ablate Tbx18 in full knockout mice, but find no perturbations in hair follicle formation, suggesting that Tbx18 is dispensable for normal DP function. In summary, our study establishes Tbx18 as a genetic driver to target for the first time embryonic DP precursors for labeling, isolation, and gene ablation that will greatly enhance investigations into their molecular functions during hair follicle morphogenesis.

  2. The structure and organization of lanceolate mechanosensory complexes at mouse hair follicles

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lishi; Ginty, David D

    2014-01-01

    In mouse hairy skin, lanceolate complexes associated with three types of hair follicles, guard, awl/auchene and zigzag, serve as mechanosensory end organs. These structures are formed by unique combinations of low-threshold mechanoreceptors (LTMRs), Aβ RA-LTMRs, Aδ-LTMRs, and C-LTMRs, and their associated terminal Schwann cells (TSCs). In this study, we investigated the organization, ultrastructure, and maintenance of longitudinal lanceolate complexes at each hair follicle subtype. We found that TSC processes at hair follicles are tiled and that individual TSCs host axonal endings of more than one LTMR subtype. Electron microscopic analyses revealed unique ultrastructural features of lanceolate complexes that are proposed to underlie mechanotransduction. Moreover, Schwann cell ablation leads to loss of LTMR terminals at hair follicles while, in contrast, TSCs remain associated with hair follicles following skin denervation in adult mice and, remarkably, become re-associated with newly formed axons, indicating a TSC-dependence of lanceolate complex maintenance and regeneration in adults. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01901.001 PMID:24569481

  3. Hair Follicle Regeneration in Skin Grafts: Current Concepts and Future Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Mahjour, Seyed Babak; Ghaffarpasand, Fariborz

    2012-01-01

    The repair and management of full-thickness skin defects resulting from burns and chronic wounds remain a significant unmet clinical challenge. For those skin defects exceeding 50%–60% of total body surface area, it is impractical to treat with autologous skin transplants because of the shortage of donor sites. The possibility of using tissue-engineered skin grafts for full-thickness wound repair is a promising approach. The primary goal of tissue-engineered skin grafts is to restore lost barrier function, but regeneration of appendages, such as hair follicles, has to be yet achieved. The successful regeneration of hair follicles in immunodeficient mice suggests that creating human hair follicles in tissue-engineered skin grafts is feasible. However, many limitations still need to be explored, particularly enriching isolated cells with trichogenic capacity, maintaining this ability during processing, and providing the cells with proper environmental cues. Current advances in hair follicle regeneration, in vitro and in vivo, are concisely summarized in this report, and key requirements to bioengineer a hair follicle are proposed, with emphasis on a three-dimensional approach. PMID:21883016

  4. The structure and organization of lanceolate mechanosensory complexes at mouse hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Li, Lishi; Ginty, David D

    2014-02-25

    In mouse hairy skin, lanceolate complexes associated with three types of hair follicles, guard, awl/auchene and zigzag, serve as mechanosensory end organs. These structures are formed by unique combinations of low-threshold mechanoreceptors (LTMRs), Aβ RA-LTMRs, Aδ-LTMRs, and C-LTMRs, and their associated terminal Schwann cells (TSCs). In this study, we investigated the organization, ultrastructure, and maintenance of longitudinal lanceolate complexes at each hair follicle subtype. We found that TSC processes at hair follicles are tiled and that individual TSCs host axonal endings of more than one LTMR subtype. Electron microscopic analyses revealed unique ultrastructural features of lanceolate complexes that are proposed to underlie mechanotransduction. Moreover, Schwann cell ablation leads to loss of LTMR terminals at hair follicles while, in contrast, TSCs remain associated with hair follicles following skin denervation in adult mice and, remarkably, become re-associated with newly formed axons, indicating a TSC-dependence of lanceolate complex maintenance and regeneration in adults. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01901.001.

  5. Effects of a Closed Space Environment on Gene Expression in Hair Follicles of Astronauts in the International Space Station

    PubMed Central

    Terada, Masahiro; Seki, Masaya; Takahashi, Rika; Yamada, Shin; Higashibata, Akira; Majima, Hideyuki J.; Sudoh, Masamichi; Mukai, Chiaki; Ishioka, Noriaki

    2016-01-01

    Adaptation to the space environment can sometimes pose physiological problems to International Space Station (ISS) astronauts after their return to earth. Therefore, it is important to develop healthcare technologies for astronauts. In this study, we examined the feasibility of using hair follicles, a readily obtained sample, to assess gene expression changes in response to spaceflight adaptation. In order to investigate the gene expression changes in human hair follicles during spaceflight, hair follicles of 10 astronauts were analyzed by microarray and real time qPCR analyses. We found that spaceflight alters human hair follicle gene expression. The degree of changes in gene expression was found to vary among individuals. In some astronauts, genes related to hair growth such as FGF18, ANGPTL7 and COMP were upregulated during flight, suggesting that spaceflight inhibits cell proliferation in hair follicles. PMID:27029003

  6. Effects of a Closed Space Environment on Gene Expression in Hair Follicles of Astronauts in the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Terada, Masahiro; Seki, Masaya; Takahashi, Rika; Yamada, Shin; Higashibata, Akira; Majima, Hideyuki J; Sudoh, Masamichi; Mukai, Chiaki; Ishioka, Noriaki

    2016-01-01

    Adaptation to the space environment can sometimes pose physiological problems to International Space Station (ISS) astronauts after their return to earth. Therefore, it is important to develop healthcare technologies for astronauts. In this study, we examined the feasibility of using hair follicles, a readily obtained sample, to assess gene expression changes in response to spaceflight adaptation. In order to investigate the gene expression changes in human hair follicles during spaceflight, hair follicles of 10 astronauts were analyzed by microarray and real time qPCR analyses. We found that spaceflight alters human hair follicle gene expression. The degree of changes in gene expression was found to vary among individuals. In some astronauts, genes related to hair growth such as FGF18, ANGPTL7 and COMP were upregulated during flight, suggesting that spaceflight inhibits cell proliferation in hair follicles.

  7. Characterization and quantification of wound-induced hair follicle neogenesis using in vivo confocal scanning laser microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Chengxiang; Luedtke, Michael A.; Prouty, Stephen M.; Burrows, Michelle; Kollias, Nikiforos

    2011-01-01

    Background In vivo confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) is a recently-developed non-invasive technique for visualizing microscopic structures with the skin. CSLM has been used to characterize proliferative and inflammatory skin diseases, neoplastic skin lesions and pigmented lesions. Objective Here, we assessed the ability of CSLM to evaluate the formation of neogenic hair follicles after a full thickness wound in mice. Methods Full-thickness wounds were made on the dorsal skin of 3-week old mice. After scab detachment (SD), the number, width, length, space and volume of neogenic hair follicles were analyzed using CSLM. The results were compared with those from conventional methods, including staining for alkaline phosphatase (AP) and keratin 17 (K17) as well as histology. Results Quantification of neogenic hair follicles using CSLM compared favorably with results from direct measurements on isolated epidermal tissue after immunostaining for K17, a marker for the epithelial portion of new hair follicles. CSLM detected 89% of K17-stained follicles. CSLM more accurately quantitated the number of new follicles compared to AP staining, which detects the dermal portion of the new follicle. The width and length measurement from CSLM and histology were very close and correlated with each other. The minimum length of a neogenic hair follicle that could be detected by CSLM was 21 μm. The space between neogenic hair follicles was decreased in histological sections compared to CSLM. Conclusions CSLM is an accurate and valuable method for counting and measuring neogenic hair follicles non-invasively. CSLM produces images similar to histology in mice. Measurements of microstructures using CSLM more accurately reflect actual sizes since this technique avoids fixation artifact. In vivo visualization of developing follicles with CSLM permits detection of serial changes in hair follicle formation, thus conserving numbers of mice required for studies and improving detection of

  8. Expression of MAEG, a novel basement membrane protein, in mouse hair follicle morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Osada, Aki; Kiyozumi, Daiji; Tsutsui, Ko; Ono, Yuichi; Weber, Charles N; Sugimoto, Nagisa; Imai, Toshio; Okada, Akiko; Sekiguchi, Kiyotoshi

    2005-02-01

    We screened for genes specifically expressed in the mesenchymes of developing hair follicles using representational differential analysis; one gene identified was MAEG, which encodes a protein consisting of five EGF-like repeats, a linker segment containing a cell-adhesive Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif, and a MAM domain. Immunohistochemistry showed that MAEG protein was localized at the basement membrane of embryonic skin and developing hair follicles, while MAEG expression diminished at the tip of the hair bud. A recombinant MAEG fragment containing the RGD motif was active in mediating adhesion of keratinocytes to the substratum in an RGD-dependent manner. One of the adhesion receptors recognizing the RGD motif was found to be the alpha8beta1 integrin, the expression of which was detected in the placode close to MAEG-positive mesenchymal cells, but later became restricted to the tip of the developing hair bud. Given its localized expression at the basement membrane in developing hair follicles and the RGD-dependent cell-adhesive activity, MAEG may play a role as a mediator regulating epithelial-mesenchymal interaction through binding to RGD-binding integrins including alpha8beta1 during hair follicle development.

  9. Restorative effect of hair follicular dermal cells on injured human hair follicles in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Yamao, Mikaru; Inamatsu, Mutsumi; Okada, Taro; Ogawa, Yuko; Ishida, Yuji; Tateno, Chise; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi

    2015-03-01

    No model is available for examining whether in vivo-damaged human hair follicles (hu-HFs) are rescued by transplanting cultured hu-HF dermal cells (dermal papilla and dermal sheath cells). Such a model might be valuable for examining whether in vivo-damaged hu-HFs such as miniaturized hu-HFs in androgenic alopecia are improvable by auto-transplanting hu-HF dermal cells. In this study, we first developed mice with humanized skin composed of hu-keratinocytes and hu-dermal fibroblasts. Then, a 'humanized scalp model mouse' was generated by transplanting hu-scalp HFs into the humanized skin. To demonstrate the usability of the model, the lower halves of the hu-HFs in the model were amputated in situ, and cultured hu-HF dermal cells were injected around the amputated area. The results demonstrated that the transplanted cells contributed to the restoration of the damaged HFs. This model could be used to explore clinically effective technologies for hair restoration therapy by autologous cell transplantation.

  10. De novo formation and ultra-structural characterization of a fiber-producing human hair follicle equivalent in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Gerd; Horland, Reyk; Wagner, Ilka; Ataç, Beren; Lauster, Roland

    2011-03-20

    Across many tissues and organs, the ability to create an organoid, the smallest functional unit of an organ, in vitro is the key both to tissue engineering and preclinical testing regimes. The hair follicle is an organoid that has been much studied based on its ability to grow quickly and to regenerate after trauma. But hair follicle formation in vitro has been elusive. Replacing hair lost due to pattern baldness or more severe alopecia, including that induced by chemotherapy, remains a significant unmet medical need. By carefully analyzing and recapitulating the growth conditions of hair follicle formation, we recreated human hair follicles in tissue culture that were capable of producing hair. Our microfollicles contained all relevant cell types and their structure and orientation resembled in some ways excised hair follicle specimens from human skin. This finding offers a new window onto hair follicle development. Having a robust culture system for hair follicles is an important step towards improved hair regeneration as well as to an understanding of how marketed drugs or drug candidates, including cancer chemotherapy, will affect this important organ.

  11. Keratin 15 promoter targets putative epithelial stem cells in the hair follicle bulge.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaping; Lyle, Stephen; Yang, Zaixin; Cotsarelis, George

    2003-11-01

    Putative epithelial stem cells in the hair follicle bulge are thought to play pivotal roles in the homeostasis, aging, and carcinogenesis of the cutaneous epithelium. Elucidating the role of bulge cells in these processes has been hampered by the lack of gene promoters that target this area with specificity. Here we describe the isolation of the mouse keratin 15 (K15) promoter and demonstrate its utility for preferentially targeting hair follicle bulge cells in adult K15/lacZ transgenic mice. We found that patterns of K15 expression and promoter activity changed with age and correlated with levels of differentiation within the cutaneous epithelium; less differentiated keratinocytes in the epidermis of the neonatal mouse and in the bulge area of the adult mouse preferentially expressed K15. These findings demonstrate the utility of the K15 promoter for targeting epithelial stem cells in the hair follicle bulge and set the stage for elucidating the role of bulge cells in skin biology.

  12. Noninvasive method for assessing the human circadian clock using hair follicle cells

    PubMed Central

    Akashi, Makoto; Soma, Haruhiko; Yamamoto, Takuro; Tsugitomi, Asuka; Yamashita, Shiko; Yamamoto, Takuya; Nishida, Eisuke; Yasuda, Akio; Liao, James K.; Node, Koichi

    2010-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the circadian clock requires qualitative evaluation of circadian clock gene expression. Thus far, no simple and effective method for detecting human clock gene expression has become available. This limitation has greatly hampered our understanding of human circadian rhythm. Here we report a convenient, reliable, and less invasive method for detecting human clock gene expression using biopsy samples of hair follicle cells from the head or chin. We show that the circadian phase of clock gene expression in hair follicle cells accurately reflects that of individual behavioral rhythms, demonstrating that this strategy is appropriate for evaluating the human peripheral circadian clock. Furthermore, using this method, we indicate that rotating shift workers suffer from a serious time lag between circadian gene expression rhythms and lifestyle. Qualitative evaluation of clock gene expression in hair follicle cells, therefore, may be an effective approach for studying the human circadian clock in the clinical setting. PMID:20798039

  13. Paracrine Secreted Frizzled-Related Protein 4 Inhibits Melanocytes Differentiation in Hair Follicle

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Haiying; Lei, Mingxing; Li, Yuhong; Liu, Yingxin; Tang, Yinhong; Xing, Yizhan; Deng, Fang

    2017-01-01

    Wnt signaling plays crucial role in regulating melanocyte stem cells/melanocyte differentiation in the hair follicle. However, how the Wnt signaling is balanced to be overactivated to control follicular melanocytes behavior remains unknown. Here, by using immunofluorescence staining, we showed that secreted frizzled-related protein 4 (sFRP4) is preferentially expressed in the skin epidermal cells rather than in melanocytes. By overexpression of sFRP4 in skin cells in vivo and in vitro, we found that sFRP4 attenuates activation of Wnt signaling, resulting in decrease of melanocytes differentiation in the regenerating hair follicle. Our findings unveiled a new regulator that involves modulating melanocytes differentiation through a paracrine mechanism in hair follicle, supplying a hope for potential therapeutic application to treat skin pigmentation disorders. PMID:28337220

  14. Fully functional hair follicle regeneration through the rearrangement of stem cells and their niches

    PubMed Central

    Toyoshima, Koh-ei; Asakawa, Kyosuke; Ishibashi, Naoko; Toki, Hiroshi; Ogawa, Miho; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Irié, Tarou; Tachikawa, Tetsuhiko; Sato, Akio; Takeda, Akira; Tsuji, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Organ replacement regenerative therapy is purported to enable the replacement of organs damaged by disease, injury or aging in the foreseeable future. Here we demonstrate fully functional hair organ regeneration via the intracutaneous transplantation of a bioengineered pelage and vibrissa follicle germ. The pelage and vibrissae are reconstituted with embryonic skin-derived cells and adult vibrissa stem cell region-derived cells, respectively. The bioengineered hair follicle develops the correct structures and forms proper connections with surrounding host tissues such as the epidermis, arrector pili muscle and nerve fibres. The bioengineered follicles also show restored hair cycles and piloerection through the rearrangement of follicular stem cells and their niches. This study thus reveals the potential applications of adult tissue-derived follicular stem cells as a bioengineered organ replacement therapy. PMID:22510689

  15. Micro-RNA-31 controls hair cycle-associated changes in gene expression programs of the skin and hair follicle.

    PubMed

    Mardaryev, Andrei N; Ahmed, Mohammed I; Vlahov, Nikola V; Fessing, Michael Y; Gill, Jason H; Sharov, Andrey A; Botchkareva, Natalia V

    2010-10-01

    The hair follicle is a cyclic biological system that progresses through stages of growth, regression, and quiescence, which involves dynamic changes in a program of gene regulation. Micro-RNAs (miRNAs) are critically important for the control of gene expression and silencing. Here, we show that global miRNA expression in the skin markedly changes during distinct stages of the hair cycle in mice. Furthermore, we show that expression of miR-31 markedly increases during anagen and decreases during catagen and telogen. Administration of antisense miR-31 inhibitor into mouse skin during the early- and midanagen phases of the hair cycle results in accelerated anagen development, and altered differentiation of hair matrix keratinocytes and hair shaft formation. Microarray, qRT-PCR and Western blot analyses revealed that miR-31 negatively regulates expression of Fgf10, the components of Wnt and BMP signaling pathways Sclerostin and BAMBI, and Dlx3 transcription factor, as well as selected keratin genes, both in vitro and in vivo. Using luciferase reporter assay, we show that Krt16, Krt17, Dlx3, and Fgf10 serve as direct miR-31 targets. Thus, by targeting a number of growth regulatory molecules and cytoskeletal proteins, miR-31 is involved in establishing an optimal balance of gene expression in the hair follicle required for its proper growth and hair fiber formation.

  16. Ligand-independent actions of the vitamin D receptor maintain hair follicle homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Skorija, Kristi; Cox, Megan; Sisk, Jeanne M; Dowd, Diane R; MacDonald, Paul N; Thompson, Catherine C; Demay, Marie B

    2005-04-01

    Alopecia is a feature of vitamin D receptor (VDR) mutations in humans and in VDR null mice. This alopecia results from an inability to initiate the anagen phase of the hair cycle after follicle morphogenesis is complete. Thus, once the initial hair is shed it does not regrow. VDR expression in the epidermal component of the hair follicle, the keratinocyte, is critical for maintenance of the hair cycle. To determine which functional domains of the VDR are required for hair cycling, mutant VDR transgenes were targeted to the keratinocytes of VDR null mice. Keratinocyte-specific expression of a VDR transgene with a mutation in the hormone-binding domain that abolishes ligand binding restores normal hair cycling in VDR null mice, whereas a VDR transgene with a mutation in the activation function 2 domain that impairs nuclear receptor coactivator recruitment results in a partial rescue. Mutations in the nuclear receptor corepressor Hairless are also associated with alopecia in humans and mice. Hairless binds the VDR, resulting in transcriptional repression. Neither VDR mutation affects Hairless interactions or its ability to repress transcription. These studies demonstrate that the effects of the VDR on the hair follicle are ligand independent and point to novel molecular and cellular actions of this nuclear receptor.

  17. Mitochondrial aerobic respiration is activated during hair follicle stem cell differentiation, and its dysfunction retards hair regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yan; Luo, Binping; Deng, Zhili; Wang, Ben; Liu, Fangfen; Li, Jinmao; Shi, Wei; Xie, Hongfu; Hu, Xingwang

    2016-01-01

    Background. Emerging research revealed the essential role of mitochondria in regulating stem/progenitor cell differentiation of neural progenitor cells, mesenchymal stem cells and other stem cells through reactive oxygen species (ROS), Notch or other signaling pathway. Inhibition of mitochondrial protein synthesis results in hair loss upon injury. However, alteration of mitochondrial morphology and metabolic function during hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) differentiation and how they affect hair regeneration has not been elaborated upon. Methods. We compared the difference in mitochondrial morphology and activity between telogen bulge cells and anagen matrix cells. Expression levels of mitochondrial ROS and superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) were measured to evaluate redox balance. In addition, the level of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) were estimated to present the change in energetic metabolism during differentiation. To explore the effect of the mitochondrial metabolism on regulating hair regeneration, hair growth was observed after application of a mitochondrial respiratory inhibitor upon hair plucking. Results. During HFSCs differentiation, mitochondria became elongated with more abundant organized cristae and showed higher activity in differentiated cells. SOD2 was enhanced for redox balance with relatively stable ROS levels in differentiated cells. PDK increased in HFSCs while differentiated cells showed enhanced PDH, indicating that respiration switched from glycolysis to oxidative phosphorylation during differentiation. Inhibiting mitochondrial respiration in differentiated hair follicle cells upon hair plucking repressed hair regeneration in vivo. Conclusions. Upon HFSCs differentiation, mitochondria are elongated with more abundant cristae and show higher activity, accompanying with activated aerobic respiration in differentiated cells for higher energy supply. Also, dysfunction of mitochondrial respiration delays hair

  18. Polymeric nanoparticles-embedded organogel for roxithromycin delivery to hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Główka, Eliza; Wosicka-Frąckowiak, Hanna; Hyla, Kinga; Stefanowska, Justyna; Jastrzębska, Katarzyna; Klapiszewski, Łukasz; Jesionowski, Teofil; Cal, Krzysztof

    2014-09-01

    Drug delivery into hair follicles with the use of nanoparticles (NPs) is gaining more importance as drug-loaded NPs may accumulate in hair follicle openings. The aim was to develop and evaluate a pluronic lecithin organogel (PLO) with roxithromycin (ROX)-loaded NPs for follicular targeting. Polymeric NPs were evaluated in terms of particle shape, size, zeta potential, suspension stability, encapsulation efficiency and in vitro drug release. Lyophilized NPs were incorporated into the PLO and rheological measurements of the nanoparticles-embedded organogels were done. The fate of the NPs in the skin was traced by incorporation of a fluorescent dye into the NPs. As a result, ROX was efficiently incorporated into polymeric NPs characterized by the appropriate size (approximately 300 nm) allowing drug delivery to hair follicles. In ex vivo human skin penetration studies, horizontal skin sections revealed fluorescence deep in the hair follicles. Although the organogel has higher affinity to the lipidic follicular area than an aqueous suspension of NPs, it did not seem to improve penetration of the NPs along the hair shaft. The results proved that it was possible to achieve preferential targeting to the pilosebaceous unit using polymeric NPs formulated either into the aqueous suspension or semisolid topical formulation.

  19. Epidermal and hair follicle progenitor cells express melanoma-associated chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan core protein.

    PubMed

    Ghali, Lucy; Wong, Soon-Tee; Tidman, Nick; Quinn, Anthony; Philpott, Michael P; Leigh, Irene M

    2004-02-01

    Basal keratinocytes in the epidermis and hair follicle are biologically heterogeneous but must include a stable subpopulation of epidermal stem cells. In animal models these can be identified by their retention of radioactive label due to their slow cycle (label-retaining cells) but human studies largely depend on in vitro characterization of colony forming efficiency and clonogenicity. Differential integrin expression has been used to detect cells of increased proliferative potential but further stem cell markers are urgently required for in vivo and in vitro characterization. Using LHM2, a monoclonal antibody reacting with a high molecular weight melanoma-associated proteoglycan core protein, a subset of basal keratinocytes in both the interfollicular epidermis and the hair follicle has been identified. Coexpression of melanoma-associated chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan with keratins 15 and 19 as well as beta 1 and alpha 6 integrins has been examined in adult and fetal human skin from hair bearing, nonhair bearing, and palmoplantar regions. Although melanoma-associated chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan coexpression with a subset of beta 1 integrin bright basal keratinocytes within the epidermis suggests that melanoma-associated chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan colocalizes with epidermal stem cells, melanoma-associated chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan expression within the hair follicle was more complex and multiple subpopulations of basal outer root sheath keratinocytes are described. These data suggest that epithelial compartmentalization of the outer root sheath is more complex than interfollicular epidermis and further supports the hypothesis that more than one hair follicle stem cell compartment may exist.

  20. [Implantation of newborn mice skin cells with chamber method to construct a model of hair follicle development].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shun-e; Hu, Zhi-qi; Feng, Chuan-bo; Liu, Ge; Miao, Yong

    2012-05-01

    To construct a convenient, reliable and visual model of hair follicle development to test the hair-inductive potential of follicular cells and investigate the molecular mechanism regulating hair follicle morphogenesis and cycling. An open chamber was transplanted into the nude mice dorsal skin, dermal and epidermal cells isolated from newborn C57BL/6 mice skin were mixed at a specific ratio and then injected into the chamber together, 1 week after transplantation, the chamber was removed, and then, hair formation and regeneration after hair plucking was observed. 1 week after cells implantation, the wound was moist without apparent contraction and among that pink and translucent tissue was formed. 2 weeks after implantation, the wound healed completely. 3 weeks after implantation, black hair grew from the skin was observed. 4 weeks after implantation, thick and black hair grew from the skin vertically. Completely developed structure of hair follicle was observed with paraffin section and HE staining. 1 week after plucking, new hair had regrown. The ratio of cell component was varied, whereas the other component was fixed at 1 x 10(7) cells. When the number of epidermal cells was reduced to 1 x 10(6) cells, the efficiency of hair follicle reconstitution was mostly unchanged. On the other hand, the density of newly formed hair was diminished considerably by reducing the number of dermal cells to 5 x 10(6) cells or lower. Neither epidermal cells nor dermal cells transplanted alone formed hair follicle. Newborn mice skin cells transplanted by chamber method can construct a complete model of hair follicle development, which can be used to test the hair-inductive potential of follicular cells and investigate the molecular mechanism regulating hair follicle morphogenesis and cycling.

  1. [Comparative study of lymphoid follicles in mucosa of pharynx and mucosal associated lymphoid tissues in paranasal sinuses].

    PubMed

    Zhai, Weigang; Yao, Min; Chen, Jue

    2013-08-01

    To study the relationship between the lymphoid follicles in mucous membrane of pharynx and mucosal associated lymphoid tissues (MALT). Ten folliculi obtained from 10 patients of follicular pharyngitis and mucosa taken form 10 patients of paranasal sinusitis were fixed in neutral formalin and embedded in paraffin. Sections were prepared, stained by H. E and by immunohistochemical method staining with S-100,and observe by light microscopy. We observed the morphology of lymphoid follicles in mucous membrane of pharynx with MALT in mucosa of paranasal sinusitis as the contrast. Lymphoid follicles in mucosa of pharynx compared with MALT in the mucosa of paranasal sinuses, there was no mantle zone, no typical germinal center and no mucosal epithelium, immunological staining with S-100 was week. The lymphoid follicles in mucosa of pharynx does not belong to the MALT.

  2. Targeted delivery of a poorly water-soluble compound to hair follicles using polymeric nanoparticle suspensions.

    PubMed

    Morgen, Michael; Lu, Guang Wei; Du, Daniel; Stehle, Randall; Lembke, Franz; Cervantes, Jessica; Ciotti, Susan; Haskell, Roy; Smithey, Dan; Haley, Kevin; Fan, Conglin

    2011-09-15

    This study explored the utility of topically applied polymeric nanoparticle suspensions to target delivery of poorly water-soluble drugs to hair follicles. Several formulations of amorphous drug/polymer nanoparticles were prepared from ethyl cellulose and UK-157,147 (systematic name (3S,4R)-[6-(3-hydroxyphenyl)sulfonyl]-2,2,3-trimethyl-4-(2-methyl-3-oxo-2,3-dihydropyridazin-6-yloxy)-3-chromanol), a potassium channel opener, using sodium glycocholate (NaGC) as a surface stabilizer. Nanoparticle suspensions were evaluated to determine if targeted drug delivery to sebaceous glands and hair follicles could be achieved. In in vitro testing with rabbit ear tissue, delivery of UK-157,147 to the follicles was demonstrated with limited distribution to the surrounding dermis. Delivery to hair follicles was also demonstrated in vivo, based on stimulation of hair growth in tests of 100-nm nanoparticles with a C3H mouse model. The nanoparticles were well-tolerated, with no visible skin irritation. In vivo tests of smaller nanoparticles with a hamster ear model also indicated targeted delivery to sebaceous glands. The nanoparticles released drug rapidly in in vitro nonsink dissolution tests and were stable in suspension for 3 months. The present results show selective drug delivery to the follicle by follicular transport of nanoparticles and rapid release of a poorly water-soluble drug. Thus, nanoparticles represent a promising approach for targeted topical delivery of low-solubility compounds to hair follicles. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A genetic basis of variation in eccrine sweat gland and hair follicle density.

    PubMed

    Kamberov, Yana G; Karlsson, Elinor K; Kamberova, Gerda L; Lieberman, Daniel E; Sabeti, Pardis C; Morgan, Bruce A; Tabin, Clifford J

    2015-08-11

    Among the unique features of humans, one of the most salient is the ability to effectively cool the body during extreme prolonged activity through the evapotranspiration of water on the skin's surface. The evolution of this novel physiological ability required a dramatic increase in the density and distribution of eccrine sweat glands relative to other mammals and a concomitant reduction of body hair cover. Elucidation of the genetic underpinnings for these adaptive changes is confounded by a lack of knowledge about how eccrine gland fate and density are specified during development. Moreover, although reciprocal changes in hair cover and eccrine gland density are required for efficient thermoregulation, it is unclear if these changes are linked by a common genetic regulation. To identify pathways controlling the relative patterning of eccrine glands and hair follicles, we exploited natural variation in the density of these organs between different strains of mice. Quantitative trait locus mapping identified a large region on mouse Chromosome 1 that controls both hair and eccrine gland densities. Differential and allelic expression analysis of the genes within this interval coupled with subsequent functional studies demonstrated that the level of En1 activity directs the relative numbers of eccrine glands and hair follicles. These findings implicate En1 as a newly identified and reciprocal determinant of hair follicle and eccrine gland density and identify a pathway that could have contributed to the evolution of the unique features of human skin.

  4. A genetic basis of variation in eccrine sweat gland and hair follicle density

    PubMed Central

    Kamberov, Yana G.; Karlsson, Elinor K.; Kamberova, Gerda L.; Lieberman, Daniel E.; Sabeti, Pardis C.; Morgan, Bruce A.; Tabin, Clifford J.

    2015-01-01

    Among the unique features of humans, one of the most salient is the ability to effectively cool the body during extreme prolonged activity through the evapotranspiration of water on the skin’s surface. The evolution of this novel physiological ability required a dramatic increase in the density and distribution of eccrine sweat glands relative to other mammals and a concomitant reduction of body hair cover. Elucidation of the genetic underpinnings for these adaptive changes is confounded by a lack of knowledge about how eccrine gland fate and density are specified during development. Moreover, although reciprocal changes in hair cover and eccrine gland density are required for efficient thermoregulation, it is unclear if these changes are linked by a common genetic regulation. To identify pathways controlling the relative patterning of eccrine glands and hair follicles, we exploited natural variation in the density of these organs between different strains of mice. Quantitative trait locus mapping identified a large region on mouse Chromosome 1 that controls both hair and eccrine gland densities. Differential and allelic expression analysis of the genes within this interval coupled with subsequent functional studies demonstrated that the level of En1 activity directs the relative numbers of eccrine glands and hair follicles. These findings implicate En1 as a newly identified and reciprocal determinant of hair follicle and eccrine gland density and identify a pathway that could have contributed to the evolution of the unique features of human skin. PMID:26195765

  5. Negative regulation of Shh levels by Kras and Fgfr2 during hair follicle development.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Anandaroop; Krishnaswami, Suguna Rani; Cowing-Zitron, Christopher; Hung, Nai-Jung; Reilly-Rhoten, Heather; Burns, Julianne; Yu, Benjamin D

    2013-01-15

    Activating mutations in the KRAS oncogene are associated with three related human syndromes, which vary in hair and skin phenotypes depending on the involved allele. How variations in RAS signals are interpreted during hair and skin development is unknown. In this study, we investigated the developmental and transcriptional response of skin and hair to changes in RAS activity, using mouse genetic models and microarray analysis. While activation of Kras (Kras(G12D)) in the skin had strong effects on hair growth and hair shape, steady state changes in downstream RAS/MAPK effectors were subtle and detected only by transcriptional responses. To model the transcriptional response of multiple developmental pathways to active RAS, the effects of growth factor stimulation were studied in skin explants. Here FGF acutely suppressed Shh transcription within 90 min but had significantly less effect on Eda, WNT, Notch or BMP pathways. Furthermore, in vivo Fgfr2 loss-of-function in the ectoderm caused derepression of Shh, revealing a role for FGF in Shh regulation in the hair follicle. These studies define both dosage sensitive effects of RAS signaling on hair morphogenesis and reveal acute mechanisms for fine-tuning Shh levels in the hair follicle. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. In vitro skin models to study epithelial regeneration from the hair follicle

    PubMed Central

    Ojeh, Nkemcho; Akgül, Baki; Tomic-Canic, Marjana; Philpott, Mike

    2017-01-01

    The development of dermal equivalents (DEs) for the treatment of burns has contributed toward efficient wound closure. A collagen-glycosaminoglycan DE (C-GAG) grafted with hair follicles converted a full-thickness wound to partial-thickness resulting in complete wound closure and restored hair. In this study we compared the ability of both intact pilosebaceous units (PSU) or truncated hair follicles (THF) to regenerate a multilayered epidermis in vitro when implanted into de-epidermalized dermis (DED) or C-GAG with the epidermis generated in vivo using C-CAG. Keratinocytes explanted from the outer root sheath of PSU and THF in both DED and C-GAG but only formed a multilayered epidermis with PSU in DED. PSU were more effective at forming multilayered epidermis in DED than THF. Both DED and C-GAG skin expressed proliferation (PCNA), differentiation (K1, K10), hyperproliferation (K6, K16), basal (K14), putative stem cell (p63), extracellular matrix protein (Collagen IV), mesenchymal (vimentin) and adherens junction (β-catenin) markers. These data suggest DEs supported initial maintenance of the implanted hair follicles, in particular PSU, and provide an excellent model with which to investigate the regulation of hair follicle progenitor epithelial cells during epidermal regeneration. Although neither PSU nor THF formed multilayered epidermis in C-CAG in vitro, hair follicles implanted into engrafted C-GAG on a burns patient resulted in epithelial regeneration and expression of proliferation and differentiation markers in a similar manner to that seen in vitro. However, the failure of C-GAG to support epidermal regeneration in vitro suggests in vivo factors are essential for full epidermal regeneration using C-GAG. PMID:28350869

  7. Characterization of rat hair follicle stem cells selected by vario magnetic activated cell sorting system.

    PubMed

    Huang, Enyi; Lian, Xiaohua; Chen, Wei; Yang, Tian; Yang, Li

    2009-10-30

    Hair follicle stem cells (HfSCs) play crucial roles in hair follicle morphogenesis and hair cycling. These stem cells are self-renewable and have the multi-lineage potential to generate epidermis, sebaceous glands, and hair follicle. The separation and identification of hair follicle stem cells are important for further research in stem cell biology. In this study, we report on the successful enrichment of rat hair follicle stem cells through vario magnetic activated cell sorting (Vario MACS) and the biological characteristics of the stem cells. We chose the HfSCs positive surface markers CD34, alpha 6-integrin and the negative marker CD71 to design four isolation strategies: positive selection with single marker of CD34, positive selection with single marker of alpha 6-integrin, CD71 depletion followed by CD34 positive selection, and CD71 depletion followed by alpha 6-integrin positive selection. The results of flow cytometry analysis showed that all four strategies had ideal effects. Specifically, we conducted a series of researches on HfSCs characterized by their high level of CD34, termed CD34(bri) cells, and low to undetectable expression of CD34, termed CD34(dim) cells. CD34(bri) cells had greater proliferative potential and higher colony-forming ability than CD34(dim) cells. Furthermore, CD34(bri) cells had some typical characteristics as progenitor cells, such as large nucleus, obvious nucleolus, large nuclear:cytoplasmic ratio and few cytoplasmic organelles. Our findings clearly demonstrated that HfSCs with high purity and viability could be successfully enriched with Vario MACS.

  8. Selective activation of the versican promoter by epithelial– mesenchymal interactions during hair follicle development

    PubMed Central

    Kishimoto, Jiro; Ehama, Ritsuko; Wu, Lin; Jiang, Shuwei; Jiang, Nanyan; Burgeson, Robert E.

    1999-01-01

    Interaction between the epithelium and the mesenchyme is an essential feature of organogenesis, including hair follicle formation. The dermal papilla (DP), a dense aggregate of specialized dermis-derived stromal cells located at the bottom of the follicle, is a major component of hair that signals the follicular epithelial cells to prolong the hair growth process. However, little is known about DP-specific gene activation with regard to hair induction. In this study we demonstrate that a short fragment (839 bp) of the human versican (a core protein of one of the matrix chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans) promoter is sufficient to activate lacZ reporter gene expression in the DP of postnatal transgenic mice and also in the condensed mesenchyme (the origin of the DP) beneath the hair placode during hair follicle embryogenesis. Using the same versican promoter with green fluorescent protein (GFP), large numbers of fresh pelage DP cells were isolated from newborn transgenic skin by high-speed cell sorting. These GFP-positive DP cells showed abundant versican mRNA, confirming that the reporter molecules reflected endogenous versican gene expression. These sorted GFP-positive cells showed DP-like morphology in culture, but both GFP and versican expression was lost during primary culture. In vivo hair growth assays showed that GFP-positive cells could induce hair when grafted with epithelial cells, whereas GFP-negative cells grafted with epithelium or GFP-positive cells alone did not. These results suggest that versican may play an essential role both in mesenchymal condensation and in hair induction. PMID:10377415

  9. Organogenesis from dissociated cells: generation of mature cycling hair follicles from skin-derived cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ying; Du, Xiabing; Wang, Wei; Boucher, Marylene; Parimoo, Satish; Stenn, Kurts

    2005-05-01

    Hair follicle formation and cycling involve extensive and continuous interactions between epithelial and mesenchymal components. A system for rapidly and reproducibly generating hair follicles from dissociated epithelial and mesenchymal cells is described here. The system serves both as a tool for measuring the trichogenic property of cells and as a tool for studying the mechanisms that dissociated cells use to assemble an organ. In this system, hair follicles develop when dissociated cells, isolated from newborn mouse skin, are injected into adult mouse truncal skin. This morphogenetic process involves the aggregation of epithelial cells to form clusters that are sculpted by apoptosis to generate "infundibular cysts". From the "infundibular cysts", hair germs form centrifugally followed by follicular buds and then pegs that grow asymmetrically to differentiate into cycling mature pilosebaceous structures. Marker studies correlate the molecular differentiation of these follicles with in situ systems. This study suggests that the earliest phase of a developing epithelial-mesenchymal system--even from dissociated cell preparations--requires an epithelial platform.

  10. Secrets of the Hair Follicle: Now on Your iPhone.

    PubMed

    Millar, Sarah E

    2015-09-14

    Skin development requires communication between epithelial and mesenchymal cells, melanocytes, and neurons. In this issue of Developmental Cell, Sennett et al. (2015) shed new light on these mechanisms by simultaneously profiling multiple different cell types in embryonic mouse skin at the onset of hair follicle formation.

  11. Hair follicles' transit-amplifying cells govern concurrent dermal adipocyte production through Sonic Hedgehog.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bing; Tsai, Pai-Chi; Gonzalez-Celeiro, Meryem; Chung, Oliver; Boumard, Benjamin; Perdigoto, Carolina N; Ezhkova, Elena; Hsu, Ya-Chieh

    2016-10-15

    Growth and regeneration of one tissue within an organ compels accommodative changes in the surrounding tissues. However, the molecular nature and operating logic governing these concurrent changes remain poorly defined. The dermal adipose layer expands concomitantly with hair follicle downgrowth, providing a paradigm for studying coordinated changes of surrounding lineages with a regenerating tissue. Here, we discover that hair follicle transit-amplifying cells (HF-TACs) play an essential role in orchestrating dermal adipogenesis through secreting Sonic Hedgehog (SHH). Depletion of Shh from HF-TACs abrogates both dermal adipogenesis and hair follicle growth. Using cell type-specific deletion of Smo, a gene required in SHH-receiving cells, we found that SHH does not act on hair follicles, adipocytes, endothelial cells, and hematopoietic cells for adipogenesis. Instead, SHH acts directly on adipocyte precursors, promoting their proliferation and their expression of a key adipogenic gene, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (Pparg), to induce dermal adipogenesis. Our study therefore uncovers a critical role for TACs in orchestrating the generation of both their own progeny and a neighboring lineage to achieve concomitant tissue production across lineages.

  12. Paracrine crosstalk between human hair follicle dermal papilla cells and microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bassino, Eleonora; Gasparri, Franco; Giannini, Valentina; Munaron, Luca

    2015-05-01

    Human follicle dermal papilla cells (FDPC) are a specialized population of mesenchymal cells located in the skin. They regulate hair follicle (HF) development and growth, and represent a reservoir of multipotent stem cells. Growing evidence supports the hypothesis that HF cycling is associated with vascular remodeling. Follicular keratinocytes release vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) that sustains perifollicular angiogenesis leading to an increase of follicle and hair size. Furthermore, several human diseases characterized by hair loss, including Androgenetic Alopecia, exhibit alterations of skin vasculature. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying HF vascularization remain largely unknown. In vitro coculture approaches can be successfully employed to greatly improve our knowledge and shed more light on this issue. Here we used Transwell-based co-cultures to show that FDPC promote survival, proliferation and tubulogenesis of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC) more efficiently than fibroblasts. Accordingly, FDPC enhance the endothelial release of VEGF and IGF-1, two well-known proangiogenic growth factors. Collectively, our data suggest a key role of papilla cells in vascular remodeling of the hair follicle.

  13. CD34 expression in human hair follicles and tricholemmoma: a comprehensive study.

    PubMed

    Misago, Noriyuki; Toda, Shuji; Narisawa, Yutaka

    2011-08-01

    There has recently been controversy regarding whether clone My10 is superior to clone QBEND-10 for labeling cells of tricholemmal lineage. Moreover, there have been no previous reports on the CD34 expression in human vellus hair follicles. We performed a comprehensive study of the CD34 expression in human terminal and vellus hair follicles and in 10 tricholemmomas using both the QBEND-10 and the My10 clones. We also performed two different procedures of immunostaining, which included the using of the standard avidin-biotin-peroxidase (ABC) complex system and the Envision system. The most sensitive marker of CD34 for normal human hair follicles and tricholemmomas is QBEND-10 using the ABC system. The degree and strength of the CD34 positive staining mainly depended on the method being used (whether it was the ABC system or the Envision system) rather than the clone. CD34 staining was rarely (20-30%) seen in the anagen and catagen vellus hair follicles, and could only be seen by the QBEND-10 clone using the ABC system. CD34 expression in the tricholemmomas represented either a diffuse or peripheral pattern. CD34 may not be a tricholemmal lineage-specific antigen, but may be related to certain functions of the cells. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  14. Hair follicle units promote re-epithelialization in chronic cutaneous wounds: A clinical case series study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia-Qi; Zhao, Kong-Bo; Feng, Zi-Hao; Qi, Fa-Zhi

    2015-07-01

    Chronic cutaneous wounds are one of the most unfavorable pathophysiological processes in routine practice. However, developments in hair follicle unit therapy may aid the treatment of these wounds. The aim of the present study was to investigate the function of hair follicle units in chronic cutaneous wound re-epithelialization and to develop an effective protocol for wound treatment. A total of 14 patients, of which nine were male and five were female, with a mean age of 60.71 years (range, 19-76 years) and a mean wound area of 74.14 cm(2), were treated in the study. The hair follicle units were dissected from a scalp graft and transplanted into the chronic cutaneous wound bed, after which clinical evaluation was performed. Images of the recipient site were captured at 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8 and 14 weeks following transplantation. In addition, histological examinations were conducted postoperatively at week 16. Total wound re-epithelialization was observed in all the patients. Histological analysis revealed that the epidermis and papillary dermis were present in the wound area. Adnexal structures and the reticular dermis were also observed. Therefore, the present study demonstrated the ability of hair follicle units to promote chronic cutaneous wound healing.

  15. Outer root sheath keratinization in anagen and catagen of the mammalian hair follicle. A seventh distinct type of keratinization in the hair follicle: trichilemmal keratinization.

    PubMed

    Pinkus, H; Iwasaki, T; Mishima, Y

    1981-08-01

    Trichilemmal keratinization, first described in Maurer in 1895 and rediscovered by Holmes (1968) and Pinkus (1968) converts the stratified epithelium of the outer root sheath into anuclear keratin without an intervening keratohyalin layer. It is a distinct seventh type of keratinization in the hair follicle, not derived from the hair matrix. It occurs wherever outer root sheath is not apposed to inner root sheath, in anagen in the zone of sloughing just below the opening of the sebaceous duct, in catagen in the trichilemmal sac surrounding the lower end of the dying hair shaft where it forms the club of the telogen hair. Electron microscopic study of the thick hairs of dogs (but not the tiny hairs of rodents) reveals intricate infoldings of non-keratinized and keratinized cells. It also shows unique ladder-like membrane coating granules in anagen, which are strongly acid phosphatase-positive and are suggested to be the source of enzyme involved with disintegration of the inner root sheath.

  16. Isolation and culture of neural crest stem cells from human hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ruifeng; Xu, Xiaowei

    2013-04-06

    Hair follicles undergo lifelong growth and hair cycle is a well-controlled process involving stem cell proliferation and quiescence. Hair bulge is a well-characterized niche for adult stem cells. This segment of the outer root sheath contains a number of different types of stem cells, including epithelial stem cells, melanocyte stem cells and neural crest like stem cells. Hair follicles represent an accessible and rich source for different types of human stem cells. We and others have isolated neural crest stem cells (NCSCs) from human fetal and adult hair follicles. These human stem cells are label-retaining cells and are capable of self-renewal through asymmetric cell division in vitro. They express immature neural crest cell markers but not differentiation markers. Our expression profiling study showed that they share a similar gene expression pattern with murine skin immature neural crest cells. They exhibit clonal multipotency that can give rise to myogenic, melanocytic, and neuronal cell lineages after in vitro clonal single cell culture. Differentiated cells not only acquire lineage-specific markers but also demonstrate appropriate functions in ex vivo conditions. In addition, these NCSCs show differentiation potential toward mesenchymal lineages. Differentiated neuronal cells can persist in mouse brain and retain neuronal differentiation markers. It has been shown that hair follicle derived NCSCs can help nerve regrowth, and they improve motor function in mice transplanted with these stem cells following transecting spinal cord injury. Furthermore, peripheral nerves have been repaired with stem cell grafts, and implantation of skin-derived precursor cells adjacent to crushed sciatic nerves has resulted in remyelination. Therefore, the hair follicle/skin derived NCSCs have already shown promising results for regenerative therapy in preclinical models. Somatic cell reprogramming to induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells has shown enormous potential for

  17. Differential Expression of Proteins Associated with the Hair Follicle Cycle - Proteomics and Bioinformatics Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Tian; Yang, Mifang; Li, Zhongming; Ping, Fengfeng; Fan, Weixin

    2016-01-01

    Hair follicle cycling can be divided into the following three stages: anagen, catagen, and telogen. The molecular signals that orchestrate the follicular transition between phases are still unknown. To better understand the detailed protein networks controlling this process, proteomics and bioinformatics analyses were performed to construct comparative protein profiles of mouse skin at specific time points (0, 8, and 20 days). Ninety-five differentially expressed protein spots were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF as 44 proteins, which were found to change during hair follicle cycle transition. Proteomics analysis revealed that these changes in protein expression are involved in Ca2+-regulated biological processes, migration, and regulation of signal transduction, among other processes. Subsequently, three proteins were selected to validate the reliability of expression patterns using western blotting. Cluster analysis revealed three expression patterns, and each pattern correlated with specific cell processes that occur during the hair cycle. Furthermore, bioinformatics analysis indicated that the differentially expressed proteins impacted multiple biological networks, after which detailed functional analyses were performed. Taken together, the above data may provide insight into the three stages of mouse hair follicle morphogenesis and provide a solid basis for potential therapeutic molecular targets for this hair disease. PMID:26752403

  18. Horse hair follicles: A novel dermal stem cell source for equine regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Michler, Jule K; Hillmann, Aline; Savkovic, Vuk; Mülling, Christoph K W

    2017-09-02

    The easily accessible niche represented by skin and its appendages may serve as a promising source to complement modern regenerative medicine for horses. In humans and in animal models for human medicine, the hair follicle and its stem cell niches are well characterized. Since literature in this field of equine research is scarce, we sought to analyze cells of the dermal stem cell niche of the equine hair follicle morphologically and for a subset of markers useful for cell characterization via immunolabeling. We cultured equine forelock skin explants to obtain cultures with cells migrating from the hair follicles. Isolation of cells revealed typical fibroblast morphology with a strong tendency to aggregate and form spheroids. For immunofluorescent characterization of primary isolations, we tested an antibody panel consisting of lineage makers for the dermal compartment of the hair follicle, markers associated with an undifferentiated cell status and markers for epithelial cell types as negative controls. All antibodies used were also tested on equine skin sections. The isolated cells displayed clear profiles of dermal and undifferentiated cells. To substantiate our findings, we tested our primary isolations for established equine multipotent mesenchymal stromal cell antigen expression markers in flow cytometry experiments yielding strong convergence. The data presented here provide insights to a stem cell source in horses almost unnoticed to date. The basic investigations of the equine dermal hair follicle stem cell niche confirm the expression of standard markers used in other species and lay the foundation for future studies on this easily available adult stem cell source. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  19. In vitro and in vivo study of dye diffusion into the human skin and hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Genina, Elina A; Bashkatov, Alexey N; Sinichkin, Yury P; Kochubey, Vyacheslav I; Lakodina, Nina A; Altshuler, Gregory B; Tuchin, Valery V

    2002-07-01

    We present experimental results on the in vitro and in vivo study of dye diffusion into human skin and hair follicles. We have studied some commercially available dyes for potential using in the laser selective thermolysis. The degree and the depth of hair follicle dyeing inside the skin were determined. For hairs in different stages the sebaceous gland was stated as a reservoir for a dye administration. It was found that the penetration depth of dyes is about 1.2 mm from the skin surface. We have developed the biocompatible Indocyanine Green lotions and the method for in vivo dyeing and dye in depth monitoring. Shift on 16-21 nm of absorption peak of Indocyanine Green to the longer wavelengths due to Indocyanine Green binding with cell proteins in the human skin was found.

