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Sample records for size distribution dependence

  1. Size dependent pore size distribution of shales by gas physisorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roshan, Hamid; Andersen, Martin S.; Yu, Lu; Masoumi, Hossein; Arandian, Hamid

    2017-04-01

    Gas physisorption, in particular nitrogen adsorption-desorption, is a traditional technique for characterization of geomaterials including the organic rich shales. The low pressure nitrogen is used together with adsorption-desorption physical models to study the pore size distribution (PSD) and porosity of the porous samples. The samples are usually crushed to a certain fragment size to measure these properties however there is not yet a consistent standard size proposed for sample crushing. Crushing significantly increases the surface area of the fragments e.g. the created surface area is differentiated from that of pores using BET technique. In this study, we show that the smaller fragment sizes lead to higher cumulative pore volume and smaller pore diameters. It is also shown that some of the micro-pores are left unaccounted because of the correction of the external surface area. In order to illustrate this, the nitrogen physisorption is first conducted on the identical organic rich shale samples with different sizes: 20-25, 45-50 and 63-71 µm. We then show that such effects are not only a function of pore structure changes induced by crushing, but is linked to the inability of the physical models in differentiating between the external surface area (BET) and micro-pores for different crushing sizes at relatively low nitrogen pressure. We also discuss models currently used in nano-technology such as t-method to address this issue and their advantages and shortcoming for shale rock characterization.

  2. Size Dependence of Dust Distribution around the Earth Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Takeuchi, Taku; Ishihara, Daisuke; Kondo, Toru; Kaneda, Hidehiro

    2017-05-01

    In the solar system, interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) originating mainly from asteroid collisions and cometary activities drift to Earth orbit due to Poynting-Robertson drag. We analyzed the thermal emission from IDPs that was observed by the first Japanese infrared astronomical satellite, AKARI. The observed surface brightness in the trailing direction of the Earth orbit is 3.7% greater than that in the leading direction in the 9 μm band and 3.0% in the 18 μm band. In order to reveal dust properties causing leading-trailing surface brightness asymmetry, we numerically integrated orbits of the Sun, the Earth, and a dust particle as a restricted three-body problem including radiation from the Sun. The initial orbits of particles are determined according to the orbits of main-belt asteroids or Jupiter-family comets. Orbital trapping in mean motion resonances results in a significant leading-trailing asymmetry so that intermediate sized dust (˜10-100 μm) produces a greater asymmetry than zodiacal light. The leading-trailing surface brightness difference integrated over the size distribution of the asteroidal dust is obtained to be 27.7% and 25.3% in the 9 μm and 18 μm bands, respectively. In contrast, the brightness difference for cometary dust is calculated as 3.6% and 3.1% in the 9 μm and 18 μm bands, respectively, if the maximum dust radius is set to be s max = 3000 μm. Taking into account these values and their errors, we conclude that the contribution of asteroidal dust to the zodiacal infrared emission is less than ˜10%, while cometary dust of the order of 1 mm mainly accounts for the zodiacal light in infrared.

  3. Retrieval of particle size distribution in the dependent model using the moment method.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaogang; Tang, Hong; Dai, Jingmin

    2007-09-03

    The problem of determining particle size distribution using the moment method in the spectral extinction technique is studied. The feasibility and reliability of the retrieval of spherical particle size distribution using the moment method are investigated. The single spherical particle extinction efficiency, which is derived theoretically using the Mie's solution to Maxwell's equation, is approximated with a higher order polynomial in order to apply the moment method. Simulation and experimental results indicate that a fairly reasonable representation of the particle size distribution can be obtained using the moment method in the dependent model algorithm. The method has advantages of simplicity, rapidity, and suitability for in-line particle size measurement.

  4. Accelerating growth and size-dependent distribution of human online activities.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lingfei; Zhang, Jiang

    2011-08-01

    Research on human online activities usually assumes that total activity T increases linearly with active population P, that is, T∝P(γ) (γ=1). However, we find examples of systems where total activity grows faster than active population. Our study shows that the power law relationship T∝P(γ) (γ>1) is in fact ubiquitous in online activities such as microblogging, news voting, and photo tagging. We call the pattern "accelerating growth" and find it relates to a type of distribution that changes with system size. We show both analytically and empirically how the growth rate γ associates with a scaling parameter b in the size-dependent distribution. As most previous studies explain accelerating growth by power law distribution, the model of size-dependent distribution is worth further exploration.

  5. Accelerating growth and size-dependent distribution of human online activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lingfei; Zhang, Jiang

    2011-08-01

    Research on human online activities usually assumes that total activity T increases linearly with active population P, that is, T∝Pγ(γ=1). However, we find examples of systems where total activity grows faster than active population. Our study shows that the power law relationship T∝Pγ(γ>1) is in fact ubiquitous in online activities such as microblogging, news voting, and photo tagging. We call the pattern “accelerating growth” and find it relates to a type of distribution that changes with system size. We show both analytically and empirically how the growth rate γ associates with a scaling parameter b in the size-dependent distribution. As most previous studies explain accelerating growth by power law distribution, the model of size-dependent distribution is worth further exploration.

  6. Modelling adipocytes size distribution.

    PubMed

    Soula, H A; Julienne, H; Soulage, C O; Géloën, A

    2013-09-07

    Adipocytes are cells whose task is to store excess energy as lipid droplets in their cytoplasm. Adipocytes can adapt their size according to the lipid amount to be stored. Adipocyte size variation can reach one order of magnitude inside the same organism which is unique among cells. A striking feature in adipocytes size distribution is the lack of characteristic size since typical size distributions are bimodal. Since energy can be stored and retrieved and adipocytes are responsible for these lipid fluxes, we propose a simple model of size-dependent lipid fluxes that is able to predict typical adipocytes size distribution. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Introduction of a Nozzle Throat Diameter Dependency into the SRM Dust Size Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stabroth, S.; Wegener, P.; Oswald, M.; Wiedemann, C.; Klinkrad, H.; Vörsmann, P.

    In the exhaust gas of SRM (Solid Rocket Motor) firings, a considerable amount of very small aluminium oxide (Al2O3) particles is generally included. In order to increase motor performance and to dampen burn instabilities, aluminium is used as an additive in the propellant. During the burn process this aluminium is transformed into Al2O3. A large number of small dust particles (< 1 μ m up to about 50 μ m) is generated continuously during a burn. At the end of a burn, a second group of much larger fragments from an Al2O3 slag pool clustering inside the motor leaves the nozzle. The ESA space debris population model MASTER-2001 considers 1,032 SRM firings with the associated generation of SRM slag and dust. The resulting Al2O3 population is a major contribution to the micron size space debris environment in Earth orbit. For the modelling of each SRM dust release event a detailed knowledge of the size distribution is essential. However, the knowledge of the particle size distribution after passing the nozzle throat is poor. The current dust implementation in the MASTER-2001 space debris model therefore assumes an average motor size, since information on the actual motor size is normally not available in common databases. Thus, a fixed distribution is identically used for large upper stages as well as small apogee motors. This assumption can lead to an over-representation of large dust in regions, where mainly apogee motors are used (i.e. GEO) and an under-representation in lower altitudes, where large stages predominate. In this paper, a concept for the improvement of SRM dust size modelling is discussed. It will be shown that an introduction of a nozzle throat diameter dependency into the dust size distribution could lead to a more precise modelling of SRM dust release events. Investigations showed that there is a good correlation between the propellant mass flow and the nozzle's throat diameter, which is in turn the determining term for the actual diameter

  8. Dependence of exponents on text length versus finite-size scaling for word-frequency distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corral, Álvaro; Font-Clos, Francesc

    2017-08-01

    Some authors have recently argued that a finite-size scaling law for the text-length dependence of word-frequency distributions cannot be conceptually valid. Here we give solid quantitative evidence for the validity of this scaling law, using both careful statistical tests and analytical arguments based on the generalized central-limit theorem applied to the moments of the distribution (and obtaining a novel derivation of Heaps' law as a by-product). We also find that the picture of word-frequency distributions with power-law exponents that decrease with text length [X. Yan and P. Minnhagen, Physica A 444, 828 (2016), 10.1016/j.physa.2015.10.082] does not stand with rigorous statistical analysis. Instead, we show that the distributions are perfectly described by power-law tails with stable exponents, whose values are close to 2, in agreement with the classical Zipf's law. Some misconceptions about scaling are also clarified.

  9. Nanoparticle distribution during systemic inflammation is size-dependent and organ-specific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, K.-H.; Lundy, D. J.; Toh, E. K.-W.; Chen, C.-H.; Shih, C.; Chen, P.; Chang, H.-C.; Lai, J. J.; Stayton, P. S.; Hoffman, A. S.; Hsieh, P. C.-H.

    2015-09-01

    This study comprehensively investigates the changing biodistribution of fluorescent-labelled polystyrene latex bead nanoparticles in a mouse model of inflammation. Since inflammation alters systemic circulatory properties, increases vessel permeability and modulates the immune system, we theorised that systemic inflammation would alter nanoparticle distribution within the body. This has implications for prospective nanocarrier-based therapies targeting inflammatory diseases. Low dose lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a bacterial endotoxin, was used to induce an inflammatory response, and 20 nm, 100 nm or 500 nm polystyrene nanoparticles were administered after 16 hours. HPLC analysis was used to accurately quantify nanoparticle retention by each vital organ, and tissue sections revealed the precise locations of nanoparticle deposition within key tissues. During inflammation, nanoparticles of all sizes redistributed, particularly to the marginal zones of the spleen. We found that LPS-induced inflammation induces splenic macrophage polarisation and alters leukocyte uptake of nanoparticles, with size-dependent effects. In addition, spleen vasculature becomes significantly more permeable following LPS treatment. We conclude that systemic inflammation affects nanoparticle distribution by multiple mechanisms, in a size dependent manner.This study comprehensively investigates the changing biodistribution of fluorescent-labelled polystyrene latex bead nanoparticles in a mouse model of inflammation. Since inflammation alters systemic circulatory properties, increases vessel permeability and modulates the immune system, we theorised that systemic inflammation would alter nanoparticle distribution within the body. This has implications for prospective nanocarrier-based therapies targeting inflammatory diseases. Low dose lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a bacterial endotoxin, was used to induce an inflammatory response, and 20 nm, 100 nm or 500 nm polystyrene nanoparticles were administered

  10. Island-size distribution and capture numbers in three-dimensonal nucleation: Dependence on island morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royston, John; Amar, Jacques G.

    2009-10-01

    The scaling of the monomer and island densities, island-size distribution (ISD), and capture-number distribution (CND) as a function of the fraction of occupied sites (coverage) and ratio Dh/F of the monomer hopping rate Dh to the (per site) monomer creation rate F are studied for the case of irreversible nucleation and growth of fractal islands in three dimensions (d=3) . We note that our model is a three-dimensional analog of submonolayer growth in the absence of island relaxation and may also be viewed as a simplified model of the early stages of vacancy cluster nucleation and growth under irradiation. In contrast to results previously obtained for point-islands in d=3 , for which mean-field behavior corresponding to a CND which is independent of island size was observed, our results indicate that for fractal islands the scaled CND increases approximately linearly with island size in the asymptotic limit of large Dh/F . In addition, while the peak height of the scaled ISD for fractal islands appears to diverge with increasing Dh/F , the dependence on Dh/F is much weaker than for point-islands in d=3 . The results of a self-consistent rate-equation calculation for the coverage and Dh/F dependence of the average island and monomer densities are also presented and good agreement with simulation results is obtained. For the case of point-islands, the value of the exponent χ describing the Dh/F dependence of the island density at fixed coverage, e.g., Nsat˜(Dh/F)-χ , is in good agreement with the value (χ=1/3) expected for irreversible growth. However, for both compact and fractal islands in d=3 , our results indicate that the value of χ (χ≃0.42) is significantly larger. In order to explain this behavior, an analytical expression [e.g., χ=df/(3df-2) ] for the dependence of χ on island fractal dimension df in d=3 is derived and found to give reasonable agreement with our simulation and rate-equation results for the case of point-islands (df=∞) , compact

  11. Temperature Dependence of Particle Size Distribution in Transformer Oil-Based Ferrofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Józefczak, Arkadiusz; Hornowski, Tomasz; Skumiel, Andrzej

    2011-04-01

    The temperature dependence of the particle size distribution (PSD) of a transformer oil-based ferrofluid was studied using an ultrasound method. The measurements of the ultrasound velocity and attenuation were carried out in the absence of an external magnetic field as a function of the volume concentration of magnetite particles at temperatures ranging from 10 °C to 80 °C. The experimental results of ultrasound measurements were analyzed within the framework of the Vinogradov-Isakovich theory which takes into account contributions to acoustical parameters due to friction and heat exchange between magnetic particles and the surrounding carrier liquid. From the best fit of the experimental results and theoretical predictions, the parameters characterizing the PSD at different temperatures were determined. In order to analyze ultrasonic data, the density and viscosity of ferrofluid samples and the transformer oil were also measured.

  12. Dependence of pulsed focused ultrasound induced thrombolysis on duty cycle and cavitation bubble size distribution.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shanshan; Zong, Yujin; Feng, Yi; Liu, Runna; Liu, Xiaodong; Hu, Yaxin; Han, Shimin; Wan, Mingxi

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the relationship between the efficiency of pulsed, focused ultrasound (FUS)-induced thrombolysis, the duty cycle (2.3%, 9%, and 18%) and the size distribution of cavitation bubbles. The efficiency of thrombolysis was evaluated through the degree of mechanical fragmentation, namely the number, mass, and size of clot debris particles. First, we found that the total number and mass of clot debris particles were highest when a duty cycle of 9% was used and that the mean diameter of clot debris particles was smallest. Second, we found that the size distribution of cavitation bubbles was mainly centered around the linear resonance radius (2.5μm) of the emission frequency (1.2MHz) of the FUS transducer when a 9% duty cycle was used, while the majority of cavitation bubbles became smaller or larger than the linear resonance radius when a 2.3% or 18% duty cycle was used. In addition, the inertial cavitation dose from the treatment performed at 9% duty cycle was much higher than the dose obtained with the other two duty cycles. The data presented here suggest that there is an optimal duty cycle at which the thrombolysis efficiency and cavitation activity are strongest. They further indicate that using a pulsed FUS may help control the size distribution of cavitation nuclei within an active size range, which we found to be near the linear resonance radius of the emission frequency of the FUS transducer.

  13. The evolution of biomass-burning aerosol size distributions due to coagulation: dependence on fire and meteorological details and parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Kimiko M.; Laing, James R.; Stevens, Robin G.; Jaffe, Daniel A.; Pierce, Jeffrey R.

    2016-06-01

    Biomass-burning aerosols have a significant effect on global and regional aerosol climate forcings. To model the magnitude of these effects accurately requires knowledge of the size distribution of the emitted and evolving aerosol particles. Current biomass-burning inventories do not include size distributions, and global and regional models generally assume a fixed size distribution from all biomass-burning emissions. However, biomass-burning size distributions evolve in the plume due to coagulation and net organic aerosol (OA) evaporation or formation, and the plume processes occur on spacial scales smaller than global/regional-model grid boxes. The extent of this size-distribution evolution is dependent on a variety of factors relating to the emission source and atmospheric conditions. Therefore, accurately accounting for biomass-burning aerosol size in global models requires an effective aerosol size distribution that accounts for this sub-grid evolution and can be derived from available emission-inventory and meteorological parameters. In this paper, we perform a detailed investigation of the effects of coagulation on the aerosol size distribution in biomass-burning plumes. We compare the effect of coagulation to that of OA evaporation and formation. We develop coagulation-only parameterizations for effective biomass-burning size distributions using the SAM-TOMAS large-eddy simulation plume model. For the most-sophisticated parameterization, we use the Gaussian Emulation Machine for Sensitivity Analysis (GEM-SA) to build a parameterization of the aged size distribution based on the SAM-TOMAS output and seven inputs: emission median dry diameter, emission distribution modal width, mass emissions flux, fire area, mean boundary-layer wind speed, plume mixing depth, and time/distance since emission. This parameterization was tested against an independent set of SAM-TOMAS simulations and yields R2 values of 0.83 and 0.89 for Dpm and modal width, respectively. The

  14. COLOR DEPENDENCE IN THE SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF MAIN BELT ASTEROIDS REVISITED

    SciTech Connect

    August, Tyler M.; Wiegert, Paul A.

    2013-06-15

    The size distribution of the asteroid belt is examined with 16956 main belt asteroids detected in data taken from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey in two filters (g' and r'). The cumulative H (absolute magnitude) distribution is examined in both filters, and both match well to simple power laws down to H = 17, with slopes in rough agreement with those reported the literature. This implies that disruptive collisions between asteroids are gravitationally dominated down to at least this size, and probably sub-kilometer scales. The slopes of these distributions appear shallower in the outer belt than the inner belt, and the g' distributions appear slightly steeper than the r'. The slope shallowing in the outer belt may reflect a real compositional difference: the inner asteroid belt has been suggested to consist mostly of stony and/or metallic S-type asteroids, whereas carbonaceous C-types are thought to be more prevalent further from the Sun. No waves are seen in the size distribution above H = 15. Since waves are expected to be produced at the transition from gravitationally-dominated to internal strength-dominated collisions, their absence here may imply that the transition occurs at sub-kilometer scales, much smaller than the H = 17 (diameter {approx} 1.6 km) cutoff of this study.

  15. Color Dependence in the Size Distribution of Main Belt Asteroids Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    August, Tyler M.; Wiegert, Paul A.

    2013-06-01

    The size distribution of the asteroid belt is examined with 16956 main belt asteroids detected in data taken from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey in two filters (g' and r'). The cumulative H (absolute magnitude) distribution is examined in both filters, and both match well to simple power laws down to H = 17, with slopes in rough agreement with those reported the literature. This implies that disruptive collisions between asteroids are gravitationally dominated down to at least this size, and probably sub-kilometer scales. The slopes of these distributions appear shallower in the outer belt than the inner belt, and the g' distributions appear slightly steeper than the r'. The slope shallowing in the outer belt may reflect a real compositional difference: the inner asteroid belt has been suggested to consist mostly of stony and/or metallic S-type asteroids, whereas carbonaceous C-types are thought to be more prevalent further from the Sun. No waves are seen in the size distribution above H = 15. Since waves are expected to be produced at the transition from gravitationally-dominated to internal strength-dominated collisions, their absence here may imply that the transition occurs at sub-kilometer scales, much smaller than the H = 17 (diameter ~ 1.6 km) cutoff of this study.

  16. Assessment of size-dependent mercury distribution in King Mackerel, Scomberomorus cavalla

    SciTech Connect

    Voit, E.O.; Balthis, W.L. |

    1994-12-31

    The assessment of health risks from fish contamination and the issuance of advisories require accurate characterizations of the actual contaminant concentrations in fish of every relevant size. Such characterizations should not only contain statistical measures of location and variation, but provide a complete parameterization of the contaminant distribution for each given size class. This paper proposes two methods for determining such distributions from scatter diagrams of contaminant concentration versus fish length and illustrates them with an analysis of mercury contaminant in king mackerel, Scomberomorus cavalla. The first method consists of fitting contamination data with a family of S-distributions. This family shows trends in its defining parameter values, and these trends provide a comprehensive characterization of the measured contaminant concentrations. Each S-distribution has a rather simple mathematical structure from which one readily obtains secondary characteristics like quantiles, which are necessary for advanced simulation purposes. The second method takes into account that contaminant accumulation is the outcome of a metabolic process. When this process is modeled as a system of differential equations, it can be reformulated in such a way that it describes how the contaminant distribution changes over a given period of time. The resulting distributions have a more complicated structure than those obtained with the first method, but they allow them to bridge the gap between individual metabolic accumulation processes and trends in populations.

  17. Business size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Hulst, R.; Rodgers, G. J.

    2001-10-01

    In a recent work, we introduced two models for the dynamics of customers trying to find the business that best corresponds to their expectation for the price of a commodity. In agreement with the empirical data, a power-law distribution for the business sizes was obtained, taking the number of customers of a business as a proxy for its size. Here, we extend one of our previous models in two different ways. First, we introduce a business aggregation rate that is fitness dependent, which allows us to reproduce a spread in empirical data from one country to another. Second, we allow the bankruptcy rate to take a different functional form, to be able to obtain a log-normal distribution with power-law tails for the size of the businesses.

  18. The weather dependence of particle size distribution of indoor radioactive aerosol associated with radon decay products.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, A M A; Tamaki, K; Moriizumi, J; Yamazawa, H; Iida, T

    2011-07-01

    This study was performed to measure the activity size distribution of aerosol particles associated with short-lived radon decay products in indoor air at Nagoya University, Nagoya, Japan. The measurements were performed using a low pressure Andersen cascade impactor under variable meteorological conditions. The results showed that the greatest activity fraction was associated with aerosol particles in the accumulation size range (100-1000 nm) with a small fraction of nucleation mode (10-100 nm). Regarding the influence of the weather conditions, the decrease in the number of accumulation particles was observed clearly after rainfall without significant change in nucleation particles, which may be due to a washout process for the large particles.

  19. Dependence of earthquake size distributions on convergence rates at subduction zones

    SciTech Connect

    Mccaffrey, R.

    1994-10-01

    The correlation of numbers of thrust earthquakes of moment magnitude 7 or greater in this century at subduction zones with convergence rate results from a combination of lower recurrence intervals for earthquakes of a given size where slip rates are high and peak in the global distribution of subduction zone convergence rates at high values (55 to 90 mm/yr). Hence, physical mechanisms related to convergence rate, such as plate interface force, slab pull, or thermal effects, are not required to explain the distribution of large earthquakes with convergence rate. The seismic coupling coefficient ranges from 10% to 100% at subduction zone segments where convergence is faster than 45 mm/yr but does not correlate with rate. The coefficient is generally orders of magnitude lower at rates below 40 mm/yr which may be due to long recurrence intervals and a short sampling period (94 years).

  20. Dynamic recrystallization of wet synthetic polycrystalline halite: dependence of grain size distribution on flow stress, temperature and strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ter Heege, J. H.; De Bresser, J. H. P.; Spiers, C. J.

    2005-02-01

    It is often observed that dynamic recrystallization results in a recrystallized grain size distribution with a mean grain size that is inversely related to the flow stress. However, it is still open to discussion if theoretical models that underpin recrystallized grain size-stress relations offer a satisfactorily microphysical basis. The temperature dependence of recrystallized grain size, predicted by most of these models, is rarely observed, possibly because it is usually not systematically investigated. In this study, samples of wet halite containing >10 ppm water (by weight) were deformed in axial compression at 50 MPa confining pressure. The evolution of the recrystallized grain size distribution with strain was investigated using experiments achieving natural strains of 0.07, 0.12 and 0.25 at a strain rate of 5×10 -7 s -1 and a temperature of 125 °C. The stress and temperature dependence of recrystallized grain size was systematically investigated using experiments achieving fixed strains of 0.29-0.46 (and one to a strain of 0.68) at constant strain rates of 5×10 -7-1×10 -4 s -1 and temperatures of 75-240 °C, yielding stresses of 7-22 MPa. The microstructures and full grain size distributions of all samples were analyzed. The results showed that deformation occurred by a combination of dislocation creep and solution-precipitation creep. Dynamic recrystallization occurred in all samples and was dominated by fluid assisted grain boundary migration. During deformation, grain boundary migration results in a competition between grain growth due to the removal of grains with high internal strain energy and grain size reduction due to grain dissection (i.e. moving boundaries that crosscut or consume parts of neighbouring grains). At steady state, grain growth and grain size reduction processes balance, yielding constant flow stress and recrystallized grain size that is inversely related to stress and temperature. Evaluation of the recrystallized grain size data

  1. Study of vesicle size distribution dependence on pH value based on nanopore resistive pulse method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuqing; Rudzevich, Yauheni; Wearne, Adam; Lumpkin, Daniel; Morales, Joselyn; Nemec, Kathleen; Tatulian, Suren; Lupan, Oleg; Chow, Lee

    2013-03-01

    Vesicles are low-micron to sub-micron spheres formed by a lipid bilayer shell and serve as potential vehicles for drug delivery. The size of vesicle is proposed to be one of the instrumental variables affecting delivery efficiency since the size is correlated to factors like circulation and residence time in blood, the rate for cell endocytosis, and efficiency in cell targeting. In this work, we demonstrate accessible and reliable detection and size distribution measurement employing a glass nanopore device based on the resistive pulse method. This novel method enables us to investigate the size distribution dependence of pH difference across the membrane of vesicles with very small sample volume and rapid speed. This provides useful information for optimizing the efficiency of drug delivery in a pH sensitive environment.

  2. Spatial distribution of steep lunar craters may be linked to size-dependent orbital distribution of impactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    JeongAhn, Youngmin; Malhotra, Renu; Werner, Stephanie; Lee, Jui-Chi; Trang, David; Ip, Wing-Huen; Reyes-Ruiz, Mauricio

    2016-10-01

    The depth/diameter (d/D) ratio of simple lunar craters (D<15km) is known to be ~0.2 at the time of formation; larger complex craters (D>15km) have smaller d/D ratios. We examine the spatial distribution of high d/D ratio (>0.18) craters using LU60645GT catalogue (Salamunićcar et al. 2012). We select craters larger than 8km for which the census is known to be almost complete over the whole lunar surface. We find that the number density of steep craters in maria is significantly lower than in highlands, which may be explained by the age differences of the background surfaces. We also find that the spatial density of steep craters in the equatorial region is lower than in the polar region. On the contrary, higher cratering flux on the lunar equator has been claimed: from the numerical calculations with the orbital distribution of observed Earth Crossing Objects (ECOs) larger than 1km (Le Feuvre & Wieczorek 2008; Ito & Malhotra 2010) and from the distribution of steepest slopes at a 25m baseline (Kreslavsky & Head, 2016). In order to reconcile our findings with previous observations, we hypothesize that the cratering rate at low latitudes has been higher for meter to decameter size ECOs than for kilometer size objects since the Late Imbrian epoch; smaller objects have triggered more frequent mass wasting on the pre-existing large steep craters (D>8km, d/D>0.18) at low latitudes, thereby reducing the surviving number of steep craters. Our hypothesis is supported by the finding that the power-law slope in the H magnitude distribution for the low inclination ECOs (i<15 deg) is steeper than for the high inclination objects. Renu Malhotra acknowledges research support from NSF (grant AST-1312498).

  3. Deposition-rate dependence of granular size distribution in Cu aggregate on liquid substrate studied by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Miao-Gen; Yu, Sen-Jiang; Jiao, Zhi-Wei; Yu, Ming-Zhou; Bao, Fu-Bing

    2012-03-01

    In this article, we report an atomic force microscopy study on the microstructure and the deposition-rate dependence of granular size distribution in copper (Cu) ramified aggregates on a liquid substrate. This study shows that the ramified Cu aggregates are composed of Gaussian size distribution granules, which form immediately after the Cu atoms are deposited. The interesting phenomenon is that the mean diameter Φm of the granules exponentially decays and approaches a stable value Φc with an increase in the deposition rate f. The granular mean diameter Φm slightly changes with the time interval Δt during which the film is kept in the vacuum chamber, owing to the large diffusion coefficient of the Cu granules on the liquid substrates. The experimental behavior strongly depends on the properties of the liquid substrate.

  4. Effect of magnetic anisotropy and particle size distribution on temperature dependent magnetic hyperthermia in Fe3O4 ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palihawadana Arachchige, Maheshika; Nemala, Humeshkar; Naik, Vaman; Naik, Ratna

    Magnetic hyperthermia (MHT) has a great potential as a non-invasive cancer therapy technique. Specific absorption rate (SAR) which measures the efficiency of heat generation, mainly depends on magnetic properties of nanoparticles such as saturation magnetization (Ms) and magnetic anisotropy (K) which depend on the size and shape. Therefore, MHT applications of magnetic nanoparticles often require a controllable synthesis to achieve desirable magnetic properties. We have synthesized Fe3O4 nanoparticles using two different methods, co-precipitation (CP) and hydrothermal (HT) techniques to produce similar XRD crystallite size of 12 nm, and subsequently coated with dextran to prepare ferrofluids for MHT. However, TEM measurements show average particle sizes of 13.8 +/-3.6 nm and 14.6 +/-3.6 nm for HT and CP samples, implying the existence of an amorphous surface layer for both. The MHT data show the two samples have very different SAR values of 110 W/g (CP) and 40W/g (HT) at room temperature, although they have similar Ms of 70 +/-4 emu/g regardless of their different TEM sizes. We fitted the temperature dependent SAR using linear response theory to explain the observed results. CP sample shows a larger magnetic core with a narrow size distribution and a higher K value compared to that of HT sample.

  5. Distribution of Systemically Administered Nanoparticles Reveals a Size-Dependent Effect Immediately following Cardiac Ischaemia-Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lundy, David J.; Chen, Kun-Hung; Toh, Elsie K.-W.; Hsieh, Patrick C.-H.

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles represent an attractive option for systemic delivery of therapeutic compounds to the heart following myocardial infarction. However, it is well known that physicochemical properties of nanoparticles such as size, shape and surface modifications can vastly alter the distribution and uptake of injected nanoparticles. Therefore, we aimed to provide an examination of the rapid size-dependent uptake of fluorescent PEG-modified polystyrene nanoparticles administered immediately following cardiac ischaemia-reperfusion injury in mice. By assessing the biodistribution of nanoparticles with core diameters between 20 nm and 2 μm 30 minutes after their administration, we conclude that 20–200 nm diameter nanoparticles are optimal for passive targeting of the injured left ventricle. PMID:27161857

  6. Influence of scale-dependent fracture intensity on block size distribution and rock slope failure mechanisms in a DFN framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agliardi, Federico; Galletti, Laura; Riva, Federico; Zanchi, Andrea; Crosta, Giovanni B.

    2017-04-01

    An accurate characterization of the geometry and intensity of discontinuities in a rock mass is key to assess block size distribution and degree of freedom. These are the main controls on the magnitude and mechanisms of rock slope instabilities (structurally-controlled, step-path or mass failures) and rock mass strength and deformability. Nevertheless, the use of over-simplified discontinuity characterization approaches, unable to capture the stochastic nature of discontinuity features, often hampers a correct identification of dominant rock mass behaviour. Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) modelling tools have provided new opportunities to overcome these caveats. Nevertheless, their ability to provide a representative picture of reality strongly depends on the quality and scale of field data collection. Here we used DFN modelling with FracmanTM to investigate the influence of fracture intensity, characterized on different scales and with different techniques, on the geometry and size distribution of generated blocks, in a rock slope stability perspective. We focused on a test site near Lecco (Southern Alps, Italy), where 600 m high cliffs in thickly-bedded limestones folded at the slope scale impend on the Lake Como. We characterized the 3D slope geometry by Structure-from-Motion photogrammetry (range: 150-1500m; point cloud density > 50 pts/m2). Since the nature and attributes of discontinuities are controlled by brittle failure processes associated to large-scale folding, we performed a field characterization of meso-structural features (faults and related kinematics, vein and joint associations) in different fold domains. We characterized the discontinuity populations identified by structural geology on different spatial scales ranging from outcrops (field surveys and photo-mapping) to large slope sectors (point cloud and photo-mapping). For each sampling domain, we characterized discontinuity orientation statistics and performed fracture mapping and circular

  7. Dependence on cation distribution of particle size, lattice parameter, and magnetic properties in nanosize Mn-Zn ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rath, Chandana; Anand, S.; Das, R. P.; Sahu, K. K.; Kulkarni, S. D.; Date, S. K.; Mishra, N. C.

    2002-02-01

    In Mn1-xZnxFe2O4 (x=0 to 1) nanosize particles prepared through hydrothermal precipitation we observe a decrease in particle size from 13 to 4 nm with increasing Zn concentration from 0 to 1. The lattice constant, a, for all Mn/Zn concentrations is found to be less than that for the corresponding bulk values. At specific compositions within x=0.35 and 0.5, the temperature dependence of the magnetization exhibits a cusp-like behavior below the temperature at which the nanoparticles undergo a ferri- to para-magnetic transition (Tc). The Curie temperatures, Tc, of the nanoparticles are in the range of 175-500 °C, which are much higher than their corresponding bulk values. To explain these unusual features, the strong preferential occupancy of cations in chemically inequivalent A and B sites and the metastable cation distribution in nanoparticles are invoked.

  8. Particle-size dependence on metal(loid) distributions in mine wastes: Implications for water contamination and human exposure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kim, C.S.; Wilson, K.M.; Rytuba, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    The mining and processing of metal-bearing ores has resulted in contamination issues where waste materials from abandoned mines remain in piles of untreated and unconsolidated material, posing the potential for waterborne and airborne transport of toxic elements. This study presents a systematic method of particle size separation, mass distribution, and bulk chemical analysis for mine tailings and adjacent background soil samples from the Rand historic mining district, California, in order to assess particle size distribution and related trends in metal(loid) concentration as a function of particle size. Mine tailings produced through stamp milling and leaching processes were found to have both a narrower and finer particle size distribution than background samples, with significant fractions of particles available in a size range (???250 ??m) that could be incidentally ingested. In both tailings and background samples, the majority of trace metal(loid)s display an inverse relationship between concentration and particle size, resulting in higher proportions of As, Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn in finer-sized fractions which are more susceptible to both water- and wind-borne transport as well as ingestion and/or inhalation. Established regulatory screening levels for such elements may, therefore, significantly underestimate potential exposure risk if relying solely on bulk sample concentrations to guide remediation decisions. Correlations in elemental concentration trends (such as between As and Fe) indicate relationships between elements that may be relevant to their chemical speciation. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Size-dependent distribution and feeding habits of Terebralia palustris in mangrove habitats of Gazi Bay, Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pape, Ellen; Muthumbi, Agnes; Kamanu, Chomba Peter; Vanreusel, Ann

    2008-03-01

    The gastropod Terebralia palustris often dominates the surface of muddy to sandy substrates of intertidal mudflats and mangrove forests, where they clearly destabilize the sediment. In the present study, it was investigated whether and to what extent the behaviour of juvenile and adult snails differs among habitats (mudflat vs. mangrove stand) in a Sonneratia alba mangal at Gazi Bay, Kenya. For this purpose we: (1) examined their distribution along three land-sea transects; and (2) applied stable isotope analysis to determine the feeding patterns of different-sized snails from the mangrove and mudflat habitats. Additionally, we investigated if these gastropods exert an impact on microphytobenthic (diatom) biomass, and whether this is size-dependent. The latter objective was met by either enclosing or excluding different-sized snails from experimental cages on the intertidal mudflat and the subsequent assessment of a change in pigment concentration of the sediment surface. In agreement with several previous studies conducted in other mangroves and geographical locations, a spatial segregation was demonstrated between juveniles (more common on the mudflat) and adults (more common in the mangrove forest). On the intertidal mudflat juveniles avoided sediment patches characterized by highly saline water in intertidal pools and a high mud content, while adults tended to dwell on substrates covered by a high amount of leaf litter. Stable carbon isotope analysis of the foot tissue of snails sampled from the S. alba stand and the mudflat indicated a transition in food source when a shell length of 51 mm is reached. Considering the δ13C value of juveniles, it seems they might be selecting for microphytobenthos, which might explain their preference for the mudflat. The diet of size classes found in both habitats did not differ significantly, although juveniles inhabiting the mangrove forest were slightly more depleted in 13C compared to those residing on the mudflat

  10. Hail Size Distribution Mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    A 3-D weather radar visualization software program was developed and implemented as part of an experimental Launch Pad 39 Hail Monitor System. 3DRadPlot, a radar plotting program, is one of several software modules that form building blocks of the hail data processing and analysis system (the complete software processing system under development). The spatial and temporal mapping algorithms were originally developed through research at the University of Central Florida, funded by NASA s Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM), where the goal was to merge National Weather Service (NWS) Next-Generation Weather Radar (NEXRAD) volume reflectivity data with drop size distribution data acquired from a cluster of raindrop disdrometers. In this current work, we adapted these algorithms to process data from a cluster of hail disdrometers positioned around Launch Pads 39A or 39B, along with the corresponding NWS radar data. Radar data from all NWS NEXRAD sites is archived at the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC). That data can be readily accessed at . 3DRadPlot plots Level III reflectivity data at four scan elevations (this software is available at Open Channel Software, ). By using spatial and temporal interpolation/extrapolation based on hydrometeor fall dynamics, we can merge the hail disdrometer array data coupled with local Weather Surveillance Radar-1988, Doppler (WSR-88D) radial velocity and reflectivity data into a 4-D (3-D space and time) picture of hail size distributions. Hail flux maps can then be generated and used for damage prediction and assessment over specific surfaces corresponding to structures within the disdrometer array volume. Immediately following a hail storm, specific damage areas and degree of damage can be identified for inspection crews.

  11. Multi-Scale Particle Size Distributions of Mars, Moon and Itokawa based on a time-maturation dependent fragmentation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charalambous, C. A.; Pike, W. T.

    2013-12-01

    We present the development of a soil evolution framework and multiscale modelling of the surface of Mars, Moon and Itokawa thus providing an atlas of extra-terrestrial Particle Size Distributions (PSD). These PSDs are profoundly based on a tailoring method which interconnects several datasets from different sites captured by the various missions. The final integrated product is then fully justified through a soil evolution analysis model mathematically constructed via fundamental physical principles (Charalambous, 2013). The construction of the PSD takes into account the macroscale fresh primary impacts and their products, the mesoscale distributions obtained by the in-situ data of surface missions (Golombek et al., 1997, 2012) and finally the microscopic scale distributions provided by Curiosity and Phoenix Lander (Pike, 2011). The distribution naturally extends at the magnitudinal scales at which current data does not exist due to the lack of scientific instruments capturing the populations at these data absent scales. The extension is based on the model distribution (Charalambous, 2013) which takes as parameters known values of material specific probabilities of fragmentation and grinding limits. Additionally, the establishment of a closed-form statistical distribution provides a quantitative description of the soil's structure. Consequently, reverse engineering of the model distribution allows the synthesis of soil that faithfully represents the particle population at the studied sites (Charalambous, 2011). Such representation essentially delivers a virtual soil environment to work with for numerous applications. A specific application demonstrated here will be the information that can directly be extracted for the successful drilling probability as a function of distance in an effort to aid the HP3 instrument of the 2016 Insight Mission to Mars. Pike, W. T., et al. "Quantification of the dry history of the Martian soil inferred from in situ microscopy

  12. Size distributions in urban aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Lippmann, M.

    1980-01-01

    Data on the size distributions of urban aerosols are reviewed with emphasis on the physical characteristics of the particles. Types of size distributions, the reliability of size distribution data, and factors affecting urban aerosol size distributions are considered. As examples, the grand average number aerosol distribution from the 1969 Los Angeles smog experiment is compared with a Junge power law distribution calculated with the constants of Clark and Whitby. The computer-prepared volume size distribution measured during the General Motors Sulfate Study in Milford, Mich. is presented, the median size distribution by number for the New York Summer Aerosol Study is considered, and volume concentration distributions for Denver-area aerosols are presented.

  13. Flare Size Distributions and Active Region Types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Taeil

    2007-05-01

    Size distributions of solar flares measured by various size indicators follow a power law with a negative index of about 1.8. On the basis of general appearance of power-law distributions, Lu and his collegues proposed an avalenche model. According to this model, the power-law index should be independent of active region size, but the cutoff size above which the size distribution steepens rapidly is expected to depend on the active region size. I have analyzed the size distribution of flares, using GOES soft X-ray observations for 2004 and 2005. For flares observed by GOES during these years, their locations are almost completely identified even for C-class flares. This enable us to study the dependence of size distribution on active region type. Comparing the power-law portion of size distributions below the high-end cutoff, I have found that the size distribution index depends on active region type. Flares from prolific active regions exhibit a flatter distribution, while flares from non-prolific active regions exhibit a steeper distribution. I plan to discuss a plausible mechanism for such behavior.

  14. Nanophase cobalt, nickel and zinc ferrites: synchrotron XAS study on the crystallite size dependence of metal distribution.

    PubMed

    Nordhei, Camilla; Ramstad, Astrid Lund; Nicholson, David G

    2008-02-21

    Nanophase cobalt, nickel and zinc ferrites, in which the crystallites are in the size range 4-25 nm, were synthesised by coprecipitation and subsequent annealing. X-Ray absorption spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation (supported by X-ray powder diffraction) was used to study the effects of particle size on the distributions of the metal atoms over the tetrahedral and octahedral sites of the spinel structure. Deviations from the bulk structure were found which are attributed to the significant influence of the surface on very small particles. Like the bulk material, nickel ferrite is an inverse spinel in the nanoregime, although the population of metals on the octahedral sites increases with decreasing particle size. Cobalt ferrite and zinc ferrite take the inverse and normal forms of the spinel structure respectively, but within the nanoregime both systems show similar trends in being partially inverted. Further, in zinc ferrite, unlike the normal bulk structure, the nanophase system involves mixed coordinations of zinc(ii) and iron(iii) consistent with increasing partial inversion with size.

  15. System Size, Energy, and Centrality Dependence of Pseudorapidity Distributions of Charged Particles in Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Alver, B.; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Chai, Z.; Holzman, B.; Nouicer, R.; Pak, R.; Sedykh, I.; Stankiewicz, M. A.; Steinberg, P.; Sukhanov, A.; Szostak, A.; Wyngaardt, S.; Ballintijn, M.; Busza, W.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Henderson, C.; Kane, J. L.; Kulinich, P.

    2009-04-10

    We present the first measurements of the pseudorapidity distribution of primary charged particles in Cu+Cu collisions as a function of collision centrality and energy, {radical}(s{sub NN})=22.4, 62.4, and 200 GeV, over a wide range of pseudorapidity, using the PHOBOS detector. A comparison of Cu+Cu and Au+Au results shows that the total number of produced charged particles and the rough shape (height and width) of the pseudorapidity distributions are determined by the number of nucleon participants. More detailed studies reveal that a more precise matching of the shape of the Cu+Cu and Au+Au pseudorapidity distributions over the full range of pseudorapidity occurs for the same N{sub part}/2A rather than the same N{sub part}. In other words, it is the collision geometry rather than just the number of nucleon participants that drives the detailed shape of the pseudorapidity distribution and its centrality dependence at RHIC energies.

  16. Thermal fluctuations of vesicles and nonlinear curvature elasticity--implications for size-dependent renormalized bending rigidity and vesicle size distribution.

    PubMed

    Ahmadpoor, Fatemeh; Sharma, Pradeep

    2016-03-07

    Both closed and open biological membranes noticeably undulate at physiological temperatures. These thermal fluctuations influence a broad range of biophysical phenomena, ranging from self-assembly to adhesion. In particular, the experimentally measured thermal fluctuation spectra also provide a facile route to the assessment of mechanical and certain other physical properties of biological membranes. The theoretical assessment of thermal fluctuations, be it for closed vesicles or the simpler case of flat open lipid bilayers, is predicated upon assuming that the elastic curvature energy is a quadratic functional of the curvature tensor. However, a qualitatively correct description of several phenomena such as binding-unbinding transition, vesicle-to-bicelle transition, appearance of hats and saddles among others, appears to require consideration of constitutively nonlinear elasticity that includes fourth order curvature contributions rather than just quadratic. In particular, such nonlinear considerations are relevant in the context of large-curvature or small-sized vesicles. In this work we discuss the statistical mechanics of closed membranes (vesicles) incorporating both constitutive and geometrical nonlinearities. We derive results for the renormalized bending rigidity of small vesicles and show that significant stiffening may occur for sub-20 nm vesicle sizes. Our closed-form results may also be used to determine nonlinear curvature elasticity properties from either experimentally measured fluctuation spectra or microscopic calculations such as molecular dynamics. Finally, in the context of our results on thermal fluctuations of vesicles and nonlinear curvature elasticity, we reexamine the problem of determining the size distribution of vesicles and obtain results that reconcile well with experimental observations. However, our results are somewhat paradoxical. Specifically, the molecular dynamics predictions for the thermo-mechanical behavior of small vesicles

  17. Numerical Estimation of the Dependence of Dielectric Constant of BaTiO3 Thick Films on Grain-Size Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Kimihiro; Yamazaki, Shozo; Koumoto, Kunihito; Yanagida, Hiroaki

    1981-10-01

    An exponential function of the grain size was assumed in calculating the apparent (total) dielectric constant of BaTiO3 thick films with the average grain diameter known. The function was tested and estimated experimentally, for cases where the grain sizes were calculated using the following methods; the two-dimensional diameter analysis, the Schwartz-Saltykov method and Oel’s method for converting a two-dimensional grain distribution to a spacial grain sizedistribution. Using the present assumed function and the extended logarithmic mixing rule to combine the dielectric constants of individual grains, the grain-size distribution-dependence of the dielectric constant was successfully simulated. From the simulated results it was concluded that the dielectric constants of coarse grains of thick films increase with increase of grain size in the range from room temperature up to 135°C.

  18. Dependence on Crystal Size of the Nanoscale Chemical Phase Distribution and Fracture in LixFePO₄.

    PubMed

    Yu, Young-Sang; Kim, Chunjoong; Shapiro, David A; Farmand, Maryam; Qian, Danna; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Kilcoyne, A L David; Celestre, Rich; Marchesini, Stefano; Joseph, John; Denes, Peter; Warwick, Tony; Strobridge, Fiona C; Grey, Clare P; Padmore, Howard; Meng, Ying Shirley; Kostecki, Robert; Cabana, Jordi

    2015-07-08

    The performance of battery electrode materials is strongly affected by inefficiencies in utilization kinetics and cycle life as well as size effects. Observations of phase transformations in these materials with high chemical and spatial resolution can elucidate the relationship between chemical processes and mechanical degradation. Soft X-ray ptychographic microscopy combined with X-ray absorption spectroscopy and electron microscopy creates a powerful suite of tools that we use to assess the chemical and morphological changes in lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4) micro- and nanocrystals that occur upon delithiation. All sizes of partly delithiated crystals were found to contain two phases with a complex correlation between crystallographic orientation and phase distribution. However, the lattice mismatch between LiFePO4 and FePO4 led to severe fracturing on microcrystals, whereas no mechanical damage was observed in nanoplates, indicating that mechanics are a principal driver in the outstanding electrode performance of LiFePO4 nanoparticles. These results demonstrate the importance of engineering the active electrode material in next generation electrical energy storage systems, which will achieve theoretical limits of energy density and extended stability. This work establishes soft X-ray ptychographic chemical imaging as an essential tool to build comprehensive relationships between mechanics and chemistry that guide this engineering design.

  19. Determination of size-dependent metal distribution in dissolved organic matter by SEC-UV/VIS-ICP-MS with special focus on changes in seawater.

    PubMed

    Rathgeb, Anna; Causon, Tim; Krachler, Regina; Hann, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    Iron is an essential micronutrient for all marine organisms, but it is also a growth limiting factor as the iron concentrations in the open ocean are below 1 nmol/L in sea water iron is almost entirely bound to organic ligands of the dissolved organic matter fraction, which are mostly of unknown structure. The input from rivers was traditionally considered as less important due to estuarine sedimentation processes of the mainly colloidal iron particles. However, recent studies have shown that this removal is not complete and riverine input may represent an important iron source in the open ocean. In this context, iron transport by land-derived natural organic matter (NOM), and dissolved organic matter (DOM) have been identified as carrier mechanisms for riverine iron. The aim of this work is to characterize complexes containing iron and other metals in waters simulating estuarine conditions in order to help understand which role iron-DOM compounds play in the open ocean. A method based on size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) with sequential UV/VIS and ICP-MS detection was developed for investigation of DOM size distribution and for assessment of the size-dependent metal distribution in NOM-rich surface water. Furthermore, sample matrix experiments were also performed revealing a dependence of DOM size distribution upon seawater concentration and different compounds present in seawater. Finally, efforts toward determination of DOM size with standardization with typical SEC standards indicate that only relative comparisons are possible with this approach, and that the sample matrix composition strongly influences obtained results.

  20. Experimental determination of size distributions: analyzing proper sample sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buffo, A.; Alopaeus, V.

    2016-04-01

    The measurement of various particle size distributions is a crucial aspect for many applications in the process industry. Size distribution is often related to the final product quality, as in crystallization or polymerization. In other cases it is related to the correct evaluation of heat and mass transfer, as well as reaction rates, depending on the interfacial area between the different phases or to the assessment of yield stresses of polycrystalline metals/alloys samples. The experimental determination of such distributions often involves laborious sampling procedures and the statistical significance of the outcome is rarely investigated. In this work, we propose a novel rigorous tool, based on inferential statistics, to determine the number of samples needed to obtain reliable measurements of size distribution, according to specific requirements defined a priori. Such methodology can be adopted regardless of the measurement technique used.

  1. Centaur size distribution with DECam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuentes, Cesar; Trilling, David E.; Schlichting, Hilke

    2014-11-01

    We present the results of the 2014 centaur search campaign on the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) in Tololo, Chile. This is the largest debiased Centaur survey to date, measuring for the first time the size distribution of small Centaurs (1-10km) and the first time the sizes of planetesimals from which the entire Solar System formed are directly detected.The theoretical model for the coagulation and collisional evolution of the outer solar system proposed in Schlichting et al. 2013 predicts a steep rise in the size distribution of TNOs smaller than 10km. These objects are below the detection limit of current TNO surveys but feasible for the Centaur population. By constraining the number of Centaurs and this feature in their size distribution we can confirm the collisional evolution of the Solar System and estimate the rate at which material is being transferred from the outer to the inner Solar System. If the shallow power law behavior from the TNO size distribution at ~40km can be extrapolated to 1km, the size of the Jupiter Family of Comets (JFC), there would not be enough small TNOs to supply the JFC population (Volk & Malhotra, 2008), debunking the link between TNOs and JFCs.We also obtain the colors of small Centaurs and TNOs, providing a signature of collisional evolution by measuring if there is in fact a relationship between color and size. If objects smaller than the break in the TNO size distribution are being ground down by collisions then their surfaces should be fresh, and then appear bluer in the optical than larger TNOs that are not experiencing collisions.

  2. Temperature induced changes in size dependent distributions of two boreal and three Lusitanian flatfish species: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hal, Ralf; van Kooten, Tobias; Rijnsdorp, Adriaan D.

    2016-01-01

    Changes in spatial distribution in several fish species have been related to recent increase in global temperature. In the North Sea, both a poleward shift and a shift to deeper water have been observed. Here, we study the underlying mechanism of these shifts in a comparative study of the changes in distribution of two boreal flatfish species (plaice Pleuronectes platessa and dab Limanda limanda) and three Lusitanian flatfish species (sole Solea solea, solenette Buglossidium luteum, and scaldfish Arnoglossus laterna) as recorded in annual bottom trawl surveys carried out in the North Sea in late summer since 1985. The distribution is analysed in relation to the bottom temperature at the time of the survey as well as to the seasonal maximum bottom temperature earlier in the year. It is shown that the boreal species plaice and dab moved to deeper water and maintained the seasonal maximum temperature that they experienced in earlier periods, while the Lusitanian species sole, solenette, and scaldfish experienced an increase in the seasonal maximum temperature that they experienced while maintaining their depth distribution. This overall response varied between length classes, reflecting a preference for higher temperature of the smaller length classes. The results lend support to the hypothesis that the fish displayed a direct response to the maximum temperature that occurred during the growth season before the time of sampling.

  3. Exponential Size Distribution of von Willebrand Factor

    PubMed Central

    Lippok, Svenja; Obser, Tobias; Müller, Jochen P.; Stierle, Valentin K.; Benoit, Martin; Budde, Ulrich; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Rädler, Joachim O.

    2013-01-01

    Von Willebrand Factor (VWF) is a multimeric protein crucial for hemostasis. Under shear flow, it acts as a mechanosensor responding with a size-dependent globule-stretch transition to increasing shear rates. Here, we quantify for the first time, to our knowledge, the size distribution of recombinant VWF and VWF-eGFP using a multilateral approach that involves quantitative gel analysis, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. We find an exponentially decaying size distribution of multimers for recombinant VWF as well as for VWF derived from blood samples in accordance with the notion of a step-growth polymerization process during VWF biosynthesis. The distribution is solely described by the extent of polymerization, which was found to be reduced in the case of the pathologically relevant mutant VWF-IIC. The VWF-specific protease ADAMTS13 systematically shifts the VWF size distribution toward smaller sizes. This dynamic evolution is monitored using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and compared to a computer simulation of a random cleavage process relating ADAMTS13 concentration to the degree of VWF breakdown. Quantitative assessment of VWF size distribution in terms of an exponential might prove to be useful both as a valuable biophysical characterization and as a possible disease indicator for clinical applications. PMID:24010664

  4. Size distribution of ring polymers

    PubMed Central

    Medalion, Shlomi; Aghion, Erez; Meirovitch, Hagai; Barkai, Eli; Kessler, David A.

    2016-01-01

    We present an exact solution for the distribution of sample averaged monomer to monomer distance of ring polymers. For non-interacting and local-interaction models these distributions correspond to the distribution of the area under the reflected Bessel bridge and the Bessel excursion respectively, and are shown to be identical in dimension d ≥ 2, albeit with pronounced finite size effects at the critical dimension, d = 2. A symmetry of the problem reveals that dimension d and 4 − d are equivalent, thus the celebrated Airy distribution describing the areal distribution of the d = 1 Brownian excursion describes also a polymer in three dimensions. For a self-avoiding polymer in dimension d we find numerically that the fluctuations of the scaled averaged distance are nearly identical in dimension d = 2, 3 and are well described to a first approximation by the non-interacting excursion model in dimension 5. PMID:27302596

  5. Power laws, discontinuities and regional city size distributions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garmestani, A.S.; Allen, C.R.; Gallagher, C.M.

    2008-01-01

    Urban systems are manifestations of human adaptation to the natural environment. City size distributions are the expression of hierarchical processes acting upon urban systems. In this paper, we test the entire city size distributions for the southeastern and southwestern United States (1990), as well as the size classes in these regions for power law behavior. We interpret the differences in the size of the regional city size distributions as the manifestation of variable growth dynamics dependent upon city size. Size classes in the city size distributions are snapshots of stable states within urban systems in flux. ?? 2008.

  6. Cell-size-dependent control of organelle sizes during development.

    PubMed

    Hara, Yuki; Kimura, Akatsuki

    2011-01-01

    During development, cells differentiate into diverse cell types with different sizes. The size of intracellular organelles often correlates with the size of the cell, which may be important for cell homeostasis. The nucleus is a well-known example of an organelle whose size correlates with cell size. However, the mechanical basis of the correlation is unknown. The lengths of the mitotic spindle and contractile ring are emerging as model system to investigate the cell-size-dependent control mechanisms of organelle size. Mechanistic models are proposed for the cell-size-dependent control of these organelles. Understanding the cell-size dependency of organelle sizes is expected to impact not only on the morphogenesis of the individual organelle, but also on cell homeostasis, cell cycle progression, and cell differentiation.

  7. Size-dependent distribution of radiocesium in riverbed sediments and its relevance to the migration of radiocesium in river systems after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kazuya; Iwatani, Hokuto; Sakaguchi, Aya; Fan, Qiaohui; Takahashi, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the particle size distribution of radiocesium in riverbed sediments after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. Riverbed sediments were collected in the Abukuma River system in Fukushima and Miyagi Prefectures. The collected sediments were separated into 11 fractions, ranging from granular size (>2000 μm) to clay size (<2 μm) fractions. Cesium-137 concentrations were higher in the smaller particle size fractions, possibly reflecting specific surface areas and the mineralogy, in particular the clay mineral content. A gap in (137)Cs concentration was observed between the silt size and sand size fractions of riverbed sediments at downstream sites, whereas riverbed sediments at an upstream site did not show such a concentration gap. It is likely that selective transport of small particles in suspended state from upstream areas resulted in an accumulation of radiocesium in downstream areas.

  8. Determination of the cumulus size distribution from LANDSAT pictures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karg, E.; Mueller, H.; Quenzel, H.

    1983-01-01

    Varying insolation causes undesirable thermic stress to the receiver of a solar power plant. The rapid change of insolation depends on the size distribution of the clouds; in order to measure these changes, it is suitable to determine typical cumulus size distributions. For this purpose, LANDSAT-images are adequate. Several examples of cumulus size distributions will be presented and their effects on the operation of a solar power plant are discussed.

  9. The invariances of power law size distributions.

    PubMed

    Frank, Steven A

    2016-01-01

    Size varies. Small things are typically more frequent than large things. The logarithm of frequency often declines linearly with the logarithm of size. That power law relation forms one of the common patterns of nature. Why does the complexity of nature reduce to such a simple pattern? Why do things as different as tree size and enzyme rate follow similarly simple patterns? Here I analyze such patterns by their invariant properties. For example, a common pattern should not change when adding a constant value to all observations. That shift is essentially the renumbering of the points on a ruler without changing the metric information provided by the ruler. A ruler is shift invariant only when its scale is properly calibrated to the pattern being measured. Stretch invariance corresponds to the conservation of the total amount of something, such as the total biomass and consequently the average size. Rotational invariance corresponds to pattern that does not depend on the order in which underlying processes occur, for example, a scale that additively combines the component processes leading to observed values. I use tree size as an example to illustrate how the key invariances shape pattern. A simple interpretation of common pattern follows. That simple interpretation connects the normal distribution to a wide variety of other common patterns through the transformations of scale set by the fundamental invariances.

  10. The invariances of power law size distributions

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    Size varies. Small things are typically more frequent than large things. The logarithm of frequency often declines linearly with the logarithm of size. That power law relation forms one of the common patterns of nature. Why does the complexity of nature reduce to such a simple pattern? Why do things as different as tree size and enzyme rate follow similarly simple patterns? Here I analyze such patterns by their invariant properties. For example, a common pattern should not change when adding a constant value to all observations. That shift is essentially the renumbering of the points on a ruler without changing the metric information provided by the ruler. A ruler is shift invariant only when its scale is properly calibrated to the pattern being measured. Stretch invariance corresponds to the conservation of the total amount of something, such as the total biomass and consequently the average size. Rotational invariance corresponds to pattern that does not depend on the order in which underlying processes occur, for example, a scale that additively combines the component processes leading to observed values. I use tree size as an example to illustrate how the key invariances shape pattern. A simple interpretation of common pattern follows. That simple interpretation connects the normal distribution to a wide variety of other common patterns through the transformations of scale set by the fundamental invariances. PMID:27928497

  11. Spatial Structure of Seagrass Suggests That Size-Dependent Plant Traits Have a Strong Influence on the Distribution and Maintenance of Tropical Multispecies Meadows

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Jillian L. S.; Van Niel, Kimberly P.; Kendrick, Gary A.; Holmes, Karen W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Seagrass species in the tropics occur in multispecies meadows. How these meadows are maintained through species co-existence and what their ecological drivers may be has been an overarching question in seagrass biogeography. In this study, we quantify the spatial structure of four co-existing species and infer potential ecological processes from these structures. Methods and Results Species presence/absence data were collected using underwater towed and dropped video cameras in Pulau Tinggi, Malaysia. The geostatistical method, utilizing semivariograms, was used to describe the spatial structure of Halophila spp, Halodule uninervis, Syringodium isoetifolium and Cymodocea serrulata. Species had spatial patterns that were oriented in the along-shore and across-shore directions, nested with larger species in meadow interiors, and consisted of multiple structures that indicate the influence of 2–3 underlying processes. The Linear Model of Coregionalization (LMC) was used to estimate the amount of variance contributing to the presence of a species at specific spatial scales. These distances were <2.5 m (micro-scale), 2.5–50 m (fine-scale) and >50 m (broad-scale) in the along-shore; and <2.5 m (micro-scale), 2.5–140 m (fine-scale) and >140 m (broad-scale) in the across-shore. The LMC suggests that smaller species (Halophila spp and H. uninervis) were most influenced by broad-scale processes such as hydrodynamics and water depth whereas large, localised species (S. isoetifolium and C. serrulata) were more influenced by finer-scale processes such as sediment burial, seagrass colonization and growth, and physical disturbance. Conclusion In this study, we provide evidence that spatial structure is distinct even when species occur in well-mixed multispecies meadows, and we suggest that size-dependent plant traits have a strong influence on the distribution and maintenance of tropical marine plant communities. This study offers a contrast from previous spatial

  12. Variations of sediment size and size distribution along a river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jan, C. D.; Tsai, Y. C.; Yang, S. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Sediment material of a river bed is an important factor for river morphodynamics. Typically, alluvial rivers construct their own geometries based on the sediment size and its distribution that affect the sediment transport capacity in river channel networks, involving the issues of watershed sediment yield, flood controls and the evolution of flood plain, habitats, deltas and adjacent coastline. Hence, investigating grain size and size distribution of sediment materials on riverbeds is important for practical river management and assessment of landscape evolution. In this study, we collected total 43 sediment samplings along the Koaping River in southern Taiwan to analyze the grain size and its distribution along the river. Spatial distributions of different representative grain sizes, such as D50 and D90, and the size corresponding Manning's n values are analyzed and discussed in this paper. An exponential grain size distribution (GSD) formula is used to explore the relation between the frequency and size of riverbed sediment. Results show that the grain size has a wide range distribution in the river upstream but displays a narrow-range variation in the river downstream. For example, the sediment medium size D50 ranges from 1.25 mm to 391.27 mm with an average of 49.36 mm in the upstream while it ranges from 0.135 mm to 0.625 mm with an average of 0.338 mm in the downstream. The best fitting curves of GSD with exponential scaling are analyzed with an empirical parameter Dc that is used to normalize the sediment grain size. This study finds that the empirical parameter Dc could be replaced by the sediment resentative size D65 (65% of sediment smaller than it). The results obtained herein could be useful not only in analyzing sediment transport of a river but also in river management.

  13. City-size distribution and the size of urban systems.

    PubMed

    Thomas, I

    1985-07-01

    "This paper is an analysis of the city-size distribution for thirty-five countries of the world in 1975; the purpose is to explain statistically the regularity of the rank-size distribution by the number of cities included in the urban systems. The rank-size parameters have been computed for each country and also for four large urban systems in which several population thresholds have been defined. These thresholds seem to have more influence than the number of cities included in the urban system on the regularity of the distribution." The data are from the U.N. Demographic Yearbook. excerpt

  14. Cumulative frequency fit for particle size distribution.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhuyun; Gautam, Mridul; Mehta, Sandeep

    2002-08-01

    A cumulative frequency distribution fit method is presented for analyzing particle size distributions by minimizing the summation of the square of cumulative frequency errors. Compared to the frequency fit method, the cumulative frequency fit method yields a more accurate solution. Based upon this, a spreadsheet was developed for analyzing multi-modal particle size distribution. The motivation for the work presented in this article was the current interest in ultra-fine and nano-sized particle exhaust emissions from heavy-duty diesel engines. The new spreadsheet provides a quick and convenient way to conduct particle size distribution analysis.

  15. Aerosol Size Distribution in the marine regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markuszewski, Piotr; Petelski, Tomasz; Zielinski, Tymon; Pakszys, Paulina; Strzalkowska, Agata; Makuch, Przemyslaw; Kowalczyk, Jakub

    2014-05-01

    We would like to present the data obtained during the regular research cruises of the S/Y Oceania over a period of time between 2009 - 2012. The Baltic Sea is a very interesting polygon for aerosol measurements, however, also difficult due to the fact that mostly cases of a mixture of continental and marine aerosols are observed. It is possible to measure clear marine aerosol, but also advections of dust from southern Europe or even Africa. This variability of data allows to compare different conditions. The data is also compared with our measurements from the Arctic Seas, which have been made during the ARctic EXperiment (AREX). The Arctic Seas are very suitable for marine aerosol investigations since continental advections of aerosols are far less frequent than in other European sea regions. The aerosol size distribution was measured using the TSI Laser Aerosol Spectrometer model 3340 (99 channels, measurement range 0.09 μm to 7 μm), condensation particle counter (range 0.01 μm to 3 μm) and laser particle counter PMS CSASP-100-HV-SP (range 0.5 μm to 47 μm in 45 channels). Studies of marine aerosol production and transport are important for many Earth sciences such as cloud physics, atmospheric optics, environmental pollution studies and interaction between ocean and atmosphere. All equipment was placed on one of the masts of S/Y Oceania. Measurements using the laser aerosol spectrometer and condensation particle counter were made on one level (8 meters above sea level). Measurements with the laser particle counter were performed at five different levels above the sea level (8, 11, 14, 17 and 20 m). Based on aerosol size distribution the parameterizations with a Log-Normal and a Power-Law distributions were made. The aerosol source functions, characteristic for the region were also determined. Additionally, poor precision of the sea spray emission determination was confirmed while using only the aerosol concentration data. The emission of sea spray depends

  16. Body size distribution of the dinosaurs.

    PubMed

    O'Gorman, Eoin J; Hone, David W E

    2012-01-01

    The distribution of species body size is critically important for determining resource use within a group or clade. It is widely known that non-avian dinosaurs were the largest creatures to roam the Earth. There is, however, little understanding of how maximum species body size was distributed among the dinosaurs. Do they share a similar distribution to modern day vertebrate groups in spite of their large size, or did they exhibit fundamentally different distributions due to unique evolutionary pressures and adaptations? Here, we address this question by comparing the distribution of maximum species body size for dinosaurs to an extensive set of extant and extinct vertebrate groups. We also examine the body size distribution of dinosaurs by various sub-groups, time periods and formations. We find that dinosaurs exhibit a strong skew towards larger species, in direct contrast to modern day vertebrates. This pattern is not solely an artefact of bias in the fossil record, as demonstrated by contrasting distributions in two major extinct groups and supports the hypothesis that dinosaurs exhibited a fundamentally different life history strategy to other terrestrial vertebrates. A disparity in the size distribution of the herbivorous Ornithischia and Sauropodomorpha and the largely carnivorous Theropoda suggests that this pattern may have been a product of a divergence in evolutionary strategies: herbivorous dinosaurs rapidly evolved large size to escape predation by carnivores and maximise digestive efficiency; carnivores had sufficient resources among juvenile dinosaurs and non-dinosaurian prey to achieve optimal success at smaller body size.

