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Sample records for site-specific dna damage

  1. Mechanism of site-specific DNA damage induced by ozone.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kimiko; Inoue, Sumiko; Hiraku, Yusuke; Kawanishi, Shosuke

    2005-08-01

    Ozone has been shown to induce lung tumors in mice. The reactivity of ozone with DNA in an aqueous solution was investigated by a DNA sequencing technique using 32P-labeled DNA fragments. Ozone induced cleavages in the deoxyribose-phosphate backbone of double-stranded DNA, which were reduced by hydroxyl radical scavengers, suggesting the participation of hydroxyl radicals in the cleavages. The ozone-induced DNA cleavages were enhanced with piperidine treatment, which induces cleavages at sites of base modification, but the inhibitory effect of hydroxyl radical scavengers on the piperidine-induced cleavages was limited. Main piperidine-labile sites were guanine and thymine residues. Cleavages at some guanine and thymine residues after piperidine treatment became more predominant with denatured single-stranded DNA. Exposure of calf thymus DNA to ozone resulted in a dose-dependent increase of the 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine formation, which was partially inhibited by hydroxyl radical scavengers. ESR studies using 5,5-dimethylpyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) showed that aqueous ozone produced the hydroxyl radical adduct of DMPO. In addition, the fluorescein-dependent chemiluminescence was detected during the decomposition of ozone in a buffer solution and the enhancing effect of D2O was observed, suggesting the formation of singlet oxygen. However, no or little enhancing effect of D2O on the ozone-induced DNA damage was observed. These results suggest that DNA backbone cleavages were caused by ozone via the production of hydroxyl radicals, while DNA base modifications were mainly caused by ozone itself and the participation of hydroxyl radicals and/or singlet oxygen in base modifications is small, if any. A possible link of ozone-induced DNA damage to inflammation-associated carcinogenesis as well as air pollution-related carcinogenesis is discussed.

  2. Design, synthesis, and characterization of nucleosomes containing site-specific DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Taylor, John-Stephen

    2015-12-01

    How DNA damaged is formed, recognized, and repaired in chromatin is an area of intense study. To better understand the structure activity relationships of damaged chromatin, mono and dinucleosomes containing site-specific damage have been prepared and studied. This review will focus on the design, synthesis, and characterization of model systems of damaged chromatin for structural, physical, and enzymatic studies.

  3. Regulation of BRCA1 Function by DNA Damage-Induced Site-Specific Phosphorylation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    Rad51p proteins, the lat - end-joining. BRCA-2 complexed with machinery. ter a member of the RAD-52 epi- RAD-51 is active in strand exchange BRCA- 1 has...AD Award Number: DAMD17-02- 1 -0584 TITLE: Regulation of BRCAl Function by DNA Damage-Induced Site- Specific Phosphorylation PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...ApprovedREPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE OMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for this collection of Information Is estimated to average 1 hour per

  4. Site-specific DICER and DROSHA RNA products control the DNA-damage response.

    PubMed

    Francia, Sofia; Michelini, Flavia; Saxena, Alka; Tang, Dave; de Hoon, Michiel; Anelli, Viviana; Mione, Marina; Carninci, Piero; d'Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio

    2012-08-09

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are involved in an increasingly recognized number of cellular events. Some ncRNAs are processed by DICER and DROSHA RNases to give rise to small double-stranded RNAs involved in RNA interference (RNAi). The DNA-damage response (DDR) is a signalling pathway that originates from a DNA lesion and arrests cell proliferation3. So far, DICER and DROSHA RNA products have not been reported to control DDR activation. Here we show, in human, mouse and zebrafish, that DICER and DROSHA, but not downstream elements of the RNAi pathway, are necessary to activate the DDR upon exogenous DNA damage and oncogene-induced genotoxic stress, as studied by DDR foci formation and by checkpoint assays. DDR foci are sensitive to RNase A treatment, and DICER- and DROSHA-dependent RNA products are required to restore DDR foci in RNase-A-treated cells. Through RNA deep sequencing and the study of DDR activation at a single inducible DNA double-strand break, we demonstrate that DDR foci formation requires site-specific DICER- and DROSHA-dependent small RNAs, named DDRNAs, which act in a MRE11–RAD50–NBS1-complex-dependent manner (MRE11 also known as MRE11A; NBS1 also known as NBN). DDRNAs, either chemically synthesized or in vitro generated by DICER cleavage, are sufficient to restore the DDR in RNase-A-treated cells, also in the absence of other cellular RNAs. Our results describe an unanticipated direct role of a novel class of ncRNAs in the control of DDR activation at sites of DNA damage.

  5. Site-specifically modified oligodeoxynucleotides as probes for the structural and biological effect of DNA-damaging agents

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, A.K.; Essigmann, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    This review critically analyzes the state of knowledge on the preparation, characterization, and uses of site-specifically modified DNA segments. Although these substrates have begun to have an impact upon several fields, the review focuses upon their applications in site-directed mutagenesis studies and for defining the effect of chemical damage upon DNA structure. Oligonucleotides have been synthesized containing alkylated DNA bases, aromatic amine adducts, base oxidation products, cyclic nucleic acid adducts, model apurinic/apyrimidinic sites, UV and psoralen photoadducts, and several antitumor drug-DNA covalent complexes. Below, the authors shall describe the progress to date on synthesis of site-specifically modified DNA segments and how these oligonucleotides have been used to further their understanding of the roles of individual DNA adducts in toxicology. The structures of the DNA adducts and adduct-derived products discussed in this review are presented. 168 references.

  6. Regulation of BRCA1 Function by DNA Damage-Induced Site-Specific Phosphorylation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: DAMD17-02- 1 -0584 TITLE: Regulation of BRCA1 Function by DNA Damage...estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining...it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1 . REPORT DATE 01-06-2007 2

  7. Molecular Analysis of Base Damage Clustering Associated with a Site-Specific Radiation-Induced DNA Double-Strand Break

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Kamal; Jaruga, Pawel; Dizdaroglu, Miral; Neumann, Ronald D.; Winters, Thomas A.

    2010-01-01

    Base damage flanking a radiation-induced DNA double-strand break (DSB) may contribute to DSB complexity and affect break repair. However, to date, an isolated radiation-induced DSB has not been assessed for such structures at the molecular level. In this study, an authentic site-specific radiation-induced DSB was produced in plasmid DNA by triplex forming oligonucleotide-targeted 125I decay. A restriction fragment terminated by the DSB was isolated and probed for base damage with the E. coli DNA repair enzymes, endonuclease III and formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase. Our results demonstrate base damage clustering within 8 bases of the 125I-targeted base in the DNA duplex. An increased yield of base damage (purine>pyrimidine) was observed for DSBs formed by irradiation in the absence of DMSO. An internal control fragment 1354 bp upstream from the targeted base was insensitive to enzymatic probing, indicating the damage detected proximal to the DSB was produced by the 125I decay that formed the DSB. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry identified three types of damaged bases in the ~32 bp region proximal to the DSB. These base lesions were 8-hydroxyguanine, 8-hydroxyadenine, and 5-hydroxycytosine. Finally, evidence is presented for base damage >24 bp upstream from the 125I-decay site that may form via a charge migration mechanism. PMID:17067210

  8. Site-specific DNA damage induced by sulfite in the presence of cobalt(II) ion. Role of sulfate radical.

    PubMed

    Kawanishi, S; Yamamoto, K; Inoue, S

    1989-10-15

    The reactivities of sulfite (SO23-) with DNA in the presence of metal ions were investigated by a DNA sequencing technique using 32P-labeled DNA fragments obtained from human c-Ha-ras-1 protooncogene. Sulfite caused DNA damage in the presence of Co2+, Cu2+ and Mn2+, although sulfite alone or metal ion alone did not. The order of inducing effect on sulfite-dependent DNA damage (Co2+ much greater than Cu2+ greater than Mn2+ Fe3+) was consistent with that of accelerating effect on the initial oxygen consumption rate of sulfite autoxidation. The DNA damage induced by sulfite plus Co2+ was inhibited by 3,5-dibromo-4-nitrobenzenesulfonate, primary and secondary alchols, whereas it was not inhibited by SOD, catalase and tert-butyl alcohol. Incubation of DNA with sulfite plus Co2+ followed by the piperidine treatment led to the predominant cleavage at the positions of guanine especially located 5' to guanine. Sulfite plus Cu2+ gave a DNA cleavage pattern different from that induced by sulfite plus Co2+. The photolysis of peroxydisulfate (S2O28-), which is known to produce SO-4 radicals, gave a DNA cleavage pattern similar to that induced by sulfite plus Co2+. ESR studies using spin-trapping reagent revealed the production of spin adduct possibly of SO-3 radical in a solution of sulfite plus Cu2+, whereas much less spin adduct was produced by sulfite plus Co2+. The results suggest that sulfite is rapidly autoxidized in the presence of Co2+ to produce SO4- radical causing site-specific DNA damage.

  9. Site-specific DNA Inversion by Serine Recombinases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Reversible site-specific DNA inversion reactions are widely distributed in bacteria and their viruses. They control a range of biological reactions that most often involve alterations of molecules on the surface of cells or phage. These programmed DNA rearrangements usually occur at a low frequency, thereby preadapting a small subset of the population to a change in environmental conditions, or in the case of phages, an expanded host range. A dedicated recombinase, sometimes with the aid of additional regulatory or DNA architectural proteins, catalyzes the inversion of DNA. RecA or other components of the general recombination-repair machinery are not involved. This chapter discusses site-specific DNA inversion reactions mediated by the serine recombinase family of enzymes and focuses on the extensively studied serine DNA invertases that are stringently controlled by the Fis-bound enhancer regulatory system. The first section summarizes biological features and general properties of inversion reactions by the Fis/enhancer-dependent serine invertases and the recently described serine DNA invertases in Bacteroides. Mechanistic studies of reactions catalyzed by the Hin and Gin invertases are then discussed in more depth, particularly with regards to recent advances in our understanding of the function of the Fis/enhancer regulatory system, the assembly of the active recombination complex (invertasome) containing the Fis/enhancer, and the process of DNA strand exchange by rotation of synapsed subunit pairs within the invertasome. The role of DNA topological forces that function in concert with the Fis/enhancer controlling element in specifying the overwhelming bias for DNA inversion over deletion and intermolecular recombination is emphasized. PMID:25844275

  10. Effect of site-specific modification on restriction endonucleases and DNA modification methyltransferases.

    PubMed Central

    McClelland, M; Nelson, M; Raschke, E

    1994-01-01

    Restriction endonucleases have site-specific interactions with DNA that can often be inhibited by site-specific DNA methylation and other site-specific DNA modifications. However, such inhibition cannot generally be predicted. The empirically acquired data on these effects are tabulated for over 320 restriction endonucleases. In addition, a table of known site-specific DNA modification methyltransferases and their specificities is presented along with EMBL database accession numbers for cloned genes. PMID:7937074

  11. Site-specific DNA transesterification catalyzed by a restriction enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Sasnauskas, Giedrius; Connolly, Bernard A.; Halford, Stephen E.; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2007-01-01

    Most restriction endonucleases use Mg2+ to hydrolyze phosphodiester bonds at specific DNA sites. We show here that BfiI, a metal-independent restriction enzyme from the phospholipase D superfamily, catalyzes both DNA hydrolysis and transesterification reactions at its recognition site. In the presence of alcohols such as ethanol or glycerol, it attaches the alcohol covalently to the 5′ terminus of the cleaved DNA. Under certain conditions, the terminal 3′-OH of one DNA strand can attack the target phosphodiester bond in the other strand to create a DNA hairpin. Transesterification reactions on DNA with phosphorothioate linkages at the target bond proceed with retention of stereoconfiguration at the phosphorus, indicating, uniquely for a restriction enzyme, a two-step mechanism. We propose that BfiI first makes a covalent enzyme–DNA intermediate, and then it resolves it by a nucleophilic attack of water or an alcohol, to yield hydrolysis or transesterification products, respectively. PMID:17267608

  12. Germinal transmission of site-specific excised genomic DNA by the bacterial ParA resolvase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genome engineering is an essential tool in research and product development. Behind some of the recent advances in plant gene transfer is the development of site-specific recombination systems that enable the precise manipulation of DNA, e.g. the deletion, integration or translocation of DNA. DNA ...

  13. Efficient synthesis of supercoiled M13 DNA molecule containing a site specifically placed psoralen adduct and its use as a substrate for DNA replication

    SciTech Connect

    Kodadek, T.; Gamper, H.

    1988-05-03

    The authors report a simple method for the in vitro synthesis of large quantities of site specifically modified DNA. The protocol involves extension of an oligonucleotide primer annealed to M13 single-stranded DNA using part of the T4 DNA polymerase holoenzyme. The resulting nicked double-stranded circles are ligated and supercoiled in the same tube, producing good yields of form I DNA. When the oligonucleotide primer is chemically modified, the resultant product contains a site-specific lesion. In this study, they report the synthesis of an M13 mp19 form I DNA which contains a psoralen monoadduct or cross-link at the KpnI site. They demonstrate the utility of these modified substrates by assessing the ability of the bacteriophage T4 DNA replication complex to bypass the damage and show that the psoralen monoadduct poses a severe block to the holoenzyme when attached to the template strand.

  14. Synthesis of DNA Oligodeoxynucleotides Containing Site-Specific 1,3-Butadiene- Deoxyadenosine Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Wickramaratne, Susith; Seiler, Christopher L.

    2016-01-01

    Post-oligomerization synthesis is a useful technique for preparing site-specifically modified DNA oligomers. This approach involves site-specific incorporation of inherently reactive halogenated nucleobases into DNA strands using standard solid phase synthesis, followed by post-oligomerization nucleophilic aromatic substitution (SNAr) reactions with carcinogen-derived synthons. In these reactions, the inherent reactivities of DNA and carcinogen-derived species are reversed: the modified DNA nucleobase acts as an electrophile, while the carcinogen-derived species acts as a nucleophile. In the present protocol, we describe the use of the post-oligomerization approach to prepare DNA strands containing site- and stereospecific N6-adenine and N1, N6-adenine adducts induced by epoxide metabolites of the known human and animal carcinogen, 1,3-butadiene (BD). The resulting oligomers containing site specific, structurally defined DNA adducts can be used in structural and biological studies to reveal the roles of specific BD adducts in carcinogenesis and mutagenesis. PMID:26344227

  15. DNA unwinding produced by site-specific intrastrand cross-links of the antitumor drug cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II)

    SciTech Connect

    Bellon, S.F.; Coleman, J.H.; Lippard, S.J. )

    1991-08-13

    The DNA unwinding produced by specific adducts of the antitumor drug cis-diamminedi-chloroplatinum(II) has been quantitatively determined. Synthetic DNA duplex oligonucleotides of varying lengths with two base pair cohesive ends were synthesized and characterized that contained site-specific intrastrand N7-purine/N7-purine cross-links. Included are cis-(Pt(NH{sub 3}){sub 2}(d(GpG))), cis-(Pt(NH){sub 3}{sub 2}(d(ApG))), and cis-(Pt(NH{sub 3}){sub 2}(d(GpTpG))) adducts, respectively referred to as cis-GG, cis-AG, and cis-GTG. Local DNA distortions at the site of platination were amplified by polymerization of these monomers and quantitatively evaluated by using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The extent of DNA unwinding was determined by systematically varying the interplatinum distance, or phasing, in polymers containing the adducts. The multimer that migrates most slowly gives the optimal phasing for cooperative bending, from which the degree of unwinding can be obtained. The authors find that the cis-GG and cis-AG adducts both unwind DNA by 13{degrees}, while the cis-GTG adduct unwinds DNA by 23{degrees}. In addition, experiments are presented that support previous studies revealing that a hinge joint forms at the sites of platination in DNA molecules containing trans-GTG adducts. On the basis of an analysis of the present and other published studies of site-specifically modified DNA. The authors propose that local duplex unwinding is a major determinant in the recognition of DNA damage by the Escherichia coli (A)BC excinuclease. In addition, local duplex unwinding of 13{degrees} and bending by 35{degrees} are shown to correlate well with the recognition of platinated DNA by a previously identified damage recognition protein (DRP) in human cells.

  16. Hybrid TiO II nanoparticles: an approach for developing site specific DNA cleavage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Saponjic, Z.; Dimitrijevic, N. M.; Luo, S.; Preuss, D.; Rajh, T.

    2006-02-01

    We have developed hybrid light responsive TiO II nanoparticles electronically linked to PNA oligonucleotides that site specifically bind to double stranded target DNA. This opens a new opportunity for the development of a highly efficient "artificial restriction enzyme" whose activity can be controlled by using light. The work focuses on the use of TiO II nanocomposites as analogs of restriction enzymes with unique specificity that does not exist in current biological approaches. TiO II nanoparticles electronically linked to DNA or PNA adapters have been site-specifically attached along double stranded λ DNA vectors. Illumination of this assembly results in selective oxidation of DNA at the deepest "thermodynamic traps" located closest to the nanoparticle surface, causing DNA cleavage. We investigate the effect of the sequence and length of DNA and PNA adapters on the specificity of DNA cleavage. Related to this issue, the potential use of TiO II/DNA nanocomposites as "rare cutters" that cleave DNA in the places not achieved with existing protein-based enzymes is investigated.

  17. Multiple DNA binding activities of the novel site-specific recombinase, Piv, from Moraxella lacunata.

    PubMed

    Tobiason, D M; Lenich, A G; Glasgow, A C

    1999-04-02

    The recombinase, Piv, is essential for site-specific DNA inversion of the type IV pilin DNA segment in Moraxella lacunata and Moraxella bovis. Piv shows significant homology with the transposases of the IS110/IS492 family of insertion elements, but, surprisingly, Piv contains none of the conserved amino acid motifs of the lambda Int or Hin/Res families of site-specific recombinases. Therefore, Piv may mediate site-specific recombination by a novel mechanism. To begin to determine how Piv may assemble a synaptic nucleoprotein structure for DNA cleavage and strand exchange, we have characterized the interaction of Piv with the DNA inversion region of M. lacunata. Gel shift and nuclease/chemical protection assays, competition and dissociation rate analyses, and cooperativity studies indicate that Piv binds two distinct recognition sequences. One recognition sequence, found at multiple sites within and outside of the invertible segment, is bound by Piv protomers with high affinity. The second recognition sequence is located at the recombination cross-over sites at the ends of the invertible element; Piv interacts with this sequence as an oligomer with apparent low affinity. A model is proposed for the role of the different Piv binding sites of the M. lacunata inversion region in the formation of an active synaptosome.

  18. Synthesis of Site-Specific DNA–Protein Conjugates and Their Effects on DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    DNA–protein cross-links (DPCs) are bulky, helix-distorting DNA lesions that form in the genome upon exposure to common antitumor drugs, environmental/occupational toxins, ionizing radiation, and endogenous free-radical-generating systems. As a result of their considerable size and their pronounced effects on DNA–protein interactions, DPCs can interfere with DNA replication, transcription, and repair, potentially leading to mutagenesis, genotoxicity, and cytotoxicity. However, the biological consequences of these ubiquitous lesions are not fully understood due to the difficulty of generating DNA substrates containing structurally defined, site-specific DPCs. In the present study, site-specific cross-links between the two biomolecules were generated by copper-catalyzed [3 + 2] Huisgen cycloaddition (click reaction) between an alkyne group from 5-(octa-1,7-diynyl)-uracil in DNA and an azide group within engineered proteins/polypeptides. The resulting DPC substrates were subjected to in vitro primer extension in the presence of human lesion bypass DNA polymerases η, κ, ν, and ι. We found that DPC lesions to the green fluorescent protein and a 23-mer peptide completely blocked DNA replication, while the cross-link to a 10-mer peptide was bypassed. These results indicate that the polymerases cannot read through the larger DPC lesions and further suggest that proteolytic degradation may be required to remove the replication block imposed by bulky DPC adducts. PMID:24918113

  19. Generalized theory on the mechanism of site-specific DNA-protein interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niranjani, G.; Murugan, R.

    2016-05-01

    We develop a generalized theoretical framework on the binding of transcription factor proteins (TFs) with specific sites on DNA that takes into account the interplay of various factors regarding overall electrostatic potential at the DNA-protein interface, occurrence of kinetic traps along the DNA sequence, presence of other roadblock protein molecules along DNA and crowded environment, conformational fluctuations in the DNA binding domains (DBDs) of TFs, and the conformational state of the DNA. Starting from a Smolochowski type theoretical framework on site-specific binding of TFs we logically build our model by adding the effects of these factors one by one. Our generalized two-step model suggests that the electrostatic attractive forces present inbetween the positively charged DBDs of TFs and the negatively charged phosphate backbone of DNA, along with the counteracting shielding effects of solvent ions, is the core factor that creates a fluidic type environment at the DNA-protein interface. This in turn facilitates various one-dimensional diffusion (1Dd) processes such as sliding, hopping and intersegmental transfers. These facilitating processes as well as flipping dynamics of conformational states of DBDs of TFs between stationary and mobile states can enhance the 1Dd coefficient on a par with three-dimensional diffusion (3Dd). The random coil conformation of DNA also plays critical roles in enhancing the site-specific association rate. The extent of enhancement over the 3Dd controlled rate seems to be directly proportional to the maximum possible 1Dd length. We show that the overall site-specific binding rate scales with the length of DNA in an asymptotic way. For relaxed DNA, the specific binding rate will be independent of the length of DNA as length increases towards infinity. For condensed DNA as in in vivo conditions, the specific binding rate depends on the length of DNA in a turnover way with a maximum. This maximum rate seems to scale with the

  20. The Energetic Contribution of Induced Electrostatic Asymmetry to DNA Bending by a Site-Specific Protein

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, Stephen P.; Hiller, David A.; Perona, John J.; Jen-Jacobson, Linda

    2012-01-01

    DNA bending can be promoted by reducing the net negative electrostatic potential around phosphates on one face of the DNA, such that electrostatic repulsion among phosphates on the opposite face drives bending toward the less negative surface. To provide the first assessment of the energetic contribution to DNA bending when electrostatic asymmetry is induced by a site-specific DNA binding protein, we manipulated the electrostatics in the EcoRV endonuclease-DNA complex by mutation of cationic sidechains that contact DNA phosphates and/or by replacing a selected phosphate in each strand with uncharged methylphosphonate. Reducing the net negative charge at two symmetrically located phosphates on the concave DNA face contributes −2.3 to −0.9 kcal/mol (depending on position) to complex formation. In contrast, reducing negative charge on the opposing convex face produces a penalty of +1.3 kcal/mol. Förster resonance energy transfer experiments show that the extent of axial DNA bending (about 50°) is little affected in the modified complexes, implying that modification affects the energetic cost but not the extent of DNA bending. Kinetic studies show that favorable effects of induced electrostatic asymmetry on equilibrium binding derive primarily from a reduced rate of complex dissociation, suggesting stabilization of the specific complex between protein and markedly bent DNA. A smaller increase in the association rate may suggest that the DNA in the initial encounter complex is mildly bent. The data imply that protein-induced electrostatic asymmetry makes a significant contribution to DNA bending, but is not itself sufficient to drive full bending in the specific EcoRV-DNA complex. PMID:21167173

  1. Site-specific initiation of DNA replication in metazoan chromosomes and the role of nuclear organization.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, D M; Miyazawa, H; Nallaseth, F S; Ortega, J M; Blow, J J; DePamphilis, M L

    1993-01-01

    We have asked whether or not Xenopus eggs or egg extracts, which have previously been shown to replicate essentially any DNA molecule, will preferentially utilize a known mammalian OBR. Our results reveal that Xenopus egg extracts can preferentially initiate DNA replication at sites chosen in vivo by the hamster cell, provided that the DNA substrate is presented to the extract in the form of a nucleus rather than bare DNA. Thus, site-specific initiation of DNA replication in metazoan cell chromosomes appears to be determined by nuclear organization as well as DNA sequence. We have also considered whether or not BPV, which was previously reported to regulate its copy number through negative as well as positive cis-acting sequences, provides a suitable paradigm for cellular origins. The BPV genome was found to contain cis-acting sequences that can suppress DNA replication driven by a lytic virus such as PyV. However, this suppression did not require any BPV protein, did not limit PyV origin activity to one initiation event per S phase, and did not affect BPV origin activity. These results, together with data from other laboratories, strongly suggest that BPV is simply a slow-replicating version of SV40 and PyV and therefore is not an appropriate model to explain how initiation of cellular DNA replication is limited to once per cell cycle.

  2. Site-specific ADP-ribosylation of histone H2B in response to DNA double strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    Rakhimova, Alina; Ura, Seiji; Hsu, Duen-Wei; Wang, Hong-Yu; Pears, Catherine J.; Lakin, Nicholas D.

    2017-01-01

    ADP-ribosyltransferases (ARTs) modify proteins with single units or polymers of ADP-ribose to regulate DNA repair. However, the substrates for these enzymes are ill-defined. For example, although histones are modified by ARTs, the sites on these proteins ADP-ribosylated following DNA damage and the ARTs that catalyse these events are unknown. This, in part, is due to the lack of a eukaryotic model that contains ARTs, in addition to histone genes that can be manipulated to assess ADP-ribosylation events in vivo. Here we exploit the model Dictyostelium to identify site-specific histone ADP-ribosylation events in vivo and define the ARTs that mediate these modifications. Dictyostelium histones are modified in response to DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in vivo by the ARTs Adprt1a and Adprt2. Adprt1a is a mono-ART that modifies H2BE18 in vitro, although disruption of this site allows ADP-ribosylation at H2BE19. Although redundancy between H2BE18 and H2BE19 ADP-ribosylation is also apparent following DSBs in vivo, by generating a strain with mutations at E18/E19 in the h2b locus we demonstrate these are the principal sites modified by Adprt1a/Adprt2. This identifies DNA damage induced histone mono-ADP-ribosylation sites by specific ARTs in vivo, providing a unique platform to assess how histone ADP-ribosylation regulates DNA repair. PMID:28252050

  3. Site-specific methylated reporter constructs for functional analysis of DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Han, Weiguo; Shi, Miao; Spivack, Simon D

    2013-11-01

    Methods to experimentally alter and functionally evaluate cytosine methylation in a site-specific manner have proven elusive. We describe a site-specific DNA methylation method, using synthetically methylated primers and high fidelity PCR coupled with ligation of reporter constructs. We applied this method to introduce methylated cytosines into fragments of the respective DAPK and RASSF1A promoters that had been cloned into luciferase reporters. We found that methylation of 3-7 residue CpG clusters that were 5' adjacent to the transcription start site (TSS) of the DAPK gene produced up to a 54% decrease in promoter activity (p<0.01). Similarly, for RASSF1A promoter reporter constructs, the methylation of either of two clusters of four CpGs each, but not an intervening cluster, produced a 63% decrease in promoter activity (p<0.01), suggesting that precise mCpG position is crucial, and factors other than simple proximity to the TSS are at play. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis of these reporter constructs demonstrated that transcription factor Oct-1 and Sp1 preferentially bound the unmethylated vs. methylated DAPK or RASSF1A promoter reporter constructs at the functional CpG sites. Histone H1, hnRNP1, and MeCP2 showed preferential binding to methylated sequence at functional sites in these reporter constructs, as well as highly preferential (> 8-80-fold) binding to native methylated vs. unmethylated chromatin. These results suggest that: (1) site-specific, precision DNA methylation of a reporter construct can be used for functional analysis of commonly observed gene promoter methylation patterns; (2) the reporter system contains key elements of the endogenous chromatin machinery.

  4. Mechanism of site-specific psoralen photoadducts formation in triplex DNA directed by psoralen-conjugated oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Ping, Yueh-Hsin; Rana, Tariq M

    2005-02-22

    Triplex-formation oligonucleotides attached with a photoreactive psoralen molecule (psoTFO) can be used to induce site-specific DNA damage and to control gene expression. Inhibition of transcription by psoralen-cross-linked triplexes results in both arrest and termination of RNA Pol II transcriptional complexes during elongation. To understand the relationship between triplex psoralen cross-linking products and the fate of RNA Pol II elongation complexes, it is important to delineate the mechanism for creating site-specific psoralen photoadducts in a target duplex DNA. To investigate the mechanism of photoadduct-formation by psoralen photo-cross-linking, triplex structures were generated by targeting a DNA duplex with psoTFOs of different lengths. The psoralen photoadducts were then analyzed after UV irradiation, which initiates the psoralen cross-linking reaction. Our results demonstrated that UV irradiation of triplexes formed between a psoTFO and a DNA duplex generated two distinct groups of psoralen photoadducts: monoadducts and psoralen interstrand cross-link products. The formation of these psoralen photoadducts was also photoreversible through exposure to short wavelength UV irradiation. The length of a psoTFO was shown to establish the position at which psoralen was added to the target DNA duplex and determined which photoadducts products formed predominantly. Kinetic experiments that monitored the formation of the psoralen photoadducts also suggested that the length of the psoTFO influenced which photoadducts were preferentially formed at faster rates. Taken together, these studies provide new insight into the mechanism associated with the formation of psoralen photoadducts that are directed by psoTFO during triplex formation.

  5. Site specificity of psoralen-DNA interstrand cross-linking determined by nuclease Bal31 digestion

    SciTech Connect

    Zhen, W.; Buchardt, O.; Nielsen, H.; Nielsen, P.E.

    1986-10-21

    A novel method for determination of psoralen photo-cross-linking sites in double-stranded DNA is described, which is based on a pronounced inhibition of Bal31 exonuclease activity by psoralen-DNA interstrand cross-links. The results using a 51 base pair fragment of plasmid pUC19 and a 346 base pair fragment of pBR322 show that 5'-TA sequences are preferred cross-linking sites compared to 3'-TA sequences. They also indicate that sequences flanking the 5'-TA site influence the cross-linking efficiency at the site. The DNA photo-cross-linking by 4,5',8-trimethylpsoralen and 8-methoxypsoralen was analyzed, and these two psoralens showed identical site specificity. The 5'-TA preference is rationalized on the basis of the local DNA structure in terms of ..pi..-..pi.. electronic interaction between the thymines and the intercalated psoralens, as well as on the base tilt angles of the DNA.

  6. Conditional mutagenesis of the genome using site-specific DNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Ohtsubo, Kazuaki; Marth, Jamey D

    2007-07-01

    INTRODUCTIONAltering the genome of intact cells and organisms by site-specific DNA recombination has become an important gene-transfer methodology. DNA modifications produced by gene transfer and homologous recombination are typically static once integrated among target cell chromosomes. In contrast, the inclusion of exogenous recombinase target sequences within transferred DNA segments allows subsequent modifications to previously altered genomic structure that increase the utility of gene transfer and enhance experimental design. Creating tissue- and cell-type-specific genetic lesions in animal models, indelibly marking progenitors for cell fate mapping, inducing large-scale chromosomal rearrangements, and complementing gene defects in studies of phenotypic maintenance and reversion are all possible by directing recombinase expression using gene transfer among experimentally modified genomes. Moreover, this approach is effective in providing controlled data establishing genotype-phenotype relationships and allows for the excision of introduced marker genes that can affect neighboring chromatin structure and function. Although early work involved the yeast Flp recombinase, most studies in mammalian systems have used the Cre recombinase derived from bacteriophage P1. Both enzymes are members of the integrase family of recombinases but bind to distinct DNA target signals. Cre recombinase operates on the 34-bp loxP sequence and, like Flp, performs conservative recombination involving DNA segments positioned among these target sites.

  7. A simplified mathematical model of directional DNA site-specific recombination by serine integrases

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jia; Stark, W. Marshall; Colloms, Sean D.; Ebenhöh, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Serine integrases catalyse site-specific recombination to integrate and excise bacteriophage genomes into and out of their host's genome. These enzymes exhibit remarkable directionality; in the presence of the integrase alone, recombination between attP and attB DNA sites is efficient and irreversible, giving attL and attR products which do not recombine further. However, in the presence of the bacteriophage-encoded recombination directionality factor (RDF), integrase efficiently promotes recombination between attL and attR to re-form attP and attB. The DNA substrates and products of both reactions are approximately isoenergetic, and no cofactors (such as adenosine triphosphate) are required for recombination. The thermodynamic driving force for directionality of these reactions is thus enigmatic. Here, we present a minimal mathematical model which can explain the directionality and regulation of both ‘forward’ and ‘reverse’ reactions. In this model, the substrates of the ‘forbidden’ reactions (between attL and attR in the absence of RDF, attP and attB in the presence of RDF) are trapped as inactive protein–DNA complexes, ensuring that these ‘forbidden’ reactions are extremely slow. The model is in good agreement with the observed in vitro kinetics of recombination by ϕC31 integrase, and defines core features of the system necessary and sufficient for directionality. PMID:28077763

  8. Nonpolar nucleobase analogs illuminate requirements for site-specific DNA cleavage by vaccinia topoisomerase.

    PubMed

    Yakovleva, Lyudmila; Lai, Jacob; Kool, Eric T; Shuman, Stewart

    2006-11-24

    , signifying that base stacking flanking the nick is critical for the religation step. Our findings highlight base isosteres as valuable tools for the analysis of proteins that act on DNA in a site-specific manner.

  9. Melanoplus sanguinipes entomopoxvirus DNA topoisomerase: site-specific DNA transesterification and effects of 5'-bridging phosphorothiolates.

    PubMed

    Krogh, B O; Cheng, C; Burgin, A; Shuman, S

    1999-11-25

    Melanoplus sanguinipes entomopoxvirus (MsEPV) encodes a 328 amino acid polypeptide related to the type I topoisomerases of six other genera of vertebrate and insect poxviruses. The gene encoding MsEPV topoisomerase was expressed in bacteria, and the recombinant protein was purified by ion-exchange chromatography and glycerol gradient sedimentation. MsEPV topoisomerase, a monomeric protein, catalyzed the relaxation of supercoiled plasmid DNA at approximately 0.6 supercoils/s. Like other poxvirus topoisomerases, the MsEPV enzyme formed a covalent adduct with duplex DNA at the target sequence CCCTT downward arrow. The kinetic and equilibrium parameters of the DNA transesterification reaction of MsEPV topoisomerase were k(cl) = 0.3 s(-1) and K(cl) = 0.25. The introduction of a 5'-bridging phosphorothiolate at the scissile phosphate increased the cleavage equilibrium constant from 0.25 to >/=30. Similar phosphorothiolate effects were observed with vaccinia topoisomerase. Kinetic analysis of single-turnover cleavage and religation reactions established that the altered equilibrium was the result of a approximately 10(-4) decrement in the rate of topoisomerase-catalyzed attack of 5'-SH DNA on the DNA-(3'-phosphotyrosyl)-enzyme intermediate. 5'-bridging phosphorothiolates at the scissile phosphate and other positions within the CCCTT element had no significant effect on k(cl).

  10. Self-catalyzed site-specific depurination of G residues mediated by cruciform extrusion in closed circular DNA plasmids.

    PubMed

    Amosova, Olga; Kumar, Veena; Deutsch, Aaron; Fresco, Jacques R

    2011-10-21

    A major variety of "spontaneous" genomic damage is endogenous generation of apurinic sites. Depurination rates vary widely across genomes, occurring with higher frequency at "depurination hot spots." Recently, we discovered a site-specific self-catalyzed depurinating activity in short (14-18 nucleotides) DNA stem-loop-forming sequences with a 5'-G(T/A)GG-3' loop and T·A or G·C as the first base pair at the base of the loop; the 5'-G residue of the loop self-depurinates at least 10(5)-fold faster than random "spontaneous" depurination at pH 5. Formation of the catalytic intermediate for self-depurination in double-stranded DNA requires a stem-loop to extrude as part of a cruciform. In this study, evidence is presented for self-catalyzed depurination mediated by cruciform formation in plasmid DNA in vitro. Cruciform extrusion was confirmed, and its extent was quantitated by digestion of the plasmid with single strand-specific mung bean endonuclease, followed by restriction digestion and sequencing of resulting mung bean-generated fragments. Appearance of the apurinic site in the self-depurinating stem-loop was confirmed by digestion of plasmid DNA with apurinic endonuclease IV, followed by primer extension and/or PCR amplification to detect the endonuclease-generated strand break and identify its location. Self-catalyzed depurination was contingent on the plasmid being supercoiled and was not observed in linearized plasmids, consistent with the presence of the extruded cruciform in the supercoiled plasmid and not in the linear one. These results indicate that self-catalyzed depurination is not unique to single-stranded DNA; rather, it can occur in stem-loop structures extruding from double-stranded DNA and therefore could, in principle, occur in vivo.

  11. Evolution of I-SceI homing endonucleases with increased DNA recognition site specificity

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Rakesh; Ho, Kwok Ki; Tenney, Kristen; Chen, Jui-Hui; Golden, Barbara L.; Gimble, Frederick S.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Elucidating how homing endonucleases undergo changes in recognition site specificity will facilitate efforts to engineer proteins for gene therapy applications. I-SceI is a monomeric homing endonuclease that recognizes and cleaves within an 18-base-pair (bp) target. It tolerates limited degeneracy in its target sequence, including substitution of a C/G+4 base-pair for the wild-type A/T+4 base-pair. Libraries encoding randomized amino acids at I-SceI residue positions that contact or are proximal to A/T+4 were used in conjunction with a bacterial one-hybrid system to select I-SceI derivatives that bind to recognition sites containing either the A/T+4 or C/G+4 base-pairs. As expected, isolates encoding wild-type residues at the randomized positions were selected using either target sequence. All I-SceI proteins isolated using the C/G+4 recognition site included small side chain substitutions at G100, and either contained (K86R/G100T, K86R/G100S and K86R/G100C) or lacked (G100A, G100T) a K86R substitution. Interestingly, the binding affinities of the selected variants for the wild-type A/T+4 target are 4–11-fold lower than that of wild-type I-SceI, whereas those for the C/G+4 target are similar. The increased specificity of the mutant proteins is also evident in binding experiments in vivo. These differences in binding affinities account for the observed ~36-fold difference in target preference between the K86R/G100T and wild-type proteins in DNA cleavage assays. An X-ray crystal structure of the K86R/G100T mutant protein bound to a DNA duplex containing the C/G+4 substitution suggests how sequence specificity of a homing enzyme can increase. This biochemical and structural analysis defines one pathway by which site specificity is augmented for a homing endonuclease. PMID:21029741

  12. Evolution of I-SceI Homing Endonucleases with Increased DNA Recognition Site Specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Rakesh; Ho, Kwok Ki; Tenney, Kristen; Chen, Jui-Hui; Golden, Barbara L.; Gimble, Frederick S.

    2013-09-18

    Elucidating how homing endonucleases undergo changes in recognition site specificity will facilitate efforts to engineer proteins for gene therapy applications. I-SceI is a monomeric homing endonuclease that recognizes and cleaves within an 18-bp target. It tolerates limited degeneracy in its target sequence, including substitution of a C:G{sub +4} base pair for the wild-type A:T{sub +4} base pair. Libraries encoding randomized amino acids at I-SceI residue positions that contact or are proximal to A:T{sub +4} were used in conjunction with a bacterial one-hybrid system to select I-SceI derivatives that bind to recognition sites containing either the A:T{sub +4} or the C:G{sub +4} base pairs. As expected, isolates encoding wild-type residues at the randomized positions were selected using either target sequence. All I-SceI proteins isolated using the C:G{sub +4} recognition site included small side-chain substitutions at G100 and either contained (K86R/G100T, K86R/G100S and K86R/G100C) or lacked (G100A, G100T) a K86R substitution. Interestingly, the binding affinities of the selected variants for the wild-type A:T{sub +4} target are 4- to 11-fold lower than that of wild-type I-SceI, whereas those for the C:G{sub +4} target are similar. The increased specificity of the mutant proteins is also evident in binding experiments in vivo. These differences in binding affinities account for the observed -36-fold difference in target preference between the K86R/G100T and wild-type proteins in DNA cleavage assays. An X-ray crystal structure of the K86R/G100T mutant protein bound to a DNA duplex containing the C:G{sub +4} substitution suggests how sequence specificity of a homing enzyme can increase. This biochemical and structural analysis defines one pathway by which site specificity is augmented for a homing endonuclease.

  13. An unnatural hydrophobic base pair system: site-specific incorporation of nucleotide analogs into DNA and RNA.

    PubMed

    Hirao, Ichiro; Kimoto, Michiko; Mitsui, Tsuneo; Fujiwara, Tsuyoshi; Kawai, Rie; Sato, Akira; Harada, Yoko; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2006-09-01

    Methods for the site-specific incorporation of extra components into nucleic acids can be powerful tools for creating DNA and RNA molecules with increased functionality. We present an unnatural base pair system in which DNA containing an unnatural base pair can be amplified and function as a template for the site-specific incorporation of base analog substrates into RNA via transcription. The unnatural base pair is formed by specific hydrophobic shape complementation between the bases, but lacks hydrogen bonding interactions. In replication, this unnatural base pair exhibits high selectivity in combination with the usual triphosphates and modified triphosphates, gamma-amidotriphosphates, as substrates of 3' to 5' exonuclease-proficient DNA polymerases, allowing PCR amplification. In transcription, the unnatural base pair complementarity mediates the incorporation of these base substrates and their analogs, such as a biotinylated substrate, into RNA by T7 RNA polymerase (RNAP). With this system, functional components can be site-specifically incorporated into a large RNA molecule.

  14. DNA unwinding produced by site-specific intrastrand cross-links of the antitumor drug cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II).

    PubMed

    Bellon, S F; Coleman, J H; Lippard, S J

    1991-08-13

    The DNA unwinding produced by specific adducts of the antitumor drug cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) has been quantitatively determined. Synthetic DNA duplex oligonucleotides of varying lengths with two base pair cohesive ends were synthesized and characterized that contained site-specific intrastrand N7-purine/N7-purine cross-links. Included are cis-[Pt(NH3)2[d(GpG)

  15. Tools to Study the Role of Architectural Protein HMGB1 in the Processing of Helix Distorting, Site-specific DNA Interstrand Crosslinks.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Anirban; Vasquez, Karen M

    2016-11-10

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein is a non-histone architectural protein that is involved in regulating many important functions in the genome, such as transcription, DNA replication, and DNA repair. HMGB1 binds to structurally distorted DNA with higher affinity than to canonical B-DNA. For example, we found that HMGB1 binds to DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs), which covalently link the two strands of the DNA, cause distortion of the helix, and if left unrepaired can cause cell death. Due to their cytotoxic potential, several ICL-inducing agents are currently used as chemotherapeutic agents in the clinic. While ICL-forming agents show preferences for certain base sequences (e.g., 5'-TA-3' is the preferred crosslinking site for psoralen), they largely induce DNA damage in an indiscriminate fashion. However, by covalently coupling the ICL-inducing agent to a triplex-forming oligonucleotide (TFO), which binds to DNA in a sequence-specific manner, targeted DNA damage can be achieved. Here, we use a TFO covalently conjugated on the 5' end to a 4'-hydroxymethyl-4,5',8-trimethylpsoralen (HMT) psoralen to generate a site-specific ICL on a mutation-reporter plasmid to use as a tool to study the architectural modification, processing, and repair of complex DNA lesions by HMGB1 in human cells. We describe experimental techniques to prepare TFO-directed ICLs on reporter plasmids, and to interrogate the association of HMGB1 with the TFO-directed ICLs in a cellular context using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. In addition, we describe DNA supercoiling assays to assess specific architectural modification of the damaged DNA by measuring the amount of superhelical turns introduced on the psoralen-crosslinked plasmid by HMGB1. These techniques can be used to study the roles of other proteins involved in the processing and repair of TFO-directed ICLs or other targeted DNA damage in any cell line of interest.

  16. Quantitative site-specific ADP-ribosylation profiling of DNA-dependent PARPs.

    PubMed

    Gagné, Jean-Philippe; Ethier, Chantal; Defoy, Daniel; Bourassa, Sylvie; Langelier, Marie-France; Riccio, Amanda A; Pascal, John M; Moon, Kyung-Mee; Foster, Leonard J; Ning, Zhibin; Figeys, Daniel; Droit, Arnaud; Poirier, Guy G

    2015-06-01

    An important feature of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) is their ability to readily undergo automodification upon activation. Although a growing number of substrates were found to be poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated, including histones and several DNA damage response factors, PARPs themselves are still considered as the main acceptors of poly(ADP-ribose). By monitoring spectral counts of specific hydroxamic acid signatures generated after the conversion of the ADP-ribose modification onto peptides by hydroxylamine hydrolysis, we undertook a thorough mass spectrometry mapping of the glutamate and aspartate ADP-ribosylation sites onto automodified PARP-1, PARP-2 and PARP-3. Thousands of hydroxamic acid-conjugated peptides were identified with high confidence and ranked based on their spectral count. This semi-quantitative approach allowed us to locate the preferentially targeted residues in DNA-dependent PARPs. In contrast to what has been reported in the literature, automodification of PARP-1 is not predominantly targeted towards its BRCT domain. Our results show that interdomain linker regions that connect the BRCT to the WGR module and the WGR to the PRD domain undergo prominent ADP-ribosylation during PARP-1 automodification. We also found that PARP-1 efficiently automodifies the D-loop structure within its own catalytic fold. Interestingly, additional major ADP-ribosylation sites were identified in functional domains of PARP-1, including all three zinc fingers. Similar to PARP-1, specific residues located within the catalytic sites of PARP-2 and PARP-3 are major targets of automodification following their DNA-dependent activation. Together our results suggest that poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation hot spots make a dominant contribution to the overall automodification process.

  17. Vascular nanomedicine: Site specific delivery of elastin stabilizing therapeutics to damaged arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Aditi

    improved resistance to elastolytic digestion. We further show that the same polyphenols interact with monomeric tropoelastin released by the vascular cells and dramatically increasing their self-assembly in-vitro. In addition, we demonstrate the elastogenic ability of these polyphenols in aiding the crosslinking of tropoelastin released by aneurysmal cells converting it into mature elastin. Finally, we developed a nanoparticle system functionalized with elastin antibody on the surface that, upon systemic delivery, can recognize and bind to sites of damaged elastin in the aorta. We are able to show that this nanoparticle system works in representative animal models for MAC and AAA. These nanoparticles demonstrated spatial and functional specificity for degraded elastin. In conclusion, our work is focused on understanding the role of elastin degradation in vascular calcification and aortic aneurysms. We tested approaches to halt elastin degradation and to regenerate elastin in arteries so that homeostasis can be achieved.

  18. Site-specific DNA-antibody conjugates for specific and sensitive immuno-PCR

    PubMed Central

    Kazane, Stephanie A.; Sok, Devin; Cho, Edward H.; Uson, Maria Loressa; Kuhn, Peter; Schultz, Peter G.; Smider, Vaughn V.

    2012-01-01

    Antibody conjugates are widely used as diagnostics and imaging reagents. However, many such conjugates suffer losses in sensitivity and specificity due to nonspecific labeling techniques. We have developed methodology to site-specifically conjugate oligonucleotides to antibodies containing a genetically encoded unnatural amino acid with orthogonal chemical reactivity. These oligobody molecules were used in immuno-PCR assays to detect Her2+ cells with greater sensitivity and specificity than nonspecifically coupled fragments, and can detect extremely rare Her2+ cells in a complex cellular environment. Such designed antibody-oligonucleotide conjugates should provide sensitive and specific reagents for diagnostics, as well as enable other unique applications based on oligobody building blocks. PMID:22345566

  19. Rapid site-specific DNA inversion in Escherichia coli mutants lacking the histonelike protein H-NS.

    PubMed Central

    Kawula, T H; Orndorff, P E

    1991-01-01

    Escherichia coli pilG mutants are thought to have a dramatically higher DNA inversion rate as measured by the site-specific DNA inversion of the type 1 pili pilA promoter. DNA sequence of the pilG gene confirmed its identity to the gene encoding the bacterial histonelike protein H-NS. Unlike other histonelike protein complexes that enhance site-specific DNA recombination, the H-NS protein inhibited this process. This inhibition was indicated by the increased inversion rate of the pilA promoter region effected by two different mutant pilG alleles. One of these alleles, pilG1, conferred a mutant phenotype only at low temperature attributable to a T-to-G transversion in the -35 sequence of the pilG promoter. The other allele, pilG2-tetR, was an insertion mutation in the pilG coding region that conferred the mutant phenotype independent of temperature. We measured an approximately 100-fold-increased pilA promoter inversion rate in the mutant by exploiting the temperature-dependent expression of pilG1 and using a novel rapid-population-sampling method. Contrary to one current view on how the H-NS protein might act to increase DNA inversion rate, we found no evidence to support the hypothesis that DNA supercoiling affected pilA promoter inversion. Images PMID:1648076

  20. Relaxed specificity of prokaryotic DNA methyltransferases results in DNA site-specific modification of RNA/DNA heteroduplexes.

    PubMed

    Wons, Ewa; Mruk, Iwona; Kaczorowski, Tadeusz

    2015-11-01

    RNA/DNA hybrid duplexes regularly occur in nature, for example in transcriptional R loops. Their susceptibility to modification by DNA-specific or RNA-specific enzymes is, thus, a biologically relevant question, which, in addition, has possible biotechnological implications. In this study, we investigated the activity of four isospecific DNA methyltransferases (M.EcoVIII, M.LlaCI, M.HindIII, M.BstZ1II) toward an RNA/DNA duplex carrying one 5'-AAGCUU-3'/3'-TTCGAA-5' target sequence. The analyzed enzymes belong to the β-group of adenine N6-methyltransferases and recognize the palindromic DNA sequence 5'-AAGCTT-3'/3'-TTCGAA-5'. Under standard conditions, none of these isospecific enzymes could detectibly methylate the RNA/DNA duplex. However, the addition of agents that generally relax specificity, such as dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and glycerol, resulted in substantial methylation of the RNA/DNA duplex by M.EcoVIII and M.LlaCI. Only the DNA strand of the RNA/DNA duplex was methylated. The same was not observed for M.HindIII or M.BstZ1II. This is, to our knowledge, the first report that demonstrates such activity by prokaryotic DNA methyltransferases. Possible applications of these findings in a laboratory practice are also discussed.

  1. Theory on the mechanism of site-specific DNA-protein interactions in the presence of traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niranjani, G.; Murugan, R.

    2016-08-01

    The speed of site-specific binding of transcription factor (TFs) proteins with genomic DNA seems to be strongly retarded by the randomly occurring sequence traps. Traps are those DNA sequences sharing significant similarity with the original specific binding sites (SBSs). It is an intriguing question how the naturally occurring TFs and their SBSs are designed to manage the retarding effects of such randomly occurring traps. We develop a simple random walk model on the site-specific binding of TFs with genomic DNA in the presence of sequence traps. Our dynamical model predicts that (a) the retarding effects of traps will be minimum when the traps are arranged around the SBS such that there is a negative correlation between the binding strength of TFs with traps and the distance of traps from the SBS and (b) the retarding effects of sequence traps can be appeased by the condensed conformational state of DNA. Our computational analysis results on the distribution of sequence traps around the putative binding sites of various TFs in mouse and human genome clearly agree well the theoretical predictions. We propose that the distribution of traps can be used as an additional metric to efficiently identify the SBSs of TFs on genomic DNA.

  2. Method for performing site-specific affinity fractionation for use in DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Mirzabekov, Andrei Darievich; Lysov, Yuri Petrovich; Dubley, Svetlana A.

    1999-01-01

    A method for fractionating and sequencing DNA via affinity interaction is provided comprising contacting cleaved DNA to a first array of oligonucleotide molecules to facilitate hybridization between said cleaved DNA and the molecules; extracting the hybridized DNA from the molecules; contacting said extracted hybridized DNA with a second array of oligonucleotide molecules, wherein the oligonucleotide molecules in the second array have specified base sequences that are complementary to said extracted hybridized DNA; and attaching labeled DNA to the second array of oligonucleotide molecules, wherein the labeled re-hybridized DNA have sequences that are complementary to the oligomers. The invention further provides a method for performing multi-step conversions of the chemical structure of compounds comprising supplying an array of polyacrylamide vessels separated by hydrophobic surfaces; immobilizing a plurality of reactants, such as enzymes, in the vessels so that each vessel contains one reactant; contacting the compounds to each of the vessels in a predetermined sequence and for a sufficient time to convert the compounds to a desired state; and isolating the converted compounds from said array.

  3. Method for performing site-specific affinity fractionation for use in DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Mirzabekov, A.D.; Lysov, Y.P.; Dubley, S.A.

    1999-05-18

    A method for fractionating and sequencing DNA via affinity interaction is provided comprising contacting cleaved DNA to a first array of oligonucleotide molecules to facilitate hybridization between the cleaved DNA and the molecules; extracting the hybridized DNA from the molecules; contacting the extracted hybridized DNA with a second array of oligonucleotide molecules, wherein the oligonucleotide molecules in the second array have specified base sequences that are complementary to the extracted hybridized DNA; and attaching labeled DNA to the second array of oligonucleotide molecules, wherein the labeled re-hybridized DNA have sequences that are complementary to the oligomers. The invention further provides a method for performing multi-step conversions of the chemical structure of compounds comprising supplying an array of polyacrylamide vessels separated by hydrophobic surfaces; immobilizing a plurality of reactants, such as enzymes, in the vessels so that each vessel contains one reactant; contacting the compounds to each of the vessels in a predetermined sequence and for a sufficient time to convert the compounds to a desired state; and isolating the converted compounds from the array. 14 figs.

  4. Catalytic site-specific cleavage of a DNA-target by an oligonucleotide carrying bleomycin A5.

    PubMed Central

    Sergeyev, D S; Godovikova, T S; Zarytova, V F

    1995-01-01

    Oligonucleotide reagents have been created which are capable of catalytic site-specific cleavage of DNA-targets. The oligonucleotide reagent Blm-R-pd(CCAAACA) bearing the bleomycin A5 (Blm-RH) residue was used to degrade the DNA-target pd(TGTTTGGCGAAGGA). It has been shown that at equimolar reagent: target concentration the bleomycin oligonucleotide derivative can repeatedly cleave the target at G9, G7, T5, T4 and T3 in site-specific manner. This paper demonstrates that with a 10-fold excess of the DNA-target relative to the reagent 30% degradation of the target was observed primarily at a single position G7. The paper also shows that one reagent molecule containing bleomycin A5 residue was capable to degrade three molecules of the DNA-target. The catalytic activity of Blm-R-pd(CCAAACA) was the highest in the temperature range close to the melting temperature of the reagent-target complex, that is under conditions where the oligonucleotide reagent can form a complementary complex and easily dissociate to interact with the next molecule of the target. The number of target molecules degraded by the bleomycin reagent is limited by the degradation of the antibiotic residue itself. Images PMID:7501462

  5. DNA Mapping Using Microfluidic Stretching and Single-Molecule Detection of Fluorescent Site-Specific Tags

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Eugene Y.; Goncalves, Nuno M.; Haeusler, Rebecca A.; Hatch, Amie J.; Larson, Jonathan W.; Maletta, Anthony M.; Yantz, Gregory R.; Carstea, Eugene D.; Fuchs, Martin; Wong, Gordon G.; Gullans, Steven R.; Gilmanshin, Rudolf

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a rapid molecular mapping technology—Direct Linear Analysis (DLA)—on the basis of the analysis of individual DNA molecules bound with sequence-specific fluorescent tags. The apparatus includes a microfluidic device for stretching DNA molecules in elongational flow that is coupled to a multicolor detection system capable of single-fluorophore sensitivity. Double-stranded DNA molecules were tagged at sequence-specific motif sites with fluorescent bisPNA (Peptide Nucleic Acid) tags. The DNA molecules were then stretched in the microfluidic device and driven in a flow stream past confocal fluorescence detectors. DLA provided the spatial locations of multiple specific sequence motifs along individual DNA molecules, and thousands of individual molecules could be analyzed per minute. We validated this technology using the 48.5 kb λ phage genome with different 8-base and 7-base sequence motif tags. The distance between the sequence motifs was determined with an accuracy of ±0.8 kb, and these tags could be localized on the DNA with an accuracy of ±2 kb. Thus, DLA is a rapid mapping technology, suitable for analysis of long DNA molecules. PMID:15173119

  6. Multiple interfaces between a serine recombinase and an enhancer control site-specific DNA inversion

    PubMed Central

    McLean, Meghan M; Chang, Yong; Dhar, Gautam; Heiss, John K; Johnson, Reid C

    2013-01-01

    Serine recombinases are often tightly controlled by elaborate, topologically-defined, nucleoprotein complexes. Hin is a member of the DNA invertase subclass of serine recombinases that are regulated by a remote recombinational enhancer element containing two binding sites for the protein Fis. Two Hin dimers bound to specific recombination sites associate with the Fis-bound enhancer by DNA looping where they are remodeled into a synaptic tetramer competent for DNA chemistry and exchange. Here we show that the flexible beta-hairpin arms of the Fis dimers contact the DNA binding domain of one subunit of each Hin dimer. These contacts sandwich the Hin dimers to promote remodeling into the tetramer. A basic region on the Hin catalytic domain then contacts enhancer DNA to complete assembly of the active Hin tetramer. Our results reveal how the enhancer generates the recombination complex that specifies DNA inversion and regulates DNA exchange by the subunit rotation mechanism. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01211.001 PMID:24151546

  7. Locus- and Site-Specific DNA Methylation of 19 kDa Zein Genes in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinxin; Miclaus, Mihai; Messing, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    An interesting question in maize development is why only a single zein gene is highly expressed in each of the 19-kDa zein gene clusters (A and B types), z1A2-1 and z1B4, in the immature endosperm. For instance, epigenetic marks could provide a structural difference. Therefore, we investigated the DNA methylation of the arrays of gene copies in both promoter and gene body regions of leaf (non-expressing tissue as a control), normal endosperm, and cultured endosperm. Although we could show that expressed genes have much lower methylation levels in promoter regions than silent ones in both leaf and normal endosperm, there was surprisingly also a difference in the pattern of the z1A and z1B gene clusters. The expression of z1B gene is suppressed by increased DNA methylation and activated with reduced DNA methylation, whereas z1A gene expression is not. DNA methylation in gene coding regions is higher in leaf than in endosperm, whereas no significant difference is observed in gene bodies between expressed and non-expressed gene copies. A median CHG methylation (25–30%) appears to be optimal for gene expression. Moreover, tissue-cultured endosperm can reset the DNA methylation pattern and tissue-specific gene expression. These results reveal that DNA methylation changes of the 19-kDa zein genes is subject to plant development and tissue culture treatment, but varies in different chromosomal locations, indicating that DNA methylation changes do not apply to gene expression in a uniform fashion. Because tissue culture is used to produce transgenic plants, these studies provide new insights into variation of gene expression of integrated sequences. PMID:26741504

  8. Conservation of genetic information: a code for site-specific DNA recognition.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, L F; Sullivan, M R; Hickok, D F

    1993-01-01

    We present findings of genetic information conservation between the glucocorticoid response element (GRE) DNA and the cDNA encoding the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) DNA-binding domain (DBD). The regions of nucleotide sub-sequence similarity to the GRE in the GR DBD occur specifically at nucleotide sequences on the ends of exons 3,4, and 5 at their splice junction sites. These sequences encode the DNA recognition helix on exon 3, a beta-strand on exon 4, and a putative alpha-helix on exon 5, respectively. The nucleotide sequence of exon 5 that encodes the putative alpha-helix located on the carboxyl terminus of the GR DBD shares sequence similarity with the flanking nucleotide regions of the GRE. We generated a computer model of the GR DBD using atomic coordinates derived from nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to which we attached the exon 5-encoded putative alpha-helix. We docked this GR DBD structure at the 39-base-pair nucleotide sequence containing the GRE binding site and flanking nucleotides, which contained conserved genetic information. We observed that amino acids of the DNA recognition helix, the beta-strand, and the putative alpha-helix are spatially aligned with trinucleotides identical to their cognate codons within the GRE and its flanking nucleotides. Images Fig. 3 PMID:8516297

  9. Cloning and characterization of seven human forkhead proteins: binding site specificity and DNA bending.

    PubMed Central

    Pierrou, S; Hellqvist, M; Samuelsson, L; Enerbäck, S; Carlsson, P

    1994-01-01

    The forkhead domain is a monomeric DNA binding motif that defines a rapidly growing family of eukaryotic transcriptional regulators. Genetic and biochemical data suggest a central role in embryonic development for genes encoding forkhead proteins. We have used PCR and low stringency hybridization to isolate clones from human cDNA and genomic libraries that represent seven novel forkhead genes, freac-1 to freac-7. The spatial patterns of expression for the seven freac genes range from specific for a single tissue to nearly ubiquitous. The DNA binding specificities of four of the FREAC proteins were determined by selection of binding sites from random sequence oligonucleotides. The binding sites for all four FREAC proteins share a core sequence, RTAAAYA, but differ in the positions flanking the core. Domain swaps between two FREAC proteins identified two subregions within the forkhead domain as responsible for creating differences in DNA binding specificity. Applying a circular permutation assay, we show that binding of FREAC proteins to their cognate sites results in bending of the DNA at an angle of 80-90 degrees. Images PMID:7957066

  10. The consensus sequence for self-catalyzed site-specific G residue depurination in DNA.

    PubMed

    Amosova, Olga; Smith, Alexander; Fresco, Jacques R

    2011-10-21

    The sequence variation tolerated within the stem-loop-forming genomic consensus sequence for self-catalyzed site-specific depurination of G residues is explored. The variation in self-depurination kinetics with sequence changes in the loop residues and stem base pairs, as well as with pH, provides insights into the self-catalytic mechanism. The observations suggest that self-catalyzed depurination of the 5' G residue of the loop consensus sequence 5'-G(T/A)GG-3' probably involves formation of some intraloop hydrogen-bonded base pair with the 3'-terminal G residue; although the electronic structure of both these G residues is retained, their 2-amino substituents are not critical for that interaction. The strong dependence of the self-depurination kinetics on stem stability suggests that the lifetime of some strained form of the loop is controlled by the integrity of the stem. In addition to the effects of length and base pair sequence on stem stability, there is a base pair requirement at the base of the loop: self-depurination is suppressed by 5'-C·G-3', 5'-A·T-3', or a mismatch but is most favored by 5'T·A3' and less so by 5'-G·C-3'. The occurrence in T and G of a similarly located carbonyl capable of hydrogen-bonding to the water molecule required for glycosyl bond hydrolysis may explain this sequence requirement. In toto, the more complete definition of the consensus sequence provided by this investigation enables a more accurate estimation of their number in the human genome and their distribution among different genes.

  11. Bending and circularization of site-specific and stereoisomeric carcinogen-DNA adducts.

    PubMed

    Xu, R; Mao, B; Amin, S; Geacintov, N E

    1998-01-13

    The potent tumorigen and mutagen (+)-7(R),8(S)-dihydroxy-9(S), 10(R)-epoxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydrobenzo[a]pyrene ((+)-anti-BPDE) is a metabolite of benzo[a]pyrene that binds predominantly to the exocyclic amino group of guanine residues in DNA in vivo and in vitro. While the (-)-7S,8R,9R,10Senantiomer, (-)-anti-BPDE, also reacts with DNA to form similar covalent N2-deoxyguanosyl adducts, this diol epoxide is nontumorigenic and its mutagenic activities are different from those of (+)-anti-BPDE. In this work, T4 ligase-induced cyclization methods have been employed to demonstrate that the (+)-anti-[BP]-N2-dG lesions (G*) cause significantly greater amounts of bending and circularization of the one-base overhang undecamer duplex 5'-d(CACAT[G*]TACAC).d(TGTACATGTGG) than the stereoisomeric oligonucleotide duplex with G* = (-)-anti-[BP]-N2-dG. In the case of the (+)-anti-BPDE-modified oligonucleotides, the ratio of circular to linear DNA multimers reaches values of 8-9 for circle contour sizes of 99-121 base pairs, while for the (-)-anti-[BP]-N2-dG-modified DNA this ratio reaches a maximum value of only approximately 1 at 154-176 base pairs. Assuming a planar circle DNA model, the inferred bending angles for 90-92% of the observed circular ligation products range from 30 to 51 degrees per (+)-trans-anti-[BP]-N2-dG lesion and from 20 to 40 degrees per (-)-trans-anti-[BP]-N2-dG lesion. In the case of unmodified DNA, the probability of circular product formation is at least 1 order of magnitude less efficient than in the BPDE-modified sequences and about 90% of the circular products exhibit bending angles in the range of 14 -19 degrees . In the most abundant circular products observed experimentally, the bending angles are 40 degrees and 26 +/- 2 degrees per (+)-anti-[BP]- or (-)-anti-[BP]-modified 11-mer; these values correspond to a net contribution of 21-26 degrees and 5-19 degrees , respectively, to the observed overall bending per lesion. The coexistence of circular DNA

  12. Cloning and characterisation of a nuclear, site specific ssDNA binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Smidt, M P; Russchen, B; Snippe, L; Wijnholds, J; Ab, G

    1995-01-01

    Estradiol inducible, liver-specific expression of the apoVLDL II gene is mediated through the estrogen receptor and a variety of other DNA-binding proteins. In the present study we report the cloning and characterisation of a single-strand DNA binding protein that interacts with the lower strand of a complex regulatory site, which includes the major estrogen responsive element and a site that resembles the rat albumin site D (apoVLDL II site D). Based on its binding specificity determined with electro-mobility shift assays, the protein is named single-strand D-box binding factor (ssDBF). Analysis of the deduced 302 amino acid sequence revealed that the protein belongs to the heteronuclear ribonucleoprotein A/B family (hnRNP A/B) and resembles other known eukaryotic single-strand DNA binding proteins. Transient transfection experiments in a chicken liver cell-line showed that the protein represses estrogen-induced transcription. A protein with similar binding characteristics is present in liver nuclear extract. The relevance of the occurrence of this protein to the expression of the apoVLDL II gene is discussed. Images PMID:7630716

  13. Site-specific DNA repair at the nucleosome level in a yeast minichromosome

    SciTech Connect

    Smerdon, M.J.; Thoma, F. )

    1990-05-18

    The rate of excision repair of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers (PDs) was measured at specific sites in each strand of a yeast minichromosome containing an active gene (URA3), a replication origin (ARS1), and positioned nucleosomes. All six PD sites analyzed in the transcribed URA3 strand were repaired more rapidly (greater than 5-fold on average) than any of the nine PD sites analyzed in the nontranscribed strand. Efficient repair also occurred in both strands of a disrupted TRP1 gene (ten PD sites), containing four unstable nucleosomes, and in a nucleosome gap at the 5' end of URA3 (two PD sites). Conversely, slow repair occurred in both strands immediately downstream of the URA3 gene (12 of 14 PD sites). This region contains the ARS1 consensus sequence, a nucleosome gap, and two stable nucleosomes. Thus, modulation of DNA repair occurs in a simple yeast minichromosome and correlates with gene expression, nucleosome stability, and (possibly) control of replication.

  14. Crossover-site sequence and DNA torsional stress control strand interchanges by the Bxb1 site-specific serine recombinase

    PubMed Central

    Keenholtz, Ross A.; Grindley, Nigel D.F.; Hatfull, Graham F.; Marko, John F.

    2016-01-01

    DNA segment exchange by site-specific serine recombinases (SRs) is thought to proceed by rigid-body rotation of the two halves of the synaptic complex, following the cleavages that create the two pairs of exchangeable ends. It remains unresolved how the amount of rotation occurring between cleavage and religation is controlled. We report single-DNA experiments for Bxb1 integrase, a model SR, where dynamics of individual synapses were observed, using relaxation of supercoiling to report on cleavage and rotation events. Relaxation events often consist of multiple rotations, with the number of rotations per relaxation event and rotation velocity sensitive to DNA sequence at the center of the recombination crossover site, torsional stress and salt concentration. Bulk and single-DNA experiments indicate that the thermodynamic stability of the annealed, but cleaved, crossover sites controls ligation efficiency of recombinant and parental synaptic complexes, regulating the number of rotations during a breakage-religation cycle. The outcome is consistent with a ‘controlled rotation’ model analogous to that observed for type IB topoisomerases, with religation probability varying in accord with DNA base-pairing free energies at the crossover site. Significantly, we find no evidence for a special regulatory mechanism favoring ligation and product release after a single 180° rotation. PMID:27550179

  15. Site-specific deletion and rearrangement of integron insert genes catalyzed by the integron DNA integrase.

    PubMed Central

    Collis, C M; Hall, R M

    1992-01-01

    Deletion of individual antibiotic resistance genes found within the variable region of integrons is demonstrated. Evidence for gene duplications and rearrangements resulting from the insertion of gene units at new locations is also presented. Deletion, duplication, and rearrangement occur only in the presence of the integron-encoded DNA integrase. These events are precise and involve loss or gain of one or more complete insert units or gene cassettes. This confirms the recent definition of gene cassettes as consisting of the gene coding sequences, all except the last 7 bases of the 59-base element found at the 3' end of the gene, and the core site located 5' to the gene (Hall et al., Mol. Microbiol. 5:1941-1959, 1991) and demonstrates that individual gene cassettes are functional units which can be independently mobilized. Both deletions and duplications can be generated by integrase-mediated cointegrate formation followed by integrase-mediated resolution involving a different pair of sites. However, deletion occurs 10 times more frequently than duplication, and we propose that the majority of deletion events are likely to involve integrase-dependent excision of the gene unit to generate a circular gene cassette. The implications of these findings in understanding the evolution of integrons and the spread of antibiotic resistance genes in bacterial populations is discussed. Images PMID:1311297

  16. DNA damage response inhibition at dysfunctional telomeres by modulation of telomeric DNA damage response RNAs.

    PubMed

    Rossiello, Francesca; Aguado, Julio; Sepe, Sara; Iannelli, Fabio; Nguyen, Quan; Pitchiaya, Sethuramasundaram; Carninci, Piero; d'Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio

    2017-02-27

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is a set of cellular events that follows the generation of DNA damage. Recently, site-specific small non-coding RNAs, also termed DNA damage response RNAs (DDRNAs), have been shown to play a role in DDR signalling and DNA repair. Dysfunctional telomeres activate DDR in ageing, cancer and an increasing number of identified pathological conditions. Here we show that, in mammals, telomere dysfunction induces the transcription of telomeric DDRNAs (tDDRNAs) and their longer precursors from both DNA strands. DDR activation and maintenance at telomeres depend on the biogenesis and functions of tDDRNAs. Their functional inhibition by sequence-specific antisense oligonucleotides allows the unprecedented telomere-specific DDR inactivation in cultured cells and in vivo in mouse tissues. In summary, these results demonstrate that tDDRNAs are induced at dysfunctional telomeres and are necessary for DDR activation and they validate the viability of locus-specific DDR inhibition by targeting DDRNAs.