  20. Macrophages Contribute to the Cyclic Activation of Adult Hair Follicle Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Castellana, Donatello; Paus, Ralf; Perez-Moreno, Mirna

    2014-01-01

    Skin epithelial stem cells operate within a complex signaling milieu that orchestrates their lifetime regenerative properties. The question of whether and how immune cells impact on these stem cells within their niche is not well understood. Here we show that skin-resident macrophages decrease in number because of apoptosis before the onset of epithelial hair follicle stem cell activation during the murine hair cycle. This process is linked to distinct gene expression, including Wnt transcription. Interestingly, by mimicking this event through the selective induction of macrophage apoptosis in early telogen, we identify a novel involvement of macrophages in stem cell activation in vivo. Importantly, the macrophage-specific pharmacological inhibition of Wnt production delays hair follicle growth. Thus, perifollicular macrophages contribute to the activation of skin epithelial stem cells as a novel, additional cue that regulates their regenerative activity. This finding may have translational implications for skin repair, inflammatory skin diseases and cancer. PMID:25536657

  1. Determination of the cuticula thickness of human and porcine hairs and their potential influence on the penetration of nanoparticles into the hair follicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lademann, Juergen; Patzelt, Alexa; Richter, Heike; Antoniou, Christina; Sterry, Wolfram; Knorr, Fanny

    2009-03-01

    An efficient penetration and long-term storage of topically applied substances is important for drug delivery in medical treatment and cosmetics. It has recently become apparent that the hair follicles represent an efficient and long-term reservoir for topically applied substances. It was found that particles sized 300-600 nm penetrate more efficiently into the hair follicles than smaller or larger particles. In the present paper, the hair surface structure of human and porcine hairs was analyzed by electron microscopy. It could be observed that the thickness of the cuticula corresponds to the optimal size of the nanoparticles for penetration into the hair follicles. Additionally, it could be demonstrated that the cuticula of human vellus and terminal hairs were of similar thickness (approx. 530 nm), while the thickness of the cuticula obtained from porcine ear bristles were slightly thinner (approx. 320 nm).

  2. Isolation and characterization of in vitro culture of hair follicle cells differentiated from umbilical cord blood mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Bu, Zhang-Yu; Wu, Li-Min; Yu, Xiao-Hong; Zhong, Jian-Bo; Yang, Ping; Chen, Jian

    2017-07-01

    The present investigation explored the in vitro culture, isolation and characterization of hair follicle cell differentiation from umbilical cord blood mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Flow cytometry was used to obtain MSCs from the isolation and purification of human umbilical cord blood MSCs. Culture suspension of hair follicle organ was centrifuged and the supernatant used in the culture medium of MSCs, and the entire process of induced differentiation was recorded by photomicroscopy. The expression level of surface marker CK15 of hair follicle cells obtained from induced differentiation was detected with immunofluorescence. RT-PCR method was used to further detect the difference in expression of CK15 between hair follicle cells and umbilical cord blood MSCs, and statistical analysis was carried out. CD44(+)CD29(+) double-labeled cells accounted for 50.8% of all the samples of umbilical cord blood MSCs in this study. The diameter of hair follicle cells differentiated from umbilical cord blood stem cells reached 800×10(-3) mm after 3 weeks of cell culture. Based on the detection and colocalization of CK15 expression in induced hair follicle cells, the overlap ratio between CK15 and nuclei reached 83% in hair follicle cells, which was obviously higher than that in umbilical cord blood stem cells. The difference had statistical significance (P<0.05). In conclusion, hair follicle cells can be successfully differentiated from umbilical cord blood stem cells by using the supernatant from hair follicle cells. This method can be used for high-speed induced differentiation with high purity, which is promising for clinical application.

  3. Development of a Model for Chemotherapy-Induced Alopecia: Profiling of Histological Changes in Human Hair Follicles after Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Ji-Seon; Choi, Mira; Shin, Chang Yup; Paik, Seung Hwan; Kim, Kyu Han; Kwon, Ohsang

    2016-03-01

    Optimized research models are required to further understand the pathogenesis and prophylaxis of chemotherapy-induced alopecia. Our aim was to develop a mouse model for chemotherapy-induced alopecia by follicular unit transplantation of human hair follicles onto immunodeficient mice. Twenty-two weeks after transplantation, a single dose of cyclophosphamide (Cph) was administered to mice in the Cph100 (100 mg/kg) and Cph150 (150 mg/kg) groups. On day 6, hair follicles showed dystrophic changes, with swollen dermal papilla and ectopic melanin clumping in the hair bulb. In addition, upregulated expression of apoptotic regulators [P53, Fas/Fas-ligand, tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand/tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand receptor (TRAIL/TRAIL receptor), and Bax], increased apoptotic matrix keratinocytes, downregulated Ki67 expression, and decreased melanogenic protein in the hair bulb were noted in both groups. After 12 treatment days, hair follicles in Cph100 mice appeared to diminish dystrophic changes. In contrast, hair follicles of Cph150 mice prematurely entered a dystrophic catagen phase after 9 treatment days, and immunofluorescence staining for Ki67 and melanogenic protein expressions was barely visible. Two hair follicle damage response pathways were observed in this model, namely dystrophic anagen (Cph100) and catagen (Cph150) pathways. Our model might be useful for further understanding the impact of chemotherapy on human hair follicles.

  4. Analysis of the expression pattern of the carrier protein transthyretin and its receptor megalin in the human scalp skin and hair follicles: hair cycle-associated changes.

    PubMed

    Adly, Mohamed A

    2010-12-01

    Transthyretin is a serum and cerebrospinal fluid protein synthesized early in development by the liver, choroid plexus and several other tissues. It is a carrier protein for the antioxidant vitamins, retinol, and thyroid hormones. Transthyretin helps internalize thyroxine and retinol-binding protein into cells by binding to megalin, which is a multi-ligand receptor expressed on the luminal surface of various epithelia. We investigated the expression of transthyretin and its receptor megalin in the human skin; however, their expression pattern in the hair follicle is still to be elucidated. This study addresses this issue and tests the hypothesis that "the expression of transthyretin and megalin undergoes hair follicle cycle-dependent changes." A total of 50 normal human scalp skin biopsies were examined (healthy females, 53-62 years) using immunofluorescence staining methods and real-time PCR. In each case, 50 hair follicles were analyzed (35, 10, and 5 follicles in anagen, catagen, and telogen, respectively). Transthyretin and megalin were prominently expressed in the human scalp skin and hair follicles, on both gene and protein levels. The concentrations of transthyretin and megalin were 0.12 and 0.03 Ul/ml, respectively, as indicated by PCR. The expression showed hair follicle cycle-associated changes i.e., strong expression during early and mature anagen, very weak expression during catagen and moderate expression during telogen. The expression values of these proteins in the anagen were statistically significantly higher than those of either catagen or telogen hair follicles (P ≤ 0.001). This study provides the first morphologic indication that transthyretin and megalin are variably expressed in the human scalp skin and hair follicles. It also reports variations in the expression of these proteins during hair follicle cycling. The clinical ramifications of these findings are open for further investigations.

  5. Delivery and targeting of nanoparticles into hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Fang, Chia-Lang; Aljuffali, Ibrahim A; Li, Yi-Ching; Fang, Jia-You

    2014-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that nanoparticles used for follicular delivery provide some advantages over conventional pathways, including improved skin bioavailability, enhanced penetration depth, prolonged residence duration, fast transport into the skin and tissue targeting. This review describes recent developments using nanotechnology approaches for drug delivery into the follicles. Different types of nanosystems may be employed for management of follicular permeation, such as polymeric nanoparticles, metallic nanocrystals, liposomes, and lipid nanoparticles. This review systematically introduces the mechanisms of follicles for nanoparticulate penetration, highlighting the therapeutic potential of drug-loaded nanoparticles for treating skin diseases. Special attention is paid to the use of nanoparticles in treating appendage-related disorders, in particular, nanomedical strategies for treating alopecia, acne, and transcutaneous immunization.

  6. A review of adipocyte lineage cells and dermal papilla cells in hair follicle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peipei; Kling, Russell E; Ravuri, Sudheer K; Kokai, Lauren E; Rubin, J Peter; Chai, Jia-ke

    2014-01-01

    Alopecia is an exceedingly prevalent problem effecting men and women of all ages. The standard of care for alopecia involves either transplanting existing hair follicles to bald areas or attempting to stimulate existing follicles with topical and/or oral medication. Yet, these treatment options are fraught with problems of cost, side effects, and, most importantly, inadequate long-term hair coverage. Innovative cell-based therapies have focused on the dermal papilla cell as a way to grow new hair in previously bald areas. However, despite this attention, many obstacles exist, including retention of dermal papilla inducing ability and maintenance of dermal papilla productivity after several passages of culture. The use of adipocyte lineage cells, including adipose-derived stem cells, has shown promise as a cell-based solution to regulate hair regeneration and may help in maintaining or increasing dermal papilla cells inducing hair ability. In this review, we highlight recent advances in the understanding of the cellular contribution and regulation of dermal papilla cells and summarize adipocyte lineage cells in hair regeneration. PMID:25383178

  7. LIPH Expression in Skin and Hair Follicles of Normal Coat and Rex Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Diribarne, Mathieu; Mata, Xavier; Rivière, Julie; Bouet, Stéphan; Vaiman, Anne; Chapuis, Jérôme; Reine, Fabienne; Fleurot, Renaud; Auvinet, Gérard; Deretz, Séverine; Allain, Daniel; Schibler, Laurent; Cribiu, Edmond-Paul; Guérin, Gérard

    2012-01-01

    Natural mutations in the LIPH gene were shown to be responsible for hair growth defects in humans and for the rex short hair phenotype in rabbits. In this species, we identified a single nucleotide deletion in LIPH (1362delA) introducing a stop codon in the C-terminal region of the protein. We investigated the expression of LIPH between normal coat and rex rabbits during critical fetal stages of hair follicle genesis, in adults and during hair follicle cycles. Transcripts were three times less expressed in both fetal and adult stages of the rex rabbits than in normal rabbits. In addition, the hair growth cycle phases affected the regulation of the transcription level in the normal and mutant phenotypes differently. LIPH mRNA and protein levels were higher in the outer root sheath (ORS) than in the inner root sheath (IRS), with a very weak signal in the IRS of rex rabbits. In vitro transfection shows that the mutant protein has a reduced lipase activity compared to the wild type form. Our results contribute to the characterization of the LIPH mode of action and confirm the crucial role of LIPH in hair production. PMID:22272275

  8. LIPH expression in skin and hair follicles of normal coat and Rex rabbits.

    PubMed

    Diribarne, Mathieu; Mata, Xavier; Rivière, Julie; Bouet, Stéphan; Vaiman, Anne; Chapuis, Jérôme; Reine, Fabienne; Fleurot, Renaud; Auvinet, Gérard; Deretz, Séverine; Allain, Daniel; Schibler, Laurent; Cribiu, Edmond-Paul; Guérin, Gérard

    2012-01-01

    Natural mutations in the LIPH gene were shown to be responsible for hair growth defects in humans and for the rex short hair phenotype in rabbits. In this species, we identified a single nucleotide deletion in LIPH (1362delA) introducing a stop codon in the C-terminal region of the protein. We investigated the expression of LIPH between normal coat and rex rabbits during critical fetal stages of hair follicle genesis, in adults and during hair follicle cycles. Transcripts were three times less expressed in both fetal and adult stages of the rex rabbits than in normal rabbits. In addition, the hair growth cycle phases affected the regulation of the transcription level in the normal and mutant phenotypes differently. LIPH mRNA and protein levels were higher in the outer root sheath (ORS) than in the inner root sheath (IRS), with a very weak signal in the IRS of rex rabbits. In vitro transfection shows that the mutant protein has a reduced lipase activity compared to the wild type form. Our results contribute to the characterization of the LIPH mode of action and confirm the crucial role of LIPH in hair production.

  9. Screening candidate microRNAs (miRNAs) in different lambskin hair follicles in Hu sheep.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wen; Sun, Wei; Yin, Jinfeng; Lv, Xiaoyang; Bao, Jianjun; Yu, Jiarui; Wang, Lihong; Jin, Chengyan; Hu, Liang

    2017-01-01

    Hu sheep lambskin is a unique white lambskin from China that exhibits three types of flower patterns, including small waves, medium waves, and large waves, with small waves considered the best quality. However, our understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying flower pattern formation in Hu sheep lambskin is limited. The aim of the present study was to further explore the relevance between candidate microRNAs (miRNAs) and developmental characteristics of hair follicles and screen miRNAs for later functional validation. Herein, we employed Illumina Hiseq 2500 to identify differentially expressed miRNAs in hair follicles of different flower patterns with small, medium, and large waves to construct a comprehensive sequence database on the mechanism of hair follicle development. Paraffin sections of lambskin tissue were prepared to assess the structure of different hair follicles. Expression levels of candidate miRNAs in different flower patterns were analyzed by relative quantitation using real-time PCR, combined with histological observation and micro-observation technologies, and the correlation between expression levels of candidate miRNAs and histological properties of hair follicles was analyzed by using SPSS 17.0. A total of 522 differentially expressed miRNAs were identified, and RNA-seq analysis detected 7,266 target genes in different groups of flower patterns. Gene ontological analysis indicated these target genes were mainly involved in cell proliferation, differentiation, growth, apoptosis, and ion transport, and 14 miRNAs, including miR-143, miR-10a, and let-7 were screened as candidate miRNAs in Hu sheep hair follicle growth and development. In the same field of vision, variance analysis showed that the number of secondary follicles in small waves was significantly larger than that in large and medium waves (P<0.01); the diameter of the primary and secondary follicles in large waves was respectively larger than those in medium and small waves (P<0

  10. Genetically null mice reveal a central role for epidermal growth factor receptor in the differentiation of the hair follicle and normal hair development.

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, L. A.; Alexander, N.; Hogan, M. E.; Sundberg, J. P.; Dlugosz, A.; Threadgill, D. W.; Magnuson, T.; Yuspa, S. H.

    1997-01-01

    Mice harboring a targeted disruption of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) allele exhibit a severely disorganized hair follicle phenotype, fuzzy coat, and systemic disease resulting in death before 3 weeks. This skin phenotype was reproduced in whole skin grafts and in grafts of EGFR null hair follicle buds onto nude mice, providing a model to evaluate the natural evolution of skin lacking the EGFR. Hair follicles in grafts of null skin did not progress from anagen to telogen and scanning electron micrografts revealed wavy, flattened hair fibers with cuticular abnormalities. Many of the EGFR null hair follicles in the grafted skin were consumed by an inflammatory reaction resulting in complete hair loss in 67% of the grafts by 10 weeks. Localization of follicular differentiation markers including keratin 6, transglutaminase, and the hair keratins mHa2 and hacl-1 revealed a pattern of premature differentiation within the null hair follicles. In intact EGFR null mice, proliferation in the interfollicular epidermis, but not hair follicles, was greatly decreased in the absence of EGFR. In contrast, grafting of EGFR null skin resulted in a hyperplastic response in the epidermis that did not resolve even after 10 weeks, although the wound-induced hyperplasia in EGFR wild-type grafts had resolved within 3 to 4 weeks. Thus, epithelial expression of the EGFR has complex functions in the skin. It is important in delaying follicular differentiation, may serve to protect the hair follicle from immunological reactions, and modifies both normal and wound-induced epidermal proliferation but seems dispensable for follicular proliferation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:9176390

  11. Prostaglandin D2 inhibits wound-induced hair follicle neogenesis through the receptor, Gpr44.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Amanda M; Loy, Dorothy E; Lawson, John A; Katseff, Adiya S; Fitzgerald, Garret A; Garza, Luis A

    2013-04-01

    Prostaglandins (PGs) are key inflammatory mediators involved in wound healing and regulating hair growth; however, their role in skin regeneration after injury is unknown. Using wound-induced hair follicle neogenesis (WIHN) as a marker of skin regeneration, we hypothesized that PGD2 decreases follicle neogenesis. PGE2 and PGD2 were elevated early and late, respectively, during wound healing. The levels of WIHN, lipocalin-type prostaglandin D2 synthase (Ptgds), and its product PGD2 each varied significantly among background strains of mice after wounding, and all correlated such that the highest Ptgds and PGD2 levels were associated with the lowest amount of regeneration. In addition, an alternatively spliced transcript variant of Ptgds missing exon 3 correlated with high regeneration in mice. Exogenous application of PGD2 decreased WIHN in wild-type mice, and PGD2 receptor Gpr44-null mice showed increased WIHN compared with strain-matched control mice. Furthermore, Gpr44-null mice were resistant to PGD2-induced inhibition of follicle neogenesis. In all, these findings demonstrate that PGD2 inhibits hair follicle regeneration through the Gpr44 receptor and imply that inhibition of PGD2 production or Gpr44 signaling will promote skin regeneration.

  12. Prostaglandin D2 inhibits wound-induced hair follicle neogenesis through the receptor, Gpr44

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Amanda M.; Loy, Dorothy E.; Lawson, John A.; Katseff, Adiya S.; FitzGerald, Garret A.; Garza, Luis A.

    2012-01-01

    Prostaglandins (PGs) are key inflammatory mediators involved in wound healing and regulating hair growth; however, their role in skin regeneration after injury is unknown. Using wound-induced hair follicle neogenesis (WIHN) as a marker of skin regeneration, we hypothesized that PGD2 decreases follicle neogenesis. PGE2 and PGD2 were elevated early and late respectively during wound healing. The levels of WIHN, lipocalin-type prostaglandin D2 synthase (Ptgds) and its product PGD2 each varied significantly among background strains of mice after wounding and all correlated such that the highest Ptgds and PGD2 levels were associated with the lowest amount of regeneration. Additionally, an alternatively spliced transcript variant of Ptgds missing exon 3 correlated with high regeneration in mice. Exogenous application of PGD2 decreased WIHN in wild type mice and PGD2 receptor Gpr44 null mice showed increased WIHN compared to strain-matched control mice. Furthermore, Gpr44 null mice were resistant to PGD2-induced inhibition of follicle neogenesis. In all, these findings demonstrate that PGD2 inhibits hair follicle regeneration through the Gpr44 receptor and imply that inhibition of PGD2 production or Gpr44 signaling will promote skin regeneration. PMID:23190891

  13. Induction of osteoblastic differentiation of neural crest-derived stem cells from hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Urano-Morisawa, Eri; Takami, Masamichi; Suzawa, Tetsuo; Matsumoto, Akifumi; Osumi, Noriko; Baba, Kazuyoshi; Kamijo, Ryutaro

    2017-01-01

    The neural crest (NC) arises near the neural tube during embryo development. NC cells migrate throughout the embryo and have potential to differentiate into multiple cell types, such as peripheral nerves, glial, cardiac smooth muscle, endocrine, and pigment cells, and craniofacial bone. In the present study, we induced osteoblast-like cells using whisker follicles obtained from the NC of mice. Hair follicle cells derived from the NC labeled with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) were collected from protein zero-Cre/floxed-EGFP double transgenic mice and cultured, then treated and cultured in stem cell growth medium. After growth for 14 days, results of flow cytometry analysis showed that 95% of the EGFP-positive (EGFP+) hair follicle cells derived from the NC had proliferated and 76.2% of those expressed mesenchymal stem cells markers, such as platelet-derived growth factor α and stem cell antigen-1, and also showed constitutive expression of Runx2 mRNA. Cells stimulated with bone morphogenetic protein-2 expressed osteocalcin, osterix, and alkaline phosphatase mRNA, resulting in production of mineralized matrices, which were detected by von Kossa and alizarin red staining. Moreover, EGFP+ hair follicle cells consistently expressed macrophage colony-stimulating factor and osteoprotegerin (OPG). Addition of 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3] (10-8 M) to the cultures suppressed OPG expression and induced RANKL production in the cells. Furthermore, multinucleated osteoclasts appeared within 6 days after starting co-cultures of bone marrow cells with EGFP+ cells in the presence of 1,25(OH)2D3 and PGE2. These results suggest that NC-derived hair follicle cells possess a capacity for osteoblastic differentiation and may be useful for developing new bone regenerative medicine therapies.

  14. Targeted disruption of the protein kinase SGK3/CISK impairs postnatal hair follicle development.

    PubMed

    McCormick, James A; Feng, Yuxi; Dawson, Kevin; Behne, Martin J; Yu, Benjamin; Wang, Jian; Wyatt, Amanda W; Henke, Guido; Grahammer, Florian; Mauro, Theodora M; Lang, Florian; Pearce, David

    2004-09-01

    Members of the serum- and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase (SGK) family are important mediators of growth factor and hormone signaling that, like their close relatives in the Akt family, are regulated by lipid products of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase. SGK3 has been implicated in the control of cell survival and regulation of ion channel activity in cultured cells. To begin to dissect the in vivo functions of SGK3, we generated and characterized Sgk3 null mice. These mice are viable and fertile, and in contrast to mice lacking SGK1 or Akt2, respectively, display normal sodium handling and glucose tolerance. However, although normal at birth, by postpartum day 4 they have begun to display an unexpected defect in hair follicle morphogenesis. The abnormality in hair follicle development is preceded by a defect in proliferation and nuclear accumulation of beta-catenin in hair bulb keratinocytes. Furthermore, in cultured keratinocytes, heterologous expression of SGK3 potently modulates activation of beta-catenin/Lef-1-mediated gene transcription. These data establish a role for SGK3 in normal postnatal hair follicle development, possibly involving effects on beta-catenin/Lef-1-mediated gene transcription.

  15. Keratin network modifications lead to the mechanical stiffening of the hair follicle fiber.

    PubMed

    Bornschlögl, Thomas; Bildstein, Lucien; Thibaut, Sébastien; Santoprete, Roberto; Fiat, Françoise; Luengo, Gustavo S; Doucet, Jean; Bernard, Bruno A; Baghdadli, Nawel

    2016-05-24

    The complex mechanical properties of biomaterials such as hair, horn, skin, or bone are determined by the architecture of the underlying fibrous bionetworks. Although much is known about the influence of the cytoskeleton on the mechanics of isolated cells, this has been less studied in tridimensional tissues. We used the hair follicle as a model to link changes in the keratin network composition and architecture to the mechanical properties of the nascent hair. We show using atomic force microscopy that the soft keratinocyte matrix at the base of the follicle stiffens by a factor of ∼360, from 30 kPa to 11 MPa along the first millimeter of the follicle. The early mechanical stiffening is concomitant to an increase in diameter of the keratin macrofibrils, their continuous compaction, and increasingly parallel orientation. The related stiffening of the material follows a power law, typical of the mechanics of nonthermal bending-dominated fiber networks. In addition, we used X-ray diffraction to monitor changes in the (supra)molecular organization within the keratin fibers. At later keratinization stages, the inner mechanical properties of the macrofibrils dominate the stiffening due to the progressive setting up of the cystine network. Our findings corroborate existing models on the sequence of biological and structural events during hair keratinization.

  16. Keratin network modifications lead to the mechanical stiffening of the hair follicle fiber

    PubMed Central

    Bornschlögl, Thomas; Bildstein, Lucien; Thibaut, Sébastien; Santoprete, Roberto; Fiat, Françoise; Luengo, Gustavo S.; Doucet, Jean; Bernard, Bruno A.; Baghdadli, Nawel

    2016-01-01

    The complex mechanical properties of biomaterials such as hair, horn, skin, or bone are determined by the architecture of the underlying fibrous bionetworks. Although much is known about the influence of the cytoskeleton on the mechanics of isolated cells, this has been less studied in tridimensional tissues. We used the hair follicle as a model to link changes in the keratin network composition and architecture to the mechanical properties of the nascent hair. We show using atomic force microscopy that the soft keratinocyte matrix at the base of the follicle stiffens by a factor of ∼360, from 30 kPa to 11 MPa along the first millimeter of the follicle. The early mechanical stiffening is concomitant to an increase in diameter of the keratin macrofibrils, their continuous compaction, and increasingly parallel orientation. The related stiffening of the material follows a power law, typical of the mechanics of nonthermal bending-dominated fiber networks. In addition, we used X-ray diffraction to monitor changes in the (supra)molecular organization within the keratin fibers. At later keratinization stages, the inner mechanical properties of the macrofibrils dominate the stiffening due to the progressive setting up of the cystine network. Our findings corroborate existing models on the sequence of biological and structural events during hair keratinization. PMID:27162354

  17. Ceramide synthase 4 regulates stem cell homeostasis and hair follicle cycling.

    PubMed

    Peters, Franziska; Vorhagen, Susanne; Brodesser, Susanne; Jakobshagen, Kristin; Brüning, Jens C; Niessen, Carien M; Krönke, Martin

    2015-06-01

    Ceramides are crucial for skin barrier function, but little is known about the regulation of epidermal appendages and whether stem cell populations that control their regeneration depend on specific ceramide species. Here we demonstrate that ceramide synthase 4 (CerS4) is highly expressed in the epidermis of adult mice where it is localized in the interfollicular epidermis and defined populations within the pilosebaceous unit. Inactivation of CerS4 in mice resulted in precocious activation of hair follicle bulge stem cells while expanding the Lrig1(+) junctional zone and sebaceous glands. This was preceded first by a decrease in bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and a subsequent increase in Wnt signaling. This imbalance in quiescent versus activating signals likely promoted a prolonged anagen-like hair follicle state after the second catagen, which exhausted stem cells over time ultimately resulting in hair loss in aged mice. K14-Cre-mediated deletion of CerS4 revealed a similar phenotype, thus suggesting an epidermis intrinsic function of CerS4 in regulating the regeneration of the pilosebaceous unit. The data indicate that CerS4-directed epidermal ceramide composition is essential to control hair follicle stem and progenitor cell behavior potentially through its regulation of BMP and Wnt signaling.

  18. Spindle checkpoint deficiency is tolerated by murine epidermal cells but not hair follicle stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Foijer, Floris; DiTommaso, Tia; Donati, Giacomo; Hautaviita, Katta; Xie, Stephanie Z.; Heath, Emma; Smyth, Ian; Watt, Fiona M.; Sorger, Peter K.; Bradley, Allan

    2013-01-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) ensures correct chromosome segregation during mitosis by preventing aneuploidy, an event that is detrimental to the fitness and survival of normal cells but oncogenic in tumor cells. Deletion of SAC genes is incompatible with early mouse development, and RNAi-mediated depletion of SAC components in cultured cells results in rapid death. Here we describe the use of a conditional KO of mouse Mad2, an essential component of the SAC signaling cascade, as a means to selectively induce chromosome instability and aneuploidy in the epidermis of the skin. We observe that SAC inactivation is tolerated by interfollicular epidermal cells but results in depletion of hair follicle bulge stem cells. Eventually, a histologically normal epidermis develops within ∼1 mo after birth, albeit without any hair. Mad2-deficient cells in this epidermis exhibited abnormal transcription of metabolic genes, consistent with aneuploid cell state. Hair follicle bulge stem cells were completely absent, despite the continued presence of rudimentary hair follicles. These data demonstrate that different cell lineages within a single tissue respond differently to chromosome instability: some proliferating cell lineages can survive, but stem cells are highly sensitive. PMID:23382243

  19. Oxidative stress management in the hair follicle: Could targeting NRF2 counter age-related hair disorders and beyond?

    PubMed

    Jadkauskaite, Laura; Coulombe, Pierre A; Schäfer, Matthias; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T; Paus, Ralf; Haslam, Iain S

    2017-08-01

    Widespread expression of the transcription factor, nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (NRF2), which maintains redox homeostasis, has recently been identified in the hair follicle (HF). Small molecule activators of NRF2 may therefore be useful in the management of HF pathologies associated with redox imbalance, ranging from HF greying and HF ageing via androgenetic alopecia and alopecia areata to chemotherapy-induced hair loss. Indeed, NRF2 activation has been shown to prevent peroxide-induced hair growth inhibition. Multiple parameters can increase the levels of reactive oxygen species in the HF, for example melanogenesis, depilation-induced trauma, neurogenic and autoimmune inflammation, toxic drugs, environmental stressors such as UV irradiation, genetic defects and aging-associated mitochondrial dysfunction. In this review, the potential mechanisms whereby NRF2 activation could prove beneficial in treatment of redox-associated HF disorders are therefore discussed. © 2017 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Exogenous R-Spondin1 Induces Precocious Telogen-to-Anagen Transition in Mouse Hair Follicles

    PubMed Central

    Li, Na; Liu, Shu; Zhang, Hui-Shan; Deng, Zhi-Li; Zhao, Hua-Shan; Zhao, Qian; Lei, Xiao-Hua; Ning, Li-Na; Cao, Yu-Jing; Wang, Hai-Bin; Liu, Shuang; Duan, En-Kui

    2016-01-01

    R-spondin proteins are novel Wnt/β-catenin agonists, which signal through their receptors leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein coupled receptor (LGR) 4/5/6 and substantially enhance Wnt/β-catenin activity. R-spondins are reported to function in embryonic development. They also play important roles in stem cell functions in adult tissues, such as the intestine and mammary glands, which largely rely on Wnt/β-catenin signaling. However, in the skin epithelium and hair follicles, the information about R-spondins is deficient, although the expressions and functions of their receptors, LGR4/5/6, have already been studied in detail. In the present study, highly-enriched expression of the R-spondin family genes (Rspo1/2/3/4) in the hair follicle dermal papilla is revealed. Expression of Rspo1 in the dermal papilla is specifically and prominently upregulated before anagen entry, and exogenous recombinant R-spondin1 protein injection in mid-telogen leads to precocious anagen entry. Moreover, R-spondin1 activates Wnt/β-catenin signaling in cultured bulge stem cells in vitro, changing their fate determination without altering the cell proliferation. Our pioneering study uncovers a role of R-spondin1 in the activation of cultured hair follicle stem cells and the regulation of hair cycle progression, shedding new light on the governance of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in skin biology and providing helpful clues for future treatment of hair follicle disorders. PMID:27104524

  1. WNT and DKK Determine Hair Follicle Spacing Through a Reaction-Diffusion Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sick, Stefanie; Reinker, Stefan; Timmer, Jens; Schlake, Thomas

    2006-12-01

    Mathematical reaction-diffusion models have been suggested to describe formation of animal pigmentation patterns and distribution of epidermal appendages. However, the crucial signals and in vivo mechanisms are still elusive. Here we identify WNT and its inhibitor DKK as primary determinants of murine hair follicle spacing, using a combined experimental and computational modeling approach. Transgenic DKK overexpression reduces overall appendage density. Moderate suppression of endogenous WNT signaling forces follicles to form clusters during an otherwise normal morphogenetic program. These results confirm predictions of a WNT/DKK-specific mathematical model and provide in vivo corroboration of the reaction-diffusion mechanism for epidermal appendage formation.

  2. The morphology of hair follicle afferent fibre collaterals in the spinal cord of the cat.

    PubMed

    Brown, A G; Rose, P K; Snow, P J

    1977-11-01

    1. The enzyme horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was injected into single axons that innervated hair follicle receptors to study the morphology of their collaterals in the dorsal horn of the cord. The axons were impaled near the dorsal root entrance zone in the lumbosacral spinal cord of anaesthetized cats and HRP injected by passing current through the intra-axonal micro-electrode. The morphology was revealed by subsequent histochemistry.2. Thirteen hair-follicle afferent fibres were stained including six that innervated tylotrichs (type T hair follicle afferent units) and one that innervated guard hairs (type G unit). The remaining six axons were not classified according to hair type, but, on the basis of their axonal conduction velocities, would have been either type G or T.3. Eleven axons could be traced back into the dorsal roots. Eight of these, upon entering the cord, turned and ran towards the brain. They did not divide into rostral and caudal branches. Three of the eleven did divide and gave rise to both rostral and caudal branches.4. Sixty-three collaterals were given off the thirteen stained axons. All well-filled collaterals had a strikingly similar morphology. They descended through laminae I-III of the dorsal horn into the deeper parts of lamina IV or into lamina V, before turning and ascending back into superficial lamina IV and lamina III where they branched profusely to give rise to their terminal arborizations. Terminal boutons, most commonly of the ;en passant' type, were numerous in lamina III, but were also seen in the dorsal part of lamina IV and in ventral lamina II. None were observed in dorsal lamina II or near the junction of the grey and white matter (lamina I) or in lamina V.5. The terminal arborizations of collaterals from a single hair follicle afferent fibre were in line with one another in the longitudinal axis of the cord. In the better-stained preparations the terminal arborizations of adjacent collaterals from a single axon formed a

  3. Enhancing hair follicle regeneration by nonablative fractional laser: Assessment of irradiation parameters and tissue response.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yueh-Feng; Wang, Shiou-Han; Wu, Pei-Shan; Fan, Sabrina Mai-Yi; Chiu, Hsien-Yi; Tsai, Tsung-Hua; Lin, Sung-Jan

    2015-04-01

    Identification of methods to enhance anagen entry can be helpful for alopecia. Recently, nonablative laser has been proposed as a potential treatment for alopecia. However, how the laser parameters affect stem cell activity, hair cycles and the associated side effects have not been well characterized. Here we examine the effects of irradiation parameters of 1,550-nm fractional laser on hair cycles. The dorsal skin of eight-week-old female C57BL/6 mice with hair follicles in synchronized telogen was shaved and irradiated with a 1,550-nm fractional erbium-glass laser (Fraxel RE:STORE (SR1500) Laser System, Solta Medical, U.S.A.) with varied beam energies (5-35 mJ) and beam densities (500-3500 microthermal zones/cm(2) ). The cutaneous changes were evaluated both grossly and histologically. Hair follicle stem cell activity was detected by BrdU incorporation and changes in gene expression were quantified by real-time PCR. Direct thermal injury to hair follicles could be observed early after irradiation, especially at higher beam energy. Anagen induction in the irradiated skin showed an all-or-non change. Anagen induction and ulcer formation were affected by the combination of beam energy and density. The lowest beam energy of 5 mJ failed to promote anagen entry at all beam densities tested. As beam energy increased from 10 mJ to 35 mJ, we found a decreasing trend of beam density that could induce anagen entry within 7-9 days with activation of hair follicle stem cells. Beam density above the pro-regeneration density could lead to ulcers and scarring followed by anagen entry in adjacent skin. Analysis of inflammatory cytokines, including TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6, revealed that transient moderate inflammation was associated with anagen induction and intense prolonged inflammation preceded ulcer formation. To avoid side effects of hair follicle injury and scarring, appropriate combination of beam energy and density is required. Parameters outside the therapeutic

  4. Lack of the vitamin D receptor is associated with reduced epidermal differentiation and hair follicle growth.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhongjion; Komuves, László; Yu, Qian-Chun; Elalieh, Hashem; Ng, Dean C; Leary, Colin; Chang, Sandra; Crumrine, Debra; Yoshizawa, Tatsuya; Kato, Shigeaki; Bikle, Daniel D

    2002-01-01

    The active vitamin D metabolite, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, acting through the vitamin D receptor, regulates the expression of genes in a variety of vitamin D-responsive tissues, including the epidermis. To investigate the role of the vitamin D receptor in mediating epidermal differentiation, we examined the histomorphology and expression of differentiation markers in the epidermis of vitamin D receptor knockout mice generated by gene targeting. The homozygous knockout mouse displayed a phenotype that closely resembles vitamin D-dependent rickets type II in humans, including the development of rickets and alopecia. Hair loss developed by 3 mo after birth and gradually led to nearly total hair loss by 8 mo. Histologic analysis of the skin of homozygous knockout mice revealed dilation of the hair follicles with the formation of dermal cysts starting at the age of 3 wk. These cysts increased in size and number with age. Epidermal differentiation markers, including involucrin, profilaggrin, and loricrin, detected by immunostaining and in situ hybridization, showed decreased expression levels in homozygous knockout mice from birth until 3 wk, preceding the morphologic changes observed in the hair follicles. Keratin 10 levels, however, were not reduced. At the ultrastructural level, homozygous knockout mice showed increased numbers of small dense granules in the granular layer with few or no surrounding keratin bundles and a loss of keratohyalin granules. Thus, both the interfollicular epidermis and the hair follicle appear to require the vitamin D receptor for normal differentiation. The temporal abnormalities between the two processes reflect the apparent lack of requirement for the vitamin D receptor during the anagen phase of the first (developmental) hair cycle, but with earlier effects on the terminal differentiation of the interfollicular epidermis.

  5. Biology of the eyelash hair follicle: an enigma in plain sight.

    PubMed

    Paus, R; Burgoa, I; Platt, C I; Griffiths, T; Poblet, E; Izeta, A

    2016-04-01

    Because of their crucial impact on our perception of beauty, eyelashes constitute a prime target for the cosmetic industry. However, when compared with other hair shafts and the mini-organs that produce them [eyelash hair follicles (ELHFs)], knowledge on the biology underlying growth and pigmentation of eyelashes is still rudimentary. This is due in part to the extremely restricted availability of human ELHFs for experimental study, underappreciation of their important sensory and protective functions and insufficient interest in understanding why they are distinct from scalp hair follicles (HFs) (e.g. ELHFs produce shorter hair shafts, do not possess an arrector pili muscle, have a shorter hair cycle and undergo greying significantly later than scalp HFs). Here we synthesize the limited current knowledge on the biology of ELHFs, in humans and other species, their role in health and disease, the known similarities with and differences from other HF populations, and their intrinsic interethnic variations. We define major open questions in the biology of these intriguing mini-organs and conclude by proposing future research directions. These include dissecting the molecular and cellular mechanisms that underlie trichomegaly and the development of in vitro models in order to interrogate the distinct molecular controls of ELHF growth, cycling and pigmentation and to probe novel strategies for the therapeutic and cosmetic manipulation of ELHFs beyond prostaglandin receptor stimulation.

  6. In vitro methodology, hormonal and nutritional effects and fibre production in isolated ovine and caprine anagen hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Galbraith, H

    2010-09-01

    Mammalian hair follicles are complex multicellular structures in the skin, which produce hair fibre under the influence of locally produced and systemic signalling systems. Investigation to determine mechanisms of regulation, follicular responses and the importance of nutritional supply have utilised a number of in vivo and in vitro approaches. Included in these are studies on isolated intact anagen secondary follicles singly or in groups with incubation in culture medium. These utilise techniques developed for investigation of follicles from human skin. Results from selected studies reviewed here demonstrate differences in capacity for hair growth and protein synthesis between secondary follicles from Angora and cashmere-bearing goats. Mohair follicles were shown to exhibit faster hair shaft elongation both in vivo and in vitro, to have greater DNA content per follicle and to deposit significantly more protein per follicle and per unit of DNA. Incubation of anagen mohair and cashmere follicles in the presence of melatonin or prolactin showed positive responses in hair shaft growth and protein synthesis to both signalling molecules. This result indicated directly acting effects on the follicle in addition to any indirect effects arising at a whole animal level in response to, for example, variation in photoperiod. Similarly, epidermal growth factor was shown to alter elongation and protein synthesis in mohair follicles and to produce, at higher concentration, club hair structures similar to effects observed in other species. The vitamin biotin was shown to be important in maintaining viability of isolated sheep secondary hair follicles where supplementation increased the proportion continuing to grow. Effects on growth and apparent protein synthesis suggested comparatively lesser effects on follicles, which remained viable. Histology on follicles indicated effects of biotin deficiency in reducing proliferation of basal keratinocytes. The final study, included in

  7. Permeation of topically applied Magnesium ions through human skin is facilitated by hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Navin Chandrakanth; Sanchez, Washington Y; Mohammed, Yousuf H; Grice, Jeffrey E; Roberts, Michael S; Barnard, Ross T

    2016-06-01

    Magnesium is an important micronutrient essential for various biological processes and its deficiency has been linked to several inflammatory disorders in humans. Topical magnesium delivery is one of the oldest forms of therapy for skin diseases, for example Dead Sea therapy and Epsom salt baths. Some anecdotal evidence and a few published reports have attributed amelioration of inflammatory skin conditions to the topical application of magnesium. On the other hand, transport of magnesium ions across the protective barrier of skin, the stratum corneum, is contentious. Our primary aim in this study was to estimate the extent of magnesium ion permeation through human skin and the role of hair follicles in facilitating the permeation. Upon topical application of magnesium solution, we found that magnesium penetrates through human stratum corneum and it depends on concentration and time of exposure. We also found that hair follicles make a significant contribution to magnesium penetration.

  8. Hair follicle aging is driven by transepidermal elimination of stem cells via COL17A1 proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Hiroyuki; Mohri, Yasuaki; Binh, Nguyen Thanh; Morinaga, Hironobu; Fukuda, Makoto; Ito, Mayumi; Kurata, Sotaro; Hoeijmakers, Jan; Nishimura, Emi K

    2016-02-05

    Hair thinning and loss are prominent aging phenotypes but have an unknown mechanism. We show that hair follicle stem cell (HFSC) aging causes the stepwise miniaturization of hair follicles and eventual hair loss in wild-type mice and in humans. In vivo fate analysis of HFSCs revealed that the DNA damage response in HFSCs causes proteolysis of type XVII collagen (COL17A1/BP180), a critical molecule for HFSC maintenance, to trigger HFSC aging, characterized by the loss of stemness signatures and by epidermal commitment. Aged HFSCs are cyclically eliminated from the skin through terminal epidermal differentiation, thereby causing hair follicle miniaturization. The aging process can be recapitulated by Col17a1 deficiency and prevented by the forced maintenance of COL17A1 in HFSCs, demonstrating that COL17A1 in HFSCs orchestrates the stem cell-centric aging program of the epithelial mini-organ. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  9. Chitosan nanoparticles for targeting and sustaining minoxidil sulphate delivery to hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Matos, Breno Noronha; Reis, Thaiene Avila; Gratieri, Taís; Gelfuso, Guilherme Martins

    2015-04-01

    This work developed minoxidil sulphate-loaded chitosan nanoparticles (MXS-NP) for targeted delivery to hair follicles, which could sustain drug release and improve the topical treatment of alopecia. Chitosan nanoparticles were obtained using low-molecular weight chitosan and tripolyphosphate as crosslink agent. MXS-NP presented a monomodal distribution with hydrodynamic diameter of 235.5 ± 99.9 nm (PDI of 0.31 ± 0.01) and positive zeta potential (+38.6 ± 6.0 mV). SEM analysis confirmed nanoparticles average size and spherical shape. A drug loading efficiency of 73.0 ± 0.3% was obtained with polymer:drug ratio of 1:1 (w/w). Drug release through cellulose acetate membranes from MXS-NP was sustained in about 5 times in comparison to the diffusion rate of MXS from the solution (188.9 ± 6.0 μg/cm(2)/h and 35.4 ± 1.8 μg/cm(2)/h). Drug permeation studies through the skin in vitro, followed by selective recovery of MXS from the hair follicles, showed that MXS-NP application resulted in a two-fold MXS increase into hair follicles after 6h in comparison to the control solution (5.9 ± 0.6 μg/cm(2) and 2.9 ± 0.8 μg/cm(2)). MXS-loading in nanoparticles appears as a promising and easy strategy to target and sustain drug delivery to hair follicles, which may improve the topical treatment of alopecia.

  10. Microdissection and visualization of individual hair follicles for lineage tracing studies.

    PubMed

    Sequeira, Inês; Legué, Emilie; Capgras, Suzanne; Nicolas, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    In vivo lineage tracing is a valuable technique to study cellular behavior. Our lab developed a lineage tracing method, based on the Cre/lox system, to genetically induce clonal labelling of cells and follow their progeny. Here we describe a protocol for temporally controlled clonal labelling and for microdissection of individual mouse hair follicles. We further present staining and visualization techniques used in our lab to analyze clones issued from genetically induced labelling.

  11. Expression of mesenchymal stem cell marker CD90 on dermal sheath cells of the anagen hair follicle in canine species

    PubMed Central

    Mercati, F.; Pascucci, L.; Ceccarelli, P.; Dall’Aglio, C.; Pedini, V.; Gargiulo, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    The dermal sheath (DS) of the hair follicle is comprised by fibroblast-like cells and extends along the follicular epithelium, from the bulb up to the infundibulum. From this structure, cells with stem characteristics were isolated: they have a mesenchymal origin and express CD90 protein, a typical marker of mesenchymal stem cells. It is not yet really clear in which region of hair follicle these cells are located but some experimental evidence suggests that dermal stem cells are localized prevalently in the lower part of the anagen hair follicle. As there are no data available regarding DS stem cells in dog species, we carried out a morphological analysis of the hair follicle DS and performed both an immunohistochemical and an immunocytochemical investigation to identify CD90+ cells. We immunohistochemically evidenced a clear and abundant positivity to CD90 protein in the DS cells located in the lower part of anagen hair follicle. The positive cells showed a typical fibroblast-like morphology. They were flat and elongated and inserted among bundles of collagen fibres.The whole structure formed a close and continuous sleeve around the anagen hair follicle. Our immunocytochemical study allowed us to localize CD90 protein at the cytoplasmic membrane level.

  12. Expression of mesenchymal stem cell marker CD90 on dermal sheath cells of the anagen hair follicle in canine species.

    PubMed

    Mercati, F; Pascucci, L; Ceccarelli, P; Dall'Aglio, C; Pedini, V; Gargiulo, A M

    2009-09-23

    The dermal sheath (DS) of the hair follicle is comprised by fibroblast-like cells and extends along the follicular epithelium, from the bulb up to the infundibulum. From this structure, cells with stem characteristics were isolated: they have a mesenchymal origin and express CD90 protein, a typical marker of mesenchymal stem cells. It is not yet really clear in which region of hair follicle these cells are located but some experimental evidence suggests that dermal stem cells are localized prevalently in the lower part of the anagen hair follicle. As there are no data available regarding DS stem cells in dog species, we carried out a morphological analysis of the hair follicle DS and performed both an immunohistochemical and an immunocytochemical investigation to identify CD90+ cells. We immunohistochemically evidenced a clear and abundant positivity to CD90 protein in the DS cells located in the lower part of anagen hair follicle. The positive cells showed a typical fibroblast-like morphology. They were flat and elongated and inserted among bundles of collagen fibres. The whole structure formed a close and continuous sleeve around the anagen hair follicle. Our immunocytochemical study allowed us to localize CD90 protein at the cytoplasmic membrane level.

