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Sample records for situ molten metal

  1. From Oxygen Generation to Metals Production: In Situ Resource Utilization by Molten Oxide Electrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khetpal, Deepak; Ducret, Andrew C.; Sadoway, Donald R.

    2003-01-01

    For the exploration of other bodies in the solar system, electrochemical processing is arguably the most versatile technology for conversion of local resources into usable commodities: by electrolysis one can, in principle, produce (1) breathable oxygen, (2) silicon for the fabrication of solar cells, (3) various reactive metals for use as electrodes in advanced storage batteries, and (4) structural metals such as steel and aluminum. Even so, to date there has been no sustained effort to develop such processes, in part due to the inadequacy of the database. The objective here is to identify chemistries capable of sustaining molten oxide electrolysis in the cited applications and to examine the behavior of laboratory-scale cells designed to generate oxygen and to produce metal. The basic research includes the study of the underlying high-temperature physical chemistry of oxide melts representative of lunar regolith and of Martian soil. To move beyond empirical approaches to process development, the thermodynamic and transport properties of oxide melts are being studied to help set the limits of composition and temperature for the processing trials conducted in laboratory-scale electrolysis cells. The goal of this investigation is to deliver a working prototype cell that can use lunar regolith and Martian soil to produce breathable oxygen along with metal by-product. Additionally, the process can be generalized to permit adaptation to accommodate different feedstock chemistries, such as those that will be encountered on other bodies in the solar system. The expected results of this research include: (1) the identification of appropriate electrolyte chemistries; (2) the selection of candidate anode and cathode materials compatible with electrolytes named above; and (3) performance data from a laboratory-scale cell producing oxygen and metal. On the strength of these results it should be possible to assess the technical viability of molten oxide electrolysis for in

  2. Laser-produced plasma sensor-probe system for in situ molten metal analysis. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.W.

    1997-01-28

    The radically new methodology of in-situ laser-produced plasma (LPP) analysis of molten metals, as developed at Lehigh University, has been implemented into an LPP sensor-probe system, ready for deployment at steelmaking facilities. The system consists of an LPP sensor-probe head, which is immersed into the molten metal bath for the short duration of measurement, a control console, an umbilical cord connecting the above two units, and a support console providing coolants and pneumatic supports to the control console. The Department of Energy funding has supported Phase III-A and -B of the project in a joint sponsorship with AISI, CTU 5-2 Consortium, and Lehigh University. The objectives have been to: (1) implement the molten metal calibration protocol for the LPP analysis methodology; (2) implement the methodology in the form of a second-generation LPP sensor-probe system, which facilitates real-time process control by in-situ determination of elemental composition of molten steel alloys; (3) deploy such developmental systems in steelmaking facilities; (4) upgrade the systems to a third-generation design; and (5) effect technology transfer by selecting a manufacturer of commercial LPP sensor-probe systems. Four of the five objectives have been fully met. The deployment objective has been partially realized at present. The full LPP sensor-probe system has been put through trial immersion runs at a foundry, but its deployment at steelmaking facilities has progressed to a stage where various issues of financial and legal nature are being codified into a formal agreement between a host site and Lehigh University.

  3. Molten metal reactors

    DOEpatents

    Bingham, Dennis N; Klingler, Kerry M; Turner, Terry D; Wilding, Bruce M

    2013-11-05

    A molten metal reactor for converting a carbon material and steam into a gas comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide is disclosed. The reactor includes an interior crucible having a portion contained within an exterior crucible. The interior crucible includes an inlet and an outlet; the outlet leads to the exterior crucible and may comprise a diffuser. The exterior crucible may contain a molten alkaline metal compound. Contained between the exterior crucible and the interior crucible is at least one baffle.

  4. Supported molten-metal catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Datta, Ravindra; Singh, Ajeet; Halasz, Istvan; Serban, Manuela

    2001-01-01

    An entirely new class of catalysts called supported molten-metal catalysts, SMMC, which can replace some of the existing precious metal catalysts used in the production of fuels, commodity chemicals, and fine chemicals, as well as in combating pollution. SMMC are based on supporting ultra-thin films or micro-droplets of the relatively low-melting (<600.degree. C.), inexpensive, and abundant metals and semimetals from groups 1, 12, 13, 14, 15 and 16, of the periodic table, or their alloys and intermetallic compounds, on porous refractory supports, much like supported microcrystallites of the traditional solid metal catalysts. It thus provides orders of magnitude higher surface area than is obtainable in conventional reactors containing molten metals in pool form and also avoids corrosion. These have so far been the chief stumbling blocks in the application of molten metal catalysts.

  5. Molten metal injector system and method

    DOEpatents

    Meyer, Thomas N.; Kinosz, Michael J.; Bigler, Nicolas; Arnaud, Guy

    2003-04-01

    Disclosed is a molten metal injector system including a holder furnace, a casting mold supported above the holder furnace, and a molten metal injector supported from a bottom side of the mold. The holder furnace contains a supply of molten metal having a metal oxide film surface. The bottom side of the mold faces the holder furnace. The mold defines a mold cavity for receiving the molten metal from the holder furnace. The injector projects into the holder furnace and is in fluid communication with the mold cavity. The injector includes a piston positioned within a piston cavity defined by a cylinder for pumping the molten metal upward from the holder furnace and injecting the molten metal into the mold cavity under pressure. The piston and cylinder are at least partially submerged in the molten metal when the holder furnace contains the molten metal. The cylinder further includes a molten metal intake for receiving the molten metal into the piston cavity. The molten metal intake is located below the metal oxide film surface of the molten metal when the holder furnace contains the molten metal. A method of injecting molten metal into a mold cavity of a casting mold is also disclosed.

  6. Recirculating Molten Metal Supply System And Method

    DOEpatents

    Kinosz, Michael J.; Meyer, Thomas N.

    2003-07-01

    The melter furnace includes a heating chamber (16), a pump chamber (18), a degassing chamber (20), and a filter chamber (22). The pump chamber (18) is located adjacent the heating chamber (16) and houses a molten metal pump (30). The degassing chamber (20) is located adjacent and in fluid communication with the pump chamber (18), and houses a degassing mechanism (36). The filter chamber (22) is located adjacent and in fluid communication with the degassing chamber (20). The filter chamber (22) includes a molten metal filter (38). The melter furnace (12) is used to supply molten metal to an externally located holder furnace (14), which then recirculates molten metal back to the melter furnace (12).

  7. Method and apparatus for atomization and spraying of molten metals

    DOEpatents

    Hobson, D.O.; Alexeff, I.; Sikka, V.K.

    1988-07-19

    A method and device for dispersing molten metal into fine particulate spray, the method comprises applying an electric current through the molten metal and simultaneously applying a magnetic field to the molten metal in a plane perpendicular to the electric current, whereby the molten metal is caused to form into droplets at an angle perpendicular to both the electric current and the magnetic field. The device comprises a structure for providing a molten metal, appropriately arranged electrodes for applying an electric current through the molten metal, and a magnet for providing a magnetic field in a plane perpendicular to the electric current. 11 figs.

  8. Method and apparatus for atomization and spraying of molten metals

    DOEpatents

    Hobson, David O.; Alexeff, Igor; Sikka, Vinod K.

    1990-01-01

    A method and device for dispersing molten metal into fine particulate spray, the method comprises applying an electric current through the molten metal and simultaneously applying a magnetic field to the molten metal in a plane perpendicular to the electric current, whereby the molten metal is caused to form into droplets at an angle perpendicular to both the electric current and the magnetic field. The device comprises a structure for providing a molten metal, appropriately arranged electrodes for applying an electric current through the molten metal, and a magnet for providing a magnetic field in a plane perpendicular to the electric current.

  9. A method of measuring a molten metal liquid pool volume

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, G.V.; Carlson, N.M., Donaldson, A.D.

    1990-12-12

    A method of measuring a molten metal liquid pool volume and in particular molten titanium liquid pools, including the steps of (a) generating an ultrasonic wave at the surface of the molten metal liquid pool, (b) shining a light on the surface of a molten metal liquid pool, (c) detecting a change in the frequency of light, (d) detecting an ultrasonic wave echo at the surface of the molten metal liquid pool, and (e) computing the volume of the molten metal liquid. 3 figs.

  10. Studies of metals electroprocessing in molten salts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadoway, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    Fluid flow patterns in molten salt electrolytes were observed in order to determine how mass transport affects the morphology of the metal deposit. Studies conducted on the same metal, both in aqueous electrolytes in which coherent solid electrodeposits are produced, as well as in transparent molten salt electrolytes are described. Process variables such as current density and composition of the electrolyte are adjusted to change the morphology of the electrodeposit and, thus, to permit the study of the nature of electrolyte flow in relation to the quality of the electrodeposit.

  11. Molten metal processes reap profit from waste

    SciTech Connect

    Mather, R.; Steckler, D.; Kimmel, S.; Tanner, A.

    1996-05-01

    Over the past few years, a new tool has been added to the waste-processing arsenal. The use of a reactor filled with molten metal has been proven for dissociating a wide range of organic, organometallic, metallic and inorganic wastes into their constituent elements. Such reactors allow users to manipulate the solution chemistry and operating conditions inside, to reconfigure the dissociated elements into useful products, such as synthesis gas (hydrogen and carbon monoxide), HCl, metal alloys and ceramics, while ensuring high levels of environmental performance. A commercial-scale, molten metal processing unit is being constructed at Hoechst Celanese Corp.`s Bay City, Tex., chemical manufacturing plant. The unit with an estimated capital cost of $25 million, will be constructed, owned and operated by Molten Metal Technology, Inc., and will use MMT`s Catalytic Extraction processing. Once online, the facility will process wastes from Hoechst Celanese`s Gulf Coast plants and from other nearby chemical manufacturers. In addition to processing wastes, the facility will generate a syngas product that will be used onsite as a raw material during chemical manufacturing. Presented are the results of commercial-scale demonstrations using a prototype molten metal reactor for a wide range of industrial waste streams.

  12. Metals Electroprocessing in Molten Salts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadoway, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    The present study seeks to explain the poor quality of solid electrodeposits in molten salts through a consideration of the effects of fluid flow of the electrolyte. Transparent cells allow observation of electrolyte circulation by a laser schlieren optical technique during the electrodeposition of solid zinc from the molten salt electrolyte, ZnCl2 - LiCl-KCl. Experimental variables are current, density, electrolyte composition, and cell geometry. Based on the results of earlier electrodeposition studies as well as reports in the literature, these parameters are identified as having the primary influence on cell performance and deposit quality. Experiments are conducted to measure the fluid flow patterns and the electrochemical cell characteristics, and to correlate this information with the morphology of the solid electrodeposit produced. Specifically, cell voltage, cell current, characteristic time for dendrite evolution, and dendrite growth directions are noted. Their relationship to electrolyte flow patterns and the morphology of the resulting electrodeposit are derived. Results to date indicate that laser schlieren imaging is capable of revealing fluid flow patterns in a molten salt electrolyte.

  13. Method for recovering hydrocarbons from molten metal halides

    DOEpatents

    Pell, Melvyn B.

    1979-01-01

    In a process for hydrocracking heavy carbonaceous materials by contacting such carbonaceous materials with hydrogen in the presence of a molten metal halide catalyst to produce hydrocarbons having lower molecular weights and thereafter recovering the hydrocarbons so produced from the molten metal halide, an improvement comprising injecting into the spent molten metal halide, a liquid low-boiling hydrocarbon stream is disclosed.

  14. Process for recovering tritium from molten lithium metal

    DOEpatents

    Maroni, Victor A.

    1976-01-01

    Lithium tritide (LiT) is extracted from molten lithium metal that has been exposed to neutron irradiation for breeding tritium within a thermonuclear or fission reactor. The extraction is performed by intimately contacting the molten lithium metal with a molten lithium salt, for instance, lithium chloride - potassium chloride eutectic to distribute LiT between the salt and metal phases. The extracted tritium is recovered in gaseous form from the molten salt phase by a subsequent electrolytic or oxidation step.

  15. Metals processing control by counting molten metal droplets

    DOEpatents

    Schlienger, Eric; Robertson, Joanna M.; Melgaard, David; Shelmidine, Gregory J.; Van Den Avyle, James A.

    2000-01-01

    Apparatus and method for controlling metals processing (e.g., ESR) by melting a metal ingot and counting molten metal droplets during melting. An approximate amount of metal in each droplet is determined, and a melt rate is computed therefrom. Impedance of the melting circuit is monitored, such as by calculating by root mean square a voltage and current of the circuit and dividing the calculated current into the calculated voltage. Analysis of the impedance signal is performed to look for a trace characteristic of formation of a molten metal droplet, such as by examining skew rate, curvature, or a higher moment.

  16. Supported Molten Metal Membranes for Hydrogen Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, Ravindra; Ma, Yi Hua; Yen, Pei-Shan; Deveau, Nicholas; Fishtik, Ilie; Mardilovich, Ivan

    2013-09-30

    We describe here our results on the feasibility of a novel dense metal membrane for hydrogen separation: Supported Molten Metal Membrane, or SMMM.1 The goal in this work was to develop these new membranes based on supporting thin films of low-melting, non- precious group metals, e.g., tin (Sn), indium (In), gallium (Ga), or their alloys, to provide a flux and selectivity of hydrogen that rivals the conventional but substantially more expensive palladium (Pd) or Pd alloy membranes, which are susceptible to poisoning by the many species in the coal-derived syngas, and further possess inadequate stability and limited operating temperature range. The novelty of the technology presented numerous challenges during the course of this project, however, mainly in the selection of appropriate supports, and in the fabrication of a stable membrane. While the wetting instability of the SMMM remains an issue, we did develop an adequate understanding of the interaction between molten metal films with porous supports that we were able to find appropriate supports. Thus, our preliminary results indicate that the Ga/SiC SMMM at 550 ºC has a permeance that is an order of magnitude higher than that of Pd, and exceeds the 2015 DOE target. To make practical SMM membranes, however, further improving the stability of the molten metal membrane is the next goal. For this, it is important to better understand the change in molten metal surface tension and contact angle as a function of temperature and gas-phase composition. A thermodynamic theory was, thus, developed, that is not only able to explain this change in the liquid-gas surface tension, but also the change in the solid-liquid surface tension as well as the contact angle. This fundamental understanding has allowed us to determine design characteristics to maintain stability in the face of changing gas composition. These designs are being developed. For further progress, it is also important to understand the nature of solution and

  17. Molten metal holder furnace and casting system incorporating the molten metal holder furnace

    DOEpatents

    Kinosz, Michael J.; Meyer, Thomas N.

    2003-02-11

    A bottom heated holder furnace (12) for containing a supply of molten metal includes a storage vessel (30) having sidewalls (32) and a bottom wall (34) defining a molten metal receiving chamber (36). A furnace insulating layer (42) lines the molten metal receiving chamber (36). A thermally conductive heat exchanger block (54) is located at the bottom of the molten metal receiving chamber (36) for heating the supply of molten metal. The heat exchanger block (54) includes a bottom face (65), side faces (66), and a top face (67). The heat exchanger block (54) includes a plurality of electrical heaters (70) extending therein and projecting outward from at least one of the faces of the heat exchanger block (54), and further extending through the furnace insulating layer (42) and one of the sidewalls (32) of the storage vessel (30) for connection to a source of electrical power. A sealing layer (50) covers the bottom face (65) and side faces (66) of the heat exchanger block (54) such that the heat exchanger block (54) is substantially separated from contact with the furnace insulating layer (42).

  18. Applications of molten salts in reactive metals processing

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, B.; Olson, D.L.; Averill, W.A.

    1993-12-31

    Pyrochemical processes using molten salts provide a unique opportunity for the extraction and refining of many reactive and valuable metals either directly from the beneficiated ore or from other process effluent that contain reactive metal compounds. This research program is aimed at developing a process for the production and recovery of reactive and valuable metals, such as zinc, tin, lead, bismuth and silver, in a hybrid reactor combining electrolytic production of the calcium reductant and in-situ utilization of this reductant for pyrochemical reduction of the metal compounds, such as halide or oxides. The process is equally suitable for producing other low melting metals, such as cadmium and antimony. The cell is typically operated below 1000C temperature. Attempts have been made to produce silver, lead, bismuth, tin and cerium by calciothermic reduction in a molten salt media. In a separate effort, calcium has been produced by an electrolytic dissociation of lime in a calcium chloride medium. The most important characteristic of the hybrid technology is its ability to produce metals under ``zero-waste`` conditions.

  19. Electrochemical cell utilizing molten alkali metal electrode-reactant

    DOEpatents

    Virkar, Anil V.; Miller, Gerald R.

    1983-11-04

    An improved electrochemical cell comprising an additive-modified molten alkali metal electrode-reactant and/or electrolyte is disclosed. Various electrochemical cells employing a molten alkali metal, e.g., sodium, electrode in contact with a cationically conductive ceramic membrane experience a lower resistance and a lower temperature coefficient of resistance whenever small amounts of selenium are present at the interface of the electrolyte and the molten alkali metal. Further, cells having small amounts of selenium present at the electrolyte-molten metal interface exhibit less degradation of the electrolyte under long term cycling conditions.

  20. Micro encapsulation in situ with super permeating molten wax

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, E.

    2007-07-01

    A new class of grout material based on molten wax offers a dramatic improvement in permeation grouting performance. This new material makes a perfect in situ containment of buried radioactive waste both feasible and cost effective. This paper describes various ways the material can be used to isolate buried waste in situ. Potential applications described in the paper include buried radioactive waste in deep trenches, deep shafts, Infiltration trenches, and large buried objects. Use of molten wax for retrieval of waste is also discussed. Wax can also be used for retrieval of air sensitive materials or drummed waste. This paper provides an analysis of the methods of application and the expected performance and cost of several potential projects. (authors)

  1. Application of molten salts in pyrochemical processing of reactive metals

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, B.; Olson, D.L. . Kroll Inst. for Extractive Metallurgy); Averill, W.A. . Rocky Flats Plant)

    1992-01-01

    Various mixes of chloride and fluoride salts are used as the media for conducting pyrochemical processes in the production and purification of reactive metals. These processes generate a significant amount of contaminated waste that has to be treated for recycling or disposal. Molten calcium chloride based salt systems have been used in this work to electrolytically regenerate calcium metal from calcium oxide for the in situ reduction of reactive metal oxides. The recovery of calcium is characterized by the process efficiency to overcome back reactions in the electrowinning cell. A thermodynamic analysis, based on fundamental rate theory, has been performed to understand the process parameters controlling the metal deposition, rate, behavior of the ceramic anode-sheath and influence of the back-reactions. It has been observed that the deposition of calcium is dependent on the ionic diffusion through the sheath. It has also been evidenced that the recovered calcium is completely lost through the back-reactions in the absence of a sheath. A practical scenario has also been presented where the electrowon metal can be used in situ as a reductant to reduce another reactive metal oxide.

  2. Pump for molten metal or other fluid

    DOEpatents

    Horton, James A.; Brown, Donald L.

    1994-01-01

    A pump having no moving parts which can be used to pump high temperature molten metal or other fluids in a vacuum or low pressure environment, and a method for pumping such fluids. The pump combines elements of a bubble pump with a trap which isolates the vacuum or low pressure region from the gas used to create the bubbles. When used in a vacuum the trap prevents the pumping gas from escaping into the isolated region and thereby reducing the quality of the vacuum. The pump includes a channel in which a pumping gas is forced under pressure into a cavity where bubbles are formed. The cavity is in contact with a reservoir which contains the molten metal or other fluid which is to be pumped. The bubbles rise up into a column (or pump tube) carrying the fluid with them. At the top of the column is located a deflector which causes the bubbles to burst and the drops of pumped fluid to fall into a trap. The fluid accumulates in the trap, eventually forcing its way to an outlet. A roughing pump can be used to withdraw the pumping gas from the top of the column and assist with maintaining the vacuum or low pressure environment.

  3. Pendant-Drop Surface-Tension Measurement On Molten Metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Man, Kin Fung; Thiessen, David

    1996-01-01

    Method of measuring surface tension of molten metal based on pendant-drop method implemented in quasi-containerless manner and augmented with digital processing of image data. Electrons bombard lower end of sample rod in vacuum, generating hanging drop of molten metal. Surface tension of drop computed from its shape. Technique minimizes effects of contamination.

  4. Observations of impact-induced molten metal-silicate partitioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowan, Linda R.; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1994-01-01

    Observations of molten mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB)-molybdenum (Mo) interactions produced by shock experiments provide insight into impact and differentiation processes involving metal-silicate partitioning. Analysis of fragments recovered from experiments (achieving MORB liquid shock pressures from 0.8 to 6 GPa) revealed significant changes in the composition of the MORB and Mo due to reaction of the silicate and metal liquids on a short time scale (less than 13 s). The FeO concentration of the shocked liquid decreases systematically with increasing pressure. In fact, the most highly shocked liquid (6 GPa) contains only 0.1 wt% FeO compared to an initial concentration of 9 wt% in the MORB. We infer from the presence of micrometer-sized Fe-, Si- and Mo-rich metallic spheres in the shocked glass that the Fe and Si oxides in the MORB were reduced in an estimated oxygen fugacity of 10(exp -17) bar and subsequently alloyed with the Mo. The in-situ reduction of FeO in the shocked molten basalt implies that shock-induced reduction of impact melt should be considered a viable mechanism for the formation of metallic phases. Similar metallic phases may form during impact accretion of planets and in impacted material found on the lunar surface and near terrestrial impact craters. In particular, the minute, isolated Fe particles found in lunar soils may have formed by such a process. Furthermore, the metallic spheres within the shocked glass have a globular texture similar to the textures of metallic spheroids from lunar samples and the estimated, slow cooling rate of less than or equal to 140 C/s for our spheres is consistent with the interpretation that the lunar spheroids formed by slow cooling within a melted target.

  5. Pressurized tundish for controlling a continuous flow of molten metal

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Thomas W.; Hamill, Jr., Paul E.; Ozgu, Mustafa R.; Padfield, Ralph C.; Rego, Donovan N.; Brita, Guido P.

    1990-01-01

    A pressurized tundish for controlling a continous flow of molten metal characterized by having a pair of principal compartments, one being essentially unpressurized and receiving molten metal introduced thereto, and the other being adapted for maintaining a controlled gaseous pressure over the surface of the fluid metal therein, whereby, by controlling the pressure within the pressurized chamber, metal exiting from the tundish is made to flow continually and at a controlled rate.

  6. Pressurized tundish for controlling a continuous flow of molten metal

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, T.W.; Hamill, P.E. Jr.; Ozgu, M.R.; Padfield, R.C.; Rego, D.N.; Brita, G.P.

    1990-07-24

    A pressurized tundish for controlling a continuous flow of molten metal is characterized by having a pair of principal compartments, one being essentially unpressurized and receiving molten metal introduced thereto, and the other being adapted for maintaining a controlled gaseous pressure over the surface of the fluid metal therein, whereby, by controlling the pressure within the pressurized chamber, metal exiting from the tundish is made to flow continually and at a controlled rate. 1 fig.

  7. Casting Apparatus Including A Gas Driven Molten Metal Injector And Method

    DOEpatents

    Trudel, David R.; Meyer, Thomas N.; Kinosz, Michael J.; Arnaud, Guy; Bigler, Nicolas

    2003-06-17

    The filtering molten metal injector system includes a holder furnace, a casting mold supported above the holder furnace, and at least one molten metal injector supported from a bottom side of the casting mold. The holder furnace contains a supply of molten metal. The mold defines a mold cavity for receiving the molten metal from the holder furnace. The molten metal injector projects into the holder furnace. The molten metal injector includes a cylinder defining a piston cavity housing a reciprocating piston for pumping the molten metal upward from the holder furnace to the mold cavity. The cylinder and piston are at least partially submerged in the molten metal when the holder furnace contains the molten metal. The cylinder or the piston includes a molten metal intake for receiving the molten metal into the piston cavity when the holder furnace contains molten metal. A conduit connects the piston cavity to the mold cavity. A molten metal filter is located in the conduit for filtering the molten metal passing through the conduit during the reciprocating movement of the piston. The molten metal intake may be a valve connected to the cylinder, a gap formed between the piston and an open end of the cylinder, an aperture defined in the sidewall of the cylinder, or a ball check valve incorporated into the piston. A second molten metal filter preferably covers the molten metal intake to the injector.

  8. WORKER REMOVING SLAG FROM THE MOLTEN METAL BATH IN THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    WORKER REMOVING SLAG FROM THE MOLTEN METAL BATH IN THE ELECTRIC FURNACE AFTER ADDING A CHEMICAL COAGULANT TO FORCE IT TO THE SURFACE. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Melting, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  9. Molten metal reactor and method of forming hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide using the molten alkaline metal reactor

    DOEpatents

    Bingham, Dennis N.; Klingler, Kerry M.; Turner, Terry D.; Wilding, Bruce M.

    2012-11-13

    A molten metal reactor for converting a carbon material and steam into a gas comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide is disclosed. The reactor includes an interior crucible having a portion contained within an exterior crucible. The interior crucible includes an inlet and an outlet; the outlet leads to the exterior crucible and may comprise a diffuser. The exterior crucible may contain a molten alkaline metal compound. Contained between the exterior crucible and the interior crucible is at least one baffle.

  10. 30 CFR 57.16013 - Working with molten metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Working with molten metal. 57.16013 Section 57.16013 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES...

  11. 30 CFR 57.16013 - Working with molten metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Working with molten metal. 57.16013 Section 57.16013 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES...

  12. 30 CFR 56.16013 - Working with molten metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Working with molten metal. 56.16013 Section 56.16013 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Materials...

  13. 30 CFR 56.16013 - Working with molten metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Working with molten metal. 56.16013 Section 56.16013 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Materials...

  14. 30 CFR 57.16013 - Working with molten metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Working with molten metal. 57.16013 Section 57.16013 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES...

  15. 30 CFR 56.16013 - Working with molten metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Working with molten metal. 56.16013 Section 56.16013 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Materials...

  16. 30 CFR 56.16013 - Working with molten metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Working with molten metal. 56.16013 Section 56.16013 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Materials...

  17. 30 CFR 57.16013 - Working with molten metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Working with molten metal. 57.16013 Section 57.16013 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES...

  18. 30 CFR 56.16013 - Working with molten metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Working with molten metal. 56.16013 Section 56.16013 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Materials...

  19. 30 CFR 57.16013 - Working with molten metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Working with molten metal. 57.16013 Section 57.16013 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES...

  20. Liquid-metal embrittlement of refractory metals by molten plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Lesuer, D.R.; Bergin, J.B.; McInturff, S.A.; Kuhn, B.A.

    1980-07-01

    Embrittlement by molten plutonium of the refractory metals and alloys W-25 wt % Re, tantalum, molybdenum, and Ta-10 wt % W was studied. At 900/sup 0/C and a strain rate of 10/sup -4/ s/sup -1/, the materials tested may be ranked in order of decreasing susceptibility to liquid-plutonium embrittlement as follows: molybdenum, W-25 wt % Re, Ta-10 wt % W, and tantalum. These materials exhibited a wide range in susceptibility. Embrittlement was found to exhibit a high degree of temperature and strain-rate dependence, and we present arguments that strongly support a stress-assisted, intergranular, liquid-metal corrosion mechanism. We also believe microstructure plays a key role in the extent of embrittlement. In the case of W-25 wt % Re, we have determined that a dealloying corrosion takes place in which rhenium is selectively withdrawn from the alloy.

  1. Supported Molten Metal Catalysis. A New Class of Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Ravindra Datta; Ajeet Singh; Manuela Serban; Istvan Halasz

    2006-06-02

    We describe a new class of heterogeneous catalysts called supported molten metal catalysis (SMMC), in which molten metal catalysts are dispersed as nanodroplets on the surface of porous supports, allowing much larger active surface area than is possible in conventional contacting techniques for catalytic metals that are molten under reaction conditions, thus greatly enhancing their activity and potential utility. Specific examples of different types of reactions are provided to demonstrate the broad applicability of the technique in designing active, selective, and stable new catalysts. It is shown that dispersing the molten metal on a support in the suggested manner can enhance the rate of a reaction by three to four orders of magnitude as a result of the concomitant increase in the active surface area. New reaction examples include {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} supported molten Te (melting point 450 C) and Ga (MP 30 C) catalysts for bifunctional methylcyclohexane dehydrogenation. These catalysts provide activity similar to conventional Pt-based catalysts for this with better resistance to coking. In addition, results are described for a controlled pore glass supported molten In (MP 157 C) catalyst for the selective catalytic reduction of NO with ethanol in the presence of water, demonstrating activities superior to conventional catalysts for this reaction. A discussion is also provided on the characterization of the active surface area and dispersion of these novel supported catalysts. It is clear based on the results described that the development of new active and selective supported molten metal catalysts for practical applications is entirely plausible.

  2. Advances in Molten Oxide Electrolysis for the Production of Oxygen and Metals from Lunar Regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadoway, Donald R.; Sirk, Aislinn; Sibille, Laurent; Melendez, Orlando; Lueck, Dale; Curreri, Peter; Dominquez, Jesus; Whitlow, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    As part of an In-Situ Resource Utilization infrastructure to sustain long term-human presence on the lunar surface, the production of oxygen and metals by electrolysis of lunar regolith has been the subject of major scrutiny. There is a reasonably large body of literature characterizing the candidate solvent electrolytes, including ionic liquids, molten salts, fluxed oxides, and pure molten regolith itself. In the light of this information and in consideration of available electrolytic technologies, the authors have determined that direct molten oxide electrolysis at temperatures of approx 1600 C is the most promising avenue for further development. Results from ongoing studies as well as those of previous workers will be presented. Topics include materials selection and testing, electrode stability, gas capture and analysis, and cell operation during feeding and tapping.

  3. Molten metal feed system controlled with a traveling magnetic field

    DOEpatents

    Praeg, Walter F.

    1991-01-01

    A continuous metal casting system in which the feed of molten metal is controlled by means of a linear induction motor capable of producing a magnetic traveling wave in a duct that connects a reservoir of molten metal to a caster. The linear induction motor produces a traveling magnetic wave in the duct in opposition to the pressure exerted by the head of molten metal in the reservoir so that p.sub.c =p.sub.g -p.sub.m where p.sub.c is the desired pressure in the caster, p.sub.g is the gravitational pressure in the duct exerted by the force of the head of molten metal in the reservoir, and p.sub.m is the electromagnetic pressure exerted by the force of the magnetic field traveling wave produced by the linear induction motor. The invention also includes feedback loops to the linear induction motor to control the casting pressure in response to measured characteristics of the metal being cast.

  4. Electrochemical devices utilizing molten alkali metal electrode-reactant

    DOEpatents

    Hitchcock, D.C.; Mailhe, C.C.; De Jonghe, L.C.

    1985-07-10

    Electrochemical cells are provided with a reactive metal to reduce the oxide of the alkali metal electrode-reactant. Cells employing a molten alkali metal electrode, e.g., sodium, in contact with a ceramic electrolyte, which is a conductor of the ions of the alkali metal forming the electrode, exhibit a lower resistance when a reactive metal, e.g., vanadium, is allowed to react with and reduce the alkali metal oxide. Such cells exhibit less degradation of the electrolyte and of the glass seals often used to joining the electrolyte to the other components of the cell under cycling conditions.

  5. Electrochemical devices utilizing molten alkali metal electrode-reactant

    DOEpatents

    Hitchcock, David C.; Mailhe, Catherine C.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    1986-01-01

    Electrochemical cells are provided with a reactive metal to reduce the oxide of the alkali metal electrode-reactant. Cells employing a molten alkali metal electrode, e.g., sodium, in contact with a ceramic electrolyte, which is a conductor of the ions of the alkali metal forming the electrode, exhibit a lower resistance when a reactive metal, e.g., vanadium, is allowed to react with and reduce the alkali metal oxide. Such cells exhibit less degradation of the electrolyte and of the glass seals often used to joining the electrolyte to the other components of the cell under cycling conditions.

  6. Molten metal containment vessel with rare earth oxysulfide protective coating thereon and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Krikorian, Oscar H.; Curtis, Paul G.

    1992-01-01

    An improved molten metal containment vessel is disclosed in which wetting of the vessel's inner wall surfaces by molten metal is inhibited by coating at least the inner surfaces of the containment vessel with one or more rare earth oxysulfide or rare earth sulfide compounds to inhibit wetting and or adherence by the molten metal to the surfaces of the containment vessel.

  7. MOLTEN METAL FROM ELECTRIC MELTING FURNACE IS TRANSFERRED THROUGH RUNNER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MOLTEN METAL FROM ELECTRIC MELTING FURNACE IS TRANSFERRED THROUGH RUNNER BOX TO HOLDING FURNACE PRIOR TO POURING. VIEW FROM BEHIND "NORTH STATION" IN CAST SHOP. THE RUNNER BOX MUST BE HEATED PRIOR TO THE TRANSFER. - American Brass Foundry, 70 Sayre Street, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  8. Two techniques enable sampling of filtered and unfiltered molten metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burris, L., Jr.; Pierce, R. D.; Tobias, K. R.; Winsch, I. O.

    1967-01-01

    Filtered samples of molten metals are obtained by filtering through a plug of porous material fitted in the end of a sample tube, and unfiltered samples are obtained by using a capillary-tube extension rod with a perforated bucket. With these methods there are no sampling errors or loss of liquid.

  9. Experimental investigation of molten metal freezing on to a structure

    SciTech Connect

    Mizanur Rahman, M.; Hino, Tomohiko; Morita, Koji; Matsumoto, Tatsuya; Nakagawa, Kiyoshi; Fukuda, Kenji; Maschek, Werner

    2007-10-15

    During core disruptive accidents (CDAs) of Liquid Metal Reactors (LMRs), it is important to understand the freezing phenomena of molten metal, which may prevent fuel dispersal and subsequent shutdown. The present paper describes the freezing behavior of molten metal during interaction with a structure with a view to the safety of LMRs. In this study, Wood's metal (melting point 78.8 C) was used as a simulant melt, while stainless steel and copper were used as freezing structures. A series of simulation experiments was conducted to study the freezing behavior of Wood's metal during pouring on to the freezing structures immersed in a coolant. In the experiments, simulant melt was poured into a stainless steel tube and finally ejected into a coolant through a nozzle so as to observe the freezing behavior of the molten metal. The penetration length and width were measured in the air cooled experiments, whereas penetration length and the proportion of adhering frozen metal were measured in water coolant experiment. The melt flow and distribution were observed in both types of experiment using a high-speed video camera. Distinct freezing modes were observed in the water coolant experiments, whereas only one freezing mode with a longer melt penetration was found in air coolant experiments. The present result will be utilized to create a relevant database for the verification of reactor safety analysis codes. (author)

  10. Electromagnetic confinement for vertical casting or containing molten metal

    DOEpatents

    Lari, Robert J.; Praeg, Walter F.; Turner, Larry R.

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus and method adapted to confine a molten metal to a region by means of an alternating electromagnetic field. As adapted for use in the present invention, the alternating electromagnetic field given by B.sub.y =(2.mu..sub.o .rho.gy).sup.1/2 (where B.sub.y is the vertical component of the magnetic field generated by the magnet at the boundary of the region; y is the distance measured downward form the top of the region, .rho. is the metal density, g is the acceleration of gravity and .mu..sub.o is the permeability of free space) induces eddy currents in the molten metal which interact with the magnetic field to retain the molten metal with a vertical boudnary. As applied to an apparatus for the continuous casting of metal sheets or rods, metal in liquid form can be continuously introduced into the region defined by the magnetic field, solidified and conveyed away from the magnetic field in solid form in a continuous process.

  11. Plasma-sprayed ceramic coatings for protection against molten metal.

    SciTech Connect

    Hollis, K. J.; Peters, M. I.; Bartram, B. D.

    2002-01-01

    Molten metal environments pose a special demand on materials due to the high temperature corrosion effects and thermal expansion mismatch induced stress effects. A solution that has been successfully employed is the use of a base material for the mechanical strength and a coating material for the chemical compatibility with the molten metal. The work described here used such an approach coating tungsten rods with aluminum oxide, yttria-stabilized zirconia, yttrium oxide, and erbium oxide deposited by atmospheric plasma spraying. The ceramic materials were deposited under varying conditions to produce different structures. Measurement of particle characteristics was performed to correlate to material properties. The coatings were tested in a thermal cycling environment to simulate the metal melting cycle expected in service. Results of the testing indicate the effect of material composition and spray conditions on the thermal cycle crack resistance of the coatings.

  12. Casting Apparatus Including A Gas Driven Molten Metal Injector And Method

    DOEpatents

    Meyer, Thomas N.

    2004-06-01

    The casting apparatus (50) includes a holding vessel (10) for containing a supply of molten metal (12) and a casting mold (52) located above the holding vessel (10) and having a casting cavity (54). A molten metal injector (14) extends into the holding vessel (10) and is at least partially immersed in the molten metal (12) in the holding vessel (10). The molten metal injector (14) is in fluid communication with the casting cavity (54). The molten metal injector (14) has an injector body (16) defining an inlet opening (24) for receiving molten metal into the injector body (16). A gas pressurization source (38) is in fluid communication with the injector body (16) for cyclically pressurizing the injector body (16) and inducing molten metal to flow from the injector body (16) to the casting cavity (54). An inlet valve (42) is located in the inlet opening (24) in the injector body (16) for filling molten metal into the injector body (16). The inlet valve (42) is configured to prevent outflow of molten metal from the injector body (16) during pressurization and permit inflow of molten metal into the injector body (16) after pressurization. The inlet valve (42) has an inlet valve actuator (44) located above the surface of the supply of molten metal (12) and is operatively connected to the inlet valve (42) for operating the inlet valve (42) between open and closed positions.

  13. MAG-GATE System for Molten metal Flow Control

    SciTech Connect

    Richard D. Nathenson, P.E.

    2004-05-15

    The need for improved active flow control has been recognized as part of the Steel Industry Technology Roadmap. Under TRP 9808 for the American Iron and Steel Institute and the Department of Energy, Concept Engineering Group Inc. has developed MAG-GATE{trademark}, an electromagnetic system for active molten metal flow control. Two hot steel tests were successfully conducted in 2003 at the Whemco Foundry Division, Midland, PA. Approximately 110,000 pounds of 0.2% carbon steel were poured through the device subject to electromagnetic flow control. Excellent agreement between predicted and actual flow control was found. A survey of the molten metal flow control practices at 100 continuous casters in North America was also conducted in 2003. This report summarizes the results of the development program to date. Preliminary designs are described for the next step of a beta test at an operating billet/bloom or slab caster.

  14. In situ observation and analysis of ultrasonic capillary effect in molten aluminium.

    PubMed

    Tzanakis, I; Xu, W W; Eskin, D G; Lee, P D; Kotsovinos, N

    2015-11-01

    An in situ synchrotron radiographic study of a molten Al-10 wt% Cu alloy under the influence of an external ultrasonic field was carried out using the Diamond-Manchester Branchline pink X-ray imaging at the Diamond Light Source in UK. A bespoke test rig was used, consisting of an acoustic transducer with a titanium sonotrode coupled with a PID-controlled resistance furnace. An ultrasonic frequency of 30 kHz, with a peak to peak amplitude at 140 microns, was used, producing a pressure output of 16.9 MPa at the radiation surface of the 1-mm diameter sonotrode. This allowed quantification of not only the cavitation bubble formation and collapse, but there was also evidence of the previously hypothesised ultrasonic capillary effect (UCE), providing the first direct observations of this phenomenon in a molten metallic alloy. This was achieved by quantifying the re-filling of a pre-existing groove in the shape of a tube (which acted as a micro-capillary channel) formed by the oxide envelope of the liquid sample. Analytical solutions of the flow suggest that the filling process, which took place in very small timescales, was related to micro-jetting from the collapsing cavitation bubbles. In addition, a secondary mechanism of liquid penetration through the groove, which is related with the density distribution of the oxides inside the groove, and practically to the filtration of aluminium melt from oxides, was revealed. The observation of the almost instantaneous re-filling of a micro-capillary channel with the metallic melt supports the hypothesised sono-capillary effect in technologically important liquids other than water, like metallic alloys with substantially higher surface tension and density. PMID:26186822

  15. URANIUM BISMUTHIDE DISPERSION IN MOLTEN METAL

    DOEpatents

    Teitel, R.J.

    1959-10-27

    The formation of intermetallic bismuth compounds of thorium or uranium dispersed in a liquid media containing bismuth and lead is described. A bismuthide of uranium dispersed in a liquid metal medium is formed by dissolving uranium in composition of lead and bismuth containing less than 80% lead and lowering the temperature of the composition to a temperature below the point at which the solubility of uranium is exceeded and above the melting point of the composition.

  16. Electrolytic production of neodymium metal from a molten chloride electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, M.F.; Murphy, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that the U.S. Bureau of Mines conducted experiments on electrowinning of neodymium metal by using a molten-metal cathode at 650{degrees} C and an electrolyte of 50 mol pet NdCl, (neodymium chloride) and 50 mol pet KCl (potassium chloride). The molten-metal cathodes were alloys of magnesium and zinc or magnesium and cadmium. Current efficiencies were 90 pct with a Mg-Zn cathode and 80 pct with a Mg-Cd cathode. The Mg-Cd cathode was easily separated from the electrolyte. In contrast, the Mg-Zn cathode tended to mix with the electrolyte, making separation difficult. The cathode metals were separated from the neodymium by distillation at 1,100{degrees} C under a vacuum of 10{sup {minus}4} torr. Neodymium metal of 99.9 + purity was recovered from the Mg-Cd alloy cathode after 30 min distillation time. The neodymium recovered from the Mg-Zn system contained almost 2 pct Zn after vacuum distillation. Continuous operation using the Mg-Cd alloy cathode was demonstrated.

  17. Laser Acoustic Molten Metal Depth Sensing in Titanium

    SciTech Connect

    J. B. Walter; K. L. Telschow; R. E. Haun

    1999-09-22

    A noncontacting ultrasonic method has been investigated for probing the solidification front in molten titanium for the purposes of profiling the channel depth in a plasma hearth re-melter. The method, known as Laser Ultrasonics, utilized a pulsed laser for generation of ultrasonic waves at the surface of a molten metal pool. The ultrasonic waves propagated into the liquid titanium reflected from the solidification front and the boundaries of the solid plug. A Fabry-Perot interferometer, driven by a second laser, demodulated the small displacements caused by the ultrasonic wave motion at the liquid surface. The method and results of measurements taken within a small research plasma melting furnace will be described. Successful results were obtained even directly beneath the plasma arc using this all-optical approach.

  18. Burning molten metallic spheres: One class of ball lightning?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephan, Karl D.; Massey, Nathan

    2008-08-01

    Abrahamson and Dinniss [2000. Ball lightning caused by oxidation of nanoparticle networks from normal lightning strikes on soil. Nature 403, 519-521] proposed a theory of ball lighting in which silicon nanoparticles undergo slow oxidation and emit light. Paiva et al. [2007. Production of ball-lightning-like luminous balls by electrical discharges in silicon. Physical Review Letters 98, 048501] reported that an electric arc to silicon produced long-lasting luminous white spheres showing many characteristics of ball lightning. We show experimentally that these consist of burning molten silicon spheres with diameters in the 0.1-1 mm range. The evidence of our experiments leads us to propose that a subset of ball lightning events may consist of macro-scale molten spheres of burning metallic materials likely to be ejected from a conventional lightning strike to earth.

  19. Laser Acoustic Molten Metal Depth Sensing in Titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, John Bradley; Telschow, Kenneth Louis; Haun, R.E.

    1999-08-01

    A noncontacting ultrasonic method has been investigated for probing the solidification front in molten titanium for the purposes of profiling the channel depth in plasma hearth re-melter. The method, known as Laser Ultrasonics, utilized a pulsed laser for generation of ultrasonic waves at the surface of a molten metal pool. The ultrasonic waves propagated into the liquid titanium reflected from the solidification front and the boundaries of the solid plug. A Fabry-Perot interferometer, driven by a second laser, demodulated the small displacements caused by the ultrasonic wave motion at the liquid surface. The method and results of measurements taken within a small research plasma melting furnace will be described. Successful results were obtained even directly beneath the plasma arc using this all optical approach.

  20. Fragment structure from vapor explosions during the impact of molten metal droplets into a liquid pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouraytem, Nadia; Li, Er Qiang; Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur

    2015-11-01

    High-speed video imaging is used in order to look at the impact of a molten metal drop falling into a liquid pool. The interaction regimes are three: film boiling, nucleate boiling or vapor explosion. Following the vapor explosion, the metal fragments and different textures are observed. It was seen that, using a tin alloy, a porous structure results whereas using a distinctive eutectic metal, Field's metal, micro beads are formed. Different parameters such as the metal type, molten metal temperature, pool surface tension and pool boiling temperature have been altered in order to assess the role they play on the explosion dynamics and the molten metal's by product.

  1. Systems to Control Molten Metal Transfer in Arc Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filonov, A. V.; Kryukov, A. V.; Gusarov, D. E.

    2015-09-01

    The paper analyzes the systems used for controlling molten wire metal droplets during the arc welding process in shielding gases. The variations for implementing the relevant systems are given, with the positive and negative aspects of such implementation taken into account. Electrical systems are currently investigated to the fullest extent possible and implemented in different power sources for pulsed welding arc. Mechanical systems are represented by different types of feeders that provide the pulsed wire feeding process. The feed mechanisms driven by electric motors and electromagnets are analyzed. In addition to the mechanical and electrical systems, the examples of combined control systems are given.

  2. Controlled Molten Metal Droplet Deposition for Net-Form Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orme, Melissa; Michaelis, Matthew; Smith, Robert

    2001-11-01

    Molten metal droplets generated from capillary stream breakup are employed as the deposition element in a droplet-based net-form manufacturing technique that is under development at UCI. The metallic droplets are electrostatically charged at the time of generation and are subsequently deflected onto a substrate by passing them through an electric field. As a showcase to this new technique, we have employed various combinations of electrostatic charging and substrate motion in order to net-form manufacture rectangular components with both thick (2.8 mm) and thin (0.6 mm) walls, tubular components with clover cross-sections, and intriguing metallic braids up to 3.0 meters in length.

  3. Solid oxide membrane-assisted controllable electrolytic fabrication of metal carbides in molten salt.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xingli; Zheng, Kai; Lu, Xionggang; Xu, Qian; Zhou, Zhongfu

    2016-08-15

    Silicon carbide (SiC), titanium carbide (TiC), zirconium carbide (ZrC), and tantalum carbide (TaC) have been electrochemically produced directly from their corresponding stoichiometric metal oxides/carbon (MOx/C) precursors by electrodeoxidation in molten calcium chloride (CaCl2). An assembled yttria stabilized zirconia solid oxide membrane (SOM)-based anode was employed to control the electrodeoxidation process. The SOM-assisted controllable electrochemical process was carried out in molten CaCl2 at 1000 °C with a potential of 3.5 to 4.0 V. The reaction mechanism of the electrochemical production process and the characteristics of these produced metal carbides (MCs) were systematically investigated. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy analyses clearly identify that SiC, TiC, ZrC, and TaC carbides can be facilely fabricated. SiC carbide can be controlled to form a homogeneous nanowire structure, while the morphologies of TiC, ZrC, and TaC carbides exhibit porous nodular structures with micro/nanoscale particles. The complex chemical/electrochemical reaction processes including the compounding, electrodeoxidation, dissolution-electrodeposition, and in situ carbonization processes in molten CaCl2 are also discussed. The present results preliminarily demonstrate that the molten salt-based SOM-assisted electrodeoxidation process has the potential to be used for the facile and controllable electrodeoxidation of MOx/C precursors to micro/nanostructured MCs, which can potentially be used for various applications. PMID:27195950

  4. Solid oxide membrane-assisted controllable electrolytic fabrication of metal carbides in molten salt.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xingli; Zheng, Kai; Lu, Xionggang; Xu, Qian; Zhou, Zhongfu

    2016-08-15

    Silicon carbide (SiC), titanium carbide (TiC), zirconium carbide (ZrC), and tantalum carbide (TaC) have been electrochemically produced directly from their corresponding stoichiometric metal oxides/carbon (MOx/C) precursors by electrodeoxidation in molten calcium chloride (CaCl2). An assembled yttria stabilized zirconia solid oxide membrane (SOM)-based anode was employed to control the electrodeoxidation process. The SOM-assisted controllable electrochemical process was carried out in molten CaCl2 at 1000 °C with a potential of 3.5 to 4.0 V. The reaction mechanism of the electrochemical production process and the characteristics of these produced metal carbides (MCs) were systematically investigated. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy analyses clearly identify that SiC, TiC, ZrC, and TaC carbides can be facilely fabricated. SiC carbide can be controlled to form a homogeneous nanowire structure, while the morphologies of TiC, ZrC, and TaC carbides exhibit porous nodular structures with micro/nanoscale particles. The complex chemical/electrochemical reaction processes including the compounding, electrodeoxidation, dissolution-electrodeposition, and in situ carbonization processes in molten CaCl2 are also discussed. The present results preliminarily demonstrate that the molten salt-based SOM-assisted electrodeoxidation process has the potential to be used for the facile and controllable electrodeoxidation of MOx/C precursors to micro/nanostructured MCs, which can potentially be used for various applications.

  5. Chronopotentiometry of refractory metals, actinides and oxyanions in molten salts: A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.

    1992-01-01

    The applications of chronopotentiometry to the study of electrochemical behavior of three technologically important areas of refractory metals, actinides, and oxyanions in molten salts are critically reviewed. Chronopotentiometry is a very versatile diagnostic tool to understand the reaction mechanism of the electrode processes for the electrochemical reduction/oxidation of these electroactive species in molten salt solutions. Well adherent, compact, and uniformly thick coatings of refractory metals may be electrodeposited from their solutions in molten salts.

  6. Chronopotentiometry of refractory metals, actinides and oxyanions in molten salts: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Bansal, N.P.

    1992-09-01

    The applications of chronopotentiometry to the study of electrochemical behavior of three technologically important areas of refractory metals, actinides, and oxyanions in molten salts are critically reviewed. Chronopotentiometry is a very versatile diagnostic tool to understand the reaction mechanism of the electrode processes for the electrochemical reduction/oxidation of these electroactive species in molten salt solutions. Well adherent, compact, and uniformly thick coatings of refractory metals may be electrodeposited from their solutions in molten salts.

  7. Simulations of rapid pressure-induced solidification in molten metals

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, M V; Streitz, F H

    2003-10-14

    The process of interest in this study is the solidification of a molten metal subjected to rapid pressurization. Most details about solidification occurring when the liquid-solid coexistence line is suddenly transversed along the pressure axis remain unknown. We present preliminary results from an ongoing study of this process for both simple models of metals (Cu) and more sophisticated material models (MGPT potentials for Ta). Atomistic (molecular dynamics) simulations are used to extract details such as the time and length scales that govern these processes. Starting with relatively simple potential models, we demonstrate how molecular dynamics can be used to study solidification. Local and global order parameters that aid in characterizing the phase have been identified, and the dependence of the solidification time on the phase space distance between the final (P,T) state and the coexistence line has been characterized.

  8. Molten metal processing of advanced cast aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivkumar, S.; Wang, L.; Apelian, D.

    1991-01-01

    Premium quality aluminum alloy castings are used extensively in various applications requiring a high strength-to-weight ratio, such as aerospace, automotive and other structural components. The mechanical properties in these structure-sensitive alloys are determined primarily by the secondary dendrite arm spacing and the morphology of interdendritic phases. In addition, the amount of porosity in the casting and the inclusion concentration have a strong influence on fracture, fatigue and impact properties. During the production of the casting, various molten metal processing techniques can be implemented to control these microstructural parameters. These melt treatments include grain refinement with Ti-B, eutectic modification with strontium or sodium, degassing with purge gases and filtration of inclusions. The efficiency of these treatments determines the quality of the cast component.

  9. Method of removal of heavy metal from molten salt in IFR fuel pyroprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, E.C.

    1993-12-23

    An electrochemical method of separating heavy metal values from a radioactive molten salt including Li halide at temperatures of about 500{degree}C. The method comprises positioning a solid Li-Cd alloy anode in the molten salt containing the heavy metal values, positioning a Cd-containing cathode or a solid cathode positioned above a catch crucible in the molten salt to recover the heavy metal values, establishing a voltage drop between the anode and the cathode to deposit material at the cathode to reduce the concentration of heavy metals in the salt, and controlling the deposition rate at the cathode by controlling the current between the anode and cathode.

  10. Method of removal of heavy metal from molten salt in IFR fuel pyroprocessing

    DOEpatents

    Gay, Eddie C.

    1995-01-01

    An electrochemical method of separating heavy metal values from a radioactive molten salt including Li halide at temperatures of about 500.degree. C. The method comprises positioning a solid Li--Cd alloy anode in the molten salt containing the heavy metal values, positioning a Cd-containing cathode or a solid cathode positioned above a catch crucible in the molten salt to recover the heavy metal values, establishing a voltage drop between the anode and the cathode to deposit material at the cathode to reduce the concentration of heavy metals in the salt, and controlling the deposition rate at the cathode by controlling the current between the anode and cathode.

  11. Method for producing hydrocarbon fuels from heavy polynuclear hydrocarbons by use of molten metal halide catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Gorin, Everett

    1979-01-01

    In a process for hydrocracking heavy polynuclear carbonaceous feedstocks to produce lighter hydrocarbon fuels by contacting the heavy feedstocks with hydrogen in the presence of a molten metal halide catalyst, thereafter separating at least a substantial portion of the carbonaceous material associated with the reaction mixture from the spent molten metal halide and thereafter regenerating the metal halide catalyst, an improvement comprising contacting the spent molten metal halide catalyst after removal of a major portion of the carbonaceous material therefrom with an additional quantity of hydrogen is disclosed.

  12. Aerosol production by high-velocity molten-metal droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Rader, D J; Benson, D A

    1988-06-01

    This report presents the results of an experimental study of the aerosol produced by high-velocity molten-metal droplets. These tests are intended to simulate the reduction of high-velocity fragments into aerosol in high-explosive detonations or reactor accidents involving nuclear materials. The primary droplets are produced by the heating and electromagnetic launch of metal wires; velocities approaching Mach 1 can be obtained at present. Size distributions obtained tungsten and zirconium droplets burning in air. Lognormal size distributions were observed in both cases with DMPS-equivalent mean diameters of about 0.4 ..mu..m and geometric standard deviations of about two. SEM and TEM analysis of aerosol samples collected by a point-to-plane electrostatic precipitator showed that the majority of these particles were web-like chain agglomerates. Tests performed in argon atmospheres produced several orders-of-magnitude less aerosol mass than in equivalent air tests, supporting the key role combustion plays in secondary aerosol generation. 26 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Apparatus and Method for Increasing the Diameter of Metal Alloy Wires Within a Molten Metal Pool

    DOEpatents

    Hartman, Alan D.; Argetsinger, Edward R.; Hansen, Jeffrey S.; Paige, Jack I.; King, Paul E.; Turner, Paul C.

    2002-01-29

    In a dip forming process the core material to be coated is introduced directly into a source block of coating material eliminating the need for a bushing entrance component. The process containment vessel or crucible is heated so that only a portion of the coating material becomes molten, leaving a solid portion of material as the entrance port of, and seal around, the core material. The crucible can contain molten and solid metals and is especially useful when coating core material with reactive metals. The source block of coating material has been machined to include a close tolerance hole of a size and shape to closely fit the core material. The core material moves first through the solid portion of the source block of coating material where the close tolerance hole has been machined, then through a solid/molten interface, and finally through the molten phase where the diameter of the core material is increased. The crucible may or may not require water-cooling depending upon the type of material used in crucible construction. The system may operate under vacuum, partial vacuum, atmospheric pressure, or positive pressure depending upon the type of source material being used.

  14. Apparatus and method for increasing the diameter of metal alloy wires within a molten metal pool

    DOEpatents

    Hartman, Alan D.; Argetsinger, Edward R.; Hansen, Jeffrey S.; Paige, Jack I.; King, Paul E.; Turner, Paul C.

    2002-01-29

    In a dip forming process the core material to be coated is introduced directly into a source block of coating material eliminating the need for a bushing entrance component. The process containment vessel or crucible is heated so that only a portion of the coating material becomes molten, leaving a solid portion of material as the entrance port of, and seal around, the core material. The crucible can contain molten and solid metals and is especially useful when coating core material with reactive metals. The source block of coating material has been machined to include a close tolerance hole of a size and shape to closely fit the core material. The core material moves first through the solid portion of the source block of coating material where the close tolerance hole has been machined, then through a solid/molten interface, and finally through the molten phase where the diameter of the core material is increased. The crucible may or may not require water-cooling depending upon the type of material used in crucible construction. The system may operate under vacuum, partial vacuum, atmospheric pressure, or positive pressure depending upon the type of source material being used.

  15. Method for producing hydrocarbon fuels and fuel gas from heavy polynuclear hydrocarbons by the use of molten metal halide catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Gorin, Everett

    1979-01-01

    In a process for hydrocracking heavy polynuclear carbonaceous feedstocks to produce lighter hydrocarbon fuels by contacting the heavy feedstocks with hydrogen in the presence of a molten metal halide catalyst in a hydrocracking zone, thereafter separating at least a major portion of the lighter hydrocarbon fuels from the spent molten metal halide and thereafter regenerating the spent molten metal halide by incinerating the spent molten metal halide by combustion of carbon and sulfur compounds in the spent molten metal halide in an incineration zone, the improvement comprising: (a) contacting the heavy feedstocks and hydrogen in the presence of the molten metal halide in the hydrocracking zone at reaction conditions effective to convert from about 60 to about 90 weight percent of the feedstock to lighter hydrocarbon fuels; (b) separating at least a major portion of the lighter hydrocarbon fuels from the spent molten metal halide; (c) contacting the spent molten metal halide with oxygen in a liquid phase gasification zone at a temperature and pressure sufficient to vaporize from about 25 to about 75 weight percent of the spent metal halide, the oxygen being introduced in an amount sufficient to remove from about 60 to about 90 weight percent of the carbon contained in the spent molten metal halide to produce a fuel gas and regenerated metal halide; and (d) incinerating the spent molten metal halide by combusting carbon and sulfur compounds contained therein.

  16. Rotating Molten Metallic Drops and Their Applications for Surface Tension Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, W. K.; Ishikawa, T.

    1998-01-01

    Shapes and stability of rotating molten metal drops carrying net surface electric charges are experimentally investigated, and the feasibility of measureing surface tension based on drop rotation is examined.

  17. In situ purification, alloying and casting methodology for metallic plutonium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lashley, Jason C.; Blau, Michael S.; Staudhammer, Karl P.; Pereyra, Ramiro A.

    Plutonium metal that has been double ER (electrorefined/electrorefining) was further purified via zone refining, using a floating molten zone to minimize the introduction of impurities. The temperature of the molten zone was 750°C, and the atmosphere was 10 -5 Pa. A total of ten zone refining passes were made at a travel rate of 1.5 cm/h. There were 19 elements reduced to quantities below the minimum detectable limits (MDL) by zone refining, while P, K, and W were significantly reduced. The zone-refined metal was then used in an in situ distillation, alloying, and casting step to prepare tapered specimens for single-crystal growth experiments. Specifically, 241Am was distilled from Pu metal by levitating Pu metal with 1 wt% Ga in the melt in a Crystallox vertical electromagnetic levitation crucible at 10 -5 Pa. The Pu is alloyed with Ga to stabilize the δ phase (fcc symmetry) upon solidification. The Pu was chill-cast directly from the electromagnetic levitation field into 1- cm tapered specimens. A water-cooled ceramic mold was used, and the Pu metal was cooled at a rate of 100°C/min. A microstructure examination of the specimen showed 10 × 25 μm acicular grains with a density of 15.938 g/cm 3 (±0.002 g/cm 3).

  18. Magnetic Gate System for Molten Metal Flow Control

    SciTech Connect

    2001-02-01

    Electromagnetics Offer Many Advantages For Better Control Of The Molten Steel. Over 80 percent of all of the world's yearly steel production or approximately 650 million tons, is produced by the continuous casting process.

