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Sample records for site nuussuaq peninsula

  1. Byers Peninsula: A reference site for coastal, terrestrial and limnetic ecosystem studies in maritime Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quesada, A.; Camacho, A.; Rochera, C.; Velázquez, D.

    2009-11-01

    This article describes the development of an international and multidisciplinary project funded by the Spanish Polar Programme on Byers Peninsula (Livingston Island, South Shetlands). The project adopted Byers Peninsula as an international reference site for coastal and terrestrial (including inland waters) research within the framework of the International Polar Year initiative. Over 30 scientists from 12 countries and 26 institutions participated in the field work, and many others participated in the processing of the samples. The main themes investigated were: Holocene changes in climate, using both lacustrine sediment cores and palaeo-nests of penguins; limnology of the lakes, ponds, rivers and wetlands; microbiology of microbial mats, ecology of microbial food webs and viral effects on aquatic ecosystems; ornithology, with investigations on a Gentoo penguin rookery ( Pygoscelis papua) as well as the flying ornithofauna; biocomplexity and life cycles of species from different taxonomic groups; analysis of a complete watershed unit from a landscape perspective; and human impacts, specifically the effect of trampling on soil characteristics and biota. Byers Peninsula offers many features as an international reference site given it is one of the largest ice-free areas in the Antarctic Peninsula region, it has a variety of different landscape units, and it hosts diverse aquatic ecosystems. Moreover, the Byers Peninsula is a hotspot for Antarctic biodiversity, and because of its high level of environmental protection, it has been very little affected by human activities. Finally, the proximity to the Spanish polar installations on Livingston Island and the experience derived from previous expeditions to the site make it logistically feasible as a site for ongoing monitoring and research.

  2. Proposed Mars Surveyor 2001 Landing Site at 'Ibishead Peninsula', Southern Elysium Planitia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, T. J.; Rice, J. W., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Our objective is to propose a landing site that the Mars Surveyor 2001 Lander and Curie Rover could go to on Mars that should meet the safety requirements of the spacecraft landing system and optimize surface operations (chiefly driven by power and communications requirements). This site lies between 1.5-3.5 deg S latitude, 195-198 deg W longitude, along a sharp albedo contact between the low-viscosity flow units of southern Elysium Planitia and the eroded highlands margin east of Aeolis Mensae. A relatively-bright "peninsula-like" protrusion of the eroded highlands into the south Elysium plains in this area reminds us of the head of an Ibis, and so we nickname this site "Ibishead Peninsula". This site is designed to be situated as close to a diversity of geologic units within view of the lander instruments. Based on our experience with the visibility of horizon details from the Mars Pathfinder and Viking landing sites, we stipulate that for horizon features to be resolved suitably for detailed study from the lander, they must be no more than several kilometers distant. This is so that diversity can be placed in a geologic context in a region that we feel has some exciting science potential. This objective is different from the Mars Pathfinder requirement to land at a site with a maximum chance for containing a diversity of rocks within a few tens of meters of the lander, which resulted in the selection of a "grab bag" site.

  3. Investigations of fungal diversity in wooden structures and soils at historic sites on the Antarctic Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Arenz, Brett E; Blanchette, Robert A

    2009-01-01

    Investigations of microbial diversity in Antarctic are important to begin to understand ecosystem functioning and decomposition processes. This study documents fungi at 9 historic sites on the Antarctic Peninsula collected from wooden structures, other organic materials, and soils during a joint National Science Foundation and British Antarctic Survey expedition in 2007. Many of these sites had wooden structures built by the British during the World War II Operation Tabarin, but others visited included the American "East Base" on Stonington Island and the Swedish hut on Snow Hill Island. Fungi were cultured on several different media and pure cultures were obtained and identified by DNA sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer region. Cadophora species previously found to attack historic wooden structures on Ross Island, Antarctica, were found at all but 1 location sampled in the Peninsula region. Fungi causing decay in the historic wooden structures and artifacts and those causing mold problems inside the structures are of great concern, and conservation efforts are urgently needed to help preserve these important polar heritage structures. The results presented also expand our knowledge on the identity of fungi present throughout the Antarctic Peninsula region and provide insights into the organisms responsible for decomposition and nutrient recycling.

  4. Soil Physical, Chemical, and Thermal Characterization, Teller Road Site, Seward Peninsula, Alaska, 2016

    DOE Data Explorer

    Graham, David; Kholodov, Alexander; Busey, Bob; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Wilson, Cathy; Moon, Ji-Won

    2017-02-08

    This dataset provides the results of physical, chemical, and thermal characterization of soils at the Teller Road Site, Seward Peninsula, Alaska. Soil pits were dug from 7-14 September 2016 at designated Intensive Stations 2 through 9 at the Teller Road MM 27 Site. This dataset includes field observations and descriptions of soil layers or horizons, field measurements of soil volumetric water content, soil temperature, thermal conductivity, and heat capacity. Laboratory measurements of soil properties include gravimetric water content, bulk density, volumetric water content, and total carbon and nitrogen.

  5. Industrial heritage sites in Spitsbergen (Svalbard), South Georgia and the Antarctic Peninsula: Sources of historical information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacquebord, Louwrens; Avango, Dag

    2016-09-01

    Industrial heritage sites in Polar Regions are very important as sources of historical information. Together with archival documents this information gives us the possibility to complete the picture of the exploitation of natural resources in those regions. Thirty years of historical-archaeological field research at whaling and mining sites in Spitsbergen (Svalbard), South Georgia and the Antarctic Peninsula has shown that these sites can provide unique evidence about the driving forces behind industrial development, the design of industrial technology, the structure of the settlements, strategies to control natural resources and achieve political influence, and the impact of resource extraction on the local environment. In this article we will give examples of the results of our research at these sites.

  6. New Neanderthal remains from Mani peninsula, Southern Greece: the Kalamakia Middle Paleolithic cave site.

    PubMed

    Harvati, Katerina; Darlas, Andreas; Bailey, Shara E; Rein, Thomas R; El Zaatari, Sireen; Fiorenza, Luca; Kullmer, Ottmar; Psathi, Eleni

    2013-06-01

    The Kalamakia cave, a Middle Paleolithic site on the western coast of the Mani peninsula, Greece, was excavated in 1993-2006 by an interdisciplinary team from the Ephoreia of Paleoanthropology and Speleology (Greek Ministry of Culture) and the Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle (Paris). The site is dated to between ca. 100,000 and >39,000 years BP (Before Present) and has yielded Mousterian lithics, a rich fauna, and human remains from several layers. The latter include 10 isolated teeth, a cranial fragment and three postcranial elements. The remains represent at least eight individuals, two of them subadults, and show both carnivore and anthropogenic modifications. They can be identified as Neanderthal on the basis of diagnostic morphology on most specimens. A diet similar to that of Neanderthals from mixed habitat is suggested by our analysis of dental wear (occlusal fingerprint analysis) and microwear (occlusal texture microwear analysis), in agreement with the faunal and palynological analyses of the site. These new fossils significantly expand the Neanderthal sample known from Greece. Together with the human specimens from Lakonis and Apidima, the Kalamakia human remains add to the growing evidence of a strong Neanderthal presence in the Mani region during the Late Pleistocene.

  7. Thermal regime of active layer at two lithologically contrasting sites on James Ross Island, Antarctic Peninsula.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrbáček, Filip; Nývlt, Daniel; Láska, Kamil

    2016-04-01

    Antarctic Peninsula region (AP) represents one of the most rapidly warming parts of our planet in the last 50 years. Despite increasing research activities along both western and eastern sides of AP in last decades, there is still a lot of gaps in our knowledge relating to permafrost, active layer and its thermal and physical properties. This study brings new results of active layer monitoring on James Ross Island, which is the largest island in northern AP. Its northern part, Ulu Peninsula, is the largest ice-free area (more than 200 km2) in the region. Due its large area, we focused this study on sites located in different lithologies, which would affect local thermal regime of active layer. Study site (1) at Abernethy Flats area (41 m a.s.l.) lies ~7 km from northern coast. Lithologically is formed by disintegrated Cretaceous calcareous sandstones and siltstones of the Santa Marta Formation. Study site (2) is located at the northern slopes of Berry Hill (56 m a.s.l.), about 0.4 km from northern coastline. Lithology is composed of muddy to intermediate diamictites, tuffaceous siltstones to fine grained sandstones of the Mendel Formation. Data of air temperature at 2 meters above ground and the active layer temperatures at 75 cm deep profiles were obtained from both sites in period 1 January 2012 to 31 December 2014. Small differences were found when comparing mean air temperatures and active temperatures at 5 and 75 cm depth in the period 2012-2014. While the mean air temperatures varied between -7.7 °C and -7.0 °C, the mean ground temperatures fluctuated between -6.6 °C and -6.1 °C at 5 cm and -6.9 °C and -6.0 °C at 75 cm at Abernethy Flats and Berry Hill slopes respectively. Even though ground temperature differences along the profiles weren't pronounced during thawing seasons, the maximum active layer thickness was significantly larger at Berry Hill slopes (80 to 82 cm) than at Abernethy Flats (52 to 64 cm). We assume this differences are affected by

  8. Active layer dynamics in three sites with contrasted topography in the Byers Peninsula (Livingston Island, Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliva, Marc; Ruiz-Fernández, Jesús; Vieira, Gonçalo

    2015-04-01

    Topography exerts a key role on permafrost distribution in areas where mean annual temperatures are slightly negative. This is the case of low-altitude environments in Maritime Antarctica, namely in the South Shetland Islands, where permafrost is marginal to discontinuous until elevations of 20-40 m asl turning to continuous at higher areas. Consequently, the active layer dynamics is also strongly conditioned by the geomorphological setting. In January 2014 we installed three sites for monitoring the active layer dynamics across the Byers Peninsula (Livingston Island, South Shetland Islands) in different geomorphological environments at elevations between 60 and 100 m. The purpose was to examine the role of the topography and microclimatic conditions on the active layer dynamics. At each site a set of loggers was set up to monitor: air temperatures, snow thickness, ground temperatures until 80 cm together with the coupling atmosphere-ground temperatures. During the first year of monitoring the mean annual air temperatures show similar values in the three sites, in all cases slightly below freezing. The snowy conditions during this year in this archipelago have resulted in a late melting of snow, which has also conditioned the duration of frozen conditions in the uppermost soil layers. Topography has a strong influence on snow cover duration, which in turn affects frozen ground conditions. The Domo site is located in a higher position with respect to the central plateau of Byers; here, the wind is stronger and snow cover thinner, which has conditioned a longer thawing season than in the other two sites (Cerro Negro, Escondido). These two sites are located in topographically protected areas favouring snow accumulation. The longer persistence of snow conditions a longer duration of negative temperatures in the active layer of the permafrost. This research was financially supported by the HOLOANTAR project (Portuguese Science Foundation) and the AXA Research Fund.

  9. The Punta Lucero Quarry site (Zierbena, Bizkaia): a window into the Middle Pleistocene in the Northern Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Olivencia, Asier; Sala, Nohemi; Arceredillo, Diego; García, Nuria; Martínez-Pillado, Virginia; Rios-Garaizar, Joseba; Garate, Diego; Solar, Gonzalo; Libano, Iñaki

    2015-08-01

    The period between the end of the Early Pleistocene and the mid-Middle Pleistocene (roughly between 1.0 and 0.4 Ma BP) is of great interest in Western Europe. It witnessed several climatic oscillations and changes in the fauna, the demise of a hominin species and the appearance of another, along with important cultural and technological changes. Thus, the few available sites with these chronologies is vital to the understanding of the tempo and mode of these changes. Middle Pleistocene sites in the Northern Iberian Peninsula are very rare. Here we present the study of the site found at the Punta Lucero Quarry (Biscay province, Northern Iberian Peninsula), which includes for the first time the complete collection from the site. The fossil association from this site includes several ungulates, such as a Megacerine deer, Cervus elaphus, large bovids (likely both Bos primigenius and Bison sp. are present), Stephanorhinus sp., and carnivores, such as Homotherium latidens, Panthera gombaszoegensis, Canis mosbachensis and Vulpes sp. This association is typical of a middle Middle Pleistocene chronology and would be the oldest macro-mammal site in the Eastern Cantabrian region. This site would likely correspond to a chronology after Mode 1 technological complex and before the arrival of Mode 2 technology in this region. Thus, it offers a glimpse into the paleoecological conditions slightly prior to or contemporaneous with the first Acheulian makers in the northern fringe of the Iberian Peninsula.

  10. Site Fidelity in Space Use by Spider Monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi) in the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Fernandez, Gabriel; Smith Aguilar, Sandra E.; Schaffner, Colleen M.; Vick, Laura G.; Aureli, Filippo

    2013-01-01

    Animal home ranges may vary little in their size and location in the short term but nevertheless show more variability in the long term. We evaluated the degree of site fidelity of two groups of spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi) over a 10- and 13-year period, respectively, in the northeastern Yucatan peninsula, Mexico. We used the Local Convex Hull method to estimate yearly home ranges and core areas (defined as the 60% probability contour) for the two groups. Home ranges varied from 7.7 to 49.6 ha and core areas varied from 3.1 to 9.2 ha. We evaluated the degree of site fidelity by quantifying the number of years in which different areas were used as either home ranges or core areas. Large tracts were used only as home ranges and only for a few years, whereas small areas were used as either core area or home range for the duration of the study. The sum of the yearly core areas coincided partially with the yearly home ranges, indicating that home ranges contain areas used intermittently. Home ranges, and especially core areas, contained a higher proportion of mature forest than the larger study site as a whole. Across years and only in one group, the size of core areas was positively correlated with the proportion of adult males in the group, while the size of home ranges was positively correlated with both the proportion of males and the number of tree species included in the diet. Our findings suggest that spider monkey home ranges are the result of a combination of long-term site fidelity and year-to-year use variation to enable exploration of new resources. PMID:23675427

  11. Site fidelity in space use by spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi) in the Yucatan peninsula, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Fernandez, Gabriel; Smith Aguilar, Sandra E; Schaffner, Colleen M; Vick, Laura G; Aureli, Filippo

    2013-01-01

    Animal home ranges may vary little in their size and location in the short term but nevertheless show more variability in the long term. We evaluated the degree of site fidelity of two groups of spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi) over a 10- and 13-year period, respectively, in the northeastern Yucatan peninsula, Mexico. We used the Local Convex Hull method to estimate yearly home ranges and core areas (defined as the 60% probability contour) for the two groups. Home ranges varied from 7.7 to 49.6 ha and core areas varied from 3.1 to 9.2 ha. We evaluated the degree of site fidelity by quantifying the number of years in which different areas were used as either home ranges or core areas. Large tracts were used only as home ranges and only for a few years, whereas small areas were used as either core area or home range for the duration of the study. The sum of the yearly core areas coincided partially with the yearly home ranges, indicating that home ranges contain areas used intermittently. Home ranges, and especially core areas, contained a higher proportion of mature forest than the larger study site as a whole. Across years and only in one group, the size of core areas was positively correlated with the proportion of adult males in the group, while the size of home ranges was positively correlated with both the proportion of males and the number of tree species included in the diet. Our findings suggest that spider monkey home ranges are the result of a combination of long-term site fidelity and year-to-year use variation to enable exploration of new resources.

  12. Late-glacial vegetation and climate at the Manis Mastodon site, Olympic Peninsula, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Kenneth L.; Mehringer, Peter J.; Gustafson, Carl E.

    1983-09-01

    As the late Wisconsin Cordilleran Ice Sheet retreated, sediment accumulated in shallow depressions at the Manis Mastodon Archaeological site on the Olympic Peninsula, near Sequim, Washington. Pollen, plant macrofossils, and bones of mastodon, caribou, and bison occur within the lower 47 cm of these deposits. The fossil pollen and seed assemblages indicate persistence for 1000 yr (11,000-12,000 yr B.P.) of an herb-and-shrub-dominated landscape at a time when forest species appear elsewhere in Washington and in adjacent British Columbia. At present, Sequim is near the northern coastal limits of both Cactaceae and Ceratophyllum. Mean annual precipitation is 42.7 cm and summer temperatures average 15°-16°C in July. The absence of coniferous trees and the presence of cactus and Ceratophyllum in late-glacial sediments are explained by a regional climate that was drier and at least as warm as today. These conditions persisted in the rain shadow of the Olympic Mountains until at least 11,000 yr B.P.

  13. Comprehensive paleoseismic geological studies in a key site in southwestern Kola Peninsula (Northeast of the Fennoscandian Shield)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaeva, S. B.; Nikonov, A. A.; Shvarev, S. V.; Rodkin, M. V.

    2016-07-01

    This paper considers the results of detailed paleoseismic and geological investigations in a key site in the wall of the Imandra Lake depression (Kola Peninsula Region, Northeast of the Fennoscandian Shield). Study of different groups of paleoseismic deformations developed in the fault zone and the application of new methods and techniques made it possible to identify a large seismotectonic zone characterized by great earthquakes at the end of the Late Glacial and in the Holocene. The investigation data are indicative of the necessity to estimate the seismic potential in the Kola Atomic plant area in a different way.

  14. Annual survival and site fidelity of Stellar's Eiders molting along the Alaska Peninsula

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flint, P.L.; Petersen, M.R.; Dau, C.P.; Hines, J.E.; Nichols, J.D.

    2000-01-01

    Populations of Steller?s eiders (Polysticta stelleri) molting and wintering along the Alaska Peninsula have declined since the 1960's. We captured and marked a large sample of Steller's eiders molting in 2 lagoons along the Alaska Peninsula between 1975-97. We used mark-recapture analysis techniques to estimate annual survival and movement probabilities within and among lagoons for male and female eiders. Estimates of annual survival (?SE) were 0.899 ? 0.032 for females and 0.765 ? 0.044 for males. Both sexes showed high rates of fidelity to specific molting locations (>95%) within lagoons; yet we found no evidence that annual probability of survival differed among groups molting in different locations either within or among lagoons. We found weak evidence that annual survival decreased between the periods 1975-81 and 1991-97. The lower survival of males compared to females is unusual for waterfowl and may result in a female-biased sex ratio. We conclude that a decrease in adult survival may have initiated the long-term population decline. Further, a shortage of males may be limiting reproductive potential.

  15. Annual survival and site fidelity of Steller's eiders molting along the Alaska Peninsula

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flint, P.L.; Petersen, M.R.; Dau, C.P.; Hines, J.E.; Nichols, J.D.

    2000-01-01

    Populations of Steller's eiders (Polysticta stelleri) molting and wintering along the Alaska Peninsula have declined since the 1960's. We captured and marked a large sample of Steller's eiders molting in 2 lagoons along the Alaska Peninsula between 1975-97. We used mark-recapture analysis techniques to estimate annual survival and movement probabilities within and among lagoons for male and female eiders. Estimates of annual survival (??SE) were 0.899 ?? 0.032 for females and 0.765 ?? 0.044 for males. Both sexes showed high rates of fidelity to specific molting locations (>95%) within lagoons; yet we found no evidence that annual probability of survival differed among groups molting in different locations either within or among lagoons. We found weak evidence that annual survival decreased between the periods 1975-81 and 1991-97. The lower survival of males compared to females is unusual for waterfowl and may result in a female-biased sex ratio. We conclude that a decrease in adult survival may have initiated the long-term population decline. Further, a shortage of males may be limiting reproductive potential.

  16. Alluvial systems as archives for environmental change at a Hominid site with Oldowan archaeological occurrences: the Homa Peninsula, southwestern Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Thomas; Whitfield, Elizabeth; Kirby, Jason; Hunt, Christopher; Bishop, Laura; Plummer, Thomas; Ditchfield, Peter

    2016-04-01

    The Homa Peninsula, southwestern Kenya, preserves fossiliferous sedimentary sequences dating to the Plio-Pleistocene. Evidence of hominids inhabiting an open grassland setting and utilising Oldowan tools has been reported here, as well as some of the oldest known traces of hominin activity. Reconstructions of the palaeoenvironment have suggested that alluvial and lake marginal environments on a grassy plain, between wooded slopes and a permanent water body might be plausible. However, these interpretations are based only on field sedimentological analyses and stable isotope analysis at a single site on the peninsula (Kanjera South). It is the aim of this study to utilise a multiproxy approach to develop our understanding of the palaeoenvironmental characteristics here. Sediments will also be characterized at a new site (Nyayanga) through field analyses, as well as through analyses of particle size, siliceous microfossils (diatoms, phytoliths and sponge spicules), pollen and stable isotopes. By utilizing this approach, new insights into the palaeoecology, palaeohydromorphology and palaeoclimate of the locale may be revealed, expanding the limited data available to palaeoanthropological studies of Oldowan occurrences in east Africa. Efforts to refine palaeoenvironmental reconstructions of Kanjera South through particle size analysis have shown that sediments in the lower beds of the sequence are characterised by poor sorting, a bimodal distribution and sand/silty-sand grade material. This suggests rapid deposition and/or a variable hydrological regime and may represent the role of relatively unconfined ephemeral channels in the transportation and deposition of sediments. Fluvial reworking of aeolian sediments, most likely during unconfined flood events may also have occurred.

  17. ALERTES-SC3 Early Warning System prototype for South Iberian Peninsula: on-site approach.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazos, Antonio; Lopez de Mesa, Mireya; Gallego Carrasco, Javier; Martín Davila, José; Rioja del Rio, Carlos; Morgado, Arturo; Vera, Angel; Ciberia, Angel; Cabieces, Roberto; Strollo, Angelo; Hanka, Winfried; Carranza, Marta

    2016-04-01

    In recent years several Earthquake Early Warning Systems (EEWS) have been developed for different parts of the world. The area between SW Cape St. Vicente and the Strait of Gibraltar is one of the most seismically active zones in the Ibero-Maghrebian region, with predominantly moderate and superficial seismicity, but also big events with associated tsunamis are well documented in the area, like the 1755 Lisbon earthquake. In the frame of the ALERT-ES (2011-2013) and ALERTES-RIM (2014-2016) Spanish projects, the ALERTES-SC3 EEWS, regional approach, prototype has been developed at the Royal Spanish Navy Observatory (ROA) and is being tested in near real time for south Iberia. This prototype, based on the SeisComP3 software package, is largely based on algorithms derived from the analysis of the first seconds of the P wave records. Calculation of several parameters are carried out, mainly the characteristic period (τc) and the displacement peak (Pd), but also the velocity peak (Pv), the maximum period (τPmáx), among others. In order to warm the areas closest to the hypocentre, places located inside the "blind zone", a on-site EEWS has also been developed by ROA and integrated in the ALERTES-SC3 prototype. From the on-site approach, a warm level is declared from one station as a function of the estimated characteristic period (τc) and the displacement Peak (Pd), although the earthquake location and therefore the lead time available remains unknown. This on-site EEWS is being tested in several Western Mediterranean net (WM) stations as ARNO (Arenosillo, Huelva,Spain) or CHAS (Chafarinas island, North Africa, Spain). Also an on-site low cost station is being developed based in low cost accelerometers. In this work the current state of the on-site EEWS developed, its integration in the ALERTES-SC3 EEWS system and the low cost seismic stations are shown.

  18. Study on the Application of Probabilistic Tsunami Hazard Analysis for the Nuclear Power Plant Site in Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, H. M.; Kim, M.; Sheen, D. H.; Choi, I. K.

    2014-12-01

    The necessity of study on the tsunami hazard assessment for Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) site was suggested since the event of Fukushima in 2011 had been occurred. It has being emphasized because all of the NPPs in Korean Peninsula are located in coastal region. The tsunami hazard is regarded as the annual exceedance probability for the wave heights. The methodology for analysis of tsunami hazard is based on the seismic hazard analysis. The seismic hazard analysis had been performed by using both deterministic and probabilistic method. Recently, the probabilistic method had been received more attention than the deterministic method because the uncertainties of hazard analysis could be considered by using the logic tree approach. In this study, the probabilistic tsunami hazard analysis for Uljin NPP site was performed by using the information of fault sources which was published by Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ). The wave parameter is the most different parameter with seismic hazard. It could be estimated from the results of tsunami propagation analysis. The TSUNAMI_ver1.0 which was developed by Japan nuclear energy safety organization (JNES), was used for the tsunami simulation. The 80 cases tsunami simulations were performed and then the wave parameters were estimated. For reducing the sensitivity which was encouraged by location of sampling point, the wave parameters were estimated from group of sampling points.The probability density function on the tsunami height was computed by using the recurrence intervals and the wave parameters. And then the exceedance probability distribution was calculated from the probability density function. The tsunami hazards for the sampling groups were calculated. The fractile curves which were shown the uncertainties of input parameters were estimated from the hazards by using the round-robin algorithm. In general, tsunami hazard analysis is focused on the maximum wave heights. But the minimum wave height should be considered

  19. Atmospheric behaviors of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at a Japanese remote background site, Noto peninsula, from 2004 to 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Ning; Hakamata, Mariko; Sato, Kousuke; Okada, Yumi; Yang, Xiaoyang; Tatematsu, Michiya; Toriba, Akira; Kameda, Takayuki; Hayakawa, Kazuichi

    2015-11-01

    Total suspended particulates were collected at a Japanese remote background site (Noto Air Monitoring Station; NAMS) on the Noto Peninsula from September 2004 to June 2014. Nine polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the particulates (fluoranthene, pyrene, benz[a]anthracene, chrysene, benzo[b]fluoranthene, benzo[k]fluoranthene, benzo[a]pyrene, benzo[ghi]perylene and indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene) were determined by HPLC with fluorescence detection. The mean total concentrations of the nine PAHs in the cold season (November to May for the years 2004-2014) was 670 pg m-3 (range 37-4100 pg m-3). The mean total concentration in the warm season (June to October for the same period) was 170 pg m-3 (range 31-960 pg m-3). The atmospheric PAH level at NAMS decreased in recent years, although no significant change was found in the warm season. An analysis of meteorological conditions showed that the atmospheric PAHs at NAMS were long range transported from Northeast China in the cold seasons and were contributed to by Japanese domestic sources in the warm seasons. Lower concentration ratios of reactive PAHs to their isomers at NAMS also supported these results. Activities associated with the Beijing Olympic and Paralympic Games in 2008 and reconstruction after the 2007 Noto Hanto earthquake may have contributed to the yearly variations of atmospheric PAH levels at NAMS during the period 2007-2009. Source control measures implemented by the Chinese and Japanese governments appear to have been effective in decreasing the atmospheric PAH levels at NAMS in recent years.

  20. Data Report: A Search for Deposits of the Late Pliocene Impact of the Eltanin Asteroid in Rise Sediments from the Antarctic Peninsula, Site 1096

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyte, Frank T.

    2003-01-01

    Concentrations of Ir have been measured in 87 sediment samples from Ocean Drilling Program Site 1096 in search of evidence of fallout from the impact of the Eltanin asteroid, which occurred at 2.15 Ma, approx. 1300 km northwest of the site. An additional six samples were measured from a unique sand layer and adjacent sediments that are dated at approx. 1.6 Ma. These 93 sediment samples are all silts and muds that were deposited on a continental rise drift of the Antarctic Peninsula. No evidence of the Eltanin impact deposit was found in this study.

  1. Peninsula Academies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raby, Marilyn E.

    1984-01-01

    Describes the Peninsula Academies program developed by the Sequoia (California) Union High School District and 27 local high technology companies to help educationally disadvantaged students break the pattern of low academic achievement, lack of skills, and chronic unemployment. (FL)

  2. A study of a possible early reindeer domestication site on the Iamal peninsula (Russia) using geoarchaeological methods and lipid biomarkers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrault, Loic; Milek, Karen; Dawson, Lorna; Anderson, David

    2016-04-01

    In past centuries, indigenous hunters in Northern Eurasia shifted from being hunters to being herders of reindeer. Even at low human population densities, large reindeer herds can alter the landscape and leave long-term biochemical signatures in the soil. Although indigenous social-ecological systems have been thought to be resilient in space and time, most are considered to be at risk due to climate and socio-economic changes related to anthropogenic activities. This situation calls for a long-term perspective to place human-animal relations in their respective contexts. As an ancient livelihood still practiced across vast areas of Northern Eurasia, reindeer herding is a nexus for feedbacks between humans, animals and environment. The Iarte site, on the Iuribei River in the central part of the Iamal peninsula is thought to be an important site of reindeer domestication dating back to the 12th century due to the enormous quantities of butchered reindeer bones found in recent excavations. The large amount of buried reindeer bones found at the settlement suggests that herds should have stood near the site despite the lack of any architectural remains of corrals or pens. The history of a possible early relation to domesticate reindeer can be described with geoarchaeological methods, including lipid biomarkers, which can indicate the presence of past human and animal activities. Among lipid biomarkers, faecal markers such as stanols and bile acids have already been used in archaeological contexts to identify and distinguish between different species because they are persistent over time and can have a species specific profile. Near the Iarte settlement, we conducted a soil survey and sampling programme and combined geoarchaeological measurements (including electrical conductivity, magnetic susceptibility and elemental analysis) with lipid analysis of soil samples, to identify the potential presence of standing reindeer herds. The different soil layers have been

  3. Light absorption and morphological properties of soot-containing aerosols observed at an East Asian outflow site, Noto Peninsula, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Sayako; Nakayama, Tomoki; Taketani, Fumikazu; Adachi, Kouji; Matsuki, Atsushi; Iwamoto, Yoko; Sadanaga, Yasuhiro; Matsumi, Yutaka

    2016-03-01

    The coating of black carbon (BC) with inorganic salts and organic compounds can enhance the magnitude of light absorption by BC. To elucidate the enhancement of light absorption of aged BC particles and its relation to the mixing state and morphology of individual particles, we conducted observations of particles at an Asian outflow site in Noto Peninsula, Japan, in the spring of 2013. Absorption and scattering coefficients at 405, 532, and 781 nm and mass concentrations/mixing states of refractory BC in PM2.5 were measured using a three-wavelength photoacoustic soot spectrometer and a single-particle soot photometer (SP2), respectively, after passage through a thermodenuder (TD) maintained at 300 or 400 °C or a bypass line maintained at room temperature (25 °C). The average enhancement factor of BC light absorption due to coating was estimated by comparing absorption coefficients at 781 nm for particles that with and without passing through the TD at 300 °C and was found to be 1.22. The largest enhancements (> 1.30) were observed under high absorption coefficient periods when the air mass was long-range transported from urban areas in China. Aerosol samples were also analyzed using a transmission electron microscope (TEM) equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray analyzer. The morphological features and mixing states of soot-containing particles of four samples collected during the high absorption events were analyzed by comparing microphotographs before and after the evaporation of beam-sensitive materials by irradiation with a high-density electron beam. The majority of the soot in all samples was found as mixed particles with sulfate-containing spherules or as clusters of such spherules. For samples showing high enhancement (> 1.30) of BC light absorption, the TEM showed that the internally mixed soot-containing particles tended to have a more spherical shape and to be thickly coated. The SP2 measurements also suggested that the proportion of thickly coated

  4. Spatial variability of the active layer thickness at the Limnopolar Lake CALM-S site (Byers Peninsula, Livingston Island, Antarctica) and the role of snow cover.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pablo, Miguel A.; Molina, Antonio; Ramos, Miguel

    2016-04-01

    Since its establishment in early 2009, thaw depth has been measured in late January - early February at the Limnopolar Lake CALM-S site (A25) in Byers Peninsula, Livingston Island, Antarctica (62°38'59.1''S, 61°06'16.9''W). Ground, surface, and air temperatures have been also measured, as well as snow cover deep, derived from an array of miniature temperature loggers mounted into a wood mast (iButton from Maxim) (Lewcovicz, 2008). Thermal characterization of the active layer has been already done based on this data (de Pablo et al., 2013), as well as the interannual variability (de Pablo et al., 2014) and the snow cover evolution analyses (de Pablo et al., submitted). The results show that permafrost could exist at 120 cm depth, although the active layer is reducing, probably caused by the elongation on the snow cover duration. While the snow cover thickness remains approximately similar each winter, the snow offset delays, reducing the period in which solar radiation could heat the ground. In fact, during the last years, thaw depth was not able to be measured (in spite we visited the area in the approximately the same dates) due to thick snow layer remained covering the CALM-S site. However, we have not yet developed an analysis of the spatial variability of the thaw depth we measured each year, and how it could be conditioned by the ground properties (as slope or grain-size) or external factors, such as snow cover. In order to confirm the effect of the snow cover in the evolution of the active layer thickness, here we analyze the spatial variability of the thaw depth for the entire CALM-S site, and try to correlate it respect to the ground surface characteristics (grain-size, ground patterns, among others), the ground surface temperature and the snow cover thickness. Some of those data were acquired while the surface was visible during Antarctic field trips few years ago, and others (snow cover thickness) was measured by mechanical probing in each node. This

  5. Analysis of aerosol scattering properties measured by a nephelometer at a coastal-rural site in the Atlantic southwest of the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Juan F.; Cachorro, Victoria E.; de Frutos, Angel M.

    2015-09-01

    Aerosol hemispherical scattering and the backscattering coefficients, σsp, σbsc, have been measured using a 3-wavelength (450, 550 and 700 nm) integrating nephelometer over two years (January 2006-May 2008) in the coastal area of the Gulf of Cádiz, in the southwest of the Iberian Peninsula. These coefficients have been carefully analyzed starting with the impact of corrections on the measurements of σsp: i.e., drift calibration constants do not modify the mean value in our data series. However, the selection of dry data (with RH less than 50%) modifies substantially the number of data and the resulting mean value of σsp is now 14% lower, which is compensated when the angular truncation correction is applied. The characterization and features of σsp, σbsc, and the derived parameters αsp (alpha Ångström exponent) and b (the backscatter ratio) has been analyzed, as annual, seasonal and diurnal evolution. A general statistic based on hourly data gives mean values and standard deviation of σsp (500 nm)=48±38 Mm-1 with a median of 38 Mm-1, and σbsc (500 nm)=5.6±3.8 Mm-1 with a median of 4.6 Mm-1. Thus, these values show moderate-low values but with a large range of variation considering the existing measured values over the Iberian Peninsula. The median value of σsp (500 nm) is an indicator that events of high aerosol burden are frequent presenting a substantial influence on the daily averages. The alpha Ångström exponent, αsp, derived from the pairs 450/700 nm gives a mean value 1.35±0.54 with a median of 1.47 and with the most frequent value of 1.7, thus indicating the prevalence of medium size particles but with a significant influence of fine particles. The b ratio has the same value for mean and median, 0.12±0.02, showing a decrease with increasing values of σsp. Annual and daily cycles have been also analyzed showing the complex behaviour of the optical properties at this coastal site where cold and warn periods show very different

  6. Physical Properties Record of Current Flow From Magnetic Analysis of Deep-sea Sediments at the Antarctic Peninsula Pacific Margin (OPP Sites 1095, 1101)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pares, J. M.; Hassold, N. J.; Rea, D. K.; van der Pluijm, B. A.

    2005-12-01

    The physical properties of bottom-current flow recorded by deep-sea sediments provide valuable information about the history of oceanic currents, their strength and direction. Specifically, details on the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) would significantly increase our understanding of late Cenozoic paleoceanography, as it is thought to isolate Antarctica from the warmer waters to the north. The Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS) provides a powerful gauge for sediment fabric, as it senses preferred grain orientation in sediments and sedimentary rocks. We have determined both relative speed and azimuth of bottom-current flow in drift deposit sediments recovered at ODP Sites 1095 and 1101, Antarctic Peninsula. A total of 35 cores have been measured for AMS, providing new clues on the physical record of the ACC in the Plio-Pleistocene. Because ODP holes are drilled and recovered in successive 9 meters-long cores, which usually do not have relative orientation, we have based our analysis on samples grouped by cores. Our results indicate that the degree of anisotropy provides a proxy for current strength: The higher the latter, the higher is the anisotropy of the magnetic ellipsoid. Further, grouping of the principal axes of maximum susceptibility is interpreted in terms of preferred grain orientation, providing a proxy for the azimuth of the paleocurrent flow. As revealed by experimental studies, AMS maximum axes are grouped in the azimuth of flow and inclined at a few degrees to the sediment surface dipping downward into the direction of the flow's origin. In the studied samples, when imbrication is observed, we have been able to determine the orientation and sense of the paleocurent. Declination and inclination of the paleomagnetic vector of each core segment was used for reorientation of AMS principal axes to the geographic coordinates to obtain the absolute orientation of the directional data. Once the cores have been reoriented using the measured

  7. Climate and environments during Marine Isotope Stage 11 in the central Iberian Peninsula: the herpetofaunal assemblage from the Acheulean site of Áridos-1, Madrid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blain, Hugues-Alexandre; Santonja, Manuel; Pérez-González, Alfredo; Panera, Joaquin; Rubio-Jara, Susana

    2014-06-01

    The interglacial episodes of the Quaternary Period are currently the focus of a great deal of attention within the scientific community, primarily because they can help us to understand how the climate of the current interglacial may have evolved without human intervention and to assess the impact of these climate changes on ecological systems. In the central Iberian Peninsula, the archaeological site of Áridos-1 (Arganda, Madrid), with numeric dates of 379.7 ± 45 ka obtained by AAR for the upper part of the sedimentological unit of Arganda I, in combination with the evolved state of the small mammals, has been chronologically attributed to Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 11. Given the diversified faunal assemblages delivered by the 1976 excavations, Áridos-1 is probably one of the best terrestrial candidates for an understanding of the climatic and environmental conditions that prevailed in central Spain during the MIS 11 interglacial. In consequence, the fossil amphibians and squamate reptiles stored in the collections of the Museo Arqueológico Nacional of Madrid have been newly described and quantified in order to apply the mutual climatic range and habitat weighting methods for estimating quantitative data. The Mediterranean climate is shown to have been warmer and wetter than today in central Spain during MIS 11, with the mean annual temperature 1.7 °C higher and mean annual precipitation 223.9 mm higher than at present. The monthly climatic reconstruction shows differences in the distribution of precipitation over the course of the year, with more abundant precipitation during the winter months, at the beginning of spring and at the end of fall (from October to March) and less precipitation than today during the summer months and at the end of spring (from May to August), suggesting stronger rainfall seasonality between winter and summer than currently occurs. Such climate reconstruction is consistent with other European MIS 11 paleoclimatic records. The

  8. A paleomagnetic study of the Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poblete, F.; Arriagada, C.; Roperch, P.

    2009-05-01

    In the Paleozoic, South America, South Africa and Antarctica were part of Gondwana. The Weddell Sea began to form at about 146 Ma, after rifting between the Antarctic Peninsula and southernmost South America. Much uncertainty still exists about the geometrical fit and subsequent drift history between Patagonia and Antarctica. Geophysical and geological data which describe the tectonic history are sparsely distributed and often of poor quality. During the last two years we have collected more than 1000 paleomagnetic samples from 70 sites at several localities (King George Island, Robert Island, Yankee Bay, Half Moon Island, Byers Peninsula and Snow Island) from the South Shetland Islands and Anderson Island in the northern tip of Antarctic Peninsula. Our main objective was to provide first-order constraints on latitudinal displacements and the amount of tectonic rotations as an essential test of published tectonic models. Paleomagnetic results were obtained from 50 sites. All samples from sites in volcanic and intrusive rocks have well-defined univectorial magnetizations. Unfortunately, all sites in late Paleozoic sediments have been remagnetized and the magnetizations are often unstable upon thermal demagnetization. Cretaceous and Cenozoic units display very little apparent polar wander. Results from intrusive rocks of expected Jurassic age do not confirm the expected relative rotation betwen the Antarctic Peninsula and East Antarctica. Further radiometric dating are needed to confirm the age of these units.

  9. Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Temperate and green in the summer, the Kamchatka Peninsula in northeastern Russia freezes over completely in the winter. This true-color image of the Kamchatka Peninsula was acquired on December 12, 2001, by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. The peninsula is surrounded by the Sea of Okhotsk to the west and by the Bering Sea to the east. The ice and snow highlight the stunning valleys and tall peaks of the Sredinnyy Khrebet, which is the volcanic mountain range running down the center of the peninsula. The mountains along the range reach heights of over 3500 meters (11,484 feet). Many of the volcanoes are still active, and ash and volcanic rock has turned the snow a dark gray on the eastern side of the range. The light blue latticework of ridges, valleys, and alluvial fans extending from the center of the range were likely carved out by past and present glaciers and by run-off from spring snowmelt. The small island that extends off of the tip of the peninsula is Ostrov Paramushir (Paramushir Island). Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  10. Ambient levels of volatile organic compounds and criteria pollutants in the most industrialized area of central Iberian Peninsula: intercomparison with an urban site.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, Florentina; Notario, Alberto; Tapia, Araceli; Albaladejo, José; Cabañas, Beatriz; Martínez, Ernesto

    2016-01-01

    This work presents observations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including carbonyls, particulate matter 2.5 (PM2.5) (included in the most recent ambient air quality standards because of its harmful effect on health), PM10 and other important pollutants, CO, SO2, NOx and ozone, over the most industrialized area in the central Iberian Peninsula. Nearly two years of data obtained through a mobile laboratory are used for this purpose. Different concentration ratios and correlations were calculated to assess the effect of the anthropogenic or biogenic processes on the observed VOC levels. The diurnal profile for SO2 is different in Puertollano and it does not coincide with the maxima of the other primary pollutants such as benzene, toluene and xylenes (BTX), CO and NO. This behaviour could be attributed to the fact that SO2 mainly comes from industrial activities. However, an impact of the industry on air quality was detected not only by the results obtained for SO2, but also by the toluene/benzene, T/B, ratio (7.5). Finally, correlations between meteorological conditions and pollution distribution have been considered; also, the analysis of the back trajectories together with Spearman correlation coefficients have been carried out to understand the origin and pathway in some events with unusual high pollutant values.

  11. Trend analysis of CO2 and CH4 recorded at a semi-natural site in the northern plateau of the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Isidro A.; Sánchez, M. Luisa; García, M. Ángeles; Pardo, Nuria

    2017-02-01

    CO2 and CH4 were recorded from October 2010 to February 2016 with a Picarro G1301 analyser at the centre of the upper plateau of the Iberian Peninsula. Large CO2 values were observed during the vegetation growing season, and were reinforced by the stable boundary layer during the night. Annual CH4 evolution may be explained by ecosystem activity and by the dispersion linked with the evolution of the boundary layer. Their trends were studied using an equation that considers one polynomial and one harmonic part. The polynomial part revealed an increasing trend from 0.8 to 2.3 ppm year-1 for CO2 and from 0.004 to 0.011 ppm year-1 for CH4. The harmonic part considered four harmonics whose amplitudes were noticeable for the first and second harmonics for CO2 and for the first harmonic for CH4. Long-term evolution was similar with alternative equations. Finally, seasonal study indicated summer minima for both gases, which may be explained by the lack of vegetation in this season. Harmonic analysis showed two maxima for CO2, one in spring linked with vegetation growth, which decreased with time, and another in autumn related with the onset of plant activity after the summer, which increased with time. CH4 presented only one maximum in winter and a short time with steady concentration in spring where the evolution of the boundary layer may play a noticeable role. The harmonic equation, which takes into account all the observations, revealed opposite behaviour between CO2, whose minima decreased, and CH4, whose maxima increased.

  12. Peninsula Academies Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sequoia Union High School District, Redwood City, CA.

    THE FOLLOWING IS THE FULL TEXT OF THIS DOCUMENT: The Peninsula Academies program helps educationally disadvantaged youth overcome the handicaps of low academic achievement, lack of skills, and chronic unemployment. This is accomplished by providing a high school curriculum that is clearly related to work, training in specific job skills, emphasis…

  13. The Resurrection Peninsula ophiolite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Steven W.; Miller, M.L.; Dumoulin, Julie A.; Nelson, Steven W.; Hamilton, Thomas D.

    1989-01-01

    The Resurrection Peninsula forms the east side of Resurrection Bay (fig. 3). Relief ranges from 437 m (1,434 ft) at the southern end of the peninsula to more than 1,463 m (4,800 ft) opposite the head of the bay. All rock units composing the informally named Resurrection Peninsula ophiolite of Nelson and others (1987) are visible or accessible by boat."Ophiolite" has been a geologic term since 1827 (Coleman, 1977). The term "ophiolite" initially referred to the rock serpentinite; the Greek root "ophi" (meaning snake or serpent) alluded to the greenish, mottled, and shiny appearance of serpentinites. In 1927, Steinmann described a rock association in the Alps, sometimes known as the "Steinmann Trinity', consisting of serpentine, diabase and spilitic lavas, and chert. Recognition of this suite led to the idea that ophiolites represent submarine magmatism that took place early in the development of a eugeosyncline. In the early 1970s the Steinmann Trinity was reconsidered in light of the plate tectonic theory, new petrologic studies, and the recognition of abducted oceanic lithosphere in orogenic belts of the world. In 1972 at a Geological Society of America Penrose Conference (Anonymous, 1972) the term "ophiolite" was defined as a distinctive assemblage of mafic to ultramafic rocks, with no emphasis on their origin. A complete ophiolite should contain, from bottom to top:1) Tectonized ultramafic rocks (more or less serpentinized)2) Gabbro complex containing cumulus textures and commonly cumulus peridotites3) Mafic sheeted-dike complex, grading upward into;4) Submarine pillow lavas of basaltic composition. Common associated rock types include plagiogranite (Na-rich) and an overlying sedimentary section typically dominated by chert.

  14. Merida, Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This rare cloud free view of the city of Merida (21.0N, 90.0W) on the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico was taken as an experiment with color infrared film to determine the best applications of this unique film. Color film presents an image as it appears to the eye but color infrared film eliminates haze and better defines vegetation and its vitality by the shade of red or pink. Note that much of the native forests have been cut down for farm lands.

  15. Plio-Pleistocene orbital periodicities (21 to 413 ky) in glacially -influenced sediments from Antarctic peninsula ODP sites 1095,1096,1101

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iorio, M.; Wolf-Welling, T.; Moerz, T.

    2003-04-01

    Petrophysical and lithological data sets spectral analyses, from Plio-Pleistocene successions, cored in sedimentary drift of the Western Antarctic continental rise during Ocean Drilling Program Leg 178, shown, in different cores, non-harmonic wavelength peaks. When the wavelength peaks are normalised, they exhibit a very high correlation factor to each other and to the predicted Earth's orbital variations calculated for the same geological period. In addition, both short (≈95--125 ky) and long (≈413 ky) eccentricity clearly emerges from the signal during the Pleistocene, without evident switch to obliquity at the mid-Pleistocene transition (0.9 Ma B.P). This suggests that the lithological parameters, proxy of glacial cycles, are controlled, directly or indirectly, by astronomically forced processes (Milankovitch cycles). Moreover, the good correlatability among distant coring sites, based on systematic sedimentological variations, corresponding to intervals of about 140 and 370 ky, allows extension of the results to a regional scale. Finally, some matching with the 3rd order relative sea-level oscillations suggests a superimposed eustatic influence for the last 2.6 Ma.

  16. Gulf of Aqaba, Sinai Peninsula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The Gulf of Aqaba separates the Sinai peninsula from Saudi Arabia in this scene of the Middle East (29.0N, 34.5E) showing the geomorphology and geology of this region including portions of Egypt, Israel, Jordon and Saudi Arabia. A small portion of the Gulf of Suez can be seen on the opposite side of the Sinai peninsula.

  17. Interactions between deformation and fluids in the frontal thrust region of the NanTroSEIZE transect offshore the Kii Peninsula, Japan: Results from IODP Expedition 316 Sites C0006 and C0007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Screaton, E.; Kimura, G.; Curewitz, D.; Moore, G.; Chester, F.; Fabbri, O.; Fergusson, C.; Girault, F.; Goldsby, D.; Harris, R.; Inagaki, F.; Jiang, T.; Kitamura, Y.; Knuth, M.; Li, C.-F.; Liljedahl, L. Claesson; Louis, L.; Milliken, K.; Nicholson, U.; Riedinger, N.; Sakaguchi, A.; Solomon, E.; Strasser, M.; Su, X.; Tsutsumi, A.; Yamaguchi, A.; Ujiee, K.; Zhao, X.

    2009-12-01

    Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 316 Sites C0006 and C0007 examined the deformation front of the Nankai accretionary prism offshore the Kii Peninsula, Japan. In the drilling area, the frontal thrust shows unusual behavior as compared to other regions of the Nankai Trough. Drilling results, integrated with observations from seismic reflection profiles, suggest that the frontal thrust has been active since ˜0.78-0.436 Ma and accommodated ˜13 to 34% of the estimated plate convergence during that time. The remainder has likely been distributed among out-of-sequence thrusts further landward and/or accommodated through diffuse shortening. Unlike results of previous drilling on the Nankai margin, porosity data provide no indication of undercompaction beneath thrust faults. Furthermore, pore water geochemistry data lack clear indicators of fluid flow from depth. These differences may be related to coarser material with higher permeability or more complex patterns of faulting that could potentially provide more avenues for fluid escape. In turn, fluid pressures may affect deformation. Well-drained, sand-rich material under the frontal thrust could have increased fault strength and helped to maintain a large taper angle near the toe. Recent resumption of normal frontal imbrication is inferred from seismic reflection data. Associated décollement propagation into weaker sediments at depth may help explain evidence for recent slope failures within the frontal thrust region. This evidence consists of seafloor bathymetry, normal faults documented in cores, and low porosities in near surface sediments that suggest removal of overlying material. Overall, results provide insight into the complex interactions between incoming materials, deformation, and fluids in the frontal thrust region.

  18. Anaglyph, Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This anaglyph (stereoscopic view) of Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula was generated entirely from Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) data, and shows a subtle but distinctive indication of the Chicxulub impact crater. Most scientists now agree that this impact was the cause of the Cretatious-Tertiary extinction, the event 65 million years ago that marked the demise of the dinosaurs as well as the majority of life then on Earth. The crater's rim is marked by a shallow semicircular depression arcing about an offshore center point in the upper left of the picture. (The arcing depression is just above the blue line, when viewed with the naked eye.) This depression, or trough, only about 3 to 5 meters (10 - 15 feet) deep and about 5 kilometers (3 miles) wide, was likely caused by collapse of limestone caverns preferentially above the crater rim, resulting in an arcing chain of sinkholes. The limestone that covers most of the Yucatan Peninsula post-dates the impact crater. However, the crater pattern apparently controls the subsidence pattern just enough to show through.

    This anaglyph was created by deriving a shaded relief image from the SRTM data, draping it back over the SRTM elevation model, and then generating two differing perspectives, one for each eye. Illumination is from the north (top). When viewed through special glasses, the anaglyph is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions. Anaglyph glasses cover the left eye with a red filter and cover the right eye with a blue filter. The total relief (range of elevations) across this entire image is less than 300 meters (1000 feet).

    Elevation data used in this image were acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM

  19. Petroleum geology of Arabian Peninsula

    SciTech Connect

    Billo, S.M.

    1982-05-01

    Petroleum activities in the Arabian Peninsula show new trends in the 1980s. Petroleum exploration is intensified and huge discoveries are anticipated. A giant Jurassic gas field along the coast of the Arabian Gulf discovered recently tops 150 tcf, the largest single reserve ever. Other giant oil fields in the area are undergoing expansion in development and productivity. Today, the Peninsula, with a total area that surpasses one million square miles, produces and exports more oil and gas and has greater reserves than any other area in the world. The excellent reservoir rocks are located in the Jurassic and Cretaceous formations between the Arabian Shield and the Tethyan Seaway. They represent porous and permeable marine cyclical beds sealed by impervious shales and anhydrites. Reservoir sedimentology was affected by 2 orogenies during late Cretaceous and Pliocene time portrayed by the Cratonic area to the southwest and the orthogeosynclinal area to the northeast. The eastern part was little deformed by these movements.

  20. Fires in Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Numerous thermal anomalies were detected on the Kamchatka Peninsula in northeastern Russia in late June and early July by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Some of the anomalies (red dots) were fires, but at least one was the result of ongoing volcanic activity at one of the Peninsula's numerous active volcanoes. The erupting volcano, called Sheveluch, can be seen most clearly in the image from July 8, 2002. It is located in the upper right quadrant of the image, and appears as a grayish circular patch amid the surrounding green vegetation. In its center is a red dot indicating that MODIS detected a thermal signature coming from the restless volcano. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  1. The Spatial Coherence of Interannual Temperature Variations in the Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, John C.; Comiso, Josefino C.; Koblinsky, Chester J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Over 50 years of observations from climate stations on the west coast of the Antarctic Peninsula show that this is a region of extreme interannual variability in near-surface temperatures. The region has also experienced more rapid warming than any other part of the Southern Hemisphere. In this paper we use a new dataset of satellite-derived surface temperatures to define the extent of the region of extreme variability more clearly than was possible using the sparse station data. The region in which satellite surface temperatures correlate strongly with west Peninsula station temperatures is found to be quite small and is largely confined to the seas just west of the Peninsula, with a northward and eastward extension into the Scotia Sea and a southward extension onto the western slopes of Palmer Land. Correlation of Peninsula surface temperatures with surface temperatures over the rest of continental Antarctica is poor confirming that the west Peninsula is in a different climate regime. The analysis has been used to identify sites where ice core proxy records might be representative of variations on the west coast of the Peninsula. Of the five existing core sites examined, only one is likely to provide a representative record for the west coast.

  2. Heavy Metal Contamination in the Taimyr Peninsula, Siberian Arctic

    SciTech Connect

    Allen-Gil, Susan M.; Ford, Jesse; Lasorsa, Brenda K.; Monetti, Matthew; Vlasova, Tamara; Landers, Dixon H.

    2003-01-01

    The Taimyr Peninsula is directly north of the world's largest heavy metal smelting complex (Norilsk, Russia). Despite this proximity, there has been little research to examine the extent of contamination of the Taimyr Peninsula. We analyzed heavy metal concentrations in lichen (Cetraria cucullata), moss (Hylocomium splendens), soils, lake sediment, freshwater fish (Salvelinus alpinus, Lota lota, and Coregonus spp.) and collared lemming (Dicrostonyx torquatus) from 13 sites between 30 and 300 km from Norilsk. Element concentrations were low in both C. cucullata and H. splendens, although concentrations of Al, Fe, Cu, Ni, and Pb were significantly higher than those in Arctic Alaska, probably due to natural differences in the geochemical environments. Inorganic surface soils had significantly higher concentrations of Cd, Zn, Pb, and Mg than inorganic soils at depth, although a lake sediment core from the eastern Taimyr Peninsula indicated no recent enrichment by atmospherically transported elements. Tissue concentrations of heavy metals in fish and lemming were not elevated relative to other Arctic sites. Our results show that the impact of the Norilsk smelting complex is primarily localized rather than regional, and does not extend northward beyond 100 km.

  3. Iberian Peninsula and Balearic Island Bathynellacea (Crustacea, Syncarida) database

    PubMed Central

    Camacho, Ana I.; Dorda, Beatriz A.; Rey, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This is the first published database of Bathynellacea. It includes all data of bathynellids (Crustacea, Bathynellacea) collected in the last 64 years (1949 to 2013) on the Iberian Peninsula and Balearic Island. The samples come from groundwater (caves, springs, wells and hyporrheic habitat associated rivers) from both sampling campaigns and occasional sampling conducted throughout the Iberian Peninsula and Balearic Islands. The dataset lists occurrence data of bathynellids distribution, sampling sites (with localities, county and geographic coordinates), taxonomic information (from family to species level) and sampling sources (collector and sampling dates) for all records. The descriptions of new species and species identifications have been carried out by an expert taxonomist (AIC) with 25 years experience in the bathynellids studies (see references). Many of the sampling sites are type localities of endemic species from Iberian Peninsula. The dataset includes 409 samples record corresponding to two families, 12 genera and 58 species, 42 of them formally described plus 16 taxa unpublished and 47 samples in study. All species known from the study area are included, which nearly sum up a quarter of species of Bathynellacea known in the world (250 species). PMID:24693212

  4. A first secular variation curve for the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Núñez, J. I.; Osete, M. L.; Ruiz-Martínez, V. C.; Fabien, A.; Tarling, D. H.

    2003-04-01

    A palaeomagnetic study has been carried out at 22 archaeological sites in the Iberian Peninsula. These new results together with data from 4 sites previously studied in Iberia and data from neighbouring countries (southern of France and northern Morocco) have been compiled in order to obtain a first Secular Variation Curve for the Iberian Peninsula. Data from France and Morocco were selected from the Archaeomagnetic Database compiled by the Dept. of Geological Sciences, University of Plymouth, UK (D. Tarling). The selection criteria adopted was the following: Dating errors <50 years, number of samples > 5 and α95 < 3^o. A total amount of 54 data points with ages ranging from 200 BC up to 1500 AD have been used to construct the Madrid Preliminary Secular Variation Curve for the Iberian Peninsula, albeit with a gap between the 7th and 10th centuries. Palaeomagnetic directions were corrected to Madrid, using the Via-Pole Conversion method (Noel and Batt, 1990, Geoph. J. Inter, 70, 201--204). A 100 year something window moving in 50 years increments was applied to the data.

  5. Zoonoses in the Arabian Peninsula

    PubMed Central

    Wernery, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    The human population is rising and will soon reach 9 billion people. In parallel, the demand for animal protein is increasing and with it is the threat of zoonotic diseases. We must therefore be on our guard. The close association of people with animals promotes the opportunity for zoonotic infections and real danger may arise when animals are imported with no health background. Therefore, it is essential to implement strict import controls, and establish efficient quarantine facilities. Many viral, bacterial, and zoonotic diseases have been diagnosed on the Arabian Peninsula, either by isolating the pathogens or through serological surveys. Most of them are briefly discussed in this paper. PMID:25491209

  6. New evidence of early Neanderthal disappearance in the Iberian Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Galván, Bertila; Hernández, Cristo M; Mallol, Carolina; Mercier, Norbert; Sistiaga, Ainara; Soler, Vicente

    2014-10-01

    The timing of the end of the Middle Palaeolithic and the disappearance of Neanderthals continue to be strongly debated. Current chronometric evidence from different European sites pushes the end of the Middle Palaeolithic throughout the continent back to around 42 thousand years ago (ka). This has called into question some of the dates from the Iberian Peninsula, previously considered as one of the last refuge zones of the Neanderthals. Evidence of Neanderthal occupation in Iberia after 42 ka is now very scarce and open to debate on chronological and technological grounds. Here we report thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dates from El Salt, a Middle Palaeolithic site in Alicante, Spain, the archaeological sequence of which shows a transition from recurrent to sporadic human occupation culminating in the abandonment of the site. The new dates place this sequence within MIS 3, between ca. 60 and 45 ka. An abrupt sedimentary change towards the top of the sequence suggests a strong aridification episode coinciding with the last Neanderthal occupation of the site. These results are in agreement with current chronometric data from other sites in the Iberian Peninsula and point towards possible breakdown and disappearance of the Neanderthal local population around the time of the Heinrich 5 event. Iberian sites with recent dates (<40 ka) attributed to the Middle Palaeolithic should be revised in the light of these data.

  7. Geyser Valley on the Kamchatka Peninsula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    On June 2, a devastating mudslide in the world-renowned Geyser Valley on the Kamchatka Peninsula virtually obliterated the natural wonder, forcing the emergency evacuation of visitors and national park personnel. The site, which is the Kamchatka Peninsula's main tourist attraction, consists of some 200 thermal pools created by the area's intense volcanic activity, including about 90 geysers covering an area of four square kilometers (2.5 square miles). It is one of only five sites in the world where the impressive eruptions of steam and boiling-hot water can be found. According to witnesses, a powerful mudslide 1.5 kilometers (one mile) long and 200 meters (600 feet) wide buried more than two-thirds of the valley beneath tens of meters of snow, dirt, trees and boulders (right image), and created a temporary lake submerging more geysers.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra spacecraft. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    The U.S. science team is

  8. Environmental geophysics, offshore Bush River Peninsula, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S.F.; Kuecher, G.J.; Davies, B.E.

    1995-11-01

    Geophysical studies in shallow waters adjacent to the Bush River Peninsula, Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, have delineated the extent of waste disposal sites and established a hydrogeologic framework, which may control contaminant transport offshore. These studies indicate that during the Pleistocene Epoch, alternating stands of high and low sea levels resulted in a complex pattern of shallow channel-fill deposits around the Bush River Peninsula. Ground-penetrating radar studies reveal paleochannels greater than 50 ft deep. Some of the paleochannels are also imaged with marine seismic reflection. Conductivity highs measured with the EM-31 are also indicative of paleochannels. This paleochannel depositional system is environmentally significant because it may control the shallow groundwater flow regime beneath the peninsula. Magnetic, conductivity, and side-scan sonar anomalies outline anthropogenic anomalies in the study area. On the basis of geophysical data, underwater anthropogenic materials do exist in some isolated areas, but large-scale offshore dumping has not occurred in the area studied.

  9. Arabian peninsula: zone of ferment

    SciTech Connect

    Stookey, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    The Arabian Peninsula is an area which must be approached in terms of its own values and traditions. The different states, however, present difficulties for even the most well-informed policymaker because the region is not homogeneous. Some of the states are tenuous congeries of tribal and sectarian communities that do not necessarily share the aims of the ruling group. The authors of these six essays consider (1) the economic position of the states, (2) how oil exports affect the economies of the exporting states, (3) how traditional tribal and religious societies react to change, (4) whether their social values are conducive to modernization, and (5) what factors lead to the development of dissent, and how they affect the expression of dissent. Separate abstracts were prepared for two of the essays selected for the Energy Data Base (EDB) and Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA). 23 tables.

  10. QUANTITATIVE PALEOCLIMATE RECONSTRUCTIONS FROM THE MELVILLE PENINSULA, NUNAVUT, CANADA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, J. K.; Finkelstein, S. A.

    2009-12-01

    Arctic regions have heightened sensitivity to climatic changes, however regional scale differences exist in the magnitude and timing of response to climatic changes. Modern and paleoclimate data indicate spatial variability in Arctic climates due to local variations in topography, sea ice persistence, or proximity to the coast. Melville Peninsula in the east-central Canadian Arctic is in a modern transitional climate area, with a relatively continental climate to the west and a more maritime climate to the east. Thus, shifting climates may particularly influence the region, and may have affected Thule migration during the past millennium. The presence of Thule archaeological sites and a transitional climate make the Melville Peninsula an area of high importance for paleoclimate reconstructions. Lake sediment cores from two adjacent lakes in the Sarcpa Lake region in the interior Melville Peninsula (68°33’N and 88°17’W, 220 m a.s.l.) were analyzed for diatom assemblages. Diatoms (microscopic algae) were well preserved in these cores and thus, could be used to track paleoclimatic changes. Unofficially named SP02 and SP04, the lakes are 3 and 2.5 ha, respectively. Chronologies were constructed using 210Pb activity and AMS radiocarbon dates. All dates are presented as calendar years before AD 1950. Diatoms appear in SP02 5,900 yrs BP; coupled with high magnetic susceptibility and lower LOI550 in sediment older than 5,900 yrs BP, the appearance of diatoms at this time confirms earlier suggestions of a persistent ice cap on the Peninsula until 6,500 yrs BP. Diatom assemblages are dominated by Fragilarioid species, particularly Staurosira construens var. venter and Staurosirella pinnata. Peak diatom concentration and LOI550 between 4,200 yrs BP and 2,900 yrs BP may indicate the Holocene Thermal Maximum (HTM) on Melville Peninsula. Timing of the HTM on the Peninsula is similar to that from the Baffin Island region to the east. High ratios of Staurosirella pinnata

  11. Tropical Depression Alex hits Yucatan Peninsula

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's TRMM spacecraft observed this view of Tropical Depression Alex on June 27, 2010 at 2214 UTC (6:14 PM EST). Tropical depression Alex was near the western coast of Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula. ...

  12. Mosaicked Historic Airborne Imagery from Seward Peninsula, Alaska, Starting in the 1950's

    SciTech Connect

    Cherry, Jessica; Wirth, Lisa

    2016-12-06

    Historical airborne imagery for each Seward Peninsula NGEE Arctic site - Teller, Kougarok, Council - with multiple years for each site. This dataset includes mosaicked, geolocated and, where possible, orthorectified, historic airborne and recent satellite imagery. The older photos were sourced from USGS's Earth Explorer site and the newer, satellite imagery is from the Statewide Digital Mapping Initiative (SDMI) project managed by the Geographic Information Network of Alaska on behalf of the state of Alaska.

  13. Sredinnyy Khrebet, Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Kamchatka Peninsula in eastern Russia is shown in this scene created from a preliminary elevation model derived from the first data collected during the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) on February 12, 2000. Sredinnyy Khrebet, the mountain range that makes up the spine of the peninsula, is a chain of active volcanic peaks. Pleistocene and recent glaciers have carved the broad valleys and jagged ridges that are common here. The relative youth of the volcanism is revealed by the topography as infilling and smoothing of the otherwise rugged terrain by lava, ash, and pyroclastic flows, particularly surrounding the high peaks in the south central part of the image. Elevations here range from near sea level up to 2,618 meters (8,590 feet). Two visualization methods were combined to produce this image: shading and color coding of topographic height. The shade image was derived by computing topographic slope in the north-south direction. Northern slopes appear bright and southern slopes appear dark. Color coding is directly related to topographic height, with green at the lower elevations, rising through yellow, red, and magenta, to white at the highest elevations. Elevation data used in this image were acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense, and the German and Italian space

  14. Shaded Relief, Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This topographic image shows the western side of the volcanically active Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia. The data are from the first C-band mapping swath of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). On the left side are four rivers, which flow northwest to the Sea of Okhotsk. These rivers are, from the south to north, Tigil, Amanina, Voyampolka, and Zhilovaya. The broad, flat floodplains of the rivers are shown in blue. These rivers are important spawning grounds for salmon. In the right side of the image is the Sredinnyy Khrebet, the volcanic mountain range that makes up the 3spine2 of the peninsula. The cluster of hills to the lower right is a field of small dormant volcanoes. High resolution SRTM topographic data will be used by geologists to study how volcanoes form and understand the hazards posed by future eruptions.

    This shaded relief image was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. A computer-generated artificial light source illuminates the elevation data to produce a pattern of light and shadows. Slopes facing the light appear bright, while those facing away are shaded. On flatter surfaces, the pattern of light and shadows can reveal subtle features in the terrain. Colors show the elevation as measured by SRTM. Colors range from blue at the lowest elevations to white at the highest elevations. This image contains about 2300 meters (7500 feet) of total relief. Shaded relief maps are commonly used in applications such as geologic mapping and land use planning.

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11,2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission is designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and

  15. Perspective View, Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This perspective view shows the western side of the volcanically active Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia. The data are from the first C-band mapping swath of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). In the foreground is the broad, flat floodplain of the Amanina River, shown in blue. In background of the image is the Sredinnyy Khrebet, the volcanic mountain range that makes up the 3spine2 of the peninsula. The cluster of hills in the upper right is a field of small dormant volcanoes. High resolution SRTM topographic data will be used by geologists to study how volcanoes form and understand the hazards posed by future eruptions.

    This shaded relief perspective view was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. A computer-generated artificial light source illuminates the elevation data to produce a pattern of light and shadows. Slopes facing the light appear bright, while those facing away are shaded. On flatter surfaces, the pattern of light and shadows can reveal subtle features in the terrain. Colors show the elevation as measured by SRTM. Colors range from blue at the lowest elevations to white at the highest elevations. This image contains about 2300 meters (7500 feet) of total relief. To emphasize subtle differences in topography, the relief is exaggerated by a factor of 5.

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11,2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission is designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) and the

  16. Geologic framework of the Alaska Peninsula, southwest Alaska, and the Alaska Peninsula terrane

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Frederic H.; Detterman, Robert L.; DuBois, Gregory D.

    2015-01-01

    The boundaries separating the Alaska Peninsula terrane from other terranes are commonly indistinct or poorly defined. A few boundaries have been defined at major faults, although the extensions of these faults are speculative through some areas. The west side of the Alaska Peninsula terrane is overlapped by Tertiary sedimentary and volcanic rocks and Quaternary deposits.

  17. Paleomagnetism of Tertiary rocks from the OGA Peninsula and the rotation of northeast Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosha, Toshiyuki; Hamano, Yozo

    1988-06-01

    We have made a paleomagnetic study of Tertiary rocks from the Oga Peninsula, northern Honshu Island. Volcanic and sedimentary rocks were sampled from 26 sites in the peninsula. The ages of the rocks range from 62 Ma to the present. The results indicate a counterclockwise rotation of Northeast Japan with respect to eastern Asia around a pole at 58°N, 149°E, between about 22 Ma and 15 Ma. The amount of the rotation is about 20°. Before the rotation, Northeast Japan was situated along the east coast of the Asian continent.

  18. Geodiversity assessment of the Sinai Peninsula, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torab, Magdy; Farghaly, Enas

    2015-04-01

    The Sinai Peninsula is a triangular plateau lies in NE corner of Egypt, its head in the south at Ras Mohammed and its other sides between the Gulf of Aqaba and Gulf of Suez and the triangle base on the Mediterranean Sea. Sinai Peninsula is the most attractive region from the geological, geomorphological and environmental stand points of view because it displays a variety of simple and complex structural and landforms, (Abu Al-Izz,1971). In general, Sinai Peninsula reflects all geologic column of Egypt. Geomorphologically, Sinai Peninsula comprises many geomorphologic units such as mountains blocks, cliffs, isolated hills, wadies, hogbacks, questas, sand ridges, muddy and marshy lands, lakes and shorelines. This paper aims to define and measure geodiversity assessment index of the Sinai Peninsula as the quantitative variety of geological, topographical, geomorphological, hydrological and soil features. Some geodiversity indices maps for the above features produced for Sinai Peninsula were based on the methodology presented by (Pereira et al, 2012), it depends upon calculate of some geodiversity elements for overlay grid of the study area, which divided topographic, geological maps of the Sinai Peninsula with scale 1:500000 and satellite image (landsat 8, 27th October 2014, 12 bands, 30m). It divided into 743 squares (10x10 km), and some partial geodiversity indices such as geological, topographical, geomorphological, hydrological and soil indices were calculated by counting the number of each element inside each square, then the overall geodiversity index map produced by calculate the total number of all indices inside each square, the geodiversity index map were classified into some gradual categories by using isolines: very low, low, medium, high and very high.

  19. Shiveluch Volcano, Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    On the night of June 4, 2001, the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) captured this thermal image of the erupting Shiveluch volcano. Located on Russia's Kamchatka Peninsula, Shiveluch rises to an altitude of 2,447 meters (8,028 feet). The active lava dome complex is seen as a bright (hot) area on the summit of the volcano. To the southwest, a second hot area is either a debris avalanche or hot ash deposit. Trailing to the west is a 25-kilometer (15-mile) ash plume, seen as a cold 'cloud' streaming from the summit. At least 60 large eruptions have occurred here during the last 10,000 years; the largest historical eruptions were in 1854 and 1964.

    Because Kamchatka is located along the major aircraft routes between North America/Europe and Asia, this area is constantly monitored for potential ash hazards to aircraft. The area is part of the 'Ring of Fire,' a string of volcanoes that encircles the Pacific Ocean.

    The lower image is the same as the upper, except it has been color-coded: red is hot, light greens to dark green are progressively colder, and gray/black are the coldest areas.

    The image is located at 56.7 degrees north latitude, 161.3 degrees east longitude.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched Dec. 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as well as black and white stereo images. With revisit time of between 4 and 16 days, ASTER will provide the capability for repeat coverage of changing areas on Earth's surface.

  20. The history of Antarctic Peninsula glaciation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, Peter F.

    2007-01-01

    As Co-Chief Scientist on DSDP Leg 35 in 1974, Cam Craddock (1930-2006) produced the first useful information on Cenozoic Antarctic Peninsula glaciation - an early middle Miocene (15-17 Ma) apparent glacial onset. Subsequent work, onshore and offshore, has greatly extended our knowledge but that early conclusion stands today. Cenozoic Antarctic Peninsula palaeoclimate as presently known is broadly consistent with global palaeoclimate proxies. Initial glacial onset was within the Eocene-Oligocene boundary interval (although earlier, short-lived glaciations have been proposed, from indirect measurements) and the peninsula probably became deglaciated in the earliest Miocene (ca. 24 Ma). The renewed middle Miocene glaciation probably continued to the present and, for the last 9 Myr at least, has persisted through glacial (orbital) cycles, with grounded ice advance to the shelf edge during maxima. Although orbital cyclicity affected earlier AP palaeoclimate also, the level of glaciation through a complete cycle is uncertain.

  1. Antarctic Peninsula Tidewater Glacier Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettit, E. C.; Scambos, T. A.; Haran, T. M.; Wellner, J. S.; Domack, E. W.; Vernet, M.

    2015-12-01

    The northern Antarctic Peninsula (nAP, north of 66°S) is a north-south trending mountain range extending transverse across the prevailing westerly winds of the Southern Ocean resulting in an extreme west-to-east precipitation gradient. Snowfall on the west side of the AP is one to two orders of magnitude higher than the east side. This gradient drives short, steep, fast-flowing glaciers into narrow fjords on the west side, while longer lower-sloping glaciers flow down the east side into broader fjord valleys. This pattern in ice dynamics affects ice-ocean interaction on timescales of decades to centuries, and shapes the subglacial topography and submarine bathymetry on timescales of glacial cycles. In our study, we calculate ice flux for the western and eastern nAP using a drainage model that incorporates the modern ice surface topography, the RACMO-2 precipitation estimate, and recent estimates of ice thinning. Our results, coupled with observed rates of ice velocity from InSAR (I. Joughin, personal communication) and Landsat 8 -derived flow rates (this study), provide an estimate of ice thickness and fjord depth in grounded-ice areas for the largest outlet glaciers. East-side glaciers either still terminate in or have recently terminated in ice shelves. Sedimentary evidence from the inner fjords of the western glaciers indicates they had ice shelves during LIA time, and may still have transient floating ice tongues (tabular berg calvings are observed). Although direct oceanographic evidence is limited, the high accumulation rate and rapid ice flux implies cold basal ice for the western nAP glaciers and therefore weak subglacial discharge relative to eastern nAP glaciers and or other tidewater fjord systems such as in Alaska. Finally, despite lower accumulation rates on the east side, the large elongate drainage basins result in a greater ice flux funneled through fewer deeper glaciers. Due to the relation between ice flux and erosion, these east-side glaciers

  2. 27 CFR 9.40 - Leelanau Peninsula.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Leelanau Peninsula. 9.40 Section 9.40 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas §...

  3. 27 CFR 9.40 - Leelanau Peninsula.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Leelanau Peninsula. 9.40 Section 9.40 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas §...

  4. The Peninsula Academies. Third Yearly Interim Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Dorothy F.

    The performance of the Peninsula Academies of Electronics and Computer Technology was assessed for the program's third year of operation in two host schools in the Sequoia Union High School District. Data were collected for approximately 190 Academy students and for a comparison group of non-Academy students. Academies students missed fewer days…

  5. A Late Holocene Slip Rate Of The North Anatolian Fault, Hersek Peninsula, Izmit Bay, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozaci, O.; Altunel, E.; Clahan, K.; Yonlu, O.; Sundermann, S. T.; Lettis, W. R.; Turner, J.; Altekruse, J.; Gumus, I.; Lindvall, S. C.

    2010-12-01

    The Hersek Peninsula has been a strategic site for at least the last two millennia as a result of its location. It extends into Izmit Bay and creates a shortcut for the historical Bagdad Road, an important section of the spice route, between Istanbul (Constantinople) and Iznik (Nicaea). It also controls the entrance of Izmit Bay to Izmit (Nicomedia). Civilizations have been investing in this location by building harbors, fortifications, baths, roads, bridges, aqueducts, and temples. The remnants of these historical structures record evidence for past destruction of both anthropogenic and tectonic origin. From an active tectonics point of view, the Hersek Peninsula is a key locality for understanding seismic hazard in the Marmara Region. It is the last place that the North Anatolian fault can be studied on land before it enters the Marmara Sea and it has experienced strong ground shaking most recently during the M7.4 Izmit earthquake in 1999. Paleoseismic trenching as well as archeoseismologic investigations were recently performed on the Hersek Peninsula for regional and site specific seismic hazard characterization. Our paleoseismic trenches north of the Hersek Lagoon provided fault exposures confirming the location of the North Anatolian fault on the peninsula. Detailed mapping of a 6th century A.D. Byzantine aqueduct offset 14 ± 1 meters along the projection of this fault trace revealed a minimum late Holocene slip rate of 13.6 +1/-3.5 mm yr-1. Rapid fan deposition and subsidence on the delta plain across the Hersek Peninsula has resulted in the relatively recent deposition of several meters of relatively young alluvium and nearshore tidal deposits. Nearly 2 km of trench exposures revealed these deposits were continuous and contain only minor evidence of ground shaking in the form of secondary liquefaction deposits and ground fractures. The lack of primary ground surface rupture evidence in these approximately 300-year-old sediments strongly suggests that the

  6. [[Characterization of the potential geographical distribution area of parrot species in Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Plasencia Vázquez, Alexis Herminio; Escalona Segura, Griselda

    2014-12-01

    Psittacidae family is one of the most endangered groups in Mexico, since many of their habitats are disappearing. In this research, we characterized the land cover of the potential geographical distribu- tion area of eight extant parrot species within the Yucatan Peninsula. We used the Maximum Entropy algorithm (MaxEnt) and species historical records. To externally validate the models, we used presence and absence records from field observations (2010-2012). To characterize the distribution area, we used the vegetation and land use maps of INEGI Series IV (2007-2010). The models showed a good performance, according to the values of the area under the curve (AUC), which ranged between 0.88-0.95 with the training data and between 0.82-0.91 with test data. We located most of the species in sites where the models predicted their presence. In the Peninsula, over 76% of the parrots' potential geographical distribution area is forested, except for Amazona oratrix. The subhumid tropical forest is the best represented, and the livestock for land use. The most affected species within the Peninsula are: Amazona farinosa and A. oratrix. The Calakmul Biosphere Reserve is the most important area for parrots' protection in the Peninsula. Knowing the characteristics of distribution areas is an essential part in the establishment of parrots' conservation strategies.

  7. Statistical Analysis of Iberian Peninsula Megaliths Orientations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-García, A. C.