  13. Hair follicle: a reliable source of recipient origin after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hong, Y C; Liu, H M; Chen, P S; Chen, Y J; Lyou, J Y; Hu, H Y; Yi, M F; Lin, J S; Tzeng, C-H

    2007-11-01

    Blood, buccal swab and hair follicles are among the most commonly used sources for forensic science, parentage testing and personal identification. A total of 29 patients who have had a sustained engraftment from 15 months to 21.5 years after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) without rejection, relapse or chronic GVHD involving oral mucosa were enrolled for a chimerism study. PCR-amplified short tandem repeat analyses were conducted per patient every 3 months for at least three consecutive times. The results for blood were all donor type except one who had a mixed chimerism, 14.5 years after receiving a transplant for lymphoma. As for buccal swab, mixed chimerism ranging from 10 to 96% donor origin was noted for 28 recipients except the one who had mixed chimerism of blood and retained total recipient type. In contrast, hair follicles were 100% recipient type for the entire group. It is concluded that the hair follicle is devoid of adult stem cell plasticity and may serve as a reliable source of recipient's origin when pre-transplant DNA fingerprinting or reference DNA is not available for people who have successfully received allogeneic HSCT while in need of a personal identification.

  14. Hair follicle-derived blood vessels vascularize tumors in skin and are inhibited by Doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Amoh, Yasuyuki; Li, Lingna; Yang, Meng; Jiang, Ping; Moossa, Abdool R; Katsuoka, Kensei; Hoffman, Robert M

    2005-03-15

    We have recently shown that the neural-stem cell marker nestin is expressed in hair follicle stem cells and the blood vessel network interconnecting hair follicles in the skin of transgenic mice with nestin regulatory element-driven green fluorescent protein (ND-GFP). The hair follicles were shown to give rise to the nestin-expressing blood vessels in the skin. In the present study, we visualized tumor angiogenesis by dual-color fluorescence imaging in ND-GFP transgenic mice after transplantation of the murine melanoma cell line B16F10 expressing red fluorescent protein. ND-GFP was highly expressed in proliferating endothelial cells and nascent blood vessels in the growing tumor. Results of immunohistochemical staining showed that the blood vessel-specific antigen CD31 was expressed in ND-GFP-expressing nascent blood vessels. ND-GFP expression was diminished in the vessels with increased blood flow. Progressive angiogenesis during tumor growth was readily visualized during tumor growth by GFP expression. Doxorubicin inhibited the nascent tumor angiogenesis as well as tumor growth in the ND-GFP mice transplanted with B16F10-RFP. This model is useful for direct visualization of tumor angiogenesis and evaluation of angiogenic inhibitors.

  15. Epithelial cornified envelope precursors are in the hair follicle and nail.

    PubMed

    Baden, H P; Kvedar, J C

    1993-07-01

    Nail and certain layers of the hair follicle form cornified envelopes (CEs) that morphologically resemble those in epidermis. We have been studying two unique precursors of the CE in human epidermis, pancornulin and sciellin. Antibodies to these proteins stained the more central cells of the outer root sheath of the ostium and isthmus of the follicle where CEs are found. Staining was also observed with these antibodies in the inner root sheath, where CEs were thought not to be present. Using immunoelectron microscopy, the staining by the sciellin antibody was at the cell periphery, but this technique did not work with the antibody to pancornulin. The antibody to pancornulin reacted to the nail fold and proximal matrix, whereas the one to sciellin reacted with the nail fold, matrix, and bed. Similar reactions were observed to monkey, sheep, and cow nail. These results suggest that envelope precursor may have an additional function in the hair follicle as well as contributing to the CE in hair and nail.

  16. Differential response of epithelial stem cell populations in hair follicles to TGF-β signaling.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsien-Yi; Yang, Liang-Tung

    2013-01-15

    Epidermal stem cells residing in different locations in the skin continuously self-renew and differentiate into distinct cell lineages to maintain skin homeostasis during postnatal life. Murine epidermal stem cells located at the bulge region are responsible for replenishing the hair lineage, while the stem cells at the isthmus regenerate interfollicular epidermis and sebaceous glands. In vitro cell culture and in vivo animal studies have implicated TGF-β signaling in the maintenance of epidermal and hair cycle homeostasis. Here, we employed a triple transgenic animal model that utilizes a combined Cre/loxP and rtTA/TRE system to allow inducible and reversible inhibition of TGF-β signaling in hair follicle lineages and suprabasal layer of the epidermis. Using this animal model, we have analyzed the role of TGF-β signaling in distinct phases of the hair cycle. Transient abrogation of TGF-β signaling does not prevent catagen progression; however, it induces aberrant proliferation and differentiation of isthmus stem cells to epidermis and sebocyte lineages and a blockade in anagen re-entry as well as results in an incomplete hair shaft development. Moreover, ablation of TGF-β signaling during anagen leads to increased apoptosis in the secondary hair germ and bulb matrix cells. Blocking of TGF-β signaling in bulge stem cell cultures abolishes their colony-forming ability, suggesting that TGF-β signaling is required for the maintenance of bulge stem cells. At the molecular level, inhibition of TGF-β signaling results in a decrease in both Lrig1-expressing isthmus stem cells and Lrg5-expressing bulge stem cells, which may account for the phenotypes seen in our animal model. These data strongly suggest that TGF-β signaling plays an important role in regulating the proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis of distinct epithelial stem cell populations in hair follicles. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Localization of the rabies virus antigen in Merkel cells in the follicle-sinus complexes of muzzle skins of rabid dogs.

    PubMed

    Shimatsu, Taichi; Shinozaki, Harumi; Kimitsuki, Kazunori; Shiwa, Nozomi; Manalo, Daria L; Perez, Rodolfo C; Dilig, Joselito E; Yamada, Kentaro; Boonsriroj, Hassadin; Inoue, Satoshi; Park, Chun-Ho

    2016-11-01

    The direct fluorescent antibody test (dFAT) on fresh brain tissues is the gold standard for rabies virus antigen detection in dogs. However, this method is laborious and holds a high risk of virus exposure for the experimenter. Skin biopsies are useful for the diagnosis of humans and animals. In mammals, the tactile hair, known as the follicle-sinus complex (FSC), is a specialized touch organ that is abundant in the muzzle skin. Each tactile hair is equipped with more than 2,000 sensory nerve endings. Therefore, this organ is expected to serve as an alternative postmortem diagnostic material. However, the target cells and localization of rabies virus antigen in the FSCs remain to be defined. In the present study, muzzle skins were obtained from 60 rabid dogs diagnosed with rabies by dFAT at the Research Institute of Tropical Medicine in the Philippines. In all dogs, virus antigen was clearly detected in a part of the outer root sheath at the level of the ring sinus of the FSCs, and the majority of cells were positive for the Merkel cell (MC) markers cytokeratin 20 and CAM5.2. Our results suggest that MCs in the FSCs of the muzzle skin are a target for virus replication and could serve as a useful alternative specimen source for diagnosis of rabies.

  18. Differentiating the stem cell pool of human hair follicle outer root sheath into functional melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Marie; Dieckmann, Christina; Rabe, Katrin; Simon, Jan-Christoph; Savkovic, Vuk

    2014-01-01

    Bench-to-Bedside concepts for regenerative therapy place significant weight on noninvasive approaches, with harvesting of the starting material as a header. This is particularly important in autologous treatments, which use one's bodily constituents for therapy. Precisely the stretch between obtaining therapeutic elements invasively and noninvasively places non-intrusive "sampling" rather than "biopsy" in the center of the road map of developing an autologous regenerative therapy. We focus on such a noninvasively available source of adult stem cells that we carry with us throughout our life, available at our fingertips-or shall we say hair roots, by a simple plucking of hair: the human hair follicle. This chapter describes an explant procedure for cultivating melanocytes differentiated from the stem cell pool of the hair follicle Outer Root Sheath (ORS). In vivo, the most abundant derivatives of the heterogeneous ORS stem cell pool are epidermal cells-melanocytes and keratinocytes which complete their differentiation-either spontaneously or upon picking up regenerative cues from damaged skin-and migrate from the ORS towards the adjacent regenerating area of the epidermis. We have taken advantage of the ORS developmental potential by optimizing explant primary culture, expansion and melanogenic differentiation of resident ORS stem cells towards end-stage melanocytes in order to obtain functional melanocytes noninvasively for the purposes of transplantation and use them for the treatment of depigmentation disorders. Our protocol specifies sampling of hair with their ORS, follicle medium-air interface primary culture, stimulation of cell outgrowth, adherent culture and differentiation of ORS stem cells and precursors towards fully functional melanocytes. Along with cultivation, we describe selection techniques for establishing and maintaining a pure melanocyte population and methods suitable for determining melanocyte identity.

  19. Hair Follicle and Sebaceous Gland De Novo Regeneration With Cultured Epidermal Stem Cells and Skin-Derived Precursors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Xusheng; Liu, Jianjun; Cai, Ting; Guo, Ling; Wang, Shujuan; Wang, Jinmei; Cao, Yanpei; Ge, Jianfeng; Jiang, Yuyang; Tredget, Edward E; Cao, Mengjun; Wu, Yaojiong

    2016-12-01

    : Stem cell-based organ regeneration is purported to enable the replacement of impaired organs in the foreseeable future. Here, we demonstrated that a combination of cultured epidermal stem cells (Epi-SCs) derived from the epidermis and skin-derived precursors (SKPs) was capable of reconstituting functional hair follicles and sebaceous glands (SG). When Epi-SCs and SKPs were mixed in a hydrogel and implanted into an excisional wound in nude mice, the Epi-SCs formed de novo epidermis along with hair follicles, and SKPs contributed to dermal papilla in the neogenic hair follicles. Notably, a combination of culture-expanded Epi-SCs and SKPs derived from the adult human scalp were sufficient to generate hair follicles and hair. Bone morphogenetic protein 4, but not Wnts, sustained the expression of alkaline phosphatase in SKPs in vitro and the hair follicle-inductive property in vivo when SKPs were engrafted with neonatal epidermal cells into excisional wounds. In addition, Epi-SCs were capable of differentiating into sebocytes and formed de novo SGs, which excreted lipids as do normal SGs. Thus our results indicate that cultured Epi-SCs and SKPs are sufficient to generate de novo hair follicles and SGs, implying great potential to develop novel bioengineered skin substitutes with appendage genesis capacity. In postpartum humans, skin appendages lost in injury are not regenerated, despite the considerable achievement made in skin bioengineering. In this study, transplantation of a combination of culture-expanded epidermal stem cells and skin-derived progenitors from mice and adult humans led to de novo regeneration of functional hair follicles and sebaceous glands. The data provide transferable knowledge for the development of novel bioengineered skin substitutes with epidermal appendage regeneration capacity. ©AlphaMed Press.

  20. Mutations in TSPEAR, Encoding a Regulator of Notch Signaling, Affect Tooth and Hair Follicle Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Samuelov, Liat; Bertolini, Marta; Weissglas-Volkov, Daphna; Eskin-Schwartz, Marina; Malchin, Natalia; Bochner, Ron; Fainberg, Gilad; Goldberg, Ilan; Sugawara, Koji; Tsuruta, Daisuke; Morasso, Maria; Shalev, Stavit; Gallo, Richard L.; Shomron, Noam; Paus, Ralf; Sprecher, Eli

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent advances in our understanding of the pathogenesis of ectodermal dysplasias (EDs), the molecular basis of many of these disorders remains unknown. In the present study, we aimed at elucidating the genetic basis of a new form of ED featuring facial dysmorphism, scalp hypotrichosis and hypodontia. Using whole exome sequencing, we identified 2 frameshift and 2 missense mutations in TSPEAR segregating with the disease phenotype in 3 families. TSPEAR encodes the thrombospondin-type laminin G domain and EAR repeats (TSPEAR) protein, whose function is poorly understood. TSPEAR knock-down resulted in altered expression of genes known to be regulated by NOTCH and to be involved in murine hair and tooth development. Pathway analysis confirmed that down-regulation of TSPEAR in keratinocytes is likely to affect Notch signaling. Accordingly, using a luciferase-based reporter assay, we showed that TSPEAR knock-down is associated with decreased Notch signaling. In addition, NOTCH1 protein expression was reduced in patient scalp skin. Moreover, TSPEAR silencing in mouse hair follicle organ cultures was found to induce apoptosis in follicular epithelial cells, resulting in decreased hair bulb diameter. Collectively, these observations indicate that TSPEAR plays a critical, previously unrecognized role in human tooth and hair follicle morphogenesis through regulation of the Notch signaling pathway. PMID:27736875

  1. Induced pluripotent stem cells from human hair follicle mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yimei; Liu, Jinyu; Tan, Xiaohua; Li, Gaofeng; Gao, Yunhe; Liu, Xuejuan; Zhang, Lihong; Li, Yulin

    2013-08-01

    Reprogramming of somatic cells into inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) provides an alternative to using embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Mesenchymal stem cells derived from human hair follicles (hHF-MSCs) are easily accessible, reproducible by direct plucking of human hairs. Whether these hHF-MSCs can be reprogrammed has not been previously reported. Here we report the generation of iPSCs from hHF-MSCs obtained by plucking several hairs. hHF-MSCs were isolated from hair follicle tissues and their mesenchymal nature confirmed by detecting cell surface antigens and multilineage differentiation potential towards adipocytes and osteoblasts. They were then reprogrammed into iPSCs by lentiviral transduction with Oct4, Sox2, c-Myc and Klf4. hHF-MSC-derived iPSCs appeared indistinguishable from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) in colony morphology, expression of alkaline phosphotase, and expression of specific hESCs surface markers, SSEA-3, SSEA-4, Tra-1-60, Tra-1-81, Nanog, Oct4, E-Cadherin and endogenous pluripotent genes. When injected into immunocompromised mice, hHF-MSC-derived iPSCs formed teratomas containing representatives of all three germ layers. This is the first study to report reprogramming of hHF-MSCs into iPSCs.

  2. Architectural niche organization by LHX2 is linked to hair follicle stem cell function.

    PubMed

    Folgueras, Alicia R; Guo, Xingyi; Pasolli, H Amalia; Stokes, Nicole; Polak, Lisa; Zheng, Deyou; Fuchs, Elaine

    2013-09-05

    In adult skin, self-renewing, undifferentiated hair follicle stem cells (HF-SCs) reside within a specialized niche, where they spend prolonged times as a single layer of polarized, quiescent epithelial cells. When sufficient activating signals accumulate, HF-SCs become mobilized to fuel tissue regeneration and hair growth. Here, we show that architectural organization of the HF-SC niche by transcription factor LHX2 plays a critical role in HF-SC behavior. Using genome-wide chromatin and transcriptional profiling of HF-SCs in vivo, we show that LHX2 directly transactivates genes that orchestrate cytoskeletal dynamics and adhesion. Conditional ablation of LHX2 results in gross cellular disorganization and HF-SC polarization within the niche. LHX2 loss leads to a failure to maintain HF-SC quiescence and hair anchoring, as well as progressive transformation of the niche into a sebaceous gland. These findings suggest that niche organization underlies the requirement for LHX2 in hair follicle structure and function. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Cathepsin L deficiency as molecular defect of furless: hyperproliferation of keratinocytes and pertubation of hair follicle cycling.

    PubMed

    Roth, W; Deussing, J; Botchkarev, V A; Pauly-Evers, M; Saftig, P; Hafner, A; Schmidt, P; Schmahl, W; Scherer, J; Anton-Lamprecht, I; Von Figura, K; Paus, R; Peters, C

    2000-10-01

    Lysosomal cysteine proteinases of the papain family are involved in lysosomal bulk proteolysis, major histocompatibility complex class II mediated antigen presentation, prohormone processing, and extracellular matrix remodeling. Cathepsin L (CTSL) is a ubiquitously expressed major representative of the papain-like family of cysteine proteinases. To investigate CTSL in vivo functions, the gene was inactivated by gene targeting in embryonic stem cells. CTSL-deficient mice develop periodic hair loss and epidermal hyperplasia, acanthosis, and hyperkeratosis. The hair loss is due to alterations of hair follicle morphogenesis and cycling, dilatation of hair follicle canals, and disturbed club hair formation. Hyperproliferation of hair follicle epithelial cells and basal epidermal keratinocytes-both of ectodermal origin-are the primary characteristics underlying the mutant phenotype. Pathological inflammatory responses have been excluded as a putative cause of the skin and hair disorder. The phenotype of CTSL-deficient mice is reminiscent of the spontaneous mouse mutant furless (fs). Analyses of the ctsl gene of fs mice revealed a G149R mutation inactivating the proteinase activity. CTSL is the first lysosomal proteinase shown to be essential for epidermal homeostasis and regular hair follicle morphogenesis and cycling.

  4. Human hair greying is linked to a specific depletion of hair follicle melanocytes affecting both the bulb and the outer root sheath.

    PubMed

    Commo, S; Gaillard, O; Bernard, B A

    2004-03-01

    Although hair greying is a very common phenomenon characterized by loss of pigment in the hair shaft, the events that cause and control natural hair whitening with age in humans are still unclear. To decipher the origin of natural hair whitening. Human hair melanocytes were immunohistochemically characterized at different stages of whitening. Loss of hair shaft melanin was found to be associated with a decrease in both bulb melanin content and bulb melanocyte population. Although few melanocytes were present in the bulbs of grey hair, they still expressed tyrosinase and tyrosinase-related protein-1, synthesized and transferred melanins to cortical keratinocytes as seen by the presence of melanin granules. In white hair bulbs, no melanocytes could be detected either with pMel-17 or vimentin labelling. Pigmented hair follicles are known to contain inactive melanocytes in the outer root sheath (ORS), and grey and white hairs were also found to contain some of these quiescent melanocytes. However, their population was decreased compared with pigmented hair follicles, ranging from small to nil. This depletion of melanocytes in the different areas of white hairs was detected throughout the hair cycle, namely at telogen and early anagen stages. In contrast, the infundibulum and sebaceous gland of both pigmented and white hairs showed a similar distribution of melanocytes. Furthermore, other distinct cell populations located in the ORS, namely putative stem cells, Merkel cells and Langerhans cells were equivalently identified in pigmented and white hairs. Thus, hair greying appears to be a consequence of an overall and specific depletion of bulb and ORS melanocytes of human hair.

  5. miR-24 affects hair follicle morphogenesis targeting Tcf-3.

    PubMed

    Amelio, I; Lena, A M; Bonanno, E; Melino, G; Candi, E

    2013-11-14

    During embryonic development, hair follicles (HFs) develop from an epidermal-mesenchymal cross talk between the ectoderm progenitor layer and the underlying dermis. Epidermal stem cell activation represents a crucial point both for HF morphogenesis and for hair regeneration. miR-24 is an anti-proliferative microRNA (miRNA), which is induced during differentiation of several cellular systems including the epidermis. Here, we show that miR-24 is expressed in the HF and has a role in hair morphogenesis. We generated transgenic mice ectopically expressing miR-24 under the K5 promoter. The K5::miR-24 animals display a marked defect in HF morphogenesis, with thinning of hair coat and altered HF structure. Expression of miR-24 alters the normal process of hair keratinocyte differentiation, leading to altered expression of differentiation markers. MiR-24 directly represses the hair keratinocyte stemness regulator Tcf-3. These results support the notion that microRNAs, and among them miR-24, have an important role in postnatal epidermal homeostasis.

  6. Hair follicle-derived IL-7 and IL-15 mediate skin-resident memory T cell homeostasis and lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, Takeya; Kobayashi, Tetsuro; Sugihara, Eiji; Yamada, Taketo; Ikuta, Koichi; Pittaluga, Stefania; Saya, Hideyuki; Amagai, Masayuki; Nagao, Keisuke

    2015-01-01

    The skin harbors a variety of resident leukocyte subsets that must be tightly regulated to maintain immune homeostasis. Hair follicles are unique structures in the skin that contribute to skin dendritic cell homeostasis via chemokine production. We demonstrate that CD4+ and CD8+ skin resident memory T cells (TRM), responsible for long-term skin immunity, resided predominantly within the hair follicle epithelium of unperturbed epidermis. TRM tropism for the epidermis and follicles was herein termed epidermotropism. Hair follicle-derived IL-15 was required for CD8+ TRM, and IL-7 for CD8+ and CD4+ TRM, to exert epidermotropism. The lack of either cytokine impaired hapten-induced contact hypersensitivity responses. In a model of cutaneous T cell lymphoma, epidermotropic CD4+ TRM lymphoma cell localization depended on hair follicle-derived IL-7. These findings implicate hair follicle-derived cytokines as regulators of malignant and non-malignant TRM cell tissue residence and suggest they may be targeted therapeutically in inflammatory skin disease and lymphoma. PMID:26479922

  7. Human hair follicle pigmentary unit as a direct target for modulators of melanogenesis, as studied by [14C]-2-thiouracil incorporation.

    PubMed

    Michelet, Jean-François; Gautier, Brigitte; Gaillard, Olivier; Bernard, Bruno Alain; Benech, Florence

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate human hair follicle melanogenic activity using the [14C]-2-thiouracil, which was known to incorporate into nascent melanins. Results obtained on pigmented, grey and non-pigmented hair follicles demonstrated that [(14)C]-2-TU incorporation was restricted to the melanogenic compartment with a strong accumulation located around dermal papilla and within the fibre of pigmented hair follicles. Quantitative analysis of [(14)C]-2-TU incorporation showed a significant increase in pigmented hair follicles upon stimulation with 1 microm forskolin concomitant to an increase in tyrosinase levels. A strong significant decrease in [14C]-2-TU incorporation was noted, when hair follicles were incubated with the tyrosinase competitive inhibitor kojic acid (200 microm). Incubation with the MC1-R agonist alpha-MSH (0.2 microm) did not induce a significant stimulation of hair melanogenesis. The present model could thus represent a useful new tool to identify modulators of human hair pigmentation.

  8. Msi2 Maintains Quiescent State of Hair Follicle Stem Cells by Directly Repressing the Hh Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xianghui; Tian, Yuhua; Song, Yongli; Shi, Jianyun; Xu, Jiuzhi; Xiong, Kai; Li, Jia; Xu, Wenjie; Zhao, Yiqiang; Shuai, Jianwei; Chen, Lei; Plikus, Maksim V; Lengner, Christopher J; Ren, Fazheng; Xue, Lixiang; Yu, Zhengquan

    2017-05-01

    Hair follicles (HFs) undergo precisely regulated cycles of active regeneration (anagen), involution (catagen), and relative quiescence (telogen). Hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) play important roles in regenerative cycling. Elucidating mechanisms that govern HFSC behavior can help uncover the underlying principles of hair development, hair growth disorders, and skin cancers. RNA-binding proteins of the Musashi (Msi) have been implicated in the biology of different stem cell types, yet they have not been studied in HFSCs. Here we utilized gain- and loss-of-function mouse models to demonstrate that forced MSI2 expression retards anagen entry and consequently delays hair growth, whereas loss of Msi2 enhances hair regrowth. Furthermore, our findings show that Msi2 maintains quiescent state of HFSCs in the process of the telogen-to-anagen transition. At the molecular level, our unbiased transcriptome profiling shows that Msi2 represses Hedgehog signaling activity and that Shh is its direct target in the hair follicle. Taken together, our findings reveal the importance of Msi2 in suppressing hair regeneration and maintaining HFSC quiescence. The previously unreported Msi2-Shh-Gli1 pathway adds to the growing understanding of the complex network governing cyclic hair growth. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Promotion of hair follicle development and trichogenesis by Wnt-10b in cultured embryonic skin and in reconstituted skin

    SciTech Connect

    Ouji, Yukiteru . E-mail: oujix@naramed-u.ac.jp; Yoshikawa, Masahide; Shiroi, Akira; Ishizaka, Shigeaki

    2006-06-30

    We previously showed that Wnt-10b promoted the differentiation of primary skin epithelial cells (MPSEC) toward hair shaft and inner root sheath of the hair follicle (IRS) cells in vitro. In the present study, we found that Wnt-10b promotes the development of hair follicles using a culture of mouse embryonic skin tissue and trichogenesis using a reconstitution experiment with nude mice. Hair follicle development was observed in skin taken from mouse embryos on embryonic day 10.5 following a 2-day culture with recombinant Wnt-10b (rWnt-10b), however, not without rWnt-10b. Brown hair growth was observed at the site of reconstituted skin in Balb/c nude mice where dermal fibroblasts and keratinocytes, derived from C3H/HeN new born mice, were transplanted with Wnt-10b-producing COS cells (Wnt-COS). Without the co-transplantation of Wnt-COS, no hair growth was observed. Our results suggest an important role of Wnt-10b in the initiation of hair follicle development and following trichogenesis.

  10. Defining BMP functions in the hair follicle by conditional ablation of BMP receptor IA.

    PubMed

    Kobielak, Krzysztof; Pasolli, H Amalia; Alonso, Laura; Polak, Lisa; Fuchs, Elaine

    2003-11-10

    Using conditional gene targeting in mice, we show that BMP receptor IA is essential for the differentiation of progenitor cells of the inner root sheath and hair shaft. Without BMPRIA activation, GATA-3 is down-regulated and its regulated control of IRS differentiation is compromised. In contrast, Lef1 is up-regulated, but its regulated control of hair differentiation is still blocked, and BMPRIA-null follicles fail to activate Lef1/beta-catenin-regulated genes, including keratin genes. Wnt-mediated transcriptional activation can be restored by transfecting BMPRIA-null keratinocytes with a constitutively activated beta-catenin. This places the block downstream from Lef1 expression but upstream from beta-catenin stabilization. Because mice lacking the BMP inhibitor Noggin fail to express Lef1, our findings support a model, whereby a sequential inhibition and then activation of BMPRIA is necessary to define a band of hair progenitor cells, which possess enough Lef1 and stabilized beta-catenin to activate the hair specific keratin genes and generate the hair shaft.

  11. Assembling Composite Dermal Papilla Spheres with Adipose-derived Stem Cells to Enhance Hair Follicle Induction

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chin-Fu; Chang, Ya-Ju; Hsueh, Yuan-Yu; Huang, Chia-Wei; Wang, Duo-Hsiang; Huang, Tzu-Chieh; Wu, Yi-Ting; Su, Fong-Chin; Hughes, Michael; Chuong, Cheng-Ming; Wu, Chia-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Intradermal adipose tissue plays an essential role for hair follicles (HFs) regeneration by regulating hair cycles. However, the effect of reconstruction of HFs and the involvement of adipose-related cells are poorly understood. We investigated assembly strategies for the interactions of dermal papilla (DP) cells with adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) in promoting hair formation. DP cells lose DP traits during adherent culture, but preserved DP markers with a unified sphere diameter by seeding on chitosan-coated microenvironments. Next, ASCs isolated from rats were co-cultured with DP spheres by different assembling approaches to determine their interactions; a mixed sphere of ASCs with DP cells (MA-DPS), or a core-shell structure, outer ASCs shell and an inner DP core (CSA-DPS). CSA-DPS exhibited superior DP characteristics compared to MA-DPS. Conditional medium from ASCs, but not differentiated adipocytes, promoted DP markers and functional alkaline phosphatase activity from the DP cells. In vivo patch assay showed the core-shell assembling of CSA-DPS can reconstruct cellular arrangements and microenvironmental niches as dominated by PPARα signal in ASCs to induce the greater hair induction than MA-DPS or DP spheres alone. Therefore, the assembling of a core-shell sphere for DP with ASCs could reconstruct the HF cellular arrangement for hair formation. This paper set the groundwork for further evaluation of the input of other cell types. PMID:27210831

  12. Permeant lipophilicity and vehicle composition influence accumulation of dyes in hair follicles of human skin.

    PubMed

    Grams, Ylva Y; Alaruikka, Soile; Lashley, Lisa; Caussin, Julia; Whitehead, Lynne; Bouwstra, Joke A

    2003-04-01

    In skin and hair research drug targeting to the hair follicle is of great interest. Therefore the influence of permeant lipophilicity and vehicle composition on local accumulation has been examined using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Formulations saturated with either Oregon Green 488, Bodipy FL C(5) or Bodipy 564/570 C(5) were prepared. The dyes were applied in citric acid buffer, 8% (w/v) surfactants in citric acid buffer or 8% (w/v) surfactants/20% (w/v) propylene glycol in citric acid buffer. Flow-through diffusion experiments were performed with fresh human scalp skin, after which the skin was imaged using CLSM. Diffusion studies showed for Oregon Green 488 (low lipophilicity) a higher flux when applied in citric acid buffer compared to surfactants. In contrast the fluxes of the more lipophilic dyes (Bodipy FL C(5) and Bodipy 564/570 C(5)) are highest when applied in surfactants/propylene glycol. CLSM studies revealed that follicular accumulation increased with (i) a lipophilic dye and (ii) application of lipophilic dyes in surfactants-propylene glycol. Therefore we conclude that targeting to the hair follicle can be increased by the use of lipophilic drugs in combination with surfactant solutions and propylene glycol.

  13. Hair Follicle Bulge Stem Cells Appear Dispensable for the Acute Phase of Wound Re‐epithelialization

    PubMed Central

    Garcin, Clare L.; Ansell, David M.; Headon, Denis J.; Paus, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The cutaneous healing response has evolved to occur rapidly, in order to minimize infection and to re‐establish epithelial homeostasis. Rapid healing is achieved through complex coordination of multiple cell types, which importantly includes specific cell populations within the hair follicle (HF). Under physiological conditions, the epithelial compartments of HF and interfollicular epidermis remain discrete, with K15+ve bulge stem cells contributing progeny for HF reconstruction during the hair cycle and as a basis for hair shaft production during anagen. Only upon wounding do HF cells migrate from the follicle to contribute to the neo‐epidermis. However, the identity of the first‐responding cells, and in particular whether this process involves a direct contribution of K15+ve bulge cells to the early stage of epidermal wound repair remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that epidermal injury in murine skin does not induce bulge activation during early epidermal wound repair. Specifically, bulge cells of uninjured HFs neither proliferate nor appear to migrate out of the bulge niche upon epidermal wounding. In support of these observations, Diphtheria toxin‐mediated partial ablation of K15+ve bulge cells fails to delay wound healing. Our data suggest that bulge cells only respond to epidermal wounding during later stages of repair. We discuss that this response may have evolved as a protective safeguarding mechanism against bulge stem cell exhaust and tumorigenesis. Stem Cells 2016;34:1377–1385 PMID:26756547

  14. A primer for studying cell cycle dynamics of the human hair follicle.

    PubMed

    Purba, Talveen S; Brunken, Lars; Hawkshaw, Nathan J; Peake, Michael; Hardman, Jonathan; Paus, Ralf

    2016-09-01

    The cell cycle is of major importance to human hair follicle (HF) biology. Not only is continuously active cell cycling required to facilitate healthy hair growth in anagen VI HFs, but perturbations in the cell cycle are likely to be of significance in HF pathology (i.e. in scarring, non-scarring, chemotherapy-induced and androgenic alopecias). However, cell cycle dynamics of the human hair follicle (HF) are poorly understood in contrast to what is known in mouse. The current Methods Review aims at helping to close this gap by presenting a primer that introduces immunohistological/immunofluorescent techniques to study the cell cycle in the human HF. Moreover, this primer encourages the exploitation of the human HF as a powerful and clinically relevant tool to investigate mammalian cell cycle biology in situ. To achieve this, we describe methods to study markers of general 'proliferation' (nuclei count, Ki-67 expression), apoptosis (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labelling, cleaved caspase 3), mitosis (phospho-histone H3, 'pS780'), DNA synthesis (5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine) and cell cycle regulation (cyclins) in the human HF. In addition, we provide specific examples of dual immunolabelling for instructive cell cycle analyses and for investigating the cell cycle behaviour of specific HF keratinocyte subpopulations, such as keratin 15+ stem/progenitor cells. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Hair Follicle Bulge Stem Cells Appear Dispensable for the Acute Phase of Wound Re-epithelialization.

    PubMed

    Garcin, Clare L; Ansell, David M; Headon, Denis J; Paus, Ralf; Hardman, Matthew J

    2016-05-01

    The cutaneous healing response has evolved to occur rapidly, in order to minimize infection and to re-establish epithelial homeostasis. Rapid healing is achieved through complex coordination of multiple cell types, which importantly includes specific cell populations within the hair follicle (HF). Under physiological conditions, the epithelial compartments of HF and interfollicular epidermis remain discrete, with K15(+ve) bulge stem cells contributing progeny for HF reconstruction during the hair cycle and as a basis for hair shaft production during anagen. Only upon wounding do HF cells migrate from the follicle to contribute to the neo-epidermis. However, the identity of the first-responding cells, and in particular whether this process involves a direct contribution of K15(+ve) bulge cells to the early stage of epidermal wound repair remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that epidermal injury in murine skin does not induce bulge activation during early epidermal wound repair. Specifically, bulge cells of uninjured HFs neither proliferate nor appear to migrate out of the bulge niche upon epidermal wounding. In support of these observations, Diphtheria toxin-mediated partial ablation of K15(+ve) bulge cells fails to delay wound healing. Our data suggest that bulge cells only respond to epidermal wounding during later stages of repair. We discuss that this response may have evolved as a protective safeguarding mechanism against bulge stem cell exhaust and tumorigenesis. Stem Cells 2016;34:1377-1385.

  16. Discovery of differentially expressed genes in cashmere goat (Capra hircus) hair follicles by RNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Qiao, X; Wu, J H; Wu, R B; Su, R; Li, C; Zhang, Y J; Wang, R J; Zhao, Y H; Fan, Y X; Zhang, W G; Li, J Q

    2016-09-02

    The mammalian hair follicle (HF) is a unique, highly regenerative organ with a distinct developmental cycle. Cashmere goat (Capra hircus) HFs can be divided into two categories based on structure and development time: primary and secondary follicles. To identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in the primary and secondary HFs of cashmere goats, the RNA sequencing of six individuals from Arbas, Inner Mongolia, was performed. A total of 617 DEGs were identified; 297 were upregulated while 320 were downregulated. Gene ontology analysis revealed that the main functions of the upregulated genes were electron transport, respiratory electron transport, mitochondrial electron transport, and gene expression. The downregulated genes were mainly involved in cell autophagy, protein complexes, neutrophil aggregation, and bacterial fungal defense reactions. According to the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes database, these genes are mainly involved in the metabolism of cysteine and methionine, RNA polymerization, and the MAPK signaling pathway, and were enriched in primary follicles. A microRNA-target network revealed that secondary follicles are involved in several important biological processes, such as the synthesis of keratin-associated proteins and enzymes involved in amino acid biosynthesis. In summary, these findings will increase our understanding of the complex molecular mechanisms of HF development and cycling, and provide a basis for the further study of the genes and functions of HF development.

  17. Beta-catenin can induce hair follicle stem cell differentiation into transit-amplifying cells through c-myc activation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qiong; Yu, Weirong; Fang, Yong; Yao, Min; Yang, Penggao

    2017-02-01

    Hair follicle stem cells play important roles in maintaining homeostasis and skin tissue self-renewal. Transit-amplifying cells represent the transition of cells from hair follicle stem cells into differentiated epidermal cells. Thus far, the signaling pathway and the molecular biological mechanism that regulate the proliferation and differentiation of hair follicle stem cells remain unclear. In this paper, we studied the relationship between β-catenin and c-myc during the process of the differentiation of hair follicle stem cells into transit-amplifying cells. Based on our results, the expression of β-catenin can activate the nuclear gene c-myc and regulate the expression of transit-amplifying cell markers K15, K19, a6-integrin and β1-integrin, indicating that β-catenin is involved in the transformation process from hair follicle stem cells to transit-amplifying cells and suggesting that β-catenin plays an important biological role in the induction of this differentiation process.

  18. [Anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia. Disorder of the differentiation of hair follicles and sweat glands leads to abnormal keratinization].

    PubMed

    Blume-Peytavi, U; Gollnick, H M; Föhles, J; Kremer, G; Pineda, M S; Phan, K H; Orfanos, C E

    1994-06-01

    We report on an 11-year-old female patient with anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (AED) showing the following characteristics: (1) reduced number of hair follicles and incomplete formation of sweat glands; (2) disturbed hair growth with shortening of anagen and anhidrosis; (3) disturbed cytokeratin expression pattern of CK 13, 14, 19 (follicular epithelium) and of CK 18 (eccrine sweat glands); (4) reduction of cystine and increase in sulphonic cysteine acid. Thus, we demonstrated pathological differentiation on the immunomorphological and on the biochemical level, leading to disturbed keratinization that could be visualized by transmission and scanning electron microscopical studies of the hair shafts. According to these findings AED is a developmental defect that involves not only incomplete formation of hair follicles and sweat glands but also a disordered differentiation and follicular keratinization with disturbed cytokeratin pattern and pathological amino acid composition of the terminal hairs produced.

  19. A multi-scale model for hair follicles reveals heterogeneous domains driving rapid spatiotemporal hair growth patterning

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qixuan; Oh, Ji Won; Lee, Hye-Lim; Dhar, Anukriti; Peng, Tao; Ramos, Raul; Guerrero-Juarez, Christian Fernando; Wang, Xiaojie; Zhao, Ran; Cao, Xiaoling; Le, Jonathan; Fuentes, Melisa A; Jocoy, Shelby C; Rossi, Antoni R; Vu, Brian; Pham, Kim; Wang, Xiaoyang; Mali, Nanda Maya; Park, Jung Min; Choi, June-Hyug; Lee, Hyunsu; Legrand, Julien M D; Kandyba, Eve; Kim, Jung Chul; Kim, Moonkyu; Foley, John; Yu, Zhengquan; Kobielak, Krzysztof; Andersen, Bogi; Khosrotehrani, Kiarash; Nie, Qing; Plikus, Maksim V

    2017-01-01

    The control principles behind robust cyclic regeneration of hair follicles (HFs) remain unclear. Using multi-scale modeling, we show that coupling inhibitors and activators with physical growth of HFs is sufficient to drive periodicity and excitability of hair regeneration. Model simulations and experimental data reveal that mouse skin behaves as a heterogeneous regenerative field, composed of anatomical domains where HFs have distinct cycling dynamics. Interactions between fast-cycling chin and ventral HFs and slow-cycling dorsal HFs produce bilaterally symmetric patterns. Ear skin behaves as a hyper-refractory domain with HFs in extended rest phase. Such hyper-refractivity relates to high levels of BMP ligands and WNT antagonists, in part expressed by ear-specific cartilage and muscle. Hair growth stops at the boundaries with hyper-refractory ears and anatomically discontinuous eyelids, generating wave-breaking effects. We posit that similar mechanisms for coupled regeneration with dominant activator, hyper-refractory, and wave-breaker regions can operate in other actively renewing organs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22772.001 PMID:28695824

  20. Toluene Diisocyanate (TDI) Disposition and Co-Localization of Immune Cells in Hair Follicles

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Ajay P.; Hettick, Justin M.; Siegel, Paul D.; Anderson, Stacey E.; Long, Carrie M.; Green, Brett J.; Beezhold, Donald H.

    2014-01-01

    Diisocyanates (dNCOs) are potent chemical allergens utilized in various industries. It has been proposed that skin exposure to dNCOs produces immune sensitization leading to work-related asthma and allergic disease. We examined dNCOs sensitization by using a dermal murine model of toluene diisocyanate (TDI) exposure to characterize the disposition of TDI in the skin, identify the predominant haptenated proteins, and discern the associated antigen uptake by dendritic cells. Ears of BALB/c mice were dosed once with TDI (0.1% or 4% v/v acetone). Ears and draining lymph nodes (DLNs) were excised at selected time points between 1 h and 15 days post-exposure and were processed for histological, immunohistochemical, and proteomic analyses. Monoclonal antibodies specific for TDI-haptenated protein (TDI-hp) and antibodies to various cell markers were utilized with confocal microscopy to determine co-localization patterns. Histopathological changes were observed following exposure in ear tissue of mice dosed with 4% TDI/acetone. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated TDI-hp localization in the stratum corneum, hair follicles, and sebaceous glands. TDI-hp were co-localized with CD11b+ (integrin αM/Mac-1), CD207+ (langerin), and CD103+ (integrin αE) cells in the hair follicles and in sebaceous glands. TDI-hp were also identified in the DLN 1 h post-exposure. Cytoskeletal and cuticular keratins along with mouse serum albumin were identified as major haptenated species in the skin. The results of this study demonstrate that the stratum corneum, hair follicles, and associated sebaceous glands in mice are dendritic cell accessible reservoirs for TDI-hp and thus identify a mechanism for immune recognition following epicutaneous exposure to TDI. PMID:24798378

  1. Laser Hair Removal as Adjunct to Surgery for Pilonidal Sinus: Our Initial Experience

    PubMed Central

    Ghnnam, Wagih Mommtaz; Hafez, Dhafer Mohmmed

    2011-01-01

    Background: Chronic pilonidal disease is a common debilitating condition. It is a cause of considerable morbidity and social embarrassment. This prospective randomized study compared permanent laser hair removal following the excision of pilonidal disease with conventional methods for hair removal. Materials and Methods: Patients undergoing surgery for pilonidal disease were randomized to two groups: those using laser hair removal methods following completed healing of wounds (group I) or regular post-healing conventional methods for hair removal, mainly razor and depilatory creams, for at least 6 months (group II). Group I patients received regular, monthly laser hair treatment sessions using Alexandrite laser for four sessions. Results: Group I patients had a mean age of 23.6 ± 4.7 years. Group I patients had monthly laser hair removal session and then they were regularly followed up within the proposed schedule. They found the procedure comfortable with no complications. Group II patients had a mean age of 23.7 ± 6.6 years; they reported difficulty in maintaining hair removal with these conventional methods, and mostly, by the end of the first year, all cases stopped maintaining regular hair removal. Recurrence occurred in Group II patients (two cases) mostly due to failure in maintaining hair removal and area hygiene. Conclusions: We advocate the use of laser epilation after surgery for pilonidal sinus as it decreases the chance of recurrence but larger studies with long-term follow-up are still needed to approve this conclusion. PMID:22279385

  2. Innovative modified hair follicle harvesting technique with reverse rake scalp elevator for lower occipital donor area in follicular unit extraction hair transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Gharwade, Chandrakant Rambhau

    2016-01-01

    Follicular unit extraction (FUE) is one of the widely practiced minimally invasive follicular harvesting techniques employed during hair transplantation. FUE technique has an advantage of utilising lower occipital area and supra-auricular region as a safe donor area described by Unger, in addition to the standard occipital donor area used in strip method (follicular unit transplant). Despite its potential advantages such as rapid recovery, minimal scarring and reduced post-operative pain; its widespread acceptance is limited due to various factors in variable contribution like steeper learning curve and potentially higher follicular transection rates (FTRs). The main practical drawbacks in harvesting FUE from lower occipital donor region that lie inferior to the standard donor area, is its acute angle (10°–15°) of emergent hair from scalp skin, higher variance angle (15°–35°) between hairs below the skin and hair exit angle above the skin and comparatively loose scalp, preventing to provide stable platform for punching. Hair transplant surgeon faces difficulty in aligning and engaging the FUE punch leading to very high hair follicle transection rate, and therefore, it is not a preferred site for harvesting follicles in FUE. Authors description of modified technique using reverse rake scalp elevator helps in negating the acute angle of the hair follicles exit from scalp skin and reducing the variance angle between emergent hair and hair below the skin in lower occipital region thereby reducing FTR. Furthermore, an added advantage of reducing the overall operative time and surgeon fatigue, improve donor area healing, availability of a comparatively larger donor area which increases the confidence of the beginners. This method will be of help as it is easy to duplicate and follow by novice hair transplant surgeons and also for those who are routinely doing mega hair transplants sessions. PMID:28216821

  3. Modulatory Role of Sensory Innervation on Hair Follicle Stem Cell Progeny during Wound Healing of the Rat Skin

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Martínez, Eduardo; Galván-Hernández, Claudio I.; Toscano-Márquez, Brenda; Gutiérrez-Ospina, Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    Background The bulge region of the hair follicle contains resident epithelial stem cells (SCs) that are activated and mobilized during hair growth and after epidermal wounding. However, little is known about the signals that modulate these processes. Clinical and experimental observations show that a reduced supply of sensory innervation is associated with delayed wound healing. Since axon terminals of sensory neurons are among the components of the bulge SC niche, we investigated whether these neurons are involved in the activation and mobilization of the hair stem cells during wound healing. Methodology/Principal Findings We used neonatal capsaicin treatment to reduce sensory terminals in the rat skin and performed morphometric analyses using design-based stereological methods. Epithelial proliferation was analyzed by quantifying the number of bromodeoxyuridine-labeled (BrdU+) nuclei in the epidermis and hair follicles. After wounding, the epidermis of capsaicin-treated rats presented fewer BrdU+ nuclei than in control rats. To assess SC progeny migration, we employed a double labeling protocol with iododeoxyuridine and chlorodeoxyuridine (IdU+/CldU+). The proportion of double-labeled cells was similar in the hair follicles of both groups at 32 h postwounding. IdU+/CldU+ cell proportion increased in the epidermis of control rats and decreased in treated rats at 61 h postwounding. The epidermal volume immunostained for keratin 6 was greater in treated rats at 61 h. Confocal microscopy analysis revealed that substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor immunoreactivity were both present in CD34+ and BrdU-retaining cells of the hair follicles. Conclusions/Significance Our results suggest that capsaicin denervation impairs SC progeny egress from the hair follicles, a circumstance associated with a greater epidermal activation. Altogether, these phenomena would explain the longer times for healing in denervated skin. Thus, sensory innervation

  4. Expression and localization of the vascular endothelial growth factor and changes of microvessel density during hair follicle development of Liaoning cashmere goats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q L; Li, J P; Li, Y M; Chang, Q; Chen, Y; Jiang, H Z; Zhao, Z H; Guo, D

    2013-12-10

    Vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs) play important roles in neovascularization, tissue development, and angiogenesis. In this study, changes in VEGF expression patterns and microvessel density (MVD), and their correlations, were investigated during hair follicle development in epidermal appendages of Liaoning cashmere goats. Polyclonal antibodies to VEGF and microvessels were used for monthly immunohistochemical examinations of normal skin specimens from adult female goats for one year. VEGF was expressed in the hair bulb of primary and secondary hair follicles, the outer and inner root sheaths, sebaceous glands (ductal and secretory portions), eccrine sweat glands (ductal and secretory portions), and the epidermis. Abundant expression of VEGF was observed in the follicular basement membrane zone surrounding the bulb matrix and in ductal and secretory portions of eccrine sweat glands. The change in VEGFs in primary hair follicles showed a bimodal pattern, with the first peak observed from March to May, and the second in August. Maximal expression in secondary hair follicles occurred in May and August. Therefore, VEGF expression in primary and secondary hair follicles is synchronized throughout the year, and is correlated to hair development. In the later telogen and anagen phases, VEGF expression was higher in the secondary, compared to the primary, hair follicle. Changes in MVD also showed a bimodal pattern with peaks in May and August. VEGF expression and MVD showed moderate and strongly positive correlation in the primary and secondary hair follicles, respectively. Therefore, MVD and VEGF are closely related to the processes involved in hair cycle regulation.