  19. Molten Metal Treatment by Salt Fluxing with Low Environmental Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Yogeshwar Sahai

    2007-07-31

    Abstract: Chlorine gas is traditionally used for fluxing of aluminum melt for removal of alkali and alkaline earth elements. However this results in undesirable emissions of particulate matter and gases such as HCl and chlorine, which are often at unacceptable levels. Additionally, chlorine gas is highly toxic and its handling, storage, and use pose risks to employees and the local community. Holding of even minimal amounts of chlorine necessitates extensive training for all plant employees. Fugitive emissions from chlorine usage within the plant cause accelerated corrosion of plant equipment. The Secondary Aluminum Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) under the Clean Air Act, finalized in March 2000 has set very tough new limits on particulate matter (PM) and total hydrogen chloride emissions from aluminum melting and holding furnaces. These limits are 0.4 and 0.1 lbs per ton of aluminum for hydrogen chloride and particulate emissions, respectively. Assuming new technologies for meeting these limits can be found, additional requirements under the Clean Air Act (Prevention of Significant Deterioration and New Source Review) trigger Best Available Control Technology (BACT) for new sources with annual emissions (net emissions not expressed per ton of production) over specified amounts. BACT currently is lime coated bag-houses for control of particulate and HCl emissions. These controls are expensive, difficult to operate and maintain, and result in reduced American competitiveness in the global economy. Solid salt fluxing is emerging as a viable option for the replacement of chlorine gas fluxing, provided emissions can be consistently maintained below the required levels. This project was a cooperative effort between the Ohio State University and Alcoa to investigate and optimize the effects of solid chloride flux addition in molten metal for alkali impurity and non-metallic inclusion removal minimizing dust and toxic emissions and maximizing energy

  20. Numerical Simulation of Molten Metal Flow Produced by Induction MHD Pump Using Rotating Twisted Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Tsutomu; Ueno, Kazuyuki; Sawada, Keisuke

    Numerical simulation at the same condition as an experiment is carried out under the magnetic Stokes approximation for small shielding parameter. Results of the simulation compensate for the information of molten metal flow that we could not directly obtain in the experiment. In this paper, we study the molten metal flow at a starting condition and quasi-steady state. Besides, the energy conversion in the MHD pump is discussed. The simulation result shows that the proposed MHD pump causes the spiral induced current in a molten gallium and produces an axial flow with swirl. At quasi-steady state, it is confirmed that the centrifugal force by the excessive swirl flow produces high pressure at a duct wall and low pressure around the central axis. Since the excessive swirl flow results in large viscous dissipation, the mechanical power output of the pump uses only about 1% of the mechanical energy production in the molten gallium.

  1. Numerical and experimental investigation of molten metal droplet deposition applied to rapid prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, SuLi; Wei, ZhengYing; Du, Jun; Zhao, Guangxi; Wang, Xin; Lu, BingHeng

    2016-08-01

    Rapid prototyping based on molten metal droplets deposition is an additive process in which parts are produced from molten materials in a single operation without the use of any mold or other tooling. Near-net shaped parts are fabricated by sequentially depositing molten droplets layer by layer. This paper presents a systematic numerical and experimental investigation of the transient transport phenomenon during the droplets impinging onto a substrate surface. The 3D models based on a volume of fluid (VOF) method were developed to investigate the deposition of molten metal droplets on a horizontally aluminum substrate surface. Based on the above research, a semiquantitative relationship between external morphology and internal microstructure was proposed, which was further certified by investigating the piled vertical columns and the three-dimensional parts. The works should be helpful for the process optimization and non-destructive detection of drop-based rapid prototyping techniques.

  2. Apparatus for efficient sidewall containment of molten metal with horizontal alternating magnetic fields utilizing low reluctance rims

    DOEpatents

    Praeg, Walter F.

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for casting sheets of metal from molten metal. The apparatus includes a containment structure having an open side, a horizontal alternating magnetic field generating structure and rollers including low reluctance rim structures. The magnetic field and the rollers help contain the molten metal from leaking out of the containment structure.

  3. Apparatus for efficient sidewall containment of molten metal with horizontal alternating magnetic fields utilizing a ferromagnetic dam

    DOEpatents

    Praeg, W.F.

    1997-02-11

    An apparatus is disclosed for casting sheets of metal from molten metal. The apparatus includes a containment structure having an open side, a horizontal alternating magnetic field generating structure and a ferromagnetic dam. The magnetic field and the ferromagnetic dam contain the molten metal from leaking out side portions of the open side of the containment structure. 25 figs.

  4. Apparatus for efficient sidewall containment of molten metal with horizontal alternating magnetic fields utilizing a ferromagnetic dam

    DOEpatents

    Praeg, Walter F.

    1997-01-01

    An apparatus for casting sheets of metal from molten metal. The apparatus includes a containment structure having an open side, a horizontal alternating magnetic field generating structure and a ferromagnetic dam. The magnetic field and the ferromagnetic dam contain the molten metal from leaking out side portions of the open side of the containment structure.

  5. Molten metal-related ocular thermal burn: report on two cases.

    PubMed

    Arici, Ceyhun; Iskeleli, Guzin; Atalay, Eray; Mangan, Mehmet Serhat; Kilic, Belgin

    2015-01-01

    We report two cases of severe thermal burns on the ocular surface and its adnexal appendages that developed secondary to exposure to molten heavy metal with a melting temperature of near-thousand degree Celsius. Despite aggressive intervention and strict monitoring, the profound inflammation caused significant damage to the ocular surface, ending up in an intractable infection with an unfavorable outcome. The heat of the molten metal at impact, the heat-retaining capacity of the heavy metal, the total area of the ocular surface exposed to the molten metal, and the duration of exposure determined the severity of the injury. The unfavorable outcome, despite an intensive treatment, in terms of visual acuity and cosmetic appearance, should be explicitly explained to the patient, and a psychiatrist consultation should be considered if necessary. PMID:26677043

  6. Method of removal of heavy metal from molten salt in IFR fuel pyroprocessing

    DOEpatents

    Gay, E.C.

    1995-10-03

    An electrochemical method is described for separating heavy metal values from a radioactive molten salt including Li halide at temperatures of about 500 C. The method comprises positioning a solid Li--Cd alloy anode in the molten salt containing the heavy metal values, positioning a Cd-containing cathode or a solid cathode positioned above a catch crucible in the molten salt to recover the heavy metal values, establishing a voltage drop between the anode and the cathode to deposit material at the cathode to reduce the concentration of heavy metals in the salt, and controlling the deposition rate at the cathode by controlling the current between the anode and cathode. 3 figs.

  7. Method for determining molten metal pool level in twin-belt continuous casting machines

    DOEpatents

    Kaiser, Timothy D.; Daniel, Sabah S.; Dykes, Charles D.

    1989-03-21

    A method for determining level of molten metal in the input of a continuous metal casting machine having at least one endless, flexible, revolving casting belt with a surface which engages the molten metal to be cast and a reverse, cooled surface along which is directed high velocity liquid coolant includes the steps of predetermining the desired range of positions of the molten metal pool and positioning at least seven heat-sensing transducers in bearing contact with the moving reverse belt surface and spaced in upstream-downstream relationship relative to belt travel spanning the desired pool levels. A predetermined temperature threshold is set, somewhat above coolant temperature and the output signals of the transducer sensors are scanned regarding their output signals indicative of temperatures of the moving reverse belt surface. Position of the molten pool is determined using temperature interpolation between any successive pair of upstream-downstream spaced sensors, which follows confirmation that two succeeding downstream sensors are at temperature levels exceeding threshold temperature. The method accordingly provides high resolution for determining pool position, and verifies the determined position by utilizing full-strength signals from two succeeding downstream sensors. In addition, dual sensors are used at each position spanning the desired range of molten metal pool levels to provide redundancy, wherein only the higher temperature of each pair of sensors at a station is utilized.

  8. In-Situ Real Time Measurements of Molten Glass Properties, Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Robert De Saro; Joe Craparo

    2007-12-16

    Energy Research Company (ERCo) of Staten Island, NY has developed a sensor capable of measuring in situ and in real time, both the elemental composition and the temperature of molten glass. A prototype sensor has been designed, constructed and tested in ERCo's laboratory. The sensor was used to collect atomic emission spectra from molten fiberglass via Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS). From these spectra, we were able to readily identify all elements of interest (B, Si, Ca, Fe, Mg, Na, Sr, Al). The high signal-to-background signals achieved suggest that data from the sensor can be used to determine elemental concentrations, either through calibration curves or using ERCo's calibrationless method. ERCo's technology fits in well with DOE's Glass Industry Technology Roadmap which emphasizes the need for accurate process and feedstock sensors. Listed first under technological barriers to increased production efficiency is the 'Inability to accurately measure and control the production process'. A large-scale glass melting furnace, developed by SenCer Inc. of Penn Yan, NY was installed in ERCo's laboratory to ensure that a large enough quantity of glass could be melted and held at temperature in the presence of the water-cooled laser sensor without solidifying the glass.

  9. Induction furnace testing of the durability of prototype crucibles in a molten metal environment

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonski, Paul D.

    2005-09-01

    Engineered ceramic crucibles are commonly used to contain molten metal. Besides high temperature stability, other desired crucible characteristics include thermal shock resistance, minimal reaction with the molten metal and resistance to attack from the base metal oxide formed during melting. When used in an induction furnace, they can be employed as a “semi-permanent” crucible incorporating a dry ram backup and a ceramic cap. This report covers several 250-lb single melt crucible tests in an air melt induction furnace. These tests consisted of melting a charge of 17-4PH stainless steel, holding the charge molten for two hours before pouring off the heat and then subsequently sectioning the crucible to review the extent of erosion, penetration and other physical characteristics. Selected temperature readings were made throughout each melt. Chemistry samples were also taken from each heat periodically throughout the hold. The manganese level was observed to affect the rate of chromium loss in a non-linear fashion.

  10. Heavy metal: Can molten metal technology turn toxic dross into gold? A study in alchemy, controversy, and green tech

    SciTech Connect

    Lerner, S.

    1995-12-31

    In a Massachusetts industrial park, inside a renovated helicopter factory, stands a giant, Rube Goldbergesque machine of metal boxes and pipes. Technicians in blue uniforms, hard hats, and safety glasses attend this contraption, watching over the fire at its heart: a cauldron of molten metal, usually iron, heated to some 3,000 degrees Fahrenheit. Hazardous wastes are injected into this molten bath. There, according to its inventor, the metal acts as a catalyst for a chemical reaction that instantly reduces compound molecules to their elemental components. A considerable portion for the wastes thus digested are spit out again in the form of industrial-grade materials, ready for reuse or resale. This article describes both the processing of hazardous wastes by using molten metal to drive reactions that would recover useful materials from hazardous waste and the future possibilities for its use.

  11. Behavior of toxic metals and radionuclides during molten salt oxidation of chlorinated plastics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hee-Chul; Cho, Yong-Jun; Eun, Hee-Chul; Yoo, Jae-Hyung; Kim, Joon-Hyung

    2004-01-01

    Molten salt oxidation is one of the promising alternatives to incineration for chlorinated organics without the emission of chlorinated organic pollutants. This study investigated the behavior of three hazardous metals (Cd, Pb, and Cr) and four radioactive metal surrogates (Cs, Ce, Gd, and Sm) in the molten Na2CO3 oxidation reactor during the destruction of PVC plastics. In the tested temperature ranges (1143 1223K) and NaCl content (0-10%), the impact of temperature on the retention of cadmium and lead in the molten salt reactor was very small, but that of the NaCl content for their retention was relatively higher. The influence of NaCl accumulation was, however, proven to be practically negligible due to the low-temperature operating characteristics of the molten salt oxidation system. Neither temperature increase nor chlorine accumulation in the MSO reactor reduced the retention of Cr, Ce, Gd, and Sm. Over 99.98% of these metals remained in the reactor. The influence of the temperature on the cesium behavior is relatively large for a chlorine addition, however, over 99.7% of cesium remained in the reactor throughout the entire test. The experimental metal entrainment rate and the entrained metal particle size distribution agree well with the theoretical equilibrium metal distributions.

  12. 30 CFR 57.15007 - Protective equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Protective equipment or clothing for welding... equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal. Protective clothing or equipment and face shields or goggles shall be worn when welding, cutting, or working with molten metal....

  13. 30 CFR 57.15007 - Protective equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Protective equipment or clothing for welding... equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal. Protective clothing or equipment and face shields or goggles shall be worn when welding, cutting, or working with molten metal....

  14. 30 CFR 57.15007 - Protective equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Protective equipment or clothing for welding... equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal. Protective clothing or equipment and face shields or goggles shall be worn when welding, cutting, or working with molten metal....

  15. 30 CFR 57.15007 - Protective equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Protective equipment or clothing for welding... equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal. Protective clothing or equipment and face shields or goggles shall be worn when welding, cutting, or working with molten metal....

  16. 30 CFR 57.15007 - Protective equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Protective equipment or clothing for welding... equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal. Protective clothing or equipment and face shields or goggles shall be worn when welding, cutting, or working with molten metal....

  17. Laser-produced plasma measurement of thermal diffusivity of molten metals

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yong W.; Park, C.S.

    1995-12-01

    We have shown that a laser-produced plasma plume which is representative in composition of the condensed phase target can be reproducibly generated if the movement of the surface due to evaporation is kept in pace with the thermal diffusion front propagating into the bulk. The resulting mass loss is then strongly controlled by the thermal diffusivity of the target matter, and this relationship has been exploited to measure the thermal diffusivity of metallic alloys. We have developed a novel RF levitator-heater as a contamination-free molten metal source to be used as a target for LPP plume generation. In order to determine the mass loss due to LPP excitation, a new high sensitivity transducer has been constructed for measurement of the resulting impulse imparted on the specimen. The impulse transducer is built onto the specimen holder within the levitation-assisted molten metal source. The LPP method has been fully excercised for measurement of the thermal diffusivity of a molten specimen relative to the value for its room temperature solid. The results for SS304 and SS316 are presented together with a critique of the results. A numerical modeling of specimen heating in the molten metal source and the physical basis of the new hod are also presented.

  18. Oxygen production by molten alkali metal salts using multiple absorption-desorption cycles

    DOEpatents

    Cassano, A.A.

    1985-07-02

    A continuous chemical air separation is performed wherein oxygen is recovered with a molten alkali metal salt oxygen acceptor in a series of absorption zones which are connected to a plurality of desorption zones operated in separate parallel cycles with the absorption zones. A greater recovery of high pressure oxygen is achieved at reduced power requirements and capital costs. 3 figs.

  19. Oxygen production by molten alkali metal salts using multiple absorption-desorption cycles

    DOEpatents

    Cassano, Anthony A.

    1985-01-01

    A continuous chemical air separation is performed wherein oxygen is recovered with a molten alkali metal salt oxygen acceptor in a series of absorption zones which are connected to a plurality of desorption zones operated in separate parallel cycles with the absorption zones. A greater recovery of high pressure oxygen is achieved at reduced power requirements and capital costs.

  20. Crucible cast from beryllium oxide and refractory cement is impervious to flux and molten metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jastrzebski, Z. D.

    1966-01-01

    Crucible from a mixture of a beryllium oxide aggregate and hydraulic refractory cement, and coated with an impervious refractory oxide will not deteriorate in the presence of fused salt- molten metal mixtures such as uranium- magnesium-zinc-halide salt systems. Vessels cast by this process are used in the flux reduction of oxides of thorium and uranium.

  1. Laser-produced plasma measurement of thermal diffusivity of molten metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y. W.; Park, C. S.

    1996-09-01

    We have shown that a laser-produced plasma plume which is representative in elemental composition of the condensed phase target can be reproducibly generated if the movement of the surface due to evaporation is kept in pace with the thermal diffusion front propagating into the bulk. The resulting mass loss is then strongly controlled by the thermal diffusivity of the target matter, and this relationship has been exploited to measure the thermal diffusivity of metallic alloys. We have developed a novel RF Ievitator-heater as a contamination-free molten metal source to be used as a target for LPP plume generation. In order to determine the mass loss due to LPP excitation, a new high-sensitivity transducer has been constructed for measurement of the resulting impulse imparted on the specimen. The impulse transducer is built onto the specimen holder within the levitation-assisted molten metal source. The LPP method has been fully exercised for measurement of the thermal diffusivity of a molten specimen relative to the value for its room temperature solid. The results for SS304 and SS316 are presented, together with a critique of the results. A numerical modeling of the specimen heating in the molten metal source and the physical basis of the new method are also presented.

  2. Bi2S3in-situ formed in molten S environment stabilized sulfur cathodes for high-performance lithium-sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaona; Liang, Jianwen; Lu, Yue; Hou, Zhiguo; Zhang, Wanqun; Zhu, Yongchun; Qian, Yitai

    2016-10-01

    S/Bi2S3/C composites have been prepared based on melt strategy at 280 °C starting from metallic bismuth (mp 271.3 °C), excess sulfur powder and porous carbon with different ratio. In the as-prepared composites, the in-situ formed Bi2S3 in molten S environment can homogeneously dispersed in S and carbon. Combining the physical confinement of porous carbon and chemical interaction of the in-situ formed Bi2S3, the dissolution of polysulfides has been well inhibited. Thus, the obtained S/Bi2S3/C composite exhibits good electrochemical performance, which could deliver capacity of ∼825 mAh g-1 at 0.5 C over 400 cycles, with 91% capacity retention and high Coulombic efficiency.

  3. INVESTIGATION OF THE THERMODYNAMICS GOVERNING METAL HYDRIDE SYNTHESIS IN THE MOLTEN STATE PROCESS.

    SciTech Connect

    Stowe, A; Polly Berseth, P; Ragaiy Zidan, R; Donald Anton, D

    2007-08-23

    Complex metal hydrides have been synthesized for hydrogen storage through a new synthetic technique utilizing high hydrogen overpressure at elevated temperatures (molten state processing). This synthesis technique holds the potential of fusing different complex hydrides at elevated temperatures and pressures to form new species with enhanced hydrogen storage properties. Formation of these compounds is driven by thermodynamic and kinetic considerations. We report on investigations of the thermodynamics. Novel synthetic complexes were formed, structurally characterized, and their hydrogen desorption properties investigated. The effectiveness of the molten state process is compared with mechanicosynthetic ball milling.

  4. Conjugate heat transfer analysis of an ultrasonic molten metal treatment system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Youli; Bian, Feilong; Wang, Yanli; Zhao, Qian

    2014-09-01

    In piezoceramic ultrasonic devices, the piezoceramic stacks may fail permanently or function improperly if their working temperatures overstep the Curie temperature of the piezoceramic material. While the end of the horn usually serves near the melting point of the molten metal and is enclosed in an airtight chamber, so that it is difficult to experimentally measure the temperature of the transducer and its variation with time, which bring heavy difficulty to the design of the ultrasonic molten metal treatment system. To find a way out, conjugate heat transfer analysis of an ultrasonic molten metal treatment system is performed with coupled fluid and heat transfer finite element method. In modeling of the system, the RNG model and the SIMPLE algorithm are adopted for turbulence and nonlinear coupling between the momentum equation and the energy equation. Forced air cooling as well as natural air cooling is analyzed to compare the difference of temperature evolution. Numerical results show that, after about 350 s of working time, temperatures in the surface of the ceramic stacks in forced air cooling drop about 7 K compared with that in natural cooling. At 240 s, The molten metal surface emits heat radiation with a maximum rate of about 19 036 W/m2, while the heat insulation disc absorbs heat radiation at a maximum rate of about 7922 W/m2, which indicates the effectiveness of heat insulation of the asbestos pad. Transient heat transfer film coefficient and its distribution, which are difficult to be measured experimentally are also obtained through numerical simulation. At 240 s, the heat transfer film coefficient in the surface of the transducer ranges from -17.86 to 20.17 W/(m2 · K). Compared with the trial and error method based on the test, the proposed research provides a more effective way in the design and analysis of the temperature control of the molten metal treatment system.

  5. Measurement of Solubility of Metallic Lithium Dissolved in Molten LiCl-Li2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burak, Adam J.; Simpson, Michael F.

    2016-07-01

    The solubility of lithium metal in molten LiCl-Li2O mixtures has been measured at various concentrations of Li2O ranging from 0 wt.% to 2.7 wt.% at a temperature of approximately 670-680°C. After contacting molten lithium with molten LiCl-Li2O for several hours to achieve equilibrium saturation, samples were taken by freezing the salt onto a room-temperature steel rod and dissolving in water for analysis. Both volume of hydrogen gas generated and volume of titrated HCl were measured to investigate two different approaches to calculating the lithium concentration. There appeared to be no effect of Li2O concentration on the Li solubility in the salt. But the results vary between different methods of deducing the amount of dissolved Li. The H2 collection method is recommended, but care must be taken to ensure all of the H2 has been included.

  6. Measurement of Solubility of Metallic Lithium Dissolved in Molten LiCl-Li2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burak, Adam J.; Simpson, Michael F.

    2016-10-01

    The solubility of lithium metal in molten LiCl-Li2O mixtures has been measured at various concentrations of Li2O ranging from 0 wt.% to 2.7 wt.% at a temperature of approximately 670-680°C. After contacting molten lithium with molten LiCl-Li2O for several hours to achieve equilibrium saturation, samples were taken by freezing the salt onto a room-temperature steel rod and dissolving in water for analysis. Both volume of hydrogen gas generated and volume of titrated HCl were measured to investigate two different approaches to calculating the lithium concentration. There appeared to be no effect of Li2O concentration on the Li solubility in the salt. But the results vary between different methods of deducing the amount of dissolved Li. The H2 collection method is recommended, but care must be taken to ensure all of the H2 has been included.

  7. High temperature corrosion of metallic materials in molten carbonate fuel cells environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durante, G.; Vegni, S.; Capobianco, P.; Golgovici, F.

    Molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFCs) are electrochemical devices that convert energy of a chemical reaction into electricity without any kind of combustion. So, MCFCs are promising for their high efficiency and their low environmental pollution. A limiting aspect for reaching the goal of 40,000 h of life-time is the corrosion of metallic parts of MCFC, especially for current collectors and separator plates. Generally, this corrosion leads to metal loss and to an important increase of the electrical resistance due to the formation of resistive oxides. One of the most critic components in a MCFC is the anodic side metallic components. More used choice for these components is actually a sheet of AISI310S cladded at both sides by a Ni layer. The analysis of the behaviour of this material after different steps of corrosion in a typical molten carbonate fuel cell environment could be important to understand some phenomena that cause the damage of the anodic current collector.

  8. Metals recovering from waste printed circuit boards (WPCBs) using molten salts.

    PubMed

    Flandinet, L; Tedjar, F; Ghetta, V; Fouletier, J

    2012-04-30

    Recycling of waste electrical and electronic equipments (WEEE) has been taken into consideration in the literature due to the large quantity of concerned wastes and their hazardous contents. The situation is so critical that EU published European Directives imposing collection and recycling with a minimum of material recovery [1]. Moreover, WEEEs contain precious metals, making the recycling of these wastes economically interesting, but also some critical metals and their recycling leads to resource conservation. This paper reports on a new approach for recycling waste printed circuit boards (WPCBs). Molten salts and specifically molten KOH-NaOH eutectic is used to dissolve glasses, oxides and to destruct plastics present in wastes without oxidizing the most valuable metals. This method is efficient for recovering a copper-rich metallic fraction, which is, moreover, cleared of plastics and glasses. In addition, analyses of gaseous emission show that this method is environmentally friendly since most of the process gases, such as carbon monoxide and dioxide and halogens, are trapped in the highly basic molten salt. In other respects, under operation without oxygen, a large quantity of hydrogen is produced and might be used as fuel gas or as synthesis gas, leading to a favourable energy balance for this new process.

  9. Joule-Heated Molten Regolith Electrolysis Reactor Concepts for Oxygen and Metals Production on the Moon and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibille, Laurent; Dominguez, Jesus A.

    2012-01-01

    The technology of direct electrolysis of molten lunar regolith to produce oxygen and molten metal alloys has progressed greatly in the last few years. The development of long-lasting inert anodes and cathode designs as well as techniques for the removal of molten products from the reactor has been demonstrated. The containment of chemically aggressive oxide and metal melts is very difficult at the operating temperatures ca. 1600 C. Containing the molten oxides in a regolith shell can solve this technical issue and can be achieved by designing a Joule-heated (sometimes called 'self-heating') reactor in which the electrolytic currents generate enough Joule heat to create a molten bath. Solutions obtained by multiphysics modeling allow the identification of the critical dimensions of concept reactors.

  10. Electromagnetic confinement and movement of thin sheets of molten metal

    DOEpatents

    Lari, Robert J.; Praeg, Walter F.; Turner, Larry R.

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus capable of producing a combination of magnetic fields that can retain a metal in liquid form in a region having a smooth vertical boundary including a levitation magnet that produces low frequency magnetic field traveling waves to retain the metal and a stabilization magnet that produces a high frequency magnetic field to produce a smooth vertical boundary. As particularly adapted to the casting of solid metal sheets, a metal in liquid form can be continuously fed into one end of the confinement region produced by the levitation and stabilization magnets and removed in solid form from the other end of confinement region. An additional magnet may be included for support at the edges of the confinement region where eddy currents loop.

  11. Production of Oxygen from Lunar Regolith using Molten Oxide Electrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibille, Laurent; Sadoway, Donald R.; Sirk, Aislinn; Tripathy, Prabhat; Melendez, Orlando; Standish, Evan; Dominquez, Jesus A.; Stefanescu, Doru M.; Curreri, Peter A.; Poizeau, Sophie

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the possible use of molten oxide electrolysis to extract oxygen from the Lunar Regolith. The presentation asserts that molten regolith electrolysis has advanced to be a useful method for production of oxygen and metals in situ on the Moon. The work has demonstrated an 8 hour batch of electrolysis at 5 amps using Iridium inert anodes.

  12. Unsteady marangoni flow in a molten pool when welding dissimilar metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, P. S.; Chung, F. K.

    2000-12-01

    The unsteady variations of transport processes in molten pools when welding dissimilar metals are systematically investigated. Convection is driven by Marangoni forces with different directions and magnitudes on a flat free surface. For a clear description without loss of generality, three-dimensional quasi-steady welding is stimulated by an unsteady two-dimensional process. Applying the volume of fluid (VOF) and enthalpy methods to determine the interfaces between the immiscible dissimilar metals and between solid and liquid, the computed results show in detail the unsteady variations in the velocity and temperature fields, the solute concentration on the free surface, and the shapes of the molten regions affected by varying the signs and magnitudes of the surface-tension coefficients. The predicted shapes of the fusion-zone and solute distributions agree with the available experimental results in welding iron to aluminum, copper and iron, and copper to nickle.

  13. The use of molten salts as physical models for the study of solidification in metals and semiconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koziol, Jurek K.; Sadoway, Donald R.

    1987-01-01

    It is presently noted that molten salts possess attributes rendering them attractive as physical models of cast metals in solidification studies. Molten alkali halides have an approximately correct Prandtl number for this modeling of metallic melts, and are transparent to visible light. Attention is given to solidification in the LiCl-KCl system, in order to determine whether such phenomena as solute rejection can be observed and characterized through the application of laser schlieren imaging.

  14. Simulation of Motion, Heating, and Breakup of Molten Metal Droplets in the Plasma Jet at Plasma-Arc Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharlamov, M. Yu.; Krivtsun, I. V.; Korzhyk, V. N.; Ryabovolyk, Y. V.; Demyanov, O. I.

    2015-04-01

    The mathematical model for the process of plasma-arc wire spraying is proposed, which describes behavior of molten metal droplets in the plasma jet, allowing for the processes of their deformation and gas-dynamic breakup. Numerical analysis of the processes of motion, heating, and breakup of molten metal droplets, detached from the sprayed wire at plasma-arc spraying of coatings, was performed. It is shown that during molten droplets movement in the plasma jet their multiple breakup takes place, leading to formation of sprayed particles with dimensions much smaller than dimensions of initial droplets, detached from the sprayed wire tip.

  15. Convection in molten pool created by a concentrated energy flux on a solid metal target

    SciTech Connect

    Dikshit, B.; Zende, G. R.; Bhatia, M. S.; Suri, B. M.

    2009-08-15

    During surface evaporation of metals by use of a concentrated energy flux such as electron beam or lasers, a liquid metal pool having a very high temperature gradient is formed around the hot zone created by the beam. Due to temperature dependence of surface tension, density, and depression of the evaporating surface caused by back pressure of the emitted vapor in this molten pool, a strong convective current sets in the molten pool. A proposition is made that this convection may pass through three different stages during increase in the electron beam power depending upon dominance of the various driving forces. To confirm this, convective heat transfer is quantified in terms of dimensionless Nusselt number and its evolution with power is studied in an experiment using aluminum, copper, and zirconium as targets. These experimentally determined values are also compared to the theoretical values predicted by earlier researchers to test the validity of their assumptions and to know about the type of flow in the melt pool. Thus, conclusion about the physical characteristics of flow in the molten pool of metals could be drawn by considering the roles of surface tension and curvature of the evaporating surface on the evolution of convective heat transfer.

  16. Performance Testing of Molten Regolith Electrolysis with Transfer of Molten Material for the Production of Oxygen and Metals on the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibille, Laurent; Sadoway, Donald; Tripathy, Prabhat; Standish, Evan; Sirk, Aislinn; Melendez, Orlando; Stefanescu, Doru

    2010-01-01

    Previously, we have demonstrated the production of oxygen by electrolysis of molten regolith simulants at temperatures near 1600 C. Using an inert anode and suitable cathode, direct electrolysis (no supporting electrolyte) of the molten silicate is carried out, resulting in the production of molten metallic products at the cathode and oxygen gas at the anode. Initial direct measurements of current efficiency have confirmed that the process offer potential advantages of high oxygen production rates in a smaller footprint facility landed on the moon, with a minimum of consumables brought from Earth. We now report the results of a scale-up effort toward the goal of achieving production rates equivalent to 1 metric ton O2/year, a benchmark established for the support of a lunar base. We previously reported on the electrochemical behavior of the molten electrolyte as dependent on anode material, sweep rate and electrolyte composition in batches of 20-200g and at currents of less than 0.5 A. In this paper, we present the results of experiments performed at currents up to 10 Amperes) and in larger volumes of regolith simulant (500 g - 1 kg) for longer durations of electrolysis. The technical development of critical design components is described, including: inert anodes capable of passing continuous currents of several Amperes, container materials selection, direct gas analysis capability to determine the gas components co-evolving with oxygen. To allow a continuous process, a system has been designed and tested to enable the withdrawal of cathodically-reduced molten metals and spent molten oxide electrolyte. The performance of the withdrawal system is presented and critiqued. The design of the electrolytic cell and the configuration of the furnace were supported by modeling the thermal environment of the system in an effort to realize a balance between external heating and internal joule heating. We will discuss the impact these simulations and experimental findings have

  17. Fluid dynamics and kinematics of molten metals in the low-gravity environment of Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourgeois, S. V.; Brashears, M. R.

    1974-01-01

    The response of molten metals to mechanical and thermal driving forces in nominal and microgravity is analyzed both theoretically and experimentally. The magnitude and transient behavior of internal fluid circulations, surface deformations, and globule trajectories and their effects on solidification in the Skylab electron beam sphere forming and metals melting experiments are determined. The theoretical approach consists of dimensional analysis of the governing differential equations. Experimental aspects include evaluation of specimens from terrestrial, KC-135 research aircraft, and actual Skylab tests and analysis of high speed movies taken during the melting processes. Several gravity variations and gravity independent results were successfully predicted based on expected differences and similarities in fluid dynamics.

  18. Polarization and mass transfer during the electrolysis of molten salts with liquid metallic electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhalev, Yu. G.

    2014-08-01

    Calculations are used to show that the fraction of the overvoltage of the stage of discharge-ionization can be significant in the total overvoltage during the polarization of liquid metallic electrodes in molten chlorides depleted of electrochemically active particles (depending on the type of the dissipative structures that appear near the electrode/electrolyte interface). This finding is taken into account to obtain criterion equations to describe the mass-transfer rate as a function of the physicochemical properties of the electrolyte and the metal electrode.

  19. Integrated oil production and upgrading using molten alkali metal

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, John Howard

    2016-10-04

    A method that combines the oil retorting process (or other process needed to obtain/extract heavy oil or bitumen) with the process for upgrading these materials using sodium or other alkali metals. Specifically, the shale gas or other gases that are obtained from the retorting/extraction process may be introduced into the upgrading reactor and used to upgrade the oil feedstock. Also, the solid materials obtained from the reactor may be used as a fuel source, thereby providing the heat necessary for the retorting/extraction process. Other forms of integration are also disclosed.

  20. Multifunctional Metallic and Refractory Materials for Energy Efficient Handling of Molten Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Xingbo Liu; Ever Barbero; Bruce Kang; Bhaskaran Gopalakrishnan; James Headrick; Carl Irwin

    2009-02-06

    The goal of the project was to extend the lifetime of hardware submerged in molten metal by an order of magnitude and to improve energy efficiency of molten metal handling process. Assuming broad implementation of project results, energy savings in 2020 were projected to be 10 trillion BTU/year, with cost savings of approximately $100 million/year. The project team was comprised of materials research groups from West Virginia University and the Missouri University of Science and Technology formerly University of Missouri – Rolla, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, International Lead and Zinc Research Organization, Secat and Energy Industries of Ohio. Industry partners included six suppliers to the hot dip galvanizing industry, four end-user steel companies with hot-dip Galvanize and/or Galvalume lines, eight refractory suppliers, and seven refractory end-user companies. The results of the project included the development of: (1) New families of materials more resistant to degradation in hot-dip galvanizing bath conditions were developed; (2) Alloy 2020 weld overlay material and process were developed and applied to GI rolls; (3) New Alloys and dross-cleaning procedures were developed for Galvalume processes; (4) Two new refractory compositions, including new anti-wetting agents, were identified for use with liquid aluminum alloys; (5) A new thermal conductivity measurement technique was developed and validated at ORNL; (6) The Galvanizing Energy Profiler Decision Support System (GEPDSS)at WVU; Newly Developed CCW Laser Cladding Shows Better Resistance to Dross Buildup than 316L Stainless Steel; and (7) A novel method of measuring the corrosion behavior of bath hardware materials. Project in-line trials were conducted at Southwire Kentucky Rod and Cable Mill, Nucor-Crawfordsville, Nucor-Arkansas, Nucor-South Carolina, Wheeling Nisshin, California Steel, Energy Industries of Ohio, and Pennex Aluminum. Cost, energy, and environmental benefits resulting from the project

  1. Molten salt technology

    SciTech Connect

    Lovering, D.G.

    1982-01-01

    In this volume, the historical background, scope, problems, economics, and future applications of molten salt technologies are discussed. Topics presented include molten salts in primary production of aluminum, general principles and handling and safety of the alkali metals, first-row transition metals, group VIII metals and B-group elements, solution electrochemistry, transport phenomena, corrosion in different molten salts, cells with molten salt electrolytes and reactants, fuel cell design, hydrocracking and liquefaction, heat storage in phase change materials, and nuclear technologies.

  2. Electrolytic production of neodymium metal from a molten chloride electrolyte. Rept. of Investigations/1991

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, M.F.; Murphy, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    Electrowinning of neodymium metal was accomplished by using a molten-metal cathode at 650 C and an electrolyte of 50 mol pct neodymium chloride-50 mol pct potassium chloride. The molten-metal cathodes were alloys of magnesium and zinc or magnesium and cadmium. Current efficiencies were 90 pct with a Mg/Zn cathode and 80 pct with a Mg-Cd cathode. The Mg-Cd cathode was easily separated from the electrolyte. In contrast, the Mg-Zn cathode tended to mix with the electrolyte, making separation difficult. The cathode metals were separated from the neodymium by distillation at 1,100 C under a vacuum of 10 to the -3rd power torr. Neodymium metal of 99.9+ purity was recovered from the Mg-Cd alloy cathode after 30 min distillation time. The neodymium recovered from the Mg-Zn system contained almost 2 pct Zn after vacuum distillation. Continuous operation using the Mg-Cd alloy cathode was demonstrated.

  3. Corrosion behavior of silicon nitride, magnesium oxide, and several metals in molten calcium chloride with chlorine

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, D. . Research and Development Center); Sesions, C.E.; Marra, J.E. )

    1992-08-01

    In this paper corrosion studies are described in a molten calcium chloride environment sparged with chlorine gas at 850{degrees}C, both in the melt and in the gas phase above the salt, in support of efforts at Westinghouse Savannah River Company to develop more resistant materials of construction for molten salt processing of plutonium. Corrosion rates and electron microscope analyses are reported for Inconel alloys 601 and 617, tantalum, tungsten, magnesium oxide, and silicon nitride. Silicon nitride exhibited the greatest resistance, showing {lt}0.1 mg/cm{sup 2} {center dot} h loss in both melt and vapor None of the metallic coupons withstood the chlorine vapor environment, although Inconel indicated resistance immersed in the melt if protected from chlorine gas.

  4. Method and apparatus for removal of gaseous, liquid and particulate contaminants from molten metals

    DOEpatents

    Hobson, David O.; Alexeff, Igor; Sikka, Vinod K.

    1988-01-01

    Method and apparatus for removal of nonelectrically-conducting gaseous, liquid, and particulate contaminants from molten metal compositions by applying a force thereto. The force (commonly referred to as the Lorentz Force) exerted by simultaneous application of an electric field and a magnetic field on a molten conductor causes an increase, in the same direction as the force, in the apparent specific gravity thereof, but does not affect the nonconducting materials. This difference in apparent densities cause the nonconducting materials to "float" in the opposite direction from the Lorentz Force at a rapid rate. Means are further provided for removal of the contaminants and prevention of stirring due to rotational forces generated by the applied fields.

  5. Method and apparatus for removal of gaseous, liquid and particulate contaminants from molten metals

    DOEpatents

    Hobson, D.O.; Alexeff, I.; Sikka, V.K.

    1987-08-10

    Method and apparatus for removal of nonelectrically-conducting gaseous, liquid, and particulate contaminants from molten metal compositions by applying a force thereto. The force (commonly referred to as the Lorentz Force) exerted by simultaneous application of an electric field and a magnetic field on a molten conductor causes an increase, in the same direction as the force, in the apparent specific gravity thereof, but does not affect the nonconducting materials. This difference in apparent densities cause the nonconducting materials to ''float'' in the opposite direction from the Lorentz Force at a rapid rate. Means are further provided for removal of the contaminants and prevention of stirring due to rotational forces generated by the applied fields. 6 figs.

  6. Multiphysics Modeling for Dimensional Analysis of a Self-Heated Molten Regolith Electrolysis Reactor for Oxygen and Metals Production on the Moon and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominguez, Jesus; Sibille, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    The technology of direct electrolysis of molten lunar regolith to produce oxygen and molten metal alloys has progressed greatly in the last few years. The development of long-lasting inert anodes and cathode designs as well as techniques for the removal of molten products from the reactor has been demonstrated. The containment of chemically aggressive oxide and metal melts is very difficult at the operating temperatures ca. 1600 C. Containing the molten oxides in a regolith shell can solve this technical issue and can be achieved by designing a self-heating reactor in which the electrolytic currents generate enough Joule heat to create a molten bath.

  7. An Assessment of Molten Metal Detachment Hazards for Electron Beam Welding in the Space Environment: Analysis and Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.; Russell, C.; Bhat, B.; Fragomeni, J. M.

    1998-01-01

    Conditions under which molten metal detachments might occur in a space welding environment are analyzed. A weld pool detachment parameter specifying conditions for pool detachment by impact is derived and corroborated by experimental evidence. Impact detachment for the pool is unlikely. Impact detachment for a drop of metal on the end of the weld wire may be possible under extreme conditions. Other potential causes of molten metal detachment considered, vaporization pressure forces and wire flickout from the pool, did not appear to present significant detachment threats.

  8. Identification of interfacial heat transfer between molten metal and green sand by inverse heat conduction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Quanpeng

    Heat flux and heat transfer coefficients at the interfaces of castings and molds are important parameters in the mold design and computer simulations of the solidification process in foundry operations. A better understanding of the heat flux and heat transfer coefficient between the solidifying casting and its mold can promote model design and improve the accuracy of computer simulation. The main purpose of the present dissertation involves the estimation of the heat flux and heat transfer coefficient at the interface of the molten metal and green sand. Since the inverse heat conduction method requires temperature measurement data to deduce the missing surface information, it is suitable for the present research. However, heat transfer inside green sand is complicated by the migration of water vapor and zonal temperature distribution results. This makes the solution of the inverse heat conduction problem more challenging. In this dissertation, Galerkin's method of Weighted Residual together with the front tracking technique is used in the development of a forward solver. Beck's future time step method incorporated with the Gaussian iterative minimization method is used as the inverse solver. The mathematical descriptions of the sensitivity coefficient for both the direct heat flux and direct heat transfer coefficient estimation are derived. The variations of the sensitivity coefficients with time are revealed. From the analysis of sensitivity coefficients, the concept of blank time period is proposed. This blank time period makes the inverse problem much more difficult. A total energy balance criterion is used to combat this. Numerical experiments confirmed the accuracy and robustness of both the direct heat flux estimation algorithm and the direct heat transfer coefficient estimation algorithm. Finally, some pouring experiments are carried out. The inverse algorithms are applied to the estimation of the heat flux and heat transfer coefficient at the interface of

  9. Monochromatic imaging studies of sustained metal vapor arcs burning on 150 mm diameter molten iron electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, R.L.; Schlienger, M.E.

    1996-07-01

    Monochromatic imaging was used to investigate the excited-state density distributions of Fe and Fe{sup +} in the inter-electrode gap region of a 3,100 A dc metal vapor arc burning between molten iron surfaces in a vacuum arc furnace. Multiple images were acquired at four wavelengths. The images were corrected and Abel inverted to yield the absolute radial intensity distributions for Fe and Fe{sup +} in the inter-electrode gap region. The results show a structured, axisymmetric plasma consisting of a high density `core` of Fe{sup +} emitters centered between the electrode surfaces situated against a relatively broad, flat excited-state Fe distribution.

  10. Stability diagrams for fourfold coordination of polyvalent metal ions in molten mixtures of halide salts

    SciTech Connect

    Akdeniz, Z. Istanbul Univ. . Dept. of Physics); Tosi, M.P. . Dipt. di Fisica Teorica Argonne National Lab., IL )

    1988-11-01

    The stability of local fourfold coordination for divalent and trivalent metal ions in liquid mixtures of polyvalent metal halides and alkali halides is classified by means of structural coordinates obtained from properties of the elements. In parallel with earlier classifications of compound crystal structures and molecular shapes, the elemental properties are taken from first-principles calculations of valence electron orbitals in atoms, in the form of (i) the nodal radii of Andreoni, Baldereschi and Guizzetti or (ii) the pseudopotential radii or Zunger and Cohen. As a third alternative a classification based on Pettifor's phenomenological chemical scale of the elements is also considered. The alternative structural classification schemes that are developed from these elemental properties are generally successfully in distinguishing molten mixtures in which the available experimental evidence indicates long-lived fourfold coordination of polyvalent metal ions. In addition, Pettifor's chemical scale scheme is useful in sorting out finer details of local coordination in the liquid state. 3 figs., 71 refs.

  11. 30 CFR 56.15007 - Protective equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Protective equipment or clothing for welding... METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Personal Protection § 56.15007 Protective equipment or clothing for welding... be worn when welding, cutting, or working with molten metal....

  12. 30 CFR 56.15007 - Protective equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Protective equipment or clothing for welding... METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Personal Protection § 56.15007 Protective equipment or clothing for welding... be worn when welding, cutting, or working with molten metal....

  13. 30 CFR 56.15007 - Protective equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Protective equipment or clothing for welding... METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Personal Protection § 56.15007 Protective equipment or clothing for welding... be worn when welding, cutting, or working with molten metal....

  14. 30 CFR 56.15007 - Protective equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Protective equipment or clothing for welding... METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Personal Protection § 56.15007 Protective equipment or clothing for welding... be worn when welding, cutting, or working with molten metal....

  15. 30 CFR 56.15007 - Protective equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Protective equipment or clothing for welding... METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Personal Protection § 56.15007 Protective equipment or clothing for welding... be worn when welding, cutting, or working with molten metal....

  16. Microstructure and Mechanical Behaviour of Al6061-ZrB2 In-situ Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasanth Kumar, R.; Keshavamurthy, R.; Perugu, Chandra S.

    2016-09-01

    Aluminium matrix composites processed through in-situ molten reaction has emerged as an alternative for eliminating defects existing in ex-situ reinforced metal matrix composites. Development of composites through in-situ method using inorganic salts via liquid metallurgy route is the most widely accepted technique. In the present work, Al6061-ZrB2 in-situ composites have been developed through in-situ reaction of Al-10%Zr and Al-3%B master alloys in Al6061 alloy. Study of microstructure and mechanical properties of in-situ reinforced ZrB2 in Al6061 alloy have been carried out. Composite exhibited grain refinement and improved the mechanical properties of Al6061 alloy. Ductility of composite is reduced with increase in content of ZrB2.

  17. Variation and correlation of content and leachability of hazardous metals in MSW molten slag.

    PubMed

    Sekito, T; Onoue, K; Dote, Y; Sakanakura, H; Nakamura, K

    2015-01-01

    To increase the amount of accessible municipal solid waste molten slag (MSWS) for its use in aggregates such as sand, MSWS must be deemed environmentally safe. Municipal solid waste (MSW) is a heterogeneous waste source used in MSWS and varies in chemical composition. Due to its nature, there is great concern about hazardous metal contamination among users of MSWS. In this study, MSWS samples were obtained weekly for 1 year from a typical incineration ash melting facility for municipal solid waste in Japan. Variation in heavy metal contents and the leachability of MSWS were investigated using two content analysis methods and two leaching tests, respectively. There is a weak correlation between metal content and concentration, and the leachability of metals in slag could not be reduced by decreasing its metal content. No measured values of hazardous metal concentration and metal content exceed the regulation levels stipulated in Japanese Industrial Standards A5031 and A5032, respectively, thereby demonstrating that the slag can be safely utilized as road and concrete aggregates. However, metal concentrations varied widely and differed by greater than 1 order of magnitude and Pb concentrations of several MSWS samples approach the regulation level. Therefore, frequent monitoring of lead leachability of MSWS and storing MSWS for several weeks to obtain a high quality that is more homogeneous in chemical composition are demanded. This study provides fundamental information for controlling the quality of MSWS and the contributing factors for achieving a safe slag recycling system. PMID:25504189

  18. Variation and correlation of content and leachability of hazardous metals in MSW molten slag.

    PubMed

    Sekito, T; Onoue, K; Dote, Y; Sakanakura, H; Nakamura, K

    2015-01-01

    To increase the amount of accessible municipal solid waste molten slag (MSWS) for its use in aggregates such as sand, MSWS must be deemed environmentally safe. Municipal solid waste (MSW) is a heterogeneous waste source used in MSWS and varies in chemical composition. Due to its nature, there is great concern about hazardous metal contamination among users of MSWS. In this study, MSWS samples were obtained weekly for 1 year from a typical incineration ash melting facility for municipal solid waste in Japan. Variation in heavy metal contents and the leachability of MSWS were investigated using two content analysis methods and two leaching tests, respectively. There is a weak correlation between metal content and concentration, and the leachability of metals in slag could not be reduced by decreasing its metal content. No measured values of hazardous metal concentration and metal content exceed the regulation levels stipulated in Japanese Industrial Standards A5031 and A5032, respectively, thereby demonstrating that the slag can be safely utilized as road and concrete aggregates. However, metal concentrations varied widely and differed by greater than 1 order of magnitude and Pb concentrations of several MSWS samples approach the regulation level. Therefore, frequent monitoring of lead leachability of MSWS and storing MSWS for several weeks to obtain a high quality that is more homogeneous in chemical composition are demanded. This study provides fundamental information for controlling the quality of MSWS and the contributing factors for achieving a safe slag recycling system.

  19. Experimental investigation of interfacial heat transfer for molten metal solidification on a substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.X.; Matthys, E.F.

    1995-12-31

    Thermal contact at the melt/substrate interface is an important issue in many material processes such as mold casting, strip and slab casting, splat cooling, melt-spinning, spray deposition, etc. In all these processes, the molten metal is brought in contact with a colder substrate, and the heat is transferred from the melt into this substrate. Here, experiments have been conducted to quantify the interfacial heat transfer between molten copper and a cold metallic substrate, and in particular to investigate the heat transfer variation as the initial liquid/solid contact becomes a solid/solid contact after nucleation. A high heat transfer coefficient (ranging from 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 5} W/m{sup 2}K) during the earlier liquid cooling phase and a lower heat transfer coefficient (from 10{sup 3} to 10{sup 4} W/m{sup 2}K) during the subsequent solid splat cooling phase were estimated through matching of model calculations and measured temperature history of the sample. The dynamic variations in the interfacial heat transfer resulting from the solidification process were quantified for splat cooling and were found to be affected by the melt superheat, the substrate material, and the substrate surface finish.

  20. Influence of aluminum salt addition on in situ sintering of electrolyte matrices for molten carbonate fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Insung; Kim, Wonsun; Moon, Youngjoon; Lim, Heechun; Lee, Dokyol

    Three aluminum salts are investigated as a sintering aid for the in situ sintering of electrolyte matrices for molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFCs). Only aluminum acetylacetonate shows a potential. At or above 420°C, aluminum acetylacetonate changes to Al 2O 3 and reacts with Li 2CO 3 in the electrolyte to produce γ-LiAlO 2. This reaction product forms necks between matrix particles. Necks grow with increasing sintering time and correspondingly, the mechanical strength of the electrolyte matrix shows an abrupt increase, starting at a sintering time of about 100 h until it levels off at about 250 h. The porosity of the matrices fabricated with aluminum acetylacetonate is in the range acceptable for use in MCFCs.

  1. Creep resistant, metal-coated LiFeO[sub 2] anodes for molten carbonated fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Khandkar, A.C.

    1994-08-23

    A porous, creep-resistant, metal-coated, LiFeO[sub 2] ceramic electrode for fuel cells is disclosed. The electrode is particularly useful for molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) although it may have utilities in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) as well. 11 figs.

  2. Creep resistant, metal-coated LiFeO.sub.2 anodes for molten carbonated fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Khandkar, Ashok C.

    1994-01-01

    A porous, creep-resistant, metal-coated, LiFeO.sub.2 ceramic electrode for fuel cells is disclosed. The electrode is particularly useful for molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) although it may have utilities in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) as well.

  3. Metallotropic liquid crystals formed by surfactant templating of molten metal halides.

    PubMed

    Martin, James D; Keary, Cristin L; Thornton, Todd A; Novotnak, Mark P; Knutson, Jeremey W; Folmer, Jacob C W

    2006-04-01

    Liquid crystals consist of anisotropic molecular units, and most are organic molecules. Materials incorporating metals into anisotropic molecules, described as metallomesogens, have been prepared. Anisotropic structures such as one-dimensional chains and two-dimensional layers are frequently observed in solid-state inorganic materials, however, little is understood about structural organization in melts of such materials. Achieving liquid-crystalline behaviour in inorganic fluids should be possible if the anisotropic structure can be retained or designed into the molten phase. We demonstrated the ability to engineer zeolite-type structures into metal halide glasses and liquids. In this work we have engineered lamellar, cubic and hexagonal liquid-crystalline structure in metal-halide melts by controlling the volume fraction and nature of the inorganic block (up to 80 mol%) with respect to alkylammonium surfactants. The high metal content of these liquid-crystalline systems significantly advances the field of metallomesogens, which seeks to combine magnetic, electronic, optical, redox and catalytic properties common to inorganic materials with the fluid properties of liquid crystals. PMID:16547520

  4. Molten salt extraction process for the recovery of valued transition metals from land-based and deep-sea minerals

    DOEpatents

    Maroni, Victor A.; von Winbush, Samuel

    1988-01-01

    A process for extracting transition metals and particularly cobalt and manganese together with iron, copper and nickel from low grade ores (including ocean-floor nodules) by converting the metal oxides or other compositions to chlorides in a molten salt, and subsequently using a combination of selective distillation at temperatures below about 500.degree. C., electrolysis at a voltage not more negative than about -1.5 volt versus Ag/AgCl, and precipitation to separate the desired manganese and cobalt salts from other metals and provide cobalt and manganese in metallic forms or compositions from which these metals may be more easily recovered.

  5. Molten salt extraction process for the recovery of valued transition metals from land-based and deep-sea minerals

    DOEpatents

    Maroni, V.A.; von Winbush, S.

    1987-05-01

    A process for extracting transition metals and particularly cobalt and manganese together with iron, copper and nickel from low grade ores (including ocean-floor nodules) by converting the metal oxides or other compositions to chlorides in a molten salt, and subsequently using a combination of selective distillation at temperatures below about 500/degree/C, electrolysis at a voltage not more negative that about /minus/1.5 volt versus Ag/AgCl, and precipitation to separate the desired manganese and cobalt salts from other metals and provide cobalt and manganese in metallic forms or compositions from which these metals may be more easily recovered.

  6. Method for removal of heavy metal from molten salt in IFR fuel pyroprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, E.C.; Miller, W.E.; Laidler, J.J.

    1994-02-01

    This report details the pyrometallurgical process for recycling spent metal fuels from the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) which involves electrorefining spent fuel in a molten salt electrolyte (LiCl-KCI-U/PuCl{sub 3}) at 500{degree}C. The total heavy metal chloride concentration in the salt will be about 2 mol %. At some point, the concentrations of alkali, alkaline earth, and rare earth fission products in the salt must be reduced to lower the amount of heat generated in the electrorefiner. The heavy metal concentration in the salt must be reduced before removing the fission products from the salt. The operation uses a lithium-cadmium alloy anode that is solid at 500{degree}C, a solid mandrel cathode with a ceramic catch crucible below to collect heavy metal that falls off it, and a liquid cadmium cathode. The design criteria that had to be met by this equipment included the following: (1) control of the reduction rate by lithium, (2) good separation between heavy metal and rare earths, and (3) the capability to collect heavy metal and rare earths over a wide range of salt compositions. In tests conducted in an engineering-scale electrorefiner (10 kg uranium per cathode), good separation was achieved while removing uranium and rare earths from the salt. Only 13% of the rare earths was removed, while 99.9% of the uranium in the salt was removed; subsequently, the rare earths were also reduced to low concentrations. The uranium concentration in the salt was reduced to 0.05 ppm after uranium and rare earths were transferred from the salt to a solid mandrel cathode with a catch crucible. Rare earth concentrations in the salt were reduced to less than 0.01 wt % in these operations. Similar tests are planned to remove plutonium from the salt in a laboratory-scale (100--300 g heavy metal) electrorefiner.

  7. Release from ISOLDE molten metal targets under pulsed proton beam conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lettry, J.; Catherall, R.; Cyvoct, G.; Evensen, A. H. M.; Lindroos, M.; Jonsson, O. C.; Kugler, E.; Schindl, K.; Ravn, H.; Wildner, E.; Drumm, P.; Obert, J.; Putaux, J. C.; Sauvage, J.

    1996-04-01

    By moving the ISOLDE mass separators from the 600 MeV Synchrocyclotron (SC) to the 1 GeV Proton-Synchrotron-Booster (PS) the instantaneous energy density of the proton beam went up by 3 orders of magnitude. The developments of the molten metal target units and the optimization of the PS proton beam to cope with the effects of the thermal shocks induced by the proton beam are described. The energy density of the PS proton beam was reduced by spatial defocusing and time staggered extraction of the four PS-accelerators. The release from lanthanum, lead and tin targets is discussed for different settings of the proton beam and compared to the release observed at ISOLDE-SC. The yields of Hg isotopes are presented.

  8. Control of molten salt corrosion of fusion structural materials by metallic beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    P. Calderoni; P. Sharpe; H. Nishimura; T. Terai

    2009-04-01

    A series of tests have been performed between 2001 and 2006 at the Safety and Tritium Applied Research facility of the Idaho National Laboratory to demonstrate chemical compatibility between the molten salt flibe (2LiF+BeF2 in moles) and fusion structural materials once suitable fluoride potential control methods are established. The tests adopted metallic beryllium contact as main fluoride potential control, and the results have been published in recent years. A further step was to expose two specimens of low activation ferritic/martensitic steel 9Cr-2W to static corrosion tests that include an active corrosion agent (hydrofluoric gas) in controlled conditions at 530 C, and the results of the tests are presented in this paper. The results confirmed the expected correlation of the HF recovery with the concentration of metallic impurities dissolved in the salt because of specimen corrosion. The metals concentration dropped to level close to the detectable limit when the beryllium rod was inserted and increased once the content of excess beryllium in the system had been consumed by HF reduction and specimens corrosion progressed. Metallographic analysis of the samples after 500 hours exposure in reactive conditions showed evidence of the formation of unstable chromium oxide layers on the specimens surface.

  9. Room temperature inorganic ``quasi-molten salts`` as alkali-metal electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, K.; Zhang, S.; Angell, C.A.

    1996-11-01

    Room temperature inorganic liquids of high ionic conductivity have been prepared by reacting Lewis acid AlCl with sulfonyl chlorides. The mechanism is not clear at this time since a crystal structure study of the 1:1 complex with CH{sub 3}SO{sub 2}Cl (T{sub m} = 30 C) is not consistent with a simple chloride transfer to create AlClO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} anions. The liquid is in a state somewhere between ionic and molecular. A new term quasi-molten salt is adopted to describe this state. A comparably conducting liquid can be made using BCL{sub 3} in place of AlCl{sub 3}. Unlike their organic counterparts based on ammonium cations (e.g., pyridinium or imidazolium) which reduce in the presence of alkali metals, this inorganic class of cation shows great stability against electrochemical reduction (ca. {minus}1.0 V vs. Li{sup +}/Li), with the useful consequence that reversible lithium and sodium metal deposition/stripping can be supported. The electrochemical window for these quasi-salts with AlCl{sub 3} ranges up to 5.0 V, and their room temperature conductivities exceed 10{sup {minus}4} S/cm. They dissolve lithium and sodium tetrachloroaluminates up to mole fraction {approximately} 0.6 at 100 C and intermediate compositions are permanently stable at ambient. The resultant lithium or sodium salt solutions exhibit electrochemical windows of 4.5--5.0 V vs. Li{sup +}/Li or Na{sup +}/Na and show room temperature conductivities of 10{sup {minus}3.0}--10{sup {minus}2.5} S/cm. In preliminary charge/discharge tests, the cell Li/``quasi-ionic liquid electrolyte``/Li{sub 1+x}Mn{sub 2}O{sub 4} showed a discharge capacity of ca. 110 mAh/(g of cathode) and sustained 80% of the initial capacity after 60 cycles, indicating that these quasi-molten salt-based electrolytes are promising candidates for alkali-metal batteries.

  10. Utilization of Heavy Metal Molten Salts in the ARIES-RS Fusion Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Übeyli, Mustafa; Yapıcı, Hüseyin

    2008-09-01

    ARIES-RS is one of the major magnetic fusion energy reactor designs that uses a blanket having vanadium alloy structure cooled by lithium [1, 2]. It is a deuterium-tritium (DT) fusion driven reactor, having a fusion power of 2170 MW [1, 2]. This study presents the neutronic analysis of the ARIES-RS fusion reactor using heavy metal molten salts in which Li2BeF4 as the main constituent was mixed with increased mole fractions of heavy metal salt (ThF4 or UF4) starting by 2 mol.% up to 12 mol.%. Neutron transport calculations were carried out with the help of the SCALE 4.3 system by solving the Boltzmann transport equation with the XSDRNPM code in 238 neutron groups and a S 8- P 3 approximation. According to the numerical results, tritium self-sufficiency was attained for the coolants, Flibe with 2% UF4 or ThF4 and 4% UF4. In addition, higher energy multiplication values were found for the salt with UF4 compared to that with ThF4. Furthermore, significant amount of high quality nuclear fuel was produced to be used in external reactors.

  11. A furnace and environmental cell for the in situ investigation of molten salt electrolysis using high-energy X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Styles, Mark J; Rowles, Matthew R; Madsen, Ian C; McGregor, Katherine; Urban, Andrew J; Snook, Graeme A; Scarlett, Nicola V Y; Riley, Daniel P

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the design, construction and implementation of a relatively large controlled-atmosphere cell and furnace arrangement. The purpose of this equipment is to facilitate the in situ characterization of materials used in molten salt electrowinning cells, using high-energy X-ray scattering techniques such as synchrotron-based energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction. The applicability of this equipment is demonstrated by quantitative measurements of the phase composition of a model inert anode material, which were taken during an in situ study of an operational Fray-Farthing-Chen Cambridge electrowinning cell, featuring molten CaCl(2) as the electrolyte. The feasibility of adapting the cell design to investigate materials in other high-temperature environments is also discussed. PMID:22186642

  12. A furnace and environmental cell for the in situ investigation of molten salt electrolysis using high-energy X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Styles, Mark J; Rowles, Matthew R; Madsen, Ian C; McGregor, Katherine; Urban, Andrew J; Snook, Graeme A; Scarlett, Nicola V Y; Riley, Daniel P

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the design, construction and implementation of a relatively large controlled-atmosphere cell and furnace arrangement. The purpose of this equipment is to facilitate the in situ characterization of materials used in molten salt electrowinning cells, using high-energy X-ray scattering techniques such as synchrotron-based energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction. The applicability of this equipment is demonstrated by quantitative measurements of the phase composition of a model inert anode material, which were taken during an in situ study of an operational Fray-Farthing-Chen Cambridge electrowinning cell, featuring molten CaCl(2) as the electrolyte. The feasibility of adapting the cell design to investigate materials in other high-temperature environments is also discussed.

