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Sample records for situ high temperature

  1. Novel High Temperature Materials for In-Situ Sensing Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Florian Solzbacher; Anil Virkar; Loren Rieth; Srinivasan Kannan; Xiaoxin Chen; Hannwelm Steinebach

    2009-12-31

    The overriding goal of this project was to develop gas sensor materials and systems compatible with operation at temperatures from 500 to 700 C. Gas sensors operating at these temperatures would be compatible with placement in fossil-energy exhaust streams close to the combustion chamber, and therefore have advantages for process regulation, and feedback for emissions controls. The three thrusts of our work included investigating thin film gas sensor materials based on metal oxide materials and electroceramic materials, and also development of microhotplate devices to support the gas sensing films. The metal oxide materials NiO, In{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} were investigated for their sensitivity to H{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and CO{sub 2}, respectively, at high temperatures (T > 500 C), where the sensing properties of these materials have received little attention. New ground was broken in achieving excellent gas sensor responses (>10) for temperatures up to 600 C for NiO and In{sub 2}O{sub 3} materials. The gas sensitivity of these materials was decreasing as temperatures increased above 500 C, which indicates that achieving strong sensitivities with these materials at very high temperatures (T {ge} 650 C) will be a further challenge. The sensitivity, selectivity, stability, and reliability of these materials were investigated across a wide range of deposition conditions, temperatures, film thickness, as using surface active promoter materials. We also proposed to study the electroceramic materials BaZr{sub (1-x)}Y{sub x}O{sub (3-x/2)} and BaCe{sub (2-x)}Ca{sub x}S{sub (4-x/2)} for their ability to detect H{sub 2}O and H{sub 2}S, respectively. This report focuses on the properties and gas sensing characteristics of BaZr{sub (1-x)}Y{sub x}O{sub (3-x/2)} (Y-doped BaZrO{sub 3}), as significant difficulties were encounter in generating BaCe{sub (2-x)}Ca{sub x}S{sub (4-x/2)} sensors. Significant new results were achieved for Y-doped BaZrO{sub 3}, including

  2. Sealed rotors for in situ high temperature high pressure MAS NMR

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hu, Jian Z.; Hu, Mary Y.; Zhao, Zhenchao; Xu, Souchang; Vjunov, Aleksei; Shi, Hui; Camaioni, Donald M.; Peden, Charles H. F.; Lercher, Johannes A.

    2015-07-06

    Magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) investigations on heterogeneous samples containing solids, semi-solids, liquid and gases or a mixture of them under non-conventional conditions of a combined high pressure and high temperature, or cold temperature suffer from the unavailability of a perfectly sealed rotor. Here, we report the design of reusable and perfectly-sealed all-zircornia MAS rotors. The rotors are easy to use and are suitable for operation temperatures from below 0 to 250 °C and pressures up to 100 bar. As an example of potential applications we performed in situ MAS NMR investigations of AlPO₄-5 molecular sieve crystallization,more » a kinetic study of the cyclohexanol dehydration reaction using 13C MAS NMR, and an investigation of the metabolomics of intact biological tissue at low temperature using 1H HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy. The in situ MAS NMR experiments performed using the reported rotors allowed reproduction of the results from traditional batch reactions, while offering more detailed quantitative information at the molecular level, as demonstrated for the molecular sieve synthesis and activation energy measurements for cyclohexanol dehydration. The perfectly sealed rotor also shows promising application for metabolomics studies using 1H HR-MAS NMR.« less

  3. Sealed rotors for in situ high temperature high pressure MAS NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jian Z.; Hu, Mary Y.; Zhao, Zhenchao; Xu, Souchang; Vjunov, Aleksei; Shi, Hui; Camaioni, Donald M.; Peden, Charles H. F.; Lercher, Johannes A.

    2015-07-06

    Magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) investigations on heterogeneous samples containing solids, semi-solids, liquid and gases or a mixture of them under non-conventional conditions of a combined high pressure and high temperature, or cold temperature suffer from the unavailability of a perfectly sealed rotor. Here, we report the design of reusable and perfectly-sealed all-zircornia MAS rotors. The rotors are easy to use and are suitable for operation temperatures from below 0 to 250 °C and pressures up to 100 bar. As an example of potential applications we performed in situ MAS NMR investigations of AlPO₄-5 molecular sieve crystallization, a kinetic study of the cyclohexanol dehydration reaction using 13C MAS NMR, and an investigation of the metabolomics of intact biological tissue at low temperature using 1H HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy. The in situ MAS NMR experiments performed using the reported rotors allowed reproduction of the results from traditional batch reactions, while offering more detailed quantitative information at the molecular level, as demonstrated for the molecular sieve synthesis and activation energy measurements for cyclohexanol dehydration. The perfectly sealed rotor also shows promising application for metabolomics studies using 1H HR-MAS NMR.

  4. In Situ Observation of Gypsum-Anhydrite Transition at High Pressure and High Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chuan-Jiang; Zheng, Hai-Fei

    2012-04-01

    An in-situ Raman spectroscopic study of gypsum-anhydrite transition under a saturated water condition at high pressure and high temperature is performed using a hydrothermal diamond anvil cell (HDAC). The experimental results show that gypsum dissolvs in water at ambient temperature and above 496 MPa. With increasing temperature, the anhydrite (CaSO4) phase precipitates at 250-320°C in the pressure range of 1.0-1.5GPa, indicating that under a saturated water condition, both stable conditions of pressure and temperature and high levels of Ca and SO4 ion concentrations in aqueous solution are essential for the formation of anhydrite. A linear relationship between the pressure and temperature for the precipitation of anhydrite is established as P(GPa) = 0.0068T-0.7126 (250°C<=T<=320°C). Anhydrite remained stable during rapid cooling of the sample chamber, showing that the gypsum-anhydrite transition involving both dissolution and precipitation processes is irreversible at high pressure and high temperature.

  5. Elevated Temperature, In Situ Micromechanical Characterization of a High Temperature Ternary Shape Memory Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, J. M.; Niederberger, C.; Raghavan, R.; Thompson, G.; Weaver, M.; Michler, J.

    2015-12-01

    The microthermomechanical behavior of a precipitation-hardenable Ni-48Ti-25Pd (at.%) shape memory alloy has been investigated as a function of temperature. Micropillars were fabricated within a large <145>-oriented grain and compressed in situ in the SEM at elevated temperatures corresponding to the martensite and austenite phase transformation temperatures. The precipitation-strengthened alloys exhibited stable pseudoelastic behavior with little or no residual strains when near the transformation temperatures. In the plastic regime, slip was observed to occur via pencil glide, circumventing the fine scale precipitates along multiple slip planes.

  6. In-situ high temperature irradiation setup for temperature dependent structural studies of materials under swift heavy ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulriya, P. K.; Kumari, Renu; Kumar, Rajesh; Grover, V.; Shukla, R.; Tyagi, A. K.; Avasthi, D. K.

    2015-01-01

    An in-situ high temperature (1000 K) setup is designed and installed in the materials science beam line of superconducting linear accelerator at the Inter-University Accelerator Centre (IUAC) for temperature dependent ion irradiation studies on the materials exposed with swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation. The Gd2Ti2O7 pyrochlore is irradiated using 120 MeV Au ion at 1000 K using the high temperature irradiation facility and characterized by ex-situ X-ray diffraction (XRD). Another set of Gd2Ti2O7 samples are irradiated with the same ion beam parameter at 300 K and simultaneously characterized using in-situ XRD available in same beam line. The XRD studies along with the Raman spectroscopic investigations reveal that the structural modification induced by the ion irradiation is strongly dependent on the temperature of the sample. The Gd2Ti2O7 is readily amorphized at an ion fluence 6 × 1012 ions/cm2 on irradiation at 300 K, whereas it is transformed to a radiation-resistant anion-deficient fluorite structure on high temperature irradiation, that amorphized at ion fluence higher than 1 × 1013 ions/cm2. The temperature dependent ion irradiation studies showed that the ion fluence required to cause amorphization at 1000 K irradiation is significantly higher than that required at room temperature irradiation. In addition to testing the efficiency of the in-situ high temperature irradiation facility, the present study establishes that the radiation stability of the pyrochlore is enhanced at higher temperatures.

  7. High-sensitivity in situ QCLAS-based ammonia concentration sensor for high-temperature applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, W. Y.; Sur, R.; Strand, C. L.; Spearrin, R. M.; Jeffries, J. B.; Hanson, R. K.

    2016-07-01

    A novel quantum cascade laser (QCL) absorption sensor is presented for high-sensitivity in situ measurements of ammonia (hbox {NH}_3) in high-temperature environments, using scanned wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) with first-harmonic-normalized second-harmonic detection (scanned WMS-2 f/1 f) to neutralize the effect of non-absorption losses in the harsh environment. The sensor utilized the sQ(9,9) transition of the fundamental symmetric stretch band of hbox {NH}_3 at 10.39 {\\upmu }hbox {m} and was sinusoidally modulated at 10 kHz and scanned across the peak of the absorption feature at 50 Hz, leading to a detection bandwidth of 100 Hz. A novel technique was used to select an optimal WMS modulation depth parameter that reduced the sensor's sensitivity to spectral interference from hbox {H}_2hbox {O} and hbox {CO}_2 without significantly sacrificing signal-to-noise ratio. The sensor performance was validated by measuring known concentrations of hbox {NH}_3 in a flowing gas cell. The sensor was then demonstrated in a laboratory-scale methane-air burner seeded with hbox {NH}_3, achieving a demonstrated detection limit of 2.8 ± 0.26 ppm hbox {NH}_3 by mole at a path length of 179 cm, equivalence ratio of 0.6, pressure of 1 atm, and temperatures of up to 600 K.

  8. In situ observation and measurement of composites subjected to extremely high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xufei; Yu, Helong; Zhang, Guobing; Su, Hengqiang; Tang, Hongxiang; Feng, Xue

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we develop an instrument to study the ablation and oxidation process of materials such as C/SiC (carbon fiber reinforced silicon carbide composites) and ultra-high temperature ceramic in extremely high temperature environment. The instrument is integrated with high speed cameras with filtering lens, infrared thermometers and water vapor generator for image capture, temperature measurement, and humid atmosphere, respectively. The ablation process and thermal shock as well as the temperature on both sides of the specimen can be in situ monitored. The results show clearly the dynamic ablation and liquid oxide flowing. In addition, we develop an algorithm for the post-processing of the captured images to obtain the deformation of the specimens, in order to better understand the behavior of the specimen subjected to high temperature.

  9. In situ observation and measurement of composites subjected to extremely high temperature.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xufei; Yu, Helong; Zhang, Guobing; Su, Hengqiang; Tang, Hongxiang; Feng, Xue

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we develop an instrument to study the ablation and oxidation process of materials such as C/SiC (carbon fiber reinforced silicon carbide composites) and ultra-high temperature ceramic in extremely high temperature environment. The instrument is integrated with high speed cameras with filtering lens, infrared thermometers and water vapor generator for image capture, temperature measurement, and humid atmosphere, respectively. The ablation process and thermal shock as well as the temperature on both sides of the specimen can be in situ monitored. The results show clearly the dynamic ablation and liquid oxide flowing. In addition, we develop an algorithm for the post-processing of the captured images to obtain the deformation of the specimens, in order to better understand the behavior of the specimen subjected to high temperature.

  10. Method for local temperature measurement in a nanoreactor for in situ high-resolution electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Vendelbo, S B; Kooyman, P J; Creemer, J F; Morana, B; Mele, L; Dona, P; Nelissen, B J; Helveg, S

    2013-10-01

    In situ high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of solids under reactive gas conditions can be facilitated by microelectromechanical system devices called nanoreactors. These nanoreactors are windowed cells containing nanoliter volumes of gas at ambient pressures and elevated temperatures. However, due to the high spatial confinement of the reaction environment, traditional methods for measuring process parameters, such as the local temperature, are difficult to apply. To address this issue, we devise an electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) method that probes the local temperature of the reaction volume under inspection by the electron beam. The local gas density, as measured using quantitative EELS, is combined with the inherent relation between gas density and temperature, as described by the ideal gas law, to obtain the local temperature. Using this method we determined the temperature gradient in a nanoreactor in situ, while the average, global temperature was monitored by a traditional measurement of the electrical resistivity of the heater. The local gas temperatures had a maximum of 56 °C deviation from the global heater values under the applied conditions. The local temperatures, obtained with the proposed method, are in good agreement with predictions from an analytical model. PMID:23831940

  11. INTEGRATION OF HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS REACTORS WITH IN SITU OIL SHALE RETORTING

    SciTech Connect

    Eric P. Robertson; Michael G. McKellar; Lee O. Nelson

    2011-05-01

    This paper evaluates the integration of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) to an in situ oil shale retort operation producing 7950 m3/D (50,000 bbl/day). The large amount of heat required to pyrolyze the oil shale and produce oil would typically be provided by combustion of fossil fuels, but can also be delivered by an HTGR. Two cases were considered: a base case which includes no nuclear integration, and an HTGR-integrated case.

  12. Acousto-optic Imaging System for In-situ Measurement of the High Temperature Distribution in Micron-size Specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machikhin, Alexander S.; Zinin, Pavel V.; Shurygin, Alexander V.

    We developed a unique acousto-optic imaging system for in-situ measurement of high temperature distribution on micron-size specimens. The system was designed to measure temperature distribution inside minerals and functional material phases subjected to high pressure and high temperatures in a diamond anvil cell (DAC) heated by a high powered laser.

  13. Low Cost Al-Si Casting Alloy As In-Situ Composite for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2000-01-01

    A new aluminum-silicon (Al-Si) alloy has been successfully developed at NASA- Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) that has significant improvement in tensile and fatigue strength at elevated temperatures (500 F-700 F). The alloy offers a number of benefits such as light weight, high hardness, low thermal expansion and high surface wear resistance. In hypereutectic form, this alloy is considered as an in-situ Al-Si composite with tensile strength of about 90% higher than the auto industry 390 alloy at 600 F. This composite is very economically produced by using either conventional permanent steel molds or die casting. The projected material cost is less than $0.90 per pound, and automotive components such as pistons can be cast for high production rate using conventional casting techniques with a low and fully accounted cost. Key Words: Metal matrix composites, In-situ composite, aluminum-silicon alloy, hypereutectic alloy, permanent mold casting, die casting.

  14. High-temperature in situ crystallographic observation of reversible gas sorption in impermeable organic cages

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Seung Bin; Moon, Dohyun; Graf, Robert; Cho, Woo Jong; Park, Sung Woo; Yoon, Tae-Ung; Cho, Seung Joo; Hwang, In-Chul; Bae, Youn-Sang; Spiess, Hans W.; Lee, Hee Cheon; Kim, Kwang S.

    2015-01-01

    Crystallographic observation of adsorbed gas molecules is a highly difficult task due to their rapid motion. Here, we report the in situ single-crystal and synchrotron powder X-ray observations of reversible CO2 sorption processes in an apparently nonporous organic crystal under varying pressures at high temperatures. The host material is formed by hydrogen bond network between 1,3,5-tris-(4-carboxyphenyl)benzene (H3BTB) and N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) and by π–π stacking between the H3BTB moieties. The material can be viewed as a well-ordered array of cages, which are tight packed with each other so that the cages are inaccessible from outside. Thus, the host is practically nonporous. Despite the absence of permanent pathways connecting the empty cages, they are permeable to CO2 at high temperatures due to thermally activated molecular gating, and the weakly confined CO2 molecules in the cages allow direct detection by in situ single-crystal X-ray diffraction at 323 K. Variable-temperature in situ synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction studies also show that the CO2 sorption is reversible and driven by temperature increase. Solid-state magic angle spinning NMR defines the interactions of CO2 with the organic framework and dynamic motion of CO2 in cages. The reversible sorption is attributed to the dynamic motion of the DMF molecules combined with the axial motions/angular fluctuations of CO2 (a series of transient opening/closing of compartments enabling CO2 molecule passage), as revealed from NMR and simulations. This temperature-driven transient molecular gating can store gaseous molecules in ordered arrays toward unique collective properties and release them for ready use. PMID:26578758

  15. A hot tip: imaging phenomena using in situ multi-stimulus probes at high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Nonnenmann, Stephen S

    2016-02-14

    Accurate high temperature characterization of materials remains a critical challenge to the continued advancement of various important energy, nuclear, electronic, and aerospace applications. Future experimental studies must assist these communities to progress past empiricism and derive deliberate, predictable designs of material classes functioning within active, extreme environments. Successful realization of systems ranging from fuel cells and batteries to electromechanical nanogenerators and turbines requires a dynamic understanding of the excitation, surface-mediated, and charge transfer phenomena which occur at heterophase interfaces (i.e. vapor-solid, liquid-solid, solid-solid) and impact overall performance. Advancing these frontiers therefore necessitates in situ (operando) characterization methods capable of resolving, both spatially and functionally, the coherence between these complex, collective excitations, and their respective response dynamics, through studies within the operating regime. This review highlights recent developments in scanning probe microscopy in performing in situ imaging at high elevated temperatures. The influence of and evolution from vacuum-based electron and tunneling microscopy are briefly summarized and discussed. The scope includes the use of high temperature imaging to directly observe critical phase transition, electronic, and electrochemical behavior under dynamic temperature settings, thus providing key physical parameters. Finally, both challenges and directions in combined instrumentation are proposed and discussed towards the end.

  16. A hot tip: imaging phenomena using in situ multi-stimulus probes at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonnenmann, Stephen S.

    2016-02-01

    Accurate high temperature characterization of materials remains a critical challenge to the continued advancement of various important energy, nuclear, electronic, and aerospace applications. Future experimental studies must assist these communities to progress past empiricism and derive deliberate, predictable designs of material classes functioning within active, extreme environments. Successful realization of systems ranging from fuel cells and batteries to electromechanical nanogenerators and turbines requires a dynamic understanding of the excitation, surface-mediated, and charge transfer phenomena which occur at heterophase interfaces (i.e. vapor-solid, liquid-solid, solid-solid) and impact overall performance. Advancing these frontiers therefore necessitates in situ (operando) characterization methods capable of resolving, both spatially and functionally, the coherence between these complex, collective excitations, and their respective response dynamics, through studies within the operating regime. This review highlights recent developments in scanning probe microscopy in performing in situ imaging at high elevated temperatures. The influence of and evolution from vacuum-based electron and tunneling microscopy are briefly summarized and discussed. The scope includes the use of high temperature imaging to directly observe critical phase transition, electronic, and electrochemical behavior under dynamic temperature settings, thus providing key physical parameters. Finally, both challenges and directions in combined instrumentation are proposed and discussed towards the end.

  17. A hot tip: imaging phenomena using in situ multi-stimulus probes at high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Nonnenmann, Stephen S

    2016-02-14

    Accurate high temperature characterization of materials remains a critical challenge to the continued advancement of various important energy, nuclear, electronic, and aerospace applications. Future experimental studies must assist these communities to progress past empiricism and derive deliberate, predictable designs of material classes functioning within active, extreme environments. Successful realization of systems ranging from fuel cells and batteries to electromechanical nanogenerators and turbines requires a dynamic understanding of the excitation, surface-mediated, and charge transfer phenomena which occur at heterophase interfaces (i.e. vapor-solid, liquid-solid, solid-solid) and impact overall performance. Advancing these frontiers therefore necessitates in situ (operando) characterization methods capable of resolving, both spatially and functionally, the coherence between these complex, collective excitations, and their respective response dynamics, through studies within the operating regime. This review highlights recent developments in scanning probe microscopy in performing in situ imaging at high elevated temperatures. The influence of and evolution from vacuum-based electron and tunneling microscopy are briefly summarized and discussed. The scope includes the use of high temperature imaging to directly observe critical phase transition, electronic, and electrochemical behavior under dynamic temperature settings, thus providing key physical parameters. Finally, both challenges and directions in combined instrumentation are proposed and discussed towards the end. PMID:26795921

  18. In situ high temperature microscopy study of the surface oxidation and phase transformations in titanium alloys.

    PubMed

    Malinov, S; Sha, W; Voon, C S

    2002-09-01

    Two popular commercial titanium alloys, Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo-0.08Si, were used for in situ high temperature microscopy study. The experiments were performed on an optical microscope equipped with high temperature stage using both normal and florescence lights. Two kinds of experiments were performed, at continuous heating/cooling with different rates and in isothermal conditions at different temperatures. The changes taking place on the sample surface during the experiments were monitored. The morphology of the alpha ==> beta ==> alpha phase transformation was recorded at different heat treatment conditions using the effect of thermal etching. An effect of sample surface oxidation and deoxidation was observed during continuous heating. The appearance and disappearance of ordered titanium oxides Ti3O and Ti2O are discussed based on the phase equilibrium diagram. The kinetics of the surface oxidation was monitored in both isothermal and continuous cooling conditions.

  19. In situ synthesis and characterization of uranium carbide using high temperature neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiche, H. Matthias; Vogel, Sven C.; Tang, Ming

    2016-04-01

    We investigated the formation of UCx from UO2+x and graphite in situ using neutron diffraction at high temperatures with particular focus on resolving the conflicting reports on the crystal structure of non-quenchable cubic UC2. The agents were UO2 nanopowder, which closely imitates nano grains observed in spent reactor fuels, and graphite powder. In situ neutron diffraction revealed the onset of the UO2 + 2C → UC + CO2 reaction at 1440 °C, with its completion at 1500 °C. Upon further heating, carbon diffuses into the uranium carbide forming C2 groups at the octahedral sites. This resulting high temperature cubic UC2 phase is similar to the NaCl-type structure as proposed by Bowman et al. Our novel experimental data provide insights into the mechanism and kinetics of formation of UC as well as characteristics of the high temperature cubic UC2 phase which agree with proposed rotational rehybridization found from simulations by Wen et al.

  20. Sealed Rotors for In Situ High Temperature High Pressure MAS NMR†

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Hu, Mary Y.; Zhao, Zhenchao; Xu, Suochang; Vjunov, Aleksei; Shi, Hui; Camaioni, Donald M.; Peden, Charles H. F.; Lercher, Johannes A.

    2015-01-01

    Here we present the design of reusable and perfectly-sealed all-zircornia MAS rotors. The rotors are used to study AlPO4-5 molecular sieve crystallization under hydrothermal conditions, high temperature high pressure cyclohexanol dehydration reaction, and low temperature metabolomics of intact biological tissue. PMID:26171928

  1. In situ analysis of texture development from sinusoidal stress at high pressure and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Li; Weidner, Donald J.

    2015-12-15

    Here, we present a new experimental protocol to investigate the relationship between texture, plastic strain, and the mechanisms of plastic deformation at high pressure and temperature. The method utilizes synchrotron X-ray radiation as the probing tool, coupled with a large-volume high pressure deformation device (D-DIA). The intensity of X-ray diffraction peaks within the spectrum of the sample is used for sampling texture development in situ. The unique feature of this study is given by the sinusoidal variation of the intensity when a sinusoidal strain is applied to the sample. For a sample of magnesium oxide at elevated pressure and temperature, we demonstrate observations that are consistent with elasto-plastic models for texture development and for diffraction-peak measurements of apparent stress. The sinusoidal strain magnitude was 3%.

  2. In situ analysis of texture development from sinusoidal stress at high pressure and temperature.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Weidner, Donald J

    2015-12-01

    Here, we present a new experimental protocol to investigate the relationship between texture, plastic strain, and the mechanisms of plastic deformation at high pressure and temperature. The method utilizes synchrotron X-ray radiation as the probing tool, coupled with a large-volume high pressure deformation device (D-DIA). The intensity of X-ray diffraction peaks within the spectrum of the sample is used for sampling texture development in situ. The unique feature of this study is given by the sinusoidal variation of the intensity when a sinusoidal strain is applied to the sample. For a sample of magnesium oxide at elevated pressure and temperature, we demonstrate observations that are consistent with elasto-plastic models for texture development and for diffraction-peak measurements of apparent stress. The sinusoidal strain magnitude was 3%. PMID:26724072

  3. A new device for high precision in situ sediment temperature profile measurements at the seafloor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feseker, T.; Wetzel, G.; Heesemann, B.

    2012-04-01

    In situ sediment temperature profile measurements at the seafloor provide valuable information on fluid seepage, hydrate stability, and ambient temperature of samples. In addition, it can be convenient to approximate other parameters such as concentrations of porewater constituents from temperature or temperature gradient using transfer functions if their distribution is controlled by the same processes and direct quantification involves time-consuming sampling and laboratory analyses. We present a new instrument that can be used to obtain precisely positioned sediment temperature profile measurements from the seafloor during ROV dives. Consisting of a 0.4 m-long sensor rod equipped with eight temperature sensors and a standard data logger, the new T-Stick can be operated by an ROV in a fully autonomous mode. The temperature range of the instrument is -5 °C to 35 °C and it can withstand pressures of up to 600 bar. Compared to previously used instruments, the smaller diameter of the new T-Stick reduces the thermal inertia of the lance and results in shorter equilibration times. Virtual measurements generated by a numerical model showed that the T-Stick provides highly accurate temperature profile measurements with a root mean square error of 0.0027 K for a wide range of thermal sediment properties. Modeled temperature gradients are representative of both normal deep sea settings and cold seep environments with elevated temperature gradients of up to three orders of magnitude above normal background values, which are the primary target areas for T-Stick measurements. Deviations from the true in situ temperature profiles are caused by disturbance of the temperature field by the probe itself and may lead to underestimation of gradients and curvature in the profiles. A first field test of the T-Stick was conducted at the Håkon Mosby mud volcano at 1250 m water depth on the Barents Sea slope, where the new instrument provided useful information about the origin and

  4. Molecular Tagging Velocimetry Development for In-situ Measurement in High-Temperature Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andre, Matthieu A.; Bardet, Philippe M.; Burns, Ross A.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    The High Temperature Test Facility, HTTF, at Oregon State University (OSU) is an integral-effect test facility designed to model the behavior of a Very High Temperature Gas Reactor (VHTR) during a Depressurized Conduction Cooldown (DCC) event. It also has the ability to conduct limited investigations into the progression of a Pressurized Conduction Cooldown (PCC) event in addition to phenomena occurring during normal operations. Both of these phenomena will be studied with in-situ velocity field measurements. Experimental measurements of velocity are critical to provide proper boundary conditions to validate CFD codes, as well as developing correlations for system level codes, such as RELAP5 (http://www4vip.inl.gov/relap5/). Such data will be the first acquired in the HTTF and will introduce a diagnostic with numerous other applications to the field of nuclear thermal hydraulics. A laser-based optical diagnostic under development at The George Washington University (GWU) is presented; the technique is demonstrated with velocity data obtained in ambient temperature air, and adaptation to high-pressure, high-temperature flow is discussed.

  5. An experimental system for high temperature X-ray diffraction studies with in situ mechanical loading.

    PubMed

    Oswald, Benjamin B; Schuren, Jay C; Pagan, Darren C; Miller, Matthew P

    2013-03-01

    An experimental system with in situ thermomechanical loading has been developed to enable high energy synchrotron x-ray diffraction studies of crystalline materials. The system applies and maintains loads of up to 2250 N in uniaxial tension or compression at a frequency of up to 100 Hz. The furnace heats the specimen uniformly up to a maximum temperature of 1200 °C in a variety of atmospheres (oxidizing, inert, reducing) that, combined with in situ mechanical loading, can be used to mimic processing and operating conditions of engineering components. The loaded specimen is reoriented with respect to the incident beam of x-rays using two rotational axes to increase the number of crystal orientations interrogated. The system was used at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source to conduct experiments on single crystal silicon and polycrystalline Low Solvus High Refractory nickel-based superalloy. The data from these experiments provide new insights into how stresses evolve at the crystal scale during thermomechanical loading and complement the development of high-fidelity material models. PMID:23556825

  6. An experimental system for high temperature X-ray diffraction studies with in situ mechanical loading

    PubMed Central

    Oswald, Benjamin B.; Schuren, Jay C.; Pagan, Darren C.; Miller, Matthew P.

    2013-01-01

    An experimental system with in situ thermomechanical loading has been developed to enable high energy synchrotron x-ray diffraction studies of crystalline materials. The system applies and maintains loads of up to 2250 N in uniaxial tension or compression at a frequency of up to 100 Hz. The furnace heats the specimen uniformly up to a maximum temperature of 1200 °C in a variety of atmospheres (oxidizing, inert, reducing) that, combined with in situ mechanical loading, can be used to mimic processing and operating conditions of engineering components. The loaded specimen is reoriented with respect to the incident beam of x-rays using two rotational axes to increase the number of crystal orientations interrogated. The system was used at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source to conduct experiments on single crystal silicon and polycrystalline Low Solvus High Refractory nickel-based superalloy. The data from these experiments provide new insights into how stresses evolve at the crystal scale during thermomechanical loading and complement the development of high-fidelity material models. PMID:23556825

  7. An experimental system for high temperature X-ray diffraction studies with in situ mechanical loading

    SciTech Connect

    Oswald, Benjamin B.; Pagan, Darren C.; Miller, Matthew P.; Schuren, Jay C.

    2013-03-15

    An experimental system with in situ thermomechanical loading has been developed to enable high energy synchrotron x-ray diffraction studies of crystalline materials. The system applies and maintains loads of up to 2250 N in uniaxial tension or compression at a frequency of up to 100 Hz. The furnace heats the specimen uniformly up to a maximum temperature of 1200 Degree-Sign C in a variety of atmospheres (oxidizing, inert, reducing) that, combined with in situ mechanical loading, can be used to mimic processing and operating conditions of engineering components. The loaded specimen is reoriented with respect to the incident beam of x-rays using two rotational axes to increase the number of crystal orientations interrogated. The system was used at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source to conduct experiments on single crystal silicon and polycrystalline Low Solvus High Refractory nickel-based superalloy. The data from these experiments provide new insights into how stresses evolve at the crystal scale during thermomechanical loading and complement the development of high-fidelity material models.

  8. An experimental system for high temperature X-ray diffraction studies with in situ mechanical loading.

    PubMed

    Oswald, Benjamin B; Schuren, Jay C; Pagan, Darren C; Miller, Matthew P

    2013-03-01

    An experimental system with in situ thermomechanical loading has been developed to enable high energy synchrotron x-ray diffraction studies of crystalline materials. The system applies and maintains loads of up to 2250 N in uniaxial tension or compression at a frequency of up to 100 Hz. The furnace heats the specimen uniformly up to a maximum temperature of 1200 °C in a variety of atmospheres (oxidizing, inert, reducing) that, combined with in situ mechanical loading, can be used to mimic processing and operating conditions of engineering components. The loaded specimen is reoriented with respect to the incident beam of x-rays using two rotational axes to increase the number of crystal orientations interrogated. The system was used at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source to conduct experiments on single crystal silicon and polycrystalline Low Solvus High Refractory nickel-based superalloy. The data from these experiments provide new insights into how stresses evolve at the crystal scale during thermomechanical loading and complement the development of high-fidelity material models.

  9. In situ wetting state transition on micro- and nanostructured surfaces at high temperature.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingming; Liu, Meng; Ma, Rui; Wang, Qianbin; Jiang, Lei

    2014-09-10

    We studied the in situ transition of the droplets' wetting state on the heated solid surfaces. The wetting behaviors of four micro- and nanostructured surfaces with different chemical components were studied. These parameters included the maximum contact areas (MCA), the maximum evaporation areas (MEA) and the wetting transition temperature (T(trans)). The reduction in MEAs has a specific transition process from wetting (Wenzel state) or partial wetting (Wenzel-Cassie intermediate state) to nonwetting (Cassie State) as the surface temperature rises. When the MEAs drop to zero at a critical temperature (T(trans)), the droplets rebound from the heated surfaces to complete the wetting transition process. The chemical compounds and the surfaces' rough structure play an important role in the droplets' wetting transition behavior. Before FAS-modification, microstructures can increase the MCAs, MEAs, and T(trans). However, the microstructures are less effective at increasing the MEAs and T(trans) than changes to nanostructures. After FAS-modification, both the nano- and microstructures reduce the T(trans). On the FAS-MNSi surfaces, the MEAs are always zero--the droplets rebounded at room temperature, and the wetting transition did occur. We propose two high-temperature mechanisms to explain these transition phenomena.

  10. MWm-array sensors for in situ monitoring of high-temperature components in power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Sheiretov, Y.; Grundy, D.; Zilberstein, V.; Goldfine, N.; Maley, S.

    2009-11-15

    Utilization of America's substantial coal reserves for energy production has become a national priority. Advanced coal-fired power plants offer an environmentally friendly means to achieve that goal. These power plants, such as ultrasupercritical power plants, will provide high thermal efficiency along with greatly reduced emissions of CO and other pollutants. Life cycle costs for the advanced coal-fired plants can be reduced by enhanced observability in support of condition-based maintenance. The enhanced observability can be achieved by using networks of condition-monitoring sensors that would provide component-level material condition information and through-wall temperature monitoring. This would reduce uncertainties in knowledge of material condition, at the level of individual components, and improve capability to predict remaining life of critical components. One approach being developed under the U.S. Department of Energy Small Business Innovation Research Program is to develop and implement high-temperature versions of the meandering winding magnetometer (HT-MWM) for temperatures up to 1000{sup o}C. These patented sensors, coupled with multivariate inverse methods, would provide superior performance for in situ material condition monitoring (material degradation, flaw detection, stress relaxation, and/or creep monitoring) and through-wall temperature measurement. Networks of HT-MWMs will generate material condition information to be used by adaptive life-management algorithms for remaining life prediction and decision support.

  11. In Situ EXAFS Studies on Ni2P Hydrodesulfurization Catalysts in the Presence of High Pressure and High Temperature Oil

    SciTech Connect

    Kawai, Toshihide; Asakura, Kiyotaka; Bando, Kyoko K.; Lee, Yong-Kul; Oyama, S. Ted.; Chun, Wang-Jae

    2007-02-02

    A Ni2P/SiO2 catalyst that is highly active for hydrodesulfurization (HDS) reaction was studied by in situ extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) under the real reaction conditions. The measurements were conducted at realistic conditions of high pressure (3 MPa) and high temperature (613 K) in the presence of model oil. We used a low-volume cell with cubic boron nitride windows. The obtained spectra revealed that the bulk Ni2P structure was stable at reaction conditions and that the active surface had Ni-S bonds under reaction conditions, which played an important role for HDS reactions.

  12. In Situ Measurements of Spectral Emissivity of Materials for Very High Temperature Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    G. Cao; S. J. Weber; S. O. Martin; T. L. Malaney; S. R. Slattery; M. H. Anderson; K. Sridharan; T. R. Allen

    2011-08-01

    An experimental facility for in situ measurements of high-temperature spectral emissivity of materials in environments of interest to the gas-cooled very high temperature reactor (VHTR) has been developed. The facility is capable of measuring emissivities of seven materials in a single experiment, thereby enhancing the accuracy in measurements due to even minor systemic variations in temperatures and environments. The system consists of a cylindrical silicon carbide (SiC) block with seven sample cavities and a deep blackbody cavity, a detailed optical system, and a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The reliability of the facility has been confirmed by comparing measured spectral emissivities of SiC, boron nitride, and alumina (Al2O3) at 600 C against those reported in literature. The spectral emissivities of two candidate alloys for VHTR, INCONEL{reg_sign} alloy 617 (INCONEL is a registered trademark of the Special Metals Corporation group of companies) and SA508 steel, in air environment at 700 C were measured.

  13. High Temperature In Situ Compression of Thermoplastically Formed Nano-scale Metallic Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mridha, Sanghita; Arora, Harpreet Singh; Lefebvre, Joseph; Bhowmick, Sanjit; Mukherjee, Sundeep

    2016-05-01

    The mechanical behavior of nano-scale metallic glasses was investigated by in situ compression tests in a scanning electron microscope. Platinum-based metallic glass nano-pillars were fabricated by thermoplastic forming. The nano-pillars and corresponding bulk substrate were tested in compression over the range of room temperature to glass transition. Stress-strain curves of the nano-pillars were obtained along with in situ observation of their deformation behavior. The bulk substrate as well as nano-pillars showed an increase in elastic modulus with temperature which is explained by diffusive rearrangement of atomic-scale viscoelastic units.

  14. A new in situ electrical calibration system for high temperature Calvet calorimeters.

    PubMed

    Razouk, Refat; Hay, Bruno; Himbert, Marc

    2013-09-01

    A new in situ high temperature electrical calibration system was developed at Laboratoire National de Metrologie et d'Essais, Laboratoire Commun de Metrologie and integrated into a heat flux Calvet calorimeter in order to perform accurate and reliable measurements of enthalpy of fusion that are directly traceable to the International System of Units (SI). This system has been designed to enable the calibration of the calorimeter by electrical substitution (Joule effect) as well as the measurement of enthalpy of fusion in perfectly identical experimental conditions. The metrological features (repeatability, linearity, etc.) of the calorimeter have been evaluated with this system by investigating the influence of some parameters (level of energy, dissipation time, and temperature) on the determination of the sensitivity factor of its thermopiles. Two different procedures, for the calibration and the enthalpy measurements with this new electrical calibration system, have been implemented and tested by measuring the enthalpy of fusion of high purity 6N tin. The results obtained are in very good agreement with those measured by other National Metrology Institutes on the same material. PMID:24089851

  15. Additive Manufacturing of Reactive In Situ Zr Based Ultra-High Temperature Ceramic Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahasrabudhe, Himanshu; Bandyopadhyay, Amit

    2016-03-01

    Reactive in situ multi-material additive manufacturing of ZrB2-based ultra-high-temperature ceramics in a Zr metal matrix was demonstrated using LENS™. Sound metallurgical bonding was achieved between the Zr metal and Zr-BN composites with Ti6Al4V substrate. Though the feedstock Zr power had α phase, LENS™ processing of the Zr powder and Zr-BN premix powder mixture led to the formation of some β phase of Zr. Microstructure of the Zr-BN composite showed primary grains of zirconium diboride phase in zirconium metal matrix. The presence of ZrB2 ceramic phase was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Hardness of pure Zr was measured as 280 ± 12 HV and, by increasing the BN content in the feedstock, the hardness was found to increase. In Zr-5%BN composite, the hardness was 421 ± 10 HV and the same for Zr-10%BN composite was 562 ± 10 HV. It is envisioned that such multi-materials additive manufacturing will enable products in the future that cannot be manufactured using traditional approaches particularly in the areas of high-temperature metal-ceramic composites with compositional and functional gradation.

  16. In situ measurement of dissolved chloride in high temperature hydrothermal fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, B. I.; Olson, E. J.; Lilley, M. D.

    2007-05-01

    The ability to continuously monitor chemical properties of hydrothermal vent effluents for extended periods of time is essential to understanding dynamic processes responsible for the temporally variable nature of mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal systems. Although instruments do exist for some parameters, there has been no sensor capable of measuring the chloride concentration, an indicator of possible phase separation, on a real-time and long-term basis. In this article, we discuss the construction of a novel instrument which measures solution resistance as a proxy for chloride concentration. The sensor consists of four gold electrodes embedded in a cylindrical ZrO 2 ceramic housing. It has been successfully deployed in several high temperature vents at the Main Endeavour Field (MEF) on the Juan de Fuca ridge in the NE Pacific, and calibrated under simulated hydrothermal conditions ranging up to 380 °C and 300 bar. The in situ data clearly demonstrate a tidal influence on the effluent from some high temperature vents possibly relating to a subsurface mixing process involving non-seawater end-members. Non-tidal changes are used to constrain the sequence and type of controls operating on fluids circulating within the subsurface.

  17. A new in situ electrical calibration system for high temperature Calvet calorimeters.

    PubMed

    Razouk, Refat; Hay, Bruno; Himbert, Marc

    2013-09-01

    A new in situ high temperature electrical calibration system was developed at Laboratoire National de Metrologie et d'Essais, Laboratoire Commun de Metrologie and integrated into a heat flux Calvet calorimeter in order to perform accurate and reliable measurements of enthalpy of fusion that are directly traceable to the International System of Units (SI). This system has been designed to enable the calibration of the calorimeter by electrical substitution (Joule effect) as well as the measurement of enthalpy of fusion in perfectly identical experimental conditions. The metrological features (repeatability, linearity, etc.) of the calorimeter have been evaluated with this system by investigating the influence of some parameters (level of energy, dissipation time, and temperature) on the determination of the sensitivity factor of its thermopiles. Two different procedures, for the calibration and the enthalpy measurements with this new electrical calibration system, have been implemented and tested by measuring the enthalpy of fusion of high purity 6N tin. The results obtained are in very good agreement with those measured by other National Metrology Institutes on the same material.

  18. Rapid, in Situ Synthesis of High Capacity Battery Anodes through High Temperature Radiation-Based Thermal Shock.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanan; Li, Yiju; Wang, Yanbin; Fu, Kun; Danner, Valencia A; Dai, Jiaqi; Lacey, Steven D; Yao, Yonggang; Hu, Liangbing

    2016-09-14

    High capacity battery electrodes require nanosized components to avoid pulverization associated with volume changes during the charge-discharge process. Additionally, these nanosized electrodes need an electronically conductive matrix to facilitate electron transport. Here, for the first time, we report a rapid thermal shock process using high-temperature radiative heating to fabricate a conductive reduced graphene oxide (RGO) composite with silicon nanoparticles. Silicon (Si) particles on the order of a few micrometers are initially embedded in the RGO host and in situ transformed into 10-15 nm nanoparticles in less than a minute through radiative heating. The as-prepared composites of ultrafine Si nanoparticles embedded in a RGO matrix show great performance as a Li-ion battery (LIB) anode. The in situ nanoparticle synthesis method can also be adopted for other high capacity battery anode materials including tin (Sn) and aluminum (Al). This method for synthesizing high capacity anodes in a RGO matrix can be envisioned for roll-to-roll nanomanufacturing due to the ease and scalability of this high-temperature radiative heating process.

  19. In situ Expression of Functional Genes Reveals Nitrogen Cycling at High Temperatures in Terrestrial Hydrothermal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loiacono, S. T.; Meyer-Dombard, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    An essential element for life, nitrogen occurs in all living organisms and is critical for the synthesis of amino acids, proteins, nucleic acids, and other forms of biomass. Thus, nitrogen cycling likely plays a vital role in microbial metabolic processes as well as nutrient availability. For microorganisms in "extreme" environments, this means developing adaptations that allow them to survive in harsh conditions and still perform the metabolisms essential to sustain life. Recent studies have screened biofilms and thermal sediments of Yellowstone National Park (YNP) thermal features for the presence of nifH genes, which code for a key enzyme in the nitrogen fixation process [1-4]. Furthermore, analysis of nitrogen isotopes in biofilms across a temperature and chemical gradient revealed that nitrogen fixation likely varies across the chemosynthetic/photosynthetic ecotone [5]. Although research has evaluated and confirmed the presence of nifH genes in various thermophilic microbial communities, the existence of a gene in the DNA of an organism does not verify its use. Instead, other methods, such as culturing, isotope tracer assays, and gene expression studies are required to provide direct evidence of biological nitrogen fixation. Culturing and isotope tracer approaches have successfully revealed high-temperature biological nitrogen fixation in both marine hydrothermal vent microbial communities [6] and in acidic, terrestrial hydrothermal sediment [3]. Transcriptomics-based techniques (using mRNA extracted from samples to confirm in situ expression of targeted genes) have been much more limited in number, and only a few studies have, to date, investigated in situ expression of the nifH gene in thermophilic microbial communities [2, 7]. This study explores the presence and expression of nifH genes in several features of the Lower Geyser Basin (LGB) of YNP. Nucleic acids from chemosynthetic and photosynthetic microbial communities were extracted and then amplified

  20. Novel high-temperature reactors for in situ studies of three-way catalysts using turbo-XAS.

    PubMed

    Guilera, Gemma; Gorges, Bernard; Pascarelli, Sakura; Vitoux, Hugo; Newton, Mark A; Prestipino, Carmelo; Nagai, Yasutaka; Hara, Naoyuki

    2009-09-01

    Two novel high-temperature reactors for in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements in fluorescence are presented, each of them being optimized for a particular purpose. The powerful combination of these reactors with the turbo-XAS technique used in a dispersive-XAS beamline permits the study of commercial three-way catalysts under realistic gas composition and temporal conditions.

  1. In situ high-temperature characterization of AlN-based surface acoustic wave devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, Thierry; Bardong, Jochen; Legrani, Ouarda; Elmazria, Omar; Badreddine Assouar, M.; Bruckner, Gudrun; Talbi, Abdelkrim

    2013-07-01

    We report on in situ electrical measurements of surface acoustic wave delay lines based on AlN/sapphire structure and iridium interdigital transducers between 20 °C and 1050 °C under vacuum conditions. The devices show a great potential for temperature sensing applications. Burnout is only observed after 60 h at 1050 °C and is mainly attributed to the agglomeration phenomena undergone by the Ir transducers. However, despite the vacuum conditions, a significant oxidation of the AlN film is observed, pointing out the limitation of the considered structure at least at such extreme temperatures. Original structures overcoming this limitation are then proposed and discussed.

  2. Use of Atomic Layer Deposition to Improve the Stability of Silver Substrates for In-Situ, High Temperature SERS Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    John, Joshy; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Dai, Sheng; Sepaniak, Michael

    2010-01-01

    A method to stabilize silver surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) substrates for in-situ, high temperature applications is demonstrated. Silver island films grown by thermal evaporation were coated with a thin layer (from 2.5nm to 5nm) of alumina by atomic layer deposition (ALD), which protects and stabilizes the SERS-active substrate without eliminating the Raman enhancement. The temporal stability of the alumina-coated silver island films was examined by measurement of the Raman intensity of rhodamine 6G molecules deposited onto bare and alumina-coated silver substrates over the course of thirty-four days. The coated substrates showed almost no change in SERS enhancement while the uncoated substrates exhibited a significant decrease in Raman intensity. To demonstrate the feasibility of the alumina-coated silver substrate as a probe of adsorbates and reactions at elevated temperatures, an in-situ SERS measurement of calcium nitrate tetrahydrate on bare and alumina-coated silver was performed at temperatures ranging from 25 C to 400 C. ALD deposition of an ultrathin alumina layer significantly improved the thermal stability of the SERS substrate thus enabling in-situ detection of the dehydration of the calcium nitrate tetrahydrate at elevated temperature. Despite some loss of Raman signal, the coated substrate exhibited greater thermal stability compared to the uncoated substrate. These experiments show that ALD can be used to synthesize stable SERS substrates capable of measuring adsorbates and processes at high temperature.

  3. In situ visualization of magma deformation at high temperature using time-lapse 3D tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godinho, jose; Lee, Peter; Lavallee, Yan; Kendrick, Jackie; Von-Aulock, Felix

    2016-04-01

    We use synchrotron based x-ray computed micro-tomography (sCT) to visualize, in situ, the microstructural evolution of magma samples 3 mm diameter with a resolution of 3 μm during heating and uniaxial compression at temperatures up to 1040 °C. The interaction between crystals, melt and gas bubbles is analysed in 4D (3D + time) during sample deformation. The ability to observe the changes of the microstructure as a function of time allow us to: a) study the effect of temperature in the ability of magma to fracture or deform; b) quantify bubble nucleation and growth rates during heating; c) study the relation between crystal displacement and volatile exsolution. We will show unique beautiful videos of how bubbles grow and coalescence, how samples and crystals within the sample fracture, heal and deform. Our study establishes in situ sCT as a powerful tool to quantify and visualize with micro-scale resolution fast processes taking place in magma that are essential to understand ascent in a volcanic conduit and validate existing models for determining the explosivity of volcanic eruptions. Tracking simultaneously the time and spatial changes of magma microstructures is shown to be primordial to study disequilibrium processes between crystals, melt and gas phases.

  4. In situ X-ray ptychography imaging of high-temperature CO{sub 2} acceptor particle agglomerates

    SciTech Connect

    Høydalsvik, Kristin; Bø Fløystad, Jostein; Esmaeili, Morteza; Mathiesen, Ragnvald H.; Breiby, Dag W.; Zhao, Tiejun; Rønning, Magnus; Diaz, Ana; Andreasen, Jens W.

    2014-06-16

    Imaging nanoparticles under relevant reaction conditions of high temperature and gas pressure is difficult because conventional imaging techniques, like transmission electron microscopy, cannot be used. Here we demonstrate that the coherent diffractive imaging technique of X-ray ptychography can be used for in situ phase contrast imaging in structure studies at atmospheric pressure and elevated temperatures. Lithium zirconate, a candidate CO{sub 2} capture material, was studied at a pressure of one atmosphere in air and in CO{sub 2}, at temperatures exceeding 600 °C. Images with a spatial resolution better than 200 nm were retrieved, and possibilities for improving the experiment are described.

  5. In situ observation of crystallographic preferred orientation of deforming olivine at high pressure and high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohuchi, Tomohiro; Nishihara, Yu; Seto, Yusuke; Kawazoe, Takaaki; Nishi, Masayuki; Maruyama, Genta; Hashimoto, Mika; Higo, Yuji; Funakoshi, Ken-ichi; Suzuki, Akio; Kikegawa, Takumi; Irifune, Tetsuo

    2015-06-01

    Simple-shear deformation experiments on polycrystalline olivine and olivine single-crystal were conducted at pressures of 1.3-3.8 GPa and temperatures of 1223-1573 K to understand the achievement of steady-state fabric strength and the process of dynamic recrystallization. Development of crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) of olivine was evaluated from two-dimensional X-ray diffraction patterns, and shear strain was measured from X-ray radiographs. The steady-state fabric strength of the A-type fabric was achieved within total shear strain of γ = 2. At strains higher than γ = 1, an increase in concentration of the [0 1 0] axes mainly contributes to an increase in fabric strength. At strains higher than γ = 2, the magnitude of VSH/VSV (i.e., ratio of horizontally and vertically polarized shear wave velocities) scarcely increased in most of the runs. The VSH/VSV of peridotite (70 vol.% olivine + 30 vol.% minor phases) having the steady-state A-type olivine fabric coincides with that of recent global one-dimensional models under the assumption of horizontal flow, suggesting that the seismic anisotropy observed in the shallow upper mantle is mostly explained by the development of A-type olivine fabric. Experimental results on the deformation of single-crystal olivine showed that the CPO of olivine is influenced by the initial orientation of the starting single crystal because strain is concentrated in the recrystallized areas and the relic of the starting single crystal remains. In the upper mantle, the old CPO of olivine developed in the past may affect the olivine CPO developed in the present.

  6. A High Temperature Capacitive Pressure Sensor Based on Alumina Ceramic for in Situ Measurement at 600 °C

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Qiulin; Li, Chen; Xiong, Jijun; Jia, Pinggang; Zhang, Wendong; Liu, Jun; Xue, Chenyang; Hong, Yingping; Ren, Zhong; Luo, Tao

    2014-01-01

    In response to the growing demand for in situ measurement of pressure in high-temperature environments, a high temperature capacitive pressure sensor is presented in this paper. A high-temperature ceramic material-alumina is used for the fabrication of the sensor, and the prototype sensor consists of an inductance, a variable capacitance, and a sealed cavity integrated in the alumina ceramic substrate using a thick-film integrated technology. The experimental results show that the proposed sensor has stability at 850 °C for more than 20 min. The characterization in high-temperature and pressure environments successfully demonstrated sensing capabilities for pressure from 1 to 5 bar up to 600 °C, limited by the sensor test setup. At 600 °C, the sensor achieves a linear characteristic response, and the repeatability error, hysteresis error and zero-point drift of the sensor are 8.3%, 5.05% and 1%, respectively. PMID:24487624

  7. In situ high-temperature X-ray diffraction characterization of yttrium-implanted extra low-carbon steel

    SciTech Connect

    Caudron, E.; Buscail, H.; Perrier, S.

    1999-11-01

    Yttrium-implanted and unimplanted extra low-carbon steel samples were analyzed at T = 700 C and under an oxygen partial pressure P{sub O2} = 0.041Pa for 24 h to show the yttrium implantation effect on extra low-carbon steel high-temperature corrosion resistance. Sample oxidation weight gains were studied by thermogravimetry, and structural analyses were performed using in situ high-temperature X-ray diffraction with the same experimental conditions. The aim of this paper is to show the initial nucleation stage of the main compounds induced by oxidation at high temperatures according to the initial sample treatment (yttrium-implanted or unimplanted). The results obtained by in situ high-temperature X-ray diffraction will be compared to those by thermogravimetry to show the existing correlation between weight gain curves and structural studies. Results allow one to understand the improved corrosion resistance of yttrium-implanted extra low-carbon steel at high temperatures.

  8. High-pressure cell for neutron diffraction with in situ pressure control at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, Matthew K.; Ridley, Christopher J.; Bocian, Artur; Kirichek, Oleg; Manuel, Pascal; Khalyavin, Dmitry; Azuma, Masaki; Attfield, J. Paul; Kamenev, Konstantin V.

    2014-04-01

    Pressure generation at cryogenic temperatures presents a problem for a wide array of experimental techniques, particularly neutron studies due to the volume of sample required. We present a novel, compact pressure cell with a large sample volume in which load is generated by a bellow. Using a supply of helium gas up to a pressure of 350 bar, a load of up to 78 kN is generated with leak-free operation. In addition, special fiber ports added to the cryogenic center stick allow for in situ pressure determination using the ruby pressure standard. Mechanical stability was assessed using finite element analysis and the dimensions of the cell have been optimized for use with standard cryogenic equipment. Load testing and on-line experiments using NaCl and BiNiO3 have been done at the WISH instrument of the ISIS pulsed neutron source to verify performance.

  9. High-pressure cell for neutron diffraction with in situ pressure control at cryogenic temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobsen, Matthew K.; Ridley, Christopher J.; Bocian, Artur; Kamenev, Konstantin V.; Kirichek, Oleg; Manuel, Pascal; Khalyavin, Dmitry; Azuma, Masaki; Attfield, J. Paul

    2014-04-15

    Pressure generation at cryogenic temperatures presents a problem for a wide array of experimental techniques, particularly neutron studies due to the volume of sample required. We present a novel, compact pressure cell with a large sample volume in which load is generated by a bellow. Using a supply of helium gas up to a pressure of 350 bar, a load of up to 78 kN is generated with leak-free operation. In addition, special fiber ports added to the cryogenic center stick allow for in situ pressure determination using the ruby pressure standard. Mechanical stability was assessed using finite element analysis and the dimensions of the cell have been optimized for use with standard cryogenic equipment. Load testing and on-line experiments using NaCl and BiNiO{sub 3} have been done at the WISH instrument of the ISIS pulsed neutron source to verify performance.

  10. High-pressure cell for neutron diffraction with in situ pressure control at cryogenic temperatures.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Matthew K; Ridley, Christopher J; Bocian, Artur; Kirichek, Oleg; Manuel, Pascal; Khalyavin, Dmitry; Azuma, Masaki; Attfield, J Paul; Kamenev, Konstantin V

    2014-04-01

    Pressure generation at cryogenic temperatures presents a problem for a wide array of experimental techniques, particularly neutron studies due to the volume of sample required. We present a novel, compact pressure cell with a large sample volume in which load is generated by a bellow. Using a supply of helium gas up to a pressure of 350 bar, a load of up to 78 kN is generated with leak-free operation. In addition, special fiber ports added to the cryogenic center stick allow for in situ pressure determination using the ruby pressure standard. Mechanical stability was assessed using finite element analysis and the dimensions of the cell have been optimized for use with standard cryogenic equipment. Load testing and on-line experiments using NaCl and BiNiO3 have been done at the WISH instrument of the ISIS pulsed neutron source to verify performance. PMID:24784623

  11. In-situ Diffraction Study of Magnetite at Simultaneous High Pressure and High Temperature Using Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Zhang, J.; Wang, S.; Chen, H.; Zhao, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetite intertwined with the evolution of human civilizations, and remains so today. It is technologically and scientifically important by virtue of its unique magnetic and electrical properties. Magnetite is a common mineral found in a variety of geologic environments, and plays an important role in deciphering the oxygen evolution in the Earth's atmosphere and its deep interiors. The latter application asks for the knowledge of the thermal and elastic properties of magnetite at high pressures and temperatures, which is currently not available in literature. We have carried out a few in-situ diffraction experiments on magnetite using white synchrotron radiation at beamline X17B2 of National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). A DIA module in an 1100-ton press and WC anvils were employed for compression, and diffraction spectra were collected at simultaneous high pressures (P) and temperatures (T) (up to 9 GPa and 900 oC). Mixture of amorphous boron and epoxy resin was used as pressure medium, and NaCl as pressure marker. Temperature was recorded by W-Re thermocouples. Commercially purchased magnetite powder and a mixture of the said powder and NaCl (1:1) were used as starting material in separate experiments. Preliminary data analyses have yielded following observations: (1) Charge disordering seen at ambient pressure remains active in current experiments, especially at lower pressures (< 6 GPa); (2) Though at each condition potentially complicated by charge disordering process, isothermal compression curves remains simple and reproducible; (3) During cooling, the reversibility and degree of cation disordering depend on the starting material and/or experimental P-T path; and (4) cation disordering notably reduces the apparent bulk moduli of magnetite.

  12. Construction and in-situ characterisation of high-temperature fixed point cells devoted to industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadli, Mohamed; Bourson, Frédéric; Diril, Ahmet; Journeau, Christophe; Lowe, Dave; Parga, Clemente

    2014-08-01

    Among the activities of the European Metrology Research Programme (EMRP) project HiTeMS one work package is devoted to the development and testing of industrial solutions for long-standing temperature measurement problems at the highest temperatures. LNE-Cnam, NPL, TUBITAK-UME have worked on the design of high temperature fixed points (HTFP) suitable for in-situ temperature monitoring to be implemented in the facilities of CEA (Commissariat à l'énergie atomique et aux énergies alternatives). Several high temperature fixed point cells were constructed in these three national metrology institutes (NMIs) using a rugged version of cells based on the hybrid design of the laboratory HTFP developed and continuously improved at LNE-Cnam during the last years. The fixed points of interest were Co-C, Ru-C and Re-C corresponding to melting temperatures of 1324 °C, 1953 °C and 2474 °C respectively. The cells were characterised at the NMIs after their construction. Having proved robust enough, they were transported to CEA and tested in an induction furnace and cycled from room temperature to temperatures much above the melting temperatures (> +400 °C) with extremely high heating and cooling rates (up to 10 000 K/h). All the cells withstood the tests and the melting plateaus could be observed in all cases.

  13. In-Situ X-Ray Diffraction Observations of Low Temperature Ag-Nanoink Sintering and High Temperature Eutectic Reaction with Copper

    SciTech Connect

    Elmer, J. W.; Specht, Eliot D

    2012-01-01

    Nanoinks, which contain nm sized metallic particles suspended in an organic dispersant fluid, are finding numerous microelectronic applications. Nanoinks sinter at much lower temperatures than bulk metals due to their high surface area to volume ratio and small radius of curvature, which reduces their melting points significantly below their bulk values. The unusually low melting and sintering temperatures have unique potential for materials joining since their melting points increase dramatically after initial sintering. In this paper Ag nanoink is studied using in-situ synchrotron based x-ray diffraction to follow the kinetics of the initial sintering step by analysis of diffraction patterns, and to directly observe the high remelt temperature of sintered nanoinks. Ag nanoink is further explored as a possible eutectic bonding medium with copper by tracking phase transformations to high temperatures where melting occurs at the Ag-Cu eutectic temperature, demonstrating nanoinks as a viable eutectic bonding medium.

  14. In situ characterization of catalysts and membranes in a microchannel under high-temperature water gas shift reaction conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavusoglu, G.; Dallmann, F.; Lichtenberg, H.; Goldbach, A.; Dittmeyer, R.; Grunwaldt, J.-D.

    2016-05-01

    Microreactor technology with high heat transfer in combination with stable catalysts is a very attractive approach for reactions involving major heat effects such as methane steam reforming and to some extent, also the high temperature water gas shift (WGS) reaction. For this study Rh/ceria catalysts and an ultrathin hydrogen selective membrane were characterized in situ in a microreactor specially designed for x-ray absorption spectroscopic measurements under WGS conditions. The results of these experiments can serve as a basis for further development of the catalysts and membranes.

  15. In situ biaxial rotation at low-temperatures in high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Selby, N. S.; Crawford, M.; Tracy, L.; Reno, J. L.; Pan, W.

    2014-09-15

    We report the design, construction, and characterization of a biaxial sample rotation stage for use in a cryogenic system for orientation-dependent studies of anisotropic electronic transport phenomena at low temperatures and high magnetic fields. Our apparatus allows for continuous rotation of a sample about two axes, both independently and simultaneously.

  16. High-resolution Sr/Ca records in sclerosponges calibrated to temperature in situ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenheim, Brad E.; Swart, Peter K.; Thorrold, Simon R.; Willenz, Philippe; Berry, Lorraine; Latkoczy, Christopher

    2004-02-01

    Ratios of strontium to calcium have been analyzed by laser-ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) in a skeletal section of the sclerosponge Ceratoporella nicholsoni. The growth period, representative of 3 yr, was stained in the skeleton with a fluorochrome (calcein). Temperatures were recorded at 2 h intervals within the shallow, cryptic reef enclosure that the sclerosponge inhabited on the northern coast of Jamaica, allowing the formulation of a direct empirical relationship between Sr/Ca and temperature. To verify this calibration, Sr/Ca ratios of two sclerosponges of the same species from depths of 67 m and 136 m in Exuma Sound, Bahamas, were analyzed by LA-ICP-MS and compared to the temperatures from these depths over a decade prior to collection. The result is an independently verified, high-resolution empirical calibration for the temperature sensitivity of Sr/Ca ratios in the aragonite skeletons of sclerosponges from Jamaica and the Bahamas. The calibration is a first for C. nicholsoni and indicates that sclerosponges are more sensitive temperature recorders than zooxanthellate corals. It represents an important step in establishing skeletal geochemistry of sclerosponges as a proxy of temperature in the upper 250 m of the ocean.

  17. In-situ Phase Transformation and Deformation of Iron at High Pressure andTemperature

    SciTech Connect

    Miyagi, Lowell; Kunz, Martin; Knight, Jason; Nasiatka, James; Voltolini, Marco; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf

    2008-07-01

    With a membrane based mechanism to allow for pressure change of a sample in aradial diffraction diamond anvil cell (rDAC) and simultaneous infra-red laser heating, itis now possible to investigate texture changes during deformation and phasetransformations over a wide range of temperature-pressure conditions. The device isused to study bcc (alpha), fcc (gamma) and hcp (epislon) iron. In bcc iron, room temperature compression generates a texture characterized by (100) and (111) poles parallel to the compression direction. During the deformation induced phase transformation to hcp iron, a subset of orientations are favored to transform to the hcp structure first and generate a texture of (01-10) at high angles to the compression direction. Upon further deformation, the remaining grains transform, resulting in a texture that obeys the Burgers relationship of (110)bcc // (0001)hcp. This is in contrast to high temperature results that indicate that texture is developed through dominant pyramidal {2-1-12}<2-1-13> and basal (0001)-{2-1-10} slip based on polycrystal plasticity modeling. We also observe that the high temperature fcc phase develops a 110 texture typical for fcc metals deformed in compression.