  17. Construction, characterization, and selected site-specific mutagenesis of an anti-single-stranded DNA single-chain autoantibody.

    PubMed

    Rumbley, C A; Denzin, L K; Yantz, L; Tetin, S Y; Voss, E W

    1993-06-25

    Single-chain antibodies are comprised of immunoglobulin light and heavy chain variable domains joined through a polypeptide linker. A single-chain autoantibody, containing the 14-amino acid 212-polypeptide linker (GSTSGSGKSSEGKG), was constructed based on the light and heavy chain variable region gene sequences of anti-single-stranded DNA autoantibody BV04-01 (IgG2b, kappa). Following protein expression in Escherichia coli, denaturation, refolding, and affinity purification, single-chain autoantibody 04-01 binding with single-stranded DNA and poly(dT) was characterized in solid-phase and solution-phase assays. Homopolymer ligand binding results demonstrated that single-chain autoantibody 04-01 possessed anti-DNA binding properties similar to BV04-01 IgG and Fab fragments. Based on x-ray crystallographic analyses of BV04-01, site-specific mutagenesis studies were conducted on 2 residues (L32Tyr and H100aTrp) involved in aromatic stacking interactions with the middle thymidine of a (dT)3 ligand.

  18. Site-specific excision repair of 1-nitrosopyrene-induced DNA adducts at the nucleotide level in the HPRT gene of human fibroblasts: effect of adduct conformation on the pattern of site-specific repair.

    PubMed Central

    Wei, D; Maher, V M; McCormick, J J

    1996-01-01

    Studies showing that different types of DNA adducts are repaired in human cells at different rates suggest that DNA adduct conformation is the major determinant of the rate of nucleotide excision repair. However, recent studies of repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers or benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide (BPDE)-induced adducts at the nucleotide level in DNA of normal human fibroblasts indicate that the rate of repair of the same adduct at different nucleotide positions can vary up to 10-fold, suggesting an important role for local DNA conformation. To see if site-specific DNA repair is a common phenomenon for bulky DNA adducts, we determined the rate of repair of 1-nitrosopyrene (1-NOP)-induced adducts in exon 3 of the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase gene at the nucleotide level using ligation-mediated PCR. To distinguish between the contributions of adduct conformation and local DNA conformation to the rate of repair, we compared the results obtained with 1-NOP with those we obtained previously using BPDE. The principal DNA adduct formed by either agent involves guanine. We found that rates of repair of 1-NOP-induced adducts also varied significantly at the nucleotide level, but the pattern of site-specific repair differed from that of BPDE-induced adducts at the same guanine positions in the same region of DNA. The average rate of excision repair of 1-NOP adducts in exon 3 was two to three times faster than that of BPDE adducts, but at particular nucleotides the rate was slower or faster than that of BPDE adducts or, in some cases, equal to that of BPDE adducts. These results indicate that the contribution of the local DNA conformation to the rate of repair at a particular nucleotide position depends upon the specific DNA adduct involved. However, the data also indicate that the conformation of the DNA adduct is not the only factor contributing to the rate of repair at different nucleotide positions. Instead, the rate of repair at a particular nucleotide

  19. Theory of site-specific DNA-protein interactions in the presence of conformational fluctuations of DNA binding domains.

    PubMed

    Murugan, R

    2010-07-21

    We develop a theory that explains how the thermally driven conformational fluctuations in the DNA binding domains (DBDs) of the DNA binding proteins (DBPs) are effectively coupled to the one-dimensional searching dynamics of DBPs for their cognate sites on DNA. We show that the rate gammaopt, associated with the flipping of conformational states of DBDs beyond which the maximum search efficiency of DBPs is achieved, varies with the one-dimensional sliding length L as gammaopt proportional, L(-2) and with the number of roadblock protein molecules present on the same DNA m as gammaopt proportional, m2. The required free energy barrier ERTO associated with this flipping transition seems to be varying with L as ERTO proportional, variant ln L2. When the barrier height associated with the conformational flipping of DBDs is comparable with that of the thermal free energy, then the possible value of L under in vivo conditions seems to be L

  20. Stereospecific suppression of active site mutants by methylphosphonate substituted substrates reveals the stereochemical course of site-specific DNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Rowley, Paul A; Kachroo, Aashiq H; Ma, Chien-Hui; Maciaszek, Anna D; Guga, Piotr; Jayaram, Makkuni

    2015-07-13

    Tyrosine site-specific recombinases, which promote one class of biologically important phosphoryl transfer reactions in DNA, exemplify active site mechanisms for stabilizing the phosphate transition state. A highly conserved arginine duo (Arg-I; Arg-II) of the recombinase active site plays a crucial role in this function. Cre and Flp recombinase mutants lacking either arginine can be rescued by compensatory charge neutralization of the scissile phosphate via methylphosphonate (MeP) modification. The chemical chirality of MeP, in conjunction with mutant recombinases, reveals the stereochemical contributions of Arg-I and Arg-II. The SP preference of the native reaction is specified primarily by Arg-I. MeP reaction supported by Arg-II is nearly bias-free or RP-biased, depending on the Arg-I substituent. Positional conservation of the arginines does not translate into strict functional conservation. Charge reversal by glutamic acid substitution at Arg-I or Arg-II has opposite effects on Cre and Flp in MeP reactions. In Flp, the base immediately 5' to the scissile MeP strongly influences the choice between the catalytic tyrosine and water as the nucleophile for strand scission, thus between productive recombination and futile hydrolysis. The recombinase active site embodies the evolutionary optimization of interactions that not only favor the normal reaction but also proscribe antithetical side reactions.

  1. Phototriggered formation and repair of DNA containing a site-specific single strand break of the type produced by ionizing radiation or AP lyase activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, K; Taylor, J S

    2001-01-09

    DNA strand breaks are produced by a variety of agents and processes such as ionizing radiation, xenobiotics, oxidative metabolism, and enzymatic processing of DNA base damage. One of the major types of strand breaks produced by these processes is a single nucleotide gap terminating in 5'- and 3'-phosphates. Previously, we had developed a method for sequence-specifically producing such phosphate-terminated strand breaks in an oligodeoxynucleotide by way of two photochemically activated (caged) building blocks placed in tandem. We now report the design and synthesis of a single caged building block consisting of 1,3-(2-nitrophenyl)-1,3-propanediol, for producing phosphate-terminated strand breaks, and its use producing such a break at a specific site in a double-stranded circular DNA vector. To produce the site-specific break in a duplex vector, a primer containing the caged single strand break was extended opposite the single strand form of a circular DNA vector followed by enzymatic ligation and purification. The single strand break could then be formed in quantitative yield by irradiation of the vector with 365 nm light. In contrast to a previous study, it was found that the strand break can be repaired by Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I and E. coli DNA ligase alone, though less efficiently than in the presence of the 3'-phosphate processing enzyme E. coli endonuclease IV. Repair in the absence of endonuclease IV could be attributed to hydrolysis of the 3'-phosphate in the presence of dNTP and to a lesser extent to exonucleolytic removal of the 3'-phosphate-bearing terminal nucleotide by way of the 3' --> 5' exonuclease activity of polymerase I. This work demonstrates that specialized 3'-end processing enzymes such as endonuclease IV or exonuclease III are not absolutely required for repair of phosphate-terminated gaps. In addition to preparing single strand breaks, the caged building block described should also be useful for preparing double strand breaks and

  2. DNA Damage, DNA Repair, Aging, and Neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Maynard, Scott; Fang, Evandro Fei; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Croteau, Deborah L; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2015-09-18

    Aging in mammals is accompanied by a progressive atrophy of tissues and organs, and stochastic damage accumulation to the macromolecules DNA, RNA, proteins, and lipids. The sequence of the human genome represents our genetic blueprint, and accumulating evidence suggests that loss of genomic maintenance may causally contribute to aging. Distinct evidence for a role of imperfect DNA repair in aging is that several premature aging syndromes have underlying genetic DNA repair defects. Accumulation of DNA damage may be particularly prevalent in the central nervous system owing to the low DNA repair capacity in postmitotic brain tissue. It is generally believed that the cumulative effects of the deleterious changes that occur in aging, mostly after the reproductive phase, contribute to species-specific rates of aging. In addition to nuclear DNA damage contributions to aging, there is also abundant evidence for a causative link between mitochondrial DNA damage and the major phenotypes associated with aging. Understanding the mechanistic basis for the association of DNA damage and DNA repair with aging and age-related diseases, such as neurodegeneration, would give insight into contravening age-related diseases and promoting a healthy life span.

  3. DNA Damage Induced Neuronal Death

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-10-01

    Experiments are proposed to examine the molecular mechanism by which mustard chemical warfare agents induce neuronal cell death . DNA damage is the...proposed underlying mechanism of mustard-induced neuronal cell death . We propose a novel research strategy to test this hypothesis by using mice with...perturbed DNA repair to explore the relationship between mustard-induced DNA damage and neuronal cell death . Initial in vitro studies (Years 1, 2 & 3

  4. Mechanical constraints on Hin subunit rotation imposed by the Fis-enhancer system and DNA supercoiling during site-specific recombination

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, Gautam; Heiss, John K.; Johnson, Reid C.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Hin, a member of the serine family of site-specific recombinases, regulates gene expression by inverting a DNA segment. DNA inversion requires assembly of an invertasome complex in which a recombinational enhancer DNA segment bound by the Fis protein associates with the Hin synaptic complex at the base of a supercoiled DNA branch. Each of the four Hin subunits becomes covalently joined to the cleaved DNA ends, and DNA exchange occurs by translocation of a Hin subunit pair within the tetramer. We show here that although the Hin tetramer forms a bidirectional molecular swivel, the Fis/enhancer system determines both the direction and number of subunit rotations. The chirality of supercoiling directs rotational direction, and the short DNA loop stabilized by Fis-Hin contacts limit rotational processivity, thereby ensuring that the DNA strands re-ligate in the recombinant configuration. We identify multiple rotational conformers that are formed under different supercoiling and solution conditions. PMID:19560425

  5. Optical detection of DNA damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Kim R.; Apostol, A.; Cembrano, J.

    1999-02-01

    A rapid and sensitive fluorescence assay for oxidative damage to calf thymus DNA is reported. A decrease in the transition temperature for strand separation resulted from exposure of the DNA to the reactive decomposition products of 3- morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1) (i.e., nitric oxide, superoxide, peroxynitrite, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radicals). A decrease in melting temperature of 12 degrees Celsius was indicative of oxidative damage including single strand chain breaks. Double stranded (ds) and single stranded (ss) forms of DNA were determined using the indicator dyes ethidium bromide and PicoGreen. The change in DNA 'melting' curves was dependant on the concentration of SIN-1 and was most pronounced at 75 degrees Celsius. This chemically induced damage was significantly inhibited by sodium citrate, tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris), and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), but was unaffected by superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, ethylenediamine tetraacietic acid (EDTA), or deferoxamine. Lowest observable effect level for SIN-1-induced damage was 200 (mu) M.

  6. Replicating damaged DNA in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Nimrat; Siede, Wolfram

    2013-12-01

    DNA damage is one of many possible perturbations that challenge the mechanisms that preserve genetic stability during the copying of the eukaryotic genome in S phase. This short review provides, in the first part, a general introduction to the topic and an overview of checkpoint responses. In the second part, the mechanisms of error-free tolerance in response to fork-arresting DNA damage will be discussed in some detail.

  7. DNA Repair by Reversal of DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Chengqi; He, Chuan

    2013-01-01

    Endogenous and exogenous factors constantly challenge cellular DNA, generating cytotoxic and/or mutagenic DNA adducts. As a result, organisms have evolved different mechanisms to defend against the deleterious effects of DNA damage. Among these diverse repair pathways, direct DNA-repair systems provide cells with simple yet efficient solutions to reverse covalent DNA adducts. In this review, we focus on recent advances in the field of direct DNA repair, namely, photolyase-, alkyltransferase-, and dioxygenase-mediated repair processes. We present specific examples to describe new findings of known enzymes and appealing discoveries of new proteins. At the end of this article, we also briefly discuss the influence of direct DNA repair on other fields of biology and its implication on the discovery of new biology. PMID:23284047

  8. DNA damage and carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Stelow, R B

    1980-01-01

    Although cancer may arise as a result of many different types of molecular changes, there is little reason to doubt that changes to DNA are one of the more important ones in cancer initiation. Although DNA repair mechanisms seem able to eliminate a very large fraction of deleterious changes to DNA, we not only have little insight into the molecular mechanisms involved in such repair, but have a negligible amount of information to permit us to estimate the shape of dose response relations at low doses. The case of skin cancer is a special one, in that the average population is exposed to sufficient solar uv so that the effects of small increments in uv dose may be estimated. An approximate 85% reduction in DNA repair increases skin cancer incidence 10/sup 4/ fold.

  9. Sperm DNA oxidative damage and DNA adducts

    PubMed Central

    Jeng, Hueiwang Anna; Pan, Chih-Hong; Chao, Mu-Rong; Lin, Wen-Yi

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate DNA damage and adducts in sperm from coke oven workers who have been exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. A longitudinal study was conducted with repeated measurements during spermatogenesis. Coke-oven workers (n=112) from a coke-oven plant served the PAH-exposed group, while administrators and security personnel (n=67) served the control. Routine semen parameters (concentration, motility, vitality, and morphology) were analyzed simultaneously; the assessment of sperm DNA integrity endpoints included DNA fragmentation, bulky DNA adducts, and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dGuo). The degree of sperm DNA fragmentation was measured using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay and sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA). The PAH-exposed group had a significant increase in bulky DNA adducts and 8-oxo-dGuo compared to the control subjects (Ps = 0.002 and 0.045, respectively). Coke oven workers' percentages of DNA fragmentation and denaturation from the PAH-exposed group were not significantly different from those of the control subjects (Ps = 0.232 and 0.245, respectively). Routine semen parameters and DNA integrity endpoints were not correlated. Concentrations of 8-oxo-dGuo were positively correlated with percentages of DNA fragmentation measured by both TUNEL and SCSA (Ps = 0.045 and 0.034, respectively). However, the concentrations of 8-oxo-dGuo and percentages of DNA fragmentation did not correlate with concentrations of bulky DNA adducts. In summary, coke oven workers with chronic exposure to PAHs experienced decreased sperm DNA integrity. Oxidative stress could contribute to the degree of DNA fragmentation. Bulky DNA adducts may be independent of the formation of DNA fragmentation and oxidative adducts in sperm. Monitoring sperm DNA integrity is recommended as a part of the process of assessing the impact of occupational and environmental toxins on

  10. Site-specific insertion of nitroxide-spin labels into DNA probes by click chemistry for structural analyses by ELDOR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Flaender, M; Sicoli, G; Fontecave, Th; Mathis, G; Saint-Pierre, C; Boulard, Y; Gambarelli, S; Gasparutto, D

    2008-01-01

    A new approach is described for the insertion of nitroxide spin-labels at specific positions within DNA oligomers. The latter bioconjugaison strategy is based on a click chemistry 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition between a spin-labeling reagent, namely the 4-azido-TEMPO, and alkyne modified uridine-containing oligonucleotides. This highly efficient labeling method was applied for site-specific incorporation of two TEMPO units within a set of double-stranded DNA constructs. Then the determination of the inter-nitroxide distances was achieved by using a four-pulses DEER technique that successfully validates the new site-directed spin labeling strategy.

  11. Autophagy in DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Czarny, Piotr; Pawlowska, Elzbieta; Bialkowska-Warzecha, Jolanta; Kaarniranta, Kai; Blasiak, Janusz

    2015-01-23

    DNA damage response (DDR) involves DNA repair, cell cycle regulation and apoptosis, but autophagy is also suggested to play a role in DDR. Autophagy can be activated in response to DNA-damaging agents, but the exact mechanism underlying this activation is not fully understood, although it is suggested that it involves the inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). mTORC1 represses autophagy via phosphorylation of the ULK1/2-Atg13-FIP200 complex thus preventing maturation of pre-autophagosomal structures. When DNA damage occurs, it is recognized by some proteins or their complexes, such as poly(ADP)ribose polymerase 1 (PARP-1), Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 (MRN) complex or FOXO3, which activate repressors of mTORC1. SQSTM1/p62 is one of the proteins whose levels are regulated via autophagic degradation. Inhibition of autophagy by knockout of FIP200 results in upregulation of SQSTM1/p62, enhanced DNA damage and less efficient damage repair. Mitophagy, one form of autophagy involved in the selective degradation of mitochondria, may also play role in DDR. It degrades abnormal mitochondria and can either repress or activate apoptosis, but the exact mechanism remains unknown. There is a need to clarify the role of autophagy in DDR, as this process may possess several important biomedical applications, involving also cancer therapy.

  12. Types and Consequences of DNA Damage

    EPA Science Inventory

    This review provides a concise overview of the types of DNA damage and the molecular mechanisms by which a cell senses DNA damage, repairs the damage, converts the damage into a mutation, or dies as a consequence of unrepaired DNA damage. Such information is important in consid...

  13. Site-specific integration in CHO cells mediated by CRISPR/Cas9 and homology-directed DNA repair pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Seong; Kallehauge, Thomas Beuchert; Pedersen, Lasse Ebdrup; Kildegaard, Helene Faustrup

    2015-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are the most widely used mammalian hosts for production of therapeutic proteins. However, development of recombinant CHO cell lines has been hampered by unstable and variable transgene expression caused by random integration. Here we demonstrate efficient targeted gene integration into site-specific loci in CHO cells using CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing system and compatible donor plasmid harboring a gene of interest (GOI) and short homology arms. This strategy has enabled precise insertion of a 3.7-kb gene expression cassette at defined loci in CHO cells following a simple drug-selection, resulting in homogeneous transgene expression. Taken together, the results displayed here can help pave the way for the targeting of GOI to specific loci in CHO cells, increasing the likelihood of generating isogenic cell lines with consistent protein production. PMID:25712033

  14. Site-specific non-LTR retrotransposons.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Haruhiko

    2015-04-01

    Although most of non-long terminal repeat (non-LTR) retrotransposons are incorporated in the host genome almost randomly, some non-LTR retrotransposons are incorporated into specific sequences within a target site. On the basis of structural and phylogenetic features, non-LTR retrotransposons are classified into two large groups, restriction enzyme-like endonuclease (RLE)-encoding elements and apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE)-encoding elements. All clades of RLE-encoding non-LTR retrotransposons include site-specific elements. However, only two of more than 20 APE-encoding clades, Tx1 and R1, contain site-specific non-LTR elements. Site-specific non-LTR retrotransposons usually target within multi-copy RNA genes, such as rRNA gene (rDNA) clusters, or repetitive genomic sequences, such as telomeric repeats; this behavior may be a symbiotic strategy to reduce the damage to the host genome. Site- and sequence-specificity are variable even among closely related non-LTR elements and appeared to have changed during evolution. In the APE-encoding elements, the primary determinant of the sequence- specific integration is APE itself, which nicks one strand of the target DNA during the initiation of target primed reverse transcription (TPRT). However, other factors, such as interaction between mRNA and the target DNA, and access to the target region in the nuclei also affect the sequence-specificity. In contrast, in the RLE-encoding elements, DNA-binding motifs appear to affect their sequence-specificity, rather than the RLE domain itself. Highly specific integration properties of these site-specific non-LTR elements make them ideal alternative tools for sequence-specific gene delivery, particularly for therapeutic purposes in human diseases.

  15. Base pair opening kinetics study of the aegPNA:DNA hydrid duplex containing a site-specific GNA-like chiral PNA monomer.

    PubMed

    Seo, Yeo-Jin; Lim, Jisoo; Lee, Eun-Hae; Ok, Taedong; Yoon, Juyoung; Lee, Joon-Hwa; Lee, Hee-Seung

    2011-09-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNA) are one of the most widely used synthetic DNA mimics where the four bases are attached to a N-(2-aminoethyl)glycine (aeg) backbone instead of the negative-charged phosphate backbone in DNA. We have developed a chimeric PNA (chiPNA), in which a chiral GNA-like γ(3)T monomer is incorporated into aegPNA backbone. The base pair opening kinetics of the aegPNA:DNA and chiPNA:DNA hybrid duplexes were studied by NMR hydrogen exchange experiments. This study revealed that the aegPNA:DNA hybrid is much more stable duplex and is less dynamic compared to DNA duplex, meaning that base pairs are opened and reclosed much more slowly. The site-specific incorporation of γ(3)T monomer in the aegPNA:DNA hybrid can destabilize a specific base pair and its neighbors, maintaining the thermal stabilities and dynamic properties of other base pairs. Our hydrogen exchange study firstly revealed the unique kinetic features of base pairs in the aegPNA:DNA and chiPNA:DNA hybrids, which will provide an insight into the development of methodology for specific DNA recognition using PNA fragments.

  16. A new strategy for site-specific alkylation of DNA using oligonucleotides containing an abasic site and alkylating probes.

    PubMed

    Sato, Norihiro; Tsuji, Genichiro; Sasaki, Yoshihiro; Usami, Akira; Moki, Takuma; Onizuka, Kazumitsu; Yamada, Ken; Nagatsugi, Fumi

    2015-10-14

    Selective chemical reactions with DNA, such as its labelling, are very useful in many applications. In this paper, we discuss a new strategy for the selective alkylation of DNA using an oligonucleotide containing an abasic site and alkylating probes. We designed three probes consisting of 2-AVP as a reactive moiety and three kinds of binding moiety with high affinity to duplex DNA. Among these probes, Hoechst-AVP probe exhibited high selectivity and efficient reactivity to thymine bases at the site opposite an abasic site in DNA. Our method is potentially useful for inducing site-directed reactions aimed at inhibiting polymerase reactions.

  17. Distinct Roles for Interfacial Hydration in Site-Specific DNA Recognition by ETS-Family Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Xhani, Suela; Esaki, Shingo; Huang, Kenneth; Erlitzki, Noa; Poon, Gregory M K

    2017-03-15

    The ETS family of transcription factors is a functionally heterogeneous group of gene regulators that share a structurally conserved, eponymous DNA-binding domain. Unlike other ETS homologs, such as Ets-1, DNA recognition by PU.1 is highly sensitive to its osmotic environment due to excess interfacial hydration in the complex. To interrogate interfacial hydration in the two homologs, we mutated a highly conserved tyrosine residue, which is exclusively engaged in coordinating a well-defined water contact between the protein and DNA among ETS proteins, to phenylalanine. The loss of this water-mediated contact blunted the osmotic sensitivity of PU.1/DNA binding, but did not alter binding under normo-osmotic conditions, suggesting that PU.1 has evolved to maximize osmotic sensitivity. The homologous mutation in Ets-1, which was minimally sensitive to osmotic stress due to a sparsely hydrated interface, reduced DNA-binding affinity at normal osmolality but the complex became stabilized by osmotic stress. Molecular dynamics simulations of wildtype and mutant PU.1 and Ets-1 in their free and DNA-bound states, which recapitulated experimental features of the proteins, showed that abrogation of this tyrosine-mediated water contact perturbed the Ets-1/DNA complex not through disruption of interfacial hydration, but by inhibiting local dynamics induced specifically in the bound state. Thus, a configurationally identical water-mediated contact plays mechanistically distinct roles in mediating DNA recognition by structurally homologous ETS transcription factors.

  18. Miniaturized reaction vessel system, method for performing site-specific biochemical reactions and affinity fractionation for use in DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Mirzabekov, Andrei Darievich; Lysov, Yuri Petrovich; Dubley, Svetlana A.

    2000-01-01

    A method for fractionating and sequencing DNA via affinity interaction is provided comprising contacting cleaved DNA to a first array of oligonucleotide molecules to facilitate hybridization between said cleaved DNA and the molecules; extracting the hybridized DNA from the molecules; contacting said extracted hybridized DNA with a second array of oligonucleotide molecules, wherein the oligonucleotide molecules in the second array have specified base sequences that are complementary to said extracted hybridized DNA; and attaching labeled DNA to the second array of oligonucleotide molecules, wherein the labeled re-hybridized DNA have sequences that are complementary to the oligomers. The invention further provides a method for performing multi-step conversions of the chemical structure of compounds comprising supplying an array of polyacrylamide vessels separated by hydrophobic surfaces; immobilizing a plurality of reactants, such as enzymes, in the vessels so that each vessel contains one reactant; contacting the compounds to each of the vessels in a predetermined sequence and for a sufficient time to convert the compounds to a desired state; and isolating the converted compounds from said array.

  19. DNA Damage and Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ranchoux, Benoît; Meloche, Jolyane; Paulin, Roxane; Boucherat, Olivier; Provencher, Steeve; Bonnet, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is defined by a mean pulmonary arterial pressure over 25 mmHg at rest and is diagnosed by right heart catheterization. Among the different groups of PH, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by a progressive obstruction of distal pulmonary arteries, related to endothelial cell dysfunction and vascular cell proliferation, which leads to an increased pulmonary vascular resistance, right ventricular hypertrophy, and right heart failure. Although the primary trigger of PAH remains unknown, oxidative stress and inflammation have been shown to play a key role in the development and progression of vascular remodeling. These factors are known to increase DNA damage that might favor the emergence of the proliferative and apoptosis-resistant phenotype observed in PAH vascular cells. High levels of DNA damage were reported to occur in PAH lungs and remodeled arteries as well as in animal models of PH. Moreover, recent studies have demonstrated that impaired DNA-response mechanisms may lead to an increased mutagen sensitivity in PAH patients. Finally, PAH was linked with decreased breast cancer 1 protein (BRCA1) and DNA topoisomerase 2-binding protein 1 (TopBP1) expression, both involved in maintaining genome integrity. This review aims to provide an overview of recent evidence of DNA damage and DNA repair deficiency and their implication in PAH pathogenesis. PMID:27338373

  20. RecQ4 promotes the conversion of the pre-initiation complex at a site-specific origin for DNA unwinding in Xenopus egg extracts.

    PubMed

    Sanuki, Yosuke; Kubota, Yumiko; Kanemaki, Masato T; Takahashi, Tatsuro S; Mimura, Satoru; Takisawa, Haruhiko

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic DNA replication is initiated through stepwise assembly of evolutionarily conserved replication proteins onto replication origins, but how the origin DNA is unwound during the assembly process remains elusive. Here, we established a site-specific origin on a plasmid DNA, using in vitro replication systems derived from Xenopus egg extracts. We found that the pre-replicative complex (pre-RC) was preferentially assembled in the vicinity of GAL4 DNA-binding sites of the plasmid, depending on the binding of Cdc6 fused with a GAL4 DNA-binding domain in Cdc6-depleted extracts. Subsequent addition of nucleoplasmic S-phase extracts to the GAL4-dependent pre-RC promoted initiation of DNA replication from the origin, and components of the pre-initiation complex (pre-IC) and the replisome were recruited to the origin concomitant with origin unwinding. In this replication system, RecQ4 is dispensable for both recruitment of Cdc45 onto the origin and stable binding of Cdc45 and GINS to the pre-RC assembled plasmid. However, both origin binding of DNA polymerase α and unwinding of DNA were diminished upon depletion of RecQ4 from the extracts. These results suggest that RecQ4 plays an important role in the conversion of pre-ICs into active replisomes requiring the unwinding of origin DNA in vertebrates.

  1. DNA Damage and Repair in Vascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Uryga, Anna; Gray, Kelly; Bennett, Martin

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage affecting both genomic and mitochondrial DNA is present in a variety of both inherited and acquired vascular diseases. Multiple cell types show persistent DNA damage and a range of lesions. In turn, DNA damage activates a variety of DNA repair mechanisms, many of which are activated in vascular disease. Such DNA repair mechanisms either stall the cell cycle to allow repair to occur or trigger apoptosis or cell senescence to prevent propagation of damaged DNA. Recent evidence has indicated that DNA damage occurs early, is progressive, and is sufficient to impair function of cells composing the vascular wall. The consequences of persistent genomic and mitochondrial DNA damage, including inflammation, cell senescence, and apoptosis, are present in vascular disease. DNA damage can thus directly cause vascular disease, opening up new possibilities for both prevention and treatment. We review the evidence for and the causes, types, and consequences of DNA damage in vascular disease.

  2. Site-specific copper-catalyzed oxidation of α-synuclein: tightening the link between metal binding and protein oxidative damage in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Miotto, Marco C; Rodriguez, Esaú E; Valiente-Gabioud, Ariel A; Torres-Monserrat, Valentina; Binolfi, Andrés; Quintanar, Liliana; Zweckstetter, Markus; Griesinger, Christian; Fernández, Claudio O

    2014-05-05

    Amyloid aggregation of α-synuclein (AS) has been linked to the pathological effects associated with Parkinson's disease (PD). Cu(II) binds specifically at the N-terminus of AS and triggers its aggregation. Site-specific Cu(I)-catalyzed oxidation of AS has been proposed as a plausible mechanism for metal-enhanced AS amyloid formation. In this study, Cu(I) binding to AS was probed by NMR spectroscopy, in combination with synthetic peptide models, site-directed mutagenesis, and C-terminal-truncated protein variants. Our results demonstrate that both Met residues in the motif (1)MDVFM(5) constitute key structural determinants for the high-affinity binding of Cu(I) to the N-terminal region of AS. The replacement of one Met residue by Ile causes a dramatic decrease in the binding affinity for Cu(I), whereas the removal of both Met residues results in a complete lack of binding. Moreover, these Met residues can be oxidized rapidly after air exposure of the AS-Cu(I) complex, whereas Met-116 and Met-127 in the C-terminal region remain unaffected. Met-1 displays higher susceptibility to oxidative damage compared to Met-5 because it is directly involved in both Cu(II) and Cu(I) coordination, resulting in closer exposure to the reactive oxygen species that may be generated by the redox cycling of copper. Our findings support a mechanism where the interaction of AS with copper ions leads to site-specific metal-catalyzed oxidation in the protein under physiologically relevant conditions. In light of recent biological findings, these results support a role for AS-copper interactions in neurodegeneration in PD.

  3. Chromatin structure and DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Gale, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    This dissertation examines the structure and structural transitions of chromatin in relation to DNA damage. The ability of intact and histone H1 depleted chromatin fibers to fold into higher ordered structures in vitro was examined following DNA photodamage introduced by two different agents. (1) 254-nm UV radiation and (2) trimethylpsoralen (plus near-UV radiation). Both agents are highly specific for DNA and form adducts predicted to cause different degrees of distortion in the DNA helix. The salt-induced structural transitions of intact and histone H1 depleted chromatin fibers were monitored by both analytical ultracentrifugation and light scattering. Our results show that even in the presence of extremely large, nonphysiological amounts of photodamage by either agent the ability of chromatin to fold into higher ordered structures is not affected. The compact, 30 nm fiber must therefore be able to accommodate a large amount of DNA damage without any measurable changes in the overall size or degree of compaction of this structure. The distribution of pyrimidine dimers was mapped at the single nucleotide level in nucleosome core DNA from UV-irradiated mononucleosomes, chromatin fibers, and human cells in culture using the 3' ..-->.. 5' exonuclease activity of T4 DNA polymerase.

  4. Conserved amino acid motifs from the novel Piv/MooV family of transposases and site-specific recombinases are required for catalysis of DNA inversion by Piv.

    PubMed

    Tobiason, D M; Buchner, J M; Thiel, W H; Gernert, K M; Karls, A C

    2001-02-01

    Piv, a site-specific invertase from Moraxella lacunata, exhibits amino acid homology with the transposases of the IS110/IS492 family of insertion elements. The functions of conserved amino acid motifs that define this novel family of both transposases and site-specific recombinases (Piv/MooV family) were examined by mutagenesis of fully conserved amino acids within each motif in Piv. All Piv mutants altered in conserved residues were defective for in vivo inversion of the M. lacunata invertible DNA segment, but competent for in vivo binding to Piv DNA recognition sequences. Although the primary amino acid sequences of the Piv/MooV recombinases do not contain a conserved DDE motif, which defines the retroviral integrase/transposase (IN/Tnps) family, the predicted secondary structural elements of Piv align well with those of the IN/Tnps for which crystal structures have been determined. Molecular modelling of Piv based on these alignments predicts that E59, conserved as either E or D in the Piv/MooV family, forms a catalytic pocket with the conserved D9 and D101 residues. Analysis of Piv E59G confirms a role for E59 in catalysis of inversion. These results suggest that Piv and the related IS110/IS492 transposases mediate DNA recombination by a common mechanism involving a catalytic DED or DDD motif.

  5. Method for assaying clustered DNA damages

    DOEpatents

    Sutherland, Betsy M.

    2004-09-07

    Disclosed is a method for detecting and quantifying clustered damages in DNA. In this method, a first aliquot of the DNA to be tested for clustered damages with one or more lesion-specific cleaving reagents under conditions appropriate for cleavage of the DNA to produce single-strand nicks in the DNA at sites of damage lesions. The number average molecular length (Ln) of double stranded DNA is then quantitatively determined for the treated DNA. The number average molecular length (Ln) of double stranded DNA is also quantitatively determined for a second, untreated aliquot of the DNA. The frequency of clustered damages (.PHI..sub.c) in the DNA is then calculated.

  6. Site-specific oxidation at GG and GGG sequences in double-stranded DNA by benzoyl peroxide as a tumor promoter.

    PubMed

    Kawanishi, S; Oikawa, S; Murata, M; Tsukitome, H; Saito, I

    1999-12-21

    Benzoyl peroxide (BzPO), a free-radical generator, has tumor-promoting activity. As a method for approaching the mechanism of tumor promoter function, the ability of oxidative DNA damage by BzPO was investigated by using (32)P-labeled DNA fragments obtained from the human p53 tumor suppressor gene and c-Ha-ras-1 protooncogene. BzPO induced piperidine-labile sites at the 5'-site guanine of GG and GGG sequences of double-stranded DNA in the presence of Cu(I), whereas the damage occurred at single guanine residues of single-stranded DNA. Both methional and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) inhibited DNA damage induced by BzPO and Cu(I), but typical hydroxyl radical ((*)OH) scavengers, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase, did not inhibit it. On the other hand, H(2)O(2) induced piperidine-labile sites at cytosine and thymine residues of double-stranded DNA in the presence of Cu(I). Phenylhydrazine, which is known to produce phenyl radicals, induced Cu(I)-dependent damage at thymine residues but not at guanine residues. These results suggest that the BzPO-derived reactive species causing DNA damage is different from (*)OH and phenyl radicals generated from benzoyloxyl radicals. BzPO/Cu(I) induced 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) formation in double-stranded DNA more effectively than that in single-stranded DNA. Furthermore, we observed that BzPO increased the amount of 8-oxodG in human cultured cells. Consequently, it is concluded that benzoyloxyl radicals generated by the reaction of BzPO with Cu(I) may oxidize the 5'-guanine of GG and GGG sequences in double-stranded DNA to lead to 8-oxodG formation and piperidine-labile guanine lesions, and the damage seems to be relevant to the tumor-promoting activity of BzPO.

  7. Highly efficient and inducible DNA excision in transgenic silkworms using the FLP/FRT site-specific recombination system.

    PubMed

    Long, Dingpei; Lu, Weijian; Hao, Zhanzhang; Xiang, Zhonghuai; Zhao, Aichun

    2016-12-01

    Efficient and inducible recombinase-mediated DNA excision is an optimal technology for automatically deleting unwanted DNA sequences, including selection marker genes. However, this methodology has yet to be established in transgenic silkworms. To achieve efficient and inducible FLP recombinase-mediated DNA excision in transgenic silkworms, one transgenic target strain (TTS) containing an FRT-flanked silkworm cytoplasmic actin 3 gene promoter (A3)-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) expression cassette, as well as two different types of FLP recombinase expression helper strains were generated. Then, the FLP recombinase was introduced into the TTS silkworms by pre-blastoderm microinjection and sexual hybridization. Successful recombinase-mediated deletion of the A3-EGFP expression cassette was observed in the offspring of the TTS, and the excision efficiencies of the FLP expression vector and FLP mRNA pre-blastoderm microinjection were 2.38 and 13.3 %, respectively. The excision efficiencies resulting from hybridization between the TTS and the helper strain that contained a heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70)-FLP expression cassette ranged from 32.14 to 36.67 % after heat shock treatment, while the excision efficiencies resulting from hybridization between the TTS and the helper strain containing the A3-FLP expression cassette ranged from 97.01 to 100 %. These results demonstrate that the FLP/FRT system can be used to achieve highly efficient and inducible post-integration excision of unwanted DNA sequences in transgenic silkworms in vivo. Our present study will facilitate the development and application of the FLP/FRT system for the functional analysis of unknown genes, and establish the safety of transgenic technologies in the silkworm and other lepidopteran species.

  8. A replicator-specific binding protein essential for site-specific initiation of DNA replication in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ya; Huang, Liang; Fu, Haiqing; Smith, Owen K.; Lin, Chii Mei; Utani, Koichi; Rao, Mishal; Reinhold, William C.; Redon, Christophe E.; Ryan, Michael; Kim, RyangGuk; You, Yang; Hanna, Harlington; Boisclair, Yves; Long, Qiaoming; Aladjem, Mirit I.

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian chromosome replication starts from distinct sites; however, the principles governing initiation site selection are unclear because proteins essential for DNA replication do not exhibit sequence-specific DNA binding. Here we identify a replication-initiation determinant (RepID) protein that binds a subset of replication-initiation sites. A large fraction of RepID-binding sites share a common G-rich motif and exhibit elevated replication initiation. RepID is required for initiation of DNA replication from RepID-bound replication origins, including the origin at the human beta-globin (HBB) locus. At HBB, RepID is involved in an interaction between the replication origin (Rep-P) and the locus control region. RepID-depleted murine embryonic fibroblasts exhibit abnormal replication fork progression and fewer replication-initiation events. These observations are consistent with a model, suggesting that RepID facilitates replication initiation at a distinct group of human replication origins. PMID:27272143

  9. Cae I: an endonuclease isolated from the African green monkey with properties indicating site-specific cleavage of homologous and heterologous mammalian DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, F L; Musich, P R; Maio, J J

    1978-01-01

    Component alpha DNA is a highly repetitive sequence that comprises nearly a quarter of the African green monkey (Cercopithecus aethiops) genome. A previous microbial restriction enzyme analysis showed that the repeat structure of component alpha DNA is based upon a monomeric unit of 176 +/- 4 base-pairs. An endonuclease, provisionally termed Case I, has been isolated from African green monkey testes that cleaves component alpha DNA into multimeric segments based upon the same repeat periodicity as that revealed by microbial restriction enzymes. The primary sites of Cae I cleavage in the component alpha sequence appear to be 120 +/- 6 base-pairs distant from the Hind III sites and 73 +/- 6 base-pairs distant from the Eco RI* sites. Cae I has been partially characterized with special reference to the effects of ATP and S-adenosylmethionine on the cleavage of component alpha DNA. Cae I may be a member of a class of similar site-specific nucleases present in mammalian cells. Cae I also cleaves mouse satellite DNA into a multimeric series of discrete segments: the periodicity of this series is shorter than that revealed by Eco RII retriction analysis of mouse satellite DNA. Images PMID:206873

  10. Crystal structure of A. aeolicus argonaute, a site-specific DNA-guided endoribonuclease, provides insights into RISC-mediated mRNA cleavage

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan,Y.; Pei, Y.; Ma, J.; Kuryavyi, V.; Zhadina, M.; Meister, G.; Chen, H.; Dauter, Z.; Tuschi, T.; Patel, D.

    2005-01-01

    Argonaute (Ago) proteins constitute a key component of the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). We report the crystal structure of Aquifex aeolicus Ago (Aa-Ago) together with binding and cleavage studies, which establish this eubacterial Ago as a bona fide guide DNA strand-mediated site-specific RNA endonuclease. We have generated a stereochemically robust model of the complex, where the guide DNA-mRNA duplex is positioned within a basic channel spanning the bilobal interface, such that the 5' phosphate of the guide strand can be anchored in a basic pocket, and the mRNA can be positioned for site-specific cleavage by RNase H-type divalent cation-coordinated catalytic Asp residues of the PIWI domain. Domain swap experiments involving chimeras of human Ago (hAgo1) and cleavage-competent hAgo2 reinforce the role of the PIWI domain in 'slicer' activity. We propose a four-step Ago-mediated catalytic cleavage cycle model, which provides distinct perspectives into the mechanism of guide strand-mediated mRNA cleavage within the RISC.

  11. DNA damage by various radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, K.; Yoshioka, H.; Yoshioka, H.

    1997-01-01

    In an attempt to shed light on the influence of tritiated water on DNA we have investigated the post-irradiation damage with a simple plasmid DNA, pBR322 and pUC18. The survival of covalently closed circular (CCC) DNA form was directly followed by agarose gel electrophoresis. The survival percentage of DNA in tritiated water was almost the same as with the irradiation with X-rays at the same absorbed dose. For irradiation with γ-rays, on the other hand, the decay rate was larger than those observed with both tritiated water and X-rays. The percentages of breakage for DNA in tritiated water, X-rays and γ-rays were found to be 34, 38 and 33% at 100 Gy of absorbed dose. The effect of dose rate was not observed for irradiation with tritiated water, X-rays and γ-rays. In order to study protection of DNA against radiation, we investigated the protecting effect of tea catechin which is the main component of (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCg). The protection mechanism for DNA against radiation-induced scission has been studied using ESR spin-trapping method.

  12. Sphingolipids in the DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Brittany; Donaldson, Cat; Obeid, Lina

    2014-01-01

    Recently, sphingolipid metabolizing enzymes have emerged as important targets of many chemotherapeutics and DNA damaging agents and therefore play significant roles in mediating the physiological response of the cell to DNA damage. In this review we will highlight points of connection between the DNA damage response (DDR) and sphingolipid metabolism; specifically how certain sphingolipid enzymes are regulated in response to DNA damage and how the bioactive lipids produced by these enzymes affect cell fate. PMID:25434743

  13. Site-specific regulation of cell cycle and DNA repair in post-mitotic GABA cells in schizophrenic versus bipolars.

    PubMed

    Benes, Francine M; Lim, Benjamin; Subburaju, Sivan

    2009-07-14

    GABA cell dysfunction in both schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD) involves decreased GAD(67) expression, although this change involves fundamentally different networks of genes in the 2 disorders. One gene that is common to these 2 networks is cyclin D2, a key component of cell cycle regulation that shows increased expression in SZ, but decreased expression in BD. Because of the importance of cell cycle regulation in maintaining functional differentiation and DNA repair, the current study has examined the genes involved in the G(1) and G(2) checkpoints to generate new hypotheses regarding the regulation of the GABA cell phenotype in the hippocampus of SZ and BD. The results have demonstrated significant changes in cell cycle regulation in both SZ and BD and these changes include the transcriptional complex (TC) that controls the expression of E2F/DP-1 target genes critical for progression to G(2)/M. The methyl-CpG binding domain protein (MBD4) that is pivotal for DNA repair, is significantly up-regulated in the stratum oriens (SO) of CA3/2 and CA1 in SZs and BDs. However, other genes associated with the TC, and the G(1) and G(2) checkpoints, show complex changes in expression in the SO of CA3/2 and CA1 of both SZs and BDS. Overall, the patterns of expression observed have suggested that the regulation of functional differentiation and/or genomic integrity of hippocampal GABA cells varies according to diagnosis and their location within the trisynaptic pathway.

  14. New families of site-specific repetitive DNA sequences that comprise constitutive heterochromatin of the Syrian hamster (Mesocricetus auratus, Cricetinae, Rodentia).

    PubMed

    Yamada, Kazuhiko; Kamimura, Eikichi; Kondo, Mariko; Tsuchiya, Kimiyuki; Nishida-Umehara, Chizuko; Matsuda, Yoichi

    2006-02-01

    We molecularly cloned new families of site-specific repetitive DNA sequences from BglII- and EcoRI-digested genomic DNA of the Syrian hamster (Mesocricetus auratus, Cricetrinae, Rodentia) and characterized them by chromosome in situ hybridization and filter hybridization. They were classified into six different types of repetitive DNA sequence families according to chromosomal distribution and genome organization. The hybridization patterns of the sequences were consistent with the distribution of C-positive bands and/or Hoechst-stained heterochromatin. The centromeric major satellite DNA and sex chromosome-specific and telomeric region-specific repetitive sequences were conserved in the same genus (Mesocricetus) but divergent in different genera. The chromosome-2-specific sequence was conserved in two genera, Mesocricetus and Cricetulus, and a low copy number of repetitive sequences on the heterochromatic chromosome arms were conserved in the subfamily Cricetinae but not in the subfamily Calomyscinae. By contrast, the other type of repetitive sequences on the heterochromatic chromosome arms, which had sequence similarities to a LINE sequence of rodents, was conserved through the three subfamilies, Cricetinae, Calomyscinae and Murinae. The nucleotide divergence of the repetitive sequences of heterochromatin was well correlated with the phylogenetic relationships of the Cricetinae species, and each sequence has been independently amplified and diverged in the same genome.

  15. Rapid Approaches Towards DNA Damage Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Crews, N.; Paidipalli, Manasa

    2013-01-01

    The severe effects of DNA damage on human health have led to a tremendous amount of research being focused. Owing to the importance of damage detection, different approaches for the detection and quantification of the damaged DNA will be presented. In this work, we have modeled DNA damage using well-known mutagens: UV radiation to create photoproducts and restriction enzyme digestion to create double strand breaks. We will show that quantitative PCR (qPCR), a widely known measure of detecting the presence of the target DNA can be used to quantify photoproducts/intramolecular DNA damage. Our results indicate that a comparison of the initial concentration available in the undamaged and the damaged samples can be used to reveal the effect of damaged DNA in its amplification. By analyzing multiple regions using this technique, their relative susceptibility to damage can be measured. We also show that high-resolution melting analysis (HRMA), a measure of the bond energy between two DNA strands, can be used to quantify double strand breaks. The strand breaks resulted in a change in the overall distribution of the bond energy thus causing variations in the melting profile. HRMA has also been examined to compare DNA damage resulting from UV-A, UV-B and UV-C irradiation. The evaluation techniques demonstrated can potentially be extended to various types of DNA damage.

  16. Pyrosequencing: Applicability for Studying DNA Damage-induced Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Minko, Irina G.; Earley, Lauriel F.; Larlee, Kimberly E.; Lin, Ying-Chih; Lloyd, R. Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Site-specifically modified DNAs are routinely used in the study of DNA damage-induced mutagenesis. These analyses involve the creation of DNA vectors containing a lesion at a predetermined position, DNA replication, and detection of mutations at the target site. The final step has previously required the isolation of individual DNA clones, hybridization with radioactively-labeled probes, and verification of mutations by Sanger sequencing. In search for an alternative procedure that would allow direct quantification of sequence variants in a mixed population of DNA molecules, we evaluated the applicability of pyrosequencing to site-specific mutagenesis assays. The progeny DNAs were analyzed that originated from replication of N6-(deoxy-D-erythro-pentofuranosyl)-2,6-diamino-3,4-dihydro-4-oxo-5-N-methylformamidopyrimidine (MeFapy-dG)-containing vectors in primate cells, with the lesion being positioned in the 5′-GCNGG-3′ sequence context. Pyrosequencing detected ~8% G to T transversions and ~3.5% G to A transitions, a result that was in excellent agreement with frequencies previously measured by the standard procedure [Earley et al., 2013]. However, ~3.5% G to C transversions and ~2.0% deletions could not be detected by pyrosequencing. Consistent with these observations, the sensitivity of pyrosequencing for measuring the single deoxynucleotide variants differed depending on the deoxynucleotide identity, and in the given sequence contexts, was determined to be ~1-2% for A and T and ~5% for C. Pyrosequencing of other DNA isolates that were obtained following replication of MeFapy-dG-containing vectors in primate cells or Escherichia coli, identified several additional limitations. Collectively, our data demonstrated that pyrosequencing can be used for studying DNA damage-induced mutagenesis as an effective complementary experimental approach to current protocols. PMID:24962778

  17. DNA damage response, redox status and hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Cary N; Ito, Keisuke

    2014-01-01

    The ability of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to self-renew and differentiate into progenitors is essential for homeostasis of the hematopoietic system. The longevity of HSCs makes them vulnerable to accumulating DNA damage, which may be leukemogenic or result in senescence and cell death. Additionally, the ability of HSCs to self-renew and differentiate allows DNA damage to spread throughout the hematologic system, leaving the organism vulnerable to disease. In this review we discuss cell fate decisions made in the face of DNA damage and other cellular stresses, and the role of reactive oxygen species in the long-term maintenance of HSCs and their DNA damage response.

  18. Site-specific DNA double-strand break generated by I-SceI endonuclease enhances ectopic homologous recombination in Pyricularia oryzae.

    PubMed

    Arazoe, Takayuki; Younomaru, Tetsuya; Ohsato, Shuichi; Kimura, Makoto; Arie, Tsutomu; Kuwata, Shigeru

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate the contribution of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) to somatic homologous recombination (HR) in Pyricularia oryzae, we established a novel detection/selection system of DSBs-mediated ectopic HR. This system consists of donor and recipient nonfunctional yellow fluorescent protein (YFP)/blasticidin S deaminase (BSD) fusion genes and the yeast endonuclease I-SceI gene as a recipient-specific DSB inducer. The system enables to detect and select ectopic HR events by the restoration of YFP fluorescence and blasticidin S resistance. The transformed lines with donor and recipient showed low frequencies of endogenous ectopic HR (> 2.1%). Compared with spontaneous HR, c. 20-fold increases in HR and absolute frequency of HR as high as 40% were obtained by integration of I-SceI gene, indicating that I-SceI-mediated DSB was efficiently repaired via ectopic HR. Furthermore, to validate the impact of DSB on targeted gene replacement (TGR), the transformed lines with a recipient gene were transfected with an exogenous donor plasmid in combination with the DSB inducer. TGR events were not observed without the DSB inducer, whereas hundreds of colonies resulting from TGR events were obtained with the DSB inducer. These results clearly demonstrated that the introduction of site-specific DSB promotes ectopic HR repair in P. oryzae.

  19. DNA Damage Signals and Space Radiation Risk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    Space radiation is comprised of high-energy and charge (HZE) nuclei and protons. The initial DNA damage from HZE nuclei is qualitatively different from X-rays or gamma rays due to the clustering of damage sites which increases their complexity. Clustering of DNA damage occurs on several scales. First there is clustering of single strand breaks (SSB), double strand breaks (DSB), and base damage within a few to several hundred base pairs (bp). A second form of damage clustering occurs on the scale of a few kbp where several DSB?s may be induced by single HZE nuclei. These forms of damage clusters do not occur at low to moderate doses of X-rays or gamma rays thus presenting new challenges to DNA repair systems. We review current knowledge of differences that occur in DNA repair pathways for different types of radiation and possible relationships to mutations, chromosomal aberrations and cancer risks.

  20. Cellular responses to environmental DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the conference entitled Cellular Responses to Environmental DNA Damage held in Banff,Alberta December 1--6, 1991. The conference addresses various aspects of DNA repair in sessions titled DNA repair; Basic Mechanisms; Lesions; Systems; Inducible Responses; Mutagenesis; Human Population Response Heterogeneity; Intragenomic DNA Repair Heterogeneity; DNA Repair Gene Cloning; Aging; Human Genetic Disease; and Carcinogenesis. Individual papers are represented as abstracts of about one page in length.

  1. DNA Damage in Plant Herbarium Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Staats, Martijn; Cuenca, Argelia; Richardson, James E.; Vrielink-van Ginkel, Ria; Petersen, Gitte; Seberg, Ole; Bakker, Freek T.

    2011-01-01

    Dried plant herbarium specimens are potentially a valuable source of DNA. Efforts to obtain genetic information from this source are often hindered by an inability to obtain amplifiable DNA as herbarium DNA is typically highly degraded. DNA post-mortem damage may not only reduce the number of amplifiable template molecules, but may also lead to the generation of erroneous sequence information. A qualitative and quantitative assessment of DNA post-mortem damage is essential to determine the accuracy of molecular data from herbarium specimens. In this study we present an assessment of DNA damage as miscoding lesions in herbarium specimens using 454-sequencing of amplicons derived from plastid, mitochondrial, and nuclear DNA. In addition, we assess DNA degradation as a result of strand breaks and other types of polymerase non-bypassable damage by quantitative real-time PCR. Comparing four pairs of fresh and herbarium specimens of the same individuals we quantitatively assess post-mortem DNA damage, directly after specimen preparation, as well as after long-term herbarium storage. After specimen preparation we estimate the proportion of gene copy numbers of plastid, mitochondrial, and nuclear DNA to be 2.4–3.8% of fresh control DNA and 1.0–1.3% after long-term herbarium storage, indicating that nearly all DNA damage occurs on specimen preparation. In addition, there is no evidence of preferential degradation of organelle versus nuclear genomes. Increased levels of C→T/G→A transitions were observed in old herbarium plastid DNA, representing 21.8% of observed miscoding lesions. We interpret this type of post-mortem DNA damage-derived modification to have arisen from the hydrolytic deamination of cytosine during long-term herbarium storage. Our results suggest that reliable sequence data can be obtained from herbarium specimens. PMID:22163018

  2. Apoptosis and DNA damage in human spermatozoa

    PubMed Central

    Aitken, R John; Koppers, Adam J

    2011-01-01

    DNA damage is frequently encountered in spermatozoa of subfertile males and is correlated with a range of adverse clinical outcomes including impaired fertilization, disrupted preimplantation embryonic development, increased rates of miscarriage and an enhanced risk of disease in the progeny. The etiology of DNA fragmentation in human spermatozoa is closely correlated with the appearance of oxidative base adducts and evidence of impaired spermiogenesis. We hypothesize that oxidative stress impedes spermiogenesis, resulting in the generation of spermatozoa with poorly remodelled chromatin. These defective cells have a tendency to default to an apoptotic pathway associated with motility loss, caspase activation, phosphatidylserine exteriorization and the activation of free radical generation by the mitochondria. The latter induces lipid peroxidation and oxidative DNA damage, which then leads to DNA fragmentation and cell death. The physical architecture of spermatozoa prevents any nucleases activated as a result of this apoptotic process from gaining access to the nuclear DNA and inducing its fragmentation. It is for this reason that a majority of the DNA damage encountered in human spermatozoa seems to be oxidative. Given the important role that oxidative stress seems to have in the etiology of DNA damage, there should be an important role for antioxidants in the treatment of this condition. If oxidative DNA damage in spermatozoa is providing a sensitive readout of systemic oxidative stress, the implications of these findings could stretch beyond our immediate goal of trying to minimize DNA damage in spermatozoa as a prelude to assisted conception therapy. PMID:20802502

  3. The DNA damage response during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Heijink, Anne Margriet; Krajewska, Małgorzata; van Vugt, Marcel A T M

    2013-10-01

    Cells are equipped with a cell-intrinsic signaling network called the DNA damage response (DDR). This signaling network recognizes DNA lesions and initiates various downstream pathways to coordinate a cell cycle arrest with the repair of the damaged DNA. Alternatively, the DDR can mediate clearance of affected cells that are beyond repair through apoptosis or senescence. The DDR can be activated in response to DNA damage throughout the cell cycle, although the extent of DDR signaling is different in each cell cycle phase. Especially in response to DNA double strand breaks, only a very marginal response was observed during mitosis. Early on it was recognized that cells which are irradiated during mitosis continued division without repairing broken chromosomes. Although these initial observations indicated diminished DNA repair and lack of an acute DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest, insight into the mechanistic re-wiring of DDR signaling during mitosis was only recently provided. Different mechanisms appear to be at play to inactivate specific signaling axes of the DDR network in mitosis. Importantly, mitotic cells not simply inactivate the entire DDR, but appear to mark their DNA damage for repair after mitotic exit. Since the treatment of cancer frequently involves agents that induce DNA damage as well as agents that block mitotic progression, it is clinically relevant to obtain a better understanding of how cancer cells deal with DNA damage during interphase versus mitosis. In this review, the molecular details concerning DDR signaling during mitosis as well as the consequences of encountering DNA damage during mitosis for cellular fate are discussed.

  4. Surviving the breakup: the DNA damage checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Jacob C; Haber, James E

    2006-01-01

    In response to even a single chromosomal double-strand DNA break, cells enact the DNA damage checkpoint. This checkpoint triggers cell cycle arrest, providing time for the cell to repair damaged chromosomes before entering mitosis. This mechanism helps prevent the segregation of damaged or mutated chromosomes and thus promotes genomic stability. Recent work has elucidated the molecular mechanisms underlying several critical steps in checkpoint activation, notably the recruitment of the upstream checkpoint kinases of the ATM and ATR families to different damaged DNA structures and the molecular events through which these kinases activate their effectors. Chromatin modification has emerged as one important component of checkpoint activation and maintenance. Following DNA repair, the checkpoint pathway is inactivated in a process termed recovery. A related but genetically distinct process, adaptation, controls cell cycle re-entry in the face of unrepairable damage.

  5. Ubiquitylation, neddylation and the DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jessica S.; Jackson, Stephen P.

    2015-01-01

    Failure of accurate DNA damage sensing and repair mechanisms manifests as a variety of human diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, immunodeficiency, infertility and cancer. The accuracy and efficiency of DNA damage detection and repair, collectively termed the DNA damage response (DDR), requires the recruitment and subsequent post-translational modification (PTM) of a complex network of proteins. Ubiquitin and the ubiquitin-like protein (UBL) SUMO have established roles in regulating the cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). A role for other UBLs, such as NEDD8, is also now emerging. This article provides an overview of the DDR, discusses our current understanding of the process and function of PTM by ubiquitin and NEDD8, and reviews the literature surrounding the role of ubiquitylation and neddylation in DNA repair processes, focusing particularly on DNA DSB repair. PMID:25833379

  6. PCR-based analysis of mitochondrial DNA copy number, mitochondrial DNA damage, and nuclear DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Hunt, Claudia P.; Rooney, John P.; Ryde, Ian T.; Anbalagan, Charumathi; Joglekar, Rashmi

    2016-01-01

    Because of the role DNA damage and depletion play in human disease, it is important to develop and improve tools to assess these endpoints. This unit describes PCR-based methods to measure nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage and copy number. Long amplicon quantitative polymerase chain reaction (LA-QPCR) is used to detect DNA damage by measuring the number of polymerase-inhibiting lesions present based on the amount of PCR amplification; real-time PCR (RT-PCR) is used to calculate genome content. In this unit we provide step-by-step instructions to perform these assays in Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, Danio rerio, Oryzias latipes, Fundulus grandis, and Fundulus heteroclitus, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of these assays. PMID:26828332

  7. The RNA Splicing Response to DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Shkreta, Lulzim; Chabot, Benoit

    2015-10-29

    The number of factors known to participate in the DNA damage response (DDR) has expanded considerably in recent years to include splicing and alternative splicing factors. While the binding of splicing proteins and ribonucleoprotein complexes to nascent transcripts prevents genomic instability by deterring the formation of RNA/DNA duplexes, splicing factors are also recruited to, or removed from, sites of DNA damage. The first steps of the DDR promote the post-translational modification of splicing factors to affect their localization and activity, while more downstream DDR events alter their expression. Although descriptions of molecular mechanisms remain limited, an emerging trend is that DNA damage disrupts the coupling of constitutive and alternative splicing with the transcription of genes involved in DNA repair, cell-cycle control and apoptosis. A better understanding of how changes in splice site selection are integrated into the DDR may provide new avenues to combat cancer and delay aging.

  8. Aging: not all DNA damage is equal.

    PubMed

    Vermeij, Wilbert P; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Pothof, Joris

    2014-06-01

    Recent advances have identified accumulation of DNA damage as a major driver of aging. However, there are numerous kinds of DNA lesions each with their own characteristics and cellular outcome, which highly depends on cellular context: proliferation (cell cycle), differentiation, propensity for survival/death, cell condition and systemic hormonal and immunological parameters. In addition, DNA damage is strongly influenced by cellular metabolism, anti-oxidant status and exogenous factors, consistent with the multi-factorial nature of aging. Notably, DNA lesions interfering with replication have very different outcomes compared to transcription. These considerations provide a conceptual framework in which different types of DNA damage and their setting contribute to the aging process in differential manners.

  9. Statistical and Economic Techniques for Site-specific Nematode Management.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zheng; Griffin, Terry; Kirkpatrick, Terrence L

    2014-03-01

    Recent advances in precision agriculture technologies and spatial statistics allow realistic, site-specific estimation of nematode damage to field crops and provide a platform for the site-specific delivery of nematicides within individual fields. This paper reviews the spatial statistical techniques that model correlations among neighboring observations and develop a spatial economic analysis to determine the potential of site-specific nematicide application. The spatial econometric methodology applied in the context of site-specific crop yield response contributes to closing the gap between data analysis and realistic site-specific nematicide recommendations and helps to provide a practical method of site-specifically controlling nematodes.

  10. DNA DAMAGE QUANTITATION BY ALKALINE GEL ELECTROPHORESIS.

    SciTech Connect

    SUTHERLAND,B.M.; BENNETT,P.V.; SUTHERLAND, J.C.

    2004-03-24

    Physical and chemical agents in the environment, those used in clinical applications, or encountered during recreational exposures to sunlight, induce damages in DNA. Understanding the biological impact of these agents requires quantitation of the levels of such damages in laboratory test systems as well as in field or clinical samples. Alkaline gel electrophoresis provides a sensitive (down to {approx} a few lesions/5Mb), rapid method of direct quantitation of a wide variety of DNA damages in nanogram quantities of non-radioactive DNAs from laboratory, field, or clinical specimens, including higher plants and animals. This method stems from velocity sedimentation studies of DNA populations, and from the simple methods of agarose gel electrophoresis. Our laboratories have developed quantitative agarose gel methods, analytical descriptions of DNA migration during electrophoresis on agarose gels (1-6), and electronic imaging for accurate determinations of DNA mass (7-9). Although all these components improve sensitivity and throughput of large numbers of samples (7,8,10), a simple version using only standard molecular biology equipment allows routine analysis of DNA damages at moderate frequencies. We present here a description of the methods, as well as a brief description of the underlying principles, required for a simplified approach to quantitation of DNA damages by alkaline gel electrophoresis.

  11. Historical perspective on the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Hanawalt, Philip C

    2015-12-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) has been broadly defined as a complex network of cellular pathways that cooperate to sense and repair lesions in DNA. Multiple types of DNA damage, some natural DNA sequences, nucleotide pool deficiencies and collisions with transcription complexes can cause replication arrest to elicit the DDR. However, in practice, the term DDR as applied to eukaryotic/mammalian cells often refers more specifically to pathways involving the activation of the ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) and ATR (ATM-Rad3-related) kinases in response to double-strand breaks or arrested replication forks, respectively. Nevertheless, there are distinct responses to particular types of DNA damage that do not involve ATM or ATR. In addition, some of the aberrations that cause replication arrest and elicit the DDR cannot be categorized as direct DNA damage. These include nucleotide pool deficiencies, nucleotide sequences that can adopt non-canonical DNA structures, and collisions between replication forks and transcription complexes. The response to these aberrations can be called the genomic stress response (GSR), a term that is meant to encompass the sensing of all types of DNA aberrations together with the mechanisms involved in coping with them. In addition to fully functional cells, the consequences of processing genomic aberrations may include mutagenesis, genomic rearrangements and lethality.

  12. Historical Perspective on the DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Hanawalt, Philip C.

    2015-01-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) has been broadly defined as a complex network of cellular pathways that cooperate to sense and repair lesions in DNA. Multiple types of DNA damage, some natural DNA sequences, nucleotide pool deficiencies and collisions with transcription complexes can cause replication arrest to elicit the DDR. However, in practice, the term DDR as applied to eukaryotic/mammalian cells often refers more specifically to pathways involving the activation of the ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) and ATR (ATM-Rad3-related) kinases in response to double-strand breaks or arrested replication forks, respectively. Nevertheless, there are distinct responses to particular types of DNA damage that do not involve ATM or ATR. In addition, some of the aberrations that cause replication arrest and elicit the DDR cannot be categorized as direct DNA damage. These include nucleotide pool deficiencies, nucleotide sequences that can adopt non-canonical DNA structures, and collisions between replication forks and transcription complexes. The response to these aberrations can be called the genomic stress response (GSR), a term that is meant to encompass the sensing of all types of DNA aberrations together with the mechanisms involved in coping with them. In addition to fully functional cells, the consequences of processing genomic aberrations may include mutagenesis, genomic rearrangements and lethality. PMID:26507443

  13. DNA damage may drive nucleosomal reorganization to facilitate damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeGresley, Sarah E.; Wilt, Jamie; Antonik, Matthew

    2014-03-01

    One issue in genome maintenance is how DNA repair proteins find lesions at rates that seem to exceed diffusion-limited search rates. We propose a phenomenon where DNA damage induces nucleosomal rearrangements which move lesions to potential rendezvous points in the chromatin structure. These rendezvous points are the dyad and the linker DNA between histones, positions in the chromatin which are more likely to be accessible by repair proteins engaged in a random search. The feasibility of this mechanism is tested by considering the statistical mechanics of DNA containing a single lesion wrapped onto the nucleosome. We consider lesions which make the DNA either more flexible or more rigid by modeling the lesion as either a decrease or an increase in the bending energy. We include this energy in a partition function model of nucleosome breathing. Our results indicate that the steady state for a breathing nucleosome will most likely position the lesion at the dyad or in the linker, depending on the energy of the lesion. A role for DNA binding proteins and chromatin remodelers is suggested based on their ability to alter the mechanical properties of the DNA and DNA-histone binding, respectively. We speculate that these positions around the nucleosome potentially serve as rendezvous points where DNA lesions may be encountered by repair proteins which may be sterically hindered from searching the rest of the nucleosomal DNA. The strength of the repositioning is strongly dependent on the structural details of the DNA lesion and the wrapping and breathing of the nucleosome. A more sophisticated evaluation of this proposed mechanism will require detailed information about breathing dynamics, the structure of partially wrapped nucleosomes, and the structural properties of damaged DNA.

  14. Aging processes, DNA damage, and repair.

    PubMed

    Gilchrest, B A; Bohr, V A

    1997-04-01

    The second triennial FASEB Summer Research Conference on "Clonal Senescence and Differentiation" (August 17-22, 1996) focused on the interrelationships between aging processes and DNA damage and repair. The attendees represented a cross section of senior and junior investigators working in fields ranging from classic cellular gerontology to yeast and nematode models of aging to basic mechanisms of DNA damage and repair. The meeting opened with a keynote address by Dr. Bruce Ames that emphasized the documented relationships between oxidative damage, cancer, and aging. This was followed by eight platform sessions, one poster discussion, one featured presentation, and an after-dinner address. The following sections highlight the key points discussed.