  13. In situ NMR spectroscopy: inulin biomass conversion in ZnCl₂ molten salt hydrate medium-SnCl₄ addition controls product distribution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yingxiong; Pedersen, Christian Marcus; Qiao, Yan; Deng, Tiansheng; Shi, Jing; Hou, Xianglin

    2015-01-22

    The dehydration of inulin biomass to the platform chemicals, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) and levulinic acid (LA), in ZnCl2 molten salt hydrate medium was investigated. The influence of the Lewis acid catalyst, SnCl4, on the product distribution was examined. An in situ(1)H NMR technique was employed to follow the reaction at the molecular level. The experimental results revealed that only 5-HMF was obtained from degradation of inulin biomass in ZnCl2 molten salt hydrate medium, while the LA was gradually becoming the main product when the reaction temperature was increased in the presence of the Lewis acid catalyst SnCl4. In situ NMR spectroscopy could monitor the reaction and give valuable insight.

  14. In situ NMR spectroscopy: inulin biomass conversion in ZnCl₂ molten salt hydrate medium-SnCl₄ addition controls product distribution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yingxiong; Pedersen, Christian Marcus; Qiao, Yan; Deng, Tiansheng; Shi, Jing; Hou, Xianglin

    2015-01-22

    The dehydration of inulin biomass to the platform chemicals, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) and levulinic acid (LA), in ZnCl2 molten salt hydrate medium was investigated. The influence of the Lewis acid catalyst, SnCl4, on the product distribution was examined. An in situ(1)H NMR technique was employed to follow the reaction at the molecular level. The experimental results revealed that only 5-HMF was obtained from degradation of inulin biomass in ZnCl2 molten salt hydrate medium, while the LA was gradually becoming the main product when the reaction temperature was increased in the presence of the Lewis acid catalyst SnCl4. In situ NMR spectroscopy could monitor the reaction and give valuable insight. PMID:25439916

  15. Aerodynamic levitator for in situ x-ray structure measurements on high temperature and molten nuclear fuel materials.

    PubMed

    Weber, J K R; Tamalonis, A; Benmore, C J; Alderman, O L G; Sendelbach, S; Hebden, A; Williamson, M A

    2016-07-01

    An aerodynamic levitator with carbon dioxide laser beam heating was integrated with a hermetically sealed controlled atmosphere chamber and sample handling mechanism. The system enabled containment of radioactive samples and control of the process atmosphere chemistry. The chamber was typically operated at a pressure of approximately 0.9 bars to ensure containment of the materials being processed. Samples 2.5-3 mm in diameter were levitated in flowing gas to achieve containerless conditions. Levitated samples were heated to temperatures of up to 3500 °C with a partially focused carbon dioxide laser beam. Sample temperature was measured using an optical pyrometer. The sample environment was integrated with a high energy (100 keV) x-ray synchrotron beamline to enable in situ structure measurements to be made on levitated samples as they were heated, melted, and supercooled. The system was controlled from outside the x-ray beamline hutch by using a LabVIEW program. Measurements have been made on hot solid and molten uranium dioxide and binary uranium dioxide-zirconium dioxide compositions. PMID:27475566

  16. Aerodynamic levitator for in situ x-ray structure measurements on high temperature and molten nuclear fuel materials.

    PubMed

    Weber, J K R; Tamalonis, A; Benmore, C J; Alderman, O L G; Sendelbach, S; Hebden, A; Williamson, M A

    2016-07-01

    An aerodynamic levitator with carbon dioxide laser beam heating was integrated with a hermetically sealed controlled atmosphere chamber and sample handling mechanism. The system enabled containment of radioactive samples and control of the process atmosphere chemistry. The chamber was typically operated at a pressure of approximately 0.9 bars to ensure containment of the materials being processed. Samples 2.5-3 mm in diameter were levitated in flowing gas to achieve containerless conditions. Levitated samples were heated to temperatures of up to 3500 °C with a partially focused carbon dioxide laser beam. Sample temperature was measured using an optical pyrometer. The sample environment was integrated with a high energy (100 keV) x-ray synchrotron beamline to enable in situ structure measurements to be made on levitated samples as they were heated, melted, and supercooled. The system was controlled from outside the x-ray beamline hutch by using a LabVIEW program. Measurements have been made on hot solid and molten uranium dioxide and binary uranium dioxide-zirconium dioxide compositions.

  17. Aerodynamic levitator for in situ x-ray structure measurements on high temperature and molten nuclear fuel materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, J. K. R.; Tamalonis, A.; Benmore, C. J.; Alderman, O. L. G.; Sendelbach, S.; Hebden, A.; Williamson, M. A.

    2016-07-01

    An aerodynamic levitator with carbon dioxide laser beam heating was integrated with a hermetically sealed controlled atmosphere chamber and sample handling mechanism. The system enabled containment of radioactive samples and control of the process atmosphere chemistry. The chamber was typically operated at a pressure of approximately 0.9 bars to ensure containment of the materials being processed. Samples 2.5-3 mm in diameter were levitated in flowing gas to achieve containerless conditions. Levitated samples were heated to temperatures of up to 3500 °C with a partially focused carbon dioxide laser beam. Sample temperature was measured using an optical pyrometer. The sample environment was integrated with a high energy (100 keV) x-ray synchrotron beamline to enable in situ structure measurements to be made on levitated samples as they were heated, melted, and supercooled. The system was controlled from outside the x-ray beamline hutch by using a LabVIEW program. Measurements have been made on hot solid and molten uranium dioxide and binary uranium dioxide-zirconium dioxide compositions.

  18. Fundamental studies on ultrasonic cavitation-assisted molten metal processing of A356-nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoda

    The usage of lightweight high-performance components is expected to increase significantly as automotive, military and aerospace industries are required to improve the energy efficiency and the performance of their products. A356, which is much lighter than steel, is an attractive replacement material. Therefore, it is of great interest to enhance its properties. There is strong evidence that the microstructure and mechanical properties can be considerably improved if nanoparticles are used as reinforcement to form metal-matrix-nano-composite (MMNC). Several recent studies revealed that ultrasonic vibration is highly efficient in dispersing nanoparticles into the melt and producing MMNC. In this thesis, a detailed analysis of the microstructure and mechanical properties is provided for an A356 alloy enhanced with Al2O 3 and SiC nanoparticles via ultrasonic processing. Each type of the nanoparticles was inserted into the A356 molten metal and dispersed by ultrasonic cavitation and acoustic streaming technology (UST) to avoid agglomeration or coalescence. The results showed that microstructures were greatly refined and with the addition of nanoparticles, tensile strength, yield strength and elongation increased significantly. SEM and EDS analyses were also performed to analyze the dispersion of nanoparticles in the A356 matrix. Since the ultrasonic energy is concentrated in a small region under the ultrasonic probe, it is difficult to ensure proper cavitation and acoustic streaming for efficient dispersion of the nanoparticles (especially in larger UST systems) without to determine the suitable ultrasonic parameters via modeling and simulation. Accordingly, another goal of this thesis was to develop well-controlled UST experiments that can be used in the development and validation of a recently developed UST modeling and simulation tool.

  19. Liquid Metal Corrosion of 316L Stainless Steel, 410 Stainless Steel, and 1015 Carbon Steel in a Molten Zinc Bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jing; Bright, Mark A.; Liu, Xingbo; Barbero, Ever

    2007-11-01

    Corrosion tests of 1015 low-carbon steel and two stainless steels (410 and 316L) were conducted in a pure zinc bath (99.98 wt pct Zn) in order to better understand the reaction mechanisms that occur during the degradation of submerged hardware at industrial general (batch) galvanizing operations. Through this testing, it was found that, in general, 316L stainless steel showed the best dissolution resistance among these three alloys, while 1015 carbon steel provided a lower solubility than 410 stainless steel. Investigating the failure mechanisms, both metallurgical composition and lattice structure played important roles in the molten metal corrosion behaviors of these alloys. High contents of nickel combined with the influence of chromium improved the resistance to molten zinc corrosion. Moreover, a face-centered-cubic (fcc) structure was more corrosion resistant than body-centered-cubic (bcc) possibly due to the compactness of the atomic structure. Analogously, the body-centered-tetragonal (bct) martensite lattice structure possessed enhanced susceptibility to zinc corrosion as a result of the greater atomic spacing and high strain energy. Finally, an increased bath temperature played an important role in molten metal corrosion by accelerating the dissolution process and changing the nature of intermetallic layers.

  20. Deposition Behavior of Semi-Molten Spray Particles During Flame Spraying of Porous Metal Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jian-Tao; Ren, Jun-Qiang; Huo, Hui-Bin; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Cheng-Xin; Li, Chang-Jiu

    2014-08-01

    Porous 316L stainless steel deposits were fabricated by flame spraying semi-molten particles with different melting degrees and spray angles to understand the deposition behavior of semi-molten spray particles. The effects of spray angle relative on the deposition efficiency and deposit porosity were investigated. The morphology of individual splats deposited on flat surface at different angles was examined. The results show that the spray angle had a significant influence on the deposit porosity, pore structure, and deposition efficiency. The slipping of solid core in semi-molten spray particle was clearly observed when semi-molten particles impacted on the polished substrate with an inclined angle. A random model was proposed to simulate the process of particle deposition. It was found that after considering the effects of both solid particle slipping upon impact and particle melting degree, the porosity calculated by simulation with the model agreed well with the experimental observation.

  1. An on-line ultrasonic cleanliness analyzer for molten light metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Yuu; Moisan, Jean-François; Jen, Cheng-Kuei; Zhang, Yuanbei; Su, Chun-Yi

    2004-02-01

    Ultrasonic techniques to evaluate the cleanliness of molten aluminum and magnesium using clad steel buffer rods are presented in this article. Backscattered ultrasonic signals from silicon carbide particles, added to molten aluminum, were detected with ultrasonic pulse-echo and pitch-catch modes at an ultrasonic frequency of 10 MHz. The scattered signals from inclusions, which might be oxide films and/or particles, in molten magnesium, were also detected. To establish the procedure and to investigate the optimum system configurations for evaluating melt cleanliness, a particle flow simulator was constructed that uses water and polyvinyl chloride particles. Also developed was a prototype of an on-line ultrasonic cleanliness analyzer for molten magnesium.

  2. Joule-Heated Molten Regolith Electrolysis Reactor Concepts for Oxygen and Metals Production on the Moon and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibille, Laurent; Dominques, Jesus A.

    2012-01-01

    The maturation of Molten Regolith Electrolysis (MRE) as a viable technology for oxygen and metals production on explored planets relies on the realization of the self-heating mode for the reactor. Joule heat generated during regolith electrolysis creates thermal energy that should be able to maintain the molten phase (similar to electrolytic Hall-Heroult process for aluminum production). Self-heating via Joule heating offers many advantages: (1) The regolith itself is the crucible material, it protects the vessel walls (2) Simplifies the engineering of the reactor (3) Reduces power consumption (no external heating) (4) Extends the longevity of the reactor. Predictive modeling is a tool chosen to perform dimensional analysis of a self-heating reactor: (1) Multiphysics modeling (COMSOL) was selected for Joule heat generation and heat transfer (2) Objective is to identify critical dimensions for first reactor prototype.

  3. The electrochemistry of metals in room-temperature chloroaluminate molten salts

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Xiao-Hong.

    1992-01-01

    The room-temperature chloroaluminate molten salt, aluminum chloride-1-methyl-3-ethylimidazolium chloride has proven to be useful electrolyte for the electrodeposition and electrodissolution of metals. The electrodeposition of lead, tin, silver, gold, and mercury was studied in this melt. Evidence for the underpotential deposition of lead and silver in acidic (66.7-33.3 mol%) melt and tin in acidic and basic (44.4-55.6 mol%) melt was found at polycrystalline gold. Nucleation overpotentials were observed for the deposition of mercury on gold in basic melt. The deposition of lead and silver from acidic melt and the deposition of gold from basic melt on glassy carbon involves progressive 3-D nucleation on a large number of active sites with hemispherical diffusion-controlled growth of the nuclei. The deposition of tin and and mercury from acidic melt exhibits progressive 3-D nucleation on a finite number of active sites. The deposition of tin and mercury from basic melt on glassy carbon involves instantaneous 3-D nucleation. The electrode-position of lead and silver from acidic melt on tungsten involves instantaneous 3-D nucleation, whereas the electrodeposition of gold and mercury from basic melt exhibits 3-D progressive nucleation. The deposition of lead and silver from acidic melt and the deposition of tin from both acidic and basic melt on platinum does not exhibit obvious evidence for either UPD or nucleation. The electrodeposition of gold and mercury on platinum from basic melt involves progressive 3-D nucleation. The voltammetric oxidation of Sn(II) to Sn(IV) is hindered by the weak adsorption of Sn(II). Sn(IV) is complexed as [SnCl[sub 6

  4. Hydrogen-transparent metal surfaces produced by use of molten salts with very low oxygen and water activities

    SciTech Connect

    Deublein, G.; Huggins, R.A. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1989-08-01

    One can employ simple thermodynamic principles to predict conditions under which metals will not form hydrogen-blocking surface oxide layers in electrolyte environments. These principles are used to show that very low oxygen and water activities can be produced in some halide-based molten salt systems by the incorporation of alkali hydrides. Under these conditions, some normally very reactive metals will not form oxide surface layers. As a result, rapid interfacial and surface/bulk equilibria with hydrogen can be attained. Experiments are presented that verify these principles in the titanium-hydrogen and vanadium-hydrogen systems by using electro chemical methods to measure the thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of the solution of hydrogen and the formation of metal hydrides. In addition, it is shown that interfacial equilibrium is obtained very rapidly upon iron and aluminum in such metals.

  5. NOVEL IN-SITU METAL AND MINERAL EXTRACTION TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn O'Gorman; Hans von Michaelis; Gregory J. Olson

    2004-09-22

    This white paper summarizes the state of art of in-situ leaching of metals and minerals, and describes a new technology concept employing improved fragmentation of ores underground in order to prepare the ore for more efficient in-situ leaching, combined with technology to continuously improve solution flow patterns through the ore during the leaching process. The process parameters and economic benefits of combining the new concept with chemical and biological leaching are described. A summary is provided of the next steps required to demonstrate the technology with the goal of enabling more widespread use of in-situ leaching.

  6. Investigation of molten metal droplet deposition and solidification for 3D printing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chien-Hsun; Tsai, Ho-Lin; Wu, Yu-Che; Hwang, Weng-Sing

    2016-09-01

    This study investigated the transient transport phenomenon during the pile up of molten lead-free solder via the inkjet printing method. With regard to the droplet impact velocity, the distance from nozzle to substrate can be controlled by using the pulse voltage and distance control apparatus. A high-speed digital camera was used to record the solder impact and examine the accuracy of the pile up. These impact conditions correspond to We  =  2.1-15.1 and Oh  =  5.4  ×  10-3-3.8  ×  10-3. The effects of impact velocity and relative distance between two types of molten droplets on the shape of the impact mode are examined. The results show that the optimal parameters of the distance from nozzle to substrate and the spreading factor in this experiment are 0.5 mm and 1.33. The diameter, volume and velocity of the inkjet solder droplet are around 37-65 μm, 25-144 picoliters, and 2.0-3.7 m s-1, respectively. The vertical and inclined column structures of molten lead-free solder can be fabricated using piezoelectric ink-jet printing systems. The end-shapes of the 3D micro structure have been found to be dependent upon the distance from nozzle to substrate and the impact velocity of the molten lead-free solder droplet.

  7. Presence of Li clusters in molten LiCl-Li

    DOE PAGES

    Merwin, Augustus; Phillips, William C.; Williamson, Mark A.; Willit, James L.; Motsegood, Perry N.; Chidambaram, Dev

    2016-05-05

    Molten mixtures of lithium chloride and metallic lithium are of significant interest in various metal oxide reduction processes. These solutions have been reported to exhibit seemingly anomalous physical characteristics that lack a comprehensive explanation. ln the current work, the physical chemistry of molten solutions of lithium chloride and metallic lithium, with and without lithium oxide, was investigated using in situ Raman spectroscopy. The Raman spectra obtained from these solutions were in agreement with the previously reported spectrum of the lithium cluster, Li8. Furthermore, this observation is indicative of a nanofluid type colloidal suspension of Li8, in a molten salt matrix.more » It is suggested that the formation and suspension of lithium clusters in lithium chloride is the cause of various phenomena exhibited by these solutions that were previously unexplainable.« less

  8. Presence of Li Clusters in Molten LiCl-Li

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merwin, Augustus; Phillips, William C.; Williamson, Mark A.; Willit, James L.; Motsegood, Perry N.; Chidambaram, Dev

    2016-05-01

    Molten mixtures of lithium chloride and metallic lithium are of significant interest in various metal oxide reduction processes. These solutions have been reported to exhibit seemingly anomalous physical characteristics that lack a comprehensive explanation. In the current work, the physical chemistry of molten solutions of lithium chloride and metallic lithium, with and without lithium oxide, was investigated using in situ Raman spectroscopy. The Raman spectra obtained from these solutions were in agreement with the previously reported spectrum of the lithium cluster, Li8. This observation is indicative of a nanofluid type colloidal suspension of Li8 in a molten salt matrix. It is suggested that the formation and suspension of lithium clusters in lithium chloride is the cause of various phenomena exhibited by these solutions that were previously unexplainable.

  9. Presence of Li Clusters in Molten LiCl-Li

    PubMed Central

    Merwin, Augustus; Phillips, William C.; Williamson, Mark A.; Willit, James L.; Motsegood, Perry N.; Chidambaram, Dev

    2016-01-01

    Molten mixtures of lithium chloride and metallic lithium are of significant interest in various metal oxide reduction processes. These solutions have been reported to exhibit seemingly anomalous physical characteristics that lack a comprehensive explanation. In the current work, the physical chemistry of molten solutions of lithium chloride and metallic lithium, with and without lithium oxide, was investigated using in situ Raman spectroscopy. The Raman spectra obtained from these solutions were in agreement with the previously reported spectrum of the lithium cluster, Li8. This observation is indicative of a nanofluid type colloidal suspension of Li8 in a molten salt matrix. It is suggested that the formation and suspension of lithium clusters in lithium chloride is the cause of various phenomena exhibited by these solutions that were previously unexplainable. PMID:27145895

  10. Presence of Li Clusters in Molten LiCl-Li.

    PubMed

    Merwin, Augustus; Phillips, William C; Williamson, Mark A; Willit, James L; Motsegood, Perry N; Chidambaram, Dev

    2016-01-01

    Molten mixtures of lithium chloride and metallic lithium are of significant interest in various metal oxide reduction processes. These solutions have been reported to exhibit seemingly anomalous physical characteristics that lack a comprehensive explanation. In the current work, the physical chemistry of molten solutions of lithium chloride and metallic lithium, with and without lithium oxide, was investigated using in situ Raman spectroscopy. The Raman spectra obtained from these solutions were in agreement with the previously reported spectrum of the lithium cluster, Li8. This observation is indicative of a nanofluid type colloidal suspension of Li8 in a molten salt matrix. It is suggested that the formation and suspension of lithium clusters in lithium chloride is the cause of various phenomena exhibited by these solutions that were previously unexplainable. PMID:27145895

  11. Partition of actinides and fission products between metal and molten salt phases: Theory, measurement, and application to IFR pyroprocess development

    SciTech Connect

    Ackerman, J.P.; Johnson, T.R.

    1993-10-01

    The chemical basis of Integral Fast Reactor fuel reprocessing (pyroprocessing) is partition of fuel, cladding, and fission product elements between molten LiCl-KCl and either a solid metal phase or a liquid cadmium phase. The partition reactions are described herein, and the thermodynamic basis for predicting distributions of actinides and fission products in the pyroprocess is discussed. The critical role of metal-phase activity coefficients, especially those of rare earth and the transuranic elements, is described. Measured separation factors, which are analogous to equilibrium constants but which involve concentrations rather than activities, are presented. The uses of thermodynamic calculations in process development are described, as are computer codes developed for calculating material flows and phase compositions in pyroprocessing.

  12. Investigation of molten metal droplet deposition and solidification for 3D printing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chien-Hsun; Tsai, Ho-Lin; Wu, Yu-Che; Hwang, Weng-Sing

    2016-09-01

    This study investigated the transient transport phenomenon during the pile up of molten lead-free solder via the inkjet printing method. With regard to the droplet impact velocity, the distance from nozzle to substrate can be controlled by using the pulse voltage and distance control apparatus. A high-speed digital camera was used to record the solder impact and examine the accuracy of the pile up. These impact conditions correspond to We  =  2.1–15.1 and Oh  =  5.4  ×  10‑3–3.8  ×  10‑3. The effects of impact velocity and relative distance between two types of molten droplets on the shape of the impact mode are examined. The results show that the optimal parameters of the distance from nozzle to substrate and the spreading factor in this experiment are 0.5 mm and 1.33. The diameter, volume and velocity of the inkjet solder droplet are around 37–65 μm, 25–144 picoliters, and 2.0–3.7 m s‑1, respectively. The vertical and inclined column structures of molten lead-free solder can be fabricated using piezoelectric ink-jet printing systems. The end-shapes of the 3D micro structure have been found to be dependent upon the distance from nozzle to substrate and the impact velocity of the molten lead-free solder droplet.

  13. Rotating Molten Metallic Drops and Related Phenomena: A New Approach to the Surface Tension Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, Won-Kyu; Ishikawa, Takehiko

    2000-01-01

    Molten aluminum and tin drops were levitated in a high vacuum by controlled electric fields, and they were systematically rotated by applying by a rotating magnetic field. When the evolution of the drop shape was measured as a function of rotation frequency, it agreed quantitatively well with the Brown and Scriven's theoretical prediction. The normalized rotation frequencies at the bifurcation point agreed with the predicted value 0.559, within 2%. An anomalous phenomenon which totally deviated from the prediction was observed in rotating molten tin drops when they were kept in a high rotation rate for several hours. No anomaly was observed in aluminum drops when they underwent similar condition. It was speculated that under the strong centrifugal force in the drop the tin isotopes must be separating. Since Al-27 is essentially the only naturally abundant isotope in the aluminum drops, the same anomaly is not expected. Based on the shape deformation of a rotating drop, an alternate approach to the surface tension measurement was verified. This new surface tension measurement technique was applied to a glassforming alloy, Zr(41.2)Ti(13.8)Cu(12.5)Ni(10.0)Be(22.5) in its highly viscous states. Also demonstrated in the paper was a use of a molten aluminum drop to verify the Busse's prediction of the influence of the drop rotation on the drop oscillation frequency.

  14. Thermal Analysis of Surrogate Simulated Molten Salts with Metal Chloride Impurities for Electrorefining Used Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Toni Y. Gutknecht; Guy L. Fredrickson; Vivek Utgikar

    2012-04-01

    This project is a fundamental study to measure thermal properties (liquidus, solidus, phase transformation, and enthalpy) of molten salt systems of interest to electrorefining operations, which are used in both the fuel cycle research & development mission and the spent fuel treatment mission of the Department of Energy. During electrorefining operations the electrolyte accumulates elements more active than uranium (transuranics, fission products and bond sodium). The accumulation needs to be closely monitored because the thermal properties of the electrolyte will change as the concentration of the impurities increases. During electrorefining (processing techniques used at the Idaho National Laboratory to separate uranium from spent nuclear fuel) it is important for the electrolyte to remain in a homogeneous liquid phase for operational safeguard and criticality reasons. The phase stability of molten salts in an electrorefiner may be adversely affected by the buildup of fission products in the electrolyte. Potential situations that need to be avoided are: (i) build up of fissile elements in the salt approaching the criticality limits specified for the vessel (ii) freezing of the salts due to change in the liquidus temperature and (iii) phase separation (non-homogenous solution) of elements. The stability (and homogeneity) of the phases can potentially be monitored through the thermal characterization of the salts, which can be a function of impurity concentration. This work describes the experimental results of typical salts compositions, consisting of chlorides of strontium, samarium, praseodymium, lanthanum, barium, cerium, cesium, neodymium, sodium and gadolinium (as a surrogate for both uranium and plutonium), used in the processing of used nuclear fuels. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to analyze numerous salt samples providing results on the thermal properties. The property of most interest to pyroprocessing is the liquidus temperature. It was

  15. Controlled temperature expansion in oxygen production by molten alkali metal salts

    DOEpatents

    Erickson, Donald C.

    1985-06-04

    A continuous process is set forth for the production of oxygen from an oxygen containing gas stream, such as air, by contacting a feed gas stream with a molten solution of an oxygen acceptor to oxidize the acceptor and cyclically regenerating the oxidized acceptor by releasing oxygen from the acceptor wherein the oxygen-depleted gas stream from the contact zone is treated sequentially to temperature reduction by heat exchange against the feed stream so as to condense out entrained oxygen acceptor for recycle to the process, combustion of the gas stream with fuel to elevate its temperature and expansion of the combusted high temperature gas stream in a turbine to recover power.

  16. Metallicity and kinematics of the bar in situ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babusiaux, C.; Katz, D.; Hill, V.; Royer, F.; Gómez, A.; Arenou, F.; Combes, F.; Di Matteo, P.; Gilmore, G.; Haywood, M.; Robin, A. C.; Rodriguez-Fernandez, N.; Sartoretti, P.; Schultheis, M.

    2014-03-01

    Context. Constraints on the Galactic bulge and bar structures and on their formation history from stellar kinematics and metallicities mainly come from relatively high-latitude fields (|b| > 4°) where a complex mix of stellar population is seen. Aims: We aim here to constrain the formation history of the Galactic bar by studying the radial velocity and metallicity distributions of stars in situ (|b| ≤ 1°). Methods: We observed red clump stars in four fields along the bar's major axis (l = 10°, -6°, 6° and b = 0° plus a field at l = 0°, b = 1°) with low-resolution spectroscopy from FLAMES/GIRAFFE at the VLT, observing around the Ca ii triplet. We developed robust methods for extracting radial velocity and metallicity estimates from these low signal-to-noise spectra. We derived distance probability distributions using Bayesian methods rigorously handling the extinction law. Results: We present radial velocities and metallicity distributions, as well as radial velocity trends with distance. We observe an increase in the radial velocity dispersion near the Galactic plane. We detect the streaming motion of the stars induced by the bar in fields at l = ±6°, the highest velocity components of this bar stream being metal-rich ([Fe/H] ~ 0.2 dex). Our data is consistent with a bar that is inclined at 26 ± 3° from the Sun-Galactic centre line. We observe a significant fraction of metal-poor stars, in particular in the field at l = 0°, b = 1°. We confirm the flattening of the metallicity gradient along the minor axis when getting closer to the plane, with a hint that it could actually be inverted. Conclusions: Our stellar kinematics corresponds to the expected behaviour of a bar issued from the secular evolution of the Galactic disc. The mix of several populations, seen further away from the plane, is also seen in the bar in situ since our metallicity distributions highlight a different spatial distribution between metal-poor and metal-rich stars, the more

  17. Process Demonstration For Lunar In Situ Resource Utilization-Molten Oxide Electrolysis (MSFC Independent Research and Development Project No. 5-81)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, P. A.; Ethridge, E. C.; Hudson, S. B.; Miller, T. Y.; Grugel, R. N.; Sen, S.; Sadoway, D. R.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this Focus Area Independent Research and Development project was to conduct, at Marshall Space Flight Center, an experimental demonstration of the processing of simulated lunar resources by the molten oxide electrolysis process to produce oxygen and metal. In essence, the vision was to develop two key technologies, the first to produce materials (oxygen, metals, and silicon) from lunar resources and the second to produce energy by photocell production on the Moon using these materials. Together, these two technologies have the potential to greatly reduce the costs and risks of NASA s human exploration program. Further, it is believed that these technologies are the key first step toward harvesting abundant materials and energy independent of Earth s resources.

  18. Historical Uses of Meteoritic Metals as Precedent for Modern In-Situ Asteroid Mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krispin, D.; Mardon, A. A.; Fawcett, B. G.

    2016-08-01

    The strain on earth's resources of metal and the metallic density of meteorites mean that in situ asteroid mining is advisable. This has precedent: Use of meteoritic metal dates back to ancient times.

  19. In Situ Synthesis of Metal Nanoparticle Embedded Hybrid Soft Nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Divya, Kizhmuri P; Miroshnikov, Mikhail; Dutta, Debjit; Vemula, Praveen Kumar; Ajayan, Pulickel M; John, George

    2016-09-20

    The allure of integrating the tunable properties of soft nanomaterials with the unique optical and electronic properties of metal nanoparticles has led to the development of organic-inorganic hybrid nanomaterials. A promising method for the synthesis of such organic-inorganic hybrid nanomaterials is afforded by the in situ generation of metal nanoparticles within a host organic template. Due to their tunable surface morphology and porosity, soft organic materials such as gels, liquid crystals, and polymers that are derived from various synthetic or natural compounds can act as templates for the synthesis of metal nanoparticles of different shapes and sizes. This method provides stabilization to the metal nanoparticles by the organic soft material and advantageously precludes the use of external reducing or capping agents in many instances. In this Account, we exemplify the green chemistry approach for synthesizing these materials, both in the choice of gelators as soft material frameworks and in the reduction mechanisms that generate the metal nanoparticles. Established herein is the core design principle centered on conceiving multifaceted amphiphilic soft materials that possess the ability to self-assemble and reduce metal ions into nanoparticles. Furthermore, these soft materials stabilize the in situ generated metal nanoparticles and retain their self-assembly ability to generate metal nanoparticle embedded homogeneous organic-inorganic hybrid materials. We discuss a remarkable example of vegetable-based drying oils as host templates for metal ions, resulting in the synthesis of novel hybrid nanomaterials. The synthesis of metal nanoparticles via polymers and self-assembled materials fabricated via cardanol (a bioorganic monomer derived from cashew nut shell liquid) are also explored in this Account. The organic-inorganic hybrid structures were characterized by several techniques such as UV-visible spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and

  20. In Situ Synthesis of Metal Nanoparticle Embedded Hybrid Soft Nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Divya, Kizhmuri P; Miroshnikov, Mikhail; Dutta, Debjit; Vemula, Praveen Kumar; Ajayan, Pulickel M; John, George

    2016-09-20

    The allure of integrating the tunable properties of soft nanomaterials with the unique optical and electronic properties of metal nanoparticles has led to the development of organic-inorganic hybrid nanomaterials. A promising method for the synthesis of such organic-inorganic hybrid nanomaterials is afforded by the in situ generation of metal nanoparticles within a host organic template. Due to their tunable surface morphology and porosity, soft organic materials such as gels, liquid crystals, and polymers that are derived from various synthetic or natural compounds can act as templates for the synthesis of metal nanoparticles of different shapes and sizes. This method provides stabilization to the metal nanoparticles by the organic soft material and advantageously precludes the use of external reducing or capping agents in many instances. In this Account, we exemplify the green chemistry approach for synthesizing these materials, both in the choice of gelators as soft material frameworks and in the reduction mechanisms that generate the metal nanoparticles. Established herein is the core design principle centered on conceiving multifaceted amphiphilic soft materials that possess the ability to self-assemble and reduce metal ions into nanoparticles. Furthermore, these soft materials stabilize the in situ generated metal nanoparticles and retain their self-assembly ability to generate metal nanoparticle embedded homogeneous organic-inorganic hybrid materials. We discuss a remarkable example of vegetable-based drying oils as host templates for metal ions, resulting in the synthesis of novel hybrid nanomaterials. The synthesis of metal nanoparticles via polymers and self-assembled materials fabricated via cardanol (a bioorganic monomer derived from cashew nut shell liquid) are also explored in this Account. The organic-inorganic hybrid structures were characterized by several techniques such as UV-visible spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and

  1. In situ remediation process using divalent metal cations

    DOEpatents

    Brady, Patrick V.; Khandaker, Nadim R.; Krumhansl, James L.; Teter, David M.

    2004-12-14

    An in situ process for treating ambient solid materials (e.g., soils, aquifer solids, sludges) by adding one or more divalent metal cations to the ambient solid material. The added divalent metal cations, such as Cu.sup.2+ or Zn.sup.2+, combine with metal oxide/hydroxides (e.g., ferric oxide/hydroxide or aluminum oxide/hydroxide) already present in the ambient solid material to form an effective sorbent material having a large number of positively-charged surface complexes that binds and immobilizes anionic contaminant species (e.g., arsenic or chromate). Divalent metal cations can be added, for example, by injecting an aqueous solution of CuSO.sub.4 into an aquifer contaminated with arsenic or chromate. Also, sludges can be stabilized against leaching of anionic contaminants through the addition of divalent metal cations. Also, an inexpensive sorbent material can be easily formed by mixing divalent metal cations with soil that has been removed from the ground.

  2. Effects of shielding gas composition on arc profile and molten pool dynamics in gas metal arc welding of steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L. L.; Lu, F. G.; Wang, H. P.; Murphy, A. B.; Tang, X. H.

    2014-11-01

    In gas metal arc welding, gases of different compositions are used to produce an arc plasma, which heats and melts the workpiece. They also protect the workpiece from the influence of the air during the welding process. This paper models gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes using an in-house simulation code. It investigates the effects of the gas composition on the temperature distribution in the arc and on the molten pool dynamics in gas metal arc welding of steels. Pure argon, pure CO2 and different mixtures of argon and CO2 are considered in the study. The model is validated by comparing the calculated weld profiles with physical weld measurements. The numerical calculations reveal that gas composition greatly affects the arc temperature profile, heat transfer to the workpiece, and consequently the weld dimension. As the CO2 content in the shielding gas increases, a more constricted arc plasma with higher energy density is generated as a result of the increased current density in the arc centre and increased Lorentz force. The calculation also shows that the heat transferred from the arc to the workpiece increases with increasing CO2 content, resulting in a wider and deeper weld pool and decreased reinforcement height.

  3. Selective Reduction of Active Metal Chlorides from Molten LiCl-KCl using Lithium Drawdown

    SciTech Connect

    Michael F. Simpson; Daniel LaBrier; Michael Lineberry; Tae-Sic Yoo

    2012-10-01

    In support of optimizing electrorefining technology for treating spent nuclear fuel, lithium drawdown has been investigated for separating actinides from molten salt electrolyte. Drawdown reaction selectivity is a major issue that needs to be investigated, since the goal is to remove actinides while leaving the fission products in the salt. A series of lithium drawdown tests with surrogate fission product chlorides was run to obtain selectivity data with non-radioactive salts, develop a predictive model, and draw conclusions about the viability of using this process with actinide-loadd salt. Results of tests with CsCl, LaCl3, CeCl3, and NdCl3 are reported here. An equilibrium model has been formulated and fit to the experimental data. Excellent fits to the data were achieved. Based on analysis and results obtained to date, it is concluded that clean separation between minor actinides and lanthanides will be difficult to achieve using lithium drawdown.

  4. Controlled temperature expansion in oxygen production by molten alkali metal salts

    DOEpatents

    Erickson, D.C.

    1985-06-04

    A continuous process is set forth for the production of oxygen from an oxygen containing gas stream, such as air, by contacting a feed gas stream with a molten solution of an oxygen acceptor to oxidize the acceptor and cyclically regenerating the oxidized acceptor by releasing oxygen from the acceptor wherein the oxygen-depleted gas stream from the contact zone is treated sequentially to temperature reduction by heat exchange against the feed stream so as to condense out entrained oxygen acceptor for recycle to the process, combustion of the gas stream with fuel to elevate its temperature and expansion of the combusted high temperature gas stream in a turbine to recover power. 1 fig.

  5. Pour stream breakup of molten IFR (Integral Fast Reactor) metal fuel in sodium

    SciTech Connect

    Gabor, J.D.; Purviance, R.T.; Aeschlimann, R.W.; Spencer, B.W.

    1988-01-01

    Tests have been conducted in which the breakup behavior of kilogram quantities of molten uranium, uranium-zirconium alloy, and uranium-iron alloy pour streams in 600C sodium was studied. A sodium depth of less than 0.3 m was required for hydrodynamic breakup and freezing of 25-mm pour streams of uranium and uranium-zirconium alloy with up to 400C melt superheat. The breakup material was primarily in the form of filaments and sheets with a settled bed voidage on the order of 0.9. The uranium-iron alloy with 800C melt superheat exhibited similar behavior except a sodium depth somewhat greater than 0.3 m was required for breakup and freezing of the particles.

  6. In Situ Synthesis of Metal Sulfide Nanoparticles Based on 2D Metal-Organic Framework Nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qipeng; Zhao, Meiting; Chen, Junze; Chen, Bo; Tan, Chaoliang; Zhang, Xiao; Huang, Ying; Yang, Jian; Cao, Feifei; Yu, Yifu; Ping, Jianfeng; Zhang, Zhicheng; Wu, Xue-Jun; Zhang, Hua

    2016-09-01

    A facile in situ synthetic method is developed to synthesize metal sulfide nanoparticles based on 2D M-TCPP (M = Cu, Cd, or Co, TCPP = tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)porphyrin)) metal-organic framework nanosheets. The obtained CuS/Cu-TCPP composite nanosheet is used as the active material in photoelectrochemical cells, showing notably increased photocurrent due to the improved exciton separation and charge carrier transport.

  7. Molten salt applications in materials processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Brajendra; Olson, David L.

    2005-02-01

    The science of molten salt electrochemistry for electrowinning of reactive metals, such as calcium, and its in situ application in pyro-reduction has been described. Calcium electrowinning has been performed in a 5 10 wt% calcium oxide calcium chloride molten salt by the electrolytic dissociation of calcium oxide. This electrolysis requires the use of a porous ceramic sheath around the anode to keep the cathodically deposited calcium and the anodic gases separate. Stainless steel cathode and graphite anode have been used in the temperature range of 850 950 °C. This salt mixture is produced as a result of the direct oxide reduction (DOR) of reactive metal oxides by calcium in a calcium chloride bath. The primary purpose of this process is to recover the expensive calcium reductant and to recycle calcium chloride. Experimental data have been included to justify the suitability as well as limitations of the electrowinning process. Transport of oxygen ions through the sheath is found to be the rate controlling step. Under the constraints of the reactor design, a calcium recovery rate of approx. 150 g/h was achieved. Feasibility of a process to produce metals by pyrometallurgical reduction, using the calcium reductant produced electrolytically within the same reactor, has been shown in a hybrid process. Several processes are currently under investigation to use this electrowon calcium for in situ reduction of metal oxides.

  8. Development of metal-coated ceramic anodes for molten carbonate fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Khandkar, A.C.; Elangovan, S.; Marianowski, L.G.

    1990-03-01

    This report documents the developmental efforts on metal coating of various ceramic substrates (LiAlO{sub 2}, SrTiO{sub 3}, and LiFeO{sub 2}) and the critical issues associated with fabricating anodes using metal-coated LiAlO{sub 2} substrates. Electroless Ni and Cu coating technology was developed to achieve complete metal coverage on LiAlO{sub 2} powder substrates. Metal coated SrTiO{sub 3} powders were fabricated into anodes by a process identical to that reported in the GE literature. Microstructural examination revealed that the grains of the ceramic had fused together, with the metal having dewetted from the surface of the ceramic. Alternate substrates that might allow for better wetting of the metal on the ceramic such as LiFeO{sub 2} and Li{sub 2}MnO{sub 3} were identified. Cu/Ni-coated (50:50 mol ratio, 50 w/o metal loading) LiFeO{sub 2} anodes were optimized to meet the MCFC anode specifications. Metal-coated gamma-LiAlO{sub 2} substrates were also developed. By using suitable chemical surface modification methods, the gamma-UAlO{sub 2} substrate surface may be modified to allow a stable metal coated anode to be fabricated. Creep testing of the metal coated ceramic anodes were conducted at IGT. It was determined that the predominant creep mechanism is due to particle rearrangement. The anode porosity, and mean pore size had significant effect on the creep of the anode. Lower porosity and pore size consistent with performance criteria are desired to reduce creep. Lower metal loading with uniformity of coverage will result in lower creep behavior of the anode. Of the two substrates evaluated, LiFeO{sub 2} in general exhibited lower creep which was attributed to superior metal adhesion.

  9. Development of metal-coated ceramic anodes for molten carbonate fuel cells. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Khandkar, A.C.; Elangovan, S.; Marianowski, L.G.

    1990-03-01

    This report documents the developmental efforts on metal coating of various ceramic substrates (LiAlO{sub 2}, SrTiO{sub 3}, and LiFeO{sub 2}) and the critical issues associated with fabricating anodes using metal-coated LiAlO{sub 2} substrates. Electroless Ni and Cu coating technology was developed to achieve complete metal coverage on LiAlO{sub 2} powder substrates. Metal coated SrTiO{sub 3} powders were fabricated into anodes by a process identical to that reported in the GE literature. Microstructural examination revealed that the grains of the ceramic had fused together, with the metal having dewetted from the surface of the ceramic. Alternate substrates that might allow for better wetting of the metal on the ceramic such as LiFeO{sub 2} and Li{sub 2}MnO{sub 3} were identified. Cu/Ni-coated (50:50 mol ratio, 50 w/o metal loading) LiFeO{sub 2} anodes were optimized to meet the MCFC anode specifications. Metal-coated gamma-LiAlO{sub 2} substrates were also developed. By using suitable chemical surface modification methods, the gamma-UAlO{sub 2} substrate surface may be modified to allow a stable metal coated anode to be fabricated. Creep testing of the metal coated ceramic anodes were conducted at IGT. It was determined that the predominant creep mechanism is due to particle rearrangement. The anode porosity, and mean pore size had significant effect on the creep of the anode. Lower porosity and pore size consistent with performance criteria are desired to reduce creep. Lower metal loading with uniformity of coverage will result in lower creep behavior of the anode. Of the two substrates evaluated, LiFeO{sub 2} in general exhibited lower creep which was attributed to superior metal adhesion.

  10. Situ formation of apatite for sequestering radionuclides and heavy metals

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Robert C.

    2003-07-15

    Methods for in situ formation in soil of a permeable reactive barrier or zone comprising a phosphate precipitate, such as apatite or hydroxyapatite, which is capable of selectively trapping and removing radionuclides and heavy metal contaminants from the soil, while allowing water or other compounds to pass through. A preparation of a phosphate reagent and a chelated calcium reagent is mixed aboveground and injected into the soil. Subsequently, the chelated calcium reagent biodegrades and slowly releases free calcium. The free calcium reacts with the phosphate reagent to form a phosphate precipitate. Under the proper chemical conditions, apatite or hydroxyapatite can form. Radionuclide and heavy metal contaminants, including lead, strontium, lanthanides, and uranium are then selectively sequestered by sorbing them onto the phosphate precipitate. A reducing agent can be added for reduction and selective sequestration of technetium or selenium contaminants.

  11. Near-Net-Shape Production of Hollow Titanium Alloy Components via Electrochemical Reduction of Metal Oxide Precursors in Molten Salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Di; Xiao, Wei; Chen, George Z.

    2013-04-01

    Metal oxide precursors (ca. 90 wt pct Ti, 6 wt pct Al, and 4 wt pct V) were prepared with a hollow structure in various shapes such as a sphere, miniature golf club head, and cup using a one-step solid slip-casting process. The precursors were then electro-deoxidized in molten calcium chloride [3.2 V, 1173 K (900 °C)] against a graphite anode. After 24 hours of electrolysis, the near-net-shape Ti-6Al-4V product maintained its original shape with controlled shrinkage. Oxygen contents in the Ti-6Al-4V components were typically below 2000 ppm. The maximum compressive stress and modulus of electrolytic products obtained in this work were approximately 243 MPa and 14 GPa, respectively, matching with the requirement for medical implants. Further research directions are discussed for mechanical improvement of the products via densification during or after electrolysis. This simple, fast, and energy-efficient near-net-shape manufacturing method could allow titanium alloy components with desired geometries to be prepared directly from a mixture of metal oxides, promising an innovative technology for the low-cost production of titanium alloy components.

  12. Dispersion and thermal interactions of molten metal fuel settling on a horizontal steel plate through a sodium pool

    SciTech Connect

    Gabor, J.D.; Purviance, R.T.; Aeschlimann, R.W.; Spencer, B.W.

    1989-01-01

    Although the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) possesses inherent safety features, an assessment of the consequences of melting of the metal fuel is necessary for risk analysis. As part of this effort an experimental study was conducted to determine the depths of sodium at 600 C required for pour streams of various molten uranium alloys (U, U-5 wt % Zr, U-10 wt % Zr, and U-10 wt % Fe) to break up and solidify. The quenched particulate material, which was in the shape of filaments and sheets, formed coolable beds because of the high voidage ({approximately}0.9) and large particle size ({approximately}10 mm). In a test with a 0.15-m sodium depth, the fragments from a pure uranium pour stream did not completely solidify but formed an agglomerated mass which did not fuse to the base plate. However, the agglomerated fragments of U-10 wt % Fe eutectic fused to the stainless steel base plate. An analysis of the temperature response of a 25-mm thick base plate was made by volume averaging the properties of the sodium and metal particle phases and assuming two semi-infinite solids coming into contact. Good agreement was obtained with the data during the initial 5 to 10 s of the contact period. 16 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Vapor Explosion of Coolant Jet When Penetrating a Hot Molten Metal

    SciTech Connect

    Perets, Y.; Harari, R.; Sher, E.

    2005-06-15

    The vapor explosion phenomenon is investigated experimentally for a geometrical arrangement in which a cold liquid (water) jet is injected into a hot liquid surface (tin). Medium-scale experiments using 1 kg of molten tin were performed in an open geometry experiment system. In the first phase of the research, the influence of the injection mass flow rate on the likelihood of vapor explosion was investigated in order to map the various relevant regimes. In the second phase, the influence of some selected parameters on the interaction was studied to characterize the relevant parameters of the vapor explosion phenomenon.The range of the initial tin and water temperatures that leads to vapor explosion has been determined in order to define the thermal interaction zone. It is noticed that vapor explosion can occur at high water temperatures even near the saturation point. The delay time for the explosion to occur and the degree of the interaction violence were correlated with the initial tin and water temperatures. We also clarified the triggering point and noted a correlation between the quench temperature and the likelihood of the vapor explosion occurrence.

  14. Linearized model for the hydrodynamic stability investigation of molten fuel jets into the coolant of a Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartel, K.

    1986-02-01

    The hydrodynamic stability of liquid jets in a liquid continuum, both characterized by low viscosity was analyzed. A linearized mathematical model was developed. This model enables the length necessary for fragmentation of a vertical, symmetric jet of molten fuel by hydraulic forces in the coolant of a liquid metal fast breeder reactor to be evaluated. On the basis of this model the FRAG code for numerical calculation of the hydrodynamic fragmentation mechanism was developed.

  15. Evaluating the Long-Term Stability of Metals Precipitated In-Situ

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because metals (including metals and metalloids) cannot be destroyed, unlike organic contaminants, in-situ approaches for their removal from groundwater necessarily involves fixation/immobilization in the solid aquifer matrix. Consequently, the success of precipitation based in...

  16. Electrolysis of a molten semiconductor.

    PubMed

    Yin, Huayi; Chung, Brice; Sadoway, Donald R

    2016-08-24

    Metals cannot be extracted by electrolysis of transition-metal sulfides because as liquids they are semiconductors, which exhibit high levels of electronic conduction and metal dissolution. Herein by introduction of a distinct secondary electrolyte, we reveal a high-throughput electro-desulfurization process that directly converts semiconducting molten stibnite (Sb2S3) into pure (99.9%) liquid antimony and sulfur vapour. At the bottom of the cell liquid antimony pools beneath cathodically polarized molten stibnite. At the top of the cell sulfur issues from a carbon anode immersed in an immiscible secondary molten salt electrolyte disposed above molten stibnite, thereby blocking electronic shorting across the cell. As opposed to conventional extraction practices, direct sulfide electrolysis completely avoids generation of problematic fugitive emissions (CO2, CO and SO2), significantly reduces energy consumption, increases productivity in a single-step process (lower capital and operating costs) and is broadly applicable to a host of electronically conductive transition-metal chalcogenides.

  17. Electrolysis of a molten semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Huayi; Chung, Brice; Sadoway, Donald R.

    2016-08-01

    Metals cannot be extracted by electrolysis of transition-metal sulfides because as liquids they are semiconductors, which exhibit high levels of electronic conduction and metal dissolution. Herein by introduction of a distinct secondary electrolyte, we reveal a high-throughput electro-desulfurization process that directly converts semiconducting molten stibnite (Sb2S3) into pure (99.9%) liquid antimony and sulfur vapour. At the bottom of the cell liquid antimony pools beneath cathodically polarized molten stibnite. At the top of the cell sulfur issues from a carbon anode immersed in an immiscible secondary molten salt electrolyte disposed above molten stibnite, thereby blocking electronic shorting across the cell. As opposed to conventional extraction practices, direct sulfide electrolysis completely avoids generation of problematic fugitive emissions (CO2, CO and SO2), significantly reduces energy consumption, increases productivity in a single-step process (lower capital and operating costs) and is broadly applicable to a host of electronically conductive transition-metal chalcogenides.

  18. An Assessment of Molten Metal Detachment Hazards During Electron Beam Welding in the Space Shuttle Bay at LEO for the International Space Welding Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fragomeni, James M.

    1996-01-01

    In 1997, the United States [NASA] and the Paton Electric Welding Institute are scheduled to cooperate in a flight demonstration on the U.S. Space Shuttle to demonstrate the feasibility of welding in space for a possible repair option for the International Space Station Alpha. This endeavor, known as the International Space Welding Experiment (ISWE), will involve astronauts performing various welding exercises such as brazing, cutting, welding, and coating using an electron beam space welding system that was developed by the E.O. Paton Electric Welding Institute (PWI), Kiev Ukraine. This electron beam welding system known as the "Universal Weld System" consists of hand tools capable of brazing, cutting, autogeneous welding, and coating using an 8 kV (8000 volts) electron beam. The electron beam hand tools have also been developed by the Paton Welding Institute with greater capabilities than the original hand tool, including filler wire feeding, to be used with the Universal Weld System on the U.S. Space Shuttle Bay as part of ISWE. The hand tool(s) known as the Ukrainian Universal Hand [Electron Beam Welding] Tool (UHT) will be utilized for the ISWE Space Shuttle flight welding exercises to perform welding on various metal alloy samples. A total of 61 metal alloy samples, which include 304 stainless steel, Ti-6AI-4V, 2219 aluminum, and 5456 aluminum alloys, have been provided by NASA for the ISWE electron beam welding exercises using the UHT. These samples were chosen to replicate both the U.S. and Russian module materials. The ISWE requires extravehicular activity (EVA) of two astronauts to perform the space shuttle electron beam welding operations of the 61 alloy samples. This study was undertaken to determine if a hazard could exist with ISWE during the electron beam welding exercises in the Space Shuttle Bay using the Ukrainian Universal Weld System with the UHT. The safety issue has been raised with regard to molten metal detachments as a result of several

  19. The molten state of trivalent metal halides and oxides : recent progress.

    SciTech Connect

    Akdeniz, Z.; Price, D. L.; Saboungi, M.-L.; Tosi, M. P.; Materials Science Division; International Centre for Theoretical Physics; Univ. of istanbul; Istituto Nazionale di Fisica della Materia and Classe di Scienze

    1998-01-01

    The structures of trivalent metal halides and oxides have been reviewed with emphasis on the stability of a six-fold coordination of metal ions, e.g. in YCl{sub 3} and YO{sub 3}, and its competition with a four-fold coordination, e.g. in AlCl{sub 3} and AlO{sub 3}. Upon melting in some cases the crystalline coordination is preserved, leading to the formation of either an ionic network or a molecular structure, while in other cases a transition to a different kind of structure occurs, such as that from an ionic to a molecular-type structure. Specific examples will be selected from recent experiments in which structural information at the partial level and Raman spectra have been obtained, and the X-ray average structure has been complemented by electrical transport data. Directions for future work with a potential impact on our understanding of the complex structure-property relations in the crystalline and liquid state have been proposed.

  20. ENGINEERING BULLETIN: IN SITU VITRIFICATION TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In situ vitrification (ISV) uses electrical power to heat and melt soil, sludge, mine tailings, buried wastes, and sediments contaminated with organic, inorganic, and metal-bearing hazardous wastes. The molten material cools to form a hard, monolithic, chemically inert, stable...

  1. Refractory metals in molten salts: Theory and simulation of geometry, electronic structure, and electron transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koslowski, Thorsten

    2000-12-01

    In this work, we present a theoretical and numerical study of the microscopic and electronic structure of solutions of refractory metal halides in alkali halide melts, [NbCl5]x[KCl]1-x and [TaCl5]x[KCl]1-x with 0⩽x⩽0.5. The geometry of the melts is described by ensembles of charged hard spheres, the electronic structure is modeled by a tight-binding Hamiltonian, which is extended by a reaction field to describe the diabatic energy profile of the electronic self-exchange in many-orbital mixed-valence systems. Despite its simplicity, the model leads to the formation of distorted octahedral [NbCl6]- and [TaCl6]- clusters, as evident both from the inspection of the simulation geometries and from the analysis of the partial pair distribution functions. Even in the presence of the strong potential energy fluctuations characteristic of ionic liquids, the octahedral structure is manifest in the density of states in a t2g-eg splitting of the conduction band. The Hamiltonian that describes mixed-valence systems is solved self-consistently. Using an attractive Hubbard parameter of 1.5 eV, we show that the numerical results can be interpreted by Marcus' theory of outer-sphere electron transfer reactions with a reorganization energy of 2.2 eV, an electronic coupling parameter of 0.12 eV, and an activation energy of 0.42 eV. Both anion-d metal cation and intervalence charge transfer excitations contribute to the optical absorption spectrum, the latter leads to a pronounced polaron absorption peak. These findings are compared to recent experimental results.

  2. Numerical Simulation of Ejected Molten Metal Nanoparticles Liquified by Laser Irradiation: Interplay of Geometry and Dewetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afkhami, S.; Kondic, L.

    2013-07-01

    Metallic nanoparticles, liquified by fast laser irradiation, go through a rapid change of shape attempting to minimize their surface energy. The resulting nanodrops may be ejected from the substrate when the mechanisms leading to dewetting are sufficiently strong, as in the experiments involving gold nanoparticles [Habenicht et al., Science 309, 2043 (2005)]. We use a direct continuum-level approach to accurately model the process of liquid nanodrop formation and the subsequent ejection from the substrate. Our computations show a significant role of inertial effects and an elaborate interplay of initial geometry and wetting properties: e.g., we can control the direction of ejection by prescribing appropriate initial shape and/or wetting properties. The basic insight regarding ejection itself can be reached by considering a simple effective model based on an energy balance. We validate our computations by comparing directly with the experiments specified above involving the length scales measured in hundreds of nanometers and with molecular dynamics simulations on much shorter scales measured in tens of atomic diameters, as by M. Fuentes-Cabrera et al. [Phys. Rev. E 83, 041603 (2011)]. The quantitative agreement, in addition to illustrating how to control particle ejection, shows utility of continuum-based simulation in describing dynamics on nanoscale quantitatively, even in a complex setting as considered here.

  3. A Molten Salt Lithium-Oxygen Battery.

    PubMed

    Giordani, Vincent; Tozier, Dylan; Tan, Hongjin; Burke, Colin M; Gallant, Betar M; Uddin, Jasim; Greer, Julia R; McCloskey, Bryan D; Chase, Gregory V; Addison, Dan

    2016-03-01

    Despite the promise of extremely high theoretical capacity (2Li + O2 ↔ Li2O2, 1675 mAh per gram of oxygen), many challenges currently impede development of Li/O2 battery technology. Finding suitable electrode and electrolyte materials remains the most elusive challenge to date. A radical new approach is to replace volatile, unstable and air-intolerant organic electrolytes common to prior research in the field with alkali metal nitrate molten salt electrolytes and operate the battery above the liquidus temperature (>80 °C). Here we demonstrate an intermediate temperature Li/O2 battery using a lithium anode, a molten nitrate-based electrolyte (e.g., LiNO3-KNO3 eutectic) and a porous carbon O2 cathode with high energy efficiency (∼95%) and improved rate capability because the discharge product, lithium peroxide, is stable and moderately soluble in the molten salt electrolyte. The results, supported by essential state-of-the-art electrochemical and analytical techniques such as in situ pressure and gas analyses, scanning electron microscopy, rotating disk electrode voltammetry, demonstrate that Li2O2 electrochemically forms and decomposes upon cycling with discharge/charge overpotentials as low as 50 mV. We show that the cycle life of such batteries is limited only by carbon reactivity and by the uncontrolled precipitation of Li2O2, which eventually becomes electrically disconnected from the O2 electrode. PMID:26871485

  4. A Molten Salt Lithium-Oxygen Battery.

    PubMed

    Giordani, Vincent; Tozier, Dylan; Tan, Hongjin; Burke, Colin M; Gallant, Betar M; Uddin, Jasim; Greer, Julia R; McCloskey, Bryan D; Chase, Gregory V; Addison, Dan

    2016-03-01

    Despite the promise of extremely high theoretical capacity (2Li + O2 ↔ Li2O2, 1675 mAh per gram of oxygen), many challenges currently impede development of Li/O2 battery technology. Finding suitable electrode and electrolyte materials remains the most elusive challenge to date. A radical new approach is to replace volatile, unstable and air-intolerant organic electrolytes common to prior research in the field with alkali metal nitrate molten salt electrolytes and operate the battery above the liquidus temperature (>80 °C). Here we demonstrate an intermediate temperature Li/O2 battery using a lithium anode, a molten nitrate-based electrolyte (e.g., LiNO3-KNO3 eutectic) and a porous carbon O2 cathode with high energy efficiency (∼95%) and improved rate capability because the discharge product, lithium peroxide, is stable and moderately soluble in the molten salt electrolyte. The results, supported by essential state-of-the-art electrochemical and analytical techniques such as in situ pressure and gas analyses, scanning electron microscopy, rotating disk electrode voltammetry, demonstrate that Li2O2 electrochemically forms and decomposes upon cycling with discharge/charge overpotentials as low as 50 mV. We show that the cycle life of such batteries is limited only by carbon reactivity and by the uncontrolled precipitation of Li2O2, which eventually becomes electrically disconnected from the O2 electrode.

  5. Encapsulation of Mono- or Bimetal Nanoparticles Inside Metal-Organic Frameworks via In situ Incorporation of Metal Precursors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liyu; Chen, Xiaodong; Liu, Hongli; Li, Yingwei

    2015-06-10

    A facile, in situ metal precursor incorporation strategy is established for good control over the location and composition of metal nanoparticles within metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). This one-step metal precursor incorporation route is successfully applied to the fabrication of ultrafine Pd, Ni, and PdNi alloys to be selectively encapsulated inside the pores of MOFs, achieving superior catalytic activity and stability in the hydrogenation of nitrobenzene.

  6. Probing Magnetism in 2D Molecular Networks after in Situ Metalation by Transition Metal Atoms.

    PubMed

    Schouteden, K; Ivanova, Ts; Li, Z; Iancu, V; Janssens, E; Van Haesendonck, C

    2015-03-19

    Metalated molecules are the ideal building blocks for the bottom-up fabrication of, e.g., two-dimensional arrays of magnetic particles for spintronics applications. Compared to chemical synthesis, metalation after network formation by an atom beam can yield a higher degree of control and flexibility and allows for mixing of different types of magnetic atoms. We report on successful metalation of tetrapyridyl-porphyrins (TPyP) by Co and Cr atoms, as demonstrated by scanning tunneling microscopy experiments. For the metalation, large periodic networks formed by the TPyP molecules on a Ag(111) substrate are exposed in situ to an atom beam. Voltage-induced dehydrogenation experiments support the conclusion that the porphyrin macrocycle of the TPyP molecule incorporates one transition metal atom. The newly synthesized Co-TPyP and Cr-TPyP complexes exhibit striking differences in their electronic behavior, leading to a magnetic character for Cr-TPyP only as evidenced by Kondo resonance measurements.

  7. Molten salt techniques. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Gale, R.J.; Lovering, D.G.

    1984-01-01

    This is the second volume in a series addressing the practical aspects of molten salt research. The book covers experiments with alkali metal carbonates, oxides, silicates, phosphates and borates. Additional sections cover molten salt spectroscopy, electrochemistry, and automated admittance spectroscopy of the semiconductor/molten salt electrolyte interface. Particular emphasis is given to safety considerations for working with these high temperature, often corrosive materials. Planning of experiments is of interest, and several experiments are described. Attention is given to the selection of materials to be used in this research, including the purification of the salts themselves, and the requirements for laboratory apparatus.