    2009-08-01

    Megalithic monuments have been intensively surveyed and studied from the archaeoastronomical point of view in the past decades. We have orientation measurements for over one thousand megalithic burial monuments in the Iberian Peninsula, from several different periods. These data, however, lack a sound understanding. A way to classify and start to understand such orientations is by means of statistical analysis of the data. A first attempt is done with simple statistical variables and a mere comparison between the different areas. In order to minimise the subjectivity in the process a further more complicated analysis is performed. Some interesting results linking the orientation and the geographical location will be presented. Finally I will present some models comparing the orientation of the megaliths in the Iberian Peninsula with the rising of the sun and the moon at several times of the year.

  8. Qatar Peninsula, United Arab Emirates, Persian Gulf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    In this view of the Qatar Peninsula, United Arab Emirates, Persian Gulf, (25.0N, 51.0E) a large oil spill, seen as a large dark toned mass in the water covers much of the surface of the western Persian Gulf. Qatar is one of several of the oil rich United Arab Emirate states. Oil spills and oil pollution of the environment are common occurrances associated with oil tanker loading operations.

  9. Tectonic map of the Arabian Peninsula

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, Glen F.

    1972-01-01

    This tectonic map of the Arabian peninsula, prepared for the Audi Arabian Ministry of Petroleum and Mineral Resource, is the first of a series of peninsular maps that attempt to show regional features. Much recent information resulting from detailed geologic mapping notably within the Arabian craton, from geophysical surveys, both airborne and oceanographic in adjacent seas, from deep exploratory drilling, and from photography from the Gemini and Apollo space programs, has been used in the tectonic evaluation.

  10. Arms Control in the Korean Peninsula.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-01

    defense expenditures of both sides are assessed as follows:4 The South Korean population outnumbers North Korea two to one. This presents difficulties for...99. Kim, Chum-Kon, The Korean War, Seoul, Kwang-Myong Publishing Company Ltd., 1980. The Text of Mutual Defense Treaty between Korea and the USA...AIR WAR COLLEGE RESEARCH REPORT ABSTRACT TITLE: Arms Control in the Korean Peninsula AUTHOR: Kim, Hyon, Colonel, Republic of Korea Air Force - 1

  11. Kuwait Oil Fires, Persian Gulf, Qatar Peninsula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This view up the Persian Gulf from the Qatar Peninsula into southern Iraq (25.5N, 51.0E) shows an excursion of the smoke plumes from the Kuwait oil fires set during the short Persian Gulf War. Smoke from the fires north of Kuwait City, extends across the Persian Gulf while a larger smoke plume from the southern fires heads into southern Saudi Arabia before beginning to spread out and become more diffuse.

  12. First Dinosaur Tracks from the Arabian Peninsula

    PubMed Central

    Schulp, Anne S.; Al-Wosabi, Mohammed; Stevens, Nancy J.

    2008-01-01

    Background The evolutionary history of Mesozoic terrestrial vertebrates from the Arabian Peninsula is virtually unknown. Despite vast exposures of rocky outcrops, only a handful of fossils have yet been described from the region. Here we report a multi-taxon dinosaur track assemblage near Madar village, 47 km north of Sana'a, Republic of Yemen. This represents the first dinosaur tracksite from the Arabian Peninsula, and the only multi-taxon dinosaur ichnosite in the Middle East. Methodology/Findings Measurements were taken directly from trackway impressions, following standard ichnological conventions. The presence of bipedal trackmakers is evidenced by a long series of pes imprints preserving smoothly rounded posterior margins, no evidence of a hallux, bluntly rounded digit tips and digital divarication angles characteristic of ornithopod dinosaurs. Nearby, eleven parallel quadrupedal trackways document a sauropod herd that included large and small individuals traveling together. Based on the morphology of manus impressions along with a narrow-gauged stance, the quadrupedal trackways were made by non-titanosauriform neosauropods. Additional isolated tracks and trackways of sauropod and ornithopod dinosaurs are preserved nearby. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, these discoveries present the most evocative window to date into the evolutionary history of dinosaurs of the Arabian Peninsula. Given the limited Mesozoic terrestrial record from the region, this discovery is of both temporal and geographic significance, and massive exposures of similarly-aged outcrops nearby offer great promise for future discoveries. PMID:18493306

  13. Watershed-scale reconstruction of middle and late Holocene paleoenvironmental changes on Melville Peninsula, Nunavut, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Jennifer K.; Finkelstein, Sarah A.

    2010-08-01

    Arctic regions have heightened sensitivity to climatic changes, however regional scale differences exist in the magnitude and timing of biotic responses. Melville Peninsula in the east-central Canadian Arctic is a transitional area with respect to modern climate, with a continental climate to the west, and more maritime influences to the east. This, and the presence of Thule archaeological sites, make the Peninsula an area of high importance for paleoclimate reconstructions. Lake sediment cores from two adjacent ultra-oligotrophic and very dilute lakes (SP02 and SP04) from interior Melville Peninsula (68°33'N and 83°17'W, 220 m a.s.l.) were analyzed for diatom assemblages (microscopic algae) to track paleoclimatic changes. High magnetic susceptibility, coarse-grained sediments, low organic matter, and lack of diatoms in sediments older than 6000 years BP confirm earlier suggestions of a persistent ice cap on the Peninsula. Peak diatom concentration and biogenic silica, and maximum values for sediment organic matter, between 4400 and 2900 years BP may indicate the Holocene Thermal Maximum (HTM). The timing of the HTM is similar to that of the Baffin region to the east. Decreases in these proxies, as well as small shifts in diatom assemblages following 2900 years BP indicate the advancement of Neoglacial cooling. The changes of the pre-industrial portion of the last millennium were of smaller magnitude than those of the HTM, but subtle changes in diatom assemblages after 750 years BP may be indicative of the Little Ice Age, the timing of which agrees well with that of Boothia Peninsula to the west. The Anthropocene is well marked in these records, with increases in diatom species richness from a pre-industrial maximum of 28-51 diatom species in the modern assemblage at Lake SP02. Planktonic diatoms appear in the 20th century, signalling profound ecological changes associated with longer ice-free seasons.

  14. Plants and soil microbes respond to recent warming on the Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amesbury, M. J.; Royles, J.; Hodgson, D.; Convey, P.; Griffiths, H.; Charman, D.

    2013-12-01

    The Antarctic Peninsula is one of the most rapidly warming regions on Earth, with temperature increases of as much as 3°C recorded since the 1950s. However, the longer-term context of this change is limited and existing records are not suitably located to be able to trace the spatial signature of change over time. This paper will present the first published results from a wider project exploiting peat moss banks spanning 10 degrees of latitude along the Antarctic Peninsula as an archive of late Holocene climate variability. These moss banks are ideal archives for palaeoclimate research as they are well-preserved by freezing, generally monospecific, easily dated by radiocarbon techniques and have sufficiently high accumulation rates to permit decadal resolution. A unique time series of past moss growth and soil microbial activity has been produced from a 150 year old moss bank at Lazarev Bay, Alexander Island, a site at the southern limit of significant plant growth in the Antarctic Peninsula region. We use accumulation rates, cellulose δ13C and fossil testate amoebae to provide an indication of ecosystem productivity. We show that both moss and microbial population growth rates rose rapidly in the 1960s, consistent with temperature change, although recently may have stalled, concurrent with other evidence. The increase in terrestrial plant growth rates and soil microbial activity is unprecedented in the last 150 years. The observed relationship between moss growth, microbial activity and climate at Lazarev Bay suggests that moss bank records have the potential to test the regional expression of temperature variability shown by instrumental data on the Antarctic Peninsula over centennial to millennial timescales, by providing long-term records of summer growth conditions, complementing the more distant and widely dispersed ice core records. As a result, we will conclude by placing the Lazarev Bay record into the wider context of the latest progress of analysis of

  15. Ground-water conditions and quality in the western part of Kenai Peninsula, southcentral Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glass, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    The western part of Kenai Peninsula in southcentral Alaska is bounded by Cook Inlet and the Kenai Mountains. Ground water is the predominant source of water for commercial, industrial, and domestic uses on the peninsula. Mean daily water use in an oil, gas, and chemical processing area north of Kenai is more than 3.5 million gallons. Unconsolidated sediments of glacial and fluvial origin are the most productive aquifers. In the upper (northwestern) peninsula, almost all water used is withdrawn from unconsolidated sediments, which may be as thick as 750 feet. In the lower peninsula, unconsolidated sediments are thinner and are absent on many hills. Water supplies in the lower peninsula are obtained from unconsolidated sediments and bedrock, and a public-water supply in parts of Homer is obtained from Bridge Creek. Throughout the peninsula, ground-water flow occurs primarily as localized flow controlled by permeability of aquifer materials and surface topography. The concentration of constituents analyzed in water from 312 wells indicated that the chemical quality of ground water for human consumption varies from marginal to excellent. Even though the median concentration of dissolved solids is low (152 milligrams per liter), much of the ground water on the peninsula does not meet water-quality regulations for public drinking water established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). About 8 percent of wells sampled yielded water having concentrations of dissolved arsenic that exceeded the USEPA primary maximum contaminant level of 50 micrograms per liter. Concentrations of dissolved arsenic were as great as 94 micrograms per liter. Forty-six percent of wells sampled yielded water having concentrations of dissolved iron greater than the USEPA secondary maximum contaminant level of 300 micrograms per liter. Unconsolidated sediments generally yield water having calcium, magnesium, and bicarbonate as its predominant ions. In some areas, ground water at

  16. 1. AT PENINSULA, THE CUYAHOGA RIVER MAKES A HAIRPIN TURN, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. AT PENINSULA, THE CUYAHOGA RIVER MAKES A HAIRPIN TURN, CARVING OUT A 'PENINSULA' AND THEREBY GIVING THE VILLAGE ITS NAME. hERE, THE REMAINS OF A DAM AND OF THE THOMAS & MOODY FLOUR MILL CAN BE SEEN. THE OHIO AND ERIE CANAL CROSSED THE CUYAHOGA RIVER AT THE PENINSULA AQUEDUCT, WHICH WAS LOCATED A SHORT DISTANCE TO THE NORTH. VIEW IS LOOKING SOUTHWEST TOWARD THE MAIN STREET BRIDGE. - Ohio & Erie Canal, Links Lake Erie at Cleveland & Ohio River at Portsmouth, Peninsula, Summit County, OH

  17. Post-fire regeneration patterns in the eastern Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pausas, Juli G.; Carbó, Ester; Neus Caturla, Rosa; Gil, José M.; Vallejo, Ramon

    1999-09-01

    Post-fire regeneration patterns (plant cover and richness) in the Valencia region (eastern Iberian Peninsula) are studied by analysing data from two different samplings after two periods of large fires (1991 and 1994). Emphasis is given to comparing different environmental conditions (thermo-Mediterranean vs. meso-Mediterranean; south facing vs. north facing slopes) and different bedrock types (limestone vs. marls). Results suggest that the highest post-fire cover and species richness is reached in thermo-Mediterranean conditions on limestone, and the main species are the resprouters Quercus coccifera and Brachypodium retusum. North-facing sites have higher plant cover than south-facing ones, and most life forms (trees, shrubs, grasses) have higher cover in these sites. Species richness is higher on north-facing sites than on the south-facing ones at the small scale (1 to 200 m 2), but differences were not significant at the highest scale studied (1 000 m 2). Plant species richness with increasing sampling area follows the classical log-log relationship; however, when species are segregated by life forms (woody species and herbs), different species-area relationships were found.

  18. Pleistocene leopards in the Iberian Peninsula: New evidence from palaeontological and archaeological contexts in the Mediterranean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchis, Alfred; Tormo, Carmen; Sauqué, Víctor; Sanchis, Vicent; Díaz, Rebeca; Ribera, Agustí; Villaverde, Valentín

    2015-09-01

    This study analyses the fossil record of leopards in the Iberian Peninsula. According to the systematic and morphometric features of new remains, identified mainly in Late Pleistocene palaeontological and archaeological sites of the Mediterranean region, they can be attributed to Panthera pardus Linnaeus 1758. The findings include the most complete leopard skeleton from the Iberian Peninsula and one of the most complete in Europe, found in a chasm (Avenc de Joan Guitón) south of Valencia. The new citations and published data are used to establish the leopard's distribution in the Iberian Peninsula, showing its maximum development during the Late Pleistocene. Some references suggest that the species survived for longer here (Lateglacial-Early Holocene) than in other parts of Europe. Finally, the contexts of appearance and origin of leopard remains are described and the processes of interaction with prehistoric human groups are assessed.

  19. Marine pelagic ecosystems: the west Antarctic Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Ducklow, Hugh W; Baker, Karen; Martinson, Douglas G; Quetin, Langdon B; Ross, Robin M; Smith, Raymond C; Stammerjohn, Sharon E; Vernet, Maria; Fraser, William

    2007-01-29

    The marine ecosystem of the West Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) extends from the Bellingshausen Sea to the northern tip of the peninsula and from the mostly glaciated coast across the continental shelf to the shelf break in the west. The glacially sculpted coastline along the peninsula is highly convoluted and characterized by deep embayments that are often interconnected by channels that facilitate transport of heat and nutrients into the shelf domain. The ecosystem is divided into three subregions, the continental slope, shelf and coastal regions, each with unique ocean dynamics, water mass and biological distributions. The WAP shelf lies within the Antarctic Sea Ice Zone (SIZ) and like other SIZs, the WAP system is very productive, supporting large stocks of marine mammals, birds and the Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba. Ecosystem dynamics is dominated by the seasonal and interannual variation in sea ice extent and retreat. The Antarctic Peninsula is one among the most rapidly warming regions on Earth, having experienced a 2 degrees C increase in the annual mean temperature and a 6 degrees C rise in the mean winter temperature since 1950. Delivery of heat from the Antarctic Circumpolar Current has increased significantly in the past decade, sufficient to drive to a 0.6 degrees C warming of the upper 300 m of shelf water. In the past 50 years and continuing in the twenty-first century, the warm, moist maritime climate of the northern WAP has been migrating south, displacing the once dominant cold, dry continental Antarctic climate and causing multi-level responses in the marine ecosystem. Ecosystem responses to the regional warming include increased heat transport, decreased sea ice extent and duration, local declines in icedependent Adélie penguins, increase in ice-tolerant gentoo and chinstrap penguins, alterations in phytoplankton and zooplankton community composition and changes in krill recruitment, abundance and availability to predators. The climate

  20. Marine pelagic ecosystems: the West Antarctic Peninsula

    PubMed Central

    Ducklow, Hugh W; Baker, Karen; Martinson, Douglas G; Quetin, Langdon B; Ross, Robin M; Smith, Raymond C; Stammerjohn, Sharon E; Vernet, Maria; Fraser, William

    2006-01-01

    The marine ecosystem of the West Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) extends from the Bellingshausen Sea to the northern tip of the peninsula and from the mostly glaciated coast across the continental shelf to the shelf break in the west. The glacially sculpted coastline along the peninsula is highly convoluted and characterized by deep embayments that are often interconnected by channels that facilitate transport of heat and nutrients into the shelf domain. The ecosystem is divided into three subregions, the continental slope, shelf and coastal regions, each with unique ocean dynamics, water mass and biological distributions. The WAP shelf lies within the Antarctic Sea Ice Zone (SIZ) and like other SIZs, the WAP system is very productive, supporting large stocks of marine mammals, birds and the Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba. Ecosystem dynamics is dominated by the seasonal and interannual variation in sea ice extent and retreat. The Antarctic Peninsula is one among the most rapidly warming regions on Earth, having experienced a 2°C increase in the annual mean temperature and a 6°C rise in the mean winter temperature since 1950. Delivery of heat from the Antarctic Circumpolar Current has increased significantly in the past decade, sufficient to drive to a 0.6°C warming of the upper 300 m of shelf water. In the past 50 years and continuing in the twenty-first century, the warm, moist maritime climate of the northern WAP has been migrating south, displacing the once dominant cold, dry continental Antarctic climate and causing multi-level responses in the marine ecosystem. Ecosystem responses to the regional warming include increased heat transport, decreased sea ice extent and duration, local declines in ice-dependent Adélie penguins, increase in ice-tolerant gentoo and chinstrap penguins, alterations in phytoplankton and zooplankton community composition and changes in krill recruitment, abundance and availability to predators. The climate/ecological gradients

  1. Seismic Hazard Assessment for the Baku City and Absheron Peninsula, Azerbaijan

    SciTech Connect

    Babayev, Gulam R.

    2006-03-23

    This paper deals with the seismic hazard assessment for Baku and the Absheron peninsula. The assessment is based on the information on the features of earthquake ground motion excitation, seismic wave propagation (attenuation), and site effect. I analyze active faults, seismicity, soil and rock properties, geological cross-sections, the borehole data of measured shear-wave velocity, lithology, amplification factor of each geological unit, geomorphology, topography, and basic rock and surface ground motions. To estimate peak ground acceleration (PGA) at the surface, PGA at the basic rock is multiplied by the amplification parameter of each surface layers. Quaternary soft deposits, representing a high risk due to increasing PGA values at surface, are studied in detail. For a near-zone target earthquake PGA values are compared to intensity at MSK-64 scale for the Absheron peninsula. The amplification factor for the Baku city is assessed and provides estimations for a level of a seismic motion and seismic intensity of the studied area.

  2. Military confidence building on the Korean Peninsula: possible first steps toward cooperation

    SciTech Connect

    Vannoni, M.

    1997-05-01

    The Korean Peninsula is one of the world`s most tense military confrontational sites. Nearly 2 million North Korean, South Korean, and U.S. troops face each other along the 255-km long military demarcation line. Confidence building measures (CBMs), particularly military ones, that address the security needs of both countries could decrease the danger of conflict and help create an environment where a peace regime might be negotiated. In spite of the present high level of mutual distrust, steps can still be taken to prepare for future development and implementation of CBMs. This paper defines some simple and specific first steps toward CBMs that might be useful on the Korean Peninsula.

  3. Climatic record of the Iberian peninsula from lake Moncortes' sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Min; Huguet, Carme; Rull, Valenti; Valero, Blas; Rosell-Mele, Antoni

    2014-05-01

    Climatic record of the Iberian peninsula from lake Moncortes' sediments Min Cao1, Carme Huguet1, Valenti Rull2, Blas L. Valero-Garces3, Antoni Rosell-Melé1,4 1Institut de Ciència i Tecnologia Ambientals (ICTA), Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Cerdanyola del Vallès, Catalonia, Spain; 2Institut de Botanic de Barcelona (CSIC), Passeig del Migdia s/n, 08038, Barcelona, Spain, 3 Instituto Pirenaico de Ecologıa (CSIC), Avda. Montañana 1005, 50059 Zaragoza, Spain, 4Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats (ICREA), 08010 Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. The continuing buildup of industrial greenhouse gases in the atmosphere and concomitant increase in global temperatures has made much of the world's society aware that decades to centuries of environmental change lie ahead, and that these will have profound economic, political and societal impacts. The Iberian Peninsula lies in the boundary between tropical and subtropical climates and seems to amplify the climatic signals form the northern hemisphere through both atmospheric and water circulation feedbacks, making it an ideal site to monitor Northern hemisphere climate changes. This extreme sensitivity to climatic changes also makes the Iberian Peninsula extremely vulnerable to future climate changes. This is why understanding sensitivity to climate change and the consequences it will have on both climate and the hydrological cycle is key to implement preventive measures. The aim of our study is to come up with a high resolution quantitative reconstruction of climate variability (temperature, production and precipitation) in the Iberian Peninsula from lake sediments. We also want to establish the relation between those changes and the ones observed in both ice cores from Greenland and paleotemperature records from marine sediments of the continental Iberian margin. For these reasons we sampled a core in Moncortes (42.3N, 0.99E), a lake of karstic origin with an average depth of 25m and an area of 0

  4. 27 CFR 9.114 - Old Mission Peninsula.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) The beginning point is on the Traverse City, Mich., U.S.G.S. map at the shoreline of the West Arm of...); (2) The boundary proceeds north 19 miles along the western shoreline of the Old Mission Peninsula... along the eastern shoreline of the peninsula to the southeast portion of an unmarked light-duty...

  5. HEAVY METAL CONTAMINATION IN THE TAIMYR PENINSULA, SIBERIAN ARCTIC

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Taimyr Peninsula is directly north of the world's largest heavy metal smelting complex (Norilsk, Russia). Despite this proximity, there has been little research to examine the extent of contamination of the Taimyr Peninsula, primarily because of the remoteness of this area. W...

  6. The climatology of dust aerosol over the arabian peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalaby, A.; Rappenglueck, B.; Eltahir, E. A. B.

    2015-01-01

    Dust storms are considered to be a natural hazard over the Arabian Peninsula, since they occur all year round with maximum intensity and frequency in Spring and Summer. The Regional Climate Model version 4 (RegCM4) has been used to study the climatology of atmospheric dust over the Arabian Peninsula from 1999 to 2012. This relatively long simulation period samples the meteorological conditions that determine the climatology of mineral dust aerosols over the Arabian Peninsula. The modeled Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) has been compared against ground-based observations of three Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) stations that are distributed over the Arabian Peninsula and daily space based observations from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), the Moderate resolution Imaging SpectroRadimeter (MODIS) and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI). The large scale atmospheric circulation and the land surface response that lead to dust uplifting have been analyzed. While the modeled AOD shows that the dust season extends from March to August with two pronounced maxima, one over the northern Arabian Peninsula in March with AOD equal to 0.4 and one over the southern Arabian Peninsula in July with AOD equal to 0.7, the observations show that the dust season extends from April to August with two pronounced maxima, one over the northern Arabian Peninsula in April with AOD equal to 0.5 and one over the southern Arabian Peninsula in July with AOD equal to 0.5. In spring a high pressure dominates the Arabian Peninsula and is responsible for advecting dust from southern and western part of the Arabian Peninsula to northern and eastern part of the Peninsula. Also, fast developed cyclones in northern Arabian Peninsula are responsible for producing strong dust storms over Iraq and Kuwait. However, in summer the main driver of the surface dust emission is the strong northerly wind ("Shamal") that transport dust from the northern Arabian Peninsula toward south parallel to the

  7. STS-42 Earth observation of Kamchatka Peninsula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-42 Earth observation taken aboard Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, with an electronic still camera (ESC) is of Kamchatka Peninsula in Russia. Mid-afternoon sun projects long shadows from volcanoes on the Kamchatka Peninsula. This flat-topped volcano with the sharp summit crater is Tobachinsky, over 3,085 kilometers high. Its last major eruption was in 1975 and 1976, but it has been very active since the middle of the Sixteenth Century. The shadows cast by the low sunlight brings out the dramatic relief of the volcano as well as the smaller morphologic features. Electronic still photography is a relatively new technology that enables a camera to electronically capture and digitize an image with resolution approaching film quality. The digital images from STS-42 were stored on a disk and brought home with the flight crewmembers for processing. ESC was developed by the JSC Man-Systems Division and this mission's application of it is part of a continuing evolutionary development le

  8. STS-42 Earth observation of Kamchatka Peninsula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-42 Earth observation taken aboard Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, with an electronic still camera (ESC) is of Kamchatka Peninsula in Russia. Mid-afternoon sun projects long shadows from volcanoes on the Kamchatka Peninsula. This flat-topped volcano with the sharp summit crater is Tobachinsky, over 3,085 kilometers high. Its last major eruption was in 1975 and 1976, but it has been very active since the middle of the Sixteenth Century. The shadows cast by the low sunlight brings out the dramatic relief of the volcano as well as the smaller morphologic features. For example, the small hills in the foreground and behind the central volcano are cinder cones, approximately only 200 meters high. Note the sharp triangular shadow from the conical volcano at right. Electronic still photography is a relatively new technology that enables a camera to electronically capture and digitize an image with resolution approaching film quality. The digital images from STS-42 were stored on a disk

  9. Storage of treated sewage effluent and stormwater in a saline aquifer, Pinellas Peninsula, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenshein, J.S.; Hickey, J.J.

    1977-01-01

    The Pinellas Peninsula, an area of 750 square kilometres (290 square miles) in coastal west-central Florida, is a small hydrogeologic replica of Florida. Most of the Peninsula's water supply is imported from well fields as much as 65 kilometres (40 miles) inland. Stresses on the hydrologic environment of the Peninsula and on adjacent water bodies, resulting from intensive water-resources development and waste discharge, have resulted in marked interest in subsurface storage of waste water (treated effluent and untreated storm water) and in future retrieval of the stored water for nonpotable use. If subsurface storage is approved by regulatory agencies, as much as 265 megalitres per day (70 million gallons a day) of waste water could be stored underground within a few years, and more than 565 megalitres per day (150 million gallons a day) could be stored in about 25 years. This storage would constitute a large resource of nearly fresh water in the saline aquifers underlying about 520 square kilometres (200 square miles) of the Peninsula.The upper 1,060 metres (3,480 feet) of the rock column underlying four test sites on the Pinellas Peninsula have been explored. The rocks consist chiefly of limestone and dolomite. Three moderately to highly transmissive zones, separated by leaky confining beds, (low permeability limestone) from about 225 to 380 metres (740 to 1,250 feet) below mean sea level, have been identified in the lower part of the Floridan aquifer in the Avon Park Limestone. Results of withdrawal and injection tests in Pinellas County indicate that the middle transmissive zone has the highest estimated transmissivity-about 10 times other reported values. The chloride concentration of water in this zone, as well as in the two other transmissive zones in the Avon Park Limestone in Pinellas Peninsula, is about 19,000 milligrams per litre. If subsurface storage is approved and implemented, this middle zone probably would be used for storage of the waste water and

  10. Sinai Peninsula, Shaded Relief and Colored Height

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The Sinai Peninsula, located between Africa and Asia, is a result of those two continents pulling apart from each other. Earth's crust is cracking, stretching, and lowering along the two northern branches of the Red Sea, namely the Gulf of Suez, seen here on the west (left), and the Gulf of Aqaba, seen to the east (right). This color-coded shaded relief image shows the triangular nature of the peninsula, with the coast of the Mediterranean Sea forming the northern side of the triangle. The Suez Canal can be seen as the narrow vertical blue line in the upper left connecting the Red Sea to the Mediterranean.

    The peninsula is divided into three distinct parts; the northern region consisting chiefly of sandstone, plains and hills, the central area dominated by the Tih Plateau, and the mountainous southern region where towering peaks abound. Much of the Sinai is deeply dissected by river valleys, or wadis, that eroded during an earlier geologic period and break the surface of the plateau into a series of detached massifs with a few scattered oases.

    Two visualization methods were combined to produce the image: shading and color coding of topographic height. The shade image was derived by computing topographic slope in the northwest-southeast direction, so that northwest slopes appear bright and southeast slopes appear dark. Color coding is directly related to topographic height, with green at the lower elevations, rising through yellow and tan, to white at the highest elevations.

    Elevation data used in this image were acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect 3-D measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter (approximately 200-foot

  11. Tropospheric ozone variability over the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Pavan S.; Bortoli, D.; Salgado, R.; Antón, M.; Costa, M. J.; Silva, A. M.

    2011-01-01

    To study tropospheric ozone variability over the Iberian Peninsula (IP), NASA Langley TOR data have been analyzed for the 1979-2005 period. The maximum tropospheric ozone concentration over the entire IP was found in June (˜41 DU) and a minimum in December (˜29 DU). However the maximum tropospheric ozone concentration was found over West Atlantic Coast (WAC) (˜44 DU), followed by Mediterranean Coast (MC) (˜42 DU), North Atlantic Coast (NAC) (˜41 DU), Central Iberian Peninsula (CIP) (˜40 DU) and Pyrenees Mountain Range (PMR) (˜39 DU) during June-July. The high concentration of tropospheric ozone in July over the Atlantic Ocean near IP is due to the presence of Azores anticyclone and related photochemistry and dynamics, and affects the observed higher tropospheric ozone concentration over WAC zone. Strong seasonal cycle in tropospheric ozone concentration has been observed with large variation over NAC (˜49%), followed by WAC (˜48%) and MC (˜41%) compared to CIP and PMR (˜38%) zones. When the data are compared over the IP for the two periods (1979-1993 and 1997-2005), a systematic increase in the number of months with higher tropospheric ozone concentration has been observed during the second period with respect to the first. These increases are almost 8% to 24% over NAC, 6% to 17% over WAC, 5% to 24% over CIP, 6% to 23% over MC and 13% to 18% over PMR, zones. It has been observed that topography, climatology and population density distribution plays a crucial role in the variability of tropospheric ozone concentration over the IP.

  12. Geomorphic status of regulated rivers in the Iberian Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Lobera, G; Besné, P; Vericat, D; López-Tarazón, J A; Tena, A; Aristi, I; Díez, J R; Ibisate, A; Larrañaga, A; Elosegi, A; Batalla, R J

    2015-03-01

    River regulation by dams modifies flow regimes, interrupts the transfer of sediment through channel networks, and alters downstream bed dynamics, altogether affecting channel form and processes. So far, most studies on the geomorphic impacts of dams are restricted to single rivers, or even single river stretches. In this paper we analyse the geomorphic status of 74 river sites distributed across four large basins in the Iberian Peninsula (i.e. 47 sites located downstream of dams). For this purpose, we combine field data with hydrological data available from water agencies, and analyse historical (1970) and current aerial photographs. In particular, we have developed a Geomorphic Status (GS) index that allows us to assess the physical structure of a given channel reach and its change through time. The GS encompasses a determination of changes in sedimentary units, sediment availability, bar stability and channel flow capacity. Sites are statistically grouped in four clusters based on contrasted physical and climate characteristics. Results emphasise that regulation changes river's flow regime with a generalized reduction of the magnitude and frequency of floods (thus flow competence). This, in addition to the decrease downstream sediment supply, results in the loss of active bars as they are encroached by vegetation, to the point that only reaches with little or no regulation maintain exposed sedimentary deposits. The GS of regulated river reaches is negatively correlated with magnitude of the impoundment (regulation). Heavily impacted reaches present channel stabilization and, in contrast to the hydrological response, the distance and number of tributaries do not reverse the geomorphic impact of the dams. Stabilization limits river dynamics and may contribute to the environmental degradation of the fluvial ecosystem. Overall, results describe the degree of geomorphological alteration experienced by representative Iberian rivers mostly because of regulation

  13. Population model for Alaska Peninsula sea otters. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Eberhardt, L.L.; Siniff, D.B.

    1988-12-31

    This study was conducted to provide a basis for assessing risks of oil spills to sea otter populations along the Alaska Peninsula. The principal efforts were devoted to analyzing the available data on population dynamics. Curves characterizing survivorship and reproduction for sea otters were devised and fitted to several data sets. A detailed review was conducted of methods of assessing population dynamics data, and several new techniques (e.g., bootstrapping) were applied to available data. A simplified model for use with Alaska Peninsula sea otter populations was devised and implemented in a 'spreadsheet' format. Various aspects of model development and data on population size in Alaska Peninsula areas were reviewed.

  14. Data Collection in the Arabian Peninsula for Nuclear Explosion Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, A; Tkalcic, H; Al-Amri, A M S

    2003-07-11

    We report results from the second year of our project (ROA0101-35) to collect seismic event and waveform data recorded in and around the Arabian Peninsula. This effort involves several elements. We have a temporary broadband seismic station operating near the IMS primary array site (PS38) in central Saudi Arabia. We recently installed two temporary broadband stations in the United Arab Emirates (funded by NNSA NA-24 Office of Non-Proliferation & International Security). We are working with King Abdulaziz city for Science and Technology to collect and analyze data from the Saudi National Seismic Network, that consist of 37 digital three-component stations (26 broadband and 11 short-period). We are collaborating with Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research (KISR) to analyze data from their 8 station national seismic network. We participated in the Workshop on Reference Events odnear the Dead Sea Rift held in Paris, France in October 2002. In this paper we present results of these efforts including integration of the raw data into LLNL's Seismic Research Database and preliminary analysis of event locations and source parameters and inference of earth structure.

  15. Heat flow through the sea bottom around the Yucatan Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khutorskoy, M. D.; Fernandez, R.; Kononov, V. I.; Polyak, B. G.; Matveev, V. G.; Rot, A. A.

    1990-02-01

    Heat flow studies were conducted in January-February 1987, off the Atlantic Coast of Mexico on board the R/V Akademik Nikolai Strakhov. Two areas were surveyed, one transecting the Salt Dome Province and the Campeche Canyon, in the Gulf of Mexico, and the other, on the eastern flank of the Yucatan Peninsula. Conductive heat flow through the bottom sediments was determined as the product of vertical temperature gradient and in situ thermal conductivity, measured with a thermal probe using a multithermistor array and real-time processing capabilities. Forward two-dimensional modeling allows us to estimate heat flow variations at both sites from local disturbances and to obtain average heat flow values of 51 mW/m2 for the transect within the Gulf of Mexico and 38 and 69 mW/m2 for two basins within the Yucatan area. Sea bottom relief has a predominant effect over other environmental factors in the scatter of heat flow determination in the Gulf of Mexico.

  16. Heat flow through the sea bottom around the Yucatan Peninsula

    SciTech Connect

    Khutorskoy, M.D.; Kononov, V.I.; Polyak, B.G. ); Fernandez, R. ); Matveev, V.G.; Rot, A.A. )

    1990-02-10

    Heat flow studies were conducted in January-February 1987, off the Atlantic Coast of Mexico on board the R/V Akademik Nikolai Strakhov. Two areas were surveyed, one transecting the Salt Dome Province and the Campeche Canyon, in the Gulf of Mexico, and the other, on the eastern flank of the Yucatan Peninsula. Conductive heat flow through the bottom sediments was determined as the product of vertical temperature gradient and in situ thermal conductivity, measured with a thermal probe using a multithermistor array and real-time processing capabilities. Forward two-dimensional modeling allows one to estimate heat flow variations at both sites from local disturbances and to obtain average heat flow values of 51 mW/m{sup 2} for the transect within the Gulf of Mexico and 38 and 69 mW/m{sup 2} for two basins within the Yucatan area. Sea bottom relief has a predominant effect over other environmental factors in the scatter of heat flow determination in the Gulf of Mexico.

  17. Shaded Relief with Height as Color, Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This shaded relief image of Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula show a subtle, but unmistakable, indication of the Chicxulub impact crater. Most scientists now agree that this impact was the cause of the Cretatious-Tertiary Extinction, the event 65 million years ago that marked the sudden extinction of the dinosaurs as well as the majority of life then on Earth.

    Most of the peninsula is visible here, along with the island of Cozumel off the east coast. The Yucatan is a plateau composed mostly of limestone and is an area of very low relief with elevations varying by less than a few hundred meters (about 500 feet.) In this computer-enhanced image the topography has been greatly exaggerated to highlight a semicircular trough, the darker green arcing line at the upper left corner of the peninsula. This trough is only about 3 to 5 meters (10 to 15 feet) deep and is about 5 km. wide (3 miles), so subtle that if you walked across it you probably would not notice it, and is a surface expression of the crater's outer boundary. Scientists believe the impact, which was centered just off the coast in the Caribbean, altered the subsurface rocks such that the overlying limestone sediments, which formed later and erode very easily, would preferentially erode on the vicinity of the crater rim. This formed the trough as well as numerous sinkholes (called cenotes) which are visible as small circular depressions.

    Two visualization methods were combined to produce the image: shading and color coding of topographic height. The shade image was derived by computing topographic slope in the northwest-southeast direction, so that northwestern slopes appear bright and southeastern slopes appear dark. Color coding is directly related to topographic height, with green at the lower elevations, rising through yellow and tan, to white at the highest elevations.

    For a smaller, annotated version of this image, please select Figure 1, below: [figure removed for brevity, see original site] (Large

  18. 27 CFR 9.114 - Old Mission Peninsula.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... They are entitled: (1) Elk Rapids, Mich. (1957); and (2) Traverse City, Mich. (1957). (c) Boundary. The... until it reaches the lighthouse near Old Mission Point at the north side of the Peninsula on the...

  19. 27 CFR 9.114 - Old Mission Peninsula.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... They are entitled: (1) Elk Rapids, Mich. (1957); and (2) Traverse City, Mich. (1957). (c) Boundary. The... until it reaches the lighthouse near Old Mission Point at the north side of the Peninsula on the...

  20. 27 CFR 9.114 - Old Mission Peninsula.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... They are entitled: (1) Elk Rapids, Mich. (1957); and (2) Traverse City, Mich. (1957). (c) Boundary. The... until it reaches the lighthouse near Old Mission Point at the north side of the Peninsula on the...

  1. 27 CFR 9.114 - Old Mission Peninsula.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... They are entitled: (1) Elk Rapids, Mich. (1957); and (2) Traverse City, Mich. (1957). (c) Boundary. The... until it reaches the lighthouse near Old Mission Point at the north side of the Peninsula on the...

  2. Endemic earthworms (Oligochaeta: Lumbricidae) of the Balkan Peninsula: a review.

    PubMed

    Trakić, Tanja; Valchovski, Hristo; Stojanović, Mirjana

    2016-11-10

    A list of the endemic earthworms of the Balkan Peninsula is presented. Comprehensive information on the ecology, distribution on the Balkan Peninsula and zoogeographical type of all endemics is given. The list comprises 90 species and subspecies, belonging to 11 genera of the family Lumbricidae. The largest number of the Balkan endemic earthworms belongs to a narrow range group (63.3%). Broad range endemic species take part with 36.7%. Our study shows that the degree of endemism on the Balkan Peninsula is extremely high (about 40%) suggesting an important process of autochthonous speciation on the Balkan Peninsula. This appearance is attributable to relative isolation of the mountains compared to the lowlands within the context of paleoenvironmental changes.

  3. Joint Vision for the Korean Peninsula -- Can We Get There?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-11

    for the Alliance of the United States and the Republic of Korea . The joint statement laid out a shared vision for the Korean Peninsula and the...setting the stage for peaceful reunification, elimination of North Korean nuclear weapons programs and promoting human rights in North Korea . North...Korea’s unpredictability not only poses a threat on the Korean Peninsula but to the entire Northeast Asia region. North Korea is a multifaceted

  4. An intersection model for estimating sea otter mortality along the Kenai Peninsula

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bodkin, J.L.; Udevitz, M.S.; Loughlin, T.R.

    1994-01-01

    We developed an intersection model to integrate parameters estimated from three distinct data sets that resulted from the Exxon Valdez oil spill: (1) the distribution, amount, and movements of spilled oil; (2) the distribution and abundance of sea otters along the Kenai Peninsula; and (3) the estimates of site-specific sea otter mortality relative to oil exposure from otters captured for rehabilitation and from collected carcasses. In this chapter, we describe the data sets and provide examples of how they can be used in the model to generate acute loss estimates. We also examine the assumptions required for the model and provide suggestions for improving and applying the model.

  5. Evaporite encrustations and sulphide oxidation products from the southern Antarctic peninsula.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vennum, W.R.

    1980-01-01

    White evaporite encrustations collected from 66 sites scattered over 30 000km2 of S.Antarctic Peninsula are dominantly gypsum and calcite, and subordinate aragonite and thenardite. Natrojarosite occurs as locally developed yellow surface stains on c30% of the white encrustations examined. Water, which forms by the melting of snow blown into cracks in highly fractured rocks by ground blizzards, dissolves soluble ions from minerals in these rocks as it percolates into them. The white encrustations appear to be deposited when this water later rises to the surface by capillary action and evaporates.-from Author Antarctica chemical weathering evaporites sulphide oxidation.

  6. Evidence for Bombus occidentalis (Hymenoptera: Apidae) Populations in the Olympic Peninsula, the Palouse Prairie, and Forests of Northern Idaho

    PubMed Central

    Rhoades, Paul R.; Koch, Jonathan B.; Waits, Lisette P.; Strange, James P.; Eigenbrode, Sanford D.

    2016-01-01

    Since the mid-1990s, Bombus occidentalis (Green) has declined from being one of the most common to one of the rarest bumble bee species in the Pacific Northwest of the United States. Although its conservation status is unresolved, a petition to list this species as endangered or threatened was recently submitted to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. To shed light on the conservation situation and inform the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service decision, we report on the detection and abundance of B. occidentalis following bumble bee collection between 2012 and 2014 across the Pacific Northwest. Collection occurred from the San Juan Islands and Olympic peninsula east to northern Idaho and northeastern Oregon, excluding the arid region in central Washington. B. occidentalis was observed at 23 collection sites out of a total of 234. With the exception of three sites on the Olympic peninsula, all of these were in the southeastern portion of the collection range. PMID:26856817

  7. SRTM Anaglyph: Sredinnyy Khrebet, Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Kamchatka Peninsula in eastern Russia is shown in this scene created from a preliminary elevation model derived from the first data collected during the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) on February 12, 2000. Sredinnyy Khrebet, the mountain range that makes up the spine of the peninsula, is a chain of active volcanic peaks. Pleistocene and recent glaciers have carved the broad valleys and jagged ridges that are common here. The relative youth of the volcanism is revealed by the topography as infilling and smoothing of the otherwise rugged terrain by lava, ash, and pyroclastic flows, particularly surrounding the high peaks in the south central part of the image. Elevations here range from near sea level up to 2,618 meters (8,590 feet).

    This anaglyph was produced by first shading a preliminary SRTM elevation model. The stereoscopic effect was then created by generating two differing perspectives, one for each eye. When viewed through special glasses, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of Earth's surface in its full three dimensions. Anaglyph glasses cover the left eye with a red filter and cover the right eye with a blue filter.

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11,2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense, and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by

  8. Neotectonics Of The Hengchun Peninsula, southern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, P.; Chen, Y.; Liu, C.; Song, K.

    2006-12-01

    The southern tip of Taiwan, the Hengchun Peninsula, has recently emerged as situated in between the collisional accretionary prism and the predecessor of the submarine forearc rise. The east-dipping Hengchun Fault (HCF), located in the middle part of the Hengchun Peninsula and oriented in the direction of NNW, can be clearly identified by the landform contrast between the mountain and the valley in the east and west respectively. This contrast confirms the thrust component of the HCF. In the hanging wall of the HCF, the raised marine terraces are widely distributed in the Hikou area, whose linear scarps coincidentally strike in the NNW, identical to the HCF. The ages of the terraces has been previously presented as 6 ka implying that the marine terraces have been uplifted by the activity of HCF during the past 6 kyr. To the south, we also discover a series of continuous and discrete scarps in the Maanshan area, which are also distributed sub-parallel or parallel to the HCF. We suggest that the scarps are formed by a series of faults, which are ramified from the northern segment of the HCF. Based on the recent GPS measurements, we divide the displacement vector field into parallel and normal to the HCF and suppose that the HCF has recently acted as a left-lateral strike- slip fault. It is obvious that there is a fault bend (from NNW to WNW) located in the immediate south of the Maanshan, which may be the cause to explain the wider fault zone composed a series of faults mentioned above. An active anticline is discovered in the offshore area of Western Hengchun Tableland (WHT) to the west, which is tentatively named as Western Hengchun Tablelend Anticline (WHTA). Within and around the WHT, marine terraces are also widely distributed according to the previous studies. The eastward (range-ward) tilting surface of the tableland itself implies its tectonic origin. Since the WHT is located on the eastern limb of the anticline, the eastward tilting of the WHT may be

  9. 3-D Perspective Kamchatka Peninsula Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This perspective view shows the western side of the volcanically active Kamchatka Peninsula in eastern Russia. The image was generated using the first data collected during the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). In the foreground is the Sea of Okhotsk. Inland from the coast, vegetated floodplains and low relief hills rise toward snow capped peaks. The topographic effects on snow and vegetation distribution are very clear in this near-horizontal view. Forming the skyline is the Sredinnyy Khrebet, the volcanic mountain range that makes up the spine of the peninsula. High resolution SRTM topographic data will be used by geologists to study how volcanoes form and to understand the hazards posed by future eruptions. This image was generated using topographic data from SRTM and an enhanced true-color image from the Landsat 7 satellite. This image contains about 2,400 meters (7,880 feet) of total relief. The topographic expression was enhanced by adding artificial shading as calculated from the SRTM elevation model. The Landsat data was provided by the United States Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observations Systems (EROS) Data Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota. SRTM, launched on February 11, 2000, used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. To collect the 3-D SRTM data, engineers added a 60- meter-long (200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. SRTM collected three dimensional measurements of nearly 80 percent of the Earth's surface. SRTM is a cooperative project between NASA, the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense, and the German and Italian space agencies. Size: 33.3 km (20.6 miles) wide x 136 km (84 miles) coast to skyline. Location: 58.3 deg. North lat., 160 deg. East long. Orientation: Easterly view, 2 degrees

  10. 3-D Perspective View, Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This perspective view shows the western side of the volcanically active Kamchatka Peninsula in eastern Russia. The image was generated using the first data collected during the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). In the foreground is the Sea of Okhotsk. Inland from the coast, vegetated floodplains and low relief hills rise toward snow capped peaks. The topographic effects on snow and vegetation distribution are very clear in this near-horizontal view. Forming the skyline is the Sredinnyy Khrebet, the volcanic mountain range that makes up the spine of the peninsula. High resolution SRTM topographic data will be used by geologists to study how volcanoes form and to understand the hazards posed by future eruptions.

    This image was generated using topographic data from SRTM and an enhanced true-color image from the Landsat 7 satellite. This image contains about 2,400 meters (7,880 feet) of total relief. The topographic expression was enhanced by adding artificial shading as calculated from the SRTM elevation model. The Landsat data was provided by the United States Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observations Systems (EROS) Data Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

    SRTM, launched on February 11, 2000, used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar(SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. To collect the 3-D SRTM data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. SRTM collected three-dimensional measurements of nearly 80 percent of the Earth's surface. SRTM is a cooperative project between NASA, the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense, and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, Washington, D.C.

    Size: 33.3 km (20.6 miles) wide x

  11. Shaded Relief Color Wrapped, Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This shaded relief topographic image shows the western side of the volcanically active Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia. The data are from the first C-band mapping swath of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). On the left side are five rivers, which flow northwest to the Sea of Okhotsk. These rivers are, from the south to north, Tigil, Amanina, Voyampolka, Zhilovaya, and Kakhtana. The broad, flat floodplains of the rivers are shown in yellow. These rivers are important spawning grounds for salmon. In the right side of the image is the Sredinnyy Khrebet, the volcanic mountain range that makes up the 3spine2 of the peninsula. The cluster of hills to the lower right is a field of small dormant volcanoes. High resolution SRTM topographic data will be used by geologists to study how volcanoes form and understand the hazards posed by future eruptions.

    This image was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. Colors show the elevation as measured by SRTM. Each cycle of colors (from red through green back to red) represents an equal amount of elevation difference (400 meters, or 1300 feet)similar to contour lines on a standard topographic map. This image contains about 2300 meters (7500 feet) of total relief. For the shading, a computer-generated artificial light source illuminates the elevation data to produce a pattern of light and shadows. Slopes facing the light appear bright, while those facing away are shaded. Shaded relief maps are commonly used in applications such as geologic mapping and land use planning.

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11,2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission is designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast

  12. Environmental geophysics at the Southern Bush River Peninsula, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, B.E.; Miller, S.F.; McGinnis, L.D.

    1995-05-01

    Geophysical studies have been conducted at five sites in the southern Bush River Peninsula in the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. The goals of the studies were to identify areas containing buried metallic objects and to provide diagnostic signatures of the hydrogeologic framework of the site. These studies indicate that, during the Pleistocene Epoch, alternating stands of high and low sea level resulted in a complex pattern of channel-fill deposits. Paleochannels of various sizes and orientations have been mapped throughout the study area by means of ground-penetrating radar and EM-31 techniques. The EM-31 paleochannel signatures are represented onshore either by conductivity highs or lows, depending on the depths and facies of the fill sequences. A companion study shows the features as conductivity highs where they extend offshore. This erosional and depositional system is environmentally significant because of the role it plays in the shallow groundwater flow regime beneath the site. Magnetic and electromagnetic anomalies outline surficial and buried debris throughout the areas surveyed. On the basis of geophysical measurements, large-scale (i.e., tens of feet) landfilling has not been found in the southern Bush River Peninsula, though smaller-scale dumping of metallic debris and/or munitions cannot be ruled out.

  13. A Study of the San Andreas Slip Rate on the San Francisco Peninsula, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigelson, L. M.; Prentice, C.; Grove, K.; Caskey, J.; Ritz, J. F.; Leslie, S.

    2008-12-01

    The most recent large earthquake on the San Andreas Fault (SAF) along the San Francisco Peninsula was the great San Francisco earthquake of April 18, 1906, when a Mw= 7.8 event ruptured 435-470 km of the northern SAF. The slip rate for this segment of the SAF is incompletely known but is important for clarifying seismic hazard in this highly urbanized region. A previous study south of our site has found an average slip rate of 17±4 mm/yr for the late Holocene on the San Francisco Peninsula segment of the SAF. North of the Golden Gate, the SAF joins the San Gregorio Fault with an estimated slip rate of 6 mm/yr. A trench study north of where the two faults join has produced an average late Holocene slip rate of 24±3 mm/yr. To refine slip-rate estimates for the peninsula segment of the SAF, we excavated a trench across the fault where we located an abandoned channel between the San Andreas and Lower Crystal Springs reservoirs. This abandoned channel marks the time when a new channel cut across the SAF; the new channel has since been offset in a right-lateral sense about 20 m. The measured amount of offset and the age of the youngest fluvial sediments in the abandoned channel will yield a slip rate for the San Francisco Peninsula segment of the SAF. We excavated a trench across the abandoned channel and logged the exposed sediments. Our investigation revealed channel-fill alluvium incised and filled by probable debris flow sediments, and a wide fault zone in bedrock, west of the channel deposits. The most prominent fault is probably the strand that moved in 1906. We completed a total-station survey to more precisely measure the offset stream, and to confirm that the fault exposed in the trench aligns with a fence that is known to have been offset 2.8m during the 1906 earthquake. We interpret the debris flow sediments to represent the last phase of deposition prior to abandonment of the old channel. We collected samples for radiocarbon dating, optically stimulated

  14. Trichinella pseudospiralis in the Iberian peninsula.

    PubMed

    Zamora, M J; Alvarez, M; Olmedo, J; Blanco, M C; Pozio, E

    2015-06-15

    Nematode worms of the genus Trichinella are zoonotic parasites circulating in most continents, including Europe. In Spain, Trichinella spiralis and Trichinella britovi are highly prevalent in wildlife but seldom in domestic pigs. In Portugal, only T. britovi was documented in wild carnivores. In the period 2006-2013 in Spain, 384 (0.0001%) pigs and 1399 (0.20%) wild boars (Sus scrofa) were positive for Trichinella spp. larvae, which were identified as T. spiralis or T. britovi. In 2014, Trichinella pseudospiralis larvae were isolated from a wild boar hunted in the Gerona province, Cataluña region, North-East of Spain, near the border to France. This is the first report of T. pseudospiralis in the Iberian peninsula, which suggests a broad distribution area of this zoonotic nematode in Europe. Since larvae of this Trichinella species do not encapsulate in the host muscles, they can be detected only by artificial digestion of muscle samples. T. pseudospiralis is the only Trichinella species infecting both mammals and birds. Birds can spread this pathogen over great distances including islands triggering new foci of infections in areas previously considered at low risk for this pathogen.

  15. Cenozoic epeirogeny of the Arabian Peninsula from drainage modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, J. W. P.; Roberts, G. G.; Hoggard, M. J.; White, N. J.

    2014-10-01

    is generally accepted that the Arabian Peninsula has been uplifted by subcrustal processes. Positive residual depth anomalies from oceanic crust in the Red Sea and in the Gulf of Aden suggest that a region surrounding this peninsula is dynamically supported. Admittance calculations, surface wave tomography studies, and receiver function analyses all imply that regional topography is generated and maintained by some combination of mantle convective circulation and lithospheric thickness changes. Despite these significant advances, the spatial and temporal uplift rate history of the Arabian Peninsula is not well known. Here we show that a regional uplift rate history can be obtained by jointly inverting 225 longitudinal river profiles that drain this peninsula. Our strategy assumes that shapes of individual river profiles are controlled by uplift rate history and moderated by erosional processes. We used local measurements of incision rate to calibrate the relevant erosional parameters. In our inverse algorithm, uplift rate is permitted to vary smoothly as a function of space and time but upstream drainage area remains invariant. We also assume that knickzone migration is not lithologically controlled. Implications of these important assumptions have been investigated. Our results suggest that the Arabian Peninsula underwent two phases of asymmetric uplift during the last 20-30 Ma at rates of 0.05-0.1 mm a-1. The southwestern flank of the peninsula has been uplifted by 1.5-2.5 km. Regional stratigraphic constraints, the age and composition of volcanism, paleosol formation, incised peneplains, emergent marine terraces, and thermochronometric measurements corroborate our calculated patterns of uplift. Progressive development of three domal swells along the western margin of the peninsula is consistent with localized upwelling of hot asthenospheric mantle.

  16. Ocean Drilling Program Leg 178 (Antarctic Peninsula): Sedimentology of glacially influenced continental margin topsets and foresets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eyles, N.; Daniels, J.; Osterman, L.E.; Januszczak, N.

    2001-01-01

    Ocean Drilling Program Leg 178 (February-April 1998) drilled two sites (Sites 1097 and 1103) on the outer Antarctic Peninsula Pacific continental shelf. Recovered strata are no older than late Miocene or early Pliocene (<4.6 Ma). Recovery at shallow depths in loosely consolidated and iceberg-turbated bouldery sediment was poor but improved with increasing depth and consolidation to allow description of lithofacies and biofacies and interpretation of depositional environment. Site 1097 lies on the outer shelf within Marguerite Trough which is a major outlet for ice expanding seaward from the Antarctic Peninsula and reached a maximum depth drilled of 436.6 m below the sea floor (mbsf). Seismic stratigraphic data show flat-lying upper strata resting on strata that dip gently seaward. Uppermost strata, to a depth of 150 mbsf, were poorly recovered, but data suggest they consist of diamictites containing reworked and abraded marine microfauna. This interval is interpreted as having been deposited largely as till produced by subglacial cannibalization of marine sediments (deformation till) recording ice sheet expansion across the shelf. Underlying gently dipping strata show massive, stratified and graded diamictite facies with common bioturbation and slump stuctures that are interbedded with laminated and massive mudstones with dropstones. The succession contains a well-preserved in situ marine microfauna typical of open marine and proglacial marine environments. The lower gently dipping succession at Site 1097 is interpreted as a complex of sediment gravity flows formed of poorly sorted glacial debris. Site 1103 was drilled in that part of the continental margin that shows uppermost flat-lying continental shelf topsets overlying steeper dipping slope foresets seaward of a structural mid-shelf high. Drilling reached a depth of 363 mbsf with good recovery in steeply dipping continental slope foreset strata. Foreset strata are dominated by massive and chaotically

  17. Rhizobium anhuiense as the predominant microsymbionts of Lathyrus maritimus along the Shandong Peninsula seashore line.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Wang, En Tao; Liu, Yajing; Li, Xiangyue; Yu, Bing; Ren, Chenggang; Liu, Wei; Li, Yunzhao; Xie, Zhihong

    2016-09-01

    Beach pea [Lathyrus maritimus Bigelow, or Lathyrus japonicus subsp. maritimus (L.) P.W. Ball] is a wild legume distributed on the seashore line, and the rhizobia nodulating with this plant have been reported only rarely. In order to reveal the diversity of beach pea rhizobia on the seashore line of Shandong Peninsula, China, a total of 124 bacterial strains were isolated from the root nodules of beach pea plants collected from five sites. All the isolates were divided into five recA types after screening by recA gene sequence analysis and they consisted of Rhizobium anhuiense covering 122 symbiotic isolates in three recA types, as well as two single isolates Rhizobium sp. and Rhizobium lusitanum representing distinct recA types. The recA genotype III of R. anhuiense (103 isolates) represented by strain YIC11270 was dominant at all five sampling sites. Identical symbiotic genes (nodC and nifH) were detected in the three recA genotypes of R. anhuiense isolates that were closely related to those of the pea and faba rhizobia. This study clarified that R. anhuiense was the main symbiont for beach pea rhizobia on the seashore line of Shandong Peninsula. The low level genetic diversity of beach pea rhizobia revealed by both MLSA and the symbiotic genes might be related to the strong selection pressure produced by the saline-alkaline environment and the host plants.

  18. Composition and microstructure of Roman metallic artefacts of Southwestern Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valério, P.; Voráčová, E.; Silva, R. J. C.; Araújo, M. F.; Soares, A. M. M.; Arruda, A. M.; Pereira, C.

    2015-10-01

    The Roman invasion introduces new alloys and metallurgical practices in Iberian Peninsula. The southwestern end of this region has many evidences of connections with the Roman World, but there are no studies about the manufacture and use of copper-based artefacts during this period. Therefore, a set of about 20 ornaments, tools and small attachments recovered at the Roman sites of Monte Molião and Cidade das Rosas was studied by an analytical approach combining micro-EDXRF, optical microscopy, SEM-EDS and Vickers microhardness testing. The artefact composition shows a good correlation with function, namely pure copper for nails and rivets, low-tin bronze (2-6 wt% Sn) for basic tools, high-tin bronze (14 wt% Sn) for fibulae and high-lead bronze (19 wt% Pb) for a decorated jug handle. The manufacture also depends on function because most artefacts were subjected to thermomechanical processing, except the ornaments that would not benefit from post-casting work. Brass and gunmetal were only present in the site with a later chronology. A metallurgy visibly ruled by economical, aesthetical and technological concerns reinforces the evidences about the total integration of Southwestern Iberian Peninsula in the Roman World, but further studies will be essential to determine the evolution of copper-based alloys in Lusitania under Roman influence.

  19. Chemical constraints of groundwater management in the Yucatan peninsula, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, W.; Lesser, J. M.

    1981-05-01

    Two critical objectives of water management in the Yucatan are: (1) to develop regional groundwater supplies for an expanding population and tourism based on the Mayan archeological sites and excellent beaches; and (2) to control groundwater pollution in a chemically sensitive system made vulnerable by geologic conditions. The Yucatan peninsula is a coastal plain underlain by permeable limestone and has an annual rainfall of more than 1000 mm. Such a setting should provide abundant supplies of water; however, factors of climate and hydrogeology have combined to form a hydrologic system with chemical boundaries that decrease the amount of available fresh water. Management of water resources has long had a major influence on the cultural and economic development of the Yucatan. The Mayan culture of the northern Yucatan developed by extensive use of groundwater. The religion was water-oriented and the Mayan priests prayed to Chac, the water god, for assistance in water management primarily to decrease the severity of droughts. The Spaniards arrived in 1517 and augmented the supplies by digging wells, which remained the common practice for more than 300 years. Many wells now have been abandoned because of serious problems of pollution resulting from the use of a sewage disposal well adjacent to each supply well. The modern phase of water management began in 1959 when the Secretaría de Recursos Hidráulicos (S.R.H.) was charged with the responsibility for both scientific investigations and development programmes for water-supply and sewage-disposal systems for cities, villages and islands.

  20. Chemical constraints of groundwater management in the Yucatan peninsula, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Back, W.; Lesser, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    Two critical objectives of water management in the Yucatan are: (1) to develop regional groundwater supplies for an expanding population and tourism based on the Mayan archeological sites and excellent beaches; and (2) to control groundwater pollution in a chemically sensitive system made vulnerable by geologic conditions. The Yucatan peninsula is a coastal plain underlain by permeable limestone and has an annual rainfall of more than 1000 mm. Such a setting should provide abundant supplies of water; however, factors of climate and hydrogeology have combined to form a hydrologic system with chemical boundaries that decrease the amount of available fresh water. Management of water resources has long had a major influence on the cultural and economic development of the Yucatan. The Mayan culture of the northern Yucatan developed by extensive use of groundwater. The religion was water-oriented and the Mayan priests prayed to Chac, the water god, for assistance in water management primarily to decrease the severity of droughts. The Spaniards arrived in 1517 and augmented the supplies by digging wells, which remained the common practice for more than 300 years. Many wells now have been abandoned because of serious problems of pollution resulting from the use of a sewage disposal well adjacent to each supply well. The modern phase of water management began in 1959 when the Secretari??a de Recursos Hidra??ulicos (S.R.H.) was charged with the responsibility for both scientific investigations and development programmes for water-supply and sewage-disposal systems for cities, villages and islands. ?? 1981.

  1. Groundwater temperature transients on the Armutlu peninsula, eastern Marmara region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woith, Heiko; Caka, Deniz; Seyis, Cemil; Italiano, Francesco; Celik, Cengiz; Wang, Rongjiang; Baris, Serif

    2016-04-01

    Since many years MAM and GFZ in co-operation with Kocaeli University (KU) operate fluid monitoring stations around the Sea of Marmara. In the frame of MARsite (MARsite has received funding from the European Union's Seventh Programme for research, technological development and demonstration under grant agreement No 308417) these networks were jointly evaluated for the first time. The on-land fluid monitoring networks continuously monitor the following parameters: soil radon (21 sites), temperature and conductivity of thermal springs (9 sites) operated by MAM covering the whole Marmara region; fluid pressure and water level/temperature (8 sites) within ARNET operated by GFZ/KU. ARNET is a combined seismological/hydrogeological monitoring network covering the Armutlu peninsula located SE of Istanbul. Additional to the geothermal wells and springs - our main target to detect transients of potentially seismo-tectonic origin - three shallow groundwater wells (tenth of meters deep) are being operated to identify and quantify seasonal variations, and meteorological influences like rainfall and snowmelt. But it turned out that these shallow aquifer systems showed very stable conditions with very small annual temperature amplitudes (0.2 - 0.3°C). One of these shallow monitoring wells is located just south of Lake Iznik (in the village of Sölöz) very close to the southern branch of the North Anatolian Fault Zone. Water level showed a steady decreasing trend since June 2012. This trend resulted in a data gap starting in January 2014, when the water level dropped below the sensor position. After adjusting the sensor position, positive spikes in the borehole temperature were recorded in June and August 2014, and again in 2015. The spikes are characterised by a sharp temperature increase followed by a decay lasting several days until the pre-event temperature was reached again. Since the spikes occurred on two independent logger systems, and since they lasted several days, a

  2. Ground-water availability on the Kitsap Peninsula, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, Arnold J.; Bolke, E.L.

    1980-01-01

    Unconsolidated deposits on the Kitsap Peninsula, Wash., are of glacial and interglacial origin. These deposits were divided into three units based on lithology and hydraulic properties. Two of the three units are composed of layers of sand and gravel , and silt and clay. The third unit consists of silt and clay and in most places separates the other two units. Water-bearing strata in the upper unit are fairly continuous and average 15 feet in thickness. The lower water-bearing strata are not believed to be as continuous as those in the upper unit, but yield larger quantities of water to wells. The silt-and-clay unit averages 70 feet in thickness, occurs generally near sea level, and is not known to contain major water-bearing deposits. The average annual ground-water recharge to streams on the Kitsap Peninsula was estimated to be 17 times the 1975 annual ground-water pumpage for the peninsula. Some, but an unknown amount, of this water is available for increased withdrawal by wells. Increased withdrawals cause decreased streamflow, declining water levels, and increased seawater contamination. There appears to be no widespread seawater contamination of wells in the study area. Local areas where chloride concentrations from wells exceed 25 milligrams per liter are near the southern part of the Longbranch Peninsula, Horsehead Bay, Point Evans, Sinclair Inlet, Eagle Harbor, Fletcher Bay, the northern end of Bainbridge Island, and the northern tip of the Kitsap Peninsula. (USGS)

  3. Paleomagnetism of early Tertiary Alaska Peninsula rocks and implications for docking of peninsular terrane

    SciTech Connect

    Whitney, J.W.; Levinson, R.A.; Van Alstine, D.R.

    1985-04-01

    In order to refine the tectonic history of the peninsular terrane, Alaska, 22 sites (averaging 10 samples/site) in Paleogene Tertiary volcanic and sedimentary formations were sampled in the vicinity of Chignik, on the Pacific side of the Alaska Peninsula. Ten of the sites were drilled in the early Oligocene Meshik volcanics, ranging from andesite to basalt, and the other twelve sites were drilled in the late Eocene Tolstoi Formation sediments. Nine of the volcanic sites yielded stable R and/or N characteristic magnetization. Virtually no fine-grained, interbedded sediments occur with the Meshik volcanics at the sample sites, thus making reliable paleohorizontal determinations difficult. Although flow attitudes were tentatively used, it became rapidly apparent that problems of initial dip were insurmountable. As a result, all volcanic sites were considered unreliable for determining a meaningful paleomagnetic inclination. Upon thermal demagnetization, five of the sedimentary sites were judged stable. The mode of the paleomagnetic direction was calculated, D/I = 349.8/75.3(..beta..95 = 8.5), indicating no significant rotation. Uncertainties in structural corrections, however, may render only the inclination meaningful, which, from McFadden statistics yields, I = 75.9, ..cap alpha..95 = 7.9, corresponding to a paleolatitude of 63.3/sup 0/. This paleolatitude agrees with the expected value for the North American craton at 40 m.y. B.P., implying that the peninsular terrane had docked at at least that time.

  4. Volcanic Facies of the Lower Jurassic Talkeetna Formation, Iniskin Peninsula to Tuxedni Bay, Alaska Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bull, K. F.

    2015-12-01

    The Lower Jurassic Talkeetna Formation (Jtk), a >1,000-km-long belt of vol­canic facies within the accreted intra-oceanic Talkeetna Arc has been characterized within the Talkeetna Mountains, but on the Alaska Peninsula Jtk facies have not previously been described in detail. Here we describe facies of the Jtk stretching from the Iniskin Peninsula to Tuxedni Bay. On the Iniskin Peninsula, a high concentration and great thickness of mafic to intermediate lavas, associated autobreccias and hyaloclastites, fluidal-clast breccias and possible pillows are suggestive of one or more submarine effusive eruption centers. Also volumetrically significant are non-stratified polymictic volcaniclastic breccia facies. Minor facies include thinly bedded volcaniclastic sandstone to pebble breccia-conglomerate facies, some of which are shard- and pumice-bearing pyroclastic deposits preserved in thinly bedded deposits, indicative of episodes of explosive volcanism and the eruption-fed nature of some of the deposits. North of Chinitna Bay, coherent facies tend to be thin and relatively small in volume. Volcaniclastic facies provide evidence of subaerial-fluvial deposition, and pyroclastic activity. Thinly bedded, laterally continuous beds locally exhibit cross-laminations, channel fills, normal grading and lenticular beds, and contain plant fossils. Within this sequence is a 10-m-thick pumice breccia containing fossilized logs, underlain by a thin, weakly laminated, pumice- and lithic-bearing volcaniclastic siltstone to sandstone. The log-bearing pumice breccia and the lithic-bearing laminated basal unit represent pyroclastic density current (PDC) facies deposited in a subaerial or possibly shallow aqueous environment. Underlying the PDC deposit are several 30-cm-thick maroon and olive green volcaniclastic fine-grained sandstone and siltstone beds containing channel fills, cross-beds and lenticular beds. Marbles exposed in the contact zone between the intrusions of Alaska

  5. Water Quality in the Delmarva Peninsula, Delaware, Maryland, and Virginia, 1999-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Denver, Judith M.; Ator, Scott W.; Debrewer, Linda M.; Ferrari, Matthew J.; Barbaro, Jeffrey R.; Hancock, Tracy C.; Brayton, Michael J.; Nardi, Mark R.

    2004-01-01

    This report contains the major findings of a 1999-2001 assessment of water quality in the Delmarva Peninsula. It is one of a series of reports by the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program that present major findings in 51 major river basins and aquifer systems across the Nation. In these reports, water quality is assessed at many scales?from local ground-water flow paths to regional ground-water networks and in surface water?and is discussed in terms of local, State, and regional issues. Conditions in the Delmarva Peninsula are compared to conditions found elsewhere and to selected national benchmarks, such as those for drinking-water quality and the protection of aquatic organisms. This report is intended for individuals working with water-resource issues in Federal, State, or local agencies; universities; public interest groups; or in the private sector. The information will be useful in addressing a number of current issues, such as the effects of agricultural and urban land use on water quality, human health, drinking water, source-water protection, hypoxia and excessive growth of algae and plants, pesticide registration, and monitoring and sampling strategies. This report is also for individuals who wish to know more about the quality of streams and ground water in areas near where they live, and how that water quality compares to the quality of water in other areas across the Nation. Other products describing water-quality conditions in the Delmarva Peninsula are available. Detailed technical information, data and analyses, methodology, models, graphs, and maps that support the findings presented in this report can be accessed from http://md.water.usgs.gov/delmarva. Other reports in this series and data collected from other basins can be accessed from the national NAWQA Web site (http://water.usgs.gov/nawqa).

  6. Geology and timing of mineralization at the Cangshang gold deposit, north-western Jiaodong Peninsula, China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, X.; Cawood, Peter A.; Wilde, S.A.; Liu, R.; Song, H.; Li, W.; Snee, L.W.

    2003-01-01

    The Cangshang gold deposit of the northwestern Jiaodong Peninsula contains reserves of greater than 50 tonnes (t) and is developed by the largest open pit gold mine in China. This deposit is a Jiaojia-style (i.e. disseminated-and-veinlet) deposit. It is controlled by the San-Cang fault zone, which trends ???040?? and dips 40-75??SE at the mine site. The main (no. 1) orebody lies between a hanging wall of Precambrian metamorphic rocks (mainly amphibolite) of the Fenzishan Group and a footwall composed of the Mesozoic Linglong granitoid. The ore zone is mainly composed of pyritized, sericitized and silicified granitoid, which has undergone variable degrees of cataclasis. SHRIMP U-Pb dating of zircon indicates that the protolith of the hanging wall amphibolite was formed at 2530 ?? 17 Ma and underwent metamorphism at 1852 ?? 37 Ma. The footwall granodiorite has been dated at 166 ?? 4 Ma, whereas zircons from the ore zone yield a younger age of 154 ?? 5 Ma. Cathodoluminescence images of zircons from the granodiorite and ore zone show oscillatory zonation indicative of an igneous origin for both and the ages of these zircons, therefore, are all interpreted to be representative of magmatic crystallization. Dating of sericite by 40Ar-39Ar has been used to directly determine the timing of formation of the Cangshang deposit, providing the first time absolute age on formation of the Jiaojia-style gold deposits. The well-defined age of 121.3 ?? 0.2 Ma provides the precise timing of gold mineralization at the Cangshang deposit. This age is consistent with those of Linglong-style (vein type) gold mineralization, also from the north-western Jiaodong Peninsula, at between 126 and 120 Ma. Therefore, our work indicates that both styles of gold deposits in the Jiaodong Peninsula were formed during the same mineralization event.

  7. Anaglyph with Landsat Overlay, Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This 3-D anaglyph shows an area on the western side of the volcanically active Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia. Red-blue glasses are required to see the 3-D effect. The topographic data are from the first C-band mapping swath of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). Images from the optical Landsat satellite are overlain on the SRTM topography data. The meandering channel of the Tigil River is seen along the bottom of the image, at the base of steep cliffs. In the middle left of the image, a terrace indicates recent uplift of the terrain and downcutting by the river. High resolution SRTM topographic data will be used by geologists and hydrologists to study the interplay of tectonic uplift and erosion.

    This anaglyph was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission to create two differing perspectives of a single image, one perspective for each eye. Each point in the image is shifted slightly, depending on its elevation. When viewed through special glasses, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions. Anaglyph glasses cover the left eye with a red filter and cover the right eye with a blue filter. The United States Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observations Systems (EROS) Data Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, provided the Landsat data, which are overlain on the topography.

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11,2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission is designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA

  8. Pan American Airways/Naval Air Transport Service/destroyer base site showing stone ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Pan American Airways/Naval Air Transport Service/destroyer base site showing stone wall around patio. View facing east-southeast. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Pearl City Peninsula, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  9. Pan American Airways/Naval Air Transport Service/destroyer base site showing brick ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Pan American Airways/Naval Air Transport Service/destroyer base site showing brick and concrete paving of patio, and circular planters. View facing east. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Pearl City Peninsula, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  10. Trends of rural tropospheric ozone at the northwest of the Iberian Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Saavedra, S; Rodríguez, A; Souto, J A; Casares, J J; Bermúdez, J L; Soto, B

    2012-01-01

    Tropospheric ozone levels around urban and suburban areas at Europe and North America had increased during 80's-90's, until the application of NO(x) reduction strategies. However, as it was expected, this ozone depletion was not proportional to the emissions reduction. On the other hand, rural ozone levels show different trends, with peaks reduction and average increments; this different evolution could be explained by either emission changes or climate variability in a region. In this work, trends of tropospheric ozone episodes at rural sites in the northwest of the Iberian Peninsula were analyzed and compared to others observed in different regions of the Atlantic European coast. Special interest was focused on the air quality sites characterization, in order to guarantee their rural character in terms of air quality. Both episodic local meteorological and air quality measurements along five years were considered, in order to study possible meteorological influences in ozone levels, different to other European Atlantic regions.

  11. Trends of Rural Tropospheric Ozone at the Northwest of the Iberian Peninsula

    PubMed Central

    Saavedra, S.; Rodríguez, A.; Souto, J. A.; Casares, J. J.; Bermúdez, J. L.; Soto, B.

    2012-01-01

    Tropospheric ozone levels around urban and suburban areas at Europe and North America had increased during 80's–90's, until the application of NOx reduction strategies. However, as it was expected, this ozone depletion was not proportional to the emissions reduction. On the other hand, rural ozone levels show different trends, with peaks reduction and average increments; this different evolution could be explained by either emission changes or climate variability in a region. In this work, trends of tropospheric ozone episodes at rural sites in the northwest of the Iberian Peninsula were analyzed and compared to others observed in different regions of the Atlantic European coast. Special interest was focused on the air quality sites characterization, in order to guarantee their rural character in terms of air quality. Both episodic local meteorological and air quality measurements along five years were considered, in order to study possible meteorological influences in ozone levels, different to other European Atlantic regions. PMID:22649298

  12. Interactions Between Islamic and Christian Traditions in the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-García, A. César; Belmonte, Juan Antonio

    Pre-Romanesque churches in the Iberian Peninsula include a number of constructions from the fourth-fifth to the eleventh century when the first Romanesque churches appeared in the north of Spain. This period of time coincided with the Muslim invasion of the Peninsula. An important number of churches and mosques were built with prescriptions for the orientation, which possibly included astronomical observations. Investigations show that both groups of monuments reacted by avoiding the areas of theoretical influence of the other religion while trying to obey their own orientation rules.

  13. Ozonesonde observations at Marambio, Antarctic Peninsula, during 1989-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivi, Rigel; Heikkinen, Pauli; Aulamo, Osmo; Sánchez, Ricardo

    2013-04-01

    Ozonesonde observations have been carried out at the Marambio station in the Antarctic Peninsula (64° S, 56° W) since late 1980s. The highest frequency of soundings has been obtained during the spring season, when severe ozone depletion has been observed each year since the start of the observational program at Marambio. Regular soundings have also been made during other seasons, in average we have performed more than 50 soundings per year. Here we have first studied the homogeneity of the long-term ozonesonde record. Similar studies have been recently initialized also at other sites. At Marambio, similar to several other sites, there have been changes in sonde types and receiving systems during the long-term observational program. For trend studies it is important to investigate whether these changes have been significant. One of the issues in the sonde network is related to the usage of two different types of the ozone sensor sensing solutions. In Marambio the sensing solution type was changed from 1% KI to 0.5 % KI in April 2006. We investigate whether this has caused improvements in data accuracy and what is the best method to homogenize the time series. Transfer functions have been suggested based on experimental results. For example in Sodankylä we performed a series of ozonesonde comparison flights to assess the effect of these two sensing solutions under polar conditions. We can use these data to recalculate the sonde time series over Marambio. To validate the results we have involved comparisons with total ozone retrievals by satellite based measurements and the local Dobson measurements. The satellite overpass measurements were provided by TOMS instrument aboard Nimbus-7, Meteor-3 and Earth Probe, GOME aboard ESA's ERS-2 and OMI aboard NASA's EOS-Aura. Finally we have calculated ozone profile trends over Marambio. We have applied a trend model to study inter-annual and longer term changes of the ozonesonde vertical profiles. The trend model included

  14. 46 CFR 7.165 - Kenai Peninsula, AK to Kodiak Island, AK.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Kenai Peninsula, AK to Kodiak Island, AK. 7.165 Section... BOUNDARY LINES Alaska § 7.165 Kenai Peninsula, AK to Kodiak Island, AK. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Kenai Peninsula at longitude 151°44.0′ W. to East Amatuli Island Light; thence to...

  15. 46 CFR 7.165 - Kenai Peninsula, AK to Kodiak Island, AK.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Kenai Peninsula, AK to Kodiak Island, AK. 7.165 Section... BOUNDARY LINES Alaska § 7.165 Kenai Peninsula, AK to Kodiak Island, AK. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Kenai Peninsula at longitude 151°44.0′ W. to East Amatuli Island Light; thence to...

  16. 46 CFR 7.165 - Kenai Peninsula, AK to Kodiak Island, AK.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Kenai Peninsula, AK to Kodiak Island, AK. 7.165 Section... BOUNDARY LINES Alaska § 7.165 Kenai Peninsula, AK to Kodiak Island, AK. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Kenai Peninsula at longitude 151°44.0′ W. to East Amatuli Island Light; thence to...

  17. 46 CFR 7.165 - Kenai Peninsula, AK to Kodiak Island, AK.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Kenai Peninsula, AK to Kodiak Island, AK. 7.165 Section... BOUNDARY LINES Alaska § 7.165 Kenai Peninsula, AK to Kodiak Island, AK. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Kenai Peninsula at longitude 151°44.0′ W. to East Amatuli Island Light; thence to...

  18. 46 CFR 7.165 - Kenai Peninsula, AK to Kodiak Island, AK.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Kenai Peninsula, AK to Kodiak Island, AK. 7.165 Section... BOUNDARY LINES Alaska § 7.165 Kenai Peninsula, AK to Kodiak Island, AK. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Kenai Peninsula at longitude 151°44.0′ W. to East Amatuli Island Light; thence to...