  5. Hairless Streaks in Cattle Implicate TSR2 in Early Hair Follicle Formation

    PubMed Central

    Murgiano, Leonardo; Shirokova, Vera; Welle, Monika Maria; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Plattet, Philippe; Oevermann, Anna; Pienkowska-Schelling, Aldona; Gallo, Daniele; Gentile, Arcangelo; Mikkola, Marja; Drögemüller, Cord

    2015-01-01

    Four related cows showed hairless streaks on various parts of the body with no correlation to the pigmentation pattern. The stripes occurred in a consistent pattern resembling the lines of Blaschko. The non-syndromic hairlessness phenotype observed occurred across three generations of a single family and was compatible with an X-linked mode of inheritance. Linkage analysis and subsequent whole genome sequencing of one affected female identified two perfectly associated non-synonymous sequence variants in the critical interval on bovine chromosome X. Both variants occurred in complete linkage disequilibrium and were absent in more than 3900 controls. An ERCC6L missense mutation was predicted to cause an amino acid substitution of a non-conserved residue. Analysis in mice showed no specific Ercc6l expression pattern related to hair follicle development and therefore ERCC6L was not considered as causative gene. A point mutation at the 5'-splice junction of exon 5 of the TSR2, 20S rRNA accumulation, homolog (S. cerevisiae), gene led to the production of two mutant transcripts, both of which contain a frameshift and generate a premature stop codon predicted to truncate approximately 25% of the protein. Interestingly, in addition to the presence of both physiological TSR2 transcripts, the two mutant transcripts were predominantly detected in the hairless skin of the affected cows. Immunohistochemistry, using an antibody against the N-terminal part of the bovine protein demonstrated the specific expression of the TSR2 protein in the skin and the hair of the affected and the control cows as well as in bovine fetal skin and hair. The RNA hybridization in situ showed that Tsr2 was expressed in pre- and post-natal phases of hair follicle development in mice. Mammalian TSR2 proteins are highly conserved and are known to be broadly expressed, but their precise in vivo functions are poorly understood. Thus, by dissecting a naturally occurring mutation in a domestic animal

  6. Hairless Streaks in Cattle Implicate TSR2 in Early Hair Follicle Formation.

    PubMed

    Murgiano, Leonardo; Shirokova, Vera; Welle, Monika Maria; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Plattet, Philippe; Oevermann, Anna; Pienkowska-Schelling, Aldona; Gallo, Daniele; Gentile, Arcangelo; Mikkola, Marja; Drögemüller, Cord

    2015-07-01

    Four related cows showed hairless streaks on various parts of the body with no correlation to the pigmentation pattern. The stripes occurred in a consistent pattern resembling the lines of Blaschko. The non-syndromic hairlessness phenotype observed occurred across three generations of a single family and was compatible with an X-linked mode of inheritance. Linkage analysis and subsequent whole genome sequencing of one affected female identified two perfectly associated non-synonymous sequence variants in the critical interval on bovine chromosome X. Both variants occurred in complete linkage disequilibrium and were absent in more than 3900 controls. An ERCC6L missense mutation was predicted to cause an amino acid substitution of a non-conserved residue. Analysis in mice showed no specific Ercc6l expression pattern related to hair follicle development and therefore ERCC6L was not considered as causative gene. A point mutation at the 5'-splice junction of exon 5 of the TSR2, 20S rRNA accumulation, homolog (S. cerevisiae), gene led to the production of two mutant transcripts, both of which contain a frameshift and generate a premature stop codon predicted to truncate approximately 25% of the protein. Interestingly, in addition to the presence of both physiological TSR2 transcripts, the two mutant transcripts were predominantly detected in the hairless skin of the affected cows. Immunohistochemistry, using an antibody against the N-terminal part of the bovine protein demonstrated the specific expression of the TSR2 protein in the skin and the hair of the affected and the control cows as well as in bovine fetal skin and hair. The RNA hybridization in situ showed that Tsr2 was expressed in pre- and post-natal phases of hair follicle development in mice. Mammalian TSR2 proteins are highly conserved and are known to be broadly expressed, but their precise in vivo functions are poorly understood. Thus, by dissecting a naturally occurring mutation in a domestic animal

  7. The electron microscopy of the human hair follicle. III. The inner root sheath and trichohyaline.

    PubMed

    BIRBECK, M S; MERCER, E H

    1957-03-25

    1. The three cylinders of cells, each one cell thick, which together constitute the inner root sheath, arise from the peripheral portions of the undifferentiated matrix. These cells, like the hair cuticle, are stabilised by the spread of adhesive contacts between their plasma membranes which occurs in the mid-bulb and upper bulb of the hair follicle. 2. The characteristic intracellular product of all three cell layers is trichohyaline. This substance is formed in the first place as amorphous droplets which subsequently transform into a birefringent form. 3. This transformation, involving the formation of a birefringent product from an amorphous precursor, is in contrast to the formation in the cortex of keratin which originates in a fibrous form. 4. Trichohyaline appears first and transforms first in the cells of Henle which are nearest the outer sheath and the dermal supply vessels. This transformation occurs at the level of the neck of the follicle. Synthesis and transformation in the cells of Huxley and the sheath cuticle lag behind the similar events in the cells of Henle. The transformation does not begin until the lower prekeratinous zone in the Huxley and cuticle cells. 5. The amorpous-fibrous transformation occurs rapidly cell by cell and involves the conversion of all the trichohyaline droplets. In longitudinal sections the birefringent modification can be seen extending from the droplets in both directions parallel to the axis of the hair. In cross-sections the images of the transformed material are difficult to interpret. They may be seen as sections of corrugated sheets ( approximately 100 A thick) or condensed fibrils approximately 100 A in width. 6. At the same time that the trichohyaline transforms, the spacing between the cell membranes increases and a dark deposit appears centrally between them. This membrane complex, and the similar complex of the hair cuticle cells described in Part 2, may be specialised formations whose purpose is to hold the

  8. Neurotrophin 4 is required for the survival of a subclass of hair follicle receptors.

    PubMed

    Stucky, C L; DeChiara, T; Lindsay, R M; Yancopoulos, G D; Koltzenburg, M

    1998-09-01

    Neurotrophin-4 (NT4) is the most recently discovered neurotrophic factor in mammals and, functionally, the least well understood. Here, we used mice that lack NT4 to determine whether NT4 is required for the survival of functionally identified subclasses of cutaneous sensory neurons. By using three independent methods of histological and electrophysiological analysis, we show that NT4 is specifically required for the survival of down hair (D-hair) receptors that innervate a subpopulation of hair follicles. All other functionally distinct types of afferents neurons innervating hairy skin were not affected in their survival or in their function. Previous studies have shown that BDNF is required for the mechanical sensitivity of slowly adapting (SA) mechanoreceptors but not for the postnatal survival of myelinated cutaneous afferent fibers. In contrast, the receptive properties of SA mechanoreceptors were not impaired in animals lacking NT4. Consequently, these data show that the two trkB ligands, NT4 and BDNF, have distinct and nonoverlapping roles in supporting cutaneous sensory neurons. Whereas NT4 is required for the survival of D-hair receptors, BDNF supports the mechanical function of SA fibers.

  9. Bisindolylmaleimide protein-kinase-C inhibitors delay the decline in DNA synthesis in mouse hair follicle organ cultures.

    PubMed

    Harmon, C S; Nevins, T D; Ducote, J; Lutz, D

    1997-01-01

    We have used a series of bisindolylmaleimide selective protein-kinase C (PKC) inhibitors to investigate the role of this enzyme in the regulation of cell proliferation in mouse hair follicle organ cultures. Mouse whisker follicles were isolated by microdissection, and rates of DNA synthesis during culture were determined from 3H-thymidine incorporation. The bisindolylmaleimides Ro 31-7549, Ro 31-8161, Ro 31-8425 and Ro 31-8830 inhibit isolated brain PKC with IC50 values of 8-80 nM, are > 60-fold less potent against protein kinase A, and inhibit PKC-mediated protein phosphorylation in platelets with IC50 values in the range 0.25-4.4 microM. These PKC inhibitors were found to increase levels of mouse hair follicle DNA synthesis, with EC50 values in the range 1-4 microM and maximal levels in the range 151-197% of control. Ro 31-7549 had an IC50 value 50-fold lower than that of minoxidil, while the maximal level of DNA synthesis for the PKC inhibitor was 86% higher. Incubation of mouse hair follicles with Ro 31-7549 resulted in a delay of approximately 24 h in the onset of decline in follicular DNA synthesis rates. Ro 31-6045 and Ro 31-7208, bisindolylmaleimides without activity in the platelet PKC assay, did not affect mouse hair follicle DNA synthesis rates. Taken together, these findings show that PKC mediates, at least in part, the rapid loss of proliferative activity that occurs in mouse whisker follicles in culture, and provide further evidence that PKC plays a role as a negative proliferative signal in hair follicles.

  10. Transcriptional Profiling in Rat Hair Follicles following Simulated Blast Insult: A New Diagnostic Tool for Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Carnduff, Lisa; Norman, Grant; Josey, Tyson; Wang, Yushan; Sawyer, Thomas W.; Martyniuk, Christopher J.; Langlois, Valerie S.

    2014-01-01

    With wide adoption of explosive-dependent weaponry during military activities, Blast-induced neurotrauma (BINT)-induced traumatic brain injury (TBI) has become a significant medical issue. Therefore, a robust and accessible biomarker system is in demand for effective and efficient TBI diagnosis. Such systems will also be beneficial to studies of TBI pathology. Here we propose the mammalian hair follicles as a potential candidate. An Advanced Blast Simulator (ABS) was developed to generate shock waves simulating traumatic conditions on brains of rat model. Microarray analysis was performed in hair follicles to identify the gene expression profiles that are associated with shock waves. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) and sub-network enrichment analysis (SNEA) were used to identify cell processes and molecular signaling cascades affected by simulated bomb blasts. Enrichment analyses indicated that genes with altered expression levels were involved in central nervous system (CNS)/peripheral nervous system (PNS) responses as well as signal transduction including Ca2+, K+-transportation-dependent signaling, Toll-Like Receptor (TLR) signaling and Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) signaling cascades. Many of the pathways identified as affected by shock waves in the hair follicles have been previously reported to be TBI responsive in other organs such as brain and blood. The results suggest that the hair follicle has some common TBI responsive molecular signatures to other tissues. Moreover, various TBI-associated diseases were identified as preferentially affected using a gene network approach, indicating that the hair follicle may be capable of reflecting comprehensive responses to TBI conditions. Accordingly, the present study demonstrates that the hair follicle is a potentially viable system for rapid and non-invasive TBI diagnosis. PMID:25136963

  11. Transcriptional profiling in rat hair follicles following simulated Blast insult: a new diagnostic tool for traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Carnduff, Lisa; Norman, Grant; Josey, Tyson; Wang, Yushan; Sawyer, Thomas W; Martyniuk, Christopher J; Langlois, Valerie S

    2014-01-01

    With wide adoption of explosive-dependent weaponry during military activities, Blast-induced neurotrauma (BINT)-induced traumatic brain injury (TBI) has become a significant medical issue. Therefore, a robust and accessible biomarker system is in demand for effective and efficient TBI diagnosis. Such systems will also be beneficial to studies of TBI pathology. Here we propose the mammalian hair follicles as a potential candidate. An Advanced Blast Simulator (ABS) was developed to generate shock waves simulating traumatic conditions on brains of rat model. Microarray analysis was performed in hair follicles to identify the gene expression profiles that are associated with shock waves. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) and sub-network enrichment analysis (SNEA) were used to identify cell processes and molecular signaling cascades affected by simulated bomb blasts. Enrichment analyses indicated that genes with altered expression levels were involved in central nervous system (CNS)/peripheral nervous system (PNS) responses as well as signal transduction including Ca2+, K+-transportation-dependent signaling, Toll-Like Receptor (TLR) signaling and Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) signaling cascades. Many of the pathways identified as affected by shock waves in the hair follicles have been previously reported to be TBI responsive in other organs such as brain and blood. The results suggest that the hair follicle has some common TBI responsive molecular signatures to other tissues. Moreover, various TBI-associated diseases were identified as preferentially affected using a gene network approach, indicating that the hair follicle may be capable of reflecting comprehensive responses to TBI conditions. Accordingly, the present study demonstrates that the hair follicle is a potentially viable system for rapid and non-invasive TBI diagnosis.

  12. Embryonic attenuated Wnt/β-catenin signaling defines niche location and long-term stem cell fate in hair follicle

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zijian; Wang, Wenjie; Jiang, Kaiju; Yu, Zhou; Huang, Huanwei; Wang, Fengchao; Zhou, Bin; Chen, Ting

    2015-01-01

    Long-term adult stem cells sustain tissue regeneration throughout the lifetime of an organism. They were hypothesized to originate from embryonic progenitor cells that acquire long-term self-renewal ability and multipotency at the end of organogenesis. The process through which this is achieved often remains unclear. Here, we discovered that long-term hair follicle stem cells arise from embryonic progenitor cells occupying a niche location that is defined by attenuated Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Hair follicle initiation is marked by placode formation, which depends on the activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Soon afterwards, a region with attenuated Wnt/β-catenin signaling emerges in the upper follicle. Embryonic progenitor cells residing in this region gain expression of adult stem cell markers and become definitive long-term hair follicle stem cells at the end of organogenesis. Attenuation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling is a prerequisite for hair follicle stem cell specification because it suppresses Sox9, which is required for stem cell formation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10567.001 PMID:26653852

  13. Protopanaxatirol type ginsenoside Re promotes cyclic growth of hair follicles via inhibiting transforming growth factor β signaling cascades.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Ryu, Seung-Wook; Lee, Jungsul; Choi, Kyungsun; Kim, Sunchang; Choi, Chulhee

    2016-02-19

    Ginsenosides, the major bio-active ingredients included in Panax ginseng, have been known for the hair growth activity and used to treat patients who suffer from hair loss; however, the detailed mechanisms of this action are still largely unknown. This study was conducted to investigate the molecular and cellular mechanisms responsible for hair growth promoting effect of ginsenoside Re (GRe) in vitro and in vivo. Different doses of minoxidil and GRe were administered topically to the back regions of nude mice for up to 45 days, and hair shaft length and hair cycles were determined for hair promoting activities. Topical treatment of GRe significantly increased the hair shaft length and hair existent time, which was comparable to the action of minoxidil. We also demonstrated that GRe stimulated hair shaft elongation in the ex vivo cultures of vibrissa hair follicles isolated from C57BL/6 mouse. Systemic transcriptome analysis by next generation sequencing demonstrated that TGF-β-pathway related genes were selectively down-regulated by treatment of GRe in vivo, and the same treatment suppressed TGF-β-induced phosphorylation of ERK in HeLa cells. The results clearly indicated that GRe is the effective constituent in the ginseng on hair promotion via selective inhibition of the hair growth phase transition related signaling pathways, TGF-β signaling cascades.

  14. Hair-follicle Transplant Into Chronic Ulcers: A New Graft Concept.

    PubMed

    Martínez Martínez, M L; Escario Travesedo, E; Jiménez Acosta, F

    Chronic venous leg ulcers are a major therapeutic challenge in clinical practice, and the search for new approaches to improve wound healing is essential. Many ulcers do not heal with traditional treatment using compression, debridement, and dressings. Skin-grafts variants, such as pinch grafts, punch grafts, split- or full-thickness skin grafts, and grafts derived from cells cultured in the laboratory, are among the most widely used options in ulcers that do not heal. In recent years, numerous studies have brought to our attention the important role of the hair follicle in the healing process of cutaneous wounds. Putting knowledge into practice, hair follicles from the scalp have been used in punch-type grafts transplanted to the base of chronic ulcers to stimulate healing. Results appear to be better than those with traditional hairless punch grafts, opening new lines of treatment for recalcitrant chronic venous ulcers. Copyright © 2017 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Alterations of plasma antioxidants and mitochondrial DNA mutation in hair follicles of smokers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chin-San; Chen, Haw-Wen; Lii, Chong-Kuei; Tsai, Ching-Shan; Kuo, Chen-Ling; Wei, Yau-Huei

    2002-01-01

    The effects of long-term smoking on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions in hair follicles were investigated in subjects with different antioxidant capacity. Twenty-two male smokers with a smoking index of greater than 5 pack-years and without any known systemic diseases were recruited for this study. Forty healthy nonsmoking males were included as controls. We found that the concentrations of ascorbate and alpha-tocopherol and the activities of glutathione S-transferase (GST) and glutathione peroxidase in blood plasma were significantly decreased in smokers. The levels of glutathione and protein thiols in whole blood and the incidence of a 4,977 bp deletion of mtDNA (dmtDNA) in hair follicles were significantly increased in smokers. A significantly higher incidence of the 4,977 bp dmtDNA was found in smokers with plasma GST activity less than 5.66 U/l (OR = 7.2, P = 0.020). Using multiple covariate ANOVA and logistic regression, we found that age and low plasma GST activity were the only two risk factors for the 4,977 bp dmtDNA. These results suggest that smoking depletes antioxidants and causes mtDNA deletions and that plasma GST may play an important role in the preservation of the mitochondrial genome in tissue cells of smokers.

  16. [Cultivated human hair follicle cells are capable of integrating to skin structure in vivo].

    PubMed

    Cheremnykh, E S; Radiukhina, N V; Rutkevich, P N; Shevelev, A Ia; Vlasik, T N; Voroteliak, E A; Vasil'ev, A V; Terskikh, V V

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, human keratinocytes and dermal papilla cells were labeled to investigate their behaviour after intradermal transplantation. Cells were transduced by lentiviral vectors that bore marker gene encoding green fluorescent protein (copGFP) or red fluorescent protein (DsRed). A portion of transgene expressing cells was evaluated by flow cytometry. Genetic constructions that we used provided high level (> 95 %) of transduction of hair follicle cells. In vitro transduced cells were injected under the epidermis of human skin fragments, and these fragments were then transplanted under the skin of immunodeficient mice. Injected epidermal keratinocytes were found, mainly, in hair follicles and partially in a zone of interfollicular epidermis, while dermal papilla cells were found in papilla derma. The results of the present research show that the chosen genetic constructions obtained on a basis of human immunodeficiency lentivirs are capable of effective and stable transduction of human skin cells. Injected cells survived and were found in the corresponding structures of the skin.

  17. Synthesis and Validation of Functional Nanogels as pH-Sensors in the Hair Follicle.

    PubMed

    Dimde, Mathias; Sahle, Fitsum Feleke; Wycisk, Virginia; Steinhilber, Dirk; Camacho, Luis Cuellar; Licha, Kai; Lademann, Jürgen; Haag, Rainer

    2017-04-10

    In the present study, a pH responsive dendritic polyglycerol nanogel (dPG-NG) is developed to measure the pH values inside the hair follicle (HF) using an ex vivo porcine ear model. The macromolecular precursors are labeled with a pH sensitive indodicarbocyanine dye (pH-IDCC) and a control dye (indocarbocyanine dye: ICC) and crosslinked via a mild and surfactant-free Thiol-Michael reaction using an inverse nanoprecipitation method. With this method, it is possible to prepare tailor-made particles in the range of 100 nm to 1 µm with a narrow polydispersity. The dPG-NGs are characterized using dynamic light scattering, nanoparticle tracking analysis, and atomic force microscopy. Systematic analysis of confocal microscope images of histological sections of the skin enables accurate determination of the pH gradient inside the HF. The results show that these novel pH-nanosensors deeply penetrate the skin via the follicular pathway and the pH of the pig hair follicles increase from 6.5 at the surface of the skin to 7.4 in deeper areas of the HF. The pH-nanosensor shows no toxicity potentials.

  18. Cryopreservation of hair follicles at 20 degrees C: can it work in staged hair transplantation.

    PubMed

    Adanali, Gokhan; Senen, Dilek; Turegun, Murat; Tuncel, Asuman; Erdogan, Bulent; Albayrak, Levent

    2002-01-01

    Androgenic alopecia is a serious problem for a large proportion of the population, especially males, and causes them to seek medical help. Many methods have been described for treatment of androgenic alopesia. Among them are punch grafts, strip grafts, scalp grafts, scalp reductions, tissue expanders, and flap combinations, and hair transplantations with minigrafts and micrografts. The latter has become popular in the last two to three decades and has been investigated extensively. Improvements in hair replacement with minigrafts and micrografts may allow an ideal result with a nearly normal appearance. However, hair replacement with these grafts has important disadvantages. It requires a long operational time and only a limited number of grafts can be placed in one session. In this study, we investigated morphological structures of micrografts stored at 4 degrees C and those stored at -20 degrees C. We found that morphological structures of the grafts stored at 4 degrees C started to be impaired in the fifth day, but that the morphological structures of the grafts stored at -20 degrees C remained unaltered for 15 days. If this method is put into practice, the use of minigrafts and micrografts available will not only obviate the second graft harvesting, but also allow reconstruction of a large area in a short period of time.

  19. Microenvironmental reprogramming by three-dimensional culture enables dermal papilla cells to induce de novo human hair-follicle growth

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Claire A.; Chen, James C.; Cerise, Jane E.; Jahoda, Colin A. B.; Christiano, Angela M.

    2013-01-01

    De novo organ regeneration has been observed in several lower organisms, as well as rodents; however, demonstrating these regenerative properties in human cells and tissues has been challenging. In the hair follicle, rodent hair follicle-derived dermal cells can interact with local epithelia and induce de novo hair follicles in a variety of hairless recipient skin sites. However, multiple attempts to recapitulate this process in humans using human dermal papilla cells in human skin have failed, suggesting that human dermal papilla cells lose key inductive properties upon culture. Here, we performed global gene expression analysis of human dermal papilla cells in culture and discovered very rapid and profound molecular signature changes linking their transition from a 3D to a 2D environment with early loss of their hair-inducing capacity. We demonstrate that the intact dermal papilla transcriptional signature can be partially restored by growth of papilla cells in 3D spheroid cultures. This signature change translates to a partial restoration of inductive capability, and we show that human dermal papilla cells, when grown as spheroids, are capable of inducing de novo hair follicles in human skin. PMID:24145441

  20. Hair follicle stem cells in the pathogenesis of the scarring process in cutaneous lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Al-Refu, Khitam; Goodfield, Mark

    2009-05-01

    Lupus erythematosus (LE) is an autoimmune disease that can affect one or more internal organs (systemic LE [SLE]) as well as the skin (CLE). Common cutaneous subtypes of CLE are chronic CLE (CCLE) and subacute CLE (SCLE). CCLE is the only type of CLE which heals with scarring and this may affect any site in the body. The fact that inflammation in CCLE generally involves the bulge area of the follicles (where the stem cells reside) raises the possibility that damage to the stem cells may be one process leading to permanent loss of follicles. One of the most useful distinctive markers of the stem cells is cytokeratin 15 (CK15) and this has been used in some studies to demonstrate the involvement of the bulge region in the scarring process in primary cicatricial alopecia and DLE. The bulge region appears to be involved in the scarring process in CLE and other types of cicatricial alopecia as part of broader involvement of the hair follicles; it is secondarily affected by the surrounding inflammatory cell infiltrate. Expression of the stem cell marker CK15 diminished and was then absent indicating either damage to stem cells or differentiation to help in the repair process.

  1. The Modulatable Stem Cell Niche: Tissue Interactions during Hair and Feather Follicle Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Chiang; Plikus, Maksim V; Tang, Pin-Chi; Widelitz, Randall B; Chuong, Cheng Ming

    2016-04-10

    Hair and feathers are unique because (1) their stem cells are contained within a follicle structure, (2) they undergo cyclic regeneration repetitively throughout life, (3) regeneration occurs physiologically in healthy individuals and (4) regeneration is also induced in response to injury. Precise control of this cyclic regeneration process is essential for maintaining the homeostasis of living organisms. While stem cells are regulated by the intra-follicle-adjacent micro-environmental niche, this niche is also modulated dynamically by extra-follicular macro-environmental signals, allowing stem cells to adapt to a larger changing environment and physiological needs. Here we review several examples of macro-environments that communicate with the follicles: intradermal adipose tissue, innate immune system, sex hormones, aging, circadian rhythm and seasonal rhythms. Related diseases are also discussed. Unveiling the mechanisms of how stem cell niches are modulated provides clues for regenerative medicine. Given that stem cells are hard to manipulate, focusing translational therapeutic applications at the environments appears to be a more practical approach.

  2. Empirically inspired simulated electro-mechanical model of the rat mystacial follicle-sinus complex.

    PubMed Central

    Mitchinson, Ben; Gurney, Kevin N.; Redgrave, Peter; Melhuish, Chris; Pipe, Anthony G.; Pearson, Martin; Gilhespy, Ian; Prescott, Tony J.

    2004-01-01

    In whiskered animals, activity is evoked in the primary sensory afferent cells (trigeminal nerve) by mechanical stimulation of the whiskers. In some cell populations this activity is correlated well with continuous stimulus parameters such as whisker deflection magnitude, but in others it is observed to represent events such as whisker-stimulator contact or detachment. The transduction process is mediated by the mechanics of the whisker shaft and follicle-sinus complex (FSC), and the mechanics and electro-chemistry of mechanoreceptors within the FSC. An understanding of this transduction process and the nature of the primary neural codes generated is crucial for understanding more central sensory processing in the thalamus and cortex. However, the details of the peripheral processing are currently poorly understood. To overcome this deficiency in our knowledge, we constructed a simulated electro-mechanical model of the whisker-FSC-mechanoreceptor system in the rat and tested it against a variety of data drawn from the literature. The agreement was good enough to suggest that the model captures many of the key features of the peripheral whisker system in the rat. PMID:15590603

  3. Innervation patterns of sea otter (Enhydra lutris) mystacial follicle-sinus complexes.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Christopher D; Rozas, Kelly; Kot, Brian; Gill, Verena A

    2014-01-01

    Sea otters (Enhydra lutris) are the most recent group of mammals to return to the sea, and may exemplify divergent somatosensory tactile systems among mammals. Therefore, we quantified the mystacial vibrissal array of sea otters and histologically processed follicle-sinus complexes (F - SCs) to test the hypotheses that the number of myelinated axons per F - SC is greater than that found for terrestrial mammalian vibrissae and that their organization and microstructure converge with those of pinniped vibrissae. A mean of 120.5 vibrissae were arranged rostrally on a broad, blunt muzzle in 7-8 rows and 9-13 columns. The F-SCs of sea otters are tripartite in their organization and similar in microstructure to pinnipeds rather than terrestrial species. Each F-SC was innervated by a mean 1339 ± 408.3 axons. Innervation to the entire mystacial vibrissal array was estimated at 161,313 axons. Our data support the hypothesis that the disproportionate expansion of the coronal gyrus in somatosensory cortex of sea otters is related to the high innervation investment of the mystacial vibrissal array, and that quantifying innervation investment is a good proxy for tactile sensitivity. We predict that the tactile performance of sea otter mystacial vibrissae is comparable to that of harbor seals, sea lions and walruses.

  4. Innervation patterns of sea otter (Enhydra lutris) mystacial follicle-sinus complexes

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Christopher D.; Rozas, Kelly; Kot, Brian; Gill, Verena A.

    2014-01-01

    Sea otters (Enhydra lutris) are the most recent group of mammals to return to the sea, and may exemplify divergent somatosensory tactile systems among mammals. Therefore, we quantified the mystacial vibrissal array of sea otters and histologically processed follicle-sinus complexes (F - SCs) to test the hypotheses that the number of myelinated axons per F - SC is greater than that found for terrestrial mammalian vibrissae and that their organization and microstructure converge with those of pinniped vibrissae. A mean of 120.5 vibrissae were arranged rostrally on a broad, blunt muzzle in 7–8 rows and 9–13 columns. The F-SCs of sea otters are tripartite in their organization and similar in microstructure to pinnipeds rather than terrestrial species. Each F-SC was innervated by a mean 1339 ± 408.3 axons. Innervation to the entire mystacial vibrissal array was estimated at 161,313 axons. Our data support the hypothesis that the disproportionate expansion of the coronal gyrus in somatosensory cortex of sea otters is related to the high innervation investment of the mystacial vibrissal array, and that quantifying innervation investment is a good proxy for tactile sensitivity. We predict that the tactile performance of sea otter mystacial vibrissae is comparable to that of harbor seals, sea lions and walruses. PMID:25400554

  5. Absence of catagen/telogen phase and loss of cytokeratin 15 expression in hair follicles in lichen planopilaris.

    PubMed

    Habashi-Daniel, Arlette; Roberts, Janet L; Desai, Nisha; Thompson, Curtis T

    2014-11-01

    Lichen planopilaris (LPP) is a lymphocyte-mediated cicatricial alopecia mostly involving the bulge region of the hair follicle. The origin of LPP is unknown. Therapy for LPP often does not prevent disease progression. We describe histologic and immunohistologic features that aid in diagnosis and provide an explanation for disease progression in LPP. We sought to demonstrate a decrease in the number of catagen-/telogen-phase follicles and to confirm the loss of cytokeratin 15 (CK15) expression in the stem cells of LPP-affected follicles. In all, 144 LPP cases were retrieved; 55 cases were stained immunohistochemically, targeting the CK15 antigen with 40 cases ultimately analyzed for CK15 expression. Catagen/telogen phase was significantly decreased or absent in all cases of LPP, a novel clue useful in histologic diagnostics. The loss of CK15+ stem cells in most affected follicles in LPP was also confirmed, with unaffected follicles retaining CK15+ stem cells. Limited tissue for analysis remained in the clinical sample tissue blocks. Damaged follicles that have lost their CK15+ stem cells disappear when they enter catagen phase. CK15+ stem cell loss explains the clinical observation that LPP progresses despite immunosuppressive therapies. Finally, the absence of catagen/telogen hair follicles is a helpful diagnostic clue for LPP. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Post-transcriptional Regulation of Keratinocyte Progenitor Cell Expansion, Differentiation and Hair Follicle Regression by miR-22

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Qingyong; Zhao, Yiqiang; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Hongquan; Xue, Lixiang; Zhang, Xiuqing; Lengner, Christopher; Yu, Zhengquan

    2015-01-01

    Hair follicles (HF) undergo precisely regulated recurrent cycles of growth, cessation, and rest. The transitions from anagen (growth), to catagen (regression), to telogen (rest) involve a physiological involution of the HF. This process is likely coordinated by a variety of mechanisms including apoptosis and loss of growth factor signaling. However, the precise molecular mechanisms underlying follicle involution after hair keratinocyte differentiation and hair shaft assembly remain poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that a highly conserved microRNA, miR-22 is markedly upregulated during catagen and peaks in telogen. Using gain- and loss-of-function approaches in vivo, we find that miR-22 overexpression leads to hair loss by promoting anagen-to-catagen transition of the HF, and that deletion of miR-22 delays entry to catagen and accelerates the transition from telogen to anagen. Ectopic activation of miR-22 results in hair loss due to the repression a hair keratinocyte differentiation program and keratinocyte progenitor expansion, as well as promotion of apoptosis. At the molecular level, we demonstrate that miR-22 directly represses numerous transcription factors upstream of phenotypic keratin genes, including Dlx3, Foxn1, and Hoxc13. We conclude that miR-22 is a critical post-transcriptional regulator of the hair cycle and may represent a novel target for therapeutic modulation of hair growth. PMID:26020521

  7. The spatio-temporal domains of Frizzled6 action in planar polarity control of hair follicle orientation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hao; Smallwood, Philip M; Williams, John; Nathans, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, hair follicles cover most of the body surface and exhibit precise and stereotyped orientations relative to the body axes. Follicle orientation is controlled by the planar cell polarity (PCP; or, more generally, tissue polarity) system, as determined by the follicle mis-orientation phenotypes observed in mice with PCP gene mutations. The present study uses conditional knockout alleles of the PCP genes Frizzled6 (Fz6), Vangl1, and Vangl2, together with a series of Cre drivers to interrogate the spatio-temporal domains of PCP gene action in the developing mouse epidermis required for follicle orientation. Fz6 is required starting between embryonic day (E)11.5 and E12.5. Eliminating Fz6 in either the anterior or the posterior halves of the embryo or in either the feet or the torso leads to follicle mis-orientation phenotypes that are limited to the territories associated with Fz6 loss, implying either that PCP signaling is required for communicating polarity information on a local but not a global scale, or that there are multiple independent sources of global polarity information. Eliminating Fz6 in most hair follicle cells or in the inter-follicular epidermis at E15.5 suggests that PCP signaling in developing follicles is not required to maintain their orientation. The asymmetric arrangement of Merkel cells around the base of each guard hair follicle dependents on Fz6 expression in the epidermis but not in differentiating Merkel cells. These experiments constrain current models of PCP signaling and the flow of polarity information in mammalian skin.

  8. [Cellular dynamics of the outer layers of the hair follicle of fine-wool sheep during the phase of stable hair growth].

    PubMed

    Vsevolodov, É B; Golichenkov, V A; Latypov, I F

    2014-01-01

    The structure, origin, and migration of outer sheath cells of the hair follicles of domestic sheep were studied by electron microscopic, autoradiographic, and histochemical (glycogen) in order to understand the role of this layer in hair morphogenesis. We demonstrated that the cells of the outer layers of the outer sheath interpose into the inner "companion" layer of the outer sheath. Although this process takes place all along the hair follicle from the lower bulb up to the sebaceous glands orifices, it mainly takes place over the bulb. Labeled cells interposed into the companion layer move towards sebaceous glands orifices more than 24 hours faster than labeled cells of the inner sheath and hair, because these cells included the label not in the bulb cambium (as hair and inner sheath) but over the bulb, and from this point they start movement. Interposition of cells into the companion layer must cause increase of its volume and additional volume supposed to be led away into the pillar canal around the hair near the sebaceous glands orifices. This can provide the mechanism for the propagation of the hair and inner sheath promotion to sebaceous gland orifices.

  9. The cycling hair follicle as an ideal systems biology research model.

    PubMed

    Al-Nuaimi, Yusur; Baier, Gerold; Watson, Rachel E B; Chuong, Cheng-Ming; Paus, Ralf

    2010-08-01

    In the postgenomic era, systems biology has rapidly emerged as an exciting field predicted to enhance the molecular understanding of complex biological systems by the use of quantitative experimental and mathematical approaches. Systems biology studies how the components of a biological system (e.g. genes, transcripts, proteins, metabolites) interact to bring about defined biological function or dysfunction. Living systems may be divided into five dimensions of complexity: (i) molecular; (ii) structural; (iii) temporal; (iv) abstraction and emergence; and (v) algorithmic. Understanding the details of these dimensions in living systems is the challenge that systems biology aims to address. Here, we argue that the hair follicle (HF), one of the signature features of mammals, is a perfect and clinically relevant model for systems biology research. The HF represents a stem cell-rich, essentially autonomous mini-organ, whose cyclic transformations follow a hypothetical intrafollicular "hair cycle clock" (HCC). This prototypic neuroectodermal-mesodermal interaction system, at the cross-roads of systems and chronobiology, encompasses various levels of complexity as it is subject to both intrafollicular and extrafollicular inputs (e.g. intracutaneous timing mechanisms with neural and systemic stimuli). Exploring how the cycling HF addresses the five dimensions of living systems, we argue that a systems biology approach to the study of hair growth and cycling, in man and mice, has great translational medicine potential. Namely, the easily accessible human HF invites preclinical and clinical testing of novel hypotheses generated with this approach.

  10. Hair Follicle Stem Cell-Specific PPARγ Deletion Causes Scarring Alopecia

    PubMed Central

    Karnik, Pratima; Tekeste, Zenar; McCormick, Thomas S.; Gilliam, Anita C.; Price, Vera H.; Cooper, Kevin D.; Mirmirani, Paradi

    2010-01-01

    Primary cicatricial or scarring alopecias (CA) are a group of inflammatory hair disorders of unknown pathogenesis characterized by the permanent destruction of the hair follicle. The current treatment options are ineffective in controlling disease progression largely because the molecular basis for CA is not understood. Microarray analysis of the lymphocytic CA, Lichen planopilaris (LPP), compared to normal scalp biopsies identified decreased expression of genes required for lipid metabolism and peroxisome biogenesis. Immunohistochemical analysis showed progressive loss of peroxisomes, proinflammatory lipid accumulation, and infiltration of inflammatory cells followed by destruction of the pilosebaceous unit. The expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) γ, a transcription factor that regulates these processes, is significantly decreased in LPP. Specific agonists of PPARγ are effective in inducing peroxisomal and lipid metabolic gene expression in human keratinocytes. Finally, targeted deletion of PPARγ in follicular stem cells in mice causes a skin and hair phenotype that emulates scarring alopecia. These studies suggest that PPARγ is crucial for healthy pilosebaceous units and it is the loss of this function that triggers the pathogenesis of LPP. We propose that PPARγ-targeted therapy may represent a new strategy in the treatment of these disorders. PMID:19052558

  11. The cycling hair follicle as an ideal systems biology research model

    PubMed Central

    Al-Nuaimi, Yusur; Baier, Gerold; Watson, Rachel E. B.; Chuong, Cheng-Ming; Paus, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    In the postgenomic era, systems biology has rapidly emerged as an exciting field predicted to enhance the molecular understanding of complex biological systems by the use of quantitative experimental and mathematical approaches. Systems biology studies how the components of a biological system (e.g. genes, transcripts, proteins, metabolites) interact to bring about defined biological function or dysfunction. Living systems may be divided into five dimensions of complexity: (i) molecular; (ii) structural; (iii) temporal; (iv) abstraction and emergence; and (v) algorithmic. Understanding the details of these dimensions in living systems is the challenge that systems biology aims to address. Here, we argue that the hair follicle (HF), one of the signature features of mammals, is a perfect and clinically relevant model for systems biology research. The HF represents a stem cell-rich, essentially autonomous mini-organ, whose cyclic transformations follow a hypothetical intrafollicular “hair cycle clock” (HCC). This prototypic neuroectodermal-mesodermal interaction system, at the cross-roads of systems and chronobiology, encompasses various levels of complexity as it is subject to both intrafollicular and extrafollicular inputs (e.g. intracutaneous timing mechanisms with neural and systemic stimuli). Exploring how the cycling HF addresses the five dimensions of living systems, we argue that a systems biology approach to the study of hair growth and cycling, in man and mice, has great translational medicine potential. Namely, the easily accessible human HF invites preclinical and clinical testing of novel hypotheses generated with this approach. PMID:20590819

  12. Detailed histological structure of human hair follicle bulge region at different ages: a visible niche for nesting adult stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiong; Shi, Ying; Zhou, Qiong; Liu, Xiaoming; Xu, Shizheng; Lei, Tiechi

    2012-10-01

    In the bulge region of the hair follicle, a densely and concentrically packed cell mass is encircled by the arrector pili muscle (APM), which offers a specilized microenvironment (niche) for housing heterogeneous adult stem cells. However, the detailed histological architecture and the cellular composition of the bulge region warrants intensive study and may have implications for the regulation of hair follicle growth regulation. This study was designed to define the gene-expression profiles of putative stem cells and lineage-specific precursors in the mid-portions of plucked hair follicles prepared according to the presence of detectable autofluorescence. The structure was also characterized by using a consecutive sectioning technique. The bulge region of the hair follicle with autofluorescence was precisely excised by employing a micro-dissection procedure. Semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed to identify the gene expression profiles specific for epithelial, melanocyte and stromal stem cells in the bulge region of the hair follicle visualized by autofluorescence. The morphology and its age-dependent changes of bulge region of the hair follicles with autofluorescence segment were also examined in 9 scalp skin specimens collected from patients aged 30 weeks to 75 years, by serial sectioning and immuno-staining. Gene expression profile analysis revealed that there were cells with mRNA transcripts of Dct(Hi)Tyrase(Lo)-Tyrp1(Lo)MC1R(Lo)MITF(Lo)/K15(Hi)/NPNT(Hi) in the bulge region of the hair follicle with autofluorescence segments, which differed from the patterns in hair bulbs. Small cell-protrusions that sprouted from the outer root sheath (ORS) were clearly observed at the APM inserting level in serial sections of hair follicles by immunohistological staining, which were characteristically replete with K15+/K19+expressing cells. Likewise, the muscle bundles of APM positive for smooth muscle actin intimately

  13. Advanced chemical imaging and comparison of human and porcine hair follicles for drug delivery by confocal Raman microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzen, Lutz; Mathes, Christiane; Hansen, Steffi; Windbergs, Maike

    2013-06-01

    Hair follicles have recently gained a lot of interest for dermal drug delivery. They provide facilitated penetration into the skin and a high potential to serve as a drug depot. In this area of research, excised pig ear is a widely accepted in vitro model to evaluate penetration of drug delivery into hair follicles. However, a comparison of human and porcine follicles in terms of chemical composition has not been performed so far. In this study, we applied confocal Raman microscopy as a chemically selective imaging technique to compare human and porcine follicle composition and to visualize component distribution within follicle cross-sections. Based on the evaluation of human and porcine Raman spectra optical similarity for both species was successfully confirmed. Furthermore, cyanoacrylate skin surface biopsies, which are generally used to determine the extent of follicular penetration, were imaged by a novel complementary analytical approach combining confocal Raman microscopy and optical profilometry. This all-encompassing analysis allows investigation of intactness and component distribution of the excised hair bulb in three dimensions. Confocal Raman microscopy shows a high potential as a noninvasive and chemically selective technique for the analysis of trans-follicular drug delivery.

  14. Changing patterns of gap junctional intercellular communication and connexin distribution in mouse epidermis and hair follicles during embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Choudhry, R; Pitts, J D; Hodgins, M B

    1997-12-01

    In the mouse embryo between embryonic days 12 (E12) and 16, regular arrays of epidermal placodes on the mystacial pad develop into whisker follicles. This system was chosen for analysis of gap junctional intercellular communication during differentiation. The patterns of communication were studied by microinjection of the tracers Lucifer yellow-CH (LY-CH) and neurobiotin (NB), while immunofluorescent staining was used to study distribution of connexins 26 and 43. Extensive communication was seen between keratinocytes in developing hair pegs or, in later-stage hair follicles, in the germinative matrix. Coupling between adjacent hair pegs via interfollicular epidermis was not observed. Coupling also became restricted as follicular cells differentiated to form outer root sheath, inner root sheath, and hair shaft. Extensive gap junctional coupling is characteristic of keratinocytes that are rapidly proliferating (as in hair pegs and germinative matrix). Follicular keratinocytes commence differentiation shortly before restriction of gap junctional coupling becomes evident. Dermal mesenchymal cells undergoing different modes of differentiation also exhibit differences in gap junctional coupling, as evidenced by poor transfer of LY-CH between cells in dermal condensations of hair follicles compared with extensive transfer elsewhere in the dermis. LY-CH and NB were not transferred between epidermal or follicular epithelium and mesenchyme, arguing against a direct role for gap junctions permeable to known second messenger molecules or nucleotides in epithelial-mesenchymal interactions in this system. The distribution of connexins 26 and 43 in epidermis and hair follicles changed during differentiation but there was no correlation with changing patterns of dye transfer, indicating an unexpected degree of complexity in the relationship between gap junctional intercellular communication and connexin protein distribution during development.

  15. Stem cells in the hair follicle bulge contribute to wound repair but not to homeostasis of the epidermis.

    PubMed

    Ito, Mayumi; Liu, Yaping; Yang, Zaixin; Nguyen, Jane; Liang, Fan; Morris, Rebecca J; Cotsarelis, George

    2005-12-01

    The discovery of long-lived epithelial stem cells in the bulge region of the hair follicle led to the hypothesis that epidermal renewal and epidermal repair after wounding both depend on these cells. To determine whether bulge cells are necessary for epidermal renewal, here we have ablated these cells by targeting them with a suicide gene encoding herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-TK) using a Keratin 1-15 (Krt1-15) promoter. We show that ablation leads to complete loss of hair follicles but survival of the epidermis. Through fate-mapping experiments, we find that stem cells in the hair follicle bulge do not normally contribute cells to the epidermis which is organized into epidermal proliferative units, as previously predicted. After epidermal injury, however, cells from the bulge are recruited into the epidermis and migrate in a linear manner toward the center of the wound, ultimately forming a marked radial pattern. Notably, although the bulge-derived cells acquire an epidermal phenotype, most are eliminated from the epidermis over several weeks, indicating that bulge stem cells respond rapidly to epidermal wounding by generating short-lived 'transient amplifying' cells responsible for acute wound repair. Our findings have implications for both gene therapy and developing treatments for wounds because it will be necessary to consider epidermal and hair follicle stem cells as distinct populations.

  16. Hopx expression defines a subset of multipotent hair follicle stem cells and a progenitor population primed to give rise to K6+ niche cells

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Norifumi; Jain, Rajan; LeBoeuf, Matthew R.; Padmanabhan, Arun; Wang, Qiaohong; Li, Li; Lu, Min Min; Millar, Sarah E.; Epstein, Jonathan A.

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian hair follicle relies on adult resident stem cells and their progeny to fuel and maintain hair growth throughout the life of an organism. The cyclical and initially synchronous nature of hair growth makes the hair follicle an ideal system with which to define homeostatic mechanisms of an adult stem cell population. Recently, we demonstrated that Hopx is a specific marker of intestinal stem cells. Here, we show that Hopx specifically labels long-lived hair follicle stem cells residing in the telogen basal bulge. Hopx+ cells contribute to all lineages of the mature hair follicle and to the interfollicular epidermis upon epidermal wounding. Unexpectedly, our analysis identifies a previously unappreciated progenitor population that resides in the lower hair bulb of anagen-phase follicles and expresses Hopx. These cells co-express Lgr5, do not express Shh and escape catagen-induced apoptosis. They ultimately differentiate into the cytokeratin 6-positive (K6) inner bulge cells in telogen, which regulate the quiescence of adjacent hair follicle stem cells. Although previous studies have suggested that K6+ cells arise from Lgr5-expressing lower outer root sheath cells in anagen, our studies indicate an alternative origin, and a novel role for Hopx-expressing lower hair bulb progenitor cells in contributing to stem cell homeostasis. PMID:23487314

  17. Sensory Hairs in the Bowhead Whale, Balaena mysticetus (Cetacea, Mammalia).

    PubMed

    Drake, Summer E; Crish, Samuel D; George, John C; Stimmelmayr, Raphaella; Thewissen, J G M

    2015-07-01

    We studied the histology and morphometrics of the hairs of bowhead whales (Balaena mysticetus). These whales are hairless except for two patches of more than 300 hairs on the rostral tip of the lower lip and chin, the rostral tip of the upper lip, and a bilateral row of approximately ten hairs caudal to the blowhole. Histological data indicate that hairs in all three of these areas are vibrissae: they show an outermost connective tissue capsule, a circumferential blood sinus system surrounding the hair shaft, and dense innervation to the follicle. Morphometric data were collected on hair diameters, epidermal recess diameters, hair follicle length, and external hair lengths. The main difference between the hairs in the different regions is that blowhole hairs have larger diameters than the hairs in the chin and rostrum regions. We speculate that the hair shaft thickness patterns in bowheads reflect functional specializations.

  18. Trps1 and its target gene Sox9 regulate epithelial proliferation in the developing hair follicle and are associated with hypertrichosis.

    PubMed

    Fantauzzo, Katherine A; Kurban, Mazen; Levy, Brynn; Christiano, Angela M

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary hypertrichoses are a group of hair overgrowth syndromes that are extremely rare in humans. We have previously demonstrated that a position effect on TRPS1 is associated with hypertrichosis in humans and mice. To gain insight into the functional role of Trps1, we analyzed the late morphogenesis vibrissae phenotype of Trps1(Δgt) mutant mice, which is characterized by follicle degeneration after peg downgrowth has been initiated. We found that Trps1 directly represses expression of the hair follicle stem cell regulator Sox9 to control proliferation of the follicle epithelium. Furthermore, we identified a copy number variation upstream of SOX9 in a family with hypertrichosis that significantly decreases expression of the gene in the hair follicle, providing new insights into the long-range regulation of SOX9. Our findings uncover a novel transcriptional hierarchy that regulates epithelial proliferation in the developing hair follicle and contributes to the pathology of hypertrichosis.