  18. In situ optical studies of methane and simulated biogas oxidation on high temperature solid oxide fuel cell anodes.

    PubMed

    Kirtley, John D; Steinhurst, Daniel A; Owrutsky, Jeffery C; Pomfret, Michael B; Walker, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    Novel integration of in situ near infrared (NIR) thermal imaging, vibrational Raman spectroscopy, and Fourier-transform infrared emission spectroscopy (FTIRES) coupled with traditional electrochemical measurements has been used to probe chemical and thermal properties of Ni-based, solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anodes operating with methane and simulated biogas fuel mixtures at 800 °C. Together, these three non-invasive optical techniques provide direct insight into the surface chemistry associated with device performance as a function of cell polarization. Specifically, data from these complementary methods measure with high spatial and temporal resolution thermal gradients and changes in material and gas phase composition in operando. NIR thermal images show that SOFC anodes operating with biogas undergo significant cooling (ΔT = -13 °C) relative to the same anodes operating with methane fuel (ΔT = -3 °C). This result is general regardless of cell polarization. Simultaneous Raman spectroscopic measurements are unable to detect carbon formation on anodes operating with biogas. Carbon deposition is observable during operation with methane as evidenced by a weak vibrational band at 1556 cm(-1). This feature is assigned to highly ordered graphite. In situ FTIRES corroborates these results by identifying relative amounts of CO2 and CO produced during electrochemical removal of anodic carbon previously formed from an incident fuel feed. Taken together, these three optical techniques illustrate the promise that complementary, in situ methods have for identifying electrochemical oxidation mechanisms and carbon-forming pathways in high temperature electrochemical devices.

  19. Chromium Reaction Mechanisms for Speciation using Synchrotron in-Situ High-Temperature X-ray Diffraction.

    PubMed

    Low, Fiona; Kimpton, Justin; Wilson, Siobhan A; Zhang, Lian

    2015-07-01

    We use in situ high-temperature X-ray diffraction (HT-XRD), ex-situ XRD and synchrotron X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy (XANES) to derive fundamental insights into mechanisms of chromium oxidation during combustion of solid fuels. To mimic the real combustion environment, mixtures of pure eskolaite (Cr(3+)2O3), lime (CaO) and/or kaolinite [Al2Si2O5(OH)4] have been annealed at 600-1200 °C in air versus 1% O2 diluted by N2. Our results confirm for the first time that (1) the optimum temperature for Cr(6+) formation is 800 °C for the coexistence of lime and eskolaite; (2) upon addition of kaolinite into oxide mixture, the temperature required to produce chromatite shifts to 1000 °C with a remarkable reduction in the fraction of Cr(6+). Beyond 1000 °C, transient phases are formed that bear Cr in intermediate valence states, which convert to different species other than Cr(6+) in the cooling stage; (3) of significance to Cr mobility from the waste products generated by combustion, chromatite formed at >1000 °C has a glassy disposition that prevents its water-based leaching; and (4) Increasing temperature facilitates the migration of eskolaite particles into bulk lime and enhances the extent to which Cr(3+) is oxidized, thereby completing the oxidation of Cr(3+) to Cr(6+) within 10 min. PMID:26055512

  20. Lubricous Deposit Formed In Situ Between Wearing Surfaces at High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Many components of future aircraft will be constructed from novel high-temperature materials, such as superalloys and ceramic composites, to meet expected operating temperatures in excess of 300 C. There are no known liquid lubricants that can lubricate above 300 C without significant decomposition. Solid lubricants could be considered, but problems caused by the higher friction coefficients and wear rates of the solid lubricant film make this an undesirable approach. An alternative method of lubrication is currently being investigated: vapor phase lubrication. In vapor phase lubrication, an organic liquid (in our studies a thioether was used) is vaporized into a flowing air stream that is directed to sliding surfaces where lubrication is needed. The organic vapor reacts at the concentrated contact sliding area generating a lubricous deposit. This deposit has been characterized as a thin polymeric film that can provide effective lubrication at temperatures greater than 400 C. Initial tribological studies were conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center and Cleveland State University with a high-temperature friction and wear tribometer. A cast iron rod was loaded (a 4-kg mass was used to generate a contact pressure of 1.2 MPa) against a reciprocating, cast iron plate at 500 C. This system was then lubricated with the vapor phase of thioether.

  1. In-situ Formation of Reinforcement Phases in Ultra High Temperature Ceramic Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stackpoole, Margaret M (Inventor); Gasch, Matthew J (Inventor); Olson, Michael W (Inventor); Hamby, Ian W. (Inventor); Johnson, Sylvia M (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A tough ultra-high temperature ceramic (UHTC) composite comprises grains of UHTC matrix material, such as HfB.sub.2, ZrB.sub.2 or other metal boride, carbide, nitride, etc., surrounded by a uniform distribution of acicular high aspect ratio reinforcement ceramic rods or whiskers, such as of SiC, is formed from uniformly mixing a powder of the UHTC material and a pre-ceramic polymer selected to form the desired reinforcement species, then thermally consolidating the mixture by hot pressing. The acicular reinforcement rods may make up from 5 to 30 vol % of the resulting microstructure.

  2. In-Situ Observation of Crystallization and Growth in High-Temperature Melts Using the Confocal Laser Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Il; Dippenaar, Rian

    2016-08-01

    This review discusses the innovative efforts initiated by Emi and co-workers for in-situ observation of phase transformations at high temperatures for materials. By using the high-temperature confocal laser-scanning microscope (CLSM), a robust database of the phase transformation behavior during heating and cooling of slags, fluxes, and steel can be developed. The rate of solidification and the progression of solid-state phase transformations can be readily investigated under a variety of atmospheric conditions and be correlated with theoretical predictions. The various research efforts following the work of Emi and co-workers have allowed a deeper fundamental understanding of the elusive solidification and phase transformation mechanisms in materials beyond the ambit of steels. This technique continues to evolve in terms of its methodology, application to other materials, and its contribution to technology.

  3. Determination of bandgaps of photoactive materials in perovskite solar cells at high temperatures by in-situ temperature-dependent resistance measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hao; Zhao, Zu-bin; Cao, Huan-qi; Yu, Hao; Li, Jin-zhao; Chen, Xiao-min; Dong, Su-juan; Yang, Li-ying; Yin, Shou-gen

    2016-09-01

    Normally, it is difficult to directly measure the bandgaps of perovskite based on methylammonium (MA) or formamidinium (FA) at high temperatures due to material decomposition. We prevent the decomposition by keeping the synthesized perovskite films (MAPbI3 and MAPbI3) in organic iodide vapors, then measure the in-situ resistance of the films at varied temperatures, and further evaluate the bandgaps of these two materials. The evaluated bandgaps are consistent with the results from ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) absorption spectrum. The bandgap of MAPbI3 decreases with temperature above 95 °C, whereas that of FAPbI3 first increases with temperature from 95 °C to 107 °C and then decreases with temperature above 107 °C.

  4. High temperature in-situ observations of multi-segmented metal nanowires encapsulated within carbon nanotubes by in-situ filling technique

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Multi-segmented one-dimensional metal nanowires were encapsulated within carbon nanotubes (CNTs) through in-situ filling technique during plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition process. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and environmental TEM were employed to characterize the as-prepared sample at room temperature and high temperature. The selected area electron diffractions revealed that the Pd4Si nanowire and face-centered-cubic Co nanowire on top of the Pd nanowire were encapsulated within the bottom and tip parts of the multiwall CNT, respectively. Although the strain-induced deformation of graphite walls was observed, the solid-state phases of Pd4Si and Co-Pd remain even at above their expected melting temperatures and up to 1,550 ± 50°C. Finally, the encapsulated metals were melted and flowed out from the tip of the CNT after 2 h at the same temperature due to the increase of internal pressure of the CNT. PMID:22873841

  5. In situ high temperature oxidation analysis of Zircaloy-4 using acoustic emission coupled with thermogravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omar, Al Haj; Véronique, Peres; Eric, Serris; François, Grosjean; Jean, Kittel; François, Ropital; Michel, Cournil

    2015-06-01

    Zircaloy-4 oxidation behavior at high temperature (900 °C), which can be reached in case of severe accidental situations in nuclear pressurised water reactor, was studied using acoustic emission analysis coupled with thermogravimetry. Two different atmospheres were used to study the oxidation of Zircaloy-4: (a) helium and pure oxygen, (b) helium and oxygen combined with slight addition of air. The experiments with 20% of oxygen confirm the dependence on oxygen anions diffusion in the oxide scale. Under a mixture of oxygen and air in helium, an acceleration of the corrosion was observed due to the detrimental effect of nitrogen. The kinetic rate increased significantly after a kinetic transition (breakaway). This acceleration was accompanied by an acoustic emission activity. Most of the acoustic emission bursts were recorded after the kinetic transition (post-transition) or during the cooling of the sample. The characteristic features of the acoustic emission signals appear to be correlated with the different populations of cracks and their occurrence in the ZrO2 layer or in the α-Zr(O) layer. Acoustic events were recorded during the isothermal dwell time at high temperature under air. They were associated with large cracks in the zirconia porous layer. Acoustic events were also recorded during cooling after oxidation tests both under air or oxygen. For the latter, cracks were observed in the oxygen enriched zirconium metal phase and not in the dense zirconia layer after 5 h of oxidation.

  6. High-temperature dehydration of talc: a kinetics study using in situ X-ray powder diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Duojun; Yi, Li; Huang, Bojin; Liu, Chuanjiang

    2015-06-01

    High-temperature in situ X-ray powder diffraction patterns were used to study the dehydration kinetics of natural talc with a size of 10-15 µm. The talc was annealed from 1073 to 1223 K, and the variations in the characteristic peaks corresponding to talc with the time were recorded to determine the reaction progress. The decomposition of talc occurred, and peaks corresponding to talc and peaks corresponding to enstatite and quartz were observed. The enstatite and talc exhibited a topotactic relationship. The dehydration kinetics of talc was studied as a function of temperature between 1073 and 1223 K. The kinetics data could be modeled using an Avrami equation that considers nucleation and growth processes ? where n varies from 0.4 to 0.8. The rate constant (k) equation for the natural talc is ? The reaction mechanism for the dehydration of talc is a heterogeneous nucleation and growth mechanism.

  7. In-situ X-ray structure measurements on aerodynamically levitated high temperature liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Richard; Benmore, Christopher; Mei Qiang; Wilding, Martin

    2009-01-29

    High energy, high flux X-ray sources enable new measurements of liquid and amorphous materials in extreme conditions. Aerodynamic levitation in combination with laser beam heating can be used to access high purity and non-equilibrium liquids at temperatures up to 3000 K. In this work, a small aerodynamic levitator was integrated with high energy beamline 11 ID-C at the Advanced Photon Source. Scattered X-rays were detected with a Mar345 image plate. The experiments investigated a series of binary in the CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MgO-SiO{sub 2}, SiO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} metal oxide compositions and pure SiO{sub 2}. The results show that the liquids exhibit large changes in structure when the predominant network former is diluted. Measurements on glasses with the same compositions as the liquids suggest that significant structural rearrangement consistent with a fragile-strong transition occurs in these reluctant glass forming liquids as they vitrify.

  8. In Situ Neutron and Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction Studies of Jarosite at High-Temperature High-Pressure Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H.; Zhao, Y.; Hickmott, D.; Zhang, J.; Vogel, S.; Daemen, L.; Hartl, M.

    2011-03-01

    Jarosite (KFe 3 (SO4)2 (OH)6) occurs in acid mine drainage and epithermal environments and hot springs associated with volcanic activity. Jarosite is also of industrial interest as an iron-impurity extractor from zinc sulfide ores. In 2004, jarosite was detected by the Mars Exploration Rover Mössbauer spectrometer, which has been interpreted as a strong evidence for the existence of water (and possibly life) on ancient Mars. This discovery has spurred considerable interests in stability and structural behavior of jarosite and related phases at various temperature, pressure, and aqueous conditions. In this work, we have investigated the crystal structure and phase stability of jarosite at temperatures up to 900 K and/or pressures up to 9 GPa using in situ neutron and synchrotron X-ray diffraction. To avoid the large incoherent scattering of neutrons by hydrogen, a deuterated sample was synthesized and characterized. Rietveld analysis of the obtained diffraction data allowed determination of unit-cell parameters, atomic positions and atomic displacement parameters as a function of temperature and pressure. In addition, the coefficients of thermal expansion, bulk moduli and pressure-temperature stability regions of jarosite were determined.

  9. Long-term, high frequency in situ measurements of intertidal mussel bed temperatures using biomimetic sensors.

    PubMed

    Helmuth, Brian; Choi, Francis; Matzelle, Allison; Torossian, Jessica L; Morello, Scott L; Mislan, K A S; Yamane, Lauren; Strickland, Denise; Szathmary, P Lauren; Gilman, Sarah E; Tockstein, Alyson; Hilbish, Thomas J; Burrows, Michael T; Power, Anne Marie; Gosling, Elizabeth; Mieszkowska, Nova; Harley, Christopher D G; Nishizaki, Michael; Carrington, Emily; Menge, Bruce; Petes, Laura; Foley, Melissa M; Johnson, Angela; Poole, Megan; Noble, Mae M; Richmond, Erin L; Robart, Matt; Robinson, Jonathan; Sapp, Jerod; Sones, Jackie; Broitman, Bernardo R; Denny, Mark W; Mach, Katharine J; Miller, Luke P; O'Donnell, Michael; Ross, Philip; Hofmann, Gretchen E; Zippay, Mackenzie; Blanchette, Carol; Macfarlan, J A; Carpizo-Ituarte, Eugenio; Ruttenberg, Benjamin; Peña Mejía, Carlos E; McQuaid, Christopher D; Lathlean, Justin; Monaco, Cristián J; Nicastro, Katy R; Zardi, Gerardo

    2016-10-11

    At a proximal level, the physiological impacts of global climate change on ectothermic organisms are manifest as changes in body temperatures. Especially for plants and animals exposed to direct solar radiation, body temperatures can be substantially different from air temperatures. We deployed biomimetic sensors that approximate the thermal characteristics of intertidal mussels at 71 sites worldwide, from 1998-present. Loggers recorded temperatures at 10-30 min intervals nearly continuously at multiple intertidal elevations. Comparisons against direct measurements of mussel tissue temperature indicated errors of ~2.0-2.5 °C, during daily fluctuations that often exceeded 15°-20 °C. Geographic patterns in thermal stress based on biomimetic logger measurements were generally far more complex than anticipated based only on 'habitat-level' measurements of air or sea surface temperature. This unique data set provides an opportunity to link physiological measurements with spatially- and temporally-explicit field observations of body temperature.

  10. In situ high temperature crystallization study of sputter deposited amorphous W-Fe-C films

    SciTech Connect

    Trindade, B.; Vieira, M.T. . Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica); Grosse, E.B. . Lab. de Sciences et Genie des Surfaces)

    1995-01-01

    The structural behavior of amorphous W[sub 46]Fe[sub 13]C[sub 41] and W[sub 36]Fe[sub 31]C[sub 33] films produced by sputtering have been studied in situ during annealing up to [approximately] 950 C by means of hot stage transmission electron microscopy. Differential thermal analysis and X-ray diffraction were used as complementary experimental techniques. The results are presented and correlated with the equilibrium phases anticipated from the W-Fe-C ternary phase diagram and with previous studied on similar films deposited and annealed onto substrates.

  11. In Situ Synthesis of Uranium Carbide and its High Temperature Cubic Phase

    SciTech Connect

    Reiche, Helmut Matthias; Vogel, Sven C.

    2015-03-25

    New in situ data for the U-C system are presented, with the goal of improving knowledge of the phase diagram to enable production of new ceramic fuels. The none quenchable, cubic, δ-phase, which in turn is fundamental to computational methods, was identified. Rich datasets of the formation synthesis of uranium carbide yield kinetics data which allow the benchmarking of modeling, thermodynamic parameters etc. The order-disorder transition (carbon sublattice melting) was observed due to equal sensitivity of neutrons to both elements. This dynamic has not been accurately described in some recent simulation-based publications.

  12. Optical cell for combinatorial in situ Raman spectroscopic measurements of hydrogen storage materials at high pressures and temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattrick-Simpers, Jason R.; Hurst, Wilbur S.; Srinivasan, Sesha S.; Maslar, James E.

    2011-03-01

    An optical cell is described for high-throughput backscattering Raman spectroscopic measurements of hydrogen storage materials at pressures up to 10 MPa and temperatures up to 823 K. High throughput is obtained by employing a 60 mm diameter × 9 mm thick sapphire window, with a corresponding 50 mm diameter unobstructed optical aperture. To reproducibly seal this relatively large window to the cell body at elevated temperatures and pressures, a gold o-ring is employed. The sample holder-to-window distance is adjustable, making this cell design compatible with optical measurement systems incorporating lenses of significantly different focal lengths, e.g., microscope objectives and single element lenses. For combinatorial investigations, up to 19 individual powder samples can be loaded into the optical cell at one time. This cell design is also compatible with thin-film samples. To demonstrate the capabilities of the cell, in situ measurements of the Ca(BH4)2 and nano-LiBH4-LiNH2-MgH2 hydrogen storage systems at elevated temperatures and pressures are reported.

  13. Long-term, high frequency in situ measurements of intertidal mussel bed temperatures using biomimetic sensors

    PubMed Central

    Helmuth, Brian; Choi, Francis; Matzelle, Allison; Torossian, Jessica L.; Morello, Scott L.; Mislan, K.A.S.; Yamane, Lauren; Strickland, Denise; Szathmary, P. Lauren; Gilman, Sarah E.; Tockstein, Alyson; Hilbish, Thomas J.; Burrows, Michael T.; Power, Anne Marie; Gosling, Elizabeth; Mieszkowska, Nova; Harley, Christopher D.G.; Nishizaki, Michael; Carrington, Emily; Menge, Bruce; Petes, Laura; Foley, Melissa M.; Johnson, Angela; Poole, Megan; Noble, Mae M.; Richmond, Erin L.; Robart, Matt; Robinson, Jonathan; Sapp, Jerod; Sones, Jackie; Broitman, Bernardo R.; Denny, Mark W.; Mach, Katharine J.; Miller, Luke P.; O’Donnell, Michael; Ross, Philip; Hofmann, Gretchen E.; Zippay, Mackenzie; Blanchette, Carol; Macfarlan, J.A.; Carpizo-Ituarte, Eugenio; Ruttenberg, Benjamin; Peña Mejía, Carlos E.; McQuaid, Christopher D.; Lathlean, Justin; Monaco, Cristián J.; Nicastro, Katy R.; Zardi, Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    At a proximal level, the physiological impacts of global climate change on ectothermic organisms are manifest as changes in body temperatures. Especially for plants and animals exposed to direct solar radiation, body temperatures can be substantially different from air temperatures. We deployed biomimetic sensors that approximate the thermal characteristics of intertidal mussels at 71 sites worldwide, from 1998-present. Loggers recorded temperatures at 10–30 min intervals nearly continuously at multiple intertidal elevations. Comparisons against direct measurements of mussel tissue temperature indicated errors of ~2.0–2.5 °C, during daily fluctuations that often exceeded 15°–20 °C. Geographic patterns in thermal stress based on biomimetic logger measurements were generally far more complex than anticipated based only on ‘habitat-level’ measurements of air or sea surface temperature. This unique data set provides an opportunity to link physiological measurements with spatially- and temporally-explicit field observations of body temperature. PMID:27727238

  14. Room temperature growth of ultrathin Au nanowires with high areal density over large areas by in situ functionalization of substrate.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Subhajit; Leelavathi, Annamalai; Madras, Giridhar; Ravishankar, N

    2014-10-28

    Although ultrathin Au nanowires (∼2 nm diameter) are expected to demonstrate several interesting properties, their extreme fragility has hampered their use in potential applications. One way to improve the stability is to grow them on substrates; however, there is no general method to grow these wires over large areas. The existing methods suffer from poor coverage and associated formation of larger nanoparticles on the substrate. Herein, we demonstrate a room temperature method for growth of these nanowires with high coverage over large areas by in situ functionalization of the substrate. Using control experiments, we demonstrate that an in situ functionalization of the substrate is the key step in controlling the areal density of the wires on the substrate. We show that this strategy works for a variety of substrates ranging like graphene, borosil glass, Kapton, and oxide supports. We present initial results on catalysis using the wires grown on alumina and silica beads and also extend the method to lithography-free device fabrication. This method is general and may be extended to grow ultrathin Au nanowires on a variety of substrates for other applications.

  15. Development of a new micro-furnace for "in situ" high-temperature single crystal X-ray diffraction measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvaro, Matteo; Angel, Ross J.; Marciano, Claudio; Zaffiro, Gabriele; Scandolo, Lorenzo; Mazzucchelli, Mattia L.; Milani, Sula; Rustioni, Greta; Domeneghetti, Chiara M.; Nestola, Fabrizio

    2015-04-01

    Several experimental methods to reliably determine elastic properties of minerals at non-ambient conditions have been developed. In particular, different techniques for generating high-pressure and high-temperature have been successfully adopted for single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction measurements. High temperature devices for "in-situ" measurements should provide the most controlled isothermal environment as possible across the entire sample. It is intuitive that in general, thermal gradients across the sample increase as the temperature increases. Even if the small isothermal volume required for single-crystal X-ray diffraction experiments makes such phenomena almost negligible, the design of a furnace should also aim to reduce thermal gradients by including a large thermal mass that encloses the sample. However this solution often leads to complex design that results in a restricted access to reciprocal space or attenuation of the incident or diffracted intensity (with consequent reduction of the accuracy and/or precision in lattice parameter determination). Here we present a newly-developed H-shaped Pt-Pt/Rh resistance microfurnace for in-situ high-temperature single-crystal X-ray diffraction measurements. The compact design of the furnace together with the long collimator-sample-detector distance allows us to perform measurements up to 2θ = 70° with no further restrictions on any other angular movement. The microfurnace is equipped with a water cooling system that allows a constant thermal gradient to be maintained that in turn guarantees thermal stability with oscillations smaller than 5°C in the whole range of operating T of room-T to 1200°C. The furnace has been built for use with a conventional 4-circle Eulerian geometry equipped with point detector and automated with the SINGLE software (Angel and Finger 2011) that allows the effects of crystal offsets and diffractometer aberrations to be eliminated from the refined peak positions by the 8

  16. Novel Modified Optical Fibers for High Temperature In-Situ Miniaturized Gas Sensors in Advanced Fossil Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pickrell, Gary; Scott, Brian

    2014-06-30

    This report covers the technical progress on the program “Novel Modified Optical Fibers for High Temperature In-Situ Miniaturized Gas Sensors in Advanced Fossil Energy Systems”, funded by the National Energy Technology Laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Materials Science & Engineering and Electrical & Computer Engineering Departments at Virginia Tech, and summarizes technical progress from July 1st, 2005 –June 30th, 2014. The objective of this program was to develop novel fiber materials for high temperature gas sensors based on evanescent wave absorption in optical fibers. This project focused on two primary areas: the study of a sapphire photonic crystal fiber (SPCF) for operation at high temperature and long wavelengths, and a porous glass based fiber optic sensor for gas detection. The sapphire component of the project focused on the development of a sapphire photonic crystal fiber, modeling of the new structures, fabrication of the optimal structure, development of a long wavelength interrogation system, testing of the optical properties, and gas and temperature testing of the final sensor. The fabrication of the 6 rod SPCF gap bundle (diameter of 70μm) with a hollow core was successfully constructed with lead-in and lead-out 50μm diameter fiber along with transmission and gas detection testing. Testing of the sapphire photonic crystal fiber sensor capabilities with the developed long wavelength optical system showed the ability to detect CO2 at or below 1000ppm at temperatures up to 1000°C. Work on the porous glass sensor focused on the development of a porous clad solid core optical fiber, a hollow core waveguide, gas detection capabilities at room and high temperature, simultaneous gas species detection, suitable joining technologies for the lead-in and lead-out fibers and the porous sensor, sensor system sensitivity improvement, signal processing improvement, relationship between pore structure and fiber

  17. Development of self-powered wireless high temperature electrochemical sensor for in situ corrosion monitoring of coal-fired power plant.

    PubMed

    Aung, Naing Naing; Crowe, Edward; Liu, Xingbo

    2015-03-01

    Reliable wireless high temperature electrochemical sensor technology is needed to provide in situ corrosion information for optimal predictive maintenance to ensure a high level of operational effectiveness under the harsh conditions present in coal-fired power generation systems. This research highlights the effectiveness of our novel high temperature electrochemical sensor for in situ coal ash hot corrosion monitoring in combination with the application of wireless communication and an energy harvesting thermoelectric generator (TEG). This self-powered sensor demonstrates the successful wireless transmission of both corrosion potential and corrosion current signals to a simulated control room environment.

  18. Development of self-powered wireless high temperature electrochemical sensor for in situ corrosion monitoring of coal-fired power plant.

    PubMed

    Aung, Naing Naing; Crowe, Edward; Liu, Xingbo

    2015-03-01

    Reliable wireless high temperature electrochemical sensor technology is needed to provide in situ corrosion information for optimal predictive maintenance to ensure a high level of operational effectiveness under the harsh conditions present in coal-fired power generation systems. This research highlights the effectiveness of our novel high temperature electrochemical sensor for in situ coal ash hot corrosion monitoring in combination with the application of wireless communication and an energy harvesting thermoelectric generator (TEG). This self-powered sensor demonstrates the successful wireless transmission of both corrosion potential and corrosion current signals to a simulated control room environment. PMID:25284768

  19. Beamline Electrostatic Levitator (BESL) for in-situ High Energy K-Ray Diffraction Studies of Levitated Solids and Liquids at High Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangopadhyay, A. K.; Lee, G. W.; Kelton, K. F.; Rogers, J. R.; Goldman, A. I.; Robinson, D. S.; Rathz, T. J.; Hyers, R. W.

    2005-01-01

    Determinations of the phase formation sequence, the crystal structures and the thermodynamic properties of materials at high temperatures are difficult because of contamination from the sample container and environment. Containerless processing techniques, such as electrostatic (ESL), electromagnetic (EML), aerodynamic, and acoustic levitation, are most suitable these studies. An adaptation of ESL for in-situ structural studies of a wide range of materials, including metals, semiconductors, insulators using high energy (125 keV) synchrotron x-rays is described here. This beamline ESL (BESL) allows the in-situ determination of the atomic structures of equilibrium solid and liquid phases, including undercooled liquids, as well as real-time studies of solid-solid and liquid-solid phase transformations. The use of image plate (MAR345) or GE-Angio detectors enables fast (30 ms - 1s) acquisition of complete diffraction patterns over a wide q-range (4 - 140/mm). The wide temperature range (300 - 2500 K), containerless processing under high vacuum (10(exp -7) - 10(exp -8) torr), and fast data acquisition, make BESL particularly suitable for phase diagram studies of high temperature materials. An additional, critically important, feature of BESL is the ability to also make simultaneous measurement of a host of thermo-physical properties, including the specific heat, enthalpy of transformation, solidus and liquidus temperatures, density, viscosity, and surface tension; all on the same sample and simultaneous with the structural measurements.

  20. [In situ experimental study of phase transition of calcite by Raman spectroscopy at high temperature and high pressure].

    PubMed

    Liu, Chuan-jiang; Zheng, Hai-fei

    2012-02-01

    The phase transitions of calcite at high temperature and high pressure were investigated by using hydrothermal diamond anvil cell combined with Raman spectroscopy. The result showed that the Raman peak of 155 cm(-1) disappeared, the peak of 1 087 cm(-1) splited into 1083 and 1 090 cm(-1) peaks and the peak of 282 cm(-1) abruptly reduced to 231 cm(-1) at ambient temperature when the system pressure increased to 1 666 and 2 127 MPa respectively, which proved that calcite transformed to calcite-II and calcite-III. In the heating process at the initial pressure of 2 761 MPa and below 171 degrees C, there was no change in Raman characteristic peaks of calcite-III. As the temperature increased to 171 degrees C, the color of calcite crystal became opaque completely and the symmetric stretching vibration peak of 1 087 cm(-1), in-plane bending vibration peak of 713 cm(-1) and lattice vibration peaks of 155 and 282 cm(-1) began to mutate, showing that the calcite-III transformed to a new phase of calcium carbonate at the moment. When the temperature dropped to room temperature, this new phase remained stable all along. It also indicated that the process of phase transformation from calcite to the new phase of calcium carbonate was irreversible. The equation of phase transition between calcite-III and new phase of calcium carbonate can be determined by P(MPa) = 9.09T x (degrees C) +1 880. The slopes of the Raman peak (v1 087) of symmetrical stretching vibration depending on pressure and temperature are dv/dP = 5.1 (cm(-1) x GPa(-1)) and dv/dT = -0.055 3(cm(-1) x degrees C(-1)), respectively. PMID:22512172

  1. Aerodynamic levitator for in situ x-ray structure measurements on high temperature and molten nuclear fuel materials.

    PubMed

    Weber, J K R; Tamalonis, A; Benmore, C J; Alderman, O L G; Sendelbach, S; Hebden, A; Williamson, M A

    2016-07-01

    An aerodynamic levitator with carbon dioxide laser beam heating was integrated with a hermetically sealed controlled atmosphere chamber and sample handling mechanism. The system enabled containment of radioactive samples and control of the process atmosphere chemistry. The chamber was typically operated at a pressure of approximately 0.9 bars to ensure containment of the materials being processed. Samples 2.5-3 mm in diameter were levitated in flowing gas to achieve containerless conditions. Levitated samples were heated to temperatures of up to 3500 °C with a partially focused carbon dioxide laser beam. Sample temperature was measured using an optical pyrometer. The sample environment was integrated with a high energy (100 keV) x-ray synchrotron beamline to enable in situ structure measurements to be made on levitated samples as they were heated, melted, and supercooled. The system was controlled from outside the x-ray beamline hutch by using a LabVIEW program. Measurements have been made on hot solid and molten uranium dioxide and binary uranium dioxide-zirconium dioxide compositions. PMID:27475566

  2. Aerodynamic levitator for in situ x-ray structure measurements on high temperature and molten nuclear fuel materials.

    PubMed

    Weber, J K R; Tamalonis, A; Benmore, C J; Alderman, O L G; Sendelbach, S; Hebden, A; Williamson, M A

    2016-07-01

    An aerodynamic levitator with carbon dioxide laser beam heating was integrated with a hermetically sealed controlled atmosphere chamber and sample handling mechanism. The system enabled containment of radioactive samples and control of the process atmosphere chemistry. The chamber was typically operated at a pressure of approximately 0.9 bars to ensure containment of the materials being processed. Samples 2.5-3 mm in diameter were levitated in flowing gas to achieve containerless conditions. Levitated samples were heated to temperatures of up to 3500 °C with a partially focused carbon dioxide laser beam. Sample temperature was measured using an optical pyrometer. The sample environment was integrated with a high energy (100 keV) x-ray synchrotron beamline to enable in situ structure measurements to be made on levitated samples as they were heated, melted, and supercooled. The system was controlled from outside the x-ray beamline hutch by using a LabVIEW program. Measurements have been made on hot solid and molten uranium dioxide and binary uranium dioxide-zirconium dioxide compositions.

  3. Aerodynamic levitator for in situ x-ray structure measurements on high temperature and molten nuclear fuel materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, J. K. R.; Tamalonis, A.; Benmore, C. J.; Alderman, O. L. G.; Sendelbach, S.; Hebden, A.; Williamson, M. A.

    2016-07-01

    An aerodynamic levitator with carbon dioxide laser beam heating was integrated with a hermetically sealed controlled atmosphere chamber and sample handling mechanism. The system enabled containment of radioactive samples and control of the process atmosphere chemistry. The chamber was typically operated at a pressure of approximately 0.9 bars to ensure containment of the materials being processed. Samples 2.5-3 mm in diameter were levitated in flowing gas to achieve containerless conditions. Levitated samples were heated to temperatures of up to 3500 °C with a partially focused carbon dioxide laser beam. Sample temperature was measured using an optical pyrometer. The sample environment was integrated with a high energy (100 keV) x-ray synchrotron beamline to enable in situ structure measurements to be made on levitated samples as they were heated, melted, and supercooled. The system was controlled from outside the x-ray beamline hutch by using a LabVIEW program. Measurements have been made on hot solid and molten uranium dioxide and binary uranium dioxide-zirconium dioxide compositions.

  4. In Situ Ptychography of Heterogeneous Catalysts using Hard X-Rays: High Resolution Imaging at Ambient Pressure and Elevated Temperature.

    PubMed

    Baier, Sina; Damsgaard, Christian D; Scholz, Maria; Benzi, Federico; Rochet, Amélie; Hoppe, Robert; Scherer, Torsten; Shi, Junjie; Wittstock, Arne; Weinhausen, Britta; Wagner, Jakob B; Schroer, Christian G; Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk

    2016-02-01

    A new closed cell is presented for in situ X-ray ptychography which allows studies under gas flow and at elevated temperature. In order to gain complementary information by transmission and scanning electron microscopy, the cell makes use of a Protochips E-chipTM which contains a small, thin electron transparent window and allows heating. Two gold-based systems, 50 nm gold particles and nanoporous gold as a relevant catalyst sample, were used for studying the feasibility of the cell. Measurements showing a resolution around 40 nm have been achieved under a flow of synthetic air and during heating up to temperatures of 933 K. An elevated temperature exhibited little influence on image quality and resolution. With this study, the potential of in situ hard X-ray ptychography for investigating annealing processes of real catalyst samples is demonstrated. Furthermore, the possibility to use the same sample holder for ex situ electron microscopy before and after the in situ study underlines the unique possibilities available with this combination of electron microscopy and X-ray microscopy on the same sample.

  5. Molecular beam mass spectrometer equipped with a catalytic wall reactor for in situ studies in high temperature catalysis research

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, R.; Ihmann, K.; Ihmann, J.; Jentoft, F.C.; Geske, M.; Taha, A.; Pelzer, K.; Schloegl, R.

    2006-05-15

    A newly developed apparatus combining a molecular beam mass spectrometer and a catalytic wall reactor is described. The setup has been developed for in situ studies of high temperature catalytic reactions (>1000 deg. C), which involve besides surface reactions also gas phase reactions in their mechanism. The goal is to identify gas phase radicals by threshold ionization. A tubular reactor, made from the catalytic material, is positioned in a vacuum chamber. Expansion of the gas through a 100 {mu}m sampling orifice in the reactor wall into differentially pumped nozzle, skimmer, and collimator chambers leads to the formation of a molecular beam. A quadrupole mass spectrometer with electron impact ion source designed for molecular beam inlet and threshold ionization measurements is used as the analyzer. The sampling time from nozzle to detector is estimated to be less than 10 ms. A detection time resolution of up to 20 ms can be reached. The temperature of the reactor is measured by pyrometry. Besides a detailed description of the setup components and the physical background of the method, this article presents measurements showing the performance of the apparatus. After deriving the shape and width of the energy spread of the ionizing electrons from measurements on N{sub 2} and He we estimated the detection limit in threshold ionization measurements using binary mixtures of CO in N{sub 2} to be in the range of several hundreds of ppm. Mass spectra and threshold ionization measurements recorded during catalytic partial oxidation of methane at 1250 deg. C on a Pt catalyst are presented. The detection of CH{sub 3}{center_dot} radicals is successfully demonstrated.

  6. In-Situ Study of Gaseous Reduction of Magnetite Doped with Alumina Using High-Temperature XRD Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapelyushin, Yury; Sasaki, Yasushi; Zhang, Jianqiang; Jeong, Sunkwang; Ostrovski, Oleg

    2015-12-01

    The reduction of magnetite of technical grade and magnetite doped with 3 mass pct Al2O3 was studied in situ using high-temperature XRD (HT-XRD) analysis. Magnetite was reduced by CO-CO2 gas (80 vol pct CO) at 1023 K (750 °C). Reduction of magnetite doped with alumina occurred from the Fe3O4-FeAl2O4 solid solution which has a miscibility gap with critical temperature of 1133 K (860 °C). The degree of reduction of magnetite was derived using Rietveld refinement of the HT-XRD spectra; the compositions of the Fe3O4-FeAl2O4 solid solution and the concentrations of carbon in γ-iron were determined from the lattice constants of the solutions. The reduction of magnetite progressed topochemically with the formation of a dense iron shell. The reduction of alumina-containing magnetite started along certain lattice planes with the formation of a network-like structure. Reduction of alumina-containing magnetite was faster than that of un-doped magnetite; this difference was attributed to the formation of the network-like structure. Hercynite content in the Fe3O4-FeAl2O4 solid solution in the process of reduction of magnetite doped with 3 mass pct Al2O3 increased from 5.11 to 20 mass pct, which is close to the miscibility gap at 1023 K (750 °C). The concentration of carbon in γ-Fe (0.76 mass pct) formed in the reduced sample of magnetite doped with 3 mass pct Al2O3 was close to the equilibrium value with 80 vol pct CO to 20 vol pct CO2 gas used in the HT-XRD experiments.

  7. Generation of methane in the Earth's mantle: in situ high pressure-temperature measurements of carbonate reduction.

    PubMed

    Scott, Henry P; Hemley, Russell J; Mao, Ho-Kwang; Herschbach, Dudley R; Fried, Laurence E; Howard, W Michael; Bastea, Sorin

    2004-09-28

    We present in situ observations of hydrocarbon formation via carbonate reduction at upper mantle pressures and temperatures. Methane was formed from FeO, CaCO(3)-calcite, and water at pressures between 5 and 11 GPa and temperatures ranging from 500 degrees C to 1,500 degrees C. The results are shown to be consistent with multiphase thermodynamic calculations based on the statistical mechanics of soft particle mixtures. The study demonstrates the existence of abiogenic pathways for the formation of hydrocarbons in the Earth's interior and suggests that the hydrocarbon budget of the bulk Earth may be larger than conventionally assumed.

  8. Generation of methane in the Earth's mantle: In situ high pressure–temperature measurements of carbonate reduction

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Henry P.; Hemley, Russell J.; Mao, Ho-kwang; Herschbach, Dudley R.; Fried, Laurence E.; Howard, W. Michael; Bastea, Sorin

    2004-01-01

    We present in situ observations of hydrocarbon formation via carbonate reduction at upper mantle pressures and temperatures. Methane was formed from FeO, CaCO3-calcite, and water at pressures between 5 and 11 GPa and temperatures ranging from 500°C to 1,500°C. The results are shown to be consistent with multiphase thermodynamic calculations based on the statistical mechanics of soft particle mixtures. The study demonstrates the existence of abiogenic pathways for the formation of hydrocarbons in the Earth's interior and suggests that the hydrocarbon budget of the bulk Earth may be larger than conventionally assumed. PMID:15381767

  9. An Insertable Passive LC Pressure Sensor Based on an Alumina Ceramic for In Situ Pressure Sensing in High-Temperature Environments

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Jijun; Li, Chen; Jia, Pinggang; Chen, Xiaoyong; Zhang, Wendong; Liu, Jun; Xue, Chenyang; Tan, Qiulin

    2015-01-01

    Pressure measurements in high-temperature applications, including compressors, turbines, and others, have become increasingly critical. This paper proposes an implantable passive LC pressure sensor based on an alumina ceramic material for in situ pressure sensing in high-temperature environments. The inductance and capacitance elements of the sensor were designed independently and separated by a thermally insulating material, which is conducive to reducing the influence of the temperature on the inductance element and improving the quality factor of the sensor. In addition, the sensor was fabricated using thick film integrated technology from high-temperature materials that ensure stable operation of the sensor in high-temperature environments. Experimental results showed that the sensor accurately monitored pressures from 0 bar to 2 bar at temperatures up to 800 °C. The sensitivity, linearity, repeatability error, and hysteretic error of the sensor were 0.225 MHz/bar, 95.3%, 5.5%, and 6.2%, respectively. PMID:26334279

  10. An Insertable Passive LC Pressure Sensor Based on an Alumina Ceramic for In Situ Pressure Sensing in High-Temperature Environments.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Jijun; Li, Chen; Jia, Pinggang; Chen, Xiaoyong; Zhang, Wendong; Liu, Jun; Xue, Chenyang; Tan, Qiulin

    2015-08-31

    Pressure measurements in high-temperature applications, including compressors, turbines, and others, have become increasingly critical. This paper proposes an implantable passive LC pressure sensor based on an alumina ceramic material for in situ pressure sensing in high-temperature environments. The inductance and capacitance elements of the sensor were designed independently and separated by a thermally insulating material, which is conducive to reducing the influence of the temperature on the inductance element and improving the quality factor of the sensor. In addition, the sensor was fabricated using thick film integrated technology from high-temperature materials that ensure stable operation of the sensor in high-temperature environments. Experimental results showed that the sensor accurately monitored pressures from 0 bar to 2 bar at temperatures up to 800 °C. The sensitivity, linearity, repeatability error, and hysteretic error of the sensor were 0.225 MHz/bar, 95.3%, 5.5%, and 6.2%, respectively.

  11. Phase transition in Ba{sub 2}In{sub 2}O{sub 5} studied by in situ high temperature X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Rey, J. F. Q.; Ferreira, F. F.; Muccillo, E. N. S.

    2009-01-29

    The order-disorder phase transition in Ba{sub 2}In{sub 2}O{sub 5} high-temperature ionic conductor was systematically studied by in situ high-temperature X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation and electrical conductivity. Pure barium indate was prepared by solid state reactions at 1300 deg. C. The room-temperature structural characterization showed a high degree of phase homogeneity in the prepared material. The reduction of the order-disorder phase transition temperature was verified by electrical conductivity and high-temperature X-ray diffraction. The observed features were explained based on Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy results that revealed the presence of hydroxyl species in the crystal lattice. The increase of the intensity of few diffraction peaks near the phase transition temperature suggests the formation of a superstructure before the orthorhombic-to-tetragonal phase transition.

  12. InAlN high electron mobility transistor Ti/Al/Ni/Au Ohmic contact optimisation assisted by in-situ high temperature transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M. D.; Parbrook, P. J.; O'Mahony, D.; Conroy, M.; Schmidt, M.

    2015-09-14

    This paper correlates the micro-structural and electrical characteristics associated with annealing of metallic multi-layers typically used in the formation of Ohmic contacts to InAlN high electron mobility transistors. The multi-layers comprised Ti/Al/Ni/Au and were annealed via rapid thermal processing at temperatures up to 925 °C with electrical current-voltage analysis establishing the onset of Ohmic (linear IV) behaviour at 750–800 °C. In-situ temperature dependent transmission electron microscopy established that metallic diffusion and inter-mixing were initiated near a temperature of 500 °C. Around 800 °C, inter-diffusion of the metal and semiconductor (nitride) was observed, correlating with the onset of Ohmic electrical behaviour. The sheet resistance associated with the InAlN/AlN/GaN interface is highly sensitive to the anneal temperature, with the range depending on the Ti layer thickness. The relationship between contact resistivity and measurement temperature follow that predicted by thermionic field emission for contacts annealed below 850 °C, but deviated above this due to excessive metal-semiconductor inter-diffusion.

  13. Transformation from molecular to polymeric nitrogen at high pressures and temperatures: In situ x-ray diffraction study

    SciTech Connect

    Trojan, I.A.; Eremets, M.I.; Medvedev, S.A.; Gavriliuk, A.G.; Prakapenka, V.B.

    2010-09-17

    We studied the mechanism of the structural transformation of molecular nitrogen to atomic single-bonded nitrogen with a cubic gauche (cg-N) crystal structure using x-ray diffraction in situ at a pressure of - 140 GPa and temperatures up to 2000 K in a diamond anvil cell. The anvils, with a toroidal shape, allowed us to drastically increase the volume of the sample, reduce the acquisition time of the diffraction pattern, and improve the quality of the Raman spectra. Molecular nitrogen transforms to the cg-N phase through an intermediate disordered state. The Raman spectra are in good agreement with recent theoretical calculations.

  14. Development of Nano-crystalline Doped-Ceramic Enabled Fiber Sensors for High Temperature In-Situ Monitoring of Fossil Fuel Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Hai; Dong, Junhang; Lin, Jerry; Romero, Van

    2012-03-01

    This is a final technical report for the first project year from July 1, 2005 to Jan 31, 2012 for DoE/NETL funded project DE-FC26-05NT42439: Development of Nanocrystalline Doped-Ceramic Enabled Fiber Sensors for High Temperature In-Situ Monitoring of Fossil Fuel Gases. This report summarizes the technical progresses and achievements towards the development of novel nanocrystalline doped ceramic material-enabled optical fiber sensors for in situ and real time monitoring the gas composition of flue or hot gas streams involved in fossil-fuel based power generation and hydrogen production.

  15. High pressure and high temperature in situ X-ray diffraction studies in the Paris-Edinburgh cell using a laboratory X-ray source†

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toulemonde, Pierre; Goujon, Céline; Laversenne, Laetitia; Bordet, Pierre; Bruyère, Rémy; Legendre, Murielle; Leynaud, Olivier; Prat, Alain; Mezouar, Mohamed

    2014-04-01

    We have developed a new laboratory experimental set-up to study in situ the pressure-temperature phase diagram of a given pure element or compound, its associated phase transitions, or the chemical reactions involved at high pressure and high temperature (HP-HT) between different solids and liquids. This new tool allows laboratory studies before conducting further detailed experiments using more brilliant synchrotron X-ray sources or before kinetic studies. This device uses the diffraction of X-rays produced by a quasi-monochromatic micro-beam source operating at the silver radiation (λ(Ag)Kα 1, 2≈0.56 Å). The experimental set-up is based on a VX Paris-Edinburgh cell equipped with tungsten carbide or sintered diamond anvils and uses standard B-epoxy 5 or 7 mm gaskets. The diffracted signal coming from the compressed (and heated) sample is collected on an image plate. The pressure and temperature calibrations were performed by diffraction, using conventional calibrants (BN, NaCl and MgO) for determination of the pressure, and by crossing isochores of BN, NaCl, Cu or Au for the determination of the temperature. The first examples of studies performed with this new laboratory set-up are presented in the article: determination of the melting point of germanium and magnesium under HP-HT, synthesis of MgB2 or C-diamond and partial study of the P, T phase diagram of MgH2.

  16. In-situ tube burst testing and high-temperature deformation behavior of candidate materials for accident tolerant fuel cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, Thak Sang; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Maloy, Stuart A.; Gussev, M. N.; Terrani, K. A.

    2015-08-25

    Here, one of the most essential properties of accident tolerant fuel (ATF) for maintaining structural integrity during a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) is high resistance of the cladding to plastic deformation and burst failure, since the deformation and burst behavior governs the cooling efficiency of flow channels and the process of fission product release. To simulate and evaluate the deformation and burst process of thin-walled cladding, an in-situ testing and evaluation method has been developed on the basis of visual imaging and image analysis techniques. The method uses a specialized optics system consisting of a high-resolution video camera, a light filtering unit, and monochromatic light sources. The in-situ testing is performed using a 50 mm long pressurized thin-walled tubular specimen set in a programmable furnace. As the first application, ten (10) candidate cladding materials for ATF, i.e., five FeCrAl alloys and five nanostructured steels, were tested using the newly developed method, and the time-dependent images were analyzed to produce detailed deformation and burst data such as true hoop stress, strain (creep) rate, and failure stress. Relatively soft FeCrAl alloys deformed and burst below 800 °C, while negligible strain rates were measured for higher strength alloys.

  17. In-situ tube burst testing and high-temperature deformation behavior of candidate materials for accident tolerant fuel cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Gussev, Maxim N.; Byun, Thak Sang; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Maloy, Stuart A.; Terrani, Kurt A.

    2015-11-01

    The high resistance of cladding to plastic deformation and burst failure is one of the most essential properties of accident tolerant fuel (ATF) for maintaining structural integrity during a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) since the deformation and burst behavior governs the cooling efficiency of flow channels and process of fission product release. To simulate and evaluate such deformation and burst process of thin-walled cladding, an in-situ testing and evaluation method has been developed on the basis of visual imaging and image analysis techniques. The method uses a specialized optics system consisted of a high-resolution video camera, light filtering unit, and monochromatic light sources, and the in-situ testing is performed using a 50 mm long pressurized thin-walled tubular specimen set in a programmable furnace. In this study eleven (11) candidate cladding materials for ATF, i.e., 6 FeCrAl alloys and 5 nanostructured steels, were tested using the newly developed method, and the time-dependent images were analyzed to produce detailed deformation and burst data such as true hoop stress, strain (creep) rate, and failure stress. Relatively soft FeCrAl alloys deformed and burst below 800°C while negligible strain rates were measured for higher strength alloys and/or for relatively thick wall specimens.

  18. In-situ tube burst testing and high-temperature deformation behavior of candidate materials for accident tolerant fuel cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gussev, M. N.; Byun, T. S.; Yamamoto, Y.; Maloy, S. A.; Terrani, K. A.

    2015-11-01

    One of the most essential properties of accident tolerant fuel (ATF) for maintaining structural integrity during a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) is high resistance of the cladding to plastic deformation and burst failure, since the deformation and burst behavior governs the cooling efficiency of flow channels and the process of fission product release. To simulate and evaluate the deformation and burst process of thin-walled cladding, an in-situ testing and evaluation method has been developed on the basis of visual imaging and image analysis techniques. The method uses a specialized optics system consisting of a high-resolution video camera, a light filtering unit, and monochromatic light sources. The in-situ testing is performed using a 50 mm long pressurized thin-walled tubular specimen set in a programmable furnace. As the first application, ten (10) candidate cladding materials for ATF, i.e., five FeCrAl alloys and five nanostructured steels, were tested using the newly developed method, and the time-dependent images were analyzed to produce detailed deformation and burst data such as true hoop stress, strain (creep) rate, and failure stress. Relatively soft FeCrAl alloys deformed and burst below 800 °C, while negligible strain rates were measured for higher strength alloys.

  19. In-situ tube burst testing and high-temperature deformation behavior of candidate materials for accident tolerant fuel cladding

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Byun, Thak Sang; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Maloy, Stuart A.; Gussev, M. N.; Terrani, K. A.

    2015-08-25

    Here, one of the most essential properties of accident tolerant fuel (ATF) for maintaining structural integrity during a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) is high resistance of the cladding to plastic deformation and burst failure, since the deformation and burst behavior governs the cooling efficiency of flow channels and the process of fission product release. To simulate and evaluate the deformation and burst process of thin-walled cladding, an in-situ testing and evaluation method has been developed on the basis of visual imaging and image analysis techniques. The method uses a specialized optics system consisting of a high-resolution video camera, a light filteringmore » unit, and monochromatic light sources. The in-situ testing is performed using a 50 mm long pressurized thin-walled tubular specimen set in a programmable furnace. As the first application, ten (10) candidate cladding materials for ATF, i.e., five FeCrAl alloys and five nanostructured steels, were tested using the newly developed method, and the time-dependent images were analyzed to produce detailed deformation and burst data such as true hoop stress, strain (creep) rate, and failure stress. Relatively soft FeCrAl alloys deformed and burst below 800 °C, while negligible strain rates were measured for higher strength alloys.« less

  20. High-Temperature Tensile and Tribological Behavior of Hybrid (ZrB2+Al3Zr)/AA5052 In Situ Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, G.; Kumar, N.; Mohan, A.; Gautam, R. K.; Mohan, S.

    2016-09-01

    During service life, components such as piston, cylinder blocks, brakes, and discs/drums, have to work under high-temperature conditions. In order to have appropriate material for such applications high-temperature studies are important. Hybrid (ZrB2+Al3Zr)/AA5052 in situ composite has been investigated from ambient to 523 K (250 °C) at an interval of 50 deg. (ZrB2+Al3Zr)/AA5052 in situ composite has been fabricated by the direct melt reaction of AA5052 alloy with zirconium and boron salts. Microstructure studies show refinement in the grain size of base alloy on in situ formation of reinforcement particles. Al3Zr particles are observed in rectangular and polyhedron shapes. It is observed from the tensile studies that ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, and percentage elongation decrease with increase in test temperature. Similar kind of behavior is also observed for flow curve properties. The tensile results have also been correlated with fractography. Wear and friction results indicate that the wear rate increases with increase in normal load, whereas coefficient of friction shows decreasing trend. With increasing test temperature, wear rate exhibits a typical phenomenon. After an initial increase, wear rate follows a decreasing trend up to 423 K (150 °C), and finally a rapid increase is observed, whereas coefficient of friction increases continuously with increase in test temperature. The mechanisms responsible for the variation of wear and friction with different temperatures have been discussed in detail with the help of worn surfaces studies under scanning electron microscope (SEM) & 3D-profilometer and debris analysis by XRD.

  1. In Situ High-Temperature Transmission Electron Microscopy Observations of the Formation of Nanocrystalline TiC from Nanocrystalline Anatase (TiO2).

    PubMed

    Agrawal; Cizeron; Colvin

    1998-05-01

    : In this work, the high-temperature behavior of nanocrystalline TiO2 is studied using in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM). These nanoparticles are made using wet chemical techniques that generate the anatase phase of TiO2 with average grain sizes of 6 nm. X-ray diffraction studies of nanophase TiO2 indicate the material undergoes a solid-solid phase transformation to the stable rutile phase between 600 degrees and 900 degreesC. This phase transition is not observed in the TEM samples, which remain anatase up to temperatures as high as 1000 degreesC. Above 1000 degreesC, nanoparticles become mobile on the amorphous carbon grid and by 1300 degreesC, all anatase diffraction is lost and larger (50 nm) single crystals of a new phase are present. This new phase is identified as TiC both from high-resolution electron microscopy after heat treatment and electron diffraction collected during in situ heating experiments. Video images of the particle motion in situ show the nanoparticles diffusing and interacting with the underlying grid material as the reaction from TiO2 to TiC proceeds.

  2. The 3R modification of LixTiS2 - insights into local electronic structures from high-temperature in situ NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkening, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Titanium disulphide was one of the very first electrode materials investigated to serve as insertion host in rechargeable, that is secondary lithium-ion batteries. At room temperature the trigonal, layer structured modification exists that can easily accommodate Li ions up to the composition ?. With increasing temperature, however, the present results give evidence that ? (?) transforms into a new crystal structure that is expected to be metastable at room temperature. Here, this high-temperature modification is attributed to the 3R polymorph previously described by Colbow et al. Quite recently, the same phase has been characterized by X-ray diffraction and Rietveld refinement. In the present work, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is used to follow up this transformation in situ; it is able to monitor the associated changes of local electronic structures sensed by the lithium ions. Indeed, via in situ NMR, which has been carried out at temperatures as high as 1023 K, it was possible to directly reveal the evolution of a metastable phase which reversibly forms upon heating the trigonal starting material ?.

  3. An In Situ High Temperature Investigation of Cation Environments in Aluminate and Silicate Glasses and Liquids at the LUCIA Beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Neuville, Daniel R.; Roux, Jacques; Cormier, Laurent; Ligny, Dominique de; Flank, Anne-Marie; Lagarde, Pierre; Henderson, Grant S.

    2007-02-02

    The structure of crystals and melts were obtained at high temperature using X-ray absorption at the Ca K-edge on CaMgSi2O6 (diopside), CaAl2Si2O8 (anorthite), Ca3Al2O6 (C3A) and CaAl2O4 (CA) compositions. Important changes are observed above the liquidus temperature particularly for the C3A composition where all oscillations in the XANES spectra disappear. Important changes in the Ca K-edge XANES are also visible in the pre-edge region, with increasing temperature, for crystalline CaMgSi2O6.

  4. In situ high-temperature X-ray diffraction and spectroscopic study of fibroferrite, FeOH(SO4)·5H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventruti, Gennaro; Ventura, Giancarlo Della; Corriero, Nicola; Malferrari, Daniele; Gualtieri, Alessandro F.; Susta, Umberto; Lacalamita, Maria; Schingaro, Emanuela

    2016-09-01

    The thermal dehydration process of fibroferrite, FeOH(SO4)·5H2O, a secondary iron-bearing hydrous sulfate, was investigated by in situ high-temperature synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction (HT-XRPD), in situ high-temperature Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (HT-FTIR) and thermal analysis (TGA-DTA) combined with evolved gas mass spectrometry. The data analysis allowed the determination of the stability fields and the reaction paths for this mineral as well as characterization of its high-temperature products. Five main endothermic peaks are observed in the DTA curve collected from room T up to 800 °C. Mass spectrometry of gases evolved during thermogravimetric analysis confirms that the first four mass loss steps are due to water emission, while the fifth is due to a dehydroxylation process; the final step is due to the decomposition of the remaining sulfate ion. The temperature behavior of the different phases occurring during the heating process was analyzed, and the induced structural changes are discussed. In particular, the crystal structure of a new phase, FeOH(SO4)·4H2O, appearing at about 80 °C due to release of one interstitial H2O molecule, was solved by ab initio real-space and reciprocal-space methods. This study contributes to further understanding of the dehydration mechanism and thermal stability of secondary sulfate minerals.

  5. In situ high-temperature X-ray diffraction and spectroscopic study of fibroferrite, FeOH(SO4)·5H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventruti, Gennaro; Ventura, Giancarlo Della; Corriero, Nicola; Malferrari, Daniele; Gualtieri, Alessandro F.; Susta, Umberto; Lacalamita, Maria; Schingaro, Emanuela

    2016-05-01

    The thermal dehydration process of fibroferrite, FeOH(SO4)·5H2O, a secondary iron-bearing hydrous sulfate, was investigated by in situ high-temperature synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction (HT-XRPD), in situ high-temperature Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (HT-FTIR) and thermal analysis (TGA-DTA) combined with evolved gas mass spectrometry. The data analysis allowed the determination of the stability fields and the reaction paths for this mineral as well as characterization of its high-temperature products. Five main endothermic peaks are observed in the DTA curve collected from room T up to 800 °C. Mass spectrometry of gases evolved during thermogravimetric analysis confirms that the first four mass loss steps are due to water emission, while the fifth is due to a dehydroxylation process; the final step is due to the decomposition of the remaining sulfate ion. The temperature behavior of the different phases occurring during the heating process was analyzed, and the induced structural changes are discussed. In particular, the crystal structure of a new phase, FeOH(SO4)·4H2O, appearing at about 80 °C due to release of one interstitial H2O molecule, was solved by ab initio real-space and reciprocal-space methods. This study contributes to further understanding of the dehydration mechanism and thermal stability of secondary sulfate minerals.

  6. Pyrosequencing reveals high-temperature cellulolytic microbial consortia in Great Boiling Spring after in situ lignocellulose enrichment.

    PubMed

    Peacock, Joseph P; Cole, Jessica K; Murugapiran, Senthil K; Dodsworth, Jeremy A; Fisher, Jenny C; Moser, Duane P; Hedlund, Brian P

    2013-01-01

    To characterize high-temperature cellulolytic microbial communities, two lignocellulosic substrates, ammonia fiber-explosion-treated corn stover and aspen shavings, were incubated at average temperatures of 77 and 85°C in the sediment and water column of Great Boiling Spring, Nevada. Comparison of 109,941 quality-filtered 16S rRNA gene pyrosequences (pyrotags) from eight enrichments to 37,057 quality-filtered pyrotags from corresponding natural samples revealed distinct enriched communities dominated by phylotypes related to cellulolytic and hemicellulolytic Thermotoga and Dictyoglomus, cellulolytic and sugar-fermenting Desulfurococcales, and sugar-fermenting and hydrogenotrophic Archaeoglobales. Minor enriched populations included close relatives of hydrogenotrophic Thermodesulfobacteria, the candidate bacterial phylum OP9, and candidate archaeal groups C2 and DHVE3. Enrichment temperature was the major factor influencing community composition, with a negative correlation between temperature and richness, followed by lignocellulosic substrate composition. This study establishes the importance of these groups in the natural degradation of lignocellulose at high temperatures and suggests that a substantial portion of the diversity of thermophiles contributing to consortial cellulolysis may be contained within lineages that have representatives in pure culture.

  7. Argon–germane in situ plasma clean for reduced temperature Ge on Si epitaxy by high density plasma chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, Erica A.; Sheng, Josephine J.; Verley, Jason C.; Carroll, Malcolm S.

    2015-06-04

    We found that the demand for integration of near infrared optoelectronic functionality with silicon complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology has for many years motivated the investigation of low temperature germanium on silicon deposition processes. Our work describes the development of a high density plasma chemical vapor deposition process that uses a low temperature (<460 °C) in situ germane/argon plasma surface preparation step for epitaxial growth of germanium on silicon. It is shown that the germane/argon plasma treatment sufficiently removes SiOx and carbon at the surface to enable germanium epitaxy. Finally, the use of this surface preparation step demonstrates an alternative way to produce germanium epitaxy at reduced temperatures, a key enabler for increased flexibility of integration with CMOS back-end-of-line fabrication.

  8. Strength Measurement of Boron Suboxide B6O at High Pressure and Temperature Using in situ Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.; Yang, Y; Yu, T; Zhang, J; Zhao, Y; Wang, L

    2008-01-01

    The strength of boron suboxide (B6O) was measured at high pressure and temperature up to 8 GPa and 800 C using diffraction peak broadening analysis. The sample was synthesized at 6 GPa and 1750 C. In situ energy dispersive X-ray diffraction was conducted at the X17B2 beamline of the National Synchrotron Light Source. The differential stress in the powdered sample was derived through deconvolution of peak broadening of diffraction lines (0 2 1) and (1 1 3) during the compression and heating. The sample shows anisotropic yielding along the two orientations. The (0 2 1) orientation does not show yielding within the investigated pressure range (8 GPa) whereas the (1 1 3) orientation yields at 5 GPa. Upon heating, significant weakening (yielding) was observed at temperatures above 400 C. The yield temperature of boron suboxide is much lower than that of diamond, 1200 C, but similar to that observed in moissanite (SiC).

  9. Argon–germane in situ plasma clean for reduced temperature Ge on Si epitaxy by high density plasma chemical vapor deposition

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Douglas, Erica A.; Sheng, Josephine J.; Verley, Jason C.; Carroll, Malcolm S.

    2015-06-04

    We found that the demand for integration of near infrared optoelectronic functionality with silicon complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology has for many years motivated the investigation of low temperature germanium on silicon deposition processes. Our work describes the development of a high density plasma chemical vapor deposition process that uses a low temperature (<460 °C) in situ germane/argon plasma surface preparation step for epitaxial growth of germanium on silicon. It is shown that the germane/argon plasma treatment sufficiently removes SiOx and carbon at the surface to enable germanium epitaxy. Finally, the use of this surface preparation step demonstrates anmore » alternative way to produce germanium epitaxy at reduced temperatures, a key enabler for increased flexibility of integration with CMOS back-end-of-line fabrication.« less

  10. Hydrogen sensor based on Au and YSZ/HgO/Hg electrode for in situ measurement of dissolved H2 in high-temperature and -pressure fluids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, R H; Hu, S M; Zhang, X T; Wang, Y

    2008-11-15

    Gold as a hydrogen-sensing electrode for in situ measurement of dissolved H2 in aqueous solutions under extreme conditions is reported. The dissolved H2 sensor, constructed with a Au-based sensing element and coupled with a YSZ/HgO/Hg electrode, is well suited for determining dissolved H2 concentrations of aqueous fluids at elevated temperatures and pressures. The Au electrode is made of Au wire mounted in a quartz bar, which can be pressurized and heated in the high-pressure and -temperature conditions. The Au-YSZ sensor has been tested for its potential response to the concentrations of dissolved H2 in fluids by using a flow-through reactor at high temperatures up to 400 degrees C and pressures to 38 MPa. Good sensitivity and linear response between the hydrogen concentrations in the fluids and the H2 sensor potentials are reported for hydrogen gas in the concentration range of 0.1-0.001 M H2 in aqueous fluids at temperatures up to 340 degrees C and 30 MPa. Nernstian response of the cell potential to dissolved H2 in fluids was determined at 340 degrees C and 30 MPa, described as follows: DeltaE = 0.9444 + 0. 0603 log m H2 The experimental results indicate that the Au-YSZ/HgO/Hg cell can be used to measure the solubility of H2 in aqueous fluid at temperatures and pressures near to the critical state of water. Thus, this type of Au hydrogen sensor could be easily used for in situ measurement of H2 in hydrothermal fluids in a high-pressure vessel, or at midocean ridge, due to its structure of compression resistance.