  17. Body Size Distribution of the Dinosaurs

    PubMed Central

    O’Gorman, Eoin J.; Hone, David W. E.

    2012-01-01

    The distribution of species body size is critically important for determining resource use within a group or clade. It is widely known that non-avian dinosaurs were the largest creatures to roam the Earth. There is, however, little understanding of how maximum species body size was distributed among the dinosaurs. Do they share a similar distribution to modern day vertebrate groups in spite of their large size, or did they exhibit fundamentally different distributions due to unique evolutionary pressures and adaptations? Here, we address this question by comparing the distribution of maximum species body size for dinosaurs to an extensive set of extant and extinct vertebrate groups. We also examine the body size distribution of dinosaurs by various sub-groups, time periods and formations. We find that dinosaurs exhibit a strong skew towards larger species, in direct contrast to modern day vertebrates. This pattern is not solely an artefact of bias in the fossil record, as demonstrated by contrasting distributions in two major extinct groups and supports the hypothesis that dinosaurs exhibited a fundamentally different life history strategy to other terrestrial vertebrates. A disparity in the size distribution of the herbivorous Ornithischia and Sauropodomorpha and the largely carnivorous Theropoda suggests that this pattern may have been a product of a divergence in evolutionary strategies: herbivorous dinosaurs rapidly evolved large size to escape predation by carnivores and maximise digestive efficiency; carnivores had sufficient resources among juvenile dinosaurs and non-dinosaurian prey to achieve optimal success at smaller body size. PMID:23284818

  18. Scaling in animal group-size distributions

    PubMed Central

    Bonabeau, Eric; Dagorn, Laurent; Fréon, Pierre

    1999-01-01

    An elementary model of animal aggregation is presented. The group-size distributions resulting from this model are truncated power laws. The predictions of the model are found to be consistent with data that describe the group-size distributions of tuna fish, sardinellas, and African buffaloes. PMID:10200286

  19. Powder Size and Distribution in Ultrasonic Gas Atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, G.; Lavernia, E.; Grant, N. J.

    1985-08-01

    Ultrasonic gas atomization (USGA) produces powder sizes dependent on the ratio of the nozzle jet diameter to the distance of spread dt/R, Powder size distribution is attributed to the spread of atomizing gas jets during travel from the nozzle exit to the metal stream. The spread diminishes at higher gas atomization pressures. In this paper, calculated powder sizes and distribution are compared with experimentally determined values.

  20. City size distributions and spatial economic change.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, E

    1982-10-01

    "The concept of the city size distribution is criticized for its lack of consideration of the effects of interurban interdependencies on the growth of cities. Theoretical justifications for the rank-size relationship have the same shortcomings, and an empirical study reveals that there is little correlation between deviations from rank-size distributions and national economic and social characteristics. Thus arguments suggesting a close correspondence between city size distributions and the level of development of a country, irrespective of intranational variations in city location and socioeconomic characteristics, seem to have little foundation." (summary in FRE, ITA, JPN, ) excerpt

  1. Particles size distribution in diluted magnetic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yerin, Constantine V.

    2017-06-01

    Changes in particles and aggregates size distribution in diluted kerosene based magnetic fluids is studied by dynamic light scattering method. It has been found that immediately after dilution in magnetic fluids the system of aggregates with sizes ranging from 100 to 250-1000 nm is formed. In 50-100 h after dilution large aggregates are peptized and in the sample stationary particles and aggregates size distribution is fixed.

  2. Size distributions of solar energetic particle events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliver, E.; Reames, D.; Kahler, S.; Cane, H.

    1991-01-01

    NASA particle detectors on the IMP-8 are employed to determine the size distributions of the peak fluxes of events related to solar-energetic particles including protons and electrons. The energetic proton events show a flatter size distribution which suggests that not all flares are proton flares. Both the electron and proton events are classified as either 'impulsive' or 'gradual', and the impulsive events tend to have a steeper power-law distribution.

  3. Asteroid Size-Frequency Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedesco, Edward F.

    2001-01-01

    A total of six deep exposures (using AOT CAM01 with a 6 inch PFOV) through the ISOCAM LW10 filter (IRAS Band 1, i.e. 12 micron) were obtained on an approximately 15 arcminute square field centered on the ecliptic plane. Point sources were extracted using the technique described. Two known asteroids appear in these frames and 20 sources moving with velocities appropriate for main belt asteroids are present. Most of the asteroids detected have flux densities less than 1 mJy, i,e., between 150 and 350 times fainter than any of the asteroids observed by IRAS. These data provide the first direct measurement of the 12 pm sky-plane density for asteroids on the ecliptic equator. The median zodiacal foreground, as measured by ISOCAM during this survey, is found to be 22.1 +/- 1.5 mJy per pixel, i.e., 26.2 +/- 1.7 MJy/sr. The results presented here imply that the actual number of kilometer-sized asteroids is significantly greater than previously believed and in reasonable agreement with the Statistical Asteroid Model.

  4. Optical heterodyne measurement of cloud droplet size distributions.

    PubMed

    Gollub, J P; Chabay, L; Flygare, W H

    1973-12-01

    Optical heterodyne spectra of laser light quasi-elastically scattered by falling water droplets (1-10-micro radius) in a diffusion cloud chamber were used to determine the droplet size distribution. The rate of fall depends on radius in a known way, thus yielding a heterodyne spectrum manifesting a distribution of Doppler shifts. This spectrum, in conjunction with the calculated Mie scattering intensity as a function of droplet radius, provides a direct measure of the droplet size distribution for droplets large enough that Brownian motion is negligible. The experiments described in this paper demonstrate the technique and establish the potential for further more quantitative studies of size distributions.

  5. Size distribution of planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asvarov, Abdul; Allahverdiyev, Ahad

    2015-08-01

    Despite a very long history of investigations, the nature and origin of planetary nebulae (PNe) are not fully understood. It is obvious that the observational properties of PNe are influenced by the properties of the central star and the conditions in the environment. In this presentation in order to understand the effects of these components we have modeled the evolution of radio luminosity and the expansion of PNe in the framework of different hypothesis on the origin of these objects. In this we have used the observational data on the central stars and clustered this data into gourps with the similar parameters of the central stars. For the each of these groups of PNe we have built statistical dependences radio luminosity - diameter, number of PNe - diameter which are then compared to the modeled ones. Unfortunately, the comparison of simulations with observations did not allow us to choose between the known models of the evolution of the PN shell. However with the increase of statistics the approach considered in this presentation may become more productive.

  6. Grain size dependence of wear in ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C.CM.; Rice, R.W.; Johnson, D.; Platt, B.A.

    1985-08-01

    Pin-on-disk (POD) microwear tests of Al2O3, MgO, MgAl2O4, and ZrO2 crystalline structures were conducted as a function of grain size and the results compared with data from single crystals of the same materials. Extrapolation to infinite grain size in the Hall-Petch type relationship for the structures resulted in lower intercepts than the single-crystal values. In addition, the macrowear grain-size dependence appears to decrease with increased wear. It is suggested that thermal expansion anisotropy (of Al2O3) significantly affects the grain size dependence of POD wear, giving a negative intercept, while elastic anisotropy is a factor in the grain-size dependence of the cubic (MgO, MgAl2O4, and ZrO2 materials. The reduced grain-size dependence is attributed to overlapping wear tracks, reducing the effects of enhanced wear damage. 9 references.

  7. Understanding Animal Group-Size Distributions

    PubMed Central

    Griesser, Michael; Ma, Qi; Webber, Simone; Bowgen, Katharine; Sumpter, David J. T.

    2011-01-01

    One of the most striking aspects of animal groups is their remarkable variation in size, both within and between species. While a number of mechanistic models have been proposed to explain this variation, there are few comprehensive datasets against which these models have been tested. In particular, we only vaguely understand how environmental factors and behavioral activities affect group-size distributions. Here we use observations of House sparrows (Passer domesticus) to investigate the factors determining group-size distribution. Over a wide range of conditions, we observed that animal group sizes followed a single parameter distribution known as the logarithmic distribution. This single parameter is the mean group size experienced by a randomly chosen individual (including the individual itself). For sparrows, the experienced mean group size, and hence the distribution, was affected by four factors: morning temperature, place, behavior and the degree of food spillage. Our results further indicate that the sparrows regulate the mean group size they experience, either by groups splitting more or merging less when local densities are high. We suggest that the mean experienced group size provides a simple but general tool for assessing the ecology and evolution of grouping. PMID:21912596

  8. Size-dependent distribution and inhalation cancer risk of particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at a typical e-waste recycling and an urban site.

    PubMed

    Luo, Pei; Bao, Lian-Jun; Li, Shao-Meng; Zeng, Eddy Y

    2015-05-01

    Atmospheric particle size distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in a typical e-waste recycling zone and an urban site (Guangzhou) in southern China featured a unimodal peak in 0.56-1.8 μm for 4-6 ring PAHs but no obvious peak for 2-3 ring PAHs at both sites. The atmospheric deposition fluxes of PAHs were estimated at 5.4 ± 2.3 μg m(-2) d(-1) in the e-waste recycling zone and 3.1 ± 0.6 μg m(-2) d(-1) in Guangzhou. In addition, dry and wet deposition fluxes of PAHs were dominated by coarse (Dp > 1.8 μm) and fine particles (Dp < 1.8 μm), respectively. Fine particles predominated the deposition of PAHs in the lung. The results estimated by incremental inhalation cancer risk suggested that particle-bound PAHs posed serious threat to human health within the e-waste recycling zone and Guangzhou.

  9. Analytic modeling of aerosol size distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deepack, A.; Box, G. P.

    1979-01-01

    Mathematical functions commonly used for representing aerosol size distributions are studied parametrically. Methods for obtaining best fit estimates of the parameters are described. A catalog of graphical plots depicting the parametric behavior of the functions is presented along with procedures for obtaining analytical representations of size distribution data by visual matching of the data with one of the plots. Examples of fitting the same data with equal accuracy by more than one analytic model are also given.

  10. Initial size distributions and hygroscopicity of indoor combustion aerosol particles

    SciTech Connect

    Li, W.; Hopke, P.K.

    1993-10-01

    Cigarette smoke, incense smoke, natural gas flames, propane fuel flames, and candle flames are contributors of indoor aerosol particles. To provide a quantitative basis for the modeling of inhaled aerosol deposition pattern, the hygroscopic growth of particles from these five sources as well as the source size distributions were measured. Because the experiments were performed on the bases of particles of single size, it provided not only the averaged particle`s hygroscopic growth of each source, but also the detailed size change for particles of different sizes within the whole size spectrum. The source particle size distribution measurements found that cigarette smoke and incense smoke contained particles in the size range of 100-700 nm, while the natural gas, propane, and candle flames generated particles between 10 and 100 nm. The hygroscopic growth experiments showed that these combustion aerosol particles could grow 10% to 120%, depending on the particle sizes and origins. 18 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Size-dependent diffusion of membrane inclusions.

    PubMed

    Guigas, Gernot; Weiss, Matthias

    2006-10-01

    Experimentally determined diffusion constants are often used to elucidate the size and oligomeric state of membrane proteins and domains. This approach critically relies on the knowledge of the size-dependence of diffusion. We have used mesoscopic simulations to thoroughly quantify the size-dependent diffusion properties of membrane inclusions. For small radii R, we find that the lateral diffusion coefficient D is well described by the Saffman-Delbrück relation, which predicts a logarithmic decrease of D with R. However, beyond a critical radius Rc approximately hetam/(2etac) (h, bilayer thickness; etam/c, viscosity of the membrane/surrounding solvent) we observe significant deviations and the emergence of an asymptotic scaling D approximately 1/R2. The latter originates from the asymptotic hydrodynamics and the inclusion's internal degrees of freedom that become particularly relevant on short timescales. In contrast to the lateral diffusion, the size dependence of the rotational diffusion constant Dr follows the predicted hydrodynamic scaling Dr approximately 1/R2 over the entire range of sizes studied here.

  12. Size-Dependent Diffusion of Membrane Inclusions

    PubMed Central

    Guigas, Gernot; Weiss, Matthias

    2006-01-01

    Experimentally determined diffusion constants are often used to elucidate the size and oligomeric state of membrane proteins and domains. This approach critically relies on the knowledge of the size-dependence of diffusion. We have used mesoscopic simulations to thoroughly quantify the size-dependent diffusion properties of membrane inclusions. For small radii R, we find that the lateral diffusion coefficient D is well described by the Saffman-Delbrück relation, which predicts a logarithmic decrease of D with R. However, beyond a critical radius Rc ≈ hηm/(2ηc) (h, bilayer thickness; ηm/c, viscosity of the membrane/surrounding solvent) we observe significant deviations and the emergence of an asymptotic scaling D ∼ 1/R2. The latter originates from the asymptotic hydrodynamics and the inclusion's internal degrees of freedom that become particularly relevant on short timescales. In contrast to the lateral diffusion, the size dependence of the rotational diffusion constant Dr follows the predicted hydrodynamic scaling Dr ∼ 1/R2 over the entire range of sizes studied here. PMID:16829562

  13. Particle Size Distributions in Atmospheric Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paoli, Roberto; Shariff, Karim

    2003-01-01

    In this note, we derive a transport equation for a spatially integrated distribution function of particles size that is suitable for sparse particle systems, such as in atmospheric clouds. This is done by integrating a Boltzmann equation for a (local) distribution function over an arbitrary but finite volume. A methodology for evolving the moments of the integrated distribution is presented. These moments can be either tracked for a finite number of discrete populations ('clusters') or treated as continuum variables.

  14. Size-Dependent Raman Shifts for nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yukun; Zhao, Xinmei; Yin, Penggang; Gao, Faming

    2016-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a very sensitive tool for probing semiconductor nanocrystals. The underlying mechanism behind the size-dependent Raman shifts is still quite controversial. Here we offer a new theoretical method for the quantum confinement effects on the Raman spectra of semiconductor nanocrystals. We propose that the shift of Raman spectra in nanocrystals can result from two overlapping effects: the quantum effect shift and surface effect shift. The quantum effect shift is extracted from an extended Kubo formula, the surface effect shift is determined via the first principles calculations. Fairly good prediction of Raman shifts can be obtained without the use of any adjustable parameter. Closer analysis shows that the size-dependent Raman shifts in Si nanocrystals mainly result from the quantum effect shifts. For nanodiamond, the proportion of surface effect shift in Raman shift is up to about 40%. Such model can also provide a good baseline for using Raman spectroscopy as a tool to measure size. PMID:27102066

  15. Impact of microphysical processes on ice crystal size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lüttmer, Tim; Spichtinger, Peter

    2017-04-01

    Cirrus clouds affect the Earth's radiation budget significantly. Their radiative properties depend on the microphysical properties and ice crystal size distribution. Microphysical processes affect the type and structure of ice crystal distributions strongly. However, bulk microphysics schemes are not able to represent changes in distribution type; thus, effects concerning changes in the distribution cannot be investigated using such simplified parameterizations. A size-resolved bin model was developed to study the influence of microphysical processes on ice crystal size distributions of cirrus clouds. The model is based on a consistent treatment of the relevant processes and ice crystal properties. Results of 1-D simulations investigating the temporal and spatial evolution of cirrus ice distributions under various idealized environmental conditions are presented. Emphasis is placed on the effects of sedimentation and depositional growth, but other processes such as ice nucleation are also considered in the simulations.

  16. Size-dependent thermopower of nickel nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Jaiveer; Kaurav, N.; Okram, Gunadhor S.

    2014-04-24

    Nickel nanoparticles (Ni-NPs) were prepared by thermal decomposition method using Trioctylphosphine (TOP) and Oleylamine (OA). The average particle size (D) estimated from X-ray diffraction (XRD) using Scherrer equation, to be 1-10nm, systematically decreases with increasing concentration of TOP at constant OA concentration. The observed thermopower strongly depends on particle size particularly at low temperatures reaching a very high value of ∼ 10{sup 5} μV/K (at 20 K), and is attributed to the enhanced grain-boundary scattering combined with quantum confinement.

  17. Phase-transfer based size refining of metal nanoparticles from arbitrary particle size distributions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Qu, Jianglan; Ye, Feng; Wang, Caixia; Yang, Jun

    2013-02-01

    The size-dependent phase-transfer property of metal nanoparticles is used to develop a simple experimental procedure that can effectively refine the particle size from colloidal solutions prepared by wet-chemistry. The protocol calls for firstly the mixing of the metal hydrosol with an ethanol solution of dodecylamine, and then the extraction of the dodecylamine-stabilized metal nanoparticles into toluene. This method offers an effective approach to prepare metal nanoparticles with narrow size distribution from an arbitrary particle size distribution.

  18. Size-Dependent Accuracy of Nanoscale Thermometers.

    PubMed

    Alicki, Robert; Leitner, David M

    2015-07-23

    The accuracy of two classes of nanoscale thermometers is estimated in terms of size and system-dependent properties using the spin-boson model. We consider solid state thermometers, where the energy splitting is tuned by thermal properties of the material, and fluorescent organic thermometers, in which the fluorescence intensity depends on the thermal population of conformational states of the thermometer. The results of the theoretical model compare well with the accuracy reported for several nanothermometers that have been used to measure local temperature inside living cells.

  19. Size distributions of quantum islands on stepped substrates.

    PubMed

    Liang, S; Zhu, H L; Wang, W

    2009-10-21

    The size distributions of self-assembled quantum islands on stepped substrates are studied using kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. It is found that the energy barrier E(SW) between the step and the terrace region is the key factor in affecting the size distribution of islands. With small E(SW) (< or = 0.1 eV), lines of uniform islands can be obtained at relative low surface coverage. As the surface coverage is increased, wirelike islands can be obtained. Scaling behavior is obeyed for the size distributions of the wirelike islands. When the size distributions are separated into their width and length components, however, scaling is only observed in the length distribution of the wirelike islands. With larger E(SW), the size distribution of islands shows a clear bimodal size distribution and anomalous growth temperature dependent island size evolutions are observed. The simulation results reproduce qualitatively the phenomena observed in the cases of InAs islands grown on stepped GaAs substrates.

  20. Activity size distribution of some natural radionuclides.

    PubMed

    Mohery, M; Abdallah, A M; Al-Amoudi, Z M; Baz, S S

    2014-03-01

    In this study, the results concerning the activity size distribution of the long-lived ((210)Pb) radon decay product aerosols and the thoron decay product aerosols ((212)Pb) and ((7)Be) of the outdoor atmosphere are presented. Also, the mass size distribution of the aerosol particles is determined. The low-pressure Berner cascade impactor Model 20/0.015 was used as a sampling device. The activity size distribution of these radionuclides was determined by one log-normal distribution (accumulation mode) whereas the mass size distribution was by two log-normal distributions (accumulation and coarse mode). The activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD) of (212)Pb was found to be 305 nm with a geometric standard deviation (σg) of 2.41. The specific air activity concentration of (212)Pb was found to be 0.14 ± 0.012 Bq m(-3). An AMAD of (210)Pb of 610 nm with σg of 1.8 was determined, whereas that of 550 nm with σg of 1.97 was determined for (7)Be. The specific air activity concentration of (210)Pb and (7)Be was found to be 0.0016±2.5×10(-4) and 0.00348 ± 4×10(-4) Bq m(-3), respectively. Using a dosimetric model, the total deposition fraction as well as the total equivalent dose has been evaluated considering the observed parameters of the activity size distribution of (212)Pb. At a total deposition fraction of ∼21 %, the total equivalent dose was found to be 0.41 µSv.

  1. The body size dependence of trophic cascades.

    PubMed

    DeLong, John P; Gilbert, Benjamin; Shurin, Jonathan B; Savage, Van M; Barton, Brandon T; Clements, Christopher F; Dell, Anthony I; Greig, Hamish S; Harley, Christopher D G; Kratina, Pavel; McCann, Kevin S; Tunney, Tyler D; Vasseur, David A; O'Connor, Mary I

    2015-03-01

    Trophic cascades are indirect positive effects of predators on resources via control of intermediate consumers. Larger-bodied predators appear to induce stronger trophic cascades (a greater rebound of resource density toward carrying capacity), but how this happens is unknown because we lack a clear depiction of how the strength of trophic cascades is determined. Using consumer resource models, we first show that the strength of a trophic cascade has an upper limit set by the interaction strength between the basal trophic group and its consumer and that this limit is approached as the interaction strength between the consumer and its predator increases. We then express the strength of a trophic cascade explicitly in terms of predator body size and use two independent parameter sets to calculate how the strength of a trophic cascade depends on predator size. Both parameter sets predict a positive effect of predator size on the strength of a trophic cascade, driven mostly by the body size dependence of the interaction strength between the first two trophic levels. Our results support previous empirical findings and suggest that the loss of larger predators will have greater consequences on trophic control and biomass structure in food webs than the loss of smaller predators.

  2. Martian crater size distributions and terrain age

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, N. G.; Strom, R. G.

    1984-01-01

    The crater size/frequency distributions of large ( 8 km) craters on the Moon and terrestrial planets display two very different curves representing two crater populations. The heavily cratered regions of the Moon, Mercury, and Mars show the same highly structured curve which cannot be represented by a single slope distribution function. In contrast, the lunar post mare crater population has a size/frequency distribution which differs significantly from that in the highlands over the same diameter range, and can be represented by a single-slope distribution function of -2.8 differential. On areas of martian lightly cratered northern plains, the crater population is essentially identical to that of the post mare population. This indicates that the same two families of impacting objects were responsible for the cratering records on both Moon and Mars. The thickness of mantling material varies among the various plains units, and can be calculated from the depth/diameter scaling relations for martian craters.

  3. Aerosol and air pollution size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shani, Gad; Haccoun, A.; Kushelevsky, A.

    The size distribution of aerosols was measured in a moderately industrial city, in a semi-arid zone on the Negev desert border. The aerosols in the city of Beer Sheva are from two sources: the dust coming from the desert and urban pollution. The size measurements were done with a cascade impactor. The elemental content of the aerosols was investigated by neutron activation analysis and X-ray fluorescence. The main elements of the dust are: Ca, Si, Fe, Na and the trace elements are: Sc, Se, La, Sm, Hf and others. The main elements of the urban pollution are S, Br, Pb, Cl, Hg and others. It was found that the elements belonging to each group can easily be classified by the size distribution. The analytical consideration of the aerosol size distribution of each group are discussed and two corresponding analytical expressions are suggested. It is shown that aerosols originating in the dust have a hump shape distribution around ~ 4μm, and those originating in urban pollution have a distribution decreasing with increasing aerosol diameter. Many examples are given to prove the conclusions.

  4. Comparison of drop size distributions from two droplet sizing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oldenburg, John R.; Ide, Robert F.

    1990-01-01

    A comparison between the Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer and the combined measurements from Particle Measuring Systems' Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe and the Optical Array Probe was conducted in an icing wind tunnel using NASA Icing Research Tunnel spray nozzles to produce the supercooled water droplet cloud. Clouds having a range of volume median diameters from 10 to greater than 50 microns were used for the instrument comparisons. A volume median diameter was calculated from combining the droplet distributions of the Optical Array Probe and the Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe. A comparison of the combined volume median diameters and the Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer volume median diameters showed agreement from 10 microns up to 30 microns. Typical drop size distributions from the Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer, the Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe, and Optical Array Probe are presented for several median volume diameters. A comparison of the distributions illustrates regions of the distributions where there is good agreement and other regions where there are discrepancies between the Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer and the Particle Measuring Systems' droplet size instruments.

  5. Size distributions in two porous chondritic micrometeorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rietmeijer, F. J. M.

    1993-06-01

    Quantitative size measurements of granular units (GUs), and nm-sized minerals in these units, in two porous chondritic micrometeorites are investigated. The matrix of these micrometeorites consist of loosely packed, 0.1 micron-sized, GUs. These objects were a major component of the solar nebula dust that accreted into protoplanets. The matrix in micrometeorite W7010*A2 has a fractal dimension with a small coefficient that supports efficient sticking of carbon-rich GUs during accretion. The fractal nature of the matrix provides a way to calculate the density using the aggregate size. The resulting very low density for porous chondritic micrometeorites is 0.08-0.14 g/cu cm, which supports the view that they are the solid debris from unconsolidated solar system bodies. Chondritic GUs contain ultrafine olivines, pyroxenes, and sulfides, embedded in hydrocarbons and amorphous carbons. Nanocrystals in the micrometeorites W7010*A2 and U2015*B show log normal size distributions. The high incidence of disk-shaped grains, a changeover from disk-shaped to euhedral grains, the unevolved nature of the size distributions, and multiple populations for grains less than 127 nm in size, are consistent with continuous postaccretion nucleation and growth in amorphous GUs, including coarsening via Ostwald ripening.

  6. THE COLLISIONAL DIVOT IN THE KUIPER BELT SIZE DISTRIBUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, Wesley C.

    2009-11-20

    This paper presents the results of collisional evolution calculations for the Kuiper Belt starting from an initial size distribution similar to that produced by accretion simulations of that region-a steep power-law large object size distribution that breaks to a shallower slope at r approx 1-2 km, with collisional equilibrium achieved for objects r approx< 0.5 km. We find that the break from the steep large object power law causes a divot, or depletion of objects at r approx 10-20 km, which, in turn, greatly reduces the disruption rate of objects with r approx> 25-50 km, preserving the steep power-law behavior for objects at this size. Our calculations demonstrate that the roll-over observed in the Kuiper Belt size distribution is naturally explained as an edge of a divot in the size distribution; the radius at which the size distribution transitions away from the power law, and the shape of the divot from our simulations are consistent with the size of the observed roll-over, and size distribution for smaller bodies. Both the kink radius and the radius of the divot center depend on the strength scaling law in the gravity regime for Kuiper Belt objects. These simulations suggest that the sky density of r approx 1 km objects is approx10{sup 6}-10{sup 7} objects per square degree. A detection of the divot in the size distribution would provide a measure of the strength of large Kuiper Belt objects, and constrain the shape of the size distribution at the end of accretion in the Kuiper Belt.

  7. Correlating size and composition-dependent effects with magnetic, Mössbauer, and pair distribution function measurements in a family of catalytically active ferrite nanoparticles

    DOE PAGES

    Wong, Stanislaus; Papaefthymiou, Georgia C.; Lewis, Crystal S.; ...

    2015-05-06

    The magnetic spinel ferrites, MFe₂O₄ (wherein 'M' = a divalent metal ion such as but not limited to Mn, Co, Zn, and Ni), represent a unique class of magnetic materials in which the rational introduction of different 'M's can yield correspondingly unique and interesting magnetic behaviors. Herein we present a generalized hydrothermal method for the synthesis of single-crystalline ferrite nanoparticles with 'M' = Mg, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn, respectively, which can be systematically and efficaciously produced simply by changing the metal precursor. Our protocol can moreover lead to reproducible size control by judicious selection of various surfactants. Asmore » such, we have probed the effects of both (i) size and (ii) chemical composition upon the magnetic properties of these nanomaterials using complementary magnetometry and Mössbauer spectroscopy techniques. The structure of the samples was confirmed by atomic PDF analysis of X-ray and electron powder diffraction data as a function of particle size. These materials retain the bulk spinel structure to the smallest size (i.e., 3 nm). In addition, we have explored the catalytic potential of our ferrites as both (a) magnetically recoverable photocatalysts and (b) biological catalysts, and noted that many of our as-prepared ferrite systems evinced intrinsically higher activities as compared with their iron oxide analogues.« less

  8. Correlating size and composition-dependent effects with magnetic, Mössbauer, and pair distribution function measurements in a family of catalytically active ferrite nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Stanislaus; Papaefthymiou, Georgia C.; Lewis, Crystal S.; Han, Jinkyu; Zhang, Cheng; Li, Qiang; Shi, Chenyang; Abeykoon, A. M.Milinda; Billinge, Simon J.L.; Stach, Eric; Thomas, Justin; Guerrero, Kevin; Munayco, Pablo; Munayco, Jimmy; Scorzelli, Rosa B.; Burnham, Philip; Viescas, Arthur J; Tiano, Amanda L.

    2015-05-06

    The magnetic spinel ferrites, MFe₂O₄ (wherein 'M' = a divalent metal ion such as but not limited to Mn, Co, Zn, and Ni), represent a unique class of magnetic materials in which the rational introduction of different 'M's can yield correspondingly unique and interesting magnetic behaviors. Herein we present a generalized hydrothermal method for the synthesis of single-crystalline ferrite nanoparticles with 'M' = Mg, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn, respectively, which can be systematically and efficaciously produced simply by changing the metal precursor. Our protocol can moreover lead to reproducible size control by judicious selection of various surfactants. As such, we have probed the effects of both (i) size and (ii) chemical composition upon the magnetic properties of these nanomaterials using complementary magnetometry and Mössbauer spectroscopy techniques. The structure of the samples was confirmed by atomic PDF analysis of X-ray and electron powder diffraction data as a function of particle size. These materials retain the bulk spinel structure to the smallest size (i.e., 3 nm). In addition, we have explored the catalytic potential of our ferrites as both (a) magnetically recoverable photocatalysts and (b) biological catalysts, and noted that many of our as-prepared ferrite systems evinced intrinsically higher activities as compared with their iron oxide analogues.

  9. PARTICLE SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS FOR AN OFFICE AEROSOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article discusses an evaluation of the effect of percent outdoor air supplied and occupation level on the particle size distributions and mass concentrations for a typical office building. (NOTE: As attention has become focused on indoor air pollution control, it has become i...

  10. PARTICLE SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS FOR AN OFFICE AEROSOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article discusses an evaluation of the effect of percent outdoor air supplied and occupation level on the particle size distributions and mass concentrations for a typical office building. (NOTE: As attention has become focused on indoor air pollution control, it has become i...

  11. Raindrop Size Distribution Measurements in Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tokay, Ali; Bashor, Paul G.; Habib, Emad; Kasparis, Takis

    2008-01-01

    Characteristics of the raindrop size distribution in seven tropical cyclones have been studied through impact-type disdrometer measurements at three different sites during the 2004-06 Atlantic hurricane seasons. One of the cyclones has been observed at two different sites. High concentrations of small and/or midsize drops were observed in the presence or absence of large drops. Even in the presence of large drops, the maximum drop diameter rarely exceeded 4 mm. These characteristics of raindrop size distribution were observed in all stages of tropical cyclones, unless the storm was in the extratropical stage where the tropical cyclone and a midlatitude frontal system had merged. The presence of relatively high concentrations of large drops in extratropical cyclones resembled the size distribution in continental thunderstorms. The integral rain parameters of drop concentration, liquid water content, and rain rate at fixed reflectivity were therefore lower in extratropical cyclones than in tropical cyclones. In tropical cyclones, at a disdrometercalculated reflectivity of 40 dBZ, the number concentration was 700 plus or minus 100 drops m(sup -3), while the liquid water content and rain rate were 0.90 plus or minus 0.05 g m(sup -3) and 18.5 plus or minus 0.5 mm h(sup -1), respectively. The mean mass diameter, on the other hand, was 1.67 plus or minus 0.3 mm. The comparison of raindrop size distributions between Atlantic tropical cyclones and storms that occurred in the central tropical Pacific island of Roi-Namur revealed that the number density is slightly shifted toward smaller drops, resulting in higher-integral rain parameters and lower mean mass and maximum drop diameters at the latter site. Considering parameterization of the raindrop size distribution in tropical cyclones, characteristics of the normalized gamma distribution parameters were examined with respect to reflectivity. The mean mass diameter increased rapidly with reflectivity, while the normalized

  12. Raindrop Size Distribution Measurements in Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tokay, Ali; Bashor, Paul G.; Habib, Emad; Kasparis, Takis

    2008-01-01

    Characteristics of the raindrop size distribution in seven tropical cyclones have been studied through impact-type disdrometer measurements at three different sites during the 2004-06 Atlantic hurricane seasons. One of the cyclones has been observed at two different sites. High concentrations of small and/or midsize drops were observed in the presence or absence of large drops. Even in the presence of large drops, the maximum drop diameter rarely exceeded 4 mm. These characteristics of raindrop size distribution were observed in all stages of tropical cyclones, unless the storm was in the extratropical stage where the tropical cyclone and a midlatitude frontal system had merged. The presence of relatively high concentrations of large drops in extratropical cyclones resembled the size distribution in continental thunderstorms. The integral rain parameters of drop concentration, liquid water content, and rain rate at fixed reflectivity were therefore lower in extratropical cyclones than in tropical cyclones. In tropical cyclones, at a disdrometercalculated reflectivity of 40 dBZ, the number concentration was 700 plus or minus 100 drops m(sup -3), while the liquid water content and rain rate were 0.90 plus or minus 0.05 g m(sup -3) and 18.5 plus or minus 0.5 mm h(sup -1), respectively. The mean mass diameter, on the other hand, was 1.67 plus or minus 0.3 mm. The comparison of raindrop size distributions between Atlantic tropical cyclones and storms that occurred in the central tropical Pacific island of Roi-Namur revealed that the number density is slightly shifted toward smaller drops, resulting in higher-integral rain parameters and lower mean mass and maximum drop diameters at the latter site. Considering parameterization of the raindrop size distribution in tropical cyclones, characteristics of the normalized gamma distribution parameters were examined with respect to reflectivity. The mean mass diameter increased rapidly with reflectivity, while the normalized

  13. Self-consistent Size and Velocity Distributions of Collisional Cascades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Margaret; Schlichting, Hilke E.

    2012-03-01

    The standard theoretical treatment of collisional cascades derives a steady-state size distribution assuming a single constant velocity dispersion for all bodies regardless of size. Here we relax this assumption and solve self-consistently for the bodies' steady-state size and size-dependent velocity distributions. Specifically, we account for viscous stirring, dynamical friction, and collisional damping of the bodies' random velocities in addition to the mass conservation requirement typically applied to find the size distribution in a steady-state cascade. The resulting size distributions are significantly steeper than those derived without velocity evolution. For example, accounting self-consistently for the velocities can change the standard q = 3.5 power-law index of the Dohnanyi differential size spectrum to an index as large as q = 4. Similarly, for bodies held together by their own gravity, the corresponding power-law index range 2.88 < q < 3.14 of Pan & Sari can steepen to values as large as q = 3.26. Our velocity results allow quantitative predictions of the bodies' scale heights as a function of size. Together with our predictions, observations of the scale heights for different-sized bodies for the Kuiper belt, the asteroid belt, and extrasolar debris disks may constrain the mass and number of large bodies stirring the cascade as well as the colliding bodies' internal strengths.

  14. SELF-CONSISTENT SIZE AND VELOCITY DISTRIBUTIONS OF COLLISIONAL CASCADES

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Margaret; Schlichting, Hilke E. E-mail: hilke@ucla.edu

    2012-03-10

    The standard theoretical treatment of collisional cascades derives a steady-state size distribution assuming a single constant velocity dispersion for all bodies regardless of size. Here we relax this assumption and solve self-consistently for the bodies' steady-state size and size-dependent velocity distributions. Specifically, we account for viscous stirring, dynamical friction, and collisional damping of the bodies' random velocities in addition to the mass conservation requirement typically applied to find the size distribution in a steady-state cascade. The resulting size distributions are significantly steeper than those derived without velocity evolution. For example, accounting self-consistently for the velocities can change the standard q = 3.5 power-law index of the Dohnanyi differential size spectrum to an index as large as q = 4. Similarly, for bodies held together by their own gravity, the corresponding power-law index range 2.88 < q < 3.14 of Pan and Sari can steepen to values as large as q = 3.26. Our velocity results allow quantitative predictions of the bodies' scale heights as a function of size. Together with our predictions, observations of the scale heights for different-sized bodies for the Kuiper belt, the asteroid belt, and extrasolar debris disks may constrain the mass and number of large bodies stirring the cascade as well as the colliding bodies' internal strengths.

  15. Colloid particle size-dependent dispersivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrysikopoulos, C. V.; Katzourakis, V. E.

    2014-12-01

    Laboratory and field studies have demonstrated that dispersion coefficients evaluated by fitting advection-dispersion transport models to nonreactive tracer breakthrough curves do not adequately describe colloid transport under the same flow field conditions. Here an extensive laboratory study was undertaken to assess whether the dispersivity, which traditionally has been considered to be a property of the porous medium, is dependent on colloid particle size and interstitial velocity. A total of 49 colloid transport experiments were performed in columns packed with glass beads under chemically unfavorable colloid attachment conditions. Nine different colloid diameters, and various flow velocities were examined. The breakthrough curves were successfully simulated with a mathematical model describing colloid transport in homogeneous, water saturated porous media. The results demonstrated that the dispersivity is positively correlated with colloid particle size, and increases with increasing velocity.

  16. Cell-size distribution in epithelial tissue formation and homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Puliafito, Alberto; Primo, Luca; Celani, Antonio

    2017-03-01

    How cell growth and proliferation are orchestrated in living tissues to achieve a given biological function is a central problem in biology. During development, tissue regeneration and homeostasis, cell proliferation must be coordinated by spatial cues in order for cells to attain the correct size and shape. Biological tissues also feature a notable homogeneity of cell size, which, in specific cases, represents a physiological need. Here, we study the temporal evolution of the cell-size distribution by applying the theory of kinetic fragmentation to tissue development and homeostasis. Our theory predicts self-similar probability density function (PDF) of cell size and explains how division times and redistribution ensure cell size homogeneity across the tissue. Theoretical predictions and numerical simulations of confluent non-homeostatic tissue cultures show that cell size distribution is self-similar. Our experimental data confirm predictions and reveal that, as assumed in the theory, cell division times scale like a power-law of the cell size. We find that in homeostatic conditions there is a stationary distribution with lognormal tails, consistently with our experimental data. Our theoretical predictions and numerical simulations show that the shape of the PDF depends on how the space inherited by apoptotic cells is redistributed and that apoptotic cell rates might also depend on size. © 2017 The Author(s).

  17. Size distributions of submicrometer aerosols from cooking

    SciTech Connect

    Li, C.S.; Lin, W.H.; Jeng, F.T. )

    1993-01-01

    Although gas stove usage varies from country to country, it is still one of the major indoor combustion sources. In order to assess the health effects of using gas stoves, the physical characteristics of the particle emissions from cooking were conducted in a first-floor apartment in the Taipei area. The particle size distributions from scrambling eggs, frying chicken, and cooking soup were measured in the kitchen by a high resolution particle sizer, which could measure the particles in the size range of 0.01 [mu]m to 1 [mu]m. The concentrations of the submicrometer particles increased significantly from 15,000 cm[sup [minus]3] to 150,000 cm[sup [minus]3] during cooking. Additionally, the ultrafine particles constituted 60%--70% of the total submicron aerosols. The changes in the size distributions and the concentrations of the submicrometer aerosols before, during, and after the aerosol generations were compared. On the average, the median diameters of scrambling eggs, frying chicken, cooking soup, and of the background conditions were 40 nm, 50 nm, 30 nm, and 70 nm, respectively. Regarding the surface area-weighted size distributions, the surface median diameters of the four situations were 180 nm, 300 nm, 150 nm, and 220 nm, respectively. Furthermore, the volume median diameters in the conditions mentioned above were almost similar, namely 300--350 nm. 10 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Size-dependent density of zirconia nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Opalinska, Agnieszka; Malka, Iwona; Dzwolak, Wojciech; Chudoba, Tadeusz; Presz, Adam; Lojkowski, Witold

    2015-01-01

    The correlation between density and specific surface area of ZrO2 nanoparticles (NPs) was studied. The NPs were produced using a hydrothermal process involving microwave heating. The material was annealed at 1100 °C which resulted in an increase in the average grain size of the ZrO2 NPs from 11 to 78 nm and a decrease in the specific surface area from 97 to 15 m(2)/g. At the same time, the density increased from 5.22 g/m(3) to 5.87 g/m(3). This effect was interpreted to be the result of the presence of a hydroxide monolayer on the NP surface. A smaller ZrO2 grain size was correlated with a larger contribution of the low density surface layer to the average density. To prove the existence of such a layer, the material was synthesized using 50% heavy water. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) permitted the identification of the -OD groups created during synthesis. It was found that the -OD groups persisted on the ZrO2 surface even after annealing at 1100 °C. This hydroxide layer is responsible for the decrease in the average density of the NPs as their size decreases. This study of the correlation between particle size and density may be used to assess the quality of the NPs. In most cases, the technological aim is to avoid an amorphous layer and to obtain fully crystalline nanoparticles with the highest density possible. However, due to the effect of the surface layers, there is a maximum density which can be achieved for a given average NP diameter. The effect of the surface layer on the NP density becomes particularly evident for NPs smaller than 50 nm, and thus, the density of nanoparticles is size dependent.

  19. Size-dependent density of zirconia nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Opalinska, Agnieszka; Dzwolak, Wojciech; Chudoba, Tadeusz; Presz, Adam; Lojkowski, Witold

    2015-01-01

    Summary The correlation between density and specific surface area of ZrO2 nanoparticles (NPs) was studied. The NPs were produced using a hydrothermal process involving microwave heating. The material was annealed at 1100 °C which resulted in an increase in the average grain size of the ZrO2 NPs from 11 to 78 nm and a decrease in the specific surface area from 97 to 15 m2/g. At the same time, the density increased from 5.22 g/m3 to 5.87 g/m3. This effect was interpreted to be the result of the presence of a hydroxide monolayer on the NP surface. A smaller ZrO2 grain size was correlated with a larger contribution of the low density surface layer to the average density. To prove the existence of such a layer, the material was synthesized using 50% heavy water. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) permitted the identification of the –OD groups created during synthesis. It was found that the –OD groups persisted on the ZrO2 surface even after annealing at 1100 °C. This hydroxide layer is responsible for the decrease in the average density of the NPs as their size decreases. This study of the correlation between particle size and density may be used to assess the quality of the NPs. In most cases, the technological aim is to avoid an amorphous layer and to obtain fully crystalline nanoparticles with the highest density possible. However, due to the effect of the surface layers, there is a maximum density which can be achieved for a given average NP diameter. The effect of the surface layer on the NP density becomes particularly evident for NPs smaller than 50 nm, and thus, the density of nanoparticles is size dependent. PMID:25671149

  20. Extension of discrete tribocharging models to continuous size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Dylan; Hartzell, Christine

    2017-01-01

    Triboelectric charging, the phenomenon by which electrical charge is exchanged during contact between two surfaces, has been known to cause significant charge separation in granular mixtures, even between chemically identical grains. This charging is a stochastic size-dependent process resulting from random collisions between grains. The prevailing models and experimental results suggest that, in most cases, larger grains in a mixture of dielectric grains acquire a positive charge, while smaller grains charge negatively. These models are typically restricted to mixtures of two discrete grain sizes, which are not representative of most naturally occurring granular mixtures, and neglect the effect of grain size on individual charging events. We have developed a model that predicts the average charge distribution in a granular mixture, for any continuous size distribution of dielectric grains of a single material. Expanding to continuous size distributions enables the prediction of charge separation in many natural granular phenomena, including terrestrial dust storms and industrial powder handling operations. The expanded model makes predictions about the charge distribution, including specific conditions under which the usual size-dependent polarity is reversed such that larger grains charge negatively.

  1. Company size distribution in different countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsden, J. J.; Kiss-Haypál, Gy.

    2000-03-01

    The distribution of companies in a country, ranked in order of size (annual net revenue) s, follows the simplified canonical law s r∼(r+ρ) -1/θ remarkably well, where r is the rank, and θ and ρ are the parameters of the distribution. These parameters have been determined for 20 countries in America, Asia and Europe. Significant differences between countries are found. Neither θ nor ρ appears to correlate well with traditional economic indicators; indeed some countries often thought to be economically and politically, but not necessarily socially, similar show surprising differences, suggesting that wealth and prosperity are influenced by hidden layers hitherto inaccessible through standard economic theory.

  2. Particle Size Distributions in Atmospheric Clouds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-12-01

    UNCLASSIFIED Center for Turbulence Research 39 Annual Research Briefs 2003 Particle size distributions in atmospheric clouds By Roberto Paoli & Karim...atmospheric turbulence is an important, though complex, problem in cloud physics ( Shaw 2003). From a computational point of view, two major factors...contribute to this complexity. First is the very high turbulence Reynolds number and the large range of spatial scales (Vaillancourt & Yau 2000; Shaw 2003

  3. Genome Sizes and the Benford Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Friar, James L.; Goldman, Terrance; Pérez–Mercader, Juan

    2012-01-01

    Background Data on the number of Open Reading Frames (ORFs) coded by genomes from the 3 domains of Life show the presence of some notable general features. These include essential differences between the Prokaryotes and Eukaryotes, with the number of ORFs growing linearly with total genome size for the former, but only logarithmically for the latter. Results Simply by assuming that the (protein) coding and non-coding fractions of the genome must have different dynamics and that the non-coding fraction must be particularly versatile and therefore be controlled by a variety of (unspecified) probability distribution functions (pdf’s), we are able to predict that the number of ORFs for Eukaryotes follows a Benford distribution and must therefore have a specific logarithmic form. Using the data for the 1000+ genomes available to us in early 2010, we find that the Benford distribution provides excellent fits to the data over several orders of magnitude. Conclusions In its linear regime the Benford distribution produces excellent fits to the Prokaryote data, while the full non-linear form of the distribution similarly provides an excellent fit to the Eukaryote data. Furthermore, in their region of overlap the salient features are statistically congruent. This allows us to interpret the difference between Prokaryotes and Eukaryotes as the manifestation of the increased demand in the biological functions required for the larger Eukaryotes, to estimate some minimal genome sizes, and to predict a maximal Prokaryote genome size on the order of 8–12 megabasepairs.These results naturally allow a mathematical interpretation in terms of maximal entropy and, therefore, most efficient information transmission. PMID:22629319

  4. Size distribution of ions in atmospheric aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivácsy, Z.; Molnár, Á.

    The aim of this paper is to present data about the concentration and size distribution of ions in atmospheric aerosol under slightly polluted urban conditions in Hungary. Concentration of inorganic cations (ammonium, sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium), inorganic anions (sulfate, nitrate, chloride, carbonate) and organic acids (oxalic, malonic, succinic, formic and acetic acid) for 8 particle size range between 0.0625 and 16 μm were determined. As was the case for ammonium, sulfate and nitrate, the organic acids were mostly found in the fine particle size range. Potassium and chloride were rather uniformly distributed between fine and coarse particles. Sodium, calcium, magnesium and carbonate were practically observed in the coarse mode. The results obtained for the summer and the winter half-year were also compared. The mass concentrations were recalculated in equivalents, and the ion balance was found to be reasonable in most cases. Measurement of the pH of the aerosol extracts indicates that the aerosol is acidic in the fine mode, but alkaline in the coarse particle size range.

  5. Determination of atmospheric particle size distribution from forward scattering data.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fymat, A. L.

    1973-01-01

    Description of an analytic method of reconstructing the particle size distribution of atmospheric aerosols when no a priori information is available regarding the refractive index of the particles, the analytic form of the distribution, the size range, and the size extremal values. The method applies in principle to angle-dependent scattering data at a fixed wave number, or to wave-number-dependent scattering data at a fixed angle, or to a combination of the two. Some results of an angular scan study of the aureole are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the method. In conclusion, an analysis is made of the efficiency and accuracy of the method, the uniqueness of the inverse solutions, and the stability of the method relative to experimental noise.

  6. Particle size distribution and particle size-related crystalline silica content in granite quarry dust.

    PubMed

    Sirianni, Greg; Hosgood, Howard Dean; Slade, Martin D; Borak, Jonathan

    2008-05-01

    Previous studies indicate that the relationship between empirically derived particle counts, particle mass determinations, and particle size-related silica content are not constant within mines or across mine work tasks. To better understand the variability of particle size distributions and variations in silica content by particle size in a granite quarry, exposure surveys were conducted with side-by-side arrays of four closed face cassettes, four cyclones, four personal environmental monitors, and a real-time particle counter. In general, the proportion of silica increased as collected particulate size increased, but samples varied in an inconstant way. Significant differences in particle size distributions were seen depending on the extent of ventilation and the nature and activity of work performed. Such variability raises concerns about the adequacy of silica exposure assessments based on only limited numbers of samples or short-term samples.

  7. Particle size distributions and the vertical distribution of suspended matter in the upwelling region off Oregon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitchen, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    Various methods of presenting and mathematically describing particle size distribution are explained and evaluated. The hyperbolic distribution is found to be the most practical but the more complex characteristic vector analysis is the most sensitive to changes in the shape of the particle size distributions. A method for determining onshore-offshore flow patterns from the distribution of particulates was presented. A numerical model of the vertical structure of two size classes of particles was developed. The results show a close similarity to the observed distributions but overestimate the particle concentration by forty percent. This was attributed to ignoring grazing by zooplankton. Sensivity analyses showed the size preference was most responsive to the maximum specific growth rates and nutrient half saturation constants. The verical structure was highly dependent on the eddy diffusivity followed closely by the growth terms.

  8. Application of bag sampling technique for particle size distribution measurements.

    PubMed

    Mazaheri, M; Johnson, G R; Morawska, L

    2009-11-01

    Bag sampling techniques can be used to temporarily store the aerosol and therefore provide sufficient time to utilize sensitive but slow instrumental techniques for recording detailed particle size distributions. Laboratory based assessment of the method was conducted to examine size dependant deposition loss coefficients for aerosols held in Velostat bags conforming to a horizontal cylindrical geometry. Deposition losses of NaCl particles in the range of 10 nm to 160 nm were analysed in relation to the bag size, storage time, and sampling flow rate. Results of this study suggest that the bag sampling method is most useful for moderately short sampling periods of about 5 minutes.

  9. Remote Laser Diffraction Particle Size Distribution Analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Batcheller, Thomas Aquinas; Huestis, Gary Michael; Bolton, Steven Michael

    2001-03-01

    In support of a radioactive slurry sampling and physical characterization task, an “off-the-shelf” laser diffraction (classical light scattering) particle size analyzer was utilized for remote particle size distribution (PSD) analysis. Spent nuclear fuel was previously reprocessed at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC—formerly recognized as the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant) which is on DOE’s INEEL site. The acidic, radioactive aqueous raffinate streams from these processes were transferred to 300,000 gallon stainless steel storage vessels located in the INTEC Tank Farm area. Due to the transfer piping configuration in these vessels, complete removal of the liquid can not be achieved. Consequently, a “heel” slurry remains at the bottom of an “emptied” vessel. Particle size distribution characterization of the settled solids in this remaining heel slurry, as well as suspended solids in the tank liquid, is the goal of this remote PSD analyzer task. A Horiba Instruments Inc. Model LA-300 PSD analyzer, which has a 0.1 to 600 micron measurement range, was modified for remote application in a “hot cell” (gamma radiation) environment. This technology provides rapid and simple PSD analysis, especially down in the fine and microscopic particle size regime. Particle size analysis of these radioactive slurries down in this smaller range was not previously achievable—making this technology far superior than the traditional methods used. Successful acquisition of this data, in conjunction with other characterization analyses, provides important information that can be used in the myriad of potential radioactive waste management alternatives.

  10. Raindrop Size Distribution Measurements in Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokay, A.; Bashor, P. G.; Habib, E.; Kasparis, T. C.

    2006-12-01

    Measurements of the raindrop size distribution (RSD) have been collected in tropical cyclones and hurricanes with an impact type disdrometer during the past three Atlantic hurricane seasons. The measurements were taken at Wallops Island, Virginia, Lafayette, Louisiana, and Orlando, Florida. The RSDs from the remnants of tropical cyclones or hurricanes at 40 dBZ agreed well with each other where the mean mass diameter was 1.65-1.7 mm, and the total concentration had a range of 600 to 800 drops/m3. Assuming the normalized gamma size distribution, the shape parameter will be 5-8 to satisfy the observed rain rate of 18-20 mm/hr. If the observations were taken during the extratropical phase of the storm where the tropical cyclone merges with a frontal system, the composite spectra at 40 dBZ include more large drops and less small to mid-size drops, typical for continental thunderstorms. Thus, the mean mass diameter was larger, while total concentration, and rain rate was less in extratropical cyclones than in tropical cyclones.

  11. Determining Size Distribution at the Phoenix Landing Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, E. L.; Lemmon, M. T.

    2016-12-01

    Dust aerosols play a crucial role in determining atmospheric radiative heating on Mars through absorption and scattering of sunlight. How dust scatters and absorbs light is dependent on size, shape, composition, and quantity. Optical properties of the dust have been well constrained in the visible and near infrared wavelengths using various methods [Wolff et al. 2009, Lemmon et al. 2004]. In addition, the dust is nonspherical, and irregular shapes have shown to work well in determining effective particle size [Pollack et al. 1977]. Variance of the size distribution is less constrained but constitutes an important parameter in fully describing the dust. The Phoenix Lander's Surface Stereo Imager performed several cross-sky brightness surveys to determine the size distribution and scattering properties of dust in the wavelength range of 400 to 1000 nm. In combination with a single-layer radiative transfer model, these surveys can be used to help constrain variance of the size distribution. We will present a discussion of seasonal size distribution as it pertains to the Phoenix landing site.

  12. Particle size distribution of indoor aerosol sources

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, K.B.

    1990-10-24

    As concern about Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) has grown in recent years, it has become necessary to determine the nature of particles produced by different indoor aerosol sources and the typical concentration that these sources tend to produce. These data are important in predicting the dose of particles to people exposed to these sources and it will also enable us to take effective mitigation procedures. Further, it will also help in designing appropriate air cleaners. A new state of the art technique, DMPS (Differential Mobility Particle Sizer) System is used to determine the particle size distributions of a number of sources. This system employs the electrical mobility characteristics of these particles and is very effective in the 0.01--1.0 {mu}m size range. A modified system that can measure particle sizes in the lower size range down to 3 nm was also used. Experimental results for various aerosol sources is presented in the ensuing chapters. 37 refs., 20 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Particle Size Distribution in Aluminum Manufacturing Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sa; Noth, Elizabeth M.; Dixon-Ernst, Christine; Eisen, Ellen A.; Cullen, Mark R.; Hammond, S. Katharine

    2015-01-01

    As part of exposure assessment for an ongoing epidemiologic study of heart disease and fine particle exposures in aluminum industry, area particle samples were collected in production facilities to assess instrument reliability and particle size distribution at different process areas. Personal modular impactors (PMI) and Minimicro-orifice uniform deposition impactors (MiniMOUDI) were used. The coefficient of variation (CV) of co-located samples was used to evaluate the reproducibility of the samplers. PM2.5 measured by PMI was compared to PM2.5 calculated from MiniMOUDI data. Mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) and concentrations of sub-micrometer (PM1.0) and quasi-ultrafine (PM0.56) particles were evaluated to characterize particle size distribution. Most of CVs were less than 30%. The slope of the linear regression of PMI_PM2.5 versus MiniMOUDI_PM2.5 was 1.03 mg/m3 per mg/m3 (± 0.05), with correlation coefficient of 0.97 (± 0.01). Particle size distribution varied substantively in smelters, whereas it was less variable in fabrication units with significantly smaller MMADs (arithmetic mean of MMADs: 2.59 μm in smelters vs. 1.31 μm in fabrication units, p = 0.001). Although the total particle concentration was more than two times higher in the smelters than in the fabrication units, the fraction of PM10 which was PM1.0 or PM0.56 was significantly lower in the smelters than in the fabrication units (p < 0.001). Consequently, the concentrations of sub-micrometer and quasi-ultrafine particles were similar in these two types of facilities. It would appear, studies evaluating ultrafine particle exposure in aluminum industry should focus on not only the smelters, but also the fabrication facilities. PMID:26478760

  14. Particle Size Distribution in Aluminum Manufacturing Facilities.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sa; Noth, Elizabeth M; Dixon-Ernst, Christine; Eisen, Ellen A; Cullen, Mark R; Hammond, S Katharine

    2014-10-01

    As part of exposure assessment for an ongoing epidemiologic study of heart disease and fine particle exposures in aluminum industry, area particle samples were collected in production facilities to assess instrument reliability and particle size distribution at different process areas. Personal modular impactors (PMI) and Minimicro-orifice uniform deposition impactors (MiniMOUDI) were used. The coefficient of variation (CV) of co-located samples was used to evaluate the reproducibility of the samplers. PM2.5 measured by PMI was compared to PM2.5 calculated from MiniMOUDI data. Mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) and concentrations of sub-micrometer (PM1.0) and quasi-ultrafine (PM0.56) particles were evaluated to characterize particle size distribution. Most of CVs were less than 30%. The slope of the linear regression of PMI_PM2.5 versus MiniMOUDI_PM2.5 was 1.03 mg/m(3) per mg/m(3) (± 0.05), with correlation coefficient of 0.97 (± 0.01). Particle size distribution varied substantively in smelters, whereas it was less variable in fabrication units with significantly smaller MMADs (arithmetic mean of MMADs: 2.59 μm in smelters vs. 1.31 μm in fabrication units, p = 0.001). Although the total particle concentration was more than two times higher in the smelters than in the fabrication units, the fraction of PM10 which was PM1.0 or PM0.56 was significantly lower in the smelters than in the fabrication units (p < 0.001). Consequently, the concentrations of sub-micrometer and quasi-ultrafine particles were similar in these two types of facilities. It would appear, studies evaluating ultrafine particle exposure in aluminum industry should focus on not only the smelters, but also the fabrication facilities.

  15. Electronic cigarette aerosol particle size distribution measurements.

    PubMed

    Ingebrethsen, Bradley J; Cole, Stephen K; Alderman, Steven L

    2012-12-01

    The particle size distribution of aerosols produced by electronic cigarettes was measured in an undiluted state by a spectral transmission procedure and after high dilution with an electrical mobility analyzer. The undiluted e-cigarette aerosols were found to have particle diameters of average mass in the 250-450 nm range and particle number concentrations in the 10(9) particles/cm(3) range. These measurements are comparable to those observed for tobacco burning cigarette smoke in prior studies and also measured in the current study with the spectral transmission method and with the electrical mobility procedure. Total particulate mass for the e-cigarettes calculated from the size distribution parameters measured by spectral transmission were in good agreement with replicate determinations of total particulate mass by gravimetric filter collection. In contrast, average particle diameters determined for e-cigarettes by the electrical mobility method are in the 50 nm range and total particulate masses calculated based on the suggested diameters are orders of magnitude smaller than those determined gravimetrically. This latter discrepancy, and the very small particle diameters observed, are believed to result from almost complete e-cigarette aerosol particle evaporation at the dilution levels and conditions of the electrical mobility analysis. A much smaller degree, ~20% by mass, of apparent particle evaporation was observed for tobacco burning cigarette smoke. The spectral transmission method is validated in the current study against measurements on tobacco burning cigarette smoke, which has been well characterized in prior studies, and is supported as yielding an accurate characterization of the e-cigarette aerosol particle size distribution.

  16. Measurement of nonvolatile particle number size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkatzelis, G. I.; Papanastasiou, D. K.; Florou, K.; Kaltsonoudis, C.; Louvaris, E.; Pandis, S. N.

    2016-01-01

    An experimental methodology was developed to measure the nonvolatile particle number concentration using a thermodenuder (TD). The TD was coupled with a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer, measuring the chemical composition and mass size distribution of the submicrometer aerosol and a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) that provided the number size distribution of the aerosol in the range from 10 to 500 nm. The method was evaluated with a set of smog chamber experiments and achieved almost complete evaporation (> 98 %) of secondary organic as well as freshly nucleated particles, using a TD temperature of 400 °C and a centerline residence time of 15 s. This experimental approach was applied in a winter field campaign in Athens and provided a direct measurement of number concentration and size distribution for particles emitted from major pollution sources. During periods in which the contribution of biomass burning sources was dominant, more than 80 % of particle number concentration remained after passing through the thermodenuder, suggesting that nearly all biomass burning particles had a nonvolatile core. These remaining particles consisted mostly of black carbon (60 % mass contribution) and organic aerosol (OA; 40 %). Organics that had not evaporated through the TD were mostly biomass burning OA (BBOA) and oxygenated OA (OOA) as determined from AMS source apportionment analysis. For periods during which traffic contribution was dominant 50-60 % of the particles had a nonvolatile core while the rest evaporated at 400 °C. The remaining particle mass consisted mostly of black carbon with an 80 % contribution, while OA was responsible for another 15-20 %. Organics were mostly hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) and OOA. These results suggest that even at 400 °C some fraction of the OA does not evaporate from particles emitted from common combustion processes, such as biomass burning and car engines, indicating that a fraction of this type of OA

  17. Landslide size distribution in seismic areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valagussa, Andrea; Frattini, Paolo; Crosta, Giovanni B.

    2015-04-01

    In seismic areas, the analysis of the landslides size distribution with the distance from the seismic source is very important for hazard zoning and land planning. From numerical modelling (Bourdeau et al., 2004), it has been observed that the area of the sliding mass tends to increase with the ground-motion amplitude up to a certain threshold input acceleration. This has been also observed empirically for the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake (Keefer and Manson, 1998) and 1999 Chi Chi earthquake (Khazai and Sitar, 2003). Based on this, it possible to assume that the landslide size decreases with the increase of the distance from the seismic source. In this research, we analysed six earthquakes-induced landslides inventories (Papua New Guinea Earthquake, 1993; Northridge Earthquake, 1994; Niigata-Chuetsu Earthquake 2004; Iwate-Miyagi Nairiku Earthquake, 2008; Wenchuan Earthquake, 2008; Tohoku Earthquake, 2011) with a magnitude ranging between 6.6 and 9.0 Mw. For each earthquake, we first analysed the size of landslides as a function of different factors such as the lithology, the PGA, the relief, the distance from the seismic sources (both fault and epicentre). Then, we analysed the magnitude frequency curves for different distances from the source area and for each lithology. We found that a clear relationship between the size distribution and the distance from the seismic source is not evident, probably due to the combined effect of the different influencing factors and to the non-linear relationship between the ground-motion intensity and the distance from the seismic source.

  18. Size-dependent spontaneous alloying of Au-Ag nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Tomohiro; Bunker, Bruce A; Zhang, Zhenyuan; Meisel, Dan; Vardeman, Charles F; Gezelter, J Daniel

    2002-10-09

    We report on systematic studies of size-dependent alloy formation of silver-coated gold nanoparticles (NPs) in aqueous solution at ambient temperature using X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS). Various Au-core sizes (2.5-20 nm diameter) and Ag shell thicknesses were synthesized using radiolytic wet techniques. The equilibrium structures (alloy versus core-shell) of these NPs were determined in the suspensions. We observed remarkable size dependence in the room temperature interdiffusion of the two metals. The interdiffusion is limited to the subinterface layers of the bimetallic NPs and depends on both the core size and the total particle size. For the very small particles (< or =4.6 nm initial Au-core size), the two metals are nearly randomly distributed within the particle. However, even for these small Au-core NPs, the interdiffusion occurs primarily in the vicinity of the original interface. Features from the Ag shells do remain. For the larger particles, the boundary is maintained to within one monolayer. These results cannot be explained either by enhanced self-diffusion that results from depression of the melting point with size or by surface melting of the NPs. We propose that defects, such as vacancies, at the bimetallic interface enhance the radial migration (as well as displacement around the interface) of one metal into the other. Molecular dynamics calculations correctly predict the activation energy for diffusion of the metals in the absence of vacancies and show an enormous dependence of the rate of mixing on defect levels. They also suggest that a few percent of the interfacial lattice sites need to be vacant to explain the observed mixing.

  19. Measurement of the aerosol size distribution with NRL's mobility analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoppel, W. A.

    1981-01-01

    The size distribution was measured in the size range between 0.0057 and 0.57 micrometer radius. A description of the instrumentation and data analysis is given, together with the measured size distributions calculated for 23 experiments.

  20. Soil signature simulation of complex mixtures and particle size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, Tyler; Bachmann, Charles M.; Salvaggio, Carl

    2015-09-01

    Soil reflectance signatures were modeled using the digital imaging and remote sensing image generation model and Blender three-dimensional (3-D) graphic design software. Using these tools, the geometry, radiometry, and chemistry of quartz and magnetite were exploited to model the presence of particle size and porosity effects in the visible and the shortwave infrared spectrum. Using the physics engines within the Blender 3-D graphic design software, physical representations of granular soil scenes were created. Each scene characterized a specific particle distribution and density. Chemical and optical properties of pure quartz and magnetite were assigned to particles in the scene based on particle size. This work presents a model to describe an observed phase-angle dependence of beach sand density. Bidirectional reflectance signatures were simulated for targets of varying size distribution and density. This model provides validation for a phenomenological trade space between density and particle size distribution in complex, heterogeneous soil mixtures. It also confirms the suggestion that directional reflectance signatures can be defined by intimate mixtures that depend on pore spacing. The study demonstrated that by combining realistic target geometry and spectral measurements of pure quartz and magnetite, effects of soil particle size and density could be modeled without functional data fitting or rigorous analysis of material dynamics. This research does not use traditional function-based models for simulation. The combination of realistic geometry, physically viable particle structure, and first-principles ray-tracing enables the ability to represent signature changes that have been observed in experimental observations.