  19. Sinusitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... my acute sinusitis is caused by viruses or bacteria? Acute viral sinusitis is likely if you have ... to tell if my sinusitis is caused by bacteria? Because sinusitis is treated differently based on cause. ...

  20. Discrimination between basal cell carcinoma and hair follicles in skin tissue sections by Raman micro-spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larraona-Puy, M.; Ghita, A.; Zoladek, A.; Perkins, W.; Varma, S.; Leach, I. H.; Koloydenko, A. A.; Williams, H.; Notingher, I.

    2011-05-01

    Skin cancer is the most common human malignancy and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) represents approximately 80% of the non-melanoma cases. Current methods of treatment require histopathological evaluation of the tissues by qualified personnel. However, this method is subjective and in some cases BCC can be confused with other structures in healthy skin, including hair follicles. In this preliminary study, we investigated the potential of Raman micro-spectroscopy (RMS) to discriminate between hair follicles and BCC in skin tissue sections excised during Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS). Imaging and diagnosis of skin sections was automatically generated using ' a priori'-built spectral model based on LDA. This model had 90 ± 9% sensitivity and 85 ± 9% specificity for discrimination of BCC from dermis and epidermis. The model used selected Raman bands corresponding to the largest spectral differences between the Raman spectra of BCC and the normal skin regions, associated mainly with nucleic acids and collagen type I. Raman spectra corresponding to the epidermis regions of the hair follicles were found to be closer to those of healthy epidermis rather than BCC. Comparison between Raman spectral images and the gold standard haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) histopathology diagnosis showed good agreement. Some hair follicle regions were misclassified as BCC; regions corresponded mainly to the outermost layer of hair follicle (basal cells) which are expected to have higher nucleic acid concentration. This preliminary study shows the ability of RMS to distinguish between BCC and other tissue structures associated to healthy skin which can be confused with BCC due to their similar morphology.

  1. Hair follicle: a novel source of multipotent stem cells for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Mistriotis, Panagiotis; Andreadis, Stelios T

    2013-08-01

    The adult body harbors powerful reservoirs of stem cells that enable tissue regeneration under homeostatic conditions or in response to disease or injury. The hair follicle (HF) is a readily accessible mini organ within the skin and contains stem cells from diverse developmental origins that were shown to have surprisingly broad differentiation potential. In this review, we discuss the biology of the HF with particular emphasis on the various stem cell populations residing within the tissue. We summarize the existing knowledge on putative HF stem cell markers, the differentiation potential, and technologies to isolate and expand distinct stem cell populations. We also discuss the potential of HF stem cells for drug and gene delivery, tissue engineering, and regenerative medicine. We propose that the abundance of stem cells with broad differentiation potential and the ease of accessibility makes the HF an ideal source of stem cells for gene and cell therapies.

  2. Hair Follicle: A Novel Source of Multipotent Stem Cells for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Mistriotis, Panagiotis

    2013-01-01

    The adult body harbors powerful reservoirs of stem cells that enable tissue regeneration under homeostatic conditions or in response to disease or injury. The hair follicle (HF) is a readily accessible mini organ within the skin and contains stem cells from diverse developmental origins that were shown to have surprisingly broad differentiation potential. In this review, we discuss the biology of the HF with particular emphasis on the various stem cell populations residing within the tissue. We summarize the existing knowledge on putative HF stem cell markers, the differentiation potential, and technologies to isolate and expand distinct stem cell populations. We also discuss the potential of HF stem cells for drug and gene delivery, tissue engineering, and regenerative medicine. We propose that the abundance of stem cells with broad differentiation potential and the ease of accessibility makes the HF an ideal source of stem cells for gene and cell therapies. PMID:23157470

  3. Basal cell carcinoma preferentially arises from stem cells within hair follicle and mechanosensory niches.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Shelby C; Eberl, Markus; Vagnozzi, Alicia N; Belkadi, Abdelmadjid; Veniaminova, Natalia A; Verhaegen, Monique E; Bichakjian, Christopher K; Ward, Nicole L; Dlugosz, Andrzej A; Wong, Sunny Y

    2015-04-02

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is characterized by frequent loss of PTCH1, leading to constitutive activation of the Hedgehog pathway. Although the requirement for Hedgehog in BCC is well established, the identity of disease-initiating cells and the compartments in which they reside remain controversial. By using several inducible Cre drivers to delete Ptch1 in different cell compartments in mice, we show here that multiple hair follicle stem cell populations readily develop BCC-like tumors. In contrast, stem cells within the interfollicular epidermis do not efficiently form tumors. Notably, we observed that innervated Gli1-expressing progenitors within mechanosensory touch dome epithelia are highly tumorigenic. Sensory nerves activate Hedgehog signaling in normal touch domes, while denervation attenuates touch dome-derived tumors. Together, our studies identify varying tumor susceptibilities among different stem cell populations in the skin, highlight touch dome epithelia as "hot spots" for tumor formation, and implicate cutaneous nerves as mediators of tumorigenesis.

  4. Involvement of epithelial Wntless in the regulation of postnatal hair follicle morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sixia; Zhu, Xuming; Tao, Yixin; Sun, Qianqian; Wang, Lei; Li, Baojie; He, Lin; Guo, Xizhi; Ma, Gang

    2015-11-01

    The roles of the Wnt cargo receptor Wntless (Wls) during hair follicle (HF) induction and postnatal HF cycling in skin have been elucidated. However, whether Wls regulates postnatal HF morphogenesis remains unclear. In this study, we found that Wls is expressed in developing HF during the morphogenesis stage after birth. By knocking out Wls in mouse skin epithelia with hypomorphic K14-cre, we found that Wls is required for normal HF morphogenesis. Wls-deficient HFs prematurely regressed, which was possibly caused by abnormally activated TGF-β/JNK pathway. Although Wls was reported to be a direct target of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, we found that epithelial β-catenin was not necessary to maintain Wls expression. Therefore, other signals are involved in regulating Wls transcription in mouse skin.

  5. Influence of the Vehicle on the Penetration of Particles into Hair Follicles

    PubMed Central

    Patzelt, Alexa; Richter, Heike; Dähne, Lars; Walden, Peter; Wiesmüller, Karl-Heinz; Wank, Ute; Sterry, Wolfram; Lademann, Jürgen

    2011-01-01

    Recently, it has been demonstrated that particulate substances penetrate preferentially into the hair follicles and that the penetration depth depends on the particle size. In the present study, the influence of the vehicle of the particulate substances on the penetration depth was investigated. Four different formulations (ethanolic suspension, aqueous suspension, ethanolic gel and aqueous gel) containing peptide-loaded particles of 1 μm in diameter were prepared and applied on porcine ear skin. After penetration, punch biopsies were taken and the penetration depths of the particles were investigated by laser scanning microscopy. The deepest penetration was achieved with the gel formulations demonstrating an influence of the vehicle on the penetration depth of particulate substances. PMID:24310497

  6. In vivo alteration of the keratin 17 gene in hair follicles by oligonucleotide-directed gene targeting.

    PubMed

    Fan, W; Yoon, K

    2003-12-01

    Using intradermal injection of a chimeric RNA-DNA oligonucleotide (RDO) or a single-stranded oligonucleotide (ssODN) into murine skin, we attempted to make a dominant mutation (R94p) in the conserve alpha-helical domain of keratin 17 (K17), the same mutation found in pachyononychia congenichia type 2 (PC-2) patients with phenotypes ranging from twisted hair and multiple pilosebaceous cysts. Both K17A-RDO and -ssODN contained a single base mismatch (CGC to CCC) to alter the normal K17 sequence to cause an amino acid substitution (R94P). The complexes consisting of oligonucleotides and cationic liposomes were injected to C57B1/6 murine skin at 2 and 5 day after birth. Histological examination of skin biopsies at postnatal day 8 from several mice showed consistent twisted hair shafts or broken hair follicles at the sebaceous gland level and occasional rupture of the hair bulb or epidermal cyst-like changes. In the injected area, the number of full anagen hair follicles decrease by 50%. Injection of the control oligonucleotide, identical to K17A-RDO but containing no mismatch to the normal sequence, did not result in any detectable abnormality. The frequency of gene alteration was lower than 3%, according to the restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of the genomic DNA isolated by dissection of hair follicles from slides. Although intradermal injection of K17A-RDO or K17-ssODN caused a dominant mutation in K17 affecting hair growth and morphology, these phenotypic changes were transient either due to the compensation of K17 by other keratins or the replacement of the mutated cells by normal surrounding cells during hair growth.

  7. The vitamin D receptor is a Wnt effector that controls hair follicle differentiation and specifies tumor type in adult epidermis.

    PubMed

    Pálmer, Héctor G; Anjos-Afonso, Fernando; Carmeliet, Geert; Takeda, Hikaru; Watt, Fiona M

    2008-01-23

    We have investigated how Wnt and vitamin D receptor signals regulate epidermal differentiation. Many epidermal genes induced by beta-catenin, including the stem cell marker keratin 15, contain vitamin D response elements (VDREs) and several are induced independently of TCF/Lef. The VDR is required for beta-catenin induced hair follicle formation in adult epidermis, and the vitamin D analog EB1089 synergizes with beta-catenin to stimulate hair differentiation. Human trichofolliculomas (hair follicle tumours) are characterized by high nuclear beta-catenin and VDR, whereas infiltrative basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) have high beta-catenin and low VDR levels. In mice, EB1089 prevents beta-catenin induced trichofolliculomas, while in the absence of VDR beta-catenin induces tumours resembling BCCs. We conclude that VDR is a TCF/Lef-independent transcriptional effector of the Wnt pathway and that vitamin D analogues have therapeutic potential in tumors with inappropriate activation of Wnt signalling.

  8. Chromatographic method for clobetasol propionate determination in hair follicles and in different skin layers.

    PubMed

    Ângelo, Tamara; Cunha-Filho, Marcílio S S; Gelfuso, Guilherme M; Gratieri, Tais

    2017-02-01

    Clobetasol propionate (CLO) is a potent steroid used for the treatment of several dermatological diseases. Recent studies suggest its additional use in alopecia topical treatment, generating a demand for novel formulations with specific delivery into hair follicles. Hence, a selective analytical method for drug quantification in follicular structures and skin layers is required. For this, a simple HPLC-UV method was developed. Quantification was performed using a RP-C18 column (4.6 mm × 15 cm, 5 μm), with a mixture of methanol-acetonitrile-water (50:15:35 v/v) as mobile phase, a flow rate of 1.2 mL/min, oven temperature of 30°C, injection volume of 50 μL and detection at 240 nm. The optimized conditions enabled a 12 min running with CLO elution at 10.1 min and resolution of 2.424 from skin matrix interferences. Validation was performed in accordance with International Conference on Harmonization guidelines and fulfilled the criteria of selectivity, linearity (0.5-15.0 μg/mL), robustness, precision, accuracy and limits of detection and quantification (0.02 and 0.07 μg/mL, respectively). The validated method was successfully applied for CLO quantification following in vitro skin permeation experiments and differential tape-stripping for hair follicle deposition determination, demonstrating its suitability. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. The basement membrane of hair follicle stem cells is a muscle cell niche.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Hironobu; Ferreira, Manuela; Donati, Giacomo; Marciano, Denise K; Linton, James M; Sato, Yuya; Hartner, Andrea; Sekiguchi, Kiyotoshi; Reichardt, Louis F; Watt, Fiona M

    2011-02-18

    The hair follicle bulge in the epidermis associates with the arrector pili muscle (APM) that is responsible for piloerection ("goosebumps"). We show that stem cells in the bulge deposit nephronectin into the underlying basement membrane, thus regulating the adhesion of mesenchymal cells expressing the nephronectin receptor, α8β1 integrin, to the bulge. Nephronectin induces α8 integrin-positive mesenchymal cells to upregulate smooth muscle markers. In nephronectin knockout mice, fewer arrector pili muscles form in the skin, and they attach to the follicle above the bulge, where there is compensatory upregulation of the nephronectin family member EGFL6. Deletion of α8 integrin also abolishes selective APM anchorage to the bulge. Nephronectin is a Wnt target; epidermal β-catenin activation upregulates epidermal nephronectin and dermal α8 integrin expression. Thus, bulge stem cells, via nephronectin expression, create a smooth muscle cell niche and act as tendon cells for the APM. Our results reveal a functional role for basement membrane heterogeneity in tissue patterning. PAPERCLIP: Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Use of the skin sandwich technique to probe the role of the hair follicles in sonophoresis.

    PubMed

    Sarheed, Omar; Frum, Yakov

    2012-02-28

    The human skin sandwich technique was used to explore the effect of brief ultrasound exposure on the transfollicular pathway of absorption. Hydrocortisone was used as a model drug. In order to calculate the permeability coefficient of hydrocortisone, its concentration at saturation in the PBS donor solution was determined. Skin samples were prepared by sandwich technique with total hydration of the epidermal and sandwich membranes. The skin was sonicated for 0 s (control), 30 s or 45 s using a pulsed mode (10% duty cycle) with the spatial and temporal average intensity (SATA) of 3.7 W/cm(2). The transducer was then removed and permeation was allowed to proceed for 52 h. Then the percentage follicular contribution was determined. It was determined that without ultrasound, drug entry into follicles accounted for 46% of total penetration. As the duration of sonication increased, the follicular contribution fell to zero even though total transepidermal flux dramatically increased. This is explained by ultrasound exposure causing sloughing off of the uppermost stratum corneum. This permeabilises the continuous surface but at the same time the disturbed cornceocytes will plug hair follicle orifices.

  11. Hair Follicle Generation by Injections of Adult Human Follicular Epithelial and Dermal Papilla Cells into Nude Mice.

    PubMed

    Nilforoushzadeh, Mohammadali; Rahimi Jameh, Elham; Jaffary, Fariba; Abolhasani, Ehsan; Keshtmand, Gelavizh; Zarkob, Hajar; Mohammadi, Parvaneh; Aghdami, Nasser

    2017-01-01

    Dermal papilla and hair epithelial stem cells regulate hair formation and the growth cycle. Damage to or loss of these cells can cause hair loss. Although several studies claim to reconstitute hairs using rodent cells in an animal model, additional research is needed to develop a stable human hair follicle reconstitution protocol. In this study, we have evaluated hair induction by injecting adult cultured human dermal papilla cells and a mixture of hair epithelial and dermal papilla cells in a mouse model. In this experimental study, discarded human scalp skins were used to obtain dermal papilla and hair epithelial cells. After separation, cells were cultured and assessed for their characteristics. We randomly allocated 15 C57BL/6 nude mice into three groups that received injections in their dorsal skin. The first group received cultured dermal papilla cells, the second group received a mixture of cultured epithelial and dermal papilla cells, and the third group (control) received a placebo [phosphate-buffered saline (PBS-)]. Histopathologic examination of the injection sites showed evidence of hair growth in samples that received cells compared with the control group. However, the group that received epithelial and dermal papilla cells had visible evidence of hair growth. PKH tracing confirmed the presence of transplanted cells in the new hair. Our data showed that injection of a combination of adult human cultured dermal papilla and epithelial cells could induce hair growth in nude mice. This study emphasized that the combination of human adult cultured dermal papilla and epithelial cells could induce new hair in nude mice.

  12. Hair Follicle Generation by Injections of Adult Human Follicular Epithelial and Dermal Papilla Cells into Nude Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nilforoushzadeh, Mohammadali; Rahimi Jameh, Elham; Jaffary, Fariba; Abolhasani, Ehsan; Keshtmand, Gelavizh; Zarkob, Hajar; Mohammadi, Parvaneh; Aghdami, Nasser

    2017-01-01

    Objective Dermal papilla and hair epithelial stem cells regulate hair formation and the growth cycle. Damage to or loss of these cells can cause hair loss. Although several studies claim to reconstitute hairs using rodent cells in an animal model, additional research is needed to develop a stable human hair follicle reconstitution protocol. In this study, we have evaluated hair induction by injecting adult cultured human dermal papilla cells and a mixture of hair epithelial and dermal papilla cells in a mouse model. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, discarded human scalp skins were used to obtain dermal papilla and hair epithelial cells. After separation, cells were cultured and assessed for their characteristics. We randomly allocated 15 C57BL/6 nude mice into three groups that received injections in their dorsal skin. The first group received cultured dermal papilla cells, the second group received a mixture of cultured epithelial and dermal papilla cells, and the third group (control) received a placebo [phosphate-buffered saline (PBS-)]. Results Histopathologic examination of the injection sites showed evidence of hair growth in samples that received cells compared with the control group. However, the group that received epithelial and dermal papilla cells had visible evidence of hair growth. PKH tracing confirmed the presence of transplanted cells in the new hair. Conclusion Our data showed that injection of a combination of adult human cultured dermal papilla and epithelial cells could induce hair growth in nude mice. This study emphasized that the combination of human adult cultured dermal papilla and epithelial cells could induce new hair in nude mice. PMID:28670518

  13. Inflammatory Mediator TAK1 Regulates Hair Follicle Morphogenesis and Anagen Induction Shown by Using Keratinocyte-Specific TAK1-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sayama, Koji; Kajiya, Kentaro; Sugawara, Koji; Sato, Shintaro; Hirakawa, Satoshi; Shirakata, Yuji; Hanakawa, Yasushi; Dai, Xiuju; Ishimatsu-Tsuji, Yumiko; Metzger, Daniel; Chambon, Pierre; Akira, Shizuo; Paus, Ralf; Kishimoto, Jiro; Hashimoto, Koji

    2010-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) is a member of the NF-κB pathway and regulates inflammatory responses. We previously showed that TAK1 also regulates keratinocyte growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. However, it is unknown whether TAK1 has any role in epithelial–mesenchymal interactions. To examine this possibility, we studied the role of TAK1 in mouse hair follicle development and cycling as an instructive model system. By comparing keratinocyte-specific TAK1-deficient mice (Map3k7fl/flK5-Cre) with control mice, we found that the number of hair germs (hair follicles precursors) in Map3k7fl/flK5-Cre mice was significantly reduced at E15.5, and that subsequent hair follicle morphogenesis was retarded. Next, we analyzed the role of TAK1 in the cyclic remodeling in follicles by analyzing hair cycle progression in mice with a tamoxifen-inducible keratinocyte-specific TAK1 deficiency (Map3k7fl/flK14-Cre-ERT2). After active hair growth (anagen) was induced by depilation, TAK1 was deleted by topical tamoxifen application. This resulted in significantly retarded anagen development in TAK1-deficient mice. Deletion of TAK1 in hair follicles that were already in anagen induced premature, apoptosis-driven hair follicle regression, along with hair follicle damage. These studies provide the first evidence that the inflammatory mediator TAK1 regulates hair follicle induction and morphogenesis, and is required for anagen induction and anagen maintenance. PMID:20585657

  14. Effect of intense pulsed light treatment on human skin in vitro: analysis of immediate effects on dermal papillae and hair follicle stem cells.

    PubMed

    Larouche, D; Kim, D H; Ratté, G; Beaumont, C; Germain, L

    2013-10-01

    Hair follicles house a permanent pool of epithelial stem cells. Intense pulsed light (IPL) sources have been successfully used for hair removal, but long-term hair reduction may require several treatments. Many questions remain regarding the impact of IPL treatment on the structure of the hair follicle, more specifically on hair follicular stem cells and dermal papilla cells, a group of specialized cells that orchestrate hair growth. To characterize the destruction of human hair follicles and surrounding tissues following IPL treatment, with more attention paid to the bulge and the bulb regions. Human scalp specimens of Fitzpatrick skin phototype II were exposed ex vivo to IPL pulses and were then processed for histological analysis, immunodetection of stem cell-associated keratin 19, and revelation of the endogenous alkaline phosphatase activity expressed in dermal papilla cells. Histological analysis confirmed that pigmented structures, such as the melanin-rich matrix cells of the bulb in anagen follicles and the hair shaft, are principally targeted by IPL treatment, while white hairs and epidermis remained unaffected. Damage caused by heat sometimes extended over the dermal papilla cells, while stem cells were mostly spared. IPL epilation principally targets pigmented structures. Our results suggest that, under the tested conditions, collateral damage does not deplete stem cells. Damage at the dermal papilla was observed only with high-energy treatment modalities. Extrapolated to frequently treated hairs, these observations explain why some hairs grow back after a single IPL treatment. © 2013 British Association of Dermatologists.

  15. Full-thickness skin with mature hair follicles generated from tissue culture expanded human cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xunwei; Scott, Larry; Washenik, Ken; Stenn, Kurt

    2014-12-01

    The goal of regenerative medicine is to reconstruct fully functional organs from tissue culture expanded human cells. In this study, we report a method for human reconstructed skin (hRSK) when starting with human cells. We implanted tissue culture expanded human epidermal and dermal cells into an excision wound on the back of immunodeficient mice. Pigmented skin covered the wound 4 weeks after implantation. Hair shafts were visible at 12 weeks and prominent at 14 weeks. Histologically, the hRSK comprises an intact epidermis and dermis with mature hair follicles, sebaceous glands and most notably, and unique to this system, subcutis. Morphogenesis, differentiation, and maturation of the hRSK mirror the human fetal process. Human antigen markers demonstrate that the constituent cells are of human origin for at least 6 months. The degree of new skin formation is most complete when using tissue culture expanded cells from fetal skin, but it also occurs with expanded newborn and adult cells; however, no appendages formed when we grafted both adult dermal and epidermal cells. The hRSK system promises to be valuable as a laboratory model for studying biological, pathological, and pharmaceutical problems of human skin.

  16. A Study of Noncultured Extracted Hair Follicle Outer Root Sheath Cell Suspension for Transplantation in Vitiligo

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Aarti N; Marfatia, Ritu K; Saikia, Siddhartha S

    2016-01-01

    Context: Vitiligo surgeries have come a long way from tissue grafts to cultured and non cultured cell transplantation. Extracted hair follicle outer root sheath cell transplantation (EHF ORS) suspension is more enriched with melanocyte. In a hair bulb, there is one melanocyte for every five keratinocytes which is much higher than the epidermal melanin unit. Aims: To analyse the effectiveness of cultured EHF ORS and to perform objective evaluation based on clinical improvement & photographic evidence. To observe any untoward events or side effects. Settings and Design: The study was open and uncontrolled. All the patients were screened at preliminary visit. Reviews were done every two weeks. The endpoint selected was six months post procedure. Materials and Methods: Twenty five patients of stable Vitiligo were included in the study and follicular unit were harvested by Follicular Unit Extraction method. Outer root sheath cells were extracted by trypsinization. The solution was transplanted over dermabraded recipient site. Pressure dressing was given. Patients were followed up regularly. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive Statistics, Chi-Square. Results: Mean ± SD repigmentation was 80.15% ± 22.9% with excellent repigmentation (90-100%) in 60% of patients. Conclusions: This method is safe, effective, and simpler than the other methods involving cell culturing and requiring a laboratory set-up but selection of patients is crucial for the success of the outcome. PMID:27601859

  17. Serum response factor controls transcriptional network regulating epidermal function and hair follicle morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Congxing; Hindes, Anna; Burns, Carole J; Koppel, Aaron C; Kiss, Alexi; Yin, Yan; Ma, Liang; Blumenberg, Miroslav; Khnykin, Denis; Jahnsen, Frode L; Crosby, Seth D; Ramanan, Narendrakumar; Efimova, Tatiana

    2013-03-01

    Serum response factor (SRF) is a transcription factor that regulates the expression of growth-related immediate-early, cytoskeletal, and muscle-specific genes to control growth, differentiation, and cytoskeletal integrity in different cell types. To investigate the role for SRF in epidermal development and homeostasis, we conditionally knocked out SRF in epidermal keratinocytes. We report that SRF deletion disrupted epidermal barrier function leading to early postnatal lethality. Mice lacking SRF in epidermis displayed morphogenetic defects, including an eye-open-at-birth phenotype and lack of whiskers. SRF-null skin exhibited abnormal morphology, hyperplasia, aberrant expression of differentiation markers and transcriptional regulators, anomalous actin organization, enhanced inflammation, and retarded hair follicle (HF) development. Transcriptional profiling experiments uncovered profound molecular changes in SRF-null E17.5 epidermis and revealed that many previously identified SRF target CArG box-containing genes were markedly upregulated in SRF-null epidermis, indicating that SRF may function to repress transcription of a subset of its target genes in epidermis. Remarkably, when transplanted onto nude mice, engrafted SRF-null skin lacked hair but displayed normal epidermal architecture with proper expression of differentiation markers, suggesting that although keratinocyte SRF is essential for HF development, a cross-talk between SRF-null keratinocytes and the surrounding microenvironment is likely responsible for the barrier-deficient mutant epidermal phenotype.

  18. Adenovirus-mediated Wnt5a expression inhibits the telogen-to-anagen transition of hair follicles in mice.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yi-Zhan; Wang, Rui-Min; Yang, Ke; Guo, Hai-Ying; Deng, Fang; Li, Yu-Hong; Ye, Ji-Xing; He, Long; Lian, Xiao-Hua; Yang, Tian

    2013-01-01

    The canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway plays an important role in hair cycle induction. Wnt5a is a non-canonical Wnt family member that generally antagonizes canonical Wnt signaling in other systems. In hair follicles, Wnt5a and canonical Wnt are both expressed in cells in the telogen stage. Wnt5a has been shown to be critical for controlling hair cell fate. However, the role that Wnt5a plays in the transition from the telogen to anagen stage is unknown. In this study, using whole-mount in situ hybridization, we show that Wnt5a is produced by several other cell types, excluding dermal papilla cells, throughout the hair cycle. For example, Wnt5a is expressed in bulge and secondary hair germ cells in the telogen stage. Our studies focused on the depilated 8-week-old mouse as a synchronized model of hair growth. Interestingly, overexpression of adenovirus Wnt5a in the dorsal skin of mice led to the elongation of the telogen stage and inhibition of the initiation of the anagen stage. However, following an extended period of time, four pelage hair types grew from hairless skin that was induced by Wnt5a, and the structure of these new hair shafts was normal. Using microarray analysis and quantitative arrays, we showed that the expression of β-catenin and some target genes of canonical Wnt signaling decreased after Wnt5a treatment. These data demonstrate that Wnt5a may inhibit the telogen stage to maintain a quiescent state of the hair follicle.

  19. Inhibition of β-catenin signalling in dermal fibroblasts enhances hair follicle regeneration during wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Celine; Pisco, Angela Oliveira; Rawlins, Emma L.; Simons, Ben D.

    2016-01-01

    New hair follicles (HFs) do not form in adult mammalian skin unless epidermal Wnt signalling is activated genetically or within large wounds. To understand the postnatal loss of hair forming ability we monitored HF formation at small circular (2 mm) wound sites. At P2, new HFs formed in back skin, but HF formation was markedly decreased by P21. Neonatal tail also formed wound-associated HFs, albeit in smaller numbers. Postnatal loss of HF neogenesis did not correlate with wound closure rate but with a reduction in Lrig1-positive papillary fibroblasts in wounds. Comparative gene expression profiling of back and tail dermis at P1 and dorsal fibroblasts at P2 and P50 showed a correlation between loss of HF formation and decreased expression of genes associated with proliferation and Wnt/β-catenin activity. Between P2 and P50, fibroblast density declined throughout the dermis and clones of fibroblasts became more dispersed. This correlated with a decline in fibroblasts expressing a TOPGFP reporter of Wnt activation. Surprisingly, between P2 and P50 there was no difference in fibroblast proliferation at the wound site but Wnt signalling was highly upregulated in healing dermis of P21 compared with P2 mice. Postnatal β-catenin ablation in fibroblasts promoted HF regeneration in neonatal and adult mouse wounds, whereas β-catenin activation reduced HF regeneration in neonatal wounds. Our data support a model whereby postnatal loss of hair forming ability in wounds reflects elevated dermal Wnt/β-catenin activation in the wound bed, increasing the abundance of fibroblasts that are unable to induce HF formation. PMID:27287810

  20. A rapid screening method using DNA binding dyes to determine whether hair follicles have sufficient DNA for successful profiling.

    PubMed

    Haines, Alicia M; Linacre, Adrian

    2016-05-01

    We report a simple screening method to assess the viability of successful DNA profiling from single hair follicles. A total of 48 hair samples (shed and plucked) were collected from male and female donors and the root tips (0.5cm) were stained using one of three DNA binding dyes (EvaGreen™, Diamond™ Nucleic Acid Dye and RedSafe™) at 20× concentration. The hairs were subsequently viewed under a Nikon Optiphot fluorescent microscope to count the approximate number of nuclei in one plane of view. The hairs were then processed using either (1) a DNA extraction kit (QIAmp(®) Mini Kit) and then amplified using the AmpFLSTR(®) NGM™ kit, which amplifies 15 short tandem repeat (STR) loci plus the gender marker amelogenin, or (2) by direct PCR amplification using the same DNA profiling kit. Diamond™ dye had the lowest background signal and plucked hairs treated with this dye produced full DNA profiles when amplified directly and was chosen to screen a further 150 mixed hair samples. These hairs were separated into one of five categories (1, >100 nuclei; 1.5, 50-99 nuclei; 2, 1-49 nuclei; 2.5, no nuclei but high fluorescent signal; 3, no nuclei and very low fluorescent signal) from which 60 of the hairs were chosen to undergo direct amplification using the NGM™ kit. It was found that there was a direct correlation to the category designation and the ability to obtain a DNA profile up-loadable to the Australian DNA Database. Approximately 91% of category 1 hairs resulted in either a full or high partial (12-29 alleles) profile by direct PCR whereas about 78% of category 3 hairs exhibited no amplification. The results show that this method can be used to predict successful STR amplification from single hair follicles. It is a rapid, sensitive, cheap, non-destructive and easy to perform methodology applicable for screening multiple hairs in order to aid forensic investigators in predicting hairs that will yield DNA results.

  1. Does collapse of immune privilege in the hair-follicle bulge play a role in the pathogenesis of primary cicatricial alopecia?

    PubMed

    Harries, M J; Meyer, K C; Chaudhry, I H; Griffiths, C E M; Paus, R

    2010-08-01

    The hair-follicle bulge has recently been added to a growing list of human tissue compartments that exhibit a complex combination of immunosuppressive mechanisms, termed immune privilege (IP), which seem to restrict immune-mediated injury in specific locations. As epithelial hair-follicle stem cells (eHFSC) reside in the hair-follicle bulge region, it is conceivable that these IP mechanisms protect this vital compartment from immune-mediated damage, thereby ensuring the ongoing growth and cyclic regeneration of the hair follicle. Primary cicatricial alopecias (PCA) are a group of inflammatory hair disorders that result in hair-follicle destruction and permanent alopecia. Growing evidence suggests that eHFSC destruction is a key factor in the permanent follicle loss seen in these conditions. To explore the possible role of bulge IP collapse in PCA pathogenesis. We report three clinically distinct cases of PCA. Immunohistochemical analyses of paired biopsies from lesional and uninvolved scalp skin were compared using recognized markers of IP. Immunohistochemical investigation found increased expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) classes I and II and of beta2-microglobulin in the bulge region of lesional follicles compared with uninvolved follicles in each case. Further, expression of the bulge marker keratin 15 was reduced in lesional skin in two of the cases. This small series represents our first preliminary attempts to ascertain whether bulge IP collapse may play a role in PCA pathogenesis. We present standard parameters relating to hair-follicle IP in the bulge region of three patients with distinct PCA variants, and show the presence of features consistent with bulge IP collapse in each case.

  2. Microstructure and innervation of the mystacial vibrissal follicle-sinus complex in bearded seals, Erignathus barbatus (Pinnipedia: Phocidae).

    PubMed

    Marshall, Christopher D; Amin, Heidi; Kovacs, Kit M; Lydersen, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Vibrissal follicle-sinus complexes (F-SCs) are sensory receptors of the mammalian integument system. They are best developed within Pinnipedia. The objective of this study was to investigate the F-SCs of bearded seals (Erignathus barbatus) for benthic foraging adaptations. Bearded seals possessed approximately 244 mystacial F-SCs. In this species, F-SCs consisted of an outer dermal capsule (DC) surrounding a blood sinus system [upper cavernous sinus (UCS), ring sinus (RS), and lower cavernous sinus (LCS)] and concentric rings of epidermal tissue. The UCS comprised up to 62% of the F-SC length and may function as thermal protection for mechanoreceptors. A large asymmetrical ringwulst was located in the RS. A deep vibrissal nerve penetrated the DC at its base and terminated on mechanoreceptors in the epidermal tissues of the LCS and RS. The mean number of myelinated axons per F-SC was 1,314 (range, 811-1,650) and was among the highest number of axons per F-SC reported to date. An estimated mean number of 320,616 myelinated axons innervate the entire mystacial vibrissal array. Merkel-Neurite complexes (MNCs) and small simple laminated corpuscles were found in the region of the LCS. Myelinated axons also terminated on MNCs and lanceolate endings apical to the ringwulst. The number of F-SCs, their geometry in the mystacial region, the number of myelinated axons per F-SC, and the distribution of mechanoreceptors support the premise that pinniped vibrissae are sensitive active-touch receptor systems, and that structural differences in bearded seals, relative to other phocids, may be adaptations for benthic foraging.

  3. Comparison of nestin-expressing multipotent stem cells in the tongue fungiform papilla and vibrissa hair follicle.

    PubMed

    Mii, Sumiyuki; Amoh, Yasuyuki; Katsuoka, Kensei; Hoffman, Robert M

    2014-06-01

    We have previously reported that hair follicles contain multipotent stem cells, which express nestin and participate in follicle growth at anagen as well as in the extension of the follicle sensory nerve. The nestin-driven green fluorescent protein (ND-GFP) transgenic mouse labels all nestin-expressing cells with GFP. The hair follicle nestin-GFP cells can differentiate into neurons, Schwann cells, and other cell types. In this study, we describe nestin-expressing multipotent stem cells in the fungiform papilla in the tongue. The nestin-expressing multipotent stem cells in the fungiform papilla are located around a peripheral sensory nerve immediately below the taste bud and co-express the neural crest cell marker p75(NTR) . The fungiform papilla cells formed spheres in suspension culture in DMEM-F12 medium supplemented with basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). The spheres consisted of nestin-expressing cells that co-expressed the neural crest marker p75(NTR) and which developed expression of the stem cell marker CD34. P75(NTR), CD34 and nestin co-expression suggested that nestin-expressing cells comprising the fungiform papilla spheres were in a relatively undifferentiated state. The nestin-expressing cells of these spheres acquired the following markers: β III tubulin typical of nerve cells; GFAP typical of glial cells; K15 typical of keratinocytes; and smooth-muscle antigen (SMA), after transfer to RPMI 1640 medium with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS), suggesting they differentiated into multiple cell types. The results of the current study indicate nestin-expressing fungiform papilla cells and the nestin-expressing hair follicle stem cells have common features of cell morphology and ability to differentiate into multiple cell types, suggesting their remarkable similarity.

  4. C/EBPalpha identifies differentiating preadipocytes around hair follicles in foetal and neonatal rat and mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Wojciechowicz, Kamila; Markiewicz, Ewa; Jahoda, Colin A B

    2008-08-01

    Previous studies have described a close anatomical association between hair follicles and subcutaneous adipocytes, yet little is known about the developmental origin of this preadipocyte population. Many transcription factors controlling adipogenesis in cell culture have been described; however, the molecular events governing the process of adipogenesis in rodent skin in vivo are largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the onset and progression of adipocyte differentiation in the skin of foetal and newborn rats and mice. We first analysed the temporo-spatial expression pattern of the transcription factor C/EBPalpha, a key player in adipocyte differentiation. Oil red O staining was then used to identify the presence of lipid within mature adipocytes in the same skin samples. In both species, nuclear staining of C/EBPalpha was first seen in cells around and below the bases of fully formed hair follicles in foetal dermis between 2 and 3 days before birth. Over time, increasing numbers of cells became labelled with C/EBPalpha, predominantly located between, rather than below, the hair follicles. Oil red O staining followed exactly the same pattern seen with the C/EBPalpha antibody, but with a delay of 12-24 h, and histomorphometry showed that the C/EBPalpha labelled cells matured into lipid filled adipocytes. These data show that C/EBPalpha is a useful developmental marker of preadipocytes in vivo. The close developmental association and physical proximity between the lower follicle and surrounding preadipocytes leads us to postulate that follicles control local adipogenic events, via signalling or by contributing to the preadipocyte pool.

  5. Ginsenoside Rg3 up-regulates the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in human dermal papilla cells and mouse hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dae Hyun; Cha, Youn Jeong; Yang, Kyeong Eun; Jang, Ik-Soon; Son, Chang-Gue; Kim, Bo Hyeon; Kim, Jung Min

    2014-07-01

    Crude Panax ginseng has been documented to possess hair growth activity and is widely used to treat alopecia, but the effects of ginsenoside Rg3 on hair growth have not to our knowledge been determined. The aim of the current study was to identify the molecules through which Rg3 stimulates hair growth. The thymidine incorporation for measuring cell proliferation was determined. We used DNA microarray analysis to measure gene expression levels in dermal papilla (DP) cells upon treatment with Rg3. The mRNA and protein expression levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in human DP cells were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry, respectively. We also used immunohistochemistry assays to detect in vivo changes in VEGF and 3-stemness marker expressions in mouse hair follicles. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction showed dose-dependent increases in VEGF mRNA levels on treatment with Rg3. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that expression of VEGF was significantly up-regulated by Rg3 in a dose-dependent manner in human DP cells and in mouse hair follicles. In addition, the CD8 and CD34 were also up-regulated by Rg3 in the mouse hair follicles. It may be concluded that Rg3 might increase hair growth through stimulation of hair follicle stem cells and it has the potential to be used in hair growth products.

  6. Early stage alopecia areata is associated with inflammation in the upper dermis and damage to the hair follicle infundibulum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Zhao, Ying; Cai, Zeming; Caulloo, Sillani; McElwee, Kevin J; Li, Yang; Chen, Xiaohong; Yu, Mei; Yang, Jian; Chen, Wenna; Tang, Xuhua; Zhang, Xingqi

    2013-08-01

    Alopecia areata (AA) is a non-scarring inflammatory hair loss disease. We investigated the early pathological changes of AA to identify possible factors participating in its pathogenesis. Clinical, laboratory and pathological features of 87 AA patients were investigated. Anti-nuclear antibody was found in 11 of 85 patients tested (13%), with a higher percentage in women (21%) than men (5%) (P = 0.026). In early AA lesions, inflammatory infiltration in the upper dermis and epithelial cell damage of the hair follicle infundibulum, just above the sebaceous gland, was observed. Liquefaction and disarrangement of peripheral infundibular epithelial cells coexisted with T-lymphocytic invasion and regression of the lower follicle. The latter findings positively correlated with the presence of eosinophils and perivascular mononuclear cell infiltration in the upper dermis. Eosinophilic infiltration was found in 35 patients (40%) and was positively correlated to elevated serum IgE levels (r = 0.21, P = 0.044), a more severe perivascular lymphocytic inflammation in the upper dermis (r = 0.24, P = 0.026), as well as a prominent swarm of bees-like peri-follicular infiltration (r = 0.41, P < 0.001). Mast cells were abundant in the upper dermis, especially around blood vessels, and positively correlated with eosinophil presence (r = 0.30, P = 0.027). Damage to the hair follicle infundibulum in the upper dermis might be an important component of early changes in AA lesions, possibly caused by lymphocyte cell infiltration in the same area. AA may involve damage of the upper hair follicle as well as the bulb, possibly involving hypersensitivity and autoimmunity. © 2013 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  7. Electrophysiological property and chemical sensitivity of primary afferent neurons that innervate rat whisker hair follicles

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Ryo

    2016-01-01

    Whisker hair follicles are sensory organs that sense touch and perform tactile discrimination in animals, and they are sites where sensory impulses are initiated when whisker hairs touch an object. The sensory signals are then conveyed by whisker afferent fibers to the brain for sensory perception. Electrophysiological property and chemical sensitivity of whisker afferent fibers, important factors affecting whisker sensory processing, are largely not known. In the present study, we performed patch-clamp recordings from pre-identified whisker afferent neurons in whole-mount trigeminal ganglion preparations and characterized their electrophysiological property and sensitivity to ATP, serotonin and glutamate. Of 97 whisker afferent neurons examined, 67% of them are found to be large-sized (diameter ≥45 µm) cells and 33% of them are medium- to small-sized (diameter <45 µm) cells. Almost every large-sized whisker afferent neuron fires a single action potential but many (40%) small/medium-sized whisker afferent neurons fire multiple action potentials in response to prolonged stepwise depolarization. Other electrophysiological properties including resting membrane potential, action potential threshold, and membrane input resistance are also significantly different between large-sized and small/medium-sized whisker afferent neurons. Most large-sized and many small/medium-sized whisker afferent neurons are sensitive to ATP and/or serotonin, and ATP and/or serotonin could evoke strong inward currents in these cells. In contrast, few whisker afferent neurons are sensitive to glutamate. Our results raise a possibility that ATP and/or serotonin may be chemical messengers involving sensory signaling for different types of rat whisker afferent fibers. PMID:27927797

  8. α-Melanocyte-stimulating hormone: a protective peptide against chemotherapy-induced hair follicle damage?

    PubMed

    Böhm, M; Bodó, E; Funk, W; Paus, R

    2014-04-01

    Effective, safe and well-tolerated therapeutic and/or preventive regimens for chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA) still remain to be developed. Because α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) exerts a number of cytoprotective effects and is well tolerated, we hypothesized that it may be a candidate CIA-protective agent. To explore, using a human in vitro model for chemotherapy-induced hair follicle (HF) dystrophy that employs the key cyclophosphamide metabolite (4-hydroperoxy-cyclophosphamide, 4-HC), whether α-MSH protects from 4-HC-induced HF dystrophy. Microdissected human scalp HFs from four individuals were treated with 4-HC, α-MSH and 4-HC plus α-MSH. Changes in HF cycling, melanin distribution and hair matrix keratinocyte proliferation/apoptosis were examined by quantitative (immune-) morphometry. Expression of the cytoprotective enzyme haem oxygenase-1 (HO-1) was determined by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction in HF of two individuals. In 50% of the individuals α-MSH reduced melanin clumping as an early sign of 4-HC-induced disruption of follicular pigmentation. α-MSH reduced 4-HC-induced apoptosis in the HFs of one female patient. These protective effects of α-MSH were not associated with changes in 4-HC-induced catagen induction. α-MSH and 4-HC both increased HO-1 mRNA expression, while the combination of both agents had additive effects on HO-1 transcription. Exogenous α-MSH exerts moderate HF-protective effects against 4-HC-induced human scalp HF damage and upregulates the intrafollicular expression of a key cytoprotective enzyme. However, as substantial interindividual response variations were found, further studies are needed to probe α-MSH as a candidate CIA-protective agent. © 2013 British Association of Dermatologists.

  9. Heparan Sulfate Regulates Hair Follicle and Sebaceous Gland Morphogenesis and Homeostasis*

    PubMed Central

    Coulson-Thomas, Vivien Jane; Gesteira, Tarsis Ferreira; Esko, Jeffrey; Kao, Winston

    2014-01-01

    Hair follicle (HF) morphogenesis and cycling are a result of intricate autonomous epithelial-mesenchymal interactions. Once the first HF cycle is complete it repeatedly undergoes cyclic transformations. Heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycans are found on the cell surface and in the extracellular matrix where they influence a variety of biological processes by interacting with physiologically important proteins, such as growth factors. Inhibition of heparanase (an HS endoglycosidase) in in vitro cultured HFs has been shown to induce a catagen-like process. Therefore, this study aimed to elucidate the precise role of HS in HF morphogenesis and cycling. An inducible tetratransgenic mouse model was generated to excise exostosin glycosyltransferase 1 (Ext1) in keratin 14-positive cells from P21. Interestingly, EXT1StEpiΔ/StEpiΔ mice presented solely anagen HFs. Moreover, waxing the fur to synchronize the HFs revealed accelerated hair regrowth in the EXT1StEpiΔ/StEpiΔ mice and hindered cycling into catagen. The ablation of HS in the interfollicular epidermal cells of mature skin led to the spontaneous formation of new HFs and an increase in Sonic Hedgehog expression resembling wild-type mice at P0, thereby indicating that the HS/Sonic Hedgehog signaling pathway regulates HF formation during embryogenesis and prevents HF formation in mature skin. Finally, the knock-out of HS also led to the morphogenesis and hyperplasia of sebaceous glands and sweat glands in mature mice, leading to exacerbated sebum production and accumulation on the skin surface. Therefore, our findings clearly show that an intricate control of HS levels is required for HF, sebaceous gland, and sweat gland morphogenesis and HF cycling. PMID:25053416

  10. Reciprocal requirements for Eda/Edar/NF-κB and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways in hair follicle induction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuhang; Tomann, Philip; Andl, Thomas; Gallant, Natalie M.; Huelsken, Joerg; Jerchow, Boris; Birchmeier, Walter; Paus, Ralf; Piccolo, Stefano; Mikkola, Marja L.; Morrisey, Edward E.; Overbeek, Paul A.; Scheidereit, Claus; Millar, Sarah E.; Schmidt-Ullrich, Ruth

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Wnt/β-catenin and NF-κB signaling mechanisms provide central controls in development and disease, but how these pathways intersect is unclear. Using hair follicle induction as a model system, we show that patterning of dermal Wnt/β-catenin signaling requires epithelial β-catenin activity. We find that Wnt/β-catenin signaling is absolutely required for NF-κB activation, and that Edar is a direct Wnt target gene. Wnt/β-catenin signaling is initially activated independently of Eda/Edar/NF-κB activity in primary hair follicle primordia. However, Eda/Edar/NF-κB signaling is required to refine the pattern of Wnt/β-catenin activity, and to maintain this activity at later stages of placode development. We show that maintenance of localized expression of Wnt10b and Wnt10a requires NF-κB signaling, providing a molecular explanation for the latter observation, and identify Wnt10b as a direct NF-κB target. These data reveal a complex interplay and inter-dependence of Wnt/β-catenin and Eda/Edar/NF-κB signaling pathways in initiation and maintenance of primary hair follicle placodes. PMID:19619491

  11. Activated hair follicle stem cells and Wnt/β-catenin signaling involve in pathnogenesis of sebaceous neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Weiming; Lei, Mingxing; Li, Jin; Wang, Ning; Lian, Xiaohua

    2014-01-01

    Sebaceous glands (SGs) undergo cyclic renewal independent of hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) activation while HFSCs have the potential to differentiate into sebaceous gland cells, hair follicle and epidermal keratinocytes. Abnormalities of sebaceous gland progenitor cells contribute to the development of sebaceous neoplasms, but little is known about the role of HFSCs during sebaceous neoplasm development. Here, using dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA) plus 12-o-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) treatment developing sebaceous neoplasms (SNs) were identified with H&E and Oil red O staining. And then the molecular expression and activation of HFSCs and was characterized by immunostaining. Wnt10b/β-catenin signaling molecular which is important for activation of HFSCs were detected by immunostaining. We found hair follicle and epidermal cell markers were expressed in sebaceous neoplasms. Furthermore, SOX-9 and CD34-positive HFSCs were located in the basal layer of sebaceous lobules within the sebaceous neoplasms. Many appear to be in an active state. Finally, Wnt10b/β-catenin signaling was activated within the basal cells of sebaceous lobules in the sebaceous neoplasms. Collectively, our findings suggest that the abnormal activation of both HFSCs and Wnt10b/β-catenin signaling involves in the development of sebaceous neoplasms.