  8. Electrokinetic In Situ Treatment of Metal-Contaminated Soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Jacqueline; Clausen, Christian A., III; Geiger, Cherie; Reinhart, Debra

    2004-01-01

    An electrokinetic technique has been developed as a means of in situ remediation of soils, sludges, and sediments that are contaminated with heavy metals. Examples of common metal contaminants that can be removed by this technique include cadmium, chromium, zinc, lead, mercury, and radionuclides. Some organic contaminants can also be removed by this technique. In the electrokinetic technique, a low-intensity direct current is applied between electrodes that have been implanted in the ground on each side of a contaminated soil mass. The electric current causes electro-osmosis and migration of ions, thereby moving aqueous-phase subsurface contaminants from one electrode to the other. The half reaction at the anode yields H+, thereby generating an acid front that travels from the anode toward the cathode. As this acid front passes through a given location, the local increase in acidity increases the solubility of cations that were previously adsorbed on soil particles. Ions are transported towards one electrode or the other which one depending on their respective electric charges. Upon arrival at the electrodes, the ionic contaminants can be allowed to become deposited on the electrodes or can be extracted to a recovery system. Surfactants and other reagents can be introduced at the electrodes to enhance rates of removal of contaminants. Placements of electrodes and concentrations and rates of pumping of reagents can be adjusted to maximize efficiency. The basic concept of electrokinetic treatment of soil is not new. What is new here are some of the details of application and the utilization of this technique as an alternative to other techniques (e.g., flushing or bioremediation) that are not suitable for treating soils of low hydraulic conductivity. Another novel aspect is the use of this technique as a less expensive alternative to excavation: The cost advantage over excavation is especially large in settings in which contaminated soil lies near and/or under

  9. Molten salt chemistry: An introduction and selected applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mamantov, G.; Marassi, R.

    1987-01-01

    The major fundamental topics covered are the structure of melts, thermodynamics of molten salt mixtures, theoretical and experimental studies of transport processes, metal-metal salt solutions, solvent properties of melt systems, acid-base effects in molten salt chemistry, electronic absorption, vibrational and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of melt systems, electrochemistry and electroanalytical chemistry in molten salts, and organic chemistry in molten salts. The applied aspects include the chemistry of aluminium production, electrodeposition using molten salts, and molten salt batteries and fuel cells.

  10. Highly Dense Isolated Metal Atom Catalytic Sites: Dynamic Formation and In Situ Observations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yaxin; Kasama, Takeshi; Huang, Zhiwei; Hu, Pingping; Chen, Jianmin; Liu, Xi; Tang, Xingfu

    2015-11-23

    Atomically dispersed noble-metal catalysts with highly dense active sites are promising materials with which to maximise metal efficiency and to enhance catalytic performance; however, their fabrication remains challenging because metal atoms are prone to sintering, especially at a high metal loading. A dynamic process of formation of isolated metal atom catalytic sites on the surface of the support, which was achieved starting from silver nanoparticles by using a thermal surface-mediated diffusion method, was observed directly by using in situ electron microscopy and in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction. A combination of electron microscopy images with X-ray absorption spectra demonstrated that the silver atoms were anchored on five-fold oxygen-terminated cavities on the surface of the support to form highly dense isolated metal active sites, leading to excellent reactivity in catalytic oxidation at low temperature. This work provides a general strategy for designing atomically dispersed noble-metal catalysts with highly dense active sites.

  11. Multiphysics Modeling for Dimensional Analysis of a Self-Heated Molten Regolith Electrolysis Reactor for Oxygen and Metals Production on the Moon and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominguez, Jesus A.; Sibille, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    The technology of direct electrolysis of molten lunar regolith to produce oxygen and molten metal alloys has progressed greatly in the last few years. The development of long-lasting inert anodes and cathode designs as well as techniques for the removal of molten products from the reactor has been demonstrated. The containment of chemically aggressive oxide and metal melts is very difficult at the operating temperatures ca 1600 C. Containing the molten oxides in a regolith shell can solve this technical issue and can be achieved by designing a self-heating reactor in which the electrolytic currents generate enough Joule heat to create a molten bath. In a first phase, a thermal analysis model was built to study the formation of a melt of lunar basaltic regolith irradiated by a focused solar beam This mode of heating was selected because it relies on radiative heat transfer, which is the dominant mode of transfer of energy in melts at 1600 C. Knowing and setting the Gaussian-type heat flux from the concentrated solar beam and the phase and temperature dependent thermal properties, the model predicts the dimensions and temperature profile of the melt. A validation of the model is presented in this paper through the experimental formation of a spherical cap melt realized by others. The Orbitec/PSI experimental setup uses an 3.6-cm diameter concentrated solar beam to create a hemispheric melt in a bed of lunar regolith simulant contained in a large pot. Upon cooling, the dimensions of the vitrified melt are measured to validate the thermal model. In a second phase, the model is augmented by multiphysics components to compute the passage of electrical currents between electrodes inserted in the molten regolith. The current through the melt generates Joule heating due to the high resistivity of the medium and this energy is transferred into the melt by conduction, convection and primarily by radiation. The model faces challenges in two major areas, the change of phase as

  12. Ancient Uses of Meteoritic Metals as Precedent for Modern In-Situ Asteroid Mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mardon, Austin A.; Fawcett, Brett; Krispin, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Given the strain on earth's supply of metal and the meteoritic content of meteorites, a prudent course would be to pursue in-situ asteroid mining of meteors for metal. There is a precedent for this going back to ancient Egypt; humans have always used the meteoritic content of meteorites to fashion everything from weapons to cosmetics.

  13. Molten salt electrochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos, U.F.; Williamson, M.A.

    1997-12-31

    The objective of this work is to develop preparation and clean-up processes for the fuel and carrier salt used in the Los Alamos Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technology molten salt nuclear system. The front-end or fuel preparation process focuses on the removal of fission products, uranium, and zirconium from spent nuclear fuel by utilizing electrochemical methods. The same method provide the separation of the transition metal fission products at the back end of the fuel cycle. Molten salts provide a natural medium for the separation of actinides and fission products from one another because they are robust, radiation resistant solvents that can be recycled. The presentation will describe the design of the electrochemistry system, the method used for salt purification, and results of preliminary experiments.

  14. Potential for EMU Fabric Damage by Electron Beam and Molten Metal During Space Welding for the International Space Welding Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fragomeni, James M.

    1998-01-01

    As a consequence of preparations concerning the International Space Welding Experiment (ISWE), studies were performed to better understand the effect of molten metal contact and electron beam impingement with various fabrics for space suit applications. The question arose as to what would occur if the electron beam from the Ukrainian Universal Hand Tool (UHT) designed for welding in space were to impinge upon a piece of Nextel AF-62 ceramic cloth designed to withstand temperatures up to 1427 C. The expectation was that the electron beam would lay down a static charge pattern with no damage to the ceramic fabric. The electron beam is capable of spraying the fabric with enough negative charge to repel further electrons from the fabric before significant heating occurs. The static charge pattern would deflect any further charge accumulation except for a small initial amount of leakage to the grounded surface of the welder. However, when studies were made of the effect of the electron beam on the insulating ceramic fabric it was surprisingly found that the electron beam did indeed burn through the ceramic fabric. It was also found that the shorter electron beam standoff distances had longer burnthrough times than did some greater electron beam standoff distances. A possible explanation for the longer burnthrough times for the small electron beam standoff distance would be outgassing of the fabric which caused the electron beam hand-tool to cycle on and off to provide some protection for the cathodes. The electron beam hand tool was observed to cycle off at the short standoff distance of two inches likely due to vapors being outgassed. During the electron beam welding process there is an electron leakage, or current leakage, flow from the fabric. A static charge pattern is initially laid down by the electron beam current flow. The static charge makes up the current leakage flow which initially slightly heats up the fabric. The initially laid down surface charge leaks a

  15. Advances in molten salt chemistry: Vol. 4

    SciTech Connect

    Mamautov, G.; Braunstein, J.

    1981-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: electronic properties of solutions of liquid metals and ionic melts; metal-metal halide, metal-chalcogen, and metal-metal solutions; metallic models; the use of high pressure in the study of molten salts; the purpose of high pressure experimentation; melting point curves and phase diagrams; compressibilities and equations of state; electrical conductivity measurements; physical chemistry and electrochemistry of alkali carbonate melts; equilibrium properties of molten carbonates; electrochemical characteristics and corrosion; stability of ceramics; some new molten salt electrolytic processes; sodium metal production by the use of a beta-alumina diaphragm; recovery of metallic sodium or caustic soda and sulfur from flue gas; high temperature electrolysis of water; and LiCl electrolysis by the use of a bipolar liquid metal electrode.

  16. Materials discovery by crystal growth: Lanthanide metal containing oxides of the platinum group metals (Ru, Os, Ir, Rh, Pd, Pt) from molten alkali metal hydroxides

    SciTech Connect

    Mugavero, Samuel J.; Gemmill, William R.; Roof, Irina P.; Loye, Hans-Conrad zur

    2009-07-15

    This review addresses the process of materials discovery via crystal growth, specifically of lanthanide metal containing oxides of the platinum group metals (Ru, Os, Ir, Rh, Pd, Pt). It provides a detailed overview of the use of hydroxide fluxes for crystal growth. The melt chemistry of hydroxide fluxes, specifically, the extensive acid base chemistry, the metal cation solubility, and the ability of hydroxide melts to oxidize metals are described. Furthermore, a general methodology for the successful crystal growth of oxides is provided, including a discussion of experimental considerations, suitable reaction vessels, reaction profiles and temperature ranges. Finally, a compilation of complex platinum group metal oxides recently synthesized using hydroxide melts, focusing on their crystal growth and crystal structures, is included. - Graphical abstract: A review that addresses the process of materials discovery via crystal growth using hydroxide fluxes. It provides a detailed overview of the use of hydroxide fluxes for crystal growth and describes the melt chemistry of hydroxide fluxes, specifically, the extensive acid base chemistry, the metal cation solubility, and the ability of hydroxide melts to oxidize metals. In addition, a compilation of complex platinum group metal oxides recently synthesized using hydroxide melts is included.

  17. Photocatalytic Properties of Layered Metal Oxides Substituted with Silver by a Molten AgNO3 Treatment.

    PubMed

    Horie, Hirotaka; Iwase, Akihide; Kudo, Akihiko

    2015-07-15

    K4Nb6O17 (BG: 3.67 eV) and Na2W4O13 (BG: 3.12 eV) layered oxide photocatalysts with wide band gaps were treated with a molten AgNO3 to substitute K+ and Na+ with Ag+, resulting in red-shifts of absorption edges in diffuse reflectance spectra. A part of Na+ ions in the interlayer of Na2W4O13 was substituted with Ag+ ions by the molten AgNO3 treatment with keeping the layered structure. Both Ag(I)-substituted K4Nb6O17 and Na2W4O13 showed photocatalytic activities for O2 evolution from aqueous solutions containing a sacrificial reagent utilizing the absorption bands newly formed by the Ag(I)-substitution. Notably, the Ag(I)-substituted Na2W4O13 produced O2 under visible light irradiation. When ball-milled Na2W4O13 was treated with a molten AgNO3, the Ag(I)-substitution rate increased. The Ag(I)-substituted Na2W4O13 with ball-milling showed higher photocatalytic activity for O2 evolution than that without ball-milling. Z-schematic water splitting proceeded under visible light irradiation by combining the Ag(I)-substituted Na2W4O13 of an O2-evolving photocatalyst with Ru-loaded SrTiO3 doped with Rh of a H2-evolving photocatalyst. PMID:26099451

  18. Photocatalytic Properties of Layered Metal Oxides Substituted with Silver by a Molten AgNO3 Treatment.

    PubMed

    Horie, Hirotaka; Iwase, Akihide; Kudo, Akihiko

    2015-07-15

    K4Nb6O17 (BG: 3.67 eV) and Na2W4O13 (BG: 3.12 eV) layered oxide photocatalysts with wide band gaps were treated with a molten AgNO3 to substitute K+ and Na+ with Ag+, resulting in red-shifts of absorption edges in diffuse reflectance spectra. A part of Na+ ions in the interlayer of Na2W4O13 was substituted with Ag+ ions by the molten AgNO3 treatment with keeping the layered structure. Both Ag(I)-substituted K4Nb6O17 and Na2W4O13 showed photocatalytic activities for O2 evolution from aqueous solutions containing a sacrificial reagent utilizing the absorption bands newly formed by the Ag(I)-substitution. Notably, the Ag(I)-substituted Na2W4O13 produced O2 under visible light irradiation. When ball-milled Na2W4O13 was treated with a molten AgNO3, the Ag(I)-substitution rate increased. The Ag(I)-substituted Na2W4O13 with ball-milling showed higher photocatalytic activity for O2 evolution than that without ball-milling. Z-schematic water splitting proceeded under visible light irradiation by combining the Ag(I)-substituted Na2W4O13 of an O2-evolving photocatalyst with Ru-loaded SrTiO3 doped with Rh of a H2-evolving photocatalyst.

  19. Compatibility of molten salts with advanced solar dynamic receiver materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, D. A.; Perry, W. D.

    1989-01-01

    Metal-coated graphite fibers are being considered as a thermal conductivity enhancement filler material for molten salts in solar dynamic thermal energy storage systems. The successful metal coating chosen for this application must exhibit acceptable wettability and must be compatible with the molten salt environment. Contact angle values between molten lithium fluoride and several metal, metal fluoride, and metal oxide substrates have been determined at 892 C using a modification of the Wilhelmy plate technique. Reproducible contact angles with repeated exposure to the molten LiF indicated compatibility.

  20. Feet sunk in molten aluminium: The burn and its prevention.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Peña, David; Arnáiz-García, María Elena; Valero-Gasalla, Javier Luis; Arnáiz-García, Ana María; Campillo-Campaña, Ramón; Alonso-Peña, Javier; González-Santos, Jose María; Fernández-Díaz, Alaska Leonor; Arnáiz, Javier

    2015-08-01

    Nowadays, despite improvements in safety rules and inspections in the metal industry, foundry workers are not free from burn accidents. Injuries caused by molten metals include burns secondary to molten iron, aluminium, zinc, copper, brass, bronze, manganese, lead and steel. Molten aluminium is one of the most common causative agents of burns (60%); however, only a few publications exist concerning injuries from molten aluminium. The main mechanisms of lesion from molten aluminium include direct contact of the molten metal with the skin or through safety apparel, or when the metal splash burns through the pants and rolls downward along the leg. Herein, we report three cases of deep dermal burns after 'soaking' the foot in liquid aluminium and its evolutive features. This paper aims to show our experience in the management of burns due to molten aluminium. We describe the current management principles and the key features of injury prevention.

  1. Separation of rare earths from transition metals by liquid-liquid extraction from a molten salt hydrate to an ionic liquid phase.

    PubMed

    Rout, Alok; Binnemans, Koen

    2014-02-28

    The solvent extraction of trivalent rare-earth ions and their separation from divalent transition metal ions using molten salt hydrates as the feed phase and an undiluted fluorine-free ionic liquid as the extracting phase were investigated in detail. The extractant was tricaprylmethylammonium nitrate, [A336][NO3], and the hydrated melt was calcium nitrate tetrahydrate, Ca(NO3)2·4H2O. The extraction behavior of rare-earth ions was studied for solutions of individual elements, as well as for mixtures of rare earths in the hydrated melt. The influence of different extraction parameters was investigated: the initial metal loading in the feed phase, percentage of water in the feed solution, equilibration time, and the type of hydrated melt. The extraction of rare earths from Ca(NO3)2·4H2O was compared with extraction from CaCl2·4H2O by [A336][Cl] (Aliquat 336). The nitrate system was found to be the better one. The extraction and separation of rare earths from the transition metals nickel, cobalt and zinc were also investigated. Remarkably high separation factors of rare-earth ions over transition metal ions were observed for extraction from Ca(NO3)2·4H2O by the [A336][NO3] extracting phase. Furthermore, rare-earth ions could be separated efficiently from transition metal ions, even in melts with very high concentrations of transition metal ions. Rare-earth oxides could be directly dissolved in the Ca(NO3)2·4H2O phase in the presence of small amounts of Al(NO3)3·9H2O or concentrated nitric acid. The efficiency of extraction after dissolving the rare-earth oxides in the hydrated nitrate melt was identical to extraction from solutions with rare-earth nitrates dissolved in the molten phase. The stripping of the rare-earth ions from the loaded ionic liquid phase and the reuse of the recycled ionic liquid were also investigated in detail.

  2. Controlled in-situ dissolution of an alkali metal

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Jeffrey Donald; Dooley, Kirk John; Tolman, David Donald

    2012-09-11

    A method for the controllable dissolution of one or more alkali metals from a vessel containing a one or more alkali metals and/or one or more partially passivated alkali metals. The vessel preferably comprising a sodium, NaK or other alkali metal-cooled nuclear reactor that has been used. The alkali metal, preferably sodium, potassium or a combination thereof, in the vessel is exposed to a treatment liquid, preferably an acidic liquid, more preferably citric acid. Preferably, the treatment liquid is maintained in continuous motion relative to any surface of unreacted alkali metal with which the treatment liquid is in contact. The treatment liquid is preferably pumped into the vessel containing the one or more alkali metals and the resulting fluid is extracted and optionally further processed. Preferably, the resulting off-gases are processed by an off-gas treatment system and the resulting liquids are processed by a liquid disposal system. In one preferred embodiment, an inert gas is pumped into the vessel along with the treatment liquid.

  3. Metal-filled carbon nanotube based optical nanoantennas: bubbling, reshaping, and in situ characterization.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zheng; Tao, Xinyong; Cui, Xudong; Fan, Xudong; Zhang, Xiaobin; Dong, Lixin

    2012-09-21

    Controlled fabrication of metal nanospheres on nanotube tips for optical antennas is investigated experimentally. Resembling soap bubble blowing using a straw, the fabrication process is based on nanofluidic mass delivery at the attogram scale using metal-filled carbon nanotubes (m@CNTs). Two methods have been investigated including electron-beam-induced bubbling (EBIB) and electromigration-based bubbling (EMBB). EBIB involves the bombardment of an m@CNT with a high energy electron beam of a transmission electron microscope (TEM), with which the encapsulated metal is melted and flowed out from the nanotube, generating a metallic particle on a nanotube tip. In the case where the encapsulated materials inside the CNT have a higher melting point than what the beam energy can reach, EMBB is an optional process to apply. Experiments show that, under a low bias (2.0-2.5 V), nanoparticles can be formed on the nanotube tips. The final shape and crystallinity of the nanoparticles are determined by the cooling rate. Instant cooling occurs with a relatively large heat sink and causes the instant shaping of the solid deposit, which is typically similar to the shape of the molten state. With a smaller heat sink as a probe, it is possible to keep the deposit in a molten state. Instant cooling by separating the deposit from the probe can result in a perfect sphere. Surface and volume plasmons characterized with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) prove that resonance occurs between a pair of as-fabricated spheres on the tip structures. Such spheres on pillars can serve as nano-optical antennas and will enable devices such as scanning near-field optical microscope (SNOM) probes, scanning anodes for field emitters, and single molecule detectors, which can find applications in bio-sensing, molecular detection, and high-resolution optical microscopy.

  4. High Temperature In Situ Compression of Thermoplastically Formed Nano-scale Metallic Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mridha, Sanghita; Arora, Harpreet Singh; Lefebvre, Joseph; Bhowmick, Sanjit; Mukherjee, Sundeep

    2016-05-01

    The mechanical behavior of nano-scale metallic glasses was investigated by in situ compression tests in a scanning electron microscope. Platinum-based metallic glass nano-pillars were fabricated by thermoplastic forming. The nano-pillars and corresponding bulk substrate were tested in compression over the range of room temperature to glass transition. Stress-strain curves of the nano-pillars were obtained along with in situ observation of their deformation behavior. The bulk substrate as well as nano-pillars showed an increase in elastic modulus with temperature which is explained by diffusive rearrangement of atomic-scale viscoelastic units.

  5. In Situ Formation of Metal Oxide Nanocrystals Embedded in Laser-Induced Graphene.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ruquan; Peng, Zhiwei; Wang, Tuo; Xu, Yunong; Zhang, Jibo; Li, Yilun; Nilewski, Lizanne G; Lin, Jian; Tour, James M

    2015-09-22

    Hybrid materials incorporating the advantages of graphene and nanoparticles have been widely studied. Here we develop an improved cost-effective approach for preparation of porous graphene embedded with various types of nanoparticles. Direct laser scribing on metal-complex-containing polyimide film leads to in situ formation of nanoparticles embedded in porous graphene. These materials are highly active in electrochemical oxygen reduction reactions, converting O2 into OH(-), with a low metal loading of less than 1 at. %. In addition, the nanoparticles can vary from metal oxide to metal dichalcogenides through lateral doping, making the composite active in other electrocatalytic reactions such as hydrogen evolution.

  6. Electrolysis of a molten semiconductor.

    PubMed

    Yin, Huayi; Chung, Brice; Sadoway, Donald R

    2016-01-01

    Metals cannot be extracted by electrolysis of transition-metal sulfides because as liquids they are semiconductors, which exhibit high levels of electronic conduction and metal dissolution. Herein by introduction of a distinct secondary electrolyte, we reveal a high-throughput electro-desulfurization process that directly converts semiconducting molten stibnite (Sb2S3) into pure (99.9%) liquid antimony and sulfur vapour. At the bottom of the cell liquid antimony pools beneath cathodically polarized molten stibnite. At the top of the cell sulfur issues from a carbon anode immersed in an immiscible secondary molten salt electrolyte disposed above molten stibnite, thereby blocking electronic shorting across the cell. As opposed to conventional extraction practices, direct sulfide electrolysis completely avoids generation of problematic fugitive emissions (CO2, CO and SO2), significantly reduces energy consumption, increases productivity in a single-step process (lower capital and operating costs) and is broadly applicable to a host of electronically conductive transition-metal chalcogenides. PMID:27553525

  7. Electrolysis of a molten semiconductor

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Huayi; Chung, Brice; Sadoway, Donald R.

    2016-01-01

    Metals cannot be extracted by electrolysis of transition-metal sulfides because as liquids they are semiconductors, which exhibit high levels of electronic conduction and metal dissolution. Herein by introduction of a distinct secondary electrolyte, we reveal a high-throughput electro-desulfurization process that directly converts semiconducting molten stibnite (Sb2S3) into pure (99.9%) liquid antimony and sulfur vapour. At the bottom of the cell liquid antimony pools beneath cathodically polarized molten stibnite. At the top of the cell sulfur issues from a carbon anode immersed in an immiscible secondary molten salt electrolyte disposed above molten stibnite, thereby blocking electronic shorting across the cell. As opposed to conventional extraction practices, direct sulfide electrolysis completely avoids generation of problematic fugitive emissions (CO2, CO and SO2), significantly reduces energy consumption, increases productivity in a single-step process (lower capital and operating costs) and is broadly applicable to a host of electronically conductive transition-metal chalcogenides. PMID:27553525

  8. Controlling the work function of molybdenum disulfide by in situ metal deposition.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Peng; Song, Xiongfei; Yan, Xiao; Liu, Chunsen; Chen, Lin; Sun, Qingqing; Zhang, David Wei

    2016-08-26

    Control of the work function of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) under ultrathin metal was investigated using in situ metal deposition and direct ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy measurement in an ultra-high vacuum system. When the metal thickness turned from two dimensional into bulk, the work function was also raised up at the nickel-MoS2 interface, barely changed at the titanium-MoS2 interface and lowered at the hafnium-MoS2 interface. Meanwhile, the mechanisms of charge transfer and band alignment with metal deposition were also discussed. The Schottky barrier at metal-MoS2 interfaces could be tailored by both types and thicknesses of deposited metal. The low work function metal was a good indicator for MoS2 contact electrodes. It paved the way towards future high performance MoS2 device applications. PMID:27419644

  9. Controlling the work function of molybdenum disulfide by in situ metal deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Peng; Song, Xiongfei; Yan, Xiao; Liu, Chunsen; Chen, Lin; Sun, Qingqing; Zhang, David Wei

    2016-08-01

    Control of the work function of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) under ultrathin metal was investigated using in situ metal deposition and direct ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy measurement in an ultra-high vacuum system. When the metal thickness turned from two dimensional into bulk, the work function was also raised up at the nickel-MoS2 interface, barely changed at the titanium-MoS2 interface and lowered at the hafnium-MoS2 interface. Meanwhile, the mechanisms of charge transfer and band alignment with metal deposition were also discussed. The Schottky barrier at metal-MoS2 interfaces could be tailored by both types and thicknesses of deposited metal. The low work function metal was a good indicator for MoS2 contact electrodes. It paved the way towards future high performance MoS2 device applications.

  10. In-situ generation of oxygen-releasing metal peroxides

    DOEpatents

    Looney, Brian B.; Denham, Miles E.

    2007-01-09

    A method for remediation of contaminants in soil and groundwater is disclosed. The method generates oxygen releasing solids in groundwater or soil by injecting an aqueous energetic oxidant solution containing free radicals, oxidative conditions can be created within or ahead of a contaminant plume. Some contaminants may be remediated directly by reaction with the free radicals. Additionally and more importantly, the free radicals create an oxidative condition whereby native or injected materials, especially metals, are converted to peroxides. These peroxides provide a long-term oxygen reservoir, releasing oxygen relatively slowly over time. The oxygen can enhance microbial metabolism to remediate contaminants, can react with contaminant metals either to form immobile precipitants or to mobilize other metals to permit remediation through leaching techniques. Various injection strategies for injecting the energetic oxidant solution are also disclosed.

  11. Intelligent potentiostat for identification of heavy metals in situ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christidis, K.; Gow, K.; Robertson, P.; Pollard, P.

    2006-01-01

    This article presents a low-cost portable electrochemical instrument capable of on-site identification of heavy metals. The instrument acquires metal-specific voltage and current signals by the application of differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry. This technique enhances the analytical current and rejects the background current, resulting in a higher signal-to-noise ratio for a better detection limit. The identification of heavy metals is based on an intelligent machine-based method using a multilayer perceptron neural network consisting of three layers of neurons. The neural network is implemented using a 16 bit microcontroller. The system is developed for use in the field in order to avoid expensive and time-consuming procedures and can be used in a variety of situations to help environmental assessment and control.

  12. In situ studies of grain growth in thin metal films

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, C.S.; Mansuri, C.M. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Townsend, S.J. . Dept. of Physics); Smith, D.A. . T.J. Watson Research Center)

    1993-06-01

    Grain growth in thin films of aluminum has been studied using in situ transmission electron microscopy and a heating stage. Videotapes taken during grain growth were analyzed with the intent of searching for the predominant local rearrangement processes responsible for growth. Evolution of a soap froth can be decomposed into only two elementary local topology rearranging events. The authors have found numerous exceptions to prevailing theories that compare grain growth in thin films to the evolution of such froths. These observations suggest that a more complete picture of grain growth is necessary and that such a theory must include more complex local rearrangement processes.

  13. SOLAR METALLICITY DERIVED FROM IN SITU SOLAR WIND COMPOSITION

    SciTech Connect

    Von Steiger, R.; Zurbuchen, T. H. E-mail: thomasz@umich.edu

    2016-01-01

    We use recently released solar wind compositional data to determine the metallicity of the Sun—the fraction per unit mass that is composed of elements heavier than He. We focus on a present-day solar sample available to us, which is the least fractionated solar wind from coronal holes near the poles of the Sun. Using these data, we derive a metallicity of Z = 0.0196 ± 0.0014, which is significantly larger than recent published values based on photospheric spectroscopy, but consistent with results from helioseismology.

  14. IS REMOVAL THE ONLY OPTION: IN SITU REMEDIATION OF METAL CONTAMINATED SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The In-place Inactivation and Natural Ecological Restoration Technologies (IINERT) Soil-Metals Action Team was established in 11/95 as one of several Action Teams under the USEPA Remediation Technologies Development Forum (RTDF). Its primary goal was to examine in situ remediatio...

  15. Controlling the work function of molybdenum disulfide by in situ metal deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Peng; Song, Xiongfei; Yan, Xiao; Liu, Chunsen; Chen, Lin; Sun, Qingqing; Zhang, David Wei

    2016-08-01

    Control of the work function of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) under ultrathin metal was investigated using in situ metal deposition and direct ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy measurement in an ultra-high vacuum system. When the metal thickness turned from two dimensional into bulk, the work function was also raised up at the nickel‑MoS2 interface, barely changed at the titanium‑MoS2 interface and lowered at the hafnium‑MoS2 interface. Meanwhile, the mechanisms of charge transfer and band alignment with metal deposition were also discussed. The Schottky barrier at metal‑MoS2 interfaces could be tailored by both types and thicknesses of deposited metal. The low work function metal was a good indicator for MoS2 contact electrodes. It paved the way towards future high performance MoS2 device applications.

  16. Ceramics for Molten Materials Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Standish, Evan; Stefanescu, Doru M.; Curreri, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    The paper reviews the main issues associated with molten materials transfer and handling on the lunar surface during the operation of a hig h temperature electrowinning cell used to produce oxygen, with molten iron and silicon as byproducts. A combination of existing technolog ies and purposely designed technologies show promise for lunar exploi tation. An important limitation that requires extensive investigation is the performance of refractory currently used for the purpose of m olten metal containment and transfer in the lunar environment associa ted with electrolytic cells. The principles of a laboratory scale uni t at a scale equivalent to the production of 1 metric ton of oxygen p er year are introduced. This implies a mass of molten materials to be transferred consistent with the equivalent of 1kg regolithlhr proces sed.

  17. Contribution of trace metals in structuring in situ macroinvertebrate community composition along a salinity gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Peeters, E.T.H.M.; Gardeniers, J.J.P.; Koelmans, A.A.

    2000-04-01

    Macroinvertebrates were studied along a salinity gradient in the North Sea Canal, The Netherlands, to quantify the effect of trace metals (cadmium, copper, lead, zinc) on community composition. In addition, two methods for assessing metal bioavailability (normalizing metal concentrations on organic carbon and on the smallest sediment fraction) were compared. Factor analyses showed that normalizing trace metals resulted in an improved separation of trace metals from ecological factors (depth, organic carbon, granulometry, and chloride). The variation in the macroinvertebrate data was partitioned into four sources using partial canonical correspondence analysis, with the partitions being purely ecological factors, purely trace metals, mutual ecological factors and trace metals, and unexplained. Partial canonical correspondence analysis applied to total and normalized trace metal concentrations gave similar results in terms of unexplained variances. However, normalization on organic carbon resulted in the highest percentage of variation explained by purely ecological factors and purely trace metals. Accounting for bioavailability thus improves the identification of factors affecting the in situ community structure. Ecological factors explained 45.4% and trace metals 8.6% of the variation in the macroinvertebrate community composition in the ecosystem of the North Sea Canal. These contributions were significant, and it is concluded that trace metals significantly affected the community composition in an environment with multiple stressors. Variance partitioning is recommended for incorporation in further risk assessment studies.

  18. Corrosion testing of zirconia, beryllia and magnesia ceramics in molten alkali metal carbonates at 900 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Valery; Bendikov, Tatyana; Feldman, Yishay; Gartsman, Konstantin; Wachtel, Ellen; Lubomirsky, Igor

    2016-01-01

    An electrochemical cell containing molten Li2CO3-Li2O at 900 °C has been proposed for the conversion of the greenhouse gas CO2 to CO for chemical energy storage. In the current work, we have examined the corrosion resistance of zirconia, beryllia and magnesia ceramics at 900 °C in the Li2CO3-Li2O and Li-Na-K carbonate eutectic mixtures to identify suitable electrically insulating materials. Conclusions regarding material stability were based on elemental analysis of the melt, primarily via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, a particularly sensitive technique. It was found that magnesia is completely stable for at least 33 h in a Li2CO3-Li2O melt, while a combined lithium titanate/lithium zirconate layer forms on the zirconia ceramic as detected by XRD. Under the same melt conditions, beryllia shows considerable leaching into solution. In a Li-Na-K carbonate eutectic mixture containing 10.2 mol% oxide at 900 °C under standard atmospheric conditions, magnesia showed no signs of degradation. Stabilization of the zirconia content of the eutectic mixture at 0.01-0.02 at% after 2 h is explained by the formation of a lithium zirconate coating on the ceramic. On the basis of these results, we conclude that only magnesia can be satisfactorily used as an insulating material in electrolysis cells containing Li2CO3-Li2O melts.

  19. Functional Application of Noble Metal Nanoparticles In Situ Synthesized on Ramie Fibers.

    PubMed

    Tang, Bin; Yao, Ya; Li, Jingliang; Qin, Si; Zhu, Haijin; Kaur, Jasjeet; Chen, Wu; Sun, Lu; Wang, Xungai

    2015-12-01

    Different functions were imparted to ramie fibers through treatment with noble metal nanoparticles including silver and gold nanoparticles. The in situ synthesis of silver and gold nanoparticles was achieved by heating in the presence of ramie fibers in the corresponding solutions of precursors. The unique optical property of synthesized noble metal nanoparticles, i.e., localized surface plasmon resonance, endowed ramie fibers with bright colors. Color strength (K/S) of fibers increased with heating temperature. Silver nanoparticles were obtained in alkaline solution, while acidic condition was conducive to gold nanoparticles. The optical properties of treated ramie fibers were investigated using UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was employed to observe the morphologies of silver and gold nanoparticles in situ synthesized on fibers. The ramie fibers treated with noble metal nanoparticles showed remarkable catalytic activity for reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) by sodium borohydride. Moreover, the silver nanoparticle treatment showed significant antibacterial property on ramie fibers. PMID:26383541

  20. Molten salt bath circulation design for an electrolytic cell

    DOEpatents

    Dawless, R.K.; LaCamera, A.F.; Troup, R.L.; Ray, S.P.; Hosler, R.B.

    1999-08-17

    An electrolytic cell for reduction of a metal oxide to a metal and oxygen has an inert anode and an upwardly angled roof covering the inert mode. The angled roof diverts oxygen bubbles into an upcomer channel, thereby agitating a molten salt bath in the upcomer channel and improving dissolution of a metal oxide in the molten salt bath. The molten salt bath has a lower velocity adjacent the inert anode in order to minimize corrosion by substances in the bath. A particularly preferred cell produces aluminum by electrolysis of alumina in a molten salt bath containing aluminum fluoride and sodium fluoride. 4 figs.

  1. Molten salt bath circulation design for an electrolytic cell

    DOEpatents

    Dawless, Robert K.; LaCamera, Alfred F.; Troup, R. Lee; Ray, Siba P.; Hosler, Robert B.

    1999-01-01

    An electrolytic cell for reduction of a metal oxide to a metal and oxygen has an inert anode and an upwardly angled roof covering the inert mode. The angled roof diverts oxygen bubbles into an upcomer channel, thereby agitating a molten salt bath in the upcomer channel and improving dissolution of a metal oxide in the molten salt bath. The molten salt bath has a lower velocity adjacent the inert anode in order to minimize corrosion by substances in the bath. A particularly preferred cell produces aluminum by electrolysis of alumina in a molten salt bath containing aluminum fluoride and sodium fluoride.

  2. Elucidation of transport mechanism and enhanced alkali ion transference numbers in mixed alkali metal-organic ionic molten salts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fangfang; Forsyth, Maria

    2016-07-28

    Mixed salts of Ionic Liquids (ILs) and alkali metal salts, developed as electrolytes for lithium and sodium batteries, have shown a remarkable ability to facilitate high rate capability for lithium and sodium electrochemical cycling. It has been suggested that this may be due to a high alkali metal ion transference number at concentrations approaching 50 mol% Li(+) or Na(+), relative to lower concentrations. Computational investigations for two IL systems illustrate the formation of extended alkali-anion aggregates as the alkali metal ion concentration increases. This tends to favor the diffusion of alkali metal ions compared with other ionic species in electrolyte solutions; behavior that has recently been reported for Li(+) in a phosphonium ionic liquid, thus an increasing alkali transference number. The mechanism of alkali metal ion diffusion via this extended coordination environment present at high concentrations is explained and compared to the dynamics at lower concentrations. Heterogeneous alkali metal ion dynamics are also evident and, somewhat counter-intuitively, it appears that the faster ions are those that are generally found clustered with the anions. Furthermore these fast alkali metal ions appear to correlate with fastest ionic liquid solvent ions. PMID:27375042

  3. In Situ, High-Resolution Profiles of Labile Metals in Sediments of Lake Taihu.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Gong, Mengdan; Li, Yangyang; Xu, Lv; Wang, Yan; Jing, Rui; Ding, Shiming; Zhang, Chaosheng

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing labile metal distribution and biogeochemical behavior in sediments is crucial for understanding their contamination characteristics in lakes, for which in situ, high-resolution data is scare. The diffusive gradient in thin films (DGT) technique was used in-situ at five sites across Lake Taihu in the Yangtze River delta in China to characterize the distribution and mobility of eight labile metals (Fe, Mn, Zn, Ni, Cu, Pb, Co and Cd) in sediments at a 3 mm spatial resolution. The results showed a great spatial heterogeneity in the distributions of redox-sensitive labile Fe, Mn and Co in sediments, while other metals had much less marked structure, except for downward decreases of labile Pb, Ni, Zn and Cu in the surface sediment layers. Similar distributions were found between labile Mn and Co and among labile Ni, Cu and Zn, reflecting a close link between their geochemical behaviors. The relative mobility, defined as the ratio of metals accumulated by DGT to the total contents in a volume of sediments with a thickness of 10 mm close to the surface of DGT probe, was the greatest for Mn and Cd, followed by Zn, Ni, Cu and Co, while Pb and Fe had the lowest mobility; this order generally agreed with that defined by the modified BCR approach. Further analyses showed that the downward increases of pH values in surface sediment layer may decrease the lability of Pb, Ni, Zn and Cu as detected by DGT, while the remobilization of redox-insensitive metals in deep sediment layer may relate to Mn cycling through sulphide coprecipitation, reflected by several corresponding minima between these metals and Mn. These in situ data provided the possibility for a deep insight into the mechanisms involved in the remobilization of metals in freshwater sediments. PMID:27608033

  4. In Situ, High-Resolution Profiles of Labile Metals in Sediments of Lake Taihu

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dan; Gong, Mengdan; Li, Yangyang; Xu, Lv; Wang, Yan; Jing, Rui; Ding, Shiming; Zhang, Chaosheng

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing labile metal distribution and biogeochemical behavior in sediments is crucial for understanding their contamination characteristics in lakes, for which in situ, high-resolution data is scare. The diffusive gradient in thin films (DGT) technique was used in-situ at five sites across Lake Taihu in the Yangtze River delta in China to characterize the distribution and mobility of eight labile metals (Fe, Mn, Zn, Ni, Cu, Pb, Co and Cd) in sediments at a 3 mm spatial resolution. The results showed a great spatial heterogeneity in the distributions of redox-sensitive labile Fe, Mn and Co in sediments, while other metals had much less marked structure, except for downward decreases of labile Pb, Ni, Zn and Cu in the surface sediment layers. Similar distributions were found between labile Mn and Co and among labile Ni, Cu and Zn, reflecting a close link between their geochemical behaviors. The relative mobility, defined as the ratio of metals accumulated by DGT to the total contents in a volume of sediments with a thickness of 10 mm close to the surface of DGT probe, was the greatest for Mn and Cd, followed by Zn, Ni, Cu and Co, while Pb and Fe had the lowest mobility; this order generally agreed with that defined by the modified BCR approach. Further analyses showed that the downward increases of pH values in surface sediment layer may decrease the lability of Pb, Ni, Zn and Cu as detected by DGT, while the remobilization of redox-insensitive metals in deep sediment layer may relate to Mn cycling through sulphide coprecipitation, reflected by several corresponding minima between these metals and Mn. These in situ data provided the possibility for a deep insight into the mechanisms involved in the remobilization of metals in freshwater sediments. PMID:27608033

  5. Molten salt electrolyte separator

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1996-01-01

    A molten salt electrolyte/separator for battery and related electrochemical systems including a molten electrolyte composition and an electrically insulating solid salt dispersed therein, to provide improved performance at higher current densities and alternate designs through ease of fabrication.

  6. Field Deployment for In-situ Metal and Radionuclide Stabilization by Microbial Metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Turick, C. E.; Knox, A. S.; Dixon, K. L.; Roseberry, R. J.; Kritzas, Y. G

    2005-09-26

    A novel biotechnology is reported here that was demonstrated at SRS that facilitates metal and actinide immobilization by incorporating the physiology and ecology of indigenous bacteria. This technology is based on our previous work with pyomelanin-producing bacteria isolated from SRS soils. Through tyrosine supplementation, overproduction of pyomelanin was achieved, which lead ultimately to metal and actinide immobilization, both in-vitro and in-situ. Pyomelanin is a recalcitrant microbial pigment and a humic type compound in the class of melanin pigments. Pyomelanin has electron shuttling and metal chelation capabilities and thus accelerates the bacterial reduction and/or immobilization of metals. Pyomelanin is produced outside the cell and either diffuses away or attaches to the cell surface. In either case, the reduced pyomelanin is capable of transferring electrons to metals as well as chelating metals. Because of its recalcitrance and redox cycling properties, pyomelanin molecules can be used over and over again for metal transformation. When produced in excess, pyomelanin produced by one bacterial species can be used by other species for metal reduction, thereby extending the utility of pyomelanin and further accelerating metal immobilization rates. Soils contaminated with Ni and U were the focus of this study in order to develop in-situ, metal bioimmobilization technologies. We have demonstrated pyomelanin production in soil from the Tims Branch area of SRS as a result of tyrosine amendments. These results were documented in laboratory soil column studies and field deployment studies. The amended soils demonstrated increased redox behavior and sequestration capacity of U and transition metals following pyomelanin production. Treatments incorporating tyrosine and lactate demonstrated the highest levels of pyomelanin production. In order to determine the potential use of this technology at other areas of SRS, pyomelanin producing bacteria were also quantified

  7. Evolution of In-Situ Generated Reinforcement Precipitates in Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, S.; Kar, S. K.; Catalina, A. V.; Stefanescu, D. M.; Dhindaw, B. K.

    2004-01-01

    Due to certain inherent advantages, in-situ production of Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs) have received considerable attention in the recent past. ln-situ techniques typically involve a chemical reaction that results in precipitation of a ceramic reinforcement phase. The size and spatial distribution of these precipitates ultimately determine the mechanical properties of these MMCs. In this paper we will investigate the validity of using classical growth laws and analytical expressions to describe the interaction between a precipitate and a solid-liquid interface (SLI) to predict the size and spatial evolution of the in-situ generated precipitates. Measurements made on size and distribution of Tic precipitates in a Ni&I matrix will be presented to test the validity of such an approach.

  8. Metal matrix composite micromechanics - In situ behavior influence on composite properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, P. L. N.; Hopkins, D. A.; Chamis, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    The influence of in situ fiber and matrix properties (such as in situ matrix strength and the interphase degradation) of high-temperature metal matrix composites (HTMMCs) on the unidirectional stress-strain behavior of the composite is examined using results of a numerical investigation of a SiC/Ti-15-3-3-3 unidirectional composite. It is shown that a reduction of the in situ matrix strength substantially decreases the transverse and the longitudinal tensile/compressive strengths, as well as the in-plane shear strength, of the composite. The interphase degradation affects the behavior in transverse tension/compression drastically; both the ultimate strength and strain showed significant reductions. The higher use temperature results in a reduction in the ultimate strength and in the initial tangential modulus for compression and for in-plane shear loading.

  9. Molecular aspects of the Eu3+/Eu2+ redox reaction at the interface between a molten salt and a metallic electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pounds, Michael A.; Salanne, Mathieu; Madden, Paul A.

    2015-09-01

    We perform molecular dynamics simulations of a system consisting of Eu3+ and Eu2+ species dissolved in a high-temperature KCl electrolyte between two metallic electrodes. The interaction potential includes ion polarisation effects, and a constant electric potential is maintained within the electrodes by allowing the atomic charges to fluctuate in response to the environment. This setup allows us to study the electrochemical Eu3+/Eu2+ reaction in the framework of Marcus theory. Numerous studies have pointed to the highly structured nature of ionic liquids and molten salts close to solid surfaces which is not accounted for in the conventional mean-field description of this interface that underpins the theories of electrochemical reaction rates. Here we examine the influence on the kinetics of the charge-transfer event of the electrical potential across the electrode-electrolyte interface and on the effect of the presence of charged surface on the coordination structure and energetics of the ions in the region important for the charge-transfer event.

  10. Direct electrochemical reduction of solid vanadium oxide to metal vanadium at low temperature in molten CaCl2-NaCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Zhuo-fei; Zhang, Zhi-mei; Guo, Zhan-cheng; Tang, Hui-qing

    2012-06-01

    V2O5 sintered pellets and graphite rods were employed as the cathode and the anode, respectively; a molten CaCl2-NaCl salt was used as the electrolyte. Then, V2O5 was directly reduced to metal vanadium by the Fray-Farthing-Chen (FFC) method at 873 K to realize low-temperature electrolysis. Two typical experimental conditions, electrolysis time and voltage, were taken into account to investigate the current efficiency and remaining oxygen content in electrolyzed products. The composition and microstructure of the products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). SEM observations show that a higher voltage (1.8-3.4 V) and a longer electrolysis time (2-5 h) can improve the product quality separately, that is, a lower remaining oxygen content and a more uniform microstructure. The products with an oxygen content of 0.205wt% are successfully obtained below 3.4 V for 10 h. However, the current efficiency is low, and further work is required.

  11. Chemistry and technology of Molten Salt Reactors - history and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlíř, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Molten Salt Reactors represent one of promising future nuclear reactor concept included also in the Generation IV reactors family. This reactor type is distinguished by an extraordinarily close connection between the reactor physics and chemical technology, which is given by the specific features of the chemical form of fuel, representing by molten fluoride salt and circulating through the reactor core and also by the requirements of continuous 'on-line' reprocessing of the spent fuel. The history of Molten Salt Reactors reaches the period of fifties and sixties, when the first experimental Molten Salt Reactors were constructed and tested in ORNL (US). Several molten salt techniques dedicated to fresh molten salt fuel processing and spent fuel reprocessing were studied and developed in those days. Today, after nearly thirty years of discontinuance, a renewed interest in the Molten Salt Reactor technology is observed. Current experimental R&D activities in the area of Molten Salt Reactor technology are realized by a relatively small number of research institutions mainly in the EU, Russia and USA. The main effort is directed primarily to the development of separation processes suitable for the molten salt fuel processing and reprocessing technology. The techniques under development are molten salt/liquid metal extraction processes, electrochemical separation processes from the molten salt media, fused salt volatilization techniques and gas extraction from the molten salt medium.

  12. In situ Raman spectroscopy study of metal-enhanced hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of VO2.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Fu, Qiang; Bao, Xinhe

    2016-11-01

    Vanadium dioxide (VO2) has a phase transition from insulator to metal at 340 K, and this transition can be strongly modified by hydrogenation. In this work, two dimensional (2D) VO2 sheets have been grown on Si(1 1 1) surfaces through chemical vapor deposition, and metal (Au, Pt) thin films were deposited on VO2 surfaces by sputtering. The hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of VO2 and metal-decorated VO2 structures in H2 and in air were in situ studied by Raman. We found that hydrogenation and dehydrogenation temperatures have been significantly decreased with the VO2 surface decorated by Au and Pt. The enhanced hydrogenation and dehydrogenation reactions can be attributed to catalytic dissociation of H2 and O2 molecules on metal surfaces and subsequent spillover of dissociated H and O atoms to the oxide surfaces. PMID:27603090

  13. In situ Raman spectroscopy study of metal-enhanced hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of VO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hao; Fu, Qiang; Bao, Xinhe

    2016-11-01

    Vanadium dioxide (VO2) has a phase transition from insulator to metal at 340 K, and this transition can be strongly modified by hydrogenation. In this work, two dimensional (2D) VO2 sheets have been grown on Si(1 1 1) surfaces through chemical vapor deposition, and metal (Au, Pt) thin films were deposited on VO2 surfaces by sputtering. The hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of VO2 and metal-decorated VO2 structures in H2 and in air were in situ studied by Raman. We found that hydrogenation and dehydrogenation temperatures have been significantly decreased with the VO2 surface decorated by Au and Pt. The enhanced hydrogenation and dehydrogenation reactions can be attributed to catalytic dissociation of H2 and O2 molecules on metal surfaces and subsequent spillover of dissociated H and O atoms to the oxide surfaces.

  14. EXAFS investigations of metal organic molecules with the goal of studying homogeneously catalytic systems in situ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertel, T. S.; Hörner, W.; Hückmann, S.; Kolb, U.; Abraham, I.; Bertagnolli, H.

    1995-02-01

    The investigations of Grignard compounds are very instructive for understanding the principles of getting structural information on highly complex and simultaneously metal activated systems by means of EXAFS spectroscopy. The structural investigations of a model system for Friedel-Crafts alkylation and some metal complexes (metal = Zr, Mo, W, Re), which activate carbonyl groups selectively with respect to the subsequent ring cleavage of axially prosterogenic biaryl lactones, are reported. As an actual field of metal organic research temperature dependent in situ EXAFS studies of the CH-activation of substituted olefins are presented. It was possible to observe the course of the rearrangement reaction of an iridium olefin complex to the corresponding hydrido (vinyl) iridium complex.

  15. METAL PRODUCTION AND CASTING

    DOEpatents

    Magel, T.T.

    1958-03-01

    This patent covers a method and apparatus for collecting the molten metal produced by high temperature metal salt reduction. It consists essentially of subjecting the reaction vessel to centrifugal force in order to force the liberatcd molten metal into a coherent molten mass, and allowing it to solidify there. The apparatus is particularly suitable for use with small quantities of rare metals.

  16. Light-Induced In Situ Transformation of Metal Clusters to Metal Nanocrystals for Photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Fang-Xing; Zeng, Zhiping; Hsu, Shao-Hui; Hung, Sung-Fu; Chen, Hao Ming; Liu, Bin

    2015-12-30

    In situ transformation of glutathione-capped gold (Aux) clusters to gold (Au) nanocrystals under simulated solar light irradiation was achieved and utilized as a facile synthetic approach to rationally fabricate Aux/Au/TiO2 ternary and Au/TiO2 binary heterostructures. Synergistic interaction of Aux clusters and Au nanocrystals contributes to enhanced visible-light-driven photocatalysis.

  17. In Situ Growth and Characterization of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles within Polyelectrolyte Membranes.

    PubMed

    Landers, John; Colon-Ortiz, Jonathan; Zong, Kenneth; Goswami, Anandarup; Asefa, Tewodros; Vishnyakov, Aleksey; Neimark, Alexander V

    2016-09-12

    This study describes a novel approach for the in situ synthesis of metal oxide-polyelectrolyte nanocomposites formed via impregnation of hydrated polyelectrolyte films with binary water/alcohol solutions of metal salts and consecutive reactions that convert metal cations into oxide nanoparticles embedded within the polymer matrix. The method is demonstrated drawing on the example of Nafion membranes and a variety of metal oxides with an emphasis placed on zinc oxide. The in situ formation of nanoparticles is controlled by changing the solvent composition and conditions of synthesis that for the first time allows one to tailor not only the size, but also the nanoparticle shape, giving a preference to growth of a particular crystal facet. The high-resolution TEM, SEM/EDX, UV-vis and XRD studies confirmed the homogeneous distribution of crystalline nanoparticles of circa 4 nm and their aggregates of 10-20 nm. The produced nanocomposite films are flexible, mechanically robust and have a potential to be employed in sensing, optoelectronics and catalysis. PMID:27539360

  18. Functional Characterization of Shape Memory CuZnAl Open-Cell Foams by Molten Metal Infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnaboldi, S.; Bassani, P.; Passaretti, F.; Redaelli, A.; Tuissi, A.

    2011-07-01

    In the recent years, the research for novel materials with tailored mechanical properties, as well as functional properties, has encouraged the study of porous and cellular materials. Our previous work proposed and reported about the possibility to manufacture open-cell metal foams of CuZnAl shape memory alloy by liquid infiltration in a leachable bed of silica-gel particles. This innovative methodology is based on cheap commercial consumables and a simple technology, focusing on intermediate-density low-cost foams with interesting cost/benefits ratio. Microstructural analyses on foamed specimens showed uniform microstructure of ligaments and a very regular and well reproducible open-cell morphology. Moreover, calorimetric analysis detected a thermo-elastic martensitic transformation in the foamed material. In this study, a CuZnAl shape memory alloy was considered and tested to clarify possible effects of the foaming process on the functional properties of the material. Morphological, calorimetric, and thermo-mechanical analyses were carried out. The results show that it is possible to produce metal foams of CuZnAl shape memory alloy with different functional properties and able to recover mono-axial compressive strains up to 3%.

  19. In situ study of the initiation of hydrogen bubbles at the aluminium metal/oxide interface.

    PubMed

    Xie, De-Gang; Wang, Zhang-Jie; Sun, Jun; Li, Ju; Ma, Evan; Shan, Zhi-Wei

    2015-09-01

    The presence of excess hydrogen at the interface between a metal substrate and a protective oxide can cause blistering and spallation of the scale. However, it remains unclear how nanoscale bubbles manage to reach the critical size in the first place. Here, we perform in situ environmental transmission electron microscopy experiments of the aluminium metal/oxide interface under hydrogen exposure. It is found that once the interface is weakened by hydrogen segregation, surface diffusion of Al atoms initiates the formation of faceted cavities on the metal side, driven by Wulff reconstruction. The morphology and growth rate of these cavities are highly sensitive to the crystallographic orientation of the aluminium substrate. Once the cavities grow to a critical size, the internal gas pressure can become great enough to blister the oxide layer. Our findings have implications for understanding hydrogen damage of interfaces.

  20. In Situ Nanoindentation Studies on Detwinning and Work Hardening in Nanotwinned Monolithic Metals

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Y.; Li, N.; Bufford, D.; Lee, J. H.; Wang, J.; Wang, H.; Zhang, X.

    2015-07-14

    Certain nanotwinned (nt) metals have rare combinations of high mechanical strength and ductility. Here, we review recent in situ nanoindentation studies (using transmission electron microscopes) on the deformation mechanisms of nt face-centered cubic metals including Cu, Ni, and Al with a wide range of stacking fault energy (SFE). Moreover, in nt Cu with low-to-intermediate SFE, detwinning (accompanied by rapid twin boundary migration) occurs at ultralow stress. In Ni with relatively high SFE, coherent {111} twin boundaries lead to substantial work hardening. Twinned Al has abundant {112} incoherent twin boundaries, which induce significant work-hardening capability and plasticity in Al. Finally, twinmore » boundaries in Al also migrate but at very high stresses. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulations reveal the influence of SFE on deformation mechanisms in twinned metals.« less

  1. In Situ Nanoindentation Studies on Detwinning and Work Hardening in Nanotwinned Monolithic Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Li, N.; Bufford, D.; Lee, J. H.; Wang, J.; Wang, H.; Zhang, X.

    2015-07-14

    Certain nanotwinned (nt) metals have rare combinations of high mechanical strength and ductility. Here, we review recent in situ nanoindentation studies (using transmission electron microscopes) on the deformation mechanisms of nt face-centered cubic metals including Cu, Ni, and Al with a wide range of stacking fault energy (SFE). Moreover, in nt Cu with low-to-intermediate SFE, detwinning (accompanied by rapid twin boundary migration) occurs at ultralow stress. In Ni with relatively high SFE, coherent {111} twin boundaries lead to substantial work hardening. Twinned Al has abundant {112} incoherent twin boundaries, which induce significant work-hardening capability and plasticity in Al. Finally, twin boundaries in Al also migrate but at very high stresses. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulations reveal the influence of SFE on deformation mechanisms in twinned metals.

  2. In situ study of the initiation of hydrogen bubbles at the aluminium metal/oxide interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, De-Gang; Wang, Zhang-Jie; Sun, Jun; Li, Ju; Ma, Evan; Shan, Zhi-Wei

    2015-09-01

    The presence of excess hydrogen at the interface between a metal substrate and a protective oxide can cause blistering and spallation of the scale. However, it remains unclear how nanoscale bubbles manage to reach the critical size in the first place. Here, we perform in situ environmental transmission electron microscopy experiments of the aluminium metal/oxide interface under hydrogen exposure. It is found that once the interface is weakened by hydrogen segregation, surface diffusion of Al atoms initiates the formation of faceted cavities on the metal side, driven by Wulff reconstruction. The morphology and growth rate of these cavities are highly sensitive to the crystallographic orientation of the aluminium substrate. Once the cavities grow to a critical size, the internal gas pressure can become great enough to blister the oxide layer. Our findings have implications for understanding hydrogen damage of interfaces.

  3. In situ Resource Utilization for Processing of Metal Alloys on Lunar and Mars Bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanescu, D. M.; Grugel, R. N.; Curreri, P. A.

    1998-01-01

    Current plans for practical missions leading to a sustained human presence on our Moon and Mars rely on utilizing their in situ resources. Initially, resource availability must be assessed followed by the development of economically acceptable and technically feasible extractive processes. In regard to metals processing and fabrication, the lower gravity level on the Moon (0.125 g) and Mars (0.369 g) will dramatically change the presently accepted hierarchy of materials in terms of specific properties, a factor which must be understood and exploited. Furthermore, significant changes are expected in the behavior of liquid metals during processing. In metal casting, for example, mold filling and associated solidification processes have to be reevaluated. Finally, microstructural development and therefore material properties, presently being documented through ongoing research in microgravity science and applications, needs to be understood and scaled to the reduced gravity environments. These and other issues are addressed in this paper.

  4. In-situ ductile metal/bulk metallic glass matrix composites formed by chemical partitioning

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Choong Paul; Hays, Charles C.; Johnson, William L.

    2004-03-23

    A composite metal object comprises ductile crystalline metal particles in an amorphous metal matrix. An alloy is heated above its liquidus temperature. Upon cooling from the high temperature melt, the alloy chemically partitions, forming dendrites in the melt. Upon cooling the remaining liquid below the glass transition temperature it freezes to the amorphous state, producing a two-phase microstructure containing crystalline particles in an amorphous metal matrix. The ductile metal particles have a size in the range of from 0.1 to 15 micrometers and spacing in the range of from 0.1 to 20 micrometers. Preferably, the particle size is in the range of from 0.5 to 8 micrometers and spacing is in the range of from 1 to 10 micrometers. The volume proportion of particles is in the range of from 5 to 50% and preferably 15 to 35%. Differential cooling can produce oriented dendrites of ductile metal phase in an amorphous matrix. Examples are given in the Zr--Ti--Cu--Ni--Be alloy bulk glass forming system with added niobium.

  5. In-situ ductile metal/bulk metallic glass matrix composites formed by chemical partitioning

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Choong Paul; Hays, Charles C.; Johnson, William L.

    2007-07-17

    A composite metal object comprises ductile crystalline metal particles in an amorphous metal matrix. An alloy is heated above its liquidus temperature. Upon cooling from the high temperature melt, the alloy chemically partitions, forming dendrites in the melt. Upon cooling the remaining liquid below the glass transition temperature it freezes to the amorphous state, producing a two-phase microstructure containing crystalline particles in an amorphous metal matrix. The ductile metal particles have a size in the range of from 0.1 to 15 micrometers and spacing in the range of from 0.1 to 20 micrometers. Preferably, the particle size is in the range of from 0.5 to 8 micrometers and spacing is in the range of from 1 to 10 micrometers. The volume proportion of particles is in the range of from 5 to 50% and preferably 15 to 35%. Differential cooling can produce oriented dendrites of ductile metal phase in an amorphous matrix. Examples are given in the Zr--Ti--Cu--Ni--Be alloy bulk glass forming system with added niobium.

  6. Low temperature oxidation using support molten salt catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Weimer, Alan W.; Czerpak, Peter J.; Hilbert, Patrick M.

    2003-05-20

    Molten salt reactions are performed by supporting the molten salt on a particulate support and forming a fluidized bed of the supported salt particles. The method is particularly suitable for combusting hydrocarbon fuels at reduced temperatures, so that the formation NO.sub.x species is reduced. When certain preferred salts are used, such as alkali metal carbonates, sulfur and halide species can be captured by the molten salt, thereby reducing SO.sub.x and HCl emissions.

  7. Bipolar electrochemical method for dynamic in situ control of single metal nanowire growth.

    PubMed

    Wood, Marissa; Zhang, Bo

    2015-03-24

    Fabrication plays a key role in determining the unique electrical, optical, and catalytic properties of metal nanowires. Here we present a bipolar electrochemical method for dynamically monitoring and controlling the rate of single metal nanowire growth in situ without a direct electrical connection. Solutions of a metal precursor and a reducing agent are placed on either side of a silica nanochannel, and a pair of electrodes is used to apply a tunable electric potential across the channel. Metal nanowire growth is initiated by chemical reduction when the two solutions meet and continues until the nanochannel is blocked by the formation of a short metal wire segment. Further growth is driven by a bipolar electrochemical mechanism which enables the reduction of metal precursor ions at one end of the nanowire and the oxidation of the reducing agent at the other. The growth rate is monitored in real time by simultaneously recording both the faradaic current and optical microscope video and can be adjusted accordingly by changing the applied electric potential. The resulting nanowire is solid, electrically insulated, and can be used as a bipolar nanoelectrode. This technique can be extended to other electrochemical systems, as well, and provides a confined reaction space for studying the dynamics of any process that can be optically or electrically monitored.