  1. Particle size distribution from a GTL engine.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinling; Huang, Zhen; Wang, Jiasong; Zhang, Wugao

    2007-09-01

    Measurements of exhaust particle number concentration and size distribution from an engine fueled with GTL at different engine loads and speeds were carried out by using a two-stage dilution system. The results for GTL were compared with those from the original engine fueled with diesel. The fuel composition and engine operation condition had significant effects on the exhaust particle size distribution, the total exhaust particle number and volume concentrations. For both fuels, the load had no significant influence on the total exhaust particle number concentration at middle speed, while the total exhaust particle number concentration increased with the increase of the load at high speed. At 1400 rpm and 2200 rpm, the total exhaust particle volume concentration increased as the load increased for both fuels. GTL was found to be a "cleaner" fuel. Compared with diesel, under the same operation conditions, the total exhaust particle number concentrations decreased 18-92%, and the total exhaust particle volume concentrations for GTL decreased 21-59%.

  2. Particle size distribution: a key factor in estimating powder dustiness.

    PubMed

    López-Lilao, Ana; Sanfélix, Forner Vicenta; Mallol, Gasch Gustavo; Monfort, Gimeno Eliseo

    2017-08-01

    ASTRACT A wide variety of raw materials, involving more than twenty samples of quartzes, feldspars, nephelines, carbonates, dolomites, sands, zircons, and alumina, were selected and characterised. Dustiness, i.e. a materials' tendency to generate dust on handling, was determined using the continuous drop method. These raw materials were selected to encompass a wide range of particle sizes (1.6-294 µm) and true densities (2650-4680 kg/m(3)). The dustiness of the raw materials, i.e. their tendency to generate dust on handling, was determined using the continuous drop method. The influence of some key material parameters (particle size distribution, flowability and specific surface area) on dustiness was assessed. In this regard, dustiness was found to be significantly affected by particle size distribution. Data analysis enabled development of a model for predicting the dustiness of the studied materials, assuming that dustiness depended on the particle fraction susceptible to emission and on the bulk material's susceptibility to release these particles. On the one hand, the developed model allows the dustiness mechanisms to be better understood. In this regard, it may be noted that relative emission increased with mean particle size. However, this did not necessarily imply that dustiness did, because dustiness also depended on the fraction of particles susceptible to be emitted. On the other hand, the developed model enables dustiness to be estimated using just the particle size distribution data. The quality of the fits was quite good and the fact that only particle size distribution data are needed facilitates industrial application, since these data are usually known by raw materials managers, thus making additional tests unnecessary. This model may therefore be deemed a key tool in drawing up efficient preventive and/or corrective measures to reduce dust emissions during bulk powder processing, both inside and outside industrial facilities. It is recommended

  3. Modeling The Size Distribution Of Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albers, Nicole; Esposito, L. W.

    2007-10-01

    Spatial structures such as density and bending waves, self-gravity and moonlet wakes are among the better known pieces in the puzzle of the formation and evolution of Saturn's main rings. But also the actual sizes of ring particles are very important to understand the long-term behavior or the system. The Cassini mission is continuing to provide a wealth of new observations. Among those are the transient features, bright clumps, and brightness fluctuations in the rather mysterious F ring that are partially attributed to a population of moonlets hidden well within the bright core of the structure. Detections of opaque features during stellar occultations of the UVIS and VIMS instruments strongly support this idea. Further, the discovery of embedded moonlets in Saturn's A ring raises questions about the origin of these objects; not to forget about the km-sized moons, Pan and Daphnis, orbiting within the A ring. Are they remnants of a shattered moon or is it possible to accrete these objects from the surrounding ring material? Currently, the theory still lags behind the observations. Here, we employ a generalized kinetic approach aiming at the long-term evolution of the size distribution that cannot be achieved by current N-body simulations and discuss its implications for the evolution and origin of Saturn's rings.

  4. Dense medium radiative transfer theory for two scattering layers with a Rayleigh distribution of particle sizes

    SciTech Connect

    West, R.; Tsang, Leung; Winebrenner, D.P. )

    1993-03-01

    Dense medium radiative transfer theory is applied to a three-layer model consisting of two scattering layers overlying a homogeneous half space with a size distribution of particles in each layer. A model with a distribution of sizes gives quite different results than those obtained from a model with a single size. The size distribution is especially important in the low frequency limit when scattering is strongly dependent on particle size. The size distribution and absorption characteristics also affect the extinction behavior as a function of fractional volume. Theoretical results are also compared with experimental data. The sizes, permittivities, and densities used in the numerical illustrations are typical values for snow.

  5. The Size Distribution of Stardust Injected into the ISM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, D.; Sedlmayr, E.

    1996-01-01

    A multi-component method for the description of the evolution of the grain size distribution in consideration of a size dependent grain drift and growth rate is applied in order to model dust driven winds around cool C-stars. Grain drift introduces several modifications concerning dust growth: on one hand the residence time in the region of efficient growth is reduced, on the other hand the growth efficiency is higher due to an increased collisional rate. For carbon grains the surface density of radical sites is increased, but on the other hand there is a reduction of the sticking efficiency of the growth species for drift velocities larger than a few km/s. It is found that the consideration of drift results in a considerable distortion of the size distribution as compared to the case of zero drift velocity. Generally, there are less, but larger grains if drift is included.

  6. Probing size-dependent electrokinetics of hematite aggregates.

    PubMed

    Kedra-Królik, Karolina; Rosso, Kevin M; Zarzycki, Piotr

    2017-02-15

    Aqueous particle suspensions of many kinds are stabilized by the electrostatic potential developed at their surfaces from reaction with water and ions. An important and less well understood aspect of this stabilization is the dependence of the electrostatic surface potential on particle size. Surface electrostatics are typically probed by measuring particle electrophoretic mobilities and quantified in the electrokinetic potential (ζ), using commercially available Zeta Potential Analyzers (ZPA). Even though ZPAs provide frequency-spectra (histograms) of electrophoretic mobility and hydrodynamic diameter, typically only the maximal-intensity values are reported, despite the information in the remainder of the spectra. Here we propose a mapping procedure that inter-correlates these histograms to extract additional insight, in this case to probe particle size-dependent electrokinetics. Our method is illustrated for a suspension of prototypical iron (III) oxide (hematite, α-Fe2O3). We found that the electrophoretic mobility and ζ-potential are a linear function of the aggregate size. By analyzing the distribution of surface site types as a function of aggregate size we show that site coordination increases with increasing aggregate diameter. This observation explains why the acidity of the iron oxide particles decreases with increasing particle size. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The Size Distribution of Cometary Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weissman, P. R.; Lowry, S. C.

    2001-11-01

    We are conducting a program of ground-based CCD photometry of distant cometary nuclei, in order to estimate their sizes, shapes, rotation periods and axial ratios. We have combined our data with that reported in the literature by other observers to obtain an estimate of the size distribution of observed Jupiter-family and Halley-type comets. The catalog consists of 79 measurements of 52 JF and HT comets using a variety of techniques, including CCD photometry, IR photometry, and HST imaging. The data has been normalized to an assumed albedo of 0.04 except in cases where the albedo was directly measured. We find that the cumulative number of comets at or larger than a given radius can be described by a power law function with a slope of --1.40 +/- 0.03. This corresponds to a slope of --0.28 +/- 0.01 for the cumulative luminosity function, close to the slope of --0.32 +/- 0.02 found by Lowry (2001), derived from a homogeneously reduced CCD survey of distant JF comets. Both values are considerably less than the slope of --0.53 +/- 0.05 found by Fernández et al. (1999). This inconsistency is most likely attributed to the inhomogeneous nature of the Fernández et al. dataset, and the inclusion of active comets within their sample. Typical values of the CLF slope for Kuiper belt objects are --0.64 to --0.69 (Gladman et al. 2001; Trujillo et al. 2001). The shallower slope of the JF and HT comets, which are considerably smaller than the measured Kuiper belt objects, may be due to intrinsic differences in the KBO size distribution at the different size ranges (Weissman & Levison 1998) or to the physical evolution of JF and HT comets as they lose mass through sublimation and fragmentation (Lowry 2001). This work was supported by the NASA Planetary Astronomy and Planetary Geology & Geophysics Programs. Support from the National Research Council is also gratefully acknowledged.

  8. Effective scatterer diameter estimates for broad scatterer size distributions.

    PubMed

    Nordberg, Eric P; Hall, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic form factors have been used to model the frequency dependence of acoustic scattering in phantoms and tissues. This work demonstrates that a broad range of scatterer sizes, individually well represented by Faran theory or a Gaussian form factor, is not accurately described by a single effective scatterer from either of these models. Contributions from a distribution of discrete scatterer sizes for two different form factor functions (Gaussian form factors and scattering functions from Faran's theory) were calculated and linearly combined. Composite form factors created from Gaussian distributions of scatterer sizes centered at 50 µm with standard deviations of up to σ = 40 µm were fit to each scattering model between 2 and 12 MHz. Scatterer distributions were generated using one of two assumptions: the number density of the scatterer diameter distribution was Gaussian distributed, or the volume fraction of each scatterer diameter in the distribution was Gaussian distributed. Each simulated form factor was fit to a single-diameter form factor model for Gaussian and exponential form factors. The mean-squared error (MSE) between the composite simulated data and the best-fit single-diameter model was smaller with an exponential form factor model, compared with a Gaussian model, for distributions with standard deviations larger than 30% of the centroid value. In addition, exponential models were shown to have better ability to distinguish between Faran scattering model-based distributions with varying center diameters than the Gaussian form factor model. The evidence suggests that when little is known about the scattering medium, an exponential scattering model provides a better first approximation to the scattering correlation function for a broad distribution of spherically symmetric scatterers than when a Gaussian form factor model is assumed.

  9. Size-Dependent Elasticity of Nanocrystalline Titania

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, B.; Zhang, H; Dunphy-Guzman, K; Spagnoli, D; Kruger, M; Muthu, D; Kunz, M; Fakra, S; Hu, J; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    Synchrotron-based high-pressure x-ray diffraction measurements indicate that compressibility, a fundamental materials property, can have a size-specific minimum value. The bulk modulus of nanocrystalline titania has a maximum at particle size of 15 nm. This can be explained by dislocation behavior because very high dislocation contents can be achieved when shear stress induced within nanoparticles counters the repulsion between dislocations. As particle size decreases, compression increasingly generates dislocation networks (hardened by overlap of strain fields) that shield intervening regions from external pressure. However, when particles become too small to sustain high dislocation concentrations, elastic stiffening declines. The compressibility has a minimum at intermediate sizes.

  10. Aggregate size distribution of the soil loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó, Judit Alexandra; Jakab, Gergely; Szabó, Boglárka; Józsa, Sándor; Szalai, Zoltán; Centeri, Csaba

    2016-04-01

    aggregate size distribution which is led to nutrient and organic matter redistribution is one of a key questions to improve erosion estimation. G. Jakab was supported by the János Bolyai fellowship of the HAS.

  11. Laboratory air bubble generation of various size distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Puleo, Jack A.; Johnson, Rex V.; Kooney, Tim N.

    2004-11-01

    Air bubble size in aqueous environments is an important factor governing natural processes ranging from fluid/atmosphere gas transfer to noise production. Bubbles are also known to affect various scientific instruments. In this study we investigate the production capability of eight inexpensive bubble generators using optical imaging techniques. Specific emphasis is directed towards determining bubble size and distribution for a given device, flow conditions, and type of water used (fresh vs salt). In almost all cases tested here, bubbles produced in salt water were more numerous, and smaller than for the same bubbler and conditions in fresh water. For porous media, the finer the pore size, the smaller the bubble produced with some variation depending on thickness of material containing the pore and water type. While no single generator tested was capable of spanning all the bubble sizes observed (100 to 6000 microns), the data contained herein will enable proper choice of bubbler or combinations thereof for future studies depending on the size and distribution of bubbles required.

  12. Size-dependent magnetic properties of branchlike nickel oxide nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dan; Li, Dongsheng; Yang, Deren

    2017-01-01

    Branchlike nickel oxide nanocrystals with narrow size distribution are obtained by a solution growth method. The size-dependent of magnetic properties of the nickel oxides were investigated. The results of magnetic characterization indicate that the NiO nanocrystals with size below 12.8 nm show very weak ferromagnetic state at room temperature due to the uncompensated spins. Both of the average blocking temperature (Tb) and the irreversible temperature (Tirr) increase with the increase of nanoparticle sizes, while both the remnant magnetization and the coercivity at 300 K increase with the decrease of the particle sizes. Moreover, the disappearance of two-magnon (2M) band and redshift of one-phonon longitudinal (1LO) and two-phonon LO in vibrational properties due to size reduction are observed. Compared to the one with the spherical morphological, it is also found that nano-structured nickel oxides with the branchlike morphology have larger remnant magnetization and the coercivity at 5 K due to their larger surface-to-volume ratio and greater degree of broken symmetry at the surface or the higher proportion of broken bonds.

  13. Particle Size Distribution in Saturn’s Ring C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marouf, Essam A.; Wong, K.; French, R.; Rappaport, N.

    2012-10-01

    Information about particle sizes in Saturn’s rings is provided by two complementary types of Cassini radio occultation measurements. The first is differential extinction of three coherent sinusoidal signals transmitted by Cassini through the rings back to Earth (wavelength = 0.94, 3.6, and 13 cm, respectively). The differential measurements strongly constraint three parameters of an assumed power-law size distribution n(a) = n0 (a/a0)q, amin ≤ a ≤ amax: namely, the power law index q, the minimum radius amin, and reference abundance n0 at reference radius a0. The differential measurements are particularly sensitive to radii in the range 0.1 mm < a < 1 m. Complementing this capability, is a second type of measurements that is particularly sensitive to the larger radii 1 m < a < 20 m and their abundance. Signature of the collective near-forward scattering by these particles is captured in power spectrum measurements as broadened component of width, shape, and strength that depend on ring particle sizes, their spatial distribution, and observation geometry. Contributions of ring features of width as small several hundred kilometers can be identified and isolated in the measured spectra for a small subset of Cassini orbits of favorable geometry. We use three inverse scattering algorithms (Bayes, constrained linear inversion, generalized singular-value-decomposition) to recover the size distribution of particles of resolved ring features over the size range 1 m < a < 20 m without assuming an explicit size distribution model. We also investigate consistency of the results with a single power-law model extending over 0.1 mm < a < 20 m and implications to the spatial distribution of ring particles normal to the ring plane (vertical ring thickness). We present example results for selected features across Saturn’s Ring C where little evidence for gravitational wakes is present, hence the approaches above are applicable.

  14. Pore-size distributions of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPA) hydrogels

    SciTech Connect

    Walther, D.H.; Blanch, H.W.; Prausnitz, J.M. |

    1993-11-01

    Pore-size distributions have been measured for N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPA) hydrogels at 25 and 32{degrees}C with swelling capacities 11.3 and 6.0 g swollen gel per g dry gel. The mixed-solute-exclusion method (introduced by Kuga) was used to obtain the experimental solute-exclusion curve which represents the amount of imbibed liquid inside the gel inaccessible for a solute of radius r. The pore-size distributions were obtained by using Casassa`s Brownian-motion model and numerically solving the Fredholm integral equation. The pore-size distributions of temperature-sensitive NIPA hydrogels are strongly dependent on temperature which determines swelling capacity. With increasing swelling capacity (from 6.0 to 11.3), the pore-size distribution shifts to higher mode values (27.3 to 50.6 {angstrom}) and to higher variance (1.07{center_dot}10{sup 3} to 3.58{center_dot}10{sup 3} {angstrom}{sup 2}).

  15. Asymmetric competition causes multimodal size distributions in spatially structured populations.

    PubMed

    Velázquez, Jorge; Allen, Robert B; Coomes, David A; Eichhorn, Markus P

    2016-01-27

    Plant sizes within populations often exhibit multimodal distributions, even when all individuals are the same age and have experienced identical conditions. To establish the causes of this, we created an individual-based model simulating the growth of trees in a spatially explicit framework, which was parametrized using data from a long-term study of forest stands in New Zealand. First, we demonstrate that asymmetric resource competition is a necessary condition for the formation of multimodal size distributions within cohorts. By contrast, the legacy of small-scale clustering during recruitment is transient and quickly overwhelmed by density-dependent mortality. Complex multi-layered size distributions are generated when established individuals are restricted in the spatial domain within which they can capture resources. The number of modes reveals the effective number of direct competitors, while the separation and spread of modes are influenced by distances among established individuals. Asymmetric competition within local neighbourhoods can therefore generate a range of complex size distributions within even-aged cohorts. © 2016 The Author(s).

  16. Asymmetric competition causes multimodal size distributions in spatially structured populations

    PubMed Central

    Velázquez, Jorge; Allen, Robert B.; Coomes, David A.; Eichhorn, Markus P.

    2016-01-01

    Plant sizes within populations often exhibit multimodal distributions, even when all individuals are the same age and have experienced identical conditions. To establish the causes of this, we created an individual-based model simulating the growth of trees in a spatially explicit framework, which was parametrized using data from a long-term study of forest stands in New Zealand. First, we demonstrate that asymmetric resource competition is a necessary condition for the formation of multimodal size distributions within cohorts. By contrast, the legacy of small-scale clustering during recruitment is transient and quickly overwhelmed by density-dependent mortality. Complex multi-layered size distributions are generated when established individuals are restricted in the spatial domain within which they can capture resources. The number of modes reveals the effective number of direct competitors, while the separation and spread of modes are influenced by distances among established individuals. Asymmetric competition within local neighbourhoods can therefore generate a range of complex size distributions within even-aged cohorts. PMID:26817778

  17. Parameterizing Size Distribution in Ice Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    DeSlover, Daniel; Mitchell, David L.

    2009-09-25

    PARAMETERIZING SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS IN ICE CLOUDS David L. Mitchell and Daniel H. DeSlover ABSTRACT An outstanding problem that contributes considerable uncertainty to Global Climate Model (GCM) predictions of future climate is the characterization of ice particle sizes in cirrus clouds. Recent parameterizations of ice cloud effective diameter differ by a factor of three, which, for overcast conditions, often translate to changes in outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) of 55 W m-2 or more. Much of this uncertainty in cirrus particle sizes is related to the problem of ice particle shattering during in situ sampling of the ice particle size distribution (PSD). Ice particles often shatter into many smaller ice fragments upon collision with the rim of the probe inlet tube. These small ice artifacts are counted as real ice crystals, resulting in anomalously high concentrations of small ice crystals (D < 100 µm) and underestimates of the mean and effective size of the PSD. Half of the cirrus cloud optical depth calculated from these in situ measurements can be due to this shattering phenomenon. Another challenge is the determination of ice and liquid water amounts in mixed phase clouds. Mixed phase clouds in the Arctic contain mostly liquid water, and the presence of ice is important for determining their lifecycle. Colder high clouds between -20 and -36 oC may also be mixed phase but in this case their condensate is mostly ice with low levels of liquid water. Rather than affecting their lifecycle, the presence of liquid dramatically affects the cloud optical properties, which affects cloud-climate feedback processes in GCMs. This project has made advancements in solving both of these problems. Regarding the first problem, PSD in ice clouds are uncertain due to the inability to reliably measure the concentrations of the smallest crystals (D < 100 µm), known as the “small mode”. Rather than using in situ probe measurements aboard aircraft, we employed a treatment of ice

  18. Lognormal field size distributions as a consequence of economic truncation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Attanasi, E.D.; Drew, L.J.

    1985-01-01

    The assumption of lognormal (parent) field size distributions has for a long time been applied to resource appraisal and evaluation of exploration strategy by the petroleum industry. However, frequency distributions estimated with observed data and used to justify this hypotheses are conditional. Examination of various observed field size distributions across basins and over time shows that such distributions should be regarded as the end result of an economic filtering process. Commercial discoveries depend on oil and gas prices and field development costs. Some new fields are eliminated due to location, depths, or water depths. This filtering process is called economic truncation. Economic truncation may occur when predictions of a discovery process are passed through an economic appraisal model. We demonstrate that (1) economic resource appraisals, (2) forecasts of levels of petroleum industry activity, and (3) expected benefits of developing and implementing cost reducing technology are sensitive to assumptions made about the nature of that portion of (parent) field size distribution subject to economic truncation. ?? 1985 Plenum Publishing Corporation.

  19. Clone size distributions in networks of genetic similarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-García, E.; Rozenfeld, A. F.; Eguíluz, V. M.; Arnaud-Haond, S.; Duarte, C. M.

    2006-12-01

    We build networks of genetic similarity in which the nodes are organisms sampled from biological populations. The procedure is illustrated by constructing networks from genetic data of a marine clonal plant. An important feature in the networks is the presence of clone subgraphs, i.e. sets of organisms with identical genotype forming clones. As a first step to understanding the dynamics that has shaped these networks, we point up a relationship between a particular degree distribution and the clone size distribution in the populations. We construct a dynamical model for the population dynamics, focussing on the dynamics of the clones, and solve it for the required distributions. Scale free and exponentially decaying forms are obtained depending on parameter values, the first type being obtained when clonal growth is the dominant process. Average distributions are dominated by the power law behavior presented by the fastest replicating populations.

  20. Effects of Grain Size Distributions on Fluid-Sediment Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conley, Daniel; Buscombe, Daniel

    2010-05-01

    Accounting for the feedback effects between sediment suspension and the generation of turbulence (Conley et al., 2008) has recently been shown to improve predictions of morphological evolution (Falchetti et al. 2010). Accounting for these interactions, which in general lead to an increase in the wave coherent component of transport relative to the mean component of transport, have been shown to even result in a change of transport direction. However most research to date has focused on simulations representing the unrealistic case of sediment beds composed of a single grain size. The recently initiated project TSSAR Waves (Turbulence, Sediment Stratification and Altered Resuspension under Waves) has initially focused on examining how the size distribution of bed sediments affects this fluid-sediment feedback. It has already been demonstrated (Conley et al. 2008) that the magnitude of the effects of sediment stratification scale with the ratio of maximum orbital velocity to grain settling velocity suggesting that the effects will be highly dependent on the grain size distribution. The nature of these effects has been investigated utilizing a modified version of the Generalized Ocean Turbulence Model (GOTM). Implementation of the ability to handle size distributions involved investigating questions such as how the mobility of individual scaseize fractions are related to total bed mobility, how excess shear stress is partitioned among size classes and grain size dependency of the Schmidt number. Observations from these investigations will be presented as well as predictions of sediment mobilization and suspension which are compared to appropriate laboratory experiments. Reference: Conley, D.C., Falchetti, S., Lohmann, I.P., Brocchini, M. (2008) The effects of flow stratification by non-cohesive sediment on transport in high-energy wave-driven flows. J. Fluid Mech., 610, 43-67. Falchetti, S., Conley, D.C., Brocchini, M. Elgar, S. (2010), Nearshore bar migration and

  1. Size distribution of mist generated during metal machining.

    PubMed

    Thornburg, J; Leith, D

    2000-08-01

    Mist generated by machining processes is formed by three mechanisms: impaction, centrifugal force, and evaporation/condensation. This study characterized the size distribution of soluble and mineral oil mists that resulted from these formation mechanisms. Salient parameters influencing the particle size distributions also were identified. Variables investigated included metalworking fluid and machining characteristics. The size distribution of the mist generated on a small lathe by each mechanism was measured using an Aerosizer LD. For impaction, only the mineral oil viscosity influenced the mass median diameter of the mist. No parameter affected the geometric standard deviation. High-viscosity mineral oil mist had a mass median diameter of 6.1 microns and a geometric standard deviation of 2.0. Low-viscosity mineral oil mist had a mass median diameter of 21.9 microns and a geometric standard deviation of 2.2. The mass median diameter of the mist generated by centrifugal force depended on the type of metalworking fluid, fluid flow, and rotational speed of the lathe. Mass median diameters for low-viscosity mineral oil mist ranged from 5 to 110 microns. Mass median diameters for soluble oil mist varied between 40 and 80 microns. The average geometric standard deviation was 2.4, and was not affected by any parameter. The mass median diameter and geometric standard deviation of the mist generated by evaporation/condensation varied with the type of metalworking fluid. The mineral oil mist and soluble oil mist mass median diameters were 2.1 microns and 3.2 microns, respectively. No machining or fluid parameter was important because the mist size distribution depended on the rate of condensation, coagulation processes, and the dynamics of the apparatus. Using the size distribution data from all three mechanisms, the estimated inhalable, thoracic, and respirable fractions of the total mass generated for each metalworking fluid were 60 percent, 12 percent, and 8 percent

  2. Prey size-distributions and size-specific foraging success of Ambystoma larvae.

    PubMed

    Smith, C K; Petranka, J W

    1987-01-01

    We examined how prey size-distributions influence size-specific foraing rate and food gain, i.e., food intake scaled to metabolic demands, in Jefferson's and small-mouth salamander larvae. Ambystoma jeffersonianum larvae sampled on 17 dates from a farm pond whose fauna was dominated by macrozooplankton and chironomid larvae were rarely gape-limited, and total volume of food in the stomach (VS) showed only a slight tendency to increase with larval size. Although 15 of 17 correlation coefficients of VS with larval size were positive, only 1 of 17 correlations were statistically significant, and body size explained only 8% of the overall variation in VS. Correlation coefficients of food gain and body size were positive in 9 cases and negative in 8, but only 3 were statistically significant.In contrast, Ambystoma texanum larvae in 42 samples taken from five sites dominated by macrozooplankton as well as relatively large isopods and amphipods were almost always gape-limited, and VS tended to increase markedly with larval size. 40 of 42 correlation coefficients of VS and larval size were positive, and 19 correlations were statistically significant. Body size in turn explained about 35% of the overall variation in VS. Correlation coefficients of food gain and larval size were positive in 32 of 42 samples, and 9 of 10 significant correlations were positive.When food is limiting and prey selection is not limited by gape, smaller larvae may grow as fast or in some cases faster than larger larvae because they are nearly as effective foragers, but have lower metabolic demands. Larger larvae may in turn grow faster than smaller larvae in environments which support a broad size spectrum of prey, particularly when gape limitations are highly disproportionate among size classes. The growth rate of larvae in one size class relative to another depends primarily on the extent to which increased foraging rate compensates for higher energy demands as body size increases. Size

  3. EXPLAINING THE GALACTIC INTERSTELLAR DUST GRAIN SIZE DISTRIBUTION FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Casuso, E.; Beckman, J. E.

    2010-04-15

    We present here a new theoretical model designed to explain the interstellar dust grain size distribution function (IDGSDF), and compare its results with previous observationally derived distributions and with previous theoretical models. The range of grain sizes produced in the late stages of stars with different masses is considered, and folded into a model which takes into account the observed changes in the historical local star formation rate. Stars in different mass ranges reach their grain producing epochs at times whose mass dependence is quantifiable, and the range of grain sizes produced has also been estimated as a function of stellar mass. The results show an IDGSDF that has a global slope comparable to the observationally derived plot and three peaks at values of the grain radius comparable to those in the observationally derived distribution, which have their ultimate origin in three major peaks which have been observed in the star formation rate (SFR) over the past 15 Gyr. The model uses grain-grain interactions to modify pre-existing size distributions at lower grain sizes, where collisions appear more important. The interactions include disruption by collisions as well as coagulation to form larger grains. The initial distributions are given a range of initial functions (flat, Gaussian, fractal) for their physical parameters, as well as geometrical forms ranging from spherical to highly elongated. The particles are constrained in an imaginary box, and laws of inelastic collisions are applied. Finally, we combine the two models and produce an IDGSDF which is a notably good match to the observational fit, and specifically at small grain radii reproduces the data better than the 'SFR model' alone.

  4. Nanocatalysis: size- and shape-dependent chemisorption and catalytic reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldan Cuenya, Beatriz; Behafarid, Farzad

    2015-06-01

    In recent years, the field of catalysis has experienced an astonishing transformation, driven in part by more demanding environmental standards and critical societal and industrial needs such as the search for alternative energy sources. Thanks to the advent of nanotechnology, major steps have been made towards the rational design of novel catalysts. Striking new catalytic properties, including greatly enhanced reactivities and selectivities, have been reported for nanoparticle (NP) catalysts as compared to their bulk counterparts. However, in order to harness the power of these nanocatalysts, a detailed understanding of the origin of their enhanced performance is needed. The present review focuses on the role of the NP size and shape on chemisorption and catalytic performance. Since homogeneity in NP size and shape is a prerequisite for the understanding of structure-reactivity correlations, we first review different synthesis methods that result in narrow NP size distributions and shape controlled NPs. Next, size-dependent phenomena which influence the chemical reactivity of NPs, including quantum size-effects and the presence of under-coordinated surface atoms are examined. The effect of the NP shape on catalytic performance is discussed and explained based on the existence of different atomic structures on the NP surface with distinct chemisorption properties. The influence of additional factors, such as the oxidation state of the NPs and NP-support interactions, is also considered in the frame of the size- and shape-dependency that these phenomena present. Ultimately, our review highlights the importance of achieving a systematic understanding of the factors that control the activity and selectivity of a catalyst in order to avoid trial and error methods in the rational design of the new generation of nanocatalysts with properties tunable at the atomic level.

  5. Quantifying the PAH Size Distribution in H II-Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allamandola, Louis

    We propose to determine the astronomical PAH size distribution for 20 compact H II-regions from the ISO H II-regions spectroscopic archive (catalog). The selected sample includes H IIregions at a range of distances, all with angular sizes captured by the ISO aperture. This is the first time that the PAH size distribution will be put on an accurate, quantitative footing and that a breakdown of the overall PAH population into different size bins is possible. Since the PAH properties that influence the astronomical environment are PAH-size dependent, this new knowledge will provide a deeper understanding of the specific, and sometimes critical, roles that PAHs play in different astronomical environments. This research will be carried out using the PAH spectra and tools that are available through the NASA Ames PAH IR Spectroscopic Database (www.astrochemistry.org/pahdb/). The ISO compact, H II-regions spectroscopic catalog contains the 2.3 196 µm spectra from some 45 H II-regions. Of these, 20 capture the PAH spectrum with high enough quality between 2.5 15 µm to carry out the proposed work. From the outset of the PAH hypothesis it has been thought that the 3.3/11.2 µm PAH band strength ratio is a qualitative proxy for PAH size and a rough measure of variations in the astronomical PAH size distribution between objects or within extended objects. However, because of the intrinsic uncertainties for most of the observational data available for these two bands, and the very limited spectroscopic data available for PAHs representative of the astronomical PAH population, only very crude estimates of the astronomical PAH size distribution have been possible up to now. The work proposed here overcomes these two limitations, allowing astronomers to quantitatively and accurately determine the astronomical PAH size distribution for the first time. The spectra and tools from the NASA Ames PAH IR Spectroscopic Database will be used to determine the astronomical PAH size

  6. Size dependent cytotoxicity of fly ash particles

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W.K.; Tam, J.S.K.; Wong, M.H.

    1988-01-01

    Fly ash samples were collected from the electrostatic precipitator of a coal-fired power plant in Hong Kong. The particles of the respirable range (smaller than 10 {mu}m) were divided into 4 groups according to their particle size (mass median aerodynamic diameters). The surface morphology and the metal contents (Fe, Mn, Al and Zn) of fly ash particles were examined by a scanning electron microscopy and an inductively coupled plasma spectrophotometer, respectively. The particles were very heterogeneous in size and shape as well as the concentration of metals. The cytotoxicity of these four groups of fly ash particles were evaluated using an in vitro rat alveolar macrophages culture assay. The viability of alveolar macrophages was lower when incubated with smaller size particles. This relationship was also reflected by the damage of the surface morphology of the cells and the release of cytoplasmic (lactate dehydrogenase) and lysosomal (acid phosphatase and {beta}-glucuronidase) marker enzymes into the culture media.

  7. Size distributions and failure initiation of submarine and subaerial landslides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ten Brink, U. S.; Barkan, R.; Andrews, B. D.; Chaytor, J. D.

    2009-09-01

    Landslides are often viewed together with other natural hazards, such as earthquakes and fires, as phenomena whose size distribution obeys an inverse power law. Inverse power law distributions are the result of additive avalanche processes, in which the final size cannot be predicted at the onset of the disturbance. Volume and area distributions of submarine landslides along the U.S. Atlantic continental slope follow a lognormal distribution and not an inverse power law. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we generated area distributions of submarine landslides that show a characteristic size and with few smaller and larger areas, which can be described well by a lognormal distribution. To generate these distributions we assumed that the area of slope failure depends on earthquake magnitude, i.e., that failure occurs simultaneously over the area affected by horizontal ground shaking, and does not cascade from nucleating points. Furthermore, the downslope movement of displaced sediments does not entrain significant amounts of additional material. Our simulations fit well the area distribution of landslide sources along the Atlantic continental margin, if we assume that the slope has been subjected to earthquakes of magnitude ≤ 6.3. Regions of submarine landslides, whose area distributions obey inverse power laws, may be controlled by different generation mechanisms, such as the gradual development of fractures in the headwalls of cliffs. The observation of a large number of small subaerial landslides being triggered by a single earthquake is also compatible with the hypothesis that failure occurs simultaneously in many locations within the area affected by ground shaking. Unlike submarine landslides, which are found on large uniformly-dipping slopes, a single large landslide scarp cannot form on land because of the heterogeneous morphology and short slope distances of tectonically-active subaerial regions. However, for a given earthquake magnitude, the total area

  8. Size distributions and failure initiation of submarine and subaerial landslides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ten Brink, U.S.; Barkan, R.; Andrews, B.D.; Chaytor, J.D.

    2009-01-01

    Landslides are often viewed together with other natural hazards, such as earthquakes and fires, as phenomena whose size distribution obeys an inverse power law. Inverse power law distributions are the result of additive avalanche processes, in which the final size cannot be predicted at the onset of the disturbance. Volume and area distributions of submarine landslides along the U.S. Atlantic continental slope follow a lognormal distribution and not an inverse power law. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we generated area distributions of submarine landslides that show a characteristic size and with few smaller and larger areas, which can be described well by a lognormal distribution. To generate these distributions we assumed that the area of slope failure depends on earthquake magnitude, i.e., that failure occurs simultaneously over the area affected by horizontal ground shaking, and does not cascade from nucleating points. Furthermore, the downslope movement of displaced sediments does not entrain significant amounts of additional material. Our simulations fit well the area distribution of landslide sources along the Atlantic continental margin, if we assume that the slope has been subjected to earthquakes of magnitude ??? 6.3. Regions of submarine landslides, whose area distributions obey inverse power laws, may be controlled by different generation mechanisms, such as the gradual development of fractures in the headwalls of cliffs. The observation of a large number of small subaerial landslides being triggered by a single earthquake is also compatible with the hypothesis that failure occurs simultaneously in many locations within the area affected by ground shaking. Unlike submarine landslides, which are found on large uniformly-dipping slopes, a single large landslide scarp cannot form on land because of the heterogeneous morphology and short slope distances of tectonically-active subaerial regions. However, for a given earthquake magnitude, the total area

  9. A fractal-based approach to lake size-distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seekell, David A.; Pace, Michael L.; Tranvik, Lars J.; Verpoorter, Charles

    2013-02-01

    The abundance and size distribution of lakes is critical to assessing the role of lakes in regional and global biogeochemical processes. Lakes are fractal but do not always conform to the power law size-distribution typically associated with fractal geographical features. Here, we evaluate the fractal geometry of lakes with the goal of explaining apparently inconsistent observations of power law and non-power law lake size-distributions. The power law size-distribution is a special case for lakes near the mean elevation. Lakes in flat regions are power law distributed, while lakes in mountainous regions deviate from power law distributions. Empirical analyses of lake size data sets from the Adirondack Mountains in New York and the flat island of Gotland in Sweden support this finding. Our approach provides a unifying framework for lake size-distributions, indicates that small lakes cannot dominate total lake surface area, and underscores the importance of regional hypsometry in influencing lake size-distributions.

  10. Capturing tensile size-dependency in polymer nanofiber elasticity.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Bo; Wang, Jun; Han, Ray P S

    2015-02-01

    As the name implies, tensile size-dependency refers to the size-dependent response under uniaxial tension. It defers markedly from bending size-dependency in terms of onset and magnitude of the size-dependent response; the former begins earlier but rises to a smaller value than the latter. Experimentally, tensile size-dependent behavior is much harder to capture than its bending counterpart. This is also true in the computational effort; bending size-dependency models are more prevalent and well-developed. Indeed, many have questioned the existence of tensile size-dependency. However, recent experiments seem to support the existence of this phenomenon. Current strain gradient elasticity theories can accurately predict bending size-dependency but are unable to track tensile size-dependency. To rectify this deficiency a higher-order strain gradient elasticity model is constructed by including the second gradient of the strain into the deformation energy. Tensile experiments involving 10 wt% polycaprolactone nanofibers are performed to calibrate and verify our model. The results reveal that for the selected nanofibers, their size-dependency begins when their diameters reduce to 600 nm and below. Further, their characteristic length-scale parameter is found to be 1095.8 nm.

  11. Size Dependant Nucleation of Confined 2-Decanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amanuel, Samuel; Bauer, Hillary; Safiq, Alexandrea; Dulmaa, Jargalsaikhan; Khraisat, Amer

    2012-02-01

    We have studied freezing and melting of physically confined 2-decanol in nano porous silica using a Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC). Both melting and freezing temperatures are suppressed for physically confined 2-decanol. In the presence of bulk, freezing of the confined system is triggered by freezing of the bulk where nucleation is heterogeneous. There is, however, a cutoff size between 100 nm and 300 nm where phase transition is no longer initiated through heterogeneous nucleation. Below the cutoff size, nucleation is homogeneous where the confined system has to be supercooled further before any phase transition can occur. Melting of the confined system, on the other hand, is not influenced by the presence or absence of the bulk.

  12. Size dependent polaronic conduction in hematite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Monika; Banday, Azeem; Murugavel, Sevi

    2016-05-01

    Lithium Ion Batteries have been attracted as the major renewable energy source for all portable electronic devices because of its advantages like superior energy density, high theoretical capacity, high specific energy, stable cycling and less memory effects. Recently, α-Fe2O3 has been considered as a potential anode material due to high specific capacity, low cost, high abundance and environmental benignity. We have synthesized α-Fe2O3 with various sizes by using the ball milling and sol-gel procedure. Here, we report the dc conductivity measurement for the crystallite size ranging from 15 nm to 50nm. It has been observed that the enhancement in the polaronic conductivity nearly two orders in magnitude while reducing the crystallite size from bulk into nano scale level. The enhancement in the conductivity is due to the augmented to compressive strain developed in the material which leads to pronounced decrease in the hopping length of polarons. Thus, nanocrystaline α-Fe2O3 may be a better alternative anode material for lithium ion batteries than earlier reported systems.

  13. Size dependent polaronic conduction in hematite

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Monika; Banday, Azeem; Murugavel, Sevi

    2016-05-23

    Lithium Ion Batteries have been attracted as the major renewable energy source for all portable electronic devices because of its advantages like superior energy density, high theoretical capacity, high specific energy, stable cycling and less memory effects. Recently, α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} has been considered as a potential anode material due to high specific capacity, low cost, high abundance and environmental benignity. We have synthesized α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} with various sizes by using the ball milling and sol-gel procedure. Here, we report the dc conductivity measurement for the crystallite size ranging from 15 nm to 50 nm. It has been observed that the enhancement in the polaronic conductivity nearly two orders in magnitude while reducing the crystallite size from bulk into nano scale level. The enhancement in the conductivity is due to the augmented to compressive strain developed in the material which leads to pronounced decrease in the hopping length of polarons. Thus, nanocrystaline α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} may be a better alternative anode material for lithium ion batteries than earlier reported systems.

  14. Atmospheric Ion Clusters: Properties and Size Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Auria, R.; Turco, R. P.

    2002-12-01

    Ions are continuously generated in the atmosphere by the action of galactic cosmic radiation. Measured charge concentrations are of the order of 103 ~ {cm-3} throughout the troposphere, increasing to about 5 x 103 ~ {cm-3} in the lower stratosphere [Cole and Pierce, 1965; Paltridge, 1965, 1966]. The lifetimes of these ions are sufficient to allow substantial clustering with common trace constituents in air, including water, nitric and sulfuric acids, ammonia, and a variety of organic compounds [e.g., D'Auria and Turco, 2001 and references cited therein]. The populations of the resulting charged molecular clusters represent a pre-nucleation phase of particle formation, and in this regard comprise a key segment of the over-all nucleation size spectrum [e.g., Castleman and Tang, 1972]. It has been suggested that these clusters may catalyze certain heterogeneous reactions, and given their characteristic crystal-like structures may act as freezing nuclei for supercooled droplets. To investigate these possibilities, basic information on cluster thermodynamic properties and chemical kinetics is needed. Here, we present new results for several relevant atmospheric ion cluster families. In particular, predictions based on quantum mechanical simulations of cluster structure, and related thermodynamic parameters, are compared against laboratory data. We also describe a hybrid approach for modeling cluster sequences that combines laboratory measurements and quantum predictions with the classical liquid droplet (Thomson) model to treat a wider range of cluster sizes. Calculations of cluster mass distributions based on this hybrid model are illustrated, and the advantages and limitations of such an analysis are summarized. References: Castelman, A. W., Jr., and I. N. Tang, Role of small clusters in nucleation about ions, J. Chem. Phys., 57, 3629-3638, 1972. Cole, R. K., and E. T. Pierce, Electrification in the Earth's atmosphere for altitudes between 0 and 100 kilometers, J

  15. Aged Boreal Biomass Burning Size Distributions from Bortas 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, J. R.; Sakamoto, K.; Allan, J. D.; Coe, H.; Taylor, J.; Duck, T.

    2014-12-01

    Biomass-burning aerosols contribute to aerosol radiative forcing on the climate system. The magnitude of this effect is partially determined by aerosol size distributions, which are strong functions of source fire characteristics (e.g. fuel type, MCE) and in-plume microphysical processing. The uncertainties in biomass-burning emission number size-distributions in climate model inventories lead to uncertainties in the CCN concentrations and forcing estimates derived from these models. The BORTAS-B measurement campaign was designed to sample boreal biomass-burning outflow over Eastern Canada in the summer of 2011. Using these BORTAS-B data, we implement plume criteria to isolate the characteristic size-distribution of aged biomass-burning emissions (aged ~ 1.5 - 2 days) from boreal wildfires in Northwestern Ontario. The composite median size-distribution yields a single dominant accumulation mode with Dpm = 232 nm, σ = 1.7, which are comparable to literature values of other aged plumes of a similar type. The organic aerosol enhancement ratios (ΔOA/ΔCO) along the path of Flight b622 show values of 0.08-0.18 μg m-3 ppbv-1 with no significant trend with distance from the source. This lack of enhancement ratio increase/decrease with distance suggests no detectable net OA production/evaporation within the aged plume over the sampling period. A Lagrangian microphysical model was used to determine an estimate of the freshly emitted size distribution and flux corresponding to the BORTAS-B aged size-distributions. The model was restricted to coagulation and dilution processes only based on the insignificant net OA production/evaporation derived from the ΔOA/ΔCO enhancement ratios. Depending on the, we estimate that the fresh-plume median diameter was in the range of 59-94 nm with modal widths in the range of 1.7-2.8. Thus, the size of the freshly emitted particles is somewhat unconstrained due to the uncertainties in the plume dilution rates.

  16. Evolution of Particle Size Distributions in Fragmentation Over Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charalambous, C. A.; Pike, W. T.

    2013-12-01

    We present a new model of fragmentation based on a probabilistic calculation of the repeated fracture of a particle population. The resulting continuous solution, which is in closed form, gives the evolution of fragmentation products from an initial block, through a scale-invariant power-law relationship to a final comminuted powder. Models for the fragmentation of particles have been developed separately in mainly two different disciplines: the continuous integro-differential equations of batch mineral grinding (Reid, 1965) and the fractal analysis of geophysics (Turcotte, 1986) based on a discrete model with a single probability of fracture. The first gives a time-dependent development of the particle-size distribution, but has resisted a closed-form solution, while the latter leads to the scale-invariant power laws, but with no time dependence. Bird (2009) recently introduced a bridge between these two approaches with a step-wise iterative calculation of the fragmentation products. The development of the particle-size distribution occurs with discrete steps: during each fragmentation event, the particles will repeatedly fracture probabilistically, cascading down the length scales to a final size distribution reached after all particles have failed to further fragment. We have identified this process as the equivalent to a sequence of trials for each particle with a fixed probability of fragmentation. Although the resulting distribution is discrete, it can be reformulated as a continuous distribution in maturity over time and particle size. In our model, Turcotte's power-law distribution emerges at a unique maturation index that defines a regime boundary. Up to this index, the fragmentation is in an erosional regime with the initial particle size setting the scaling. Fragmentation beyond this index is in a regime of comminution with rebreakage of the particles down to the size limit of fracture. The maturation index can increment continuously, for example under

  17. Evaluation of Factors Affecting Size and Size Distribution of Chitosan-Electrosprayed Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Abyadeh, Morteza; Karimi Zarchi, Ali Akbar; Faramarzi, Mohammad Ali; Amani, Amir

    2017-01-01

    Size and size distribution of polymeric nanoparticles have important effect on their properties for pharmaceutical application. In this study, Chitosan nanoparticles were prepared by electrospray method (electrohydrodynamic atomization) and parameters that simultaneously affect size and/or size distribution of chitosan nanoparticles were optimized. Effect of formulation/processing three independent formulation/processing parameters, namely concentration, flow rate and applied voltage was investigated on particle size and size distribution of generated nanoparticles using a Box-Behnken experimental design. All the studied factors showed important effects on average size and size distribution of nanoparticles. A decrease in size and size distribution was obtainable with decreasing flow rate and concentration and increasing applied voltage. Eventually, a sample with minimum size and polydispersity was obtained with polymer concentration, flow rate and applied voltage values of 0.5 %w/v, 0.05 ml/hr and 15 kV, respectively. The experimentally prepared nanoparticles, expected having lowest size and size distribution values had a size of 105 nm, size distribution of 36 and Zeta potential of 59.3 mV. Results showed that optimum condition for production of chitosan nanoparticles with the minimum size and narrow size distribution was a minimum value for flow rate and highest value for applied voltage along with an optimum chitosan concentration.

  18. Size-dependent structure of silver nanoparticles under high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Koski, Kristie Jo

    2008-12-31

    Silver noble metal nanoparticles that are<10 nm often possess multiply twinned grains allowing them to adopt shapes and atomic structures not observed in bulk materials. The properties exhibited by particles with multiply twinned polycrystalline structures are often far different from those of single-crystalline particles and from the bulk. I will present experimental evidence that silver nanoparticles<10 nm undergo a reversible structural transformation under hydrostatic pressures up to 10 GPa. Results for nanoparticles in the intermediate size range of 5 to 10 nm suggest a reversible linear pressure-dependent rhombohedral distortion which has not been previously observed in bulk silver. I propose a mechanism for this transitiion that considers the bond-length distribution in idealized multiply twinned icosahedral particles. Results for nanoparticles of 3.9 nm suggest a reversible linear pressure-dependent orthorhombic distortion. This distortion is interpreted in the context of idealized decahedral particles. In addition, given these size-dependent measurements of silver nanoparticle compression with pressure, we have constructed a pressure calibration curve. Encapsulating these silver nanoparticles in hollow metal oxide nanospheres then allows us to measure the pressure inside a nanoshell using x-ray diffraction. We demonstrate the measurement of pressure gradients across nanoshells and show that these nanoshells have maximum resolved shear strengths on the order of 500 MPa to IGPa.

  19. Phenomenological extraction of Transverse Momentum Dependent distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Prokudin, Alexei

    2011-10-24

    We discuss phenomenological extraction of Transverse Momentum Dependent Distributions (TMDs) from experimental data. At leading twist spin structure of spin-1/2 hadron can be described by 8 TMDs. TMDs reveal three-dimensional distribution of partons inside polarised nucleon. Experimentally these functions can be studied in polarised experiments using Spin Asymmetries in particular Single Spin Asymmetries (SSAs). We discuss transversity that measures distribution of transversely polarised quarks in a transversely polarised nucleon and Sivers distribution function that describes distribution of unpolarised quarks in a transversely polarised nucleon.

  20. Size Dependent Antioxidant Activity of Polypyrrole Nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, A.; Banerjee, Somik

    2011-07-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy) nanofibers have been synthesized employing surfactant assisted miceller polymerization by varying the surfactant concentration. The synthesized nanofibers have been characterized using TEM, XRD, FTIR and UV-Visible spectroscopy. TEM reveals that the diameter of the PPy nanowires decreases with the increase in surfactant concentration. X-ray spectra shows an amorphous peak centered around 2θ = 24.6° which is attributed to the π-π interaction of the partial PPy chains similar to that of aromatic groups. The domain length of the samples determined using the single-line approximation technique, decreases with decreasing diameter whereas the strain in the material increases, which have been attributed to the reduction of size with increase in the surfactant concentration as revealed by TEM. The vibrational bands observed from the FTIR spectra confirm the formation of surfactant free PPy nanowires. UV-Visible spectra shows a blue-shift in the π-π* absorption peak. Antioxidant activity of the samples has been determined using the DPPH free radical method. It has been observed that enhancement in free radical scavenging coincides with the decreasing diameter of the PPy nanofibers which has been associated with the increase in the surface reaction sites with the reduction of size.

  1. Effects of particle size distribution in thick film conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vest, R. W.

    1983-01-01

    Studies of particle size distribution in thick film conductors are discussed. The distribution of particle sizes does have an effect on fired film density but the effect is not always positive. A proper distribution of sizes is necessary, and while the theoretical models can serve as guides to selecting this proper distribution, improved densities can be achieved by empirical variations from the predictions of the models.

  2. Improved Root Normal Size Distributions for Liquid Atomization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    Improved Root Normal Size Distributions for Liquid Atomization Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited... Atomization Culbert B. Laney1 Engility Corp., 8211 Terminal Rd, Lorton, VA 22079 U.S.A. Abstract: This paper identifies two issues with traditional...root normal size distributions, which are commonly fitted to experimental results for liquid atomization and sprays. First, while root normal size

  3. Experimental investigations of size distribution through large van der Waals cluster beam cross-section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shenghong; Daineka, D. V.; Châtelet, M.

    2003-08-01

    Size distributions through large van der Waals cluster beam cross-section are studied with the pick-up technique. Based on our experimental results, we observed that the larger cluster is always concentrated in the center of the beam. From the center to the periphery, the cluster size gradually decreases. The size distributions through the beam cross-section depend on incoming cluster size and incoming cluster velocity. The larger the incoming cluster size or the faster the incoming cluster velocity, the flatter the size distributions through the beam cross-section are found. These experimental results are interpreted by the Mack focusing effect.

  4. Rheology of PVC Plastisol: Particle Size Distribution and Viscoelastic Properties.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, N.; Harrell, E. R.

    2001-06-01

    Plastisols of poly(vinyl chloride), PVC, are suspensions of fine particles in plasticizer with about 50% resin volume fraction. Typically, the gross particle size ranges from 15 to 0.2 &mgr;m and smaller, where the common practice of spray-drying these resins and subsequent grinding of larger particles dictate the size ranges including agglomerates as well as the primary particles. The plastisol is a pastelike liquid, which may be spread to coat substrates. The coated substrates are heated in an oven to gel and fuse the material for producing uniform, rubbery products. Because the first step of processing is spreading the plastisol on a substrate, rheology at room temperature is obviously important. The material is thixotropic under very low stress. The flow behavior is pseudoplastic and exhibits dilatancy and fracture at high shear rate. This work is concerned with the pseudoplastic behavior but the dynamic mechanical measurements are employed instead of the usual steady-state shear flow measurements. This is because the steady shear may break up agglomerates. The dynamic measurements with small strain-amplitude avoid the break-up of the agglomerates. This is important, because this work is concerned with the effects of the particle size distribution on the material behavior. The frequency dependence of both viscous and elastic behavior is recorded and presented with samples varying in particle size distribution. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  5. Evolution of grain size distribution during deformation of superplastic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lesuer, D.R.; Glaser, R.; Syn, C.K.

    1997-10-28

    Grain size distribution and its evolution during superplastic deformation has been studied for two materials- ultrahigh carbon steel, which has a two phase microstructure, and a copper alloy, which has a quasi-single phase microstructure. For both materials the distribution of initial grain size is very accurately represented by a lognormal throughout the deformation history. The evolution of the parameters characterizing the log normal distribution have also been studied and found to vary in a systematic manner results. Results can be used to specify the grain size distribution as a function of strain during superplastic deformation and thus should prove useful for computational studies in which grain size distribution is evaluated.

  6. [The fractal characteristics of particle size distribution and conservation relationship].

    PubMed

    Jin, Peng-kang; Wang, Xiao-chang

    2004-01-01

    Using a microscopic technique, the characteristics of particle size distribution of Al-humic flocs were studied. The results showed that Al-humic floc size followed a lognormal distribution. By introducing the lognormal distribution and fractal dimension into the fundamental kinetic equation of flocculation, a conservation relationship was obtained between the total number of particles, average floc volume and standard deviation of floc size distribution. Significance of the relation can greatly simplify the complicated procedure of kinetic analysis and enable a more accurate evaluation of floc size distribution.

  7. The determination and optimization of (rutile) pigment particle size distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, L. W.

    1972-01-01

    A light scattering particle size test which can be used with materials having a broad particle size distribution is described. This test is useful for pigments. The relation between the particle size distribution of a rutile pigment and its optical performance in a gray tint test at low pigment concentration is calculated and compared with experimental data.

  8. The determination and optimization of (rutile) pigment particle size distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, L. W.

    1972-01-01

    A light scattering particle size test which can be used with materials having a broad particle size distribution is described. This test is useful for pigments. The relation between the particle size distribution of a rutile pigment and its optical performance in a gray tint test at low pigment concentration is calculated and compared with experimental data.

  9. How Sample Size Affects a Sampling Distribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulekar, Madhuri S.; Siegel, Murray H.

    2009-01-01

    If students are to understand inferential statistics successfully, they must have a profound understanding of the nature of the sampling distribution. Specifically, they must comprehend the determination of the expected value and standard error of a sampling distribution as well as the meaning of the central limit theorem. Many students in a high…

  10. How Sample Size Affects a Sampling Distribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulekar, Madhuri S.; Siegel, Murray H.

    2009-01-01

    If students are to understand inferential statistics successfully, they must have a profound understanding of the nature of the sampling distribution. Specifically, they must comprehend the determination of the expected value and standard error of a sampling distribution as well as the meaning of the central limit theorem. Many students in a high…

  11. The Dependence of Cirrus Gamma Size Distributions Expressed as Volumes in N(sub 0)-Lambda-Mu Phase Space and Bulk Cloud Properties on Environmental Conditions: Results from the Small Ice Particles in Cirrus Experiment (SPARTICUS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Robert C.; McFarquhar, Greg M.; Fridlind, Ann M.; Atlas, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    The variability of cirrus ice microphysical properties is investigated using observations obtained during the Small Particles in Cirrus (SPARTICUS) campaign. An existing approach that represents a size distribution (SD) as a single gamma function using an ellipsoid of equally realizable solutions in (N(sub 0), lambda, mu) phase space is modified to automatically identify multiple modes in SDs and characterize each mode by such an ellipsoid. The modified approach is applied to ice crystals with maximum dimension D greater than15 micrometers collected by the 2-D stereo and 2-D precipitation probes on the Stratton Park Engineering Company Learjet. The dependencies of N(sub 0), mu, and lambda from each mode, total number concentration, bulk extinction, ice water content (IWC), and mass median maximum dimension D(sub mm) as a function of temperature T and cirrus type are then analyzed. The changes in the observed codependencies between N(sub 0), mu, and lambda, bulk extinction, IWC, and D(sub mm) with environmental conditions indicate that particles were larger at higher T during SPARTICUS. At most two modes were observed in any SD during SPARTICUS, with the average boundary between them at 115 micrometers, similar to past studies not using probes with shatter mitigating tips and artifact removal algorithms. The bimodality of the SDs increased with T. This and the differences in N(sub 0), mu, and lambda between the modes suggest that particles with smaller D nucleated more recently than particles with larger D, which grew via vapor deposition and aggregation. Because smaller crystals, whose concentrations are uncertain, make marginal contributions to higher order moments, the use of higher moments for evaluating model fields is suggested.

  12. The Dependence of Cirrus Gamma Size Distributions Expressed as Volumes in N(sub 0)-Lambda-Mu Phase Space and Bulk Cloud Properties on Environmental Conditions: Results from the Small Ice Particles in Cirrus Experiment (SPARTICUS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Robert C.; McFarquhar, Greg M.; Fridlind, Ann M.; Atlas, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    The variability of cirrus ice microphysical properties is investigated using observations obtained during the Small Particles in Cirrus (SPARTICUS) campaign. An existing approach that represents a size distribution (SD) as a single gamma function using an ellipsoid of equally realizable solutions in (N(sub 0), lambda, mu) phase space is modified to automatically identify multiple modes in SDs and characterize each mode by such an ellipsoid. The modified approach is applied to ice crystals with maximum dimension D greater than15 micrometers collected by the 2-D stereo and 2-D precipitation probes on the Stratton Park Engineering Company Learjet. The dependencies of N(sub 0), mu, and lambda from each mode, total number concentration, bulk extinction, ice water content (IWC), and mass median maximum dimension D(sub mm) as a function of temperature T and cirrus type are then analyzed. The changes in the observed codependencies between N(sub 0), mu, and lambda, bulk extinction, IWC, and D(sub mm) with environmental conditions indicate that particles were larger at higher T during SPARTICUS. At most two modes were observed in any SD during SPARTICUS, with the average boundary between them at 115 micrometers, similar to past studies not using probes with shatter mitigating tips and artifact removal algorithms. The bimodality of the SDs increased with T. This and the differences in N(sub 0), mu, and lambda between the modes suggest that particles with smaller D nucleated more recently than particles with larger D, which grew via vapor deposition and aggregation. Because smaller crystals, whose concentrations are uncertain, make marginal contributions to higher order moments, the use of higher moments for evaluating model fields is suggested.

  13. The dependence of cirrus gamma size distributions expressed as volumes in N0-λ-μ phase space and bulk cloud properties on environmental conditions: Results from the Small Ice Particles in Cirrus Experiment (SPARTICUS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Robert C.; McFarquhar, Greg M.; Fridlind, Ann M.; Atlas, Rachel

    2015-10-01

    The variability of cirrus ice microphysical properties is investigated using observations obtained during the Small Particles in Cirrus (SPARTICUS) campaign. An existing approach that represents a size distribution (SD) as a single gamma function using an ellipsoid of equally realizable solutions in (N0, λ, μ) phase space is modified to automatically identify multiple modes in SDs and characterize each mode by such an ellipsoid. The modified approach is applied to ice crystals with maximum dimension D > 15 µm collected by the 2-D stereo and 2-D precipitation probes on the Stratton Park Engineering Company Learjet. The dependencies of N0, μ, and λ from each mode, total number concentration, bulk extinction, ice water content (IWC), and mass median maximum dimension Dmm as a function of temperature T and cirrus type are then analyzed. The changes in the observed codependencies between N0, μ, and λ, bulk extinction, IWC, and Dmm with environmental conditions indicate that particles were larger at higher T during SPARTICUS. At most two modes were observed in any SD during SPARTICUS, with the average boundary between them at 115 µm, similar to past studies not using probes with shatter mitigating tips and artifact removal algorithms. The bimodality of the SDs increased with T. This and the differences in N0, μ, and λ between the modes suggest that particles with smaller D nucleated more recently than particles with larger D, which grew via vapor deposition and aggregation. Because smaller crystals, whose concentrations are uncertain, make marginal contributions to higher order moments, the use of higher moments for evaluating model fields is suggested.

  14. Morphology, size distribution and elemental composition of several dental debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Shigeaki; Iwadera, Nobuki; Esaki, Mitsue; Aoyama, Ken-Ichi; Akasaka, Tsukasa; Uo, Motohiro; Morita, Manabu; Yawaka, Yasutaka; Watari, Fumio

    2012-12-01

    We investigated morphologies, size distributions and elemental compositions of dental debris formed by cutting/grinding teeth or dental alloys. The average size of debris formed by cutting/grinding dental alloy was around 100 μm and that of teeth was 20 μm. The debris formed by grinding with diamond or carborundum point had isotropic irregular shape, while the debris formed by cutting with carbide bar had characteristic lathe-cut shape. The elemental analysis indicated that the debris formed by grinding dental alloy with carborundum point consisted of not only the particles of the alloy but also the particles of Si compounds with the size of around 10 μm. The particles of Si compounds would be formed by abrasion of the grinding instrument (carborundum, SiC). Similarly, the debris formed by grinding with diamond point also contained submicro-sized particles consisting of C compounds. The results indicate that the morphology and composition of dental debris are varied depending on the combination between the workpiece and the cutting/grinding materials and that the dental debris consist of both the workpiece and the cutting/grinding materials in some combination. In addition, some of the debris of tooth had the size less than 2 μm, which has a potential to induce inflammation. Though the inflammation can be expected at low level, it is required to investigate the details in future.

  15. Approximate sample sizes required to estimate length distributions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miranda, L.E.

    2007-01-01

    The sample sizes required to estimate fish length were determined by bootstrapping from reference length distributions. Depending on population characteristics and species-specific maximum lengths, 1-cm length-frequency histograms required 375-1,200 fish to estimate within 10% with 80% confidence, 2.5-cm histograms required 150-425 fish, proportional stock density required 75-140 fish, and mean length required 75-160 fish. In general, smaller species, smaller populations, populations with higher mortality, and simpler length statistics required fewer samples. Indices that require low sample sizes may be suitable for monitoring population status, and when large changes in length are evident, additional sampling effort may be allocated to more precisely define length status with more informative estimators. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2007.

  16. Evaluation of droplet size distributions using univariate and multivariate approaches.

    PubMed

    Gaunø, Mette Høg; Larsen, Crilles Casper; Vilhelmsen, Thomas; Møller-Sonnergaard, Jørn; Wittendorff, Jørgen; Rantanen, Jukka

    2013-01-01

    Pharmaceutically relevant material characteristics are often analyzed based on univariate descriptors instead of utilizing the whole information available in the full distribution. One example is droplet size distribution, which is often described by the median droplet size and the width of the distribution. The current study was aiming to compare univariate and multivariate approach in evaluating droplet size distributions. As a model system, the atomization of a coating solution from a two-fluid nozzle was investigated. The effect of three process parameters (concentration of ethyl cellulose in ethanol, atomizing air pressure, and flow rate of coating solution) on the droplet size and droplet size distribution using a full mixed factorial design was used. The droplet size produced by a two-fluid nozzle was measured by laser diffraction and reported as volume based size distribution. Investigation of loading and score plots from principal component analysis (PCA) revealed additional information on the droplet size distributions and it was possible to identify univariate statistics (volume median droplet size), which were similar, however, originating from varying droplet size distributions. The multivariate data analysis was proven to be an efficient tool for evaluating the full information contained in a distribution.

  17. Monte Carlo predictions of DNA fragment-size distributions for large sizes after HZE particle irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponomarev, A. L.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Sachs, R. K.; Brenner, D. J.

    2001-01-01

    DSBs (double-strand breaks) produced by densely ionizing space radiation are not located randomly in the genome: recent data indicate DSB clustering along chromosomes. DSB clustering at large scales, from >100 Mbp down to approximately 2 kbp, is modeled using a Monte-Carlo algorithm. A random-walk model of chromatin is combined with a track model, that predicts the radial distribution of energy from an ion, and the RLC (randomly-located-clusters) formalism, in software called DNAbreak. This model generalizes the random-breakage model, whose broken-stick fragment-size distribution is applicable to low-LET radiation. DSB induction due to track interaction with the DNA volume depends on the radiation quality parameter Q. This dose-independent parameter depends only weakly on LET. Multi-track, high-dose effects depend on the cluster intensity parameter lambda, proportional to fluence as defined by the RLC formalism. After lambda is determined by a numerical experiment, the model reduces to one adjustable parameter Q. The best numerical fits to the experimental data, determining Q, are obtained. The knowledge of lambda and Q allows us to give biophysically based extrapolations of high-dose DNA fragment-size data to low doses or to high LETs.

  18. Monte Carlo predictions of DNA fragment-size distributions for large sizes after HZE particle irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponomarev, A. L.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Sachs, R. K.; Brenner, D. J.