  11. Oil-Soluble Silver-Organic Molecule for in Situ Deposition of Lubricious Metallic Silver at High Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Desanker, Michael; Johnson, Blake; Seyam, Afif M; Chung, Yip-Wah; Bazzi, Hassan S; Delferro, Massimiliano; Marks, Tobin J; Wang, Q Jane

    2016-06-01

    A major challenge in lubrication technology is to enhance lubricant performance at extreme temperatures that exceed conventional engine oil thermal degradation limits. Soft noble metals such as silver have low reactivity and shear strength, which make them ideal solid lubricants for wear protection and friction reduction between contacting surfaces at high temperatures. However, achieving adequate dispersion in engine lubricants and metallic silver deposition over predetermined temperatures ranges presents a significant chemical challenge. Here we report the synthesis, characterization, and tribological implementation of the trimeric silver pyrazolate complex, [Ag(3,5-dimethyl-4-n-hexyl-pyrazolate)]3 (1). This complex is oil-soluble and undergoes clean thermolysis at ∼310 °C to deposit lubricious, protective metallic silver particles on metal/metal oxide surfaces. Temperature-controlled tribometer tests show that greater than 1 wt % loading of 1 reduces wear by 60% in PAO4, a poly-α-olefin lubricant base fluid, and by 70% in a commercial fully formulated 15W40 motor oil (FF oil). This silver-organic complex also imparts sufficient friction reduction so that the tribological transition from oil as the primary lubricant through its thermal degradation, to 1 as the primary lubricant, is experimentally undetectable. PMID:27163783

  12. Oil-Soluble Silver-Organic Molecule for in Situ Deposition of Lubricious Metallic Silver at High Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Desanker, Michael; Johnson, Blake; Seyam, Afif M; Chung, Yip-Wah; Bazzi, Hassan S; Delferro, Massimiliano; Marks, Tobin J; Wang, Q Jane

    2016-06-01

    A major challenge in lubrication technology is to enhance lubricant performance at extreme temperatures that exceed conventional engine oil thermal degradation limits. Soft noble metals such as silver have low reactivity and shear strength, which make them ideal solid lubricants for wear protection and friction reduction between contacting surfaces at high temperatures. However, achieving adequate dispersion in engine lubricants and metallic silver deposition over predetermined temperatures ranges presents a significant chemical challenge. Here we report the synthesis, characterization, and tribological implementation of the trimeric silver pyrazolate complex, [Ag(3,5-dimethyl-4-n-hexyl-pyrazolate)]3 (1). This complex is oil-soluble and undergoes clean thermolysis at ∼310 °C to deposit lubricious, protective metallic silver particles on metal/metal oxide surfaces. Temperature-controlled tribometer tests show that greater than 1 wt % loading of 1 reduces wear by 60% in PAO4, a poly-α-olefin lubricant base fluid, and by 70% in a commercial fully formulated 15W40 motor oil (FF oil). This silver-organic complex also imparts sufficient friction reduction so that the tribological transition from oil as the primary lubricant through its thermal degradation, to 1 as the primary lubricant, is experimentally undetectable.

  13. An in situ neutron diffraction study of cation disordering in synthetic quandilite Mg{sub 2}tiO{sub 4} at high temperatures.

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neill, H. St. C.; Redfern, S. A. T.; Kesson, S.; Short, S.; Australian National Univ.; Univ. Cambridge

    2003-05-01

    Temperature-dependent cation order-disorder has been studied in many 2+ - 3+ oxide spinels but 4+ - 2+ spinels have been found to be either completely normal or completely inverse when examined at room temperature. Here we report the temperature dependence of the cation distribution in the 4-2 spinel synthetic qandilite (Mg{sub 2}TiO{sub 4}) from in situ time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction experiments to 1416 {sup o}C. At room temperature, Mg{sub 2}TiO{sub 4} is confirmed to have completely inverse cation distribution, with Ti atoms occupying half the octahedrally coordinated cation sites. Cation disordering becomes observable above about 900 {sup o}C, with 4% of the Ti occupying the tetrahedral site by 1416 {sup o}C. The rate of reordering on cooling is fast, such that high-temperature disorder is not preserved on cooling to room temperature. The thermodynamics of the change in cation distribution with temperature can be described by an enthalpy of Mg-Ti disorder of -46.1 {+-} 0.4 kJ/mol.

  14. Investigation of phase evolution of CaCu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12} (CCTO) by in situ synchrotron high-temperature powder diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Ouyang, Xin; Huang, Saifang; Zhang, Weijun; Cao, Peng; Huang, Zhaohui; Gao, Wei

    2014-03-15

    In situ synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction was used to study the high-temperature phase evolution of CaCu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12} (CCTO) precursors prepared via solid-state and sol–gel methods. After the precursors are heated to 1225 °C, the CCTO phase is the main phase observed in the calcined powder, with the presence of some minor impurities. Comparing the two precursors, we found that the onset temperature for the CCTO phase formation is 800 °C in the sol–gel precursor, lower than that in the solid-state precursor (875 °C). Intermediate phases were only observed in the sol–gel precursor. Both precursors are able to be calcined to sub-micrometric sized powders. Based on the synchrotron data along with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), the phase formation sequence and mechanism during calcination are proposed in this study. -- Graphical abstract: The in situ synchrotron HT-XRD patterns of CCTO sol–gel and solid-state precursor. Highlights: • Phase formation sequence/mechanism in two CCTO precursors has been established. • Formation temperature of CCTO via sol–gel method is lower than solid-state method. • Intermediate phases are only observed in the sol–gel precursor. • Both precursors are able to be calcined into sub-micrometric sized powders.

  15. Microstructure and high-temperature wear properties of in situ TiC composite coatings by plasma transferred arc surface alloying on gray cast iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hang; Li, Jian-jun; Zheng, Zhi-zhen; Wang, Ai-hua; Huang, Qi-wen; Zeng, Da-wen

    2015-12-01

    In this work, an in situ synthesized TiC-reinforced metal matrix composite (MMC) coating of approximately 350-400 µm thickness was fabricated on a gray cast iron (GCI) substrate by plasma transferred arc (PTA) surface alloying of Ti-Fe alloy powder. Microhardness tests showed that the surface hardness increased approximately four-fold after the alloying treatment. The microstructure of the MMC coating was mainly composed of residual austenite, acicular martensite, and eutectic ledeburite. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction analyzes revealed that the in situ TiC particles, which were formed by direct reaction of Ti with carbon originally contained in the GCI, was uniformly distributed at the boundary of residual austenite in the alloying zone. Pin-on-disc high-temperature wear tests were performed on samples both with and without the MMC coating at room temperature and at elevated temperatures (473 K and 623 K), and the wear behavior and mechanism were investigated. The results showed that, after the PTA alloying treatment, the wear resistance of the samples improved significantly. On the basis of our analysis of the composite coatings by optical microscopy, SEM with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and microhardness measurements, we attributed this improvement of wear resistance to the transformation of the microstructure and to the presence of TiC particles.

  16. High-temperature in-situ TEM straining of the interaction with dislocations and particles for Cu-added ferritic stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shuhei; Kaneko, Kenji; Yamada, Kazuhiro; Kikuchi, Masao; Kanno, Norihiro; Hamada, Junichi

    2014-11-01

    IntroductionCu is always present in the matrix when ferritic steels were prepared from ferrous scrap. When the ferritic steels are aged thermally, Cu precipitates start appear and disperse finely and homogeneously [1], which may make the steels strengthened by precipitation hardening. In this study, the interaction between Cu precipitates and dislocations was exmined via high-temperature in-situ TEM straining. ExperimentalCu-added ferritic stainless steel (Fe-18.4%Cr-1.5%Cu) was used in the present study. Specimen was aged at1073 K for 360 ks. Samples for TEM observation were prepared by focused ion beam (FIB; Quanta 3D 200i) method. Microstructure of specimen was analyzed by JEM-3200FSK and high-temperature in-situ TEM straining was conducted using JEM-1300NEF. Results and discussionInteraction between Cu precipitates and dislocation is seen from consecutive TEM images acquired by in-situ TEM straining at 1073 K, as shown in Fig.1. The size of Cu precipitates was about 70 nm and several dislocations were present within the field of view. In particular, progressing dislocations contacted with the Cu precipitate at right angle, as indicated by arrows in Fig.1 (b) to (d). This result implies that there is an attractive interaction between dislocations and the Cu precipitate. This is attributed to the fact that Stress field of dislocations was easily relaxed in interface between the Cu precipitate and matrix because of lattice and interface diffusion as well as slip in the interface [2,3]. Furthermore, dislocations pass through the particle after contacting it, so that the interaction with dislocations and particles should be explained by Srolovitz mechanism [4].jmicro;63/suppl_1/i28/DFU083F1F1DFU083F1Fig. 1.TEM images foucused on interaction with dislocations and partticles.

  17. In situ measurement of magnesium carbonate formation from CO2 using static high-pressure and -temperature 13C NMR.

    PubMed

    Surface, J Andrew; Skemer, Philip; Hayes, Sophia E; Conradi, Mark S

    2013-01-01

    We explore a new in situ NMR spectroscopy method that possesses the ability to monitor the chemical evolution of supercritical CO(2) in relevant conditions for geological CO(2) sequestration. As a model, we use the fast reaction of the mineral brucite, Mg(OH)(2), with supercritical CO(2) (88 bar) in aqueous conditions at 80 °C. The in situ conversion of CO(2) into metastable and stable carbonates is observed throughout the reaction. After more than 58 h of reaction, the sample was depressurized and analyzed using in situ Raman spectroscopy, where the laser was focused on the undisturbed products through the glass reaction tube. Postreaction, ex situ analysis was performed on the extracted and dried products using Raman spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, and magic-angle spinning (1)H-decoupled (13)C NMR. These separate methods of analysis confirmed a spatial dependence of products, possibly caused by a gradient of reactant availability, pH, and/or a reaction mechanism that involves first forming hydroxy-hydrated (basic, hydrated) carbonates that convert to the end-product, anhydrous magnesite. This carbonation reaction illustrates the importance of static (unmixed) reaction systems at sequestration-like conditions. PMID:22676479

  18. A First Step Toward Understanding Nucleation Processes: in situ High-Temperature X-ray Diffraction and Absorption Investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strukelj, E.; Neuville, D. R.; Cochain, B.; Hennet, L.; Thiaudière, D.; Guillot, B.; Roskosz, M.; Comte, M.; Richet, P.

    2009-05-01

    Nucleation is the first step of the transition between the amorphous and crystalline states and thus plays a key role in Earth and Materials sciences whenever crystallization takes place. In spite of its considerable importance in igneous petrology and industrial applications (ceramics, glass-ceramics, etc.), nucleation remains known poorly because of the difficulties of investigating the structural rearrangements that take place at a nm scale when an ordered atomic packing begins to develop in a melt. In addition, the structure of amorphous phases is not only difficult to determine, but the wealth of information available for glasses is not necessarily applicable to nucleation because of the existence of temperature-induced structural changes in melts. In view of the basic geological and industrial importance of the SiO2-Al2O3-CaO system, we have investigated a calcium aluminosilicate whose crystallization has already been studied. And because elements such as Ti or Zr can promote rapid nucleation, information can be gained about the structural changes they induce by probing specifically their own environment. In this work we have thus performed a high-temperature study of the very first steps of crystallization in a calcium aluminosilicate with 7 mol percent ZrO2 by X-ray absorption measurements at the Zr K-edge et 1873 K on the homogenous melt and 1173 K on a nucleating supercooled liquid. To complement these results with information on medium range order (MRO) X-Ray diffraction experiments have also been performed under the same conditions. As a reference, the glass has been investigated by both techniques at room temperature.

  19. Cross-check of ex-situ and in-situ metrology of a bendable temperature stabilized KB mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Sheng Sam; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Celestre, Richard; McKinney, Wayne R.; Morrison, Gregory; Macdougall, James; Mochi, Iacopo; Warwick, Tony

    2010-09-15

    At the Advanced Light Source (ALS), we are developing broadly applicable, high-accuracy, in-situ, at-wavelength wavefront slope measurement techniques for Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirror nano-focusing. In this paper, we report an initial cross-check of ex-situ and in-situ metrology of a bendable temperature stabilized KB mirror. This cross-check provides a validation of the in-situ shearing interferometry currently under development at the ALS.

  20. Highly conductive graphene by low-temperature thermal reduction and in situ preparation of conductive polymer nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liping; Kong, Junhua; Yee, Wu Aik; Liu, Wanshuang; Phua, Si Lei; Toh, Cher Ling; Huang, Shu; Lu, Xuehong

    2012-08-21

    Polydopamine-coated graphene oxide (DGO) films exhibit electrical conductivities of 11,000 S m(-1) and 30,000 S m(-1) upon vacuum annealing at 130 °C and 180 °C, respectively. Conductive poly(vinyl alcohol)/graphene and epoxy/graphene nanocomposites show low percolation thresholds due to the excellent dispersibility of the DGO sheets and their effective in situ reduction. PMID:22797422

  1. Platinum-cobalt catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction in high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells - Long term behavior under ex-situ and in-situ conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenk, Alexander; Grimmer, Christoph; Perchthaler, Markus; Weinberger, Stephan; Pichler, Birgit; Heinzl, Christoph; Scheu, Christina; Mautner, Franz-Andreas; Bitschnau, Brigitte; Hacker, Viktor

    2014-11-01

    Platinum cobalt catalysts (Pt-Co) have attracted much interest as cathode catalysts for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) due to their high activity toward oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Many of the reported catalysts show outstanding performance in ex-situ experiments. However, the laborious synthesis protocols of these Pt-Co catalysts disable an efficient and economic production of membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs). We present an economic, flexible and continuous Pt-M/C catalyst preparation method as part of a large scale membrane electrode assembly manufacturing. In comparison, the as-prepared Pt-Co/C based high temperature (HT)-PEM MEA showed an equal performance to a commercially available HT-PEM MEA during 600 h of operation under constant load, although the commercial one had a significantly higher Pt loading at the cathode.

  2. Dislocation generation related to micro-cracks in Si wafers: High temperature in situ study with white beam X-ray topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilewsky, A.; Wittge, J.; Hess, A.; Cröll, A.; Allen, D.; McNally, P.; Vagovič, P.; Cecilia, A.; Li, Z.; Baumbach, T.; Gorostegui-Colinas, E.; Elizalde, M. R.

    2010-02-01

    The generation and propagation of dislocations in Si at high temperature is observed in situ with white beam X-ray topography. For the heating experiments a double ellipsoidal mirror furnace was installed at the Topo-Tomo beamline of the ANKA synchrotron light source, Research Centre Karlsruhe, Germany. Details of the experimental set-up and the first results on the occurrence of dislocations are presented. Artificial damage was generated in commercial (1 0 0) Si wafers using a nanoindenter with various loads. The applied forces for each set of indents were varied from 100 to 500 mN, respectively. After heating to approx. 790 °C large area transmission topographs were taken every 30 min which were then compared to room temperature topographs before and after heating. At the outset straight 60°-dislocations with b = a/2<1 1 0> originate from the 500 mN indents into the direction of the strongest temperature gradient. After 60 min at constant temperature an increase in the length and number of the dislocations in other directions is also observed. As a result of the continual thermal stressing dislocations develop from the 100 mN indents too.

  3. In situ atomic force microscope study of high-temperature untwinning surface relief in Mn-Fe-Cu antiferromagnetic shape memory alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.; Cui, Y. G.; Wan, J. F.; Rong, Y. H.; Zhang, J. H.; Jin, X.; Cai, M. M.

    2013-05-06

    The N-type untwinning surface relief associated with the fcc {r_reversible} fct martensitic transformation (MT) was observed in the Mn{sub 81.5}Fe{sub 14.0}Cu{sub 4.5} antiferromagnetic high-temperature shape memory alloy (SMA) by in situ atomic force microscopy. The measured untwinning relief angles ({theta}{sub {alpha}} Double-Vertical-Line {theta}{sub {beta}}) at the ridge and at the valley were different, and both angles were less than the conventional values. The surface relief exhibited good reversibility during heating and cooling because of the crystallographic reversibility of thermal-elastic SMAs. Untwinning shear was proposed as the main mechanism of the N-type surface relief. The order of the reverse MT was discussed based on the experimental measurements.

  4. Crystalline phase transition information induced by high temperature susceptibility transformations in bulk PMP-YBCO superconductor growth in-situ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C. P.; Chaud, X.; Beaugnon, E.; Zhou, L.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic susceptibility transformations of bulk HTSC PMP-YBCO growth have been investigated from 200 °C up to 1060 °C by the Faraday Balance in-situ. It revealed that the crystalline phase transitions of bulk PMP-YBCO growth in process. A new discovery of Y123 phase pre-formed then melted in heating stage has been found. It also discovered that Y123 crystal solidification started at 1004 °C in cooling stage. Before Y123 solidification the liquid phase CuO change to Cu2O reciprocally as well as the copper ion valence changed between divalent Cu2+ and trivalent Cu1+ each other. It was essential to keep quantities of CuO phase instead of the Cu2O for Y123 crystal solidification.

  5. Six Month In Situ High-Resolution Carbonate Chemistry and Temperature Study on a Coral Reef Flat Reveals Asynchronous pH and Temperature Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Kline, David I; Teneva, Lida; Hauri, Claudine; Schneider, Kenneth; Miard, Thomas; Chai, Aaron; Marker, Malcolm; Dunbar, Rob; Caldeira, Ken; Lazar, Boaz; Rivlin, Tanya; Mitchell, Brian Gregory; Dove, Sophie; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the temporal dynamics of present thermal and pH exposure on coral reefs is crucial for elucidating reef response to future global change. Diel ranges in temperature and carbonate chemistry parameters coupled with seasonal changes in the mean conditions define periods during the year when a reef habitat is exposed to anomalous thermal and/or pH exposure. Anomalous conditions are defined as values that exceed an empirically estimated threshold for each variable. We present a 200-day time series from June through December 2010 of carbonate chemistry and environmental parameters measured on the Heron Island reef flat. These data reveal that aragonite saturation state, pH, and pCO2 were primarily modulated by biologically-driven changes in dissolved organic carbon (DIC) and total alkalinity (TA), rather than salinity and temperature. The largest diel temperature ranges occurred in austral spring, in October (1.5 - 6.6°C) and lowest diel ranges (0.9 - 3.2°C) were observed in July, at the peak of winter. We observed large diel total pH variability, with a maximum range of 7.7 - 8.5 total pH units, with minimum diel average pH values occurring during spring and maximum during fall. As with many other reefs, the nighttime pH minima on the reef flat were far lower than pH values predicted for the open ocean by 2100. DIC and TA both increased from June (end of Fall) to December (end of Spring). Using this high-resolution dataset, we developed exposure metrics of pH and temperature individually for intensity, duration, and severity of low pH and high temperature events, as well as a combined metric. Periods of anomalous temperature and pH exposure were asynchronous on the Heron Island reef flat, which underlines the importance of understanding the dynamics of co-occurrence of multiple stressors on coastal ecosystems. PMID:26039687

  6. Six Month In Situ High-Resolution Carbonate Chemistry and Temperature Study on a Coral Reef Flat Reveals Asynchronous pH and Temperature Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Kline, David I.; Teneva, Lida; Hauri, Claudine; Schneider, Kenneth; Miard, Thomas; Chai, Aaron; Marker, Malcolm; Dunbar, Rob; Caldeira, Ken; Lazar, Boaz; Rivlin, Tanya; Mitchell, Brian Gregory; Dove, Sophie; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the temporal dynamics of present thermal and pH exposure on coral reefs is crucial for elucidating reef response to future global change. Diel ranges in temperature and carbonate chemistry parameters coupled with seasonal changes in the mean conditions define periods during the year when a reef habitat is exposed to anomalous thermal and/or pH exposure. Anomalous conditions are defined as values that exceed an empirically estimated threshold for each variable. We present a 200-day time series from June through December 2010 of carbonate chemistry and environmental parameters measured on the Heron Island reef flat. These data reveal that aragonite saturation state, pH, and pCO2 were primarily modulated by biologically-driven changes in dissolved organic carbon (DIC) and total alkalinity (TA), rather than salinity and temperature. The largest diel temperature ranges occurred in austral spring, in October (1.5 – 6.6°C) and lowest diel ranges (0.9 – 3.2°C) were observed in July, at the peak of winter. We observed large diel total pH variability, with a maximum range of 7.7 – 8.5 total pH units, with minimum diel average pH values occurring during spring and maximum during fall. As with many other reefs, the nighttime pH minima on the reef flat were far lower than pH values predicted for the open ocean by 2100. DIC and TA both increased from June (end of Fall) to December (end of Spring). Using this high-resolution dataset, we developed exposure metrics of pH and temperature individually for intensity, duration, and severity of low pH and high temperature events, as well as a combined metric. Periods of anomalous temperature and pH exposure were asynchronous on the Heron Island reef flat, which underlines the importance of understanding the dynamics of co-occurrence of multiple stressors on coastal ecosystems. PMID:26039687

  7. Six Month In Situ High-Resolution Carbonate Chemistry and Temperature Study on a Coral Reef Flat Reveals Asynchronous pH and Temperature Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Kline, David I; Teneva, Lida; Hauri, Claudine; Schneider, Kenneth; Miard, Thomas; Chai, Aaron; Marker, Malcolm; Dunbar, Rob; Caldeira, Ken; Lazar, Boaz; Rivlin, Tanya; Mitchell, Brian Gregory; Dove, Sophie; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the temporal dynamics of present thermal and pH exposure on coral reefs is crucial for elucidating reef response to future global change. Diel ranges in temperature and carbonate chemistry parameters coupled with seasonal changes in the mean conditions define periods during the year when a reef habitat is exposed to anomalous thermal and/or pH exposure. Anomalous conditions are defined as values that exceed an empirically estimated threshold for each variable. We present a 200-day time series from June through December 2010 of carbonate chemistry and environmental parameters measured on the Heron Island reef flat. These data reveal that aragonite saturation state, pH, and pCO2 were primarily modulated by biologically-driven changes in dissolved organic carbon (DIC) and total alkalinity (TA), rather than salinity and temperature. The largest diel temperature ranges occurred in austral spring, in October (1.5 - 6.6°C) and lowest diel ranges (0.9 - 3.2°C) were observed in July, at the peak of winter. We observed large diel total pH variability, with a maximum range of 7.7 - 8.5 total pH units, with minimum diel average pH values occurring during spring and maximum during fall. As with many other reefs, the nighttime pH minima on the reef flat were far lower than pH values predicted for the open ocean by 2100. DIC and TA both increased from June (end of Fall) to December (end of Spring). Using this high-resolution dataset, we developed exposure metrics of pH and temperature individually for intensity, duration, and severity of low pH and high temperature events, as well as a combined metric. Periods of anomalous temperature and pH exposure were asynchronous on the Heron Island reef flat, which underlines the importance of understanding the dynamics of co-occurrence of multiple stressors on coastal ecosystems.

  8. High Temperature Piezoelectric Drill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Scott, James; Boudreau, Kate; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart; Badescu, Mircea; Shrout, Tom; Zhang, Shujun

    2009-01-01

    The current NASA Decadal mission planning effort has identified Venus as a significant scientific target for a surface in-situ sampling/analyzing mission. The Venus environment represents several extremes including high temperature (460 deg C), high pressure (9 MPa), and potentially corrosive (condensed sulfuric acid droplets that adhere to surfaces during entry) environments. This technology challenge requires new rock sampling tools for these extreme conditions. Piezoelectric materials can potentially operate over a wide temperature range. Single crystals, like LiNbO3, have a Curie temperature that is higher than 1000 deg C and the piezoelectric ceramics Bismuth Titanate higher than 600 deg C. A study of the feasibility of producing piezoelectric drills that can operate in the temperature range up to 500 deg C was conducted. The study includes the high temperature properties investigations of engineering materials and piezoelectric ceramics with different formulas and doping. The drilling performances of a prototype Ultrasonic/Sonic Drill/Corer (USDC) using high temperate piezoelectric ceramics and single crystal were tested at temperature up to 500 deg C. The detailed results of our study and a discussion of the future work on performance improvements are presented in this paper.

  9. Modelling of the vapour-liquid equilibrium of water and the in situ concentration of H3PO4 in a high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazdal, Timur J.; Lang, Sebastian; Kühl, Frank; Hampe, Manfred J.

    2014-03-01

    The fuel cell technology is a key element for the hydrogen energy economy and therefore crucial for sustainable development. High temperature proton exchange membrane (HT-PEM) fuel cells (FC) can be operated with reformate gas and thus represent an important bridging technology for the energy transition to a renewable energy based system. HT-PEM FCs based on phosphoric acid (PA) are still subject to intense research, investigating the electrolyte behaviour. By enhancing state of the art 2D FEM simulations of FCs with the vapour liquid equilibrium of water-phosphoric acid and evaporation kinetics, a model was created in which the local concentration of PA can be calculated. Knowledge of the concentration field yields the basis for calculating the locally varying ionic conductivity and other physical properties. By describing the volume expansion behaviour of PA it was possible to predict the catalyst particle deactivation due to the swelling of PA. The in situ concentration predicted by the simulation ranges from 96 to 111 wt%. The model was validated using measured data of a single cell design for different temperatures and pressures. By varying the PA content flooding of the simulated fuel cell could be observed and was linked to humidification effects.

  10. Tensile testing of materials at high temperatures above 1700 °C with in situ synchrotron X-ray micro-tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Haboub, Abdel; Nasiatka, James R.; MacDowell, Alastair A.; Bale, Hrishikesh A.; Cox, Brian N.; Marshall, David B.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2014-08-15

    A compact ultrahigh temperature tensile testing instrument has been designed and fabricated for in situ x-ray micro-tomography using synchrotron radiation at the Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. It allows for real time x-ray micro-tomographic imaging of test materials under mechanical load at temperatures up to 2300 °C in controlled environments (vacuum or controlled gas flow). Sample heating is by six infrared halogen lamps with ellipsoidal reflectors arranged in a confocal configuration, which generates an approximately spherical zone of high heat flux approximately 5 mm in diameter. Samples are held between grips connected to a motorized stage that loads the samples in tension or compression with forces up to 2.2 kN. The heating chamber and loading system are water-cooled for thermal stability. The entire instrument is mounted on a rotation stage that allows stepwise recording of radiographs over an angular range of 180°. A thin circumferential (360°) aluminum window in the wall of the heating chamber allows the x-rays to pass through the chamber and the sample over the full angular range. The performance of the instrument has been demonstrated by characterizing the evolution of 3D damage mechanisms in ceramic composite materials under tensile loading at 1750 °C.

  11. In Situ Synthesis of Porous Carbons by Using Room-Temperature, Atmospheric-Pressure Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma as High-Performance Adsorbents for Solid-Phase Microextraction.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yao; Wu, Li; Xu, Kailai; Tian, Yunfei; Hou, Xiandeng; Zheng, Chengbin

    2015-09-21

    A one-step, template-free method is described to synthesize porous carbons (PCs) in situ on a metal surface by using a room-temperature, atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma. This method not only features high efficiency, environmentally friendliness, and low cost and simple equipment, but also can conveniently realize large-area synthesis of PCs by only changing the design of the DBD reactor. The synthesized PCs have a regulated nestlike morphology, and thus, provide a high specific surface area and high pore volume, which result in excellent adsorption properties. Its applicability was demonstrated by using a PC-coated stainless-steel fiber as a solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fiber to preconcentrate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) prior to analysis by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (GC-FID). The results showed that the fiber exhibited excellent enrichment factors (4.1×10(4) to 3.1×10(5)) toward all tested PAHs. Thus, the PC-based SPME-GC-FID provides low limits of detection (2 to 20 ng L(-1)), good precision (<7.8%), and good recoveries (80-115%) for ultra-sensitive determination of PAHs in real water samples. In addition, the PC-coated fiber could be stable enough for more than 500 replicate extraction cycles. PMID:26267394

  12. In Situ Measurement of the γ/ γ' Lattice Mismatch Evolution of a Nickel-Based Single-Crystal Superalloy During Non-isothermal Very High-Temperature Creep Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Graverend, Jean-Briac; Dirand, Laura; Jacques, Alain; Cormier, Jonathan; Ferry, Olivier; Schenk, Thomas; Gallerneau, Franck; Kruch, Serge; Mendez, José

    2012-11-01

    The evolution of the γ/ γ' lattice mismatch of the AM1 single-crystal superalloy was measured during in situ non-isothermal very high-temperature creep tests under X-ray synchrotron radiation. The magnitude of the effective lattice mismatch in the 1273 K to 1323 K (1000 °C to 1050 °C) temperature range always increased after overheatings performed at temperatures lower than 1403 K (1130 °C). In contrast, a decrease of its magnitude was observed after overheatings at temperatures greater than 1453 K (1180 °C) due to massive dislocation recovery processes occurring at very high temperature.

  13. In situ Growth of NixCu1-x Alloy Nanocatalysts on Redox-reversible Rutile (Nb,Ti)O4 Towards High-Temperature Carbon Dioxide Electrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Haoshan; Xie, Kui; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Yan; Qin, Yongqiang; Cui, Jiewu; Yan, Jian; Wu, Yucheng

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we report the in situ growth of NixCu1-x (x = 0, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75 and 1.0) alloy catalysts to anchor and decorate a redox-reversible Nb1.33Ti0.67O4 ceramic substrate with the aim of tailoring the electrocatalytic activity of the composite materials through direct exsolution of metal particles from the crystal lattice of a ceramic oxide in a reducing atmosphere at high temperatures. Combined analysis using XRD, SEM, EDS, TGA, TEM and XPS confirmed the completely reversible exsolution/dissolution of the NixCu1-x alloy particles during the redox cycling treatments. TEM results revealed that the alloy particles were exsolved to anchor onto the surface of highly electronically conducting Nb1.33Ti0.67O4 in the form of heterojunctions. The electrical properties of the nanosized NixCu1-x/Nb1.33Ti0.67O4 were systematically investigated and correlated to the electrochemical performance of the composite electrodes. A strong dependence of the improved electrode activity on the alloy compositions was observed in reducing atmospheres at high temperatures. Direct electrolysis of CO2 at the NixCu1-x/Nb1.33Ti0.67O4 composite cathodes was investigated in solid-oxide electrolysers. The CO2 splitting rates were observed to be positively correlated with the Ni composition; however, the Ni0.75Cu0.25 combined the advantages of metallic nickel and copper and therefore maximised the current efficiencies. PMID:24889679

  14. In situ Growth of NixCu1-x Alloy Nanocatalysts on Redox-reversible Rutile (Nb,Ti)O4 Towards High-Temperature Carbon Dioxide Electrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Haoshan; Xie, Kui; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Yan; Qin, Yongqiang; Cui, Jiewu; Yan, Jian; Wu, Yucheng

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we report the in situ growth of NixCu1-x (x = 0, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75 and 1.0) alloy catalysts to anchor and decorate a redox-reversible Nb1.33Ti0.67O4 ceramic substrate with the aim of tailoring the electrocatalytic activity of the composite materials through direct exsolution of metal particles from the crystal lattice of a ceramic oxide in a reducing atmosphere at high temperatures. Combined analysis using XRD, SEM, EDS, TGA, TEM and XPS confirmed the completely reversible exsolution/dissolution of the NixCu1-x alloy particles during the redox cycling treatments. TEM results revealed that the alloy particles were exsolved to anchor onto the surface of highly electronically conducting Nb1.33Ti0.67O4 in the form of heterojunctions. The electrical properties of the nanosized NixCu1-x/Nb1.33Ti0.67O4 were systematically investigated and correlated to the electrochemical performance of the composite electrodes. A strong dependence of the improved electrode activity on the alloy compositions was observed in reducing atmospheres at high temperatures. Direct electrolysis of CO2 at the NixCu1-x/Nb1.33Ti0.67O4 composite cathodes was investigated in solid-oxide electrolysers. The CO2 splitting rates were observed to be positively correlated with the Ni composition; however, the Ni0.75Cu0.25 combined the advantages of metallic nickel and copper and therefore maximised the current efficiencies.

  15. Isothermal nucleation and growth kinetics of Pd/Ag alloy phase via in-situ time-resolved high-temperature x-ray diffraction (HTXRD) analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ayturk, Mahmut Engin; Payzant, E Andrew; Speakman, Scott A; Ma, Yi Hua

    2008-01-01

    Among several different approaches to form Pd/Ag alloys for hydrogen separation applications, ex-situ studies carried by conventional X-ray point scanning detectors might fail to reveal the key aspects of the phase transformation between Pd and Ag metals. In this respect, in-situ time-resolved high temperature X-ray diffraction (HTXRD) was employed to study the Pd/Ag alloy phase nucleation and growth kinetics. By the use of linear position sensitive detectors, advanced optics and profile fitting with the use of JADE-6.5 software, isothermal phase evolution of the Pd/Ag alloy at 500 C, 550 C and 600 C under hydrogen atmosphere were quantified to elucidate the mechanistic details of the Pd/Ag alloy phase nucleation and growth pattern. Analysis of the HTXRD data by the Avrami model indicated that the nucleation of the Pd/Ag alloy phase was instantaneous where the growth mechanism was through diffusion-controlled one-dimensional thickening of the Pd/Ag alloy layer. The value of the Avrami exponent, n, was found to increase with temperature with the values of 0.34, 0.39 and 0.67 at 500oC, 550oC and 600oC, respectively. In addition, parabolic rate law analysis suggested that the nucleation of the Pd/Ag alloy phase was through a heterogeneous nucleation mode, in which the nucleation sites were defined as the non-equilibrium defects. The cross-sectional SEI micrographs indicated that the Pd/Ag alloy phase growth was strongly dependent upon the deposition morphology of the as-synthesized Pd and Ag layers formed by the electroless plating. Based on the Avrami model and the parabolic rate law, the estimated activation energies for the phase transformation were 236.5 and 185.6 kJ/mol and in excellent agreement with the literature values (183-239.5 kJ/mol).

  16. A multipurpose ultra-high vacuum-compatible chamber for in situ X-ray surface scattering studies over a wide range of temperature and pressure environment conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer, P.; Rubio-Zuazo, J.; Heyman, C.; Esteban-Betegón, F.; Castro, G. R.

    2013-03-01

    A low/high temperature (60-1000K) and pressure (10-10-3x103 mbar) "baby chamber", specially adapted to the grazing-incidence X-ray scattering station, has been designed, developed and installed at the Spanish CRG BM25 SpLine beamline at European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The chamber has a cylindrical form with 100 mm of diameter, built on a 360° beryllium nipple of 150 mm height. The UHV equipment and a turbo pump are located on the upper part of the chamber to leave a wide solid angle for exploring reciprocal space. The chamber features 4 CF16 and 5 CF40 ports for electrical feed through and leak valves, ion gun, etc. The heat exchanger is a customized compact LN2 (or LHe) continuous flow cryostat. The sample is mounted on a Mo support on the heat exchanger, which has in the back side a BORALECTRIC® Heater Elements. Experiments of surfaces/interfaces/ multilayer materials, thin films or single crystals in a huge variety of environments can be performed, also in situ studies of growth or evolution of the samples. Data measurement can be collected with a punctual and a bi-dimensional detector, being possible to simultaneously use them.

  17. Determination of the phase boundary of the omega to beta transition in Zr using in situ high-pressure and high-temperature X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Shigeaki; Kikegawa, Takumi

    2015-05-15

    The high-pressure behavior of zirconium has been examined using the synchrotron X-ray diffraction technique to a pressure of 38 GPa and a temperature of 800 K employing a hydrothermal diamond anvil cell technique. The structural transition from the ω to the β phase was observed. This transition has a negative dP/dT gradient, which is in general agreement with those reported in previous studies. The transition boundary was determined to be, P (GPa)=41.2–0.025×T (K). The negative slope of the transition, dP/dT, determined in our study using the diamond anvil cell technique was less than half that estimated by the previous study using a large press apparatus. - Graphical abstract: Experimental results and phase boundary of the ω–β transition in Zr. - Highlights: • X-ray diffraction patterns of zirconium were measured by the synchrotron experiments. • High-pressure experiments were performed by an external-heated diamond anvil cell. • Phase diagram of zirconium was determined at high pressures and high temperatures. • Phase boundary between omega and beta transition has a negative dP/dT slope.

  18. Determination of the Phase Boundary Fe3O4 - h-Fe3O4 at high Temperature and Pressure using in situ Synchroton Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schollenbruch, K.; Woodland, A. B.; Frost, D. J.; Wang, Y.; Sanehira, T.

    2009-12-01

    Magnetite is an important accessory mineral in the Earth’s mantle and its rare occurrence as inclusions in diamonds means that this phase has a direct relevance to geochemical processes in the deep earth. For this reason it is important to define its thermodynamic behaviour at high P and T. Magnetite transforms to an orthorhombic high-pressure phase (h-Fe3O4) at room T and ~25 GPa, however the reaction is very sluggish and h-Fe3O4 is unquenchable, complicating the determination of the exact position of the phase boundary at low T. For this reason the phase transition has been investigated by a combination of a multianvil press and in situ X-ray diffraction measurements performed at the Advanced Photo Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory, U.S.A.. With this setup, pressure can be monitored during an experiment, allowing different P-T trajectories to be employed (i.e. pressurisation at high T) compared to conventional methods. Experiments were performed up to 15 GPa and 1400°C. A series of measurements during pressurisation at different temperatures revealed, that diffraction peaks related to h-Fe3O4 appeared at the expense of magnetite peaks at about 10 GPa. At the onset of the phase transition, the pressure decreased slightly due to pressure buffering from the 7% volume reduction attending the transition. However, the strongest magnetite reflections remained even at the highest P and T, underlining the sluggishness of the reaction. Measurements made while tracking down P at high T provided reversals, where the regrowth of magnetite diffraction peaks were observed. Once formed, h-Fe3O4 remains metastable down to nearly ambient conditions. Post-experiment TEM investigation revealed extensive twinning and other microstructures, confirming the interpretation of Frost et al. (2001), that such structures formed during the reconversion to magnetite at low pressure. Our high P-T experiments indicate a nearly isobaric phase boundary over a range of 800-1400

  19. Chemistry at high pressures and temperatures: in-situ synthesis and characterization of {beta}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} by DAC X-ray/laser-heating studies

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, C.-S.; Akella, J.; Nicol, M.

    1996-01-01

    We have developed in-situ XRD technique at high pressures and temperatures by integrating the angle-resolved synchrotron XRD method, laser-heating system, and diamond anvil cell together. Using this technique, we have studied the direct elementary reactions of nitrogen with Si, yielding technologically important {beta}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}. These reactions do not occur at ambient temperatures at high pressures up to 50 GPa, but proceed exothermically at high temperatures at moderate pressures. It implies that the reaction is kinetically limited by a large activation barrier.

  20. Evidence for high-temperature in situ nifH transcription in an alkaline hot spring of Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park.

    PubMed

    Loiacono, Sara T; Meyer-Dombard, D'Arcy R; Havig, Jeff R; Poret-Peterson, Amisha T; Hartnett, Hilairy E; Shock, Everett L

    2012-05-01

    Genes encoding nitrogenase (nifH) were amplified from sediment and photosynthetic mat samples collected in the outflow channel of Mound Spring, an alkaline thermal feature in Yellowstone National Park. Results indicate the genetic capacity for nitrogen fixation over the entire range of temperatures sampled (57.2°C to 80.2°C). Amplification of environmental nifH transcripts revealed in situ expression of nifH genes at temperatures up to 72.7°C. However, we were unable to amplify transcripts of nifH at the higher-temperature locations (> 72.7°C). These results indicate that microbes at the highest temperature sites contain the genetic capacity to fix nitrogen, yet either do not express nifH or do so only transiently. Field measurements of nitrate and ammonium show fixed nitrogen limitation as temperature decreases along the outflow channel, suggesting nifH expression in response to the downstream decrease in bioavailable nitrogen. Nitrogen stable isotope values of Mound Spring sediment communities further support geochemical and genetic data. DNA and cDNA nifH amplicons form several unique phylogenetic clades, some of which appear to represent novel nifH sequences in both photosynthetic and chemosynthetic microbial communities. This is the first report of in situ nifH expression in strictly chemosynthetic zones of terrestrial (non-marine) hydrothermal systems, and sets a new upper temperature limit (72.7°C) for nitrogen fixation in alkaline, terrestrial hydrothermal environments.

  1. Evidence for high-temperature in situ nifH transcription in an alkaline hot spring of Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park.

    PubMed

    Loiacono, Sara T; Meyer-Dombard, D'Arcy R; Havig, Jeff R; Poret-Peterson, Amisha T; Hartnett, Hilairy E; Shock, Everett L

    2012-05-01

    Genes encoding nitrogenase (nifH) were amplified from sediment and photosynthetic mat samples collected in the outflow channel of Mound Spring, an alkaline thermal feature in Yellowstone National Park. Results indicate the genetic capacity for nitrogen fixation over the entire range of temperatures sampled (57.2°C to 80.2°C). Amplification of environmental nifH transcripts revealed in situ expression of nifH genes at temperatures up to 72.7°C. However, we were unable to amplify transcripts of nifH at the higher-temperature locations (> 72.7°C). These results indicate that microbes at the highest temperature sites contain the genetic capacity to fix nitrogen, yet either do not express nifH or do so only transiently. Field measurements of nitrate and ammonium show fixed nitrogen limitation as temperature decreases along the outflow channel, suggesting nifH expression in response to the downstream decrease in bioavailable nitrogen. Nitrogen stable isotope values of Mound Spring sediment communities further support geochemical and genetic data. DNA and cDNA nifH amplicons form several unique phylogenetic clades, some of which appear to represent novel nifH sequences in both photosynthetic and chemosynthetic microbial communities. This is the first report of in situ nifH expression in strictly chemosynthetic zones of terrestrial (non-marine) hydrothermal systems, and sets a new upper temperature limit (72.7°C) for nitrogen fixation in alkaline, terrestrial hydrothermal environments. PMID:22404902

  2. An in situ synchrotron energy-dispersive diffraction study of the hydration of oilwell cement systems under high temperature/autoclave conditions up to 130 deg. C

    SciTech Connect

    Colston, Sally L.; Barnes, Paul . E-mail: p.barnes@bbk.ac.uk; Jupe, Andrew C.; Jacques, Simon D.M.; Hall, Christopher; Livesey, Paul; Dransfield, John; Meller, Nicola; Maitland, Geoffrey C.

    2005-12-15

    The technique of synchrotron energy dispersive diffraction has been developed for in situ studies of cement hydration under autoclave conditions. This has been applied to oilwell cements hydrating at typical oilwell temperatures up to 130 deg. C. The results show clearly the detailed interplay between 11 detectable phases, from which a phase transformation scheme has been derived; this illustrates the progression of hydration up to 130 deg. C for two extreme cases, with and without conservation of water content and autoclave pressure. The monosulphate hydrate phases are found to exhibit different stability bounds, with a surprising sequence of the 14-water, 10-water then 12-water monosulphate as temperature/time increases; the latter form is particularly associated with conditions of water/pressure loss. The effect of retarders on C{sub 3}S dissolution and CH formation is negligible above 70 deg. C, whereas the effect on the calcium sulphoaluminate hydrates is more complex, and possible reasons for this are discussed.

  3. In situ determination of the spinel-post-spinel transition in Fe3O4 at high pressure and temperature by synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Schollenbruch, K; Woodland, A B; Frost, D J; Wang, Y; Sanehira, T; Langenhorst, F

    2011-08-10

    The position of the spinel-post-spinel phase transition in Fe3O4 has been determined in pressure-temperature space by in situ measurements using a multi-anvil press combined with white synchrotron radiation. Pressure measurement using the equation of state for MgO permitted pressure changes to be monitored at high temperature. The phase boundary was determined by the first appearance of diffraction peaks of the high-pressure polymorph (h-Fe3O4) during pressure increase and the disappearance of these peaks on pressure decrease along several isotherms. We intersected the phase boundary over the temperature interval of 700-1400 ºC. The boundary is linear and nearly isobaric, with a slightly positive slope. Post-experiment investigation by TEM confirms that the reverse reaction from h-Fe 3O4 to magnetite during decompression leads to the formation of microtwins on the (311) plane in the newly formed magnetite. Observations made during the phase transition suggest that the transition has a pseudomartensitic character, explaining in part why magnetite persists at conditions well within the stability field of h-Fe3O4, even at high temperatures. This study emphasizes the utility of studying phase transitions in situ at simultaneously high temperatures and pressures since the reaction kinetics may not be favorable at room temperature.

  4. High-resolution in-situ thermal imaging of microbial mats at El Tatio Geyser, Chile shows coupling between community color and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunckel, Anne E.; Cardenas, M. Bayani; Sawyer, Audrey H.; Bennett, Philip C.

    2009-12-01

    Microbial mats have spatially heterogeneous structured communities that manifest visually through vibrant color zonation often associated with environmental gradients. We report the first use of high-resolution thermal infrared imaging to map temperature at four hot springs within the El Tatio Geyser Field, Chile. Thermal images with millimeter resolution show drastic variability and pronounced patterning in temperature, with changes on the order of 30°C within a square decimeter. Paired temperature and visual images show that zones with specific coloration occur within distinct temperature ranges. Unlike previous studies where maximum, minimum, and optimal temperatures for microorganisms are based on isothermally-controlled laboratory cultures, thermal imaging allows for mapping thousands of temperature values in a natural setting. This allows for efficiently constraining natural temperature bounds for visually distinct mat zones. This approach expands current understanding of thermophilic microbial communities and opens doors for detailed analysis of biophysical controls on microbial ecology.

  5. New Experimental Method for In Situ Determination of Material Textures at Simultaneous High-Pressure and -Temperature by Means of Radial Diffraction in the Diamond Anvil Cell.

    SciTech Connect

    Liermann, H; Merkel, S; Miyagi, L; Wenk, H; Shen, G; Cynn, H; Evans, W J

    2009-07-15

    We introduce the design and capabilities of a new resistive heated diamond anvil cell that can be used for side diffraction at simultaneous high-pressure and -temperature. The device can be used to study lattice-preferred orientations in polycrystalline samples up to temperatures of 1100 K and pressures of 36 GPa. Capabilities of the instrument are demonstrated with preliminary results on the development of textures in the BCC, FCC and HCP polymorphs of iron during a non-hydrostatic compression experiment at simultaneous high-pressure and -temperature.

  6. Preparation of W-Ta thin-film thermocouple on diamond anvil cell for in-situ temperature measurement under high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Jie; Li Ming; Zhang Honglin; Gao Chunxiao

    2011-04-15

    In this paper, a W-Ta thin-film thermocouple has been integrated on a diamond anvil cell by thin-film deposition and photolithography methods. The thermocouple was calibrated and its thermal electromotive force was studied under high pressure. The results indicate that the thermal electromotive force of the thermocouple exhibits a linear relationship with temperature and is not associated with pressure. The resistivity measurement of ZnS powders under high pressure at different temperatures shows that the phase transition pressure decreases as the temperature increases.

  7. High temperature furnace

    DOEpatents

    Borkowski, Casimer J.

    1976-08-03

    A high temperature furnace for use above 2000.degree.C is provided that features fast initial heating and low power consumption at the operating temperature. The cathode is initially heated by joule heating followed by electron emission heating at the operating temperature. The cathode is designed for routine large temperature excursions without being subjected to high thermal stresses. A further characteristic of the device is the elimination of any ceramic components from the high temperature zone of the furnace.

  8. In Situ Analysis of a High-Temperature Cure Reaction in Real Time Using Modulated Fiber-Optic FT-Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aust, Jeffrey F.; Cooper, John B.; Wise, Kent L.; Jensen, Brian J.

    1999-01-01

    The vibrational spectrum of a high-temperature (330 C) polymerization reaction was successfully monitored in real time with the use of a modulated fiber-optic Fourier transform (FT)-Raman spectrometer. A phenylethynyl-terminated monomer was cured, and spectral evidence for two different reaction products was acquired. The products are a conjugated polyene chain and a cyclized trimer. This is the first report describing the use of FT-Raman spectroscopy to monitor a high temperature (greater than 250 C) reaction in real time.

  9. Hybrid-type temperature sensor for in situ measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Iuchi, Tohru; Hiraka, Kensuke

    2006-11-15

    A hybrid-type surface temperature sensor combines the contact and noncontact methods, which allows us to overcome the shortcomings of both methods. The hybrid-type surface thermometer is composed mainly of two components: a metal film sheet that makes contact with an object and a radiometer that is used to detect the radiance of the rear surface of the metal film, which is actually a modified radiation thermometer. Temperature measurement using the hybrid-type thermometer with a several tens micrometer thick Hastelloy sheet, a highly heat and corrosion resistant alloy, is possible with a systematic error of -0.5 K and random errors of {+-}0.5 K, in the temperature range from 900 to 1000 K. This thermometer provides a useful means for calibration of in situ temperature measurement in various processes, especially in the silicon semiconductor industry. This article introduces the basic idea of the hybrid-type surface sensor, presents experimental results and discussions, and finally describes some applications.

  10. High temperature reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulera, I. V.; Sinha, R. K.

    2008-12-01

    With the advent of high temperature reactors, nuclear energy, in addition to producing electricity, has shown enormous potential for the production of alternate transport energy carrier such as hydrogen. High efficiency hydrogen production processes need process heat at temperatures around 1173-1223 K. Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), is currently developing concepts of high temperature reactors capable of supplying process heat around 1273 K. These reactors would provide energy to facilitate combined production of hydrogen, electricity, and drinking water. Compact high temperature reactor is being developed as a technology demonstrator for associated technologies. Design has been also initiated for a 600 MWth innovative high temperature reactor. High temperature reactor development programme has opened new avenues for research in areas like advanced nuclear fuels, high temperature and corrosion resistant materials and protective coatings, heavy liquid metal coolant technologies, etc. The paper highlights design of these reactors and their material related requirements.

  11. High temperature sensor

    DOEpatents

    Tokarz, Richard D.

    1982-01-01

    A high temperature sensor includes a pair of electrical conductors separated by a mass of electrical insulating material. The insulating material has a measurable resistivity within the sensor that changes in relation to the temperature of the insulating material within a high temperature range (1,000 to 2,000 K.). When required, the sensor can be encased within a ceramic protective coating.

  12. Combined resistive and laser heating technique for in situ radial X-ray diffraction in the diamond anvil cell at high pressure and temperature.

    PubMed

    Miyagi, Lowell; Kanitpanyacharoen, Waruntorn; Raju, Selva Vennila; Kaercher, Pamela; Knight, Jason; MacDowell, Alastair; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf; Williams, Quentin; Alarcon, Eloisa Zepeda

    2013-02-01

    To extend the range of high-temperature, high-pressure studies within the diamond anvil cell, a Liermann-type diamond anvil cell with radial diffraction geometry (rDAC) was redesigned and developed for synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiments at beamline 12.2.2 of the Advanced Light Source. The rDAC, equipped with graphite heating arrays, allows simultaneous resistive and laser heating while the material is subjected to high pressure. The goals are both to extend the temperature range of external (resistive) heating and to produce environments with lower temperature gradients in a simultaneously resistive- and laser-heated rDAC. Three different geomaterials were used as pilot samples to calibrate and optimize conditions for combined resistive and laser heating. For example, in Run#1, FeO was loaded in a boron-mica gasket and compressed to 11 GPa then gradually resistively heated to 1007 K (1073 K at the diamond side). The laser heating was further applied to FeO to raise temperature to 2273 K. In Run#2, Fe-Ni alloy was compressed to 18 GPa and resistively heated to 1785 K (1973 K at the diamond side). The combined resistive and laser heating was successfully performed again on (Mg0.9Fe0.1)O in Run#3. In this instance, the sample was loaded in a boron-kapton gasket, compressed to 29 GPa, resistive-heated up to 1007 K (1073 K at the diamond side), and further simultaneously laser-heated to achieve a temperature in excess of 2273 K at the sample position. Diffraction patterns obtained from the experiments were deconvoluted using the Rietveld method and quantified for lattice preferred orientation of each material under extreme conditions and during phase transformation.

  13. Combined resistive and laser heating technique for in situ radial X-ray diffraction in the diamond anvil cell at high pressure and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Miyagi, Lowell; Kanitpanyacharoen, Waruntorn; Kaercher, Pamela; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf; Alarcon, Eloisa Zepeda; Raju, Selva Vennila; Knight, Jason; MacDowell, Alastair; Williams, Quentin

    2013-02-15

    To extend the range of high-temperature, high-pressure studies within the diamond anvil cell, a Liermann-type diamond anvil cell with radial diffraction geometry (rDAC) was redesigned and developed for synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiments at beamline 12.2.2 of the Advanced Light Source. The rDAC, equipped with graphite heating arrays, allows simultaneous resistive and laser heating while the material is subjected to high pressure. The goals are both to extend the temperature range of external (resistive) heating and to produce environments with lower temperature gradients in a simultaneously resistive- and laser-heated rDAC. Three different geomaterials were used as pilot samples to calibrate and optimize conditions for combined resistive and laser heating. For example, in Run1, FeO was loaded in a boron-mica gasket and compressed to 11 GPa then gradually resistively heated to 1007 K (1073 K at the diamond side). The laser heating was further applied to FeO to raise temperature to 2273 K. In Run2, Fe-Ni alloy was compressed to 18 GPa and resistively heated to 1785 K (1973 K at the diamond side). The combined resistive and laser heating was successfully performed again on (Mg{sub 0.9}Fe{sub 0.1})O in Run3. In this instance, the sample was loaded in a boron-kapton gasket, compressed to 29 GPa, resistive-heated up to 1007 K (1073 K at the diamond side), and further simultaneously laser-heated to achieve a temperature in excess of 2273 K at the sample position. Diffraction patterns obtained from the experiments were deconvoluted using the Rietveld method and quantified for lattice preferred orientation of each material under extreme conditions and during phase transformation.

  14. A novel high-temperature furnace for combined in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction and infrared thermal imaging to investigate the effects of thermal gradients upon the structure of ceramic materials.

    PubMed

    Robinson, James B; Brown, Leon D; Jervis, Rhodri; Taiwo, Oluwadamilola O; Millichamp, Jason; Mason, Thomas J; Neville, Tobias P; Eastwood, David S; Reinhard, Christina; Lee, Peter D; Brett, Daniel J L; Shearing, Paul R

    2014-09-01

    A new technique combining in situ X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation and infrared thermal imaging is reported. The technique enables the application, generation and measurement of significant thermal gradients, and furthermore allows the direct spatial correlation of thermal and crystallographic measurements. The design and implementation of a novel furnace enabling the simultaneous thermal and X-ray measurements is described. The technique is expected to have wide applicability in material science and engineering; here it has been applied to the study of solid oxide fuel cells at high temperature.

  15. A novel high-temperature furnace for combined in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction and infrared thermal imaging to investigate the effects of thermal gradients upon the structure of ceramic materials

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, James B.; Brown, Leon D.; Jervis, Rhodri; Taiwo, Oluwadamilola O.; Millichamp, Jason; Mason, Thomas J.; Neville, Tobias P.; Eastwood, David S.; Reinhard, Christina; Lee, Peter D.; Brett, Daniel J. L.; Shearing, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    A new technique combining in situ X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation and infrared thermal imaging is reported. The technique enables the application, generation and measurement of significant thermal gradients, and furthermore allows the direct spatial correlation of thermal and crystallographic measurements. The design and implementation of a novel furnace enabling the simultaneous thermal and X-ray measurements is described. The technique is expected to have wide applicability in material science and engineering; here it has been applied to the study of solid oxide fuel cells at high temperature. PMID:25178003

  16. Determination of the effect of different additives in coking blends using a combination of in situ high-temperature {sup 1}H NMR and rheometry

    SciTech Connect

    Miguel C. Diaz; Karen M. Steel; Trevor C. Drage; John W. Patrick; Colin E. Snape

    2005-12-01

    High-temperature {sup 1}H NMR and rheometry measurements were carried out on 4:1 wt/wt blends of a medium volatile bituminous coal with two anthracites, two petroleum cokes, charcoal, wood, a low-temperature coke breeze, tyre crumb, and active carbon to determine the effects on fluidity development to identify the parameters responsible for these effects during pyrolysis and to study possible relationships among the parameters derived from these techniques. Positive, negative, and neutral effects were identified on the concentration of fluid material. Small positive effects (ca. 5-6%) were caused by blending the coal with petroleum cokes. Charcoal, wood, and active carbon all exerted negative effects on concentration (18-27% reduction) and mobility (12-25% reduction in T2) of the fluid phase, which have been associated with the inert character and high surface areas of these additives that adsorb the fluid phase of the coal. One of the anthracites and the low-temperature coke breeze caused deleterious effects to a lesser extent on the concentration (7-12%) and mobility (13-17%) of the fluid material, possibly due to the high concentration of metals in these additives (ca. 11% ash). Despite the high fluid character of tyre crumb at the temperature of maximum fluidity of the coal (73%), the mobility of the fluid phase of the blend was lower than expected. The comparison of {sup 1}H NMR and rheometry results indicated that to account for the variations in minimum complex viscosity for all the blends, both the maximum concentration of fluid phase and the maximum mobility of the fluid material had to be considered. For individual blends, two exponential relationships have been found between the complex viscosity and the concentration of solid phase in both the softening and resolidification stages but the parameters are different for each blend. 30 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. In Situ Characterization of Ge Nanocrystals Near the Growth Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, I.D.; Xu, Q.; Liao, C.Y.; Chrzan, D.C.; Haller, E.E.; Yi, D.O.; Beeman, J.W.; Liliental-Weber, Z.; Yu, K.M.; Zakharov, D.N.; Ager, J.W. III

    2005-06-30

    We present in situ electron diffraction data indicating that Ge nanocrystals embedded in a silica matrix can be solid at temperatures exceeding the bulk Ge melting point. Supercooling is observed when returning from temperatures above the melting point of the Ge nanocrystals. Since melting point hysteresis is observed, it is not clear if nanoclusters are solid or liquid during the initial growth process. Raman spectra of as-grown nanocrystals give a measure of compressive stress and in-situ Raman spectroscopy further confirms the presence of crystalline Ge above 800 deg. C.

  18. Effects of temperature on in situ toxicity testing

    SciTech Connect

    Rowland, C.D.; Burton, G.A. Jr.

    1994-12-31

    With increasing concern over the impacts and perturbations to receiving waters as a result of storm water runoff and contaminated sediments, many investigators have turned towards in situ testing for direct response data. In situ testing has been shown to be an effective assessment tool. In order to further evaluate the limitations of this method, temperature effects were evaluated. There is concern that laboratory to stream transfer of test organisms may induce significant stress if water temperatures are too cool. This study was designed to specifically address the issue of temperature tolerance and attenuation of Hyalella azteca, Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pimephales promelas in in situ conditions. Temperature tolerance is of importance in areas where receiving waters are subject to low or fluctuating temperatures as well as areas of more temperate climates. In this study, the organisms where exposed to temperatures as low as 2 C for variable lengths of time, removed and allowed to come to ambient laboratory temperatures then monitored for acute or chronic responses. No effects on survival were observed after 48 h. at 5 C; however lower temperatures increased mortality.

  19. High-Temperature Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Shoji

    2006-12-01

    A general review on high-temperature superconductivity was made. After prehistoric view and the process of discovery were stated, the special features of high-temperature superconductors were explained from the materials side and the physical properties side. The present status on applications of high-temperature superconductors were explained on superconducting tapes, electric power cables, magnets for maglev trains, electric motors, superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) and single flux quantum (SFQ) devices and circuits.

  20. High temperature refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Steyert, Jr., William A.

    1978-01-01

    A high temperature magnetic refrigerator which uses a Stirling-like cycle in which rotating magnetic working material is heated in zero field and adiabatically magnetized, cooled in high field, then adiabatically demagnetized. During this cycle said working material is in heat exchange with a pumped fluid which absorbs heat from a low temperature heat source and deposits heat in a high temperature reservoir. The magnetic refrigeration cycle operates at an efficiency 70% of Carnot.

  1. High temperature measuring device

    DOEpatents

    Tokarz, Richard D.

    1983-01-01

    A temperature measuring device for very high design temperatures (to 2,000.degree. C.). The device comprises a homogenous base structure preferably in the form of a sphere or cylinder. The base structure contains a large number of individual walled cells. The base structure has a decreasing coefficient of elasticity within the temperature range being monitored. A predetermined quantity of inert gas is confined within each cell. The cells are dimensionally stable at the normal working temperature of the device. Increases in gaseous pressure within the cells will permanently deform the cell walls at temperatures within the high temperature range to be measured. Such deformation can be correlated to temperature by calibrating similarly constructed devices under known time and temperature conditions.

  2. An in-situ investigation of the passive film on stainless steel and Inconel 600 in high temperature, pressurized, impurity containing water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mintz, Todd Samuel

    2003-08-01

    An in situ investigation of the films that formed on stainless steel and Inconel 600 at 288°C and 1500psi were performed using Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS). By examining the changes in the films that formed on these materials, information was obtained about how these films affect the Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking (IGSCC) of these two metals. Stainless steel was examined in water with dilute amounts of sulfate added, which is known to enhance IGSCC. It was observed that the addition of sulfates in no way affected the films that formed on the stainless steel. The enhanced susceptibility for IGSCC of stainless steel is due to an increase in the conductivity of the water. The increased conductivity, due to the added sulfate, reduced the potential drop down a crack, so the minimum concentration of oxygen required to cause IGSCC is less than in high purity water. Thus, the sulfate additions led to an enhancement in the IGSCC. Incone1 600 was studied in boron and lithium containing solution at 288°C. The results showed that in the corrosion potential region where IGSCC occurs, an M3O4 oxide enriched in chromium was stable. This suggested that the M3O4 was the deleterious film that enhanced SCC in the Inconel 600. Once the potential was increased above the SCC region, NiO formed, which must counteract the effects of the chromium enriched M3O4. The results from this study suggested that there is a correlation between film formation and SCC susceptibility.

  3. Experimental issues in in-situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction at high pressure and temperature by using a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, C.S.

    1997-12-01

    An integrated technique of diamond-anvil cell, laser-heating and synchrotron x-ray diffraction technologies is capable of structural investigation of condensed matter in an extended region of high pressures and temperatures above 100 GPa and 3000 K. The feasibility of this technique to obtain reliable data, however, strongly depends on several experimental issues, including optical and x-ray setups, thermal gradients, pressure homogeneity, preferred orientation, and chemical reaction. In this paper, we discuss about these experimental issues together with future perspectives of this technique for obtaining accurate data.

  4. High-temperature sensor

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1981-01-29

    A high temperature sensor is described which includes a pair of electrical conductors separated by a mass of electrical insulating material. The insulating material has a measurable resistivity within the sensor that changes in relation to the temperature of the insulating material within a high temperature range (1000 to 2000/sup 0/K). When required, the sensor can be encased within a ceramic protective coating.