  8. Bipolar electrochemical method for dynamic in situ control of single metal nanowire growth.

    PubMed

    Wood, Marissa; Zhang, Bo

    2015-03-24

    Fabrication plays a key role in determining the unique electrical, optical, and catalytic properties of metal nanowires. Here we present a bipolar electrochemical method for dynamically monitoring and controlling the rate of single metal nanowire growth in situ without a direct electrical connection. Solutions of a metal precursor and a reducing agent are placed on either side of a silica nanochannel, and a pair of electrodes is used to apply a tunable electric potential across the channel. Metal nanowire growth is initiated by chemical reduction when the two solutions meet and continues until the nanochannel is blocked by the formation of a short metal wire segment. Further growth is driven by a bipolar electrochemical mechanism which enables the reduction of metal precursor ions at one end of the nanowire and the oxidation of the reducing agent at the other. The growth rate is monitored in real time by simultaneously recording both the faradaic current and optical microscope video and can be adjusted accordingly by changing the applied electric potential. The resulting nanowire is solid, electrically insulated, and can be used as a bipolar nanoelectrode. This technique can be extended to other electrochemical systems, as well, and provides a confined reaction space for studying the dynamics of any process that can be optically or electrically monitored. PMID:25695464

  9. Induced metal redistribution and bioavailability enhancement in contaminated river sediment during in situ biogeochemical remediation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tongzhou; Zhang, Zhen; Mao, Yanqing; Yan, Dickson Y S

    2016-04-01

    In situ sediment remediation using Ca(NO3)2 or CaO2 for odor mitigation and acid volatile sulfide (AVS) and organic pollutant (such as TPH and PAHs) removal was reported in many studies and fieldwork. Yet, the associated effects on metal mobilization and potential distortion in bioavailability were not well documented. In this study, contaminated river sediment was treated by Ca(NO3)2 and CaO2 in bench studies. Through the investigation of AVS removal, organic matter removal, the changes in sediment oxidation-reduction potential (ORP), microbial activity, and other indigenous parameters, the effects on metal bioavailability, bioaccessibility, and fraction redistribution in sediment were evaluated. The major mechanisms for sediment treated by Ca(NO3)2 and CaO2 are biostimulation with indigenous denitrifying bacteria and chemical oxidation, respectively. After applying Ca(NO3)2 and CaO2, the decreases of metal concentrations in the treated sediment were insignificant within a 35-day incubation period. However, the [SEMtot-AVS]/f OC increased near to the effective boundary of toxicity (100 μmol g(-1) organic carbon (OC)), indicating that both bioavailability and bioaccessibility of metals (Cu, Zn, and Ni) to benthic organisms are enhanced after remediation. Metals were found redistributed from relatively stable fractions (oxidizable and residual fractions) to weakly bound fractions (exchangeable and reducible fractions), and the results are in line with the enhanced metal bioavailability. Compared with Ca(NO3)2, CaO2 led to higher enhancement in metal bioavailability and bioaccessibility, and more significant metal redistribution, probably due to its stronger chemical reactive capacity to AVS and sediment organic matter. The reactions in CaO2-treated sediment would probably shift from physicochemical to biochemical heterotrophic oxidation for sediment organic matter degradation. Therefore, further investigation on the long-term metal redistribution and associated

  10. Induced metal redistribution and bioavailability enhancement in contaminated river sediment during in situ biogeochemical remediation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tongzhou; Zhang, Zhen; Mao, Yanqing; Yan, Dickson Y S

    2016-04-01

    In situ sediment remediation using Ca(NO3)2 or CaO2 for odor mitigation and acid volatile sulfide (AVS) and organic pollutant (such as TPH and PAHs) removal was reported in many studies and fieldwork. Yet, the associated effects on metal mobilization and potential distortion in bioavailability were not well documented. In this study, contaminated river sediment was treated by Ca(NO3)2 and CaO2 in bench studies. Through the investigation of AVS removal, organic matter removal, the changes in sediment oxidation-reduction potential (ORP), microbial activity, and other indigenous parameters, the effects on metal bioavailability, bioaccessibility, and fraction redistribution in sediment were evaluated. The major mechanisms for sediment treated by Ca(NO3)2 and CaO2 are biostimulation with indigenous denitrifying bacteria and chemical oxidation, respectively. After applying Ca(NO3)2 and CaO2, the decreases of metal concentrations in the treated sediment were insignificant within a 35-day incubation period. However, the [SEMtot-AVS]/f OC increased near to the effective boundary of toxicity (100 μmol g(-1) organic carbon (OC)), indicating that both bioavailability and bioaccessibility of metals (Cu, Zn, and Ni) to benthic organisms are enhanced after remediation. Metals were found redistributed from relatively stable fractions (oxidizable and residual fractions) to weakly bound fractions (exchangeable and reducible fractions), and the results are in line with the enhanced metal bioavailability. Compared with Ca(NO3)2, CaO2 led to higher enhancement in metal bioavailability and bioaccessibility, and more significant metal redistribution, probably due to its stronger chemical reactive capacity to AVS and sediment organic matter. The reactions in CaO2-treated sediment would probably shift from physicochemical to biochemical heterotrophic oxidation for sediment organic matter degradation. Therefore, further investigation on the long-term metal redistribution and associated

  11. Production of lead metal by molten-salt electrolysis with energy-efficient electrodes. Rept. of investigations/1991

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, J.E.; Chambers, M.F.

    1991-01-01

    The U.S. Bureau of Mines investigated electrode designs for electrowinning lead metal from a LiCl-KCl-PbCl2 electrolyte at 450 C. The major objective of the investigation was to decrease the energy requirement for lead electrowinning. Electrolysis was performed in a bench-scale cell using several graphite electrode assemblies. Parameters, such as electrode spacing, current density, and chlorine gas removal from the anode, were investigated in the bench-scale tests. An optimum electrode assembly, termed the sawtooth design, was scaled up and operated at 3,000 and 4,000 A. The sawtooth electrodes operating at 3,000 A produced lead for 0.66 kW times h/kg. The electrodes were constructed by cutting large triangular grooves in the electrode surfaces. The electrodes were placed together such that the triangular peaks of one electrode projected into the triangular valleys of the other electrode. Chlorine did not build up on the anode with the sawtooth electrodes.

  12. Inherent predominance of high chiral angle metallic carbon nanotubes in continuous fibers grown from a molten catalyst.

    PubMed

    Alemán, B; Bernal, M Mar; Mas, B; Pérez, Emilio M; Reguero, V; Xu, G; Cui, Y; Vilatela, Juan J

    2016-02-21

    We present evidence that high temperature CVD growth of SWNTs under conditions of continuous spinning of macroscopic fibers leads to an inherent predominance of high chiral angle CNTs, peaking at the armchair end. Raman, UV-vis-NIR absorption, and photoluminescence spectroscopy measurements show the prevalence of metallic SWNTs. The complete chiral angle distribution is obtained by electron diffraction of over 390 CNTs. It is biased towards high chiral angles and peaks at the armchair end (30°), in good agreement with the established atomistic models for SWNT growth from a liquid catalyst. Based on the Fe-C-S constituent binary and ternary phase diagrams, thermodynamic calculations of phase compositions from fast cooling and experimental evidence of a post-synthesis catalyst, the proposed thermodynamic path of the catalyst is to form a solid FCC Fe core and a liquid Fe-S shell. S in the outer liquid shell first stabilizes the edge of the nascent CNT, but once a graphitic wall forms it is rejected due to the high interfacial energy of the Fe-C-S alloy. PMID:26837936

  13. Role of molten salt flux in melting of used beverage container (UBC) scrap

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, J.; Sahai, Y.

    1995-12-31

    Recycling of aluminum scrap, such as Used Beverage Container (UBC) scrap is steadily increasing. In secondary remelting of such scrap, it is a common practice to use protective molten salt cover. An appropriate salt protects metal from oxidation, promotes coalescence of the suspended metal droplets, and separates clean metal from the oxide contamination. The molten salt also reacts with metal. This causes metal loss and change of resulting metal composition. In this paper, role of molten salt fluxes in melting of UBC scrap is discussed, and selection criteria for molten salt are provided.

  14. Inherent predominance of high chiral angle metallic carbon nanotubes in continuous fibers grown from a molten catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alemán, B.; Bernal, M. Mar; Mas, B.; Pérez, Emilio M.; Reguero, V.; Xu, G.; Cui, Y.; Vilatela, Juan J.

    2016-02-01

    We present evidence that high temperature CVD growth of SWNTs under conditions of continuous spinning of macroscopic fibers leads to an inherent predominance of high chiral angle CNTs, peaking at the armchair end. Raman, UV-vis-NIR absorption, and photoluminescence spectroscopy measurements show the prevalence of metallic SWNTs. The complete chiral angle distribution is obtained by electron diffraction of over 390 CNTs. It is biased towards high chiral angles and peaks at the armchair end (30°), in good agreement with the established atomistic models for SWNT growth from a liquid catalyst. Based on the Fe-C-S constituent binary and ternary phase diagrams, thermodynamic calculations of phase compositions from fast cooling and experimental evidence of a post-synthesis catalyst, the proposed thermodynamic path of the catalyst is to form a solid FCC Fe core and a liquid Fe-S shell. S in the outer liquid shell first stabilizes the edge of the nascent CNT, but once a graphitic wall forms it is rejected due to the high interfacial energy of the Fe-C-S alloy.We present evidence that high temperature CVD growth of SWNTs under conditions of continuous spinning of macroscopic fibers leads to an inherent predominance of high chiral angle CNTs, peaking at the armchair end. Raman, UV-vis-NIR absorption, and photoluminescence spectroscopy measurements show the prevalence of metallic SWNTs. The complete chiral angle distribution is obtained by electron diffraction of over 390 CNTs. It is biased towards high chiral angles and peaks at the armchair end (30°), in good agreement with the established atomistic models for SWNT growth from a liquid catalyst. Based on the Fe-C-S constituent binary and ternary phase diagrams, thermodynamic calculations of phase compositions from fast cooling and experimental evidence of a post-synthesis catalyst, the proposed thermodynamic path of the catalyst is to form a solid FCC Fe core and a liquid Fe-S shell. S in the outer liquid shell first

  15. In situ metalation of free base phthalocyanine covalently bonded to silicon surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Lupo, Fabio; Tudisco, Cristina; Bertani, Federico; Dalcanale, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Summary Free 4-undecenoxyphthalocyanine molecules were covalently bonded to Si(100) and porous silicon through thermic hydrosilylation of the terminal double bonds of the undecenyl chains. The success of the anchoring strategy on both surfaces was demonstrated by the combination of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy with control experiments performed adopting the commercially available 2,3,9,10,16,17,23,24-octakis(octyloxy)-29H,31H-phthalocyanine, which is not suited for silicon anchoring. Moreover, the study of the shape of the XPS N 1s band gave relevant information on the interactions occurring between the anchored molecules and the substrates. The spectra suggest that the phthalocyanine ring interacts significantly with the flat Si surface, whilst ring–surface interactions are less relevant on porous Si. The surface-bonded molecules were then metalated in situ with Co by using wet chemistry. The efficiency of the metalation process was evaluated by XPS measurements and, in particular, on porous silicon, the complexation of cobalt was confirmed by the disappearance in the FTIR spectra of the band at 3290 cm−1 due to –NH stretches. Finally, XPS results revealed that the different surface–phthalocyanine interactions observed for flat and porous substrates affect the efficiency of the in situ metalation process. PMID:25551050

  16. Metal matrix composite micromechanics: In-situ behavior influence on composite properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, P. L. N.; Hopkins, D. A.; Chamis, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    Recent efforts in computational mechanics methods for simulating the nonlinear behavior of metal matrix composites have culminated in the implementation of the Metal Matrix Composite Analyzer (METCAN) computer code. In METCAN material nonlinearity is treated at the constituent (fiber, matrix, and interphase) level where the current material model describes a time-temperature-stress dependency of the constituent properties in a material behavior space. The composite properties are synthesized from the constituent instantaneous properties by virtue of composite micromechanics and macromechanics models. The behavior of metal matrix composites depends on fabrication process variables, in situ fiber and matrix properties, bonding between the fiber and matrix, and/or the properties of an interphase between the fiber and matrix. Specifically, the influence of in situ matrix strength and the interphase degradation on the unidirectional composite stress-strain behavior is examined. These types of studies provide insight into micromechanical behavior that may be helpful in resolving discrepancies between experimentally observed composite behavior and predicted response.

  17. In situ remediation of soils contaminated with toxic metal ions using microwave energy.

    PubMed

    Abramovitch, Rudolph A; ChangQing, Lu; Hicks, Evan; Sinard, Joseph

    2003-12-01

    Following onto our work on the in situ remediation of soils contaminated with PAH's, PCB's and other polychlorinated organic compounds using microwave energy, we now report a preliminary investigation on the in situ remediation of soils contaminated with toxic metal ions: Cd(II), Mn(II), Th(IV), Cr(III) and mainly Cr(VI). The soil is partially vitrified in the process, and extraction with hot (70 degrees C) 35% nitric acid for 4.5 h leads to the recovery of very small amounts of the metals which had been spiked into the clean soil: Cd, Mn, and Cr(III) are completely immobilized (unextractable), Th is mostly unextractable, and Cr(VI) partially extractable at very high levels of spiking, but almost completely unextractable using the US EPA Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure. This suggests that contaminated soils which are not going to be used for agricultural purposes can be remediated safely to preset depths without fear of the toxic metal ions leaching out for a long time. PMID:14512111

  18. Coated Metal Articles and Method of Making

    DOEpatents

    Boller, Ernest R.; Eubank, Lowell D.

    2004-07-06

    The method of protectively coating metallic uranium which comprises dipping the metallic uranium in a molten alloy comprising about 20-75% of copper and about 80-25% of tin, dipping the coated uranium promptly into molten tin, withdrawing it from the molten tin and removing excess molten metal, thereupon dipping it into a molten metal bath comprising aluminum until it is coated with this metal, then promptly withdrawing it from the bath.

  19. Coated metal articles and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Boller, Ernest R.; Eubank, Lowell D.

    2004-07-06

    The method of protectively coating metallic uranium which comprises dipping the metallic uranium in a molten alloy comprising about 20-75% of copper and about 80-25% of tin, dipping the coated uranium promptly into molten tin, withdrawing it from the molten tin and removing excess molten metal, thereupon dipping it into a molten metal bath comprising aluminum until it is coated with this metal, then promptly withdrawing it from the bath.

  20. Behaviour of TEM metal grids during in-situ heating experiments.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zaoli; Su, Dangsheng

    2009-05-01

    The stability of Ni, Cu, Mo and Au transmission electron microscope (TEM) grids coated with ultra-thin amorphous carbon (alpha-C) or silicon monoxide film is examined by in-situ heating up to a temperature in the range 500-850 degrees C in a transmission electron microscope. It is demonstrated that some grids can generate nano-particles either due to the surface diffusion of metal atoms on amorphous film or due to the metal evaporation/redeposition. The emergence of nano-particles can complicate experimental observations, particularly in in-situ heating studies of dynamic behaviours of nano-materials in TEM. The most widely used Cu grid covered with amorphous carbon is unstable, and numerous Cu nano-particles start to form once the heating temperature reaches 600 degrees C. In the case of Ni grid covered with alpha-C film, a large number of Ni nano-crystals occur immediately when the temperature approaches 600 degrees C, accompanied by the graphitization of amorphous carbon. In contrast, both Mo and Au grids covered with alpha-C film exhibit good stability at elevated temperature, for instance, up to 680 and 850 degrees C for Mo and Au, respectively, and any other metal nano-particles are detected. Cu grid covered Si monoxide thin film is stable up to 550 degrees C, but Si nano-crystals appear under intensive electron beam. The generated nano-particles are well characterized by spectroscopic techniques (EDXS/EELS) and high-resolution TEM. The mechanism of nano-particle formation is addressed based on the interactions between the metal grid and the amorphous carbon film and on the sublimation of metal.

  1. Novel in situ mechanical testers to enable integrated metal surface micro-machines.

    SciTech Connect

    Follstaedt, David Martin; de Boer, Maarten Pieter; Kotula, Paul Gabriel; Hearne, Sean Joseph; Foiles, Stephen Martin; Buchheit, Thomas Edward; Dyck, Christopher William

    2005-10-01

    The ability to integrate metal and semiconductor micro-systems to perform highly complex functions, such as RF-MEMS, will depend on developing freestanding metal structures that offer improved conductivity, reflectivity, and mechanical properties. Three issues have prevented the proliferation of these systems: (1) warpage of active components due to through-thickness stress gradients, (2) limited component lifetimes due to fatigue, and (3) low yield strength. To address these issues, we focus on developing and implementing techniques to enable the direct study of the stress and microstructural evolution during electrodeposition and mechanical loading. The study of stress during electrodeposition of metal thin films is being accomplished by integrating a multi-beam optical stress sensor into an electrodeposition chamber. By coupling the in-situ stress information with ex-situ microstructural analysis, a scientific understanding of the sources of stress during electrodeposition will be obtained. These results are providing a foundation upon which to develop a stress-gradient-free thin film directly applicable to the production of freestanding metal structures. The issues of fatigue and yield strength are being addressed by developing novel surface micromachined tensile and bend testers, by interferometry, and by TEM analysis. The MEMS tensile tester has a ''Bosch'' etched hole to allow for direct viewing of the microstructure in a TEM before, during, and after loading. This approach allows for the quantitative measurements of stress-strain relations while imaging dislocation motion, and determination of fracture nucleation in samples with well-known fatigue/strain histories. This technique facilitates the determination of the limits for classical deformation mechanisms and helps to formulate a new understanding of the mechanical response as the grain sizes are refined to a nanometer scale. Together, these studies will result in a science-based infrastructure to

  2. Imaging microbial metal metabolism in situ under conditions of the deep-sea hydrothermal vents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oger, P. M.; Daniel, I.; Simionovici, A.; Picard, A.

    2006-12-01

    High-pressure biotopes are the most widely spread biotopes on Earth. They represent one possible location for the origin of life. They also share striking similarities with extraterrestrial biotopes such as those postulated for Europe or Mars. In absence of light, dissimilatory reduction of metals (DMR) is fueling the ecosystem. Monitoring the metabolism of the deep-sea hydrothermal vent microbial fauna under P, T and chemical conditions relevant to their isolation environment can be difficult because of the confinement and because most spectroscopic probes do not sense metallic ions in solution. We demonstrated the possibility to use Xray spectroscopy to monitor the speciation of metallic species in solution. Experiments were performed at The ESRF using Selenium (Se) detoxification by Agrobacterium tumefaciens as an analog of DMR. The reduction of Se from selenite to the metal was monitored by a combiantion of two Xray spectroscopic techniques (XANES and μXRF). Cells were incubated in the low pressure DAC in growth medium supplemented with 5mM Selenite and incubated under pressures up to 60 Mpa at 30°C for 24h. The evolution of the speciation can be easily monitored and the concentration of each Se species determined from the Xray spectra by linear combinations of standard spectra. Selenite is transformed by the bacterium into a mixture of metal Se and methylated Se after 24 hours. Se detoxification is observed in situ up to at least 25 MPa. The technique, developped for Se can be adapted to monitor other elements more relevant to DMR such as As, Fe or S, which should allow to monitor in situ under controlled pressure and temperature the metabolism of vent organisms. It is also amenable to the monitoring of toxic metals. Xray spectroscopy and the lpDAC are compatible with other spectroscopic techniques, such as Raman, UV or IR spectroscopies, allowing to probe other metabolic activities. Hence, enlarging the range of metabolic information that can be obtained in

  3. Molten-Metal Droplet Deposition on a Moving Substrate in Microgravity: Aiding the Development of Novel Technologies for Microelectronic Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Megaridis, C. M.; Bayer, I. S.; Poulikakos, D.; Nayagam, V.

    2002-01-01

    Driven by advancements in microelectronics manufacturing, this research investigates the oblique (non-axisymmetric) impact of liquid-metal droplets on flat substrates. The problem of interest is relevant to the development of the novel technology of on-demand dispension (printing) of microscopic solder deposits for the surface mounting of microelectronic devices. The technology, known as solder jetting, features on-demand deposition of miniature solder droplets (30 to 120 microns in diameter) in very fine, very accurate patterns using techniques analogous to those developed for the ink-jet printing industry. Despite its promise, severe limitations exist currently with regards to the throughput rates of the technology; some of these limitations are largely due to the lack of the capability for reliable prediction of solder bump positioning and shapes, especially under ballistic deposition conditions where the droplet impact phenomena are inherently three-dimensional. The study consists of a theoretical and an experimental component. The theoretical work uses a finite element formulation to simulate numerically the non-axisymmetric (3-D) fluid mechanics and heat transfer phenomena of a liquid solder droplet impacting at an angle alpha on a flat substrate. The work focuses on the pre-solidification regime. The modeling of the most challenging fluid mechanics part of the process has been completed successfully. It is based upon the full laminar Navier-Stokes equations employing a Lagrangian frame of reference. Due to the large droplet deformation, the surface (skin) as well as the volumetric mesh have to be regenerated during the calculations in order to maintain the high accuracy of the numerical scheme. The pressure and velocity fields are then interpolated on the newly created mesh. The numerical predictions are being tested against experiments, for cases where wetting phenomena are not important. For the impact parameters used in the example shown (We = 2.38, Fr

  4. Voltage oxide removal for plating: A new method of electroplating oxide coated metals in situ

    SciTech Connect

    Gutfeld, R. J. von; West, A. C.

    2007-03-15

    A novel in situ method for electroplating oxide coated metals is described. Termed VORP, for voltage oxide removal for plating, the process utilizes a voltage pulse {approx}20-200 V, {approx}2 ms in duration, applied between working and counterelectrodes while both are immersed in a copper electrolyte. The pulse is almost immediately followed by galvanostatic plate-up. Adherent copper deposits up to {approx}4 {mu}m in height on stainless steel 316 coupons have been obtained. Temperature testing up to 260 deg. C in air does not affect the copper adhesion. A preliminary model for oxide removal is proposed utilizing concepts of dielectric breakdown.

  5. In situ observation of deformation processes in nanocrystalline face-centered cubic metals

    PubMed Central

    Kobler, Aaron; Brandl, Christian; Hahn, Horst

    2016-01-01

    Summary The atomistic mechanisms active during plastic deformation of nanocrystalline metals are still a subject of controversy. The recently developed approach of combining automated crystal orientation mapping (ACOM) and in situ straining inside a transmission electron microscope was applied to study the deformation of nanocrystalline PdxAu1− x thin films. This combination enables direct imaging of simultaneously occurring plastic deformation processes in one experiment, such as grain boundary motion, twin activity and grain rotation. Large-angle grain rotations with ≈39° and ≈60° occur and can be related to twin formation, twin migration and twin–twin interaction as a result of partial dislocation activity. Furthermore, plastic deformation in nanocrystalline thin films was found to be partially reversible upon rupture of the film. In conclusion, conventional deformation mechanisms are still active in nanocrystalline metals but with different weighting as compared with conventional materials with coarser grains. PMID:27335747

  6. In situ observation of deformation processes in nanocrystalline face-centered cubic metals.

    PubMed

    Kobler, Aaron; Brandl, Christian; Hahn, Horst; Kübel, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The atomistic mechanisms active during plastic deformation of nanocrystalline metals are still a subject of controversy. The recently developed approach of combining automated crystal orientation mapping (ACOM) and in situ straining inside a transmission electron microscope was applied to study the deformation of nanocrystalline Pd x Au1- x thin films. This combination enables direct imaging of simultaneously occurring plastic deformation processes in one experiment, such as grain boundary motion, twin activity and grain rotation. Large-angle grain rotations with ≈39° and ≈60° occur and can be related to twin formation, twin migration and twin-twin interaction as a result of partial dislocation activity. Furthermore, plastic deformation in nanocrystalline thin films was found to be partially reversible upon rupture of the film. In conclusion, conventional deformation mechanisms are still active in nanocrystalline metals but with different weighting as compared with conventional materials with coarser grains. PMID:27335747

  7. In situ ceramic layer growth on coated fuel particles dispersed in a zirconium metal matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Terrani, Kurt A; Silva, G W Chinthaka M; Kiggans, Jim; Cai, Zhonghou; Shin, Dongwon; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2013-01-01

    The extent and nature of the chemical interaction between the outermost coating layer of coated fuel particles embedded in zirconium metal during fabrication of metal matrix microencapsulated fuels was examined. Various particles with outermost coating layers of pyrocarbon, SiC, and ZrC have been investigated in this study. ZrC-Zr interaction was least substantial while PyC-Zr reaction can be exploited to produce a ZrC layer at the interface in an in situ manner. The thickness of the ZrC layer in the latter case can be controlled by adjusting the time and temperature during processing. The kinetics of ZrC layer growth is significantly faster from what is predicted using literature carbon diffusivity data in ZrC. SiC-Zr interaction is more complex and results in formation of various chemical phases in a layered aggregate morphology at the interface.

  8. In situ ceramic layer growth on coated fuel particles dispersed in a zirconium metal matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrani, K. A.; Silva, C. M.; Kiggans, J. O.; Cai, Z.; Shin, D.; Snead, L. L.

    2013-06-01

    The extent and nature of the chemical interaction between the outermost coating layer of coated fuel particles embedded in zirconium metal during fabrication of metal matrix microencapsulated fuels were examined. Various particles with outermost coating layers of pyrocarbon, SiC, and ZrC have been investigated in this study. ZrC-Zr interaction was the least substantial, while the PyC-Zr reaction can be exploited to produce a ZrC layer at the interface in an in situ manner. The thickness of the ZrC layer in the latter case can be controlled by adjusting the time and temperature during processing. The kinetics of ZrC layer growth is significantly faster from what is predicted using literature carbon diffusivity data in ZrC. SiC-Zr interaction is more complex and results in formation of various chemical phases in a layered aggregate morphology at the interface.

  9. In Situ Quantitative Mechanical Characterization and Integration of One Dimensional Metallic Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yang

    2011-12-01

    One dimensional (1-D) metallic nanostructures (e.g. nanowires, nanorods) have stimulated great interest recently as important building blocks for future nanoscale electronic and electromechanical devices. In this thesis work, gold and nickel nanowires with various diameters were successfully fabricated, and two dedicated platforms, based on (1) a novel micro mechanical device (MMD) assisted with a quantitative nanoindenter and (2) a TEM-AFM sample holder system, were developed and adopted to perform in situ tensile tests inside SEM and TEM on samples with diameter ranging from a few nanometers to hundreds nanometers. Size-dependent mechanical behavior and different fracture mechanisms of gold nanowires had been revealed and discussed. In addition, we discovered cold welding phenomenon for ultrathin gold nanowires (diameter < 10nm), which is anticipated to have potential applications in the future bottom-up integration of metallic 1-D nanostructures and next-generation interconnects for extremely dense logic circuits.

  10. Crystallisation behaviour of bulk metallic glasses by in-situ neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soubeyroux, J. L.; Claret, N.

    Crystallisation behaviour of some bulk metallic glasses has been studied by neutron diffraction and by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) performed at the same heating rate. The alloys Zr51Ti2.5Al11.5Cu22Ni13 (F35) and Zr41.25Ti13.75Cu8Ni14.5Be22.5 (Vit1*) present a first crystallisation corresponding to the first peak in the DSC experiments, this first phase being different in each system and corresponding to intermediate phases. The Pd43Cu27Ni10P20 alloy crystallises by forming, in a very narrow interval of temperature, binary and ternary phosphides, all stable up to the melting temperature. The combination of in-situ neutron-diffraction and DSC experiments has proved to be a powerful technique to study the crystallisation of bulk metallic glasses.

  11. Degassing of molten alloys with the assistance of ultrasonic vibration

    DOEpatents

    Han, Qingyou; Xu, Hanbing; Meek, Thomas T.

    2010-03-23

    An apparatus and method are disclosed in which ultrasonic vibration is used to assist the degassing of molten metals or metal alloys thereby reducing gas content in the molten metals or alloys. High-intensity ultrasonic vibration is applied to a radiator that creates cavitation bubbles, induces acoustic streaming in the melt, and breaks up purge gas (e.g., argon or nitrogen) which is intentionally introduced in a small amount into the melt in order to collect the cavitation bubbles and to make the cavitation bubbles survive in the melt. The molten metal or alloy in one version of the invention is an aluminum alloy. The ultrasonic vibrations create cavitation bubbles and break up the large purge gas bubbles into small bubbles and disperse the bubbles in the molten metal or alloy more uniformly, resulting in a fast and clean degassing.

  12. Electrodeposition of molten silicon

    DOEpatents

    De Mattei, Robert C.; Elwell, Dennis; Feigelson, Robert S.

    1981-01-01

    Silicon dioxide is dissolved in a molten electrolytic bath, preferably comprising barium oxide and barium fluoride. A direct current is passed between an anode and a cathode in the bath to reduce the dissolved silicon dioxide to non-alloyed silicon in molten form, which is removed from the bath.

  13. Electrodeposition of molten silicon

    SciTech Connect

    De Mattei, R.C.; Elwell, D.; Feigelson, R.S.

    1981-09-29

    Silicon dioxide is dissolved in a molten electrolytic bath, preferably comprising barium oxide and barium fluoride. A direct current is passed between an anode and a cathode in the bath to reduce the dissolved silicon dioxide to non-alloyed silicon in molten form, which is then removed from the bath.

  14. Molten salt electrolyte separator

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, T.D.

    1996-07-09

    The patent describes a molten salt electrolyte/separator for battery and related electrochemical systems including a molten electrolyte composition and an electrically insulating solid salt dispersed therein, to provide improved performance at higher current densities and alternate designs through ease of fabrication. 5 figs.

  15. WIPP/SRL in-situ tests: MIIT program--The effects of metal package components

    SciTech Connect

    Covington, J.A. ); Wicks, G.G. ); Molecke, M.A. )

    1991-01-01

    The Materials Interface Interactions Tests or MIIT is the largest in-situ testing program in progress, involving burial of many simulated nuclear waste systems and accompanying package components. In MIIT, waste glass samples were fabricated into the shape of pineapple slices', polished on one side. Proposed package components were also made into a similar configuration and the various glasses, metals, and geologic samples were than stacked onto heater elements within Teflon assemblies. This produced interactions of interest by creating glass/glass, glass/salt, and glass/metal interfaces. Since the outer diameter of the metal was smaller than the outer diameter of the glass, a lip was created which was also produced a glass/liquid interface, which was also studied. Overall, a total of 50 stacks or assemblies of pineapple slices were created in seven different stacking arrangements. Each individual assembly was then installed in an instrumented borehole at WIPP. Brine was then added to most of boreholes and the assemblies heated and maintained at 90{degrees}C. This was achieved by energizing the central heating and rod that traversed through the middle opening of each of the pineapple slices in each assembly. Due to the design of these units, glass, metal and geologic samples could be removed at time intervals of 6 mos., 1 year, 2 years, and 5 years. Currently, all but the 5 year samples have been removed from test and are being evaluated in laboratories of MIIT participants.

  16. WIPP/SRL in-situ tests: MIIT program--The effects of metal package components

    SciTech Connect

    Covington, J.A.; Wicks, G.G.; Molecke, M.A.

    1991-12-31

    The Materials Interface Interactions Tests or MIIT is the largest in-situ testing program in progress, involving burial of many simulated nuclear waste systems and accompanying package components. In MIIT, waste glass samples were fabricated into the shape of `pineapple slices`, polished on one side. Proposed package components were also made into a similar configuration and the various glasses, metals, and geologic samples were than stacked onto heater elements within Teflon assemblies. This produced interactions of interest by creating glass/glass, glass/salt, and glass/metal interfaces. Since the outer diameter of the metal was smaller than the outer diameter of the glass, a lip was created which was also produced a glass/liquid interface, which was also studied. Overall, a total of 50 stacks or assemblies of pineapple slices were created in seven different stacking arrangements. Each individual assembly was then installed in an instrumented borehole at WIPP. Brine was then added to most of boreholes and the assemblies heated and maintained at 90{degrees}C. This was achieved by energizing the central heating and rod that traversed through the middle opening of each of the pineapple slices in each assembly. Due to the design of these units, glass, metal and geologic samples could be removed at time intervals of 6 mos., 1 year, 2 years, and 5 years. Currently, all but the 5 year samples have been removed from test and are being evaluated in laboratories of MIIT participants.

  17. Metallic monoclinic phase in VO2 induced by electrochemical gating: In situ Raman study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath Gupta, Satyendra; Pal, Anand; Muthu, D. V. S.; Kumar, P. S. Anil; Sood, A. K.

    2016-07-01

    We report in situ Raman scattering studies of electrochemically top gated VO2 thin film to address metal-insulator transition (MIT) under gating. The room temperature monoclinic insulating phase goes to metallic state at a gate voltage of 2.6 V. However, the number of Raman modes do not change with electrolyte gating showing that the metallic phase is still monoclinic. The high-frequency Raman mode A g (7) near 616 cm-1 ascribed to V-O vibration of bond length 2.06 Å in VO6 octahedra hardens with increasing gate voltage and the B g (3) mode near 654 cm-1 softens. This shows that the distortion of the VO6 octahedra in the monoclinic phase decreases with gating. The time-dependent Raman data at fixed gate voltages of 1 V (for 50 minutes, showing enhancement of conductivity by a factor of 50) and 2 V (for 130 minutes, showing further increase in conductivity by a factor of 5) show similar changes in high-frequency Raman modes A g (7) and B g (3) as observed in gating. This slow change in conductance together with Raman frequency changes show that the governing mechanism for metalization is more likely due to the diffusion-controlled oxygen vacancy formation due to the applied electric field.

  18. Nanoceramic -Metal Matrix Composites by In-Situ Pyrolysis of Organic Precursors in a Liquid Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudarshan; Surappa, M. K.; Ahn, Dongjoon; Raj, Rishi

    2008-12-01

    We show the feasibility of introducing a dispersion of a refractory ceramic phase into metals by stirring a powder of an organic polymer into a magnesium melt and having it convert into a ceramic within the melt by in-situ pyrolysis of the polymer. The pyrolysis is a highly reactive process, accompanied by the evolution of hydrogen, which disperses the ceramic phase into nanoscale constituents. In the present experiments, a polysilazane-based precursor, which is known to yield an amorphous ceramic constituted from silicon, carbon, and nitrogen, was used. Five weight percent of the precursor (which has a nominal ceramic yield of 75 to 85 wt pct) produced a twofold increase in the room-temperature yield strength and reduced the steady-state strain rate at 450 °C by one to two orders of magnitude, relative to pure magnesium. This polymer-based in-situ process (PIP) for processing metal-matrix composites (MMCs) is likely to have great generality, because many different kinds of organic precursors, for producing oxide, carbides, nitrides, and borides, are commercially available. Also, the process would permit the addition of large volume fractions of the ceramic, enabling the nanostructural design, and production of MMCs with a wide range of mechanical properties, meant especially for high-temperature applications. An important and noteworthy feature of the present process, which distinguishes it from other methods, is that all the constituents of the ceramic phase are built into the organic molecules of the precursor ( e.g., polysilazanes contain silicon, carbon, and nitrogen); therefore, a reaction between the polymer and the host metal is not required to produce the dispersion of the refractory phase.

  19. Molten salts and energy related materials.

    PubMed

    Fray, Derek

    2016-08-15

    Molten salts have been known for centuries and have been used for the extraction of aluminium for over one hundred years and as high temperature fluxes in metal processing. This and other molten salt routes have gradually become more energy efficient and less polluting, but there have been few major breakthroughs. This paper will explore some recent innovations that could lead to substantial reductions in the energy consumed in metal production and in carbon dioxide production. Another way that molten salts can contribute to an energy efficient world is by creating better high temperature fuel cells and novel high temperature batteries, or by acting as the medium that can create novel materials that can find applications in high energy batteries and other energy saving devices, such as capacitors. Carbonate melts can be used to absorb carbon dioxide, which can be converted into C, CO and carbon nanoparticles. Molten salts can also be used to create black silicon that can absorb more sunlight over a wider range of wavelengths. Overall, there are many opportunities to explore for molten salts to play in an efficient, low carbon world. PMID:27276650

  20. Molten salts and energy related materials.

    PubMed

    Fray, Derek

    2016-08-15

    Molten salts have been known for centuries and have been used for the extraction of aluminium for over one hundred years and as high temperature fluxes in metal processing. This and other molten salt routes have gradually become more energy efficient and less polluting, but there have been few major breakthroughs. This paper will explore some recent innovations that could lead to substantial reductions in the energy consumed in metal production and in carbon dioxide production. Another way that molten salts can contribute to an energy efficient world is by creating better high temperature fuel cells and novel high temperature batteries, or by acting as the medium that can create novel materials that can find applications in high energy batteries and other energy saving devices, such as capacitors. Carbonate melts can be used to absorb carbon dioxide, which can be converted into C, CO and carbon nanoparticles. Molten salts can also be used to create black silicon that can absorb more sunlight over a wider range of wavelengths. Overall, there are many opportunities to explore for molten salts to play in an efficient, low carbon world.

  1. Simultaneous infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy and quartz crystal microbalance measurements for in situ studies of the metal/atmosphere interface

    SciTech Connect

    Aastrup, T.; Leygraf, C.

    1997-09-01

    A new experimental setup for in situ studies of the metal/atmosphere interface has been developed based on simultaneous infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS) and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) measurements of a metal surface. It consists of an in situ chamber in which the metal can be exposed to a well-controlled atmosphere. Four external devices are connected to the in situ chamber; a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer with external optical compartments, a QCM sensor probe with a frequency counter, a corrosive air generator, and a corrosive air analyzing system. In order to demonstrate the capability of the IRAS/QCM setup, copper was exposed to purified air at 80% relative humidity and 25 C. Under these exposure conditions, the interface between copper and air consists of cuprous oxide and water physisorbed on the oxide. The kinetics of the cuprous oxide formation could be followed in situ with both techniques. The combined IRAS/QCM results show excellent agreement with previous combined IRAS and cathodic reduction measurements and with optical calculations of the IRAS response. Under these conditions, the detection limit in terms of an equivalent Cu{sub 2}O film thickness is 10 {angstrom} for IRAS in situ analysis and 2 {angstrom} for QCM in situ analysis, respectively.

  2. Beryllium Interactions in Molten Salts

    SciTech Connect

    G. S. Smolik; M. F. Simpson; P. J. Pinhero; M. Hara; Y. Hatano; R. A. Anderl; J. P. Sharpe; T. Terai; S. Tanaka; D. A. Petti; D.-K. Sze

    2006-01-01

    Molten flibe (2LiF·BeF2) is a candidate as a cooling and tritium breeding media for future fusion power plants. Neutron interactions with the salt will produce tritium and release excess free fluorine ions. Beryllium metal has been demonstrated as an effective redox control agent to prevent free fluorine, or HF species, from reacting with structural metal components. The extent and rate of beryllium solubility in a pot design experiments to suppress continuously supplied hydrogen fluoride gas has been measured and modeled[ ]. This paper presents evidence of beryllium loss from specimens, a dependence of the loss upon bi-metal coupling, i.e., galvanic effect, and the partitioning of the beryllium to the salt and container materials. Various posttest investigative methods, viz., scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to explore this behavior.

  3. Al/Cl2 molten salt battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giner, J.

    1972-01-01

    Molten salt battery has been developed with theoretical energy density of 5.2 j/kg (650 W-h/lb). Battery, which operates at 150 C, can be used in primary mode or as rechargeable battery. Battery has aluminum anode and chlorine cathode. Electrolyte is mixture of AlCl3, NaCl, and some alkali metal halide such as KCl.

  4. Method for preparing metal powder, device for preparing metal powder, method for processing spent nuclear fuel

    DOEpatents

    Park, Jong-Hee

    2011-11-29

    A method for producing metal powder is provided the comprising supplying a molten bath containing a reducing agent, contacting a metal oxide with the molten bath for a time and at a temperature sufficient to reduce the metal in the metal oxide to elemental metal and produce free oxygen; and isolating the elemental metal from the molten bath.

  5. In situ insights to Se (S) partitioning between silicate and metallic melts at extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borchert, M.; Petitgirard, S.; Appel, K.; Watenphul, A.; Morgenroth, W.

    2012-12-01

    The Earth's core mainly consists of a metallic Fe-Ni mixture. However, seismic observations show that the density is about 5-10% lower than expected for an Fe-Ni alloy under similar pressure and temperature conditions (e.g., [1,2]). This discovery initiated numerous studies to identify and quantify light elements in the Earth0s core. Among others, sulphur has been suggested to be a promisingly candidate to alloy with the metallic core because of its depletion in the crust and the mantle relative to other volatile elements by several orders of magnitude (e.g., [3-5]). In the last decades, several experimental studies have aimed to quantify the sulphur content in the Earth's core and to determine its influence on the physical properties (e.g., [6]). However, experimental data on sulphur partitioning between silicate and metallic liquids at pressures and temperatures relevant for core-mantle boundary conditions are missing. This lack is due to pressure and temperature limitations of conventional experimental approaches (up to 25 GPa and 2200 K). New developments, like laser-heated diamond-anvil cells (LDAC), allow studies at core-mantle boundary conditions, but in-situ chemical analysis of sulphur in LDACs is impossible due to the high absorption of S fluorescence in the diamonds. Instead of sulphur, selenium can be used to model sulphur partitioning between silicate and metallic melts at elevated PT conditions. This is based on the fact that sulphur and selenium can be considered as geochemical twins ([7,8]). The main advantage of this approach is the much higher excitation energy of selenium compared to sulphur, which enables in-situ XRF analysis in LDACs. Here, we present preliminary data on Se partitioning between silicate and metallic melt at extreme conditions. The experiments have been performed in double-sided laser-heated LDACs at the high pressure beamlines P02.2 (DESY, Germany) and ID27 (ESRF, France) as described in [9]. Micro-XRF mappings are used to

  6. Characteristics of in-situ chamber cleaning for DPS+ metal etcher by using optical emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Yonghwan; Cho, Woojin; Lee, Yongwoo; Chae, Minchul; Kwon, Sungun; Hwang, Jaeseung

    2006-10-01

    Plasma enhanced in-situ chamber cleaning (ICC) is generally used for plasma processes such as plasma etching system and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) system. It is generally believed that ICC makes a chamber condition to be constant and be able to extend wet cleaning period. We have studied ICC characteristics for DPS+ metal etcher by using the optical emission spectroscopy (OES) as a function of the source power, the chamber pressure and the composition and total flow rate of the gases used. We observe that the higher source power and the lower pressure are more efficient for the ICC and also investigate the effects of the additional gases. We have applied our ICC condition to the patterned wafers and concluded that the chamber condition is maintained in a stable way. However, ICC treatment to the chamber result in some process changes such as the profile of the metal line and the oxide recess and the etch selectivity of the metal line to the oxide hard mask.

  7. A dynamic inert metal anode.

    SciTech Connect

    Hryn, J. N.

    1998-11-09

    A new concept for a stable anode for aluminum electrowinning is described. The anode consists of a cup-shaped metal alloy container filled with a molten salt that contains dissolved aluminum. The metal alloy can be any of a number of alloys, but it must contain aluminum as a secondary alloying metal. A possible alloy composition is copper with 5 to 15 weight percent aluminum. In the presence of oxygen, aluminum on the metal anode's exterior surface forms a continuous alumina film that is thick enough to protect the anode from chemical attack by cryolite during electrolysis and thin enough to maintain electrical conductivity. However, the alumina film is soluble in cryolite, so it must be regenerated in situ. Film regeneration is achieved by the transport of aluminum metal from the anode's molten salt interior through the metal wall to the anode's exterior surface, where the transported aluminum oxidizes to alumina in the presence of evolving oxygen to maintain the protective alumina film. Periodic addition of aluminum metal to the anode's interior keeps the aluminum activity in the molten salt at the desired level. This concept for an inert anode is viable as long as the amount of aluminum produced at the cathode greatly exceeds the amount of aluminum required to maintain the anode's protective film.

  8. In situ fabrication of highly conductive metal nanowire networks with high transmittance from deep-ultraviolet to near-infrared.

    PubMed

    Bao, Chunxiong; Yang, Jie; Gao, Hao; Li, Faming; Yao, Yingfang; Yang, Bo; Fu, Gao; Zhou, Xiaoxin; Yu, Tao; Qin, Yiqiang; Liu, Jianguo; Zou, Zhigang

    2015-03-24

    We have developed a facile and compatible method to in situ fabricate uniform metal nanowire networks on substrates. The as-fabricated metal nanowire networks show low sheet resistance and high transmittance (2.2 Ω sq(-1) at T = 91.1%), which is equivalent to that of the state-of-the-art metal nanowire networks. We demonstrated that the transmittance of the metal networks becomes homogeneous from deep-ultraviolet (200 nm) to near-infrared (2000 nm) when the size of the wire spacing increases to micrometer size. Theoretical and experimental analyses indicated that we can improve the conductivity of the metal networks as well as keep their transmittance by increasing the thickness of the metal films. We also carried out durability tests to demonstrate our as-fabricated metal networks having good flexibility and strong adhesion. PMID:25738309

  9. Method and apparatus for spraying molten materials

    DOEpatents

    Glovan, Ronald J.; Tierney, John C.; McLean, Leroy L.; Johnson, Lawrence L.; Nelson, Gordon L.; Lee, Ying-Ming

    1996-01-01

    A metal spray apparatus is provided with a supersonic nozzle. Molten metal is injected into a gas stream flowing through the nozzle under pressure. By varying the pressure of the injected metal, the droplet can be made in various selected sizes with each selected size having a high degree of size uniformity. A unique one piece graphite heater provides easily controlled uniformity of temperature in the nozzle and an attached tundish which holds the pressurized molten metal. A unique U-shaped gas heater provides extremely hot inlet gas temperatures to the nozzle. A particularly useful application of the spray apparatus is coating of threads of a fastener with a shape memory alloy. This permits a fastener to be easily inserted and removed but provides for a secure locking of the fastener in high temperature environments.

  10. Method and apparatus for spraying molten materials

    DOEpatents

    Glovan, R.J.; Tierney, J.C.; McLean, L.L.; Johnson, L.L.; Nelson, G.L.; Lee, Y.M.

    1996-06-25

    A metal spray apparatus is provided with a supersonic nozzle. Molten metal is injected into a gas stream flowing through the nozzle under pressure. By varying the pressure of the injected metal, the droplet can be made in various selected sizes with each selected size having a high degree of size uniformity. A unique one piece graphite heater provides easily controlled uniformity of temperature in the nozzle and an attached tundish which holds the pressurized molten metal. A unique U-shaped gas heater provides extremely hot inlet gas temperatures to the nozzle. A particularly useful application of the spray apparatus is coating of threads of a fastener with a shape memory alloy. This permits a fastener to be easily inserted and removed but provides for a secure locking of the fastener in high temperature environments. 12 figs.

  11. Method for the regeneration of spent molten zinc chloride

    DOEpatents

    Zielke, Clyde W.; Rosenhoover, William A.

    1981-01-01

    In a process for regenerating spent molten zinc chloride which has been used in the hydrocracking of coal or ash-containing polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbonaceous materials derived therefrom and which contains zinc chloride, zinc oxide, zinc oxide complexes and ash-containing carbonaceous residue, by incinerating the spent molten zinc chloride to vaporize the zinc chloride for subsequent condensation to produce a purified molten zinc chloride: an improvement comprising the use of clay in the incineration zone to suppress the vaporization of metals other than zinc. Optionally water is used in conjunction with the clay to further suppress the vaporization of metals other than zinc.

  12. In situ testing of metallic iron nanoparticle mobility and reactivity in a shallow granular aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Peter; He, Feng; Zhao, Dongye; Aiken, Brian; Feldman, Lester

    2010-07-01

    This paper describes the results of a series of single well push-pull tests conducted to evaluate the in situ transport of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) stabilized nanoscale zero-valent iron (ZVI) particles in saturated sediments and their reactivity toward chlorinated ethenes. CMC-stabilized nanoscale ZVI particles were synthesized on site by reducing ferrous ions with borohydride in water in the presence of CMC. Nanoscale ZVI and bimetallic ZVI-Pd nanoparticle suspensions were prepared and injected into depth-discrete aquifer zones during three push-pull tests. The injected nanoparticle suspensions contained a conservative tracer (Br -) and were allowed to reside in the aquifer pore space for various time periods prior to recovery by groundwater extraction. The comparison between Br - and Fe concentrations in extracted groundwater samples indicated that the CMC-stabilized nanoscale ZVI particles were mobile in the aquifer but appeared to lose mobility with time, likely due to the interactions between particles and aquifer sediments. After 13 h in the aquifer, the nanoscale ZVI particles became essentially immobilized. During the push-pull test with injection of Fe-Pd nanoparticles, ethane concentrations increased from non-detectable to 65 μg/L in extracted groundwater within less than 2 h of reaction time, indicating the rapid abiotic degradation of chlorinated ethenes. The amount of total chlorinated ethene mass destroyed was low presumably because the injected solutions "pushed" the dissolved chlorinated ethenes away from the injection well, without substantial mixing, and because stationary (sorbed) chlorinated ethene mass on the aquifer sediments was low. In situ remediation programs using highly reactive metallic nanoparticles should incorporate delivery methods that maintain high groundwater pore velocities during injection to increase advective transport distances (e.g. groundwater circulation wells). Also, source zones with abundant stationary

  13. In situ testing of metallic iron nanoparticle mobility and reactivity in a shallow granular aquifer.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Peter; He, Feng; Zhao, Dongye; Aiken, Brian; Feldman, Lester

    2010-07-30

    This paper describes the results of a series of single well push-pull tests conducted to evaluate the in situ transport of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) stabilized nanoscale zero-valent iron (ZVI) particles in saturated sediments and their reactivity toward chlorinated ethenes. CMC-stabilized nanoscale ZVI particles were synthesized on site by reducing ferrous ions with borohydride in water in the presence of CMC. Nanoscale ZVI and bimetallic ZVI-Pd nanoparticle suspensions were prepared and injected into depth-discrete aquifer zones during three push-pull tests. The injected nanoparticle suspensions contained a conservative tracer (Br(-)) and were allowed to reside in the aquifer pore space for various time periods prior to recovery by groundwater extraction. The comparison between Br(-) and Fe concentrations in extracted groundwater samples indicated that the CMC-stabilized nanoscale ZVI particles were mobile in the aquifer but appeared to lose mobility with time, likely due to the interactions between particles and aquifer sediments. After 13 h in the aquifer, the nanoscale ZVI particles became essentially immobilized. During the push-pull test with injection of Fe-Pd nanoparticles, ethane concentrations increased from non-detectable to 65 microg/L in extracted groundwater within less than 2 h of reaction time, indicating the rapid abiotic degradation of chlorinated ethenes. The amount of total chlorinated ethene mass destroyed was low presumably because the injected solutions "pushed" the dissolved chlorinated ethenes away from the injection well, without substantial mixing, and because stationary (sorbed) chlorinated ethene mass on the aquifer sediments was low. In situ remediation programs using highly reactive metallic nanoparticles should incorporate delivery methods that maintain high groundwater pore velocities during injection to increase advective transport distances (e.g. groundwater circulation wells). Also, source zones with abundant stationary

  14. In situ testing of metallic iron nanoparticle mobility and reactivity in a shallow granular aquifer.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Peter; He, Feng; Zhao, Dongye; Aiken, Brian; Feldman, Lester

    2010-07-30

    This paper describes the results of a series of single well push-pull tests conducted to evaluate the in situ transport of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) stabilized nanoscale zero-valent iron (ZVI) particles in saturated sediments and their reactivity toward chlorinated ethenes. CMC-stabilized nanoscale ZVI particles were synthesized on site by reducing ferrous ions with borohydride in water in the presence of CMC. Nanoscale ZVI and bimetallic ZVI-Pd nanoparticle suspensions were prepared and injected into depth-discrete aquifer zones during three push-pull tests. The injected nanoparticle suspensions contained a conservative tracer (Br(-)) and were allowed to reside in the aquifer pore space for various time periods prior to recovery by groundwater extraction. The comparison between Br(-) and Fe concentrations in extracted groundwater samples indicated that the CMC-stabilized nanoscale ZVI particles were mobile in the aquifer but appeared to lose mobility with time, likely due to the interactions between particles and aquifer sediments. After 13 h in the aquifer, the nanoscale ZVI particles became essentially immobilized. During the push-pull test with injection of Fe-Pd nanoparticles, ethane concentrations increased from non-detectable to 65 microg/L in extracted groundwater within less than 2 h of reaction time, indicating the rapid abiotic degradation of chlorinated ethenes. The amount of total chlorinated ethene mass destroyed was low presumably because the injected solutions "pushed" the dissolved chlorinated ethenes away from the injection well, without substantial mixing, and because stationary (sorbed) chlorinated ethene mass on the aquifer sediments was low. In situ remediation programs using highly reactive metallic nanoparticles should incorporate delivery methods that maintain high groundwater pore velocities during injection to increase advective transport distances (e.g. groundwater circulation wells). Also, source zones with abundant stationary

  15. Cathodes for molten-salt batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Argade, Shyam D.

    1993-01-01

    Viewgraphs of the discussion on cathodes for molten-salt batteries are presented. For the cathode reactions in molten-salt cells, chlorine-based and sulfur-based cathodes reactants have relatively high exchange current densities. Sulfur-based cathodes, metal sulfides, and disulfides have been extensively investigated. Primary thermal batteries of the Li-alloy/FeS2 variety have been available for a number of years. Chlorine based rechargable cathodes were investigated for the pulse power application. A brief introduction is followed by the experimental aspects of research, and the results obtained. Performance projections to the battery system level are discussed and the presentation is summarized with conclusions.

  16. Cathodes for molten-salt batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argade, Shyam D.

    1993-02-01

    Viewgraphs of the discussion on cathodes for molten-salt batteries are presented. For the cathode reactions in molten-salt cells, chlorine-based and sulfur-based cathodes reactants have relatively high exchange current densities. Sulfur-based cathodes, metal sulfides, and disulfides have been extensively investigated. Primary thermal batteries of the Li-alloy/FeS2 variety have been available for a number of years. Chlorine based rechargable cathodes were investigated for the pulse power application. A brief introduction is followed by the experimental aspects of research, and the results obtained. Performance projections to the battery system level are discussed and the presentation is summarized with conclusions.

  17. Electrochemical-metallothermic reduction of zirconium in molten salt solutions

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, D.F.; Talko, F.

    1990-05-08

    This patent describes a method for separating hafnium from zirconium of the type wherein a feed containing zirconium and hafnium chlorides is prepared from zirconium-hafnium chloride and the feed is introduced into a distillation column, which distillation column has a reboiler connected at the bottom and a reflux condenser connected at the top and wherein a hafnium chloride enriched stream is taken from the top of the column and a zirconium enriched chloride stream is taken from the bottom of the column. It comprises: reducing the zirconium enriched chloride stream taken from the distillation column to metal by electrochemically reducing an alkaline earth metal in a molten salt bath with the molten salt in the molten salt bath consisting essentially of a mixture of at least one alkali metal chloride and at least one alkaline earth metal chloride and zirconium chloride, with the reduced alkaline earth metal reacting with the zirconium chloride to produce zirconium metal and alkaline earth metal chloride.

  18. Self-pumping impurity control by in-situ metal deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, J.N.; Mattas, R.F.

    1983-05-01

    A system for in-situ removal of helium by trapping in freshly deposited metal surface layers of a limiter or divertor has been studied. The system would trap helium on a limiter front surface, or a divertor plate, at low plasma edge temperatures, or in a limiter slot region, at high edge temperatures. Fresh material, introduced to the plasma and/or scrape-off zone, would be added at a rate of about five times the alpha production rate. The material would be reprocessed periodically, e.g., once year. Possible materials are nickel, vanadium, niobium, and tantalum. Advantages of a self-pumping system are the absence of vacuum ducts and pumps, and the minimization of tritium processing and inventory.

  19. Dynamic Deformation Behaviors of an In Situ Ti-Based Metallic Glass Matrix Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Z. M.; Wang, Z. H.; Wu, R. F.; Zhang, T. W.; Yang, H. J.; Qiao, J. W.

    2016-09-01

    Quasi-static and dynamic deformation behaviors, fracture characteristics, and microstructural evolution of an in situ dendrite-reinforced metallic glass matrix composite: Ti50Zr20V10Cu5Be15 within a wide range of strain rates are investigated. Compared with the quasi-static compression, the yielding stress increases, but the macroscopic plasticity significantly decreases upon dynamic compression. The effects of the strain rate on strain hardening upon quasi-static loading and flow stress upon dynamic loading are evaluated, respectively. The Zerilli-Armstrong (Z-A) model based on dendrite-dominated mechanism is employed to further uncover the dependence of the yielding stress on the strain rate.

  20. In-Situ Cleaning of Metal Photo-Cathodes in rf Guns

    SciTech Connect

    Schmerge, J.F.; Castro, J.M.; Clendenin, J.E.; Colby, E.R.; Dowel, D.H.; Gierman, S.M.; Loos, H.; Nalls, M.; White, W.E.; /SLAC

    2007-01-03

    Metal cathodes installed in rf guns typically exhibit much lower quantum efficiency than the theoretical limit. Experimenters often use some sort of in situ technique to ''clean'' the cathode to improve the QE. The most common technique is laser cleaning where the laser is focused to a small spot and scanned across the cathode surface. However, since the laser is operated near the damage threshold, it can also damage the cathode and increase the dark current. The QE also degrades over days and must be cleaned regularly. We are searching for a more robust cleaning technique that cleans the entire cathode surface simultaneously. In this paper we describe initial results using multiple techniques such as several keV ion beams, glow discharge cleaning and back bombarding electrons. Results are quantified in terms of the change in QE and dark current.

  1. "Metallic burn paper" used for in situ characterization of laser beam properties.

    PubMed

    Bass, Isaac L; Negres, Raluca A; Stanion, Ken; Guss, Gabe; Bude, Jeff

    2016-04-20

    In situ ablation of thin metal films on fused silica substrates by picosecond class lasers was investigated as a method of characterizing the beam at the sample plane. The technique involved plotting the areas enclosed by constant fluence contours identified in optical microscope images of the ablation sites versus the logs of the pulse energies. Inconel films on commercially available neutral density filters as well as magnetron sputtered gold films were used. It was also shown that this technique could be used to calibrate real-time beam profile diagnostics against the beam at the sample plane. The contours were shown to correspond to the boundary where part or all of the film was ablated.

  2. Techniques for Assessing the Performance of In Situ Bioreduction and Immobilization of Metals and Radionuclides in Contaminated Subsurface Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, D. B.; Jardine, P. M.

    2005-05-01

    Department of Energy (DOE) facilities within the weapons complex face a daunting challenge of remediating huge below inventories of legacy radioactive and toxic metal waste. More often than not, the scope of the problem is massive, particularly in the high recharge, humid regions east of the Mississippi river, where the off-site migration of contaminants continues to plague soil water, groundwater, and surface water sources. As of 2002, contaminated sites are closing rapidly and many remediation strategies have chosen to leave contaminants in-place. In situ barriers, surface caps, and bioremediation are often the remedial strategies of chose. By choosing to leave contaminants in-place, we must accept the fact that the contaminants will continue to interact with subsurface and surface media. Contaminant interactions with the geosphere are complex and investigating long term changes and interactive processes is imperative to verifying risks. We must be able to understand the consequences of our action or inaction. The focus of this presentation is to describe recent technical developments for assessing the performance of in situ bioremediation and immobilization of subsurface metals and radionuclides. Research within DOE's NABIR and EMSP programs has been investigating the possibility of using subsurface microorganisms to convert redox sensitive toxic metals and radionuclides (e.g. Cr, U, Tc, Co) into a less soluble, less mobile forms. Much of the research is motivated by the likelihood that subsurface metal-reducing bacteria can be stimulated to effectively alter the redox state of metals and radionuclides so that they are immobilized in situ for long time periods. The approach is difficult, however, since subsurface media and waste constituents are complex with competing electron acceptors and hydrogeological conditions making biostimulation a challenge. Performance assessment of in situ biostimulation strategies is also difficult and typically requires detailed

  3. Techniques for assessing the performance of in situ bioreduction and immobilization of metals and radionuclides in contaminated subsurface environments

    SciTech Connect

    Jardine, P.M.; Watson, D.B.; Blake, D.A.; Beard, L.P.; Brooks, S.C.; Carley, J.M.; Criddle, C.S.; Doll, W.E.; Fields, M.W.; Fendorf, S.E.; Geesey, G.G.; Ginder-Vogel, M.; Hubbard, S.S.; Istok, J.D.; Kelly, S.; Kemner, K.M.; Peacock, A.D.; Spalding, B.P.; White, D.C.; Wolf, A.; Wu, W.; Zhou, J.