    2001-01-01

    DSBs (double-strand breaks) produced by densely ionizing space radiation are not located randomly in the genome: recent data indicate DSB clustering along chromosomes. DSB clustering at large scales, from >100 Mbp down to approximately 2 kbp, is modeled using a Monte-Carlo algorithm. A random-walk model of chromatin is combined with a track model, that predicts the radial distribution of energy from an ion, and the RLC (randomly-located-clusters) formalism, in software called DNAbreak. This model generalizes the random-breakage model, whose broken-stick fragment-size distribution is applicable to low-LET radiation. DSB induction due to track interaction with the DNA volume depends on the radiation quality parameter Q. This dose-independent parameter depends only weakly on LET. Multi-track, high-dose effects depend on the cluster intensity parameter lambda, proportional to fluence as defined by the RLC formalism. After lambda is determined by a numerical experiment, the model reduces to one adjustable parameter Q. The best numerical fits to the experimental data, determining Q, are obtained. The knowledge of lambda and Q allows us to give biophysically based extrapolations of high-dose DNA fragment-size data to low doses or to high LETs.

  19. Strong size-dependent stress relaxation in electrospun polymer nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wingert, Matthew C.; Jiang, Zhang; Chen, Renkun; Cai, Shengqiang

    2017-01-01

    Electrospun polymer nanofibers have garnered significant interest due to their strong size-dependent material properties, such as tensile moduli, strength, toughness, and glass transition temperatures. These properties are closely correlated with polymer chain dynamics. In most applications, polymers usually exhibit viscoelastic behaviors such as stress relaxation and creep, which are also determined by the motion of polymer chains. However, the size-dependent viscoelasticity has not been studied previously in polymer nanofibers. Here, we report the first experimental evidence of significant size-dependent stress relaxation in electrospun Nylon-11 nanofibers as well as size-dependent viscosity of the confined amorphous regions. In conjunction with the dramatically increasing stiffness of nano-scaled fibers, this strong relaxation enables size-tunable properties which break the traditional damping-stiffness tradeoff, qualifying electrospun nanofibers as a promising set of size-tunable materials with an unusual and highly desirable combination of simultaneously high stiffness and large mechanical energy dissipation.

  20. Temperature and size-dependent Hamaker constants for metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, K.; Pinchuk, P.

    2016-08-01

    Theoretical values of the Hamaker constant have been calculated for metal nanoparticles using Lifshitz theory. The theory describes the Hamaker constant in terms of the permittivity of the interacting bodies. Metal nanoparticles exhibit an internal size effect that alters the dielectric permittivity of the particle when its size falls below the mean free path of the conducting electrons. This size dependence of the permittivity leads to size-dependence of the Hamaker constant for metal nanoparticles. Additionally, the electron damping and the plasma frequency used to model the permittivity of the particle exhibit temperature-dependence, which lead to temperature dependence of the Hamaker constant. In this work, both the size and temperature dependence for gold, silver, copper, and aluminum nanoparticles is demonstrated. The results of this study might be of interest for studying the colloidal stability of nanoparticles in solution.

  1. Time-dependent photoelectron angular distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiangyang

    1999-09-01

    I show that the angular distribution of electrons photoionized from gas phase targets by short light pulses is time-dependent, when the orbital momentum composition of the photocurrent changes with excitation energy so evolves with the time of detection. A theory of time- dependent photoionization is outlined and general formulas of time-dependent photoelectron flux and angular distribution are given. Two general propagator methods suitable to describe the time-dependent photoionization and scattering processes are developed. The photoionization process is viewed as a local excitation followed by a half scattering. The local excitation process is solved theoretically in a small region around the target core. This approach has been generalized to describe the evolution of a wavepacket in an unbound system. An asymptotic propagator theorem is discovered and used to derive analytic expressions for asymptotic propagators. The origin of the time dependence is explored by parameterizing the time delay and orbital momentum coupling in a two channel model. K-shell photoionization of N2 and CO are calculated with this time- dependent photoionization theory, implemented using a multiple scattering model. Numerical results demonstrate that the time dependence of photoelectron angular distributions is a realistic effect.

  2. Binary nucleation kinetics. I. Self-consistent size distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Wilemski, G.; Wyslouzil, B.E. ||

    1995-07-15

    Using the principle of detailed balance, we derive a new self-consistency requirement, termed the kinetic product rule, relating the evaporation coefficients and equilibrium cluster distribution for a binary system. We use this result to demonstrate and resolve an inconsistency for an idealized Kelvin model of nucleation in a simple binary mixture. We next examine several common forms for the equilibrium distribution of binary clusters based on the capillarity approximation and ideal vapor behavior. We point out fundamental deficiencies for each expression. We also show that each distribution yields evaporation coefficients that formally satisfy the new kinetic product rule but are physically unsatisfactory because they depend on the monomer vapor concentrations. We then propose a new form of the binary distribution function that is free of the deficiencies of the previous functions except for its reliance on the capillarity approximation. This new self-consistent classical (SCC) size distribution for binary clusters has the following properties: It satisfies the law of mass action; it reduces to an SCC unary distribution for clusters of a single component; and it produces physically acceptable evaporation rate coefficients that also satisfy the new kinetic product rule. Since it is possible to construct other examples of similarly well-behaved distributions, our result is not unique in this respect, but it does give reasonable predictions. As an illustration, we calculate binary nucleation rates and vapor activities for the ethanol--hexanol system at 260 K using the new SCC distribution and compare them to experimental results. The theoretical rates are uniformly higher than the experimental values over the entire vapor composition range. Although the predicted activities are lower, we find good agreement between the measured and theoretical slope of the critical vapor activity curve at a constant nucleation rate of 10{sup 7} cm{sup {minus}3} s{sup {minus}2}.

  3. How dense can one pack spheres of arbitrary size distribution?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reis, S. D. S.; Araújo, N. A. M.; Andrade, J. S., Jr.; Herrmann, Hans J.

    2012-01-01

    We present the first systematic algorithm to estimate the maximum packing density of spheres when the grain sizes are drawn from an arbitrary size distribution. With an Apollonian filling rule, we implement our technique for disks in 2d and spheres in 3d. As expected, the densest packing is achieved with power-law size distributions. We also test the method on homogeneous and on empirical real distributions, and we propose a scheme to obtain experimentally accessible distributions of grain sizes with low porosity. Our method should be helpful in the development of ultra-strong ceramics and high-performance concrete.

  4. The smallest crater production size-frequency distribution on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Stephanie C.; Popova, Olga P.; Quantin, Cathy; Hartmann, William K.

    2015-04-01

    We selected areas on Mars that are mapped as very young, where we anticipate minimal surface modification since crater formation. By comparing shapes of the size-frequency distribution (SFD) of craters, measured with HiRISE and other image data in several such areas, we attempt to determine the least altered SFD, and thus identify the shape of the pristine, or "production" distribution (PSFD) at meter- and decameter-scale crater sizes on the surface of Mars. We identify several effects, dependent on factors such as surface materials, layered target materials, surface elevation, and the somewhat stochastic meteorite breakup mechanics, which may cause modest variations in the shape of the observed distributions at meter scales from one place to another on Mars, and suggest that surface modification on Mars, especially aeolian deposition modifies the crater record in very short time-scales. Better understanding of the PSFD shape not only allows more accurate crater chronometry of Mars, but also places limits on losses of weak bolides during passage through the atmosphere of Mars. We estimate the PSFD of Martian craters (including the effects of atmospheric loss of weak meteoroids, for craters down to diameter D ~ 2m) and will propose a new polynomial description for the smallest crater range currently covered by modern imagery.

  5. Empirical Reference Distributions for Networks of Different Size

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Anna; Calder, Catherine A.; Browning, Christopher R.

    2016-01-01

    Network analysis has become an increasingly prevalent research tool across a vast range of scientific fields. Here, we focus on the particular issue of comparing network statistics, i.e. graph-level measures of network structural features, across multiple networks that differ in size. Although “normalized” versions of some network statistics exist, we demonstrate via simulation why direct comparison is often inappropriate. We consider normalizing network statistics relative to a simple fully parameterized reference distribution and demonstrate via simulation how this is an improvement over direct comparison, but still sometimes problematic. We propose a new adjustment method based on a reference distribution constructed as a mixture model of random graphs which reflect the dependence structure exhibited in the observed networks. We show that using simple Bernoulli models as mixture components in this reference distribution can provide adjusted network statistics that are relatively comparable across different network sizes but still describe interesting features of networks, and that this can be accomplished at relatively low computational expense. Finally, we apply this methodology to a collection of ecological networks derived from the Los Angeles Family and Neighborhood Survey activity location data. PMID:27721556

  6. Ejected Particle Size Distributions from Shocked Metal Surfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Schauer, M. M.; Buttler, W. T.; Frayer, D. K.; ...

    2017-04-12

    Here, we present size distributions for particles ejected from features machined onto the surface of shocked Sn targets. The functional form of the size distributions is assumed to be log-normal, and the characteristic parameters of the distribution are extracted from the measured angular distribution of light scattered from a laser beam incident on the ejected particles. We also found strong evidence for a bimodal distribution of particle sizes with smaller particles evolved from features machined into the target surface and larger particles being produced at the edges of these features.

  7. Pareto tails and lognormal body of US cities size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luckstead, Jeff; Devadoss, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    We consider a distribution, which consists of lower tail Pareto, lognormal body, and upper tail Pareto, to estimate the size distribution of all US cities. This distribution fits the data more accurately than a distribution that comprises of only lognormal and the upper tail Pareto.

  8. Size and Age Dependence of Koronis Family Colors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnar, L. A.

    2011-10-01

    The ancient and massive Koronis family now has four identified subfamilies (asteroid families made by the breakup of fragments of the ancient collision), with ages running from 5.7 to 290 My. This presents unique opportunities to explore space weathering processes, along with dynamical processes such as collisions and binary formation and destruction. Analysis of family members with accurate SDSS measurements shows a correlation of average subfamily color with age that for the first time is highly statistically significant. Yet Thomas et al. (2011) report a size dependence of the colors of the ancient family that demands caution when comparing subfamilies with differing size distributions. Reanalyis of the Thomas et al. data show the reported break near asteroid diameter 5 km is not significant. However, analysis of the much more extensive SDSS data set show a significant break past diameter 2.5 km, with smaller objects systematically bluer. The break is not present in the Karin subfamily (the youngest at 5.7 My), but is already fully developed in the Eriphyla subfamily (only 220 My). The reddening trend with age remains even when comparing only asteroids of similar size, confirming the presence of space weathering phenomena. The meaning of the trend with size is not immediately clear. We consider briefly the strengths and weaknesses of several interpretations of the bluer colors for small objects: 1) those objects receive more jolts from random collisions capable of shaking the regolith and exposing fresh material beneath; 2) those objects receive more jolts from the cycle of fission and recombination driven by YORP; and 3) the lower gravity on those objects retains regolith less well.

  9. Changes of firm size distribution: The case of Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Sang Hoon; Jiang, Zhuhua; Cheong, Chongcheul; Yoon, Seong-Min

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the distribution and inequality of firm sizes is evaluated for the Korean firms listed on the stock markets. Using the amount of sales, total assets, capital, and the number of employees, respectively, as a proxy for firm sizes, we find that the upper tail of the Korean firm size distribution can be described by power-law distributions rather than lognormal distributions. Then, we estimate the Zipf parameters of the firm sizes and assess the changes in the magnitude of the exponents. The results show that the calculated Zipf exponents over time increased prior to the financial crisis, but decreased after the crisis. This pattern implies that the degree of inequality in Korean firm sizes had severely deepened prior to the crisis, but lessened after the crisis. Overall, the distribution of Korean firm sizes changes over time, and Zipf’s law is not universal but does hold as a special case.

  10. Hierarchy, cities size distribution and Zipf's law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semboloni, F.

    2008-06-01

    We show that a hierarchical cities structure can be generated by a self-organized process which grows with a bottom-up mechanism, and that the resulting distribution is power law. First we analytically prove that the power law distribution satisfies the balance between the offer of the city and the demand of its basin of attraction, and that the exponent in the Zipf's law corresponds to the multiplier linking the population of the central city to the population of its basin of attraction. Moreover, the corresponding hierarchical structure shows a variable spanning factor, and the population of the cities linked to the same city up in the hierarchy is variable as well. Second a stochastic dynamic spatial model is proposed, whose numerical results confirm the analytical findings. In this model, inhabitants minimize the transportation cost, so that the greater the importance of this cost, the more stable is the system in its microscopic aspect. After a comparison with the existent methods for the generation of a power law distribution, conclusions are drawn on the connection of hierarchical structure, and power law distribution, with the functioning of the system of cities.

  11. The size frequency distribution of dormant Jupiter family comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitman, Kathryn; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Jedicke, Robert

    2006-07-01

    We estimate the total number and the slope of the size-frequency distribution (SFD) of dormant Jupiter family comets (JFCs) by fitting a one-parameter model to the known population. We first select 61 near-Earth objects (NEOs) that are likely to be dormant JFCs because their orbits are dynamically coupled to Jupiter [Bottke, W.F., Morbidelli, A., Jedicke, R., Petit, J., Levison, H.F., Michel, P., Metcalfe, T.S., 2002a. Icarus 156, 399-433]. Then, from the numerical simulations of Levison and Duncan [1997. Icarus 127, 13-32], we construct an orbit distribution model for JFCs in the NEO orbital element space. We assume an orbit-independent SFD for all JFCs, the slope of which is our unique free parameter. Finally, we compute observational biases for dormant JFCs using a calibrated NEO survey simulator [Jedicke, R., Morbidelli, A., Spahr, T., Petit, J., Bottke, W.F., 2003. Icarus 161, 17-33]. By fitting the biased model to the data, we estimate that there are ˜75 dormant JFCs with H<18 in the NEO region and that the slope of their cumulative SFD is -1.5±0.3. Our slope for the SFD of dormant JFCs is very close to that of active JFCs as determined by Weissman and Lowry [2003. Lunar Planet. Sci. 34. Abstract 2003]. Thus, we argue that when JFCs fade they are likely to become dormant rather than to disrupt and that the fate of faded comets is size-independent. Our results imply that the size distribution of the JFC progenitors—the scattered disk trans-neptunian population—either (i) has a similar and shallow SFD or ( i) is slightly steeper and physical processes acting on the comets in a size-dependent manner creates the shallower active comet SFD. Our measured slope, typical of collisionally evolved populations with a size-dependent impact strength [Benz, W., Asphaug, E., 1999. Icarus 142, 5-20], suggests that scattered disk bodies reached collisional equilibrium inside the protoplanetary disk prior to their removal from the planetary region.

  12. Size- and temperature-dependent Young's modulus and size-dependent thermal expansion coefficient of thin films.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiao-Ye; Huang, Bao-Ling; Zhang, Tong-Yi

    2016-08-21

    Nanomaterials possess a high surface/volume ratio and surfaces play an essential role in size-dependent material properties. In the present study, nanometer-thick thin films were taken as an ideal system to investigate the surface-induced size- and temperature-dependent Young's modulus and size-dependent thermal expansion coefficient. The surface eigenstress model was further developed with the consideration of thermal expansion, leading to analytic formulas of size- and temperature-dependent Young's modulus, and size-dependent thermal expansion coefficient of thin films. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on face-centered cubic (fcc) Ag, Cu, and Ni(001) thin films were conducted at temperatures ranging from 300 K to 600 K. The MD simulation results are perfectly consistent with the theoretical predictions, thereby verifying the theoretical approach. The newly developed surface eigenstress model will be able to attack similar problems in other types of nanomaterials.

  13. The distribution of bubble sizes during reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yin; Oh, S. Peng; Furlanetto, Steven R.; Sutter, P. M.

    2016-09-01

    A key physical quantity during reionization is the size of H II regions. Previous studies found a characteristic bubble size which increases rapidly during reionization, with apparent agreement between simulations and analytic excursion set theory. Using four different methods, we critically examine this claim. In particular, we introduce the use of the watershed algorithm - widely used for void finding in galaxy surveys - which we show to be an unbiased method with the lowest dispersion and best performance on Monte Carlo realizations of a known bubble size probability density function (PDF). We find that a friends-of-friends algorithm declares most of the ionized volume to be occupied by a network of volume-filling regions connected by narrow tunnels. For methods tuned to detect the volume-filling regions, previous apparent agreement between simulations and theory is spurious, and due to a failure to correctly account for the window function of measurement schemes. The discrepancy is already obvious from visual inspection. Instead, H II regions in simulations are significantly larger (by factors of 10-1000 in volume) than analytic predictions. The size PDF is narrower, and evolves more slowly with time, than predicted. It becomes more sharply peaked as reionization progresses. These effects are likely caused by bubble mergers, which are inadequately modelled by analytic theory. Our results have important consequences for high-redshift 21 cm observations, the mean free path of ionizing photons, and the visibility of Lyα emitters, and point to a fundamental failure in our understanding of the characteristic scales of the reionization process.

  14. Energy dependent 4-dimensional multiple scattering distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tschalär, C.

    1984-12-01

    A complete analytic solution in Fourier space is presented of the four dimensional small angle, multiple scattering distribution MSD in angle and space, produced by an energy dependent single scattering cross section from an initial pencil beam of heavy particles. Independently, simple integrals are derived for the central moments of the energy dependent MSD in the continuous-slowing-down approximation. The distributions of the projections t and x of the scattering angle and displacement into a plane through the axis of propagation are evaluated numerically for a truncated Rutherford scattering cross section using a fast Fourier transform. The resulting MSDs for a wide range of particles, initial and final momenta, and scattering materials are found to be approximately represented by one-dimensional set of standard distributions symmetrized by a linear transformation in t- x-space.

  15. Lunar soil: Size distribution and mineralogical constituents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duke, M.B.; Woo, C.C.; Bird, M.L.; Sellers, G.A.; Finkelman, R.B.

    1970-01-01

    The lunar soil collected by Apollo 11 consists primarily of submillimeter material and is finer in grain size than soil previously recorded photographically by Surveyor experiments. The main constituents are fine-grained to glassy rocks of basaltic affinity and coherent breccia of undetermined origin. Dark glass, containing abundant nickel-iron spheres, coats many rocks, mineral, and breccia fragments. Several types of homogeneous glass occur as fragments and spheres. Colorless spheres, probably an exotic component, are abundant in the fraction finer than 20 microns.

  16. The size distribution of inhabited planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Fergus

    2016-02-01

    Earth-like planets are expected to provide the greatest opportunity for the detection of life beyond the Solar system. However, our planet cannot be considered a fair sample, especially if intelligent life exists elsewhere. Just as a person's country of origin is a biased sample among countries, so too their planet of origin may be a biased sample among planets. The magnitude of this effect can be substantial: over 98 per cent of the world's population live in a country larger than the median. In the context of a simple model where the mean population density is invariant to planet size, we infer that a given inhabited planet (such as our nearest neighbour) has a radius r < 1.2r⊕ (95 per cent confidence bound). We show that this result is likely to hold not only for planets hosting advanced life, but also for those which harbour primitive life forms. Further, inferences may be drawn for any variable which influences population size. For example, since population density is widely observed to decline with increasing body mass, we conclude that most intelligent species are expected to exceed 300 kg.

  17. Knife mill operating factors effect on switchgrass particle size distributions.

    PubMed

    Bitra, Venkata S P; Womac, Alvin R; Yang, Yuechuan T; Igathinathane, C; Miu, Petre I; Chevanan, Nehru; Sokhansanj, Shahab

    2009-11-01

    Biomass particle size impacts handling, storage, conversion, and dust control systems. Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) particle size distributions created by a knife mill were determined for integral classifying screen sizes from 12.7 to 50.8 mm, operating speeds from 250 to 500 rpm, and mass input rates from 2 to 11 kg/min. Particle distributions were classified with standardized sieves for forage analysis that included horizontal sieving motion with machined-aluminum sieves of thickness proportional to sieve opening dimensions. Then, a wide range of analytical descriptors were examined to mathematically represent the range of particle sizes in the distributions. Correlation coefficient of geometric mean length with knife mill screen size, feed rate, and speed were 0.872, 0.349, and 0.037, respectively. Hence, knife mill screen size largely determined particle size of switchgrass chop. Feed rate had an unexpected influence on particle size, though to a lesser degree than screen size. The Rosin-Rammler function fit the chopped switchgrass size distribution data with an R(2)>0.982. Mass relative span was greater than 1, which indicated a wide distribution of particle sizes. Uniformity coefficient was more than 4.0, which indicated a large assortment of particles and also represented a well-graded particle size distribution. Knife mill chopping of switchgrass produced 'strongly fine skewed mesokurtic' particles with 12.7-25.4 mm screens and 'fine skewed mesokurtic' particles with 50.8 mm screen. Results of this extensive analysis of particle sizes can be applied to selection of knife mill operating parameters to produce a particular size of switchgrass chop, and will serve as a guide for relations among the various analytic descriptors of biomass particle distributions.

  18. Knife mill operating factors effect on switchgrass particle size distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Bitra, V.S.P.; Womac, A.R.; Yang, Y.T.; Igathinathane, C.; Miu, P.I; Chevanan, Nehru; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine

    2009-06-01

    Biomass particle size impacts handling, storage, conversion, and dust control systems. Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) particle size distributions created by a knife mill were determined for integral classifying screen sizes from 12.7 to 50.8 mm, operating speeds from 250 to 500 rpm, and mass input rates from 2 to 11 kg/min. Particle distributions were classified with standardized sieves for forage analysis that included horizontal sieving motion with machined-aluminum sieves of thickness proportional to sieve opening dimensions. Then, a wide range of analytical descriptors were examined to mathematically represent the range of particle sizes in the distributions. Correlation coefficient of geometric mean length with knife mill screen size, feed rate, and speed were 0.872, 0.349, and 0.037, respectively. Hence, knife mill screen size largely determined particle size of switchgrass chop. Feed rate had an unexpected influence on particle size, though to a lesser degree than screen size. The Rosin Rammler function fit the chopped switchgrass size distribution data with an R2 > 0.982. Mass relative span was greater than 1, which indicated a wide distribution of particle sizes. Uniformity coefficient was more than 4.0, which indicated a large assortment of particles and also represented a well-graded particle size distribution. Knife mill chopping of switchgrass produced strongly fine skewed mesokurtic particles with 12.7 25.4 mm screens and fine skewed mesokurtic particles with 50.8 mm screen. Results of this extensive analysis of particle sizes can be applied to selection of knife mill operating parameters to produce a particular size of switchgrass chop, and will serve as a guide for relations among the various analytic descriptors of biomass particle distributions.

  19. The equilibrium size distribution of rouleaux.

    PubMed Central

    Perelson, A S; Wiegel, F W

    1982-01-01

    Rouleaux are formed by the aggregation of red blood cells in the presence of macromolecules that bridge the membranes of adherent erythrocytes. We compute the size and degree of branching of rouleaux for macroscopic systems in thermal equilibrium in the absence of fluid flow. Using techniques from statistical mechanics, analytical expressions are derived for (a) the average number of rouleaux consisting of n cells and having m branch points; (b) the average number of cells per rouleau; (c) the average number of branch points per rouleau; and (d) the number of rouleaux with n cells, n = 1, 2, ..., in a system containing a total of N cells. We also present the results of numerical evaluations to establish the validity of asymptotic expressions that simplify our formal analytic results. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:7059653

  20. Estimating Flaw Size Distributions From Service Inspection Results (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    equivalent initial flaw size model...the adequacy of the model, only whether or not the parameters are equal to 0. One reason the model did not fit well is that the equivalent initial flaw size (EIFS...curve model was used along with a lognormal equivalent initial flaw size distribution. The parameter values were chosen to approximate the real

  1. Thermophoresis of microemulsion droplets: size dependence of the Soret effect.

    PubMed

    Vigolo, Daniele; Brambilla, Giovanni; Piazza, Roberto

    2007-04-01

    Thermophoresis, akin to thermal diffusion in simple fluid mixtures, consists of particle drift induced by a temperature gradient. Notwithstanding its practical interest, the dependence of thermophoretic effects on particle size R is still theoretically and experimentally debated. By performing measurements of water-in-oil microemulsion droplets with tunable size, we show that the thermal diffusion coefficient, at least for a suspension of small particles in a nonpolar solvent, does not appreciably depend on R .

  2. Size dependence of microscopic Hall sensor detection limits.

    PubMed

    Vervaeke, K; Simoen, E; Borghs, G; Moshchalkov, V V

    2009-07-01

    In this paper the magnetic field detection limits of microscopic Hall sensors are investigated as a function of their lateral size. Hall sensors fabricated from GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures and silicon are experimentally investigated at different temperatures using Hall effect and noise spectrum measurements. At room temperature a clear size dependence of the detection limit is observed, whereas at low temperatures this dependence is found to disappear. The results are explained using the theory of noise in semiconductors.

  3. Snow grain size and shape distributions in northern Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langlois, A.; Royer, A.; Montpetit, B.; Roy, A.

    2016-12-01

    Pioneer snow work in the 1970s and 1980s proposed new approaches to retrieve snow depth and water equivalent from space using passive microwave brightness temperatures. Numerous research work have led to the realization that microwave approaches depend strongly on snow grain morphology (size and shape), which was poorly parameterized since recently, leading to strong biases in the retrieval calculations. Related uncertainties from space retrievals and the development of complex thermodynamic multilayer snow and emission models motivated several research works on the development of new approaches to quantify snow grain metrics given the lack of field measurements arising from the sampling constraints of such variable. This presentation focuses on the unknown size distribution of snow grain sizes. Our group developed a new approach to the `traditional' measurements of snow grain metrics where micro-photographs of snow grains are taken under angular directional LED lighting. The projected shadows are digitized so that a 3D reconstruction of the snow grains is possible. This device has been used in several field campaigns and over the years a very large dataset was collected and is presented in this paper. A total of 588 snow photographs from 107 snowpits collected during the European Space Agency (ESA) Cold Regions Hydrology high-resolution Observatory (CoReH2O) mission concept field campaign, in Churchill, Manitoba Canada (January - April 2010). Each of the 588 photographs was classified as: depth hoar, rounded, facets and precipitation particles. A total of 162,516 snow grains were digitized across the 588 photographs, averaging 263 grains/photo. Results include distribution histograms for 5 `size' metrics (projected area, perimeter, equivalent optical diameter, minimum axis and maximum axis), and 2 `shape' metrics (eccentricity, major/minor axis ratio). Different cumulative histograms are found between the grain types, and proposed fits are presented with the

  4. Size distribution of Amazon River bed sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nordin, C.F.; Meade, R.H.; Curtis, W.F.; Bosio, N.J.; Landim, P.M.B.

    1980-01-01

    The first recorded observations of bed material of the Amazon River were made in 1843 by Lt William Lewis Herndon of the US Navy, when he travelled the river from its headwaters to its mouth, sounding its depths, and noting the nature of particles caught in a heavy grease smeared to the bottom of his sounding weight1. He reported the bed material of the river to be mostly sand and fine gravel. Oltman and Ames took samples at a few locations in 1963 and 1964, and reported the bed material at O??bidos, Brazil, to be fine sands, with median diameters ranging from 0.15 to 0.25 mm (ref. 2). We present here a summary of particle-size analyses of samples of streambed material collected from the Amazon River and its major tributaries along a reach of the river from Iquitos in Peru, ???3,500 km above Macapa?? Brazil, to a point 220 km above Macapa??3. ?? 1980 Nature Publishing Group.

  5. Influence of particle size distribution on nanopowder cold compaction processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boltachev, G.; Volkov, N.; Lukyashin, K.; Markov, V.; Chingina, E.

    2017-06-01

    Nanopowder uniform and uniaxial cold compaction processes are simulated by 2D granular dynamics method. The interaction of particles in addition to wide-known contact laws involves the dispersion forces of attraction and possibility of interparticle solid bridges formation, which have a large importance for nanopowders. Different model systems are investigated: monosized systems with particle diameter of 10, 20 and 30 nm; bidisperse systems with different content of small (diameter is 10 nm) and large (30 nm) particles; polydisperse systems corresponding to the log-normal size distribution law with different width. Non-monotone dependence of compact density on powder content is revealed in bidisperse systems. The deviations of compact density in polydisperse systems from the density of corresponding monosized system are found to be minor, less than 1 per cent.

  6. Determination of particle size distributions from acoustic wave propagation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Spelt, P.D.; Norato, M.A.; Sangani, A.S.; Tavlarides, L.L.

    1999-05-01

    The wave equations for the interior and exterior of the particles are ensemble averaged and combined with an analysis by Allegra and Hawley [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. {bold 51}, 1545 (1972)] for the interaction of a single particle with the incident wave to determine the phase speed and attenuation of sound waves propagating through dilute slurries. The theory is shown to compare very well with the measured attenuation. The inverse problem, i.e., the problem of determining the particle size distribution given the attenuation as a function of frequency, is examined using regularization techniques that have been successful for bubbly liquids. It is shown that, unlike the bubbly liquids, the success of solving the inverse problem is limited since it depends strongly on the nature of particles and the frequency range used in inverse calculations. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Transverse-momentum-dependent parton distributions (TMDs)

    SciTech Connect

    Bacchetta, Alessandro

    2011-10-24

    Transverse-momentum-dependent parton distributions (TMDs) provide three-dimensional images of the partonic structure of the nucleon in momentum space. We made impressive progress in understanding TMDs, both from the theoretical and experimental point of view. This brief overview on TMDs is divided in two parts: in the first, an essential list of achievements is presented. In the second, a selection of open questions is discussed.

  8. Time Delay Systems with Distribution Dependent Dynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-10

    sensitivity function for general nonlinear ordinary differential equations (ODEs) in a Banach space. Here we only show the construction of the abstract...shear: A nonlinear stick-slip formulation. CRSC-TR06-07, February, 2006; Differential Equations and Nonlinear Mechanics. Banks, H.T. and H.K. Nguyen (to...dependent dynamical system (in this case a 6 complicated system of partial differential equations ) for which the distribution PL must be estimated in some

  9. Effects of size distribution on hysteresis losses of magnetic nanoparticles for hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Hergt, Rudolf; Dutz, Silvio; Röder, Michael

    2008-09-24

    For understanding hysteresis losses of magnetic nanoparticles to be used for magnetic particle hyperthermia the effect of size distribution on the dependence of hysteresis losses on magnetic field amplitude is studied on the basis of a phenomenological model in the size range from superparamagnetism to magnetic multi-domains-roughly 10 up to 100 nm. Relying on experimental data for the size dependence of coercivity, an empirical expression for the dependence of hysteresis loss on field amplitude and particle size is derived for hypothetical monodisperse particle ensembles. Considering experimentally observable size distributions, the dependence of loss on distribution parameters-mean particle size and variance-is studied. There, field amplitude is taken into account as an important parameter, which for technical and biomedical reasons in hyperthermia equipment is restricted. Experimental results for different particle types with mean diameter of 30 nm may be well reproduced theoretically if a small loss contribution of Rayleigh type is taken into account. Results show that the Stoner-Wohlfarth model for single domain magnetization reversal via homogeneous rotation cannot explain experimental observations. In particular, in magnetosomes which are distinguished by nearly ideal crystallographic shapes and narrow size distribution large friction-like losses occur even for small field amplitude. Parameters of the high frequency field for hyperthermia (amplitude and frequency) as well as of the size distribution of applied particles are discussed with respect to attaining maximum specific heating power.

  10. The Angstrom Exponent and Bimodal Aerosol Size Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, Gregory L.; Dubovik, Oleg; Holben, Brent H.

    2005-01-01

    Powerlaws have long been used to describe the spectral dependence of aerosol extinction, and the wavelength exponent of the aerosol extinction powerlaw is commonly referred to as the Angstrom exponent. The Angstrom exponent is often used as a qualitative indicator of aerosol particle size, with values greater than two indicating small particles associated with combustion byproducts, and values less than one indicating large particles like sea salt and dust. In this study, we investigate the relationship between the Angstrom exponent and the mode parameters of bimodal aerosol size distributions using Mie theory calculations and Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) retrievals. We find that Angstrom exponents based upon seven wavelengths (0.34, 0.38, 0.44, 0.5, 0.67, 0.87, and 1.02 micrometers) are sensitive to the volume fraction of aerosols with radii less then 0.6 micrometers, but not to the fine mode effective radius. The Angstrom exponent is also known to vary with wavelength, which is commonly referred to as curvature; we show how the spectral curvature can provide additional information about aerosol size distributions for intermediate values of the Angstrom exponent. Curvature also has a significant effect on the conclusions that can be drawn about two-wavelength Angstrom exponents; long wavelengths (0.67, 0.87 micrometers) are sensitive to fine mode volume fraction of aerosols but not fine mode effective radius, while short wavelengths (0.38, 0.44 micrometers) are sensitive to the fine mode effective radius but not the fine mode volume fraction.

  11. Body size distributions signal a regime shift in a lake ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Communities of organisms, from mammals to microorganisms, have discontinuous distributions of body size. This pattern of size structuring is a conservative trait of community organization and is a product of processes that occur at multiple spatial and temporal scales. In this study, we assessed whether body size patterns serve as an indicator of a threshold between alternative regimes. Over the past 7000 years, the biological communities of Foy Lake (Montana,USA) have undergone a major regime shift owing to climate change. We used a palaeoecological record of diatom communities to estimate diatom sizes, and then analysed the discontinuous distribution of organism sizes over time. We used Bayesian classification and regression tree models to determine that all time intervals exhibited aggregations of sizes separated by gaps in the distribution and found a significant change in diatom body size distributions approximately 150 years before the identified ecosystem regime shift. We suggest that discontinuity analysis is a useful addition to the suite of tools for the detection of early warning signals of regime shifts. Communities of organisms from mammals to microorganisms have discontinuous distributions of body size. This pattern of size structuring is a conservative trait of community organization and is a product of processes that occur at discrete spatial and temporal scales within ecosystems. Here, a paleoecological record of diatom community change is use

  12. Momentum transfer dependence of generalized parton distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Neetika

    2016-11-01

    We revisit the model for parametrization of the momentum dependence of nucleon generalized parton distributions in the light of recent MRST measurements of parton distribution functions (A.D. Martin et al., Eur. Phys. J. C 63, 189 (2009)). Our parametrization method with a minimum set of free parameters give a sufficiently good description of data for Dirac and Pauli electromagnetic form factors of proton and neutron at small and intermediate values of momentum transfer. We also calculate the GPDs for up- and down-quarks by decomposing the electromagnetic form factors for the nucleon using the charge and isospin symmetry and also study the evolution of GPDs to a higher scale. We further investigate the transverse charge densities for both the unpolarized and transversely polarized nucleon and compare our results with Kelly's distribution.

  13. Universal relation for size dependent thermodynamic properties of metallic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Shiyun; Qi, Weihong; Cheng, Yajuan; Huang, Baiyun; Wang, Mingpu; Li, Yejun

    2011-06-14

    The previous model on surface free energy has been extended to calculate size dependent thermodynamic properties (i.e., melting temperature, melting enthalpy, melting entropy, evaporation temperature, Curie temperature, Debye temperature and specific heat capacity) of nanoparticles. According to the quantitative calculation of size effects on the calculated thermodynamic properties, it is found that most thermodynamic properties of nanoparticles vary linearly with 1/D as a first approximation. In other words, the size dependent thermodynamic properties P(n) have the form of P(n) = P(b)(1 -K/D), in which P(b) is the corresponding bulk value and K is the material constant. This may be regarded as a scaling law for most of the size dependent thermodynamic properties for different materials. The present predictions are consistent literature values.

  14. Intercomparison of 15 aerodynamic particle size spectrometers (APS 3321): uncertainties in particle sizing and number size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeifer, S.; Müller, T.; Weinhold, K.; Zikova, N.; Santos, S.; Marinoni, A.; Bischof, O. F.; Kykal, C.; Ries, L.; Meinhardt, F.; Aalto, P.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2015-11-01

    Aerodynamic particle size spectrometers are a well-established method to measure number size distributions of coarse mode particles in the atmosphere. Quality assurance is essential for atmospheric observational aerosol networks to obtain comparable results with known uncertainties. In a laboratory study within the framework of ACTRIS (Aerosols, Clouds, and Trace gases Research Infrastructure Network), 15 aerodynamic particle size spectrometers (APS model 3321, TSI Inc., St. Paul, MN, USA) were compared with a focus on flow rates accuracy, particle sizing, and unit-to-unit variability of the particle number size distribution. Flow rate deviations were relatively small (within a few percent), while the sizing accuracy was found to be within 10 % compared to polystyrene latex (PSL) reference particles. The unit-to-unit variability in terms of the particle number size distribution during this study was within 10-20 % for particles in the range of 0.9 up to 3 μm, which is acceptable for atmospheric measurements. For particles smaller than that, the variability increased up to 60 %, probably caused by differences in the counting efficiencies of individual units. Number size distribution data for particles smaller than 0.9 μm in aerodynamic diameter should be only used with caution. For particles larger than 3 μm, the unit-to-unit variability increased as well. A possible reason is an insufficient sizing accuracy in combination with a steeply sloping particle number size distribution and the increasing uncertainty due to decreasing counting. This uncertainty of the particle number size distribution has especially to be considered if higher moments of the size distribution such as the particle volume or mass are calculated, which require the conversion of the aerodynamic diameter measured to a volume equivalent diameter. In order to perform a quantitative quality assurance, a traceable reference method for the particle number concentration in the size range 0.5-3

  15. Intercomparison of 15 aerodynamic particle size spectrometers (APS 3321): uncertainties in particle sizing and number size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeifer, Sascha; Müller, Thomas; Weinhold, Kay; Zikova, Nadezda; Martins dos Santos, Sebastiao; Marinoni, Angela; Bischof, Oliver F.; Kykal, Carsten; Ries, Ludwig; Meinhardt, Frank; Aalto, Pasi; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos; Wiedensohler, Alfred

    2016-04-01

    Aerodynamic particle size spectrometers are a well-established method to measure number size distributions of coarse mode particles in the atmosphere. Quality assurance is essential for atmospheric observational aerosol networks to obtain comparable results with known uncertainties. In a laboratory study within the framework of ACTRIS (Aerosols, Clouds, and Trace gases Research Infrastructure Network), 15 aerodynamic particle size spectrometers (APS model 3321, TSI Inc., St. Paul, MN, USA) were compared with a focus on flow rates, particle sizing, and the unit-to-unit variability of the particle number size distribution. Flow rate deviations were relatively small (within a few percent), while the sizing accuracy was found to be within 10 % compared to polystyrene latex (PSL) reference particles. The unit-to-unit variability in terms of the particle number size distribution during this study was within 10 % to 20 % for particles in the range of 0.9 up to 3 µm, which is acceptable for atmospheric measurements. For particles smaller than that, the variability increased up to 60 %, probably caused by differences in the counting efficiencies of individual units. Number size distribution data for particles smaller than 0.9 µm in aerodynamic diameter should only be used with caution. For particles larger than 3 µm, the unit-to-unit variability increased as well. A possible reason is an insufficient sizing accuracy in combination with a steeply sloping particle number size distribution and the increasing uncertainty due to decreasing counting. Particularly this uncertainty of the particle number size distribution must be considered if higher moments of the size distribution such as the particle volume or mass are calculated, which require the conversion of the aerodynamic diameter measured to a volume equivalent diameter. In order to perform a quantitative quality assurance, a traceable reference method for the particle number concentration in the size range 0.5-3 µm

  16. The Size Distribution of Jupiter-Family Cometary Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, Paul R.; Lowry, Stephen C.

    2003-01-01

    Introduction: We are continuing our program to determine the size distribution of cometary nuclei. We have compiled a catalog of 105 measurements of 57 cometary nuclei, drawn from the general literature, from our own program of CCD photometry of distant cometary nuclei (Lowry and Weissman), and from unpublished observations by colleagues. We model the cumulative size distribution of the nuclei as a power law. Previous determinations of the size distribution slope do not agree. Fernandez et al. found a slope of alpha = 2.65+/-0.25 whereas Lowry et al. and Weissman and Lowry each found a slope of alpha = 1.60+/-0.10.

  17. Free Volume Size Distribution in Some Natural Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrashekara, M. N.; Ranganathaiah, C.

    2011-07-01

    Positron lifetime technique was used to determine the size distribution of free volume holes in some natural polymers-animal hair, feather, cotton and silk. The effect of fiber swelling on the nature of size distribution was also monitored. The obtained positron lifetime spectra were analyzed by using the computer program CONTIN (PALS-2). Significant differences in the size distribution were observed for these biological polymers (and even among the different animal hair types), possibly due to the structural differences, which have not been investigated hitherto.

  18. Pore-size-distribution of cationic polyacrylamide hydrogels. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Kremer, M.; Prausnitz, J.M.

    1992-06-01

    The pore size distribution of a AAm/MAPTAC (acrylamide copolymerized with (3-methacrylamidopropyl)trimethylammonium chloride) hydrogel was investigated using Kuga`s mixed-solute-exclusion method, taking into account the wall effect. A Brownian-motion model is also used. Results show the feasibility of determining pore-size distribution of porous materials using the mixed-solute-exclusion method in conjunction with solution of the Fredholm equation; good agreement was obtained with experiment, even for bimodal pore structures. However, different pore size distributions were calculated for the two different probe-solutes (Dextran and poly(ethylene glycol/oxide)). Future work is outlined. 32 figs, 25 refs.

  19. Pore-size-distribution of cationic polyacrylamide hydrogels

    SciTech Connect

    Kremer, M.; Prausnitz, J.M.

    1992-06-01

    The pore size distribution of a AAm/MAPTAC (acrylamide copolymerized with (3-methacrylamidopropyl)trimethylammonium chloride) hydrogel was investigated using Kuga's mixed-solute-exclusion method, taking into account the wall effect. A Brownian-motion model is also used. Results show the feasibility of determining pore-size distribution of porous materials using the mixed-solute-exclusion method in conjunction with solution of the Fredholm equation; good agreement was obtained with experiment, even for bimodal pore structures. However, different pore size distributions were calculated for the two different probe-solutes (Dextran and poly(ethylene glycol/oxide)). Future work is outlined. 32 figs, 25 refs.

  20. The Size Distribution of Jupiter-Family Cometary Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, Paul R.; Lowry, Stephen C.

    2003-01-01

    Introduction: We are continuing our program to determine the size distribution of cometary nuclei. We have compiled a catalog of 105 measurements of 57 cometary nuclei, drawn from the general literature, from our own program of CCD photometry of distant cometary nuclei (Lowry and Weissman), and from unpublished observations by colleagues. We model the cumulative size distribution of the nuclei as a power law. Previous determinations of the size distribution slope do not agree. Fernandez et al. found a slope of alpha = 2.65+/-0.25 whereas Lowry et al. and Weissman and Lowry each found a slope of alpha = 1.60+/-0.10.

  1. Investigating the Size Dependent Material Properties of Nanoceria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Bushra B.

    Nanoceria is widely being investigated for applications as support materials for fuel cell catalysts, free radical scavengers, and as chemical and mechanical abrasives due to its high antioxidant capacity and its oxygen buffering capacity. This antioxidant or oxygen buffering capacity has been reported to be highly size dependent and related to its redox properties. However, the quantification of this antioxidant capacity has not been well defined or understood and has been often been carried out using colorimetric assays which do not directly correlate to ceria nanoparticle properties. Fabrication rules for developing materials with optimal antioxidant/oxygen buffering capacities are not yet defined and one of the limitations has been the challenge of obtaining quantitative measurements of the antioxidant properties. In this work, we create our own library of ceria nanoparticles of various size distributions by two synthesis methods: sol-gel peroxo and thermal decomposition/calcination and annealing in open atmosphere at three different temperatures. The synthesis methods and conditions produce characteristic sizes and morphologies of ceria nanoparticles. Qualitative and quantitative approaches are used for characterization and to predict reactivity. Qualitative approaches include Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area measurements and Raman analysis while quantitative approaches include a combination of powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) Rietveld analysis, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to measure crystallite sizes, lattice parameters, oxygen site occupancies, and the relative abundance of Ce(III) ions in a nanoceria sample. These methods are discussed in detail in addition to their limitations and challenges. These methods are used to predict nanocrystalline or bulk-like behavior of ceria nanoparticles. The investigation of the material properties is also extended to test the redox properties of ceria

  2. The size distribution of conspecific populations: the peoples of New Guinea.

    PubMed Central

    Novotny, V; Drozd, P

    2000-01-01

    The size distribution of the language populations in New Guinea, which represent over 15% of the world's languages, is analysed using models analogous to the resource division models of species abundance distribution in ecological communities. A model distribution of resource segments reflecting population size is created by repeated selection of an existing resource segment and its division into two. We found that any dependency of the selection probability on the size of the segment generated negatively skewed abundance distributions after log transformation. Asymmetric segment division further exacerbated the negative skewness. Size-independent selection produced lognormal abundance distributions, irrespective of the segment division method. Size-dependent selection and asymmetric division were deemed reasonable assumptions since large language populations are more likely to generate isolates, which develop into new populations, than small ones, and these isolates are likely to be small relative to the progenitor population. A negatively skewed distribution of the log-transformed population sizes was therefore expected. However, the observed distributions were lognormal, scale invariant for areas containing between 100 and over 1000 language populations. The dynamics of language differentiation, as reflected by the models, may therefore be unimportant relative to the effect of variable growth rates among populations. All lognormal distributions from resource division models had a higher variance than the observed one, where half of the 1053 populations had between 350 and 3000 individuals. The possible mechanisms maintaining such a low variance around a modal population size of 1000 are discussed. PMID:10853740

  3. Environmental control of natural gap size distribution in tropical forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulamoussène, Youven; Bedeau, Caroline; Descroix, Laurent; Linguet, Laurent; Hérault, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    Natural disturbances are the dominant form of forest regeneration and dynamics in unmanaged tropical forests. Monitoring the size distribution of treefall gaps is important to better understand and predict the carbon budget in response to land use and other global changes. In this study, we model the size frequency distribution of natural canopy gaps with a discrete power law distribution. We use a Bayesian framework to introduce and test, using Monte Carlo Markov chain and Kuo-Mallick algorithms, the effect of local physical environment on gap size distribution. We apply our methodological framework to an original light detecting and ranging dataset in which natural forest gaps were delineated over 30 000 ha of unmanaged forest. We highlight strong links between gap size distribution and environment, primarily hydrological conditions and topography, with large gaps being more frequent on floodplains and in wind-exposed areas. In the future, we plan to apply our methodological framework on a larger scale using satellite data. Additionally, although gap size distribution variation is clearly under environmental control, variation in gap size distribution in time should be tested against climate variability.

  4. What We Can Learn From Supernova Remnant Size Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elwood, Benjamin; Murphy, Jeremiah; Diaz, Mariangelly

    2016-01-01

    Previous literature regarding size distributions of supernova remnants generally discuss a uniform distribution for the radius, occasionally considering a Gaussian alternative. We indeed show that these distributions are consistent with log-normal, which can be considered a natural consequence of the Central Limit Theorem and Sedov expansion. Modeling explosion energy, remnant age, and ambient density as independent, random distributions, we show, using simple Monte Carlo simulations, that the size distribution is indistinguishable from log-normal when the SNR sample size is of order three hundred. This implies that these SNR distributions provide only information on the mean and variance, yielding additional information only when the sample size grows large. We then proceed to Bayesian statistical inference to characterize the information provided by the size distributions. In particular, we use the mean and variance of sizes and explosion energies to subsequently estimate the mean and variance of the ambient medium surrounding SNR progenitors. This in turn allows us to characterize potential bias in studies involving samples of supernova remnants.

  5. Effects of Mixtures on Liquid and Solid Fragment Size Distributions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-01

    treated steel ; 67.0/ mn Table 11 gives examples of size distributions taken from the research literature on atomization and sprays where mn...impact (0.5–2.0 km/s) on thin steel plates.” More specifically, he studied “spherical porous aluminum projectiles 2.51 cm in diameter … cut from a...Effects of Mixtures on Liquid and Solid Fragment Size Distributions Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited

  6. Appendix B: Summary of TEM Particle Size Distribution Datasets

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    As discussed in the main text (see Section 5.3.2), calculation of the concentration of asbestos fibers in each of the bins of potential interest requires particle size distribution data derived using transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

  7. Grain Size Distribution in the Matrix of Primitive Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaccaro, E.; Wozniakiewicz, P. J.; Starkey, N. A.; Franchi, I. A.; Russell, S. S.

    2015-07-01

    We describe the abundances and size distribution of discrete grains of different phases observed within the matrix of: Acfer 094, ALHA77307, MIL 07687 and QUE 99177 and discuss how the observed differences may be evidence of parent body processes.

  8. A model for predicting fog aerosol size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudiger, Joshua J.; Book, Kevin; Baker, Brooke; deGrassie, John Stephen; Hammel, Stephen

    2016-09-01

    An accurate model and parameterization of fog is needed to increase the reliability and usefulness of electro-optical systems in all relevant environments. Current models vary widely in their ability to accurately predict the size distribution and subsequent optical properties of fog. The Advanced Navy Aerosol Model (ANAM), developed to model the distribution of aerosols in the maritime environment, does not currently include a model for fog. One of the more prevalent methods for modeling particle size spectra consists of fitting a modified gamma function to fog measurement data. This limits the fog distribution to a single mode. Here we establish an empirical model for predicting complicated multimodal fog droplet size spectra using machine learning techniques. This is accomplished through careful measurements of fog in a controlled laboratory environment and measuring fog particle size distributions during outdoor fog events.

  9. The best nanoparticle size distribution for minimum thermal conductivity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hang; Minnich, Austin J

    2015-03-11

    Which sizes of nanoparticles embedded in a crystalline solid yield the lowest thermal conductivity? Nanoparticles have long been demonstrated to reduce the thermal conductivity of crystals by scattering phonons, but most previous works assumed the nanoparticles to have a single size. Here, we use optimization methods to show that the best nanoparticle size distribution to scatter the broad thermal phonon spectrum is not a similarly broad distribution but rather several discrete peaks at well-chosen nanoparticle radii. For SiGe, the best size distribution yields a thermal conductivity below that of amorphous silicon. Further, we demonstrate that a simplified distribution yields nearly the same low thermal conductivity and can be readily fabricated. Our work provides important insights into how to manipulate the full spectrum of phonons and will guide the design of more efficient thermoelectric materials.

  10. The best nanoparticle size distribution for minimum thermal conductivity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hang; Minnich, Austin J.

    2015-01-01

    Which sizes of nanoparticles embedded in a crystalline solid yield the lowest thermal conductivity? Nanoparticles have long been demonstrated to reduce the thermal conductivity of crystals by scattering phonons, but most previous works assumed the nanoparticles to have a single size. Here, we use optimization methods to show that the best nanoparticle size distribution to scatter the broad thermal phonon spectrum is not a similarly broad distribution but rather several discrete peaks at well-chosen nanoparticle radii. For SiGe, the best size distribution yields a thermal conductivity below that of amorphous silicon. Further, we demonstrate that a simplified distribution yields nearly the same low thermal conductivity and can be readily fabricated. Our work provides important insights into how to manipulate the full spectrum of phonons and will guide the design of more efficient thermoelectric materials. PMID:25757414

  11. Size-dependent magnetic properties of iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patsula, Vitalii; Moskvin, Maksym; Dutz, Silvio; Horák, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Uniform iron oxide nanoparticles in the size range from 10 to 24 nm and polydisperse 14 nm iron oxide particles were prepared by thermal decomposition of Fe(III) carboxylates in the presence of oleic acid and co-precipitation of Fe(II) and Fe(III) chlorides by ammonium hydroxide followed by oxidation, respectively. While the first method produced hydrophobic oleic acid coated particles, the second one formed hydrophilic, but uncoated, nanoparticles. To make the iron oxide particles water dispersible and colloidally stable, their surface was modified with poly(ethylene glycol) and sucrose, respectively. Size and size distribution of the nanoparticles was determined by transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering and X-ray diffraction. Surface of the PEG-functionalized and sucrose-modified iron oxide particles was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and Raman spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Magnetic properties were measured by means of vibration sample magnetometry and specific absorption rate in alternating magnetic fields was determined calorimetrically. It was found, that larger ferrimagnetic particles showed higher heating performance than smaller superparamagnetic ones. In the transition range between superparamagnetism and ferrimagnetism, samples with a broader size distribution provided higher heating power than narrow size distributed particles of comparable mean size. Here presented particles showed promising properties for a possible application in magnetic hyperthermia.

  12. Does Apparent Stress Vary With Earthquake Size? Possible Mechanism of Artificial Size Dependency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ide, S.; Beroza, G. C.; Prejean, S. G.; Ellsworth, W. L.

    2001-12-01

    The energy radiated from the seismic source (Es) has been estimated for a wide range of earthquake sizes. Many studies have found that the ratio between Es and seismic moment (apparent stress) increases as seismic moment increases. Es is distributed across a wide frequency band, reliable estimates require broadband recordings relative to the corner frequency. There are several possible mechanisms that could bias estimates of Es: 1) data bandwidth is too narrow, 2) a constant upper cutoff on the corner frequency affects event selection, and 3) unmodeled elastic/anelastic wave propagation effects may obscure source properties. We can attempt to account for 1) by estimating the missing energy based on the assumption of an omega-square spectral model. For 2) we know the minimum energy of missing events and can show where these events should be located in the moment-apparent stress relation. These two factors act to diminish the size dependency of apparent stress suggested by previous studies. For 3), we re-examined the data of Prejean and Ellsworth (2001) from a 2-km deep borehole in Long Valley Caldera, California. First, assuming an omega-square model with a constant Q, we determined the stress drop and apparent stress of 41 events (0.5 < Mw < 5.0). We find that some small events have small apparent stresses of about 0.003-0.03 MPa, and also find that these events have low stress drops of 0.01 to 0.1 MPa. Most larger events have both larger stress drops of 1-10 MPa and larger apparent stresses. This analysis supports the decline of Es with declining moment. It is natural that stress drop would have a strong relationship to the apparent stress---we find (apparent stress) = 0.3 x (stress drop)---since we assumed an omega-square model. Insofar as no systematic change in the spectral shape is observed with seismic moment in the data, it is unlikely that stress drop and apparent stress will have different dependencies on seismic moment. We also estimated stress drops

  13. Pore Size Determination Using Frequency-Dependent Electro-Osmosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reppert, P. M.; Morgan, F. D.

    2001-12-01

    Frequency-dependent electro-osmosis has the potential for use as an alternative method for determining the average pore size of porous media. It has been previously shown for the frequency-dependent streaming potential case that the frequency response of the streaming potential coupling coefficient is directly related to the pore size of the rock. However, a drawback to using frequency-dependent streaming potentials is that it is difficult to generate sufficient pressures at intermediate frequencies where both mechanical and piezoelectric devices are not efficient. Frequency-dependent electro-osmosis does not have this problem since the driving electric field can efficiently be applied in the frequency range of interest. Although the underlying physics of both the frequency-dependent electro-osmosis and frequency-dependent streaming potential cases are similar, there are differences in their frequency responses. Similar to the frequency-dependent streaming potential case, it is shown that the electro-osmosis frequency-dependent coupling coefficient is constant with increasing frequency until the critical frequency is reached, at which time the coupling coefficient starts to decrease with increasing frequency. The frequency response of the electro-osmosis coupling coefficient is dependent on the capillary radius. As the capillary radius decreases, the rollover frequency increases. The theory is developed that demonstrates the rollover frequency for the electro-osmosis frequency response is higher than that for the related streaming potential frequency response for the same size capillary. It is shown that this higher rollover frequency is due to the presence of velocity zeros within the bulk fluid of the capillary which serve to reduce the effective radius of the capillary. Data is presented for a 0.127 mm capillary that supports the theoretical findings. Frequency-dependent electro-osmosis can be used for the laboratory determination of average pore sizes of rocks

  14. INITIAL PLANETESIMAL SIZES AND THE SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF SMALL KUIPER BELT OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Schlichting, Hilke E.; Fuentes, Cesar I.; Trilling, David E.

    2013-08-01

    The Kuiper Belt is a remnant from the early solar system and its size distribution contains many important constraints that can be used to test models of planet formation and collisional evolution. We show, by comparing observations with theoretical models, that the observed Kuiper Belt size distribution is well matched by coagulation models, which start with an initial planetesimal population with radii of about 1 km, and subsequent collisional evolution. We find that the observed size distribution above R {approx} 30 km is primordial, i.e., it has not been modified by collisional evolution over the age of the solar system, and that the size distribution below R {approx} 30 km has been modified by collisions and that its slope is well matched by collisional evolution models that use published strength laws. We investigate in detail the resulting size distribution of bodies ranging from 0.01 km to 30 km and find that its slope changes several times as a function of radius before approaching the expected value for an equilibrium collisional cascade of material strength dominated bodies for R {approx}< 0.1 km. Compared to a single power-law size distribution that would span the whole range from 0.01 km to 30 km, we find in general a strong deficit of bodies around R {approx} 10 km and a strong excess of bodies around 2 km in radius. This deficit and excess of bodies are caused by the planetesimal size distribution left over from the runaway growth phase, which left most of the initial mass in small planetesimals while only a small fraction of the total mass is converted into large protoplanets. This excess mass in small planetesimals leaves a permanent signature in the size distribution of small bodies that is not erased after 4.5 Gyr of collisional evolution. Observations of the small Kuiper Belt Object (KBO) size distribution can therefore test if large KBOs grew as a result of runaway growth and constrained the initial planetesimal sizes. We find that results from

  15. A statistical approach to estimate the 3D size distribution of spheres from 2D size distributions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kong, M.; Bhattacharya, R.N.; James, C.; Basu, A.

    2005-01-01

    Size distribution of rigidly embedded spheres in a groundmass is usually determined from measurements of the radii of the two-dimensional (2D) circular cross sections of the spheres in random flat planes of a sample, such as in thin sections or polished slabs. Several methods have been devised to find a simple factor to convert the mean of such 2D size distributions to the actual 3D mean size of the spheres without a consensus. We derive an entirely theoretical solution based on well-established probability laws and not constrained by limitations of absolute size, which indicates that the ratio of the means of measured 2D and estimated 3D grain size distribution should be r/4 (=.785). Actual 2D size distribution of the radii of submicron sized, pure Fe0 globules in lunar agglutinitic glass, determined from backscattered electron images, is tested to fit the gamma size distribution model better than the log-normal model. Numerical analysis of 2D size distributions of Fe0 globules in 9 lunar soils shows that the average mean of 2D/3D ratio is 0.84, which is very close to the theoretical value. These results converge with the ratio 0.8 that Hughes (1978) determined for millimeter-sized chondrules from empirical measurements. We recommend that a factor of 1.273 (reciprocal of 0.785) be used to convert the determined 2D mean size (radius or diameter) of a population of spheres to estimate their actual 3D size. ?? 2005 Geological Society of America.

  16. Diffusion in nanoporous phases: size dependence and levitation effect.

    PubMed

    Yashonath, S; Ghorai, Pradip Kr

    2008-01-24

    Self-diffusivity, D, of diffusants in widely differing mediums such as liquids (e.g., solution), porous solids (e.g., guests in zeolites), or ions in polar solvents exhibit strong size dependence. We discuss the nature of the size dependence observed in these systems. Altogether, different theoretical approaches have been proposed to understand the nature of size dependence of D not only across these widely differing systems but even in just one medium or class of systems such as, for example, ions in polar solvents. But molecular dynamics investigations in the past decade have shown that the size dependence of self-diffusion in guest-porous solids could have origins in the mutual cancellation of forces that occurs when the size of the diffusant is comparable to the size of the void. The effect leading to the maximum in D is known as the levitation effect (LE). Such a cancellation is a consequence of symmetry. This effect exists in all porous solids irrespective of the geometrical and topological details of the pore network provided by the solid. Recent studies show that the levitation effect and size-dependent diffusivity maximum exists for uncharged solutes in solvents. One of the consequences of this is the breakdown in the Stokes-Einstein relationship over a certain range of solute-solvent size ratio. Experimental measurements of ionic conductivity over the past hundred years have found the existence of a size-dependent diffusivity maximum leading to violation of the Walden's rule for ions in polar solvents. Molecular dynamics simulations and experimental data suggest that even this maximum has its origin in LE. Simulation studies of impurity atom diffusion in close-packed solids as well as ions in superionic and other solids suggest the existence of a size-dependent diffusivity maximum in these materials as well. The levitation effect is a universal effect leading to a maximum in diffusivity of a diffusant in a variety of condensed matter phases. The only

  17. Remote sensing of floe size distribution and surface topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, D. A.; Thorndike, A. S.

    1984-01-01

    Floe size can be measured by several properties p- for instance, area or mean caliper diameter. Two definitions of floe size distribution seem particularly useful. F(p), the fraction of area covered by floes no smaller than p; and N(p), the number of floes per unit area no smaller than p. Several summertime distributions measured are a graph, their slopes range from -1.7 to -2.5. The variance of an estimate is also calculated.

  18. THE EFFECT OF THE DUST SIZE DISTRIBUTION ON ASTEROID POLARIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Masiero, Joseph; Hartzell, Christine; Scheeres, Daniel J. E-mail: christine.hartzell@colorado.edu

    2009-12-15

    We have developed a theoretical description of how of an asteroid's polarization-phase curve will be affected by the removal of the dust from the surface due to a size-dependent phenomenon such as radiation pressure-driven escape of levitated particles. We test our calculations against new observations of four small (D {approx} 1 km) near-Earth asteroids (NEAs; (85236), (142348), (162900), and 2006 SZ{sub 217}) obtained with the Dual Beam Imaging Polarimeter on the University of Hawaii's 2.2 m telescope, as well as previous observations of (25143) Itokawa and (433) Eros. We find that the polarization of the light reflected from an asteroid is controlled by the mineralogical and chemical composition of the surface and is independent of dust particle. The relation between the slope of the polarization-phase curve beyond the inversion angle and the albedo of an asteroid is thus independent of the surface regolith size distribution and is valid for both Main Belt and NEAs.

  19. Size-biased distributions in the generalized beta distribution family, with applications to forestry

    Treesearch

    Mark J. Ducey; Jeffrey H. Gove

    2015-01-01

    Size-biased distributions arise in many forestry applications, as well as other environmental, econometric, and biomedical sampling problems. We examine the size-biased versions of the generalized beta of the first kind, generalized beta of the second kind and generalized gamma distributions. These distributions include, as special cases, the Dagum (Burr Type III),...

  20. Estimation and applications of size-biased distributions in forestry

    Treesearch

    Jeffrey H. Gove

    2003-01-01

    Size-biased distributions arise naturally in several contexts in forestry and ecology. Simple power relationships (e.g. basal area and diameter at breast height) between variables are one such area of interest arising from a modelling perspective. Another, probability proportional to size PPS) sampling, is found in the most widely used methods for sampling standing or...

  1. Estimation and applications of size-based distributions in forestry

    Treesearch

    Jeffrey H. Gove

    2003-01-01

    Size-based distributions arise in several contexts in forestry and ecology. Simple power relationships (e.g., basal area and diameter at breast height) between variables are one such area of interest arising from a modeling perspective. Another, probability proportional to size sampline (PPS), is found in the most widely used methods for sampling standing or dead and...

  2. Universal size dependence of the physical properties of nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremin, E. N.; Yurov, V. M.; Guchenko, S. A.; Laurynas, V. Ch

    2017-06-01

    Dimensional analysis of the experimentally observed dependence of the physical properties of nanoparticles, nanofilms and nanomaterials showed that there is a universal equation that accurately describes the observed size effects. It is shown that the size factor is also a universal value and is determined only by the atomic structure of the nanomaterial. Discovered universal relationships enable us to calculate the physical properties (mechanical, electrical, magnetic, thermal, etc.) of small particles and thin films based on knowledge of the properties of bulk materials.

  3. Mechanical properties of sorbents depending on nanopore sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnikova, A. S.

    2017-07-01

    The effect of the nanopore size on the mechanical properties of a porous carbon material with the density of 1.4 g/cm3 is discussed. The atomistic models of porous carbon materials depending on the nanopore size are constructed. The numerical experiments are implemented with using the molecular mechanical method based on the Brenner potential. The Young's moduli are evaluated for porous carbon structures at certain nanopore dimensions and are found to decrease with the enlarging nanopores.

  4. Modelling complete particle-size distributions from operator estimates of particle-size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberson, Sam; Weltje, Gert Jan

    2014-05-01

    Estimates of particle-size made by operators in the field and laboratory represent a vast and relatively untapped data archive. The wide spatial distribution of particle-size estimates makes them ideal for constructing geological models and soil maps. This study uses a large data set from the Netherlands (n = 4837) containing both operator estimates of particle size and complete particle-size distributions measured by laser granulometry. This study introduces a logit-based constrained-cubic-spline (CCS) algorithm to interpolate complete particle-size distributions from operator estimates. The CCS model is compared to four other models: (i) a linear interpolation; (ii) a log-hyperbolic interpolation; (iii) an empirical logistic function; and (iv) an empirical arctan function. Operator estimates were found to be both inaccurate and imprecise; only 14% of samples were successfully classified using the Dutch classification scheme for fine sediment. Operator estimates of sediment particle-size encompass the same range of values as particle-size distributions measured by laser analysis. However, the distributions measured by laser analysis show that most of the sand percentage values lie between zero and one, so the majority of the variability in the data is lost because operator estimates are made to the nearest 1% at best, and more frequently to the nearest 5%. A method for constructing complete particle-size distributions from operator estimates of sediment texture using a logit constrained cubit spline (CCS) interpolation algorithm is presented. This model and four other previously published methods are compared to establish the best approach to modelling particle-size distributions. The logit-CCS model is the most accurate method, although both logit-linear and log-linear interpolation models provide reasonable alternatives. Models based on empirical distribution functions are less accurate than interpolation algorithms for modelling particle-size distributions in

  5. Time-dependent species sensitivity distributions.

    PubMed

    Fox, David R; Billoir, Elise

    2013-02-01

    Time is a central component of toxicity assessments. However, current ecotoxicological practice marginalizes time in concentration-response (C-R) modeling and species sensitivity distribution (SSD) analyses. For C-R models, time is invariably fixed, and toxicity measures are estimated from a function fitted to the data at that time. The estimated toxicity measures are used as inputs to the SSD modeling phase, which similarly avoids explicit recognition of the temporal component. The present study extends some commonly employed probability models for SSDs to derive theoretical results that characterize the time-dependent nature of hazardous concentration (HCx) values. The authors' results show that even from very simple assumptions, more complex patterns in the SSD time dependency can be revealed.