  19. 75 FR 16094 - Upper Peninsula Power Company; North American Hydro Holdings, LLC; Notice of Application for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-31

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Upper Peninsula Power Company; North American Hydro Holdings, LLC; Notice of... 17, 2010, Upper Peninsula Power Company (transferor) and North American Hydro Holdings, LLC.... Jensky, Upper Peninsula Power Company, 700 N Adams Street, Green Bay, WI 54307, phone (920) 433-2900....

  20. Probabilistic seismic hazard analysis for Sumatra, Indonesia and across the Southern Malaysian Peninsula

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petersen, M.D.; Dewey, J.; Hartzell, S.; Mueller, C.; Harmsen, S.; Frankel, A.D.; Rukstales, K.

    2004-01-01

    The ground motion hazard for Sumatra and the Malaysian peninsula is calculated in a probabilistic framework, using procedures developed for the US National Seismic Hazard Maps. We constructed regional earthquake source models and used standard published and modified attenuation equations to calculate peak ground acceleration at 2% and 10% probability of exceedance in 50 years for rock site conditions. We developed or modified earthquake catalogs and declustered these catalogs to include only independent earthquakes. The resulting catalogs were used to define four source zones that characterize earthquakes in four tectonic environments: subduction zone interface earthquakes, subduction zone deep intraslab earthquakes, strike-slip transform earthquakes, and intraplate earthquakes. The recurrence rates and sizes of historical earthquakes on known faults and across zones were also determined from this modified catalog. In addition to the source zones, our seismic source model considers two major faults that are known historically to generate large earthquakes: the Sumatran subduction zone and the Sumatran transform fault. Several published studies were used to describe earthquakes along these faults during historical and pre-historical time, as well as to identify segmentation models of faults. Peak horizontal ground accelerations were calculated using ground motion prediction relations that were developed from seismic data obtained from the crustal interplate environment, crustal intraplate environment, along the subduction zone interface, and from deep intraslab earthquakes. Most of these relations, however, have not been developed for large distances that are needed for calculating the hazard across the Malaysian peninsula, and none were developed for earthquake ground motions generated in an interplate tectonic environment that are propagated into an intraplate tectonic environment. For the interplate and intraplate crustal earthquakes, we have applied ground

  1. Probabilistic seismic hazard analysis for Sumatra, Indonesia and across the Southern Malaysian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Mark D.; Dewey, James; Hartzell, Stephan; Mueller, Charles; Harmsen, Stephan; Frankel, ArthurD.; Rukstales, Ken

    2004-10-01

    The ground motion hazard for Sumatra and the Malaysian peninsula is calculated in a probabilistic framework, using procedures developed for the US National Seismic Hazard Maps. We constructed regional earthquake source models and used standard published and modified attenuation equations to calculate peak ground acceleration at 2% and 10% probability of exceedance in 50 years for rock site conditions. We developed or modified earthquake catalogs and declustered these catalogs to include only independent earthquakes. The resulting catalogs were used to define four source zones that characterize earthquakes in four tectonic environments: subduction zone interface earthquakes, subduction zone deep intraslab earthquakes, strike-slip transform earthquakes, and intraplate earthquakes. The recurrence rates and sizes of historical earthquakes on known faults and across zones were also determined from this modified catalog. In addition to the source zones, our seismic source model considers two major faults that are known historically to generate large earthquakes: the Sumatran subduction zone and the Sumatran transform fault. Several published studies were used to describe earthquakes along these faults during historical and pre-historical time, as well as to identify segmentation models of faults. Peak horizontal ground accelerations were calculated using ground motion prediction relations that were developed from seismic data obtained from the crustal interplate environment, crustal intraplate environment, along the subduction zone interface, and from deep intraslab earthquakes. Most of these relations, however, have not been developed for large distances that are needed for calculating the hazard across the Malaysian peninsula, and none were developed for earthquake ground motions generated in an interplate tectonic environment that are propagated into an intraplate tectonic environment. For the interplate and intraplate crustal earthquakes, we have applied ground

  2. Stable isotopes and Antarctic moss banks: Plants and soil microbes respond to recent warming on the Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royles, Jessica; Amesbury, Matthew; Ogée, Jérôme; Wingate, Lisa; Convey, Peter; Hodgson, Dominic; Griffiths, Howard; Leng, Melanie; Charman, Dan

    2014-05-01

    The Antarctic Peninsula is one of the most rapidly warming regions on Earth, with air temperature increases of as much as 3°C recorded since the 1950s. However, the longer-term context of this change is limited and existing records, largely relying on ice core data, are not suitably located to be able to trace the spatial signature of change over time. We are working on a project exploiting stable isotope records preserved in moss peat banks spanning 10 degrees of latitude along the Antarctic Peninsula as an archive of late Holocene climate variability. Here we present a unique time series of past moss growth and soil microbial activity that has been produced from a 150 year old moss bank at Lazarev Bay, Alexander Island (69°S), a site at the southern limit of significant plant growth in the Antarctic Peninsula region. These moss banks are ideal archives for palaeoclimate research as they are well-preserved by freezing, generally monospecific, easily dated by radiocarbon techniques, and have sufficiently high accumulation rates to permit decadal resolution. We use accumulation rates, cellulose δ13C and fossil testate amoebae to show that growth rates, assimilation and microbial productivity rose rapidly in the 1960s, consistent with temperature change, although recently may have stalled, concurrent with other evidence. The increase in biological activity is unprecedented in the last 150 years. Along with work completed on Signy Island (60°S), in the South Orkney Islands, in which we used carbon isotope evidence to show recent climate-related enhancement of CO2 assimilation and peat accumulation rates in Antarctica, the observed relationships between moss growth, microbial activity and climate suggests that moss bank records have the potential to test the regional expression of temperature variability shown by instrumental data on the Antarctic Peninsula over centennial to millennial timescales, by providing long-term records of summer growth conditions

  3. Surface ozone levels in the forest and vegetation areas of the Biga Peninsula, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Sari, Deniz; İncecik, Selahattin; Ozkurt, Nesimi

    2016-11-15

    Spatial and temporal variability of surface ozone in the rural, mountainous and suburban sites of Biga Peninsula, at the northwest of Turkey which is about 300km southwest of Istanbul was investigated using passive samplers and continuous analyzers. A total 10 passive samplers and two continuous analyzers were used between 1.1.2013 and 31.12.2014. OX levels in the study region were examined to understand NOx dependent or independent contribution to ozone. The influences of the meteorological parameters on ozone levels were also examined by wind speed and ambient temperature. The results clearly show that mountainous areas have higher cumulative exposure to ozone than suburban locations. In order to understand the long range transport sources contributing to the high ozone levels in the region backward trajectories were computed using HYSPLIT model and then clustering of trajectories are performed. The results clearly show the characteristics of pollutant transport from north to Biga Peninsula. Additionally, AOT40 (Accumulated hourly O3 concentrations Over a Threshold of 40ppb) cumulative index was calculated using daytime hourly measurements. The results indicate that the ozone values in the study area are much higher than the critical levels for forest and vegetation based on EU Directive 2008/50/EC.

  4. Emmons Lake Volcanic Center, Alaska Peninsula: Source of the Late Wisconsin Dawson tephra, Yukon Territory, Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mangan, M.T.; Waythomas, C.F.; Miller, T.P.; Trusdell, F.A.

    2003-01-01

    The Emmons Lake Volcanic Center on the Alaska Peninsula of southwestern Alaska is the site of at least two rhyolitic caldera-forming eruptions (C1 and C2) of late Quaternary age that are possibly the largest of the numerous caldera-forming eruptions known in the Aleutian arc. The deposits produced by these eruptions are widespread (eruptive volumes of >50 km3 each), and their association with Quaternary glacial and eolian deposits on the Alaska Peninsula and elsewhere in Alaska and northwestern Canada enhances the likelihood of establishing geochronological control on Quaternary stratigraphic records in this region. The pyroclastic deposits associated with the second caldera-forming eruption (C2) consist of loose, granular, airfall and pumice-flow deposits that extend for tens of kilometres beyond Emmons Lake caldera, reaching both the Bering Sea and Pacific Ocean coastlines north and south of the caldera. Geochronological and compositional data on C2 deposits indicate a correlation with the Dawson tephra, a 24 000 14C BP (27 000 calibrated years BP), widespread bed of silicic ash found in loess deposits in west-central Yukon Territory, Canada. The correlation clearly establishes the Dawson tephra as the time-stratigraphic marker of the last glacial maximum.

  5. Elemental content of lichens of the Point Reyes Peninsula, northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennett, J.P.; Benson, S.

    2005-01-01

    The Point Reyes peninsula in northern California is about 45 km northwest of San Francisco and occasionally receives air masses from the city contributing to haze and lowered visibility. Although gaseous pollutants are not a problem, fine particulates containing carbon and other elements are measurable at the park. In this study, five lichen species were sampled along a 40-km linear transect from southeast to northwest from the town of Bolinas at the southern end of the peninsula. Elevated levels of Na and S and the Na/S ratio at localities nearer the ocean confirmed there is a definite marine aerosol influence on lichen elemental content. Elevated potassium and mercury concentrations were also found at high elevation sites that intercept fog. However, arsenic and lead were found to decrease with distance from Bolinas along the transect, suggesting these two elements originate in the fine particulate haze that enters the park from San Francisco. Concentrations of elements were not at enriched levels for other lichen species. A possible local influence of roads on element content needs further study.

  6. [Microbial Processes and Genesis of Methane Gas Jets in the Coastal Areas of the Crimea Peninsula].

    PubMed

    Malakhova, T V; Kanapatskii, T A; Egorov, V N; Malakhova, L V; Artemov, Yu G; Evtushenko, D B; Gulin, S B; Pimenov, N V

    2015-01-01

    Hydroasoustic techniques were used for detection and mapping of gas jet areas in the coastal regions of the Crimean peninsula. Gas seep areas in the bays Laspi, Khersones, and Kazach'ya were chosen for detailed microbiological investigation. The first type of gas jets, observed in the Laspi Bay, was probably associated with discarge of deep thermogenic methane along the faults. Methane isotopic composition was char- acterized by Δ13C of -35.3 degrees. While elevated rates of aerobic methane oxidation were revealed in the sandy sediments adjacent to the methane release site, no evidence of bacterial mats was found. The second type of gas emission, observed in the Khersones Bay, was accompanied by formation of bacterial biofilms of the "Thiodendron" microbial community type, predominated by filamentous, spirochete-like organisms, in the areas of gas seepage. The isotopic composition of methane was there considerably lower (-60.4 degrees), indicating a considerable contribution of modern microbial methane to the gas bubbles discharged in this bay. Activity of the third type of gas emission, the seeps of the Kazach'ya Bay, probably depended directly on modern microbial processes of organic matter degradation in the upper sediment layers. The rates of sulfate reduction and methanogenesis were 260 and 34 μmol dm(-3) day(-1), respectively. Our results indicate different mechanisms responsible for formation of methane jets in the Laspi Bay and in the coastal areas of the Heracles Peninsula, where the bays Kazach'ya and Khersones are located.

  7. The medical and veterinary role of Ornithodoros erraticus complex ticks (Acari: Ixodida) on the Iberian Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Boinas, Fernando; Ribeiro, Rita; Madeira, Sara; Palma, Mariana; de Carvalho, Isabel Lopes; Núncio, Sofia; Wilson, Anthony James

    2014-12-01

    Argasid ticks of the Ornithodoros erraticus complex are associated with traditional pig-farming practices on the Iberian Peninsula and are also found elsewhere in North Africa, West Africa, and western Asia. The ticks associated with pig farming on the Iberian Peninsula are the only biological vectors of African swine fever virus (ASFV) known to occur in Europe, and their ecology makes them an extremely effective reservoir of both ASFV and the Borrelia species which cause tick-borne relapsing fever (TBRF) in humans. The recent reappearance of ASFV in the European Union, coupled with evidence that Portuguese tick populations continue to harbor Borrelia despite a lack of confirmed human infections, suggest that these populations merit closer attention. In Portugal, a series of surveys over the last twenty-five years indicates that the number of farm sites with tick infestations has declined and suggest that populations are sensitive to changes in farm management, particularly the use of modern pig housing. Various technologies have been suggested for the control of farm-associated Ornithodoros ticks and related species but, in our opinion, farm management changes are still the most effective strategy for population control. Furthermore, we suggest that this species could probably be eradicated from Iberian pig farms.

  8. Origin of honeybees (Apis mellifera L.) from the Yucatan peninsula inferred from mitochondrial DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Clarke, K E; Oldroyd, B P; Javier, J; Quezada-Euán, G; Rinderer, T E

    2001-06-01

    Honeybees (Apis mellifera L.) sampled at sites in Europe, Africa and South America were analysed using a mitochondrial DNA restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) marker. These samples were used to provide baseline information for a detailed analysis of the process of Africanization of bees from the neotropical Yucatan peninsula of Mexico. Radical changes in mitochondrial haplotype (mitotype) frequencies were found to have occurred in the 13-year period studied. Prior to the arrival of Africanized bees (1986) the original inhabitants of the Yucatan peninsula appear to have been essentially of southeastern European origin with a smaller proportion having northwestern European ancestry. Three years after the migration of Africanized bees into the area (1989), only very low levels of maternal gene flow from Africanized populations into the resident European populations had occurred. By 1998, however, there was a sizeable increase in the proportion of African mitotypes in domestic populations (61%) with feral populations having 87% of mitotypes classified as African derived. The results suggest that the early stages of Africanization did not involve a rapid replacement of European with African mitotypes and that earlier studies probably overestimated the prevalence of African mitotypes.

  9. 48. Photocopy of photograph (from Reflections, Peninsula Transportation District Commission, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. Photocopy of photograph (from Reflections, Peninsula Transportation District Commission, 1985. Original three CRT buses in 1928. *FOR Photocopy of photograph (from the Charles H. Taylor Memorial Library), photographer unknown. Trolley car No. 315 shown April 25, 1929 at the Trolley Barn. SEE FIELD NOTES - Newport News & Old Point Railway & Electric Company, Trolley Barn & Administration Building, 3400 Victoria Boulevard, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  10. 46. Photocopy of photograph (Pentran file), (from Alexander Brown's Peninsula's ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. Photocopy of photograph (Pentran file), (from Alexander Brown's Peninsula's Last Street Cars, Daily Press, January 15, 1956) photographer unknown. The first streetcar (with dignitaries) to make the run from Newport News to a new housing development named Hilton Village in September 1918. - Newport News & Old Point Railway & Electric Company, Trolley Barn & Administration Building, 3400 Victoria Boulevard, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  11. Drought variability and change across the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coll, J. R.; Aguilar, E.; Ashcroft, L.

    2016-09-01

    Drought variability and change was assessed across the Iberian Peninsula over more than 100 years expanding through the twentieth century and the first decade of the twenty-first century. Daily temperature and precipitation data from 24 Iberian time series were quality controlled and homogenized to create the Monthly Iberian Temperature and Precipitation Series (MITPS) for the period 1906-2010. The Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI), driven only by precipitation, and the Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI), based on the difference between the precipitation and the reference evapotranspiration (ET0), were computed at annual and seasonal scale to describe the evolution of droughts across time. The results confirmed that a clear temperature increase has occurred over the entire Iberian Peninsula at the annual and seasonal scale, but no significant changes in precipitation accumulated amounts were found. Similar drought variability was provided by the SPI and SPEI, although the SPEI showed greater drought severity and larger surface area affected by drought than SPI from 1980s to 2010 due to the increase in atmospheric evaporative demand caused by increased temperatures. Moreover, a clear drying trend was found by the SPEI for most of the Iberian Peninsula at annual scale and also for spring and summer, although the SPI did not experience significant changes in drought conditions. From the drying trend identified for most of the Iberian Peninsula along the twentieth century, an increase in drought conditions can also be expected for this region in the twenty-first century according to future climate change projections and scenarios.

  12. Crustal structure beneath the southern Korean Peninsula from local earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kwang-Hee; Park, Jung-Ho; Park, Yongcheol; Hao, Tian-Yao; Kim, Han-Joon

    2017-02-01

    The three-dimensional subsurface structure beneath the southern Korean Peninsula is poorly known, even though such information could be key in verifying or rejecting several competing models of the tectonic evolution of East Asia. We constructed a three-dimensional velocity model of the upper crust beneath the southern Korean Peninsula using 19,935 P-wave arrivals from 747 earthquakes recorded by high-density local seismic networks. Results show significant lateral and vertical variations: velocity increases from northwest to southeast at shallow depths, and significant velocity variations are observed across the South Korea Tectonic Line between the Okcheon Fold Belt and the Youngnam Massif. Collision between the North China and South China blocks during the Early Cretaceous might have caused extensive deformation and the observed negative velocity anomalies in the region. The results of the tomographic inversion, combined with the findings of previous studies of Bouguer and isostatic gravity anomalies, indicate the presence of high-density material in the upper and middle crust beneath the Gyeongsang Basin in the southeastern Korean Peninsula. Although our results partially support the indentation tectonic model, it is still premature to discard other tectonic evolution models because our study only covers the southern half of the peninsula.

  13. A sketch of language history in the Korean Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sean

    2015-01-01

    Among 7100 languages spoken on Earth, the Koreanic language is the 13th largest, with about 77 million speakers in and around the Korean Peninsula. In comparison to other languages of similar size, however, surprisingly little is known about the evolution of the Koreanic language. This is mainly due to two reasons. The first reason is that the genealogical relationship of the Koreanic to other neighboring languages remains uncertain, and thus inference from the linguistic comparative method provides only provisional evidence. The second reason is that, as the ancestral Koreanic speakers lacked their own writing system until around 500 years ago, there are scant historical materials to peer into the past, except for those preserved in Sinitic characters that we have no straightforward way of interpreting. Here I attempt to overcome these disadvantages and shed some light on the linguistic history of the Korean Peninsula, by analyzing the internal variation of the Koreanic language with methods adopted from evolutionary biology. The preliminary results presented here suggest that the evolutionary history of the Koreanic language is characterized by a weak hierarchical structure, and intensive gene/culture flows within the Korean Peninsula seem to have promoted linguistic homogeneity among the Koreanic variants. Despite the gene/culture flows, however, there are still three detectable linguistic barriers in the Korean Peninsula that appear to have been shaped by geographical features such as mountains, elevated areas, and ocean. I discuss these findings in an inclusive manner to lay the groundwork for future studies.

  14. Pumas and Prepositions: Training Nature Guides in the Yucatan Peninsula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Cynthia

    2000-01-01

    In the Yucatan Peninsula (Mexico), the 10-week Nature Guide Training Program integrates English immersion with natural history and environmental interpretation to train rural adults as nature guides and conservation leaders. Most graduates have found work as ecotourism guides or in conservation-related activities, and many have provided English…

  15. Phosphorus leaching from agricultural soils of the Delmarva Peninsula, USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leaching of phosphorus (P) mobilizes edaphic and applied sources of P and is a primary pathway of concern in agricultural soils of the Delmarva Peninsula, which defines the eastern boundary of the eutrophic Chesapeake Bay. We evaluated P leaching before and after poultry litter application from inta...

  16. Quantification of subaerial and episodic subglacial erosion rates on high latitude upland plateaus: Cumberland Peninsula, Baffin Island, Arctic Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margreth, Annina; Gosse, John C.; Dyke, Arthur S.

    2016-02-01

    Long-term rates of subaerial and episodic subglacial erosion by predominately cold-based ice cover are determined for tors on weathered plateaus on Cumberland Peninsula. By measuring terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide concentrations in differentially weathered surfaces on a given tor, we reconstruct the complex exposure and erosion history involving recurring cold-based ice cover. The style and rate of subaerial and subglacial erosion at multiple tor sites on Cumberland Peninsula are assessed with a Monte Carlo approach that computes plausible exposure histories based on a proxy record of global ice volume. Constant subaerial erosion rates by weathering are low (<2 mm ka-1), corroborated by nuclide concentrations measured on two tors located on coastal ridge crests that have likely never been glaciated. Summit plateaus intermittently covered by cold-based ice throughout the Quaternary have experienced episodic subglacial erosion by plucking of fractured bedrock with rates between 1 and 16 mm ka-1. Variation of episodic erosion rates is associated with topographic position of the sampled tors and bedrock fracture density. Most of the tors were last glacially plucked in pre-ultimate glaciations, not during the Wisconsinan glaciation. Furthermore, the new approach provides evidence for the extent of ice coverage during the late Wisconsinan, which is significant if no erratics are available for exposure dating. Despite late Pleistocene intervals of ice cover and glacial plucking, tor-studded landscapes of Cumberland Peninsula are of considerable antiquity.

  17. Drought variability and change across the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coll, Joan Ramon; Aguilar, Enric

    2015-04-01

    Drought variability and change is assessed in this study across the Iberian Peninsula along the 20th century and the first decade of the 21st century using state of the art drought indices: the Sc-PDSI, the SPI and the SPEI. Daily temperature and precipitation data from 24 time-series regularly spread over Iberian Peninsula are quality controlled and also homogenized in a monthly scale to create the Monthly Iberian Temperature and Precipitation Series (MITPS) for the period 1906-2010. The Sc-PDSI, the 12-month SPI and 12-month SPEI are computed on a monthly basis using the newly MITPS dataset to identify dry and wet conditions across time. Precipitation data is only required to compute SPI, but potential evapotranspiration (PET) is also needed to perform the Sc-PDSI and SPEI, which is estimated using the Tornthwaite's method. The analysis conducted in this study confirms that drought conditions are worsening for most of the Iberian Peninsula across time strongly induced by global warming especially during the last three decades. All drought indices have found a drying trend in the Pyrenees, Ebro basin, central Iberia and in the south and south-eastern area while a wetting trend is identified in the western and in the north-western region. Future projections also indicate a clear increase in hydrological drought conditions along the 21st century, thus, water saving and the application of effective water management strategies will be crucial to minimize the impact of hydrological droughts over the Iberian Peninsula into the near future. KEY WORDS: Drought, climate change, Iberian Peninsula, drought indices.

  18. Geology of Seward Peninsula and Saint Lawrence Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Till, Alison B.; Dumoulin, Julie A.

    1994-01-01

    Seward Peninsula (Fig. 1) may be divided into two geologic terranes (Fig. 2) on the basis of stratigraphy, structure, and metamorphic history. The Seward terrane, an area 150 by 150 km in the central and eastern peninsula, is dominated by Precambrian(?) and early Paleozoic blueschist-, greenschist-, and amphibolite-facies schist and marble, and intruded by three suites of granitic rocks. The York terrane, roughly 100 by 75 km, occupies western Seward Peninsula and the Bering Straits region; it is composed of Ordovician, Silurian, Devonian, Mississippian, and possibly older limestone, argillaceous limestone, dolostone, and phyllite, which are cut by a suite of Late Cretaceous tin-bearing granites. The boundary between the Seward and York terranes is poorly exposed but is thought to be a major thrust fault because of its sinuous map trace, a discontinuity in metamorphic grade, and differences in stratigraphy across the boundary (Travis Hudson, oral communication, 1984). The boundary between the Seward terrane and the Yukon-Koyukuk province to the east is complicated by vertical faults (the Kugruk fault Zone of Sainsbury, 1974) and obscured by Cretaceous and Tertiary cover.The Seward Peninsula heretofore was thought to consist largely of rocks of Precambrian age (Sainsbury, 1972, 1974, 1975; Hudson, 1977), Microfossil data, however, indicate that many of the rocks considered to be Precambrian are early Paleozoic in age (Till and others, 1986; Dumoulin and Harris, 1984; Dumoulin and Till, 1985; Till and others, 1983; Wandervoort, 1985). It is likely that Precambrian rocks are a minor part of the stratigraphy of the Seward Peninsula.

  19. Wildlife uses and hunting patterns in rural communities of the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Subsistence hunting is a traditional practice providing food and many other goods for households in the Yucatan Peninsula, southeast Mexico. Economic, demographic, and cultural change in this region drive wildlife habitat loss and local extinctions. Improving our understanding about current practices of wildlife use may support better management strategies for conserving game species and their habitat. We aimed to evaluate if wildlife use remained relevant for the subsistence of rural residents of the Yucatan Peninsula, as well as if local hunting practices were related to environmental, geographical, and cultural factors. Methods Fieldwork was done between March 2010 and March 2011. Information was obtained through conversations, interviews, and participant observation. Record forms allowed recording animals hunted, biomass extracted, distance intervals to hunting sites, habitat types and seasonality of wildlife harvests. Data were analyzed using one-way Analysis of Variance, and Generalized Linear Models. Results Forty-six terrestrial vertebrate species were used for obtaining food, medicine, tools, adornments, pets, ritual objects, and for sale and mitigating damage. We recorded 968 animals taken in 664 successful hunting events. The Great Curassow, Ocellated Turkey, paca, white-tailed deer, and collared peccary were the top harvested species, providing 80.7% of biomass (10,190 kg). The numbers of animals hunted and biomass extracted declined as hunting distances increased from villages. Average per capita consumption was 4.65 ± 2.7 kg/person/year. Hunting frequencies were similar in forested and agricultural areas. Discussion Wildlife use, hunting patterns, and technologies observed in our study sites were similar to those recorded in previous studies for rural Mayan and mestizo communities in the Yucatan Peninsula and other Neotropical sites. The most heavily hunted species were those providing more products and by-products for residents. Large

  20. Continental shelf benthos off Otago Peninsula, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Probert, P. Keith; Wilson, John B.

    1984-09-01

    Benthic macrofauna of the continental shelf off Otago Peninsula, south-eastern New Zealand (45°51'S, 170°52'E) was surveyed by dredge sampling during 1973-1975. Numerical classification (Canberra metric coefficient and flexible sorting) was used to produce site groups and species groups, and three major benthic communities were recognised: a shallow-water (14-25 m) fauna inhabiting well-sorted fine sand, a mid-shelf fauna (concentrated in the depth range 50-76 m) associated with sediments containing the greatest proportions of gravel and siltclay, and a predominantly sand-bottom fauna occurring mainly on the outer shelf (87-150 m). All station groups were dominated numerically by polychaetes (mean of 36·6-56% of individuals) with Mollusca (13·8-25%) or Crustacea (12·1-19·4%) the next most abundant group. The inshore sand fauna was the most distinct, characteristic elements being the trochid gastropod Antisolarium egenum, an amphipod of the genus Hippomedon and dense patches of the spionid polychaete Spiophanes bombyx. Diagnostic species of the mid-shelf mixed sediments were Lepidonotus jacksoni, Psammolyce antipoda, Lumbrineris brevicirra and Phyllamphicteis foliata (Polychaeta), Terenochiton otagoensis, Micrelenchus caelatus caelatus, Maoricolpus roseus roseus and Zegalerus tenuis (Mollusca), Ampelisca chiltoni (Amphipoda) and Amphipholis squamata (Ophiuroidea). Outer shelf sand stations were faunally less distinct, but among the more characteristic species were Euthalenessa fimbriata, Sigalion sp. and Euchone sp. (Polychaeta) and Gari stangeri (Bivalvia). Several abundant species were widely distributed among station groups, notably Nephtys macroura, Lumbrineris magalhaensis, Phyllochaetopterus socialis and Owenia fusiformis (Polychaeta) and Nucula nitidula and Tawera spissa (Bivalvia). Free-living lunulitiform Bryozoa of the genus Otionella were a characteristic component of inner and outer shelf sand faunas, and their inshore penetration probably marks

  1. Evolution of subsidence styles in forearc basin: example from Cretaceous of southern Vizcaino Peninsula, Baja California, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Busby-Spera, C.J.; Boles, J.R.

    1986-04-01

    Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous arc magmatism is represented by volcaniclastic rocks of the Eugenia Formation in the northern Vizcaino Peninsula and by the metamorphosed Cedros-San Andres volcanoplutonic complex, with a dismembered ophiolitic basement, in the southern peninsula. The Vizcaino Peninsula became the site of forearc sedimentation by the Aptian-Albian (late Early Cretaceous), when arc magmatism moved abruptly eastward to the present-day Peninsular Range. On the southern Vizcaino Peninsula, a conformable stratigraphic section, complicated by later faulting, records a gradual transition from a ridged forearc, broken by basement uplifts and grabens (the Aptian-Albian Asunction Formation), to a broadly subsiding, deep marine forearc basin (the Cenomanian Valle Formation). The basal contact of the Asunction formation has irregular relief caused by brecciated basement rocks and talus accumulated along fault zones. An upward-fining sequence several hundred meters thick records abrupt uplift and gradual denudation of adjacent metamorphic basement. Contemporaneous andesite arc volcanism to the east supplied ash and fresh volcanic detritus to the grabens. Angular sand to boulder-size detritus of the Asunction Formation was derived locally, and includes basic to intermediate meta-igneous rock fragments, with epidote, actinolite, and chlorite, as well as serpentine. Abundant calcareous fossils are commonly unbroken, suggesting local sources for these as well. Angular to subrounded, sand to cobble-sized, intermediate to mafic volcanic rock fragments were derived from a more distant island arc to the east, which occasionally provided intermediate to felsic tuffs to the basin. This source is probably represented by the Aptian-Albian Alisitos Group, which forms much of the western wall of the Late Cretaceous Peninsular Range batholith.

  2. Paleoseismic Study on the Peninsula Section of the San Andreas Fault South of Crystal Springs Reservoir, San Mateo County, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zachariasen, J. A.; Prentice, C. S.; Kozaci, O.; Sickler, R. R.; Baldwin, J. N.; Sanquini, A.; Knudsen, K. L.

    2010-12-01

    The Peninsula section of the San Andreas Fault is a significant hazard for the San Francisco Bay area, but little is known about the timing of earthquakes on this section of the fault prior to the great earthquake of April 18, 1906. An earthquake in 1838 resulted in strong shaking on the San Francisco Peninsula. Estimates of the magnitude of the 1838 earthquake vary from 6.8 to 7.4, based on historical accounts, and most workers have assumed that this event occurred on the San Andreas Fault. However, paleoseismic excavations across the fault near San Andreas Lake failed to provide evidence that the 1838 earthquake was associated with surface rupture on the Peninsula section of the San Andreas Fault (Prentice et al., 2008, 2009). Earlier work at the Filoli Estate, south of Crystal Springs Reservoirs, by Hall et al. (1999) suggested that both the 1838 and 1906 earthquakes ruptured the Peninsula section, based on the projected offsets of buried stream channels that crossed the fault. While this interpretation is permissible, the data also allow alternative interpretations that do not require surface rupture in 1838. We used LiDAR images produced from data collected by the GeoEarthScope project to search for promising paleoseismic sites along the Peninsula section of the San Andreas Fault. At a site about 1.2 km southeast of Crystal Springs Reservoir, we excavated two trenches across the fault and exposed fluvial gravel and overbank deposits cut by two distinct generations of faults. The younger set of faults break nearly to the ground surface, and we interpret these to represent 1906 surface faulting that has been buried post-1906 sediments. The older faults terminate below a colluvial wedge derived from one of the fluvial gravel deposits. The scarp-derived colluvium overlies a faulted fine-grained overbank deposit that in turn rests on the channel gravel, and represents the ground surface at the time of the older earthquake. The scarp-derived colluvium is overlain by

  3. Hurricane Ike Deposits on the Bolivar Peninsula, Galveston Bay, Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Cynthia A.; Wilkinson, M. J.; Eppler, Dean

    2011-01-01

    In September 2008, Hurricane Ike made landfall on Galveston Bay, close to the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC). The storm flooded much of the area with a storm surge ranging from 11 -20 feet. The Bolivar peninsula, the southeastern coast of Galveston Bay, experienced the brunt of the surge. Several agencies collected excellent imagery baselines before the storm and complementary data a few days afterward that helped define the impacts of the storm. In April of 2011, a team of scientists and astronauts from JSC conducted field mapping exercises along the Bolivar Peninsula, the section of the Galveston Bay coast most impacted by the storm. Astronauts routinely observe and document coastal changes from orbit aboard the International Space Station. As part of their basic Earth Science training, scientists at the Johnson Space Center take astronauts out for field mapping exercises so that they can better recognize and understand features and processes that they will later observe from the International Space Station. Using pre -storm baseline images of the Bolivar Peninsula near Rollover Pass and Gilchrist (NOAA/Google Earth Imagery and USGS aerial imagery and lidar data), the astronauts mapped current coastline positions at defined locations, and related their findings to specific coastal characteristics, including channel, jetties, and other developments. In addition to mapping, we dug trenches along both the Gulf of Mexico coast as well as the Galveston Bay coast of the Bolivar peninsula to determine the depth of the scouring from the storm on the Gulf side, and the amount of deposition of the storm surge deposits on the Bay side of the peninsula. The storm signature was easy to identify by sharp sediment transitions and, in the case of storm deposits, a layer of storm debris (roof shingles, PVC pipes, etc) and black, organic rich layers containing buried sea grasses in areas that were marshes before the storm. The amount of deposition was generally about 20 -25 cm

  4. Hurricane Ike Deposits on the Bolivar Peninsula, Galveston Bay, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, C. A.; Wilkinson, M. J.; Eppler, D.

    2011-12-01

    In September 2008, Hurricane Ike made landfall on Galveston Bay, close to the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC). The storm flooded much of the area with a storm surge ranging from 11-20 feet. The Bolivar peninsula, the southeastern coast of Galveston Bay, experienced the brunt of the surge. Several agencies collected excellent imagery baselines before the storm and complementary data a few days afterward that helped define the impacts of the storm. In April of 2011, a team of scientists and astronauts from JSC conducted field mapping exercises along the Bolivar Peninsula, the section of the Galveston Bay coast most impacted by the storm. Astronauts routinely observe and document coastal changes from orbit aboard the International Space Station. As part of their basic Earth Science training, scientists at the Johnson Space Center take astronauts out for field mapping exercises so that they can better recognize and understand features and processes that they will later observe from the International Space Station. Using pre-storm baseline images of the Bolivar Peninsula near Rollover Pass and Gilchrist (NOAA/Google Earth Imagery and USGS aerial imagery and lidar data), the astronauts mapped current coastline positions at defined locations, and related their findings to specific coastal characteristics, including channel, jetties, and other developments. In addition to mapping, we dug trenches along both the Gulf of Mexico coast as well as the Galveston Bay coast of the Bolivar peninsula to determine the depth of the scouring from the storm on the Gulf side, and the amount of deposition of the storm surge deposits on the Bay side of the peninsula. The storm signature was easy to identify by sharp sediment transitions and, in the case of storm deposits, a layer of storm debris (roof shingles, PVC pipes, etc) and black, organic rich layers containing buried sea grasses in areas that were marshes before the storm. The amount of deposition was generally about 20-25 cm; the

  5. LARISSA: Benthic Foraminiferal Analysis from Barilari Bay, western Antarctic Peninsula margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matulaitis, I.; Ishman, S. E.; Leventer, A.; Brachfeld, S. A.; Jeong, S.; Domack, E. W.

    2011-12-01

    The LARISSA (LARsen Ice Shelf System, Antarctica) Project is an interdisciplinary project funded by the US National Science Foundation bringing together marine and Quaternary geology, cryosphere, ocean and marine ecology. The goal of LARISSA is to use the Larsen Ice Shelf System to study climate change effects on ice shelf systems and the oceanic and ecological responses to ice shelf collapse. This study focuses on jumbo piston core (JPC) 127 collected during cruise NBP 10-01. The 8.5 meter core was recovered from Barilari Bay (65.917°S 64.700°W) on the western side of the Antarctic Peninsula. The core site at the outer edge of the bay is of particular interest due to its location between the inner fjord high deposition rate sites and the more distal middle shelf sites, its exposure to open ocean circulation within the bay, and its proximity to the ice core site drilled on the Bruce Plateau during the LARISSA project. The abundance of calcareous taxa throughout the core makes it a target for isotopic studies. The recovered section was sampled for a variety of proxy measurements with samples collected for benthic foraminiferal analysis at 10 cm intervals. Correlation of the magnetic susceptibility data, as well as a peak in the diatom Eucampia antarctica from JPC 127 and other core records from the western Antarctic Peninsula indicate recovery of at least mid-Holocene through recent. Foraminiferal analyses resulted in the identification of 92 species of foraminifera. Three of the abundant species are indicators of specific water masses. Bulimina aculeata is indicative of the warmer, less saline Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW). Marked high abundance of Bulimina aculeata in the uppermost 600 cm indicates incursions of CDW onto the continental shelf and into Barilari Bay. This period of increased Bulimina aculeata abundance is also seen in other cores taken around the peninsula such as kasten core (KC) 11 in the Hugo Island Trough and in the Palmer Deep. Fursenkoina is

  6. High shrew diversity on Alaska's Seward Peninsula: Community assembly and environmental change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hope, Andrew G.

    2012-01-01

    In September 2010, 6 species of shrews (genus: Sorex) were collected at a single locality on the Seward Peninsula of Alaska. Such high sympatric diversity within a single mammalian genus is seldom realized. This phenomenon at high latitudes highlights complex Arctic community dynamics that reflect significant turnover through time as a consequence of environmental change. Each of these shrew species occupies a broad geographic distribution collectively spanning the entire Holarctic, although the study site lies within Eastern Beringia, near the periphery of all individual ranges. A review of published genetic evidence reflects a depauperate shrew community within ice-free Beringia through the last glaciation, and recent assembly of current diversity during the Holocene.

  7. Modelling Chemical Patterns of Atmospheric Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratola, Nuno; Jiménez-Guerrero, Pedro

    2013-04-01

    Semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) such as PBDEs, PCBs, organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) or PAHs, are widespread and generated in a multitude of anthropogenic (and natural for PAHs) processes and although they are found in the environment at low concentrations, possess an extraordinary carcinogenic capacity (Baussant et al., 2001) and high ecotoxicity due to their persistence in different matrices (air, soil, water, living organisms). In particular, PAHs are originated by combustion processes or release from fossil fuels and can be transported in the atmosphere over long distances in gaseous or particulate matter (Baek et al., 1991). The establishment of strategies for sampling and chemical transport modelling of SVOCs in the atmosphere aiming the definition and validation of the spatial, temporal and chemical transport patterns of contaminants can be achieved by an integrated system of third-generation models that represent the current state of knowledge in air quality modelling and experimental data collected in field campaigns. This has implications in the fields of meteorology, atmospheric chemistry and even climate change. In this case, an extensive database already obtained on levels of atmospheric PAHs from biomonitoring schemes in the Iberian Peninsula fuelled the establishment of the first models of behaviour for PAHs. The modelling system WRF+CHIMERE was implemented with high spatial and temporal resolution to the Iberian Peninsula in this first task (9 km for the Iberian Peninsula, 3 km to Portugal, 1 hour), using PAHs atmospheric levels collected over a year-long sampling scheme comprising 4 campaigns (one per season) in over 30 sites. Daily information on meteorological parameters such as air temperature, humidity, rainfall or wind speed and direction was collected from the weather stations closest to the sampling sites. Diagnosis and forecasts of these meteorological variables using MM5 or WRF were used to feed a chemistry transport model

  8. Holocene records of geomagnetic field behavior from a north-south transect along the western Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brachfeld, S. A.; Shah, D. P.; St-Onge, M.; St-Onge, G.

    2013-12-01

    Geochronology is inherently difficult when working with Antarctic margin sediments. Radiocarbon dating and oxygen isotope stratigraphy are challenging or impossible in sites with poor preservation of biogenic calcite. Radiocarbon dating of the acid insoluble organic matter (AIOM) is further complicated by organically lean sediment and the presence of reworked organic carbon or detrital carbon from sedimentary rocks. These complications limit the ability to interpret a paleoclimate record. Geomagnetic paleointensity dating is a proven 'tuning' technique that has been successfully applied in several studies around the Antarctic margin. However, the reference curves to which these sites were tuned were constructed primarily from Northern Hemisphere data. Here we present paleomagnetic secular variation (PSV) and relative paleointensity (RPI) data from three Antarctic Peninsula sites that possess independent chronologies and which have moderate to ultra-high sedimentation rates (40 - 700 cm/ka). Maxwell Bay, located in the volcanic South Shetland Islands, is an ultra-high-resolution site with strongly magnetic sediments from which the Shallow Drilling (SHALDRIL) program recovered a 108-m record spanning the last 14 ka. Outer Barilari Bay and Hugo Island Trough, which lie to the South along the western Antarctic Peninsula, are moderate resolution sites with a high proportion of biogenic silica. Maxwell Bay and Bariliari Bay are unique in that they possess homogenous sediment and uniform magnetic mineral assemblages, while also preserving biogenic calcite, a rare combination on the Antarctic margin. All three sites preserve strong, stable remanent magnetizations with an easily isolated characteristic component and MAD values generally < 2°, with the exception of turbidites, intervals with abundant dropstones, and biosiliceous ooze intervals. Inclination values fluctuate between the present-day value at the cores sites (-58°) and the geomagnetic axial dipole inclination

  9. Ground-water flow and water quality in the sand aquifer of Long Beach Peninsula, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, B.E.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes a study that was undertaken to improve the understanding of ground-water flow and water quality in the coastal sand aquifer of the Long Beach Peninsula of southwestern Washington. Data collected for the study include monthly water levels at 103 wells and 28 surface-water sites during 1992, and water-quality samples from about 40 wells and 13 surface-water sites in February and July 1992. Ground water generally flows at right angles to a ground-water divide along the spine of the low-lying peninsula. Historical water-level data indicate that there was no long-term decline in the water table from 1974 to 1992. The water quality of shallow ground water was generally good with a few local problems. Natural concentrations of dissolved iron were higher than 0.3 milligrams per liter in about one-third of the samples. The dissolved-solids concentrations were generally low, with a range of 56 to 218 milligrams per liter. No appreciable amount of seawater has intruded into the sand aquifer, chloride concentrations were low, with a maximum of 52 milligrams per liter. Agricultural activities do not appear to have significantly affected the quality of ground water. Concentrations of nutrients were low in the cranberry-growing areas, and selected pesticides were not found above the analytical detection limits. Septic systems probably caused an increase in the concentration of nitrate from medians of less than 0.05 milligrams per liter in areas of low population density to 0.74 milligrams per liter in areas of high density.

  10. Paleoseismic Investigations of Subduction Zone Earthquakes on the Southeastern Coast of the Kenai Peninsula, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelsey, H. M.; Witter, R. C.; Briggs, R. W.; Engelhart, S. E.; Nelson, A. R.; Haeussler, P. J.

    2013-12-01

    Rupture extents for prehistoric subduction zone earthquakes on the Alaska margin are poorly documented. For example, the 1964 great Alaska earthquake ruptured the subduction zone from Prince William Sound westward to the southwest end of Kodiak Island, but an outstanding question is whether or not earlier subduction earthquakes ruptured a shorter segment in the Kodiak region with the eastern margin located in the Kenai Peninsula. To address the question, we investigated several embayments on the Pacific (southeastern) coast of the Kenai Peninsula to reconstruct the late Holocene paleoseismic history. Constraints to constructing a paleoseismic history on the outer Kenai coast include recent deglaciation of embayments that limits a stratigraphic record to approximately the last 1 to 3 thousand years and the high wave-energy environment that results in frequent closure of embayments by barrier bars. Recognizing these constraints, two approaches have proved productive in investigating paleoseismic history on the outer Kenai coast. One involves understanding how beach ridges can be formed and modified by coseismic subsidence and documenting timing and number of late Holocene prehistoric earthquakes based on beach ridge genesis and evolution. The other approach, which is the more conventional paleoseismic approach for subduction zones, is investigating stratigraphic evidence for coseismic subsidence in peaty and muddy sediment within embayments. We illustrate these two approaches using two coastal sites in Aialik Bay within Kenai Fjords National Park, a strandplain complex at Verdant Cove and a drowned embayment at Quicksand Cove, respectively. Both sites record two prehistoric subduction zone earthquakes prior to the historically known 1964 great Alaska earthquake.

  11. Prokaryotic Community in Lacustrine Sediments of Byers Peninsula (Livingston Island, Maritime Antarctica).

    PubMed

    Gugliandolo, Concetta; Michaud, Luigi; Lo Giudice, Angelina; Lentini, Valeria; Rochera, Carlos; Camacho, Antonio; Maugeri, Teresa Luciana

    2016-02-01

    Byers Peninsula (Livingston Island, Antarctica), the largest seasonally ice-free region of the Maritime Antarctica, holds a large number of lakes, ponds, and streams. The prokaryotic structure and bacterial diversity in sediment samples collected during the 2008-2009 austral summer from five inland lakes, two coastal lakes, and an estuarine site were analyzed by Catalyzed Reporter Deposition Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (CARD-FISH) and 16S rRNA 454 tag pyrosequencing techniques, respectively. Differently from inland lakes, which range around the oligotrophic status, coastal lakes are eutrophic environments, enriched by nutrient inputs from marine animals. Although the prokaryotic abundances (estimated as DAPI stained cells) in sediment samples were quite similar among inland and coastal lakes, Bacteria always far dominated over Archaea. Despite the phylogenetic analysis indicated that most of sequences were affiliated to a few taxonomic groups, mainly referred to Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Actinobacteria, their relative abundances greatly differed from each site. Differences in bacterial composition showed that lacustrine sediments were more phyla rich than the estuarine sediment. Proteobacterial classes in lacustrine samples were dominated by Betaproteobacteria (followed by Alphaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, and Gammaproteobacteria), while in the estuarine sample, they were mainly related to Gammaproteobacteria (followed by Deltaproteobacteria, Epsilonproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, and Betaproteobacteria). Higher number of sequences of Alphaproteobacteria, Cyanobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, and Planctomycetes were observed in sediments of inland lakes compared to those of coastal lakes, whereas Chloroflexi were relatively more abundant in the sediments of coastal eutrophic lakes. As demonstrated by the great number of dominant bacterial genera, bacterial diversity was higher in the sediments of inland lakes than that in coastal lakes

  12. The relative influence of ENSO and SAM on Antarctic Peninsula climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clem, Kyle R.; Renwick, James A.; McGregor, James; Fogt, Ryan L.

    2016-08-01

    Recent warming of the Antarctic Peninsula during austral autumn, winter, and spring has been linked to sea surface temperature (SST) trends in the tropical Pacific and tropical Atlantic, while warming of the northeast Peninsula during summer has been linked to a strengthening of westerly winds traversing the Peninsula associated with a positive trend in the Southern Annular Mode (SAM). Here we demonstrate that circulation changes associated with the SAM dominate interannual temperature variability across the entire Antarctic Peninsula during both summer and autumn, while relationships with tropical Pacific SST variability associated with the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) are strongest and statistically significant primarily during winter and spring only. We find the ENSO-Peninsula temperature relationship during autumn to be weak on interannual time scales and regional circulation anomalies associated with the SAM more important for interannual temperature variability across the Peninsula during autumn. Consistent with previous studies, western Peninsula temperatures during autumn, winter, and spring are closely tied to changes in the Amundsen Sea Low (ASL) and associated meridional wind anomalies. The interannual variability of ASL depth is most strongly correlated with the SAM index during autumn, while the ENSO relationship is strongest during winter and spring. Investigation of western and northeast Peninsula temperatures separately reveals that interannual variability of northeast Peninsula temperatures is primarily sensitive to zonal wind anomalies crossing the Peninsula and resultant leeside adiabatic warming rather than to meridional wind anomalies, which is closely tied to variability in the zonal portion of the SAM pattern.

  13. Distribution of Radioactive Materials in the Absheron Peninsula, Azerbaijan - 13567

    SciTech Connect

    Vandergraaf, Tjalle T.; Mamedov, Gudrat G.; Ramazanov, Mahammadali A.; Badalov, Vatan H.; Naghiyev, Jalal A.; Mehdiyeva, Afat A.

    2013-07-01

    The Absheron Peninsula forms the extreme Eastern part of Azerbaijan and juts into the Caspian Sea. The region has a long history of oil and gas exploration, transport, and processing and includes a number of abandoned chemical plants that were used in the separation of iodine from formation waters. As a result of lax environmental standards during the Soviet era, the industrial activity has led to serious contamination from oils residues, heavy metals and naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM). Radiometric surveys performed over a wide range of the Absheron Peninsula showed generally low NORM concentrations. However, radiation levels two to three orders of magnitude above background levels were detected at two abandoned iodine separation plants near the capital city, Baku. These elevated radiation levels are mainly due to Ra-226 and U-238 with lower contributions from Ra-228 and U-235. (authors)

  14. Historic and instrumental earthquake records of Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Y.

    2012-12-01

    NIMR(National Institute of Meteorological Researches) published historic earthquake catalogs of Korean Peninsula recently. This catalog contains 2161 events recorded at historic documents such as annals of the Jo-seon dynasty and the chronicles of 3 countries. Among those events, 440 earthquakes classified as intensity greater than 5(Korea intensity scale) and 15 earthquakes having intensity between 8 to 10(Korea intensity scale) are interpreted as damaging earthquake. Kyung-Ju earthquake occurred at 779 was the greatest one with M 6.7 and killed 100 people written by historic records. Several records contained the information of damage and casualties from possible Tsunami event. The purpose of making earthquake catalog is to define potential earthquake hazard of Korean Peninsula. As a result of collecting earthquake records for last 2000 years, the Intensity population distribution of historic earthquake marked similar to that of present instrumental earthquake record of KMA bulletin.

  15. Karst features of a glaciated dolomite peninsula, Door County, Wisconsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Scot B.; Stieglitz, Ronald D.

    1990-11-01

    A geologic investigation of the northern part of Door Peninsula, Wisconsin for a state funded water quality project revealed that karstification of the Silurian aquifer is more extensive than previously believed. Sinkholes and small insurgent features, solution modified crevices, pavements, caves and springs were inventories and mapped. These features are generally smaller and less densely developed than those in most limestone terranes; however, they are important to the geomorphology and water quality of the peninsula. Continental glaciation has strongly influenced both the distribution and the present surface morphology of the karst features. Ice scour has formed a stepped bedrock topography, contributed to pavement formation and may have removed some preglacial features. Deposition has plugged and masked features in places. In addition, subglacial water circulation, and ice loading and unloading may have influenced karst development.

  16. Physical short-term changes after a tussock tundra fire, Seward Peninsula, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liljedahl, Anna; Hinzman, Larry; Busey, Robert; Yoshikawa, Kenji

    2007-06-01

    The Kougarok area, situated on the central Seward Peninsula, Alaska, experienced a severe fire in August 2002. This may be the only tundra fire where high-quality prefire (1999-2002) and postfire (2003-2006) active layer and meteorology measurements have been collected in the same locations. After fire, near-surface soil showed increased moisture at the burned tussock site, remaining close to saturation throughout the thawed season 2003-2006. Despite wetter soil after the fire, freezing occurred earlier at the burned tussock site than at the control, indicating the importance of a reduced organic layer. Severe combustion of lichen and moss left 15-25 cm high tussocks, resulting in a doubling of the surface roughness coefficient. Average September temperature at the tussock site increased 2.3 ± 0.7°C throughout the 1 m soil profile, doubling the active layer depth, although this is due partly to favorable meteorological conditions. The shrubby control station experienced a mean annual temperature increase of 1.1 ± 0.3°C in the upper 0.5 m. A similar annual change was found at the burned tussock site. Cooler weather conditions in 2006 stagnated the soil-warming trend, which occurred after 2002. How the thermal and moisture regimes in tundra will be affected after fire is highly influenced by weather, fire severity, vegetation regrowth, prefire vegetation, and ground ice conditions.

  17. Earthquake induced landslide hazard field observatory in the Avcilar peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigarre, Pascal; Coccia, Stella; Theoleyre, Fiona; Ergintav, Semih; Özel, Oguz; Yalçinkaya, Esref; Lenti, Luca; Martino, Salvatore; Gamba, Paolo; Zucca, Francesco; Moro, Marco

    2015-04-01

    Earthquake-triggered landslides have an increasing disastrous impact in seismic regions due to the fast growing urbanization and infrastructures. Just considering disasters from the last fifteen years, among which the 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake, the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake, and the 2011 Tohoku earthquake, these events generated tens of thousands of coseismic landslides. Those resulted in amazing death toll and considerable damages, affecting the regional landscape including its hydrological main features. Despite a strong impetus in research during past decades, knowledge on those geohazards is still fragmentary, while databases of high quality observational data are lacking. These phenomena call for further collaborative researches aiming eventually to enhance preparedness and crisis management. The MARSITE project gathers research groups in a comprehensive monitoring activity developed in the Sea of Marmara Region, one of the most densely populated parts of Europe and rated at high seismic risk level since the 1999 Izmit and Duzce devastating earthquakes. Besides the seismic threat, landslides in Turkey and in this region constitute an important source of loss. The 6th Work Package of MARSITE project gathers 9 research groups to study earthquake-induced landslides focusing on two sub-regional areas of high interest among which the Cekmece-Avcilar peninsula, located westwards of Istanbul, as a highly urbanized concentrated landslide prone area, showing high susceptibility to both rainfalls while affected by very significant seismic site effects. A multidisciplinary research program based on pre-existing studies has been designed with objectives and tasks linked to constrain and tackle progressively some challenging issues related to data integration, modeling, monitoring and mapping technologies. Since the start of the project, progress has been marked on several important points as follows. The photogeological interpretation and analysis of ENVISAT-ERS DIn

  18. Presque Isle Peninsula, Erie, Pennsylvania. Volume I. Main Report. Revised.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-01

    and Wormwood , and on older, more stable dunes, Sandbar Willow and Cottonwood. At the eastern end of the peninsula, in the Gull Point area, extending...include Iluejoint, Panic Grass, and a variety of rushes, Scouring Rush, Cypress $purge, Lyre-leaved Rock Cress, Goldenrods, Wormwood , Marsh Pink...occupying these areas include Willows, Alder, Bayberry, Buttonbush, and Meadow- sweet . These areas exist both as fairly stable wetland ecosystems, and

  19. Fossils from bore holes on the Eastern Shore Peninsula, Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Todd, Ruth; Gardner, Julia A.; Sohn, I.G.

    1955-01-01

    This report lists Foraminifera, Mollusca, and Ostracoda in five bore holes that penetrated a maximum of 445 feet of section in sediments of Pleistocene and Miocene age, and discusses the paleoecologic and stratigraphic significance of the fossils. It includes the contents of references 6, 16, and 18 of Virginia Division of Geology Mineral Resources Circular No. 2, dealing with the geology and groundwater resources of the Eastern Shore peninsula.

  20. Spatial and temporal variability of periglaciation of the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliva, M.; Serrano, E.; Gómez-Ortiz, A.; González-Amuchastegui, M. J.; Nieuwendam, A.; Palacios, D.; Pérez-Alberti, A.; Pellitero-Ondicol, R.; Ruiz-Fernández, J.; Valcárcel, M.; Vieira, G.; Antoniades, D.

    2016-04-01

    Active periglacial processes are currently marginal in the Iberian Peninsula, spatially limited to the highest mountain ranges. However, a wide variety of periglacial deposits and landforms are distributed in low and mid-altitude environments, which shows evidence of past periods of enhanced periglacial activity. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the present knowledge of past periglacial activity in the Iberian Peninsula. The chronological framework takes four main stages into account: the last glaciation, deglaciation, Holocene and present-day processes. This study focuses on the highest massifs (Pyrenees, Cantabrian Range, NW ranges, Central Range, Iberian Range, Sierra Nevada) as well as other lower elevation environments, namely the central Iberian Meseta. During the last glaciation the periglacial belt extended to much lower altitudes than today, reaching current sea level in the NW corner of the Iberian Peninsula. A wide range of geomorphological landforms and sedimentary records is indicative of very active periglacial processes during that phase, in some cases related to permafrost conditions (i.e., block streams, rock glaciers). Most of the inactive landforms and deposits in low and mid-elevations in Iberia are also related to this phase. The massive deglaciation of the Iberian massifs was caused by a gradual increase in temperatures. The deglaciation phase was only interrupted by a short period with colder conditions (the Younger Dryas) that reactivated periglacial processes in the formerly glaciated cirques of the highest lands, specifically with the widespread development of rock glaciers. During the Holocene, periglacial processes have been only active in the highest ranges, shifting in altitude according to temperature regimes and moisture conditions. The Little Ice Age saw the reactivation of periglacial activity in lower elevations than today. Currently, periglacial processes are only active in elevations exceeding 2500 m in the southern

  1. [Public access defibrillation in the Sorrento Peninsula].

    PubMed

    Santomauro, Maurizio; Giordano, Raffaele; Poli, Vincenzo; Iaccarino, Vincenzo; Palagiano, Francesco; Matarazzo, Luigi; Langella, Giuseppina; Riganti, Carla; Vosa, Carlo

    2012-10-01

    Early cardiac defibrillation is the only effective therapy to stop ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia. It is still considered the gold standard for the treatment of ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation, and is the only intervention capable of improving survival in cardiac arrest survivors. Timing of intervention, however, is crucial because after only 10 min success rates are very low (0-2%). Unfortunately, adequate relief cannot always be provided within the necessary time. The purpose of the public access defibrillation project in Sorrento was to create fixed and mobile first aid with automated external defibrillators in combination with the local 118 emergency system. With the involvement of pharmacies, bathing establishments and schools, 31 equally distant sites for public access defibrillation were made available. This organization was supplemented by mobile units on the cars of the Municipal Police and Civil Protection, and on patrol boats in the harbor.

  2. Severe dust storms over the Arabian Peninsula: Observations and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    shalaby, ahmed

    2014-05-01

    Dust aerosols and dust storms have tremendous effects on human health and all development activities. Also atmospheric dust plays a major role in the Earth climate system by its interaction with radiation and clouds. Severe dust storms are considered the severest phenomena in the Arabian Peninsula, since they are occurring all the year round with maximum activity and frequency in Summer. The Regional Climate Model (RegCM4) has been used to simulate severe dust storms events in the Arabian Peninsula from 1998 up to 2011. This long period simulation shows a typical pattern and dynamical features of the large-scale severe dust storm in winter seasons and summer seasons. The Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) from the model outputs have been compared against ground--base observations of three AERONET stations (i.e., Kuwait, Mazeria and Solar-Village) and daily space--based observations of MISR, Deepblue and OMI. The dynamical analysis of the large—scale severe dust storms reveal the difference between winter time storms and summer time storm. Winter time storm occurs when the cold air front in the north is coupled with the extension of the Red Sea trough from the south. However, the summer time storm is associated with strong Shamal wind that extend from northern Kuwait to the southern Arabian Peninsula.

  3. Coastal-Change and Glaciological Maps of the Antarctic Peninsula

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ferrigno, Jane G.; Williams, Richard S.; Thomson, Janet W.

    2002-01-01

    In 2000, the Glacier Studies Project (GSP) of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Mapping and Geographic Information Centre (MAGIC) of the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) began a formal cooperative 3-year endeavor to prepare three maps of the Antarctic Peninsula region. The maps will be based on a large variety of cartographic, aerial photograph, satellite image, and ancillary historical datasets archived at each institution. The maps will document dynamic changes on the peninsula during the past 50 years. The three maps are part of a planned 24-map series (I-2600) being published by the USGS in both paper and digital format (see USGS Fact Sheet FS-050-98 at http://pubs.usgs.gov/factsheet/fs50-98/); the maps are of the Trinity Peninsula area (I-2600-A), the Larsen Ice Shelf area (I-2600-B), and the Palmer Land area (I-2600-C). The 1:1,000,000-scale maps will encompass an area 1,800 kilometers (km) long and with an average width of 400 km (range of 200 to 600 km wide); the area is between lats 60? and 76? S. and longs 52? and 80? W. Each of the three maps will include an interpretive booklet that analyzes documented historical changes in the fronts of the ice shelves and termini of the outlet glaciers.

  4. Preliminary assessment of aridity conditions in the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, C.; Corte-Real, J. A.

    2016-06-01

    Aridity is one of the key elements characterizing the climate of a region, having a severe impact on human activities. Aiming at assessing aridity conditions in the Iberian Peninsula, the spatial distribution of the UNEP aridity index is analyzed during the period 1901-2012. Gridded precipitation and potential evapotranspiration datasets are used on a monthly basis. Results show that the southern half of Iberia is particularly vulnerable to water stress and hence to desertification processes. In particular, the UNEP aridity index reveals an increase and northward extension of the semi-arid regime in the Iberian Peninsula between 1901 and 2012. More than 50% of the north and western territory have experienced humid/sub-humid conditions, while the other regions underwent semi-arid settings. Results also reveal that climate was subjected to spatial and temporal variabilities with an overall statistically significant (at a 95% confidence level) trend to aridification in the south-easternmost and central regions. The remaining territory of the Iberian Peninsula does not reveal statistically significant trends.

  5. Holocene climate and glacial history of the northeastern Antarctic Peninsula: the marine sedimentary record from a long SHALDRIL core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalchuk, Bradley R.; Anderson, John B.; Wellner, Julia S.; Manley, Patricia L.; Majewski, Wojciech; Bohaty, Steve

    2009-12-01

    A high-resolution record of Holocene deglacial and climate history was obtained from a 77 m sediment core from the Firth of Tay, Antarctic Peninsula, as part of the SHALDRIL initiative. This study provides a detailed sedimentological record of Holocene paleoclimate and glacial advance and retreat from the eastern side of the peninsula. A robust chronostratigraphy was derived from thirty-three radiocarbon dates on carbonate material. This chronostratigraphic framework was used to establish the timing of glacial and climate events derived from multiple proxies including: magnetic susceptibility, electric resistivity, porosity, ice-rafted debris content, organic carbon content, nitrogen content, biogenic silica content, and diatom and foraminiferal assemblages. The core bottomed-out in a stiff diamicton interpreted as till. Gravelly and sandy mud above the till is interpreted as proximal glaciomarine sediment that represents decoupling of the glacier from the seafloor circa 9400 cal. yr BP and its subsequent landward retreat. This was approximately 5000 yr later than in the Bransfield Basin and South Shetland Islands, on the western side of the peninsula. The Firth of Tay core site remained in a proximal glaciomarine setting until 8300 cal. yr BP, at which time significant glacial retreat took place. Deposition of diatomaceous glaciomarine sediments after 8300 cal. yr BP indicates that an ice shelf has not existed in the area since this time. The onset of seasonally open marine conditions between 7800 and 6000 cal. yr BP followed the deglacial period and is interpreted as the mid-Holocene Climatic Optimum. Open marine conditions lasted until present, with a minor cooling having occurred between 6000 and 4500 cal. yr BP and a period of minor glacial retreat and/or decreased sea ice coverage between 4500 and 3500 cal. yr BP. Finally, climatic cooling and variable sea ice cover occurred from 3500 cal. yr BP to near present and it is interpreted as being part of the

  6. Study of Tropospheric ozone (TOR) variability over Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Pavan; Bortoli, Daniele; Salgado, Rui; Antón, Manuel; João Costa, Maria; Silva, Ana Maria

    2010-05-01

    To study tropospheric ozone (O3) variability and the increase in the number of months with higher tropospheric O3 concentration over the Iberian Peninsula, NASA Langley Tropospheric Ozone Residual (TOR) data has been analyzed for the 1979-2005 period. The maximum tropospheric O3 amount over the entire Iberian Peninsula was found in June (~41 DU) and a minimum in December (~29 DU). Over North Atlantic Coast (NAC) and Mediterranean Coast (MC) the maximum tropospheric O3 amount was found in July (~41 DU) and June (~42 DU) and the minimum was found in December (~28 DU and ~30 DU, respectively). The West Atlantic Coast (WAC), Pyrenees Mountain Range (PMR) and Central Iberian Peninsula (CIP) have an extended period of maximum tropospheric O3 amount, during June and July over WAC (~44 DU) and PMR (~39 DU), and during May, June and July over CIP (~40 DU). Similarly, WAC, PMR and CIP have an extended period of minimum tropospheric O3 amount, during December and January over WAC (~30 DU) and CIP (~29 DU) and November and December over PMR (~28 DU). The high concentration of ozone in July over the Atlantic Ocean near Iberian Peninsula are due to the presence of Azores anticyclone, extending in ridge through the Cantabrian Sea to the British Isles and West and Central Europe, and related photochemistry and dynamics, has profound effect on the observed higher ozone concentration over WAC zone. Strong seasonal cycle in tropospheric O3 amount has been observed with large variation over NAC (~49%), followed by WAC (~48%) and MC (~41%) compared to CIP and PMR (~38%). When the data are compared over the Iberian Peninsula for the two periods (1979-1993 and 1997-2005), a systematic increase in the number of months with higher tropospheric O3 concentration has been observed during the second period with respect to the first. These increases are almost 8% to 24% over NAC, 6% to 17% over WAC, 5% to 24% over CIP, 6% to 23% over MC and 13% to 18% over PMR. It has been observed that

  7. Glacial Geomorphic Characteristics of the Antarctic Peninsula Fjords

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellner, J. S.; Munoz, Y. P.; Mead, K. A.; Hardin, L. A.

    2011-12-01

    A distinctive suite of subglacial geomorphic features, representing the grounding of an ice sheet and its subsequent retreat, has been well documented for many parts of the Antarctic continental shelf. Geomorphic features include meltwater channels, drumlins, mega-scale glacial lineations, and gullies cut into the upper slope. Many of these same features occur in more recently deglaciated fjords, but at different scales and in different combinations. We have surveyed twelve fjords on the Antarctic Peninsula, from the Graham Land Coast to Hope Bay as well as on Anvers Island and in the South Shetland Islands. Surveys include multibeam swath bathymetry, CHIRP 3.5 kHz seismic, and sediment cores. Recently, we have reprocessed much of the multibeam data using new software allowing higher-resolution imagery. Unlike on the outer continental shelf of the Antarctic Peninsula, where there is a relatively simple suite of geomorphic features and a uniform retreat history, the fjords on the inner shelf show a complex geomorphic pattern representing somewhat unique glacial retreat histories for each fjord. Several fjords have distinctive grounding zone wedge deposits, and some fjords have such wedges in multiple locations, representing multiple pauses in the retreat history, or a stepped retreat of the ice. Drumlins and mega-scale glacial lineations are present in the fjords, but extend for kms rather than the tens of kms that are typical of the outer shelf. If drumlins are interpreted to indicate acceleration of grounded ice, as they are on the outer shelf, then there must have been multiple zones of acceleration across the flow path of the ice as drumlin sets occur in multiple zones in a single flow path. The inner parts of many fjords along the coast of the peninsula are characterized by features interpreted as erosional meltwater channels, although such features are not common in fjords in the islands off the peninsula, despite the similar scale of the fjords themselves

  8. Status and distribution of the Kittlitz's Murrelet Brachyramphus brevirostris along the Alaska Peninsula and Kodiak and Aleutian Islands, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madison, Erica N.; Piatt, John F.; Arimitsu, Mayumi L.; Romano, Marc D.; van Pelt, Thomas I.; Nelson, S. Kim; Williams, Jeffrey C.; DeGange, Anthony R.

    2011-01-01

    The Kittlitz's Murrelet Brachyramphus brevirostris is adapted for life in glacial-marine ecosystems, being concentrated in the belt of glaciated fjords in the northern Gulf of Alaska from Glacier Bay to Cook Inlet. Most of the remaining birds are scattered along coasts of the Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian Islands, where they reside in protected bays and inlets, often in proximity to remnant glaciers or recently deglaciated landscapes. We summarize existing information on Kittlitz's Murrelet in this mainly unglaciated region, extending from Kodiak Island in the east to the Near Islands in the west. From recent surveys, we estimated that ~2400 Kittlitz's Murrelets were found in several large embayments along the Alaska Peninsula, where adjacent ice fields feed silt-laden water into the bays. On Kodiak Island, where only remnants of ice remain today, observations of Kittlitz's Murrelets at sea were uncommon. The species has been observed historically around the entire Kodiak Archipelago, however, and dozens of nest sites were found in recent years. We found Kittlitz's Murrelets at only a few islands in the Aleutian chain, notably those with long complex shorelines, high mountains and remnant glaciers. The largest population (~1600 birds) of Kittlitz's Murrelet outside the Gulf of Alaska was found at Unalaska Island, which also supports the greatest concentration of glacial ice in the Aleutian Islands. Significant populations were found at Atka (~1100 birds), Attu (~800) and Adak (~200) islands. Smaller numbers have been reported from Unimak, Umnak, Amlia, Kanaga, Tanaga, Kiska islands, and Agattu Island, where dozens of nest sites have been located in recent years. Most of those islands have not been thoroughly surveyed, and significant pockets of Kittlitz's Murrelets may yet be discovered. Our estimate of ~6000 Kittlitz's Murrelets along the Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian Islands is also likely to be conservative because of the survey protocols we employed (i.e. early

  9. Environments and hominin activities across the FLK Peninsula during Zinjanthropus times (1.84 Ma), Olduvai Gorge, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Blumenschine, Robert J; Stanistreet, Ian G; Njau, Jackson K; Bamford, Marion K; Masao, Fidelis T; Albert, Rosa M; Stollhofen, Harald; Andrews, Peter; Prassack, Kari A; McHenry, Lindsay J; Fernández-Jalvo, Yolanda; Camilli, Eileen L; Ebert, James I

    2012-08-01

    We establish through 13 excavations the landscape context and nature of hominin activities across the Zinjanthropus land surface from which the Leakeys recovered the FLK 22 and FLK NN 1 paleoanthropological assemblages. The land surface was created by fluvial incision of the eastern margin of paleo-Lake Olduvai following a major lake withdrawal. Erosion was uneven, leaving a peninsula bounded by a river channel, the FLK Fault, and a freshwater wetland. This FLK Peninsula supported groves of trees that attracted hominins and carnivores, and that preserved the dense concentrations of carcass remains and stone tools they left behind, including those at FLK 22. Some carcasses appear to have been acquired at the ecotone of the Peninsula and Wetland, where another dense artifact and bone assemblage accumulated. A lesser topographic high at the edge of a Typha marsh in the Wetland was the site of FLK NN 1 and a scatter of large stone tools used possibly for rootstock processing. Our landscape reconstruction delimits the vegetation mosaic indicated by previous work and provides a topographical explanation for the existence of FLK 22 and FLK NN 1. Both are unexpected if the FLK area was the flat, featureless lake margin terrain typical of lake basins similar to paleo-Olduvai. The results show that the Leakeys' sites were not isolated occupation floors but rather parts of a land surface utilized intensively by hominins. Although commonly considered to have been home bases, their likely high predation risk, evidenced by large carnivore feeding traces and the remains of four hominin individuals, suggests visits to them were brief and limited to feeding. Finally, stratigraphic observations confirm that FLK NN 3 accumulated on an older land surface, refuting the hypothesis that the OH 8 foot found there is the same individual as the OH 35 leg from FLK 22.

  10. Quantitative distribution and functional groups of intertidal macrofaunal assemblages in Fildes Peninsula, King George Island, South Shetland Islands, Southern Ocean.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoshou; Wang, Lu; Li, Shuai; Huo, Yuanzi; He, Peimin; Zhang, Zhinan

    2015-10-15

    To evaluate spatial distribution pattern of intertidal macrofauna, quantitative investigation was performed in January to February, 2013 around Fildes Peninsula, King George Island, South Shetland Islands. A total of 34 species were identified, which were dominated by Mollusca, Annelida and Arthropoda. CLUSTER analysis showed that macrofaunal assemblages at sand-bottom sites belonged to one group, which was dominated by Lumbricillus sp. and Kidderia subquadrata. Macrofaunal assemblages at gravel-bottom sites were divided into three groups while Nacella concinna was the dominant species at most sites. The highest values of biomass and Shannon-Wiener diversity index were found in gravel sediment and the highest value of abundance was in sand sediment of eastern coast. In terms of functional group, detritivorous and planktophagous groups had the highest values of abundance and biomass, respectively. Correlation analysis showed that macrofaunal abundance and biomass had significant positive correlations with contents of sediment chlorophyll a, phaeophorbide and organic matter.

  11. Is U.S. Forces Korea Still Needed on the Korean Peninsula?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-15

    USAWC STRATEGY RESEARCH PROJECT IS U.S. FORCES KOREA STILL NEEDED ON THE KOREAN PENINSULA? by Colonel Wayne Stevens United States Army Colonel Jiyul...1. REPORT DATE 15 MAR 2006 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Is U.S. Forces Korea Still Needed on the Korean Peninsula...Wayne Stevens TITLE: Is U.S. Forces Korea Still Needed on the Korean Peninsula? FORMAT: Strategy Research Project DATE: 15 March 2006 WORD COUNT

  12. Comparison of multi-proxy data with past1000 model output over the Terminal Classic Period (800-1000 A.D.) on the Yucatan Peninsula.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Pelt, S.; Kohfeld, K. E.; Allen, D. M.

    2015-12-01

    The decline of the Mayan Civilization is thought to be caused by a series of droughts that affected the Yucatan Peninsula during the Terminal Classic Period (T.C.P.) 800-1000 AD. The goals of this study are two-fold: (a) to compare paleo-model simulations of the past 1000 years with a compilation of multiple proxies of changes in moisture conditions for the Yucatan Peninsula during the T.C.P. and (b) to use this comparison to inform the modeling of groundwater recharge in this region, with a focus on generating the daily climate data series needed as input to a groundwater recharge model. To achieve the first objective, we compiled a dataset of 5 proxies from seven locations across the Yucatan Peninsula, to be compared with temperature and precipitation output from the Community Climate System Model Version 4 (CCSM4), which is part of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) past1000 experiment. The proxy dataset includes oxygen isotopes from speleothems and gastropod/ostrocod shells (11 records); and sediment density, mineralogy, and magnetic susceptibility records from lake sediment cores (3 records). The proxy dataset is supplemented by a compilation of reconstructed temperatures using pollen and tree ring records for North America (archived in the PAGES2k global network data). Our preliminary analysis suggests that many of these datasets show evidence of drier and warmer climate on the Yucatan Peninsula around the T.C.P. when compared to modern conditions, although the amplitude and timing of individual warming and drying events varies between sites. This comparison with modeled output will ultimately be used to inform backward shift factors that will be input to a stochastic weather generator. These shift factors will be based on monthly changes in temperature and precipitation and applied to a modern daily climate time series for the Yucatan Peninsula to produce a daily climate time series for the T.C.P.

  13. Soils and landforms from Fildes Peninsula and Ardley Island, Maritime Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Roberto F. M.; Schaefer, Carlos E. G. R.; López-Martínez, Jerónimo; Simas, Felipe N. B.; Haus, Nick W.; Serrano, Enrique; Bockheim, James G.

    2014-11-01

    Fildes Peninsula (F.P.) and Ardley Island (A.I.) are among the first ice-free areas in Maritime Antarctica. Since the last glacial retreat in this part of Antarctica (8000 to 5000 years BP), the landscape in these areas evolved under paraglacial to periglacial conditions, with pedogenesis marked by cryogenic processes. We carried out a detailed soil and geomorphology survey, with full morphological and analytical description for both areas; forty-eight soil profiles representing different landforms were sampled, analyzed and classified according to the U.S. Soil Taxonomy and the World Reference Base for Soil Resources (WRB). Soils are mostly turbic, moderately developed, with podzolization and strong phosphatization (chemical weathering of rock minerals and formation of amorphous Al and Fe minerals) in former ornithogenic sites while in areas with poor vegetation show typical features of cryogenic weathering. Nivation, solifluction, cryoturbation, frost weathering, ablation and surface erosion are widespread. The most represented landform system by surface in Fildes Peninsula is the periglacial one, and 15 different periglacial landforms types have been identified and mapped. These features occupy about 30% of the land surface, in which patterned ground and stone fields are the most common landforms. Other significant landforms as protalus lobes, rock glaciers or debris lobes indicate the extensive presence of permafrost. Soil variability was high, in terms of morphological, physical and chemical properties, due to varying lithic contributions and mixing of different rocks, as well as to different degrees of faunal influence. Three soil taxonomy orders were identified, whereas thirty four individual pedons were differentiated. Fildes Peninsula experiences a south-north gradient from periglacial to paraglacial conditions, and apparently younger soils and landforms are located close to the Collins Glacier. Arenosols/Entisols and Cryosols/Gelisols (frequently

  14. Ice flow velocities and elevation change at Fleming Glacier, Wordie Ice Shelf, Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendt, A.; Wendt, J.; Bown, F.; Rivera, A.; Zamora, R.; Bravo, C.; Casassa, G.

    2009-04-01

    Glaciers in the Antarctic Peninsula have been responding to the pronounced atmospheric warming in the region (Vaughan et al. 2003) with frontal retreat (Cook et al. 2005), ice shelf collapse (Rott et al. 1996) and ice flow acceleration and thinning (Rignot et al. 2004; Shepherd et al. 2003; Pritchard & Vaughan 2007). These trends have progressively migrated southwards along the Antarctic Peninsula causing, for instance, a substantial retreat of Wilkins Ice Shelf (70.2˚ S) in 2008. At 69.3˚ S, but 300 km to the east, Wordie Ice Shelf experienced a major reduction in size in the 1980s (Doake & Vaughan 1991). Available information about this ice shelf and its feeding glaciers dates back to the 1970s when ice thickness and velocity measurements were carried out on Fleming Glacier (Doake 1975). Although initially it was thought that the post-collapse conditions of the feeding glaciers remained unchanged (Vaughan 1993), more recent evidence shows that glaciers accelerated after the ice shelf collapse and substantial glacier thinning has occurred (Rignot et al. 2005). We present data acquired during two field expeditions to Fleming Glacier. During the first season in November 2007, we installed an Automatic Weather Station (AWS) and a permanent GPS site. Additional data including a local GPS network, ground penetrating radar measurements and snow densities were collected. In December 2008, during the second field campaign, surface elevation data were acquired using an airborne laser scanner along a trajectory between Gibbs Glacier and Airy Glacier, along the ice divide between both sides of the Peninsula and on Fleming Glacier. The AWS was found protruding only 20 cm above the snow surface, demonstrating the high snow accumulation in the area, which was sufficient to cover the 4 m high tower installed in 2007 and that annual variability in the mass accumulation is significant. The station collected data for 250 days. The permanent GPS stopped collecting data after

  15. Human activities impact on mountain river channels (case study of Kamchatka peninsula rivers)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakova, Aleksandra S.