  15. Polyphenols and DNA Damage: A Mixed Blessing

    PubMed Central

    Azqueta, Amaya; Collins, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Polyphenols are a very broad group of chemicals, widely distributed in plant foods, and endowed with antioxidant activity by virtue of their numerous phenol groups. They are widely studied as putative cancer-protective agents, potentially contributing to the cancer preventive properties of fruits and vegetables. We review recent publications relating to human trials, animal experiments and cell culture, grouping them according to whether polyphenols are investigated in whole foods and drinks, in plant extracts, or as individual compounds. A variety of assays are in use to study genetic damage endpoints. Human trials, of which there are rather few, tend to show decreases in endogenous DNA damage and protection against DNA damage induced ex vivo in blood cells. Most animal experiments have investigated the effects of polyphenols (often at high doses) in combination with known DNA-damaging agents, and generally they show protection. High concentrations can themselves induce DNA damage, as demonstrated in numerous cell culture experiments; low concentrations, on the other hand, tend to decrease DNA damage. PMID:27918471

  16. Targeting the DNA Damage Response in Cancer.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Mark J

    2015-11-19

    An underlying hallmark of cancers is their genomic instability, which is associated with a greater propensity to accumulate DNA damage. Historical treatment of cancer by radiotherapy and DNA-damaging chemotherapy is based on this principle, yet it is accompanied by significant collateral damage to normal tissue and unwanted side effects. Targeted therapy based on inhibiting the DNA damage response (DDR) in cancers offers the potential for a greater therapeutic window by tailoring treatment to patients with tumors lacking specific DDR functions. The recent approval of olaparib (Lynparza), the poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor for treating tumors harboring BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations, represents the first medicine based on this principle, exploiting an underlying cause of tumor formation that also represents an Achilles' heel. This review highlights the different concepts behind targeting DDR in cancer and how this can provide significant opportunities for DDR-based therapies in the future.

  17. Fern spore extracts can damage DNA

    PubMed Central

    Simán, S E; Povey, A C; Ward, T H; Margison, G P; Sheffield, E

    2000-01-01

    The carcinogenicity of the vegetative tissues of bracken fern (Pteridium) has long been established. More recently, the carcinogenic effects of the spores of bracken have also been recognized. Both vegetative tissues and spores of bracken can induce adducts in DNA in animal tissues, but the possible genotoxic or carcinogenic effects of spores from fern species other than bracken are unknown. The single-cell gel electrophoresis (‘comet’) assay was used to investigate whether fern spores can cause DNA damage in vitro. Extracts of spores from six fern species were administered to cultured human premyeloid leukaemia (K562) cells. Spore extracts of five fern species: Anemia phyllitidis, Dicksonia antarctica, Pteridium aquilinum, Pteris vittata and Sadleria pallida, induced significantly more DNA strand breaks than those in the control groups. Only in one species, Osmunda regalis, was the effect no different from that in the control groups. Using extracts from A. phyllitidis and P. vittata, the extent of DNA damage was increased by increasing the original dose 10 times, whereas an experiment in which exposure times were varied suggested that the highest levels of strand breaks appear after 2 h exposure. Simultaneous incubation with human S9 liver enzyme mix ablated the damaging effect of the extracts. Our data show that fern spore extracts can cause DNA damage in human cells in vitro. Considering the strong correlation between DNA damage and carcinogenic events, the observations made in this report may well have some implications for human health. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10883670

  18. The actinophage RP3 DNA integrates site-specifically into the putative tRNA(Arg)(AGG) gene of Streptomyces rimosus.

    PubMed Central

    Gabriel, K; Schmid, H; Schmidt, U; Rausch, H

    1995-01-01

    The temperate actinophage RP3 integrates site-specifically into the chromosome of Streptomyces rimosus R6-554. The phage attachment site attP and the hybrid attachment sites of the integrated prophage--attL and attR--were cloned and sequenced. The 54nt core sequence, common to all RP3 related attachment sites, comprises the 3' terminal end of a putative tRNA(Arg)(AGG) gene. AttB bears the complete tRNA gene which is restored in attL after integration. A 7.5kb HindIII fragment, bearing attP, was used to construct an integrative plasmid to simulate the integration process in vivo and to localize the phage genes necessary for site specific integration. The int and xis genes were sequenced and compared to other recombination genes. PMID:7870591

  19. Chromatin Remodeling, DNA Damage Repair and Aging

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Baohua; Yip, Raymond KH; Zhou, Zhongjun

    2012-01-01

    Cells are constantly exposed to a variety of environmental and endogenous conditions causing DNA damage, which is detected and repaired by conserved DNA repair pathways to maintain genomic integrity. Chromatin remodeling is critical in this process, as the organization of eukaryotic DNA into compact chromatin presents a natural barrier to all DNA-related events. Studies on human premature aging syndromes together with normal aging have suggested that accumulated damages might lead to exhaustion of resources that are required for physiological functions and thus accelerate aging. In this manuscript, combining the present understandings and latest findings, we focus mainly on discussing the role of chromatin remodeling in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and regulation of aging. PMID:23633913

  20. DNA damage, oxidative mutagen sensitivity, and repair of oxidative DNA damage in nonmelanoma skin cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Bendesky, Andrés; Michel, Alejandra; Sordo, Monserrat; Calderón-Aranda, Emma S; Acosta-Saavedra, Leonor C; Salazar, Ana M; Podoswa, Nancy; Ostrosky-Wegman, Patricia

    2006-08-01

    Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most frequent type of cancer in humans. Exposure to UV radiation is a major risk factor for NMSC, and oxidative DNA damage, caused either by UV radiation itself or by other agents, may be involved in its induction. Increased sensitivity to oxidative damage and an altered DNA repair capacity (DRC) increase the risk of many types of cancer; however, sensitivity to oxidizing agents has not been evaluated for NMSC, and results regarding DRC in NMSC are inconclusive. In the present study, we evaluated DNA damage and repair in leukocytes from 41 NMSC patients and 45 controls. The Comet assay was used to measure basal and H(2)O(2)-induced DNA damage, as well as the DRC, while the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay was used to measure the basal level of chromosome damage. Although basal DNA damage was higher for the controls than for the patients, this finding was mainly due to sampling more controls in the summer, which was associated with longer comet tails. In contrast, H(2)O(2)-induced DNA damage was significantly higher in cases than in controls, and this parameter was not influenced by the season of the year. The DRC for the H(2)O(2)-induced damage was similar for cases and controls and unrelated to seasonality. Finally, the frequency of binucleated lymphocytes with micronuclei was similar for cases and controls. The results of this study indicate that NMSC patients are distinguished from controls by an increased sensitivity to oxidative DNA damage.

  1. Maternal diabetes triggers DNA damage and DNA damage response in neurulation stage embryos through oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Daoyin; Yu, Jingwen; Wu, Yanqing; Fu, Noah; Villela, Natalia Arias; Yang, Peixin

    2015-01-01

    DNA damage and DNA damage response (DDR) in neurulation stage embryos under maternal diabetes conditions are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether maternal diabetes and high glucose in vitro induce DNA damage and DDR in the developing embryo through oxidative stress. In vivo experiments were conducted by mating superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) transgenic male mice with wild-type (WT) female mice with or without diabetes. Embryonic day 8.75 (E8.75) embryos were tested for the DNA damage markers, phosphorylated histone H2A.X (p-H2A.X) and DDR signaling intermediates, including phosphorylated checkpoint 1 (p-Chk1), phosphorylated checkpoint 2 (p-Chk2), and p53. Levels of the same DNA damage markers and DDR signaling intermediates were also determined in the mouse C17.2 neural stem cell line. Maternal diabetes and high glucose in vitro significantly increased the levels of p-H2A.X. Levels of p-Chk1, p-Chk2, and p53, were elevated under both maternal diabetic and high glucose conditions. SOD1 overexpression blocked maternal diabetes-induced DNA damage and DDR in vivo. Tempol, a SOD1 mimetic, diminished high glucose-induced DNA damage and DDR in vitro. In conclusion, maternal diabetes and high glucose in vitro induce DNA damage and activates DDR through oxidative stress, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetes-associated embryopathy. PMID:26427872

  2. Molecular Models for DNA Damaged by Photoreaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearlman, David A.; Holbrook, Stephen R.; Pirkle, David H.; Kim, Sung-Hou

    1985-03-01

    Structural models of a DNA molecule containing a radiation-induced psoralen cross-link and of a DNA containing a thymine photodimer were constructed by applying energy-minimization techniques and model-building procedures to data from x-ray crystallographic studies. The helical axes of the models show substantial kinking and unwinding at the sites of the damage, which may have long-range as well as local effects arising from the concomitant changes in the supercoiling and overall structure of the DNA. The damaged areas may also serve as recognition sites for repair enzymes. These results should help in understanding the biologic effects of radiation-induced damage on cells.

  3. Molecular models for DNA damaged by photoreaction

    SciTech Connect

    Pearlman, D.A.; Holbrook, S.R.; Pirkle, D.H.; Kim, S.H.

    1985-03-15

    Structural models of a DNA molecule containing a radiation-induced psoralen cross-link and of a DNA containing a thymine photodimer were constructed by applying energy-minimization techniques and model-building procedures to data from x-ray crystallographic studies. The helical axes of the models show substantial kinking and unwinding at the sites of the damage, which may have long-range as well as local effects arising from the concomitant changes in the supercoiling and overall structure of the DNA. The damaged areas may also serve as recognition sites for repair enzymes. These results should help in understanding the biologic effects of radiation-induced damage on cells.

  4. Molecular mechanisms involved in initiation of the DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Barnum, Kevin J; O’Connell, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    DNA is subject to a wide variety of damage. In order to maintain genomic integrity, cells must respond to this damage by activating repair and cell cycle checkpoint pathways. The initiating events in the DNA damage response entail recognition of the lesion and the assembly of DNA damage response complexes at the DNA. Here, we review what is known about these processes for various DNA damage pathways. PMID:27308403

  5. Molecular mechanisms involved in initiation of the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Barnum, Kevin J; O'Connell, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    DNA is subject to a wide variety of damage. In order to maintain genomic integrity, cells must respond to this damage by activating repair and cell cycle checkpoint pathways. The initiating events in the DNA damage response entail recognition of the lesion and the assembly of DNA damage response complexes at the DNA. Here, we review what is known about these processes for various DNA damage pathways.

  6. The RNA Response to DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Giono, Luciana E; Nieto Moreno, Nicolás; Cambindo Botto, Adrián E; Dujardin, Gwendal; Muñoz, Manuel J; Kornblihtt, Alberto R

    2016-06-19

    Multicellular organisms must ensure genome integrity to prevent accumulation of mutations, cell death, and cancer. The DNA damage response (DDR) is a complex network that senses, signals, and executes multiple programs including DNA repair, cell cycle arrest, senescence, and apoptosis. This entails regulation of a variety of cellular processes: DNA replication and transcription, RNA processing, mRNA translation and turnover, and post-translational modification, degradation, and relocalization of proteins. Accumulated evidence over the past decades has shown that RNAs and RNA metabolism are both regulators and regulated actors of the DDR. This review aims to present a comprehensive overview of the current knowledge on the many interactions between the DNA damage and RNA fields.

  7. O6-alkylguanine-DNA transferase (SNAP) as capture module for site-specific covalent bioconjugation of targeting protein on nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzucchelli, Serena; Colombo, Miriam; Galbiati, Elisabetta; Corsi, Fabio; Montenegro, Josè M.; Parak, Wolfgang J.; Prosperi, Davide

    2013-02-01

    A bimodular genetic fusion comprising a delivery module (scFv) and a capture module (SNAP) is proposed as a novel strategy for the biologically mediated site-specific covalent conjugation of targeting proteins to nanoparticles. ScFv800E6, an scFv mutant selective for HER2 antigen overexpressed in breast cancer cells was chosen as targeting ligand. The fusion protein SNAP-scFv was irreversibly immobilized on magnetofluorescent nanoparticles through the recognition between SNAP module and pegylated O6-alkylguanine derivative. The targeting efficiency of the resulting nanoparticle against HER2-positive breast cancer cells was assessed by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence.

  8. Nutritional Status DNA Damage and Tumor Pathology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    Periconceptional multivitamin folic acid use, dietary folate , total folate and risk of neural tube defects in South Carolina. Ann. Epidemiol. 13:412-418... folate metabolism and colorectal neoplasia: a HuGE review. Am. J. Epidemiol. 159:423-443 (2004). 9 APPENDIX Central Role of 5,10...cancer (1). Breast cancer is associated with defects in DNA damage surveillance and repair. Polymorphism in genes encoding proteins involved in DNA repair

  9. FIBER OPTIC BIOSENSOR FOR DNA DAMAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes a fiber optic biosensor for the rapid and sensitive detection of radiation-induced or chemically-induced oxidative DNA damage. The assay is based on the hybridization and temperature-induced dissociation (melting curves) of synthetic oligonucleotides. The...

  10. Profiling DNA damage response following mitotic perturbations

    PubMed Central

    S. Pedersen, Ronni; Karemore, Gopal; Gudjonsson, Thorkell; Rask, Maj-Britt; Neumann, Beate; Hériché, Jean-Karim; Pepperkok, Rainer; Ellenberg, Jan; Gerlich, Daniel W.; Lukas, Jiri; Lukas, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Genome integrity relies on precise coordination between DNA replication and chromosome segregation. Whereas replication stress attracted much attention, the consequences of mitotic perturbations for genome integrity are less understood. Here, we knockdown 47 validated mitotic regulators to show that a broad spectrum of mitotic errors correlates with increased DNA breakage in daughter cells. Unexpectedly, we find that only a subset of these correlations are functionally linked. We identify the genuine mitosis-born DNA damage events and sub-classify them according to penetrance of the observed phenotypes. To demonstrate the potential of this resource, we show that DNA breakage after cytokinesis failure is preceded by replication stress, which mounts during consecutive cell cycles and coincides with decreased proliferation. Together, our results provide a resource to gauge the magnitude and dynamics of DNA breakage associated with mitotic aberrations and suggest that replication stress might limit propagation of cells with abnormal karyotypes. PMID:27976684

  11. Maternal diabetes triggers DNA damage and DNA damage response in neurulation stage embryos through oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Dong, Daoyin; Yu, Jingwen; Wu, Yanqing; Fu, Noah; Villela, Natalia Arias; Yang, Peixin

    2015-11-13

    DNA damage and DNA damage response (DDR) in neurulation stage embryos under maternal diabetes conditions are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether maternal diabetes and high glucose in vitro induce DNA damage and DDR in the developing embryo through oxidative stress. In vivo experiments were conducted by mating superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) transgenic male mice with wild-type (WT) female mice with or without diabetes. Embryonic day 8.75 (E8.75) embryos were tested for the DNA damage markers, phosphorylated histone H2A.X (p-H2A.X) and DDR signaling intermediates, including phosphorylated checkpoint 1 (p-Chk1), phosphorylated checkpoint 2 (p-Chk2), and p53. Levels of the same DNA damage markers and DDR signaling intermediates were also determined in the mouse C17.2 neural stem cell line. Maternal diabetes and high glucose in vitro significantly increased the levels of p-H2A.X. Levels of p-Chk1, p-Chk2, and p53, were elevated under both maternal diabetic and high glucose conditions. SOD1 overexpression blocked maternal diabetes-induced DNA damage and DDR in vivo. Tempol, a SOD1 mimetic, diminished high glucose-induced DNA damage and DDR in vitro. In conclusion, maternal diabetes and high glucose in vitro induce DNA damage and activates DDR through oxidative stress, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetes-associated embryopathy.

  12. DNA damage checkpoint recovery and cancer development

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Haiyong; Zhang, Xiaoshan; Teng, Lisong; Legerski, Randy J.

    2015-06-10

    Cell cycle checkpoints were initially presumed to function as a regulator of cell cycle machinery in response to different genotoxic stresses, and later found to play an important role in the process of tumorigenesis by acting as a guard against DNA over-replication. As a counterpart of checkpoint activation, the checkpoint recovery machinery is working in opposition, aiming to reverse the checkpoint activation and resume the normal cell cycle. The DNA damage response (DDR) and oncogene induced senescence (OIS) are frequently found in precancerous lesions, and believed to constitute a barrier to tumorigenesis, however, the DDR and OIS have been observed to be diminished in advanced cancers of most tissue origins. These findings suggest that when progressing from pre-neoplastic lesions to cancer, DNA damage checkpoint barriers are overridden. How the DDR checkpoint is bypassed in this process remains largely unknown. Activated cytokine and growth factor-signaling pathways were very recently shown to suppress the DDR and to promote uncontrolled cell proliferation in the context of oncovirus infection. In recent decades, data from cell line and tumor models showed that a group of checkpoint recovery proteins function in promoting tumor progression; data from patient samples also showed overexpression of checkpoint recovery proteins in human cancer tissues and a correlation with patients' poor prognosis. In this review, the known cell cycle checkpoint recovery proteins and their roles in DNA damage checkpoint recovery are reviewed, as well as their implications in cancer development. This review also provides insight into the mechanism by which the DDR suppresses oncogene-driven tumorigenesis and tumor progression. - Highlights: • DNA damage checkpoint works as a barrier to cancer initiation. • DDR machinary response to genotoxic and oncogenic stress in similar way. • Checkpoint recovery pathways provide active signaling in cell cycle control. • Checkpoint

  13. Telomeres, histone code, and DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Misri, S; Pandita, S; Kumar, R; Pandita, T K

    2008-01-01

    Genomic stability is maintained by telomeres, the end terminal structures that protect chromosomes from fusion or degradation. Shortening or loss of telomeric repeats or altered telomere chromatin structure is correlated with telomere dysfunction such as chromosome end-to-end associations that could lead to genomic instability and gene amplification. The structure at the end of telomeres is such that its DNA differs from DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) to avoid nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ), which is accomplished by forming a unique higher order nucleoprotein structure. Telomeres are attached to the nuclear matrix and have a unique chromatin structure. Whether this special structure is maintained by specific chromatin changes is yet to be thoroughly investigated. Chromatin modifications implicated in transcriptional regulation are thought to be the result of a code on the histone proteins (histone code). This code, involving phosphorylation, acetylation, methylation, ubiquitylation, and sumoylation of histones, is believed to regulate chromatin accessibility either by disrupting chromatin contacts or by recruiting non-histone proteins to chromatin. The histone code in which distinct histone tail-protein interactions promote engagement may be the deciding factor for choosing specific DSB repair pathways. Recent evidence suggests that such mechanisms are involved in DNA damage detection and repair. Altered telomere chromatin structure has been linked to defective DNA damage response (DDR), and eukaryotic cells have evolved DDR mechanisms utilizing proficient DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoints in order to maintain genomic stability. Recent studies suggest that chromatin modifying factors play a critical role in the maintenance of genomic stability. This review will summarize the role of DNA damage repair proteins specifically ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and its effectors and the telomere complex in maintaining genome stability.

  14. Site-specific immunochemical methylation assessment from genome DNA utilizing a conformational difference between looped-out target and stacked-in nontarget methylcytosines.

    PubMed

    Kurita, Ryoji; Yanagisawa, Hiroyuki; Yoshioka, Kyoko; Niwa, Osamu

    2015-08-15

    We report the sequence-selective immunochemical discrimination of methylcytosine from genomic DNA that we achieved by utilizing selective antibody binding to a looped-out methylcytosine in a bulge region and without using bisulfite treatment, a methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme, or PCR. First, we investigated the affinity of an anti-methylcytosine antibody for methylcytosine in full match, bulge, mismatch and abasic sites using surface plasmon resonance measurement and a microtiter plate to explore the differences as regards antibody binding to the target methylcytosine. The highest affinity, which was comparable to that in a single strand of DNA, was observed in the bulge region. In particular, no affinity was observed in a full match site. This is because there is no interaction such as hydrogen bond or π-π stacking for the bulged methylcytosine, thus enabling only the target in the bulge to be looped out. Methylated and unmethylated genomic DNA were blended to form a model DNA with which to assess the methylation ratio at a specific site. Fragmented DNA was hybridized with a biotinylated probe DNA, which has a sequence capable of forming a single base bulge at the target. The probe design is simple because it consists solely of the elimination of guanine paired with the target cytosine from a full match sequence. As a result, we successfully obtained a linear relationship (r(2)=0.9962) between the immunoassay signal and the methylation ratio of a specific site within 4 h.

  15. DNA mismatch repair and the DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhongdao; Pearlman, Alexander H.; Hsieh, Peggy

    2015-01-01

    This review discusses the role of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) in the DNA damage response (DDR) that triggers cell cycle arrest and, in some cases, apoptosis. Although the focus is on findings from mammalian cells, much has been learned from studies in other organisms including bacteria and yeast [1,2]. MMR promotes a DDR mediated by a key signaling kinase, ATM and Rad3-related (ATR), in response to various types of DNA damage including some encountered in widely used chemotherapy regimes. An introduction to the DDR mediated by ATR reveals its immense complexity and highlights the many biological and mechanistic questions that remain. Recent findings and future directions are highlighted. PMID:26704428

  16. Immunofluorescence Imaging of DNA Damage Response Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Brian T.; Bewersdorf, Jörg; Knight, Kendall L.

    2013-01-01

    Immunofluorescence imaging has provided captivating visual evidence for numerous cellular events, from vesicular trafficking, organelle maturation and cell division to nuclear processes including the appearance of various proteins and chromatin components in distinct foci in response to DNA damaging agents. With the advent of new super-resolution microscope technologies such as 4Pi microscopy, standard immunofluorescence protocols deserve some reevaluation in order to take full advantage of these new technological accomplishments. Here we describe several methodological considerations that will help overcome some of the limitations that may result from the use of currently applied procedures, with particular attention paid to the analysis of possible colocalization of fluorescent signals. We conclude with an example of how application of optimized methods led to a breakthrough in super-resolution imaging of nuclear events occurring in response to DNA damage. PMID:19245833

  17. Activation of ATM by DNA Damaging Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    serine 139. Pretreatment of cells with NAC partially, peroxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase - 1 (37). This but significantly, attenuated the... Gy , concentrations of wortmannin (lanes 3-5) for 30 min prior to the addi- 2 h) (Fig. 4A). tion of 1 gm doxorubicin (lanes 2-5) and further incubation...AD Award Number: DAMD17-02- 1 -0318 TITLE: Activation of ATM by DNA Damaging Agents PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ebba U. Kurz, Ph.D. Susan P. Lees-Miller

  18. Deformation of DNA during site-specific recombination of bacteriophage lambda: replacement of IHF protein by HU protein or sequence-directed bends.

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, S D; Nicholson, S C; Nash, H A

    1992-01-01

    Escherichia coli IHF protein is a prominent component of bacteriophage lambda integration and excision that binds specifically to DNA. We find that the homologous protein HU, a nonspecific DNA binding protein, can substitute for IHF during excisive recombination of a plasmid containing the prophage attachment sites attL and attR but not during integrative recombination between attP and attB. We have examined whether IHF and HU function in excisive recombination is mediated through DNA bending. Our strategy has been to construct chimeric attachment sites in which IHF binding sites are replaced by an alternative source of DNA deformation. Previously, we demonstrated that properly phased bends can substitute for the binding of IHF at one site in attP. Although this result is highly suggestive of a critical role of IHF-promoted bending in lambda integration, its interpretation is obscured by the continued need for IHF binding to the remaining IHF sites of these constructs. In the present work, we engineered a population of sequence-directed bends in the vicinity of the two essential IHF sites found in attR and attL. Even in the absence of IHF or HU, pairs of these attachment sites with properly phased bends are active for both in vitro and in vivo excision. This success, although tempered by the limited efficiency of these systems, reinforces our interpretation that IHF functions primarily as an architectural element. Images PMID:1465417

  19. Dynamical signature of abasic damage in DNA.

    PubMed

    Furse, Kristina E; Corcelli, Steven A

    2011-02-02

    Time-dependent Stokes shift (TDSS) responses in proteins and DNA exhibit a broad range of long time scales (>10 ps) that are not present in bulk aqueous solution. The physical interpretation of the long TDSS time scales in biomolecular systems is a matter of considerable debate because of the many different components present in the sample (water, biomolecule, counterions), which have highly correlated motions and intrinsically different abilities to adapt to local perturbations. Here we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to show that the surprisingly slow (∼10 ns) TDSS response of coumarin 102 (C102), a base pair replacement, reflects a distinct dynamical signature for DNA damage. When the C102 molecule is covalently incorporated into DNA, an abasic site is created on the strand opposite the C102 probe. The abasic sugar exhibits a reversible interchange between intra- and extrahelical conformations that are kinetically stable on a nanosecond time scale. This conformational change, only possible in damaged DNA, was found to be responsible for the long time scales in the measured TDSS response. For the first time, a TDSS measurement has been attributed to a specific biomolecular motion. This finding directly contradicts the prevailing notion that the TDSS response in biomolecular contexts is dominated by hydration dynamics. It also suggests that TDSS experiments can be used to study ultrafast biomolecular dynamics that are inaccessible to other techniques.

  20. Profiling oxidative DNA damage: effects of antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Box, Harold C; Patrzyc, Helen B; Budzinski, Edwin E; Dawidzik, Jean B; Freund, Harold G; Zeitouni, Nathalie C; Mahoney, Martin C

    2012-11-01

    The goal of this research was to determine whether antioxidant usage could be correlated with changes in DNA damage levels. Liquid Chromatography-tandem Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to simultaneously measure five different oxidatively-induced base modifications in the DNA of WBC. Measurements of the five modifications were made before and after an 8-week trial during which participants took the SU.VI.MAX supplement. Levels of the five DNA modifications were compared among different groupings: users versus non-users of antioxidant supplements, before versus after the supplement intervention and men versus women. The statistical significance of differences between groups was most significant for pyrimidine base modifications and the observed trends reflect trends reported in epidemiological studies of antioxidant usage. A combination of modifications derived from pyrimidine bases is suggested as a superior indicator of oxidative stress.

  1. Nanoparticles for Site Specific Genome Editing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeer, Nicole Ali

    Triplex-forming peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) can be used to coordinate the recombination of short 50-60 by "donor DNA" fragments into genomic DNA, resulting in site-specific correction of genetic mutations or the introduction of advantageous genetic modifications. Site-specific gene editing in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) could result in treatment or cure of inherited disorders of the blood such as beta-thalassemia. Gene editing in HSPCs and differentiated T cells could help combat HIV/AIDs by modifying receptors, such as CCR5, necessary for R5-tropic HIV entry. However, translation of genome modification technologies to clinical practice is limited by challenges in intracellular delivery, especially in difficult-to-transfect hematolymphoid cells. In vivo gene editing could also provide novel treatment for systemic monogenic disorders such as cystic fibrosis, an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane receptor. Here, we have engineered biodegradable nanoparticles to deliver oligonucleotides for site-specific genome editing of disease-relevant genes in human cells, with high efficiency, low toxicity, and editing of clinically relevant cell types. We designed nanoparticles to edit the human beta-globin and CCR5 genes in hematopoietic cells. We show that poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles can delivery PNA and donor DNA for site-specific gene modification in human hematopoietic cells in vitro and in vivo in NOD-scid IL2rgammanull mice. Nanoparticles delivered by tail vein localized to hematopoietic compartments in the spleen and bone marrow of humanized mice, resulting in modification of the beta-globin and CCR5 genes. Modification frequencies ranged from 0.005 to 20% of cells depending on the organ and cell type, without detectable toxicity. This project developed highly versatile methods for delivery of therapeutics to hematolymphoid cells and hematopoietic stem cells, and will help to

  2. Acrylonitrile-induced oxidative DNA damage in rat astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Pu, Xinzhu; Kamendulis, Lisa M; Klaunig, James E

    2006-10-01

    Chronic administration of acrylonitrile results in a dose-related increase in astrocytomas in rat brain, but the mechanism of acrylonitrile carcinogenicity is not fully understood. The potential of acrylonitrile or its metabolites to induce direct DNA damage as a mechanism for acrylonitrile carcinogenicity has been questioned, and recent studies indicate that the mechanism involves the induction of oxidative stress in rat brain. The present study examined the ability of acrylonitrile to induce DNA damage in the DI TNC1 rat astrocyte cell line using the alkaline Comet assay. Oxidized DNA damage also was evaluated using formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase treatment in the modified Comet assay. No increase in direct DNA damage was seen in astrocytes exposed to sublethal concentrations of acrylonitrile (0-1.0 mM) for 24 hr. However, acrylonitrile treatment resulted in a concentration-related increase in oxidative DNA damage after 24 hr. Antioxidant supplementation in the culture media (alpha-tocopherol, (-)-epigallocathechin-3 gallate, or trolox) reduced acrylonitrile-induced oxidative DNA damage. Depletion of glutathione using 0.1 mM DL-buthionine-[S,R]-sulfoximine increased acrylonitrile-induced oxidative DNA damage (22-46%), while cotreatment of acrylonitrile with 2.5 mM L-2-oxothiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid, a precursor for glutathione biosynthesis, significantly reduced acrylonitrile-induced oxidative DNA damage (7-47%). Cotreatment of acrylonitrile with 0.5 mM 1-aminobenzotriazole, a suicidal inhibitor of cytochrome P450, prevented the oxidative DNA damage produced by acrylonitrile. Cyanide (0.1-0.5 mM) increased oxidative DNA damage (44-160%) in astrocytes. These studies demonstrate that while acrylonitrile does not directly damage astrocyte DNA, it does increase oxidative DNA damage. The oxidative DNA damage following acrylonitrile exposure appears to arise mainly through the P450 metabolic pathway; moreover, glutathione depletion may contribute to the

  3. Inflammation, oxidative DNA damage, and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, J G; Adams, D O

    1987-01-01

    Inflammation has long been associated with carcinogenesis, especially in the promotion phase. The mechanism of action of the potent inflammatory agent and skin promoter 12-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) is unknown. It is thought that TPA selectively enhances the growth of initiated cells, and during this process, initiated cells progress to the preneoplastic state and eventually to the malignant phenotype. Many studies support the multistep nature of carcinogenesis, and a significant amount of evidence indicates that more than one genetic event is necessary for neoplastic transformation. Selective growth stimulation of initiated cells by TPA does not explain how further genetic events may occur by chronic exposure to this nongenotoxic agent. We and others have proposed that TPA may work, in part, by inciting inflammation and stimulating inflammatory cells to release powerful oxidants which then induce DNA damage in epidermal cells. Macrophages cocultured with target cells and TPA induce oxidized thymine bases in the target cells. This process is inhibited by both catalase and inhibitors of lipoxygenases, suggesting the involvement of both H2O2 and oxidized lipid products. Furthermore, macrophage populations that release both H2O2 and metabolites of arachidonic acid (AA) are more efficient at inducing oxidative DNA damage in surrounding cells than populations which only release H2O2 or metabolites of AA. In vivo studies demonstrated that SENCAR mice, which are sensitive to promotion by TPA, have a more intense inflammatory reaction in skin than C57LB/6 mice, which are resistant to promotion by TPA. In addition, macrophages from SENCAR mice release more H2O2 and metabolites of AA, and induce more oxidative DNA damage in cocultured cells than macrophages from C57LB/6 mice.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images FIGURE 8. A FIGURE 8. B PMID:3129286

  4. The site-specific ribosomal DNA insertion element R1Bm belongs to a class of non-long-terminal-repeat retrotransposons

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Y.; Eickbush, T.H.

    1988-01-01

    Two types of insertion elements, R1 and R2 (previously called type I and type II), are known to interrupt the 28S ribosomal genes of several insect species. In the silkmoth, Bombyx mori, each element occupies approximately 10% of the estimated 240 ribosomal DNA units, while at most only a few copies are located outside the ribosomal DNA units. The authors present here the complete nucleotide sequence of an R1 insertion from B. mori (R1Bm). This 5.1-kilobase element contains two overlapping open reading frames (ORFs) which together occupy 88% of its length. ORF1 is 461 amino acids in length and exhibits characteristics of retroviral gag genes. ORF2 is 1,051 amino acids in length and contains homology to reverse transcriptase-like enzymes. The analysis of 3' and 5' ends of independent isolates from the ribosomal locus supports the suggestion that R1 is still functioning as a transposable element. The precise location of the element within the genome implies that its transposition must occur with remarkable insertion sequence specificity. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences from six retrotransposons, R1 and R2 of B. mori, I factor and F element of Drosophila melanogaster, L1 of Mus domesticus, and Ingi of Trypanosoma brucei, reveals a relatively high level of sequence homology in the reverse transcriptase region. Like R1, these elements lack long terminal repeats. The authors therefore named this class of related elements the non-long-terminal-repeat (non-LTR) retrotransposons.

  5. DNA strand breaks: the DNA template alterations that trigger p53-dependent DNA damage response pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, W G; Kastan, M B

    1994-01-01

    The tumor suppressor protein p53 serves as a critical regulator of a G1 cell cycle checkpoint and of apoptosis following exposure of cells to DNA-damaging agents. The mechanism by which DNA-damaging agents elevate p53 protein levels to trigger G1/S arrest or cell death remains to be elucidated. In fact, whether damage to the DNA template itself participates in transducing the signal leading to p53 induction has not yet been demonstrated. We exposed human cell lines containing wild-type p53 alleles to several different DNA-damaging agents and found that agents which rapidly induce DNA strand breaks, such as ionizing radiation, bleomycin, and DNA topoisomerase-targeted drugs, rapidly triggered p53 protein elevations. In addition, we determined that camptothecin-stimulated trapping of topoisomerase I-DNA complexes was not sufficient to elevate p53 protein levels; rather, replication-associated DNA strand breaks were required. Furthermore, treatment of cells with the antimetabolite N(phosphonoacetyl)-L-aspartate (PALA) did not cause rapid p53 protein increases but resulted in delayed increases in p53 protein levels temporally correlated with the appearance of DNA strand breaks. Finally, we concluded that DNA strand breaks were sufficient for initiating p53-dependent signal transduction after finding that introduction of nucleases into cells by electroporation stimulated rapid p53 protein elevations. While DNA strand breaks appeared to be capable of triggering p53 induction, DNA lesions other than strand breaks did not. Exposure of normal cells and excision repair-deficient xeroderma pigmentosum cells to low doses of UV light, under conditions in which thymine dimers appear but DNA replication-associated strand breaks were prevented, resulted in p53 induction attributable to DNA strand breaks associated with excision repair. Our data indicate that DNA strand breaks are sufficient and probably necessary for p53 induction in cells with wild-type p53 alleles exposed to DNA-damaging

  6. DNA Damage Response and Immune Defense: Links and Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Nakad, Rania; Schumacher, Björn

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage plays a causal role in numerous human pathologies including cancer, premature aging, and chronic inflammatory conditions. In response to genotoxic insults, the DNA damage response (DDR) orchestrates DNA damage checkpoint activation and facilitates the removal of DNA lesions. The DDR can also arouse the immune system by for example inducing the expression of antimicrobial peptides as well as ligands for receptors found on immune cells. The activation of immune signaling is triggered by different components of the DDR including DNA damage sensors, transducer kinases, and effectors. In this review, we describe recent advances on the understanding of the role of DDR in activating immune signaling. We highlight evidence gained into (i) which molecular and cellular pathways of DDR activate immune signaling, (ii) how DNA damage drives chronic inflammation, and (iii) how chronic inflammation causes DNA damage and pathology in humans. PMID:27555866

  7. Inflammation, oxidative DNA damage, and carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, J.G.; Adams, D.O.

    1987-12-01

    Inflammation has long been associated with carcinogenesis, especially in the promotion phase. The mechanism of action of the potent inflammatory agent and skin promoter 12-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) is unknown. It is though that TPA selectively enhances the growth of initiated cells, and during this process, initiated cells progress to the preneoplastic state and eventually to the malignant phenotype. The authors and others have proposed that TPA may work, in part, by inciting inflammation and stimulating inflammatory cells to release powerful oxidants which then induce DNA damage in epidermal cells. Macrophages cocultured with target cells and TPA induce oxidized thymine bases in the target cells. This process is inhibited by both catalase and inhibitors of lipoxygenases, suggesting the involvement of both H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ and oxidized lipid products. In vivo studies demonstrated that SENCAR mice, which are sensitive to promotion by TPA, have a more intense inflammatory reaction in skin that C57LB/6 mice, which are resistant to promotion by TPA. In addition, macrophages from SENCAR mice release more H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ and metabolites of AA, and induce more oxidative DNA damage in cocultured cells than macrophages from C57LB/6 mice. These data support the hypothesis that inflammation and the release of genotoxic oxidants may be one mechanism whereby initiated cells receive further genetic insults. They also further complicate risk assessment by suggesting that some environmental agents may work indirectly by subverting host systems to induce damage rather than maintaining homeostasis.

  8. Replication fork dynamics and the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Jones, Rebecca M; Petermann, Eva

    2012-04-01

    Prevention and repair of DNA damage is essential for maintenance of genomic stability and cell survival. DNA replication during S-phase can be a source of DNA damage if endogenous or exogenous stresses impair the progression of replication forks. It has become increasingly clear that DNA-damage-response pathways do not only respond to the presence of damaged DNA, but also modulate DNA replication dynamics to prevent DNA damage formation during S-phase. Such observations may help explain the developmental defects or cancer predisposition caused by mutations in DNA-damage-response genes. The present review focuses on molecular mechanisms by which DNA-damage-response pathways control and promote replication dynamics in vertebrate cells. In particular, DNA damage pathways contribute to proper replication by regulating replication initiation, stabilizing transiently stalled forks, promoting replication restart and facilitating fork movement on difficult-to-replicate templates. If replication fork progression fails to be rescued, this may lead to DNA damage and genomic instability via nuclease processing of aberrant fork structures or incomplete sister chromatid separation during mitosis.

  9. Acetylation of Werner syndrome protein (WRN): relationships with DNA damage, DNA replication and DNA metabolic activities

    PubMed Central

    Lozada, Enerlyn; Yi, Jingjie; Luo, Jianyuan; Orren, David K.

    2014-01-01

    Loss of WRN function causes Werner Syndrome, characterized by increased genomic instability, elevated cancer susceptibility and premature aging. Although WRN is subject to acetylation, phosphorylation and sumoylation, the impact of these modifications on WRN’s DNA metabolic function remains unclear. Here, we examined in further depth the relationship between WRN acetylation and its role in DNA metabolism, particularly in response to induced DNA damage. Our results demonstrate that endogenous WRN is acetylated somewhat under unperturbed conditions. However, levels of acetylated WRN significantly increase after treatment with certain DNA damaging agents or the replication inhibitor hydroxyurea. Use of DNA repair-deficient cells or repair pathway inhibitors further increase levels of acetylated WRN, indicating that induced DNA lesions and their persistence are at least partly responsible for increased acetylation. Notably, acetylation of WRN correlates with inhibition of DNA synthesis, suggesting that replication blockage might underlie this effect. Moreover, WRN acetylation modulates its affinity for and activity on certain DNA structures, in a manner that may enhance its relative specificity for physiological substrates. Our results also show that acetylation and deacetylation of endogenous WRN is a dynamic process, with sirtuins and other histone deacetylases contributing to WRN deacetylation. These findings advance our understanding of the dynamics of WRN acetylation under unperturbed conditions and following DNA damage induction, linking this modification not only to DNA damage persistence but also potentially to replication stalling caused by specific DNA lesions. Our results are consistent with proposed metabolic roles for WRN and genomic instability phenotypes associated with WRN deficiency. PMID:24965941

  10. DNA damage in Fabry patients: An investigation of oxidative damage and repair.

    PubMed

    Biancini, Giovana Brondani; Moura, Dinara Jaqueline; Manini, Paula Regina; Faverzani, Jéssica Lamberty; Netto, Cristina Brinckmann Oliveira; Deon, Marion; Giugliani, Roberto; Saffi, Jenifer; Vargas, Carmen Regla

    2015-06-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a lysosomal storage disorder associated with loss of activity of the enzyme α-galactosidase A. In addition to accumulation of α-galactosidase A substrates, other mechanisms may be involved in FD pathophysiology, such as inflammation and oxidative stress. Higher levels of oxidative damage to proteins and lipids in Fabry patients were previously reported. However, DNA damage by oxidative species in FD has not yet been studied. We investigated basal DNA damage, oxidative DNA damage, DNA repair capacity, and reactive species generation in Fabry patients and controls. To measure oxidative damage to purines and pyrimidines, the alkaline version of the comet assay was used with two endonucleases, formamidopyrimidine DNA-glycosylase (FPG) and endonuclease III (EndoIII). To evaluate DNA repair, a challenge assay with hydrogen peroxide was performed. Patients presented significantly higher levels of basal DNA damage and oxidative damage to purines. Oxidative DNA damage was induced in both DNA bases by H2O2 in patients. Fabry patients presented efficient DNA repair in both assays (with and without endonucleases) as well as significantly higher levels of oxidative species (measured by dichlorofluorescein content). Even if DNA repair be induced in Fabry patients (as a consequence of continuous exposure to oxidative species), the repair is not sufficient to reduce DNA damage to control levels.

  11. Mitochondrial DNA Damage and its Consequences for Mitochondrial Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Cline, Susan D.

    2012-01-01

    How mitochondria process DNA damage and whether a change in the steady-state level of mitochondrial DNA damage (mtDNA) contributes to mitochondrial dysfunction are questions that fuel burgeoning areas of research into aging and disease pathogenesis. Over the past decade, researchers have identified and measured various forms of endogenous and environmental mtDNA damage and have elucidated mtDNA repair pathways. Interestingly, mitochondria do not appear to contain the full range of DNA repair mechanisms that operate in the nucleus, although mtDNA contains types of damage that are targets of each nuclear DNA repair pathway. The reduced repair capacity may, in part, explain the high mutation frequency of the mitochondrial chromosome. Since mtDNA replication is dependent on transcription, mtDNA damage may alter mitochondrial gene expression at three levels: by causing DNA polymerase γ nucleotide incorporation errors leading to mutations, by interfering with the priming of mtDNA replication by the mitochondrial RNA polymerase, or by inducing transcriptional mutagenesis or premature transcript termination. This review summarizes our current knowledge of mtDNA damage, its repair, and its effects on mtDNA integrity and gene expression. PMID:22728831

  12. Hydroxyl radical Thymine adduct induced DNA damages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schyman, Patric; Eriksson, Leif A.; Zhang, Ru bo; Laaksonen, Aatto

    2008-06-01

    DNA damages caused by a 5-hydroxy-5,6-dihydrothymine-6-yl radical (5-OHT-6yl) abstracting a C2‧ hydrogen from a neighboring sugar (inter-H abstraction) have been theoretically investigated using hybrid DFT in gas phase and in water solution. The inter-H abstraction was here shown to be comparable in energy (24 kcal mol-1) with the intra-H abstraction in which the 5-OHT-6yl abstracts a C2‧ hydrogen from its own sugar. The effect of a neutrally or a negatively charged phosphate group was also studied and the results show no significant impact on the activation energy of the hydrogen abstraction whereas base release and strand break reactions are affected.

  13. Assessment of mitochondrial DNA damage in little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus) collected near a mercury-contaminated river.

    PubMed

    Karouna-Renier, Natalie K; White, Carl; Perkins, Christopher R; Schmerfeld, John J; Yates, David

    2014-10-01

    Historical discharges of Hg into the South River near the town of Waynesboro, VA, USA, have resulted in persistently elevated Hg concentrations in sediment, surface water, ground water, soil, and wildlife downstream of the discharge site. In the present study, we examined mercury (Hg) levels in in little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus) from this location and assessed the utility of a non-destructively collected tissue sample (wing punch) for determining mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage in Hg exposed bats. Bats captured 1 and 3 km from the South River, exhibited significantly higher levels of total Hg (THg) in blood and fur than those from the reference location. We compared levels of mtDNA damage using real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis of two distinct regions of mtDNA. Genotoxicity is among the many known toxic effects of Hg, resulting from direct interactions with DNA or from oxidative damage. Because it lacks many of the protective protein structures and repair mechanisms associated with nuclear DNA, mtDNA is more sensitive to the effects of genotoxic chemicals and therefore may be a useful biomarker in chronically exposed organisms. Significantly higher levels of damage were observed in both regions of mtDNA in bats captured 3 km from the river than in controls. However, levels of mtDNA damage exhibited weak correlations with fur and blood THg levels, suggesting that other factors may play a role in the site-specific differences.

  14. Assessment of mitochondrial DNA damage in little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus) collected near a mercury-contaminated river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karouna-Renier, Natalie K.; White, Carl; Perkins, Christopher R.; Schmerfeld, John J.; Yates, David

    2014-01-01

    Historical discharges of Hg into the South River near the town of Waynesboro, VA, USA, have resulted in persistently elevated Hg concentrations in sediment, surface water, ground water, soil, and wildlife downstream of the discharge site. In the present study, we examined mercury (Hg) levels in in little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus) from this location and assessed the utility of a non-destructively collected tissue sample (wing punch) for determining mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage in Hg exposed bats. Bats captured 1 and 3 km from the South River, exhibited significantly higher levels of total Hg (THg) in blood and fur than those from the reference location. We compared levels of mtDNA damage using real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis of two distinct regions of mtDNA. Genotoxicity is among the many known toxic effects of Hg, resulting from direct interactions with DNA or from oxidative damage. Because it lacks many of the protective protein structures and repair mechanisms associated with nuclear DNA, mtDNA is more sensitive to the effects of genotoxic chemicals and therefore may be a useful biomarker in chronically exposed organisms. Significantly higher levels of damage were observed in both regions of mtDNA in bats captured 3 km from the river than in controls. However, levels of mtDNA damage exhibited weak correlations with fur and blood THg levels, suggesting that other factors may play a role in the site-specific differences.

  15. The methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T mutation induces cell-specific changes in genomic DNA methylation and uracil misincorporation: a possible molecular basis for the site-specific cancer risk modification.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Kyoung-Jin; Jang, Hyeran; Campan, Mihaela; Weisenberger, Daniel J; Dickhout, Jeffrey; Wang, Yi-Cheng; Cho, Robert C; Yates, Zoe; Lucock, Mark; Chiang, En-Pei; Austin, Richard C; Choi, Sang-Woon; Laird, Peter W; Kim, Young-In

    2009-05-01

    The C677T polymorphism in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene is associated with a decreased risk of colon cancer although it may increase the risk of breast cancer. This polymorphism is associated with changes in intracellular folate cofactors, which may affect DNA methylation and synthesis via altered one-carbon transfer reactions. We investigated the effect of this mutation on DNA methylation and uracil misincorporation and its interaction with exogenous folate in further modulating these biomarkers of one-carbon transfer reactions in an in vitro model of the MTHFR 677T mutation in HCT116 colon and MDA-MB-435 breast adenocarcinoma cells. In HCT116 cells, the MTHFR 677T mutation was associated with significantly increased genomic DNA methylation when folate supply was adequate or high; however, in the setting of folate insufficiency, this mutation was associated with significantly decreased genomic DNA methylation. In contrast, in MDA-MB-435 cells, the MTHFR 677T mutation was associated with significantly decreased genomic DNA methylation when folate supply was adequate or high and with no effect when folate supply was low. The MTHFR 677T mutation was associated with a nonsignificant trend toward decreased and increased uracil misincorporation in HCT116 and MDA-MB-435 cells, respectively. Our data demonstrate for the first time a functional consequence of changes in intracellular folate cofactors resulting from the MTHFR 677T mutation in cells derived from the target organs of interest, thus providing a plausible cellular mechanism that may partly explain the site-specific modification of colon and breast cancer risks associated with the MTHFR C677T mutation.

  16. Mitochondrial DNA damage by bleomycin induces AML cell death.

    PubMed

    Yeung, ManTek; Hurren, Rose; Nemr, Carine; Wang, Xiaoming; Hershenfeld, Samantha; Gronda, Marcela; Liyanage, Sanduni; Wu, Yan; Augustine, Jeevan; Lee, Eric A; Spagnuolo, Paul A; Southall, Noel; Chen, Catherine; Zheng, Wei; Jeyaraju, Danny V; Minden, Mark D; Laposa, Rebecca; Schimmer, Aaron D

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondria contain multiple copies of their own 16.6 kb circular genome. To explore the impact of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage on mitochondrial (mt) function and viability of AML cells, we screened a panel of DNA damaging chemotherapeutic agents to identify drugs that could damage mtDNA. We identified bleomycin as an agent that damaged mtDNA in AML cells at concentrations that induced cell death. Bleomycin also induced mtDNA damage in primary AML samples. Consistent with the observed mtDNA damage, bleomycin reduced mt mass and basal oxygen consumption in AML cells. We also demonstrated that the observed mtDNA damage was functionally important for bleomycin-induced cell death. Finally, bleomycin delayed tumor growth in xenograft mouse models of AML and anti-leukemic concentrations of the drug induced mtDNA damage in AML cells preferentially over normal lung tissue. Taken together, mtDNA-targeted therapy may be an effective strategy to target AML cells and bleomycin could be useful in the treatment of this disease.

  17. Commentary: Mitochondrial DNA damage and loss in diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Gilkerson, Robert

    2017-01-01

    This commentary discusses damage and loss of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in type 2 diabetes mellitus from both the clinical and experimental perspectives. Increasingly, an array of studies in experimental models and patients suggests that the cellular stresses of insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes damage mtDNA, leading to loss of mitochondrial genetic content. As such, mtDNA is emerging as both a valuable monitoring tool and translational preventive target for metabolic disease. PMID:27253402

  18. Impact of Alternative DNA Structures on DNA Damage, DNA Repair, and Genetic Instability

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guliang; Vasquez, Karen M.

    2014-01-01

    Repetitive genomic sequences can adopt a number of alternative DNA structures that differ from the canonical B-form duplex (i.e. non-B DNA). These non-B DNA-forming sequences have been shown to have many important biological functions related to DNA metabolic processes; for example, they may have regulatory roles in DNA transcription and replication. In addition to these regulatory functions, non-B DNA can stimulate genetic instability in the presence or absence of DNA damage, via replication-dependent and/or replication-independent pathways. This review focuses on the interactions of non-B DNA conformations with DNA repair proteins and how these interactions impact genetic instability. PMID:24767258

  19. Saccharomyces cerevisiae-based system for studying clustered DNA damages

    SciTech Connect

    Moscariello, M.M.; Sutherland, B.

    2010-08-01

    DNA-damaging agents can induce clustered lesions or multiply damaged sites (MDSs) on the same or opposing DNA strands. In the latter, attempts to repair MDS can generate closely opposed single-strand break intermediates that may convert non-lethal or mutagenic base damage into double-strand breaks (DSBs). We constructed a diploid S. cerevisiae yeast strain with a chromosomal context targeted by integrative DNA fragments carrying different damages to determine whether closely opposed base damages are converted to DSBs following the outcomes of the homologous recombination repair pathway. As a model of MDS, we studied clustered uracil DNA damages with a known location and a defined distance separating the lesions. The system we describe might well be extended to assessing the repair of MDSs with different compositions, and to most of the complex DNA lesions induced by physical and chemical agents.

  20. Systemic DNA damage responses in aging and diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ribezzo, Flavia; Shiloh, Yosef; Schumacher, Björn

    2016-01-01

    The genome is constantly attacked by a variety of genotoxic insults. The causal role for DNA damage in aging and cancer is exemplified by genetic defects in DNA repair that underlie a broad spectrum of acute and chronic human disorders that are characterized by developmental abnormalities, premature aging, and cancer predisposition. The disease symptoms are typically tissue-specific with uncertain genotype-phenotype correlation. The cellular DNA damage response (DDR) has been extensively investigated ever since yeast geneticists discovered DNA damage checkpoint mechanisms, several decades ago. In recent years, it has become apparent that not only cell-autonomous but also systemic DNA damage responses determine the outcome of genome instability in organisms. Understanding the mechanisms of non-cell-autonomous DNA damage responses will provide important new insights into the role of genome instability in human aging and a host of diseases including cancer and might better explain the complex phenotypes caused by genome instability. PMID:26773346

  1. UV and ionizing radiations induced DNA damage, differences and similarities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Douki, Thierry

    2016-11-01

    Both UV and ionizing radiations damage DNA. Two main mechanisms, so-called direct and indirect pathways, are involved in the degradation of DNA induced by ionizing radiations. The direct effect of radiation corresponds to direct ionization of DNA (one electron ejection) whereas indirect effects are produced by reactive oxygen species generated through water radiolysis, including the highly reactive hydroxyl radicals, which damage DNA. UV (and visible) light damages DNA by again two distinct mechanisms. UVC and to a lesser extend UVB photons are directly absorbed by DNA bases, generating their excited states that are at the origin of the formation of pyrimidine dimers. UVA (and visible) light by interaction with endogenous or exogenous photosensitizers induce the formation of DNA damage through photosensitization reactions. The excited photosensitizer is able to induce either a one-electron oxidation of DNA (type I) or to produce singlet oxygen (type II) that reacts with DNA. In addition, through an energy transfer from the excited photosensitizer to DNA bases (sometime called type III mechanism) formation of pyrimidine dimers could be produced. Interestingly it has been shown recently that pyrimidine dimers are also produced by direct absorption of UVA light by DNA, even if absorption of DNA bases at these wavelengths is very low. It should be stressed that some excited photosensitizers (such as psoralens) could add directly to DNA bases to generate adducts. The review will described the differences and similarities in terms of damage formation (structure and mechanisms) between these two physical genotoxic agents.

  2. Chimeric proteins for detection and quantitation of DNA mutations, DNA sequence variations, DNA damage and DNA mismatches

    DOEpatents

    McCutchen-Maloney, Sandra L.

    2002-01-01

    Chimeric proteins having both DNA mutation binding activity and nuclease activity are synthesized by recombinant technology. The proteins are of the general formula A-L-B and B-L-A where A is a peptide having DNA mutation binding activity, L is a linker and B is a peptide having nuclease activity. The chimeric proteins are useful for detection and identification of DNA sequence variations including DNA mutations (including DNA damage and mismatches) by binding to the DNA mutation and cutting the DNA once the DNA mutation is detected.

  3. Novel DNA damage checkpoint in mitosis: Mitotic DNA damage induces re-replication without cell division in various cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Sun-Yi; Rosen, Eliot M; Jang, Young-Joo

    2012-07-06

    DNA damage induces multiple checkpoint pathways to arrest cell cycle progression until damage is repaired. In our previous reports, when DNA damage occurred in prometaphase, cells were accumulated in 4 N-DNA G1 phase, and mitosis-specific kinases were inactivated in dependent on ATM/Chk1 after a short incubation for repair. We investigated whether or not mitotic DNA damage causes cells to skip-over late mitotic periods under prolonged incubation in a time-lapse study. 4 N-DNA-damaged cells re-replicated without cell division and accumulated in 8 N-DNA content, and the activities of apoptotic factors were increased. The inhibition of DNA replication reduced the 8 N-DNA cell population dramatically. Induction of replication without cell division was not observed upon depletion of Chk1 or ATM. Finally, mitotic DNA damage induces mitotic slippage and that cells enter G1 phase with 4 N-DNA content and then DNA replication is occurred to 8 N-DNA content before completion of mitosis in the ATM/Chk1-dependent manner, followed by caspase-dependent apoptosis during long-term repair.

  4. DNA damage induced by low energy electron collision and new experimental setup for further studying DNA damage by plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Yeunsoo; Sanche, Leon; Wagner, Richard

    2013-09-01

    Low energy electrons (LEEs; below 10 eV) are the most abundant among the radiolytic species generated along the high energy radiation track in living cell. And these electrons are also one of major components with ions and photon in plasma. Interestingly, it has turned out that LEEs can create DNA damages such as base release, single- and double- strand breaks (SSB and DSB) via indirect action named dissociative electron attachment (DEA). The purposes of this study are to further find out exact mechanisms of DNA damage by LEEs at the molecular level and to verify new DNA damage like structural alteration on DNA subunits. And we will expand our study to DNA damage by plasma source to develop plasma-based new medical and biological applications. We are currently setting new experimental system for reaching our goals. We will show some recent results about new finding DNA modification damage and some experimental designs and working principles.

  5. Oxidative DNA damage in osteoarthritic porcine articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Antonia F.; Davies, Catrin M.; De Lin, Ming; Fermor, Beverley

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Osteoarthritis (OA) is associated with increased levels of reactive oxygen species. This study investigated if increased oxidative DNA damage accumulates in OA articular cartilage compared with non-OA articular cartilage from pigs with spontaneous OA. Additionally, the ability of nitric oxide (NO) or peroxynitrite (ONOO-) induced DNA damage in non-OA chondrocytes to undergo endogenous repair was investigated. Methods Porcine femoral condyles were graded for the stage of OA, macroscopically by the Collins Scale, and histologically by the modified Mankin Grade. Levels of DNA damage were determined in non-OA and OA cartilage, using the comet assay. For calibration, DNA damage was measured by exposing non-OA chondrocytes to 0-12 Gray of x-ray irradiation. Non-OA articular chondrocytes were treated with 0-500 μM of NO donors (NOC-18 or SIN-1), and DNA damage assessed after treatment and 5 days recovery. Results A significant increase (p<0.01) in oxidative DNA damage occurred in OA chondrocytes in joints with Mankin Grades 3 or greater, compared to non-OA chondrocytes. The percentage of nuclei containing DNA damage increased significantly (p<0.001) from early to late grades of OA. An increase of approximately 0.65-1.7 breaks/1000kB of DNA occurred in OA, compared to non-OA nuclei. NOC-18 or SIN-1 caused significant DNA damage (p<0.001) in non-OA chondrocytes that did not undergo full endogenous repair after 5 days (p<0.05). Conclusion Our data suggest significant levels of oxidative DNA damage occur in OA chondrocytes that accumulates with OA progression. Additionally, DNA damage induced by NO and ONOO- in non-OA chondrocytes does not undergo full endogenous repair. PMID:18720406

  6. Amphetamines promote mitochondrial dysfunction and DNA damage in pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pin-I; Cao, Aiqin; Miyagawa, Kazuya; Tojais, Nancy F.; Hennigs, Jan K.; Li, Caiyun G.; Sweeney, Nathaly M.; Inglis, Audrey S.; Wang, Lingli; Li, Dan; Ye, Matthew; Feldman, Brian J.

    2017-01-01

    Amphetamine (AMPH) or methamphetamine (METH) abuse can cause oxidative damage and is a risk factor for diseases including pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAECs) from AMPH-associated-PAH patients show DNA damage as judged by γH2AX foci and DNA comet tails. We therefore hypothesized that AMPH induces DNA damage and vascular pathology by interfering with normal adaptation to an environmental perturbation causing oxidative stress. Consistent with this, we found that AMPH alone does not cause DNA damage in normoxic PAECs, but greatly amplifies DNA damage in hypoxic PAECs. The mechanism involves AMPH activation of protein phosphatase 2A, which potentiates inhibition of Akt. This increases sirtuin 1, causing deacetylation and degradation of HIF1α, thereby impairing its transcriptional activity, resulting in a reduction in pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 and impaired cytochrome c oxidase 4 isoform switch. Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation is inappropriately enhanced and, as a result of impaired electron transport and mitochondrial ROS increase, caspase-3 is activated and DNA damage is induced. In mice given binge doses of METH followed by hypoxia, HIF1α is suppressed and pulmonary artery DNA damage foci are associated with worse pulmonary vascular remodeling. Thus, chronic AMPH/METH can induce DNA damage associated with vascular disease by subverting the adaptive responses to oxidative stress. PMID:28138562

  7. DNA damage in cells exhibiting radiation-induced genomic instability

    DOE PAGES

    Keszenman, Deborah J.; Kolodiuk, Lucia; Baulch, Janet E.

    2015-02-22

    Cells exhibiting radiation induced genomic instability exhibit varied spectra of genetic and chromosomal aberrations. Even so, oxidative stress remains a common theme in the initiation and/or perpetuation of this phenomenon. Isolated oxidatively modified bases, abasic sites, DNA single strand breaks and clustered DNA damage are induced in normal mammalian cultured cells and tissues due to endogenous reactive oxygen species generated during normal cellular metabolism in an aerobic environment. While sparse DNA damage may be easily repaired, clustered DNA damage may lead to persistent cytotoxic or mutagenic events that can lead to genomic instability. In this study, we tested the hypothesismore » that DNA damage signatures characterised by altered levels of endogenous, potentially mutagenic, types of DNA damage and chromosomal breakage are related to radiation-induced genomic instability and persistent oxidative stress phenotypes observed in the chromosomally unstable progeny of irradiated cells. The measurement of oxypurine, oxypyrimidine and abasic site endogenous DNA damage showed differences in non-double-strand breaks (DSB) clusters among the three of the four unstable clones evaluated as compared to genomically stable clones and the parental cell line. These three unstable clones also had increased levels of DSB clusters. The results of this study demonstrate that each unstable cell line has a unique spectrum of persistent damage and lead us to speculate that alterations in DNA damage signaling and repair may be related to the perpetuation of genomic instability.« less

  8. DNA damage in cells exhibiting radiation-induced genomic instability

    SciTech Connect

    Keszenman, Deborah J.; Kolodiuk, Lucia; Baulch, Janet E.

    2015-02-22

    Cells exhibiting radiation induced genomic instability exhibit varied spectra of genetic and chromosomal aberrations. Even so, oxidative stress remains a common theme in the initiation and/or perpetuation of this phenomenon. Isolated oxidatively modified bases, abasic sites, DNA single strand breaks and clustered DNA damage are induced in normal mammalian cultured cells and tissues due to endogenous reactive oxygen species generated during normal cellular metabolism in an aerobic environment. While sparse DNA damage may be easily repaired, clustered DNA damage may lead to persistent cytotoxic or mutagenic events that can lead to genomic instability. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that DNA damage signatures characterised by altered levels of endogenous, potentially mutagenic, types of DNA damage and chromosomal breakage are related to radiation-induced genomic instability and persistent oxidative stress phenotypes observed in the chromosomally unstable progeny of irradiated cells. The measurement of oxypurine, oxypyrimidine and abasic site endogenous DNA damage showed differences in non-double-strand breaks (DSB) clusters among the three of the four unstable clones evaluated as compared to genomically stable clones and the parental cell line. These three unstable clones also had increased levels of DSB clusters. The results of this study demonstrate that each unstable cell line has a unique spectrum of persistent damage and lead us to speculate that alterations in DNA damage signaling and repair may be related to the perpetuation of genomic instability.

  9. Inflammation, DNA Damage, Helicobacter pylori and Gastric Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kalisperati, Polyxeni; Spanou, Evangelia; Pateras, Ioannis S.; Korkolopoulou, Penelope; Varvarigou, Anastasia; Karavokyros, Ioannis; Gorgoulis, Vassilis G.; Vlachoyiannopoulos, Panayiotis G.; Sougioultzis, Stavros

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a Gram negative bacterium that colonizes the stomach of almost half human population. It has evolved to escape immune surveillance, establishes lifelong inflammation, predisposing to genomic instability and DNA damage, notably double strand breaks. The epithelial host cell responds by activation of DNA damage repair (DDR) machinery that seems to be compromised by the infection. It is therefore now accepted that genetic damage is a major mechanism operating in cases of H. pylori induced carcinogenesis. Here, we review the data on the molecular pathways involved in DNA damage and DDR activation during H. pylori infection. PMID:28289428

  10. DNA Damage among Wood Workers Assessed with the Comet Assay.

    PubMed

    Bruschweiler, Evin Danisman; Wild, Pascal; Huynh, Cong Khanh; Savova-Bianchi, Dessislava; Danuser, Brigitta; Hopf, Nancy B

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to wood dust, a human carcinogen, is common in wood-related industries, and millions of workers are occupationally exposed to wood dust worldwide. The comet assay is a rapid, simple, and sensitive method for determining DNA damage. The objective of this study was to investigate the DNA damage associated with occupational exposure to wood dust using the comet assay (peripheral blood samples) among nonsmoking wood workers (n = 31, furniture and construction workers) and controls (n = 19). DNA damage was greater in the group exposed to composite wood products compared to the group exposed to natural woods and controls (P < 0.001). No difference in DNA damage was observed between workers exposed to natural woods and controls (P = 0.13). Duration of exposure and current dust concentrations had no effect on DNA damage. In future studies, workers' exposures should include cumulative dust concentrations and exposures originating from the binders used in composite wood products.

  11. DNA Damage among Wood Workers Assessed with the Comet Assay

    PubMed Central

    Bruschweiler, Evin Danisman; Wild, Pascal; Huynh, Cong Khanh; Savova-Bianchi, Dessislava; Danuser, Brigitta; Hopf, Nancy B.

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to wood dust, a human carcinogen, is common in wood-related industries, and millions of workers are occupationally exposed to wood dust worldwide. The comet assay is a rapid, simple, and sensitive method for determining DNA damage. The objective of this study was to investigate the DNA damage associated with occupational exposure to wood dust using the comet assay (peripheral blood samples) among nonsmoking wood workers (n = 31, furniture and construction workers) and controls (n = 19). DNA damage was greater in the group exposed to composite wood products compared to the group exposed to natural woods and controls (P < 0.001). No difference in DNA damage was observed between workers exposed to natural woods and controls (P = 0.13). Duration of exposure and current dust concentrations had no effect on DNA damage. In future studies, workers’ exposures should include cumulative dust concentrations and exposures originating from the binders used in composite wood products. PMID:27398027

  12. An inducible long noncoding RNA amplifies DNA damage signaling

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Adam M.; Garcia, Julia T.; Hung, Tiffany; Flynn, Ryan A.; Shen, Ying; Qu, Kun; Payumo, Alexander Y.; Peres-da-Silva, Ashwin; Broz, Daniela Kenzelmann; Baum, Rachel; Guo, Shuling; Chen, James K.; Attardi, Laura D.; Chang, Howard Y.

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are prevalent genes with frequently exquisite regulation but mostly unknown functions. Here we demonstrate a role of lncRNAs in guiding organismal DNA damage response. DNA damage activates transcription of DINO (Damage Induced NOncoding) via p53. DINO is required for p53-dependent gene expression, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis in response to DNA damage, and DINO expression suffice to activate damage signaling and cell cycle arrest in the absence of DNA damage. DINO binds to and promotes p53 protein stabilization, mediating a p53 auto-amplification loop. Dino knockout or promoter inactivation in mice dampens p53 signaling and ameliorates acute radiation syndrome in vivo. Thus, inducible lncRNA can create a feedback loop with its cognate transcription factor to amplify cellular signaling networks. PMID:27668660

  13. DNA Damage Response and Autophagy: A Meaningful Partnership

    PubMed Central

    Eliopoulos, Aristides G.; Havaki, Sophia; Gorgoulis, Vassilis G.

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy and the DNA damage response (DDR) are biological processes essential for cellular and organismal homeostasis. Herein, we summarize and discuss emerging evidence linking DDR to autophagy. We highlight published data suggesting that autophagy is activated by DNA damage and is required for several functional outcomes of DDR signaling, including repair of DNA lesions, senescence, cell death, and cytokine secretion. Uncovering the mechanisms by which autophagy and DDR are intertwined provides novel insight into the pathobiology of conditions associated with accumulation of DNA damage, including cancer and aging, and novel concepts for the development of improved therapeutic strategies against these pathologies. PMID:27917193

  14. Sodium tungstate modulates ATM function upon DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Hernandez, C J; Llorens-Agost, M; Calbó, J; Murguia, J R; Guinovart, J J

    2013-05-21

    Both radiotherapy and most effective chemotherapeutic agents induce different types of DNA damage. Here we show that tungstate modulates cell response to DNA damaging agents. Cells treated with tungstate were more sensitive to etoposide, phleomycin and ionizing radiation (IR), all of which induce DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Tungstate also modulated the activation of the central DSB signalling kinase, ATM, in response to these agents. These effects required the functionality of the Mre11-Nbs1-Rad50 (MRN) complex and were mimicked by the inhibition of PP2A phosphatase. Therefore, tungstate may have adjuvant activity when combined with DNA-damaging agents in the treatment of several malignancies.

  15. Ultraviolet induced DNA damage and hereditary skin cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, J.D.; Carrier, W.L.; Francis, A.A.

    1984-01-01

    Clearly, cells from normal individuals possess the ability to repair a variety of damage to DNA. Numerous studies indicate that defects in DNA repair may increase an individual's susceptibility to cancer. It is hoped that continued studies of the exact structural changes produced in the DNA by environmental insults, and the correlation of specific DNA changes with particulr cellular events, such as DNA repair, will lead to a better understanding of cell-killing, mutagenesis and carbinogenesis. 1 figure, 2 tables.

  16. Estrogenic and DNA-damaging activity of Red No. 3 in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Dees, C; Askari, M; Garrett, S; Gehrs, K; Henley, D; Ardies, C M

    1997-01-01

    Exposure to pesticides, dyes, and pollutants that mimic the growth promoting effects of estrogen may cause breast cancer. The pesticide DDT and the food colorant Red No. 3 were found to increase the growth of HTB 133 but not estrogen receptor (ER) negative human breast cells (HTB 125) or rat liver epithelial cells (RLE). Red No. 3, beta-estradiol, and DDT increase ER site-specific DNA binding to the estrogen response element in HTB 133 cells and increase cyclin-dependent kinase 2 activity in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Site-specific DNA binding by p53 in RLE, HTB 125, HTB 133, and MCF-7 cells was increased when they were treated with Red No. 3, which suggests that cellular DNA was damaged by this colorant. Red No. 3 increased binding of the ER from MCF-7 cells to the estrogen-responsive element. Consumption of Red No. 3, which has estrogenlike growth stimulatory properties and may be genotoxic, could be a significant risk factor in human breast carcinogenesis. Images Figure 4. A Figure 4. B Figure 5. A Figure 5. B Figure 6. Figure 7. A Figure 7. B Figure 7. C PMID:9168006

  17. Comparative Analysis of Interaction of Human and Yeast DNA Damage Recognition Complexes with Damaged DNA in Nucleotide Excision Repair*

    PubMed Central

    Krasikova, Yuliya S.; Rechkunova, Nadejda I.; Maltseva, Ekaterina A.; Pestryakov, Pavel E.; Petruseva, Irina O.; Sugasawa, Kaoru; Chen, Xuejing; Min, Jung-Hyun; Lavrik, Olga I.