  6. Size-dependent rheology of type-I collagen networks.

    PubMed

    Arevalo, Richard C; Urbach, Jeffrey S; Blair, Daniel L

    2010-10-20

    We investigate the system size-dependent rheological response of branched type I collagen gels. When subjected to a shear strain, the highly interconnected mesh dynamically reorients, resulting in overall stiffening of the network. When a continuous shear strain is applied to a collagen network, we observe that the local apparent modulus, in the strain-stiffening regime, is strongly dependent on the gel thickness. In addition, we demonstrate that the overall network failure is determined by the ratio of the gel thickness to the mesh size. These findings have broad implications for cell-matrix interactions, the interpretation of rheological tissue data, and the engineering of biomimetic scaffolds.

  7. Sample sizes and model comparison metrics for species distribution models

    Treesearch

    B.B. Hanberry; H.S. He; D.C. Dey

    2012-01-01

    Species distribution models use small samples to produce continuous distribution maps. The question of how small a sample can be to produce an accurate model generally has been answered based on comparisons to maximum sample sizes of 200 observations or fewer. In addition, model comparisons often are made with the kappa statistic, which has become controversial....

  8. Microfluidic-Enabled Liposomes Elucidate Size-Dependent Transdermal Transport

    PubMed Central

    Junqueira, Mariana; Vreeland, Wyatt N.; Quezado, Zenaide; Finkel, Julia C.; DeVoe, Don L.

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic synthesis of small and nearly-monodisperse liposomes is used to investigate the size-dependent passive transdermal transport of nanoscale lipid vesicles. While large liposomes with diameters above 105 nm are found to be excluded from deeper skin layers past the stratum corneum, the primary barrier to nanoparticle transport, liposomes with mean diameters between 31–41 nm exhibit significantly enhanced penetration. Furthermore, multicolor fluorescence imaging reveals that the smaller liposomes pass rapidly through the stratum corneum without vesicle rupture. These findings reveal that nanoscale liposomes with well-controlled size and minimal size variance are excellent vehicles for transdermal delivery of functional nanoparticle drugs. PMID:24658111

  9. Oligogermanes as molecular precursors for germanium(0) nanoparticles: Size control and size-dependent fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Schrick, Aaron C.; Weinert, Charles S.

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: Catenated germanium compounds are employed as molecular precursors for germanium(0) nanoparticles. The size of the nanoparticles, and their fluorescence spectra, depend on the number of catenated germanium atoms present in the precursor. - Highlights: • We have used oligogermanes for the size-specific synthesis of germanium(0) nanoparticles. • The size of the nanomaterials obtained depends directly on the degree of catenation present in the oligogermane precursor. • The nanoparticles are shown to exhibit size-dependent fluorescence. • Oligogermanes will function as useful precursors for the synthesis of a variety of nanomaterials. - Abstract: Germanium nanoparticles were synthesized in solution from novel oligogermane molecular precursors. The size of the nanoparticles obtained is directly related to the number of catenated germanium atoms present in the oligogermane precursor and the nanoparticles exhibit size-dependent fluorescence. The germanium nanoparticles were also characterized by TEM, powder XRD, FTIR, EDS and XPS methods. This method appears to be a promising new route for the synthesis of germanium nanoparticles since the size of the materials obtained can be controlled by the choice of the oligogermane used as the precursor.

  10. Quasi-elastic light scattering determination of the size distribution of extruded vesicles.

    PubMed

    Kölchens, S; Ramaswami, V; Birgenheier, J; Nett, L; O'Brien, D F

    1993-04-01

    The size distribution of phospholipid vesicles prepared by the freeze thaw-extrusion method were determined by the non-perturbing technique of quasi-elastic light scattering (QELS) and compared to latex particles of known size. Multiangle QELS experiments were performed to avoid errors due to the angular dependence of the scattering function of the particles. The experimentally determined autocorrelation function was analyzed by multiple mathematical procedures, i.e. single exponential, CUMULANT, exponential sampling, non-negatively constrained least square and CONTIN, in order to select suitable models for vesicle characterization. The most consistent results were obtained with CUMULANT, non-negatively constrained least square and CONTIN. In many instances single exponential analysis gave comparable results to these procedures, which indicates the vesicles have a narrow distribution of sizes. The influence of filter pore size, extrusion pressure and lipid concentration on the size and size distribution of extruded vesicles was determined. Extrusion through 100-, 200- and 400-nm pore size filters produced a unimodal distribution of vesicles, with somewhat smaller diameters as the extrusion pressure increased. The larger the filter pore size, the more dependent the vesicle size was on applied pressure. The observed vesicle size was independent of the lipid concentration between 0.1 and 10 mg ml-1.

  11. The Seasonal Evolution of Sea Ice Floe Size Distribution

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. “The Seasonal Evolution of Sea Ice Floe Size Distribution...This work was motivated by the desire to improve the understanding of processes governing the evolution of the marginal ice zone that forms...seasonally in the southern Beaufort and Chukchi Seas region. OBJECTIVES The objective of this work was to determine the seasonal evolution of the

  12. Efficient approximation of the cluster size distribution in binary condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Putten, Dennis S.; Sidin, Ryan S. R.; Hagmeijer, Rob

    2010-05-01

    We propose a computationally efficient method for the calculation of the binary cluster size distribution. This method is based on the phase path analysis algorithm, which was originally derived for single-component condensation. We extend this method by constructing the binary general dynamic equation, which introduces clusters at a point in two component n1,n2-space. The location of this source point is determined by the Gibbs free energy of formation and the impingement rates of the two constituents. The resulting model describes the binary cluster size distribution along a line in n1,n2-space. The solution of the binary general dynamic equation is compared with the solution of formally exact binary Becker-Döring equations for a typical nucleation pulse experiment. The results show good agreement for the cluster composition and size and the integral properties of the size distribution.

  13. Airborne Particle Size Distribution Measurements at USDOE Fernald

    SciTech Connect

    Harley, N.H.; Chittaporn, P.; Heikkinen, M.; Medora, R.; Merrill, R.

    2003-03-27

    There are no long term measurements of the particle size distribution and concentration of airborne radionuclides at any USDOE facility except Fernald. Yet the determinant of lung dose is the particle size, determining the airway and lower lung deposition. Beginning in 2000, continuous (6 to 8 weeks) measurements of the aerosol particle size distribution have been made with a miniature sampler developed under EMSP. Radon gas decays to a chain of four short lived solid radionuclides that attach immediately to the resident atmospheric aerosol. These in turn decay to long lived polonium 210. Alpha emitting polonium is a tracer for any atmospheric aerosol. Six samplers at Fernald and four at QC sites in New Jersey show a difference in both polonium concentration and size distribution with the winter measurements being higher/larger than summer by almost a factor of two at all locations. EMSP USDOE Contract DE FG07 97ER62522.

  14. Particle size and shape distributions of hammer milled pine

    SciTech Connect

    Westover, Tyler Lott; Matthews, Austin Colter; Williams, Christopher Luke; Ryan, John Chadron Benjamin

    2015-04-01

    Particle size and shape distributions impact particle heating rates and diffusion of volatized gases out of particles during fast pyrolysis conversion, and consequently must be modeled accurately in order for computational pyrolysis models to produce reliable results for bulk solid materials. For this milestone, lodge pole pine chips were ground using a Thomas-Wiley #4 mill using two screen sizes in order to produce two representative materials that are suitable for fast pyrolysis. For the first material, a 6 mm screen was employed in the mill and for the second material, a 3 mm screen was employed in the mill. Both materials were subjected to RoTap sieve analysis, and the distributions of the particle sizes and shapes were determined using digital image analysis. The results of the physical analysis will be fed into computational pyrolysis simulations to create models of materials with realistic particle size and shape distributions. This milestone was met on schedule.

  15. Bubble size distribution in a laboratory-scale electroflotation study.

    PubMed

    Alam, Raquibul; Shang, Julie Q; Khan, Adnan Hossain

    2017-04-01

    The performance of electroflotation (EF) is strongly influenced by the size of O2 and H2 bubbles. Therefore, in this study, the bubble sizes are measured in a lab-scale EF cell using a high-speed camera. The mean bubble size is found to vary in the range of 32.7-68.6 μm under different operating conditions. This study shows that the electrode material, current density, water pH, ionic strength, and frother (Tennafroth 250) concentration are important factors in controlling the bubble size. Furthermore, four mathematical distributions (normal, log-normal, Weibull, and gamma distributions) are fitted to the experimental data, among which the log-normal distribution is found to be the best fit based on the lower Anderson-Darling (AD) value.

  16. Size distribution of microbubbles as a function of shell composition.

    PubMed

    Dicker, Stephen; Mleczko, Michał; Schmitz, Georg; Wrenn, Steven P

    2013-09-01

    The effect of modifying the shell composition of a population of microbubbles on their size demonstrated through experiment. Specifically, these variations include altering both the mole fraction and molecular weight of functionalized polymer, polyethylene glycol (PEG) in the microbubble phospholipid monolayer shell (1-15 mol% PEG, and 1000-5000 g/mole, respectively). The size distribution is measured with an unbiased image segmentation program written in MATLAB which identifies and sizes bubbles from micrographs. For a population of microbubbles with a shell composition of 5 mol% PEG2000, the mean diameter is 1.42 μm with a variance of 0.244 μm. For the remainder of the shell compositions studied herein, we find that the size distributions do not show a statistically significant correlation to either PEG molecular weight or mole fraction. All the measured distributions are nearly Gaussian in shape and have a monomodal peak.

  17. Distribution of cooperative unit size of amphiphilic molecules in the phase coexistence region in Langmuir monolayers.

    PubMed

    Hatta, E; Nishimura, T

    2013-02-01

    The dependence of the size of the cooperative unit (C.U.) of amphiphilic molecules on surface pressure (π) in the liquid expanded (LE)-liquid condensed (LC) phase coexistence region of Langmuir monolayers has been formulated and calculated using measured isotherm data. The C.U. size changes largely depending on the surface pressure in the coexistence region: these submicroscopic molecular aggregates are not static objects, but dynamic ones characterized by large fluctuations in size. It has been found that the C.U. size distribution can be a natural consequence of the significant change of monolayer compressibility, which reflects large molecular area density fluctuations, in the coexistence region.

  18. Characterizations of particle size distribution in Guangzhou during dry season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fei

    2017-04-01

    The relationship of ambient aerosol and visibility deterioration over Pearl River Delta(PRD) have attached more and more attentions in recent years. The extinction coefficient of ambient aerosol can be calculated with the Mie theory(N. Ma, 2014), which is based on a set of measured dry aerosol number size distribution, ambient relative humidity, aerosol hygroscopic growth factor, and the assumption of no activation. Using the parameters that can be easily measured would make the extinction coefficient of ambient aerosol calculation more widely available. PM2.5 (total mass concentration of dry aerosols with the aerodynamic diameter smaller than 2.5μm) measurements are widely applied in PRD, the aerosol concentrations could be estimated based on PM2.5 measurements and used to calculate the extinction. However, with different size distributions, aerosol with the same mass concentration may have different extinction coefficients. Ignoring the variations of the shapes of aerosol size distributions may introduce an uncertainty in the calculation of aerosol extinction coefficient. In order to quantify this uncertainty, the historical data of aerosol size distribution need to be analyzed. In this paper, continuous measurements of particle number size distributions and PM2.5 were simultaneously performed at Guangzhou urban site from Nov. 2014 to Jan. 2015. The temporal and diurnal statistical results of dry seasons would be used in the calculation of aerosol extinction coefficient, and the extinction coefficients corresponding to a certain aerosol volume concentration and relative humidity are given in the form of probability distribution.

  19. Liquid crystal size selection of large-size graphene oxide for size-dependent N-doping and oxygen reduction catalysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung Eun; Kim, Ji Eun; Maiti, Uday Narayan; Lim, Joonwon; Hwang, Jin Ok; Shim, Jongwon; Oh, Jung Jae; Yun, Taeyeong; Kim, Sang Ouk

    2014-09-23

    Graphene oxide (GO) is aqueous-dispersible oxygenated graphene, which shows colloidal discotic liquid crystallinity. Many properties of GO-based materials, including electrical conductivity and mechanical properties, are limited by the small flake size of GO. Unfortunately, typical sonochemical exfoliation of GO from graphite generally leads to a broad size and shape distribution. Here, we introduce a facile size selection of large-size GO exploiting liquid crystallinity and investigate the size-dependent N-doping and oxygen reduction catalysis. In the biphasic GO dispersion where both isotropic and liquid crystalline phases are equilibrated, large-size GO flakes (>20 μm) are spontaneously concentrated within the liquid crystalline phase. N-Doping and reduction of the size-selected GO exhibit that N-dopant type is highly dependent on GO flake size. Large-size GO demonstrates quaternary dominant N-doping and the lowest onset potential (-0.08 V) for oxygen reduction catalysis, signifying that quaternary N-dopants serve as principal catalytic sites in N-doped graphene.

  20. Size-dependent Strain in Epitaxial (001) Gadolinium-doped Ceria Nanoislands

    SciTech Connect

    Solovyov, V.F.; Gibert, M.; Puig, T.; Obradors, X.

    2010-12-06

    We report size-dependent strain in epitaxial gadolinium doped ceria nanoislands, which was determined by synchrotron x-ray diffraction. Reciprocal space sections of symmetric, (004) and asymmetric, (224) reflections are approximated by a model assuming size-dependent strain of the islands using real-space size distribution obtained by atomic force microscopy. We show that the islands smaller than 40 nm are subjected to a high level of lateral tensile strain and normal compression. The lateral to normal strain ratio determined from the reciprocal map analysis suggests that lateral tension is the primary stress generator, possibly due to oxygen vacancy ordering on the island-substrate interface.

  1. Size-dependent Strain in Epitaxial (001)Gadolinium-doped Ceria Nanoislands

    SciTech Connect

    V Solovyov; M Gibert; T Puig; X Obradors

    2011-12-31

    We report size-dependent strain in epitaxial gadolinium doped ceria nanoislands, which was determined by synchrotron x-ray diffraction. Reciprocal space sections of symmetric, (004) and asymmetric, (224) reflections are approximated by a model assuming size-dependent strain of the islands using real-space size distribution obtained by atomic force microscopy. We show that the islands smaller than 40 nm are subjected to a high level of lateral tensile strain and normal compression. The lateral to normal strain ratio determined from the reciprocal map analysis suggests that lateral tension is the primary stress generator, possibly due to oxygen vacancy ordering on the island-substrate interface.

  2. Size-dependent strain in epitaxial (001) gadolinium-doped ceria nanoislands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solovyov, Vyacheslav F.; Gibert, Marta; Puig, Teresa; Obradors, Xavier

    2010-12-01

    We report size-dependent strain in epitaxial gadolinium doped ceria nanoislands, which was determined by synchrotron x-ray diffraction. Reciprocal space sections of symmetric, (004) and asymmetric, (224) reflections are approximated by a model assuming size-dependent strain of the islands using real-space size distribution obtained by atomic force microscopy. We show that the islands smaller than 40 nm are subjected to a high level of lateral tensile strain and normal compression. The lateral to normal strain ratio determined from the reciprocal map analysis suggests that lateral tension is the primary stress generator, possibly due to oxygen vacancy ordering on the island-substrate interface.

  3. Packing fraction of particles with lognormal size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouwers, H. J. H.

    2014-05-01

    This paper addresses the packing and void fraction of polydisperse particles with a lognormal size distribution. It is demonstrated that a binomial particle size distribution can be transformed into a continuous particle-size distribution of the lognormal type. Furthermore, an original and exact expression is derived that predicts the packing fraction of mixtures of particles with a lognormal distribution, which is governed by the standard deviation, mode of packing, and particle shape only. For a number of particle shapes and their packing modes (close, loose) the applicable values are given. This closed-form analytical expression governing the packing fraction is thoroughly compared with empirical and computational data reported in the literature, and good agreement is found.

  4. Size-dependent sex change can be the ESS without any size advantage of reproduction when mortality is size-dependent.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Mollie; Iwasa, Yoh

    2010-11-01

    Almost all models of sex change evolution assume that reproductive rate increases with body size. However, size-dependent sex changing plants often show size-independent reproductive success, presumably due to pollen limitation. Can the observed size-dependent sex change pattern be the ESS in this case? To answer this question, we analyze a game model of size-dependent sex expression in plants. We assume: (1) reproductive rate is perfectly independent of size; (2) mortality decreases with size in the same way for both sexes; (3) growth rates decrease at maturity, more for females than males. We show that the ESS is size-dependent sex expression: small individuals are vegetative, intermediate individuals are male, and large individuals are female. These results demonstrate that mortality is important in size-dependent sex allocation even when mortality rate is independent of sex. They also offer an explanation of why we see populations in poor environments to have sex ratios more biased toward the first sex relative to high quality environments.

  5. Inferring Past Effective Population Size from Distributions of Coalescent Times

    PubMed Central

    Gattepaille, Lucie; Günther, Torsten; Jakobsson, Mattias

    2016-01-01

    Inferring and understanding changes in effective population size over time is a major challenge for population genetics. Here we investigate some theoretical properties of random-mating populations with varying size over time. In particular, we present an exact solution to compute the population size as a function of time, Ne(t), based on distributions of coalescent times of samples of any size. This result reduces the problem of population size inference to a problem of estimating coalescent time distributions. To illustrate the analytic results, we design a heuristic method using a tree-inference algorithm and investigate simulated and empirical population-genetic data. We investigate the effects of a range of conditions associated with empirical data, for instance number of loci, sample size, mutation rate, and cryptic recombination. We show that our approach performs well with genomic data (≥ 10,000 loci) and that increasing the sample size from 2 to 10 greatly improves the inference of Ne(t) whereas further increase in sample size results in modest improvements, even under a scenario of exponential growth. We also investigate the impact of recombination and characterize the potential biases in inference of Ne(t). The approach can handle large sample sizes and the computations are fast. We apply our method to human genomes from four populations and reconstruct population size profiles that are coherent with previous finds, including the Out-of-Africa bottleneck. Additionally, we uncover a potential difference in population size between African and non-African populations as early as 400 KYA. In summary, we provide an analytic relationship between distributions of coalescent times and Ne(t), which can be incorporated into powerful approaches for inferring past population sizes from population-genomic data. PMID:27638421

  6. Dependent Variable Reliability and Determination of Sample Size.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Scott E.

    Arguments have recently been put forth that standard textbook procedures for determining the sample size necessary to achieve a certain level of power in a completely randomized design are incorrect when the dependent variable is fallible because they ignore measurement error. In fact, however, there are several correct procedures, one of which is…

  7. The influence of grain size and grain size distribution on methods for estimating paleostresses from twinning in carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Julie

    1994-12-01

    This study examines the relative differential stresses around a minor thrust fault within the Mountain City window, Tennessee, U.S.A. The fault zone developed within dolomite rocks and deformation took place by twinning, fracturing, pressure solution and the development of fine-grained deformation zones. Grain-size reduction is observed from undeformed wall rock to the center of the fault zone, and occurred by dynamic recrystallization. Methods to determine paleostresses in naturally deformed rocks from twinning assume a single, coaxial, strain-inducing event. The recrystallization within the center of the fault zone removed the effects of earlier deformation, so that the twinning more closely reflects a single, coaxial deformation event late in the fault history. Two methods were used to estimate the relative differential stresses across the fault zone and the results show opposite trends towards the center of the fault zone. The different results may be partially explained by the influence of grain size, as only one of these methods considers the influence of grain size. In addition, the grainsize data from this fault zone demonstrate that the tendency for a grain-size class to be twinned depends on the grain size distribution. The grain size distribution may result in grain-to-grain stress concentrations that induce twinning. Thus, grain size distribution should also be considered to achieve more accurate estimates of paleostresses.

  8. Mechanical vulnerability explains size-dependent mortality of reef corals

    PubMed Central

    Madin, Joshua S; Baird, Andrew H; Dornelas, Maria; Connolly, Sean R

    2014-01-01

    Understanding life history and demographic variation among species within communities is a central ecological goal. Mortality schedules are especially important in ecosystems where disturbance plays a major role in structuring communities, such as coral reefs. Here, we test whether a trait-based, mechanistic model of mechanical vulnerability in corals can explain mortality schedules. Specifically, we ask whether species that become increasingly vulnerable to hydrodynamic dislodgment as they grow have bathtub-shaped mortality curves, whereas species that remain mechanically stable have decreasing mortality rates with size, as predicted by classical life history theory for reef corals. We find that size-dependent mortality is highly consistent between species with the same growth form and that the shape of size-dependent mortality for each growth form can be explained by mechanical vulnerability. Our findings highlight the feasibility of predicting assemblage-scale mortality patterns on coral reefs with trait-based approaches. PMID:24894390

  9. Size- and dimensionality-dependent thermodynamic properties of ice nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Han, Y Y; Shuai, J; Lu, H M; Meng, X K

    2012-02-09

    Although the melting of ice is the most ubiquitous phase transition, (pre)melting and the quasi-liquid layer remain a matter of debate, and little is known about the relationship between the thermodynamic properties of ice nanocrystals and their size and dimensionality. Here, we model analytically the size- and dimensionality-dependent melting temperature, premelting temperature, and melting enthalpy of hydrogen-bonded ice nanocrystals. These three thermodynamic parameters are found to increase with increasing size and dimensionality where the size effect is principle while the dimensionality effect is secondary, and the size dependence of premelting temperature almost follows the same trend as that of melting temperature. The model predictions correspond to the available molecular dynamic simulation and experimental results of ice nanoparticles and nanowires. These agreements enable us to determine theoretically the thickness of the quasi-liquid layer for the first time, which is found to be not constant but slightly increase with increasing size and thus accounts for the occurrence of different reported thicknesses of the quasi-liquid layer. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  10. Size-dependent oxygen storage ability of nano-sized ceria.

    PubMed

    Sun, Congting; Xue, Dongfeng

    2013-09-14

    We thermodynamically studied the size-dependent oxygen storage ability of nano-sized ceria by tracing the surface Ce/O ratio of octahedral particles with different diameters, from the viewpoint of lattice Ce and O in a CeO2 crystallographic structure. The high surface Ce/O ratio with small scale particle size has more excess surface Ce(4+) ions, which allows ceria to have an increasing oxygen storage ability in a crystalline lattice. For the perfect octahedron growth shape of ceria, the nonstoichiometric surfaces can produce excess Ce(4+) ions, Ce(4+) ions can be stabilized by bonding with lattice oxygen, leading to an enhanced oxygen storage ability of ceria. With the increasing particle size, the surface Ce/O ratio approaches to 0.5 owing to the decreased contributions of atoms located at the edges and corners. When the octahedron diameter D = 0.55 nm, the surface Ce/O ratio can reach 0.75. When D = 7.58 nm, the surface Ce/O ratio decreases down to 0.51. If D≥ 14.61 nm, the surface Ce/O ratios are equal to 0.5. The present study deepens the insight of the size-dependent oxygen storage ability of nano-sized ceria, focusing on the size-dependent excess Ce(4+) on nonstoichiometric surfaces of ceria in thermodynamics.

  11. Crater size distributions on Ganymede and Callisto: fundamental issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Roland; Schmedemann, Nico; Werner, Stefanie; Ivanov, Boris; Stephan, Katrin; Jaumann, Ralf

    2015-04-01

    Crater size distributions on the two largest Jovian satellites Ganymede and Callisto and the origin of impactors are subject of intense and controversial debates. In this paper, we reinvestigate crater size distributions measured in surface units derived from a recently published global geologic map, based on Voyager and Galileo SSI images at a scale of 1 km/pxl (Collins G. C. et al. (2013), U. S. Geol. Surv., Sci. Inv. Map 3237). These units are used as a context to units mapped in more detail at higher resolution in Galileo SSI images. We focus on the following fundamental issues: (1) Similarity between shapes of crater distributions on the Galilean satellites and on inner solar system bodies; (2) production versus equilibrium distributions; (3) apex/antapex variations in crater distributions. First, our results show a strong similarity in shape between the crater distributions on the most densely cratered regions on Ganymede and Callisto with those in the lunar highlands. We conclude that the shape of the crater distributions on these two Jovian satellites implies the craters were preferentially formed from members of a collisionally evolved projectile family, derived either from Main Belt asteroids as candidates of impactors on the Jovian satellites, or from projectiles stemming from the outer solar system which have undergone collisional evolution, resulting in a size distribution similar to those of Main Belt asteroids. Second, the complex shape of the crater distributions on Ganymede and Callisto indicates they are mostly production distributions and can be used to infer the underlying shape of the projectile size distribution. Locally, equilibrium distributions occur, especially at smaller sub-kilometer diameters. Third, the most densely cratered regions on both satellites do not show apex-antapex variations in crater frequency, as inferred for bodies from heliocentric orbits (e.g., Zahnle K. et al. (2003), Icarus 163, 263-289). This indicates that these

  12. Online particle size distribution estimation of a mixture of similar sized particles with acoustic emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nsugbe, Ejay; Starr, Andrew; Jennions, Ian; Ruiz Carcel, Cristobal

    2017-08-01

    Particle processing plants regard the Particle Size Distribution (PSD) as a key quality factor as it influences the bulk and flow properties of the particles. In this work, Acoustic Emission (AE) is used to estimate the PSD of a mixture that comprise of similar sized particles. The experiments involved the use of regular sized particles (glass beads) and with the aid of a time domain based threshold analysis of the particle impacts the PSD of the mixtures could be estimated.

  13. Size Distributions of Solar Proton Events: Methodological and Physical Restrictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miroshnichenko, L. I.; Yanke, V. G.

    2016-12-01

    Based on the new catalogue of solar proton events (SPEs) for the period of 1997 - 2009 (Solar Cycle 23) we revisit the long-studied problem of the event-size distributions in the context of those constructed for other solar-flare parameters. Recent results on the problem of size distributions of solar flares and proton events are briefly reviewed. Even a cursory acquaintance with this research field reveals a rather mixed and controversial picture. We concentrate on three main issues: i) SPE size distribution for {>} 10 MeV protons in Solar Cycle 23; ii) size distribution of {>} 1 GV proton events in 1942 - 2014; iii) variations of annual numbers for {>} 10 MeV proton events on long time scales (1955 - 2015). Different results are critically compared; most of the studies in this field are shown to suffer from vastly different input datasets as well as from insufficient knowledge of underlying physical processes in the SPEs under consideration. New studies in this field should be made on more distinct physical and methodological bases. It is important to note the evident similarity in size distributions of solar flares and superflares in Sun-like stars.

  14. Unraveling the Anomalous Grain Size Dependence of Cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkerson, J. W.; Ramesh, K. T.

    2016-11-01

    Experimental studies have identified an anomalous grain size dependence associated with the critical tensile pressure that a metal may sustain before catastrophic failure by cavitation processes. Here we derive the first quantitative theory (and its associated closed-form solution) capable of explaining this phenomena. The theory agrees well with experimental measurements and atomistic calculations over a very wide range of conditions. Utilizing this theory, we are able to map out three distinct regimes in which the critical tensile pressure for cavitation failure (i) increases with decreasing grain size in accordance with conventional wisdom, (ii) nonintuitively decreases with decreasing grain size, and (iii) is independent of grain size. The theory also predicts microscopic signatures of the cavitation process which agree with available data.

  15. Modelling and validation of particle size distributions of supported nanoparticles using the pair distribution function technique

    DOE PAGES

    Gamez-Mendoza, Liliana; Terban, Maxwell W.; Billinge, Simon J. L.; ...

    2017-04-13

    The particle size of supported catalysts is a key characteristic for determining structure–property relationships. It is a challenge to obtain this information accurately and in situ using crystallographic methods owing to the small size of such particles (<5 nm) and the fact that they are supported. In this work, the pair distribution function (PDF) technique was used to obtain the particle size distribution of supported Pt catalysts as they grow under typical synthesis conditions. The PDF of Pt nanoparticles grown on zeolite X was isolated and refined using two models: a monodisperse spherical model (single particle size) and a lognormalmore » size distribution. The results were compared and validated using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) results. Both models describe the same trends in average particle size with temperature, but the results of the number-weighted lognormal size distributions can also accurately describe the mean size and the width of the size distributions obtained from STEM. Since the PDF yields crystallite sizes, these results suggest that the grown Pt nanoparticles are monocrystalline. As a result, this work shows that refinement of the PDF of small supported monocrystalline nanoparticles can yield accurate mean particle sizes and distributions.« less

  16. Thresholded Power law Size Distributions of Instabilities in Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.

    2015-11-01

    Power-law-like size distributions are ubiquitous in astrophysical instabilities. There are at least four natural effects that cause deviations from ideal power law size distributions, which we model here in a generalized way: (1) a physical threshold of an instability; (2) incomplete sampling of the smallest events below a threshold x0; (3) contamination by an event-unrelated background xb; and (4) truncation effects at the largest events due to a finite system size. These effects can be modeled in the simplest terms with a “thresholded power law” distribution function (also called generalized Pareto [type II] or Lomax distribution), N(x){dx}\\propto {(x+{x}0)}-a{dx}, where x0 > 0 is positive for a threshold effect, while x0 < 0 is negative for background contamination. We analytically derive the functional shape of this thresholded power law distribution function from an exponential growth evolution model, which produces avalanches only when a disturbance exceeds a critical threshold x0. We apply the thresholded power law distribution function to terrestrial, solar (HXRBS, BATSE, RHESSI), and stellar flare (Kepler) data sets. We find that the thresholded power law model provides an adequate fit to most of the observed data. Major advantages of this model are the automated choice of the power law fitting range, diagnostics of background contamination, physical instability thresholds, instrumental detection thresholds, and finite system size limits. When testing self-organized criticality models that predict ideal power laws, we suggest including these natural truncation effects.

  17. Lognormal Behavior of the Size Distributions of Animation Characters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Ken

    This study investigates the statistical property of the character sizes of animation, superhero series, and video game. By using online databases of Pokémon (video game) and Power Rangers (superhero series), the height and weight distributions are constructed, and we find that the weight distributions of Pokémon and Zords (robots in Power Rangers) follow the lognormal distribution in common. For the theoretical mechanism of this lognormal behavior, the combination of the normal distribution and the Weber-Fechner law is proposed.

  18. Mass size distribution of particle-bound water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canepari, S.; Simonetti, G.; Perrino, C.

    2017-09-01

    The thermal-ramp Karl-Fisher method (tr-KF) for the determination of PM-bound water has been applied to size-segregated PM samples collected in areas subjected to different environmental conditions (protracted atmospheric stability, desert dust intrusion, urban atmosphere). This method, based on the use of a thermal ramp for the desorption of water from PM samples and the subsequent analysis by the coulometric KF technique, had been previously shown to differentiate water contributes retained with different strength and associated to different chemical components in the atmospheric aerosol. The application of the method to size-segregated samples has revealed that water showed a typical mass size distribution in each one of the three environmental situations that were taken into consideration. A very similar size distribution was shown by the chemical PM components that prevailed during each event: ammonium nitrate in the case of atmospheric stability, crustal species in the case of desert dust, road-dust components in the case of urban sites. The shape of the tr-KF curve varied according to the size of the collected particles. Considering the size ranges that better characterize the event (fine fraction for atmospheric stability, coarse fraction for dust intrusion, bi-modal distribution for urban dust), this shape is coherent with the typical tr-KF shape shown by water bound to the chemical species that predominate in the same PM size range (ammonium nitrate, crustal species, secondary/combustion species - road dust components).

  19. Formation and size distribution of self-assembled vesicles.

    PubMed

    Huang, Changjin; Quinn, David; Sadovsky, Yoel; Suresh, Subra; Hsia, K Jimmy

    2017-03-14

    When detergents and phospholipid membranes are dispersed in aqueous solutions, they tend to self-assemble into vesicles of various shapes and sizes by virtue of their hydrophobic and hydrophilic segments. A clearer understanding of such vesiculation processes holds promise for better elucidation of human physiology and disease, and paves the way to improved diagnostics, drug development, and drug delivery. Here we present a detailed analysis of the energetics and thermodynamics of vesiculation by recourse to nonlinear elasticity, taking into account large deformation that may arise during the vesiculation process. The effects of membrane size, spontaneous curvature, and membrane stiffness on vesiculation and vesicle size distribution were investigated, and the critical size for vesicle formation was determined and found to compare favorably with available experimental evidence. Our analysis also showed that the critical membrane size for spontaneous vesiculation was correlated with membrane thickness, and further illustrated how the combined effects of membrane thickness and physical properties influenced the size, shape, and distribution of vesicles. These findings shed light on the formation of physiological extracellular vesicles, such as exosomes. The findings also suggest pathways for manipulating the size, shape, distribution, and physical properties of synthetic vesicles, with potential applications in vesicle physiology, the pathobiology of cancer and other diseases, diagnostics using in vivo liquid biopsy, and drug delivery methods.

  20. Formation and size distribution of self-assembled vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Changjin; Quinn, David; Suresh, Subra

    2017-01-01

    When detergents and phospholipid membranes are dispersed in aqueous solutions, they tend to self-assemble into vesicles of various shapes and sizes by virtue of their hydrophobic and hydrophilic segments. A clearer understanding of such vesiculation processes holds promise for better elucidation of human physiology and disease, and paves the way to improved diagnostics, drug development, and drug delivery. Here we present a detailed analysis of the energetics and thermodynamics of vesiculation by recourse to nonlinear elasticity, taking into account large deformation that may arise during the vesiculation process. The effects of membrane size, spontaneous curvature, and membrane stiffness on vesiculation and vesicle size distribution were investigated, and the critical size for vesicle formation was determined and found to compare favorably with available experimental evidence. Our analysis also showed that the critical membrane size for spontaneous vesiculation was correlated with membrane thickness, and further illustrated how the combined effects of membrane thickness and physical properties influenced the size, shape, and distribution of vesicles. These findings shed light on the formation of physiological extracellular vesicles, such as exosomes. The findings also suggest pathways for manipulating the size, shape, distribution, and physical properties of synthetic vesicles, with potential applications in vesicle physiology, the pathobiology of cancer and other diseases, diagnostics using in vivo liquid biopsy, and drug delivery methods. PMID:28265065

  1. Rank-Size Distribution of Notes in Harmonic Music: Hierarchic Shuffling of Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Río, Manuel Beltrán; Cocho, Germinal

    We trace the rank size distribution of notes in harmonic music, which on previous works we suggested was much better represented by the Two-parameter, first class Beta distribution than the customary power law, to the ranked mixing of distributions dictated by the harmonic and instrumental nature of the piece. The same representation is shown to arise in other fields by the same type of ranked shuffling of distributions. We include the codon content of intergenic DNA sequences and the ranked distribution of sizes of trees in a determined area as examples. We show that the fittings proposed increase their accuracy with the number of distributions that are mixed and ranked.

  2. Molecular theory of size exclusion chromatography for wide pore size distributions.

    PubMed

    Sepsey, Annamária; Bacskay, Ivett; Felinger, Attila

    2014-02-28

    Chromatographic processes can conveniently be modeled at a microscopic level using the molecular theory of chromatography. This molecular or microscopic theory is completely general; therefore it can be used for any chromatographic process such as adsorption, partition, ion-exchange or size exclusion chromatography. The molecular theory of chromatography allows taking into account the kinetics of the pore ingress and egress processes, the heterogeneity of the pore sizes and polymer polydispersion. In this work, we assume that the pore size in the stationary phase of chromatographic columns is governed by a wide lognormal distribution. This property is integrated into the molecular model of size exclusion chromatography and the moments of the elution profiles were calculated for several kinds of pore structure. Our results demonstrate that wide pore size distributions have strong influence on the retention properties (retention time, peak width, and peak shape) of macromolecules. The novel model allows us to estimate the real pore size distribution of commonly used HPLC stationary phases, and the effect of this distribution on the size exclusion process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The Italian primary school-size distribution and the city-size: a complex nexus

    PubMed Central

    Belmonte, Alessandro; Di Clemente, Riccardo; Buldyrev, Sergey V.

    2014-01-01

    We characterize the statistical law according to which Italian primary school-size distributes. We find that the school-size can be approximated by a log-normal distribution, with a fat lower tail that collects a large number of very small schools. The upper tail of the school-size distribution decreases exponentially and the growth rates are distributed with a Laplace PDF. These distributions are similar to those observed for firms and are consistent with a Bose-Einstein preferential attachment process. The body of the distribution features a bimodal shape suggesting some source of heterogeneity in the school organization that we uncover by an in-depth analysis of the relation between schools-size and city-size. We propose a novel cluster methodology and a new spatial interaction approach among schools which outline the variety of policies implemented in Italy. Different regional policies are also discussed shedding lights on the relation between policy and geographical features. PMID:24954714

  4. Global Patterns of City Size Distributions and Their Fundamental Drivers

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Ethan H.; Kerkhoff, Andrew J.; Moses, Melanie E.

    2007-01-01

    Urban areas and their voracious appetites are increasingly dominating the flows of energy and materials around the globe. Understanding the size distribution and dynamics of urban areas is vital if we are to manage their growth and mitigate their negative impacts on global ecosystems. For over 50 years, city size distributions have been assumed to universally follow a power function, and many theories have been put forth to explain what has become known as Zipf's law (the instance where the exponent of the power function equals unity). Most previous studies, however, only include the largest cities that comprise the tail of the distribution. Here we show that national, regional and continental city size distributions, whether based on census data or inferred from cluster areas of remotely-sensed nighttime lights, are in fact lognormally distributed through the majority of cities and only approach power functions for the largest cities in the distribution tails. To explore generating processes, we use a simple model incorporating only two basic human dynamics, migration and reproduction, that nonetheless generates distributions very similar to those found empirically. Our results suggest that macroscopic patterns of human settlements may be far more constrained by fundamental ecological principles than more fine-scale socioeconomic factors. PMID:17895975

  5. Production, depreciation and the size distribution of firms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Qi; Chen, Yongwang; Tong, Hui; Di, Zengru

    2008-05-01

    Many empirical researches indicate that firm size distributions in different industries or countries exhibit some similar characters. Among them the fact that many firm size distributions obey power-law especially for the upper end has been mostly discussed. Here we present an agent-based model to describe the evolution of manufacturing firms. Some basic economic behaviors are taken into account, which are production with decreasing marginal returns, preferential allocation of investments, and stochastic depreciation. The model gives a steady size distribution of firms which obey power-law. The effect of parameters on the power exponent is analyzed. The theoretical results are given based on both the Fokker-Planck equation and the Kesten process. They are well consistent with the numerical results.

  6. Initial drop size and velocity distributions for airblast coaxial atomizers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eroglu, H.; Chigier, N.

    1991-01-01

    Phase Doppler measurements were used to determine initial drop size and velocity distributions after a complete disintegration of coaxial liquid jets. The Sauter mean diameter (SMD) distribution was found to be strongly affected by the structure and behavior of the preceding liquid intact jet. The axial measurement stations were determined from the photographs of the coaxial liquid jet at very short distances (1-2 mm) downstream of the observed break-up locations. Minimum droplet mean velocities were found at the center, and maximum velocities were near the spray boundary. Size-velocity correlations show that the velocity of larger drops did not change with drop size. Drop rms velocity distributions have double peaks whose radial positions coincide with the maximum mean velocity gradients.

  7. Aerosol size distribution at Nansen Ice Sheet Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belosi, F.; Contini, D.; Donateo, A.; Santachiara, G.; Prodi, F.

    2012-04-01

    During austral summer 2006, in the framework of the XXII Italian Antarctic expedition of PNRA (Italian National Program for Research in Antarctica), aerosol particle number size distribution measurements were performed in the 10-500 range nm over the Nansen Ice Sheet glacier (NIS, 74°30' S, 163°27' E; 85 m a.s.l), a permanently iced branch of the Ross Sea. Observed total particle number concentrations varied between 169 and 1385 cm- 3. A monomodal number size distribution, peaking at about 70 nm with no variation during the day, was observed for continental air mass, high wind speed and low relative humidity. Trimodal number size distributions were also observed, in agreement with measurements performed at Aboa station, which is located on the opposite side of the Antarctic continent to the NIS. In this case new particle formation, with subsequent particle growth up to about 30 nm, was observed even if not associated with maritime air masses.

  8. Recovering 3D particle size distributions from 2D sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Olson, Daniel M.

    2017-03-01

    We discuss different ways to convert observed, apparent particle size distributions from 2D sections (thin sections, SEM maps on planar surfaces, etc.) into true 3D particle size distributions. We give a simple, flexible, and practical method to do this; show which of these techniques gives the most faithful conversions; and provide (online) short computer codes to calculate both 2D-3D recoveries and simulations of 2D observations by random sectioning. The most important systematic bias of 2D sectioning, from the standpoint of most chondrite studies, is an overestimate of the abundance of the larger particles. We show that fairly good recoveries can be achieved from observed size distributions containing 100-300 individual measurements of apparent particle diameter.

  9. Initial drop size and velocity distributions for airblast coaxial atomizers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eroglu, H.; Chigier, N.

    1991-01-01

    Phase Doppler measurements were used to determine initial drop size and velocity distributions after a complete disintegration of coaxial liquid jets. The Sauter mean diameter (SMD) distribution was found to be strongly affected by the structure and behavior of the preceding liquid intact jet. The axial measurement stations were determined from the photographs of the coaxial liquid jet at very short distances (1-2 mm) downstream of the observed break-up locations. Minimum droplet mean velocities were found at the center, and maximum velocities were near the spray boundary. Size-velocity correlations show that the velocity of larger drops did not change with drop size. Drop rms velocity distributions have double peaks whose radial positions coincide with the maximum mean velocity gradients.

  10. Measurement of the (212)Pb particle size distribution indoors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Guo, Q; Zhuo, W

    2010-10-01

    A new device has been developed for the measurement of the (212)Pb particle size distribution indoors. This device consists of two wire screens and a back-up filter with a diameter of 2.0 cm. The sampling flow rate is typically 3.0 l min(-1). After 3-h sampling time and 6-h waiting time, a CR-39 detector is used for the registration of the alpha particles from the (212)Pb, deposited on the wire screens and the filter, respectively. It appears clear from field measurements that there are no appreciable differences among the particle size distributions from different dwellings within the same location and under the same climate conditions. However, the (212)Pb particle size distributions from the countryside dwellings have different results from those of the city dwellings.

  11. Dynamic Scaling of Island-size Distribution on Anisotropic Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Maozhi; Wang, E. G.; Liu, Banggui; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2002-03-01

    Dynamic scaling of island-size distribution on isotropic and anisotropic surfaces in submonolayer growth is systematically studied using kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. It is found that the island-size distribution in anisotropic submonolayer growth exhibits a general dynamic scaling behavior. An analytic expression is proposed for the scaling function, and is compared with the simulation results. This scaling function not only improves previous results for the isotropic growth (1), but also describes the scaling behavior of the island-size distribution in anisotropic submonolayer growth very well (2). 1. J. G. Amar and F. Family, Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 2066 (1995). 2. M. Z. Li, E. G. Wang, B. G. Liu, and Z. Y. Zhang, Phys. Rev. Lett. (submitted).

  12. The Size Frequency Distribution of Small Main-Belt Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burt, Brian J.; Trilling, David E.; Hines, Dean C.; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.; Rebull, Luisa M.; Fuentes, Cesar I.; Hulsebus, Alan

    2012-01-01

    The asteroid size distribution informs us about the formation and composition of the Solar System. We build on our previous work in which we harvest serendipitously observed data of the Taurus region and measure the brightness and size distributions of Main-belt asteroids. This is accomplished with the highly sensitive MIPS 24 micron channel. We expect to catalog 104 asteroids, giving us a statistically significant data set. Results from this investigation will allow us to characterize the total population of small, Main-belt asteroids. Here we will present new results on the completeness of our study; on the presence of size distribution variations with inclination and radial distance in the belt; and early result on other archival fields.

  13. Body size distributions of the pale grass blue butterfly in Japan: Size rules and the status of the Fukushima population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taira, Wataru; Iwasaki, Mayo; Otaki, Joji M.

    2015-07-01

    The body size of the pale grass blue butterfly, Zizeeria maha, has been used as an environmental indicator of radioactive pollution caused by the Fukushima nuclear accident. However, geographical and temporal size distributions in Japan and temperature effects on size have not been established in this species. Here, we examined the geographical, temporal, and temperature-dependent changes of the forewing size of Z. maha argia in Japan. Butterflies collected in 2012 and 2013 from multiple prefectures throughout Japan demonstrated an inverse relationship of latitude and forewing size, which is the reverse of Bergmann’s cline. The Fukushima population was significantly larger than the Aomori and Miyagi populations and exhibited no difference from most of the other prefectural populations. When monitored at a single geographic locality every other month, forewing sizes were the largest in April and the smallest in August. Rearing larvae at a constant temperature demonstrated that forewing size followed the temperature-size rule. Therefore, the converse Bergmann’s rule and the temperature-size rule coexist in this multivoltine species. Our study establishes this species as a useful environmental indicator and supports the idea that the size reduction observed only in Fukushima Prefecture in 2011 was caused by the environmental stress of radioactive pollution.

  14. Body size distributions of the pale grass blue butterfly in Japan: Size rules and the status of the Fukushima population

    PubMed Central

    Taira, Wataru; Iwasaki, Mayo; Otaki, Joji M.

    2015-01-01

    The body size of the pale grass blue butterfly, Zizeeria maha, has been used as an environmental indicator of radioactive pollution caused by the Fukushima nuclear accident. However, geographical and temporal size distributions in Japan and temperature effects on size have not been established in this species. Here, we examined the geographical, temporal, and temperature-dependent changes of the forewing size of Z. maha argia in Japan. Butterflies collected in 2012 and 2013 from multiple prefectures throughout Japan demonstrated an inverse relationship of latitude and forewing size, which is the reverse of Bergmann’s cline. The Fukushima population was significantly larger than the Aomori and Miyagi populations and exhibited no difference from most of the other prefectural populations. When monitored at a single geographic locality every other month, forewing sizes were the largest in April and the smallest in August. Rearing larvae at a constant temperature demonstrated that forewing size followed the temperature-size rule. Therefore, the converse Bergmann’s rule and the temperature-size rule coexist in this multivoltine species. Our study establishes this species as a useful environmental indicator and supports the idea that the size reduction observed only in Fukushima Prefecture in 2011 was caused by the environmental stress of radioactive pollution. PMID:26197998

  15. A multiscale gradient-dependent plasticity model for size effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Hao; Taheri-Nassaj, Nasrin; Zbib, Hussein M.

    2016-06-01

    The mechanical behaviour of polycrystalline material is closely correlated to grain size. In this study, we investigate the size-dependent phenomenon in multi-phase steels using a continuum dislocation dynamic model coupled with viscoplastic self-consistent model. We developed a dislocation-based strain gradient plasticity model and a stress gradient plasticity model, as well as a combined model, resulting in a theory that can predict size effect over a wide range of length scales. Results show that strain gradient plasticity and stress gradient plasticity are complementary rather than competing theories. The stress gradient model is dominant at the initial strain stage, and is much more effective for predicting yield strength than the strain gradient model. For larger deformations, the strain gradient model is dominant and more effective for predicting size-dependent hardening. The numerical results are compared with experimental data and it is found that they have the same trend for the yield stress. Furthermore, the effect of dislocation density at different strain stages is investigated, and the findings show that the Hall-Petch relation holds for the initial strain stage and breaks down for higher strain levels. Finally, a power law to describe the size effect and the transition zone between the strain gradient and stress gradient dominated regions is developed.

  16. Verifying the Dependence of Fractal Coefficients on Different Spatial Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Gospodinov, Dragomir; Marekova, Elisaveta; Marinov, Alexander

    2010-01-21

    A fractal distribution requires that the number of objects larger than a specific size r has a power-law dependence on the size N(r) = C/r{sup D}propor tor{sup -D} where D is the fractal dimension. Usually the correlation integral is calculated to estimate the correlation fractal dimension of epicentres. A 'box-counting' procedure could also be applied giving the 'capacity' fractal dimension. The fractal dimension can be an integer and then it is equivalent to a Euclidean dimension (it is zero of a point, one of a segment, of a square is two and of a cube is three). In general the fractal dimension is not an integer but a fractional dimension and there comes the origin of the term 'fractal'. The use of a power-law to statistically describe a set of events or phenomena reveals the lack of a characteristic length scale, that is fractal objects are scale invariant. Scaling invariance and chaotic behavior constitute the base of a lot of natural hazards phenomena. Many studies of earthquakes reveal that their occurrence exhibits scale-invariant properties, so the fractal dimension can characterize them. It has first been confirmed that both aftershock rate decay in time and earthquake size distribution follow a power law. Recently many other earthquake distributions have been found to be scale-invariant. The spatial distribution of both regional seismicity and aftershocks show some fractal features. Earthquake spatial distributions are considered fractal, but indirectly. There are two possible models, which result in fractal earthquake distributions. The first model considers that a fractal distribution of faults leads to a fractal distribution of earthquakes, because each earthquake is characteristic of the fault on which it occurs. The second assumes that each fault has a fractal distribution of earthquakes. Observations strongly favour the first hypothesis.The fractal coefficients analysis provides some important advantages in examining earthquake spatial

  17. Verifying the Dependence of Fractal Coefficients on Different Spatial Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gospodinov, Dragomir; Marekova, Elisaveta; Marinov, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    A fractal distribution requires that the number of objects larger than a specific size r has a power-law dependence on the size N(r) = C/rD∝r-D where D is the fractal dimension. Usually the correlation integral is calculated to estimate the correlation fractal dimension of epicentres. A `box-counting' procedure could also be applied giving the `capacity' fractal dimension. The fractal dimension can be an integer and then it is equivalent to a Euclidean dimension (it is zero of a point, one of a segment, of a square is two and of a cube is three). In general the fractal dimension is not an integer but a fractional dimension and there comes the origin of the term `fractal'. The use of a power-law to statistically describe a set of events or phenomena reveals the lack of a characteristic length scale, that is fractal objects are scale invariant. Scaling invariance and chaotic behavior constitute the base of a lot of natural hazards phenomena. Many studies of earthquakes reveal that their occurrence exhibits scale-invariant properties, so the fractal dimension can characterize them. It has first been confirmed that both aftershock rate decay in time and earthquake size distribution follow a power law. Recently many other earthquake distributions have been found to be scale-invariant. The spatial distribution of both regional seismicity and aftershocks show some fractal features. Earthquake spatial distributions are considered fractal, but indirectly. There are two possible models, which result in fractal earthquake distributions. The first model considers that a fractal distribution of faults leads to a fractal distribution of earthquakes, because each earthquake is characteristic of the fault on which it occurs. The second assumes that each fault has a fractal distribution of earthquakes. Observations strongly favour the first hypothesis. The fractal coefficients analysis provides some important advantages in examining earthquake spatial distribution, which are

  18. Endogenic craters on basaltic lava flows - Size frequency distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, R.; Gault, D. E.

    1979-01-01

    Circular crater forms, termed collapse depressions, which occur on many basalt flows on the earth have also been detected on the moon and Mars and possibly on Mercury and Io. The admixture of collapse craters with impact craters would affect age determinations of planetary surface units based on impact crater statistics by making them appear anomalously old. In the work described in the present paper, the techniques conventionally used in planetary crater counting were applied to the determination of the size range and size frequency distribution of collapse craters on lava flows in Idaho, California, and New Mexico. Collapse depressions range in size from 3 to 80 m in diameter; their cumulative size distributions are similar to those of small impact craters on the moon.

  19. Bubble Size Distribution in a Vibrating Bubble Column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohagheghian, Shahrouz; Wilson, Trevor; Valenzuela, Bret; Hinds, Tyler; Moseni, Kevin; Elbing, Brian

    2016-11-01

    While vibrating bubble columns have increased the mass transfer between phases, a universal scaling law remains elusive. Attempts to predict mass transfer rates in large industrial scale applications by extrapolating laboratory scale models have failed. In a stationary bubble column, mass transfer is a function of phase interfacial area (PIA), while PIA is determined based on the bubble size distribution (BSD). On the other hand, BSD is influenced by the injection characteristics and liquid phase dynamics and properties. Vibration modifies the BSD by impacting the gas and gas-liquid dynamics. This work uses a vibrating cylindrical bubble column to investigate the effect of gas injection and vibration characteristics on the BSD. The bubble column has a 10 cm diameter and was filled with water to a depth of 90 cm above the tip of the orifice tube injector. BSD was measured using high-speed imaging to determine the projected area of individual bubbles, which the nominal bubble diameter was then calculated assuming spherical bubbles. The BSD dependence on the distance from the injector, injector design (1.6 and 0.8 mm ID), air flow rates (0.5 to 5 lit/min), and vibration conditions (stationary and vibration conditions varying amplitude and frequency) will be presented. In addition to mean data, higher order statistics will also be provided.

  20. Reduction in soil aggregate size distribution due to wind erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swet, Nitzan; Katra, Itzhak

    2017-04-01

    Soil erosion process by wind causes emission of fine soil particles, and thus alters the topsoil's properties, fertility, and erodibility. Topsoil resistance to erosion depends on its physicochemical properties, especially on the soil aggregation. Although the key role of aggregates in soil erodibility, quantitative information on the relations between soil aggregate size distribution (ASD) and erosion is still lucking. This study focuses on ASD analyses before and after soil erosion by wind. Wind tunnel experiments and soil analyses were conducted on semiarid loess topsoils with different initial conditions of aggregation. The results show that in all initial soil conditions saltation of sand particles caused the breakdown of macro-aggregates > 500 µm, resulting in increase of micro-aggregates (63-250 µm). The micro-aggregate production increases with the wind shear velocity (up to 0.61 m s-1) for soils with available macro-aggregates. The findings highlight dynamics in soil aggregation in response to erosion process, and therefore the significance of ASD in quantifying soil degradation and soil loss potential.

  1. Influence of multidroplet size distribution on icing collection efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, H.-P.; Kimble, K. R.; Frost, W.; Shaw, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    Calculation of collection efficiencies of two-dimensional airfoils for a monodispersed droplet icing cloud and a multidispersed droplet is carried out. Comparison is made with the experimental results reported in the NACA Technical Note series. The results of the study show considerably improved agreement with experiment when multidroplet size distributions are employed. The study then investigates the effect of collection efficiency on airborne particle droplet size sampling instruments. The biased effect introduced due to sampling from different collection volumes is predicted.

  2. The Size Distribution of Jupiter-Family Comet Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weissman, Paul R.; Snodgrass, C.; Fitzsimmons, A.; Lowry, S. C.

    2009-09-01

    We present an updated size distribution for the nuclei of Jupiter-Family Comets, based on observations of nuclei at large heliocentric distances. The data set used includes our own recently published work and that of others published since the comprehensive review by Lamy et al. (2004, in Comets II), in addition to older measurements from the refereed literature that were included in that compilation. We apply a new approach to make a rigorous assessment of the uncertainty on the size distribution power law slope, taking into account all unknown factors and sources of uncertainty. We include: 1) the uncertainty on the original photometry; 2) the difference between the measured effective radius from snap-shot observations and the mean effective radius for observations at unknown rotational phase of a nucleus with unknown pole orientation and axial ratio; 3) the unknown solar phase function; and 4) the unknown albedo. We use a Monte Carlo technique to look at how the size distribution changes when allowing individual size measurements to vary within these uncertainties. We find the cumulative size distribution can be fit by a power law, N( > r) r^{-a}, where r is the radius and the slope, a = 1.86 ± 0.15. This work was funded in part by the NASA Planetary Astronomy Program and was performed in part at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory under contract with NASA.

  3. Three optical methods for remotely measuring aerosol size distributions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reagan, J. A.; Herman, B. M.

    1971-01-01

    Three optical probing methods for remotely measuring atmospheric aerosol size distributions are discussed and contrasted. The particular detection methods which are considered make use of monostatic lidar (laser radar), bistatic lidar, and solar radiometer sensing techniques. The theory of each of these measurement techniques is discussed briefly, and the necessary constraints which must be applied to obtain aerosol size distribution information from such measurements are pointed out. Theoretical and/or experimental results are also presented which demonstrate the utility of the three proposed probing methods.

  4. Size distribution of Portuguese firms between 2006 and 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascoal, Rui; Augusto, Mário; Monteiro, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    This study aims to describe the size distribution of Portuguese firms, as measured by annual sales and total assets, between 2006 and 2012, giving an economic interpretation for the evolution of the distribution along the time. Three distributions are fitted to data: the lognormal, the Pareto (and as a particular case Zipf) and the Simplified Canonical Law (SCL). We present the main arguments found in literature to justify the use of distributions and emphasize the interpretation of SCL coefficients. Methods of estimation include Maximum Likelihood, modified Ordinary Least Squares in log-log scale and Nonlinear Least Squares considering the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. When applying these approaches to Portuguese's firms data, we analyze if the evolution of estimated parameters in both lognormal power and SCL is in accordance with the known existence of a recession period after 2008. This is confirmed for sales but not for assets, leading to the conclusion that the first variable is a best proxy for firm size.

  5. Particle size- and concentration-dependent separation of magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witte, Kerstin; Müller, Knut; Grüttner, Cordula; Westphal, Fritz; Johansson, Christer

    2017-04-01

    Small magnetic nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution are of great interest for several biomedical applications. When the size of the particles decreases, the magnetic moment of the particles decreases. This leads to a significant increase in the separation time by several orders of magnitude. Therefore, in the present study the separation processes of bionized nanoferrites (BNF) with different sizes and concentrations were investigated with the commercial Sepmag Q system. It was found that an increasing initial particle concentration leads to a reduction of the separation time for large nanoparticles due to the higher probability of building chains. Small nanoparticles showed exactly the opposite behavior with rising particle concentration up to 0.1 mg(Fe)/ml. For higher iron concentrations the separation time remains constant and the measured Z-average decreases in the supernatant at same time intervals. At half separation time a high yield with decreasing hydrodynamic diameter of particles can be obtained using higher initial particle concentrations.

  6. Consistent patterns of the size distribution of thermokarst lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viktorov, A. S.; Kapralova, V. N.; Orlov, T. V.; Trapeznikova, O. N.; Arkhipova, M. V.; Berezin, P. V.; Zverev, A. V.; Panchenko, E. N.; Sadkov, S. A.

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this work is to study empirically the patterns of size distribution of thermokarst lakes within lacustrine thermokarst plains. Investigations were performed at 16 sites with various geomorphological, geocryological, and physical geographical conditions (Kolyma Lowland, Western Siberia, Lena River valley, Alaska). The accordance of the distribution area with the lognormal and exponential laws, and the accordance of the average diameter distribution with the normal law have been tested; the tested laws of distribution resulted from previous investigations. The results have shown that the lognormal law of distribution of thermokarst lake areas is valid for the vast majority of cases, and the other types of distribution are inconsistent with empirical data. This evidence favors the development pattern for lacustrine thermokarst plains, when thermokarst processes started simultaneously and the rate of lake growth was proportional to the density of heat loss through the side surface.

  7. Particle size distributions of several commonly used seeding aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosswy, F. L.

    1985-01-01

    During the course of experimentation, no solid particle powder could be found which produced an aerosol with a narrow particle size distribution when fluidization was the only flow process used in producing the aerosol. The complication of adding particle size fractionation processes to the aerosol generation effort appears to be avoidable. In this regard, a simple sonic orifice is found to be effective in reducing the percentage of agglomerates in the several metal oxide powders tested. Marginally beneficial results are obtained for a 0.5/99.5 percent by weight mixture of the flow agent and metal oxide powder. However, agglomeration is observed to be enhanced when the flow agent percentage is increased to 5 percent. Liquid atomization using the Collison nebulizer as well as a version of the Laskin nozzle resulted in polydispersed aerosols with particle size distributions heavily weighted by the small particle end of the size spectrum. The aerosol particle size distributions produced by the vaporization/condensation seeder are closer to the ideal monodispersed aerosol than any of the other aerosols tested. In addition, this seeding approach affords a measure of control over particle size and particle production rate.

  8. Ductility of metal alloys with grain size distribution in a wide range of strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skripnyak, Vladimir V.; Skripnyak, Nataliya V.; Skripnyak, Evgeniya G.

    Ductility of ultrafine grained (UFG) metal alloys with a distribution of grain size was investigated in wide loading conditions by numerical simulation. The multiscale models with a unimodal and a bimodal grain size distributions were developed using the data of structure research of hexagonal close packed and face center cubic UFG alloys. Macroscopic fracture is considered as a result of the formation of percolation clusters of damage at the mesoscopic level. The critical fracture strain of UFG alloys on the mesoscale level depends on the relative volumes of coarse grains. The nucleation of damages at quasi-static and dynamic loading is associated with strain localization in UFG partial volumes with bimodal grain size distribution. The concentration of damages arise in the vicinity of the boundaries of coarse and ultrafine grains. The occurrence of a bimodal grain size distributions causes the increase of UFG alloys' ductility, but decrease of their tensile strength. Linkoping University, Sweden.

  9. Particle size distributions of organic aerosol constituents during the 2002 Yosemite Aerosol Characterization Study.

    PubMed

    Herckes, Pierre; Engling, Guenter; Kreidenweis, Sonia M; Collett, Jeffrey L

    2006-08-01

    The Yosemite Aerosol Characterization Study (YACS) was conducted in the summer of 2002 to investigate sources of regional haze in Yosemite National Park. Organic carbon and molecular source marker species size distributions were investigated during hazy and clear periods. More than 75% of the organic carbon mass was associated with submicron aerosol particles. Most molecular marker species for wood smoke, an important source of particulate matter during the study, were contained in submicron particles, although on some fire influenced days, levoglucosan shifted toward larger sizes. Various wood smoke marker species exhibited slightly different size distributions in the samples, suggesting different, size dependent emission or atmospheric processing rates of these species. Secondary biogenic compounds including pinic and pinonic acids were associated with smaller particles. Pinonaldehyde, however, exhibited a broader distribution, likely due to its higher volatility. Dicarboxylic acids were associated mainly with submicron particles. Hopanes, molecular markers for vehicle emissions, were mostly contained in smaller particles but exhibited some tailing into larger size classes.

  10. New image processing software for analyzing object size-frequency distributions, geometry, orientation, and spatial distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beggan, Ciarán; Hamilton, Christopher W.

    2010-04-01

    Geological Image Analysis Software (GIAS) combines basic tools for calculating object area, abundance, radius, perimeter, eccentricity, orientation, and centroid location, with the first automated method for characterizing the aerial distribution of objects using sample-size-dependent nearest neighbor (NN) statistics. The NN analyses include tests for (1) Poisson, (2) Normalized Poisson, (3) Scavenged k=1, and (4) Scavenged k=2 NN distributions. GIAS is implemented in MATLAB with a Graphical User Interface (GUI) that is available as pre-parsed pseudocode for use with MATLAB, or as a stand-alone application that runs on Windows and Unix systems. GIAS can process raster data (e.g., satellite imagery, photomicrographs, etc.) and tables of object coordinates to characterize the size, geometry, orientation, and spatial organization of a wide range of geological features. This information expedites quantitative measurements of 2D object properties, provides criteria for validating the use of stereology to transform 2D object sections into 3D models, and establishes a standardized NN methodology that can be used to compare the results of different geospatial studies and identify objects using non-morphological parameters.

  11. Universal Size-Dependent Conductance Fluctuations in Disordered Organic Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massé, A.; Coehoorn, R.; Bobbert, P. A.

    2014-09-01

    Numerically exact results of hopping charge transport in disordered organic semiconductors show for uncorrelated and dipole-correlated Gaussian energy disorder a universal, power-law, and non-power-law dependence, respectively, of the relative conductance fluctuations on the size of the considered region. Data collapse occurs upon scaling with a characteristic length having a power-law temperature dependence. Below this length, which can be as high as 100 nm for correlated disorder in a realistic case, fluctuations dominate and a continuum description of charge transport breaks down.

  12. Universal size-dependent conductance fluctuations in disordered organic semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Massé, A; Coehoorn, R; Bobbert, P A

    2014-09-12

    Numerically exact results of hopping charge transport in disordered organic semiconductors show for uncorrelated and dipole-correlated Gaussian energy disorder a universal, power-law, and non-power-law dependence, respectively, of the relative conductance fluctuations on the size of the considered region. Data collapse occurs upon scaling with a characteristic length having a power-law temperature dependence. Below this length, which can be as high as 100 nm for correlated disorder in a realistic case, fluctuations dominate and a continuum description of charge transport breaks down.