    2010-05-01

    Human-induced driving factors along with natural environmental changes greatly impact on fluvial regime of rivers. On mountain and semi-mountain territories these processes are developed in the most complicated manner due to man-made activities diversity throughout river basins. Besides these processes are significantly enhanced because of the disastrous natural processes (like volcanic and mud-flow activity) frequent occurrences in mountainous regions. On of the most striking example on the matter is Kamchatka peninsula which is located at the North-West part of Russian Federation. This paper contributes to the study of human activities impact on fluvial systems in this volcanic mountain region. Human effects on rivers directly alter channel morphology and deformations, dynamics of water and sediment movement, aquatic communities or indirectly affect streams by altering the movement of water and sediment into the channel. In case study of Kamchatka peninsula human activities affect fluvial systems through engineering works including construction of bridges, dams and channel diversions and placer mining. These processes are characterized by spatial heterogeneity because of irregular population distribution. Due to specific natural conditions of the peninsula the most populated areas are the valleys of big rivers (rivers Kamchatka, Avacha, Bistraya (Bolshaya), etc) within piedmont and plain regions. These rivers are characterized by very unstable channels. Both with man-made activities this determines wide range of fluvial system changes. Firstly bridges construction leads to island and logjam formation directly near their piers and intensification of channels patterns shifts. Furthermore rivers of the peninsula are distinguished for high water flow velocities and water rate. Incorrect bridge constructions both with significant channel deformations lead to the destructions of the bridges themselves due to intensive bank erosion. Secondly, intensive water flow

  16. An annotated checklist of the Chilopoda and Diplopoda (Myriapoda) of the Abrau Peninsula, northwestern Caucasus, Russia

    PubMed Central

    Semenyuk, Irina I.; Tuf, Ivan H.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background The Abrau Peninsula is located in northwestern Caucasus between the cities of Novorossiysk and Anapa, Krasnodar Province, Russia. This paper contains an annotated checklist of the Chilopoda and Diplopoda inhabiting the Abrau Peninsula. New information The fauna of the Abrau Peninsula comprises 17 centipede (4 orders) and 16 millipede (6 orders) species. Henia taurica, hitherto known only from the Crimea, has now been reported from several localities in the studied region. The study also reveals two possibly new millipede species. Statistical analyses showed that habitat preferences of myriapod species within the Abrau Peninsula are caused by species geographic distribution pattern and microbiotope preferences. PMID:27346949

  17. Arthropod and oligochaete assemblages from grasslands of the southern Kenai Peninsula, Alaska

    PubMed Central

    Bowser, Matthew L.; Morton, John M.; Hanson, John Delton; Magness, Dawn R.; Okuly, Mallory

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background By the end of this century, the potential climate-biome of the southern Kenai Peninsula is forecasted to change from transitional boreal forest to prairie and grasslands, a scenario that may already be playing out in the Caribou Hills region. Here, spruce (Picea × lutzii Little [glauca × sitchensis]) forests were heavily thinned by an outbreak of the spruce bark beetle (Dendroctonus rufipennis (Kirby, 1837)) and replaced by the native but invasive grass species, Calamagrostis canadensis (Michx.) P. Beauv. As part of a project designed to delimit and characterize potentially expanding grasslands in this region, we sought to characterize the arthropod and earthworm communities of these grasslands. We also used this sampling effort as a trial of applying high-throughput sequencing metabarcoding methods to a real-world inventory of terrestrial arthropods. New information We documented 131 occurrences of 67 native arthropod species at ten sites, characterizing the arthropod fauna of these grasslands as being dominated by Hemiptera (60% of total reads) and Diptera (38% of total reads). We found a single exotic earthworm species, Dendrobaena octaedra (Savigny, 1826), at 30% of sites and one unidentified enchytraeid at a single site. The utility of high-throughput sequencing metabarcoding as a tool for bioassessment of terrestrial arthropod assemblages was confirmed. PMID:28325976

  18. Dust Optical Properties Over North Africa and Arabian Peninsula Derived from the AERONET Dataset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, D.; Chin, M.; Yu, H.; Eck, T. F.; Sinyuk, A.; Smirnov, A.; Holben, B. N.

    2011-01-01

    Dust optical properties over North Africa and the Arabian Peninsula are extracted from the quality assured multi-year datasets obtained at 14 sites of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). We select the data with (a) large aerosol optical depth (AOD >= 0.4 at 440 nm) and (b) small Angstrom exponent (A(sub ext)<= 0.2) for retaining high accuracy and reducing interference of non-dust aerosols. The result indicates that the major fraction of high aerosol optical depth days are dominated by dust over these sites even though it varies depending on location and time. We have found that the annual mean and standard deviation of single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, real refractive index, and imaginary refractive index for Saharan and Arabian desert dust is 0.944 +/- 0.005, 0.752 +/- 0.014, 1.498 +/- 0.032, and 0.0024 +/- 0.0034 at 550 nm wavelength, respectively. Dust aerosol selected by this method is less absorbing than the previously reported values over these sites. The weaker absorption of dust from this study is consistent with the studies using remote sensing techniques from satellite. These results can help to constrain uncertainties in estimating global dust shortwave radiative forcing.

  19. Compliance with wetland mitigation standards in the upper peninsula of Michigan, USA.

    PubMed

    Kozich, Andrew T; Halvorsen, Kathleen E

    2012-07-01

    The United States has lost about half its wetland acreage since European settlement, and the effectiveness of current wetland mitigation policies is often questioned. In most states, federal wetland laws are overseen by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, but Michigan administers these laws through the state's Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ). Our research provides insight into the effectiveness of the state's implementation of these laws. We examined wetland mitigation permit files issued in Michigan's Upper Peninsula between 2003 and 2006 to assess compliance with key MDEQ policies. Forty-six percent of files were out of compliance with monitoring report requirements, and forty-nine percent lacked required conservation easement documents. We also conducted site assessments of select compensatory wetland projects to determine compliance with MDEQ invasive plant species performance standards. Fifty-five percent were out of compliance. We found no relationship between invasive species noncompliance and past site monitoring, age of mitigation site, or proximity to roads. However, we found wetland restoration projects far more likely to be compliant with performance standards than wetland creation projects. We suggest policy changes and agency actions that could increase compliance with wetland restoration and mitigation goals.

  20. Channel initiation by groundwater sapping in Kanozan, Boso Peninsula of central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushi, Y.; Hattanji, T.

    2006-12-01

    Groundwater sapping is known as one of the important processes for channel initiation. We examined hydro- geomorphic factors that affect channel initiation by groundwater sapping. The study site (Mt. Kanozan) is located in Boso Peninsula, 50-km southeast of Tokyo, central Japan. Unconfined sandstone with high permeability comprises the mountain. Some features of piping, boiling and seepage erosion were found along first and second-order channels. Runoff at a spring site (SS) kept a constant discharge throughout year, and did not show any responses to typhoon storms with over 100-mm total rainfall. We surveyed micro-topography of 12 channel heads. Most channel heads have steep head slope (35-45 deg.) and gentle gradient downstream (5-10 deg.). Gentle slope of groundwater table immediately above channel head (roughly 7 deg. at the spring site SS) controls channel gradient, and affects distinct gradient transition at channel heads. We could not found any significant correlation between source area and local slope at channel heads, probably due to a scattered relation between surface drainage area and spring discharge. All channel heads are located in an altitude zone of 50-100 m, while the altitude of mountain peak is 270 m. The limited altitude distribution of channel heads implies that channel initiation of this area should be controlled by a critical altitude associated with deep groundwater flow systems.

  1. Forest response to increasing typhoon activity on the Korean peninsula: evidence from oak tree-rings.

    PubMed

    Altman, Jan; Doležal, Jiří; Cerný, Tomáš; Song, Jong-Suk

    2013-02-01

    The globally observed trend of changing intensity of tropical cyclones over the past few decades emphasizes the need for a better understanding of the effects of such disturbance events in natural and inhabited areas. On the Korean Peninsula, typhoon intensity has increased over the past 100 years as evidenced by instrumental data recorded from 1904 until present. We examined how the increase in three weather characteristics (maximum hourly and daily precipitation, and maximum wind speed) during the typhoon activity affected old-growth oak forests. Quercus mongolica is a dominant species in the Korean mountains and the growth releases from 220 individuals from three sites along a latitudinal gradient (33-38°N) of decreasing typhoon activity were studied. Growth releases indicate tree-stand disturbance and improved light conditions for surviving trees. The trends in release events corresponded to spatiotemporal gradients in maximum wind speed and precipitation. A high positive correlation was found between the maximum values of typhoon characteristics and the proportion of trees showing release. A higher proportion of disturbed trees was found in the middle and southern parts of the Korean peninsula where typhoons are most intense. This shows that the releases are associated with typhoons and also indicates the differential impact of typhoons on the forests. Finally, we present a record of the changing proportion of trees showing release based on tree-rings for the period 1770-1979. The reconstruction revealed no trend during the period 1770-1879, while the rate of forest disturbances increased rapidly from 1880 to 1979. Our results suggest that if typhoon intensity rises, as is projected by some climatic models, the number of forest disturbance events will increase thus altering the disturbance regime and ecosystem processes.

  2. Soil-landform-plant communities relationships of a periglacial landscape at Potter Peninsula, Maritime Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poelking, E. L.; Schaefer, C. E. R.; Fernandes Filho, E. I.; de Andrade, A. M.; Spielmann, A. A.

    2014-08-01

    Integrated studies on the interplay between soils, periglacial geomorphology and plant communities are crucial for the understanding of climate change effects on terrestrial ecosystems of Maritime Antarctica, one of the most sensitive areas to global warming. Knowledge on physical environmental factors that influence plant communities can greatly benefit studies on monitoring climate change in Maritime Antarctica, where new ice-free areas are being constantly exposed, allowing plant growth and organic carbon inputs. The relationship between topography, plant communities and soils was investigated in Potter Peninsula, King George Island, Maritime Antarctica. We mapped the occurrence and distribution of plant communities and identified soil-landform-vegetation relationships. The vegetation map was obtained by classification of a Quickbird image, coupled with detailed landform and characterization of 18 soil profiles. The sub-formations were identified and classified, and we also determined the total elemental composition of lichens, mosses and grasses. Plant communities at Potter Peninsula occupy 23% of the ice-free area, at different landscape positions, showing decreasing diversity and biomass from the coastal zone to inland areas where sub-desert conditions prevail. There is a clear dependency between landform and vegetated soils. Soils with greater moisture or poorly drained, and acid to neutral pH, are favourable for mosses subformations. Saline, organic-matter rich ornithogenic soils of former penguin rookeries have greater biomass and diversity, with mixed associations of mosses and grasses, while stable felseenmeers and flat rocky cryoplanation surfaces are the preferred sites for Usnea and Himantormia lugubris lichens, at the highest surface. Lichens subformations cover the largest vegetated area, showing varying associations with mosses.

  3. Variability on the Hypoxic Conditions in the Northwestern Region of the Baja California Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bustos-Serrano, H.

    2015-12-01

    The NW region of the Baja California peninsula in México is dominated by the California Current System (CCS). Dissolved oxygen (DO) is a key variable in water bodies because it is considered as a health in biological processes. Hypoxic conditions (DO 60 to 120 μmol kg-1) occur naturally in large areas of the ocean. In the Eastern Pacific, the DO can be altered by eutrophication, derived from anthropogenic activity, especially in shallow and enclosed seas. Fluctuations in the conditions of hypoxia zones may have significant ecological and economic impact. It is of interest in assessing whether hypoxic conditions in the vicinity of Bahia de Todos Santos (BTS) and Coronado Islands in México are altered by anthropogenic activity (Figs. 1 and 2 respectively). For the present study, we worked with data collected from oceanographic expeditions during the period October 2010 to June 2015. The DO was determined using a CTD (SBE Model 25) and by sea water collection with hydrographic bottles using a modification of the Winkler method. The signs of hypoxia are evident in the area near BTS and in the vicinity of Coronado´s Islands, mainly on locations between the Todos Santos Islands and the peninsula of Punta Banda, which shows that the hypoxic zone begins to occur in shallow water between 50-200 m depth. This particular area corresponds to the point where the Mexican Navy determined as a site for dredging materials from the ports of Ensenada and El Sauzal, it is possible that the anthropogenic activity alters the natural conditions of hypoxia in the area to enlarge. In June 2012 for the first time in that region we obtained sediment samples below 700 m depth, which are mixed terrigenous clastic and oceanic sediments.

  4. Preliminary Geochemical and Rock Magnetic Study of a Stalagmite From Quintana Roo, Northeastern Yucatan Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.; Perez-Cruz, L.; Zhao, X.; Rebolledo-Vieyra, M.; Rodriguez, A.

    2012-04-01

    We present the preliminary results of geochemical, stable isotopes and rock magnetic studies of a stalagmite from a cave in eastern Quintana Roo, northern Yucatan peninsula. In the past years, there has been increased interest in understanding the paleoclimatic and paleoenvironmental evolution of the Yucatan peninsula and northern Central America, investigating the relationships between climate variations and the development of the Maya civilization. In particular, the variations in regional precipitation and occurrence of several drought periods, which might have been related to the collapse of the Classic Maya period. Stable isotope data on speleothems from different sites in Yucatan and Central America have provided evidence on changes in precipitation, which have affected the Maya region. The stalagmite is ~47 cm long and about 4-5 cm wide at its base. It was collected from the Hilariós Well cave in Tulum, Quintana Roo. Magnetic susceptibility and geochemical analyses have been completed as part of the initial characterization of the stalagmite, with measurements taken every centimeter. Geochemical analyses have been carried out for x-ray fluorescence, with a Niton XRF analyzer. Magnetic susceptibility was determined with a Bartington MS2 instrument using the high resolution surface probe. Additional rock magnetic analyses include magnetic hysteresis loops and isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM) acquisition, and saturation IRM demagnetization, which have been measured with a MicroMag instrument. Hysteresis loops are diamagnetic, with small varying low-coercivity ferromagnetic components. The elemental compositions of major oxides and trace elements vary with depth. Calcium is the major element and displays a pattern of small amplitude fluctuations with a trend to lower values at the bottom, which are also shown in other elements such as barium. Silica and elements such as titanium and strontium are positively correlated and show an apparent cyclic pattern

  5. Soil-landform-plant-community relationships of a periglacial landscape on Potter Peninsula, maritime Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poelking, E. L.; Schaefer, C. E. R.; Fernandes Filho, E. I.; de Andrade, A. M.; Spielmann, A. A.

    2015-05-01

    Integrated studies on the interplay between soils, periglacial geomorphology and plant communities are crucial for the understanding of climate change effects on terrestrial ecosystems of maritime Antarctica, one of the most sensitive areas to global warming. Knowledge on physical environmental factors that influence plant communities can greatly benefit studies on the monitoring of climate change in maritime Antarctica, where new ice-free areas are being constantly exposed, allowing plant growth and organic carbon inputs. The relationship between topography, plant communities and soils was investigated on Potter Peninsula, King George Island, maritime Antarctica. We mapped the occurrence and distribution of plant communities and identified soil-landform-vegetation relationships. The vegetation map was obtained by classification of a QuickBird image, coupled with detailed landform and characterization of 18 soil profiles. The sub-formations were identified and classified, and we also determined the total elemental composition of lichens, mosses and grasses. Plant communities on Potter Peninsula occupy 23% of the ice-free area, at different landscape positions, showing decreasing diversity and biomass from the coastal zone to inland areas where sub-desert conditions prevail. There is a clear dependency between landform and vegetated soils. Soils that have greater moisture or are poorly drained, and with acid to neutral pH, are favourable for moss sub-formations. Saline, organic-matter-rich ornithogenic soils of former penguin rookeries have greater biomass and diversity, with mixed associations of mosses and grasses, while stable felsenmeers and flat rocky cryoplanation surfaces are the preferred sites for Usnea and Himantormia lugubris lichens at the highest surface. Lichens sub-formations cover the largest vegetated area, showing varying associations with mosses.

  6. Subglacial morphology and glacial evolution of the Palmer deep outlet system, Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domack, Eugene; Amblàs, David; Gilbert, Robert; Brachfeld, Stefanie; Camerlenghi, Angelo; Rebesco, Michele; Canals, Miquel; Urgeles, Roger

    2006-04-01

    The Palmer Deep is an erosional, inner-shelf trough located at the convergence of ice flow from three distinct accumulation centers. It served as a funnel for ice flow out across the continental shelf of the Antarctic Peninsula. Swath mapping of 1440 km 2 of seafloor in and adjacent to the Palmer Deep basin defines a large paleo-ice stream that flowed 230 km across the Antarctic Peninsula continental shelf during the Last Glacial Maximum (MIS-2). The unique perspective and detail of the Palmer Deep physiography allow us to recognize several phases of erosion and deposition in the outlet basin. These events are uniquely constrained by two ODP drill cores (sites 1099 and 1098) that together recovered over 150 m of latest Pleistocene and Holocene sediment. We divide this region of the continental shelf into three zones based upon mega- to meso-scale bathymetric features and emphasize that all three were part of one glacial outlet during the most recent period of glaciation. These zones include from inner shelf to outer shelf: the Palmer Deep basin, the Palmer Deep Outlet Sill and the Hugo Island Trough. Specific seafloor features associated with these zones include: relict terraces, sub-glacial lake deltas, channels and levees, debris slopes, spindle and out bed forms, mega-scale glacial lineations, morainal banks, and bank breach points. The origin of many of these features can be linked to the development of a sub-glacial lake basin within the Palmer Deep during or prior to MIS-2, its subsequent drainage, and recession of the Palmer Deep ice stream system. This sub-glacial lake system is reconstructed at the head of a major paleo-ice stream.

  7. Meteorological hazard assessment based on trends and abrupt changes in rainfall characteristics on the Korean peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Jang Hyun; Chung, Eun-Sung; Kim, Yeonjoo; Lee, Bo-Ram

    2017-01-01

    This study presents a statistical approach for assessing meteorological hazards based on trends and abrupt changes in precipitation characteristics. Daily rainfall data from 64 stations in South Korea (SK) and 27 stations in North Korea (NK) were used to identify temporal patterns in the rainfall characteristics of both regions using seven rainfall indices, such as the total annual rainfall and annual number of wet days. This study suggests the use of three steps in identifying meteorological hazards based on two statistical analyses. In step 1, we conducted a trend analysis of a 10-year moving average of the rainfall index using the Mann-Kendall (MK) trend test. Most stations (65.6 %) in SK exhibit clear increasing trends in five indices, whereas far fewer have data indicating any trends in five of the indices in NK (25.9 %). In step 2, abrupt changes in all rainfall indices were identified using a Bayesian Change Point (BCP) approach. The results contradict those from the MK trend analysis. The proportion of stations in NK where trends were identified is much higher than that in SK. In step 3, the results from the two previous steps were integrated to identify the meteorological hazards based on the identified trend and change point. The BCP approach can be used to identify meteorological hazards that MK cannot, as the former approach focuses on the change point during the entire period. As a result, meteorological stability at the sites of weather stations can be identified, and then the meteorological hazards across the entire Korean peninsula can be spatially interpolated. Although SK and NK are located on the same peninsula, distinct differences in the trends were observed.

  8. Mid Holocene Warmth in the Antarctic Peninsula: evidence from the Vega Drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, M.; Leventer, A.; Drake, A.; Domack, E.; Buffen, A.; Ishman, S.; Szymcek, P.; Brachfeld, S.; Backman, E.

    2005-12-01

    Jumbo piston core NBP0003-38, a 20.53 meter core from the Vega Drift (Erebus and Terror Gulf, northeastern Antarctic Peninsula), contains a high resolution record of climate extending back ~8500 years. Lithologic and foraminiferal data presented previously document mid-Holocene conditions warmer than today. These data include increased clay concentration, higher concentrations of ice-rafted debris, and higher magnetic susceptibility below ~6000 ybp, the consequence of extensive meltwater and iceberg calving. This change in lithology is accompanied by the presence of a benthic foraminferal assemblage characteristic of the western Antarctic Peninsula, as contrasted to a lower productivity assemblage observed in the upper section of core. New diatom data confirm mid-Holocene warmth, as based on analysis of the distribution of the two varieties of the species Eucampia antarctica. They are distinguished by their symmetry, with the asymmetric E. antarctica var. antarctica characteristic of subpolar waters and the symmetric E. antarctica var. recta a polar form. Increased relative abundance of the sub-polar form occurs between ~4000-7000 ybp, overlapping and then post-dating the time interval characterized by increased ice melt. In addition, the ratio of terminal to intercalary valves was analyzed. A direct consequence of chain length, a function of the amount of growth, this ratio has been used to record oscillations in winter sea ice cover. Data from JPC38 show longest chain lengths (and least winter sea ice) from ~4000-7000 ybp, in concert with the dominance of the sub-polar form of the species. These data suggest the possibility that mid-Holocene warmth at this site was associated with the southward migration of sub-polar waters and consequently less winter sea ice.

  9. Changes on permafrost and active layer characteristics after the tundra fire in summer 2002 in Seward Peninsula, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, Y.; Harada, K.; Fukuda, M.; Narita, K.

    2006-12-01

    Thermal, water and electrical conditions of permafrost after the tundra fire occurred in summer 2002 were studied in Seward Peninsula, southwest Alaska, in order to evaluate the effect of tundra fire on the arctic permafrost terrains. Field observations were made in summer 2005 and 2006. Four sites were established where the slope direction and surface disturbance condition are different; south- or north-facing, and burned or unburned. At each site ground temperature, water content, thermal conductivity and EC were measured by pit survey, and the seasonal thawed depth measurements were also conducted by using the steel rod from the ground surface. Transient electromagnetic soundings for deeper part and 1D and 2D DC resistivity soundings for shallow part were carried out in the four sites. We compared these field data among the four sites, highlighting in significant differences between burned and unburned sites. Burned sites have deeper thawing depths, and it may correspond with the thin organic soil in the burned sites. Due to the removal of litter and organic soil by the fire, thermal and hydrological regimes of active layer have drastically changed in the burned sites.

  10. Potential Effects of Climate Change on the Distribution of Cold-Tolerant Evergreen Broadleaved Woody Plants in the Korean Peninsula

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Kyung Ah; Kong, Woo-Seok; Nibbelink, Nathan P.; Hopkinson, Charles S.; Lee, Joon Ho

    2015-01-01

    Climate change has caused shifts in species’ ranges and extinctions of high-latitude and altitude species. Most cold-tolerant evergreen broadleaved woody plants (shortened to cold-evergreens below) are rare species occurring in a few sites in the alpine and subalpine zones in the Korean Peninsula. The aim of this research is to 1) identify climate factors controlling the range of cold-evergreens in the Korean Peninsula; and 2) predict the climate change effects on the range of cold-evergreens. We used multimodel inference based on combinations of climate variables to develop distribution models of cold-evergreens at a physiognomic-level. Presence/absence data of 12 species at 204 sites and 6 climatic factors, selected from among 23 candidate variables, were used for modeling. Model uncertainty was estimated by mapping a total variance calculated by adding the weighted average of within-model variation to the between-model variation. The range of cold-evergreens and model performance were validated by true skill statistics, the receiver operating characteristic curve and the kappa statistic. Climate change effects on the cold-evergreens were predicted according to the RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5 scenarios. Multimodel inference approach excellently projected the spatial distribution of cold-evergreens (AUC = 0.95, kappa = 0.62 and TSS = 0.77). Temperature was a dominant factor in model-average estimates, while precipitation was minor. The climatic suitability increased from the southwest, lowland areas, to the northeast, high mountains. The range of cold-evergreens declined under climate change. Mountain-tops in the south and most of the area in the north remained suitable in 2050 and 2070 under the RCP 4.5 projection and 2050 under the RCP 8.5 projection. Only high-elevations in the northeastern Peninsula remained suitable under the RCP 8.5 projection. A northward and upper-elevational range shift indicates change in species composition at the alpine and subalpine

  11. Potential Effects of Climate Change on the Distribution of Cold-Tolerant Evergreen Broadleaved Woody Plants in the Korean Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Koo, Kyung Ah; Kong, Woo-Seok; Nibbelink, Nathan P; Hopkinson, Charles S; Lee, Joon Ho

    2015-01-01

    Climate change has caused shifts in species' ranges and extinctions of high-latitude and altitude species. Most cold-tolerant evergreen broadleaved woody plants (shortened to cold-evergreens below) are rare species occurring in a few sites in the alpine and subalpine zones in the Korean Peninsula. The aim of this research is to 1) identify climate factors controlling the range of cold-evergreens in the Korean Peninsula; and 2) predict the climate change effects on the range of cold-evergreens. We used multimodel inference based on combinations of climate variables to develop distribution models of cold-evergreens at a physiognomic-level. Presence/absence data of 12 species at 204 sites and 6 climatic factors, selected from among 23 candidate variables, were used for modeling. Model uncertainty was estimated by mapping a total variance calculated by adding the weighted average of within-model variation to the between-model variation. The range of cold-evergreens and model performance were validated by true skill statistics, the receiver operating characteristic curve and the kappa statistic. Climate change effects on the cold-evergreens were predicted according to the RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5 scenarios. Multimodel inference approach excellently projected the spatial distribution of cold-evergreens (AUC = 0.95, kappa = 0.62 and TSS = 0.77). Temperature was a dominant factor in model-average estimates, while precipitation was minor. The climatic suitability increased from the southwest, lowland areas, to the northeast, high mountains. The range of cold-evergreens declined under climate change. Mountain-tops in the south and most of the area in the north remained suitable in 2050 and 2070 under the RCP 4.5 projection and 2050 under the RCP 8.5 projection. Only high-elevations in the northeastern Peninsula remained suitable under the RCP 8.5 projection. A northward and upper-elevational range shift indicates change in species composition at the alpine and subalpine

  12. Scaling Tendency of Geothermal Waters Armutlu Peninsula, Northwestern Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertekin, Can

    2015-04-01

    Prediction of scaling tendencies from geothermal waters is important for taking necessary precautions to prevent or control the scale formation. This study contains scaling tendency of geothermal outlets occurring through Armutlu Peninsula in Northwestern Turkey. The E-W trending region stretches into the Marmara Sea (ca. 117 km E-W by 45 km N-S) and is bounded to the north and the south by North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ). The two branches of NAFZ traversing the peninsula control not only active seismicity but also geothermal discharges of the region. Widespread basement rocks across the peninsula including metamorphic assemblage of granitic and volcanic rocks host geothermal fluids. The two distinctive geothermal discharges (Armutlu and Yalova) take place through lineaments appurtenant to the northern branch of NAFZ. Their discharge temperatures of 65 ° C (Yalova) and 70 ° C (Armutlu) are the highest of the region. According to their water chemical results, scaling tendency were computed by using WATCH for different temperature steps under the assumptions of single-stage adiabatic boiling and equilibrium degassing. To evaluate their scaling tendencies, mean geothermal reservoir temperatures were computed by using chemical geothermometers. Scaling tendencies were plotted for calcite, amorphous silica and quartz minerals for different temperature values including reservoir temperatures. Their scaling behavior reveals that oversaturation with calcite and quartz minerals are rapidly attained for the geothermal fluids (Yalova and Armutlu) at relatively lower temperatures. Regarding amorphous silica, they are completely undersaturated. Besides, Langelier Saturation Index (LSI) and Ryznar Stability Index (RSI) were calculated. Their results depict scale formation due to being positive LSI and less than 6.0 of RSI values.

  13. Cenozoic evolution of the Antarctic Peninsula continental margin

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.B. )

    1990-05-01

    Cenozoic evolution of the Antarctic Peninsula continental margin has involved a series of ridge (Aluk Ridge)-trench collisions between the Pacific and Antarctic plates. Subduction occurred episodically between segments of the Pacific plate that are bounded by major fracture zones. The age of ridge-trench collisions decreases from south to north along the margin. The very northern part of the margin, between the Hero and Shackleton fracture zones, has the last surviving Aluk-Antarctic spreading ridge segments and the only remaining trench topography. The sedimentary cover on the northern margin is relatively thin generally less than 1.5 km, thus providing a unique setting in which to examine margin evolution using high resolution seismic methods. Over 5,000 km of high resolution (water gun) seismic profiles were acquired from the Antarctic Peninsula margin during four cruises to the region. The margin is divided into discrete fracture-zone-bounded segments; each segment displays different styles of development. Highly tectonized active margin sequences have been buried beneath a seaward-thickening sediment wedge that represents the passive stage of margin development Ice caps, which have existed in the Antarctic Peninsula region since at least the late Oligocene, have advanced onto the continental shelf on numerous occasions, eroding hundreds of meters into the shelf and depositing a thick sequence of deposits characterized by till tongues and glacial troughs. Glacial erosion has been the main factor responsible for overdeepening of the shelf; isostasy is of secondary importance. As the shelf was lowered by glacial erosion, it was able to accommodate thicker and more unstable marine ice sheets. The shelf also became a vast reservoir for cold, saline shelf water, one of the key ingredients of Antarctic bottom water.

  14. Changing structures and dynamics of western Antarctic Peninsula Ice Shelves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasser, N. F.; Holt, T. O.; Quincey, D. J.; Fricker, H.; Siegfried, M. R.

    2013-12-01

    Over the last three decades, Antarctic Peninsula Ice Shelves have shown a pattern of sustained retreat, often ending in catastrophic and rapid breakup. This study provides a detailed analysis of the structures and dynamics of three western Antarctic Peninsula ice shelves: Bach, Stange and George VI Ice Shelves. Spatial extent and glaciological surface features were mapped for each ice shelf from 1973 to 2010 using optical and radar satellite images to assess their structural evolution, historical dynamics and stability. InSAR and feature-tracking methods were used to assess the recent dynamic configurations of the ice shelves from 1989 to 2010. Repeat ICESat measurements were used to evaluate their vertical changes from 2003 to 2008. On Bach Ice Shelf, the formation of two large fractures near the ice front is linked to widespread thinning (~2 ma-1) and sustained retreat (~360 km2). It looks likely that iceberg calving along these fractures will alter the frontal geometry sufficiently to promote enhanced, irreversible retreat within the next decade. On George VI Ice Shelf, acceleration is observed at both ice fronts; linked to a release of back-stresses through continued ice loss (1995 km2 in total). The most significant changes are recorded at its southern ice front, with ice flow accelerating up to 360% between ca. 1989 and ca. 2010, coupled with widespread rifting and a mean thinning rate of 2.1 ma-1. On Stange Ice Shelf, shear-induced fracturing was observed between two flow units, also linked to widespread thinning (~4.2 ma-1). A semi-quantitative assessment reveals that the southern margin of George VI Ice Shelf is most susceptible to rapid retreat, whilst its northern ice front, Bach Ice Shelf and the northern front of Stange Ice Shelf are more vulnerable than those situated on the east Antarctic Peninsula.

  15. Clusters of Earthquakes In The Southern of Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posadas, A. M.; Luzón, F.; Vidal, F.

    The southern part of the Iberian Peninsula forms part of the western border of Eurasia- Africa plate boundary. This area is characterized by the occurrence of earthquakes of moderate magnitude (the maximum magnitude ranging from 4.5 to 5.5). From the point of view of seismic activity, this region is the most active one in he Iberian Penin- sula. Until earlier 80, only the National Seismic Network belonging to the National Geographic Institute monitores the activity in the south of Iberian Peninsula. From 1983 to the actuality, the Andalusian Seismic Network belonging to the Andalusian Geophysics Institute and Seismic Disaster Prevention, records the microseismicity of the area. Nowadays, the earthquakes catalogue used belongs to the Andalusian Insti- tute of Geophysics and Seismic Disaster Prevention and it counts on more than 20000 events registered from 1985 to 2001. Today, after 20 years of recording seismic ac- tivity, statistics analysis of the catalogue have sense. In this paper we present a first approach to the clustering properties of the seismicity in the south of the Iberian Penin- sula. The analysis carried out starts with the study of clustering properties (temporal and spatial properties) in the Southern of Iberian Peninsula seismicity to demonstrate, by using the Fractal Dimension of the temporal earthquake distribution and the Mor- ishita Index of the spatial distribution of earthquakes, that this seismicity is charac- terized by a tendency to form earthquake clusters, both spatial and temporal clusters. As an example, five seismogenetic areas of the zone are analyzed (Adra-Berja, Agron, Alboran, Antequera and Loja). This particular study of the series find out the b param- eter from the Gutenberg-Richter's Law (which characterizes the energetic relaxation of events), the p parameter from Omori's Law (that characterizes the temporal relax- ation of aftershocks) and the Fractal Dimension of the spatial distribution of earth- quakes (to find the

  16. Monitoring of Landslides using Repeated Kinematics GPS Observables in Sevketiye Town, Biga Peninsula, Çanakkale, NW Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuneyt Erenoglu, Ramazan; Akcay, Ozgun; Karaca, Zeki; Erenoglu, Oya; Sengul Uluocak, Ebru; Yucel, Mehmet Ali

    2014-05-01

    Landslide is one of the most important natural events, and is also a result of earth's crust movements. Landslides generally result in the outward and downward movement of slope-forming materials consisting soil, rock, artificial fill and etc. Moreover, possible earthquakes are one of the main reasons of triggering landslides in active areas seismically. There have been many studies based on the Global Positioning System (GPS) observables to compute the three dimensional positioning of established sites, and to model landslides precisely. We can monitor landslide with GPS using continuous data collection or the type of campaign surveying. While continuous data collection provide a millimetre-level of accuracy, the accuracy decreases with the shorter sessions, e.g. campaign surveying, due to possible sources of error. The area, located west of the Çanakkale, has been studied to identify the landslide susceptibility and geology. Çanakkale, NW Turkey, is located on the territory of the Biga Peninsula and the Gallipoli Peninsula. The section of remaining at the west of the line from the Gulf of Edremit to the Gulf of Erdek is called Biga Peninsula, and it covers an area of approximately 10 thousand km². In the Biga Peninsula, the main morphological units are at the western, northern and southern of coastal plains, and on their behind the hills, plateaus and mountainous areas of the inland. But at the middle areas, it is often possible to find the tectonic depressions sandwiched between the masses plateau and mountainous. In general, moving down the slope of a rock, soil or debris can be defined as landslides that are ranks second in terms of caused losses after earthquakes in Turkey. Landslides, harm to urbanization as well as loss of lives and economic losses. Moreover they adversely affects to agricultural, forest areas and the quality of the rivers. For example, the gas pipeline connecting Turkey and Greece, which will provide gas to the Southern Europe passes

  17. Examining Holocene Stability ofAntarctic Peninsula Ice Shelves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgson, Dominic; Bentley, Michael J.; Roberts, Stephen J.; Smith, James A.; Sugden, David E.; Domack, Eugene W.

    2006-08-01

    Temperatures on the Antarctic Peninsulaare increasing at a rate of 3.4°C per century,more than five times the global mean. At thesame time, the region's ice shelves haveretreated and collapsed, with an area ofmore than 14,000 square kilometers disappearingwithin the past two decades. Ice shelf retreat has followed the southwardmigration of the -9°C mean annual isotherm,referred to as the `climatic limit of ice shelfstability' (Figure 1). Thus, present-day iceshelf retreats on the Antarctic Peninsula havebeen linked to increased atmospheric temperature[Vaughan et al., 2003].

  18. Metalliferous deposits near Granite Mountain, eastern Seward Peninsula, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Thomas P.; Elliott, R.L.

    1969-01-01

    New deposits of lead, zinc, and silver were found in a large altered zone 18 miles long and 2 to 5 miles wide near Quartz Creek west of Granite Mountain in the eastern Seward Peninsula, Alaska. New deposits of molybdenum, bismuth, and silver were found associated with a previously reported occurrence of uranium, copper, lead, and zinc minerals in the upper Peace River drainage northeast of Granite Mountain. Both groups of deposits are associated spatially with felsic plutonic rocks and occur near the western edge of a late Mesozoic province of volcanic plutonic rocks. Both groups of deposits warrant further investigation as possible exploration target areas.

  19. Lichens of Izembek National Wildlife Refuge, westernmost Alaska Peninsula

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Talbot, S. S.; Talbot, S.L.; Thomson, J.W.; Schofield, W.B.

    2000-01-01

    One hundred eighty-two taxa of lichens including two lichen parasites are reported from Izembek National Wildlife Refuge on the tip of the Alaska Peninsula. Metasphaeria tartarina is new to North America; Scoliciosporum umbrinum is new to Alaska. Wide-ranging, arctic-alpine, and boreal species dominate the lichen flora; a coastal element is moderately represented, while amphi-Beringian species form a minor element. Epigeic lichen abundance is described along a lowland to alpine mesotopographic gradient selected to represent major landscape variation in the refuge. Of six major community types identified, three had significant lichen components.

  20. Permian Tethyan Fusulinina from the Kenai Peninsula, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stevens, C.H.; Davydov, V.I.; Bradley, D.

    1997-01-01

    Two samples from a large, allochthonous limestone block in the McHugh Complex of the Chugach terrane on the Kenai Peninsula, Alaska, contain species of 12 genera of Permian Fusulinina including Abadehella, Kahlerina, Pseudokahlerina?, Nankinella, Codonofusiella, Dunbarula, Parafusulina?, Chusenella, Verbeekina, Pseudodoliolina, Metadoliolina?, Sumatrina?, and Yabeina, as well as several other foraminiferans and one alga. The assemblage of fusulinids is characteristically Tethyan, belonging to the Yabeina archaica zone of early Midian (late Wordian) age. Similar faunas are known from the Pamirs, Transcaucasia, and Japan, as well as from allochthonous terranes in British Columbia, northwestern Washington, and Koryakia in eastern Siberia.

  1. ABCGheritage project - promoting geotourism in northern Finland, northern Norway and the Kola Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pihlaja, Jouni; Johansson, Peter; Lauri, Laura S.

    2014-05-01

    Nature tourism has been a growing business sector in the Barents area during the recent decades. With the purpose to develop nature tourism in a sustainable way, a cooperation project ABCGheritage - Arctic Biological, Cultural and Geological Heritage has been carried out. Project has received partial funding from the EU Kolarctic ENPI program. In the geoheritage part of the project the main activities were aimed to develop pro-environmental ways of geotourism in the area. The three main participants in the geoheritage part of the project are the Geological Survey of Finland, Northern Finland Office, the Geological Institute of the Kola Science Centre of the Russian Academy of Sciences and Bioforsk Soil and Environment from northeastern Norway. The duration of the project is 2012-2014 and most of the work has already been completed even if most of the results are not published yet. Totally ten different tasks have been implemented in the geological part of the project. The largest task has been the preparation of a geological outdoor map and guide book of the Khibiny Tundra locating in the central part of the Kola Peninsula. In Finland already 11 such maps have been published, and the experiences gained during their production have been used in this project, too. Geological heritage trails to the Khibiny Tundra have also been created and they will be drawn on the map. The second concrete result is the Barents Tour for Geotourist -guide, which will be published as a guide book, web pages and an exhibition. The route comprises ca 35 best geological demonstration sites along the circle route from northern Finland to northeastern Norway, from there to Kola Peninsula and then back to Finland. Information of the route will be available for all interested travelers. In addition to the geological outdoor map of the Khibiny Tundra and "Barents Tour for Geotourists"-guide, the primary outputs of the project are the geological nature trails on the field, geological

  2. Mission and modern citrus species diversity of Baja California Peninsula cases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The spring-fed mission oases of the Baja California peninsula, Mexico, hold several species, varieties and unique hybrids of heritage citrus, which may represent valuable genetic resources. Citrus species first arrived to the peninsula with the Jesuit missionaries (1697-1768), and new varieties were...

  3. 46 CFR 7.170 - Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK. 7.170... BOUNDARY LINES Alaska § 7.170 Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Cape Kumlium to the westernmost extremity of Nakchamik Island; thence to...

  4. 46 CFR 7.170 - Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK. 7.170... BOUNDARY LINES Alaska § 7.170 Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Cape Kumlium to the westernmost extremity of Nakchamik Island; thence to...

  5. 46 CFR 7.170 - Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK. 7.170... BOUNDARY LINES Alaska § 7.170 Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Cape Kumlium to the westernmost extremity of Nakchamik Island; thence to...

  6. 46 CFR 7.170 - Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK. 7.170... BOUNDARY LINES Alaska § 7.170 Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Cape Kumlium to the westernmost extremity of Nakchamik Island; thence to...

  7. 46 CFR 7.170 - Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK. 7.170... BOUNDARY LINES Alaska § 7.170 Alaska Peninsula, AK to Aleutian Islands, AK. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Cape Kumlium to the westernmost extremity of Nakchamik Island; thence to...

  8. Benthic infauna variability in relation to environmental factors and organic pollutants in tropical coastal lagoons from the northern Yucatan Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Kuk-Dzul, J Gabriel; Gold-Bouchot, G; Ardisson, P-L

    2012-12-01

    We examine the abundance and species composition variability of benthic infauna from tropical coastal lagoons in relation to environmental factors and organic pollutants. Sediment samples were collected at 40 sites in four lagoons in the northern Yucatan Peninsula. A total of 7985 individuals belonging to 173 species were sampled. While the eastern lagoons were dominated by polychaetes, the western ones were dominated by crustaceans. Overall, polychaetes had the highest abundance (48%), followed by crustaceans (42%). According to canonical correspondence analysis, species attributes were correlated with water salinity, pH and temperature, but also with sediment pentachlorobenzene, trichlorobenzene, and low molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Some pollutants exceeded sediment quality guidelines, representing a potential environmental risk to benthic infauna. Together, environmental factors and pollutants explained 52% of the variance in abundance and species composition among sites.

  9. Digital data for the geologic framework of the Alaska Peninsula, southwest Alaska, and the Alaska Peninsula terrane

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Frederic H.; Detterman, Robert L.; DuBois, Gregory D.

    1999-01-01

    These digital databases are the result of the compilation and reinterpretation of published and unpublished 1:250,000- and 1:63,360-scale mapping. The map area covers approximately 62,000 sq km (23,000 sq mi) in land area and encompasses much of 13 1:250,000-scale quadrangles on the Alaska Peninsula in southwestern Alaska. The compilation was done as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's Alaska Mineral Resource Assessment project (AMRAP), whose goal was create and assemble geologic, geochemical, geophysical, and other data in order to perform mineral resource assessments on a quadrangle, regional or statewide basis. The digital data here was created to assist in the completion of a regional mineral resource assessment of the Alaska Peninsula. Mapping on the Alaska Peninsula under AMRAP began in 1977 in the Chignik and Sutwik Island 1:250,000 quadrangles (Detterman and others, 1981). Continued mapping in the Ugashik, bristol bay, and northwestern Karluk quadrangles (Detterman and others, 1987) began in 1979, followed by the Mount Katmai, eastern Naknek, and northwestern Afognak quadrangles (Riehle and others, 1987; Riehle and others, 1993), the Port Moller, Stepovak bay, and Simeonof Island quadrangles (Wilson and others, 1995) beginning in 1983. Work in the Cold bay and False Pass quadrangles (Wilson and others, 1992 [Superceded by Wilson and others 1997, but not incorporated herein]) began in 1986. The reliability of the geologic mapping is variable, based, in part, on the field time spent in each area of the map, the available support, and the quality of the existing base maps. In addition, our developing understanding of the geology of the Alaska Peninsula required revision of earlier maps, such as the Chignik and Sutwik Island quadrangles map (Detterman and others, 1981) to reflect this new knowledge. We have revised the stratigraphic nomenclature (Detterman and others, 1996) and our assignment of unit names to some rocks has been changed. All geologic maps on

  10. Trends in photochemical smog in the Cape Peninsula and the implications for health.

    PubMed

    Bailie, R S; Ehrlich, R I; Truluck, T F

    1994-11-01

    There has been growing public concern over reports of increasing air pollution in the Cape Peninsula. Attention has been focused on the 'brown haze' and on photochemical smog. Because of deficiencies in the monitoring equipment, information on trends in photochemical smog levels over the past decade is limited. Trends in oxides of nitrogen, one of the main precursors of photochemical smog, and therefore an indicator of the potential for its formation, were examined for the period 1984-1993. Meaningful data for determining trends were available from only a single site. Increases in mean monthly levels, peak hourly levels and the number of times guidelines were exceeded were demonstrated. Given the dynamics of formation of photochemical smog and the particular role of motor vehicles, it is argued that the trends measured at this site are probably an underestimate of the trends in other parts of the Cape Town metropolitan area. Some of the precursors of photochemical smog, notably nitrogen dioxide, and some of its components, notably ozone, have been shown to be detrimental to respiratory health at levels close to, or below, current recommended guidelines. A continuing increase in these pollutants will therefore result in more respiratory illness, particularly among susceptible groups. This calls for an upgrading of monitoring of air pollution in Cape Town and for appropriate steps to prevent its further increase.

  11. Geographic distribution of the chytrid pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis among mountain amphibians along the Italian peninsula.

    PubMed

    Zampiglia, Mauro; Canestrelli, Daniele; Chiocchio, Andrea; Nascetti, Giuseppe

    2013-11-25

    The amphibian chytrid pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) is considered a major cause of amphibian population declines, particularly in montane areas. Here, we investigated the presence and distribution of Bd among populations of 3 mid- to high-altitude species spanning the entire Italian peninsula (486 individuals from 39 sites overall): the stream frog Rana italica, the fire salamander Salamandra salamandra gigliolii, and the alpine newt Mesotriton alpestris apuanus. We found Bd in all of the analyzed species. Despite the widespread distribution of the pathogen, its overall prevalence (6, 9 and 19%, respectively) was lower than previously reported for the endangered Apennine yellow-bellied toad Bombina pachypus (62.5%). Moreover, several populations of the species studied here were not infected, even at sites where Bd has been detected in other host species. When coupled with the lack of evidence for Bd-related mortalities in these species in peninsular Italy, these results suggest that mechanisms of resistance and/or tolerance are protecting populations of these species from the pathogenic activity of Bd. Nevertheless, in light of the dynamic pattern of Bd-host interactions reported in other studies, of Bd-related mortalities in at least 1 study species (S. s. salamandra) in other areas, and the ongoing climate changes in montane environments, we suggest that the occurrence of Bd should be considered a potential threat to the long-term persistence of these species, and urge the implementation of monitoring and conservation plans.

  12. What shapes edaphic communities in mineral and ornithogenic soils of Cierva Point, Antarctic Peninsula?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mataloni, G.; Garraza, G. González; Bölter, M.; Convey, P.; Fermani, P.

    2010-08-01

    Three mineral soil and four ornithogenic soil sites were sampled during summer 2006 at Cierva Point (Antarctic Peninsula) to study their bacterial, microalgal and faunal communities in relation to abiotic and biotic features. Soil moisture, pH, conductivity, organic matter and nutrient contents were consistently lower and more homogeneous in mineral soils. Ornithogenic soils supported larger and more variable bacterial abundances than mineral ones. Algal communities from mineral soils were more diverse than those from ornithogenic soils, although chlorophyll- a concentrations were significantly higher in the latter. This parameter and bacterial abundance were correlated with nutrient and organic matter contents. The meiofauna obtained from mineral soils was homogeneous, with one nematode species dominating all samples. The fauna of ornithogenic soils varied widely in composition and abundance. Tardigrades and rotifers dominated the meiofauna at eutrophic O2, where they supported a large population of the predatory nematode Coomansus gerlachei. At site O3, high bacterial abundance was consistent with high densities of the bacterivorous nematodes Plectus spp. This study provides evidence that Antarctic soils are complex and diverse systems, and suggests that biotic interactions (e.g. competition and predation) may have a stronger and more direct influence on community variability in space and time than previously thought.

  13. Vertical Methane Migration on the Hikurangi Margin off the Mahia Peninsula, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffin, R. B.; Rose, P. S.; Yoza, B.; Boyd, T. J.; Crutchley, G. J.; Mountjoy, J. J.; Pecher, I. A.

    2015-12-01

    This study focuses on gas source and vertical migration patterns in sediments on the Hikurangi Margin, east of the North Island, New Zealand off the Mahia Peninsula, collected aboard the RV Tangaroa (TAN1508) during June 2015. Seismic and Topas data collected on board were used to organize a coring plan for this expedition. Selection of piston core locations was based on spatial variation in vertical gas migration across seismic patterns indicating BSR migration toward the sediment surface. Higher molecular weight gases were not observed at this location suggesting a biogenic gas source. Across this transect, methane concentrations varied by more than an order of magnitude at stations within a few hundred meters. The highest methane concentrations were 5051.7 ppm in Core 004 at and 2413.4 ppm in Core 036. Concentrations at other sites ranged from 23.8 to 125.9 ppm. Methane concentrations showed a strong correlation with seismic and Topas data that suggested high vertical migration and large shallow gas pockets. While these data focused on locations across a BSR, higher methane concentrations, ranging from 1529 to 7862 ppm were observed in three cores from a nearby site where a BSR was not observed. This presentation will compare spatial variation in the vertical gas migration and stable isotopic composition of sediment organic and inorganic carbon, methane and porewater dissolved inorganic carbon among the core locations to better understand vertical methane migration and shallow sediment methane cycling.

  14. The dilemma of development in the Arabian Peninsula

    SciTech Connect

    Osama, A.R.

    1986-01-01

    With the current of Arab oil revenues it is appropriate to review the experience of the Arab oil producers in social, economic and political development over the last decade. This book, by one of Saudi Arabia's most distinguished academics, concentrates on the six oil producers of the Arabian Peninsula. (Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, UAE, Qatar, Oman and Bahrain). The book suggests that in many respects the oil revenues have obstructed serious development because they have made the economies totally dependent on one expendable resource and this has made all the Arabian countries too vulnerable to external pressures and interests. Futhermore, the oil revenues have encouraged fantasy and wishful thinking which have skewed the development process and stimulated pseudo-development. The book makes clear that until the petro-bureaucracy adopts a realistic approach to development there can be no prospect of real development in the Arabian Peninsula. Contents: acknowledgment, preface, introduction, theoretical framework for development administration, development and planning, development of bureaucracy, the appropriate model for development administration, manpower development, the allocation of financial resources for development, conclusion. Bibliography. Index.

  15. Beryllium deposits of the western Seward Peninsula, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sainsbury, C.L.

    1963-01-01

    Deposits of beryllium ore in the Lost River area of the western Seward Peninsula, Alaska, consist of replacement veins, pipes, and stringer lodes is limestone in a zone about 7 miles long and 2 to 3 miles wide which is faulted and intruded by dikes and stocks. The ores are remarkably alike and typically consist of the following minerals, in percent: fluorite, 45-65; diaspore, 5-10; tourmaline, 0-10; chrysoberyl, 3-10; white mica, 0-5; small amounts of hematite, sulfide minerals, manganese oxide, other beryllium minerals; and traces of minerals not yet identified. The ores generally are cut by late veinlets which are of the same mineralogy as the groundmass ore, or which consist of fluorite, white mica, and euclase. The ores are fine grained, and many of the individual mineral grains, except fluorite, are less than 1 mm in size. The beryllium content of bulk samples of ore ranges from 0.11 to 0.54 percent (0.31 to 1.50 percent BeO). High-grade nodules, composed principally of chrysoberyl, diaspore, fluorite, and mica, contain as much as 6 percent BeO. Geochemical reconnaissance has disclosed other areas of anomalous beryllium in stream sediments elsewhere on the Seward Peninsula, generally around biotite granites that have them associated with tin deposits; additional exploration probably will disclose other deposits.

  16. Radiological dose in Muria peninsula from SB-LOCA event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunarko; Suud, Zaki

    2017-01-01

    Dose assessment for accident condition is performed for Muria Peninsula region using source-term from Three-Mile Island unit 2 SB-LOCA accident. Xe-133, Kr-88, 1-131 and Cs-137 isotopes are considered in the calculation. The effluent is assumed to be released from a 50 m stack. Lagrangian particle dispersion method (LPDM) employing non-Gaussian dispersion coefficient in 3-dimensional mass-consistent wind-field is employed to obtain periodic surface-level concentration which is then time-integrated to obtain spatial distribution of ground-level dose. In 1-hour simulation, segmented plumes with 60 seconds duration with a total of 18.000 particles involved. Simulations using 6-hour worst-case meteorological data from Muria peninsula results in a peak external dose of around 1.668 mSv for low scenario and 6.892 mSv for high scenario in dry condition. In wet condition with 5 mm/hour and 10 mm/hour rain for the whole duration of the simulation provides only minor effect to dose. The peak external dose is below the regulatory limit of 50 mSv for effective skin dose from external gamma exposure.

  17. Impacts of tundra fire on active layer condition and estimation of true resistivity value of soil in Seward Peninsula, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, K.; Sawada, Y.; Narita, K.; Fukuda, M.

    2007-12-01

    In Seward Peninsula, southwest Alaska, large tundra fires were occurred in 1997 and 2002, and a discontinuous permafrost area burned widely near the Kougarok River. After fires, a vegetation condition was destroyed and a ground surface thermal condition was changed. Then, field observations were conducted at burned and unburned sites in summer 2005, 2006 and 2007, in order to clarify impacts of the tundra fire on thermal and water conditions of active layer. From pit surveys, ground temperatures at burned sites showed 4-5 °C higher values than those at unburned sites. Soil water contents at burned sites showed relative high values in 2005, but low in 2006. Active layer thicknesses were significantly different between burned and unburned sites, about 60cm and 40cm, respectively. There is no significant increasing of the thickness between 2005 and 2006, however, the thickness in 2007 at north-facing sites increased to 80cm at the burned site and 50cm at the unburned site, respectively. Apparent electrical resistivity values up to 1m deep were obtained from electrical soundings in 2006, and values at burned sites were lower than those at unburned sites due to the thick active layer whose resistivity value is relatively low. As an apparent resistivity value is generally produced from the combination of a true resistivity value and a thickness of a layer, a simple calculation was carried out in order to estimate a true resistivity value of unfrozen mineral soil in the active layer. The calculated results showed that the true resistivity at burned sites was higher than that at unburned sites, which was seemed to correspond to a relative low water condition. This result is in agreement with the measured result of water content in 2006. Using this method, the apparent resistivity may show a soil water condition.

  18. Morphotectonic segmentation along the Nicoya Peninsula seismic gap, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J.; Morrish, S.; Butcher, A.; Ritzinger, B.; Wellington, K.; Lafromboise, E.; Protti, M.; Gardner, T.; Spotila, J.

    2010-12-01

    The Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica forms a prominent morphologic high along the outer forearc of the erosive southern Middle America convergent margin. This emergent coastal landmass overlies the seismogenic zone and occupies a seismic gap that last ruptured in 1950 with a M7.7 megathrust earthquake. The edges of both the Nicoya seismic gap and the peninsula’s abrupt shorelines correspond with the aftershock limits of the more recent 1992 M7.2 Nicaragua tsunami earthquake to the north, and the 1990 M7.0 Cobano seamount rupture to the south. The coincidence of emergent topography and recent earthquake rupture zones suggests persistence of the Nicoya segment through multiple seismic cycles. Along the Nicoya Peninsula's seaward-facing coastline, net Quaternary uplift is recorded by emergent strandlines, marine terraces, and incised valley-fill alluvium. Ongoing field mapping, surveying, and isotopic dating reveal uplift variations along the Nicoya segment that coincide with three contrasting domains of subducting seafloor offshore (EPR, CNS-1, CNS-2). Uplift rates vary between 0.1-0.2 m/k.y. inboard of older EPR crust along the northern Nicoya coast; 0.2-0.3 m/k.y. inboard of younger CNS-1 crust along the southern Nicoya coast; and 1.0-2.0 m/k.y. inboard of CNS-2 seamounts impacting the peninsula’s southern tip. These results are consistent with geophysical observations that indicate finer scale segmentation of the Nicoya seismogenic zone related to along-strike changes in the characteristics of the subducting plate. Variable upper-plate uplift along the Nicoya segment may reflect differences in subducting-plate roughness, thermal structure, fluid flow, and seismogenic-zone locking (up-dip/down-dip limits). Based on the rapid convergence rate (9 cm/yr) and the frequency of historic seismicity, the recurrence interval for large Nicoya earthquakes is estimated at ~50 years. The most recent event, in 1950, generated >1m of coseismic uplift along the central Nicoya

  19. Holocene glacier dynamics on James Ross Island, NE Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, B. J.; Glasser, N. F.; Hambrey, M.

    2013-12-01

    The northern Antarctic Peninsula is currently warming very rapidly, which has resulted in ice sheet thinning, ice-shelf collapse, and rapid and widespread glacier recession. These small mountain glaciers are predicted to make a large sea level contribution over the coming century. Reconstructing past rates, volumes and magnitudes of change, particularly with respect to the former configuration of former ice sheets and ice shelves, is vital to contextualise contemporary change and to improve predictions of future ice-sheet behaviour. The aim of this research is therefore to investigate the relationship of deglacial ice sheet thinning and Holocene glacier fluctuations around James Ross Island, northeast Antarctic Peninsula, with temperature changes recorded in the Mount Haddington Ice Core. We use a combination of geomorphological mapping, from field campaigns and remotely sensed images, cosmogenic nuclide ages on glacially transported boulders, and numerical modelling with a simple 1D flowline model. Prior to 18 ka, James Ross Island was inundated by a thick and mainly cold-based ice sheet, which scattered granite erratics across the island. Ice sheet thickness and the rate of thinning is constrained by granite erratics on Terrapin Hill (610 m a.s.l.), and from flat-topped mesas at 370 m a.s.l. on Ulu Peninsula. During deglaciation and a period of rapid warming and eustatic sea level rise, the area was drained by Prince Gustav Ice Stream. The ice sheet reached its current configuration by around 6 ka, with glacier readvances around 4-5 ka. At Boulder Valley, near Terrapin Hill on James Ross Island, a large glacial readvance reached the current shoreline. It pre-dated the Mid-Holocene sea level high-stand, and has shorelines imprinted upon its seaward face. After 5.3 cal. ka BP and post-dating the mid-Holocene sea level high-stand, there was a readvance of at least 7 km by glacier 'IJR-45' on Ulu Peninsula. Rapid glacier recession occurred during a period of

  20. Updated Episodic Tremor and Slip on the Cocos-Caribbean Subduction zone as measured by a GPS and Seismic Network on the Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Psencik, K. C.; Dixon, T. H.; Schwartz, S.; Walter, J.; Protti, M.; Gonzalez, V.

    2008-12-01

    The close proximity of the Nicoya Peninsula to the Cocos-Caribbean Subduction zone plate boundary makes it a prime location to use GPS to study episodic tremor and slip. Nicoya Peninsula currently has an operating network of 13 continuous GPS (CGPS) and 12 seismic stations designed to identify and characterize the pattern of episodic tremor and slip (ETS) events along the seismogenic zone under Costa Rica's Pacific Margin. The CGPS stations have varying degrees of equipment and communication. Of the 13 sites, five are equipped with SIM cards and modems for direct download capabilities, two of which are connected to a router for direct internet access. These sites, LMNL, located in Limonal, and LEPA, located in Lepanta are being monitored on the PBO network by UNAVCO with all of the quality and systems checks that this implies. All sites with NetRS receivers are currently partitioned to record both 5Hz and 30 second position data. The advantage to recording at a 5 Hz interval is that the receivers may be used to record long period dynamic events during large earthquakes along the Cocos-Caribbean plate boundary. The occurrence of slow slip events has been previously postulated in this region based on correlated fluid flow and seismic tremor events recorded near the margin wedge in 2000 and from sparse GPS observations in 2003. Paucity of data prevented details of these events from being resolved. In May 2007 a slow slip event was recorded on our densified GPS network and accompanied by seismic tremor. We will present the refined GPS time series and correlated seismic tremor for both likely slow slip events in September 2003 and May 2007. We will also present the inferred pattern of slip on the plate interface. Future plans include installation of additional sites, including the interior of the peninsula and reference sites on the stable Caribbean plate.

  1. Multichannel Seismic Investigations of Sediment Drifts off West Antarctica and the Antarctic Peninsula: Preliminary Results from Research Cruise JR298

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larter, R. D.; Graham, A. G. C.; Hernandez-Molina, J.; Channell, J. E. T.; Hillenbrand, C. D.; Hogan, K. A.; Uenzelmann-Neben, G.; Gohl, K.; Rebesco, M.; Hodell, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    The West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) and Antarctic Peninsula Ice Sheet (APIS) have exhibited significant changes over recent decades but there is still great uncertainty about how rapidly and how far they will retreat in a warmer climate. For example, it remains unclear whether or not the marine-based WAIS "collapsed" during the last interglacial period, resulting in a global sea-level rise contribution of more than 3 m. Previous studies, including Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 178, have shown that sediment drifts on the continental rise west of the Antarctic Peninsula contain a rich high-resolution archive of Antarctic margin paleoceanography and APIS history that extends back to at least the Late Miocene. The potential of existing ODP cores from the drifts is, however, compromised by the fact that composite sections are incomplete and lack of precise chronological control. A new drilling proposal (732-Full2) has been scientifically approved and is with the JOIDES Resolution Facilities Board of the International Ocean Discovery Program for scheduling. The main aims of the proposal are to obtain continuous, high-resolution records from sites on sediment drifts off both the Antarctic Peninsula and West Antarctica (southern Bellingshausen Sea) and to achieve good chronological control on them using a range of techniques. We present preliminary results from a recent site survey investigation cruise on RRS James Clark Ross (JR298) that obtained high-resolution multichannel seismic reflection data over the proposed sites and adjacent working areas. The new data provide a basis for interpretation of (i) sedimentary processes that operated during the development of the drifts, and (ii) links between depositional systems on the continental rise, paleo-ice-sheet dynamics and paleoceanographic processes. Through further analyses of seismic and other geophysical data, in combination with marine sediment cores retrieved from the proposed sites, we aim to provide insight into

  2. Expanding Ice Sheets on the Antarctic Peninsula during the Plio/Pleistocene Recorded in Continental Rise Sediment Drifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, E. A.; Hillenbrand, C.

    2007-12-01

    Sediment drifts on the continental rise west of the Antarctic Peninsula are located within 125 km from the continental shelf edge, the main contributor of terrigenous sediment during both glacial and interglacial periods. The composition of drift deposits continuously recorded changes in ice sheet volume and thermal regime as well as sea surface temperatures (SSTs) and sea ice extent. The coarse-grained terrigenous sediment (pebbles and coarse sand), a proxy for iceberg-rafted debris (IRD), was analyzed in sediments spanning the last 3.1 m.y. at Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Sites 1101 and 1096. IRD is deposited in both glacial intervals, dominated by fine-grained laminated mud and interglacial units consisting of bioturbated muds enriched in biogenic components. Contents of biogenic opal, which reflect diatom abundance, are relatively high from 3.1-2.2 Ma. Calcareous nannofossils are present within interglacial sediments from 2.2-0.76 Ma. Both findings suggest warm SSTs and limited sea ice over the drifts during interglacial periods before the Late Pleistocene. Quartz grains picked from the IRD fraction and imaged with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) show an abrupt change in surface microtextures at 1.35 Ma. During the Late Pliocene to Early Pleistocene, many quartz grains are completely weathered and only a few show signs of crushing and abrasion, indicating that glaciers were too small to inundate the Antarctic Peninsula topography. Debris shed from mountain peaks was transported supraglacially or englacially allowing weathered grains to pass unmodified through the glaciers. Glaciers expanded in size during glacial periods from 1.35-0.76 Ma. The IRD accumulation during those periods was very high and diverse dropstone lithologies document supply from sources throughout the Antarctica Peninsula. Conditions that spawned the large polar ice sheet identified at the Last Glacial Maximum have been present on the Antarctic Peninsula during glacial periods since

  3. Thickness of the surficial aquifer, Delmarva Peninsula, Maryland and Delaware

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Denver, Judith; Nardi, Mark R.

    2017-01-01

    A digital map of the thickness of the surficial unconfined aquifer, including from the land surface and unsaturated zone to the bottom of sediments of geologic units identified as part of the surficial aquifer, was produced to improve understanding of the hydrologic system in the Maryland and Delaware portions of the Delmarva Peninsula. The map is intended to be used in conjunction with other environmental coverages (such land use, wetlands, and soil characteristics) to provide a subsurface hydrogeologic component to studies of nitrate transport that have historically relied on maps of surficial features. It could also be used to study the transport of other water soluble chemicals. The map was made using the best currently available data, which was of varying scales. It was created by overlaying a high resolution land surface and bathymetry digital elevation model (DEM) on a digital representation of the base of the surficial aquifer, part of hydrogeologic framework, as defined by Andreasen and others (2013). Thickness was calculated as the difference between the top of land surface and the bottom of the surficial aquifer sediments, which include sediments from geologic formations of late-Miocene through Quaternary age. Geologic formations with predominantly sandy surficial sediments that comprise the surficial aquifer on the Delmarva Peninsula include the Parsonsburg Sand, Sinepuxent Formation (Fm.), and parts of the Omar Fm. north of Indian River Bay in Delaware, the Columbia Fm., Beaverdam Fm., and Pennsauken Fm. (Ator and others 2005; Owens and Denney, 1986; Mixon, 1985; Bachman and Wilson, 1984). Formations with mixed texture and sandy stratigraphy including the Scotts Corner Fm. and Lynch Heights Fm. in Delaware are also considered part of the surficial aquifer (Ramsey, 1997). Subcropping aquifers and confining beds underlie the surficial aquifer throughout the Peninsula and may increase or limit its thickness, respectively (Andreasen and others, 2013

  4. The return to the Iberian Peninsula: first Quaternary record of Muscardinus and a palaeogeographical overview of the genus in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Ibaibarriaga, Naroa; Arrizabalaga, Álvaro; Iriarte-Chiapusso, María-José; Rofes, Juan; Murelaga, Xabier

    2015-07-01

    Although the earliest record of the genus Muscardinus dates from the Middle Miocene in Spain, no mention has been reported since the Lower Pliocene in the Iberian Peninsula. In this paper, Quaternary fossil remains of a hazel dormouse (Muscardinus avellanarius) are described, for the first time, in the Iberian Peninsula. These remains constitute the south-westernmost record of the genus in the Eurasian continent during the Late Pleistocene. The fossils, one first upper molar (M1) and two second upper molars (M2), come from Lezetxiki II Cave, an early Late Pleistocene site in northern Spain. The presence of the hazel dormouse agrees with the abundance of rodent species indicative of woodland, suggesting mild climatic conditions and a landscape formed by deciduous forest. This assemblage has been arguably assigned to warm and humid conditions related to an interstadial period in MIS 5. We also present an overview of the palaeogeography of the genus in Europe. The identification of this dormouse reinforces the idea of biological corridors between western Iberia and the rest of Europe during the Pleistocene.

  5. Assessing Impacts of Disturbances and Climate Change on Carbon Stocks in Mexican Semidry Forests of the Yucatan Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Z.; Birdsey, R.; Johnson, K.; Dupuy, J. M.; Hernandez-Stefanoni, J. L.; Richardson, K.

    2014-12-01

    The spatially explicit biogeochemical model Forest-DNDC was used to estimate carbon dynamics with disturbances and climate change in secondary semidry forests in Yucatan Peninsula. The model was validated using observations from 276 field plots in a 350 km2 region of semi-deciduous forest surrounding the intensive monitoring site at Kaxil Kiuic, and it performed well with high performance efficiency (E=0.79, R2=0.83). The simulation results showed substantial spatial differences in biomass in the forests due to historical disturbance patterns and heterogeneous forest environments. The simulated impacts of the disturbances that occurred from 1998-2010 revealed an estimated loss of total biomass carbon storage of 154.7 Gg due mainly to about 12 km2 of forestland loss. The results from disturbance scenarios indicate that disastrous storms, which are not uncommon in the Yucatan Peninsula, can substantially impact carbon storage in a short time. However, warming can produce a long-term impact on carbon sequestration, due principally to the decrease in biomass carbon at a mean rate of over 100 kg ha-1yr-1 with an increase in temperature by 1 degree Celsius. The forests in this area are highly sensitive to warming due to a semidry climate where the evapotranspiration is higher than precipitation. Even if each degree of warming increase is accompanied by an increase in precipitation of 10%, the significant impact of warming cannot be dismissed.

  6. [Seasonal variations of community structures phytoplankton in groundwater discharge areas along the Northern Yucatán Peninsula coast].

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Góngora, Cynthia Catalina; Liceaga-Correa, Maria de los Angeles; Herrera-Silveira, Jorge Alfredo

    2012-03-01

    The highly touristic Yucatán Peninsula is principally constituted with coastal marine environments. Like other coastal areas, this has been affected by the increase of waste water discharge, hydrological modifications and land use changes in the area. The phytoplankton community structure is one of the main components of coastal ecosystems and the most affected in hydrological processes. In order to follow the seasonal variations, the phytoplankton was characterized to follow the hydrological variability in two sites (Dzilam and Progreso) of the Northern Yucatán Peninsula. For this, cruises were carried out monthly during one year, from April 2004 to March 2005, with two samplings per season (dry, rainy and "nortes"). Hydrological variability was associated with seasonality and directly linked to groundwater discharges in the Dzilam area, and waste water discharges in the Progreso area. The highest nutrient concentrations occurred mainly during the rainy season. The phytoplankton community changes observed throughout the year suggested that the hydrological and chemical variability associated with seasonality and anthropogenic impacts have a strong influence. The substitution of diatoms by dinoflagellates as the dominant group in Progreso was the result of seasonal variability itself, but also could have been caused by eutrophic processes; while in Dzilam, the major presence of diatoms could have been favored by groundwater discharges. The results of this study can be used to understand the linkages between stressors from the anthropogenic activities and coastal water quality and changes.

  7. Climate Variability in the Antarctic Peninsula: Insights from the 2010 Bruce Plateau Ice Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosley-Thompson, E. S.; Goodwin, B. P.; Sierra, R.; Lin, P.; Miller, D.; Thompson, L. G.; Kenny, D. V.

    2013-12-01

    A new ice core was drilled to bedrock (448.12 m) in 2010 on the Bruce Plateau (BP) ice field (66.03°S; 64.07°W; 1975.5 masl) in the northern Antarctic Peninsula (AP). This is the second ice core, the 2008 James Ross Island (JRI) core was the first, in the AP to reach bedrock and thereby capture the entire record preserved at the drill site. There are just a handful of multi-century long ice core records from the AP, most extending back less than 500 years. The very high annual mass accumulation on the BP (~1.8 m w.e. from 1900 to 2009 CE) allows precise layer counting back to 1400 CE and with temporal constraints by known volcanic eruptions the record is annually resolved back to 1250 CE. The δ18O of individual samples correlates well with temperature observations at Rothera Station (1977 to 2009) which allows calculation of monthly estimates of mass accumulation. These reveal a late winter/ early spring precipitation maximum which imparts a seasonal bias to the climate signals closely linked to wet deposition (e.g., δ18O, various chemical species). The annually resolved records of δ18O and mass accumulation provide proxy-based histories of temperature and precipitation. Comparison with meteorological observations indicates that the BP δ18O record provides a reliable proxy of mean annual air temperature along the west side of the AP. The resulting δ18O-inferred air temperatures for the last 600 years reveal multi-decadal scale variability with warm conditions during some periods exceeding that of the last few decades. Extracting the annual accumulation history is complicated by layer thinning at depth and to reconstruct annual layer thicknesses a Dansgaard-Johnsen model configured for flank flow was applied. The resulting record indicates that over the last 600 years the average annual mass accumulation (precipitation) rises slightly until ~1800 CE (~2.3 m w.e.) after which it declines to a minimum (~1.5 m w.e.) around 1950 CE. Accumulation then rises

  8. Beachrock horizons of the Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica: Implications for coastal neotectonics and paleogeodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J.; Osborn, S.; Morrish, S.; Barnhart, A.; Wenceslao, L.; Landeros, M.; Butcher, A.; Ritzinger, B.; Wellington, K.; Protti, M.; Spotila, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    Beachrock deposits are a common feature of tropical coastlines, formed by precipitation of carbonate cements (calcite or aragonite) within intergranular pore spaces of beach sediments. In this study, we employ geomorphic, petrographic, and hydrochemical analyses to evaluate the formation mechanism and neotectonic significance of uplifted Holocene beachrock horizons on the Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica. The Nicoya Peninsula forms a prominent forearc high along the southern Middle America convergent margin. This emergent coastal landmass overlies the seismogenic zone and is sensitive to vertical movements of the earthquake cycle. The last major rupture of the Nicoya megathrust (M7.7, 1950) produced up to 1.5 m of coseismic coastal uplift, followed by gradual interseismic subsidence that continues today. Net Quaternary emergence is recorded by uplifted Pleistocene marine terraces and Holocene shore deposits, including carbonate-cemented beachrock. Along the rocky macro-tidal coastline of the Nicoya Peninsula, beachrock deposits occur in tabular seaward-dipping horizons (5-15o) that are 0.1-0.5 m thick, 2-5 m wide, and extend laterally 10s to 100s of m along the beach. At some sites, multiple imbricate horizons step up the beach face beyond the high tide zone. Outcrops typically occur where coastal streams or wetlands provide abundant groundwater. Radiocarbon ages (25 samples, 12 field sites) range from 0.7-3.8 ka for deposits on the modern beach, and from 4.5-5.3 ka for deposits located up to 0.5 km inland. Petrographic analyses reveal compositional and textural diversity among constituent sand grains and interstitial carbonate cements. Sands consist primarily of sub-angular to sub-rounded marine shell and coral fragments mixed with lithic and mineral grains derived from local outcrops of Cretaceous oceanic basement rock (basalt, olivine, plagioclase, pyroxene, vein quartz, and radiolarian chert). Interstitial cements occur in two distinct forms: 1) acicular circum

  9. Evidence for temperate conditions along the Antarctic peninsula during the Early Tertiary

    SciTech Connect

    Zinsmeister, W.J.

    1985-01-01

    Several investigators based on deep sea glacial marine sediments from the southern oceans and volcanic sequences in West Antarctica have suggested extreme glacial conditions existed around Antarctica during the early Tertiary. Their data suggest ice sheets with ice shelves greater than those today were present on Antarctica by the late Eocene. If these data are correct, conditions during the Eocene along the Peninsula were similar to those that exist today. Late Eocene faunas and floras from Seymour Island indicate that conditions along the Peninsula were temperature. No paleontologic or geologic evidence have been obtained from Seymour Island (64/degree/18'S) to support the existence of glacial conditions along the northern part of the Peninsula during the early Tertiary. The presence of large quantities of fossil wood and plant debris in the upper Eocene sediments on Seymour Island indicates the presence of dense forests on the Peninsula during the Eocene. The discovery of marsupial and land birds remains on Seymour Island also indicate the presence of abundant terrestrial life on the Peninsula. The occurrence of an abundant marine life on Seymour Island supports the existence of temperate conditions along the Peninsula. Similarities of the Eocene faunas and floras with present day biotas from Tasmania, New Zealand and southern South America indicate that conditions along the Antarctic Peninsula during the late Eocene were comparable to present day mid latitudes of the southern hemisphere.

  10. Spatial Analysis of b-value Variability in Armutlu Peninsula (NW Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeken, Tekin

    2016-10-01

    Spatial variations of b values were studied by means of 2376 earthquakes with a magnitude completeness of 2.7 in the Armutlu Peninsula (NW Turkey) during a 15-year period following the destructive earthquake on August 17, 1999 in Kocaeli. The b value of L6 for the entire Armutlu Peninsula represents a large value for a global value, but this analysis suggested that the distribution of b value around the Armutlu Peninsula varied extensively from 1.2 to 2.6. Several pockets of high bvalue reflected changes in the physical properties of the Armutlu Peninsula. The southern part of the peninsula represents a lower b value against the northern part of the peninsula. A high b value was observed around Termal and Armutlu towns where plenty of geothermal springs occur. Seismic tomography studies revealed a low velocity zone beneath the Termal area where the high b value was imaged in this study. A seismic swarm which is considered to be related with geothermal activity also occurred in 2014 at the same place. This observation suggests that it is possible to propose that the high b value in the northern part of the peninsula could be related to hydrothermal/geothermal activity which contributes to lowering the effective stress.

  11. Preliminary Geomorphic Map of the Kitsap Peninsula, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haugerud, Ralph A.

    2009-01-01

    The Kitsap Peninsula, in the center of the Puget Lowland of Washington State, has been glaciated repeatedly during the last 2 million years. This geologic history is significant to our understanding of crustal deformation, ground- and surface-water resources, the distribution of fishes, and other topics. Recent high-resolution lidar (LIght Detection And Ranging; also known as airborne laser swath mapping, or ALSM) topographic surveys of much of the Puget Lowland provide a more accurate depiction of the morphology of this forested landscape than has previously been available. More accurate morphology promises more accurate mapping of unconsolidated deposits and a more detailed earth history, particularly in this low-relief forested region where outcrops are not abundant and many deposits are similar in composition. In order to clarify the chain of observation and inference that proceeds from morphology to geologic map, this map describes the distribution of morphologic units - the 2-dimensional surfaces that bound near-surface deposits.

  12. Teleseismic P-wave Velocity Tomography Beneath The Arabian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Y.; Nyblade, A. A.; Rodgers, A.; Al-Amri, A.

    2004-12-01

    We have imaged tomographically the three-dimensional velocity structure of the upper mantle beneath the Arabian Peninsula using teleseismic P-waves. The data came from the Saudi Arabian National Digital Seismic Network (SANDSN) operated by King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST) and three permanent stations (RAYN, EIL and MRNI). The KACST network consists of 38 stations (27 broadband and 11 short-period) spread throughout most of western Saudi Arabia. P wave travel time residuals were obtained for 131 earthquakes in the distance range from 30\\deg to 90\\deg, resulting in 1716 rays paths. We find a pronounced low velocity anomaly beneath the southeastern Arabian Shield and southern Red Sea that likely represents a northward continuation of the Afar hotspot. We also image smaller low velocity anomalies beneath the Dead Sea Transform, the Gulf of Aqaba, and the northeastern corner of the Arabian Shield. The origin of these low velocity anomalies is uncertain.