  5. Temperature Calibration for In Situ Environmental Transmission Electron Microscopy Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Winterstein, JP; Lin, PA; Sharma, R

    2016-01-01

    In situ environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM) experiments require specimen heating holders to study material behavior in gaseous environments at elevated temperatures. In order to extract meaningful kinetic parameters, such as activation energies, it is essential to have a direct and accurate measurement of local sample temperature. This is particularly important if the sample temperature might fluctuate, for example when room temperature gases are introduced to the sample area. Using selected-area diffraction (SAD) in an ETEM, the lattice parameter of Ag nanoparticles was measured as a function of the temperature and pressure of hydrogen gas to provide a calibration of the local sample temperature. SAD permits measurement of temperature to an accuracy of ± 30 °C using Ag lattice expansion. Gas introduction can cause sample cooling of several hundred degrees celsius for gas pressures achievable in the ETEM. PMID:26441334

  6. Isentropic advection and convective lifting of water vapor in the UT - LS as observed over Brazil (22° S) in February 2004 by in situ high-resolution measurements of H2O, CH4, O3 and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durry, G.; Huret, N.; Hauchecorne, A.; Marecal, V.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Jones, R. L.; Held, G.; Larsen, N.; Renard, J.-B.

    2006-12-01

    The micro-SDLA balloonborne diode laser spectrometer was flown twice from Bauru (22° S, Brazil) in February 2004 during HIBISCUS to yield in situ H2O measurements in the Upper Troposphere (UT) and Lower Stratosphere (LS) and in particular in the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL). The overall TTL was found warmer (with a subsaturated cold point near -79°C) and the LS moister compared to former measurements obtained in tropical oceanic conditions. The use of specific balloons with a slow descent, combined with the high-resolution of the laser sensor, allowed us to observe in situ in the UT, the TTL and the LS several thin layers correlated on H2O, CH4, O3, temperature and PV. A component of these layers is associated with the isentropic transport into the UT- LS of extratropical stratospheric air masses. Moreover, the examination of temperature and tracer (CH4, O3) profiles gives insights on the potential contribution of convective transport of H2O in the TTL.

  7. Multi-use high/low-temperature and pressure compatible portable chamber for in situ grazing-incidence X-ray scattering studies.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Pilar; Rubio-Zuazo, Juan; Heyman, Catherine; Esteban-Betegón, Fatima; Castro, Germán R

    2013-05-01

    The multipurpose portable ultra-high-vacuum-compatible chamber described in detail in this article has been designed to carry out grazing-incidence X-ray scattering techniques on the BM25-SpLine CRG beamline at the ESRF. The chamber has a cylindrical form, built on a 360° beryllium double-ended conflate flange (CF) nipple. The main advantage of this chamber design is the wide sample temperature range, which may be varied between 60 and 1000 K. Other advantages of using a cylinder are that the wall thickness is reduced to a minimum value, keeping maximal solid angle accessibility and keeping wall absorption of the incoming X-ray beam constant. The heat exchanger is a customized compact liquid-nitrogen (LN2) continuous-flow cryostat. LN2 is transferred from a storage Dewar through a vacuum-isolated transfer line to the heat exchanger. The sample is mounted on a molybdenum support on the heat exchanger, which is equipped with a BORALECTRIC heater element. The chamber versatility extends to the operating pressure, ranging from ultra-high vacuum (<10(-10) mbar) to high pressure (up to 3 × 10(3) mbar). In addition, it is equipped with several CF ports to allocate auxiliary components such as capillary gas-inlet, viewports, leak valves, ion gun, turbo pump, etc., responding to a large variety of experiment requirements. A movable slits set-up has been foreseen to reduce the background and diffuse scattering produced at the beryllium wall. Diffraction data can be recorded either with a point detector or with a bi-dimensional CCD detector, or both detectors simultaneously. The system has been designed to carry out a multitude of experiments in a large variety of environments. The system feasibility is demonstrated by showing temperature-dependence grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction and conductivity measurements on a 20 nm-thick La0.7Ca0.3MnO3 thin film grown on a SrTiO3(001) substrate. PMID:23592627

  8. High-Temperature Superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Johnson

    2008-11-05

    Like astronomers tweaking images to gain a more detailed glimpse of distant stars, physicists at Brookhaven National Laboratory have found ways to sharpen images of the energy spectra in high-temperature superconductors — materials that carry electrical c

  9. High Temperature Capacitor Development

    SciTech Connect

    John Kosek

    2009-06-30

    The absence of high-temperature electronics is an obstacle to the development of untapped energy resources (deep oil, gas and geothermal). US natural gas consumption is projected to grow from 22 trillion cubic feet per year (tcf) in 1999 to 34 tcf in 2020. Cumulatively this is 607 tcf of consumption by 2020, while recoverable reserves using current technology are 177 tcf. A significant portion of this shortfall may be met by tapping deep gas reservoirs. Tapping these reservoirs represents a significant technical challenge. At these depths, temperatures and pressures are very high and may require penetrating very hard rock. Logistics of supporting 6.1 km (20,000 ft) drill strings and the drilling processes are complex and expensive. At these depths up to 50% of the total drilling cost may be in the last 10% of the well depth. Thus, as wells go deeper it is increasingly important that drillers are able to monitor conditions down-hole such as temperature, pressure, heading, etc. Commercial off-the-shelf electronics are not specified to meet these operating conditions. This is due to problems associated with all aspects of the electronics including the resistors and capacitors. With respect to capacitors, increasing temperature often significantly changes capacitance because of the strong temperature dependence of the dielectric constant. Higher temperatures also affect the equivalent series resistance (ESR). High-temperature capacitors usually have low capacitance values because of these dielectric effects and because packages are kept small to prevent mechanical breakage caused by thermal stresses. Electrolytic capacitors do not operate at temperatures above 150oC due to dielectric breakdown. The development of high-temperature capacitors to be used in a high-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) drilling environment was investigated. These capacitors were based on a previously developed high-voltage hybridized capacitor developed at Giner, Inc. in conjunction with a

  10. High temperature pressure gauge

    DOEpatents

    Echtler, J. Paul; Scandrol, Roy O.

    1981-01-01

    A high temperature pressure gauge comprising a pressure gauge positioned in fluid communication with one end of a conduit which has a diaphragm mounted in its other end. The conduit is filled with a low melting metal alloy above the diaphragm for a portion of its length with a high temperature fluid being positioned in the remaining length of the conduit and in the pressure gauge.

  11. High-temperature electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matus, Lawrence G.; Seng, Gary T.

    1990-01-01

    To meet the needs of the aerospace propulsion and space power communities, the high temperature electronics program at the Lewis Research Center is developing silicon carbide (SiC) as a high temperature semiconductor material. This program supports a major element of the Center's mission - to perform basic and developmental research aimed at improving aerospace propulsion systems. Research is focused on developing the crystal growth, characterization, and device fabrication technologies necessary to produce a family of SiC devices.

  12. High Temperature ESP Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Jack Booker; Brindesh Dhruva

    2011-06-20

    The objective of the High Temperature ESP Monitoring project was to develop a downhole monitoring system to be used in wells with bottom hole well temperatures up to 300°C for measuring motor temperature, formation pressure, and formation temperature. These measurements are used to monitor the health of the ESP motor, to track the downhole operating conditions, and to optimize the pump operation. A 220 ºC based High Temperature ESP Monitoring system was commercially released for sale with Schlumberger ESP motors April of 2011 and a 250 ºC system with will be commercially released at the end of Q2 2011. The measurement system is now fully qualified, except for the sensor, at 300 °C.

  13. High temperature probe

    DOEpatents

    Swan, Raymond A.

    1994-01-01

    A high temperature probe for sampling, for example, smokestack fumes, and is able to withstand temperatures of 3000.degree. F. The probe is constructed so as to prevent leakage via the seal by placing the seal inside the water jacket whereby the seal is not exposed to high temperature, which destroys the seal. The sample inlet of the probe is also provided with cooling fins about the area of the seal to provide additional cooling to prevent the seal from being destroyed. Also, a heated jacket is provided for maintaining the temperature of the gas being tested as it passes through the probe. The probe includes pressure sensing means for determining the flow velocity of an efficient being sampled. In addition, thermocouples are located in various places on the probe to monitor the temperature of the gas passing there through.

  14. High temperature structural silicides

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, J.J.

    1997-03-01

    Structural silicides have important high temperature applications in oxidizing and aggressive environments. Most prominent are MoSi{sub 2}-based materials, which are borderline ceramic-intermetallic compounds. MoSi{sub 2} single crystals exhibit macroscopic compressive ductility at temperatures below room temperature in some orientations. Polycrystalline MoSi{sub 2} possesses elevated temperature creep behavior which is highly sensitive to grain size. MoSi{sub 2}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} composites show an important combination of oxidation resistance, creep resistance, and low temperature fracture toughness. Current potential applications of MoSi{sub 2}-based materials include furnace heating elements, molten metal lances, industrial gas burners, aerospace turbine engine components, diesel engine glow plugs, and materials for glass processing.

  15. In situ fabrication of high-performance Ni-GDC-nanocube core-shell anode for low-temperature solid-oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Qiu, Nan; Ohara, Satoshi

    2015-11-01

    A core-shell anode consisting of nickel-gadolinium-doped-ceria (Ni-GDC) nanocubes was directly fabricated by a chemical process in a solution containing a nickel source and GDC nanocubes covered with highly reactive {001} facets. The cermet anode effectively generated a Ni metal framework even at 500 °C with the growth of the Ni spheres. Anode fabrication at such a low temperature without any sintering could insert a finely nanostructured layer close to the interface between the electrolyte and the anode. The maximum power density of the attractive anode was 97 mW cm-2, which is higher than that of a conventional NiO-GDC anode prepared by an aerosol process at 55 mW cm-2 and 600 °C, followed by sintering at 1300 °C. Furthermore, the macro- and microstructure of the Ni-GDC-nanocube anode were preserved before and after the power-generation test at 700 °C. Especially, the reactive {001} facets were stabled even after generation test, which served to reduce the activation energy for fuel oxidation successfully.

  16. In situ fabrication of high-performance Ni-GDC-nanocube core-shell anode for low-temperature solid-oxide fuel cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Qiu, Nan; Ohara, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    A core–shell anode consisting of nickel–gadolinium-doped-ceria (Ni–GDC) nanocubes was directly fabricated by a chemical process in a solution containing a nickel source and GDC nanocubes covered with highly reactive {001} facets. The cermet anode effectively generated a Ni metal framework even at 500 °C with the growth of the Ni spheres. Anode fabrication at such a low temperature without any sintering could insert a finely nanostructured layer close to the interface between the electrolyte and the anode. The maximum power density of the attractive anode was 97 mW cm–2, which is higher than that of a conventional NiO–GDC anode prepared by an aerosol process at 55 mW cm–2 and 600 °C, followed by sintering at 1300 °C. Furthermore, the macro- and microstructure of the Ni–GDC-nanocube anode were preserved before and after the power-generation test at 700 °C. Especially, the reactive {001} facets were stabled even after generation test, which served to reduce the activation energy for fuel oxidation successfully. PMID:26615816

  17. In situ fabrication of high-performance Ni-GDC-nanocube core-shell anode for low-temperature solid-oxide fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Qiu, Nan; Ohara, Satoshi

    2015-11-30

    A core-shell anode consisting of nickel-gadolinium-doped-ceria (Ni-GDC) nanocubes was directly fabricated by a chemical process in a solution containing a nickel source and GDC nanocubes covered with highly reactive {001} facets. The cermet anode effectively generated a Ni metal framework even at 500 °C with the growth of the Ni spheres. Anode fabrication at such a low temperature without any sintering could insert a finely nanostructured layer close to the interface between the electrolyte and the anode. The maximum power density of the attractive anode was 97 mW cm(-2), which is higher than that of a conventional NiO-GDC anode prepared by an aerosol process at 55 mW cm(-2) and 600 °C, followed by sintering at 1300 °C. Furthermore, the macro- and microstructure of the Ni-GDC-nanocube anode were preserved before and after the power-generation test at 700 °C. Especially, the reactive {001} facets were stabled even after generation test, which served to reduce the activation energy for fuel oxidation successfully.

  18. Multifunctional Nanowire/film Composites based Bi-modular Sensors for In-situ and Real-time High Temperature Gas Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Pu-Xian; Lei, Yu

    2013-06-01

    This final report to the Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory for DE-FE0000870 covers the period from 2009 to June, 2013 and summarizes the main research accomplishments, which can be divided in sensing materials innovation, bimodular sensor demonstration, and new understanding and discoveries. As a matter of fact, we have successfully completed all the project tasks in June 1, 2013, and presented the final project review presentation on the 9th of July, 2013. Specifically, the major accomplishments achieved in this project include: 1) Successful development of a new class of high temperature stable gas sensor nanomaterials based on composite nano-array strategy in a 3D or 2D fashion using metal oxides and perovskite nanostructures. 2) Successful demonstration of bimodular nanosensors using 2D nanofibrous film and 3D composite nanowire arrays using electrical resistance mode and electrochemical electromotive force mode. 3) Series of new discoveries and understandings based on the new composite nanostructure platform toward enhancing nanosensor performance in terms of stability, selectivity, sensitivity and mass flux sensing. In this report, we highlight some results toward these accomplishments.

  19. Probing the thermal decomposition behaviors of ultrathin HfO2 films by an in situ high temperature scanning tunneling microscope.

    PubMed

    Xue, Kun; Wang, Lei; An, Jin; Xu, Jianbin

    2011-05-13

    The thermal decomposition of ultrathin HfO(2) films (∼0.6-1.2 nm) on Si by ultrahigh vacuum annealing (25-800 °C) is investigated in situ in real time by scanning tunneling microscopy. Two distinct thickness-dependent decomposition behaviors are observed. When the HfO(2) thickness is ∼ 0.6 nm, no discernible morphological changes are found below ∼ 700 °C. Then an abrupt reaction occurs at 750 °C with crystalline hafnium silicide nanostructures formed instantaneously. However, when the thickness is about 1.2 nm, the decomposition proceeds gradually with the creation and growth of two-dimensional voids at 800 °C. The observed thickness-dependent behavior is closely related to the SiO desorption, which is believed to be the rate-limiting step of the decomposition process.

  20. Development of Self-Powered Wireless-Ready High Temperature Electrochemical Sensors for In-Situ Corrosion Monitoring for Boiler Tubes in Next Generation Coal-based Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xingbo

    2015-06-30

    The key innovation of this project is the synergy of the high temperature sensor technology based on the science of electrochemical measurement and state-of-the-art wireless communication technology. A novel self-powered wireless high temperature electrochemical sensor system has been developed for coal-fired boilers used for power generation. An initial prototype of the in-situ sensor demonstrated the capability of the wireless communication system in the laboratory and in a pilot plant (Industrial USC Boiler Setting) environment to acquire electrochemical potential and current signals during the corrosion process. Uniform and localized under-coal ash deposit corrosion behavior of Inconel 740 superalloy has been studied at different simulated coal ash hot corrosion environments using the developed sensor. Two typical potential noise patterns were found to correlate with the oxidation and sulfidation stages in the hot coal ash corrosion process. Two characteristic current noise patterns indicate the extent of the corrosion. There was a good correlation between the responses of electrochemical test data and the results from corroded surface analysis. Wireless electrochemical potential and current noise signals from a simulated coal ash hot corrosion process were concurrently transmitted and recorded. The results from the performance evaluation of the sensor confirm a high accuracy in the thermodynamic and kinetic response represented by the electrochemical noise and impedance test data.

  1. High temperature storage loop :

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, David Dennis; Kolb, William J.

    2013-07-01

    A three year plan for thermal energy storage (TES) research was created at Sandia National Laboratories in the spring of 2012. This plan included a strategic goal of providing test capability for Sandia and for the nation in which to evaluate high temperature storage (>650ÀC) technology. The plan was to scope, design, and build a flow loop that would be compatible with a multitude of high temperature heat transfer/storage fluids. The High Temperature Storage Loop (HTSL) would be reconfigurable so that it was useful for not only storage testing, but also for high temperature receiver testing and high efficiency power cycle testing as well. In that way, HTSL was part of a much larger strategy for Sandia to provide a research and testing platform that would be integral for the evaluation of individual technologies funded under the SunShot program. DOEs SunShot program seeks to reduce the price of solar technologies to 6/kWhr to be cost competitive with carbon-based fuels. The HTSL project sought to provide evaluation capability for these SunShot supported technologies. This report includes the scoping, design, and budgetary costing aspects of this effort

  2. Combining Remote Temperature Sensing with in-Situ Sensing to Track Marine/Freshwater Mixing Dynamics.

    PubMed

    McCaul, Margaret; Barland, Jack; Cleary, John; Cahalane, Conor; McCarthy, Tim; Diamond, Dermot

    2016-08-31

    The ability to track the dynamics of processes in natural water bodies on a global scale, and at a resolution that enables highly localised behaviour to be visualized, is an ideal scenario for understanding how local events can influence the global environment. While advances in in-situ chem/bio-sensing continue to be reported, costs and reliability issues still inhibit the implementation of large-scale deployments. In contrast, physical parameters like surface temperature can be tracked on a global scale using satellite remote sensing, and locally at high resolution via flyovers and drones using multi-spectral imaging. In this study, we show how a much more complete picture of submarine and intertidal groundwater discharge patterns in Kinvara Bay, Galway can be achieved using a fusion of data collected from the Earth Observation satellite (Landsat 8), small aircraft and in-situ sensors. Over the course of the four-day field campaign, over 65,000 in-situ temperatures, salinity and nutrient measurements were collected in parallel with high-resolution thermal imaging from aircraft flyovers. The processed in-situ data show highly correlated patterns between temperature and salinity at the southern end of the bay where freshwater springs can be identified at low tide. Salinity values range from 1 to 2 ppt at the southern end of the bay to 30 ppt at the mouth of the bay, indicating the presence of a freshwater wedge. The data clearly show that temperature differences can be used to track the dynamics of freshwater and seawater mixing in the inner bay region. This outcome suggests that combining the tremendous spatial density and wide geographical reach of remote temperature sensing (using drones, flyovers and satellites) with ground-truthing via appropriately located in-situ sensors (temperature, salinity, chemical, and biological) can produce a much more complete and accurate picture of the water dynamics than each modality used in isolation.

  3. Combining Remote Temperature Sensing with in-Situ Sensing to Track Marine/Freshwater Mixing Dynamics.

    PubMed

    McCaul, Margaret; Barland, Jack; Cleary, John; Cahalane, Conor; McCarthy, Tim; Diamond, Dermot

    2016-01-01

    The ability to track the dynamics of processes in natural water bodies on a global scale, and at a resolution that enables highly localised behaviour to be visualized, is an ideal scenario for understanding how local events can influence the global environment. While advances in in-situ chem/bio-sensing continue to be reported, costs and reliability issues still inhibit the implementation of large-scale deployments. In contrast, physical parameters like surface temperature can be tracked on a global scale using satellite remote sensing, and locally at high resolution via flyovers and drones using multi-spectral imaging. In this study, we show how a much more complete picture of submarine and intertidal groundwater discharge patterns in Kinvara Bay, Galway can be achieved using a fusion of data collected from the Earth Observation satellite (Landsat 8), small aircraft and in-situ sensors. Over the course of the four-day field campaign, over 65,000 in-situ temperatures, salinity and nutrient measurements were collected in parallel with high-resolution thermal imaging from aircraft flyovers. The processed in-situ data show highly correlated patterns between temperature and salinity at the southern end of the bay where freshwater springs can be identified at low tide. Salinity values range from 1 to 2 ppt at the southern end of the bay to 30 ppt at the mouth of the bay, indicating the presence of a freshwater wedge. The data clearly show that temperature differences can be used to track the dynamics of freshwater and seawater mixing in the inner bay region. This outcome suggests that combining the tremendous spatial density and wide geographical reach of remote temperature sensing (using drones, flyovers and satellites) with ground-truthing via appropriately located in-situ sensors (temperature, salinity, chemical, and biological) can produce a much more complete and accurate picture of the water dynamics than each modality used in isolation. PMID:27589770

  4. Combining Remote Temperature Sensing with in-Situ Sensing to Track Marine/Freshwater Mixing Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    McCaul, Margaret; Barland, Jack; Cleary, John; Cahalane, Conor; McCarthy, Tim; Diamond, Dermot

    2016-01-01

    The ability to track the dynamics of processes in natural water bodies on a global scale, and at a resolution that enables highly localised behaviour to be visualized, is an ideal scenario for understanding how local events can influence the global environment. While advances in in-situ chem/bio-sensing continue to be reported, costs and reliability issues still inhibit the implementation of large-scale deployments. In contrast, physical parameters like surface temperature can be tracked on a global scale using satellite remote sensing, and locally at high resolution via flyovers and drones using multi-spectral imaging. In this study, we show how a much more complete picture of submarine and intertidal groundwater discharge patterns in Kinvara Bay, Galway can be achieved using a fusion of data collected from the Earth Observation satellite (Landsat 8), small aircraft and in-situ sensors. Over the course of the four-day field campaign, over 65,000 in-situ temperatures, salinity and nutrient measurements were collected in parallel with high-resolution thermal imaging from aircraft flyovers. The processed in-situ data show highly correlated patterns between temperature and salinity at the southern end of the bay where freshwater springs can be identified at low tide. Salinity values range from 1 to 2 ppt at the southern end of the bay to 30 ppt at the mouth of the bay, indicating the presence of a freshwater wedge. The data clearly show that temperature differences can be used to track the dynamics of freshwater and seawater mixing in the inner bay region. This outcome suggests that combining the tremendous spatial density and wide geographical reach of remote temperature sensing (using drones, flyovers and satellites) with ground-truthing via appropriately located in-situ sensors (temperature, salinity, chemical, and biological) can produce a much more complete and accurate picture of the water dynamics than each modality used in isolation. PMID:27589770

  5. Comparison between AVHRR surface temperature data and in-situ weather station temperatures over the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezvanbehbahani, S.; Csatho, B. M.; Comiso, J. C.; Babonis, G. S.

    2011-12-01

    Advanced Very-High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) images have been exhaustively used to measure surface temperature time series of the Greenland Ice sheet. The purpose of this study is to assess the accuracy of monthly average ice sheet surface temperatures, derived from thermal infrared AVHRR satellite imagery on a 6.25 km grid. In-situ temperature data sets are from the Greenland Collection Network (GC-Net). GC-Net stations comprise sensors monitoring air temperature at 1 and 2 meter above the snow surface, gathered at every 60 seconds and monthly averaged to match the AVHRR temporal resolution. Our preliminary results confirm the good agreement between satellite and in-situ temperature measurements reported by previous studies. However, some large discrepancies still exist. While AVHRR provides ice surface temperature, in-situ stations measure air temperatures at different elevations above the snow surface. Since most in-situ data on ice sheets are collected by Automatic Weather Station (AWS) instruments, it is important to characterize the difference between surface and air temperatures. Therefore, we compared and analyzed average monthly AVHRR ice surface temperatures using data collected in 2002. Differences between these temperatures correlate with in-situ temperatures and GC-Net station elevations, with increasing differences at lower elevations and higher temperatures. The Summit Station (3199 m above sea level) and the Swiss Camp (1176 m above sea level) results were compared as high altitude and low altitude stations for 2002, respectively. Our results show that AVHRR derived temperatures were 0.5°K warmer than AWS temperature at the Summit Station, while this difference was 2.8°K in the opposite direction for the Swiss Camp with surface temperatures being lower than air temperatures. The positive bias of 0.5°K at the high altitude Summit Station (surface warmer than air) is within the retrieval error of AVHRR temperatures and might be in part due to

  6. Oil-Well Cement and C3S Hydration Under High Pressure as Seen by In Situ X-Ray Diffraction, Temperatures ;= 80 degrees C with No Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Jupe, Andrew C.; Wilkinson, Angus P.; Funkhouser, Garry P.

    2012-06-28

    The hydration kinetics of a white cement and batches of both Class G and H oil-well cements were examined between 0 and 60 MPa, at {le}80 C, using in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction. This gives a continuous measure of the C{sub 3}S (Ca{sub 3}SiO{sub 5}), CH (Ca(OH){sub 2}), C{sub 4}AF (Ca{sub 2}FeAlO{sub 5}), ettringite, and other phases in the hydrating slurries. Slurries prepared from single-phase C{sub 3}S; synthetic C{sub 4}AF, and gypsum; and white cement, synthetic C{sub 4}AF and gypsum were also examined. An increasing pressure enhanced the rate of hydration for all slurries. Analysis of the data, using a kinetic model, provided rate constants that were used to obtain activation volumes for C{sub 3}S hydration. For all the cement and C{sub 3}S slurries studied, similar activation volumes were obtained (average {Delta}V{double_dagger}{sup -}-35 cm{sup 3}/mol), indicating that the presence of cement phases other than C{sub 3}S has a modest influence on the pressure dependence of C{sub 3}S hydration. An alternative analysis, using the time at which 90% of the initial C{sub 3}S remained, gave similar activation volumes. Pressure accelerated the formation of ettringite from synthetic C{sub 4}AF in the presence of gypsum. However, in slurries containing cement, the pressure dependence of C{sub 3}S hydration plays a major role in determining the pressure dependence of ettringite formation.

  7. High Temperature Structural Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiser, Erik S.; Baillif, Faye F.; Grimsley, Brian W.; Marchello, Joseph M.

    1997-01-01

    The Aerospace Industry is experiencing growing demand for high performance polymer foam. The X-33 program needs structural foam insulation capable of retaining its strength over a wide range of environmental conditions. The High Speed Research Program has a need for low density core splice and potting materials. This paper reviews the state of the art in foam materials and describes experimental work to fabricate low density, high shear strength foam which can withstand temperatures from -220 C to 220 C. Commercially available polymer foams exhibit a wide range of physical properties. Some with densities as low as 0.066 g/cc are capable of co-curing at temperatures as high as 182 C. Rohacell foams can be resin transfer molded at temperatures up to 180 C. They have moduli of elasticity of 0.19 MPa, tensile strengths of 3.7 Mpa and compressive strengths of 3.6 MPa. The Rohacell foams cannot withstand liquid hydrogen temperatures, however Imi-Tech markets Solimide (trademark) foams which withstand temperatures from -250 C to 200 C, but they do not have the required structural integrity. The research activity at NASA Langley Research Center focuses on using chemical blowing agents to produce polyimide thermoplastic foams capable of meeting the above performance requirements. The combination of blowing agents that decompose at the minimum melt viscosity temperature together with plasticizers to lower the viscosity has been used to produce foams by both extrusion and oven heating. The foams produced exhibit good environmental stability while maintaining structural properties.

  8. High-Temperature Superconductivity

    ScienceCinema

    Peter Johnson

    2016-07-12

    Like astronomers tweaking images to gain a more detailed glimpse of distant stars, physicists at Brookhaven National Laboratory have found ways to sharpen images of the energy spectra in high-temperature superconductors — materials that carry electrical c

  9. In situ characterization of liquid network structures at high pressure and temperature using X-ray absorption spectroscopy coupled with the Paris-Edinburgh press

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, A. D.; Pohlenz, J.; de Grouchy, C.; Cochain, B.; Kono, Y.; Pasternak, S.; Mathon, O.; Irifune, T.; Wilke, M.

    2016-07-01

    We review recent progress in studying structural properties of liquids using X-ray absorption spectroscopy coupled with the Paris-Edinburgh press at third-generation synchrotron facilities. This experimental method allows for detecting subtle changes in atomic arrangements of melts over a wide pressure-temperature range. It has been also employed to monitor variations of the local coordination environment of diluted species contained in glasses, liquids and crystalline phases as a function of the pressure and temperature. Such information is of great importance for gaining deeper insights into the physico-chemical properties of liquids at extreme condition, including the understanding of such phenomena as liquid-liquid phase transitions, viscosity drops and various transport properties of geological melts. Here, we describe the experimental approach and discuss its potential in structural characterization on selected scientific highlights. Finally, the current ongoing instrumental developments and future scientific opportunities are discussed.

  10. HIGH TEMPERATURE THERMOCOUPLE

    DOEpatents

    Eshayu, A.M.

    1963-02-12

    This invention contemplates a high temperature thermocouple for use in an inert or a reducing atmosphere. The thermocouple limbs are made of rhenium and graphite and these limbs are connected at their hot ends in compressed removable contact. The rhenium and graphite are of high purity and are substantially stable and free from diffusion into each other even without shielding. Also, the graphite may be thick enough to support the thermocouple in a gas stream. (AEC)

  11. High temperature thermometric phosphors

    DOEpatents

    Allison, Stephen W.; Cates, Michael R.; Boatner, Lynn A.; Gillies, George T.

    1999-03-23

    A high temperature phosphor consists essentially of a material having the general formula LuPO.sub.4 :Dy.sub.(x),Eu.sub.y) wherein: 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.20 wt % and 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.20 wt %. The high temperature phosphor is in contact with an article whose temperature is to be determined. The article having the phosphor in contact with it is placed in the environment for which the temperature of the article is to be determined. The phosphor is excited by a laser causing the phosphor to fluoresce. The emission from the phosphor is optically focused into a beam-splitting mirror which separates the emission into two separate emissions, the emission caused by the dysprosium dopant and the emission caused by the europium dopent. The separated emissions are optically filtered and the intensities of the emission are detected and measured. The ratio of the intensity of each emission is determined and the temperature of the article is calculated from the ratio of the intensities of the separate emissions.

  12. High temperature thermometric phosphors

    DOEpatents

    Allison, S.W.; Cates, M.R.; Boatner, L.A.; Gillies, G.T.

    1999-03-23

    A high temperature phosphor consists essentially of a material having the general formula LuPO{sub 4}:Dy{sub x},Eu{sub y} wherein: 0.1 wt % {<=} x {<=} 20 wt % and 0.1 wt % {<=} y {<=} 20 wt %. The high temperature phosphor is in contact with an article whose temperature is to be determined. The article having the phosphor in contact with it is placed in the environment for which the temperature of the article is to be determined. The phosphor is excited by a laser causing the phosphor to fluoresce. The emission from the phosphor is optically focused into a beam-splitting mirror which separates the emission into two separate emissions, the emission caused by the dysprosium dopant and the emission caused by the europium dopant. The separated emissions are optically filtered and the intensities of the emission are detected and measured. The ratio of the intensity of each emission is determined and the temperature of the article is calculated from the ratio of the intensities of the separate emissions. 2 figs.

  13. High temperature adsorption measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bertani, R.; Parisi, L.; Perini, R.; Tarquini, B.

    1996-12-31

    Adsorption phenomena are a rich and rather new field of study in geothermal research, in particular at very high temperature. ENEL is interested in the exploitation of geothermal regions with super-heated steam, and it is important to understand the behavior of water-rock interaction. We have analyzed in the 170-200{degrees}C temperature range four samples of Monteverdi cuttings; the next experimental effort will be at 220{degrees}C and over in 1996. The first results of the 1995 runs are collected in this paper. We can highlight four main items: (1) At relative pressures over 0.6 the capillarity forces are very important. (2) There is no significant temperature effect. (3) Adsorbed water can be present, and it is able to multiply by a factor of 15 the estimated reserve of super-heated steam only. (4) Pores smaller than 15 {Angstrom} do not contribute to the adsorbed mass.

  14. High temperature adsorption measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bertani, R.; Parisi, L.; Perini, R.; Tarquini, B.

    1996-01-24

    Adsorption phenomena are a rich and rather new field of study in geothermal research, in particular at very high temperature. ENEL is interested in the exploitation of geothermal regions with superheated steam, and it is important to understand the behavior of water-rock interaction. We have analyzed in the 170-200 °C temperature range four samples of Monteverdi cuttings; the next experimental effort will be at 220 °C and over in 1996. The first results of the 1995 runs are collected in this paper. We can highlight four main items: 1. At relative pressures over 0.6 the capillarity forces are very important. 2. There is no significant temperature effect. 3. Adsorbed water can be present, and it is able to multiply by a factor of 15 the estimated reserve of super-heated steam only. 4. Pores smaller than 15 Å do not contribute to the adsorbed mass.

  15. In situ monitoring of temperature inside lithium-ion batteries by flexible micro temperature sensors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chi-Yuan; Lee, Shuo-Jen; Tang, Ming-Shao; Chen, Pei-Chi

    2011-01-01

    Lithium-ion secondary batteries are commonly used in electric vehicles, smart phones, personal digital assistants (PDA), notebooks and electric cars. These lithium-ion secondary batteries must charge and discharge rapidly, causing the interior temperature to rise quickly, raising a safety issue. Over-charging results in an unstable voltage and current, causing potential safety problems, such as thermal runaways and explosions. Thus, a micro flexible temperature sensor for the in in-situ monitoring of temperature inside a lithium-ion secondary battery must be developed. In this work, flexible micro temperature sensors were integrated into a lithium-ion secondary battery using the micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) process for monitoring temperature in situ.

  16. In situ monitoring of temperature inside lithium-ion batteries by flexible micro temperature sensors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chi-Yuan; Lee, Shuo-Jen; Tang, Ming-Shao; Chen, Pei-Chi

    2011-01-01

    Lithium-ion secondary batteries are commonly used in electric vehicles, smart phones, personal digital assistants (PDA), notebooks and electric cars. These lithium-ion secondary batteries must charge and discharge rapidly, causing the interior temperature to rise quickly, raising a safety issue. Over-charging results in an unstable voltage and current, causing potential safety problems, such as thermal runaways and explosions. Thus, a micro flexible temperature sensor for the in in-situ monitoring of temperature inside a lithium-ion secondary battery must be developed. In this work, flexible micro temperature sensors were integrated into a lithium-ion secondary battery using the micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) process for monitoring temperature in situ. PMID:22163735

  17. In Situ Monitoring of Temperature inside Lithium-Ion Batteries by Flexible Micro Temperature Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chi-Yuan; Lee, Shuo-Jen; Tang, Ming-Shao; Chen, Pei-Chi

    2011-01-01

    Lithium-ion secondary batteries are commonly used in electric vehicles, smart phones, personal digital assistants (PDA), notebooks and electric cars. These lithium-ion secondary batteries must charge and discharge rapidly, causing the interior temperature to rise quickly, raising a safety issue. Over-charging results in an unstable voltage and current, causing potential safety problems, such as thermal runaways and explosions. Thus, a micro flexible temperature sensor for the in in-situ monitoring of temperature inside a lithium-ion secondary battery must be developed. In this work, flexible micro temperature sensors were integrated into a lithium-ion secondary battery using the micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) process for monitoring temperature in situ. PMID:22163735

  18. High Temperature Thermosets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, Paul M.

    1999-01-01

    A thermoset or network polymer is an organic material where the molecules are tied together through chemical bonds (crosslinks) and therefore they cannot move past one another. As a result, these materials exhibit a certain degree of dimensional stability. The chemical composition and the degree of crosslink density of the thermoset have a pronounced effect upon the properties. High temperature thermosets offer a favorable combination of properties that makes them attractive for many applications. Their most important features are the excellent processability particularly of the low molecular weight precusor forms, the chemical and solvent resistance and the dimensional stability. The market for high temperature thermosets will increase as new uses for them are uncovered and new thermosets with better combinations of properties are developed.

  19. High temperature future

    SciTech Connect

    Sheinkopf, K.

    1994-09-01

    During the past few years, there have been dramatic accomplishments and success of high temperature solar thermal systems and significant development of these systems. High temperature technologies, about 500 F and higher, such as dish engines, troughs, central receiver power towers and solar process heat systems, have been tested, demonstrated and used in an array of applications, including many cost-effective utility bulk power production and demand side supply projects in the United States. Large systems provide power and hot water to prisons, schools, nursing homes and other institutions. Joint ventures with industry, utility projects, laboratory design assistance and other activities are building a solid industry of US solar thermal systems ready for use today.

  20. High temperature materials characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.

    1990-01-01

    A lab facility for measuring elastic moduli up to 1700 C was constructed and delivered. It was shown that the ultrasonic method can be used to determine elastic constants of materials from room temperature to their melting points. The ease in coupling high frequency acoustic energy is still a difficult task. Even now, new coupling materials and higher power ultrasonic pulsers are being suggested. The surface was only scratched in terms of showing the full capabilities of either technique used, especially since there is such a large learning curve in developing proper methodologies to take measurements into the high temperature region. The laser acoustic system does not seem to have sufficient precision at this time to replace the normal buffer rod methodology.

  1. Better high temperature sealing

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, W.V.

    1987-01-01

    Acceptance of welded metal bellows designs, superior seal face materials and advancement of environmental control systems has extended the limits of mechanical seals to the operating limits of the process systems themselves. The nonpusher type welded metal bellows designs have overcome past seal hang-up problems. Material combinations such as silicon carbide versus silicon carbide and silicon carbide versus tungsten carbide have proven to be capable of handling the harsh abrasives encountered on high temperature sealing applications. Steam purges have done a good job of flushing away the deposits and sludges that form on the atmospheric side of the seal and cause seal hang-up. Today's field experience shows that hot water at temperatures up to 350/sup 0/F in the seal cavity can be handled with nothing more than a bypass flush per API piping plan 11 as long as adequate vapor pressure of the fluid is available. For temperatures above 350/sup 0/F, only moderate cooling is now required on hot water applications, where full cooling and a reduction of the seal cavity temperature to something below 180/sup 0/F were once necessary. Initially, the move towards high temperature seals was made for safety, long seal life and reliability reasons. Users wanted seals on their equipment that would avoid the danger of catastrophic seal failures in the event the environmental control systems failed. More recently, the economic advantages of running seals hot have been recognized. It is estimated that an annual savings of $1,000 per inch of shaft size can be realized for every 100/sup 0/F of cooling requirements that can be removed from the seal cavity. This cost savings is due to the elimination or reduction of energy sources used to cool the mechanical seal.

  2. In situ study of the fractionation of hydrogen isotopes between aluminosilicate melts and coexisting aqueous fluids at high pressure and high temperature - Implications for the δD in magmatic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalou, Célia; Le Losq, Charles; Mysen, Bjorn O.

    2015-09-01

    The hydrogen isotopic composition of melt inclusions trapped in phenocrysts during their crystallization and growth in a magma may contribute to a better understanding of the water cycle between the atmosphere, the hydrosphere and the lithosphere. Such understanding relies on the knowledge of the hydrogen isotopic fractionation factors between aqueous fluids, silicate melts, and minerals at temperature and pressure conditions relevant to the Earth's interior. Significant D/H fractionation between silicate melts and aqueous fluids was reported at hundreds of MPa and °C by using in situ measurements in hydrothermal diamond anvil cell (HDAC) experiments (Mysen, 2013a, 2013b, Am. Mineral. 98, 376-386 and 1754-1764). However, the available dataset is focused on fluids and melts with D/H ratios close to unity. The relevance of such data for natural processes that involve per mil variations of δD-values may not always be clear. To address such concerns, the effect of the bulk D/H ratio on hydrogen isotope partitioning between water-saturated silicate melts and coexisting silicate-saturated aqueous fluids has been determined in the Na2O-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O-D2O system. To this end, in situ Raman spectroscopic measurements were performed on fluids and melts with bulk D/H ratios from 0.05 to 2.67 by using an externally-heated diamond anvil cell in the 300-800 °C and 200-1500 MPa temperature and pressure range, respectively. In these pressure/temperature ranges, the D/H ratios of fluids in equilibrium with melt barely change with temperature (in average ΔHfluid = 0.47 ± 1.15 kJ /mol). In contrast, the D/H ratios of coexisting melts display strong dependence on temperature (average ΔHmelt = 7.18 ± 1.27 kJ /mol). The temperature-dependence of the D/H fractionation factor between melt and fluid (αfluid-melt = D /Hfluid / D /Hmelt) is comparable in all the experiments and can be written: 1000 ṡ ln ⁡ (αfluid-melt) = 263 (± 26) ṡT-2- 126 (± 48). Therefore, the

  3. High temperature strain gages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Otto J. (Inventor); You, Tao (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A ceramic strain gage based on reactively sputtered indium-tin-oxide (ITO) thin films is used to monitor the structural integrity of components employed in aerospace propulsion systems operating at temperatures in excess of 1500.degree. C. A scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of the thick ITO sensors reveals a partially sintered microstructure comprising a contiguous network of submicron ITO particles with well defined necks and isolated nanoporosity. Densification of the ITO particles was retarded during high temperature exposure with nitrogen thus stabilizing the nanoporosity. ITO strain sensors were prepared by reactive sputtering in various nitrogen/oxygen/argon partial pressures to incorporate more nitrogen into the films. Under these conditions, sintering and densification of the ITO particles containing these nitrogen rich grain boundaries was retarded and a contiguous network of nano-sized ITO particles was established.

  4. High Temperature Piezoelectric Drill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart; Badescu, Mircea; Shrout, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Venus is one of the planets in the solar systems that are considered for potential future exploration missions. It has extreme environment where the average temperature is 460 deg C and its ambient pressure is about 90 atm. Since the existing actuation technology cannot maintain functionality under the harsh conditions of Venus, it is a challenge to perform sampling and other tasks that require the use of moving parts. Specifically, the currently available electromagnetic actuators are limited in their ability to produce sufficiently high stroke, torque, or force. In contrast, advances in developing electro-mechanical materials (such as piezoelectric and electrostrictive) have enabled potential actuation capabilities that can be used to support such missions. Taking advantage of these materials, we developed a piezoelectric actuated drill that operates at the temperature range up to 500 deg C and the mechanism is based on the Ultrasonic/Sonic Drill/Corer (USDC) configuration. The detailed results of our study are presented in this paper

  5. Low Temperature Regolith Bricks for In-Situ Structural Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossman, Kevin; Sakthivel, Tamil S.; Mantovani, James; Seal, Sudipta

    2016-01-01

    Current technology for producing in-situ structural materials on future missions to Mars or the moon relies heavily on energy-intensive sintering processes to produce solid bricks from regolith. This process requires heating the material up to temperatures in excess of 1000 C and results in solid regolith pieces with compressive strengths in the range of 14000 to 28000 psi, but are heavily dependent on the porosity of the final material and are brittle. This method is currently preferred over a low temperature cementation process to prevent consumption of precious water and other non-renewable materials. A high strength structural material with low energy requirements is still needed for future colonization of other planets. To fulfill these requirements, a nano-functionalization process has been developed to produce structural bricks from regolith simulant and shows promising mechanical strength results. Functionalization of granular silicate particles into alkoxides using a simple low temperature chemical process produces a high surface area zeolite particles that are held together via inter-particle oxygen bonding. Addition of water in the resulting zeolite particles produces a sol-gel reaction called "inorganic polymerization" which gives a strong solid material after a curing process at 60 C. The aqueous solution by-product of the reaction is currently being investigated for its reusability; an essential component of any ISRU technology. For this study, two batches of regolith bricks are synthesized from JSC-1A; the first batch from fresh solvents and chemicals, the second batch made from the water solution by-product of the first batch. This is done to determine the feasibility of recycling necessary components of the synthesis process, mainly water. Characterization including BET surface area, SEM, and EDS has been done on the regolith bricks as well as the constituent particles,. The specific surface area of 17.53 sq m/g (average) of the granular regolith

  6. Instabilities of High Temperature Superconductors

    PubMed Central

    Matthias, B. T.; Corenzwit, E.; Cooper, A. S.; Longinotti, L. D.

    1971-01-01

    We have observed the transition temperature of both the cubic and tetragonal phases of several high-temperature β-W superconductors. The instability of the cubic lattice appears to be characteristic of high-temperature superconductors. PMID:16591897

  7. High temperature detonator

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, James O.; Dinegar, Robert H.

    1988-01-01

    A detonator assembly is provided which is usable at high temperatures about 300.degree. C. A detonator body is provided with an internal volume defining an anvil surface. A first acceptor explosive is disposed on the anvil surface. A donor assembly having an ignition element, an explosive material, and a flying plate, are placed in the body effective to accelerate the flying plate to impact the first acceptor explosive on the anvil for detonating the first acceptor explosive. A second acceptor explosive is eccentrically located in detonation relationship with the first acceptor explosive to thereafter effect detonation of a main charge.

  8. High temperature geophysical instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Hardee, H.C.

    1988-06-01

    The instrumentation development program was to proceed in parallel with scientific research and was driven by the needs of researchers. The development of these instruments has therefore included numerous geophysical field tests, many of which have resulted in the publication of scientific articles. This paper is a brief summary of some of the major geophysical instruments that have been developed and tested under the High Temperature Geophysics Program. These instruments are briefly described and references are given for further detailed information and for scientific papers that have resulted from the use of these instruments. 9 refs., 14 figs.

  9. High temperature drilling fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Stong, R.E.; Walinsky, S.W.

    1986-01-28

    This patent describes an aqueous drilling fluid suitable for high-temperature use. This fluid is composed of a water base. Clay is suspended in the base and from about 0.01-25 pounds per barrel total composition of a hydrolyzed terpolymer of maleic anhydride, styrene and a third monomer selected from acrylamide, methacrylamide, acrylic acid and metacrylic acid. The molar ratio of maleic anhydride to styrene to the third monomer is from about 30:10:60 to 50:40:10, and the alkali metal, ammonium and lower aliphatic amine salts thereof, the weight-average molecular weight of the hydrolyzed terpolymer is from about 500-10,000.

  10. High Temperature Protonic Conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, Fred; Berger, Marie-Helen; Sayir, Ali

    2007-01-01

    High Temperature Protonic Conductors (HTPC) with the perovskite structure are envisioned for electrochemical membrane applications such as H2 separation, H2 sensors and fuel cells. Successive membrane commercialization is dependent upon addressing issues with H2 permeation rate and environmental stability with CO2 and H2O. HTPC membranes are conventionally fabricated by solid-state sintering. Grain boundaries and the presence of intergranular second phases reduce the proton mobility by orders of magnitude than the bulk crystalline grain. To enhanced protonic mobility, alternative processing routes were evaluated. A laser melt modulation (LMM) process was utilized to fabricate bulk samples, while pulsed laser deposition (PLD) was utilized to fabricate thin film membranes . Sr3Ca(1+x)Nb(2-x)O9 and SrCe(1-x)Y(x)O3 bulk samples were fabricated by LMM. Thin film BaCe(0.85)Y(0.15)O3 membranes were fabricated by PLD on porous substrates. Electron microscopy with chemical mapping was done to characterize the resultant microstructures. High temperature protonic conduction was measured by impedance spectroscopy in wet air or H2 environments. The results demonstrate the advantage of thin film membranes to thick membranes but also reveal the negative impact of defects or nanoscale domains on protonic conductivity.

  11. High temperature filter materials

    SciTech Connect

    Alvin, M.A.; Lippert, T.E.; Bachovchin, D.M.; Tressler, R.E.

    1992-12-01

    Objectives of this program are to identify the potential long-term thermal/chemical effects that advanced coal-based power generating system environments have on the stability of porous ceramic filter materials, as well as to assess the influence of these effects on filter operating performance and life. We have principally focused our efforts on developing an understanding of the stability of the alumina/mullite filter material at high temperature (i.e., 870, 980, and 1100{degrees}C) under oxidizing conditions which contain gas phase alkali species. Testing has typically been performed in two continuous flow-through, high temperature test facilities at the Westinghouse Science and Technology Center, using 7 cm diameter {times} 6.4 mm thick discs. (Alvin, 1992) Each disc of ceramic filter material is exposed for periods of 100 to 3,000 hours in duration. Additional efforts have been performed at Westinghouse to broaden our understanding of the stability of cordierite, cordierite-silicon nitride, reaction and sintered silicon nitride, and clay bonded silicon carbide under similar simulated advanced coal fired process conditions. The results of these efforts are presented in this paper.

  12. High temperature filter materials

    SciTech Connect

    Alvin, M.A.; Lippert, T.E.; Bachovchin, D.M. . Science and Technology Center); Tressler, R.E. )

    1992-01-01

    Objectives of this program are to identify the potential long-term thermal/chemical effects that advanced coal-based power generating system environments have on the stability of porous ceramic filter materials, as well as to assess the influence of these effects on filter operating performance and life. We have principally focused our efforts on developing an understanding of the stability of the alumina/mullite filter material at high temperature (i.e., 870, 980, and 1100[degrees]C) under oxidizing conditions which contain gas phase alkali species. Testing has typically been performed in two continuous flow-through, high temperature test facilities at the Westinghouse Science and Technology Center, using 7 cm diameter [times] 6.4 mm thick discs. (Alvin, 1992) Each disc of ceramic filter material is exposed for periods of 100 to 3,000 hours in duration. Additional efforts have been performed at Westinghouse to broaden our understanding of the stability of cordierite, cordierite-silicon nitride, reaction and sintered silicon nitride, and clay bonded silicon carbide under similar simulated advanced coal fired process conditions. The results of these efforts are presented in this paper.

  13. High Temperature Aquifer Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueckert, Martina; Niessner, Reinhard; Baumann, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Combined heat and power generation (CHP) is highly efficient because excess heat is used for heating and/or process energy. However, the demand of heat energy varies considerably throughout the year while the demand for electrical energy is rather constant. It seems economically and ecologically highly beneficial for municipalities and large power consumers such as manufacturing plants to store excess heat in groundwater aquifers and to recuperate this energy at times of higher demand. Apart from the hydrogeological conditions, high transmissivity and favorable pressure gradients, the hydrochemical conditions are crucial for long-term operation. Within the project High Temperature Aquifer Storage, scientists investigate storage and recuperation of excess heat energy into the bavarian Malm aquifer. After one year of planning, construction, and the successful drilling of a research well to 495 m b.s.l. the first large scale heat storage test in the Malm aquifer was finished just before Christmas 2014. An enormous technical challenge was the disruption of the carbonate equilibrium - modeling results indicated a carbonate precipitation of 10-50 kg/d in the heat exchangers. The test included five injection pulses of hot water (60 °C up to 110 °C) and four tracer pulses, each consisting of a reactive and a conservative fluorescent dye. Injection and production rates were 15 L/s. About 4 TJ of heat energy were necessary to achieve the desired water temperatures. Electrical conductivity, pH and temperature were recorded at a bypass where also samples were taken. A laboratory container at the drilling site was equipped for the analysis of the concentration of the tracers and the cation concentrations at sampling intervals of down to 15 minutes. Additional water samples were taken and analyzed for major ions and trace elements in the laboratory. The disassembled heat exchanger proved that precipitation was successfully prevented by adding CO2 to the water before heating

  14. High Temperature Aquifer Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueckert, Martina; Niessner, Reinhard; Baumann, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Combined heat and power generation (CHP) is highly efficient because excess heat is used for heating and/or process energy. However, the demand of heat energy varies considerably throughout the year while the demand for electrical energy is rather constant. It seems economically and ecologically highly beneficial for municipalities and large power consumers such as manufacturing plants to store excess heat in groundwater aquifers and to recuperate this energy at times of higher demand. Within the project High Temperature Aquifer Storage, scientists investigate storage and recuperation of excess heat energy into the bavarian Malm aquifer. Apart from high transmissivity and favorable pressure gradients, the hydrochemical conditions are crucial for long-term operation. An enormous technical challenge is the disruption of the carbonate equilibrium - modeling results indicated a carbonate precipitation of 10 - 50 kg/d in the heat exchangers. The test included five injection pulses of hot water (60 °C up to 110 °C) and four tracer pulses, each consisting of a reactive and a conservative fluorescent dye, into a depth of about 300 m b.s.l. resp. 470 m b.s.l. Injection and production rates were 15 L/s. To achieve the desired water temperatures, about 4 TJ of heat energy were necessary. Electrical conductivity, pH and temperature were recorded at a bypass where also samples were taken. A laboratory container at the drilling site was equipped for analysing the concentration of the dyes and the major cations at sampling intervals of down to 15 minutes. Additional water samples were taken and analysed in the laboratory. The disassembled heat exchanger prooved that precipitation was successfully prevented by adding CO2 to the water before heating. Nevertheless, hydrochemical data proved both, dissolution and precipitation processes in the aquifer. This was also suggested by the hydrochemical modelling with PhreeqC and is traced back to mixture dissolution and changing

  15. High temperature interfacial superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Bozovic, Ivan; Logvenov, Gennady; Gozar, Adrian Mihai

    2012-06-19

    High-temperature superconductivity confined to nanometer-scale interfaces has been a long standing goal because of potential applications in electronic devices. The spontaneous formation of a superconducting interface in bilayers consisting of an insulator (La.sub.2CuO.sub.4) and a metal (La.sub.1-xSr.sub.xCuO.sub.4), neither of which is superconducting per se, is described. Depending upon the layering sequence of the bilayers, T.sub.c may be either .about.15 K or .about.30 K. This highly robust phenomenon is confined to within 2-3 nm around the interface. After exposing the bilayer to ozone, T.sub.c exceeds 50 K and this enhanced superconductivity is also shown to originate from a 1 to 2 unit cell thick interfacial layer. The results demonstrate that engineering artificial heterostructures provides a novel, unconventional way to fabricate stable, quasi two-dimensional high T.sub.c phases and to significantly enhance superconducting properties in other superconductors. The superconducting interface may be implemented, for example, in SIS tunnel junctions or a SuFET.

  16. Mid-crust fluid and water-rock interaction kinetic experiments and their geophysical significance: 3. in situ measurements of electric conductance of the water-rock interaction system at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.

    2013-12-01

    Recently, we designed a new experimental apparatus, which was used to measure dissolution rates as water-rock interactions, and simultaneously in situ measure the electric conductance of the multi phase (rock - fluid) system. At first, a tubular reactor is put in horizontally. The rock sample was crushed and sieved to 20-40 mesh, and cleaned, then put in a titanium network bag inside of the vessel. The electric conductivity detectors were connected to the two ends of the vessel. Fluid inlet and outlet were also fabricated in the two ends of the vessel. And the furnace, temperature controller, liquid pump, back pressure regulator etc. are involved in the whole experimental system. High temperature (T) and pressure (P) electric conductivity measuring system consists of an electric conductivity detector (ECD limit.), which was reformed by us and connected to the vessel; and a transfer: T23-CDH-UM: 5.67(L)×3.50(W)×5.67(H) (inch).The distance between the two electrode of the sensor is 10cm. The electrode is 5cm of length and its diameter is 5/16 inch. Water-rock interaction experiments were performed using this apparatus. The volume inside of vessel is 10.81 ml, l= 170mm, d=4.5mm and 7.246g rock sample put in the vessel. The fluid velocity was changed from 1.5 to 3.5 ml/min, allowing the water through the sample. As in situ to measure the electric conductance of the rock-fluids in the vessel, continuously record the electric conductance, each record in 5 seconds. Water-basalt interaction experiments were carried out and in situ measured electric conductance at high T up to 450°C and at 22 to 36MPa. Basalt sample was collected from natural outcrop (volcanic area in Yangtze valley, China, which is K-rich trachy-basalt. Rock sample was crushed and sieved to 20-40 mesh, and cleaned. 8.0097g sample was put in the vessel (surface area: 1.37m2/g ). Experiments found dissolution rates (dis.r.) for different metals of the rock vary with T. Usually, dis.r., rSi increase with T

  17. High Temperature Superconducting Materials Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 149 NIST High Temperature Superconducting Materials Database (Web, free access)   The NIST High Temperature Superconducting Materials Database (WebHTS) provides evaluated thermal, mechanical, and superconducting property data for oxides and other nonconventional superconductors.

  18. High Temperature Thermoelectric Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioannidou, A. A.; Rull, M.; Martin-Gonzalez, M.; Moure, A.; Jacquot, A.; Niarchos, D.

    2014-07-01

    The use of microwave energy for materials processing has a major potential and real advantages over conventional heating such as (1) time and energy savings, (2) rapid heating rates (volumetric heating vs. conduction), (3) considerably reduced processing time and temperature, (4) fine microstructures and hence improved mechanical properties and better product performance, and (5) finally lower environmental impact. In this study, we investigated the use of microwave-assisted synthesis to synthesize a series of Co1- x Fe x Sb3 using this novel approach, which gave high quality materials with little or no impurities in a fraction of the time needed for conventional synthesis. X-ray diffraction analysis was used to examine the structure and the lattice parameters of the samples, while scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy was used to study the morphology of the compounds. The samples were sintered by spark plasma sintering, and the highest ZT of 0.33 was obtained for x = 0.2 at 700 K.

  19. In situ visualisation of electromigration in Pt nanobridges at elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Kozlova, Tatiana; Zandbergen, Henny W

    2015-11-01

    We used a combination of in situ TEM, a MEMS-based heater as a substrate and a dedicated biasing sample holder to study the temperature dependence of electromigration in Pt nanobridges (500 nm wide, 15 nm high and 1000 nm long). We visualised changes in the nanobridges under both dynamic conditions, i.e. heating (substrate temperatures up to 660 K) and current passage. Our electromigration experiments at various substrate temperatures (100, 300, 420 and 660 K) show the same tendency: material transport occurs from the cathode to the anode side, which can be explained by the electron-wind force. In all cases the bridge breaks due to the formation of a neck closer to the cathode side. At 300, 420 and 660 K, voids and the neck form at the cathode contact pad simultaneously. The higher the temperature, the bigger the voids size. As expected, at higher temperatures a lower power is needed to break the nanobridge.

  20. Wireless device for monitoring the temperature - moisture regime in situ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudec, Ján; Štofanik, Vladimír; Vretenár, Viliam; Kubičár, Ľudovít

    2014-05-01

    This contribution presents the wireless device for monitoring the temperature - moisture regime in situ. For the monitoring so called moisture sensor is used. Principle of moisture sensor is based on measuring the thermal conductivity. Moisture sensor has cylindrical shape with about 20 mm diameter and 20 mm length. It is made of porous material identical to the monitored object. The thermal conductivity is measured by hot-ball method. Hot-ball method is patented invention of the Institute of Physic SAS. It utilizes a small ball, diameter up to 2 mm, in which sensing elements are incorporated. The ball produces heat spreading into surrounding material, in our case into body of the moisture sensor. Temperature of the ball is measured simultaneously. Then change of the temperature, in steady state, is inversely proportional to the thermal conductivity. Such moisture sensor is inserted into monitored wall. Thermophysical properties of porous material are function of moisture. Moisture sensors are calibrated for dry and water saturated state. Whole the system is primarily intended to do long-term monitoring. Design of a new electronic device was needed for this innovative method. It covers all needed operations for measurement. For example energizing hot-ball sensor, measuring its response, storing the measured data and wireless data transmission. The unit is able to set parameters of measurement via wireless access as well. This contribution also includes the description of construction and another features of the wireless measurement system dedicated for this task. Possibilities and functionality of the system is demonstrated by actual monitoring of the tower of St. Martin's Cathedral in Bratislava. Correlations with surrounding meteorological conditions are presented. Some of them can be also measured by our system, right in the monitoring place.

  1. High temperature annealing of ion irradiated tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Ferroni, Francesco; Yi, Xiaoou; Fitzgerald, Steven P.; Edmondson, Philip D.; Roberts, Steve G.

    2015-03-21

    In this study, transmission electron microscopy of high temperature annealing of pure tungsten irradiated by self-ions was conducted to elucidate microstructural and defect evolution in temperature ranges relevant to fusion reactor applications (500–1200°C). Bulk isochronal and isothermal annealing of ion irradiated pure tungsten (2 MeV W+ ions, 500°C, 1014 W+/cm2) with temperatures of 800, 950, 1100 and 1400°C, from 0.5 to 8 h, was followed by ex situ characterization of defect size, number density, Burgers vector and nature. Loops with diameters larger than 2–3 nm were considered for detailed analysis, among which all loops had View the MathML source and were predominantly of interstitial nature. In situ annealing experiments from 300 up to 1200°C were also carried out, including dynamic temperature ramp-ups. These confirmed an acceleration of loop loss above 900°C. At different temperatures within this range, dislocations exhibited behaviour such as initial isolated loop hopping followed by large-scale rearrangements into loop chains, coalescence and finally line–loop interactions and widespread absorption by free-surfaces at increasing temperatures. An activation energy for the annealing of dislocation length was obtained, finding Ea=1.34±0.2 eV for the 700–1100°C range.

  2. High temperature annealing of ion irradiated tungsten

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ferroni, Francesco; Yi, Xiaoou; Arakawa, Kazuto; Fitzgerald, Steven P.; Edmondson, Philip D.; Roberts, Steve G.

    2015-03-21

    In this study, transmission electron microscopy of high temperature annealing of pure tungsten irradiated by self-ions was conducted to elucidate microstructural and defect evolution in temperature ranges relevant to fusion reactor applications (500–1200°C). Bulk isochronal and isothermal annealing of ion irradiated pure tungsten (2 MeV W+ ions, 500°C, 1014 W+/cm2) with temperatures of 800, 950, 1100 and 1400°C, from 0.5 to 8 h, was followed by ex situ characterization of defect size, number density, Burgers vector and nature. Loops with diameters larger than 2–3 nm were considered for detailed analysis, among which all loops had View the MathML source andmore » were predominantly of interstitial nature. In situ annealing experiments from 300 up to 1200°C were also carried out, including dynamic temperature ramp-ups. These confirmed an acceleration of loop loss above 900°C. At different temperatures within this range, dislocations exhibited behaviour such as initial isolated loop hopping followed by large-scale rearrangements into loop chains, coalescence and finally line–loop interactions and widespread absorption by free-surfaces at increasing temperatures. An activation energy for the annealing of dislocation length was obtained, finding Ea=1.34±0.2 eV for the 700–1100°C range.« less

  3. Low toxicity high temperature PMR polyimide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pater, Ruth H. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    In-situ polymerization of monomer reactants (PMR) type polyimides constitute an important class of ultra high performance composite matrix resins. PMR-15 is the best known and most widely used PMR polyimide. An object of the present invention is to provide a substantially improved high temperature PMR-15 system that exhibits better processability, toughness, and thermo-oxidative stability than PMR-15, as well as having a low toxicity. Another object is to provide new PMR polyimides that are useful as adhesives, moldings, and composite matrices. By the present invention, a new PMR polyimide comprises a mixture of the following compounds: 3,4'-oxydianiline (3,4'-ODA), NE, and BTDE which are then treated with heat. This PMR was designated LaRC-RP46 and has a broader processing window, better reproducibility of high quality composite parts, better elevated temperature mechanical properties, and higher retention of mechanical properties at an elevated temperature, particularly, at 371 C.

  4. Comparison of Model Temperatures to NOAA In Situ Data at the Greenland Summit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuman, Christopher; Cullather, Richard; Nowicki, Sophie; Schnaubelt, Michael

    2015-04-01

    slightly warm at the low end, and too cool at the high end while the 2-meter temperatures exaggerate this offset (rotation). ERAI surface temps are slightly too warm at the low end but are fairly close across the full range but their derived 2-meter temps become even warmer at low end of the range. Additional analyses are anticipated including assessing if the elevation differences between the gridded data and the in situ instruments can explain some of the observed differences.

  5. In situ strain and temperature measurement and modelling during arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jian; Yu, Xinghua; Miller, Roger G.; Feng, Zhili

    2014-12-26

    In this study, experiments and numerical models were applied to investigate the thermal and mechanical behaviours of materials adjacent to the weld pool during arc welding. In the experiment, a new high temperature strain measurement technique based on digital image correlation (DIC) was developed and applied to measure the in situ strain evolution. In contrast to the conventional DIC method that is vulnerable to the high temperature and intense arc light involved in fusion welding processes, the new technique utilised a special surface preparation method to produce high temperature sustaining speckle patterns required by the DIC algorithm as well as a unique optical illumination and filtering system to suppress the influence of the intense arc light. These efforts made it possible for the first time to measure in situ the strain field 1 mm away from the fusion line. The temperature evolution in the weld and the adjacent regions was simultaneously monitored by an infrared camera. Finally and additionally, a thermal–mechanical finite element model was applied to substantiate the experimental measurement.