  12. Matriptase/MT-SP1 is required for postnatal survival, epidermal barrier function, hair follicle development, and thymic homeostasis.

    PubMed

    List, Karin; Haudenschild, Christian C; Szabo, Roman; Chen, WanJun; Wahl, Sharon M; Swaim, William; Engelholm, Lars H; Behrendt, Niels; Bugge, Thomas H

    2002-05-23

    Matriptase/MT-SP1 is a novel tumor-associated type II transmembrane serine protease that is highly expressed in the epidermis, thymic stroma, and other epithelia. A null mutation was introduced into the Matriptase/MT-SP1 gene of mice to determine the role of Matriptase/MT-SP1 in epidermal development and neoplasia. Matriptase/MT-SP1-deficient mice developed to term but uniformly died within 48 h of birth. All epidermal surfaces of newborn mice were grossly abnormal with a dry, red, shiny, and wrinkled appearance. Matriptase/MT-SP1-deficiency caused striking malformations of the stratum corneum, characterized by dysmorphic and pleomorphic corneocytes and the absence of vesicular bodies in transitional layer cells. This aberrant skin development seriously compromised both inward and outward epidermal barrier function, leading to the rapid and fatal dehydration of Matriptase/MT-SP1-deficient pups. Loss of Matriptase/MT-SP1 also seriously affected hair follicle development resulting in generalized follicular hypoplasia, absence of erupted vibrissae, lack of vibrissal hair canal formation, ingrown vibrissae, and wholesale abortion of vibrissal follicles. Furthermore, Matriptase/MT-SP1-deficiency resulted in dramatically increased thymocyte apoptosis, and depletion of thymocytes. This study demonstrates that Matriptase/MT-SP1 has pleiotropic functions in the development of the epidermis, hair follicles, and cellular immune system.

  13. Penetration and distribution of three lipophilic probes in vitro in human skin focusing on the hair follicle.

    PubMed

    Grams, Ylva Y; Bouwstra, Joke A

    2002-10-04

    Fluorescent model substances of increasing lipophilicity (Oregon Green) 488, Bodipy, FL C5 and Bodipy 564/570 C5) were selected to enable the visualization in the skin using confocal laser scanning microscopy. After measuring the penetration for 18 h, the nonfixed human scalp skin was imaged from the bottom parallel to the stratum corneum and in a cross-section view perpendicular to the skin surface. The images were evaluated by calculating relative accumulation values for different penetrants. The studies indicate that the penetrated amount is highest for Bodipy FL C5 (medium lipophilicity) and lowest for Bodipy 564/570 C5 (high lipophilicity) whereas Bodipy 564/570 C5 (high lipophilicity) reveals the highest relative accumulation in parts of the hair follicle compared to Oregon Green 488 (low lipophilicity). The addition of 30% (v/v) ethanol to the donor phase of substance with a low lipophilicity increases the follicular delivery. From our results we conclude that delivery to the hair follicle can be improved by increasing the drugs lipophilicity and optimizing the composition of the donor phase. However, no conclusion can be drawn about the actual route of transport to the hair follicle.

  14. Corneodesmosin gene ablation induces lethal skin-barrier disruption and hair-follicle degeneration related to desmosome dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Leclerc, Emilie A; Huchenq, Anne; Mattiuzzo, Nicolas R; Metzger, Daniel; Chambon, Pierre; Ghyselinck, Norbert B; Serre, Guy; Jonca, Nathalie; Guerrin, Marina

    2009-08-01

    Corneodesmosin (CDSN) is specific to desmosomes of epithelia undergoing cornification, mainly the epidermis and the inner root sheath of the hair follicles. CDSN nonsense mutations are associated with hypotrichosis simplex of the scalp, a rare disease that leads to complete baldness in young adults. CDSN displays adhesive properties, mostly attributable to its N-terminal glycine-rich domain, and is sequentially proteolyzed as corneocytes migrate towards the skin surface. K14-promoter driven Cre-mediated deletion of Cdsn in mice resulted in neonatal death as a result of epidermal tearing upon minor mechanical stress. Ultrastructural analyses revealed a desmosomal break at the interface between the living and cornified layers. After grafting onto nude mice, knockout skin showed a chronic defect in the epidermal permeability barrier. The epidermis was first hyperproliferative with a thick cornified layer, then, both the epidermis and the hair follicles degenerated. In adults, Cdsn deletion resulted in similar histological abnormalities and in a lethal barrier defect. We demonstrate that Cdsn is not essential for skin-barrier formation in utero, but is vital throughout life to preserve this barrier by maintaining desmosome integrity. The strong adhesive function that the protein confers on corneodesmosomes also seems necessary for maintaining the architecture of the hair follicle.

  15. Morphological analysis of the growth stages of in-vivo mouse hair follicles by using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Rakesh Kumar; Kim, Kanghae; Jeon, Mansik; Kim, Jeehyun; Kang, Minyoung; Han, Insook; Kim, Moonkyu

    2016-09-01

    Swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT), a bio-photonic imaging modality, was used to demonstrate an initial feasibility experiment for detecting morphological variations of in-vivo mouse hair follicles for the anagen and the telogen growth stages. Two C57BL/6 adult male mice, one undergoing the anagen stage and the other undergoing the telogen stage of the hair follicle growth cycle, were selected for the experiment. The OCT cross-sectional images of mice skin were acquired in-vivo within an interval of 15 days, and the observed morphological changes were analyzed. The micro-structural features of mice skin on the 15th experimental day were further compared with corresponding histological observations. The preliminary result of this study provides clear insights into the structural details of mouse skin, confirming the resemblance of the OCT images with the corresponding histological measurements, and ensures the suitability of SS-OCT for non-invasive analysis of hair follicle conditions.

  16. Kinematic response in limb and body posture to sensory feedback from carpal sinus hairs in the rat (Rattus norvegicus).

    PubMed

    Niederschuh, Sandra J; Helbig, Thomas; Zimmermann, Klaus; Witte, Hartmut; Schmidt, Manuela

    2017-04-01

    One of the most challenging adaptations within the therians has been to ensure dynamic stability of the trunk during rapid locomotion in highly structured environments. A reorganization of limb mechanics and development of new sensors has taken place within their stem lineage. Rats, which have a similar lifestyle to the first therians, possess sinus hairs specialized for tactile sensing. It is supposed that carpal sinus hairs have a role in sensing substrate properties and can thus induce adjustments in limb kinematics and body posture according to the different surface diameters and structures detected. This implies a shared sensorimotor control loop of sinus hairs and body posture. To investigate the role of the carpal sinus hairs during locomotion and to explore a possible interaction between limb and spine motion, spatiotemporal and kinematic parameters as well as the contact mechanics of the hairs with regard to the surface were quantified. Locomotion on a treadmill with continuous and discontinuous substrates was compared in the presence/absence of the carpal sinus hairs across a speed range from 0.2m/s to 0.6m/s. Recordings were taken synchronously using x-ray fluoroscopy and normal-light high-speed cameras. Our investigation revealed that the three tactile hairs made a triangle-like contact with the ground approximately 30ms before touchdown of the forelimb. Within that time, it is likely that both the body posture and its oscillation are adjusted according to the different surface textures. The sensory input of the carpal sinus hairs induces a stabilization of the trajectory of the center of mass and, therefore, improves the dynamic stability of the trunk; conversely, the absence of the sensors results in a more crouched frontal body posture, similar to that seen in rats when they are moving in an unknown terrain. The carpal sinus hairs also sense the animal's speed during surface contact. This implicates an adjustment of the limb and spine kinematics, by

  17. Penetration profile of microspheres in follicular targeting of terminal hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Toll, R; Jacobi, U; Richter, H; Lademann, J; Schaefer, H; Blume-Peytavi, U

    2004-07-01

    The transfollicular administration of pharmacologically active molecules is of current therapeutic interest, mainly with regard to delivery to specific sites of the hair follicle (HF) and the reduction of hepatic metabolism and systemic toxicity. HF are privileged pathways for specific molecules depending on formulations, which enter faster into these shunts than through the stratum corneum. The aim was to optimize the delivery of fluorescent microspheres into the HF, thereby, developing a standardized protocol for follicular targeting with microspheres. The number of HF showing penetration, as well as the depth of penetration, was determined. Freshly excised skin samples with terminal HF were divided into groups, with or without prior treatment with cyanoacrylate skin surface stripping-technique (CSSS). Thereafter microspheres at a size of 0.75-6.0 microm were applied according to the developed standardized protocol. Skin biopsies were obtained, shock-frozen, and sectioned in 5 microm slices. We demonstrated a selective penetration route of the microspheres into the HF. Optimal microsphere size proved to be approximately 1.5 microm, with a 55% rate of all HF, and with a maximum penetration depth of >2300 microm. Without previous CSSS treatment of the skin, the transfollicular microsphere penetration was below 27% with a maximum penetration depth of 1000 microm. Thus, the basis for follicular targeting of essential structures containing stem cells for keratinocytes, melanocytes, and mast cells has been laid.

  18. An Integrated Transcriptome Atlas of Embryonic Hair Follicle Progenitors, Their Niche, and the Developing Skin.

    PubMed

    Sennett, Rachel; Wang, Zichen; Rezza, Amélie; Grisanti, Laura; Roitershtein, Nataly; Sicchio, Cristina; Mok, Ka Wai; Heitman, Nicholas J; Clavel, Carlos; Ma'ayan, Avi; Rendl, Michael

    2015-09-14

    Defining the unique molecular features of progenitors and their niche requires a genome-wide, whole-tissue approach with cellular resolution. Here, we co-isolate embryonic hair follicle (HF) placode and dermal condensate cells, precursors of adult HF stem cells and the dermal papilla/sheath niche, along with lineage-related keratinocytes and fibroblasts, Schwann cells, melanocytes, and a population inclusive of all remaining skin cells. With next-generation RNA sequencing, we define gene expression patterns in the context of the entire embryonic skin, and through transcriptome cross-comparisons, we uncover hundreds of enriched genes in cell-type-specific signatures. Axon guidance signaling and many other pathway genes are enriched in multiple signatures, implicating these factors in driving the large-scale cellular rearrangements necessary for HF formation. Finally, we share all data in an interactive, searchable companion website. Our study provides an overarching view of signaling within the entire embryonic skin and captures a molecular snapshot of HF progenitors and their niche. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Dynamics of Lgr6+ Progenitor Cells in the Hair Follicle, Sebaceous Gland, and Interfollicular Epidermis

    PubMed Central

    Füllgrabe, Anja; Joost, Simon; Are, Alexandra; Jacob, Tina; Sivan, Unnikrishnan; Haegebarth, Andrea; Linnarsson, Sten; Simons, Benjamin D.; Clevers, Hans; Toftgård, Rune; Kasper, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Summary The dynamics and interactions between stem cell pools in the hair follicle (HF), sebaceous gland (SG), and interfollicular epidermis (IFE) of murine skin are still poorly understood. In this study, we used multicolor lineage tracing to mark Lgr6-expressing basal cells in the HF isthmus, SG, and IFE. We show that these Lgr6+ cells constitute long-term self-renewing populations within each compartment in adult skin. Quantitative analysis of clonal dynamics revealed that the Lgr6+ progenitor cells compete neutrally in the IFE, isthmus, and SG, indicating population asymmetry as the underlying mode of tissue renewal. Transcriptional profiling of Lgr6+ and Lgr6− cells did not reveal a distinct Lgr6-associated gene expression signature, raising the question of whether Lgr6 expression requires extrinsic niche signals. Our results elucidate the interrelation and behavior of Lgr6+ populations in the IFE, HF, and SG and suggest population asymmetry as a common mechanism for homeostasis in several epithelial skin compartments. PMID:26607954

  20. The histocompatibility research of hair follicle stem cells with bladder acellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jia; Wang, Wenguang; Li, Jiuzhi; Rexiati, Mulati; An, Henqing; Wang, Feng; Wang, Yujie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) were reported to have multidirectional differentiation ability and could be differentiated into melanocytes, keratin cells, smooth muscle cells, and neurons. However, the functionality of HFSCs in bladder tissue regeneration is unknown. Methods: This study was conducted to build HFSCs vs bladder acellular matrix (BAM) complexes (HFSCs–BAM complexes) in vitro and evaluated whether HFSCs have well biocompatibility with BAM. HFSCs were separated from SD rats. BAM scaffold was prepared from the submucosa of rabbit bladder tissue. Afterwards, HFSCs were inoculated on BAM. Results: HFSCs–BAM complexes grew rapidly through inverted microscope observation. Cell growth curve showed the proliferation was in stagnate phase at 7th and 8th day. Cytotoxicity assay showed the toxicity grading of BAM was 0 or 1. Scanning electron microscopy, HE staining, and masson staining showed that cells have germinated on the surface of scaffold. Conclusion: The results provide evidence that HFSCs–BAM complexes have well biocompatibility and accumulate important experimental basis for clinical applying of tissue engineering bladder. PMID:27828841

  1. Transdifferentiation of Human Hair Follicle Mesenchymal Stem Cells into Red Blood Cells by OCT4.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhijing; Lu, Shi-Jiang; Lu, Yan; Tan, Xiaohua; Zhang, Xiaowei; Yang, Minlan; Zhang, Fuming; Li, Yulin; Quan, Chengshi

    2015-01-01

    Shortage of red blood cells (RBCs, erythrocytes) can have potentially life-threatening consequences for rare or unusual blood type patients with massive blood loss resulting from various conditions. Erythrocytes have been derived from human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), but the risk of potential tumorigenicity cannot be ignored, and a majority of these cells produced from PSCs express embryonic ε- and fetal γ-globins with little or no adult β-globin and remain nucleated. Here we report a method to generate erythrocytes from human hair follicle mesenchymal stem cells (hHFMSCs) by enforcing OCT4 gene expression and cytokine stimulation. Cells generated from hHFMSCs expressed mainly the adult β-globin chain with minimum level of the fetal γ-globin chain. Furthermore, these cells also underwent multiple maturation events and formed enucleated erythrocytes with a biconcave disc shape. Gene expression analyses showed that OCT4 regulated the expression of genes associated with both pluripotency and erythroid development during hHFMSC transdifferentiation toward erythroid cells. These findings show that mature erythrocytes can be generated from adult somatic cells, which may serve as an alternative source of RBCs for potential autologous transfusion.

  2. Commensal Microbes and Hair Follicle Morphogenesis Coordinately Drive Treg Migration into Neonatal Skin.

    PubMed

    Scharschmidt, Tiffany C; Vasquez, Kimberly S; Pauli, Mariela L; Leitner, Elizabeth G; Chu, Kevin; Truong, Hong-An; Lowe, Margaret M; Sanchez Rodriguez, Robert; Ali, Niwa; Laszik, Zoltan G; Sonnenburg, Justin L; Millar, Sarah E; Rosenblum, Michael D

    2017-04-12

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are required to establish immune tolerance to commensal microbes. Tregs accumulate abruptly in the skin during a defined window of postnatal tissue development. However, the mechanisms mediating Treg migration to neonatal skin are unknown. Here we show that hair follicle (HF) development facilitates the accumulation of Tregs in neonatal skin and that upon skin entry these cells localize to HFs, a primary reservoir for skin commensals. Further, germ-free neonates had reduced skin Tregs indicating that commensal microbes augment Treg accumulation. We identified Ccl20 as a HF-derived, microbiota-dependent chemokine and found its receptor, Ccr6, to be preferentially expressed by Tregs in neonatal skin. The Ccl20-Ccr6 pathway mediated Treg migration in vitro and in vivo. Thus, HF morphogenesis, commensal microbe colonization, and local chemokine production work in concert to recruit Tregs into neonatal skin, thereby establishing this tissue Treg niche early in life. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A new hair follicle-derived human epidermal model for the evaluation of sunscreen genoprotection.

    PubMed

    Bacqueville, D; Douki, T; Duprat, L; Rebelo-Moreira, S; Guiraud, B; Dromigny, H; Perier, V; Bessou-Touya, S; Duplan, H

    2015-10-01

    Induction of skin cancer is the most deleterious effect of excessive exposure to sunlight. Accurate evaluation of sunscreens to protect the genome is thus of major importance. In particular, the ability of suncare products to prevent the formation of DNA damage should be evaluated more directly since the Sun Protection Factor is only related to erythema induction. For this purpose, we developed an in vitro approach using a recently characterized reconstituted human epidermis (RHE) model engineered from hair follicle. The relevance of this skin substitute in terms of UV-induced genotoxicity was compared to ex vivo explants exposed to solar-simulated radiation (SSR). The yield of bipyrimidine photoproducts, their rate of repair, and the induction of apoptosis were very similar in both types of skin samples. In order to evaluate the protection afforded by sunscreen against DNA damage, bipyrimidine photoproducts were quantified in tissue models following SSR exposure in the presence or absence of a SPF50+ formula. A rather high DNA protection factor of approximately 20 was found in RHE, very similar to that determined for explants. Thus, RHE is a good surrogate to human skin, and also a convenient and useful tool for investigation of the genoprotection of sunscreens.

  4. The Role of Biodegradable Engineered Nanofiber Scaffolds Seeded with Hair Follicle Stem Cells for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Beigom Hejazian, Leila; Esmaeilzade, Banafshe; Ghoroghi, Fatima Moghanni; Moradi, Fatemeh; Hejazian, Marzieh Beigom; Aslani, Anahita; Bakhtiari, Mehrdad; Soleimani, Masoud; Nobakht, Maliheh

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to fabricate the poly caprolactone (PCL) aligned nanofiber scaffold and to evaluate the survival, adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation of rat hair follicle stem cells (HFSC) in the graft material using electrospun PCL nanofiber scaffold for tissue engineering applications. Methods The bulge region of rat whisker was isolated and cultured in DMEM: nutrient mixture F-12 supplemented with epidermal growth factor. The morphological and biological features of cultured bulge cells were observed by light microscopy using immunocytochemistry methods. Electrospinning was used for production of PCL nanofiber scaffolds. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), 3-(4, 5-di-methylthiazol- 2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, and histology analysis were used to investigate the cell morphology, viability, attachment and infiltration of the HFSC on the PCL nanofiber scaffolds. Results The results of the MTT assay showed cell viability and cell proliferation of the HFSC on PCL nanofiber scaffolds. SEM microscopy images indicated that HFSC are attached, proliferated and spread on PCL nanofiber scaffolds. Also, immunocytochemical analysis showed cell infiltration and cell differentiation on the scaffolds. Conclusion The results of this study reveal that PCL nanofiber scaffolds are suitable for cell culture, proliferation, differentiation and attachment. Furthermore, HFSC are attached and proliferated on PCL nanofiber scaffolds. PMID:23183618

  5. Basal cell carcinoma preferentially arises from stem cells within hair follicle and mechanosensory niches

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Shelby C.; Eberl, Markus; Vagnozzi, Alicia N.; Belkadi, Abdelmadjid; Veniaminova, Natalia A.; Verhaegen, Monique E.; Bichakjian, Christopher K.; Ward, Nicole L.; Dlugosz, Andrzej A.; Wong, Sunny Y.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is characterized by frequent loss of PTCH1, leading to constitutive activation of the Hedgehog pathway. Although the requirement for Hedgehog in BCC is well-established, the identity of disease-initiating cells and the compartments in which they reside remain controversial. By using several inducible Cre drivers to delete Ptch1 in different cell compartments in mice, we show here that multiple hair follicle stem cell populations readily develop BCC-like tumors. In contrast, stem cells within the interfollicular epidermis do not efficiently form tumors. Notably, we observed that innervated Gli1-expressing progenitors within mechanosensory touch dome epithelia are highly tumorigenic. Sensory nerves activate Hedgehog signaling in normal touch domes, while denervation attenuates touch dome-derived tumors. Together, our studies identify varying tumor susceptibilities among different stem cell populations in the skin, highlight touch dome epithelia as “hot spots” for tumor formation, and implicate cutaneous nerves as mediators of tumorigenesis. PMID:25842978

  6. The basement membrane of hair follicle stem cells is a muscle cell niche

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Hironobu; Ferreira, Manuela; Donati, Giacomo; Marciano, Denise K.; Linton, James M.; Sato, Yuya; Hartner, Andrea; Sekiguchi, Kiyotoshi; Reichardt, Louis F.; Watt, Fiona M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The hair follicle bulge in the epidermis associates with the arrector pili muscle (APM) that is responsible for piloerection (commonly called "goosebumps"). We show that deposition of nephronectin into the basement membrane by bulge stem cells mediates selective adhesion of α8β1 integrin-expressing mesenchymal cells, including APM progenitors. Nephronectin induces α8 integrin-positive cells to upregulate smooth muscle markers. In nephronectin-null skin, the number of APM is reduced and those that form insert above the bulge, where there is compensatory upregulation of the nephronectin family member EGFL6. Deletion of α8 integrin also abolishes the selectivity of APM anchorage to the bulge. Nephronectin is a Wnt target gene; epidermal β-catenin activation upregulates epidermal nephronectin and dermal α8 integrin expression. We conclude that by expressing nephronectin bulge stem cells provide a smooth muscle cell niche and act as tendon cells for the APM. The results also reveal a functional role for basement membrane heterogeneity in tissue patterning. PMID:21335239

  7. Engineering of the human vessel wall with hair follicle stem cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhi-Cheng; Zhang, Qun; Li, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) are increasingly used as a stem cell paradigm in vascular tissue engineering due to the fact that they are a rich source of easily accessible multipotent adult stem cells. Promising results have been demonstrated with small diameter (less than 6 mm) tissue engineered blood vessels under low blood pressure, however engineering large vessels (>6 mm in diameter) remains a challenge due to the fact it demands a higher number of seed cells and higher quality biomechanical properties. The aim of the current study was to engineer a large vessel (6 mm in diameter) with differentiated smooth muscle cells (SMCs) induced from human (h)HFSCs using transforming growth factor‑β1 and platelet‑derived growth factor BB in combination with low‑serum culture medium. The cells were seeded onto polyglycolic acid and then wrapped around a silicone tube and further cultured in vitro. A round vessel wall was formed subsequent to 8 weeks of culture. Histological examination indicated that layers of smooth muscle‑like cells and collagenous fibres were oriented in the induced group. In contrast, disorganised cells and collagenous fibres were apparent in the undifferentiated group. The approach developed in the current study demonstrated potential for constructing large muscular vessels with differentiated SMCs induced from hHFSCs.

  8. Differentiation of hepatocytes from induced pluripotent stem cells derived from human hair follicle mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xu; Lv, Shuang; He, Xia; Liu, Xiaomei; Sun, Meiyu; Li, Meiying; Chi, Guangfan; Li, Yulin

    2016-10-01

    Due to the limitations of organ donors and immune rejection in severe liver diseases, stem cell-based therapy presents a promising application for tissue repair and regeneration. As a novel cell source, mesenchymal stem cells separated from human hair follicles (HF-MSCs) are convenient to obtain and have no age limit. To date, the differentiation of HF-MSCs into hepatocytes has not been reported. In this study, we explored whether HF-MSCs and HF-MSC-derived-induced pluripotent stem cells (HF-iPS) could differentiate into hepatocytes in vitro. Flow cytometry, Oil Red O stain and Alizarin Red stain were used to identify the characteristics of HF-MSCs. The expression of liver-specific gene was detected by immunofluorescence and Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction. Periodic Acid-Schiff stain, Indocyanine Green stain and Low-Density Lipoprotein stain were performed to evaluate the functions of induced hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs). HF-MSCs were unable to differentiate into HLCs using previously reported procedures for MSCs from other tissues. However, HF-iPS efficiently induced the generation of HLCs that expressed hepatocyte markers and drug metabolism-related genes. HF-iPS can be used as novel and alternative cellular tools for inducing hepatocytes in vitro, simultaneously benefiting from utilizing HF-MSCs as a noninvasive and convenient cell source for reprogramming.

  9. Piezo2 channel conductance and localization domains in Merkel cells of rat whisker hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Ryo; Gu, Jianguo G

    2014-11-07

    We have recently shown that Merkel cells transduce tactile stimuli via Piezo2 channels to initiate the sense of touch. Here we performed patch-clamp recordings to assess single channel activity on the membranes of Merkel cells in whisker hair follicles. Under the cell-attached configuration, most Merkel cell membrane patches showed large outward unitary currents with single channel conductance being ∼200pS. The outward unitary currents were not affected by negative pressures up to 150mmHg when applied to the membrane patches. The application of negative pressures up to 190mmHg also could not directly elicit any inward unitary current in the membrane patches. However, after establishing the whole-cell configuration, mechanically activated currents (MA) that resembled Piezo2 currents could be elicited by membrane displacements in every Merkel cell tested. While the MA current decayed rapidly, a small steady-state current component with significant channel noise could be observed. Applications of stationary and non-stationary fluctuation analyses to the MA currents yielded single channel conductance of 32.5±3.8 and 54.0±5.3pS, respectively. The lack of mechanical responses under the cell-attached configuration and the existence of Piezo2 MA currents under the whole-cell configuration raised a possibility that Piezo2 channels are preferentially located on Merkel cell processes, the membrane domains inaccessible by recording electrodes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Histopathological changes in the hair follicle after irradiation of long-pulse alexandrite laser equipped with a cooling device.

    PubMed

    Ono, I; Tateshita, T

    2000-01-01

    Several laser systems are currently used for epilation. However, the optimal parameters and treatment protocols remain largely unknown. In this study, the histopathological changes in the hair follicles after long pulsed alexandrite laser irradiation are discussed and the clinical application of irradiation energy at the time of treatment is described. The laser used in this study is equipped with a computer controlled cooling device. A histopathological study was performed to compare the differences in the degree of degeneration in the epidermis and follicles treated with and without the cooling device. In comparison with normal hair papilla, in the laser irradiated skin, injury of melanin containing cells and hair shafts and external root-sheaths in the periphery were observed, while the epidermis was completely protected by the cooling device. The condition of the hair papilla of the tissue irradiated at a fluence of 25 J/cm2 with a spot diameter of 15 mm and 20 J/cm2, with a spot diameter of 18 mm were investigated thoroughly. Swollen papilla and selective destruction of the site where melanocytes were present were observed. The results of this study strongly indicate the efficacy of a long-pulsed alexandrite laser equipped with a computer controlled cooling device for clinical depilation.

  11. The Transient Role for Calcium and Vitamin D during the Developmental Hair Follicle Cycle.

    PubMed

    Mady, Leila J; Ajibade, Dare V; Hsaio, Connie; Teichert, Arnaud; Fong, Chak; Wang, Yongmei; Christakos, Sylvia; Bikle, Daniel D

    2016-07-01

    The role for 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 and/or calcium in hair follicle cycling is not clear despite their impact on keratinocyte differentiation. We found that calbindin-D9k null (knockout) pups generated from calbindin-D9k knockout females fed a vitamin D-deficient, low-calcium (0.47%) diet develop transient alopecia. The pups appear phenotypically normal until 13 days of age, after which the hair progressively sheds in a caudocephalic direction, resulting in truncal alopecia totalis by 20-23 days, with spontaneous recovery by 28 days. Histological studies showed markedly dystrophic hair follicles, loss of hair shafts with increased apoptosis, and hyperplastic epidermis during this time. Ha1 expression is lost during catagen in all mice but recovers more slowly in the knockout pups on the vitamin D-deficient, low-calcium diet. Keratin 1 expression is reduced throughout days 19-28. The expressions of involucrin, loricrin, and cathepsin L is initially increased by day 19 but subsequently falls below those of controls by day 23, as does that of desmoglein 3. Feeding the mothers a high-vitamin D/high-calcium (2%)/lactose (20%) diet lessens the phenotype, and knockout pups fostered to mothers fed a normal diet do not develop alopecia. Our results show that in calbindin-D9k knockout pups, a maternal vitamin D-deficient/low-calcium diet leads to transient noncicatricial alopecia. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Acidic and basic hair/nail ("hard") keratins: their colocalization in upper cortical and cuticle cells of the human hair follicle and their relationship to "soft" keratins

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Although numerous hair proteins have been studied biochemically and many have been sequenced, relatively little is known about their in situ distribution and differential expression in the hair follicle. To study this problem, we have prepared several mouse monoclonal antibodies that recognize different classes of human hair proteins. Our AE14 antibody recognizes a group of 10-25K hair proteins which most likely corresponds to the high sulfur proteins, our AE12 and AE13 antibodies define a doublet of 44K/46K proteins which are relatively acidic and correspond to the type I low sulfur keratins, and our previously described AE3 antibody recognizes a triplet of 56K/59K/60K proteins which are relatively basic and correspond to the type II low sulfur keratins. Using these and other immunological probes, we demonstrate the following. The acidic 44K/46K and basic 56-60K hair keratins appear coordinately in upper corticle and cuticle cells. The 10-25K, AE14-reactive antigens are expressed only later in more matured corticle cells that are in the upper elongation zone, but these antigens are absent from cuticle cells. The 10-nm filaments of the inner root sheath cells fail to react with any of our monoclonal antibodies and are therefore immunologically distinguishable from the cortex and cuticle filaments. Nail plate contains 10-20% soft keratins in addition to large amounts of hair keratins; these soft keratins have been identified as the 50K/58K and 48K/56K keratin pairs. Taken together, these results suggest that the precursor cells of hair cortex and nail plate share a major pathway of epithelial differentiation, and that the acidic 44K/46K and basic 56-60K hard keratins represent a co- expressed keratin pair which can serve as a marker for hair/nail-type epithelial differentiation. PMID:2432071

  13. Axin2 marks quiescent hair follicle bulge stem cells that are maintained by autocrine Wnt/β-catenin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Xinhong; Tan, Si Hui; Yu, Ka Lou; Lim, Sophia Beng Hui; Nusse, Roeland

    2016-01-01

    How stem cells maintain their identity and potency as tissues change during growth is not well understood. In mammalian hair, it is unclear how hair follicle stem cells can enter an extended period of quiescence during the resting phase but retain stem cell potential and be subsequently activated for growth. Here, we use lineage tracing and gene expression mapping to show that the Wnt target gene Axin2 is constantly expressed throughout the hair cycle quiescent phase in outer bulge stem cells that produce their own Wnt signals. Ablating Wnt signaling in the bulge cells causes them to lose their stem cell potency to contribute to hair growth and undergo premature differentiation instead. Bulge cells express secreted Wnt inhibitors, including Dickkopf (Dkk) and secreted frizzled-related protein 1 (Sfrp1). However, the Dickkopf 3 (Dkk3) protein becomes localized to the Wnt-inactive inner bulge that contains differentiated cells. We find that Axin2 expression remains confined to the outer bulge, whereas Dkk3 continues to be localized to the inner bulge during the hair cycle growth phase. Our data suggest that autocrine Wnt signaling in the outer bulge maintains stem cell potency throughout hair cycle quiescence and growth, whereas paracrine Wnt inhibition of inner bulge cells reinforces differentiation. PMID:26903625

  14. In situ patch-clamp recordings from Merkel cells in rat whisker hair follicles, an experimental protocol for studying tactile transduction in tactile-end organs.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Ryo; Ling, Jennifer; Cha, Myeounghoon; Gu, Jianguo G

    2015-04-25

    Mammals use tactile end-organs to perform sensory tasks such as environmental exploration, social interaction, and tactile discrimination. However, cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying tactile transduction in tactile end-organs remain poorly understood. The patch-clamp recording technique may be the most valuable approach for detecting and studying tactile transduction in tactile end-organs, but it is technically challenging because tactile transduction elements in an end-organ are normally inaccessible by patch-clamp recording electrodes. Here we describe an in situ patch-clamp recording protocol for the study of tactile transduction in Merkel cells of rat whisker hair follicles, one of the most sensitive tactile end-organs in mammals. This technique offers an opportunity to explore the identities and properties of ion channels that are involved in tactile transduction in whisker hair follicles, and it may also lend a useful tool for researchers to study other tactile end-organs. The experimental protocol describes procedures for 1) tissue dissection and whisker hair follicle preparation, 2) device setup and steps for performing patch-clamp recordings from Merkel cells in a whisker hair follicle, 3) methods of delivering mechanical stimuli, and 4) intra-follicle microinjection for receptor knockdown in whisker hair follicles. The main procedures in this protocol, from tissue preparation to whole-cell patch-clamp recordings, can be completed in a few hours.

  15. SCF/c-kit signaling is required in 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-induced migration and differentiation of hair follicle melanocytes for epidermal pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Weiming; Yang, Ke; Lei, Mingxing; Yan, Hongtao; Tang, Hui; Bai, Xiufeng; Yang, Guihong; Lian, Xiaohua; Wu, Jinjin

    2015-05-01

    Hair follicle melanocyte stem cells (McSCs) are responsible for hair pigmentation and also function as a major melanocyte reservoir for epidermal pigmentation. However, the molecular mechanism promoting McSCs for epidermal pigmentation remains elusive. 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) mimics key signaling involved in melanocyte growth, migration and differentiation. We therefore investigated the molecular basis for the contribution of hair follicle McSCs to epidermal pigmentation using the TPA induction model. We found that repetitive TPA treatment of female C57BL/6 mouse dorsal skin induced epidermal pigmentation by increasing the number of epidermal melanocytes. Particularly, TPA treatment induced McSCs to initiate proliferation, exit the stem cell niche and differentiate. We also demonstrated that TPA promotes melanoblast migration and differentiation in vitro. At the molecular level, TPA treatment induced robust expression of stem cell factor (SCF) in keratinocytes and c-kit in melanoblasts and melanocytes. Administration of ACK2, a neutralizing antibody against the Kit receptor, suppressed mouse epidermal pigmentation, decreased the number of epidermal melanocytes, and inhibited melanoblast migration. Taken together, our data demonstrate that TPA promotes the expansion, migration and differentiation of hair follicle McSCs for mouse epidermal pigmentation. SCF/c-kit signaling was required for TPA-induced migration and differentiation of hair follicle melanocytes. Our findings may provide an excellent model to investigate the signaling mechanisms regulating epidermal pigmentation from mouse hair follicle McSCs, and a potential therapeutic option for skin pigmentation disorders.

  16. Photoactivation of ROS production in situ transiently activates cell proliferation in mouse skin and in the hair follicle stem cell niche promoting hair growth and wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco, Elisa; Calvo, María I.; Blázquez-Castro, Alfonso; Vecchio, Daniela; Zamarrón, Alicia; de Almeida, Irma Joyce Dias; Stockert, Juan C.; Hamblin, Michael R.; Juarranz, Ángeles; Espada, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    The role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the regulation of hair follicle cycle and skin homeostasis is poorly characterized. ROS have been traditionally linked to human disease and ageing, but recent findings suggest that can also have beneficial physiological functions in vivo in mammals. To test this hypothesis, we transiently switched on in situ ROS production in mouse skin. This process activated cell proliferation in the tissue and, interestingly, in the bulge region of the hair follicle, a major reservoir of epidermal stem cells, promoting hair growth as well as stimulating tissue repair after severe burn injury. We further show that these effects were associated with a transient Src kinase phosphorylation at Tyr416 and with a strong transcriptional activation of the prolactin family 2 subfamily c of growth factors. Our results point to potentially relevant modes of skin homeostasis regulation and demonstrate that a local and transient ROS production can regulate stem cell and tissue function in the whole organism. PMID:26134949

  17. Dendritic polyglycerol and N-isopropylacrylamide based thermoresponsive nanogels as smart carriers for controlled delivery of drugs through the hair follicle.

    PubMed

    Sahle, Fitsum Feleke; Giulbudagian, Michael; Bergueiro, Julian; Lademann, Jürgen; Calderón, Marcelo

    2017-01-07

    Nanoparticles with a size of several hundred nanometers can effectively penetrate into the hair follicles and may serve as depots for controlled drug delivery. However, they can neither overcome the hair follicle barrier to reach the viable cells nor release the loaded drug adequately. On the other hand, small drug molecules cannot penetrate deep into the hair follicles. Thus, the most efficient way for drug delivery through the follicular route is to employ nanoparticles that can release the drug close to the target structure upon exposure to some external or internal stimuli. Accordingly, 100-700 nm sized thermoresponsive nanogels with a phase transition temperature of 32-37 °C were synthesized by the precipitation polymerization technique using N-isopropylacrylamide as a monomer, acrylated dendritic polyglycerol as a crosslinker, VA-044 as an initiator, and sodium dodecyl sulphate as a stabilizer. The follicular penetration of the indodicarbocyanine (IDCC) labeled nanogels into the hair follicles and the release of coumarin 6, which was loaded as a model drug, in the hair follicles were assessed ex vivo using porcine ear skin. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) enabled independent tracking of the nanogels and the loaded dye, although it is not as precise and accurate as standard analytical methods. The results showed that, unlike smaller nanogels (<100 nm), medium and larger sized nanogels (300-500 nm) penetrated effectively into the hair follicles with penetration depths proportional to the nanogel size. The release of the loaded dye in the hair follicles increased significantly when the investigation on penetration was carried out above the cloud point temperature of the nanogels. The follicular penetration of the nanogels from the colloidal dispersion and a 2.5% hydroxyethyl cellulose gel was not significantly different.

  18. The dog mite, Demodex canis: prevalence, fungal co-infection, reactions to light, and hair follicle apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yu-Jen; Chung, Wen-Cheng; Wang, Lian-Chen; Ju, Yu-Ten; Hong, Chin-Lin; Tsai, Yu-Yang; Li, Yi-Hung; Wu, Ying-Ling

    2011-01-01

    Infection rate, reaction to light, and hair follicle apoptosis are examined in the dogmite, Demodex canis Leydig (Prostigmata: Demodicidae), in dogs from the northern area of Taiwan. An analysis of relevant samples revealed 7.2% (73/1013) prevalence of D. canis infection. Infection during the investigation peaked each winter, with an average prevalence of 12.5% (32/255). The infection rates significantly varied in accordance with month, sex, age, and breed (p < 0.05). Most of the lesions were discovered on the backs of the infected animals, where the infection rate was 52.1% (38/73) (P < 0.05). The epidemiologic analysis of infection based on landscape area factor, found that employing a map-overlapping method showed a higher infection rate in the eastern distribution of Taiwan's northern area than other areas. Isolation tests for Microsporum canis Bodin (Onygenales: Arthrodermataceae) and Trichophyton mentagrophyte Robin (Blanchard) on the D. canis infected dogs revealed prevalence rates of 4.4% (2/45) and 2.2% (1/45), respectively. Observations demonstrated that D. canis slowly moved from a light area to a dark area. Skin samples were examined for cellular apoptosis by activated caspase3 immunohistochemical staining. Cells that surrounded the infected hair follicles were activated caspase3-positive, revealing cell apoptosis in infected follicles via the activation of caspase3.

  19. Sinusitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... to decrease swelling, especially if there are nasal polyps or allergies Surgery to enlarge the sinus opening and drain the ... each year. Most fungal sinus infections need surgery. Surgery to repair ... or nasal polyps may prevent the condition from returning.

  20. Quantification of nanoparticle uptake into hair follicles in pig ear and human forearm.

    PubMed

    Raber, A S; Mittal, A; Schäfer, J; Bakowsky, U; Reichrath, J; Vogt, T; Schaefer, U F; Hansen, S; Lehr, C-M

    2014-04-10

    Drug delivery via the hair follicle (HF) especially with nanoparticles (NP) recently gained attention due to a depot effect and facilitated absorption conditions within the lower HF. With the prospect of transdermal drug delivery, it is of interest to optimize the follicular uptake of NP. In this study, a method was developed to quantify NP uptake into HF and applied in vitro in a pig ear model and in vivo in human volunteers. The influence of NP material on HF uptake was investigated using fluorescence-labeled NP based on poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA). All NP had similar hydrodynamic sizes (163-170 nm) but different surface modifications: (i) plain PLGA, (ii) chitosan-coated PLGA (Chit.-PLGA), and (iii) Chit.-PLGA coated with different phospholipids (PL) (DPPC (100), DPPC:Chol (85:15), and DPPC:DOTAP (92:8). Differential stripping was performed, including complete mass balance. The samples were extracted for fluorescence quantification. An effect of the PL coating on follicular uptake was observed as DPPC (100) and DPPC:DOTAP (92:8) penetrated into HF to a higher extent than the other tested NP. The effect was observed both in the pig ear model as well as in human volunteers, although it was statistically significant only in the in vitro model. An excellent in vitro-in vivo correlation (IVIVC, r(2)=0.987) between both models was demonstrated, further supporting the suitability of the pig ear model as a surrogate for the in vivo situation in humans for quantifying NP uptake into HF. These findings may help to optimize NP for targeting the HF and to improve transdermal delivery.

  1. Hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis hormones stimulate mitochondrial function and biogenesis in human hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Vidali, Silvia; Knuever, Jana; Lerchner, Johannes; Giesen, Melanie; Bíró, Tamás; Klinger, Matthias; Kofler, Barbara; Funk, Wolfgang; Poeggeler, Burkhard; Paus, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormones regulate mitochondrial function. As other hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis hormones, i.e., thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and thyrotropin (TSH), are expressed in human hair follicles (HFs) and regulate mitochondrial function in human epidermis, we investigated in organ-cultured human scalp HFs whether TRH (30 nM), TSH (10 mU ml(-1)), thyroxine (T4) (100 nM), and triiodothyronine (T3) (100 pM) alter intrafollicular mitochondrial energy metabolism. All HPT-axis members increased gene and protein expression of mitochondrial-encoded subunit 1 of cytochrome c oxidase (MTCO1), a subunit of respiratory chain complex IV, mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), and Porin. All hormones also stimulated intrafollicular complex I/IV activity and mitochondrial biogenesis. The TSH effects on MTCO1, TFAM, and porin could be abolished by K1-70, a TSH-receptor antagonist, suggesting a TSH receptor-mediated action. Notably, as measured by calorimetry, T3 and TSH increased follicular heat production, whereas T3/T4 and TRH stimulated ATP production in cultured HF keratinocytes. HPT-axis hormones did not increase reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Rather, T3 and T4 reduced ROS formation, and all tested HPT-axis hormones increased the transcription of ROS scavengers (catalase, superoxide dismutase 2) in HF keratinocytes. Thus, mitochondrial biology, energy metabolism, and redox state of human HFs are subject to profound (neuro-)endocrine regulation by HPT-axis hormones. The neuroendocrine control of mitochondrial biology in a complex human mini-organ revealed here may be therapeutically exploitable.

  2. Sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Morcom, Samuel; Phillips, Nicholas; Pastuszek, Andrew; Timperley, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Acute and chronic sinusitis are common primary care presentations. They are caused by mucosal inflammation, which inhibits mucociliary function of the nose and paranasal sinuses. This article provides an overview of acute and chronic sinusitis, and a guide to workup and management in a primary care setting. Complications and other indications for referral are discussed. Sinusitis involves a wide spectrum of presentations, both acute and chronic. It is primarily a medical condition, and surgical management is reserved for complicated or refractory cases.

  3. The nude mutant gene Foxn1 is a HOXC13 regulatory target during hair follicle and nail differentiation.

    PubMed

    Potter, Christopher S; Pruett, Nathanael D; Kern, Michael J; Baybo, Mary Ann; Godwin, Alan R; Potter, Kathleen A; Peterson, Ron L; Sundberg, John P; Awgulewitsch, Alexander

    2011-04-01

    Among the Hox genes, homeobox C13 (Hoxc13) has been shown to be essential for proper hair shaft differentiation, as Hoxc13 gene-targeted (Hoxc13(tm1Mrc)) mice completely lack external hair. Because of the remarkable overt phenotypic parallels to the Foxn1(nu) (nude) mutant mice, we sought to determine whether Hoxc13 and forkhead box N1 (Foxn1) might act in a common pathway of hair follicle (HF) differentiation. We show that the alopecia exhibited by both the Hoxc13(tm1Mrc) and Foxn1(nu) mice is because of strikingly similar defects in hair shaft differentiation and that both mutants suffer from a severe nail dystrophy. These phenotypic similarities are consistent with the extensive overlap between Hoxc13 and Foxn1 expression patterns in the HF and the nail matrix. Furthermore, DNA microarray analysis of skin from Hoxc13(tm1Mrc) mice identified Foxn1 as significantly downregulated along with numerous hair keratin genes. This Foxn1 downregulation apparently reflects the loss of direct transcriptional control by HOXC13 as indicated by our results obtained through co-transfection and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. As presented in the discussion, these data support a regulatory model of keratinocyte differentiation in which HOXC13-dependent activation of Foxn1 is part of a regulatory cascade controlling the expression of terminal differentiation markers.

  4. Sulfotransferase activity in plucked hair follicles predicts response to topical minoxidil in the treatment of female androgenetic alopecia.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Janet; Desai, Nisha; McCoy, John; Goren, Andy

    2014-01-01

    Two percent topical minoxidil is the only US Food and Drug Administration-approved drug for the treatment of female androgenetic alopecia (AGA). Its success has been limited by the low percentage of responders. Meta-analysis of several studies reporting the number of responders to 2% minoxidil monotherapy indicates moderate hair regrowth in only 13-20% of female patients. Five percent minoxidil solution, when used off-label, may increase the percentage of responders to as much as 40%. As such, a biomarker for predicting treatment response would have significant clinical utility. In a previous study, Goren et al. reported an association between sulfotransferase activity in plucked hair follicles and minoxidil response in a mixed cohort of male and female patients. The aim of this study was to replicate these findings in a well-defined cohort of female patients with AGA treated with 5% minoxidil daily for a period of 6 months. Consistent with the prior study, we found that sulfotransferase activity in plucked hair follicles predicts treatment response with 93% sensitivity and 83% specificity. Our study further supports the importance of minoxidil sulfation in eliciting a therapeutic response and provides further insight into novel targets for increasing minoxidil efficacy. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. The in vitro use of the hair follicle closure technique to study the follicular and percutaneous permeation of topically applied drugs.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Jessica; Niedorf, Frank; Wohlert, Mareike; Kietzmann, Manfred

    2012-03-01

    Recent studies on follicular permeation emphasise the importance of hair follicles as diffusion pathways, but only a limited amount of data are available about the follicular permeation of topically applied drugs. This study examines the use of a hair follicle closure technique in vitro, to determine the participation of hair follicles in transdermal drug penetration. Various substances, with different lipophilicities, were tested: caffeine, diclofenac, flufenamic acid, ibuprofen, paracetamol, salicylic acid and testosterone. Diffusion experiments were conducted with porcine skin, the most common replacement material for human skin, in Franz-type diffusion cells over 28 hours. Different experimental settings allowed the differentiation between interfollicular and follicular permeation after topical application of the test compounds. A comparison of the apparent permeability coefficients of the drugs demonstrates that the percutaneous permeations of caffeine and flufenamic acid were significantly higher along the hair follicles. In the cases of paracetamol and testosterone, the follicular pathway appears to be of importance, while no difference was found between interfollicular and follicular permeation for diclofenac, ibuprofen and salicylic acid. Thus, the hair follicle closure technique represents an adequate in vitro method for gaining information about follicular or percutaneous permeation, and can replace in vivo testing in animals or humans.