  13. Seismic Tomography Imaging beneath the Arabian Peninsula and Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Khrepy, Sami; Koulakov, Ivan; Burov, Evgeniy; Cloetingh, Sierd; Al-arifi, Nassir; Bushenkova, Natalia

    2015-04-01

    Seismic tomography model of the body waves velocity in the upper mantle beneath the Arabian Peninsula, Red Sea and surrounding regions is presented. This model is computed using the P-and S-waves travel times provided by the earthquake catalogue of the International Seismological Center (ISC) 1980-2011. The Red Sea is clearly associated with higher P-velocity anomaly which may testify to the passive character of rifting. Thick lithosphere of the Arabian Platform is imaged as high-velocity anomaly down to 200-250 km depth. Below this plate we observe low-velocity which is interpreted as a mantle plume. Based on the tomography results we propose that this plume played the major role in origin of Cenozoic basaltic fields in western Arabia. In the NE side of the Arabian Plate, we clearly observe the subduction zone beneath Zagros and Makran. Key words: seismic tomography, Arabian Plate, Red Sea, Cenozoic volcanism, Passive rifting

  14. Ocean forcing of glacier retreat in the western Antarctic Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Cook, A J; Holland, P R; Meredith, M P; Murray, T; Luckman, A; Vaughan, D G

    2016-07-15

    In recent decades, hundreds of glaciers draining the Antarctic Peninsula (63° to 70°S) have undergone systematic and progressive change. These changes are widely attributed to rapid increases in regional surface air temperature, but it is now clear that this cannot be the sole driver. Here, we identify a strong correspondence between mid-depth ocean temperatures and glacier-front changes along the ~1000-kilometer western coastline. In the south, glaciers that terminate in warm Circumpolar Deep Water have undergone considerable retreat, whereas those in the far northwest, which terminate in cooler waters, have not. Furthermore, a mid-ocean warming since the 1990s in the south is coincident with widespread acceleration of glacier retreat. We conclude that changes in ocean-induced melting are the primary cause of retreat for glaciers in this region.

  15. SEISMIC DATA FOR NUCLEAR EXPLOSION MONITORING IN THE ARABIAN PENINSULA

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, A; Al-Amri, A

    2004-07-08

    We report results from the third and final year of our project (ROA0101-35) to collect seismic event and waveform data recorded in and around the Arabian Peninsula. This effort involves several elements. We are working with King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology to collect data from the Saudi National Seismic Network, that consists of 38 digital three-component stations (27 broadband and 11 short-period). We have an ongoing collaboration with the Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research, which runs the eight station Kuwait National Seismic Network. We installed two temporary broadband stations in the United Arab Emirates (funded by NNSA NA-24 Office of Non-Proliferation & International Security). In this paper we present a summary of data collected under these efforts including integration of the raw data into LLNL's Seismic Research Database and preliminary analysis of souce parameters and earth structure.

  16. Shear wave velocity structures of the Arabian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhtar, Talal A.; Al-Saeed, Mohammed M.

    1994-02-01

    The shear velocity structures of the different tectonic provinces of the Arabian Peninsula has been studied using surface wave data recorded by the RYD (Riyadh) station. The inversion of Rayleigh wave group velocities indicates that the Arabian shield can be modeled by two layers, each of which is 20 km thick with a shear velocity of 3.61 km/s in the upper crust and 3.88 km/s in the lower crust. The underlying upper mantle velocity is 4.61 km/s. Inversion of both Love and Rayleigh waves group velocities shows that the Arabian platform upper and lower crusts are comparable in their thicknesses to those of the shield, but with shear velocities of 3.4 and 4 km/s, respectively. The upper mantle velocity beneath the platform is 4.4 km/s and the average total thickness of the crust is 45 km.

  17. Paleoseismic Studies of the Peninsula San Andreas Fault near Crystal Springs Reservoir, Woodside, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prentice, C. S.; Zachariasen, J. A.; Kozaci, O.; Clahan, K.; Sickler, R. R.; Rosa, C. M.; Hassett, W.; Feigelson, L.; Haproff, P. J.; DeLong, S.; Perkins, A.; Brooks, B. A.; Delano, J.; Baldwin, J. N.

    2013-12-01

    The Peninsula section of the San Andreas Fault (SAFP) is within 10 km of downtown San Francisco, making it among the most significant contributors to seismic hazard in the San Francisco Bay area. However, the history of earthquakes along this fault is poorly known. The most recent ground-rupturing earthquake occurred in 1906, but the ages of earlier earthquakes associated with surface rupture on this fault segment remain uncertain. Most researchers assume that the historically documented earthquake in 1838 occurred on the SAFP, but no definitive evidence of surface rupture at that time has been found. South of Crystal Springs Reservoir, the San Andreas Fault zone is expressed as a prominent fault scarp that is cut back in several locations by recent fluvial processes. At our Crystal Springs South (CSS) trench site, the fault is expressed as a low scarp with no other surface expression to suggest additional young fault traces. Excavations at this site revealed two distinct sets of faults, a younger set of faults that extend nearly to the modern ground surface that we assume represent the 1906 surface rupture, and an older set of faults that terminate lower in the stratigraphic section and are overlain by a scarp-derived colluvial deposit. Radiocarbon dating constrains the age of this older earthquake to 830-930 Cal. years BP. We determined that a buried channel deposit that dates to 790-960 Cal. years BP is displaced approximately 6-7m across both sets of faults. The closest 1906 offset measurement was made about 11 km northwest of this site, and is about 2.9m. Therefore our measurement of 6-7m of offset on the buried channel deposit at the CSS site could represent slip from 1906 and only one previous event comparable in size to the 1906 earthquake. The surprisingly old age of the earlier earthquake raises concerns that one or both of the event horizons exposed at the CSS site could represent multiple earthquakes. We therefore excavated an exploratory trench about 0

  18. Permafrost degradation after the 2002 wildfire in Kougarok, Seward Peninsula, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwahana, G.; Harada, K.; Uchida, M.; Kondo, M.; Saito, K.; Narita, K.; Kushida, K.; Hinzman, L. D.; Fukuda, M.; Tsuyuzaki, S.

    2014-12-01

    Geomorphological and thermo-hydrological changes after wildfire were investigated here to clarify the rates of permafrost degradation and impacts on the surrounding environment. Study sites are located in Kougarok on the central Seward Peninsula of northwestern Alaska. This area is classified as zones of either continuous and discontinuous permafrost. In 2002, wildfire burned a large area of this region. We selected an intact area and a burned area as research sites located close to one another and divided by a road. The surface organic layer was either combusted or reduced in thickness during the fire. It is assumed that the vegetation cover and subsurface conditions were similar between both sites before the fire. General vegetation at unburned sites was shrub-tussock tundra with more than 30 % evergreen shrubs, about 30 % deciduous shrubs and about 20 % sedges. Our studies of aerial photography and high-resolution satellite images showed that surface subsidence due to thermokarst developed differentially within some of the burned and vehicle-disturbed areas, exposing the polygonal reliefs on the surface. Within burned areas absent the thermokarst polygonal reliefs, soil moisture was higher at burned areas than unburned, and the active layer thickness was about 1.5-2.0 times deeper at the burned area during the initial stage of the study (2005-2007). In the following years, however, the difference in active layer thickness decreased, and thickness for the burned area seemed to be recovering to pre-fire status. Geophysical surveys demonstrated that there had been no detectable difference in the depth of the permafrost base between the burned and unburned areas. On the other hand, at the burned site with thermokarst polygonal reliefs, we confirmed using differential GPS that the polygonal reliefs actually coincides with depression lines along the subsurface ice wedge network. Near-surface unfrozen and frozen soil cores down to 1.6 m depth were sampled at seven and

  19. Brownfields Samoa Peninsula Project: Phase I Sustainable Site Analysis Final Report

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This report provides an analysis and scoring using the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, Neighborhood Development Rating System, and the Land and Natural Development Code in order to assess the proposed redevelopment a master plan.

  20. Validation of IPCC AR4 models over the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Errasti, Iñigo; Ezcurra, Agustin; Saenz, Jon; Ibarra-Berastegi, Gabriel

    2010-05-01

    Global Climate Models (GCMs) are sophisticated numerical tools designed to simulate the Earth's Climate that need supercomputing devices to run on. Only a few research institutions worldwide have developed such models and run integrations of these GCMs in order to support the activities of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). However, numerical models are not perfect. Consequently, and before using the IPCC model results in order to establish future climate scenarios, these numerical models need previous assessments of their accuracy. In particular, evaluations of these models are a necessary first step that has to be carried out when climate models are thought to be used in downscaling projects. In this sense several scientific papers have recently dealt with this question. In all these papers, authors investigate the performance of different IPCC climate models by measuring their ability to describe today's climate at different scales from global to regional. This work analyses the ability of twenty four coupled global climate models that were used in the Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's (IPCC) to simulate the observed monthly seasonal cycle of sea level pressure, surface air temperature and precipitation over the Iberian Peninsula in the last decades of the twentieth century. The period investigated covers from 1979 to 1998. In order to assess the performance of the models, averaged seasonal cycles and probability density functions (PDFs) deduced from model simulations are compared with the corresponding seasonal cycles and PDFs deduced from the data contained in the ERA40 reanalysis project and in the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP). A ranking of AR4 model performance is finally obtained. MIROC3.2-HIRES, MPI-ECHAM5, GFDL-CM2.1 and BCCR-BCM2.0 and UKMO-HADGEM1, get outstanding scores for 1979-1998 period over the Iberian Peninsula.

  1. Paleoseismic Studies of the Peninsula San Andreas Fault at the Filoli Estate, Woodside, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prentice, C. S.; Clahan, K.; Sickler, R. R.; Salin, A.; DeLong, S. B.; McDermott, R.; Pickering, A.; Baldwin, J. N.

    2014-12-01

    The Peninsula section of the San Andreas Fault (SAFP) is within 10 km of downtown San Francisco, making it among the most significant sources of seismic hazard in the San Francisco Bay area. However, the history of earthquakes along this fault segment is poorly known. The most recent ground-rupturing earthquake occurred in 1906, but the dates of earlier surface-rupturing earthquakes on this segment remain uncertain. Earlier work at the Crystal Springs South trench site showed that a ground-rupturing paleo-earthquake occurred 830-930 Cal. yr BP, but poor stratigraphic resolution hampered our ability to determine whether or not earthquakes occurred between then and 1906. We combined existing airborne LiDAR data with newly-collected terrestrial laser scanner data to create a high-resolution digital elevation model that we used to guide the locations of two trenches at a new site near Scarp Creek on the Filoli Estate, about 0.5km to the southeast along the fault. The new trenches exposed a stratigraphic section of faulted fluvial, overbank, and lacustrine deposits overlying a massive colluvial deposit. Our preliminary results show evidence for at least three surface ruptures, including the 1906 earthquake, since deposition of the colluvial material. Preliminary radiocarbon analyses show that these three earthquakes occurred during the last 900 years. We expect that radiocarbon analyses of samples of the abundant organic material exposed in the trenches will constrain more closely the ages of the prehistoric events. In addition, we anticipate that additional work at this site will provide an opportunity to test our earlier results and will provide additional data to better constrain the timing of pre-1906 surface ruptures on the SAFP.

  2. [Imposex in Voluta musica (Caenogastropoda: Volutidae) from Northeastern Peninsula de Araya, Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Peralta, Ana Carolina; Miloslavich, Patricia; Bigatti, Gregorio

    2014-06-01

    Voluta musica is a dioecious marine gastropod endemic of the South Caribbean. Tributyltin (TBT) and copper (Cu) are potential inducers of imposex, an endocrine disorder by which females develop a penis and/or vas deferens. The goal of this work was to determine the imposex incidence in V. musica populations from Northeastern Peninsula de Araya. For this, we selected three sites (Isla Caribe, Isla Lobos and Bajo Cuspe) and made monthly samplings of 15 snails in each site, during one year, and determined: (1) sizes; (2) sex and imposex incidence and (3) the Relative Penis Length Index (RPLI). We also performed histological analysis of the gonads, and measured TBT and Cu concentrations in sediments from the studied localities. Our results showed that the total number of sampled females affected by imposex was 24.5% at Isla Caribe, 12% at Isla Lobos, and none at Bajo Cuspe. In sediments, Cu was detected mostly in Isla Lobos. The female gonads with imposex did not show any development of male cells in any of the sampled sites. The higher percentage of females with imposex matched with the higher boat traffic locality, and higher TBT level (Isla Caribe). No esterilization was evident in this work, nevertheless, the presence of TBT and Cu in the sediments and females with imposex were considered as a potential threat to V. musica populations in this region. In Venezuela there is no control over this particular issue, possibly because of the lack of information and research in this topic, but certainly, this information will be useful in biodiversity conservation policies.

  3. SHRIMP U-Pb dating and geochemistry of the Cretaceous plutonic rocks in the Korean Peninsula: A new tectonic model of the Cretaceous Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung Won; Kwon, Sanghoon; Park, Seung-Ik; Lee, Changyeol; Cho, Deung-Lyong; Lee, Hong-Jin; Ko, Kyoungtae; Kim, Sook Ju

    2016-10-01

    The Cretaceous tectonomagmatism of the Korean Peninsula was examined based on geochemical and geochronological data of the Cretaceous plutonic rocks, along with distribution of volcano-sedimentary nonmarine N- to NE-trending fault bounded sedimentary basins. We conducted sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) zircon U-Pb ages and whole-rock geochemical compositions of 21 Cretaceous plutonic rocks, together with previously published data, from the central to southern Korean Peninsula. Four age groups of plutonic rocks were identified: Group I (ca. 119-106 Ma) in the northern to central area, Group II (ca. 99-87 Ma) in the central southern area, Group III (ca. 85-82 Ma) in the central to southern area, and Group IV (ca. 76-67 Ma) in the southernmost area. These results indicate a sporadic trenchward-younging trend of the Cretaceous magmatism in the Korean Peninsula. The Group I, II, and III rocks are dominated by high-K calc-alkaline I-type rocks with rift-related A-type granitoids. In contrast, the Group IV rocks are high-K calc-alkaline I-type plutonic rocks with no A-type rocks. The geochemical signatures of the entire groups indicated LREEs (light rare earth elements) enrichments and negative Nb, Ta, and Ti anomalies, indicating normal arc magmatism. A new tectonic model of the Cretaceous Korean Peninsula was proposed based on temporal and spatial distribution of the Cretaceous plutons represented by four age groups; 1) magmatic quiescence throughout the Korean Peninsula from ca. 160 to 120 Ma, 2) intrusions of the I- and A-type granitoids in the northern and central Korean Peninsula (Group I plutonic rocks from ca. 120 to 100 Ma) resulted from the partial melting of the lower continental crust due to the rollback of the Izanagi plate expressed as the conversion from flat-lying subduction to normal subduction. The Gyeongsang nonmarine sedimentary rift basin in the Korean Peninsula and adakite magmatism preserved in the present-day Japanese Islands

  4. Active deformation near the Nicoya Peninsula, northwestern Costa Rica, between 1996 and 2010: Interseismic megathrust coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Lujia; Newman, Andrew V.; Protti, Marino; GonzáLez, VíCtor; Jiang, Yan; Dixon, Timothy H.

    2012-06-01

    We use campaign and continuous GPS measurements at 49 sites between 1996 and 2010 to describe the long-term active deformation in and near the Nicoya Peninsula, northwestern Costa Rica. The observed deformation reveals partial partitioning of the Cocos-Caribbean oblique convergence into trench-parallel forearc sliver motion and less oblique thrusting on the subduction interface. The northern Costa Rican forearc translates northwestward as a whole ridge block at 11 ± 1 mm/yr relative to the stable Caribbean. The transition from the forearc to the stable Caribbean occurs in a narrow deforming zone of ˜16 km wide. Subduction thrust earthquakes take 2/3 of the trench-parallel component of the plate convergence; however, surface deformation caused by interseismic megathrust coupling is primarily trench-normal. Two fully coupled patches, one located offshore Nicoya centered at ˜15 km depth and the other located inland centered at ˜24 km depth, are identified in Nicoya with the potential to generate an Mw 7.8 1950-type earthquake. Another fully coupled patch SE of Nicoya coincides with the rupture region of the 1990 Nicoya Gulf earthquake. Interface microearthquakes, non-volcanic tremor, low-frequency earthquakes, and transient slow-slip events generally occur in the intermediately to weakly coupled regions.

  5. Block volume estimation from the discontinuity spacing measurements of mesozoic limestone quarries, Karaburun Peninsula, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Elci, Hakan; Turk, Necdet

    2014-01-01

    Block volumes are generally estimated by analyzing the discontinuity spacing measurements obtained either from the scan lines placed over the rock exposures or the borehole cores. Discontinuity spacing measurements made at the Mesozoic limestone quarries in Karaburun Peninsula were used to estimate the average block volumes that could be produced from them using the suggested methods in the literature. The Block Quality Designation (BQD) ratio method proposed by the authors has been found to have given in the same order of the rock block volume to the volumetric joint count (J(v)) method. Moreover, dimensions of the 2378 blocks produced between the years of 2009 and 2011 in the working quarries have been recorded. Assuming, that each block surfaces is a discontinuity, the mean block volume (V(b)), the mean volumetric joint count (J(vb)) and the mean block shape factor of the blocks are determined and compared with the estimated mean in situ block volumes (V(in)) and volumetric joint count (J(vi)) values estimated from the in situ discontinuity measurements. The established relations are presented as a chart to be used in practice for estimating the mean volume of blocks that can be obtained from a quarry site by analyzing the rock mass discontinuity spacing measurements.

  6. High resolution reconstruction of monthly autumn and winter precipitation of Iberian Peninsula for last 150 years.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortesi, N.; Trigo, R.; González-Hidalgo, J. C.; Ramos, A.

    2012-04-01

    Precipitation over Iberian Peninsula (IP) presents large values of interannual variability and large spatial contrasts between wet mountainous regions in the north and dry regions in the southern plains. Unlike other European regions, IP was poorly monitored for precipitation during 19th century. Here we present a new approach to fill this gap. A set of 26 atmospheric circulation weather types (Trigo R.M. and DaCamara C.C., 2000) derived from a recent SLP dataset, the EMULATE (European and North Atlantic daily to multidecadal climate variability) Project, was used to reconstruct Iberian monthly precipitation from October to March during 1851-1947. Principal Component Regression Analysis was chosen to develop monthly precipitation reconstruction back to 1851 and calibrated over 1948-2003 period for 3030 monthly precipitation series of high-density homogenized MOPREDAS (Monthly Precipitation Database for Spain and Portugal) database. Validation was conducted over 1920-1947 at 15 key site locations. Results show high model performance for selected months, with a mean coefficient of variation (CV) around 0.6 during validation period. Lower CV values were achieved in western area of IP. Trigo, R. M., and DaCamara, C.C., 2000: "Circulation weather types and their impact on the precipitation regime in Portugal". Int. J. Climatol., 20, 1559-1581.

  7. Prey composition in the carnivorous plants Utricularia inflata and U. gibba (Lentibulariaceae) from Paria Peninsula, Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Elizabeth; Pacheco, Sergio

    2007-01-01

    Carnivorous aquatic plants, genus Utricularia (Lentibulariaceae), capture small aquatic organisms, such as rotifers, copepods, and cladocerans, by means of anatomical structures named bladders. The present study aimed to determine prey size and composition in U. gibba and U inflata, which were collected from a small lake and an herbaceous wetland, respectively, located in Paria Peninsula (Sucre State, Venezuela). Water pH, conductivity, dissolved oxygen, and salinity were measured in situ at each sampling location, and water samples were collected to determine N-Kjeldahl, total-P, Na+, K+, Ca++, Mg++, and Cl-. Fifty bladders from each plant species were measured and their contents were analyzed. N-Kjeldahl and total-P values were similar in both sites, and were also similar to values reported for eutrophic ecosystems, although Na+, K+, Ca++, Mg++ concentrations and in situ water parameter values were higher in the herbaceous wetland. Bladder content showed the following zooplankton groups: rotifers, cladocerans, copepods, annelids, rhizopodeans, and insects; and the following phytoplankton divisions: Bacillariophyta, Chlorophyta, Cyanophyta, and Euglenophyta. U. inflata presented smaller and fewer bladders, but higher abundance and total algal and animal morphospecies richness than U. gibba. Prey composition similarity at the taxon level between the two carnivorous species was low.

  8. Seasonal occurrences of ostracodes in lakes and streams of the San Francisco Peninsula, California

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, C.

    1991-09-01

    Fresh-water ostracodes from eight different sites on the San Francisco Peninsula were sampled periodically between May 1989 and May 1990. Seasonal variations in the relative abundances of ostracode species were observed. Those changes are believed to have been due, at least in part, to seasonal changes in water and sediment temperatures. Ostracodes are bivalved crustaceans with calcite carapaces that live in most aquatic environments, from the oceans to ditches and seeps. Each environment has its own set of physical and chemical parameters and hosts its own characteristic species of ostracodes because ostracodes are sensitive to these parameters. Ostracodes can be used as environmental indicators. Fresh-water ostracodes are good indicators of water chemistry and thus of the local climate. Although ostracode biology is poorly known, it is known that ostracode life cycles are temperature dependent and that therefore ostracode populations exhibit seasonal fluctuations. This study is an effort to document and quantify the seasonal fluctuations in a few California ostracode populations in terms of the relative abundances of the individual species comprising the total population. 3 refs., 24 figs.

  9. The impact of sea surface temperature on winter wheat in Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capa-Morocho, Mirian; Rodríguez-Fonseca, Belen; Ruiz-Ramos, Margarita

    2016-04-01

    Climate variability is the main driver of changes in crops yield, especially for rainfed production systems. This is also the case of Iberian Peninsula (IP) (Capa-Morocho et al., 2014), where wheat yields are strongly dependent on seasonal rainfall amount and temporal distribution of rainfall during the growing season. Previous works have shown that large-scale oceanic patterns have a significant impact on precipitation over IP (Rodriguez-Fonseca and de Castro, 2002; Rodríguez-Fonseca et al., 2006). The existence of some predictability of precipitation has encouraged us to analyze the possible predictability of the wheat yield in the IP using sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies as predictor. For this purpose, a crop model site specific calibrated for the Northeast of IP and several reanalysis climate datasets have been used to obtain long time series of attainable wheat yield and relate their variability with SST anomalies. The results show that wheat yield anomalies are associated with changes in the Tropical Pacific (El Niño) and Atlantic (TNA) SST. For these events, the regional associated atmospheric pattern resembles the NAO, which also influences directly on the maximum temperatures and precipitation experienced by the crop during flowering and grain filling. Results from this study could have important implications for predictability issues in agricultural planning and management, such as insurance coverage, changes in sowing dates and choice of species and varieties.

  10. Block Volume Estimation from the Discontinuity Spacing Measurements of Mesozoic Limestone Quarries, Karaburun Peninsula, Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Elci, Hakan; Turk, Necdet

    2014-01-01

    Block volumes are generally estimated by analyzing the discontinuity spacing measurements obtained either from the scan lines placed over the rock exposures or the borehole cores. Discontinuity spacing measurements made at the Mesozoic limestone quarries in Karaburun Peninsula were used to estimate the average block volumes that could be produced from them using the suggested methods in the literature. The Block Quality Designation (BQD) ratio method proposed by the authors has been found to have given in the same order of the rock block volume to the volumetric joint count (Jv) method. Moreover, dimensions of the 2378 blocks produced between the years of 2009 and 2011 in the working quarries have been recorded. Assuming, that each block surfaces is a discontinuity, the mean block volume (Vb), the mean volumetric joint count (Jvb) and the mean block shape factor of the blocks are determined and compared with the estimated mean in situ block volumes (Vin) and volumetric joint count (Jvi) values estimated from the in situ discontinuity measurements. The established relations are presented as a chart to be used in practice for estimating the mean volume of blocks that can be obtained from a quarry site by analyzing the rock mass discontinuity spacing measurements. PMID:24696642

  11. In situ measurements of chlorinated hydrocarbons in the water column off the Palos Verdes Peninsula, California

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, E.Y.; Yu, C.C.; Tran, K.

    1999-02-01

    Spatial distributions of DDT and its primary metabolites (DDTs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the water column off the Palos Verdes Peninsula, CA, were measured in the winter and summer of 1997 using an in situ sampling method. The concentrations of DDTs ranged from 0.6 to 15.8 ng/L, while those of PCBs ranged from 0.06 to 15.8 ng/L, while those of PCBs ranged from 0.06 to 1.14 ng/L at eight sampling stations. The spatial distribution patterns of DDTs and PCBs as well as the DDT/PCB concentration ratio in the water column were similar to those found in the sediment, and the vertical profiles of DDTs and PCBs at both sampling seasons exponentially decreased with increasing distance from the sea floor. In addition, the partitioning characteristics of DDTs and selected PCB congeners indicated a tendency of mobilization from sediment to water. All of these findings strongly suggest that contaminated sediments are a main source of DDT and PCB inputs to the water column surrounding the study site.

  12. Holocene glacier fluctuations inferred from lacustrine sediment, Emerald Lake, Kenai Peninsula, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaBrecque, Taylor S.; Kaufman, Darrell S.

    2016-01-01

    Physical and biological characteristics of lacustrine sediment from Emerald Lake were used to reconstruct the Holocene glacier history of Grewingk Glacier, southern Alaska. Emerald Lake is an ice-marginal threshold lake, receiving glaciofluvial sediment when Grewingk Glacier overtops the topographic divide that separates it from the lake. Sub-bottom acoustical profiles were used to locate core sites to maximize both the length and resolution of the sedimentary sequence recovered in the 4-m-long cores. The age model for the composite sequence is based on 13 14C ages and a 210Pb profile. A sharp transition from the basal inorganic mud to organic-rich mud at 11.4 ± 0.2 ka marks the initial retreat of Grewingk Glacier below the divide of Emerald Lake. The overlaying organic-rich mud is interrupted by stony mud that records a re-advance between 10.7 ± 0.2 and 9.8 ± 0.2 ka. The glacier did not spill meltwater into the lake again until the Little Ice Age, consistent with previously documented Little Ice Ages advances on the Kenai Peninsula. The retreat of Grewingk Glacier at 11.4 ka took place as temperature increased following the Younger Dryas, and the subsequent re-advance corresponds with a climate reversal beginning around 11 ka across southern Alaska.

  13. Spatially integrated assessment reveals widespread changes in penguin populations on the Antarctic Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Heather J; Naveen, Ron; Trathan, Philip N; Fagan, William F

    2012-06-01

    As important marine mesopredators and sensitive indicators of Antarctic ecosystem change, penguins have been a major focus of long-term biological research in the Antarctic. However, the vast majority of such studies have been constrained by logistics and relate mostly to the temporal dynamics of individual breeding populations from which regional trends have been inferred, often without regard for the complex spatial heterogeneity of population processes and the underlying environmental conditions. Integrating diverse census data from 70 breeding sites across 31 years in a robust, hierarchical analysis, we find that trends from intensely studied populations may poorly reflect regional dynamics and confuse interpretation of environmental drivers. Results from integrated analyses confirm that Pygoscelis adeliae (Adélie Penguins) are decreasing at almost all locations on the Antarctic Peninsula. Results also resolve previously contradictory studies and unambiguously establish that P. antarctica (Chinstrap Penguins), thought to benefit from decreasing sea ice, are instead declining regionally. In contrast, another open-water species, P. papua (Gentoo Penguin), is increasing in abundance and expanding southward. These disparate population trends accord with recent mechanistic hypotheses of biological change in the Southern Ocean and highlight limitations of the influential but oversimplified "sea ice" hypothesis. Aggregating population data at the regional scale also allows us to quantify rates of regional population change in a way not previously possible.

  14. Late Glacial to Holocene paleoenvironmental change on the northwestern Pacific seaboard, Kamchatka Peninsula (Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendea, Ionel Florin; Ponomareva, Vera; Bourgeois, Joanne; Zubrow, Ezra B. W.; Portnyagin, Maxim; Ponkratova, Irina; Harmsen, Hans; Korosec, Gregory

    2017-02-01

    We used a new sedimentary record from a small kettle wetland to reconstruct the Late Glacial and Holocene vegetation and fire history of the Krutoberegovo-Ust Kamchatsk region in eastern Kamchatka Peninsula (Russia). Pollen and charcoal data suggest that the Late Glacial landscape was dominated by a relatively fire-prone Larix forest-tundra during the Greenland Interstadial complex (GI 1) and a subarctic steppe during the Younger Dryas (GS1). The onset of the Holocene is marked by the reappearance of trees (mainly Alnus incana) within a fern and shrub dominated landscape. The Holocene Thermal Maximum (HTM) features shifting vegetational communities dominated by Alnus shrubs, diverse forb species, and locally abundant aquatic plants. The HTM is further defined by the first appearance of stone birch forests (Betula ermanii) - Kamchatka's most abundant modern tree species. The Late Holocene is marked by shifts in forest dynamics and forest-graminoid ratio and the appearance of new non-arboreal taxa such as bayberry (Myrica) and meadow rue (Filipendula). Kamchatka is one of Earth's most active volcanic regions. During the Late Glacial and Holocene, Kamchatka's volcanoes spread large quantities of tephra over the study region. Thirty-four tephra falls have been identified at the site. The events represented by most of these tephra falls have not left evidence of major impacts on the vegetation although some of the thicker tephras caused expansion of grasses (Poaceae) and, at least in one case, forest die-out and increased fire activity.

  15. The application of cooperative monitoring techniques to a conceptual limited deployment zone in the Korean peninsula

    SciTech Connect

    Vannoni, M.; Duggan, R.

    1996-10-01

    The Korean peninsula is the site of a tense military confrontation. Relations between North and South Korea improved during the early 1990`s but the process is now frozen. Confidence building measures, particularly military ones, that address the security needs of both countries would decrease the danger of conflict and help create an environment for direct negotiations. The Korean Institute for Defense Analysis (KIDA) analyzed current security conditions and options. Their scenario includes a conceptual agreement to establish Limited Force Deployment Zones (LDZ) along the current demilitarized zone (DMZ) to increase mutual security. The Cooperative Monitoring Center (CMC) of Sandia National Laboratories, in collaboration with KIDA, developed a strategy, with examples, for cooperatively monitoring the agreement. A cooperative monitoring regime requires consideration of the agreement`s terms, the geographic, logistic, military, and political factors of the Korean environment, and the capability of technology to monitor the terms. This paper assesses the applicability of cooperative monitoring to Korea, describes the monitoring strategy for the Korean enhanced DMZ scenario, and describes the applicable technologies and procedures.

  16. Holocene evolution of Dahab coastline - Gulf of Aqaba, Sinai Peninsula, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magdy, Torab

    2016-04-01

    Dahab was a little Bedouin-village in Sinai Peninsula at the mid-western coast of Gulf of Aqaba approx. 90 km north of Sharm-el-Sheikh City and it means "gold" in Arabic language. But in the past 20 years ago it becomes one of the most tourist sites in Egypt. The basement complex is composed mostly of biotiteaplite-granite, mica-aplitegranite, granodiorite, quartzdiorite, alaskite, and diorite. Based on correlation with similar igneous in the most southern part of Sinai and the Red Sea area. Wadi Dahab composed of igneous and metamorphic rocks and the coastline is formed of the fragments of its rocks, mixed with fragments of coral reef and fluvial deposits of Wadi Dahab. The morphology of Dahab coastline is characterized by hooked marine spit, which composed of fluvial sediments carried by marine current from wadi Dahab mouth, this spit encloses shallow lagoon, but the active deposition on the lagoon bottom will evaluate it into saline marsh. This paper dealing with the evolution of Dahab spit and lagoon during the Holocene in addition to the recent time for last 100 years, and it impacts of the future management of the coast area. The coastline mapping during the period of study depends upon GIS technique for data were collected during field measuring by using total station, aerial photo and satellite image interpretation as well as soil sample dating. Suggested geomorphological evolution of Dahab area during the Holocene depending upon geomorphic investigation of the sedimentological process into 6 stages.

  17. Screening and health risk of organic micropollutants in rural groundwater of Liaodong Peninsula, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuehua; Shang, Xiaochen; Luo, Tianlie; Du, Xu; Wang, Ya; Xie, Qing; Matsuura, Naoki; Chen, Jingwen; Kadokami, Kiwao

    2016-11-01

    Groundwater serves as a main drinking water source for rural residents in China. However, little is known regarding the pollution of organic micropollutants in groundwater that may pose health risks. In this study, more than 1300 organic micropollutants were screened in the groundwater samples collected from 13 drinking water wells distributed across five rural regions of Liaodong Peninsula in China. A total of 80 organic micropollutants including 12 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, 11 alkanes, 9 pesticides, 7 substituted phenols, 7 perfluoroalkyl acids, 6 heterocyclic compounds, 5 alcohols, 5 phthalic acid esters, 5 pharmaceutical and personal care products, 3 ketones, 2 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), 2 alkylbenzenes and 2 chlorinated benzenes were detected, with their total concentration of 32-1.5 × 10(4) ng/L. Noncarcinogenic and carcinogenic risks of a part of pollutants were assessed. Exposure through skin absorption and oral ingestion was considered in the assessment. Generally the risks are within the acceptable limits, except for that the carcinogenic risk at two sites in Jinzhou is higher than 10(-6). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on health risks of groundwater micropollutants in China.

  18. Ecohydrology of the coastal wetlands of Yucatan Peninsula are related with the submarine groundwater discharges?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera Silveira, J. A.; Morales-Ojeda, S. M.; Medina Gomez, I.; Kantun Manzano, C.; Caamal Sosa, J.; Marino-Tapia, I.; Adame, F.; Teutli Hernandez, C.

    2013-05-01

    Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) contributes significantly in the structure and function of coastal ecosystems favoring nutrients and salinity gradients, and with these spatial variability of wetland types and rates of primary production. However, the connectivity between SGD and coastal wetlands remains largely unexplored, especially in the tropics and karstic regions. On the other hand, coastal wetlands could represents exceptionally large carbon (C) stocks, whose protection and restoration can constitute an effective mitigation strategy for climate change. The Yucatán Peninsula is a low-relief carbonate platform and karst geology that permits fast rainfall infiltration, minimal surface flow, and high SGD., which is characterized by a continuum of freshwater wetland, mangroves, seagrasses meadows and coral reefs. Our studies around the Yucatan coastal wetlands related with the ecohydrology, suggest strong connectivity between SGD and mangrove and seagrasses structure and function. Some of the results indicate that SGD are the main source of nitrate and silicate favoring salinity gradient along the coastal lagoons and bays like estuaries. Mangrove forests show the best structural developments where a spring of groundwater is located, these types of mangroves are called locally "petenes" and show large C stocks. Respect to seagrasses, high shoots density has been observed at sites characterized by low salinity and peak nutrients concentration. Further research on groundwater flows among human activities on inland activities, coastal wetlands and marine ecosystems are required in order to develop management strategies for mitigation and adaptation to global climate change

  19. Foraging habitats of southern elephant seals, Mirounga leonina, from the Northern Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muelbert, Monica M. C.; de Souza, Ronald B.; Lewis, Mirtha N.; Hindell, Mark A.

    2013-04-01

    Elephant Island (EI) is uniquely placed to provide southern elephant seals (SES) breeding there with potential access to foraging grounds in the Weddell Sea, the frontal zones of the South Atlantic Ocean, the Patagonian shelf and the Western Antarctic Peninsula (WAP). Quantifying where seals from EI forage therefore provides insights into the types of important habitats available, and which are of particular importance to elephant seals. Twenty nine SES (5 sub-adult males—SAM and 24 adult females—AF) were equipped with SMRU CTD-SLDRs during the post-breeding (PB 2008, 2009) and post-moulting (PM 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010) trips to sea. There were striking intra-annual and inter-sex differences in foraging areas, with most of the PB females remaining within 150 km of EI. One PB AF travelled down the WAP as did 16 out of the 20 PM females and foraged near the winter ice-edge. Most PM sub-adult males remained close to EI, in areas similar to those used by adult females several months earlier, although one SAM spent the early part of the winter foraging on the Patagonian Shelf. The waters of the Northern Antarctic Peninsula (NAP) contain abundant resources to support the majority of the Islands' SES for the summer and early winter, such that the animals from this population have shorter migrations than those from most other populations. Sub-adult males and PB females are certainly taking advantage of these resources. However, PM females did not remain there over the winter months, instead they used the same waters at the ice-edge in the southern WAP that females from both King George Island and South Georgia used. Females made more benthic dives than sub-adult males—again this contrasts with other sites where SAMs do more benthic diving. Unlike most other populations studied to date EI is a relatively southerly breeding colony located on the Antarctic continental shelf. EI seals are using shelf habitats more than other SES populations but some individuals still

  20. Hematology and serum chemistries of nestling bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) in the lower peninsula of MI, USA.

    PubMed

    Bowerman, W W; Stickle, J E; Giesy, J P

    2000-11-01

    Hematology constituents and serum biochemistries were determined in blood collected from 55 nestling bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) from nest sites within the lower peninsula of Michigan in 1992. Hematological values were comparable to published ranges for birds for all but eosinophils, which were greater than normal. Serum chemistry values were similar to those of other birds for all but six parameters, uric acid, cholesterol, alkaline phosphatase, total protein, globulin, and urea nitrogen, which were greater and glucose which was less. Samples of blood collected from wild bald eagles can be used for hematologic parameters and serum chemistry. It is important for other studies of endangered species to obtain baseline data from healthy, wild animals in their natural environment, and for comparison of animals living in environments of greater exposure to those living in areas of lesser exposure to xenobiotics. We caution that arrangements for rapid analysis be done in advance of sample collection.

  1. Analysis of crustal deformation associated with the 2011 Tohoku earthquake in Korean Peninsula using GPS time series with ARMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, J.; Park, K.

    2011-12-01

    The huge earthquake off the Pacific coast of Tohoku in Japan occurred on 11 March, 2001. This earthquake moved portions of Japan and Northeast Asia in the east direction. After the earthquake many research institutes in South Korea analysed crustal movements of the Korean Peninsula and Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute announced that South Korea was moved 2 to 5 cm toward Japan. In this study, GPS time series were used to analyse the crustal displacements and the velocity change. In order to calculate the daily positions of 80 sites, we used GIPSY 5.0 software. Then the autoregressive moving average (ARMA) method was used to improve the GPS time series of daily position changes. We also analyzed the amount and tendency of the displacement and velocity changes after the ARMA was applied. As a result, the ARMA method can reduce the noise and detect the outlier but it can be lead to an over-estimation of the velocity.

  2. Polygonal tundra geomorphological change in response to warming alters future CO2 and CH4 flux on the Barrow Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Lara, Mark J; McGuire, A David; Euskirchen, Eugenie S; Tweedie, Craig E; Hinkel, Kenneth M; Skurikhin, Alexei N; Romanovsky, Vladimir E; Grosse, Guido; Bolton, W Robert; Genet, Helene

    2015-04-01

    The landscape of the Barrow Peninsula in northern Alaska is thought to have formed over centuries to millennia, and is now dominated by ice-wedge polygonal tundra that spans drained thaw-lake basins and interstitial tundra. In nearby tundra regions, studies have identified a rapid increase in thermokarst formation (i.e., pits) over recent decades in response to climate warming, facilitating changes in polygonal tundra geomorphology. We assessed the future impact of 100 years of tundra geomorphic change on peak growing season carbon exchange in response to: (i) landscape succession associated with the thaw-lake cycle; and (ii) low, moderate, and extreme scenarios of thermokarst pit formation (10%, 30%, and 50%) reported for Alaskan arctic tundra sites. We developed a 30 × 30 m resolution tundra geomorphology map (overall accuracy:75%; Kappa:0.69) for our ~1800 km² study area composed of ten classes; drained slope, high center polygon, flat-center polygon, low center polygon, coalescent low center polygon, polygon trough, meadow, ponds, rivers, and lakes, to determine their spatial distribution across the Barrow Peninsula. Land-atmosphere CO2 and CH4 flux data were collected for the summers of 2006-2010 at eighty-two sites near Barrow, across the mapped classes. The developed geomorphic map was used for the regional assessment of carbon flux. Results indicate (i) at present during peak growing season on the Barrow Peninsula, CO2 uptake occurs at -902.3 10(6) gC-CO2 day(-1) (uncertainty using 95% CI is between -438.3 and -1366 10(6) gC-CO2 day(-1)) and CH4 flux at 28.9 10(6) gC-CH4 day(-1) (uncertainty using 95% CI is between 12.9 and 44.9 10(6) gC-CH4 day(-1)), (ii) one century of future landscape change associated with the thaw-lake cycle only slightly alter CO2 and CH4 exchange, while (iii) moderate increases in thermokarst pits would strengthen both CO2 uptake (-166.9 10(6) gC-CO2 day(-1)) and CH4 flux (2.8 10(6) gC-CH4 day(-1)) with geomorphic change from low

  3. Increased Precipitation over the Yucatan Peninsula Inferred from the Spatial and Temporal Distribution of Late Holocene Foram Assemblages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachmallu, M.; Broach, K.; Paytan, A.; Street, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    As global climate warms, IPCC predictions suggest dry and seasonally dry regions will become dryer, increasing stress on water resources by growing urban populations (e.g. Southern California; Yucatan, Mexico). This study aims to reconstruct paleohydrologic trends during the late Holocene using foraminifera assemblages in Yucatan, Mexico to determine drought susceptibility in a region affected by migration of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). The ITCZ affects precipitation over the Yucatan Peninsula, potentially decreasing groundwater infiltration and thus reducing discharge in submarine springs at the peninsula margins. The field site Celestun Lagoon near Merida, Yucatan, Mexico, is dominated by spring and groundwater inputs at the northern terminus and opens to the Gulf of Mexico at the southern end resulting in a strong salinity gradient dependent on freshwater influx. We analyzed the foram assemblage in the top 6 cm of a set of 7 cores collected along a lagoonal transect (from the mouth to the head) and plotted the relative abundances of Ammonia beccarii, Elphidium sp., Quinqueloculina sp., and the ostracod Hemicyprideis cf. nichuptensis against site location. A. beccarii abundance increases from 40% near the head to 70% near the middle of the lagoon before dropping to <10% toward the saline lagoon mouth (high abundance in brackish salinity). Quinqueloculina sp. increases from 0% at the upper lagoon to nearly 40% near the mouth showing an opposite trend along the same transect. Elphidium sp. showed no clear trend (abundance range 10-28% throughout), and lowest H. nichuptensis abundance occurred at the middle of the lagoon (10%) increasing to the north and south (up to 60%). The inversely correlated spatial distribution between A. beccarii and Quinqueloculina sp. occurs vertically in an upper lagoon long core from 125-96 cm below sediment-water interface (14C age dates 3968-2820 ka), implying a decreasing salinity over ~1000 yrs and increased

  4. Transport pathway and depocenter of anthropogenic heavy metals off the Shandong Peninsula, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Gang; Liu, Jian; Pei, Shaofeng; Gao, Maosheng; Kong, Xianghuai

    2016-10-01

    Surface sediment grain size as well as the spatial distribution, sources and geochemical baseline levels of heavy metals in the south Shandong Peninsula clinoform were analyzed to determine the transport pathway and main depocenter of anthropogenic heavy metals off the peninsula. Results showed that the surface sediments were primarily silt-sized components, and the fine grain matter mainly originated from the Yellow River and rivers around Laizhou Bay. Heavy metals Cu, Pb, Zn, Cr, and Cd were predominantly from natural sources and their spatial distributions were controlled by grain size; conversely, anthropogenic As (concentration above geochemical baseline level 10.9 mg/kg) was principally derived from human activities, and its transportation from the Yellow River and Laizhou Bay was controlled by the Shandong Coastal Current off the Shandong Peninsula. Furthermore, the anthropogenic As was deposited in three main areas, that is, the Yellow River estuary, Laizhou Bay, and south Shandong Peninsula clinoform.

  5. Crustal Deformation Measurements Using Repeat-pass JERS 1 SAR Interferometry Near the Izu Peninsula, Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujiwara, Satoshi; Rosen, Paul A.; Tobita, Mikio; Murakami, Makoto

    1997-01-01

    We have examined the precision of interferometric SAR measurements of surface deformation of the Earth using 24-cm wavelength data acqured by the Japanese Earth Resources Satellite 1 (JERS 1) spacecraft, over the Izu Peninsula, Japan.

  6. Assemblages of micronektonic fishes and invertebrates in a gradient of regional warming along the Western Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Melanie L.; Fraser, William R.; Ashford, Julian; Patarnello, Tomaso; Zane, Lorenzo; Torres, Joseph J.

    2015-12-01

    Micronektonic fishes and invertebrates were sampled with 32 midwater trawls at nine sites along the Western Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) in the austral fall (March-April) of 2010. Study sites were located within four hypothesized hydrographic regions: near Joinville Island in Region I, at Croker Passage, near Anvers Island, and near Renaud Island in Region II, within Marguerite Bay and the Marguerite Trough in Region III, and near Charcot Island in Region IV. A total of 62 taxa representing 12 taxonomic groups of pelagic invertebrates and 9 families of fish were captured, but assemblages were dominated by only a few species. The most numerically abundant taxa were the euphausiids, Thysanoessa macrura, Euphausia superba, and E. crystallorophias, combining to contribute nearly 79% of the total catch. Biomass dominants included E. superba, which contributed more than 44% of the total catch, the notothenioid Pleuragramma antarctica, and the salp, Salpa thompsoni. A comparison of total catches among sites revealed that the largest volumetric abundances and biomasses were captured at the Marguerite Bay site. Cluster analysis of abundance data identified distinct multispecies assemblages at Joinville Island in Region I, Croker Passage in Region II, Marguerite Bay in Region III, and Charcot Island in Region IV. A fifth distinct assemblage included samples from sites near Anvers and Renaud Island in Region II, and from the Marguerite Trough in Region III. Assemblages at Joinville Island and Croker Passage were both dominated by E. superba and S. thompsoni, but hydrographic conditions at Joinville Island favored a neritic assemblage, underscored by substantial numbers of P. antarctica. The assemblage at Croker Passage was more oceanic in nature with major inputs from the myctophid, Electrona antarctica and the hyperiid amphipod, Themisto gaudichaudii. Marguerite Bay and Charcot Island were well-mixed assemblages with strong representation by both neritic and oceanic fauna. The

  7. Recent Antarctic Peninsula warming relative to Holocene climate and ice-shelf history.

    PubMed

    Mulvaney, Robert; Abram, Nerilie J; Hindmarsh, Richard C A; Arrowsmith, Carol; Fleet, Louise; Triest, Jack; Sime, Louise C; Alemany, Olivier; Foord, Susan

    2012-09-06

    Rapid warming over the past 50 years on the Antarctic Peninsula is associated with the collapse of a number of ice shelves and accelerating glacier mass loss. In contrast, warming has been comparatively modest over West Antarctica and significant changes have not been observed over most of East Antarctica, suggesting that the ice-core palaeoclimate records available from these areas may not be representative of the climate history of the Antarctic Peninsula. Here we show that the Antarctic Peninsula experienced an early-Holocene warm period followed by stable temperatures, from about 9,200 to 2,500 years ago, that were similar to modern-day levels. Our temperature estimates are based on an ice-core record of deuterium variations from James Ross Island, off the northeastern tip of the Antarctic Peninsula. We find that the late-Holocene development of ice shelves near James Ross Island was coincident with pronounced cooling from 2,500 to 600 years ago. This cooling was part of a millennial-scale climate excursion with opposing anomalies on the eastern and western sides of the Antarctic Peninsula. Although warming of the northeastern Antarctic Peninsula began around 600 years ago, the high rate of warming over the past century is unusual (but not unprecedented) in the context of natural climate variability over the past two millennia. The connection shown here between past temperature and ice-shelf stability suggests that warming for several centuries rendered ice shelves on the northeastern Antarctic Peninsula vulnerable to collapse. Continued warming to temperatures that now exceed the stable conditions of most of the Holocene epoch is likely to cause ice-shelf instability to encroach farther southward along the Antarctic Peninsula.

  8. Interdecadal variation of precipitation days in August in the Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jae-Won; Cha, Yumi; Kim, Hae-Dong

    2017-03-01

    The present study examines a climate regime shift in the time series of the number of rainy days during August in the Korean Peninsula. The statistical change-point analysis indicates that a significant shift occurred in the time series around 1998, providing a rationale to divide it into two parts: 1975-1997 for the shorter rainy-day period and 1998-2012 for the longer rainy-day period. To examine the cause of recent rapid increases in the number of days with precipitation in August in the Korean Peninsula, differences in the averages of large-scale environments between the 1998-2012 period and the 1975-1997 period were analyzed. The differences in stream flows showed that anomalous cyclones were reinforced in the East Asian continent while anomalous anticyclones were reinforced in the western North Pacific at all layers of the troposphere. The anomalous anticyclones reinforced in the western North Pacific were associated with the western North Pacific subtropical high (WNPSH) developed a little more toward the Korean Peninsula recently. Consequently, the Korean Peninsula has been affected by anomalous south westerlies that supplied warm and humid airs from low tropical regions to the Korean Peninsula. The vertical thermal instability (warm anomaly at lower-level and cold anomaly at middle and upper-level) developed near the Korean Peninsula. In addition, upper tropospheric jets were reinforced further recently near the Korean Peninsula to provide good environments for development of upward flows. The frequency of TCs that affect the Korean Peninsula in August also increased rapidly since 1998.

  9. An assessment of heat stress in the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasilla Álvarez, D.; Fernandez García, F.

    2010-09-01

    The analysis of human comfort requires the inclusion of additional parameters to air temperature, such as wind, humidity or radiation, especially in areas like the Iberian Peninsula, where the summer thermal differences between the marine surfaces and the continent promotes local circulations capable to modify locally the characteristics of the air masses. A variety of bioclimatic indices that relate atmospheric conditions to human sensations have been developed so far, being the Physiological Equivalent Temperature (PET, Matzarakis et al, 1999) one of the most popular. Several objectives have guided this research. First, a basic climatology of PET over the Iberian Peninsula has been elaborated. Secondly, the main modes of spatial and temporal variability in the apparent temperature field have been obtained. Aditionally, the role of the regional atmospheric circulation and local surface variables in the spatial and temporal variability of PET has been analyzed through a synoptic climatological approach. The data used have been 3 hourly synop reports from stations located in the Iberian Peninsula, Southern France and Northern Africa (Morocco and Argelia), for the period 1971-2007. 850 hPa geopotential heights, retrieved from NCEP Reanalysis web server (http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/psd/data/reanalysis/reanalysis.shtml) were used to devise a circulation pattern catalogue, obtained following a well-known procedure that combines Principal Component Analysis (PCA) for reduction purposes and clustering (Ward plus K-means) to define the types. Additional gridded variables, like 850 u/v wind components and 850 relative humidity fields were also used to obtain composites of the synoptic patterns. The methodology followed comprised several steps. Initially, 3 hourly values of PET corresponding to selected stations was calculated with RayMan. The 12 UTC values were subsequently submitted to a regionalization using a Rotated Principal Component Analysis. The frequency of occurrence

  10. Butyltin occurrence and risk assessment in the sediments of the Iberian Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Díez, Sergi; Bayona, Josep M

    2009-02-01

    The occurrence of butyltin (BT) compounds in more than 50 recent sediment samples of the Iberian Peninsula, collected in the harbours of the western Mediterranean Sea (Spain) and the North Atlantic Ocean (Portugal), including domestic and industrial sewage disposal sites, has been assessed. The highest levels of tributyltin (TBT) (7673 microg kg(-1)dry wt.) were detected in commercial harbours associated with inputs from large vessels. However, relatively high TBT values (about 2150 microg kg(-1)dry wt.) were also detected in fishing and recreational boating areas. Spanish marinas and harbours are more polluted in terms of TBT (5-7673 microg kg(-1)dry wt.) compared to those in Portugal (4-12 microg kg(-1)dry wt.). Generally, the Mediterranean sediments show a BT distribution characterized by the predominance of TBT over the degradation products dibutyl (DBT) and monobutyltin (MBT), indicating the presence of recent inputs, in contrast to the Portuguese coastal distribution. Calculation of butyltin degradation indexes (BDI) confirmed a different trend, depending on the area. Furthermore, a comparative study of the occurrence of BT in different sewage sludge disposal sites shows that domestic primary sewage sludge effluents can contribute to coastal BT pollution, but to a lesser extent when compared with harbours. Historical trends (1995-2003) for Barcelona harbour reveal that BT regulations on the use of TBT-based antifouling paints have not been fully effective. Finally, a comparison against the existing sediment quality guidelines (SQGs) indicated that acute toxic effects could only be expected for TBT in some Mediterranean harbours; conversely, in every North Atlantic Ocean station, a lesser environmental threat for the harbour benthic community is expected.

  11. Fjord sediment record of Holocene climate change in the Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, John; Minzoni, Rebecca; Wellner, Julia; Majewski, Wojciech

    2014-05-01

    High-resolution paleoclimate records were generated from long sediment cores collected in five fjords of drastically different settings in the Antarctic Peninsula (AP), including Maxwell Bay, Firth of Tay, Herbert Sound, Lapeyrère Bay, and Neny Fjord. These results are augmented by published records from open marine settings of the Palmer Deep and Bransfield Basin and from terrestrial studies to obtain sufficient spatial sampling for regional analysis of Holocene climate events and local forcing mechanisms. These records include SHALDRIL cores acquired through some of the thicker (up to 108 meters) Holocene sections in fjords of the northern AP region. Robust radiocarbon chronology has been established for each site, and several paleoclimate proxies have been applied to identify and characterize climate events. These include magnetic susceptibility, sedimentation rates, grain size, pebble content, TOC, stable isotopes, biogenic silica content, and foraminifera and diatom assemblages. Current data analysis, including application of additional proxies and analysis of additional cores, refines our understanding of the nature and timing of climatic events expressed in each site. Five previously recognized climate intervals are recorded throughout the AP: an early Holocene deglacial interval, the Mid-Holocene Climate Optimum, a minor cooling event in the mid-Holocene followed by a minor warming event, and the late Holocene Neoglacial. The magnitude and timing of these events varies widely--up to a few thousand years--across the AP region and reflects differences in factors such as orographic effects, drainage basin size and altitude, wind patterns, oceanography, and sea-ice coverage. These results suggest that the rapid regional warming and widespread glacial retreat observed during the last century is unprecedented in breadth and synchronicity.

  12. Geomorphological and geochemistry changes in permafrost after the 2002 tundra wildfire in Kougarok, Seward Peninsula, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwahana, Go; Harada, Koichiro; Uchida, Masao; Tsuyuzaki, Shiro; Saito, Kazuyuki; Narita, Kenji; Kushida, Keiji; Hinzman, Larry D.

    2016-09-01

    Geomorphological and thermohydrological changes to tundra, caused by a wildfire in 2002 on the central Seward Peninsula of Alaska, were investigated as a case study for understanding the response from ice-rich permafrost terrain to surface disturbance. Frozen and unfrozen soil samples were collected at burned and unburned areas, and then water isotope geochemistry and cryostratigraphy of the active layer and near-surface permafrost were analyzed to investigate past hydrological and freeze/thaw conditions and how this information could be recorded within the permafrost. The development of thermokarst subsidence due to ice wedge melting after the fire was clear from analyses of historical submeter-resolution remote sensing imagery, long-term monitoring of thermohydrological conditions within the active layer, in situ surveys of microrelief, and geochemical signals recorded in the near-surface permafrost. The resulting polygonal relief coincided with depression lines along an underground ice wedge network, and cumulative subsidence to 2013 was estimated as at least 10.1 to 12.1 cm (0.9-1.1 cm/year 11 year average). Profiles of water geochemistry in the ground indicated mixing or replenishment of older permafrost water with newer meteoric water, as a consequence of the increase in active layer thickness due to wildfire or past thaw event. Our geocryological analysis of cores suggests that permafrost could be used to reconstruct the permafrost degradation history for the study site. Distinct hydrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions above the Global Meteoric Water Line were found for water from these sites where permafrost degradation with geomorphological change and prolonged surface inundation were suggested.

  13. Latest Early Pleistocene wolf-like canids from the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolini Lucenti, Saverio; Alba, David M.; Rook, Lorenzo; Moyà-Solà, Salvador; Madurell-Malapeira, Joan

    2017-04-01

    Several species of the genus Canis (Carnivora: Canidae) have been recorded from the European Early Pleistocene, but the phylogenetic relationships among them and in relation to extant members of this genus are still unclear. This is particularly true for the medium-sized and wolf-like extinct species Canis mosbachensis. It has been considered by many researchers as a descendant of the larger Canis etruscus and as a likely putative ancestor of extant wolves (Canis lupus). Other scholars, in contrast, have advocated instead for a closer relationship between C. mosbachensis and the extinct Canis arnensis, and even a close relationship between C. mosbachensis and C. lupus has been questioned. Here we describe the previously unpublished medium-sized Canis remains from the late Early Pleistocene site of Vallparadís Estació, along with additional new Canis material from the roughly coeval site of Cueva Victoria (both in the Iberian Peninsula), and compare them qualitatively and morphometrically with both extant and extinct species of this genus. The described material most closely resembles in craniodental size and shape the remains from Central and Southern Europe that have been previously assigned to C. mosbachensis, to which they are hence formally attributed. The excellent preservation of the newly described specimens (which include the most complete skull of this taxon) enables the description of features previously unknown for this species, which further support a close phylogenetic link with living wolves. Based on the described material, we review the role played by C. mosbachensis in the evolutionary history of European fossil canids, and conclude that this extinct species is most closely related to C. lupus and other closely-allied species, such as Canis anthus and Canis latrans.

  14. Orographic Flows across the Antarctic Peninsula: a comparison of AWS data and regional atmospheric model simulations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchgaessner, A.

    2012-04-01

    Over the past 50 years the Antarctic Peninsula (AP) has been one of the most rapidly warming regions on the planet, with the strongest warming rate occurring in winter along the west coast of the Peninsula. In summer, the largest temperature increase is observed over the northern part of the east coast. During summer the temperature on both sides of the Peninsula is correlated with the circumpolar westerlies, expressed in the Southern Annular Mode (SAM). The suggestion is that the stronger westerlies interact with the orographic barrier formed by the Peninsula, resulting in Föhn events on the lee side in the area of the Larsen Ice Shelf. In this study we use standard meteorological parameters as measured by Automatic Weather Stations (AWS) on either side of the Antarctic Peninsula to derive an indicator for Föhn events. This indicator is then used to analyse simulations by two high-resolution regional atmospheric models - the WRF model, run at 5 km resolution as part of the Antarctic Mesoscale Prediction System (AMPS) and the UK Met Office Unified Model (UM) run at 4 km resolution as part of an experimental real-time forecast system for the Antarctic Peninsula region with regard to their representation of such events. In a further step we will look into which impact the models' performance with regard to Föhn events may have on simulated components of the surface energy balance and thus potential melt.

  15. Stand structure and dynamics of sand pine differ between the Florida panhandle and peninsula

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drewa, P.B.; Platt, W.J.; Kwit, C.; Doyle, T.W.

    2008-01-01

    Size and age structures of stand populations of numerous tree species exhibit uneven or reverse J-distributions that can persist after non-catastrophic disturbance, especially windstorms. Among disjunct populations of conspecific trees, alternative distributions are also possible and may be attributed to more localized variation in disturbance. Regional differences in structure and demography among disjunct populations of sand pine (Pinus clausa (Chapm. ex Engelm.) Vasey ex Sarg.) in the Florida panhandle and peninsula may result from variation in hurricane regimes associated with each of these populations. We measured size, age, and growth rates of trees from panhandle and peninsula populations and then compiled size and age class distributions. We also characterized hurricanes in both regions over the past century. Size and age structures of panhandle populations were unevenly distributed and exhibited continuous recruitment; peninsula populations were evenly sized and aged and exhibited only periodic recruitment. Since hurricane regimes were similar between regions, historical fire regimes may have been responsible for regional differences in structure of sand pine populations. We hypothesize that fires were locally nonexistent in coastal panhandle populations, while periodic high intensity fires occurred in peninsula populations over the past century. Such differences in local fire regimes could have resulted in the absence of hurricane effects in the peninsula. Increased intensity of hurricanes in the panhandle and current fire suppression patterns in the peninsula may shift characteristics of sand pine stands in both regions. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  16. Development of a diagnosis index of tropical cyclones affecting the Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jae-Won; Cha, Yumi

    2016-06-01

    This study has developed the index for diagnosis on possibility that tropical cyclones (TCs) affect Korean Peninsula. This index is closely related to the strength of the western North Pacific subtropical high (WNPSH), which is calculated as a difference in meridional wind between at the highest correlation area (around Korean Peninsula) and at the lowest correlation area (sea southeast of Japan) through a correlation analysis between TC frequency that affects Korean Peninsula and 500 hPa meridional wind. In low frequency years that selected from Korea affecting TC index, anomalous northeasterly is strengthened from Korea to the South China Sea because the center of anomalous anticyclonic circulation is located to northwest of Korean Peninsula. Thus, TCs tend to move westward from the sea east of the Philippines to the mainland China. On the other hand, in high frequency years, anomalous southwesterly serves as steering flow that more TCs move toward Korean Peninsula because the center of anomalous anticyclonic circulation is located to sea east of Japan. Consequently, this study suggests that if this index is calculated using real time 500 hPa meridional winds that forecasted by dynamic models during the movement of TCs, the possibility that TCs approach Korean Peninsula can be diagnosed in real time.

  17. Preliminary geothermal evaluation of the Mokapu Peninsula on the Island of Oahu, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-08-01

    Preliminary geological, geochemical, and geophysical field surveys have been conducted on Mokapu Peninsula on the island of Oahu in an effort to determine whether sufficient indications of geothermal potential exist within or adjacent to the peninsula to justify further, more detailed, exploratory efforts. An evaluation of existing geologic data as well as recently completed mapping on Mokapu indicate that the peninsula is located on the edge of or immediately adjacent to the inferred caldera of Koolau volcano. Geochemical surveys conducted within and around the Mokapu Peninsula included mercury and radon ground gas surveys as well as a limited evaluation of groundwater chemistry. Groundwater sampling on Mokapu Peninsula was severely restricted due to the absence of wells within the study area and thus water chemistry analyses were limited to the Nuupia fish ponds. Schlumberger resistivity soundings were completed in three locations on the peninsula: KVS1, in the northeast quadrant within the Ulupau crater, KVS2 in the northwest quadrant along the main jet runway, and KVS3 in the southeast along Mokapu Road. KVS1 encountered a relatively high resistivity to a depth of approximately 20 meters below sea level which was underlain by a basement resistivity of about 2 to 3 ohm meters. KVS2 and KVS3 detected similar resistivities of 2 to 3 ohm meters at much shallower depths (approximately equivalent to local sea level) below a thin, moderately resistive layer having an impedance ranging from 15 to 118 ohm meters.

  18. Effects of precipitation regime and soil nitrogen on leaf traits in seasonally dry tropical forests of the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Roa-Fuentes, Lilia L; Templer, Pamela H; Campo, Julio

    2015-10-01

    Leaf traits are closely associated with nutrient use by plants and can be utilized as a proxy for nutrient cycling processes. However, open questions remain, in particular regarding the variability of leaf traits within and across seasonally dry tropical forests. To address this, we considered six leaf traits (specific area, thickness, dry matter content, N content, P content and natural abundance (15)N) of four co-occurring tree species (two that are not associated with N2-fixing bacteria and two that are associated with N2-fixing bacteria) and net N mineralization rates and inorganic N concentrations along a precipitation gradient (537-1036 mm per year) in the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. Specifically we sought to test the hypothesis that leaf traits of dominant plant species shift along a precipitation gradient, but are affected by soil N cycling. Although variation among different species within each site explains some leaf trait variation, there is also a high level of variability across sites, suggesting that factors other than precipitation regime more strongly influence leaf traits. Principal component analyses indicated that across sites and tree species, covariation in leaf traits is an indicator of soil N availability. Patterns of natural abundance (15)N in foliage and foliage minus soil suggest that variation in precipitation regime drives a shift in plant N acquisition and the openness of the N cycle. Overall, our study shows that both plant species and site are important determinants of leaf traits, and that the leaf trait spectrum is correlated with soil N cycling.

  19. Holocene tephrochronology of the Cold Bay area, southwest Alaska Peninsula

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carson, E.C.; Fournelle, J.H.; Miller, T.P.; Mickelson, D.M.

    2002-01-01

    The major-element glass geochemistry of 92 tephra samples from the southwest Alaska Peninsula provides the basis for establishing a Holocene tephrochronology for the region. Electron microprobe analysis has been combined with field descriptions of samples, stratigraphic relationships between tephra samples and sample localities, and glass shard micro-morphology to correlate these sampled distal tephra units throughout the area of Cold Bay and adjacent Morzhovoi Bay. Radiocarbon dating provides age constraints on correlated horizons. Previous research had clearly delineated only one horizon in the region, the so-called 'Funk/Fisher' ash, dating to between 8425 ± 350 and 9130 ± 140 14C yr BP. In addition to constraining the bimodal andesitic and dacitic glass chemistry of that horizon, this study has recognized six additional tephra layers in the area. Two horizons pre-date the Funk/Fisher ash and four are younger than it. A tephra containing dacitic and andesitic components was identified in the vicinity of Morzhovoi Bay, with a minimum age of 9300 ± 80 14C yr BP and a maximum age of 10,200 ± 75 14C yr BP. A rhyolitic horizon composed of cm-sized, rounded pumice clasts was identified in the vicinity of Cold Bay; it has been correlated to the ca 9500 BP eruption of Roundtop volcano on Unimak Island. The four younger tephra beds date to between 6070 ± 340 and 3600 ± 140 14C yr BP. The oldest of the four is rhyodacitic, followed by a mixed rhyodacitic-andesitic horizon, another rhyodacitic horizon, and finally an andesitic layer. Comparison of all the correlated horizons to proximal samples collected on Unimak Island provides conclusive geochemical evidence that the ca 9100 BP Caldera-forming eruption of Fisher volcano is the source of the Funk/Fisher ash. Correlation between the rhyodacitic tephra horizons and proximal samples from Fisher volcano suggests that Fisher Caldera is the source of one of the rhyodacitic tephra horizons that post-dates the Funk

  20. Feasibility study concerning remediation and rehabilitation of industrial polluted lands on the Absheron Peninsula, Republic of Azerbaijan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivin, Majorie; Helsen, Stefan; Cuyvers, Lars

    2014-05-01

    ECOREM is carrying out a feasibility study focused on the remediation and rehabilitation of industrial polluted lands, located on the Absheron Peninsula (Republic of Azerbaijan), on behalf of the State Oil Company of Azerbaijan Republic (SOCAR). The objective of this study is to support SOCAR with specific technologies and capacity building for environmental remediation works on various sectors of the Peninsula. As an independent consultancy company, ECOREM provides sustainable and quality advice, seeking the balance to the interests of the client and the environment in the broadest sense of the word. Within this study, it is important to underline that extraction activities in the country have been going on for more than a century. Given that the age of the environmental problems is equal to the history of the oil production, it is nearly impossible to point out the responsibilities of the various companies or to define the exact activities that occurred on a particular location. From the data gathered so far, more than 3600 ha of oil contaminated area are known in Baku and the Absheron Peninsula. Within this feasibility study, ECOREM will advice SOCAR on suitable and best available remediation technologies to apply on prior contaminated areas. According to the Environmental Policy of the Company, SOCAR would like to act in priority on the numerous contaminated lands of the Absheron Peninsula. Through the exploitation of the extensive GIS database provided by SOCAR, the oil contaminated sites will be examined in details in order to determine the most sensitive areas, on which remediation works or monitoring should be implemented in priority. To locate these sites, ECOREM will provide SOCAR with technical support in order to conduct risk analysis, remediation and monitoring of soil and/or groundwater oil pollutions. According to these results, practical solutions will be proposed concerning the possible reuse and management of contaminated soils and hazardous

  1. Fluvial networks of the Iberian Peninsula: a chronological framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santisteban, Juan I.; Schulte, Lothar

    2007-11-01

    Knowledge of the evolution of Spanish fluvial networks has improved during recent years as more river systems have been studied and more geochronological data has become available. However, the chronological framework is a major issue as the range of applications is limited by methodological constraints and spatial coverage is sparse. Integration of 'absolute' dating methods with biostratigraphy and palaeomagnetism permits the recent evolution of these river systems to be reviewed. The timing of incision from the Late Neogene to the present varies between the major Iberian fluvial systems, depending on the substrata and tectonic settings. Early Pleistocene and older fluvial sequences in the core areas of the Iberian Peninsula provide a more extensive record of fluvial evolution and are better preserved than the terrace flights in the coastal lowlands. Middle Pleistocene sequences are well developed in most of the major river systems in Iberia, particularly those of the Tajo, Guadalquivir and Aguas River, and frequently represent the principal climatic cycles of that period, although tectonic and sea-level effects can also be seen. For Late Pleistocene to Holocene times, the scheme becomes more complex. Our review suggests that each river system has responded differently to local and regional climate control, glacial and periglacial processes in headwaters in high mountain areas, glacio-eustatic sea-level changes and local and regional tectonic patterns.

  2. Birds of the Northcentral Alaska Peninsula, 1976-1980

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gill, Jr.; Petersen, M.R.; Jorgensen, P.D.

    1981-01-01

    Between spring 1976 and fall 1980 we studied the occurrence, abundance, and habitat use of birds over a 2000 square km segment of the northcentral Alaska Peninsula. During this period observers were present 473 days and obtained records for all seasons. A total of 125 species was recorded; 63% (79 of 125) were water-associated. The breeding avifauna was found to be a mixture of Panboreal (49%), North American (34%), and Aleutican (17%) species. The Aleutican group was dominant in terms of biomass and numbers of individuals during the nonbreeding period. Forty-two species were confirmed breeding in the area and another 19 were suspected of breeding. The majority of birds occurred as migrants; 14 species were considered permanent residents and an additional 20 were winter residents. ... The area is a principal late summer and fall molting and staging area for several species of arctic and subarctic nesting waders and seaducks and emperor geese .... From late September through mid-October the density of water birds over the entire littoral and nearshore area approached 1000 birds square km. This density was exceeded many fold for certain species on particular segments of habitats in the area.

  3. Francisella species in ticks and animals, Iberian Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Lopes de Carvalho, I; Toledo, A; Carvalho, C L; Barandika, J F; Respicio-Kingry, L B; Garcia-Amil, C; García-Pérez, A L; Olmeda, A S; Zé-Zé, L; Petersen, J M; Anda, P; Núncio, M S; Escudero, R

    2016-02-01

    The presence of Francisella species in 2134 ticks, 93 lagomorphs and 280 small mammals from the Iberian Peninsula was studied. Overall, 19 ticks and 6 lagomorphs were positive for Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica, suggesting, as described for other regions, that lagomorphs may have an important role in the maintenance of F. tularensis in nature. Of the 6 positive lagomorphs, 4 were identified as the European rabbit, Oryctogalus cuniculus. Additionally, 353 ticks and 3 small mammals were PCR positive for Francisella-like endosymbionts (FLEs) and one small mammal was also positive for Francisella hispaniensis-like DNA sequences. Among FLE positive specimens, a variety of sequence types were detected: ticks were associated with 5 lpnA sequence types, with only one type identified per tick, in contrast to 2 lpnA sequence types detected in a single wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus). To our knowledge, this is the first report of FLEs in free-living small mammals as well as the first detection of F. hispaniensis-like sequences in a natural setting.

  4. Seismic hazards of the Iberian Peninsula - evaluation with kernel functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo, M. J.; Martínez, F.; Martí, J.

    2013-08-01

    The seismic hazard of the Iberian Peninsula is analysed using a nonparametric methodology based on statistical kernel functions; the activity rate is derived from the catalogue data, both its spatial dependence (without a seismogenetic zonation) and its magnitude dependence (without using Gutenberg-Richter's law). The catalogue is that of the Instituto Geográfico Nacional, supplemented with other catalogues around the periphery; the quantification of events has been homogenised and spatially or temporally interrelated events have been suppressed to assume a Poisson process. The activity rate is determined by the kernel function, the bandwidth and the effective periods. The resulting rate is compared with that produced using Gutenberg-Richter statistics and a zoned approach. Three attenuation laws have been employed, one for deep sources and two for shallower events, depending on whether their magnitude was above or below 5. The results are presented as seismic hazard maps for different spectral frequencies and for return periods of 475 and 2475 yr, which allows constructing uniform hazard spectra.

  5. Seismic hazard of the Iberian Peninsula: evaluation with kernel functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo, M. J.; Martínez, F.; Martí, J.

    2014-05-01

    The seismic hazard of the Iberian Peninsula is analysed using a nonparametric methodology based on statistical kernel functions; the activity rate is derived from the catalogue data, both its spatial dependence (without a seismogenic zonation) and its magnitude dependence (without using Gutenberg-Richter's relationship). The catalogue is that of the Instituto Geográfico Nacional, supplemented with other catalogues around the periphery; the quantification of events has been homogenised and spatially or temporally interrelated events have been suppressed to assume a Poisson process. The activity rate is determined by the kernel function, the bandwidth and the effective periods. The resulting rate is compared with that produced using Gutenberg-Richter statistics and a zoned approach. Three attenuation relationships have been employed, one for deep sources and two for shallower events, depending on whether their magnitude was above or below 5. The results are presented as seismic hazard maps for different spectral frequencies and for return periods of 475 and 2475 yr, which allows constructing uniform hazard spectra.

  6. Angiostrongylus species in wild carnivores in the Iberian Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Gerrikagoitia, X; Barral, M; Juste, R A

    2010-11-24

    A survey of Angiostrongylus parasites was carried out between 2003 and 2006 in wild carnivore species in the Basque Country (Northern Spain). Parasitological examination consisted in the dissection of heart and lungs for the extraction of adult worms. Nematodes were identified using morphometrical features and also PCR amplification and sequencing analysis. The animal species included in this study were Eurasian badger (Meles meles), Weasel (Mustela nivalis), Beech marten (Martes foina), Pine marten (Martes martes), Polecat (Mustela putorius), American mink (Mustela vison), Red fox (Vulpes vulpes), Wolf (Canis lupus), Wild cat (Felis silvestris), and Small-spotted genet (Genetta genetta). Angiostrongylus parasites were only found in foxes and badgers at prevalences of 33.3% and 24%, respectively. Identification of the nematodes by morphometrical features revealed that foxes were infected with A. vasorum while badgers were infected by a different species of Angiostrongylus most likely A. daskalovi. Sequencing data of the second internal transcribed spacer region of ribosomal DNA (ITS2) of isolates from each species confirmed the species difference. The high prevalence of Angiostrongylus found in the present survey, indicates that the wild cycle of two different species of Angiostrongylus is present in the Basque Country. To our knowledge this is the first report of A. daskalovi in the Iberian Peninsula.

  7. Recent increase in Antarctic Peninsula ice core uranium concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potocki, Mariusz; Mayewski, Paul A.; Kurbatov, Andrei V.; Simões, Jefferson C.; Dixon, Daniel A.; Goodwin, Ian; Carleton, Andrew M.; Handley, Michael J.; Jaña, Ricardo; Korotkikh, Elena V.

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the distribution of airborne uranium is important because it can result in both chemical and radiological toxicity. Ice cores offer the most robust reconstruction of past atmospheric levels of toxic substances. Here we present the first sub-annually dated, continuously sampled ice core documenting change in U levels in the Southern Hemisphere. The ice core was recovered from the Detroit Plateau, northern Antarctic Peninsula, in 2007 by a joint Brazilian-Chilean-US team. It displays a significant increase in U concentration that coincides with reported mining activities in the Southern Hemisphere, notably Australia. Raw U concentrations in the Detroit Plateau ice core increased by as much as 102 between the 1980s and 2000s accompanied by increased variability in recent years. Decadal mean U concentrations increased by a factor of ∼3 from 1980 to 2007, reaching a mean of 205 pg/L from 2000 to 2007. The fact that other terrestrial source dust elements such as Ce, La, Pr, and Ti do not show a similar increase and that the increased U concentrations are enriched above natural crustal levels, supports an anthropogenic source for the U as opposed to a change in atmospheric circulation.

  8. Trace gas emissions from tropical biomass fires: Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cofer, Wesley R.; Levine, Joel S.; Winstead, Edward L.; Stocks, Brian J.; Cahoon, Donald R.; Pinto, Joseph P.

    Mixing ratios for carbon dioxide (CO 2), carbon monoxide (CO), hydrogen (H 2), methane (CH 4) and total non-methane hydrocarbons (TNMHC) were determined from the smoke plumes of two small (˜0.25 ha) prescribed biomass fires conducted on the Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico. In the region of these fires the combination of climate and shallow soils produces a scrubby and stunted forest with species composition similar to the Brazilian rain forest, but at a noticeably reduced size. Aircraft collections of smoke from these fires were analysed and used to determine CO 2-normalized emission ratios ( ΔX/ ΔCO 2; v/v; where Δ = in-plume specie concentration less background concentration) for CO, H 2, CH 4 and TNMHC produced and released into the atmosphere from these fires. Suprisingly, high mean emission ratios for TNMHCs (˜1.7% of CO 2 release) and H 2 (˜2.5% of CO 2) were determined. Emission ratios for CO (˜7%) and CH 4 (˜0.7%), however, were found to fall within expected bounds.

  9. Stratigraphy and paleogeography of the Cretaceous in Arabian Peninsula

    SciTech Connect

    Alsharhan, A.S.; Nairn, A.E.M.

    1986-05-01

    The Cretaceous of the Arabian Peninsula is divided into three major units by regional unconformities: Lower Cretaceous Thamama Group (Berriasian-middle Aptian), middle Cretaceous Wasia Group (Albian-Turonian), and Upper Cretaceous Aruma Group (Coniacian-Maestrichtian). The profusion of named stratigraphic units in the area reflects not only the lithologic variation resulting from facies changes, but also terminologies adopted by different companies. The authors provide a stratigraphic nomenclature defining standard type sections and indicate synonymies, which follow the recommendation of 10th Geological Liaison Meeting and hence are acceptable to operators in the area. The sedimentologic history of the area was presented in a series of paleogeographic maps, which they relate to the regional tectonic framework. The maps show a predominantly carbonate shelf ramp bordering a land area to the north and west. The principal change in depositional environment occurs during the Upper Cretaceous, as a result of tectonic activity. Less significant changes are attributed to eustatic sea level fluctuations, on which tilting caused by tectonic movement may be superposed during the Lower and middle Cretaceous. The major producing horizons lie below the regional unconformities; secondary porosity in the shelf reefal buildups was developed during subaerial exposure in the Shuaiba Formation (early-middle Aptian), in the Mishrif Formation (late Cenomanian), and in the Simsima Formation (Maestrichtian).