    2013-01-01

    The human XPC-RAD23B complex and its yeast ortholog, Rad4-Rad23, are the primary initiators of global genome nucleotide excision repair. The interaction of these proteins with damaged DNA was analyzed using model DNA duplexes containing a single fluorescein-substituted dUMP analog as a lesion. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay revealed similarity between human and yeast proteins in DNA binding. Quantitative analyses of XPC/Rad4 binding to the model DNA structures were performed by fluorescent depolarization measurements. XPC-RAD23B and Rad4-Rad23 proteins demonstrate approximately equal binding affinity to the damaged DNA duplex (KD ∼ (0.5 ± 0.1) and (0.6 ± 0.3) nm, respectively). Using photoreactive DNA containing 5-iodo-dUMP in defined positions, XPC/Rad4 location on damaged DNA was shown. Under conditions of equimolar binding to DNA both proteins exhibited the highest level of cross-links to 5I-dUMP located exactly opposite the damaged nucleotide. The positioning of the XPC and Rad4 proteins on damaged DNA by photocross-linking footprinting is consistent with x-ray analysis of the Rad4-DNA crystal complex. The identity of the XPC and Rad4 location illustrates the common principles of structure organization of DNA damage-scanning proteins from different Eukarya organisms. PMID:23443653

  18. Reshaping chromatin after DNA damage: the choreography of histone proteins.

    PubMed

    Polo, Sophie E

    2015-02-13

    DNA damage signaling and repair machineries operate in a nuclear environment where DNA is wrapped around histone proteins and packaged into chromatin. Understanding how chromatin structure is restored together with the DNA sequence during DNA damage repair has been a topic of intense research. Indeed, chromatin integrity is central to cell functions and identity. However, chromatin shows remarkable plasticity in response to DNA damage. This review presents our current knowledge of chromatin dynamics in the mammalian cell nucleus in response to DNA double strand breaks and UV lesions. I provide an overview of the key players involved in regulating histone dynamics in damaged chromatin regions, focusing on histone chaperones and their concerted action with histone modifiers, chromatin remodelers and repair factors. I also discuss how these dynamics contribute to reshaping chromatin and, by altering the chromatin landscape, may affect the maintenance of epigenetic information.

  19. Stress-induced DNA damage biomarkers: applications and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Nikitaki, Zacharenia; Hellweg, Christine E.; Georgakilas, Alexandros G.; Ravanat, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    A variety of environmental stresses like chemicals, UV and ionizing radiation and organism's endogenous processes such as replication stress and metabolism can lead to the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) that can attack cellular vital components like DNA, proteins and lipid membranes. Among them, much attention has been focused on DNA since DNA damage plays a role in several biological disorders and aging processes. Thus, DNA damage can be used as a biomarker in a reliable and accurate way to quantify for example radiation exposure and can indicate its possible long term effects and cancer risk. Based on the type of DNA lesions detected one can hypothesize on the most probable mechanisms involved in the formation of these lesions for example in the case of UV and ionizing radiation (e.g., X- or α-, γ-rays, energetic ions, neutrons). In this review we describe the most accepted chemical pathways for DNA damage induction and the different types of DNA lesions, i.e., single, complex DNA lesions etc. that can be used as DNA damage biomarkers. We critically compare DNA damage detection methods and their limitations. In addition, we suggest the use of DNA repair gene products as biomarkes for identification of different types of stresses i.e., radiation, oxidative, or replication stress, based on bioinformatic approaches and meta-analysis of literature data. PMID:26082923

  20. HDAC inhibitors: roles of DNA damage and repair.

    PubMed

    Robert, Carine; Rassool, Feyruz V

    2012-01-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis) increase gene expression through induction of histone acetylation. However, it remains unclear whether specific gene expression changes determine the apoptotic response following HDACis administration. Herein, we discuss evidence that HDACis trigger in cancer and leukemia cells not only widespread histone acetylation but also actual increases in reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DNA damage that are further increased following treatment with DNA-damaging chemotherapies. While the origins of ROS production are not completely understood, mechanisms, including inflammation and altered antioxidant signaling, have been reported. While the generation of ROS is an explanation, at least in part, for the source of DNA damage observed with HDACi treatment, DNA damage can also be independently induced by changes in the DNA repair activity and chromatin remodeling factors. Recent development of sirtuin inhibitors (SIRTis) has shown that, similar to HDACis, these drugs induce increases in ROS and DNA damage used singly, or in combination with HDACis and other drugs. Thus, induction of apoptosis by HDACis/SIRTis may result through oxidative stress and DNA damage mechanisms in addition to direct activation of apoptosis-inducing genes. Nevertheless, while DNA damage and stress responses could be of interest as markers for clinical responses, they have yet to be validated as markers for responses to HDACi treatment in clinical trials, alone, and in combination.

  1. Chimeric Proteins to Detect DNA Damage and Mismatches

    SciTech Connect

    McCutchen-Maloney, S; Malfatti, M; Robbins, K M

    2002-01-14

    The goal of this project was to develop chimeric proteins composed of a DNA mismatch or damage binding protein and a nuclease, as well as methods to detect DNA mismatches and damage. We accomplished this through protein engineering based on using polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) to create chimeras with novel functions for damage and mismatch detection. This project addressed fundamental questions relating to disease susceptibility and radiation-induced damage in cells. It also supported and enhanced LLNL's competency in the emerging field of proteomics. In nature, DNA is constantly being subjected to damaging agents such as exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation and various environmental and dietary carcinogens. If DNA damage is not repaired however, mutations in DNA result that can eventually manifest in cancer and other diseases. In addition to damage-induced DNA mutations, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), which are variations in the genetic sequence between individuals, may predispose some to disease. As a result of the Human Genome Project, the integrity of a person's DNA can now be monitored. Therefore, methods to detect DNA damage, mutations, and SNPs are useful not only in basic research but also in the health and biotechnology industries. Current methods of detection often use radioactive labeling and rely on expensive instrumentation that is not readily available in many research settings. Our methods to detect DNA damage and mismatches employ simple gel electrophoresis and flow cytometry, thereby alleviating the need for radioactive labeling and expensive equipment. In FY2001, we explored SNP detection by developing methods based on the ability of the chimeric proteins to detect mismatches. Using multiplex assays with flow cytometry and fluorescent beads to which the DNA substrates where attached, we showed that several of the chimeras possess greater affinity for damaged and mismatched DNA than for native DNA. This affinity was demonstrated in

  2. Plasmid DNA damage induced by helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xu; Cantrell, William A.; Escobar, Erika E.; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2014-03-01

    A helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) is applied to induce damage to aqueous plasmid DNA. The resulting fractions of the DNA conformers, which indicate intact molecules or DNA with single- or double-strand breaks, are determined using agarose gel electrophoresis. The DNA strand breaks increase with a decrease in the distance between the APPJ and DNA samples under two working conditions of the plasma source with different parameters of applied electric pulses. The damage level induced in the plasmid DNA is also enhanced with increased plasma irradiation time. The reactive species generated in the APPJ are characterized by optical emission spectra, and their roles in possible DNA damage processes occurring in an aqueous environment are also discussed.

  3. DETECTION OF DNA DAMAGE USING MELTING ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid and simple fluorescence screening assay for UV radiation-, chemical-, and enzyme-induced DNA damage is reported. This assay is based on a melting/annealing analysis technique and has been used with both calf thymus DNA and plasmid DNA (puc 19 plasmid from E. coli). DN...

  4. Kinetic gating mechanism of DNA damage recognition by Rad4/XPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xuejing; Velmurugu, Yogambigai; Zheng, Guanqun; Park, Beomseok; Shim, Yoonjung; Kim, Youngchang; Liu, Lili; van Houten, Bennett; He, Chuan; Ansari, Anjum; Min, Jung-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    The xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC) complex initiates nucleotide excision repair by recognizing DNA lesions before recruiting downstream factors. How XPC detects structurally diverse lesions embedded within normal DNA is unknown. Here we present a crystal structure that captures the yeast XPC orthologue (Rad4) on a single register of undamaged DNA. The structure shows that a disulphide-tethered Rad4 flips out normal nucleotides and adopts a conformation similar to that seen with damaged DNA. Contrary to many DNA repair enzymes that can directly reject non-target sites as structural misfits, our results suggest that Rad4/XPC uses a kinetic gating mechanism whereby lesion selectivity arises from the kinetic competition between DNA opening and the residence time of Rad4/XPC per site. This mechanism is further supported by measurements of Rad4-induced lesion-opening times using temperature-jump perturbation spectroscopy. Kinetic gating may be a general mechanism used by site-specific DNA-binding proteins to minimize time-consuming interrogations of non-target sites.

  5. Kinetic gating mechanism of DNA damage recognition by Rad4/XPC

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xuejing; Velmurugu, Yogambigai; Zheng, Guanqun; Park, Beomseok; Shim, Yoonjung; Kim, Youngchang; Liu, Lili; Van Houten, Bennett; He, Chuan; Ansari, Anjum; Min, Jung-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    The xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC) complex initiates nucleotide excision repair by recognizing DNA lesions before recruiting downstream factors. How XPC detects structurally diverse lesions embedded within normal DNA is unknown. Here we present a crystal structure that captures the yeast XPC orthologue (Rad4) on a single register of undamaged DNA. The structure shows that a disulphide-tethered Rad4 flips out normal nucleotides and adopts a conformation similar to that seen with damaged DNA. Contrary to many DNA repair enzymes that can directly reject non-target sites as structural misfits, our results suggest that Rad4/XPC uses a kinetic gating mechanism whereby lesion selectivity arises from the kinetic competition between DNA opening and the residence time of Rad4/XPC per site. This mechanism is further supported by measurements of Rad4-induced lesion-opening times using temperature-jump perturbation spectroscopy. Kinetic gating may be a general mechanism used by site-specific DNA-binding proteins to minimize time-consuming interrogations of non-target sites. PMID:25562780

  6. Kinetic gating mechanism of DNA damage recognition by Rad4/XPC

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Xuejing; Velmurugu, Yogambigai; Zheng, Guanqun; ...

    2015-01-06

    The xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC) complex initiates nucleotide excision repair by recognizing DNA lesions before recruiting downstream factors. How XPC detects structurally diverse lesions embedded within normal DNA is unknown. Here we present a crystal structure that captures the yeast XPC orthologue (Rad4) on a single register of undamaged DNA. The structure shows that a disulphide-tethered Rad4 flips out normal nucleotides and adopts a conformations similar to that seen with damaged DNA. Contrary to many DNA repair enzymes that can directly reject non-target sites as structural misfits, our results suggest that Rad4/XPC uses a kinetic gating mechanism whereby lesion selectivitymore » arises from the kinetic competition between DNA opening and the residence time of Rad4/XPC per site. This mechanism is further supported by measurements of Rad4-induced lesion-opening times using temperature-jump pertubation spectroscopy. Kinetic gating may be a general mechanism used by site-specific DNA-binding proteins to minimize time-consuming interrogations of non-target sites.« less

  7. Kinetic gating mechanism of DNA damage recognition by Rad4/XPC

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xuejing; Velmurugu, Yogambigai; Zheng, Guanqun; Park, Beomseok; Shim, Yoonjung; Kim, Youngchang; Liu, Lili; Van Houten, Bennett; He, Chuan; Ansari, Anjum; Min, Jung -Hyun

    2015-01-06

    The xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC) complex initiates nucleotide excision repair by recognizing DNA lesions before recruiting downstream factors. How XPC detects structurally diverse lesions embedded within normal DNA is unknown. Here we present a crystal structure that captures the yeast XPC orthologue (Rad4) on a single register of undamaged DNA. The structure shows that a disulphide-tethered Rad4 flips out normal nucleotides and adopts a conformations similar to that seen with damaged DNA. Contrary to many DNA repair enzymes that can directly reject non-target sites as structural misfits, our results suggest that Rad4/XPC uses a kinetic gating mechanism whereby lesion selectivity arises from the kinetic competition between DNA opening and the residence time of Rad4/XPC per site. This mechanism is further supported by measurements of Rad4-induced lesion-opening times using temperature-jump pertubation spectroscopy. Kinetic gating may be a general mechanism used by site-specific DNA-binding proteins to minimize time-consuming interrogations of non-target sites.

  8. Chromatin perturbations during the DNA damage response in higher eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Bakkenist, Christopher J; Kastan, Michael B

    2015-12-01

    The DNA damage response is a widely used term that encompasses all signaling initiated at DNA lesions and damaged replication forks as it extends to orchestrate DNA repair, cell cycle checkpoints, cell death and senescence. ATM, an apical DNA damage signaling kinase, is virtually instantaneously activated following the introduction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 (MRN) complex, which has a catalytic role in DNA repair, and the KAT5 (Tip60) acetyltransferase are required for maximal ATM kinase activation in cells exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation. The sensing of DNA lesions occurs within a highly complex and heterogeneous chromatin environment. Chromatin decondensation and histone eviction at DSBs may be permissive for KAT5 binding to H3K9me3 and H3K36me3, ATM kinase acetylation and activation. Furthermore, chromatin perturbation may be a prerequisite for most DNA repair. Nucleosome disassembly during DNA repair was first reported in the 1970s by Smerdon and colleagues when nucleosome rearrangement was noted during the process of nucleotide excision repair of UV-induced DNA damage in human cells. Recently, the multi-functional protein nucleolin was identified as the relevant histone chaperone required for partial nucleosome disruption at DBSs, the recruitment of repair enzymes and for DNA repair. Notably, ATM kinase is activated by chromatin perturbations induced by a variety of treatments that do not directly cause DSBs, including treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitors. Central to the mechanisms that activate ATR, the second apical DNA damage signaling kinase, outside of a stalled and collapsed replication fork in S-phase, is chromatin decondensation and histone eviction associated with DNA end resection at DSBs. Thus, a stress that is common to both ATM and ATR kinase activation is chromatin perturbations, and we argue that chromatin perturbations are both sufficient and required for induction of the DNA damage response.

  9. Stress-induced DNA Damage biomarkers: Applications and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitaki, Zacharenia; Hellweg, Christine; Georgakilas, Alexandros; Ravanat, Jean-Luc

    2015-06-01

    A variety of environmental stresses like chemicals, UV and ionizing radiation and organism’s endogenous processes like replication stress and metabolism can lead to the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) that can attack cellular vital components like DNA, proteins and lipid membranes. Among them, much attention has been focused on DNA since DNA damages play a role in several biological disorders and aging processes. Thus, DNA damage can be used as a biomarker in a reliable and accurate way to quantify for example radiation exposure and can indicate its possible long term effects and cancer risk. Based on the type of DNA lesions detected one can hypothesize on the most probable mechanisms involved in the formation of these lesions for example in the case of UV and ionizing radiation (e.g. X- or α-, γ-rays, energetic ions, neutrons). In this review we describe the most accepted chemical pathways for DNA damage induction and the different types of DNA lesions, i.e. single, complex DNA lesions etc. that can be used as biomarkers. We critically compare DNA damage detection methods and their limitations. In addition to such DNA damage products, we suggest possible gene inductions that can be used to characterize responses to different types of stresses i.e. radiation, oxidative and replication stress, based on bioinformatic approaches and stringent meta-analysis of literature data.

  10. CHK2 kinase in the DNA damage response and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Zannini, Laura; Delia, Domenico; Buscemi, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    The serine/threonine kinase CHK2 is a key component of the DNA damage response. In human cells, following genotoxic stress, CHK2 is activated and phosphorylates >20 proteins to induce the appropriate cellular response, which, depending on the extent of damage, the cell type, and other factors, could be cell cycle checkpoint activation, induction of apoptosis or senescence, DNA repair, or tolerance of the damage. Recently, CHK2 has also been found to have cellular functions independent of the presence of nuclear DNA lesions. In particular, CHK2 participates in several molecular processes involved in DNA structure modification and cell cycle progression. In this review, we discuss the activity of CHK2 in response to DNA damage and in the maintenance of the biological functions in unstressed cells. These activities are also considered in relation to a possible role of CHK2 in tumorigenesis and, as a consequence, as a target of cancer therapy. PMID:25404613

  11. Oxidative and non-oxidative DNA damage and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Malik, Qudsia; Herbert, Karl E

    2012-04-01

    Evidence for the association of DNA damage with cardiovascular disease has been obtained from in vitro cell culture models, experimental cardiovascular disease and analysis of samples obtained from humans with disease. There is general acceptance that several factors associated with the risk of developing cardiovascular disease cause oxidative damage to DNA in cell culture models with both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA as targets. Moreover, evidence obtained over the past 10 years points to a possible mechanistic role for DNA damage in experimental atherosclerosis culminating in recent studies challenging the assumption that DNA damage is merely a biomarker of the disease process. This kind of mechanistic insight provides a renewed impetus for further studies in this area.

  12. Single-step intercalating dye strategies for DNA damage studies.

    PubMed

    Paidipalli, Manasa; Pjescic, Ilija; Hindmarsh, Patrick L; Crews, Niel D

    2013-08-01

    Many analytical protocols exist for the quantification of varied types of DNA damage, which span a range of complexity and sensitivity. As an alternative or companion to existing procedures, this article demonstrates the application of quantitative PCR (qPCR) and high-resolution DNA melting analysis (HRMA) to the detection and quantification of intramolecular DNA damage and/or strand breaks. These proven molecular biology methods are essentially single-step processes. When implemented with a third-generation saturating DNA dye, high sensitivity can be obtained. The experiments presented here demonstrate how DNA damage can inhibit amplification of the affected molecules. This corresponding decrease in the initial concentration of amplifiable DNA can be measured with qPCR. In addition, damage in the form of intramolecular dimerization and strand breaks alters the stored energy in the hydrogen bonds between the two strands in the dsDNA molecule. This significantly affects the thermal stability, which can be measured with extreme precision using HRMA. Simplified damage models were used in these experiments: UV-C irradiation to produce photoproducts, and restriction enzyme digestion to simulate double-strand breaks. The findings of this work, however, can be intuitively applied to the broad scope of DNA damage mechanisms.

  13. DNA damage and repair after high LET radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, Peter; Cucinotta, Francis; Anderson, Jennifer

    Predictions from biophysical models of interactions of radiation tracks with cellular DNA indicate that clustered DNA damage sites, defined as two or more lesions formed within one or two helical turns of the DNA by passage of a single radiation track, are formed in mammalian cells. These complex DNA damage sites are regarded as a signature of ionizing radiation exposure particularly as the likelihood of clustered damage sites arising endogenously is low. For instance, it was predicted from biophysical modelling that 30-40% of low LET-induced double strand breaks (DSB), a form of clustered damage, are complex with the yield increasing to >90% for high LET radiation, consistent with the reduced reparability of DSB with increasing ionization density of the radiation. The question arises whether the increased biological effects such as mutagenesis, carcinogenesis and lethality is in part related to DNA damage complexity and/or spatial distribution of the damage sites, which may lead to small DNA fragments. With particle radiation it is also important to consider not only delta-rays which may cause clustered damaged sites and may be highly mutagenic but the non-random spatial distribution of DSB which may lead to deletions. In this overview I will concentrate on the molecular aspects of the variation of the complexity of DNA damage on radiation quality and the challenges this complexity presents the DNA damage repair pathways. I will draw on data from micro-irradiations which indicate that the repair of DSBs by non-homologous end joining is highly regulated with pathway choice and kinetics of repair dependent on the chemical complexity of the DSB. In summary the aim is to emphasis the link between the spatial distribution of energy deposition events related to the track, the molecular products formed and the consequence of damage complexity contributing to biological effects and to present some of the outstanding molecular challenges with particle radiation.

  14. Alkaline Comet Assay for Assessing DNA Damage in Individual Cells.

    PubMed

    Pu, Xinzhu; Wang, Zemin; Klaunig, James E

    2015-08-06

    Single-cell gel electrophoresis, commonly called a comet assay, is a simple and sensitive method for assessing DNA damage at the single-cell level. It is an important technique in genetic toxicological studies. The comet assay performed under alkaline conditions (pH >13) is considered the optimal version for identifying agents with genotoxic activity. The alkaline comet assay is capable of detecting DNA double-strand breaks, single-strand breaks, alkali-labile sites, DNA-DNA/DNA-protein cross-linking, and incomplete excision repair sites. The inclusion of digestion of lesion-specific DNA repair enzymes in the procedure allows the detection of various DNA base alterations, such as oxidative base damage. This unit describes alkaline comet assay procedures for assessing DNA strand breaks and oxidative base alterations. These methods can be applied in a variety of cells from in vitro and in vivo experiments, as well as human studies.

  15. Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics for Investigating DNA Damage-Associated Protein Ubiquitylation

    PubMed Central

    Heidelberger, Jan B.; Wagner, Sebastian A.; Beli, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Modification of proteins with the 76 amino acid protein ubiquitin plays essential roles in cellular signaling. Development of methods for specific enrichment of ubiquitin remnant peptides and advances in high-resolution mass spectrometry have enabled proteome-wide identification of endogenous ubiquitylation sites. Moreover, ubiquitin remnant profiling has emerged as a powerful approach for investigating changes in protein ubiquitylation in response to cellular perturbations, such as DNA damage, as well as for identification of substrates of ubiquitin-modifying enzymes. Despite these advances, interrogation of ubiquitin chain topologies on substrate proteins remains a challenging task. Here, we describe mass spectrometry-based approaches for quantitative analyses of site-specific protein ubiquitylation and highlight recent studies that employed these methods for investigation of ubiquitylation in the context of the cellular DNA damage response. Furthermore, we provide an overview of experimental strategies for probing ubiquitin chain topologies on proteins and discuss how these methods can be applied to analyze functions of ubiquitylation in the DNA damage response. PMID:27379159

  16. Inducible repair of oxidative DNA damage in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Demple, B; Halbrook, J

    Hydrogen peroxide is lethal to many cell types, including the bacterium Escherichia coli. Peroxides yield transient radical species that can damage DNA and cause mutations. Such partially reduced oxygen species are occasionally released during cellular respiration and are generated by lethal and mutagenic ionizing radiation. Because cells live in an environment where the threat of oxidative DNA damage is continual, cellular mechanisms may have evolved to avoid and repair this damage. Enzymes are known which evidently perform these functions. We report here that resistance to hydrogen peroxide toxicity can be induced in E. coli, that this novel induction is specific and occurs, in part, at the level of DNA repair.

  17. Superoxide and the production of oxidative DNA damage.

    PubMed Central

    Keyer, K; Gort, A S; Imlay, J A

    1995-01-01

    The conventional model of oxidative DNA damage posits a role for superoxide (O2-) as a reductant for iron, which subsequently generates a hydroxyl radical by transferring the electron to H2O2. The hydroxyl radical then attacks DNA. Indeed, mutants of Escherichia coli that lack superoxide dismutase (SOD) were 10-fold more vulnerable to DNA oxidation by H2O2 than were wild-type cells. Even the pace of DNA damage by endogenous oxidants was great enough that the SOD mutants could not tolerate air if enzymes that repair oxidative DNA lesions were inactive. However, DNA oxidation proceeds in SOD-proficient cells without the involvement of O2-, as evidenced by the failure of SOD overproduction or anaerobiosis to suppress damage by H2O2. Furthermore, the mechanism by which excess O2- causes damage was called into question when the hypersensitivity of SOD mutants to DNA damage persisted for at least 20 min after O2- had been dispelled through the imposition of anaerobiosis. That behavior contradicted the standard model, which requires that O2- be present to rereduce cellular iron during the period of exposure to H2O2. Evidently, DNA oxidation is driven by a reductant other than O2-, which leaves the mechanism of damage promotion by O2- unsettled. One possibility is that, through its well-established ability to leach iron from iron-sulfur clusters, O2- increases the amount of free iron that is available to catalyze hydroxyl radical production. Experiments with iron transport mutants confirmed that increases in free-iron concentration have the effect of accelerating DNA oxidation. Thus, O2- may be genotoxic only in doses that exceed those found in SOD-proficient cells, and in those limited circumstances it may promote DNA damage by increasing the amount of DNA-bound iron. PMID:7592468

  18. A fluorescence enhancement assay for cellular DNA damage. [X Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kanter, P.M.; Schwartz, H.S.

    1982-07-01

    A fluorescence procedure is described for quantitative measurement of DNA damage in mammalian cells. The technique is based upon the time-dependent partial alkaline unwinding of cellular DNA followed by determination of duplex:total DNA ratios with bisbenzamide, which has a differential molar fluorescence with single-stranded and duplex DNA. The method is rapid, does not require radioactive labeling of DNA, and is sufficiently sensitive to detect damage induced with 100 rads of X-irradiation. This method is standardized with respect to the alkaline unwinding unit, Mn0, and the unwinding constant, beta. Results obtained with this new technique and with hydroxylapatite chromatography for physical separation of single- and double-stranded DNA were confirmatory. The utility of the technique was demonstrated by detection of dose-related damage with X-irradiation and a variety of antineoplastic agents in unlabeled murine leukemia cells.

  19. Radiation-induced DNA damage and chromatin structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rydberg, B.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    DNA lesions induced by ionizing radiation in cells are clustered and not randomly distributed. For low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation this clustering occurs mainly on the small scales of DNA molecules and nucleosomes. For example, experimental evidence suggests that both strands of DNA on the nucleosomal surface can be damaged in single events and that this damage occurs with a 10-bp modulation because of protection by histones. For high LET radiation, clustering also occurs on a larger scale and depends on chromatin organization. A particularly significant clustering occurs when an ionizing particle traverses the 30 nm chromatin fiber with generation of heavily damaged DNA regions with an average size of about 2 kbp. On an even larger scale, high LET radiation can produce several DNA double-strand breaks in closer proximity than expected from randomness. It is suggested that this increases the probability of misrejoining of DNA ends and generation of lethal chromosome aberrations.

  20. Oxidatively induced DNA damage and its repair in cancer.

    PubMed

    Dizdaroglu, Miral

    2015-01-01

    Oxidatively induced DNA damage is caused in living organisms by endogenous and exogenous reactive species. DNA lesions resulting from this type of damage are mutagenic and cytotoxic and, if not repaired, can cause genetic instability that may lead to disease processes including carcinogenesis. Living organisms possess DNA repair mechanisms that include a variety of pathways to repair multiple DNA lesions. Mutations and polymorphisms also occur in DNA repair genes adversely affecting DNA repair systems. Cancer tissues overexpress DNA repair proteins and thus develop greater DNA repair capacity than normal tissues. Increased DNA repair in tumors that removes DNA lesions before they become toxic is a major mechanism for development of resistance to therapy, affecting patient survival. Accumulated evidence suggests that DNA repair capacity may be a predictive biomarker for patient response to therapy. Thus, knowledge of DNA protein expressions in normal and cancerous tissues may help predict and guide development of treatments and yield the best therapeutic response. DNA repair proteins constitute targets for inhibitors to overcome the resistance of tumors to therapy. Inhibitors of DNA repair for combination therapy or as single agents for monotherapy may help selectively kill tumors, potentially leading to personalized therapy. Numerous inhibitors have been developed and are being tested in clinical trials. The efficacy of some inhibitors in therapy has been demonstrated in patients. Further development of inhibitors of DNA repair proteins is globally underway to help eradicate cancer.

  1. Global chromatin fibre compaction in response to DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, Charlotte; Hayward, Richard L.; Gilbert, Nick

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Robust KAP1 phosphorylation in response to DNA damage in HCT116 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA repair foci are found in soluble chromatin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biophysical analysis reveals global chromatin fibre compaction after DNA damage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA damage is accompanied by rapid linker histone dephosphorylation. -- Abstract: DNA is protected by packaging it into higher order chromatin fibres, but this can impede nuclear processes like DNA repair. Despite considerable research into the factors required for signalling and repairing DNA damage, it is unclear if there are concomitant changes in global chromatin fibre structure. In human cells DNA double strand break (DSB) formation triggers a signalling cascade resulting in H2AX phosphorylation ({gamma}H2AX), the rapid recruitment of chromatin associated proteins and the subsequent repair of damaged sites. KAP1 is a transcriptional corepressor and in HCT116 cells we found that after DSB formation by chemicals or ionising radiation there was a wave of, predominantly ATM dependent, KAP1 phosphorylation. Both KAP1 and phosphorylated KAP1 were readily extracted from cells indicating they do not have a structural role and {gamma}H2AX was extracted in soluble chromatin indicating that sites of damage are not attached to an underlying structural matrix. After DSB formation we did not find a concomitant change in the sensitivity of chromatin fibres to micrococcal nuclease digestion. Therefore to directly investigate higher order chromatin fibre structures we used a biophysical sedimentation technique based on sucrose gradient centrifugation to compare the conformation of chromatin fibres isolated from cells before and after DNA DSB formation. After damage we found global chromatin fibre compaction, accompanied by rapid linker histone dephosphorylation, consistent with fibres being more regularly folded or fibre deformation being stabilized by

  2. Bayesian estimation of sequence damage in ancient DNA.

    PubMed

    Ho, Simon Y W; Heupink, Tim H; Rambaut, Andrew; Shapiro, Beth

    2007-06-01

    DNA extracted from archaeological and paleontological remains is usually damaged by biochemical processes postmortem. Some of these processes lead to changes in the structure of the DNA molecule, which can result in the incorporation of incorrect nucleotides during polymerase chain reaction. These base misincorporations, or miscoding lesions, can lead to the inclusion of spurious additional mutations in ancient DNA (aDNA) data sets. This has the potential to affect the outcome of phylogenetic and population genetic analyses, including estimates of mutation rates and genetic diversity. We present a novel model, termed the delta model, which estimates the amount of damage in DNA data and accounts for its effects in a Bayesian phylogenetic framework. The ability of the delta model to estimate damage is first investigated using a simulation study. The model is then applied to 13 aDNA data sets. The amount of damage in these data sets is shown to be significant but low (about 1 damaged base per 750 nt), suggesting that precautions for limiting the influence of damaged sites, such as cloning and enzymatic treatment, are worthwhile. The results also suggest that relatively high rates of mutation previously estimated from aDNA data are not entirely an artifact of sequence damage and are likely to be due to other factors such as the persistence of transient polymorphisms. The delta model appears to be particularly useful for placing upper credibility limits on the amount of sequence damage in an alignment, and this capacity might be beneficial for future aDNA studies or for the estimation of sequencing errors in modern DNA.

  3. DNA damage in cancer therapeutics: a boon or a curse?

    PubMed

    Khanna, Anchit

    2015-06-01

    Millions of DNA-damaging lesions occur every day in each cell of our bodies due to various stresses. The failure to detect and accurately repair these lesions can give rise to cells with high levels of endogenous DNA damage, deleterious mutations, or genomic aberrations. Such genomic instability can lead to the activation of specific signaling pathways, including the DNA damage response (DDR) pathway. Constitutive activation of DDR proteins has been observed in human tumor specimens from different cancer stages, including precancerous and metastatic cancers, although not in normal tissues. The tumor-suppressive role of DDR activity during the premalignant stage has been studied, and strong evidence is emerging for an oncogenic role for DDR proteins such as DNA-PK and CHK1 during the later stages of tumor development. However, the majority of current cancer therapies induce DNA damage, potentially exacerbating protumorigenic genomic instability and enabling the development of resistance. Therefore, elucidating the molecular basis of DNA damage-mediated genomic instability and its role in tumorigenesis is critical. Finally, I discuss the potential existence of distinct DNA damage thresholds at various stages of tumorigenesis and what the ramifications of such thresholds would be, including the ambiguous role of the DDR pathway in human cancers, therapy-induced malignancies, and enhanced therapies.

  4. Commentary: Mitochondrial DNA damage and loss in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Gilkerson, Robert

    2016-10-01

    This commentary discusses damage and loss of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in type 2 diabetes mellitus from both the clinical and experimental perspectives. Increasingly, an array of studies in experimental models and patients suggests that the cellular stresses of insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes damage mtDNA, leading to loss of mitochondrial genetic content. As such, mtDNA is emerging as both a valuable monitoring tool and translational preventive target for metabolic disease. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Damage-specific DNA-binding proteins from human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kanjilal, S.

    1992-01-01

    The primary objective of the study was to detect and characterize factors from human cells that bind DNA damaged by ultraviolet radiation. An application of the gel-shift assay was devised in which a DNA probe was UV-irradiated and compared with non-irradiated probe DNA for the ability to bind to such factors in cell extracts. UV-dose dependent binding proteins were identified. Formation of the DNA-protein complexes was independent of the specific sequence, form or source of the DNA. There was a marked preference for lesions on double stranded DNA over those on single stranded DNA. DNA irradiated with gamma rays did not compete with UV-irradiated DNA for the binding activities. Cell lines from patients with genetic diseases associated with disorders of the DNA repair system were screened for the presence of damaged-DNA-binding activities. Simultaneous occurrence of the clinical symptoms of some of these diseases had been previously documented and possible links between the syndromes proposed. However, supporting biochemical or molecular evidence for such associations were lacking. The data from the present investigations indicate that some cases of Xeroderma Pigmentosum group A, Cockayne's Syndrome, Bloom's Syndrome and Ataxia Telangiectasia, all of which exhibit sensitivity to UV or gamma radiation, share an aberrant damaged-DNA-binding factor. These findings support the hypothesis that some of the repair disorder diseases are closely related and may have arisen from a common defect. Partial purification of the binding activities from HeLa cells was achieved. Size-exclusion chromatography resolved the activities into various peaks, one of which was less damage-specific than the others as determined by competition studies using native or UV-irradiated DNA. Some of the activities were further separated by ion-exchange chromatography. On using affinity chromatography methods, the major damage-binding factor could be eluted in the presence of 2 M KCl and 1% NP-40.

  6. Electrochemical study of DNA damaged by oxidation stress.

    PubMed

    Zitka, Ondrej; Krizkova, Sona; Skalickova, Sylvie; Kopel, Pavel; Babula, Petr; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2013-02-01

    Many compounds can interact with DNA leading to changes of DNA structure as point mutation and bases excision, which could trigger some metabolic failures, which leads to the changes in DNA structure resulting in cancer. Oxidation of nucleic acid bases belongs to the one of the mostly occurred type of DNA damaging leading to the above mentioned phenomena. The investigation of processes of DNA oxidation damage is topical and electrochemical methods include a versatile and sensitive tool for these purposes. 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) is the most widely accepted marker of DNA damage. Oxidative damage to DNA by free radicals and exposure to ionizing radiation generate several other products within the double helix besides mentioned oxidation products of nucleic acid bases. The basic electrochemical behaviour of nucleic acids bases on various types of carbon electrodes is reviewed. Further, we address our attention on description of oxidation mechanisms and on detection of the most important products of nucleic bases oxidation. The miniaturization of detector coupled with some microfluidic devices is suggested and discussed. The main aim of this review is to report the advantages and features of the electrochemical detection of guanine oxidation product as 8-OHdG and other similarly produced molecules as markers for DNA damage.

  7. Homologous recombination maintenance of genome integrity during DNA damage tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Prado, Félix

    2014-01-01

    The DNA strand exchange protein Rad51 provides a safe mechanism for the repair of DNA breaks using the information of a homologous DNA template. Homologous recombination (HR) also plays a key role in the response to DNA damage that impairs the advance of the replication forks by providing mechanisms to circumvent the lesion and fill in the tracks of single-stranded DNA that are generated during the process of lesion bypass. These activities postpone repair of the blocking lesion to ensure that DNA replication is completed in a timely manner. Experimental evidence generated over the last few years indicates that HR participates in this DNA damage tolerance response together with additional error-free (template switch) and error-prone (translesion synthesis) mechanisms through intricate connections, which are presented here. The choice between repair and tolerance, and the mechanism of tolerance, is critical to avoid increased mutagenesis and/or genome rearrangements, which are both hallmarks of cancer. PMID:27308329

  8. Carbamate insecticide methomyl confers cytotoxicity through DNA damage induction.

    PubMed

    Guanggang, Xiang; Diqiu, Li; Jianzhong, Yuan; Jingmin, Guan; Huifeng, Zhai; Mingan, Shi; Liming, Tao

    2013-03-01

    Carbamate insecticide methomyl could induce genotoxic effects, including micronuclei, chromosome aberrations and sister-chromatid exchanges. However, methomyl induction of cytotoxicity through DNA damage is largely unknown. Here we identify cytotoxicity and potential genotoxicity of methomyl in vitro. We have employed alkaline comet assay, γH2AX foci formation and DNA ladder assay to detected DNA damage and apoptosis of Drosophila S2, HeLa and HEK293 cells. The alkaline comet assay was used to evaluate total DNA single strand breaks (SSBs) in the target cells exposed in vitro to sublethal concentrations of methomyl. As expected, methomyl induced significant concentration-dependent increases in DNA damage of target cells compared with the negative control, as measured by increases in tail length (μm), tail DNA (percentage of the comet tail) and tail moment (arbitrary units). In agreement with the comet assay data, the percentage of γH2AX positive reaction in HeLa cells also revealed methomyl caused DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in a time-dependent manner. Moreover, methomyl induced a significant increase of apoptosis in Drosophila S2, HeLa and HEK293 cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, as determined by Urea PAGE DNA fragmentation analysis. In conclusion, methomyl is a strongly genotoxic agent that induces cell DNA damage and apoptosis in vitro at these sublethal concentrations.

  9. Novel Ser/Thr Protein Phosphatase 5 (PP5) Regulated Targets during DNA Damage Identified by Proteomics Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ham, Bryan M.; Jayachandran, Hemalatha; Yang, Feng; Jaitly, Navdeep; Polpitiya, Ashoka D.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Wang, Ling; Zhao, Rui; Purvine, Samuel O.; Livesay, Eric A.; Camp, David G.; Rossie, Sandra S.; Smith, Richard D.

    2010-02-05

    The DNA damage response is a global phosphorylation signaling cascade process involved in sensing the damaged DNA condition and coordinating responses to cope with and repair the perturbed cellular state. We utilized a label-free liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry approach to evaluate changes in protein phosphorylation associated with PP5 activity during the DNA damage response. Biological replicate analyses of bleomycin-treated HeLa cells expressing either WT-PP5 or mutant inactive PP5 lead to the identification of six potential target proteins of PP5 action. Four of these putative targets are known to be involved in DNA damage responses. Using phospho-site specific antibodies, we confirmed that phosphorylation of one target, ribosomal protein S6, was selectively decreased in cells overexpressing catalytically inactive PP5. Our findings also suggest that PP5 may play a role in controlling translation and in regulating substrates for proline-directed kinases, such as MAP kinases and cyclin-dependent protein kinases that are involved in response to DNA damage.

  10. Mechanisms of mutagenesis: DNA replication in the presence of DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Binyan; Xue, Qizhen; Tang, Yong; Cao, Jia; Guengerich, F. Peter; Zhang, Huidong

    2017-01-01

    Environmental mutagens cause DNA damage that disturbs replication and produces mutations, leading to cancer and other diseases. We discuss mechanisms of mutagenesis resulting from DNA damage, from the level of DNA replication by a single polymerase to the complex DNA replisome of some typical model organisms (including bacteriophage T7, T4, Sulfolobus solfataricus, E. coli, yeast and human). For a single DNA polymerase, DNA damage can affect replication in three major ways: reducing replication fidelity, causing frameshift mutations, and blocking replication. For the DNA replisome, protein interactions and the functions of accessory proteins can yield rather different results even with a single DNA polymerase. The mechanism of mutation during replication performed by the DNA replisome is a long-standing question. Using new methods and techniques, the replisomes of certain organisms and human cell extracts can now be investigated with regard to the bypass of DNA damage. In this review, we consider the molecular mechanism of mutagenesis resulting from DNA damage in replication at the levels of single DNA polymerases and complex DNA replisomes, including translesion DNA synthesis. PMID:27234563

  11. Oxidative DNA damage and repair in teratogenesis and neurodevelopmental deficits.

    PubMed

    Wells, Peter G; McCallum, Gordon P; Lam, Kyla C H; Henderson, Jeffrey T; Ondovcik, Stephanie L

    2010-06-01

    Several teratogenic agents, including ionizing radiation and xenobiotics such as phenytoin, benzo[a]pyrene, thalidomide, and methamphetamine, can initiate the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that oxidatively damage cellular macromolecules including DNA. Oxidative DNA damage, and particularly the most prevalent 8-oxoguanine lesion, may adversely affect development, likely via alterations in gene transcription rather than via a mutational mechanism. Contributions from oxidative DNA damage do not exclude roles for alternative mechanisms of initiation like receptor-mediated processes or the formation of covalent xenobiotic-macromolecular adducts, damage to other macromolecular targets like proteins and lipids, and other effects of ROS like altered signal transduction. Even in the absence of teratogen exposure, endogenous developmental oxidative stress can have embryopathic consequences in the absence of key pathways for detoxifying ROS or repairing DNA damage. Critical proteins in pathways for DNA damage detection/repair signaling, like p53 and ataxia telangiectasia mutated, and DNA repair itself, like oxoguanine glycosylase 1 and Cockayne syndrome B, can often, but not always, protect the embryo from ROS-initiating teratogens. Protection may be variably dependent upon such factors as the nature of the teratogen and its concentration within the embryo, the stage of development, the species, strain, gender, target tissue and cell type, among other factors.

  12. The nucleosome: orchestrating DNA damage signaling and repair within chromatin.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Poonam; Miller, Kyle M

    2016-10-01

    DNA damage occurs within the chromatin environment, which ultimately participates in regulating DNA damage response (DDR) pathways and repair of the lesion. DNA damage activates a cascade of signaling events that extensively modulates chromatin structure and organization to coordinate DDR factor recruitment to the break and repair, whilst also promoting the maintenance of normal chromatin functions within the damaged region. For example, DDR pathways must avoid conflicts between other DNA-based processes that function within the context of chromatin, including transcription and replication. The molecular mechanisms governing the recognition, target specificity, and recruitment of DDR factors and enzymes to the fundamental repeating unit of chromatin, i.e., the nucleosome, are poorly understood. Here we present our current view of how chromatin recognition by DDR factors is achieved at the level of the nucleosome. Emerging evidence suggests that the nucleosome surface, including the nucleosome acidic patch, promotes the binding and activity of several DNA damage factors on chromatin. Thus, in addition to interactions with damaged DNA and histone modifications, nucleosome recognition by DDR factors plays a key role in orchestrating the requisite chromatin response to maintain both genome and epigenome integrity.

  13. The Cartography of UV-induced DNA Damage Formation and DNA Repair.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jinchuan; Adar, Sheera

    2017-01-01

    DNA damage presents a barrier to DNA-templated biochemical processes, including gene expression and faithful DNA replication. Compromised DNA repair leads to mutations, enhancing the risk for genetic diseases and cancer development. Conventional experimental approaches to study DNA damage required a researcher to choose between measuring bulk damage over the entire genome, with little or no resolution regarding a specific location, and obtaining data specific to a locus of interest, without a global perspective. Recent advances in high-throughput genomic tools overcame these limitations and provide high-resolution measurements simultaneously across the genome. In this review, we discuss the available methods for measuring DNA damage and their repair, focusing on genomewide assays for pyrimidine photodimers, the major types of damage induced by ultraviolet irradiation. These new genomic assays will be a powerful tool in identifying key components of genome stability and carcinogenesis.

  14. Single-molecule visualization of ROS-induced DNA damage in large DNA molecules.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinyong; Kim, Yongkyun; Lim, Sangyong; Jo, Kyubong

    2016-02-07

    We present a single molecule visualization approach for the quantitative analysis of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced DNA damage, such as base oxidation and single stranded breaks in large DNA molecules. We utilized the Fenton reaction to generate DNA damage with subsequent enzymatic treatment using a mixture of three types of glycosylases to remove oxidized bases, and then fluorescent labeling on damaged lesions via nick translation. This single molecule analytical platform provided the capability to count one or two damaged sites per λ DNA molecule (48.5 kb), which were reliably dependent on the concentrations of hydrogen peroxide and ferrous ion at the micromolar level. More importantly, the labeled damaged sites that were visualized under a microscope provided positional information, which offered the capability of comparing DNA damaged sites with the in silico genomic map to reveal sequence specificity that GTGR is more sensitive to oxidative damage. Consequently, single DNA molecule analysis provides a sensitive analytical platform for ROS-induced DNA damage and suggests an interesting biochemical insight that the genome primarily active during the lysogenic cycle may have less probability for oxidative DNA damage.

  15. DNA damage in mouse lymphocytes exposed to curcumin and copper.

    PubMed

    Urbina-Cano, Patricia; Bobadilla-Morales, Lucina; Ramírez-Herrera, Mario A; Corona-Rivera, Jorge R; Mendoza-Magaña, Maria L; Troyo-Sanromán, Rogelio; Corona-Rivera, Alfredo

    2006-01-01

    Dietary polyphenolics, such as curcumin, have shown antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. Some antioxidants cause DNA strand breaks in excess of transition metal ions, such as copper. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro effect of curcumin in the presence of increasing concentrations of copper to induce DNA damage in murine leukocytes by the comet assay. Balb-C mouse lymphocytes were exposed to 50 microM curcumin and various concentrations of copper (10 microM, 100 microM and 200 microM). Cellular DNA damage was detected by means of the alkaline comet assay. Our results show that 50 microM curcumin in the presence of 100-200 microM copper induced DNA damage in murine lymphocytes. Curcumin did not inhibit the oxidative DNA damage caused by 50 microM H2O2 in mouse lymphocytes. Moreover, 50 microM curcumin alone was capable of inducing DNA strand breaks under the tested conditions. The increased DNA damage by 50 mM curcumin was observed in the presence of various concentrations of copper, as detected by the alkaline comet assay.

  16. MECHANISTIC AND BIOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF HELICASE ACTION ON DAMAGED DNA

    PubMed Central

    Suhasini, Avvaru N.; Brosh, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    Helicases catalytically unwind structured nucleic acids in a nucleoside-triphosphate-dependent and directionally specific manner, and are essential for virtually all aspects of nucleic acid metabolism. ATPase-driven helicases which translocate along nucleic acids play a role in damage recognition or unwinding of a DNA tract containing the lesion. Although classical biochemical experiments provided evidence that bulky covalent adducts inhibit DNA unwinding catalyzed by certain DNA helicases in a strand-specific manner (i.e. , block to DNA unwinding restricted to adduct residence in the strand the helicase translocates), recent studies suggest more complex arrangements that may depend on the helicase under study, its assembly in a protein complex, and the type of structural DNA perturbation. Moreover, base and sugar phosphate backbone modifications exert effects on DNA helicases that suggest specialized tracking mechanisms. As a component of the replication stress response, the single-stranded DNA binding protein Replication Protein A (RPA) may serve to enable eukaryotic DNA helicases to overcome certain base lesions. Helicases play important roles in DNA damage signaling which also involve their partnership with RPA. In this review, we will discuss our current understanding of mechanistic and biological aspects of helicase action on damaged DNA. PMID:20574162

  17. Site-specific nicking within the adenovirus inverted terminal repetition.

    PubMed Central

    Chow, K C; Pearson, G D

    1984-01-01

    Site-specific nicking occurs on the l-strand, but not on the r-strand, of the adenovirus left inverted terminal repeat. Nicks are presumably introduced into double- or single-stranded DNA by a cellular endonuclease in an ATP-independent reaction. The consensus nick site has the sequence: (sequence in text). Images PMID:6322107

  18. Insight into the ERVK Integrase – Propensity for DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Bray, Samantha; Turnbull, Matthew; Hebert, Sherry; Douville, Renée N.

    2016-01-01

    Retroviruses create permanently integrated proviruses that exist in the host genome. Retroviral genomes encode for functionally conserved gag, pro, pol, and env regions, as well as integrase (IN), which is required for retroviral integration. IN mediates viral genome insertion through 3′ end processing of the viral DNA and the strand transfer reaction. This process requires the formation of a pre-integration complex, comprised of IN, viral DNA, and cellular proteins. Viral insertion causes DNA damage, leading to the requirement of host DNA repair mechanisms. Therefore, a failure of DNA repair pathways may result in genomic instability and potentially cause host cell death. Considering the numerous human diseases associated with genomic instability, the endogenous retrovirus-K (ERVK) IN should be considered as a putative contributor to DNA damage in human cells. Future research and drug discovery should focus on ERVK IN activity and its role in human conditions, such as neurological disease and cancers. PMID:27990140

  19. T7 replisome directly overcomes DNA damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Bo; Pandey, Manjula; Inman, James T.; Yang, Yi; Kashlev, Mikhail; Patel, Smita S.; Wang, Michelle D.

    2015-12-01

    Cells and viruses possess several known `restart' pathways to overcome lesions during DNA replication. However, these `bypass' pathways leave a gap in replicated DNA or require recruitment of accessory proteins, resulting in significant delays to fork movement or even cell division arrest. Using single-molecule and ensemble methods, we demonstrate that the bacteriophage T7 replisome is able to directly replicate through a leading-strand cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) lesion. We show that when a replisome encounters the lesion, a substantial fraction of DNA polymerase (DNAP) and helicase stay together at the lesion, the replisome does not dissociate and the helicase does not move forward on its own. The DNAP is able to directly replicate through the lesion by working in conjunction with helicase through specific helicase-DNAP interactions. These observations suggest that the T7 replisome is fundamentally permissive of DNA lesions via pathways that do not require fork adjustment or replisome reassembly.

  20. DNA damage response to the Mdm2 inhibitor Nutlin-3

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Rajeev; Rigatti, Marc J.; Belinsky, Glenn S.; Godman, Cassandra A.; Giardina, Charles

    2009-01-01

    Mdm2 inhibitors represent a promising class of p53 activating compounds that may be useful in cancer treatment and prevention. However, the consequences of pharmacological p53 activation are not entirely clear. We observed that Nutlin-3 triggered a DNA damage response in azoxymethane-induced mouse AJ02-NM0 colon cancer cells, characterized by the phosphorylation of H2AX (at Ser-139) and p53 (at Ser-15). The DNA damage response was highest in cells showing robust p53 stabilization, it could be triggered by the active but not the inactive Nutlin-3 enantiomer, and it was also activated by another pharmacological Mdm2 inhibitor (Caylin). Quantification of γH2AX-positive cells following Nutlin-3 exposure showed that approximately 17% of cells in late S and G2/M were mounting a DNA damage response (compared to a ~50% response to 5-fluorouracil). Nutlin-3 treatment caused the formation of double strand DNA strand breaks, promoted the formation of micronuclei, accentuated strand breakage induced by doxorubicin and sensitized the mouse colon cancer cells to DNA break-inducing topoisomerase II inhibitors. Although the HCT116 colon cancer cells did not mount a significant DNA damage response following Nutlin-3 treatment, Nutlin-3 enhanced the DNA damage response to the nucleotide synthesis inhibitor hydroxyurea in a p53-dependent manner. Finally, p21 deletion also sensitized HCT116 cells to the Nutlin-3-induced DNA damage response, suggesting that cell cycle checkpoint abnormalities may promote this response. We propose that p53 activation by Mdm2 inhibitors can result in the slowing of double stranded DNA repair. Although this effect may suppress illegitimate homologous recombination repair, it may also increase the risk of clastogenic events. PMID:19788889

  1. Marker-free site-specific gene integration in plants.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Vibha; Ow, David W

    2004-12-01

    For nearly 15 years, the use of site-specific recombination systems in plants has focused on the deletion or integration of DNA. Each of these applications offers practical solutions to two problems in biotechnology: the presence of unneeded DNA in the transgene locus and variation in the locus structure among independent transgenic lines. Given that each of these separate applications is becoming more practical for commercial use, it is time to consider combining them into an integrated technology. Here we propose a strategy for a "combined step" method that makes use of two site-specific recombination systems: one for integrating the DNA and a second for removing sequences that are not needed after DNA transfer. This strategy is based on published data and exemplifies the use of the Cre-lox, FLP-FRT and R-RS inducible systems.

  2. DNA damage in dihydroartemisinin-resistant Molt-4 cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Jungsoo; Lai, Henry C; Sasaki, Tomikazu; Singh, Narendra P

    2015-03-01

    Artemisinin generates carbon-based free radicals when it reacts with iron, and induces molecular damage and apoptosis. Its toxicity is more selective toward cancer cells because cancer cells contain a higher level of intracellular free iron. Dihydroartemisinin (DHA), an analog of artemisinin, has selective cytotoxicity toward Molt-4 human lymphoblastoid cells. A major concern is whether cancer cells could develop resistance to DHA, thus limiting its therapeutic efficacy. We have developed a DHA-resistant Molt-4 cell line (RTN) and found out that these cells exhibited resistance to DHA but no significant cross- resistance to artemisinin-tagged holotransferrin (ART-TF), a synthetic artemisinin compound. In the present study, we investigated DNA damage induced by DHA and ART-TF in both Molt-4 and RTN cells using the comet assay. RTN cells exhibited a significantly lower level of basal and X-ray-induced DNA damage compared to Molt-4 cells. Both DHA and ART-TF induced DNA damage in Molt-4 cells, whereas DNA damage was induced in RTN cells by ART-TF, and not DHA. The result of this study shows that by the cell selection method, it is possible to generate a Molt-4 cell line which is not sensitive to DHA, but sensitive to ART-TF, as measured by DNA damage.

  3. DICER, DROSHA and DNA damage response RNAs are necessary for the secondary recruitment of DNA damage response factors.

    PubMed

    Francia, Sofia; Cabrini, Matteo; Matti, Valentina; Oldani, Amanda; d'Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio

    2016-04-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) plays a central role in preserving genome integrity. Recently, we reported that the endoribonucleases DICER and DROSHA contribute to DDR activation by generating small non-coding RNAs, termed DNA damage response RNA (DDRNA), carrying the sequence of the damaged locus. It is presently unclear whether DDRNAs act by promoting the primary recognition of DNA lesions or the secondary recruitment of DDR factors into cytologically detectable foci and consequent signal amplification. Here, we demonstrate that DICER and DROSHA are dispensable for primary recruitment of the DDR sensor NBS1 to DNA damage sites. Instead, the accumulation of the DDR mediators MDC1 and 53BP1 (also known as TP53BP1), markers of secondary recruitment, is reduced in DICER- or DROSHA-inactivated cells. In addition, NBS1 (also known as NBN) primary recruitment is resistant to RNA degradation, consistent with the notion that RNA is dispensable for primary recognition of DNA lesions. We propose that DICER, DROSHA and DDRNAs act in the response to DNA damage after primary recognition of DNA lesions and, together with γH2AX, are essential for enabling the secondary recruitment of DDR factors and fuel the amplification of DDR signaling.

  4. Activation of DNA damage response signaling by condensed chromatin.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Rebecca C; Burman, Bharat; Kruhlak, Michael J; Misteli, Tom

    2014-12-11

    The DNA damage response (DDR) occurs in the context of chromatin, and architectural features of chromatin have been implicated in DNA damage signaling and repair. Whereas a role of chromatin decondensation in the DDR is well established, we show here that chromatin condensation is integral to DDR signaling. We find that, in response to DNA damage chromatin regions transiently expand before undergoing extensive compaction. Using a protein-chromatin-tethering system to create defined chromatin domains, we show that interference with chromatin condensation results in failure to fully activate DDR. Conversely, forced induction of local chromatin condensation promotes ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)- and ATR-dependent activation of upstream DDR signaling in a break-independent manner. Whereas persistent chromatin compaction enhanced upstream DDR signaling from irradiation-induced breaks, it reduced recovery and survival after damage. Our results demonstrate that chromatin condensation is sufficient for activation of DDR signaling and is an integral part of physiological DDR signaling.

  5. Bacterial natural transformation by highly fragmented and damaged DNA.

    PubMed

    Overballe-Petersen, Søren; Harms, Klaus; Orlando, Ludovic A A; Mayar, J Victor Moreno; Rasmussen, Simon; Dahl, Tais W; Rosing, Minik T; Poole, Anthony M; Sicheritz-Ponten, Thomas; Brunak, Søren; Inselmann, Sabrina; de Vries, Johann; Wackernagel, Wilfried; Pybus, Oliver G; Nielsen, Rasmus; Johnsen, Pål Jarle; Nielsen, Kaare Magne; Willerslev, Eske

    2013-12-03

    DNA molecules are continuously released through decomposition of organic matter and are ubiquitous in most environments. Such DNA becomes fragmented and damaged (often <100 bp) and may persist in the environment for more than half a million years. Fragmented DNA is recognized as nutrient source for microbes, but not as potential substrate for bacterial evolution. Here, we show that fragmented DNA molecules (≥ 20 bp) that additionally may contain abasic sites, cross-links, or miscoding lesions are acquired by the environmental bacterium Acinetobacter baylyi through natural transformation. With uptake of DNA from a 43,000-y-old woolly mammoth bone, we further demonstrate that such natural transformation events include ancient DNA molecules. We find that the DNA recombination is RecA recombinase independent and is directly linked to DNA replication. We show that the adjacent nucleotide variations generated by uptake of short DNA fragments escape mismatch repair. Moreover, double-nucleotide polymorphisms appear more common among genomes of transformable than nontransformable bacteria. Our findings reveal that short and damaged, including truly ancient, DNA molecules, which are present in large quantities in the environment, can be acquired by bacteria through natural transformation. Our findings open for the possibility that natural genetic exchange can occur with DNA up to several hundreds of thousands years old.

  6. Investigating DNA Radiation Damage Using X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Czapla-Masztafiak, Joanna; Szlachetko, Jakub; Milne, Christopher J.; Lipiec, Ewelina; Sá, Jacinto; Penfold, Thomas J.; Huthwelker, Thomas; Borca, Camelia; Abela, Rafael; Kwiatek, Wojciech M.

    2016-01-01

    The biological influence of radiation on living matter has been studied for years; however, several questions about the detailed mechanism of radiation damage formation remain largely unanswered. Among all biomolecules exposed to radiation, DNA plays an important role because any damage to its molecular structure can affect the whole cell and may lead to chromosomal rearrangements resulting in genomic instability or cell death. To identify and characterize damage induced in the DNA sugar-phosphate backbone, in this work we performed x-ray absorption spectroscopy at the P K-edge on DNA irradiated with either UVA light or protons. By combining the experimental results with theoretical calculations, we were able to establish the types and relative ratio of lesions produced by both UVA and protons around the phosphorus atoms in DNA. PMID:27028640

  7. Oxidative DNA Damage in Blood of CVD Patients Taking Detralex

    PubMed Central

    Krzyściak, Wirginia; Cierniak, Agnieszka; Kózka, Mariusz; Kozieł, Joanna

    2011-01-01

    The main goal of the work reported here was to determine the degree of oxidative/alkali-labile DNA damages in peripheral blood as well as in the blood stasis from varicose vein of (chronic venous disorder) CVD patients. Moreover, determination of the impact of Detralex usage on the level of (oxidative) DNA damages in CVD patients was evaluated as well. The degree of oxidative DNA damages was studied in a group consisted of thirty patients with diagnosed chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) in the 2nd and 3rd degree, according to clinical state, etiology, anatomy and pathophysiology (CEAP), and qualified to surgical procedure. The control group consisted of normal volunteers (blood donors) qualified during standard examinations at Regional Centers of Blood Donation and Blood Therapy. The comet assay was used for determination of DNA damages. Analyses of the obtained results showed increase in the level of oxidative/alkali-labile DNA damages in lymphocytes originating from antebrachial blood of CVD patients as compared to the control group (Control) (p < 0.002; ANOVA). In addition, it was demonstrated that the usage of Detralex® resulted in decrease of the level of oxidative/alkali-labile DNA damages in CVD patients as compared to patients without Detralex® treatment (p < 0.001; ANOVA). Based on findings from the study, it may be hypothesized about occurrence of significant oxidative DNA damages as the consequence of strong oxidative stress in CVD. In addition, antioxidative effectiveness of Detralexu® was observed at the recommended dose, one tablet twice daily. PMID:21912579

  8. APOBEC3A damages the cellular genome during DNA replication

    PubMed Central

    Green, Abby M.; Landry, Sébastien; Budagyan, Konstantin; Avgousti, Daphne C.; Shalhout, Sophia; Bhagwat, Ashok S.; Weitzman, Matthew D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human APOBEC3 family of DNA-cytosine deaminases comprises 7 members (A3A-A3H) that act on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). The APOBEC3 proteins function within the innate immune system by mutating DNA of viral genomes and retroelements to restrict infection and retrotransposition. Recent evidence suggests that APOBEC3 enzymes can also cause damage to the cellular genome. Mutational patterns consistent with APOBEC3 activity have been identified by bioinformatic analysis of tumor genome sequences. These mutational signatures include clusters of base substitutions that are proposed to occur due to APOBEC3 deamination. It has been suggested that transiently exposed ssDNA segments provide substrate for APOBEC3 deamination leading to mutation signatures within the genome. However, the mechanisms that produce single-stranded substrates for APOBEC3 deamination in mammalian cells have not been demonstrated. We investigated ssDNA at replication forks as a substrate for APOBEC3 deamination. We found that APOBEC3A (A3A) expression leads to DNA damage in replicating cells but this is reduced in quiescent cells. Upon A3A expression, cycling cells activate the DNA replication checkpoint and undergo cell cycle arrest. Additionally, we find that replication stress leaves cells vulnerable to A3A-induced DNA damage. We propose a model to explain A3A-induced damage to the cellular genome in which cytosine deamination at replication forks and other ssDNA substrates results in mutations and DNA breaks. This model highlights the risk of mutagenesis by A3A expression in replicating progenitor cells, and supports the emerging hypothesis that APOBEC3 enzymes contribute to genome instability in human tumors. PMID:26918916

  9. APOBEC3A damages the cellular genome during DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Green, Abby M; Landry, Sébastien; Budagyan, Konstantin; Avgousti, Daphne C; Shalhout, Sophia; Bhagwat, Ashok S; Weitzman, Matthew D

    2016-01-01

    The human APOBEC3 family of DNA-cytosine deaminases comprises 7 members (A3A-A3H) that act on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). The APOBEC3 proteins function within the innate immune system by mutating DNA of viral genomes and retroelements to restrict infection and retrotransposition. Recent evidence suggests that APOBEC3 enzymes can also cause damage to the cellular genome. Mutational patterns consistent with APOBEC3 activity have been identified by bioinformatic analysis of tumor genome sequences. These mutational signatures include clusters of base substitutions that are proposed to occur due to APOBEC3 deamination. It has been suggested that transiently exposed ssDNA segments provide substrate for APOBEC3 deamination leading to mutation signatures within the genome. However, the mechanisms that produce single-stranded substrates for APOBEC3 deamination in mammalian cells have not been demonstrated. We investigated ssDNA at replication forks as a substrate for APOBEC3 deamination. We found that APOBEC3A (A3A) expression leads to DNA damage in replicating cells but this is reduced in quiescent cells. Upon A3A expression, cycling cells activate the DNA replication checkpoint and undergo cell cycle arrest. Additionally, we find that replication stress leaves cells vulnerable to A3A-induced DNA damage. We propose a model to explain A3A-induced damage to the cellular genome in which cytosine deamination at replication forks and other ssDNA substrates results in mutations and DNA breaks. This model highlights the risk of mutagenesis by A3A expression in replicating progenitor cells, and supports the emerging hypothesis that APOBEC3 enzymes contribute to genome instability in human tumors.

  10. Fluorescent reports for detection and measurement of DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Uziel, M.; Houck, K. )

    1993-01-01

    Epidemiological studies of real populations are complicated by the inevitable coexistence of exposure to multiple agents within the target population. An alternative method for characterizing these types of exposures is to use the reactive chemical functional group as the toxic agent identify the corresponding classes (families) of damage as markers of effects. We have begun studies to develop spectrometric reporters of DNA damage that can be measured on intact DNA. The direct measurement of adducts on microgram levels of DNA from tissue biopsy may succeed because of the high sensitivity and selectivity of different reporter compounds. While one cannot readily distinguish between recent or persistent exposures, baseline values for individuals may be constructed. For example, normal oxidative metabolism and environmental radiation create oxidation processes that continually damage DNA. These reactions create lesions that can be measured with the reporter compound FABA [N- (5- fluoresceinyl), N[prime]-(3-boronatophenyl)thioureal]. We report preliminary observations with binding FABA (selective for cis, vicdiol structures) to damage sites present on intact nonirradiated and irradiated DNA from C3H10T[sub 1/2] cells. We have observed binding of 42,000 FABA per mouse tetraploid genome (9 billion base pairs) to the putative thymidylic glycol resulting from normal oxidative processes in nonirradiated DNA. Additional binding of FABA to DNA from cells exposed to 100, 300, and 500 rad shows an exponential increase in binding sites of up to 140,000 with 500 rad exposure. This damage reporter may prove useful in characterizing levels of nonovert and overt oxidative damage to DNA.

  11. Aven-dependent activation of ATM following DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jessie Yanxiang; Yamada, Ayumi; Kajino, Taisuke; Wu, Judy Qiju; Tang, Wanli; Freel, Christopher D.; Feng, Junjie; Chau, B. Nelson; Wang, Michael Zhuo; Margolis, Seth; Yoo, Hae Yong; Wang, Xiao-Fan; Dunphy, William G.; Irusta, Pablo M.; Hardwick, J. Marie; Kornbluth, Sally

    2009-01-01

    Summary Background In response to DNA damage, cells either undergo cell cycle arrest or apoptosis, depending on the extent of damage and the cell’s capacity for DNA repair. Cell cycle arrest induced by double-stranded DNA breaks depends on activation of the ataxia-telangiectasia (ATM) protein kinase, which phosphorylates cell cycle effectors such as Chk2 and p53 to inhibit cell cycle progression. ATM is recruited to double stranded DNA breaks by a complex of sensor proteins including Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1, resulting in autophosphorylation, monomerization, and activation of ATM kinase. Results In characterizing Aven protein, a previously reported apoptotic inhibitor, we have found that Aven can function as an ATM activator to inhibit G2/M progression. Aven bound to ATM and Aven overexpression in cycling Xenopus egg extracts prevented mitotic entry and induced phosphorylation of ATM and its substrates. Immunodepletion of endogenous Aven allowed mitotic entry even in the presence of damaged DNA, and RNAi-mediated knock-down of Aven in human cells prevented autophosphorylation of ATM at an activating site (S1981) in response to DNA damage. Interestingly, Aven is also a substrate of the ATM kinase. Mutation of ATM-mediated phosphorylation sites on Aven reduced its ability to activate ATM, suggesting that Aven activation of ATM following DNA damage is enhanced by ATM-mediated Aven phosphorylation. Conclusions These results identify Aven as a new ATM activator and describe a positive feedback loop operating between Aven and ATM. In aggregate, these findings place Aven, a known apoptotic inhibitor, as a critical transducer of the DNA damage signal. PMID:18571408

  12. NBS1 and multiple regulations of DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Kenshi

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage response is finely tuned, with several pathways including those for DNA repair, chromatin remodeling and cell cycle checkpoint, although most studies to date have focused on single pathways. Genetic diseases characterized by genome instability have provided novel insights into the underlying mechanisms of DNA damage response. NBS1, a protein responsible for the radiation-sensitive autosomal recessive disorder Nijmegen breakage syndrome, is one of the first factors to accumulate at sites of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). NBS1 binds to at least five key proteins, including ATM, RPA, MRE11, RAD18 and RNF20, in the conserved regions within a limited span of the C terminus, functioning in the regulation of chromatin remodeling, cell cycle checkpoint and DNA repair in response to DSBs. In this article, we reviewed the functions of these binding proteins and their comprehensive association with NBS1. PMID:27068998

  13. Connecting the Dots: From DNA Damage and Repair to Aging

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Mei-Ren; Li, Kaiyi; Lin, Shiaw-Yih; Hung, Wen-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian cells evolve a delicate system, the DNA damage response (DDR) pathway, to monitor genomic integrity and to prevent the damage from both endogenous end exogenous insults. Emerging evidence suggests that aberrant DDR and deficient DNA repair are strongly associated with cancer and aging. Our understanding of the core program of DDR has made tremendous progress in the past two decades. However, the long list of the molecules involved in the DDR and DNA repair continues to grow and the roles of the new “dots” are under intensive investigation. Here, we review the connection between DDR and DNA repair and aging and discuss the potential mechanisms by which deficient DNA repair triggers systemic effects to promote physiological or pathological aging. PMID:27164092

  14. DNA Damage in Chronic Kidney Disease: Evaluation of Clinical Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Schupp, Nicole; Stopper, Helga; Heidland, August

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) exhibit an increased cancer risk compared to a healthy control population. To be able to estimate the cancer risk of the patients and to assess the impact of interventional therapies thereon, it is of particular interest to measure the patients' burden of genomic damage. Chromosomal abnormalities, reduced DNA repair, and DNA lesions were found indeed in cells of patients with CKD. Biomarkers for DNA damage measurable in easily accessible cells like peripheral blood lymphocytes are chromosomal aberrations, structural DNA lesions, and oxidatively modified DNA bases. In this review the most common methods quantifying the three parameters mentioned above, the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay, the comet assay, and the quantification of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine, are evaluated concerning the feasibility of the analysis and regarding the marker's potential to predict clinical outcomes. PMID:27313827

  15. Triplex technology in studies of DNA damage, DNA repair, and mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Anirban; Vasquez, Karen M

    2011-08-01

    Triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) can bind to the major groove of homopurine-homopyrimidine stretches of double-stranded DNA in a sequence-specific manner through Hoogsteen hydrogen bonding to form DNA triplexes. TFOs by themselves or conjugated to reactive molecules can be used to direct sequence-specific DNA damage, which in turn results in the induction of several DNA metabolic activities. Triplex technology is highly utilized as a tool to study gene regulation, molecular mechanisms of DNA repair, recombination, and mutagenesis. In addition, TFO targeting of specific genes has been exploited in the development of therapeutic strategies to modulate DNA structure and function. In this review, we discuss advances made in studies of DNA damage, DNA repair, recombination, and mutagenesis by using triplex technology to target specific DNA sequences.