  13. Size Evolution and Stochastic Models: Explaining Ostracod Size through Probabilistic Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, M.; Decker, S.; Heim, N. A.; Payne, J.

    2014-12-01

    The biovolume of animals has functioned as an important benchmark for measuring evolution throughout geologic time. In our project, we examined the observed average body size of ostracods over time in order to understand the mechanism of size evolution in these marine organisms. The body size of ostracods has varied since the beginning of the Ordovician, where the first true ostracods appeared. We created a stochastic branching model to create possible evolutionary trees of ostracod size. Using stratigraphic ranges for ostracods compiled from over 750 genera in the Treatise on Invertebrate Paleontology, we calculated overall speciation and extinction rates for our model. At each timestep in our model, new lineages can evolve or existing lineages can become extinct. Newly evolved lineages are assigned sizes based on their parent genera. We parameterized our model to generate neutral and directional changes in ostracod size to compare with the observed data. New sizes were chosen via a normal distribution, and the neutral model selected new sizes differentials centered on zero, allowing for an equal chance of larger or smaller ostracods at each speciation. Conversely, the directional model centered the distribution on a negative value, giving a larger chance of smaller ostracods. Our data strongly suggests that the overall direction of ostracod evolution has been following a model that directionally pushes mean ostracod size down, shying away from a neutral model. Our model was able to match the magnitude of size decrease. Our models had a constant linear decrease while the actual data had a much more rapid initial rate followed by a constant size. The nuance of the observed trends ultimately suggests a more complex method of size evolution. In conclusion, probabilistic methods can provide valuable insight into possible evolutionary mechanisms determining size evolution in ostracods.

  14. Size distributions of gold nanoclusters studied by liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    WILCOXON,JESS P.; MARTIN,JAMES E.; PROVENCIO,PAULA P.

    2000-05-23

    The authors report high pressure liquid chromatography, (HPLC), and transmission electron microscopy, (TEM), studies of the size distributions of nanosize gold clusters dispersed in organic solvents. These metal clusters are synthesized in inverse micelles at room temperature and those investigated range in diameter from 1--10 nm. HPLC is sensitive enough to discern changes in hydrodynamic volume corresponding to only 2 carbon atoms of the passivating agent or metal core size changes of less than 4 {angstrom}. The authors have determined for the first time how the total cluster volume (metal core + passivating organic shell) changes with the size of the passivating agent.

  15. The size-distribution of Earth’s lakes

    PubMed Central

    Cael, B. B.; Seekell, D. A.

    2016-01-01

    Globally, there are millions of small lakes, but a small number of large lakes. Most key ecosystem patterns and processes scale with lake size, thus this asymmetry between area and abundance is a fundamental constraint on broad-scale patterns in lake ecology. Nonetheless, descriptions of lake size-distributions are scarce and empirical distributions are rarely evaluated relative to theoretical predictions. Here we develop expectations for Earth’s lake area-distribution based on percolation theory and evaluate these expectations with data from a global lake census. Lake surface areas ≥8.5 km2 are power-law distributed with a tail exponent (τ = 1.97) and fractal dimension (d = 1.38), similar to theoretical expectations (τ = 2.05; d = 4/3). Lakes <8.5 km2 are not power-law distributed. An independently developed regional lake census exhibits a similar transition and consistency with theoretical predictions. Small lakes deviate from the power-law distribution because smaller lakes are more susceptible to dynamical change and topographic behavior at sub-kilometer scales is not self-similar. Our results provide a robust characterization and theoretical explanation for the lake size-abundance relationship, and form a fundamental basis for understanding and predicting patterns in lake ecology at broad scales. PMID:27388607

  16. Biophysical and size-dependent perspectives on plant evolution.

    PubMed

    Niklas, Karl J

    2013-11-01

    Physical laws and processes have profoundly influenced plant evolution. Their effects are invariably size dependent and thus subject to scaling as well as biophysical analyses even though these effects differ depending upon the fluid (water or air) in which plants evolve. Although organisms cannot obviate the effects of physical laws and processes, the consequences of these effects can be altered by ontogenetic or phylogenetic alterations in geometry, shape, or orientation as well as in body size. These assertions are examined using theoretical insights and empirical data drawn from extant and fossil plants pertinent to four evolutionary transitions: (1) the evolution of multicellularity, (2) the transition from an aquatic to an aerial habitat, (3) the evolution of vascular tissues, and (4) the evolution of secondary growth by the independent acquisition of cambia. This examination shows how physical laws limit phenotypic expression, but how they also simultaneously provide alternative, potentially adaptive possibilities.

  17. Size dependent mechanical properties of single crystalline nickel nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Cheng; Ganesan, Yogeeswaran; Lu, Yang; Lou, Jun

    2012-03-01

    Using a simple micromechanical device, in situ tensile testing of single crystalline nickel (Ni) nanowires (NWs) with different diameters (100 to 300 nm) and crystalline orientations was performed inside a scanning electron microscope. With the aid of a quantitative nanoindenter and corresponding theoretical analysis, the load applied to the sample and the sample displacement were ascertained from nanoindenter load versus displacement curves so as to obtain engineering stress-strain curves. Limited plasticity and brittle-like fracture modes were evident in the Ni NWs investigated, and the breaking strength values were found to be much higher than that of the bulk material. More important, the critical resolved shear stress was found to increase as the NW diameter decreased, showing strong size dependence. The quantitative experimental results from this work could offer important insights into the origin of the size dependent mechanical behaviors of metals at the nano-scale.

  18. Solitary dust sound waves in a plasma with two-temperature ions and distributed grain size

    SciTech Connect

    Prudskikh, V. V.

    2009-01-15

    The propagation of weakly nonlinear dust sound waves in a dusty plasma containing two different-temperature ion species is explored. The nonlinear equations describing both the quadratic and cubic plasma nonlinearities are derived. It is shown that the properties of dust sound waves depend substantially on the grain size distribution. In particular, for solitary dust sound waves with a positive potential to exist in a plasma with distributed grain size, it is necessary that the difference between the temperatures of two ion species be larger than that in the case of equal-size grains.

  19. Effects of transverse electron beam size on transition radiation angular distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiadroni, E.; Castellano, M.; Cianchi, A.; Honkavaara, K.; Kube, G.

    2012-05-01

    In this paper we consider the effect of the transverse electron beam size on the Optical Transition Radiation (OTR) angular distribution in case of both incoherent and coherent emission. Our results confute the theoretical argumentations presented first in Optics Communications 211, 109 (2002), which predicts a dependence of the incoherent OTR angular distribution on the beam size and emission wavelength. We present here theoretical and experimental data not only to validate the well-established Ginzburg-Frank theory, but also to show the impact of the transverse beam size in case of coherent emission.

  20. Aerosol mobility imaging for rapid size distribution measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jian; Hering, Susanne Vera; Spielman, Steven Russel; Kuang, Chongai

    2016-07-19

    A parallel plate dimensional electrical mobility separator and laminar flow water condensation provide rapid, mobility-based particle sizing at concentrations typical of the remote atmosphere. Particles are separated spatially within the electrical mobility separator, enlarged through water condensation, and imaged onto a CCD array. The mobility separation distributes particles in accordance with their size. The condensation enlarges size-separated particles by water condensation while they are still within the gap of the mobility drift tube. Once enlarged the particles are illuminated by a laser. At a pre-selected frequency, typically 10 Hz, the position of all of the individual particles illuminated by the laser are captured by CCD camera. This instantly records the particle number concentration at each position. Because the position is directly related to the particle size (or mobility), the particle size spectra is derived from the images recorded by the CCD.

  1. On the origin of size-dependent and size-independent crystal growth: Influence of advection and diffusion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kile, D.E.; Eberl, D.D.

    2003-01-01

    Crystal growth experiments were conducted using potassium alum and calcite crystals in aqueous solution under both non-stirred and stirred conditions to elucidate the mechanism for size-dependent (proportionate) and size-independent (constant) crystal growth. Growth by these two laws can be distinguished from each other because the relative size difference among crystals is maintained during proportionate growth, leading to a constant crystal size variance (??2) for a crystal size distribution (CSD) as the mean size increases. The absolute size difference among crystals is maintained during constant growth, resulting in a decrease in size variance. Results of these experiments show that for centimeter-sized alum crystals, proportionate growth occurs in stirred systems, whereas constant growth occurs in non-stirred systems. Accordingly, the mechanism for proportionate growth is hypothesized to be related to the supply of reactants to the crystal surface by advection, whereas constant growth is related to supply by diffusion. Paradoxically, micrometer-sized calcite crystals showed proportionate growth both in stirred and in non-stirred systems. Such growth presumably results from the effects of convection and Brownian motion, which promote an advective environment and hence proportionate growth for minute crystals in non-stirred systems, thereby indicating the importance of solution velocity relative to crystal size. Calcite crystals grown in gels, where fluid motion was minimized, showed evidence for constant, diffusion-controlled growth. Additional investigations of CSDs of naturally occurring crystals indicate that proportionate growth is by far the most common growth law, thereby suggesting that advection, rather than diffusion, is the dominant process for supplying reactants to crystal surfaces.

  2. Tip size dependence of passive near-field microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kuan-Ting; Komiyama, Susumu; Kajihara, Yusuke

    2016-02-01

    We improve the spatial resolution and investigate the tip-sample coupling in a passive scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscope (s-SNOM), which probes thermally excited surface waves without any external light source. We study the spatial resolution, the intensity, and the decay behavior of the thermally excited near-field signals with different radii of curvatures of tungsten-tip apexes. We also study the tip size dependence of the interference pattern in the far-field region. The spatial resolution is closely related to the tip size, but the decay behavior of the near field is unrelated. These results suggest that the strength of the tip-sample coupling is unrelated to the tip size in the passive s-SNOM. We propose a theoretical model able to interpret the experimental data for the passive s-SNOM.

  3. Peptide-size dependent active transport in the proteasome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaikin, A.; Pöschel, T.

    2005-03-01

    We investigate the transport of proteins inside the proteasome and propose an active-transport mechanism based on a spatially asymmetric interaction potential of peptide chains. The transport is driven by fluctuations which are always present in such systems. We compute the peptide-size dependent transport rate which is essential for the functioning of the proteasome. In agreement with recent experiments, varying temperature changes the transport mechanism qualitatively.

  4. THE SIZE-LUMINOSITY DISTRIBUTIONS OF LYMAN-BREAK GALAXIES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kuang-Han; CANDELS Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs) comprise the largest sample of star-forming galaxies at z>3 and are crucial to our understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. Their luminosity functions allow us to calculate the cosmic star formation history, and their sizes also provide valuable information about the angular momentum content of the galaxies and dark matter halos. However, due to surface brightness dimming effects, galaxies at high redshifts are especially susceptible to selection effects; it is important to understand the selection effects before we can draw conclusions from the statistics of LBG properties. In this work we will investigate the size--luminosity distribution of LBGs between 3 and 6 with careful modeling of selection effects and measurement errors of size and magnitude. Our modeling is more careful than previous studies because it is performed in the two-dimensional size--magnitude space. The results of this work show that (1) the effective radii of star-forming galaxies likely evolve as H(z)^{-2/3} at a fixed luminosity, (2) the widths of the LBG size distribution are larger than expected from the spin parameter distribution of dark matter halos, and (3) the size--luminosity relation slopes of LBGs are similar to those for late-type disk galaxies in the local universe. These results favor the disk formation theory put forward by Fall & Efstathiou (1980) if the majority of LBGs are disks, but more observational evidence is needed to confirm the kinematical structure of LBGs as well as to explain the widths of the size distribution.

  5. The Lunar Rock Size Frequency Distribution from Diviner Infrared Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elder, C. M.; Hayne, P. O.; Piqueux, S.; Bandfield, J.; Williams, J. P.; Ghent, R. R.; Paige, D. A.

    2016-12-01

    Knowledge of the rock size frequency distribution on a planetary body is important for understanding its geologic history and for selecting landing sites. The rock size frequency distribution can be estimated by counting rocks in high resolution images, but most bodies in the solar system have limited areas with adequate coverage. We propose an alternative method to derive and map rock size frequency distributions using multispectral thermal infrared data acquired at multiple times during the night. We demonstrate this new technique for the Moon using data from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Diviner radiometer in conjunction with three dimensional thermal modeling, leveraging the differential cooling rates of different rock sizes. We assume an exponential rock size frequency distribution, which has been shown to yield a good fit to rock populations in various locations on the Moon, Mars, and Earth [2, 3] and solve for the best radiance fits as a function of local time and wavelength. This method presents several advantages: 1) unlike other thermally derived rock abundance techniques, it is sensitive to rocks smaller than the diurnal skin depth; 2) it does not result in apparent decrease in rock abundance at night; and 3) it can be validated using images taken at the lunar surface. This method yields both the fraction of the surface covered in rocks of all sizes and the exponential factor, which defines the rate of drop-off in the exponential function at large rock sizes. We will present maps of both these parameters for the Moon, and provide a geological interpretation. In particular, this method reveals rocks in the lunar highlands that are smaller than previous thermal methods could detect. [1] Bandfield J. L. et al. (2011) JGR, 116, E00H02. [2] Golombek and Rapp (1997) JGR, 102, E2, 4117-4129. [3] Cintala, M.J. and K.M. McBride (1995) NASA Technical Memorandum 104804.

  6. Distributional shifts in size structure of phytoplankton community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waga, H.; Hirawake, T.; Fujiwara, A.; Nishino, S.; Kikuchi, T.; Suzuki, K.; Takao, S.

    2015-12-01

    Increased understanding on how marine species shift their distribution is required for effective conservation of fishery resources under climate change. Previous studies have often predicted distributional shifts of fish using satellite derived sea surface temperature (SST). However, SST may not fully represent the changes in species distribution through food web structure and as such this remains an open issue due to lack of ecological perspective on energy transfer process in the earlier studies. One of the most important factors in ecosystem is composition of phytoplankton community, and its size structure determines energy flow efficiency from base to higher trophic levels. To elucidate spatiotemporal variation in phytoplankton size structure, chlorophyll-a size distribution (CSD) algorithm was developed using spectral variance of phytoplankton absorption coefficient through principal component analysis. Slope of CSD (CSD slope) indicates size structure of phytoplankton community where, strong and weak magnitudes of CSD slope indicate smaller and larger phytoplankton structure, respectively. Shifts in CSD slope and SST were derived as the ratio of temporal trend over the 12-year period (2003-2014) to 2-dimensional spatial gradient and the resulting global median velocity of CSD slope and SST were 0.361 and 0.733 km year-1, respectively. In addition, the velocity of CSD slope monotonically increases with increasing latitude, while relatively complex latitudinal pattern for SST emerged. Moreover, angle of shifts suggest that species are required to shift their distribution toward not limited to simple pole-ward migration, and some regions exhibit opposite direction between the velocity of CSD slope and SST. These findings further imply that combined phytoplankton size structure and SST may contribute for more accurate prediction of species distribution shifts relative to existing studies which only considering variations in thermal niches.

  7. Selecting series size where the generalized Pareto distribution best fits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Zvi, Arie

    2016-10-01

    Rates of arrival and magnitudes of hydrologic variables are frequently described by the Poisson and the generalized Pareto (GP) distributions. Variations of their goodness-of-fit to nested series are studied here. The variable employed is depth of rainfall events at five stations of the Israel Meteorological Service. Series sizes range from about 50 (number of years on records) to about 1000 (total number of recorded events). The goodness-of-fit is assessed by the Anderson-Darling test. Three versions of this test are applied here. These are the regular two-sided test (of which the statistic is designated here by A2), the upper one-sided test (UA2) and the adaptation to the Poisson distribution (PA2). Very good fits, with rejection significance levels higher than 0.5 for A2 and higher than 0.25 for PA2, are found for many series of different sizes. Values of the shape parameter of the GP distribution and of the predicted rainfall depths widely vary with series size. Small coefficients of variation are found, at each station, for the 100-year rainfall depths, predicted through the series with very good fit of the GP distribution. Therefore, predictions through series of very good fit appear more consistent than through other selections of series size. Variations of UA2, with series size, are found narrower than those of A2. Therefore, it is advisable to predict through the series of low UA2. Very good fits of the Poisson distribution to arrival rates are found for series with low UA2. But, a reversed relation is not found here. Thus, the model of Poissonian arrival rates and GP distribution of magnitudes suits here series with low UA2. It is recommended to predict through the series, to which the lowest UA2 is obtained.

  8. Nanomaterial cytotoxicity is composition, size, and cell type dependent

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Despite intensive research efforts, reports of cellular responses to nanomaterials are often inconsistent and even contradictory. Additionally, relationships between the responding cell type and nanomaterial properties are not well understood. Using three model cell lines representing different physiological compartments and nanomaterials of different compositions and sizes, we have systematically investigated the influence of nanomaterial properties on the degrees and pathways of cytotoxicity. In this study, we selected nanomaterials of different compositions (TiO2 and SiO2 nanoparticles, and multi-wall carbon nanotubes [MWCNTs]) with differing size (MWCNTs of different diameters < 8 nm, 20-30 nm, > 50 nm; but same length 0.5-2 μm) to analyze the effects of composition and size on toxicity to 3T3 fibroblasts, RAW 264.7 macrophages, and telomerase-immortalized (hT) bronchiolar epithelial cells. Results Following characterization of nanomaterial properties in PBS and serum containing solutions, cells were exposed to nanomaterials of differing compositions and sizes, with cytotoxicity monitored through reduction in mitochondrial activity. In addition to cytotoxicity, the cellular response to nanomaterials was characterized by quantifying generation of reactive oxygen species, lysosomal membrane destabilization and mitochondrial permeability. The effect of these responses on cellular fate - apoptosis or necrosis - was then analyzed. Nanomaterial toxicity was variable based on exposed cell type and dependent on nanomaterial composition and size. In addition, nanomaterial exposure led to cell type dependent intracellular responses resulting in unique breakdown of cellular functions for each nanomaterial: cell combination. Conclusions Nanomaterials induce cell specific responses resulting in variable toxicity and subsequent cell fate based on the type of exposed cell. Our results indicate that the composition and size of nanomaterials as well as the target

  9. Nanomaterial cytotoxicity is composition, size, and cell type dependent.

    PubMed

    Sohaebuddin, Syed K; Thevenot, Paul T; Baker, David; Eaton, John W; Tang, Liping

    2010-08-21

    Despite intensive research efforts, reports of cellular responses to nanomaterials are often inconsistent and even contradictory. Additionally, relationships between the responding cell type and nanomaterial properties are not well understood. Using three model cell lines representing different physiological compartments and nanomaterials of different compositions and sizes, we have systematically investigated the influence of nanomaterial properties on the degrees and pathways of cytotoxicity. In this study, we selected nanomaterials of different compositions (TiO2 and SiO2 nanoparticles, and multi-wall carbon nanotubes [MWCNTs]) with differing size (MWCNTs of different diameters < 8 nm, 20-30 nm, > 50 nm; but same length 0.5-2 microm) to analyze the effects of composition and size on toxicity to 3T3 fibroblasts, RAW 264.7 macrophages, and telomerase-immortalized (hT) bronchiolar epithelial cells. Following characterization of nanomaterial properties in PBS and serum containing solutions, cells were exposed to nanomaterials of differing compositions and sizes, with cytotoxicity monitored through reduction in mitochondrial activity. In addition to cytotoxicity, the cellular response to nanomaterials was characterized by quantifying generation of reactive oxygen species, lysosomal membrane destabilization and mitochondrial permeability. The effect of these responses on cellular fate - apoptosis or necrosis - was then analyzed. Nanomaterial toxicity was variable based on exposed cell type and dependent on nanomaterial composition and size. In addition, nanomaterial exposure led to cell type dependent intracellular responses resulting in unique breakdown of cellular functions for each nanomaterial: cell combination. Nanomaterials induce cell specific responses resulting in variable toxicity and subsequent cell fate based on the type of exposed cell. Our results indicate that the composition and size of nanomaterials as well as the target cell type are critical

  10. Population dynamic theory of size-dependent cannibalism.

    PubMed Central

    Claessen, David; de Roos, André M.; Persson, Lennart

    2004-01-01

    Cannibalism is characterized by four aspects: killing victims, gaining energy from victims, size-dependent interactions and intraspecific competition. In this review of mathematical models of cannibalistic populations, we relate the predicted population dynamic consequences of cannibalism to its four defining aspects. We distinguish five classes of effects of cannibalism: (i) regulation of population size; (ii) destabilization resulting in population cycles or chaos; (iii) stabilization by damping population cycles caused by other interactions; (iv) bistability such that, depending on the initial conditions, the population converges to one of two possible stable states; and (v) modification of the population size structure. The same effects of cannibalism may be caused by different combinations of aspects of cannibalism. By contrast, the same combination of aspects may lead to different effects. For particular cannibalistic species, the consequences of cannibalism will depend on the presence and details of the four defining aspects. Empirical evidence for the emerged theory of cannibalism is discussed briefly. The implications of the described dynamic effects of cannibalism are discussed in the context of community structure, making a comparison with the community effects of intraguild predation. PMID:15101690

  11. Sample size estimation for time-dependent receiver operating characteristic.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Gatsonis, C

    2014-03-15

    In contrast to the usual ROC analysis with a contemporaneous reference standard, the time-dependent setting introduces the possibility that the reference standard refers to an event at a future time and may not be known for every patient due to censoring. The goal of this research is to determine the sample size required for a study design to address the question of the accuracy of a diagnostic test using the area under the curve in time-dependent ROC analysis. We adapt a previously published estimator of the time-dependent area under the ROC curve, which is a function of the expected conditional survival functions. This estimator accommodates censored data. The estimation of the required sample size is based on approximations of the expected conditional survival functions and their variances, derived under parametric assumptions of an exponential failure time and an exponential censoring time. We also consider different patient enrollment strategies. The proposed method can provide an adequate sample size to ensure that the test's accuracy is estimated to a prespecified precision. We present results of a simulation study to assess the accuracy of the method and its robustness to departures from the parametric assumptions. We apply the proposed method to design of a study of positron emission tomography as predictor of disease free survival in women undergoing therapy for cervical cancer. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Elemental composition and size distribution of particulates in Cleveland, Ohio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, R. B.; Fordyce, J. S.; Neustadter, H. E.; Leibecki, H. F.

    1975-01-01

    Measurements were made of the elemental particle size distribution at five contrasting urban environments with different source-type distributions in Cleveland, Ohio. Air quality conditions ranged from normal to air pollution alert levels. A parallel network of high-volume cascade impactors (5-state) were used for simultaneous sampling on glass fiber surfaces for mass determinations and on Whatman-41 surfaces for elemental analysis by neutron activation for 25 elements. The elemental data are assessed in terms of distribution functions and interrelationships and are compared between locations as a function of resultant wind direction in an attempt to relate the findings to sources.

  13. Time-dependent radioactivity distribution in MAFF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nebel, F.; Zech, E.; Faestermann, T.; Krücken, R.; Maier-Komor, P.; Assmann, W.; Szerypo, J.; Groß, M.; Kester, O.; Thirolf, P. G.; Grötzschel, R.

    2006-05-01

    The Munich Accelerator for Fission Fragments is planned to be installed at the FRM II in Garching. It will operate a uranium-carbide-loaded graphite matrix as a target for neutron-induced fission. The radioactive reaction fragments leave the ion source as both, atoms and ions. For radiation safety it is imperative to have a basic understanding of the fragment distribution within the beam line. Atoms leaving the graphite matrix will spread like a gas and stick to surfaces depending on their species. A probabilistic Monte-Carlo approach is used to predict the surface coating of internal surfaces of the beam line for all fission nuclides. To decrease calculation time, the problem is reduced to two dimensions with the surface areas being a measure for the probability, that they are hit by a particle. The program is completely time dependent to implement radioactive decay. Ions leaving the fission ion source are transported by electrostatic means towards the mass pre-separator, a low-resolution dipole magnet with a complex slit system in the focal plane. All unwanted ions are stopped at the slits, resulting in a high level of radioactive contamination. While it is advantageous for shielding purposes to have the majority of the contamination in one point, precautions must be taken to ensure that it stays that way. Material corrosion caused by sputtering will release previously implanted radionuclides. To reduce this effect, different methods are under investigation, one of which is changing the slit geometry. The considered designs will be described and experimental results will be shown.

  14. Tracing Particle Size Distribution Curves Using an Analogue Circuit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bisschop, F. De; Segaert, O.

    1986-01-01

    Proposes an analog circuit for use in sedimentation analysis of finely divided solid materials. Discusses a method of particle size distribution analysis and provides schematics of the circuit with list of components as well as a discussion about the operation of the circuit. (JM)

  15. Environmental DNA particle size distribution from Brook Trout (Salvelinus fontinalis)

    Treesearch

    Taylor M. Wilcox; Kevin S. McKelvey; Michael K. Young; Winsor H. Lowe; Michael K. Schwartz

    2015-01-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) sampling has become a widespread approach for detecting aquatic animals with high potential for improving conservation biology. However, little research has been done to determine the size of particles targeted by eDNA surveys. In this study, we conduct particle distribution analysis of eDNA from a captive Brook Trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) in...

  16. Modeling of Microporosity Size Distribution in Aluminum Alloy A356

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Lu; Cockcroft, Steve; Zhu, Jindong; Reilly, Carl

    2011-12-01

    Porosity is one of the most common defects to degrade the mechanical properties of aluminum alloys. Prediction of pore size, therefore, is critical to optimize the quality of castings. Moreover, to the design engineer, knowledge of the inherent pore population in a casting is essential to avoid potential fatigue failure of the component. In this work, the size distribution of the porosity was modeled based on the assumptions that the hydrogen pores are nucleated heterogeneously and that the nucleation site distribution is a Gaussian function of hydrogen supersaturation in the melt. The pore growth is simulated as a hydrogen-diffusion-controlled process, which is driven by the hydrogen concentration gradient at the pore liquid interface. Directionally solidified A356 (Al-7Si-0.3Mg) alloy castings were used to evaluate the predictive capability of the proposed model. The cast pore volume fraction and size distributions were measured using X-ray microtomography (XMT). Comparison of the experimental and simulation results showed that good agreement could be obtained in terms of both porosity fraction and size distribution. The model can effectively evaluate the effect of hydrogen content, heterogeneous pore nucleation population, cooling conditions, and degassing time on microporosity formation.

  17. Sample Size Tables, "t" Test, and a Prevalent Psychometric Distribution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawilowsky, Shlomo S.; Hillman, Stephen B.

    Psychology studies often have low statistical power. Sample size tables, as given by J. Cohen (1988), may be used to increase power, but they are based on Monte Carlo studies of relatively "tame" mathematical distributions, as compared to psychology data sets. In this study, Monte Carlo methods were used to investigate Type I and Type II…

  18. Size and moisture distribution characteristics of walnuts and their components

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to determine the size characteristics and moisture content (MC) distributions of individual walnuts and their components, including hulls, shells and kernels under different harvest conditions. Measurements were carried out for three walnut varieties, Tulare, Howard a...

  19. Tracing Particle Size Distribution Curves Using an Analogue Circuit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bisschop, F. De; Segaert, O.

    1986-01-01

    Proposes an analog circuit for use in sedimentation analysis of finely divided solid materials. Discusses a method of particle size distribution analysis and provides schematics of the circuit with list of components as well as a discussion about the operation of the circuit. (JM)

  20. Stand size, stand distribution, and rotation lengths for forest wildlife

    Treesearch

    Steven E. Backs; Russel R. Titus

    1989-01-01

    The key to managing forest wildlife is providing diverse habitats. Stand size, stand distribution, and rotation length determine how diverse habitats will be. Since the tenure of private forest owners is generally shorter than prescribed rotations, rotation recommendations serve more as guides to the amount and intensity of cutting needed to maintain desired habitat....

  1. Factors influencing the effect size distribution of adaptive substitutions

    PubMed Central

    Oakley, Christopher G.; Gould, Billie A.; Schemske, Douglas W.

    2016-01-01

    The distribution of effect sizes of adaptive substitutions has been central to evolutionary biology since the modern synthesis. Early theory proposed that because large-effect mutations have negative pleiotropic consequences, only small-effect mutations contribute to adaptation. More recent theory suggested instead that large-effect mutations could be favoured when populations are far from their adaptive peak. Here we suggest that the distributions of effect sizes are expected to differ among study systems, reflecting the wide variation in evolutionary forces and ecological conditions experienced in nature. These include selection, mutation, genetic drift, gene flow, and other factors such as the degree of pleiotropy, the distance to the phenotypic optimum, whether the optimum is stable or moving, and whether new mutation or standing genetic variation provides the source of adaptive alleles. Our goal is to review how these factors might affect the distribution of effect sizes and to identify new research directions. Until more theory and empirical work is available, we feel that it is premature to make broad generalizations about the effect size distribution of adaptive substitutions important in nature. PMID:27053750

  2. Characterization of Flocs and Floc Size Distributions Using Image Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Siwei; Weber-Shirk, Monroe; Lion, Leonard W

    2016-01-01

    A nonintrusive digital imaging process was developed to study particle size distributions created through flocculation and sedimentation. Quantification of particle size distributions under different operating conditions can be of use in the understanding of aggregation mechanisms. This process was calibrated by measuring standardized polystyrene particles of known size and was utilized to count and measure individual kaolin clay particles as well as aggregates formed by coagulation with polyaluminum chloride and flocculation. Identification of out-of-focus flocs was automated with LabVIEW and used to remove them from the database that was analyzed. The particle diameter of the test suspension of kaolinite clay was measured to be 7.7 ± 3.8 μm and a linear relationship was obtained between turbidity and the concentration of clay particles determined by imaging. The analysis technique was applied to characterize flocs and floc particle size distribution as a function of coagulant dose. Removal of flocs by sedimentation was characterized by imaging, and the negative logarithm of the fraction of turbidity remaining after settling had a linear relationship with the logarithm of aluminum dose. The maximum floc size observed in the settled water was less than 120 μm, which was in accordance with the value predicted by a model for the capture velocity of the experimental tube settler of 0.21 mm/s.

  3. Characterization of Flocs and Floc Size Distributions Using Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Siwei; Weber-Shirk, Monroe; Lion, Leonard W.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A nonintrusive digital imaging process was developed to study particle size distributions created through flocculation and sedimentation. Quantification of particle size distributions under different operating conditions can be of use in the understanding of aggregation mechanisms. This process was calibrated by measuring standardized polystyrene particles of known size and was utilized to count and measure individual kaolin clay particles as well as aggregates formed by coagulation with polyaluminum chloride and flocculation. Identification of out-of-focus flocs was automated with LabVIEW and used to remove them from the database that was analyzed. The particle diameter of the test suspension of kaolinite clay was measured to be 7.7 ± 3.8 μm and a linear relationship was obtained between turbidity and the concentration of clay particles determined by imaging. The analysis technique was applied to characterize flocs and floc particle size distribution as a function of coagulant dose. Removal of flocs by sedimentation was characterized by imaging, and the negative logarithm of the fraction of turbidity remaining after settling had a linear relationship with the logarithm of aluminum dose. The maximum floc size observed in the settled water was less than 120 μm, which was in accordance with the value predicted by a model for the capture velocity of the experimental tube settler of 0.21 mm/s. PMID:26909006

  4. Integrated microfluidic system capable of size-specific droplet generation with size-dependent droplet separation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangmin; Hong, Seok Jun; Yoo, Hyung Jung; Ahn, Jae Hyun; Cho, Dong-il Dan

    2013-06-01

    Droplet-based microfluidics is receiving much attention in biomedical research area due to its advantage in uniform size droplet generation. Our previous results have reported that droplet size plays an important role in drug delivery actuated by flagellated bacteria. Recently, many research groups have been reported the size-dependent separation of emulsion droplets by a microfluidic system. In this paper, an integrated microfluidic system is proposed to produce and sort specificsized droplets sequentially. Operation of the system relies on two microfluidic transport processes: initial generation of droplets by hydrodynamic focusing and subsequent separation of droplets by a T-junction channel. The microfluidic system is fabricated by the SU-8 rapid prototyping method and poly-di-methyl-siloxane (PDMS) replica molding. A biodegradable polymer, poly-capro-lactone (PCL), is used for the droplet material. Using the proposed integrated microfluidic system, specific-sized droplets which can be delivered by flagellated bacteria are successfully generated and obtained.

  5. The Detection and Measurement of the Activity Size Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamurthi, Mukund

    The infiltration of radon into the indoor environment may cause the exposure of the public to excessive amounts of radioactivity and has spurred renewed research interest over the past several years into the occurrence and properties of radon and its decay products in indoor air. The public health risks posed by the inhalation and subsequent lung deposition of the decay products of Rn-222 have particularly warranted the study of their diffusivity and attachment to molecular cluster aerosols in the ultrafine particle size range (0.5-5 nm) and to accumulation mode aerosols. In this research, a system for the detection and measurement of the activity size distributions and concentration levels of radon decay products in indoor environments has been developed. The system is microcomputer-controlled and involves a combination of multiple wire screen sampler -detector units operated in parallel. The detection of the radioactivity attached to the aerosol sampled in these units permits the determination of the radon daughter activity -weighted size distributions and concentration levels in indoor air on a semi-continuous basis. The development of the system involved the design of the detection and measurement system, its experimental characterization and testing in a radon-aerosol chamber, and numerical studies for the optimization of the design and operating parameters of the system. Several concepts of utility to aerosol size distribution measurement methods sampling the ultrafine cluster size range evolved from this study, and are discussed in various chapters of this dissertation. The optimized multiple wire screen (Graded Screen Array) system described in this dissertation is based on these concepts. The principal facet of the system is its ability to make unattended measurements of activity size distributions and concentration levels of radon decay products on a semi-continuous basis. Thus, the capability of monitoring changes in the activity concentrations and size

  6. Size-dependent reactions of ammonium bisulfate clusters with dimethylamine.

    PubMed

    Bzdek, Bryan R; Ridge, Douglas P; Johnston, Murray V

    2010-11-04

    The reaction kinetics of ammonium bisulfate clusters with dimethylamine (DMA) gas were investigated using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS). Clusters ranged in size from 1 to 10 bisulfate ions. Although displacement of the first several ammonium ions by DMA occurred with near unit efficiency, displacement of the final ammonium ion was cluster size dependent. For small clusters, all ammonium ions are exposed to incoming DMA molecules, allowing for facile exchange ("surface" exchange). However, with increasing cluster size, an ammonium ion can be trapped in an inaccessible region of the cluster ("core" exchange), thereby rendering exchange difficult. DMA was also observed to add onto existing dimethylaminium bisulfate clusters above a critical size, whereas ammonia did not add onto ammonium bisulfate clusters. The results suggest that as the cluster size increases, di-dimethylaminium sulfate formation becomes more favorable. The results of this study give further evidence to suggest that ambient sub-3 nm diameter particles are likely to contain aminium salts rather than ammonium salts.

  7. Novel magnetic Fe onion-like fullerene micrometer-sized particles of narrow size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snovski, Ron; Grinblat, Judith; Margel, Shlomo

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic polydivinylbenzene (PDVB)/magnetite micrometer-sized particles of narrow size distribution were prepared by entrapping Fe(CO)5 within the pores of uniform porous PDVB particles, followed by the thermal decomposition of the encapsulated Fe(CO)5 at 300 °C in a sealed cell under inert atmosphere. Magnetic Fe onion-like fullerene micrometer-sized particles of narrow size distribution have been prepared by the thermal decomposition of the PDVB/magnetite magnetic microspheres at 1100 °C under inert atmosphere. The graphitic coating protects the elemental iron particles from oxidation and thereby preserves their very high magnetic moment for at least a year. Characterization of these unique magnetic carbon graphitic particles was also performed.

  8. Size and energy distributions of interplanetary magnetic flux ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, H. Q.; Wu, D. J.; Chao, J. K.

    2007-02-01

    In observations from 1995 to 2001 from the Wind spacecraft, 144 interplanetary magnetic flux ropes were identified in the solar wind around 1 AU. Their durations vary from tens of minutes to tens of hours. These magnetic flux ropes include many small- and intermediate-sized structures and display a continuous distribution in size. Energies of these flux ropes are estimated and it is found that the distribution of their energies is a good power law spectrum with an index ~-0.87. The possible relationship between them and solar eruptions is discussed. It is suggested that like interplanetary magnetic clouds are interplanetary coronal mass ejections, the small- and intermediate-sized interplanetary magnetic flux ropes are the interplanetary manifestations of small coronal mass ejections produced in small solar eruptions. However, these small coronal mass ejections are too weak to appear clearly in the coronagraph observations as an ordinary coronal mass ejection.

  9. Turbulent Concentration of Chondrules: Size Distribution and Multifractal Scaling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Hogan, Robert C.; Paque, Julie M.; Dobrovolskis, Anthony R.

    1999-01-01

    Size-selective concentration of particles in 3D turbulence may be related to collection of chondrules and other constituents into primitive bodies in a weakly turbulent protoplanetary nebula. In the terrestrial planet region, both the characteristic size and narrow size distribution of chondrules are explained, whereas "fluffier" particles would be concentrated in lower density, or more intensely turbulent, regions of the nebula. The spatial distribution of concentrated particle density obeys multifractal scaling, suggesting a dose tie to the turbulent cascade process. This scaling behavior allows predictions of the concentration probabilities to be made in the protoplanetary nebula, which are so large (> 10(exp 3) - 10(exp 4)) that further studies must be made of the role of mass loading.

  10. Remnant lipoprotein size distribution profiling via dynamic light scattering analysis.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Richa; Mellis, Birgit; Garza, Kyana; Hameed, Samee A; Jurica, James M; Hernandez, Ana V; Nguyen, Mia N; Mittal, Chandra K

    2016-11-01

    Remnant lipoproteins (RLP) are a metabolically derived subpopulation of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRL) in human blood that are involved in the metabolism of dietary fats or triglycerides. RLP, the smaller and denser variants of TRL particles, are strongly correlated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and were listed as an emerging atherogenic risk factor by the AHA in 2001. Varying analytical techniques used in clinical studies in the size determination of RLP contribute to conflicting hypotheses in regard to whether larger or smaller RLP particles contribute to CVD progression, though multiple pathways may exist. We demonstrated a unique combinatorial bioanalytical approach involving the preparative immunoseparation of RLP, and dynamic light scattering for size distribution analysis. This is a new facile and robust methodology for the size distribution analysis of RLP that in conjunction with clinical studies may reveal the mechanisms by which RLP cause CVD progression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Growing axons analysis by using Granulometric Size Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Mariela A.; Ballarin, Virginia L.; Rapacioli, Melina; Celín, A. R.; Sánchez, V.; Flores, V.

    2011-09-01

    Neurite growth (neuritogenesis) in vitro is a common methodology in the field of developmental neurobiology. Morphological analyses of growing neurites are usually difficult because their thinness and low contrast usually prevent to observe clearly their shape, number, length and spatial orientation. This paper presents the use of the granulometric size distribution in order to automatically obtain information about the shape, size and spatial orientation of growing axons in tissue cultures. The results here presented show that the granulometric size distribution results in a very useful morphological tool since it allows the automatic detection of growing axons and the precise characterization of a relevant parameter indicative of the axonal growth spatial orientation such as the quantification of the angle of deviation of the growing direction. The developed algorithms automatically quantify this orientation by facilitating the analysis of these images, which is important given the large number of images that need to be processed for this type of study.

  12. Size-dependent complex dielectric function of Ni, Mo, W, Pb, Zn and Na nanoparticles. Application to sizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñetón Arboleda, David; Santillán, Jesica M. J.; Mendoza Herrera, Luis J.; Muraca, Diego; Schinca, Daniel C.; Scaffardi, Lucía B.

    2016-02-01

    This work determines the size dependent metal nanoparticle (NP) dielectric function from a ‘top-down’ approach using the bulk experimental refractive index as a starting point. Free-electron damping constant ({γ\\text{free}} ) and plasma frequency ({ω\\text{p}} ) parameters in the Drude model are calculated for nickel (Ni), molybdenum (Mo), tungsten (W), lead (Pb), zinc (Zn) and sodium (Na) using a method developed in our group. Determined {γ\\text{free}} and {ω\\text{p}} parameters allow to develop an expression that improves the precision in reproducing the discrete metal bulk dielectric function in a wide wavelength range (UV-FIR). The bulk dielectric function is modified for describing the nanometric case by adding size corrective terms for free and bound electrons contributions. As an application of this study we characterize Ni spherical NPs synthesized by ultrafast laser ablation of a solid target in water. Using Mie theory together with the size-dependent dielectric function, we theoretically reproduce its experimental extinction spectrum. From this fitting, composition and size distribution of the particles in the colloidal suspension may be derived. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results agree with the sizes and structure derived from optical extinction spectroscopy (OES).

  13. Auxin regulates SNARE-dependent vacuolar morphology restricting cell size.

    PubMed

    Löfke, Christian; Dünser, Kai; Scheuring, David; Kleine-Vehn, Jürgen

    2015-03-05

    The control of cellular growth is central to multicellular patterning. In plants, the encapsulating cell wall literally binds neighbouring cells to each other and limits cellular sliding/migration. In contrast to its developmental importance, growth regulation is poorly understood in plants. Here, we reveal that the phytohormone auxin impacts on the shape of the biggest plant organelle, the vacuole. TIR1/AFBs-dependent auxin signalling posttranslationally controls the protein abundance of vacuolar SNARE components. Genetic and pharmacological interference with the auxin effect on vacuolar SNAREs interrelates with auxin-resistant vacuolar morphogenesis and cell size regulation. Vacuolar SNARE VTI11 is strictly required for auxin-reliant vacuolar morphogenesis and loss of function renders cells largely insensitive to auxin-dependent growth inhibition. Our data suggests that the adaptation of SNARE-dependent vacuolar morphogenesis allows auxin to limit cellular expansion, contributing to root organ growth rates.

  14. A new stochastic algorithm for inversion of dust aerosol size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li; Li, Feng; Yang, Ma-ying

    2015-08-01

    Dust aerosol size distribution is an important source of information about atmospheric aerosols, and it can be determined from multiwavelength extinction measurements. This paper describes a stochastic inverse technique based on artificial bee colony (ABC) algorithm to invert the dust aerosol size distribution by light extinction method. The direct problems for the size distribution of water drop and dust particle, which are the main elements of atmospheric aerosols, are solved by the Mie theory and the Lambert-Beer Law in multispectral region. And then, the parameters of three widely used functions, i.e. the log normal distribution (L-N), the Junge distribution (J-J), and the normal distribution (N-N), which can provide the most useful representation of aerosol size distributions, are inversed by the ABC algorithm in the dependent model. Numerical results show that the ABC algorithm can be successfully applied to recover the aerosol size distribution with high feasibility and reliability even in the presence of random noise.

  15. Size-dependent collection of micrometer-sized particles using nylon mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Naomichi; Kumagai, Kazukiyo; Fujii, Minoru; Shendell, Derek G.; Endo, Osamu; Yanagisawa, Yukio

    Our study explored the size-dependent collection characteristics for micron-sized particles using several kinds of commercially available woven nylon net filters. The particle concentrations with and without the filter were compared to determine the filtration characteristics. The theoretical efficiencies based on a single-fiber theory and a hole model were also computed. Although the theoretical efficiencies were generally consistent with the experimental results, the non-uniformity of air velocity profile within a mesh hole, and a particle's detachment from or bounce off the filters, should be further investigated in future research. Overall, the present study revealed the size-fractionation capability of the nylon wire mesh filters for micron-sized particles from experimental and theoretical points of view. Unlike impactors, the size-fractionation characteristics of the nylon wire mesh filter were determined by particle size, mesh fiber diameter, and a combination of different particle collection mechanisms including impaction, interception, and gravitational settling. Each mechanical process appears interdependently governed in part by the filter dimensions such as filter mesh size (diameter of opening) as well as related variables such as packing density and fiber diameter.

  16. Particle-Size-Distribution of Nevada Test Site Soils

    SciTech Connect

    Spriggs, G; Ray-Maitra, A

    2007-09-17

    The amount of each size particle in a given soil is called the particle-size distribution (PSD), and the way it feels to the touch is called the soil texture. Sand, silt, and clay are the three particle sizes of mineral material found in soils. Sand is the largest sized particle and it feels gritty; silt is medium sized and it feels floury; and clay is the smallest and if feels sticky. Knowing the particle-size distribution of a soil sample helps to understand many soil properties such as how much water, heat, and nutrients the soil will hold, how fast water and heat will move through the soil, and what kind of structure, bulk density and consistence the soil will have. Furthermore, the native particle-size distribution of the soil in the vicinity of ground zero of a nuclear detonation plays a major role in nuclear fallout. For soils that have a high-sand content, the near-range fallout will be relatively high and the far-range fallout will be relatively light. Whereas, for soils that have a high-silt and high-clay content, the near-range fallout will be significantly lower and the far-range fallout will be significantly higher. As part of a program funded by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has recently measured the PSDs from the various major areas at the Nevada Test Site where atmospheric detonations and/or nuclear weapon safety tests were performed back in the 50s and 60s. The purpose of this report is to document those results.

  17. Undersampling power-law size distributions: effect on the assessment of extreme natural hazards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geist, Eric L.; Parsons, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of undersampling on estimating the size of extreme natural hazards from historical data is examined. Tests using synthetic catalogs indicate that the tail of an empirical size distribution sampled from a pure Pareto probability distribution can range from having one-to-several unusually large events to appearing depleted, relative to the parent distribution. Both of these effects are artifacts caused by limited catalog length. It is more difficult to diagnose the artificially depleted empirical distributions, since one expects that a pure Pareto distribution is physically limited in some way. Using maximum likelihood methods and the method of moments, we estimate the power-law exponent and the corner size parameter of tapered Pareto distributions for several natural hazard examples: tsunamis, floods, and earthquakes. Each of these examples has varying catalog lengths and measurement thresholds, relative to the largest event sizes. In many cases where there are only several orders of magnitude between the measurement threshold and the largest events, joint two-parameter estimation techniques are necessary to account for estimation dependence between the power-law scaling exponent and the corner size parameter. Results indicate that whereas the corner size parameter of a tapered Pareto distribution can be estimated, its upper confidence bound cannot be determined and the estimate itself is often unstable with time. Correspondingly, one cannot statistically reject a pure Pareto null hypothesis using natural hazard catalog data. Although physical limits to the hazard source size and by attenuation mechanisms from source to site constrain the maximum hazard size, historical data alone often cannot reliably determine the corner size parameter. Probabilistic assessments incorporating theoretical constraints on source size and propagation effects are preferred over deterministic assessments of extreme natural hazards based on historic data.

  18. Experimental study of the relationship between local particle-size distributions and local ordering in random close packing.

    PubMed

    Kurita, Rei

    2015-12-01

    We experimentally study the structural properties of a sediment of size distributed colloids. By determining each particle size using a size estimation algorithm, we are able to investigate the relationship between local environment and local ordering. Our results show that ordered environments of particles tend to generate where the local particle-size distribution is within 5%. In addition, we show that particles whose size is close to the average size have 12 coordinate neighbors, which matches the coordination number of the fcc and hcp crystals. On the other hand, bcc structures are observed around larger particles. Our results represent experiments to show a size dependence of the specific ordering in colloidal systems.

  19. Transneptunians as probes of planet building: The Plutino size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandersen, M.; Gladman, B.; Kavelaars, J.; Petit, J.; Gwyn, S.

    2014-07-01

    Planetesimals that formed during planet formation are the building blocks of giant planet cores; some are preserved as large transneptunian objects (TNOs). Previous work has shown steep power-law size distributions for TNOs of diameters > 100 km. Recent results claim a dramatic roll-over or divot in the size distribution of Neptunian Trojans (1:1 resonance with Neptune) and scattering TNOs, with a significant lack of intermediate-size D < 100 km planetesimals [1,2,3]. One theoretical explanation for this is that planetesimals were born big, skipping the intermediate sizes, contrary to the expectation of bottom-up planetesimal formation. Exploration of the TNO size distribution requires more precisely calibrated detections in order to improve statistics on these results. We have searched a 32 sq.deg. area near RA=2 hr to an r-band limiting magnitude of m_r=24.6 using the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. This coverage was near the Neptunian L4 region to maximise our detection rate, as this is where Neptunian Trojans reside and where Plutinos (and several other resonant populations) come to perihelion. This program successfully detected and tracked 77 TNOs and Centaurs for up to 17 months, giving us both the high-quality orbits and the quantitative detection efficiency needed for precise modelling. Among our detections were one Uranian Trojan, two Neptunian Trojans, 18 Plutinos (3:2 resonance with Neptune) and other resonant objects. We test TNO size and orbital-distribution models using a survey simulator, which simulates the detectability of model objects, accounting for the survey biases. We show that the Plutino size distribution cannot continue as a rising power law past H_r˜8.3 (equivalent to ˜100 km). A single power law is found rejectable at 99.5 % confidence, and a knee (a broken power law to a softer slope) is also rejectable. A divot (sudden drop in number of objects at a transition size), with parameters found independently for scattering TNOs by Shankman

  20. Size and DNA distributions of electrophoretically separated cultured human kidney cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunze, M. E.; Plank, L. D.; Todd, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    Electrophoretic purification of purifying cultured cells according to function presumes that the size of cycle phase of a cell is not an overriding determinant of its electrophoretic velocity in an electrophoretic separator. The size distributions and DNA distributions of fractions of cells purified by density gradient electrophoresis were determined. No systematic dependence of electrophoretic migration upward in a density gradient column upon either size or DNA content were found. It was found that human leukemia cell populations, which are more uniform function and found in all phases of the cell cycle during exponential growth, separated on a vertical sensity gradient electrophoresis column according to their size, which is shown to be strictly cell cycle dependent.

  1. Size-frequency distributions of chondrules in CO3 chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, Alan E.

    1989-01-01

    The size-frequency distributions of chondrules were determined for eleven CO3 chondrites (including ALHA77003, ALHA77307, ALH82101, ALH85003, Colony, Felix, Isna, Kainsaz, Lance, Ornans, and Warrenton), using the results of petrographic analyses of thin sections. The mean proportion of different chondrule types in CO3 chondrites were estimated to be 69 percent POP, 18 percent PP, 8 percent PO, 2 percent BO, 2 percent RP, 1 percent C, and less than 0.1 percent GOP. These proportions are very different from those in ordinary or EH and CV chondrites, with the smaller proportion of nonporphyritic chondrules than EH chondrites, but a larger proportion than CV chondrites. Relative proportions of chondrule types vary with size interval; thus, with decreasing chondrule size, PO chondrules decrease fairly regularly in abundance, while RP chondrules are most abundant in the smallest size intervals.

  2. Determination of the pore size distribution and porosity of aerobic granules using size-exclusion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yu-Ming; Yu, Han-Qing

    2007-01-01

    The pore size distribution and porosity of aerobic granules with different diameters were evaluated using size-exclusion chromatography, in which polyethylene glycols and distilled water were, respectively, used as solute and mobile phase. The porosity of the aerobic granules varied from 68% to 93% and the exclusion limit, expressed as molecular mass, showed a significant difference. For the small-size granules with a diameter of 0.2-0.6mm, molecules greater than 137,000Da could not penetrate the pores, while the exclusion limits of the middle-size granules with a diameter of 0.6-0.9mm and large-size ones with a diameter of 0.9-1.5mm were 76,000 and 29,000Da, respectively. The extracellular polymeric substances of the granules might clog the pores and might be responsible for the reduced porosity. A correlation between the bioactivity and available porosity of the aerobic granules was found. The experimental results show that the size-exclusion chromatography was appropriate for elucidating the pore size distribution and porosity of the aerobic granules.

  3. Evaluation of the Malvern optical particle monitor. [Volumetric size distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R. J.; Johnson, E.

    1983-07-01

    The Malvern 2200/3300 Particle Sizer is a laser-based optical particle sizing device which utilizes the principle of Fraunhofer Diffraction as the means of particle size measurement. The instrument is designed to analyze particle sizes in the range of 1 to 1800 microns diameter through a selection of lenses for the receiving optics. It is not a single-particle counter but rather an ensemble averager over the distribution of particles present in the measuring volume. Through appropriate measurement techniques, the instrument can measure the volumetric size distribution of: solids in gas or liquid suspension; liquid droplets in gas or other immiscible liquids; and, gas bubbles in liquid. (Malvern Handbook, Version 1.5). This report details a limited laboratory evaluation of the Malvern system to determine its operational characteristics, limitations, and accuracy. This investigation focused on relatively small particles in the range of 5 to 150 microns. Primarily, well characterized particles of coal in a coal and water mixture were utilized, but a selection of naturally occurring, industrially generated, and standard samples (i.e., glass beads) wer also tested. The characteristic size parameter from the Malvern system for each of these samples was compared with the results of a Coulter particle counter (Model TA II) analysis to determine the size measurement accuracy. Most of the particulate samples were suspended in a liquid media (water or isoton, plus a dispersant) for the size characterization. Specifically, the investigations contained in this report fall into four categories: (a) Sample-to-lense distance and sample concentration studies, (b) studies testing the applicability to aerosols, (c) tests of the manufacturer supplied software, and (d) size measurement comparisons with the results of Coulter analysis. 5 references, 15 figures, 2 tables.

  4. Size-Dependent Antimicrobial Effects of Novel Palladium Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Clara P.; Walker, Katherine A.; Obare, Sherine O.; Docherty, Kathryn M.

    2014-01-01

    Investigating the interactions between nanoscale materials and microorganisms is crucial to provide a comprehensive, proactive understanding of nanomaterial toxicity and explore the potential for novel applications. It is well known that nanomaterial behavior is governed by the size and composition of the particles, though the effects of small differences in size toward biological cells have not been well investigated. Palladium nanoparticles (Pd NPs) have gained significant interest as catalysts for important carbon-carbon and carbon-heteroatom reactions and are increasingly used in the chemical industry, however, few other applications of Pd NPs have been investigated. In the present study, we examined the antimicrobial capacity of Pd NPs, which provides both an indication of their usefulness as target antimicrobial compounds, as well as their potency as potential environmental pollutants. We synthesized Pd NPs of three different well-constrained sizes, 2.0±0.1 nm, 2.5±0.2 nm and 3.1±0.2 nm. We examined the inhibitory effects of the Pd NPs and Pd2+ ions toward gram negative Escherichia coli (E. coli) and gram positive Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) bacterial cultures throughout a 24 hour period. Inhibitory growth effects of six concentrations of Pd NPs and Pd2+ ions (2.5×10−4, 10−5, 10−6, 10−7, 10−8, and 10−9 M) were examined. Our results indicate that Pd NPs are generally much more inhibitory toward S. aureus than toward E. coli, though all sizes are toxic at ≥10−5 M to both organisms. We observed a significant difference in size-dependence of antimicrobial activity, which differed based on the microorganism tested. Our work shows that Pd NPs are highly antimicrobial, and that fine-scale (<1 nm) differences in size can alter antimicrobial activity. PMID:24465824

  5. Particle size dependence of biogenic secondary organic aerosol molecular composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Peijun; Johnston, Murray V.

    2017-06-01

    Formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is initiated by the oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the gas phase whose products subsequently partition to the particle phase. Non-volatile molecules have a negligible evaporation rate and grow particles at their condensation rate. Semi-volatile molecules have a significant evaporation rate and grow particles at a much slower rate than their condensation rate. Particle phase chemistry may enhance particle growth if it transforms partitioned semi-volatile molecules into non-volatile products. In principle, changes in molecular composition as a function of particle size allow non-volatile molecules that have condensed from the gas phase (a surface-limited process) to be distinguished from those produced by particle phase reaction (a volume-limited process). In this work, SOA was produced by β-pinene ozonolysis in a flow tube reactor. Aerosol exiting the reactor was size-selected with a differential mobility analyzer, and individual particle sizes between 35 and 110 nm in diameter were characterized by on- and offline mass spectrometry. Both the average oxygen-to-carbon (O / C) ratio and carbon oxidation state (OSc) were found to decrease with increasing particle size, while the relative signal intensity of oligomers increased with increasing particle size. These results are consistent with oligomer formation primarily in the particle phase (accretion reactions, which become more favored as the volume-to-surface-area ratio of the particle increases). Analysis of a series of polydisperse SOA samples showed similar dependencies: as the mass loading increased (and average volume-to-surface-area ratio increased), the average O / C ratio and OSc decreased, while the relative intensity of oligomer ions increased. The results illustrate the potential impact that particle phase chemistry can have on biogenic SOA formation and the particle size range where this chemistry becomes important.

  6. Size dependence of phase transitions in aerosol nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yafang; Su, Hang; Koop, Thomas; Mikhailov, Eugene; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2015-04-01

    Phase transitions of nanoparticles are of fundamental importance in atmospheric sciences. Current understanding is insufficient to explain observations at the nano-scale. In particular, discrepancies exist between observations and model predictions of deliquescence and efflorescence transitions and the hygroscopic growth of salt nanoparticles. Here we show that these discrepancies can be resolved by consideration of particle size effects with consistent thermodynamic data. We present a new method for the determination of water and solute activities and interfacial energies in highly supersaturated aqueous solution droplets. Our analysis reveals that particle size can strongly alter the characteristic concentration of phase separation in mixed systems, resembling the influence of temperature. Due to similar effects, atmospheric secondary organic aerosol particles at room temperature are expected to be always liquid at diameters below ~20 nm. We thus propose and demonstrate that particle size should be included as an additional dimension in the equilibrium phase diagram of aerosol nanoparticles. Reference: Cheng, Y. et al. Size dependence of phase transitions in aerosol nanoparticles. Nature Communications. 5:5923 doi: 10.1038/ncomms6850 (2015).

  7. Aerosol size distribution, composition, and CO2 backscatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Antony D.; Porter, John N.

    1991-01-01

    The aerosol size distribution, composition, and CO2 backscatter at 10.6 microns (beta-CO2) were measured continuosly at the Mauna Loa Observatory (Hawaii) during January-March and November-December, 1988 periods to compare the characteristics of periods associated with appreciable Asian dust transport to that site (January-March) with those of periods characterized by low-dust condition. The aerosol size distribution in the range 0.15 micron to 7.6 microns was measured at temperatures of 40, 150, and 340 C to differentiate between volatile and nonvolatile aerosols. Large ranges of variability was found in measurements of aerosol size distribution during both periods, but the average distributions were similar for both the high-dust and the low-dust periods. However, values for beta-CO2 were more elevated (by about six times) during periods associated with active Asian dust transport to the observatory site than during the low-dust periods.

  8. Solution for the fragment-size distribution in a crack-branching model of fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kekäläinen, P.; Åström, J. A.; Timonen, J.

    2007-08-01

    It is well established that rapidly propagating cracks in brittle material are unstable such that they generate side branches. It is also known that cracks are attracted by free surfaces, which means that they attract each other. This information is used here to formulate a generic model of fragmentation in which the small-size part of the fragment-size distribution results from merged crack branches in the damage zones along the paths of the propagating cracks. This model is solved under rather general assumptions for the fragment-size distribution. The model leads to a generic distribution S-γexp(-S/S0) for fragment sizes S , where γ=(2d-1)/(d) with d the Euclidean dimension, and S0 is a material dependent parameter.

  9. Unimodal size scaling of phytoplankton growth and the size dependence of nutrient uptake and use.

    PubMed

    Marañón, Emilio; Cermeño, Pedro; López-Sandoval, Daffne C; Rodríguez-Ramos, Tamara; Sobrino, Cristina; Huete-Ortega, María; Blanco, José María; Rodríguez, Jaime

    2013-03-01

    Phytoplankton size structure is key for the ecology and biogeochemistry of pelagic ecosystems, but the relationship between cell size and maximum growth rate (μ(max) ) is not yet well understood. We used cultures of 22 species of marine phytoplankton from five phyla, ranging from 0.1 to 10(6) μm(3) in cell volume (V(cell) ), to determine experimentally the size dependence of growth, metabolic rate, elemental stoichiometry and nutrient uptake. We show that both μ(max) and carbon-specific photosynthesis peak at intermediate cell sizes. Maximum nitrogen uptake rate (V(maxN) ) scales isometrically with V(cell) , whereas nitrogen minimum quota scales as V(cell) (0.84) . Large cells thus possess high ability to take up nitrogen, relative to their requirements, and large storage capacity, but their growth is limited by the conversion of nutrients into biomass. Small species show similar volume-specific V(maxN) compared to their larger counterparts, but have higher nitrogen requirements. We suggest that the unimodal size scaling of phytoplankton growth arises from taxon-independent, size-related constraints in nutrient uptake, requirement and assimilation. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.

  10. Reversal in the Size Dependence of Grain Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaoling; Tamura, Nobumichi; Mi, Zhongying; Lei, Jialin; Yan, Jinyuan; Zhang, Lingkong; Deng, Wen; Ke, Feng; Yue, Binbin; Chen, Bin

    2017-03-01

    The conventional belief, based on the Read-Shockley model for the grain rotation mechanism, has been that smaller grains rotate more under stress due to the motion of grain boundary dislocations. However, in our high-pressure synchrotron Laue x-ray microdiffraction experiments, 70 nm nickel particles are found to rotate more than any other grain size. We infer that the reversal in the size dependence of the grain rotation arises from the crossover between the grain boundary dislocation-mediated and grain interior dislocation-mediated deformation mechanisms. The dislocation activities in the grain interiors are evidenced by the deformation texture of nickel nanocrystals. This new finding reshapes our view on the mechanism of grain rotation and helps us to better understand the plastic deformation of nanomaterials, particularly of the competing effects of grain boundary and grain interior dislocations.

  11. Size-dependent antimicrobial response of zinc oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Palanikumar, Loganathan; Ramasamy, Sinna Nadar; Balachandran, Chandrasekaran

    2014-06-01

    Antibacterial and antifungal activities of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) were investigated against infectious microorganisms. ZnO NPs were prepared by wet chemical precipitation method varying the pH values. Particle size and morphology of the as-prepared ZnO powders were characterised by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and transmission electron microscope. The zone of inhibition by NPs ranged from 0 to 17 mm. The lowest minimum inhibitory concentration value of NPs is 25 µg.ml(-1) against Staphylococcus epidermidis. These studies demonstrate that ZnO NPs have wide range of antimicrobial activities towards various microorganisms. The results obtained in the authors' study indicate that the inhibitory efficacy of ZnO NPs is significantly dependent on its chosen concentration and size. Significant inhibition in antibacterial response was observed for S. epidermidis when compared with control antibiotic.

  12. Reversal in the Size Dependence of Grain Rotation

    DOE PAGES

    Zhou, Xiaoling; Tamura, Nobumichi; Mi, Zhongying; ...

    2017-03-01

    The conventional belief, based on the Read-Shockley model for the grain rotation mechanism, has been that smaller grains rotate more under stress due to the motion of grain boundary dislocations. However, in our high-pressure synchrotron Laue x-ray microdiffraction experiments, 70 nm nickel particles are found to rotate more than any other grain size. We infer that the reversal in the size dependence of the grain rotation arises from the crossover between the grain boundary dislocation-mediated and grain interior dislocation-mediated deformation mechanisms. The dislocation activities in the grain interiors are evidenced by the deformation texture of nickel nanocrystals. This new findingmore » reshapes our view on the mechanism of grain rotation and helps us to better understand the plastic deformation of nanomaterials, particularly of the competing effects of grain boundary and grain interior dislocations.« less

  13. Size and voltage dependence of effective anisotropy in sub-100-nm perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrowski, Stephan K.; Bapna, Mukund; Oberdick, Samuel D.; Majetich, Sara A.; Li, Mingen; Chien, C. L.; Ahmed, Rizvi; Victora, R. H.

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic tunnel junctions with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy are investigated using a conductive atomic force microscope. The 1.23 -nm Co40Fe40B20 recording layer coercivity exhibits a size dependence which suggests single-domain behavior for diameters ≤100 nm. Focusing on devices with diameters smaller than 100 nm, we determine the effect of voltage and size on the effective device anisotropy Keff using two different techniques. Keff is extracted both from distributions of the switching fields of the recording and reference layers and from measurement of thermal fluctuations of the recording layer magnetization when a field close to the switching field is applied. The results from both sets of measurements reveal that Keff increases monotonically with decreasing junction diameter, consistent with the size dependence of the demagnetization energy density. We demonstrate that Keff can be controlled with a voltage down to the smallest size measured, 64 nm.

  14. Effect of a RF Wave on Ion Cyclotron Instability in Size Distributed Impurities Containing Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, A. K.; Tripathi, V. K.; Annou, R.

    2008-09-07

    The effect of a large amplitude lower hybrid wave on current driven ion cyclotron waves in a dusty plasma where dust grains are size distributed is examined. The influence of the lower hybrid wave on the stabilization of the instability is studied. The efficacy of rf is dust density dependent.

  15. Simulation of 2D Fields of Raindrop Size Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berne, A.; Schleiss, M.; Uijlenhoet, R.