  10. Inventory Survey of Geodiversity Elements in a Regional Territory: Applied to the Biga Peninsula, Northwestern Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedat Çetiner, Ziya; Ertekin, Can; Filiz, Nurdan

    2016-04-01

    Representative geodiversity elements such as minerals, rocks, fossils, landforms, etc are key components in order to obtain data for the pursuit of geo-research. The scientific worth of geodiversity is not only related to how the geosphere works but also is connected with the conservation of earth materials for present and future geo-knowledge and geoscience milieu. Hence, the nonrenewable nature of geodiversity elements in the human time scale is taken into account for the conservation of natural diversity or simply geo-conservation. Geodiversity as an abiotic element ascribes to in situ or ex situ features both of which maintain scientific value and are used by various societies such as in teaching, tourism, etc. Ex situ elements are known as fossils, minerals and rocks found in museum collections on the other hand in situ features are known as geosites for which there are certain sub-categories such as geomorphological (landform), hydrogeological, paleontological, structural, stratigraphic sequence and lithological. Due to the plethora of geological data dispersed among geodiversity elements, the first crucial step is to execute an inventory solid study. The scope of this study is to survey geodiversity features of potential natural sites distributed the entire sectors of the Biga Peninsula of Northwestern Turkey. In the territory, there are 37 natural sites with their own data set. This data describing their boundaries and administrative features were acquired from Directorate General for Preservation of Natural Heritage. Then, site boundaries, regional published geological maps, surface hydrologic and anthropic attributes were overlaid conceiving as a single unit. Before initiating the inventory survey, the criteria scale were established for geoscience value and geo-tourism potential. In these two frames, geodiversity elements were labeled and tabulated by their representativeness, integrity, rarity, scientific knowledge, scenery, interpretative potential and

  11. A palaeoenvironmental reconstruction of c. 2 million year old Oldowan archaeological occurrences on the Homa Peninsula, southwestern Kenya: a multiproxy approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Thomas; Whitfield, Elizabeth; Kirby, Jason; Hunt, Christopher; Bishop, Laura; Plummer, Thomas; Ditchfield, Peter

    2016-04-01

    The Homa Peninsula, situated on the Winam Gulf of Lake Victoria, has yielded traces of hominin activity going back to at least ˜2ma BP. The best known site on the peninsula, Kanjera South, boasts large stone artefact and zooarchaeological assemblages preserved in three beds (from oldest to youngest: KS-1 to KS-3). Previous studies have used field sedimentological analyses, as well as stable isotope analysis of pedogenic carbonates to better understand the depositional and environmental contexts of hominin activities. These suggest that sediments were deposited in alluvial and lake marginal environments on a grassy plain, between wooded slopes and a permanent water body. The aim of this study is to refine previous palaeoenvironmental reconstructions of Kanjera South with the aid of particle size analysis, whilst also offering insights into the palaeoenvironment of other archaeological sites on the Homa Peninsula through a multiproxy approach. The project aims to include analyses of particle size, stable-isotopes, pollen and siliceous microfossils (phytoliths, diatoms and sponge spicules). Preliminary results of particle size and phytolith analyses have refined interpretations of the depositional environment at Kanjera South for beds KS1-3. Poor sorting, a bimodal distribution and sand/silty-sand grade material characterise the sediments. The characteristics suggest rapid deposition and/or a variable energy regime. A varying flow regime in relatively unconfined ephemeral channels might explain the transportation and deposition of sediments. Fluvial reworking of aeolian sediments, most likely during unconfined flood events may also have occurred. Phytoliths from the same beds showed grassland indicating Pooideae, as well as some Bambusoideae and woodland indicating phytoliths; this supports previous work.

  12. Seismic Strong Motion Array Project (SSMAP) to Record Future Large Earthquakes in the Nicoya Peninsula area, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simila, G.; McNally, K.; Quintero, R.; Segura, J.

    2006-12-01

    The seismic strong motion array project (SSMAP) for the Nicoya Peninsula in northwestern Costa Rica is composed of 10 13 sites including Geotech A900/A800 accelerographs (three-component), Ref-Teks (three- component velocity), and Kinemetric Episensors. The main objectives of the array are to: 1) record and locate strong subduction zone mainshocks [and foreshocks, "early aftershocks", and preshocks] in Nicoya Peninsula, at the entrance of the Nicoya Gulf, and in the Papagayo Gulf regions of Costa Rica, and 2) record and locate any moderate to strong upper plate earthquakes triggered by a large subduction zone earthquake in the above regions. Our digital accelerograph array has been deployed as part of our ongoing research on large earthquakes in conjunction with the Earthquake and Volcano Observatory (OVSICORI) at the Universidad Nacional in Costa Rica. The country wide seismographic network has been operating continuously since the 1980's, with the first earthquake bulletin published more than 20 years ago, in 1984. The recording of seismicity and strong motion data for large earthquakes along the Middle America Trench (MAT) has been a major research project priority over these years, and this network spans nearly half the time of a "repeat cycle" (50 years) for large (Ms 7.5- 7.7) earthquakes beneath the Nicoya Peninsula, with the last event in 1950. Our long time co-collaborators include the seismology group OVSICORI, with coordination for this project by Dr. Ronnie Quintero and Mr. Juan Segura. Numerous international investigators are also studying this region with GPS and seismic stations (US, Japan, Germany, Switzerland, etc.). Also, there are various strong motion instruments operated by local engineers, for building purposes and mainly concentrated in the population centers of the Central Valley. The major goal of our project is to contribute unique scientific information pertaining to a large subduction zone earthquake and its related seismic activity when

  13. Seismic Strong Motion Array Project (SSMAP) to Record Future Large Earthquakes in the Nicoya Peninsula area, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simila, G.; Lafromboise, E.; McNally, K.; Quintereo, R.; Segura, J.

    2007-12-01

    The seismic strong motion array project (SSMAP) for the Nicoya Peninsula in northwestern Costa Rica is composed of 10 - 13 sites including Geotech A900/A800 accelerographs (three-component), Ref-Teks (three- component velocity), and Kinemetric Episensors. The main objectives of the array are to: 1) record and locate strong subduction zone mainshocks [and foreshocks, "early aftershocks", and preshocks] in Nicoya Peninsula, at the entrance of the Nicoya Gulf, and in the Papagayo Gulf regions of Costa Rica, and 2) record and locate any moderate to strong upper plate earthquakes triggered by a large subduction zone earthquake in the above regions. Our digital accelerograph array has been deployed as part of our ongoing research on large earthquakes in conjunction with the Earthquake and Volcano Observatory (OVSICORI) at the Universidad Nacional in Costa Rica. The country wide seismographic network has been operating continuously since the 1980's, with the first earthquake bulletin published more than 20 years ago, in 1984. The recording of seismicity and strong motion data for large earthquakes along the Middle America Trench (MAT) has been a major research project priority over these years, and this network spans nearly half the time of a "repeat cycle" (~ 50 years) for large (Ms ~ 7.5- 7.7) earthquakes beneath the Nicoya Peninsula, with the last event in 1950. Our long time co- collaborators include the seismology group OVSICORI, with coordination for this project by Dr. Ronnie Quintero and Mr. Juan Segura. The major goal of our project is to contribute unique scientific information pertaining to a large subduction zone earthquake and its related seismic activity when the next large earthquake occurs in Nicoya. We are now collecting a database of strong motion records for moderate sized events to document this last stage prior to the next large earthquake. A recent event (08/18/06; M=4.3) located 20 km northwest of Samara was recorded by two stations (Playa Carrillo

  14. Re-Processing of ERS-1/-2 SAR data for derivation of glaciological parameters on the Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedl, Peter; Höppner, Kathrin; Braun, Matthias; Lorenz, Rainer; Diedrich, Erhard

    2015-04-01

    Climate Change, it`s polar amplification and impacts are subject of current research in various thematic and methodological fields. In this context different spaceborne remote sensing techniques play an important role for data acquisition and measurement of different geophysical variables. A recently founded Junior Researchers Group at the German Aerospace Center (DLR) is studying changing processes in cryosphere and atmosphere above the Antarctic Peninsula. It is the aim of the group to make use of long-term remote sensing data sets of the land and ice surface and the atmosphere in order to characterize changes in this sensitive region. One aspect focuses on the application of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data for glaciological investigations on the Antarctic Peninsula. The data had been acquired by the European Remote Sensing (ERS-1 and ERS-2) satellites and received at DLR's Antarctic station GARS O'Higgins. Even though recent glaciological investigations often make use of modern polar-orbiting single-pass SAR-systems like e.g. TanDEM-X, only ERS-1 (1991 - 2000) and its follow-up mission ERS-2 (1995 - 2011) provided a 20 years' time series of continuous measurements, which offers great potential for long-term studies. Interferometric synthetic radar (InSAR) and differential interferometric synthetic radar (DInSAR) methods as well as the intensity tracking technique are applied to create value-added glaciological SAR-products, such as glacier velocity maps, coherence maps, interferograms and differential interferograms with the aim to make them accessible to interested scientific end-users. These products are suitable for glaciological applications, e.g. determinations of glacier extend, and grounding line position, glacier and ice-stream velocities and glacier mass balance calculations with the flux-gate approach. We represent results of case studies from three test sites located at different latitudes and presenting different climatic and glaciological

  15. Wavefield Inversion of Surface Waves for Delineating Seismic Structure in Saline Permafrost: A Case History from the Barrow Peninsula, AK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, S.; Dreger, D. S.; Peterson, J.; Ulrich, C.; Dafflon, B.; Hubbard, S. S.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    Seismic investigations of permafrost are essential in cold-region applications including static corrections for seismic exploration and site characterization for infrastructure development. Surface-wave methods are advantageous because their applicability does not require regular velocity gradients. But distinct challenges also exist: The irregular velocity variations in permafrost, combined with the marked velocity contrasts between frozen and unfrozen ground, often yield complicated dispersion spectra in which higher-order and leaky modes are dominant. Owing to the difficulties in retrieving dispersion curves from such spectra, dispersion-curved-based inversion methods become inapplicable. Here we present a case study of using wavefield inversion of surface waves to infer the permafrost structure on the Barrow Peninsula of the Alaskan Arctic Coastal Plain. In May of 2014, we conducted an active multichannel surface-wave survey along a 4300-m (2.7-mi) NE-SW trending transect that extended from the coastal to the interior areas of the peninsula. We acquired surface-wave supergathers—each covering a distance of 147 meters—from four nearly equidistantly distributed subsections of the transect. The dispersion spectra show dominant higher-order and leaky modes, as well as inversely dispersive trends (i.e., phase velocities increase with increasing frequencies). Preliminary results reveal a "sandwich" velocity structure, in which a pronounced low-velocity layer (with S-wave velocity reductions up to ~45%-60%; tens of meters thick; overlain by 3-4 m of high-velocity strata) is embedded within high-velocity strata, and the low-velocity layer itself contains irregular velocity gradients. Considering the low ground temperatures of -10 °C to -8 °C, this low-velocity feature is likely to be an embedded saline layer that is only partially frozen due to freezing-point depression of dissolved salts. Because saline permafrost is particularly sensitive to thermal

  16. Population increase in Kirtland's warbler and summer range expansion to Wisconsin and Michigan's Upper Peninsula, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Probst, J.R.; Donner, D.M.; Bocetti, C.I.; Sjogren, S.

    2003-01-01

    The threatened Kirtland's warbler Dendroica kirtlandii breeds in stands of young jack pine Pinus banksiana growing on well-drained soils in Michigan, USA. We summarize information documenting the range expansion of Kirtland's warbler due to increased habitat management in the core breeding range in the Lower Peninsula of Michigan during 1990?2000. We collected records and conducted searches for the species in Michigan's Upper Peninsula and Wisconsin over 1978?2000. During that time 25 males were found in Wisconsin and 90 males in the Upper Peninsula. We documented colonization of Michigan's Upper Peninsula by six ringed males from the Lower Peninsula of Michigan. Four ringed birds also moved back to the core breeding range, including two males that made two-way movements between the core breeding range and the Upper Peninsula. Thirty-seven females were observed with males from 1995 to 2000, all in Michigan. Nesting activities were noted for 25 pairs and at least nine nests fledged young. One male ringed as a fledgling returned to breed in two subsequent years. After a 19-year period of population stability, the Kirtland's warbler population increased four-fold during 1990?2000, most likely in response to a tripling in habitat area. This increase in sightings and documented breeding may be related to habitat availability in Michigan's Upper Peninsula and to saturation of habitat in the main breeding range. The increase in extra-limital records during 1995?1999 corresponds to the time when the population went from the minimum to the maximum projected population densities, and a decline in natural wildfire habitat was just offset by new managed habitat for the Kirtland's warbler.

  17. Evolution of the Antarctic Peninsula lithosphere: Evidence from Mesozoic mafic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, T. R.; Curtis, M. L.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Whitehouse, M. J.

    2016-02-01

    New geochronology from a thick (> 800 m) basaltic succession along the eastern margin of the Antarctic Peninsula confirm a Middle Jurassic age (178 ± 1 Ma). This marginally postdates the adjacent Ferrar large igneous province of the Transantarctic Mountains and predates the extensive silicic volcanism of the Mapple Formation (~ 170 Ma) of the Antarctic Peninsula. The geochemistry of other rare, but broadly contemporaneous, basaltic successions of the Antarctic Peninsula, along with Cretaceous-age mafic dykes, are used to interpret the influences of lithospheric and asthenospheric mantle sources during the Mesozoic. Two significant high magmatic addition rate events occurred along the Antarctic Peninsula continental margin at 170 and 110 Ma and can be correlated to events along the South American Cordillera. These 'flare-up' events are characterised by extensive silicic (mostly ignimbrite) volcanism of the Chon Aike Province (V2 event: 170 Ma) and significant granitoid batholith emplacement of the Lassiter Coast intrusive suite (110 Ma). The 170 Ma event is exposed across large parts of the northern Antarctic Peninsula, whilst the 110 Ma event is more widespread across the southern Antarctic Peninsula. The basaltic volcanism described here precedes the 'flare-up' event at 170 Ma and has geochemical characteristics that indicate a thickened lithosphere prevailed. A major dyke swarm that followed the 170 Ma event indicates that extensive lithospheric thinning had occurred, which allowed the ascent of depleted mafic melts. The thinning was the direct result of widespread lower crustal/upper lithospheric melting associated with the silicic volcanism. In the southern Antarctic Peninsula, the lithosphere remained over thickened until the emplacement of the major batholiths of the Lassiter Coast intrusive suite at 110 Ma and was then immediately followed by the emplacement of more asthenosphere-like melts indicating extensive lithospheric thinning.

  18. Last Neanderthals and first Anatomically Modern Humans in the NW Iberian Peninsula: Climatic and environmental conditions inferred from the Cova Eirós small-vertebrate assemblage during MIS 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey-Rodríguez, Iván; López-García, Juan-Manuel; Bennàsar, Maria; Bañuls-Cardona, Sandra; Blain, Hugues-Alexandre; Blanco-Lapaz, Ángel; Rodríguez-Álvarez, Xosé-Pedro; de Lombera-Hermida, Arturo; Díaz-Rodríguez, Mikel; Ameijenda-Iglesias, Alicia; Agustí, Jordi; Fábregas-Valcarce, Ramón

    2016-11-01

    Cova Eirós is emerging as a reference site in the northwestern Iberian Peninsula for the study of the development of the last Neanderthal populations and the first populations of Anatomically Modern Humans (AMH) in MIS 3. Cova Eirós is an archaeological site (with Middle and Upper Palaeolithic levels) located in Cancelo, Triacastela (Lugo, northwestern Iberian Peninsula), which has been systematically excavated from 2008 onwards. The small-vertebrate assemblage analysed came from the archaeo-palaeontological field seasons that took place from 2009 to 2014. At least 18 small-vertebrate taxa have been identified: 1 frog (Rana temporaria), 1 snake (Vipera sp.), 4 insectivores (Sorex minutus, Sorex sp., Talpa cf. occidentalis and Erinaceus europaeus), 4 chiropters (Myotis myotis/blythii, cf. Miniopterus sp., Myotis sp. and Rhinolophus ferrumequinum) and 8 rodents (Apodemus sylvaticus, Arvicola amphibius, Arvicola sapidus, Chionomys nivalis, Microtus (Terricola) lusitanicus, Microtus agrestis, Microtus arvalis and Microtus oeconomus). Using the Habitat Weighting method to reconstruct the palaeoenvironment, we reconstruct a landscape for MIS 3 characterized by open woodland formations. The Mutual Ecogeographic Range (MER) method and the Bioclimatic Model (BM) used for the palaeoclimatic reconstruction show lower temperatures and higher precipitation than at present in the region. Our results from Cova Eirós are compared with the data obtained from several other sites in the Iberian Peninsula; it can be said that Neanderthals and AMH were well adapted to the territory that they occupied, as well as to the surrounding environment and the climatic conditions prevalent in the unstable context of MIS 3 in the Iberian Peninsula.

  19. Heterogeneous structure of the lithosphere of the Taimyr Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinova, Tamara; Petrova, Alevtina

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic anomalies of the lower crust is well manifested in the satellite measurements and their reductions for the heights H = 100 and 400 km. Currently, however, a great interest is the area of negative magnetic anomalies, allocated to the same heights. They are confined to a special permeable zones of the crust and lithosphere, having increased geothermal activity and are associated with a variety of minerals. In digital magnetic anomalies and gravity anomalies circumpolar map of the Arctic Ocean (Total) was built geomagnetic and density sections along latitudinal and longitudinal cross sections of negative magnetic anomalies (n = 100 km). In the Taimyr Peninsula they capture the largest Fadyukudinsko Kotuiskaya-ring structure. In the north-central Siberia Fadyukudinsko Kotuiskaya ring structure is the "hub" articulation largest geoblocks (Anabar, Kureisko-Tunguska and North Kara). It is manifested in the gravity and magnetic field is also a ring structure. With Fadyukudinsko Kotui-ring structure formation associated injectors and high-carbonate metasomatic rocks tectonites controlling uranium and thorium-uranium-fluorite-barite-rare earth mineralization (VF Proskurnin, et al. 2010). It hypabyssal front of the hot spots. Fadyukudinsko-Kotuiskaya structure is defined posletrappovoe place in the north of the Eurasian plate, responding to a hot spot or a spot lower mantle plumes Triassic [Kravchenko SM, Hain VE 1996 Sazonov AM, Zvyagin EA, Leontiev SI et al., 2010]. Latitude and longitude revealed Profile permeable zones of low magnetic properties and density, confined to a weakened layer in the middle crust. Negative satellite magnetic anomalies (n = 100 km) at depths of 20 - 25-30 km weakly magnetic lens revealed a low density. The upper crust they overlap and dense magnetic rocks. At the bottom of the crust, these lenses are underlain by layers of dense and magnetic structures.

  20. Assessing methods for developing crop forecasting in the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ines, A. V. M.; Capa Morocho, M. I.; Baethgen, W.; Rodriguez-Fonseca, B.; Han, E.; Ruiz Ramos, M.

    2015-12-01

    Seasonal climate prediction may allow predicting crop yield to reduce the vulnerability of agricultural production to climate variability and its extremes. It has been already demonstrated that seasonal climate predictions at European (or Iberian) scale from ensembles of global coupled climate models have some skill (Palmer et al., 2004). The limited predictability that exhibits the atmosphere in mid-latitudes, and therefore de Iberian Peninsula (PI), can be managed by a probabilistic approach based in terciles. This study presents an application for the IP of two methods for linking tercile-based seasonal climate forecasts with crop models to improve crop predictability. Two methods were evaluated and applied for disaggregating seasonal rainfall forecasts into daily weather realizations: 1) a stochastic weather generator and 2) a forecast tercile resampler. Both methods were evaluated in a case study where the impacts of two seasonal rainfall forecasts (wet and dry forecast for 1998 and 2015 respectively) on rainfed wheat yield and irrigation requirements of maize in IP were analyzed. Simulated wheat yield and irrigation requirements of maize were computed with the crop models CERES-wheat and CERES-maize which are included in Decision Support System for Agrotechnology Transfer (DSSAT v.4.5, Hoogenboom et al., 2010). Simulations were run at several locations in Spain where the crop model was calibrated and validated with independent field data. These methodologies would allow quantifying the benefits and risks of a seasonal climate forecast to potential users as farmers, agroindustry and insurance companies in the IP. Therefore, we would be able to establish early warning systems and to design crop management adaptation strategies that take advantage of favorable conditions or reduce the effect of adverse ones. ReferencesPalmer, T. et al., 2004. Development of a European multimodel ensemble system for seasonal-to-interannual prediction (DEMETER). Bulletin of the

  1. Climate change enhances primary production in the western Antarctic Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Sébastien; Mostajir, Behzad; Bélanger, Simon; Schloss, Irene R; Vancoppenolle, Martin; Demers, Serge; Ferreyra, Gustavo A

    2015-06-01

    Intense regional warming was observed in the western Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) over the last 50 years. Here, we investigate the impact of climate change on primary production (PP) in this highly productive region. This study is based on temporal data series of ozone thickness (1972-2010), sea ice concentration (1978-2010), sea-surface temperature (1990-2010), incident irradiance (1988-2010) and satellite-derived chlorophyll a concentration (Chl-a, 1997-2010) for the coastal WAP. In addition, we apply a photosynthesis/photoinhibition spectral model to satellite-derived data (1997-2010) to compute PP and examine the separate impacts of environmental forcings. Since 1978, sea ice retreat has been occurring earlier in the season (in March in 1978 and in late October during the 2000s) while the ozone hole is present in early spring (i.e. August to November) since the early 1990s, increasing the intensity of ultraviolet-B radiation (UVBR, 280-320 nm). The WAP waters have also warmed over 1990-2010. The modelled PP rates are in the lower range of previously reported PP rates in the WAP. The annual open water PP in the study area increased from 1997 to 2010 (from 0.73 to 1.03 Tg C yr(-1) ) concomitantly with the increase in the production season length. The coincidence between the earlier sea ice retreat and the presence of the ozone hole increased the exposure to incoming radiation (UVBR, UVAR and PAR) and, thus, increased photoinhibition during austral spring (September to November) in the study area (from 0.014 to 0.025 Tg C yr(-1) ). This increase in photoinhibition was minor compared to the overall increase in PP, however. Climate change hence had an overall positive impact on PP in the WAP waters.

  2. Pesticides in shallow groundwater in the Delmarva Peninsula

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koterba, M.T.; Banks, W.S.L.; Shedlock, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    A regional study of the areal and depth distribution of pesticides in shallow groundwater in the Delmarva Peninsula of Delaware, Maryland, and Virginia was done to (i) relate the pesticides detected to landscape and shallow subsurface features, and (ii) evaluate aquifer vulnerability and the potential contamination of drinking-water supplies. Water samples collected at 100 wells from 1988 to 1990 were analyzed for concentrations of 36 pesticides, four metabolites, and other constituents. The most commonly detected residues were atrazine, cyanazine, simazine, alachlor, metolachlor, and dicamba. Concentrations were low; few exceeded 3 ??g L-1. Most detections correlate with the intensive use of these herbicides in three widely distributed and commonly rotated crops-corn (Zea mays L.), soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.], and small grain-particularly if grown in well- drained soils. Most detections occurred in samples collected from shallow wells screened within 10 m of the overlying water table. The shallow depth distribution of most residues is consistent with their suspected history of use (ca. 20 yr), and patterns in shallow groundwater flow in the surficial aquifer in the study area. The areal and depth distributions of detectable residues in groundwater did not correlate with a vulnerability index, nor any of the component scores developed to estimate that index using the DRASTIC method. The shallow depth of most detections also indicates why few samples from water-supply wells in this study had measurable concentrations of pesticides; most supply wells are deeper than 10 m below the water table. The low number of contaminated samples from supply wells implies that deep groundwater currently (1992) used for drinking generally does not contain detectable pesticide residues.

  3. Sand dunes on the central Delmarva Peninsula, Maryland and Delaware

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Denny, Charles Storrow; Owens, James Patrick

    1979-01-01

    Inconspicuous ancient sand dunes are present in parts of the central Delmarva Peninsula, Maryland and Delaware. Many dunes are roughly V-shaped, built by northwest winds, especially on the east sides of some of the large rivers. On the uplands, the form and spacing of the dunes are variable. A surficial blanket composed mainly of medium and fine-grained sand-the Parsonsburg Sand-forms both the ancient dunes and the broad plains between the dunes. The sand that forms the dunes is massive and intensely burrowed in the upper part; traces of horizontal or slightly inclined bedding appear near the base. Quartz is the dominant mineral constituent of the sand. Microline is abundant in the very fine to fine sand fraction. The heavy-mineral assemblages (high zircon, tourmaline, rutile) are more mature than in most of the possible source rocks. The most abundant minerals in the clay-sized fraction are dioctahedral vermiculite, kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite, and gibbsite. The first four minerals are common in deposits of late Wisconsin and Holocene age. The gibbsite may be detrital, coming from weathered rocks of Tertiary age. The soil profile in the dune sand is weakly to moderately developed. At or near the base of the Parsonsburg Sand are peaty beds that range in age from about 30,000 to about 13,000 radiocarbon years B.P. Microfloral assemblages in the peaty beds suggest that the dunes on the uplands formed in a spruce parkland during the late Wisconsin glacial maximum. The river dunes may also be of late Wisconsin age, but could be Holocene.

  4. A high resolution regional paleoclimate experiment over the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Navarro, J. J.; Montavez, J. P.; Jerez, S.; Jimenez-Guerrero, P.; Garcia-Valero, J. A.; Gonzalez-Rouco, J. F.

    2009-04-01

    During the last years the use of paleoclimate simulations with models of different complexity has become an usual tool in paleoclimate studies. Progress in understanding climate variability leans on simulation and reconstruction efforts. Exercises blending both approaches present a great potential for answering questions relevant for both the simulation and reconstruction of past climate, and depend on the specific peculiarities of proxies and methods involved in climate reconstructions, as well as on the realism and limitations of model simulations. Most of paleoclimate integrations available in the literature covering the last millennium have been performed with relative rough resolution which does not allow to analyze regional climate features that can be of interest in the context of proxies evidence. In this work we present a new high resolution (30 km) regional climate simulation over the Iberian Peninsula of the last five centuries and two extensions to the future for the A2 and B2 SRES scenarios. The regional simulations were performed with a climate version of the MM5 model coupled to the Noah LSM. The driving conditions used follow the Erik1 experiment, performed with the ECHO-G global circulation model. The results indicate that the seasonal modes of variation for near surface air temperature and precipitation obtained within the regional paleoclimate experiment are consistent with the obtained using the observational databases and equivalent to regional climate integrations driven by reanalysis data. On the other hand, the main modes of variation show strong signals in historical periods such as the Maunder and Dalton Minimum. Finally, some preliminary comparisons between the global and the regional model against tree ring temperature reconstructions are also reported in this contribution.

  5. Magnetostratigraphic Dating of Paleogene Sediments in the Seymour Island (Antarctic Peninsula): A Preliminary Chronostratigraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beamud, E.; Montes, M. J.; Santillana, S.; Nozal, F.; Marenssi, S.

    2015-12-01

    Seymour Island is located at 64 º S, close to the northeastern tip of the Antarctic Peninsula. This glacier-free island contains the southernmost exposures of the K/Pg boundary and it has the most complete record of the Paleogene in Antarctica. The base of the Paleogene is represented by the Early Paleocene shallow marine shelf deposits of the Marambio Group; which are unconformably overlain by the Late Paleocene to Late Eocene Seymour Island Group. The Marambio Group is divided into the quartz-rich silty sandstones and mudstones of the López de Bertodano Fm and the mudstones to quartz-rich sandstones of the Sobral Fm. The overlaying Seymour Island Group records the erosion and filling of incised valleys. This group is made up by the Cross Valley-Wiman, La Meseta and the uppermost new Submeseta Formations. Main regressive periods are evidenced by the erosional unconformities and their related time gaps at the base of these three Formations. The La Meseta and Submeseta Formations are composed by poorly consolidated marine sandstones and siltstones deposited in a shallow coastal (possibly estuarine) environment. Several biostratigraphic and isotopic studies have been conducted in the Seymour Island due to its extremely rich fossil record, and the age of the López de Bertodano Fm has been recently refined by magnetostratigraphy. However, the overlying Paleogene formations lack a reliable absolute continuous dating. To solve this problem, a composite magnetostratigraphic section spanning more than 1300 m from the K/Pg boundary up to the top of the Submeseta Fm was conducted, with an average sampling resolution of 3 m per site. Although many samples yielded weak results, a local magnetostratigraphy was obtained which has been correlated to the GPTS. The new derived ages range from Danian (~ 66 Ma) up to Priabonian (~ 34 Ma). These results have been integrated with previous litho-, bio- and isotopic data to build a new Paleogene chronostratigraphy for the Seymour

  6. An 8700 Year Record of Holocene Climate Variability from the Yucatan Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahl, D.; Byrne, R.; Anderson, L.

    2013-12-01

    Our understanding of Holocene climate change in the Maya lowlands of Central America has improved significantly during the last several decades thanks to the development of proxy climate records from lake cores and speleothems. One important finding is that longer-term climate changes (i.e., millennial scale) were driven primarily by precessional forcing; less clear, however, are the causes of abrupt shifts and higher frequency (centennial to decadal) change recognized in many Holocene climate reconstructions. The mechanisms driving climate change on these time scales have been difficult to identify in the region, in part because the Yucatan peninsula is influenced by climatic conditions linked to both the tropical Atlantic and Pacific oceans. Additional complications arise from the development of dense human populations following the initial introduction of agriculture ~5000 cal yr BP, which had significant impact on the environment as a whole. Here we present the results of analyses (stable isotope, pollen, magnetic susceptibility, and physical properties) of a 7.25 m sediment core from Lago Puerto Arturo, a closed basin lake in the northern Peten, Guatemala. An age-depth model, based on 6 AMS radiocarbon determinations and created using CLAM, indicates the record extends to 8700 cal yr BP. Proxy data suggest that, similar to other low latitude sites, millennial scale climate at Lago Puerto Arturo was driven by changes in insolation. Higher frequency variability is associated with El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) dynamics, reflecting latitudinal shifts in the Intertropical Convergence Zone in both the tropical North Atlantic and North Pacific. Solar forcing may also play a role in short-term climate change. The pollen and isotope records show that the entire period of prehispanic settlement and agricultural activity, i.e. ~5000-1000 cal yr B.P., was characterized by relatively dry conditions compared to before or after.

  7. Plate convergence west of Patagonia and the Antarctic Peninsula since 61 Ma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eagles, Graeme; Scott, Benjamin G. C.

    2014-12-01

    A new plate kinematic model portrays plate motions immediately west and south of Drake Passage in the southeast Pacific Ocean. Overall intermediate-to-slow rate spreading generated oceanic lithosphere as the Phoenix plate diverged from the Antarctic plate. The model shows a history of Phoenix plate motion that is interpretable as having been affected by a northeast-increasing gradient in the slab pull force since chron 18 (39 Ma), during which time newer, less dense lithosphere was subducting in the southwest than in the northeast. The model allows first calculations of Phoenix-Farallon (Nazca) plate motion parameters in the south Pacific plate circuit. Using these parameters, it is possible to show that the simplest assumptions about the ridge's segmentation, length and migration are consistent with existing suggestions of its location from consideration of slab window-related volcanism at sites in South America around 50 and 20 Ma. The parameters thus define ridge locations that can be used to define which plates were subducting beneath South America and the Magallanes and Antarctic plates, and when. We consider the relationships between the plate convergence rate, obliquity and the history of magmatism on the Antarctic Peninsula and at the North Patagonian batholith, showing that magmatic pulses can be related to accelerations in the plate convergence rate. Between these settings, Phoenix-South American plate motion was almost parallel to the Fuegian trench. Here, magmatism in Paleocene to early Miocene times must be related to the presence of a slab subducted beneath the region by the less oblique collision further north. Later magmatism can be related to migration of the Phoenix-Farallon ridge and Phoenix-Farallon-Antarctic triple junction into the area south of the Fuegian margin, which brought it into slow low-obliquity convergence with first Farallon and then Antarctic plate lithosphere.

  8. Persistent Multidecadal SST Variability Since 1775 AD Recorded in Multiple Corals from the Yucatan Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernando Vásquez-Bedoya, L.; Blanchon, P.; Oppo, D.; Cohen, A. L.

    2011-12-01

    Observational and modeling studies have shown that long term North Atlantic basin-averaged sea surface temperatures (SSTs) combine a CO2-forced global warming trend with a multi-decadal oscillation (the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation or AMO) that likely arose from internal variability. The AMO can mitigate or amplify regional climate change, and will likely play a significant role in modulating the projected 21st century North Atlantic SST increase. Numerical models have proven incapable of predicting future phase shifts in AMO in a deterministic manner and probability-based projections are hampered by the short duration of the instrumental record (130-150 years), which captures just 2 multidecadal oscillations. Longer records of past AMO behavior could help improve probability-based projections. In the absence of instrumental data (or direct observations) such records must be generated from proxy climate archives. Here we report SST reconstructions based on coral annual growth rates (linear extension) from multiple long-lived colonies of Siderastrea sideraea collected live at two sites on the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexican Caribbean. Yucatan is geographically well placed to capture AMO variability: instrumental SSTs over the last 150 years show a strong positive correlation with the AMO Index (R=0.68). We demonstrate that the annual linear growth rates of three coral colonies are significantly inversely correlated with SST, and the correlation is strongest on decadal timescales. We use annual linear growth rates to extend the SST record to 1775 AD. Finally, our marine-based record of multidecadal variability compare favorably with recently published records of paleo-AMO based on terrestrial proxies. Our results provide strong motivation for extending growth-based proxy records of Atlantic SST further back in time using a combination of longer-lived S. siderea at select locations, and deceased colonies that can be independently dated by Uranium-series to extend the

  9. Mosquitoes associated with ditch-plugged and control tidal salt marshes on the Delmarva Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Leisnham, Paul T; Sandoval-Mohapatra, Sarah

    2011-08-01

    A study was conducted during the summer of 2009 (from July to September) to characterize mosquito communities among different habitats in five historically ditched tidal salt marshes and three adjacent wooded areas in the E.A. Vaughn Wetland Management Area on the Maryland Delmarva Peninsula, USA. Study marshes are characteristic of Atlantic coastal salt marshes that had undergone grid ditching from the 1930s to 1950s. In the autumn of 2008 (October and November) ditches were plugged near their outlets in two ('experimental') marshes with the aim to restore their natural tidal hydrology. The three other marshes were not plugged. Marshes were sampled from July to September in 2009 by using standard dip count method. A total of 2,457 mosquito larvae representing six species were collected on 15.4% (86/557) of all sample occasions and 399 adults representing four mosquito species were collected from landing counts. Aedes sollicitans, Anopheles bradleyi and Culex salinarius were the most common species collected in larval habitats, and Ae. sollicitans was the most common adult collected. Wooded habitats had more total mosquitoes, were also more frequently occupied by mosquitoes and had higher densities of mosquitoes than marsh habitats. Almost all larvae collected from marshes were from one experimental and one control site. The majority of larvae at the control site were Ae. sollicitans in marsh pannes while Cx. salinarius, An. bradleyi, Ae. cantator, and Ae. sollicitans were collected in high numbers from ditches at the experimental site. We found a difference in the proportion of marsh pannes occupied by Ae. sollicitans but not total mosquitoes sampled 4-5 days after spring tide events than on other occasions. Salinity measures of 42 larval habitats showed lower median salinity in mosquito-occupied habitats (11.5 ppt) than unoccupied habitats (20.1 ppt), and in habitats in wooded areas followed by ditches and pannes in marsh areas. The results of this study suggest

  10. The microphysics of clouds over the Antarctic Peninsula - Part 1: Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachlan-Cope, Tom; Listowski, Constantino; O'Shea, Sebastian

    2016-12-01

    Observations of clouds over the Antarctic Peninsula during summer 2010 and 2011 are presented here. The peninsula is up to 2500 m high and acts as a barrier to weather systems approaching from the Pacific sector of the Southern Ocean. Observations of the number of ice and liquid particles as well as the ice water content and liquid water content in the clouds from both sides of the peninsula and from both years were compared. In 2011 there were significantly more water drops and ice crystals, particularly in the east, where there were approximately twice the number of drops and ice crystals in 2011.Ice crystals observations as compared to ice nuclei parameterizations suggest that secondary ice multiplication at temperatures around -5 °C is important for ice crystal formation on both sides of the peninsula below 2000 m. Also, back trajectories have shown that in 2011 the air masses over the peninsula were more likely to have passed close to the surface over the sea ice in the Weddell Sea. This suggests that the sea-ice-covered Weddell Sea can act as a source of both cloud condensation nuclei and ice-nucleating particles.

  11. Climate variability, warming and ice melt on the Antarctic Peninsula over the last millennium (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abram, N.; Mulvaney, R.; Wolff, E. W.; Triest, J.; Kipfstuhl, S.; Trusel, L. D.; Vimeux, F.; Fleet, L.; Arrowsmith, C.

    2013-12-01

    The Antarctic Peninsula has experienced rapid warming over the past 50 years, which has led to extensive summer ice melt, the collapse of ice shelves and the acceleration of glacial outflow. But the short observational records of Antarctic climate don't allow for an understanding of how unusual the recent conditions may be. We present reconstructions of temperature and melt history since 1000 AD from a highly resolved ice core record from James Ross Island on the northeastern Antarctic Peninsula. The spatial pattern of temperature variability across networks of palaeoclimate reconstructions demonstrates that the Southern Annular Mode (SAM) has been an important driver of Antarctic Peninsula climate variability over a range of time scales. Rapid warming of the Antarctic Peninsula since the mid-20th century is consistent with strengthening of the SAM by a combination of greenhouse and later ozone forcing. The rare reconstruction of summer melting, from visible melt layers in the ice core, demonstrates the non-linear response of ice melt to increasing summer temperatures. Melting in the region is now more intense than at any other time over the last 1000 years and suggests that the Antarctic Peninsula is now particularly susceptible to rapid increases in ice loss in response to relatively small increases in mean temperature.

  12. Pan American Airways/Naval Air Transport Service/destroyer base site at the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Pan American Airways/Naval Air Transport Service/destroyer base site at the east side showing walkway and building foundation. View facing west-northwest. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Pearl City Peninsula, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  13. Synergetic monitoring of Saharan dust plumes and potential impact on surface: a case study of dust transport from Canary Islands to Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Córdoba-Jabonero, C.; Sorribas, M.; Guerrero-Rascado, J. L.; Adame, J. A.; Hernández, Y.; Lyamani, H.; Cachorro, V.; Gil, M.; Alados-Arboledas, L.; Cuevas, E.; de La Morena, B.

    2010-11-01

    Synergetic use of meteorological information, remote sensing both ground-based active (lidar) and passive (sun-photometry) techniques together with backtrajectory analysis and in situ measurements is carried out for the characterization of dust intrusions. A case study of air masses advected from Saharan region to the Canary Islands and the Iberian Peninsula, relatively located close and far away from the dust sources, respectively, was monitored from 11 to 19 March 2008. The observations were performed over three Spanish geographically strategic within the dust-influenced area stations along a common dust plume pathway. A 4-day long dust event (13-16 March) over the Santa Cruz de Tenerife Observatory (SCO), and a linked short 1-day dust episode (14 March) in the Southern Iberian Peninsula over both the Atmospheric Sounding Station "El Arenosillo" (ARN) and the Granada station (GRA) were detected. Meteorological situation favoured the dust plume transport over the area under study. Backtrajectory analysis clearly showed the Saharan origin of the dust intrusion. Under the Saharan air masses influence, AERONET Aerosol Optical Depth at 500 nm (AOD500) ranged from 0.3 to 0.6 and Angstrom Exponent at 440/675 nm wavelength pair (AE440/675) was lower than 0.5, indicating a high loading and predominance of coarse particles during those dusty events. Lidar observations characterized their vertical layering structure, identifying different aerosol contributions depending on altitude. In particular, the 3-km height layer observed over ARN and GRA stations corresponds to that dust plume transported from Saharan region after crossing through Canary Islands at 3 km height as observed over SCO site as well. No significant differences were found in the lidar (extinction-to-backscatter) ratio (LR) estimation for that dust plume over all stations when a suitable aerosol scenario for lidar data retrieval is selected. Lidar-retrieved LR values of 65-70 sr were obtained during the

  14. Spatial climate dynamics in the Iberian Peninsula since 15 000 yr BP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarroso, Pedro; Carrión, José; Dorado-Valiño, Miriam; Queiroz, Paula; Santos, Luisa; Valdeolmillos-Rodríguez, Ana; Célio Alves, Paulo; Brito, José Carlos; Cheddadi, Rachid

    2016-05-01

    Climate changes in the Iberian Peninsula since the Last Glacial Maximum are associated with distributional shifts of major Mediterranean and European temperate species. The dynamic relationship between climate and species in the past may be retrieved from the fossil records available in the Iberian Peninsula. We have used an extensive set of pollen records to reconstruct spatial layers (1 kyr interval) of January minimum temperature, July maximum temperature, and annual precipitation over the time period between 15 and 3 ka. A functional principal component analysis was used to summarise the spatial evolution of climate in areas that share similar climate trends. When compared between them, the identified four areas show different climate trends over the studied period and are coherent with the existence of multiple refugial areas within the Iberian Peninsula.

  15. Evaluation of high-resolution MetUM and AMPS forecasts of near-surface meteorological variables over Larsen C ice shelf and northern Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orr, Andrew; Kirchgaessner, Amelie; King, John; Weeks, Mark; Gadian, Alan; Kuipers Munneke, Peter; van den Broeke, Michiel; Steffen, Konrad

    2016-04-01

    High-resolution weather forecasts are an important tool for understanding the detailed patterns of surface melt on the Larsen C ice shelf (LCIS), Antarctic Peninsula. We investigate the skill of UK Met Office Unified Model (MetUM) and Antarctic Mesoscale Prediction System (AMPS) forecasts with horizontal grid spacing of 4-5 km for a 1 month period during January-February 2011 by comparing near-surface model output to automatic weather station measurements at 5 sites on the LCIS and 3 on the northern Antarctic Peninsula. Forecasts for the range 12-24 h showed a fairly homogeneous performance over the LCIS. The 2 m temperature simulated by AMPS has a correlation with observations of 0.5-0.6 and a systematic cold bias of around -1 degrees centigrade. By comparison, the MetUM had a higher correlation and was less negatively biased. The simulated surface pressure has a correlation of 0.99 and small biases in both models. AMPS yielded better results than the MetUM for 10 m wind speed, being able to capture particularly well synoptically-driven high wind speeds which the MetUM systematically underestimated. Both models struggle to simulate the 10 m wind direction when the wind conditions are highly variable. The simulation of specific humidity by both models was poor. Both models showed a general reduction in performance over the northern Antarctic Peninsula compared to the LCIS. Extending the analysis to consider the 12-36 h forecast range demonstrated a relatively weak dependence of model skill to the length of the forecast. The study focuses particularly on the representation of foehn wind events, which are an important contributor to surface melt over the LCIS, by examining additional ~1 km scale forecasts using the MetUM.

  16. Fossil tubeworms link coastal uplift of the northern Noto Peninsula to rupture of the Wajima-oki fault in AD 1729

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, Masaaki; Hiramatsu, Yoshihiro; Oda, Mitsuhiro; Yamaguchi, Hiroyuki

    2016-02-01

    The active fault zone on the seafloor off the northern coast of the Noto Peninsula of central Japan is divided into four segments from west to east: Monzen-oki, Saruyama-oki, Wajima-oki, and Suzu-oki. To examine the latest event that occurred in these segments, we investigated the dates and elevations of fossilized intertidal tubeworms along the northern coast of the Noto Peninsula, located on the hanging-wall sides of the faults, using radioactive carbon dating and global positioning measurements. For each fossil, we calculated the difference between the past and present elevation, thereby estimating the elevation of the sea level at the date of the fossil, using a curve for sea level change. This calculation provided us with the elevation change at each site. The vertical changes estimated from the elevations and ages of the intertidal tubeworms revealed that the coastal emergence probably occurred between 1600 and 1800 AD. This area of coastal emergence lies adjacent to active faults within the Wajima-oki segment. A model for rectangular faults with three fault planes and a moment magnitude of 6.6 for the Wajima-oki segment reproduced the observed pattern of coastal emergence well. Only one damaging earthquake, that in 1729, is known to have occurred in this part of the northern Noto Peninsula between 1600 and 1800 AD, and there has not been one since 1800 AD. The slip distribution of the fault predicted by the model is consistent with the distribution of shaking-related damage documented in 1729. We conclude that rupture of the Wajima-oki segment caused the 1729 earthquake.

  17. Evaluation's Contribution to the Success of a Silicon Valley School/Industry Partnership: The Peninsula Academies Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Steven M.; And Others

    In an effort to encourage the participation of educationally disadvantaged youth in the Silicon Valley's high technology employment boom, the Peninsula Academies program was established utilizing a triad-partnership arrangement among the Sequoia Union High School District, high technology employers in the area, and the Stanford Mid-Peninsula Urban…

  18. 50 CFR Figure 6 to Subpart E of... - Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian Islands Rural and Non-Rural Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian Islands Rural and Non-Rural Areas 6 Figure 6 to Subpart E of Part 300 Wildlife and Fisheries INTERNATIONAL..., Subpt. E, Fig. 6 Figure 6 to Subpart E of Part 300—Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian Islands Rural and...

  19. 75 FR 71107 - Upper Peninsula Power Company; UP Hydro; Notice of Application for Transfer of License, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-22

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Upper Peninsula Power Company; UP Hydro; Notice of Application for Transfer..., Upper Peninsula Power Company (transferor) and UP Hydro (transferee) filed an application for transfer.... Alsberg, North American Hydro Holdings, Inc., 116 State Street, Neshkoro, WI 54960, (920) 293-4628 Ext....

  20. Linking seasonal climate forecasts with crop models in Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capa, Mirian; Ines, Amor; Baethgen, Walter; Rodriguez-Fonseca, Belen; Han, Eunjin; Ruiz-Ramos, Margarita

    2015-04-01

    Translating seasonal climate forecasts into agricultural production forecasts could help to establish early warning systems and to design crop management adaptation strategies that take advantage of favorable conditions or reduce the effect of adverse conditions. In this study, we use seasonal rainfall forecasts and crop models to improve predictability of wheat yield in the Iberian Peninsula (IP). Additionally, we estimate economic margins and production risks associated with extreme scenarios of seasonal rainfall forecast. This study evaluates two methods for disaggregating seasonal climate forecasts into daily weather data: 1) a stochastic weather generator (CondWG), and 2) a forecast tercile resampler (FResampler). Both methods were used to generate 100 (with FResampler) and 110 (with CondWG) weather series/sequences for three scenarios of seasonal rainfall forecasts. Simulated wheat yield is computed with the crop model CERES-wheat (Ritchie and Otter, 1985), which is included in Decision Support System for Agrotechnology Transfer (DSSAT v.4.5, Hoogenboom et al., 2010). Simulations were run at two locations in northeastern Spain where the crop model was calibrated and validated with independent field data. Once simulated yields were obtained, an assessment of farmer's gross margin for different seasonal climate forecasts was accomplished to estimate production risks under different climate scenarios. This methodology allows farmers to assess the benefits and risks of a seasonal weather forecast in IP prior to the crop growing season. The results of this study may have important implications on both, public (agricultural planning) and private (decision support to farmers, insurance companies) sectors. Acknowledgements Research by M. Capa-Morocho has been partly supported by a PICATA predoctoral fellowship of the Moncloa Campus of International Excellence (UCM-UPM) and MULCLIVAR project (CGL2012-38923-C02-02) References Hoogenboom, G. et al., 2010. The Decision

  1. Neotectonics and fluvial geomorphology of the Northern Sinai Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusky, T.; El-Baz, F.

    2000-08-01

    Large anticlinal ridges of Jurassic-Tertiary limestone in the northern Sinai Peninsula are part of the Syrian Arc Fold Belt, parts of which have been active intermittently from Late Cretaceous through the present. Recent uplift of the Syrian Arc Fold Belt is supported by quantitative indices of active tectonics including low values of mountain front sinuosity and, by recent seismicity, extending southwest past Cairo into the Fayoum Depression. The northern Sinai Desert has a climate similar to that of the adjacent part of the eastern Sahara. Sand sheets and dune fields cover its northwestern part, which is a depression extending from the Suez Canal to Wadi El-Arish. Numerous dry channels of palaeorivers and streams lead into this depression, where several temporary palaeolakes and flood overbank deposits have been identified. Some of the temporary pluvial palaeolakes developed behind natural dams formed by folds of the Syrian Arc, whereas others filled deeply-eroded fault traces. Migration of sand dunes may have blocked some channels, but the location of the dunes seems to be controlled by Recent uplift of parts of the fold belt, with the dunes residing in synclinal depressions and adjacent to fault scarps. The palaeolakes are correlated more with structures than with active dune fields. Wadi El-Arish abandoned a channel west of its present-day course, perhaps because of recent growth and uplift of the Gebel Halal Fold. This abandonment was synchronous with down-cutting of a gorge through Gebel Halal, which follows conjugate faults formed during uplift of an anticline. The presence of standing water during wetter climates in the past is supported by silt deposits and archaeological evidence of previous human habitation. The newly identified lake margin and fluvial sediments could be important targets for studying early-modern human and Neanderthal activities. In the eastern Sahara, cycles of pluvial periods that date back 320,000 years appear to correspond to

  2. Assessment of the Climate Vulnerabilities of the Arabian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alharbi, T.; Sultan, M.; Ahmed, M.; Chouinard, K.

    2014-12-01

    The Arabian Peninsula (AP), like many places around the world, is apparently witnessing the impacts (amount, patterns, and frequency of precipitation) of global warming. Precipitation over the AP is largely controlled by two main wind regimes, the winter (October to March) northerlies or northwesterlies, hereafter referred to as westerlies, and the summer (April to September) monsoonal wind regimes. The global monthly Climate Prediction Centers (CPC) Merged Analysis of Precipitation (CMAP) data (spatial resolution: 2.5° × 2.5°; temporal resolution: monthly; operational period: January 1979 to November 2011) was used to investigate the nature and magnitude of precipitation variations over the AP throughout 1979 - 2010. Trends in CMAP-derived precipitation patterns were examined over the winter and summer seasons throughout Periods I (1979-1995) and II (1996-2010). Reversals in precipitation patterns were observed in Periods I and II, where areas witnessing an increase in precipitation in Period I showed a decrease in precipitation throughout Period II, and vice versa for the remaining areas. Our findings suggest: (1) an increase in precipitation during Period I over the southeastern and southwestern coastal areas of AP (e.g., Muscat, Sanaa, and Jeddah) that is probably related to the intensification of the monsoons at the expense of the westerlies, (2) an increase in precipitation during Period II over the northwestern and southeastern of AP (e.g., northwestern Saudi Arabia, Empty Quarter, western and southwestern Oman, and eastern Yemen) is here attributed to intensification of the westerlies, and 3) the general similarity of annual trend patterns to the summer trend (Period I) and to winter trend (Period II) suggest that the annual trends are largely controlled by monsoonal wind regimes in Period I and by the westerlies in Period II. Outputs (i.e., precipitation) of climatic models (CCSM4.0) over the AP are being extracted (for upcoming 100 years) , downscaled

  3. Recent trends of extreme temperature indices for the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, D.; Carvalho, M. J.; Marta-Almeida, M.; Melo-Gonçalves, P.; Rocha, A.

    2016-08-01

    Climate change and extreme climate events have a significant impact on societies and ecosystems. As a result, climate change projections, especially related with extreme temperature events, have gained increasing importance due to their impacts on the well-being of the population and ecosystems. However, most studies in the field are based on coarse global climate models (GCMs). In this study, we perform a high resolution downscaling simulation to evaluate recent trends of extreme temperature indices. The model used was Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) forced by MPI-ESM-LR, which has been shown to be one of the more robust models to simulate European climate. The domain used in the simulations includes the Iberian Peninsula and the simulation covers the 1986-2005 period (i.e. recent past). In order to study extreme temperature events, trends were computed using the Theil-Sen method for a set of temperature indexes defined by the Expert Team on Climate Change Detection and Indices (ETCCDI). For this, daily values of minimum and maximum temperatures were used. The trends of the indexes were computed for annual and seasonal values and the Mann-Kendall Trend test was used to evaluate their statistical significance. In order to validate the results, a second simulation, in which WRF was forced by ERA-Interim, was performed. The results suggest an increase in the number of warm days and warm nights, especially during summer and negative trends for cold nights and cold days for the summer and spring. For the winter, contrary to the expected, the results suggest an increase in cold days and cold nights (warming hiatus). This behavior is supported by the WRF simulation forced by ERA-Interim for the autumn days, pointing to an extension of the warming hiatus phenomenon to the remaining seasons. These results should be used with caution since the period used to calculate the trends may not be long enough for this purpose. However, the general sign of trends are similar for

  4. Holocene Temperature Record of the North Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willmott, V.; Kim, J.; Domack, E. W.; Sinninghe Damsté, J. S.; Schouten, S.

    2009-12-01

    Because sea temperature plays a critical role not only on the stability of ice shelves and sea ice formation, but as well on the marine ecology of polar areas, a lot of effort has been placed to reconstruct the past climate using proxies from ice, marine and terrestrial records. However, it has been difficult to apply traditional paleoenvironmental proxies in polar areas because of problems that include insufficient dating of recovered sequences, complexities introduced by glacial activity (i.e. glacial erosion), sea-ice cover and poor calcium carbonate preservation. Despite these difficulties, some paleoenvironmental records have been obtained so far although paleotemperature records are still very scarce. The TEX86 (TetraEther indeX of lipids with 86 carbon atoms), is an organic-based paleothermomether (Schouten et al., 2002) based on the relative distribution of archaeal lipids (GDGTs) biosynthesized by marine Crenarchaeota, one of the main prokaryotes of today’s oceans. Although the use of TEX86 in polar areas may be promising because it can be measured in carbonate poor sediments, its global correlation with sea surface temperature (SST) (Kim et al., 2008) revealed that the relationship between TEX86 values and SSTs over the entire temperature range was non-linear, mainly because below 5°C, i.e. in the polar oceans, changes in TEX86 were relatively minor with temperature. Recently, we obtained new insights on the relation between isoprenoid GDGTs and SST in polar oceans using an extended core-top sediment dataset which has lead to a new GDGT index which minimizes the scatter at low temperatures. We applied this new index to obtain a detailed Holocene SST record from well dated sediment cores from the north western Antarctic Peninsula. Temperature ranges show absolute temperature estimates (between -1 and 6 °C) in agreement with present day temperature range, reaching warmer temperatures between 6 to 8 ky. Cooler temperatures of about 2 °C dominates the

  5. Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia 3-D Perspective with Landsat Overlay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This three-dimensional perspective view, looking up the Tigil River, shows the western side of the volcanically active Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia. The image shows that the Tigil River has eroded down from a higher and differing landscape and now flows through, rather than around the large green-colored bedrock ridge in the foreground. The older surface was likely composed of volcanic ash and debris from eruptions of nearby volcanoes. The green tones indicate that denser vegetation grows on south facing sunlit slopes at the northern latitudes. High resolution SRTM elevation data will be used by geologists to study how rivers shape the landscape, and by ecologists to study the influence of topography on ecosystems.

    This image shows how data collected by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) can be used to enhance other satellite images. Color and natural shading are provided by a Landsat 7 image acquired on January 31, 2000. Terrain perspective and shading were derived from SRTM elevation data acquired on February 12, 2000. Topography is exaggerated by about six times vertically. The United States Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observations Systems (EROS) DataCenter, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, provided the Landsat data.

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11,2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission is designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) and the German (DLR) and Italian (ASI) space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet

  6. Dynamics of the Iberian Peninsula Coastal Low-Level Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semedo, Alvaro; Rijo, Nádia; Miranda, Pedro; Lima, Daniela C. A.; Cardoso, Rita; Soares, Pedro

    2016-04-01

    Coastal low-level jets (CLLJ) are important mesoscale phenomena of some regional coastal climates. They are characterized by a coast-parallel flow which has a wind speed maxima within the first few hundred meters above sea level (usually below 1000 m, and most of the times around 500 m), encapsulated within the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL). Coastal jets have a larger scale synoptic forcing behind them: a high pressure system over the ocean and a thermal low inland. The regions where CLLJ occur coincide with cold equator-ward eastern boundary currents in the mid-latitudes (with an exception of the coast of Oman in the Arabian Sea), where the contrast between the cold ocean and the warm land in the summer is highest. As a response of CLLJ occurrences a positive feedback mechanism is triggered: the coast-parallel wind induces upwelling currents at the coast, reducing the sea surface temperature, which in turn increase the thermal (pressure) gradient at the coast, leading to higher wind speeds. The Iberian Peninsula Coastal Jet (IPCJ) is an example of a CLLJ, developed mostly during the summer season due to the effect of the semi-present Azores high-pressure system in the North Atlantic and of a thermal low pressure system inland. This synoptic pattern drives a seasonal (western) coast parallel wind, often called the Nortada (northerly wind), where the IPCJ develops. A detailed analysis of the IPCJ structure and dynamics will be presented, trough the analysis of two case studies off the west coast of Portugal. The case studies are simulated using the WRF mesoscale model, at 9 and 3 km horizontal resolution, forced by the ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts) ERA-Interim reanalysis. The MABL structure off the west coast of Iberia, the interaction of the flow with the two main west Iberia capes (Finisterre and Roca), and the consequences on the cloud cover and wind speed up- and down-wind of the capes will be analysed.

  7. Recent observed climate change over the Arabian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsarmi, Said; Washington, Richard

    2011-06-01

    We have examined trends in temperature and precipitation parameters for the Arabian Peninsula (AP) during the last 2 to 3 decades. The data set has been carefully quality controlled and checked for homogeneity. Although of low density (21 stations) and relatively short time period, a clear picture of climate change in the region has emerged. The general pattern of the AP mean annual temperature trend is one of warming, with 14 of 21 stations show statistically significant warming at 0.05 level and most at 0.001 level and only one (Seeb) showing statistically significant cooling. The highest statistically significant mean annual warming trends are found in Oman (Sur = 1.03°C decade-1) and Emirates (Dubai = 0.81°C decade-1). The season of maximum warming in mean temperature is March to April. The highest monthly mean temperature trend in the AP occurs in Sur in May (1.47°C decade-1). There is a broad statistically significant increase in mean annual maximum temperature in AP in 12 out of 21 stations, with the highest trends in central and eastern/southeastern AP. Only SW AP and the Gulf of Oman do not show warming. The highest monthly maximum temperature trend in the AP occurs in Bahrain in March (2.27°C decade-1). The second highest significant warming trends are reported in Doha in February (1.54°C decade-1). For minimum temperature, 16 out of 21 stations show statistically significant warming trends, with the highest annual trends observed in the Emirates (Dubai = 1.24°C decade-1), northwest Oman (Sohar = 1.17°C decade-1) and Qatar (Doha = 1.13°C decade-1). The highest monthly minimum temperature warming rate occurred in October. Both Dubai and Kuwait reported the highest significant rate of 2.00°C decade-1. The general mean annual diurnal temperature range trend is negative in the AP, with six out of 21 stations show statistically significant negative trends while three stations show statistically significant positive trends. Trends in mean annual

  8. Regionalisation of precipitation for the Iberian Peninsula and climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parracho, A. C.; Melo-Gonçalves, P.; Rocha, A.

    2016-08-01

    Temporal variability of precipitation over the Iberian Peninsula (IP) has high spatial gradients. Therefore, statistics of the temporal behaviour of precipitation and derived quantities over the IP must be estimated taking into account these spatial gradients. Some statistics can be displayed over a map. However there are statistics, such as Probability Density Functions at each location of the IP, that are impossible to display in a map. Because of this, it is mandatory to reduce the number of degrees of freedom which, in this case, consists of a reduction of the time series representative of the IP domain. In this work, we present a spatial partition of the IP region into areas of similar precipitation. For that, an observed dataset of daily-total precipitation for the years between 1951 and 2003 was used. The land-only high resolution data was obtained on a regular grid with 0.2° resolution in the IP domain. This data was subjected to a k-means Cluster Analysis in order to divide the IP into K regions. The clustering was performed using the squared Euclidean distance. Four clusters of IP grid points, defining 4 IP regions, were identified. The grid points in each region share the same time-varying behaviour which is different from region to region. The annual precipitation discriminates the following regions: (1) north Iberia, (2) a large region extending from the centre to the Mediterranean shores of the IP, (3) a large region ranging from the centre to the western and southwestern shores of the Iberia, and (4) northwest Iberia. The regions obtained for the four seasons of the year are similar. These results are consistent with the thermodynamic characteristics described in the available literature. These Iberian regions were used to assess climate change of seasonal precipitation from the multi-model ensemble of the fifteen simulations provided by the European project ENSEMBLES. Probability Density Functions of annual- and seasonal-total precipitation

  9. Deformation Bands in Subglacially Erupted Hyaloclastite Ridges, Reykjanes Peninsula, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, J.; Kattenhorn, S. A.

    2010-12-01

    Pleistocene glaciation across the Reykjanes Peninsula, where the mid-Atlantic spreading ridge comes onshore in SW Iceland, created an environment for subglacial fissure eruptions along the plate boundary. The addition of meltwater to the eruption process resulted in fragmentation of magma and the creation of hyaloclastites and hyalotuff: subaqueous hydroclastic deposits, which are inherently weak and poorly consolidated. The resultant hyaloclastite ridges (also called mobergs or tindar) form linear hills (generally <300 m high) oriented NE-SW in response to sinistral-oblique spreading across the ENE-WSW plate boundary. Faults, fissures, and joints within Holocene lavas in low-lying areas around the hyaloclastite ridges show consistent patterns that can be related to theoretical stress fields associated with oblique spreading. However, deformation features within the hyaloclastite ridges show fracture orientations commonly inconsistent with those in the intervening lava plains, suggesting a more complex deformation history. We focus on prevalent deformation bands (DBs), which are strain localization features (tabular bands of cataclasis and porosity reduction) predominately studied in porous siliciclastic rocks. We advocate that DBs in the hyaloclastite and hyalotuff sequences of these mobergs play a critical role in their deformation in response to tectonic, magmatic, and gravitational influences. DBs forming in hyaloclastite and hyalotuff are unique in character compared to analogous features in porous granular sedimentary rock. For example, DBs in sandstone generally result in at most a few millimeters of offset along a single DB. However, offsets of up to several meters occur along DBs of comparable thickness (<1 cm) within the hyaloclastite and hyalotuff. This distinct characteristic of these bands indicates a fundamentally different evolutionary process than occurs in sedimentary rock, likely in response to the breakdown of weak glassy fragments (sideromelane

  10. Retreating glacier fronts on the Antarctic Peninsula over the past half-century

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cook, A.J.; Fox, A.J.; Vaughan, D.G.; Ferrigno, J.G.

    2005-01-01

    The continued retreat of ice shelves on the Antarctic Peninsula has been widely attributed to recent atmospheric warming, but there is little published work describing changes in glacier margin positions. We present trends in 244 marine glacier fronts on the peninsula and associated islands over the past 61 years. Of these glaciers, 87% have retreated and a clear boundary between mean advance and retreat has migrated progressively southward. The pattern is broadly compatible with retreat driven by atmospheric warming, but the rapidity of the migration suggests that this may not be the sole driver of glacier retreat in this region.

  11. GPS and GIS-Based Data Collection and Image Mapping in the Antarctic Peninsula

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanchez, Richard D.

    1999-01-01

    High-resolution satellite images combined with the rapidly evolving global positioning system (GPS) and geographic information system (GIS) technology may offer a quick and effective way to gather information in Antarctica. GPS- and GIS-based data collection systems are used in this project to determine their applicability for gathering ground truthing data in the Antarctic Peninsula. These baseline data will be used in a later study to examine changes in penguin habitats resulting in part from regional climate warming. The research application in this study yields important information on the usefulness and limits of data capture and high-resolution images for mapping in the Antarctic Peninsula.

  12. An outbreak of type E botulism among common loons (Gavia immer) in Michigan's Upper Peninsula

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brand, Christopher J.; Schmitt, Stephen; Duncan, Ruth M.; Cooley, Thomas M.

    1988-01-01

    An epizootic of type E botulism (Clostridium botulinum) occurred among common loons (Gavia immer) along the Lake Michigan shore of Michigan's Upper Peninsula (USA) during October and November 1983. An estimated 592 dead loons washed ashore along the Garden Peninsula. Type E botulinal toxin was demonstrated in blood samples and stomach contents of dead loons, and in samples of three species of dead fish found on the Lake Michigan shore. We suspect that loons acquired botulism by ingesting sick or dead fish containing type E toxin.

  13. Seasonality of blue and fin whale calls and the influence of sea ice in the Western Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Širović, Ana; Hildebrand, John A.; Wiggins, Sean M.; McDonald, Mark A.; Moore, Sue E.; Thiele, Deborah

    2004-08-01

    The calling seasonality of blue ( Balaenoptera musculus) and fin ( B. physalus) whales was assessed using acoustic data recorded on seven autonomous acoustic recording packages (ARPs) deployed from March 2001 to February 2003 in the Western Antarctic Peninsula. Automatic detection and acoustic power analysis methods were used for determining presence and absence of whale calls. Blue whale calls were detected year round, on average 177 days per year, with peak calling in March and April, and a secondary peak in October and November. Lowest calling rates occurred between June and September, and in December. Fin whale calling rates were seasonal with calls detected between February and June (on average 51 days/year), and peak calling in May. Sea ice formed a month later and retreated a month earlier in 2001 than in 2002 over all recording sites. During the entire deployment period, detected calls of both species of whales showed negative correlation with sea ice concentrations at all sites, suggesting an absence of blue and fin whales in areas covered with sea ice. A conservative density estimate of calling whales from the acoustic data yields 0.43 calling blue whales per 1000 n mi 2 and 1.30 calling fin whales per 1000 n mi 2, which is about one-third higher than the density of blue whales and approximately equal to the density of fin whales estimated from the visual surveys.

  14. Borehole temperatures reveal details of 20th century warming at Bruce Plateau, Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagorodnov, V.; Nagornov, O.; Scambos, T. A.; Muto, A.; Mosley-Thompson, E.; Pettit, E. C.; Tyuflin, S.

    2012-06-01

    Two ice core boreholes of 143.18 m and 447.73 m (bedrock) were drilled during the 2009-2010 austral summer on the Bruce Plateau at a location named LARISSA Site Beta (66°02' S, 64°04' W, 1975.5 m a.s.l.). Both boreholes were logged with thermistors shortly after drilling. The shallow borehole was instrumented for 4 months with a series of resistance thermometers with satellite uplink. Surface temperature proxy data derived from an inversion of the borehole temperature profiles are compared to available multi-decadal records from weather stations and ice cores located along a latitudinal transect of the Antarctic Peninsula to West Antarctica. The LARISSA Site Beta profiles show temperatures decreasing from the surface downward through the upper third of the ice, and warming thereafter to the bed. The average temperature for the most recent year is -14.78°C (measured at 15 m depth, abbreviated T15). A minimum temperature of -15.8°C is measured at 173 m depth, and basal temperature is estimated to be -10.2°C. Current mean annual temperature and the gradient in the lower part of the measured temperature profile have a best fit with an accumulation rate of 1.9×103 kg m-2 a-1 and basal heat flux (q) of 88 mW m-2, if steady-state conditions are assumed. However, the mid-level temperature variations show that recent temperature has varied significantly. Reconstructed surface temperatures (Ts=T15) over the last 200 yr are derived by an inversion technique (Tikhonov and Samarskii, 1990). From this, we find that cold temperatures (minimum Ts=-16.2°C) prevailed from ~1920 to ~1940, followed by a gradual rise of temperature to -14.2°C around 1995, then cooling over the following decade and warming in the last few years. The coldest period was preceded by a relatively warm 19th century at T15≥-15°C. To facilitate regional comparisons of the surface temperature history, we use our T15 data and nearby weather station records to refine estimates of lapse rates

  15. 77 FR 65359 - Olympic Peninsula Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-26

    ... members serve without compensation, but may be reimbursed for travel expenses. Members must be Washington.... Interested participants should submit the required AD 755 application, available on the forest's Web site...

  16. 78 FR 10595 - Olympic Peninsula Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-14

    ... members serve without compensation, but may be reimbursed for travel expenses. Members must be Washington.... Interested participants should submit the required AD 755 application, available on the forest's Web site...

  17. U‒Pb age of detrital zircons from Upper Precambrian deposits of the Sredni and Rybachi peninsulas (northern margin of the Kola Peninsula)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailenko, Yu. V.; Soboleva, A. A.; Hourigan, J. K.

    2016-09-01

    The first U‒Pb dates are obtained for detrital zircons from Upper Precambrian deposits of the Sredni (Zemlepakhtinskaya and Kuyakan formations) and Rybachi (Lonskii Formation) peninsulas. The spectra of ages of detrital zircons in sandstone samples from the Zemlepakhtinskaya and Kuyakan formations are similar to a significant extent to each other, which implies the dominant role of the same provenances. Most zircon grains are the Paleoproterozoic and Mesoproterozoic in age; some of them are characterized by Mesoarchean and Neoarchean ages. Zircons dated back to 1.0‒2.0 Ga with maxima at approximately 1.8, 1.5, 1.3, and 1.1 Ga are the most abundant. The youngest zircon grains are the Mesoproterozoic in age: 1050 ± 21Ma (i.e., close to the Mesoproterozoic‒Neoproterozoic boundary) and 1028 ± 21 Ma from the Zemlepakhtinskaya and Kuyakan formations, respectively. The distribution spectrum of ages obtained for zircons from sandstones of the Lonskii Formation significantly differs from that characteristic of zircons from sandstones of the Zemlepakhtinskaya and Kuyakan formations. The zircon population from the Lonskii Formation is dominated by detrital zircons with Neoarchean and Paleoproterozoic ages (2.8‒1.6 Ga); Paleoarchean and Mesoarchean grains are scarce. Their age maxima are registered at levels of approximately 2.7 and 1.8 Ga. The minimum age obtained for zircons from sandstones of the Lonskii Formation (1349 ± 35 Ma) allows the Rybachi block to be considered as being older as compared with the Sredni bock. Crystalline complexes of the Baltic Shield served as a main provenance for the Upper Precambrian deposits of the peninsulas under consideration. The dates obtained for detrital zircons from the Upper Precambrian deposits of the Sredni and Rybachi peninsulas are compared with similar data on the Upper Precambrian sequences of the Timan and Varanger Peninsula areas to reveal differences and similarities in the distribution of ages.

  18. Episodic Tremor and Slip on the Cocos-Caribbean Subduction zone as measured by a GPS and Seismic Network on the Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Psencik, K. C.; Dixon, T. H.; Schwartz, S.; Protti, M.; Gonzalez, V.; Walter, J.; Biggs, J.

    2008-05-01

    The close proximity of the Nicoya Peninsula land mass to the Cocos-Caribbean subduction zone plate boundary makes it a prime location to use GPS to study such plate boundary processes as locking zone dynamics and episodic tremor and slip. Nicoya Peninsula currently has an operating network of 12 continuous GPS (CGPS) and 10 seismic stations designed to identify and characterize the pattern of episodic tremor and slip (ETS) events along the seismogenic zone under Costa Rica's Pacific Margin. The CGPS stations have varying degrees of equipment and communication. Of the 12 sites, four are equipped with SIM cards and modems for direct download capabilities, one of which is connected to a router for direct internet access. This site, LMNL, located in Limonal, is being monitored on the PBO network by UNAVCO with all of the quality and systems checks that this implies. All sites with NetRS receivers are currently partitioned to record both 5Hz and 30 second position data. The advantage to recording at a 5 Hz interval is that the receivers may be used to record long period dynamic events during large earthquakes along the Cocos-Caribbean plate boundary. The occurrence of slow slip events has been previously postulated in this region based on correlated fluid flow and seismic tremor events recorded near the margin wedge in 2000 and from sparse GPS observations in 2003. Paucity of data prevented details of these events from being resolved. In May 2007 a slow slip event was recorded on our densified GPS network and accompanied by seismic tremor. We will present the preliminary GPS time series and correlated seismic tremor for both likely slow slip events in September 2003 and May 2007. Once the displacement patterns have been characterized, we intend to model both the transient motion on the fault plane as well as the locking pattern before and after the events in an effort to determine if the occurrence of an ETS event has any impact on the nature and distribution of the

  19. Physical and Chemical Properties of Asian Dust on the Coast of the Japan Sea (Tango peninsula) during Springtime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohno, S.; Ito, K.; Ma, C. J.; Yamasaki, S.; Kasahara, M.; Hayakawa, S.; Mizohata, A.

    2002-12-01

    Asian mineral dust derives from deserts in western and north central China and East Asia is also a major source for anthropogenic aerosols such as soot or sulfate aerosol over the Northern Hemisphere. The natural mineral dusts could provide reaction sites for many heterogeneous reactions involving acidic gases and carry anthropogenic substances far distance from their sources. Therefore, aerosols over East Asia are complex mixtures of soil dust, marine aerosols and anthropogenic particles from various sources. To demonstrate the diversity of physical and chemical properties of Asian dust in the spring, we have carried out an intensive, ground-based physical and chemical characterization of the background and continentally polluted aerosols. The springtime of 2002 was characterized by several strong dust events and three intensive measurements were performed during the period March 18 to May 30, 2002. The measurement site is located on the coast of the Japan Sea (Tango Peninsula, Kyoto Prefecture). Tango was chosen as an observation site, since it is relatively unpolluted and can therefore serve as a background site for studies of the direct impact of the mainland Asian outflow on the western Pacific area. For measurements of aerosol mass-size distributions we used 12-stage low-pressure impactors, which were subsequently analyzed for elemental and ionic concentrations by PIXE and ion-chromatography, respectively. Two-stage filterpacks were used to sample coarse and fine particles separately with a 12 hours sampling time. The impactor stages were also analyzed by a thermal-optical method for mass-size distributions of elemental and organic carbons. SR x-ray microbeam analysis was applied to characterize a variety of trace elements in individual dust particles and trace element such as Cr or Mn was detected in a single mineral dust.

  20. Lateglacial and Holocene climate, disturbance and permafrost peatland dynamics on the Seward Peninsula, western Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Stephanie; Yu, Zicheng; Jones, Miriam

    2013-03-01

    Northern peatlands have accumulated large carbon (C) stocks, acting as a long-term atmospheric C sink since the last deglaciation. How these C-rich ecosystems will respond to future climate change, however, is still poorly understood. Furthermore, many northern peatlands exist in regions underlain by permafrost, adding to the challenge of projecting C balance under changing climate and permafrost dynamics. In this study, we used a paleoecological approach to examine the effect of past climates and local disturbances on vegetation and C accumulation at a peatland complex on the southern Seward Peninsula, Alaska over the past ˜15 ka (1 ka = 1000 cal yr BP). We analyzed two cores about 30 m apart, NL10-1 (from a permafrost peat plateau) and NL10-2 (from an adjacent thermokarst collapse-scar bog), for peat organic matter (OM), C accumulation rates, macrofossil, pollen and grain size analysis. A wet rich fen occurred during the initial stages of peatland development at the thermokarst site (NL10-2). The presence of tree pollen from Picea spp. and Larix laricinia at 13.5-12.1 ka indicates a warm regional climate, corresponding with the well-documented Bølling-Allerød warm period. A cold and dry climate interval at 12.1-11.1 ka is indicated by the disappearance of tree pollen and increase in Poaceae pollen and an increase in woody material, likely representing a local expression of the Younger Dryas (YD) event. Following the YD, the warm Holocene Thermal Maximum (HTM) is characterized by the presence of Populus pollen, while the presence of Sphagnum spp. and increased C accumulation rates suggest high peatland productivity under a warm climate. Toward the end of the HTM and throughout the mid-Holocene a wet climate-induced several major flooding disturbance events at 10 ka, 8.1 ka, 6 ka, 5.4 ka and 4.7 ka, as evidenced by decreases in OM, and increases in coarse sand abundance and aquatic fossils (algae Chara and water fleas Daphnia). The initial peatland at permafrost

  1. Three Storm Surge Events during Late Holocene in Shelly Gravel Sediments of the most Southern Coast of Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dong Yoon

    2015-04-01

    Super Typhoon Haiyan which occurred in November, 2013 left as many as 5,200 people dead and destroyed towns across the Philippines. However, because of rapid climate change, we cannot disregard such a super typhoon strike probability in Korean Peninsula. If we can detect the frequency and periodicity of paleo-geohazards recorded in sediments, the extreme geohazards can be predicted and its damage can be somewhat mitigated. The geology, geochemistry and mineralogy of the island sediments ahead of Yeongjeon coast, Haenam-gun, the most southern part, Korean peninsula were investigated. Shells from the three shelly gravel layers were used for 14C age dating and cube samples were collected at 5-10cm intervals for measuring the magnetic susceptibility, grain size distribution and geochemical analyses at the study site. Granitic gneiss clasts of debris flow mixed with the weathered tuffaceous materials on the eroded face of tuff rock. The sediments of Pleistocene were also eroded almost horizontally and unconformably covered by late Holocene shelly gravel deposits characterized by some kind of shells and unsorted sub-rounded or rounded gravels to pebbles. The horizontal erosion face is 2.2m in elevation and the current erosion face of beach was observed at 1.2m in elevation. This indicates that the former erosion face would have been formed at higher sea level than those of latter one by the similar mechanism of current erosion in the study site. Three shelly gravel layers overlie the erosion face from 2.2m to 2.9m in elevation. The reflected water energy caused by stronger storm would have been needed for delivering gravels and cobbles to the erosion face. Three shell layers dated as 3200 yr BP, 1900 yr BP, and 1700 yr BP, respectively. Four sedimentary units, from unit 1 to 4 in ascending order, are distinguished on the basis of sedimentary textures, shell contents, grain size distribution and vertical color variations. The sand ratios in the grain size distribution

  2. Assessment of Darkling Beetle Fauna after Implementation of an Environmental Restoration Program in the Southern Iberian Peninsula Affected by the Aznalcóllar Toxic Spill

    PubMed Central

    Cárdenas, Ana M.; Bujalance, José L.; Hidalgo, Juan M.