  6. In situ strain and temperature measurement and modelling during arc welding

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chen, Jian; Yu, Xinghua; Miller, Roger G.; Feng, Zhili

    2014-12-26

    In this study, experiments and numerical models were applied to investigate the thermal and mechanical behaviours of materials adjacent to the weld pool during arc welding. In the experiment, a new high temperature strain measurement technique based on digital image correlation (DIC) was developed and applied to measure the in situ strain evolution. In contrast to the conventional DIC method that is vulnerable to the high temperature and intense arc light involved in fusion welding processes, the new technique utilised a special surface preparation method to produce high temperature sustaining speckle patterns required by the DIC algorithm as well asmore » a unique optical illumination and filtering system to suppress the influence of the intense arc light. These efforts made it possible for the first time to measure in situ the strain field 1 mm away from the fusion line. The temperature evolution in the weld and the adjacent regions was simultaneously monitored by an infrared camera. Finally and additionally, a thermal–mechanical finite element model was applied to substantiate the experimental measurement.« less

  7. High accuracy in situ radiometric mapping.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Andrew N

    2004-01-01

    In situ and airborne gamma ray spectrometry have been shown to provide rapid and spatially representative estimates of environmental radioactivity across a range of landscapes. However, one of the principal limitations of this technique has been the influence of changes in the vertical distribution of the source (e.g. 137Cs) on the observed photon fluence resulting in a significant reduction in the accuracy of the in situ activity measurement. A flexible approach for single gamma photon emitting radionuclides is presented, which relies on the quantification of forward scattering (or valley region between the full energy peak and Compton edge) within the gamma ray spectrum to compensate for changes in the 137Cs vertical activity distribution. This novel in situ method lends itself to the mapping of activity concentrations in environments that exhibit systematic changes in the vertical activity distribution. The robustness of this approach has been demonstrated in a salt marsh environment on the Solway coast, SW Scotland, with both a 7.6 cm x 7.6 cm NaI(Tl) detector and a 35% n-type HPGe detector. Application to ploughed field environments has also been demonstrated using HPGe detector, including its application to the estimation of field moist bulk density and soil erosion measurement. Ongoing research work is also outlined.

  8. A comparison of HCMM surface temperatures with in situ temperature data. [Nantucket shoals and the Gulf of Mexico regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vukovich, F. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    All HCMM required were processed. Calibrated and atmospherically corrected sea surface temperatures were developed for the Nantucket Shoals and Gulf of Mexico regions. These data were analyzed and the sea surface temperatures along the various transacts were compared with in situ data. The comparisons indicate that there is, on the average, a root mean square difference between the in situ data and the HCMM sea surface temperatures of + or - 1.0 C. The linear correlation coefficient was 0.97.

  9. High-temperature piezoelectric sensing.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaoning; Kim, Kyungrim; Zhang, Shujun; Johnson, Joseph; Salazar, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Piezoelectric sensing is of increasing interest for high-temperature applications in aerospace, automotive, power plants and material processing due to its low cost, compact sensor size and simple signal conditioning, in comparison with other high-temperature sensing techniques. This paper presented an overview of high-temperature piezoelectric sensing techniques. Firstly, different types of high-temperature piezoelectric single crystals, electrode materials, and their pros and cons are discussed. Secondly, recent work on high-temperature piezoelectric sensors including accelerometer, surface acoustic wave sensor, ultrasound transducer, acoustic emission sensor, gas sensor, and pressure sensor for temperatures up to 1,250 °C were reviewed. Finally, discussions of existing challenges and future work for high-temperature piezoelectric sensing are presented. PMID:24361928

  10. High-Temperature Piezoelectric Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xiaoning; Kim, Kyungrim; Zhang, Shujun; Johnson, Joseph; Salazar, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Piezoelectric sensing is of increasing interest for high-temperature applications in aerospace, automotive, power plants and material processing due to its low cost, compact sensor size and simple signal conditioning, in comparison with other high-temperature sensing techniques. This paper presented an overview of high-temperature piezoelectric sensing techniques. Firstly, different types of high-temperature piezoelectric single crystals, electrode materials, and their pros and cons are discussed. Secondly, recent work on high-temperature piezoelectric sensors including accelerometer, surface acoustic wave sensor, ultrasound transducer, acoustic emission sensor, gas sensor, and pressure sensor for temperatures up to 1,250 °C were reviewed. Finally, discussions of existing challenges and future work for high-temperature piezoelectric sensing are presented. PMID:24361928

  11. In situ measurements of thermospheric composition, temperature, and winds by mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, N. W.; Carignan, G. R.

    1988-01-01

    Mass spectrometry, in which a beam of electrons ionizes a sample of atmospheric gas and then analyses the ions thus produced to determine the concentration of each species in the sample, is presently evaluated as a basis for the study of earth atmosphere and other planetary atmospheres' properties. Recent applications of in situ mass spectrometry have measured thermospheric neutral gas composition, temperatures, and winds, with a spatial resolution sufficiently high to reveal previously unsuspected atmospheric variability. It is expected that analyses of these data will lead to a more detailed understanding of the deposition processes governing the thermosphere's highly variable structure.

  12. In Situ Thermal Ion Temperature Measurements in the E Region Ionosphere: Techniques, Results, and Limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchill, J. K.; Archer, W. E.; Clemmons, J. H.; Knudsen, D. J.; Nicolls, M. J.

    2011-12-01

    In situ measurements of thermal ion temperature are rare at E region altitudes, which are too low for satellites. Here we present ion temperature measurements from a Thermal Ion Imager (TII) that flew on NASA sounding rocket 36.234 (the "Joule-2" mission) into the nightside E region ionosphere on 19 January 2007 from Poker Flat, AK. The TII is an electrostatic ion energy/angle imager that provides 2D ion distributions at 8 ms resolution. Ion temperatures are derived at altitudes between 100 km and 190 km by modelling the detector total count rate versus ion bulk flow angle with respect to the plane of the imager's field of view. Modelling this count rate spin profile shows that the analysis technique is robust against a number of error sources, including variability in payload floating potential, ion upflow, and aperture widening due to reflections from electrode surfaces. A significant uncertainty is associated with the average mass of the ions, which is not measured independently. Using the International Reference Ionosphere model to estimate ion mass, we obtain an ion temperature of 1300 K at 125 km, increasing to more than 3000 K at 180 km. These temperatures are much larger than neutral temperatures obtained from an ionization gauge on the same rocket (Tn˜500 K at 125 km, ˜600 K at 180 km), and do not agree with incoherent scatter radar observations in the vicinity of the rocket. These anomalous ion temperatures are, however, consistent with results from an independent analysis of the shape of the ion distribution images from a similar instrument on a separate payload flown 10 minutes earlier [Archer, MSc Thesis, University of Calgary, 2009]. We conclude that the high ion temperature readings are an artifact related to the environment in the vicinity of the probe, and investigate mechanisms for the cause. We discuss the implications of this effect for future in situ attempts to measure ion temperature in the E region ionosphere.

  13. In situ bioremediation under high saline conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Bosshard, B.; Raumin, J.; Saurohan, B.

    1995-12-31

    An in situ bioremediation treatability study is in progress at the Salton Sea Test Base (SSTB) under the NAVY CLEAN 2 contract. The site is located in the vicinity of the Salon Sea with expected groundwater saline levels of up to 50,000 ppm. The site is contaminated with diesel, gasoline and fuel oils. The treatability study is assessing the use of indigenous heterotrophic bacteria to remediate petroleum hydrocarbons. Low levels of significant macro nutrients indicate that nutrient addition of metabolic nitrogen and Orthophosphate are necessary to promote the process, requiring unique nutrient addition schemes. Groundwater major ion chemistry indicates that precipitation of calcium phosphorus compounds may be stimulated by air-sparging operations and nutrient addition, which has mandated the remedial system to include pneumatic fracturing as an option. This presentation is tailored at an introductory level to in situ bioremediation technologies, with some emphasize on innovations in sparge air delivery, dissolved oxygen uptake rates, nutrient delivery, and pneumatic fracturing that should keep the expert`s interest.

  14. High-temperature-measuring device

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1981-01-27

    A temperature measuring device for very high design temperatures (to 2000/sup 0/C) is described. The device comprises a homogenous base structure preferably in the form of a sphere or cylinder. The base structure contains a large number of individual walled cells. The base structure has a decreasing coefficient of elasticity within the temperature range being monitored. A predetermined quantity of inert gas is confined within each cell. The cells are dimensonally stable at the normal working temperature of the device. Increases in gaseous pressure within the cells will permanently deform the cell walls at temperatures within the high temperature range to be measured. Such deformation can be correlated to temperature by calibrating similarly constructed devices under known time and temperature conditions.

  15. High resolution in situ ultrasonic corrosion monitor

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Robert J.

    1985-01-01

    An ultrasonic corrosion monitor is provided which produces an in situ measurement of the amount of corrosion of a monitoring zone or zones of an elongate probe placed in the corrosive environment. A monitoring zone is preferably formed between the end of the probe and the junction of the zone with a lead-in portion of the probe. Ultrasonic pulses are applied to the probe and a determination made of the time interval between pulses reflected from the end of the probe and the junction referred to, both when the probe is uncorroded and while it is corroding. Corresponding electrical signals are produced and a value for the normalized transit time delay derived from these time interval measurements is used to calculate the amount of corrosion.

  16. High resolution in situ ultrasonic corrosion monitor

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, R.J.

    1984-01-10

    An ultrasonic corrosion monitor is provided which produces an in situ measurement of the amount of corrosion of a monitoring zone or zones of an elongate probe placed in the corrosive environment. A monitoring zone is preferably formed between the end of the probe and the junction of the zone with a lead-in portion of the probe. Ultrasonic pulses are applied to the probe and a determination made of the time interval between pulses reflected from the end of the probe and the junction referred to, both when the probe is uncorroded and while it is corroding. Corresponding electrical signals are produced and a value for the normalized transit time delay derived from these time interval measurements is used to calculate the amount of corrosion.

  17. High temperature interface superconductivity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gozar, A.; Bozovic, I.

    2016-01-20

    High-Tc superconductivity at interfaces has a history of more than a couple of decades. In this review we focus our attention on copper-oxide based heterostructures and multi-layers. We first discuss the technique, atomic layer-by-layer molecular beam epitaxy (ALL-MBE) engineering, that enabled High-Tc Interface Superconductivity (HT-IS), and the challenges associated with the realization of high quality interfaces. Then we turn our attention to the experiments which shed light on the structure and properties of interfacial layers, allowing comparison to those of single-phase films and bulk crystals. Both ‘passive’ hetero-structures as well as surface-induced effects by external gating are discussed. Here, wemore » conclude by comparing HT-IS in cuprates and in other classes of materials, especially Fe-based superconductors, and by examining the grand challenges currently laying ahead for the field.« less

  18. High temperature interface superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozar, A.; Bozovic, I.

    2016-02-01

    High-Tc superconductivity at interfaces has a history of more than a couple of decades. In this review we focus our attention on copper-oxide based heterostructures and multi-layers. We first discuss the technique, atomic layer-by-layer molecular beam epitaxy (ALL-MBE) engineering, that enabled High-Tc Interface Superconductivity (HT-IS), and the challenges associated with the realization of high quality interfaces. Then we turn our attention to the experiments which shed light on the structure and properties of interfacial layers, allowing comparison to those of single-phase films and bulk crystals. Both 'passive' hetero-structures as well as surface-induced effects by external gating are discussed. We conclude by comparing HT-IS in cuprates and in other classes of materials, especially Fe-based superconductors, and by examining the grand challenges currently laying ahead for the field.

  19. High-temperature ceramic receivers

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvinen, P. O.

    1980-01-01

    An advanced ceramic dome cavity receiver is discussed which heats pressurized gas to temperatures above 1800/sup 0/F (1000/sup 0/C) for use in solar Brayton power systems of the dispersed receiver/dish or central receiver type. Optical, heat transfer, structural, and ceramic material design aspects of the receiver are reported and the development and experimental demonstration of a high-temperature seal between the pressurized gas and the high-temperature silicon carbide dome material is described.

  20. In Situ Irradiation and Measurement of Triple Junction Solar Cells at Low Intensity, Low Temperature (LILT) Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, R.D.; Imaizumi, M.; Walters, R.J.; Lorentzen, J.R.; Messenger, S.R.; Tischler, J.G.; Ohshima, T.; Sato, S.; Sharps, P.R.; Fatemi, N.S.

    2008-01-01

    The performance of triple junction InGaP/(In)GaAs/Ge space solar cells was studied following high energy electron irradiation at low temperature. Cell characterization was carried out in situ at the irradiation temperature while using low intensity illumination, and, as such, these conditions reflect those found for deep space, solar powered missions that are far from the sun. Cell characterization consisted of I-V measurements and quantum efficiency measurements. The low temperature irradiations caused substantial degradation that differs in some ways from that seen after room temperature irradiations. The short circuit current degrades more at low temperature while the open circuit voltage degrades more at room temperature. A room temperature anneal after the low temperature irradiation produced a substantial recovery in the degradation. Following irradiation at both temperatures and an extended room temperature anneal, quantum efficiency measurement suggests that the bulk of the remaining damage is in the (In)GaAs sub-cell

  1. A Low-Cost, In Situ Resistivity and Temperature Monitoring System

    EPA Science Inventory

    We present a low-cost, reliable method for long-term in situ autonomous monitoring of subsurface resistivity and temperature in a shallow, moderately heterogeneous subsurface. Probes, to be left in situ, were constructed at relatively low cost with close electrode spacing. Once i...

  2. Simple and compact optode for real-time in-situ temperature detection in very small samples

    PubMed Central

    Long, Feng; Shi, Hanchang

    2014-01-01

    Real-time in-situ temperature detection is essential in many applications. In this paper, a simple and robust optode, which uses Ruthenium (II) complex as a temperature indicator, has been developed for rapid and sensitive temperature detection in small volume samples (<5 μL). Transmission of excitation light and collection and transmission of fluorescence are performed by a homemade single-multi mode fiber coupler, which provides the entire system with a simple and robust structure. The photoluminescence intensity of Ruthenium (II) complex diminishes monotonically from 0°C to 80°C, and the response to temperature is rapid and completely reversible. When temperature is less than (or higher than) 50°C, a linear correlation exists between the fluorescence intensity and the temperature. Excellent agreement was also observed between the continuous and in situ measurements obtained by the presented optode and the discrete temperature values measured by a conventional thermometer. The proposed optode has high sensitivity, high photostability and chemical stability, a wide detection range, and thermal reversibility, and can be applied to real-time in-situ temperature detection of a very small volume biological, environmental, and chemical sample. PMID:24875420

  3. High Temperature Solar Cell Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Merritt, Danielle

    2004-01-01

    The majority of satellites and near-earth probes developed to date have used photovoltaic arrays for power generation. If future mission to probe environments close to the sun will be able to use photovoltaic power, solar cells that can function at high temperatures, under high light intensity, and high radiation conditions must be developed. In this paper, we derive the optimum bandgap as a function of the operating temperature.

  4. In-situ turbulence observations in the stratospheric wind and temperature field with LITOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, A.; Theuerkauf, A.; Gerding, M.; Lübken, F.-J.

    2012-04-01

    Although stably stratified, turbulence occurs in the stratosphere due to breaking gravity waves. This leads to energy dissipation which modifies the energy transfer from the troposphere to the mesosphere. Stratospheric turbulence is also important for vertical mixing of trace species. In order to derive turbulent parameters accurately very small scales on the order of centimeters and below have to be resolved. This can only be performed applying in-situ techniques. Our balloon-borne in-situ measurement system LITOS (Leibniz Institute Turbulence Observations in the Stratosphere) utilizes constant temperature anemometer (CTA) and constant current anemometer (CCA) for simultaneous observation of small scale fluctuations of wind and temperature with high vertical resolution (~1 mm). The CTA consists of a small, thin (5 µm) wire kept at constant temperature; its principle of operation is based on the cooling effect of the air flow around the wire. The CCA is a thin (3.8 µm) wire which is basically operated as a resistance thermometer. Three flights in different configurations have been carried out at Kiruna, Sweden (67°N, 21°E) within the BEXUS programme in 2008, 2009 and 2011. The balloons reached altitudes of typically 27 km. To our knowledge, during the flights in 2009 and 2011 the first simultaneous turbulence measurements of winds and temperatures in the stratosphere were performed. Turbulent layers with a vertical thickness in the order of several 10 m have been observed. Results for energy dissipation rates computed directly from the spectrum of wind or temperature fluctuations will be presented. We will compare measurements from different flights for both wind and temperature fluctuations and consider a potential dependence on background conditions.

  5. Advanced High Temperature Structural Seals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newquist, Charles W.; Verzemnieks, Juris; Keller, Peter C.; Rorabaugh, Michael; Shorey, Mark

    2002-10-01

    This program addresses the development of high temperature structural seals for control surfaces for a new generation of small reusable launch vehicles. Successful development will contribute significantly to the mission goal of reducing launch cost for small, 200 to 300 pound payloads. Development of high temperature seals is mission enabling. For instance, ineffective control surface seals can result in high temperature (3100 F) flows in the elevon area exceeding structural material limits. Longer sealing life will allow use for many missions before replacement, contributing to the reduction of hardware, operation and launch costs.

  6. Advanced High Temperature Structural Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newquist, Charles W.; Verzemnieks, Juris; Keller, Peter C.; Rorabaugh, Michael; Shorey, Mark

    2002-01-01

    This program addresses the development of high temperature structural seals for control surfaces for a new generation of small reusable launch vehicles. Successful development will contribute significantly to the mission goal of reducing launch cost for small, 200 to 300 pound payloads. Development of high temperature seals is mission enabling. For instance, ineffective control surface seals can result in high temperature (3100 F) flows in the elevon area exceeding structural material limits. Longer sealing life will allow use for many missions before replacement, contributing to the reduction of hardware, operation and launch costs.

  7. Development of high strength, high temperature ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, W. B.

    1982-01-01

    Improvement in the high-pressure turbopumps, both fuel and oxidizer, in the Space Shuttle main engine were considered. The operation of these pumps is limited by temperature restrictions of the metallic components used in these pumps. Ceramic materials that retain strength at high temperatures and appear to be promising candidates for use as turbine blades and impellers are discussed. These high strength materials are sensitive to many related processing parameters such as impurities, sintering aids, reaction aids, particle size, processing temperature, and post thermal treatment. The specific objectives of the study were to: (1) identify and define the processing parameters that affect the properties of Si3N4 ceramic materials, (2) design and assembly equipment required for processing high strength ceramics, (3) design and assemble test apparatus for evaluating the high temperature properties of Si3N4, and (4) conduct a research program of manufacturing and evaluating Si3N4 materials as applicable to rocket engine applications.

  8. Compact low temperature scanning tunneling microscope with in-situ sample preparation capability

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jungdae; Nam, Hyoungdo; Schroeder, Allan; Shih, Chih-Kang; Qin, Shengyong; Kim, Sang-ui; Eom, Daejin

    2015-09-15

    We report on the design of a compact low temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM) having in-situ sample preparation capability. The in-situ sample preparation chamber was designed to be compact allowing quick transfer of samples to the STM stage, which is ideal for preparing temperature sensitive samples such as ultra-thin metal films on semiconductor substrates. Conventional spring suspensions on the STM head often cause mechanical issues. To address this problem, we developed a simple vibration damper consisting of welded metal bellows and rubber pads. In addition, we developed a novel technique to ensure an ultra-high-vacuum (UHV) seal between the copper and stainless steel, which provides excellent reliability for cryostats operating in UHV. The performance of the STM was tested from 2 K to 77 K by using epitaxial thin Pb films on Si. Very high mechanical stability was achieved with clear atomic resolution even when using cryostats operating at 77 K. At 2 K, a clean superconducting gap was observed, and the spectrum was easily fit using the BCS density of states with negligible broadening.

  9. Compact low temperature scanning tunneling microscope with in-situ sample preparation capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungdae; Nam, Hyoungdo; Qin, Shengyong; Kim, Sang-ui; Schroeder, Allan; Eom, Daejin; Shih, Chih-Kang

    2015-09-01

    We report on the design of a compact low temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM) having in-situ sample preparation capability. The in-situ sample preparation chamber was designed to be compact allowing quick transfer of samples to the STM stage, which is ideal for preparing temperature sensitive samples such as ultra-thin metal films on semiconductor substrates. Conventional spring suspensions on the STM head often cause mechanical issues. To address this problem, we developed a simple vibration damper consisting of welded metal bellows and rubber pads. In addition, we developed a novel technique to ensure an ultra-high-vacuum (UHV) seal between the copper and stainless steel, which provides excellent reliability for cryostats operating in UHV. The performance of the STM was tested from 2 K to 77 K by using epitaxial thin Pb films on Si. Very high mechanical stability was achieved with clear atomic resolution even when using cryostats operating at 77 K. At 2 K, a clean superconducting gap was observed, and the spectrum was easily fit using the BCS density of states with negligible broadening.

  10. Compact low temperature scanning tunneling microscope with in-situ sample preparation capability.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungdae; Nam, Hyoungdo; Qin, Shengyong; Kim, Sang-ui; Schroeder, Allan; Eom, Daejin; Shih, Chih-Kang

    2015-09-01

    We report on the design of a compact low temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM) having in-situ sample preparation capability. The in-situ sample preparation chamber was designed to be compact allowing quick transfer of samples to the STM stage, which is ideal for preparing temperature sensitive samples such as ultra-thin metal films on semiconductor substrates. Conventional spring suspensions on the STM head often cause mechanical issues. To address this problem, we developed a simple vibration damper consisting of welded metal bellows and rubber pads. In addition, we developed a novel technique to ensure an ultra-high-vacuum (UHV) seal between the copper and stainless steel, which provides excellent reliability for cryostats operating in UHV. The performance of the STM was tested from 2 K to 77 K by using epitaxial thin Pb films on Si. Very high mechanical stability was achieved with clear atomic resolution even when using cryostats operating at 77 K. At 2 K, a clean superconducting gap was observed, and the spectrum was easily fit using the BCS density of states with negligible broadening.

  11. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, Gary L.

    1990-01-01

    A high temperature turbine engine includes a hybrid ceramic/metallic rotor member having ceramic/metal joint structure. The disclosed joint is able to endure higher temperatures than previously possible, and aids in controlling heat transfer in the rotor member.

  12. Preparation of high temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel element

    DOEpatents

    Bradley, Ronnie A.; Sease, John D.

    1976-01-01

    This invention relates to a method for the preparation of high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel elements wherein uncarbonized fuel rods are inserted in appropriate channels of an HTGR fuel element block and the entire block is inserted in an autoclave for in situ carbonization under high pressure. The method is particularly applicable to remote handling techniques.

  13. Advanced High Temperature Structural Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newquist, Charles W.; Verzemnieks, Juris; Keller, Peter C.; Shorey, Mark W.; Steinetz, Bruce (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This program addresses the development of high temperature structural seals for control surfaces for a new generation of small reusable launch vehicles. Successful development will contribute significantly to the mission goal of reducing launch cost for small, 200 to 300 lb payloads. Development of high temperature seals is mission enabling. For instance, ineffective control surface seals can result in high temperature (3100 F) flows in the elevon area exceeding structural material limits. Longer sealing life will allow use for many missions before replacement, contributing to the reduction of hardware, operation and launch costs. During the first phase of this program the existing launch vehicle control surface sealing concepts were reviewed, the aerothermal environment for a high temperature seal design was analyzed and a mock up of an arc-jet test fixture for evaluating seal concepts was fabricated.

  14. High temperature structural insulating material

    DOEpatents

    Chen, W.Y.

    1984-07-27

    A high temperature structural insulating material useful as a liner for cylinders of high temperature engines through the favorable combination of high service temperature (above about 800/sup 0/C), low thermal conductivity (below about 0.2 W/m/sup 0/C), and high compressive strength (above about 250 psi). The insulating material is produced by selecting hollow ceramic beads with a softening temperature above about 800/sup 0/C, a diameter within the range of 20-200 ..mu..m, and a wall thickness in the range of about 2 to 4 ..mu..m; compacting the beads and a compatible silicate binder composition under pressure and sintering conditions to provide the desired structural form with the structure having a closed-cell, compact array of bonded beads.

  15. High temperature structural insulating material

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Wayne Y.

    1987-01-01

    A high temperature structural insulating material useful as a liner for cylinders of high temperature engines through the favorable combination of high service temperature (above about 800.degree. C.), low thermal conductivity (below about 0.2 W/m.degree. C.), and high compressive strength (above about 250 psi). The insulating material is produced by selecting hollow ceramic beads with a softening temperature above about 800.degree. C., a diameter within the range of 20-200 .mu.m, and a wall thickness in the range of about 2-4 .mu.m; compacting the beads and a compatible silicate binder composition under pressure and sintering conditions to provide the desired structural form with the structure having a closed-cell, compact array of bonded beads.

  16. High temperature structural insulating material

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Wayne Y.

    1987-01-06

    A high temperature structural insulating material useful as a liner for cylinders of high temperature engines through the favorable combination of high service temperature (above about 800.degree. C.), low thermal conductivity (below about 0.2 W/m.degree. C.), and high compressive strength (above about 250 psi). The insulating material is produced by selecting hollow ceramic beads with a softening temperature above about 800.degree. C., a diameter within the range of 20-200 .mu.m, and a wall thickness in the range of about 2-4 .mu.m; compacting the beads and a compatible silicate binder composition under pressure and sintering conditions to provide the desired structural form with the structure having a closed-cell, compact array of bonded beads.

  17. Containerless high temperature calorimeter apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacy, L. L.; Nisen, D. B. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A calorimeter apparatus for measuring high temperature thermophysical properties of materials is disclosed which includes a containerless heating apparatus in which the specimen is suspended and heated by electron bombardment.

  18. High-temperature structural intermetallics

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, M.; Inui, H.; Ito, K.

    2000-01-01

    In the last one and a half decades, a great deal of fundamental and developmental research has been made on high-temperature structural intermetallics aiming at the implementation of these intermetallics in aerospace, automotive and land-based applications. These intermetallics include aluminides formed with either titanium, nickel or iron and silicides formed with transition metals. Of these high-temperature intermetallics, TiAl-based alloys with great potential in both aerospace and automotive applications have been attracting particular attention. Recently TiAl turbocharger wheels have finally started being used for turbochargers for commercial passenger cars of a special type. The current status of the research and development of these high-temperature intermetallics is summarized and a perspective on what directions future research and development of high-temperature intermetallics should take is provided.

  19. Temperature-dependent properties of silver-poly(methylmethacrylate) nanocomposites synthesized by in-situ technique

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Ag/PMMA nanocomposites were successfully synthesized by in-situ technique. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images show that the particles are spherical in shape and their sizes are dependent on temperature. The smallest particle achieved high stability as indicated from Zeta sizer analysis. The red shift of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) indicated the increases of particle sizes. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns exhibit a two-phase (crystalline and amorphous) structure of Ag/PMMA nanocomposites. The complexation of Ag/PMMA nanocomposites was confirmed using Raman spectroscopy. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy spectra confirmed that the bonding was dominantly influenced by the PMMA and DMF solution. Finally, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) results indicate that the total weight loss increases as the temperature increases. PMID:24450850

  20. The In-situ Validation of ATSR-2 and AATSR sea surface temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nightingale, T.

    Three Along Track Scanning Radiometers have now been launched on the European Space Agency's ERS-1, ERS-2 and, most recently, Envisat remote sensing platforms. These radiometers are distinguished by their dual views to the sea surface and the care taken with their on-board calibration systems. The primary product is a "skin" sea surface temperature, calculated with coefficients derived from a physically-based model of radiative transfer. The high estimated accuracy of the SST products (0.3K) and the explicit production of skin, rather than the more familiar pseudo-bulk SSTs, constrain the methods by which the product can be validated. In-situ validation measurements of skin SST made with the Scanning Infrared Sea surface Temperature Radiometer (SISTeR), are described and compared with ATSR-2 and the Advanced ATSR (AATSR) products for a range of waters.

  1. High temperature current mirror amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Patterson, III, Raymond B.

    1984-05-22

    A high temperature current mirror amplifier having biasing means in the transdiode connection of the input transistor for producing a voltage to maintain the base-collector junction reversed-biased and a current means for maintaining a current through the biasing means at high temperatures so that the base-collector junction of the input transistor remained reversed-biased. For accuracy, a second current mirror is provided with a biasing means and current means on the input leg.

  2. In situ tryptophan-like fluorometers: assessing turbidity and temperature effects for freshwater applications.

    PubMed

    Khamis, K; Sorensen, J P R; Bradley, C; Hannah, D M; Lapworth, D J; Stevens, R

    2015-04-01

    Tryptophan-like fluorescence (TLF) is an indicator of human influence on water quality as TLF peaks are associated with the input of labile organic carbon (e.g. sewage or farm waste) and its microbial breakdown. Hence, real-time measurement of TLF could be particularly useful for monitoring water quality at a higher temporal resolution than available hitherto. However, current understanding of TLF quenching/interference is limited for field deployable sensors. We present results from a rigorous test of two commercially available submersible tryptophan fluorometers (ex ∼ 285, em ∼ 350). Temperature quenching and turbidity interference were quantified in the laboratory and compensation algorithms developed. Field trials were then undertaken involving: (i) an extended deployment (28 days) in a small urban stream; and, (ii) depth profiling of an urban multi-level borehole. TLF was inversely related to water temperature (regression slope range: -1.57 to -2.50). Sediment particle size was identified as an important control on the turbidity specific TLF response, with signal amplification apparent <150 NTU for clay particles and <650 NTU for silt particles. Signal attenuation was only observed >200 NTU for clay particles. Compensation algorithms significantly improved agreement between in situ and laboratory readings for baseflow and storm conditions in the stream. For the groundwater trial, there was an excellent agreement between laboratory and raw in situ TLF; temperature compensation provided only a marginal improvement, and turbidity corrections were unnecessary. These findings highlight the potential utility of real time TLF monitoring for a range of environmental applications (e.g. tracing polluting sources and monitoring groundwater contamination). However, in situations where high/variable suspended sediment loads or rapid changes in temperature are anticipated concurrent monitoring of turbidity and temperature is required and site specific calibration is

  3. In situ tryptophan-like fluorometers: assessing turbidity and temperature effects for freshwater applications.

    PubMed

    Khamis, K; Sorensen, J P R; Bradley, C; Hannah, D M; Lapworth, D J; Stevens, R

    2015-04-01

    Tryptophan-like fluorescence (TLF) is an indicator of human influence on water quality as TLF peaks are associated with the input of labile organic carbon (e.g. sewage or farm waste) and its microbial breakdown. Hence, real-time measurement of TLF could be particularly useful for monitoring water quality at a higher temporal resolution than available hitherto. However, current understanding of TLF quenching/interference is limited for field deployable sensors. We present results from a rigorous test of two commercially available submersible tryptophan fluorometers (ex ∼ 285, em ∼ 350). Temperature quenching and turbidity interference were quantified in the laboratory and compensation algorithms developed. Field trials were then undertaken involving: (i) an extended deployment (28 days) in a small urban stream; and, (ii) depth profiling of an urban multi-level borehole. TLF was inversely related to water temperature (regression slope range: -1.57 to -2.50). Sediment particle size was identified as an important control on the turbidity specific TLF response, with signal amplification apparent <150 NTU for clay particles and <650 NTU for silt particles. Signal attenuation was only observed >200 NTU for clay particles. Compensation algorithms significantly improved agreement between in situ and laboratory readings for baseflow and storm conditions in the stream. For the groundwater trial, there was an excellent agreement between laboratory and raw in situ TLF; temperature compensation provided only a marginal improvement, and turbidity corrections were unnecessary. These findings highlight the potential utility of real time TLF monitoring for a range of environmental applications (e.g. tracing polluting sources and monitoring groundwater contamination). However, in situations where high/variable suspended sediment loads or rapid changes in temperature are anticipated concurrent monitoring of turbidity and temperature is required and site specific calibration is

  4. The Very High Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hans D. Gougar; David A. Petti

    2011-06-01

    The High Temperature Reactor (HTR) and Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) are types of nuclear power plants that, as the names imply, operate at temperatures above those of the conventional nuclear power plants that currently generate electricity in the US and other countries. Like existing nuclear plants, heat generated from the fission of uranium or plutonium atoms is carried off by a working fluid and can be used generate electricity. The very hot working fluid also enables the VHTR to drive other industrial processes that require high temperatures not achievable by conventional nuclear plants (Figure 1). For this reason, the VHTR is being considered for non-electrical energy applications. The reactor and power conversion system are constructed using special materials that make a core meltdown virtually impossible.

  5. Temperature controlled high voltage regulator

    DOEpatents

    Chiaro, Jr., Peter J.; Schulze, Gerald K.

    2004-04-20

    A temperature controlled high voltage regulator for automatically adjusting the high voltage applied to a radiation detector is described. The regulator is a solid state device that is independent of the attached radiation detector, enabling the regulator to be used by various models of radiation detectors, such as gas flow proportional radiation detectors.

  6. High temperature electronic gain device

    DOEpatents

    McCormick, J. Byron; Depp, Steven W.; Hamilton, Douglas J.; Kerwin, William J.

    1979-01-01

    An integrated thermionic device suitable for use in high temperature, high radiation environments. Cathode and control electrodes are deposited on a first substrate facing an anode on a second substrate. The substrates are sealed to a refractory wall and evacuated to form an integrated triode vacuum tube.

  7. High temperature lightweight foamed cements

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi.

    1989-10-03

    Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed. 3 figs.

  8. High temperature lightweight foamed cements

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1989-01-01

    Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed.

  9. High temperature Seebeck coefficient metrology

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.; Tritt, T.; Uher, C.

    2010-12-15

    We present an overview of the challenges and practices of thermoelectric metrology on bulk materials at high temperature (300 to 1300 K). The Seebeck coefficient, when combined with thermal and electrical conductivity, is an essential property measurement for evaluating the potential performance of novel thermoelectric materials. However, there is some question as to which measurement technique(s) provides the most accurate determination of the Seebeck coefficient at high temperature. This has led to the implementation of nonideal practices that have further complicated the confirmation of reported high ZT materials. To ensure meaningful interlaboratory comparison of data, thermoelectric measurements must be reliable, accurate, and consistent. This article will summarize and compare the relevant measurement techniques and apparatus designs required to effectively manage uncertainty, while also providing a reference resource of previous advances in high temperature thermoelectric metrology.

  10. Gallium phosphide high temperature diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaffin, R. J.; Dawson, L. R.

    1981-01-01

    High temperature (300 C) diodes for geothermal and other energy applications were developed. A comparison of reverse leakage currents of Si, GaAs, and GaP was made. Diodes made from GaP should be usable to 500 C. A Liquid Phase Epitaxy (LPE) process for producing high quality, grown junction GaP diodes is described. This process uses low vapor pressure Mg as a dopant which allows multiple boat growth in the same LPE run. These LPE wafers were cut into die and metallized to make the diodes. These diodes produce leakage currents below ten to the -9th power A/sq cm at 400 C while exhibiting good high temperature rectification characteristics. High temperature life test data is presented which shows exceptional stability of the V-I characteristics.

  11. Validation of Land Surface Temperature products in arid climate regions with permanent in-situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goettsche, F.; Olesen, F.; Trigo, I.; Hulley, G. C.

    2013-12-01

    Land Surface Temperature (LST) is operationally obtained from several space-borne sensors, e.g. from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) onboard Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) by the Land Surface Analysis - Satellite Application Facility (LSA-SAF) and from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on EOS-Terra by the MODIS Land Team. The relative accuracy of LST products can be assessed by cross-validating different products. Alternatively, the so-called 'radiance based validation' can be used to compare satellite-retrieved LST with results from radiative transfer models: however, this requires precise a priori knowledge of land surface emissivity (LSE) and atmospheric conditions. Ultimately, in-situ measurements (';ground truth') are needed for validating satellite LST&E products. Therefore, the LST product derived by LSA-SAF is validated with independent in-situ measurements (';temperature based validation') at permanent validation stations located in different climate regions on the SEVIRI disk. In-situ validation is largely complicated by the spatial scale mismatch between satellite sensors and ground based sensors, i.e. areas observed by ground radiometers usually cover about 10 m2, whereas satellite measurements in the thermal infrared typically cover between 1 km2 and 100 km2. Furthermore, an accurate characterization of the surface is critical for all validation approaches, but particularly over arid regions, as shown by in-situ measurements revealing that LSE products can be wrong by more than 3% [1]. The permanent stations near Gobabeb (Namibia; hyper-arid desert climate) and Dahra (Senegal; hot-arid steppe-prairie climate) are two of KIT's four dedicated LST validation stations. Gobabeb station is located on vast and flat gravel plains (several 100 km2), which are mainly covered by coarse gravel, sand, and desiccated grass. The gravel plains are highly homogeneous in space and time, which makes them ideal for

  12. Temperature optimization of high con

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabry, M.

    2016-06-01

    Active cooling is essential for solar cells operating under high optical concentration ratios. A system comprises four solar cells that are in thermal contact on top of a copper tube is proposed. Water is flowing inside the tube in order to reduce solar cells temperature for increasing their performance. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation of such system has been performed in order to investigate the effect of water flow rate, tube internal diameter, and convective heat transfer coefficient on the temperature of the solar cells. It is found that increasing convective heat transfer coefficient has a significant effect on reducing solar cells temperatures operating at low flow rates and high optical concentration ratios. Also, a further increase of water flow rate has no effect on reducing cells temperatures.

  13. Containerless high-temperature calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacy, L. L.; Nisen, D. B.; Robinson, M. B.

    1979-01-01

    Samples are heated by electron bombardment in high-temperature calorimeter that operates from 1,000 to 3,600 C yet consumes less that 100 watts at temperatures less than 2,500 C. Contamination of samples is kept to minimum by suspending them from wire in vacuum chamber. Various sample slopes such as wires, dishs, spheres, rods, or irregular bodies can be accommodated and only about 100 nq of samples are needed for accurate measurements.

  14. Bellows high temperature cycle life

    SciTech Connect

    Broyles, R.K.

    1995-11-01

    In most cases, the bellows elements in an expansion joint are separated or insulated from the hot flow stream and have an actual bellows metal temperature (ABMT) that is much lower than the flow stream temperature. However, when the bellows are externally insulated or when the expansion joint is located inside a hot vessel, the ABMT can be very high. For these situations, the effects of temperature on bellows cycle life should be carefully considered. The design equations presented in the Standards of the expansion Joint Manufacturers Association (EJMA), ASME Section 8, Division 1, and ASME B31.3 do not currently provide cycle life equations or temperature correction factors for bellows operating in the creep temperature range. Therefore, a method is proposed which is specifically tailored to bellows for the estimation of high temperature cycle life based upon available test results. Data is also presented which demonstrates the effect of temperatures above and below 800 F on the cycle life of various bellows materials.

  15. Calibrating IR cameras for in-situ temperature measurement during the electron beam melt processing of Inconel 718 and Ti-Al6-V4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinwiddie, R. B.; Kirka, M. M.; Lloyd, P. D.; Dehoff, R. R.; Lowe, L. E.; Marlow, G. S.

    2016-05-01

    High performance mid-wave infrared (IR) cameras are used for in-situ electron beam melt process monitoring and temperature measurements. Since standard factory calibrations are insufficient due to very low transmissions of the leaded glass window required for X-ray absorption, two techniques for temperature calibrations are compared. In-situ measurement of emittance will also be discussed. Ultimately, these imaging systems have the potential for routine use for online quality assurance and feedback control.

  16. Room-temperature in situ nuclear spin hyperpolarization from optically pumped nitrogen vacancy centres in diamond

    SciTech Connect

    King, Jonathan P.; Jeong, Keunhong; Vassiliou, Christophoros C.; Shin, Chang S.; Page, Ralph H.; Avalos, Claudia E.; Wang, Hai-Jing; Pines, Alexander

    2015-12-07

    Low detection sensitivity stemming from the weak polarization of nuclear spins is a primary limitation of magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging. Methods have been developed to enhance nuclear spin polarization but they typically require high magnetic fields, cryogenic temperatures or sample transfer between magnets. Here we report bulk, room-temperature hyperpolarization of 13C nuclear spins observed via high-field magnetic resonance. The technique harnesses the high optically induced spin polarization of diamond nitrogen vacancy centres at room temperature in combination with dynamic nuclear polarization. We observe bulk nuclear spin polarization of 6%, an enhancement of ~170,000 over thermal equilibrium. The signal of the hyperpolarized spins was detected in situ with a standard nuclear magnetic resonance probe without the need for sample shuttling or precise crystal orientation. In conclusion, hyperpolarization via optical pumping/dynamic nuclear polarization should function at arbitrary magnetic fields enabling orders of magnitude sensitivity enhancement for nuclear magnetic resonance of solids and liquids under ambient conditions.

  17. Room-temperature in situ nuclear spin hyperpolarization from optically pumped nitrogen vacancy centres in diamond

    DOE PAGESBeta

    King, Jonathan P.; Jeong, Keunhong; Vassiliou, Christophoros C.; Shin, Chang S.; Page, Ralph H.; Avalos, Claudia E.; Wang, Hai-Jing; Pines, Alexander

    2015-12-07

    Low detection sensitivity stemming from the weak polarization of nuclear spins is a primary limitation of magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging. Methods have been developed to enhance nuclear spin polarization but they typically require high magnetic fields, cryogenic temperatures or sample transfer between magnets. Here we report bulk, room-temperature hyperpolarization of 13C nuclear spins observed via high-field magnetic resonance. The technique harnesses the high optically induced spin polarization of diamond nitrogen vacancy centres at room temperature in combination with dynamic nuclear polarization. We observe bulk nuclear spin polarization of 6%, an enhancement of ~170,000 over thermal equilibrium. The signal ofmore » the hyperpolarized spins was detected in situ with a standard nuclear magnetic resonance probe without the need for sample shuttling or precise crystal orientation. In conclusion, hyperpolarization via optical pumping/dynamic nuclear polarization should function at arbitrary magnetic fields enabling orders of magnitude sensitivity enhancement for nuclear magnetic resonance of solids and liquids under ambient conditions.« less

  18. High Temperature Transparent Furnace Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, Stephen C.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the use of novel techniques for heat containment that could be used to build a high temperature transparent furnace. The primary objective of the work was to experimentally demonstrate transparent furnace operation at 1200 C. Secondary objectives were to understand furnace operation and furnace component specification to enable the design and construction of a low power prototype furnace for delivery to NASA in a follow-up project. The basic approach of the research was to couple high temperature component design with simple concept demonstration experiments that modify a commercially available transparent furnace rated at lower temperature. A detailed energy balance of the operating transparent furnace was performed, calculating heat losses through the furnace components as a result of conduction, radiation, and convection. The transparent furnace shells and furnace components were redesigned to permit furnace operation at at least 1200 C. Techniques were developed that are expected to lead to significantly improved heat containment compared with current transparent furnaces. The design of a thermal profile in a multizone high temperature transparent furnace design was also addressed. Experiments were performed to verify the energy balance analysis, to demonstrate some of the major furnace improvement techniques developed, and to demonstrate the overall feasibility of a high temperature transparent furnace. The important objective of the research was achieved: to demonstrate the feasibility of operating a transparent furnace at 1200 C.

  19. High-Temperature Optical Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovsky, Grigory; Juergens, Jeffrey R.; Varga, Donald J.; Floyd, Bertram M.

    2010-01-01

    A high-temperature optical sensor (see Figure 1) has been developed that can operate at temperatures up to 1,000 C. The sensor development process consists of two parts: packaging of a fiber Bragg grating into a housing that allows a more sturdy thermally stable device, and a technological process to which the device is subjected to in order to meet environmental requirements of several hundred C. This technology uses a newly discovered phenomenon of the formation of thermally stable secondary Bragg gratings in communication-grade fibers at high temperatures to construct robust, optical, high-temperature sensors. Testing and performance evaluation (see Figure 2) of packaged sensors demonstrated operability of the devices at 1,000 C for several hundred hours, and during numerous thermal cycling from 400 to 800 C with different heating rates. The technology significantly extends applicability of optical sensors to high-temperature environments including ground testing of engines, flight propulsion control, thermal protection monitoring of launch vehicles, etc. It may also find applications in such non-aerospace arenas as monitoring of nuclear reactors, furnaces, chemical processes, and other hightemperature environments where other measurement techniques are either unreliable, dangerous, undesirable, or unavailable.

  20. Low temperature barriers for use with in situ processes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dong Sub; Vinegar, Harold J

    2009-06-16

    A method of forming and maintaining a low temperature zone around at least a portion of a subsurface treatment area is described. The method includes reducing a temperature of heat transfer fluid with a refrigeration system. The heat transfer fluid is circulated through freeze well canisters and placed in a formation around at least a portion of the subsurface treatment area. An initial temperature of the heat transfer fluid supplied to a first freeze well canister is in a range from about -35 .degree. C. to about -55 .degree. C. At least one of the well canisters includes carbon steel. The heat transfer fluid is returned to the refrigeration system.

  1. High temperature current mirror amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Patterson, R.B. III.

    1984-05-22

    Disclosed is a high temperature current mirror amplifier having biasing means in the transdiode connection of the input transistor for producing a voltage to maintain the base-collector junction reversed-biased and a current means for maintaining a current through the biasing means at high temperatures so that the base-collector junction of the input transistor remained reversed-biased. For accuracy, a second current mirror is provided with a biasing means and current means on the input leg. 2 figs.

  2. "Green" High-Temperature Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Michael A.

    1998-01-01

    PMR-15 is a processable, high-temperature polymer developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center in the 1970's principally for aeropropulsion applications. Use of fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composites in these applications can lead to substantial weight savings, thereby leading to improved fuel economy, increased passenger and payload capacity, and better maneuverability. PMR-15 is used fairly extensively in military and commercial aircraft engines components seeing service temperatures as high as 500 F (260 C), such as the outer bypass duct for the F-404 engine. The current world-wide market for PMR-15 materials (resins, adhesives, and composites) is on the order of $6 to 10 million annually.

  3. High Temperature Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    These are the proceedings of the High Temperature Polymer Matrix Composites Conference held at the NASA Lewis Research Center on March 16 to 18, 1983. The purpose of the conference is to provide scientists and engineers working in the field of high temperature polymer matrix composites an opportunity to review, exchange, and assess the latest developments in this rapidly expanding area of materials technology. Technical papers are presented in the following areas: (1) matrix development; (2) adhesive development; (3) characterization; (4) environmental effects; and (5) applications.

  4. High temperature superconductor current leads

    DOEpatents

    Hull, J.R.; Poeppel, R.B.

    1995-06-20

    An electrical lead is disclosed having one end for connection to an apparatus in a cryogenic environment and the other end for connection to an apparatus outside the cryogenic environment. The electrical lead includes a high temperature superconductor wire and an electrically conductive material distributed therein, where the conductive material is present at the one end of the lead at a concentration in the range of from 0 to about 3% by volume, and at the other end of the lead at a concentration of less than about 20% by volume. Various embodiments are shown for groups of high temperature superconductor wires and sheaths. 9 figs.

  5. High temperature superconductor current leads

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.; Poeppel, Roger B.

    1995-01-01

    An electrical lead having one end for connection to an apparatus in a cryogenic environment and the other end for connection to an apparatus outside the cryogenic environment. The electrical lead includes a high temperature superconductor wire and an electrically conductive material distributed therein, where the conductive material is present at the one end of the lead at a concentration in the range of from 0 to about 3% by volume, and at the other end of the lead at a concentration of less than about 20% by volume. Various embodiments are shown for groups of high temperature superconductor wires and sheaths.

  6. In Situ Chemical Profiling of an Extremely low Temperature Hydrothermal System at Loihi Seamount, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazer, B. T.; Briggs, R. A.

    2007-12-01

    Loihi Seamount is a submarine, active volcano located on the southeast flanks of the Big Island of Hawaii. It is considered to be the youngest volcano in the chain, sharing the hot spot magma chamber with Mauna Loa and Kilauea. Sites of both vigorous and diffuse hydrothermal venting can be found surrounding the pit crater summit (1000m) and on the flanks of the seamount, down to its base (5000m). Vent fluids at Loihi are chemically distinct from other well-studied marine hydrothermal systems and have been shown to be enriched in carbon dioxide, iron(II), and manganese(II), and deplete in sulfur species. The Loihi summit is located within a zone of low oxygen, further enabling elevated iron(II) concentrations and support for a dominant community of iron-oxidizing bacteria. We deployed a sensor wand consisting of up to four voltammetric working electrodes and the ROV Jason temperature probe, and/or a submersible micromanipulator with voltammetric electrodes to provide real time in situ redox characterizations of hydrothermal fluids and geochemical gradients associated with iron-oxidizing microbial mats and flocs. In addition to surveying known areas of warm temperature (10-60 degrees C) venting at the Loihi summit, we performed widespread profiling of a previously undescribed site at 5000m, that exhibits temperature anomalies of just 0.2 degrees C. Extensive iron-oxidizing microbial mats were shown to occur up to 2m in thickness over several hundred square meters. Bottom water oxygen concentrations were near-saturation, and we observed steep gradients at the mat-interface, with little oxygen penetration and iron(II) concentrations of up to 150 micromolar. Our in situ electrochemical analyses provided an efficient and valuable means for directed discrete sampling of hydrothermal fluids and microbial flocs, as well as previously unattainable high spatial resolution geochemical profiles through the mats.

  7. A solar high temperature kiln

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huettenhoelscher, N.; Bergmann, K.

    1981-11-01

    The feasibility of using solar energy in developing countries for baking ceramic construction materials was investigated. The solar high temperature kiln is described. It uses two parabolic concentrators which direct available radiation into the baking chamber. The Sun tracker has only one axis. Preliminary test results with the prototype kiln were satisfactory.

  8. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, Gary L.

    1991-01-01

    A high temperature turbine engine includes a rotor portion having axially stacked adjacent ceramic rotor parts. A ceramic/ceramic joint structure transmits torque between the rotor parts while maintaining coaxial alignment and axially spaced mutually parallel relation thereof despite thermal and centrifugal cycling.

  9. High-Temperature Vibration Damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Alan; Litwin, Joel; Krauss, Harold

    1987-01-01

    Device for damping vibrations functions at temperatures up to 400 degrees F. Dampens vibrational torque loads as high as 1,000 lb-in. but compact enough to be part of helicopter rotor hub. Rotary damper absorbs energy from vibrating rod, dissipating it in turbulent motion of viscous hydraulic fluid forced by moving vanes through small orifices.

  10. Acoustic travel time gauges for in-situ determination of pressure and temperature in multi-anvil apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xuebing; Chen, Ting; Qi, Xintong; Zou, Yongtao; Liebermann, Robert C.; Li, Baosheng; Kung, Jennifer; Yu, Tony; Wang, Yanbin

    2015-08-14

    In this study, we developed a new method for in-situ pressure determination in multi-anvil, high-pressure apparatus using an acoustic travel time approach within the framework of acoustoelasticity. The ultrasonic travel times of polycrystalline Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were calibrated against NaCl pressure scale up to 15 GPa and 900 °C in a Kawai-type double-stage multi-anvil apparatus in conjunction with synchrotron X-radiation, thereby providing a convenient and reliable gauge for pressure determination at ambient and high temperatures. The pressures derived from this new travel time method are in excellent agreement with those from the fixed-point methods. Application of this new pressure gauge in an offline experiment revealed a remarkable agreement of the densities of coesite with those from the previous single crystal compression studies under hydrostatic conditions, thus providing strong validation for the current travel time pressure scale. The travel time approach not only can be used for continuous in-situ pressure determination at room temperature, high temperatures, during compression and decompression, but also bears a unique capability that none of the previous scales can deliver, i.e., simultaneous pressure and temperature determination with a high accuracy (±0.16 GPa in pressure and ±17 °C in temperature). Therefore, the new in-situ Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} pressure gauge is expected to enable new and expanded opportunities for offline laboratory studies of solid and liquid materials under high pressure and high temperature in multi-anvil apparatus.

  11. High temperature, high power piezoelectric composite transducers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeong Jae; Zhang, Shujun; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart

    2014-08-08

    Piezoelectric composites are a class of functional materials consisting of piezoelectric active materials and non-piezoelectric passive polymers, mechanically attached together to form different connectivities. These composites have several advantages compared to conventional piezoelectric ceramics and polymers, including improved electromechanical properties, mechanical flexibility and the ability to tailor properties by using several different connectivity patterns. These advantages have led to the improvement of overall transducer performance, such as transducer sensitivity and bandwidth, resulting in rapid implementation of piezoelectric composites in medical imaging ultrasounds and other acoustic transducers. Recently, new piezoelectric composite transducers have been developed with optimized composite components that have improved thermal stability and mechanical quality factors, making them promising candidates for high temperature, high power transducer applications, such as therapeutic ultrasound, high power ultrasonic wirebonding, high temperature non-destructive testing, and downhole energy harvesting. This paper will present recent developments of piezoelectric composite technology for high temperature and high power applications. The concerns and limitations of using piezoelectric composites will also be discussed, and the expected future research directions will be outlined.

  12. High Temperature, High Power Piezoelectric Composite Transducers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyeong Jae; Zhang, Shujun; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, StewarT.

    2014-01-01

    Piezoelectric composites are a class of functional materials consisting of piezoelectric active materials and non-piezoelectric passive polymers, mechanically attached together to form different connectivities. These composites have several advantages compared to conventional piezoelectric ceramics and polymers, including improved electromechanical properties, mechanical flexibility and the ability to tailor properties by using several different connectivity patterns. These advantages have led to the improvement of overall transducer performance, such as transducer sensitivity and bandwidth, resulting in rapid implementation of piezoelectric composites in medical imaging ultrasounds and other acoustic transducers. Recently, new piezoelectric composite transducers have been developed with optimized composite components that have improved thermal stability and mechanical quality factors, making them promising candidates for high temperature, high power transducer applications, such as therapeutic ultrasound, high power ultrasonic wirebonding, high temperature non-destructive testing, and downhole energy harvesting. This paper will present recent developments of piezoelectric composite technology for high temperature and high power applications. The concerns and limitations of using piezoelectric composites will also be discussed, and the expected future research directions will be outlined. PMID:25111242

  13. High temperature, high power piezoelectric composite transducers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeong Jae; Zhang, Shujun; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart

    2014-01-01

    Piezoelectric composites are a class of functional materials consisting of piezoelectric active materials and non-piezoelectric passive polymers, mechanically attached together to form different connectivities. These composites have several advantages compared to conventional piezoelectric ceramics and polymers, including improved electromechanical properties, mechanical flexibility and the ability to tailor properties by using several different connectivity patterns. These advantages have led to the improvement of overall transducer performance, such as transducer sensitivity and bandwidth, resulting in rapid implementation of piezoelectric composites in medical imaging ultrasounds and other acoustic transducers. Recently, new piezoelectric composite transducers have been developed with optimized composite components that have improved thermal stability and mechanical quality factors, making them promising candidates for high temperature, high power transducer applications, such as therapeutic ultrasound, high power ultrasonic wirebonding, high temperature non-destructive testing, and downhole energy harvesting. This paper will present recent developments of piezoelectric composite technology for high temperature and high power applications. The concerns and limitations of using piezoelectric composites will also be discussed, and the expected future research directions will be outlined. PMID:25111242

  14. High temperature chemically resistant polymer concrete

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.

    High temperature chemically resistant, non-aqueous polymer concrete composites consist of about 12 to 20% by weight of a water-insoluble polymer binder. The binder is polymerized in situ from a liquid vinyl-type monomer or mixture of vinyl containing monomers such as triallylcyanurate, styrene, acrylonitrile, acrylamide, methacrylamide, methyl-methacrylate, trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate and divinyl benzene. About 5 to 40% by weight of a reactive inorganic filler selected from the group consisting of tricalcium silicate and dicalcium silicate and mixtures containing less than 2% free lime, and about 48 to 83% by weight of silica sand/ and a free radical initiator such as di-tert-butyl peroxide, azobisisobutyronitrile, benzoyl peroxide, lauryl peroxide, other orgaic peroxides and combinations to initiate polymerization of the monomer in the presence of the inorganic filers are used.

  15. High-temperature containerless calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, M. B.; Lacy, L. L.

    1985-01-01

    A high-temperature (greater than 1500 K) containerless calorimeter is described and its usefulness demonstrated. The calorimeter uses the technique of omnidirectional electron bombardment of pendant drops to achieve an isothermal test environment. The small heat input into the sample (i.e., 15-50 W) can be controlled and measured. The apparatus can be used to determine the total hemispherical emissivity, specific heat, heat of fusion, surface tension, and equilibrium melting temperature of small molten drops in the temperature range of 1500 to 3500 K. The total hemispherical emissivity and specific heat of pure niobium and two alloys of niobium-germanium have been measured in the temperature range of 1700 to 2400 K. As reported in the literature, the total hemispherical emissivity varied as a function of temperature. However, specific heat values for both the pure metal and alloys seem to be independent of temperature. Specific heat for the liquid alloy phase was also measured and compared to the solid phase.

  16. Solute strengthening at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leyson, G. P. M.; Curtin, W. A.

    2016-08-01

    The high temperature behavior of solute strengthening has previously been treated approximately using various scaling arguments, resulting in logarithmic and power-law scalings for the stress-dependent energy barrier Δ E(τ ) versus stress τ. Here, a parameter-free solute strengthening model is extended to high temperatures/low stresses without any a priori assumptions on the functional form of Δ E(τ ) . The new model predicts that the well-established low-temperature, with energy barrier Δ {{E}\\text{b}} and zero temperature flow stress {τy0} , transitions to a near-logarithmic form for stresses in the regime 0.2<τ /{τy0}≤slant 0.5 and then transitions to a power-law form at even lower stresses τ /{τy0}<0.03 . Δ {{E}\\text{b}} and {τy0} remains as the reference energy and stress scales over the entire range of stresses. The model is applied to literature data on solution strengthening in Cu alloys and captures the experimental results quantitatively and qualitatively. Most importantly, the model accurately captures the transition in strength from the low-temperature to intermediate-temperature and the associated transition for the activation volume. Overall, the present analysis unifies the different qualitative models in the literature and, when coupled with the previous parameter-free solute strengthening model, provides a single predictive model for solute strengthening as a function of composition, temperature, and strain rate over the full range of practical utility.

  17. Temperature dependence of the in situ widths of a rotating condensate in one dimensional optical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Ahmed S.; Soliman, Shemi S. M.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a conventional method of quantum statistical mechanics is used to study the temperature dependence of the in situ widths of a rotating condensate bosons in 1D optical potential. We trace the experimentally accessible parameters for which the temperature dependence of the in situ widths becomes perceivable. The calculated results showed that the temperature dependence of the in situ widths is completely different from that of a rotating condensate or trapped bosons in the optical lattice separately. The z-width shows distinct behavior from x- and y-widths due to the rotation effect. The obtained results provide useful qualitative theoretical results for future Bose Einstein condensation experiments in such traps.

  18. Temperature response of denitrification and anammox reveals the adaptation of microbial communities to in situ temperatures in permeable marine sediments that span 50° in latitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canion, A.; Kostka, J. E.; Gihring, T. M.; Huettel, M.; van Beusekom, J. E. E.; Gao, H.; Lavik, G.; Kuypers, M. M. M.

    2014-01-01

    Despite decades of research on the physiology and biochemistry of nitrate/nitrite-respiring microorganisms, little is known regarding their metabolic response to temperature, especially under in situ conditions. The temperature regulation of microbial communities that mediate anammox and denitrification was investigated in near shore permeable sediments at polar, temperate, and subtropical sites with annual mean temperatures ranging from -5 to 23 °C. Total N2 production rates were determined using the isotope pairing technique in intact core incubations under diffusive and simulated advection conditions and ranged from 2 to 359 μmol N m-2 d-1. For the majority of sites studied, N2 removal was 2-7 times more rapid under simulated advective flow conditions. Anammox comprised 6-14% of total N2 production at temperate and polar sites and was not detected at the subtropical site. Potential rates of denitrification and anammox were determined in anaerobic slurries in a temperature gradient block incubator across a temperature range of -1 °C to 42 °C. The highest optimum temperature (Topt) for denitrification was 36 °C and was observed in subtropical sediments, while the lowest Topt of 21 °C was observed at the polar site. Seasonal variation in the Topt was observed at the temperate site with values of 26 and 34 °C in winter and summer, respectively. The Topt values for anammox were 9 and 26 °C at the polar and temperate sites, respectively. The results demonstrate adaptation of denitrifying communities to in situ temperatures in permeable marine sediments across a wide range of temperatures, whereas marine anammox bacteria may be predominately psychrophilic to psychrotolerant. The adaptation of microbial communities to in situ temperatures suggests that the relationship between temperature and rates of N removal is highly dependent on community structure.

  19. High temperature strain gage evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, J. I.

    1977-01-01

    The structural thermal test of an advanced ramjet missile section required strain measurements as high as 922 K (1200 F). Since there is relatively little experience in the use of strain gages above the 700-755 K (800-900 F) level, a program was initiated to select and evaluate the best available gage. Candidate gages suitable for measurements up to 922 K (1200 F) were selected. This involved the determination of their operating characteristics, availability, cost, installation aspects, etc. The evaluation involved the following tests: strain as a function of load at room temperature and apparent strain as a function of temperature.

  20. High temperature sorbents for oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A sorbent capable of removing trace amounts of oxygen (ppt) from a gas stream at a high temperature above 200 C comprising a porous alumina silicate support, such as zeolite, containing from 1 to 10 percent by weight of ion exchanged transition metal, such as copper or cobalt ions, and 0.05 to 1.0 percent by weight of an activator selected from a platinum group metal such as platinum is described. The activation temperature, oxygen sorption, and reducibility are all improved by the presence of the platinum activator.

  1. High Temperature Sorbents for Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A sorbent capable of removing trace amounts of oxygen (ppt) from a gas stream at a high temperature above 200 C is introduced. The sorbent comprises a porous alumina silicate support such as zeolite containing from 1 to 10 percent by weight of ion exchanged transition metal such as copper or cobalt ions and 0.05 to 1.0 percent by weight of an activator selected from a platinum group metal such as platinum. The activation temperature, oxygen sorption and reducibility are all improved by the presence of the platinum activator.

  2. High Temperature Mechanisms for Venus Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Jerri; Narine, Roop; Kumar, Nishant; Singh, Sase; Gorevan, Steven

    Future Venus missions, including New Frontiers Venus In-Situ Explorer and three Flagship Missions - Venus Geophysical Network, Venus Mobile Explorer and Venus Surface Sample Return all focus on searching for evidence of past climate change both on the surface and in the atmospheric composition as well as in the interior dynamics of the planet. In order to achieve these goals and objectives, many key technologies need to be developed for the Venus extreme environment. These key technologies include sample acquisition systems and other high-temperature mechanisms and mobility systems capable of extended operation when directly exposed to the Venus surface or lower atmosphere environment. Honeybee Robotics has developed two types of high temperature motors, the materials and components in both motors were selected based on the requirement to survive temperatures above a minimum of 460° C, at earth atmosphere. The prototype Switched Reluctance Motor (SRM) has been operated non-continuously for over 20 hours at Venus-like conditions (460° C temperature, mostly CO2 gas environment) and it remains functional. A drilling system, actuated by two SRMs was tested in Venus-like conditions, 460° C temperature and mostly CO2 gas environment, for more than 15 hours. The drill successfully completed three tests by drilling into chalk up to 6 inches deep in each test. A first generation Brushless DC (BLDC) Motor and high temperature resolver were also tested and the feasibility of the designs was demonstrated by the extended operation of both devices under Venus-like condition. Further development of the BLDC motor and resolver continues and these devices will, ultimately, be integrated into the development of a high temperature sample acquisition scoop and high temperature joint (awarded SBIR Phase II in October, 2007). Both the SR and BLDC motors will undergo extensive testing at Venus temperature and pressure (TRL6) and are expected to be mission ready before the next New

  3. High temperature thermoelectric energy conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Charles

    1987-01-01

    The theory and current status of materials research for high-temperature thermoelectric energy conversion are reviewed. Semiconductors are shown to be the preferred class of materials for this application. Optimization of the figure of merit of both broadband and narrow-band semiconductors is discussed as a function of temperature. Phonon scattering mechanisms are discussed, and basic material guidelines are given for reduction of thermal conductivity. Two general classes of materials show promise for high temperature figure of merit (Z) values, namely the rare earth chalcogenides and the boron-rich borides. The electronic transport properties of the rare earth chalcogenides are explicable on the basis of degenerate or partially degenerate n-type semiconductors. Boron and boron-rich borides exhibit p-type hopping conductivity, with detailed explanations proposed for the transport differing from compound to compound. Some discussion is presented on the reasons for the low thermal conductivities in these materials. Also, ZTs greater than one appear to have been realized at high temperature in many of these compounds.