  16. Modulation of irinotecan-induced genomic DNA damage by theanine.

    PubMed

    Attia, Sabry

    2012-05-01

    The possible chemoprotective activity of theanine against irinotecan-induced genomic DNA damage towards mouse bone marrow cells was investigated. Chromosomal aberrations, DNA damage, micronuclei formation and mitotic activity were studied in the current study as markers of genomic damage. Oxidative DNA stress markers such as 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, lipid peroxidation, reduced and oxidized glutathione levels were assessed as a possible mechanism underlying this amelioration. Theanine was neither genotoxic nor cytotoxic in mice at doses equivalent to 30 or 60 mg/kg for 12 days. Pretreatment of mice with theanine significantly reduced irinotecan-induced genomic damage in the bone marrow cells and these effects were dose dependent. Irinotecan induced marked biochemical alterations characteristic of oxidative DNA stress, including increased 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, enhanced lipid peroxidation and reduction in the reduced/oxidized glutathione ratio. Prior administration of theanine ahead of irinotecan challenge ameliorated these oxidative DNA stress markers. Overall, this study provides for the first time that theanine has a protective role in the abatement of irinotecan-induced genomic damage in the bone marrow cells of mice that resides, at least in part, on its ability to modulate the cellular antioxidant levels and consequently protect bone marrow from irinotecan genotoxicity.

  17. PARP-2 domain requirements for DNA damage-dependent activation and localization to sites of DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Riccio, Amanda A; Cingolani, Gino; Pascal, John M

    2016-02-29

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-2 (PARP-2) is one of three human PARP enzymes that are potently activated during the cellular DNA damage response (DDR). DDR-PARPs detect DNA strand breaks, leading to a dramatic increase in their catalytic production of the posttranslational modification poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) to facilitate repair. There are limited biochemical and structural insights into the functional domains of PARP-2, which has restricted our understanding of how PARP-2 is specialized toward specific repair pathways. PARP-2 has a modular architecture composed of a C-terminal catalytic domain (CAT), a central Trp-Gly-Arg (WGR) domain and an N-terminal region (NTR). Although the NTR is generally considered the key DNA-binding domain of PARP-2, we report here that all three domains of PARP-2 collectively contribute to interaction with DNA damage. Biophysical, structural and biochemical analyses indicate that the NTR is natively disordered, and is only required for activation on specific types of DNA damage. Interestingly, the NTR is not essential for PARP-2 localization to sites of DNA damage. Rather, the WGR and CAT domains function together to recruit PARP-2 to sites of DNA breaks. Our study differentiates the functions of PARP-2 domains from those of PARP-1, the other major DDR-PARP, and highlights the specialization of the multi-domain architectures of DDR-PARPs.

  18. PARP-2 domain requirements for DNA damage-dependent activation and localization to sites of DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Riccio, Amanda A.; Cingolani, Gino; Pascal, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-2 (PARP-2) is one of three human PARP enzymes that are potently activated during the cellular DNA damage response (DDR). DDR-PARPs detect DNA strand breaks, leading to a dramatic increase in their catalytic production of the posttranslational modification poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) to facilitate repair. There are limited biochemical and structural insights into the functional domains of PARP-2, which has restricted our understanding of how PARP-2 is specialized toward specific repair pathways. PARP-2 has a modular architecture composed of a C-terminal catalytic domain (CAT), a central Trp-Gly-Arg (WGR) domain and an N-terminal region (NTR). Although the NTR is generally considered the key DNA-binding domain of PARP-2, we report here that all three domains of PARP-2 collectively contribute to interaction with DNA damage. Biophysical, structural and biochemical analyses indicate that the NTR is natively disordered, and is only required for activation on specific types of DNA damage. Interestingly, the NTR is not essential for PARP-2 localization to sites of DNA damage. Rather, the WGR and CAT domains function together to recruit PARP-2 to sites of DNA breaks. Our study differentiates the functions of PARP-2 domains from those of PARP-1, the other major DDR-PARP, and highlights the specialization of the multi-domain architectures of DDR-PARPs. PMID:26704974

  19. Activation of the DNA Damage Response by RNA Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Ellis L.; Hollingworth, Robert; Grand, Roger J.

    2016-01-01

    RNA viruses are a genetically diverse group of pathogens that are responsible for some of the most prevalent and lethal human diseases. Numerous viruses introduce DNA damage and genetic instability in host cells during their lifecycles and some species also manipulate components of the DNA damage response (DDR), a complex and sophisticated series of cellular pathways that have evolved to detect and repair DNA lesions. Activation and manipulation of the DDR by DNA viruses has been extensively studied. It is apparent, however, that many RNA viruses can also induce significant DNA damage, even in cases where viral replication takes place exclusively in the cytoplasm. DNA damage can contribute to the pathogenesis of RNA viruses through the triggering of apoptosis, stimulation of inflammatory immune responses and the introduction of deleterious mutations that can increase the risk of tumorigenesis. In addition, activation of DDR pathways can contribute positively to replication of viral RNA genomes. Elucidation of the interactions between RNA viruses and the DDR has provided important insights into modulation of host cell functions by these pathogens. This review summarises the current literature regarding activation and manipulation of the DDR by several medically important RNA viruses. PMID:26751489

  20. Repair of damaged DNA in vivo: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Hanawalt, P.C.

    1987-09-01

    This contract was initiated in 1962 with the US Atomic Energy Commission to carry out basic research on the effects of radiation on the process of DNA replication in bacteria. Within the first contract year we discovered repair replication at the same time that Setlow and Carrier discovered pyrimidine dimer excision. These discoveries led to the elucidation of the process of excision-repair, one of the most important mechanisms by which living systems, including humans, respond to structural damage in their genetic material. We improved methodology for distinguishing repair replication from semiconservative replication and instructed others in these techniques. Painter then was the first to demonstrate repair replication in ultraviolet irradiated human cells. He, in turn, instructed James Cleaver who discovered that skin fibroblasts from patients with xeroderma pigmentosum were defective in excision-repair. People with this genetic defect are extremely sensitive to sunlight and they develop carcinomas and melanomas of the skin with high frequency. The existence of this hereditary disease attests to the importance of DNA repair in man. We certainly could not survive in the normal ultraviolet flux from the sun if our DNA were not continuously monitored for damage and repaired. Other hereditary diseases such as ataxia telangiectasia, Cockayne's syndrome, Blooms syndrome and Fanconi's anemia also involve deficiencies in DNA damage processing. The field of DNA repair has developed rapidly as we have learned that most environmental chemical carcinogens as well as radiation produce repairable damage in DNA. 251 refs.

  1. DNA Damage: From Chronic Inflammation to Age-Related Deterioration

    PubMed Central

    Ioannidou, Anna; Goulielmaki, Evi; Garinis, George A.

    2016-01-01

    To lessen the “wear and tear” of existence, cells have evolved mechanisms that continuously sense DNA lesions, repair DNA damage and restore the compromised genome back to its native form. Besides genome maintenance pathways, multicellular organisms may also employ adaptive and innate immune mechanisms to guard themselves against bacteria or viruses. Recent evidence points to reciprocal interactions between DNA repair, DNA damage responses and aspects of immunity; both self-maintenance and defense responses share a battery of common players and signaling pathways aimed at safeguarding our bodily functions over time. In the short-term, this functional interplay would allow injured cells to restore damaged DNA templates or communicate their compromised state to the microenvironment. In the long-term, however, it may result in the (premature) onset of age-related degeneration, including cancer. Here, we discuss the beneficial and unrewarding outcomes of DNA damage-driven inflammation in the context of tissue-specific pathology and disease progression. PMID:27826317

  2. Involvement of DNA Damage Response Pathways in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sheau-Fang; Wei, Ren-Jie; Shiue, Yow-Ling; Wang, Shen-Nien

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has been known as one of the most lethal human malignancies, due to the difficulty of early detection, chemoresistance, and radioresistance, and is characterized by active angiogenesis and metastasis, which account for rapid recurrence and poor survival. Its development has been closely associated with multiple risk factors, including hepatitis B and C virus infection, alcohol consumption, obesity, and diet contamination. Genetic alterations and genomic instability, probably resulted from unrepaired DNA lesions, are increasingly recognized as a common feature of human HCC. Dysregulation of DNA damage repair and signaling to cell cycle checkpoints, known as the DNA damage response (DDR), is associated with a predisposition to cancer and affects responses to DNA-damaging anticancer therapy. It has been demonstrated that various HCC-associated risk factors are able to promote DNA damages, formation of DNA adducts, and chromosomal aberrations. Hence, alterations in the DDR pathways may accumulate these lesions to trigger hepatocarcinogenesis and also to facilitate advanced HCC progression. This review collects some of the most known information about the link between HCC-associated risk factors and DDR pathways in HCC. Hopefully, the review will remind the researchers and clinicians of further characterizing and validating the roles of these DDR pathways in HCC. PMID:24877058

  3. SOS processing of unique oxidative DNA damages in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Laspia, M F; Wallace, S S

    1989-05-05

    phi X174 replicative form (RF) I transfecting DNA containing thymine glycols (5,6-dihydroxy-5,6-dihydrothymine), urea glycosides or apurinic (AP) sites was used to study SOS processing of unique DNA damages in Escherichia coli. All three lesions can be found in DNA damaged by chemical oxidants or radiation and are representative of several common structural modifications of DNA bases. When phi X DNA containing thymine glycols was transfected into host cells that were ultraviolet-irradiated to induce the SOS response, a substantial increase in survival was observed compared to transfection into uninduced hosts. Studies with mutants demonstrated that both the activated form of RecA and UmuDC proteins were required for this reactivation. In contrast, no increase in survival was observed when DNA containing urea glycosides or AP sites was transfected into ultraviolet-induced hosts. These data suggest that SOS-induced reactivation does not reflect a generalized repair system for all replication-blocking, lethal lesions but rather that the efficiency of reactivation is damage dependent. Further, we found that a significant fraction of potentially lethal thymine glycols could be ultraviolet-reactivated in an umuC lexA recA-independent manner, suggesting the existence of an as yet uncharacterized damage-inducible SOS-independent mode of thymine glycol repair.

  4. Damage to rat spermatozoal DNA after chronic cyclophosphamide exposure.

    PubMed

    Qiu, J; Hales, B F; Robaire, B

    1995-12-01

    Treatment of male rats with low dosages of cyclophosphamide causes a dramatic increase in early embryo death among their progeny without significantly affecting the general health of the male. It is hypothesized that cyclophosphamide exerts its effects by targeting specific components of spermatozoal nuclei. The purpose of the present studies was to investigate the effects of chronic cyclophosphamide treatment on spermatozoal DNA. Two approaches were pursued. The first was to determine total DNA damage by using the alkaline elution method. The second was to study spermatozoal DNA template function by using an in vitro DNA synthesis system. Adult male rats were treated with saline or cyclophosphamide (6.1 mg/kg/day) daily for 1 or 6 wk. Cauda epididymal spermatozoa were collected and subjected to alkaline elution using DNA-DNA dot hybridization to quantify the fractionated DNA. One week of treatment with cyclophosphamide caused DNA single strand breaks that could be detected only in the presence of proteinase K in the lysis solution; no DNA cross-links were observed in the animals that received 1-wk drug treatment. In contrast, 6 wk of treatment with cyclophosphamide induced a significant increase in both DNA single strand breaks and cross-links in spermatozoal nuclei; the cross-links were attributable primarily to DNA-DNA linkages. The availability of spermatozoal DNA for template function was not affected by 1 wk of treatment with cyclophosphamide but was markedly affected after 6 wk of treatment with this drug. It is proposed that during chromatin transition processes the male genome may be in an open dynamic state with many exposed sites that are vulnerable to alkylating agents. Since there is no DNA repair during spermiogenesis, damage to the genome by alkylation at this stage may be cumulative, resulting in the production of dysfunctional germ cells.

  5. Parvovirus diversity and DNA damage responses.

    PubMed

    Cotmore, Susan F; Tattersall, Peter

    2013-02-01

    Parvoviruses have a linear single-stranded DNA genome, around 5 kb in length, with short imperfect terminal palindromes that fold back on themselves to form duplex hairpin telomeres. These contain most of the cis-acting information required for viral "rolling hairpin" DNA replication, an evolutionary adaptation of rolling-circle synthesis in which the hairpins create duplex replication origins, prime complementary strand synthesis, and act as hinges to reverse the direction of the unidirectional cellular fork. Genomes are packaged vectorially into small, rugged protein capsids ~260 Å in diameter, which mediate their delivery directly into the cell nucleus, where they await their host cell's entry into S phase under its own cell cycle control. Here we focus on genus-specific variations in genome structure and replication, and review host cell responses that modulate the nuclear environment.

  6. Looking for Waldo: A Potential Thermodynamic Signature to DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conspectus DNA in its simplest form is an ensemble of nucleic acids, water, and ions, and the conformation of DNA is dependent on the relative proportions of all three components. When DNA is covalently damaged by endogenous or exogenous reactive species, including those produced by some anticancer drugs, the ensemble undergoes localized changes that affect nucleic acid structure, thermodynamic stability, and the qualitative and quantative arrangement of associated cations and water molecules. Fortunately, the biological effects of low levels of DNA damage are successfully mitigated by a large number of proteins that efficiently recognize and repair DNA damage in the midst of a vast excess of canonical DNA. In this Account, we explore the impact of DNA modifications on the high resolution and dynamic structure of DNA, DNA stability, and the uptake of ions and water and explore how these changes may be sensed by proteins whose function is to initially locate DNA lesions. We discuss modifications on the nucleobases that are located in the major and minor grooves of DNA and include lesions that are observed in vivo, including oxidized bases, as well as some synthetic nucleobases that allow us to probe how the location and nature of different substituents affect the thermodynamics and structure of the DNA ensemble. It is demonstrated that disruption of a cation binding site in the major groove by modification of the N7-position on the purines, which is the major site for DNA alkylation, is enthalpically destabilizing. Accordingly, tethering a cationic charge in the major groove is enthalpically stabilizing. The combined structural and thermodynamic studies provide a detailed picture of how different DNA lesions affect the dynamics of DNA and how modified bases interact with their environment. Our work supports the hypothesis that there is a “thermodynamic signature” to DNA lesions that can be exploited in the initial search that requires differentiation between

  7. Looking for Waldo: a potential thermodynamic signature to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Gold, Barry; Stone, Michael P; Marky, Luis A

    2014-04-15

    DNA in its simplest form is an ensemble of nucleic acids, water, and ions, and the conformation of DNA is dependent on the relative proportions of all three components. When DNA is covalently damaged by endogenous or exogenous reactive species, including those produced by some anticancer drugs, the ensemble undergoes localized changes that affect nucleic acid structure, thermodynamic stability, and the qualitative and quantative arrangement of associated cations and water molecules. Fortunately, the biological effects of low levels of DNA damage are successfully mitigated by a large number of proteins that efficiently recognize and repair DNA damage in the midst of a vast excess of canonical DNA. In this Account, we explore the impact of DNA modifications on the high resolution and dynamic structure of DNA, DNA stability, and the uptake of ions and water and explore how these changes may be sensed by proteins whose function is to initially locate DNA lesions. We discuss modifications on the nucleobases that are located in the major and minor grooves of DNA and include lesions that are observed in vivo, including oxidized bases, as well as some synthetic nucleobases that allow us to probe how the location and nature of different substituents affect the thermodynamics and structure of the DNA ensemble. It is demonstrated that disruption of a cation binding site in the major groove by modification of the N7-position on the purines, which is the major site for DNA alkylation, is enthalpically destabilizing. Accordingly, tethering a cationic charge in the major groove is enthalpically stabilizing. The combined structural and thermodynamic studies provide a detailed picture of how different DNA lesions affect the dynamics of DNA and how modified bases interact with their environment. Our work supports the hypothesis that there is a "thermodynamic signature" to DNA lesions that can be exploited in the initial search that requires differentiation between canonical DNA and

  8. E2F-7 couples DNA damage-dependent transcription with the DNA repair process.

    PubMed

    Zalmas, Lykourgos-Panagiotis; Coutts, Amanda S; Helleday, Thomas; La Thangue, Nicholas B

    2013-09-15

    The cellular response to DNA damage, mediated by the DNA repair process, is essential in maintaining the integrity and stability of the genome. E2F-7 is an atypical member of the E2F family with a role in negatively regulating transcription and cell cycle progression under DNA damage. Surprisingly, we found that E2F-7 makes a transcription-independent contribution to the DNA repair process, which involves E2F-7 locating to and binding damaged DNA. Further, E2F-7 recruits CtBP and HDAC to the damaged DNA, altering the local chromatin environment of the DNA lesion. Importantly, the E2F-7 gene is a target for somatic mutation in human cancer and tumor-derived mutant alleles encode proteins with compromised transcription and DNA repair properties. Our results establish that E2F-7 participates in 2 closely linked processes, allowing it to directly couple the expression of genes involved in the DNA damage response with the DNA repair machinery, which has relevance in human malignancy.

  9. Cellular effects of UVA: DNA damages

    SciTech Connect

    Peak, M.J.; Peak, J.G.

    1988-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation between 320 nm and visible light (UVA) is a major component of both solar radiation and suntan lamps, which are being increasingly used in tanning booths. UVA has generally been considered innocuous, partially because DNA does not absorb appreciably in this region, but UVB radiation (290-320 nm) has widely been considered to be the major etiological factor in human skin carcinogenesis caused by solar uv radiation, largely because DNA absorbs photons of UVB, which is known to produce thymine photoproducts (cyclobutane dimers and adducts). It is true that patients with xeroderma pigmentosum are particularly prone to solar-uv-induced skin cancer, and cells derived from these people have been shown to lack ability to repair pyrimidine photoproducts by excision, evidence that pyrimidine photoproducts might play a role in carcinogenesis in certain specialized situations. Normal cells have the ability to repair these UVB-induced lesions. However, UVA is considerably more penetrating and more abundant than UVB, and others have performed a spectral analysis that claimed that 20-60% (depending upon the solar zenith angle) of the toxic biological effects of solar radiation can be attributed to UVA. The fact that UVA radiations are mutagenic provides motivation for studying DNA changes that might be effected by this region of the electromagnetic spectrum.

  10. Oxidant-induced DNA damage of target cells.

    PubMed Central

    Schraufstätter, I; Hyslop, P A; Jackson, J H; Cochrane, C G

    1988-01-01

    In this study we examined the leukocytic oxidant species that induce oxidant damage of DNA in whole cells. H2O2 added extracellularly in micromolar concentrations (10-100 microM) induced DNA strand breaks in various target cells. The sensitivity of a specific target cell was inversely correlated to its catalase content and the rate of removal of H2O2 by the target cell. Oxidant species produced by xanthine oxidase/purine or phorbol myristate acetate-stimulated monocytes induced DNA breakage of target cells in proportion to the amount of H2O2 generated. These DNA strand breaks were prevented by extracellular catalase, but not by superoxide dismutase. Cytotoxic doses of HOCl, added to target cells, did not induce DNA strand breakage, and myeloperoxidase added extracellularly in the presence of an H2O2-generating system, prevented the formation of DNA strand breaks in proportion to its H2O2 degrading capacity. The studies also indicated that H2O2 formed hydroxyl radical (.OH) intracellularly, which appeared to be the most likely free radical responsible for DNA damage: .OH was detected in cells exposed to H2O2; the DNA base, deoxyguanosine, was hydroxylated in cells exposed to H2O2; and intracellular iron was essential for induction of DNA strand breaks. PMID:2843565

  11. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitors induce DNA damage through nucleoside depletion

    PubMed Central

    Juvekar, Ashish; Hu, Hai; Yadegarynia, Sina; Lyssiotis, Costas A.; Ullas, Soumya; Lien, Evan C.; Bellinger, Gary; Son, Jaekyoung; Hok, Rosanna C.; Seth, Pankaj; Daly, Michele B.; Kim, Baek; Scully, Ralph; Asara, John M.; Cantley, Lewis C.; Wulf, Gerburg M.

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that combining a phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor with a poly-ADP Rib polymerase (PARP)-inhibitor enhanced DNA damage and cell death in breast cancers that have genetic aberrations in BRCA1 and TP53. Here, we show that enhanced DNA damage induced by PI3K inhibitors in this mutational background is a consequence of impaired production of nucleotides needed for DNA synthesis and DNA repair. Inhibition of PI3K causes a reduction in all four nucleotide triphosphates, whereas inhibition of the protein kinase AKT is less effective than inhibition of PI3K in suppressing nucleotide synthesis and inducing DNA damage. Carbon flux studies reveal that PI3K inhibition disproportionately affects the nonoxidative pentose phosphate pathway that delivers Rib-5-phosphate required for base ribosylation. In vivo in a mouse model of BRCA1-linked triple-negative breast cancer (K14-Cre BRCA1f/fp53f/f), the PI3K inhibitor BKM120 led to a precipitous drop in DNA synthesis within 8 h of drug treatment, whereas DNA synthesis in normal tissues was less affected. In this mouse model, combined PI3K and PARP inhibition was superior to either agent alone to induce durable remissions of established tumors. PMID:27402769

  12. Detecting ATM-Dependent Chromatin Modification in DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Udayakumar, Durga; Horikoshi, Nobuo; Mishra, Lope; Hunt, Clayton; Pandita, Tej K.

    2015-01-01

    Loss of function or mutation of the ataxia–telangiectasia mutated gene product (ATM) results in inherited genetic disorders characterized by neurodegeneration, immunodeficiency, and cancer. Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene product belongs to the PI3K-like protein kinase (PIKKs) family and is functionally implicated in mitogenic signal transduction, chromosome condensation, meiotic recombination, cell-cycle control, and telomere maintenance. The ATM protein kinase is primarily activated in response to DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), the most deleterious form of DNA damage produced by ionizing radiation (IR) or radiomimetic drugs. It is detected at DNA damage sites, where ATM autophosphorylation causes dissociation of the inactive homodimeric form to the activated monomeric form. Interestingly, heat shock can activate ATM independent of the presence of DNA strand breaks. ATM is an integral part of the sensory machinery that detects DSBs during meiosis, mitosis, or DNA breaks mediated by free radicals. These DNA lesions can trigger higher order chromatin reorganization fuelled by posttranslational modifications of histones and histone binding proteins. Our group, and others, have shown that ATM activation is tightly regulated by chromatin modifications. This review summarizes the multiple approaches used to discern the role of ATM and other associated proteins in chromatin modification in response to DNA damage. PMID:25827888

  13. DNA damage in storage cells of anhydrobiotic tardigrades.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Simon; Reuner, Andy; Brümmer, Franz; Schill, Ralph O

    2009-08-01

    In order to recover without any apparent damage, tardigrades have evolved effective adaptations to preserve the integrity of cells and tissues in the anhydrobiotic state. Despite those adaptations and the fact that the process of biological ageing comes to a stop during anhydrobiosis, the time animals can persist in this state is limited; after exceedingly long anhydrobiotic periods tardigrades fail to recover. Using the single cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay) technique to study the effect of anhydrobiosis on the integrity of deoxyribonucleic acid, we showed that the DNA in storage cells of the tardigrade Milnesium tardigradum was well protected during transition from the active into the anhydrobiotic state. Specimens of M. tardigradum that had been desiccated for two days had only accumulated minor DNA damage (2.09 +/- 1.98% DNA in tail, compared to 0.44 +/- 0.74% DNA in tail for the negative control with active, hydrated animals). Yet the longer the anhydrobiotic phase lasted, the more damage was inflicted on the DNA. After six weeks in anhydrobiosis, 13.63 +/- 6.41% of DNA was found in the comet tail. After ten months, 23.66 +/- 7.56% of DNA was detected in the comet tail. The cause for this deterioration is unknown, but oxidative processes mediated by reactive oxygen species are a possible explanation.

  14. Multiomic Analysis of the UV-Induced DNA Damage Response.

    PubMed

    Boeing, Stefan; Williamson, Laura; Encheva, Vesela; Gori, Ilaria; Saunders, Rebecca E; Instrell, Rachael; Aygün, Ozan; Rodriguez-Martinez, Marta; Weems, Juston C; Kelly, Gavin P; Conaway, Joan W; Conaway, Ronald C; Stewart, Aengus; Howell, Michael; Snijders, Ambrosius P; Svejstrup, Jesper Q

    2016-05-11

    In order to facilitate the identification of factors and pathways in the cellular response to UV-induced DNA damage, several descriptive proteomic screens and a functional genomics screen were performed in parallel. Numerous factors could be identified with high confidence when the screen results were superimposed and interpreted together, incorporating biological knowledge. A searchable database, bioLOGIC, which provides access to relevant information about a protein or process of interest, was established to host the results and facilitate data mining. Besides uncovering roles in the DNA damage response for numerous proteins and complexes, including Integrator, Cohesin, PHF3, ASC-1, SCAF4, SCAF8, and SCAF11, we uncovered a role for the poorly studied, melanoma-associated serine/threonine kinase 19 (STK19). Besides effectively uncovering relevant factors, the multiomic approach also provides a systems-wide overview of the diverse cellular processes connected to the transcription-related DNA damage response.

  15. BACH2: a Marker of DNA Damage and Aging

    PubMed Central

    Uittenboogaard, L.M.; Payan-Gomez, C.; Pothof, J.; van IJcken, W.; Mastroberardino, PG; van der Pluijm; Hoeijmakers, J.H.J.; Tresini, M.

    2013-01-01

    DNA damage and aging share expression changes involving alterations in many aspects of metabolism, suppression of growth and upregulation of defence and genome maintenance systems. “Omics” technologies have permitted large-scale parallel measurements covering global cellular constituents and aided the identification of specific response pathways that change during aging and after DNA damage. We have set out to identify genes with highly conserved response patterns through meta-analysis of mRNA expression datasets collected during natural aging and accelerated aging caused by a Transcription-Coupled Nucleotide Excision Repair (TC-NER) defect in a diverse set of organs and tissues in mice, and from in-vitro UV-induced DNA damage in a variety of murine cells. The identified set of genes that show similar expression patterns in response to organ aging (accelerated and normal), and endogenously and exogenously induced DNA damage, consists of genes involved in anti-oxidant systems and includes the transcription factor Bach2 as one of the most consistent markers. BACH2 was originally identified as a partner of the small Maf proteins and antagonist of the NRF2 anti-oxidant defence pathway and has been implicated in B-cell differentiation and immune system homeostasis. Although BACH2 has never before been associated with UV-induced damage or aging, it shows a strong downregulation in both conditions. We have characterized the dynamics of Bach2 expression in response to DNA damage and show that it is a highly sensitive responder to transcription-blocking DNA lesions. Gene expression profiling using Affymetrix microarray analysis after siRNA-mediated silencing of Bach2 identified cell cycle and transcription regulation as the most significantly altered processes consistent with a function as transcription factor affecting proliferation. PMID:24075570

  16. BACH2: a marker of DNA damage and ageing.

    PubMed

    Uittenboogaard, L M; Payan-Gomez, C; Pothof, J; van Ijcken, W; Mastroberardino, P G; van der Pluijm, I; Hoeijmakers, J H J; Tresini, M

    2013-11-01

    DNA damage and ageing share expression changes involving alterations in many aspects of metabolism, suppression of growth and upregulation of defence and genome maintenance systems. "Omics" technologies have permitted large-scale parallel measurements covering global cellular constituents and aided the identification of specific response pathways that change during ageing and after DNA damage. We have set out to identify genes with highly conserved response patterns through meta-analysis of mRNA expression datasets collected during natural ageing and accelerated ageing caused by a Transcription-Coupled Nucleotide Excision Repair (TC-NER) defect in a diverse set of organs and tissues in mice, and from in vitro UV-induced DNA damage in a variety of murine cells. The identified set of genes that show similar expression patterns in response to organ ageing (accelerated and normal), and endogenously and exogenously induced DNA damage, consists of genes involved in anti-oxidant systems and includes the transcription factor Bach2 as one of the most consistent markers. BACH2 was originally identified as a partner of the small Maf proteins and antagonist of the NRF2 anti-oxidant defence pathway and has been implicated in B-cell differentiation and immune system homeostasis. Although BACH2 has never before been associated with UV-induced damage or ageing, it shows a strong downregulation in both conditions. We have characterized the dynamics of Bach2 expression in response to DNA damage and show that it is a highly sensitive responder to transcription-blocking DNA lesions. Gene expression profiling using Affymetrix microarray analysis after siRNA-mediated silencing of Bach2 identified cell cycle and transcription regulation as the most significantly altered processes consistent with a function as transcription factor affecting proliferation.

  17. Can graphene quantum dots cause DNA damage in cells?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dan; Zhu, Lin; Chen, Jian-Feng; Dai, Liming

    2015-05-01

    Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have attracted tremendous attention for biological applications. We report the first study on cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of GQDs to fibroblast cell lines (NIH-3T3 cells). The NIH-3T3 cells treated with GQDs at dosages over 50 μg mL-1 showed no significant cytotoxicity. However, the GQD-treated NIH-3T3 cells exhibited an increased expression of proteins (p53, Rad 51, and OGG1) related to DNA damage compared with untreated cells, indicating the DNA damage caused by GQDs. The GQD-induced release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was demonstrated to be responsible for the observed DNA damage. These findings should have important implications for future applications of GQDs in biological systems.Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have attracted tremendous attention for biological applications. We report the first study on cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of GQDs to fibroblast cell lines (NIH-3T3 cells). The NIH-3T3 cells treated with GQDs at dosages over 50 μg mL-1 showed no significant cytotoxicity. However, the GQD-treated NIH-3T3 cells exhibited an increased expression of proteins (p53, Rad 51, and OGG1) related to DNA damage compared with untreated cells, indicating the DNA damage caused by GQDs. The GQD-induced release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was demonstrated to be responsible for the observed DNA damage. These findings should have important implications for future applications of GQDs in biological systems. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01734c

  18. Oxidative DNA damage causes mitochondrial genomic instability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Doudican, Nicole A; Song, Binwei; Shadel, Gerald S; Doetsch, Paul W

    2005-06-01

    Mitochondria contain their own genome, the integrity of which is required for normal cellular energy metabolism. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by normal mitochondrial respiration can damage cellular macromolecules, including mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), and have been implicated in degenerative diseases, cancer, and aging. We developed strategies to elevate mitochondrial oxidative stress by exposure to antimycin and H(2)O(2) or utilizing mutants lacking mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (sod2Delta). Experiments were conducted with strains compromised in mitochondrial base excision repair (ntg1Delta) and oxidative damage resistance (pif1Delta) in order to delineate the relationship between these pathways. We observed enhanced ROS production, resulting in a direct increase in oxidative mtDNA damage and mutagenesis. Repair-deficient mutants exposed to oxidative stress conditions exhibited profound genomic instability. Elimination of Ntg1p and Pif1p resulted in a synergistic corruption of respiratory competency upon exposure to antimycin and H(2)O(2). Mitochondrial genomic integrity was substantially compromised in ntg1Delta pif1Delta sod2Delta strains, since these cells exhibit a total loss of mtDNA. A stable respiration-defective strain, possessing a normal complement of mtDNA damage resistance pathways, exhibited a complete loss of mtDNA upon exposure to antimycin and H(2)O(2). This loss was preventable by Sod2p overexpression. These results provide direct evidence that oxidative mtDNA damage can be a major contributor to mitochondrial genomic instability and demonstrate cooperation of Ntg1p and Pif1p to resist the introduction of lesions into the mitochondrial genome.

  19. Repair Machinery for Radiation-Induced DNA Damage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-07-01

    significant defect in the repair of certain DNA damages, but of which damages needs to be determined. We have selected Chinese Hamster Ovary ( CHO ) as...chromosome (BAC) genomic fragment, which we isolated from a CHO BAC library, revealed that APE1 exists as a single copy gene in AA8 (see Appendix, Figure... cells , we first determined the APE1 gene copy number in the CHO AA8 cell line. Fluorescence in situ hybridization with an APE1 bacterial artificial

  20. Function of ZFAND3 in the DNA Damage Response

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    to DNA damaging agents . The replication stress reagent hydroxyurea (HU) stalls replication forks, and NS TEX27_1...survival during the replication stress observed in these conditions. The role of ZFAND3 following a variety of damaging agents was examined as proposed in...the procedure effectively captures a maturing chromatin segment of constant length (Fig. 1D). However, PCNA and CAF-1 levels purified with the EdU

  1. DNA damage and repair in human skin in situ

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, B.M.; Gange, R.W.; Freeman, S.E.; Sutherland, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    Understanding the molecular and cellular origins of sunlight-induced skin cancers in man requires knowledge of the damages inflicted on human skin during sunlight exposure, as well as the ability of cells in skin to repair or circumvent such damage. Although repair has been studied extensively in procaryotic and eucaryotic cells - including human cells in culture - there are important differences between repair by human skin cells in culture and human skin in situ: quantitative differences in rates of repair, as well as qualitative differences, including the presence or absence of repair mechanisms. Quantitation of DNA damage and repair in human skin required the development of new approaches for measuring damage at low levels in nanogram quantities of non-radioactive DNA. The method allows for analysis of multiple samples and the resulting data should be related to behavior of the DNA molecules by analytic expressions. Furthermore, it should be possible to assay a variety of lesions using the same methodology. The development of new analysis methods, new technology, and new biochemical probes for the study of DNA damage and repair are described. 28 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Nuclear DNA damage signalling to mitochondria in ageing

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Evandro Fei; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Chua, Katrin F.; Mattson, Mark P.; Croteau, Deborah L.; Bohr, Vilhelm A.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of ageing, and mitochondrial maintenance may lead to increased healthspan. Emerging evidence suggests a crucial role for signalling from the nucleus to mitochondria (NM signalling) in regulating mitochondrial function and ageing. An important initiator of NM signalling is nuclear DNA damage, which accumulates with age and may contribute to the development of age-associated diseases. DNA damage-dependent NM signalling constitutes a network that includes nuclear sirtuins and controls genomic stability and mitochondrial integrity. Pharmacological modulation of NM signalling is a promising novel approach for the prevention and treatment of age-associated diseases. PMID:26956196

  3. DNA damage response in nephrotoxic and ischemic kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Yan, Mingjuan; Tang, Chengyuan; Ma, Zhengwei; Huang, Shuang; Dong, Zheng

    2016-10-27

    DNA damage activates specific cell signaling cascades for DNA repair, cell cycle arrest, senescence, and/or cell death. Recent studies have demonstrated DNA damage response (DDR) in experimental models of acute kidney injury (AKI). In cisplatin-induced AKI or nephrotoxicity, the DDR pathway of ATR/Chk2/p53 is activated and contributes to renal tubular cell apoptosis. In ischemic AKI, DDR seems more complex and involves at least the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), a member of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related kinase (PIKK) family, and p53; however, while ATM may promote DNA repair, p53 may trigger cell death. Targeting DDR for kidney protection in AKI therefore relies on a thorough elucidation of the DDR pathways in various forms of AKI.

  4. Voltammetric Behavior of o-Nitrophenol and Damage to DNA

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Da-Peng; Wu, Wei-Li; Long, Hai-Yan; Liu, Yun-Chun; Yang, Zhou-Sheng

    2008-01-01

    The electrochemical behavior of o-nitrophenol was studied in detail with a glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The dependence of peak potential on pH indicated that equivalent electrons and protons were involved in the process of o-nitrophenol reduction. The interaction of o-nitrophenol with calf thymus DNA was investigated by adding DNA to the o-nitrophenol solution and by immobilizing DNA on GCE, respectively. The peak current decrement and peak potential shift in presence of DNA indicated that o-nitrophenol could interact with DNA. The result was demonstrated that the in situ DNA damage was detected by differential pulse voltammetry after the o-nitrophenol was electrochemically reduced. PMID:19325751

  5. DNA damage response during mouse oocyte maturation

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Alexandra; Baran, Vladimir; Sakakibara, Yogo; Brzakova, Adela; Ferencova, Ivana; Motlik, Jan; Kitajima, Tomoya S.; Schultz, Richard M.; Solc, Petr

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Because low levels of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) appear not to activate the ATM-mediated prophase I checkpoint in full-grown oocytes, there may exist mechanisms to protect chromosome integrity during meiotic maturation. Using live imaging we demonstrate that low levels of DSBs induced by the radiomimetic drug Neocarzinostatin (NCS) increase the incidence of chromosome fragments and lagging chromosomes but do not lead to APC/C activation and anaphase onset delay. The number of DSBs, represented by γH2AX foci, significantly decreases between prophase I and metaphase II in both control and NCS-treated oocytes. Transient treatment with NCS increases >2-fold the number of DSBs in prophase I oocytes, but less than 30% of these oocytes enter anaphase with segregation errors. MRE11, but not ATM, is essential to detect DSBs in prophase I and is involved in H2AX phosphorylation during metaphase I. Inhibiting MRE11 by mirin during meiotic maturation results in anaphase bridges and also increases the number of γH2AX foci in metaphase II.  Compromised DNA integrity in mirin-treated oocytes indicates a role for MRE11 in chromosome integrity during meiotic maturation. PMID:26745237

  6. Glycosylases utilize ``stop and go'' motion to locate DNA damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Shane

    2015-03-01

    Oxidative damage to DNA results in alterations that are mutagenic or even cytotoxic. Base excision repair is a mechanism that functions to identify and correct these lesions, and is present in organisms ranging from bacteria to humans. DNA glycosylases are the first enzymes in this pathway and function to locate and remove oxidatively damaged bases, and do so utilizing only thermal energy. However, the question remains of how these enzymes locate and recognize a damaged base among millions of undamaged bases. Utilizing fluorescence video microscopy with high spatial and temporal resolution, we have observed a number of different fluorescently labeled glycosylases (including bacterial FPG, NEI, and NTH as well as mammalian MutyH and OGG). These enzymes diffuse along DNA tightropes at approximately 0.01 +/- 0.005 μm2/s with binding lifetimes ranging from one second to several minutes. Chemically induced damage to the DNA substrate causes a ~ 50% reduction in diffusion coefficients and a ~ 400% increase in binding lifetimes, while mutation of the key ``wedge residue'' - which has been shown to be responsible for damage detection - results in a 200% increase in the diffusion coefficient. Utilizing a sliding window approach to measure diffusion coefficients within individual trajectories, we observe that distributions of diffusion coefficients are bimodal, consistent with periods of diffusive motion interspersed with immobile periods. Utilizing a unique chemo-mechanical simulation approach, we demonstrate that the motion of these glycosylases can be explained as free diffusion along the helical pitch of the DNA, punctuated with two different types of pauses: 1) rapid, short-lived pauses as the enzyme rapidly probes DNA bases to interrogate for damage and, 2) less frequent, longer lived pauses that reflect the enzyme bound to and catalytically removing a damaged base. These simulations also indicate that the wedge residue is critical for interrogation and recognition of

  7. Diagnosis of Lung Cancer by Fractal Analysis of Damaged DNA

    PubMed Central

    Namazi, Hamidreza; Kiminezhadmalaie, Mona

    2015-01-01

    Cancer starts when cells in a part of the body start to grow out of control. In fact cells become cancer cells because of DNA damage. A DNA walk of a genome represents how the frequency of each nucleotide of a pairing nucleotide couple changes locally. In this research in order to study the cancer genes, DNA walk plots of genomes of patients with lung cancer were generated using a program written in MATLAB language. The data so obtained was checked for fractal property by computing the fractal dimension using a program written in MATLAB. Also, the correlation of damaged DNA was studied using the Hurst exponent measure. We have found that the damaged DNA sequences are exhibiting higher degree of fractality and less correlation compared with normal DNA sequences. So we confirmed this method can be used for early detection of lung cancer. The method introduced in this research not only is useful for diagnosis of lung cancer but also can be applied for detection and growth analysis of different types of cancers. PMID:26539245

  8. Viral Carcinogenesis: Factors Inducing DNA Damage and Virus Integration

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yan; Williams, Vonetta; Filippova, Maria; Filippov, Valery; Duerksen-Hughes, Penelope

    2014-01-01

    Viruses are the causative agents of 10%–15% of human cancers worldwide. The most common outcome for virus-induced reprogramming is genomic instability, including accumulation of mutations, aberrations and DNA damage. Although each virus has its own specific mechanism for promoting carcinogenesis, the majority of DNA oncogenic viruses encode oncogenes that transform infected cells, frequently by targeting p53 and pRB. In addition, integration of viral DNA into the human genome can also play an important role in promoting tumor development for several viruses, including HBV and HPV. Because viral integration requires the breakage of both the viral and the host DNA, the integration rate is believed to be linked to the levels of DNA damage. DNA damage can be caused by both endogenous and exogenous factors, including inflammation induced by either the virus itself or by co-infections with other agents, environmental agents and other factors. Typically, cancer develops years to decades following the initial infection. A better understanding of virus-mediated carcinogenesis, the networking of pathways involved in transformation and the relevant risk factors, particularly in those cases where tumorigenesis proceeds by way of virus integration, will help to suggest prophylactic and therapeutic strategies to reduce the risk of virus-mediated cancer. PMID:25340830

  9. No Ancient DNA Damage in Actinobacteria from the Neanderthal Bone

    PubMed Central

    Zaremba-Niedźwiedzka, Katarzyna; Andersson, Siv G. E.

    2013-01-01

    Background The Neanderthal genome was recently sequenced using DNA extracted from a 38,000-year-old fossil. At the start of the project, the fraction of mammalian and bacterial DNA in the sample was estimated to be <6% and 9%, respectively. Treatment with restriction enzymes prior to sequencing increased the relative proportion of mammalian DNA to 15%, but the large majority of sequences remain uncharacterized. Principal Findings Our taxonomic profiling of 3.95 Gb of Neanderthal DNA isolated from the Vindija Neanderthal Vi33.16 fossil showed that 90% of about 50,000 rRNA gene sequence reads were of bacterial origin, of which Actinobacteria accounted for more than 75%. Actinobacteria also represented more than 80% of the PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene sequences from a cave sediment sample taken from the same G layer as the Neanderthal bone. However, phylogenetic analyses did not identify any sediment clones that were closely related to the bone-derived sequences. We analysed the patterns of nucleotide differences in the individual sequence reads compared to the assembled consensus sequences of the rRNA gene sequences. The typical ancient nucleotide substitution pattern with a majority of C to T changes indicative of DNA damage was observed for the Neanderthal rRNA gene sequences, but not for the Streptomyces-like rRNA gene sequences. Conclusions/Significance Our analyses suggest that the Actinobacteria, and especially members of the Streptomycetales, contribute the majority of sequences in the DNA extracted from the Neanderthal fossil Vi33.16. The bacterial DNA showed no signs of damage, and we hypothesize that it was derived from bacteria that have been enriched inside the bone. The bioinformatic approach used here paves the way for future studies of microbial compositions and patterns of DNA damage in bacteria from archaeological bones. Such studies can help identify targeted measures to increase the relative amount of endogenous DNA in the sample. PMID:23658776

  10. DNA damage under simulated extraterrestrial conditions in bacteriophage T7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fekete, A.; Kovács, G.; Hegedüs, M.; Módos, K.; Rontó, Gy.; Lammer, H.; Panitz, C.

    The experiment ``Phage and uracil response'' (PUR) will be accommodated in the EXPOSE facility of the ISS aiming to examine and quantify the effect of specific space conditions on bacteriophage T7 and isolated T7 DNA thin films. To achieve this new method was elaborated for the preparation of DNA and nucleoprotein thin films (1). During the EXPOSE Experiment Verification Tests (EVT) the samples were exposed to vacuum (10 -6 Pa), to monochromatic (254 nm) and polychromatic (200-400 nm) UV radiation in air as well in simulated space vacuum. Using neutral density (ND) filters dose-effect curves were performed in order to define the maximum doses tolerated, and we also studied the effect of temperature in vacuum as well as the influence of temperature fluctuations. We obtained substantial evidence that DNA lesions (e.g. strand breaks, DNA-protein cross-links, DNA-DNA cross-links) accumulate throughout exposure. DNA damage was determined by quantitative PCR using 555 bp and 3826 bp fragments of T7 DNA (2) and by neutral and alkaline agarose gel electrophoresis; the structural/chemical effects were analyzed by spectroscopic and microscopical methods. Characteristic changes in the absorption spectrum, in the electrophoretic pattern of DNA and the decrease of the amount of the PCR products have been detected indicating the damage of isolated and intraphage DNA. Preliminary results suggest a synergistic action of space vacuum and UV radiation with DNA being the critical target. Fekete et al. J. Luminescence 102-103, 469-475, 2003 Hegedüs et al. Photochem. Photobiol. 78, 213-219, 2003

  11. Induction of dnaN and dnaQ gene expression in Escherichia coli by alkylation damage to DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Quiñones, A; Kaasch, J; Kaasch, M; Messer, W

    1989-01-01

    The dnaN and dnaQ genes encode the beta-subunit and the epsilon-subunit of the DNA polymerase III holoenzyme. By transcriptional fusions to the galK gene, translational fusions to lacZ and comparative S1 mapping analysis, we investigated the in-vivo regulation of dnaN and dnaQ. We found that DNA damage caused by the alkylating agent methyl methanesulphonate (MMS) leads to a significant induction in dnaN and dnaQ gene expression suggesting a requirement of increased amounts of at least some DNA polymerase III holoenzyme subunits for recovery from DNA damage caused by MMS. These results are first evidences that subunits of the DNA polymerase III holoenzyme are DNA damage inducible. This MMS induction of dnaN and dnaQ gene expression is unrelated to the adaptive response. It was not observed in lexA and recA mutants which abolish the induction of the SOS response. Images PMID:2656258

  12. Induction of dnaN and dnaQ gene expression in Escherichia coli by alkylation damage to DNA.

    PubMed

    Quiñones, A; Kaasch, J; Kaasch, M; Messer, W

    1989-02-01

    The dnaN and dnaQ genes encode the beta-subunit and the epsilon-subunit of the DNA polymerase III holoenzyme. By transcriptional fusions to the galK gene, translational fusions to lacZ and comparative S1 mapping analysis, we investigated the in-vivo regulation of dnaN and dnaQ. We found that DNA damage caused by the alkylating agent methyl methanesulphonate (MMS) leads to a significant induction in dnaN and dnaQ gene expression suggesting a requirement of increased amounts of at least some DNA polymerase III holoenzyme subunits for recovery from DNA damage caused by MMS. These results are first evidences that subunits of the DNA polymerase III holoenzyme are DNA damage inducible. This MMS induction of dnaN and dnaQ gene expression is unrelated to the adaptive response. It was not observed in lexA and recA mutants which abolish the induction of the SOS response.

  13. Low-Dose Formaldehyde Delays DNA Damage Recognition and DNA Excision Repair in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Luch, Andreas; Frey, Flurina C. Clement; Meier, Regula; Fei, Jia; Naegeli, Hanspeter

    2014-01-01

    Objective Formaldehyde is still widely employed as a universal crosslinking agent, preservative and disinfectant, despite its proven carcinogenicity in occupationally exposed workers. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to understand the possible impact of low-dose formaldehyde exposures in the general population. Due to the concomitant occurrence of multiple indoor and outdoor toxicants, we tested how formaldehyde, at micromolar concentrations, interferes with general DNA damage recognition and excision processes that remove some of the most frequently inflicted DNA lesions. Methodology/Principal Findings The overall mobility of the DNA damage sensors UV-DDB (ultraviolet-damaged DNA-binding) and XPC (xeroderma pigmentosum group C) was analyzed by assessing real-time protein dynamics in the nucleus of cultured human cells exposed to non-cytotoxic (<100 μM) formaldehyde concentrations. The DNA lesion-specific recruitment of these damage sensors was tested by monitoring their accumulation at local irradiation spots. DNA repair activity was determined in host-cell reactivation assays and, more directly, by measuring the excision of DNA lesions from chromosomes. Taken together, these assays demonstrated that formaldehyde obstructs the rapid nuclear trafficking of DNA damage sensors and, consequently, slows down their relocation to DNA damage sites thus delaying the excision repair of target lesions. A concentration-dependent effect relationship established a threshold concentration of as low as 25 micromolar for the inhibition of DNA excision repair. Conclusions/Significance A main implication of the retarded repair activity is that low-dose formaldehyde may exert an adjuvant role in carcinogenesis by impeding the excision of multiple mutagenic base lesions. In view of this generally disruptive effect on DNA repair, we propose that formaldehyde exposures in the general population should be further decreased to help reducing cancer risks. PMID:24722772

  14. Viruses and the DNA Damage Response: Activation and Antagonism.

    PubMed

    Luftig, Micah A

    2014-11-01

    Viruses must interact with their hosts in order to replicate; these interactions often provoke the evolutionarily conserved response to DNA damage, known as the DNA damage response (DDR). The DDR can be activated by incoming viral DNA, during the integration of retroviruses, or in response to the aberrant DNA structures generated upon replication of DNA viruses. Furthermore, DNA and RNA viral proteins can induce the DDR by promoting inappropriate S phase entry, by modifying cellular DDR factors directly, or by unintentionally targeting host DNA. The DDR may be antiviral, although viruses often require proximal DDR activation of repair and recombination factors to facilitate replication as well as downstream DDR signaling suppression to ensure cell survival. An unintended consequence of DDR attenuation during infection is the long-term survival and proliferation of precancerous cells. Therefore, the molecular basis for DDR activation and attenuation by viruses remains an important area of study that will likely provide key insights into how viruses have evolved with their hosts.

  15. The Interaction between Polynucleotide Kinase Phosphatase and the DNA Repair Protein XRCC1 Is Critical for Repair of DNA Alkylation Damage and Stable Association at DNA Damage Sites*

    PubMed Central

    Della-Maria, Julie; Hegde, Muralidhar L.; McNeill, Daniel R.; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Ellenberger, Tom; Wilson, David M.; Mitra, Sankar; Tomkinson, Alan E.

    2012-01-01

    XRCC1 plays a key role in the repair of DNA base damage and single-strand breaks. Although it has no known enzymatic activity, XRCC1 interacts with multiple DNA repair proteins and is a subunit of distinct DNA repair protein complexes. Here we used the yeast two-hybrid genetic assay to identify mutant versions of XRCC1 that are selectively defective in interacting with a single protein partner. One XRCC1 mutant, A482T, that was defective in binding to polynucleotide kinase phosphatase (PNKP) not only retained the ability to interact with partner proteins that bind to different regions of XRCC1 but also with aprataxin and aprataxin-like factor whose binding sites overlap with that of PNKP. Disruption of the interaction between PNKP and XRCC1 did not impact their initial recruitment to localized DNA damage sites but dramatically reduced their retention there. Furthermore, the interaction between PNKP and the DNA ligase IIIα-XRCC1 complex significantly increased the efficiency of reconstituted repair reactions and was required for complementation of the DNA damage sensitivity to DNA alkylation agents of xrcc1 mutant cells. Together our results reveal novel roles for the interaction between PNKP and XRCC1 in the retention of XRCC1 at DNA damage sites and in DNA alkylation damage repair. PMID:22992732

  16. MicroRNAs, DNA Damage Response, and Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    He, Mingyang; Zhou, Weiwei; Li, Chuang; Guo, Mingxiong

    2016-01-01

    As a result of various stresses, lesions caused by DNA-damaging agents occur constantly in each cell of the human body. Generally, DNA damage is recognized and repaired by the DNA damage response (DDR) machinery, and the cells survive. When repair fails, the genomic integrity of the cell is disrupted—a hallmark of cancer. In addition, the DDR plays a dual role in cancer development and therapy. Cancer radiotherapy and chemotherapy are designed to eliminate cancer cells by inducing DNA damage, which in turn can promote tumorigenesis. Over the past two decades, an increasing number of microRNAs (miRNAs), small noncoding RNAs, have been identified as participating in the processes regulating tumorigenesis and responses to cancer treatment with radiation therapy or genotoxic chemotherapies, by modulating the DDR. The purpose of this review is to summarize the recent findings on how miRNAs regulate the DDR and discuss the therapeutic functions of miRNAs in cancer in the context of DDR regulation. PMID:27973455

  17. Autophagy positively regulates DNA damage recognition by nucleotide excision repair.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Lei; Zhao, Baozhong; Shah, Palak; Sample, Ashley; Yang, Seungwon; He, Yu-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Macroautophagy (hereafter autophagy) is a cellular catabolic process that is essential for maintaining tissue homeostasis and regulating various normal and pathologic processes in human diseases including cancer. One cancer-driving process is accumulation of genetic mutations due to impaired DNA damage repair, including nucleotide excision repair. Here we show that autophagy positively regulates nucleotide excision repair through enhancing DNA damage recognition by the DNA damage sensor proteins XPC and DDB2 via 2 pathways. First, autophagy deficiency downregulates the transcription of XPC through TWIST1-dependent activation of the transcription repressor complex E2F4-RBL2. Second, autophagy deficiency impairs the recruitment of DDB2 to ultraviolet radiation (UV)-induced DNA damage sites through TWIST1-mediated inhibition of EP300. In mice, the pharmacological autophagy inhibitor Spautin-1 promotes UVB-induced tumorigenesis, whereas the autophagy inducer rapamycin reduces UVB-induced tumorigenesis. These findings demonstrate the crucial role of autophagy in maintaining proper nucleotide excision repair in mammalian cells and suggest a previously unrecognized tumor-suppressive mechanism of autophagy in cancer.

  18. DNA Damage, Fruits and Vegetables and Breast Cancer Prevention

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-08-01

    fruits and vegetables per day for a total of 8 weeks on measures of oxidative damage to DNA and lipids is being determined. Urine and blood ... components are being assessed for oxidative endpoints and plasma is being evaluated for biochemical markers of edible plant consumption. Body Approved

  19. DETECTION OF DNA DAMAGE USING A FIBEROPTIC BIOSENSOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid and sensitive fiber optic biosensor assay for radiation-induced DNA damage is reported. For this assay, a biotin-labeled capture oligonucleotide (38 mer) was immobilized to an avidin-coated quartz fiber. Hybridization of a dye-labeled complementary sequence was observed...

  20. Modeling the Study of DNA Damage Responses in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Specks, Julia; Nieto-Soler, Maria; Lopez-Contreras, Andres J; Fernandez-Capetillo, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Summary Damaged DNA has a profound impact on mammalian health and overall survival. In addition to being the source of mutations that initiate cancer, the accumulation of toxic amounts of DNA damage can cause severe developmental diseases and accelerate ageing. Therefore, understanding how cells respond to DNA damage has become one of the most intense areas of biomedical research in the recent years. However, whereas most mechanistic studies derive from in vitro or in cellulo work, the impact of a given mutation on a living organism is largely unpredictable. For instance, why BRCA1 mutations preferentially lead to breast cancer whereas mutations compromising mismatch repair drive colon cancer is still not understood. In this context, evaluating the specific physiological impact of mutations that compromise genome integrity has become crucial for a better dimensioning of our knowledge. We here describe the various technologies that can be used for modeling mutations in mice, and provide a review of the genes and pathways that have been modeled so far in the context of DNA damage responses. PMID:25636482

  1. Mitochondrial DNA damage induces apoptosis in senescent cells

    PubMed Central

    Laberge, R-M; Adler, D; DeMaria, M; Mechtouf, N; Teachenor, R; Cardin, G B; Desprez, P-Y; Campisi, J; Rodier, F

    2013-01-01

    Senescence is a cellular response to damage and stress. The senescence response prevents cancer by suppressing the proliferation of cells with a compromised genome and contributes to optimal wound healing in normal tissues. Persistent senescent cells are also thought to drive aging and age-associated pathologies through their secretion of inflammatory factors that modify the tissue microenvironment and alter the function of nearby normal or transformed cells. Understanding how senescent cells alter the microenvironment would be aided by the ability to induce or eliminate senescent cells at will in vivo. Here, we combine the use of the synthetic nucleoside analog ganciclovir (GCV) with herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk) activity to create or eliminate senescent human cells. We show that low concentrations of GCV induce senescence through the accumulation of nuclear DNA damage while higher concentrations of GCV, similar to those used in vivo, kill non-dividing senescent cells via mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage and caspase-dependent apoptosis. Using this system, we effectively eliminated xenografted normal human senescent fibroblasts or induced senescence in human breast cancer cells in vivo. Thus, cellular senescence and mtDNA damage are outcomes of synthetic nucleoside analog treatment, indicating that the GCV–HSVtk combination can be used effectively to promote the targeted formation or eradication of senescent cells. PMID:23868060

  2. Mitochondrial DNA damage induces apoptosis in senescent cells.

    PubMed

    Laberge, R-M; Adler, D; DeMaria, M; Mechtouf, N; Teachenor, R; Cardin, G B; Desprez, P-Y; Campisi, J; Rodier, F

    2013-07-18

    Senescence is a cellular response to damage and stress. The senescence response prevents cancer by suppressing the proliferation of cells with a compromised genome and contributes to optimal wound healing in normal tissues. Persistent senescent cells are also thought to drive aging and age-associated pathologies through their secretion of inflammatory factors that modify the tissue microenvironment and alter the function of nearby normal or transformed cells. Understanding how senescent cells alter the microenvironment would be aided by the ability to induce or eliminate senescent cells at will in vivo. Here, we combine the use of the synthetic nucleoside analog ganciclovir (GCV) with herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk) activity to create or eliminate senescent human cells. We show that low concentrations of GCV induce senescence through the accumulation of nuclear DNA damage while higher concentrations of GCV, similar to those used in vivo, kill non-dividing senescent cells via mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage and caspase-dependent apoptosis. Using this system, we effectively eliminated xenografted normal human senescent fibroblasts or induced senescence in human breast cancer cells in vivo. Thus, cellular senescence and mtDNA damage are outcomes of synthetic nucleoside analog treatment, indicating that the GCV-HSVtk combination can be used effectively to promote the targeted formation or eradication of senescent cells.

  3. DNA damage, neuronal and glial cell death and neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Barzilai, Ari

    2010-11-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is a key factor in the maintenance of genome stability. As such, it is a central axis in sustaining cellular homeostasis in a variety of contexts: development, growth, differentiation, and maintenance of the normal life cycle of the cell. It is now clear that diverse mechanisms encompassing cell cycle regulation, repair pathways, many aspects of cellular metabolism, and cell death are inter-linked and act in concert in response to DNA damage. Defects in the DDR in proliferating cells can lead to cancer, while DDR defects in neurons may result in neurodegeneration. Mature neurons are highly differentiated, post-mitotic cells that cannot be replenished after disease or trauma. Their high metabolic activity generates large amounts of reactive oxygen species with DNA damaging capacity. Moreover, their intense transcriptional activity increases the potential for genomic DNA damage. Respectively, neurons have elaborate mechanisms to defend the integrity of their genome, thus ensuring their longevity and functionality in the face of these threats. Over the course of the past two decades, there has been a substantial increase in our understanding of the role of glial cells in supporting the neuronal cell DDR and longevity. This review article focuses on the potential role of the DDR in the etiology and pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, and in addition, it describes various aspects of glial cell functionality in two genomic instability disorders: ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) and Nijmegen breakage syndrome.

  4. UV Radiation Damage and Bacterial DNA Repair Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zion, Michal; Guy, Daniel; Yarom, Ruth; Slesak, Michaela

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on a simple hands-on laboratory procedure for high school students in studying both radiation damage and DNA repair systems in bacteria. The sensitivity to ultra-violet (UV) radiation of both "Escherichia coli" and "Serratia marcescens" is tested by radiating them for varying time periods. Two growth temperatures are used in…

  5. Electrochemical DNA biosensor for detection of DNA damage induced by hydroxyl radicals.

    PubMed

    Hájková, Andrea; Barek, Jiří; Vyskočil, Vlastimil

    2017-03-01

    A simple electrochemical DNA biosensor based on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was prepared by adsorbing double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) onto the GCE surface and subsequently used for the detection of dsDNA damage induced by hydroxyl radicals. Investigation of the mutual interaction between hydroxyl radicals and dsDNA was conducted using a combination of several electrochemical detection techniques: square-wave voltammetry for direct monitoring the oxidation of dsDNA bases, and cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy as indirect electrochemical methods making use of the redox-active indicator [Fe(CN)6](4-/3-). Hydroxyl radicals were generated electrochemically on the surface of a boron-doped diamond electrode and chemically (via the Fenton's reaction or the auto-oxidation of Fe(II)). The extent of dsDNA damage by electrochemically generated hydroxyl radicals depended on the current density applied to the generating electrode: by applying 5, 10, and 50mAcm(-2), selected relative biosensor responses decreased after 3min incubation from 100% to 38%, 27%, and 3%, respectively. Chemically generated hydroxyl radicals caused less pronounced dsDNA damage, and their damaging activity depended on the form of Fe(II) ions: decreases to 49% (Fenton's reaction; Fe(II) complexed with EDTA) and 33% (auto-oxidation of Fe(II); Fe(II) complexed with dsDNA) were observed after 10min incubation.

  6. DNA Damage and Genomic Instability Induced by Inappropriate DNA Re-Replication

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    ml a that sustained rereplication leads to a dramatic decrease factor. Samples were fixed in 67% ethanol (vol/vol), washed twice with PBS, and...significant decrease in cell viability and a cellular DNA damage response. Strikingly, we have observed DNA damage in the absence of a classical...genome re-replicates. In this reporting period, we have shown that re-replication induces a rapid and significant decrease in cell viability and a

  7. Chemistry and Structural Biology of DNA Damage and Biological Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Michael P.; Huang, Hai; Brown, Kyle L.; Shanmugam, Ganesh

    2013-01-01

    The formation of adducts by the reaction of chemicals with DNA is a critical step for the initiation of carcinogenesis. The structural analysis of various DNA adducts reveals that conformational and chemical rearrangements and interconversions are a common theme. Conformational changes are modulated both by the nature of adduct and the base sequences neighboring the lesion sites. Equilibria between conformational states may modulate both DNA repair and error-prone replication past these adducts. Likewise, chemical rearrangements of initially formed DNA adducts are also modulated both by the nature of adducts and the base sequences neighboring the lesion sites. In this review, we focus on DNA damage caused by a number of environmental and endogenous agents, and biological consequences. PMID:21922653

  8. DNA Damage Repair in the Context of Plant Chromatin1

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The integrity of DNA molecules is constantly challenged. All organisms have developed mechanisms to detect and repair multiple types of DNA lesions. The basic principles of DNA damage repair (DDR) in prokaryotes and unicellular and multicellular eukaryotes are similar, but the association of DNA with nucleosomes in eukaryotic chromatin requires mechanisms that allow access of repair enzymes to the lesions. This is achieved by chromatin-remodeling factors, and their necessity for efficient DDR has recently been demonstrated for several organisms and repair pathways. Plants share many features of chromatin organization and DNA repair with fungi and animals, but they differ in other, important details, which are both interesting and relevant for our understanding of genome stability and genetic diversity. In this Update, we compare the knowledge of the role of chromatin and chromatin-modifying factors during DDR in plants with equivalent systems in yeast and humans. We emphasize plant-specific elements and discuss possible implications. PMID:26089404

  9. Phototoxicity mechanisms: chlorpromazine photosensitized damage to DNA and cell membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Kochevar, K.E.

    1981-07-01

    Photosensitized damage to biological molecules is the initial process in phototoxic responses. It is now recognized that many phototoxic compounds can photosensitize damage to more than one type of biological substrate. The in vitro light-initiated reactions of phototoxic compounds with DNA, soluble proteins and membrane components can be classified by their molecular mechanisms: (1) those in which an excited state of the phototoxic compound (or an unstable species derived from it) reacts directly with the biological substrate and (2) those in which a molecule derived from the phototoxic compound (a photoproduct or an activated oxygen species) reacts with the biological substrate. This paper describes the mechanisms by which chlorpromazine photosensitizes damage to membranes, protein and DNA and compares them to the mechanisms of photosensitization by psoralens, porphyrins, dyes, and other molecules.

  10. How do male germ cells handle DNA damage?

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Ann-Karin; Lindeman, Birgitte; Wiger, Richard; Duale, Nur; Brunborg, Gunnar . E-mail: gunnar.brunborg@fhi.no

    2005-09-01

    Male reproductive health has received considerable attention in recent years. In addition to declining sperm quality, fertility problems and increased incidence of testicular cancer, there is accumulating evidence that genetic damage, in the form of unrepaired DNA lesions or de novo mutations, may be transmitted via sperm to the offspring. Such genetic damage may arise from environmental exposure or via endogenously formed reactive species, in stem cells or during spermatogenesis. Damaged testicular cells not removed by apoptosis rely on DNA repair for their genomic integrity to be preserved. To identify factors with potentially harmful effects on testicular cells and to characterise associated risk, a thorough understanding of repair mechanisms in these cells is of particular importance. Based on results from our own and other laboratories, we discuss the current knowledge of different pathways of excision repair in rodent and human testicular cells. It has become evident that, in human spermatogenic cells, some repair functions are indeed non-functional.

  11. Nitrous acid induced damage in T7 DNA and phage

    SciTech Connect

    Scearce, L.M.; Masker, W.E.

    1986-05-01

    The response of bacteriophage T7 to nitrous acid damage was investigated. The T7 system allows in vitro mimicry of most aspects of in vivo DNA metabolism. Nitrous acid is of special interest since it has been previously shown to induce deletions and point mutations as well as novel adducts in DNA. T7 phage was exposed to 56 mM nitrous acid at pH 4.6 in vivo, causing a time dependent 98% decrease in survival for each 10 min duration of exposure to nitrous acid. These studies were extended to include examination of pure T7 DNA exposed in vitro to nitrous acid conditions identical to those used in the in vivo survival studies. The treated DNA was dialyzed to remove the nitrous acid and the DNA was encapsulated into empty phage heads. These in vitro packaged phage showed a survival curve analogous to the in vivo system. There was no change in survival when either in vitro or in vivo exposed phage were grown on wild type E. coli or on E. coli strains deficient in DNA repair due to mutations in DNA polymerase I, exonuclease III or a uvrA mutation. Survival was not increased when nitrous acid treated T7 were grown on E. coli induced for SOS repair. In vitro replication of nitrous acid treated DNA showed a time dependent decrease in the total amount of DNA synthesized.