    2008-12-01

    The raindrop size distribution (DSD hereafter) is of primary importance for quantitative applications of weather radar measurements. The radar reflectivity~Z (directly measured by radar) is related to the power backscattered by the ensemble of hydrometeors within the radar sampling volume. However, the rain rate~R (the flux of water to the surface) is the variable of interest for many applications (hydrology, weather forecasting, air traffic for example). Usually, radar reflectivity is converted into rain rate using a power law such as Z=aRb. The coefficients a and b of the Z-R relationship depend on the DSD. The variability of the DSD in space and time has to be taken into account to improve radar rain rate estimates. Therefore, the ability to generate a large number of 2D fields of DSD which are statistically homogeneous provides a very useful simulation framework that nicely complements experimental approaches based on DSD data, in order to investigate radar beam propagation through rain as well as radar retrieval techniques. The proposed approach is based on geostatistics for structural analysis and stochastic simulation. First, the DSD is assumed to follow a gamma distribution. Hence a 2D field of DSDs can be adequately described as a 2D field of a multivariate random function consisting of the three DSD parameters. Such fields are simulated by combining a Gaussian anamorphosis and a multivariate Gaussian random field simulation algorithm. Using the (cross-)variogram models fitted on data guaranties that the spatial structure of the simulated fields is consistent with the observed one. To assess its validity, the proposed method is applied to data collected during intense Mediterranean rainfall. As only time series are available, Taylor's hypothesis is assumed to convert time series in 1D range profile. Moreover, DSD fields are assumed to be isotropic so that the 1D structure can be used to simulate 2D fields. A large number of 2D fields of DSD parameters are

  16. Measurement of Droplet Size Distribution in Insecticide and Herbicide Sprays.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-04-01

    exceeding 100 :m, this result is not critical to the measurement requirements of the U.S. Army. o The spread in the processed signal is less for mineral oil...AD-A136 391 MEASUREMENT OF DROPLET SIZE DISTRIRUTION IN INSECTICIDE 1/1 AND HERRICIDE SPRAYS(UI KLD ASSOCIATES INC HUNTINGTON U D S MAHLER APR 83...NATIONAL BUREAU Of SIANDARDS 1963 A r TR- 126 AD______ MEASUREMENT Or DROPLET SIZE DISTRIBUTION IN INSECTICIDE AND HERBICIDE SPRAYS Phase.I Final

  17. Collagen fibril arrangement and size distribution in monkey oral mucosa

    PubMed Central

    OTTANI, V.; FRANCHI, M.; DE PASQUALE, V.; LEONARDI, L.; MOROCUTTI, M.; RUGGERI, A.

    1998-01-01

    Collagen fibre organisation and fibril size were studied in the buccal gingival and hard palate mucosa of Macacus rhesus monkey. Light and electron microscopy analysis showed connective papillae exhibiting a similar inner structure in the different areas examined, but varying in distribution, shape and size. Moving from the deep to surface layers of the buccal gingival mucosa (free and attached portions), large collagen fibril bundles became smaller and progressively more wavy with decreasing collagen fibril diameter. This gradual diameter decrease did not occur in the hard palate mucosa (free portion, rugae and interrugal regions) where the fibril diameter remained constant. A link between collagen fibril diameter and mechanical function is discussed. PMID:9688498

  18. Rock sampling. [method for controlling particle size distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blum, P. (Inventor)

    1971-01-01

    A method for sampling rock and other brittle materials and for controlling resultant particle sizes is described. The method involves cutting grooves in the rock surface to provide a grouping of parallel ridges and subsequently machining the ridges to provide a powder specimen. The machining step may comprise milling, drilling, lathe cutting or the like; but a planing step is advantageous. Control of the particle size distribution is effected primarily by changing the height and width of these ridges. This control exceeds that obtainable by conventional grinding.

  19. Size dependence of ozone lamina characteristics and their correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krizan, Peter; Lastovicka, Jan; Kozubek, Michal

    2015-09-01

    Ozone profiles contain narrow layers of substantially enhanced or reduced ozone, called positive and negative laminae, respectively. They reflect both evolutions of stratospheric ozone content and stratospheric dynamics. Here we deal only with positive laminae. The following lamina characteristics are investigated in dependence on lamina size: the number of laminae per profile, the overall ozone amount in laminae per profile and the ozone amount in one lamina at the European ozonosonde stations. An important role of the vertical resolution of ozonesonde measurements is specified. Lamina characteristics for Legionowo and Lindenberg, and small lamina (<2 mPa) characteristics for all stations suffer with effects of vertical resolution of measurements. For this reason they are not used here for long-term trend investigations. The long-term evolution of the ozone amount in one lamina does not display a trend. The results for the three remaining stations, Hohenpeissenberg, Payerne and Uccle, are largely consistent with our previous results on lamina behaviour, which means that our previous results on trends in laminae (e.g., Križan and Laštovička, 2005; Laštovička et al., 2014) are basically correct. The number of laminae per profile and the overall ozone amount in laminae per profile show negative trends before (1979-1995) and rather positive trends after (1996-2011) the reversal of trends in total columnar ozone over Europe. Both parameters reach the highest values for small laminae and with increasing size they decrease. Correlations between characteristics of laminae of different size ranges at individual stations are better for neighbour lamina ranges than for distant lamina ranges. The number of statistically significant correlations of laminae of the same size between pairs of stations is much higher for large laminae above 4 mPa, probably due to processes responsible for their formation and their expected larger horizontal size.

  20. Pore size distribution in an uncompacted equilibrated ordinary chondrite

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, J.M.; Macke, R.J.; Wignarajah, D.P.; Rivers, M.L.; Britt, D.T.; Ebel, D.S.

    2008-05-30

    The extraordinarily uncompacted nature of the ordinary L chondrite fall Baszkowka gives a unique opportunity to investigate the potentially pre-compaction pore size distribution in an equilibrated ordinary chondrite. Using X-ray microtomography and helium pycnometry on two samples of Baszkowka, we have found that on average, two-thirds of the 19.0% porosity resides in inter- and intra-granular voids with volumes between {approx}3 x10{sup 05} and 3 mm{sup 3}. We show the cumulative number density of pore volumes observable by X-ray microtomography obeys a power law distribution function in this equilibrated ordinary chondrite. We foresee these data adding to our understanding of the impact processing of chondrites and their parent asteroids, where porosity and pore size play significant roles in the parameterization of impact events.

  1. Size distribution of cell pattern observed in gravitational instability.

    PubMed

    Shimokawa, Michiko; Kitahata, Hiroyuki; Sakurai, Tatsunari

    2013-01-01

    Gravitational instability occurs at the interface of two solutions when a higher-density solution (HDS) is placed on the surface of a lower-density solution (LDS). As the HDS sinks, a cell pattern forms on the surface. We investigate the size distribution of the cells in this pattern. We show that the cumulative size distribution obeys a power law with a power index that is independent of time as long as it is possible to neglect the interactions among the cells. To understand the power law mechanism, a simple model excluding the interactions is proposed, and we demonstrate that this simple model provides the power law measured in experiments. Our results indicate that independent cell generation and growth are key factors to understand the feature of the cell pattern.

  2. Group-size distribution of skeins of wild geese

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakawa, Yoshinori; Furuhashi, Sho

    2012-09-01

    In appropriate situations, large populations of geese exhibit dynamical rearrangements by repeated mergers and splits among the groups. We describe the grouping process in terms of a mean-field model based on the Smoluchowski equation of coagulation with fragmentation and observationally plausible kernels. To verify our model, we conducted field observations on skeins of airborne geese, noting both the group-size distribution and the group-forming processes. We found that the group-size distribution we obtained in our field measurements could be represented by a fractional power function with an exponential cutoff. This function matches the asymptotic form of the steady-state solution of our model. Furthermore, we estimated the effective number of individuals involved in interactions by comparison of the model to our field data.

  3. Degree distribution, rank-size distribution, and leadership persistence in mediation-driven attachment networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Md. Kamrul; Islam, Liana; Haque, Syed Arefinul

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the growth of a class of networks in which a new node first picks a mediator at random and connects with m randomly chosen neighbors of the mediator at each time step. We show that the degree distribution in such a mediation-driven attachment (MDA) network exhibits power-law P(k) ∼k - γ(m) with a spectrum of exponents depending on m. To appreciate the contrast between MDA and Barabási-Albert (BA) networks, we then discuss their rank-size distribution. To quantify how long a leader, the node with the maximum degree, persists in its leadership as the network evolves, we investigate the leadership persistence probability F(τ) i.e. the probability that a leader retains its leadership up to time τ. We find that it exhibits a power-law F(τ) ∼τ - θ(m) with persistence exponent θ(m) ≈ 1.51 ∀ m in MDA networks and θ(m) → 1.53 exponentially with m in BA networks.

  4. Modulus of elasticity of randomly and aligned polymeric scaffolds with fiber size dependency.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Yuan, Bo; Han, Ray P S

    2017-09-20

    The stiffness of a nano-fibrous scaffold is generally enhanced due to the size-dependency of the thin nanofibers contained in the scaffold. We proposed a model that incorporates size-dependency of single nanofibers to predict the scaffold effective modulus, in which the fibers' random or orientation distribution are considered. In the model the fiber segments between rigid fiber-fiber bonds can be stretching, shearing and bending. Using deformation energy equilibrium between sum of individual fibers and the plate of nano-fibrous scaffold, the scaffold effective modulus was derived explicitly. The model was verified via finite element analysis (FEA) and published experimental results. The parametric studies revealed that the fiber diameter is the dominant parameter to stiffen the scaffold beyond the fiber density and fiber aspect ratio when the fiber diameter is reduced below the onset value of size-dependencies. As a result, the scaffold stiffness can maintain its higher value and lower decrease rate because of the size-dependency with a decreasing diameter of the nanofiber as a result of biodegradation. This inspires the idea of selecting nanofibers near the onset value of size-dependency to obtain a controlled tuning of the scaffold stiffness in the design of novel nano-fibrous scaffolds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Computer Modeling of Crystallization and Crystal Size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amenta, R. V.

    2002-05-01

    The crystal size distribution of an igneous rock has been shown to be related to the crystallization kinetics. In order to better understand crystallization processes, the nucleation and growth of crystals in a closed system is modeled computationally and graphically. Units of volume analogous to unit cells are systematically attached to stationary crystal nuclei. The number of volume units attached to each crystal per growth stage is proportional to the crystal size insuring that crystal dimensional growth rates are constant regardless of their size. The number of new crystal nuclei per total system volume that form in each growth stage increases exponentially Cumulative crystal size distributions (CCSD) are determined for various stages of crystallization (30 percent, 60 pct, etc) from a database generated by the computer model, and each distribution is fit to an exponential function of the same form. Simulation results show that CCSD functions appear to fit the data reasonably well (R-square) with the greatest misfit at 100 pct crystallization. The crystal size distribution at each pct crystallization can be obtained from the derivative of the respective CCSD function. The log form of each crystal size distribution (CSD) is a linear function with negative slope. Results show that the slopes of the CSD functions at pcts crystallization up to 90 pct are parallel, but the slope at 100 pct crystallization differs from the others although still in approximate alignment. We suggest that real crystallization of igneous rocks may show this pattern. In the early stages of crystallization crystals are far apart and CSD's are ideal as predicted by theory based on growth of crystals in a brine. At advanced stages of crystallization growth collision boundaries develop between crystals. As contiguity increases crystals become blocked and inactive because they can no longer grow. As crystallization approaches 100 pct a significant number of inactive crystals exist resulting in

  6. The fossilized size distribution of the main asteroid belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottke, William F.; Durda, Daniel D.; Nesvorný, David; Jedicke, Robert; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Vokrouhlický, David; Levison, Hal

    2005-05-01

    Planet formation models suggest the primordial main belt experienced a short but intense period of collisional evolution shortly after the formation of planetary embryos. This period is believed to have lasted until Jupiter reached its full size, when dynamical processes (e.g., sweeping resonances, excitation via planetary embryos) ejected most planetesimals from the main belt zone. The few planetesimals left behind continued to undergo comminution at a reduced rate until the present day. We investigated how this scenario affects the main belt size distribution over Solar System history using a collisional evolution model (CoEM) that accounts for these events. CoEM does not explicitly include results from dynamical models, but instead treats the unknown size of the primordial main belt and the nature/timing of its dynamical depletion using innovative but approximate methods. Model constraints were provided by the observed size frequency distribution of the asteroid belt, the observed population of asteroid families, the cratered surface of differentiated Asteroid (4) Vesta, and the relatively constant crater production rate of the Earth and Moon over the last 3 Gyr. Using CoEM, we solved for both the shape of the initial main belt size distribution after accretion and the asteroid disruption scaling law QD∗. In contrast to previous efforts, we find our derived QD∗ function is very similar to results produced by numerical hydrocode simulations of asteroid impacts. Our best fit results suggest the asteroid belt experienced as much comminution over its early history as it has since it reached its low-mass state approximately 3.9-4.5 Ga. These results suggest the main belt's wavy-shaped size-frequency distribution is a "fossil" from this violent early epoch. We find that most diameter D≳120 km asteroids are primordial, with their physical properties likely determined during the accretion epoch. Conversely, most smaller asteroids are byproducts of fragmentation

  7. Airblast atomization: studies on drop-size distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Rizk, N.K.; Lefebvze, A.H.

    1982-09-01

    The influence of air velocity and liquid properties on drop-size distribution is examined using an airblast atomizer in which a flat liquid sheet is exposed to high velocity air on both sides. Both photographic and lightscattering techniques are employed to measure drop sizes. The effect of the physical properties of liquids is studied by preparing special liquid solutions to obtain wide variations in one property while keeping the others sensibly constant. The results obtained show that increases in air velocity and/or reduction in liquid flow rate lead to more uniform sprays and a lower mean drop size. Higher values of viscosity and surface tension result in coarser sprays of larger mean drop size. The effect of liquid density on spray characteristics appears to be quite small. In general, it is found that any change in liquid properties or atomizer operating conditions which tends to lower the mean drop size will also tend to narrow the range of drop sizes produced.

  8. An improved method for size distribution of stream bed gravel

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leopold, Luna Bergere

    1970-01-01

    Random sampling of surface rocks on a gravel bar is biased toward larger sizes which, because of their area, are more likely to be picked up. Weighting can eliminate this bias. Data on average weight of a single rock are used to change numbers of rocks to weights, thus yielding size frequency data in general agreement with a sieved and weighed sample. The question of what to sample depends on the use to which the data are to be put, and is not treated in detail in this paper.

  9. Multifractal Characteristics of Bimodal Mercury Pore Size Distribution Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos Bonini, C.; Alves, M. C.; Paz González, A.

    2012-04-01

    Characterization of Hg pore size distribution (PSDs) curves by monofractal or multifractal analysis has been demonstrated to be an useful tool, which allows a better understanding of the organization of the soil pore space. There are also evidences that multiscale analysis of different segments found in bimodal pore size distributions measured by Hg intrusion can provide further valuable information. In this study we selected bimodal PSDs from samples taken from an experimental area in São Paulo state, Brazil, where a revegetation trial was set up over saprolitic material. The saprolite was left abandoned after decapitation of an Oxisol for building purposes. The field trial consisted of various treatments with different grass species and amendments. Pore size distribution of the sampled aggregates was measured in the equivalent diameter range from 0.005 to about 50 μm and it was characterized by a bimodal pattern, so that two compartments, i.e. 0.005 to 0.2 μm and 0.2 to 50 μm, could be distinguished. The multifractal theory was used to analyse both segments. The scaling properties of these two segments could be fitted reasonably well with multifractal models. Multifractal parameters obtained for equivalent diameters for the segments > 0.2 and < 0.2 μm showed great differences. For example, entropy dimension, D1, values from the segment 0.005-0.2 μm were always lower than those for the segment 0.2-50 μm form NDI , whereas the Hólder exponent of order zero, α0, were higher for the former segment. These results indicate the probability different degrees of heterogeneity within the Hg pore size distributions studied.

  10. Size distributions of manure particles released under simulated rainfall.

    PubMed

    Pachepsky, Yakov A; Guber, Andrey K; Shelton, Daniel R; McCarty, Gregory W

    2009-03-01

    Manure and animal waste deposited on cropland and grazing lands serve as a source of microorganisms, some of which may be pathogenic. These microorganisms are released along with particles of dissolved manure during rainfall events. Relatively little if anything is known about the amounts and sizes of manure particles released during rainfall, that subsequently may serve as carriers, abode, and nutritional source for microorganisms. The objective of this work was to obtain and present the first experimental data on sizes of bovine manure particles released to runoff during simulated rainfall and leached through soil during subsequent infiltration. Experiments were conducted using 200 cm long boxes containing turfgrass soil sod; the boxes were designed so that rates of manure dissolution and subsequent infiltration and runoff could be monitored independently. Dairy manure was applied on the upper portion of boxes. Simulated rainfall (ca. 32.4 mm h(-1)) was applied for 90 min on boxes with stands of either live or dead grass. Electrical conductivity, turbidity, and particle size distributions obtained from laser diffractometry were determined in manure runoff and soil leachate samples. Turbidity of leachates and manure runoff samples decreased exponentially. Turbidity of manure runoff samples was on average 20% less than turbidity of soil leachate samples. Turbidity of leachate samples from boxes with dead grass was on average 30% less than from boxes with live grass. Particle size distributions in manure runoff and leachate suspensions remained remarkably stable after 15 min of runoff initiation, although the turbidity continued to decrease. Particles had the median diameter of 3.8 microm, and 90% of particles were between 0.6 and 17.8 microm. The particle size distributions were not affected by the grass status. Because manure particles are known to affect transport and retention of microbial pathogens in soil, more information needs to be collected about the

  11. Power law olivine crystal size distributions in lithospheric mantle xenoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armienti, P.; Tarquini, S.

    2002-12-01

    Olivine crystal size distributions (CSDs) have been measured in three suites of spinel- and garnet-bearing harzburgites and lherzolites found as xenoliths in alkaline basalts from Canary Islands, Africa; Victoria Land, Antarctica; and Pali Aike, South America. The xenoliths derive from lithospheric mantle, from depths ranging from 80 to 20 km. Their textures vary from coarse to porphyroclastic and mosaic-porphyroclastic up to cataclastic. Data have been collected by processing digital images acquired optically from standard petrographic thin sections. The acquisition method is based on a high-resolution colour scanner that allows image capturing of a whole thin section. Image processing was performed using the VISILOG 5.2 package, resolving crystals larger than about 150 μm and applying stereological corrections based on the Schwartz-Saltykov algorithm. Taking account of truncation effects due to resolution limits and thin section size, all samples show scale invariance of crystal size distributions over almost three orders of magnitude (0.2-25 mm). Power law relations show fractal dimensions varying between 2.4 and 3.8, a range of values observed for distributions of fragment sizes in a variety of other geological contexts. A fragmentation model can reproduce the fractal dimensions around 2.6, which correspond to well-equilibrated granoblastic textures. Fractal dimensions >3 are typical of porphyroclastic and cataclastic samples. Slight bends in some linear arrays suggest selective tectonic crushing of crystals with size larger than 1 mm. The scale invariance shown by lithospheric mantle xenoliths in a variety of tectonic settings forms distant geographic regions, which indicate that this is a common characteristic of the upper mantle and should be taken into account in rheological models and evaluation of metasomatic models.

  12. Line Tension Measurements through Drop Size Dependence of Contact Angle.

    PubMed

    Amirfazli; Kwok; Gaydos; Neumann

    1998-09-01

    Experiments with different organic liquids have been conducted to study the drop size dependence of the contact angles on a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) surface of 1-octadecanethiol (HS(CH2)17CH3) on gold. Low-rate dynamic advancing contact angles were measured for sessile drops in vapor-saturated air using Axisymmetric Drop Shape Analysis-Profile (ADSA-P). The experiments were performed using a minimum of eight separately prepared SAM surfaces for each liquid. Although a degree of scatter in the measured contact angles existed, the general trend observed for each run was that the contact angles decreased as the radius of the three-phase line for the sessile drop increased from approximately 1 to 5 mm. To obtain a better view of the overall trend, the contact angles from all of the individual runs for each liquid were averaged at corresponding radii. Subsequently, the averaged results from these experiments were interpreted using the modified Young equation. It was found that the drop size dependence of contact angles was due to a positive line tension. The line tension values are of the order of 1 µJ/m with a trend toward larger values for higher liquid surface tensions. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  13. Universal Asymptotic Clone Size Distribution for General Population Growth.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Michael D; Antal, Tibor

    2016-11-01

    Deterministically growing (wild-type) populations which seed stochastically developing mutant clones have found an expanding number of applications from microbial populations to cancer. The special case of exponential wild-type population growth, usually termed the Luria-Delbrück or Lea-Coulson model, is often assumed but seldom realistic. In this article, we generalise this model to different types of wild-type population growth, with mutants evolving as a birth-death branching process. Our focus is on the size distribution of clones-that is the number of progeny of a founder mutant-which can be mapped to the total number of mutants. Exact expressions are derived for exponential, power-law and logistic population growth. Additionally, for a large class of population growth, we prove that the long-time limit of the clone size distribution has a general two-parameter form, whose tail decays as a power-law. Considering metastases in cancer as the mutant clones, upon analysing a data-set of their size distribution, we indeed find that a power-law tail is more likely than an exponential one.

  14. Comparison of photon correlation spectroscopy with photosedimentation analysis for the determination of aqueous colloid size distributions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rees, T.F.

    1990-01-01

    Photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS) utilizes the Doppler frequency shift of photons scattered off particles undergoing Brownian motion to determine the size of colloids suspended in water. Photosedimentation analysis (PSA) measures the time-dependent change in optical density of a suspension of colloidal particles undergoing centrifugation. A description of both techniques, important underlying assumptions, and limitations are given. Results for a series of river water samples show that the colloid-size distribution means are statistically identical as determined by both techniques. This also is true of the mass median diameter (MMD), even though MMD values determined by PSA are consistently smaller than those determined by PCS. Because of this small negative bias, the skew parameters for the distributions are generally smaller for the PCS-determined distributions than for the PSA-determined distributions. Smaller polydispersity indices for the distributions are also determined by PCS. -from Author

  15. Taurocholate pool size and distribution in the fetal rat.

    PubMed Central

    Little, J M; Richey, J E; Van Thiel, D H; Lester, R

    1979-01-01

    Taurocholate concentrations in fetal and neonatal rats were determined by radioimmunoassay. Total body taurocholate pool size varied from 0.0049 +/- 0.0008 to 203 +/- 8 nmol/g body weight from day 5 of gestation to 5 d after birth. A 50-fold increase in taurocholate pool size was observed between days 15 and 19 of gestation. The distribution of taurocholate between liver, intestine, and the remainder of the carcass was determined for rats of gestational age 19 d to 5 d after birth. The major fraction of total body taurocholate was in the liver and intestine, with less than 15% in the remainder of the carcass. The ratio of taurocholate in intestine to taurocholate in liver, which was 1:17 at 19 d of gestation, had altered substantially to a ratio of 6:1 by 5 d after birth. Treatment of pregnant rats with 60 microgram/d of dexamethasone from gestational day 9 until sacrifice increased fetal taurocholate pool size by 80% at 15 d, 40% at 19 d, and 16% at 1 d after birth. Administration of dexamethasone to the mother also changed the ratio of taurocholate in intestine to taurocholate in liver. At 19 d of gestation, dexamethasone-treated mothers had fetuses with approximately equal amounts of taurocholate in intestine and liver. This suggested that adrenocorticosteroids stimulate the early maturation of factors controlling taurocholate pool size and tissue distribution in the rat fetus. PMID:447826

  16. Scale size-dependent characteristics of the nightside aurora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humberset, B. K.; Gjerloev, J. W.; Samara, M.; Michell, R. G.

    2017-02-01

    We have determined the spatiotemporal characteristics of the magnetosphere-ionosphere (M-I) coupling using auroral imaging. Observations at fixed positions for an extended period of time are provided by a ground-based all-sky imager measuring the 557.7 nm auroral emissions. We report on a single event of nightside aurora (˜22 magnetic local time) preceding a substorm onset. To determine the spatiotemporal characteristics, we perform an innovative analysis of an all-sky imager movie (19 min duration, images at 3.31 Hz) that combines a two-dimensional spatial fast Fourier transform with a temporal correlation. We find a scale size-dependent variability where the largest scale sizes are stable on timescales of minutes while the small scale sizes are more variable. When comparing two smaller time intervals of different types of auroral displays, we find a variation in their characteristics. The characteristics averaged over the event are in remarkable agreement with the spatiotemporal characteristics of the nightside field-aligned currents during moderately disturbed times. Thus, two different electrodynamical parameters of the M-I coupling show similar behavior. This gives independent support to the claim of a system behavior that uses repeatable solutions to transfer energy and momentum from the magnetosphere to the ionosphere.

  17. Size- and structure-dependent toxicity of silica particulates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanada, Sanshiro; Miyaoi, Kenichi; Hoshino, Akiyoshi; Inasawa, Susumu; Yamaguchi, Yukio; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2011-03-01

    Nano- and micro-particulates firmly attach with the surface of various biological systems. In some chronic pulmonary disease such as asbestosis and silicosis, causative particulates will induce chronic inflammatory disorder, followed by poor prognosis diseases. However, nano- and micro-scale specific toxicity of silica particulates is not well examined enough to recognize the risk of nano- and micro-particulates from the clinical aspect. To clarify the effect of the size and structure of silica particulates on the cellular damage and the biological response, we assessed the cytotoxicity of the various kinds of silica particles including amorphous and crystalline silica, in mouse alveolar macrophage culture, focusing on the fibrotic and inflammatory response. Our study showed that the cytotoxicity, which depends on the particle size and surface area, is correlated with their inflammatory response. By contrast, production of TGF-β, which is one of the fibrotic agents in lung, by addition of crystal silica was much higher than that of amorphous silica. We conclude that fibrosis and inflammation are induced at different phases and that the size- and structure-differences of silica particulates affect the both biological responses, caused by surface activity, radical species, and so on.

  18. Size-dependent toxicity of silver nanoparticles to Glyptotendipes tokunagai

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seona; Kim, Soyoun; Bae, Yeon-Jae; Park, June-Woo; Jung, Jinho

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study aims to evaluate the size-dependent toxicity of spherical silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) to an endemic benthic organism, Glyptotendipes tokunagai. Methods Ag nanoparticles of three nominal sizes (50, 100, and 150 nm) capped with polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP-Ag NPs) were used. Their physicochemical properties, acute toxicity (48 hours), and bioaccumulation were measured using third instar larvae of G. tokunagai. Results The aggregation and dissolution of PVP-Ag NPs increased with exposure time and concentration, respectively, particularly for 50 nm PVP-Ag NPs. However, the dissolved concentration of Ag ions was not significant compared with the median lethal concentration value for AgNO3 (3.51 mg/L). The acute toxicity of PVP-Ag NPs was highest for the smallest particles (50 nm), whereas bioaccumulation was greatest for the largest particles (150 nm). However, larger PVP-Ag NPs were absorbed and excreted rapidly, resulting in shorter stays in G. tokunagai than the smaller ones. Conclusions The size of PVP-Ag NPs significantly affects their acute toxicity to G. tokunagai. In particular, smaller PVP-Ag NPs have a higher solubility and stay longer in the body of G. tokunagai, resulting in higher toxicity than larger PVP-Ag NPs. PMID:26184045

  19. Use of elemental size distributions in identifying particle formation modes

    SciTech Connect

    Dunxi Yu; Minghou Xu; Hong Yao; Jiancai Sui; Xiaowei Liu; Yun Yu; Qian Cao

    2007-07-01

    The chemical composition of particles generated during pulverized coal combustion is the consequence of their formation processes. This work aims to use the size resolved elemental composition of coal-derived particles to identify their formation modes. A size-classified bituminous coal is burnt in a laboratory drop tube furnace at 1150, 1250, and 1350{sup o}C, respectively. The elemental composition of the size-segregated particles from coal combustion is analyzed and the total mass fraction size distributions of Si and Al are obtained. Three particle formation modes are observed in these distribution profiles. The coarse mode has the highest value of the total mass fraction of Si and Al while the ultrafine mode has the lowest one. The total mass fraction of Si and Al in these two modes is nearly independent of particle size. It is believed that the coarse mode is formed by the mineral coalescence mechanism and the ultrafine mode by the vaporization-condensation mechanism. The difference in the total mass fraction of Si and Al between the central mode and the other two indicates that the central mode is formed by different mechanisms. Based on the observation that the total mass fraction of Si and Al in this mode increases with increasing particle size, heterogeneous condensation of vaporized species on existing fine residual ash particles is proposed to account for the formation of these particles. The study of the elemental composition of the three modes represented in five categories verifies the proposed formation mechanisms for them to some extent. 30 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Measurements of Aerosol Charge and Size Distribution for Graphite, Gold, Palladium, and Silver Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Simones, Matthew P.; Gutti, Veera R.; Meyer, Ryan M.; Loyalka, Sudarshan K.

    2011-11-01

    The role of charge on aerosol evolution and hence the nuclear source term has been an issue of interest, and there is a need for both experimental techniques and modeling for quantifying this role. Our focus here is on further exploration of a tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA) technique to simultaneously measure both the size and charge (positive, negative and neutral) dependent aerosol distributions. We have generated graphite, gold, silver, and palladium nanoparticles (aerosol) using a spark generator. We measure the electrical mobility-size distributions for these aerosols using a TDMA, and from these data we deduce the full charge-size distributions. We observe asymmetry in the particle size distributions for negative and positive charges. This asymmetry could have a bearing on the dynamics of charged aerosols, indicating that the assumption of symmetry for size distributions of negatively and positively charged particles in source term simulations may not be always appropriate. Also, the experimental technique should find applications in measurements of aerosol rate processes that are affected by both particle charge and size (e.g. coagulation, deposition, resuspension), and hence in modeling and simulation of the nuclear source term.

  1. Truncated shifted pareto distribution in assessing size distribution of oil and gas fields

    SciTech Connect

    Houghton, J.C.

    1988-11-01

    The truncated shifted Pareto (TSP) distribution, a variant of the two-parameter Pareto distribution, in which one parameter is added to shift the distribution right and left and the right-hand side is truncated, is used to model size distributions of oil and gas fields for resource assessment. Assumptions about limits to the left-hand and right-hand side reduce the number of parameters to two. The TSP distribution has advantages over the more customary lognormal distribution because it has a simple analytic expression, allowing exact computation of several statistics of interest, has a J-shape, and has more flexibility in the thickness of the right-hand tail. Oil field sizes from the Minnelusa play in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana, are used as a case study. Probability plotting procedures allow easy visualization of the fit and help the assessment.

  2. Use of the truncated shifted Pareto distribution in assessing size distribution of oil and gas fields

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houghton, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    The truncated shifted Pareto (TSP) distribution, a variant of the two-parameter Pareto distribution, in which one parameter is added to shift the distribution right and left and the right-hand side is truncated, is used to model size distributions of oil and gas fields for resource assessment. Assumptions about limits to the left-hand and right-hand side reduce the number of parameters to two. The TSP distribution has advantages over the more customary lognormal distribution because it has a simple analytic expression, allowing exact computation of several statistics of interest, has a "J-shape," and has more flexibility in the thickness of the right-hand tail. Oil field sizes from the Minnelusa play in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana, are used as a case study. Probability plotting procedures allow easy visualization of the fit and help the assessment. ?? 1988 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

  3. Monte Carlo Method for Predicting a Physically Based Drop Size Distribution Evolution of a Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tembely, Moussa; Lécot, Christian; Soucemarianadin, Arthur

    2010-03-01

    We report in this paper a method for predicting the evolution of a physically based drop size distribution of a spray, by coupling the Maximum Entropy Formalism and the Monte Carlo scheme. Using the discrete or continuous population balance equation, a Mass Flow Algorithm is formulated taking into account interactions between droplets via coalescence. After deriving a kernel for coalescence, we solve the time dependent drop size distribution equation using a Monte Carlo method. We apply the method to the spray of a new print-head known as a Spray On Demand (SOD) device; the process exploits ultrasonic spray generation via a Faraday instability where the fluid/structure interaction causing the instability is described by a modified Hamilton's principle. This has led to a physically-based approach for predicting the initial drop size distribution within the framework of the Maximum Entropy Formalism (MEF): a three-parameter generalized Gamma distribution is chosen by using conservation of mass and energy. The calculation of the drop size distribution evolution by Monte Carlo method shows the effect of spray droplets coalescence both on the number-based or volume-based drop size distributions.

  4. Effect of void-size distribution on the Hugoniot state at low shock pressures.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, D J; Buettner, D J; Tsou, P

    1991-11-01

    In most theoretical and experimental investigations into the shock response of underdense solid media, the influence of the medium's mesostructure on the resulting pressure and degree of compaction has not been taken into account. In typical cases examined, shock pressures are well in excess of 1 GPa and this approach is clearly justified. However, at low pressures, calculations show that the distribution of void sizes can affect the final state achieved upon shocking the medium from a given initial porosity. This paper analyzes the response of porous aluminum to low pressure shocking and demonstrates a dependence of the final shocked state on the distribution of void sizes.

  5. Effect of void-size distribution on the Hugoniot state at low shock pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffiths, David J.; Buettner, Douglas J.; Tsou, Peter

    1991-01-01

    In most theoretical and experimental investigations into the shock response of underdense solid media, the influence of the medium's mesostructure on the resulting pressure and degree of compaction has not been taken into account. In typical cases examined, shock pressures are well in excess of 1 GPa and this approach is clearly justified. However, at low pressures, calculations show that the distribution of void sizes can affect the final state achieved upon shocking the medium from a given initial porosity. This paper analyzes the response of porous aluminum to low pressure shocking and demonstrates a dependence of the final shocked state on the distribution of void sizes.

  6. Size resolved ultrafine particles emission model--a continues size distribution approach.

    PubMed

    Nikolova, Irina; Janssen, Stijn; Vrancken, Karl; Vos, Peter; Mishra, Vinit; Berghmans, Patrick

    2011-08-15

    A new parameterization for size resolved ultrafine particles (UFP) traffic emissions is proposed based on the results of PARTICULATES project (Samaras et al., 2005). It includes the emission factors from the Emission Inventory Guidebook (2006) (total number of particles, #/km/veh), the shape of the corresponding particle size distribution given in PARTICULATES and data for the traffic activity. The output of the model UFPEM (UltraFine Particle Emission Model) is a sum of continuous distributions of ultrafine particles emissions per vehicle type (passenger cars and heavy duty vehicles), fuel (petrol and diesel) and average speed representative for urban, rural and highway driving. The results from the parameterization are compared with measured total number of ultrafine particles and size distributions in a tunnel in Antwerp (Belgium). The measured UFP concentration over the entire campaign shows a close relation to the traffic activity. The modelled concentration is found to be lower than the measured in the campaign. The average emission factor from the measurement is 4.29E+14 #/km/veh whereas the calculated is around 30% lower. A comparison of emission factors with literature is done as well and in overall a good agreement is found. For the size distributions it is found that the measured distributions consist of three modes--Nucleation, Aitken and accumulation and most of the ultrafine particles belong to the Nucleation and the Aitken modes. The modelled Aitken mode (peak around 0.04-0.05 μm) is found in a good agreement both as amplitude of the peak and the number of particles whereas the modelled Nucleation mode is shifted to smaller diameters and the peak is much lower that the observed. Time scale analysis shows that at 300 m in the tunnel coagulation and deposition are slow and therefore neglected. The UFPEM emission model can be used as a source term in dispersion models. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Cluster size dependence of high-order harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Y.; Hagmeijer, R.; Bastiaens, H. M. J.; Goh, S. J.; van der Slot, P. J. M.; Biedron, S. G.; Milton, S. V.; Boller, K.-J.

    2017-08-01

    We investigate high-order harmonic generation (HHG) from noble gas clusters in a supersonic gas jet. To identify the contribution of harmonic generation from clusters versus that from gas monomers, we measure the high-order harmonic output over a broad range of the total atomic number density in the jet (from 3×1016 to 3 × 1018 {{cm}}-3) at two different reservoir temperatures (303 and 363 K). For the first time in the evaluation of the harmonic yield in such measurements, the variation of the liquid mass fraction, g, versus pressure and temperature is taken into consideration, which we determine, reliably and consistently, to be below 20% within our range of experimental parameters. By comparing the measured harmonic yield from a thin jet with the calculated corresponding yield from monomers alone, we find an increased emission of the harmonics when the average cluster size is less than 3000. Using g, under the assumption that the emission from monomers and clusters add up coherently, we calculate the ratio of the average single-atom response of an atom within a cluster to that of a monomer and find an enhancement of around 100 for very small average cluster size (∼200). We do not find any dependence of the cut-off frequency on the composition of the cluster jet. This implies that HHG in clusters is based on electrons that return to their parent ions and not to neighboring ions in the cluster. To fully employ the enhanced average single-atom response found for small average cluster sizes (∼200), the nozzle producing the cluster jet must provide a large liquid mass fraction at these small cluster sizes for increasing the harmonic yield. Moreover, cluster jets may allow for quasi-phase matching, as the higher mass of clusters allows for a higher density contrast in spatially structuring the nonlinear medium.

  8. Single-size thermometric measurements on a size distribution of neutral fullerenes.

    PubMed

    Cauchy, C; Bakker, J M; Huismans, Y; Rouzée, A; Redlich, B; van der Meer, A F G; Bordas, C; Vrakking, M J J; Lépine, F

    2013-05-10

    We present measurements of the velocity distribution of electrons emitted from mass-selected neutral fullerenes, performed at the intracavity free electron laser FELICE. We make use of mass-specific vibrational resonances in the infrared domain to selectively heat up one out of a distribution of several fullerene species. Efficient energy redistribution leads to decay via thermionic emission. Time-resolved electron kinetic energy distributions measured give information on the decay rate of the selected fullerene. This method is generally applicable to all neutral species that exhibit thermionic emission and provides a unique tool to study the stability of mass-selected neutral clusters and molecules that are only available as part of a size distribution.

  9. Maintenance of phenotypic variation: Repeatability, heritability and size-dependent processes in a wild brook trout population

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Letcher, B.H.; Coombs, J.A.; Nislow, K.H.

    2011-01-01

    Phenotypic variation in body size can result from within-cohort variation in birth dates, among-individual growth variation and size-selective processes. We explore the relative effects of these processes on the maintenance of wide observed body size variation in stream-dwelling brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis). Based on the analyses of multiple recaptures of individual fish, it appears that size distributions are largely determined by the maintenance of early size variation. We found no evidence for size-dependent compensatory growth (which would reduce size variation) and found no indication that size-dependent survival substantially influenced body size distributions. Depensatory growth (faster growth by larger individuals) reinforced early size variation, but was relatively strong only during the first sampling interval (age-0, fall). Maternal decisions on the timing and location of spawning could have a major influence on early, and as our results suggest, later (>age-0) size distributions. If this is the case, our estimates of heritability of body size (body length=0.25) will be dominated by processes that generate and maintain early size differences. As a result, evolutionary responses to environmental change that are mediated by body size may be largely expressed via changes in the timing and location of reproduction. Published 2011. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  10. Size-dependent penetration of trace elements through a utility baghouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shendrikar, A. D.; Ensor, D. S.; Cowen, S. J.; Woffinden, G. J.; McElroy, M. W.

    Particle size-dependent concentrations of 35 major and minor trace elements were measured at the inlet and outlet of a fabric filter baghouse installed on a western pulverized coal-fired power plant. Size-segregated particulate samples were collected using University of Washington impactors with Kapton collection disks coated with Apiezon-L grease. The impactor samples were analyzed for trace elements using neutron activation analysis. The inlet particle size distribution for most elements was bimodal, with the larger mode having a geometric mean diameter of approximately 4-10 μm and the smaller mode having a geometric mean diameter of 0.08 μm or less. In general, individual trace elements exhibited size distributions similar to total mass. However, several elements, including As, Se, Sb, Hg, Cl, Zn and Ni, showed noticeably 'flatter' size distributions with proportionally higher concentrations in submicrometer particles compared to total mass. The elemental penetrations through the baghouse generally agreed well with the mass penetration. An exception is Se, which shows penetration an order of magnitude higher than that of total mass and other elements. Most trace elements were removed by the baghouse with greater than 95 % collection efficiency over the entire particle size range.

  11. Modeling the dust size distribution in comets with dust fragmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konno, Ichishiro; Huebner, Walter F.

    1990-01-01

    A hydrodynamic model was developed of a spherically symmetric dusty gas flow in a cometary atmosphere assuming a single fluid, inviscid, perfect gas. The hydrodynamics for gas and dust, which involves the gas drag force (momentum transfer), heat exchange between gas and dust, photodissociation energy for H2O gas, and radiative heating and cooling terms for dust particles, are solved using the Gear method for stiff, coupled differential equations. Calculations were done with a dust size distribution for radii alpha = 0.01 micron to 10 cm with densities variable with the size. A nucleus size of 4.0 km radius with a density of 0.5 g/cu cm and a total dust-to-gas mass ratio chi = 1 was adopted. There are indications from in situ observations that dust particle fragment into smaller ones. Fragmentation of dust particles was incorporated into the model. This is done by adding source and sink terms in the continuity equations for the dust. Lifetimes for the decay of dust particles were assumed as a function of particle size. It is also assumed that dust particles always fragment only into the next smaller size.

  12. A diagnostic stratospheric aerosol size distribution inferred from SAGE II measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomason, Larry W.

    1991-01-01

    An aerosol size distribution model for the stratosphere is inferred based on 5 years of Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II measurements of multispectral aerosol and water vapor extinction. The SAGE II aerosol and water vapor extinction data strongly suggest that there is a critical particle radius below which there is a relatively weak dependence of particle number density with size and above which there are few, if any, particles. A segmented power law model, as a simple representation of this dependence, is used in theoretical calculations and intercomparisons with a variety of aerosol measurements including dustsondes, longwave lidar, and wire impactors and shows a consistently good agreement.

  13. INITIAL SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF THE GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Jihye; Kim, Sungsoo S.; Yoon, Suk-Jin; Kim, Juhan

    2013-01-10

    Despite the importance of their size evolution in understanding the dynamical evolution of globular clusters (GCs) of the Milky Way, studies that focus specifically on this issue are rare. Based on the advanced, realistic Fokker-Planck (FP) approach, we theoretically predict the initial size distribution (SD) of the Galactic GCs along with their initial mass function and radial distribution. Over one thousand FP calculations in a wide parameter space have pinpointed the best-fit initial conditions for the SD, mass function, and radial distribution. Our best-fit model shows that the initial SD of the Galactic GCs is of larger dispersion than today's SD, and that the typical projected half-light radius of the initial GCs is {approx}4.6 pc, which is 1.8 times larger than that of the present-day GCs ({approx}2.5 pc). Their large size signifies greater susceptibility to the Galactic tides: the total mass of destroyed GCs reaches 3-5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} M {sub Sun }, several times larger than previous estimates. Our result challenges a recent view that the Milky Way GCs were born compact on the sub-pc scale, and rather implies that (1) the initial GCs were generally larger than the typical size of the present-day GCs, (2) the initially large GCs mostly shrank and/or disrupted as a result of the galactic tides, and (3) the initially small GCs expanded by two-body relaxation, and later shrank by the galactic tides.

  14. Fog-Influenced Submicron Aerosol Number Size Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zikova, N.; Zdimal, V.

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate the influence of fog on aerosol particle number size distributions (PNSD) in submicron range. Thus, five-year continuous time series of the SMPS (Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer) data giving information on PNSD in five minute time step were compared with detailed meteorological records from the professional meteorological station Kosetice in the Czech Republic. The comparison included total number concentration and PNSD in size ranges between 10 and 800 nm. The meteorological records consist from the exact times of starts and ends of individual meteorological phenomena (with one minute precision). The records longer than 90 minutes were considered, and corresponding SMPS spectra were evaluated. Evaluation of total number distributions showed considerably lower concentration during fog periods compared to the period when no meteorological phenomenon was recorded. It was even lower than average concentration during presence of hydrometeors (not only fog, but rain, drizzle, snow etc. as well). Typical PNSD computed from all the data recorded in the five years is in Figure 1. Not only median and 1st and 3rd quartiles are depicted, but also 5th and 95th percentiles are plotted, to see the variability of the concentrations in individual size bins. The most prevailing feature is the accumulation mode, which seems to be least influenced by the fog presence. On the contrary, the smallest aerosol particles (diameter under 40 nm) are effectively removed, as well as the largest particles (diameter over 500 nm). Acknowledgements: This work was supported by the projects GAUK 62213 and SVV-2013-267308. Figure 1. 5th, 25th, 50th, 75th and 95th percentile of aerosol particle number size distributions recorded during fog events.

  15. Measuring Technique of Bubble Size Distributions in Dough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Tatsurou; Do, Gab-Soo; Sugiyama, Junichi; Oguchi, Kosei; Tsuta, Mizuki

    A novel technique to recognize bubbles in bread dough and analyze their size distribution was developed by using a Micro-Slicer Image Processing System (MSIPS). Samples were taken from the final stage of the mixing process of bread dough which generally consists of four distinctive stages. Also, to investigate the effect of freeze preservation on the size distribution of bubbles, comparisons were made between fresh dough and the dough that had been freeze preserved at .30°C for three months. Bubbles in the dough samples were identified in the images of MSIPS as defocusing spots due to the difference in focal distance created by vacant spaces. In case of the fresh dough, a total of 910 bubbles were recognized and their maximum diameter ranged from 0.4 to 70.5μm with an average of 11.1μm. On the other hand, a total of 1,195 bubbles were recognized from the freeze-preserved sample, and the maximum diameter ranged from 0.9 to 32.7μm with an average of 6.7μm. Small bubbles with maximum diameters less than 10μm comprised approximately 59% and 78% of total bubbles for fresh and freeze-preserved dough samples, respectively. The results indicated that the bubble size of frozen dough is smaller than that of unfrozen one. The proposed method can provide a novel tool to investigate the effects of mixing and preservation treatments on the size, morphology and distribution of bubbles in bread dough.

  16. Universal functional form of 1-minute raindrop size distribution?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cugerone, Katia; De Michele, Carlo

    2015-04-01

    Rainfall remains one of the poorly quantified phenomena of the hydrological cycle, despite its fundamental role. No universal laws describing the rainfall behavior are available in literature. This is probably due to the continuous description of rainfall, which is a discrete phenomenon, made by drops. From the statistical point of view, the rainfall variability at particle size scale, is described by the drop size distribution (DSD). With this term, it is generally indicated as the concentration of raindrops per unit volume and diameter, as the probability density function of drop diameter at the ground, according to the specific problem of interest. Raindrops represent the water exchange, under liquid form, between atmosphere and earth surface, and the number of drops and their size have impacts in a wide range of hydrologic, meteorologic, and ecologic phenomena. DSD is used, for example, to measure the multiwavelength rain attenuation for terrestrial and satellite systems, it is an important input for the evaluation of the below cloud scavenging coefficient of the aerosol by precipitation, and is of primary importance to make estimates of rainfall rate through radars. In literature, many distributions have been used to this aim (Gamma and Lognormal above all), without statistical supports and with site-specific studies. Here, we present an extensive investigation of raindrop size distribution based on 18 datasets, consisting in 1-minute disdrometer data, sampled using Joss-Waldvogel or Thies instrument in different locations on Earth's surface. The aim is to understand if an universal functional form of 1-minute drop diameter variability exists. The study consists of three main steps: analysis of the high order moments, selection of the model through the AIC index and test of the model with the use of goodness-of-fit tests.

  17. Size distribution and dry deposition of road dust PAHs

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, H.H.; Chiang, C.F.; Lee, W.J.; Hwang, K.P.; Wu, E.M.Y.

    1999-07-01

    The size distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) for road dust and for the engine exhaust of both gasoline-powered cars and motorcycles was investigated. In addition, by using the measured size distribution data, monitoring and modeling the PAH dry deposition, the contribution fraction of road dust on the dry deposition materials was also studied. Twenty-one PAHs were analyzed primarily by using a gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS). The mass median diameters (MMDs) of 21 individual PAHs for resuspendable road dust (cut size < 100 {micro}m) ranged between 63.4 {micro}m and 65.5 {micro}m. However, the MMDs of total-PAH size distributions for the engine exhaust of both gasoline-powered cars and four-stroke motorcycles averaged 0.45 {micro}m and 0.35 {micro}m, respectively, which were near the MMDs of PAHs (average 0.50 {micro}m) in the ambient air of traffic intersections. Suspended particle-phase total PAHs in the ambient air of traffic intersections were found to be more than 90% of the result of the automobile exhaust; that is, less than 10% of the amount was contributed by the road dust. However, the modeled MMDs of 21 individual PAHs on the dry deposition material were between 22.1 {micro}m and 44.6 {micro}m, and the contribution fraction of road dust on the PAH dry deposition was found to be more than 95%, even though the suspendable ambient-air PAHs were mainly from the mobile exhaust.

  18. Universal scaling of grain size distributions during dislocation creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aupart, Claire; Dunkel, Kristina G.; Angheluta, Luiza; Austrheim, Håkon; Ildefonse, Benoît; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2017-04-01

    Grain size distributions are major sources of information about the mechanisms involved in ductile deformation processes and are often used as paleopiezometers (stress gauges). Several factors have been claimed to influence the stress vs grain size relation, including the water content (Jung & Karato 2001), the temperature (De Bresser et al., 2001), the crystal orientation (Linckens et al., 2016), the presence of second phase particles (Doherty et al. 1997; Cross et al., 2015), and heterogeneous stress distributions (Platt & Behr 2011). However, most of the studies of paleopiezometers have been done in the laboratory under conditions different from those in natural systems. It is therefore essential to complement these studies with observations of naturally deformed rocks. We have measured olivine grain sizes in ultramafic rocks from the Leka ophiolite in Norway and from Alpine Corsica using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) data, and calculated the corresponding probability density functions. We compared our results with samples from other studies and localities that have formed under a wide range of stress and strain rate conditions. All distributions collapse onto one universal curve in a log-log diagram where grain sizes are normalized by the mean grain size of each sample. The curve is composed of two straight segments with distinct slopes for grains above and below the mean grain size. These observations indicate that a surprisingly simple and universal power-law scaling describes the grain size distribution in ultramafic rocks during dislocation creep irrespective of stress levels and strain rates. Cross, Andrew J., Susan Ellis, and David J. Prior. 2015. « A Phenomenological Numerical Approach for Investigating Grain Size Evolution in Ductiley Deforming Rocks ». Journal of Structural Geology 76 (juillet): 22-34. doi:10.1016/j.jsg.2015.04.001. De Bresser, J. H. P., J. H. Ter Heege, and C. J. Spiers. 2001. « Grain Size Reduction by Dynamic

  19. Size distribution of submarine landslides along the U.S. Atlantic margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chaytor, J.D.; ten Brink, U.S.; Solow, A.R.; Andrews, B.D.

    2009-01-01

    Assessment of the probability for destructive landslide-generated tsunamis depends on the knowledge of the number, size, and frequency of large submarine landslides. This paper investigates the size distribution of submarine landslides along the U.S. Atlantic continental slope and rise using the size of the landslide source regions (landslide failure scars). Landslide scars along the margin identified in a detailed bathymetric Digital Elevation Model (DEM) have areas that range between 0.89??km2 and 2410??km2 and volumes between 0.002??km3 and 179??km3. The area to volume relationship of these failure scars is almost linear (inverse power-law exponent close to 1), suggesting a fairly uniform failure thickness of a few 10s of meters in each event, with only rare, deep excavating landslides. The cumulative volume distribution of the failure scars is very well described by a log-normal distribution rather than by an inverse power-law, the most commonly used distribution for both subaerial and submarine landslides. A log-normal distribution centered on a volume of 0.86??km3 may indicate that landslides preferentially mobilize a moderate amount of material (on the order of 1??km3), rather than large landslides or very small ones. Alternatively, the log-normal distribution may reflect an inverse power law distribution modified by a size-dependent probability of observing landslide scars in the bathymetry data. If the latter is the case, an inverse power-law distribution with an exponent of 1.3 ?? 0.3, modified by a size-dependent conditional probability of identifying more failure scars with increasing landslide size, fits the observed size distribution. This exponent value is similar to the predicted exponent of 1.2 ?? 0.3 for subaerial landslides in unconsolidated material. Both the log-normal and modified inverse power-law distributions of the observed failure scar volumes suggest that large landslides, which have the greatest potential to generate damaging tsunamis

  20. Cloud droplet size distributions in low-level stratiform clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, N.L.; Verlinde, J.; Clothiaux, E.E.

    2000-01-15

    A database of stratus cloud droplet size distribution parameters, derived from in situ data reported in the existing literature, was created, facilitating intercomparison among datasets and quantifying typical values and their variability. From the datasets, which were divided into marine and continental groups, several parameters are presented, including the total number concentration, effective diameter, mean diameter, standard deviation of the droplet diameters about the mean diameter, and liquid water content, as well as the parameters of modified gamma and lognormal distributions. In light of these results, the appropriateness of common assumptions used in remote sensing of cloud droplet size distributions is discussed. For example, vertical profiles of mean diameter, effective diameter, and liquid water content agreed qualitatively with expectations based on the current paradigm of cloud formation. Whereas parcel theory predicts that the standard deviation about the mean diameter should decrease with height, the results illustrated that the standard deviation generally increases with height. A feature common to all marine clouds was their approximately constant total number concentration profiles; however, the total number concentration profiles of continental clouds were highly variable. Without cloud condensation nuclei spectra, classification of clouds into marine and continental groups is based on indirect methods. After reclassification of four sets of measurements in the database, there was a fairly clear dichotomy between marine and continental clouds, but a great deal of variability within each classification. The relevant applications of this study lie in radiative transfer and climate issues, rather than in cloud formation and dynamics. Techniques that invert remotely sensed measurements into cloud droplet size distributions frequently rely on a priori assumptions, such as constant number concentration profiles and constant spectral width. The

  1. Aerosol concentration and particle size distributions in underground excavations of a hard coal mine.

    PubMed

    Skubacz, Krystian; Wojtecki, Łukasz; Urban, Paweł

    2017-09-01

    Deposition of aerosols in the respiratory system depends inter alia on their size and the respiratory tract deposition is appreciable for nanometer-sized particles. This article presents the results of measurements of size distributions of aerosols in the range of several nanometers up to about 20 μm in the underground mine excavations of an active hard coal mine. The study included practically all particles of a respirable fraction. The results showed that a high concentration of fine and ultrafine aerosols occurs in key underground workplaces especially during mining machine operations, although their contribution to total mass concentration is usually negligible.

  2. Predictive control of crystal size distribution in protein crystallization.

    PubMed

    Shi, Dan; Mhaskar, Prashant; El-Farra, Nael H; Christofides, Panagiotis D

    2005-07-01

    This work focuses on the modelling, simulation and control of a batch protein crystallization process that is used to produce the crystals of tetragonal hen egg-white (HEW) lysozyme. First, a model is presented that describes the formation of protein crystals via nucleation and growth. Existing experimental data are used to develop empirical models of the nucleation and growth mechanisms of the tetragonal HEW lysozyme crystal. The developed growth and nucleation rate expressions are used within a population balance model to simulate the batch crystallization process. Then, model reduction techniques are used to derive a reduced-order moments model for the purpose of controller design. Online measurements of the solute concentration and reactor temperature are assumed to be available, and a Luenberger-type observer is used to estimate the moments of the crystal size distribution based on the available measurements. A predictive controller, which uses the available state estimates, is designed to achieve the objective of maximizing the volume-averaged crystal size while respecting constraints on the manipulated input variables (which reflect physical limitations of control actuators) and on the process state variables (which reflect performance considerations). Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed predictive controller is able to increase the volume-averaged crystal size by 30% and 8.5% compared to constant temperature control (CTC) and constant supersaturation control (CSC) strategies, respectively, while reducing the number of fine crystals produced. Furthermore, a comparison of the crystal size distributions (CSDs) indicates that the product achieved by the proposed predictive control strategy has larger total volume and lower polydispersity compared to the CTC and CSC strategies. Finally, the robustness of the proposed method (achieved due to the presence of feedback) with respect to plant-model mismatch is demonstrated. The proposed method is

  3. Size-dependent axisymmetric vibration of functionally graded circular plates in bifurcation/limit point instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashoori, A. R.; Vanini, S. A. Sadough; Salari, E.

    2017-04-01

    In the present paper, vibration behavior of size-dependent functionally graded (FG) circular microplates subjected to thermal loading are carried out in pre/post-buckling of bifurcation/limit-load instability for the first time. Two kinds of frequently used thermal loading, i.e., uniform temperature rise and heat conduction across the thickness direction are considered. Thermo-mechanical material properties of FG plate are supposed to vary smoothly and continuously throughout the thickness based on power law model. Modified couple stress theory is exploited to describe the size dependency of microplate. The nonlinear governing equations of motion and associated boundary conditions are extracted through generalized form of Hamilton's principle and von-Karman geometric nonlinearity for the vibration analysis of circular FG plates including size effects. Ritz finite element method is then employed to construct the matrix representation of governing equations which are solved by two different strategies including Newton-Raphson scheme and cylindrical arc-length method. Moreover, in the following a parametric study is accompanied to examine the effects of the several parameters such as material length scale parameter, temperature distributions, type of buckling, thickness to radius ratio, boundary conditions and power law index on the dimensionless frequency of post-buckled/snapped size-dependent FG plates in detail. It is found that the material length scale parameter and thermal loading have a significant effect on vibration characteristics of size-dependent circular FG plates.

  4. Drop Size Distribution - Based Separation of Stratiform and Convective Rain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thurai, Merhala; Gatlin, Patrick; Williams, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    For applications in hydrology and meteorology, it is often desirable to separate regions of stratiform and convective rain from meteorological radar observations, both from ground-based polarimetric radars and from space-based dual frequency radars. In a previous study by Bringi et al. (2009), dual frequency profiler and dual polarization radar (C-POL) observations in Darwin, Australia, had shown that stratiform and convective rain could be separated in the log10(Nw) versus Do domain, where Do is the mean volume diameter and Nw is the scaling parameter which is proportional to the ratio of water content to the mass weighted mean diameter. Note, Nw and Do are two of the main drop size distribution (DSD) parameters. In a later study, Thurai et al (2010) confirmed that both the dual-frequency profiler based stratiform-convective rain separation and the C-POL radar based separation were consistent with each other. In this paper, we test this separation method using DSD measurements from a ground based 2D video disdrometer (2DVD), along with simultaneous observations from a collocated, vertically-pointing, X-band profiling radar (XPR). The measurements were made in Huntsville, Alabama. One-minute DSDs from 2DVD are used as input to an appropriate gamma fitting procedure to determine Nw and Do. The fitted parameters - after averaging over 3-minutes - are plotted against each other and compared with a predefined separation line. An index is used to determine how far the points lie from the separation line (as described in Thurai et al. 2010). Negative index values indicate stratiform rain and positive index indicate convective rain, and, moreover, points which lie somewhat close to the separation line are considered 'mixed' or 'transition' type precipitation. The XPR observations are used to evaluate/test the 2DVD data-based classification. A 'bright-band' detection algorithm was used to classify each vertical reflectivity profile as either stratiform or convective

  5. Investigate the relationship between multiwavelength lidar ratios and aerosol size distributions using aerodynamic particle sizer spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hu; Hua, Dengxin; Mao, Jiandong; Zhou, Chunyan

    2017-02-01

    The real aerosol size distributions were obtained by aerodynamic particle sizer spectrometer (APS) in China YinChuan. The lidar ratios at wavelengths of 355 nm, 532 nm and 1064 nm were calculated using Mie theory. The effective radius of aerosol particles reff and volume C/F ratio (coarse/fine) Vc/f were retrieved from the real aerosol size distributions. The relationship between multiwavelength lidar ratios and particle reff and Vc/f were investigated. The results indicate that the lidar ratio is positive correlated to the particle reff and Vc/f. The lidar ratio is more sensitive to the coarse particles. The short wavelength lidar ratio is more sensitive to the particle Vc/f and the long wavelength lidar ratio is more sensitive to the particle reff. The wavelength dependency indicated that the lidar ratios decrease with increasing the wavelength. The lidar ratios are almost irrelevant to the shape and total particles of aerosol size distributions.

  6. Multimodal Dispersion of Nanoparticles: A Comprehensive Evaluation of Size Distribution with 9 Size Measurement Methods.

    PubMed

    Varenne, Fanny; Makky, Ali; Gaucher-Delmas, Mireille; Violleau, Frédéric; Vauthier, Christine

    2016-05-01

    Evaluation of particle size distribution (PSD) of multimodal dispersion of nanoparticles is a difficult task due to inherent limitations of size measurement methods. The present work reports the evaluation of PSD of a dispersion of poly(isobutylcyanoacrylate) nanoparticles decorated with dextran known as multimodal and developed as nanomedecine. The nine methods used were classified as batch particle i.e. Static Light Scattering (SLS) and Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), single particle i.e. Electron Microscopy (EM), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Tunable Resistive Pulse Sensing (TRPS) and Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis (NTA) and separative particle i.e. Asymmetrical Flow Field-Flow Fractionation coupled with DLS (AsFlFFF) size measurement methods. The multimodal dispersion was identified using AFM, TRPS and NTA and results were consistent with those provided with the method based on a separation step prior to on-line size measurements. None of the light scattering batch methods could reveal the complexity of the PSD of the dispersion. Difference between PSD obtained from all size measurement methods tested suggested that study of the PSD of multimodal dispersion required to analyze samples by at least one of the single size particle measurement method or a method that uses a separation step prior PSD measurement.

  7. The Effects of Aggregation and Disaggregation on Particle Size Distributions and Water Clarity in the Coastal Ocean

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    The effects of aggregation and disaggregation on particle size distributions and water clarity in the coastal ocean Paul S. Hill Department of...of fine siliciclastics on water clarity in the coastal ocean. Scattering of light by suspended particles depends on sediment concentration...composition, and size distribution. Particle size distribu- tions in coastal waters are dynamic because high concentrations of suspended sediment in coastal

  8. Shape, size, and distribution of magnetic particles in Bjurbole chondrules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nava, David F.

    1994-01-01

    Chondrules from the Bjurbole chondritic meteorite (L4) exhibit saturation remanence magnetization (SIRM) values which vary over three orders of magnitude. REM values (Natural Remanence Magnetization/SIRM) for Allende (C3V) and Chainpur (LL3) are less than 0.01 but in Bjurbole some chondrules were found to have REM values greater than 0.1 with several greater than 0.2. REM values greater than 0.1 are abnormal and cannot be acquired during weak field cooling. If exposure to a strong field (whatever the source) during the chondrules' history is responsible for the high REM values, was such history associated with a different processing which might have resulted in different shape, size, and distribution of metal particles compared to chondrules having REM values of less than 0.01? Furthermore, magnetic hysteresis results show a broad range of magnetic hardness and other intrinsic magnetic properties. These features must be related to (1) size and amount of metal; and (2) properties of, and amount of, tetrataenite in the chondrules (all chondrules thus far subjected to thermomagnetic analysis show the presence of tetrataenite). A scanning electron microscopy (SEM) study is underway to determine the relationship between the shape, size, and distribution of metal particles within individual chondrules and the magnetic properties of these chondrules. Results from the SEM study in conjunction with magnetic property data may also help to discern effects from possible lightning strikes in the nebula prior to incorporation of the chondrules into the parent body.

  9. A numerical study of the particle size distribution of an aerosol undergoing turbulent coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reade, Walter C.; Collins, Lance R.

    2000-07-01

    Coagulation and growth of aerosol particles subject to isotropic turbulence has been explored using direct numerical simulations. The computations follow the trajectories of 262 144 initial particles as they are convected by the turbulent flow field. Collision between two parent particles leads to the formation of a new daughter particle with the mass and momentum (but not necessarily the energy) of the parent particles. The initially monodisperse population of particles will develop a size distribution over time that is controlled by the collision dynamics. In an earlier study, Sundaram & Collins (1997) showed that collision rates in isotropic turbulence are controlled by two statistics: (i) the radial distribution of the particles and (ii) the relative velocity probability density function. Their study considered particles that rebound elastically; however, we find that the formula that they derived is equally valid in a coagulating system. However, coagulation alters the numerical values of these statistics from the values they attain for the elastic rebound case. This difference is substantial and must be taken into consideration to properly predict the evolution of the size distribution of a population of particles. The DNS results also show surprising trends in the relative breadth of the particle size distribution. First, in all cases, the standard deviation of the particle size distribution of particles with finite Stokes numbers is much larger than the standard deviation for either the zero-Stokes-number or infinite-Stokes-number limits. Secondly, for particles with small initial Stokes numbers, the standard deviation of the final particle size distribution decreases with increasing initial particle size; however, the opposite trend is observed for particles with slightly larger initial Stokes numbers. An explanation for these phenomena can be found by carefully examining the functional dependence of the radial distribution function on the particle size

  10. Size dependent elastic modulus and mechanical resilience of dental enamel.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Simona; Shaw, Jeremy; Zhao, Xiaoli; Abbott, Paul V; Munroe, Paul; Xu, Jiang; Habibi, Daryoush; Xie, Zonghan

    2014-03-21

    Human tooth enamel exhibits a unique microstructure able to sustain repeated mechanical loading during dental function. Although notable advances have been made towards understanding the mechanical characteristics of enamel, challenges remain in the testing and interpretation of its mechanical properties. For example, enamel was often tested under dry conditions, significantly different from its native environment. In addition, constant load, rather than indentation depth, has been used when mapping the mechanical properties of enamel. In this work, tooth specimens are prepared under hydrated conditions and their stiffnesses are measured by depth control across the thickness of enamel. Crystal arrangement is postulated, among other factors, to be responsible for the size dependent indentation modulus of enamel. Supported by a simple structure model, effective crystal orientation angle is calculated and found to facilitate shear sliding in enamel under mechanical contact. In doing so, the stress build-up is eased and structural integrity is maintained. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Size Dependent Cation Channel in Nanoporous Prussian Blue Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moritomo, Yutaka; Igarashi, Kazuhiro; Kim, Jungeun; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2009-08-01

    Cation and/or molecule transfer within nanoporous materials can be utilized in, for example, electrochromic devices, hydrogen storage, molecular sensors, and molecular filters. Here, we investigated the mobilities of cations, Na+, K+, and Rb+, in vacancy-controlled Prussian blue film, NaxCo[Fe(CN)6]1-vzH2O (v is vacancy concentration) with a jungle gym structure. We found that only the smallest Na+ ions pass through the cubic planes of the lattice, while the larger cations, i.e., K+ and Rb+, take a detour channel along the [Fe(CN)6] vacancy. The size-dependent cation channel is well understood in terms of the potential curve derived by an ab initio total energy calculation.