  4. High Temperature Transfer Molding Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    High temperature resins containing phenylethynyl groups that are processable by transfer molding have been prepared. These phenylethynyl containing oligomers were prepared from aromatic diamines containing phenylethynyl groups and various ratios of phthalic anhydride and 4-phenylethynlphthalic anhydride in glacial acetic acid to form a mixture of imide compounds in one step. This synthetic approach is advantageous since the products are a mixture of compounds and consequently exhibit a relatively low melting temperature. In addition, these materials exhibit low melt viscosities which are stable for several hours at 210-275 C, and since the thermal reaction of the phenylethynyl group does not occur to any appreciable extent at temperatures below 300 C, these materials have a broad processing window. Upon thermal cure at approximately 300-350 C, the phenylethynyl groups react to provide a crosslinked resin system. These new materials exhibit excellent properties and are potentially useful as adhesives, coatings, films, moldings and composite matrices.

  5. High temperature seal test rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Addy, Harold E., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The High Temperature Seals Test Rig Program at NASA's Lewis Research Center is a joint effort involving three separate federal government agencies. Testing has been underway at Lewis in this test rig since April, 1993. The rig was designed to run tests at temperatures to 800 F at pressures to 200 psia or at temperatures to 1300 to 1500 F at pressures to 65 psia. It was designed to run at speeds of up to 50,000 rpm which, for a 5.1 inch diameter disk, is a surface speed of about 1100 ft./sec. The rig was designed to allow easy replacement of the disks as well as the seals such that different disk materials and coatings may be tested.

  6. High-temperature battery calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, L.D.; Hart, R.H.; Chen, D.M.; Gibbard, H.F.

    1982-04-01

    A battery calorimeter was built for the measurement of thermal energy generation of high-temperature lithium--aluminum/iron sulfide battery cells, which are under development for electric vehicle propulsion and other energy storage applications. The calorimeter was designed with a temperature range of 400 /sup 0/--500 /sup 0/C, a detection limit of 1 mW, and an upper limit of heat flow of 50 W. The results of measurements on 200-Ah LiAl/FeS cells were in excellent agreement with the predictions of thermodynamic calculations based on precise measurements of the total cell polarization and the temperature coefficient of the emf. Details of the construction and operation principles of this calorimeter are given.

  7. Perspectives on high temperature superconducting electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatesan, T.

    1990-01-01

    The major challenges in making high temperature superconducting (HTSC) electronics viable are predominantly materials problems. Unlike their predecessors the metal oxide-based superconductors are integratable with other advanced technologies such as opto-electronics and micro-electronics. The materials problems to be addressed relate to the epitaxial growth of high quality films, highly oriented films on non-lattice matched substrates, heterostructures with atomically sharp interfaces of junctions and other novel devices, and the processing of these films with negligible deterioration of the superconducting properties. These issues are illustrated with results based on films prepared in-situ by a pulsed laser deposition process. Films with zero-transition temperatures of 90 K and critical current densities of 5 x 10(exp 6) A/sq cm at 77 K have been prepared by this technique. Ultra-thin films, less than 100 A show T(sub c) is greater than 80 K, supporting the idea of two-dimensional transport in these materials. By the use of appropriate buffer layers, films with T(sub c) of 87 K and J(sub c) of 6 x 10(exp 4) A/sq cm were fabricated on silicon substrates. Submicron structures with J(sub c) is greater than 2 x 10(exp 7) at 10 K were fabricated. Results on nonlinear switching elements, IR detectors, and microwave studies will be briefly summarized.

  8. Perspectives on high temperature superconducting electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatesan, T.

    1991-01-01

    The major challenges in making high temperature superconducting (HTSC) electronics viable are predominantly materials problems. Unlike their predecessors, the metal oxide-based superconductors are integratable with other advanced technologies such as opto-electronics and micro-electronics. The materials problems to be addressed relate to the epitaxial growth of high quality films, highly oriented films on non-lattice matched substrates, heterostructures with atomically sharp interfaces of junctions and other novel devices, and the processing of these films with negligible deterioration of the superconducting properties. These issues are illustrated with results based on films prepared in-situ by a pulsed laser deposition process. Films with zero-transition temperatures of 90 K and critical current densities of 5 x 10(exp 6) A/sq cm at 77 K have been prepared by this technique. Ultra-thin films, less than 100 A show T(sub c) is greater than 80 K, supporting the idea of two-dimensional transport in these materials. By the use of appropriate buffer layers, films with T(sub c) of 87 K and J(sub c) of 6 x 10(exp 4) A/sq cm were fabricated on silicon substrates. Submicron structures with J(sub c) is greater than 2 x 10(exp 7) at 10 K were fabricated. Results on nonlinear switching elements, IR detectors, and microwave studies will be briefly summarized.

  9. NSTX High Temperature Sensor Systems

    SciTech Connect

    B.McCormack; H.W. Kugel; P. Goranson; R. Kaita; et al

    1999-11-01

    The design of the more than 300 in-vessel sensor systems for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) has encountered several challenging fusion reactor diagnostic issues involving high temperatures and space constraints. This has resulted in unique miniature, high temperature in-vessel sensor systems mounted in small spaces behind plasma facing armor tiles, and they are prototypical of possible high power reactor first-wall applications. In the Center Stack, Divertor, Passive Plate, and vessel wall regions, the small magnetic sensors, large magnetic sensors, flux loops, Rogowski Coils, thermocouples, and Langmuir Probes are qualified for 600 degrees C operation. This rating will accommodate both peak rear-face graphite tile temperatures during operations and the 350 degrees C bake-out conditions. Similar sensor systems including flux loops, on other vacuum vessel regions are qualified for 350 degrees C operation. Cabling from the sensors embedded in the graphite tiles follows narrow routes to exit the vessel. The detailed sensor design and installation methods of these diagnostic systems developed for high-powered ST operation are discussed.

  10. High temperature two component explosive

    DOEpatents

    Mars, James E.; Poole, Donald R.; Schmidt, Eckart W.; Wang, Charles

    1981-01-01

    A two component, high temperature, thermally stable explosive composition comprises a liquid or low melting oxidizer and a liquid or low melting organic fuel. The oxidizer and fuel in admixture are incapable of substantial spontaneous exothermic reaction at temperatures on the order of 475.degree. K. At temperatures on the order of 475.degree. K., the oxidizer and fuel in admixture have an activation energy of at least about 40 kcal/mol. As a result of the high activation energy, the preferred explosive compositions are nondetonable as solids at ambient temperature, and become detonable only when heated beyond the melting point. Preferable oxidizers are selected from alkali or alkaline earth metal nitrates, nitrites, perchlorates, and/or mixtures thereof. Preferred fuels are organic compounds having polar hydrophilic groups. The most preferred fuels are guanidinium nitrate, acetamide and mixtures of the two. Most preferred oxidizers are eutectic mixtures of lithium nitrate, potassium nitrate and sodium nitrate, of sodium nitrite, sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate, and of potassium nitrate, calcium nitrate and sodium nitrate.

  11. High temperature structural sandwich panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papakonstantinou, Christos G.

    High strength composites are being used for making lightweight structural panels that are being employed in aerospace, naval and automotive structures. Recently, there is renewed interest in use of these panels. The major problem of most commercial available sandwich panels is the fire resistance. A recently developed inorganic matrix is investigated for use in cases where fire and high temperature resistance are necessary. The focus of this dissertation is the development of a fireproof composite structural system. Sandwich panels made with polysialate matrices have an excellent potential for use in applications where exposure to high temperatures or fire is a concern. Commercial available sandwich panels will soften and lose nearly all of their compressive strength temperatures lower than 400°C. This dissertation consists of the state of the art, the experimental investigation and the analytical modeling. The state of the art covers the performance of existing high temperature composites, sandwich panels and reinforced concrete beams strengthened with Fiber Reinforced Polymers (FRP). The experimental part consists of four major components: (i) Development of a fireproof syntactic foam with maximum specific strength, (ii) Development of a lightweight syntactic foam based on polystyrene spheres, (iii) Development of the composite system for the skins. The variables are the skin thickness, modulus of elasticity of skin and high temperature resistance, and (iv) Experimental evaluation of the flexural behavior of sandwich panels. Analytical modeling consists of a model for the flexural behavior of lightweight sandwich panels, and a model for deflection calculations of reinforced concrete beams strengthened with FRP subjected to fatigue loading. The experimental and analytical results show that sandwich panels made with polysialate matrices and ceramic spheres do not lose their load bearing capability during severe fire exposure, where temperatures reach several

  12. Winter frost resistance of Pinus cembra measured in situ at the alpine timberline as affected by temperature conditions.

    PubMed

    Buchner, Othmar; Neuner, Gilbert

    2011-11-01

    Winter frost resistance (WFR), midwinter frost hardening and frost dehardening potential of Pinus cembra L. were determined in situ by means of a novel low-temperature freezing system at the alpine timberline ecotone (1950 m a.s.l., Mt Patscherkofel, Innsbruck, Austria). In situ liquid nitrogen (LN₂)-quenching experiments should check whether maximum WFR of P. cembra belonging to the frost hardiest conifer group, being classified in US Department of Agriculture climatic zone 1, suffices to survive dipping into LN₂ (-196 °C). Viability was assessed in a field re-growth test. Maximum in situ WFR (LT₅₀) of leaves was <- 75 °C and that of buds was less (-70.3 °C), matching the lowest water contents. In midwinter, in situ freezing exotherms of leaves, buds and the xylem were often not detectable. Ice formed in the xylem at a mean of -2.8 °C and in leaves at -3.3 °C. In situ WFR of P. cembra was higher than that obtained on detached twigs, as reported earlier. In situ LN₂-quenching experiments were lethal in all cases even when twigs of P. cembra were exposed to an in situ frost hardening treatment (12 days at -20 °C followed by 3 days at -50 °C) to induce maximum WFR. Temperature treatments applied in the field significantly affected the actual WFR. In January a frost hardening treatment (21 days at -20 °C) led to a significant increase of WFR (buds: -62 °C to <- 70 °C; leaves: -59.6 °C to -65.2 °C), showing that P. cembra was not at its specific maximum WFR. In contrast, simulated warm spells in late winter led to premature frost dehardening (buds: -32.6 °C to -10.2 °C; leaves: -32.7 to -16.4 °C) followed by significantly earlier bud swelling and burst in late winter. Strikingly, both temperature treatments, either increased air temperature (+10.1 °C) or increased soil temperature (+6.5 °C), were similarly effective. This high readiness to frost harden and deharden in winter in the field must be considered to be of great significance for

  13. Motor for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roopnarine (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A high temperature motor has a stator with poles formed by wire windings, and a rotor with magnetic poles on a rotor shaft positioned coaxially within the stator. The stator and rotor are built up from stacks of magnetic-alloy laminations. The stator windings are made of high temperature magnet wire insulated with a vitreous enamel film, and the wire windings are bonded together with ceramic binder. A thin-walled cylinder is positioned coaxially between the rotor and the stator to prevent debris from the stator windings from reaching the rotor. The stator windings are wound on wire spools made of ceramic, thereby avoiding need for mica insulation and epoxy/adhesive. The stator and rotor are encased in a stator housing with rear and front end caps, and rear and front bearings for the rotor shaft are mounted on external sides of the end caps to keep debris from the motor migrating into the bearings' races.

  14. High Temperature Heat Exchanger Project

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony E. Hechanova, Ph.D.

    2008-09-30

    The UNLV Research Foundation assembled a research consortium for high temperature heat exchanger design and materials compatibility and performance comprised of university and private industry partners under the auspices of the US DOE-NE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative in October 2003. The objectives of the consortium were to conduct investigations of candidate materials for high temperature heat exchanger componets in hydrogen production processes and design and perform prototypical testing of heat exchangers. The initial research of the consortium focused on the intermediate heat exchanger (located between the nuclear reactor and hydrogen production plan) and the components for the hydrogen iodine decomposition process and sulfuric acid decomposition process. These heat exchanger components were deemed the most challenging from a materials performance and compatibility perspective

  15. Stream temperature estimated in situ from thermal-infrared images: best estimate and uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iezzi, F.; Todisco, M. T.

    2015-11-01

    The paper aims to show a technique to estimate in situ the stream temperature from thermal-infrared images deepening its best estimate and uncertainty. Stream temperature is an important indicator of water quality and nowadays its assessment is important particularly for thermal pollution monitoring in water bodies. Stream temperature changes are especially due to the anthropogenic heat input from urban wastewater and from water used as a coolant by power plants and industrial manufacturers. The stream temperatures assessment using ordinary techniques (e.g. appropriate thermometers) is limited by sparse sampling in space due to a spatial discretization necessarily punctual. Latest and most advanced techniques assess the stream temperature using thermal-infrared remote sensing based on thermal imagers placed usually on aircrafts or using satellite images. These techniques assess only the surface water temperature and they are suitable to detect the temperature of vast water bodies but do not allow a detailed and precise surface water temperature assessment in limited areas of the water body. The technique shown in this research is based on the assessment of thermal-infrared images obtained in situ via portable thermal imager. As in all thermographic techniques, also in this technique, it is possible to estimate only the surface water temperature. A stream with the presence of a discharge of urban wastewater is proposed as case study to validate the technique and to show its application limits. Since the technique analyzes limited areas in extension of the water body, it allows a detailed and precise assessment of the water temperature. In general, the punctual and average stream temperatures are respectively uncorrected and corrected. An appropriate statistical method that minimizes the errors in the average stream temperature is proposed. The correct measurement of this temperature through the assessment of thermal- infrared images obtained in situ via portable

  16. High pressure and high temperature apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Voronov, Oleg A.

    2005-09-13

    A design for high pressure/high temperature apparatus and reaction cell to achieve .about.30 GPa pressure in .about.1 cm volume and .about.100 GPa pressure in .about.1 mm volumes and 20-5000.degree. C. temperatures in a static regime. The device includes profiled anvils (28) action on a reaction cell (14, 16) containing the material (26) to be processed. The reaction cell includes a heater (18) surrounded by insulating layers and screens. Surrounding the anvils are cylindrical inserts and supporting rings (30-48) whose hardness increases towards the reaction cell. These volumes may be increased considerably if applications require it, making use of presses that have larger loading force capability, larger frames and using larger anvils.

  17. High temperature solar thermal receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A design concept for a high temperature solar thermal receiver to operate at 3 atmospheres pressure and 2500 F outlet was developed. The performance and complexity of windowed matrix, tube-header, and extended surface receivers were evaluated. The windowed matrix receiver proved to offer substantial cost and performance benefits. An efficient and cost effective hardware design was evaluated for a receiver which can be readily interfaced to fuel and chemical processes or to heat engines for power generation.

  18. HIGH TEMPERATURE MICROSCOPE AND FURNACE

    DOEpatents

    Olson, D.M.

    1961-01-31

    A high-temperature microscope is offered. It has a reflecting optic situated above a molten specimen in a furnace and reflecting the image of the same downward through an inert optic member in the floor of the furnace, a plurality of spaced reflecting plane mirrors defining a reflecting path around the furnace, a standard microscope supported in the path of and forming the end terminus of the light path.

  19. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOEpatents

    Carruthers, William D.; Boyd, Gary L.

    1993-01-01

    A high temperature ceramic/metallic turbine engine includes a metallic housing which journals a rotor member of the turbine engine. A ceramic disk-like shroud portion of the engine is supported on the metallic housing portion and maintains a close running clearance with the rotor member. A ceramic spacer assembly maintains the close running clearance of the shroud portion and rotor member despite differential thermal movements between the shroud portion and metallic housing portion.

  20. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOEpatents

    Carruthers, William D.; Boyd, Gary L.

    1994-01-01

    A high temperature ceramic/metallic turbine engine includes a metallic housing which journals a rotor member of the turbine engine. A ceramic disk-like shroud portion of the engine is supported on the metallic housing portion and maintains a close running clearance with the rotor member. A ceramic spacer assembly maintains the close running clearance of the shroud portion and rotor member despite differential thermal movements between the shroud portion and metallic housing portion.

  1. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOEpatents

    Carruthers, William D.; Boyd, Gary L.

    1992-01-01

    A high temperature ceramic/metallic turbine engine includes a metallic housing which journals a rotor member of the turbine engine. A ceramic disk-like shroud portion of the engine is supported on the metallic housing portion and maintains a close running clearance with the rotor member. A ceramic spacer assembly maintains the close running clearance of the shroud portion and rotor member despite differential thermal movements between the shroud portion and metallic housing portion.

  2. High-temperature geothermal cableheads

    SciTech Connect

    Coquat, J.A.; Eifert, R.W.

    1981-11-01

    Two high-temperature, corrosion-resistant logging cableheads which use metal seals and a stable fluid to achieve proper electrical terminations and cable-sonde interfacings are described. A tensile bar provides a calibrated yield point, and a cone assembly anchors the cable armor to the head. Electrical problems of the sort generally ascribable to the cable-sonde interface were absent during demonstration hostile-environment loggings in which these cableheads were used.

  3. Temperature-responsive compounds as in situ gelling biomedical materials.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hyo Jung; Ko, Du Young; Park, Min Hee; Joo, Min Kyung; Jeong, Byeongmoon

    2012-07-21

    Aqueous solutions that undergo sol-to-gel transition as the temperature increases have been extensively studied during the last decade. The material can be designed by controlling the hydrophilic and hydrophobic balance of the material. Basically, the molecular weight of the hydrophilic block and hydrophobic block of a compound should be fine-tuned from the synthetic point of view. In addition, stereochemistry, microsequence, topology, and nanostructures of the compound also affect the transition temperature, gel window, phase diagram, and modulus of the gel. From a practical point of view, biodegradability, biocompatibility, and interactions between the material and drug or cell should be considered in designing a thermogelling material. The interactions are particularly important in that they control drug release profile and initial burst release of the drug in the drug delivery system, and affect cell proliferation, differentiation, and biomarker expression in three-dimensional cell culture and tissue engineering application. This review provides an in-depth summary of the recent progress of thermogelling systems including polymers, low molecular compounds, and nanoemulsions. Their biomedical applications were also comparatively discussed. In addition, perspectives on future material design of a new thermogelling material and its application are suggested. PMID:22688789

  4. High temperature catalytic membrane reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    Current state-of-the-art inorganic oxide membranes offer the potential of being modified to yield catalytic properties. The resulting modules may be configured to simultaneously induce catalytic reactions with product concentration and separation in a single processing step. Processes utilizing such catalytically active membrane reactors have the potential for dramatically increasing yield reactions which are currently limited by either thermodynamic equilibria, product inhibition, or kinetic selectivity. Examples of commercial interest include hydrogenation, dehydrogenation, partial and selective oxidation, hydrations, hydrocarbon cracking, olefin metathesis, hydroformylation, and olefin polymerization. A large portion of the most significant reactions fall into the category of high temperature, gas phase chemical and petrochemical processes. Microporous oxide membranes are well suited for these applications. A program is proposed to investigate selected model reactions of commercial interest (i.e. dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene to styrene and dehydrogenation of butane to butadiene) using a high temperature catalytic membrane reactor. Membranes will be developed, reaction dynamics characterized, and production processes developed, culminating in laboratory-scale demonstration of technical and economic feasibility. As a result, the anticipated increased yield per reactor pass economic incentives are envisioned. First, a large decrease in the temperature required to obtain high yield should be possible because of the reduced driving force requirement. Significantly higher conversion per pass implies a reduced recycle ratio, as well as reduced reactor size. Both factors result in reduced capital costs, as well as savings in cost of reactants and energy.

  5. Ultrasonic waveguide transducer for high temperature testing of ceramic honeycomb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, N.; An, C. P.; Nickerson, S. T.; Gunasekaran, N.; Shi, Z.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a practical ultrasonic waveguide transducer designed for in situ material property characterization of ceramic honeycomb at high temperatures (>1200°C) and under fast thermal cycles (>1000°C/min). The low thermal conductivity MACOR waveguide allows the use of conventional transducer (max temp. 50°C) at one end and guides ultrasonic waves into the high temperature region where the characterization is carried out. The impact of time, temperature, and heating/cooling rates on the material behavior was studied. It was demonstrated that the same transducer could also be used for in-situ crack detection during the thermal shock testing of ceramic honeycomb.

  6. Development of High Temperature Gas Sensor Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Chen, Liang-Yu; Neudeck, Philip G.; Knight, Dak; Liu, Chung-Chiun; Wu, Quing-Hai; Zhou, Huan-Jun

    1997-01-01

    The measurement of engine emissions is important for their monitoring and control. However, the ability to measure these emissions in-situ is limited. We are developing a family of high temperature gas sensors which are intended to operate in harsh environments such as those in an engine. The development of these sensors is based on progress in two types of technology: (1) The development of SiC-based semiconductor technology; and (2) Improvements in micromachining and microfabrication technology. These technologies are being used to develop point-contact sensors to measure gases which are important in emission control especially hydrogen, hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides, and oxygen. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the development of this point-contact sensor technology. The detection of each type of gas involves its own challenges in the fields of materials science and fabrication technology. Of particular importance is sensor sensitivity, selectivity, and stability in long-term, high temperature operation. An overview is presented of each sensor type with an evaluation of its stage of development. It is concluded that this technology has significant potential for use in engine applications but further development is necessary.

  7. Highly Dense Isolated Metal Atom Catalytic Sites: Dynamic Formation and In Situ Observations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yaxin; Kasama, Takeshi; Huang, Zhiwei; Hu, Pingping; Chen, Jianmin; Liu, Xi; Tang, Xingfu

    2015-11-23

    Atomically dispersed noble-metal catalysts with highly dense active sites are promising materials with which to maximise metal efficiency and to enhance catalytic performance; however, their fabrication remains challenging because metal atoms are prone to sintering, especially at a high metal loading. A dynamic process of formation of isolated metal atom catalytic sites on the surface of the support, which was achieved starting from silver nanoparticles by using a thermal surface-mediated diffusion method, was observed directly by using in situ electron microscopy and in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction. A combination of electron microscopy images with X-ray absorption spectra demonstrated that the silver atoms were anchored on five-fold oxygen-terminated cavities on the surface of the support to form highly dense isolated metal active sites, leading to excellent reactivity in catalytic oxidation at low temperature. This work provides a general strategy for designing atomically dispersed noble-metal catalysts with highly dense active sites.

  8. High temperature polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Michael A.

    1987-01-01

    With the increased emphasis on high performance aircraft the need for lightweight, thermal/oxidatively stable materials is growing. Because of their ease of fabrication, high specific strength, and ability to be tailored chemically to produce a variety of mechanical and physical properties, polymers and polymer matrix composites present themselves as attractive materials for a number of aeropropulsion applications. In the early 1970s researchers at the NASA Lewis Research Center developed a highly processable, thermally stable (600 F) polyimide, PMR-15. Since that time, PMR-15 has become commercially available and has found use in military aircraft, in particular, the F-404 engine for the Navy's F/A-18 strike fighter. The NASA Lewis'contributions to high temperature polymer matrix composite research will be discussed as well as current and future directions.

  9. Trends in Surface Temperature at High Latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comiso, Josefino C.

    2012-01-01

    The earliest signal of a climate change is expected to be found in the polar regions where warming is expected to be amplified on account of ice-albedo feedbacks associated with the high reflectivity of snow and ice. Because of general inaccessibility, there is a general paucity of in situ data and hence the need to use satellite data to observe the large-scale variability and trends in surface temperature in the region. Among the most important sensors for monitoring surface temperature has been the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) which was first launched in 1978 and has provided continuous thermal infrared data since 1981. The top of the atmosphere data are converted to surface temperature data through various schemes that accounts for the unique atmospheric and surface conditions in the polar regions. Among the highest source of error in the data is cloud masking which is made more difficult in the polar region because of similar Signatures of clouds and snow lice covered areas. The availability of many more channels in the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) launched on board Terra satellite in December 1999 and on board Aqua in May 2002 (e.g., 36 visible and infrared channels compared to 5 for AVHRR) made it possible to minimize the error. Further capabilities were introduced with the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR) which has the appropriate frequency channels for the retrieval of sea surface temperature (SST). The results of analysis of the data show an amplified warming in the Arctic region, compared with global warming. The spatial distribution of warming is, however, not uniform and during the last 3 decades, positive temperature anomalies have been most pronounced in North America, Greenland and the Arctic basin. Some regions of the Arctic such as Siberia and the Bering Sea surprisingly show moderate cooling but this may be because these regions were anomalously warm in the 1980s when the satellite record

  10. High temperature jet fuel stabilizers

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, E.M.; Selvaraj, L.; Stallman, J.B.

    1996-10-01

    We have previously discussed the rationale for development of jet fuels with enhanced thermal stability at temperatures above 400{degrees}C. At these temperatures we are encroaching into the so-called pyrolysis regime, where the cleavage of carbon-carbon bonds into free radicals is facile and leads to the rapid degradation of aliphatic hydrocarbons. Notwithstanding, we established that the formation of carbonaceous materials is significantly retarded in hydrocarbon mixtures containing molecules such as benzyl alcohol (BzOH). It was ascertained that BzOH acts as a hydrogen donor capping aliphatic radicals formed at temperatures > 400{degrees}C while transforming into relatively stable products. These results suggested is superior high temperature thermal stabilizers might be found among the more conventional hydrogen donors that find application in coal liquefaction and similar hydrogenation processes. Here we present the results of {open_quotes}screening{close_quotes} and kinetic studies of traditional hydrogen donors, such as tetralin, tetrahydroquinoline and the like, together with simple derivatives designed to test the importance of specific factors in the thermal stabilization of jet fuels.

  11. Structural modifications of GeO2 glass under high pressure and high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornet, Antoine; Molherac, Rémy; Champagnon, Bernard; Martinet, Christine

    2016-09-01

    Vitreous GeO2 has been compressed at high temperature to investigate the effect of thermal activation on the structural reorganization during compression. The measurements were performed in-situ using micro Raman spectroscopy under pressure up to 6 GPa and temperature up to 400 °C. The evolution of the Raman shift of the main band (400-500 cm-1) with temperature during compression evidences a pressure window around 3 GPa within which temperature has a remarkable influence on the structure, in particular, the intermediate range order. We find that this change is well correlated with previous ex-situ density measurements from high pressure-high temperature densifications. Moreover, coordination changes from tetrahedrally (GeO4) to octahedrally (GeO6) coordinated GeO2 are accelerated with the heating during the compression.

  12. Temperature and layer thickness dependent in situ investigations on epindolidione organic thin-film transistors

    PubMed Central

    Lassnig, R.; Striedinger, B.; Jones, A.O.F.; Scherwitzl, B.; Fian, A.; Głowacl, E.D.; Stadlober, B.; Winkler, A.

    2016-01-01

    We report on in situ performance evaluations as a function of layer thickness and substrate temperature for bottom-gate, bottom-gold contact epindolidione organic thin-film transistors on various gate dielectrics. Experiments were carried out under ultra-high vacuum conditions, enabling quasi-simultaneous electrical and surface analysis. Auger electron spectroscopy and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) were applied to characterize the quality of the substrate surface and the thermal stability of the organic films. Ex situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to gain additional information on the layer formation and surface morphology of the hydrogen-bonded organic pigment. The examined gate dielectrics included SiO2, in its untreated and sputtered forms, as well as the spin-coated organic capping layers poly(vinyl-cinnamate) (PVCi) and poly((±)endo,exo-bicyclo[2.2.1]hept-5-ene-2,3-dicarboxylic acid, diphenylester) (PNDPE, from the class of polynorbornenes). TDS and AFM revealed Volmer-Weber island growth dominated film formation with no evidence of a subjacent wetting layer. This growth mode is responsible for the comparably high coverage required for transistor behavior at 90–95% of a monolayer composed of standing molecules. Surface sputtering and an increased sample temperature during epindolidione deposition augmented the surface diffusion of adsorbing molecules and therefore led to a lower number of better-ordered islands. Consequently, while the onset of charge transport was delayed, higher saturation mobility was obtained. The highest, bottom-contact configuration, mobilities of approximately 2.5 × 10−3cm2/Vs were found for high coverages (50 nm) on sputtered samples. The coverage dependence of the mobility showed very different characteristics for the different gate dielectrics, while the change of the threshold voltage with coverage was approximately the same for all systems. An apparent decrease of the mobility with increasing coverage on the

  13. High temperature PEM fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianlu; Xie, Zhong; Zhang, Jiujun; Tang, Yanghua; Song, Chaojie; Navessin, Titichai; Shi, Zhiqing; Song, Datong; Wang, Haijiang; Wilkinson, David P.; Liu, Zhong-Sheng; Holdcroft, Steven

    There are several compelling technological and commercial reasons for operating H 2/air PEM fuel cells at temperatures above 100 °C. Rates of electrochemical kinetics are enhanced, water management and cooling is simplified, useful waste heat can be recovered, and lower quality reformed hydrogen may be used as the fuel. This review paper provides a concise review of high temperature PEM fuel cells (HT-PEMFCs) from the perspective of HT-specific materials, designs, and testing/diagnostics. The review describes the motivation for HT-PEMFC development, the technology gaps, and recent advances. HT-membrane development accounts for ∼90% of the published research in the field of HT-PEMFCs. Despite this, the status of membrane development for high temperature/low humidity operation is less than satisfactory. A weakness in the development of HT-PEMFC technology is the deficiency in HT-specific fuel cell architectures, test station designs, and testing protocols, and an understanding of the underlying fundamental principles behind these areas. The development of HT-specific PEMFC designs is of key importance that may help mitigate issues of membrane dehydration and MEA degradation.

  14. Effects of temperature and desiccation on ex situ conservation of nongreen fern spores

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conservation of the genetic diversity of ferns is limited by the paucity of ex situ spore banks. Conflicting reports of fern spore response to low temperature and moisture impedes establishment of fern spore banks. There is little information available to evaluate longevity of fern spores under dif...

  15. Compensated High Temperature Strain Gage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    A device for measuring strain in substrates at high temperatures in which the thermally induced apparent strain is nulled is described. Two gages are used, one active gage and one compensating gage. Both gages are placed on the substrate to be gaged; the active gage is attached such that it responds to mechanical and thermally induced apparent strain while the compensating gage is attached such that it does not respond to mechanical strain and and measures only thermally induced apparent strain. A thermal blanket is placed over the two gages to maintain the gages at the same temperature. The two gages are wired as adjacent arms of a wheatstone bridge which nulls the thermally induced apparent strain giving a true reading of the mechanical strain in the substrate.

  16. Ultra-High Temperature Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasky, Dan; Bull, Jeff

    1994-01-01

    Recent developments in ultra-high temperature ceramic composites, and their application to advanced vehicle thermal protection systems will be discussed. Research and testing of refractory ceramics has resulted in the identification of a new family of ceramic composites that promise temperature performance to 4000 F+, significantly beyond the current state-of-the-art of reusable systems which are limited to approximately 300 F. This new family of materials includes zirconium and hafnium diboride composites with various reinforcements, such as fibers and particulates. Preliminary material characterization and testing results, including plasma arc-jet testing of prototype vehicle components, will be described. Future directions for the research and material development activities will also be discussed.

  17. In situ monitoring of internal surface temperature of the historic building envelope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labovská, Veronika; Katunský, Dušan

    2016-06-01

    Historical building envelope is characterized by a large accumulation that impact is mainly by changing the inner surface temperature over time. The minimum value of the inner surface temperature is set Code requirements. In the case of thermal technology assessment of building envelope contemplates a steady state external temperature and internal environment, thereby neglecting the heat accumulation capacity of building envelopes. Monitoring surface temperature in real terms in situ shows the real behavior of the building envelope close to reality. The recorded data can be used to create a numerical model for the simulation.

  18. In-situ measurement of dissolved H 2 in aqueous fluid at elevated temperatures and pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, K.; Seyfried, W. E., Jr.

    1995-11-01

    In-situ measurement of Hz in aqueous fluid under hydrothermal conditions has long been a major concern in experimental geochemistry owing to the important role of H 2 in a wide range of homogenous and heterogeneous equilibria. Although numerous efforts have been made, an effective and reliable H 2 sensor for geochemical applications is lacking, especially one suitable for measurement at supercritical conditions of water. In this paper, we discuss a sensor which was developed for in-situ measurement of dissolved H 2 in aqueous fluid at temperatures and pressures greater than previously possible. In general, the H 2 sensor consists of two electrodes and a Hg/HgO internal reference element: a platinum electrode and a yttrium-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) membrane electrode. The electrochemical cell can be depicted as follows: Pt|H 2, H +, H 2O|ZrO 2(Y 2O 3)| HgO|Hg. A titanium flow reactor was used to test and calibrate sensor response and sensitivity. Dissolved H 2 concentration and the rate of fluid flowing through the reactor were controlled by a modified HPLC pump and computer system, respectively. Dissolved H 2 concentrations of fluid leaving the reactor were determined by GC analysis. ΔE YH of the fluid in the reactor was, at the same time, monitored and recorded by an electrometer with high input impedance. The experiments were performed at 400 bars, and temperatures up to 400°C. Results revealed good Nemstain response, even for unusually low dissolved H 2 concentrations. Thus, at 400°C and 400 bars, the following calibration line was obtained: Δ EYH (V) = 0.972 + 0.054 log mH 2 (M/kg) ( r = 0.9974, N = 9), where mH 2 ranged from 0.096 to 5.75 mM/kg. The experiments also demonstrated excellent stability of the sensor during the month-long operation. The high temperature H 2 sensor may have important applications for field monitoring dissolved H 2 in mid-ocean ridge vent fluids. It is also ideally suited for direct determination of redox state in hydrothermal

  19. High temperature sealed electrochemical cell

    SciTech Connect

    Valentin Chung, Brice Hoani; Burke, Paul J.; Sadoway, Donald R.

    2015-10-06

    A cell for high temperature electrochemical reactions is provided. The cell includes a container, at least a portion of the container acting as a first electrode. An extension tube has a first end and a second end, the extension tube coupled to the container at the second end forming a conduit from the container to said first end. A second electrode is positioned in the container and extends out of the container via the conduit. A seal is positioned proximate the first end of the extension tube, for sealing the cell.

  20. Passivation of high temperature superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Richard P. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The surface of high temperature superconductors such as YBa2Cu3O(7-x) are passivated by reacting the native Y, Ba and Cu metal ions with an anion such as sulfate or oxalate to form a surface film that is impervious to water and has a solubility in water of no more than 10(exp -3) M. The passivating treatment is preferably conducted by immersing the surface in dilute aqueous acid solution since more soluble species dissolve into the solution. The treatment does not degrade the superconducting properties of the bulk material.

  1. High temperature insulation barrier composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onstott, Joseph W. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A composite material suitable for providing insulation for the nozzle structure of the Space Shuttle and other similar surfaces is disclosed. The composite layer is comprised of an outer skin layer of nickel chromium and an interleaved inner region comprising a top layer of nickel chromium foil which acts as a primary convective shield. There are at least two layers of alumina batting adjacent to the layers of silicon carbide fabric. An additional layer of nickel chromium foil is used as a secondary convective shield. The composite is particularly advantageous for use as nozzle insulation because of its ability to withstand high reentry temperatures, its flexibility, oxidation resistance, low conductivity, and light weight.

  2. Advanced high-temperature batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Paul A.

    1989-01-01

    The promise of very high specific energy and power was not yet achieved for practical battery systems. Some recent approaches are discussed for new approaches to achieving high performance for lithium/DeS2 cells and sodium/metal chloride cells. The main problems for the development of successful LiAl/FeS2 cells were the instability of the FeS2 electrode, which has resulted in rapidly declining capacity, the lack of an internal mechanism for accommodating overcharge of a cell, thus requiring the use of external charge control on each individual cell, and the lack of a suitable current collector for the positive electrode other than expensive molybdenum sheet material. Much progress was made in solving the first two problems. Reduction of the operating temperatures to 400 C by a change in electrolyte composition has increased the expected life to 1000 cycles. Also, a lithium shuttle mechanism was demonstrated for selected electrode compositions that permits sufficient overcharge tolerance to adjust for the normally expected cell-to-cell deviation in coulombic efficiency. Sodium/sulfur batteries and sodium/metal chloride batteries have demonstrated good reliability and long cycle life. For applications where very high power is desired, new electrolyte coinfigurations would be required. Design work was carried out for the sodium/metal chloride battery that demonstrates the feasibility of achieving high specific energy and high power for large battery cells having thin-walled high-surface area electrolytes.

  3. Impact of process temperature on GaSb metal-oxide-semiconductor interface properties fabricated by ex-situ process

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoyama, Masafumi Takenaka, Mitsuru; Takagi, Shinichi; Asakura, Yuji; Yokoyama, Haruki

    2014-06-30

    We have studied the impact of process temperature on interface properties of GaSb metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structures fabricated by an ex-situ atomic-layer-deposition (ALD) process. We have found that the ALD temperature strongly affects the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/GaSb MOS interface properties. The Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/GaSb MOS interfaces fabricated at the low ALD temperature of 150 °C have the minimum interface-trap density (D{sub it}) of ∼4.5 × 10{sup 13 }cm{sup −2} eV{sup −1}. We have also found that the post-metalization annealing at temperature higher than 200 °C degrades the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/GaSb MOS interface properties. The low-temperature process is preferable in fabricating GaSb MOS interfaces in the ex-situ ALD process to avoid the high-temperature-induced degradations.

  4. High modulus high temperature glass fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    The search for a new high-modulus, high-temperature glass fiber involved the preparation of 500 glass compositions lying in 12 glass fields. These systems consisted primarily of low atomic number oxides and rare-earth oxides. Direct optical measurements of the kinetics of crystallization of the cordierite-rare earth system, for example, showed that the addition of rare-earth oxides decreased the rate of formation of cordierite crystals. Glass samples prepared from these systems proved that the rare-earth oxides made large specific contributions to the Young's modulus of the glasses. The best glasses have moduli greater than 21 million psi, the best glass fibers have moduli greater than 18 million psi, and the best glass fiber-epoxy resin composites have tensile strengths of 298,000 psi, compressive strengths of at least 220,000 psi, flexural strengths of 290,000 psi, and short-beam shear strengths of almost 17,000 psi.

  5. Multifunctional, High-Temperature Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W.; Smith, Joseph G.; Siochi, Emilie J.; Working, Dennis C.; Criss, Jim M.; Watson, Kent A.; Delozier, Donavon M.; Ghose, Sayata

    2007-01-01

    In experiments conducted as part of a continuing effort to incorporate multifunctionality into advanced composite materials, blends of multi-walled carbon nanotubes and a resin denoted gPETI-330 h (wherein gPETI h is an abbreviation for gphenylethynyl-terminated imide h) were prepared, characterized, and fabricated into moldings. PETI-330 was selected as the matrix resin in these experiments because of its low melt viscosity (<10 poise at a temperature of 280 C), excellent melt stability (lifetime >2 hours at 280 C), and high temperature performance (>1,000 hours at 288 C). The multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), obtained from the University of Kentucky, were selected because of their electrical and thermal conductivity and their small diameters. The purpose of these experiments was to determine the combination of thermal, electrical, and mechanical properties achievable while still maintaining melt processability. The PETI-330/MWCNT mixtures were prepared at concentrations ranging from 3 to 25 weight-percent of MWCNTs by dry mixing of the constituents in a ball mill using zirconia beads. The resulting powders were characterized for degree of mixing and thermal and rheological properties. The neat resin was found to have melt viscosity between 5 and 10 poise. At 280 C and a fixed strain rate, the viscosity was found to increase with time. At this temperature, the phenylethynyl groups do not readily react and so no significant curing of the resin occurred. For MWCNT-filled samples, melt viscosity was reasonably steady at 280 C and was greater in samples containing greater proportions of MWCNTs. The melt viscosity for 20 weightpercent of MWCNTs was found to be .28,000 poise, which is lower than the initial estimated allowable maximum value of 60,000 poise for injection molding. Hence, MWCNT loadings of as much as 20 percent were deemed to be suitable compositions for scale-up. High-resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM) showed the MWCNTs to be well

  6. In-Situ X-ray Spectroscopic Studies of the Fundamental Chemistry of Pb and Pb-Bi Corrosion Processes at High Temperatures: Development and Assessment of Composite Corrosion Resistant Materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Carlo Segre

    2009-12-30

    Over the course of this project, we have a number of accomplishments. The following list is presented as a summary statement for the project. Specific details from previous Quarterly Reports are given. (1) We established that it is possible to use EXAFS to study the interface layer between a material and the liquid Pb overlayer. We have discovered that molybdenum grows a selflimiting oxide layer which does not spall even at the highest temperatures studied. There have been 2 publications resulting from these studies. (2) We have fabricated a high temperature environmental chamber capable of extending the Pb overlayer studies by varying the incident x-ray beam angle to perform depth profiling of the Pb layer. This chamber will continue to be available to nuclear materials program researchers who wish to use the MRCAT beam line. (3) We have developed a collaboration with researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute to study corrosion layers on zircalloy. One publication has resulted from this collaboration and another is in progress. (4) We have developed a collaboration with Prof. G.R. Odette of UCSB in which we studied the local structure of Ti and Y in nanoclusters found in oxygen dispersion strengthened steels. There are two publications in progress form this collaboration and we have extended the project to anomalous small angle x-ray scattering as well as EXAFS. (5) We have promoted the use of EXAFS for the study of nuclear materials to the community over the past 4 years and we have begun to see an increase in demand for EXAFS from the community at the MRCAT beam line. (6) This grant was instrumental in nucleating interest in establishing a new Collaborative Access Team at the Advanced Photon Source, the Nuclear and Radiological Research CAT (NRR-CAT). The co-PI (Jeff Terry) is the lead investigator on this project and it has been approved by the APS Scientific Advisory Committee for further planning. The status of the NRR-CAT project is being discussed in a

  7. Sialons as high temperature insulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, W. M.; Kuo, Y. S.

    1978-01-01

    Sialons were evaluated for application as high temperature electrical insulators in contact with molybdenum and tungsten components in hard vacuum applications. Both D.C. and variable frequency A.C. resistivity data indicate the sialons to have electrical resistivity similar to common oxide in the 1000 C or higher range. Metallographic evaluations indicate good bonding of the type 15R ALN polytype to molybdenum and tungsten. The beta prime or modified silicon nitride phase was unacceptable in terms of vacuum stability. Additives effect on electrical resistivity. Similar resistivity decreases were produced by additions of molybdenum or tungsten to form cermets. The use of hot pressing at 1800 C with ALN, Al2 O3 and Si3N4 starting powders produced a better product than did a combination of SiO2 and AIN staring powders. It was indicated that sialons will be suitable insulators in the 1600K range in contact with molybdenum or tungsten if they are produced as a pure ceramic and subsequently bonded to the metal components at temperatures in the 1600K range.

  8. Faraday imaging at high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Lloyd A.; Reichert, Patrick

    1997-01-01

    A Faraday filter rejects background light from self-luminous thermal objects, but transmits laser light at the passband wavelength, thus providing an ultra-narrow optical bandpass filter. The filter preserves images so a camera looking through a Faraday filter at a hot target illuminated by a laser will not see the thermal radiation but will see the laser radiation. Faraday filters are useful for monitoring or inspecting the uranium separator chamber in an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process. Other uses include viewing welds, furnaces, plasma jets, combustion chambers, and other high temperature objects. These filters are can be produced at many discrete wavelengths. A Faraday filter consists of a pair of crossed polarizers on either side of a heated vapor cell mounted inside a solenoid.

  9. Faraday imaging at high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, L.A.; Reichert, P.

    1997-03-18

    A Faraday filter rejects background light from self-luminous thermal objects, but transmits laser light at the passband wavelength, thus providing an ultra-narrow optical bandpass filter. The filter preserves images so a camera looking through a Faraday filter at a hot target illuminated by a laser will not see the thermal radiation but will see the laser radiation. Faraday filters are useful for monitoring or inspecting the uranium separator chamber in an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process. Other uses include viewing welds, furnaces, plasma jets, combustion chambers, and other high temperature objects. These filters are can be produced at many discrete wavelengths. A Faraday filter consists of a pair of crossed polarizers on either side of a heated vapor cell mounted inside a solenoid. 3 figs.

  10. High Temperature Particle Filtration Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, T.M.

    2001-11-13

    High temperature filtration can serve to improve the economic, environmental, and energy performance of chemical processes. This project was designed to evaluate the stability of filtration materials in the environments of the production of dimethyldichlorosilane (DDS). In cooperation with Dow Corning, chemical environments for the fluidized bed reactor where silicon is converted to DDS and the incinerator where vents are cornbusted were characterized. At Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) an exposure system was developed that could simulate these two environments. Filter samples obtained from third parties were exposed to the environments for periods up to 1000 hours. Mechanical properties before and after exposure were determined by burst-testing rings of filter material. The results indicated that several types of filter materials would likely perform well in the fluid bed environment, and two materials would be good candidates for the incinerator environment.

  11. High Temperature Capacitive Strain Gage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wnuk, Stephen P., Jr.; Wnuk, Stephen P., III; Wnuk, V. P.

    1990-01-01

    Capacitive strain gages designed for measurements in wind tunnels to 2000 F were built and evaluated. Two design approaches were followed. One approach was based on fixed capacitor plates with a movable ground plane inserted between the plates to effect differential capacitive output with strain. The second approach was based on movable capacitor plates suspended between sapphire bearings, housed in a rugged body, and arranged to operate as a differential capacitor. A sapphire bearing gage (1/4 in. diameter x 1 in. in size) was built with a range of 50,000 and a resolution of 200 microstrain. Apparent strain on Rene' 41 was less than + or - 1000 microstrain from room temperature to 2000 F. Three gage models were built from the Ground Plane Differential concept. The first was 1/4 in. square by 1/32 in. high and useable to 700 F. The second was 1/2 in. square by 1/16 in. high and useable to 1440 F. The third, also 1/2 in. square by 1/16 in. high was expected to operate in the 1600 to 2000 F range, but was not tested because time and funding ended.

  12. High temperature control rod assembly

    DOEpatents

    Vollman, Russell E.

    1991-01-01

    A high temperature nuclear control rod assembly comprises a plurality of substantially cylindrical segments flexibly joined together in succession by ball joints. The segments are made of a high temperature graphite or carbon-carbon composite. The segment includes a hollow cylindrical sleeve which has an opening for receiving neutron-absorbing material in the form of pellets or compacted rings. The sleeve has a threaded sleeve bore and outer threaded surface. A cylindrical support post has a threaded shaft at one end which is threadably engaged with the sleeve bore to rigidly couple the support post to the sleeve. The other end of the post is formed with a ball portion. A hollow cylindrical collar has an inner threaded surface engageable with the outer threaded surface of the sleeve to rigidly couple the collar to the sleeve. the collar also has a socket portion which cooperates with the ball portion to flexibly connect segments together to form a ball and socket-type joint. In another embodiment, the segment comprises a support member which has a threaded shaft portion and a ball surface portion. The threaded shaft portion is engageable with an inner threaded surface of a ring for rigidly coupling the support member to the ring. The ring in turn has an outer surface at one end which is threadably engageably with a hollow cylindrical sleeve. The other end of the sleeve is formed with a socket portion for engagement with a ball portion of the support member. In yet another embodiment, a secondary rod is slidably inserted in a hollow channel through the center of the segment to provide additional strength. A method for controlling a nuclear reactor utilizing the control rod assembly is also included.

  13. Ice surface temperatures: seasonal cycle and daily variability from in-situ and satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, Kristine S.; Dybkjær, Gorm; Høyer, Jacob L.; Nielsen-Englyst, Pia; Rasmussen, Till A. S.; Tonboe, Rasmus T.

    2016-04-01

    Surface temperature is an important parameter for understanding the climate system, including the Polar Regions. Yet, in-situ temperature measurements over ice- and snow covered regions are sparse and unevenly distributed, and atmospheric circulation models estimating surface temperature may have large biases. To change this picture, we will analyse the seasonal cycle and daily variability of in-situ and satellite observations, and give an example of how to utilize the data in a sea ice model. We have compiled a data set of in-situ surface and 2 m air temperature observations over land ice, snow, sea ice, and from the marginal ice zone. 2523 time series of varying length from 14 data providers, with a total of more than 13 million observations, have been quality controlled and gathered in a uniform format. An overview of this data set will be presented. In addition, IST satellite observations have been processed from the Metop/AVHRR sensor and a merged analysis product has been constructed based upon the Metop/AVHRR, IASI and Modis IST observations. The satellite and in-situ observations of IST are analysed in parallel, to characterize the IST variability on diurnal and seasonal scales and its spatial patterns. The in-situ data are used to estimate sampling effects within the satellite observations and the good coverage of the satellite observations are used to complete the geographical variability. As an example of the application of satellite IST data, results will be shown from a coupled HYCOM-CICE ocean and sea ice model run, where the IST products have been ingested. The impact of using IST in models will be assessed. This work is a part of the EUSTACE project under Horizon 2020, where the ice surface temperatures form an important piece of the puzzle of creating an observationally based record of surface temperatures for all corners of the Earth, and of the ESA GlobTemperature project which aims at applying surface temperatures in models in order to

  14. Structure determination of an integral membrane protein at room temperature from crystals in situ

    SciTech Connect

    Axford, Danny; Foadi, James; Hu, Nien-Jen; Choudhury, Hassanul Ghani; Iwata, So; Beis, Konstantinos; Evans, Gwyndaf; Alguel, Yilmaz

    2015-05-14

    The X-ray structure determination of an integral membrane protein using synchrotron diffraction data measured in situ at room temperature is demonstrated. The structure determination of an integral membrane protein using synchrotron X-ray diffraction data collected at room temperature directly in vapour-diffusion crystallization plates (in situ) is demonstrated. Exposing the crystals in situ eliminates manual sample handling and, since it is performed at room temperature, removes the complication of cryoprotection and potential structural anomalies induced by sample cryocooling. Essential to the method is the ability to limit radiation damage by recording a small amount of data per sample from many samples and subsequently assembling the resulting data sets using specialized software. The validity of this procedure is established by the structure determination of Haemophilus influenza TehA at 2.3 Å resolution. The method presented offers an effective protocol for the fast and efficient determination of membrane-protein structures at room temperature using third-generation synchrotron beamlines.

  15. In-situ Stress Measurement of MOVPE Growth of High Efficiency Lattice-Mismatched Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Geisz, J. F.; Levander, A. X.; Norman, A. G.; Jones, K. M.; Romero, M. J.

    2007-04-01

    We have recently reported high efficiencies in a monolithic III-V triple-junction solar cell design that is grown inverted with a metamorphic 1.0 eV bottom In{sub .27}Ga{sub .73}As junction. The biaxial stress and strain grown into this highly lattice-mismatched junction can be controlled by varying the design of a step-graded Ga{sub x}In{sub 1-x}P buffer layer, in which most, but not all, of the 1.9% misfit strain is relieved. A multi-beam optical stress sensor (MOSS) is a convenient tool for in situ measurement of stress during metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) for the optimization of solar cell performance. The analysis of stress from curvature data is complicated by significant temperature effects due to relatively small thermal gradients in our atmospheric-pressure MOVPE reactor. These temperature effects are discussed and approximations made to allow practical analysis of the data. The results show excellent performance of inverted In{sub .27}Ga{sub .73}. As solar cells grown with slight compressive stress, but degradation under tensile stress. The best devices had a V{sub oc} of 0.54 V and a dislocation density in the low 10{sup 6} cm{sup -2}. The in situ stress data is also compared with ex situ strain data derived from X-ray diffraction measurements.

  16. In situ observation of self-propagating high temperature syntheses of Ta5Si3, Ti5Si3 and TiB2 by proton and X-ray radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernert, T.; Winkler, B.; Haussühl, E.; Trouw, F.; Vogel, S. C.; Hurd, A. J.; Smilowitz, L.; Henson, B. F.; Merrill, F. E.; Morris, C. L.; Mariam, F. G.; Saunders, A.; Juarez-Arellano, E. A.

    2013-08-01

    Self-propagating high temperature reactions of tantalum and titanium with silicon and titanium with boron were studied using proton and X-ray radiography, small-angle neutron scattering, neutron time-of-flight, X-ray and neutron diffraction, dilatometry and video recording. We show that radiography allows the observation of the propagation of the flame front in all investigated systems and the determination of the widths of the burning zones. X-ray and neutron diffraction showed that the reaction products consisted of ≈90 wt% of the main phase and one or two secondary phases. For the reaction 5Ti + 3Si → Ti5Si3 flame front velocities of 7.1(3)-34.2(4) mm/s were determined depending on the concentration of a retardant added to the starting material, the geometry and the green density of the samples. The flame front width was determined to be 1.17(4)-1.82(8) mm and depends exponentially on the flame front velocity. Similarly, for the reaction Ti + 2B → TiB2 flame front velocities of 15(2)-26.6(4) mm/s were determined, while for a 5Ta + 3Si → Ta5Si3 reaction the flame front velocity was 7.05(4) mm/s. The micro structure of the product phase Ta5Si3 shows no texture. From SANS measurements the dependence of the specific surface of the product phase on the particle sizes of the starting materials was studied.

  17. High-Temperature Experiments using a Resistively-Heated High-Pressure Membrane Diamond Anvil Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Jenei, Z; Visbeck, K; Cynn, H; Yoo, C; Evans, W

    2009-04-22

    A reliable high-performance heating method using resistive heaters and a membrane driven diamond anvil cell (mDAC) is presented. Two micro-heaters are mounted in a mDAC and use electrical power of less than 150 W to achieve sample temperatures up to 1200 K. For temperature measurement we use two K-type thermocouples mounted near the sample. The approach can be used for in-situ Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction at high pressures and temperatures. A W-Re alloy gasket material permits stable operation of mDAC at high temperature. Using this method, we made an isothermal compression at 900 K to pressures in excess of 100 GPa and isobaric heating at 95 GPa to temperatures in excess of 1000 K. As an example, we present high temperature Raman spectroscopy measurements of nitrogen at high pressures.

  18. High Pressure Study on High Temperature Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jauyn Grace

    In spite of the progress on the understanding of high-temperature superconductivity (HTS), there is still not sufficient evidence to differentiate one theoretical model from the others. In an attempt to relate the crystal structures of high-temperature superconductors (HTS's) to the mechanism of HTS, we have adopted a chemico-physical approach by examining the pressure-effect on the superconducting and transport properties of superconducting compound systems. Without exception, all compounds exhibiting superconductivity above 77 K, the boiling point of liquid nitrogen, are anisotropic structures consisting of layers of CuO_2 , metal element (R's; where R is R being Ca, Y or rare-earth element) and metal-oxide (MO's; where M is Ca, Ba, Sr, Cu, Hg, Tl, Bi or Pb). We have investigated under pressure the electrical and superconducting properties of four highly related systems with different R's, different numbers of MO layers, different numbers of CuO _2 layers and various anion dopings. The specific systems studied were: RBa_2Cu _3O_7 (R = Y, Yb, Tm, Ho, Dy, Gd, Sm and Nd), R_{1 -x}Pr_{x}Ba _2Cu_3O _7 (R = Yb and Dy), Y_2Ba _4Cu_{5 + m} O_{13 + m} (m = 1, 2 and 3), and Tl_2Ba _2Ca_{L-1}Cu _{2L-1}O_ {4 + 2L-delta} (L= 1,2 and 3, and 0 <= delta <= 0.1). We found that: (1) in R-123, R affects T _{c} due to its chemical pressure which, in turn, can lead to a modification in the electronic structure of HTS's, in contrast to the general belief that R is isolated from the superconducting CuO_2 layers and hence has no influence on T _{c}; (2) the absence of superconductivity in PrBa_2Cu_3O _7 may be due to the low carrier concentration and hole-localization, in contrast to the suggestion of pair-breaking; (3) there may exist a common optimal T_{c} for all members of the homologous series Y_2Ba _4Cu_{5 + m} O_{13 + m}, raising the possibility of a similar situation in other compound families; and (4) We have observed a universal T _{c}-behavior for HTS's. We believe that these

  19. A new furnace for high gradient directional growth. [solidification of in-situ composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flemings, M. C.; Lee, D. S.; Neff, M. A.; Young, K. P.; Rickinson, B. A.

    1979-01-01

    A new design furnace for high gradient solidification of in-situ composites is presented. Its essential feature is the direct addition of heat to one side of a thin, pancake-like layer of liquid, and continuous withdrawal of a solid crystal from the other side. Liquid in the thin layer is continuously replenished by solid or liquid feed, and the thinness of the layer permits a large heat throughput with a high temperature gradient without excessive metal superheat. The commercial advantages of this design are improved process efficiency in scale-up, lower melt temperatures, and control of interface morphology by adjusting heater position and temperature. The furnace was tested on Sn-Pb and Al-Cu alloys, obtaining 100C/mm gradients for 6 mm specimens of Al-31.5 % Cu alloy.

  20. Temperature calibration of lacustrine alkenones using in-situ sampling and growth cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y.; Toney, J. L.; Andersen, R.; Fritz, S. C.; Baker, P. A.; Grimm, E. C.; Theroux, S.; Amaral Zettler, L.; Nyren, P. E.

    2010-12-01

    Sedimentary alkenones have been found in an increasing number of lakes around the globe. Studies using molecular biological tools, however, indicate that haptophyte species that produce lacustrine alkenones differ from the oceanic species. In order to convert alkenone unsaturation ratios measured in sediments into temperature, it is necessary to obtain an accurate calibration for individual lakes. Using Lake George, North Dakota, U.S. as an example, we have carried out temperature calibrations by both in-situ water column sampling and culture growth experiments. In-situ measured lake water temperatures in the lake show a strong correlation with the alkenone unsaturation indices (r-squared = 0.82), indicating a rapid equilibrium of alkenone distributions with the lake water temperature in the water column. We applied the in-situ calibration to down-core measurements for Lake George and generated realistic temperature estimates for the past 8 kyr. Algal isolation and culture growth, on the other hand, reveal the presence of two different types of alkenone producing haptophytes. The species making a predominant C37:4 alkenone (species A) produced much greater concentrations of alkenones per unit volume than the species that produced a predominant C37:3 alkenone (species B). It is the first time that a haptophyte species (species A) making a predominant C37:4 alkenone is cultured successfully and now replicated at four different growth temperatures. The distribution of alkeones in Lake George sediments matches extremely well with the alkenones produced by species A, indicating species A is likely the producer for the alkenones in the sediments. The alkenone unsaturation ratio of alkenones produced by species A haptophyte shows a primary dependence on growth temperature as expected, but the slope of change appears to vary depending on the growth stages. The implications of our findings for paleoclimate reconstructions using lacustrine alkenones will be discussed.

  1. Comparison of MTI satellite-derived surface water temperatures and in-situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurzeja, Robert J.; Pendergast, Malcolm M.; Villa-Aleman, Eliel; Garrett, Alfred J.

    2002-01-01

    Temperatures of the water surface of a cold, mid-latitude lake and the tropical Pacific Ocean were determined from MTI images and from in situ concurrent measurements. In situ measurements were obtained at the time of the MTI image with a floating, anchored platform, which measured the surface and bulk water temperatures and relevant meteorological variables, and also from a boat moving across the target area. Atmospheric profiles were obtained from concurrent radiosonde soundings. Radiances at the satellite were calculated with the Modtran radiative transfer model. The MTI infrared radiances were within 1% of the calculated values at the Pacific Ocean site but were 1-2% different over the mid-latitude lake.

  2. Comparison of MTI Satellite-Derived Surface Water Temperatures and In-Situ Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Kurzeja, R.

    2001-07-26

    Temperatures of the water surface of a cold, mid-latitude lake and the tropical Pacific Ocean were determined from MTI images and from in situ concurrent measurements. In situ measurements were obtained at the time of the MTI image with a floating, anchored platform, which measured the surface and bulk water temperatures and relevant meteorological variables, and also from a boat moving across the target area. Atmospheric profiles were obtained from concurrent radiosonde soundings. Radiances at the satellite were calculated with the Modtran radiative transfer model. The MTI infrared radiances were within 1 percent of the calculated values at the Pacific Ocean site but were 1-2 percent different over the mid-latitude lake.

  3. High Temperature Solid Lubricant Coating for High Temperature Wear Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher (Inventor); Edmonds, Brian J (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A self-lubricating, friction and wear reducing composite useful over a wide temperature range is described herein. The composite includes metal bonded chromium oxide dispersed in a metal binder having a substantial amount of nickel. The composite contains a fluoride of at least one Group I, Group II, or rare earth metal, and optionally a low temperature lubricant metal.

  4. Thermal disconnect for high-temperature batteries

    DOEpatents

    Jungst, Rudolph George; Armijo, James Rudolph; Frear, Darrel Richard

    2000-01-01

    A new type of high temperature thermal disconnect has been developed to protect electrical and mechanical equipment from damage caused by operation at extreme temperatures. These thermal disconnects allow continuous operation at temperatures ranging from 250.degree. C. to 450.degree. C., while rapidly terminating operation at temperatures 50.degree. C. to 150.degree. C. higher than the continuous operating temperature.

  5. Development of an in situ temperature stage for synchrotron X-ray spectromicroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, R.; Serdy, J.; West, B.; Stuckelberger, M.; Lai, B.; Maser, J.; Bertoni, M. I.; Culpepper, M. L.; Buonassisi, T.

    2015-11-01

    In situ characterization of micro- and nanoscale defects in polycrystalline thin-film materials is required to elucidate the physics governing defect formation and evolution during photovoltaic device fabrication and operation. X-ray fluorescence spectromicroscopy is particularly well-suited to study defects in compound semiconductors, as it has a large information depth appropriate to study thick and complex materials, is sensitive to trace amounts of atomic species, and provides quantitative elemental information, non-destructively. Current in situ methods using this technique typically require extensive sample preparation. In this work, we design and build an in situ temperature stage to study defect kinetics in thin-film solar cells under actual processing conditions, requiring minimal sample preparation. Careful selection of construction materials also enables controlled non-oxidizing atmospheres inside the sample chamber such as H2Se and H2S. Temperature ramp rates of up to 300 °C/min are achieved, with a maximum sample temperature of 600 °C. As a case study, we use the stage for synchrotron X-ray fluorescence spectromicroscopy of CuInxGa1-xSe2 (CIGS) thin-films and demonstrate predictable sample thermal drift for temperatures 25-400 °C, allowing features on the order of the resolution of the measurement technique (125 nm) to be tracked while heating. The stage enables previously unattainable in situ studies of nanoscale defect kinetics under industrially relevant processing conditions, allowing a deeper understanding of the relationship between material processing parameters, materials properties, and device performance.