  12. Diseases Associated with Defective Responses to DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    O’Driscoll, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Within the last decade, multiple novel congenital human disorders have been described with genetic defects in known and/or novel components of several well-known DNA repair and damage response pathways. Examples include disorders of impaired nucleotide excision repair, DNA double-strand and single-strand break repair, as well as compromised DNA damage-induced signal transduction including phosphorylation and ubiquitination. These conditions further reinforce the importance of multiple genome stability pathways for health and development in humans. Furthermore, these conditions inform our knowledge of the biology of the mechanics of genome stability and in some cases provide potential routes to help exploit these pathways therapeutically. Here, I will review a selection of these exciting findings from the perspective of the disorders themselves, describing how they were identified, how genotype informs phenotype, and how these defects contribute to our growing understanding of genome stability pathways. PMID:23209155

  13. DNA damage response defect in Williams-Beuren syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Guenat, David; Merla, Giuseppe; Deconinck, Eric; Borg, Christophe; Rohrlich, Pierre-Simon

    2017-01-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS, no. OMIM 194050) is a rare multisystem genetic disorder caused by a microdeletion on chromosome 7q11.23 and characterized by cardiovascular malformations, mental retardation, and a specific facial dysmorphism. Recently, we reported that a series of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma occurs in children with WBS and thus hypothesized that a predisposition to cancer may be associated with this genetic disorder. The aim of the present study was to ascertain the role played by three genes hemizygously deleted in WBS (RFC2, GTF2I and BAZ1B) in DNA damage response pathways. Cell proliferation, cell cycle analysis, γ-H2A.X induction, and expression of DNA damage response proteins were investigated upon exposure to genotoxic treatments in WBS patient-derived primary fibroblasts and in the 293T cell line treated with specific siRNAs targeting RFC2, GTF2I and BAZ1B. An impaired hydroxyurea-induced phosphorylation of CHK1 was observed in the WBS cells. However, this defective DNA damage response was not associated with an increased sensitivity to genotoxic agents. In addition, depletion of RFC2, GTF2I and BAZ1B using specific siRNAs did not have a significant impact on the DNA damage response in 293T cells. Our results highlight that the ATR-dependent DNA damage response is impaired in WBS patient cells but is also dispensable for viability when these cells undergo a genotoxic stress. The mechanism by which the ATR pathway is impaired in WBS warrants elucidation through further investigation. PMID:28098859

  14. DNA Damage: A Main Determinant of Vascular Aging.

    PubMed

    Bautista-Niño, Paula K; Portilla-Fernandez, Eliana; Vaughan, Douglas E; Danser, A H Jan; Roks, Anton J M

    2016-05-18

    Vascular aging plays a central role in health problems and mortality in older people. Apart from the impact of several classical cardiovascular risk factors on the vasculature, chronological aging remains the single most important determinant of cardiovascular problems. The causative mechanisms by which chronological aging mediates its impact, independently from classical risk factors, remain to be elucidated. In recent years evidence has accumulated that unrepaired DNA damage may play an important role. Observations in animal models and in humans indicate that under conditions during which DNA damage accumulates in an accelerated rate, functional decline of the vasculature takes place in a similar but more rapid or more exaggerated way than occurs in the absence of such conditions. Also epidemiological studies suggest a relationship between DNA maintenance and age-related cardiovascular disease. Accordingly, mouse models of defective DNA repair are means to study the mechanisms involved in biological aging of the vasculature. We here review the evidence of the role of DNA damage in vascular aging, and present mechanisms by which genomic instability interferes with regulation of the vascular tone. In addition, we present potential remedies against vascular aging induced by genomic instability. Central to this review is the role of diverse types of DNA damage (telomeric, non-telomeric and mitochondrial), of cellular changes (apoptosis, senescence, autophagy), mediators of senescence and cell growth (plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP)/senescence-messaging secretome (SMS), insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) signaling), the adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) axis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) vs. endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (c

  15. DNA Damage: A Main Determinant of Vascular Aging

    PubMed Central

    Bautista-Niño, Paula K.; Portilla-Fernandez, Eliana; Vaughan, Douglas E.; Danser, A. H. Jan; Roks, Anton J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Vascular aging plays a central role in health problems and mortality in older people. Apart from the impact of several classical cardiovascular risk factors on the vasculature, chronological aging remains the single most important determinant of cardiovascular problems. The causative mechanisms by which chronological aging mediates its impact, independently from classical risk factors, remain to be elucidated. In recent years evidence has accumulated that unrepaired DNA damage may play an important role. Observations in animal models and in humans indicate that under conditions during which DNA damage accumulates in an accelerated rate, functional decline of the vasculature takes place in a similar but more rapid or more exaggerated way than occurs in the absence of such conditions. Also epidemiological studies suggest a relationship between DNA maintenance and age-related cardiovascular disease. Accordingly, mouse models of defective DNA repair are means to study the mechanisms involved in biological aging of the vasculature. We here review the evidence of the role of DNA damage in vascular aging, and present mechanisms by which genomic instability interferes with regulation of the vascular tone. In addition, we present potential remedies against vascular aging induced by genomic instability. Central to this review is the role of diverse types of DNA damage (telomeric, non-telomeric and mitochondrial), of cellular changes (apoptosis, senescence, autophagy), mediators of senescence and cell growth (plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP)/senescence-messaging secretome (SMS), insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) signaling), the adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) axis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) vs. endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (c

  16. Hyperactivation of DNA-PK by double-strand break mimicking molecules disorganizes DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Quanz, Maria; Chassoux, Danielle; Berthault, Nathalie; Agrario, Céline; Sun, Jian-Sheng; Dutreix, Marie

    2009-07-21

    Cellular response to DNA damage involves the coordinated activation of cell cycle checkpoints and DNA repair. The early steps of DNA damage recognition and signaling in mammalian cells are not yet fully understood. To investigate the regulation of the DNA damage response (DDR), we designed short and stabilized double stranded DNA molecules (Dbait) mimicking double-strand breaks. We compared the response induced by these molecules to the response induced by ionizing radiation. We show that stable 32-bp long Dbait, induce pan-nuclear phosphorylation of DDR components such as H2AX, Rpa32, Chk1, Chk2, Nbs1 and p53 in various cell lines. However, individual cell analyses reveal that differences exist in the cellular responses to Dbait compared to irradiation. Responses to Dbait: (i) are dependent only on DNA-PK kinase activity and not on ATM, (ii) result in a phosphorylation signal lasting several days and (iii) are distributed in the treated population in an "all-or-none" pattern, in a Dbait-concentration threshold dependant manner. Moreover, despite extensive phosphorylation of the DNA-PK downstream targets, Dbait treated cells continue to proliferate without showing cell cycle delay or apoptosis. Dbait treatment prior to irradiation impaired foci formation of Nbs1, 53BP1 and Rad51 at DNA damage sites and inhibited non-homologous end joining as well as homologous recombination. Together, our results suggest that the hyperactivation of DNA-PK is insufficient for complete execution of the DDR but induces a "false" DNA damage signaling that disorganizes the DNA repair system.

  17. Microfluidic array for simultaneous detection of DNA oxidation and DNA-adduct damage.

    PubMed

    Song, Boya; Shen, Min; Jiang, Di; Malla, Spundana; Mosa, Islam M; Choudhary, Dharamainder; Rusling, James F

    2016-10-21

    Exposure to chemical pollutants and pharmaceuticals may cause health issues caused by metabolite-related toxicity. This paper reports a new microfluidic electrochemical sensor array with the ability to simultaneously detect common types of DNA damage including oxidation and nucleobase adduct formation. Sensors in the 8-electrode screen-printed carbon array were coated with thin films of metallopolymers osmium or ruthenium bipyridyl-poly(vinylpyridine) chloride (OsPVP, RuPVP) along with DNA and metabolic enzymes by layer-by-layer electrostatic assembly. After a reaction step in which test chemicals and other necessary reagents flow over the array, OsPVP selectively detects oxidized guanines on the DNA strands, and RuPVP detects DNA adduction by metabolites on nucleobases. We demonstrate array performance for test chemicals including 17β-estradiol (E2), its metabolites 4-hydroxyestradiol (4-OHE2), 2-hydroxyestradiol (2-OHE2), catechol, 2-nitrosotoluene (2-NO-T), 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), and 2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF). Results revealed DNA-adduct and oxidation damage in a single run to provide a metabolic-genotoxic chemistry screen. The array measures damage directly in unhydrolyzed DNA, and is less expensive, faster, and simpler than conventional methods to detect DNA damage. The detection limit for oxidation is 672 8-oxodG per 10(6) bases. Each sensor requires only 22 ng of DNA, so the mass detection limit is 15 pg (∼10 pmol) 8-oxodG.

  18. Site-Specific Infrared Probes of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jianqiang; Pazos, Ileana M.; Zhang, Wenkai; Culik, Robert M.; Gai, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Infrared spectroscopy has played an instrumental role in studying a wide variety of biological questions. However, in many cases it is impossible or difficult to rely on the intrinsic vibrational modes of biological molecules of interest, such as proteins, to reveal structural and/or environmental information in a site-specific manner. To overcome this limitation, many recent efforts have been dedicated to the development and application of various extrinsic vibrational probes that can be incorporated into biological molecules and used to site-specifically interrogate their structural and/or environmental properties. In this Review, we highlight some recent advancements of this rapidly growing research area. PMID:25580624

  19. DOE site-specific threat assessment

    SciTech Connect

    West, D.J.; Al-Ayat, R.A.; Judd, B.R.

    1985-07-12

    A facility manager faced with the challenges of protecting a nuclear facility against potential threats must consider the likelihood and consequences of such threats, know the capabilities of the facility safeguards and security systems, and make informed decisions about the cost-effectivness of safeguards and security upgrades. To help meet these challenges, the San Francisco Operations Office of the Department of Energy, in conjunction with the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, has developed a site-specific threat assessment approach and a quantitative model to improve the quality and consistency of site-specific threat assessment and resultant security upgrade decisions at sensitive Department of Energy facilities. 5 figs.

  20. Measurement of oxidatively generated base damage in cellular DNA.

    PubMed

    Cadet, Jean; Douki, Thierry; Ravanat, Jean-Luc

    2011-06-03

    This survey focuses on the critical evaluation of the main methods that are currently available for monitoring single and complex oxidatively generated damage to cellular DNA. Among chromatographic methods, HPLC-ESI-MS/MS and to a lesser extent HPLC-ECD which is restricted to a few electroactive nucleobases and nucleosides are appropriate for measuring the formation of single and clustered DNA lesions. Such methods that require optimized protocols for DNA extraction and digestion are sensitive enough for measuring base lesions formed under conditions of severe oxidative stress including exposure to ionizing radiation, UVA light and high intensity UVC laser pulses. In contrast application of GC-MS and HPLC-MS methods that are subject to major drawbacks have been shown to lead to overestimated values of DNA damage. Enzymatic methods that are based on the use of DNA repair glycosylases in order to convert oxidized bases into strand breaks are suitable, even if they are far less specific than HPLC methods, to deal with low levels of single modifications. Several other methods including immunoassays and (32)P-postlabeling methods that are still used suffer from drawbacks and therefore are not recommended. Another difficult topic is the measurement of oxidatively generated clustered DNA lesions that is currently achieved using enzymatic approaches and that would necessitate further investigations.

  1. DNA damage response induced by HZE particles in human cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, David; Aroumougame, Asaithamby

    Convincing evidences indicate that high-linear energy transfer (LET) ionizing radiation (IR) induced complex DNA lesions are more difficult to repair than isolated DNA lesions induced by low-LET IR; this has been associated with the increased RBE for cell killing, chromosomal aberrations, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis in high energy charged-particle irradiated human cells. We have employed an in situ method to directly monitor induction and repair of clustered DNA lesions at the single-cell level. We showed, consistent with biophysical modeling, that the kinetics of loss of clustered DNA lesions was substantially compromised in human fibroblasts. The unique spatial distribution of different types of DNA lesions within the clustered damages determined the cellular ability to repair these damages. Importantly, examination of metaphase cells derived from HZE particle irradiated cells revealed that the extent of chromosome aberrations directly correlated with the levels of unrepaired clustered DNA lesions. In addition, we used a novel organotypic human lung three-dimensional (3D) model to investigate the biological significance of unrepaired DNA lesions in differentiated lung epithelial cells. We found that complex DNA lesions induced by HZE particles were even more difficult to be repaired in organotypic 3D culture, resulting enhanced cell killing and chromosome aberrations. Our data suggest that DNA repair capability in differentiated cells renders them vulnerable to DSBs, promoting genome instability that may lead to carcinogenesis. As the organotypic 3D model mimics human lung, it opens up new experimental approaches to explore the effect of radiation in vivo and will have important implications for evaluating radiation risk in human tissues.

  2. Carbon dots based FRET for the detection of DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Kudr, Jiri; Richtera, Lukas; Xhaxhiu, Kledi; Hynek, David; Heger, Zbynek; Zitka, Ondrej; Adam, Vojtech

    2017-02-09

    Here, we aimed our attention at the synthesis of carbon dots (C-dots) with the ability to interact with DNA to suggest an approach for the detection of DNA damage. Primarily, C-dots modified with amine moieties were synthesized using the one-step microwave pyrolysis of citric acid in the presence of diethylenetriamine. The C-dots showed strong photoluminescence with a quantum yield of 4%. In addition, the C-dots (2.8±0.8nm) possessed a good colloidal stability and exhibited a positive surface charge (ζ=36mV) at a neutral pH. An interaction study of the C-dots and the DNA fragment of λ bacteriophage was performed, and the DNA binding resulted in changes to the photoluminescent and absorption properties of the C-dots. A binding of the C-dots to DNA was also observed as a change to DNA electrophoretic mobility and a decreased ability to intercalate ethidium bromide (EtBr). Moreover, the Förster (or fluorescence) resonance energy transfer (FRET) between the C-dots and EtBr was studied, in which the C-dots serve as an excitation energy donor and the EtBr serves as an acceptor. When DNA was damaged using ultraviolet (UV) radiation (λ=254nm) and hydroxyl radicals, the intensity of the emitted photoluminescence at 612nm significantly decreased. The concept was proved on analysis of the genomic DNA from PC-3 cells and DNA isolated from melanoma tissues.

  3. Situation-dependent repair of DNA damage in yeast

    SciTech Connect

    von Borstel, R.C.; Hastings, P.J.

    1985-01-01

    The concept of channelling of lesions in DNA into defined repair systems has been used to explain many aspects of induced and spontaneous mutation. The channelling hypothesis states that lesions excluded from one repair process will be taken up by another repair process. This is a simplification. The three known modes of repair of damage induced by radiation are not equivalent modes of repair; they are, instead, different solutions to the problem of replacement of damaged molecules with new molecules which have the same informational content as those that were damaged. The mode of repair that is used is the result of the response to the situation in which the damage takes place. Thus, when the most likely mode of repair does not take place, then the situation changes with respect to the repair of the lesion; the lesion may enter the replication fork and be reparable by another route.

  4. Interactions and Localization of Escherichia coli Error-Prone DNA Polymerase IV after DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Mallik, Sarita; Popodi, Ellen M.; Hanson, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Escherichia coli's DNA polymerase IV (Pol IV/DinB), a member of the Y family of error-prone polymerases, is induced during the SOS response to DNA damage and is responsible for translesion bypass and adaptive (stress-induced) mutation. In this study, the localization of Pol IV after DNA damage was followed using fluorescent fusions. After exposure of E. coli to DNA-damaging agents, fluorescently tagged Pol IV localized to the nucleoid as foci. Stepwise photobleaching indicated ∼60% of the foci consisted of three Pol IV molecules, while ∼40% consisted of six Pol IV molecules. Fluorescently tagged Rep, a replication accessory DNA helicase, was recruited to the Pol IV foci after DNA damage, suggesting that the in vitro interaction between Rep and Pol IV reported previously also occurs in vivo. Fluorescently tagged RecA also formed foci after DNA damage, and Pol IV localized to them. To investigate if Pol IV localizes to double-strand breaks (DSBs), an I-SceI endonuclease-mediated DSB was introduced close to a fluorescently labeled LacO array on the chromosome. After DSB induction, Pol IV localized to the DSB site in ∼70% of SOS-induced cells. RecA also formed foci at the DSB sites, and Pol IV localized to the RecA foci. These results suggest that Pol IV interacts with RecA in vivo and is recruited to sites of DSBs to aid in the restoration of DNA replication. IMPORTANCE DNA polymerase IV (Pol IV/DinB) is an error-prone DNA polymerase capable of bypassing DNA lesions and aiding in the restart of stalled replication forks. In this work, we demonstrate in vivo localization of fluorescently tagged Pol IV to the nucleoid after DNA damage and to DNA double-strand breaks. We show colocalization of Pol IV with two proteins: Rep DNA helicase, which participates in replication, and RecA, which catalyzes recombinational repair of stalled replication forks. Time course experiments suggest that Pol IV recruits Rep and that RecA recruits Pol IV. These findings

  5. DNA repair and the evolution of transformation in Bacillus subtilis. 3. Sex with damaged DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Hoelzer, M.A.; Michod, R.E. )

    1991-06-01

    Natural genetic transformation in the bacterium Bacillus subtilis provides an experimental system for studying the evolutionary function of sexual recombination. The repair hypothesis proposes that during transformation the exogenous DNA taken up by cells is used as template for recombinational repair of damages in the recipient cell's genome. Earlier results demonstrated that the population density of transformed cells (i.e., sexual cells) increases, relative to nontransformed cells (primarily asexual cells), with increasing dosage of ultraviolet irradiation, provided that the cells are transformed with undamaged homologous DNA after they have become damaged. In nature, however, donor DNA for transformation is likely to come from cells that are as damaged as the recipient cells. In order to better simulate the effects of transformation in natural populations we conducted similar experiments as those just described using damaged donor DNA. The authors document in this report that transformants continue to increase in relative density even if they are transformed with damaged donor DNA. These results suggest that sites of transformation are often damaged sites in the recipient cell's genome.

  6. Self-cytoplasmic DNA upregulates the mutator enzyme APOBEC3A leading to chromosomal DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Suspène, Rodolphe; Mussil, Bianka; Laude, Hélène; Caval, Vincent; Berry, Noémie; Bouzidi, Mohamed S; Thiers, Valérie; Wain-Hobson, Simon; Vartanian, Jean-Pierre

    2017-01-18

    Foreign and self-cytoplasmic DNA are recognized by numerous DNA sensor molecules leading to the production of type I interferons. Such DNA agonists should be degraded otherwise cells would be chronically stressed. Most human APOBEC3 cytidine deaminases can initiate catabolism of cytoplasmic mitochondrial DNA. Using the human myeloid cell line THP-1 with an interferon inducible APOBEC3A gene, we show that cytoplasmic DNA triggers interferon α and β production through the RNA polymerase III transcription/RIG-I pathway leading to massive upregulation of APOBEC3A By catalyzing C→U editing in single stranded DNA fragments, the enzyme prevents them from re-annealing so attenuating the danger signal. The price to pay is chromosomal DNA damage in the form of CG→TA mutations and double stranded DNA breaks which, in the context of chronic inflammation, could drive cells down the path toward cancer.

  7. Detection of DNA damage based on metal-mediated molecular beacon and DNA strands displacement reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Yanxiang; Wei, Min; Wei, Wei; Yin, Lihong; Pu, Yuepu; Liu, Songqin

    2014-01-01

    DNA hairpin structure probes are usually designed by forming intra-molecular duplex based on Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds. In this paper, a molecular beacon based on silver ions-mediated cytosine-Ag+-cytosine base pairs was used to detect DNA. The inherent characteristic of the metal ligation facilitated the design of functional probe and the adjustment of its binding strength compared to traditional DNA hairpin structure probes, which make it be used to detect DNA in a simple, rapid and easy way with the help of DNA strands displacement reaction. The method was sensitive and also possesses the good specificity to differentiate the single base mismatched DNA from the complementary DNA. It was also successfully applied to study the damage effect of classic genotoxicity chemicals such as styrene oxide and sodium arsenite on DNA, which was significant in food science, environmental science and pharmaceutical science.

  8. Targeting ATR in DNA damage response and cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Fokas, Emmanouil; Prevo, Remko; Hammond, Ester M; Brunner, Thomas B; McKenna, W Gillies; Muschel, Ruth J

    2014-02-01

    The ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR) plays an important role in maintaining genome integrity during DNA replication through the phosphorylation and activation of Chk1 and regulation of the DNA damage response. Preclinical studies have shown that disruption of ATR pathway can exacerbate the levels of replication stress in oncogene-driven murine tumors to promote cell killing. Additionally, inhibition of ATR can sensitise tumor cells to radiation or chemotherapy. Accumulating evidence suggests that targeting ATR can selectively sensitize cancer cells but not normal cells to DNA damage. Furthermore, in hypoxic conditions, ATR blockade results in overloading replication stress and DNA damage response causing cell death. Despite the attractiveness of ATR inhibition in the treatment of cancer, specific ATR inhibitors have remained elusive. In the last two years however, selective ATR inhibitors suitable for in vitro and - most recently - in vivo studies have been identified. In this article, we will review the literature on ATR function, its role in DDR and the potential of ATR inhibition to enhance the efficacy of radiation and chemotherapy.

  9. p53 in the DNA damage repair process

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Ashley B.; Schumacher, Björn

    2016-01-01

    The cells in the human body are continuously challenged by a variety of genotoxic attacks. Erroneous repair of the DNA can lead to mutations and chromosomal aberrations that can alter the functions of tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes, thus causing cancer development. As a central tumor suppressor, p53 guards the genome by orchestrating a variety of DNA damage response (DDR) mechanisms. Already early in metazoan evolution, p53 started controlling the apoptotic demise of genomically compromised cells. p53 plays a prominent role as a facilitator of DNA repair by halting the cell cycle to allow time for the repair machineries to restore genome stability. In addition, p53 took on diverse roles to also directly impact the activity of various DNA repair systems. It thus appears as if p53 is multitasking in protecting from cancer development by maintaining genome stability. PMID:27048304

  10. Skeletal muscle DNA damage precedes spinal motor neuron DNA damage in a mouse model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA).

    PubMed

    Fayzullina, Saniya; Martin, Lee J

    2014-01-01

    Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is a hereditary childhood disease that causes paralysis by progressive degeneration of skeletal muscles and spinal motor neurons. SMA is associated with reduced levels of full-length Survival of Motor Neuron (SMN) protein, due to mutations in the Survival of Motor Neuron 1 gene. The mechanisms by which lack of SMN causes SMA pathology are not known, making it very difficult to develop effective therapies. We investigated whether DNA damage is a perinatal pathological event in SMA, and whether DNA damage and cell death first occur in skeletal muscle or spinal cord of SMA mice. We used a mouse model of severe SMA to ascertain the extent of cell death and DNA damage throughout the body of prenatal and newborn mice. SMA mice at birth (postnatal day 0) exhibited internucleosomal fragmentation in genomic DNA from hindlimb skeletal muscle, but not in genomic DNA from spinal cord. SMA mice at postnatal day 5, compared with littermate controls, exhibited increased apoptotic cell death profiles in skeletal muscle, by hematoxylin and eosin, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling, and electron microscopy. SMA mice had no increased cell death, no loss of choline acetyl transferase (ChAT)-positive motor neurons, and no overt pathology in the ventral horn of the spinal cord. At embryonic days 13 and 15.5, SMA mice did not exhibit statistically significant increases in cell death profiles in spinal cord or skeletal muscle. Motor neuron numbers in the ventral horn, as identified by ChAT immunoreactivity, were comparable in SMA mice and control littermates at embryonic day 15.5 and postnatal day 5. These observations demonstrate that in SMA, disease in skeletal muscle emerges before pathology in spinal cord, including loss of motor neurons. Overall, this work identifies DNA damage and cell death in skeletal muscle as therapeutic targets for SMA.

  11. Reduction in oxidatively generated DNA damage following smoking cessation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cigarette smoking is a known cause of cancer, and cancer may be in part due to effects of oxidative stress. However, whether smoking cessation reverses oxidatively induced DNA damage unclear. The current study sought to examine the extent to which three DNA lesions showed significant reductions after participants quit smoking. Methods Participants (n = 19) in this study were recruited from an ongoing 16-week smoking cessation clinical trial and provided blood samples from which leukocyte DNA was extracted and assessed for 3 DNA lesions (thymine glycol modification [d(TgpA)]; formamide breakdown of pyrimidine bases [d(TgpA)]; 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine [d(Gh)]) via liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Change in lesions over time was assessed using generalized estimating equations, controlling for gender, age, and treatment condition. Results Overall time effects for the d(TgpA) (χ2(3) = 8.068, p < 0.045), d(PfpA) (χ2(3) = 8.477, p < 0.037), and d(Gh) (χ2(3) = 37.599, p < 0.001) lesions were seen, indicating levels of each decreased significantly after CO-confirmed smoking cessation. The d(TgpA) and d(PfpA) lesions show relatively greater rebound at Week 16 compared to the d(Gh) lesion (88% of baseline for d(TgpA), 64% of baseline for d(PfpA), vs 46% of baseline for d(Gh)). Conclusions Overall, results from this analysis suggest that cigarette smoking contributes to oxidatively induced DNA damage, and that smoking cessation appears to reduce levels of specific damage markers between 30-50 percent in the short term. Future research may shed light on the broader array of oxidative damage influenced by smoking and over longer durations of abstinence, to provide further insights into mechanisms underlying carcinogenesis. PMID:21569419

  12. In cellulo phosphorylation of XRCC4 Ser320 by DNA-PK induced by DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Mukesh Kumar; Imamichi, Shoji; Fukuchi, Mikoto; Samarth, Ravindra Mahadeo; Tomita, Masanori; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa

    2016-01-01

    XRCC4 is a protein associated with DNA Ligase IV, which is thought to join two DNA ends at the final step of DNA double-strand break repair through non-homologous end joining. In response to treatment with ionizing radiation or DNA damaging agents, XRCC4 undergoes DNA-PK-dependent phosphorylation. Furthermore, Ser260 and Ser320 (or Ser318 in alternatively spliced form) of XRCC4 were identified as the major phosphorylation sites by purified DNA-PK in vitro through mass spectrometry. However, it has not been clear whether these sites are phosphorylated in vivo in response to DNA damage. In the present study, we generated an antibody that reacts with XRCC4 phosphorylated at Ser320 and examined in cellulo phosphorylation status of XRCC4 Ser320. The phosphorylation of XRCC4 Ser320 was induced by γ-ray irradiation and treatment with Zeocin. The phosphorylation of XRCC4 Ser320 was detected even after 1 Gy irradiation and increased in a manner dependent on radiation dose. The phosphorylation was observed immediately after irradiation and remained mostly unchanged for up to 4 h. The phosphorylation was inhibited by DNA-PK inhibitor NU7441 and was undetectable in DNA-PKcs-deficient cells, indicating that the phosphorylation was mainly mediated by DNA-PK. These results suggested potential usefulness of the phosphorylation status of XRCC4 Ser320 as an indicator of DNA-PK functionality in living cells. PMID:26666690

  13. Site-Specific Rules for Risk Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, William; And Others

    1994-01-01

    This article examines the development of regulatory guidance upon which the technology of risk assessment has matured into a decision-making method of choice. It examines in particular the role of site-specific risk assessment at Superfund sites. (LZ)

  14. DNA damage during glycation of lysine by methylglyoxal: assessment of vitamins in preventing damage.

    PubMed

    Suji, G; Sivakami, S

    2007-11-01

    Amino acids react with methylglyoxal to form advanced glycation end products. This reaction is known to produce free radicals. In this study, cleavage to plasmid DNA was induced by the glycation of lysine with methylglyoxal in the presence of iron(III). This system was found to produce superoxide as well as hydroxyl radicals. The abilities of various vitamins to prevent damage to plasmid DNA were evaluated. Pyridoxal-5-phosphate showed maximum protection, while pyridoxamine showed no protection. The protective abilities could be directly correlated to inhibition of production of hydroxyl and superoxide radicals. Pyridoxal-5-phosphate exhibited low radical scavenging ability as evaluated by its TEAC, but showed maximum protection probably by interfering in free radical production. Pyridoxamine did not inhibit free radical production. Thiamine and thiamine pyrophosphate, both showed protective effects albeit to different extents. Tetrahydrofolic acid showed better antioxidant activity than folic acid but was found to damage DNA by itself probably by superoxide generation.

  15. Gilvocarcin V, a Photodynamic DNA Damaging Agent Of Unusual Potency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elespuru, Rosalie K.; Look, Sally A.

    1988-02-01

    Gilvocarcin V (GV) is a planar, aromatic DNA-intercalating C-glycoside isolated as a natural product antibiotic. In the presence of UVA or visible radiation, it becomes a DNA damaging agent at low doses in both bacterial and mammalian cells. In mice treated without regard to light exposure, GV exhibited antitumor activity at high doses, with little accompanying toxicity. Wavelength-dependence studies showed that lambda prophage induction profiles were similar to (part of) the absorption spectrum of GV, with a peak near 400 nm. However, significant induction at a higher wavelength (546 nm), was observed at relatively high (e.g. 1 μg/m1) concentrations of GV. The DNA damaging activity of GV was dependent on both the concentration of antibiotic and the fluence of radiation in a reciprocal manner. Mutagenesis and DNA binding experiments suggest a preference for interaction with AT-rich regions of DNA, but multiple modes of interaction seem likely. The presence of different C-glycosides on the gilvocarcin V chromophore may alter the pharmacological properties of the molecule, but photoactivation appears to be independent of these groups. The therapeutic possibilities of gilvocarcins remain largely unexplored; the demonstrated potency of these compounds when activated, the reciprocity effect, possibility of structural variation, and apparent lack of toxicity in mammalian systems are properties which could be exploited in therapeutic development.

  16. Melanin photosensitizes ultraviolet light (UVC) DNA damage in pigmented cells

    SciTech Connect

    Huselton, C.A.; Hill, H.Z. )

    1990-01-01

    Melanins, pigments of photoprotection and camouflage, are very photoreactive and can both absorb and emit active oxygen species. Nevertheless, black skinned individuals rarely develop skin cancer and melanin is assumed to act as a solar screen. Since DNA is the target for solar carcinogenesis, the effect of melanin on Ultraviolet (UV)-induced thymine lesions was examined in mouse melanoma and carcinoma cells that varied in melanin content. Cells prelabeled with 14C-dThd were irradiated with UVC; DNA was isolated, purified, degraded to bases by acid hydrolysis and analyzed by HPLC. Thymine dimers were detected in all of the extracts of irradiated cells. Melanotic and hypomelanotic but not mammary carcinoma cell DNA from irradiated cells contained hydrophilic thymine derivatives. The quantity of these damaged bases was a function of both the UVC dose and the cellular melanin content. One such derivative was identified by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy as thymine glycol. The other appears to be derived from thymine glycol by further oxidation during acid hydrolysis of the DNA. The finding of oxidative DNA damage in melanin-containing cells suggests that melanin may be implicated in the etiology of caucasian skin cancer, particularly melanoma. Furthermore, the projected decrease in stratospheric ozone could impact in an unanticipated deleterious manner on dark-skinned individuals.

  17. Melanin photosensitizes ultraviolet light (UVC) DNA damage in pigmented cells.

    PubMed

    Huselton, C A; Hill, H Z

    1990-01-01

    Melanins, pigments of photoprotection and camouflage, are very photoreactive and can both absorb and emit active oxygen species. Nevertheless, black skinned individuals rarely develop skin cancer and melanin is assumed to act as a solar screen. Since DNA is the target for solar carcinogenesis, the effect of melanin on Ultraviolet (UV)-induced thymine lesions was examined in mouse melanoma and carcinoma cells that varied in melanin content. Cells prelabeled with 14C-dThd were irradiated with UVC; DNA was isolated, purified, degraded to bases by acid hydrolysis and analyzed by HPLC. Thymine dimers were detected in all of the extracts of irradiated cells. Melanotic and hypomelanotic but not mammary carcinoma cell DNA from irradiated cells contained hydrophilic thymine derivatives. The quantity of these damaged bases was a function of both the UVC dose and the cellular melanin content. One such derivative was identified by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy as thymine glycol. The other appears to be derived from thymine glycol by further oxidation during acid hydrolysis of the DNA. The finding of oxidative DNA damage in melanin-containing cells suggests that melanin may be implicated in the etiology of caucasian skin cancer, particularly melanoma. Furthermore, the projected decrease in stratospheric ozone could impact in an unanticipated deleterious manner on dark-skinned individuals.

  18. Primary DNA damage in chrome-plating workers.

    PubMed

    Gambelunghe, A; Piccinini, R; Ambrogi, M; Villarini, M; Moretti, M; Marchetti, C; Abbritti, G; Muzi, G

    2003-06-30

    In order to evaluate the primary DNA damage due to occupational exposure to chromium (VI), DNA strand-breaks and apoptosis in peripheral lymphocytes were measured in a group of 19 chrome-plating workers. DNA strand-breaks was assessed by alkaline (pH>13) single-cell microgel electrophoresis ('comet') assay, while apoptosis was measured by flow-cytometry after propidium iodide staining of the cells. Concentrations of chromium in urine, erythrocytes and lymphocytes were investigated as biological indicators of exposure. A group of 18 hospital workers (control group I) and another 20 university personnel (control group II) without exposure to chromium were also studied as controls. The results of the study show that chrome-plating workers have higher levels of chromium in urine, erythrocytes and lymphocytes than unexposed workers. Comet tail moment values, assumed as index of DNA damage, are increased in chromium-exposed workers and results are significantly correlated to chromium lymphocyte concentrations. No difference emerged in the percentage of apoptotic nuclei in exposed and unexposed workers. The study confirms that measurements of chromium in erythrocytes and lymphocytes may provide useful information about recent and past exposure to hexavalent chromium at the workplace. The increase in DNA strand-breaks measured by comet assay suggests this test is valid for the biological monitoring of workers exposed to genotoxic compounds such as chromium (VI).

  19. DNA damage in mammalian cells following heavy-ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Rosander, K.; Frankel, K.A.; Cerda, H.; Phillips, M.H.; Lo, E.H.; Fabrikant, I.; Fabrikant, J.I.; Levy, R.P.

    1989-09-01

    In our laboratory we have been investigating DNA damage and repair in the endothelial and oligodendroglial cells of the mouse brain after irradiation using two different types of heavy ions, helium and neon. The method used, the unwinding technique with subsequent staining of the DNA with acridine orange, has been proven to be useful for nondividing cells and analysis using a microscope photometric technique. Our primary goal has been to obtain a measure of RBE, in the dose range used in clinical treatment of various brain disorders using heavy charged particle radiosurgery. 12 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Site-specific, covalent incorporation of Tus, a DNA-binding protein, on ionic-complementary self-assembling peptide hydrogels using transpeptidase Sortase A as a conjugation tool†Dedicated to the memory of Joachim H. G. Steinke.‡Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Further experimental data. See DOI: 10.1039/c3sm00131hClick here for additional data file.

    PubMed

    Piluso, Susanna; Cassell, Heather C; Gibbons, Jonathan L; Waller, Thomas E; Plant, Nick J; Miller, Aline F; Cavalli, Gabriel

    2013-08-07

    The site-specific conjugation of DNA-binding protein (Tus) to self-assembling peptide FEFEFKFKK was demonstrated. Rheology studies and TEM of the corresponding hydrogels (including PNIPAAm-containing systems) showed no significant variation in properties and hydrogel morphology compared to FEFEFKFKK. Critically, we demonstrate that Tus is accessible within the gel network displaying DNA-binding properties.

  1. Eukaryotic damaged DNA-binding proteins: DNA repair proteins or transcription factors?

    SciTech Connect

    Protic, M.

    1994-12-31

    Recognition and removal of structural defects in the genome, caused by diverse physical and chemical agents, are among the most important cell functions. Proteins that recognize and bind to modified DNA, and thereby initiate damage-induced recovery processes, have been identified in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Damaged DNA-binding (DDB) proteins from prokaryotes are either DNA repair enzymes or noncatalytic subunits of larger DNA repair complexes that participate in excision repair, or in recombinational repair and SOS-mutagenesis. Although the methods employed may not have allowed detection of all eukaryotic DDB proteins and identification of their functions, it appears that during evolution cells have developed a wide array of DDB proteins that can discriminate among the diversity of DNA conformations found in the eukaryotic nucleus, as well as a gene-sharing feature found in DDB proteins that also act as transcription factors.

  2. The comet assay, DNA damage, DNA repair and cytotoxicity: hedgehogs are not always dead.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, Yolanda; Costa, Solange; Collins, Andrew R; Azqueta, Amaya

    2013-07-01

    DNA damage is commonly measured at the level of individual cells using the so-called comet assay (single-cell gel electrophoresis). As the frequency of DNA breaks increases, so does the fraction of the DNA extending towards the anode, forming the comet tail. Comets with almost all DNA in the tail are often referred to as 'hedgehog' comets and are widely assumed to represent apoptotic cells. We review the literature and present theoretical and empirical arguments against this interpretation. The level of DNA damage in these comets is far less than the massive fragmentation that occurs in apoptosis. 'Hedgehog' comets are formed after moderate exposure of cells to, for example, H2O2, but if the cells are incubated for a short period, 'hedgehogs' are no longer seen. We confirm that this is not because DNA has degraded further and been lost from the gel, but because the DNA is repaired. The comet assay may detect the earliest stages of apoptosis, but as it proceeds, comets disappear in a smear of unattached DNA. It is clear that 'hedgehogs' can correspond to one level on a continuum of genotoxic damage, are not diagnostic of apoptosis and should not be regarded as an indicator of cytotoxicity.

  3. Regulation of the DNA Damage Response by DNA-PKcs Inhibitory Phosphorylation of ATM.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yi; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Jiang, Wenxia; Crowe, Jennie L; Zha, Shan; Paull, Tanya T

    2017-01-05

    Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) regulates the DNA damage response as well as DNA double-strand break repair through homologous recombination. Here we show that ATM is hyperactive when the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) is chemically inhibited or when the DNA-PKcs gene is deleted in human cells. Pre-incubation of ATM protein with active DNA-PKcs also significantly reduces ATM activity in vitro. We characterize several phosphorylation sites in ATM that are targets of DNA-PKcs and show that phospho-mimetic mutations at these residues significantly inhibit ATM activity and impair ATM signaling upon DNA damage. In contrast, phospho-blocking mutations at one cluster of sites increase the frequency of apoptosis during normal cell growth. DNA-PKcs, which is integral to the non-homologous end joining pathway, thus negatively regulates ATM activity through phosphorylation of ATM. These observations illuminate an important regulatory mechanism for ATM that also controls DNA repair pathway choice.

  4. Rewiring of genetic networks in response to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Sourav; Mehta, Monika; Kuo, Dwight; Sung, Min-Kyung; Chuang, Ryan; Jaehnig, Eric J; Bodenmiller, Bernd; Licon, Katherine; Copeland, Wilbert; Shales, Michael; Fiedler, Dorothea; Dutkowski, Janusz; Guénolé, Aude; van Attikum, Haico; Shokat, Kevan M; Kolodner, Richard D; Huh, Won-Ki; Aebersold, Ruedi; Keogh, Michael-Christopher; Krogan, Nevan J; Ideker, Trey

    2010-12-03

    Although cellular behaviors are dynamic, the networks that govern these behaviors have been mapped primarily as static snapshots. Using an approach called differential epistasis mapping, we have discovered widespread changes in genetic interaction among yeast kinases, phosphatases, and transcription factors as the cell responds to DNA damage. Differential interactions uncover many gene functions that go undetected in static conditions. They are very effective at identifying DNA repair pathways, highlighting new damage-dependent roles for the Slt2 kinase, Pph3 phosphatase, and histone variant Htz1. The data also reveal that protein complexes are generally stable in response to perturbation, but the functional relations between these complexes are substantially reorganized. Differential networks chart a new type of genetic landscape that is invaluable for mapping cellular responses to stimuli.

  5. DNA polymerase III requirement for repair of DNA damage caused by methyl methanesulfonate and hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Hagensee, M.E.; Bryan, S.K.; Moses, R.E.

    1987-10-01

    The pcbA1 mutation allows DNA replication dependent on DNA polymerase I at the restrictive temperature in polC(Ts) strains. Cells which carry pcbA1, a functional DNA polymerase I, and a temperature-sensitive DNA polymerase III gene were used to study the role of DNA polymerase III in DNA repair. At the restrictive temperature for DNA polymerase III, these strains were more sensitive to the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and hydrogen peroxide than normal cells. The same strains showed no increase in sensitivity to bleomycin, UV light, or psoralen at the restrictive temperature. The sensitivity of these strains to MMS and hydrogen peroxide was not due to the pcbAl allele, and normal sensitivity was restored by the introduction of a chromosomal or cloned DNA polymerase III gene, verifying that the sensitivity was due to loss of DNA polymerase III alpha-subunit activity. A functional DNA polymerase III is required for the reformation of high-molecular-weight DNA after treatment of cells with MMS or hydrogen peroxide, as demonstrated by alkaline sucrose sedimentation results. Thus, it appears that a functional DNA polymerase III is required for the optimal repair of DNA damage by MMS or hydrogen peroxide.

  6. Endogenous DNA Damage and Risk of Testicular Germ Cell Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, M B; Sigurdson, A J; Jones, I M; Thomas, C B; Graubard, B I; Korde, L; Greene, M H; McGlynn, K A

    2008-01-18

    Testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT) are comprised of two histologic groups, seminomas and nonseminomas. We postulated that the possible divergent pathogeneses of these histologies may be partially explained by variable endogenous DNA damage. To assess our hypothesis, we conducted a case-case analysis of seminomas and nonseminomas using the alkaline comet assay to quantify single-strand DNA breaks and alkali-labile sites. The Familial Testicular Cancer study and the U.S. Radiologic Technologists cohort provided 112 TGCT cases (51 seminomas & 61 nonseminomas). A lymphoblastoid cell line was cultured for each patient and the alkaline comet assay was used to determine four parameters: tail DNA, tail length, comet distributed moment (CDM) and Olive tail moment (OTM). Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were estimated using logistic regression. Values for tail length, tail DNA, CDM and OTM were modeled as categorical variables using the 50th and 75th percentiles of the seminoma group. Tail DNA was significantly associated with nonseminoma compared to seminoma (OR{sub 50th percentile} = 3.31, 95%CI: 1.00, 10.98; OR{sub 75th percentile} = 3.71, 95%CI: 1.04, 13.20; p for trend=0.039). OTM exhibited similar, albeit statistically non-significant, risk estimates (OR{sub 50th percentile} = 2.27, 95%CI: 0.75, 6.87; OR{sub 75th percentile} = 2.40, 95%CI: 0.75, 7.71; p for trend=0.12) whereas tail length and CDM showed no association. In conclusion, the results for tail DNA and OTM indicate that endogenous DNA damage levels are higher in patients who develop nonseminoma compared with seminoma. This may partly explain the more aggressive biology and younger age-of-onset of this histologic subgroup compared with the relatively less aggressive, later-onset seminoma.

  7. DNA Repair Decline During Mouse Spermiogenesis Results in the Accumulation of Heritable DNA Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, Francesco; Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2007-12-01

    The post-meiotic phase of mouse spermatogenesis (spermiogenesis) is very sensitive to the genomic effects of environmental mutagens because as male germ cells form mature sperm they progressively lose the ability to repair DNA damage. We hypothesized that repeated exposures to mutagens during this repair-deficient phase result in the accumulation of heritable genomic damage in mouse sperm that leads to chromosomal aberrations in zygotes after fertilization. We used a combination of single or fractionated exposures to diepoxybutane (DEB), a component of tobacco smoke, to investigate how differential DNA repair efficiencies during the three weeks of spermiogenesis affected the accumulation of DEB-induced heritable damage in early spermatids (21-15 days before fertilization, dbf), late spermatids (14-8 dbf) and sperm (7-1 dbf). Analysis of chromosomal aberrations in zygotic metaphases using PAINT/DAPI showed that late spermatids and sperm are unable to repair DEB-induced DNA damage as demonstrated by significant increases (P<0.001) in the frequencies of zygotes with chromosomal aberrations. Comparisons between single and fractionated exposures suggested that the DNA repair-deficient window during late spermiogenesis may be less than two weeks in the mouse and that during this repair-deficient window there is accumulation of DNA damage in sperm. Finally, the dose-response study in sperm indicated a linear response for both single and repeated exposures. These findings show that the differential DNA repair capacity of post-meioitic male germ cells has a major impact on the risk of paternally transmitted heritable damage and suggest that chronic exposures that may occur in the weeks prior to fertilization because of occupational or lifestyle factors (i.e, smoking) can lead to an accumulation of genetic damage in sperm and result in heritable chromosomal aberrations of paternal origin.

  8. DNA repair decline during mouse spermiogenesis results in the accumulation of heritable DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, Francesco; Marchetti, Francesco; Wryobek, Andrew J

    2008-02-21

    The post-meiotic phase of mouse spermatogenesis (spermiogenesis) is very sensitive to the genomic effects of environmental mutagens because as male germ cells form mature sperm they progressively lose the ability to repair DNA damage. We hypothesized that repeated exposures to mutagens during this repair-deficient phase result in the accumulation of heritable genomic damage in mouse sperm that leads to chromosomal aberrations in zygotes after fertilization. We used a combination of single or fractionated exposures to diepoxybutane (DEB), a component of tobacco smoke, to investigate how differential DNA repair efficiencies during the three weeks of spermiogenesis affected the accumulation of DEB-induced heritable damage in early spermatids (21-15 days before fertilization, dbf), late spermatids (14-8 dbf) and sperm (7- 1 dbf). Analysis of chromosomalaberrations in zygotic metaphases using PAINT/DAPI showed that late spermatids and sperm are unable to repair DEB-induced DNA damage as demonstrated by significant increases (P<0.001) in the frequencies of zygotes with chromosomal aberrations. Comparisons between single and fractionated exposures suggested that the DNA repair-deficient window during late spermiogenesis may be less than two weeks in the mouse and that during this repair-deficient window there is accumulation of DNA damage in sperm. Finally, the dose-response study in sperm indicated a linear response for both single and repeated exposures. These findings show that the differential DNA repair capacity of post-meioitic male germ cells has a major impact on the risk of paternally transmitted heritable damage and suggest that chronic exposures that may occur in the weeks prior to fertilization because of occupational or lifestyle factors (i.e, smoking) can lead to an accumulation of genetic damage in sperm and result in heritable chromosomal aberrations of paternal origin.

  9. Botanical Extracts as Medical Countermeasures for Radiation Induced DNA Damage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    seed extract supplements and Labrador tea whole leaf extracts as potential radioprotectants. Three different commercial grape seed extracts were... supplements and Labrador tea whole leaf extracts as potential radioprotectants. A novel assay was used to compare DNA damage in cellular and...concentrations of commercial grape seed extract supplements and Labrador tea. In addition, this work has identified and validated a set of procedures to use

  10. DNA Damage in Embryonic Stem Cells Caused by Nanodiamonds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-03

    have important implications for future applications of NDs in biological applications . KEYWORDS: nanodiamond . DNA damage . embryonic stem cells... Application of Single Fluorescent Nanodiamonds as Cellular Biomarkers. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2007, 104, 727–732. 7. Vial, S.; Mansuy, C.; Sagan...S.; Pozdnyakova, I. O.; Puzyr, A. P. Applications of Nanodiamonds for Separation and Purification of Proteins. Phys. Solid State 2004, 46, 758–760

  11. Recruitment of DNA polymerase eta by FANCD2 in the early response to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Fu, Dechen; Dudimah, Fred Duafalia; Zhang, Jun; Pickering, Anna; Paneerselvam, Jayabal; Palrasu, Manikandan; Wang, Hong; Fei, Peiwen

    2013-03-01

    How Fanconi anemia (FA) protein D2 (FANCD2) performs DNA damage repair remains largely elusive. We report here that translesion synthesis DNA polymerase (pol) eta is a novel mediator of FANCD2 function. We found that wild type (wt) FANCD2, not K561R (mt) FANCD2, can interact with pol eta. Upon DNA damage, the interaction of pol eta with FANCD2 occurs earlier than that with PCNA, which is in concert with our finding that FANCD2 monoubiquitination peaks at an earlier time point than that of PCNA monoubiquitination. FANCD2-null FA patient cells (PD20) carrying histone H2B-fused pol eta and wtFANCD2, respectively, show a similar tendency of low Mitomycin C (MMC) sensitivity, while cells transfected with empty vector control or pol eta alone demonstrate a similar high level of MMC sensitivity. It therefore appears that FANCD2 monoubiquitination plays a similar anchor role as histone to bind DNA in regulating pol eta. Collectively, our study indicates that, in the early phase of DNA damage response, FANCD2 plays crucial roles in recruiting pol eta to the sites of DNA damage for repair.

  12. RAD54 forms DNA repair foci in response to DNA damage in living plant cells.

    PubMed

    Hirakawa, Takeshi; Hasegawa, Junko; White, Charles I; Matsunaga, Sachihiro

    2017-02-02

    Plants have various defense mechanisms against environmental stresses that induce DNA damage. Genetic and biochemical analyses have revealed the sensing and signaling of DNA damage, but little is known about subnuclear dynamics in response to DNA damage in living plant cells. Here, we observed that the chromatin remodeling factor RAD54, which is involved in DNA repair via the homologous recombination pathway, formed subnuclear foci (termed RAD54 foci) in Arabidopsis thaliana after induction of DNA double-strand breaks. The appearance of RAD54 foci was dependent on the ATAXIA-TELANGIECTASIA MUTATED-SUPPRESSOR OF GAMMA RESPONSE 1 pathway, and RAD54 foci were co-localized with γH2AX signals. Laser irradiation of a subnuclear area demonstrated that in living cells RAD54 was specifically accumulated at the damaged site. In addition, the formation of RAD54 foci showed specificity for cell type and region. We conclude that RAD54 foci correspond to DNA repair foci in A. thaliana.

  13. Level of DNA damage in lead-exposed workers.

    PubMed

    Olewińska, Elżbieta; Kasperczyk, Aleksandra; Kapka, Lucyna; Kozłowska, Agnieszka; Pawlas, Natalia; Dobrakowski, Michał; Birkner, Ewa; Kasperczyk, Sławomir

    2010-01-01

    Lead plays a significant role in modern industry. This metal is related to a broad range of physiological, biochemical and behavioural dysfunctions. The genotoxic effects of lead have been studied both in animals and humans in in vitro systems but results were contradictory. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between DNA damage and occupational exposure to lead in workers. The study population consisted of 62 employees of metalworks exposed to lead in the southern region of Poland. The control group consisted of 26 office workers with no history of occupational exposure to lead. The concentration of lead (PbB) and zincprotoporphyrin (ZPP) in blood samples were measured. The DNA damage was analyzed in blood lymphocytes using alkaline comet assay. The level of DNA damage was determined as the percentage of DNA in the tail, tail length and tail moment. The lead exposure indicators were significantly higher in lead exposed group: PbB about 8.5 times and ZPP 3.3 times. Also, the percentage of DNA in the tail (60.3 ± 14 vs. 37.1 ± 17.6), comet tail length (86.9 ± 15.49 vs. 73.8 ± 19.12) and TM (57.8 ± 17.82 vs. 33.2 ± 19.13) were significantly higher in the study group when compared with the controls; however, the difference between the subgroups was only 5-10%. Years of lead exposure positively correlated with all comet assay parameters (R = 0.21-0.41). Both mean and current PbB and ZPP were correlated with tail DNA % and TM (R = 0.32; R = 0.33; R = 0.24; R = 0.26 and R = 0.34; R = 0.33; R = 0.28 and R = 0.28, respectively). This study shows that occupational exposure to lead is associated with DNA damage and confirmed that comet assay is a rapid, sensitive method suitable for biomonitoring studies.

  14. Prevention of oxidative DNA damage in rats by brussels sprouts.

    PubMed

    Deng, X S; Tuo, J; Poulsen, H E; Loft, S

    1998-03-01

    The alleged cancer preventive effects of cruciferous vegetables could be related to protection from mutagenic oxidative DNA damage. We have studied the effects of Brussels sprouts, some non-cruciferous vegetables and isolated glucosinolates on spontaneous and induced oxidative DNA damage in terms of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) in groups of 6-8 male Wistar rats. Excess oxidative DNA damage was induced by 2-nitropropane (2-NP 100 mg/kg). Four days oral administration of 3 g of cooked Brussels sprouts homogenate reduced the spontaneous urinary 8-oxodG excretion by 31% (p<0.05) whereas raw sprouts, beans and endive (1:1), isolated indolyl glucosinolates and breakdown products had no significant effect. An aqueous extract of cooked Brussels sprouts (corresponding to 6.7 g vegetable per day for 4 days) decreased the spontaneous 8-oxodG excretion from 92 +/- 12 to 52 +/- 15 pmol/24 h (p<0.05). After 2-NP administration the 8-oxodG excretion was increased to 132 +/- 26 pmol/24 h (p<0.05) whereas pretreatment with the sprouts extract reduced this to 102 +/- 30 pmol/24 h (p<0.05). The spontaneous level of 8-oxodG in nuclear DNA from liver and bone marrow was not significantly affected by the sprouts extract whereas the level decreased by 27% in the kidney (p<0.05). In the liver 2-NP increased the 8-oxodG levels in nuclear DNA 8.7 and 3.8 times (p<0.05) 6 and 24 h after dose, respectively. The sprouts extract reduced this increase by 57% (p<0.05) at 6 h whereas there was no significant effect at 24 h. In the kidneys 2-NP increased the 8-oxodG levels 2.2 and 1.2 times (p<0.05) 6 and 24 h after dose, respectively. Pretreatment with the sprouts extract abolished these increases (p<0.05). Similarly, in the bone marrow the extract protected completely (p<0.05) against a 4.9-fold 2-NP induced increase (p<0.05) in the 8-oxodG level. These findings demonstrate that cooked Brussels sprouts contain bioactive substance(s) with a potential for reducing the physiological

  15. Breaking the DNA damage response to improve cervical cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Wieringa, Hylke W; van der Zee, Ate G J; de Vries, Elisabeth G E; van Vugt, Marcel A T M

    2016-01-01

    Every year, cervical cancer affects ∼500,000 women worldwide, and ∼275,000 patients die of this disease. The addition of platin-based chemotherapy to primary radiotherapy has increased 5-year survival of advanced-stage cervical cancer patients, which is, however, still only 66%. One of the factors thought to contribute to treatment failure is the ability of tumor cells to repair chemoradiotherapy-induced DNA damage. Therefore, sensitization of tumor cells for chemoradiotherapy via inhibition of the DNA damage response (DDR) as a novel strategy to improve therapy effect, is currently studied pre-clinically as well as in the clinic. Almost invariably, cervical carcinogenesis involves infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV), which inactivates part of the DNA damage response. This HPV-mediated partial inactivation of the DDR presents therapeutic targeting of the residual DDR as an interesting approach to achieve chemoradio-sensitization for cervical cancer. How the DDR can be most efficiently targeted, however, remains unclear. The fact that cisplatin and radiotherapy activate multiple signaling axes within the DDR further complicates a rational choice of therapeutic targets within the DDR. In this review, we provide an overview of the current preclinical and clinical knowledge about targeting the DDR in cervical cancer.

  16. Microvesicles Contribute to the Bystander Effect of DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaozeng; Wei, Fengxiang; Major, Pierre; Al-Nedawi, Khalid; Al Saleh, Hassan A; Tang, Damu

    2017-04-07

    Genotoxic treatments elicit DNA damage response (DDR) not only in cells that are directly exposed but also in cells that are not in the field of treatment (bystander cells), a phenomenon that is commonly referred to as the bystander effect (BE). However, mechanisms underlying the BE remain elusive. We report here that etoposide and ultraviolet (UV) exposure stimulate the production of microvesicles (MVs) in DU145 prostate cancer cells. MVs isolated from UV-treated DU145 and A431 epidermoid carcinoma cells as well as etoposide-treated DU145 cells induced phosphorylation of ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) at serine 1981 (indicative of ATM activation) and phosphorylation of histone H2AX at serine 139 (γH2AX) in naïve DU145 cells. Importantly, neutralization of MVs derived from UV-treated cells with annexin V significantly reduced the MV-associated BE activities. Etoposide and UV are known to induce DDR primarily through the ATM and ATM- and Rad3-related (ATR) pathways, respectively. In this regard, MV is likely a common source for the DNA damage-induced bystander effect. However, pre-treatment of DU145 naïve cells with an ATM (KU55933) inhibitor does not affect the BE elicited by MVs isolated from etoposide-treated cells, indicating that the BE is induced upstream of ATM actions. Taken together, we provide evidence supporting that MVs are a source of the DNA damage-induced bystander effect.

  17. ATM kinase: Much more than a DNA damage responsive protein.

    PubMed

    Guleria, Ayushi; Chandna, Sudhir

    2016-03-01

    ATM, mutation of which causes Ataxia telangiectasia, has emerged as a cardinal multifunctional protein kinase during past two decades as evidenced by various studies from around the globe. Further to its well established and predominant role in DNA damage response, ATM has also been understood to help in maintaining overall functional integrity of cells; since its mutation, inactivation or deficiency results in a variety of pathological manifestations besides DNA damage. These include oxidative stress, metabolic syndrome, mitochondrial dysfunction as well as neurodegeneration. Recently, high throughput screening using proteomics, metabolomics and transcriptomic studies revealed several proteins which might be acting as substrates of ATM. Studies that can help in identifying effective regulatory controls within the ATM-mediated pathways/mechanisms can help in developing better therapeutics. In fact, more in-depth understanding of ATM-dependent cellular signals could also help in the treatment of variety of other disease conditions since these pathways seem to control many critical cellular functions. In this review, we have attempted to put together a detailed yet lucid picture of the present-day understanding of ATM's role in various pathophysiological conditions involving DNA damage and beyond.

  18. Oxidative DNA damage in mouse sperm chromosomes: Size matters.

    PubMed

    Kocer, Ayhan; Henry-Berger, Joelle; Noblanc, Anais; Champroux, Alexandre; Pogorelcnik, Romain; Guiton, Rachel; Janny, Laurent; Pons-Rejraji, Hanae; Saez, Fabrice; Johnson, Graham D; Krawetz, Stephen A; Alvarez, Juan G; Aitken, R John; Drevet, Joël R

    2015-12-01

    Normal embryo and foetal development as well as the health of the progeny are mostly dependent on gamete nuclear integrity. In the present study, in order to characterize more precisely oxidative DNA damage in mouse sperm we used two mouse models that display high levels of sperm oxidative DNA damage, a common alteration encountered both in in vivo and in vitro reproduction. Immunoprecipitation of oxidized sperm DNA coupled to deep sequencing showed that mouse chromosomes may be largely affected by oxidative alterations. We show that the vulnerability of chromosomes to oxidative attack inversely correlated with their size and was not linked to their GC richness. It was neither correlated with the chromosome content in persisting nucleosomes nor associated with methylated sequences. A strong correlation was found between oxidized sequences and sequences rich in short interspersed repeat elements (SINEs). Chromosome position in the sperm nucleus as revealed by fluorescent in situ hybridization appears to be a confounder. These data map for the first time fragile mouse sperm chromosomal regions when facing oxidative damage that may challenge the repair mechanisms of the oocyte post-fertilization.

  19. Silica radical-induced DNA damage and lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed Central

    Shi, X; Mao, Y; Daniel, L N; Saffiotti, U; Dalal, N S; Vallyathan, V

    1994-01-01

    In recent years, more attention has been given to the mechanism of disease induction caused by the surface properties of minerals. In this respect, specific research needs to be focused on the biologic interactions of oxygen radicals generated by mineral particles resulting in cell injury and DNA damage leading to fibrogenesis and carcinogenesis. In this investigation, we used electron spin resonance (ESR) and spin trapping to study oxygen radical generation from aqueous suspensions of freshly fractured crystalline silica. Hydroxyl radical (.OH), superoxide radical (O2.-) and singlet oxygen (1O2) were all detected. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) partially inhibited .OH yield, whereas catalase abolished .OH generation. H2O2 enhanced .OH generation while deferoxamine inhibited it, indicating that .OH is generated via a Haber-Weiss type reaction. These spin trapping measurements provide the first evidence that aqueous suspensions of silica particles generate O2.- and 1O2. Oxygen consumption measurements indicate that freshly fractured silica uses molecular oxygen to generate O2.- and 1O2. Electrophoretic assays of in vitro DNA strand breakages showed that freshly fractured silica induced DNA strand breakage, which was inhibited by catalase and enhanced by H2O2. In an argon atmosphere, DNA damage was suppressed, showing that molecular oxygen is required for the silica-induced DNA damage. Incubation of freshly fractured silica with linoleic acid generated linoleic acid-derived free radicals and caused dose-dependent lipid peroxidation as measured by ESR spin trapping and malondialdehyde formation. SOD, catalase, and sodium benzoate inhibited lipid peroxidation by 49, 52, and 75%, respectively, again showing the role of oxygen radicals in silica-induced lipid peroxidation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 7. PMID:7705289

  20. The Intra-S Checkpoint Responses to DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Divya Ramalingam; Rhind, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    Faithful duplication of the genome is a challenge because DNA is susceptible to damage by a number of intrinsic and extrinsic genotoxins, such as free radicals and UV light. Cells activate the intra-S checkpoint in response to damage during S phase to protect genomic integrity and ensure replication fidelity. The checkpoint prevents genomic instability mainly by regulating origin firing, fork progression, and transcription of G1/S genes in response to DNA damage. Several studies hint that regulation of forks is perhaps the most critical function of the intra-S checkpoint. However, the exact role of the checkpoint at replication forks has remained elusive and controversial. Is the checkpoint required for fork stability, or fork restart, or to prevent fork reversal or fork collapse, or activate repair at replication forks? What are the factors that the checkpoint targets at stalled replication forks? In this review, we will discuss the various pathways activated by the intra-S checkpoint in response to damage to prevent genomic instability. PMID:28218681

  1. DNA damage during the G0/G1 phase triggers RNA-templated, Cockayne syndrome B-dependent homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Wei, Leizhen; Nakajima, Satoshi; Böhm, Stefanie; Bernstein, Kara A; Shen, Zhiyuan; Tsang, Michael; Levine, Arthur S; Lan, Li

    2015-07-07

    Damage repair mechanisms at transcriptionally active sites during the G0/G1 phase are largely unknown. To elucidate these mechanisms, we introduced genome site-specific oxidative DNA damage and determined the role of transcription in repair factor assembly. We find that KU and NBS1 are recruited to damage sites independent of transcription. However, assembly of RPA1, RAD51C, RAD51, and RAD52 at such sites is strictly governed by active transcription and requires both wild-type Cockayne syndrome protein B (CSB) function and the presence of RNA in the G0/G1 phase. We show that the ATPase activity of CSB is indispensable for loading and binding of the recombination factors. CSB counters radiation-induced DNA damage in both cells and zebrafish models. Taken together, our results have uncovered a novel, RNA-based recombination mechanism by which CSB protects genome stability from strand breaks at transcriptionally active sites and may provide insight into the clinical manifestations of Cockayne syndrome.

  2. DNA damage during the G0/G1 phase triggers RNA-templated, Cockayne syndrome B-dependent homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Leizhen; Nakajima, Satoshi; Böhm, Stefanie; Bernstein, Kara A.; Shen, Zhiyuan; Tsang, Michael; Levine, Arthur S.; Lan, Li

    2015-01-01

    Damage repair mechanisms at transcriptionally active sites during the G0/G1 phase are largely unknown. To elucidate these mechanisms, we introduced genome site-specific oxidative DNA damage and determined the role of transcription in repair factor assembly. We find that KU and NBS1 are recruited to damage sites independent of transcription. However, assembly of RPA1, RAD51C, RAD51, and RAD52 at such sites is strictly governed by active transcription and requires both wild-type Cockayne syndrome protein B (CSB) function and the presence of RNA in the G0/G1 phase. We show that the ATPase activity of CSB is indispensable for loading and binding of the recombination factors. CSB counters radiation-induced DNA damage in both cells and zebrafish models. Taken together, our results have uncovered a novel, RNA-based recombination mechanism by which CSB protects genome stability from strand breaks at transcriptionally active sites and may provide insight into the clinical manifestations of Cockayne syndrome. PMID:26100862

  3. DNA damage and repair in telomeres: relation to aging.

    PubMed Central

    Kruk, P A; Rampino, N J; Bohr, V A

    1995-01-01

    We have established a method for the detection of DNA damage and its repair in human telomeres, the natural ends of chromosomes which are necessary for replication and critical for chromosomal stability. We find that ultraviolet light-induced pyrimidine dimers in telomeric DNA are repaired less efficiently than endogenous genes but more efficiently than inactive, noncoding regions. We have also measured telomeric length, telomeric DNA damage, and its repair in relation to the progression of aging. Telomeres are shorter in fibroblasts from an old donor compared to fibroblasts from a young donor, shortest in cells from a patient with the progeroid disorder Werner syndrome, and relatively long in fibroblasts from a patient with Alzheimer disease. Telomeric DNA repair efficiency is lower in cells from an old donor than in cells from a young donor, normal in Alzheimer cells, and slightly lower in Werner cells. It is possible that this decline in telomeric repair with aging is of functional significance to an age-related decline in genomic stability. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7816828

  4. Preparation of next-generation sequencing libraries from damaged DNA.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Adrian W; Heyn, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has revolutionized ancient DNA research, especially when combined with high-throughput target enrichment methods. However, attaining high sequencing depth and accuracy from samples often remains problematic due to the damaged state of ancient DNA, in particular the extremely low copy number of ancient DNA and the abundance of uracil residues derived from cytosine deamination that lead to miscoding errors. It is therefore critical to use a highly efficient procedure for conversion of a raw DNA extract into an adaptor-ligated sequencing library, and equally important to reduce errors from uracil residues. We present a protocol for NGS library preparation that allows highly efficient conversion of DNA fragments into an adaptor-ligated form. The protocol incorporates an option to remove the vast majority of uracil miscoding lesions as part of the library preparation process. The procedure requires only two spin column purification steps and no gel purification or bead handling. Starting from an aliquot of DNA extract, a finished, highly amplified library can be generated in 5 h, or under 3 h if uracil removal is not required.

  5. DNA-damaging activity of patulin in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, K S; Röschenthaler, R J

    1986-01-01

    At a concentration of 10 micrograms/ml, patulin caused single-strand DNA breaks in living cells of Escherichia coli. At 50 micrograms/ml, double-strand breaks were observed also. Single-strand breaks were repaired in the presence of 10 micrograms of patulin per ml within 90 min when the cells were incubated at 37 degrees C in M9-salts solution without a carbon source. The same concentration also induced temperature-sensitive lambda prophage and a prophage of Bacillus megaterium. When an in vitro system with permeabilized Escherichia coli cells was used, patulin at 10 micrograms/ml induced DNA repair synthesis and inhibited DNA replication. The in vivo occurrence of DNA strand breaks and DNA repair correlated with the in vitro induction of repair synthesis. In vitro the RNA synthesis was less affected, and overall protein synthesis was not inhibited at 10 micrograms/ml. Only at higher concentrations (250 to 500 micrograms/ml) was inhibition of in vitro protein synthesis observed. Thus, patulin must be regarded as a mycotoxin with selective DNA-damaging activity. PMID:2431653

  6. Noncatalytic, N-terminal Domains of DNA Polymerase Lambda Affect Its Cellular Localization and DNA Damage Response.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Anthony A; Taggart, David J; Suo, Zucai

    2017-04-13

    Specialized DNA polymerases, such as DNA polymerase lambda (Polλ), are important players in DNA damage tolerance and repair pathways. Knowing how DNA polymerases are regulated and recruited to sites of DNA damage is imperative to understanding these pathways. Recent work has suggested that Polλ plays a role in several distinct DNA damage tolerance and repair pathways. In this paper, we report previously unknown roles of the N-terminal domains of human Polλ for modulating its involvement in DNA damage tolerance and repair. By using Western blot analysis, fluorescence microscopy, and cell survival assays, we found that the BRCA1 C-terminal (BRCT) and proline/serine-rich (PSR) domains of Polλ affect its cellular localization and DNA damage responses. The nuclear localization signal (NLS) of Polλ was necessary to overcome the impediment of its nuclear localization caused by its BRCT and PSR domains. Induction of DNA damage resulted in recruitment of Polλ to chromatin, which was controlled by its BRCT and PSR domains. In addition, the presence of both domains was required for Polλ-mediated tolerance of oxidative DNA damage but not DNA methylation damage. These findings suggest that the N-terminal domains of Polλ are important for regulating its responses to DNA damage.

  7. SUMO-mediated regulation of DNA damage repair and responses

    PubMed Central

    Sarangi, Prabha; Zhao, Xiaolan

    2015-01-01

    Sumoylation plays important roles during DNA damage repair and responses. Recent broad-scope and substrate-based studies have shed light on the regulation and significance of sumoylation during these processes. An emerging paradigm is that sumoylation of many DNA metabolism proteins is controlled by DNA engagement. Such “on-site modification” can explain low substrate modification levels and has important implications in sumoylation mechanisms and effects. New studies also suggest that sumoylation can regulate a process through an ensemble effect or via major substrates. Additionally, we describe new trends in the functional effects of sumoylation, such as bi-directional changes in biomolecule binding and multi-level coordination with other modifications. These emerging themes and models will stimulate our thinking and research in sumoylation and genome maintenance. PMID:25778614

  8. HSV-I and the cellular DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Smith, Samantha; Weller, Sandra K

    2015-04-01

    Peter Wildy first observed genetic recombination between strains of HSV in 1955. At the time, knowledge of DNA repair mechanisms was limited, and it has only been in the last decade that particular DNA damage response (DDR) pathways have been examined in the context of viral infections. One of the first reports addressing the interaction between a cellular DDR protein and HSV-1 was the observation by Lees-Miller et al. that DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit levels were depleted in an ICP0-dependent manner during Herpes simplex virus 1 infection. Since then, there have been numerous reports describing the interactions between HSV infection and cellular DDR pathways. Due to space limitations, this review will focus predominantly on the most recent observations regarding how HSV navigates a potentially hostile environment to replicate its genome.