  6. Hair follicle disruption facilitates pathogenesis to UVB-induced cutaneous inflammation and basal cell carcinoma development in Ptch(+/-) mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianmin; Weng, Zhiping; Arumugam, Aadithya; Tang, Xiuwei; Chaudhary, Sandeep C; Li, Changzhao; Christiano, Angela M; Elmets, Craig A; Bickers, David R; Athar, Mohammad

    2014-05-01

    Hairless mice carrying homozygous mutations in hairless gene manifest rudimentary hair follicles (HFs), epidermal cysts, hairless phenotype, and enhanced susceptibility to squamous cell carcinomas. However, their susceptibility to basal cell carcinomas (BCCs), a neoplasm considered originated from HF-localized stem cells, is unknown. To demonstrate the role of HFs in BCC development, we bred Ptch(+/-)/C57BL6 with SKH-1 hairless mice, followed by brother-sister cross to get F2 homozygous mutant (hairless) or wild-type (haired) mice. UVB-induced inflammation was less pronounced in shaved haired than in hairless mice. In hairless mice, inflammatory infiltrate was found around the rudimentary HFs and epidermal cysts. Expression of epidermal IL1f6, S100a8, vitamin D receptor, repetin, and major histocompatibility complex II, biomarkers depicting susceptibility to cutaneous inflammation, was also higher. In these animals, HF disruption altered susceptibility to UVB-induced BCCs. Tumor onset in hairless mice was 10 weeks earlier than in haired littermates. The incidence of BCCs was significantly higher in hairless than in haired animals; however, the magnitude of sonic hedgehog signaling did not differ significantly. Overall, 100% of hairless mice developed >12 tumors per mouse after 32 weeks of UVB therapy, whereas haired mice developed fewer than three tumors per mouse after 44 weeks of long-term UVB irradiation. Tumors in hairless mice were more aggressive than in haired littermates and manifested decreased E-cadherin and enhanced mesenchymal proteins. These data provide novel evidence that disruption of HFs in Ptch(+/-) mice enhances cutaneous susceptibility to inflammation and BCCs.

  7. VEGF induces proliferation of human hair follicle dermal papilla cells through VEGFR-2-mediated activation of ERK

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wei; Man, Xiao-Yong; Li, Chun-Ming; Chen, Jia-Qi; Zhou, Jiong; Cai, Sui-Qing; Lu, Zhong-Fa; Zheng, Min

    2012-08-15

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is one of the strongest regulators of physiological and pathological angiogenesis. VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR-2), the primary receptor for VEGF, is thought to mediate major functional effects of VEGF. Previously, we have localized both VEGF and VEGFR-2 in human hair follicles. In this study, we further defined the expression and roles of VEGFR-2 on human hair follicle dermal papilla (DP) cells. The expression of VEGFR-2 on DP cells was examined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot analysis separately, and localization of VEGFR-2 was defined by immunofluorescence. The effect of VEGF on DP cells was analyzed by MTT assays and specific inhibitors. Finally, the role of VEGF involved in the signaling pathways was investigated by Western blot. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis demonstrated the expression of VEGFR-2 on DP cells. Immunostaining for VEGFR-2 showed strong signal on cultured human DP cells in vitro. Exogenous VEGF{sub 165} stimulated proliferation of DP cells in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, this stimulation was blocked by a VEGFR-2 neutralizing antibody (MAB3571) and an ERK inhibitor (PD98059). VEGF{sub 165}-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 was abolished by MAB3571 and PD98059, while the phosphorylation of p38, JNK and AKT were not changed by VEGF{sub 165}. Taken together, VEGFR-2 is expressed on primary human hair follicle DP cells and VEGF induces proliferation of DP cells through VEGFR-2/ERK pathway, but not p38, JNK or AKT signaling. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine the expression of VEGFR-2 on cultured human dermal papilla (DP) cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer VEGF{sub 165} stimulated proliferation of human DP cells in a dose-dependent manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This stimulation was through VEGFR-2-mediated activation of ERK.

  8. Identification and localization of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein (IGFBP) messenger RNAs in human hair follicle dermal papilla.

    PubMed

    Batch, J A; Mercuri, F A; Werther, G A

    1996-03-01

    The role of the insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) in hair follicle biology has recently been recognized, although their actions, sites of production, and modulation by the insulin-like growth factor-binding proteins (IGFBPs) have not to date been defined. IGF-I is essential for normal hair growth and development, and may be important in regulation of the hair growth cycle. In many culture systems, IGF-I actions are modulated by the IGFBPs. Thus, if IGFBPs are produced in the human hair follicle, they may play a role in targeting IGF-I to its receptor or may modulate IGF-I action by interaction with matrix proteins. We have used in situ hybridization to localize messenger RNA for the six IGFBPs in anagen hair follicles. Anti-sense and sense RNA probes for the IGFBPs (IGFBP-1 to -6) were produced, and 5-micrometer sections of adult facial skin were probed. Messenger RNA for IGFBP-3, -4, and -5 were identified, with predominantly IGFBP-3 and -5 mRNA found in the dermal papilla, and to a lesser extent IGFBP-4 mRNA. IGFBP-4 mRNA was also found at the dermal papilla/epithelial matrix border. Messenger RNAs for both IGFBP-4 and -5 were also demonstrated in the dermal sheath surrounding the hair follicle. Messenger RNAs for IGFBP-1, -2, and -6 were not identified. These studies demonstrate specific localization of IGFBP mRNAs in hair follicles, suggesting that they each play specific roles in the local modulation of IGF action during the hair growth cycle.

  9. Utility of saliva and hair follicles in donor selection for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and chimerism monitoring.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurvinder; Kumar, Neeraj; Nandakumar, Ramya; Rapthap, Chowphi C; Sharma, Gaurav; Neolia, Shekhar; Kumra, Heena; Mahalwar, Prateek; Garg, Abhinav; Kumar, Sunil; Kaur, Jasmeet; Hakim, Mrinali; Kumar, Lalit; Mehra, Narinder K

    2012-01-01

    Selection of an HLA identical donor is a critical pre-requisite for successful hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Most transplant centers utilize blood as the most common source of DNA for HLA testing. However, obtaining blood through phlebotomy is often challenging in patients with conditions like severe leucopenia or hemophilia, pediatric and elderly patients. We have used a simple in-house protocol and shown that HLA genotypes obtained on DNA extracted from saliva or hair are concordant with blood and hence can be used for selection of donors for HSCT or organ transplantation. Similarly, for post-HSCT chimerism monitoring, non-availability of pre-transplant DNA samples poses a major limitation of reference STR fingerprints. This study shows that DNA obtained post-HSCT from hair follicles can be used to generate pre-transplant patient specific fingerprints while the STR profiles obtained in saliva samples cannot as these display a mixed state of chimerism.

  10. Cxcr4 is transiently expressed in both epithelial and mesenchymal compartments of nascent hair follicles but is not required for follicle formation.

    PubMed

    Sennett, Rachel; Rezza, Amélie; Dauber, Katherine L; Clavel, Carlos; Rendl, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Hair follicle (HF) morphogenesis relies on the coordinated exchange of signals between mesenchymal and epithelial compartments of embryonic skin. Chemokine receptor Cxcr4 expression was recently identified in dermal condensates (DCs) of nascent HFs, but its role in promoting HF morphogenesis remains unknown. Our analyses confirmed Cxcr4 expression in condensate cells, and additionally revealed transient Cxcr4 expression in incipient epithelial hair placodes. Placodal Cxcr4 appeared prior to detection in DCs, representing a switch of expression between epithelial and mesenchymal compartments. To explore the functional role of this receptor in both compartments for early HF formation, we conditionally ablated Cxcr4 with condensate-targeting Tbx18(cre) knock-in and epidermis-targeting Krt14-cre transgenic mice. Conditional knockouts for both crosses were viable throughout embryogenesis and into adulthood. Morphological and biochemical marker analyses revealed comparable numbers of HFs forming in knockout embryos compared to wild-type littermate controls in both cases, suggesting that neither dermal nor epithelial Cxcr4 expression is required for early HF morphogenesis. We conclude that Cxcr4 expression and chemokine signaling through this receptor in embryonic mouse skin is dispensable for HF formation.

  11. Subdivision of mouse vibrissae on an embryological basis, with descriptions of variations in the number and arrangement of sinus hairs and cortical barrels in BALB/c (nu/+; nude, nu/nu) and hairless (hr/hr) strains.

    PubMed

    Yamakado, M; Yohro, T

    1979-06-01

    Development of vibrissae was studied in dd/y mouse embryos by scanning electron microscopy. Arrangement of vibrissae and cortical barrels were also studied by light microscopy in adult dd/y, BALB/c(nu/+), nude (BALB/c, nu/nu) and hairless (hr/hr) mice to find genetic or epigenetic variations. Rudiments of vibrissae first appear on Day 12 of pregnancy as longitudinal ridges on the developing muzzle, and each hair rudiment is represented by a dome on the ridges. The dorsal two rows (A and B; Woolsey and Van der Loos, '70) of mystacial vibrissae are on the lateral nasal prominence, while the ventral three (C, D and E) are on the maxillary prominence. Smaller hairs of mystacial vibrissae appear at the labial part of the maxillary prominenceon Day 13. The rudiments of rhinal hairs also appear at this stage on the part of the muzzle derived from the medial nasal prominence. Thus the so-called mystacial vibrissae should be subdivided into three (or 4, including the rhinal) groups on an embryological basis. They are the lateral nasal, the maxillary and the labial. A supernumerary sinus hair and a corresponding barrel was observed between D and C rows uni-or bilaterally in one third of individuals of BALB/c, nude and hairless mice. It is suggested that supernumerary hairs tend to occur between the groups of hairs as defined above. In nude and hairless mice small barrels representing labial hairs are diminished in number. The number of hair follicles, however, is normal.

  12. Cutaneous consequences of inhibiting EGF receptor signaling in vivo: normal hair follicle development, but retarded hair cycle induction and inhibition of adipocyte growth in Egfr(Wa5) mice.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Koji; Schneider, Marlon R; Dahlhoff, Maik; Kloepper, Jennifer E; Paus, Ralf

    2010-03-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) network is essential for proper development and homeostasis of skin and hair. However, detailed dissection of the role of the EGFR in hair follicle development and cycling have been impaired by the early mortality of EGFR knockout mice. We have studied in Waved-5 mice carrying an antimorphic EGFR allele (Egfr(wa5)), whose product acts as a dominant-negative receptor, whether strongly reduced EGFR signaling impacts on the hair and skin phenotype. Histomorphometry and immunohistochemistry were employed to study hair follicle morphogenesis stages and cycle induction in Waved-5 mice and control littermates during embryonic development and postnatal life. By routine histology and quantitative histomorphometry, no significant abnormalities in the epidermis and in hair follicle morphogenesis were detected, while the initiation of hair follicle cycling was slightly, but significantly retarded. Proliferation and apoptosis of epidermal and hair matrix keratinocytes of Waved-5 mice appeared unaltered. Intriguingly, the thickness of the subcutis and the percentage of proliferating subcutaneous adipocytes were significantly reduced in Waved-5 mice around days P8.5 to P10.5. Although no differences in total body weight gain could be detected, Wa5 mice showed a significant reduction in the percentage of body fat at P8.5. Our results suggest the presence of effective compensatory mechanisms in murine skin in vivo that ensure nearly normal epidermal and hair follicle keratinocyte function despite very low levels of EGFR-mediated signaling. Our unexpected findings of transiently reduced subcutaneous adipose tissue indicate a role for the EGFR in regulating subcutaneous fat. 2009 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Successful direct amplification of nuclear markers from a single hair follicle.

    PubMed

    Ottens, Renée; Taylor, Duncan; Abarno, Damien; Linacre, Adrian

    2013-06-01

    We report on successful amplification of DNA profiles from a single hair. Direct amplification was used on the root tip of both anagen and telogen hairs using a kit to amplify 15 STR loci. All 30 anagen hairs tested from five different people gave full DNA profiles after 29 cycles with no allelic drop-in or heterozygous imbalance. Six of the 30 telogen hairs tested resulted in a full DNA profile, and a further four telogen hair samples tested produced a DNA profile of five or more complete loci that could be up-loaded to the National DNA Database (Australia). A full DNA profile was also obtained from the shaft of an anagen hair. Current practice for many laboratories is that a single hair may not be subjected to DNA testing as there is little chance of success, hence this 100 % success rate from anagen hairs is a significant advancement. A full DNA profile was obtained from a 5 year-old single hair illustrating the success when using direct PCR rather than attempting an extraction prior to the amplification step. The process described deliberately uses current DNA profiling methods with no increase in cycle number, such that the methodology can be incorporated readily into operational practice. For the first time in the field of human identification, single hairs can be analyzed with confidence that a meaningful DNA profile will be generated and the data accepted by the criminal justice system.

  14. The targeted overexpression of a Claudin mutant in the epidermis of transgenic mice elicits striking epidermal and hair follicle abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Troy, Tammy-Claire; Turksen, Kursad

    2007-06-01

    Skin is one of the largest organs of the body, and is formed during development through a highly orchestrated process involving mesenchymal-epithelial interactions, cell commitment, and terminal differentiation. It protects against microorganism invasion and UV irradiation, inhibits water loss, regulates body temperature, and is an important part of the immune system. Using transgenic mouse technology, we have demonstrated that Claudin (Cldn)-containing tight junctions (TJs) are intricately involved in cell signaling during epidermal differentiation and that an epidermal suprabasal overexpression of Cldn6 results in a perturbed epidermal terminal differentiation program with distinct phenotypic abnormalities. To delineate the role of the Cldn cytoplasmic tail domain in epidermal differentiation, we engineered transgenic mice targeting the overexpression of a Cldn6 cytoplasmic tail-truncation mutant in the epidermis. Transgenic mice were characterized by a lethal barrier dysfunction in addition to the existence of hyperproliferative squamous invaginations/cysts replacing hair follicles. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed an epidermal cytoplasmic accumulation of Cldn6, Cldn11, Cldn12, and Cldn18, downregulation of Cldn1 and aberrant expression of various classical markers of epidermal differentiation; namely the basal keratins as well as K1, involucrin, loricrin, and filaggrin. Collectively these studies suggest an important role for Cldns in epidermal/hair follicle differentiation programs likely involving cross talk to signaling pathways (e.g., Notch) directing cell fate selection and differentiation.

  15. Topical formulations containing finasteride. Part II: determination of finasteride penetration into hair follicles using the differential stripping technique.

    PubMed

    Tampucci, Silvia; Burgalassi, Susi; Chetoni, Patrizia; Lenzi, Carla; Pirone, Andrea; Mailland, Federico; Caserini, Maurizio; Monti, Daniela

    2014-08-01

    The differential stripping technique consists of a tape-stripping phase followed by a cyanoacrylate biopsy. This technique not only allows the quantification of drug retained in the stratum corneum (SC) and in the hair follicles but also differentiates transepidermal from transfollicular penetration. Our study aimed at both validating the differential stripping procedure on hairless rat skin and assessing the role of the hair follicle in the cutaneous penetration of finasteride (FNS) after application of two experimental formulations for 6 or 24 h: P-08-016, a hydroxypropyl chitosan (HPCH)-based formulation and P-10-008, an anhydrous formulation devoid of HPCH. Microscopic and histological evaluation showed that after 15 tape strips both the SC and the viable epidermis were completely removed. A subsequent cyanoacrylate skin surface biopsy led to the removal of the infundibula content. The largest amounts of FNS were found in the epidermis and in the appendages after application of P-08-016, regardless of the time from application. In contrast, smaller and statistically significant amounts of FNS were recovered with P-10-008 6 h after application, compared with that at 24 h. In conclusion, the differential stripping technique allowed determination of the amount of FNS localized in different skin districts, focusing particularly on the follicular contribution.

  16. Stable transfection and identification of a hair follicle-specific expression vector of IGFBP-5 in goat fetal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Wang, X J; Su, H M; Liang, Y; Wang, Y F; Guo, X D; Wang, Z G; Liu, D J

    2014-03-17

    The insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-5 (IGFBP-5) is one of the 6 members of the IGFBP family and is involved in the regulation of cell growth, apoptosis, and other IGF-stimulated signaling pathways. To determine the significance of IGFBP-5 in the Inner Mongolia Cashmere goat (Capra hircus), a hair follicle-specific expression vector of IGFBP-5, pCDsRed2-K-IGFBP5 (6.7 kb), was constructed by cloning IGFBP-5 downstream of the keratin-association protein (KAP)6-1 promoter and inserting this fragment into pCDsRed2, which contains a red fluorescent protein (DsRed) expression unit. Inner Mongolia Cashmere goat fetal fibroblast (GFb) cells were transfected with the expression vector by using Lipofectamine(TM) 2000. Cell clones that stably expressed red fluorescence were obtained after selection with Geneticin (G418). The transgene in the cell clones was examined by polymerase chain reaction to verify that exogenous DNA (pKAP6-1 and IGFBP-5) had integrated stably into GFb cells. These data suggest that this method can be used for the construction of a hair follicle-specific expression vector for functional genetic analyses and for obtaining stable transfection donor cells for nuclear transfer.

  17. PDGF signalling in the dermis and in dermal condensates is dispensable for hair follicle induction and formation.

    PubMed

    Rezza, Amélie; Sennett, Rachel; Tanguy, Manon; Clavel, Carlos; Rendl, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Embryonic hair follicle (HF) induction and formation is dependent on signalling crosstalk between the dermis and specialized dermal condensates on the mesenchymal side and epidermal cells and incipient placodes on the epithelial side, but the precise nature and succession of signals remain unclear. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) signalling is involved in the development of several organs and the maintenance of adult tissues, including HF regeneration in the hair cycle. As both PDGF receptors, PDGFRα and PDGFRβ, are expressed in embryonic dermis and dermal condensates, we explored in this study the role of PDGF signalling in HF induction and formation in the developing skin mesenchyme. We conditionally ablated both PDGF receptors with Tbx18(Cre) in early dermal condensates before follicle formation, and with Prx1-Cre broadly in the ventral dermis prior to HF induction. In both PDGFR double mutants, HF induction and formation ensued normally, and the pattern of HF formation and HF numbers were unaffected. These data demonstrate that mesenchymal PDGF signalling, either in the specialized niche or broadly in the dermis, is dispensable for HF induction and formation.

  18. Malignant hair follicle tumors of the periorbital region: A review of literature and suggestion of a management guideline.

    PubMed

    Sia, Paul Ikgan; Figueira, Edwin; Allende, Alexandra; Selva, Dinesh

    2016-06-01

    Malignant hair follicle tumors are rare skin adnexal malignancies that have a predilection for the head and neck region. They can be categorized into a number of different subtypes. Histologically, they are distinct from their benign counterpart. To the best of our knowledge, there is no extensive review of these malignancies, especially in the periorbital region. We aim to provide a literature review and a guideline for management of these malignant tumors in the periorbital region. Database from Medline, PubMed, Embase, and Google Scholar were consulted. A total of 16 cases from the literature on hair follicle malignancies in the periorbital region were included in this review. The clinical presentations, diagnostic patterns, investigations used, and best management approach of these tumors are discussed. The American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) 7(th) edition carcinoma of the eyelid staging system was used to describe their behaviors. We recommend wide excision surgery and a close follow-up for these tumors. Tumors presenting with a late stage require work-up for distant metastasis and consideration for exenteration procedures. The role of radiotherapy and chemotherapy in this context is still uncertain.

  19. The Effect of 0.02% Mitomycin C Injection into the Hair Follicle with Radiofrequency Ablation in Trichiasis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gyu-Nam; Yoo, Woong-Sun; Kim, Seong-Jae; Han, Yong-Seop; Chung, In-Young; Park, Jong-Moon; Yoo, Ji-Myong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the inhibitory effect of 0.02% mitomycin C on eyelash regrowth when injected to the eyelash hair follicle immediately after radiofrequency ablation. Methods We prospectively included 21 trichiasis patients from June 2011 to October 2012. Twenty eyes of 14 patients were treated with 0.02% mitomycin C to the hair follicle immediately after radiofrequency ablation in group 1, while radiofrequency ablation only was conducted in ten eyes of seven patients in group 2. Recurrences and complications were evaluated until six months after treatment. Results One hundred sixteen eyelashes of 20 eyes in group 1 underwent treatment, and 19 (16.4%) eyelashes recurred. Eighty-four eyelashes of ten eyes in group 2 underwent treatment, and 51 (60.7%) eyelashes recurred. No patients developed any complications related to mitomycin C. Conclusions Application of 0.02% mitomycin C in conjunction with radiofrequency ablation may help to improve the success rate of radiofrequency ablation treatment in trichiasis patients. PMID:24505196

  20. CD133 expression correlates with membrane beta-catenin and E-cadherin loss from human hair follicle placodes during morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gay, Denise L; Yang, Chao-Chun; Plikus, Maksim V; Ito, Mayumi; Rivera, Charlotte; Treffeisen, Elsa; Doherty, Laura; Spata, Michelle; Millar, Sarah E; Cotsarelis, George

    2015-01-01

    Genetic studies suggest that the major events of human hair follicle development are similar to those in mice, but detailed analyses of this process are lacking. In mice, hair follicle placode "budding" is initiated by invagination of Wnt-induced epithelium into the underlying mesenchyme. Modification of adherens junctions (AJs) is clearly required for budding. Snail-mediated downregulation of AJ component E-cadherin is important for placode budding in mice. Beta-catenin, another AJ component, has been more difficult to study owing to its essential functions in Wnt signaling, a prerequisite for hair follicle placode induction. Here, we show that a subset of human invaginating hair placode cells expresses the stem cell marker CD133 during early morphogenesis. CD133 associates with membrane beta-catenin in early placodes, and its continued expression correlates with loss of beta-catenin and E-cadherin from the cell membrane at a time when E-cadherin transcriptional repressors Snail and Slug are not implicated. Stabilization of CD133 via anti-CD133 antibody treatment of human fetal scalp explants depresses beta-catenin and E-cadherin membrane localization. We discuss this unique correlation and suggest a hypothetical model whereby CD133 promotes morphogenesis in early hair follicle placodes through the localized removal of membrane beta-catenin proteins and subsequent AJ dissolution.

  1. Autosomal Recessive Hypotrichosis with Woolly Hair Caused by a Mutation in the Keratin 25 Gene Expressed in Hair Follicles.

    PubMed

    Zernov, Nikolay V; Skoblov, Mikhail Y; Marakhonov, Andrey V; Shimomura, Yutaka; Vasilyeva, Tatyana A; Konovalov, Fedor A; Abrukova, Anna V; Zinchenko, Rena A

    2016-06-01

    Hypotrichosis is an abnormal condition characterized by decreased hair density and various defects in hair structure and growth patterns. In particular, in woolly hair, hypotrichosis is characterized by a tightly curled structure and abnormal growth. In this study, we present a detailed comparative examination of individuals affected by autosomal-recessive hypotrichosis (ARH), which distinguishes two types of ARH. Earlier, we demonstrated that exon 4 deletion in the lipase H gene caused an ARH (hypotrichosis 7; MIM: 604379) in populations of the Volga-Ural region of Russia. Screening for this mutation in all affected individuals revealed its presence only in the group with the hypotrichosis 7 phenotype. Other patients formed a separate group of woolly hair-associated ARH, with a homozygous missense mutation c.712G>T (p.Val238Leu) in a highly conserved position of type I keratin KRT25 (K25). Haplotype analysis indicated a founder effect. An expression study in the HaCaT cell line demonstrated a deleterious effect of the p.Val238Leu mutation on the formation of keratin intermediate filaments. Hence, we have identified a previously unreported missense mutation in the KRT25 gene causing ARH with woolly hair. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis of Fetal Skin Reveals Key Genes Related to Hair Follicle Morphogenesis in Cashmere Goats

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Hailong; Zeng, Jie; Ma, Sen; Niu, Yiyuan; Zhou, Guangxian; Jiang, Yu; Chen, Yulin

    2016-01-01

    Cashmere goat skin contains two types of hair follicles (HF): primary hair follicles (PHF) and secondary hair follicles (SHF). Although multiple genetic determinants associated with HF formation have been identified, the molecules that determine the independent morphogenesis of HF in cashmere goats remain elusive. The growth and development of SHF directly influence the quantity and quality of cashmere production. Here, we report the transcriptome profiling analysis of nine skin samples from cashmere goats using 60- and 120-day-old embryos (E60 and E120, respectively), as well as newborns (NB), through RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq). HF morphological changes indicated that PHF were initiated at E60, with maturation from E120, while differentiation of SHF was identified at E120 until formation of cashmere occurred after birth (NB). The RNA-sequencing analysis generated over 20.6 million clean reads from each mRNA library. The number of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in E60 vs. E120, E120 vs. NB, and E60 vs. NB were 1,024, 0 and 1,801, respectively, indicating that no significant differences were found at transcriptomic levels between E120 and NB. Key genes including B4GALT4, TNC, a-integrin, and FGFR1, were up-regulated and expressed in HF initiation from E60 to E120, while regulatory genes such as GPRC5D, PAD3, HOXC13, PRR9, VSIG8, LRRC15, LHX2, MSX-2, and FOXN1 were up-regulated and expressed in HF keratinisation and hair shaft differentiation from E120 and NB to E60. Several genes belonging to the KRT and KRTAP gene families were detected throughout the three HF developmental stages. The transcriptional trajectory analyses of all DEGs indicated that immune privilege, glycosaminoglycan biosynthesis, extracellular matrix receptor interaction, and growth factor receptors all played dominant roles in the epithelial-mesenchymal interface and HF formation. We found that the Wnt, transforming growth factor-beta/bone morphogenetic protein, and Notch family members

  3. Expression of Kruppel-Like Factor KLF4 in Mouse Hair Follicle Stem Cells Contributes to Cutaneous Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junfeng; Yu, Fang; Morris, Rebecca J.; Wang, Timothy C.; Huang, Shiang; Ai, Walden

    2012-01-01

    Background Kruppel-like factor KLF4 is a transcription factor critical for the establishment of the barrier function of the skin. Its function in stem cell biology has been recently recognized. Previous studies have revealed that hair follicle stem cells contribute to cutaneous wound healing. However, expression of KLF4 in hair follicle stem cells and the importance of such expression in cutaneous wound healing have not been investigated. Methodology/Principal Findings Quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis showed higher KLF4 expression in hair follicle stem cell-enriched mouse skin keratinocytes than that in control keratinocytes. We generated KLF4 promoter-driven enhanced green fluorescence protein (KLF4/EGFP) transgenic mice and tamoxifen-inducible KLF4 knockout mice by crossing KLF4 promoter-driven Cre recombinase fused with tamoxifen-inducible estrogen receptor (KLF4/CreER™) transgenic mice with KLF4(flox) mice. KLF4/EGFP cells purified from dorsal skin keratinocytes of KLF4/EGFP transgenic mice were co-localized with 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU)-label retaining cells by flow cytometric analysis and immunohistochemistry. Lineage tracing was performed in the context of cutaneous wound healing, using KLF4/CreER™ and Rosa26RLacZ double transgenic mice, to examine the involvement of KLF4 in wound healing. We found that KLF4 expressing cells were likely derived from bulge stem cells. In addition, KLF4 expressing multipotent cells migrated to the wound and contributed to the wound healing. After knocking out KLF4 by tamoxifen induction of KLF4/CreER™ and KLF4(flox) double transgenic mice, we found that the population of bulge stem cell-enriched population was decreased, which was accompanied by significantly delayed cutaneous wound healing. Consistently, KLF4 knockdown by KLF4-specific small hairpin RNA in human A431 epidermoid carcinoma cells decreased the stem cell population and was accompanied by compromised cell migration

  4. Hypoxia Enhances Differentiation of Hair Follicle-Associated-Pluripotent (HAP) Stem Cells to Cardiac-Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Kyoumi; Hamada, Yuko; Arakawa, Nobuko; Yamazaki, Aiko; Tohgi, Natsuko; Aki, Ryoichi; Mii, Sumiyuki; Hoffman, Robert M; Amoh, Yasuyuki

    2017-03-01

    We have previously demonstrated that the neural stem-cell marker nestin is expressed in hair-follicle stem cells located in the bulge area which are termed hair-follicle-associated pluripotent (HAP) stem cells. HAP stem cells from mouse and human could form spheres in culture, termed hair spheres, which are keratin 15-negative and nestin-positive and could differentiate to neurons, glia, keratinocytes, smooth muscle cells, and melanocytes in vitro. Subsequently, we demonstrated that nestin-expressing stem cells could effect nerve and spinal cord regeneration in mouse models. Recently, we demonstrated that HAP stem cells differentiated to beating cardiac muscle cells. We recently observed that isoproterenol directs HAP stem cells to differentiate to cardiac-muscle cells in large numbers in culture compared to HAP stem cells not supplemented with isoproterenol. The addition of activin A, bone morphogenetic protein 4, and basic fibroblast growth factor, along with isoproternal, induced the cardiac muscle cells to form tissue sheets of beating heart muscle cells. In the present study, we report that, under hypoxic conditions, HAP stem cells differentiated to troponin-positive cardiac-muscle cells at a higher rate that under normoxic conditions. Hypoxia did not influence the differentiation to other cell types. For future use of HAP stem cells for cardiac muscle regeneration, hypoxia should enhance the rate of differentiation thereby providing patients more opportunities to use their own HAP stem cells which are easily accessible, for this purpose. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 554-558, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Protective effect of Korean Red Ginseng against chemotherapeutic drug-induced premature catagen development assessed with human hair follicle organ culture model

    PubMed Central

    Keum, Dong In; Pi, Long-Quan; Hwang, Sungjoo Tommy; Lee, Won-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Background Chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA) is one of the most distressing side effects for patients undergoing chemotherapy. This study evaluated the protective effect of Korean Red Ginseng (KRG) on CIA in a well-established in vitro human hair follicle organ culture model as it occurs in vivo. Methods We examined whether KRG can prevent premature hair follicle dystrophy in a human hair follicle organ culture model during treatment with a key cyclophosphamide metabolite, 4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide (4-HC). Results 4-HC inhibited human hair growth, induced premature catagen development, and inhibited proliferation and stimulated apoptosis of hair matrix keratinocytes. In addition, 4-HC increased p53 and Bax protein expression and decreased Bcl2 protein expression. Pretreatment with KRG protected against 4-HC-induced hair growth inhibition and premature catagen development. KRG also suppressed 4-HC-induced inhibition of matrix keratinocyte proliferation and stimulation of matrix keratinocyte apoptosis. Moreover, KRG restored 4-HC-induced p53 and Bax/Bcl2 expression. Conclusion Overall, our results indicate that KRG may protect against 4-HC-induced premature catagen development through modulation of p53 and Bax/Bcl2 expression. PMID:27158238

  6. Discovery of cashmere goat (Capra hircus) microRNAs in skin and hair follicles by Solexa sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a large family of endogenous, non-coding RNAs, about 22 nucleotides long, which regulate gene expression through sequence-specific base pairing with target mRNAs. Extensive studies have shown that miRNA expression in the skin changes remarkably during distinct stages of the hair cycle in humans, mice, goats and sheep. Results In this study, the skin tissues were harvested from the three stages of hair follicle cycling (anagen, catagen and telogen) in a fibre-producing goat breed. In total, 63,109,004 raw reads were obtained by Solexa sequencing and 61,125,752 clean reads remained for the small RNA digitalisation analysis. This resulted in the identification of 399 conserved miRNAs; among these, 326 miRNAs were expressed in all three follicular cycling stages, whereas 3, 12 and 11 miRNAs were specifically expressed in anagen, catagen, and telogen, respectively. We also identified 172 potential novel miRNAs by Mireap, 36 miRNAs were expressed in all three cycling stages, whereas 23, 29 and 44 miRNAs were specifically expressed in anagen, catagen, and telogen, respectively. The expression level of five arbitrarily selected miRNAs was analyzed by quantitative PCR, and the results indicated that the expression patterns were consistent with the Solexa sequencing results. Gene Ontology and KEGG pathway analyses indicated that five major biological pathways (Metabolic pathways, Pathways in cancer, MAPK signalling pathway, Endocytosis and Focal adhesion) accounted for 23.08% of target genes among 278 biological functions, indicating that these pathways are likely to play significant roles during hair cycling. Conclusions During all hair cycle stages of cashmere goats, a large number of conserved and novel miRNAs were identified through a high-throughput sequencing approach. This study enriches the Capra hircus miRNA databases and provides a comprehensive miRNA transcriptome profile in the skin of goats during the hair follicle cycle. PMID

  7. Dermal Papilla Cells Improve the Wound Healing Process and Generate Hair Bud-Like Structures in Grafted Skin Substitutes Using Hair Follicle Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Leirós, Gustavo José; Kusinsky, Ana Gabriela; Drago, Hugo; Bossi, Silvia; Sturla, Flavio; Castellanos, María Lía; Stella, Inés Yolanda

    2014-01-01

    Tissue-engineered skin represents a useful strategy for the treatment of deep skin injuries and might contribute to the understanding of skin regeneration. The use of dermal papilla cells (DPCs) as a dermal component in a permanent composite skin with human hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) was evaluated by studying the tissue-engineered skin architecture, stem cell persistence, hair regeneration, and graft-take in nude mice. A porcine acellular dermal matrix was seeded with HFSCs alone and with HFSCs plus human DPCs or dermal fibroblasts (DFs). In vitro, the presence of DPCs induced a more regular and multilayered stratified epidermis with more basal p63-positive cells and invaginations. The DPC-containing constructs more accurately mimicked the skin architecture by properly stratifying the differentiating HFSCs and developing a well-ordered epithelia that contributed to more closely recapitulate an artificial human skin. This acellular dermal matrix previously repopulated in vitro with HFSCs and DFs or DPCs as the dermal component was grafted in nude mice. The presence of DPCs in the composite substitute not only favored early neovascularization, good assimilation and remodeling after grafting but also contributed to the neovascular network maturation, which might reduce the inflammation process, resulting in a better healing process, with less scarring and wound contraction. Interestingly, only DPC-containing constructs showed embryonic hair bud-like structures with cells of human origin, presence of precursor epithelial cells, and expression of a hair differentiation marker. Although preliminary, these findings have demonstrated the importance of the presence of DPCs for proper skin repair. PMID:25161315

  8. Dermal papilla cells improve the wound healing process and generate hair bud-like structures in grafted skin substitutes using hair follicle stem cells.

    PubMed

    Leirós, Gustavo José; Kusinsky, Ana Gabriela; Drago, Hugo; Bossi, Silvia; Sturla, Flavio; Castellanos, María Lía; Stella, Inés Yolanda; Balañá, María Eugenia

    2014-10-01

    Tissue-engineered skin represents a useful strategy for the treatment of deep skin injuries and might contribute to the understanding of skin regeneration. The use of dermal papilla cells (DPCs) as a dermal component in a permanent composite skin with human hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) was evaluated by studying the tissue-engineered skin architecture, stem cell persistence, hair regeneration, and graft-take in nude mice. A porcine acellular dermal matrix was seeded with HFSCs alone and with HFSCs plus human DPCs or dermal fibroblasts (DFs). In vitro, the presence of DPCs induced a more regular and multilayered stratified epidermis with more basal p63-positive cells and invaginations. The DPC-containing constructs more accurately mimicked the skin architecture by properly stratifying the differentiating HFSCs and developing a well-ordered epithelia that contributed to more closely recapitulate an artificial human skin. This acellular dermal matrix previously repopulated in vitro with HFSCs and DFs or DPCs as the dermal component was grafted in nude mice. The presence of DPCs in the composite substitute not only favored early neovascularization, good assimilation and remodeling after grafting but also contributed to the neovascular network maturation, which might reduce the inflammation process, resulting in a better healing process, with less scarring and wound contraction. Interestingly, only DPC-containing constructs showed embryonic hair bud-like structures with cells of human origin, presence of precursor epithelial cells, and expression of a hair differentiation marker. Although preliminary, these findings have demonstrated the importance of the presence of DPCs for proper skin repair. ©AlphaMed Press.

  9. MicroRNA-214 controls skin and hair follicle development by modulating the activity of the Wnt pathway.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mohammed I; Alam, Majid; Emelianov, Vladimir U; Poterlowicz, Krzysztof; Patel, Ankit; Sharov, Andrey A; Mardaryev, Andrei N; Botchkareva, Natalia V

    2014-11-24

    Skin development is governed by complex programs of gene activation and silencing, including microRNA-dependent modulation of gene expression. Here, we show that miR-214 regulates skin morphogenesis and hair follicle (HF) cycling by targeting β-catenin, a key component of the Wnt signaling pathway. miR-214 exhibits differential expression patterns in the skin epithelium, and its inducible overexpression in keratinocytes inhibited proliferation, which resulted in formation of fewer HFs with decreased hair bulb size and thinner hair production. The inhibitory effects of miR-214 on HF development and cycling were associated with altered activities of multiple signaling pathways, including decreased expression of key Wnt signaling mediators β-catenin and Lef-1, and were rescued by treatment with pharmacological Wnt activators. Finally, we identify β-catenin as one of the conserved miR-214 targets in keratinocytes. These data provide an important foundation for further analyses of miR-214 as a key regulator of Wnt pathway activity and stem cell functions during normal tissue homeostasis, regeneration, and aging.

  10. BMP Signaling and Its pSMAD1/5 Target Genes Differentially Regulate Hair Follicle Stem Cell Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Genander, Maria; Cook, Peter J.; Ramsköld, Daniel; Keyes, Brice E.; Mertz, Aaron F.; Sandberg, Rickard; Fuchs, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    Hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) and their transit amplifying cell (TAC) progeny sense BMPs at defined stages of the hair cycle to control their proliferation and differentiation. Here, we exploit the distinct spatial and temporal localizations of these cells to selectively ablate BMP signaling in each compartment and examine its functional role. We find that BMP signaling is required for HFSC quiescence and to promote TAC differentiation along different lineages as the hair cycle progresses. We also combine in vivo genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation and deep-sequencing, transcriptional profiling, and loss-of-function genetics to define BMP-regulated genes. We show that some pSMAD1/5 targets, like Gata3, function specifically in TAC lineage-progression. Others, like Id1 and Id3, function in both HFSCs and TACs, but in distinct ways. Our study therefore illustrates the complex differential roles that a key signaling pathway can play in regulation of closely-related stem/progenitor cells within the context of their overall niche. PMID:25312496

  11. MicroRNA-214 controls skin and hair follicle development by modulating the activity of the Wnt pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Mohammed I.; Alam, Majid; Emelianov, Vladimir U.; Poterlowicz, Krzysztof; Patel, Ankit; Sharov, Andrey A.; Mardaryev, Andrei N.

    2014-01-01

    Skin development is governed by complex programs of gene activation and silencing, including microRNA-dependent modulation of gene expression. Here, we show that miR-214 regulates skin morphogenesis and hair follicle (HF) cycling by targeting β-catenin, a key component of the Wnt signaling pathway. miR-214 exhibits differential expression patterns in the skin epithelium, and its inducible overexpression in keratinocytes inhibited proliferation, which resulted in formation of fewer HFs with decreased hair bulb size and thinner hair production. The inhibitory effects of miR-214 on HF development and cycling were associated with altered activities of multiple signaling pathways, including decreased expression of key Wnt signaling mediators β-catenin and Lef-1, and were rescued by treatment with pharmacological Wnt activators. Finally, we identify β-catenin as one of the conserved miR-214 targets in keratinocytes. These data provide an important foundation for further analyses of miR-214 as a key regulator of Wnt pathway activity and stem cell functions during normal tissue homeostasis, regeneration, and aging. PMID:25422376

  12. Properties of different functional types of neurones in the cat's rostral trigeminal nuclei responding to sinus hair stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Gottschaldt, K.-M.; Young, D. W.

    1977-01-01

    1. Properties of neurones in the trigeminal nuclei principalis and oralis responding to movements of facial sinus hairs were studied in cats anaesthetized by I. V. infusion of pentobarbitone. 2. Using electrophysiological methods trigeminal neurones were classified into primary afferent fibres, trigeminothalamic relay neurones, interneurones and other unspecified higher order neurones. 3. When receptive fields of synaptically activated neurones were compared with those of primary afferent fibres, an often extensive convergence from first order on to higher order neurones was established. Out of 119 relay neurones six received input from one sinus hair only. Spontaneous activity was encountered about twice as often in synaptically activated neurones than in primary afferent fibres. 4. The responsiveness of single neurones was unstable over time in about one fifth of the population and then the total number of impulses discharged in successive responses could vary by as much as 500%. Unstable responsiveness occurred sometimes alone but was often accompanied by marked changes in the size or the configuration of the receptive field. Such instabilities were observed in all kinds of synaptically activated neurones but not in primary afferent fibres. 5. Afferent inhibition in relay neurones could be elicited from within the excitatory receptive field and appeared to be related to the activation of distinct receptor populations responding to specific stimulus parameters. Inhibition was also seen in interneurones following both mechanical stimulation of the skin and electrical stimulation of lemniscal fibre terminals in the contralateral ventromedial thalamus. 6. The results are discussed and compared with previous findings about sinus hair representation in the trigeminal nucleus and the ascending lemniscal projection. The findings indicate that the concept of the `static properties' of relay neurones is not adequate for all trigeminothalamic relay neurones and may require

  13. Keratin-6 driven ODC expression to hair follicle keratinocytes enhances stemness and tumorigenesis by negatively regulating Notch

    SciTech Connect

    Arumugam, Aadithya; Weng, Zhiping; Chaudhary, Sandeep C.; Afaq, Farrukh; Elmets, Craig A.; Athar, Mohammad

    2014-08-29

    Highlights: • Targeting ODC to hair follicle augments skin carcinogenesis and invasive SCCs. • Hair follicle ODC expands stem cell compartment carrying CD34{sup +}/K15{sup +}/p63{sup +} keratinocytes. • Negatively regulated Notch1 is associated with expansion of stem cell compartment. - Abstract: Over-expression of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) is known to be involved in the epidermal carcinogenesis. However, the mechanism by which it enhances skin carcinogenesis remains undefined. Recently, role of stem cells localized in various epidermal compartments has been shown in the pathogenesis of skin cancer. To direct ODC expression in distinct epidermal compartments, we have developed keratin 6 (K6)-ODC/SKH-1 and keratin 14 (K14)-ODC/SKH-1 mice and employed them to investigate the role of ODC directed to these epidermal compartments on UVB-induced carcinogenesis. K6-driven ODC over-expression directed to outer root sheath (ORS) of hair follicle was more effective in augmenting tumorigenesis as compared to mice where K14-driven ODC expression was directed to inter-follicular epidermal keratinocytes. Chronically UVB-irradiated K6-ODC/SKH-1 developed 15 ± 2.5 tumors/mouse whereas K14-ODC/SKH-1 developed only 6.8 ± 1.5 tumors/mouse. K6-ODC/SKH-1 showed augmented UVB-induced proliferation and much higher pro-inflammatory responses than K14-ODC/SKH-1 mice. Tumors induced in K6-ODC/SKH-1 were rapidly growing, invasive and ulcerative squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) showing decreased expression of epidermal polarity marker E-cadherin and enhanced mesenchymal marker, fibronectin. Interestingly, the number of CD34/CK15/p63 positive stem-like cells was significantly higher in chronically UVB-irradiated K6-ODC/SKH-1 as compared to K14-ODC/SKH-1 mice. Reduced Notch1 expression was correlated with the expansion of stem cell compartment in these animals. However, other signaling pathways such as DNA damage response or mTOR signaling pathways were not significantly different in

  14. Expression of hair follicle stem cells detected by cytokeratin 15 stain: implications for pathogenesis of the scarring process in cutaneous lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Al-Refu, K; Edward, S; Ingham, E; Goodfield, M

    2009-06-01

    Discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE) is a scarring disease. Although the scarring and deformity may affect any part of the body, such changes have been reported to be most obvious on the face and scalp. The pathogenesis behind this scarring process is not well understood. Once lesions have scarred, recurrent disease tends to occur at the edge of the scarred lesions but not within them. The fact that inflammation in DLE generally involves the bulge area of the follicles raises the possibility that damage to the stem cells of the bulge region may be one process leading to the permanent loss of follicles. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of the hair follicle stem cells which reside in the bulge region in the scarring process in cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE). We studied the reactivity of an antibody to the CD8 antigen (C8/144B), which recognizes cytokeratin (CK) 15 and preferentially immunostains hair follicle stem cells without staining the remaining hair follicle, on skin biopsies (scalp and body lesions) from patients with CLE (36 with discoid lesions and 10 with subacute lesions). Normal scalp and body biopsy specimens served as controls. The correlation between the extent of the cytotoxic inflammatory cell infiltrate (CD8+) and the presence of stem cells was investigated. Results were analysed semiquantitatively. The expression of CK15 in hair follicle stem cells was variable in the DLE lesions; there was normal to moderate CK15 expression at the bulge region of hair follicles when surrounded by mild or moderate inflammatory infiltrate (CD8+), but in cases of severe inflammation, CK15 expression was weak or absent. The bulge region appears to be involved in this disease as part of a broader involvement of the hair follicles; it is secondarily affected by the surrounding inflammatory cell infiltrate. Expression of C8/144B diminished and was then absent, indicating either damage to stem cells or differentiation to help in the repair process

  15. Hair follicle morphogenesis and epidermal homeostasis in we/we wal/wal mice with postnatal alopecia.

    PubMed

    Rippa, Alexandra; Terskikh, Vasily; Nesterova, Anastasia; Vasiliev, Andrey; Vorotelyak, Ekaterina

    2015-05-01

    Mice with skin and hair follicle (HF) defects are common models of human skin disorders. A mutant strain with the we/we wal/wal genotype develops alopecia. We found the hair shaft structure in the pelage of mutant mice to have significant defects. Although these mice lose their hair at 21 days, a label-retaining cell population persists in HFs until at least day 54. Depilation-induced anagen was accomplished in we/we wal/wal mutants but the resulting hair shafts were short and extremely deformed. Serious abnormalities in epidermis stratification and HF morphogenesis exist in we/we wal/wal homozygous E18.5 embryos. There were significantly fewer HF primordia in this mutant compared with wild type. We discovered specific structures, identified as invalid placodes, positive for ectodysplasin A1 receptor, nuclear β-catenin, and LEF1, which failed to invaginate, produced a double basal-like layer of epidermal cells, and lacked cylindrical keratinocytes. Specification of dermal papillae (DP) was impaired, and the papillary dermis expressed alkaline phosphatase and LEF1. We also detected DP-like groups of intensively stained cells in the absence of visible signs of folliculogenesis in the epidermis. We showed differentiation disturbances in the mutant embryonic E18.5 epidermis and HFs: The cornified layer was absent, the width of the spinous layer was reduced, and HFs lacked LEF1-positive precortex cells. In this study, we used a very interesting and useful mouse model of alopecia. The presence of symptoms of skin disorders in we/we wal/wal murine embryos correlates with the postnatal skin phenotype. This correlation may help to evaluate reasons of alopecia.

  16. On-line diffusion profile of a lipophilic model dye in different depths of a hair follicle in human scalp skin.

    PubMed

    Grams, Ylva Y; Whitehead, Lynne; Lamers, Gerda; Sturmann, Nico; Bouwstra, Joke A

    2005-10-01

    In skin and hair research, drug targeting to the hair follicle is of great interest in the treatment of skin diseases. The aim of this study is to visualize on-line the diffusion processes of a model fluorophore into the hair follicle at different depths using fresh human scalp skin and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Up to a depth of 500 microm in the skin, a fast increase of fluorescence is observed in the gap followed by accumulation of the dye in the hair cuticle. Penetration was also observed via the stratum corneum and the epidermis. Little label reached depths greater than 2000 microm. Fat cells accumulated the label fastest, followed by the cuticular area and the outer root sheath of the hair follicle. Sweat glands revealed very low staining, whereas the bulb at a depth of 4000 microm was visualized only by autofluorescence. From this study, we conclude that on-line visualization is a promising technique to access diffusion processes in deep skin layers even on a cellular level. Furthermore, we conclude that the gap and the cuticle play an important role in the initial diffusion period with the label in the cuticle originating from the gap.

  17. Optical Monitoring of Living Nerve Terminal Labeling in Hair Follicle Lanceolate Endings of the Ex Vivo Mouse Ear Skin.