  6. Development of an in situ temperature stage for synchrotron X-ray spectromicroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, R. E-mail: buonassisi@mit.edu; Serdy, J.; Culpepper, M. L.; Buonassisi, T. E-mail: buonassisi@mit.edu; West, B.; Stuckelberger, M.; Bertoni, M. I.; Lai, B.; Maser, J.

    2015-11-15

    In situ characterization of micro- and nanoscale defects in polycrystalline thin-film materials is required to elucidate the physics governing defect formation and evolution during photovoltaic device fabrication and operation. X-ray fluorescence spectromicroscopy is particularly well-suited to study defects in compound semiconductors, as it has a large information depth appropriate to study thick and complex materials, is sensitive to trace amounts of atomic species, and provides quantitative elemental information, non-destructively. Current in situ methods using this technique typically require extensive sample preparation. In this work, we design and build an in situ temperature stage to study defect kinetics in thin-film solar cells under actual processing conditions, requiring minimal sample preparation. Careful selection of construction materials also enables controlled non-oxidizing atmospheres inside the sample chamber such as H{sub 2}Se and H{sub 2}S. Temperature ramp rates of up to 300 °C/min are achieved, with a maximum sample temperature of 600 °C. As a case study, we use the stage for synchrotron X-ray fluorescence spectromicroscopy of CuIn{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}Se{sub 2} (CIGS) thin-films and demonstrate predictable sample thermal drift for temperatures 25–400 °C, allowing features on the order of the resolution of the measurement technique (125 nm) to be tracked while heating. The stage enables previously unattainable in situ studies of nanoscale defect kinetics under industrially relevant processing conditions, allowing a deeper understanding of the relationship between material processing parameters, materials properties, and device performance.

  7. Low-temperature plasticity of olivine revisited with in situ TEM nanomechanical testing.

    PubMed

    Idrissi, Hosni; Bollinger, Caroline; Boioli, Francesca; Schryvers, Dominique; Cordier, Patrick

    2016-03-01

    The rheology of the lithospheric mantle is fundamental to understanding how mantle convection couples with plate tectonics. However, olivine rheology at lithospheric conditions is still poorly understood because experiments are difficult in this temperature range where rocks and mineral become very brittle. We combine techniques of quantitative in situ tensile testing in a transmission electron microscope and numerical modeling of dislocation dynamics to constrain the low-temperature rheology of olivine. We find that the intrinsic ductility of olivine at low temperature is significantly lower than previously reported values, which were obtained under strain-hardened conditions. Using this method, we can anchor rheological laws determined at higher temperature and can provide a better constraint on intermediate temperatures relevant for the lithosphere. More generally, we demonstrate the possibility of characterizing the mechanical properties of specimens, which can be available in the form of submillimeter-sized particles only. PMID:26998522

  8. Low-temperature plasticity of olivine revisited with in situ TEM nanomechanical testing.

    PubMed

    Idrissi, Hosni; Bollinger, Caroline; Boioli, Francesca; Schryvers, Dominique; Cordier, Patrick

    2016-03-01

    The rheology of the lithospheric mantle is fundamental to understanding how mantle convection couples with plate tectonics. However, olivine rheology at lithospheric conditions is still poorly understood because experiments are difficult in this temperature range where rocks and mineral become very brittle. We combine techniques of quantitative in situ tensile testing in a transmission electron microscope and numerical modeling of dislocation dynamics to constrain the low-temperature rheology of olivine. We find that the intrinsic ductility of olivine at low temperature is significantly lower than previously reported values, which were obtained under strain-hardened conditions. Using this method, we can anchor rheological laws determined at higher temperature and can provide a better constraint on intermediate temperatures relevant for the lithosphere. More generally, we demonstrate the possibility of characterizing the mechanical properties of specimens, which can be available in the form of submillimeter-sized particles only.

  9. Low-temperature plasticity of olivine revisited with in situ TEM nanomechanical testing

    PubMed Central

    Idrissi, Hosni; Bollinger, Caroline; Boioli, Francesca; Schryvers, Dominique; Cordier, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The rheology of the lithospheric mantle is fundamental to understanding how mantle convection couples with plate tectonics. However, olivine rheology at lithospheric conditions is still poorly understood because experiments are difficult in this temperature range where rocks and mineral become very brittle. We combine techniques of quantitative in situ tensile testing in a transmission electron microscope and numerical modeling of dislocation dynamics to constrain the low-temperature rheology of olivine. We find that the intrinsic ductility of olivine at low temperature is significantly lower than previously reported values, which were obtained under strain-hardened conditions. Using this method, we can anchor rheological laws determined at higher temperature and can provide a better constraint on intermediate temperatures relevant for the lithosphere. More generally, we demonstrate the possibility of characterizing the mechanical properties of specimens, which can be available in the form of submillimeter-sized particles only. PMID:26998522

  10. High Temperature Polyimide Materials in Extreme Temperature Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Theodore F.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2001-01-01

    At the end of the NASA High Speed Research (HSR) Program, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) began a program to screen the high-temperature Polymeric Composite Materials (PMCs) characterized by the HSR Durability Program for possible use in Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLVs) operating under extreme temperature conditions. The HSR Program focused on developing material-related technologies to enable a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) capable of operating temperatures ranging from 54 C (-65 F) to 177 C (350 F). A high-temperature polymeric resin, PETI-5 was used in the HSR Program to satisfy the requirements for performance and durability for a PMC. For RLVs, it was anticipated that this high temperature material would contribute to reducing the overall weight of a vehicle by eliminating or reducing the thermal protection required to protect the internal structural elements of the vehicle and increasing the structural strain limits. The tests were performed to determine temperature-dependent mechanical and physical proper-ties of IM7/PETI-5 composite over a temperature range from cryogenic temperature -253 C (-423F) to the material's maximum use temperature of 230 C (450 F). This paper presents results from the test program for the temperature-dependent mechanical and physical properties of IM7/PETI-5 composite in the temperature range from -253 C (-423 F) to 27 C (80 F).

  11. High-temperature thermocouples and related methods

    DOEpatents

    Rempe, Joy L.; Knudson, Darrell L.; Condie, Keith G.; Wilkins, S. Curt

    2011-01-18

    A high-temperature thermocouple and methods for fabricating a thermocouple capable of long-term operation in high-temperature, hostile environments without significant signal degradation or shortened thermocouple lifetime due to heat induced brittleness.

  12. High-temperature borehole instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, B.R.; Koczan, S.P.; Stephani, E.L.

    1985-10-01

    A new method of extracting natural heat from the earth's crust was invented at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in 1970. It uses fluid pressures (hydraulic fracturing) to produce cracks that connect two boreholes drilled into hot rock formations of low initial permeability. Pressurized water is then circulated through this connected underground loop to extract heat from the rock and bring it to the surface. The creation of the fracture reservior began with drilling boreholes deep within the Precambrian basement rock at the Fenton Hill Test Site. Hydraulic fracturing, flow testing, and well-completion operations required unique wellbore measurements using downhole instrumentation systems that would survive the very high borehole temperatures, 320/sup 0/C (610/sup 0/F). These instruments were not available in the oil and gas industrial complex, so the Los Alamos National Laboratory initiated an intense program upgrading existing technology where applicable, subcontracting materials and equipment development to industrial manufactures, and using the Laboratory resource to develop the necessary downhole instruments to meet programmatic schedules. 60 refs., 11 figs.

  13. High Temperature Superconducting Underground Cable

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, Roger, A.

    2010-02-28

    The purpose of this Project was to design, build, install and demonstrate the technical feasibility of an underground high temperature superconducting (HTS) power cable installed between two utility substations. In the first phase two HTS cables, 320 m and 30 m in length, were constructed using 1st generation BSCCO wire. The two 34.5 kV, 800 Arms, 48 MVA sections were connected together using a superconducting joint in an underground vault. In the second phase the 30 m BSCCO cable was replaced by one constructed with 2nd generation YBCO wire. 2nd generation wire is needed for commercialization because of inherent cost and performance benefits. Primary objectives of the Project were to build and operate an HTS cable system which demonstrates significant progress towards commercial progress and addresses real world utility concerns such as installation, maintenance, reliability and compatibility with the existing grid. Four key technical areas addressed were the HTS cable and terminations (where the cable connects to the grid), cryogenic refrigeration system, underground cable-to-cable joint (needed for replacement of cable sections) and cost-effective 2nd generation HTS wire. This was the world’s first installation and operation of an HTS cable underground, between two utility substations as well as the first to demonstrate a cable-to-cable joint, remote monitoring system and 2nd generation HTS.

  14. High-temperature borehole instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, B. R.; Koczan, S. P.; Stephani, E. L.

    1985-10-01

    A new method of extracting natural heat from the Earth's crust was invented at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in 1970. It uses fluid pressures (hydraulic fracturing) to produce cracks that connect two boreholes drilled into hot rock formations of low initial permeability. Pressurized water is then circulated through this connected underground loop to extract heat from the rock and bring it to the surface. The creation of the fracture reservior began with drilling boreholes deep within the Precambrian basement rock at the Fenton Hill Test Site. Hydraulic fracturing, flow testing, and well-completion operations required unique wellbore measurements using downhole instrumentation systems that would survive the very high borehole temperatures, 320(0)C (610(0)F). These instruments were not available in the oil and gas industrial complex, so the Los Alamos National Laboratory initiated an intense program upgrading existing technology where applicable, subcontracting materials and equipment development to industrial manufactures, and using the Laboratory resources to develop the necessary downhole instruments to meet programmatic schedules.

  15. High temperature suppression of dioxins.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Ming-Xiu; Chen, Tong; Fu, Jian-Ying; Lin, Xiao-Qing; Lu, Sheng-Yong; Li, Xiao-Dong; Yan, Jian-Hua; Buekens, Alfons

    2016-03-01

    Combined Sulphur-Nitrogen inhibitors, such as sewage sludge decomposition gases (SDG), thiourea and amidosulphonic acid have been observed to suppress the de novo synthesis of dioxins effectively. In this study, the inhibition of PCDD/Fs formation from model fly ash was investigated at unusually high temperatures (650 °C and 850 °C), well above the usual range of de novo tests (250-400 °C). At 650 °C it was found that SDG evolving from dried sewage sludge could suppress the formation of 2,3,7,8-substituted PCDD/Fs with high efficiency (90%), both in weight units and in I-TEQ units. Additionally, at 850 °C, three kinds of sulphur-amine or sulphur-ammonium compounds were tested to inhibit dioxins formation during laboratory-scale tests, simulating municipal solid waste incineration. The suppression efficiencies of PCDD/Fs formed through homogeneous gas phase reactions were all above 85% when 3 wt. % of thiourea (98.7%), aminosulphonic acid (96.0%) or ammonium thiosulphate (87.3%) was added. Differences in the ratio of PCDFs/PCDDs, in weight average chlorination level and in the congener distribution of the 17 toxic PCDD/Fs indicated that the three inhibitors tested followed distinct suppression pathways, possibly in relation to their different functional groups of nitrogen. Furthermore, thiourea reduced the (weight) average chlorinated level. In addition, the thermal decomposition of TUA was studied by means of thermogravimetry-fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (TG-FTIR) and the presence of SO2, SO3, NH3 and nitriles (N≡C bonds) was shown in the decomposition gases; these gaseous inhibitors might be the primary dioxins suppressants.

  16. High temperature power electronics for space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammoud, Ahmad N.; Baumann, Eric D.; Myers, Ira T.; Overton, Eric

    1991-01-01

    A high temperature electronics program at NASA Lewis Research Center focuses on dielectric and insulating materials research, development and testing of high temperature power components, and integration of the developed components and devices into a demonstrable 200 C power system, such as inverter. An overview of the program and a description of the in-house high temperature facilities along with experimental data obtained on high temperature materials are presented.

  17. In situ investigation of Geobacillus stearothermophilus spore germination and inactivation mechanisms under moderate high pressure.

    PubMed

    Georget, Erika; Kapoor, Shobhna; Winter, Roland; Reineke, Kai; Song, Youye; Callanan, Michael; Ananta, Edwin; Heinz, Volker; Mathys, Alexander

    2014-08-01

    Bacterial spores are a major concern for food safety due to their high resistance to conventional preservation hurdles. Innovative hurdles can trigger bacterial spore germination or inactivate them. In this work, Geobacillus stearothermophilus spore high pressure (HP) germination and inactivation mechanisms were investigated by in situ infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and fluorometry. G. stearothermophilus spores' inner membrane (IM) was stained with Laurdan fluorescent dye. Time-dependent FT-IR and fluorescence spectra were recorded in situ under pressure at different temperatures. The Laurdan spectrum is affected by the lipid packing and level of hydration, and provided information on the IM state through the Laurdan generalized polarization. Changes in the -CH2 and -CH3 asymmetric stretching bands, characteristic of lipids, and in the amide I' band region, characteristic of proteins' secondary structure elements, enabled evaluation of the impact of HP on endospores lipid and protein structures. These studies were complemented by ex situ analyses (plate counts and microscopy). The methods applied showed high potential to identify germination mechanisms, particularly associated to the IM. Germination up to 3 log10 was achieved at 200 MPa and 55 °C. A molecular-level understanding of these mechanisms is important for the development and validation of multi-hurdle approaches to achieve commercial sterility.

  18. In situ investigation of Geobacillus stearothermophilus spore germination and inactivation mechanisms under moderate high pressure.

    PubMed

    Georget, Erika; Kapoor, Shobhna; Winter, Roland; Reineke, Kai; Song, Youye; Callanan, Michael; Ananta, Edwin; Heinz, Volker; Mathys, Alexander

    2014-08-01

    Bacterial spores are a major concern for food safety due to their high resistance to conventional preservation hurdles. Innovative hurdles can trigger bacterial spore germination or inactivate them. In this work, Geobacillus stearothermophilus spore high pressure (HP) germination and inactivation mechanisms were investigated by in situ infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and fluorometry. G. stearothermophilus spores' inner membrane (IM) was stained with Laurdan fluorescent dye. Time-dependent FT-IR and fluorescence spectra were recorded in situ under pressure at different temperatures. The Laurdan spectrum is affected by the lipid packing and level of hydration, and provided information on the IM state through the Laurdan generalized polarization. Changes in the -CH2 and -CH3 asymmetric stretching bands, characteristic of lipids, and in the amide I' band region, characteristic of proteins' secondary structure elements, enabled evaluation of the impact of HP on endospores lipid and protein structures. These studies were complemented by ex situ analyses (plate counts and microscopy). The methods applied showed high potential to identify germination mechanisms, particularly associated to the IM. Germination up to 3 log10 was achieved at 200 MPa and 55 °C. A molecular-level understanding of these mechanisms is important for the development and validation of multi-hurdle approaches to achieve commercial sterility. PMID:24750808

  19. Oil-Well Cement and C[subscript 3]S Hydration Under High Pressure as Seen by In Situ X-Ray Diffraction, Temperatures 80[degrees]C with No Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Jupe, Andrew C.; Wilkinson, Angus P.; Funkhouser, Gary P.

    2013-01-10

    The hydration kinetics of a white cement and batches of both Class G and H oil-well cements were examined between 0 and 60 MPa, at {le}80 C, using in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction. This gives a continuous measure of the C{sub 3}S (Ca{sub 3}SiO{sub 5}), CH (Ca(OH){sub 2}), C{sub 4}AF (Ca{sub 2}FeAlO{sub 5}), ettringite, and other phases in the hydrating slurries. Slurries prepared from single-phase C{sub 3}S; synthetic C{sub 4}AF, and gypsum; and white cement, synthetic C{sub 4}AF and gypsum were also examined. An increasing pressure enhanced the rate of hydration for all slurries. Analysis of the data, using a kinetic model, provided rate constants that were used to obtain activation volumes for C{sub 3}S hydration. For all the cement and C{sub 3}S slurries studied, similar activation volumes were obtained (average {Delta}{double_dagger}{approx}-35 cm{sup 3}/mol), indicating that the presence of cement phases other than C{sub 3}S has a modest influence on the pressure dependence of C{sub 3}S hydration. An alternative analysis, using the time at which 90% of the initial C{sub 3}S remained, gave similar activation volumes. Pressure accelerated the formation of ettringite from synthetic C{sub 4}AF in the presence of gypsum. However, in slurries containing cement, the pressure dependence of C{sub 3}S hydration plays a major role in determining the pressure dependence of ettringite formation.

  20. High Temperature Chemistry at NASA: Hot Topics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.

    2014-01-01

    High Temperature issues in aircraft engines Hot section: Ni and Co based Superalloys Oxidation and Corrosion (Durability) at high temperatures. Thermal protection system (TPS) and RCC (Reinforced Carbon-Carbon) on the Space Shuttle Orbiter. High temperatures in other worlds: Planets close to their stars.

  1. In situ studies of microbial inactivation during high pressure processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado, Jose Antonio; Schaffner, Donald W.; Cuitiño, Alberto M.; Karwe, Mukund V.

    2016-01-01

    High pressure processing (HPP) has been shown to reduce microbial concentration in foods. The mechanisms of microbial inactivation by HPP have been associated with damage to cell membranes. The real-time response of bacteria to HPP was measured to elucidate the mechanisms of inactivation, which can aid in designing more effective processes. Different pressure cycling conditions were used to expose Enterobacter aerogenes cells to HPP. Propidium iodide (PI) was used as a probe, which fluoresces after penetrating cells with damaged membranes and binding with nucleic acids. A HPP vessel with sapphire windows was used for measuring fluorescence in situ. Membrane damage was detected during pressurization and hold time, but not during depressurization. The drop in fluorescence was larger than expected after pressure cycles at higher pressure and longer times. This indicated possible reversible disassociation of ribosomes resulting in additional binding of PI to exposed RNA under pressure and its release after depressurization.

  2. Packaging Technology Developed for High-Temperature Silicon Carbide Microsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Liang-Yu; Hunter, Gary W.; Neudeck, Philip G.

    2001-01-01

    High-temperature electronics and sensors are necessary for harsh-environment space and aeronautical applications, such as sensors and electronics for space missions to the inner solar system, sensors for in situ combustion and emission monitoring, and electronics for combustion control for aeronautical and automotive engines. However, these devices cannot be used until they can be packaged in appropriate forms for specific applications. Suitable packaging technology for operation temperatures up to 500 C and beyond is not commercially available. Thus, the development of a systematic high-temperature packaging technology for SiC-based microsystems is essential for both in situ testing and commercializing high-temperature SiC sensors and electronics. In response to these needs, researchers at Glenn innovatively designed, fabricated, and assembled a new prototype electronic package for high-temperature electronic microsystems using ceramic substrates (aluminum nitride and aluminum oxide) and gold (Au) thick-film metallization. Packaging components include a ceramic packaging frame, thick-film metallization-based interconnection system, and a low electrical resistance SiC die-attachment scheme. Both the materials and fabrication process of the basic packaging components have been tested with an in-house-fabricated SiC semiconductor test chip in an oxidizing environment at temperatures from room temperature to 500 C for more than 1000 hr. These test results set lifetime records for both high-temperature electronic packaging and high-temperature electronic device testing. As required, the thick-film-based interconnection system demonstrated low (2.5 times of the room-temperature resistance of the Au conductor) and stable (decreased 3 percent in 1500 hr of continuous testing) electrical resistance at 500 C in an oxidizing environment. Also as required, the electrical isolation impedance between printed wires that were not electrically joined by a wire bond remained high

  3. In situ synchrotron IR study relating temperature and heating rate to surface functional group changes in biomass.

    PubMed

    Kirtania, Kawnish; Tanner, Joanne; Kabir, Kazi Bayzid; Rajendran, Sharmen; Bhattacharya, Sankar

    2014-01-01

    Three types of woody biomass were investigated under pyrolysis condition to observe the change in the surface functional groups by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) technique with increasing temperature under two different (5 and 150°C/min) heating rates. The experiments were carried out in situ in the infrared microscopy beamline (IRM) of the Australian Synchrotron. The capability of the beamline made it possible to focus on single particles to obtain low noise measurements without mixing with KBr. At lower heating rate, the surface functional groups were completely removed by 550°C. In case of higher heating rate, a delay was observed in losing the functional groups. Even at a high temperature, significant number of functional groups was retained after the higher heating rate experiments. This implies that at considerably high heating rates typical of industrial reactors, more functional groups will remain on the surface.

  4. High-Sensitivity Temperature Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leadstone, G. S.

    1978-01-01

    Describes a method of measuring small temperature differences that amount to a .01K, using an arrangement of a copper-constantan thermocouple, a microamplifier and a galvanometer, as an indirect way of measuring heat energy. (GA)

  5. NOvel Refractory Materials for High Alkali, High Temperature Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Hemrick, J.G.; Griffin, R.

    2011-08-30

    Refractory materials can be limited in their application by many factors including chemical reactions between the service environment and the refractory material, mechanical degradation of the refractory material by the service environment, temperature limitations on the use of a particular refractory material, and the inability to install or repair the refractory material in a cost effective manner or while the vessel was in service. The objective of this project was to address the need for new innovative refractory compositions by developing a family of novel MgO-Al2O3 spinel or other similar magnesia/alumina containing unshaped refractory composition (castables, gunnables, shotcretes, etc) utilizing new aggregate materials, bond systems, protective coatings, and phase formation techniques (in-situ phase formation, altered conversion temperatures, accelerated reactions, etc). This family of refractory compositions would then be tailored for use in high-temperature, highalkaline industrial environments like those found in the aluminum, chemical, forest products, glass, and steel industries. A research team was formed to carry out the proposed work led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and was comprised of the academic institution Missouri University of Science and Technology (MS&T), and the industrial company MINTEQ International, Inc. (MINTEQ), along with representatives from the aluminum, chemical, glass, and forest products industries. The two goals of this project were to produce novel refractory compositions which will allow for improved energy efficiency and to develop new refractory application techniques which would improve the speed of installation. Also methods of hot installation were sought which would allow for hot repairs and on-line maintenance leading to reduced process downtimes and eliminating the need to cool and reheat process vessels.

  6. Measurement of thermodynamic temperature of high temperature fixed points

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrilov, V. R.; Khlevnoy, B. B.; Otryaskin, D. A.; Grigorieva, I. A.; Samoylov, M. L.; Sapritsky, V. I.

    2013-09-11

    The paper is devoted to VNIIOFI's measurements of thermodynamic temperature of the high temperature fixed points Co-C, Pt-C and Re-C within the scope of the international project coordinated by the Consultative Committee for Thermometry working group 5 'Radiation Thermometry'. The melting temperatures of the fixed points were measured by a radiance mode radiation thermometer calibrated against a filter radiometer with known irradiance spectral responsivity via a high temperature black body. This paper describes the facility used for the measurements, the results and estimated uncertainties.

  7. Situ

    2014-06-16

    Rapidly discovering novel and sophisticated cyber attacks and providing situation aware-ness to analysts are unsolved problems in cyber security. We have developed a platform that scores events in real-time based on probabilistic models to define how typical an event is. This anomaly detection approach is based on unsupervised, probabilistic modeling of data at multiple scales. Scoring events based on multiple scales allows the system to 1) score anomalousness at different levels to detect important eventsmore » that would otherwise be hidden, and 2) explain to users why an event is anomalous, not just that it is. The system was designed to address several challenges: 1) scaling to very high volume, heterogeneous, streaming data, and 2) minimizing the time from observation to discovery to understanding. The prototype has the real-time framework for pushing scored events to a web-based visualization.« less

  8. Situ

    SciTech Connect

    2014-06-16

    Rapidly discovering novel and sophisticated cyber attacks and providing situation aware-ness to analysts are unsolved problems in cyber security. We have developed a platform that scores events in real-time based on probabilistic models to define how typical an event is. This anomaly detection approach is based on unsupervised, probabilistic modeling of data at multiple scales. Scoring events based on multiple scales allows the system to 1) score anomalousness at different levels to detect important events that would otherwise be hidden, and 2) explain to users why an event is anomalous, not just that it is. The system was designed to address several challenges: 1) scaling to very high volume, heterogeneous, streaming data, and 2) minimizing the time from observation to discovery to understanding. The prototype has the real-time framework for pushing scored events to a web-based visualization.

  9. High Temperature Filler for Tile Gaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, J. W.; Wang, D. S.

    1983-01-01

    Gaps between ceramic tiles filled with ceramic-coated fabric that withstands temperatures as high as 2,000 degrees F (1,300 degrees C). Reusable high-temperature gap filler is made of fabric coated with ceramic slurry and bonded in place with room-temperature-vulcanized adhesive. Procedure used in kilns and furnaces.

  10. High temperature superconducting fault current limiter

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.

    1997-01-01

    A fault current limiter (10) for an electrical circuit (14). The fault current limiter (10) includes a high temperature superconductor (12) in the electrical circuit (14). The high temperature superconductor (12) is cooled below its critical temperature to maintain the superconducting electrical properties during operation as the fault current limiter (10).

  11. High temperature superconducting fault current limiter

    DOEpatents

    Hull, J.R.

    1997-02-04

    A fault current limiter for an electrical circuit is disclosed. The fault current limiter includes a high temperature superconductor in the electrical circuit. The high temperature superconductor is cooled below its critical temperature to maintain the superconducting electrical properties during operation as the fault current limiter. 15 figs.

  12. 4-Diamond Formation from Amorphouse Carbon and Graphite in the Presence of COH Fluids : An InSitu High-Pressure and -Temperature Laser-Heated Diamond Anvil Cell Experimental Study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.; Prakapenka, V.; Kubo, A.; Kavner, A.; Green, H.W.; Dobrzhinetskaya, L.

    2011-10-14

    Microdiamonds from orogenic belts contain nanometer-size fluid inclusions suggesting diamond formation from supercritical carbon - oxygen - hydrogen (COH) fluids. Here we report experimental results of diamond nucleation from amorphous carbon and polycrystalline graphite in the presence of COH fluids in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell. Our results show that: (i) diamonds can nucleate from graphite or amorphous carbon at pressures of 9-11 GPa and temperatures of 1200-1400 K in the presence of COH fluids; (ii) it is easier to nucleate diamond from amorphous carbon than from graphite with or without the COH fluids; and (iii) the fluid from decomposition of glucose is more efficient in promoting the graphite-to-diamond transformation than the fluid from decomposition of oxalic acid dihydrate. Carbon crystallinity has strong effects on the kinetics of diamond nucleation and growth. The experimental results demonstrated the critical role of presence and composition of supercritical COH fluids for promoting the graphite-to-diamond transformation.

  13. High temperature ceramic interface study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindberg, L. J.

    1984-01-01

    Monolithic SiC and Si3N4 are susceptible to contact stress damage at static and sliding interfaces. Transformation-toughened zirconia (TTZ) was evaluated under sliding contact conditions to determine if the higher material fracture toughness would reduce the susceptibility to contact stress damage. Contact stress tests were conducted on four commercially available TTZ materials at normal loads ranging from 0.455 to 22.7 kg (1 to 50 pounds) at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 1204C (2200 F). Static and dynamic friction were measured as a function of temperature. Flexural strength measurements after these tests determined that the contact stress exposure did not reduce the strength of TTZ at contact loads of 0.455, 4.55, and 11.3 kg (1, 10, and 25 pounds). Prior testing with the lower toughness SiC and Si3N4 materials resulted in a substantial strength reduction at loads of only 4.55 and 11.3 kg (10 and 25 pounds). An increase in material toughness appears to improve ceramic material resistance to contact stress damage. Baseline material flexure strength was established and the stress rupture capability of TTZ was evaluated. Stress rupture tests determined that TTZ materials are susceptible to deformation due to creep and that aging of TTZ materials at elevated temperatures results in a reduction of material strength.

  14. Transmission electron microscopy study in-situ of radiation-induced defects in copper at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Daulton, T.L.; Kirk, M.A.; Rehn, L.E.

    1996-12-01

    Neutrons and high-energy ions incident upon a solid can initiate a displacement collision cascade of lattice atoms resulting in localized regions within the solid containing a high concentration of interstitial and vacancy point defects. These point defects can collapse into various types of dislocation loops and stacking fault tetrahedra (SFT) large enough that their lattice strain fields are visible under diffraction-contrast imaging using a Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM). The basic mechanisms driving the collapse of point defects produced in collision cascades is investigated in situ with TEM for fcc-Cu irradiated with heavy (100 keV Kr) ions at elevated temperature. The isothermal stability of these clusters is also examined in situ. Areal defect yields were observed to decrease abruptly for temperatures greater than 300 C. This decrease in defect yield is attributed to a proportional decrease in the probability of collapse of point defects into clusters. The evolution of the defect density under isothermal conditions appears to be influenced by three different rate processes active in the decline of the total defect density. These rate constants can be attributed to differences in the stability of various types of defect clusters and to different loss mechanisms. Based upon observed stabilities, estimations for the average binding enthalpies of vacancies to SFT are calculated for copper.

  15. Deep Trek High Temperature Electronics Project

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce Ohme

    2007-07-31

    This report summarizes technical progress achieved during the cooperative research agreement between Honeywell and U.S. Department of Energy to develop high-temperature electronics. Objects of this development included Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) wafer process development for high temperature, supporting design tools and libraries, and high temperature integrated circuit component development including FPGA, EEPROM, high-resolution A-to-D converter, and a precision amplifier.

  16. Kinetics of Methane Hydrate Decomposition Studied via in Situ Low Temperature X-ray Powder Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Everett, Susan M; Rawn, Claudia J; Keffer, David J.; Mull, Derek L; Payzant, E Andrew; Phelps, Tommy Joe

    2013-01-01

    Gas hydrates are known to have a slowed decomposition rate at ambient pressure and temperatures below the melting point of ice termed self-preservation or anomalous preservation. As hydrate exothermically decomposes, gas is released and water of the clathrate cages transforms into ice. Two regions of slowed decomposition for methane hydrate, 180 200 K and 230 260 K, were observed, and the kinetics were studied by in situ low temperature x-ray powder diffraction. The kinetic constants for ice formation from methane hydrate were determined by the Avrami model within each region and activation energies, Ea, were determined by the Arrhenius plot. Ea determined from the data for 180 200 K was 42 kJ/mol and for 230 260 K was 22 kJ/mol. The higher Ea in the colder temperature range was attributed to a difference in the microstructure of ice between the two regions.

  17. High temperature measurements of martensitic transformations using digital holography.

    PubMed

    Thiesing, Benjamin P; Mann, Christopher J; Dryepondt, Sebastien

    2013-07-01

    During thermal cycling of nickel-aluminum-platinum (NiAlPt) and single crystal iron-chromium-nickel (FeCrNi) alloys, the structural changes associated with the martensite to austenite phase transformation were measured using dual-wavelength digital holography. Real-time in situ measurements reveal the formation of striations within the NiAlPt alloy at 70°C and the FeCrNi alloy at 520°C. The results demonstrate that digital holography is an effective technique for acquiring noncontact, high precision information of the surface evolution of alloys at high temperatures.

  18. High Temperature Measurements Of Martensitic transformations Using Digital Holography

    SciTech Connect

    Thiesing, Benjamin; Mann, Christopher J; Dryepondt, Sebastien N

    2013-01-01

    During thermal cycling of nickel-aluminum-platinum (NiAlPt) and single crystal Fe-15Cr-15Ni alloys, the structural changes associated with the martensite to austenite phase transformation were measured using dual-wavelength digital holography. Real-time in-situ measurements reveal the formation of striations within the NiPtAl alloy at 70 C and the FeCrNi alloy at 520 C. The results demonstrate that digital holography is an effective technique for acquiring non-contact, high precision information of the surface evolution of alloys at high temperatures.

  19. High temperature measurements of martensitic transformations using digital holography.

    PubMed

    Thiesing, Benjamin P; Mann, Christopher J; Dryepondt, Sebastien

    2013-07-01

    During thermal cycling of nickel-aluminum-platinum (NiAlPt) and single crystal iron-chromium-nickel (FeCrNi) alloys, the structural changes associated with the martensite to austenite phase transformation were measured using dual-wavelength digital holography. Real-time in situ measurements reveal the formation of striations within the NiAlPt alloy at 70°C and the FeCrNi alloy at 520°C. The results demonstrate that digital holography is an effective technique for acquiring noncontact, high precision information of the surface evolution of alloys at high temperatures. PMID:23842235

  20. Mars dayside temperature from airglow limb profiles : comparison with in situ measurements and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gérard, Jean-Claude; Bougher, Stephen; Montmessin, Franck; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Stiepen, A.

    The thermal structure of the Mars upper atmosphere is the result of the thermal balance between heating by EUV solar radiation, infrared heating and cooling, conduction and dynamic influences such as gravity waves, planetary waves, and tides. It has been derived from observations performed from different spacecraft. These include in situ measurements of orbital drag whose strength depends on the local gas density. Atmospheric temperatures were determined from the altitude variation of the density measured in situ by the Viking landers and orbital drag measurements. Another method is based on remote sensing measurements of ultraviolet airglow limb profiles obtained over 40 years ago with spectrometers during the Mariner 6 and 7 flybys and from the Mariner 9 orbiter. Comparisons with model calculations indicate that they both reflect the CO_2 scale height from which atmospheric temperatures have been deduced. Upper atmospheric temperatures varying over the wide range 270-445 K, with a mean value of 325 K were deduced from the topside scale height of the airglow vertical profile. We present an analysis of limb profiles of the CO Cameron (a(3) Pi-X(1) Sigma(+) ) and CO_2(+) doublet (B(2) Sigma_u(+) - X(2) PiΠ_g) airglows observed with the SPICAM instrument on board Mars Express. We show that the temperature in the Mars thermosphere is very variable with a mean value of 270 K, but values ranging between 150 and 400 K have been observed. These values are compared to earlier determinations and model predictions. No clear dependence on solar zenith angle, latitude or season is apparent. Similarly, exospheric variations with F10.7 in the SPICAM airglow dataset are small over the solar minimum to moderate conditions sampled by Mars Express since 2005. We conclude that an unidentified process is the cause of the large observed temperature variability, which dominates the other sources of temperature variations.

  1. High temperature tensile testing of ceramic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, John Z.; Hemann, John H.

    1988-01-01

    The various components of a high temperature tensile testing system are evaluated. The objective is the high temperature tensile testing of SiC fiber reinforced reaction bonded Si3N4 specimens at test temperatures up to 1650 C (3000 F). Testing is to be conducted in inert gases and air. Gripping fixtures, specimen configurations, furnaces, optical strain measuring systems, and temperature measurement techniques are reviewed. Advantages and disadvantages of the various techniques are also noted.

  2. Spatial and Temporal Variations of Surface Temperature Over Greenland As Observed In AIRS, MODIS and In-Situ Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. N.; Susskind, J.; Wu, D. L.; Nowicki, S.; Hall, D. K.; Iredell, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    This paper compares the temporal and spatial characteristics of the AIRS and MODIS surface temperatures over Greenland. To estimate uncertainties in space-based temperature measurements, we reprojected the MODIS Ice Surface Temperature (IST) into 0.5 by 0.5 degree spatial resolution. We also re-gridded AIRS Skin Temperature (Ts) with same spatial resolution but classified with different cloud conditions and surface types. These co-located data sets make intercomparison between the two instruments relatively straightforward. By this approach, the spatial comparison between AIRS Ts and MODIS IST monthly mean is in good agreement with RMS less than 2K during May 2012. This approach also allows the detection of any long-term calibration drift and the careful examination of calibration consistency in MODIS and AIRS temperature data record. The temporal correlations between temperature data are also compared with those from in-situ measurements from GC-Net and NOAA stations. The most significant diurnal difference is found during spring season (April and May) in high altitude regions, when interannual variability is relatively smaller than summer and winter.

  3. Defining Structure and Stress in Deep, High Temperature Geothermal Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, M. J.; McNamara, D. D.; Massiot, C.; Bignall, G.

    2010-12-01

    Extreme T-P (temperature - pressure) environments associated with deep geothermal drilling in the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ), New Zealand have limited the use of conventional geophysical borehole logging tools, and interpretation of fracture character and controls on permeability in the geothermal systems. Development of AFIT logging tools with high temperature capabilities has enabled detailed determination of structure (fractures and faults) and variations in the in-situ stress orientations in hot (up to 300 °C) and deep (to 3 km TVD) TVZ geothermal wells, as presented here. Recent surveys at Wairakei, Kawerau, Rotokawa and Ngatamariki have provided detailed information of fracture controlled permeability in these fields, and positively impacted production and injection well drilling strategies. Current application of high temperature tools by geothermal developers is a precursor to the detailed structural investigation that will be undertaken for a proposed deeper (to 5 km depth) science-exploration well, planned to be drilled in the TVZ in 2013-14.

  4. Charge collection in Si detectors irradiated in situ at superfluid helium temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbitskaya, Elena; Eremin, Vladimir; Zabrodskii, Andrei; Dehning, Bernd; Kurfürst, Christoph; Sapinski, Mariusz; Bartosik, Marcin R.; Egorov, Nicolai; Härkönen, Jaakko

    2015-10-01

    Silicon and diamond detectors operated in a superfluid helium bath are currently being considered for the upgrade of the LHC beam loss monitoring system. The detectors would be installed in immediate proximity of the superconducting coils of the triplet magnets. We present here the results of the in situ irradiation test for silicon detectors using 23 GeV protons while keeping the detectors at a temperature of 1.9 K. Red laser (630 nm) Transient Current Technique and DC current measurements were used to study the pulse response and collected charge for silicon detectors irradiated to a maximum radiation fluence of 1×1016 p/cm2. The dependence between collected charge and irradiation fluence was parameterized using the Hecht equation and assumption of a uniform electric field distribution. The collected charge was found to degrade with particle fluence for both bias polarities. We observed that the main factor responsible for this degradation was related to trapping of holes on the donor-type radiation-induced defects. In contrast to expectations, along with formation of donors, acceptor-type defects (electron traps) are introduced into the silicon bulk. This suggests that the current models describing charge collection in irradiated silicon detectors require an extension for taking into account trapping at low temperatures with a contribution of shallow levels. New in situ irradiation tests are needed and planned now to extend statistics of the results and gain a deeper insight into the physics of low temperature detector operation in harsh radiation environment.

  5. Dynamic, High-Temperature, Flexible Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Sirocky, Paul J.

    1989-01-01

    New seal consists of multiple plies of braided ceramic sleeves filled with small ceramic balls. Innermost braided sleeve supported by high-temperature-wire-mesh sleeve that provides both springback and preload capabilities. Ceramic balls reduce effect of relatively high porosity of braided ceramic sleeves by acting as labyrinth flow path for gases and thereby greatly increasing pressure gradient seal can sustain. Dynamic, high-temperature, flexible seal employed in hypersonic engines, two-dimensional convergent/divergent and vectorized-thrust exhaust nozzles, reentry vehicle airframes, rocket-motor casings, high-temperature furnaces, and any application requiring non-asbestos high-temperature gaskets.

  6. Tensile deformation mechanisms of an in-situ Ti-based metallic glass matrix composite at cryogenic temperature.

    PubMed

    Bai, J; Li, J S; Qiao, J W; Wang, J; Feng, R; Kou, H C; Liaw, P K

    2016-01-01

    Remarkable tensile ductility was first obtained in an in-situ Ti-based bulk metallic glass (BMG) composite at cryogenic temperature (77 K). The novel cryogenic tensile plasticity is related to the effective accommodation of ductile body-centered cubic dendrites at 77 K, characteristic of the prevailing slip bands and dislocations, as well as lattice disorder, which can effectively hinder the propagation of critical shear bands. The greatly increased yield strength of dendrites contributes to the high yield strength of composite at 77 K. A trend of stronger softening is observed at low temperature, and a criterion is proposed to understand the softening behavior. The current research could also provide a guidance to the promising cryogenic application of these new advanced BMG composites. PMID:27576728

  7. Tensile deformation mechanisms of an in-situ Ti-based metallic glass matrix composite at cryogenic temperature

    PubMed Central

    Bai, J.; Li, J. S.; Qiao, J. W.; Wang, J.; Feng, R.; Kou, H. C.; Liaw, P. K.

    2016-01-01

    Remarkable tensile ductility was first obtained in an in-situ Ti-based bulk metallic glass (BMG) composite at cryogenic temperature (77 K). The novel cryogenic tensile plasticity is related to the effective accommodation of ductile body-centered cubic dendrites at 77 K, characteristic of the prevailing slip bands and dislocations, as well as lattice disorder, which can effectively hinder the propagation of critical shear bands. The greatly increased yield strength of dendrites contributes to the high yield strength of composite at 77 K. A trend of stronger softening is observed at low temperature, and a criterion is proposed to understand the softening behavior. The current research could also provide a guidance to the promising cryogenic application of these new advanced BMG composites. PMID:27576728

  8. Tensile deformation mechanisms of an in-situ Ti-based metallic glass matrix composite at cryogenic temperature.

    PubMed

    Bai, J; Li, J S; Qiao, J W; Wang, J; Feng, R; Kou, H C; Liaw, P K

    2016-08-31

    Remarkable tensile ductility was first obtained in an in-situ Ti-based bulk metallic glass (BMG) composite at cryogenic temperature (77 K). The novel cryogenic tensile plasticity is related to the effective accommodation of ductile body-centered cubic dendrites at 77 K, characteristic of the prevailing slip bands and dislocations, as well as lattice disorder, which can effectively hinder the propagation of critical shear bands. The greatly increased yield strength of dendrites contributes to the high yield strength of composite at 77 K. A trend of stronger softening is observed at low temperature, and a criterion is proposed to understand the softening behavior. The current research could also provide a guidance to the promising cryogenic application of these new advanced BMG composites.

  9. Tensile deformation mechanisms of an in-situ Ti-based metallic glass matrix composite at cryogenic temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, J.; Li, J. S.; Qiao, J. W.; Wang, J.; Feng, R.; Kou, H. C.; Liaw, P. K.

    2016-08-01

    Remarkable tensile ductility was first obtained in an in-situ Ti-based bulk metallic glass (BMG) composite at cryogenic temperature (77 K). The novel cryogenic tensile plasticity is related to the effective accommodation of ductile body-centered cubic dendrites at 77 K, characteristic of the prevailing slip bands and dislocations, as well as lattice disorder, which can effectively hinder the propagation of critical shear bands. The greatly increased yield strength of dendrites contributes to the high yield strength of composite at 77 K. A trend of stronger softening is observed at low temperature, and a criterion is proposed to understand the softening behavior. The current research could also provide a guidance to the promising cryogenic application of these new advanced BMG composites.

  10. One-dimensional soil temperature simulation with Common Land Model by assimilating in situ observations and MODIS LST with the ensemble particle filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhongbo; Fu, Xiaolei; Luo, Lifeng; Lü, Haishen; Ju, Qin; Liu, Di; Kalin, Dresden A.; Huang, Dui; Yang, Chuanguo; Zhao, Lili

    2014-08-01

    Soil temperature plays an important role in hydrology, agriculture, and meteorology. In order to improve the accuracy of soil temperature simulation, a soil temperature data assimilation system was developed based on the Ensemble Particle Filter (EnPF) and the Common Land Model (CLM), and then applied in the Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed (WGEW) in Arizona, United States. Surface soil temperature in situ observations and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Land Surface Temperature (MODIS LST) data were assimilated into the system. In this study, four different assimilation experiments were conducted: (1) assimilating in situ observations of instantaneous surface soil temperature each hour, (2) assimilating in situ observations of instantaneous surface soil temperature once per day, (3) assimilating verified MODIS LST once per day, and (4) assimilating original MODIS LST once per day. These four experiments reflect a transition from high-quality and more frequent in situ observations to lower quality and less frequent remote sensing data in the data assimilation system. The results from these four experiments show that the assimilated results are better than the simulated results without assimilation at all layers except the bottom layer, while the superiority gradually diminishes as the quality and frequency of the observations decrease. This demonstrates that remote sensing data can be assimilated using the ensemble particle filter in poorly gauged catchments to obtain highly accurate soil variables (e.g., soil moisture, soil temperature). Meanwhile, the results also demonstrate that the ensemble particle filter is effective in assimilating soil temperature observations to improve simulations, but the performance of the data assimilation method is affected by the frequency of assimilation and the quality of the input data.

  11. In situ characterization of alloy catalysts for low-temperature graphene growth.

    PubMed

    Weatherup, Robert S; Bayer, Bernhard C; Blume, Raoul; Ducati, Caterina; Baehtz, Carsten; Schlögl, Robert; Hofmann, Stephan

    2011-10-12

    Low-temperature (∼450 °C), scalable chemical vapor deposition of predominantly monolayer (74%) graphene films with an average D/G peak ratio of 0.24 and domain sizes in excess of 220 μm(2) is demonstrated via the design of alloy catalysts. The admixture of Au to polycrystalline Ni allows a controlled decrease in graphene nucleation density, highlighting the role of step edges. In situ, time-, and depth-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction reveal the role of subsurface C species and allow a coherent model for graphene formation to be devised.

  12. Understanding Depth Variation of Deep Seismicity from in situ Measurements of Mineral Strengths at High Pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.

    2010-01-01

    Strengths of major minerals of Earth's mantle have been measured using in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction at high pressures. Analysis of the diffraction peak widths is used to derive the yield strengths. Systematic analysis of the experimental result for olivine, wadsleyite, ringwoodite and perovskite indicates that minerals in the upper mantle, the transition zone and the lower mantle have very distinct strength character. Increasing temperature weakens the upper mantle mineral, olivine, significantly. At high temperature and high pressure, the transition zone minerals, wadsleyite and ringwoodite, have higher strengths than the upper mantle mineral. Among all the minerals studied, the lower mantle mineral, perovskite, has the highest strength. While both the upper mantle and the transition zone minerals show a notable strength drop, the strength of the lower mantle mineral shows just an increase of relaxation rate (no strength drop) when the temperature is increased stepwise by 200 K. The strength characteristics of these major mantle minerals at high pressures and temperatures indicate that yield strength may play a crucial role in defining the profile of deep earthquake occurrence with depth.

  13. Rapid thermal processing of high-efficiency silicon solar cells with controlled in-situ annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Doshi, P.; Rohatgi, A.; Ropp, M.; Chen, Z.; Ruby, D.; Meier, D.L.

    1995-01-01

    Silicon solar cell efficiencies of 17.1%, 16.4%, 14.8%, and 14.9% have been achieved on FZ, Cz, multicrystalline (mc-Si), and dendritic web (DW) silicon, respectively, using simplified, cost-effective rapid thermal processing (RTP). These represent the highest reported efficiencies for solar cells processed with simultaneous front and back diffusion with no conventional high-temperature furnace steps. Appropriate diffusion temperature coupled with the added in-situ anneal resulted in suitable minority-carrier lifetime and diffusion profiles for high-efficiency cells. The cooling rate associated with the in-situ anneal can improve the lifetime and lower the reverse saturation current density (J{sub 0}), however, this effect is material and base resistivity specific. PECVD antireflection (AR) coatings provided low reflectance and efficient front surface and bulk defect passivation. Conventional cells fabricated on FZ silicon by furnace diffusions and oxidations gave an efficiency of 18.8% due to greater short wavelength response and lower J{sub 0}.

  14. A sample chamber for in situ high-energy X-ray studies of crystal growth at deeply buried interfaces in harsh environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, A. E. F.; Vonk, V.; Honkimäki, V.; Gorges, B.; Vitoux, H.; Vlieg, E.

    2015-06-01

    We introduce a high pressure high temperature chamber for in situ synchrotron X-ray studies. The chamber design allows for in situ studies of thin film growth from solution at deeply buried interfaces in harsh environments. The temperature can be controlled between room temperature and 1073 K while the pressure can be set as high as 50 bar using a variety of gases including N2 and NH3. The formation of GaN on the surface of a Ga13Na7 melt at 1073 K and 50 bar of N2 is presented as a performance test.

  15. High temperature silicon carbide impregnated insulating fabrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schomburg, C.; Dotts, R. L. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    High temperature insulating articles having improved performance characteristics are described. The articles comprise fabrics of closely woven refractory or heat resistant fibers having particles of silicon carbide dispersed at least partially through the fabric and bonded to the fibers with an emulsifiable polyethylene wax. Such articles exhibit significantly increased high temperature emittance characteristics and an improved retention of integrity and flexibility after prolonged exposure to high temperature.

  16. Recent Advances in High Pressure and Temperature Rheological Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yanbin; Hilairet, Nadege; Dera, Przemyslaw

    2012-01-20

    Rheological studies at high pressure and temperature using in-situ X-ray diffraction and imaging have made significant progresses in recent years, thanks to a combination of recent developments in several areas: (1) advances in synchrotron X-ray techniques, (2) advances in deformation devices and the abilities to control pressure, temperature, stress, strain and strain rates, (3) theoretical and computational advances in stress determination based on powder and single crystal diffraction, (4) theoretical and computational advances in modeling of grain-level micromechanics based on elasto-plastic and visco-plastic self-consistent formulations. In this article, we briefly introduce the experimental techniques and theoretical background for in-situ high pressure, high temperature rheological studies, and then review recent studies of rheological properties of major mantle materials. Some currently encountered issues have prompted developments in single-crystal quasi-Laue diffraction for complete stress tensor determination and textural evolution of poly-phased composites based on X-ray microtomography. Future prospects are discussed.

  17. Advanced high-temperature batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, P. A.

    1989-01-01

    Recent results for Li-Al/FeS2 cells and bipolar battery design have shown the possibility of achieving high specific energy (210 Wh/kg) and high specific power (239 W/kg) at the cell level for an electric vehicle application. Outstanding performance is also projected for sodium/metal chloride cells having large electrolyte areas and thin positive electrodes.

  18. Ultrasonic/Sonic Drill for High Temperature Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Scott, James; Sherrit, Stewart; Widholm, Scott; Badescu, Mircea; Shrout, Tom; Jones, Beth

    2010-01-01

    Venus is one of the many significant scientific targets for NASA. New rock sampling tools with the ability to be operated at high temperatures of the order of 460 deg C are required for surface in-situ sampling/analysis missions. Piezoelectric materials such as LiNbO? crystals and Bismuth Titanate are potentially operational at the temperature range found on the surface of Venus. A study of the feasibility of producing piezoelectric drills for a temperature up to 500 deg C was conducted. The study includes investigation of the high temperature properties of piezoelectric crystals and ceramics with different formulas and doping. Several prototypes of Ultrasonic/Sonic Drill/Corers (USDC) driven by transducers using the high temperate piezoelectric ceramics and single LiNbO? crystal were fabricated. The transducers were analyzed by scanning the impedance at room temperature and 500 deg C under both low and high voltages. The drilling performances were tested at temperature up to 500 deg C. Preliminary results were previously reported [Bao et al, 2009]. In this paper, the progress is presented and the future works for performance improvements are discussed.

  19. Flexible sample environment for high resolution neutron imaging at high temperatures in controlled atmosphere

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Makowska, Małgorzata G.; Theil Kuhn, Luise; Cleemann, Lars N.; Lauridsen, Erik M.; Bilheux, Hassina Z.; Molaison, Jamie J.; Santodonato, Louis J.; Tremsin, Anton S.; Grosse, Mirco; Morgano, Manuel; et al

    2015-12-17

    In high material penetration by neutrons allows for experiments using sophisticated sample environments providing complex conditions. Thus, neutron imaging holds potential for performing in situ nondestructive measurements on large samples or even full technological systems, which are not possible with any other technique. Our paper presents a new sample environment for in situ high resolution neutron imaging experiments at temperatures from room temperature up to 1100 degrees C and/or using controllable flow of reactive atmospheres. The design also offers the possibility to directly combine imaging with diffraction measurements. Design, special features, and specification of the furnace are described. In addition,more » examples of experiments successfully performed at various neutron facilities with the furnace, as well as examples of possible applications are presented. Our work covers a broad field of research from fundamental to technological investigations of various types of materials and components.« less

  20. Flexible sample environment for high resolution neutron imaging at high temperatures in controlled atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Makowska, Małgorzata G.; Theil Kuhn, Luise; Cleemann, Lars N.; Lauridsen, Erik M.; Bilheux, Hassina Z.; Molaison, Jamie J.; Santodonato, Louis J.; Tremsin, Anton S.; Grosse, Mirco; Morgano, Manuel; Kabra, Saurabh; Strobl, Markus

    2015-12-17

    In high material penetration by neutrons allows for experiments using sophisticated sample environments providing complex conditions. Thus, neutron imaging holds potential for performing in situ nondestructive measurements on large samples or even full technological systems, which are not possible with any other technique. Our paper presents a new sample environment for in situ high resolution neutron imaging experiments at temperatures from room temperature up to 1100 degrees C and/or using controllable flow of reactive atmospheres. The design also offers the possibility to directly combine imaging with diffraction measurements. Design, special features, and specification of the furnace are described. In addition, examples of experiments successfully performed at various neutron facilities with the furnace, as well as examples of possible applications are presented. Our work covers a broad field of research from fundamental to technological investigations of various types of materials and components.

  1. Flexible sample environment for high resolution neutron imaging at high temperatures in controlled atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Makowska, Małgorzata G.; Theil Kuhn, Luise; Cleemann, Lars N.; Lauridsen, Erik M.; Bilheux, Hassina Z.; Molaison, Jamie J.; Santodonato, Louis J.; Tremsin, Anton S.; Grosse, Mirco; Morgano, Manuel; Kabra, Saurabh; Strobl, Markus

    2015-12-15

    High material penetration by neutrons allows for experiments using sophisticated sample environments providing complex conditions. Thus, neutron imaging holds potential for performing in situ nondestructive measurements on large samples or even full technological systems, which are not possible with any other technique. This paper presents a new sample environment for in situ high resolution neutron imaging experiments at temperatures from room temperature up to 1100 °C and/or using controllable flow of reactive atmospheres. The design also offers the possibility to directly combine imaging with diffraction measurements. Design, special features, and specification of the furnace are described. In addition, examples of experiments successfully performed at various neutron facilities with the furnace, as well as examples of possible applications are presented. This covers a broad field of research from fundamental to technological investigations of various types of materials and components.

  2. Investigations into High Temperature Components and Packaging

    SciTech Connect

    Marlino, L.D.; Seiber, L.E.; Scudiere, M.B.; M.S. Chinthavali, M.S.; McCluskey, F.P.

    2007-12-31

    The purpose of this report is to document the work that was performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in support of the development of high temperature power electronics and components with monies remaining from the Semikron High Temperature Inverter Project managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). High temperature electronic components are needed to allow inverters to operate in more extreme operating conditions as required in advanced traction drive applications. The trend to try to eliminate secondary cooling loops and utilize the internal combustion (IC) cooling system, which operates with approximately 105 C water/ethylene glycol coolant at the output of the radiator, is necessary to further reduce vehicle costs and weight. The activity documented in this report includes development and testing of high temperature components, activities in support of high temperature testing, an assessment of several component packaging methods, and how elevated operating temperatures would impact their reliability. This report is organized with testing of new high temperature capacitors in Section 2 and testing of new 150 C junction temperature trench insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBTs) in Section 3. Section 4 addresses some operational OPAL-GT information, which was necessary for developing module level tests. Section 5 summarizes calibration of equipment needed for the high temperature testing. Section 6 details some additional work that was funded on silicon carbide (SiC) device testing for high temperature use, and Section 7 is the complete text of a report funded from this effort summarizing packaging methods and their reliability issues for use in high temperature power electronics. Components were tested to evaluate the performance characteristics of the component at different operating temperatures. The temperature of the component is determined by the ambient temperature (i.e., temperature surrounding the device) plus the

  3. Room Temperature Deformation Mechanisms of Alumina Particles Observed from In Situ Micro-compression and Atomistic Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarobol, Pylin; Chandross, Michael; Carroll, Jay D.; Mook, William M.; Bufford, Daniel C.; Boyce, Brad L.; Hattar, Khalid; Kotula, Paul G.; Hall, Aaron C.

    2016-01-01

    Aerosol deposition (AD) is a solid-state deposition technology that has been developed to fabricate ceramic coatings nominally at room temperature. Sub-micron ceramic particles accelerated by pressurized gas impact, deform, and consolidate on substrates under vacuum. Ceramic particle consolidation in AD coatings is highly dependent on particle deformation and bonding; these behaviors are not well understood. In this work, atomistic simulations and in situ micro-compressions in the scanning electron microscope, and the transmission electron microscope (TEM) were utilized to investigate fundamental mechanisms responsible for plastic deformation/fracture of particles under applied compression. Results showed that highly defective micron-sized alumina particles, initially containing numerous dislocations or a grain boundary, exhibited no observable shape change before fracture/fragmentation. Simulations and experimental results indicated that particles containing a grain boundary only accommodate low strain energy per unit volume before crack nucleation and propagation. In contrast, nearly defect-free, sub-micron, single crystal alumina particles exhibited plastic deformation and fracture without fragmentation. Dislocation nucleation/motion, significant plastic deformation, and shape change were observed. Simulation and TEM in situ micro-compression results indicated that nearly defect-free particles accommodate high strain energy per unit volume associated with dislocation plasticity before fracture. The identified deformation mechanisms provide insight into feedstock design for AD.

  4. Room temperature deformation mechanisms of alumina particles observed from in situ micro-compression and atomistic simulations.

    SciTech Connect

    Sarobol, Pylin; Chandross, Michael E.; Carroll, Jay D.; Mook, William M.; Bufford, Daniel Charles; Boyce, Brad L.; Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel; Kotula, Paul G.; Hall, Aaron Christopher

    2015-09-22

    Aerosol deposition (AD) is a solid-state deposition technology that has been developed to fabricate ceramic coatings nominally at room temperature. Sub-micron ceramic particles accelerated by pressurized gas impact, deform, and consolidate on substrates under vacuum. Ceramic particle consolidation in AD coatings is highly dependent on particle deformation and bonding; these behaviors are not well understood. In this work, atomistic simulations and in situ micro-compressions in the scanning electron microscope, and the transmission electron microscope (TEM) were utilized to investigate fundamental mechanisms responsible for plastic deformation/fracture of particles under applied compression. Results showed that highly defective micron-sized alumina particles, initially containing numerous dislocations or a grain boundary, exhibited no observable shape change before fracture/fragmentation. Simulations and experimental results indicated that particles containing a grain boundary only accommodate low strain energy per unit volume before crack nucleation and propagation. In contrast, nearly defect-free, sub-micron, single crystal alumina particles exhibited plastic deformation and fracture without fragmentation. Dislocation nucleation/motion, significant plastic deformation, and shape change were observed. Simulation and TEM in situ micro-compression results indicated that nearly defect-free particles accommodate high strain energy per unit volume associated with dislocation plasticity before fracture. As a result, the identified deformation mechanisms provide insight into feedstock design for AD.

  5. Room temperature deformation mechanisms of alumina particles observed from in situ micro-compression and atomistic simulations.

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sarobol, Pylin; Chandross, Michael E.; Carroll, Jay D.; Mook, William M.; Bufford, Daniel Charles; Boyce, Brad L.; Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel; Kotula, Paul G.; Hall, Aaron Christopher

    2015-09-22

    Aerosol deposition (AD) is a solid-state deposition technology that has been developed to fabricate ceramic coatings nominally at room temperature. Sub-micron ceramic particles accelerated by pressurized gas impact, deform, and consolidate on substrates under vacuum. Ceramic particle consolidation in AD coatings is highly dependent on particle deformation and bonding; these behaviors are not well understood. In this work, atomistic simulations and in situ micro-compressions in the scanning electron microscope, and the transmission electron microscope (TEM) were utilized to investigate fundamental mechanisms responsible for plastic deformation/fracture of particles under applied compression. Results showed that highly defective micron-sized alumina particles, initially containingmore » numerous dislocations or a grain boundary, exhibited no observable shape change before fracture/fragmentation. Simulations and experimental results indicated that particles containing a grain boundary only accommodate low strain energy per unit volume before crack nucleation and propagation. In contrast, nearly defect-free, sub-micron, single crystal alumina particles exhibited plastic deformation and fracture without fragmentation. Dislocation nucleation/motion, significant plastic deformation, and shape change were observed. Simulation and TEM in situ micro-compression results indicated that nearly defect-free particles accommodate high strain energy per unit volume associated with dislocation plasticity before fracture. As a result, the identified deformation mechanisms provide insight into feedstock design for AD.« less

  6. Development of high temperature strain gages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemcoe, M. M.

    1973-01-01

    High temperature electric resistance wire strain gages were developed and evaluated for use at temperatures exceeding 922 K (1200 F). A special high temperature strain gage alloy (Fe-25Cr-7.5A1), designated BCL-3, was used to fabricate the gages. Pertinent gage characteristics were determined at temperatures up to 1255 K (1800 F). The results of the evaluation were reported in graphical and tabular form. It was concluded that the gages will perform satisfactorily at temperatures to at least 1089 K (1500 F) for at least one hour.

  7. In situ soil moisture coupled with extreme temperatures: A study based on the Oklahoma Mesonet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Trent W.; Quiring, Steven M.

    2014-07-01

    The relationship between the observed (in situ) soil moisture and the percent hot days (%HD) in Oklahoma is examined using quantile regression. Consistent with results from previous modeling studies and observational studies using precipitation deficits as proxy, soil moisture is found to most strongly impact air temperature in the upper quantile of the %HD distribution. The utility of soil moisture for forecasting extreme heat events in Oklahoma is also assessed. Our results show that %HD can be predicted with reasonable skill using soil moisture anomalies from the previous month. These soil moisture-based forecasts of extreme temperature events can be used to support public health and water resource planning and mitigation activities in the Southern Great Plain region of the United States.

  8. Modeling in situ soil enzyme activity using continuous field soil moisture and temperature data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinweg, J. M.; Wallenstein, M. D.

    2010-12-01

    Moisture and temperature are key drivers of soil organic matter decomposition, but there is little consensus on how climate change will affect the degradation of specific soil compounds under field conditions. Soil enzyme activities are a useful metric of soil community microbial function because they are they are the direct agents of decomposition for specific substrates in soil. However, current standard enzyme assays are conducted under optimized conditions in the laboratory and do not accurately reflect in situ enzyme activity, where diffusion and substrate availability may limit reaction rates. The Arrhenius equation, k= A*e(-Ea/RT), can be used to predict enzyme activity (k), collision frequency (A) or activation energy (Ea), but is difficult to parameterize when activities are measured under artificial conditions without diffusion or substrate limitation. We developed a modifed equation to estimate collision frequency and activation energy based on soil moisture to model in-situ enzyme activites. Our model was parameterized using data we collected from the Boston Area Climate Experiment (BACE) in Massachusetts; a multi-factor climate change experiment that provides an opportunity to assess how changes in moisture availability and temperature may impact enzyme activity. Soils were collected from three precipitation treatments and four temperature treatments arranged in a full-factorial design at the BACE site in June 2008, August 2008, January 2009 and June 2009. Enzyme assays were performed at four temperatures (4, 15, 25 and 35°C) to calculate temperature sensitivity and activation energy over the different treatments and seasons. Enzymes activities were measured for six common enzymes involved in carbon (β-glucosidase, cellobiohydrolase, xylosidase), phosphorus (phosphatase) and nitrogen cycling (N-acetyl glucosaminidase, and leucine amino peptidase). Potential enzyme activity was not significantly affected by precipitation, warming or the interaction of

  9. Nuclear fuels for very high temperature applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lundberg, L.B.; Hobbins, R.R.