  9. Reversal of DNA damage induced Topoisomerase 2 DNA-protein crosslinks by Tdp2.

    PubMed

    Schellenberg, Matthew J; Perera, Lalith; Strom, Christina N; Waters, Crystal A; Monian, Brinda; Appel, C Denise; Vilas, Caroline K; Williams, Jason G; Ramsden, Dale A; Williams, R Scott

    2016-05-05

    Mammalian Tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 2 (Tdp2) reverses Topoisomerase 2 (Top2) DNA-protein crosslinks triggered by Top2 engagement of DNA damage or poisoning by anticancer drugs. Tdp2 deficiencies are linked to neurological disease and cellular sensitivity to Top2 poisons. Herein, we report X-ray crystal structures of ligand-free Tdp2 and Tdp2-DNA complexes with alkylated and abasic DNA that unveil a dynamic Tdp2 active site lid and deep substrate binding trench well-suited for engaging the diverse DNA damage triggers of abortive Top2 reactions. Modeling of a proposed Tdp2 reaction coordinate, combined with mutagenesis and biochemical studies support a single Mg(2+)-ion mechanism assisted by a phosphotyrosyl-arginine cation-π interface. We further identify a Tdp2 active site SNP that ablates Tdp2 Mg(2+) binding and catalytic activity, impairs Tdp2 mediated NHEJ of tyrosine blocked termini, and renders cells sensitive to the anticancer agent etoposide. Collectively, our results provide a structural mechanism for Tdp2 engagement of heterogeneous DNA damage that causes Top2 poisoning, and indicate that evaluation of Tdp2 status may be an important personalized medicine biomarker informing on individual sensitivities to chemotherapeutic Top2 poisons.

  10. Proteasome inhibition enhances resistance to DNA damage via upregulation of Rpn4-dependent DNA repair genes.

    PubMed

    Karpov, Dmitry S; Spasskaya, Daria S; Tutyaeva, Vera V; Mironov, Alexander S; Karpov, Vadim L

    2013-09-17

    The 26S proteasome is an ATP-dependent multi-subunit protease complex and the major regulator of intracellular protein turnover and quality control. However, its role in the DNA damage response is controversial. We addressed this question in yeast by disrupting the transcriptional regulation of the PRE1 proteasomal gene. The mutant strain has decreased proteasome activity and is hyper-resistant to various DNA-damaging agents. We found that Rpn4-target genes MAG1, RAD23, and RAD52 are overexpressed in this strain due to Rpn4 stabilisation. These genes represent three different pathways of base excision, nucleotide excision and double strand break repair by homologous recombination (DSB-HR). Consistently, the proteasome mutant displays increased DSB-HR activity. Our data imply that the proteasome may have a negative role in DNA damage response.

  11. Site-Specific PEGylation of Therapeutic Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Dozier, Jonathan K.; Distefano, Mark D.

    2015-01-01

    The use of proteins as therapeutics has a long history and is becoming ever more common in modern medicine. While the number of protein-based drugs is growing every year, significant problems still remain with their use. Among these problems are rapid degradation and excretion from patients, thus requiring frequent dosing, which in turn increases the chances for an immunological response as well as increasing the cost of therapy. One of the main strategies to alleviate these problems is to link a polyethylene glycol (PEG) group to the protein of interest. This process, called PEGylation, has grown dramatically in recent years resulting in several approved drugs. Installing a single PEG chain at a defined site in a protein is challenging. Recently, there is has been considerable research into various methods for the site-specific PEGylation of proteins. This review seeks to summarize that work and provide background and context for how site-specific PEGylation is performed. After introducing the topic of site-specific PEGylation, recent developments using chemical methods are described. That is followed by a more extensive discussion of bioorthogonal reactions and enzymatic labeling. PMID:26516849

  12. Site-Specific PEGylation of Therapeutic Proteins.

    PubMed

    Dozier, Jonathan K; Distefano, Mark D

    2015-10-28

    The use of proteins as therapeutics has a long history and is becoming ever more common in modern medicine. While the number of protein-based drugs is growing every year, significant problems still remain with their use. Among these problems are rapid degradation and excretion from patients, thus requiring frequent dosing, which in turn increases the chances for an immunological response as well as increasing the cost of therapy. One of the main strategies to alleviate these problems is to link a polyethylene glycol (PEG) group to the protein of interest. This process, called PEGylation, has grown dramatically in recent years resulting in several approved drugs. Installing a single PEG chain at a defined site in a protein is challenging. Recently, there is has been considerable research into various methods for the site-specific PEGylation of proteins. This review seeks to summarize that work and provide background and context for how site-specific PEGylation is performed. After introducing the topic of site-specific PEGylation, recent developments using chemical methods are described. That is followed by a more extensive discussion of bioorthogonal reactions and enzymatic labeling.

  13. Novobiocin Inhibits the Antimicrobial Resistance Acquired through DNA Damage-Induced Mutagenesis in Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Jara, Luis M.; Pérez-Varela, María; Corral, Jordi; Arch, Marta; Cortés, Pilar; Bou, Germán; Barbé, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii, a worldwide emerging nosocomial pathogen, acquires antimicrobial resistances in response to DNA-damaging agents, which increase the expression of multiple error-prone DNA polymerase components. Here we show that the aminocoumarin novobiocin, which inhibits the DNA damage response in Gram-positive bacteria, also inhibits the expression of error-prone DNA polymerases in this Gram-negative multidrug-resistant pathogen and, consequently, its potential acquisition of antimicrobial resistance through DNA damage-induced mutagenesis. PMID:26503651

  14. Reconstitution of the cellular response to DNA damage in vitro using damage-activated extracts from mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Roper, Katherine; Coverley, Dawn

    2012-03-10

    In proliferating mammalian cells, DNA damage is detected by sensors that elicit a cellular response which arrests the cell cycle and repairs the damage. As part of the DNA damage response, DNA replication is inhibited and, within seconds, histone H2AX is phosphorylated. Here we describe a cell-free system that reconstitutes the cellular response to DNA double strand breaks using damage-activated cell extracts and naieve nuclei. Using this system the effect of damage signalling on nuclei that do not contain DNA lesions can be studied, thereby uncoupling signalling and repair. Soluble extracts from G1/S phase cells that were treated with etoposide before isolation, or pre-incubated with nuclei from etoposide-treated cells during an in vitro activation reaction, restrain both initiation and elongation of DNA replication in naieve nuclei. At the same time, H2AX is phosphorylated in naieve nuclei in a manner that is dependent upon the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-like protein kinases. Notably, phosphorylated H2AX is not focal in naieve nuclei, but is evident throughout the nucleus suggesting that in the absence of DNA lesions the signal is not amplified such that discrete foci can be detected. This system offers a novel screening approach for inhibitors of DNA damage response kinases, which we demonstrate using the inhibitors wortmannin and LY294002. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A cell free system that reconstitutes the response to DNA damage in the absence of DNA lesions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Damage-activated extracts impose the cellular response to DNA damage on naieve nuclei. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PIKK-dependent response impacts positively and negatively on two separate fluorescent outputs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Can be used to screen for inhibitors that impact on the response to damage but not on DNA repair. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LY294002 and wortmannin demonstrate the system's potential as a pathway focused screening

  15. Inhibition of Topoisomerase (DNA) I (TOP1): DNA Damage Repair and Anticancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yang; Her, Chengtao

    2015-01-01

    Most chemotherapy regimens contain at least one DNA-damaging agent that preferentially affects the growth of cancer cells. This strategy takes advantage of the differences in cell proliferation between normal and cancer cells. Chemotherapeutic drugs are usually designed to target rapid-dividing cells because sustained proliferation is a common feature of cancer [1,2]. Rapid DNA replication is essential for highly proliferative cells, thus blocking of DNA replication will create numerous mutations and/or chromosome rearrangements—ultimately triggering cell death [3]. Along these lines, DNA topoisomerase inhibitors are of great interest because they help to maintain strand breaks generated by topoisomerases during replication. In this article, we discuss the characteristics of topoisomerase (DNA) I (TOP1) and its inhibitors, as well as the underlying DNA repair pathways and the use of TOP1 inhibitors in cancer therapy. PMID:26287259

  16. Oxidative damage to DNA during aging: 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine in rat organ DNA and urine.

    PubMed Central

    Fraga, C G; Shigenaga, M K; Park, J W; Degan, P; Ames, B N

    1990-01-01

    Oxidative damage to DNA is shown to be extensive and could be a major cause of the physiological changes associated with aging and the degenerative diseases related to aging such as cancer. The oxidized nucleoside, 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (oh8dG), one of the approximately 20 known oxidative DNA damage products, has been measured in DNA isolated from various organs of Fischer 344 rats of different ages. oh8dG was present in the DNA isolated from all the organs studied: liver, brain, kidney, intestine, and testes. Steady-state levels of oh8dG ranged from 8 to 73 residues per 10(6) deoxyguanosine residues or 0.2-2.0 x 10(5) residues per cell. Levels of oh8dG in DNA increased with age in liver, kidney, and intestine but remained unchanged in brain and testes. The urinary excretion of oh8dG, which presumably reflects its repair from DNA by nuclease activity, decreased with age from 481 to 165 pmol per kg of body weight per day for urine obtained from 2-month- and 25-month-old rats, respectively. 8-Hydroxyguanine, the proposed repair product of a glycosylase activity, was also assayed in the urine. We estimate approximately 9 x 10(4) oxidative hits to DNA per cell per day in the rat. The results suggest that the age-dependent accumulation of oh8dG residues observed in DNA from liver, kidney, and intestine is principally due to the slow loss of DNA nuclease activity; however, an increase in the rate of oxidative DNA damage cannot be ruled out. PMID:2352934

  17. DNA damage response in peripheral nervous system: coping with cancer therapy-induced DNA lesions.

    PubMed

    Englander, Ella W

    2013-08-01

    In the absence of blood brain barrier (BBB) the DNA of peripheral nervous system (PNS) neurons is exposed to a broader spectrum of endogenous and exogenous threats compared to that of the central nervous system (CNS). Hence, while CNS and PNS neurons cope with many similar challenges inherent to their high oxygen consumption and vigorous metabolism, PNS neurons are also exposed to circulating toxins and inflammatory mediators due to relative permeability of PNS blood nerve barrier (BNB). Consequently, genomes of PNS neurons incur greater damage and the question awaiting investigation is whether specialized repair mechanisms for maintenance of DNA integrity have evolved to meet the additional needs of PNS neurons. Here, I review data showing how PNS neurons manage collateral DNA damage incurred in the course of different anti-cancer treatments designed to block DNA replication in proliferating tumor cells. Importantly, while PNS neurotoxicity and concomitant chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) are among major dose limiting barriers in achieving therapy goals, CIPN is partially reversible during post-treatment nerve recovery. Clearly, cell recovery necessitates mobilization of the DNA damage response and underscores the need for systematic investigation of the scope of DNA repair capacities in the PNS to help predict post-treatment risks to recovering neurons.

  18. Capturing Snapshots of APE1 Processing DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Freudenthal, Bret D.; Beard, William A.; Cuneo, Matthew J.; Dyrkheeva, Nadezhda S.; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    DNA apurinic-apyrimidinic (AP) sites are prevalent non-coding threats to genomic stability and are processed by AP endonuclease 1 (APE1). APE1 incises the AP-site phosphodiester backbone, generating a DNA repair intermediate that is potentially cytotoxic. The molecular events of the incision reaction remain elusive due in part to limited structural information. We report multiple high-resolution human APE1:DNA structures that divulge novel features of the APE1 reaction, including the metal binding site, nucleophile, and arginine clamps that mediate product release. We also report APE1:DNA structures with a T:G mismatch 5′ to the AP-site, representing a clustered lesion occurring in methylated CpG dinucleotides. These reveal that APE1 molds the T:G mismatch into a unique Watson-Crick like geometry that distorts the active site reducing incision. These snapshots provide mechanistic clarity for APE1, while affording a rational framework to manipulate biological responses to DNA damage. PMID:26458045

  19. Capturing snapshots of APE1 processing DNA damage

    DOE PAGES

    Freudenthal, Bret D.; Beard, William A.; Cuneo, Matthew J.; ...

    2015-10-12

    DNA apurinic-apyrimidinic (AP) sites are prevalent noncoding threats to genomic stability and are processed by AP endonuclease 1 (APE1). APE1 incises the AP-site phosphodiester backbone, generating a DNA-repair intermediate that is potentially cytotoxic. The molecular events of the incision reaction remain elusive, owing in part to limited structural information. Here we report multiple high-resolution human APE1-DNA structures that divulge new features of the APE1 reaction, including the metal-binding site, the nucleophile and the arginine clamps that mediate product release. We also report APE1-DNA structures with a T-G mismatch 5' to the AP site, representing a clustered lesion occurring in methylatedmore » CpG dinucleotides. Moreover, these structures reveal that APE1 molds the T-G mismatch into a unique Watson-Crick-like geometry that distorts the active site, thus reducing incision. Finally, these snapshots provide mechanistic clarity for APE1 while affording a rational framework to manipulate biological responses to DNA damage.« less

  20. Capturing snapshots of APE1 processing DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Freudenthal, Bret D.; Beard, William A.; Cuneo, Matthew J.; Dyrkheeva, Nadezhda S.; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2015-10-12

    DNA apurinic-apyrimidinic (AP) sites are prevalent noncoding threats to genomic stability and are processed by AP endonuclease 1 (APE1). APE1 incises the AP-site phosphodiester backbone, generating a DNA-repair intermediate that is potentially cytotoxic. The molecular events of the incision reaction remain elusive, owing in part to limited structural information. Here we report multiple high-resolution human APE1-DNA structures that divulge new features of the APE1 reaction, including the metal-binding site, the nucleophile and the arginine clamps that mediate product release. We also report APE1-DNA structures with a T-G mismatch 5' to the AP site, representing a clustered lesion occurring in methylated CpG dinucleotides. Moreover, these structures reveal that APE1 molds the T-G mismatch into a unique Watson-Crick-like geometry that distorts the active site, thus reducing incision. Finally, these snapshots provide mechanistic clarity for APE1 while affording a rational framework to manipulate biological responses to DNA damage.

  1. Pathophysiology of Bronchoconstriction: Role of Oxidatively Damaged DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Bacsi, Attila; Pan, Lang; Ba, Xueqing; Boldogh, Istvan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review To provide an overview on the present understanding of roles of oxidative DNA damage repair in cell signaling underlying bronchoconstriction common to, but not restricted to various forms of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease Recent findings Bronchoconstriction is a tightening of smooth muscle surrounding the bronchi and bronchioles with consequent wheezing and shortness of breath. Key stimuli include air pollutants, viral infections, allergens, thermal and osmotic changes, and shear stress of mucosal epithelium, triggering a wide range of cellular, vascular and neural events. Although activation of nerve fibers, the role of G-proteins, protein kinases and Ca++, and molecular interaction within contracting filaments of muscle are well defined, the overarching mechanisms by which a wide range of stimuli initiate these events are not fully understood. Many, if not all, stimuli increase levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are signaling and oxidatively modifying macromolecules, including DNA. The primary ROS target in DNA is guanine, and 8-oxoguanine is one of the most abundant base lesions. It is repaired by 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase1 (OGG1) during base excision repair processes. The product, free 8-oxoG base, is bound by OGG1 with high affinity, and the complex then functions as an activator of small GTPases, triggering pathways for inducing gene expression and contraction of intracellular filaments in mast and smooth muscle cells. Summary Oxidative DNA damage repair-mediated cell activation signaling result in gene expression that “primes” the mucosal epithelium and submucosal tissues to generate mediators of airway smooth muscle contractions. PMID:26694039

  2. Radiation track, DNA damage and response—a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikjoo, H.; Emfietzoglou, D.; Liamsuwan, T.; Taleei, R.; Liljequist, D.; Uehara, S.

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this paper has been to review the current status and progress of the field of radiation biophysics, and draw attention to the fact that physics, in general, and radiation physics in particular, with the aid of mathematical modeling, can help elucidate biological mechanisms and cancer therapies. We hypothesize that concepts of condensed-matter physics along with the new genomic knowledge and technologies and mechanistic mathematical modeling in conjunction with advances in experimental DNA (Deoxyrinonucleic acid molecule) repair and cell signaling have now provided us with unprecedented opportunities in radiation biophysics to address problems in targeted cancer therapy, and genetic risk estimation in humans. Obviously, one is not dealing with ‘low-hanging fruit’, but it will be a major scientific achievement if it becomes possible to state, in another decade or so, that we can link mechanistically the stages between the initial radiation-induced DNA damage; in particular, at doses of radiation less than 2 Gy and with structural changes in genomic DNA as a precursor to cell inactivation and/or mutations leading to genetic diseases. The paper presents recent development in the physics of radiation track structure contained in the computer code system KURBUC, in particular for low-energy electrons in the condensed phase of water for which we provide a comprehensive discussion of the dielectric response function approach. The state-of-the-art in the simulation of proton and carbon ion tracks in the Bragg peak region is also presented. The paper presents a critical discussion of the models used for elastic scattering, and the validity of the trajectory approach in low-electron transport. Brief discussions of mechanistic and quantitative aspects of microdosimetry, DNA damage and DNA repair are also included as developed by the authors’ work.

  3. β2-spectrin depletion impairs DNA damage repair

    PubMed Central

    Horikoshi, Nobuo; Pandita, Raj K.; Mujoo, Kalpana; Hambarde, Shashank; Sharma, Dharmendra; Mattoo, Abid R.; Chakraborty, Sharmistha; Charaka, Vijaya; Hunt, Clayton R.; Pandita, Tej K.

    2016-01-01

    β2-Spectrin (β2SP/SPTBN1, gene SPTBN1) is a key TGF-β/SMAD3/4 adaptor and transcriptional cofactor that regulates TGF-β signaling and can contribute to liver cancer development. Here we report that cells deficient in β2-Spectrin (β2SP) are moderately sensitive to ionizing radiation (IR) and extremely sensitive to agents that cause interstrand cross-links (ICLs) or replication stress. In response to treatment with IR or ICL agents (formaldehyde, cisplatin, camptothecin, mitomycin), β2SP deficient cells displayed a higher frequency of cells with delayed γ-H2AX removal and a higher frequency of residual chromosome aberrations. Following hydroxyurea (HU)-induced replication stress, β2SP-deficient cells displayed delayed disappearance of γ-H2AX foci along with defective repair factor recruitment (MRE11, CtIP, RAD51, RPA, and FANCD2) as well as defective restart of stalled replication forks. Repair factor recruitment is a prerequisite for initiation of DNA damage repair by the homologous recombination (HR) pathway, which was also defective in β2SP deficient cells. We propose that β2SP is required for maintaining genomic stability following replication fork stalling, whether induced by either ICL damage or replicative stress, by facilitating fork regression as well as DNA damage repair by homologous recombination. PMID:27248179

  4. Maintaining Genome Stability in Defiance of Mitotic DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Stefano; Gentili, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The implementation of decisions affecting cell viability and proliferation is based on prompt detection of the issue to be addressed, formulation and transmission of a correct set of instructions and fidelity in the execution of orders. While the first and the last are purely mechanical processes relying on the faithful functioning of single proteins or macromolecular complexes (sensors and effectors), information is the real cue, with signal amplitude, duration, and frequency ultimately determining the type of response. The cellular response to DNA damage is no exception to the rule. In this review article we focus on DNA damage responses in G2 and Mitosis. First, we set the stage describing mitosis and the machineries in charge of assembling the apparatus responsible for chromosome alignment and segregation as well as the inputs that control its function (checkpoints). Next, we examine the type of issues that a cell approaching mitosis might face, presenting the impact of post-translational modifications (PTMs) on the correct and timely functioning of pathways correcting errors or damage before chromosome segregation. We conclude this essay with a perspective on the current status of mitotic signaling pathway inhibitors and their potential use in cancer therapy. PMID:27493659

  5. Editing livestock genomes with site-specific nucleases.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Daniel F; Tan, Wenfang; Hackett, Perry B; Fahrenkrug, Scott C

    2013-01-01

    Over the past 5 years there has been a major transformation in our ability to precisely manipulate the genomes of animals. Efficiencies of introducing precise genetic alterations in large animal genomes have improved 100000-fold due to a succession of site-specific nucleases that introduce double-strand DNA breaks with a specificity of 10(-9). Herein we describe our applications of site-specific nucleases, especially transcription activator-like effector nucleases, to engineer specific alterations in the genomes of pigs and cows. We can introduce variable changes mediated by non-homologous end joining of DNA breaks to inactive genes. Alternatively, using homology-directed repair, we have introduced specific changes that support either precise alterations in a gene's encoded polypeptide, elimination of the gene or replacement by another unrelated DNA sequence. Depending on the gene and the mutation, we can achieve 10%-50% effective rates of precise mutations. Applications of the new precision genetics are extensive. Livestock now can be engineered with selected phenotypes that will augment their value and adaption to variable ecosystems. In addition, animals can be engineered to specifically mimic human diseases and disorders, which will accelerate the production of reliable drugs and devices. Moreover, animals can be engineered to become better providers of biomaterials used in the medical treatment of diseases and disorders.

  6. DNA damage in embryonic stem cells caused by nanodiamonds.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yun; Xiong, Wei; Zhu, Lin; Osawa, Eiji; Hussin, Saber; Dai, Liming

    2011-03-22

    Because of their unique photoluminescence and magnetic properties, nanodiamonds (NDs) are promising for biomedical imaging and therapeutical applications. However, these biomedical applications will hardly be realized unless the potential hazards of NDs to humans and other biological systems are ascertained. Previous studies performed in our group and others have demonstrated the excellent biocompatibility of NDs in a variety of cell lines without noticeable cytotoxicity. In the present paper, we report the first genotoxicity study on NDs. Our results showed that incubation of embryonic stem cells with NDs led to slightly increased expression of DNA repair proteins, such as p53 and MOGG-1. Oxidized nanodiamonds (O-NDs) were demonstrated to cause more DNA damage than the pristine/raw NDs (R-NDs), showing the surface chemistry specific genotoxicity. However, the DNA damages caused by either the O-NDs or the R-NDs are much less severe than those caused by multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) observed in our previous study. These findings should have important implications for future applications of NDs in biological applications.

  7. Site-specific gene modification by PNAs conjugated to psoralen.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki-Hyun; Nielsen, Peter E; Glazer, Peter M

    2006-01-10

    DNA-binding molecules, including triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) and peptide nucleic acids (PNAs), can be utilized to introduce site-specific mutations or to promote recombination at selected genomic sites. To further evaluate the utility of PNAs for site-specific gene modification, we tested dimeric bis-PNAs conjugated to psoralen. These PNAs are designed to form a triplex-invasion complex within the supF reporter gene in an episomal shuttle vector and to direct site-specific photoadduct formation by the conjugated psoralen. The psoralen-bis-PNA conjugate was found to direct photoadduct formation to the intended 5'-TpA base step next to the PNA-binding site, and the photoadduct formation efficiency displayed both concentration and UVA irradiation dependence. The effect of PNA-targeted photoadducts in a mammalian system was tested by SV40-based shuttle vector assay. After in vitro binding, we found that photoadducts directed by PNAs conjugated to psoralen-induced mutations at frequencies in the range of 0.46%, 6.5-fold above the background. In a protocol for intracellular gene targeting in the episomal shuttle vector, the psoralen-PNA-induced mutation frequency was 0.13%, 3.5-fold higher than the background. Most of the induced mutations were deletions and single-base-pair substitutions at or adjacent to the targeted PNA-binding and photoadduct-formation sites. When the results are taken together, they demonstrate the ability of bis-PNAs conjugated with psoralen to mediate site-specific gene modification, and they further support the development of PNAs as tools for gene-targeting applications.

  8. Solar UVB-induced DNA damage and photoenzymatic DNA repair in antarctic zooplankton

    SciTech Connect

    Malloy, K.D.; Holman, M.A.; Mitchell, D.

    1997-02-18

    The detrimental effects of elevated intensities of mid-UV radiation (UVB), a result of stratospheric ozone depletion during the austral spring, on the primary producers of the Antarctic marine ecosystem have been well documented. Here we report that natural populations of Antarctic zooplankton also sustain significant DNA damage [measured as cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs)] during periods of increased UVB flux. This is the first direct evidence that increased solar UVB may result in damage to marine organisms other than primary producers in Antarctica. The extent of DNA damage in pelagic icefish eggs correlated with daily incident UVB irradiance, reflecting the difference between acquisition and repair of CPDs. Patterns of DNA damage in fish larvae did not correlated with daily UVB flux, possibly due to different depth distributions and/or different capacities for DNA repair. Clearance of CPDs by Antarctic fish and krill was mediated primarily by the photoenzymatic repair system. Although repair rates were large for all species evaluated, they were apparently inadequate to prevent the transient accumulation of substantial CPD burdens. The capacity for DNA repair in Antarctic organisms was highest in those species whose early life history stages occupy the water column during periods of ozone depletion (austral spring) and lowest in fish species whose eggs and larvae are abundant during winter. Although the potential reduction in fitness of Antarctic zooplankton resulting from DNA damage is unknown, we suggest that increased solar UV may reduce recruitment and adversely affect trophic transfer of productivity by affecting heterotrophic species as well as primary producers. 54 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Attenuation of acridine mutagen ICR-191--DNA interactions and DNA damage by the mutagen interceptor chlorophyllin.

    PubMed

    Pietrzak, Monika; Halicka, H Dorota; Wieczorek, Zbigniew; Wieczorek, Jolanta; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew

    2008-06-01

    We have investigated the ability of chlorophyllin (CHL) to interact with acridine mutagen ICR-191 (2-methoxy-6-chloro-9-(3-(2-chloroethyl)aminopropylamino)acridine) and also its ability to decrease binding of ICR-191 to DNA in a simple three-component competition system: CHL-ICR-DNA. Our data indicate a strong association of ICR-191 with CHL, stronger even than the association of ICR-191 with DNA. Calculations based on the measured affinity data show that a two- to three-fold excess of CHL reduces by about two-fold the concentration of the mutagen-DNA complex. We also exposed human leukemic HL-60 cells to ICR-191 in the absence and presence of CHL and measured the mutagen-induced DNA damage. The extent of DNA damage was assessed by analysis of histone H2AX phosphorylation. While ICR-191 induced significant increase in expression of phosphorylated H2AX (gammaH2AX), particularly in DNA replicating cells, this increase was totally abolished in the cells treated with ICR-191 in the presence of CHL.

  10. Involvement of oxidatively damaged DNA and repair in cancer development and aging

    PubMed Central

    Tudek, Barbara; Winczura, Alicja; Janik, Justyna; Siomek, Agnieszka; Foksinski, Marek; Oliński, Ryszard

    2010-01-01

    DNA damage and DNA repair may mediate several cellular processes, like replication and transcription, mutagenesis and apoptosis and thus may be important factors in the development and pathology of an organism, including cancer. DNA is constantly damaged by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) directly and also by products of lipid peroxidation (LPO), which form exocyclic adducts to DNA bases. A wide variety of oxidatively-generated DNA lesions are present in living cells. 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoGua) is one of the best known DNA lesions due to its mutagenic properties. Among LPO-derived DNA base modifications the most intensively studied are ethenoadenine and ethenocytosine, highly miscoding DNA lesions considered as markers of oxidative stress and promutagenic DNA damage. Although at present it is impossible to directly answer the question concerning involvement of oxidatively damaged DNA in cancer etiology, it is likely that oxidatively modified DNA bases may serve as a source of mutations that initiate carcinogenesis and are involved in aging (i.e. they may be causal factors responsible for these processes). To counteract the deleterious effect of oxidatively damaged DNA, all organisms have developed several DNA repair mechanisms. The efficiency of oxidatively damaged DNA repair was frequently found to be decreased in cancer patients. The present work reviews the basis for the biological significance of DNA damage, particularly effects of 8-oxoGua and ethenoadduct occurrence in DNA in the aspect of cancer development, drawing attention to the multiplicity of proteins with repair activities. PMID:20589166

  11. Fisetin Protects DNA Against Oxidative Damage and Its Possible Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tingting; Lin, Huajuan; Tu, Qian; Liu, Jingjing; Li, Xican

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The paper tries to assess the protective effect of fisetin against •OH-induced DNA damage, then to investigate the possible mechanism. Methods: The protective effect was evaluated based on the content of malondialdehyde (MDA). The possible mechanism was analyzed using various antioxidant methods in vitro, including •OH scavenging (deoxyribose degradation), •O2- scavenging (pyrogallol autoxidation), DPPH• scavenging, ABTS•+ scavenging, and Cu2+-reducing power assays. Results: Fisetin increased dose-dependently its protective percentages against •OH-induced DNA damage (IC50 value =1535.00±29.60 µM). It also increased its radical-scavenging percentages in a dose-dependent manner in various antioxidants assays. Its IC50 values in •OH scavenging, •O2- scavenging, DPPH• scavenging, ABTS•+ scavenging, and Cu2+-reducing power assays, were 47.41±4.50 µM, 34.05±0.87 µM, 9.69±0.53 µM, 2.43±0.14 µM, and 1.49±0.16 µM, respectively. Conclusion: Fisetin can effectively protect DNA against •OH-induced oxidative damage possibly via reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging approach, which is assumed to be hydrogen atom (H•) and/or single electron (e) donation (HAT/SET) pathways. In the HAT pathway, the 3’,4’-dihydroxyl moiety in B ring of fisetin is thought to play an important role, because it can be ultimately oxidized to a stable ortho-benzoquinone form. PMID:27478791

  12. Genetic Control or Repair and Adaptive Response to Low-Level DNA Damage

    SciTech Connect

    J. E. Haber

    2009-10-05

    Research was focused on how a single double-strand break - a model of low-dose ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage - could be studied in a simple model system, budding yeast. Breaks were induced in several different ways. We used the site-specific HO endonuclease to create a single DSB in all cells of the population so that its fate could be extensively analyzed genetically and molecularly. We also used two heterologous systems, the plant DS element and the Rag1/Rag2 proteins, to generate different types of DSBs, these containing hairpin ends that needed to be cleaved open before end-joining could take place. All three approaches yielded important new findings. We also extended our analysis of the Mre11 protein that plays key roles in both NHEJ and in homologous recombination. Finally we analyzed the poorly understood recombination events that were independent of the key recombination protein, Rad52. This line of inquiry was strongly motivated by the fact that vertebrate cells do not rely strongly on Rad52 for homologous recombination, so that some clues about alternative mechanisms could be gained by understanding how Rad52-independent recombination occurred. We found that the Mre11 complex was the most important element in Rad52-independent recombination.

  13. Lymphocyte DNA damage in Turkish asphalt workers detected by the comet assay.

    PubMed

    Bacaksiz, Aysegul; Kayaalti, Zeliha; Soylemez, Esma; Tutkun, Engin; Soylemezoglu, Tulin

    2014-01-01

    Asphalt has a highly complex structure and it contains several organic compounds including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and heterocyclic compounds. In this study, comet assay was used to detect the DNA damage in blood lymphocytes of 30 workers exposed to asphalt fumes and 30 nonexposed controls. This is the first report on Turkish asphalt workers' investigated DNA damage using the alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE). The DNA damage was evaluated by the percentage of DNA in the comet tail (% tail DNA) for each cell. According to our results, workers exposed to asphalt fumes had higher DNA damage than the control group (p < 0.01). The present study showed that asphalt fumes caused a significant increase in DNA damage and the comet assay is a suitable method for determining DNA damage in asphalt workers.

  14. DNA damage as an indicator of pollutant-induced genotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Shugart, L.R.

    1989-01-01

    Biological monitoring is an approach of considerable interest to scientists in the field of environmental genotoxicity who are investigating the effects of hazardous substances on the biota. In essence the technique involves an evaluation of various types of responses in living organisms for their potential to identify exposure to dangerous substances and to define or to predict subsequent deleterious effects. The rationale for the selection of DNA damage as an indicator of exposure to genotoxic agents is based mainly on the mechanisms of action of chemicals that are known mutagens and carcinogens. An alkaline unwinding assay that detects excess strand breakage within the DNA polymer was applied to sunfish in a local stream as a biological monitor for environmental genotoxicity due to industrial pollution. The study was conducted over a period of 15 months and the temporal and spatial aspects of the data were evaluated for the effect of remedial action. 16 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. DNA damage in Wistar rats exposed to dithiocarbamate pesticide mancozeb.

    PubMed

    Goldoni, A; Klauck, C R; Da Silva, S T; Da Silva, M D; Ardenghi, P G; Da Silva, L B

    2014-01-01

    Pesticides are used in large amounts in agriculture and the evaluation of their toxic effects is of major concern to public and environmental health. The aim of the present study was to investigate the genotoxic potential of a commercial formulation of the fungicide mancozeb by the micronucleus test in bone marrow and the comet assay in total blood of Wistar rats. Adult male Wistar rats were treated with a solution of mancozeb at a concentration of 40 mg/kg/day, administered intraperitoneally for 18 consecutive days, and compared to a control group. The results indicate that mancozeb induced significantly higher DNA damage as detected by the comet assay and increased the frequency of micronuclei. The results show that mancozeb is genotoxic and may adversely affect the DNA integrity of exposed organisms.

  16. Sumoylation regulates EXO1 stability and processing of DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Bologna, Serena; Altmannova, Veronika; Valtorta, Emanuele; Koenig, Christiane; Liberali, Prisca; Gentili, Christian; Anrather, Dorothea; Ammerer, Gustav; Pelkmans, Lucas; Krejci, Lumir; Ferrari, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    DNA double-strand break repair by the error-free pathway of homologous recombination (HR) requires the concerted action of several factors. Among these, EXO1 and DNA2/BLM are responsible for the extensive resection of DNA ends to produce 3′-overhangs, which are essential intermediates for downstream steps of HR. Here we show that EXO1 is a SUMO target and that sumoylation affects EXO1 ubiquitylation and protein stability. We identify an UBC9-PIAS1/PIAS4-dependent mechanism controlling human EXO1 sumoylation in vivo and demonstrate conservation of this mechanism in yeast by the Ubc9-Siz1/Siz2 using an in vitro reconstituted system. Furthermore, we show physical interaction between EXO1 and the de-sumoylating enzyme SENP6 both in vitro and in vivo, promoting EXO1 stability. Finally, we identify the major sites of sumoylation in EXO1 and show that ectopic expression of a sumoylation-deficient form of EXO1 rescues the DNA damage-induced chromosomal aberrations observed upon wt-EXO1 expression. Thus, our study identifies a novel layer of regulation of EXO1, making the pathways that regulate its function an ideal target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26083678

  17. Dynamics of DNA damage response proteins at DNA breaks: a focus on protein modifications

    PubMed Central

    Polo, Sophie E.; Jackson, Stephen P.

    2011-01-01

    Genome integrity is constantly monitored by sophisticated cellular networks, collectively termed the DNA damage response (DDR). A common feature of DDR proteins is their mobilization in response to genotoxic stress. Here, we outline how the development of various complementary methodologies has provided valuable insights into the spatiotemporal dynamics of DDR protein assembly/disassembly at sites of DNA strand breaks in eukaryotic cells. Considerable advances have also been made in understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms for these events, with post-translational modifications of DDR factors being shown to play prominent roles in controlling the formation of foci in response to DNA-damaging agents. We review these regulatory mechanisms and discuss their biological significance to the DDR. PMID:21363960

  18. The dynamic behavior of Ect2 in response to DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    He, Dan; Xiang, Jinnan; Li, Baojie; Liu, Huijuan

    2016-01-01

    Ect2 is a BRCT-containing guanidine exchange factor for Rho GTPases. It is essential for cytokinesis and is also involved in tumorigenesis. Since most BRCT-containing proteins are involved in DNA damage response and/or DNA repair, we tested whether Ect2 plays similar roles. We report that in primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), DNA damage quickly led to Ect2 relocalization to the chromatin and DNA damage foci-like structures. Ect2 knockdown did not affect foci localization of γH2AX, TopBP1, or Brca1, or activation of Atm, yet it impeded p53 Ser15 phosphorylation and activation, and resulted in defects in apoptosis and activation of S and G2/M checkpoints in response to DNA damage. These results suggest that Ect2 plays a role in DNA damage response. Interestingly, Ect2 is down-regulated at late stages of DNA damage response. Although p53 and E2F1 have been shown to regulate Ect2 transcription, DNA damage-induced Ect2 down-regulation occurred in p53−/− or Atm−/− MEFs and E2F1 knockdown cells. Instead, DNA damage-induced Ect2 down-regulation is mainly attributable to decreased protein stability. Like Ect2 knockdown, Ect2 destabilization may help the cell to recover from DNA damage response. These results suggest that Ect2 plays roles in multiple aspects of DNA damage response. PMID:27074761

  19. In vitro replication by prokaryotic and eukaryotic polymerases on DNA templates containing site-specific and stereospecific benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol-9,10-epoxide adducts.

    PubMed Central

    Chary, P; Lloyd, R S

    1995-01-01

    DNA adducts of the environmental carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol-9,10-epoxide (BPDE) interact stereospecifically with prokaryotic and eukaryotic polymerases in vitro. Toward understanding the capacity to replicate past different diastereomers of BPDE at specific sites in DNA, six deoxyoligonucleotides, each 33 bases long, were constructed with stereochemically defined BPDE adducts on adenine N6 at position two of the human N-ras codon 61. Four polymerases that were studied under single encounters with the template-primer complex terminated synthesis one base 3' to the lesion with all the adducted templates. When multiple encounters between polymerase and substrate were permitted, each of the polymerases analyzed revealed a unique pattern for a given adducted template. The general replication pattern was encompassed under two categories, reflecting the significance of the R and S configurations of C10 of the pyrenyl ring attached to the single-stranded DNA template. Furthermore, within each of these categories, every polymerase demonstrated distinct quantitative differences in product accumulation at a given site, for the various adducted templates. Among the polymerases utilized in this study, exonuclease-deficient Klenow fragment of polymerase I (exo- KF) exhibited the most efficient translesion synthesis resulting in approximately 16% full-length products with the modified templates bearing adducts with C10-S configuration. In contrast, chain elongation with bacteriophage T4 DNA polymerase bearing an active 3'-->5' exonucleolytic activity was most strongly inhibited by all six BPDE-adducted templates. Misincorporation of A opposite the adduct occurred in all the templates when polymerized with Sequenase, whereas exo- KF preferentially incorporated C opposite the C10-R BPDE adducts and A opposite the C10-S BPDE adducts. Images PMID:7753632

  20. Designing a Single-Molecule Biophysics Tool for Characterising DNA Damage for Techniques that Kill Infectious Pathogens Through DNA Damage Effects.

    PubMed

    Miller, Helen; Wollman, Adam J M; Leake, Mark C

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotics such as the quinolones and fluoroquinolones kill bacterial pathogens ultimately through DNA damage. They target the essential type IIA topoisomerases in bacteria by stabilising the normally transient double-strand break state which is created to modify the supercoiling state of the DNA. Here we discuss the development of these antibiotics and their method of action. Existing methods for DNA damage visualisation, such as the comet assay and immunofluorescence imaging can often only be analysed qualitatively and this analysis is subjective. We describe a putative single-molecule fluorescence technique for quantifying DNA damage via the total fluorescence intensity of a DNA origami tile fully saturated with an intercalating dye, along with the optical requirements for how to implement these into a light microscopy imaging system capable of single-molecule millisecond timescale imaging. This system promises significant improvements in reproducibility of the quantification of DNA damage over traditional techniques.

  1. DNA damage response and sphingolipid signaling in liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Yasunobu; Moro, Kazuki; Tsuchida, Junko; Soma, Daiki; Hirose, Yuki; Kobayashi, Takashi; Kosugi, Shin-ichi; Takabe, Kazuaki; Komatsu, Masaaki; Wakai, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cannot generally be cured by systemic chemotherapy or radiotherapy due to their poor response to conventional therapeutic agents. The development of novel and efficient targeted therapies to increase their treatment options depends on the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms that underlie the pathogenesis of HCC. The DNA damage response (DDR) is a network of cell-signaling events that are triggered by DNA damage. Its dysregulation is thought to be one of the key mechanisms underlying the generation of HCC. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), a lipid mediator, has emerged as an important signaling molecule that has been found to be involved in many cellular functions. In the liver, the alteration of S1P signaling potentially affects the DDR pathways. In this review, we explore the role of the DDR in hepatocarcinogenesis of various etiologies, including hepatitis B and C infection and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Furthermore, we discuss the metabolism and functions of S1P that may affect the hepatic DDR. The elucidation of the pathogenic role of S1P may create new avenues of research into therapeutic strategies for patients with HCC. PMID:26514817

  2. Hydroxytyrosol Protects against Oxidative DNA Damage in Human Breast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Warleta, Fernando; Quesada, Cristina Sánchez; Campos, María; Allouche, Yosra; Beltrán, Gabriel; Gaforio, José J.

    2011-01-01

    Over recent years, several studies have related olive oil ingestion to a low incidence of several diseases, including breast cancer. Hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol are two of the major phenols present in virgin olive oils. Despite the fact that they have been linked to cancer prevention, there is no evidence that clarifies their effect in human breast tumor and non-tumor cells. In the present work, we present hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol’s effects in human breast cell lines. Our results show that hydroxytyrosol acts as a more efficient free radical scavenger than tyrosol, but both fail to affect cell proliferation rates, cell cycle profile or cell apoptosis in human mammary epithelial cells (MCF10A) or breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 and MCF7). We found that hydroxytyrosol decreases the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in MCF10A cells but not in MCF7 or MDA-MB-231 cells while very high amounts of tyrosol is needed to decrease the ROS level in MCF10A cells. Interestingly, hydroxytyrosol prevents oxidative DNA damage in the three breast cell lines. Therefore, our data suggest that simple phenol hydroxytyrosol could contribute to a lower incidence of breast cancer in populations that consume virgin olive oil due to its antioxidant activity and its protection against oxidative DNA damage in mammary cells. PMID:22254082

  3. 3D view of chromosomes, DNA damage, and translocations.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Michal; Hakim, Ofir

    2014-04-01

    The cell nucleus is a busy and organized organelle. In this megalopolis made of billions of nucleotides, protein factors find their target loci to exert nuclear functions such as transcription and replication. Remarkably, despite the lack of internal membrane barrier, the interlinked and tightly regulated nuclear processes occur in spatially organized fashion. These processes can lead to double-strand breaks (DSBs) that compromise the integrity of the genome. Moreover, in some cells like lymphocytes, DNA damage is also targeted within the context of immunoglobulin gene recombination. If not repaired correctly, DSBs can cause chromosomal rearrangements, including translocations which are etiological in numerous tumors. Therefore, the chromosomal locations of DSBs, as well as their spatial positioning, are important contributors to formation of chromosomal translocations at specific genomic loci. To obtain a mechanistic understanding of chromosomal translocations these parameters should be accounted for in a global and integrative fashion. In this review we will discuss recent findings addressing how genome architecture, DNA damage, and repair contribute to the genesis of chromosomal translocations.

  4. The Yeast Copper Response Is Regulated by DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Kangzhen; Addinall, Stephen G.; Lydall, David

    2013-01-01

    Copper is an essential but potentially toxic redox-active metal, so the levels and distribution of this metal are carefully regulated to ensure that it binds to the correct proteins. Previous studies of copper-dependent transcription in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have focused on the response of genes to changes in the exogenous levels of copper. We now report that yeast copper genes are regulated in response to the DNA-damaging agents methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and hydroxyurea by a mechanism(s) that requires the copper-responsive transcription factors Mac1 and AceI, copper superoxide dismutase (Sod1) activity, and the Rad53 checkpoint kinase. Furthermore, in copper-starved yeast, the response of the Rad53 pathway to MMS is compromised due to a loss of Sod1 activity, consistent with the model that yeast imports copper to ensure Sod1 activity and Rad53 signaling. Crucially, the Mac1 transcription factor undergoes changes in its redox state in response to changing levels of copper or MMS. This study has therefore identified a novel regulatory relationship between cellular redox, copper homeostasis, and the DNA damage response in yeast. PMID:23959798

  5. Hydroxytyrosol protects against oxidative DNA damage in human breast cells.

    PubMed

    Warleta, Fernando; Quesada, Cristina Sánchez; Campos, María; Allouche, Yosra; Beltrán, Gabriel; Gaforio, José J

    2011-10-01

    Over recent years, several studies have related olive oil ingestion to a low incidence of several diseases, including breast cancer. Hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol are two of the major phenols present in virgin olive oils. Despite the fact that they have been linked to cancer prevention, there is no evidence that clarifies their effect in human breast tumor and non-tumor cells. In the present work, we present hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol's effects in human breast cell lines. Our results show that hydroxytyrosol acts as a more efficient free radical scavenger than tyrosol, but both fail to affect cell proliferation rates, cell cycle profile or cell apoptosis in human mammary epithelial cells (MCF10A) or breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 and MCF7). We found that hydroxytyrosol decreases the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in MCF10A cells but not in MCF7 or MDA-MB-231 cells while very high amounts of tyrosol is needed to decrease the ROS level in MCF10A cells. Interestingly, hydroxytyrosol prevents oxidative DNA damage in the three breast cell lines. Therefore, our data suggest that simple phenol hydroxytyrosol could contribute to a lower incidence of breast cancer in populations that consume virgin olive oil due to its antioxidant activity and its protection against oxidative DNA damage in mammary cells.

  6. Detection of DNA damage by using hairpin molecular beacon probes and graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jie; Lu, Qian; Tong, Ying; Wei, Wei; Liu, Songqin

    2012-09-15

    A hairpin molecular beacon tagged with carboxyfluorescein in combination with graphene oxide as a quencher reagent was used to detect the DNA damage by chemical reagents. The fluorescence of molecular beacon was quenched sharply by graphene oxide; while in the presence of its complementary DNA the quenching efficiency decreased because their hybridization prevented the strong adsorbability of molecular beacon on graphene oxide. If the complementary DNA was damaged by a chemical reagent and could not form intact duplex structure with molecular beacon, more molecular beacon would adsorb on graphene oxide increasing the quenching efficiency. Thus, damaged DNA could be detected based on different quenching efficiencies afforded by damaged and intact complementary DNA. The damage effects of chlorpyrifos-methyl and three metabolites of styrene such as mandelieaeids, phenylglyoxylieaeids and epoxystyrene on DNA were studied as models. The method for detection of DNA damage was reliable, rapid and simple compared to the biological methods.

  7. Protective Effect of Folic Acid on Oxidative DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaojuan; Cui, Huan; Zhang, Haiyang; Guan, Xiaoju; Zhang, Zheng; Jia, Chaonan; Wu, Jia; Yang, Hui; Qiu, Wenting; Zhang, Chuanwu; Yang, Zuopeng; Chen, Zhu; Mao, Guangyun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although previous reports have linked DNA damage with both transmissions across generations as well as our own survival, it is unknown how to reverse the lesion. Based on the data from a Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo Controlled Clinical Trial, this study aimed to assess the efficacy of folic acid supplementation (FAS) on DNA oxidative damage reversal. In this randomized clinical trial (RCT), a total of 450 participants were enrolled and randomly assigned to 3 groups to receive folic acid (FA) 0.4 mg/day (low-FA), 0.8 mg/day (high-FA), or placebo (control) for 8 weeks. The urinary 8-hydroxy-2’-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and creatinine (Cr) concentration at pre- and post-FAS were measured with modified enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), respectively. A multivariate general linear model was applied to assess the individual effects of FAS and the joint effects between FAS and hypercholesterolemia on oxidative DNA damage improvement. This clinical trial was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02235948. Of the 438 subjects that received FA fortification or placebo, the median (first quartile, third quartile) of urinary 8-OHdG/Cr for placebo, low-FA, and high-FA groups were 58.19 (43.90, 82.26), 53.51 (38.97, 72.74), 54.73 (39.58, 76.63) ng/mg at baseline and 57.77 (44.35, 81.33), 51.73 (38.20, 71.30), and 50.65 (37.64, 76.17) ng/mg at the 56th day, respectively. A significant decrease of urinary 8-OHdG was observed after 56 days FA fortification (P < 0.001). Compared with the placebo, after adjusting for some potential confounding factors, including the baseline urinary 8-OHdG/Cr, the urinary 8-OHdG/Cr concentration significantly decreased after 56 days FAS [β (95% confidence interval) = −0.88 (−1.62, −0.14) and P = 0.020 for low-FA; and β (95% confidence interval) = −2.68 (−3.42, −1.94) and P < 0.001 for high-FA] in a dose-response fashion (Ptrend

  8. Clerocidin selectively modifies the gyrase-DNA gate to induce irreversible and reversible DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xiao Su; Dias, Miriam; Palumbo, Manlio; Fisher, L. Mark

    2008-01-01

    Clerocidin (CL), a microbial diterpenoid, reacts with DNA via its epoxide group and stimulates DNA cleavage by type II DNA topoisomerases. The molecular basis of CL action is poorly understood. We establish by genetic means that CL targets DNA gyrase in the Gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae, and promotes gyrase-dependent single- and double-stranded DNA cleavage in vitro. CL-stimulated DNA breakage exhibited a strong preference for guanine preceding the scission site (−1 position). Mutagenesis of −1 guanines to A, C or T abrogated CL cleavage at a strong pBR322 site. Surprisingly, for double-strand breaks, scission on one strand consistently involved a modified (piperidine-labile) guanine and was not reversed by heat, salt or EDTA, whereas complementary strand scission occurred at a piperidine-stable −1 nt and was reversed by EDTA. CL did not induce cleavage by a mutant gyrase (GyrA G79A) identified here in CL-resistant pneumococci. Indeed, mutations at G79 and at the neighbouring S81 residue in the GyrA breakage-reunion domain discriminated poisoning by CL from that of antibacterial quinolones. The results suggest a novel mechanism of enzyme inhibition in which the −1 nt at the gyrase-DNA gate exhibit different CL reactivities to produce both irreversible and reversible DNA damage. PMID:18723572

  9. DNA Damage Tolerance and a Web of Connections with DNA Repair at Yale

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Richard D.

    2013-01-01

    This short article summarizes some of the research carried out recently by my laboratory colleagues on the function of DNA polymerase zeta (polζ) in mammalian cells. Some personal background is also described, relevant to research associations with Yale University and its continuing influence. Polζ is involved in the bypass of many DNA lesions by translesion DNA synthesis and is responsible for the majority of DNA damage-induced point mutagenesis in mammalian cells (including human cells), as well as in yeast. We also found that the absence of this enzyme leads to gross chromosomal instability in mammalian cells and increased spontaneous tumorigenesis in mice. Recently, we discovered a further unexpectedly critical role for polζ: it plays an essential role in allowing continued rapid proliferation of cells and tissues. These observations and others indicate that polζ engages frequently during DNA replication to bypass and tolerate DNA lesions or unusual DNA structures that are barriers for the normal DNA replication machinery. PMID:24348215

  10. Savannah River Site's Site Specific Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    This Site Specific Plan (SSP) has been prepared by the Savannah River Site (SRS) in order to show the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities that were identified during the preparation of the Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan (FYP) for FY 1992--1996. The SSP has been prepared in accordance with guidance received from DOE-HQ. DOE-SR is accountable to DOE-HQ for the implementation of this plan. The purpose of the SSP is to develop a baseline for policy, budget, and schedules for the DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities. The plan explains accomplishments since the Fiscal Year (FY) 1990 plan, demonstrates how present and future activities are prioritized, identifies currently funded activities and activities that are planned to be funded in the upcoming fiscal year, and describes future activities that SRS is considering.

  11. Site-Specific Carbon Isotopes in Organics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piasecki, A.; Eiler, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    Natural organic molecules exhibit a wide range of internal site-specific isotope variation (i.e., molecules with same isotopic substitution type but different site). Such variations are generally unconstrained by bulk isotopic measurements. If known, site-specific variations might constrain temperatures of equilibrium, mechanisms of formation or consumption reactions, and possibly other details. For example, lipids can exhibit carbon isotope differences of up to 30‰ between adjacent carbon sites as a result of fractionations arising during decarboxylation of pyruvate and other steps in lipid biosynthesis(1). We present a method for site-specific carbon isotope analysis of propane, based on high-resolution, multi-collector gas source mass spectrometry, using a novel prototype instrument - the Thermo MAT 253 Ultra. This machine has an inlet system and electron bombardment ion source resembling those in conventional stable isotope gas source mass spectrometers, and the energy filter, magnet, and detector array resembling those in multi-collector ICPMS and TIMS. The detector array has 7 detector positions, 6 of which are movable, and each of which can collect ions with either a faraday cup (read through amplifiers ranging from 107-1012 ohms) or an SEM. High mass resolving power (up to 27,000, MRP = M/dM definition) is achieved through a narrow entrance slit, adjustable from 250 to 5 μm. Such resolution can cleanly separate isobaric interferences between isotopologues of organic molecules having the same cardinal mass (e.g., 13CH3 and 12CH2D). We use this technology to analyze the isotopologues and fragments of propane, and use such data to solve for the site-specific carbon isotope fractionation. By measuring isotopologues of both the one-carbon (13CH3) and the two-carbon (13C12CH4) fragment ion, we can solve for both bulk δ13C and the difference in δ13C between the terminal and central carbon position. We tested this method by analyzing mixtures between natural

  12. Examining site-specific GPCR phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Butcher, Adrian J; Tobin, Andrew B; Kong, Kok Choi

    2011-01-01

    Phosphorylation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is one of the most prominent post-translation modifications mediated by agonist stimulation. This process has been shown to result not only in receptor desensitisation but also, via the recruitment of arrestin adaptor proteins, to promote receptor coupling to numerous signalling pathways. Furthermore, there is now a growing body of evidence suggesting that GPCRs may employ phosphorylation as a mechanism to regulate their cell-type-specific signalling, hence generating tissue-specific functions. These advances have resulted partly from improved methods used in the determination of phospho-acceptor sites on GPCRs and improved analysis of the consequences of phosphorylation. This chapter aims to describe the methods used in our laboratory for the investigation of site-specific phosphorylation of the M₃-muscarinic receptor. These methods could easily be applied in the study of other receptors.

  13. Functional interplay between ATM/ATR-mediated DNA damage response and DNA repair pathways in oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Sorrell, Melanie; Berman, Zachary

    2014-01-01

    To maintain genome stability, cells have evolved various DNA repair pathways to deal with oxidative DNA damage. DNA damage response (DDR) pathways, including ATM-Chk2 and ATR-Chk1 checkpoints, are also activated in oxidative stress to coordinate DNA repair, cell cycle progression, transcription, apoptosis, and senescence. Several studies demonstrate that DDR pathways can regulate DNA repair pathways. On the other hand, accumulating evidence suggests that DNA repair pathways may modulate DDR pathway activation as well. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of how various DNA repair and DDR pathways are activated in response to oxidative DNA damage primarily from studies in eukaryotes. In particular, we analyze the functional interplay between DNA repair and DDR pathways in oxidative stress. A better understanding of cellular response to oxidative stress may provide novel avenues of treating human diseases, such as cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:24947324

  14. Clusters of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation: formation of short DNA fragments. II. Experimental detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rydberg, B.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The basic 30-nm chromatin fiber in the mammalian cell consists of an unknown (possibly helical) arrangement of nucleosomes, with about 1.2 kb of DNA per 10-nm length of fiber. Track-structure considerations suggest that interactions of single delta rays or high-LET particles with the chromatin fiber might result in the formation of multiple lesions spread over a few kilobases of DNA (see the accompanying paper: W.R. Holley and A. Chatterjee, Radiat. Res. 145, 188-199, 1996). In particular, multiple DNA double-strand breaks and single-strand breaks may form. To test this experimentally, primary human fibroblasts were labeled with [3H]thymidine and exposed at 0 degrees C to X rays or accelerated nitrogen or iron ions in the LET range of 97-440 keV/microns. DNA was isolated inside agarose plugs and subjected to agarose gel electrophoresis under conditions that allowed good separation of 0.1-2 kb size DNA. The bulk of DNA remained in the well or migrated only a small distance into the gel. It was found that DNA fragments in the expected size range were formed linearly with dose with an efficiency that increased with LET. A comparison of the yield of such fragments with the yield of total DNA double-strand breaks suggests that for the high-LET ions a substantial proportion (20-90%) of DNA double-strand breaks are accompanied within 0.1-2 kb by at least one additional DNA double-strand break. It is shown that these results are in good agreement with theoretical calculations based on treating the 30-nm chromatin fiber as the target for ionizing particles. Theoretical considerations also predict that the clusters will contain numerous single-strand breaks and base damages. It is proposed that such clusters be designated "regionally multiply damaged sites." Postirradiation incubation at 37 degrees C resulted in a decline in the number of short DNA fragments, suggesting a repair activity. The biological significance of regionally multiply damaged sites is presently unknown.

  15. Clusters of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation: Formation of short DNA fragments. II. Experimental detection

    SciTech Connect

    Rydberg, B.

    1996-02-01

    The basic 30-nm chromatin fiber in the mammalian cell consists of an unknown (possibly helical) arrangement of nucleosomes, with about 1.2 kb of DNA per 10-nm length of fiber. Track-structure considerations suggest that interactions of single {delta} rays or high-LET particles with the chromatin fiber might result in the formation of multiple lesions spread over a few kilobases of DNA. In particular, multiple DNA double-strand breaks and single-strand breaks may form. To test this experimentally, primary human fibroblasts were labeled with [{sup 3}H]thymidine and exposed at 0{degrees}C to X rays or accelerated nitrogen or iron ions in the LET range of 97-440 keV/pm. DNA was isolated inside agarose plugs and subjected to agarose gel electrophoresis under conditions that allowed good separation of 0.1-2 kb size DNA. The bulk of DNA remained in the well or migrated only a small distance into the gel. It was found that DNA fragments in the expected size range were formed linearly with dose with an efficiency that increased with LET. A comparison of the yield of such fragments with the yield of total DNA double-strand breaks suggests that for the high-LET ions a substantial proportion (20-90%) of DNA double-strand breaks are accompanied within 0.1-2 kb by at least one additional DNA double-strand break. It is shown that these results are in good agreement with theoretical calculations based on treating the 30-nm chromatin fiber as the target for ionizing particles. Theoretical considerations also predict that the clusters will contain numerous single-strand breaks and base damages. It is proposed that such clusters be designated {open_quotes}regionally multiply damaged sites.{close_quotes} Postirradiation incubation at 37{degrees}C resulted in a decline in the number of short DNA fragments, suggesting a repair activity. The biological significance of regionally multiply damaged sites is presently unknown. 34 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Development of a qPCR Method to Measure Mitochondrial and Genomic DNA Damage with Application to Chemotherapy-Induced DNA Damage and Cryopreserved Cells.

    PubMed

    Evans, Stephen O; Jameson, Michael B; Cursons, Ray T M; Peters, Linda M; Bird, Steve; Jacobson, Gregory M

    2016-10-08

    DNA damage quantitation assays such as the comet assay have focused on the measurement of total nuclear damage per cell. The adoption of PCR-based techniques to quantify DNA damage has enabled sequence- and organelle-specific assessment of DNA lesions. Here we report on an adaptation of a qPCR technique to assess DNA damage in nuclear and mitochondrial targets relative to control. Novel aspects of this assay include application of the assay to the Rotor-Gene platform with optimized DNA polymerase/fluorophore/primer set combination in a touchdown PCR protocol. Assay validation was performed using ultraviolet C radiation in A549 and THP1 cancer cell lines. A comparison was made to the comet assay applied to peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and an estimation of the effects of cryopreservation on ultraviolet C-induced DNA damage was carried out. Finally, dose responses for DNA damage were measured in peripheral blood mononuclear cells following exposure to the cytotoxic agents bleomycin and cisplatin. We show reproducible experimental outputs across the tested conditions and concordance with published findings with respect to mitochondrial and nuclear genotoxic susceptibilities. The application of this DNA damage assay to a wide range of clinical and laboratory-derived samples is both feasible and resource-efficient.

  17. Development of a qPCR Method to Measure Mitochondrial and Genomic DNA Damage with Application to Chemotherapy-Induced DNA Damage and Cryopreserved Cells

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Stephen O.; Jameson, Michael B.; Cursons, Ray T. M.; Peters, Linda M.; Bird, Steve; Jacobson, Gregory M.

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage quantitation assays such as the comet assay have focused on the measurement of total nuclear damage per cell. The adoption of PCR-based techniques to quantify DNA damage has enabled sequence- and organelle-specific assessment of DNA lesions. Here we report on an adaptation of a qPCR technique to assess DNA damage in nuclear and mitochondrial targets relative to control. Novel aspects of this assay include application of the assay to the Rotor-Gene platform with optimized DNA polymerase/fluorophore/primer set combination in a touchdown PCR protocol. Assay validation was performed using ultraviolet C radiation in A549 and THP1 cancer cell lines. A comparison was made to the comet assay applied to peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and an estimation of the effects of cryopreservation on ultraviolet C-induced DNA damage was carried out. Finally, dose responses for DNA damage were measured in peripheral blood mononuclear cells following exposure to the cytotoxic agents bleomycin and cisplatin. We show reproducible experimental outputs across the tested conditions and concordance with published findings with respect to mitochondrial and nuclear genotoxic susceptibilities. The application of this DNA damage assay to a wide range of clinical and laboratory-derived samples is both feasible and resource-efficient. PMID:27740596

  18. Thirdhand smoke causes DNA damage in human cells.

    PubMed

    Hang, Bo; Sarker, Altaf H; Havel, Christopher; Saha, Saikat; Hazra, Tapas K; Schick, Suzaynn; Jacob, Peyton; Rehan, Virender K; Chenna, Ahmed; Sharan, Divya; Sleiman, Mohamad; Destaillats, Hugo; Gundel, Lara A

    2013-07-01

    Exposure to thirdhand smoke (THS) is a newly described health risk. Evidence supports its widespread presence in indoor environments. However, its genotoxic potential, a critical aspect in risk assessment, is virtually untested. An important characteristic of THS is its ability to undergo chemical transformations during aging periods, as demonstrated in a recent study showing that sorbed nicotine reacts with the indoor pollutant nitrous acid (HONO) to form tobacco-specific nitrosamines (TSNAs) such as 4-(methylnitrosamino)-4-(3-pyridyl)butanal (NNA) and 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK). The goal of this study was to assess the genotoxicity of THS in human cell lines using two in vitro assays. THS was generated in laboratory systems that simulated short (acute)- and long (chronic)-term exposures. Analysis by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry quantified TSNAs and common tobacco alkaloids in extracts of THS that had sorbed onto cellulose substrates. Exposure of human HepG2 cells to either acute or chronic THS for 24h resulted in significant increases in DNA strand breaks in the alkaline Comet assay. Cell cultures exposed to NNA alone showed significantly higher levels of DNA damage in the same assay. NNA is absent in freshly emitted secondhand smoke, but it is the main TSNA formed in THS when nicotine reacts with HONO long after smoking takes place. The long amplicon-quantitative PCR assay quantified significantly higher levels of oxidative DNA damage in hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase 1 (HPRT) and polymerase β (POLB) genes of cultured human cells exposed to chronic THS for 24h compared with untreated cells, suggesting that THS exposure is related to increased oxidative stress and could be an important contributing factor in THS-mediated toxicity. The findings of this study demonstrate for the first time that exposure to THS is genotoxic in human cell lines.

  19. Inhibitors of Histone Deacetylases Enhance Neurotoxicity of DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Vashishta, A.

    2014-01-01

    The nonselective inhibitors of class I/II histone deacetylases (HDACs) including trichostatin A and the clinically used suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA, vorinostat) are neuroprotective in several models of neuronal injury. Here, we report that in cultured cortical neurons from newborn rats and in the cerebral cortex of whole neonate rats, these HDAC inhibitors exacerbated cytotoxicity of the DNA double-strand break (DSB)-inducing anticancer drug etoposide by enhancing apoptosis. Similar neurotoxic interactions were also observed in neurons that were treated with other DNA damaging drugs including cisplatin and camptothecin. In addition, in rat neonates, SAHA increased cortical neuron apoptosis that was induced by a single injection of the NMDA receptor antagonist dizocilpine (MK801). In etoposide-treated neurons, the nonselective HDAC inhibition resulted in more DSBs. It also potentiated etoposide-induced accumulation and phosphorylation of the pro-apoptotic transcription factor p53. Moreover, nonselective HDAC inhibition exacerbated neuronal apoptosis that was induced by the overexpressed p53. Importantly, such effects cannot be fully explained by inhibition of HDAC1, which is known to play a role in DSB repair and regulation of p53. The specific HDAC1 inhibitor MS275 only moderately enhanced etoposide-induced neuronal death. Although in etoposide-treated neurons MS275 increased DSBs, it did not affect activation of p53. Our findings suggest that besides HDAC1, there are other class I/II HDACs that participate in neuronal DNA damage response attenuating neurotoxic consequences of genotoxic insults to the developing brain. PMID:25063076

  20. Neutron energy-dependent initial DNA damage and chromosomal exchange.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, K; Gajendiran, N; Endo, S; Komatsu, K; Hoshi, M; Kamada, N

    1999-12-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the biological effect of monoenergetic neutrons on human lymphocyte DNA and chromosomes. Monoenergetic neutrons of 2.3, 1.0, 0.79, 0.57, 0.37 and 0.186 MeV were generated, and 252Cf neutrons and 60Co gamma-rays were also used for comparison. Biological effect was evaluated two ways. The RBE values with the comet assay were estimated as 6.3 and 5.4 at 0.37 MeV and 0.57 MeV relative to that of 60Co gamma-rays, and chromosome aberration rates were also observed in these different levels of monoenergetic neutrons. The yield of chromosome aberrations per unit dose was high at lower neutron energies with a gradual decline with 0.186 MeV neutron energy. The RBE was increased to 10.7 at 0.57 MeV from 3.9 at 252Cf neutrons and reached 16.4 as the highest RBE at 0.37 MeV, but the value decreased to 11.2 at 0.186 MeV. The response patterns of initial DNA damage and chromosome exchange were quite similar to that of LET. These results show that the intensity of DNA damage and chromosomal exchange is LET dependent. RBE of low energy neutrons is higher than that of fission neutrons. Low energy neutrons containing Hiroshima atomic bomb radiation may have created a significantly higher incidence of biological effect in atomic bomb survivors.

  1. The multifaceted influence of histone deacetylases on DNA damage signalling and DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Roos, Wynand Paul; Krumm, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Histone/protein deacetylases play multiple roles in regulating gene expression and protein activation and stability. Their deregulation during cancer initiation and progression cause resistance to therapy. Here, we review the role of histone deacetylases (HDACs) and the NAD+ dependent sirtuins (SIRTs) in the DNA damage response (DDR). These lysine deacetylases contribute to DNA repair by base excision repair (BER), nucleotide excision repair (NER), mismatch repair (MMR), non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), homologous recombination (HR) and interstrand crosslink (ICL) repair. Furthermore, we discuss possible mechanisms whereby these histone/protein deacetylases facilitate the switch between DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathways, how SIRTs play a central role in the crosstalk between DNA repair and cell death pathways due to their dependence on NAD+, and the influence of small molecule HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) on cancer cell resistance to genotoxin based therapies. Throughout the review, we endeavor to identify the specific HDAC targeted by HDACi leading to therapy sensitization. PMID:27738139

  2. Interplay between DNA tumor viruses and the host DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    McFadden, Karyn; Luftig, Micah A

    2013-01-01

    Viruses encounter many challenges within host cells in order to replicate their nucleic acid. In the case of DNA viruses, one challenge that must be overcome is recognition of viral DNA structures by the host DNA damage response (DDR) machinery. This is accomplished in elegant and unique ways by different viruses as each has specific needs and sensitivities dependent on its life cycle. In this review, we focus on three DNA tumor viruses and their interactions with the DDR. The viruses Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), and human papillomavirus (HPV) account for nearly all of the virus-associated human cancers worldwide. These viruses have also been excellent models for the study of oncogenic virus-mediated cell transformation. In this review, we will discuss how each of these viruses engage and subvert aspects of the host DDR. The first level of DDR engagement is a result of the genetic linkage between the oncogenic potential of these viruses and their ability to replicate. Namely, the promotion of cells from quiescence into the cell cycle to facilitate virus replication can be sensed through aberrant cellular DNA replication structures which activate the DDR and hinder cell transformation. DNA tumor viruses subvert this growth-suppressive DDR through changes in viral oncoprotein expression which ultimately facilitate virus replication. An additional level of DDR engagement is through direct detection of replicating viral DNA. These interactions parallel those observed in other DNA virus systems in that the need to subvert these intrinsic sensors of aberrant DNA structure in order to replicate must be in place. DNA tumor viruses are no exception. This review will cover the molecular features of DNA tumor virus interactions with the host DDR and the consequences for virus replication.

  3. Alpha-phellandrene-induced DNA damage and affect DNA repair protein expression in WEHI-3 murine leukemia cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jen-Jyh; Wu, Chih-Chung; Hsu, Shu-Chun; Weng, Shu-Wen; Ma, Yi-Shih; Huang, Yi-Ping; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-11-01

    Although there are few reports regarding α-phellandrene (α-PA), a natural compound from Schinus molle L. essential oil, there is no report to show that α-PA induced DNA damage and affected DNA repair associated protein expression. Herein, we investigated the effects of α-PA on DNA damage and repair associated protein expression in murine leukemia cells. Flow cytometric assay was used to measure the effects of α-PA on total cell viability and the results indicated that α-PA induced cell death. Comet assay and 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride staining were used for measuring DNA damage and condensation, respectively, and the results indicated that α-PA induced DNA damage and condensation in a concentration-dependent manner. DNA gel electrophoresis was used to examine the DNA damage and the results showed that α-PA induced DNA damage in WEHI-3 cells. Western blotting assay was used to measure the changes of DNA damage and repair associated protein expression and the results indicated that α-PA increased p-p53, p-H2A.X, 14-3-3-σ, and MDC1 protein expression but inhibited the protein of p53, MGMT, DNA-PK, and BRCA-1.