    2004-11-14

    Department of Energy (DOE) facilities within the weapons complex face a daunting challenge of remediating huge below inventories of legacy radioactive and toxic metal waste. More often than not, the scope of the problem is massive, particularly in the high recharge, humid regions east of the Mississippi river, where the off-site migration of contaminants continues to plague soil water, groundwater, and surface water sources. As of 2002, contaminated sites are closing rapidly and many remediation strategies have chosen to leave contaminants in-place. In situ barriers, surface caps, and bioremediation are often the remedial strategies of chose. By choosing to leave contaminants in-place, we must accept the fact that the contaminants will continue to interact with subsurface and surface media. Contaminant interactions with the geosphere are complex and investigating long term changes and interactive processes is imperative to verifying risks. We must be able to understand the consequences of our action or inaction. The focus of this manuscript is to describe recent technical developments for assessing the performance of in situ bioremediation and immobilization of subsurface metals and radionuclides. Research within DOE's NABIR and EMSP programs has been investigating the possibility of using subsurface microorganisms to convert redox sensitive toxic metals and radionuclides (e.g. Cr, U, Tc, Co) into a less soluble, less mobile forms. Much of the research is motivated by the likelihood that subsurface metal-reducing bacteria can be stimulated to effectively alter the redox state of metals and radionuclides so that they are immobilized in situ for long time periods. The approach is difficult, however, since subsurface media and waste constituents are complex with competing electron acceptors and hydrogeological conditions making biostimulation a challenge. Performance assessment of in situ biostimulation strategies is also difficult and typically requires detailed

  4. A Tensile Deformation Model for In-situ Dendrite/Metallic Glass Matrix Composites

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, J. W.; Zhang, T.; Yang, F. Q.; Liaw, P. K.; Pauly, S.; Xu, B. S.

    2013-01-01

    In-situ dendrite/metallic glass matrix composites (MGMCs) with a composition of Ti46Zr20V12Cu5Be17 exhibit ultimate tensile strength of 1510 MPa and fracture strain of about 7.6%. A tensile deformation model is established, based on the five-stage classification: (1) elastic-elastic, (2) elastic-plastic, (3) plastic-plastic (yield platform), (4) plastic-plastic (work hardening), and (5) plastic-plastic (softening) stages, analogous to the tensile behavior of common carbon steels. The constitutive relations strongly elucidate the tensile deformation mechanism. In parallel, the simulation results by a finite-element method (FEM) are in good agreement with the experimental findings and theoretical calculations. The present study gives a mathematical model to clarify the work-hardening behavior of dendrites and softening of the amorphous matrix. Furthermore, the model can be employed to simulate the tensile behavior of in-situ dendrite/MGMCs. PMID:24085187

  5. Impact of Physical Vapor Deposition-Based In situ Fabrication Method on Metal/High-k Gate Stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Heiji; Horie, Shinya; Minami, Takashi; Kitano, Naomu; Kosuda, Motomu; Shimura, Takayoshi; Yasutake, Kiyoshi

    2007-04-01

    We proposed an in situ method for fabricating metal/high-k gate stacks. High-quality Hf silicate gate dielectrics were formed by utilizing a solid phase interface reaction (SPIR) between a metal Hf layer and an SiO2 underlayer, and TiN electrodes were continuously grown on the gate dielectrics using a low-damage sputtering system without exposure to air. We investigated the optimum SPIR conditions for TiN/HfSiO gate stacks, such as the thicknesses of the metal Hf and oxide underlayers, in situ annealing temperature, and oxygen pressure. The results indicate that the in situ method can be used to precisely control the SPIR to form silicate films and improve the electrical properties at metal/high-k interfaces. We demonstrated that the scaling of equivalent oxide thickness (EOT) was achieved and that the carbon impurity content at the gate stacks was successfully reduced by in situ silicate formation and continuous electrode deposition. As a consequence, we obtained excellent EOT versus gate leakage characteristics and succeeded in improving the hysteresis of capacitance-voltage curves for the TiN/HfSiO gate stacks.

  6. Colorimetric detection of in situ metal acetates and fluorides by a bipyridyl-linked Schiff base.

    PubMed

    Suganya, Sivalingam; Zo, Hye Jin; Park, Jong S; Velmathi, Sivan

    2014-12-01

    Here, we present a new bipyridyl moiety linked Schiff base (bipy-1) that is well characterized using spectroscopic techniques. Colorimetric and UV-vis titrations were used to study the photophysical properties of bipy-1 in the presence of various tetrabutyl ammonium salt of anions and metal salts containing different counter cations. bipy-1 showed selective recognition of dimethyl sulphoxide solution of tetrabutyl ammonium salt of F(-) ion accompanied with a UV-vis band at 529 nm and interesting binding of aqueous Co, Ni, and Cu acetates/fluorides, as confirmed by distinct color changes from fluorescent green to pink or orange and a strong band around 480-510 nm in the UV-vis spectrum. However, in the presence of Co, Ni, and Cu countercations, any form of metal acetate/fluorides was found to be able to respond to similar color changes from fluorescent green to pink or orange, showing a band around 480-510 nm. This type of output clearly indicates that the in situ formation of Co, Ni, and Cu acetates/fluorides also coordinates with bipyridyl nitrogen atoms.

  7. Electron Beam Induced Artifacts During in situ TEM Deformation of Nanostructured Metals

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Rohit; Rentenberger, Christian; Rajagopalan, Jagannathan

    2015-01-01

    A critical assumption underlying in situ transmission electron microscopy studies is that the electron beam (e-beam) exposure does not fundamentally alter the intrinsic deformation behavior of the materials being probed. Here, we show that e-beam exposure causes increased dislocation activation and marked stress relaxation in aluminum and gold films spanning a range of thicknesses (80–400 nanometers) and grain sizes (50–220 nanometers). Furthermore, the e-beam induces anomalous sample necking, which unusually depends more on the e-beam diameter than intensity. Notably, the stress relaxation in both aluminum and gold occurs at beam energies well below their damage thresholds. More remarkably, the stress relaxation and/or sample necking is significantly more pronounced at lower accelerating voltages (120 kV versus 200 kV) in both the metals. These observations in aluminum and gold, two metals with highly dissimilar atomic weights and properties, indicate that e-beam exposure can cause anomalous behavior in a broad spectrum of nanostructured materials, and simultaneously suggest a strategy to minimize such artifacts. PMID:26552934

  8. Colorimetric detection of in situ metal acetates and fluorides by a bipyridyl-linked Schiff base.

    PubMed

    Suganya, Sivalingam; Zo, Hye Jin; Park, Jong S; Velmathi, Sivan

    2014-12-01

    Here, we present a new bipyridyl moiety linked Schiff base (bipy-1) that is well characterized using spectroscopic techniques. Colorimetric and UV-vis titrations were used to study the photophysical properties of bipy-1 in the presence of various tetrabutyl ammonium salt of anions and metal salts containing different counter cations. bipy-1 showed selective recognition of dimethyl sulphoxide solution of tetrabutyl ammonium salt of F(-) ion accompanied with a UV-vis band at 529 nm and interesting binding of aqueous Co, Ni, and Cu acetates/fluorides, as confirmed by distinct color changes from fluorescent green to pink or orange and a strong band around 480-510 nm in the UV-vis spectrum. However, in the presence of Co, Ni, and Cu countercations, any form of metal acetate/fluorides was found to be able to respond to similar color changes from fluorescent green to pink or orange, showing a band around 480-510 nm. This type of output clearly indicates that the in situ formation of Co, Ni, and Cu acetates/fluorides also coordinates with bipyridyl nitrogen atoms. PMID:25319616

  9. Electron Beam Induced Artifacts During in situ TEM Deformation of Nanostructured Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Rohit; Rentenberger, Christian; Rajagopalan, Jagannathan

    2015-11-01

    A critical assumption underlying in situ transmission electron microscopy studies is that the electron beam (e-beam) exposure does not fundamentally alter the intrinsic deformation behavior of the materials being probed. Here, we show that e-beam exposure causes increased dislocation activation and marked stress relaxation in aluminum and gold films spanning a range of thicknesses (80-400 nanometers) and grain sizes (50-220 nanometers). Furthermore, the e-beam induces anomalous sample necking, which unusually depends more on the e-beam diameter than intensity. Notably, the stress relaxation in both aluminum and gold occurs at beam energies well below their damage thresholds. More remarkably, the stress relaxation and/or sample necking is significantly more pronounced at lower accelerating voltages (120 kV versus 200 kV) in both the metals. These observations in aluminum and gold, two metals with highly dissimilar atomic weights and properties, indicate that e-beam exposure can cause anomalous behavior in a broad spectrum of nanostructured materials, and simultaneously suggest a strategy to minimize such artifacts.

  10. Electron Beam Induced Artifacts During in situ TEM Deformation of Nanostructured Metals.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Rohit; Rentenberger, Christian; Rajagopalan, Jagannathan

    2015-01-01

    A critical assumption underlying in situ transmission electron microscopy studies is that the electron beam (e-beam) exposure does not fundamentally alter the intrinsic deformation behavior of the materials being probed. Here, we show that e-beam exposure causes increased dislocation activation and marked stress relaxation in aluminum and gold films spanning a range of thicknesses (80-400 nanometers) and grain sizes (50-220 nanometers). Furthermore, the e-beam induces anomalous sample necking, which unusually depends more on the e-beam diameter than intensity. Notably, the stress relaxation in both aluminum and gold occurs at beam energies well below their damage thresholds. More remarkably, the stress relaxation and/or sample necking is significantly more pronounced at lower accelerating voltages (120 kV versus 200 kV) in both the metals. These observations in aluminum and gold, two metals with highly dissimilar atomic weights and properties, indicate that e-beam exposure can cause anomalous behavior in a broad spectrum of nanostructured materials, and simultaneously suggest a strategy to minimize such artifacts. PMID:26552934

  11. Anode composite for molten carbonate fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Iacovangelo, Charles D.; Zarnoch, Kenneth P.

    1983-01-01

    An anode composite useful for a molten carbonate fuel cell comprised of a porous sintered metallic anode component having a porous bubble pressure barrier integrally sintered to one face thereof, said barrier being comprised of metal coated ceramic particles sintered together and to said anode by means of said metal coating, said metal coating enveloping said ceramic particle and being selected from the group consisting of nickel, copper and alloys thereof, the median pore size of the barrier being significantly smaller than that of the anode.

  12. A novel in situ method for sampling urban soil dust: particle size distribution, trace metal concentrations, and stable lead isotopes.

    PubMed

    Bi, Xiangyang; Liang, Siyuan; Li, Xiangdong

    2013-06-01

    In this study, a novel in situ sampling method was utilized to investigate the concentrations of trace metals and Pb isotope compositions among different particle size fractions in soil dust, bulk surface soil, and corresponding road dust samples collected within an urban environment. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the feasibility of using soil dust samples to determine trace metal contamination and potential risks in urban areas in comparison with related bulk surface soil and road dust. The results of total metal loadings and Pb isotope ratios revealed that soil dust is more sensitive than bulk surface soil to anthropogenic contamination in urban areas. The new in situ method is effective at collecting different particle size fractions of soil dust from the surface of urban soils, and that soil dust is a critical indicator of anthropogenic contamination and potential human exposure in urban settings.

  13. On-site solid-phase extraction and application to in situ preconcentration of heavy metals in surface water.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Fang; Gao, Hong-Wen

    2013-01-01

    An on-site solid-phase extraction, consisting of the sorption, the separation and the elution function units, was designed for in situ preconcentration of heavy metals ions. The D401 resin powder was employed as sorbent to capture Pb(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+), Co(2+), and Ni(2+), and then they desorbed with 2 mol/L nitric acid as eluent. Under the optimized conditions, these heavy metals ions in West Lake, Taihu Lake, and Yangtze River of China were captured and then determined by ICP-OES with the recovery of 92.5% to 111.5%. The on-site solid-phase extraction achieved a quick preconcentration of heavy metals to avoid the transport and storage of a large volume water sample. It is suitable for in situ monitoring of water quality in mountains, tablelands or other remote areas. PMID:22286838

  14. Mathematical Modeling on the Growth and Removal of Non-metallic Inclusions in the Molten Steel in a Two-Strand Continuous Casting Tundish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Haitao; Zhang, Lifeng; Li, Hong

    2016-07-01

    In the current study, mathematical models were developed to predict the transient concentration and size distribution of inclusions in a two-strand continuous casting tundish. The collision and growth of inclusions were considered. The contribution of turbulent collision and Stokes collision was evaluated. The removal of inclusions from the top surface was modeled by considering the properties of inclusions and the molten steel, such as the wettability, density, size, and interfacial tension. The effect of composition of inclusions on the collision of inclusions was included through the Hamaker constant. Meanwhile, the effect of the turbulent fluctuation velocity on the removal of inclusions at the top surface was also studied. Inclusions in steel samples were detected using automatic SEM Scanning so that the amount, morphology, size, and composition of inclusions were achieved. In the simulation, the size distribution of inclusions at the end steel refining was used as the initial size distribution of inclusions at tundish inlet. The equilibrium time when the collision and coalescence of inclusions reached the steady state was equal to 3.9 times of the mean residence time. When Stokes collision, turbulent collision, and removal by floating were included, the removal fraction of inclusions was 16.4 pct. Finally, the removal of solid and liquid inclusions, such as Al2O3, SiO2, and 12CaO·7Al2O3, at the interface between the molten steel and slag was studied. Compared with 12CaO·7Al2O3 inclusions, the silica and alumina inclusions were much easier to be removed from the molten steel and their removal fractions were 36.5 and 39.2 pct, respectively.

  15. Mathematical Modeling on the Growth and Removal of Non-metallic Inclusions in the Molten Steel in a Two-Strand Continuous Casting Tundish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Haitao; Zhang, Lifeng; Li, Hong

    2016-10-01

    In the current study, mathematical models were developed to predict the transient concentration and size distribution of inclusions in a two-strand continuous casting tundish. The collision and growth of inclusions were considered. The contribution of turbulent collision and Stokes collision was evaluated. The removal of inclusions from the top surface was modeled by considering the properties of inclusions and the molten steel, such as the wettability, density, size, and interfacial tension. The effect of composition of inclusions on the collision of inclusions was included through the Hamaker constant. Meanwhile, the effect of the turbulent fluctuation velocity on the removal of inclusions at the top surface was also studied. Inclusions in steel samples were detected using automatic SEM Scanning so that the amount, morphology, size, and composition of inclusions were achieved. In the simulation, the size distribution of inclusions at the end steel refining was used as the initial size distribution of inclusions at tundish inlet. The equilibrium time when the collision and coalescence of inclusions reached the steady state was equal to 3.9 times of the mean residence time. When Stokes collision, turbulent collision, and removal by floating were included, the removal fraction of inclusions was 16.4 pct. Finally, the removal of solid and liquid inclusions, such as Al2O3, SiO2, and 12CaO·7Al2O3, at the interface between the molten steel and slag was studied. Compared with 12CaO·7Al2O3 inclusions, the silica and alumina inclusions were much easier to be removed from the molten steel and their removal fractions were 36.5 and 39.2 pct, respectively.

  16. The Gellyfish: An In-Situ Equilibrium-Based Sampler for Determining Multiple Free Metal Ion Concentrations in Marine Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Zhao; Lewis, Christopher G.; Burgess, Robert M.; Shine, James P.

    2016-01-01

    Free metal ions are usually the most bioavailable and toxic metal species to aquatic organisms, but they are difficult to measure due to their extremely low concentrations in the marine environment. Many of the current methods for determining free metal ions are complicated, time-consuming, and can only measure one metal at a time. We developed a new version of the ‘Gellyfish’, an in-situ equilibrium-based sampler, with significantly reduced equilibration time and the capability of measuring multiple free metal ions simultaneously. By calibrating the Gellyfish to account for its uptake of cationic metal complexes and validating them in multi-metal competition experiments, we were able to determine free metal ion concentrations previously collected over ten months at five locations in Boston Harbor for Cu, Zn, Pb, Ni, and Cd. This work generated one of the largest free metal ion datasets and demonstrated the applicability of the Gellyfish as an easy-to-use and inexpensive tool for monitoring free ion concentrations of metal mixtures in marine ecosystems. PMID:25598362

  17. The Gellyfish: An in situ equilibrium-based sampler for determining multiple free metal ion concentrations in marine ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhao; Lewis, Christopher G; Burgess, Robert M; Shine, James P

    2015-05-01

    Free metal ions are usually the most bioavailable and toxic metal species to aquatic organisms, but they are difficult to measure because of their extremely low concentrations in the marine environment. Many of the current methods for determining free metal ions are complicated and time-consuming, and they can only measure 1 metal at a time. The authors developed a new version of the "Gellyfish," an in situ equilibrium-based sampler, with significantly reduced equilibration time and the capability of measuring multiple free metal ions simultaneously. By calibrating the Gellyfish to account for its uptake of cationic metal complexes and validating them in multi-metal competition experiments, the authors were able to determine free metal ion concentrations previously collected over 10 mo at 5 locations in Boston Harbor for Cu, Zn, Pb, Ni, and Cd. This generated 1 of the largest free metal ion datasets and demonstrated the applicability of the Gellyfish as an easy-to-use and inexpensive tool for monitoring free ion concentrations of metal mixtures in marine ecosystems.

  18. In situ study of e-beam Al and Hf metal deposition on native oxide InP (100)

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, H.; KC, Santosh; Azcatl, A.; Cabrera, W.; Qin, X.; Brennan, B.; Cho, K.; Wallace, R. M.; Zhernokletov, D.

    2013-11-28

    The interfacial chemistry of thin Al (∼3 nm) and Hf (∼2 nm) metal films deposited by electron beam (e-beam) evaporation on native oxide InP (100) samples at room temperature and after annealing has been studied by in situ angle resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and low energy ion scattering spectroscopy. The In-oxides are completely scavenged forming In-In/In-(Al/Hf) bonding after Al and Hf metal deposition. The P-oxide concentration is significantly decreased, and the P-oxide chemical states have been changed to more P-rich oxides upon metal deposition. Indium diffusion through these metals before and after annealing at 250 °C has also been characterized. First principles calculation shows that In has lower surface formation energy compared with Al and Hf metals, which is consistent with the observed indium diffusion behavior.

  19. A method to investigate the electron scattering characteristics of ultrathin metallic films by in situ electrical resistance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Trindade, I. G.; Sousa, J. B.; Fermento, R.; Leitao, D.

    2009-07-15

    In this article, a method to measure the electrical resistivity/conductivity of metallic thin films during layer growth on specific underlayers is described. The in situ monitoring of an underlayer electrical resistance, its change upon the incoming of new material atoms/molecules, and the growth of a new layer are presented. The method is easy to implement and allows obtaining in situ experimental curves of electrical resistivity dependence upon film thickness with a subatomic resolution, providing insight in film growth microstructure characteristics, specular/diffuse electron scattering surfaces, and optimum film thicknesses.

  20. Novel waste printed circuit board recycling process with molten salt.

    PubMed

    Riedewald, Frank; Sousa-Gallagher, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the method was to prove the concept of a novel waste PCBs recycling process which uses inert, stable molten salts as the direct heat transfer fluid and, simultaneously, uses this molten salt to separate the metal products in either liquid (solder, zinc, tin, lead, etc.) or solid (copper, gold, steel, palladium, etc.) form at the operating temperatures of 450-470 °C. The PCB recovery reactor is essentially a U-shaped reactor with the molten salt providing a continuous fluid, allowing molten salt access from different depths for metal recovery. A laboratory scale batch reactor was constructed using 316L as suitable construction material. For safety reasons, the inert, stable LiCl-KCl molten salts were used as direct heat transfer fluid. Recovered materials were washed with hot water to remove residual salt before metal recovery assessment. The impact of this work was to show metal separation using molten salts in one single unit, by using this novel reactor methodology. •The reactor is a U-shaped reactor filled with a continuous liquid with a sloped bottom representing a novel reactor concept.•This method uses large PCB pieces instead of shredded PCBs as the reactor volume is 2.2 L.•The treated PCBs can be removed via leg B while the process is on-going.

  1. Novel waste printed circuit board recycling process with molten salt

    PubMed Central

    Riedewald, Frank; Sousa-Gallagher, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the method was to prove the concept of a novel waste PCBs recycling process which uses inert, stable molten salts as the direct heat transfer fluid and, simultaneously, uses this molten salt to separate the metal products in either liquid (solder, zinc, tin, lead, etc.) or solid (copper, gold, steel, palladium, etc.) form at the operating temperatures of 450–470 °C. The PCB recovery reactor is essentially a U-shaped reactor with the molten salt providing a continuous fluid, allowing molten salt access from different depths for metal recovery. A laboratory scale batch reactor was constructed using 316L as suitable construction material. For safety reasons, the inert, stable LiCl–KCl molten salts were used as direct heat transfer fluid. Recovered materials were washed with hot water to remove residual salt before metal recovery assessment. The impact of this work was to show metal separation using molten salts in one single unit, by using this novel reactor methodology. • The reactor is a U-shaped reactor filled with a continuous liquid with a sloped bottom representing a novel reactor concept. • This method uses large PCB pieces instead of shredded PCBs as the reactor volume is 2.2 L. • The treated PCBs can be removed via leg B while the process is on-going. PMID:26150977

  2. Novel waste printed circuit board recycling process with molten salt.

    PubMed

    Riedewald, Frank; Sousa-Gallagher, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the method was to prove the concept of a novel waste PCBs recycling process which uses inert, stable molten salts as the direct heat transfer fluid and, simultaneously, uses this molten salt to separate the metal products in either liquid (solder, zinc, tin, lead, etc.) or solid (copper, gold, steel, palladium, etc.) form at the operating temperatures of 450-470 °C. The PCB recovery reactor is essentially a U-shaped reactor with the molten salt providing a continuous fluid, allowing molten salt access from different depths for metal recovery. A laboratory scale batch reactor was constructed using 316L as suitable construction material. For safety reasons, the inert, stable LiCl-KCl molten salts were used as direct heat transfer fluid. Recovered materials were washed with hot water to remove residual salt before metal recovery assessment. The impact of this work was to show metal separation using molten salts in one single unit, by using this novel reactor methodology. •The reactor is a U-shaped reactor filled with a continuous liquid with a sloped bottom representing a novel reactor concept.•This method uses large PCB pieces instead of shredded PCBs as the reactor volume is 2.2 L.•The treated PCBs can be removed via leg B while the process is on-going. PMID:26150977

  3. Imaging molten steel flow profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binns, R.; Lyons, A. R. A.; Peyton, A. J.; Pritchard, W. D. N.

    2001-08-01

    Control of delivery of molten steel in continuous casting is critical in order to ensure stability of the meniscus and satisfactory mould flow patterns, which in turn are determinants of cleanness and surface quality of steel. Considerable effort has been expended over the last ten years on optimizing the design of the metal delivery system, particularly the pouring nozzle, in order to allow the consistent production of high quality steel at a high throughput. This paper looks forward to possible systems that are capable of tomographically imaging the distribution of molten steel flows in these applications. The paper will concentrate on the feasibility of using electromagnetic methods. The paper will present some initial results; an overview of the applied image reconstruction process will also be included. The paper will conclude with a discussion of possible future developments, such as the use of a tomographic or multi-frequency approach, future research on the reconstruction image procedures and the potential for visualization and flow measurement. There is a need for further research in this area and some priority areas for future work will be suggested.

  4. Shock Wave Response of Iron-based In Situ Metallic Glass Matrix Composites

    PubMed Central

    Khanolkar, Gauri R.; Rauls, Michael B.; Kelly, James P.; Graeve, Olivia A.; Hodge, Andrea M.; Eliasson, Veronica

    2016-01-01

    The response of amorphous steels to shock wave compression has been explored for the first time. Further, the effect of partial devitrification on the shock response of bulk metallic glasses is examined by conducting experiments on two iron-based in situ metallic glass matrix composites, containing varying amounts of crystalline precipitates, both with initial composition Fe49.7Cr17.7Mn1.9Mo7.4W1.6B15.2C3.8Si2.4. The samples, designated SAM2X5-600 and SAM2X5-630, are X-ray amorphous and partially crystalline, respectively, due to differences in sintering parameters during sample preparation. Shock response is determined by making velocity measurements using interferometry techniques at the rear free surface of the samples, which have been subjected to impact from a high-velocity projectile launched from a powder gun. Experiments have yielded results indicating a Hugoniot Elastic Limit (HEL) to be 8.58 ± 0.53 GPa for SAM2X5-600 and 11.76 ± 1.26 GPa for SAM2X5-630. The latter HEL result is higher than elastic limits for any BMG reported in the literature thus far. SAM2X5-600 catastrophically loses post-yield strength whereas SAM2X5-630, while showing some strain-softening, retains strength beyond the HEL. The presence of crystallinity within the amorphous matrix is thus seen to significantly aid in strengthening the material as well as preserving material strength beyond yielding. PMID:26932846

  5. Shock Wave Response of Iron-based In Situ Metallic Glass Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanolkar, Gauri R.; Rauls, Michael B.; Kelly, James P.; Graeve, Olivia A.; Hodge, Andrea M.; Eliasson, Veronica

    2016-03-01

    The response of amorphous steels to shock wave compression has been explored for the first time. Further, the effect of partial devitrification on the shock response of bulk metallic glasses is examined by conducting experiments on two iron-based in situ metallic glass matrix composites, containing varying amounts of crystalline precipitates, both with initial composition Fe49.7Cr17.7Mn1.9Mo7.4W1.6B15.2C3.8Si2.4. The samples, designated SAM2X5-600 and SAM2X5-630, are X-ray amorphous and partially crystalline, respectively, due to differences in sintering parameters during sample preparation. Shock response is determined by making velocity measurements using interferometry techniques at the rear free surface of the samples, which have been subjected to impact from a high-velocity projectile launched from a powder gun. Experiments have yielded results indicating a Hugoniot Elastic Limit (HEL) to be 8.58 ± 0.53 GPa for SAM2X5-600 and 11.76 ± 1.26 GPa for SAM2X5-630. The latter HEL result is higher than elastic limits for any BMG reported in the literature thus far. SAM2X5-600 catastrophically loses post-yield strength whereas SAM2X5-630, while showing some strain-softening, retains strength beyond the HEL. The presence of crystallinity within the amorphous matrix is thus seen to significantly aid in strengthening the material as well as preserving material strength beyond yielding.

  6. Shock Wave Response of Iron-based In Situ Metallic Glass Matrix Composites.

    PubMed

    Khanolkar, Gauri R; Rauls, Michael B; Kelly, James P; Graeve, Olivia A; Hodge, Andrea M; Eliasson, Veronica

    2016-01-01

    The response of amorphous steels to shock wave compression has been explored for the first time. Further, the effect of partial devitrification on the shock response of bulk metallic glasses is examined by conducting experiments on two iron-based in situ metallic glass matrix composites, containing varying amounts of crystalline precipitates, both with initial composition Fe49.7Cr17.7Mn1.9Mo7.4W1.6B15.2C3.8Si2.4. The samples, designated SAM2X5-600 and SAM2X5-630, are X-ray amorphous and partially crystalline, respectively, due to differences in sintering parameters during sample preparation. Shock response is determined by making velocity measurements using interferometry techniques at the rear free surface of the samples, which have been subjected to impact from a high-velocity projectile launched from a powder gun. Experiments have yielded results indicating a Hugoniot Elastic Limit (HEL) to be 8.58 ± 0.53 GPa for SAM2X5-600 and 11.76 ± 1.26 GPa for SAM2X5-630. The latter HEL result is higher than elastic limits for any BMG reported in the literature thus far. SAM2X5-600 catastrophically loses post-yield strength whereas SAM2X5-630, while showing some strain-softening, retains strength beyond the HEL. The presence of crystallinity within the amorphous matrix is thus seen to significantly aid in strengthening the material as well as preserving material strength beyond yielding. PMID:26932846

  7. In Situ Electrochemical Oxidation Tuning of Transition Metal Disulfides to Oxides for Enhanced Water Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Wang, Haotian; Li, Yuzhang; Liu, Yayuan; Sun, Jie; Lee, Sanghan; Lee, Jang-Soo; Cui, Yi

    2015-08-26

    The development of catalysts with earth-abundant elements for efficient oxygen evolution reactions is of paramount significance for clean and sustainable energy storage and conversion devices. Our group demonstrated recently that the electrochemical tuning of catalysts via lithium insertion and extraction has emerged as a powerful approach to improve catalytic activity. Here we report a novel in situ electrochemical oxidation tuning approach to develop a series of binary, ternary, and quaternary transition metal (e.g., Co, Ni, Fe) oxides from their corresponding sulfides as highly active catalysts for much enhanced water oxidation. The electrochemically tuned cobalt-nickel-iron oxides grown directly on the three-dimensional carbon fiber electrodes exhibit a low overpotential of 232 mV at current density of 10 mA cm(-2), small Tafel slope of 37.6 mV dec(-1), and exceptional long-term stability of electrolysis for over 100 h in 1 M KOH alkaline medium, superior to most non-noble oxygen evolution catalysts reported so far. The materials evolution associated with the electrochemical oxidation tuning is systematically investigated by various characterizations, manifesting that the improved activities are attributed to the significant grain size reduction and increase of surface area and electroactive sites. This work provides a promising strategy to develop electrocatalysts for large-scale water-splitting systems and many other applications. PMID:27162978

  8. In Situ Electrochemical Oxidation Tuning of Transition Metal Disulfides to Oxides for Enhanced Water Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The development of catalysts with earth-abundant elements for efficient oxygen evolution reactions is of paramount significance for clean and sustainable energy storage and conversion devices. Our group demonstrated recently that the electrochemical tuning of catalysts via lithium insertion and extraction has emerged as a powerful approach to improve catalytic activity. Here we report a novel in situ electrochemical oxidation tuning approach to develop a series of binary, ternary, and quaternary transition metal (e.g., Co, Ni, Fe) oxides from their corresponding sulfides as highly active catalysts for much enhanced water oxidation. The electrochemically tuned cobalt–nickel–iron oxides grown directly on the three-dimensional carbon fiber electrodes exhibit a low overpotential of 232 mV at current density of 10 mA cm–2, small Tafel slope of 37.6 mV dec–1, and exceptional long-term stability of electrolysis for over 100 h in 1 M KOH alkaline medium, superior to most non-noble oxygen evolution catalysts reported so far. The materials evolution associated with the electrochemical oxidation tuning is systematically investigated by various characterizations, manifesting that the improved activities are attributed to the significant grain size reduction and increase of surface area and electroactive sites. This work provides a promising strategy to develop electrocatalysts for large-scale water-splitting systems and many other applications. PMID:27162978

  9. Macronutrient and trace-metal geochemistry of an in situ iron-induced Southern Ocean bloom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frew, Russell; Bowie, Andrew; Croot, Peter; Pickmere, Stuart

    We have investigated the effect of iron supply and increased phytoplankton growth on the cycling of the macronutrients phosphate, nitrate and silicic acid as well as the micronutrients copper (Cu), nickel (Ni), zinc (Zn) and cadmium (Cd). Nutrient levels were measured in situ in an iron-induced phytoplankton bloom at 61°S 140°E in the Southern Ocean Iron Release experiment (SOIREE). Nutrient ratios upon arrival at the study site indicate that much of the seasonal phytoplankton productivity was by iron-limited diatoms growing at low mean light levels. The addition of iron (Fe) induced a bloom that led to a draw-down in the macronutrients in ratios consistent with the growth of diatoms under iron-replete conditions. None of the bioutilised trace metals Cu, Ni, Zn or Cd showed any indication of co-limitation, with Fe, of phytoplankton growth. Zn concentrations did not decrease by algal uptake as expected. Cd was partitioned to the particulate phase indicating consumption by the algae. Cd was preferentially utilised with respect to P with a αCd/P=5.8. Interpretation of the Cd/Ca data from the sedimentary record using this higher induced αCd/P value would imply even higher Southern Ocean surface water P during the last glacial maximum.

  10. An improved tensile deformation model for in-situ dendrite/metallic glass matrix composites

    PubMed Central

    Sun, X. H.; Qiao, J. W.; Jiao, Z. M.; Wang, Z. H.; Yang, H. J.; Xu, B. S.

    2015-01-01

    With regard to previous tensile deformation models simulating the tensile behavior of in-situ dendrite-reinforced metallic glass matrix composites (MGMCs) [Qiao et al., Acta Mater. 59 (2011) 4126; Sci. Rep. 3 (2013) 2816], some parameters, such as yielding strength of the dendrites and glass matrix, and the strain-hardening exponent of the dendrites, are estimated based on literatures. Here, Ti48Zr18V12Cu5Be17 MGMCs are investigated in order to improve the tensile deformation model and reveal the tensile deformation mechanisms. The tensile behavior of dendrites is obtained experimentally combining nano-indentation measurements and finite-element-method analysis for the first time, and those of the glass matrix and composites are obtained by tension. Besides, the tensile behavior of the MGMCs is divided into four stages: (1) elastic-elastic, (2) elastic-plastic, (3) plastic-plastic (work-hardening), and (4) plastic-plastic (softening). The respective constitutive relationships at different deformation stages are quantified. The calculated results coincide well with the experimental results. Thus, the improved model can be applied to clarify and predict the tensile behavior of the MGMCs. PMID:26354724

  11. In situ electrochemical digital holographic microscopy; a study of metal electrodeposition in deep eutectic solvents.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Andrew P; Azam, Muhammad; Ryder, Karl S; Saleem, Saima

    2013-07-16

    This study has shown for the first time that digital holographic microscopy (DHM) can be used as a new analytical tool in analysis of kinetic mechanism and growth during electrolytic deposition processes. Unlike many alternative established electrochemical microscopy methods such as probe microscopy, DHM is both the noninvasive and noncontact, the unique holographic imaging allows the observations and measurement to be made remotely. DHM also provides interferometric resolution (nanometer vertical scale) with a very short acquisition time. It is a surface metrology technique that enables the retrieval of information about a 3D structure from the phase contrast of a single hologram acquired using a conventional digital camera. Here DHM has been applied to investigate directly the electro-crystallization of a metal on a substrate in real time (in situ) from two deep eutectic solvent (DES) systems based on mixture of choline chloride and either urea or ethylene glycol. We show, using electrochemical DHM that the nucleation and growth of silver deposits in these systems are quite distinct and influenced strongly by the hydrogen bond donor of the DES. PMID:23751128

  12. In situ ellipsometry of surface layer of non-metallic transparent materials during its finish processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filatov, Oleksandr Y.; Poperenko, Leonid V.

    2006-10-01

    For modern technology applications it is important to develop non-contact methods of control of the modification of dielectric materials surface layer. The aim of the work is to determine the level of roughness changes in the surface layer of non-metallic material, optical glass BK-7, and to control it by in situ ellipsometry. The probing light spot was formed at a second (lower) reflective surface of the plate being studied during its mechanical processing at direct observation of these changes. The fine mechanical polishing was carried out for 2 hours by using the grinding-polishing machine installed directly on the sample table of ellipsometer LEF-3M. The angle of light incidence was close to 70 degree. The ellipsometric parameters, were determined within the mechanically processed area. For this purpose, the probing light beam passed two times through the sample and then returned to the initial (air) medium, where its polarization state was studied. The polarized beam falls on lower plate surface polished by conventional technology using grinding-polishing CeO 2-based instrument "Aquapol" (grain size 1 micron). The time dependences of the ellipsometric parameters during the surface layer treatment were studied. In these dependences the tendency of changes of ellipsometric parameters indicates the surface roughness enhancement.

  13. Hybrid Al + Al3Ni metallic foams synthesized in situ via laser engineered net shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Baolong; Li, Ying; Smugeresky, John E.; Zhou, Yizhang; Baker, Dean; Lavernia, Enrique J.

    2011-09-01

    A hybrid, Al + Al3Ni metallic foam was synthesized in situ via laser engineered net shaping (LENS®) of Ni-coated 6061 Al powder in the absence of a foaming agent. During LENS® processing, the Ni coating reacted with the Al matrix, resulting in the simultaneous formation of a fine dispersion of Al3Ni, and a high volume fraction of porosity. As a reinforcement phase, the intermetallic compound formed particles with a size range of 1-5 µm and a volume fraction of 63%, with accompanying 35-300 µm pores with a 60% volume fraction. The microstructure of the as-deposited Al + Al3Ni composite foams was characterized using SEM, EDS, XRD and TEM/HRTEM techniques. The evolution of the microstructure was analyzed on the basis of the thermal field present during deposition, paying particular attention to the thermodynamics of the Al3Ni intermetallic compound formation as well as discussing the mechanisms that may be responsible for the observed porosity. The mechanical behavior of the as-deposited material was characterized using compression and microhardness testing, indicating that the yield strength and hardness are 190 MPa and 320 HV, respectively, which represents an increase of over three times higher than that of annealed Al6061, or similar to heat-treated Al6061 fully dense matrix, and much higher than those of traditional Al alloy foams, and with a low density of 1.64 g/m3.

  14. An improved tensile deformation model for in-situ dendrite/metallic glass matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, X. H.; Qiao, J. W.; Jiao, Z. M.; Wang, Z. H.; Yang, H. J.; Xu, B. S.

    2015-09-01

    With regard to previous tensile deformation models simulating the tensile behavior of in-situ dendrite-reinforced metallic glass matrix composites (MGMCs) [Qiao et al., Acta Mater. 59 (2011) 4126; Sci. Rep. 3 (2013) 2816], some parameters, such as yielding strength of the dendrites and glass matrix, and the strain-hardening exponent of the dendrites, are estimated based on literatures. Here, Ti48Zr18V12Cu5Be17 MGMCs are investigated in order to improve the tensile deformation model and reveal the tensile deformation mechanisms. The tensile behavior of dendrites is obtained experimentally combining nano-indentation measurements and finite-element-method analysis for the first time, and those of the glass matrix and composites are obtained by tension. Besides, the tensile behavior of the MGMCs is divided into four stages: (1) elastic-elastic, (2) elastic-plastic, (3) plastic-plastic (work-hardening), and (4) plastic-plastic (softening). The respective constitutive relationships at different deformation stages are quantified. The calculated results coincide well with the experimental results. Thus, the improved model can be applied to clarify and predict the tensile behavior of the MGMCs.

  15. Thermodynamics of gas-metal-slag equilibria for applications in in situ and ex situ vitrification melts

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.L.; Reimann, G.A.

    1993-05-01

    An equilibrium thermodynamic model for melting mixed waste was evaluated using the STEPSOL computer code. STEPSOL uses free energy minimization techniques to predict equilibrium composition from input species and user selected species in the output. The model assumes equilibrium between gas, slag, and metallic phases. Input for the model was developed using compositional data from Pit 9 of the Subsurface Disposal Area at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Thermodynamic data were primarily from compilations published by the US Government. The results of model evaluation indicate that the amount of plutonium chloride or plutonium oxyhydroxide that would be evaporated into the vapor phase would be minor. Relatively more uranium chloride and uranium oxyhydroxide would be vaporized. However, a hazards analysis was not part of the present task. Minor amounts of plutonium and uranium would be reduced to the metallic state, but these amounts should alloy with the iron-chromium-nickel metallic phase. The vast majority of the plutonium and uranium are in the slag phase as oxides. Results of the calculations show that silica and silicates dominate the products and that the system is very reducing. The major gases are carbon monoxide and hydrogen, with lesser amounts of carbon dioxide and water. High vapor pressure metals are considered but were not analyzed using STEPSOL. STEPSOL does not make predictions of distribution of species between phases.

  16. Trace Metals in Groundwater & Vadose Zone Calcite: In Situ Containment & Stabilization of 90Strontium & Other Divalent Metals & Radionuclides at Arid West DOE Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Robert W.; Fujita, Yoshiko; Ferris, F. Grant; Cosgrove, Donna M.; Colwell, Rick S.

    2004-06-01

    Radionuclide and metal contaminants such as 90Sr are present beneath U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) lands in both the groundwater (e.g., 100-N area at Hanford, WA) and vadose zone (e.g., Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory). In situ containment and stabilization of these contaminants is a cost-effective treatment strategy. However, implementing in situ containment and stabilization approaches requires definition of the mechanisms that control contaminant sequestration. We are investigating the in situ immobilization of radionuclides or contaminant metals (e.g., 90Sr) by their facilitated co-precipitation with calcium carbonate in groundwater and vadose zone systems. Our facilitated approach, shown schematically in Figure 1, relies upon the hydrolysis of introduced urea to cause the acceleration of calcium carbonate precipitation (and trace metal co-precipitation) by increasing pH and alkalinity. Subsurface urea hydrolysis is catalyzed by the urease enzyme, which may be either introduced with the urea or produced in situ by ubiquitous subsurface urea hydrolyzing microorganisms. Because the precipitation process tends to be irreversible and many western aquifers are saturated with respect to calcite, the co-precipitated metals and radionuclides will be effectively removed from the aqueous phase over the long-term. Another advantage of the ureolysis approach is that the ammonium ions produced by the reaction can exchange with radionuclides sorbed to subsurface minerals, thereby enhancing the availability of the radionuclides for re-capture in a more stable solid phase (co-precipitation rather than adsorption).

  17. Trace Metals in Groundwater & Vadose Zone Calcite: In Situ Containment & Stabilization of Stronthium-90 & Other Divalent Metals & Radionuclides at Arid West DOE

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Robert W.

    2005-06-01

    Radionuclide and metal contaminants such as strontium-90 are present beneath U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) lands in both the groundwater (e.g., 100-N area at Hanford, WA) and vadose zone (e.g., Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center [INTEC] at the Idaho National Laboratory [INL]). In situ containment and stabilization of these contaminants is a cost-effective treatment strategy. However, implementing in situ containment and stabilization approaches requires definition of the mechanisms that control contaminant sequestration. We are investigating the in situ immobilization of radionuclides or contaminant metals (e.g., strontium-90) by their facilitated co-precipitation with calcium carbonate (primarily calcite) in groundwater and vadose zone systems. Our facilitated approach relies upon the hydrolysis of introduced urea to cause the acceleration of calcium carbonate precipitation (and trace metal co-precipitation) by (a) increasing pH and alkalinity and (b) liberating cations from the aquifer matrix by cation exchange reactions. Subsurface urea hydrolysis is catalyzed by the urease enzyme, which is produced in situ by native urea hydrolyzing microorganisms. Because the precipitation process tends to be irreversible and many western aquifers are saturated with respect to calcite, the co-precipitated metals and radionuclides will be effectively removed from the aqueous phase over the long term. We are currently conducting field based activities at both the INL Vadose Zone Research Park (VZRP), an uncontaminated surrogate site for the strontium-90 contaminated vadose zone at INTEC and at the strontium-90 contaminated aquifer of 100-N area of the Hanford site.

  18. Trace Metals in Groundwater & the Vadose Zone Calcite: In Situ Containment & Stabilization of Strontium-90 & Other Divalent Metals & Radionuclides at Arid West DOE

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Robert W.

    2004-12-01

    Radionuclide and metal contaminants such as strontium-90 are present beneath U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) lands in both the groundwater (e.g., 100-N area at Hanford, WA) and vadose zone (e.g., Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory). In situ containment and stabilization of these contaminants is a cost-effective treatment strategy. However, implementing in situ containment and stabilization approaches requires definition of the mechanisms that control contaminant sequestration. We are investigating the in situ immobilization of radionuclides or contaminant metals (e.g., strontium-90) by their facilitated co-precipitation with calcium carbonate in groundwater and vadose zone systems. Our facilitated approach, shown schematically in Figure 1, relies upon the hydrolysis of introduced urea to cause the acceleration of calcium carbonate precipitation (and trace metal co-precipitation) by increasing pH and alkalinity. Subsurface urea hydrolysis is catalyzed by the urease enzyme, which may be either introduced with the urea or produced in situ by ubiquitous subsurface urea hydrolyzing microorganisms. Because the precipitation process tends to be irreversible and many western aquifers are saturated with respect to calcite, the co-precipitated metals and radionuclides will be effectively removed from the aqueous phase over the long-term. Another advantage of the ureolysis approach is that the ammonium ions produced by the reaction can exchange with radionuclides sorbed to subsurface minerals, thereby enhancing the availability of the radionuclides for re-capture in a more stable solid phase (co-precipitation rather than adsorption).

  19. In situ fabrication of a microfluidic device for immobilised metal affinity sensing.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Abhishek G; Darton, Nicholas J; Yunus, Kamran; Fisher, Adrian C; Slater, Nigel K H

    2012-05-15

    In this work a novel microfluidic device was constructed in situ containing the smallest microscopic co-polymeric immobilised metal affinity (IMA) adsorbent yet documented. This device has for the first time allowed the microlitre scale chromatographic assay of histidine-tagged proteins in a biological sample. To enable this approach, rather than using a high capacity commercial packed bed column which requires large sample volumes and would be susceptible to occlusion by cell debris, a microgram capacity co-polymeric chromatographic substrate suitable for analytical applications was fabricated within a microfluidic channel. This porous co-polymeric IMA micro-chromatographic element, only 27μl in volume, was assessed for the analytical capture of two different histidine-tagged recombinant fusion proteins. The micro-chromatographic adsorber was fabricated in situ by photo-polymerising an iminodiacetic acid (IDA) functionalised polymer matrix around a template of fused 100μm diameter NH(4)Cl particles entirely within the microfluidic channel and then etching away the salt with water to form a network of interconnected voids. The surface of the micro-chromatographic adsorber was chemically functionalised with a chelating agent and loaded with Cu(2+) ions. FTIR and NMR analysis verified the presence of the chelating agent on the adsorbent surface and its Cu(2+) ion binding capacity was determined to be 2.4μmol Cu(2+) (ml of adsorbent)(-1). Micro-scale equilibrium adsorption studies using the two different histidine-tagged proteins, LacI-His(6)-GFP and α-Synuclein-His(8)-YFP, were carried out and the protein binding capacity of the adsorbent was determined to be 0.370 and 0.802mg(g of adsorbent)(-1), respectively. The dynamic binding capacity was determined at four different flow rates and found to be comparable to the equilibrium binding capacity at low flow rates. The sensing platform was also used to adsorb LacI-His(6)-GFP protein from crude cell lysate. During

  20. Selective reduction of biomass by hydriodic acid and its in situ regeneration from iodine by metal/hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weiran; Grochowski, Matthew R; Sen, Ayusman

    2012-07-01

    HI returns: Hydroiodic acid is a highly selective reducing reagent for a wide variety of substrates. Its application is limited by the formation of iodine and the difficulty in reconverting that iodione back to HI in situ. We report the facile conversion of I(2) to HI by metal-catalyzed hydrogenation in the presence of water, and demonstrate the utility of this process in the conversion of fructose to 5-methyfurfural and glycerol to 2-iodopropane. PMID:22492614

  1. Quantitative In Situ TEM Studies of Small-Scale Plasticity in Irradiated and Unirradiated Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisholm, Claire

    mechanical data, as the two defect conditions exhibit similar yield strengths, ultimate tensile strengths, and number and size of load-drops. This similarity implies that, even if materials contain dissimilar individual defects, the collective defect behavior can result in similar mechanical properties. Thus, the origin of mechanical properties can be ambiguous and caution should be taken when extrapolating to different size scales. Furthermore, such similarities highlight the importance of in-situ observation during deformation. These experiments provide a key test of theory, by providing a local test of behavior, which is much more stringent than testing behaviors averaged over many regions. Advanced electron microscopy imaging techniques and quantitative in-situ TEM tensile tests are performed with Au thin-film as a model FCC structural material. These investigations highlight the various hurdles experimental studies must overcome in order to probe defect behavior at a fundamental level. Two novelly-applied strain mapping techniques are performed to directly measure the matrix strain around helium bubbles in He1+ implanted Au thin-film. Dark-field inline holography (DFIH) is applied here for the first time to a metal, and nano-beam electron diffraction (NBED) transient strain mapping is shown to be experimentally feasible using the high frame rate Gatan K2 camera. The K2 camera reduces scan times from ˜18 minutes to 82 seconds for a 128x256 pixel scan at 400 fps. Both methods measure a peak strain around 10 nm bubbles of 0.7%, correlating to an internal pressure of 580 MPa, or a vacancy to helium ion ratio of 1V:2.4He. Previous studies have relied on determining the appropriate equation of state to relate measured or approximated helium density to internal bubble pressure and thus strain. Direct measurement of the surrounding matrix strain through DFIH and NBED methods effectively bypasses this step, allowing for easier defect interaction modeling as the bubble can be

  2. Molten fluoride fuel salt chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, L. M.; Del Cul, G. D.; Dai, S.; Metcalf, D. H.

    1995-01-01

    The chemistry of molten fluorides is traced from their development as fuels in the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment with important factors in their selection being discussed. Key chemical characteristics such as solubility, redox behavior, and chemical activity are explained as they relate to the behavior of molten fluoride fuel systems. Development requirements for fitting the current state of the chemistry to modern nuclear fuel system are described. It is concluded that while much is known about molten fluoride behavior which can be used effectively to reduce the amount of development required for future systems, some significant molten salt chemical questions must still be addressed.

  3. Molten fluoride fuel salt chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, L. M.; Delcul, G. D.; Dai, S.; Metcalf, D. H.

    The chemistry of molten fluorides is traced from their development as fuels in the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment with important factors in their selection being discussed. Key chemical characteristics such as solubility, redox behavior, and chemical activity are explained as they relate to the behavior of molten fluoride fuel systems. Development requirements for fitting the current state of the chemistry to modern nuclear fuel system are described. It is concluded that while much is known about molten fluoride behavior which can be used effectively to reduce the amount of development required for future systems, some significant molten salt chemical questions must still be addressed.

  4. Molten salt techniques. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    Lovering, D.G.; Gale, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    This collection of five papers on molten salts deals with the following specific topics: the actinides and their salts, including their availability along with techniques and equipment for their handling, preparation, purification, and physical property measurement; cryolite systems and methods for their handling, preparation, and thermodynamic and physicochemical property assessment, as well as the use of electrodes in molten cryolite; the theory, construction, and application of reference electrodes for molten salt electrolytes; neutron diffraction in molten salt systems including isotope exchange methods for sample preparation; and dry boxes and inert atmosphere techniques for molten salt handling and analysis.

  5. Application of Mythen detector: In-situ XRD study on the thermal expansion behavior of metal indium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Rong; Chen, ZhongJun; Cai, Quan; Fu, JianLong; Gong, Yu; Wu, ZhongHua

    2016-07-01

    A Mythen detector has been equipped at the beamline 4B9A of Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BSRF), which is expected to enable BSRF to perform time-resolved measurement of X-ray diffraction (XRD) full-profiles. In this paper, the thermal expansion behavior of metal indium has been studied by using the in-situ XRD technique with the Mythen detector. The indium was heated from 303 to 433 K with a heating rate of 2 K/min. The in-situ XRD full-profiles were collected with a rate of one profile per 10 seconds. Rietveld refinement was used to extract the structural parameters. The results demonstrate that these collected quasi-real-time XRD profiles can be well used for structural analysis. The metal indium was found to have a nonlinear thermal expansion behavior from room temperature to the melting point (429.65 K). The a-axis of the tetragonal unit cell expands with a biquadratic dependency on temperature, while the c-axis contracts with a cubic dependency on temperature. By the time-resolved XRD measurements, it was observed that the [200] preferred orientation can maintain to about 403.15 K. While (110) is the last and detectable crystal plane just before melting of the polycrystalline indium foil. This study is not only beneficial to the application of metal indium, but also exhibits the capacity of in-situ time-resolved XRD measurements at the X-ray diffraction station of BSRF.

  6. Sulfur tolerant molten carbonate fuel cell anode and process

    DOEpatents

    Remick, Robert J.

    1990-01-01

    Molten carbonate fuel cell anodes incorporating a sulfur tolerant carbon monoxide to hydrogen water-gas-shift catalyst provide in situ conversion of carbon monoxide to hydrogen for improved fuel cell operation using fuel gas mixtures of over about 10 volume percent carbon monoxide and up to about 10 ppm hydrogen sulfide.

  7. Liquid surface skimmer apparatus for molten lithium and method

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, Samuel C.; Pollard, Roy E.; Thompson, William F.; Stark, Marshall W.; Currin, Jr., Robert T.

    1995-01-01

    This invention relates to an apparatus for separating two fluids having different specific gravities. The invention also relates to a method for using the separating apparatus of the present invention. This invention particularly relates to the skimming of molten lithium metal from the surface of a fused salt electrolyte in the electrolytic production of lithium metal from a mixed fused salt.

  8. Metal atomization spray nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Huxford, T.J.

    1993-11-16

    A spray nozzle for a magnetohydrodynamic atomization apparatus has a feed passage for molten metal and a pair of spray electrodes mounted in the feed passage. The electrodes, diverging surfaces which define a nozzle throat and diverge at an acute angle from the throat. Current passes through molten metal when fed through the throat which creates the Lorentz force necessary to provide atomization of the molten metal. 6 figures.

  9. Metal atomization spray nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Huxford, Theodore J.

    1993-01-01

    A spray nozzle for a magnetohydrodynamic atomization apparatus has a feed passage for molten metal and a pair of spray electrodes mounted in the feed passage. The electrodes, diverging surfaces which define a nozzle throat and diverge at an acute angle from the throat. Current passes through molten metal when fed through the throat which creates the Lorentz force necessary to provide atomization of the molten metal.

  10. Trace Metals in Groundwater & Vadose Zone Calcite: In Situ Containment & Stabilization of Stronthium-90 & Other Divalent Metals & Radionuclides at Arid West DOE

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Robert W

    2003-06-01

    Radionuclide and metal contaminants such as strontium-90 are present beneath U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) lands in both the groundwater (e.g., 100-N area at Hanford, WA) and vadose zone (e.g., Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory). In situ containment and stabilization of these contaminants is a cost-effective treatment strategy. However, implementing in situ containment and stabilization approaches requires definition of the mechanisms that control contaminant sequestration. We are investigating the in situ immobilization of radionuclides or contaminant metals (e.g., strontium-90) by their facilitated co-precipitation with calcium carbonate in groundwater and vadose zone systems. Our facilitated approach, shown schematically in Figure 1, relies upon the hydrolysis of introduced urea to cause the acceleration of calcium carbonate precipitation (and trace metal co-precipitation) by increasing pH and alkalinity. Subsurface urea hydrolysis is catalyzed by the urease enzyme, which may be either introduced with the urea or produced in situ by ubiquitous subsurface urea hydrolyzing microorganisms. Because the precipitation process tends to be irreversible and many western aquifers are saturated with respect to calcite, the co-precipitated metals and radionuclides will be effectively removed from the aqueous phase over the long-term. Another advantage of the ureolysis approach is that the ammonium ions produced by the reaction can exchange with radionuclides sorbed to subsurface minerals, thereby enhancing the availability of the radionuclides for recapture in a more stable solid phase (co-precipitation rather than adsorption). Our specific research objectives include: * Elucidation of the mechanisms and rates for the release of sorbed trace metals and their subsequent sequestration by co-precipitation in calcite induced by urea hydrolysis. * Evaluation at the field scale of the influence of

  11. Molten core retention assembly

    DOEpatents

    Lampe, Robert F.

    1976-06-22

    Molten fuel produced in a core overheating accident is caught by a molten core retention assembly consisting of a horizontal baffle plate having a plurality of openings therein, heat exchange tubes having flow holes near the top thereof mounted in the openings, and a cylindrical, imperforate baffle attached to the plate and surrounding the tubes. The baffle assembly is supported from the core support plate of the reactor by a plurality of hanger rods which are welded to radial beams passing under the baffle plate and intermittently welded thereto. Preferably the upper end of the cylindrical baffle terminates in an outwardly facing lip to which are welded a plurality of bearings having slots therein adapted to accept the hanger rods.

  12. Polyimide/metal composite films via in situ decomposition of inorganic additives - Soluble polyimide versus polyimide precursor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rancourt, J. D.; Porta, G. M.; Moyer, E. S.; Madeleine, D. G.; Taylor, L. T.

    1988-01-01

    Polyimide-metal oxide (Co3O4 or CuO) composite films have been prepared via in situ thermal decomposition of cobalt (II) chloride or bis(trifluoroacetylacetonato)copper(II). A soluble polyimide (XU-218) and its corresponding prepolymer (polyamide acid) were individually employed as the reaction matrix. The resulting composites exhibited a greater metal oxide concentration at the air interface with polyamide acid as the reaction matrix. The water of imidization that is released during the concurrent polyamide acid cure and additive decomposition is believed to promote metal migration and oxide formation. In contrast, XU-218 doped with either HAuCl4.3H2O or AgNO3 yields surface gold or silver when thermolyzed (300 C).

  13. An Automated Electronic Tongue for In-Situ Quick Monitoring of Trace Heavy Metals in Water Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Wei; Li, Yi; Gao, Xiaoming; Guo, Hongsun; Zhao, Huixin; Wang, Ping

    2009-05-01

    An automated electronic tongue instrumentation has been developed for in-situ concentration determination of trace heavy metals in water environment. The electronic tongue contains two main parts. The sensor part consists of a silicon-based Hg-coated Au microelectrodes array (MEA) for the detection of Zn(II), Cd(II), Pb(II) and Cu(II) and a multiple light-addressable potentiometric sensor (MLAPS) for the detection of Fe(III) and Cr(VI). The control part employs pumps, valves and tubes to enable the pick-up and pretreatment of aqueous sample. The electronic tongue realized detection of the six metals mentioned above at part-per-billion (ppb) level without manual operation. This instrumentation will have wide application in quick monitoring and prediction the heavy metal pollution in lakes and oceans.

  14. Oxidation of hydrogen halides to elemental halogens with catalytic molten salt mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Rohrmann, Charles A.

    1978-01-01

    A process for oxidizing hydrogen halides by means of a catalytically active molten salt is disclosed. The subject hydrogen halide is contacted with a molten salt containing an oxygen compound of vanadium and alkali metal sulfates and pyrosulfates to produce an effluent gas stream rich in the elemental halogen. The reduced vanadium which remains after this contacting is regenerated to the active higher valence state by contacting the spent molten salt with a stream of oxygen-bearing gas.

  15. Effects of metal contamination in situ on osmoregulation and oxygen consumption in the mudflat fiddler crab Uca rapax (Ocypodidae, Brachyura).

    PubMed

    Capparelli, Mariana V; Abessa, Denis M; McNamara, John C

    2016-01-01

    The contamination of estuaries by metals can impose additional stresses on estuarine species, which may exhibit a limited capability to adjust their regulatory processes and maintain physiological homeostasis. The mudflat fiddler crab Uca rapax is a typical estuarine crab, abundant in both pristine and contaminated areas along the Atlantic coast of Brazil. This study evaluates osmotic and ionic regulatory ability and gill Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity in different salinities (<0.5, 25 and 60‰ S) and oxygen consumption rates at different temperatures (15, 25 and 35°C) in U. rapax collected from localities along the coast of São Paulo State showing different histories of metal contamination (most contaminated Ilha Diana, Santos>Rio Itapanhaú, Bertioga>Picinguaba, Ubatuba [pristine reference site]). Our findings show that the contamination of U. rapax by metals in situ leads to bioaccumulation and induces biochemical and physiological changes compared to crabs from the pristine locality. U. rapax from the contaminated sites exhibit stronger hyper- and hypo-osmotic regulatory abilities and show greater gill Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activities than crabs from the pristine site, revealing that the underlying biochemical machinery can maintain systemic physiological processes functioning well. However, oxygen consumption, particularly at elevated temperatures, decreases in crabs showing high bioaccumulation titers but increases in crabs with low/moderate bioaccumulation levels. These data show that U. rapax chronically contaminated in situ exhibits compensatory biochemical and physiological adjustments, and reveal the importance of studies on organisms exposed to metals in situ, particularly estuarine invertebrates subject to frequent changes in natural environmental parameters like salinity and temperature.

  16. Occlusion and ion exchange in the molten (lithium chloride-potassium chloride-alkali metal chloride) salt + zeolite 4A system with alkali metal chlorides of sodium, rubidium, and cesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lexa, Dusan; Johnson, Irving

    2001-06-01

    Interaction between molten salts of the type LiCl-KCl-MeCl (Me = Na, Rb, Cs, x MeCl = 0 to 0.5, x KCl/ x LiCl = 0.69) and zeolite 4A have been studied at 823 K. The main interactions between these salts and zeolite are molten salt occlusion to form salt-loaded zeolite and ion exchange between the molten salt and salt-loaded zeolite. No chemical reaction has been observed. The extent of occlusion is a function of the concentration of MeCl in the zeolite and is equal to 11±1 Cl- per zeolite unit cell, (AlSiO4)12, at infinite MeCl dilution. The ion-exchange mole fraction equilibrium constants (separation factors) with respect to Li are decreasing functions of concentration of MeCl in the zeolite. At infinite MeCl dilution, they are equal to 0.84, 0.87, and 2.31 for NaCl, RbCl, and CsCl, respectively, and increase in the order Na

  17. Volmer-Weber growth stages of polycrystalline metal films probed by in situ and real-time optical diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abadias, G.; Simonot, L.; Colin, J. J.; Michel, A.; Camelio, S.; Babonneau, D.