    1992-01-01

    The success of the development of nuclear thermal propulsion devices and thermionic space nuclear power generation systems depends on the successful utilization of nuclear fuel materials at temperatures in the range 2000 to 3500 K. Problems associated with the utilization of uranium bearing fuel materials at these very high temperatures while maintaining them in the solid state for the required operating times are addressed. The critical issues addressed include evaporation, melting, reactor neutron spectrum, high temperature chemical stability, fabrication, fission induced swelling, fission product release, high temperature creep, thermal shock resistance, and fuel density, both mass and fissile atom. Candidate fuel materials for this temperature range are based on UO{sub 2} or uranium carbides. Evaporation suppression, such as a sealed cladding, is required for either fuel base. Nuclear performance data needed for design are sparse for all candidate fuel forms in this temperature range, especially at the higher temperatures.

  10. Nuclear fuels for very high temperature applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lundberg, L.B.; Hobbins, R.R.

    1992-08-01

    The success of the development of nuclear thermal propulsion devices and thermionic space nuclear power generation systems depends on the successful utilization of nuclear fuel materials at temperatures in the range 2000 to 3500 K. Problems associated with the utilization of uranium bearing fuel materials at these very high temperatures while maintaining them in the solid state for the required operating times are addressed. The critical issues addressed include evaporation, melting, reactor neutron spectrum, high temperature chemical stability, fabrication, fission induced swelling, fission product release, high temperature creep, thermal shock resistance, and fuel density, both mass and fissile atom. Candidate fuel materials for this temperature range are based on UO{sub 2} or uranium carbides. Evaporation suppression, such as a sealed cladding, is required for either fuel base. Nuclear performance data needed for design are sparse for all candidate fuel forms in this temperature range, especially at the higher temperatures.

  11. Corrosion Resistant Coatings for High Temperature Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Besman, T.M.; Cooley, K.M.; Haynes, J.A.; Lee, W.Y.; Vaubert, V.M.

    1998-12-01

    Efforts to increase efficiency of energy conversion devices have required their operation at ever higher temperatures. This will force the substitution of higher-temperature structural ceramics for lower temperature materials, largely metals. Yet, many of these ceramics will require protection from high temperature corrosion caused by combustion gases, atmospheric contaminants, or the operating medium. This paper discusses examples of the initial development of such coatings and materials for potential application in combustion, aluminum smelting, and other harsh environments.

  12. Deformation mechanisms in a precipitation-strengthened ferritic super alloy revealed by in situ neutron dffraction studies at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Shenyan; Gao, Yanfei; An, Ke; Zheng, Lili; Teng, Zhenke; Wu, Wei; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-01-01

    The ferritic superalloy Fe–10Ni–6.5Al–10Cr–3.4Mo strengthened by ordered (Ni,Fe)AlB2-type precipitates is a candidate material for ultra-supercritical steam turbine applications above 923 K. Despite earlier success in improving its room-temperature ductility, the creep resistance of this material at high temperatures needs to be further improved, which requires a fundamental understanding of the high-temperature deformation mechanisms at the scales of individual phases and grains. In situ neutron diffraction has been utilized to investigate the lattice strain evolution and the microscopic load-sharing mechanisms during tensile deformation of this ferritic superalloy at elevated temperatures. Finite-element simulations based on the crystal plasticity theory are employed and compared with the experimental results, both qualitatively and quantitatively. Based on these interphase and intergranular load-partitioning studies, it is found that the deformation mechanisms change from dislocation slip to those related to dislocation climb, diffusional flow and possibly grain boundary sliding, below and above 873 K, respectively. Insights into microstructural design for enhancing creep resistance are also discussed.

  13. Deformation mechanisms in a precipitation-strengthened ferritic superalloy revealed by in situ neutron diffraction studies at elevated temperatures

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Huang, Shenyan; Gao, Yanfei; An, Ke; Zheng, Lili; Wu, Wei; Teng, Zhenke; Liaw, Peter K

    2014-10-22

    In this study, the ferritic superalloy Fe–10Ni–6.5Al–10Cr–3.4Mo strengthened by ordered (Ni,Fe)Al B2-type precipitates is a candidate material for ultra-supercritical steam turbine applications above 923 K. Despite earlier success in improving its room-temperature ductility, the creep resistance of this material at high temperatures needs to be further improved, which requires a fundamental understanding of the high-temperature deformation mechanisms at the scales of individual phases and grains. In situ neutron diffraction has been utilized to investigate the lattice strain evolution and the microscopic load-sharing mechanisms during tensile deformation of this ferritic superalloy at elevated temperatures. Finite-element simulations based on the crystal plasticitymore » theory are employed and compared with the experimental results, both qualitatively and quantitatively. Based on these interphase and intergranular load-partitioning studies, it is found that the deformation mechanisms change from dislocation slip to those related to dislocation climb, diffusional flow and possibly grain boundary sliding, below and above 873 K, respectively. Insights into microstructural design for enhancing creep resistance are also discussed.« less

  14. Deformation mechanisms in a precipitation-strengthened ferritic superalloy revealed by in situ neutron diffraction studies at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Shenyan; Gao, Yanfei; An, Ke; Zheng, Lili; Wu, Wei; Teng, Zhenke; Liaw, Peter K

    2014-10-22

    In this study, the ferritic superalloy Fe–10Ni–6.5Al–10Cr–3.4Mo strengthened by ordered (Ni,Fe)Al B2-type precipitates is a candidate material for ultra-supercritical steam turbine applications above 923 K. Despite earlier success in improving its room-temperature ductility, the creep resistance of this material at high temperatures needs to be further improved, which requires a fundamental understanding of the high-temperature deformation mechanisms at the scales of individual phases and grains. In situ neutron diffraction has been utilized to investigate the lattice strain evolution and the microscopic load-sharing mechanisms during tensile deformation of this ferritic superalloy at elevated temperatures. Finite-element simulations based on the crystal plasticity theory are employed and compared with the experimental results, both qualitatively and quantitatively. Based on these interphase and intergranular load-partitioning studies, it is found that the deformation mechanisms change from dislocation slip to those related to dislocation climb, diffusional flow and possibly grain boundary sliding, below and above 873 K, respectively. Insights into microstructural design for enhancing creep resistance are also discussed.

  15. Spin Hall magnetoresistance at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Uchida, Ken-ichi; Qiu, Zhiyong; Kikkawa, Takashi; Iguchi, Ryo; Saitoh, Eiji

    2015-02-02

    The temperature dependence of spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) in Pt/Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12} (YIG) bilayer films has been investigated in a high temperature range from room temperature to near the Curie temperature of YIG. The experimental results show that the magnitude of the magnetoresistance ratio induced by the SMR monotonically decreases with increasing the temperature and almost disappears near the Curie temperature. We found that, near the Curie temperature, the temperature dependence of the SMR in the Pt/YIG film is steeper than that of a magnetization curve of the YIG; the critical exponent of the magnetoresistance ratio is estimated to be 0.9. This critical behavior of the SMR is attributed mainly to the temperature dependence of the spin-mixing conductance at the Pt/YIG interface.

  16. Estimation of in-situ thermal conductivities from temperature gradient measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang, V.T.

    1980-12-01

    A mathematical model has been developed to study the effect of variable thermal conductivity of the formations, and the wellbore characteristics, on the fluid temperature behavior inside the wellbore during injection or production and after shut-in. During the injection or production period the wellbore fluid temperature is controlled mainly by the fluid flow rate and the heat lost from the fluid to the formation. During the shut-in period, the fluid temperature is strongly affected by differences in the formation thermal conductivities. Based on the results of the present analysis, two methods for estimating in-situ thermal conductivity were derived. First, the line source concept is extended to estimate values of the formation thermal conductivities utilizing the fluid temperature record during the transient period of injection or production and shut-in. The second method is applied when a well is under thermal equilibrium conditions. Values of the formation thermal conductivities can also be estimated by using a continuous temperature gradient log and by measuring the thermal conductivity of the formation at a few selected wellbore locations.

  17. Comparison of Satellite-Derived and In-Situ Observations of Ice and Snow Surface Temperatures over Greenland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Dorothy K.; Box, Jason E.; Casey, Kimberly A.; Hook, Simon J.; Shuman, Christopher A.; Steffen, Konrad

    2008-01-01

    The most practical way to get a spatially broad and continuous measurements of the surface temperature in the data-sparse cryosphere is by satellite remote sensing. The uncertainties in satellite-derived LSTs must be understood to develop internally-consistent decade-scale land-surface temperature (LST) records needed for climate studies. In this work we assess satellite-derived "clear-sky" LST products from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), and LSTs derived from the Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) over snow and ice on Greenland. When possible, we compare satellite-derived LSTs with in-situ air-temperature observations from Greenland Climate Network (GC-Net) automatic-weather stations (AWS). We find that MODIS, ASTER and ETM+ provide reliable and consistent LSTs under clear-sky conditions and relatively-flat terrain over snow and ice targets over a range of temperatures from -40 to 0 C. The satellite-derived LSTs agree within a relative RMS uncertainty of approx.0.5 C. The good agreement among the LSTs derived from the various satellite instruments is especially notable since different spectral channels and different retrieval algorithms are used to calculate LST from the raw satellite data. The AWS record in-situ data at a "point" while the satellite instruments record data over an area varying in size from: 57 X 57 m (ETM+), 90 X 90 m (ASTER), or to 1 X 1 km (MODIS). Surface topography and other factors contribute to variability of LST within a pixel, thus the AWS measurements may not be representative of the LST of the pixel. Without more information on the local spatial patterns of LST, the AWS LST cannot be considered valid ground truth for the satellite measurements, with RMS uncertainty approx.2 C. Despite the relatively large AWS-derived uncertainty, we find LST data are characterized by high accuracy but have uncertain absolute precision.

  18. Borehole Stability in High-Temperature Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Chuanliang; Deng, Jingen; Yu, Baohua; Li, Wenliang; Chen, Zijian; Hu, Lianbo; Li, Yang

    2014-11-01

    In oil and gas drilling or geothermal well drilling, the temperature difference between the drilling fluid and formation will lead to an apparent temperature change around the borehole, which will influence the stress state around the borehole and tend to cause borehole instability in high geothermal gradient formations. The thermal effect is usually not considered as a factor in most of the conventional borehole stability models. In this research, in order to solve the borehole instability in high-temperature formations, a calculation model of the temperature field around the borehole during drilling is established. The effects of drilling fluid circulation, drilling fluid density, and mud displacement on the temperature field are analyzed. Besides these effects, the effect of temperature change on the stress around the borehole is analyzed based on thermoelasticity theory. In addition, the relationships between temperature and strength of four types of rocks are respectively established based on experimental results, and thermal expansion coefficients are also tested. On this basis, a borehole stability model is established considering thermal effects and the effect of temperature change on borehole stability is also analyzed. The results show that the fracture pressure and collapse pressure will both increase as the temperature of borehole rises, and vice versa. The fracture pressure is more sensitive to temperature. Temperature has different effects on collapse pressures due to different lithological characters; however, the variation of fracture pressure is unrelated to lithology. The research results can provide a reference for the design of drilling fluid density in high-temperature wells.

  19. High temperature sensing of thermal barrier materials by luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentleman, Molly Maureen

    The basis for a number of concepts for in situ monitoring of thermal barrier coating heath and temperature using non-contact luminescence techniques is described. Restrictions imposed by phase compatibility and the optical properties of the coating materials are discussed as guidelines for the selection of rare-earth ions as chromophore dopants in these sensors. Extensive studies of type and concentration of rare-earth doping lead to the selection of Eu-doped materials as the preferred material for temperature sensing. Sensor layers, consisting of 1 atomic percent europia-doped yttria stabilized zirconia were deposited and exposed to high heat flux conditions similar to those seen today's turbine environments and were shown to be capable of measuring temperature at different depths within the coating.

  20. Influence of temperature on carbon and nitrogen dynamics during in situ aeration of aged waste in simulated landfill bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Tong, Huanhuan; Yin, Ke; Giannis, Apostolos; Ge, Liya; Wang, Jing-Yuan

    2015-09-01

    The effect of temperature on carbon and nitrogen compounds during in situ aeration of aged waste was investigated in lab-scale simulated landfill bioreactors at 35, 45 and 55 °C, respectively. The bioreactor operated at 55 °C presented the highest carbon mineralization rate in the initial stage, suggesting accelerated biodegradation rates under thermophilic conditions. The nitrogen speciation study indicated that organic nitrogen was the dominant species of total N in aerobic bioreactors due to ammonia removal. Leachate organic nitrogen was further fractionated to elucidate the fate of individual constituent. Detailed investigation revealed the higher bioconversion rates of N-humic and N-fulvic compounds compared to hydrophilic compounds in thermophilic conditions. At the end, waste material in 55 °C bioreactor was richer in highly matured humic substances (HS) verifying the high bioconversion rates. PMID:26026292

  1. Influence of temperature on carbon and nitrogen dynamics during in situ aeration of aged waste in simulated landfill bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Tong, Huanhuan; Yin, Ke; Giannis, Apostolos; Ge, Liya; Wang, Jing-Yuan

    2015-09-01

    The effect of temperature on carbon and nitrogen compounds during in situ aeration of aged waste was investigated in lab-scale simulated landfill bioreactors at 35, 45 and 55 °C, respectively. The bioreactor operated at 55 °C presented the highest carbon mineralization rate in the initial stage, suggesting accelerated biodegradation rates under thermophilic conditions. The nitrogen speciation study indicated that organic nitrogen was the dominant species of total N in aerobic bioreactors due to ammonia removal. Leachate organic nitrogen was further fractionated to elucidate the fate of individual constituent. Detailed investigation revealed the higher bioconversion rates of N-humic and N-fulvic compounds compared to hydrophilic compounds in thermophilic conditions. At the end, waste material in 55 °C bioreactor was richer in highly matured humic substances (HS) verifying the high bioconversion rates.

  2. Recrystallization of high temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Kouzoudis, D.

    1996-05-09

    Currently one of the most widely used high {Tc} superconductors is the Bi-based compounds Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub z} and Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub z} (known as BSCCO 2212 and 2223 compounds) with {Tc} values of about 85 K and 110 K respectively. Lengths of high performance conductors ranging from 100 to 1000 m long are routinely fabricated and some test magnets have been wound. An additional difficulty here is that although Bi-2212 and Bi-2223 phases exist over a wide range of stoichiometries, neither has been prepared in phase-pure form. So far the most successful method of constructing reliable and robust wires or tapes is the so called powder-in-tube (PIT) technique [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7] in which oxide powder of the appropriate stoichiometry and phase content is placed inside a metal tube, deformed into the desired geometry (round wire or flat tape), and annealed to produce the desired superconducting properties. Intermediate anneals are often incorporated between successive deformation steps. Silver is the metal used in this process because it is the most compatible with the reacting phase. In all of the commercial processes for BSCCO, Ag seems to play a special catalytic role promoting the growth of high performance aligned grains that grow in the first few micrometers near the Ag/BSCCO interface. Adjacent to the Ag, the grain alignment is more perfect and the current density is higher than in the center of the tape. It is known that Ag lowers the melting point of several of the phases but the detailed mechanism for growth of these high performance grains is not clearly understood. The purpose of this work is to study the nucleation and growth of the high performance material at this interface.

  3. High temperature resistant cermet and ceramic compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, W. M. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Cermet compositions having high temperature oxidation resistance, high hardness and high abrasion and wear resistance, and particularly adapted for production of high temperature resistant cermet insulator bodies are presented. The compositions are comprised of a sintered body of particles of a high temperature resistant metal or metal alloy, preferably molybdenum or tungsten particles, dispersed in and bonded to a solid solution formed of aluminum oxide and silicon nitride, and particularly a ternary solid solution formed of a mixture of aluminum oxide, silicon nitride and aluminum nitride. Also disclosed are novel ceramic compositions comprising a sintered solid solution of aluminum oxide, silicon nitride and aluminum nitride.

  4. Copper Alloy For High-Temperature Uses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreshfield, Robert L.; Ellis, David L.; Michal, Gary

    1994-01-01

    Alloy of Cu/8Cr/4Nb (numbers indicate parts by atom percent) improved over older high-temperature copper-based alloys in that it offers enhanced high temperature strength, resistance to creep, and ductility while retaining most of thermal conductivity of pure copper; in addition, alloy does not become embrittled upon exposure to hydrogen at temperatures as high as 705 degrees C. Designed for use in presence of high heat fluxes and active cooling; for example, in heat exchangers in advanced aircraft and spacecraft engines, and other high-temperature applications in which there is need for such material. High conductivity and hardness of alloy exploited in welding electrodes and in high-voltage and high-current switches and other applications in which wear poses design problem.

  5. Silicon carbide, a high temperature semiconductor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    Electronic applications are described that would benefit from the availability of high temperature semiconductor devices. Comparisons are made among potential materials for these devices and the problems of each are discussed. Recent progress in developing silicon carbide as a high temperature semiconductor is described.

  6. Evaluation of high temperature polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jayaraj, K.; Dorogy, W.; Farrell, B.; Landrau, N.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to identify and develop arc-track resistant insulation materials that can operate reliably at 300 C. In the first phase, high performance polymers are evaluated based on structure, thermal stability and electrical properties. Next, the polymers are ranked according to performance and experimental characterization. Then, experimental evaluations in wire configuration are conducted. And selection is made based on performance and commerical potential.

  7. High temperature superconductors for computer interconnect applications

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsson, B.J.L.

    1994-12-31

    High temperature superconductors, because of their extremely low loss at high frequencies and their high current handling capability, have the potential for use in computer interconnect boards. They offer the potential advantages of high interconnect density, reduced interconnect delays, and higher data rate. Because silicon CMOS circuits dramatically improve in performance at low temperatures, cooled computers may become attractive in the future to capture both the improved interconnect and circuit benefits.

  8. High-temperature Solar Cell Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Merritt, Danielle; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Scheiman, David

    2005-01-01

    The vast majority of space probes to date have relied upon photovoltaic power generation. If future missions designed to probe environments close to the sun (Figure 1) will be able to use such power generation, solar cells that can function at high temperatures, under high light intensity, and high radiation conditions must be developed. The significant problem is that solar cells lose performance at high temperatures.

  9. High temperature solar selective coatings

    DOEpatents

    Kennedy, Cheryl E

    2014-11-25

    Improved solar collectors (40) comprising glass tubing (42) attached to bellows (44) by airtight seals (56) enclose solar absorber tubes (50) inside an annular evacuated space (54. The exterior surfaces of the solar absorber tubes (50) are coated with improved solar selective coatings {48} which provide higher absorbance, lower emittance and resistance to atmospheric oxidation at elevated temperatures. The coatings are multilayered structures comprising solar absorbent layers (26) applied to the meta surface of the absorber tubes (50), typically stainless steel, topped with antireflective Savers (28) comprising at least two layers 30, 32) of refractory metal or metalloid oxides (such as titania and silica) with substantially differing indices of refraction in adjacent layers. Optionally, at least one layer of a noble metal such as platinum can be included between some of the layers. The absorbent layers cars include cermet materials comprising particles of metal compounds is a matrix, which can contain oxides of refractory metals or metalloids such as silicon. Reflective layers within the coating layers can comprise refractory metal silicides and related compounds characterized by the formulas TiSi. Ti.sub.3SiC.sub.2, TiAlSi, TiAN and similar compounds for Zr and Hf. The titania can be characterized by the formulas TiO.sub.2, Ti.sub.3O.sub.5. TiOx or TiO.sub.xN.sub.1-x with x 0 to 1. The silica can be at least one of SiO.sub.2, SiO.sub.2x or SiO.sub.2xN.sub.1-x with x=0 to 1.

  10. Structural characterization of high temperature composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandell, J. F.; Grande, D. H.

    1991-01-01

    Glass, ceramic, and carbon matrix composite materials have emerged in recent years with potential properties and temperature resistance which make them attractive for high temperature applications such as gas turbine engines. At the outset of this study, only flexural tests were available to evaluate brittle matrix composites at temperatures in the 600 to 1000 C range. The results are described of an ongoing effort to develop appropriate tensile, compression, and shear test methods for high temperature use. A tensile test for unidirectional composites was developed and used to evaluate the properties and behavior of ceramic fiber reinforced glass and glass-ceramic matrix composites in air at temperatures up to 1000 C. The results indicate generally efficient fiber reinforcement and tolerance to matrix cracking similar to polymer matrix composites. Limiting properties in these materials may be an inherently very low transverse strain to failure, and high temperature embrittlement due to fiber/matrix interface oxidation.

  11. In situ growth of carbon nanotube wrapped Si composites as anodes for high performance lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianbin; Lan, Yang; Zhang, Kailong; Xia, Guoliang; Du, Jin; Zhu, Yongchun; Qian, Yitai

    2016-03-01

    The composites of carbon nanotube wrapped Si particles (CNTWS) were synthesized in situ by using the catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) method. In this process, carbon nanotubes were produced in situ to wrap Si by the catalysis action of nascent Cu* under an acetylene atmosphere at a relatively low temperature of 400 °C, in which nascent Cu* was created by the reaction between Si particles and CuCl synchronously. The weight ratio of Si/C in CNTWS is 0.76/0.24. As anode materials for lithium ion batteries, the CNTWS composites exhibit a reversible discharge capacity of 1031.1 mA h g(-1) at 1.8 A g(-1) after 500 cycles, and 868.2 mA h g(-1) at 10.0 A g(-1). The high electrochemical performance of CNTWS composites is associated with the in situ formed carbon nanotubes. PMID:26875542

  12. Use of aluminum nitride to obtain temperature measurements in a high temperature and high radiation environment

    DOEpatents

    Wernsman, Bernard R.; Blasi, Raymond J.; Tittman, Bernhard R.; Parks, David A.

    2016-04-26

    An aluminum nitride piezoelectric ultrasonic transducer successfully operates at temperatures of up to 1000.degree. C. and fast (>1 MeV) neutron fluencies of more than 10.sup.18 n/cm.sup.2. The transducer comprises a transparent, nitrogen rich aluminum nitride (AlN) crystal wafer that is coupled to an aluminum cylinder for pulse-echo measurements. The transducer has the capability to measure in situ gamma heating within the core of a nuclear reactor.

  13. A batteryless temperature sensor based on high temperature sensitive material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakkali, Asma; Pelegri-Sebastia, José; Laghmich, Youssef; Lyhyaoui, Abdelouahid

    2016-05-01

    The major challenge in wireless sensor networks is the reduction of energy consumption. Passive wireless sensor network is an attractive solution for measuring physical parameters in harsh environment for large range of applications requiring sensing devices with low cost of fabrication, small size and long term measurement stability. Batteryless temperature sensing techniques are an active research field. The approach developed in our work holds a promising future for temperature sensor applications in order to successfully reduce the energy consumption. The temperature sensor presented in this paper is based on the electromagnetic transduction principle using the integration of the high temperature sensitive material into a passive structure. Variation in temperature makes the dielectric constant of this material changing, and such modification induces variation in the resonant frequencies of high-Q whispering-gallery modes (WGM) in the millimeter-wave frequency range. Following the results achieved, the proposed device shows a linear response to the increasing temperature and these variations can be remotely detected from a radar interrogation. Contribution to the topical issue "Materials for Energy Harvesting, Conversion and Storage (ICOME 2015) - Elected submissions", edited by Jean-Michel Nunzi, Rachid Bennacer and Mohammed El Ganaoui

  14. Vanadium dioxide thin films prepared on silicon by low temperature MBE growth and ex-situ annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homm, Pia; van Bilzen, Bart; Menghini, Mariela; Locquet, Jean-Pierre; Ivanova, Todora; Sanchez, Luis; Sanchis, Pablo

    Vanadium dioxide (VO2) is a material that shows an insulator to metal transition (IMT) near room temperature. This property can be exploited for applications in field effect devices, electro-optical switches and nonlinear circuit components. We have prepared VO2 thin films on silicon wafers by combining a low temperature MBE growth with an ex-situ annealing at high temperature. We investigated the structural, electrical and optical characteristics of films with thicknesses ranging from 10 to 100 nm. We have also studied the influence of the substrate cleaning. The films grown with our method are polycrystalline with a preferred orientation in the (011) direction of the monoclinic phase. For the films produced on silicon with a native oxide, an IMT at around 75 °C is observed. The magnitude of the resistance change across the IMT decreases with thickness while the refractive index at room temperature corresponds with values reported in the literature for thin films. The successful growth of VO2 films on silicon with good electrical and optical properties is an important step towards the integration of VO2 in novel devices. The authors acknowledge financial support from the FWO project G052010N10 and EU-FP7 SITOGA project. PH acknowledges support from Becas Chile - CONICYT.

  15. In situ growth of carbon nanotube wrapped Si composites as anodes for high performance lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jianbin; Lan, Yang; Zhang, Kailong; Xia, Guoliang; Du, Jin; Zhu, Yongchun; Qian, Yitai

    2016-02-01

    The composites of carbon nanotube wrapped Si particles (CNTWS) were synthesized in situ by using the catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) method. In this process, carbon nanotubes were produced in situ to wrap Si by the catalysis action of nascent Cu* under an acetylene atmosphere at a relatively low temperature of 400 °C, in which nascent Cu* was created by the reaction between Si particles and CuCl synchronously. The weight ratio of Si/C in CNTWS is 0.76/0.24. As anode materials for lithium ion batteries, the CNTWS composites exhibit a reversible discharge capacity of 1031.1 mA h g-1 at 1.8 A g-1 after 500 cycles, and 868.2 mA h g-1 at 10.0 A g-1. The high electrochemical performance of CNTWS composites is associated with the in situ formed carbon nanotubes.The composites of carbon nanotube wrapped Si particles (CNTWS) were synthesized in situ by using the catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) method. In this process, carbon nanotubes were produced in situ to wrap Si by the catalysis action of nascent Cu* under an acetylene atmosphere at a relatively low temperature of 400 °C, in which nascent Cu* was created by the reaction between Si particles and CuCl synchronously. The weight ratio of Si/C in CNTWS is 0.76/0.24. As anode materials for lithium ion batteries, the CNTWS composites exhibit a reversible discharge capacity of 1031.1 mA h g-1 at 1.8 A g-1 after 500 cycles, and 868.2 mA h g-1 at 10.0 A g-1. The high electrochemical performance of CNTWS composites is associated with the in situ formed carbon nanotubes. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr08961a

  16. High temperature structural and magnetic properties of cobalt nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Ait Atmane, Kahina; Zighem, Fatih; Soumare, Yaghoub; Ibrahim, Mona; Boubekri, Rym; Maurer, Thomas; Margueritat, Jeremie; Piquemal, Jean-Yves; Ott, Frederic; Chaboussant, Gregory; Schoenstein, Frederic; Jouini, Noureddine; Viau, Guillaume

    2013-01-15

    We present in this paper the structural and magnetic properties of high aspect ratio Co nanoparticles ({approx}10) at high temperatures (up to 623 K) using in-situ X ray diffraction (XRD) and SQUID characterizations. We show that the anisotropic shapes, the structural and texture properties are preserved up to 500 K. The coercivity can be modelled by {mu}{sub 0}H{sub C}=2(K{sub MC}+K{sub shape})/M{sub S} with K{sub MC} the magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant, K{sub shape} the shape anisotropy constant and M{sub S} the saturation magnetization. H{sub C} decreases linearly when the temperature is increased due to the loss of the Co magnetocrystalline anisotropy contribution. At 500 K, 50% of the room temperature coercivity is preserved corresponding to the shape anisotropy contribution only. We show that the coercivity drop is reversible in the range 300-500 K in good agreement with the absence of particle alteration. Above 525 K, the magnetic properties are irreversibly altered either by sintering or by oxidation. - Graphical abstract: We present in this paper the structural and magnetic properties of high aspect ratio Co nanorods ({approx}10) at high temperatures (up to 623 K) using in-situ X-ray diffraction and SQUID characterizations. We show that the anisotropic shapes, the structural and texture properties are preserved up to 500 K. Above 525 K, the magnetic properties are irreversibly altered either by sintering or by oxidation. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ferromagnetic Co nanorods are prepared using the polyol process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structural and texture properties of the Co nanorods are preserved up to 500 K. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The magnetic properties of the Co nanorods are irreversibly altered above 525 K.

  17. Comparison of Land Skin Temperature from a Land Model, Remote Sensing, and In-situ Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Aihui; Barlage, Michael; Zeng, Xubin; Draper, Clara Sophie

    2014-01-01

    Land skin temperature (Ts) is an important parameter in the energy exchange between the land surface and atmosphere. Here hourly Ts from the Community Land Model Version 4.0, MODIS satellite observations, and in-situ observations in 2003 were compared. Compared with the in-situ observations over four semi-arid stations, both MODIS and modeled Ts show negative biases, but MODIS shows an overall better performance. Global distribution of differences between MODIS and modeled Ts shows diurnal, seasonal, and spatial variations. Over sparsely vegetated areas, the model Ts is generally lower than the MODIS observed Ts during the daytime, while the situation is opposite at nighttime. The revision of roughness length for heat and the constraint of minimum friction velocity from Zeng et al. [2012] bring the modeled Ts closer to MODIS during the day, and have little effect on Ts at night. Five factors contributing to the Ts differences between the model and MODIS are identified, including the difficulty in properly accounting for cloud cover information at the appropriate temporal and spatial resolutions, and uncertainties in surface energy balance computation, atmospheric forcing data, surface emissivity, and MODIS Ts data. These findings have implications for the cross-evaluation of modeled and remotely sensed Ts, as well as the data assimilation of Ts observations into Earth system models.

  18. Sandia_HighTemperatureComponentEvaluation_2015.

    SciTech Connect

    Cashion, Avery T.

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this project is to perform independent evaluation of high temperature components to determine their suitability for use in high temperature geothermal tools. Development of high temperature components has been increasing rapidly due to demand from the high temperature oil and gas exploration and aerospace industries. Many of these new components are at the late prototype or first production stage of development and could benefit from third party evaluation of functionality and lifetime at elevated temperatures. In addition to independent testing of new components, this project recognizes that there is a paucity of commercial-off-the-shelf COTS components rated for geothermal temperatures. As such, high-temperature circuit designers often must dedicate considerable time and resources to determine if a component exists that they may be able to knead performance out of to meet their requirements. This project aids tool developers by characterization of select COTS component performances beyond published temperature specifications. The process for selecting components includes public announcements of project intent (e.g., FedBizOps), direct discussions with candidate manufacturers,and coordination with other DOE funded programs.

  19. Low to high temperature energy conversion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A method for converting heat energy from low temperature heat sources to higher temperature was developed. It consists of a decomposition chamber in which ammonia is decomposed into hydrogen and nitrogen by absorbing heat of decomposition from a low temperature energy source. A recombination reaction then takes place which increases the temperature of a fluid significantly. The system is of use for the efficient operation of compact or low capital investment turbine driven electrical generators, or in other applications, to enable chemical reactions that have a critical lower temperature to be used. The system also recovers heat energy from low temperature heat sources, such as solar collectors or geothermal sources, and converts it to high temperatures.

  20. Silicon Carbide Nanotube Oxidation at High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahlborg, Nadia; Zhu, Dongming

    2012-01-01

    Silicon Carbide Nanotubes (SiCNTs) have high mechanical strength and also have many potential functional applications. In this study, SiCNTs were investigated for use in strengthening high temperature silicate and oxide materials for high performance ceramic nanocomposites and environmental barrier coating bond coats. The high · temperature oxidation behavior of the nanotubes was of particular interest. The SiCNTs were synthesized by a direct reactive conversion process of multiwall carbon nanotubes and silicon at high temperature. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was used to study the oxidation kinetics of SiCNTs at temperatures ranging from 800degC to1300degC. The specific oxidation mechanisms were also investigated.

  1. Aeronautical applications of high-temperature superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turney, George E.; Luidens, Roger W.; Uherka, Kenneth; Hull, John

    1989-01-01

    The successful development of high-temperature superconductors (HTS) could have a major impact on future aeronautical propulsion and aeronautical flight vehicle systems. A preliminary examination of the potential application of HTS for aeronautics indicates that significant benefits may be realized through the development and implementation of these newly discovered materials. Applications of high-temperature superconductors (currently substantiated at 95 K) were envisioned for several classes of aeronautical systems, including subsonic and supersonic transports, hypersonic aircraft, V/STOL aircraft, rotorcraft, and solar, microwave and laser powered aircraft. Introduced and described are the particular applications and potential benefits of high-temperature superconductors as related to aeronautics and/or aeronautical systems.

  2. Symposium on high temperature and materials chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-10-01

    This volume contains the written proceedings of the Symposium on High Temperature and Materials Chemistry held in Berkeley, California on October 24--25, 1989. The Symposium was sponsored by the Materials and Chemical Sciences Division of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and by the College of Chemistry of the University of California at Berkeley to discuss directions, trends, and accomplishments in the field of high temperature and materials chemistry. Its purpose was to provide a snapshot of high temperature and materials chemistry and, in so doing, to define status and directions.

  3. The high temperature superconductivity space experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, Denis C.; Nisenoff, M.

    1991-01-01

    The history and the current status of the high temperature superconductivity space experiment (HTSSE) initiated in 1988 are briefly reviewed. The goal of the HTSSE program is to demonstrate the feasibility of incorporating high temperature superconductivity (HTS) technology into space systems. The anticipated payoffs include the development of high temperature superconductor devices for space systems; preparation and space qualification of a cryogenically cooled experimental package containing HTS devices and components; and acquisition of data for future space experiments using more complex HTS devices and subsystems. The principal HTSSE systems and devices are described.

  4. Dimensionality of high temperature superconductivity in oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, C. W.

    1989-01-01

    Many models have been proposed to account for the high temperature superconductivity observed in oxide systems. Almost all of these models proposed are based on the uncoupled low dimensional carrier Cu-O layers of the oxides. Results of several experiments are presented and discussed. They suggest that the high temperature superconductivity observed cannot be strictly two- or one-dimensional, and that the environment between the Cu-O layers and the interlayer coupling play an important role in the occurrence of such high temperature superconductivity. A comment on the very short coherence length reported is also made.

  5. A high-temperature wideband pressure transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.

    1975-01-01

    Progress in the development of a pressure transducer for measurement of the pressure fluctuations in the high temperature environment of a jet exhaust is reported. A condenser microphone carrier system was adapted to meet the specifications. A theoretical analysis is presented which describes the operation of the condenser microphone in terms of geometry, materials, and other physical properties. The analysis was used as the basis for design of a prototype high temperature microphone. The feasibility of connecting the microphone to a converter over a high temperature cable operating as a half-wavelength transmission line was also examined.

  6. High temperature solid state storage cell

    DOEpatents

    Rea, Jesse R.; Kallianidis, Milton; Kelsey, G. Stephen

    1983-01-01

    A completely solid state high temperature storage cell comprised of a solid rechargeable cathode such as TiS.sub.2, a solid electrolyte which remains solid at the high temperature operating conditions of the cell and which exhibits high ionic conductivity at such elevated temperatures such as an electrolyte comprised of lithium iodide, and a solid lithium or other alkali metal alloy anode (such as a lithium-silicon alloy) with 5-50% by weight of said anode being comprised of said solid electrolyte.

  7. The population of giant clumps in simulated high-z galaxies: in situ and ex situ migration and survival

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandelker, Nir; Dekel, Avishai; Ceverino, Daniel; Tweed, Dylan; Moody, Christopher E.; Primack, Joel

    2014-10-01

    We study the properties of giant clumps and their radial gradients in high-z disc galaxies using AMR cosmological simulations. Our sample consists of 770 snapshots in the redshift range z = 4-1 from 29 galaxies that at z = 2 span the stellar mass range (0.2-3) × 1011 M⊙. Extended gas discs exist in 83 per cent of the snapshots. Clumps are identified by gas density in 3D and their stellar and dark matter components are considered thereafter. While most of the overdensities are diffuse and elongated, 91 per cent of their mass and 83 per cent of their star formation rate (SFR) are in compact round clumps. Nearly all galaxies have a central, massive bulge clump, while 70 per cent of the discs show off-centre clumps, 3-4 per galaxy. The fraction of clumpy discs peaks at intermediate disc masses. Clumps are divided based on dark matter content into in situ and ex situ originating from violent disc instability (VDI) and minor mergers, respectively. 60 per cent of the discs are in a VDI phase showing off-centre in situ clumps, which contribute 1-7 per cent of the disc mass and 5-45 per cent of its SFR. The in situ clumps constitute 75 per cent of the off-centre clumps in terms of number and SFR but only half the mass, each clump containing on average 1 per cent of the disc mass and 6 per cent of its SFR. They have young stellar ages, 100-400 Myr, and high specific SFR (sSFR), 1-10 Gyr-1. They exhibit gradients resulting from inward clump migration, where the inner clumps are somewhat more massive and older, with lower gas fraction and sSFR and higher metallicity. Similar observed gradients indicate that clumps survive outflows. The ex situ clumps have stellar ages 0.5-3 Gyr and sSFR ˜0.1-2 Gyr-1, and they exhibit weaker gradients. Massive clumps of old stars at large radii are likely ex situ mergers, though half of them share the disc rotation.

  8. High Temperature Thermographic Phosphor Coatings Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goedeke, Shawn; Allison, S. W.; Beshears, D. L.; Bencic, T.; Cates, M. R.; Hollerman, W. A.; Guidry, R.

    2003-01-01

    For many years, phosphor thermometry has been used for non-contact temperature measurements. A large number of applications have been associated with high temperatures, especially for aerospace systems where blackbody radiation backgrounds are large and in challenging environments, such as vibration, rotation, flame, or noise. These environments restrict the use of more common thermocouples or infrared thermometric techniques. In particular, temperature measurements inside jet turbines, rocket engines, or similar devices are especially amenable to phosphor techniques. Often the fluorescent materials are used as powders, either suspended in binders and applied like paint or applied as high-temperature sprays. Thin coatings that are less than 50 m thick are used on the surfaces of interest. These coatings will quickly assume the same temperature as the surface to which they are applied. The temperature dependence of fluorescent materials is a function of the base matrix atoms and a small quantity of added activator or dopant ions. Often for high temperature applications, the selected materials are refractory and include rare earth ions. Phosphors like Y3Al5O12 (YAG) doped with Eu, Dy, or Tm, Y2O3 doped with Eu, or similar rare earth compounds, will survive high temperatures and can be configured to emit light that changes rapidly in lifetime and intensity. For example, researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory recently observed fluorescence from YAG:Dy and YAG:Tm at temperatures above 1400 C. One of the biggest challenges is to locate a binder material that can withstand tremendous variations in temperature in an adverse aerospace environment. This poster will provide an overview into our attempt to utilize phosphors for thermometry purposes. Emphasis will be placed on the use of selected binder materials that can withstand high temperatures. This research was completed for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Glenn Research Center in Cleveland

  9. In Situ Microstructural Control and Mechanical Testing Inside the Transmission Electron Microscope at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Baoming; Haque, M. A.

    2015-08-01

    With atomic-scale imaging and analytical capabilities such as electron diffraction and energy-loss spectroscopy, the transmission electron microscope has allowed access to the internal microstructure of materials like no other microscopy. It has been mostly a passive or post-mortem analysis tool, but that trend is changing with in situ straining, heating and electrical biasing. In this study, we design and demonstrate a multi-functional microchip that integrates actuators, sensors, heaters and electrodes with freestanding electron transparent specimens. In addition to mechanical testing at elevated temperatures, the chip can actively control microstructures (grain growth and phase change) of the specimen material. Using nano-crystalline aluminum, nickel and zirconium as specimen materials, we demonstrate these novel capabilities inside the microscope. Our approach of active microstructural control and quantitative testing with real-time visualization can influence mechanistic modeling by providing direct and accurate evidence of the fundamental mechanisms behind materials behavior.

  10. In situ Measurements of Irradiation-Induced Creep of Nanocrystalline Copper at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özerİnç, Sezer; Averback, Robert S.; King, William P.

    2016-08-01

    We have measured irradiation-induced creep on nanocrystalline copper micropillars at elevated temperatures. The micropillars, which were ≈1 µm in diameter and ≈2 µm in height, were fabricated from magnetron-sputtered nanocrystalline copper films. The micropillars were compressed during 2.0 MeV Ar+ bombardment and the deformation measured in situ by laser interferometry. The creep rate was measured over the stress range 10-120 MPa at ≈200°C. The results show linear relationships of creep rate with both applied stress and displacement rate, yielding a creep compliance of 0.07 dpa-1 GPa-1 (dpa:displacement per atom). The findings are in good agreement with the previous results obtained using a bulge test on free-standing thin film specimens.

  11. High temperature acclimation through PIF4 signaling.

    PubMed

    Proveniers, Marcel C G; van Zanten, Martijn

    2013-02-01

    Ambient temperature has direct consequences for plant functioning. Many plant species are able to adjust reproductive timing and development to optimize fitness to changes in ambient temperatures. Understanding the molecular networks of how plants cope with high temperatures is essential to counteract the effects of global warming and to secure future crop productivity. Several recent papers reported that Arabidopsis thaliana responses to changing light conditions and high temperature, and their underlying signaling mechanisms are highly similar and involve the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR 4 (PIF4). In this opinion article we discuss the mechanisms of PIF4-mediated acclimation to increased ambient temperature with focus on timing of flowering and morphological acclimation.

  12. High temperature erosion of nickel alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, J.

    1995-12-31

    High temperature erosion behavior was studied on three commercial nickel alloys, Inconel 718, Inconel 601 and Inconel X-750, using a vertical sand-blast type of erosion test rig. Effect of temperature on erosion was investigated by varying test temperature in six steps from ambient up to 800 C. Other erosion variables investigated included impingement angle, changed from 10{degree} to 90{degree}, and impingement velocity, covered a range of 40 to 90 m/s. Extensive studies on erosion surface morphological features were done on eroded or eroded-corroded specimen surfaces using scanning electron microscopy. Thermogravimetric analysis and scratch test revealed corrosion rate, characteristics of oxide scale formed at high temperature, and some effects of corrosion on erosion. It was found that variation of erosion rate with temperature was directly related to temperature-dependent mechanical property changes of the materials. The mechanisms of the high-temperature erosion were analyzed based on test results. It was observed that erosion was dominant in temperature range up to 800 C, while corrosion played increased roles in upper portion of the temperature range tested.

  13. High temperature thermometric phosphors for use in a temperature sensor

    DOEpatents

    Allison, Stephen W.; Cates, Michael R.; Boatner, Lynn A.; Gillies, George T.

    1998-01-01

    A high temperature phosphor consists essentially of a material having the general formula LuPO.sub.4 :Dy.sub.(x),Eu.sub.(y), wherein: 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.20 wt % and 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.20 wt %. The high temperature phosphor is in contact with an article whose temperature is to be determined. The article having the phosphor in contact with it is placed in the environment for which the temperature of the article is to be determined. The phosphor is excited by a laser causing the phosphor to fluoresce. The emission from the phosphor is optically focused into a beam-splitting mirror which separates the emission into two separate emissions, the emission caused by the dysprosium dopant and the emission caused by the europium dopent. The separated emissions are optically filtered and the intensities of the emission are detected and measured. The ratio of the intensity of each emission is determined and the temperature of the article is calculated from the ratio of the intensities of the separate emissions.

  14. High temperature thermometric phosphors for use in a temperature sensor

    DOEpatents

    Allison, S.W.; Cates, M.R.; Boatner, L.A.; Gillies, G.T.

    1998-03-24

    A high temperature phosphor consists essentially of a material having the general formula LuPO{sub 4}:Dy{sub (x)},Eu{sub (y)}, wherein: 0.1 wt %{<=}x{<=}20 wt % and 0.1 wt %{<=}y{<=}20 wt %. The high temperature phosphor is in contact with an article whose temperature is to be determined. The article having the phosphor in contact with it is placed in the environment for which the temperature of the article is to be determined. The phosphor is excited by a laser causing the phosphor to fluoresce. The emission from the phosphor is optically focused into a beam-splitting mirror which separates the emission into two separate emissions, the emission caused by the dysprosium dopant and the emission caused by the europium dopant. The separated emissions are optically filtered and the intensities of the emission are detected and measured. The ratio of the intensity of each emission is determined and the temperature of the article is calculated from the ratio of the intensities of the separate emissions. 2 figs.

  15. Electrical Properties Of Capacitors At High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumann, E. D.; Myers, I. T.; Overton, E.; Hammoud, A. N.

    1994-01-01

    Brief report describes results of experiments in which capacitance and dielectric loss of glass, metallized-polytetrafluoroethylene, and solid-tantalum capacitor measured at temperatures from 20 degrees C to 200 degrees C. Conclusions drawn concerning suitability of capacitors for use at high temperatures; such as in nuclear powerplants, aircraft, equipment for extracting geothermal energy, switching power supplies, and automotive integrated engine electronics.

  16. High temperature ceramic/metal joint structure

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, Gary L.

    1991-01-01

    A high temperature turbine engine includes a hybrid ceramic/metallic rotor member having ceramic/metal joint structure. The disclosed joint is able to endure higher temperatures than previously possible, and aids in controlling heat transfer in the rotor member.

  17. High temperature superconductor materials and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doane, George B., III.; Banks, Curtis; Golben, John

    1990-01-01

    Research on processing methods leading to a significant enhancement in the critical current densities (Jc) and the critical temperature (Tc) of high temperature superconducting in thin bulk and thin film forms. The fabrication of important devices for NASA unique applications (sensors) is investigated.

  18. Assigning thermodynamic temperatures to high-temperature fixed-points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolliams, E. R.; Bloembergen, P.; Machin, G.

    2013-09-01

    Workpackage five of the High Temperature Fixed-Point research programme will determine the thermodynamic temperature for the equilibrium melting transition of the pure eutectic systems of Re-C, Pt-C and Co-C and, in addition, the freezing point of Cu. Measurements of four different cells of each type will be made by nine participating laboratories. This paper describes how the melt sensitivity to the rate of the previous freeze, furnace effects and cell impurities will be accounted for and how the results will be combined allowing for all existing correlations.

  19. NCTM of liquids at high temperatures using polarization techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnan, Shankar; Weber, J. K. Richard; Nordine, Paul C.; Schiffman, Robert A.

    1990-01-01

    Temperature measurement and control is extremely important in any materials processing application. However, conventional techniques for non-contact temperature measurement (mainly optical pyrometry) are very uncertain because of unknown or varying surface emittance. Optical properties like other properties change during processing. A dynamic, in-situ measurement of optical properties including the emittance is required. Intersonics is developing new technologies using polarized laser light scattering to determine surface emittance of freely radiating bodies concurrent with conventional optical pyrometry. These are sufficient to determine the true surface temperature of the target. Intersonics is currently developing a system called DAPP, the Division of Amplitude Polarimetric Pyrometer, that uses polarization information to measure the true thermodynamic temperature of freely radiating objects. This instrument has potential use in materials processing applications in ground and space based equipment. Results of thermophysical and thermodynamic measurements using laser reflection as a temperature measuring tool are presented. The impact of these techniques on thermophysical property measurements at high temperature is discussed.

  20. High-Temperature Optical Window Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roeloffs, Norman; Taranto, Nick

    1995-01-01

    A high-temperature optical window is essential to the optical diagnostics of high-temperature combustion rigs. Laser Doppler velocimetry, schlieren photography, light sheet visualization, and laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy are a few of the tests that require optically clear access to the combustor flow stream. A design was developed for a high-temperature window that could withstand the severe environment of the NASA Lewis 3200 F Lean Premixed Prevaporized (LPP) Flame Tube Test Rig. The development of this design was both time consuming and costly. This report documents the design process and the lessons learned, in an effort to reduce the cost of developing future designs for high-temperature optical windows.

  1. A sharp knife for high temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heisman, R. M.; Iceland, W. F.

    1978-01-01

    Electrically heated nickel-chrome-steel alloy knife may be used to cut heat resistant plastic felt and similar materials with relative ease. Blade made of commercially available alloy RA 330 retains edge at temperatures as high as 927 C.

  2. Measuring Moduli Of Elasticity At High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfenden, Alan

    1993-01-01

    Shorter, squatter specimens and higher frequencies used in ultrasonic measurement technique. Improved version of piezo-electric ultrasonic composite oscillator technique used to measure moduli of elasticity of solid materials at high temperatures.

  3. Silicon carbide, an emerging high temperature semiconductor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matus, Lawrence G.; Powell, J. Anthony

    1991-01-01

    In recent years, the aerospace propulsion and space power communities have expressed a growing need for electronic devices that are capable of sustained high temperature operation. Applications for high temperature electronic devices include development instrumentation within engines, engine control, and condition monitoring systems, and power conditioning and control systems for space platforms and satellites. Other earth-based applications include deep-well drilling instrumentation, nuclear reactor instrumentation and control, and automotive sensors. To meet the needs of these applications, the High Temperature Electronics Program at the Lewis Research Center is developing silicon carbide (SiC) as a high temperature semiconductor material. Research is focussed on developing the crystal growth, characterization, and device fabrication technologies necessary to produce a family of silicon carbide electronic devices and integrated sensors. The progress made in developing silicon carbide is presented, and the challenges that lie ahead are discussed.

  4. High-temperature superconductivity: A conventional conundrum

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Božović, Ivan

    2016-01-07

    High-temperature superconductivity in ultrathin films of iron selenide deposited on strontium titanate has been attributed to various exotic mechanisms, and new experiments indicate that it may be conventional, with broader implications.

  5. The Conference on High Temperature Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, D. J.; Mccormick, J. B.; Kerwin, W. J.; Narud, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    The status of and directions for high temperature electronics research and development were evaluated. Major objectives were to (1) identify common user needs; (2) put into perspective the directions for future work; and (3) address the problem of bringing to practical fruition the results of these efforts. More than half of the presentations dealt with materials and devices, rather than circuits and systems. Conference session titles and an example of a paper presented in each session are (1) User requirements: High temperature electronics applications in space explorations; (2) Devices: Passive components for high temperature operation; (3) Circuits and systems: Process characteristics and design methods for a 300 degree QUAD or AMP; and (4) Packaging: Presently available energy supply for high temperature environment.

  6. Altering high temperature subterranean formation permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Moradi-Araghi, A.

    1991-02-19

    This patent describes a delayed acrylamide containing polymer crosslinker having stability in an aqueous solution at high temperatures. It comprises: a combination of an aldehyde and a salicylic acid derivative selected from salicylamide and acetysalicylic acid.

  7. Materials for high-temperature thermoelectric conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, R. S.; Elwell, D.; Auld, B. A.

    1984-01-01

    The development of materials for high temperature thermoelectric energy conversion devices was investigated. The development of new criteria for the selection of materials which is based on understanding of the fundamental principles governing the behavior of high temperature thermoelectric materials is discussed. The synthesis and characterization of promising new materials and the growth of single crystals to eliminate possible problems associated with grain boundaries and other defects in polycrystalline materials are outlined.

  8. PLA recycling by hydrolysis at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristina, Annesini Maria; Rosaria, Augelletti; Sara, Frattari; Fausto, Gironi

    2016-05-01

    In this work the process of PLA hydrolysis at high temperature was studied, in order to evaluate the possibility of chemical recycling of this polymer bio-based. In particular, the possibility to obtain the monomer of lactic acid from PLA degradation was investigated. The results of some preliminary tests, performed in a laboratory batch reactor at high temperature, are presented: the experimental results show that the complete degradation of PLA can be obtained in relatively low reaction times.

  9. Recent developments in high temperature organic polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, P. M.

    1991-01-01

    Developments in high temperature organic polymers during the last 5 years with major emphasis on polyimides and poly(arylene ether)s are discussed. Specific polymers or series of polymers have been selected to demonstrate unique properties or the effect chemical structure has upon certain properties. This article is not intended to be a comprehensive review of high temperature polymer advancements during the last 5 years.

  10. High temperature structural fibers: Status and needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, James A.

    1991-01-01

    The key to high temperature structural composites is the selection and incorporation of continuous fiber reinforcement with optimum mechanical, physical, and chemical properties. Critical fiber property needs are high strength, high stiffness, and retention of these properties during composite fabrication and use. However, unlike polymeric composites where all three requirements are easily achieved with a variety of commercially available carbon-based fibers, structural fibers with sufficient stiffness and strength retention for high temperature metal, intermetallic, and ceramic composites are not available. The objective here is to discuss in a general manner the thermomechanical stability problem for current high performance fibers which are based on silicon and alumina compositions. This is accomplished by presenting relevant fiber property data with a brief discussion of potential underlying mechanisms. From this general overview, some possible materials engineering approaches are suggested which may lead to minimization and/or elimination of this critical stability problem for current high temperature fibers.

  11. Apparatus and method for high temperature viscosity and temperature measurements

    DOEpatents

    Balasubramaniam, Krishnan; Shah, Vimal; Costley, R. Daniel; Singh, Jagdish P.

    2001-01-01

    A probe for measuring the viscosity and/or temperature of high temperature liquids, such as molten metals, glass and similar materials comprises a rod which is an acoustical waveguide through which a transducer emits an ultrasonic signal through one end of the probe, and which is reflected from (a) a notch or slit or an interface between two materials of the probe and (b) from the other end of the probe which is in contact with the hot liquid or hot melt, and is detected by the same transducer at the signal emission end. To avoid the harmful effects of introducing a thermally conductive heat sink into the melt, the probe is made of relatively thermally insulative (non-heat-conductive) refractory material. The time between signal emission and reflection, and the amplitude of reflections, are compared against calibration curves to obtain temperature and viscosity values.

  12. Quasipermanent magnets of high temperature superconductor - Temperature dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, In-Gann; Liu, Jianxiong; Ren, Yanru; Weinstein, Roy; Kozlowski, Gregory; Oberly, Charles E.

    1993-01-01

    We report on persistent field in quasi-permanent magnets of high temperature superconductors. Magnets composed of irradiated Y(1+)Ba2Cu3O7 trapped field Bt = 1.52 T at 77 K and 1.9 T at lower temperature. However, the activation magnet limited Bt at lower temperature. We present data on Jc(H,T) for unirradiated materials, and calculate Bt at various T. Based upon data at 65 K, we calculate Bt in unirradiated single grains at 20 K and find that 5.2 T will be trapped for grain diameter d about 1.2 cm, and 7.9 T for d = 2.3 cm. Irradiated grains will trap four times these values.

  13. In-situ deposition of YBCO high-Tc superconducting thin films by MOCVD and PE-MOCVD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, J.; Noh, D. W.; Chern, C.; Li, Y. Q.; Norris, P. E.; Kear, B.; Gallois, B.

    1991-01-01

    Metal-Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) offers the advantages of a high degree of compositional control, adaptability for large scale production, and the potential for low temperature fabrication. The capability of operating at high oxygen partial pressure is particularly suitable for in situ formation of high temperature superconducting (HTSC) films. Yttrium barium copper oxide (YBCO) thin films having a sharp zero-resistance transition with T(sub c) greater than 90 K and J(sub c) of approximately 10(exp 4) A on YSZ have been prepared, in situ, at a substrate temperature of about 800 C. Moreover, the ability to form oxide films at low temperature is very desirable for device applications of HTSC materials. Such a process would permit the deposition of high quality HTSC films with a smooth surface on a variety of substrates. Highly c-axis oriented, dense, scratch resistant, superconducting YBCO thin films with mirror-like surfaces have been prepared, in situ, at a reduced substrate temperature as low as 570 C by a remote microwave-plasma enhanced metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (PE-MOCVD) process. Nitrous oxide was used as a reactant gas to generate active oxidizing species. This process, for the first time, allows the formation of YBCO thin films with the orthorhombic superconducting phase in the as-deposited state. The as-deposited films grown by PE-MOCVD show attainment of zero resistance at 72 K with a transition width of about 5 K. MOCVD was carried out in a commercial production scale reactor with the capability of uniform deposition over 100 sq cm per growth run. Preliminary results indicate that PE-MOCVD is a very attractive thin film deposition process for superconducting device technology.

  14. In Situ deposition of YBCO high-T(sub c) superconducting thin films by MOCVD and PE-MOCVD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, J.; Noh, D. W.; Chern, C.; Li, Y. Q.; Norris, P.; Gallois, B.; Kear, B.

    1990-01-01

    Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) offers the advantages of a high degree of compositional control, adaptability for large scale production, and the potential for low temperature fabrication. The capability of operating at high oxygen partial pressure is particularly suitable for in situ formation of high temperature superconducting (HTSC) films. Yttrium barium copper oxide (YBCO) thin films having a sharp zero-resistance transition with T( sub c) greater than 90 K and Jc approx. 10 to the 4th power A on YSZ have been prepared, in situ, at a substrate temperature of about 800 C. Moreover, the ability to form oxide films at low temperature is very desirable for device applications of HTSC materials. Such a process would permit the deposition of high quality HTSC films with a smooth surface on a variety of substrates. Highly c-axis oriented, dense, scratch resistant, superconducting YBCO thin films with mirror-like surfaces have been prepared, in situ, at a reduced substrate temperature as low as 570 C by a remote microwave-plasma enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (PE-MOCVD) process. Nitrous oxide was used as a reactant gas to generate active oxidizing species. This process, for the first time, allows the formation of YBCO thin films with the orthorhombic superconducting phase in the as-deposited state. The as-deposited films grown by PE-MOCVD show attainment of zero resistance at 72 K with a transition width of about 5 K. MOCVD was carried out in a commercial production scale reactor with the capability of uniform deposition over 100 sq cm per growth run. Preliminary results indicate that PE-MOCVD is a very attractive thin film deposition process for superconducting device technology.

  15. Ionization of NO at high temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, C. Frederick

    1991-01-01

    Space vehicles flying through the atmosphere at high speed are known to excite a complex set of chemical reactions in the atmospheric gases, ranging from simple vibrational excitation to dissociation, atom exchange, electronic excitation, ionization, and charge exchange. Simple arguments are developed for the temperature dependence of the reactions leading to ionization of NO, including the effect of vibrational electronic thermal nonequilibrium. NO ionization is the most important source of electrons at intermediate temperatures and at higher temperatures provides the trigger electrons that ionize atoms. Based on these arguments, recommendations are made for formulae which fit observed experimental results, and which include a dependence on both a heavy particle temperature and different vibration electron temperatures. In addition, these expressions will presumably provide the most reliable extrapolation of experimental results to much higher temperatures.

  16. An in situ-based analysis of the relationship between land surface "skin" and screen-level air temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Good, Elizabeth Jane

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the relationship between land surface temperatures (LST) and screen-level air temperatures (T2m) using in situ observations from 19 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) deployments located in a range of geographical regimes. The diurnal cycle is resolved using 1 min observations: a particular focus of the study is on the relationship between daily extremes of LST (LSTmax, LSTmin) and T2m (Tmax, Tmin). Temperature differences are analyzed with respect to cloud, wind speed, and snow cover. Under cloud-free, low wind speed conditions, daytime LST is often several degrees Celsius (°C) higher than T2m at low-to-middle latitudes and at high latitudes during the summer months. In contrast, LST and T2m are often close (e.g., within 2°C) under cloudy and/or moderate-to-high wind speed conditions or when solar insolation is low or absent. LSTmin and Tmin are generally well correlated (r > 0.8, often r > 0.9), while seasonal correlations between LSTmax and Tmax are weaker (r > 0.6, often r > 0.8). At high latitudes, LST and T2m are well coupled in spring/autumn/winter; the relationship between LST and T2m tends to weaken with decreasing latitude. The timing of daily extremes is also investigated and it is found that LSTmin and Tmin typically occur close to sunrise, with Tmin occurring slightly after LSTmin. LSTmax occurs close to solar noon, with Tmax typically occurring 1-3 hours later. This study will inform temperature data users on differences between LST and T2m and aid development of methods to estimate T2m using satellite LSTs.

  17. High temperature crystalline superconductors from crystallized glasses

    DOEpatents

    Shi, Donglu

    1992-01-01

    A method of preparing a high temperature superconductor from an amorphous phase. The method involves preparing a starting material of a composition of Bi.sub.2 Sr.sub.2 Ca.sub.3 Cu.sub.4 Ox or Bi.sub.2 Sr.sub.2 Ca.sub.4 Cu.sub.5 Ox, forming an amorphous phase of the composition and heat treating the amorphous phase for particular time and temperature ranges to achieve a single phase high temperature superconductor.

  18. Impact of Physical Vapor Deposition-Based In situ Fabrication Method on Metal/High-k Gate Stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Heiji; Horie, Shinya; Minami, Takashi; Kitano, Naomu; Kosuda, Motomu; Shimura, Takayoshi; Yasutake, Kiyoshi

    2007-04-01

    We proposed an in situ method for fabricating metal/high-k gate stacks. High-quality Hf silicate gate dielectrics were formed by utilizing a solid phase interface reaction (SPIR) between a metal Hf layer and an SiO2 underlayer, and TiN electrodes were continuously grown on the gate dielectrics using a low-damage sputtering system without exposure to air. We investigated the optimum SPIR conditions for TiN/HfSiO gate stacks, such as the thicknesses of the metal Hf and oxide underlayers, in situ annealing temperature, and oxygen pressure. The results indicate that the in situ method can be used to precisely control the SPIR to form silicate films and improve the electrical properties at metal/high-k interfaces. We demonstrated that the scaling of equivalent oxide thickness (EOT) was achieved and that the carbon impurity content at the gate stacks was successfully reduced by in situ silicate formation and continuous electrode deposition. As a consequence, we obtained excellent EOT versus gate leakage characteristics and succeeded in improving the hysteresis of capacitance-voltage curves for the TiN/HfSiO gate stacks.

  19. In situ multipurpose time-resolved spectrometer for monitoring nanoparticle generation in a high-pressure fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Shaoyu; Saitow, Ken-ichi

    2012-07-15

    We developed a multipurpose time-resolved spectrometer for studying the dynamics of nanoparticles generated by pulsed-laser ablation (PLA) in a high-pressure fluid. The apparatus consists of a high-pressure optical cell and three spectrometers for in situ measurements. The optical cell was designed for experiments at temperatures up to 400 K and pressures up to 30 MPa with fluctuations within {+-}0.1% h{sup -1}. The three spectrometers were used for the following in situ measurements at high pressures: (i) transient absorption spectrum measurements from 350 to 850 nm to investigate the dynamics of nanoparticle generation from nanoseconds to milliseconds after laser irradiation, (ii) absorption spectrum measurements from 220 to 900 nm to observe the time evolution of nanoparticles from seconds to hours after laser ablation, and (iii) dynamic light scattering measurements to track nanoparticles with sizes from 10 nm to 10 {mu}m in the time range from seconds to hours after laser ablation. By combining these three spectrometers, we demonstrate in situ measurements of gold nanoparticles generated by PLA in supercritical fluids. This is the first report of in situ time-resolved measurements of the dynamics of nanoparticles generated in a supercritical fluid.

  20. A Novel Method for In-Situ Monitoring of Local Voltage, Temperature and Humidity Distributions in Fuel Cells Using Flexible Multi-Functional Micro Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chi-Yuan; Fan, Wei-Yuan; Chang, Chih-Ping

    2011-01-01

    In this investigation, micro voltage, temperature and humidity sensors were fabricated and integrated for the first time on a stainless steel foil using micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS). These flexible multi-functional micro sensors have the advantages of high temperature resistance, flexibility, smallness, high sensitivity and precision of location. They were embedded in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) and used to simultaneously measure variations in the inner voltage, temperature and humidity. The accuracy and reproducibility of the calibrated results obtained using the proposed micro sensors is excellent. The experimental results indicate that, at high current density and 100%RH or 75%RH, the relative humidity midstream and downstream saturates due to severe flooding. The performance of the PEM fuel cell can be stabilized using home-made flexible multi-functional micro sensors by the in-situ monitoring of local voltage, temperature and humidity distributions within it. PMID:22319361