  4. ELF alternating magnetic field decreases reproduction by DNA damage induction.

    PubMed

    Panagopoulos, Dimitris J; Karabarbounis, Andreas; Lioliousis, Constantinos

    2013-11-01

    In the present experiments, the effect of 50-Hz alternating magnetic field on Drosophila melanogaster reproduction was studied. Newly eclosed insects were separated into identical groups of ten males and ten females and exposed to three different intensities of the ELF magnetic field (1, 11, and 21 G) continuously during the first 5 days of their adult lives. The reproductive capacity was assessed by the number of F1 pupae according to a well-defined protocol of ours. The magnetic field was found to decrease reproduction by up to 4.3%. The effect increased with increasing field intensities. The decline in reproductive capacity was found to be due to severe DNA damage (DNA fragmentation) and consequent cell death induction in the reproductive cells as determined by the TUNEL assay applied during early and mid-oogenesis (from germarium to stage 10) where physiological apoptosis does not occur. The increase in DNA damage was more significant than the corresponding decrease in reproductive capacity (up to ~7.5%). The TUNEL-positive signal denoting DNA fragmentation was observed exclusively at the two most sensitive developmental stages of oogenesis: the early and mid-oogenesis checkpoints (i.e. region 2a/2b of the germarium and stages 7-8 just before the onset of vitellogenesis)-in contrast to exposure to microwave radiation of earlier work of ours in which the DNA fragmentation was induced at all developmental stages of early and mid-oogenesis. Moreover, the TUNEL-positive signal was observed in all three types of egg chamber cells, mainly in the nurse and follicle cells and also in the oocyte, in agreement with the microwave exposure of our earlier works. According to previous reports, cell death induction in the oocyte was observed only in the case of microwave exposure and not after exposure to other stress factors as toxic chemicals or food deprivation. Now it is also observed for the first time after ELF magnetic field exposure. Finally, in contrast to microwave

  5. A FLUORESCENCE BASED ASSAY FOR DNA DAMAGE INDUCED BY TOXIC INDUSTRIAL CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    One of the reported effects for exposure to many of the toxic industrial chemicals is DNA damage. The present study describes a simple, rapid and innovative assay to detect DNA damage resulting from exposure of surrogate DNA to toxic industrial chemicals (acrolein, allylamine, ch...

  6. A FLUORESCENCE BASED ASSAY FOR DNA DAMAGE INDUCED BY STYRENE OXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid and simple assay to detect DNA damage to calf thymus DNA caused by styrene oxide (SO) is reported. This assay is based on changes observed in the melting and annealing behavior of the damaged DNA. The melting annealing process was monitored using a fluorescence indicat...

  7. Host DNA damage response facilitates African swine fever virus infection.

    PubMed

    Simões, Margarida; Martins, Carlos; Ferreira, Fernando

    2013-07-26

    Studies with different viral infection models on virus interactions with the host cell nucleus have opened new perspectives on our understanding of the molecular basis of these interactions in African swine fever virus (ASFV) infection. The present study aims to characterize the host DNA damage response (DDR) occurring upon in vitro infection with the ASFV-Ba71V isolate. We evaluated protein levels during ASFV time-course infection, of several signalling cascade factors belonging to DDR pathways involved in double strand break repair - Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM), ATM-Rad 3 related (ATR) and DNA dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs). DDR inhibitory trials using caffeine and wortmannin and ATR inducible-expression cell lines were used to confirm specific pathway activation during viral infection. Our results show that ASFV specifically elicits ATR-mediated pathway activation from the early phase of infection with increased levels of H2AX, RPA32, p53, ATR and Chk1 phosphorylated forms. Viral p72 synthesis was abrogated by ATR kinase inhibitors and also in ATR-kd cells. Furthermore, a reduction of viral progeny was identified in these cells when compared to the outcome of infection in ATR-wt. Overall, our results strongly suggest that the ATR pathway plays an essential role for successful ASFV infection of host cells.

  8. An Integrated Approach for Analysis of the DNA Damage Response in Mammalian Cells: NUCLEOTIDE EXCISION REPAIR, DNA DAMAGE CHECKPOINT, AND APOPTOSIS.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jun-Hyuk; Kim, So-Young; Kim, Sook-Kyung; Kemp, Michael G; Sancar, Aziz

    2015-11-27

    DNA damage by UV and UV-mimetic agents elicits a set of inter-related responses in mammalian cells, including DNA repair, DNA damage checkpoints, and apoptosis. Conventionally, these responses are analyzed separately using different methodologies. Here we describe a unified approach that is capable of quantifying all three responses in parallel using lysates from the same population of cells. We show that a highly sensitive in vivo excision repair assay is capable of detecting nucleotide excision repair of a wide spectrum of DNA lesions (UV damage, chemical carcinogens, and chemotherapeutic drugs) within minutes of damage induction. This method therefore allows for a real-time measure of nucleotide excision repair activity that can be monitored in conjunction with other components of the DNA damage response, including DNA damage checkpoint and apoptotic signaling. This approach therefore provides a convenient and reliable platform for simultaneously examining multiple aspects of the DNA damage response in a single population of cells that can be applied for a diverse array of carcinogenic and chemotherapeutic agents.

  9. Clustered DNA damages induced in isolated DNA and in human cells by low doses of ionizing radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutherland, B. M.; Bennett, P. V.; Sidorkina, O.; Laval, J.; Lowenstein, D. I. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Clustered DNA damages-two or more closely spaced damages (strand breaks, abasic sites, or oxidized bases) on opposing strands-are suspects as critical lesions producing lethal and mutagenic effects of ionizing radiation. However, as a result of the lack of methods for measuring damage clusters induced by ionizing radiation in genomic DNA, neither the frequencies of their production by physiological doses of radiation, nor their repairability, nor their biological effects are known. On the basis of methods that we developed for quantitating damages in large DNAs, we have devised and validated a way of measuring ionizing radiation-induced clustered lesions in genomic DNA, including DNA from human cells. DNA is treated with an endonuclease that induces a single-strand cleavage at an oxidized base or abasic site. If there are two closely spaced damages on opposing strands, such cleavage will reduce the size of the DNA on a nondenaturing gel. We show that ionizing radiation does induce clustered DNA damages containing abasic sites, oxidized purines, or oxidized pyrimidines. Further, the frequency of each of these cluster classes is comparable to that of frank double-strand breaks; among all complex damages induced by ionizing radiation, double-strand breaks are only about 20%, with other clustered damage constituting some 80%. We also show that even low doses (0.1-1 Gy) of high linear energy transfer ionizing radiation induce clustered damages in human cells.

  10. The Connectivity Between Site-Specific Life Cycle Impact Assessment and Site-Specific Weighting

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of many LCIAs is to come to a single score with all of the impacts from a wide variety of impact assessments weighted to form this single score. My past experiences with developing site-specific impact assessment methodologies and how this can change the valuation porti...

  11. The ATM Kinase Induces MicroRNA Biogenesis in the DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinna; Wan, Guohui; Berger, Franklin G.; He, Xiaoming; Lu, Xiongbin

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The DNA damage response involves a complex network of processes that detect and repair DNA damage. Here we show that miRNA biogenesis is globally induced upon DNA damage in an ATM-dependent manner. About one fourth of miRNAs are significantly up-regulated after DNA damage, while loss of ATM abolishes their induction. KSRP (KH-type splicing regulatory protein) is a key player that translates DNA damage signaling to miRNA biogenesis. The ATM kinase directly binds to and phosphorylates KSRP, leading to enhanced interaction between KSRP and pri-miRNAs and increased KSRP activity in miRNA processing. Mutations of the ATM phosphorylation sites of KSRP impaired its activity in regulating miRNAs. These findings reveal a mechanism by which DNA damage signaling is linked to miRNA biogenesis. PMID:21329876

  12. Modulation of DNA damage checkpoint; patenting and possible application for cancer medicine.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Kazuhiro; Ishii, Hideshi; Ichimura, Keiichi

    2008-01-01

    Eukaryote cells survey genomic integrity for DNA damage or incomplete replication. Aberrant structures being detected, checkpoint mechanisms are activated to slow down or arrest cell cycle progression, which allow the DNA damage to be repaired and the replication to be completed. In cancer development, precancerous cells overcome selective pressure to escape from blocked cell cycle progression, induced by checkpoint responses to DNA damage. Medical applications targeting the process of DNA damage would lead to efficient repairs of DNA damage or induction of cell death, which contributes to cancer detection, diagnosis and therapeutic approaches. In this article, the recent progress of our knowledge and patenting in modulation of DNA damage checkpoint especially by Rad9-Chk1 pathway is noted and possible application for cancer medicine is discussed.

  13. Visualizing the search for radiation-damaged DNA bases in real time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Andrea J.; Wallace, Susan S.

    2016-11-01

    The Base Excision Repair (BER) pathway removes the vast majority of damages produced by ionizing radiation, including the plethora of radiation-damaged purines and pyrimidines. The first enzymes in the BER pathway are DNA glycosylases, which are responsible for finding and removing the damaged base. Although much is known about the biochemistry of DNA glycosylases, how these enzymes locate their specific damage substrates among an excess of undamaged bases has long remained a mystery. Here we describe the use of single molecule fluorescence to observe the bacterial DNA glycosylases, Nth, Fpg and Nei, scanning along undamaged and damaged DNA. We show that all three enzymes randomly diffuse on the DNA molecule and employ a wedge residue to search for and locate damage. The search behavior of the Escherichia coli DNA glycosylases likely provides a paradigm for their homologous mammalian counterparts.

  14. Hyperglycemia Differentially Affects Maternal and Fetal DNA Integrity and DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Moreli, Jusciele B.; Santos, Janine H.; Lorenzon-Ojea, Aline Rodrigues; Corrêa-Silva, Simone; Fortunato, Rodrigo S.; Rocha, Clarissa Ribeiro; Rudge, Marilza V.; Damasceno, Débora C.; Bevilacqua, Estela; Calderon, Iracema M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Investigate the DNA damage and its cellular response in blood samples from both mother and the umbilical cord of pregnancies complicated by hyperglycemia. Methods: A total of 144 subjects were divided into 4 groups: normoglycemia (ND; 46 cases), mild gestational hyperglycemia (MGH; 30 cases), gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM; 45 cases) and type-2 diabetes mellitus (DM2; 23 cases). Peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) isolation and/or leukocytes from whole maternal and umbilical cord blood were obtained from all groups at delivery. Nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage were measured by gene-specific quantitative PCR, and the expression of mRNA and proteins involved in the base excision repair (BER) pathway were assessed by real-time qPCR and Western blot, respectively. Apoptosis was measured in vitro experiments by caspase 3/7 activity and ATP levels. Results: GDM and DM2 groups were characterized by an increase in oxidative stress biomarkers, an increase in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage, and decreased expression of mRNA (APE1, POLβ and FEN1) and proteins (hOGG1, APE1) involved in BER. The levels of hyperglycemia were associated with the in vitro apoptosis pathway. Blood levels of DNA damage in umbilical cord were similar among the groups. Newborns of diabetic mothers had increased expression of BER mRNA (APE1, POLβ and FEN1) and proteins (hOGG1, APE1, POLβ and FEN1). A diabetes-like environment was unable to induce apoptosis in the umbilical cord blood cells. Conclusions: Our data show relevant asymmetry between maternal and fetal blood cell susceptibility to DNA damage and apoptosis induction. Maternal cells seem to be more predisposed to changes in an adverse glucose environment. This may be due to differential ability in upregulating multiple genes involved in the activation of DNA repair response, especially the BER mechanism. However if this study shows a more effective adaptive response by the fetal organism, it also calls for

  15. A new compound, withangulatin A, promotes type II DNA topoisomerase-mediated DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Juang, J K; Huang, H W; Chen, C M; Liu, H J

    1989-03-31

    Withangulatin A, a new compound with a known chemical structure and from the antitumor Chinese herb Physalis angulata L, was found to act on topoisomerase II to induce topoisomerase II-mediated DNA damage in vitro. It has two effective dosage ranges of approximate 0.5 and 20 microM, with about one-third the activity of 20 microM VM-26.

  16. The Role of the DNA Damage Response throughout the Papillomavirus Life Cycle

    PubMed Central

    McKinney, Caleb C.; Hussmann, Katherine L.; McBride, Alison A.

    2015-01-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) maintains genomic integrity through an elaborate network of signaling pathways that sense DNA damage and recruit effector factors to repair damaged DNA. DDR signaling pathways are usurped and manipulated by the replication programs of many viruses. Here, we review the papillomavirus (PV) life cycle, highlighting current knowledge of how PVs recruit and engage the DDR to facilitate productive infection. PMID:26008695

  17. Circadian Clock Control of the Cellular Response to DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Sancar, Aziz; Lindsey-Boltz, Laura A.; Kang, Tae-Hong; Reardon, Joyce T.; Lee, Jin Hyup; Ozturk, Nuri

    2010-01-01

    Mammalian cells possess a cell-autonomous molecular clock which controls the timing of many biochemical reactions and hence the cellular response to environmental stimuli including genotoxic stress. The clock consists of an autoregulatory transcription-translation feedback loop made up of four genes/proteins, BMal1, Clock, Cryptochrome, and Period. The circadian clock has an intrinsic period of about 24 hours, and it dictates the rates of many biochemical reactions as a function of the time of the day. Recently, it has become apparent that the circadian clock plays an important role in determining the strengths of cellular responses to DNA damage including repair, checkpoints, and apoptosis. These new insights are expected to guide development of novel mechanism-based chemotherapeutic regimens. PMID:20227409

  18. DDRprot: a database of DNA damage response-related proteins

    PubMed Central

    Andrés-León, Eduardo; Cases, Ildefonso; Arcas, Aida; Rojas, Ana M.

    2016-01-01

    The DNA Damage Response (DDR) signalling network is an essential system that protects the genome’s integrity. The DDRprot database presented here is a resource that integrates manually curated information on the human DDR network and its sub-pathways. For each particular DDR protein, we present detailed information about its function. If involved in post-translational modifications (PTMs) with each other, we depict the position of the modified residue/s in the three-dimensional structures, when resolved structures are available for the proteins. All this information is linked to the original publication from where it was obtained. Phylogenetic information is also shown, including time of emergence and conservation across 47 selected species, family trees and sequence alignments of homologues. The DDRprot database can be queried by different criteria: pathways, species, evolutionary age or involvement in (PTM). Sequence searches using hidden Markov models can be also used. Database URL: http://ddr.cbbio.es. PMID:27577567

  19. Common Fragile Sites: Genomic Hotspots of DNA Damage and Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ke; Qiu, Li; Mrasek, Kristin; Zhang, Jun; Liehr, Thomas; Quintana, Luciana Gonçalves; Li, Zheng

    2012-01-01

    Genomic instability, a hallmark of cancer, occurs preferentially at specific genomic regions known as common fragile sites (CFSs). CFSs are evolutionarily conserved and late replicating regions with AT-rich sequences, and CFS instability is correlated with cancer. In the last decade, much progress has been made toward understanding the mechanisms of chromosomal instability at CFSs. However, despite tremendous efforts, identifying a cancer-associated CFS gene (CACG) remains a challenge and little is known about the function of CACGs at most CFS loci. Recent studies of FATS (for Fragile-site Associated Tumor Suppressor), a new CACG at FRA10F, reveal an active role of this CACG in regulating DNA damage checkpoints and suppressing tumorigenesis. The identification of FATS may inspire more discoveries of other uncharacterized CACGs. Further elucidation of the biological functions and clinical significance of CACGs may be exploited for cancer biomarkers and therapeutic benefits. PMID:23109895

  20. DNA damage tolerance pathway involving DNA polymerase ι and the tumor suppressor p53 regulates DNA replication fork progression

    PubMed Central

    Hampp, Stephanie; Kiessling, Tina; Buechle, Kerstin; Mansilla, Sabrina F.; Thomale, Jürgen; Rall, Melanie; Ahn, Jinwoo; Pospiech, Helmut; Gottifredi, Vanesa; Wiesmüller, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage tolerance facilitates the progression of replication forks that have encountered obstacles on the template strands. It involves either translesion DNA synthesis initiated by proliferating cell nuclear antigen monoubiquitination or less well-characterized fork reversal and template switch mechanisms. Herein, we characterize a novel tolerance pathway requiring the tumor suppressor p53, the translesion polymerase ι (POLι), the ubiquitin ligase Rad5-related helicase-like transcription factor (HLTF), and the SWI/SNF catalytic subunit (SNF2) translocase zinc finger ran-binding domain containing 3 (ZRANB3). This novel p53 activity is lost in the exonuclease-deficient but transcriptionally active p53(H115N) mutant. Wild-type p53, but not p53(H115N), associates with POLι in vivo. Strikingly, the concerted action of p53 and POLι decelerates nascent DNA elongation and promotes HLTF/ZRANB3-dependent recombination during unperturbed DNA replication. Particularly after cross-linker–induced replication stress, p53 and POLι also act together to promote meiotic recombination enzyme 11 (MRE11)-dependent accumulation of (phospho-)replication protein A (RPA)-coated ssDNA. These results implicate a direct role of p53 in the processing of replication forks encountering obstacles on the template strand. Our findings define an unprecedented function of p53 and POLι in the DNA damage response to endogenous or exogenous replication stress. PMID:27407148

  1. RESRAD. Site-Specific Residual Radioactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, C.

    1989-06-01

    RESRAD is designed to derive site-specific guidelines for allowable residual concentrations of radionuclides in soil. A guideline is defined as a radionuclide concentration or a level of radiation or radioactivity that is acceptable if a site is to be used without radiological restrictions. Guidelines are expressed as (1) concentrations of residual radionuclides in soil, (2) concentrations of airborne radon decay products, (3) levels of external gamma radiation, (4) levels of radioactivity from surface contamination, and (5) concentrations of residual radionuclides in air and water. Soil is defined as unconsolidated earth material, including rubble and debris that may be present. The controlling principles of all guidelines are (1) the annual radiation dose received by a member of the critical population group from the residual radioactive material - predicted by a realistic but reasonably conservative analysis and averaged over a 50 year period - should not exceed 100 mrem/yr, and (2) doses should be kept as low as reasonably achievable. All significant exposure pathways for the critical population group are considered in deriving soil guidelines. These pathways include direct exposure to external radiation from the contaminated soil material; internal radiation from inhalation of airborne radionuclides; and internal radiation from ingestion of plant foods grown in the contaminated soil, meat and milk from livestock fed with contaminated fodder and water, drinking water from a contaminated well, and fish from a contaminated pond.

  2. BCL10 is recruited to sites of DNA damage to facilitate DNA double-strand break repair

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Ismail Hassan; Dronyk, Ashley; Hu, Xiuying; Hendzel, Michael J.; Shaw, Andrew R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recent studies have found BCL10 can localize to the nucleus and that this is linked to tumor aggression and poorer prognosis. These studies suggest that BCL10 localization plays a novel role in the nucleus that may contribute to cellular transformation and carcinogenesis. In this study, we show that BCL10 functions as part of the DNA damage response (DDR). We found that BCL10 facilitates the rapid recruitment of RPA, BRCA1 and RAD51 to sites of DNA damage. Furthermore, we also found that ATM phosphorylates BCL10 in response to DNA damage. Functionally, BCL10 promoted DNA double-strand breaks repair, enhancing cell survival after DNA damage. Taken together our results suggest a novel role for BCL10 in the repair of DNA lesions. PMID:26771713

  3. Reduction of arsenite-enhanced ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage by supplemental zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Karen L.; King, Brenee S.; Sandoval, Monica M.; Liu, Ke Jian; Hudson, Laurie G.

    2013-06-01

    Arsenic is a recognized human carcinogen and there is evidence that arsenic augments the carcinogenicity of DNA damaging agents such as ultraviolet radiation (UVR) thereby acting as a co-carcinogen. Inhibition of DNA repair is one proposed mechanism to account for the co-carcinogenic actions of arsenic. We and others find that arsenite interferes with the function of certain zinc finger DNA repair proteins. Furthermore, we reported that zinc reverses the effects of arsenite in cultured cells and a DNA repair target protein, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1. In order to determine whether zinc ameliorates the effects of arsenite on UVR-induced DNA damage in human keratinocytes and in an in vivo model, normal human epidermal keratinocytes and SKH-1 hairless mice were exposed to arsenite, zinc or both before solar-simulated (ss) UVR exposure. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase activity, DNA damage and mutation frequencies at the Hprt locus were measured in each treatment group in normal human keratinocytes. DNA damage was assessed in vivo by immunohistochemical staining of skin sections isolated from SKH-1 hairless mice. Cell-based findings demonstrate that ssUVR-induced DNA damage and mutagenesis are enhanced by arsenite, and supplemental zinc partially reverses the arsenite effect. In vivo studies confirm that zinc supplementation decreases arsenite-enhanced DNA damage in response to ssUVR exposure. From these data we can conclude that zinc offsets the impact of arsenic on ssUVR-stimulated DNA damage in cells and in vivo suggesting that zinc supplementation may provide a strategy to improve DNA repair capacity in arsenic exposed human populations. - Highlights: • Low levels of arsenite enhance UV-induced DNA damage in human keratinocytes. • UV-initiated HPRT mutation frequency is enhanced by arsenite. • Zinc supplementation offsets DNA damage and mutation frequency enhanced by arsenite. • Zinc-dependent reduction of arsenite enhanced DNA damage is confirmed in vivo.

  4. A ubiquitylation site in Cockayne syndrome B required for repair of oxidative DNA damage, but not for transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Ranes, Michael; Boeing, Stefan; Wang, Yuming; Wienholz, Franziska; Menoni, Hervé; Walker, Jane; Encheva, Vesela; Chakravarty, Probir; Mari, Pierre-Olivier; Stewart, Aengus; Giglia-Mari, Giuseppina; Snijders, Ambrosius P.; Vermeulen, Wim; Svejstrup, Jesper Q.

    2016-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome B (CSB), best known for its role in transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER), contains a ubiquitin-binding domain (UBD), but the functional connection between protein ubiquitylation and this UBD remains unclear. Here, we show that CSB is regulated via site-specific ubiquitylation. Mass spectrometry analysis of CSB identified lysine (K) 991 as a ubiquitylation site. Intriguingly, mutation of this residue (K991R) does not affect CSB's catalytic activity or protein stability, but greatly affects genome stability, even in the absence of induced DNA damage. Moreover, cells expressing CSB K991R are sensitive to oxidative DNA damage, but proficient for TC-NER. K991 becomes ubiquitylated upon oxidative DNA damage, and while CSB K991R is recruited normally to such damage, it fails to dissociate in a timely manner, suggesting a requirement for K991 ubiquitylation in CSB activation. Interestingly, deletion of CSB's UBD gives rise to oxidative damage sensitivity as well, while CSB ΔUBD and CSB K991R affects expression of overlapping groups of genes, further indicating a functional connection. Together, these results shed new light on the regulation of CSB, with K991R representing an important separation-of-function-mutation in this multi-functional protein. PMID:27060134

  5. How to Cope with DNA Damage Induced by Ionizing Radiation and Anti-Cancer Drugs?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enomoto, A.; Miyagawa, K.

    Ionizing radiation and chemotherapeutic agents induce many types of DNA lesions, of which DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are assumed to be the most deleterious. DNA damage response mechanisms encompass pathways of DNA damage signaling, DNA repair, cell cycle checkpoint arrest, and apoptosis. Increasing evidence suggests that these pathways function co-operatively to maintain genomic stability in the face of exogenous and endogenous DNA damage. The relative impact of one mechanism over another probably depends on the kinds of lesions, the cell cycle phase, and the cell or tissue type. The inability to respond properly to or to repair DSBs may lead to hypersensitivity to DNA damaging agents and genomic instability including chromosomal aberrations. Chromosomal instability, a state of continuous accumulation of chromosomal change, is a common feature of many human cancers and of chromosome instability syndromes with increased cancer susceptibility. Here, we review the DNA da mage response and the links between deficiencies in response to DSBs and chromosomal instability.

  6. RNase H enables efficient repair of R-loop induced DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Amon, Jeremy D; Koshland, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    R-loops, three-stranded structures that form when transcripts hybridize to chromosomal DNA, are potent agents of genome instability. This instability has been explained by the ability of R-loops to induce DNA damage. Here, we show that persistent R-loops also compromise DNA repair. Depleting endogenous RNase H activity impairs R-loop removal in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, causing DNA damage that occurs preferentially in the repetitive ribosomal DNA locus (rDNA). We analyzed the repair kinetics of this damage and identified mutants that modulate repair. We present a model that the persistence of R-loops at sites of DNA damage induces repair by break-induced replication (BIR). This R-loop induced BIR is particularly susceptible to the formation of lethal repair intermediates at the rDNA because of a barrier imposed by RNA polymerase I. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20533.001 PMID:27938663

  7. Eukaryotic Translesion Polymerases and Their Roles and Regulation in DNA Damage Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Lauren S.; Minesinger, Brenda K.; Wiltrout, Mary Ellen; D'Souza, Sanjay; Woodruff, Rachel V.; Walker, Graham C.

    2009-01-01

    Summary: DNA repair and DNA damage tolerance machineries are crucial to overcome the vast array of DNA damage that a cell encounters during its lifetime. In this review, we summarize the current state of knowledge about the eukaryotic DNA damage tolerance pathway translesion synthesis (TLS), a process in which specialized DNA polymerases replicate across from DNA lesions. TLS aids in resistance to DNA damage, presumably by restarting stalled replication forks or filling in gaps that remain in the genome due to the presence of DNA lesions. One consequence of this process is the potential risk of introducing mutations. Given the role of these translesion polymerases in mutagenesis, we discuss the significant regulatory mechanisms that control the five known eukaryotic translesion polymerases: Rev1, Pol ζ, Pol κ, Pol η, and Pol ι. PMID:19258535

  8. Targeted DNA damage at individual telomeres disrupts their integrity and triggers cell death

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Luxi; Tan, Rong; Xu, Jianquan; LaFace, Justin; Gao, Ying; Xiao, Yanchun; Attar, Myriam; Neumann, Carola; Li, Guo-Min; Su, Bing; Liu, Yang; Nakajima, Satoshi; Levine, Arthur S.; Lan, Li

    2015-01-01

    Cellular DNA is organized into chromosomes and capped by a unique nucleoprotein structure, the telomere. Both oxidative stress and telomere shortening/dysfunction cause aging-related degenerative pathologies and increase cancer risk. However, a direct connection between oxidative damage to telomeric DNA, comprising <1% of the genome, and telomere dysfunction has not been established. By fusing the KillerRed chromophore with the telomere repeat binding factor 1, TRF1, we developed a novel approach to generate localized damage to telomere DNA and to monitor the real time damage response at the single telomere level. We found that DNA damage at long telomeres in U2OS cells is not repaired efficiently compared to DNA damage in non-telomeric regions of the same length in heterochromatin. Telomeric DNA damage shortens the average length of telomeres and leads to cell senescence in HeLa cells and cell death in HeLa, U2OS and IMR90 cells, when DNA damage at non-telomeric regions is undetectable. Telomere-specific damage induces chromosomal aberrations, including chromatid telomere loss and telomere associations, distinct from the damage induced by ionizing irradiation. Taken together, our results demonstrate that oxidative damage induces telomere dysfunction and underline the importance of maintaining telomere integrity upon oxidative damage. PMID:26082495

  9. Phosphoramide mustard exposure induces DNA adduct formation and the DNA damage repair response in rat ovarian granulosa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ganesan, Shanthi Keating, Aileen F.

    2015-02-01

    Phosphoramide mustard (PM), the ovotoxic metabolite of the anti-cancer agent cyclophosphamide (CPA), destroys rapidly dividing cells by forming NOR-G-OH, NOR-G and G-NOR-G adducts with DNA, potentially leading to DNA damage. A previous study demonstrated that PM induces ovarian DNA damage in rat ovaries. To investigate whether PM induces DNA adduct formation, DNA damage and induction of the DNA repair response, rat spontaneously immortalized granulosa cells (SIGCs) were treated with vehicle control (1% DMSO) or PM (3 or 6 μM) for 24 or 48 h. Cell viability was reduced (P < 0.05) after 48 h of exposure to 3 or 6 μM PM. The NOR-G-OH DNA adduct was detected after 24 h of 6 μM PM exposure, while the more cytotoxic G-NOR-G DNA adduct was formed after 48 h by exposure to both PM concentrations. Phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX), a marker of DNA double stranded break occurrence, was also increased by PM exposure, coincident with DNA adduct formation. Additionally, induction of genes (Atm, Parp1, Prkdc, Xrcc6, and Brca1) and proteins (ATM, γH2AX, PARP-1, PRKDC, XRCC6, and BRCA1) involved in DNA repair were observed in both a time- and dose-dependent manner. These data support that PM induces DNA adduct formation in ovarian granulosa cells, induces DNA damage and elicits the ovarian DNA repair response. - Highlights: • PM forms ovarian DNA adducts. • DNA damage marker γH2AX increased by PM exposure. • PM induces ovarian DNA double strand break repair.

  10. Non-Problematic Risks from Low-Dose Radiation-Induced DNA Damage Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Daniel P.

    2008-01-01

    Radiation-induced DNA damage clusters have been proposed and are usually considered to pose the threat of serious biological damage. This has been attributed to DNA repair debilitation or cessation arising from the complexity of cluster damage. It will be shown here, contrary to both previous suggestions and perceived wisdom, that radiation induced damage clusters contribute to non-problematic risks in the low-dose, low-LET regime. The very complexity of cluster damage which inhibits and/or compromises DNA repair will ultimately be responsible for the elimination and/or diminution of precancer-ous and cancerous cells. PMID:18648573

  11. Characterization of UVC-induced DNA damage in bloodstains: forensic implications.

    PubMed

    Hall, Ashley; Ballantyne, Jack

    2004-09-01

    The ability to detect DNA polymorphisms using molecular genetic techniques has revolutionized the forensic analysis of biological evidence. DNA typing now plays a critical role within the criminal justice system, but one of the limiting factors with the technology is that DNA isolated from biological stains recovered from the crime scene is sometimes so damaged as to be intractable to analysis. Potential remedies for damaged DNA are likely to be dependent upon the precise nature of the DNA damage present in any particular sample but, unfortunately, current knowledge of the biochemical nature, and the extent, of such DNA damage in dried biological stains is rudimentary. As a model for DNA damage assessment in biological stains recovered from crime scenes, we have subjected human bloodstains and naked DNA in the hydrated and dehydrated states to varying doses of UVC radiation. It was possible to damage the DNA sufficiently in a bloodstain to cause a standard autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) profile to be lost. However, a detailed analysis of the process, based upon assays developed to detect bipyrimidine photoproducts (BPPPs), single- and double-strand breaks, and DNA-DNA crosslinks, produced some unexpected findings. Contrary to the situation with living tissues or cells in culture, the predominant UVC-induced damage to DNA in bloodstains appears not to be pyrimidine dimers. Although some evidence for the presence of BPPPs and DNA crosslinks was obtained, the major form of UVC damage causing genetic profile loss appeared to be single-strand breaks. It was not possible, however, to preclude the possibility that a combination of damage types was responsible for the profile loss observed. We demonstrate here that a significant measure of protection against UVC-mediated genetic profile loss in dried biological stain material is afforded by the dehydrated state of the DNA and, to a lesser extent, the DNA cellular milieu.

  12. Beryllium chloride-induced oxidative DNA damage and alteration in the expression patterns of DNA repair-related genes.

    PubMed

    Attia, Sabry M; Harisa, Gamaleldin I; Hassan, Memy H; Bakheet, Saleh A

    2013-09-01

    Beryllium metal has physical properties that make its use essential for very specific applications, such as medical diagnostics, nuclear/fusion reactors and aerospace applications. Because of the widespread human exposure to beryllium metals and the discrepancy of the genotoxic results in the reported literature, detail assessments of the genetic damage of beryllium are warranted. Mice exposed to beryllium chloride at an oral dose of 23mg/kg for seven consecutive days exhibited a significant increase in the level of DNA-strand breaking and micronuclei formation as detected by a bone marrow standard comet assay and micronucleus test. Whereas slight beryllium chloride-induced oxidative DNA damage was detected following formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase digestion, digestion with endonuclease III resulted in considerable increases in oxidative DNA damage after the 11.5 and 23mg/kg/day treatment as detected by enzyme-modified comet assays. Increased 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine was also directly correlated with increased bone marrow micronuclei formation and DNA strand breaks, which further confirm the involvement of oxidative stress in the induction of bone marrow genetic damage after exposure to beryllium chloride. Gene expression analysis on the bone marrow cells from beryllium chloride-exposed mice showed significant alterations in genes associated with DNA damage repair. Therefore, beryllium chloride may cause genetic damage to bone marrow cells due to the oxidative stress and the induced unrepaired DNA damage is probably due to the down-regulation in the expression of DNA repair genes, which may lead to genotoxicity and eventually cause carcinogenicity.

  13. Retinoblastoma loss modulates DNA damage response favoring tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Seoane, Marcos; Iglesias, Pablo; Gonzalez, Teresa; Dominguez, Fernando; Fraga, Maximo; Aliste, Carlos; Forteza, Jeronimo; Costoya, Jose A

    2008-01-01

    Senescence is one of the main barriers against tumor progression. Oncogenic signals in primary cells result in oncogene-induced senescence (OIS), crucial for protection against cancer development. It has been described in premalignant lesions that OIS requires DNA damage response (DDR) activation, safeguard of the integrity of the genome. Here we demonstrate how the cellular mechanisms involved in oncogenic transformation in a model of glioma uncouple OIS and DDR. We use this tumor type as a paradigm of oncogenic transformation. In human gliomas most of the genetic alterations that have been previously identified result in abnormal activation of cell growth signaling pathways and deregulation of cell cycle, features recapitulated in our model by oncogenic Ras expression and retinoblastoma (Rb) inactivation respectively. In this scenario, the absence of pRb confers a proliferative advantage and activates DDR to a greater extent in a DNA lesion-independent fashion than cells that express only HRas(V12). Moreover, Rb loss inactivates the stress kinase DDR-associated p38MAPK by specific Wip1-dependent dephosphorylation. Thus, Rb loss acts as a switch mediating the transition between premalignant lesions and cancer through DDR modulation. These findings may have important implications for the understanding the biology of gliomas and anticipate a new target, Wip1 phosphatase, for novel therapeutic strategies.

  14. The DNA damage response in viral-induced cellular transformation.

    PubMed

    Nikitin, P A; Luftig, M A

    2012-01-31

    The DNA damage response (DDR) has emerged as a critical tumour suppressor pathway responding to cellular DNA replicative stress downstream of aberrant oncogene over-expression. Recent studies have now implicated the DDR as a sensor of oncogenic virus infection. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms by which tumour viruses activate and also suppress the host DDR. The mechanism of tumour virus induction of the DDR is intrinsically linked to the need for these viruses to promote an S-phase environment to replicate their nucleic acid during infection. However, inappropriate expression of viral oncoproteins can also activate the DDR through various mechanisms including replicative stress, direct interaction with DDR components and induction of reactive oxygen species. Given the growth-suppressive consequences of activating the DDR, tumour viruses have also evolved mechanisms to attenuate these pathways. Aberrant expression of viral oncoproteins may therefore promote tumourigenesis through increased somatic mutation and aneuploidy due to DDR inactivation. This review will focus on the interplay between oncogenic viruses and the DDR with respect to cellular checkpoint control and transformation.

  15. WWOX modulates the ATR-mediated DNA damage checkpoint response.

    PubMed

    Abu-Odeh, Mohammad; Hereema, Nyla A; Aqeilan, Rami I

    2016-01-26

    For many decades genomic instability is considered one of the hallmarks of cancer. Role of the tumor suppressor WWOX (WW domain-containing oxidoreductase) in DNA damage response upon double strand breaks has been recently revealed. Here we demonstrate unforeseen functions for WWOX upon DNA single strand breaks (SSBs) checkpoint activation. We found that WWOX levels are induced following SSBs and accumulate in the nucleus. WWOX deficiency is associated with reduced activation of ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein (ATR) checkpoint proteins and increased chromosomal breaks. At the molecular level, we show that upon SSBs WWOX is modified at lysine 274 by ubiquitination mediated by the ubiquitin E3 ligase ITCH and interacts with ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM). Interestingly, ATM inhibition was associated with reduced activation of ATR checkpoint proteins suggesting that WWOX manipulation of ATR checkpoint proteins is ATM-dependent. Taken together, the present findings indicate that WWOX plays a key role in ATR checkpoint activation, while its absence might facilitate genomic instability.

  16. WWOX modulates the ATR-mediated DNA damage checkpoint response

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Odeh, Mohammad; Hereema, Nyla A.; Aqeilan, Rami I.

    2016-01-01

    For many decades genomic instability is considered one of the hallmarks of cancer. Role of the tumor suppressor WWOX (WW domain-containing oxidoreductase) in DNA damage response upon double strand breaks has been recently revealed. Here we demonstrate unforeseen functions for WWOX upon DNA single strand breaks (SSBs) checkpoint activation. We found that WWOX levels are induced following SSBs and accumulate in the nucleus. WWOX deficiency is associated with reduced activation of ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein (ATR) checkpoint proteins and increased chromosomal breaks. At the molecular level, we show that upon SSBs WWOX is modified at lysine 274 by ubiquitination mediated by the ubiquitin E3 ligase ITCH and interacts with ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM). Interestingly, ATM inhibition was associated with reduced activation of ATR checkpoint proteins suggesting that WWOX manipulation of ATR checkpoint proteins is ATM-dependent. Taken together, the present findings indicate that WWOX plays a key role in ATR checkpoint activation, while its absence might facilitate genomic instability. PMID:26675548

  17. DNA Damage Response in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Ageing.

    PubMed

    Li, Tangliang; Zhou, Zhong-Wei; Ju, Zhenyu; Wang, Zhao-Qi

    2016-06-01

    Maintenance of tissue-specific stem cells is vital for organ homeostasis and organismal longevity. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are the most primitive cell type in the hematopoietic system. They divide asymmetrically and give rise to daughter cells with HSC identity (self-renewal) and progenitor progenies (differentiation), which further proliferate and differentiate into full hematopoietic lineages. Mammalian ageing process is accompanied with abnormalities in the HSC self-renewal and differentiation. Transcriptional changes and epigenetic modulations have been implicated as the key regulators in HSC ageing process. The DNA damage response (DDR) in the cells involves an orchestrated signaling pathway, consisting of cell cycle regulation, cell death and senescence, transcriptional regulation, as well as chromatin remodeling. Recent studies employing DNA repair-deficient mouse models indicate that DDR could intrinsically and extrinsically regulate HSC maintenance and play important roles in tissue homeostasis of the hematopoietic system. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of how the DDR determines the HSC fates and finally contributes to organismal ageing.

  18. Detection and quantitation of single nucleotide polymorphisms, DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations, DNA damage and DNA mismatches

    DOEpatents

    McCutchen-Maloney, Sandra L.

    2002-01-01

    DNA mutation binding proteins alone and as chimeric proteins with nucleases are used with solid supports to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms. The solid supports may be flow cytometry beads, DNA chips, glass slides or DNA dips sticks. DNA molecules are coupled to solid supports to form DNA-support complexes. Labeled DNA is used with unlabeled DNA mutation binding proteins such at TthMutS to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide length polymorphisms by binding which gives an increase in signal. Unlabeled DNA is utilized with labeled chimeras to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide length polymorphisms by nuclease activity of the chimera which gives a decrease in signal.

  19. Assessment of okadaic acid effects on cytotoxicity, DNA damage and DNA repair in human cells.

    PubMed

    Valdiglesias, Vanessa; Méndez, Josefina; Pásaro, Eduardo; Cemeli, Eduardo; Anderson, Diana; Laffon, Blanca

    2010-07-07

    Okadaic acid (OA) is a phycotoxin produced by several types of dinoflagellates causing diarrheic shellfish poisoning (DSP) in humans. Symptoms induced by DSP toxins are mainly gastrointestinal, but the intoxication does not appear to be fatal. Despite this, this toxin presents a potential threat to human health even at concentrations too low to induce acute toxicity, since previous animal studies have shown that OA has very potent tumour promoting activity. However, its concrete action mechanism has not been described yet and the results reported with regard to OA cytotoxicity and genotoxicity are often contradictory. In the present study, the genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of OA on three different types of human cells (peripheral blood leukocytes, HepG2 hepatoma cells, and SHSY5Y neuroblastoma cells) were evaluated. Cells were treated with a range of OA concentrations in the presence and absence of S9 fraction, and MTT test and Comet assay were performed in order to evaluate cytotoxicity and genotoxicity, respectively. The possible effects of OA on DNA repair were also studied by means of the DNA repair competence assay, using bleomycin as DNA damage inductor. Treatment with OA in absence of S9 fraction induced not statistically significant decrease in cell viability and significant increase in DNA damage in all cell types at the highest concentrations investigated. However, only SHSY5Y cells showed OA induced genotoxic and cytotoxic effects in presence of S9 fraction. Furthermore, we found that OA can induce modulations in DNA repair processes when exposure was performed prior to BLM treatment, in co-exposure, or during the subsequent DNA repair process.

  20. DNA damage by smoke: Protection by turmeric and other inhibitors of ROS

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivas, L.; Shalini, V.K. )

    1991-01-01

    Twigs-dry leaves smoke condensate (TDS), as a source of clastogenic ROS and carcinogenic PAH, was investigated for its in vitro DNA-damaging effect in calf thymus DNA and human peripheral lymphocytes. An aqueous turmeric component--Aq.T--with an established antioxidant activity, was tested as a DNA protectant. TDS induced 13-fold damage to calf thymus DNA as judged by the emergence of a DNA damage specific, fluorescent product (em: 405 nm). Aq.T at 800 ng/microL extended 69% protection to calf thymus DNA and was comparable to the other protectants such as curcumin, BHA, vitamin E, SOD, and CAT. In human peripheral lymphocytes, TDS induced extensive DNA damage in comparison with the tumor promoter TPA, as judged by FADU. Aq.T at 300 ng/microL extended 90% protection to human lymphocyte DNA against TDS-induced damage, and was more effective than the other protectants--DABCO, D-mannitol, sodium benzoate, vitamin E (ROS quenchers), SOD, CAT (antioxidant enzymes), tannic acid, flufenamic acid, BHA, BHT, n-PG, curcumin and quercetin (antioxidants). Aq.T offered 65% protection to human lymphocyte DNA against TPA-induced damage and was comparable to SOD. The above results indicate that TDS induces substantial DNA damage in calf thymus DNA and human lymphocytes and Aq.T is an efficient protectant.

  1. Mitotic entry in the presence of DNA damage is a widespread property of aneuploidy in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Blank, Heidi M.; Sheltzer, Jason M.; Meehl, Colleen M.; Amon, Angelika

    2015-01-01

    Genetic instability is a hallmark of aneuploidy in budding and fission yeast. All aneuploid yeast strains analyzed to date harbor elevated levels of Rad52-GFP foci, a sign of DNA damage. Here we investigate how continuously elevated levels of DNA damage affect aneuploid cells. We show that Rad52-GFP foci form during S phase, consistent with the observation that DNA replication initiation and elongation are impaired in some aneuploid yeast strains. We furthermore find that although DNA damage is low in aneuploid cells, it nevertheless has dramatic consequences. Many aneuploid yeast strains adapt to DNA damage and undergo mitosis despite the presence of unrepaired DNA leading to cell death. Wild-type cells exposed to low levels of DNA damage exhibit a similar phenotype, indicating that adaptation to low levels of unrepaired DNA is a general property of the cell's response to DNA damage. Our results indicate that by causing low levels of DNA damage, whole-chromosome aneuploidies lead to DNA breaks that persist into mitosis. Such breaks provide the substrate for translocations and deletions that are a hallmark of cancer. PMID:25694455

  2. Ku80-deletion suppresses spontaneous tumors and induces a p53-mediated DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Holcomb, Valerie B.; Rodier, Francis; Choi, Yong Jun; Busuttil, Rita A.; Vogel, Hannes; Vijg, Jan; Campisi, Judith; Hasty, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Ku80 facilitates DNA repair and therefore should suppress cancer. However, ku80−/− mice exhibit reduced cancer, although they age prematurely and have a shortened life span. We tested the hypothesis that Ku80 deletion suppresses cancer by enhancing cellular tumor suppressive responses to inefficiently repaired DNA damage. In support of this hypothesis, Ku80 deletion ameliorated tumor burden in APCMIN mice, and increased a p53-mediated DNA damage response, DNA lesions, and chromosomal rearrangements. Thus, contrary to its assumed role as a caretaker tumor suppressor, Ku80 facilitates tumor growth most likely by dampening baseline cellular DNA damage responses. PMID:19010925

  3. Sperm DNA damage has a negative association with live-birth rates after IVF.

    PubMed

    Simon, L; Proutski, I; Stevenson, M; Jennings, D; McManus, J; Lutton, D; Lewis, S E M

    2013-01-01

    Sperm DNA damage has a negative impact on pregnancy rates following assisted reproduction treatment (ART). The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship between sperm DNA fragmentation and live-birth rates after IVF and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). The alkaline Comet assay was employed to measure sperm DNA fragmentation in native semen and in spermatozoa following density-gradient centrifugation in semen samples from 203 couples undergoing IVF and 136 couples undergoing ICSI. Men were divided into groups according to sperm DNA damage. Following IVF, couples with <25% sperm DNA fragmentation had a live-birth rate of 33%; in contrast, couples with >50% sperm DNA fragmentation had a much lower live-birth rate of 13%. Following ICSI, no significant differences in sperm DNA damage were found between any groups of patients. Sperm DNA damage was also associated with low live-birth rates following IVF in both men and couples with idiopathic infertility: 39% of couples and 41% of men with idiopathic infertility have high sperm DNA damage. Sperm DNA damage assessed by the Comet assay has a close inverse relationship with live-birth rates after IVF. Sperm DNA damage has a negative impact on assisted reproduction treatment outcome, in particular, on pregnancy rates. The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship between sperm DNA fragmentation and live-birth rates after IVF and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). The alkaline Comet assay was employed to measure sperm DNA fragmentation in native semen and in spermatozoa following density-gradient centrifugation in semen samples from 203 couples undergoing IVF and 136 couples undergoing ICSI. Men were divided into groups according to sperm DNA damage and treatment outcome. Following IVF, couples with <25% sperm DNA fragmentation had a live birth rate of 33%. In contrast, couples with >50% sperm DNA fragmentation had a much lower live-birth rate of 13% following IVF. Following ICSI

  4. Site-Specific, Climate-Friendly Farming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, D. J.; Brooks, E. S.; Eitel, J.; Huggins, D. R.; Painter, K.; Rupp, R.; Smith, J. L.; Stockle, C.; Vierling, L. A.

    2011-12-01

    Of the four most important atmospheric greenhouse gasses (GHG) enriched through human activities, only nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions are due primarily to agriculture. However, reductions in the application of synthetic N fertilizers could have significant negative consequences for a growing world population given the crucial role that these fertilizers have played in cereal yield increases since WWII. Increasing N use efficiency (NUE) through precision management of agricultural N in space and time will therefore play a central role in the reduction of agricultural N2O emissions. Precision N management requires a greater understanding of the spatio-temporal variability of factors supporting N management decisions such as crop yield, water and N availability, utilization and losses. We present an overview of a large, collaborative, multi-disciplinary project designed to improve our basic understanding of nitrogen (N), carbon (C) and water (H2O) spatio-temporal dynamics for wheat-based cropping systems on complex landscapes, and develop management tools to optimize water- and nitrogen-use efficiency for these systems and landscapes. Major components of this project include: (a) cropping systems experiments addressing nitrogen application rate and seeding density for different landscape positions; (b) GHG flux experiments and monitoring; (c) soil microbial genetics and stable isotope analyses to elucidate biochemical pathways for N2O production; (d) proximal soil sensing for construction of detailed soil maps; (e) LiDAR and optical remote sensing for crop growth monitoring; (f) hydrologic experiments, monitoring, and modeling; (g) refining the CropSyst simulation model to estimate biophysical processes and GHG emissions under a variety of management and climatic scenarios; and (h) linking farm-scale enterprise budgets to simulation modeling in order to provide growers with economically viable site-specific climate-friendly farming guidance.

  5. A review and appraisal of the DNA damage theory of ageing.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Alex A; de Magalhães, João Pedro

    2011-01-01

    Given the central role of DNA in life, and how ageing can be seen as the gradual and irreversible breakdown of living systems, the idea that damage to the DNA is the crucial cause of ageing remains a powerful one. DNA damage and mutations of different types clearly accumulate with age in mammalian tissues. Human progeroid syndromes resulting in what appears to be accelerated ageing have been linked to defects in DNA repair or processing, suggesting that elevated levels of DNA damage can accelerate physiological decline and the development of age-related diseases not limited to cancer. Higher DNA damage may trigger cellular signalling pathways, such as apoptosis, that result in a faster depletion of stem cells, which in turn contributes to accelerated ageing. Genetic manipulations of DNA repair pathways in mice further strengthen this view and also indicate that disruption of specific pathways, such as nucleotide excision repair and non-homologous end joining, is more strongly associated with premature ageing phenotypes. Delaying ageing in mice by decreasing levels of DNA damage, however, has not been achieved yet, perhaps due to the complexity inherent to DNA repair and DNA damage response pathways. Another open question is whether DNA repair optimization is involved in the evolution of species longevity, and we suggest that the way cells from different organisms respond to DNA damage may be crucial in species differences in ageing. Taken together, the data suggest a major role of DNA damage in the modulation of longevity, possibly through effects on cell dysfunction and loss, although understanding how to modify DNA damage repair and response systems to delay ageing remains a crucial challenge.

  6. Modulation of inflammation and disease tolerance by DNA damage response pathways.

    PubMed

    Neves-Costa, Ana; Moita, Luis F

    2016-09-30

    The accurate replication and repair of DNA is central to organismal survival. This process is challenged by the many factors that can change genetic information such as replication errors and direct damage to the DNA molecule by chemical and physical agents. DNA damage can also result from microorganism invasion as an integral step of their life cycle or as collateral damage from host defense mechanisms against pathogens. Here we review the complex crosstalk of DNA damage response and immune response pathways that might be evolutionarily connected and argue that DNA damage response pathways can be explored therapeutically to induce disease tolerance through the activation of tissue damage control processes. Such approach may constitute the missing pillar in the treatment of critical illnesses caused by multiple organ failure, such as sepsis and septic shock.

  7. 1α,25 dihydroxyvitamin D3 enhances cellular defences against UV-induced oxidative and other forms of DNA damage in skin.

    PubMed

    Gordon-Thomson, Clare; Gupta, Ritu; Tongkao-on, Wannit; Ryan, Anthony; Halliday, Gary M; Mason, Rebecca S

    2012-12-01

    DNA damage induced by ultraviolet radiation is the key initiator for skin carcinogenesis since mutations may arise from the photoproducts and it also contributes to photoimmune suppression. The active vitamin D hormone, 1α,25 dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (1,25(OH)(2)D(3)) reduces thymine dimers, the major photoproduct found in human skin after UV exposure, and suppresses the accumulation of nitric oxide derivatives that lead to more toxic reactive nitrogen species (RNS). We examined whether other forms of DNA damage are reduced by 1,25(OH)(2)D(3), and hypothesized that photoprotection by 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) is, in part, due to the suppression of various forms of promutagenic DNA damage, including thymine dimers, through a reduction of genotoxic RNS. Different forms of UV-induced DNA damage were investigated in irradiated skin cells treated with or without 1,25(OH)(2)D(3), or inhibitors of metabolism and inducible nitric oxide synthase. Keratinocytes were also treated with nitric oxide donors in the absence of UV light. DNA damage was assessed by comet assay incorporating site specific DNA repair endonucleases, and by immunohistochemistry using antibodies to thymine dimers or 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine, and quantified by image analysis. Strand breaks in T4 endonuclease V, endonuclease IV and human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase digests increased more than 2-fold in UV irradiated human keratinocytes, and were reduced by 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) treatment after UV exposure, and also by low temperature, sodium azide and an inhibitor of inducible nitric oxide synthase. Conversely, nitric oxide donors induced all three types of DNA damage in the absence of UV. We present data to show that 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) protects skin cells from at least three forms of UV-induced DNA damage, and provide further evidence to support the proposal that a reduction in RNS by 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) is a likely mechanism for its photoprotective effect against oxidative and nitrative DNA damage, as well as

  8. GENETIC AND MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF DNA DAMAGE REPAIR AND TOLERANCE PATHWAYS.

    SciTech Connect

    SUTHERLAND, B.M.

    2001-07-26

    Radiation can damage cellular components, including DNA. Organisms have developed a panoply of means of dealing with DNA damage. Some repair paths have rather narrow substrate specificity (e.g. photolyases), which act on specific pyrimidine photoproducts in a specific type (e.g., DNA) and conformation (double-stranded B conformation) of nucleic acid. Others, for example, nucleotide excision repair, deal with larger classes of damages, in this case bulky adducts in DNA. A detailed discussion of DNA repair mechanisms is beyond the scope of this article, but one can be found in the excellent book of Friedberg et al. [1] for further detail. However, some DNA damages and paths for repair of those damages important for photobiology will be outlined below as a basis for the specific examples of genetic and molecular analysis that will be presented below.

  9. WDR76 Co-Localizes with Heterochromatin Related Proteins and Rapidly Responds to DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, Joshua M.; Sardiu, Mihaela E.; Groppe, Brad D.; Thornton, Janet L.; Liu, Xingyu; Dayebgadoh, Gerald; Banks, Charles A.; Slaughter, Brian D.; Unruh, Jay R.; Workman, Jerry L.; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Proteins that respond to DNA damage play critical roles in normal and diseased states in human biology. Studies have suggested that the S. cerevisiae protein CMR1/YDL156w is associated with histones and is possibly associated with DNA repair and replication processes. Through a quantitative proteomic analysis of affinity purifications here we show that the human homologue of this protein, WDR76, shares multiple protein associations with the histones H2A, H2B, and H4. Furthermore, our quantitative proteomic analysis of WDR76 associated proteins demonstrated links to proteins in the DNA damage response like PARP1 and XRCC5 and heterochromatin related proteins like CBX1, CBX3, and CBX5. Co-immunoprecipitation studies validated these interactions. Next, quantitative imaging studies demonstrated that WDR76 was recruited to laser induced DNA damage immediately after induction, and we compared the recruitment of WDR76 to laser induced DNA damage to known DNA damage proteins like PARP1, XRCC5, and RPA1. In addition, WDR76 co-localizes to puncta with the heterochromatin proteins CBX1 and CBX5, which are also recruited to DNA damage but much less intensely than WDR76. This work demonstrates the chromatin and DNA damage protein associations of WDR76 and demonstrates the rapid response of WDR76 to laser induced DNA damage. PMID:27248496

  10. Bisdemethoxycurcumin induces DNA damage and inhibits DNA repair associated protein expressions in NCI-H460 human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chien-Chih; Yang, Su-Tso; Huang, Wen-Wen; Peng, Shu-Fen; Huang, An-Cheng; Tang, Nou-Ying; Liu, Hsin-Chung; Yang, Mei-Due; Lai, Kuang-Chi; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-08-30

    Nonsmall cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) is a devastating primary lung tumor resistant to conventional therapies. Bisdemethoxycurcumin (BDMC) is one of curcumin derivate from Turmeric and has been shown to induce NSCLC cell death. Although there is one report to show BDMC induced DNA double strand breaks, however, no available information to show BDMC induced DNA damage action with inhibited DNA repair protein in lung cancer cells in detail. In this study, we tested BDMC-induced DNA damage and condensation in NCI-H460 cells by using Comet assay and DAPI staining examinations, respectively and we found BDMC induced DNA damage and condension. Western blotting was used to examine the effects of BDMC on protein expression associated with DNA damage and repair and results indicated that BDMC suppressed the protein levels associated with DNA damage and repair, such as 14-3-3σ (an important checkpoint keeper of DDR), O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase, DNA repair proteins breast cancer 1, early onset, mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 but activate phosphorylated p53 and p-H2A.X (phospho Ser140) in NCI-H460 cells. Confocal laser systems microscopy was used for examining the protein translocation and results show that BDMC increased the translocation of p-p53 and p-H2A.X (phospho Ser140) from cytosol to nuclei in NCI-H460 cells. In conclusion, BDMC induced DNA damage and condension and affect DNA repair proteins in NCI-H460 cells in vitro. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol, 2015.

  11. DNA damage induced by red food dyes orally administered to pregnant and male mice.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, S; Murakami, M; Matsusaka, N; Kano, K; Taniguchi, K; Sasaki, Y F

    2001-05-01

    We determined the genotoxicity of synthetic red tar dyes currently used as food color additives in many countries, including JAPAN: For the preliminary assessment, we treated groups of 4 pregnant mice (gestational day 11) once orally at the limit dose (2000 mg/kg) of amaranth (food red No. 2), allura red (food red No. 40), or acid red (food red No. 106), and we sampled brain, lung, liver, kidney, glandular stomach, colon, urinary bladder, and embryo 3, 6, and 24 h after treatment. We used the comet (alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis) assay to measure DNA damage. The assay was positive in the colon 3 h after the administration of amaranth and allura red and weakly positive in the lung 6 h after the administration of amaranth. Acid red did not induce DNA damage in any sample at any sampling time. None of the dyes damaged DNA in other organs or the embryo. We then tested male mice with amaranth, allura red, and a related color additive, new coccine (food red No. 18). The 3 dyes induced DNA damage in the colon starting at 10 mg/kg. Twenty ml/kg of soaking liquid from commercial red ginger pickles, which contained 6.5 mg/10 ml of new coccine, induced DNA damage in colon, glandular stomach, and bladder. The potencies were compared to those of other rodent carcinogens. The rodent hepatocarcinogen p-dimethylaminoazobenzene induced colon DNA damage at 1 mg/kg, whereas it damaged liver DNA only at 500 mg/kg. Although 1 mg/kg of N-nitrosodimethylamine induced DNA damage in liver and bladder, it did not induce colon DNA damage. N-nitrosodiethylamine at 14 mg/kg did not induce DNA damage in any organs examined. Because the 3 azo additives we examined induced colon DNA damage at a very low dose, more extensive assessment of azo additives is warranted.

  12. Oxidative DNA Damage Response in Helicobacter pylori-Infected Mongolian Gerbils.

    PubMed

    Bae, Minkyung; Lim, Joo Weon; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2013-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) induced DNA damage which may be related to gastric cancer development. The DNA damage response coordinates DNA repair, cell-cycle transition, and apoptosis through activation of DNA damage response molecules. The damaged DNA is repaired through non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR). In the present study, we investigated the changes of HR DNA repair proteins (ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated; ATM, ATM and Rad3-related; ATR), NHEJ repair proteins (Ku70/80), cell cycle regulators (Chk1, Chk2), and apoptosis marker (p53/p-p53) were determined in H. pylori-infected Mongolian gerbils. In addition, the effect of an antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on H. pylori-induced DNA damage response was determined to assess the involvement of oxidative stress on DNA damage of the animals infected with H. pylori. One week after intragastric inoculation with H. pylori, Mongolian gerbils were fed with basal diet with or without 3% NAC for 6 weeks. After 6 week, the expression levels of DNA repair proteins (Ku70/80, ATM, ATR), cell cycle regulators (Chk1, Chk2) and apoptosis marker (p-p53/p53) were increased in gastric mucosa of Mongolian gerbils, which was suppressed by NAC treatment. In conclusion, oxidative stress mediates H. pylori-induced DNA damage response including NHEJ and HR repairing processes, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in gastric mucosa of Mongolian gerbils.

  13. Water extracts of tree Hypericum sps. protect DNA from oxidative and alkylating damage and enhance DNA repair in colon cells.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Alice A; Marques, Filipe; Fernandes-Ferreira, Manuel; Pereira-Wilson, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Diet may induce colon carcinogenesis through oxidative or alkylating DNA damage. However, diet may also contain anticarcinogenic compounds that contribute to cancer prevention. DNA damage prevention and/or induction of repair are two important mechanisms involved in cancer chemoprevention by dietary compounds. Hypericum sps. are widely used in traditional medicine to prepare infusions due to their beneficial digestive and neurologic effects. In this study, we investigated the potential of water extracts from three Hypericum sps. and some of their main phenolic compounds to prevent and repair oxidative and alkylating DNA damage in colon cells. The results showed that water extracts of Hypericum perforatum, Hypericum androsaemum, Hypericum undulatum, quercetin and rutin have protective effect against oxidative DNA damage in HT29 cells. Protective effect was also observed against alkylating DNA damage induced by methyl-methanesulfonate, except for H. androsaemum. With regard to alkylating damage repair H. perforatum, H. androsaemum and chlorogenic acid increased repair of alkylating DNA damage by base excision repair pathway. No effect was observed on nucleotide excision repair pathway. Antigenotoxic effects of Hypericum sps. may contribute to colon cancer prevention and the high amount of phenolic compounds present in Hypericum sps. play an important role in DNA protective effects.

  14. The DNA Damage Response: Making it safe to play with knives

    PubMed Central

    Ciccia, Alberto; Elledge, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Damage to our genetic material is an ongoing threat to both our ability to faithfully transmit genetic information to our offspring as well as our own survival. To respond to these threats, eukaryotes have evolved the DNA Damage Response (DDR). The DDR is a complex signal transduction pathway that has the ability to sense DNA damage and transduce this information to the cell to influence cellular responses to DNA damage. Cells possess an arsenal of enzymatic tools capable of remodeling and repairing DNA, however, their activities must be tightly regulated in a temporal, spatial and DNA lesion-appropriate fashion to optimize repair and prevent unnecessary and potentially deleterious alterations in the structure of DNA during normal cellular processes. This review will focus on how the DDR controls DNA repair and the phenotypic consequences of defects in these critical regulatory functions in mammals. PMID:20965415

  15. Viral DNA Replication-Dependent DNA Damage Response Activation during BK Polyomavirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Verhalen, Brandy; Justice, Joshua L.; Imperiale, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) reactivation is associated with severe human disease in kidney and bone marrow transplant patients. The interplay between viral and host factors that regulates the productive infection process remains poorly understood. We have previously reported that the cellular DNA damage response (DDR) is activated upon lytic BKPyV infection and that its activation is required for optimal viral replication in primary kidney epithelial cells. In this report, we set out to determine what viral components are responsible for activating the two major phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-like kinases (PI3KKs) involved in the DDR: ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase and ATM and Rad3-related (ATR) kinase. Using a combination of UV treatment, lentivirus transduction, and mutant virus infection experiments, our results demonstrate that neither the input virus nor the expression of large T antigen (TAg) alone is sufficient to trigger the activation of ATM or ATR in our primary culture model. Instead, our data suggest that the activation of both the ATM- and ATR-mediated DDR pathways is linked to viral DNA replication. Intriguingly, a TAg mutant virus that is unable to activate the DDR causes substantial host DNA damage. Our study provides insight into how DDRs are activated by polyomaviruses in primary cells with intact cell cycle checkpoints and how the activation might be linked to the maintenance of host genome stability. IMPORTANCE Polyomaviruses are opportunistic pathogens that are associated with several human diseases under immunosuppressed conditions. BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) affects mostly kidney and bone marrow transplant patients. The detailed replication mechanism of these viruses remains to be determined. We have previously reported that BKPyV activates the host DNA damage response (DDR), a response normally used by the host cell to combat genotoxic stress, to aid its own replication. In this study, we identified that the trigger for DDR

  16. DNA damage induced by boron neutron capture therapy is partially repaired by DNA ligase IV.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Natsuko; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Hirota, Yuki; Tanaka, Hiroki; Watanabe, Tsubasa; Nakagawa, Yosuke; Narabayashi, Masaru; Kinashi, Yuko; Miyatake, Shin-ichi; Hasegawa, Masatoshi; Suzuki, Minoru; Masunaga, Shin-ichiro; Ohnishi, Takeo; Ono, Koji

    2016-03-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a particle radiation therapy that involves the use of a thermal or epithermal neutron beam in combination with a boron ((10)B)-containing compound that specifically accumulates in tumor. (10)B captures neutrons and the resultant fission reaction produces an alpha ((4)He) particle and a recoiled lithium nucleus ((7)Li). These particles have the characteristics of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation and therefore have marked biological effects. High-LET radiation is a potent inducer of DNA damage, specifically of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The aim of the present study was to clarify the role of DNA ligase IV, a key player in the non-homologous end-joining repair pathway, in the repair of BNCT-induced DSBs. We analyzed the cellular sensitivity of the mouse embryonic fibroblast cell lines Lig4-/- p53-/- and Lig4+/+ p53-/- to irradiation using a thermal neutron beam in the presence or absence of (10)B-para-boronophenylalanine (BPA). The Lig4-/- p53-/- cell line had a higher sensitivity than the Lig4+/+ p53-/-cell line to irradiation with the beam alone or the beam in combination with BPA. In BNCT (with BPA), both cell lines exhibited a reduction of the 50 % survival dose (D 50) by a factor of 1.4 compared with gamma-ray and neutron mixed beam (without BPA). Although it was found that (10)B uptake was higher in the Lig4+/+ p53-/- than in the Lig4-/- p53-/- cell line, the latter showed higher sensitivity than the former, even when compared at an equivalent (10)B concentration. These results indicate that BNCT-induced DNA damage is partially repaired using DNA ligase IV.

  17. Identification of S-phase DNA damage-response targets in fission yeast reveals conservation of damage-response networks

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Nicholas A.; Zhou, Chunshui; Elia, Andrew E. H.; Murray, Johanne M.; Carr, Antony M.; Elledge, Stephen J.; Rhind, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    The cellular response to DNA damage during S-phase regulates a complicated network of processes, including cell-cycle progression, gene expression, DNA replication kinetics, and DNA repair. In fission yeast, this S-phase DNA damage response (DDR) is coordinated by two protein kinases: Rad3, the ortholog of mammalian ATR, and Cds1, the ortholog of mammalian Chk2. Although several critical downstream targets of Rad3 and Cds1 have been identified, most of their presumed targets are unknown, including the targets responsible for regulating replication kinetics and coordinating replication and repair. To characterize targets of the S-phase DDR, we identified proteins phosphorylated in response to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS)-induced S-phase DNA damage in wild-type, rad3∆, and cds1∆ cells by proteome-wide mass spectrometry. We found a broad range of S-phase–specific DDR targets involved in gene expression, stress response, regulation of mitosis and cytokinesis, and DNA replication and repair. These targets are highly enriched for proteins required for viability in response to MMS, indicating their biological significance. Furthermore, the regulation of these proteins is similar in fission and budding yeast, across 300 My of evolution, demonstrating a deep conservation of S-phase DDR targets and suggesting that these targets may be critical for maintaining genome stability in response to S-phase DNA damage across eukaryotes. PMID:27298342

  18. Dissecting DNA damage response pathways by analyzing protein localization and abundance changes during DNA replication stress

    PubMed Central

    Tkach, Johnny M.; Yimit, Askar; Lee, Anna Y.; Riffle, Michael; Costanzo, Michael; Jaschob, Daniel; Hendry, Jason A.; Ou, Jiongwen; Moffat, Jason; Boone, Charles; Davis, Trisha N.; Nislow, Corey; Brown, Grant W.

    2012-01-01

    Re-localization of proteins is a hallmark of the DNA damage response. We use high-throughput microscopic screening of the yeast GFP fusion collection to develop a systems-level view of protein re-organization following drug-induced DNA replication stress. Changes in protein localization and abundance reveal drug-specific patterns of functional enrichments. Classification of proteins by sub-cellular destination allows the identification of pathways that respond to replication stress. We analyzed pairwise combinations of GFP fusions and gene deletion mutants to define and order two novel DNA damage responses. In the first, Cmr1 forms subnuclear foci that are regulated by the histone deacetylase Hos2 and are distinct from the typical Rad52 repair foci. In a second example, we find that the checkpoint kinases Mec1/Tel1 and the translation regulator Asc1 regulate P-body formation. This method identifies response pathways that were not detected in genetic and protein interaction screens, and can be readily applied to any form of chemical or genetic stress to reveal cellular response pathways. PMID:22842922

  19. Conservative site-specific and single-copy transgenesis in human LINE-1 elements

    PubMed Central

    Vijaya Chandra, Shree Harsha; Makhija, Harshyaa; Peter, Sabrina; Myint Wai, Cho Mar; Li, Jinming; Zhu, Jindong; Ren, Zhonglu; D'Alcontres, Martina Stagno; Siau, Jia Wei; Chee, Sharon; Ghadessy, Farid John; Dröge, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Genome engineering of human cells plays an important role in biotechnology and molecular medicine. In particular, insertions of functional multi-tra