    2015-11-01

    The Volmer-Weber growth of high-mobility metal films is associated with the development of a complex compressive-tensile-compressive stress behavior as the film deposition proceeds through nucleation of islands, coalescence, and formation of a continuous layer. The tensile force maximum has been attributed to the end of the islands coalescence stage, based on ex situ morphological observations. However, microstructural rearrangements are likely to occur in such films during post-deposition, somewhat biasing interpretations solely based on ex situ analysis. Here, by combining two simultaneous in situ and real-time optical sensing techniques, based on surface differential reflectance spectroscopy (SDRS) and change in wafer curvature probed by multibeam optical stress sensor (MOSS), we provide direct evidence that film continuity does coincide with tensile stress maximum during sputter deposition of a series of metal (Ag, Au, and Pd) films on amorphous SiOx. Stress relaxation after growth interruption was testified from MOSS, whose magnitude scaled with adatom mobility, while no change in SDRS signal could be revealed, ruling out possible changes of the surface roughness at the micron scale.

  18. Molten salt spectroelectrochemistry: recent developments

    SciTech Connect

    Mamantov, G.; Chapman, D.M.; Harward, B.L.; Klatt, L.N.; Smith, G.P.

    1985-01-01

    Molten salt spectroelectrochemistry will be reviewed in this paper. UV-visible transmission, infrared reflectance, resonance and normal Raman, and electron spin resonance spectroelectrochemistry have been used for molten salt studies. Two recent applications of uv-visible transmission spectroelectrochemistry to studies of organic and inorganic solutes in molten SbCl/sub 3/-AlCl/sub 3/-N-(1-butyl)pyridinium chloride and AlCl/sub 3/-NaCl will be described.

  19. In situ X-ray diffraction monitoring of a mechanochemical reaction reveals a unique topology metal-organic framework.

    PubMed

    Katsenis, Athanassios D; Puškarić, Andreas; Štrukil, Vjekoslav; Mottillo, Cristina; Julien, Patrick A; Užarević, Krunoslav; Pham, Minh-Hao; Do, Trong-On; Kimber, Simon A J; Lazić, Predrag; Magdysyuk, Oxana; Dinnebier, Robert E; Halasz, Ivan; Friščić, Tomislav

    2015-03-23

    Chemical and physical transformations by milling are attracting enormous interest for their ability to access new materials and clean reactivity, and are central to a number of core industries, from mineral processing to pharmaceutical manufacturing. While continuous mechanical stress during milling is thought to create an environment supporting nonconventional reactivity and exotic intermediates, such speculations have remained without proof. Here we use in situ, real-time powder X-ray diffraction monitoring to discover and capture a metastable, novel-topology intermediate of a mechanochemical transformation. Monitoring the mechanochemical synthesis of an archetypal metal-organic framework ZIF-8 by in situ powder X-ray diffraction reveals unexpected amorphization, and on further milling recrystallization into a non-porous material via a metastable intermediate based on a previously unreported topology, herein named katsenite (kat). The discovery of this phase and topology provides direct evidence that milling transformations can involve short-lived, structurally unusual phases not yet accessed by conventional chemistry.

  20. In situ X-ray diffraction monitoring of a mechanochemical reaction reveals a unique topology metal-organic framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsenis, Athanassios D.; Puškarić, Andreas; Štrukil, Vjekoslav; Mottillo, Cristina; Julien, Patrick A.; Užarević, Krunoslav; Pham, Minh-Hao; Do, Trong-On; Kimber, Simon A. J.; Lazić, Predrag; Magdysyuk, Oxana; Dinnebier, Robert E.; Halasz, Ivan; Friščić, Tomislav

    2015-03-01

    Chemical and physical transformations by milling are attracting enormous interest for their ability to access new materials and clean reactivity, and are central to a number of core industries, from mineral processing to pharmaceutical manufacturing. While continuous mechanical stress during milling is thought to create an environment supporting nonconventional reactivity and exotic intermediates, such speculations have remained without proof. Here we use in situ, real-time powder X-ray diffraction monitoring to discover and capture a metastable, novel-topology intermediate of a mechanochemical transformation. Monitoring the mechanochemical synthesis of an archetypal metal-organic framework ZIF-8 by in situ powder X-ray diffraction reveals unexpected amorphization, and on further milling recrystallization into a non-porous material via a metastable intermediate based on a previously unreported topology, herein named katsenite (kat). The discovery of this phase and topology provides direct evidence that milling transformations can involve short-lived, structurally unusual phases not yet accessed by conventional chemistry.

  1. Refractory-Slag-Metal-Inclusion Multiphase Reactions Modeling Using Computational Thermodynamics: Kinetic Model for Prediction of Inclusion Evolution in Molten Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuva, M. A. H.; Rhamdhani, M. A.; Brooks, G. A.; Masood, S.; Reuter, M. A.

    2016-07-01

    The distribution ratio of germanium (Ge), L_{{Ge}}^{s/m} during equilibrium reactions between magnesia-saturated FeOx-CaO-SiO2 (FCS) slag and molten copper has been measured under oxygen partial pressures from 10-10 to 10-7 atm and at temperatures 1473 to 1623 K (1200 to 1350 °C). It was observed that the Ge distribution ratio increases with increasing oxygen partial pressure, and with decreasing temperature. It was also observed that the distribution ratio is strongly dependent on slag basicity. The distribution ratio was observed to increase with increasing optical basicity. At fixed CaO concentration in the slag, the distribution ratio was found to increase with increasing Fe/SiO2 ratio, tending to a plateau at L_{{Ge}}^{s/m} = 0.8. This behavior is consistent with the assessment of ionic bond fraction carried out in this study, and suggested the acidic nature of germanium oxide (GeO2) in the slag system studied. The characterisation results of the quenched slag suggested that Ge is present in the FeOx-CaO-SiO2-MgO slag predominantly as GeO2. At 1573 K (1300 °C) and p_{{{{O}}2 }} = 10-8 atm, the activity coefficient of GeO2 in the slag was calculated to be in the range of 0.24 to 1.50. The results from the current study suggested that less-basic slag, high operating temperature, and low oxygen partial pressure promote a low Ge distribution ratio. These conditions are desired for maximizing Ge recovery, for example, during pyrometallurgical processing of Ge-containing e-waste through secondary copper smelting. Overall, the thermodynamics data generated from this study can be used for process modeling purposes for improving recovery of Ge in primary and secondary copper smelting processes.

  2. High temperature in-situ observations of multi-segmented metal nanowires encapsulated within carbon nanotubes by in-situ filling technique

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Multi-segmented one-dimensional metal nanowires were encapsulated within carbon nanotubes (CNTs) through in-situ filling technique during plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition process. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and environmental TEM were employed to characterize the as-prepared sample at room temperature and high temperature. The selected area electron diffractions revealed that the Pd4Si nanowire and face-centered-cubic Co nanowire on top of the Pd nanowire were encapsulated within the bottom and tip parts of the multiwall CNT, respectively. Although the strain-induced deformation of graphite walls was observed, the solid-state phases of Pd4Si and Co-Pd remain even at above their expected melting temperatures and up to 1,550 ± 50°C. Finally, the encapsulated metals were melted and flowed out from the tip of the CNT after 2 h at the same temperature due to the increase of internal pressure of the CNT. PMID:22873841

  3. Optimization and comprehensive characterization of metal hydride based hydrogen storage systems using in-situ Neutron Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Börries, S.; Metz, O.; Pranzas, P. K.; Bellosta von Colbe, J. M.; Bücherl, T.; Dornheim, M.; Klassen, T.; Schreyer, A.

    2016-10-01

    For the storage of hydrogen, complex metal hydrides are considered as highly promising with respect to capacity, reversibility and safety. The optimization of corresponding storage tanks demands a precise and time-resolved investigation of the hydrogen distribution in scaled-up metal hydride beds. In this study it is shown that in situ fission Neutron Radiography provides unique insights into the spatial distribution of hydrogen even for scaled-up compacts and therewith enables a direct study of hydrogen storage tanks. A technique is introduced for the precise quantification of both time-resolved data and a priori material distribution, allowing inter alia for an optimization of compacts manufacturing process. For the first time, several macroscopic fields are combined which elucidates the great potential of Neutron Imaging for investigations of metal hydrides by going further than solely 'imaging' the system: A combination of in-situ Neutron Radiography, IR-Thermography and thermodynamic quantities can reveal the interdependency of different driving forces for a scaled-up sodium alanate pellet by means of a multi-correlation analysis. A decisive and time-resolved, complex influence of material packing density is derived. The results of this study enable a variety of new investigation possibilities that provide essential information on the optimization of future hydrogen storage tanks.

  4. Direct in situ nitridation of nanostructured metal oxide deposited semiconductor interfaces: tuning the response of reversibly interacting sensor sites.

    PubMed

    Laminack, William I; Gole, James L

    2014-08-25

    Metal-oxide nanostructure-decorated extrinsic semiconductor interfaces modified through in situ nitridation greatly expand the range of sensor interface response. Select metal-oxide sites, deposited to an n-type nanopore-coated microporous interface, direct a dominant electron-transduction process for reversible chemical sensing, which minimizes chemical-bond formation. The oxides are modified to decrease their Lewis acidity through a weak interaction to form metal oxynitride sites. Conductometric and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements demonstrate that in situ treatment changes the reversible interaction with the analytes NH3 and NO. The sensor range is extended, which creates a distinct new family of responses determined by the Lewis acidity/basicity of a given analyte relative to that of the nanostructures chosen to decorate the interface. The analyte response, broadened in a substantial and predictable way by nitridation, is explained by the recently developing inverse hard/soft acid/base model (IHSAB) of reversible electron transduction. PMID:24862834

  5. Molten fluoride fuel salt chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, L. M.; Del Cul, G. D.; Dai, S.; Metcalf, D. H.

    1995-09-01

    The chemistry of molten fluorides is traced from their development as fuels in the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment with important factors in their selection being discussed. Key chemical characteristics such as solubility, redox behavior, and chemical activity are explained as they relate to the behavior of molten fluoride fuel systems. Fission product behavior is described along with processing experience. Development requirements for fitting the current state of the chemistry to modern nuclear fuel system are described. It is concluded that while much is known about molten fluoride behavior, processing and recycle of the fuel components is a necessary factor if future systems are to be established.

  6. Molten fluoride fuel salt chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Toth, L.M.; Del Cul, G.D.; Dai, S.; Metcalf, D.H.

    1994-09-01

    The chemistry of molten fluorides is traced from their development as fuels in the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment with important factors in their selection being discussed. Key chemical characteristics such as solubility, redox behavior, and chemical activity are explained as they relate to the behavior of molten fluoride fuel systems. Fission product behavior is described along with processing experience. Development requirements for fitting the current state of the chemistry to modern nuclear fuel system are described. It is concluded that while much is known about molten fluoride behavior, processing and recycle of the fuel components is a necessary factor if future systems are to be established.

  7. Diagnosis of sources of current inefficiency in industrial molten salt electrolysis cells by Raman spectroscopy: A topical report on chlorides: Topical report, June 1982-June 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Sadoway, D. R.

    1987-06-01

    Molten salt electrolysis, a very energy-intensive process, is used in the extraction of light metals. Aluminum production by the Hall process and magnesium production in the Dow and I.G. Farbenindustrie cells constitute the major commercial applications of metal electrowinning from molten-salt media at present. The energy input into the electrolysis cell is in the form of direct current, and the energy efficiencies in the magnesium or aluminum processes are only in the 30 to 40% range. Major energy reductions are achieved by reducing the cell voltage or by increasing the current efficiency. Goal of the research is to identify the sources of the current losses occurring in molten salt electrolysis. This research worked on the systems of I.G. Farben magnesium chloride and Alcoa smelting aluminum chloride processes. Raman spectra were measured and analyzed for each component or their mixtures of the electrolyte for magnesium and aluminum reduction in chloride melts. Raman measurements were also conducted on the melts of industrial composition for aluminum and magnesium electrolysis. In laboratory-scale cells which imitated industrial practice, Raman spectra were measured in situ during electrolysis in attempts to identify the streamers, coloration of electrolyte, and any subvalent species. They were known to occur only during electrolysis, and they have been reported to be possible current losses. Cyclic voltammetry was conducted to obtain information about the generation of subvalent species which were not detected by Raman measurement. These were thought to be kinetic entities present only during electrolysis. Results of Raman spectroscopy and electrochemistry of magnesium and aluminum reduction from molten chloride bath are presented. The results would be useful to establish the basis for the study of electrolysis of aluminum from molten fluoride media. 119 refs., 66 figs.

  8. Design of nanocoatings by in situ phosphatizing reagent catalyzed polysilsesquioxane for corrosion inhibition and adhesion promotion on metal alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Kimberly B.

    When a metal reacts with oxygen and water, a redox reaction happens, which will cause corrosion. Current surface pretreatment for inhibiting corrosion on metal alloys is a phosphate conversion bath. The phosphate conversion bath will generate a phosphate-chromate layer to adhere strongly to a metal substrate. However, it is toxic and unfriendly to the environment. Our group proposed an innovative coating that contains a phosphate component (ISPR-In-situ Phosphatizing Reagent) within a protective coating. The ISPR coating will form a bound phosphate layer on the metal surface acting as the corrosion barrier and enhancing adhesion into the metal surface; moreover, it is low in cost and non-toxic. Within this dissertation, there are four projects that investigate design of ISPR nanocoatings for the use of corrosion inhibition and adhesion promotion. Surface modification and adjusting concentrations of materials with the different formulations are explored. The first project focuses on the adhesion enhancement of a coating created by modifying the surface of an aluminum panel. Secondly, the next project will discuss and present the use of three rare earth element formulations as a replacement for phosphate conversion coatings on magnesium alloy, AZ61. The third project is the design of a nanocoating by using heat dissipating materials to fill in small vacant spaces in the ISPR network coating on various metal alloys. The last project, studies the strategic selection of incorporating metal components into ISPR network by the reduction potential values on several different alloys. Many methods of analysis are used; SEM, TEM, ASTM B117, ASTM D1308, ASTM D3359, EIS, and thickness probe. It was found that the addition of ISPR in the nanocoatings dramatically improves the vitality of metal alloys and these results will be presented during this dissertation.

  9. In situ spectroscopic detection of SMSI effect in a Ni/CeO2 system: hydrogen-induced burial and dig out of metallic nickel

    SciTech Connect

    Caballero, Alfonso; Holgado, Juan P.; Gonzalez-delaCruz, Victor M.; Habas, Susan e.; Herranz, Tirma; Salmeron, Miquel

    2010-06-29

    In situ APPES technique demonstrates that the strong metal support interaction effect (SMSI) in the Ni-ceria system is associated with the decoration and burial of metallic particles by the partially reduced support, a phenomenon reversible by evacuation at high temperature of the previously absorbed hydrogen.

  10. Marine lake as in situ laboratory for studies of organic matter influence on speciation and distribution of trace metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlakar, Marina; Fiket, Željka; Geček, Sunčana; Cukrov, Neven; Cuculić, Vlado

    2015-07-01

    Karst marine lakes are unique marine systems, also recognized as in situ "laboratories" in which geochemical processes on a different scale compared to the open sea, can be observed. In this study, organic matter cycle and its impact on distribution of trace metals in the marine lake Mir, located on Dugi Otok Island, in the central part of the eastern Adriatic Sea, was investigated for the first time. Studied marine lake is small, isolated, shallow basin, with limited communication with the open sea. Intense spatial and seasonal variations of organic matter, dissolved and particulate (DOC, POC), and dissolved trace metals concentrations in the water column of the Lake are governed predominantly by natural processes. Enhanced oxygen consumption in the Lake during summer season, high DOC and POC concentrations and low redox potential result in occasional occurrence of anoxic conditions in the bottom layers with appearance of sulfur species. Speciation modeling showed that dissolved trace metals Cu, Pb and Zn, are mostly bound to organic matter, while Cd, Co and Ni are present predominantly as free ions and inorganic complexes. Trace metals removal from the water column and their retention in the sediment was found to depend on the nature of the relationship between specific metal and organic or inorganic phases, sulfides, Fe-oxyhydroxydes or biogenic calcite. The above is reflected in the composition of the sediments, which are, in addition to influence of karstic background and bathymetry of the basin, significantly affected by accumulation of detritus at the bottom of the Lake.

  11. Use of in situ structural and functional variables of phytoplankton of the river Ganga for assessment of heavy metal toxicity.

    PubMed

    Singh, A K; Rai, L C

    1990-12-01

    Toxicity of Cd and Zn on autotrophic index, pigment diversity. 14C uptake, and in situ nitrogenase activity of phytoplankton of the river Ganga has been studied for the first time in India using CEPEX enclosures. Maximum reduction in algal population was noted at 8.0 micrograms ml-1 Cd followed by 8.0 micrograms ml-1 Zn. Complete elimination of two and four species was observed respectively at 4.0 and 8.0 micrograms ml-1 Cd and Zn. The filamentous forms showed greater tolerance against Cd and Zn, whereas unicellular forms were more sensitive to test metals used. Bacillariophytes in general depicted greater sensitivity for both the metals. A concentration-dependent metal-specific increase in autotrophic index and pigment diversity of phytoplankton was noted for Cd and Zn. Inhibition of carbon and nitrogen fixation was, however, concentration dependent and metal specific. Looking at the sensitivity of 14CO2 uptake rather than other variables, we recommend the employment of this parameter for assessment of heavy metal toxicity in an aquatic ecosystem.

  12. In-situ study of crystallization kinetics in ternary bulk metallic glass alloys with different glass forming abilities

    SciTech Connect

    Lan, Si; Wei, Xiaoya; Wu, Xuelian; Wang, Xun-Li; Zhou, Jie; Lu, Zhaoping; Feygenson, Mikhail; Neuefeind, Jörg

    2014-11-17

    In-situ transmission electron microcopy and time-resolved neutron diffraction were used to study crystallization kinetics of two ternary bulk metallic glasses during isothermal annealing in the supercooled liquid region. It is found that the crystallization of Zr{sub 56}Cu{sub 36}Al{sub 8}, an average glass former, follows continuous nucleation and growth, while that of Zr{sub 46}Cu{sub 46}Al{sub 8}, a better glass former, is characterized by site-saturated nucleation, followed by slow growth. Possible mechanisms for the observed differences and the relationship to the glass forming ability are discussed.

  13. In-situ study of crystallization kinetics in ternary bulk metallic glass alloys with different glass forming abilities

    DOE PAGES

    Lan, Si; Wei, Xiaoya; Zhou, Jie; Lu, Zhaoping; Wu, Xuelian; Feygenson, Mikhail; Neuefeind, Jorg C.; Wang, Xun-Li

    2014-11-18

    In-situ transmission electron microcopy and time-resolved neutron diffraction were used to study crystallization kinetics of two ternary bulk metallic glasses during isothermal annealing in the supercooled liquid region. It is found that the crystallization of Zr56Cu36Al8, an average glass former, follows continuous nucleation and growth, while that of Zr46Cu46Al8, a better glass former, is characterized by site-saturated nucleation, followed by slow growth. Possible mechanisms for the observed differences and the relationship to the glass forming ability are discussed.

  14. Solvothermal in situ metal/ligand reactions: a new bridge between coordination chemistry and organic synthetic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Ming; Tong, Ming-Liang

    2007-02-01

    Several important solvothermal (including hydrothermal) in situ metal/ligand reactions and their mechanisms, including dehydrogenative carbon-carbon coupling, hydroxylation of aromatic rings, cycloaddition of organic nitriles with azide and ammonia, transformation of inorganic and organic sulfur, as well as the CuII to CuI reduction, are outlined in this Account. The current progress clearly demonstrates the important potential of such reactions in the crystal engineering of functional coordination compounds and one-pot synthesis of some unusual organic ligands that are inaccessible or not easily obtainable via conventional methods, thereby substantiating our expectation that a new bridge has been created between coordination chemistry and synthetic organic chemistry.

  15. Detection and removal of molten salts from molten aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    K. Butcher; D. Smith; C. L. Lin; L. Aubrey

    1999-08-02

    Molten salts are one source of inclusions and defects in aluminum ingots and cast shapes. A selective adsorption media was used to remove these inclusions and a device for detection of molten salts was tested. This set of experiments is described and the results are presented and analyzed.

  16. 13. VIEW OF THE MOLTEN SALT EXTRACTION LINE. THE MOLTEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. VIEW OF THE MOLTEN SALT EXTRACTION LINE. THE MOLTEN SALT EXTRACTION PROCESS WAS USED TO PURIFY PLUTONIUM BY REMOVING AMERICIUM, A DECAY BY-PRODUCT OF PLUTONIUM. (1/98) - Rocky Flats Plant, Plutonium Fabrication, Central section of Plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  17. Molten carbonate fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, T.D.; Smith, J.L.

    1986-07-08

    A molten electrolyte fuel cell is disclosed with an array of stacked cells and cell enclosures isolating each cell except for access to gas manifolds for the supply of fuel or oxidant gas or the removal of waste gas. The cell enclosures collectively provide an enclosure for the array and effectively avoid the problems of electrolyte migration and the previous need for compression of stack components. The fuel cell further includes an inner housing about and in cooperation with the array enclosure to provide a manifold system with isolated chambers for the supply and removal of gases. An external insulated housing about the inner housing provides thermal isolation to the cell components.

  18. Molten carbonate fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.; Smith, James L.

    1987-01-01

    A molten electrolyte fuel cell with an array of stacked cells and cell enclosures isolating each cell except for access to gas manifolds for the supply of fuel or oxidant gas or the removal of waste gas, the cell enclosures collectively providing an enclosure for the array and effectively avoiding the problems of electrolyte migration and the previous need for compression of stack components, the fuel cell further including an inner housing about and in cooperation with the array enclosure to provide a manifold system with isolated chambers for the supply and removal of gases. An external insulated housing about the inner housing provides thermal isolation to the cell components.

  19. Molten salt lithium cells

    DOEpatents

    Raistrick, I.D.; Poris, J.; Huggins, R.A.

    1980-07-18

    Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and is operated in the temperature range of about 400 to 500/sup 0/C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems and a substantial amount of energy is lost through heat transfer. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell which may be operated at temperatures between about 100 to 170/sup 0/C. The cell is comprised of an electrolyte, which preferably includes lithium nitrate, and a lithium or lithium alloy electrode.

  20. Molten salt lithium cells

    DOEpatents

    Raistrick, Ian D.; Poris, Jaime; Huggins, Robert A.

    1983-01-01

    Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and is operated in the temperature range of about 400.degree.-500.degree. C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems and a substantial amount of energy is lost through heat transfer. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell (10) which may be operated at temperatures between about 100.degree.-170.degree. C. Cell (10) comprises an electrolyte (16), which preferably includes lithium nitrate, and a lithium or lithium alloy electrode (12).

  1. Molten salt lithium cells

    DOEpatents

    Raistrick, Ian D.; Poris, Jaime; Huggins, Robert A.

    1982-02-09

    Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and is operated in the temperature range of about 400.degree.-500.degree. C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems and a substantial amount of energy is lost through heat transfer. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell (10) which may be operated at temperatures between about 100.degree.-170.degree. C. Cell (10) comprises an electrolyte (16), which preferably includes lithium nitrate, and a lithium or lithium alloy electrode (12).

  2. I-NERI ANNUAL TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT: 2006-002-K, Separation of Fission Products from Molten LiCl-KCl Salt Used for Electrorefining of Metal Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    S. Frank

    2009-09-01

    An attractive alternative to the once-through disposal of electrorefiner salt is to selectively remove the active fission products from the salt and recycle the salt back to the electrorefiner (ER). This would allow salt reuse for some number of cycles before ultimate disposal of the salt in a ceramic waste form. Reuse of ER salt would, thus, greatly reduce the volume of ceramic waste produced during the pyroprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. This final portion of the joint I-NERI research project is to demonstrate the separation of fission products from molten ER salt by two methods previously selected during phase two (FY-08) of this project. The two methods selected were salt/zeolite contacting and rare-earth fission product precipitation by oxygen bubbling. The ER salt used in these tests came from the Mark-IV electrorefiner used to anodically dissolved driver fuel from the EBR-II reactor on the INL site. The tests were performed using the Hot Fuel Dissolution Apparatus (HFDA) located in the main cell of the Hot Fuels Examination Facility (HFEF) at the Materials and Fuels complex on the INL site. Results from these tests were evaluated during a joint meeting of KAERI and INL investigators to provide recommendations as to the future direction of fission product removal from electrorefiner salt that accumulate during spent fuel treatment. Additionally, work continued on kinetic measurements of surrogate quaternary salt systems to provide fundamental kinetics on the ion exchange system and to expand the equilibrium model system developed during the first two phases of this project. The specific objectives of the FY09 I-NERI research activities at the INL include the following: • Perform demonstration tests of the selected KAERI precipitation and INL salt/zeolite contacting processes for fission product removal using radioactive, fission product loaded ER salt • Continue kinetic studies of the quaternary Cs/Sr-LiCl-KCl system to determine the rate of ion

  3. In Situ TEM Nanoindentation Studies on Stress-Induced Phase Transformations in Metallic Materials

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Y.; Wang, H.; Zhang, X.

    2015-11-30

    Though abundant phase transformations are in general thermally driven processes, there are many examples wherein stresses can induce phase transformations. We applied numerous in situ techniques, such as in situ x-ray diffraction and neutron diffraction in order to reveal phase transformations. Recently, an in situ nanoindentation technique coupled with transmission electron microscopy demonstrated the capability to directly correlating stresses with phase transformations and microstructural evolutions at a submicron length scale. We briefly review in situ studies on stress-induced diffusional and diffusionless phase transformations in amorphous CuZrAl alloy and NiFeGa shape memory alloy. Moreover, in the amorphous CuZrAl, in situ nanoindentationmore » studies show that the nucleation of nanocrystals (a diffusional process) occurs at ultra-low stresses manifested by a prominent stress drop. In the NiFeGa shape memory alloy, two distinctive types of martensitic (diffusionless) phase transformations accompanied by stress plateaus are observed, including a reversible gradual phase transformation at low stress levels, and an irreversible abrupt phase transition at higher stress levels.« less

  4. In Situ TEM Nanoindentation Studies on Stress-Induced Phase Transformations in Metallic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Wang, H.; Zhang, X.

    2015-11-30

    Though abundant phase transformations are in general thermally driven processes, there are many examples wherein stresses can induce phase transformations. We applied numerous in situ techniques, such as in situ x-ray diffraction and neutron diffraction in order to reveal phase transformations. Recently, an in situ nanoindentation technique coupled with transmission electron microscopy demonstrated the capability to directly correlating stresses with phase transformations and microstructural evolutions at a submicron length scale. We briefly review in situ studies on stress-induced diffusional and diffusionless phase transformations in amorphous CuZrAl alloy and NiFeGa shape memory alloy. Moreover, in the amorphous CuZrAl, in situ nanoindentation studies show that the nucleation of nanocrystals (a diffusional process) occurs at ultra-low stresses manifested by a prominent stress drop. In the NiFeGa shape memory alloy, two distinctive types of martensitic (diffusionless) phase transformations accompanied by stress plateaus are observed, including a reversible gradual phase transformation at low stress levels, and an irreversible abrupt phase transition at higher stress levels.

  5. In situ atom scale visualization of domain wall dynamics in VO2 insulator-metal phase transition.

    PubMed

    He, Xinfeng; Xu, Tao; Xu, Xiaofeng; Zeng, Yijie; Xu, Jing; Sun, Litao; Wang, Chunrui; Xing, Huaizhong; Wu, Binhe; Lu, Aijiang; Liu, Dingquan; Chen, Xiaoshuang; Chu, Junhao

    2014-10-08

    A domain wall, as a device, can bring about a revolution in developing manipulation of semiconductor heterostructures devices at the atom scale. However, it is a challenge for these new devices to control domain wall motion through insulator-metal transition of correlated-electron materials. To fully understand and harness this motion, it requires visualization of domain wall dynamics in real space. Here, domain wall dynamics in VO2 insulator-metal phase transition was observed directly by in situ TEM at atom scale. Experimental results depict atom scale evolution of domain morphologies and domain wall exact positions in (202) and (040) planes referring to rutile structure at 50°C. In addition, microscopic mechanism of domain wall dynamics and accurate lattice basis vector relationship of two domains were investigated with the assistance of X-ray diffraction, ab initio calculations and image simulations. This work offers a route to atom scale tunable heterostructure device application.

  6. Scattering influences in quantitative fission neutron radiography for the in situ analysis of hydrogen distribution in metal hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Börries, S.; Metz, O.; Pranzas, P. K.; Bücherl, T.; Söllradl, S.; Dornheim, M.; Klassen, T.; Schreyer, A.

    2015-10-01

    In situ neutron radiography allows for the time-resolved study of hydrogen distribution in metal hydrides. However, for a precise quantitative investigation of a time-dependent hydrogen content within a host material, an exact knowledge of the corresponding attenuation coefficient is necessary. Additionally, the effect of scattering has to be considered as it is known to violate Beer's law, which is used to determine the amount of hydrogen from a measured intensity distribution. Within this study, we used a metal hydride inside two different hydrogen storage tanks as host systems, consisting of steel and aluminum. The neutron beam attenuation by hydrogen was investigated in these two different setups during the hydrogen absorption process. A linear correlation to the amount of absorbed hydrogen was found, allowing for a readily quantitative investigation. Further, an analysis of scattering contributions on the measured intensity distributions was performed and is described in detail.

  7. In Situ Atom Scale Visualization of Domain Wall Dynamics in VO2 Insulator-Metal Phase Transition

    PubMed Central

    He, Xinfeng; Xu, Tao; Xu, Xiaofeng; Zeng, Yijie; Xu, Jing; Sun, Litao; Wang, Chunrui; Xing, Huaizhong; Wu, Binhe; Lu, Aijiang; Liu, Dingquan; Chen, Xiaoshuang; Chu, Junhao

    2014-01-01

    A domain wall, as a device, can bring about a revolution in developing manipulation of semiconductor heterostructures devices at the atom scale. However, it is a challenge for these new devices to control domain wall motion through insulator-metal transition of correlated-electron materials. To fully understand and harness this motion, it requires visualization of domain wall dynamics in real space. Here, domain wall dynamics in VO2 insulator-metal phase transition was observed directly by in situ TEM at atom scale. Experimental results depict atom scale evolution of domain morphologies and domain wall exact positions in (202) and (040) planes referring to rutile structure at 50°C. In addition, microscopic mechanism of domain wall dynamics and accurate lattice basis vector relationship of two domains were investigated with the assistance of X-ray diffraction, ab initio calculations and image simulations. This work offers a route to atom scale tunable heterostructure device application. PMID:25292447

  8. Water adsorption behavior on metal surfaces and its influence on surface potential studied by in situ SPM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, L. Q.; Zhao, X. M.; Bai, Y.; Qiao, L. J.

    2012-09-01

    The water adsorption behavior on the surfaces of chromium, copper and gold and its effect on the surface potential at various relative humidity were studied by in situ scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy (SKPFM) combined with force calibration. The thickness of water layer on different surfaces was obtained from the force-distance curve. It increases with the rise of humidity. The Volta potential map was measured using SKPFM within a wide humidity range of 20-100% as a function of the thickness of water layers. The surface potential decreases with the increasing thickness of water layers on the metal surfaces. The difference in the water adsorption behavior and its effect on surface potential originates from the different surface properties of three metals, such as the roughness and contact angle.

  9. In-situ monitor of insulator to metal transition in SrTiO3 by Ar+ irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiuru; Zhang, Wanli; Zhang, Wenxu; Zeng, Huizhong

    2016-03-01

    Metallic conduction layer produced by the irradiation of the SrTiO3 surface is an intriguing phenomenon, where the process and mechanism of the insulating to conducting transition are still under debate. We have studied the influence of argon ion bombardment on the SrTiO3 (STO) single crystal by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Photoluminescence (PL). The former demonstrated the existence of a lower oxidation state of Ti, which implied oxygen vacancies were present at the near-surface region. The latter showed that the oxygen damage enhanced with increasing irradiation time, and decreased by annealing in oxygen at high temperature. The in-situ electrical conductance measurement during irradiation revealed the correlation between the resistance of ion-irradiated STO and the irradiation time. The existence of sufficient amount of oxygen vacancies was proposed to be responsible to the insulator to metal transition during the process of irradiation.

  10. In-situ Study of Dynamic Phenomena at Metal Nanosolder Interfaces Using Aberration Corrected Scanning Transmission Electron Microcopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Ping

    2014-10-01

    Controlling metallic nanoparticle (NP) interactions plays a vital role in the development of new joining techniques (nanosolder) that bond at lower processing temperatures but remain viable at higher temperatures. The pr imary objective of this project is t o develop a fundamental understanding of the actual reaction processes, associated atomic mechanisms, and the resulting microstructure that occur during thermally - driven bond formation concerning metal - metal nano - scale (%3C50nm) interfaces. In this LDRD pr oject, we have studied metallic NPs interaction at the elevated temperatures by combining in - situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM ) using an aberration - corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (AC - STEM) and atomic - scale modeling such as m olecular dynamic (MD) simulations. Various metallic NPs such as Ag, Cu and Au are synthesized by chemical routines. Numerous in - situ e xperiments were carried out with focus of the research on study of Ag - Cu system. For the first time, using in - situ STEM he ating experiments , we directly observed t he formation of a 3 - dimensional (3 - D) epitaxial Cu - Ag core - shell nanoparticle during the thermal interaction of Cu and Ag NPs at elevated temperatures (150 - 300 o C). The reaction takes place at temperatures as low as 150 o C and was only observed when care was taken to circumvent the effects of electron beam irradiation during STEM imaging. Atomic - scale modeling verified that the Cu - Ag core - shell structure is energetically favored, and indicated that this phenomenon is a nano - scale effect related to the large surface - to - volume ratio of the NPs. The observation potentially can be used for developing new nanosolder technology that uses Ag shell as the "glue" that stic ks the particles of Cu together. The LDRD has led to several journal publications and numerous conference presentations, and a TA. In addition, we have developed new TEM characterization techniques and phase

  11. In situ SEM thermal fatigue of Al/graphite metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zong, G. S.; Rabenberg, L.; Marcus, H. L.

    1990-01-01

    Several thermal fatigue-induced failure mechanisms are deduced for unidirectional graphite-reinforced 6061 Al-alloy MMCs subjected to in situ thermal cycling. These thermal cycling conditions are representative of MMC service cycles in aerospace environments, where thermal fatigue is primarily associated with changes in the stress states near the interfaces due to coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch between fiber and matrix. This in situ SEM thermal-cycling study clarified such factors affecting MMCs' thermal fatigue as local fiber content and distribution, void volume, fiber stiffness, thermal excursion magnitude, and number of thermal cycles. MMC microfailure modes in thermal fatigue have been deduced.

  12. Dual intercalating molten electrolyte batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Carlin, R.T.; De Long, H.C.; Fuller, J.; Trulove, P.C. . Frank J. Seiler Research Lab.)

    1994-07-01

    The reductive and oxidative intercalation of ions into graphite from room-temperature and low temperature molten salts is demonstrated. For this investigation, the molten salts use 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium (EMI[sup +]) or 1,2-dimethyl-3-propylimidazolium (DMPI[sup +]) as the cation and AlCl[sup [minus

  13. Removing Dross From Molten Solder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, Winston S.

    1990-01-01

    Automatic device helps to assure good solder connections. Machine wipes dross away from area on surface of molten solder in pot. Sweeps across surface of molten solder somewhat in manner of windshield wiper. Each cycle of operation triggered by pulse from external robot. Equipment used wherever precise, automated soldering must be done to military specifications.

  14. Cathode for molten salt batteries

    DOEpatents

    Mamantov, Gleb; Marassi, Roberto

    1977-01-01

    A molten salt electrochemical system for battery applications comprises tetravalent sulfur as the active cathode material with a molten chloroaluminate solvent comprising a mixture of AlCl.sub.3 and MCl having a molar ratio of AlCl.sub.3 /MCl from greater than 50.0/50.0 to 80/20.

  15. Method and apparatus for performing in-situ vacuum-assisted metal to glass sealing

    DOEpatents

    Kramer, D.P.; Massey, R.T.

    1985-07-18

    A method and apparatus for assembling and fusing glass to metal in a glass-metal electrical component is disclosed. The component includes a metallic shell formed with upper and lower cylindrical recesses connected together by longitudinal passages, a pair of metal rings and plural metal pins assembled to define electrical feed-throughs. The component parts are assembled on a fixture having a sleeve-like projection and a central mounting projection establishing concentric nesting surfaces to which the metal rings are slip-fitted in concentric alignment with each other spaced from sidewalls of the lower recess. The pins are in electrical contact with the metal rings. A glass pre-form is seated within the upper recess. The assembled structure is heated to a temperature sufficient to melt the glass pre-form which flows under gravity through the passages into the lower recess to provide an insulative seal between the metal parts. The gravity flow of glass is assisted by applying vacuum to the lower recess, ensuring that all spaces between the metal parts are filled with sealing glass without formation of bubbles.

  16. Method and apparatus for performing in-situ vacuum-assisted metal to glass sealing

    DOEpatents

    Kramer, Daniel P.; Massey, Richard T.

    1986-01-01

    A method and apparatus for assembling and fusing glass to metal in a glass-metal electrical component is disclosed. The component includes a metallic shell formed with upper and lower cylindrical recesses connected together by longitudinal passages, a pair of metal rings and plural metal pins assembled to define electrical feed-throughs. The component parts are assembled on a fixture having a sleeve-like projection and a central mounting projection establishing concentric nesting surfaces to which the metal rings are slip-fitted in concentric alignment with each other spaced from sidewalls of the lower recess. The pins are in electrical contact with the metal rings. A glass pre-form is seated within the upper recess. The assembled structure is heated to a temperature sufficient to melt the glass pre-form which flows under gravity through the passages into the lower recess to provide an insulative seal between the metal parts. The gravity flow of glass is assisted by applying vacuum to the lower recess, ensuring that all spaces between the metal parts are filled with sealing glass without formation of bubbles.

  17. Process for removing technetium from iron and other metals

    DOEpatents

    Leitnaker, James M.; Trowbridge, Lee D.

    1999-01-01

    A process for removing technetium from iron and other metals comprises the steps of converting the molten, alloyed technetium to a sulfide dissolved in manganese sulfide, and removing the sulfide from the molten metal as a slag.

  18. Process for removing technetium from iron and other metals

    DOEpatents

    Leitnaker, J.M.; Trowbridge, L.D.

    1999-03-23

    A process for removing technetium from iron and other metals comprises the steps of converting the molten, alloyed technetium to a sulfide dissolved in manganese sulfide, and removing the sulfide from the molten metal as a slag. 4 figs.

  19. In situ generation of Ni nanoparticles from metal-organic framework precursors and their use for biomass hydrodeoxygenation.

    PubMed

    Čelič, Tadeja Birsa; Grilc, Miha; Likozar, Blaž; Tušar, Nataša Novak

    2015-05-22

    So far, in situ-generated Ni nanoparticles have been reported to be efficient catalysts for tar cracking during wood liquefaction by pyrolysis. Herein, their performance in further bio-oil conversion steps is evaluated. Nanoparticles were generated for the first time from a Ni-containing metal-organic framework, MIL-77, during the hydrotreatment of glycerol-solvolyzed lignocellulosic (LC) biomass. Reactions were conducted at 300 °C and the H2 pressure was 8 MPa in a slurry reactor. The catalytic activity and selectivity of the deoxygenation and hydrocracking reactions for real biomass-derived feedstock using in situ-generated nanoparticles was compared with Ni nanoparticles dispersed on a silica-alumina support (commercial Ni/SiO2 -Al2 O3 catalyst). The mass activity of the in situ-generated nanoparticles for hydrogenolysis was more than ten times higher in comparison to their commercial analogues, and their potential for the use in LC biorefinery is discussed. PMID:25755008

  20. Alkali metal nitrate purification

    DOEpatents

    Fiorucci, Louis C.; Morgan, Michael J.

    1986-02-04

    A process is disclosed for removing contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises heating the impure alkali metal nitrates in solution form or molten form at a temperature and for a time sufficient to effect precipitation of solid impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified alkali metal nitrates in solution form may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrates suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of purified alkali metal nitrates.

  1. Electrochemical cell having an alkali-metal-nitrate electrode

    DOEpatents

    Roche, M.F.; Preto, S.K.

    1982-06-04

    A power-producing secondary electrochemical cell includes a molten alkali metal as the negative-electrode material and a molten-nitrate salt as the positive-electrode material. The molten material in the respective electrodes are separated by a solid barrier of alkali-metal-ion conducting material. A typical cell includes active materials of molten sodium separated from molten sodium nitrate and other nitrates in mixture by a layer of sodium ..beta..'' alumina.

  2. Heat capacity of molten halides.

    PubMed

    Redkin, Alexander A; Zaikov, Yurii P; Korzun, Iraida V; Reznitskikh, Olga G; Yaroslavtseva, Tatiana V; Kumkov, Sergey I

    2015-01-15

    The heat capacities of molten salts are very important for their practical use. Experimental investigation of this property is challenging because of the high temperatures involved and the corrosive nature of these materials. It is preferable to combine experimental investigations with empirical relationships, which allows for the evaluation of the heat capacity of molten salt mixtures. The isobaric molar heat capacities of all molten alkali and alkaline-earth halides were found to be constant for each group of salts. The value depends on the number of atoms in the salt, and the molar heat capacity per atom is constant for all molten halide salts with the exception of the lithium halides. The molar heat capacities of molten halides do not change when the anions are changed.

  3. Heat capacity of molten halides.

    PubMed

    Redkin, Alexander A; Zaikov, Yurii P; Korzun, Iraida V; Reznitskikh, Olga G; Yaroslavtseva, Tatiana V; Kumkov, Sergey I

    2015-01-15

    The heat capacities of molten salts are very important for their practical use. Experimental investigation of this property is challenging because of the high temperatures involved and the corrosive nature of these materials. It is preferable to combine experimental investigations with empirical relationships, which allows for the evaluation of the heat capacity of molten salt mixtures. The isobaric molar heat capacities of all molten alkali and alkaline-earth halides were found to be constant for each group of salts. The value depends on the number of atoms in the salt, and the molar heat capacity per atom is constant for all molten halide salts with the exception of the lithium halides. The molar heat capacities of molten halides do not change when the anions are changed. PMID:25530462

  4. Impact of process temperature on GaSb metal-oxide-semiconductor interface properties fabricated by ex-situ process

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoyama, Masafumi Takenaka, Mitsuru; Takagi, Shinichi; Asakura, Yuji; Yokoyama, Haruki

    2014-06-30

    We have studied the impact of process temperature on interface properties of GaSb metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structures fabricated by an ex-situ atomic-layer-deposition (ALD) process. We have found that the ALD temperature strongly affects the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/GaSb MOS interface properties. The Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/GaSb MOS interfaces fabricated at the low ALD temperature of 150 °C have the minimum interface-trap density (D{sub it}) of ∼4.5 × 10{sup 13 }cm{sup −2} eV{sup −1}. We have also found that the post-metalization annealing at temperature higher than 200 °C degrades the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/GaSb MOS interface properties. The low-temperature process is preferable in fabricating GaSb MOS interfaces in the ex-situ ALD process to avoid the high-temperature-induced degradations.

  5. In situ gamma spectrometry measurements and Monte Carlo computations for the detection of radioactive sources in scrap metal.

    PubMed

    Clouvas, A; Xanthos, S; Takoudis, G; Potiriadis, C; Silva, J

    2005-02-01

    A very limited number of field experiments have been performed to assess the relative radiation detection sensitivities of commercially available equipment used to detect radioactive sources in recycled metal scrap. Such experiments require the cooperation and commitment of considerable resources on the part of vendors of the radiation detection systems and the cooperation of a steel mill or scrap processing facility. The results will unavoidably be specific to the equipment tested at the time, the characteristics of the scrap metal involved in the tests, and to the specific configurations of the scrap containers. Given these limitations, the use of computer simulation for this purpose would be a desirable alternative. With this in mind, this study sought to determine whether Monte Carlo simulation of photon flux energy distributions resulting from a radiation source in metal scrap would be realistic. In the present work, experimental and simulated photon flux energy distributions in the outer part of a truck due to the presence of embedded radioactive sources in the scrap metal load are compared. The experimental photon fluxes are deduced by in situ gamma spectrometry measurements with portable Ge detector and the calculated ones by Monte Carlo simulations with the MCNP code. The good agreement between simulated and measured photon flux energy distributions indicate that the results obtained by the Monte Carlo simulations are realistic.

  6. In situ hard x-ray photoemission spectroscopy of barrier-height control at metal/PMN-PT interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kröger, E.; Petraru, A.; Quer, A.; Soni, R.; Kalläne, M.; Pertsev, N. A.; Kohlstedt, H.; Rossnagel, K.

    2016-06-01

    Metal-ferroelectric interfaces form the basis of novel electronic devices. A key effect determining the device functionality is the bias-dependent change of the electronic energy-level alignment at the interface. Here, hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) is used to determine the energy-level alignment at two metal-ferroelectric interfaces—Au versus SrRuO3 on the relaxor ferroelectric Pb (Mg1 /3Nb2 /3 )0.72Ti0.28O3 (PMN-PT)—directly in situ as a function of electrical bias. The bias-dependent average shifts of the PMN-PT core levels are found to have two dominant contributions on the 0.1 -1-eV energy scale: one depending on the metal electrode and the remanent electric polarization and the other correlated with electric-field-induced strain. Element-specific deviations from the average shifts are smaller than 0.1 eV and appear to be related to predicted dynamical charge variations in PMN-PT. In addition, the efficiency of ferroelectric polarization switching is shown to be reduced near the coercive field under x-ray irradiation. The results establish HAXPES as a tool for the in operando investigation of metal-ferroelectric interfaces and suggest electric-field-induced modifications of the polarization distribution as a novel way to control the barrier height at such interfaces.

  7. Closed cell metal foam method

    DOEpatents

    Patten, James W.

    1978-01-01

    Foamed metals and metal alloys which have a closed cellular structure are prepared by heating a metal body containing entrapped inert gas uniformly distributed throughout to a temperature above the melting point of the metal and maintaining the body at this temperature a period of time sufficient to permit the entrapped gas to expand, forming individual cells within the molten metal, thus expanding and foaming the molten metal. After cell formation has reached the desired amount, the foamed molten metal body is cooled to below the melting temperature of the metal. The void area or density of the foamed metal is controlled by predetermining the amount of inert gas entrapped in the metal body and by the period of time the metal body is maintained in the molten state. This method is useful for preparing foamed metals and metal alloys from any metal or other material of which a body containing entrapped inert gas can be prepared.

  8. Advanced heat exchanger development for molten salts

    DOE PAGES

    Sabharwall, Piyush; Clark, Denis; Glazoff, Michael; Zheng, Guiqiu; Sridharan, Kumar; Anderson, Mark

    2014-12-01

    This study addresses present work concerned with advanced heat exchanger development for molten salt in nuclear and non nuclear thermal systems. The molten salt systems discussed herein use alloys, such as Hastelloy N and 242, which show corrosion resistance to molten salt at nominal operating temperatures up to 700°C. These alloys were diffusion welded, and the corresponding information is presented. Test specimens were prepared for exposing diffusion welds to molten salt environments. Hastelloy N and 242 were found to be weldable by diffusion welding, with ultimate tensile strengths about 90% of base metal values. Both diffusion welds and sheet materialmore » in Hastelloy N were corrosion tested in?58 mol% KF and 42 mol% ZrF4 at 650, 700, and 850°C for 200, 500, and 1,000 hours. Corrosion rates found were similar between welded and nonwelded materials, typically <10 mils per year. For materials of construction, nickel and alloys with dense nickel coatings are effectively inert to corrosion in fluorides, but not so in chlorides. Hence, additional testing of selected alloys for resistance to intergranular corrosion is needed, as is a determination of corrosion rate as a function of contaminant type and alloy composition with respect to chromium and carbon to better define the optimal chromium and carbon composition, independent of galvanic or differential solubility effects. Also presented is the division of the nuclear reactor and high temperature components per ASME standards, along with design requirements for a subcritical Rankine power cycle heat exchanger that has to overcome pressure difference of about 17 MPa.« less

  9. Advanced heat exchanger development for molten salts

    SciTech Connect

    Sabharwall, Piyush; Clark, Denis; Glazoff, Michael; Zheng, Guiqiu; Sridharan, Kumar; Anderson, Mark

    2014-12-01

    This study addresses present work concerned with advanced heat exchanger development for molten salt in nuclear and non nuclear thermal systems. The molten salt systems discussed herein use alloys, such as Hastelloy N and 242, which show corrosion resistance to molten salt at nominal operating temperatures up to 700°C. These alloys were diffusion welded, and the corresponding information is presented. Test specimens were prepared for exposing diffusion welds to molten salt environments. Hastelloy N and 242 were found to be weldable by diffusion welding, with ultimate tensile strengths about 90% of base metal values. Both diffusion welds and sheet material in Hastelloy N were corrosion tested in?58 mol% KF and 42 mol% ZrF4 at 650, 700, and 850°C for 200, 500, and 1,000 hours. Corrosion rates found were similar between welded and nonwelded materials, typically <10 mils per year. For materials of construction, nickel and alloys with dense nickel coatings are effectively inert to corrosion in fluorides, but not so in chlorides. Hence, additional testing of selected alloys for resistance to intergranular corrosion is needed, as is a determination of corrosion rate as a function of contaminant type and alloy composition with respect to chromium and carbon to better define the optimal chromium and carbon composition, independent of galvanic or differential solubility effects. Also presented is the division of the nuclear reactor and high temperature components per ASME standards, along with design requirements for a subcritical Rankine power cycle heat exchanger that has to overcome pressure difference of about 17 MPa.

  10. A view of treatment process of melted nuclear fuel on a severe accident plant using a molten salt system

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, R.; Takahashi, Y.; Nakamura, H.; Mizuguchi, K.; Oomori, T.

    2013-07-01

    At severe accident such as Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident, the nuclear fuels in the reactor would melt and form debris which contains stable UO2-ZrO2 mixture corium and parts of vessel such as zircaloy and iron component. The requirements for solution of issues are below; -) the reasonable treatment process of the debris should be simple and in-situ in Fukushima Daiichi power plant, -) the desirable treatment process is to take out UO{sub 2} and PuO{sub 2} or metallic U and TRU metal, and dispose other fission products as high level radioactive waste; and -) the candidate of treatment process should generate the smallest secondary waste. Pyro-process has advantages to treat the debris because of the high solubility of the debris and its total process feasibility. Toshiba proposes a new pyro-process in molten salts using electrolysing Zr before debris fuel being treated.

  11. In situ monitoring of the diurnal cycling of dynamic metal species in a stream under contrasting photobenthic biofilm activity and hydrological conditions.

    PubMed

    Tercier-Waeber, Mary-Lou; Hezard, Teddy; Masson, Matthieu; Schäfer, Jörg

    2009-10-01

    The diurnal evolution of the dynamic fraction, i.e., the potentially bioavailable fraction, of Cd, Cu, and Pb in a small river impacted by mining and smelting waste was studied in situ, under contrasting biofilm activity and hydrological conditions, using an automated voltammetric analyzer. The in situ, near real-time measurements revealed persistent dynamic metal species diurnal cycles. These cycles were affected mainly by the biochemical conditions rather than hydrological conditions. The data obtained from the in situ measurements, coupled with complementary laboratory analyses, revealed that various processes control the diurnal dynamic metal species cycles in the studied site; the trends of the diurnal cycles of the dynamic metal species can be different from those observed for the dissolved metal species measured in filtered samples. Moreover, the dynamic fraction of a given cationic metal can show diurnal cycles with opposite trends depending on the environmental conditions. All these findings highlight the interest and importance of automated, continuous measurements of specific relevant environmental metal fractions, compared to punctual weekly or monthly traditional sampling strategies of total dissolved metal analysis, to allow more appropriate water quality control and reliable assessment of metal ecotoxicological impact.

  12. Electrically conductive containment vessel for molten aluminum

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, C.E.; Scott, D.G.

    1984-06-25

    The present invention is directed to a containment vessel which is particularly useful in melting aluminum. The vessel of the present invention is a multilayered vessel characterized by being electrically conductive, essentially nonwettable by and nonreactive with molten aluminum. The vessel is formed by coating a tantalum substrate of a suitable configuration with a mixture of yttria and particulate metal 10 borides. The yttria in the coating inhibits the wetting of the coating while the boride particulate material provides the electrical conductivity through the vessel. The vessel of the present invention is particularly suitable for use in melting aluminum by ion bombardment.

  13. Electrically conductive containment vessel for molten aluminum

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Scott, Donald G.

    1985-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a containment vessel which is particularly useful in melting aluminum. The vessel of the present invention is a multilayered vessel characterized by being electrically conductive, essentially nonwettable by and nonreactive with molten aluminum. The vessel is formed by coating a tantalum substrate of a suitable configuration with a mixture of yttria and particulate metal borides. The yttria in the coating inhibits the wetting of the coating while the boride particulate material provides the electrical conductivity through the vessel. The vessel of the present invention is particularly suitable for use in melting aluminum by ion bombardment.

  14. Production of oxygen from lunar soil by molten salt electrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Rudolf

    1989-01-01

    A simple approach to utilizing lunar resources proposes to dissolve lunar soil, without or with little beneficiation, in a suitable molten salt and to electrolyze the oxides to oxygen and a metal byproduct. The envisioned process and the required technological advances are discussed. Promising electrolysis conditions have been identified in a recent experimental program to manufacture silicon and aluminum from anorthite.

  15. 13. VIEW OF THE MOLTEN SALT BATHS USED TO UNIFORMLY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. VIEW OF THE MOLTEN SALT BATHS USED TO UNIFORMLY AND QUICKLY HEAT METALS PRIOR TO WORKING (ROLLING). (9/16/85) - Rocky Flats Plant, Uranium Rolling & Forming Operations, Southeast section of plant, southeast quadrant of intersection of Central Avenue & Eighth Street, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  16. In situ formation of coal gasification catalysts from low cost alkali metal salts

    DOEpatents

    Wood, Bernard J.; Brittain, Robert D.; Sancier, Kenneth M.

    1985-01-01

    A carbonaceous material, such as crushed coal, is admixed or impregnated with an inexpensive alkali metal compound, such as sodium chloride, and then pretreated with a stream containing steam at a temperature of 350.degree. to 650.degree. C. to enhance the catalytic activity of the mixture in a subsequent gasification of the mixture. The treatment may result in the transformation of the alkali metal compound into another, more catalytically active, form.

  17. Effects of Cations on Corrosion of Inconel 625 in Molten Chloride Salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ming; Ma, Hongfang; Wang, Mingjing; Wang, Zhihua; Sharif, Adel

    2016-04-01

    Hot corrosion of Inconel 625 in sodium chloride, potassium chloride, magnesium chloride, calcium chloride and their mixtures with different compositions is conducted at 900°C to investigate the effects of cations in chloride salts on corrosion behavior of the alloy. XRD, SEM/EDS were used to analyze the compositions, phases, and morphologies of the corrosion products. The results showed that Inconel 625 suffers more severe corrosion in alkaline earth metal chloride molten salts than alkaline metal chloride molten salts. For corrosion in mixture salts, the corrosion rate increased with increasing alkaline earth metal chloride salt content in the mixture. Cations in the chloride molten salts mainly affect the thermal and chemical properties of the salts such as vapor pressure and hydroscopicities, which can affect the basicity of the molten salt. Corrosion of Inconel 625 in alkaline earth metal chloride salts is accelerated with increasing basicity.

  18. Method for converting UF5 to UF4 in a molten fluoride salt

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Melvin R.; Bamberger, Carlos E.; Kelmers, A. Donald

    1977-01-01

    The reduction of UF.sub.5 to UF.sub.4 in a molten fluoride salt by sparging with hydrogen is catalyzed by metallic platinum. The reaction is also catalyzed by platinum alloyed with gold reaction equipment.

  19. An in situ self-assembly template strategy for the preparation of hierarchical-pore metal-organic frameworks

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hongliang; Li, Jian-Rong; Wang, Keke; Han, Tongtong; Tong, Minman; Li, Liangsha; Xie, Yabo; Yang, Qingyuan; Liu, Dahuan; Zhong, Chongli

    2015-01-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have recently emerged as a new type of nanoporous materials with tailorable structures and functions. Usually, MOFs have uniform pores smaller than 2 nm in size, limiting their practical applications in some cases. Although a few approaches have been adopted to prepare MOFs with larger pores, it is still challenging to synthesize hierarchical-pore MOFs (H-MOFs) with high structural controllability and good stability. Here we demonstrate a facile and versatile method, an in situ self-assembly template strategy for fabricating stable H-MOFs, in which multi-scale soluble and/or acid-sensitive metal-organic assembly (MOA) fragments form during the reactions between metal ions and organic ligands (to construct MOFs), and act as removable dynamic chemical templates. This general strategy was successfully used to prepare various H-MOFs that show rich porous properties and potential applications, such as in large molecule adsorption. Notably, the mesopore sizes of the H-MOFs can be tuned by varying the amount of templates. PMID:26548441

  20. Platinum-nickel frame within metal-organic framework fabricated in situ for hydrogen enrichment and molecular sieving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi; Yu, Rong; Huang, Jinglu; Shi, Yusheng; Zhang, Diyang; Zhong, Xiaoyan; Wang, Dingsheng; Wu, Yuen; Li, Yadong

    2015-09-01

    Developing catalysts that provide the effective activation of hydrogen and selective absorption of substrate on metal surface is crucial to simultaneously improve activity and selectivity of hydrogenation reaction. Here we present an unique in situ etching and coordination synthetic strategy for exploiting a functionalized metal-organic framework to incorporate the bimetallic platinum-nickel frames, thereby forming a frame within frame nanostructure. The as-grown metal-organic framework serves as a `breath shell' to enhance hydrogen enrichment and activation on platinum-nickel surface. More importantly, this framework structure with defined pores can provide the selective accessibility of molecules through its one-dimensional channels. In a mixture containing four olefins, the composite can selectively transport the substrates smaller than its pores to the platinum-nickel surface and catalyse their hydrogenation. This molecular sieve effect can be also applied to selectively produce imines, which are important intermediates in the reductive imination of nitroarene, by restraining further hydrogenation via cascade processes.

  1. In situ dissolution or deposition of Ytterbium (Yb) metal in microhotplate wells for a miniaturized atomic clock.

    PubMed

    Manginell, Ronald P; Moorman, Matthew W; Anderson, John M; Burns, George R; Achyuthan, Komandoor E; Wheeler, David R; Schwindt, Peter D D

    2012-10-22

    Current atomic clocks are burdened by size, weight, power and portability limitations to satisfy a broad range of potential applications. One critical need in the fabrication of a miniaturized atomic clock is small, low-power metallic sources. Exploiting the relatively high vapor pressure of ytterbium (Yb) and its dissolution in anhydrous ammonia, we report two independent techniques for depositing Yb inside a well micromachined into a microhotplate. Subsequent in situ evaporation of Yb from the microhotplate well serves as a low-power metallic source suitable for atomic clocks. The deposition and evaporation of Yb were confirmed using a variety of physicochemical techniques including quartz crystal microbalance, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and laser fluorescence. We also describe the fabrication of the microhotplate device, an integral component of our Yb-based miniature atomic clock. The Yb deposition/evaporation on a microhotplate well is thus useful as a low power Yb source during the fabrication of a miniaturized atomic clock, and this technique could be used for other applications requiring a vapor of a metal that has a moderate vapor pressure.