    PubMed

    Bewick, Guy S; Banks, Robert W

    2016-04-05

    A novel dissection and recording technique is described for optical monitoring staining and de-staining of lanceolate terminals surrounding hair follicles in the skin of the mouse pinna. The preparation is simple and relatively fast, reliably yielding extensive regions of multiple labeled units of living nerve terminals to study uptake and release of styryl pyridinium dyes extensively used in studies of vesicle recycling. Subdividing the preparations before labeling allows test vs. control comparisons in the same ear from a single individual. Helpful tips are given for improving the quality of the preparation, the labeling and the imaging parameters. This new system is suitable for assaying pharmacologically and mechanically-induced uptake and release of these vital dyes in lanceolate terminals in both wild-type and genetically modified animals. Examples of modulatory influences on labeling intensity are given.

  18. Optical Monitoring of Living Nerve Terminal Labeling in Hair Follicle Lanceolate Endings of the Ex Vivo Mouse Ear Skin

    PubMed Central

    Bewick, Guy S.; Banks, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    A novel dissection and recording technique is described for optical monitoring staining and de-staining of lanceolate terminals surrounding hair follicles in the skin of the mouse pinna. The preparation is simple and relatively fast, reliably yielding extensive regions of multiple labeled units of living nerve terminals to study uptake and release of styryl pyridinium dyes extensively used in studies of vesicle recycling. Subdividing the preparations before labeling allows test vs. control comparisons in the same ear from a single individual. Helpful tips are given for improving the quality of the preparation, the labeling and the imaging parameters. This new system is suitable for assaying pharmacologically and mechanically-induced uptake and release of these vital dyes in lanceolate terminals in both wild-type and genetically modified animals. Examples of modulatory influences on labeling intensity are given. PMID:27077818

  19. Feasibility of human hair follicle-derived mesenchymal stem cells/CultiSpher(®)-G constructs in regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Li, Pengdong; Liu, Feilin; Wu, Chunling; Jiang, Wenyue; Zhao, Guifang; Liu, Li; Bai, Tingting; Wang, Li; Jiang, Yixu; Guo, Lili; Qi, Xiaojuan; Kou, Junna; Fan, Ruirui; Hao, Deshun; Lan, Shaowei; Li, Yulin; Liu, Jin Yu

    2015-10-01

    The use of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) in cell therapies has increased the demand for strategies that allow efficient cell scale-up. Preliminary data on the three-dimensional (3D) spinner culture describing the potential use of microcarriers for hMSCs culture scale-up have been reported. We exploited a rich source of autologous stem cells (human hair follicle) and demonstrated the robust in vitro long-term expansion of human hair follicle-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hHF-MSCs) by using CultiSpher(®)-G microcarriers. We analyzed the feasibility of 3D culture by using hHF-MSCs/CultiSpher(®)-G microcarrier constructs for its potential applicability in regenerative medicine by comparatively analyzing the performance of hHF-MSCs adhered to the CultiSpher(®)-G microspheres in 3D spinner culture and those grown on the gelatin-coated plastic dishes (2D culture), using various assays. We showed that the hHF-MSCs seeded at various densities quickly adhered to and proliferated well on the microspheres, thus generating at least hundreds of millions of hHF-MSCs on 1 g of CultiSpher(®)-G within 12 days. This resulted in a cumulative cell expansion of greater than 26-fold. Notably, the maximum and average proliferation rates in 3D culture were significantly greater than that of the 2D culture. However, the hHF-MSCs from both the cultures retained surface marker and nestin expression, proliferation capacity and differentiation potentials toward adipocytes, osteoblasts and smooth muscle cells and showed no significant differences as evidenced by Edu incorporation, cell cycle, colony formation, apoptosis, biochemical quantification and qPCR assays.

  20. In vivo formation steps of the hard alpha-keratin intermediate filament along a hair follicle: evidence for structural polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Rafik, Mériem Er; Briki, Fatma; Burghammer, Manfred; Doucet, Jean

    2006-04-01

    Several aspects of the intermediate filaments' molecular architecture remain mysterious despite decades of study. The growth process and the final architecture may depend on the physical, chemical, and biochemical environment. Aiming at clarifying this issue, we have revisited the structure of the human hair follicle by means of X-ray microdiffraction. We conclude that the histology-based growth zones along the follicle are correlated to the fine architecture of the filaments deduced from X-ray microdiffraction. Our analysis reveals the existence of two major polymorph intermediate filament architectures. Just above the bulb, the filaments are characterized by a diameter of 100 Angstroms and a low-density core. The following zone upwards is characterized by the lateral aggregation of the filaments into a compact network of filaments, by a contraction of their diameter (to 75 Angstroms) and by the setting up of a long-range longitudinal ordering. In the upper zone, the small structural change associated with the tissue hardening likely concerns the terminal domains. The architecture of the intermediate filament in the upper zones could be specific to hard alpha-keratin whilst the other architecture found in the lower zone could be representative for intermediate filaments in a different environment.

  1. Squarticles as a lipid nanocarrier for delivering diphencyprone and minoxidil to hair follicles and human dermal papilla cells.

    PubMed

    Aljuffali, Ibrahim A; Sung, Calvin T; Shen, Feng-Ming; Huang, Chi-Ting; Fang, Jia-You

    2014-01-01

    Delivery of diphencyprone (DPCP) and minoxidil to hair follicles and related cells is important in the treatment of alopecia. Here we report the development of "squarticles," nanoparticles formed from sebum-derived lipids such as squalene and fatty esters, for use in achieving targeted drug delivery to the follicles. Two different nanosystems, nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) and nanoemulsions (NE), were prepared. The physicochemical properties of squarticles, including size, zeta potential, drug encapsulation efficiency, and drug release, were examined. Squarticles were compared to a free control solution with respect to skin absorption, follicular accumulation, and dermal papilla cell targeting. The particle size of the NLC type was 177 nm; that of the NE type was 194 nm. Approximately 80% of DPCP and 60% of minoxidil were entrapped into squarticles. An improved drug deposition in the skin was observed in the in vitro absorption test. Compared to the free control, the squarticles reduced minoxidil penetration through the skin. This may indicate a minimized absorption into systemic circulation. Follicular uptake by squarticles was 2- and 7-fold higher for DPCP and minoxidil respectively compared to the free control. Fluorescence and confocal images of the skin confirmed a great accumulation of squarticles in the follicles and the deeper skin strata. Vascular endothelial growth factor expression in dermal papilla cells was significantly upregulated after the loading of minoxidil into the squarticles. In vitro papilla cell viability and in vivo skin irritancy tests in nude mice suggested a good tolerability of squarticles to skin. Squarticles provide a promising nanocarrier for topical delivery of DPCP and minoxidil.

  2. 15-deoxy prostaglandin J2, the nonenzymatic metabolite of prostaglandin D2, induces apoptosis in keratinocytes of human hair follicles: a possible explanation for prostaglandin D2-mediated inhibition of hair growth.

    PubMed

    Joo, Hyun Woo; Kang, Yoo Ri; Kwack, Mi Hee; Sung, Young Kwan

    2016-07-01

    Recent studies have shown that prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) and its nonenzymatic metabolite, 15-deoxy-Δ(12,14)-prostaglandin J2 (15-dPGJ2), inhibit in vitro growth of explanted human hair follicles and inhibit hair growth in mice through the GPR44 (DP2). However, the underlying mechanism is still unclear. In this study, we first investigated the expression of DP2 in human hair follicles and in cultured follicular cells. We found that DP2 is strongly expressed in the outer root sheath (ORS) cells and weakly expressed in the dermal papilla (DP) cells. We observed slight growth stimulation when ORS and DP cells were treated with PGD2. We also observed slight growth stimulation when DP and ORS cells were treated with low concentrations (0.5 and 1 μM) of 15-dPGJ2. However, 5 μM 15-dPGJ2 inhibited the viability and caused apoptosis of both cell types. Exposure of cultured human hair follicles to 15-dPGJ2 resulted in significant apoptosis in follicular keratinocytes. Altogether, our data provide an evidence that 15-dPGJ2 promotes apoptosis in follicular keratinocytes and provide rationale for developing remedies for the prevention and treatment of hair loss based on DP2 antagonism.

  3. Atypical Protein Kinase C Isoform, aPKCλ, Is Essential for Maintaining Hair Follicle Stem Cell Quiescence.

    PubMed

    Osada, Shin-Ichi; Minematsu, Naoko; Oda, Fumino; Akimoto, Kazunori; Kawana, Seiji; Ohno, Shigeo

    2015-11-01

    The atypical protein kinase C (aPKC)-partition-defective (PAR) complex regulates the formation of tight junctions and apico-basal epithelial polarity. To examine the role of this complex in the epidermis, we generated mutant mice harboring epidermal-specific deletion of aPKCλ (conditional knock-out (cKO)), a major component of the aPKC-PAR complex. The mutant mice exhibited abnormal hair follicle (HF) cycling, progressive losses of pelage hairs and vibrissae, and altered differentiation into the epidermis and sebaceous gland. We found that in the aPKCλ cKO mice HF stem cell (HFSC) quiescence was lost, as revealed by the decreased expression level of quiescence-inducing factors (Fgf18 and Bmp6) produced in Keratin 6-positive bulge stem cells. The loss of quiescence dysregulated the HFSC marker expression and led to the increase in Lrig1-positive cells, inducing hyperplasia of the interfollicular epidermis and sebaceous glands, and drove an increase in Lef1-positive matrix cells, causing a prolonged anagen-like phase. Persistent bulge stem cell activation led to a gradual depletion of CD34- and α6 integrin-positive HFSC reservoirs. These results suggest that aPKCλ regulates signaling pathways implicated in HFSC quiescence.

  4. Polycaprolactone fiber meshes provide a 3D environment suitable for cultivation and differentiation of melanocytes from the outer root sheath of hair follicle.

    PubMed

    Savkovic, Vuk; Flämig, Franziska; Schneider, Marie; Sülflow, Katharina; Loth, Tina; Lohrenz, Andrea; Hacker, Michael Christian; Schulz-Siegmund, Michaela; Simon, Jan-Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Melanocytes differentiated from the stem cells of human hair follicle outer root sheath (ORS) have the potential for developing non-invasive treatments for skin disorders out of a minimal sample: of hair root. With a robust procedure for melanocyte cultivation from the ORS of human hair follicle at hand, this study focused on the identification of a suitable biocompatible, biodegradable carrier as the next step toward their clinical implementation. Polycaprolactone (PCL) is a known biocompatible material used for a number of medical devices. In this study, we have populated electrospun PCL fiber meshes with normal human epidermal melanocytes (NHEM) as well as with hair-follicle-derived human melanocytes from the outer root sheath (HUMORS) and tested their functionality in vitro. PCL fiber meshes evidently provided a niche for melanocytes and supported their melanotic properties. The cells were tested for gene expression of PAX3, PMEL, TYR and MITF, as well as for proliferation, expression of melanocyte marker proteins tyrosinase and glycoprotein 100 (gp100), L-DOPA-tautomerase enzymatic activity and melanin content. Reduced mitochondrial activity and PAX-3 gene expression indicated that the three-dimensional PCL scaffold supported differentiation rather than proliferation of melanocytes. The monitored melanotic features of both the NHEM and HUMORS cultivated on PCL scaffolds significantly exceeded those of two-dimensional adherent cultures.

  5. Herbal Extracts Induce Dermal Papilla Cell Proliferation of Human Hair Follicles

    PubMed Central

    Rastegar, Hosein; Aghaei, Mahmoud; Barikbin, Behrooz; Ehsani, Amirohushang

    2015-01-01

    Background The number of people suffering from balding or hair thinning is increasing, despite the advances in various medical therapies. Therefore, it is highly important to develop new therapies to inhibit balding and increase hair proliferation. Objective We investigated the effects of herbal extracts commonly used for improving balding in traditional medicine to identify potential agents for hair proliferation. Methods The expression levels of 5α-reductase isoforms (type I and II) were analyzed using quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in the human follicular dermal papilla cells (DPCs). The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenylteterazolium bromide and bromodeoxyuridine tests were used to evaluate the cell proliferation effect of herbal extracts in DPCs. The expression levels of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), Akt, cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (Cdk4), B-cell lymphoma (Bcl-2) and Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) were measured using western blot analysis. Results The 5α-reductase isoform mRNAs and proteins were detected in the cultured DPCs, and the expression level of 5α-R2 in DPCs in the presence of the herbal extracts was gradually decreased. Herbal extracts were found to significantly increase the proliferation of human DPCs at concentrations ranging from 1.5% to 4.5%. These results show that the herbal extracts tested affected the protein expressions of ERK, Akt, cyclin D1, Cdk4, Bcl-2, and Bax in DPCs. Conclusion These results suggest that herbal extracts exert positive effects on hair proliferation via ERK, Akt, cyclin D1, and Cdk4 signaling in DPCs; they also suggest that herbal extracts could be a great alternative therapy for increasing hair proliferation. PMID:26719634

  6. Aging changes in hair and nails

    MedlinePlus

    ... of aging. Hair color is due to a pigment called melanin , which hair follicles produce. Follicles are ... slows. Hair strands become smaller and have less pigment. So the thick, coarse hair of a young ...

  7. Central anatomy of individual rapidly adapting low-threshold mechanoreceptors innervating the "hairy" skin of newborn mice: early maturation of hair follicle afferents.

    PubMed

    Woodbury, C J; Ritter, A M; Koerber, H R

    2001-07-30

    Adult skin sensory neurons exhibit characteristic projection patterns in the dorsal horn of the spinal gray matter that are tightly correlated with modality. However, little is known about how these patterns come about during the ontogeny of the distinct subclasses of skin sensory neurons. To this end, we have developed an intact ex vivo somatosensory system preparation in neonatal mice, allowing single, physiologically identified cutaneous afferents to be iontophoretically injected with Neurobiotin for subsequent histological analyses. The present report, centered on rapidly adapting mechanoreceptors, represents the first study of the central projections of identified skin sensory neurons in neonatal animals. Cutaneous afferents exhibiting rapidly adapting responses to sustained natural stimuli were encountered as early as recordings were made. Well-stained representatives of coarse (tylotrich and guard) and fine-diameter (down) hair follicle afferents, along with a putative Pacinian corpuscle afferent, were recovered from 2-7-day-old neonates. All were characterized by narrow, uninflected somal action potentials and generally low mechanical thresholds, and many could be activated via deflection of recently erupted hairs. The central collaterals of hair follicle afferents formed recurrent, flame-shaped arbors that were essentially miniaturized replicas of their adult counterparts, with identical laminar terminations. The terminal arbors of down hair afferents, previously undescribed in rodents, were distinct and consistently occupied a more superficial position than tylotrich and guard hair afferents. Nevertheless, the former extended no higher than the middle of the incipient substantia gelatinosa, leaving a clear gap more dorsally. In all major respects, therefore, hair follicle afferents display the same laminar specificity in neonates as they do in adults. The widely held misperception that their collaterals extend exuberant projections into pain

  8. Androgens and hair growth.

    PubMed

    Randall, Valerie Anne

    2008-01-01

    Hair's importance in human communication means that abnormalities like excess hair in hirsutism or hair loss in alopecia cause psychological distress. Androgens are the main regulator of human hair follicles, changing small vellus follicles producing tiny, virtually invisible hairs into larger intermediate and terminal follicles making bigger, pigmented hairs. The response to androgens varies with the body site as it is specific to the hair follicle itself. Normally around puberty, androgens stimulate axillary and pubic hair in both sexes, plus the beard, etc. in men, while later they may also inhibit scalp hair growth causing androgenetic alopecia. Androgens act within the follicle to alter the mesenchyme-epithelial cell interactions, changing the length of time the hair is growing, the dermal papilla size and dermal papilla cell, keratinocyte and melanocyte activity. Greater understanding of the mechanisms of androgen action in follicles should improve therapies for poorly controlled hair disorders like hirsutism and alopecia.

  9. Beta-catenin and Hedgehog signal strength can specify number and location of hair follicles in adult epidermis without recruitment of bulge stem cells.

    PubMed

    Silva-Vargas, Violeta; Lo Celso, Cristina; Giangreco, Adam; Ofstad, Tyler; Prowse, David M; Braun, Kristin M; Watt, Fiona M

    2005-07-01

    Using K14deltaNbeta-cateninER transgenic mice, we show that short-term, low-level beta-catenin activation stimulates de novo hair follicle formation from sebaceous glands and interfollicular epidermis, while only sustained, high-level activation induces new follicles from preexisting follicles. The Hedgehog pathway is upregulated by beta-catenin activation, and inhibition of Hedgehog signaling converts the low beta-catenin phenotype to wild-type epidermis and the high phenotype to low. beta-catenin-induced follicles contain clonogenic keratinocytes that express bulge markers; the follicles induce dermal papillae and provide a niche for melanocytes, and they undergo 4OHT-dependent cycles of growth and regression. New follicles induced in interfollicular epidermis are derived from that cellular compartment and not through bulge stem cell migration or division. These results demonstrate the remarkable capacity of adult epidermis to be reprogrammed by titrating beta-catenin and Hedgehog signal strength and establish that cells from interfollicular epidermis can acquire certain characteristics of bulge stem cells.

  10. An Integrated Analysis of MicroRNA and mRNA Expression Profiles to Identify RNA Expression Signatures in Lambskin Hair Follicles in Hu Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Xiaoyang; Sun, Wei; Yin, Jinfeng; Ni, Rong; Su, Rui; Wang, Qingzeng; Gao, Wen; Bao, Jianjun; Yu, Jiarui; Wang, Lihong; Chen, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Wave patterns in lambskin hair follicles are an important factor determining the quality of sheep’s wool. Hair follicles in lambskin from Hu sheep, a breed unique to China, have 3 types of waves, designated as large, medium, and small. The quality of wool from small wave follicles is excellent, while the quality of large waves is considered poor. Because no molecular and biological studies on hair follicles of these sheep have been conducted to date, the molecular mechanisms underlying the formation of different wave patterns is currently unknown. The aim of this article was to screen the candidate microRNAs (miRNA) and genes for the development of hair follicles in Hu sheep. Two-day-old Hu lambs were selected from full-sib individuals that showed large, medium, and small waves. Integrated analysis of microRNA and mRNA expression profiles employed high-throughout sequencing technology. Approximately 13, 24, and 18 differentially expressed miRNAs were found between small and large waves, small and medium waves, and medium and large waves, respectively. A total of 54, 190, and 81 differentially expressed genes were found between small and large waves, small and medium waves, and medium and large waves, respectively, by RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis. Differentially expressed genes were classified using gene ontology and pathway analyses. They were found to be mainly involved in cell differentiation, proliferation, apoptosis, growth, immune response, and ion transport, and were associated with MAPK and the Notch signaling pathway. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analyses of differentially-expressed miRNA and genes were consistent with sequencing results. Integrated analysis of miRNA and mRNA expression indicated that, compared to small waves, large waves included 4 downregulated miRNAs that had regulatory effects on 8 upregulated genes and 3 upregulated miRNAs, which in turn influenced 13 downregulated genes. Compared to small waves

  11. Role of the Mouse Pygopus 2 Gene and Wnt Signaling in Normal and Malignant Development of Mammary Glands and Hair Follicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    K14, luminal and basal /myoepithelial markers, respectively, to follow a lead generated by the analysis of the null mutant that deletion of mpygo2, and...by interference reduced Wnt signaling, might bias mammary epithelial cells towards a basal /myoepithelial fate. Task 2. To determinine the role...right) and the basal and suprabasal cells of the interfollicular epidermis. Within the pelage hair follicle, the protein was particularly

  12. Nestin-expressing stem cells from the hair follicle can differentiate into motor neurons and reduce muscle atrophy after transplantation to injured nerves.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Zhang, Chuansen; Hoffman, Robert M

    2014-02-01

    We have previously shown that nestin-expressing hair follicle stem cells from the mouse and human are multipotent and can differentiate into many cell types, including neurons and glial cells. The nestin-expressing hair follicle stem cells can effect nerve and spinal cord repair upon transplantation in mouse models. In the present study, nestin-expressing hair follicle stem cells expressing red fluorescent protein (RFP) were induced by retinoic acid and fetal bovine serum to differentiate and then transplanted together with Matrigel into the transected distal sciatic or tibial nerve stump of transgenic nude mice ubiquitously expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP). Control mice were transplanted with Matrigel only. The transplanted cells appeared neuron like, with large round nuclei and long extensions. Immunofluorescence staining showed that some of the transplanted cells in the distal nerve stump expressed the neuron marker Tuj1 as well as motor neuron markers Isl 1/2 and EN1. These transplanted cells contacted each other as well as host nerve fibers. Two weeks post-transplantation, nerve fibers in the distal sciatic nerve stump of the transplanted mice had greater expression of motor neuron markers and neurotrophic factor-3 than those in the Matrigel-only transplanted mice. Muscle fiber areas in the nestin-expressing stem cell plus Matrigel-transplanted animals were much bigger than that in the Matrigel-only transplanted animals after 4 weeks. The present results suggest that transplanted nestin-expressing hair follicle stem cells can differentiate into motor neurons and reduce muscle atrophy after sciatic nerve transection. This study demonstrates a new and accessible neuron source to reduce muscle atrophy after nerve injury.

  13. FOXC1 maintains the hair follicle stem cell niche and governs stem cell quiescence to preserve long-term tissue-regenerating potential

    PubMed Central

    Lay, Kenneth; Kume, Tsutomu; Fuchs, Elaine

    2016-01-01

    Adult tissue stem cells (SCs) reside in niches, which orchestrate SC behavior. SCs are typically used sparingly and exist in quiescence unless activated for tissue growth. Whether parsimonious SC use is essential to conserve long-term tissue-regenerating potential during normal homeostasis remains poorly understood. Here, we examine this issue by conditionally ablating a key transcription factor Forkhead box C1 (FOXC1) expressed in hair follicle SCs (HFSCs). FOXC1-deficient HFSCs spend less time in quiescence, leading to markedly shortened resting periods between hair cycles. The enhanced hair cycling accelerates HFSC expenditure, and impacts hair regeneration in aging mice. Interestingly, although FOXC1-deficient HFs can still form a new bulge that houses HFSCs for the next hair cycle, the older bulge is left unanchored. As the new hair emerges, the entire old bulge, including its reserve HFSCs and SC-inhibitory inner cell layer, is lost. We trace this mechanism first, to a marked increase in cell cycle-associated transcripts upon Foxc1 ablation, and second, to a downstream reduction in E-cadherin–mediated inter-SC adhesion. Finally, we show that when the old bulge is lost with each hair cycle, overall levels of SC-inhibitory factors are reduced, further lowering the threshold for HFSC activity. Taken together, our findings suggest that HFSCs have restricted potential in vivo, which they conserve by coupling quiescence to adhesion-mediated niche maintenance, thereby achieving long-term tissue homeostasis. PMID:26912458

  14. Glutamatergic modulation of synaptic-like vesicle recycling in mechanosensory lanceolate nerve terminals of mammalian hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Banks, Robert W; Cahusac, Peter M B; Graca, Anna; Kain, Nakul; Shenton, Fiona; Singh, Paramjeet; Njå, Arild; Simon, Anna; Watson, Sonia; Slater, Clarke R; Bewick, Guy S

    2013-05-15

    Our aim in the present study was to determine whether a glutamatergic modulatory system involving synaptic-like vesicles (SLVs) is present in the lanceolate ending of the mouse and rat hair follicle and, if so, to assess its similarity to that of the rat muscle spindle annulospiral ending we have described previously. Both types of endings are formed by the peripheral sensory terminals of primary mechanosensory dorsal root ganglion cells, so the presence of such a system in the lanceolate ending would provide support for our hypothesis that it is a general property of fundamental importance to the regulation of the responsiveness of the broad class of primary mechanosensory endings. We show not only that an SLV-based system is present in lanceolate endings, but also that there are clear parallels between its operation in the two types of mechanosensory endings. In particular, we demonstrate that, as in the muscle spindle: (i) FM1-43 labels the sensory terminals of the lanceolate ending, rather than the closely associated accessory (glial) cells; (ii) the dye enters and leaves the terminals primarily by SLV recycling; (iii) the dye does not block the electrical response to mechanical stimulation, in contrast to its effect on the hair cell and dorsal root ganglion cells in culture; (iv) SLV recycling is Ca(2+) sensitive; and (v) the sensory terminals are enriched in glutamate. Thus, in the lanceolate sensory ending SLV recycling is itself regulated, at least in part, by glutamate acting through a phospholipase D-coupled metabotropic glutamate receptor.

  15. Adaptations in the structure and innervation of follicle-sinus complexes to an aquatic environment as seen in the Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris).

    PubMed

    Sarko, Diana K; Reep, Roger L; Mazurkiewicz, Joseph E; Rice, Frank L

    2007-09-20

    Florida manatees are large-bodied aquatic herbivores that use large tactile vibrissae for several purposes. Facial vibrissae are used to forage in a turbid water environment, and the largest perioral vibrissae can also grasp and manipulate objects. Other vibrissae distributed over the entire postfacial body appear to function as a lateral line system. All manatee vibrissae emanate from densely innervated follicle-sinus complexes (FSCs) like those in other mammals, although proportionately larger commensurate with the caliber of the vibrissae. As revealed by immunofluorescence, all manatee FSCs have many types of C, Adelta and Abeta innervation including Merkel, club, and longitudinal lanceolate endings at the level of the ring sinus, but they lack other types such as reticular and spiny endings at the level of the cavernous sinus. As in non-whisking terrestrial species, the inner conical bodies of facial FSCs are well innervated but lack Abeta-fiber terminals. Importantly, manatee FSCs have two unique types of Abeta-fiber endings. First, all of the FSCs have exceptionally large-caliber axons that branch to terminate as novel, gigantic spindle-like endings located at the upper ring sinus. Second, facial FSCs have smaller caliber Abeta fibers that terminate in the trabeculae of the cavernous sinus as an ending that resembles a Golgi tendon organ. In addition, the largest perioral vibrissae, which are used for grasping, have exceptionally well-developed medullary cores that have a structure and dense small-fiber innervation resembling that of tooth pulp. Other features of the epidermis and upper dermis structure and innervation differ from that seen in terrestrial mammals.

  16. Nanoparticle-based targeting of vaccine compounds to skin antigen-presenting cells by hair follicles and their transport in mice.

    PubMed

    Mahe, Brice; Vogt, Annika; Liard, Christelle; Duffy, Darragh; Abadie, Valérie; Bonduelle, Olivia; Boissonnas, Alexandre; Sterry, Wolfram; Verrier, Bernard; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Combadiere, Behazine

    2009-05-01

    Particle-based drug delivery systems target active compounds to the hair follicle and may result in a better penetration and higher efficiency of compound uptake by skin resident cells. As previously proposed, such delivery systems could be important tools for vaccine delivery. In this study, we investigated the penetration of solid fluorescent 40 or 200 nm polystyrene nanoparticles (NPs) as well as virus particles in murine skin to further investigate the efficacy of transcutaneously (TC) applied particulate vaccine delivery route. We demonstrated that 40 and 200 nm NPs and modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) expressing the green-fluorescent protein penetrated deeply into hair follicles and were internalized by perifollicular antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Fibered-based confocal microscopy analyses allowed visualizing in vivo particle penetration along the follicular duct, diffusion into the surrounding tissue, uptake by APCs and transport to the draining lymph nodes. The application of small particles, such as ovalbumin coding DNA or MVA, induced both humoral and cellular immune responses. Furthermore, TC applied MVA induced protection against vaccinia virus challenge. Our results strengthen the concept of TC targeting of cutaneous APCs by hair follicles and will contribute to the development of advanced vaccination protocols using NPs or viral vectors.

  17. Molecular characterization, expression and methylation status analysis of BMP4 gene in skin tissue of Liaoning cashmere goat during hair follicle cycle.

    PubMed

    Bai, Wen L; Dang, Yun L; Wang, Jiao J; Yin, Rong H; Wang, Ze Y; Zhu, Yu B; Cong, Yu Y; Xue, Hui L; Deng, Liang; Guo, Dan; Wang, Shi Q; Yang, Shu H

    2016-08-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) is a member of the bone morphogenetic protein family (BMPs). It is involved in the development and cycle of hair follicle, as well as, is thought to be a potential candidate gene for cashmere traits in goats. In the present study, we isolated and characterized a full-length open reading frame (ORF) of BMP4 cDNA from the skin tissue of Liaoning cashmere goat, and investigated the transcriptional pattern and methylation status of BMP4 gene in skin tissue of this breed during different stages of hair follicle cycle. The sequence analysis indicated that the isolated cDNA was 1264-bp in length containing a complete ORF of 1230-bp. It encoded a precursor peptide of 409 amino acids with a signal peptide of 19 amino acids. The structural analysis indicated that goat BMP4 contains typical TGF-β propeptide and TGF-β domains. In skin tissue, BMP4 is generally transcribed in an ascendant pattern from anagen to telogen. The methylation level of 5' flanking regulatory region of BMP4 gene might be involved in its mRNA expression in skin tissue: a higher BMP4 methylation level in skin coincides with a lower expression of BMP4 mRNA. These results from the present work provided a foundation for further insight into the functional and regulatory characteristics of BMP4 in the development and cycle of hair follicle in Liaoning Cashmere goat.

  18. Collagen Fibrils in Skin Orient in the Direction of Applied Uniaxial Load in Proportion to Stress while Exhibiting Differential Strains around Hair Follicles

    PubMed Central

    Nesbitt, Sterling; Scott, Wentzell; Macione, James; Kotha, Shiva

    2015-01-01

    We determined inhomogeneity of strains around discontinuities as well as changes in orientation of collagen fibrils under applied load in skin. Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) images of collagen fibrils were obtained at different strain magnitudes. Changes in collagen orientation were analyzed using Fast Fourier Transforms (FFT) while strain inhomogeneity was determined at different distances from hair follicles using Digital Image Correlation (DIC). A parameter, defined as the Collagen Orientation Index (COI), is introduced that accounts for the increasingly ellipsoidal nature of the FFT amplitude images upon loading. We show that the COI demonstrates two distinct mechanical regimes, one at low strains (0%, 2.5%, 5% strain) in which randomly oriented collagen fibrils align in the direction of applied deformation. In the second regime, beginning at 5% strain, collagen fibrils elongate in response to applied deformation. Furthermore, the COI is also found to be linearly correlated with the applied stress indicating that collagen fibrils orient to take the applied load. DIC results indicated that major principal strains were found to increase with increased load at all locations. In contrast, minimum principal strain was dependent on distance from hair follicles. These findings are significant because global and local changes in collagen deformations are expected to be changed by disease, and could affect stem cell populations surrounding hair follicles, including mesenchymal stem cells within the outer root sheath. PMID:28788035

  19. Human hair follicle and interfollicular keratinocyte reactivity to mouse HPV16-transformed cells: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Smetana, Karel; Dvoránková, Barbora; Lacina, Lukás; Cada, Zdenek; Vonka, Vladimír

    2008-07-01

    The role of stem cells in cancer formation and spreading has been established. As with normal tissue, the cancer stem cells need a special microenvironment to support their growth. This microenvironment may be represented by the tumor stroma. One of the possible ways of tumor stromal formation is the epithelial-mesenchymal transition of tumor epithelium. Following this mechanism, stromal cells must share the basic genetic alterations with the tumor cells. In an attempt to create a system capable of testing some aspects of the mesenchymal cell-keratinocyte interactions, we studied the effects of the fibroblastoid mouse TC-1 cells that were prepared by the introduction of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) genes E6 and E7 to lung epithelial cells on the phenotype of normal human interfollicular and hair follicle keratinocytes. From this point of view, they may resemble stromal cells formed by the epithelial-mesenchymal transition of cells from HPV-induced squamous cell carcinoma. In contrast to 3T3 murine embryonic fibroblasts which were used as control cells, TC-1 cells influenced not only the size of the keratinocytes and the shape of their colonies, but also induced the expression of keratins 8 and 19 and vimentin. In conclusion, TC-1 cells exhibited a marked biological activity by influencing the behavior of the normal human follicular and intefollicular keratinocytes. This observation is compatible with the hypothesis that stromal cells play an important role in tumor progression and spreading.

  20. miR-128 regulates differentiation of hair follicle mesenchymal stem cells into smooth muscle cells by targeting SMAD2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhihao; Pang, Li; Zhao, Huiying; Song, Lei; Wang, Yuehui; Sun, Qi; Guo, Chunjie; Wang, Bin; Qin, Xiujiao; Pan, Aiqun

    2016-05-01

    Human hair follicle mesenchymal stem cells (hHFMSCs) are an important source of cardiovascular tissue engineering for their differentiation potential into smooth muscle cells (SMCs), yet the molecular pathways underlying such fate determination is unclear. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding RNAs that play critical roles in cell differentiation. In present study, we found that miR-128 was remarkably decreased during the differentiation of hHFMSCs into SMCs induced by transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). Moreover, overexpression of miR-128 led to decreased expression of SMC cellular marker proteins, such as smooth muscle actin (SMA) and calponin, in TGF-β1-induced SMC differentiation. Further, we identified that miR-128 targeted the 3'-UTR of SMAD2 transcript for translational inhibition of SMAD2 protein, and knockdown of SMAD2 abrogated the promotional effect of antagomir-128 (miR-128 neutralizer) on SMC differentiation. These results suggest that miR-128 regulates the differentiation of hHFMSCs into SMCs via targeting SMAD2, a main transcription regulator in TGF-β signaling pathway involving SMC differentiation. The miR-128/SMAD2 axis could therefore be considered as a candidate target in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine for SMCs.

  1. Mitochondrial function in murine skin epithelium is crucial for hair follicle morphogenesis and epithelial-mesenchymal interactions.

    PubMed

    Kloepper, Jennifer E; Baris, Olivier R; Reuter, Karen; Kobayashi, Ken; Weiland, Daniela; Vidali, Silvia; Tobin, Desmond J; Niemann, Catherin; Wiesner, Rudolf J; Paus, Ralf

    2015-03-01

    Here, we studied how epithelial energy metabolism impacts overall skin development by selectively deleting intraepithelial mtDNA in mice by ablating a key maintenance factor (Tfam(EKO)), which induces loss of function of the electron transport chain (ETC). Quantitative (immuno)histomorphometry demonstrated that Tfam(EKO) mice showed significantly reduced hair follicle (HF) density and morphogenesis, fewer intrafollicular keratin15+ epithelial progenitor cells, increased apoptosis, and reduced proliferation. Tfam(EKO) mice also displayed premature entry into (aborted) HF cycling by apoptosis-driven HF regression (catagen). Ultrastructurally, Tfam(EKO) mice exhibited severe HF dystrophy, pigmentary abnormalities, and telogen-like condensed dermal papillae. Epithelial HF progenitor cell differentiation (Plet1, Lrig1 Lef1, and β-catenin), sebaceous gland development (adipophilin, Scd1, and oil red), and key mediators/markers of epithelial-mesenchymal interactions during skin morphogenesis (NCAM, versican, and alkaline phosphatase) were all severely altered in Tfam(EKO) mice. Moreover, the number of mast cells, major histocompatibility complex class II+, or CD11b+ immunocytes in the skin mesenchyme was increased, and essentially no subcutis developed. Therefore, in contrast to their epidermal counterparts, pilosebaceous unit stem cells depend on a functional ETC. Most importantly, our findings point toward a frontier in skin biology: the coupling of HF keratinocyte mitochondrial function with the epithelial-mesenchymal interactions that drive overall development of the skin and its appendages.

  2. BRCA1 deficiency in skin epidermis leads to selective loss of hair follicle stem cells and their progeny

    PubMed Central

    Sotiropoulou, Panagiota A.; Karambelas, Andrea E.; Debaugnies, Maud; Candi, Aurelie; Bouwman, Peter; Moers, Virginie; Revenco, Tatiana; Rocha, Ana Sofia; Sekiguchi, Kiyotoshi; Jonkers, Jos; Blanpain, Cedric

    2013-01-01

    The accurate maintenance of genomic integrity is essential for tissue homeostasis. Deregulation of this process leads to cancer and aging. BRCA1 is a critical mediator of this process. Here, we performed conditional deletion of Brca1 during epidermal development and found that BRCA1 is specifically required for hair follicle (HF) formation and for development of adult HF stem cells (SCs). Mice deficient for Brca1 in the epidermis are hairless and display a reduced number of HFs that degenerate progressively. Surprisingly, the interfollicular epidermis and the sebaceous glands remain unaffected by Brca1 deletion. Interestingly, HF matrix transient amplifying progenitors present increased DNA damage, p53 stabilization, and caspase-dependent apoptosis compared with the interfollicular and sebaceous progenitors, leading to hyperproliferation, apoptosis, and subsequent depletion of the prospective adult HF SCs. Concomitant deletion of p53 and Brca1 rescues the defect of HF morphogenesis and loss of HF SCs. During adult homeostasis, BRCA1 is dispensable for quiescent bulge SCs, but upon their activation during HF regeneration, Brca1 deletion causes apoptosis and depletion of Brca1-deficient bulge SCs. Our data reveal a major difference in the requirement of BRCA1 between different types of epidermal SCs and progenitors and during the different activation stages of adult HF SCs. PMID:23271346

  3. Visualization of hair follicles using high-speed optical coherence tomography based on a Fourier domain mode locking laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, M.-T.; Chang, F.-Y.

    2012-04-01

    In this study, a swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) system with a Fourier domain mode locking (FDML) laser is proposed for a dermatology study. The homemade FDML laser is one kind of frequency-sweeping light source, which can provide output power of >20 mW and an output spectrum of 65 nm in bandwidth centered at 1300 nm, enabling imaging with an axial resolution of 12 μm in the OCT system. To eliminate the forward scans from the laser output and insert the delayed backward scans, a Mach-Zehnder configuration is implemented. Compared with conventional frequency-sweeping light sources, the FDML laser can achieve much higher scan rates, as high as ˜240 kHz, which can provide a three-dimensional imaging rate of 4 volumes/s. Furthermore, the proposed high-speed SS-OCT system can provide three-dimensional (3D) images with reduced motion artifacts. Finally, a high-speed SS-OCT system is used to visualize hair follicles, demonstrating the potential of this technology as a tool for noninvasive diagnosis of alopecia.

  4. Macrophages induce AKT/β-catenin-dependent Lgr5+ stem cell activation and hair follicle regeneration through TNF

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xusheng; Chen, Haiyan; Tian, Ruiyun; Zhang, Yiling; Drutskaya, Marina S.; Wang, Chengmei; Ge, Jianfeng; Fan, Zhimeng; Kong, Deqiang; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Cai, Ting; Zhou, Ying; Wang, Jingwen; Wang, Jinmei; Wang, Shan; Qin, Zhihai; Jia, Huanhuan; Wu, Yue; Liu, Jia; Nedospasov, Sergei A.; Tredget, Edward E.; Lin, Mei; Liu, Jianjun; Jiang, Yuyang; Wu, Yaojiong

    2017-01-01

    Skin stem cells can regenerate epidermal appendages; however, hair follicles (HF) lost as a result of injury are barely regenerated. Here we show that macrophages in wounds activate HF stem cells, leading to telogen–anagen transition (TAT) around the wound and de novo HF regeneration, mostly through TNF signalling. Both TNF knockout and overexpression attenuate HF neogenesis in wounds, suggesting dose-dependent induction of HF neogenesis by TNF, which is consistent with TNF-induced AKT signalling in epidermal stem cells in vitro. TNF-induced β-catenin accumulation is dependent on AKT but not Wnt signalling. Inhibition of PI3K/AKT blocks depilation-induced HF TAT. Notably, Pten loss in Lgr5+ HF stem cells results in HF TAT independent of injury and promotes HF neogenesis after wounding. Thus, our results suggest that macrophage-TNF-induced AKT/β-catenin signalling in Lgr5+ HF stem cells has a crucial role in promoting HF cycling and neogenesis after wounding. PMID:28345588

  5. A Conditioned Medium of Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells Overexpressing Wnt7a Promotes Wound Repair and Regeneration of Hair Follicles in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Liang; Hao, Haojie; Liu, Jiejie; Ti, Dongdong; Tong, Chuan; Hou, Qian; Li, Meirong; Zheng, Jingxi; Liu, Gang

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can affect the microenvironment of a wound and thereby accelerate wound healing. Wnt proteins act as key mediators of skin development and participate in the formation of skin appendages such as hair. The mechanisms of action of MSCs and Wnt proteins on skin wounds are largely unknown. Here, we prepared a Wnt7a-containing conditioned medium (Wnt-CM) from the supernatant of cultured human umbilical cord-MSCs (UC-MSCs) overexpressing Wnt7a in order to examine the effects of this CM on cutaneous healing. Our results revealed that Wnt-CM can accelerate wound closure and induce regeneration of hair follicles. Meanwhile, Wnt-CM enhanced expression of extracellular matrix (ECM) components and cell migration of fibroblasts but inhibited the migratory ability and expression of K6 and K16 in keratinocytes by enhancing expression of c-Myc. However, we found that the CM of fibroblasts treated with Wnt-CM (HFWnt-CM-CM) can also promote wound repair and keratinocyte migration; but there was no increase in the number of hair follicles of regeneration. These data indicate that Wnt7a and UC-MSCs have synergistic effects: they can accelerate wound repair and induce hair regeneration via cellular communication in the wound microenvironment. Thus, this study opens up new avenues of research on the mechanisms underlying wound repair. PMID:28337222

  6. Label-free identification and characterization of murine hair follicle stem cells located in thin tissue sections with Raman micro-spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tsung-Hua; Short, Michael A; McLean, David I; Zeng, Haishan; McElwee, Kevin; Lui, Harvey

    2014-06-07

    Stem cells offer tremendous opportunities for regenerative medicine. Over the past decade considerable research has taken place to identify and characterize the differentiation states of stem cells in culture. Raman micro-spectroscopy has emerged as an ideal technology since it is fast, nondestructive, and does not require potentially toxic dyes. Raman spectroscopy systems can also be incorporated into confocal microscope imaging systems allowing spectra to be obtained from below the tissue surface. Thus there is significant potential for monitoring stem cells in living tissue. Stem cells that reside in hair follicles are suitable for testing this possibility since they are close to the skin surface, and typically clustered around the bulge area. One of the first steps needed would be to obtain Raman micro-spectra from stem cells located in thin sections of tissue, and then see whether these spectra are clearly different from those of the surrounding differentiated cells. To facilitate this test, standard 5 μm thick sections of murine skin tissue were stained to identify the location of hair follicle stem cells and their progeny. Raman spectra were then obtained from adjacent cells in a subsequent unstained 10 μm thick section. The spectra revealed significant differences in peak intensities associated with nucleic acids, proteins, lipids and amino acids. Statistical analyses of the Raman micro-spectra identified stem cells with 98% sensitivity and 94% specificity, as compared with a CD34 immunostaining gold standard. Furthermore analyses of the spectral variance indicated differences in cellular dynamics between the two cell groups. This study shows that Raman micro-spectroscopy has a potential role in identifying adult follicle stem cells, laying the groundwork for future applications of hair follicle stem cells and other somatic stem cells in situ.

  7. Nuclear aberrations in hair follicle cells of patients receiving cyclophosphamide. A possible in vivo assay for human exposure to genotoxic agents.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, M T; Tackaberry, L E; Hardy, M H; Noseworthy, J H

    1990-01-01

    The toxic effect of cyclophosphamide on the proliferative cell population of hair follicles plucked from the human scalp was examined by the in vivo nuclear aberration assay. Patients participating in an independent clinical trial received oral low dose cyclophosphamide, intravenous high dose cyclophosphamide or oral placebo treatment. The percent of cells with nuclear aberrations (indicating apoptosis, a special form of cell death) and the percent of mitotic cells, in the hair matrix, were calculated for each patient before treatment and at several time points following cyclophosphamide or placebo treatment. The mean percentages of nuclear aberrations in both the treated Low dose and High dose cyclophosphamide patients were significantly higher than those for the pre-treatment and Placebo patients. The nuclear aberrations in hair follicle cells increased from pre-treatment (and Placebo) to treated Low dose and finally to treated High dose patients. The average percentage for pre-treatment samples from all patients was 0.06 +/- 0.03 SE. For 1 week and 1 month samples from Low dose patients it was 0.35 +/- 0.08 SE, and for combined 2,3 and 4 day samples from High dose patients it was 1.08 +/- 0.12 SE. Cyclophosphamide also had a significant effect on mitosis. A decrease in mitotic activity was observed at 1 month following the initial low dose cyclophosphamide treatment and at 24 +/- 2 h following each of the first two high dose cyclophosphamide treatments. The observed increase in nuclear aberrations following low dose as well as high dose cyclophosphamide suggests that it is feasible to use the nuclear aberration assay for in vivo human genotoxicity testing, using proliferating hair follicle cells.

  8. p75 Neurotrophin receptor differentiates between morphoeic basal cell carcinoma and desmoplastic trichoepithelioma: insights into the histogenesis of adnexal tumours based on embryology and hair follicle biology.

    PubMed

    Krahl, D; Sellheyer, K

    2010-07-01

    Tumour development is frequently described in the basic pathology literature as a recapitulation of embryogenesis. However, a link between the embryology of the skin and the histogenesis of adnexal tumours has been largely overlooked. The low-affinity p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) has a profound role in hair follicle biology. We therefore speculated that it is involved in the histogenesis of follicular adnexal tumours. One of the most challenging diagnoses in dermatopathology is differentiating morphoeic basal cell carcinoma from desmoplastic trichoepithelioma. To describe the expression pattern of p75NTR during cutaneous embryogenesis, in the adult hair follicle and in morphoeic basal cell carcinoma and desmoplastic trichoepithelioma. Evaluation of the staining pattern for p75NTR was performed using standard immunohistochemical techniques. For comparison, we examined staining for cytokeratin 20 which highlights Merkel cells. All 17 desmoplastic trichoepitheliomas were immunoreactive with > 80% of the cells stained, whereas 12 of the 14 (86%) morphoeic basal cell carcinomas were p75NTR negative. In the two positive cases of morphoeic basal cell carcinoma < 30% of cells were labelled. In the late bulbous hair peg stage and in the postnatal anagen hair follicle p75NTR highlights the outer root sheath. Our results support the classification of desmoplastic trichoepithelioma as a follicular hamartoma mimicking the outer root sheath. In contrast, the lack of p75NTR expression in morphoeic basal cell carcinoma favours a concept of this tumour as a more primitive follicular lesion with the characteristics of a carcinoma and not a hamartoma. We suggest including p75NTR as a tool in the differential diagnosis between morphoeic basal cell carcinoma and desmoplastic trichoepithelioma.

  9. Skin physiology in microgravity: a 3-month stay aboard ISS induces dermal atrophy and affects cutaneous muscle and hair follicles cycling in mice.

    PubMed

    Neutelings, Thibaut; Nusgens, Betty V; Liu, Yi; Tavella, Sara; Ruggiu, Alessandra; Cancedda, Ranieri; Gabriel, Maude; Colige, Alain; Lambert, Charles

    2015-01-01

    The Mice Drawer System (MDS) Tissue Sharing program was the longest rodent space mission ever performed. It provided 20 research teams with organs and tissues collected from mice having spent 3 months on the International Space Station (ISS). Our participation to this experiment aimed at investigating the impact of such prolonged exposure to extreme space conditions on mouse skin physiology. Mice were maintained in the MDS for 91 days aboard ISS (space group (S)). Skin specimens were collected shortly after landing for morphometric, biochemical, and transcriptomic analyses. An exact replicate of the experiment in the MDS was performed on ground (ground group (G)). A significant reduction of dermal thickness (-15%, P=0.05) was observed in S mice accompanied by an increased newly synthetized procollagen (+42%, P=0.03), likely reflecting an increased collagen turnover. Transcriptomic data suggested that the dermal atrophy might be related to an early degradation of defective newly formed procollagen molecules. Interestingly, numerous