    2011-01-01

    This study is part of the Follow up Restoration Program of animal communities that colonize the Guadiamar River Basin. In 1998, the area was affected by a release of toxic sludge after the retention walls of the Aznalcóllar Mines (southern Iberian Peninsula) broke. The main objective of this study was to assess the current state of the population of Tenebrionidae, one of the most representative groups of edaphic Coleoptera inhabiting the Guadiamar River Basin. This paper analyses the progress made by the darkling beetle community six years after the disaster occurred and the Restoration Program was implemented. The study is based on faunistic data from systematic sampling carried out for six years to monitor plots distributed across the damaged area. To make an overall assessment of the tenebrionid fauna in relation to adjacent areas qualitative and quantitative ecological indices were applied, and temporal follow up and biogeographical comparisons were also made. The results indicate that, on the whole, tenebrionid fauna was somewhat affected by the Aznalcóllar Mine spill, and that a greater loss of fauna was detected closer to the accident site. The analysis of the temporal population dynamic suggests that the most affected zones are undergoing a process of re-colonization. However, this process varies widely by species and has not yet reached the expected levels of a non-affected river basin in the southern Iberian Peninsula. PMID:21864152

  3. Assessment of darkling beetle fauna after implementation of an environmental restoration program in the southern Iberian Peninsula affected by the Aznalcóllar toxic spill.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas, Ana M; Bujalance, José L; Hidalgo, Juan M

    2011-01-01

    This study is part of the Follow up Restoration Program of animal communities that colonize the Guadiamar River Basin. In 1998, the area was affected by a release of toxic sludge after the retention walls of the Aznalcóllar Mines (southern Iberian Peninsula) broke. The main objective of this study was to assess the current state of the population of Tenebrionidae, one of the most representative groups of edaphic Coleoptera inhabiting the Guadiamar River Basin. This paper analyses the progress made by the darkling beetle community six years after the disaster occurred and the Restoration Program was implemented. The study is based on faunistic data from systematic sampling carried out for six years to monitor plots distributed across the damaged area. To make an overall assessment of the tenebrionid fauna in relation to adjacent areas qualitative and quantitative ecological indices were applied, and temporal follow up and biogeographical comparisons were also made. The results indicate that, on the whole, tenebrionid fauna was somewhat affected by the Aznalcóllar Mine spill, and that a greater loss of fauna was detected closer to the accident site. The analysis of the temporal population dynamic suggests that the most affected zones are undergoing a process of re-colonization. However, this process varies widely by species and has not yet reached the expected levels of a non-affected river basin in the southern Iberian Peninsula.

  4. Genetic differentiation of octopuses from different habitats near the Korean Peninsula and eastern China based on analysis of the mDNA cytochrome C oxidase 1 gene.

    PubMed

    Kang, J-H; Park, J-Y; Choi, T-J

    2012-11-21

    Distributed along the coastal waters of Korea and China, Octopus minor is found in various habitats, including the mud flats in the southern and western coasts of the Korean Peninsula and the rocky areas around Jeju Island; however, the genetic relationships among the different populations are unknown and have not been studied. We compared 630-nucleotide sequences of the CO1 gene from O. minor specimens collected from five regions around the Korean Peninsula and three regions from eastern China in order to determine population structure and genetic relationships. Based on the sequences at 12 polymorphic sites in this region, 11 haplotypes were identified from 85 specimens. Individuals from Jeju Island had unique haplotypes, including two haplotypes not found in the other populations. Nucleotide and haplotype diversity for all populations ranged from 0.03-0.37 and 0.20-0.64, respectively. Pairwise F(ST) values indicated significant genetic differences in populations from Korea and China. An UPGMA dendrogram showed separation of the eight populations into three clusters; one included only the Jeju population, another included the rest of the Korean populations and some from Dalian, China; a third cluster consisted of two other populations from China. We conclude that there are discrete genetic differences in O. minor from the different habitats, suggesting that the populations should be considered as management units in the ongoing recovery program.

  5. Perspective View, Landsat Overlay, Salalah, Oman, Southern Arabian Peninsula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This perspective view includes the city of Salalah, the second largest city in Oman. The city is located on the broad, generally bright coastal plain and includes areas of green irrigated crops. This view was generated from a Landsat image draped over a preliminary elevation model produced by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). The edges of the dataset are to the upper right, left, and lower left. The Arabian Sea (lower right) is represented by the blue false-colored area. Vertical exaggeration of topography is 3X.

    This scene illustrates how topography determines local climate and, in turn, where people live. The Arabian Peninsula is very arid. However, the steep escarpment of the Qara Mountains wrings moisture from the summer monsoons allowing for growth of natural vegetation (green along the mountain fronts and in the canyons), and soil development (dark brown areas), as well as cultural development of the coastal plain. The monsoons also provide moisture for Frankincense trees growing on the desert (north) side of the mountains. In ancient times, incense derived from the sap of the Frankincense tree was the basis for an extremely lucrative trade.

    Landsat satellites have provided visible light and infrared images of the Earth continuously since 1972. SRTM topographic data match the 30-meter (99-foot)spatial resolution of most Landsat images and provide a valuable complement for studying the historic and growing Landsat data archive. The Landsat 7 Thematic Mapper image used here was provided to the SRTM project by the United States Geological Survey, Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) Data Center,Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by SRTM aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar(SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was

  6. Genesis of a zoned granite stock, Seward Peninsula, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hudson, Travis

    1977-01-01

    A composite epizonal stock of biotite granite has intruded a diverse assemblage of metamorphic rocks in the Serpentine Hot Springs area of north-central Seward Peninsula, Alaska. The metamorphic rocks include amphibolite-facies orthogneiss and paragneiss, greenschist-facies fine-grained siliceous and graphitic metasediments, and a variety of carbonate rocks. Lithologic units within the metamorphic terrane trend generally north-northeast and dip moderately toward the southeast. Thrust faults locally juxtapose lithologic units in the metamorphic assemblage, and normal faults displace both the metamorphic rocks and some parts of the granite stock. The gneisses and graphitic metasediments are believed to be late Precambrian in age, but the carbonate rocks are in part Paleozoic. Dating by the potassium-argon method indicates that the granite stock is Late Cretaceous. The stock has sharp discordant contacts, beyond which is a well-developed thermal aureole with rocks of hornblende hornfels facies. The average mode of the granite is 29 percent plagioclase, 31 percent quartz, 36 percent K-feldspar, and 4 percent biotite. Accessory minerals include apatite, magnetite, sphene, allanite, and zircon. Late-stage or deuteric minerals include muscovite, fluorite, tourmaline, quartz, and albite. The stock is a zoned complex containing rocks with several textural facies that are present in four partly concentric zones. Zone 1 is a discontinuous border unit, containing fine- to coarse-grained biotite granite, that grades inward into zone 2. Zone 2 consists of porphyritic biotite granite with oriented phenocrysts of pinkish-gray microcline in a coarse-grained equigranular groundmass of plagioclase, quartz, and biotite. It is in sharp, concordant to discordant contact with rocks of zone 3. Zone 3 consists of seriate-textured biotite granite that has been intruded by bodies of porphyritic biotite granite containing phenocrysts of plagioclase, K-feldspar, quartz, and biotite in an

  7. Late Quaternary Tephrochronology From Three Lakes, Kenai Peninsula, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Fontaine, C. S.; Kaufman, D. S.; Anderson, R.; Werner, A.; Waythomas, C. F.; Wallace, K. L.

    2003-12-01

    Tustumena, Paradox, and Jigsaw Lakes, located 60-120 km southwest of Anchorage, Alaska, on the Kenai Peninsula, were cored to evaluate the conditions best suited for the preservation of tephra, and to determine the ages and frequency of ash fall associated with regional volcanic eruptions. The lakes are located downwind of the eastern Aleutian Arc, where they are likely to receive tephra fallout, especially from Augustine, Iliamna, Redoubt, Spurr and Hayes Volcanoes. The lakes are close together (<60 km), so differences among their tephra records should primarily reflect lake-dependent processes and features, although variations in individual tephra plumes may preclude deposition in all the lakes. Multiple cores from each lake were analyzed to locate tephra using magnetic susceptibility (MS) and petrographic techniques (all tephra were found to have high MS). Tephra beds are typically light-gray ash, 1-2 mm thick, and are composed of glass shards and pumice (commonly 0.06-0.3 mm diameter), and varying proportions of glass-coated phenocrysts. Most are relatively pure, suggesting primary deposition with minor subsequent reworking. Core depth-age models were derived based on 28 radiocarbon ages on plant macrofossils preserved in the stratigraphy. Of the three lakes, sediment from Paradox Lake recorded the greatest frequency of tephra-fall events: 6.1 tephra/ka (81 over the 13,200-cal-yr record). Sediment from Jigsaw and Tustumena Lakes contains only 1.1 and 1.9 tephra/ka over their 9700-cal-yr records. Paradox Lake is better suited for tephra preservation compared to Tustumena and Jigsaw Lakes because, (1) it is small (0.11 km2) yet has a relatively large drainage-basin-to-lake area ratio of more that 5 times the other lakes for accumulating tephra; (2) it is situated in a narrow (ca. 0.6 km), steep-sided (10-18° ) valley that focuses tephra deposition and shelters the lake from wind-driven mixing (the other lakes are more exposed and susceptible to wind

  8. Hydrogeochemistry of sulfate-affected landscapes in Keller Peninsula, Maritime Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza, José João L. L.; Schaefer, Carlos Ernesto G. R.; Abrahão, Walter Antônio P.; de Mello, Jaime Wilson V.; Simas, Felipe N. B.; da Silva, Juscimar; Francelino, Márcio R.

    2012-06-01

    Keller Peninsula, located in King George Island, has a typical Maritime Antarctica climatic regime, with higher temperatures and rainfall than other areas in Continental Antarctica. The main outcropping rocks are pyritized andesites, volcaniclastics and basalts. Recent pedological investigation indicated that the presence of sulfides in Keller Peninsula accelerates the weathering process. The aim of this work was the determination of the geochemical background in water channels following geomorphological gradients in Keller Peninsula, Maritime Antarctica. We delimited and mapped all catchments in Keller Peninsula using GIS techniques and field observations. Water samples were analyzed for twenty-nine elements by ICP-OES and IEC, after the proper treatments. Eight catchments were identified as sulfide-affected, although water pH was nearly neutral. The ionic concentration in solution was high, both in non-affected and sulfide-affected catchments, with a trend of greater values in the latter, and changing downslope. Concentration values are above the range of other hydrogeochemical studies from elsewhere in Antarctica. The values of molar ratio HCO3-:(Ca + Mg)2 + and Na+:Cl- indicated the absence of carbonate-bearing rocks. Local precipitation of evaporites, as gypsum and epsomite was confirmed by the Ca2 +:SO42 - and Mg2 +:SO42 - molar ratios. The high ionic concentration in sulfide-affected areas illustrates the role of sulfate soil formation in this part of Antarctica.

  9. Geology of the Prince William Sound and Kenai Peninsula region, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Frederic H.; Hults, Chad P.

    2012-01-01

    The Prince William Sound and Kenai Peninsula region includes a significant part of one of the world’s largest accretionary complexes and a small part of the classic magmatic arc geology of the Alaska Peninsula. Physiographically, the map area ranges from the high glaciated mountains of the Alaska and Aleutian Ranges and the Chugach Mountains to the coastal lowlands of Cook Inlet and the Copper River delta. Structurally, the map area is cut by a number of major faults and postulated faults, the most important of which are the Border Ranges, Contact, and Bruin Bay Fault systems. The rocks of the map area belong to the Southern Margin composite terrane, a Tertiary and Cretaceous or older subduction-related accretionary complex, and the Alaska Peninsula terrane. Mesozoic rocks between these two terranes have been variously assigned to the Peninsular or the Hidden terranes. The oldest rocks in the map area are blocks of Paleozoic age within the mélange of the McHugh Complex; however, the protolith age of the greenschist and blueschist within the Border Ranges Fault zone is not known. Extensive glacial deposits mantle the Kenai Peninsula and the lowlands on the west side of Cook Inlet and are locally found elsewhere in the map area. This map was compiled from existing mapping, without generalization, and new or revised data was added where available.

  10. Suez Canal, Gulf of Suez, Sinai Peninsula, Egypt, as seen from the Apollo 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Suez Canal, Gulf of Suez, Sinai Peninsula, United Arab Republic (Egypt), Mediterranean Sea, as seen from the Apollo 7 spacecraft during its 13th revolution of the earth. Photographed from an altitude of 126 nautical miles, at ground elapsed time of 19 hours and 42 minutes.

  11. A Survey of Music Education in the Primary Schools of South Africa's Cape Peninsula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herbst, Anri; Wet, Jacques de; Rijsdijk, Susan

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the state of music education in government primary schools in the Cape Peninsula (Western Cape Province, South Africa) as perceived by the general class teacher. Since the first democratic elections in South Africa (1994), the entire primary and secondary school education system has changed drastically in terms of content, and…

  12. First records of Cotylea (Polycladida, Platyhelminthes) for the Atlantic coast of the Iberian Peninsula

    PubMed Central

    Noreña, Carolina; Marquina, Daniel; Perez, Jacinto; Almon, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A study of polyclad fauna of the Atlantic coast of the Iberian Peninsula was carried out from 2010 to 2013. The paper reports nine new records belonging to three Cotylean families: the family Euryleptidae Lang, 1884, Pseudocerotidae Lang, 1884 and the family Prosthiostomidae Lang, 1884, and describes one new species, Euryleptodes galikias sp. n. PMID:24843268

  13. Cretaceous deposits and flora of the Muravyov-Amurskii Peninsula (Amur Bay, sea of Japan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volynets, E. B.

    2015-05-01

    The Cretaceous sections and plant macrofossils are investigated in detail near Vladivostok on the Muravyov-Amurskii Peninsula of southern Primorye. It is established that the Ussuri and Lipovtsy formations in the reference section of the Markovskii Peninsula rest with unconformity upon Upper Triassic strata. The continuous Cretaceous succession is revealed in the Peschanka River area of the northern Muravyov-Amurskii Peninsula, where plant remains were first sampled from the lower and upper parts of the Korkino Group, which are determined to be the late Albian-late Cenmanian in age. The taxonomic composition of floral assemblages from the Ussuri, Lipovtsy, and Galenki formations is widened owing to additional finds of plant remains. The Korkino Group received floral characteristics for the first time. The Cretaceous flora of the peninsula is represented by 126 taxa. It is established that ferns and conifers are dominant elements of the Ussuri floral assemblage, while the Lipovtsy Assemblage is dominated by ferns, conifers, and cycadphytes. In addition, the latter assemblage is characterized by the highest taxonomic diversity. The Galenki Assemblage is marked by the first appearance of rare flowering plants against the background of dominant ferns and conifers. The Korkino floral assemblage is subdivided into two subassemblages dominated by different groups: conifers in the early and flowering plants in the late.

  14. Connection between autumn Sea Surface Temperature and winter precipitation in the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-González, Sergio; Pereira, Susana C.; Castro, Amaya; Rocha, Alfredo; Fraile, Roberto

    2014-10-01

    The oceanic influence on winter precipitation in the Iberian Peninsula has been evidenced in numerous scientific papers. Large-scale forecasting models generally use variables such as Sea Surface Temperature (SST), soil moisture and ice cover, but they are not very accurate yet. Using observational data, this paper analyzes the influence of North Atlantic and Mediterranean SST on winter precipitation in the Iberian Peninsula between October 1951 and September 2011. First, trends of both data sets have been calculated to study their behavior during the past six decades, showing an overall increase of SST and a substantial decrease in winter precipitation in the Iberian Peninsula, except in eastern and south-eastern regions. Then, connection patterns between autumn Sea Surface Temperature Anomalies and winter precipitation have been studied to identify ocean regions that may be used as potential predictors of winter precipitation. After applying a Principal Component Analysis to cluster the information provided by the 1431 measuring points of a SST grid with a small number of variables, the Principal Components extracted were introduced into a Multiple Linear Regression algorithm in order to obtain an estimation of winter precipitation in each river basin. The validation process has shown that the algorithm explains nearly 50% of inter-annual variability of winter precipitation in the basins of the Iberian Peninsula with a strongly oceanic influence; this percentage is somewhat lower in the Mediterranean regions.

  15. Modeling ice dynamic contributions to sea level rise from the Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schannwell, C.; Barrand, N. E.; Radić, V.

    2015-11-01

    The future ice dynamical contribution to sea level rise (SLR) from 199 ice shelf nourishing drainage basins of the Antarctic Peninsula Ice Sheet is simulated, using the British Antarctic Survey Antarctic Peninsula Ice Sheet Model. Simulations of the grounded ice sheet include response to ice shelf collapse, estimated by tracking thermal ice shelf viability limits in 14 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change global climate models ensemble temperature projections. Grounding line retreat in response to ice shelf collapse is parameterized with a new multivariate linear regression model utilizing a range of glaciological and geometric predictor variables. Multimodel means project SLR up to 9.4 mm sea level equivalent (SLE) by 2200, and up to 19 mm SLE by 2300. Rates of SLR from individual drainage basins throughout the peninsula are similar to 2100, yet diverge between 2100 and 2300 due to individual basin characteristics. Major contributors to SLR are the outlet glaciers feeding southern George VI Ice Shelf, accounting for >75% of total SLR in some model runs. Ice sheet thinning induced by ice-shelf removal is large (up to ˜500 m), especially in Palmer Land in the southern Antarctic Peninsula, and may propagate as far as 135 km inland. These results emphasize the importance of the ice dynamical contribution to future sea level of the APIS on decadal to centennial timescales.

  16. Spectral distribution of gravity wave momentum fluxes over the Antarctic Peninsula from Concordiasi superpressure balloon data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walterscheid, R. L.; Gelinas, L. J.; Mechoso, C. R.; Schubert, G.

    2016-07-01

    Gravity waves generated by flow over the steep topography of the Antarctic Peninsula transport significant amounts of zonal and meridional momentum into the stratosphere. Quantitative determination of this transport has been carried out for wave periods of 1 h or greater using data from a previous Antarctic superpressure balloon campaign in austral spring 2005 (VORCORE). The present study uses data from the later Concordiasi campaign (2010) to extend the momentum flux determination to shorter periods. Maps of the vertical fluxes of meridional and zonal momentum are presented for periods down to 12 min. We find that the momentum fluxes for periods below 1 h are comparable to those at longer periods, despite larger variances at longer periods. The momentum fluxes in the vicinity of the peninsula provide a significant zonal acceleration of the lower stratosphere, confirming a conclusion from the VORCORE data. The geographical distribution of fluxes around the peninsula has peaks both leeward and windward of the main terrain features. Numerical simulations suggest that the separate peaks may be related to wave transience caused by unsteady winds over the peninsula. Momentum fluxes comprise a main distribution maximizing at moderate flux values and a secondary distribution maximizing at high values exhibiting a high degree of intermittency. The high flux events account for the largest part of the average flux and suggest that drag parameterizations should take them into account. It is found that waves generated by the jet stream are also a significant source of momentum flux.

  17. Estimation of Water Availability Considering Climate Change in the Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, S.; Lee, D. K.; Hanasaki, N.

    2015-12-01

    The hydrological cycle is directly affected by climate and human intervention. Climate change is expected to affect hydrology and water resources. In Korean Peninsula, the rainfall pattern is seasonally concentrated, causing temporal and spatial variations in water availability. Many previous studies have investigated that the Korean Peninsula region is vulnerable to changes in water availability with changing climate, but a majority of the studies have focused on natural river discharge. However, the present-day hydrological cycle is not natural, but is affected by human activity, such as the water demands of agriculture, the industrial and domestic sector, and reservoir operations. In this study, water availability considering the impacts of human activity and climate change in the Korean Peninsula region is assessed in terms of water supply and demand. To assess present and future water availability, the integrated water resources model H08, which has six sub-modules to address land surfaces, river routing, crop growth, environmental flow requirements, and anthropogenic water withdrawal (Hanasaki et al., 2008), was applied to simulate historical and future hydrological processes based on climate scenarios. The model was calibrated and validated based on observed river discharge data. The simulation results show the temporal and spatial variations of water availability in the Korean Peninsula region. Results of this research could be used for spatial planning, taking into account the water availability.

  18. Acremonium camtosporum isolated as an endophyte of Bursera simaruba from Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bursera simaruba (Burseraceae) is a frequent and co-dominant tree of tropical sub-caducifolious forest in the Yucatan Peninsula. This species is important ecologically because it can grow in poor, clay or sandy, saline soils. The Mayan communities use this plant medicinally for its analgesic, antimy...

  19. Diptera of forensic importance in the Iberian Peninsula: larval identification key.

    PubMed

    Velásquez, Y; Magaña, C; Martínez-Sánchez, A; Rojo, S

    2010-09-01

    A revision of the species and families of sarcosaprophagous flies (Diptera: Calliphoridae, Sarcophagidae, Muscidae, Fanniidae, Drosophilidae, Phoridae, Piophilidae and Stratiomyidae) suitable for forensic purposes in the Iberian Peninsula is presented. Morphological characteristics that allow the accurate identification of third instars of the species present in the Iberian Peninsula are described and presented in the form of a diagnostic key. For larval Calliphoridae, characteristics such as the spines of the body segments were useful for the genus Calliphora whereas features of the anal segment and the cephalopharyngeal skeleton were useful for larvae of Lucilia. Identification of three Chrysominae species present in the Iberian Peninsula is included. For larval Sarcophagidae, characters such as the arrangement and shape of spiracular openings, structures of the anal segment and the cephalopharyngeal skeleton were used for the first time. A new record of Sarcophaga cultellata Pandellé, from a human corpse, is also included as well as recent incursions into the European cadaveric entomofauna such as Synthesiomyia nudiseta (van der Wulp) and Hermetia illucens (Linnaeus). This work provides useful new information that could be applied to forensic investigations in the Iberian Peninsula and in southern Europe.

  20. Late holocene fluctuations in the front of the Muller Ice Shelf, Antarctic Peninsula

    SciTech Connect

    Domack, E.W. ); Stein, A.B. )

    1993-01-01

    Ice shelves are important environmental indicators along the antarctic Peninsula. This study investigates the fluctuation of the Muller Ice Shelf by collecting and analysing surface sediment samples, piston cores, and kasten cores close to the present calving line. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Bioenergy crops grown for hyperaccumulation of phosphorus in the delmarva peninsula and their biofuels potential

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Herbaceous bioenergy crops, including sorghum, switchgrass, and miscanthus, were evaluated for their potential as phytoremedators for the uptake of phosphorus in the Delmarva Peninsula and their subsequent conversion to biofuel intermediates (bio-oil) by fast pyrolysis using pyrolysis-gas chromatogr...

  2. Population genetic structure of endangered Mongolian racerunner (Eremias argus) from the Korean Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Park, Han-Chan; Suk, Ho Young; Jeong, Eu-Jin; Park, Dae-Sik; Lee, Hang; Min, Mi-Sook

    2014-11-01

    The Mongolian racerunner (Eremias argus) is a small lacertid lizard species, and its distribution range encompasses the Korean Peninsula, Mongolia, China and Russia. Eremias argus is widespread, but populations on the Korean Peninsula are small and declining, provoking concerns that genetic diversity is being lost. This species is currently listed under the Protection of Wild Fauna and Flora Act in South Korea. In this study, nine novel microsatellites for E. argus were developed with a biotin-enrichment method and used to understand its population genetic structure and delineate conservation units on the Korean Peninsula. Overall, low intrapopulation genetic diversity was observed (mean number of alleles per locus = 2.463; mean H E = 0.398) from 10 populations investigated (n = 110). Two populations (among five with n≥ 10) showed an excess of heterozygosity expected under HWE relative to that expected at mutation-drift equilibrium, indicating severe reduction in population sizes. With only a few exceptions, the overall genetic differentiation among populations was substantial with the high levels of pairwise-F ST (0.006-0.746) and -R ST (0.034-0.940) values. The results of Bayesian STRUCTURE analysis showed that E. argus populations on the Korean Peninsula were most likely partitioned into three genetic clusters. Taken all together, such low levels of gene flow and strong genetic structuring have critical implications for the conservation of this endangered species and its management.

  3. Typical Infrasonic Daily Changes Associated with Weather Conditions in Southern Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. T.

    2015-12-01

    The dominant source of infrasonic waves in Korean peninsula is associated with weather changes around 0.1 to several hertz. The microbarom are mainly observed with KMA(Korea Meteorological Administration) infrasound station and other activity associated with typhoon in summer. The period of observation was processed during year of 2012. The KMA running two permanent infrasound stations at the middle of Korean peninsula which located DeMilitarized Zone from the 2011. For the special event that recorded from the Northern Korean Peninsula was missle launch 12-Dec 2012 which was clearly recorded. The Korean peninsula is located on Northern Hemisphere that induce the typhoon visit in summer rainy season, so main infrasonic activity was associated this weather changes concentrated general weather activity frequency area. We focused on seasonal changes induced by weather activities and processed infrasonic data related with typhoon report by KMA's weather report. The progressing results was reviewed for the infrasonic noise level changes which associated with typhoon and missle launch record on Dec-2012 for the special event.

  4. Ba/Ca coral-based proxy of tropical hydrology: Yucatan Peninsula case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonneea, M. E.; Cohen, A. L.; Charette, M. A.

    2011-12-01

    The barium/calcium ratio (Ba/Ca) in corals growing on fringing reefs of the Yucatan Peninsula is a potentially powerful tool with which to reconstruct seasonally resolved, multicentury-long records of precipitation (both seasonally-forced as well as episodic events). The Yucatan Peninsula is a carbonate platform with minimal surface flow, thus groundwater is the major vector for freshwater transport to the coast. The basic premise for this work is that elements enriched in groundwater (such as Ba) are delivered via submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) to the coastal waters of the Yucatan Peninsula and that the magnitude of SGD is positively correlated with precipitation. Delivery of Ba enriched groundwater elevates coastal Ba concentrations and high/low rainfall events are recorded as high/low Ba/Ca ratios in the coral skeleton. Recent quantification of groundwater discharge to coastal waters of the Yucatan Peninsula showed that discharge was three times higher at the end of the wet season relative to the dry season. This strongly suggests that precipitation drives the delivery of fresh groundwater to coastal waters (and the reef). The Ba/Ca ratio of seawater is linearly dependent on salinity, thus this is an excellent tracer of terrestrially source fresh water. Initial Ba/Ca data generated from two corals (Siderastrea spp.) collected live on the Yucatan reefs demonstrate a positive correlation with rainfall; both corals record Hurricane Isadore as a substantial Ba/Ca spike in the 2002 annual growth band.

  5. Genesis of peat-bog soils in the northern taiga spruce forests of the Kola Peninsula

    SciTech Connect

    Nikonov, V.V.

    1981-01-01

    The characteristics of soil formation processes in the Peat-Bog soils of waterlogged spruce phytocenoses on the Kola Peninsula are investigated. It is found that the ash composition of the peat layer is determined primarily by the composition of the buried plant residues. The effect of the chemical composition of water feeding the peat bogs is determined. (Refs. 7).

  6. Tropical cyclone rainfall structure affecting indochina peninsula and lower mekong river basin (LMB)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CHHIN, Rattana; Joko Trilaksono, Nurjanna; Wahyu Hadi, Tri

    2016-08-01

    Indochina Peninsula is located in between Bay of Bengal (BoB) and South-China Sea (SCS). This region is affected frequently from Tropical Cyclones (TCs) formed in North Indian Ocean (NIO), South-China Sea (SCS), and North West Pacific Ocean (NWP). This research analyzed the structure of the rainfall over Indochina Peninsula and its relationships with TCs from the aforementioned sources. Principle Component Analysis (PCA) was performed to investigate the dominant rainfall area produced from those TCs. Spatial and Temporal structures of rainfall from the TCs is analyzed to understand their propagation. The results show that the dominant TC rainfall area covers Central Vietnam which contributed around 25% to total rainfall in the region. However, the contribution of this TC rainfall over LMB is likely less than 20% where Laos's territory receives highest contribution (20%). Furthermore, from the three source areas, TCs formed in SCS produce the highest rain rate when they develop into typhoon intensity stage of Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC)’s scale. The average duration of TC rainfall over Indochina Peninsula is 81.28 hours, and over LMB is 66.22 hours. Thus, same as other regions in the Indochina Peninsula, LMB is affected by TC rainfall with considerable scales both spatially and temporally that may lead to significant hydrometeorological hazards.

  7. Radioecologycal study of 239/240Pu in Bangka Island and Muria Peninsula: Determination of 239/240Pu in marine sediment and seawater as part of baseline data collecting for sitting of candidates of first Indonesia NPP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suseno, Heny; Wisnubroto, Djarot S.

    2014-03-01

    Radioisotope Pu-239/240 are alpha emitting nuclides important indicators of radioactive contamination of the marine environment. Global fallout is the main source of plutonium in the marine environment. There are very limited study on 239/240Pu in Indonesia coastal environments. The data of this radioisotopes is needed for baseline data of nuclear power plant (NPP) site candidates both in Bangka Island and Muria Peninsula. Bottom sediments play an important role in radioecological studies of the marine environment because a large proportion of radioactive substances entering the sea is adsorbed over time onto suspended particulate matter and deposited in sediments. Plutonium is particle reactive and deposited in marine sediment. Radioisotope 239/240Pu was determinated by alpha spectrometry after radiochemical procedure that was performed in both water and marine sediment from Bangka Island and Muria Peninsula. The sediment baseline of concentration 239/240Pu in Bangka Island and Muria Peninsula were range from 0.013 to 0.021 Bq.kg-1 and 0.018 to 0.024 Bq.kg-1 respectively. The water baseline concentration this isotope were range from 2.73 to 4.05 mBq.m-3 and 2.98 to 4.50 mBq.m-3.

  8. Radioecologycal study of {sup 239/240}Pu in Bangka Island and Muria Peninsula: Determination of {sup 239/240}Pu in marine sediment and seawater as part of baseline data collecting for sitting of candidates of first Indonesia NPP

    SciTech Connect

    Suseno, Heny; Wisnubroto, Djarot S.

    2014-03-24

    Radioisotope Pu-239/240 are alpha emitting nuclides important indicators of radioactive contamination of the marine environment. Global fallout is the main source of plutonium in the marine environment. There are very limited study on {sup 239/240}Pu in Indonesia coastal environments. The data of this radioisotopes is needed for baseline data of nuclear power plant (NPP) site candidates both in Bangka Island and Muria Peninsula. Bottom sediments play an important role in radioecological studies of the marine environment because a large proportion of radioactive substances entering the sea is adsorbed over time onto suspended particulate matter and deposited in sediments. Plutonium is particle reactive and deposited in marine sediment. Radioisotope {sup 239/240}Pu was determinated by alpha spectrometry after radiochemical procedure that was performed in both water and marine sediment from Bangka Island and Muria Peninsula. The sediment baseline of concentration {sup 239/240}Pu in Bangka Island and Muria Peninsula were range from 0.013 to 0.021 Bq.kg{sup −1} and 0.018 to 0.024 Bq.kg{sup −1} respectively. The water baseline concentration this isotope were range from 2.73 to 4.05 mBq.m{sup −3} and 2.98 to 4.50 mBq.m{sup −3}.

  9. Links between Synoptic Weather Types and Extreme Wet Events in the Arabian Peninsula (1960-2100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenawy, Ahmed; McCabe, Matthew; Stenchikov, Georgiy; Raj, Jerry

    2014-05-01

    In this work, an automated version of the Lamb weather type classification scheme was applied to classify daily weather types in the Arabian Peninsula. The output catalogue included ten basic weather types, which describe the direction and vorticity of airflow in the peninsula (i.e., cyclonic, anticyclonic and directional). These large-scale patterns were first defined for the observed climate (1960-2013), allowing for an assessment of the spatial and temporal variations in circulation-rainfall relationships over the peninsula using rainfall data from 209 weather observatories. The same methodology was then applied to assess how the defined weather types will be presented in future climate simulations (under RCP45 and RCP85 emission scenarios) and to explore their probable dependency with rainfall characteristics. In this regard, daily simulated SLP derived from an ensemble of 12 climate models within the CMIP5 project were used for two future time-slices (2035-2060 and 2075-2100). Our findings indicate that the cyclonic (C) type represented the most frequent classification with 69.2% of days, followed by SE directional flows (21%). It was also found that the main circulation features influencing winter (spring) rainfall across the peninsula are the strong influence of the anticyclonic (easterly and southeasterly) air masses. Generally, the role of airflows originating from the Indian Ocean is larger than those of the Mediterranean and the Red Seas. The trend results of defined weather types show that the cyclonic (anticyclonic) conditions tend to decrease (increase). This picture is likely to continue during the 21st century. The only exception corresponds to the summer season. Here, understanding the association between atmospheric circulation patterns and rainfall in the Arabian Peninsula can be important for the understanding of climatic variability and thus developing circulation-based downscaling methods in this region.

  10. Holocene deglaciation of Byers Peninsula (Livingston Island, Maritime Antarctica) inferred from lake records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliva, Marc; Antoniades, Dermot; Giralt, Santiago; Granados, Ignacio; Toro, Manuel; Pla-Rabes, Sergi; Vieira, Gonçalo

    2014-05-01

    The South Shetland Islands are located in the northwestern tip of the Antarctic Peninsula. This area has been one of the regions in Earth where the climate warming recorded during the second half of the XXI century has been more significant (+2.5 ºC). However, a slight decrease in the rate of warming has been observed during the last decade. The HOLOANTAR project aims to provide accurate data on the Holocene climate conditions in this region in order to better frame this warming trend within the natural climate variability in the region. Our research is focused on the westernmost part of Livingston Island, Byers Peninsula, the largest ice-free area in the South Shetland Islands where tens of lakes and ponds are distributed. During the field work campaign in November-December'12 we collected the complete sedimentary sequence of four lakes distributed along a transect following the deglaciation of the peninsula: Chester, Escondido, Cerro Negro and Domo lakes. Geochemical, biological and geochronological studies are being undertaken on several of these cores. The ongoing analisys of their properties are providing insights about the Holocene palaeoenvironments and palaeoclimate conditions in Byers. In this communication we introduce the chronological framework for the Holocene deglaciation process in Byers Peninsula based on OSL, C14, Pb210 and Cs137 datings, as well as on tephrochronological data. According to these data, the deglaciation in Byers Peninsula started during the Early to Mid Holocene and continued through the Late Holocene, when the lakes distributed along the present-day moraines were formed.

  11. Habitat Selection and Foraging Behavior of Southern Elephant Seals in the Western Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huckstadt, L.; Costa, D. P.; McDonald, B. I.; Tremblay, Y.; Crocker, D. E.; Goebel, M. E.; Fedak, M. E.

    2006-12-01

    We examined the foraging behavior of 18 southern elephant seals foraging over two seasons in the Western Antarctic Peninsula. The foraging behavior and habitat utilization of 7 females in 2005 and 12 in 2006 were followed using satellite linked Satellite Relay Data Loggers that measured diving behavior as well collected salinity and temperature profiles as the animals dove. Animals were tagged after the annual molt during February at Cape Shirreff Livngston Island, South Shetland Islands. There was significant interannual variation in the regions of the Southern Ocean used by seals from Livingston Island. In 2005 of the 7 animals tagged one foraged 4700 km due west of the Antarctic Peninsula going as far as 150 W. The remaining females headed south along the Western Antarctic Peninsula bypassing Marguerite Bay moving south along Alexander Island. Three of these animals continued to forage in the pack ice as it developed. On their return trip all females swam past Livingston Island, continuing on to South Georgia Island where they apparently bred in the austral spring. One animal returned to Cape Shirreff to molt and her tag was recovered. During 2006 animals initially followed a similar migratory pattern going south along the Antarctic Peninsula, but unlike 2005 where the majority of the animals remained in the immediate vicinity of the Western Antarctic Peninsula, most of the animals in 2006 moved well to the west foraging as far as the Amundsen Sea. We compared the area restricted search (focal foraging areas) areas of these animals using a newly developed fractal landscape technique that identifies and quantifies areas of intensive search. The fractal analysis of area restricted search shows that the area, distance and coverage (Fractal D) searched were not different between years, while the time spent in the search areas was higher in 2005. Further analysis will examine how the physical properties of the water column as determined from the CTD data derived from

  12. Was the Devonian geomagnetic field dipolar or multipolar? Palaeointensity studies of Devonian igneous rocks from the Minusa Basin (Siberia) and the Kola Peninsula dykes, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbakova, V. V.; Biggin, A. J.; Veselovskiy, R. V.; Shatsillo, A. V.; Hawkins, L.; Shcherbakov, V. P.; Zhidkov, G. V.

    2017-02-01

    Defining variations in the behaviour of the geomagnetic field through geological time is critical to understanding the dynamics of Earth's core and its response to mantle convection and planetary evolution. Furthermore, the question of whether the axial dipole dominance of the recent palaeomagnetic field persists through the whole of Earth's history is fundamental to determining the reliability of palaeogeographic reconstructions and the efficacy of the magnetosphere in shielding Earth from solar wind radiation. Previous palaeomagnetic directional studies have suggested that the palaeofield had a complex configuration in the Devonian period (419-359 Ma). Here we present new palaeointensity determinations from rocks aged between 408 and 375 Ma from the Minusa Basin (southern Siberia), and the Kola Peninsula to investigate the strength of the field during this enigmatic period. Palaeointensity experiments were performed using the thermal Thellier, microwave Thellier, and Wilson methods on 165 specimens from 25 sites. Six out of eight successful sites from the Minusa Basin and all four successful sites from the Kola Peninsula produced extremely low palaeointensities (< 10 μT). These findings challenge the uniformitarian view of the palaeomagnetic field: field intensities of nearly an order of magnitude lower than Neogene values (except during relatively rare geomagnetic excursions and reversals) together with the widespread appearance of strange directions found in the Devonian suggest that the Earth's field during this time may have had a dominantly multipolar geometry. A persistent, low intensity multipolar magnetic field and associated diminished magnetosphere would increase the impact of solar particles on the Earth's magnetosphere, ionosphere and atmosphere with potential major implications for Earth's climate and biosphere.

  13. Aerosol Optical Depth over Arabian Peninsula: a Validation of ECHAM5-HAM against Ground-Based and Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawad, Faisal Al; Mamdouh, Khoder; Almazroui, Mansour; Alghamdi, Mansour

    2016-04-01

    This research validates aerosol optical depth (AOD) of the global climate - aerosol model (ECHAM5-HAM) for the period 2005 - 2011 over Arabian Peninsula. The ECHAM5-HAM AOD is evaluated at mid visible wavelength (550 nm) against AOD observation at three AERONET ground-base stations, and against satellite AOD measurements carried out by MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer). Average AOD monthly data for the period 2005 - 2011 is extracted from the model ECHAM5-HAM and compared to three AERONET stations located over Arabian Peninsula representing western (Hada Al-Sham), central (Solar Village) and eastern (Kuwait) regions. In addition, semillar comparison to MODIS AOD were carried out over all and over six sub-regions of Arabian Peninsula. The model overestimates the Angstrom Exponent by 0.69 and underestimate AOD by -0.15, but the model AOD is in a good correlation with observation (0.66) over Arabian Peninsula. This makes the model capable of predicting successfully the aerosol annual cycle over Arabian Peninsula. The ECHAM5-HAM model overestimates the Angstom Exponent and underestimates AOD over Arabian Peninsula, but it correlates well with observation. This implys that the model can be improved for regions dominated by dust, and can be effective in studying the various aspects of aerosol interactions in the atmosphere including investigating the direct and indirect enfluence of aerosols on the climate of Arabian Peninsula.

  14. Diagnostic modeling of dimethylsulfide production in coastal water west of the Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermann, Maria; Najjar, Raymond G.; Neeley, Aimee R.; Vila-Costa, Maria; Dacey, John W. H.; DiTullio, Giacomo, R.; Kieber, David J.; Kiene, Ronald P.; Matrai, Patricia A.; Simo, Rafel; Vernet, Maria

    2012-01-01

    The rate of gross biological dimethylsulfide (DMS) production at two coastal sites west of the Antarctic Peninsula, off Anvers Island, near Palmer Station, was estimated using a diagnostic approach that combined field measurements from 1 January 2006 through 1 March 2006 and a one-dimensional physical model of ocean mixing. The average DMS production rate in the upper water column (0-60 m) was estimated to be 3.1 +/- 0.6 nM/d at station B (closer to shore) and 2.7 +/- 0.6 nM/d1 at station E (further from shore). The estimated DMS replacement time was on the order of 1 d at both stations. DMS production was greater in the mixed layer than it was below the mixed layer. The average DMS production normalized to chlorophyll was 0.5 +/- nM/d)/(mg cubic m) at station B and 0.7 +/- 0.2 (nM/d)/(mg/cubic m3) at station E. When the diagnosed production rates were normalized to the observed concentrations of total dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSPt, the biogenic precursor of DMS), we found a remarkable similarity between our estimates at stations B and E (0.06 +/- 0.02 and 0.04 +/- 0.01 (nM DMS / d1)/(nM DMSP), respectively) and the results obtained in a previous study from a contrasting biogeochemical environment in the North Atlantic subtropical gyre (0.047 =/- 0.006 and 0.087 +/- 0.014 (nM DMS d1)/(nM DMSP) in a cyclonic and anticyclonic eddy, respectively).We propose that gross biological DMS production normalized to DMSPt might be relatively independent of the biogeochemical environment, and place our average estimate at 0.06 +/- 0.01 (nM DMS / d)/(nM DMSPt). The significance of this finding is that it can provide a means to use DMSPt measurements to extrapolate gross biological DMS production, which is extremely difficult to measure experimentally under realistic in situ conditions.

  15. Characterization of sea ice cover, motion and dynamics in Marguerite Bay, Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyatt, Jason; Beardsley, Robert C.; Owens, W. Brechner

    2011-07-01

    As part of the U.S. GLOBEC Southern Ocean Program, data from two automatic weather stations (AWSs) on small islets and upward-looking acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) and an upward-looking sonar (ULS) on sub-surface moorings have been analyzed to produce time series of atmospheric forcing, sea ice thickness, sea ice and ocean velocities, and sea ice momentum balances within Marguerite Bay and at mid-shelf on the central west Antarctic Peninsula continental shelf for the austral winter-spring seasons of 2001 and 2002. Both years had roughly seven months of nearly complete sea ice cover, but ice onset was about two months earlier in 2002 than 2001 mostly due to extremely cold surface air temperatures in Marguerite Bay during May-June 2002. Sea ice draft was quite variable, but generally thickened with time, reaching ˜2-3 m by the end of September before thinning. In October, 2002, a polynya was observed at one site within Marguerite Bay that lasted for 4 days. The sea ice motion and dynamics in Marguerite Bay were analyzed when sea ice draft was greater than 2 m. Wind stress during these periods was predominantly southward and southeastward. Wind stress, sea ice, and near-surface water motion were partially correlated, with sea ice motion greater than water motion. Large wind stress and sea ice and water motions occurred during short energetic events of a few days or shorter; however, the rms wind stress, sea ice, and water velocities were small, about 0.3 N m -2, 8-16 cm s -1, and 5-7 cm s -1, respectively. Mean sea ice motion was southward, but quite small, of order 2 cm s -1, while mean near-surface water motion was not statistically different from zero. The dominant sea ice momentum balance was between wind and internal ice stresses on time scales of several days and longer, with water stress, Coriolis, and tilt terms playing secondary roles. The mean southward wind stress was balanced, within uncertainty, by the mean northward internal ice stress. The

  16. Landscape-scale habitat selection by fishers translocated to the Olympic Peninsula of Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewis, Jeffrey C.; Jenkins, Kurt J.; Happe, Patricia J.; Manson, David J.; McCalmon, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The fisher was extirpated from much of the Pacific Northwestern United States during the mid- to late-1900s and is now proposed for federal listing as a threatened species in all or part of its west coast range. Following the translocation of 90 fishers from central British Columbia, Canada, to the Olympic Peninsula of Washington State from 2008 to 2010, we investigated the landscape-scale habitat selection of reintroduced fishers across a broad range of forest ages and disturbance histories, providing the first information on habitat relationships of newly reintroduced fishers in coastal coniferous forests in the Pacific Northwest. We developed 17 a priori models to evaluate several habitat-selection hypotheses based on premises of habitat models used to forecast habitat suitability for the reintroduced population. Further, we hypothesized that female fishers, because of their smaller body size than males, greater vulnerability to predation, and specific reproductive requirements, would be more selective than males for mid- to late-seral forest communities, where complex forest structural elements provide secure foraging, resting, and denning sites. We assessed 11 forest structure and landscape characteristics within the home range core-areas used by 19 females and 12 males and within randomly placed pseudo core areas that represented available habitats. We used case-controlled logistic regression to compare the characteristics of used and pseudo core areas and to assess selection by male and female fishers. Females were more selective of core area placement than males. Fifteen of 19 females (79%) and 5 of 12 males (42%) selected core areas within federal lands that encompassed primarily forests with an overstory of mid-sized or large trees. Male fishers exhibited only weak selection for core areas dominated by forests with an overstory of small trees, primarily on land managed for timber production or at high elevations. The amount of natural open area best

  17. Developmental History of an Intriguing Peat-Forming Community Along the West Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loisel, J.; Yu, Z.; Beilman, D.; Kaiser, K.

    2014-12-01

    Permafrost peatbanks along the West Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) have become valuable high-resolution archives for late-Holocene climatic conditions recently. We recently observed and studied a few water-saturated peatlands that had formed in rocky depressions near Vernadsky Station and in mainland Antarctica (~ 65°S, 64°W). Remarkably, we seem to be the very first ones to analyze these systems for environmental reconstructions. The similarity between these peatlands and fens from the lower latitudes is striking, and the rarity of these systems along the WAP is intriguing. We present a high-resolution, multi-proxy record of ecosystem development and paleoenvironmental conditions for Rasmussen peatland. The ecosystem is ~100 m2 in size and is characterized by a shallow water table depth at 7 cm below the surface. Surface vegetation is dominated by Calliergon spp., a wet-adapted moss found along the WAP. The studied moss deposit is 50 cm thick and has a high organic matter content (> 90% dry weight). Plant macrofossil analysis reveals that the peatland was initially a wet Sanionia spp. carpet and that a sharp transition to Calliergon spp. occurred about half way through the deposit. A distinct layer of highly decomposed organic matter was observed from 32 to 40 cm and could indicate a period of slowed peat formation, potentially due to dry conditions (enhanced peat decay) or perennial snow cover (limited plant growth). Biochemical decomposition indicators such as carbohydrate yields, acid:aldehyde ratios of lignin phenols, and hydroxyproline yields are being determined to better understand the extent of peat decay that has occurred at this site throughout its development, particularly to further address the nature of the observed stratigraphic changes. Preliminary results indicate that carbohydrate yields of the bottom half of the core are about 1/3 smaller than those of the top half, indicating substantial carbon loss due to decomposition. Overall, these peatlands

  18. Geomorphological characteristics of Yedoma terrains in the northern part of Seward Peninsula, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephani, E.; Dillon, M.; Fortier, D.; Jorgenson, T.; Kanevskiy, M. Z.; Shur, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Yedoma (Ice Complex) is a Late Pleistocene periglacial formation of syngenetic permafrost with large ice wedges. These extremely ice-rich stratigraphic sequences have been widely observed and studied in northern Siberia. However, very few studies have focused on Yedoma terrain in Northern America. Occurrence of Yedoma landscape has a great significance for paleoenvironmental reconstructions because the regions where Yedoma can be observed remained unglaciated during the late Pleistocene. Understanding the dynamics of Yedoma landscape and the geotechnical properties of this permafrost unit is necessary for modeling the evolution of the periglacial landscape in the context of climate change. Degradation of Yedoma terrain triggers several geomorphological processes such as thaw settlement due to deepening of the active layer, development of thermokarst lakes, thermo-erosion gullies, and active layer detachment slides. Degradation of yedoma terrain also releases greenhouse gases (e.g. methane, CO2), water from melting ice, and various types of mineral and organic sediments which need to be accounted for in climate warming scenarios. Yedoma terrains in their contemporary state can be identified by the presence of typical geomorphological features such as erosional remnants with specific shape, baidjarakhs (ground mounds formed as a result of wedge-ice thawing), abundance of thermokarst lakes, drained lakes basins, low-gradient streams and erosion-thermokarst valleys (alas valleys) with occasional pingos. We have studied and characterized in the field the metrics of two Yedoma sites at the northern part of Seward Peninsula. Geomorphic sub-units such as drained lake basins and Yedoma remnants have been characterized in detail via optical leveling surveys. Bathymetry of thermokarst lakes was measured by lake-based sonar and GPS surveys. Drilling was conducted in several locations along the survey transects. The cores retrieved were described in the field in terms of

  19. Synergetic monitoring of Saharan dust plumes and potential impact on surface: a case study of dust transport from Canary Islands to Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Córdoba-Jabonero, C.; Sorribas, M.; Guerrero-Rascado, J. L.; Adame, J. A.; Hernández, Y.; Lyamani, H.; Cachorro, V.; Gil, M.; Alados-Arboledas, L.; Cuevas, E.; de La Morena, B.

    2011-04-01

    The synergetic use of meteorological information, remote sensing both ground-based active (lidar) and passive (sun-photometry) techniques together with backtrajectory analysis and in-situ measurements is devoted to the characterization of dust intrusions. A case study of air masses advected from the Saharan region to the Canary Islands and the Iberian Peninsula, located relatively close and far away from the dust sources, respectively, was considered for this purpose. The observations were performed over three Spanish geographically strategic stations within the dust-influenced area along a common dust plume pathway monitored from 11 to 19 of March 2008. A 4-day long dust event (13-16 March) over the Santa Cruz de Tenerife Observatory (SCO), and a linked short 1-day dust episode (14 March) in the Southern Iberian Peninsula over the Atmospheric Sounding Station "El Arenosillo" (ARN) and the Granada station (GRA) were detected. Meteorological conditions favoured the dust plume transport over the area under study. Backtrajectory analysis clearly revealed the Saharan region as the source of the dust intrusion. Under the Saharan air masses influence, AERONET Aerosol Optical Depth at 500 nm (AOD500) ranged from 0.3 to 0.6 and Ångström Exponent at 440/675 nm wavelength pair (AE440/675) was lower than 0.5, indicating a high loading and predominance of coarse particles during those dusty events. Lidar observations characterized their vertical layering structure, identifying different aerosol contributions depending on altitude. In particular, the 3-km height dust layer transported from the Saharan region and observed over SCO site was later on detected at ARN and GRA stations. No significant differences were found in the lidar (extinction-to-backscatter) ratio (LR) estimation for that dust plume over all stations when a suitable aerosol scenario for lidar data retrieval is selected. Lidar-retrieved LR values of 60-70 sr were obtained during the main dust episodes. These

  20. Acrostichum, a Pioneering Fern of Floodplain Areas from the Late Oligocene Sariñena Formation of the Iberian Peninsula

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer, Javier; Diez, José B.

    2016-01-01

    Acrostichum is considered today an opportunistic fern in disturbed areas, which indicates the first stages of colonisation of such zones. However, in the fossil record, Acrostichum appears related to fluvio-lacustrine environments, freshwater marshes and mangrove deposits. We report here for first time fossil evidence of Acrostichum that reveals a pioneering behaviour of this fern in the colonisation of perturbed communities in Europe, which corroborates previous assumptions about the paleobiology of Acrostichum. Plant remains were collected from the Chattian (late Oligocene) La Val fossil site (Estadilla, Huesca, northeastern Spain) belonging to the Sariñena Formation, which mainly embraces crevasse splays, levees and floodplain deposits. Evidence shows that Acrostichum grew within the levee’s vegetal community or close to/on the river banks as well as on floodplain areas and closer to/on the shores of ephemeral ponds. But most importantly, the observed co-existence of Equisetum and Acrostichum remains in the same beds indicates that such strata represent short-lived inundated terrains, e.g., floodplains where the water table was temporarily stagnant. Evidence shows wetland environments dominated by pioneering taxa, implying a pioneering role for Acrostichum during the late Oligocene in the Iberian Peninsula. PMID:27631099

  1. Do low-frequency climate patterns affect chemical deposition in the NE coast of the Iberian Peninsula?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila, Anna; Izquierdo, Rebeca; Alarcón, Marta

    2013-04-01

    Atmospheric deposition to land and aquatic surfaces depends on the atmospheric gas/aerosol loads and on precipitation amount (which is a major vehicle for scavenging and depositing atmospheric material). Climate variability patterns (NAO, WO and WeMO) have been found to affect precipitation quantity in the Mediterranean fringe of the Iberian Peninsula, and this can have an influence on precipitation chemistry and the deposition of atmospheric elements. Also the air mass flow imposed by these teleconnections can influence the frequency of transport from different sources which have different emission characteristics (predominance of natural emissions or anthropogenic pollutants). Thus, modifications in the wind circulation and precipitation patterns related to these climate variability modes can determine the chemistry of precipitation and the atmospheric deposition loads of different elements. Here we analyse the effect of NAO, WO and WeMO climatic variability patterns on precipitation amount and atmospheric deposition of major elements (Na, Ca, Mg, K, NH4, NO3, SO4, Cl and alkalinity) in Catalonia (NE Spain) where precipitation chemistry has been analyzed at 5 sites for periods of 16 - 25 years. The purpose of this work is to analyze to which extent the amount of precipitation and of chemical deposition is determined by the aforementioned climate variability modes.

  2. High Prevalence of Gammaproteobacteria in the Sediments of Admiralty Bay and North Bransfield Basin, Northwestern Antarctic Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Franco, Diego C; Signori, Camila N; Duarte, Rubens T D; Nakayama, Cristina R; Campos, Lúcia S; Pellizari, Vivian H

    2017-01-01

    Microorganisms dominate most Antarctic marine ecosystems, in terms of biomass and taxonomic diversity, and play crucial role in ecosystem functioning due to their high metabolic plasticity. Admiralty Bay is the largest bay on King George Island (South Shetland Islands, Antarctic Peninsula) and a combination of hydro-oceanographic characteristics (bathymetry, sea ice and glacier melting, seasonal entrance of water masses, turbidity, vertical fluxes) create conditions favoring organic carbon deposition on the seafloor and microbial activities. We sampled surface sediments from 15 sites across Admiralty Bay (100-502 m total depth) and the adjacent North Bransfield Basin (693-1147 m), and used the amplicon 454-sequencing of 16S rRNA gene tags to compare the bacterial composition, diversity, and microbial community structure across environmental parameters (sediment grain size, pigments and organic nutrients) between the two areas. Marine sediments had a high abundance of heterotrophic Gammaproteobacteria (92.4% and 83.8% inside and outside the bay, respectively), followed by Alphaproteobacteria (2.5 and 5.5%), Firmicutes (1.5 and 1.6%), Bacteroidetes (1.1 and 1.7%), Deltaproteobacteria (0.8 and 2.5%) and Actinobacteria (0.7 and 1.3%). Differences in alpha-diversity and bacterial community structure were found between the two areas, reflecting the physical and chemical differences in the sediments, and the organic matter input.

  3. High Prevalence of Gammaproteobacteria in the Sediments of Admiralty Bay and North Bransfield Basin, Northwestern Antarctic Peninsula

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Diego C.; Signori, Camila N.; Duarte, Rubens T. D.; Nakayama, Cristina R.; Campos, Lúcia S.; Pellizari, Vivian H.

    2017-01-01

    Microorganisms dominate most Antarctic marine ecosystems, in terms of biomass and taxonomic diversity, and play crucial role in ecosystem functioning due to their high metabolic plasticity. Admiralty Bay is the largest bay on King George Island (South Shetland Islands, Antarctic Peninsula) and a combination of hydro-oceanographic characteristics (bathymetry, sea ice and glacier melting, seasonal entrance of water masses, turbidity, vertical fluxes) create conditions favoring organic carbon deposition on the seafloor and microbial activities. We sampled surface sediments from 15 sites across Admiralty Bay (100–502 m total depth) and the adjacent North Bransfield Basin (693–1147 m), and used the amplicon 454-sequencing of 16S rRNA gene tags to compare the bacterial composition, diversity, and microbial community structure across environmental parameters (sediment grain size, pigments and organic nutrients) between the two areas. Marine sediments had a high abundance of heterotrophic Gammaproteobacteria (92.4% and 83.8% inside and outside the bay, respectively), followed by Alphaproteobacteria (2.5 and 5.5%), Firmicutes (1.5 and 1.6%), Bacteroidetes (1.1 and 1.7%), Deltaproteobacteria (0.8 and 2.5%) and Actinobacteria (0.7 and 1.3%). Differences in alpha-diversity and bacterial community structure were found between the two areas, reflecting the physical and chemical differences in the sediments, and the organic matter input. PMID:28210255

  4. First report of the ectomycorrhizal status of boletes on the Northern Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico determined using isotopic methods.

    PubMed

    Hasselquist, Niles J; Douhan, Greg W; Allen, Michael F

    2011-08-01

    Despite their prominent role for tree growth, few studies have examined the occurrence of ectomycorrhizal fungi in lowland, seasonally dry tropical forests (SDTF). Although fruiting bodies of boletes have been observed in a dry tropical forest on the Northern Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico, their occurrence is rare and their mycorrhizal status is uncertain. To determine the trophic status (mycorrhizal vs. saprotrophic) of these boletes, fruiting bodies were collected and isotopically compared to known saprotrophic fungi, foliage, and soil from the same site. Mean δ(15)N and δ(13)C values differed significantly between boletes and saprotrophic fungi, with boletes 8.0‰ enriched and 2.5‰ depleted in (15)N and (13)C, respectively relative to saprotrophic fungi. Foliage was depleted in (13)C relative to both boletes and saprotrophic fungi. Foliar δ(15)N values, on the other hand, were similar to saprotrophic fungi, yet were considerably lower relative to bolete fruiting bodies. Results from this study provide the first isotopic evidence of ectomycorrhizal fungi in lowland SDTF and emphasize the need for further research to better understand the diversity and ecological importance of ectomycorrhizal fungi in these forested ecosystems.

  5. Full-glacial upland tundra vegetation preserved under tephra in the Beringia National Park, Seward Peninsula, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetcheus, Victoria G.; Birks, Hilary H.

    2001-01-01

    The nature of the full-glacial vegetation of Beringia has been the subject of a great deal of investigation and debate. Here we present a reconstruction of an intact example of the full-glacial upland vegetation of part of the northern Seward Peninsula at one point in time. The area was blanketed by more than 1 m of tephra ca. 18,000 14C BP (ca. 21,500 cal. BP), and the former land-surface was preserved in the permafrost. The discovery of the land-surface provides a unique opportunity to study a fossil ecosystem preserved in situ. Macrofossils were used to reconstruct the vegetation growing at several sites on the buried land-surface. The macrofossil assemblages indicate a vegetation characterized by graminoids and forbs, with the occasional occurrence of Salix arctica. The vegetation was dominated by Kobresia myosuroides, other sedges ( Carex), and grasses, with a fine-scale mosaic related to snow accumulation and moisture availability. Overall, the vegetation was a closed, dry, herb-rich tundra-grassland with a continuous moss layer, growing on calcareous soil that was continuously supplied with loess. Nutrient renewal by loess deposition was probably responsible for the relatively fertile vegetation, and the occurrence of a continuous mat of acrocarpous mosses. Good physiognomic analogues can be suggested, but no exact modern vegetational analogues have been found, probably because the full-glacial environment and climate with loess deposition do not occur today.

  6. Autumn migration and wintering areas of Peregrine Falcons Falco peregrinus nesting on the Kola Peninsula, northern Russia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ganusevich, S.A.; Maechtle, T.L.; Seegar, W.S.; Yates, M.A.; McGrady, M.J.; Fuller, M.; Schueck, L.; Dayton, J.; Henny, C.J.

    2004-01-01

    Four female Peregrine Falcons Falco peregrinus breeding on the Kola Peninsula, Russia, were fitted with satellite-received transmitters in 1994. Their breeding home ranges averaged 1175 (sd = ??714) km2, and overlapped considerably. All left their breeding grounds in September and migrated generally south-west along the Baltic Sea. The mean travel rate for three falcons was 190 km/day. Two Falcons wintered on the coasts of France and in southern Spain, which were, respectively, 2909 and 4262 km from their breeding sites. Data on migration routes suggested that Falcons took a near-direct route to the wintering areas. No prolonged stopovers were apparent. The 90% minimum convex polygon winter range of a bird that migrated to Spain encompassed 213 km2 (n = 54). The area of the 50% minimum convex polygon was 21.5 km2 (n = 29). Data from this study agree with others from North America that show that Falcons breeding in a single area do not necessarily follow the same migratory path southward and do not necessarily use the same wintering grounds.

  7. Stress Change Prior to the Major Events in the 1989 Earthquake Swarm off the Eastern Izu Peninsula, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakata, H.; Ogasawara, H.; Sekiguchi, S.; Mino, K.

    2002-12-01

    Stress state is one of the most important parameters for describing the physical processes of earthquakes. In particular, learning its temporal variation in seismic source regions of the Earth's crust just prior to seismic events is essential for understanding the earthquake development process. Laboratory experiments with granite samples confirm that instability (dynamic rupture) occurs after peak stress, both in triaxial fracture and in frictional sliding. We calculate a stress parameter, the energy index (EI), of earthquakes that occurred in the 1989 swarms off the eastern Izu Peninsula in Japan. This parameter has been monitored in deep South African gold mines for predicting major events. EI is an estimate of E / Mo normalized to remove dependence on Mo caused by both real source effect, and also site and frequency bandwidth effect. We find significant decrease in EI prior to the largest events (M = 5.2 and 5.5). We propose a mechanism of precursory change in EI for the major earthquakes in the 1989 earthquake swarm off the eastern Izu Peninsula as follows: 1) On July 4, 1989, strain accumulation accelerated in the eastern portion of the source region of the major earthquakes (M 5.2 and 5.5), due to magma intrusion, and local yielding started in the region with the lowest yielding strength followed by yielding in the stronger region. The EI and stress drop of earthquakes that occurred in this stage increased. 2) Further strain accumulation due to magma intrusion caused the whole source region of the M 5.5 earthquake to yield on July 6, and stress quasi-statically decreased because of anelastic deformation. Earthquakes occurring at this stage (the earthquake development stage) had smaller stress drops than those in the previous stage, so that EI decreased. 3) After occurrence of the M 5.2 earthquake on early July 7, the M 5.5 earthquake took place in the vicinity of the strong asperity on July 9, and the accumulated stress around the M 5.5 source region was

  8. A quantitative analysis of grid nudging effect on each process of PM2.5 production in the Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Wonbae; Choi, Yunsoo; Lee, Hwa Woon; Lee, Soon-Hwan; Yoo, Jung-Woo; Park, Jaehyeong; Lee, Hyo-Jung

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated the effect of assimilated meteorological fields on simulated PM2.5 concentrations in the Korean Peninsula. Two different CMAQ simulations were conducted using base WRF run (BASE) and grid-nudged WRF run (GNG) which included a simple data assimilation method for the time period of April, 2009. The simulated PM2.5 and PM10 concentrations were compared with corresponding observations. The BASE PM2.5 concentrations were significantly underestimated at Anmyeondo (AMD) and six Air Quality Monitoring Station (AQMS) sites in Korea, but GNG showed improved agreement with in-situ measurements due to the effect of grid nudging. The grid nudging effect was dominant under the PBL height and it appeared more clearly under the unstable synoptic condition (April 5-8) than stable condition (April 9-13). Additional quantitative analysis was conducted using the Integrated Process Rate (IPR) in the CMAQ model to investigate the effect of varied meteorological fields on each PM2.5 production and destruction processes. The PM2.5 production rate by aerosol process in GNG was shown to be higher than that of BASE, especially near the source region (e.g., Eastern China). The increased temperature and decreased wind speed by grid nudging effect led to increase of aerosol production rates especially during the nighttime. The change of aerosol production rates were mainly caused by increased sulfate (SO42-) and nitrate (NO3-) production rates in the day and nighttime respectively. Also, GNG provides higher PM2.5 transport rates than BASE over the whole domain. The amount of PM2.5 scavenged by wet deposition process in GNG was smaller than that of BASE over the Yellow Sea, reflecting the decreased water vapor mixing ratio by grid nudging. Thus, it resulted in the increase of simulated PM2.5 concentrations. The results indicated that understanding the effects of grid nudging on PM2.5 concentrations is crucial to enhance the performance of PM2.5 modeling

  9. Three Kanto Earthquakes Inferred from the Tsunami Deposits and the Relative Sea Level Change in the Miura Peninsula, Central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.; Shimazaki, K.; Chiba, T.; Ishibe, T.; Okamura, M.; Matsuoka, H.; Tsuji, Y.; Satake, K.

    2010-12-01

    The Kanto earthquake is a great interplate earthquake caused by subduction of the Philippine Sea Plate beneath the Japan Island along the Sagami Trough. The 1923 Kanto earthquake (M=7.9) and the 1703 Kanto earthquake (M~8.0) are two of the most devastating earthquake those struck Tokyo Metropolitan area, respectively. These earthquakes brought large (~5 m) tsunami to the coast area and uplifted the Miura peninsula by ~1.4 m. The tide gauge station, moreover, records the subsidence during the interseismic period before and after the 1923 earthquake. Present study clarifies the past Kanto earthquake prior to the 1703 earthquake based on the sedimentary analysis in the Koajiro bay of the southern Miura Peninsula. The continuous samples of inner bay fine sediments were taken by the boring survey using 3-m-long geoslicer. Three layers of coarse sediments, T1, T2, and T3 units from top toward bottom, are observed in the bay sediments at almost all the sites. These units are composed of mixture of materials such as shell fragments, rock clasts and gravel, and some of units have eroded the lower fine sediments, indicating the event deposits by the strong traction flow. The grain sizes of the bay sediments are grading upward and abruptly become larger after the deposition of the T1, T2 and T3 units. Very little diatom is observed in these units, but the total number of diatoms increase in the bay sediments. The ratio of the marine planktonic species against the benthic species gradually rises from the lower part to the upper part in the bay sediment. In the tidal flat sediment, the freshwater planktonic species appear in place of the marine planktonic diatom. The changes of grain size and diatom species make a presumption that the sea depth suddenly becomes shallow by the event and deeper during the interseismic period. The T1, T2 and T3 units, thus, are correlated with the tsunami deposits conveyed by the Kanto earthquake. The T1 and T2 units are inferred to be the tsunami

  10. Site Selection for DOE/JIP Gas Hydrate Drilling in the Northern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Collett, T.S.; Riedel, M.; Cochran, J.R.; Boswell, R.M.; Kumar, Pushpendra; Sathe, A.V.

    2008-07-01

    Studies of geologic and geophysical data from the offshore of India have revealed two geologically distinct areas with inferred gas hydrate occurrences: the passive continental margins of the Indian Peninsula and along the Andaman convergent margin. The Indian National Gas Hydrate Program (NGHP) Expedition 01 was designed to study the occurrence of gas hydrate off the Indian Peninsula and along the Andaman convergent margin with special emphasis on understanding the geologic and geochemical controls on the occurrence of gas hydrate in these two diverse settings. NGHP Expedition 01 established the presence of gas hydrates in Krishna- Godavari, Mahanadi and Andaman basins. The expedition discovered one of the richest gas hydrate accumulations yet documented (Site 10 in the Krishna-Godavari Basin), documented the thickest and deepest gas hydrate stability zone yet known (Site 17 in Andaman Sea), and established the existence of a fully-developed gas hydrate system in the Mahanadi Basin (Site 19).

  11. Apparent Stress Variation in Response to Seamount Subduction at Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankova-Pursley, J.; Bilek, S. L.; Phillips, W. S.; Newman, A. V.

    2008-12-01

    Seamounts are high relief features seen on many oceanic plates, including the Cocos plate offshore Costa Rica. As these features enter the subduction zone at Middle America Trench, they may perturb interface coupling by changing physical properties of the plate interface. Here we explore the role of seamounts on rupture process of microseismicity along Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica. This peninsula lies close to a region where down-going Cocos plate structure varies along-strike of the trench. The Cocos plate has low relief along the north and central parts of Nicoya Peninsula, where the subducting plate was created at East Pacific Rise (EPR). Seamounts dot the plate subducting at the southern tip of the peninsula, where the plate was created at Cocos-Nazca Spreading center (CNS). Given these structural differences, we are able to evaluate possible along-strike variations in earthquake source properties. We use 357 earthquakes from the Costa Rica Seismogenic Zone (CR-SEIZE) project to estimate the effects of seamount subduction on apparent stress (σa). We compute σa, which is a measure of stress drop combined with seismic efficiency, using waveform coda because of its proven stability relative to measurements using direct arrivals. We allow variable source scaling, finding that non-constant scaling provides good fit for our data, suggesting that seismic moment is not proportional to the cube root of corner frequency at ML 0.8 to 4.2. σa values for well constrained data indicate along strike variations between the northern and southern tips of the peninsula. Except in the region of a previously subducted seamount in the Gulf of Nicoya where the mean σa is 1.03 MPa, the southern and central portions of the peninsula have mean σa values 0.79 and 0.89 MPa respectively, while the mean σa value in the northern region is 1.66 MPa. The larger mean σa values in the northern region and in the Gulf of Nicoya implies that the interface is more strongly coupled where there

  12. Resurrection Peninsula and Knight Island ophiolites and recent faulting on Montague Island, southern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Steven W.; Miller, Marti L.; Dumoulin, Julie A.

    1987-01-01

    The Resurrection Peninsula forms the east side of Resurrection Bay (Fig. 1). The city of Seward is located at the head of the bay and can be reached from Anchorage by highway (127 mi;204 km). Relief ranges from 1,434 ft (437 m) at the southern end of the peninsula to more than 4,800 ft (1,463 m) 17 mi (28 km) to the north. All rock units composing the informally named Resurrection Peninsula ophiolite are visible and (or) accessible by boat.The eastern half of the peninsula is located within the Chugach National Forest; the western half is mainly state land, but there is some private land with recreational cabins. The Seward A6 and A7 and Blying Sound D6 and D7 maps at 1:63,360 scale (mile-to-the-inch) cover the entire Resurrection Peninsula.Knight Island is located 53 mi (85 km) east of Seward (Fig. 1). Numerous fiords indent the 31-mi-long (50 km) by 7.4-mi-wide (12 km) island and offer excellent bedrock exposures. The island is rugged and has a maximum elevation of 3,000 ft (914 m). It has numerous mineral prospects (Tysdal, 1978; Nelson and others, 1984; Jansons and others, 1984; Koski and others, 1985), and several abandoned canneries are located on the island. Knight Island lies entirely within the Chugach National Forest—state and private inholdings constitute less than five percent of its total land area. The Seward A2, A3, B2, B3, and C2, 1:63,360-scale U.S. Geological Survey topographic maps cover the entire island.Montague Island, 50 mi (80 km) long and up to 11 mi (18 km) wide, lies 10.6 mi (17 km) southeast of Knight Island. It belongs to an island group that forms the southern margin of Prince William Sound (Fig. 1). Montague Island is less rugged and less heavily vegetated than either the Resurrection Peninsula or Knight Island. Rock exposures are excellent along the beaches, and ground disruption due to recent fault movements is clearly visible. The Seward Al and A2 and Blying Sound Dl, D2, and D3 maps cover the areas of interest on Montague Island

  13. Characteristics of storms that contribute to extreme precipitation events over the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigo, Ricardo; Ramos, Alexandre M.; Ordoñez, Paulina; Liberato, Margarida L. R.; Trigo, Isabel F.

    2014-05-01

    Floods correspond to one of the most deadly natural disasters in the Iberian Peninsula during the last century. Quite often these floods are associated to intense low pressure systems with an Atlantic origin. In recent years a number of episodes have been evaluated on a case-by-case approach, with a clear focus on extreme events, thus lacking a systematic assessment. In this study we focus on the characteristics of storms for the extended winter season (October to March) that are responsible for the most extreme rainfall events over large areas of the Iberian Peninsula. An objective method for ranking daily precipitation events during the extended winter is used based on the most comprehensive database of high resolution (0.2º latitude by 0.2º longitude) gridded daily precipitation dataset available for the Iberian Peninsula. The magnitude of an event is obtained after considering the total area affected as well as its intensity in every grid point (taking into account the daily normalised departure from climatology). Different precipitation rankings are studied considering the entire Iberian Peninsula, Portugal and also the six largest river basins in the Iberian Peninsula (Duero, Ebro, Tagus, Minho, Guadiana and Guadalquivir). Using an objective cyclone detecting and tracking scheme [Trigo, 2006] the storm track and characteristics of the cyclones were obtained using the ERA-Interim reanalyses for the 1979-2008 period. The spatial distribution of extratropical cyclone positions when the precipitation extremes occur will be analysed over the considered sub-domains (Iberia, Portugal, major river basins). In addition, we distinguish the different cyclone characteristics (lifetime, direction, minimum pressure, position, velocity, vorticity and radius) with significant impacts in precipitation over the different domains in the Iberian Peninsula. This work was partially supported by FEDER (Fundo Europeu de Desenvolvimento Regional) funds through the COMPETE (Programa

  14. Structural and hydrologic controls of subduction zone seismogenic behavior along the Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audet, P.; Schwartz, S. Y.

    2012-12-01

    Subduction zone thrust faults exhibit variations in rupture behavior that include potentially great (M>8) earthquakes and slow propagating (M~7) slip. The factors controlling transitions in frictional properties are loosely constrained and include variations in temperature, lithologies and pore-fluid pressures. Along the Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica, the seismogenic zone is characterized by strong heterogeneity in mechanical properties and a lateral change in the origin of the subducting plate. We use observations of scattered teleseismic waves to examine structural properties (compressional to shear velocity ratio, or Vp/Vs) of the subduction zone elements beneath the Nicoya Peninsula and report two findings: 1) evidence for inferred high pore fluid pressures within the subducting oceanic crust, in agreement with results globally and 2) contrasts from lower to higher forearc and oceanic Vp/Vs ratios from northwest to southeast that correlate with changes in interseismic locking, seismogenic behavior and the origin of the subducting plate. We interpret these results as representing differences in permeability and thus fluid overpressures in the oceanic crust. We suggest that enhanced permeability of the East Pacific Rise (EPR) crust being subducted beneath the northwest portion of the Nicoya Peninsula results in lower pore-fluid pressure, higher effective stress and strength compared with the Cocos Nazca Spreading Center (CNS) crust, subducted beneath the southeastern Nicoya Peninsula. The higher pore-fluid pressure within the CNS crust is consistent with the lower coupling and large slow slip events observed in this region. We posit that the elevated fluid pressures here are periodically released allowing fluids to migrate into the upper plate reducing its velocities. Changes in hydrologic properties resulting from differences in the structural integrity of the subducting oceanic crust appear to control the seismogenic segmentation along the Nicoya Peninsula. (a

  15. Morphotectonic Index Analysis as an Indicator of Neotectonic Segmentation of the Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrish, S.; Marshall, J. S.

    2013-12-01

    The Nicoya Peninsula lies within the Costa Rican forearc where the Cocos plate subducts under the Caribbean plate at ~8.5 cm/yr. Rapid plate convergence produces frequent large earthquakes (~50yr recurrence interval) and pronounced crustal deformation (0.1-2.0m/ky uplift). Seven uplifted segments have been identified in previous studies using broad geomorphic surfaces (Hare & Gardner 1984) and late Quaternary marine terraces (Marshall et al. 2010). These surfaces suggest long term net uplift and segmentation of the peninsula in response to contrasting domains of subducting seafloor (EPR, CNS-1, CNS-2). In this study, newer 10m contour digital topographic data (CENIGA- Terra Project) will be used to characterize and delineate this segmentation using morphotectonic analysis of drainage basins and correlation of fluvial terrace/ geomorphic surface elevations. The peninsula has six primary watersheds which drain into the Pacific Ocean; the Río Andamojo, Río Tabaco, Río Nosara, Río Ora, Río Bongo, and Río Ario which range in area from 200 km2 to 350 km2. The trunk rivers follow major lineaments that define morphotectonic segment boundaries and in turn their drainage basins are bisected by them. Morphometric analysis of the lower (1st and 2nd) order drainage basins will provide insight into segmented tectonic uplift and deformation by comparing values of drainage basin asymmetry, stream length gradient, and hypsometry with respect to margin segmentation and subducting seafloor domain. A general geomorphic analysis will be conducted alongside the morphometric analysis to map previously recognized (Morrish et al. 2010) but poorly characterized late Quaternary fluvial terraces. Stream capture and drainage divide migration are common processes throughout the peninsula in response to the ongoing deformation. Identification and characterization of basin piracy throughout the peninsula will provide insight into the history of landscape evolution in response to

  16. GAS HYDRATES AT TWO SITES OF AN ACTIVE CONTINENTAL MARGIN.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.

    1985-01-01

    Sediment containing gas hydrates from two distant Deep Sea Drilling Project sites (565 and 568), located about 670 km apart on the landward flank of the Middle America Trench, was studied to determine the geochemical conditions that characterize the occurrence of gas hydrates. Site 565 was located in the Pacific Ocean offshore the Nicoya Peninsula of Costa Rica in 3,111 m of water. The depth of the hole at this site was 328 m, and gas hydrates were recovered from 285 and 319 m. Site 568 was located about 670 km to the northwest offshore Guatemala in 2,031 m of water. At this site the hole penetrated to 418 m, and gas hydrates were encountered at 404 m.

  17. Ecological risk assessments and context-dependence analysis of heavy metal contamination in the sediments of mangrove swamp in Leizhou Peninsula, China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Ma, Keming; Qu, Laiye

    2015-11-15

    Sediments in eight types of mangroves were sampled in the Leizhou Peninsula. Heavy metals were analyzed to investigate the effects on metal distribution of mangrove communities, to evaluate contamination levels, identify sources and relationships between the two. Results showed that mangrove communities have effects on most heavy metal distributions in sediments, especially in the sediment with shrub communities of Aegiceras corniculatum where the contents of many metals are highest. As, Cr and Ni were identified as metal pollutants of primary concern, while Cd was of no concern. Zn, Pb, As mainly originated from anthropogenic source while the other metals are geogenic. Heavy metal distributions were affected by the independent and joint effects of landscape and sediment context; landscape context explains more variations in heavy metals than does sediment physicochemical variables. Total sulfur, total phosphorus and total potassium in sediment, and the existence of paddy field and forest land within 2000m around the sampling sites are significant variables also.