  2. Quantitative, In Situ Visualization of Metal-Ion Dissolution and Transport Using (1) H Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Bray, Joshua M; Davenport, Alison J; Ryder, Karl S; Britton, Melanie M

    2016-08-01

    Quantitative mapping of metal ions freely diffusing in solution is important across a diverse range of disciplines and is particularly significant for dissolution processes in batteries, metal corrosion, and electroplating/polishing of manufactured components. However, most current techniques are invasive, requiring sample extraction, insertion of an electrode, application of an electric potential or the inclusion of a molecular sensor. Thus, there is a need for techniques to visualize the distribution of metal ions non-invasively, in situ, quantitatively, in three dimensions (3D) and in real time. Here we have used (1) H magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to make quantitative 3D maps showing evolution of the distribution of Cu(2+) ions, not directly visible by MRI, during the electrodissolution of copper, with high sensitivity and spatial resolution. The images are sensitive to the speciation of copper, the depletion of dissolved O2 in the electrolyte and show the dissolution of Cu(2+) ions is not uniform across the anode. PMID:27329307

  3. In situ dissolution or deposition of Ytterbium (Yb) metal in microhotplate wells for a miniaturized atomic clock.

    PubMed

    Manginell, Ronald P; Moorman, Matthew W; Anderson, John M; Burns, George R; Achyuthan, Komandoor E; Wheeler, David R; Schwindt, Peter D D

    2012-10-22

    Current atomic clocks are burdened by size, weight, power and portability limitations to satisfy a broad range of potential applications. One critical need in the fabrication of a miniaturized atomic clock is small, low-power metallic sources. Exploiting the relatively high vapor pressure of ytterbium (Yb) and its dissolution in anhydrous ammonia, we report two independent techniques for depositing Yb inside a well micromachined into a microhotplate. Subsequent in situ evaporation of Yb from the microhotplate well serves as a low-power metallic source suitable for atomic clocks. The deposition and evaporation of Yb were confirmed using a variety of physicochemical techniques including quartz crystal microbalance, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and laser fluorescence. We also describe the fabrication of the microhotplate device, an integral component of our Yb-based miniature atomic clock. The Yb deposition/evaporation on a microhotplate well is thus useful as a low power Yb source during the fabrication of a miniaturized atomic clock, and this technique could be used for other applications requiring a vapor of a metal that has a moderate vapor pressure. PMID:23187228

  4. In-situ laser Raman scattering and far infrared spectroscopy studies of corrosion-passivation phenomena in metals.

    SciTech Connect

    Melendres, C. A.

    1999-06-28

    Vibrational spectroscopic and electrochemical techniques are among the most useful tools for the elucidation of corrosion-passivation phenomena in metals. The former can provide information on the structure and composition of corrosion films ''in situ'' in aqueous solution environments, while thermodynamic and kinetic information may be obtained using electrochemical techniques. In this paper, we demonstrate the application of Laser Raman Scattering (LRS) and Synchrotrons Far Infrared Reflectance Spectroscopy (SFIRS), coupled with electrochemical methods, for the determination of the structure and composition of surface films on nickel and copper in aqueous solution environment. The corrosion film on nickel has been found to consist of NiO and Ni(OH){sub 2} in the passive region of potential and NiOOH in the transpassive region. The film on copper consists of Cu{sub 2}O, CUO and Cu(OH){sub 2}. We also show for the first time that SFIRS can be used to obtain information on the adsorption of ions on a metal surface with sub-monolayer sensitivity. Adsorption of Cl{sup {minus}}, Br{sup {minus}}, SO{sup {minus}2}, and PO{sub 4}{sup {minus}3} was found to occur at gold electrodes in perchloric acid solution. We also observed that when two different ions are present in solution, the more strongly adsorbed ion determined the corrosion behavior of the metal.

  5. In-situ observations of adsorption and film formation on metal electrodes by synchrotron far infrared reflectance spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Bowmaker, G. A.; Hahn, F.; Leger, J. M.; Melendres, C. A.

    1999-05-17

    Adsorption and film formation are key processes associated with the passivation and inhibition of metallic corrosion. New experimental approaches are needed to advance our knowledge in these areas. We have developed the technique of Synchrotron Far Infrared Reflectance Spectroscopy (SFIRS) for in situ investigations of the structure and composition of surface films and adsorbed layers on metals. We demonstrate its application to the determination of the nature of surface films on copper in aqueous solutions and the adsorption of anions on gold. The anodic corrosion films on copper in alkaline solution were found to consist of Cu{sub 2}O in the passive region at about {minus}0.05 V vs SCE and CUO, together with CU(OH){sub 2}, at 0.30 V. We have also observed for the first time the adsorption of anions at monolayer coverage on the surface of a gold electrode in perchloric acid solution. Halides (Cl-, Br-), nitrate, sulfate, and phosphate have been studied. When two different anions are present in solution, the more strongly adsorbed species determines the corrosion behavior of the metal. This is illustrated in the competitive adsorption of bromide and phosphate on gold.

  6. Platinum–nickel frame within metal-organic framework fabricated in situ for hydrogen enrichment and molecular sieving

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhi; Yu, Rong; Huang, Jinglu; Shi, Yusheng; Zhang, Diyang; Zhong, Xiaoyan; Wang, Dingsheng; Wu, Yuen; Li, Yadong

    2015-01-01

    Developing catalysts that provide the effective activation of hydrogen and selective absorption of substrate on metal surface is crucial to simultaneously improve activity and selectivity of hydrogenation reaction. Here we present an unique in situ etching and coordination synthetic strategy for exploiting a functionalized metal-organic framework to incorporate the bimetallic platinum–nickel frames, thereby forming a frame within frame nanostructure. The as-grown metal-organic framework serves as a ‘breath shell' to enhance hydrogen enrichment and activation on platinum–nickel surface. More importantly, this framework structure with defined pores can provide the selective accessibility of molecules through its one-dimensional channels. In a mixture containing four olefins, the composite can selectively transport the substrates smaller than its pores to the platinum–nickel surface and catalyse their hydrogenation. This molecular sieve effect can be also applied to selectively produce imines, which are important intermediates in the reductive imination of nitroarene, by restraining further hydrogenation via cascade processes. PMID:26391605

  7. In-situ Hydrogen Sorption 2D-ACAR Facility for the Study of Metal Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legerstee, W. J.; de Roode, J.; Anastasopol, A.; Falub, C. V.; Eijt, S. W. H.

    We developed a dedicated hydrogen sorption setup coupled to a positron 2D-ACAR (two-dimensional Angular Correlation of Annihilation Radiation) setup employing a 22Na-source, which will enable to collect 2D-ACAR momentum distributions in-situ as a function of temperature, hydrogen pressure and hydrogen content. In parallel, a dedicated glovebox was constructed for handling air-sensitive metal and metal hydride samples, with a special entrance for the 2D-ACAR sample insert. The 2D-ACAR setup was tested in first measurements on a Pd0.75Ag0.25 foil and on a ball-milled MgH2 powder in both the hydrogen loaded and desorbed states. The hydrogen loaded Pd0.75Ag0.25Hx sample was kept under a 1 bar hydrogen pressure to prevent partial desorption during measurements at room temperature. The collected 2D-ACAR distributions of Pd0.75Ag0.25 and Pd0.75Ag0.25Hx showed similar features as observed in previous studies. The broadening of the ACAR distributions observed for the Mg to MgH2 metal-insulator transition was compared in a quantitative manner to ab-initio calculations reported in the literature.

  8. Electrolytic purification of metals

    DOEpatents

    Bowman, Kenneth A.

    1980-01-01

    A method of electrolytically separating metal from impurities comprises providing the metal and impurities in a molten state in a container having a porous membrane therein, the membrane having a thickness in the range of about 0.01 to 0.1 inch, being capable of containing the molten metal in the container, and being permeable by a molten electrolyte. The metal is electrolytically transferred through the membrane to a cathode in the presence of the electrolyte for purposes of separating or removing impurities from the metal.

  9. ADVANCED CERAMIC COMPOSITES FOR MOLTEN ALUMINUM CONTACT APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Hemrick, James Gordon; Peters, Klaus-Markus

    2009-01-01

    A new refractory material which was developed for use in molten aluminum contact applications was shown to exhibit improved corrosion and wear resistance leading to improved thermal management through reduced heat losses caused by refractory thinning and wastage. This material was developed based on an understanding of the corrosion and wear mechanisms associated with currently used aluminum contact refractories under a U.S. Department of Energy funded project to investigate multifunctional refractory materials for energy efficient handling of molten metals. This new material has been validated through an industrial trial at a commercial aluminum rod and cable mill. Material development and results of this industrial validation trial are discussed.

  10. Porous electrolyte retainer for molten carbonate fuel cell. [lithium aluminate

    DOEpatents

    Singh, R.N.; Dusek, J.T.

    1979-12-27

    A porous tile for retaining molten electrolyte within a fuel cell is prepared by sintering particles of lithium aluminate into a stable structure. The tile is assembled between two porous metal plates which serve as electrodes with fuels gases such as H/sub 2/ and CO opposite to oxidant gases such as O/sub 2/ and CO/sub 2/. The tile is prepared with a porosity of 55 to 65% and a pore size distribution selected to permit release of sufficient molten electrolyte to wet but not to flood the adjacent electrodes.

  11. Porous electrolyte retainer for molten carbonate fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Raj N.; Dusek, Joseph T.

    1983-06-21

    A porous tile for retaining molten electrolyte within a fuel cell is prepared by sintering particles of lithium aluminate into a stable structure. The tile is assembled between two porous metal plates which serve as electrodes with fuels gases such as H.sub.2 and CO opposite to oxidant gases such as O.sub.2 and CO.sub.2. The tile is prepared with a porosity of 55-65% and a pore size distribution selected to permit release of sufficient molten electrolyte to wet but not to flood the adjacent electrodes.

  12. In situ X-ray nanotomography of metal surfaces during electropolishing

    DOE PAGES

    Nave, Maryana I.; Allen, Jason P.; Karen Chen-Wiegart, Yu-chen; Wang, Jun; Kalidindi, Surya R.; Kornev, Konstantin G.

    2015-10-15

    A low voltage electropolishing of metal wires is attractive for nanotechnology because it provides centimeter long and micrometer thick probes with the tip radius of tens of nanometers. Using X-ray nanotomography we studied morphological transformations of the surface of tungsten wires in a specially designed electrochemical cell where the wire is vertically submersed into the KOH electrolyte. We show that stability and uniformity of the probe span is supported by a porous shell growing at the surface of tungsten oxide and shielding the wire surface from flowing electrolyte. We discovered that the kinetics of shell growth at the triple line,more » where meniscus meets the wire, is very different from that of the bulk of electrolyte. Many metals follow similar electrochemical transformations hence the discovered morphological transformations of metal surfaces are expected to play significant role in many natural and technological applications.« less

  13. In situ X-ray nanotomography of metal surfaces during electropolishing

    PubMed Central

    Nave, Maryana I.; Allen, Jason P.; Karen Chen-Wiegart, Yu-chen; Wang, Jun; Kalidindi, Surya R.; Kornev, Konstantin G.

    2015-01-01

    A low voltage electropolishing of metal wires is attractive for nanotechnology because it provides centimeter long and micrometer thick probes with the tip radius of tens of nanometers. Using X-ray nanotomography we studied morphological transformations of the surface of tungsten wires in a specially designed electrochemical cell where the wire is vertically submersed into the KOH electrolyte. It is shown that stability and uniformity of the probe span is supported by a porous shell growing at the surface of tungsten oxide and shielding the wire surface from flowing electrolyte. It is discovered that the kinetics of shell growth at the triple line, where meniscus meets the wire, is very different from that of the bulk of electrolyte. Many metals follow similar electrochemical transformations hence the discovered morphological transformations of metal surfaces are expected to play significant role in many natural and technological applications. PMID:26469184

  14. In situ X-ray nanotomography of metal surfaces during electropolishing

    SciTech Connect

    Nave, Maryana I.; Allen, Jason P.; Karen Chen-Wiegart, Yu-chen; Wang, Jun; Kalidindi, Surya R.; Kornev, Konstantin G.

    2015-10-15

    A low voltage electropolishing of metal wires is attractive for nanotechnology because it provides centimeter long and micrometer thick probes with the tip radius of tens of nanometers. Using X-ray nanotomography we studied morphological transformations of the surface of tungsten wires in a specially designed electrochemical cell where the wire is vertically submersed into the KOH electrolyte. We show that stability and uniformity of the probe span is supported by a porous shell growing at the surface of tungsten oxide and shielding the wire surface from flowing electrolyte. We discovered that the kinetics of shell growth at the triple line, where meniscus meets the wire, is very different from that of the bulk of electrolyte. Many metals follow similar electrochemical transformations hence the discovered morphological transformations of metal surfaces are expected to play significant role in many natural and technological applications.

  15. Studies on synthesis of in-situ Al-TiC metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, R. N.; Saha, S. C.; Datta, G. L.; Chakraborty, M.

    2016-03-01

    In the present research work, synthesis and characterization of in-situ Al-TiC composites reinforced with ceramic phases was carried out. The formation of undesirable TiAl3 particles could be avoided justifying the correct procedural requirement adopted while preparing Al-TiC composites. It was observed that distributions of reinforced particles were uniform along the grain boundaries. It was also observed that the average size of the TiC particles was of 0.5 μm. It was also noted that the presence of TiC particles in the composite enhances the yield strength and hardness substantially.

  16. In situ formation of micron-scale Li-metal anodes with high cyclability

    SciTech Connect

    Arruda, Thomas M; Lawton, Jamie S; Kumar, Amit; Unocic, Raymond R; Kravchenko, Ivan I; Zawodzinski, Thomas A; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V; Balke, Nina

    2014-01-01

    Scanning probe microscopy methods have been used to fabricate and cycle micron-scale Li anodes deposited electrochemically under nanofabricated Au current collectors. An average Li volume of 5 10^8 nm3 was deposited and cycled with 100 % coulombic efficiency for ~ 160 cycles. Integrated charge/discharge values agree with before/after topography, as well as in situ dilatometry, suggesting this is a reliable method to study solid-state electrochemical processes. In this work we illustrate the possibility to deposit highly cyclable nanometer thick Li electrodes by mature SPM and nanofab techniques which can pave the way for inexpensive nanoscale battery arrays.

  17. An in situ study of resin-assisted solvothermal metal-organic framework synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moorhouse, Saul J.; Wu, Yue; O'Hare, Dermot

    2016-04-01

    A newly developed in situ monochromatic high-energy X-ray diffraction setup was used to investigate the synthesis of MOFs using cation-impregnated polymer resin beads as a ion source. The Co-NDC-DMF (NDC=2,6-naphthalenedicarboxylate; DMF=dimethylformamide) system was investigated, a system which is known to produce at least three distinct frameworks. It was found that the resin-assisted synthesis results in the preferential formation of a topology previously impossible to synthesise in bulk, while the comparable nitrate-salt synthesis appeared to form an alternative phases. It was also found that the resin-assisted synthesis is highly diffusion-controlled.

  18. In Situ NDA Conformation Measurements Performed at Auxiliary Charcoal Bed and Other Main Charcoal Beds After Uranium Removal from Molten Salt Reactor Experiment ACB at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Haghighi, M. H.; Kring, C. T.; McGehee, J. T.; Jugan, M. R.; Chapman, J.; Meyer, K. E.

    2002-02-26

    The Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) site is located in Tennessee, on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The MSRE was run by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to demonstrate the desirable features of the molten-salt concept in a practical reactor that could be operated safely and reliably. It introduced the idea of a homogeneous reactor using fuel salt media and graphite moderation for power and breeder reactors. The MSRE reactor and associated components are located in cells beneath the floor in the high-bay area of Building 7503. The reactor was operated from June 1965 to December 1969. When the reactor was shut down, fuel salt was drained from the reactor circuit to two drain tanks. A ''clean'' salt was then circulated through the reactor as a decontamination measure and drained to a third drain tank. When operations ceased, the fuel and flush salts were allowed to cool and solidify in the drain tanks. At shutdown, the MSRE facility complex was placed in a surveillance and maintenance program. Beginning in 1987, it was discovered that gaseous uranium (U-233/U-232) hexafluoride (UF6) had moved throughout the MSRE process systems. The UF6 had been generated when radiolysis in the fluorine salts caused the individual constituents to dissociate to their component atoms, including free fluorine. Some of the free fluorine combined with uranium fluorides (UF4) in the salt to produce UF6. UF6 is gaseous at slightly above ambient temperatures; thus, periodic heating of the fuel salts (which was intended to remedy the radiolysis problems) and simple diffusion had allowed the UF6 to move out of the salt and into the process systems of MSRE. One of the systems that UF6 migrated into due to this process was the offgas system which is vented to the MSRE main charcoal beds and MSRE auxiliary charcoal bed (ACB). Recently, the majority of the uranium laden-charcoal material residing within the ACB was safely and successfully removed using

  19. The molten salt reactor adventure

    SciTech Connect

    MacPherson, H.G.

    1985-08-01

    A personal history of the development of molten salt reactors in the United States is presented. The initial goal was an aircraft propulsion reactor, and a molten fluoride-fueled Aircraft Reactor Experiment was operated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1954. In 1956, the objective shifted to civilian nuclear power, and reactor concepts were developed using a circulating UF4-ThF4 fuel, graphite moderator, and Hastelloy N pressure boundary. The program culminated in the successful operation of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment in 1965 to 1969. By then the Atomic Energy Commission's goals had shifted to breeder development; the molten salt program supported on-site reprocessing development and study of various reactor arrangements that had potential to breed. Some commercial and foreign interest contributed to the program which, however, was terminated by the government in 1976. The current status of the technology and prospects for revived interest are summarized.

  20. Molten carbonate fuel cell reduction of nickel deposits

    DOEpatents

    Smith, James L.; Zwick, Stanley A.

    1987-01-01

    A molten carbonate fuel cell with anode and cathode electrodes and an eleolyte formed with two tile sections, one of the tile sections being adjacent the anode and limiting leakage of fuel gas into the electrolyte with the second tile section being adjacent the cathode and having pores sized to permit the presence of oxygen gas in the electrolyte thereby limiting the formation of metal deposits caused by the reduction of metal compositions migrating into the electrolyte from the cathode.

  1. Structural characterizaiton and gas reactions of small metal particles by high-resolution, in-situ TEM and TED

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The existing in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) facility was improved by adding a separately pumped mini-specimen chamber. The chamber contains wire-evaporation sources for three metals and a specimen heater for moderate substrate temperatures. A sample introduction device was constructed, installed, and tested, facilitating rapid introduction of a specimen into the mini-chamber while maintaining the background pressure in that chamber in the 10(-9) millibar range. Small particles and clusters of Pd, grown by deposition from the vapor phase in an in-situ TEM facility on amorphous and crystalline support films of alumina and on ultra-thin carbon films, were analyzed by conventional high-resolution TEM and image analysis in terms of detectability, number density, and size distribution. The smallest particles that could be detected and counted contained no more than 6 atoms; size determinations could be made for particles 1 nm in diameter. The influence of various oxygen plasma treatments, annealing treatments, and of increasing the substrate temperature during deposition was investigated. The TEM technique was employed to demonstrate that under otherwise identica l conditions the lattice parameter of Pd particles in the 1 to 2 nm size range and supported in random orientation on ex-situ prepared mica films is expanded by some 3% when compared to 5 nm size particles. It is believed that this expansion is neither a small-particle diffraction effect nor due to pseudomorphism, but that it is due to a annealing-induced transformation of the small as-deposited particles with predominantly composite crystal structures into larger particles with true f.c.c. structure and thus inherently smaller lattice parameter.

  2. Preparation of Aluminum Metal Matrix Composite with Novel In situ Ceramic Composite Particulates, Developed from Waste Colliery Shale Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkata Siva, S. B.; Sahoo, K. L.; Ganguly, R. I.; Dash, R. R.; Singh, S. K.; Satpathy, B. K.; Srinivasarao, G.

    2013-08-01

    A novel method is adapted to prepare an in situ ceramic composite from waste colliery shale (CS) material. Heat treatment of the shale material, in a plasma reactor and/or in a high temperature furnace at 1673 K (1400 °C) under high vacuum (10-6 Torr), has enabled in situ conversion of SiO2 to SiC in the vicinity of carbon and Al2O3 present in the shale material. The composite has the chemical constituents, SiC-Al2O3-C, as established by XRD/EDX analysis. Particle sizes of the composite range between 50 nm and 200 μm. The shape of the particles vary, presumably rod to spherical shape, distributed preferably in the region of grain boundaries. The CS composite so produced is added to aluminum melt to produce Al-CS composite (12 vol. pct). For comparison of properties, the aluminum metal matrix composite (AMCs) is made with Al2O3 particulates (15 vol. pct) with size <200 μm. The heat-treated Al-CS composite has shown better mechanical properties compared to the Al-Al2O3 composite. The ductility and toughness of the Al-CS composite are greater than that of the Al-Al2O3 composite. Fractographs revealed fine sheared dimples in the Al-CS composite, whereas the same of the Al-Al2O3 composite showed an appearance of cleavage-type facets. Abrasion and frictional behavior of both the composites have been compared. The findings lead to the conclusion that the in situ composite developed from the colliery shale waste material has a good future for its use in AMCs.

  3. In Situ Observation of Successive Crystallizations and Metastable Intermediates in the Formation of Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Hamish H-M; Wu, Yue; Henke, Sebastian; Cheetham, Anthony K; O'Hare, Dermot; Walton, Richard I

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the driving forces controlling crystallization is essential for the efficient synthesis and design of new materials, particularly metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), where mild solvothermal synthesis often allows access to various phases from the same reagents. Using high-energy in situ synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction, we monitor the crystallization of lithium tartrate MOFs, observing the successive crystallization and dissolution of three competing phases in one reaction. By determining rate constants and activation energies, we fully quantify the reaction energy landscape, gaining important predictive power for the choice of reaction conditions. Different reaction rates are explained by the structural relationships between the products and the reactants; larger changes in conformation result in higher activation energies. The methods we demonstrate can easily be applied to other materials, opening the door to a greater understanding of crystallization in general. PMID:26836335

  4. Effect of strain rates on deformation behaviors of an in situ Ti-based metallic glass matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Z. M.; Wang, Z. H.; Chu, M. Y.; Wang, Y. S.; Yang, H. J.; Qiao, J. W.

    2016-06-01

    Quasi-static and dynamic deformation behaviors of an in situ dendrite-reinforced metallic glass matrix composite: Ti56Zr18V10Cu4Be12 were investigated. Upon quasi-static compression, the composite exhibits distinguished work hardening, accompanied by the ultimate strength of 1290 MPa and the plasticity of 20 %. The improved plasticity is attributed to the multiplication of shear bands within the glass matrix and pileups of dislocations within the dendrites. Upon dynamic compression, the stable plastic flow prevails and the yielding stress increases with the strain rate. The macroscopic plasticity decreases considerably, since the shear bands cannot be effectively hindered by dendrites with deteriorated toughness. The dendrite-dominated mechanism results in the positive strain-rate sensitivity, and the Cowper-Symonds model is employed to depict the strain-rate dependency of yielding strength.

  5. In-situ study of crystallization kinetics in ternary bulk metallic glass alloys with different glass forming abilities

    SciTech Connect

    Lan, Si; Wei, Xiaoya; Zhou, Jie; Lu, Zhaoping; Wu, Xuelian; Feygenson, Mikhail; Neuefeind, Jorg C.; Wang, Xun-Li

    2014-11-18

    In-situ transmission electron microcopy and time-resolved neutron diffraction were used to study crystallization kinetics of two ternary bulk metallic glasses during isothermal annealing in the supercooled liquid region. It is found that the crystallization of Zr56Cu36Al8, an average glass former, follows continuous nucleation and growth, while that of Zr46Cu46Al8, a better glass former, is characterized by site-saturated nucleation, followed by slow growth. Possible mechanisms for the observed differences and the relationship to the glass forming ability are discussed.

  6. In Situ Observation of Successive Crystallizations and Metastable Intermediates in the Formation of Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Hamish H-M; Wu, Yue; Henke, Sebastian; Cheetham, Anthony K; O'Hare, Dermot; Walton, Richard I

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the driving forces controlling crystallization is essential for the efficient synthesis and design of new materials, particularly metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), where mild solvothermal synthesis often allows access to various phases from the same reagents. Using high-energy in situ synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction, we monitor the crystallization of lithium tartrate MOFs, observing the successive crystallization and dissolution of three competing phases in one reaction. By determining rate constants and activation energies, we fully quantify the reaction energy landscape, gaining important predictive power for the choice of reaction conditions. Different reaction rates are explained by the structural relationships between the products and the reactants; larger changes in conformation result in higher activation energies. The methods we demonstrate can easily be applied to other materials, opening the door to a greater understanding of crystallization in general.

  7. Tensile deformation mechanisms of an in-situ Ti-based metallic glass matrix composite at cryogenic temperature.

    PubMed

    Bai, J; Li, J S; Qiao, J W; Wang, J; Feng, R; Kou, H C; Liaw, P K

    2016-01-01

    Remarkable tensile ductility was first obtained in an in-situ Ti-based bulk metallic glass (BMG) composite at cryogenic temperature (77 K). The novel cryogenic tensile plasticity is related to the effective accommodation of ductile body-centered cubic dendrites at 77 K, characteristic of the prevailing slip bands and dislocations, as well as lattice disorder, which can effectively hinder the propagation of critical shear bands. The greatly increased yield strength of dendrites contributes to the high yield strength of composite at 77 K. A trend of stronger softening is observed at low temperature, and a criterion is proposed to understand the softening behavior. The current research could also provide a guidance to the promising cryogenic application of these new advanced BMG composites. PMID:27576728

  8. Tensile deformation mechanisms of an in-situ Ti-based metallic glass matrix composite at cryogenic temperature

    PubMed Central

    Bai, J.; Li, J. S.; Qiao, J. W.; Wang, J.; Feng, R.; Kou, H. C.; Liaw, P. K.

    2016-01-01

    Remarkable tensile ductility was first obtained in an in-situ Ti-based bulk metallic glass (BMG) composite at cryogenic temperature (77 K). The novel cryogenic tensile plasticity is related to the effective accommodation of ductile body-centered cubic dendrites at 77 K, characteristic of the prevailing slip bands and dislocations, as well as lattice disorder, which can effectively hinder the propagation of critical shear bands. The greatly increased yield strength of dendrites contributes to the high yield strength of composite at 77 K. A trend of stronger softening is observed at low temperature, and a criterion is proposed to understand the softening behavior. The current research could also provide a guidance to the promising cryogenic application of these new advanced BMG composites. PMID:27576728

  9. Tensile deformation mechanisms of an in-situ Ti-based metallic glass matrix composite at cryogenic temperature.

    PubMed

    Bai, J; Li, J S; Qiao, J W; Wang, J; Feng, R; Kou, H C; Liaw, P K

    2016-08-31

    Remarkable tensile ductility was first obtained in an in-situ Ti-based bulk metallic glass (BMG) composite at cryogenic temperature (77 K). The novel cryogenic tensile plasticity is related to the effective accommodation of ductile body-centered cubic dendrites at 77 K, characteristic of the prevailing slip bands and dislocations, as well as lattice disorder, which can effectively hinder the propagation of critical shear bands. The greatly increased yield strength of dendrites contributes to the high yield strength of composite at 77 K. A trend of stronger softening is observed at low temperature, and a criterion is proposed to understand the softening behavior. The current research could also provide a guidance to the promising cryogenic application of these new advanced BMG composites.

  10. Tensile deformation mechanisms of an in-situ Ti-based metallic glass matrix composite at cryogenic temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, J.; Li, J. S.; Qiao, J. W.; Wang, J.; Feng, R.; Kou, H. C.; Liaw, P. K.

    2016-08-01

    Remarkable tensile ductility was first obtained in an in-situ Ti-based bulk metallic glass (BMG) composite at cryogenic temperature (77 K). The novel cryogenic tensile plasticity is related to the effective accommodation of ductile body-centered cubic dendrites at 77 K, characteristic of the prevailing slip bands and dislocations, as well as lattice disorder, which can effectively hinder the propagation of critical shear bands. The greatly increased yield strength of dendrites contributes to the high yield strength of composite at 77 K. A trend of stronger softening is observed at low temperature, and a criterion is proposed to understand the softening behavior. The current research could also provide a guidance to the promising cryogenic application of these new advanced BMG composites.

  11. Observing Metal-Catalyzed Chemical Reactions in Situ Using Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy on Pd–Au Nanoshells

    PubMed Central

    Heck, Kimberly N.; Janesko, Benjamin G.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    2016-01-01

    Insight into the nature of transient reaction intermediates and mechanistic pathways involved in heterogeneously catalyzed chemical reactions is obtainable from a number of surface spectroscopic techniques. Carrying out these investigations under actual reaction conditions is preferred but remains challenging, especially for catalytic reactions that occur in water. Here, we report the direct spectroscopic study of the catalytic hydrodechlorination of 1,1-dichloroethene in H2O using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). With Pd islands grown on Au nanoshell films, this reaction can be followed in situ using SERS, exploiting the high enhancements and large active area of Au nanoshell SERS substrates, the transparency of Raman spectroscopy to aqueous solvents, and the catalytic activity enhancement of Pd by the underlying Au metal. The formation and subsequent transformation of several adsorbate species was observed. These results provide the first direct evidence of the room-temperature catalytic hydrodechlorination of a chlorinated solvent, a potentially important pathway for groundwater cleanup, as a sequence of dechlorination and hydrogenation steps. More broadly, the results highlight the exciting prospects of studying catalytic processes in water in situ, like those involved in biomass conversion and proton-exchange membrane fuel cells. PMID:19554693

  12. Oxidation of metals and alloys in controlled atmospheres using in situ transmission electron microscopy and Auger spectrography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, D. B.; Heinemann, K.; Douglass, D. L.

    1976-01-01

    Single-crystalline thin films of copper were oxidized at an isothermal temperature of 425 C and at an oxygen partial pressure of .005 Torr in situ in a high-resolution electron microscope. The specimens were prepared by epitaxial vapor deposition onto polished 100 and 110 faces of rocksalt and mounted in a hot stage inside an ultra-high-vacuum specimen chamber of the microscope. Large amounts of sulfur, carbon, and oxygen were detected by Auger electron spectroscopy on the surface of the as-received films and were removed in situ by ion-sputter etching immediately prior to the oxidation. The nucleation and growth characteristics of Cu2O on Cu were studied. Results show that neither stacking faults nor dislocations are associated with the Cu2O nucleation sites. The growth of Cu2O nuclei is linear with time. The experimental findings, including results from oxygen dissolution experiments and from repetitive oxidation-reduction-oxidation sequences, fit well into the framework of an oxidation process involving (a) the formation of a surface-charge layer, (b) oxygen saturation in the metal and (c) nucleation, followed by surface diffusion of oxygen and bulk diffusion of copper for lateral and vertical oxide growth, respectively.

  13. In-situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies of water on metals and oxides at ambient conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Salmeron, Miquel; Yamamoto, S.; Bluhm, H.; Andersson, K.; Ketteler, G.; Ogasawara, H.; Salmeron, M.; Nilsson, A.

    2007-10-29

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is a powerful tool for surface and interface analysis, providing the elemental composition of surfaces and the local chemical environment of adsorbed species. Conventional XPS experiments have been limited to ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions due to a short mean free path of electrons in a gas phase. The recent advances in instrumentation coupled with third-generation synchrotron radiation sources enables in-situ XPS measurements at pressures above 5 Torr. In this review, we describe the basic design of the ambient pressure XPS setup that combines differential pumping with an electrostatic focusing. We present examples of the application of in-situ XPS to studies of water adsorption on the surface of metals and oxides including Cu(110), Cu(111), TiO2(110) under environmental conditions of water vapor pressure. On all these surfaces we observe a general trend where hydroxyl groups form first, followed by molecular water adsorption. The importance of surface OH groups and their hydrogen bonding to water molecules in water adsorption on surfaces is discussed in detail.

  14. Batteries using molten salt electrolyte

    DOEpatents

    Guidotti, Ronald A.

    2003-04-08

    An electrolyte system suitable for a molten salt electrolyte battery is described where the electrolyte system is a molten nitrate compound, an organic compound containing dissolved lithium salts, or a 1-ethyl-3-methlyimidazolium salt with a melting temperature between approximately room temperature and approximately 250.degree. C. With a compatible anode and cathode, the electrolyte system is utilized in a battery as a power source suitable for oil/gas borehole applications and in heat sensors.

  15. Efficient destruction of CF4 through in situ generation of alkali metals from heated alkali halide reducing mixtures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myung Churl; Choi, Wonyong

    2002-03-15

    Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are the most potent green house gases that are very recalcitrant at destruction. An effective way of converting PFCs using hot solid reagents into safe products has been recently introduced. By investigating the thermal reductive destruction of tetrafluoromethane (CF4) we provided new insight and more physicochemical consideration on this novel process. The complete destruction of CF4was successfully achieved by flowing the gas through a heated reagent bed (400-950 degrees C) that contained powder mixtures of alkali halides, CaO, and Si. The silicon acted as a reducing agent of alkali halides for the in-situ production of alkali metals, and the calcium oxide played the role of a halide ion acceptor. The absence of any single component in this ternary mixture drastically reduced the destruction efficiency of CF4. The CF4 destruction efficiencies with the solid reagent containing the alkali halide, MX, increased in the order of Li approximately Na < K < Cs for alkali cations and I < Br < Cl < F for halide anions. This trend agreed with the endothermicity of the alkali metal generation reaction: the higher the endothermicity, the lower the destruction efficiency. Alkali metal generation was indirectly detected by monitoring H2 production from its reaction with water. The production of alkali metals increased with NaF, KF, and CsF in this order. The CsF/CaO/Si system exhibited the complete destruction of CF4 at as low as 600 degrees C. The solid product analysis by X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed the formation of CaF2 and the depletion of Si with black carbon particles formed in the solid reagent residue. No CO/CO2 and toxic HF and SiF4 formation were detected in the exhaust gas.

  16. [Bio-oil production from biomass pyrolysis in molten salt].

    PubMed

    Ji, Dengxiang; Cai, Tengyue; Ai, Ning; Yu, Fengwen; Jiang, Hongtao; Ji, Jianbing

    2011-03-01

    In order to investigate the effects of pyrolysis conditions on bio-oil production from biomass in molten salt, experiments of biomass pyrolysis were carried out in a self-designed reactor in which the molten salt ZnCl2-KCl (with mole ratio 7/6) was selected as heat carrier, catalyst and dispersion agent. The effects of metal salt added into ZnCl2-KCl and biomass material on biomass pyrolysis were discussed, and the main compositions of bio-oil were determined by GC-MS. Metal salt added into molten salt could affect pyrolysis production yields remarkably. Lanthanon salt could enhance bio-oil yield and decrease water content in bio-oil, when mole fraction of 5.0% LaCl3 was added, bio-oil yield could reach up to 32.0%, and water content of bio-oil could reduce to 61.5%. The bio-oil and char yields were higher when rice straw was pyrolysed, while gas yield was higher when rice husk was used. Metal salts showed great selectivity on compositions of bio-oil. LiCl and FeCl2 promoted biomass to pyrolyse into smaller molecular weight compounds. CrCl3, CaCl2 and LaCl3 could restrain second pyrolysis of bio-oil. The research provided a scientific reference for production of bio-oil from biomass pyrolysis in molten salt.

  17. In situ capping for size control of monochalcogenides (ZnS, CdS, and SnS) nanocrystals produced by anaerobic metal-reducing bacteria

    DOE PAGES

    Jang, Gyoung Gug; Jacobs, Christopher B.; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Joshi, Pooran C.; Meyer, III, Harry M.; Kidder, Michelle; Armstrong, Beth L.; Datskos, Panos G.; Graham, David E.; Moon, Ji -Won

    2015-07-24

    Metal monochalcogenide quantum dot nanocrystals of ZnS, CdS and SnS were prepared by anaerobic, metal-reducing bacteria using in situ capping by oleic acid or oleylamine. Furthermore, the capping agent preferentially adsorbs on the surface of the nanocrystal, suppressing the growth process in the early stages, thus leading to production of nanocrystals with a diameter of less than 5 nm.

  18. A bracket approach to improve the stability and gas sorption performance of a metal-organic framework via in situ incorporating the size-matching molecular building blocks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Di-Ming; Tian, Jia-Yue; Liu, Chun-Sen; Du, Miao

    2016-06-28

    Incorporating the in situ formed size-matching molecular building blocks (MBBs) into the open channels will remarkably improve the robustness and gas sorption performance of an evacuated metal-organic framework. As a result, such MBBs can transfer the open metal sites from the framework walls to the channel centers and separate the large channels into multiple smaller voids, leading to a molecular sieving effect and high-performance gas-separation of the modified material. PMID:27301546

  19. Passive in situ remediation of metal-polluted water with caustic magnesia: evidence from column experiments.

    PubMed

    Cortina, Jose-Luis; Lagreca, Isabella; De Pablo, Joan; Cama, Jordi; Ayora, Carlos

    2003-05-01

    Passive remediation consists of a permeable system that enables the water to pass through while retaining metals by means of biogeochemical reactions. Conventional passive treatments are based on calcite dissolution. This increases the pH to values between 6 and 7, which are insufficiently high to precipitate divalent metals. Alternative treatments are based on sulfate reduction with organic matter in order to precipitate metal sulfides. However, redox reactions are usually too slow to treat large groundwater flows as currently found in gravel aquifers (>50 m/a). Caustic magnesia obtained from calcination of magnesium carbonate was tested as an alternative material to devising passive remediation systems. Caustic magnesia reacts with water to form magnesium hydroxide, which dissolves, increasing the pH to values higher than 8.5. Then zinc and lead are mainly precipitated as hydroxides, copper is precipitated as hydroxysulfate, and manganese(II) is oxidized and precipitated as manganese(III) oxides. Thus, metal concentrations as high as 75 mg/L in the inflowing water are depleted to values below 0.04 mg/L. Magnesia dissolution is sufficiently fast to treat flows as high as 100 m/a. The new precipitates may lead to a permeability drop in the porous treating system. Mixtures of caustic magnesia and an inert material such as silica sand (approximately 50% of each) have been shown to be as reactive as pure magnesia and permeable for a longer time (more than 10 months and 1000 pore vol).

  20. In Situ Determination of Siderophile Trace Elements in Metals and Sulfides in Enstatite Achondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vanAcken, D.; Humayun, M.; Brandon, A. D.; Peslier, A.

    2010-01-01

    Enstatite meteorites are identified by their extremely reduced mineralogy (1) and similar oxygen isotope composition (2). The enstatite meteorite clan incorporates both EH and EL chondrites, as well as a wide variety of enstatite achondrites, such as aubrites or anomalous enstatite meteorites (e.g. Mt. Egerton, Shallowater, Zaklodzie, NWA 2526). The role of nebular versus planetary processes in the formation of enstatite meteorites is still under debate (e.g. 3-5). Past studies showed a significant influence of metal segregation in the formation of enstatite achondrites. Casanova et al. (6) suggested incomplete metal-silicate segregation during core formation and attributed the unfractionated siderophile element patterns in aubrites metals to a lack of fractional crystallization in a planetary core. Recent studies suggest a significant role of impact melting in the formation of primitive enstatite chondrites (7) and identified NWA 2526 as a partial melt residue of an enstatite chondrite (8). To understand the nature of siderophile element-bearing phases in enstatite achondrites, establish links between enstatite achondrites and enstatite chondrites (9), and constrain planetary differentiation on their respective parent bodies and their petrogenetic histories, we present laser ablation ICP-MS measurements of metal and sulfide phases in Shallowater, Mt. Egerton, and the aubrites Aubres, Cumberland Falls, and Mayo Belwa.

  1. Experimental Demonstration of the Molten Oxide Electrolysis Method for Oxygen and Iron Production from Simulated Lunar Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, P. A.; Ethridge, E.; Hudson, S.; Sen, S.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a Marshall Space Flight Center funded effort to conduct an experimental demonstration of the processing of simulated lunar resources by the molten oxide electrolysis (MOE) process to produce oxygen and metal from lunar resources to support human exploration of space. Oxygen extracted from lunar materials can be used for life support and propellant, and silicon and metallic elements produced can be used for in situ fabrication of thin-film solar cells for power production. The Moon is rich in mineral resources, but it is almost devoid of chemical reducing agents, therefore, molten oxide electrolysis, MOE, is chosen for extraction, since the electron is the most practical reducing agent. MOE was also chosen for following reasons. First, electrolytic processing offers uncommon versatility in its insensitivity to feedstock composition. Secondly, oxide melts boast the twin key attributes of highest solubilizing capacity for regolith and lowest volatility of any candidate electrolytes. The former is critical in ensuring high productivity since cell current is limited by reactant solubility, while the latter simplifies cell design by obviating the need for a gas-tight reactor to contain evaporation losses as would be the case with a gas or liquid phase fluoride reagent operating at such high temperatures. In the experiments reported here, melts containing iron oxide were electrolyzed in a low temperature supporting oxide electrolyte (developed by D. Sadoway, MIT).

  2. Application of lithium in molten-salt reduction processes.

    SciTech Connect

    Gourishankar, K. V.

    1998-11-11

    Metallothermic reductions have been extensively studied in the field of extractive metallurgy. At Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), we have developed a molten-salt based reduction process using lithium. This process was originally developed to reduce actinide oxides present in spent nuclear fuel. Preliminary thermodynamic considerations indicate that this process has the potential to be adapted for the extraction of other metals. The reduction is carried out at 650 C in a molten-salt (LiCl) medium. Lithium oxide (Li{sub 2}O), produced during the reduction of the actinide oxides, dissolves in the molten salt. At the end of the reduction step, the lithium is regenerated from the salt by an electrowinning process. The lithium and the salt from the electrowinning are then reused for reduction of the next batch of oxide fuel. The process cycle has been successfully demonstrated on an engineering scale in a specially designed pyroprocessing facility. This paper discusses the applicability of lithium in molten-salt reduction processes with specific reference to our process. Results are presented from our work on actinide oxides to highlight the role of lithium and its effect on process variables in these molten-salt based reduction processes.

  3. The removal of iron from molten aluminium

    SciTech Connect

    Donk, H.M. van der; Nijhof, G.H.; Castelijns, C.A.M.

    1995-12-31

    In this work an overview is given about the techniques available for the removal of metallic impurities from molten aluminium. The overview is focused on the removal of iron. Also, some experimental results are given about the creation of iron-rich intermetallic compounds in an aluminium system, which are subsequently removed by gravity segregation and filtration techniques. This work is part of an ongoing research project of three major European aluminium companies who are co-operating on the subject of recycling of aluminium packaging materials recovered from household waste by means of Eddy-Current techniques. Using this technique the pick-up of some contaminating metals, particularly iron, is almost unavoidable.

  4. Modelisation of the SECMin molten salts environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, M.; Slim, C.; Delpech, S.; di Caprio, D.; Stafiej, J.

    2014-06-01

    We develop a cellular automata modelisation of SECM experiments to study corrosion in molten salt media for generation IV nuclear reactors. The electrodes used in these experiments are cylindrical glass tips with a coaxial metal wire inside. As the result of simulations we obtain the current approach curves of the electrodes with geometries characterized by several values of the ratios of glass to metal area at the tip. We compare these results with predictions of the known analytic expressions, solutions of partial differential equations for flat uniform geometry of the substrate. We present the results for other, more complicated substrate surface geometries e. g. regular saw modulated surface, surface obtained by Eden model process, ...

  5. High-pressure chemistry of hydrogen in metals: in situ study of iron hydride.

    PubMed

    Badding, J V; Hemley, R J; Mao, H K

    1991-07-26

    Optical observations and x-ray diffraction measurements of the reaction between iron and hydrogen at high pressure to form iron hydride are described. The reaction is associated with a sudden pressure-induced expansion at 3.5 gigapascals of iron samples immersed in fluid hydrogen. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction measurements carried out to 62 gigapascals demonstrate that iron hydride has a double hexagonal close-packed structure, a cell volume up to 17% larger than pure iron, and a stoichiometry close to FeH. These results greatly extend the pressure range over which the technologically important iron-hydrogen phase diagram has been characterized and have implications for problems ranging from hydrogen degradation and embrittlement of ferrous metals to the presence of hydrogen in Earth's metallic core.

  6. Investigations of the structural stability of metal hydride composites by in-situ neutron imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbrig, Kai; Pohlmann, Carsten; Gondek, Łukasz; Figiel, Henryk; Kardjilov, Nikolay; Hilger, André; Manke, Ingo; Banhart, John; Kieback, Bernd; Röntzsch, Lars

    2015-10-01

    Metal hydride composites (MHC) with expanded natural graphite (ENG) exhibiting enhanced thermal conductivity and reduced porosity compared to metal hydride powders can enable a reversible, compact and safe way for hydrogen storage. In this study, neutron imaging during cyclic hydrogenation was utilized to investigate the structural stability and the spatial-temporal hydrogen concentration of application-oriented MHC with 40 mm in diameter compared to a loose metal hydride powder. In particular, swelling and shrinking effects of a radially confined MHC which could freely expand upwards were studied. It was found that the loose powder bed was easily torn apart during dehydrogenation, which leads to increased thermal resistance within the hydride bed. In contrast, the thermal resistance between MHC and container wall was minimized since the initial gap closes during initial hydrogenation and does not reopen thereafter. Further cyclic hydrogenation caused MHC volume changes, i.e. an almost reversible swelling/shrinking (so-called "MHC breathing"). Moreover, neutron imaging allowed for the observation of reaction fronts within the MHC and the powder bed that are governed by the heat transfer.

  7. Amorphization and Directional Crystallization of Metals Confined in Carbon Nanotubes Investigated by in Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tang, Dai-Ming; Ren, Cui-Lan; Lv, Ruitao; Yu, Wan-Jing; Hou, Peng-Xiang; Wang, Ming-Sheng; Wei, Xianlong; Xu, Zhi; Kawamoto, Naoyuki; Bando, Yoshio; Mitome, Masanori; Liu, Chang; Cheng, Hui-Ming; Golberg, Dmitri

    2015-08-12

    The hollow core of a carbon nanotube (CNT) provides a unique opportunity to explore the physics, chemistry, biology, and metallurgy of different materials confined in such nanospace. Here, we investigate the nonequilibrium metallurgical processes taking place inside CNTs by in situ transmission electron microscopy using CNTs as nanoscale resistively heated crucibles having encapsulated metal nanowires/crystals in their channels. Because of nanometer size of the system and intimate contact between the CNTs and confined metals, an efficient heat transfer and high cooling rates (∼10(13) K/s) were achieved as a result of a flash bias pulse followed by system natural quenching, leading to the formation of disordered amorphous-like structures in iron, cobalt, and gold. An intermediate state between crystalline and amorphous phases was discovered, revealing a memory effect of local short-to-medium range order during these phase transitions. Furthermore, subsequent directional crystallization of an amorphous iron nanowire formed by this method was realized under controlled Joule heating. High-density crystalline defects were generated during crystallization due to a confinement effect from the CNT and severe plastic deformation involved. PMID:26114583

  8. In-situ x-ray microscopy of phase and composition distributions in metal alloys during solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaukler, William F.; Curreri, Peter A.

    1999-07-01

    This research applies a state of the art x-ray transmission microscope, to image the solidification of metallic or semiconductor alloys in real-time. By employing a hard x-ray source with sub-micron dimensions, resolutions of up to 2 micrometers can be obtained with magnifications of over 800 X. Specimen growth conditions were optimized and the best imaging technologies applied to maintain x-ray image resolution, contrast and sensitivity. In addition, a special furnace design is required to permit controlled growth conditions and still offer maximum resolution and image contrast. We have successfully imaged in real-time: interfacial morphologies, phase growth, coalescence, incorporation of phases into the growing interface, and the solute boundary layer in the liquid at the solid-liquid interface. We have also measured true local growth rates and can evaluate segregation structures in the solid; a form of in situ metallography. Composition gradients within the specimen cause variations in absorption of the flux such that the final image represents a spatial integration of composition. During this study, the growth of secondary phase fibers and lamellae form eutectic and monotectic alloys have been imaged during solidification, in real-time, for the first time in bulk metal alloys.

  9. In-Situ X-Ray Microscopy of Phase and Composition Distributions in Metal Alloys During Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, William F.; Curreri, Peter A.

    1999-01-01

    This research applies a state of the art X-ray Transmission Microscope, to image the solidification of metallic or semiconductor alloys in real-time. By employing a hard x-ray source with sub-micron dimensions, resolutions of up to 3 gm can be obtained with magnifications of over 800 X. Specimen growth conditions were optimized and the best imaging technologies applied to maintain x-ray image resolution, contrast and sensitivity. In addition, a special furnace design is required to permit controlled growth conditions and still offer maximum resolution and image contrast. We have successfully imaged in real-time: interfacial morphologies, phase growth, coalescence, incorporation of phases into the growing interface, and the solute boundary layer in the liquid at the solid-liquid inter-face. We have also measured true local growth rates and can evaluate segregation structures in the solid; a form of in-situ metallography. Composition gradients within the specimen cause vafiations in absorption of the flux such that the final image represents a spatial integral of composition (or thickness). During this study, the growth of secondary phase fibers and lameilae from eutectic and monotectic alloys have been imaged during solidification, in real-time, for the first time in bulk metal alloys. Keywords: x-ray, microscope, solidification, microfocus, real-time, microstructure

  10. Amorphization and Directional Crystallization of Metals Confined in Carbon Nanotubes Investigated by in Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tang, Dai-Ming; Ren, Cui-Lan; Lv, Ruitao; Yu, Wan-Jing; Hou, Peng-Xiang; Wang, Ming-Sheng; Wei, Xianlong; Xu, Zhi; Kawamoto, Naoyuki; Bando, Yoshio; Mitome, Masanori; Liu, Chang; Cheng, Hui-Ming; Golberg, Dmitri

    2015-08-12

    The hollow core of a carbon nanotube (CNT) provides a unique opportunity to explore the physics, chemistry, biology, and metallurgy of different materials confined in such nanospace. Here, we investigate the nonequilibrium metallurgical processes taking place inside CNTs by in situ transmission electron microscopy using CNTs as nanoscale resistively heated crucibles having encapsulated metal nanowires/crystals in their channels. Because of nanometer size of the system and intimate contact between the CNTs and confined metals, an efficient heat transfer and high cooling rates (∼10(13) K/s) were achieved as a result of a flash bias pulse followed by system natural quenching, leading to the formation of disordered amorphous-like structures in iron, cobalt, and gold. An intermediate state between crystalline and amorphous phases was discovered, revealing a memory effect of local short-to-medium range order during these phase transitions. Furthermore, subsequent directional crystallization of an amorphous iron nanowire formed by this method was realized under controlled Joule heating. High-density crystalline defects were generated during crystallization due to a confinement effect from the CNT and severe plastic deformation involved.

  11. Porphyrins as Templates for Site-Selective Atomic Layer Deposition: Vapor Metalation and in Situ Monitoring of Island Growth.

    PubMed

    Avila, Jason R; Emery, Jonathan D; Pellin, Michael J; Martinson, Alex B F; Farha, Omar K; Hupp, Joseph T

    2016-08-10

    Examinations of enzymatic catalysts suggest one key to efficient catalytic activity is discrete size metallo clusters. Mimicking enzymatic cluster systems is synthetically challenging because conventional solution methods are prone to aggregation or require capping of the cluster, thereby limiting its catalytic activity. We introduce site-selective atomic layer deposition (ALD) on porphyrins as an alternative approach to grow isolated metal oxide islands that are spatially separated. Surface-bound tetra-acid free base porphyrins (H2TCPP) may be metalated with Mn using conventional ALD precursor exposure to induce homogeneous hydroxide synthetic handles which acts as a nucleation point for subsequent ALD MnO island growth. Analytical fitting of in situ QCM mass uptake reveals island growth to be hemispherical with a convergence radius of 1.74 nm. This growth mode is confirmed with synchrotron grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) measurements. Finally, we extend this approach to other ALD chemistries to demonstrate the generality of this route to discrete metallo island materials.

  12. In situ electron microscopy studies of electromechanical behavior in metals at the nanoscale using a novel microdevice-based system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Wonmo; Beniam, Iyoel; Qidwai, Siddiq M.

    2016-09-01

    Electrically assisted deformation (EAD) is an emerging technique to enhance formability of metals by applying an electric current through them. Despite its increasing importance in manufacturing applications, there is still an unresolved debate on the nature of the fundamental deformation mechanisms underlying EAD, mainly between electroplasticity (non-thermal effects) and resistive heating (thermal effects). This status is due to two critical challenges: (1) a lack of experimental techniques to directly observe fundamental mechanisms of material deformation during EAD, and (2) intrinsic coupling between electric current and Joule heating giving rise to unwanted thermally activated mechanisms. To overcome these challenges, we have developed a microdevice-based electromechanical testing system (MEMTS) to characterize nanoscale metal specimens in transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our studies reveal that MEMTS eliminates the effect of Joule heating on material deformation, a critical advantage over macroscopic experiments, owing to its unique scale. For example, a negligible change in temperature (<0.02 °C) is predicted at ˜3500 A/mm2. Utilizing the attractive features of MEMTS, we have directly investigated potential electron-dislocation interactions in single crystal copper (SCC) specimens that are simultaneously subjected to uniaxial loading and electric current density up to 5000 A/mm2. Our in situ TEM studies indicate that for SCC, electroplasticity does not play a key role as no differences in dislocation activities, such as depinning and movement, are observed.

  13. Porphyrins as Templates for Site-Selective Atomic Layer Deposition: Vapor Metalation and in Situ Monitoring of Island Growth.

    PubMed

    Avila, Jason R; Emery, Jonathan D; Pellin, Michael J; Martinson, Alex B F; Farha, Omar K; Hupp, Joseph T

    2016-08-10

    Examinations of enzymatic catalysts suggest one key to efficient catalytic activity is discrete size metallo clusters. Mimicking enzymatic cluster systems is synthetically challenging because conventional solution methods are prone to aggregation or require capping of the cluster, thereby limiting its catalytic activity. We introduce site-selective atomic layer deposition (ALD) on porphyrins as an alternative approach to grow isolated metal oxide islands that are spatially separated. Surface-bound tetra-acid free base porphyrins (H2TCPP) may be metalated with Mn using conventional ALD precursor exposure to induce homogeneous hydroxide synthetic handles which acts as a nucleation point for subsequent ALD MnO island growth. Analytical fitting of in situ QCM mass uptake reveals island growth to be hemispherical with a convergence radius of 1.74 nm. This growth mode is confirmed with synchrotron grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) measurements. Finally, we extend this approach to other ALD chemistries to demonstrate the generality of this route to discrete metallo island materials. PMID:27454741

  14. In situ7Li and 133Cs nuclear magnetic resonance investigations on the role of Cs+ additive in lithium-metal deposition process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Zhao, Zhenchao; Hu, Mary Y.; Feng, Ju; Deng, Xuchu; Chen, Xilin; Xu, Wu; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Ji-Guang

    2016-02-01

    Cesium ion (Cs+) has been reported to be an effective electrolyte additive to suppress Li dendrite growth which prevents the application of lithium (Li) metal as an anode for rechargeable Li batteries. In this work, we investigated the effect of Cs+ additive on Li depositions using quantitative in situ7Li and 133Cs nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with planar symmetric Li cells. It's found that the addition of Cs+ can significantly enhance both the formation of well aligned Li nanorods and reversibility of the Li electrode. In situ133Cs NMR directly confirms that Cs+ migrates to Li electrode to form a positively charged electrostatic shield during the charging process. Much more electrochemical "active" Li was found in Li films deposited with Cs+ additive, while more electrochemical "dead" and thicker Li rods were identified in Li films deposited without Cs+. Combining the in situ and the previous ex-situ results, a Li deposition model has been proposed to explain these observations.

  15. Hydrocracking of coal using molten salts as catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikkawa, S.; Nomura, M.; Sakashita, H.; Nishimura, M.; Miyake, M.

    1981-10-01

    Characteristics of the reactions during coal liquefaction and the hydrocracking of coal and coal-related materials using ZnCl2-transition metal chloride or ZnCl2-alkaline metal chloride are discussed. The studies involve development of a molten salt catalyst for hydrocracking heavy residual oils or coals, including hydrocarbons containing many heteroatoms. It was found that ZnCl2 shows higher activity for hydrocracking of anthracene and phenanthrene, and experiments with Yubari coal using the binary metal catalysts ZnCl2-MoCl5 and ZnCl2-CrCl3 are described. The use of molten salts in the desulphurization of heavy residual oils is also explored, specifically for the hydrocracking of benziophene, and the possibility that a coal-like polymer structure containing an oxygen surplus might depolymerize above ternary melts is suggested.

  16. Engineered Natural Geosorbents for In Situ Immobilization of DNAPLs and Heavy Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Walter J. Weber; Gordon M. Fair; Earnest Boyce

    2006-12-01

    Extensive subsurface contamination by dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) organic solvents and heavy metals is common place at many DOE facilities. Poor performances and excessive costs have made traditional technologies and approaches less than satisfactory for remediation of such sites. It is increasingly apparent that marginal improvements in conventional methods and approaches will not suffice for clean up of many contaminated DOE sites. Innovative approaches using new and/or existing technologies in more efficient and cost-effective ways are thus urgently required.

  17. Structural change in molten basalt at deep mantle conditions.

    PubMed

    Sanloup, Chrystèle; Drewitt, James W E; Konôpková, Zuzana; Dalladay-Simpson, Philip; Morton, Donna M; Rai, Nachiketa; van Westrenen, Wim; Morgenroth, Wolfgang

    2013-11-01

    Silicate liquids play a key part at all stages of deep Earth evolution, ranging from core and crust formation billions of years ago to present-day volcanic activity. Quantitative models of these processes require knowledge of the structural changes and compression mechanisms that take place in liquid silicates at the high pressures and temperatures in the Earth's interior. However, obtaining such knowledge has long been impeded by the challenging nature of the experiments. In recent years, structural and density information for silica glass was obtained at record pressures of up to 100 GPa (ref. 1), a major step towards obtaining data on the molten state. Here we report the structure of molten basalt up to 60 GPa by means of in situ X-ray diffraction. The coordination of silicon increases from four under ambient conditions to six at 35 GPa, similar to what has been reported in silica glass. The compressibility of the melt after the completion of the coordination change is lower than at lower pressure, implying that only a high-order equation of state can accurately describe the density evolution of silicate melts over the pressure range of the whole mantle. The transition pressure coincides with a marked change in the pressure-evolution of nickel partitioning between molten iron and molten silicates, indicating that melt compressibility controls siderophile-element partitioning.

  18. Treatment of plutonium process residues by molten salt oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Stimmel, J.; Wishau, R.; Ramsey, K.B.; Montoya, A.; Brock, J.; Heslop, M.; Wernly, K.

    1999-04-01

    Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO) is a thermal process that can remove more than 99.999% of the organic matrix from combustible {sup 238}Pu material. Plutonium processing residues are injected into a molten salt bed with an excess of air. The salt (sodium carbonate) functions as a catalyst for the conversion of the organic material to carbon dioxide and water. Reactive species such as fluorine, chlorine, bromine, iodine, sulfur, phosphorous and arsenic in the organic waste react with the molten salt to form the corresponding neutralized salts, NaF, NaCl, NaBr, NaI, Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, Na{sub 3}PO{sub 4} and NaAsO{sub 2} or Na{sub 3}AsO4. Plutonium and other metals react with the molten salt and air to form metal salts or oxides. Saturated salt will be recycled and aqueous chemical separation will be used to recover the {sup 238}Pu. The Los Alamos National Laboratory system, which is currently in the conceptual design stage, will be scaled down from current systems for use inside a glovebox.

  19. Reactive landing of gas-phase ions as a tool for the fabrication of metal oxide surfaces for in situ phosphopeptide enrichment.

    PubMed

    Blacken, Grady R; Volný, Michael; Diener, Matthew; Jackson, Karl E; Ranjitkar, Pratistha; Maly, Dustin J; Turecek, Frantisek

    2009-06-01

    Zirconium, titanium, and hafnium oxide-coated stainless steel surfaces are fabricated by reactive landing of gas-phase ions produced by electrospray ionization of group IVB metal alkoxides. The surfaces are used for in situ enrichment of phosphopeptides before analysis by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry. To evaluate this method we characterized ZrO(2) (zirconia) surfaces by (1) comparison with the other group IVB metal oxides of TiO(2) (titania) and HfO(2) (hafnia), (2) morphological characterization by SEM image analysis, and (3) dependence of phosphopeptide enrichment on the metal oxide layer thickness. Furthermore, we evaluated the necessity of the reactive landing process for the construction of useful metal oxide surfaces by preparing surfaces by electrospray deposition of Zr, Ti, and Hf alkoxides directly onto polished metal surfaces at atmospheric pressure. Although all three metal oxide surfaces evaluated were capable of phosphopeptide enrichment from complex peptide mixtures, zirconia performed better than hafnia or titania as a result of morphological characteristics illustrated by the SEM analysis. Metal oxide coatings that were fabricated by atmospheric pressure deposition were still capable of in situ phosphopeptide enrichment, although with inferior efficiency and surface durability. We show that zirconia surfaces prepared by reactive landing of gas-phase ions can be a useful tool for high throughput screening of novel phosphorylation sites and quantitation of phosphorylation kinetics.

  20. Preliminary molten salt extraction experiments with dicesium hexachloroplutonate (Cs/sub 2/PuCl/sub 6/)

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, R.L.; Long, J.L.; Humiston, T.J.; Murray, A.M.

    1989-01-30

    Dicesium hexachloroplutonate was prepared on a 200-gram scale and used as an oxidant in the molten salt extraction process to remove americium from plutonium metal. Single-pass extraction efficiencies exceeding 90% were achieved in molten calcium chloride. 7 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.