  12. The flexoelectric effect associated size dependent pyroelectricity in solid dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Gang; Liu, Zhiguo; Xie, Qiyun; Guo, Yanyan; Li, Wei; Yan, Xiaobing

    2015-09-15

    A phenomenological thermodynamic theory is used to investigate the effect of strain gradient on the pyroelectric effect in centrosymmetric dielectric solids. Direct pyroelectricity can exist as external mechanical stress is applied to non-pyroelectric dielectrics with shapes such as truncated pyramids, due to elastic strain gradient induced flexoelectric polarization. Effective pyroelectric coefficient was analyzed in truncated pyramids. It is found to be controlled by size, ambient temperature, stress, and aspect ratio and depends mainly on temperature sensitivity of flexoelectric coefficient (TSFC) and strain gradient of the truncated pyramids dielectric solids. These results show that the pyroelectric property of Ba{sub 0.67}Sr{sub 0.33}TiO{sub 3} above T{sub c} similar to PZT and other lead-based ferroelectrics can be obtained. This feature might widely broaden the selection of materials for infrared detectors with preferable properties.

  13. Size Dependent Mechanical Properties of Monolayer Densely Arranged Polystyrene Nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Huang, Peng; Zhang, Lijing; Yan, Qingfeng; Guo, Dan; Xie, Guoxin

    2016-12-13

    In contrast to macroscopic materials, the mechanical properties of polymer nanospheres show fascinating scientific and application values. However, the experimental measurements of individual nanospheres and quantitative analysis of theoretical mechanisms remain less well performed and understood. We provide a highly efficient and accurate method with monolayer densely arranged honeycomb polystyrene (PS) nanospheres for the quantitatively mechanical characterization of individual nanospheres on the basis of atomic force microscopy (AFM) nanoindentation. The efficiency is improved by 1-2 orders, and the accuracy is also enhanced almost by half-order. The elastic modulus measured in the experiments increases with decreasing radius to the smallest nanospheres (25-35 nm in radius). A core-shell model is introduced to predict the size dependent elasticity of PS nanospheres, and the theoretical prediction agrees reasonably well with the experimental results and also shows a peak modulus value.

  14. Size-dependent cytotoxicity and inflammatory responses of PEGylated silica-iron oxide nanocomposite size series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Injumpa, Wishulada; Ritprajak, Patcharee; Insin, Numpon

    2017-04-01

    incubation with the highest concentration of 1000 μg/mL. Although 1000 μg/mL of all sizes of the nanocomposites decreased macrophage viability, the cytotoxicity of the nanocomposites was notably less than silica. The inflammatory response of macrophage was also observed by ELISA, and we found that the size of 20 and 40 nm, but not 100 and 200 nm, obviously stimulated IL-6 production. From this study, the preparations of multifunctional superparamagnetic nanocomposites of different sizes along with the size-dependent effects on cellular toxicity and inflammatory response were demonstrated and could be applied for designing of new drug carriers.

  15. SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS OF SOLAR FLARES AND SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Cliver, E. W.; Ling, A. G.; Belov, A.; Yashiro, S.

    2012-09-10

    We suggest that the flatter size distribution of solar energetic proton (SEP) events relative to that of flare soft X-ray (SXR) events is primarily due to the fact that SEP flares are an energetic subset of all flares. Flares associated with gradual SEP events are characteristically accompanied by fast ({>=}1000 km s{sup -1}) coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that drive coronal/interplanetary shock waves. For the 1996-2005 interval, the slopes ({alpha} values) of power-law size distributions of the peak 1-8 A fluxes of SXR flares associated with (a) >10 MeV SEP events (with peak fluxes {>=}1 pr cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} sr{sup -1}) and (b) fast CMEs were {approx}1.3-1.4 compared to {approx}1.2 for the peak proton fluxes of >10 MeV SEP events and {approx}2 for the peak 1-8 A fluxes of all SXR flares. The difference of {approx}0.15 between the slopes of the distributions of SEP events and SEP SXR flares is consistent with the observed variation of SEP event peak flux with SXR peak flux.

  16. Size Distributions of Solar Flares and Solar Energetic Particle Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliver, E. W.; Ling, A. G.; Belov, A.; Yashiro, S.

    2012-01-01

    We suggest that the flatter size distribution of solar energetic proton (SEP) events relative to that of flare soft X-ray (SXR) events is primarily due to the fact that SEP flares are an energetic subset of all flares. Flares associated with gradual SEP events are characteristically accompanied by fast (much > 1000 km/s) coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that drive coronal/interplanetary shock waves. For the 1996-2005 interval, the slopes (alpha values) of power-law size distributions of the peak 1-8 Angs fluxes of SXR flares associated with (a) >10 MeV SEP events (with peak fluxes much > 1 pr/sq cm/s/sr) and (b) fast CMEs were approx 1.3-1.4 compared to approx 1.2 for the peak proton fluxes of >10 MeV SEP events and approx 2 for the peak 1-8 Angs fluxes of all SXR flares. The difference of approx 0.15 between the slopes of the distributions of SEP events and SEP SXR flares is consistent with the observed variation of SEP event peak flux with SXR peak flux.

  17. Marked point process models of raindrop-size distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, James A.

    1993-01-01

    The principal process considered in this paper is the flux of raindrops through a volume of the atmosphere. This process is of fundamental importance for a wide variety of engineering and environmental problems, notably remote sensing of precipitation, infiltration of rainfall, soil erosion, atmospheric deposition of pollutants, and design of microwave communication systems. A marked point process model is developed in which the point process represents the arrival times of drops at the upper surface of a sample volume and the mark associated with a drop is its diameter. In the model, both the rate of occurrence of raindrops and the distribution of drop diameters vary randomly over time. Results that relate the drop-size distribution within the sample volume to the probability law of the drop-arrival process are presented. These results allow straightforward comparisons between temporal characterizations of drop-size distributions and spatial characterizations. Representations for derived processes such as rainfall rate and reflectivity are shown to be quite accurate using raindrop data from North Carolina.

  18. Marked point process models of raindrop-size distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, James A.

    1993-01-01

    The principal process considered in this paper is the flux of raindrops through a volume of the atmosphere. This process is of fundamental importance for a wide variety of engineering and environmental problems, notably remote sensing of precipitation, infiltration of rainfall, soil erosion, atmospheric deposition of pollutants, and design of microwave communication systems. A marked point process model is developed in which the point process represents the arrival times of drops at the upper surface of a sample volume and the mark associated with a drop is its diameter. In the model, both the rate of occurrence of raindrops and the distribution of drop diameters vary randomly over time. Results that relate the drop-size distribution within the sample volume to the probability law of the drop-arrival process are presented. These results allow straightforward comparisons between temporal characterizations of drop-size distributions and spatial characterizations. Representations for derived processes such as rainfall rate and reflectivity are shown to be quite accurate using raindrop data from North Carolina.

  19. Inferring local competition intensity from patch size distributions: a test using biological soil crusts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowker, Matthew A.; Maestre, Fernando T.

    2012-01-01

    Dryland vegetation is inherently patchy. This patchiness goes on to impact ecology, hydrology, and biogeochemistry. Recently, researchers have proposed that dryland vegetation patch sizes follow a power law which is due to local plant facilitation. It is unknown what patch size distribution prevails when competition predominates over facilitation, or if such a pattern could be used to detect competition. We investigated this question in an alternative vegetation type, mosses and lichens of biological soil crusts, which exhibit a smaller scale patch-interpatch configuration. This micro-vegetation is characterized by competition for space. We proposed that multiplicative effects of genetics, environment and competition should result in a log-normal patch size distribution. When testing the prevalence of log-normal versus power law patch size distributions, we found that the log-normal was the better distribution in 53% of cases and a reasonable fit in 83%. In contrast, the power law was better in 39% of cases, and in 8% of instances both distributions fit equally well. We further hypothesized that the log-normal distribution parameters would be predictably influenced by competition strength. There was qualitative agreement between one of the distribution's parameters (μ) and a novel intransitive (lacking a 'best' competitor) competition index, suggesting that as intransitivity increases, patch sizes decrease. The correlation of μ with other competition indicators based on spatial segregation of species (the C-score) depended on aridity. In less arid sites, μ was negatively correlated with the C-score (suggesting smaller patches under stronger competition), while positive correlations (suggesting larger patches under stronger competition) were observed at more arid sites. We propose that this is due to an increasing prevalence of competition transitivity as aridity increases. These findings broaden the emerging theory surrounding dryland patch size distributions

  20. Dynamics of Particle Size Distribution in Slide-Hold Tests on Laboratory Gouge Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhuri, S. K.; Dewers, T. A.; Scott, T. E.

    2001-12-01

    Slide-hold tests using triaxially-loaded precut forcing blocks and artificial gouge examine contrasts in gouge particle size dynamics during frictional sliding and annealing or healing stages. A series of room-dry sliding experiments were conducted to various shear strains using dry gypsum gouge in between precut steel forcing members. A separate series of experiments saturated with distilled water was conducted at a pore pressure of 6.9 MPa (effective pressure of 13.8 MPa identical to the dry tests). The latter experiments were taken to a constant shear strain but were held under shear loading for various lengths of time (0.01-10 hours) after slip. Pore-volume change was monitored during hold periods. Particle size distribution (PSD) of gouge was measured using a laser particle size analyzer with a measurement range of 0.4-2000 microns. Stress-strain behavior for both dry and wet tests revealed multiple stress drops or stick-slip events and were similar suggesting no marked strengthening or weakening effect due to presence of water over the time scale of sliding. Gouge PSD's were fit to a log-normal distribution function and then analyzed in terms of the moments of mass-size distributions. The best log-normal fits were obtained in the coarser fraction of the gouge (larger than peak size). PSD means decreased with shear while higher moments such as skewness increased with shear. Particle number-size relationships computed from the mass-size distributions revealed a fractal nature of the gouge with excellent fits obtained for fine and intermediate fractions (smaller than peak size). A fractal dimension (D) around 2.6 consistent with previous work on both natural and experimental fault gouge was obtained. There appears to be a correlation between D and the amount of shear strain and an inverse relationship between D and the maximum particle size. Empirical distributions such as the Weibull, Rosin-Rammler distribution functions and others provide good approximations

  1. Size-dependent symmetry breaking in models for morphogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrio, R. A.; Maini, P. K.; Aragón, J. L.; Torres, M.

    2002-08-01

    A general property of dynamical systems is the appearance of spatial and temporal patterns due to a change of stability of a homogeneous steady state. Such spontaneous symmetry breaking is observed very frequently in all kinds of real systems, including the development of shape in living organisms. Many nonlinear dynamical systems present a wide variety of patterns with different shapes and symmetries. This fact restricts the applicability of these models to morphogenesis, since one often finds a surprisingly small variation in the shapes of living organisms. For instance, all individuals in the Phylum Echinodermata share a persistent radial fivefold symmetry. In this paper, we investigate in detail the symmetry-breaking properties of a Turing reaction-diffusion system confined in a small disk in two dimensions. It is shown that the symmetry of the resulting pattern depends only on the size of the disk, regardless of the boundary conditions and of the differences in the parameters that differentiate the interior of the domain from the outer space. This study suggests that additional regulatory mechanisms to control the size of the system are of crucial importance in morphogenesis.

  2. Size dependent nanomechanics of coil spring shaped polymer nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Ushiba, Shota; Masui, Kyoko; Taguchi, Natsuo; Hamano, Tomoki; Kawata, Satoshi; Shoji, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    Direct laser writing (DLW) via two-photon polymerization (TPP) has been established as a powerful technique for fabrication and integration of nanoscale components, as it enables the production of three dimensional (3D) micro/nano objects. This technique has indeed led to numerous applications, including micro- and nanoelectromechanical systems (MEMS/NEMS), metamaterials, mechanical metamaterials, and photonic crystals. However, as the feature sizes decrease, an urgent demand has emerged to uncover the mechanics of nanosized polymer materials. Here, we fabricate coil spring shaped polymer nanowires using DLW via two-photon polymerization. We find that even the nanocoil springs follow a linear-response against applied forces, following Hooke’s law, as revealed by compression tests using an atomic force microscope. Further, the elasticity of the polymer material is found to become significantly greater as the wire radius is decreased from 550 to 350 nm. Polarized Raman spectroscopy measurements show that polymer chains are aligned in nanowires along the axis, which may be responsible for the size dependence. Our findings provide insight into the nanomechanics of polymer materials fabricated by DLW, which leads to further applications based on nanosized polymer materials. PMID:26612544

  3. Size dependent nanomechanics of coil spring shaped polymer nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushiba, Shota; Masui, Kyoko; Taguchi, Natsuo; Hamano, Tomoki; Kawata, Satoshi; Shoji, Satoru

    2015-11-01

    Direct laser writing (DLW) via two-photon polymerization (TPP) has been established as a powerful technique for fabrication and integration of nanoscale components, as it enables the production of three dimensional (3D) micro/nano objects. This technique has indeed led to numerous applications, including micro- and nanoelectromechanical systems (MEMS/NEMS), metamaterials, mechanical metamaterials, and photonic crystals. However, as the feature sizes decrease, an urgent demand has emerged to uncover the mechanics of nanosized polymer materials. Here, we fabricate coil spring shaped polymer nanowires using DLW via two-photon polymerization. We find that even the nanocoil springs follow a linear-response against applied forces, following Hooke’s law, as revealed by compression tests using an atomic force microscope. Further, the elasticity of the polymer material is found to become significantly greater as the wire radius is decreased from 550 to 350 nm. Polarized Raman spectroscopy measurements show that polymer chains are aligned in nanowires along the axis, which may be responsible for the size dependence. Our findings provide insight into the nanomechanics of polymer materials fabricated by DLW, which leads to further applications based on nanosized polymer materials.

  4. Size dependent nanomechanics of coil spring shaped polymer nanowires.

    PubMed

    Ushiba, Shota; Masui, Kyoko; Taguchi, Natsuo; Hamano, Tomoki; Kawata, Satoshi; Shoji, Satoru

    2015-11-27

    Direct laser writing (DLW) via two-photon polymerization (TPP) has been established as a powerful technique for fabrication and integration of nanoscale components, as it enables the production of three dimensional (3D) micro/nano objects. This technique has indeed led to numerous applications, including micro- and nanoelectromechanical systems (MEMS/NEMS), metamaterials, mechanical metamaterials, and photonic crystals. However, as the feature sizes decrease, an urgent demand has emerged to uncover the mechanics of nanosized polymer materials. Here, we fabricate coil spring shaped polymer nanowires using DLW via two-photon polymerization. We find that even the nanocoil springs follow a linear-response against applied forces, following Hooke's law, as revealed by compression tests using an atomic force microscope. Further, the elasticity of the polymer material is found to become significantly greater as the wire radius is decreased from 550 to 350 nm. Polarized Raman spectroscopy measurements show that polymer chains are aligned in nanowires along the axis, which may be responsible for the size dependence. Our findings provide insight into the nanomechanics of polymer materials fabricated by DLW, which leads to further applications based on nanosized polymer materials.

  5. Spatiotopic buildup of saccade target representation depends on target size.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Eckart

    2016-12-01

    How we maintain spatial stability across saccade eye movements is an open question in visual neuroscience. A phenomenon that has received much attention in the field is our seemingly poor ability to discriminate the direction of transsaccadic target displacements. We have recently shown that discrimination performance increases the longer the saccade target has been previewed before saccade execution (Zimmermann, Morrone, & Burr, 2013). We have argued that the spatial representation of briefly presented stimuli is weak but that a strong representation is needed for transsaccadic, i.e., spatiotopic localization. Another factor that modulates the representation of saccade targets is stimulus size. The representation of spatially extended targets is more noisy than that of point-like targets. Here, I show that the increase in transsaccadic displacement discrimination as a function of saccade target preview duration depends on target size. This effect was found for spatially extended targets-thus replicating the results of Zimmermann et al. (2013)-but not for point-like targets. An analysis of saccade parameters revealed that the constant error for reaching the saccade target was bigger for spatially extended than for point-like targets, consistent with weaker representation of bigger targets. These results show that transsaccadic displacement discrimination becomes accurate when saccade targets are spatially extended and presented longer, thus resembling closer stimuli in real-world environments.

  6. Depth and size dependence of Mn-53 activity in chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, S. K.; Imamura, M.; Sinha, N.; Bhandari, N.

    1980-11-01

    The dependence of Mn-53 activity in core samples from four chondrites on sample shielding depth and the pre-atmospheric size of the meteorite is investigated. Cosmogenic Mn-53 activity and cosmic ray track densities were measured at various depths in cores from the Madhipura, Udaipur, Bansur and St. Severin chondrites. Track density analyses indicate effective radii of 6.5, 9, 15 and 25 cm for the meteorites in space, respectively. The depth profiles of Mn-53 activity reveal that the nuclide production rate at any given depth increases with meteorite size, while the activity profile for meteorites with effective radii less than or equal to 15 cm is nearly flat for shielding depths greater than 3 cm and that for meteorites about 25 cm in radius increases by about 40% from near the surface to the center, indicating the importance of the secondary cascade at radii greater than 15 cm. The profiles are then used to determine the spectral hardness parameter as a function of depth which is in turn used in the calculation of production profiles for Al-26 which are found to be in agreement with observations.

  7. Size-Dependent Particle Dynamics in Entangled Polymer Nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Mangal, Rahul; Srivastava, Samanvaya; Narayanan, Suresh; Archer, Lynden A.

    2015-12-22

    Polymer-grafted nanoparticles with diameter d homogeneously dispersed in entangled polymer melts with varying random coil radius R0, but fixed entanglement mesh size ae, are used to study particle motions in entangled polymers. We focus on materials in the transition region between the continuum regime (d > R0), where the classical Stokes-Einstein (S-E) equation is known to describe polymer drag on particles, and the non-continuum regime (d < ae), in which several recent studies report faster diffusion of particles than expected from continuum S-E analysis, based on the bulk polymer viscosity. Specifically, we consider dynamics of particles with sizes d ≥ ae in entangled polymers with varying molecular weight Mw in order to investigate how the transition from non-continuum to continuum dynamics occur. We take advantage of favorable enthalpic interactions between SiO2 nanoparticles tethered with PEO molecules and entangled PMMA host polymers to create model nanoparticle-polymer composites, in which spherical nanoparticles are uniformly dispersed in entangled polymers. Investigation of the particle dynamics via X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy measurements reveal a transition from fast to slow particle motion as the PMMA molecular weight is increased beyond the entanglement threshold, with a much weaker Mw dependence for Mw>Me than expected from S-E analysis based on bulk viscosity of entangled PMMA melts. We rationalize these observations using a simple force balance analysis around particles and find that nanoparticle motion in entangled melts can be described using a variant of the S-E analysis in which motion of particles is assumed to only disturb sub-chain entangled host segments with sizes comparable to the particle diameter.

  8. Domain-size-dependent exchange bias in Co/LaFeO3

    SciTech Connect

    Scholl, A.; Nolting, F.; Seo, J.W.; Ohldag, H.; Stohr, J.; Raoux,S.; Locquet, J.-P.; Fompeyrine, J.

    2004-09-22

    X-ray microscopy using magnetic linear dichroism of a zero-field-grown, multi-domain Co/LaFeO{sub 3} ferromagnet/antiferromagnet sample shows a local exchange bias of random direction and magnitude. A statistical analysis of the local bias of individual, micron-size magnetic domains demonstrates an increasing bias field with decreasing domain size as expected for a random distribution of pinned, uncompensated spins, which are believed to mediate the interface coupling. A linear dependence with the inverse domain diameter is found.

  9. Size-dependent mobility of gold nano-clusters during growth on chemically modified graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Gavin R.; Dawson, Peter M.; Pandey, Priyanka A.; Wilson, Neil R.; Mulheran, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Gold nano-clusters were grown on chemically modified graphene by direct sputter deposition. Transmission electron microscopy of the nano-clusters on these electron-transparent substrates reveals an unusual bimodal island size distribution (ISD). A kinetic Monte Carlo model of growth incorporating a size-dependent cluster mobility rule uniquely reproduces the bimodal ISD, providing strong evidence for the mobility of large clusters during surface growth. The cluster mobility exponent of -5/3 is consistent with cluster motion via one-dimensional diffusion of gold atoms around the edges of the nano-clusters.

  10. Size-dependent mobility of gold nano-clusters during growth on chemically modified graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Gavin R. Dawson, Peter M.; Pandey, Priyanka A.; Wilson, Neil R.; Mulheran, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Gold nano-clusters were grown on chemically modified graphene by direct sputter deposition. Transmission electron microscopy of the nano-clusters on these electron-transparent substrates reveals an unusual bimodal island size distribution (ISD). A kinetic Monte Carlo model of growth incorporating a size-dependent cluster mobility rule uniquely reproduces the bimodal ISD, providing strong evidence for the mobility of large clusters during surface growth. The cluster mobility exponent of −5/3 is consistent with cluster motion via one-dimensional diffusion of gold atoms around the edges of the nano-clusters.

  11. Size-dependant heating rates of iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetic fluid hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Gonzales-Weimuller, Marcela; Zeisberger, Matthias; Krishnan, Kannan M

    2009-07-01

    Using the thermal decomposition of organometallics method we have synthesized high-quality, iron oxide nanoparticles of tailorable size up to ~15nm and transferred them to a water phase by coating with a biocompatible polymer. The magnetic behavior of these particles was measured and fit to a log-normal distribution using the Chantrell method and their polydispersity was confirmed to be very narrow. By performing calorimetry measurements with these monodisperse particles we have unambiguously demonstrated, for the first time, that at a given frequency, heating rates of superparamagnetic particles are dependent on particle size, in agreement with earlier theoretical predictions.

  12. Bounds on transverse momentum dependent distribution functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henneman, A.

    2001-01-01

    When more than one hadron takes part in a hard process, an extended set of quark distribution and fragmentation functions becomes relevant. In this talk, the derivation of Soffer-like bounds for these functions, in the case of a spin-1/2 target [1], is sketched and some of their aspects are discussed.

  13. Submicron Size Distributions of Inorganic Suspended Solids in Turbid Waters by Photon Correlation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallegos, C. L.; Menzel, R. G.

    1987-04-01

    Photon correlation Spectroscopy (PCS) is a technique for determining size distributions of submicron-sized particles. A particle diffusion coefficient, which is dependent on particle diameter, is determined from measurements of the autocorrelation function of the intensity fluctuations of light scattered from a laser beam passing through a suspension of particles. We demonstrate the applicability of the technique to particles likely to be found in runoff or turbid impoundments using soil fractions prepared to have a known size distribution. Mean particle diameters of all soil fractions determined by PCS fell within the expected range. Particle-size distributions of natural water samples were reproducible when analyzed within minutes of collection. The effects of sample storage and pretreatment varied between water bodies and thus can be a source of uncertainty in the results. Particles from a turbid creek carying storm runoff began to coagulate within 2.5-6 hours, whereas particles from a perennially turbid impoundment remained stable for 10 days. Addition of sodium hexametaphosphate improved the reproducibility of the particle-size distribution with prolonged storage. Applications of the technique include determination of coagulation rates and critical coagulation concentrations of electrolytes, and calculation of settling velocity distributions of submicron particles in turbid natural waters.

  14. Size distribution of particles in Saturn’s rings from aggregation and fragmentation

    PubMed Central

    Brilliantov, Nikolai; Krapivsky, P. L.; Bodrova, Anna; Spahn, Frank; Hayakawa, Hisao; Stadnichuk, Vladimir; Schmidt, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Saturn’s rings consist of a huge number of water ice particles, with a tiny addition of rocky material. They form a flat disk, as the result of an interplay of angular momentum conservation and the steady loss of energy in dissipative interparticle collisions. For particles in the size range from a few centimeters to a few meters, a power-law distribution of radii, ∼r−q with q≈3, has been inferred; for larger sizes, the distribution has a steep cutoff. It has been suggested that this size distribution may arise from a balance between aggregation and fragmentation of ring particles, yet neither the power-law dependence nor the upper size cutoff have been established on theoretical grounds. Here we propose a model for the particle size distribution that quantitatively explains the observations. In accordance with data, our model predicts the exponent q to be constrained to the interval 2.75≤q≤3.5. Also an exponential cutoff for larger particle sizes establishes naturally with the cutoff radius being set by the relative frequency of aggregating and disruptive collisions. This cutoff is much smaller than the typical scale of microstructures seen in Saturn’s rings. PMID:26183228

  15. Three-dimensional assemblies built up by quantum dots in size-quantization regime: Band gap shifts due to size-distribution of cadmium selenide nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Pejova, Biljana

    2013-11-15

    In the present study, it is predicted that the band gap energy of a three-dimensional quantum dot assembly exhibits a red shift when the dispersion of the crystal size distribution is enlarged, even at a fixed average value thereof. The effect is manifested when the size quantization regime in individual quantum dots constituting the assembly has been entered. Under the same conditions, the sub-band gap absorption tails are characterized with large Urbach energies, which could be one or two orders of magnitude larger than the value characteristic for the non-quantized case. - Graphical abstract: Band gap shifts due to size-distribution of nanoparticles in 3D assemblies built up by quantum dots in size-quantization regime. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Optical absorption of 3D QD assemblies in size-quantization regime is modeled. • Band gap energy of the QD solid depends on the size-distribution of the nanoparticles. • QD solid samples with same 〈R〉 exhibit band gap shift depending on size distribution. • QD size distribution leads to large Urbach energies.

  16. [Size distributions of organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) in Shanghai atmospheric particles].

    PubMed

    Wang, Guang-Hua; Wei, Nan-Nan; Liu, Wei; Lin, Jun; Fan, Xue-Bo; Yao, Jian; Geng, Yan-Hong; Li, Yu-Lan; Li, Yan

    2010-09-01

    Size distributions of organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC) and secondary organic carbon (SOC) in atmospheric particles with size range from < 0.49, 0.49-0.95, 0.95-1.50, 1.50-3.00, 3.00-7.20, > 7.20 microm, collected in Jiading District, Shanghai were determined. For estimating size distribution of SOC in these atmospheric particles, a method of determining (OC/EC)(pri) in atmospheric particles with different sizes was discussed and developed, with which SOC was estimated. According to the correlation between OC and EC, main sources of the particles were also estimated roughly. The size distributions of OC and SOC showed a bi-modal with peaks in the particles with size of < 0.49 microm and > 3.0 microm, respectively. EC showed both of a bi-modal and tri-modal. Compared with OC, EC was preferably enriched in particles with size of < 0.49 microm. Mass concentrations of OC and EC in fine particles (< 3.00 microm) accounted for 59.8%-80.0% and 58.1%-82.4% of those in total suspended particles. OC and EC were preferably enriched in fine particles (< 3.00 microm). The concentrations of SOC in the particles with different sizes accounted for 15.7%-79.1% of OC in the particles with corresponding size. Concentrations of SOC in fine aerosols (< 3.00 microm) and coarse aerosols (> 3.00 microm) accounted for 41.4% and 43.5% of corresponding OC. Size distributions of OC, EC and SOC showed time-dependence. The correlation between OC and EC showed that the main contribution to atmospheric particles in Jiading District derived from light petrol vehicles exhaust.

  17. The Dependence of Atomic Oxygen Undercutting of Protected Polyimide Kapton(tm) H upon Defect Size

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Aaron; deGroh, Kim K.

    2001-01-01

    Understanding the behavior of polymeric materials when exposed to the low-Earth-orbit (LEO) environment is important in predicting performance characteristics such as in-space durability. Atomic oxygen (AO) present in LEO is known to be the principal agent in causing undercutting erosion of SiO(x) protected polyimide Kapton(R) H film, which serves as a mechanically stable blanket material in solar arrays. The rate of undercutting is dependent on the rate of arrival, directionality and energy of the AO with respect to the film surface. The erosion rate also depends on the distribution of the size of defects existing in the protective coating. This paper presents results of experimental ground testing using low energy, isotropic AO flux together with numerical modeling to determine the dependence of undercutting erosion upon defect size.

  18. Exploiting Size-Dependent Drag and Magnetic Forces for Size-Specific Separation of Magnetic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Hunter B.; Anani, Tareq; Choi, Young Suk; Beyers, Ronald J.; David, Allan E.

    2015-01-01

    Realizing the full potential of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in nanomedicine requires the optimization of their physical and chemical properties. Elucidation of the effects of these properties on clinical diagnostic or therapeutic properties, however, requires the synthesis or purification of homogenous samples, which has proved to be difficult. While initial simulations indicated that size-selective separation could be achieved by flowing magnetic nanoparticles through a magnetic field, subsequent in vitro experiments were unable to reproduce the predicted results. Magnetic field-flow fractionation, however, was found to be an effective method for the separation of polydisperse suspensions of iron oxide nanoparticles with diameters greater than 20 nm. While similar methods have been used to separate magnetic nanoparticles before, no previous work has been done with magnetic nanoparticles between 20 and 200 nm. Both transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis were used to confirm the size of the MNPs. Further development of this work could lead to MNPs with the narrow size distributions necessary for their in vitro and in vivo optimization. PMID:26307980

  19. Exploiting Size-Dependent Drag and Magnetic Forces for Size-Specific Separation of Magnetic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Hunter B; Anani, Tareq; Choi, Young Suk; Beyers, Ronald J; David, Allan E

    2015-08-21

    Realizing the full potential of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in nanomedicine requires the optimization of their physical and chemical properties. Elucidation of the effects of these properties on clinical diagnostic or therapeutic properties, however, requires the synthesis or purification of homogenous samples, which has proved to be difficult. While initial simulations indicated that size-selective separation could be achieved by flowing magnetic nanoparticles through a magnetic field, subsequent in vitro experiments were unable to reproduce the predicted results. Magnetic field-flow fractionation, however, was found to be an effective method for the separation of polydisperse suspensions of iron oxide nanoparticles with diameters greater than 20 nm. While similar methods have been used to separate magnetic nanoparticles before, no previous work has been done with magnetic nanoparticles between 20 and 200 nm. Both transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis were used to confirm the size of the MNPs. Further development of this work could lead to MNPs with the narrow size distributions necessary for their in vitro and in vivo optimization.

  20. Method for measuring the size distribution of airborne rhinovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, M.L.; Goth-Goldstein, R.; Apte, M.G.; Fisk, W.J.

    2002-01-01

    About 50% of viral-induced respiratory illnesses are caused by the human rhinovirus (HRV). Measurements of the concentrations and sizes of bioaerosols are critical for research on building characteristics, aerosol transport, and mitigation measures. We developed a quantitative reverse transcription-coupled polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay for HRV and verified that this assay detects HRV in nasal lavage samples. A quantitation standard was used to determine a detection limit of 5 fg of HRV RNA with a linear range over 1000-fold. To measure the size distribution of HRV aerosols, volunteers with a head cold spent two hours in a ventilated research chamber. Airborne particles from the chamber were collected using an Andersen Six-Stage Cascade Impactor. Each stage of the impactor was analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR for HRV. For the first two volunteers with confirmed HRV infection, but with mild symptoms, we were unable to detect HRV on any stage of the impactor.

  1. Dust generation in powders: Effect of particle size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarty, Somik; Le Bihan, Olivier; Fischer, Marc; Morgeneyer, Martin

    2017-06-01

    This study explores the relationship between the bulk and grain-scale properties of powders and dust generation. A vortex shaker dustiness tester was used to evaluate 8 calcium carbonate test powders with median particle sizes ranging from 2μm to 136μm. Respirable aerosols released from the powder samples were characterised by their particle number and mass concentrations. All the powder samples were found to release respirable fractions of dust particles which end up decreasing with time. The variation of powder dustiness as a function of the particle size distribution was analysed for the powders, which were classified into three groups based on the fraction of particles within the respirable range. The trends we observe might be due to the interplay of several mechanisms like de-agglomeration and attrition and their relative importance.

  2. The scattering matrix for size distributions of irregular particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, F.; Vilaplana, R.; Muñoz, O.; Molina, A.

    2005-05-01

    We have performed extensive calculations to obtain the scattering matrix elements for a size distribution of irregularly-shaped, randomly oriented particles by the Discrete Dipole Approximation (DDA) method, at size parameters X<25. We have studied the effects of changing the porosity of the particles and their refractive index on the scattering properties. To study both the color at blue and red incident wavelengths. The results will be used in the future for the interpretation of polarimetric observations of cosmic dust and laboratory measurements of scattering matrices of dust samples in a new light scattering facility which is currently built at the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía in Granada, Spain.

  3. Measurement of non-volatile particle number size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkatzelis, G. I.; Papanastasiou, D. K.; Florou, K.; Kaltsonoudis, C.; Louvaris, E.; Pandis, S. N.

    2015-06-01

    An experimental methodology was developed to measure the non-volatile particle number concentration using a thermodenuder (TD). The TD was coupled with a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer, measuring the chemical composition and mass size distribution of the submicrometer aerosol and a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) that provided the number size distribution of the aerosol in the range from 10 to 500 nm. The method was evaluated with a set of smog chamber experiments and achieved almost complete evaporation (> 98 %) of secondary organic as well as freshly nucleated particles, using a TD temperature of 400 °C and a centerline residence time of 15 s. This experimental approach was applied in a winter field campaign in Athens and provided a direct measurement of number concentration and size distribution for particles emitted from major pollution sources. During periods in which the contribution of biomass burning sources was dominant, more than 80 % of particle number concentration remained after passing through the thermodenuder, suggesting that nearly all biomass burning particles had a non-volatile core. These remaining particles consisted mostly of black carbon (60 % mass contribution) and organic aerosol, OA (40 %). Organics that had not evaporated through the TD were mostly biomass burning OA (BBOA) and oxygenated OA (OOA) as determined from AMS source apportionment analysis. For periods during which traffic contribution was dominant 50-60 % of the particles had a non-volatile core while the rest evaporated at 400 °C. The remaining particle mass consisted mostly of black carbon (BC) with an 80 % contribution, while OA was responsible for another 15-20 %. Organics were mostly hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) and OOA. These results suggest that even at 400 °C some fraction of the OA does not evaporate from particles emitted from common combustion processes, such as biomass burning and car engines, indicating that a fraction of this type

  4. Modeling the dependence of strength on grain sizes in nanocrystalline materials.

    PubMed

    He, Wei; Bhole, Sanjeev D; Chen, DaoLun

    2008-01-01

    A model was developed to describe the grain size dependence of hardness (or strength) in nanocrystalline materials by combining the Hall-Petch relationship for larger grains with a coherent polycrystal model for nanoscale grains and introducing a log-normal distribution of grain sizes. The transition from the Hall-Petch relationship to the coherent polycrystal mechanism was shown to be a gradual process. The hardness in the nanoscale regime was observed to increase with decreasing grain boundary affected zone (or effective grain boundary thickness, Δ) in the form of Δ(-1/2). The critical grain size increased linearly with increasing Δ. The variation of the calculated hardness value with the grain size was observed to be in agreement with the experimental data reported in the literature.

  5. Size-dependent second virial coefficients of quantum dots from quantitative cryogenic electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    van Rijssel, J; Peters, V F D; Meeldijk, J D; Kortschot, R J; van Dijk-Moes, R J A; Petukhov, A V; Erné, B H; Philipse, A P

    2014-09-18

    Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) is utilized to determine the second virial coefficient of osmotic pressure of PbSe quantum dots (QDs) dispersed in apolar liquid. Cryo-TEM images from vitrified samples provide snapshots of the equilibrium distribution of the particles. These snapshots yield radial distribution functions from which second virial coefficients are calculated, which agree with second virial coefficients determined with analytical centrifugation and small-angle X-ray scattering. The size dependence of the second virial coefficient points to an interparticle interaction that is proportional to the QD surface area. A plausible cause for this attraction is the interaction between the surface ions on adjacent QDs.

  6. Analysis of scale-invariant slab avalanche size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faillettaz, J.; Louchet, F.; Grasso, J.-R.; Daudon, D.

    2003-04-01

    Scale invariance of snow avalanche sizes was reported for the first time in 2001 by Louchet et al. at the EGS conference, using both acoustic emission duration, and the surface of the crown step left at the top of the starting zone, where the former parameter characterises the size of the total avalanche flow, and the latter that of the starting zone. The present paper focuses on parameters of the second type, that are more directly related to precise release mechanisms, vz. the crown crack length L, the crown crack or slab depth H, the crown step surface HxL, the volume HxL^2 of the snow involved in the starting zone, and LxH^2 which is a measure of the stress concentration at the basal crack tip at failure. The analysis is performed on two data sets, from la Grande Plagne (GP) and Tignes (T) ski resorts. For both catalogs, cumulative distributions of L, H, HxL, HxL^2 and LxH^2 are shown to be roughly linear in a log-log plot. i.e. consistent with so-called scale invariant (or power law) distributions for both triggered and natural avalanches. Plateaus are observed at small sizes, and roll-offs at large sizes. The power law exponents for each of these quantities are roughly independent of the ski resort (GP or T) they come from. In contrast, exponents for natural events are significantly smaller than those for artificial ones. We analyse the possible reasons for the scale invariance of these quantities, for the possible "universality" of the exponents corresponding to a given triggering mode, and for the difference in exponents between triggered and natural events. The physical meaning of the observed roll-offs and plateaus is also discussed. The power law distributions analysed here provide the occurrence probability of an avalanche of a given (starting) volume in a given time period on a given area. A possible use of this type of distributions for snow avalanche hazard assessment is contemplated, as it is for earthquakes or rockfalls.

  7. Saharan Dust Particle Size And Concentration Distribution In Central Ghana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunnu, A. K.

    2010-12-01

    A.K. Sunnu*, G. M. Afeti* and F. Resch+ *Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST) Kumasi, Ghana. E-mail: albertsunnu@yahoo.com +Laboratoire Lepi, ISITV-Université du Sud Toulon-Var, 83162 La Valette cedex, France E-mail: resch@univ-tln.fr Keywords: Atmospheric aerosol; Saharan dust; Particle size distributions; Particle concentrations. Abstract The Saharan dust that is transported and deposited over many countries in the West African atmospheric environment (5°N), every year, during the months of November to March, known locally as the Harmattan season, have been studied over a 13-year period, between 1996 and 2009, using a location at Kumasi in central Ghana (6° 40'N, 1° 34'W) as the reference geographical point. The suspended Saharan dust particles were sampled by an optical particle counter, and the particle size distributions and concentrations were analysed. The counter gives the total dust loads as number of particles per unit volume of air. The optical particle counter used did not discriminate the smoke fractions (due to spontaneous bush fires during the dry season) from the Saharan dust. Within the particle size range measured (0.5 μm-25 μm.), the average inter-annual mean particle diameter, number and mass concentrations during the northern winter months of January and February were determined. The average daily number concentrations ranged from 15 particles/cm3 to 63 particles/cm3 with an average of 31 particles/cm3. The average daily mass concentrations ranged from 122 μg/m3 to 1344 μg/m3 with an average of 532 μg/m3. The measured particle concentrations outside the winter period were consistently less than 10 cm-3. The overall dust mean particle diameter, analyzed from the peak representative Harmattan periods over the 13-year period, ranged from 0.89 μm to 2.43 μm with an average of 1.5 μm ± 0.5. The particle size distributions exhibited the typical distribution pattern for

  8. Mass size distributions of elemental aerosols in industrial area.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Mona; Mohamed, Amer; Ahmed, Abdel-Rahman; Nazmy, Hyam

    2015-11-01

    Outdoor aerosol particles were characterized in industrial area of Samalut city (El-minia/Egypt) using low pressure Berner cascade impactor as an aerosol sampler. The impactor operates at 1.7 m(3)/h flow rate. Seven elements were investigated including Ca, Ba, Fe, K, Cu, Mn and Pb using atomic absorption technique. The mean mass concentrations of the elements ranged from 0.42 ng/m(3) (for Ba) to 89.62 ng/m(3) (for Fe). The mass size distributions of the investigated elements were bi-modal log normal distribution corresponding to the accumulation and coarse modes. The enrichment factors of elements indicate that Ca, Ba, Fe, K, Cu and Mn are mainly emitted into the atmosphere from soil sources while Pb is mostly due to anthropogenic sources.

  9. Permeability of packed coal beds: The effect of particle size distribution, particle size and coal type

    SciTech Connect

    Greeff, S.C.; Slaghuis, J.H.; Walt, T.J. van der

    1998-12-31

    Sasol operates 97 Lurgi type gasifiers for the production of syngas using lump coal obtained from 7 captive coal mines. Permeability of packed coal beds of the coal has been identified as one of the major variables affecting stable operation which in turn affects maximum coal throughput and gas production. A tenth scale instrumented cold perspex model simulating a gasifier was constructed in which the pressure drop per unit bed length for a given gas flow could be measured. The effect of particle size distribution, particle size and coal type on the pressure drop (and hence permeability) was measured. The results were augmented by measuring void fractions as well as shape factors for the different coal types. The effect of size segregation during filling of the scale model was also investigated. Results have shown that bed permeability is strongly affected by the 3 variables investigated. The change in void fraction was found to be very small and could not be linked to the change in permeability. Size segregation resulted in a difference in gas flow rate between the center of the coal bed and against the wall of the model. The significance of the observations are discussed in terms of gasifier stability, optimum pressure drop and the effect of thermal size stability of coal upon entering the gasifier.

  10. Self-consistent rate equation theory of cluster size distribution in aggregation phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Family, Fereydoon; Popescu, Mihail N.; Amar, Jacques G.

    2002-04-01

    Cluster nucleation and growth by aggregation is the central feature of many physical processes, from polymerization and gelation in polymer science, flocculation and coagulation in aerosol and colloidal chemistry, percolation and coarsening in phase transitions and critical phenomena, agglutination and cell adhesion in biology, to island nucleation and thin-film growth in materials science. Detailed information about the kinetics of aggregation is provided by the time dependent cluster size-distribution, a quantity which can be measured experimentally. While the standard Smoluchowski rate-equation approach has been in general successful in predicting average quantities like the total cluster density, it fails to account for spatial fluctuations and correlations and thus predicts size distributions that are in significant disagreement with both experiments and kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. In this work we outline a new method which takes into account such correlations. We show that by coupling a set of evolution equations for the capture-zone distributions with a set of rate-equations for the island densities one may obtain accurate predictions for the time- and size-dependent rates of monomer capture. In particular, by using this method we obtain excellent results for the capture numbers and island-size distributions in irreversible growth on both one- and two-dimensional substrates.

  11. Backscattering enhancement from a random distribution of large discrete spherical scatterers with a size distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Mandt, C.E.; Leung Tsang )

    1992-12-01

    The authors study backscattering enhancement from a sparse random distribution of large scatterers wtih a size distribution. Second-order multiple-scattering theory based on the Bethe-Salpeter equation is used to compute the scattered field. The second-order cyclical term is used to account for the enhancement. The effects of polarization are included by using the Mie theory to account for scattering by individual particles, and the result is then averaged over the size distribution. Comparisons are made with experimental data for the case of a slab medium of sparsely distributed dielectric spheres with average ka of 298 and moderate optical thickness. Agreement between theory and experiment is good for both the copolarized and the cross-polarized returns. The Mueller matrix is also derived, an the degree of polarization is computed for the same case. Results show that including the cyclical term reduces the degree of polarization of the computed backscattered return. 19 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Influence of charging process and size distribution of dust grain on the electric conductivity of dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Ji-Zheng; Wang, Cang-Long; Zhang, Jian-Rong; Ma, Sheng-Qian; Hong, Xue-Ren; Sun, Jian-An; Duan, Wen-Shan; Yang, Lei

    2012-08-01

    The effects of dust size distribution and charging process of dust grains on the complex electric conductivity of dusty plasmas have been investigated in the present paper. Comparisons are made between real dusty plasma in which there are many different dust grain species and the mono-sized dusty plasma (MDP) in which there is only one kind of dust grain whose size is the average dust size. In some cases the complex electric conductivity of real dusty plasma is larger than that of MDP, while in other cases it is smaller than that of MDP, it depends on the dust size distribution function.

  13. Influence of charging process and size distribution of dust grain on the electric conductivity of dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Duan Jizheng; Wang Canglong; Zhang Jianrong; Ma Shengqian; Hong Xueren; Sun Jianan; Duan Wenshan; Yang Lei

    2012-08-15

    The effects of dust size distribution and charging process of dust grains on the complex electric conductivity of dusty plasmas have been investigated in the present paper. Comparisons are made between real dusty plasma in which there are many different dust grain species and the mono-sized dusty plasma (MDP) in which there is only one kind of dust grain whose size is the average dust size. In some cases the complex electric conductivity of real dusty plasma is larger than that of MDP, while in other cases it is smaller than that of MDP, it depends on the dust size distribution function.

  14. Debiased Orbital and Size Distributions of the NEOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottke, W. F.; Morbidelli, A.; Jedicke, R.; Petit, J. M.; Levison, H. F.

    2001-11-01

    The orbital and absolute magnitude distribution of the Near-Earth Objects (NEOs) is difficult to compute, partly because known NEOs are biased by complicated observational selection effects but also because only a modest fraction of the entire NEO population has been discovered so far. To circumvent these problems, we created a model NEO population which was fit to known NEOs discovered or accidentally rediscovered by Spacewatch. Our method was to numerically integrate thousands of test bodies from four ``intermediate sources'': three in or adjacent to the main asteroid belt (Bottke et al. 2000, Science 288, 2190.) and one in the Kuiper belt (Levison and Duncan 1997, Icarus 127, 13). The test bodies which passed into the NEO region were tracked until they were eliminated. Next, we calculated the observational biases and assumed a functional form for the absolute magnitude (H) distribution associated with objects on those orbits. By merging the observational biases with our NEO dynamical ``roadmaps'' and an observed NEO H distribution, we produced a probability distribution which was fit to the biased NEO population. By testing a range of possible source combinations, a ``best-fit'' distribution was then deconvolved to provide the debiased orbital and H distributions for the NEO population as well as the relative importance of each NEO replenishment source. Our best-fit model predicts there are ~ 1010 H < 18 NEOs out to T > 2 (i.e., a < ~ 7.4 AU), with ~ 55% coming from the inner main belt (a < 2.5 AU), ~ 30% from the central main belt (2.5 < a < 2.8 AU), and ~ 15% from the Jupiter-family comet region. These results suggest that roughly 40% of the H < 18 NEOs have been found. The Amor, Apollo, and Aten populations contain 30%, 64%, and 6% of the H < 22 NEO population, respectively. The population of objects inside Earth's orbit (IEOs) are about 2% the size of the NEO population. Active and extinct comets make up a third of the entire km-sized NEO population with T

  15. Rheology of dense granular mixtures: particle-size distributions, boundary conditions, and collisional time scales.

    PubMed

    Yohannes, Bereket; Hill, K M

    2010-12-01

    We computationally investigate the dependence of the rheology of dense sheared granular mixtures on their particle size distribution. We consider the simplest case of a binary mixture of two different sized particles where the fraction of large particles is varied from one simulation to the next while the total solid mass is kept constant. We find that the variation of the rheology with the particle size distribution depends on the boundary conditions. For example, under constant pressure conditions the effective friction coefficient μ(∗) (the ratio between shear and pressure stresses at the boundary) increases mildly with the average particle size. On the other hand, under constant volume conditions, μ(∗) has a nonmonotonic dependence on the average particle size that is related to the proximity of the system solid fraction to the maximum packing fraction. Somewhat surprisingly, then, μ(∗) scales with a dimensionless shear rate (a generalized inertial number) in the same way for either boundary condition. We show that, for our system of relatively hard spheres, these relationships are governed largely by the ratio between average collision times and mean-free-path times, also independent of boundary conditions.

  16. Non-monotonic size dependence of diffusion and levitation effect: a mode-coupling theory analysis.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Manoj Kumar; Banerjee, Atreyee; Bhattacharyya, Sarika Maitra

    2013-03-28

    We present a study of diffusion of small tagged particles in a solvent, using mode coupling theory (MCT) analysis and computer simulations. The study is carried out for various interaction potentials. For the first time, using MCT, it is shown that only for strongly attractive interaction potential with allowing interpenetration between the solute-solvent pair the diffusion exhibits a non-monotonic solute size dependence which has earlier been reported in simulation studies [P. K. Ghorai and S. Yashonath, J. Phys. Chem. B 109, 5824-5835 (2005)]. For weak attractive and repulsive potential the solute size dependence of diffusion shows monotonic behaviour. It is also found that for systems where the interaction potential does not allow solute-solvent interpenetration, the solute cannot explore the neck of the solvent cage. Thus these systems even with strong attractive interaction will never show any non-monotonic size dependence of diffusion. This non-monotonic size dependence of diffusion has earlier been connected to levitation effect [S. Yashonath and P. Santikary, J. Phys. Chem. 98, 6368 (1994)]. We also show that although levitation is a dynamic phenomena, the effect of levitation can be obtained in the static radial distribution function.

  17. Non-monotonic size dependence of diffusion and levitation effect: A mode-coupling theory analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandi, Manoj Kumar; Banerjee, Atreyee; Bhattacharyya, Sarika Maitra

    2013-03-01

    We present a study of diffusion of small tagged particles in a solvent, using mode coupling theory (MCT) analysis and computer simulations. The study is carried out for various interaction potentials. For the first time, using MCT, it is shown that only for strongly attractive interaction potential with allowing interpenetration between the solute-solvent pair the diffusion exhibits a non-monotonic solute size dependence which has earlier been reported in simulation studies [P. K. Ghorai and S. Yashonath, J. Phys. Chem. B 109, 5824-5835 (2005), 10.1021/jp046312w]. For weak attractive and repulsive potential the solute size dependence of diffusion shows monotonic behaviour. It is also found that for systems where the interaction potential does not allow solute-solvent interpenetration, the solute cannot explore the neck of the solvent cage. Thus these systems even with strong attractive interaction will never show any non-monotonic size dependence of diffusion. This non-monotonic size dependence of diffusion has earlier been connected to levitation effect [S. Yashonath and P. Santikary, J. Phys. Chem. 98, 6368 (1994), 10.1021/j100076a022]. We also show that although levitation is a dynamic phenomena, the effect of levitation can be obtained in the static radial distribution function.

  18. Probe measurements and numerical model predictions of evolving size distributions in premixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    De Filippo, A.; Sgro, L.A.; Lanzuolo, G.; D'Alessio, A.

    2009-09-15

    Particle size distributions (PSDs), measured with a dilution probe and a Differential Mobility Analyzer (DMA), and numerical predictions of these PSDs, based on a model that includes only coagulation or alternatively inception and coagulation, are compared to investigate particle growth processes and possible sampling artifacts in the post-flame region of a C/O = 0.65 premixed laminar ethylene-air flame. Inputs to the numerical model are the PSD measured early in the flame (the initial condition for the aerosol population) and the temperature profile measured along the flame's axial centerline. The measured PSDs are initially unimodal, with a modal mobility diameter of 2.2 nm, and become bimodal later in the post-flame region. The smaller mode is best predicted with a size-dependent coagulation model, which allows some fraction of the smallest particles to escape collisions without resulting in coalescence or coagulation through the size-dependent coagulation efficiency ({gamma}{sub SD}). Instead, when {gamma} = 1 and the coagulation rate is equal to the collision rate for all particles regardless of their size, the coagulation model significantly under predicts the number concentration of both modes and over predicts the size of the largest particles in the distribution compared to the measured size distributions at various heights above the burner. The coagulation ({gamma}{sub SD}) model alone is unable to reproduce well the larger particle mode (mode II). Combining persistent nucleation with size-dependent coagulation brings the predicted PSDs to within experimental error of the measurements, which seems to suggest that surface growth processes are relatively insignificant in these flames. Shifting measured PSDs a few mm closer to the burner surface, generally adopted to correct for probe perturbations, does not produce a better matching between the experimental and the numerical results. (author)

  19. Scale-dependent habitat selection and size-based dominance in adult male American alligators

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Strickland, Bradley A.; Vilella, Francisco; Belant, Jerrold L.

    2016-01-01

    Habitat selection is an active behavioral process that may vary across spatial and temporal scales. Animals choose an area of primary utilization (i.e., home range) then make decisions focused on resource needs within patches. Dominance may affect the spatial distribution of conspecifics and concomitant habitat selection. Size-dependent social dominance hierarchies have been documented in captive alligators, but evidence is lacking from wild populations. We studied habitat selection for adult male American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis; n = 17) on the Pearl River in central Mississippi, USA, to test whether habitat selection was scale-dependent and individual resource selectivity was a function of conspecific body size. We used K-select analysis to quantify selection at the home range scale and patches within the home range to determine selection congruency and important habitat variables. In addition, we used linear models to determine if body size was related to selection patterns and strengths. Our results indicated habitat selection of adult male alligators was a scale-dependent process. Alligators demonstrated greater overall selection for habitat variables at the patch level and less at the home range level, suggesting resources may not be limited when selecting a home range for animals in our study area. Further, diurnal habitat selection patterns may depend on thermoregulatory needs. There was no relationship between resource selection or home range size and body size, suggesting size-dependent dominance hierarchies may not have influenced alligator resource selection or space use in our sample. Though apparent habitat suitability and low alligator density did not manifest in an observed dominance hierarchy, we hypothesize that a change in either could increase intraspecific interactions, facilitating a dominance hierarchy. Due to the broad and diverse ecological roles of alligators, understanding the factors that influence their social dominance

  20. Scale-Dependent Habitat Selection and Size-Based Dominance in Adult Male American Alligators.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Bradley A; Vilella, Francisco J; Belant, Jerrold L

    2016-01-01

    Habitat selection is an active behavioral process that may vary across spatial and temporal scales. Animals choose an area of primary utilization (i.e., home range) then make decisions focused on resource needs within patches. Dominance may affect the spatial distribution of conspecifics and concomitant habitat selection. Size-dependent social dominance hierarchies have been documented in captive alligators, but evidence is lacking from wild populations. We studied habitat selection for adult male American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis; n = 17) on the Pearl River in central Mississippi, USA, to test whether habitat selection was scale-dependent and individual resource selectivity was a function of conspecific body size. We used K-select analysis to quantify selection at the home range scale and patches within the home range to determine selection congruency and important habitat variables. In addition, we used linear models to determine if body size was related to selection patterns and strengths. Our results indicated habitat selection of adult male alligators was a scale-dependent process. Alligators demonstrated greater overall selection for habitat variables at the patch level and less at the home range level, suggesting resources may not be limited when selecting a home range for animals in our study area. Further, diurnal habitat selection patterns may depend on thermoregulatory needs. There was no relationship between resource selection or home range size and body size, suggesting size-dependent dominance hierarchies may not have influenced alligator resource selection or space use in our sample. Though apparent habitat suitability and low alligator density did not manifest in an observed dominance hierarchy, we hypothesize that a change in either could increase intraspecific interactions, facilitating a dominance hierarchy. Due to the broad and diverse ecological roles of alligators, understanding the factors that influence their social dominance

  1. Scale-Dependent Habitat Selection and Size-Based Dominance in Adult Male American Alligators

    PubMed Central

    Strickland, Bradley A.; Vilella, Francisco J.; Belant, Jerrold L.

    2016-01-01

    Habitat selection is an active behavioral process that may vary across spatial and temporal scales. Animals choose an area of primary utilization (i.e., home range) then make decisions focused on resource needs within patches. Dominance may affect the spatial distribution of conspecifics and concomitant habitat selection. Size-dependent social dominance hierarchies have been documented in captive alligators, but evidence is lacking from wild populations. We studied habitat selection for adult male American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis; n = 17) on the Pearl River in central Mississippi, USA, to test whether habitat selection was scale-dependent and individual resource selectivity was a function of conspecific body size. We used K-select analysis to quantify selection at the home range scale and patches within the home range to determine selection congruency and important habitat variables. In addition, we used linear models to determine if body size was related to selection patterns and strengths. Our results indicated habitat selection of adult male alligators was a scale-dependent process. Alligators demonstrated greater overall selection for habitat variables at the patch level and less at the home range level, suggesting resources may not be limited when selecting a home range for animals in our study area. Further, diurnal habitat selection patterns may depend on thermoregulatory needs. There was no relationship between resource selection or home range size and body size, suggesting size-dependent dominance hierarchies may not have influenced alligator resource selection or space use in our sample. Though apparent habitat suitability and low alligator density did not manifest in an observed dominance hierarchy, we hypothesize that a change in either could increase intraspecific interactions, facilitating a dominance hierarchy. Due to the broad and diverse ecological roles of alligators, understanding the factors that influence their social dominance

  2. Estimation of Weibull parameters from parameters of initial distribution of flaw size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakabayashi, C.; Yasuda, K.; Shiota, T.

    2009-11-01

    The distribution of the largest flaw size is derived from the initial distribution of flaw size based on extreme value statistics, and also the distribution of fracture origin size is given by transforming Weibull distribution by fracture mechanical relation. These two distributions are equivalent under uniaxial loading. By using this relation, their parameters are related each other and Weibull parameters are estimated from the parameters of the initial distribution of flaw size and the number of links.

  3. Light scattering by lunar-like particle size distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goguen, Jay D.

    1991-01-01

    A fundamental input to models of light scattering from planetary regoliths is the mean phase function of the regolith particles. Using the known size distribution for typical lunar soils, the mean phase function and mean linear polarization for a regolith volume element of spherical particles of any composition were calculated from Mie theory. The two contour plots given here summarize the changes in the mean phase function and linear polarization with changes in the real part of the complex index of refraction, n - ik, for k equals 0.01, the visible wavelength 0.55 micrometers, and the particle size distribution of the typical mature lunar soil 72141. A second figure is a similar index-phase surface, except with k equals 0.1. The index-phase surfaces from this survey are a first order description of scattering by lunar-like regoliths of spherical particles of arbitrary composition. They form the basis of functions that span a large range of parameter-space.

  4. Influence of molecular size on tissue distribution of antibody fragments

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhe; Krippendorff, Ben-Fillippo; Sharma, Sharad; Walz, Antje C.; Lavé, Thierry; Shah, Dhaval K.

    2016-01-01

    Biodistribution coefficients (BC) allow estimation of the tissue concentrations of proteins based on the plasma pharmacokinetics. We have previously established the BC values for monoclonal antibodies. Here, this concept is extended by development of a relationship between protein size and BC values. The relationship was built by deriving the BC values for various antibody fragments of known molecular weight from published biodistribution studies. We found that there exists a simple exponential relationship between molecular weight and BC values that allows the prediction of tissue distribution of proteins based on molecular weight alone. The relationship was validated by a priori predicting BC values of 4 antibody fragments that were not used in building the relationship. The relationship was also used to derive BC50 values for all the tissues, which is the molecular weight increase that would result in 50% reduction in tissue uptake of a protein. The BC50 values for most tissues were found to be ~35 kDa. An ability to estimate tissue distribution of antibody fragments based on the BC vs. molecular size relationship established here may allow better understanding of the biologics concentrations in tissues responsible for efficacy or toxicity. This relationship can also be applied for rational development of new biotherapeutic modalities with optimal biodistribution properties to target (or avoid) specific tissues. PMID:26496429

  5. Coarse atmospheric aerosol: size distributions of trace elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eleftheriadis, K.; Colbeck, I.

    A sampler, employing nine single stage impactors placed in parallel within a portable wind tunnel, has been used to determine the metal content of coarse atmospheric aerosol. The wind tunnel maintains a constant flow environment for the collectors housed inside it, so that representative sampling conditions are achieved compared to the varied ambient wind conditions. At a flow rate of 8 m s -1 the 50% cut-off diameters of the impactors ranged from 7.8 to 38.8 μm. Measurements were conducted at a rural and urban site near Colchester in south east England. The samplers were analysed by PIXE for P, K, Ca, Fe, Ti, Mn, Cu, V, Co, Cr, Br, Zn, Ni, Sc and Pb. It is found that the sampler can be employed to quantitatively characterise the elemental mass size distribution for aerosol larger than 10 μm. The results indicate that a small fraction of the above earth and trace elements' metal mass is present in particles greater than 10 μm. This fraction for earth metals (Ca, K, Ti) is comparatively greater in the rural site than the urban site, while for trace metals (Mn, V, Cu, Cr) this fraction constitutes a more significant part of the coarse mass at the urban site. Trace element concentrations were of a similar order of magnitude to earlier literature reports. Although the number of measurements was limited it can be concluded that the size distributions obtained were characteristic of an unpolluted area.

  6. Measurement of size distributions of a coagulating aerosol. [Calcium carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Loos, H.G.

    1984-05-01

    Measurements have been performed for the determination of the size distribution of a coagulating ultrafine aerosol over a time interval of up to about 30 min. The aerosol was contained in a balloon with an initial volume of 60 l subject to a temperature inversion for the purpose of quenching the free convection and thereby diminishing the aerosol loss to the balloon wall. The aerosol size distribution was measured with the TSI electrostatic aerosol classifier hooked up to a TSI aerosol electrometer. The initial aerosol had an average diameter of about 12 nm. Measurements were taken by computer at a rate of 1 measurement cycle every 3 s; 1 cycle consists of a measurement of time, and burst measurements of electrometer current, classifier rod voltage, 3 flow rates, and 5 temperatures, followed by the calculation of averages and standard deviations, and storage of the results in a data string. The TSI instruments have been modified to permit the automatic computer reading of the parameters mentioned above. A multiplexer has been built to allow the multiplet data to be measured by a single system voltmeter. Channel switching in the multiplexer can be done either automatically by using the ''delay'' signal emitted by the system voltmeter every time it makes a reading or by software control through the 16-bit parallel interface of the computer.

  7. Influence of molecular size on tissue distribution of antibody fragments.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhe; Krippendorff, Ben-Fillippo; Sharma, Sharad; Walz, Antje C; Lavé, Thierry; Shah, Dhaval K

    2016-01-01

    Biodistribution coefficients (BC) allow estimation of the tissue concentrations of proteins based on the plasma pharmacokinetics. We have previously established the BC values for monoclonal antibodies. Here, this concept is extended by development of a relationship between protein size and BC values. The relationship was built by deriving the BC values for various antibody fragments of known molecular weight from published biodistribution studies. We found that there exists a simple exponential relationship between molecular weight and BC values that allows the prediction of tissue distribution of proteins based on molecular weight alone. The relationship was validated by a priori predicting BC values of 4 antibody fragments that were not used in building the relationship. The relationship was also used to derive BC50 values for all the tissues, which is the molecular weight increase that would result in 50% reduction in tissue uptake of a protein. The BC50 values for most tissues were found to be ~35 kDa. An ability to estimate tissue distribution of antibody fragments based on the BC vs. molecular size relationship established here may allow better understanding of the biologics concentrations in tissues responsible for efficacy or toxicity. This relationship can also be applied for rational development of new biotherapeutic modalities with optimal biodistribution properties to target (or avoid) specific tissues.

  8. Time-evolution of grain size distributions in random nucleation and growth crystallization processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teran, Anthony V.; Bill, Andreas; Bergmann, Ralf B.

    2010-02-01

    We study the time dependence of the grain size distribution N(r,t) during crystallization of a d -dimensional solid. A partial differential equation, including a source term for nuclei and a growth law for grains, is solved analytically for any dimension d . We discuss solutions obtained for processes described by the Kolmogorov-Avrami-Mehl-Johnson model for random nucleation and growth (RNG). Nucleation and growth are set on the same footing, which leads to a time-dependent decay of both effective rates. We analyze in detail how model parameters, the dimensionality of the crystallization process, and time influence the shape of the distribution. The calculations show that the dynamics of the effective nucleation and effective growth rates play an essential role in determining the final form of the distribution obtained at full crystallization. We demonstrate that for one class of nucleation and growth rates, the distribution evolves in time into the logarithmic-normal (lognormal) form discussed earlier by Bergmann and Bill [J. Cryst. Growth 310, 3135 (2008)]. We also obtain an analytical expression for the finite maximal grain size at all times. The theory allows for the description of a variety of RNG crystallization process