  18. Millennial δ18O oscillations from a replicated Holocene speleothem record from Iberian Peninsula and hemispherical teleconecctions affecting the water cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínguez-Villar, David; Wang, Xianfeng; Krklec, Kristina; Cheng, Hai; Edwards, R. Lawrence

    2016-04-01

    We present a speleothem δ18O record from Kaite Cave in northern Iberian Peninsula covering the last 9.7 ka BP. The record is constructed from four different stalagmites that replicate each other. The age model is based on 63 U-Th dates and over 4500 laminae providing a robust time frame for the record. The δ18O record has characteristic millennial oscillations through the Holocene with periodicity around 2 ka during the Late Holocene and around 1 ka during the Early Holocene. Causes of the millennial δ18O variability are not dominated by the amount of rainfall or atmospheric temperature and other controls of the water cycle are more relevant. The aquifer at this site filters any seasonal bias and speleothems records the inter-annual δ18O variability in precipitation. On the other hand, moisture source analysis at this site shows that significant amount of precipitation is from recycled moisture (continental origin). A variable proportion of this parameter is capable to impact significantly past values of δ18O in precipitation. Thus, we interpret the millennial oscillations of the δ18O record as changes in the hydrological cycle resulting from variable percentages of the recycled precipitation over the Iberian Peninsula. We found that variable amount of recycled precipitation in Iberian Peninsula is related to the location of the Iceland Low pressure cell, although does not correlate with NAO index. Correlation of Kaite δ18O record during the Holocene with other representative records suggests that millennial oscillations are caused by variability of the Gulf Stream/North Atlantic Current that affects atmospheric pressure fields in the North Atlantic. Further correlation of Kaite δ18O record along the world supports that the recorded millennial oscillations of the water cycle are related to persistent variability on the tropical North Atlantic. Only during periods of major sea-ice variability in high-latitudes of the North Atlantic, the later region replaces

  19. Paratuberculosis in European wild rabbits from the Iberian Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Maio, Elisa; Carta, Tania; Balseiro, Ana; Sevilla, Iker A; Romano, Angelo; Ortiz, José Antonio; Vieira-Pinto, Madalena; Garrido, Joseba M; de la Lastra, Jose Manuel Pérez; Gortázar, Christian

    2011-10-01

    Of the non-ruminant wildlife species known to harbor Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis (MAP), the rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) is thought to pose the greatest risk of transmission to cattle. We analyzed 80 hunter-harvested wild rabbits from a core study area in southern Spain, and sera from 157 wild rabbits sampled opportunistically on seven additional sites. Gross lesions compatible with paratuberculosis were observed in two of 80 necropsied rabbits. Histopathology revealed focal to diffuse multibacillary MAP-compatible lesions in 8 of 10 rabbits examined. Presence of MAP was confirmed in one rabbit with gross lesions by positive amplification curves for both IS900 and ISMAP02. However, no isolate was obtained from 47 samples by culture. We adapted an indirect ELISA for the detection of MAP antibodies. At the established cut-off of 0.5, 6 of 237 wild rabbit sera (2.5%) yielded a positive ELISA result. Antibodies were detected in rabbits from 3 of 8 sampling sites. Considering the increasing relevance of MAP infection for animal health, these results open a challenging field for future research.

  20. Ice core evidence for significant 100-year regional warming on the Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, E. R.; Dennis, P. F.; Bracegirdle, T. J.; Franzke, C.

    2009-10-01

    We present a new 150-year, high-resolution, stable isotope record (δ 18O) from the Gomez ice core, drilled on the data sparse south western Antarctic Peninsula, revealing a ˜2.7°C rise in surface temperatures since the 1950s. The record is highly correlated with satellite-derived temperature reconstructions and instrumental records from Faraday station on the north west coast, thus making it a robust proxy for local and regional temperatures since the 1850s. We conclude that the exceptional 50-year warming, previously only observed in the northern Peninsula, is not just a local phenomena but part of a statistically significant 100-year regional warming trend that began around 1900. A suite of coupled climate models are employed to demonstrate that the 50 and 100 year temperature trends are outside of the expected range of variability from pre-industrial control runs, indicating that the warming is likely the result of external climate forcing.

  1. Viral hemorrhagic fevers in the Tihamah region of the western Arabian Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Zakham, Fathiah; Al-Habal, Mohammed; Taher, Rola; Alaoui, Altaf; El Mzibri, Mohammed

    2017-04-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) refers to a group of diseases characterized by an acute febrile syndrome with hemorrhagic manifestations and high mortality rates caused by several families of viruses that affect humans and animals. These diseases are typically endemic in certain geographical regions and sometimes cause major outbreaks. The history of hemorrhagic fever in the Arabian Peninsula refers to the 19th century and most outbreaks were reported in the Tihamah region-the Red Sea coastal plain of the Arabian Peninsula in the west and southwest of Saudi Arabia and Yemen. Herein, we describe the agents that cause VHFs and their epidemiology in Tihamah, the history of the diseases, transmission, species affected, and clinical signs. Finally, we address challenges in the diagnosis and control of VHFs in this region.

  2. [Characteristics of N2O emissions from vegetal soils on Fildes peninsula, Antarctica].

    PubMed

    Sun, L; Zhu, R; Xie, Z; Zhao, J; Xing, G; Shi, S; Du, L

    2001-07-01

    The N2O fluxes from the vegetal soils were first measured on the Fildes peninsula, Antarctica, and the total N2O emission was also estimated in the summer 2 months. The daily variations of N2O fluxes appeared single-peak trend under the sunshine or rainy weather conditions but they were irregular under the snow weather conditions and inconsistent with the atmospheric temperatures. The seasonal variations of the N2O fluxes were affected by the temperature and rainfall. The conditions during the transitions between dry and wet seasons improved the N2O emission. The total N2O emissions from moss and lichen soils were 3.7152 kg and 2.5344 kg, respectively. It follows that the vegetal soils are the sources for the atmospheric N2O on the Fildes peninsula, Antarctica.

  3. Mercury accumulation in sediments and seabird feathers from the Antarctic Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Calle, Paola; Alvarado, Omar; Monserrate, Lorena; Cevallos, Juan Manuel; Calle, Nastenka; Alava, Juan José

    2015-02-28

    In an effort to assess the impact of mercury in the Antarctic Peninsula, we conducted ecotoxicological research in this region during the summer of 2012 and 2013. The objectives were to assess: (a) mercury levels in sediment samples; (b) mercury accumulation in Antarctic seabird feathers: Catharacta lonnbergi (brown skua), Pygoscelis papua (gentoo penguin) and Pygoscelis antarctica (chinstrap penguin); and (c) biomagnification (BMF predator/prey) and biota sediment accumulation (BSAF skuas/sediment) factors. Mercury concentrations in sediment were relatively low. Mercury concentrations were significantly higher in brown skuas and gentoo penguins than in chinstrap penguins (2012), and significantly higher in brown skuas than in both penguins (2013). BMF indicated 2-7.5 times greater mercury levels in brown skuas than in penguins. BSAF values suggested an apparent temporal decrease of 18.2% of this ratio from 2012 to 2013. Long-range environmental transport is the likely route of entry of mercury into the Antarctic Peninsula.

  4. Paleomagnetic studies of late pleistocene rocks from the Malyi Kut section (Taman Peninsula, Krasnodar krai)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilipenko, O. V.; Trubikhin, V. M.

    2013-07-01

    Paleomagnetic studies of Quaternary deposits from the Malyi Kut rock sequence (Krasnodar krai, western part of the Taman Peninsula) in two time intervals of Late Pleistocene are carried out. The Malyi Kut sequence is a marine terrace of the Baku age, which is embedded in the disturbed marine Sarmatian deposits. The terrace of the Bakinian age nests the Karangat marine terrace. The presence of the marine molluscan fauna in the both terraces enables reliable dating of the studied deposits. The composition, grain size, and concentration of ferromagnetic fraction present in the studied rocks are investigated by a set of rock magnetic methods. The directions of natural remanent magnetization (NRM) are studied, and the reliability of their isolation is estimated. The results are compared with the paleomagnetic records of NRM in the rocks of the parallel coeval sections of the Tuzla (Taman Peninsula) and Roxolany (Ukraine). This correlation suggests that the studied rock sequences recorded the Mono Lake geomagnetic excursion.

  5. [Diagnostic Criteria for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/Parkinsonism-Dementia Complex in the Kii Peninsula, Japan].

    PubMed

    Kokubo, Yasumasa

    2015-07-01

    The diagnostic criteria for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/parkinsonism-dementia complex in the Kii peninsula of Japan (Kii ALS/PDC) have been proposed. Muro disease has been considered an endemic neurodegenerative disease in the southern part of the Kii peninsula. Recent intensive and comprehensive research has revealed it to be a complex and genetically heterogeneous disease. At present, there are four subtypes of Muro disease: sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Kii ALS/PDC with tauopathy, ALS with C9orf72 gene mutation, and ALS with optineurin gene mutation. The present criteria are applicable to only one of these subtypes, Kii ALS/PDC with tauopathy, which is quite similar to ALS/PDC in Guam.

  6. First seropositive cases of Coxiella burnetii in red deer populations in the southwest Iberian peninsula.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Leticia; Fernández-Llario, Pedro; Carranza Almansa, Juan; Bermejo, Félix; Hermoso de Mendoza, Javier

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the seroprevalence of Coxiella burnetii in different red deer populations and to investigate role of red deer densities, livestock, and habitat on seroprevalence. The serosurvey revealed 5 positive cases out of 137 sera (3.64%) that occurred in two of the three study areas. This study documents the first cases of Coxiella burnetii in red deer in the southwest Iberian peninsula. A relationship between deer density and Coxiella seroprevalence was not found. Results revealed that indirect transmission through ticks between livestock and red deer might be associated with higher prevalence. The timing of shelter area usage may influence the contact between ticks and red deer by favoring transmission. Coxiella burnetii in red deer may be associated with infertility or early abortions with reabsorption. Further research is needed to evaluate its epidemiology and effect on the disease dynamics of red deer in the southwest Iberian peninsula.

  7. How unique is the tiger beetle fauna (Coleoptera, Cicindelidae) of the Balkan Peninsula?

    PubMed Central

    Jaskuła, Radomir

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The tiger beetle fauna of the Balkan Peninsula is one of the richest in Europe and includes 19 species or 41% of the European tiger beetle fauna. Assembled by their biogeographical origins, the Balkan tiger beetle species fall into 14 different groups that include, Mediterranean, Middle Oriental, Central Asiatic, Euro-Siberian, South and East European, Pannonian-Sarmatian, West Palaearctic, Turano-European and Afrotropico Indo-Mediterranean species. The Mediterranean Sclerophyl and the Pontian Steppe are the Balkan biogeographical provinces with the highest species richness, while the Balkan Highlands has the lowest Cicindelidae diversity. Most species are restricted to single habitat types in lowland areas of the Balkan Peninsula and only Calomera aulica aulica and Calomera littoralis nemoralis occur in respectively 3 and 4 different types of habitat. About 60% of all Balkan Cicindelidae species are found in habitats potentially endangered by human activity. PMID:21738429

  8. A diverse assemblage of fossil hardwood from the Upper Tertiary (Miocene?) of the Arauco Peninsula, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöning, Meike; Bandel, Klaus

    2004-09-01

    Silicified woods of 10 dicotyledonous tree families of probably Miocene age from the Arauco Peninsula, central Chile are described and classified according to their anatomy. The diversity is surprisingly high, in that of the 19 samples analyzed, virtually every one could belong to a different species of tree or shrub. Almost all species document a damp climate, and most have related species living in the central zone of modern Chile. The samples were collected in a narrow zone on Punta El Fraile, west of the town of Arauco. The following families are based on woods from the Arauco Peninsula: Anacardiaceae, Boraginaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Fagaceae, Lauraceae, Leguminosae, Monimiaceae, the first report of fossil Myristicaceae, Myrtaceae, and Proteaceae. Their diagenetic history is connected to tuffaceous material and calcareous concretions.

  9. A Radial Pattern of Six Paleo Ice Streams Emanating from the Bruce Plateau Ice Dome, Antarctic Peninsula Ice Sheet: Constraints from Multibeam Bathymetry and GPS Rebound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, M.; Domack, E.; Canals, M.; Casamor, J.; King, M.

    2008-12-01

    We reconstructed ice thicknesses along six paleo ice streams emanating out of the Bruce Plateau in the Northern Antarctic Peninsula. This was done in order to generate models of potential isostatic rebound along the flow paths since the LGM and thereby provide a theoretical test for empirical observations of vertical displacement (rebound) as measured by seven coastal GPS stations (to be deployed during the current IPY- LARISSA project). This study is pertinent to realizing the effect of moderate ice sheet size during collapse and resulting sea level rise. The Palmer, Vernadsky, Hugo Island and Gerlache and Boyd Strait ice stream paths (flow lines) were highlighted on the Western side of the Peninsula. The Drygalski, Crane and Hektoria ice streams were studied on the Eastern side. Using detailed and near complete swath bathymetry data available for the Western Peninsula coastal region and partial swath mapping data generated at the site of the former Larsen B ice shelf (and Roberston Trough), we constructed hypothetical longitudinal profiles of all six ice streams along precisely located flow paths. These profiles extended from the accumulation zones in the upper elevations of the Bruce Plateau to the terminus along the continental shelf edge. The profiles included detailed elevations of the bedrock and hypothetical ice thickness values along the ice streams as they would have been during the Last Glacial Maximum (~ 16 ka). Ice thickness values were based on the elevations of bedrock, trim lines, surrounding topography, influence of surrounding glaciers and previous estimates of LGM ice thickness values around the Antarctic Peninsula. Using the components of the hypothetical longitudinal profiles, total isostatic rebound since the LGM can be calculated for the region (assuming reasonable mantle viscosities). In all the profiles reconstructed ice thicknesses are characterized by an order of magnitude increase across inner shelf troughs (such as the Palmer Deep and

  10. Surveillance of Viruses in Wild Fish Populations in Areas around the Gulf of Cadiz (South Atlantic Iberian Peninsula)

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Patricia; Olveira, José G.; Labella, Alejandro; Cutrín, Juan Manuel; Baro, Jorge C.; Borrego, Juan Jose

    2014-01-01

    This report describes a viral epidemiological study of wild fish around the Gulf of Cadiz (southwestern Iberian Peninsula) and is focused on infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV), viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV), and viral nervous necrosis virus (VNNV). One fish species (Chelon labrosus) was sampled inside the gulf, at the mouth of the San Pedro River. Another 29 were sampled, in three oceanographic campaigns, at sites around the Bay of Cadiz. The fish were processed individually and subjected to isolation in cell culture and molecular diagnosis. VHSV was not isolated from any species. Thirteen IPNV-type isolates were obtained from barracuda (Sphyraena sphyraena), axillary seabream (Pagellus acarne), common two-banded seabream (Diplodus vulgaris), common pandora (P. erythrinus), Senegal seabream (D. bellottii), and surmullet (Mullus surmuletus). Six VNNV isolates were obtained from axillary seabream, common pandora, black seabream (Spondyliosoma cantharus), red mullet (Mullet barbatus), Lusitanian toadfish (Halobatrachus didactylus), and tub gurnard (Chelidonichtys lucerna). In the river mouth, viruses were detected only after reamplification, obtaining prevalence percentages of IPNV and VNNV (44.4 and 63.0%, respectively) much higher than those observed in the oceanographic campaigns (25.7 and 19.6%, respectively). The opposite results were obtained in the case of VHSV after reamplification: 11.1% in the river mouth and 43.6% in the oceanic locations. Analyzing the results with respect to the proximity of the sampling sites to the coast, an anthropogenic influence on wild fish is suggested and discussed. The type of viruses and the presence of natural reassortants are also discussed. PMID:25128341

  11. Discriminating between subglacial and proglacial lake sediments: an example from the Dänischer Wohld Peninsula, northern Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livingstone, Stephen J.; Piotrowski, Jan A.; Bateman, Mark D.; Ely, Jeremy C.; Clark, Chris D.

    2015-03-01

    Subglacial lakes are common features of contemporary ice masses. However, they are rarely identified in the geological record. This is due to the difficulty in discriminating between subglacial and proglacial lake sediments; a proglacial origin is typically preferred as the ';simplest' explanation. We hypothesise that numerous deposits currently interpreted to record proglacial lake sedimentation may actually have a subglacial origin. Here we try and find ways of distinguishing proglacial from subglacial lake sediments by investigating three sites along the Dänischer Wohld Peninsula, northern Germany, which have been interpreted to record both proglacial and subglacial sedimentation. We identify two major phases of ice activity and associated lake formation during the Late Weichselian glaciation. (1) Proglacial lake formation at ˜23 ka in front of the advancing Baltic Ice Stream. This lake was subsequently overridden and the sediments glaciotectonised as ice continued to advance to its maximum extent. (2) Retreat of ice back into the Baltic Basin at ˜19 ka and formation of a proglacial lake that persisted for ˜4 ka. We suggest that subglacial lake activity may have occurred at two of the sites between 23 and 19 ka. This is based on the presence of aggrading sediment deposits characterised by stratified/laminated diamictons and interbedded tabular to channelized sorted sediments, the juxtaposition of relatively undeformed waterlain sediment and subglacial till, absence of glaciotectonic thrusting and folding or of fining/coarsening successions and the geomorphic association with tunnel valleys to the south of the study area. The style of sedimentation and deformation provided the greatest insight into the discrimination of proglacially vs subglacially deposited glaciolacustrine sediments. The luminescence signal palaeodose distributions also offers a potentially powerful means of fingerprinting sediment transport pathways of young glacial systems.

  12. Structural characterization and composition of Y-rich hainite from Sakharjok nepheline syenite pegmatite (Kola Peninsula, Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyalina, L.; Zolotarev, A.; Selivanova, E.; Savchenko, Ye.; Zozulya, D.; Krivovichev, S.; Mikhailova, Yu.

    2015-08-01

    Y-rich hainite occurs in nepheline syenite pegmatite of the Sakharjok massif (Kola Peninsula, Russia). It forms euhedral prismatic crystals up to 2 mm in length as well as rims around an unidentified mineral phase (silicate of Ca, Y, Zr and Ti). The mineral is triclinic, space group P-1, a 9.6054(10), b 5.6928(6), c 7.3344(7) Å, α 89.903(2), β 101.082(2), γ 100.830(2)°, V 386.32(7) Å3, Z = 1. The calculated density is 3.39 g/cm3. Chemical composition of Sakharjok hainite is different from the previously published data by much higher Y and Nb contents up to 0.72 and 0.20 atoms per formula unit, respectively, by the two- to five-fold depletion in the LREEs and by the strong enrichment of the HREEs. From the single-crystal X-ray diffraction data, there is a significant amount of Y in the M1 site associated with the absence of Zr in it. Nb and Zr are concentrated in the M5 site substituting Ti. Combination of single-crystal X-ray diffraction data and electron microprobe data give the empirical formula (Ca1.04Y0.63REE0.24Mn0.02)∑1.93(Na0.92Ca0.77)∑1.69Ca2.00(Na0.65Ca0.10)∑0.75(Ti0.60Zr0.21Nb0.15Fe0.03)∑0.99((Si4.00Al0.02)∑4.02O14) (F2.61O1.39)∑4.00.

  13. Late Cretaceous-early Eocene counterclockwise rotation of the Fueguian Andes and evolution of the Patagonia-Antarctic Peninsula system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poblete, F.; Roperch, P.; Arriagada, C.; Ruffet, G.; Ramírez de Arellano, C.; Hervé, F.; Poujol, M.

    2016-02-01

    The southernmost Andes of Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego present a prominent arc-shaped structure: the Patagonian Bend. Whether the bending is a primary curvature or an orocline is still matter of controversy. New paleomagnetic data have been obtained south of the Beagle Channel in 39 out of 61 sites. They have been drilled in Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous sediments and interbedded volcanics and in mid-Cretaceous to Eocene intrusives of the Fuegian Batholith. The anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility was measured at each site and the influence of magnetic fabric on the characteristic remanent magnetizations (ChRM) in plutonic rocks was corrected using inverse tensors of anisotropy of remanent magnetizations. Normal polarity secondary magnetizations with west-directed declination were obtained in the sediments and they did not pass the fold test. These characteristic directions are similar to those recorded by mid Cretaceous intrusives suggesting a remagnetization event during the normal Cretaceous superchron and describe a large (> 90°) counterclockwise rotation. Late Cretaceous to Eocene rocks of the Fueguian Batholith, record decreasing counterclockwise rotations of 45° to 30°. These paleomagnetic results are interpreted as evidence of a large counterclockwise rotation of the Fueguian Andes related to the closure of the Rocas Verdes Basin and the formation of the Darwin Cordillera during the Late Cretaceous and Paleocene. The tectonic evolution of the Patagonian Bend can thus be described as the formation of a progressive arc from an oroclinal stage during the closure of the Rocas Verdes basin to a mainly primary arc during the final stages of deformation of the Magallanes fold and thrust belt. Plate reconstructions show that the Antarctic Peninsula would have formed a continuous margin with Patagonia between the Early Cretaceous and the Eocene, and acted as a non-rotational rigid block facilitating the development of the Patagonian Bend.

  14. Hosts of the exotic ornate kangaroo tick, Amblyomma triguttatum triguttatum Koch, on southern Yorke Peninsula, South Australia.

    PubMed

    Waudby, Helen P; Petit, Sophie; Dixon, Bruce; Andrews, Ross H

    2007-10-01

    Amblyomma triguttatum triguttatum is assumed to be endemic to south-western Western Australia (including Barrow Island), Queensland (excluding Cape York Peninsula), and New South Wales, south to Dubbo and Barham. The species has been recorded on a range of mammalian hosts including macropods and domestic animals. In Queensland, A. triguttatum triguttatum is implicated in the epidemiology of Q fever. In 2000, the species was detected on southern Yorke Peninsula in South Australia. We aimed to identify A. triguttatum triguttatum's hosts through trapping, sampling of carcasses, and opportunistic capture of vertebrates on Yorke Peninsula. A. triguttatum triguttatum was removed from black rats (Rattus rattus), wild rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus), western grey kangaroos (Macropus fuliginosus), Tammar wallabies (M. eugenii eugenii), domesticated cats and dogs, and humans. Before this study, A. triguttatum triguttatum had not been found on black rats or rabbits in the wild. This research has implications for the management of wildlife, livestock, and visitors on Yorke Peninsula. The potential for A. triguttatum triguttatum to spread to other areas of Yorke Peninsula and South Australia is considerable, as visitors (tourists) to southern Yorke Peninsula report the presence of ticks both on themselves and among camping equipment on arriving home.

  15. Three-dimensional upper crustal velocity structure beneath San Francisco Peninsula, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, T.; Zoback, M.L.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents new seismic data from, and crustal models of the San Francisco Peninsula. In much of central California the San Andreas fault juxtaposes the Cretaceous granitic Salinian terrane on its west and the Late Mesozoic/Early Tertiary Franciscan Complex on its east. On San Francisco Peninsula, however, the present-day San Andreas fault is completely within a Franciscan terrane, and the Pilarcitos fault, located southwest of the San Andreas, marks the Salinian-Franciscan boundary. This circumstance has evoked two different explanations: either the Pilarcitos is a thrust fault that has pushed Franciscan rocks over Salinian rocks or the Pilarcitos is a transform fault that has accommodated significant right-lateral slip. In an effort to better resolve the subsurface structure of the peninsula faults, we established a temporary network of 31 seismographs arrayed across the San Andreas fault and the subparallel Pilarcitos fault at ???1-2 km spacings. These instruments were deployed during the first 6 months of 1995 and recorded local earthquakes, air gun sources set off in San Francisco Bay, and explosive sources. Travel times from these sources were used to augment earthquake arrival times recorded by the Northern California Seismic Network and were inverted for three-dimensional velocity structure. Results show lateral velocity changes at depth (???0.5-7 km) that correlate with downward vertical projections of the surface traces of the San Andreas and Pilarcitos faults. We thus interpret the faults as high-angle to vertical features (constrained to a 70??-110?? dip range). From this we conclude that the Pilarcitos fault is probably an important strike-slip fault that accommodated much of the right-lateral plate boundary strain on the peninsula prior to the initiation of the modern-day San Andreas fault in this region sometime after about 3.0 m.y. ago.

  16. Arabian Peninsula and northeast Africa as seen from Gemini 11 spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Arabian Peninsula (on left) and northeast Africa (on right) as seen from the Gemini 11 spacecraft at an altitude of 340 nautical miles during its 27th revolution of the earth, looking southeast. Saudia Arabia, South Arabia, Yemen and Aden Protectorate are at left. At bottom right is Ethiopia. French Somaliland is in center on right shore. Somali is at upper right. Body of water at bottom is Red Sea. Gulf of Aden is in center; and at top left is Indian Ocean.

  17. Leishmanicidal evaluation of extracts from native plants of the Yucatan peninsula.

    PubMed

    Peraza-Sánchez, S R; Cen-Pacheco, F; Noh-Chimal, A; May-Pat, F; Simá-Polanco, P; Dumonteil, E; García-Miss, M R; Mut-Martín, M

    2007-06-01

    Methanol extracts were prepared from different parts of 18 plants collected in the Yucatan peninsula and evaluated in an in vitro bioassay for leishmanicidal activity against Leishmania mexicana promastigotes. The ten most potent plant extracts (IC(50)<50 microg/ml) were Aphelandra scabra leaves, Byrsonima bucidaefolia bark, Byrsonima crassifolia bark, Clusia flava leaves, Cupania dentata bark, Diphysa carthagenensis leaves, Dorstenia contrajerva whole plant, Milleria quinqueflora roots, Tridax procumbens whole plant, and Vitex gaumeri bark.

  18. Holocene Southern Ocean surface temperature variability west of the Antarctic Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Shevenell, A E; Ingalls, A E; Domack, E W; Kelly, C

    2011-02-10

    The disintegration of ice shelves, reduced sea-ice and glacier extent, and shifting ecological zones observed around Antarctica highlight the impact of recent atmospheric and oceanic warming on the cryosphere. Observations and models suggest that oceanic and atmospheric temperature variations at Antarctica's margins affect global cryosphere stability, ocean circulation, sea levels and carbon cycling. In particular, recent climate changes on the Antarctic Peninsula have been dramatic, yet the Holocene climate variability of this region is largely unknown, limiting our ability to evaluate ongoing changes within the context of historical variability and underlying forcing mechanisms. Here we show that surface ocean temperatures at the continental margin of the western Antarctic Peninsula cooled by 3-4 °C over the past 12,000 years, tracking the Holocene decline of local (65° S) spring insolation. Our results, based on TEX(86) sea surface temperature (SST) proxy evidence from a marine sediment core, indicate the importance of regional summer duration as a driver of Antarctic seasonal sea-ice fluctuations. On millennial timescales, abrupt SST fluctuations of 2-4 °C coincide with globally recognized climate variability. Similarities between our SSTs, Southern Hemisphere westerly wind reconstructions and El Niño/Southern Oscillation variability indicate that present climate teleconnections between the tropical Pacific Ocean and the western Antarctic Peninsula strengthened late in the Holocene epoch. We conclude that during the Holocene, Southern Ocean temperatures at the western Antarctic Peninsula margin were tied to changes in the position of the westerlies, which have a critical role in global carbon cycling.

  19. Holocene sediment accumulation rates in fjords and bays of Chilean Patagonia and the Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellner, J. S.; Anderson, J. B.; Milliken, K.; Fernandez, R.; Michalchuk, B.; Boyd, B.

    2007-12-01

    Beginning in 2005 and ending in May of 2007, we completed a series of four research cruises in the fjords and bays of Chilean Patagonia and the Antarctic Peninsula aimed, in part, at determining the style and rate of Holocene sediment accumulation in a range of glacial settings. Our original hypothesis stated that rates of glacial erosion are a function of sliding speed, and are therefore expected to diminish sharply as basal temperatures drop below the melting point. To test this hypothesis, we measured sediment accumulation in tidewater glacier fjords ranging from fast-moving temperate glaciers in Patagonia to slower moving polar glaciers on the Antarctic Peninsula. Four fjords were surveyed in Patagonia ranging from San Rafael fjord in the Northern Patagonia ice field to Marinelli fjord in Tierra del Fuego. The cruises to the Antarctic Peninsula included two SHALDRIL legs during which drill cores recovered 108 m and 80 m of Holocene sediment in Maxwell Bay, South Shetland Islands, and the Firth of Tay in the northwestern Weddell Sea, respectively. An additional nine fjords across the northern peninsula were surveyed with kasten and jumbo piston cores. To date, we have completed nearly 100 radiocarbon dates from fossil carbonate material, both shells and foraminifera, extracted from the sediment cores obtained in these fjords. Our initial results highlight the complexity of the controls on sediment yields and the extreme variability in sediment accumulation amongst fjords. While climate may be the first order control on glacier erosion rates and sediment transport to bays and fjords, several other factors must significantly influence these processes and may mask the broader signal. Our ongoing work with this newly acquired comprehensive dataset is examining additional controls including drainage basin size, precipitation gradient, altitude of the glaciers, and glacial substrate.

  20. Plate Coupling and Transient Events Detection from Geodetic Measurements in Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Y.; McCaffrey, R.; Wdowinski, S.; Dixon, T.; Protti, M.; Gonzalez, V. M.; Newman, A. V.; Feng, L.

    2011-12-01

    Aseismic tremor and slow slip events (SSE) are known to perturb the stress field at the plate subduction interface. Nicoya Peninsula in northern Costa Rica is located near the Middle America Trench (MAT), where the Cocos plate subducts underneath Caribbean plate. The subducting Cocos plate contains two types of subducting oceanic crust, East Pacific Rise (EPR) in the northern peninsula and Cocos-Nazca Spreading center (CNS) in the southern peninsula. The two crust types differ in subducting speed and orientation, topography, age and heat flow. This unique geological setting provides an opportunity to investigate the kinematics and dynamics of SSE and tremor. In the Nicoya peninsula SSE are found in high b-value regions and occur approximately every 20 months. However, the location and magnitude of SSE are still uncertain due to limited observations. Here we report additional geodetic observations and use a new GPS time-series inversion scheme to investigate simultaneously both SSE and interseismic locking patterns in the study area and their evolution with time. We solve for the steady inter-seismic velocity field and parameters characterizing SSE including slip amount and duration. A preliminary analysis of continuous and campaign GPS data using the time dependent geodetic inversion software TDefnode [McCaffrey 2009] reveals three slow-slipping patches for events in 2003, 2005, 2007 and 2009. Previous inversion analysis of Outerbridge et al. [2010] of the 2007 SSE identified the two of the three patches, a deep on at depth of ~25 km, and a shallower patch at depth of ~7 km. The third patch identified by our inversion at depth of ~15 km is similar in area and location to that reported by Protti et al. [2004] for the 2003 event.

  1. Subsurface stratigraphy of Cambrian rocks in southern Peninsula of Michigan: Michigan basin

    SciTech Connect

    Milstein, R.L. )

    1989-08-01

    Rocks believed to be Late Cambrian exist throughout the subsurface area of Michigan's Southern Peninsula. These Cambrian rocks represent the oldest Paleozoic sedimentary deposits in the Michigan basin. Isopach and paleogeologic maps of these Cambrian rock units have been prepared with the data derived from geophysical well logs, descriptive logs, and well samples from 101 oil and gas test wells, mineral extraction wells, and deep disposal wells. A generalized contour map of the Precambrian surface has also been prepared from these data.

  2. New data on the material composition of mud volcano products on Kerch Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ershov, V. V.; Levin, B. V.

    2016-11-01

    The results of recent studies of the isotope and chemical composition of the waters and breccias that erupted from mud volcanoes of Kerch Peninsula are presented. It was found that the waters of the volcanoes considered were characterized by low salinity, a chloride-hydrocarbonate-sodium composition, and an increased 18O content. The breccias were enriched in organic matter and some microelements (Li, Se, Hg, etc.). As for petrogenic elements, depletion of Ca in the breccias is noted.

  3. Penguin eggshell membranes reflect homogeneity of mercury in the marine food web surrounding the Antarctic Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Brasso, Rebecka L; Polito, Michael J; Lynch, Heather J; Naveen, R; Emslie, Steven D

    2012-11-15

    Remote regions such as the Antarctic have become increasingly important for investigations into far-reaching anthropogenic impacts on the environment, most recently in regard to the global mercury cycle. Spatial patterns of mercury availability in four regions of the Antarctic Peninsula were investigated using three species of sympatrically breeding Pygoscelis penguins as biomonitors. Eggshells with intact membranes from Adélie, Gentoo, and Chinstrap penguins were collected at 24 breeding colonies in the South Orkney Islands, South Shetland Islands, eastern Antarctic Peninsula, and western Antarctic Peninsula during the 2006/2007 austral summer. In addition, we compared eggshell membrane mercury concentrations with eggshell stable isotope values (δ(15)N and δ(13)C) to determine if species-specific trophic or foraging habitat preferences influenced female mercury exposure prior to breeding. With few exceptions, mercury concentrations were found to be fairly homogeneous throughout the Antarctic Peninsula suggesting little spatial variation in the risk of exposure to dietary mercury in this food web. Mercury concentrations in Gentoo and Adélie penguins were similar while Chinstrap penguins tended to have higher eggshell membrane mercury concentrations than their congeners. However, inter and intra-specific differences in eggshell membrane mercury concentration were not related to eggshell δ(15)N or δ(13)C values, a likely result of all three species foraging at similar trophic positions. The lack of regional-scale differences in mercury availability in this marine ecosystem may be a reflection of generally uniform atmospheric deposition and upwelling of regionally homogeneous deep water rather than from geographically distinct point sources.

  4. Upper-crust Tomographic Structure of the Southern Korea Peninsula from Local Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K. H.; Park, J. H.; Kang, S. Y.

    2015-12-01

    We derived the three dimensional P wave velocity model for the uppermost 14 km of crust in the southern Korea peninsula using travel-time data from local earthquakes which are recorded by two nation-wide seismic networks operated by Korea Meteorological Administration and Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources. Earthquakes in the study occurred between 2001 and 2014. 19,935 P wave arrivals from 747 earthquakes observed by 184 seismic stations are selected for the 3-D tomographic inversion. In order to secure best possible data for tomography inversion, we applied a strict criteria during the selection of earthquakes and travel-times. The study area is parameterized by 10km×10km×4km grid for velocity inversion and 1km×1km×1km grid for travel time calculations. Checkerboard resolution test are used to demonstrate the ray coverage and the resolution for the given station-event configurations. The results indicate P-wave velocity model at shallow depths less than 2 km are not properly resolved mainly due to the insufficient ray coverage. The model at deeper depths greater than 14 km also suffered by lack of ray coverage. Thus, we limit our interpretations of the preliminary P wave velocity model to areas that are illuminated by enough rays. P wave velocity model indicates there are significant lateral velocity variations across the southern Korea peninsula. Most distinguished feature in the velocity model is the higher velocity anomaly beneath the southeastern Korea peninsula. The anomaly regions is distinguished by well-defined tectonic boundary. At 8 km depth, lower velocity anomaly is observed in Gyeonggi massif and high-mountain regions in the southern Korea peninsula. The 3-D velocity model is compared with geophysical and geological observations.

  5. Ground-water-quality assessment of the Delmarva Peninsula, Delaware, Maryland, and Virginia; project description

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bachman, L.J.; Shedlock, R.J.; Phillips, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    In April 1986, the U.S. Geological Survey began a pilot program to assess the quality of the Nation 's surface water and groundwater resources. This National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) program is designed to acquire and interpret information about a wide range of water quality issues. Three groundwater pilot projects have been started, including the project on the Delmarva Peninsula, which covers eastern Maryland and Virginia and most of Delaware. The objectives of the Delmarva project are to: (1) investigate regional groundwater quality on the Delmarva Peninsula, emphasizing a description of the occurrence of trace elements and manmade organic compounds; (2) relate groundwater quality to land use and geohydrologic conditions; and (3) provide a general description of the location, nature, and possible causes of selected water quality problems prevalent in the study area. The shallow aquifer system and the deeper aquifers used for public water supply will be addressed. The shallow aquifer system in the Delmarva Peninsula consists of permeable unconsolidated sand and gravel. Flow systems are localized and small-scale. Farming is common on the peninsula, and the migration of agricultural chemicals to the groundwater system is a local water quality concern. To assess the water quality of the groundwater resources, a regional survey for a wide range of constituents will be conducted in all of the pilot projects to provide a representative sample of groundwater analyses for a national assessment of groundwater quality. Results of this survey may be used as a baseline to monitor future water quality trends. (Lantz-PTT)

  6. Preliminary Geothermal Evaluation of the Mokapu Peninsula on the Island of Oahu, Hawaii.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    locations does occur, we believe, based on available evidence, that only the Koko Head rift is a reasonable postulation. Dating of the Honolulu Volcanic...Oahu (e.g., Diamond Head, Koko Head) and is considered to be derived from a nepheline basalt magma (Winchell, 1947). The flat area of the peninsula to...are mainly restricted to the Koko Head rift. Also, melilitites have now been determined to exist on the apron of the Koolau caldera well outside the

  7. First record of Hermetia illucens (Diptera: Stratiomyidae) on human corpses in Iberian Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Sánchez, Anabel; Magaña, Concepción; Saloña, Marta; Rojo, Santos

    2011-03-20

    This article presents the first record of Hermetia illucens larvae on a human corpse in Spain (the second case report in Europe). Prepupae of H. illucens, and other insects, were recovered from the dead body of a 72-year-old man in an advanced stage of decomposition. The body was located in Reus (NE Spain), in October 1998. This article provides additional biological data on experimental studies and an update on the geographic distribution of this species in the Iberian Peninsula.

  8. Distribution of phthalate esters in agricultural soil with plastic film mulching in Shandong Peninsula, East China.

    PubMed

    Li, Kankan; Ma, Dong; Wu, Juan; Chai, Chao; Shi, Yanxi

    2016-12-01

    The content of phthalate esters (PAEs) was investigated in 36 vegetable fields with plastic film mulching in Shandong Peninsula, East China. Soils at depths of 0-10 cm, 10-20 cm, and 20-40 cm were collected, and 16 PAEs were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. PAEs were detected in all the analyzed samples. The total contents of the 16 PAEs (Σ16PAEs) ranged from 1.374 to 18.810 mg/kg, with an average of 6.470 mg/kg. Among the four areas of Shandong Peninsula, including Qingdao, Weihai, Weifang, and Yantai, the highest Σ16PAE in the soil was observed in Weifang district (9.786 mg/kg), which is famous for large-scale vegetable production. Despite the significant differences among the Σ16PAEs, the PAE compositions in soils with plastic film mulching in Shandong Peninsula were comparable. Diethyl phthalate (DEP), diisobutyl phthalate, and di(4-methyl-2-pentyl) phthalate were present in all the samples, whereas di-n-hexyl phthalate was detected only in Qingdao (∼1%) and dicyclohexyl phthalate was observed only in Weifang (5.7-8.2%) in low proportions. The ratios of dimethyl phthalate, DEP, and di-n-butyl phthalate, which exceeded allowable concentrations, were 63.9-100% at different soil depths, indicating high PAE pollution. The concentration of butyl benzyl phthalate detected only in Weifang exceeded the recommended allowable soil concentration. Overall, the high PAE content in the soil with plastic film mulching in Shandong Peninsula is an issue of concern because of the large amounts of plastic film used.

  9. The ant genus Carebara Westwood in the Arabian Peninsula (Hymenoptera, Formicidae)

    PubMed Central

    Sharaf, Mostafa R.; Aldawood, Abdulrahman S.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The ant genus Carebara of the Arabian Peninsula is revised. Carebara abuhurayri Sharaf & Aldawood, 2011 is synonymized under Carebara arabica Collingwood & van Harten, 2001. Carebara arabica is redescribed and a Neotype is fixed based on a specimen collected from southwestern Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. A new species, C. fayrouzae sp. n. is described from Saudi Arabia based on queens, major and minor workers. Keys to major and minor workers of the two Arabian Carebara species are given. PMID:24363580

  10. Spatial Distribution of Dorylaimid and Mononchid Nematodes from Southeast Iberian Peninsula: Chorological Relationships among Species

    PubMed Central

    Liébanas, G.; Peña-Santiago, R.; Real, R.; Márquez, A. L.

    2002-01-01

    The spatial distribution of 138 Dorylaimid and Mononchid species collected in a natural area from the Southeast Iberian Peninsula was studied. A chorological classification was used to examine distribution patterns shared by groups of species. Eighty species were classified into 14 collective and 16 individual chorotypes. The geographical projections of several collective chorotypes are illustrated along with their corresponding distribution maps. The importance of this analysis to nematological study is briefly discussed. PMID:19265962

  11. The Polyploid Series of the Achillea millefolium Aggregate in the Iberian Peninsula Investigated Using Microsatellites

    PubMed Central

    López-Vinyallonga, Sara; Soriano, Ignasi; Susanna, Alfonso; Montserra, Josep Maria; Roquet, Cristina; Garcia-Jacas, Núria

    2015-01-01

    The Achillea millefolium aggregate is one of the most diverse polyploid complexes of the Northern hemisphere and has its western Eurasian boundary in the Iberian Peninsula. Four ploidy levels have been detected in A. millefolium, three of which have already been found in Iberia (diploid, hexaploid and octoploid), and a fourth (tetraploid) reported during the preparation of this paper. We collected a sample from 26 Iberian populations comprising all ploidy levels, and we used microsatellite markers analyzed as dominant in view of the high ploidy levels. Our goals were to quantify the genetic diversity of A. millefolium in the Iberian Peninsula, to elucidate its genetic structure, to investigate the differences in ploidy levels, and to analyse the dispersal of the species. The lack of spatial genetic structure recovered is linked to both high levels of gene flow between populations and to the fact that most genetic variability occurs within populations. This in turn suggests the existence of a huge panmictic yarrow population in the Iberian Peninsula. This is consistent with the assumption that recent colonization and rapid expansion occurred throughout this area. Likewise, the low levels of genetic variability recovered suggest that bottlenecks and/or founder events may have been involved in this process, and clonal reproduction may have played an important role in maintaining this genetic impoverishment. Indeed, the ecological and phenologic uniformity present in the A. millefolium agg. in Iberia compared to Eurasia and North America may be responsible for the low number of representatives of this complex of species present in the Iberian Peninsula. The low levels of genetic differentiation between ploidy levels recovered in our work suggest the absence of barriers between them. PMID:26091537

  12. China and the Korean Peninsula: Beijing’s Pyongyang Problem and Seoul Hope

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    observers need a clear idea of China’s objectives on the Korean Peninsula. In the abstract, a Korea that would best serve China’s interests would...publicly oppose reunification would offend Koreans on both sides of the 38th Parallel, and a divided Korea has clearly been advantageous in some ways...and areas of Manchuria with heavily ethnic Korean populations. A North Korea hostile to the United States has precluded the possibility of U.S. military

  13. The Key to Stability on the Korean Peninsula - United States, Japan and China

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-04-01

    US diplomatic, defense , and economic efforts on the Korean 7 Peninsula rest. Our treaty commitment and the presence of US troops in South Korea help...the Korean people and ROK service members. —Kim Dae-jung President, Republic of Korea , 1998-2003 Mutual Defense Treaty To deter the North... Korean threat of attack, the Republic of Korea entered into a defense alliance with the United States. This was formalized when the “ROK-US Mutual

  14. Seasonal variability in whale encounters in the Western Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiele, Deborah; Chester, Edwin T.; Moore, Sue E.; Širovic, Ana; Hildebrand, John A.; Friedlaender, Ari S.

    2004-08-01

    Cetacean sighting surveys were conducted as part of nine multidisciplinary research cruises over late summer, autumn and winter of 2 years (2001-2003) during the Southern Ocean Global Ocean Ecosystems (SO GLOBEC) program. Sea-ice cover differed markedly between years, with apparent effects on cetacean distribution. No ice was present until late June in 2001, while the previous winter sea ice never fully retreated (>30% cover) during the 2002 or 2003 summer, thus increasing the proportion of thicker and more complex ice, including multi-year floes. Humpback (237 sightings; 537 individuals) and minke (103 sightings: 267 individuals) whales were the most commonly detected species. Data from seven comparable cruises were used to identify habitat for minke and humpback whales over five geographically distinct spatial divisions in the study area. In all years, both species were predominantly found in near coastal habitat, particularly in the fjords where complex habitat likely concentrated prey. In 2002 and 2003 the presence of sea ice provided additional feeding habitat, and the numbers of minkes (in winter) and humpbacks (late summer and autumn) in the area doubled compared with 2001. Humpbacks in particular were concentrated at the ice boundaries during late summer and autumn, while minke numbers increased in the winter that followed and occupied ice-covered areas along the entire shelf edge. Important resource sites for these species are mainly located in near-coastal areas and are used in all years, but when ice margins exist and intersect with resource sites they attract much larger numbers of animals due to the dynamics between sea ice and prey.

  15. Impacts of the north and tropical Atlantic Ocean on the Antarctic Peninsula and sea ice.

    PubMed

    Li, Xichen; Holland, David M; Gerber, Edwin P; Yoo, Changhyun

    2014-01-23

    In recent decades, Antarctica has experienced pronounced climate changes. The Antarctic Peninsula exhibited the strongest warming of any region on the planet, causing rapid changes in land ice. Additionally, in contrast to the sea-ice decline over the Arctic, Antarctic sea ice has not declined, but has instead undergone a perplexing redistribution. Antarctic climate is influenced by, among other factors, changes in radiative forcing and remote Pacific climate variability, but none explains the observed Antarctic Peninsula warming or the sea-ice redistribution in austral winter. However, in the north and tropical Atlantic Ocean, the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (a leading mode of sea surface temperature variability) has been overlooked in this context. Here we show that sea surface warming related to the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation reduces the surface pressure in the Amundsen Sea and contributes to the observed dipole-like sea-ice redistribution between the Ross and Amundsen-Bellingshausen-Weddell seas and to the Antarctic Peninsula warming. Support for these findings comes from analysis of observational and reanalysis data, and independently from both comprehensive and idealized atmospheric model simulations. We suggest that the north and tropical Atlantic is important for projections of future climate change in Antarctica, and has the potential to affect the global thermohaline circulation and sea-level change.

  16. Tectonically controlled sedimentation in the Mesozoic basins of the Antarctic Peninsula

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, D.I.M.; Butterworth, P.J. )

    1990-05-01

    The Antarctica Peninsula (AP) lies on a medium-size block of continental crust and is one of a mosaic of west Antarctica coastal block that underwent a complex tectonic evolution during Gondwana breakup. The peninsula represents the eroded roots of a microcontinental volcanic arc; this arc lay above the easterly subducting proto-Pacific plate, and was active throughout the Mesozoic. The exposed Mesozoic basins display a complex stratigraphy, reflecting local tectonic and volcanic events. There are a few general trends. Almost all basins are post-late Oxfordian, their fill is entirely clastic, and is largely derived from the Antarctica peninsula volcanic arc. Most basins were affected by a period of arc expansion in the latest Jurassic or earliest Cretaceous, which manifests itself as inputs of lava or coarse volcaniclastic sediment overlying mudstones with an open marine fauna. Barriasian and older mudstones are generally finer grained and darker than mudstones from post-Berriasian strata. However, it must be emphasized that these are only general trends. Deformation is variable, commonly progressive. No lithostratigraphic units can be correlated between any two basins, nor are there any interregional unconformities. No matching is possible with basins of equivalent age in formerly contiguous areas of Gondwana. There is evidence that some global eustatic events are recorded in the sedimentary records of at least two of the AP Mesozoic basins, but these have effect only in periods of local tectonic quiescence. The dominant control on sedimentation in this large segment of the Pacific rim was arc tectonics.

  17. Seasonal transmission of Leishmania (Leishmania) mexicana in the state of Campeche, Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Andrade-Narvaez, Fernando J; Canto Lara, Silvia B; Van Wynsberghe, Nicole R; Rebollar-Tellez, Eduardo A; Vargas-Gonzalez, Alberto; Albertos-Alpuche, Nelly E

    2003-12-01

    In the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico, localized cutaneous leishmaniasis (LCL) caused by Leishmania (Leishmania) mexicana is a typical wild zoonosis restricted to the forest, and humans are only accidentally involved. The transmission of L. (L.) mexicana has been related to the patient's occupation: "chicleros" (gum collectors) and agricultural workers. The objective of this study was to document L. (L.) mexicana seasonally of transmission in endemic areas of LCL in the state of Campeche, Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. The timing of incidence of LCL in humans during 1993-1994, as well as the rate and time of infection in rodents and sand flies between February 1993 and March 1995 were analyzed. Rodents and sand flies were found infected between November and March, when men carried out their field activities and are exposed. Based on results analyzed, it is concluded that L. (L.) mexicana in the endemic area of LCL in the state of Campeche, Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico, presents a seasonal transmission restricted to the months of November to March. The knowledge of the timing of the transmission cycle in an endemic area of leishmaniasis is very important because intervention measures on the high-risk focus and population might be restricted.

  18. Hydrological extremes in hyperarid regions: A diagnostic characterization of intense precipitation over the Central Arabian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Kondapalli Niranjan; Entekhabi, Dara; Molini, Annalisa

    2015-03-01

    Aridity is typically associated with deep and dry daytime boundary layers, stable nighttime stratification, divergent flows, and limited large-scale moisture advection. All these factors are paramount in regulating the hydroclimatology of hyperarid regions, resulting in extremely intermittent—and often intense—local precipitation patterns. However, the link between synoptic-scale forcing and intense precipitation over arid regions has been scarcely investigated in the literature and still remains exceedingly unexplored. We present here a diagnostic study of intense precipitation in the Central Arabian Peninsula, based on the analysis of local extreme signatures embedded in synoptic patterns. Special emphasis is given to the genesis of winter extremes over the Peninsula, and to possible effects of synchronization between the atmospheric circulation over the Mediterranean and the Indian Ocean. Based on composites of the tropospheric circulation for a large ensemble of intense events, we show that moisture necessary to trigger winter extremes over the Peninsula starts to build up in average 8 days before heavy rainfall occurrence, mainly as a consequence of the interplay between the Mediterranean and the Monsoonal circulation. Moisture advection is in turn associated with an upper troposphere cyclonic circulation and pronounced potential vorticity intrusions. Overall, our results demonstrate how large-scale precursors can be effectively used to improve the predictability of rainfall extremes in hyperarid regions.

  19. Ground-water resources of the North Beach Peninsula, Pacific County, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tracy, James V.

    1977-01-01

    The anticipated water demand of 425 million gallons per year for the North Brach Peninsula, Pacific County, Wash., can be met by properly developing the ground-water supplies of the area 's water-table aquifer. Of the approximately 77 inches of annual precipitation on the peninsula, an estimated 23 inches is lost to evapotranspiration, and approximately 36 inches is discharged by the water-table aquifer into the ocean and bay. The remaining water either runs off the surface or is leaked to a deeper aquifer that ultimately discharges to the ocean. At least 12 inches of the water that discharges naturally through the aquifer is available for additional development. This quantity of water is approximately equivalent to 860,000 gallons per day. Wells spaced at least 1,000 feet apart along the major axis of the peninsula and pumped at average rates of no more than 80 gallons per minute could ensure that water-level declines do not exceed 6 feet near the wells and 1 foot at the shoreline, thereby preventing seawater intrusion. Lowering of the water table may be beneficial in reducing waterlogging problems, but care must be taken not to lower the levels near cranberry bogs, which require a shallow water table. Treatment of the otherwise good quality water for iron may be required, as about 75 percent of the well water sampled from the aquifer had iron concentrations in excess of limits recommended by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. (Woodard-USGS)

  20. Remotely-Sensed Glacier Change Estimation: a Case Study at Lindblad Cove, Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fieber, K. D.; Mills, J. P.; Miller, P. E.; Fox, A. J.

    2016-06-01

    This study builds on existing literature of glacier change estimation in polar regions and is a continuation of efforts aimed at unlocking the information encapsulated in archival aerial photography of Antarctic Peninsula glaciers. Historical aerial imagery acquired in 1957 over three marine-terminating glaciers at Lindblad Cove on the West Coast of Trinity Peninsula is processed to extract digital elevation models (DEMs) which are subsequently compared to DEMs generated from present day (2014) WorldView-2 satellite stereo-imagery. The new WorldView-2 images offer unprecedented sub-metre resolution of the Antarctic Peninsula and are explored here to facilitate improved registration and higher accuracy analysis of glacier changes. Unlike many studies, which focus on glacier fronts or only restricted regions of glaciers, this paper presents a complete coverage of elevation changes across the glacier surfaces for two of the studied glaciers. The study utilises a robust least squares matching technique to ensure precise registration of the archival and modern DEMs, which is applied due to lack of existing ground control in this remote region. This case study reveals that, while many glaciers in polar regions are reported as experiencing significant mass loss, some glaciers are stable or even demonstrate mass gain. All three glaciers reported here demonstrated overall mean increases in surface elevation, indicative of positive mass balance ranging from 0.6 to 5.8 metre water equivalent between 1957 and 2014.

  1. Spatial climate dynamics in the Iberian Peninsula since 15 000 Yr BP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarroso, P.; Carrión, J.; Dorado-Valiño, M.; Queiroz, P.; Santos, L.; Valdeolmillos-Rodríguez, A.; Célio Alves, P.; Brito, J. C.; Cheddadi, R.

    2014-09-01

    The evolution of the climate in the Iberian Peninsula since the last glacial maximum is associated with distributional shifts of multiple species. We rely on this dynamic relationship between past climate and biodiversity patterns to quantify climate change using fossil pollen records widespread throughout the Iberian Peninsula and modern spatial distribution of plant taxa and climate. We have reconstructed spatial layers (1 ka interval) of January minimum temperature, July maximum temperature and minimum annual precipitation using a method based on probability density functions and covering the time period between 15 and 3 ka. A functional principal component analysis was used in order to summarise the spatial evolution of climate. Using a clustering method we have identified areas that share similar climate evolutions during the studied time period. The spatial reconstructions show a highly dynamic pattern in accordance with the main climatic trends. The four cluster areas we found exhibit different climate evolution over the studied period. The clustering scheme and patterns of change between millenia are coherent with the existence of multiple refugial areas in the Iberian Peninsula.

  2. Late Holocene Marine Sediment Record from the Bransfield Basin, Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, A.; Wellner, J. S.

    2009-12-01

    A comparison of published records of marine sediment cores from fjords around the northern Antarctic Peninsula suggests that climate change during the deglacial period occurred diachronously across the region. This is in contrast to the widespread retreat observed today. However, detailed records of the Holocene climate from the Antarctic Peninsula are widely spaced and this paucity does not allow for an understanding of the controls on the changes in different areas, or if the apparent diachronous change is simply due to poor chronostratigraphic controls. The purpose of this study is to correlate studies that are separated by large distances with a new record in a central location. The Bransfield Basin is located between the Antarctic Peninsula and the South Shetland Islands and links marine records from the Firth of Tay, Maxwell Bay, Palmer Deep and the western Bransfield Basin. This study focuses on a 22 m sediment core collected in 2007 from the deep central Bransfield Basin, which spans the last 4000 years. Analyses completed to date include core descriptions, laser particle size analysis, multi-sensor core logger analysis, X-ray radiograph fabric description, pebble count and petrography. Ongoing analyses include TOC, total C, total N, 12-13C and 14-15N. The core lithology is dominantly characterized by diatomaceous mud with varying amounts of terrigenous sediment and ice rafted debris. Interpretation of the sedimentary facies suggests that this is a high-resolution record of climatic change that may be used to link other records in this region.

  3. Salmon Futures: Stakeholder-driven salmon management scenarios under changing environmental conditions on Alaska's Kenai Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trammell, E. J.; Krupa, M.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the adaptive capacity of individuals within natural resource management agencies is a key component of assessing the vulnerability of salmon to future environmental change. We seek to explore the adaptive capacity of natural resource agencies on Alaska's Kenai Peninsula by exploring the drivers and implications of different salmon allocation scenarios through participatory workshops with managers. We present here the initial results from the first workshop, which explores the various drivers responsible for changes in salmon allocation. Ranging from global to local, and biophysical to socioeconomic, these drivers are also linked to specific actors in the region. These complex interactions comprise the Kenai Peninsula's social-ecological system and determine its ability to react to change. Using a stakeholder-driven scenario framework, we aim to: 1) explore the adaptive capacity of natural resource agencies in the region by exploring and exposing managers to different but logically coherent salmon allocation scenarios; 2) build stakeholder confidence in the science of environmental change on the Kenai Peninsula; and 3) develop a decision support tool that helps regional resource managers better understand their changing environment. We utilize and present the scenario framework as a platform for integrating hydrologic, landscape, and cultural change information into actionable decisions, crafted by the stakeholders, so that landscape change on the Kenai becomes more coordinated.

  4. Spatial and temporal characteristics of wildfire activity over the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calado, Teresa; DaCamara, Carlos C.; Ermida, Sofia; Trigo, Isabel.

    2013-04-01

    According to the official reports of the European Commission, during the period 1980-2010 the Iberian Peninsula has contributed to 60% of the total burned area of 14 620 968 ha, which was recorded in the five Southern Member States with higher wildfire activity (Portugal, Spain, France, Italy and Greece). The aim of the present study is to assess fire activity over the Iberian Peninsula based on time series of hot spots extracted from the MODIS global daily active fire product (MOD14A1 and MYD14A1). This dataset, which contains the coordinates of MODIS pixels where fire events were identified together with the respective date and quality indicators, covers the period from July 2002 to August 2012. It is first shown that overall hot spot activity exhibits power law behaviour. A spatial analysis is then undertaken based on land cover information as obtained from Globcover - an ESA initiative relying on observations from the 300m MERIS on board the ENVISAT. Temporal analysis of hot spot activity is also performed based on daily information about meteorological conditions provided by the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. Results obtained allow defining a set of fire regions over the Iberian Peninsula determined essentially by the respective land cover type, which present coherent statistical behaviour in space and time. Finally, models of fire risk are developed for each region and their potential operational use by forest and civil protection services is discussed.

  5. Temporal controls on silicic acid utilisation along the West Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swann, George E. A.; Pike, Jennifer; Leng, Melanie J.; Sloane, Hilary J.; Snelling, Andrea M.

    2017-03-01

    The impact of climatic change along the Antarctica Peninsula has been widely debated in light of atmospheric/oceanic warming and increases in glacial melt over the past half century. Particular concern exists over the impact of these changes on marine ecosystems, not only on primary producers but also on higher trophic levels. Here we present a record detailing of the historical controls on the biogeochemical cycling of silicic acid [Si(OH)4] on the west Antarctica Peninsula margin, a region in which the modern phytoplankton environment is constrained by seasonal sea ice. We demonstrate that Si(OH)4 cycling through the Holocene alternates between being primarily regulated by sea ice or glacial discharge from the surrounding grounded ice sheet. With further climate-driven change and melting forecast for the twenty-first century, our findings document the potential for biogeochemical cycling and multi-trophic interactions along the peninsula to be increasingly regulated by glacial discharge, altering food-web interactions.

  6. Geodetic implications on block formation and geodynamic domains in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrocoso, M.; Fernández-Ros, A.; Prates, G.; García, A.; Kraus, S.

    2016-01-01

    The South Shetland Islands archipelago is dynamically complex due to its tectonic surroundings. Most islands are part of a formerly active volcanic arc, although Deception, Penguin and Bridgeman Islands, as well as several submarine volcanoes, are characterized by active back-arc volcanism. Geodetic benchmarks were deployed and the movement of the lithosphere to which they were fixed measured to provide geodynamic insight for the South Shetland Islands, Bransfield Basin and Antarctic Peninsula area based on surface deformation. These benchmarks' data add spatial and temporal coverage to previous results. The results reveal two different geodynamic patterns, each confined to a distinct part of the South Shetland Islands archipelago. The inferred absolute horizontal velocity vectors for the benchmarks in the northeastern part of the archipelago are consistent with the opening of the Bransfield Basin, while benchmark vectors in the southwestern part of the archipelago are similar to those of the benchmarks on the Antarctic Peninsula. In between, Snow, Deception and Livingston Islands represent a transition zone. In this area, the horizontal velocity vectors relative to the Antarctic plate shift northeastwards from N to NW. Furthermore, the South Shetland Islands benchmarks, except for that at Gibbs (Elephant) Islands, indicate subsidence, which might be a consequence of the slab roll-back at the South Shetland Trench. In contrast, the uplift revealed by the Antarctic Peninsula benchmarks suggests glacial isostatic adjustment after the Larson B ice-shelf breakup.

  7. Coccidiosis in European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus algirus) populations in the Iberian Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Silva, Sofia Marques; Ferreira, Catarina; Paupério, Joana; Silva, Rodolfo Miguel; Alves, Paulo Célio; Lemos, Armando

    2015-06-01

    The European rabbit Oryctolagus cuniculus is a keystone species from the Iberian Peninsula where viral diseases have played a prominent role in regulating their populations. Coccidiosis, a parasitic disease caused primarily by Eimeria spp., is also thought to have important negative effects. However, few studies have investigated the impact of coccidia on wild European rabbit populations on the Iberian Peninsula. Here we estimate coccidian prevalence in rabbit faecal samples collected along transects established in two ecological regions. Six Eimeria species, with different pathogenicity, were identified (E. coecicola, E. perforans, E media, E. magna, E. irresidua and E. flavescens). Species diversity varied significantly between regions although mean oocyst excretion levels were generally low in both areas (57.61 s.d.±78.07 and 17.03 s.d.±27.72, oocyst per gram of rabbit faeces). This study is the first to describe the composition of the Eimeria spp. assemblage for wild rabbit populations on the Iberian Peninsula and provides fundamental information for future studies on the potential interaction of viral and parasitic diseases.

  8. Inter-annual variation of NDVI over Korea Peninsula using harmonic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, In-hwan; Han, Kyung-Soo; Pi, Kyoung-Jin; Park, Soo-Jae; Kim, Sang-Il

    2010-10-01

    Global warming and climatic changes due to human activities impact on marine and terrestrial ecosystems, which feedbacks to climate system. These negative feedbacks amplify or accelerate again global climate change. In particular, life cycle of vegetation sensitively vary according to global climate change. This study attempts to analyze quantitatively vegetation change in Korea peninsula using harmonic analysis. Satellite data was extracted from SPOT/VEGETATION S10 MVC (Maximum Value Composite) NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) products during 10 years (1999 to 2008) around Korea peninsula. This NDVI data set was pre-processed to correct noise pixels cause by cloud and ground wetness. Variation of vegetation life cycle was analyzed through amplitudes and phases of annual harmonic components (first harmonic components) per year for two land cover types (cropland and forest). The results clearly show that the peak of vegetation life cycle in Korea peninsula is brought forward to early. Especially, it represents that the phases over low latitudes area between 32.8°N and 38°N steadily decrease every year both forest and cropland. The study estimated that phase values moved up approximately 0.5 day per year in cropland and 0.8 day per year in forest.

  9. Precipitation variability in September over the Korean Peninsula during ENSO developing phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Hye-Young; Park, Jong-Yeon; Kug, Jong-Seong

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the relationship between the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and precipitation variability over the Korean Peninsula is investigated. In contrast to the previously-known positive correlation between them during an El Niño developing summer and winter, we found a considerably significant negative correlation in September between Niño3 Sea Surface Temperature and Korean precipitation during ENSO developing phase. The northerly wind is only seen during El Nino developing phase and is part of the cyclonic flow over the subtropical North Pacific. The cyclonic flow over the subtropical North Pacific is induced by the subtropical diabatic heating, which is a peculiar feature during El Niño developing phase. In addition, it is demonstrated that the negative correlation is partly attributed to the tropical cyclone (TC), particularly during La Niña phase. That is, TC tends to pass through Korean Peninsula more frequently during La Niña years, which leads to more precipitation over the Korean Peninsula.

  10. Site selection

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, C.W.

    1983-07-01

    The conditions and criteria for selecting a site for a nuclear weapons test at the Nevada Test Site are summarized. Factors considered are: (1) scheduling of drill rigs, (2) scheduling of site preparation (dirt work, auger hole, surface casing, cementing), (3) schedule of event (when are drill hole data needed), (4) depth range of proposed W.P., (5) geologic structure (faults, Pz contact, etc.), (6) stratigraphy (alluvium, location of Grouse Canyon Tuff, etc.), (7) material properties (particularly montmorillonite and CO/sub 2/ content), (8) water table depth, (9) potential drilling problems (caving), (10) adjacent collapse craters and chimneys, (11) adjacent expended but uncollapsed sites, (12) adjacent post-shot or other small diameter holes, (13) adjacent stockpile emplacement holes, (14) adjacent planned events (including LANL), (15) projected needs of Test Program for various DOB's and operational separations, and (16) optimal use of NTS real estate.

  11. Detailed predictions of climate induced changes in the thermal and flow regimes in mountain streams of the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago, José M.; Muñoz-Mas, Rafael; García de Jalón, Diego; Solana, Joaquín; Alonso, Carlos; Martínez-Capel, Francisco; Ribalaygua, Jaime; Pórtoles, Javier; Monjo, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Streamflow and temperature regimes are well-known to influence on the availability of suitable physical habitat for instream biological communities. General Circulation Models (GCMs) have predicted significant changes in timing and geographic distribution of precipitation and atmospheric temperature for the ongoing century. However, differences in these predictions may arise when focusing on different spatial and temporal scales. Therefore, to perform substantiated mitigation and management actions detailed scales are necessary to adequately forecast the consequent thermal and flow regimes. Regional predictions are relatively abundant but detailed ones, both spatially and temporally, are still scarce. The present study aimed at predicting the effects of climate change on the thermal and flow regime in the Iberian Peninsula, refining the resolution of previous studies. For this purpose, the study encompassed 28 sites at eight different mountain rivers and streams in the central part of the Iberian Peninsula (Spain). The daily flow was modelled using different daily, monthly and quarterly lags of the historical precipitation and temperature time series. These precipitation-runoff models were developed by means of M5 model trees. On the other hand water temperature was modelled at similar time scale by means of nonlinear regression from dedicated site-specific data. The developed models were used to simulate the temperature and flow regime under two Representative Concentration Pathway (RCPs) climate change scenarios (RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5) until the end of the present century by considering nine different GCMs, which were pertinently downscaled. The precipitation-runoff models achieved high accuracy (NSE>0.7), especially in regards of the low flows of the historical series. Results concomitantly forecasted flow reductions between 7 and 17 % (RCP4.5) and between 8 and 49% (RCP8.5) of the annual average in the most cases, being variable the magnitude and timing at each

  12. Abrupt along-strike change in tectonic style: San Andreas fault zone, San Francisco Peninsula

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zoback, M.L.; Jachens, R.C.; Olson, J.A.

    1999-01-01

    Seismicity and high-resolution aeromagnetic data are used to define an abrupt change from compressional to extensional tectonism within a 10- to 15-km-wide zone along the San Andreas fault on the San Francisco Peninsula and offshore from the Golden Gate. This 100-km-long section of the San Andreas fault includes the hypocenter of the Mw = 7.8 1906 San Francisco earthquake as well as the highest level of persistent microseismicity along that ???470-km-long rupture. We define two distinct zones of deformation along this stretch of the fault using well-constrained relocations of all post-1969 earthquakes based a joint one-dimensional velocity/hypocenter inversion and a redetermination of focal mechanisms. The southern zone is characterized by thrust- and reverse-faulting focal mechanisms with NE trending P axes that indicate "fault-normal" compression in 7- to 10-km-wide zones of deformation on both sides of the San Andreas fault. A 1- to 2-km-wide vertical zone beneath the surface trace of the San Andreas is characterized by its almost complete lack of seismicity. The compressional deformation is consistent with the young, high topography of the Santa Cruz Mountains/Coast Ranges as the San Andreas fault makes a broad restraining left bend (???10??) through the southernmost peninsula. A zone of seismic quiescence ???15 km long separates this compressional zone to the south from a zone of combined normal-faulting and strike-slip-faulting focal mechanisms (including a ML = 5.3 earthquake in 1957) on the northernmost peninsula and offshore on the Golden Gate platform. Both linear pseudo-gravity gradients, calculated from the aeromagnetic data, and seismic reflection data indicate that the San Andreas fault makes an abrupt ???3-km right step less than 5 km offshore in this northern zone. A similar right-stepping (dilatational) geometry is also observed for the subparallel San Gregorio fault offshore. Persistent seismicity and extensional tectonism occur within the San

  13. Mass Balance of the Northern Antarctic Peninsula and its Ongoing Response to Ice Shelf Loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scambos, T. A.; Berthier, E.; Haran, T. M.; Shuman, C. A.; Cook, A. J.; Bohlander, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    An assessment of the most rapidly changing areas of the Antarctic Peninsula (north of 66°S) shows that ice mass loss for the region is dominated by areas affected by eastern-Peninsula ice shelf losses in the past 20 years. Little if any of the mass loss is compensated by increased snowfall in the northwestern or far northern areas. We combined satellite stereo-image DEM differencing and ICESat-derived along-track elevation changes to measure ice mass loss for the Antarctic Peninsula north of 66°S between 2001-2010, focusing on the ICESat-1 period of operation (2003-2009). This mapping includes all ice drainages affected by recent ice shelf loss in the northeastern Peninsula (Prince Gustav, Larsen Inlet, Larsen A, and Larsen B) as well as James Ross Island, Vega Island, Anvers Island, Brabant Island and the adjacent west-flowing glaciers. Polaris Glacier (feeding the Larsen Inlet, which collapsed in 1986) is an exception, and may have stabilized. Our method uses ASTER and SPOT-5 stereo-image DEMs to determine dh/dt for elevations below 800 m; at higher elevations ICESat along-track elevation differencing is used. To adjust along-track path offsets between its 2003-2009 campaigns, we use a recent DEM of the Peninsula to establish and correct for cross-track slope (Cook et al., 2012, doi:10.5194/essdd-5-365-2012; http://nsidc.org/data/nsidc-0516.html) . We reduce the effect of possible seasonal variations in elevation by using only integer-year repeats of the ICESat tracks for comparison. Mass losses are dominated by the major glaciers that had flowed into the Prince Gustav (Boydell, Sjorgren, Röhss), Larsen A (Edgeworth, Bombardier, Dinsmoor, Drygalski), and Larsen B (Hektoria, Jorum, and Crane) embayments. The pattern of mass loss emphasizes the significant and multi-decadal response to ice shelf loss. Areas with shelf losses occurring 30 to 100s of years ago seem to be relatively stable or losing mass only slowly (western glaciers, northernmost areas). The

  14. Lower Miocene stratigraphy along the Panama Canal and its bearing on the Central American Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Michael Xavier; Jones, Douglas S; MacFadden, Bruce J

    2008-07-30

    Before the formation of the Central American Isthmus, there was a Central American Peninsula. Here we show that southern Central America existed as a peninsula as early as 19 Ma, based on new lithostratigraphic, biostratigraphic and strontium chemostratigraphic analyses of the formations exposed along the Gaillard Cut of the Panama Canal. Land mammals found in the Miocene Cucaracha Formation have similar body sizes to conspecific taxa in North America, indicating that there existed a terrestrial connection with North America that allowed gene flow between populations during this time. How long did this peninsula last? The answer hinges on the outcome of a stratigraphic dispute: To wit, is the terrestrial Cucaracha Formation older or younger than the marine La Boca Formation? Previous stratigraphic studies of the Panama Canal Basin have suggested that the Cucaracha Formation lies stratigraphically between the shallow-marine Culebra Formation and the shallow-to-upper-bathyal La Boca Formation, the latter containing the Emperador Limestone. If the La Boca Formation is younger than the Cucaracha Formation, as many think, then the peninsula was short-lived (1-2 m.y.), having been submerged in part by the transgression represented by the overlying La Boca Formation. On the other hand, our data support the view that the La Boca Formation is older than the Cucaracha Formation. Strontium dating shows that the La Boca Formation is older (23.07 to 20.62 Ma) than both the Culebra (19.83-19.12 Ma) and Cucaracha (Hemingfordian to Barstovian North American Land Mammal Ages; 19-14 Ma) formations. The Emperador Limestone is also older (21.24-20.99 Ma) than the Culebra and Cucaracha formations. What has been called the "La Boca Formation" (with the Emperador Limestone), is re-interpreted here as being the lower part of the Culebra Formation. Our new data sets demonstrate that the main axis of the volcanic arc in southern Central America more than likely existed as a peninsula

  15. Lower Miocene Stratigraphy along the Panama Canal and Its Bearing on the Central American Peninsula

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, Michael Xavier; Jones, Douglas S.; MacFadden, Bruce J.

    2008-01-01

    Before the formation of the Central American Isthmus, there was a Central American Peninsula. Here we show that southern Central America existed as a peninsula as early as 19 Ma, based on new lithostratigraphic, biostratigraphic and strontium chemostratigraphic analyses of the formations exposed along the Gaillard Cut of the Panama Canal. Land mammals found in the Miocene Cucaracha Formation have similar body sizes to conspecific taxa in North America, indicating that there existed a terrestrial connection with North America that allowed gene flow between populations during this time. How long did this peninsula last? The answer hinges on the outcome of a stratigraphic dispute: To wit, is the terrestrial Cucaracha Formation older or younger than the marine La Boca Formation? Previous stratigraphic studies of the Panama Canal Basin have suggested that the Cucaracha Formation lies stratigraphically between the shallow-marine Culebra Formation and the shallow-to-upper-bathyal La Boca Formation, the latter containing the Emperador Limestone. If the La Boca Formation is younger than the Cucaracha Formation, as many think, then the peninsula was short-lived (1–2 m.y.), having been submerged in part by the transgression represented by the overlying La Boca Formation. On the other hand, our data support the view that the La Boca Formation is older than the Cucaracha Formation. Strontium dating shows that the La Boca Formation is older (23.07 to 20.62 Ma) than both the Culebra (19.83–19.12 Ma) and Cucaracha (Hemingfordian to Barstovian North American Land Mammal Ages; 19–14 Ma) formations. The Emperador Limestone is also older (21.24–20.99 Ma) than the Culebra and Cucaracha formations. What has been called the “La Boca Formation” (with the Emperador Limestone), is re-interpreted here as being the lower part of the Culebra Formation. Our new data sets demonstrate that the main axis of the volcanic arc in southern Central America more than likely existed as a

  16. Daily precipitation extreme events for the Iberian Peninsula and its association with Atmospheric Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Alexandre M.; Trigo, Ricardo M.; Liberato, Margarida LR

    2014-05-01

    Extreme precipitation events in the Iberian Peninsula during the extended winter months have major socio-economic impacts such as floods, landslides, extensive property damage and life losses. These events are usually associated with low pressure systems with Atlantic origin, although some extreme events in summer/autumn months can be linked to Mediterranean low pressure systems. Quite often these events are evaluated on a casuistic base and making use of data from relatively few stations. An objective method for ranking daily precipitation events is presented here based on the extensive use of the most comprehensive database of daily gridded precipitation available for the Iberian Peninsula (IB02) and spanning from 1950 to 2008, with a resolution of 0.2° (approximately 16 x 22 km at latitude 40°N), for a total of 1673 pixels. This database is based on a dense network of rain gauges, combining two national data sets, 'Spain02' for peninsular Spain and Balearic islands, and 'PT02' for mainland Portugal, with a total of more than two thousand stations over Spain and four hundred stations over Portugal, all quality-controlled and homogenized. Through this objective method for ranking daily precipitation events the magnitude of an event is obtained after considering the area affected as well as its intensity in every grid point and taking into account the daily precipitation normalised departure from climatology. Different precipitation rankings are presented considering the entire Iberian Peninsula, Portugal and also the six largest river basins in the Iberian Peninsula. Atmospheric Rivers (AR) are the water vapour (WV) core section of the broader warm conveyor belt occurring over the oceans along the warm sector of extra-tropical cyclones. They are usually W-E oriented steered by pre-frontal low level jets along the trailing cold front and subsequently feed the precipitation in the extra-tropical cyclones. They are relatively narrow regions of concentrated WV

  17. 77 FR 61046 - The Amendment of the Designation of Al-Qa'ida in the Arabian Peninsula, aka Al-Qa'ida of Jihad...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE The Amendment of the Designation of Al-Qa'ida in the Arabian Peninsula, aka Al-Qa'ida of Jihad Organization in the Arabian Peninsula, aka Tanzim Qa'idat al-Jihad fi Jazirat al-Arab, aka Al- Qa'ida in Yemen, aka Al-Qa'ida in the South Arabian Peninsula, as...

  18. Basin characterisation by means of joint inversion of electromagnetic geophysical data: A case study from the Loop Head Peninsula, western Ireland, and the implications for onshore carbon sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campanyà, Joan; Ogaya, Xènia; Jones, Alan G.; Rath, Volker; McConnell, Brian; Haughton, Peter D. W.; Ledo, Juanjo

    2016-04-01

    The Science Foundation Ireland funded IRECCSEM project (www.ireccsem.ie) aims to evaluate Ireland's potential for onshore carbon sequestration in saline aquifers by integrating new electromagnetic geophysical data with existing geophysical and geological data. The main goal of this investigation is to characterise the subsurface beneath the Loop Head Peninsula (part of the Clare Basin, Co. Clare, Ireland) and in particular to identify the main geoelectrical structures that can guide an interpretation of the carbon sequestration potential of this area. During the summer of 2014, a magnetotelluric (MT) survey was carried out on the Loop Head Peninsula. Data from a total of 140 sites were acquired, including audio-magnetotelluric (AMT), broadband magnetotelluric (BBMT) and long period magnetotelluric (LMT) data. The dataset was used to generate four shallow three-dimensional (3-D) electrical resistivity models to constrain the subsurface to depths of up to 3 km, and an additional deep study to constrain the electrical resistivity values to depths of up to 30 km. Three-dimensional (3-D) joint inversion process was performed using t